Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
The Tribune

USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

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Travolta: Jett
final moments

Hollywood
Star relives
son’s death

R CLASSIFIEDS TRADER





Bahamian lawyer
is indicted over
money laundering

allegations

Sidney Cambridge charged in
US after FBI ‘sting’ operation

AN attorney and partner with a top Bahamian law
firm, Callender’s & Co, was yesterday indicted by the US
federal authorities over allegations that he knowingly
helped launder hundreds of thousands of dollars in pro-
ceeds from a purported investment fraud.

Sidney Cambridge, a senior Progressive Liberal Party
(PLP) member who has served as its vice-chairman, was
charged following a Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
“sting” operation, involving undercover agents posing as
persons who wanted to launder funds from a fictitious
European-based financial fraud.

A copy of the indictment obtained by The Tribune
alleged: “On or about November 23, 2007, at Nassau,
Bahamas, defendant Cambridge was told by an undercover
agent that the funds came from a ‘Ponzi’ scheme.

“After acknowledging his understanding of the pur-
ported source of the funds, defendant Cambridge instruct-
ed undercover agents how to launder the proceeds in the



By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

HOLLYWOOD superstar
John Travolta yesterday
recalled the efforts that he
and others made to save the
life of his 16-year-old son Jett
after he suffered a seizure.

Mr Travolta was the only
witness to take the stand yes-
terday as the case against for-
mer PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater and former
ambulance driver Tarino
Lightbourne continued in the
Supreme Court. The pair are
accused of attempting to
extort $25 million from him.

The grieving actor, who

wore a black suit and grey tie,
was escorted into the court-
room by a security detail
shortly after 10am yesterday.
His wife Kelly Preston sat in
the public gallery.

Appearing somber and
composed, Mr Travolta testi-
fied that on December 29,
2008, he and his wife, with
their son Jett and daughter
Ella, eight, travelled to
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Accompanying them on the
family trip were four nannies,
he said. Mr Travolta told the
court his family stayed at a
condo at the Old Bahama
Bay resort.

SEE page nine

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US ACTOR John Travolta and wife Kelly Preston
leave the court building.

UK judge: Cases from countries like
Bahamas taking up too much time

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



A LEADING UK judge claims cases from other countries such
as The Bahamas are taking up too much British time and resources,
and he would like to see the burden reduced.

Referring to the caseload of the Judicial Committee of the Privy
Council, Lord Nicholas Phillip’s comments have been seen by
some as a sign that Britain may soon make moves to shake off the
colonial hangover the institution represents, leaving countries like
the Bahamas to find or create another final court of appeal.

Speaking to the Financial Times newspaper, Lord Phillips, Pres-

SEE page ten

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Bahamas.”

SEE page ten

SAC principal
Fohhed by thug

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

POLICE are searching for
the thug who robbed a high
school principal as she tried
to enter her home in the east-
ern area of New Providence.

The victim — St
Augustine's College Principal
Sonia Knowles — arrived at
her home in the Eastern
Estates subdivision at around
10pm on Tuesday when a
man accosted her and
demanded cash.

Police said he made off
with the victim's handbag,
which contained cash and per-
sonal effects, before fleeing
the area in a nearby vehicle —
believed to be a Honda.

Investigators are still trying
to determine whether the
thief targeted his victim or
simply struck when he saw an
opportunity.

Last night police said they
did not have a full description
of the attacker, who is said to
be a slim built, dark-skinned
male.

According to police, Ms
Knowles was not seriously
harmed during the robbery.

The incident occurred

SEE page 11



NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISCANDS) LEADING NEWSPAPER



- 325-157

‘Fan, Dears. Berean,

Tributes to
sporting icon

VINCENT Lloyd Fergu-
son (pictured) died at his
home yesterday morning
after an illness with prostate
cancer.

The former teacher/admin-
istrator, sporting icon and
sports administrator extraor-
dinaire, had celebrated his
71st birthday on August 25th.

Winston “Tappy” Davis,
who had a long affiliation
with the deceased, broke
down when he was asked to
describe his former friend and
team-mate. “It’s so sad that
he had to leave us,” said
Davis, who tried to contain
himself. “Vince was a straight
forward intelligent, honest
and hard working individual.

“He believed in everything
he was into and he cared a
whole lot about it. I never
knew that people that had the
kind of passion and commit-
ment in what they did the way
Vince did.”



ISLANDER

‘Waee Breer Checking Lit







THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



TEACHERS’ PROTEST

C I Gibson
students
miss classes
for third day

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

STUDENTS at C I Gibson
High missed out on lessons for
the third day yesterday as
teachers continued their protest
over inadequate working con-
ditions at the school.

The entire teaching body of
around 80 teachers who started
their “sit-in” on Monday said
they will not return to work
until there are enough desks
and chairs for all students, and
a science teacher and vice-prin-
cipal are in place.

Bahamas Union of Teachers
(BUT) president Belinda Wil-
son said students at the senior
high school in Marathon
Estates are forced to stand or
sit on desks during lessons
because there is not enough fur-
niture to accommodate every-
one in a class. The teachers are
also angry that the vice-princi-
pal position has not been filled
since the previous vice-principal
resigned two weeks ago.

Security is another major
issue at the high school as 11
knives and an ice-pick have
been found on the property this
term. Since the industrial action
began, four security officers and
three teachers have been post-
ed at C I Gibson, one of three
public schools disrupted by
industrial action this week.

The “sit-ins” started at Uriah
McPhee Primary School on
Kemp Road on Friday as teach-
ers refused to work until air-
conditioning was restored on
the second and third floors of
the school building.

Work was done over the
weekend to repair the air-con-
ditioning and students returned
to their classes at around 11am
on Monday. Staff at Anatol
Rodgers High School in Faith
Avenue staged a two-day “sit-
in” on Monday and Tuesday
over inadequate staffing and
furniture provisions.

They resumed teaching yes-
terday after receiving furniture
and a new English language
teacher. A second English lan-
guage teacher is expected to
arrive this morning.

Minister of Education Carl
Bethel failed to return The Tri-
bune’s calls yesterday to explain
why his department did not
ensure schools were sufficient-
ly staffed and furnished at the
start of the new school year.

Mts Wilson has criticised the
ministry for being reactionary,
rather than proactive in its
work, and she is calling on par-
ents to speak out for the good
of their children’s education.

The BUT president said: “It
is really disheartening that one
month into the school year we
are scrambling for teachers,
supplies, security officers, desks
and chairs.

0 In brief

inquests into
police related
shooting deaths

THREE police related
shooting deaths will be exam-
ined in three separate
inquests set to take place in
the Coroner’s Court over the
next two weeks. On Septem-
ber 25, an inquest into the
death of Dario McKenzie will
begin, followed by an inquiry
into the death of Lincoln Met-
telus on September 28 and
Drexel Rolle on October 5.

Also set to be begin at the
Coroner’s Court today is an
inquest into the death of
Trevor Ferguson stemming
from a traffic collision in
Andros. Meanwhile, on Octo-
ber 29 and 30, an inquest will
be held into the death of
Peter McWeeney, brother of
former Attorney General
Sean McWeeney, who died in
October 2003.

The Coroner’s Court
recently recorded a verdict of
“death by accident” in the
case of the shooting of securi-
ty guard Troy Russell in 2003.

Mr Russell, who worked at
the Shell Service Station
opposite Saunders Beach on
West Bay Street, had been
shot by the manager of the
station, Marcelles Saunders,
during a robbery. Mr Saun-
ders said he mistook Mr Rus-
sell for a burglar when he saw
him running towards him
from the direction of the
cashier’s cage on December
24, 2003. Jurors delivered
their verdict on August 12,
2009.

MURDER: RANDY WILLIAMS, 35

Police quiz suspect over Seagrape
Shopping Centre stabbing death

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A SUSPECT is being ques-
tioned by police in connection
with the murder of 35-year-old
Randy Williams at the Sea-
grape Shopping Centre on
Prince Charles Drive on Tues-
day evening.

Mr Williams, of Gladstone
Road, was stabbed several
times when an argument with
another man escalated into vio-
lence at around 5pm.

He was rushed to the
Princess Margaret Hospital and
died half an hour later, accord-
ing to police sources.

Supt Leon Bethel, officer in-
charge of the homicide depart-
ment in the Criminal Investi-
gation Unit, said he expects the
suspect will be charged in court
before the end of the week.

Police reported that Mr
Williams and another man were
in the shopping centre car park,
near the entrance of Body

Zone Fitness gym, when they
started to argue.

“The argument resulted in a
fight between the two men,”
Supt Bethel said. “One of the
men produced a weapon and
stabbed the other. He was
stabbed a number of times
about the body, and we are
waiting for the pathologist’s
report to tell us exactly how
many times he was stabbed.

“A sharp-pointed object was
used but we are not sure yet
what it was. The victim was tak-
en to hospital and pronounced
dead shortly after.”

Mr Williams is the country’s
63rd murder victim this year.
His murder was the third in
New Providence in just three
days. Rashad Morris, 21, a man-
ager at Burger King on Freder-
ick Street, and former manager
of Burger King on Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway, was
beaten and stabbed to death
outside the Tonique Williams-
Darling Highway restaurant at

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By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

SENATOR Jerome Fitzger-
ald will join the ranks of candi-
dates making a bid for the
deputy leadership of the PLP
when he officially launches his
campaign tonight at the Sun
And resort.

Citing his extensive business
background and experience
around the world, Mr Fitzger-
ald said that he hopes to be able
to assist PLP leader Perry
Christie in implementing his
vision for the Bahamas.

“Tam running for deputy
leader and the role that I see
for the deputy leader is to assist
the leader, and of course with
myself having some input in his
decision-making, but at the end
of the day it is his vision. The
other qualities I intend to bring
to the table is that I think I have
a close affinity and relationship
to the young generation, and it
is obvious to me that the party
has a void that needs to be
filled in ensuring that we have a
message that is relevant to the
younger generation. And in
that regard I think that they will
be looking to see whether or
not the PLP is really willing to
embrace the sort of change that
they demand at this time,” Mr
Fitzgerald said.

Persons wanting to be a part
of the candidate’s launch can
either join the senator at the
Sun And resort at 7pm tonight,
or watch it live on his website.

With profile pictures of him-
self and his family, Mr Fitzger-

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ald’s website records the
endorsements of other success-
ful businessmen such as Nas-
sau Guardian publisher Antho-
ny Ferguson and Philip Kemp.

Mr Ferguson’s endorsement
reads: “I think the country is
looking for young visionary
leadership and I think Jerome,
as a family man, as a business-
man and as true friend, Jerome
can add a lot of value. This is
what the county needs at this
particular time.”

Mr Kemp’s reads: “One of
the things we lack today are
persons who have a vision of
where this country should go.
Jerome has always impressed
me with his vision for the coun-
try.”

Attorney

An attorney by profession,
Mr Fitzgerald is the chairman
and a director of RND Hold-
ings Limited, a diversified com-
pany he co-founded in 1993
with several subsidiaries.

Senator Fitzgerald is also a
director of A Scott Fitzgerald
Insurance Brokers and Agents,

around 1.30am on Sunday.
Burger King has put up a
$10,000 reward for any infor-
mation which could lead to the
arrest or conviction of his killer.

Soaring

Just hours later on Sunday,
Bahamasair pilot Lionel Lewis
McQueen, 29, was shot dead at
his home in Golden Palm
Estates, near the Kennedy Sub-
division. A police investigation
into the suspicious deaths of
four people killed in a house
fire last Thursday morning
could lead to the reclassifica-
tion of those deaths as homi-
cides and send the murder
count soaring to 67 this year.

That would amount to ten
more homicides this year than
the 57 recorded at the same
time last year.

Supt Bethel is appealing to
the public to come forward with
any information which could
help solve all of the above




JEROME FITZGERALD

an insurance firm started by his
mother over 20 years ago.
Additionally, he holds direc-
torships on the boards of three
public companies namely RND
Holdings Limited, Bahamas
Waste Limited, Freeport Con-
crete Company Limited and the
privately held Global United
Limited.
























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Sept, 24- Oct. 3

crimes. “We have lots of assis-
tance from members of the
public and we do appreciate
that, but we do believe that
with more assistance from the
public we will see a better rate
of solution and we would see a
reduction in the number of

murders,” he said. Anyone with
information should call 911 or
919 urgently, or call Crime
Stoppers anonymously on 328-
TIPS (8477). Calls to Crime
Stoppers are answered in the
United States and ensure total
anonymity.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 4, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Which study said

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

United Nations hears its detractors

WE WERE surprised yesterday morning
after the rambling 90-minute speech to the
UN of Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi to
hear news commentators wonder out loud if
people like Kadafi and Iran’s President
Ahmadinejad should be allowed into the
United States.

This is what we would have expected to
hear — and did hear— from the protesters in
the streets, but were surprised that news
commentators did not seem to know that
the United Nations on First Street in Man-
hattan, New York, is located on interna-
tional — and not American — territory.

Of course, the United States could stop
such persons landing at New York’s airports,
but if they were denied landing rights and
free passage to the international area, the
UN would have to be removed from the
U.S. However, there is prestige involved in
having this international body in its present
location. It is a distinction that we doubt
New York would give up lightly.

Wrapped in his flowing coffee-coloured
robes, Kadafi’s disjointed speech touched
on every topic — including the jet lag from
which he was suffering to get to New York.
He highlighted the sins of the world, side-
stepping his own oppressive human rights
atrocities. He was highly critical of the Secu-
rity Council, which to him was elitist with a
handful of superpowers — US, Britain,
France, Russia and China —controlling the
world.

He complained of the limits placed on
visitors like himself in travelling around New
York, likening it to being imprisoned at
Guantanamo Bay. We wonder what free-
dom others from the outside world would
have in Tripoli if the tables were turned. Of
course, Kadafi was in New York to point
out the moat in his brother’s eye, not to
examine his own — and so_ there wasn’t
even a whisper about the aircraft blown up
by a Libyan terrorist over Lockerbie, Scot-
land — a subject so much in the news in
recent weeks.

We must admit that in the early days we
were not a great fan of the UN, dismissing it
as a debating society that spent too much
money, often unwisely.

However, as a graduate student of
Columbia University’s Journalism School
in the late fifties we were assigned to the
Associated Press desk at the UN. On Feb-
ruary 8, 1958 we saw the true worth of the
UN. This was during the height of the Alger-
ian-Tunisian war of independence from
France. Early that morning French aircraft
from Algeria bombed the Tunisian border
village of Sakhiet Sidi Youssef. It was as

Worried About Being Left in the Dark?
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though the bomb had been dropped in the
centre of the UN. Delegates scattered to
find their counterparts from around the
world. They huddled in deep negotiations.
They desperately tried to extinguish the
Mediterranean fire. This was the advantage
of heads of the world’s nations being togeth-
er under one roof and being able to meet
together quickly to solve world problems.

As for Iran’s Mahmoud Ahmadinejad
with his downtrodden look and apologetic
frame, he believes that the Holocaust is a lie
created by the West to justify the existence
of Israel.

He too was in New York to bring his
message of “peace” to the UN, while back in
Teheran, his government is forging ahead
with its controversial nuclear programme,
ostensibly to protect itself from Israel.

Ahmadinejad was born 11 years after the
second world war, and so has no first hand
knowledge of the events of those times.

But for those who lived during the war
years and still have vivid memories of those
days, Ahmadinejad can be dismissed as an
hallucinating nut case.

We probably remember more than the
average Bahamian, because we grew up in a
newspaper office where local and world news
daily swirled.

We shall never forget our first sight of
death. In The Tribune that particular morn-
ing was Life magazine’s first edition showing
bodies tumbling out of the ovens of
Auschwitz.

We were struck dumb in disbelief. Men
with sunken eyes, open mouths and thin
skin pulled over skeleton frames thrown one
on top of the other at all angles. Trenches
filled with naked skeletons — horror upon
horror upon horror. As a child we could not
believe that men could stoop to such bes-
tiality.

There is a photograph that has haunted us
all our life. It is a picture of sad faced Jews
lined up to be loaded into trains for the gas
chambers. In front there is a little boy, no
more than six years old, with the sadness of
the world in his eyes, a cloth cap is on his
head.

He is clinging to his mother’s hand. Help-
less, hopeless, lost. How could any human
being treat a small, innocent child like this.

The Nazis were a special breed — they
were less than human. Whatever boat they
shipped out on for Hades, we hope that it is
the Devil who is now stoking the flames
under them.

As for President Ahamdinejad and those
who think like him, we hope that the world
will be spared their pathetic ignorance.



Arawak Cay was the
place for a port?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Arawak Cay port — which
consultant supported using
the Cay for a Port?

I listened to the live broad-
cast from the FNM Headquar-
ters in August and was struck
by the responses and the arro-
gance of the tone of the voice of
the various participants.

Why can’t our politicians
take the licks?

We are now seeing this atti-
tude in the US — the most
recent one being that of Bar-
ney Franks when he held a
community meeting on the
Health Care proposals — his
arrogance was absolutely unac-
ceptable when one considers he
is there in that position simply
because the people voted him
in.

Getting back to the issue of
this letter — Minister of State
Laing said on this broadcast as
a response to a fax read by

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



Wendall Jones that considera-
tion of the pluses for Arawak
Cay were excluded in one of
the Studies.

The Minister knows full well
as we have been there many
times that the last Study, so-
called the Ecory’s Study, was
specifically for the then “chosen
site” subject to their study
results. It is my understanding
that there was no intent to
study any alternative as that
had already been completed by
Coastal International.

The Minister seems not to
understand that even the 19-
proposed shareholders of the
now Arawak Cay proposal paid
50 per cent of the Ecory’s
Study cost so we surely have to
accept they were on board with

the government if everything
came out favourably they
would support the location at
Clifton, or am I crazy?

For the Minister to say that
Arawak Cay was excluded is
very irresponsible and, in my
opinion a deliberate attempt to
confuse.

Which study said Arawak
was the place, Minister?

Can The Tribune collect all
the studies made on the port
proposal over the years from
Checci forward and publish the
conclusion section so we Joe
Public can understand which
location was supported and
which certainly were not — The
Tribune will do the country and
us a considerable favour by
doing this....we wait.

ABRAHAM MOSS
Nassau,
August, 2009.

Too much made from Congressman Wilson’s comment

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Far too much has been made from the outcry
of one Congressman Wilson during the recent
speech of President Obama at the joint session of
the US House.

There is accepted and appropriate “parlia-
mentary language” although some might say the
use of the words “that’s a lie” might not be dis-
creet enough the facts say it all — in an open
democracy no man is above scrutiny and cer-
tainly no president is or no prime minister
because neither are infallible and make all kinds
of mistakes.

Certainly it is interesting that Cable Channels
like MSNBC have made a big issue over Repre-
sentative Wilson’s comment but in true reality
when a speaker misquotes or says something to
cause praise (applause) are not both actions sim-
ilar and just part of the democratic process and
we should not be so thinned skinned?

Now the incredible rather stupid statement of
an ex-US President Jimmy Carter — I seriously
suggest that it would be best for the good gen-
tleman to remain on his peanut farm and stay qui-
et as his comment does not merit comment as
President Obama was elected by whites-blacks-

Editor, we have this prevailing thought
amongst many who sit in parliament, be it the
House of Assembly or the Senate, that when
certain people speak the “world” has to stop.
All representatives are elected, except in our
case the Senate, and therefore their colleagues
have within accepted form (regrettably it seems
the current speaker is restricting this privilege
and limiting the verbage that can be used) can say
so long established exclamations as “shame” to
indicate their personal unacceptance of a state-
ment. In this day where MPs are unable to ad-lib,
speak without written speeches, there is no excuse
for inaccurate statements. Mr Speaker, please
note this is not permitted.

Politicians have to understand that their free
spending — irresponsible policies and lacking of
definitive economic policy is what is causing the
massive grass-root protests. I suggest the man
in the street has better housekeeping qualifica-
tions than most politicians and they recognise
you can’t continue to spend-spend and spend
irrationally.

W THOMPSON
Nassau,

latinos and everyone else.

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I am writing to ask about
the status of the College of the
Bahamas' fabulous, new, “state
of the art” publicly funded the-
atre that opened with much
fanfare at the earlier part of the
year and, as far as I know (and
I stand to be corrected), has not
been used for a public event
since.

At the inaugural event —
the Colour of Harmony — it
was stated that the theatre had
been built at much expense for
the use of the country's artists
and it was hoped that it would
be constantly in use.

It is indeed a magnificent
theatre and I applaud whom-
soever is responsible for accom-
plishing such a feat — but I
would like to find out what
exactly is the criteria for use of
the theatre, and whether the
theatre is going to remain, as

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What is the status of COB's ‘state-of-the-art’ theatre?

do many of our Bahamian “liv-
ing parlours”, covered in plastic
for “show only” for only cer-
tain “exclusive” events, or is it
intended to be actually filled
with cultural enthusiasts anx-
ious to drink from the well of
Bahamian creativity and tal-
ent? These thoughts came to
mind as the time rapidly
approaches for one of the most
exciting dramatic events in the
country — the Shakespeare in
Paradise Festival due to take
place from October 5-12 which,
through the rich talent of dedi-
cated and hard working
Bahamian artists, is poised to
present first class dramatic tal-
ent to the people of The
Bahamas and the world.
Imagine what such a festi-
val can do to fill the literary
starved minds of our commu-
nity? Imagine how such an
event, if properly nourished,
can grow into a spectacle that

will not only offer our commu-
nity avenues to express their
creativity and talent on the
stage, but will inspire more per-
sons to write plays and books,
provide the original music for
dramatic events, design stage
scenery and costumes, learn
how to work the lights and
sound stage, exercise their pro-
motional and marketing skills
sage the possibilities are endless.
I venture to speculate that most
of the work being done for this
Festival is a “labour of love”
by the participants and I
applaud any entity who is offer-
ing them much needed spon-
sorship. So I wish to ask the
question: ‘““Why isn't the COB
Theatre listed as one of the
venues on the ‘Shakespeare in
Paradise’ timetable?”

PAM BURNSIDE
Nassau,
September 23, 2009

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS







By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

SWINE flu vaccinations will
be made available in the
Bahamas from the World
Health Organisation’s global
supply, or if government makes
a direct request to suppliers and
manufacturers in the United
States.

The vaccinations to protect
individuals from serious illness
or death resulting from the
highly infectious H1N1 influen-
za were approved by the Unit-
ed States government Food and
Drug Administration last week.

Around half of the US pop-
ulation, that is 160 million
Americans are expected to
receive the inoculations from
mid-October. At risk groups
will take priority for the inocu-
lations, including pregnant
women, healthcare workers,
children and young adults, as
well as the chronically ill in the
US. People caring for infants
will also receive priority.

Dr Minnis said healthcare
workers would take priority in
the Bahamas as they are most
at risk of infection, and the
Ministry of Health is taking a
pro-active approach by work-
ing with schools to prepare chil-
dren and staff for the possibili-
ty of an outbreak in the upcom-
ing flu season.

The Minister said supplies
will be ordered through the
World Health Organisation
(WHO) when necessary, as the
WHO retains a supply of vac-
cinations for developing coun-
tries around the world.

He added: “We will watch
World Health Organisation
reports and communicate with
them and purchase the vacci-

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nations as necessary. We will
not be left out in the cold.”

Local pharmaceutical com-
panies in the Bahamas which
have tried to order the vacci-
nations have been told by sup-
pliers and manufacturers they
cannot purchase the live vacci-
nations without a special
request from the Bahamas gov-
ernment as the new inocula-
tions are in limited supply.

Nassau Agencies Barbara
Donathan-Henderson said:
“At least one doctor has been
harassing us to bring it in, but
the only way we can do that is if
it was being sold to government
in a government purchase
order, and even then they may
not order it through us. “If we
had the option we would have
brought it in so people would
be able to take it if they wanted
to, but it is up to the govern-
ment to make that decision.”

Lowe’s Wholesale Pharma-
ceutical has also failed to bring
in the inoculations. Sales Man-
ager Carrol Sands said: “I have
not had any confirmation as to
when we will be getting any as
yet. “I have been communicat-
ing with companies that we deal
with, and they have told me
their first priority is providing it
to institutions in the US.”

A representative from Com-
monwealth Drugs and Medical
Supplies told The Tribune: “It is
all being sold directly to gov-
ernment and we have had no
indication from the government
as to whether or not they would
want us to bring in any.”

There have been at least 29
confirmed cases of swine flu in
the Bahamas this year, and
although the virus has a high
infection rate, Dr Minnis said it
is far less deathly than regular
flu as about 40,000 people in
the United States die as a result
of the regular flu every year,
while just 600 people have died
from the H1N1 virus since it
became apparent earlier this
year.

Ph: 325-3336

Policeman’s death: Murder trial resumes

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The trial of
two men accused of murdering
a policeman resumed in the
Supreme Court on Tuesday.

Edwin Bauld Jr and Wilfred
McPhee Jr are accused of the
murder, kidnapping and rob-
bery of Police Corporal Eddi-
son Bain in October 2007.

Acting Justice Jethro Miller
is presiding over the trial, which
was interrupted briefly when
Bauld made a loud outburst in
the courtroom as a prosecution
witness was giving testimony in
the witness box.

Justice Miller advised
Bauld’s attorney that the out-
burst was not acceptable and
initiated a five minute break.
Bauld was later escorted from
the courtroom by two police
officers to give him time to cool
off. The decomposed body of
Corporal Eddison Bain was dis-
covered on October 22, 2007,
in a ditch near the Casuarina
Bridge. Bain’s hands and feet
were bound and a large stone
was on his head. The body was
covered with tree shrubs and
stones in a four-foot deep ditch.

K Brian Hanna represents
Bauld and Mario Gray repre-
sents McPhee. It is alleged that
the accused men kidnapped
Bain, robbed him of his ATM
bank card and withdrew money
from his account. On Monday,
the prosecution produced a
video that showed one of the
accused men withdrawing mon-
ey using Bain’s ATM card.

Hospital pathologist Dr Cor-
nelius Kachali gave evidence in
the trial on Tuesday.

Dr Kachali, who performed
an autopsy on Corporal Bain,
said the cause of death was a
blunt force trauma to the head.

He said that the skull was
penetrated as a result of the
blunt force. He added that Bain
was alive when he sustained the
injury because there was a
swelling of the brain which can
only occur if a person is alive at
the time.

Lawyer Brian Hanna asked if
Bain could have survived his
injuries if he had been taken to
hospital. Dr Kachali said that
Bain’s chances of survival were
“very slim.” “Statistically sur-
vival is not good, he would have
lived only for two minutes after
sustaining injuries,” he said.

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Lawyer Mario Gray asked
Dr Kachali if Bain, while
bound, could have sustained
the injury himself by falling and
hitting his head. Dr Kachali said
that it was impossible because
the deceased was found face up
in the ditch with a huge stone
on his head.

Also giving evidence was
Gahnise Campbell, the girl-
friend of Edwin Bauld Jr.

Ms Campbell told the court


























































that she was Bauld’s girlfriend
during 2007. She said that she
and Bauld had been dating for
six months. She said she had
known Wilfred McPhee Jr all
her life as he was her cousin
and they grew up in the same
neighbourhood.

Ms Campbell said a week
before October 20 she went for
aride with Edwin and Eddison.
She said Eddison was Edwin’s
cousin. She said Edwin and

Eddison went into a liquor
store for two Guinness. They
then went to Commonwealth
Bank because she wanted to
check her account.

“T gave Edwin my ATM card
to check if the money he had
put on the card was on my
account,” she said. Ms Camp-
bell said they went to Bell
Channel Resort.

She was given $100 and went
to pay for a room for the night.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Road Traffic Department holds



customer service workshop

PUBLIC Works and
Transport Minister
Neko Grant gives the
opening remarks at
the launch of a two-
day workshop for
staff of the Road
Traffic Department on
Tuesday. Road Traffic
Controller Philip
Turner is pictured in
the background.

Letisha Henderson/BIS



The Bahamas Utilities Co-operative
Credit Union Limited

NOTICE OF SPECIAL
GENERAL MEETING

A Special General Meeting of
the Bahamas Utilities Co-operative
Credit Union Limited
will be held on

Friday, October 2nd, 2009

at
6:00 p.m.
in
The Patrick A. Bain Training Room
at
The Bahamas Co-operative League Building
Russell Road, Oakes Field

PURPOSE OF THE MEETING

The purpose of the meeting is to seek approval
from the membership for a merger with National
Workers Co-operative Credit Union Limited. Note
that the Annual General Meeting held May 28th,
2009, authorized the Board of Directors to seek
alliance with a larger credit union.

Secretary: Dexter Cartwright




























BY KATHRYN CAMPBELL

THE Road Traffic Depart-
ment has a vital role to play in
providing services and con-
tributing to the economic and
social development of the
Bahamas, Public Works and
Transport Minister Neko
Grant said. “Each staff mem-
ber therefore has the respon-
sibility of ensuring that these
services are provided to the
satisfaction of customers.”

Mr Grant officially opened
the first of a two-day work-
shop for staff of the Road
Traffic Department on Tues-
day at Workers House. The
theme for the workshop is
“Forward in Growth -
Together for Excellence.”

One hundred staff members
representing various units in
the Department participated
in the workshop designed to
enhance customer service
skills. The workshop is in
keeping with the governmen-
t’s service improvement pro-
gramme that aims to formu-
late strategies for internal and
external service improvement.

The programme was imple-
mented in six key service
delivery agencies within the
public service. Speakers for
both days included Philip
Turner, Controller of Depart-
ment of Road Traffic, who
spoke on the topic “The Way
Forward for the Road Traffic
Department”; Elma Gar-
raway, Permanent Secretary
in the Ministry of Education,
on “Dress Code and Work
Ethics”, and Rev James Pala-
cious on the topic “Setting
Standards for Excellence.”

“Excellence in service
delivery is challenging under
normal circumstances. How-
ever, it presents an even
greater challenge in today’s
society from a general per-
spective in both the public
and private sectors,” Minister
Grant said. “Globalisation has
had a significant impact on
customers’ expectations. We
now see an increasing demand
by customers for better ser-
vice in a work environment
that reflects current economic
circumstances where more
efficiency in the use of
resources is required.”

Weight LOSS...
Health Gain

CAT ISLAND: Rotary Club proposal
Plans for state-of-the-art

resource centre, library

BY AVA TURNQUEST

USING an old teacher's
cottage given by the Ministry
of Works and Ministry of
Education, the newly formed
Rotary Club Cat Island plans
to create a state-of-the-art
community resource centre
and library.

With an estimated com-
pletion date of September
2010, the library is a much
needed resource on the island
as the club hopes it will bring
a fresh and exciting challenge
for the youth.

The club, currently
totalling 21 members and
directors, is the first and only
Rotary Club on Cat Island.

President-elect Gwendolyn
Rolle, former member of the
Rotary Club of Lucaya
Freeport, Grand Bahama,
says the club began meeting
in November 2008 with a
group of professionals at the
island's resource centre.

“Rotary brings a new kind
of hope to the community,”
said Ms Rolle, “the youth and
the elderly at large.”

The club believes that the
library is most needed, bring-
ing a fresh and exciting chal-
lenge for the youth of Cat
Island.

The library, located in
Bennett’s Harbour, will be the
club's maiden civic project
since its official installation
and charter to the global asso-
ciation June 13, 2009.

“Ready students need a
safe and informative environ-
ment in order to complete
school projects, do research,
and be in touch with the
world in a controlled envi-
ronment,” said Ms Rolle.

HISTORY

The world's first service
club, the Rotary Club of
Chicago, was formed in 1905
by Paul Harris, an attorney
who wished to capture in a
professional club the same
friendly spirit he had felt in
the small towns of his youth.

Now Rotary International
is a global network of volun-
teers, enhancing their com-
munities and promoting inter-
national goodwill through

] 4 7



“Rotary brings a
new kind of hope
to the community,
the youth and the
elderly at large.”



Gwendolyn Rolle

club projects, scholarships and
grants for development and
humanitarian projects.
Rotary Club of Cat Island is
part of Rotary District 7020
comprising 10 countries and
16 islands in the Caribbean,
being one of the 75 clubs in
the District with over 2400
Rotarians, all men and
women with the finest cre-
dentials.

Area District Governor
Felix Stubbs spoke to the
newly installed club, encour-
aging them to utilise tools and
opportunities the organisation
presents. “My personal grat-
itude and appreciation to the
business and professional
community of Cat Island for
embracing Rotary whole-
heartedly and to the Rotary
Club of South East Nassau
for the sponsorship and duly
represented by the Club Pres-
ident David Moncur, Presi-
dent-elect Anna deGregory
and other members of that
Club.

“This is your opportunity
to exploit the immense pos-
sibilities for your communi-
ty,” Mr. Stubbs said. “The
onus is on you to create
friendship and fellowship, to
invite the best amongst your
vocations to join hands with
you, to do good so as to give
back, and to be recognised in
the world as an important seg-
ment of the world communi-

ty.”
DONATIONS

The Rotary Club of Cat
Island has received numerous
donations from both the pub-
lic and private sectors. The
government, through the
Ministry of Works and Min-
istry of Education, has donat-

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ed the cottage with supplies
and books and has also com-
mitted to provide a librarian
upon its completion.

The club has set up a reg-
istry for material at Kelly’s
Lumber Yard and Marathon
Mall location. To access this
registry, interested persons
should contact Mr. Robert
Plank. The public can pur-
chase discounted items on the
“Rotary Club of Cat Island
Material for Library List” that
Kelly’s will ship to Cat Island
at the start of the project. Pri-
vate companies that have also
provided outstanding support
to this project have been Cat
Island Air, The Christie
Estate, Orange Creek Car
Rental, Neighbourhood Food
Store and many more.

Local contractors on the
island have also donated their
time, which has allowed the
club to save on labour costs.
Mr Allworth Rolle drew the
renovation plans and Mr.
Lewis Sweeting has commit-
ted to all the electrical wiring.

“T would really like to
acknowledge all members of
the community and the club
that has donated their time
and funds,” said Ms Rolle,
“working tirelessly to see this
project brought to reality.

COOK-OUT

The club will host its first
cook-out from noon to 6 pm
on Saturday, October 3, on
the grounds of the library in
Bennett’s Harbour. Joining
them will be representatives
from the various Rotary fam-
ilies in the Bahamas as they
kick off the first phase of the
renovation project.

“This will be a day of fun,
with work as well as play,”
said Ms Rolle. “There will be
a lot of local goodies on sale
and we are eager to share this
experience with the commu-
nity and our visiting clubs.”

In addition to their sched-
uled civic duties, the club also
plans to renovate local parks
and play areas and raise funds
for a multi-purpose sport
facility for the community.

“T have great faith in your
brand new club and its
promising membership,” said
Mr Stubbs. “I truly believe
that the club will make a
strong statement that indeed a
new entrant is no less versatile
and vibrant than a veteran in
the world of service and fel-
lowship.”

Donations can also be sent
to The Rotary, Arthur’s Town
Post Office, Cat Island. The
club meets every Thursday at
7pm at The Boggie Pond
Restaurant in Arthur’s Town.
All visiting Rotarians are wel-
come.

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THE TRIBUNE

DPM Symonette
accompanied
by Ministers
Earl Deveaux,
Dion Foulkes

BY LINDSAY
THOMPSON

DEPUTY Prime Minister
and Minister of Foreign
Affairs Brent Symonette left
the country yesterday to
address the 64th Session of
the United Nations General
Assembly in New York ona
number of issues relevant to
the Bahamas.

He will also sign a Tax
Information Exchange
Agreement (TIEA) with the
Republic of San Marino, in
keeping with standards set
out by the Organisation for
Economic and Cooperation
and Development (OECD).

Mr Symonette, along with
other CARICOM leaders
will address the session
tomorrow on the vulnera-
bility of Small Island Devel-
oping States (SIDS), and
devise ways for a more
cohesive union. He is being
accompanied by Minister of
the Environment Earl
Deveaux and Senator Dion
Foulkes, Minister of Labour.

Issues

Main issues for the session
are the Millennium Devel-
opment Goals; the world
financial and economic crisis
and its impact on develop-
ment; climate change; disar-
mament; United Nations
reform; review of the peace-
building commission and the
Human Rights Council.

Yesterday, United States
President Barack Obama
gave his first speech to the



BRENT SYMONETTE

UN General Assembly. In
a speech that was described
as “audacious” by some
observers, he said his coun-
try is committed to “a new
chapter of international
cooperation.”

“Those who used to chas-
tise America for acting
alone in the world cannot
now stand by and wait for

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

CAL NEWS eee
Minister of Foreign Affairs to address the United Nations

WTO OL e Cs



America to solve the world's
problems alone,” President
Obama said. The UN, head-
quartered in New York is
an international organisa-
tion founded in 1945, after
World War II. The 192
member-states have com-
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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





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BY NOELLE NICOLLS

ITH the

ongoing

debate

about the
proposed amendment to the
Sexual Offences and Domestic
Violence Act of 1991, I
became very curious about the
perspectives of the Bahamas
Christian Council. I decided
to attend a meeting, but when
I arrived the group gathered
was actually a rogue Christ-
ian group, known as the

INVITATION FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (EOI)
FOR THE PROVISION OF PROFESSIONAL SERVICES TO CONDUCT
A COMPREHENSIVE ENGINEEERING ASSESSMENT OF THE
PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL - NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The Public Hospitals Authority of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas is
seeking proposals from qualified professional engineering firms to provide
consultancy services for completing a comprehensive assessment of the HVAC,
ELECTRICAL, PLUMBING, and STRUCTUAL SYSTEMS within the Princess

Margaret Hospital.

The purpose of this assessment is to develop a comprehensive Engineering Report

for the Princess Margaret Hospital.

The selected firm will be required to design and lead the assessment process and
deliver a full report on the current situation, detailing and benchmarking against
acceptable standards and trends for the proposed redevelopment of the Princess

Margaret Hospital.

Note: The project will follow GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH
OF THE BAHAMAS MINISTRY OF WORKS Standard Form of Agreement
between Authority and Consultant (Engineer) adapted for use by the Public

Hospitals Authority.

The principal project goals of the Firm are to:

° Develop a comprehensive engineering assessment report on the current

condition at the Princess Margaret Hospital;

Provide realistic engineering schematics design of the facility for

redevelopment; and

Provide specialist consultancy services for the planning and evaluation of
the Princess Margaret Hospital Redevelopment Project.

Firms should emphasize: (1) general consulting experience; (ii) working experi-
ence in hospital redevelopment service within an Acute Hospital; (iti) availability

of appropriate skill sets within the firm.

This Expressions of Interest will be evaluated based on the qualifications and rele-
vant experience of the firm and the results will be used to prepare a shortlist of no
more than six (6) Professional Engineering firms. Those included in the shortlist
will subsequently be invited to present technical and economical proposals on the
basis of a Request-for-Proposals (RFP) forwarded to them, which would include

the detailed Terms of Reference.

Name, Addresses and Contact Point (s):
Address: The Public Hospitals Authority

Building B, Third and West Terrace, Collins Avenue

Contact:

Managing Director, Attn: Herbert Brown, P.O. Box N-8200,

Nassau, Bahamas; Tel: (242) 502-1400; Fax: (242) 323-1422.
Interested Professional Engineering Firms should submit their expression of
interest to the address above no later than 5th October 2009 during office hours

(9:00am —5:00pm)



LOOKING AT VIOLENCE AND MARRIAGE

The five interesting lessons I learned at a
Bahamas Christian Consortium meeting

SO a

Bahamas Christian Consor-
tium (BCC). I stayed anyway
and learned five interesting
lessons.

Marriage is the ultimate
form of martyrdom

When a man and a woman
join as one in marriage they
literally give up their individ-
ual selves to become one body
under God, not in a
metaphorical sense, but phys-
ically. A miracle happens and
their bodies join up like con-
genital twins, which means
they are incapable of raping
each other. “Marriage is a
covenant [with] your life long
partner. You are no longer to
operate as individuals but a
bond where the two are to
become one. So how can one
rape themselves, especially
when you vowed to fulfil each
other sexually?” Ingenious
words of Keith Ferguson, who
is not a member of the BCC,
but considered a prophet.

Men marry to avoid the
sin of fornication.

Since men are sexual beasts
at heart and prime fornicators,
marriage is the best solution: a
sacred space where sexual
relations are acceptable to
God not just for procreation.
Marriage is an unrestricted
pleasure club for men and
women: once signing the mar-
riage contract both parties
agree to “upfront, implicit,
open-ended sexual consent”.
This is not what the actual
Marriage Act says or implies,
but the moral law of God,
according to the Bahamas
Christian Council sanctions
this interpretation. This
makes sense, considering it is
much easier for a woman to
give her man a key to the
house so he does not have to
knock on the door to gain
entry every time he wants to
get in.

Sexual violence in
marriage is sacred
and intimate.

The Bahamas Christian
Council in their official state-
ment said one of the questions
causing grave concern over
the proposed amendments
was: “How far should the gov-
ernment be going with things
that are sacred and intimate?”
A marriage is sacred no mat-
ter how unhealthy it is, even
where the most extreme forms
of sexual violence exist. An
assault against men who rape
their wives is an assault
against all married men and
women. The Christian com-
munity has a responsibility to
uphold the moral laws of God
and protect these sacred and
intimate marriages.

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If there is no violence in
the lead up to rape then no
violent act occurred.

The BCC is very concerned
about a complete “multi-gen-
erational breakdown” in soci-
ety if the government is
allowed to make men answer-
able to the law for raping their
wives. Spiritual icon of the
movement Myles Munroe
believes the law “could” be or
“perhaps should” be amended
only if the activities leading
up to the “sexual intercourse”
are abusive, violent and force-
ful. So the sexually violent act
of rape itself is not sufficient to
warrant the government get-
ting into the marriage bed.
The lead up to “sexual inter-
course” also has to be violent.

Lesbian feminists are
trying to destroy
marriage.

The valid concern of the
BCC is there are many
“malignant, evil, spiteful,
whoremonger” women who
are itching for the opportuni-
ty to get back at their hus-
bands “because of some
unfortunate circumstance”
and married men in unhealthy
violent relationships need to
be protected by the church. If
the feminists succeed in pass-
ing this amendment it will
open the gates of hell for all
homosexuals to wield politi-
cal power in the Bahamas.

After the meeting | heard
people asking the question
on whose behalf does Rev-
erend Patrick Paul speak.



‘The BCC seems
to be a rogue
organisation, or
revolutionary,
depending on
one’s perspective,
run by a few
ministers in New
Providence. They
speak for them-
selves. I realised
they are so
forward
thinking that
normal people
cannot keep up
with their logic.’
—SSS————

He speaks for the Bahamas
Christian Council, as their
President, not for the
Bahamas Christian Consor-
tium (BCC).

Despite their names, nei-
ther organisation represents
Catholics, Methodists, and
Seventh-Day Adventists, who
all support the amendment.

The Bahamas Christian
Council is a public front pri-
marily representing Baptist
and Church of God members.

The BCC seems to be a
rogue organisation, or revo-
lutionary, depending on one’s
perspective, run by a few min-
isters in New Providence.
They speak for themselves.

I realised they are so for-
ward thinking that normal
people cannot keep up with
their logic.

¢ Noelle Nicolls is a Pan-
Caribbean writer trained as a
professional journalist. She is
also a political commentator
and new media entrepreneur.

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THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

Mr Travolta, 55, explained
how Jett was autistic and suf-
fered from a seizure disorder.
He said Jett would suffer a
seizure every five to 10 days.
Each time the seizures would
last for about 45 seconds. Mr
Travolta recalled that around
10.15am on January 2, he was
wakened by Eli Wheaton, one
of Jett’s nannies, who was
pounding on his bedroom
door. The actor said that he
and his wife ran downstairs
to help their son.

“T saw him on the bath-
room floor. Jeff Kathrein, his
other nanny and a woman
from Old Bahama Bay were
doing CPR,” Mr Travolta
said. Mr Travolta said that he
took the place of the woman
doing CPR.

“Jeff Kathrein was doing
compression and I was doing
breathing,” Mr Travolta said.
Mr Travolta said that while
all this was taking place, his
wife was holding their son’s
head.

Mr Travolta told the court
that Jared McGrath, who was
a part of a group visiting for a
party he was having for
employees, also continued the
compressions. Mr Travolta
said that he knew McGrath
to have medical expertise and
he fitted his son with a defib-
rillator.

Mr Travolta testified that
after 35 minutes an ambu-
lance came and Jett was
placed on a gurney and taken
to the ambulance while Jared
continued the compressions.

Mr Travolta told the court
that outside the condo, he
spoke to the ambulance driver
and following that exchange
he received a liability release
document which he signed.
Mr Travolta admitted that he
did not read the document.

“Time was of the
essence,” Mr Travolta told the
court, when asked by lead
prosecutor and Director of
Public Prosecutions Bernard
Turner why he had not read
the document.

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JETT TRAVOLTA



Mr Travolta said he told
the ambulance driver to take
Jett to the airport at Old
Bahama Bay, the reason
being, he said, was so that he
could take his son on a jet to

‘ .

LOCAL NEWS

Travolta: Jett’s final moments

West Palm Beach rather than
taking him to the Freeport
hospital. Mr Travolta testi-
fied, however, that Jett was
taken to the Freeport hospital
by ambulance.

“T was in the back of the
ambulance. There was EMT
and one other person,” Mr
Travolta told the court.

When asked by the prose-
cutor whether anything hap-
pened on the way to the hos-
pital, Mr Travolta said that
“there was a stop where there
was a switching of drivers.”

Mr Travolta told the court
that once they arrived at the
hospital, he stayed with Jett in
the hospital room until he was
asked to leave.

He said the last time he
saw Jett at the hospital he was
not alive.

Mr Travolta said he stayed
on Grand Bahama for about
four days after Jett’s death,

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then returned to his home in
the United States.

Both defence attorneys
Murrio Ducille and Carlson
Shurland opted not to cross-
examine Mr Travolta yester-
day as the actor is expected
to be recalled after certain
other witnesses have given
evidence.

Bridgewater, 49, and
Lightbourne, 47, are accused
of conspiring to extort and
attempting to extort money
from Mr Travolta between
January 2 and 20 by means of
threats. Bridgewater is also
accused of abetment to extor-
tion.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 9



US ACTOR John Travolta, left, and wife Kelly Preston leave the
court building in Nassau yesterday.

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Lawyer indicted in U



FROM page one

Mr Cambridge was alleged to have facilitated the scheme by cre-
ating a Bahamian International Business Company (IBC), Hexa-
gon Development, and setting up a bank account for the company
at FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas).

He then allegedly handled wire transfers totalling hundreds of
thousands of dollars.

The “sting” was part of an FBI investigation into public official
corruption in the Miami area, and one of Mr Cambridge’s fellow
defendants is former vice-mayor of Broward County and Broward
County Commissioner, Josephus Eggelleton.

In 2006, Eggelleton was alleged to have told an FBI agent and
“cooperating witness”: “If you wanna do some deals in the
Bahamas, let me know.

“Yes sir. In fact, ’m gonna be raising some money for the
Prime Minister of the Bahamas that’s running for re-election.” That
appears to imply that he was going to donate to the PLP’s 2007
election campaign, although there is nothing to suggest the party
or Mr Christie did anything wrong in relation to this or the situa-
tion surrounding Mr Cambridge.

See Tribune Business for full story.

FROM page one

ident of the UK’s new Supreme
Court, said he is looking for
ways to reduce the “dispropor-
tionate” amount of time judges
who staff that court also spend
on cases coming from outside
the UK.

The President questioned
whether some Privy Council
cases, which have ranged from
Jamaican death row appeals to
fights over press freedom in
Bermuda, needed to be heard
by a panel of five of Britain’s
most senior judges.

Robert Hazell, director of
The Constitution Unit at Uni-
versity College London, claims
it is a “minor public scandal”
that judges in the country’s top
court spend almost half their

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Princess Margaret Hospital

ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

PUBLIC

NOTICE!

IN AN EFFORT TO IMPROVE OUR PATIENT
SERVICES AT THE PRINCESS MARGARET

HOSPITAL. WE WILL

RENOVATIONS TO THE ENTRANCE

UNDERGO
AND

TRIAGE AREA OF THE ACCIDENT &

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WE ASK THAT PERSONS VISITING THE

DEPARTMENT

ENTER THROUGH

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SIGNED: MANAGEMENT

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time on business “of no interest
to anyone in the UK”, refer-
ring to those cases originating in
places like the Bahamas.

One former Governor Gen-
eral told BBC Caribbean that
he sees Lord Phillip’s message
as one telling Caribbean and
other Commonwealth countries
to “get your house in order and
do what you have to do” to
prepare for the eventuality that
final appeals may in the future
no longer be made to the Lon-
don-based Privy Council.

“The message,” said Sir
Probyn Innis, former Governor
General of St Kitts and Nevis,
“ds loud and clear.”

“Enough is enough is

enough. Allow us to get on with
our business of modernising our
legal system in the United
Kingdom.”




Yesterday former Attorney
General and MP for Fort Char-
lotte Alfred Sears said the time
is “long overdue” for the
Bahamas to make a “contin-
gency plan” for the likely even-
tuality that the Privy Council
will not act as the final court of
appeal forever.

“T think it’s our responsibili-
ty to provide the critical insti-
tutions of governance for our-
selves and the time has come,
before the British tell us to go
— a likelihood that will only
increase as the demands of their
own society call for giving pri-
ority to their needs — that we
assume the responsibility for
ourselves,” said Mr Sears.

He noted that the Bahamas
already helps fund the
Caribbean Court of Justice
despite not using it as a final

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S UK judge: Cases from countries like Bahamas taking up too much time

court of appeal.

Meanwhile, he said, he has
no doubt that there is sufficient
legal talent within the
Caribbean region and the rest
of the Commonwealth to deal
adequately with any legal issues
that may arise.

Many Bahamians have called
for the Bahamas to end its
dependence on the Privy Coun-
cil since it ruled in 2006 that it
was unconstitutional for the
death penalty to be mandatory,
perceiving a foreign court to
have placed an unfair impedi-
ment to convicted Bahamian
killers receiving their just
deserts.

However, Mr Sears said that
this in itself is no argument in
favour of a national or
Caribbean court as such a court
could make the same ruling —
as it did in South Africa.

Nonetheless, he said, he does
believe the issue of capital pun-
ishment should be decided by a
court “in our region”, rather
than Europe.

PLP leadership contender
Paul Moss raised the issue of
the final court of appeal pub-
licly during his campaign launch
on Tuesday evening, telling his
audience that he would bring
“unparalleled focus to fixing
the administration of justice,”
culminating in the “removal”
of the Privy Council as the final
court of appeal.

Yesterday Mr Moss said he
feels it is unlikely that Britain
will itself move to stop other
countries appealing to the Privy
Council as he believes it is “an
industry” for the country.

However, he said, he strong-
ly believes The Bahamas
“should not outsource” its final
court of appeal, whether to
Britain or the Caribbean Court
of Justice.

“The judiciary is part of gov-
ernment. We do not have a for-
eign prime minister why then
should we have foreigners sit-
ting on another arm of govern-
ment, such as the judiciary,” he
said.

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS



Schools in Long Island | 3 ))\yy WINNERS!
receive greenhouses



KRAFT
a SUMMER

al al pauls
Cr D UL i



AGRICULTURE MINISTER Larry Cartwright (right) inspects one of the sreoriiouske with (from left)
BAIC’s assistant general manager of Agriculture Arnold Dorsett, Long Island administrator Roderick
Bowe, and local government official Wellington Taylor.

FURTHERING the local
food production initiative, four
schools in Long Island received
greenhouses during special
assemblies last week.

The greenhouses went to
North Long High, NGM Major
High, Glinton’s Primary, and
Simms’ Primary. Three green-
houses came from the Bahamas
Agricultural and Industrial Cor-
poration (BAIC) and the other
through the Food and Agricul-
ture Organisation’s Initiative
on Soaring Food Prices.

Among the dignitaries pre-
sent were Minister of Agricul-
ture and Marine Resources and

Member of Parliament for
Long Island and Raged Island,
Larry Cartwright; BAIC exec-
utive chairman Edison Key;
administrator Roderick Bowe,
and Ministry of Education and
local government officials.

Mr Cartwright told the stu-
dents that agriculture is for life.

“Everybody needs food,” he
said.

“And the greatest thrill of
one’s life is to be able to grow
one’s own food.”

Mr Key underscored BAIC’s
theme to ‘grow what you eat
and eat what you grow’.

He said there is no need for

the Bahamas to be importing
some $500 million in food each
year when the means are here
to produce much of that.

“If there is a magical word
in agriculture today, that word
is ‘greenhouses’,” agricultural
officer, Maurice Minnis told
students.

“The appeal of growing
plants in a controlled environ-
ment protected from the open
sun without most of the physi-
cal labour normally associated
with production on the open
field makes the attraction of
greenhouses almost irre-
sistible.”

vo

SAC principal robbed by thug ar

FROM page one

about five hours after a man was fatally
stabbed during a scuffle at the nearby Sea-
grapes shopping centre on Prince Charles Dri-
ve.

Inspector Warren Rodgers, of the Elizabeth
Estates police station, said patrols have been
intensified as police try to crack down on crime
in the area.

"We have a lot of patrols in the night-time.
We also have been getting a lot of reserve
officers to come out and assist in the night-time
to reassure the communities in this area that

the police are out working and also to deter the
criminals," he told The Tribune yesterday.
Police launched investigations after at least
two rapes and two attempted rapes occurred in
eastern New Providence since March.
However, The Tribune has received reports
that this number may be greater than reported.
On an internet message board, a poster
claimed a woman had been attacked and near-
ly raped two weeks ago by a man who lurked
outside her home in the eastern area.
Yesterday, police at the Elizabeth Estates
station said they had no knowledge of the
reported attack.



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TRIBUNE SPORTS

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



‘A sporting icon of the highest order’

TODAY?’S column is not
your usual one. I just had to
pause and reflect on the life of
the late Vincent Lloyd Fer-
guson, a sporting icon of the
highest order, not just as an
athlete, but an administrator
as well.

When I got the news that
the 71-year-old had passed
away yesterday after his battle
with prostate cancer, the first
thing that really came to mind
was how I first got to know
him in a personal way.

I was attending my first
major international event at
the 1992 Olympic Games in
Barcelona, Spain, and as a
young reporter on the curb, I
was eager to make the trip.

But when I got to
Barcelona, I was staying quite
a ways out from everything
that was going on. And not
being able to speak Spanish
didn’t help.

Ferguson, the Bahamas
Olympic Association’s trea-
surer at the time, served as
the Chef de Mission for the
team at the Olympics. Being a



Photos: Felipé MajorTribune staff



Sere

Champion Truckers put on probation

sata ae # fel as) ae iz

very small team, there was
more than adequate space in
the Games Village.

Upon the insistence of
triple jumper Frank Ruther-
ford and quarter-miler
Pauline Davis-Thompson, I
moved into the Games Vil-
lage where I was able to hang
out with the team.

However, Ferguson was not
informed initially and when
he found out, he almost hit
the roof. He insisted that the
BOA would not be responsi-
ble for me being in the village
as the press was not allowed.

That actually showed me
the seriousness of Ferguson,
who is known as a discipli-
narian.

Anybody who got to know
Ferguson can attest to his
firmness and his commitment
to being the best out of every-
body and ensuring that noth-
ing was left to chance.

After his sting as a semi-
professional baseball player
in the major leagues, Fergu-
son returned home and took
up a long and successful

Rain delays softball game...



bea

STUBBS



OPINION

teaching career.

It started at his alma mater
at St Augustine’s College
where he and the late Leviti-
cus ‘Uncle Low’ Adderley

THE senior boys’ game
between the Big Red Machine
and the Nassau Christian
Academy Crusaders was
stopped in the bottom of the
fifth inning when the rain
came pouring down.

¢ SOME of the players can
eMac IMM Ot eM Ia kG)

were responsible for coining
the school’s nickname The
Big Red Machine after the
Cincinnati Reds in the 1960s.

He last taught at the A F
Adderley High School before
he retired in 1994.

Ferguson leaves behind his
beloved wife Marie, a former
teacher of mine, and two chil-
dren, Anne-Marie and Vin-
cent Alex.

He had also compiled a
résumé that speaks for itself.

Here’s a glance at his
career:

e Attended St Augustine’s
College from 1950-1955
where he participated in bas-
ketball, softball, volleyball
and track and field

e Enrolled at St Anselm’s
College, Manchester, New
Hampshire, on a basketball
scholarship in 1957 and grad-
uated with a BA in English
and a minor in Philosophy in
1961

e Started playing profes-
sional basketball with the Mil-
waukee Braves (now Atlanta)
minor league in 1964-1967,

although he never got to play
in the majors

¢ Obtained a Master of Sci-
ence degree in Education
Administration from Manka-
to State University in 1974

e Taught locally in the
classroom at SAC from 1961-
1968

e Served as an administra-
tor at SAC from 1968-1975

e Vice principal at R M
Bailey from 1975-1977 and
acting principal from 1977-

978

e Principal at Aquinas Col-
lege from 1978-1993

e Acting principal at A F
Adderley from 1993-1994

e Served as the longest
president of the Bahamas
Amateur Basketball Associa-
tion from 1966-1983.










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e Founded the Bahamas
Association of Basketball
Officials (BABO) in 1968

e First FIBA certified ref-
eree for the English speaking
Caribbean after he refereed
at the Central American and
Caribbean Championships in
Cuba in 197

e Founding member and
president of the Bahamas
Association of Former and
Present Professional Baseball
Players.

e Inducted into the Min-
nesota State University
Mankato in 2004 when he was
presented with the Distin-
guished Alumni Achievement
Award.

My condolences to his
entire family. May his soul
rest in peace.

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FROM page 15

stated,” Seymour said.

“T don’t know where this thing about a sus-
pension or probation came from. They are
only trying to blow this thing up more than it
is because they lost money on what they call a
big night when two top teams were supposed
to meet. But we didn’t have enough players to
play and so we lost the game by default.”

As far as the constitution is concerned, Sey-
mour said a team is allowed three defaults,
but they are not allowed to have two back-
to-back. He said they have a game scheduled
to play on Friday and they will show up to
play that game.

“The Mighty Mitts defaulted a game the
other day and nobody made no noise,” Sey-
mour said. “Two girls teams lost by default
and nobody made any noise. I think because
it’s the Truckers, everybody was making an
issue out of it.”

“When was the last time a Nassau team
went anywhere,” Seymour asked. “They are
only worrying about themselves. They have
to start worrying about the players. They are
upset because they might have lost a big night,
but things happened.”

Seymour said the NPSA knows that his team
was struggling to get players out. He said three
of their players had to work, but they came late
and about five of them played in a number of
softball games in other leagues, so the players
might have been tired.

“It’s not the first ttrme something like this has
happened on a Saturday night,” he said. “The
last Saturday we played, I only had 10 players
and one had to leave.”

The NPSA, according to Fernander, is
preparing to wind down its regular season so
that they can start the playoffs as they march
towards the BSF’s National Round Robin in
November.

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Former boxer ‘Kid Nassaw’
plans to form amateur club

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

REMEMBER the name
Leroy ‘Kid Nassau’ Brown?

The former light welter-
weight champion, who domi-
nated the local scene back in
the days when Oswald ‘Elisha
Obed’ Ferguson was making
a name for himself, has resur-
faced, but this time to give
back to the sport of boxing.

Brown, a 61-year-old recov-
ering drug addict with the

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Leroy Brown to stage exhibition
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Bahamas Association of
Social Health (BASH) for the
past 16 months, is planning
to form his own amateur box-
ing club.

He has already started the
facility on the site that used to

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host BASH’s car wash off
Columbus Drive in Chip-
pingham, but is in need of
some additional material to
complete the wooden struc-
ture.

During BASH’s Earth Vil-
lage Fun Day on Monday,
October 12, Brown will rein-
troduce himself to the public
as he stages an amateur exhi-
bition boxing show.

“We’re going to show the
people what we have to
offer,” Brown said. “Ray
Minus Jr is assisting me. He
will put down a boxing ring
that we will use and he will
bring some of his boxers to
compete.”

Kid Nassau, as he was
affectionately called, was one
of the top local boxers along
with Obed and Baby Boy
Rolle. But he would be the
first to tell you that he was
the best in his time, having
posted an impressive record
of 29-1.

“They really didn’t recog-
nise me back then,” said
Brown, whose only loss was
against an American in Mia-
mi, Florida. “I wasn’t in con-
dition when the people called
me for that fight.”

Having fought and defeat-
ed just about all of the big
name fighters whom Obed
was matched against, Brown
said he decided to quit after a
fight between himself and
Obed was canceled.

“He and his trainers
watched me and they said I

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LEROY BROWN (shown) is planning to form his own amateur boxing club inside this wooden building...

was too heavy to fight Obed,”
said Brown, who noted that at
the time he was just one
pound over the weight limit.

“We fought guys who were
20-30 pounds heavier than we
were. I was a junior mid-
dleweight and he was a wel-
terweight, but they used it as
an excuse because they didn’t
want him to lose.”

After the fight was called
off, Brown hung up his box-
ing gear and he walked away
from the sport.

However, he continued in
his latter years to watch the
sport that he perfected more
as a technician. But he found
the urge to come back and
give back to the sport.

“T had the style like Cas-
sius Clay. I was the crowd

pleaser,” Brown recalled.
“That was why everybody
wanted me to fight.”

Through his boxing club,
Brown said he intends to
bring back the art of the
sport.

“The only thing I see out
there is the brute force. The
man who can punch the hard-
est win. But they want to see
something that they can
enjoy,” Brown said.

“Although I got strung out
on drugs, I came back, thanks
to BASH. Now I can con-
tribute to my immediate com-
munity and society.”

Brown is encouraging any
and all young men who have
an interest in boxing to come
out and participate in the
gym, which he hopes to have



LEROY BROWN (right) with Wesley Finlayson outside the wooden structure on the site that used to host
BASH’s car wash off Columbus Drive in Chippingham...

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completed after they have
acquired the much-needed
material and equipment.

“We need boxing bags,
training gloves, head gears,
skipping ropes, mouth pieces,
cups to protect the groins,
speed bags and a few more
items,” he said.

“T’m appealing to the pub-
lic to be a part of this by lend-
ing a helping hand.”

Already BASH has gotten
a lot of support from Premier
Importers and the New Prov-
idence Community Church in
getting the structure to near
completion.

However, Brown said they
are still looking for corporate
Bahamas to assist in provid-
ing them with plywood,
cement and a rug to put on
the floor once it’s completed.

Interested persons can con-
tact Brown or Wesley Fin-
layson, the marketing and
media liaison for
BASH/Earth Village at 356-
2274.

Finlayson, a cousin of
Alpheus ‘Hawk’ Finlayson,
said they are throwing their
full support behind Brown in
his venture into getting the
gym opened.

“He’s been an inspiration
to all of us,” Finlayson said.
“He’s been a role model,
someone who’s been there
and done that and is moving
on. ’'m very proud of him and
this is his way of giving back
to the community. So I feel
good about it. I think after
the gym opens, it’s going to
be good.”

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THE TRIBUNE

| THURSDAY,

Champio
Truckers put
on probation

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

PAGE

Rain delays

BAISS softball
game between
SAC and NCA...

F
i=

i

ts ©

2009



I

SEPTEMBER 24,



Photos: Felipé MajorTribune staff

THE New Providence Softball Association (NPSA)
has placed the defending champions Commando Securi-
ty Truckers on probation after they defaulted a live tele-
vision game against the Heavy Lift Dorsey Park Boyz that
was set to be played on Saturday night.

As aresult, a number of dedicated fans were disgrun-
tled. So in an effort to lure them back to the park, Fer-
nander said the NPSA designated Tuesday and Wednes-
day as fan appreciation nights when softball lovers were
able to watch the game free of charge.

Calling the default an embarrassment for the league,
NPSA president Sidney ‘Bobby Baylor’ Fernander said
they are not going to showcase the Truckers in any radio
or television game, nor will they “recommend them for
any national team consideration.”

“We will hope that the BSF (Bahamas Softball Feder-
ation) will uphold what we do because we will not rec-
ommend them for any national team consideration,” he
said.

“Any team traveling out of New Providence going
anywhere, they will not be recommended for team play
based on our sanctions that we will put on them.”

But Truckers manager Perry Seymour said it’s not fair
to his team because they didn’t do anything wrong, except
lose a game by default.

“With a defaulted game, the constitution states that you



THE Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools’ ‘09 softball season got started yesterday.
But at St Augustine’s College, the senior boys’ game between the Big Red Machine and the Nassau Chris-
tian Academy Crusaders was stopped in the bottom of the fifth inning when the rain came pouring down.
The game was tied 11-11 when it was halted by plate umpire Michael Hanna. As the seven-inning game
was not official, it will have to continue from that point at a date to be announced.

¢ SOME of the players can be seen in action here and on page 13

EXTRA

are allowed to pay a $50
fine and you are rein-

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

VINCENT Lloyd Fergu-
son, who was battling prostate
cancer, died at his home while
having breakfast yesterday
morning.

The former teacher/admin-
istrator, sporting icon and
sports administrator extraor-
dinaire just celebrated his 71st
birthday on August 25.

Winston ‘Tappy’ Davis,
who had a long affiliation with
Ferguson, broke down when
he was asked to describe his
former friend and teammate.

“It’s so sad that he had to
leave us,” said Davis, who
tried to contain himself.
“Vince was a straight forward
intelligent, honest and hard
working individual.

“He believed in everything
he was into and he cared a
whole lot about it. I never
knew that people had the
kind of passion and commit-
ment in what they did the way
Vince did.”

Davis and Ferguson were a
part of an historic committee
that was commissioned by the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture to put together the
history of the game of bas-
ketball in the country.

The committee was sched-
uled to meet again today.

Tom ‘the Bird’ Grant, who
was also a part of the com-
mittee, said the Bahamas has
certainly lost a giant of a man.

“He was a no nonsense
man period,” Grant stated.
“He did all he could for
sports, but he was an individ-
ual all by himself. He wasn’t
one to follow the crowd.

“He did things his way. At
times we couldn’t see eye to
eye, but I knew he meant
well. We were going down the

SHERWIN
WILLIAMS.

SEE page 13



VINCENT FERGUSON

same road. It’s just that we
did it on different paths. That
was just Vince.”

Basketball standout Reggie
Forbes, who shaped his life
after his disciplinarian men-
tor, said it’s a sad day for
sports.

“Vince was one of the rare
Bahamians, real men, an icon,
who has served the Bahamas
in many capacities, both aca-
demically, athletically, social-
ly and has made immeasur-
able contributions to the
building of our nation,”
Forbes said.

“Today is a sad day. It caus-
es us to reflect on the contri-
bution he has made and the
impact he has made in the
lives of both men and women.
To me, he has made an
invaluable contribution in my
life as I developed through
the ranks of playing basket-
ball.”

Having had the pleasure of
working with him as a teacher
at Aquinas College, Forbes,
now the Dean of Student
Affairs at SAC, said Fergu-
son always tried to get the
best of everybody he came in
contact with.

With ColorSnapâ„¢, you can discover how coordinating



“To his wife and children,
God knows best. Just hold on
and be strong,” he said. We
just wish that his legacy will
live on in each of them.”

Ferguson had a storied
career.

It began as a multiple ath-
lete at St Augustine’s College,
to his collegiate days at St
Anselm’s College, to his pro-
fessional baseball sting with
the Milwaukee Braves, to his
return home as a high school
administrator, to his latest
role as the founder of the
Bahamas Association of For-
mer and Present Professional
Baseball Players, and his con-
tribution on the committee
for the history of basketball
in the country.

Ferguson leaves behind his
beloved wife Marie and his
two children, Anne-Marie
and Vincent Alex.

¢ See column (Stubbs’
Opinion) on page 13 for more
on Ferguson’s achievement

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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





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spurcitl \Yeitiiey yee |

Includes ill Fi Pee ere ee ed

Summer



LOCAL NEWS

YOUNG Bahamian Marine Scientists
(YBMS), an educational component of the Dan-
guillecourt Project, hosted a seven-day summer
camp on Little Farmers Cay, Exuma.

Seventeen students between the ages of 10 and
18 attended the camp, where they were intro-
duced to different aspects of the Bahamian envi-
ronment. The mornings were spent in the class-
room discussing and learning the important facts
about each daily topic. Afternoons were spent
outdoors in the field.

Nikita Shiel-Rolle, director and founder of
YBMS, said: “For many of these students it was
their first time putting on a mask and snorkel,
their first time swimming with sharks in 70 feet of
water, their first teme walking through mangrove
creeks where they identified the four different
types of mangroves and their first time making the
connection that these same mangroves act as
nurseries to countless juvenile creatures which,
when grown, relocate onto nearby coral reefs.”

Each day brought a new topic of discussion
and adventure. A full day was dedicated to inva-
sive species where lionfish were the focus. Com-
munity members accompanied the students on a
lionfish hunt after the morning discussion which
addressed the environmental threats associated
with this predator. The day ended with a grill-out
on the Farmer’s Cay government dock where
fishermen, who just hours before swore that they
would never consume the deadly creature,
cracked jokes and savoured the white meat of
the lionfish. The summer camp would not have
been complete without a trip to the Exuma Cays
Land and Sea Park, a protected area established
by the Bahamas National Trust in 1959. Students
visited the park’s headquarters on Warderick
Wells and learned about the importance of
marine conservation and the spill-over effect,
gaining an understanding of how wildlife in these
protected areas can flourish resulting in an abun-
dance of species that will eventually take up res-
idence outside the designated protected area.

Upon exploring the area, the group saw the
skeleton of a sperm whale that had died as a
result of pollution, and observed hutia, the largest
native mammal in the Bahamas, as well as arti-



STUDENTS
between the
ages of 10
and 18
attended the
camp, where
| they were
introduced to
| different

| aspects of

| the Bahamian
| environment.

facts left from the days of the Loyalists’ occupa-
tion.

Stromatolites, ancient microbial reefs unique to
the Exuma cays, were another topic of study.

These living layered outcrop structures called
stromatolites date back to the origins of the plan-
et, when their photosynthetic properties were
attributed to creating Earth’s atmosphere.

Students visited the Danguillecourt Project’s
research lab located on Little Darby Island where
Dr Pamela Reid of the University of Miami along
with researchers from 12 other institutions, includ-
ing NASA, are conducting ground-breaking sci-
entific studies.

On the last day of the YBMS summer camp
students gave a presentation to the local com-
munity highlighting the events of the week. Gov-
ernment officials from George Town, Great Exu-
ma, made the trip to Little Farmers Cay along
with residents from neighbouring cays. The stu-
dents’ demonstrations included poetry about the
invasive lionfish, a song about coral reefs and a
dance illustrating the four mangrove communities.

In closing remarks, the visiting George Town
administrator said that YBMS camps should be
duplicated in every local fishing community. He
added that it was particularly nice to have
Bahamians running this programme as opposed
to having foreigners educating us about our coun-
try. The 2009 YBMS summer programme was
run by George Allen, Kristal Ambrose, Nikita
Shiel-Rolle and Ryan Winder — all Bahamians
who are between the ages of 19 and 23.

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THE TRIBUNE







JOHN DELANEY

‘The perfect
location’ for
the wealthy,
companies

* Top attorney says
Bahamas ‘can compete
more effectively than
any other international
financial centre’ in
attracting companies,
high net-worths to base
themselves here as
primary domicile

* Investment to ‘stay in the
game’ increasing, but
lawyer confident Bahamas
has ‘wherewithal’
to compete

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas “can com-
pete more effectively than any
other international financial
centre” when it comes to
attracting companies and
high-net worth individuals to
use this nation as their pri-
mary operational base, a lead-
ing attorney said yesterday,
asserting that this nation has
“the wherewithal to stay in
the game”.

John Delaney, managing
partner at Higgs & Johnson,
urged attendees at a seminar
organised by his law firm to
“not believe the doomsayers”
who claimed that the
Bahamas was finished as an
international financial services
centre due to the concerted,
and increasing attacks on such
jurisdictions by the G-
20/OECD grouping.

Warning that the Bahamas
“must invest more in educa-
tion” if its international finan-
cial services sector was to sur-
vive and grow market share,
Mr Delaney said: “There is a
place in the world for an
international financial centre
that maintains alignment with
evolving standards, and is pre-
pared to invest in human cap-
ital and infrastructure in what
is a highly competitive envi-
ronment.

“The space is getting small-
er and smaller, and the invest-
ment needed to stay in the
game has increased signifi-
cantly. More and more are
falling by the wayside, but I
believe we have the where-

SEE page 4B

Tors and/or omission

from the daily report,
i



THURSDAY,

ine

SEPTEMBER 24,



y fy

Top attorney
is charged
with money
laundering

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

prominent

Bahamian attor-

ney was yesterday

indicted in the

US on allegations
that he helped to knowingly laun-
der hundreds of thousands of dol-
lars in proceeds from an invest-
ment fraud, after being seemingly
being caught in a Federal Bureau
of Investigation (FBI) ‘sting’ oper-
ation.

Sidney Cambridge, an attorney
and partner with Callender’s &
Co, was named as a defendant
along with the former vice-mayor
of Broward County and Broward
County Commissioner, Josephus
Eggelleton, in an indictment
unveiled yesterday by the US Dis-
trict Attorney’s Office for south
Florida in connection with a mul-
ti-year FBI investigation into pub-
lic sector corruption in the Miami
area.

Mr Cambridge did not return
Tribune Business’s calls seeking
comment before press deadline
yesterday, despite this newspaper
leaving detailed messages on his
cell phone and with his assistant
asking for an urgent reply.

However, his indictment is like-
ly to stun many in Nassau’s legal
circles, where he is held in high
regard for his ability and integrity.
The Callender’s & Co attorney
and partner is well-known in both
legal and political circles, having
served as vice-chair of the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party (PLP).

He is also the attorney repre-
senting CLICO (Bahamas) liq-
uidator Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez
in that liquidation, and is also act-

Cable attacks
‘flawed’ retail
price analysis

* BISX-listed firm says own
analysis shows cable TV
and Internet prices 28%
and 118% lower than
Caribbean regional
average

* Warns that programming
costs up 95% in 15 years,
with other operating
expenses up 200%, to
justify basic cable
TV fee rise

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Cable Bahamas has argued
that a ‘benchmarking’ exer-
cise designed to justify retail
price regulation in the
Bahamian communications
industry “is flawed and does
not provide a valid basis” for
regulating either its cable TV
or Internet services, arguing
that its prices for the latter
market are 118 per cent below
the Caribbean average.

In its response to the
request for feedback on retail
price regulations for the
Bahamian communications
sector, the BISX-listed utility
provider said its own “more
comprehensive” benchmark-
ing exercise showed that its
prices for cable TV, Internet
and other data services were
below Caribbean compara-
tives.

SEE page 9B

* Callender’s & Co partner,
and PLP vice-chair,
indicted in Miami

* Co-accused bragged of
allegedly helping to fund
raise for ex-PM Christie’s
2007 election campaign

ing for Mr Gomez in another
prominent court-supervised liq-
uidation, that involving Leaden-
hall Bank & Trust.

There is nothing to suggest that
Callender’s & Co has done any-
thing wrong, and the firm is not
named in the indictment relating
to Mr Cambridge. Mr Cambridge
is understood to still be in the
Bahamas, although all his fellow
defendants appeared in court in
Miami yesterday.

The indictment alleged that FBI
undercover agents made contact
with Eggelleton in February 27,
2006, then donated a $5,000
cheque to one of his charities.
Eggelleton then allegedly said, on
May 30, 2006, to an FBI agent and
‘cooperating witness’: “If you
wanna do some deals in the
Bahamas, let me know.

“Yes sir. In fact, I’m gonna be
raising some money for the Prime
Minister of the Bahamas that’s
running for re-election.” That
appears to imply that he was
going to donate to the PLP’s 2007
election campaign, although there
is nothing to suggest the party or
Mr Christie did anything wrong
in relation to this or the situation

SEE page 8B



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Sandals exec
blasts Exuma
Chamber boss

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A SENIOR Sandals executive has
blasted the Exuma Chamber of Com-
merce’s president for making the most
“inappropriate, misplaced and unpro-
fessional” demands of the resort chain
that he has ever seen, in relation to
its plans for re-opening the Emerald
Bay resort.

Floyd Armbrister, the Chamber’s
president, in a September 10, 2009,
communication sent to senior Sandals
executives had demanded that they
answer a number of questions, and
provide details, on the resort chain’s
plans for the Emerald Bay resort,
warning that he could not simply stand
by and watch “the total disregard” for
the island’s business community.

He also railed at the alleged “rape
and pillage” of Exuma’s economy by
previous investors who had failed to
deliver on their promises.

Mr Armbrister, in a communication
obtained by Tribune Business, said he
was “surprised at the lack of informa-
tion being provided to the local com-
munity to date”, saying what Exumi-
ans knew of Sandals plans had come
from the media and a press release.

He added that he had been unsuc-
cessful in contacting Gordon ‘Butch’
Stewart, Sandals’ chairman, as had
others, in seeking to learn how they
could help Sandals, but added that the
‘word on the street’ regarding the
resort chain’s plans “does not seem
very positive”.

Stating that he was “elated that Exu-
ma, the Bahamas was to be beauty
behind it all” when it came to San-
dals’ latest resort acquisition, Mr Arm-
brister wrote: “I am aware of the
repeated rape and pillage of the Exu-
ma economy in the past.

“Many have come, they have got
concessions and did not perform for
the concessions received. All that the
Government gives belongs to the peo-
ple, and thus makes the people
investors in the company receiving the
concessions.

“As president of the Exuma Cham-
ber of Commerce, I cannot stand and
watch the total disregard for the busi-

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ness community by any individual or
group...... The Chamber expects to get
a return phone call. We expect that
with this acquisition that your corpo-
rate social responsibility would lead
you to honour the triple bottom line:
people, planet, profits.”

Mr Armbrister then demanded that
Sandals disclose a variety of details
regarding its plans, including the total
dollar value of concessions it was
receiving from the Government; how
many non-Bahamians it was planning
to bring in; whether Bahamian con-
struction workers would be employed
in upgrades to Emerald Bay; when
staff would be hired and trained; and
how non-local staff would be housed.

Other demands related to Sandals’
plans for water sports and ground
transportation; its “vision for the com-
munity”; its “attitude towards local
people; and its expectations of them.

The concern generated by letters
such as Mr Armbrister’s is that the
content could potentially scare away
prospective investors in the Bahamas,
although there is no sign of this hap-
pening with Sandals.

However, the resort chain may now
be wondering about the quality of the
reception it will get in some circles in
Exuma, despite having effectively res-
cued the island’s economy by acquir-
ing Emerald Bay - for a price believed
to be in the $20-$30 million range -
more than two years after it was
placed in receivership under the pre-
vious ownership.

In a withering response to Mr Arm-
brister, Sandals’ director of operations,
Shawn DaCosta, wrote to the Exuma
Chamber president on September 11,
2009, to express “displeasure” over
the previous day’s letter following his
conversation with Mr Stewart.

“We have worked with various
Chambers of Commerce throughout
the world, but never in all the years of
our operation have I seen opening dis-
cussion so inappropriate, misplaced
and unprofessional as yours,” Mr
DaCosta wrote.

“Need I remind you that one hotel
has already failed on this island, which

SEE page 8B

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





‘Playing a role’ in stopping loss

DURING a training ses-
sion this morning, I had to
deal with a recruit who we
will call ‘Jeff. Jeff was
stronger and more aggres-
sive than his partner, who
we will call ‘Peter’. As the
various drills were given out,

I observed how Jeff would
throw and toss Peter around
the floor as if he was a rag
doll. On the other hand,
when the roles were
switched unexpectedly, the
rough and aggressive
response was not given. Jef-

fs action became more
aggressive to the point
where I had to step in and
admonish him about his
actions, which in my opinion
equated to abuse. However,
in Jeff’s opinion he was not
doing anything wrong, as he

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felt that he was in control
and stressed the fact that
Peter was doing the same
thing.

Jeff’s perspective is what
he operated on, so he made
a decision to act accordingly.
If this action was not
checked, the end result
could have been injury. We
are observing various behav-
1ours in our society that, for
whatever reason, are going
unchecked. They are being
allowed to fester and grow.
Compounding this is that
what we believe is unusual,
dangerous and unsafe, based
on our norms and culture, is
not necessarily the case. We
are seeing before us the evo-
lution of a very different
Bahamas. The sleepy island
has awakened, and the per-
ception of risks to survival is
being met head on with the
same violent and aggressive
force.

Unfortunately, those of us
who hold fast to now ancient
and historic beliefs are not
taking the necessary steps to
reduce the potential for
large-scale loss that may
result from our inaction or
disregard. We prefer to sing
and hold prayer services in
our attempt to pacify the
eruption around us. Not
good enough, so sorry!
Agreed, prayer can move
mountains, but who is going
to move if everybody is
down on their knees pray-
ing.
Now, we all have our own
way of managing events, be
they loss or criminal in
nature. Who is to say which
is the right way or, as some
would say, reasonable. One
thing for certain is that
choosing not to do some-
thing or ignoring the event is
action within itself.

The time is long past, in
my opinion, for peace rallies
and prayers that are not
backed or supported by spe-
cific actions to change

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behaviour. The change in
behaviour is not limited to
the would-be-criminal but,
more importantly in my
opinion, this change is for us
who are at risk. How do we
reduce the risk of loss and
crime? Risk, too, is relative
to culture, location, time of
day and individuals or
organisations being exposed
to the threat. Thus what we
perceive as the crime risk is
not recognised in the same
way by the police.

When I speak of the
police in this instance, I
speak regarding the organi-
sation, not any one individ-
ual. Their view, in many
instances, becomes perplex-
ing as it appears they take a
very nonchalant approach to
conditions that we believe to
be extreme. Just as Jeff’s
actions to the untrained eye
may be seen as ‘horsing
around’, the trained eye sees
him taking advantage of a
perceived weaker partner
and abusing that relation-
ship. But again this, too, is
relative as Jeff also stated he
was reacting to a threat, and
rather than seek assistance
from the authority figure
(me in this instance )m he
decided to resolve this issue
his way.

Is Jeff wrong for this, or is
he just acting the part that
he has so efficiently been
taught over the last 18 or so
years. Can we blame him or
any other individual com-
pletely for actions that
essentially have brought
them this far in life. No, we
cannot, but we as a society
must take part of the blame,
and incarceration and hang-
ings cannot be our escape.

It is false to think that we
can live in a society free of
crime and loss, since both
have been with us since time
began. Loss is associated
with the removal of cher-
ished possessions or people,
and crime relates to the
means by which the event
occurred.

Bear in mind that all
crime is loss, but not all loss
is crime. For example, loss
resulting from a hurricane,
floods and other naturally-



occurring events is not
crime. However, loss from
stealing, rape and murder is
crime. Many work-related
incidents, such as extended
lunch hours and tardiness,
are also loss events.

We must also consider
that crimes such as driving
without the proper vehicle
inspection certificate or
licensing are also crimes, but
because they are seen as
minor threats to safety they
are regularly disregarded.
Yet as the story described
earlier, if they go unchecked
they create a breeding
ground for more serious
offences. What can be done
about this? Do we give up
hope or do we press on with
the ensuing battle? Unfortu-
nately, we cannot complete-
ly remove ourselves from
any of these occurrences;
they will happen in one form
or the other. With that said
we must now develop pre-
ventative and preparatory
measures so we might ade-
quately deal with them as
they occur. This is - and has
been - the premise for my
column, to recommend solu-
tions to the challenges of
crime and loss that may pre-
sent themselves.

As crime is on the minds
and, in some instances, the
hearts of many, it is only
appropriate to address these
issues and provide realistic
solutions to this dilemma.
As it pertains to loss events,
this is a bit more complex,
so preventative solutions
that pertain to management
styles will be suggested. A
‘no rules’ society that is free
from defined crime; some
have dared to say is the way
to go. This ‘survival of the
fittest’? mentality would take
us back to ‘uncivilised’ and
chaotic times, very similar to
the times we are living now
here in the Bahamas.

NB: Gamal Newry is the
president of Preventative
Measures, a loss prevention
and asset protection training
and consulting company,
specialising in policy and
procedure development,
business security reviews
and audits, and emergency
and crisis management.
Comments can be sent to
P.O. Box N-3154 Nassau,
Bahamas or e-mail
ghewry@gmail.com or visit
us at www.preventativemea-
sures.net

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 3B



Port urged to stop
licensing realtors

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Real Estate
Association’s (BREA) presi-
dent yesterday urged the
Grand Bahama Port Author-
ity (GBPA) to stop issuing
persons with real estate
licences, arguing that this was
creating unfair competition in
the Freeport market and
leave consumers exposed.

William Wong told Tribune
Business: “For several years
now, we’ve been trying to get
the Port Authority not to
issue persons with licences to
sell real estate because they’re
not mandated to do so. They
can issue licences, but not for
the selling of real estate.
They’re unleashing untrained
people on the market in
Freeport.”

Mr Wong said the issue was
causing BREA’s 70-plus
members in Freeport and
Grand Bahama “a lot of frus-
tration and a lot of stress, and
it’s been going on for at least
the last 10 years.”

The BREA president said
that for the last four to five
years, the organisation had
been trying to get the Port
Authority to recognise it as
the only licensing body for
realtors in Grand Bahama
and Freeport, but without suc-
cess.

Mr Wong said BREA’s
position was that the 1995
Real Estate Act empowered
it as the sole boy to licence
practising realtors throughout
the Bahamas - including
Freeport and Grand Bahama.
The profession, he added, had
been placed on par with the



WILLIAM WONG

likes of architects, doctors and
attorneys in terms of being
able to self-regulate.

“For anyone to practice
real estate in Freeport they
need to be licensed by us,”
Mr Wong told Tribune Busi-
ness. “They [the Port Author-
ity] need to recognise this and
stop doing what they’re
doing.”

BREA said a legal opinion
on the issue that was drafted
on its behalf had been sent to
the Port Authority, but no
reply had been received.

“All the complaints we
have heard about in Freeport
recently have come from peo-
ple the Port has given a
licence to. People have been
putting themselves forward as
real estate agents and they’re
not. That’s against the law,”
Mr Wong said.

“We are trying to bring
some order to this Wild Wild
West. It’s in everyone’s inter-

“For several years now, we’ve been
trying to get the Port Authority not to
issue persons with licences to sell real
estate because they're not mandated to
do so. They can issue licences, but not
for the selling of real estate. They’re
unleashing untrained people
on the market in Freeport.”

ests for people to be licensed
so the public are protected.
We have 70-plus people in
Freeport paying dues, play-
ing by the rules, and the Port
is licensing people not play-
ing by the rules.

EFG Q Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd

Client Relationship Officer

— William Wong

“Right now, the public are
not protected.

“BREA is the only author-
ity to licence realtors any-
where in the Bahamas, and
that’s set out in an Act of Par-
liament.”

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trips and work within very tight deadlines is also a necessity.

EFG offers an attractive compensation plan that includes salary, benefits
and a bonus structure directly related to profitability. Salary will be determined
by experience, and qualifications.

Only qualified professionals should submit applications by 9th October
2009 to:

EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd
Human Resources
Centre of Commerce, 2â„¢ Floor
1 Bay Street
P.O. Box 58 6289
Nassau, The Bahamas
Fax (242) 502-5487

1M AIL he
MARATHO!





PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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WILL BE OPEN as usual

We thank you for your patronage
and apologize to our customers for
any inconvenience caused.



‘The perfect location’ for
the wealthy, companies

FROM page 1B

withal to stay in the game.”

Mr Delaney said the G-
20/OECD offensive was
aimed at controlling interna-
tional financial centres and
the offshore world, rather
than eliminating it altogeth-
er.

As a result, he advocated
that there “is a place for inter-
national financial centres”
that were able to create effi-
cient structures, aggregate

investment capital from across
the globe and send it into G-
20/OECD states. These cen-
tres also needed to be well-
regulated and have a strong
brand reputation.
“Bahamian financial insti-
tutions have been preparing
for years for this sort of thing.
Since 200, they’ve been try-
ing to ensure they have a tax
compliant book of cus-
tomers,” Mr Delaney said,
adding that banks and trust
companies regularly sought
opinions from tax attorneys
in their clients’ home coun-

NOTICE
HUDSON GLOBAL ENTERPRISES INC.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, HUDSON GLOBAL ENTERPRISES INC. is in
dissolution as of September 17, 2009.

Neofytos Nikolaou of Seychellon 14, 3067 Limassol,
Cyprus is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

WANTED

L. C. Hull & Co.
Counsel & Attorneys



We are seeking to hire a talented Attorney
to join practice in Abaco. Lawyers with 2-4
years experience, a strong record of academic
achievement, excellent writing skills, good
computer skills and experience in real property
transactions.

Please send your resume to:

mpearce_Ichull@ yahoo.com
P.O. Box AB - 20415

Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Bahamas



S.A. T. PREPARATION
CLASSES

AT KINGSWAY ACADEMY

Beginning Saturday September 26 through Saturday
December 5, 2009, Kingsway Academy will hold
S.A.T. Preparation Classes from 9:00 a.m. to
12:00 noon culminating in the writing of the S. A. T.
Examination in January. The cost is $250.00 per

person and includes all materials.

Interested persons are asked to contact the
Business Office at telephone 324-6887 / 324-6269
or the Guidance Conselor at 324-8811 or 324-3409.



"AP LOD TVS
* Aocess Points

tries to ensure structures and
solutions were compliant.

Still, the Higgs & Johnson
managing partner urged: “We
must act. Nature has proven
very unkind to those who will
not adapt to change. One
thing is certain, and that is
change. We must adapt, and
must ensure all the ingredi-
ents required for success
exist.”

Among these ingredients,
Mr Delaney suggested, were
possessing the “best talent”,
which meant the Bahamas
“must invest more in educa-
tion that we have up till now”.

The Bahamian workforce
in the financial services indus-
try also needed to be “sup-
plemented” with specialist,
skilled and high-end expatri-
ate talent, Mr Delaney sug-
gested that this nation needed
to examine its Immigration
policies and, if necessary,
make some changes if these
were not conducive to that
objective.

Other prerequisites, he sug-
gested, were improving the
administration of justice, plus
the efficiency and effective-
ness of the enforcement and
regulatory agencies.

While the Bahamas need-
ed to implement a “greater
effort” when it came to long-
term planning, and “invest
more in selling the brand”,
Mr Delaney said this nation
had the “potential to be the
location of choice” for com-

panies who wanted to move
their operational base and
substantial activities offshore,
plus high net-worth individu-
als wanting to use this juris-
diction as their primary domi-
cile.

“That is an area where we
can compete more effectively
than any other international
financial centre,” Mr Delaney
said, pointing out that the
Bahamas’ 20-plus inhabited
islands created “ample room
for high-end residential devel-
opments”.

This nation’s location, close
to US metropolitan areas and
in the US east coast time
zone, meant that the Bahamas
was “ideal” as a base for both
companies and high net worth
individuals.

Mr Delaney said the
Bahamas needed to “aggres-
sively go after” this market,
as the land purchase and
building boom it might cre-
ate would generate employ-
ment in sectors such as real
estate and construction.
Crime, though, would need
to be tackled.

“We are in a period of sig-
nificant global change that is
impacting our way of life,” Mr
Delaney said. “I have every
confidence we will be able to
survive, and every confidence
we can get the job done.”

To achieve this, the
Bahamas would need to
exploit its size and respond
with agility and efficiency.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

ALAMOSA HOLDINGS LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of
2000), ALAMOSA HOLDINGS LTD, is in dissolution. New
World Trustees (Jersey) Limited is the Liquidator and can be
contacted at Norwich Union House, 8 Church Street, St. Helier,
Jersey, JE4 OSG, Channel Islands. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
names, addresses and particular of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator before the 18th day of December, 2009.

oes Lin
Liquidator

New World Trustees (Jersey) Limited

NOTICE

OF

DRD CORPORATION LTD.

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above com-
pany commenced on the 28th day of August , 2009. Credit
Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial Centre, Shir-
ley & Charlotte Streets, PO.Box N-3023, Nassau, The Ba-

hamas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 5B





China pushing for bigger IMF role at G-20

By JOE McDONALD
AP Business Writer

BEIJING (AP) — Beijing
is pressing for a bigger voice
in the International Monetary
Fund and says Group of 20
leaders at their Pittsburgh
summit should start making
good on promises to give
developing countries more
IMF votes.

The G-20 has agreed in
principle but could face an
obstacle: European govern-
ments, which hold a big share
of the IMF board seats and
are reluctant to accept
changes that might reduce
their own status in the IMF.

“For many of them, it’s the
only way they can do some
grandstanding globally,” said
Daniel Gros, director of the
Centre for European Policy
Studies in Brussels, the center
of the 27-nation European
Union. “They don’t even
want to talk about it.”

The agenda at the Septem-
ber 24-25 summit includes
possible curbs on financial
industry pay, joint economic
policy and whether to start
winding down stimulus spend-
ing. But for China, the prize is
greater representation in the
IMF, which Beijing sees as a
way to influence global eco-
nomic policy. Working
through such a multilateral
body could help to allay
unease abroad about rising
Chinese economic and politi-
cal power.

The change holds symbolic
appeal for Beijing, rearrang-
ing a global order that dates
to World War II and signify-
ing the start of a new era.

By tradition the IMF boss is
a European, while an Ameri-
can leads its sister institution,
the World Bank. The IMF
Executive Board has eight
directors from individual gov-
ernments — the United
States, Japan, France, Britain,
Germany, China, Russia and
Saudi Arabia. Sixteen seats
are assigned to groups of
nations from the Middle East,
Caribbean and other regions,

many of them represented by
a European government such
as Ireland or Belgium.

Increasing developing
countries’ voting power might
require cutting the number of
European seats or creating
joint European Union seats.

Beijing has been unusually
assertive in pressing its
demands, reflecting its grow-
ing confidence as an econo-
my that has suffered little
damage from the worst glob-
al downturn since the 1930s.
Its banks avoided the turmoil
that battered Western
lenders, it has $2 trillion in
foreign reserves and it is
expected to be the first econ-
omy to recover from the
slump.

“We believe the Pittsburgh
summit should work toward
transferring voting power
from developed countries to
developing countries,” said a
deputy governor of China’s
central bank, Guo Qingping,
at a news conference this
week.

“At the same time, we hope
there will be more members
from developing countries in
the senior management of the
IMF,” Guo said. “This will
help to increase representa-
tion and legitimacy of the
senior management.”

Beijing wants developing
and developed countries to
have equal voting shares in
the IMF and World Bank,
said Zhu Guangyao, a deputy
finance minister. Currently,
developed countries hold 57
per cent of IMF shares and
56 per cent of World Bank
shares.

China announced Septem-
ber 2 it would buy the equiv-

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



pak

ars

N

Nassau Airport

Development Company

alent of $50 billion of the
IMP’s first bond sale. It is part
of the Fund’s effort to raise
$500 billion for lending to
economies battered by the
global downturn.

This month in London, G-
20 finance ministers reaf-
firmed the group’s promise of
reforms at the two institu-
tions. They stopped short of
committing to specific
changes but said World Bank
reforms will be completed by
the first half of 2010 and the
next IMF quota review —
which decides voting rights —
by January 2011.

In March, EU leaders
endorsed IMF reforms to
reflect “relative economic
weights in the world econo-
my” — a reference to new
economic powers such as Chi-
na, Brazil and India.

Britain, Germany and

France are confident they can
retain a leading role. But mid-
size nations such as the
Netherlands, with just 20 mil-
lion people, and Spain worry
about their status.

European politicians know
this and have hinted that
Europe could help defend its
voting share by increasing its
contribution to the new IMF
lending facility to 125 billion
euros ($180 billion) — or 35
per cent of the total.

“Maintaining a significant
share would ensure that EU
member states’ views are ade-
quately represented,” Ger-
man Finance Minister Peer
Steinbrueck and his French
counterpart, Christine
Lagarde, said in a joint state-
ment this month.

European governments are
resistant to accepting a joint
EU seat.

JOB OPPORTUNITY
Real Estate Agents

Applicants must have:

* Outstanding personality

* Current BREA license

* Minimum 2-years experience
* Proven sales record

Apply to bahamas@'kingsrealty.com
Deadline: September 30, 2009
Information; 394-4397

Nassau Airport Development Company Limited (NAD) is Seeking a Proponent or
Proponents (individual, consortium or joint venture that must include an experienced
newsstand operator) to finance, design, develop, operate and manage three newsstand,
bookstore and convenience shop lacations in the new U.S. Departures Terminal currently
under construction at the Lynden Pindling International Airport. These stores will be
world class in operation, design and appearance with a distinctive ‘sense of place’ and
will offer a broad selection of newspapers, magazines, books, sundry & convenience
items and miscellaneous gifts at competitive prices.

1 (a) NEWSSTAND/BOOKSTORE/GIFTS in the U.S, Departures lounge
(b) NEWSSTAND KIOSK/COFFEE BAR/BAR in the U.S, Departures Concourse

2 NEWSSTAND/CONVENIENCE STORE/COFFEE BAR in U.S. Check-in.

Locations 1a) and 1[b) must be bid together. NAD will consider individual proposals for

I(a\'(b) and 2 above or combined proposals for all locations.

Mandatory qualifications

i. Proponents must be Bahamian and incorporated in The Bahamas.

li, Proponents must have operated a similar newsstand/books/gifts facility within
the last three (3) years.

NAD’S goals and objectives are to:
(a) achieve a high standard of excellence and customer service:
(b) offera mixof concepts that will help to enhance the image of LPIA as. a world

class airport;

(c) offer retail and food & beverage choices to passengers at fair prices;
(d) offer a mixof local, regional and national and intemational brand-name

companies:

(e) develop and design retail facilities that complement the qualities of the new
terminal while recognizing the distinctive spirit, character and ‘sense of place’

of The Bahamas; and

(f) optimize revenue to NAD,



“We need to have a Euro-
pean leader who is basically
bold enough to overcome this
impasse” and persuade Euro-

peans to a reduction in their
representation, Gros said.
“But before that happens,
many years could pass.”

4 Sa DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life

Vacancy: Physician Liaison Officer

Physician Liaison:

Position: Responsible for the support of the development of clinical information
systems that assist physicians in the delivery of patient care. Participates as a
member of the MIS department in representing the needs and requirements of the
physician community and serves as an advocate of management in promoting the
use of information technology in the clinical setting. Works in partnership with
Physician Care Management Design and Implementation Teams to translate
clinician requirements into specifications for new clinical systems.

¢ Helps lead, and facilitate clinician advisory groups in the design of clinical
systems to support excellence in patient care. Engages patient care providers with
varying roles including physicians, nursing practitioners, nursing staff, ancillary
department personnel, & medical records professionals to contribute to the
development and use of the clinical information system. Develops empathy &
understanding of physician needs & builds relationships with physicians to gain

support of IT initiatives.

¢ Review medical information trends, experiences and approaches helps develop
technical and application implementation strategies and assists in the development
of strategic plans for clinical information systems.

Education & Experience: PhD qualification in medicine or a related
clinical background. (no physician licensing necessary for the post)

Special Range of Skills: Possess excellent interpersonal skills and can work
effectively with a diversity of personalities. Must be approachable, show respect for
others and be able to present data with effective communication and presentation
skills. Must be an effective consensus builder. Possess a good grasp of clinician
work flow in both inpatient and outpatient settings, interest in clinical information

system and outcomes measurement.

Please submit resume to: Human Resources Department | Doctors Hospital
P.O. Box N-3018 | | Nassau, Bahamas | or Email: info@doctorshosp.com

Ww WwW W



~doctorshosp.com

REQUEST FOR
PROPOSAL

NEWSSTANDS, BOOKS, GIFTS AND
CONVENIENCE SHOPS

Qualified and interested parties may pick-up the Request for Proposal package at NAD's
offices at the reception desk on the second floor Domestic/International Terminal at
Lynden Pindling International Airport between the hours of 9:00am and 4:00pm, from
September 15th to September 28th, 2009, A mandatory pre-proposal briefing for
those who have picked up packages will be held in the Arawak Lounge at the Airport on
Wednesday, September 30th at 10:00am.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 7B

Small business
angst rises as
tax deadline
draws near

By JOYCE M
ROSENBERG
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) —
These are anxious times for
some small business owners
who face an October 15 due
date for their 2008 income tax
returns. These owners got
extensions of the deadline for
filing their returns back in
April but aren’t ready to file.
Or, they can’t pay the gov-
ernment the money they owe.

Some of them are just dis-
organised. Others might be
having a cash flow crunch.

No matter what the prob-
lem is, if you’re one of these
owners, you must submit your
return by the deadline or face
big penalties for late filing.
And not filing your return will
only prolong the agony.

If your issue is disorganisa-
tion, it’s time to rethink not
just how you’re running your
taxes, but your overall busi-
ness. And maybe more than
that.

“My observation of these
types of people is that it’s not
just their business that runs
this way, it’s their life,” said
Gordon Spoor, a certified
public accountant in St Peters-
burg, Florida.

Despite the availability and
simplicity of software that
helps small businesses keep
their books and compile their
tax returns, many of these
owners have piles of receipts,
invoices and statements that
they bundle up and take to
their CPAs or tax lawyers
each year. Tax professionals
call these owners “shoebox
clients,” and many preparers
don’t want to work with them,
especially since they tend to
show up right before the filing
deadline looking for service.

The solution for these own-
ers is clear: Get help, either
from software, or get some-
one else to help you keep
your accounts year-round.
There are good, even critical
reasons for doing this. Spoor
pointed out that a CPA who
charges a client $300 an hour
for tax prep will also charge
$300 an hour to sort through
piles of receipts and invoices.
That is money badly spent.

Moreover, a disorganised
owner often doesn’t have a
good handle on how the busi-
ness is doing, and that could

“My observation of
these types of people
is that it’s not just
their business that
runs this way,
it’s their life.”

— Gordon Spoor, certified

be a threat to the company’s
survival.

Some business owners just
don’t want to work with com-
puters. Gregg Wind, a CPA
with Wind Bremer Hocken-
berg LLP in Los Angeles,
suggests some easy, low-tech
organisation tips: “If you do
nothing else, set up folders
and drop invoices in there.”

The good news is there is
still time to sort through the
paper, input the data into a
programme and get it to a tax
professional. It may take a
day or two, but it'll save mon-
ey in the long run.

If your papers are so disor-
ganised that you have many
missing checks or invoices, or
can’t figure out which receipts
go with which payments, do
the best you can. But be up-
front with the government
and tell the IRS you're filing
an estimated return. You can
always amend it in the future.

Spoor recalled the case of a
client whose disorganisation,
the result of serious personal
problems, extended back
more than a decade. When
the client, who hadn’t filed
returns during that time,
decided to settle up with the
government, many of his
records didn’t exist.

“We constructed estimates
based on what we knew,”
Spoor said. “The IRS accept-
ed it.”

October 15 is generally a
hard and fast deadline for fil-
ing a return if you’ve had an
extension. The IRS has been
known to make exceptions in

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
BAHAMAS NATIONAL DRUG AGENCY

PUBLIC NOTICE
SUPPLEMENTARY TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY

OF DRUGS AND RELATED ITEMS

Tenders are invited for the Supply of Drugs and Related
Items for the Public Hospitals Authority and the Ministry
of Health, The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

The Supplementary Tender Document, which includes
instruction to the Tenderers along with other relevant
information, can be collected from the Bahamas National
Drug Agency, Market & McPherson Streets, from
Thursday 24" , September 2009 from 9 am — 5 pm.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicated in a sealed
envelope or package identified as “Supplementary
Tender for the Supply of Drug and Related Items” and

addressed to:

Managing Director
Public Hospitals Authority
Third Terrace, West Centerville
P.O. Box N-8200

Nassau, The Bahamas

Electronic and hard copies must be received at the above
address on or before 5pm Friday, October 16%, 2009. A
copy of a valid business license and Nationals Insurance

Certificate must accompany all proposals.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to

reject any or all Tender(s).

Director

public accountant

some cases, but Spoor noted,
“being a disorganised small
business owner is not a rea-
sonable cause.”

Wind noted that e-filing, or
submitting your return to the
government online, can buy
you a little more time.

The IRS is quite clear on
its Web site, www.irs.gov,
about the reasons you should
file your return on time. “If
taxes are owed, a delay in fil-
ing may result in penalty and
interest charges that could
increase your tax bill by 25
percent or more.”

The government does rec-
ognize that not everyone can
afford to pay their taxes right
away. While it will charge
interest on taxes not paid on
time, it is willing to work out a
payment schedule.

If you owe the government
$25,000 or less in taxes, penal-
ties and interest, you can
apply to set up an installment
agreement. There are several
ways to do this. One is to
download and complete IRS
Form 9465, Installment
Agreement Request. Or, you
can use the Online Payment
Agreement Application at
www.irs.gov/individuals/arti-
cle/0,,id149373,00.html.

However, if you can pay
the IRS your entire bill with-
in 120 days, the agency says
you can avoid the fees for set-
ting up an agreement. You
need to call an IRS toll-free
number, 1-800-829-1040 to
arrange for this option.

If you owe the government
more than $25,000, you may
need to complete Form 433-F,
Collection Information State-
ment, which asks for infor-
mation including your assets,
liabilities and income.

Whatever the reason for an
owner’s October 15 anxiety,
it’s a good idea to meet with
an accountant or other finan-
cial adviser to figure out how
to prevent it from becoming
an annual occurrence. Since
the year is nearly three-quar-
ters over, “people should be
thinking about getting organ-
ised for next year’s tax plan-
ning,” Wind said.

“And if they’re going to
talk to a CPA about 2008,
they should spend a few min-
utes talking about 2009,” he
said.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





TEAK FURNITURE
Â¥* SALE xx

10-50% OFF

Gifts, Handicrafts & Batik Clothing
Sept. 26th - 24th Oct.
OPEN 10am - 5pm

KURA KURA

26 Virginia St., Tel: 325 - 1389

1 bik west of Hilton hotel enirance, in large two storey
ene building, on one a westbound street



UE aL 0 UT
MAS RCL
US eT are ACL

GN-919

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF

THE REAL PROPERTY TAX
ACT, 1969

Pursuant to Section 7(2) of the Real Property Tax Act, 1969, as amended,
the Chief Valuation Officer hereby gives notice:-

(a) that copies of the assessment list are available as required by
subsection (4) of Section 7 of the Real Property Tax Act, 1969
(hereinafter in this notice referred to as the Act) and may be
inspected at the Valuation Office or the Treasury, on or after 15th
October, 2009.

that a Notice of Assessment addressed to each owner of property
liable to tax under the Act is available at the Valuation Office,
located at Frederick House, Frederick Street and may be collected
there from by or on behalf of the owner of such property during
normal working hours;

that pursuant to subsection (3) of Section 7 of the Act, upon the
expiration of five (5) days after the publication of this notice, a
Notice of Assessment shall be deemed to have been served on
every owner of property liable to tax under the Act;

that without prejudice to the provision of subsection (3) of Section
7 of the Act, the Chief Valuation Officer may at any time after the
publication in the Gazette of this notice send by post, a Notice of
Assessment addressed to any owner of property liable to tax under
the Act;

That pursuant to Section 11(1) any person aggrieved by a notice
of assessment deemed to have been served under this Act may
object thereto by serving on Chief Valuation Officer within thirty
days after the date on which the notice of assessment is deemed
to have been served, a notice in writing of such objection stating
the grounds upon which he relies.

that pursuant to Section 18 of the Act (but subject to provisions of
Section 11(1)* of the Act) the tax in respect of property will be
due and payable by the owners of property not later than sixty days
after the date on which notice of assessment is deemed to have
been served. Accordingly, it is the duty of each taxpayer to ensure
that he receives a Notice of Assessment;

that the exemption has been allowed for 2009 on those properties
which have been declared as owner-occupied residences, and have
satisfied the conditions under Section 2(d) of the Real Property
Tax (amendment) Act 2009. However, owners are by law, Section
(43)(1) required to disclose to the Chief Valuation Officer any
change in the circumstances of occupation which does not entitle
the property to the exemption allowed. *(Section 43 is reproduced
below):

that pursuant to Section 7 (3) of the Act, persons receiving a Notice
of Assessment and Demand Note for the first time should therefore
examine the columns labeled ‘Current Tax’, ‘Accumulated Arrears
of Tax’ and ‘Total Now Due’, as it would indicate the amount due
for current and prior years.

that if you are a Bahamian citizen/company and own improved
property situate in New Providence or a non-Bahamian
citizen/company (less than 60 percent of shares beneficially owned
by citizens of The Bahamas) and own property situate in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and have never received a Notice
of Assessment and Demand Note, you are required by Section (10)
of the Act to make a declaration of your property not later than
31st December, 2009. Declaration forms for this purpose are
available at the Valuation Section or online at
https:/Aforms.bahamas.gov.bs and should be returned accompanied
by documentary proof of Bahamian citizenship and in the case of
a Bahamian Company, a copy of the Company’s latest annual
statement of return.

* Section 11 (1) is as follows:-

The Chief Valuation Officer shall dismiss any such objection unless the
whole of the tax payable under the Notice of Assessment shall have been
deposited with him or for good cause, the Chief Valuation Officer determines
that the objector shall be relieved of the requirements of this subsection
in whole or in part and is satisfied that the objector has complied with any
such determination which gives partial relief only.

Section 43 is as follows:-

(1) Any owner who is granted an exemption under the provisions of
Section 42(1)(f), by reason of the property qualifying as owner-
occupied property, shall where he is aware of any circumstances
or facts which do not entitle the property to the exemption disclose
to the Chief Valuation Officer those circumstances or facts;

Any owner who knowingly fails to comply with the requirements
of subsection (1) is guilty of an offense and liable on summary

conviction to a fine of one thousand dollars or to imprisonment

for a term of three months or to both such fine and imprisonment;
and the court shall upon conviction of an offender, in addition to
any other penalty imposed, order the offender to pay to the Treasurer
a sum equivalent to twice the amount of the tax which would have
been payable but for the exemption had the disclosure been made;

No limitations as to the time within which proceedings may be
brought for the prosecution of a summary offense shall apply to
proceedings under subsection (2).

Chief valuation Officer/
Controller Of Inland Revenue
Ministry Of Finance

Sandals exec
blasts Exum, with imoney

Top attorney
is charged

laundering

Chamber DOSS. «on:

FROM page 1B

resulted in hundreds of
Bahamians without their
livelihoods. This is not a path
we intend to follow, and for
that reason we will take the
time we need to ensure suc-
cess and do not welcome let-
ters such as yours.

“Not only is it impossible
to provide the information
you have asked for, it’s not
your place to ask for it. As a
businessman, I’m sure you
would take the perceived lack
of information at this present

time and exchange it for a
successful resort in the
future.”

Mr DaCosta pointed to
Sandals’ 14 years of operat-
ing in the Bahamas, and its
“strong affinity” and “deep
love for the people”.

He added that Sandals had
“continued to invest when
others have not, and the
acquisition of Sandals Emer-
ald Bay has once again
demonstrated our love for
these islands and its people.

“The success of our organ-
isation is based on a tried and

tested formula, a fundamental
part of which is sound plan-
ning. We leave nothing to
chance, and everything hap-
pens for a reason. It is due to
this that we can boast some
of the highest average occu-
pancies in the region, bene-
fiting economies and commu-
nities in which we are.”

Mr DaCosta said Sandals
was open and easy to work
with “providing one respects
the boundaries of the part-
nership, and doesn’t overstep
the mark, as has happened
here”.

Tie cle

aetna Com aT

Homes, Apartanet

UU a

Pea Le hs

DUE TO THE LACK OF A QUORUM
ALL MEMBERS Of
Bahama Islands Resorts & Casinos
Cooperative Credit Union (BIRCCCU)
Limited Are Urged To Attend The
Special Called Meeting
Which Will NOW Be Held

Date:

Saturday, October 3", 2009

Location:

Grounds Of The Credit Union

Time:
10:00 A.M.

Purpose of The Meeting:
To Discuss & Vote On The Proposed Opening

Up Of Our Bond To Allow Your Family To
Become Members Of BIRCCCU Ltd.



surrounding Mr Cambridge.

The indictment then
alleged that Eggelleton
offered to provide the under-
cover FBI agents with con-
tacts in the Bahamian finan-
cial services industry around
July 31, 2006, stating that “ in
the Bahamas, he does not
have to adhere to the ethical
restrictions he has in the Unit-
ed States”.

That offer was repeated in
October 2006, the indictment
alleged, Eggelleton the fol-
lowing month telling an
unnamed hotelier with
Bahamas connections that the
FBI agents needed help in
establishing a Bahamian bank
account and company.

However, the hotelier and
another man, referred to as
‘E.D’, who had “very good
connections in the Bahamas”,
were “frightened” and “scep-
tical” about helping Eggel-
leton and the FBI agents,
especially after the latter told
Eggelleton they wanted to
hide and launder proceeds
from a fictitious ‘fraudulent’
investment scheme.

Instead, Eggelleton alleged-
ly introduced the undercover
agents to the two other defen-
dants in the case, Joel
Williams and Ronald Owens,
who would assist them with
their banking needs.

The pair met an undercov-
er FBI agent in Nassau on
March 6, 2007. After hearing
of the need to conceal and
launder proceeds from the
fake financial fraud, Williams
was alleged to have said that
“in the Bahamas, they did not
call it money laundering as
long as the money did not
come from arms, drugs or ter-
rorists”.

Agent

Around the same time, the
FBI agent and the two defen-
dants allegedly met with Mr
Cambridge. He was said to
have provided the undercover
agent with an application
form for opening a Bahamian
International Business Com-
pany (IBC) and wiring
instructions to the attorney’s
trust account at First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas).

Then, on March 20, 2007,
the undercover agents
allegedly sent Mr Cambridge
a $100,000 wire transfer from
a Miami bank. Eight days lat-
er, the Bahamian attorney
allegedly took the FBI agent
to meet ‘S.B’, a First-
Caribbean banker, to be inter-
viewed and sign bank account
opening documents for Hexa-
gon Development.

The indictment alleged that
the undercover agent paid
$7,000 to be shared between
Mr Cambridge and the other
defendants on March 30,
2007.

From then on, Mr Cam-
bridge was alleged to have
transferred $97,000 from his
trust account to the Hexagon
Development account on
April 4, 2007, and received a
$200,000 wire transfer in May
2007. He then allegedly trans-
ferred $199,000 from the
Hexagon Development
account with FirstCaribbean
to a bank account in St Croix.

Betweeen August 30, 2007,
and November 23, 2007, Cam-
bridge was alleged to have
received three wire transfers,
valued at $200,000 each, from
the undercover agents.

“On or about November
23, 2007, at Nassau, Bahamas,
defendant Cambridge was
told by an undercover agent
that the funds came from a
‘Ponzi’ scheme,” the indict-
ment alleged. “After acknowl-
edging his understanding of
the purported source of the
funds, defendant Cambridge
instructed undercover agents
how to launder the proceeds
in the Bahamas.”

That same day, Mr Cam-
bridge was alleged to have
told the FBI agent he
received $2,000, not $1,000,
for laundering the money, and
the same day gave him a
$399,000 cheque to deposit
into the Hexagon bank
account at FirstCaribbean
International Bank
(Bahamas).

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 9B



Cable attacks ‘flawed’ retail price analysis

FROM page 1B

As a result, there was “no
justification” to introduce new
retail price regulations with
respect to any of its services
due to price level concerns,
Cable Bahamas argued.

The company compared 16
other Caribbean countries to
the monthly fee charged for
its CoralWave Jazz Internet
service, priced at $21.70, with
a download speed of 1,500
kilobytes per second and
upload of 256 kilobytes per
second.

“The average monthly sub-
scription price for compara-
ble services in the other 17
Caribbean countries surveyed

(excluding the Bahamas) is
$47.33, which is about 118 per
cent higher than Cable
Bahamas monthly price of
$21.70,” Cable Bahamas said
in its submission to the Utili-
ties Regulatory and Compe-
tition Authority (URCA).

“Looking at the price per
kilobytes, the average
(excluding the Bahamas) is
$0.039, which is about 178 per
cent higher than Cable
Bahamas’ per channel price
of $0.014. These results indi-
cate the robustness of the con-
clusion that Cable Bahamas
prices are lower.”

On the cable TV front,
Cable Bahamas used as its
benchmark its SuperBASIC

UST SELL

Re: Lot # 12, Block # 86, Richmond Park

Subdivision, Unit 3R Freeport, Grand Bahama

oes
cently Constructed Six-Plex

Re

Five Units:
One bedroom one bathroom, living and dining
area, kitchen and laundry area.

One Unit:
Four bedrooms, two bathrooms, a powder room,
living and dining room, family room, kitchen,
office and laundry room and arctic area.

Potential Income:
One bedroom units $3,250.00 per month
Four bedrooms unit $1,400.00 per month.

For conditions of sale and any
other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
@ 502-0929 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should
submit offer in writing addressed to
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
P. O. Box N-7518 Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us before October 9th, 2009

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
INTHE SUPREME COURT
Common Law & Equity Division

2009/CLE/gen/00040

BETWEEN
SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Plaintiff
AND
BARBARAA. DEVEAUX
Defendant
To: Barbara Deveuax

TAKE NOTICE that

1. An action has been commenced against you by
Scotiabank (Bahamas) limited in the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas by Writ of Summons filed on the 15th of January
2009 being Action No. 2009/CLE/ gen/00040, wherein the
Plaintiff's claim is for the total sum of $34,279.08 which
represents the principal sum of $24,266.51, accrued
interest on the said principal in the sum of $9,316.57,
add-on charges in the sum of $616.00, interest on the said
add-on charges in the sum of $127.14 and late fees in the
sum of $80.00 due under a loan numbered 1746456.

2. It has been ordered that service of the Writ of
Summons in the said action be effected on you
by virtue of this advertisement

3. You must within 21 days from the publication of this
advertisement inclusive of the day of such publication,
acknowledge service of the said Writ of Summons
by entering an Memorandum of Appearance on the
Attorneys whose name and address appear below,
otherwise judgment may be entered against you.

Dated the 22nd day of September A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Plaintiff



service that includes between
48 to 54 video channels at a
monthly price of $30.

The BISX-listed utility
provider said: “The average
monthly subscription price for
comparable services in the
other 12 Caribbean countries
surveyed (excluding the
Bahamas) is $38.39, which is
about 28 per cent higher than
Cable Bahamas’ monthly
price of $30.

“Looking at the price per
channel, the average (exclud-
ing the Bahamas) is $0.75,
which is also about 28 per
cent higher than Cable
Bahamas per channel price of
$0.60.”

To further back its case,
Cable Bahamas pointed to
the fact that Bahamian gross
domestic product (GDP) per
capita, based on purchasing
power parity, was relatively
high in the Caribbean con-
text.

In addition, the Bahamas’
population density was one
of the lowest in the region,
preventing the company from
exploiting economies of den-
sity, as it alleged that it was
further disadvantaged by hav-
ing to provide services to mul-
tiple islands - instead of the

one normally served by rivals.

Cable Bahamas then
moved to justify its case for a
rise in the $30 per month rate
for its basic cable TV pack-
age it has been forced to levy
since 1994, pointing out that
the Bahamian all-items infla-
tion index had increased by
30 per cent over the same 15-
year period.

“More specially in the case
of Cable Bahamas’ operating
costs, since 1995 Cable
Bahamas’ programming costs
per subscriber for basic cable
TV service have increased by
roughly 95 per cent,” the com-
pany said.

“Salary and benefit costs
per subscriber (for customer
service, technical and IT and
administrative personnel have
increased by over 200 per
cent, and other operating
expenses per subscriber
(including plant maintenance,
electricity, vehicles) have also
increased by over 200 per
cent.”

Cable Bahamas contrasted
this situation with what had
happened in the US, pointing
out that in response to
increased operating costs,
cable companies there had on
average increased basic TV

package fees from $22 per
month in 1995 to $49.65 in
2008, a 122 per cent increase.
Over the same period, infla-
tion, as measured by the US
consumer price index, grew
by just 38 per cent.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

“Cable Bahamas is simply
not in a position to hold basic
cable TV service price con-
stant at $30 indefinitely with-
out significant deterioration
in the quality of that service,”
Cable Bahamas said.

2009/CLE/gen/00119

Common Law & Equity Division

BETWEEN

SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

Plaintiff

AND
KELPHINE D. JOHNSON

To: Kelphine D. Johnson

TAKE NOTICE that

Defendant

1. An action has been commenced against you

by Scotiabank (Bahamas)

Umited in the Supreme

Licensing Authority

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Licensing Authority wishes to remind the public
that in accordance with the instructions issued, with
every Music and Dancing License, it is an offense to
disturb the peace in any way, whether by the volume
of the music being played in your establishment or by
the behaviour of the patrons of your establishment.

Over the past several months the Board has received
many complaints related to disturbance. Investigation
by the Police has proven that many owners and operators
of establishments are abusing their Music and Dancing
License and causing much distress to their neighbours.

The Board wishes to reiterate its policies with regard
to Music and Dancing Licenses. All establishments
holding Music and Dancing Licenses are required to
contain their music within the confines of their building
and that music should not be heard outside of the
building. Further, at no time should music be played on
the outside of the building. Recently some establishments
have circumvented these rules by applying for Occasional
Licenses covering days of the week when they wish to
move music out onto the street and to extend their hours.
In many cases their requests are submitted as medical
cookouts or promotional days and, being
accommodating, the Board has often granted these
requests only to discover subsequently that the entire
neighbourhood has been disrupted and disturbed.

The Board hereby gives notice that no further Occasional
Licenses will be given for any space directly outside
any establishment. The Board wishes to commend
owners and operators who put on promotional events
and encourage them to hold these events in public areas
designated for such events and for which there is already
in place the means by which police monitoring and
oversight can be offered. Places include Public Parks,
RM. Bailey Park, Arawak Cay, Western Esplanade,
and Goodman’s Bay and other areas approved by the
police.

The method of obtaining such license is as follows:

For liquor only: make application to Roads and Parks,
Ministry of Works and Transport or the relevant
Government agency to use the chosen site; if granted,
take this permit to the Officer in Charge of Licensing
at Police District Headquarters and request a Vendor’s
Permit.

We suggest that this be done at least one week in advance
of your function.

Upon receipt of permission from the Police, take your
documents to The Licensing Authority and you will
receive your license within two working days.

For food sold with liquor: In addition to the above,
you must also obtain a health certificate for at least two
persons and request that Environmental Health inspect
the place where the food will be prepared and issue you
a Food Vendors Permit.

For food only: Environmental Health Food Vendor’s
Permit and a Police Vendor’s Permit are required. No
permit from the Licensing Authority is required.

The Board
The Licensing Authority of New Providence



Court of The Bahamas by Writ of Summons filed on
the 30th of January 2009 being Action No. 2009/CLE/
gen/00119, wherein the Plaintiff's claim is for the total
5um of $28,367.40 which represents the principal
sum of $15,047.39, accrued interest on the said
principal in the sum of $10,751.51, add-on charges
in the sum of $912.85, and interest on the said add-
on charges in the sum of $1,655.65 due under a loan
numbered 1579053 and the principal sum of $1,118.76
due under a Mastercard No. 5449 68501002 7759.

2. It has been ordered that service of the Writ of
Summons in the said action be effected on you by virtue of
this advertisement

3. You must within 21 days from the publication of this
advertisement inclusive of the day of such publication,
acknowledge service of the said Writ of Summons
by entering an Memorandum of Appearance on the
Attorneys whose name and address appear below,
otherwise judgment may be entered against you.

Dated the 22nd day of September A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Plaintiff

ar

JUDICIAL AND LEGAL SERVICE COMMISSION
VACANCY NOTICE

Stipendiary & Circuit Magistrate
Office Of The Judiciary
New Providence & The Family Islands

Applications are invited from suitably qualified
persons for appointment as resident Stipendiary
and Circuit Magistrates in:

(a) New Providence;
(b) Abaco;

(c) Andros;

(d) Eleuthera;

(e) Exuma;

(f) Long Island.

Applicants must be members of the English, Irish,
Scottish or Bahamian Bars or of the Bar of any
country of the Commonwealth to which a member
of The Bahamas Bar is admitted without
examination. In addition, they must be at least five
(5) years in the above-mentioned countries.

The duties of the post are as set out in The
Magistrates Act Chapter 42 of the Statute Laws of
The Bahamas and all other applicable Statutes as
well as The Common Law, where applicable, and
all rules made thereunder, and all other statutory
duties which may be prescribed from time to time.

The Salary of the post is in Scale JL14 - $49,800
x 700 to 55,400 per annum, with a Responsibility
Allowance of $4,000 per annum and a Scarcity
Allowance of $7,500 per annum. Housing and
Utilities, along with a vehicle, are attached to the
positions in the Family Islands only.

Serving officers must apply through their Heads
of Departments.

Application forms may be obtained from the
Judicial & Legal Service Commission, 3rd Floor,
Ansbacher House, East Street & Bank Lane, and
should be returned to the Secretary, P.O. Box N-
167, Nassau, The Bahamas, not later than Friday,
16th October, 2009.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Asian markets lower as
monthslong rally sputters

BANGKOK (AP) —
Asian stock markets fell
Wednesday as a monthslong
rally sputtered and investors
waited for clues from the US
Federal Reserve about the
global recovery’s strength.
European shares were high-
er.

Oil prices hovered above
$71 a barrel following a big
jump overnight while the US
dollar continued to languish,
falling against the yen and
euro. Japan’s market was
closed for a national holiday.

Asian markets were invig-
orated Tuesday by the Asian
Development Bank raising its
growth forecasts for China
and India, two of the region’s
biggest economies.

Investors have piled into
Asian equities this year but
some analysts say the rally,
fueled by loose monetary pol-
icy and government stimulus
spending, has gotten ahead of
economic reality.

Markets in Europe were
higher in early trade with
benchmarks in Germany,

France and Britain up 0.5 per
cent or more.

Hong Kong’s Hang Seng
index fell 105.62, or 0.5 per
cent, to 21,595.52 and South
Korea’s Kospi dropped 7.41,
or 0.4 per cent, to 1,711.47.
Australia’s benchmark gained
1.5 per cent while China’s
Shanghai index shed 1.9 per
cent as investors cashed out
ahead of a slew of new initial
public offerings.

Elsewhere, New Zealand’s
market rose 0.2 per cent after
its economy unexpectedly

grew in the second quarter.
Singapore’s index was frac-
tionally higher and Taiwan
fell 1.9 per cent. India’s Sen-
sex was down 0.1 per cent.

“All the markets are over-
bought and people are waiting
for a reason or catalyst to take
profits,” said Peter Lai, invest-
ment manager at DBS Vick-
ers in Hong Kong.

Some economic data from
the US, the world’s largest
economy, has showed signs of
improvement but unemploy-
ment is likely to continue ris-







NOTICE is hereby given that

MARIE MARTHE BELLOT

of P.O. Box AB-20554, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO,

Medical

Sales Representative




BAHAMAS,

is applying to the Minister responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a



Introduction:

ing, resulting in a weak recov-
ery, he said.

Investors will watch closely
what the Fed has to say about
the economy and the scale of
the recovery after its meeting
wraps up Wednesday. The
Fed is widely expected to
leave rock-bottom interest
rates unchanged, though
investors will be looking for
clues in the central bank’s
statement about when hikes
might start.

Also toward the end of the
week, markets will be focus-
ing on the Group of 20 meet-
ing of the world’s leading
economies on Thursday and
Friday in Pittsburgh.

In the US Tuesday, the
Dow Jones industrial average
rose 51.01, or 0.5 per cent, to
9,829.87, its highest close since
October 6, when it finished at
9,956.

Poor’s 500 index gained 7.00,
or 0.7 per cent, to 1,071.66,
while the Nasdaq composite
index rose 8.26, or 0.4 per
cent, to 2,146.30. Both index-
es are at 11-month highs.

Futures pointed to gains
Wednesday on Wall Street.
Dow futures were up 19, or
0.2 per cent, at 9,790.

Oil prices hovered above
$71 a barrel in Asia as signs of
weak crude demand were off-
set by a slumping US dollar.
Benchmark crude for Novem-
ber delivery was down eight
cents at $71.68 a barrel by late
afternoon Singapore time in
electronic trading on the New
York Mercantile Exchange.
The contract added $1.83 a
barrel to settle at $71.76 on
Tuesday.

In currencies, the dollar fell
to 90.97 yen from 91.15 yen.
The euro rose to $1.4795 from

citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 17 day of September, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

i'm lovin’ it



The broader Standard & = $1.4788.

A local healthcare supplier is currently looking to
recruit a Medical Sales Representative to sell
medical and surgical products in the local market.
With this position experience in the healthcare
field would be an asset but is not essential. NOTICE is hereby given that KENOL LOUIS PIERRE of P.O.
Box AB-20541, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 17" day of September, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WILSON AUSTRAL of TREASURE
CAY, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 17" day of September, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-
7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Job Specification:

wan Purpose of the Medical Sales Representative:
To achieve sales targets for the various product
lines through planned activity.
Maintain business records for all Health Care
Professionals and key accounts within the local
healthcare industry to help select and deliver
business management objectives linked to sales
and market share growth.

Road Traffic Department
Road Safety Competition

ecufet place tn cries fhe: road’?

Skills/Experience Requirements:
- Excellent communication and interpersonal
skills.
Tenacious, driven and resilient.
Good planning and organizational skills.
Self discipline and self motivated.
Interested in the healthcare industry.
Ability to interpret data.
Ambitious and keen to develop a career ina
successful organization
- * - Able to provide evidence of individual
achievement in line with core competencies of
a medical representative, this can be from other
fields of employment, education and social and
L sporting activities.

Heine Ox RAINE the read what shauld you do

the falkrwing read sign meus?

Vv PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, NAWAKO KIKI ROLLE of
STAPLEDON GARDENS, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, intend
fo change the name to MAWAKO KIKI ROLLE. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objectionstotheChiefPassportOfficer,P.0.BoxN-742, Nassau, Bahamas
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

Education Requirements:
- Degree Level or equivalent, ideally in sales or
medical related

UME:
UTR ES§:
= The area covered is the Caribbean. You will live

TEL EHSOME: in the Bahamas and be prepared to travel.

The Salary offered for the Medical Representative
is competitive and depends on experience +
bonus + benefits.

THPETITUIY BELES

To apply for this position, candidates must be

eligible to live and work in the Bahamas. a te ee DEPARTMENT

OF CIVIL AVIATION

Please send resume's to
RISC hOPHUMSTWESOUrSE Se EIN. com

ik
red momma A OR AW PC AA Ms pol oti Fea rath

PUBLICATION BY THE MINISTRY OF
TRANSPORT & AVIATION DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL
AVIATION PARTICULARS OF AN APPLICATION TO

OPERATE SCHEDULED AIR SERVICES

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Roney ot Work

In accordance with the provisions of Regulation
9 of the Civil Aviation (Licensing of Air Services)
Regulations 1976, the Minister responsible for
Aviation hereby publishes the following particulars
of the under-mentioned applicant to operate
scheduled air services to and from The Bahamas.

crac? becoa Me TA TL
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 22 SEPTEMBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,513.89| CHG -0.77| %CHG -0.05 | YTD -198.47 | YTD % -11.59
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
Security Daily Vol. Div $

AML Foods Limited

Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank ($1)

Previous Close Today's Close Change

PARTICULARS OF APPLICATION
1. Application: LEAIR CHARTER SERVICE LTD.

Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol ($)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 0.00
Premier Real Estate 0.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Daily Vol.

2. Date of first publication: 17th September, 2009

3. Routes: BETWEEN NASSAU ON THE ONE
HAND AND ANDROS TOWN ON THE OTHER.
4. Purpose of services: Passenger, mail and freight.

ec000000000000000
geo0o0o000s=0g00000002
e000c0o0ooMmo0q000000H2

Q
Qo
Qo

Local Times
0630/0645 Daily
1530/1545 “
0700/0715 “
1600/1615 “

5. Provisional time table:
NASSAU/ANDROS TOWN

5S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low Security Last Sale Interest
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series ©) +

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13 100.00
FBB15 100.00

risen’ Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

7%
Prime + 1.75%
7%

1000.00

1000.00 Prime + 1.75%

ANDROS TOWN/NASSAU

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.0
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
2,

6. Frequency of flights: See above time-table.

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund

1.3344
2.8952
1.4119
3.0941
12.3870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund

7. Type of Aircraft: EMBRAER-110, CESSNA 402-C &
PIPER AZTECS

Any representation regarding or objection thereto in
accordance with Regulation 10 must be received by the
Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Tourism & Aviation & the
Department of Civil Aviation within fourteen (14) days after

the date of first publication of this Notice.

1.0000
9.0775
1.0000

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund 4.93
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

1.0000

1.0000 31-Aug-09

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
in

Signed
HYACINTH PRATT
PERMANENT SECRETARY

N/M - Net Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM









ls

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST











ically, itt

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zi Today Friday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
sf | “ ai —a High = Low W High Low W NASSAU Today: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 86° F
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ht AYN — li Low | MoDerATE J HicH } HIGH J EX. © Amsterdam 65/18 51/10 s 63/17 52/11 pe Friday: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 86° F
‘ ORLANDO N Ankara, Turkey 75/23 43/6 s 77ie5 47/8 pe = ABACO ‘Today: E at 8-16 Knots 3-6 Feet 10 Miles 85° F
High:91°F/33°C i Sun and some clouds Patchy clouds with a Partly sunny, a t-storm Brilliant sunshine. Partly sunny, a t-storm Partly sunny. The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 77/25 64/17 s 79/26 66/18 pc Friday: E at 8-16 Knots 3-5 Feet 6 Miles 85° F
yf rae rorenc —4 with a shower. stray shower. in spots. possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 65/18 56/13 1 616 53/11 +
<«e 7 é ‘ é Bangkok 90/32 77/25 sh 89/31 78/25 +
1 N igh: 88° L - 79° oe - oe a Coe ie Tee - Barbados 86/30 78/25 pc 87/30 77/25 pc
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as i f- 7 ment ae: Ta Uae YN MS BS SS
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ge: 81 E33" a =e Ta a ai High HLL} Low Ht) beirut 79/26 71/21 s 78/25 72/22 s
Low: 75° F/24°C ry r, ee of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 11:40am. 3.1 5:13am. 0.7 Belgrade 89/97 58/14 s 76/24 54/12 pc
a @ : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 11:59pm. 25 6:11pm. 1.2 aah 6518 47/8 s 63/17 46/7 :
. — CT ne Friday t2dopm. 29 an i Bermuda 81/27 74/23 sh 80/26 70/21 pe
”, | ee AUp.m. 7. Bogota 68/20 38/3 pc 70/21 =41/5 pc Billings
2 “ie a Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday 57am. 24 703am. 12 Brussels 69/20 46/7 pc 66/18 46/7 pc Mest ep
i ‘1 ABACO Temperature 1:35pm. 28 8:11pm. 14 Budapest 81/27 56/13 s 73/22 50/10 pc
f ; =» High: 89° F/32° C THUD .cessacenara Setar tare dtcrarcee 91° F/33° C Silay Iam, 24 Gubam, 13 Buenos Aires 64/17 46/7 s 68/20 50/10 pe (H) 1
: - Reema p LOW ceeccccssseesee 78° F/26° C 2:35pm. 28 9:09pm. 14 Cairo 90/32 65/18 s 91/32 68/20 s chitso
c - “* ae ow: 76° F/24 Normal high... arratG 93/33 84/28 r 91/32 83/28 Ronee
- F Normal low . 74° F/24° C Calgary 85/29 39/3 s 74/23 44/6 s 60100
5 = @ WEST PALM BEACH AT Last year's HIQh uo... esses 90° F/32° C SUN ay Ty ify Cancun 90/32 73/22 t 89/31 73/22 t
: aioe High: 89° F/32° C Y bi Last year's IOW: stented 77° F/25° C Caracas 81/27 72/22 t 82/27 72/22 t
——- Low: 79° F/26° C o- ie Precipitation Sunrise. ..... 6:59am. Moonrise ...12:41 p.m. Casablanca 83/28 62/16 s 81/27 61/16 p
aa ye AS of 2 p.m. yeSterday .ecsccsesisnsnstenntnetn 0.15" Sunset... 704 p.m. Moonset....11:17p.m. Copenhagen 60/15 50/10 sh 63/17 52/11 ¢
cm, FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Ar Year to date 30, First Full Last New Dublin 61/16 48/8 pe 63/17 50/10 pc
High: 89° F/32° C @ High: 88° F/31°C Normal year to date .......c.ccsessesscsssssecseeseene 36.74" 7 7 Frankfurt 64/17 48/8 c 6518 47/8 pc
Low: 78° F/26°C Low: 75° F/24°C Geneva 73/22 54/12 pc 68/20 50/10 pc
ip EF AccuWeather.com Halifax 64/17 45/7 pc 59/15 43/6 pc
Ce @ — Forecasts and graphics provided by - he Havana 91/32 73/22 t 88/31 71/21 5 =< Miata
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a High: 88° F/31°C = Hong Kong 88/31 81/27 t 90/32 79/26 s Rai
Low: 79° F/26°C NASSAU High: 90° F/32° C Islamabad 107/41 73/22 s 110/43 72/22 s au Cold =peonts
F 5h. QO ° Low: 76° F/24°C Istanbul 76/24 64/17 pc 76/24 63/7 s Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
High: 88° F/31°C i ] p y
Low: 79° F/26° C Jerusalem 81/27 60/15 s 81/27 59/15 s Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm afd.
7 = “i Johannesburg 77/25 54/12 pc 61/16 52/11 + [v=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mangum
KEY WEST = * Kingston 88/31 80/26 r 89/31 79/26 sh f “BOs 60s 70s 80s /G0s) AU0sNNinS)
High: 88° F/31°C Xr A CAT ISLAND Lima 74/23 87/13 pe 73/22 8/14 po s/s 10s 20s [308)) 40s
Low: 79° F/26°C \ High: 87° F/31° London 70/21 50/10 pc 70/21 52/11 s
: — © Low: 75° F/24°C Madrid 82/27 54/12 s 82/27 54/12 s
ye, Manila 86/30 77/25 t 85/29 76/24 +
AS . a Mexico City 73/22 54/12 t 73/22 55/12 t .
N he = Monterrey 82/27 63/17 c 82/27 64/17 po H e * * IC AN 7 Ths he UJ RANG =
_ GREAT EXUMA ~~ \ SAN SALVADOR Montreal 72/22 46/7 pe 6417 45/7 s
High: 87° F/31°C High: 89° F/32°C Moscow 55/12 45/7 c 54/12 41/5 +
AY Low: 75°F/24°C eo Munich 72/22 51/10 c 6116 45/7 c
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS : peer Nairobi 87/30 55/12 pe 88/31 55/12 s
highs and tonighis’s lows. Ve High: 89° F/32° C ro New Delhi 99/37 79/26 s 101/38 77/25 s
Za Low: 76° F/24°C a % Oslo 59/15 48/8 pc 64/17 52/11 c
te AY Paris 72/22 54/12 c 70/21 49/9 s an eC OW’?
Y Prague 62/16 46/7 sh 64/17 45/7 pc
LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 74/23 65/18 sh 73/22 65/18 pc y ny
a rere ae sozr oie s 82ers way peelic
Low: 78° F/26°C Rome 82/27 61/16 s 82/27 61/16 s "
Ti anes ae cas Tiel aaa = * MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 88/31 79/26 pc 88/31 80/26 s Moy you can rest easy knowing
High tow Wo High Low Ww High tow Wo High Low) w High tow Wo High Low w We Mocerran’c Sa ua 7996 467 8 —B6RD_40/9 that you have excellent INSBIANCE
FIC FIC FIC FC FIC FIC FIC =F /C FIC F/C FIC FIC NY Low: 77° F/25° C an ava Ol co rave no matter whic
Albuquerque 68/20 49/9 pc 78/25 55/12 s Indianapolis 81/27 5915 t 79/26 57/13 + Philadelphia 84/28 G16 t 73/22 53/11 CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS Santiago 73/22 48/8 s 64/17 43/6 c waw the wind blows.
Anchorage 47/8 41/5 r 49/9 41/5 + Jacksonville 87/30 72/22 t 90/32 71/21 pc Phoenix 97/36 72/22 s 100/37 75/23 s oe Ui santo Daring ete sh CEU eae y .
Atlanta 86/30 69/20 pc 87/30 67/19 c Kansas City 74/23 56/13 pc 76/24 58/411 c Pittsburgh 78/25 54/12 po 73/22 49/9 s RAGGEDISLAND — Migh:89°F/s2°c - — — ar r ae scr s c
Atlantic City 86/30 56/13 t 70/21 45/7 s Las Vegas 96/35 66/18 s 99/37 71/21 s Portland, OR 77/25 52/41 s 79/26 53/11 s High: 88° F/31°C Low: 79° F/26°C Sea ma : ia pe ee a ee Nobody does it better
Baltimore 85/29 58/14 t 75/23 5140 s Little Rock 79/26 63/17 t 78/25 64/17 ¢ Raleigh-Durham 89/31 66/18 pc 80/26 58/14 pc Low:76°F/24°C = % sen — Tao. ESA? , Rar SOAs - 3
Boston 77/25 5412 po 66/18 45/7 s LosAngeles 94/34 66/18 s 90/32 64/17 5 St. Louis 92/27 6417 t 74/23 63/17 t . om ae ETDS = ETS A
Buffalo 74/23 48/8 po 65/18 45/7 s Louisville 95/29 64/17 t 83/28 64/17 1 Salt Lake City 78/25 55/12 pc 84/28 55/12 s GREATINAGUA wr Tala 70/96 66/18 s 77/95 cores
Charleston, SC 87/30 70/21 pc 86/30 65/18 c Memphis 93/28 69/20 t 84/28 69/20 t San Antonio 74/23 62/16 t 84/28 67/19 pc High: 92° F/33°C aaa 74/23 50/10 pc GAAS
Chicago 81/27 55/12 po 71/21 56/13 1 Miami 88/31 79/26 pc 989/31 79/26 pc San Diego 83/28 63/17 s 80/26 64/17 pc Low 77°F25°C Trinidad 80/07 GA/I7 00/32 72/22 pe
Cleveland 77/25 52/11 po 74/23 50/10 s Minneapolis 77/25 5945 pe 69/20 54/12 + San Francisco 77/25 5542 pe 79/26 57/13 pe ; yaReRO 66/18 50/10 65/18 54/12 pc et men INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 75/23 57413 t 80/26 62/16 pc Nashville 88/31 6719 t 83/28 68/20 t Seattle 69/20 48/8 s 72/22 52/11 s Vienna 70/21 55/12 po 64/17 50/10 po
Denver 60/15 40/4 sh 66/18 44/6 pc NewOrleans 989/31 76/24 t 89/31 76/24 t Tallahassee 92/33 72/22 t 92/33 71/21 pe in
i Warsaw 64/17 50/10 c 63/17 48/8 pc
Detroit 79/26 53/11 po 71/21 5140 s New York 82/27 6216 t 68/20 52/11 s Tampa 91/32 75/23 t 91/32 76/24 t Winnipeg 77/95 BA/12 s 73/22 55/12 pc
Honolulu 89/31 75/23 s 89/31 76/24 s Oklahoma City 75/23 52/11 c 78/25 55/12 c Tucson 91/32 64/17 s 95/35 65/18 s Vw ;
Houston 82/27 68/20 t 85/29 73/22 t Orlando 91/32 75/23 t 92/33 75/23 pc Washington,DC 86/30 62/16 t 78/25 54/12 s Teh ee ie ee





sayy V4
CIT a eA by

The Tribune

RELIGIOUS
NEWS,
STORIES
AND
CHURCH
EVENTS





PG 22 Thursday, September 24, 2009

RELIGION

The Tribune



Carmichael Baptist Holiness Church
Ferguson Sub-Division; Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 361-5798 P.O. Box CR-55785
Pastor Rev. Paul J. McPhee J.P.
Assistant Pastor Gertrude Miller

Re: 4th Pastoral Anniversary
Theme: "A MAN WALKING
BY FAITH"

Date: 23rd September - 25th
September 2009

Wednesday night:
Asst. Pastor Gertrude Miller

Thursday Night:
Rev. Albert Kerr

Friday Night:
Min. Lennis McPhee

Services Begin at 7:45 pm nightly
Closing out on Sunday 27th at 3:00pm
Guest speaker: Pastor Lawrence McPhee
Greater Pentecostal Church of God







FACULTY and board members of Hope College shown here at an Open
House over the weekend.

HOPE COLLEGE

TO OFFER RELIGIOUS DEGREES

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

WITH the national average down for the Fall 2009 BGCSE examina
tions-dropping to a ‘D’ this academic year, there is no doubt that many
class of 2009 graduates received reject letters from local colleges they
desired to attend this semester.

For such persons, this desire to continue their education was tarnished,
leaving them with little option, which includes finding work in a depressing
job market. One institution is offering an alternative solution for such indi-
viduals, with a message of hope.

Hope College, located on JFK Drive in the Christian Life Centre (CLC)
pitched its degree programs to the public in an open house over the weekend,
and began registering new students for the Fall 2009 academic year.

The Christian based college, spareheaded by the Assemblies of Brethren in
the Bahamas is targeting those whose aspirations for higher education were
tarnished by unsatisfactory BGCSE results, Dr June Wilson, Research and
Education Director at the college told The Tribune yesterday.

In addition to secular training, the college seeks to equip persons interest-
ed in entering Christian ministry, providing an at-home ministry training
experience however, for aspiring church-workers in the Associate of Arts
Divinity degree (A. T-H.).

Institutes that offer Biblical studies at home are very limited; leaving aspir-
ing pastors with a starkly brisk decision where they should receive their min-
istry training.

“Church members who want to take on leadership positions but don’t have
knowledge on Biblical principles can equip themselves with these classes and
upgrade themselves so that they can be impactful in ministry,” said Dr Wilson.

Studies show that the success of church’s growth,and impact in the com-
munity it is in, is directly attributed to whether the church’s pastor has
received any formal biblical training.

“When it comes to the school of divinity, leaders and members can take
those classes and not necessarily enroll in Associate degree programs at this
time but they will receive certificate verifying that they completed the class,”
she explained.

Courses offered in the School of Divinity include: BIB 193 Biblical
Interpretation and Hermeneutics, MIN 403 Homiletics, TH 202 Systematic
Theology I, and TH 401 Women of the Bible.

In a press statement to Tribune Religion, representatives expressed their
vision as follows for the college:

“The mission of Hope College is to educate students for lives of leadership
and courage in the global environment, through academic and co-circular

SEE page 26



The Tribune RELIGION Thur mber 24, 2009 ® PG 23

(CY MEDITATION

Do we need
a revival? |LOANS BY PHONE

LAST Sunday l >
evening the discussion oo at ) f /
centered around the
topic of revival. The we ~ REV. ANGELA
approach took the “ - FT ; ee8

form of four questions A. PALACIOUS

and the persons pres-
ent were invited to give
individual responses.

The answers are not in any particular order of importance. : @ e (ash In Hand
You are also invited to engage in the same exercise. Before

reading the suggestions, write your answers down if you like, and | e

foster dialogue between members of your family colleagues, fel- e Vacation Loans e (ar Loans

lowship groups, or church sisters and brothers and amoung the

youth. Add more questions and be prayerfully open to the move- 7

eect et + Medical Loans - School Fee Loans

- Home-Improvement Loans

ro #1 WHAT ARE THE SIGNS OF REVIVAL?
- Loans, Loans, Loans



1. Care and concern for others

. Engaging in personal spiritual devotions and disciplines

. Young people worshipping regularly and with enthusiasm
. A deep love for the Lord

. Love in the heart and kindness towards others
Involvement in church activities

. Testimonies, occasional altar calls

. Forgiveness, healing and joy

QUESTION #2 BLOCKS TO REVIVAL F AST TU RN ARO U N D TI Mi E
1. Laziness

2. Resistance to change
3. Not being holy as God’s people

4. Not accepting God’s condition, * if you turn to me...confess, ° NO LONG WAIT ) 4 LIVE ASSISTANTS ° N0 MACHINES

then I will heal”

5. Lack of a Ninevah-like spirit of repentance
6. A mind-set fixed in stone

7. Limited resources

8. Pushing our own agenda, not God’s agenda Requirements:
1 Ongoing prayer both personal and corporate Job Letter, Passport, NIB, Pay Slip

2.Sermons, seminars, workshops, teaching, and prayer ministry
3. The alliance of area ministers to combine their efforts and

4 To be open and expectant as « people ALT Government, B.E.C, Batelco,
QUESTION #4 HOW CAN | HELP AS AN INDIVIDUAL? WSC and Salary Deduction Employees

AADMABRWNE

LIMITED TIME ONLY!!! CALL NOW!! ACT TODAY!

225-1075

The Tribune wants to hear from people
who are making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are

raising funds for a good cause,
campaigning for improvements in the ¢
area or have won an award. :
If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your

story.





SE

PG 24 ® Thursday, September 24, 2009

RELIGION
(oy THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS



The Tribune

Part 45




History of Trinity Methodist Church Nassau

TRINITY Methodist Church, Nassau,
Bahamas was founded in 1861 and was
opened for worship in 1865.

The District Synod's report of 1861
states:

"The new chapel (Trinity) has not yet
been commenced, the builder's estimate
of costs being so much in advance of the
contemplated expenditure, it is wisely
judged that delay is preferable to embar-
rassment!”

However, the foundation stone of the
new church was laid on August 21, 1861
by His Honour Charles Nesbitt, Esq.
Lieutenant-Governor of the Bahamas.

It was estimated that the new chapel
would cost about £6,200. Plans were fur-
nished by W.W. Pocock, Esq of London.
The building was intended to serve as a
Chapel and a schoolroom and to accom-
modate a congregation of 800 persons.
However, difficulties were experienced as
the work progressed. Due to the Civil
War in the United States of America, the
builder was unable to get timber from the
southern states. In addition, in 1864 an
epidemic of yellow fever struck Nassau
and four of the carpenters imported from
Glasgow to work on the church died, and
the remaining two fled to the United
States of America.

In a letter to the Mission House in
London, Rev Hilton Cheesbrough,
Minister of Trinity Church and District
Superintendent, writes: "Trinity Church
was officially opened on April 2, 1865 at a
cost of £8,000 of which the Government
gave £2,000."

Writing to the Methodist Missionary
Society in 1866 Rev Cheesbrough states:
"On the evening of September 30, 1866
whilst conducting divine service in our
beautiful Trinity Chapel in this city, a
fresh breeze was blowing from the north

” The next day October 1, 1866 Trinity



DEACON Bradley Miller (on the right)
assists Fr Enrique Miller during a midday
mass held in the chapel of Addington
House yesterday. Deacon Miller will be
ordained to the priesthood next Tuesday.

S/ iv
} LAWLOR

Church was completely demolished by
this “fresh breeze" which turned out to be
the worst hurricane this city has experi-
enced to date. This hurricane destroyed
or badly damaged ten Methodist chapels.

The "Nassau Guardian", a daily news-
paper, says in its October 3, 1866 issue:
"The Wesleyans, we believe, suffered
most, their new and beautiful Trinity
Chapel, Frederick Street, with its large
and powerful organ being entirely demol-
ished, leaving only the class and school-
rooms beneath entire.

Before Rev Cheesbrough left the
Colony in 1869 the Church had been re-
built, and he was its first minister. Rev
Cheesbrough is described as an able and
eloquent preacher, a wise administrator,
and a kind and sympathetic friend. He
died in Liverpool, England on May
17,1882.

On September 16, 1928, Trinity Church
again suffered considerable damage by
another hurricane. Two-thirds of its roof
at its western end was blown away. The
gallery disappeared and the remains of
the pipe organ was found in the base-
ment.

The minister of the church at that time,
Rev Walter H Richards, M.B.E., and the
trustees had insured the building for its
full value, and this sum was sufficient to
restore the church building to its former
glory. The building was restored by Fred
Dillet, one of Nassau's premier builders
of a bygone era.

Restoration took just over a year and

during that period members worshipped
in Victoria Hall, the building which for-
merly housed Queen's College, a
Methodist School.

A new organ from a firm in
Connecticut, USA was installed in 1929,
and gave excellent service for 36 years. In
1964, a three manual Wick's organ was
installed.

Trinity's beautiful stained glass win-
dows were installed in 1973 and dedicated
on Trinity Sunday, June 17, 1973.

In 1960 during the ministry of Rev
Harold Slater (1957-1962) the whole
building was thoroughly renovated. It
was painted, the pews and the floor revar-
nished and a new red floor matting laid.
Due to the generosity of the late PM
Lightbourne, an elevator was installed at
the western end of the church for the ben-
efit of the elderly and those not so old.
The basement hall and classrooms were
renovated for the use of youth groups and
men's and women's meetings after the
departure of the Queen's College
Preparatory Department in September
1961 to their new campus on Village
Road.

From 1865 to 1986, Trinity Church had
30 ministers. Twenty-eight of them came
from the United Kingdom and two from
the Caribbean and the Americas.
Ministers who served were as follows:

Hilton Cheesbrough (1865-1869);
Henry Bleby (1869-1879); Jonathan C.
Richardson (1879-1884); Francis Moon
(1884-1889); Thomas Raspass (1889-
1891); George Lester (1892-1896);
Frederick W. Gostick (1896-1904); W.H.E
"Willie" Bleby (1904-1916); Allworth
Eardley (1916-1921); W.T. Kilbride (1921
- 1923); T. H. Howitt (1923-1925); W.H.
Richards, M.B.E. (1925-1931); A.E.
Nelson (1932); H.S.F. Rossiter (1932); E.
Vosper Paget (1932-1937); Herbert S.
Clarke (1937-1947); W.H. Armstrong

(1947-1950); George T. Start (1950-1952);
Willie Rhodes (1952 -1955); G. I. George
Jones (1954-1956); William T Makepeace
(1955-1957); Harold Slater (1957-1962);
Frank E Poad (1960-1974); Philip
Blackburn (1962 -1966); David
Livingstone (1966-1968); Godfrey S
Johns (1968-1972); Peter B Swinglehurst
(1972-1976); Eric St. C Clarke (1976-
1978); John Bilverstone (1978-1980);
Nymphas R Edwards (1980 to 1986).

Since 1986, Bahamian Ministers, Rev
Henley Perry and Rev Franklyn Knowles
served and during the period of the
autonomy issue American ministers,
including Rev Gene Zimmerman filled
in. Another Bahamian, Rev Bill Higgs,
has been the Minister at Trinity since
January 2000.

In September 1986, Eddie Sykes of the
United Kingdom was appointed by the
Bahamas/Turks & Caicos Islands District
of the Methodist Church to serve as a
Youth Worker at Trinity. He made a pos-
itive impact on the young people of the
community. Trinity now has a créche and
Children's Storytime. Their scholarship
fund assists able students to attend
Queen's College.

Trinity Methodist Church has had an
interesting history during which time it
worked energetically for the Kingdom of
God. Over the years this Church has
made a significant contribution to the
religious, social, economic and political
life of the Bahamas. It has a strong Bible
Study Group, A Cottage Prayer Group,
A Soup Kitchen and a Ministry to the
Poor.

Today as always it 'seeKs to serve the
present age’ by becoming more involved
in some of the pressing social problems of
the community of which it is a part and to
be faithful to the calling of her Lord and
Master, Jesus Christ.

Deacon Miller to be ordained
to the Sacred Priesthood

REV’D Deacon Bradley Hayward
Miller will be ordained to the Sacred
Priesthood by Reverend Laish Zane
Boyd, Sr on Tuesday, September 29,
The Feast of St Michael and All

Angels.
The concelebrated mass will take
place at historic Christ Church

Cathedral, George Street, at 7pm. The
chief celebrant will be Bishop Boyd,
who will be assisted by con-celebrants

Reverend Drexel Gomez, Rev'd
Gilbert Thompson and Rev’d Fr G
Kingsley Knowles. Rev’d Fr Rodney
Burrows will deliver the sermon.

A descendant of Green Castle,
Eleuthera, Deacon Miller received his
early education at the Green Castle
Primary School, and Rock Sound
Senior High (now Preston H
Albury). He is a graduate of The
College of The Bahamas, where he

attained an Associate’s Degree in
Biblical Studies. In 2006 he entered
Codrington Theological College,
Barbados, and graduated in 2008 with a
Diploma in Theology and Pastoral
Studies. He is currently the Assistant
Curate at Christ the King Church,
Ridgeland Park, West.

Deacon Miller is married to the for-
mer Vernalee Duncombe and they are
the parents of six children.



The Tribune

RELIGION

When church folks
couldn't care less!

IT IS amazing how easy it is these
days to get a group of people to gather
and protest. The slightest problem at a
worksite results in people leaving their
work station to go outside to demon-
strate, bearing placards. Sometimes it is
a lunch-time demonstration.
Sometimes the demonstration makes
the city centre of Bay Street, often with
the general public not fully aware of the
rationale for the public show of dis-
pleasure.

When a church, the place where

Christians meet for corporate prayer
and worship to almighty God, is razed,
or in Bahamian language, 'yucked out
of the ground’, and there is no mass out-
cry and mass public demonstration of
Christians from everywhere in the
nation, there must be a message being
sent, and I am not quite sure what it
is...
Our hearts palpitate at a media
report of vandals breaking and entering
a church and desecrating the altar.
What do we feel when, because of a dis-
pute, an entire church building is will-
fully demolished?

Being aware of those in the ‘moneyed
class’ who often wait with bated breath
to defend their honour in the court sys-
tem against anything /anyone they per-
ceive to be libelous, I would declare my
intention at the outset, which is not to
malign anyone's good name. My inten-

tion is to cause fellow Christians to
reflect on their position and the mes-
sage they send when they choose
silence in the face of opposition (as in
Ephesians 6:12).

In early 2007, the general public and
members of Firetrail Ministries Church
pastored by Dave and Michelle Baker,
saw their church and the foundation for
their new church on the adjacent prop-
erty demolished, only to be replaced by
homes in the private subdivision on Fire
Trail Road which was later named ‘Ros
Davis Estates’ by the developer. Some
years ago, residents living in eastern
New Providence served by Prince
Charles Drive tearfully experienced the
result of heavy equipment demolishing
a portion of the new church building
being constructed by Rhema Christian
Ministries, pastored by Pastors Eugene
& Dr Rosetta V Clare, obviously the
result of an unresolved dispute.

In mid September, 2009, the news
media reported the demolition of the
Canaan Baptist Church and there were
further media reports that other church
buildings could face the same fate.

All of these matters have business,
financial and legal sides, to which I do
not speak. I draw attention to the spir-
itual side. In all that is happening in our
little country today, can Christians
“look the other way” when a “House of
God”, a Christian church in a ‘Christian

‘Strap ya back’

It is indeed amazing how our nation's
foundation was built on Christian val-
ues yet every now and then we still
manage to put "old wives fables” into
our mindset.

I was thinking about my name and
how common it is. This does not bother
me, because I know within myself that
there is only one me. In January of
(while employed at The Tribune) one of
the funeral homes brought in their obit-
uaries. Immediately my interest was
sparked because one of the deceased
persons was named Allison Miller.

When I explained to the funeral
home worker why I was staring at the
photo, he said jokingly to me, "well you
better strap ya back."

At first I didn't know how to

ALLISON
MILLER



respond to his remark but realised that
I could not let that put fear in me. So I
said to him, "You know what, it does-
n’t matter what happens, when it is my
time to go I will. Since there are some
things that God still has for me to do
and I want to do them, I don't think
that will be anytime soon." He looked
at me as if to say, "well that's true, you
will be fine."

nation’ is smashed and removed to
make way for commercial housing
works?

Prophets and prophetesses of the
Bahamas--what is God saying about His
houses of prayer being “yucked up?”

God the Father, in Jesus Christ, was
greatly upset even when the activities in
His house were inappropriate (see
Luke 19:46). Will God judge His
“called out” ones, His Ecclesia, for
being so silent when churches are being
demolished? Bishop Ian Brathwaite’s
fellowship group called “Pastors of
Prayer” reportedly labeled the Canaan
Baptist Church tragedy as the “darkest
day” in the history of the church in The
Bahamas. (See TRIBUNE RELI-
GION, September 17, 2009). Well, it is
not the first blackout, and, reportedly,
there are more dark days ahead...

Some years ago, the public will recall,
from the media, Temple Christian
Academy discovered that a portion of
their new school building under con-
struction was sitting on land reportedly
owned by Thompson Trading
Company.

As the latter entity had not yet been
built on Shirley Street, there was an
obvious mistake, by someone, some
persons or some entities. I well remem-
ber the public outcry by Christians gen-
erally and by churches connected to
that denomination and Fellowship.

You see for me God has the last say
in all things. Only what he says really
matters. However, that does not
excuse the fact that life and death is in
the power of the tongue. Many times
we allow people to say negative things
in and over our lives and we don't can-
cel it with the word of God which
speaks life to us. Negativity just ends
up playing out in our lives. We have to
cancel the negative things spoken over
our lives. This gentleman meant no
harm, he thought that he was doing me
a favor by telling me to protect myself
regardless of the manner he said it in.

However, I had to cancel the
deadly joke that was spoken to me.
The Bible tells us to “let a thing be
established in the mouth of two or
three witness” (Matt 18:16). It is
important that we know the word of
God and the power that words have
whether it is a joke or not. Sometimes
things are said in casual conversation

Thursday, September 24, 2009 ® PG 25



DR ALBERT S.

Our hearts palpitate at a
media report of vandals
breaking and entering a
church and desecrating the

altar. What do we feel when,
because of a dispute, an
entire church building is
willfully demolished?



In this case, this was a Christian
SCHOOL. We are talking today about
churches being uprooted. Can actions
of this nature be pleasing to God? If
they are not, will this nation not be held
accountable and judged for their apa-
thetic silence?

In promoting the 2009 Artist Against
Violence Concert initiative, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham quoted 18th
century politician, Edmund Burke,
who said that all that is necessary for
the triumph of (the forces of) evil is that
good men do nothing. I feel that his
words are worthy of deep, deep consid-
eration, over and over again, by all of
us, especially professing Christians...

¢ Dr Albert S. Ferguson, J.P., is a former
senior-level corporate manager, a former
Associate Professor of Management
Studies, an ordained Minister of Religion
for over 30 years and a transformational
leader. Contact Dr Ferguson at email
albertsferguson@gmail.com.

and we just let it go without even
being aware of the negative things
that can happen to us.

Because we don't cancel negative
words spoken over and in our lives,
words take root and destroy many
lives. In a harsh and hurtful conversa-
tion I was told that, "I won't have any-
thing, I won't be anyone, I don't count
and I should die."

If I did not omit them, those words
would probably be my story. I know
that the Devil is a liar and those words
won't happen. God Almighty is Alpha
and Omega and only what He says
matters and will stand.

We have to cancel negative words
said in and over our lives. It does not
matter if it was said casually or jok-
ingly, they still have to be omitted bot-
tom line. God gave us His words
which is truth and life. Let's speak
that over and in our lives and the lives
of others.



PG 26 ® Thursday, September 24, 2009 RELIGION The Tribune



Ma Becca laid to rest in

FAMILY and Friends of Rebecca
Williams last week said goodbye to the
matriarch last Saturday in Cat Island.
She was 86.

Mrs Williams or Ma “Becca” as she
was affectionately called was an avid
Anglican, a cornerstone in the commu-
nity and a pillar in the Anglican
Church.

Her funeral was held at the St
Andrew’s Anglican Church in Arthur’s
‘Town, the church where she had been
baptisied, confirmed and married.

She was described as a “ giant of a
lady and saluted as a modern day hero-
ine. She was one of the island's premier



ambassadors who entertained prime
ministers, dignitaries, bishops, priests
and deacons.

She was also remembered for going
above and beyond the call of duty in
her devotion to the Anglican Church.

She delivered a yeoman service
organising many bake sales, cook outs
and church programs.

Tributes were given by George
Johnson (Anglican Church Men
President -St. Saviour's Parish) her
niece Cleomie Burrows, Rose Pratt
Rolle, Charles’ Dommie' King, Island
Administrator for Cat Island District
and Canon Warren Rolle.

ee a alae!
Friends of Rebecca
Williams last week
said goodbye to the

BeCWieueiee
Saturday in Cat
Island. She was 86.

In his
Seymour

sermon Edward

exemplified what

fame or remuneration.

the wider Cat Island community.



> Hope College to offer
__ Religious Degrees

FROM page 22

: programmes of recognised excellence in
i the context of the historical Christian
i faith.”

“Hope College plans to operate on

: Bible-based principles, and has a non-
? denominational posture to attract students
? of all religious backgrounds.”

“We are trying to reach high school grad-

? uates who are not equipped to enter col-
i lege,” Dr Wilson explained.
? many who have graduated high school, but
i haven’t had the qualifications to enter a
? college.”

“There are

The College will offer BGCSE and Pre-

i College Classes in English, Math, History,
? Geography, Biology, Religious Knowledge,
i Accounts and Economics at $350 per
? course.

As it stands, the Ministry of Education

? does not have a systematic approach to
? dealing with persons who miserably fail
i BGCSE subject tests. Before the written
? examination is taken, students must com-
i plete sufficient coursework.

“We’re really focusing on the exam, and

? what it takes to get them through the exam.

her birth place Cat Island '

? Bahamas require that students pass at least
i 5 of the major BGCSE’s. If the student

'Rex' } passes at least 3 of the examinations, they

Assistant Priest for St? are required to take college prep courses
Saviour's Parish said Ma Becka dis- }
played many strong attributes and
every member :
should offer their God, priest and :
church in terms of true and laudable :

service without seeking any personal :

We are screening faculty and staff who
have taken students through the BGCSE
with a successful track record of students
who passed.

Guidelines for acceptance into a pro-
gram of study at the College of the

that don’t credit toward their degree pro-
gram.

If they meet neither standard--unsuc-
cessfully completing at least 3 BGCSE’--
they are referred to the Bahamas Baptist
College to bring themselves up to speed.

Hope College offers an alternative how-

Fr Chester Burton, Priest in Charge : ever, and will register students for its Fall

of St Saviour's Parish challenged the ; S°Mester up to next week.
family and friends to leave a legacy just : ‘ ; :
: payment plans are available for incoming

as Ma Becka left an indelible mark on } fb ochinen cai.

the pages of the Anglican Church and }

in the Arthurs Town community and in ? man of the school’s steering committee,

: they have been “working consistently over
i the last few months to ensure that the facil-
i ities, programs and plans are in place to

Financial assistance opportunities and

According to Barton Duncanson, chair-

m: accomplish the fall semester opening of

i on that date.
i Bachelor’s degrees in The Arts, Business
? Administration, Education, and Divinity
i are tentative for January 2010.

: October 5.”

New Student orientation will take place
Plans for Associate and

Admissions applications for the school

are available at the college’s campus at the
i? Christian Life Centre on John F Kennedy
i Drive.

To be considered for admission, first

: time students, transfer students, continuing
i education and diploma students must pro-
i vide the following:

-completed application form
-$25 application fee

-Official high school transcript
-Letter of Recommendation



The Tribune

Sa HASTE 2

* COCONUT Grove Temple will
hold its five day long Spiritual
Warfare Conference 2009 on
September 27- October 2 at the
church on Coconut Grove and
Crooked Island Street. The con-
ference is being held under the
theme “ Weapons of Power
Spiritual Warfare and Prophetic
Move.” Sessions begin 7 pm
nightly.

Speakers throughout the week
will include Roger Williams
Conference Host (Coconut Grove
Temple), Bishop Lindo Wallace
Host Pastor ( Coconut Grove
Temple), Evangelist Origin
Deleveaux (First Baptist Church),
Minister Antonio Rolle (Kingdom
Come Ministries), Evangelist Alisa
Collie (Living Faith Seventh Day
Adventist), Prophet Don Clarke
(First Baptist Church), and
Evangelist Marie McDonald
(Coconut Grove Temple).







* A Comm-Uni-Tee- Social
event will be held at the Gardens
of Gray’s Music Center on
September 26 at pm. There will be
local Bahamian entertainers,
refreshments, and giveaways. This
social event is uplifting, empower-
ing, and the host of the event is
requesting a donation of $15 for
adults and $2 for children under
the age of 12.

CSE

@ Did you recently give birth to
the newest little angel on earth?
Have you and your beloved
recently tied the knot? Is your
church planning a special event?
Tribune Religion wants to hear
from you!

We want to know about the
special things going on in your
life, so go ahead and send in your
wedding photographs, birth
announcements and church activi-
ties schedule to be posted in
upcoming Tribune Religion sec-
tions.

This service is free. Send all
information, including (especial-
ly) photographs, to features@tri-
bunemedia.net. Information can
be hand delivered to The Tribune
at Shirley and Deveaux Streets or
call the Religion section @
502.2368.

RELIGIO Thursday, September 24, 2009 ® PG 27



Cat Islanders celebrate Holy Cross
— Anglican Church Feast of Title

ANGLICANS recently marked
the Feast of Title of Holy Cross in
Dumfries, Cat Island by turning out
in droves to welcome Fr Bernard
Been, the assistant priest at St
Agnes Parish Blue Hill Road, New
Providence. It was Fr Been first
visit to the church and he took his
text from the parable of the Good
Samaritian from the gospel of Luke.

He told the congregation that
“everyone in the church is on a jour-
ney and we cannot manipulate this
trek without Almighty God”. He
added that the whole Anglican
community be they Cat Islanders,
Abaconians or Exumians will one
day complete this arduous task and
be called to give an account of the
way they live, adding that no bishop,
priest or deacon can answer or
defend anyone's journey. Only the
person who completes their own
course can do this task,he explained.

After the mass, members
marched to Turning Point
Resturant and Bar for lunch.





PG 28 © Thursday, September 24, 2009 RELIGION The Tribune

=

St Christopher Church, located
in Lyford Cay and led by
Deacon Keith Cartwright has
been established for many
years. Their dedication to the
Anglican faith and to the peo-
ple of this country has brought
them recognition and appreci-
ation throughout the years.

- il:

Bei’





Full Text


The Tribune

USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

{T\

Pim blowin’ it

HIGH S8F
LOW 79F

ai PARTLY SUNNY
“Ae WITH SHOWER

Volume: 105 No.252

8) 3

"Available at



Mt. Royal Ave.
Tel:326-1875



PRICE — 75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)









ANG aa Le =) TRV:

Travolta: Jett
final moments

Hollywood
Star relives
son’s death

R CLASSIFIEDS TRADER





Bahamian lawyer
is indicted over
money laundering

allegations

Sidney Cambridge charged in
US after FBI ‘sting’ operation

AN attorney and partner with a top Bahamian law
firm, Callender’s & Co, was yesterday indicted by the US
federal authorities over allegations that he knowingly
helped launder hundreds of thousands of dollars in pro-
ceeds from a purported investment fraud.

Sidney Cambridge, a senior Progressive Liberal Party
(PLP) member who has served as its vice-chairman, was
charged following a Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
“sting” operation, involving undercover agents posing as
persons who wanted to launder funds from a fictitious
European-based financial fraud.

A copy of the indictment obtained by The Tribune
alleged: “On or about November 23, 2007, at Nassau,
Bahamas, defendant Cambridge was told by an undercover
agent that the funds came from a ‘Ponzi’ scheme.

“After acknowledging his understanding of the pur-
ported source of the funds, defendant Cambridge instruct-
ed undercover agents how to launder the proceeds in the



By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

HOLLYWOOD superstar
John Travolta yesterday
recalled the efforts that he
and others made to save the
life of his 16-year-old son Jett
after he suffered a seizure.

Mr Travolta was the only
witness to take the stand yes-
terday as the case against for-
mer PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater and former
ambulance driver Tarino
Lightbourne continued in the
Supreme Court. The pair are
accused of attempting to
extort $25 million from him.

The grieving actor, who

wore a black suit and grey tie,
was escorted into the court-
room by a security detail
shortly after 10am yesterday.
His wife Kelly Preston sat in
the public gallery.

Appearing somber and
composed, Mr Travolta testi-
fied that on December 29,
2008, he and his wife, with
their son Jett and daughter
Ella, eight, travelled to
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Accompanying them on the
family trip were four nannies,
he said. Mr Travolta told the
court his family stayed at a
condo at the Old Bahama
Bay resort.

SEE page nine

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US ACTOR John Travolta and wife Kelly Preston
leave the court building.

UK judge: Cases from countries like
Bahamas taking up too much time

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



A LEADING UK judge claims cases from other countries such
as The Bahamas are taking up too much British time and resources,
and he would like to see the burden reduced.

Referring to the caseload of the Judicial Committee of the Privy
Council, Lord Nicholas Phillip’s comments have been seen by
some as a sign that Britain may soon make moves to shake off the
colonial hangover the institution represents, leaving countries like
the Bahamas to find or create another final court of appeal.

Speaking to the Financial Times newspaper, Lord Phillips, Pres-

SEE page ten

Janaees Uniform Center

Chesapeake Road - 394-8385 + East Street §. Andros Aven

Pfantig (five
Shirts $25.00
Pants $28.75 San

ISLANOER

Work Bhar Geitey Line

Bahamas.”

SEE page ten

SAC principal
Fohhed by thug

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

POLICE are searching for
the thug who robbed a high
school principal as she tried
to enter her home in the east-
ern area of New Providence.

The victim — St
Augustine's College Principal
Sonia Knowles — arrived at
her home in the Eastern
Estates subdivision at around
10pm on Tuesday when a
man accosted her and
demanded cash.

Police said he made off
with the victim's handbag,
which contained cash and per-
sonal effects, before fleeing
the area in a nearby vehicle —
believed to be a Honda.

Investigators are still trying
to determine whether the
thief targeted his victim or
simply struck when he saw an
opportunity.

Last night police said they
did not have a full description
of the attacker, who is said to
be a slim built, dark-skinned
male.

According to police, Ms
Knowles was not seriously
harmed during the robbery.

The incident occurred

SEE page 11



NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISCANDS) LEADING NEWSPAPER



- 325-157

‘Fan, Dears. Berean,

Tributes to
sporting icon

VINCENT Lloyd Fergu-
son (pictured) died at his
home yesterday morning
after an illness with prostate
cancer.

The former teacher/admin-
istrator, sporting icon and
sports administrator extraor-
dinaire, had celebrated his
71st birthday on August 25th.

Winston “Tappy” Davis,
who had a long affiliation
with the deceased, broke
down when he was asked to
describe his former friend and
team-mate. “It’s so sad that
he had to leave us,” said
Davis, who tried to contain
himself. “Vince was a straight
forward intelligent, honest
and hard working individual.

“He believed in everything
he was into and he cared a
whole lot about it. I never
knew that people that had the
kind of passion and commit-
ment in what they did the way
Vince did.”



ISLANDER

‘Waee Breer Checking Lit




THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



TEACHERS’ PROTEST

C I Gibson
students
miss classes
for third day

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

STUDENTS at C I Gibson
High missed out on lessons for
the third day yesterday as
teachers continued their protest
over inadequate working con-
ditions at the school.

The entire teaching body of
around 80 teachers who started
their “sit-in” on Monday said
they will not return to work
until there are enough desks
and chairs for all students, and
a science teacher and vice-prin-
cipal are in place.

Bahamas Union of Teachers
(BUT) president Belinda Wil-
son said students at the senior
high school in Marathon
Estates are forced to stand or
sit on desks during lessons
because there is not enough fur-
niture to accommodate every-
one in a class. The teachers are
also angry that the vice-princi-
pal position has not been filled
since the previous vice-principal
resigned two weeks ago.

Security is another major
issue at the high school as 11
knives and an ice-pick have
been found on the property this
term. Since the industrial action
began, four security officers and
three teachers have been post-
ed at C I Gibson, one of three
public schools disrupted by
industrial action this week.

The “sit-ins” started at Uriah
McPhee Primary School on
Kemp Road on Friday as teach-
ers refused to work until air-
conditioning was restored on
the second and third floors of
the school building.

Work was done over the
weekend to repair the air-con-
ditioning and students returned
to their classes at around 11am
on Monday. Staff at Anatol
Rodgers High School in Faith
Avenue staged a two-day “sit-
in” on Monday and Tuesday
over inadequate staffing and
furniture provisions.

They resumed teaching yes-
terday after receiving furniture
and a new English language
teacher. A second English lan-
guage teacher is expected to
arrive this morning.

Minister of Education Carl
Bethel failed to return The Tri-
bune’s calls yesterday to explain
why his department did not
ensure schools were sufficient-
ly staffed and furnished at the
start of the new school year.

Mts Wilson has criticised the
ministry for being reactionary,
rather than proactive in its
work, and she is calling on par-
ents to speak out for the good
of their children’s education.

The BUT president said: “It
is really disheartening that one
month into the school year we
are scrambling for teachers,
supplies, security officers, desks
and chairs.

0 In brief

inquests into
police related
shooting deaths

THREE police related
shooting deaths will be exam-
ined in three separate
inquests set to take place in
the Coroner’s Court over the
next two weeks. On Septem-
ber 25, an inquest into the
death of Dario McKenzie will
begin, followed by an inquiry
into the death of Lincoln Met-
telus on September 28 and
Drexel Rolle on October 5.

Also set to be begin at the
Coroner’s Court today is an
inquest into the death of
Trevor Ferguson stemming
from a traffic collision in
Andros. Meanwhile, on Octo-
ber 29 and 30, an inquest will
be held into the death of
Peter McWeeney, brother of
former Attorney General
Sean McWeeney, who died in
October 2003.

The Coroner’s Court
recently recorded a verdict of
“death by accident” in the
case of the shooting of securi-
ty guard Troy Russell in 2003.

Mr Russell, who worked at
the Shell Service Station
opposite Saunders Beach on
West Bay Street, had been
shot by the manager of the
station, Marcelles Saunders,
during a robbery. Mr Saun-
ders said he mistook Mr Rus-
sell for a burglar when he saw
him running towards him
from the direction of the
cashier’s cage on December
24, 2003. Jurors delivered
their verdict on August 12,
2009.

MURDER: RANDY WILLIAMS, 35

Police quiz suspect over Seagrape
Shopping Centre stabbing death

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A SUSPECT is being ques-
tioned by police in connection
with the murder of 35-year-old
Randy Williams at the Sea-
grape Shopping Centre on
Prince Charles Drive on Tues-
day evening.

Mr Williams, of Gladstone
Road, was stabbed several
times when an argument with
another man escalated into vio-
lence at around 5pm.

He was rushed to the
Princess Margaret Hospital and
died half an hour later, accord-
ing to police sources.

Supt Leon Bethel, officer in-
charge of the homicide depart-
ment in the Criminal Investi-
gation Unit, said he expects the
suspect will be charged in court
before the end of the week.

Police reported that Mr
Williams and another man were
in the shopping centre car park,
near the entrance of Body

Zone Fitness gym, when they
started to argue.

“The argument resulted in a
fight between the two men,”
Supt Bethel said. “One of the
men produced a weapon and
stabbed the other. He was
stabbed a number of times
about the body, and we are
waiting for the pathologist’s
report to tell us exactly how
many times he was stabbed.

“A sharp-pointed object was
used but we are not sure yet
what it was. The victim was tak-
en to hospital and pronounced
dead shortly after.”

Mr Williams is the country’s
63rd murder victim this year.
His murder was the third in
New Providence in just three
days. Rashad Morris, 21, a man-
ager at Burger King on Freder-
ick Street, and former manager
of Burger King on Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway, was
beaten and stabbed to death
outside the Tonique Williams-
Darling Highway restaurant at

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By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

SENATOR Jerome Fitzger-
ald will join the ranks of candi-
dates making a bid for the
deputy leadership of the PLP
when he officially launches his
campaign tonight at the Sun
And resort.

Citing his extensive business
background and experience
around the world, Mr Fitzger-
ald said that he hopes to be able
to assist PLP leader Perry
Christie in implementing his
vision for the Bahamas.

“Tam running for deputy
leader and the role that I see
for the deputy leader is to assist
the leader, and of course with
myself having some input in his
decision-making, but at the end
of the day it is his vision. The
other qualities I intend to bring
to the table is that I think I have
a close affinity and relationship
to the young generation, and it
is obvious to me that the party
has a void that needs to be
filled in ensuring that we have a
message that is relevant to the
younger generation. And in
that regard I think that they will
be looking to see whether or
not the PLP is really willing to
embrace the sort of change that
they demand at this time,” Mr
Fitzgerald said.

Persons wanting to be a part
of the candidate’s launch can
either join the senator at the
Sun And resort at 7pm tonight,
or watch it live on his website.

With profile pictures of him-
self and his family, Mr Fitzger-

eR Be Bes
A a
eG
eye Pag rey
nye AL |

ald’s website records the
endorsements of other success-
ful businessmen such as Nas-
sau Guardian publisher Antho-
ny Ferguson and Philip Kemp.

Mr Ferguson’s endorsement
reads: “I think the country is
looking for young visionary
leadership and I think Jerome,
as a family man, as a business-
man and as true friend, Jerome
can add a lot of value. This is
what the county needs at this
particular time.”

Mr Kemp’s reads: “One of
the things we lack today are
persons who have a vision of
where this country should go.
Jerome has always impressed
me with his vision for the coun-
try.”

Attorney

An attorney by profession,
Mr Fitzgerald is the chairman
and a director of RND Hold-
ings Limited, a diversified com-
pany he co-founded in 1993
with several subsidiaries.

Senator Fitzgerald is also a
director of A Scott Fitzgerald
Insurance Brokers and Agents,

around 1.30am on Sunday.
Burger King has put up a
$10,000 reward for any infor-
mation which could lead to the
arrest or conviction of his killer.

Soaring

Just hours later on Sunday,
Bahamasair pilot Lionel Lewis
McQueen, 29, was shot dead at
his home in Golden Palm
Estates, near the Kennedy Sub-
division. A police investigation
into the suspicious deaths of
four people killed in a house
fire last Thursday morning
could lead to the reclassifica-
tion of those deaths as homi-
cides and send the murder
count soaring to 67 this year.

That would amount to ten
more homicides this year than
the 57 recorded at the same
time last year.

Supt Bethel is appealing to
the public to come forward with
any information which could
help solve all of the above




JEROME FITZGERALD

an insurance firm started by his
mother over 20 years ago.
Additionally, he holds direc-
torships on the boards of three
public companies namely RND
Holdings Limited, Bahamas
Waste Limited, Freeport Con-
crete Company Limited and the
privately held Global United
Limited.
























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Sept, 24- Oct. 3

crimes. “We have lots of assis-
tance from members of the
public and we do appreciate
that, but we do believe that
with more assistance from the
public we will see a better rate
of solution and we would see a
reduction in the number of

murders,” he said. Anyone with
information should call 911 or
919 urgently, or call Crime
Stoppers anonymously on 328-
TIPS (8477). Calls to Crime
Stoppers are answered in the
United States and ensure total
anonymity.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Which study said

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

United Nations hears its detractors

WE WERE surprised yesterday morning
after the rambling 90-minute speech to the
UN of Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi to
hear news commentators wonder out loud if
people like Kadafi and Iran’s President
Ahmadinejad should be allowed into the
United States.

This is what we would have expected to
hear — and did hear— from the protesters in
the streets, but were surprised that news
commentators did not seem to know that
the United Nations on First Street in Man-
hattan, New York, is located on interna-
tional — and not American — territory.

Of course, the United States could stop
such persons landing at New York’s airports,
but if they were denied landing rights and
free passage to the international area, the
UN would have to be removed from the
U.S. However, there is prestige involved in
having this international body in its present
location. It is a distinction that we doubt
New York would give up lightly.

Wrapped in his flowing coffee-coloured
robes, Kadafi’s disjointed speech touched
on every topic — including the jet lag from
which he was suffering to get to New York.
He highlighted the sins of the world, side-
stepping his own oppressive human rights
atrocities. He was highly critical of the Secu-
rity Council, which to him was elitist with a
handful of superpowers — US, Britain,
France, Russia and China —controlling the
world.

He complained of the limits placed on
visitors like himself in travelling around New
York, likening it to being imprisoned at
Guantanamo Bay. We wonder what free-
dom others from the outside world would
have in Tripoli if the tables were turned. Of
course, Kadafi was in New York to point
out the moat in his brother’s eye, not to
examine his own — and so_ there wasn’t
even a whisper about the aircraft blown up
by a Libyan terrorist over Lockerbie, Scot-
land — a subject so much in the news in
recent weeks.

We must admit that in the early days we
were not a great fan of the UN, dismissing it
as a debating society that spent too much
money, often unwisely.

However, as a graduate student of
Columbia University’s Journalism School
in the late fifties we were assigned to the
Associated Press desk at the UN. On Feb-
ruary 8, 1958 we saw the true worth of the
UN. This was during the height of the Alger-
ian-Tunisian war of independence from
France. Early that morning French aircraft
from Algeria bombed the Tunisian border
village of Sakhiet Sidi Youssef. It was as

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though the bomb had been dropped in the
centre of the UN. Delegates scattered to
find their counterparts from around the
world. They huddled in deep negotiations.
They desperately tried to extinguish the
Mediterranean fire. This was the advantage
of heads of the world’s nations being togeth-
er under one roof and being able to meet
together quickly to solve world problems.

As for Iran’s Mahmoud Ahmadinejad
with his downtrodden look and apologetic
frame, he believes that the Holocaust is a lie
created by the West to justify the existence
of Israel.

He too was in New York to bring his
message of “peace” to the UN, while back in
Teheran, his government is forging ahead
with its controversial nuclear programme,
ostensibly to protect itself from Israel.

Ahmadinejad was born 11 years after the
second world war, and so has no first hand
knowledge of the events of those times.

But for those who lived during the war
years and still have vivid memories of those
days, Ahmadinejad can be dismissed as an
hallucinating nut case.

We probably remember more than the
average Bahamian, because we grew up in a
newspaper office where local and world news
daily swirled.

We shall never forget our first sight of
death. In The Tribune that particular morn-
ing was Life magazine’s first edition showing
bodies tumbling out of the ovens of
Auschwitz.

We were struck dumb in disbelief. Men
with sunken eyes, open mouths and thin
skin pulled over skeleton frames thrown one
on top of the other at all angles. Trenches
filled with naked skeletons — horror upon
horror upon horror. As a child we could not
believe that men could stoop to such bes-
tiality.

There is a photograph that has haunted us
all our life. It is a picture of sad faced Jews
lined up to be loaded into trains for the gas
chambers. In front there is a little boy, no
more than six years old, with the sadness of
the world in his eyes, a cloth cap is on his
head.

He is clinging to his mother’s hand. Help-
less, hopeless, lost. How could any human
being treat a small, innocent child like this.

The Nazis were a special breed — they
were less than human. Whatever boat they
shipped out on for Hades, we hope that it is
the Devil who is now stoking the flames
under them.

As for President Ahamdinejad and those
who think like him, we hope that the world
will be spared their pathetic ignorance.



Arawak Cay was the
place for a port?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Arawak Cay port — which
consultant supported using
the Cay for a Port?

I listened to the live broad-
cast from the FNM Headquar-
ters in August and was struck
by the responses and the arro-
gance of the tone of the voice of
the various participants.

Why can’t our politicians
take the licks?

We are now seeing this atti-
tude in the US — the most
recent one being that of Bar-
ney Franks when he held a
community meeting on the
Health Care proposals — his
arrogance was absolutely unac-
ceptable when one considers he
is there in that position simply
because the people voted him
in.

Getting back to the issue of
this letter — Minister of State
Laing said on this broadcast as
a response to a fax read by

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



Wendall Jones that considera-
tion of the pluses for Arawak
Cay were excluded in one of
the Studies.

The Minister knows full well
as we have been there many
times that the last Study, so-
called the Ecory’s Study, was
specifically for the then “chosen
site” subject to their study
results. It is my understanding
that there was no intent to
study any alternative as that
had already been completed by
Coastal International.

The Minister seems not to
understand that even the 19-
proposed shareholders of the
now Arawak Cay proposal paid
50 per cent of the Ecory’s
Study cost so we surely have to
accept they were on board with

the government if everything
came out favourably they
would support the location at
Clifton, or am I crazy?

For the Minister to say that
Arawak Cay was excluded is
very irresponsible and, in my
opinion a deliberate attempt to
confuse.

Which study said Arawak
was the place, Minister?

Can The Tribune collect all
the studies made on the port
proposal over the years from
Checci forward and publish the
conclusion section so we Joe
Public can understand which
location was supported and
which certainly were not — The
Tribune will do the country and
us a considerable favour by
doing this....we wait.

ABRAHAM MOSS
Nassau,
August, 2009.

Too much made from Congressman Wilson’s comment

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Far too much has been made from the outcry
of one Congressman Wilson during the recent
speech of President Obama at the joint session of
the US House.

There is accepted and appropriate “parlia-
mentary language” although some might say the
use of the words “that’s a lie” might not be dis-
creet enough the facts say it all — in an open
democracy no man is above scrutiny and cer-
tainly no president is or no prime minister
because neither are infallible and make all kinds
of mistakes.

Certainly it is interesting that Cable Channels
like MSNBC have made a big issue over Repre-
sentative Wilson’s comment but in true reality
when a speaker misquotes or says something to
cause praise (applause) are not both actions sim-
ilar and just part of the democratic process and
we should not be so thinned skinned?

Now the incredible rather stupid statement of
an ex-US President Jimmy Carter — I seriously
suggest that it would be best for the good gen-
tleman to remain on his peanut farm and stay qui-
et as his comment does not merit comment as
President Obama was elected by whites-blacks-

Editor, we have this prevailing thought
amongst many who sit in parliament, be it the
House of Assembly or the Senate, that when
certain people speak the “world” has to stop.
All representatives are elected, except in our
case the Senate, and therefore their colleagues
have within accepted form (regrettably it seems
the current speaker is restricting this privilege
and limiting the verbage that can be used) can say
so long established exclamations as “shame” to
indicate their personal unacceptance of a state-
ment. In this day where MPs are unable to ad-lib,
speak without written speeches, there is no excuse
for inaccurate statements. Mr Speaker, please
note this is not permitted.

Politicians have to understand that their free
spending — irresponsible policies and lacking of
definitive economic policy is what is causing the
massive grass-root protests. I suggest the man
in the street has better housekeeping qualifica-
tions than most politicians and they recognise
you can’t continue to spend-spend and spend
irrationally.

W THOMPSON
Nassau,

latinos and everyone else.

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I am writing to ask about
the status of the College of the
Bahamas' fabulous, new, “state
of the art” publicly funded the-
atre that opened with much
fanfare at the earlier part of the
year and, as far as I know (and
I stand to be corrected), has not
been used for a public event
since.

At the inaugural event —
the Colour of Harmony — it
was stated that the theatre had
been built at much expense for
the use of the country's artists
and it was hoped that it would
be constantly in use.

It is indeed a magnificent
theatre and I applaud whom-
soever is responsible for accom-
plishing such a feat — but I
would like to find out what
exactly is the criteria for use of
the theatre, and whether the
theatre is going to remain, as

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What is the status of COB's ‘state-of-the-art’ theatre?

do many of our Bahamian “liv-
ing parlours”, covered in plastic
for “show only” for only cer-
tain “exclusive” events, or is it
intended to be actually filled
with cultural enthusiasts anx-
ious to drink from the well of
Bahamian creativity and tal-
ent? These thoughts came to
mind as the time rapidly
approaches for one of the most
exciting dramatic events in the
country — the Shakespeare in
Paradise Festival due to take
place from October 5-12 which,
through the rich talent of dedi-
cated and hard working
Bahamian artists, is poised to
present first class dramatic tal-
ent to the people of The
Bahamas and the world.
Imagine what such a festi-
val can do to fill the literary
starved minds of our commu-
nity? Imagine how such an
event, if properly nourished,
can grow into a spectacle that

will not only offer our commu-
nity avenues to express their
creativity and talent on the
stage, but will inspire more per-
sons to write plays and books,
provide the original music for
dramatic events, design stage
scenery and costumes, learn
how to work the lights and
sound stage, exercise their pro-
motional and marketing skills
sage the possibilities are endless.
I venture to speculate that most
of the work being done for this
Festival is a “labour of love”
by the participants and I
applaud any entity who is offer-
ing them much needed spon-
sorship. So I wish to ask the
question: ‘““Why isn't the COB
Theatre listed as one of the
venues on the ‘Shakespeare in
Paradise’ timetable?”

PAM BURNSIDE
Nassau,
September 23, 2009

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS







By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

SWINE flu vaccinations will
be made available in the
Bahamas from the World
Health Organisation’s global
supply, or if government makes
a direct request to suppliers and
manufacturers in the United
States.

The vaccinations to protect
individuals from serious illness
or death resulting from the
highly infectious H1N1 influen-
za were approved by the Unit-
ed States government Food and
Drug Administration last week.

Around half of the US pop-
ulation, that is 160 million
Americans are expected to
receive the inoculations from
mid-October. At risk groups
will take priority for the inocu-
lations, including pregnant
women, healthcare workers,
children and young adults, as
well as the chronically ill in the
US. People caring for infants
will also receive priority.

Dr Minnis said healthcare
workers would take priority in
the Bahamas as they are most
at risk of infection, and the
Ministry of Health is taking a
pro-active approach by work-
ing with schools to prepare chil-
dren and staff for the possibili-
ty of an outbreak in the upcom-
ing flu season.

The Minister said supplies
will be ordered through the
World Health Organisation
(WHO) when necessary, as the
WHO retains a supply of vac-
cinations for developing coun-
tries around the world.

He added: “We will watch
World Health Organisation
reports and communicate with
them and purchase the vacci-

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nations as necessary. We will
not be left out in the cold.”

Local pharmaceutical com-
panies in the Bahamas which
have tried to order the vacci-
nations have been told by sup-
pliers and manufacturers they
cannot purchase the live vacci-
nations without a special
request from the Bahamas gov-
ernment as the new inocula-
tions are in limited supply.

Nassau Agencies Barbara
Donathan-Henderson said:
“At least one doctor has been
harassing us to bring it in, but
the only way we can do that is if
it was being sold to government
in a government purchase
order, and even then they may
not order it through us. “If we
had the option we would have
brought it in so people would
be able to take it if they wanted
to, but it is up to the govern-
ment to make that decision.”

Lowe’s Wholesale Pharma-
ceutical has also failed to bring
in the inoculations. Sales Man-
ager Carrol Sands said: “I have
not had any confirmation as to
when we will be getting any as
yet. “I have been communicat-
ing with companies that we deal
with, and they have told me
their first priority is providing it
to institutions in the US.”

A representative from Com-
monwealth Drugs and Medical
Supplies told The Tribune: “It is
all being sold directly to gov-
ernment and we have had no
indication from the government
as to whether or not they would
want us to bring in any.”

There have been at least 29
confirmed cases of swine flu in
the Bahamas this year, and
although the virus has a high
infection rate, Dr Minnis said it
is far less deathly than regular
flu as about 40,000 people in
the United States die as a result
of the regular flu every year,
while just 600 people have died
from the H1N1 virus since it
became apparent earlier this
year.

Ph: 325-3336

Policeman’s death: Murder trial resumes

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The trial of
two men accused of murdering
a policeman resumed in the
Supreme Court on Tuesday.

Edwin Bauld Jr and Wilfred
McPhee Jr are accused of the
murder, kidnapping and rob-
bery of Police Corporal Eddi-
son Bain in October 2007.

Acting Justice Jethro Miller
is presiding over the trial, which
was interrupted briefly when
Bauld made a loud outburst in
the courtroom as a prosecution
witness was giving testimony in
the witness box.

Justice Miller advised
Bauld’s attorney that the out-
burst was not acceptable and
initiated a five minute break.
Bauld was later escorted from
the courtroom by two police
officers to give him time to cool
off. The decomposed body of
Corporal Eddison Bain was dis-
covered on October 22, 2007,
in a ditch near the Casuarina
Bridge. Bain’s hands and feet
were bound and a large stone
was on his head. The body was
covered with tree shrubs and
stones in a four-foot deep ditch.

K Brian Hanna represents
Bauld and Mario Gray repre-
sents McPhee. It is alleged that
the accused men kidnapped
Bain, robbed him of his ATM
bank card and withdrew money
from his account. On Monday,
the prosecution produced a
video that showed one of the
accused men withdrawing mon-
ey using Bain’s ATM card.

Hospital pathologist Dr Cor-
nelius Kachali gave evidence in
the trial on Tuesday.

Dr Kachali, who performed
an autopsy on Corporal Bain,
said the cause of death was a
blunt force trauma to the head.

He said that the skull was
penetrated as a result of the
blunt force. He added that Bain
was alive when he sustained the
injury because there was a
swelling of the brain which can
only occur if a person is alive at
the time.

Lawyer Brian Hanna asked if
Bain could have survived his
injuries if he had been taken to
hospital. Dr Kachali said that
Bain’s chances of survival were
“very slim.” “Statistically sur-
vival is not good, he would have
lived only for two minutes after
sustaining injuries,” he said.

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Lawyer Mario Gray asked
Dr Kachali if Bain, while
bound, could have sustained
the injury himself by falling and
hitting his head. Dr Kachali said
that it was impossible because
the deceased was found face up
in the ditch with a huge stone
on his head.

Also giving evidence was
Gahnise Campbell, the girl-
friend of Edwin Bauld Jr.

Ms Campbell told the court


























































that she was Bauld’s girlfriend
during 2007. She said that she
and Bauld had been dating for
six months. She said she had
known Wilfred McPhee Jr all
her life as he was her cousin
and they grew up in the same
neighbourhood.

Ms Campbell said a week
before October 20 she went for
aride with Edwin and Eddison.
She said Eddison was Edwin’s
cousin. She said Edwin and

Eddison went into a liquor
store for two Guinness. They
then went to Commonwealth
Bank because she wanted to
check her account.

“T gave Edwin my ATM card
to check if the money he had
put on the card was on my
account,” she said. Ms Camp-
bell said they went to Bell
Channel Resort.

She was given $100 and went
to pay for a room for the night.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Road Traffic Department holds



customer service workshop

PUBLIC Works and
Transport Minister
Neko Grant gives the
opening remarks at
the launch of a two-
day workshop for
staff of the Road
Traffic Department on
Tuesday. Road Traffic
Controller Philip
Turner is pictured in
the background.

Letisha Henderson/BIS



The Bahamas Utilities Co-operative
Credit Union Limited

NOTICE OF SPECIAL
GENERAL MEETING

A Special General Meeting of
the Bahamas Utilities Co-operative
Credit Union Limited
will be held on

Friday, October 2nd, 2009

at
6:00 p.m.
in
The Patrick A. Bain Training Room
at
The Bahamas Co-operative League Building
Russell Road, Oakes Field

PURPOSE OF THE MEETING

The purpose of the meeting is to seek approval
from the membership for a merger with National
Workers Co-operative Credit Union Limited. Note
that the Annual General Meeting held May 28th,
2009, authorized the Board of Directors to seek
alliance with a larger credit union.

Secretary: Dexter Cartwright




























BY KATHRYN CAMPBELL

THE Road Traffic Depart-
ment has a vital role to play in
providing services and con-
tributing to the economic and
social development of the
Bahamas, Public Works and
Transport Minister Neko
Grant said. “Each staff mem-
ber therefore has the respon-
sibility of ensuring that these
services are provided to the
satisfaction of customers.”

Mr Grant officially opened
the first of a two-day work-
shop for staff of the Road
Traffic Department on Tues-
day at Workers House. The
theme for the workshop is
“Forward in Growth -
Together for Excellence.”

One hundred staff members
representing various units in
the Department participated
in the workshop designed to
enhance customer service
skills. The workshop is in
keeping with the governmen-
t’s service improvement pro-
gramme that aims to formu-
late strategies for internal and
external service improvement.

The programme was imple-
mented in six key service
delivery agencies within the
public service. Speakers for
both days included Philip
Turner, Controller of Depart-
ment of Road Traffic, who
spoke on the topic “The Way
Forward for the Road Traffic
Department”; Elma Gar-
raway, Permanent Secretary
in the Ministry of Education,
on “Dress Code and Work
Ethics”, and Rev James Pala-
cious on the topic “Setting
Standards for Excellence.”

“Excellence in service
delivery is challenging under
normal circumstances. How-
ever, it presents an even
greater challenge in today’s
society from a general per-
spective in both the public
and private sectors,” Minister
Grant said. “Globalisation has
had a significant impact on
customers’ expectations. We
now see an increasing demand
by customers for better ser-
vice in a work environment
that reflects current economic
circumstances where more
efficiency in the use of
resources is required.”

Weight LOSS...
Health Gain

CAT ISLAND: Rotary Club proposal
Plans for state-of-the-art

resource centre, library

BY AVA TURNQUEST

USING an old teacher's
cottage given by the Ministry
of Works and Ministry of
Education, the newly formed
Rotary Club Cat Island plans
to create a state-of-the-art
community resource centre
and library.

With an estimated com-
pletion date of September
2010, the library is a much
needed resource on the island
as the club hopes it will bring
a fresh and exciting challenge
for the youth.

The club, currently
totalling 21 members and
directors, is the first and only
Rotary Club on Cat Island.

President-elect Gwendolyn
Rolle, former member of the
Rotary Club of Lucaya
Freeport, Grand Bahama,
says the club began meeting
in November 2008 with a
group of professionals at the
island's resource centre.

“Rotary brings a new kind
of hope to the community,”
said Ms Rolle, “the youth and
the elderly at large.”

The club believes that the
library is most needed, bring-
ing a fresh and exciting chal-
lenge for the youth of Cat
Island.

The library, located in
Bennett’s Harbour, will be the
club's maiden civic project
since its official installation
and charter to the global asso-
ciation June 13, 2009.

“Ready students need a
safe and informative environ-
ment in order to complete
school projects, do research,
and be in touch with the
world in a controlled envi-
ronment,” said Ms Rolle.

HISTORY

The world's first service
club, the Rotary Club of
Chicago, was formed in 1905
by Paul Harris, an attorney
who wished to capture in a
professional club the same
friendly spirit he had felt in
the small towns of his youth.

Now Rotary International
is a global network of volun-
teers, enhancing their com-
munities and promoting inter-
national goodwill through

] 4 7



“Rotary brings a
new kind of hope
to the community,
the youth and the
elderly at large.”



Gwendolyn Rolle

club projects, scholarships and
grants for development and
humanitarian projects.
Rotary Club of Cat Island is
part of Rotary District 7020
comprising 10 countries and
16 islands in the Caribbean,
being one of the 75 clubs in
the District with over 2400
Rotarians, all men and
women with the finest cre-
dentials.

Area District Governor
Felix Stubbs spoke to the
newly installed club, encour-
aging them to utilise tools and
opportunities the organisation
presents. “My personal grat-
itude and appreciation to the
business and professional
community of Cat Island for
embracing Rotary whole-
heartedly and to the Rotary
Club of South East Nassau
for the sponsorship and duly
represented by the Club Pres-
ident David Moncur, Presi-
dent-elect Anna deGregory
and other members of that
Club.

“This is your opportunity
to exploit the immense pos-
sibilities for your communi-
ty,” Mr. Stubbs said. “The
onus is on you to create
friendship and fellowship, to
invite the best amongst your
vocations to join hands with
you, to do good so as to give
back, and to be recognised in
the world as an important seg-
ment of the world communi-

ty.”
DONATIONS

The Rotary Club of Cat
Island has received numerous
donations from both the pub-
lic and private sectors. The
government, through the
Ministry of Works and Min-
istry of Education, has donat-

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ed the cottage with supplies
and books and has also com-
mitted to provide a librarian
upon its completion.

The club has set up a reg-
istry for material at Kelly’s
Lumber Yard and Marathon
Mall location. To access this
registry, interested persons
should contact Mr. Robert
Plank. The public can pur-
chase discounted items on the
“Rotary Club of Cat Island
Material for Library List” that
Kelly’s will ship to Cat Island
at the start of the project. Pri-
vate companies that have also
provided outstanding support
to this project have been Cat
Island Air, The Christie
Estate, Orange Creek Car
Rental, Neighbourhood Food
Store and many more.

Local contractors on the
island have also donated their
time, which has allowed the
club to save on labour costs.
Mr Allworth Rolle drew the
renovation plans and Mr.
Lewis Sweeting has commit-
ted to all the electrical wiring.

“T would really like to
acknowledge all members of
the community and the club
that has donated their time
and funds,” said Ms Rolle,
“working tirelessly to see this
project brought to reality.

COOK-OUT

The club will host its first
cook-out from noon to 6 pm
on Saturday, October 3, on
the grounds of the library in
Bennett’s Harbour. Joining
them will be representatives
from the various Rotary fam-
ilies in the Bahamas as they
kick off the first phase of the
renovation project.

“This will be a day of fun,
with work as well as play,”
said Ms Rolle. “There will be
a lot of local goodies on sale
and we are eager to share this
experience with the commu-
nity and our visiting clubs.”

In addition to their sched-
uled civic duties, the club also
plans to renovate local parks
and play areas and raise funds
for a multi-purpose sport
facility for the community.

“T have great faith in your
brand new club and its
promising membership,” said
Mr Stubbs. “I truly believe
that the club will make a
strong statement that indeed a
new entrant is no less versatile
and vibrant than a veteran in
the world of service and fel-
lowship.”

Donations can also be sent
to The Rotary, Arthur’s Town
Post Office, Cat Island. The
club meets every Thursday at
7pm at The Boggie Pond
Restaurant in Arthur’s Town.
All visiting Rotarians are wel-
come.

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THE TRIBUNE

DPM Symonette
accompanied
by Ministers
Earl Deveaux,
Dion Foulkes

BY LINDSAY
THOMPSON

DEPUTY Prime Minister
and Minister of Foreign
Affairs Brent Symonette left
the country yesterday to
address the 64th Session of
the United Nations General
Assembly in New York ona
number of issues relevant to
the Bahamas.

He will also sign a Tax
Information Exchange
Agreement (TIEA) with the
Republic of San Marino, in
keeping with standards set
out by the Organisation for
Economic and Cooperation
and Development (OECD).

Mr Symonette, along with
other CARICOM leaders
will address the session
tomorrow on the vulnera-
bility of Small Island Devel-
oping States (SIDS), and
devise ways for a more
cohesive union. He is being
accompanied by Minister of
the Environment Earl
Deveaux and Senator Dion
Foulkes, Minister of Labour.

Issues

Main issues for the session
are the Millennium Devel-
opment Goals; the world
financial and economic crisis
and its impact on develop-
ment; climate change; disar-
mament; United Nations
reform; review of the peace-
building commission and the
Human Rights Council.

Yesterday, United States
President Barack Obama
gave his first speech to the



BRENT SYMONETTE

UN General Assembly. In
a speech that was described
as “audacious” by some
observers, he said his coun-
try is committed to “a new
chapter of international
cooperation.”

“Those who used to chas-
tise America for acting
alone in the world cannot
now stand by and wait for

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

CAL NEWS eee
Minister of Foreign Affairs to address the United Nations

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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





» SLINX

Don’t miss This Special Business Information Meeting
IN THE BAHAMAS

You are cordially invited to a Special Presentation Introducing A Cutting
Edge New Technology and Business Opportunity

Special Guest Speaker
Executive Director

MARVA SCOTT

All the way from the

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Event Info: Thursday September 24, 2009 @ 7:00 p.m.
Saturday September 26, 2009 @ 6:00 p.m.
Hillside Restoration Center, Marathon Road, Upstairs Wallace Auto
BAHAMAS
R.S.V.P: Patsy Davis - 242-525-1605 / 242-394-8237
Email:_trivenadavis @ hotmail.com

DOOR PRIZE WILL BE GIVEN TO THE FIRST 25 GUESTS



BY NOELLE NICOLLS

ITH the

ongoing

debate

about the
proposed amendment to the
Sexual Offences and Domestic
Violence Act of 1991, I
became very curious about the
perspectives of the Bahamas
Christian Council. I decided
to attend a meeting, but when
I arrived the group gathered
was actually a rogue Christ-
ian group, known as the

INVITATION FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (EOI)
FOR THE PROVISION OF PROFESSIONAL SERVICES TO CONDUCT
A COMPREHENSIVE ENGINEEERING ASSESSMENT OF THE
PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL - NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The Public Hospitals Authority of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas is
seeking proposals from qualified professional engineering firms to provide
consultancy services for completing a comprehensive assessment of the HVAC,
ELECTRICAL, PLUMBING, and STRUCTUAL SYSTEMS within the Princess

Margaret Hospital.

The purpose of this assessment is to develop a comprehensive Engineering Report

for the Princess Margaret Hospital.

The selected firm will be required to design and lead the assessment process and
deliver a full report on the current situation, detailing and benchmarking against
acceptable standards and trends for the proposed redevelopment of the Princess

Margaret Hospital.

Note: The project will follow GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH
OF THE BAHAMAS MINISTRY OF WORKS Standard Form of Agreement
between Authority and Consultant (Engineer) adapted for use by the Public

Hospitals Authority.

The principal project goals of the Firm are to:

° Develop a comprehensive engineering assessment report on the current

condition at the Princess Margaret Hospital;

Provide realistic engineering schematics design of the facility for

redevelopment; and

Provide specialist consultancy services for the planning and evaluation of
the Princess Margaret Hospital Redevelopment Project.

Firms should emphasize: (1) general consulting experience; (ii) working experi-
ence in hospital redevelopment service within an Acute Hospital; (iti) availability

of appropriate skill sets within the firm.

This Expressions of Interest will be evaluated based on the qualifications and rele-
vant experience of the firm and the results will be used to prepare a shortlist of no
more than six (6) Professional Engineering firms. Those included in the shortlist
will subsequently be invited to present technical and economical proposals on the
basis of a Request-for-Proposals (RFP) forwarded to them, which would include

the detailed Terms of Reference.

Name, Addresses and Contact Point (s):
Address: The Public Hospitals Authority

Building B, Third and West Terrace, Collins Avenue

Contact:

Managing Director, Attn: Herbert Brown, P.O. Box N-8200,

Nassau, Bahamas; Tel: (242) 502-1400; Fax: (242) 323-1422.
Interested Professional Engineering Firms should submit their expression of
interest to the address above no later than 5th October 2009 during office hours

(9:00am —5:00pm)



LOOKING AT VIOLENCE AND MARRIAGE

The five interesting lessons I learned at a
Bahamas Christian Consortium meeting

SO a

Bahamas Christian Consor-
tium (BCC). I stayed anyway
and learned five interesting
lessons.

Marriage is the ultimate
form of martyrdom

When a man and a woman
join as one in marriage they
literally give up their individ-
ual selves to become one body
under God, not in a
metaphorical sense, but phys-
ically. A miracle happens and
their bodies join up like con-
genital twins, which means
they are incapable of raping
each other. “Marriage is a
covenant [with] your life long
partner. You are no longer to
operate as individuals but a
bond where the two are to
become one. So how can one
rape themselves, especially
when you vowed to fulfil each
other sexually?” Ingenious
words of Keith Ferguson, who
is not a member of the BCC,
but considered a prophet.

Men marry to avoid the
sin of fornication.

Since men are sexual beasts
at heart and prime fornicators,
marriage is the best solution: a
sacred space where sexual
relations are acceptable to
God not just for procreation.
Marriage is an unrestricted
pleasure club for men and
women: once signing the mar-
riage contract both parties
agree to “upfront, implicit,
open-ended sexual consent”.
This is not what the actual
Marriage Act says or implies,
but the moral law of God,
according to the Bahamas
Christian Council sanctions
this interpretation. This
makes sense, considering it is
much easier for a woman to
give her man a key to the
house so he does not have to
knock on the door to gain
entry every time he wants to
get in.

Sexual violence in
marriage is sacred
and intimate.

The Bahamas Christian
Council in their official state-
ment said one of the questions
causing grave concern over
the proposed amendments
was: “How far should the gov-
ernment be going with things
that are sacred and intimate?”
A marriage is sacred no mat-
ter how unhealthy it is, even
where the most extreme forms
of sexual violence exist. An
assault against men who rape
their wives is an assault
against all married men and
women. The Christian com-
munity has a responsibility to
uphold the moral laws of God
and protect these sacred and
intimate marriages.

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If there is no violence in
the lead up to rape then no
violent act occurred.

The BCC is very concerned
about a complete “multi-gen-
erational breakdown” in soci-
ety if the government is
allowed to make men answer-
able to the law for raping their
wives. Spiritual icon of the
movement Myles Munroe
believes the law “could” be or
“perhaps should” be amended
only if the activities leading
up to the “sexual intercourse”
are abusive, violent and force-
ful. So the sexually violent act
of rape itself is not sufficient to
warrant the government get-
ting into the marriage bed.
The lead up to “sexual inter-
course” also has to be violent.

Lesbian feminists are
trying to destroy
marriage.

The valid concern of the
BCC is there are many
“malignant, evil, spiteful,
whoremonger” women who
are itching for the opportuni-
ty to get back at their hus-
bands “because of some
unfortunate circumstance”
and married men in unhealthy
violent relationships need to
be protected by the church. If
the feminists succeed in pass-
ing this amendment it will
open the gates of hell for all
homosexuals to wield politi-
cal power in the Bahamas.

After the meeting | heard
people asking the question
on whose behalf does Rev-
erend Patrick Paul speak.



‘The BCC seems
to be a rogue
organisation, or
revolutionary,
depending on
one’s perspective,
run by a few
ministers in New
Providence. They
speak for them-
selves. I realised
they are so
forward
thinking that
normal people
cannot keep up
with their logic.’
—SSS————

He speaks for the Bahamas
Christian Council, as their
President, not for the
Bahamas Christian Consor-
tium (BCC).

Despite their names, nei-
ther organisation represents
Catholics, Methodists, and
Seventh-Day Adventists, who
all support the amendment.

The Bahamas Christian
Council is a public front pri-
marily representing Baptist
and Church of God members.

The BCC seems to be a
rogue organisation, or revo-
lutionary, depending on one’s
perspective, run by a few min-
isters in New Providence.
They speak for themselves.

I realised they are so for-
ward thinking that normal
people cannot keep up with
their logic.

¢ Noelle Nicolls is a Pan-
Caribbean writer trained as a
professional journalist. She is
also a political commentator
and new media entrepreneur.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

Mr Travolta, 55, explained
how Jett was autistic and suf-
fered from a seizure disorder.
He said Jett would suffer a
seizure every five to 10 days.
Each time the seizures would
last for about 45 seconds. Mr
Travolta recalled that around
10.15am on January 2, he was
wakened by Eli Wheaton, one
of Jett’s nannies, who was
pounding on his bedroom
door. The actor said that he
and his wife ran downstairs
to help their son.

“T saw him on the bath-
room floor. Jeff Kathrein, his
other nanny and a woman
from Old Bahama Bay were
doing CPR,” Mr Travolta
said. Mr Travolta said that he
took the place of the woman
doing CPR.

“Jeff Kathrein was doing
compression and I was doing
breathing,” Mr Travolta said.
Mr Travolta said that while
all this was taking place, his
wife was holding their son’s
head.

Mr Travolta told the court
that Jared McGrath, who was
a part of a group visiting for a
party he was having for
employees, also continued the
compressions. Mr Travolta
said that he knew McGrath
to have medical expertise and
he fitted his son with a defib-
rillator.

Mr Travolta testified that
after 35 minutes an ambu-
lance came and Jett was
placed on a gurney and taken
to the ambulance while Jared
continued the compressions.

Mr Travolta told the court
that outside the condo, he
spoke to the ambulance driver
and following that exchange
he received a liability release
document which he signed.
Mr Travolta admitted that he
did not read the document.

“Time was of the
essence,” Mr Travolta told the
court, when asked by lead
prosecutor and Director of
Public Prosecutions Bernard
Turner why he had not read
the document.

Fashion

JETT TRAVOLTA



Mr Travolta said he told
the ambulance driver to take
Jett to the airport at Old
Bahama Bay, the reason
being, he said, was so that he
could take his son on a jet to

‘ .

LOCAL NEWS

Travolta: Jett’s final moments

West Palm Beach rather than
taking him to the Freeport
hospital. Mr Travolta testi-
fied, however, that Jett was
taken to the Freeport hospital
by ambulance.

“T was in the back of the
ambulance. There was EMT
and one other person,” Mr
Travolta told the court.

When asked by the prose-
cutor whether anything hap-
pened on the way to the hos-
pital, Mr Travolta said that
“there was a stop where there
was a switching of drivers.”

Mr Travolta told the court
that once they arrived at the
hospital, he stayed with Jett in
the hospital room until he was
asked to leave.

He said the last time he
saw Jett at the hospital he was
not alive.

Mr Travolta said he stayed
on Grand Bahama for about
four days after Jett’s death,

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the United States.

Both defence attorneys
Murrio Ducille and Carlson
Shurland opted not to cross-
examine Mr Travolta yester-
day as the actor is expected
to be recalled after certain
other witnesses have given
evidence.

Bridgewater, 49, and
Lightbourne, 47, are accused
of conspiring to extort and
attempting to extort money
from Mr Travolta between
January 2 and 20 by means of
threats. Bridgewater is also
accused of abetment to extor-
tion.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 9



US ACTOR John Travolta, left, and wife Kelly Preston leave the
court building in Nassau yesterday.

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Lawyer indicted in U



FROM page one

Mr Cambridge was alleged to have facilitated the scheme by cre-
ating a Bahamian International Business Company (IBC), Hexa-
gon Development, and setting up a bank account for the company
at FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas).

He then allegedly handled wire transfers totalling hundreds of
thousands of dollars.

The “sting” was part of an FBI investigation into public official
corruption in the Miami area, and one of Mr Cambridge’s fellow
defendants is former vice-mayor of Broward County and Broward
County Commissioner, Josephus Eggelleton.

In 2006, Eggelleton was alleged to have told an FBI agent and
“cooperating witness”: “If you wanna do some deals in the
Bahamas, let me know.

“Yes sir. In fact, ’m gonna be raising some money for the
Prime Minister of the Bahamas that’s running for re-election.” That
appears to imply that he was going to donate to the PLP’s 2007
election campaign, although there is nothing to suggest the party
or Mr Christie did anything wrong in relation to this or the situa-
tion surrounding Mr Cambridge.

See Tribune Business for full story.

FROM page one

ident of the UK’s new Supreme
Court, said he is looking for
ways to reduce the “dispropor-
tionate” amount of time judges
who staff that court also spend
on cases coming from outside
the UK.

The President questioned
whether some Privy Council
cases, which have ranged from
Jamaican death row appeals to
fights over press freedom in
Bermuda, needed to be heard
by a panel of five of Britain’s
most senior judges.

Robert Hazell, director of
The Constitution Unit at Uni-
versity College London, claims
it is a “minor public scandal”
that judges in the country’s top
court spend almost half their

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time on business “of no interest
to anyone in the UK”, refer-
ring to those cases originating in
places like the Bahamas.

One former Governor Gen-
eral told BBC Caribbean that
he sees Lord Phillip’s message
as one telling Caribbean and
other Commonwealth countries
to “get your house in order and
do what you have to do” to
prepare for the eventuality that
final appeals may in the future
no longer be made to the Lon-
don-based Privy Council.

“The message,” said Sir
Probyn Innis, former Governor
General of St Kitts and Nevis,
“ds loud and clear.”

“Enough is enough is

enough. Allow us to get on with
our business of modernising our
legal system in the United
Kingdom.”




Yesterday former Attorney
General and MP for Fort Char-
lotte Alfred Sears said the time
is “long overdue” for the
Bahamas to make a “contin-
gency plan” for the likely even-
tuality that the Privy Council
will not act as the final court of
appeal forever.

“T think it’s our responsibili-
ty to provide the critical insti-
tutions of governance for our-
selves and the time has come,
before the British tell us to go
— a likelihood that will only
increase as the demands of their
own society call for giving pri-
ority to their needs — that we
assume the responsibility for
ourselves,” said Mr Sears.

He noted that the Bahamas
already helps fund the
Caribbean Court of Justice
despite not using it as a final

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S UK judge: Cases from countries like Bahamas taking up too much time

court of appeal.

Meanwhile, he said, he has
no doubt that there is sufficient
legal talent within the
Caribbean region and the rest
of the Commonwealth to deal
adequately with any legal issues
that may arise.

Many Bahamians have called
for the Bahamas to end its
dependence on the Privy Coun-
cil since it ruled in 2006 that it
was unconstitutional for the
death penalty to be mandatory,
perceiving a foreign court to
have placed an unfair impedi-
ment to convicted Bahamian
killers receiving their just
deserts.

However, Mr Sears said that
this in itself is no argument in
favour of a national or
Caribbean court as such a court
could make the same ruling —
as it did in South Africa.

Nonetheless, he said, he does
believe the issue of capital pun-
ishment should be decided by a
court “in our region”, rather
than Europe.

PLP leadership contender
Paul Moss raised the issue of
the final court of appeal pub-
licly during his campaign launch
on Tuesday evening, telling his
audience that he would bring
“unparalleled focus to fixing
the administration of justice,”
culminating in the “removal”
of the Privy Council as the final
court of appeal.

Yesterday Mr Moss said he
feels it is unlikely that Britain
will itself move to stop other
countries appealing to the Privy
Council as he believes it is “an
industry” for the country.

However, he said, he strong-
ly believes The Bahamas
“should not outsource” its final
court of appeal, whether to
Britain or the Caribbean Court
of Justice.

“The judiciary is part of gov-
ernment. We do not have a for-
eign prime minister why then
should we have foreigners sit-
ting on another arm of govern-
ment, such as the judiciary,” he
said.

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS



Schools in Long Island | 3 ))\yy WINNERS!
receive greenhouses



KRAFT
a SUMMER

al al pauls
Cr D UL i



AGRICULTURE MINISTER Larry Cartwright (right) inspects one of the sreoriiouske with (from left)
BAIC’s assistant general manager of Agriculture Arnold Dorsett, Long Island administrator Roderick
Bowe, and local government official Wellington Taylor.

FURTHERING the local
food production initiative, four
schools in Long Island received
greenhouses during special
assemblies last week.

The greenhouses went to
North Long High, NGM Major
High, Glinton’s Primary, and
Simms’ Primary. Three green-
houses came from the Bahamas
Agricultural and Industrial Cor-
poration (BAIC) and the other
through the Food and Agricul-
ture Organisation’s Initiative
on Soaring Food Prices.

Among the dignitaries pre-
sent were Minister of Agricul-
ture and Marine Resources and

Member of Parliament for
Long Island and Raged Island,
Larry Cartwright; BAIC exec-
utive chairman Edison Key;
administrator Roderick Bowe,
and Ministry of Education and
local government officials.

Mr Cartwright told the stu-
dents that agriculture is for life.

“Everybody needs food,” he
said.

“And the greatest thrill of
one’s life is to be able to grow
one’s own food.”

Mr Key underscored BAIC’s
theme to ‘grow what you eat
and eat what you grow’.

He said there is no need for

the Bahamas to be importing
some $500 million in food each
year when the means are here
to produce much of that.

“If there is a magical word
in agriculture today, that word
is ‘greenhouses’,” agricultural
officer, Maurice Minnis told
students.

“The appeal of growing
plants in a controlled environ-
ment protected from the open
sun without most of the physi-
cal labour normally associated
with production on the open
field makes the attraction of
greenhouses almost irre-
sistible.”

vo

SAC principal robbed by thug ar

FROM page one

about five hours after a man was fatally
stabbed during a scuffle at the nearby Sea-
grapes shopping centre on Prince Charles Dri-
ve.

Inspector Warren Rodgers, of the Elizabeth
Estates police station, said patrols have been
intensified as police try to crack down on crime
in the area.

"We have a lot of patrols in the night-time.
We also have been getting a lot of reserve
officers to come out and assist in the night-time
to reassure the communities in this area that

the police are out working and also to deter the
criminals," he told The Tribune yesterday.
Police launched investigations after at least
two rapes and two attempted rapes occurred in
eastern New Providence since March.
However, The Tribune has received reports
that this number may be greater than reported.
On an internet message board, a poster
claimed a woman had been attacked and near-
ly raped two weeks ago by a man who lurked
outside her home in the eastern area.
Yesterday, police at the Elizabeth Estates
station said they had no knowledge of the
reported attack.



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TRIBUNE SPORTS

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



‘A sporting icon of the highest order’

TODAY?’S column is not
your usual one. I just had to
pause and reflect on the life of
the late Vincent Lloyd Fer-
guson, a sporting icon of the
highest order, not just as an
athlete, but an administrator
as well.

When I got the news that
the 71-year-old had passed
away yesterday after his battle
with prostate cancer, the first
thing that really came to mind
was how I first got to know
him in a personal way.

I was attending my first
major international event at
the 1992 Olympic Games in
Barcelona, Spain, and as a
young reporter on the curb, I
was eager to make the trip.

But when I got to
Barcelona, I was staying quite
a ways out from everything
that was going on. And not
being able to speak Spanish
didn’t help.

Ferguson, the Bahamas
Olympic Association’s trea-
surer at the time, served as
the Chef de Mission for the
team at the Olympics. Being a



Photos: Felipé MajorTribune staff



Sere

Champion Truckers put on probation

sata ae # fel as) ae iz

very small team, there was
more than adequate space in
the Games Village.

Upon the insistence of
triple jumper Frank Ruther-
ford and quarter-miler
Pauline Davis-Thompson, I
moved into the Games Vil-
lage where I was able to hang
out with the team.

However, Ferguson was not
informed initially and when
he found out, he almost hit
the roof. He insisted that the
BOA would not be responsi-
ble for me being in the village
as the press was not allowed.

That actually showed me
the seriousness of Ferguson,
who is known as a discipli-
narian.

Anybody who got to know
Ferguson can attest to his
firmness and his commitment
to being the best out of every-
body and ensuring that noth-
ing was left to chance.

After his sting as a semi-
professional baseball player
in the major leagues, Fergu-
son returned home and took
up a long and successful

Rain delays softball game...



bea

STUBBS



OPINION

teaching career.

It started at his alma mater
at St Augustine’s College
where he and the late Leviti-
cus ‘Uncle Low’ Adderley

THE senior boys’ game
between the Big Red Machine
and the Nassau Christian
Academy Crusaders was
stopped in the bottom of the
fifth inning when the rain
came pouring down.

¢ SOME of the players can
eMac IMM Ot eM Ia kG)

were responsible for coining
the school’s nickname The
Big Red Machine after the
Cincinnati Reds in the 1960s.

He last taught at the A F
Adderley High School before
he retired in 1994.

Ferguson leaves behind his
beloved wife Marie, a former
teacher of mine, and two chil-
dren, Anne-Marie and Vin-
cent Alex.

He had also compiled a
résumé that speaks for itself.

Here’s a glance at his
career:

e Attended St Augustine’s
College from 1950-1955
where he participated in bas-
ketball, softball, volleyball
and track and field

e Enrolled at St Anselm’s
College, Manchester, New
Hampshire, on a basketball
scholarship in 1957 and grad-
uated with a BA in English
and a minor in Philosophy in
1961

e Started playing profes-
sional basketball with the Mil-
waukee Braves (now Atlanta)
minor league in 1964-1967,

although he never got to play
in the majors

¢ Obtained a Master of Sci-
ence degree in Education
Administration from Manka-
to State University in 1974

e Taught locally in the
classroom at SAC from 1961-
1968

e Served as an administra-
tor at SAC from 1968-1975

e Vice principal at R M
Bailey from 1975-1977 and
acting principal from 1977-

978

e Principal at Aquinas Col-
lege from 1978-1993

e Acting principal at A F
Adderley from 1993-1994

e Served as the longest
president of the Bahamas
Amateur Basketball Associa-
tion from 1966-1983.










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e Founded the Bahamas
Association of Basketball
Officials (BABO) in 1968

e First FIBA certified ref-
eree for the English speaking
Caribbean after he refereed
at the Central American and
Caribbean Championships in
Cuba in 197

e Founding member and
president of the Bahamas
Association of Former and
Present Professional Baseball
Players.

e Inducted into the Min-
nesota State University
Mankato in 2004 when he was
presented with the Distin-
guished Alumni Achievement
Award.

My condolences to his
entire family. May his soul
rest in peace.

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FROM page 15

stated,” Seymour said.

“T don’t know where this thing about a sus-
pension or probation came from. They are
only trying to blow this thing up more than it
is because they lost money on what they call a
big night when two top teams were supposed
to meet. But we didn’t have enough players to
play and so we lost the game by default.”

As far as the constitution is concerned, Sey-
mour said a team is allowed three defaults,
but they are not allowed to have two back-
to-back. He said they have a game scheduled
to play on Friday and they will show up to
play that game.

“The Mighty Mitts defaulted a game the
other day and nobody made no noise,” Sey-
mour said. “Two girls teams lost by default
and nobody made any noise. I think because
it’s the Truckers, everybody was making an
issue out of it.”

“When was the last time a Nassau team
went anywhere,” Seymour asked. “They are
only worrying about themselves. They have
to start worrying about the players. They are
upset because they might have lost a big night,
but things happened.”

Seymour said the NPSA knows that his team
was struggling to get players out. He said three
of their players had to work, but they came late
and about five of them played in a number of
softball games in other leagues, so the players
might have been tired.

“It’s not the first ttrme something like this has
happened on a Saturday night,” he said. “The
last Saturday we played, I only had 10 players
and one had to leave.”

The NPSA, according to Fernander, is
preparing to wind down its regular season so
that they can start the playoffs as they march
towards the BSF’s National Round Robin in
November.

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PUBLIC NOTICE
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The Bohoamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. is currently

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Former boxer ‘Kid Nassaw’
plans to form amateur club

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

REMEMBER the name
Leroy ‘Kid Nassau’ Brown?

The former light welter-
weight champion, who domi-
nated the local scene back in
the days when Oswald ‘Elisha
Obed’ Ferguson was making
a name for himself, has resur-
faced, but this time to give
back to the sport of boxing.

Brown, a 61-year-old recov-
ering drug addict with the

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Bahamas Association of
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past 16 months, is planning
to form his own amateur box-
ing club.

He has already started the
facility on the site that used to

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host BASH’s car wash off
Columbus Drive in Chip-
pingham, but is in need of
some additional material to
complete the wooden struc-
ture.

During BASH’s Earth Vil-
lage Fun Day on Monday,
October 12, Brown will rein-
troduce himself to the public
as he stages an amateur exhi-
bition boxing show.

“We’re going to show the
people what we have to
offer,” Brown said. “Ray
Minus Jr is assisting me. He
will put down a boxing ring
that we will use and he will
bring some of his boxers to
compete.”

Kid Nassau, as he was
affectionately called, was one
of the top local boxers along
with Obed and Baby Boy
Rolle. But he would be the
first to tell you that he was
the best in his time, having
posted an impressive record
of 29-1.

“They really didn’t recog-
nise me back then,” said
Brown, whose only loss was
against an American in Mia-
mi, Florida. “I wasn’t in con-
dition when the people called
me for that fight.”

Having fought and defeat-
ed just about all of the big
name fighters whom Obed
was matched against, Brown
said he decided to quit after a
fight between himself and
Obed was canceled.

“He and his trainers
watched me and they said I

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LEROY BROWN (shown) is planning to form his own amateur boxing club inside this wooden building...

was too heavy to fight Obed,”
said Brown, who noted that at
the time he was just one
pound over the weight limit.

“We fought guys who were
20-30 pounds heavier than we
were. I was a junior mid-
dleweight and he was a wel-
terweight, but they used it as
an excuse because they didn’t
want him to lose.”

After the fight was called
off, Brown hung up his box-
ing gear and he walked away
from the sport.

However, he continued in
his latter years to watch the
sport that he perfected more
as a technician. But he found
the urge to come back and
give back to the sport.

“T had the style like Cas-
sius Clay. I was the crowd

pleaser,” Brown recalled.
“That was why everybody
wanted me to fight.”

Through his boxing club,
Brown said he intends to
bring back the art of the
sport.

“The only thing I see out
there is the brute force. The
man who can punch the hard-
est win. But they want to see
something that they can
enjoy,” Brown said.

“Although I got strung out
on drugs, I came back, thanks
to BASH. Now I can con-
tribute to my immediate com-
munity and society.”

Brown is encouraging any
and all young men who have
an interest in boxing to come
out and participate in the
gym, which he hopes to have



LEROY BROWN (right) with Wesley Finlayson outside the wooden structure on the site that used to host
BASH’s car wash off Columbus Drive in Chippingham...

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completed after they have
acquired the much-needed
material and equipment.

“We need boxing bags,
training gloves, head gears,
skipping ropes, mouth pieces,
cups to protect the groins,
speed bags and a few more
items,” he said.

“T’m appealing to the pub-
lic to be a part of this by lend-
ing a helping hand.”

Already BASH has gotten
a lot of support from Premier
Importers and the New Prov-
idence Community Church in
getting the structure to near
completion.

However, Brown said they
are still looking for corporate
Bahamas to assist in provid-
ing them with plywood,
cement and a rug to put on
the floor once it’s completed.

Interested persons can con-
tact Brown or Wesley Fin-
layson, the marketing and
media liaison for
BASH/Earth Village at 356-
2274.

Finlayson, a cousin of
Alpheus ‘Hawk’ Finlayson,
said they are throwing their
full support behind Brown in
his venture into getting the
gym opened.

“He’s been an inspiration
to all of us,” Finlayson said.
“He’s been a role model,
someone who’s been there
and done that and is moving
on. ’'m very proud of him and
this is his way of giving back
to the community. So I feel
good about it. I think after
the gym opens, it’s going to
be good.”

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THE TRIBUNE

| THURSDAY,

Champio
Truckers put
on probation

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

PAGE

Rain delays

BAISS softball
game between
SAC and NCA...

F
i=

i

ts ©

2009



I

SEPTEMBER 24,



Photos: Felipé MajorTribune staff

THE New Providence Softball Association (NPSA)
has placed the defending champions Commando Securi-
ty Truckers on probation after they defaulted a live tele-
vision game against the Heavy Lift Dorsey Park Boyz that
was set to be played on Saturday night.

As aresult, a number of dedicated fans were disgrun-
tled. So in an effort to lure them back to the park, Fer-
nander said the NPSA designated Tuesday and Wednes-
day as fan appreciation nights when softball lovers were
able to watch the game free of charge.

Calling the default an embarrassment for the league,
NPSA president Sidney ‘Bobby Baylor’ Fernander said
they are not going to showcase the Truckers in any radio
or television game, nor will they “recommend them for
any national team consideration.”

“We will hope that the BSF (Bahamas Softball Feder-
ation) will uphold what we do because we will not rec-
ommend them for any national team consideration,” he
said.

“Any team traveling out of New Providence going
anywhere, they will not be recommended for team play
based on our sanctions that we will put on them.”

But Truckers manager Perry Seymour said it’s not fair
to his team because they didn’t do anything wrong, except
lose a game by default.

“With a defaulted game, the constitution states that you



THE Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools’ ‘09 softball season got started yesterday.
But at St Augustine’s College, the senior boys’ game between the Big Red Machine and the Nassau Chris-
tian Academy Crusaders was stopped in the bottom of the fifth inning when the rain came pouring down.
The game was tied 11-11 when it was halted by plate umpire Michael Hanna. As the seven-inning game
was not official, it will have to continue from that point at a date to be announced.

¢ SOME of the players can be seen in action here and on page 13

EXTRA

are allowed to pay a $50
fine and you are rein-

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

VINCENT Lloyd Fergu-
son, who was battling prostate
cancer, died at his home while
having breakfast yesterday
morning.

The former teacher/admin-
istrator, sporting icon and
sports administrator extraor-
dinaire just celebrated his 71st
birthday on August 25.

Winston ‘Tappy’ Davis,
who had a long affiliation with
Ferguson, broke down when
he was asked to describe his
former friend and teammate.

“It’s so sad that he had to
leave us,” said Davis, who
tried to contain himself.
“Vince was a straight forward
intelligent, honest and hard
working individual.

“He believed in everything
he was into and he cared a
whole lot about it. I never
knew that people had the
kind of passion and commit-
ment in what they did the way
Vince did.”

Davis and Ferguson were a
part of an historic committee
that was commissioned by the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture to put together the
history of the game of bas-
ketball in the country.

The committee was sched-
uled to meet again today.

Tom ‘the Bird’ Grant, who
was also a part of the com-
mittee, said the Bahamas has
certainly lost a giant of a man.

“He was a no nonsense
man period,” Grant stated.
“He did all he could for
sports, but he was an individ-
ual all by himself. He wasn’t
one to follow the crowd.

“He did things his way. At
times we couldn’t see eye to
eye, but I knew he meant
well. We were going down the

SHERWIN
WILLIAMS.

SEE page 13



VINCENT FERGUSON

same road. It’s just that we
did it on different paths. That
was just Vince.”

Basketball standout Reggie
Forbes, who shaped his life
after his disciplinarian men-
tor, said it’s a sad day for
sports.

“Vince was one of the rare
Bahamians, real men, an icon,
who has served the Bahamas
in many capacities, both aca-
demically, athletically, social-
ly and has made immeasur-
able contributions to the
building of our nation,”
Forbes said.

“Today is a sad day. It caus-
es us to reflect on the contri-
bution he has made and the
impact he has made in the
lives of both men and women.
To me, he has made an
invaluable contribution in my
life as I developed through
the ranks of playing basket-
ball.”

Having had the pleasure of
working with him as a teacher
at Aquinas College, Forbes,
now the Dean of Student
Affairs at SAC, said Fergu-
son always tried to get the
best of everybody he came in
contact with.

With ColorSnapâ„¢, you can discover how coordinating



“To his wife and children,
God knows best. Just hold on
and be strong,” he said. We
just wish that his legacy will
live on in each of them.”

Ferguson had a storied
career.

It began as a multiple ath-
lete at St Augustine’s College,
to his collegiate days at St
Anselm’s College, to his pro-
fessional baseball sting with
the Milwaukee Braves, to his
return home as a high school
administrator, to his latest
role as the founder of the
Bahamas Association of For-
mer and Present Professional
Baseball Players, and his con-
tribution on the committee
for the history of basketball
in the country.

Ferguson leaves behind his
beloved wife Marie and his
two children, Anne-Marie
and Vincent Alex.

¢ See column (Stubbs’
Opinion) on page 13 for more
on Ferguson’s achievement

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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





C

DOUBLE
STACKER

spurcitl \Yeitiiey yee |

Includes ill Fi Pee ere ee ed

Summer



LOCAL NEWS

YOUNG Bahamian Marine Scientists
(YBMS), an educational component of the Dan-
guillecourt Project, hosted a seven-day summer
camp on Little Farmers Cay, Exuma.

Seventeen students between the ages of 10 and
18 attended the camp, where they were intro-
duced to different aspects of the Bahamian envi-
ronment. The mornings were spent in the class-
room discussing and learning the important facts
about each daily topic. Afternoons were spent
outdoors in the field.

Nikita Shiel-Rolle, director and founder of
YBMS, said: “For many of these students it was
their first time putting on a mask and snorkel,
their first time swimming with sharks in 70 feet of
water, their first teme walking through mangrove
creeks where they identified the four different
types of mangroves and their first time making the
connection that these same mangroves act as
nurseries to countless juvenile creatures which,
when grown, relocate onto nearby coral reefs.”

Each day brought a new topic of discussion
and adventure. A full day was dedicated to inva-
sive species where lionfish were the focus. Com-
munity members accompanied the students on a
lionfish hunt after the morning discussion which
addressed the environmental threats associated
with this predator. The day ended with a grill-out
on the Farmer’s Cay government dock where
fishermen, who just hours before swore that they
would never consume the deadly creature,
cracked jokes and savoured the white meat of
the lionfish. The summer camp would not have
been complete without a trip to the Exuma Cays
Land and Sea Park, a protected area established
by the Bahamas National Trust in 1959. Students
visited the park’s headquarters on Warderick
Wells and learned about the importance of
marine conservation and the spill-over effect,
gaining an understanding of how wildlife in these
protected areas can flourish resulting in an abun-
dance of species that will eventually take up res-
idence outside the designated protected area.

Upon exploring the area, the group saw the
skeleton of a sperm whale that had died as a
result of pollution, and observed hutia, the largest
native mammal in the Bahamas, as well as arti-



STUDENTS
between the
ages of 10
and 18
attended the
camp, where
| they were
introduced to
| different

| aspects of

| the Bahamian
| environment.

facts left from the days of the Loyalists’ occupa-
tion.

Stromatolites, ancient microbial reefs unique to
the Exuma cays, were another topic of study.

These living layered outcrop structures called
stromatolites date back to the origins of the plan-
et, when their photosynthetic properties were
attributed to creating Earth’s atmosphere.

Students visited the Danguillecourt Project’s
research lab located on Little Darby Island where
Dr Pamela Reid of the University of Miami along
with researchers from 12 other institutions, includ-
ing NASA, are conducting ground-breaking sci-
entific studies.

On the last day of the YBMS summer camp
students gave a presentation to the local com-
munity highlighting the events of the week. Gov-
ernment officials from George Town, Great Exu-
ma, made the trip to Little Farmers Cay along
with residents from neighbouring cays. The stu-
dents’ demonstrations included poetry about the
invasive lionfish, a song about coral reefs and a
dance illustrating the four mangrove communities.

In closing remarks, the visiting George Town
administrator said that YBMS camps should be
duplicated in every local fishing community. He
added that it was particularly nice to have
Bahamians running this programme as opposed
to having foreigners educating us about our coun-
try. The 2009 YBMS summer programme was
run by George Allen, Kristal Ambrose, Nikita
Shiel-Rolle and Ryan Winder — all Bahamians
who are between the ages of 19 and 23.

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THE TRIBUNE







JOHN DELANEY

‘The perfect
location’ for
the wealthy,
companies

* Top attorney says
Bahamas ‘can compete
more effectively than
any other international
financial centre’ in
attracting companies,
high net-worths to base
themselves here as
primary domicile

* Investment to ‘stay in the
game’ increasing, but
lawyer confident Bahamas
has ‘wherewithal’
to compete

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas “can com-
pete more effectively than any
other international financial
centre” when it comes to
attracting companies and
high-net worth individuals to
use this nation as their pri-
mary operational base, a lead-
ing attorney said yesterday,
asserting that this nation has
“the wherewithal to stay in
the game”.

John Delaney, managing
partner at Higgs & Johnson,
urged attendees at a seminar
organised by his law firm to
“not believe the doomsayers”
who claimed that the
Bahamas was finished as an
international financial services
centre due to the concerted,
and increasing attacks on such
jurisdictions by the G-
20/OECD grouping.

Warning that the Bahamas
“must invest more in educa-
tion” if its international finan-
cial services sector was to sur-
vive and grow market share,
Mr Delaney said: “There is a
place in the world for an
international financial centre
that maintains alignment with
evolving standards, and is pre-
pared to invest in human cap-
ital and infrastructure in what
is a highly competitive envi-
ronment.

“The space is getting small-
er and smaller, and the invest-
ment needed to stay in the
game has increased signifi-
cantly. More and more are
falling by the wayside, but I
believe we have the where-

SEE page 4B

Tors and/or omission

from the daily report,
i



THURSDAY,

ine

SEPTEMBER 24,



y fy

Top attorney
is charged
with money
laundering

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

prominent

Bahamian attor-

ney was yesterday

indicted in the

US on allegations
that he helped to knowingly laun-
der hundreds of thousands of dol-
lars in proceeds from an invest-
ment fraud, after being seemingly
being caught in a Federal Bureau
of Investigation (FBI) ‘sting’ oper-
ation.

Sidney Cambridge, an attorney
and partner with Callender’s &
Co, was named as a defendant
along with the former vice-mayor
of Broward County and Broward
County Commissioner, Josephus
Eggelleton, in an indictment
unveiled yesterday by the US Dis-
trict Attorney’s Office for south
Florida in connection with a mul-
ti-year FBI investigation into pub-
lic sector corruption in the Miami
area.

Mr Cambridge did not return
Tribune Business’s calls seeking
comment before press deadline
yesterday, despite this newspaper
leaving detailed messages on his
cell phone and with his assistant
asking for an urgent reply.

However, his indictment is like-
ly to stun many in Nassau’s legal
circles, where he is held in high
regard for his ability and integrity.
The Callender’s & Co attorney
and partner is well-known in both
legal and political circles, having
served as vice-chair of the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party (PLP).

He is also the attorney repre-
senting CLICO (Bahamas) liq-
uidator Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez
in that liquidation, and is also act-

Cable attacks
‘flawed’ retail
price analysis

* BISX-listed firm says own
analysis shows cable TV
and Internet prices 28%
and 118% lower than
Caribbean regional
average

* Warns that programming
costs up 95% in 15 years,
with other operating
expenses up 200%, to
justify basic cable
TV fee rise

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Cable Bahamas has argued
that a ‘benchmarking’ exer-
cise designed to justify retail
price regulation in the
Bahamian communications
industry “is flawed and does
not provide a valid basis” for
regulating either its cable TV
or Internet services, arguing
that its prices for the latter
market are 118 per cent below
the Caribbean average.

In its response to the
request for feedback on retail
price regulations for the
Bahamian communications
sector, the BISX-listed utility
provider said its own “more
comprehensive” benchmark-
ing exercise showed that its
prices for cable TV, Internet
and other data services were
below Caribbean compara-
tives.

SEE page 9B

* Callender’s & Co partner,
and PLP vice-chair,
indicted in Miami

* Co-accused bragged of
allegedly helping to fund
raise for ex-PM Christie’s
2007 election campaign

ing for Mr Gomez in another
prominent court-supervised liq-
uidation, that involving Leaden-
hall Bank & Trust.

There is nothing to suggest that
Callender’s & Co has done any-
thing wrong, and the firm is not
named in the indictment relating
to Mr Cambridge. Mr Cambridge
is understood to still be in the
Bahamas, although all his fellow
defendants appeared in court in
Miami yesterday.

The indictment alleged that FBI
undercover agents made contact
with Eggelleton in February 27,
2006, then donated a $5,000
cheque to one of his charities.
Eggelleton then allegedly said, on
May 30, 2006, to an FBI agent and
‘cooperating witness’: “If you
wanna do some deals in the
Bahamas, let me know.

“Yes sir. In fact, I’m gonna be
raising some money for the Prime
Minister of the Bahamas that’s
running for re-election.” That
appears to imply that he was
going to donate to the PLP’s 2007
election campaign, although there
is nothing to suggest the party or
Mr Christie did anything wrong
in relation to this or the situation

SEE page 8B



WHAT IS MEDLINE?

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

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Sandals exec
blasts Exuma
Chamber boss

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A SENIOR Sandals executive has
blasted the Exuma Chamber of Com-
merce’s president for making the most
“inappropriate, misplaced and unpro-
fessional” demands of the resort chain
that he has ever seen, in relation to
its plans for re-opening the Emerald
Bay resort.

Floyd Armbrister, the Chamber’s
president, in a September 10, 2009,
communication sent to senior Sandals
executives had demanded that they
answer a number of questions, and
provide details, on the resort chain’s
plans for the Emerald Bay resort,
warning that he could not simply stand
by and watch “the total disregard” for
the island’s business community.

He also railed at the alleged “rape
and pillage” of Exuma’s economy by
previous investors who had failed to
deliver on their promises.

Mr Armbrister, in a communication
obtained by Tribune Business, said he
was “surprised at the lack of informa-
tion being provided to the local com-
munity to date”, saying what Exumi-
ans knew of Sandals plans had come
from the media and a press release.

He added that he had been unsuc-
cessful in contacting Gordon ‘Butch’
Stewart, Sandals’ chairman, as had
others, in seeking to learn how they
could help Sandals, but added that the
‘word on the street’ regarding the
resort chain’s plans “does not seem
very positive”.

Stating that he was “elated that Exu-
ma, the Bahamas was to be beauty
behind it all” when it came to San-
dals’ latest resort acquisition, Mr Arm-
brister wrote: “I am aware of the
repeated rape and pillage of the Exu-
ma economy in the past.

“Many have come, they have got
concessions and did not perform for
the concessions received. All that the
Government gives belongs to the peo-
ple, and thus makes the people
investors in the company receiving the
concessions.

“As president of the Exuma Cham-
ber of Commerce, I cannot stand and
watch the total disregard for the busi-

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ness community by any individual or
group...... The Chamber expects to get
a return phone call. We expect that
with this acquisition that your corpo-
rate social responsibility would lead
you to honour the triple bottom line:
people, planet, profits.”

Mr Armbrister then demanded that
Sandals disclose a variety of details
regarding its plans, including the total
dollar value of concessions it was
receiving from the Government; how
many non-Bahamians it was planning
to bring in; whether Bahamian con-
struction workers would be employed
in upgrades to Emerald Bay; when
staff would be hired and trained; and
how non-local staff would be housed.

Other demands related to Sandals’
plans for water sports and ground
transportation; its “vision for the com-
munity”; its “attitude towards local
people; and its expectations of them.

The concern generated by letters
such as Mr Armbrister’s is that the
content could potentially scare away
prospective investors in the Bahamas,
although there is no sign of this hap-
pening with Sandals.

However, the resort chain may now
be wondering about the quality of the
reception it will get in some circles in
Exuma, despite having effectively res-
cued the island’s economy by acquir-
ing Emerald Bay - for a price believed
to be in the $20-$30 million range -
more than two years after it was
placed in receivership under the pre-
vious ownership.

In a withering response to Mr Arm-
brister, Sandals’ director of operations,
Shawn DaCosta, wrote to the Exuma
Chamber president on September 11,
2009, to express “displeasure” over
the previous day’s letter following his
conversation with Mr Stewart.

“We have worked with various
Chambers of Commerce throughout
the world, but never in all the years of
our operation have I seen opening dis-
cussion so inappropriate, misplaced
and unprofessional as yours,” Mr
DaCosta wrote.

“Need I remind you that one hotel
has already failed on this island, which

SEE page 8B

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





‘Playing a role’ in stopping loss

DURING a training ses-
sion this morning, I had to
deal with a recruit who we
will call ‘Jeff. Jeff was
stronger and more aggres-
sive than his partner, who
we will call ‘Peter’. As the
various drills were given out,

I observed how Jeff would
throw and toss Peter around
the floor as if he was a rag
doll. On the other hand,
when the roles were
switched unexpectedly, the
rough and aggressive
response was not given. Jef-

fs action became more
aggressive to the point
where I had to step in and
admonish him about his
actions, which in my opinion
equated to abuse. However,
in Jeff’s opinion he was not
doing anything wrong, as he

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felt that he was in control
and stressed the fact that
Peter was doing the same
thing.

Jeff’s perspective is what
he operated on, so he made
a decision to act accordingly.
If this action was not
checked, the end result
could have been injury. We
are observing various behav-
1ours in our society that, for
whatever reason, are going
unchecked. They are being
allowed to fester and grow.
Compounding this is that
what we believe is unusual,
dangerous and unsafe, based
on our norms and culture, is
not necessarily the case. We
are seeing before us the evo-
lution of a very different
Bahamas. The sleepy island
has awakened, and the per-
ception of risks to survival is
being met head on with the
same violent and aggressive
force.

Unfortunately, those of us
who hold fast to now ancient
and historic beliefs are not
taking the necessary steps to
reduce the potential for
large-scale loss that may
result from our inaction or
disregard. We prefer to sing
and hold prayer services in
our attempt to pacify the
eruption around us. Not
good enough, so sorry!
Agreed, prayer can move
mountains, but who is going
to move if everybody is
down on their knees pray-
ing.
Now, we all have our own
way of managing events, be
they loss or criminal in
nature. Who is to say which
is the right way or, as some
would say, reasonable. One
thing for certain is that
choosing not to do some-
thing or ignoring the event is
action within itself.

The time is long past, in
my opinion, for peace rallies
and prayers that are not
backed or supported by spe-
cific actions to change

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behaviour. The change in
behaviour is not limited to
the would-be-criminal but,
more importantly in my
opinion, this change is for us
who are at risk. How do we
reduce the risk of loss and
crime? Risk, too, is relative
to culture, location, time of
day and individuals or
organisations being exposed
to the threat. Thus what we
perceive as the crime risk is
not recognised in the same
way by the police.

When I speak of the
police in this instance, I
speak regarding the organi-
sation, not any one individ-
ual. Their view, in many
instances, becomes perplex-
ing as it appears they take a
very nonchalant approach to
conditions that we believe to
be extreme. Just as Jeff’s
actions to the untrained eye
may be seen as ‘horsing
around’, the trained eye sees
him taking advantage of a
perceived weaker partner
and abusing that relation-
ship. But again this, too, is
relative as Jeff also stated he
was reacting to a threat, and
rather than seek assistance
from the authority figure
(me in this instance )m he
decided to resolve this issue
his way.

Is Jeff wrong for this, or is
he just acting the part that
he has so efficiently been
taught over the last 18 or so
years. Can we blame him or
any other individual com-
pletely for actions that
essentially have brought
them this far in life. No, we
cannot, but we as a society
must take part of the blame,
and incarceration and hang-
ings cannot be our escape.

It is false to think that we
can live in a society free of
crime and loss, since both
have been with us since time
began. Loss is associated
with the removal of cher-
ished possessions or people,
and crime relates to the
means by which the event
occurred.

Bear in mind that all
crime is loss, but not all loss
is crime. For example, loss
resulting from a hurricane,
floods and other naturally-



occurring events is not
crime. However, loss from
stealing, rape and murder is
crime. Many work-related
incidents, such as extended
lunch hours and tardiness,
are also loss events.

We must also consider
that crimes such as driving
without the proper vehicle
inspection certificate or
licensing are also crimes, but
because they are seen as
minor threats to safety they
are regularly disregarded.
Yet as the story described
earlier, if they go unchecked
they create a breeding
ground for more serious
offences. What can be done
about this? Do we give up
hope or do we press on with
the ensuing battle? Unfortu-
nately, we cannot complete-
ly remove ourselves from
any of these occurrences;
they will happen in one form
or the other. With that said
we must now develop pre-
ventative and preparatory
measures so we might ade-
quately deal with them as
they occur. This is - and has
been - the premise for my
column, to recommend solu-
tions to the challenges of
crime and loss that may pre-
sent themselves.

As crime is on the minds
and, in some instances, the
hearts of many, it is only
appropriate to address these
issues and provide realistic
solutions to this dilemma.
As it pertains to loss events,
this is a bit more complex,
so preventative solutions
that pertain to management
styles will be suggested. A
‘no rules’ society that is free
from defined crime; some
have dared to say is the way
to go. This ‘survival of the
fittest’? mentality would take
us back to ‘uncivilised’ and
chaotic times, very similar to
the times we are living now
here in the Bahamas.

NB: Gamal Newry is the
president of Preventative
Measures, a loss prevention
and asset protection training
and consulting company,
specialising in policy and
procedure development,
business security reviews
and audits, and emergency
and crisis management.
Comments can be sent to
P.O. Box N-3154 Nassau,
Bahamas or e-mail
ghewry@gmail.com or visit
us at www.preventativemea-
sures.net

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 3B



Port urged to stop
licensing realtors

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Real Estate
Association’s (BREA) presi-
dent yesterday urged the
Grand Bahama Port Author-
ity (GBPA) to stop issuing
persons with real estate
licences, arguing that this was
creating unfair competition in
the Freeport market and
leave consumers exposed.

William Wong told Tribune
Business: “For several years
now, we’ve been trying to get
the Port Authority not to
issue persons with licences to
sell real estate because they’re
not mandated to do so. They
can issue licences, but not for
the selling of real estate.
They’re unleashing untrained
people on the market in
Freeport.”

Mr Wong said the issue was
causing BREA’s 70-plus
members in Freeport and
Grand Bahama “a lot of frus-
tration and a lot of stress, and
it’s been going on for at least
the last 10 years.”

The BREA president said
that for the last four to five
years, the organisation had
been trying to get the Port
Authority to recognise it as
the only licensing body for
realtors in Grand Bahama
and Freeport, but without suc-
cess.

Mr Wong said BREA’s
position was that the 1995
Real Estate Act empowered
it as the sole boy to licence
practising realtors throughout
the Bahamas - including
Freeport and Grand Bahama.
The profession, he added, had
been placed on par with the



WILLIAM WONG

likes of architects, doctors and
attorneys in terms of being
able to self-regulate.

“For anyone to practice
real estate in Freeport they
need to be licensed by us,”
Mr Wong told Tribune Busi-
ness. “They [the Port Author-
ity] need to recognise this and
stop doing what they’re
doing.”

BREA said a legal opinion
on the issue that was drafted
on its behalf had been sent to
the Port Authority, but no
reply had been received.

“All the complaints we
have heard about in Freeport
recently have come from peo-
ple the Port has given a
licence to. People have been
putting themselves forward as
real estate agents and they’re
not. That’s against the law,”
Mr Wong said.

“We are trying to bring
some order to this Wild Wild
West. It’s in everyone’s inter-

“For several years now, we’ve been
trying to get the Port Authority not to
issue persons with licences to sell real
estate because they're not mandated to
do so. They can issue licences, but not
for the selling of real estate. They’re
unleashing untrained people
on the market in Freeport.”

ests for people to be licensed
so the public are protected.
We have 70-plus people in
Freeport paying dues, play-
ing by the rules, and the Port
is licensing people not play-
ing by the rules.

EFG Q Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd

Client Relationship Officer

— William Wong

“Right now, the public are
not protected.

“BREA is the only author-
ity to licence realtors any-
where in the Bahamas, and
that’s set out in an Act of Par-
liament.”

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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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‘The perfect location’ for
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FROM page 1B

withal to stay in the game.”

Mr Delaney said the G-
20/OECD offensive was
aimed at controlling interna-
tional financial centres and
the offshore world, rather
than eliminating it altogeth-
er.

As a result, he advocated
that there “is a place for inter-
national financial centres”
that were able to create effi-
cient structures, aggregate

investment capital from across
the globe and send it into G-
20/OECD states. These cen-
tres also needed to be well-
regulated and have a strong
brand reputation.
“Bahamian financial insti-
tutions have been preparing
for years for this sort of thing.
Since 200, they’ve been try-
ing to ensure they have a tax
compliant book of cus-
tomers,” Mr Delaney said,
adding that banks and trust
companies regularly sought
opinions from tax attorneys
in their clients’ home coun-

NOTICE
HUDSON GLOBAL ENTERPRISES INC.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, HUDSON GLOBAL ENTERPRISES INC. is in
dissolution as of September 17, 2009.

Neofytos Nikolaou of Seychellon 14, 3067 Limassol,
Cyprus is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

WANTED

L. C. Hull & Co.
Counsel & Attorneys



We are seeking to hire a talented Attorney
to join practice in Abaco. Lawyers with 2-4
years experience, a strong record of academic
achievement, excellent writing skills, good
computer skills and experience in real property
transactions.

Please send your resume to:

mpearce_Ichull@ yahoo.com
P.O. Box AB - 20415

Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Bahamas



S.A. T. PREPARATION
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Beginning Saturday September 26 through Saturday
December 5, 2009, Kingsway Academy will hold
S.A.T. Preparation Classes from 9:00 a.m. to
12:00 noon culminating in the writing of the S. A. T.
Examination in January. The cost is $250.00 per

person and includes all materials.

Interested persons are asked to contact the
Business Office at telephone 324-6887 / 324-6269
or the Guidance Conselor at 324-8811 or 324-3409.



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tries to ensure structures and
solutions were compliant.

Still, the Higgs & Johnson
managing partner urged: “We
must act. Nature has proven
very unkind to those who will
not adapt to change. One
thing is certain, and that is
change. We must adapt, and
must ensure all the ingredi-
ents required for success
exist.”

Among these ingredients,
Mr Delaney suggested, were
possessing the “best talent”,
which meant the Bahamas
“must invest more in educa-
tion that we have up till now”.

The Bahamian workforce
in the financial services indus-
try also needed to be “sup-
plemented” with specialist,
skilled and high-end expatri-
ate talent, Mr Delaney sug-
gested that this nation needed
to examine its Immigration
policies and, if necessary,
make some changes if these
were not conducive to that
objective.

Other prerequisites, he sug-
gested, were improving the
administration of justice, plus
the efficiency and effective-
ness of the enforcement and
regulatory agencies.

While the Bahamas need-
ed to implement a “greater
effort” when it came to long-
term planning, and “invest
more in selling the brand”,
Mr Delaney said this nation
had the “potential to be the
location of choice” for com-

panies who wanted to move
their operational base and
substantial activities offshore,
plus high net-worth individu-
als wanting to use this juris-
diction as their primary domi-
cile.

“That is an area where we
can compete more effectively
than any other international
financial centre,” Mr Delaney
said, pointing out that the
Bahamas’ 20-plus inhabited
islands created “ample room
for high-end residential devel-
opments”.

This nation’s location, close
to US metropolitan areas and
in the US east coast time
zone, meant that the Bahamas
was “ideal” as a base for both
companies and high net worth
individuals.

Mr Delaney said the
Bahamas needed to “aggres-
sively go after” this market,
as the land purchase and
building boom it might cre-
ate would generate employ-
ment in sectors such as real
estate and construction.
Crime, though, would need
to be tackled.

“We are in a period of sig-
nificant global change that is
impacting our way of life,” Mr
Delaney said. “I have every
confidence we will be able to
survive, and every confidence
we can get the job done.”

To achieve this, the
Bahamas would need to
exploit its size and respond
with agility and efficiency.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

ALAMOSA HOLDINGS LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of
2000), ALAMOSA HOLDINGS LTD, is in dissolution. New
World Trustees (Jersey) Limited is the Liquidator and can be
contacted at Norwich Union House, 8 Church Street, St. Helier,
Jersey, JE4 OSG, Channel Islands. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
names, addresses and particular of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator before the 18th day of December, 2009.

oes Lin
Liquidator

New World Trustees (Jersey) Limited

NOTICE

OF

DRD CORPORATION LTD.

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above com-
pany commenced on the 28th day of August , 2009. Credit
Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial Centre, Shir-
ley & Charlotte Streets, PO.Box N-3023, Nassau, The Ba-

hamas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 5B





China pushing for bigger IMF role at G-20

By JOE McDONALD
AP Business Writer

BEIJING (AP) — Beijing
is pressing for a bigger voice
in the International Monetary
Fund and says Group of 20
leaders at their Pittsburgh
summit should start making
good on promises to give
developing countries more
IMF votes.

The G-20 has agreed in
principle but could face an
obstacle: European govern-
ments, which hold a big share
of the IMF board seats and
are reluctant to accept
changes that might reduce
their own status in the IMF.

“For many of them, it’s the
only way they can do some
grandstanding globally,” said
Daniel Gros, director of the
Centre for European Policy
Studies in Brussels, the center
of the 27-nation European
Union. “They don’t even
want to talk about it.”

The agenda at the Septem-
ber 24-25 summit includes
possible curbs on financial
industry pay, joint economic
policy and whether to start
winding down stimulus spend-
ing. But for China, the prize is
greater representation in the
IMF, which Beijing sees as a
way to influence global eco-
nomic policy. Working
through such a multilateral
body could help to allay
unease abroad about rising
Chinese economic and politi-
cal power.

The change holds symbolic
appeal for Beijing, rearrang-
ing a global order that dates
to World War II and signify-
ing the start of a new era.

By tradition the IMF boss is
a European, while an Ameri-
can leads its sister institution,
the World Bank. The IMF
Executive Board has eight
directors from individual gov-
ernments — the United
States, Japan, France, Britain,
Germany, China, Russia and
Saudi Arabia. Sixteen seats
are assigned to groups of
nations from the Middle East,
Caribbean and other regions,

many of them represented by
a European government such
as Ireland or Belgium.

Increasing developing
countries’ voting power might
require cutting the number of
European seats or creating
joint European Union seats.

Beijing has been unusually
assertive in pressing its
demands, reflecting its grow-
ing confidence as an econo-
my that has suffered little
damage from the worst glob-
al downturn since the 1930s.
Its banks avoided the turmoil
that battered Western
lenders, it has $2 trillion in
foreign reserves and it is
expected to be the first econ-
omy to recover from the
slump.

“We believe the Pittsburgh
summit should work toward
transferring voting power
from developed countries to
developing countries,” said a
deputy governor of China’s
central bank, Guo Qingping,
at a news conference this
week.

“At the same time, we hope
there will be more members
from developing countries in
the senior management of the
IMF,” Guo said. “This will
help to increase representa-
tion and legitimacy of the
senior management.”

Beijing wants developing
and developed countries to
have equal voting shares in
the IMF and World Bank,
said Zhu Guangyao, a deputy
finance minister. Currently,
developed countries hold 57
per cent of IMF shares and
56 per cent of World Bank
shares.

China announced Septem-
ber 2 it would buy the equiv-

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



pak

ars

N

Nassau Airport

Development Company

alent of $50 billion of the
IMP’s first bond sale. It is part
of the Fund’s effort to raise
$500 billion for lending to
economies battered by the
global downturn.

This month in London, G-
20 finance ministers reaf-
firmed the group’s promise of
reforms at the two institu-
tions. They stopped short of
committing to specific
changes but said World Bank
reforms will be completed by
the first half of 2010 and the
next IMF quota review —
which decides voting rights —
by January 2011.

In March, EU leaders
endorsed IMF reforms to
reflect “relative economic
weights in the world econo-
my” — a reference to new
economic powers such as Chi-
na, Brazil and India.

Britain, Germany and

France are confident they can
retain a leading role. But mid-
size nations such as the
Netherlands, with just 20 mil-
lion people, and Spain worry
about their status.

European politicians know
this and have hinted that
Europe could help defend its
voting share by increasing its
contribution to the new IMF
lending facility to 125 billion
euros ($180 billion) — or 35
per cent of the total.

“Maintaining a significant
share would ensure that EU
member states’ views are ade-
quately represented,” Ger-
man Finance Minister Peer
Steinbrueck and his French
counterpart, Christine
Lagarde, said in a joint state-
ment this month.

European governments are
resistant to accepting a joint
EU seat.

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items and miscellaneous gifts at competitive prices.

1 (a) NEWSSTAND/BOOKSTORE/GIFTS in the U.S, Departures lounge
(b) NEWSSTAND KIOSK/COFFEE BAR/BAR in the U.S, Departures Concourse

2 NEWSSTAND/CONVENIENCE STORE/COFFEE BAR in U.S. Check-in.

Locations 1a) and 1[b) must be bid together. NAD will consider individual proposals for

I(a\'(b) and 2 above or combined proposals for all locations.

Mandatory qualifications

i. Proponents must be Bahamian and incorporated in The Bahamas.

li, Proponents must have operated a similar newsstand/books/gifts facility within
the last three (3) years.

NAD’S goals and objectives are to:
(a) achieve a high standard of excellence and customer service:
(b) offera mixof concepts that will help to enhance the image of LPIA as. a world

class airport;

(c) offer retail and food & beverage choices to passengers at fair prices;
(d) offer a mixof local, regional and national and intemational brand-name

companies:

(e) develop and design retail facilities that complement the qualities of the new
terminal while recognizing the distinctive spirit, character and ‘sense of place’

of The Bahamas; and

(f) optimize revenue to NAD,



“We need to have a Euro-
pean leader who is basically
bold enough to overcome this
impasse” and persuade Euro-

peans to a reduction in their
representation, Gros said.
“But before that happens,
many years could pass.”

4 Sa DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life

Vacancy: Physician Liaison Officer

Physician Liaison:

Position: Responsible for the support of the development of clinical information
systems that assist physicians in the delivery of patient care. Participates as a
member of the MIS department in representing the needs and requirements of the
physician community and serves as an advocate of management in promoting the
use of information technology in the clinical setting. Works in partnership with
Physician Care Management Design and Implementation Teams to translate
clinician requirements into specifications for new clinical systems.

¢ Helps lead, and facilitate clinician advisory groups in the design of clinical
systems to support excellence in patient care. Engages patient care providers with
varying roles including physicians, nursing practitioners, nursing staff, ancillary
department personnel, & medical records professionals to contribute to the
development and use of the clinical information system. Develops empathy &
understanding of physician needs & builds relationships with physicians to gain

support of IT initiatives.

¢ Review medical information trends, experiences and approaches helps develop
technical and application implementation strategies and assists in the development
of strategic plans for clinical information systems.

Education & Experience: PhD qualification in medicine or a related
clinical background. (no physician licensing necessary for the post)

Special Range of Skills: Possess excellent interpersonal skills and can work
effectively with a diversity of personalities. Must be approachable, show respect for
others and be able to present data with effective communication and presentation
skills. Must be an effective consensus builder. Possess a good grasp of clinician
work flow in both inpatient and outpatient settings, interest in clinical information

system and outcomes measurement.

Please submit resume to: Human Resources Department | Doctors Hospital
P.O. Box N-3018 | | Nassau, Bahamas | or Email: info@doctorshosp.com

Ww WwW W



~doctorshosp.com

REQUEST FOR
PROPOSAL

NEWSSTANDS, BOOKS, GIFTS AND
CONVENIENCE SHOPS

Qualified and interested parties may pick-up the Request for Proposal package at NAD's
offices at the reception desk on the second floor Domestic/International Terminal at
Lynden Pindling International Airport between the hours of 9:00am and 4:00pm, from
September 15th to September 28th, 2009, A mandatory pre-proposal briefing for
those who have picked up packages will be held in the Arawak Lounge at the Airport on
Wednesday, September 30th at 10:00am.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 7B

Small business
angst rises as
tax deadline
draws near

By JOYCE M
ROSENBERG
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) —
These are anxious times for
some small business owners
who face an October 15 due
date for their 2008 income tax
returns. These owners got
extensions of the deadline for
filing their returns back in
April but aren’t ready to file.
Or, they can’t pay the gov-
ernment the money they owe.

Some of them are just dis-
organised. Others might be
having a cash flow crunch.

No matter what the prob-
lem is, if you’re one of these
owners, you must submit your
return by the deadline or face
big penalties for late filing.
And not filing your return will
only prolong the agony.

If your issue is disorganisa-
tion, it’s time to rethink not
just how you’re running your
taxes, but your overall busi-
ness. And maybe more than
that.

“My observation of these
types of people is that it’s not
just their business that runs
this way, it’s their life,” said
Gordon Spoor, a certified
public accountant in St Peters-
burg, Florida.

Despite the availability and
simplicity of software that
helps small businesses keep
their books and compile their
tax returns, many of these
owners have piles of receipts,
invoices and statements that
they bundle up and take to
their CPAs or tax lawyers
each year. Tax professionals
call these owners “shoebox
clients,” and many preparers
don’t want to work with them,
especially since they tend to
show up right before the filing
deadline looking for service.

The solution for these own-
ers is clear: Get help, either
from software, or get some-
one else to help you keep
your accounts year-round.
There are good, even critical
reasons for doing this. Spoor
pointed out that a CPA who
charges a client $300 an hour
for tax prep will also charge
$300 an hour to sort through
piles of receipts and invoices.
That is money badly spent.

Moreover, a disorganised
owner often doesn’t have a
good handle on how the busi-
ness is doing, and that could

“My observation of
these types of people
is that it’s not just
their business that
runs this way,
it’s their life.”

— Gordon Spoor, certified

be a threat to the company’s
survival.

Some business owners just
don’t want to work with com-
puters. Gregg Wind, a CPA
with Wind Bremer Hocken-
berg LLP in Los Angeles,
suggests some easy, low-tech
organisation tips: “If you do
nothing else, set up folders
and drop invoices in there.”

The good news is there is
still time to sort through the
paper, input the data into a
programme and get it to a tax
professional. It may take a
day or two, but it'll save mon-
ey in the long run.

If your papers are so disor-
ganised that you have many
missing checks or invoices, or
can’t figure out which receipts
go with which payments, do
the best you can. But be up-
front with the government
and tell the IRS you're filing
an estimated return. You can
always amend it in the future.

Spoor recalled the case of a
client whose disorganisation,
the result of serious personal
problems, extended back
more than a decade. When
the client, who hadn’t filed
returns during that time,
decided to settle up with the
government, many of his
records didn’t exist.

“We constructed estimates
based on what we knew,”
Spoor said. “The IRS accept-
ed it.”

October 15 is generally a
hard and fast deadline for fil-
ing a return if you’ve had an
extension. The IRS has been
known to make exceptions in

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
BAHAMAS NATIONAL DRUG AGENCY

PUBLIC NOTICE
SUPPLEMENTARY TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY

OF DRUGS AND RELATED ITEMS

Tenders are invited for the Supply of Drugs and Related
Items for the Public Hospitals Authority and the Ministry
of Health, The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

The Supplementary Tender Document, which includes
instruction to the Tenderers along with other relevant
information, can be collected from the Bahamas National
Drug Agency, Market & McPherson Streets, from
Thursday 24" , September 2009 from 9 am — 5 pm.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicated in a sealed
envelope or package identified as “Supplementary
Tender for the Supply of Drug and Related Items” and

addressed to:

Managing Director
Public Hospitals Authority
Third Terrace, West Centerville
P.O. Box N-8200

Nassau, The Bahamas

Electronic and hard copies must be received at the above
address on or before 5pm Friday, October 16%, 2009. A
copy of a valid business license and Nationals Insurance

Certificate must accompany all proposals.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to

reject any or all Tender(s).

Director

public accountant

some cases, but Spoor noted,
“being a disorganised small
business owner is not a rea-
sonable cause.”

Wind noted that e-filing, or
submitting your return to the
government online, can buy
you a little more time.

The IRS is quite clear on
its Web site, www.irs.gov,
about the reasons you should
file your return on time. “If
taxes are owed, a delay in fil-
ing may result in penalty and
interest charges that could
increase your tax bill by 25
percent or more.”

The government does rec-
ognize that not everyone can
afford to pay their taxes right
away. While it will charge
interest on taxes not paid on
time, it is willing to work out a
payment schedule.

If you owe the government
$25,000 or less in taxes, penal-
ties and interest, you can
apply to set up an installment
agreement. There are several
ways to do this. One is to
download and complete IRS
Form 9465, Installment
Agreement Request. Or, you
can use the Online Payment
Agreement Application at
www.irs.gov/individuals/arti-
cle/0,,id149373,00.html.

However, if you can pay
the IRS your entire bill with-
in 120 days, the agency says
you can avoid the fees for set-
ting up an agreement. You
need to call an IRS toll-free
number, 1-800-829-1040 to
arrange for this option.

If you owe the government
more than $25,000, you may
need to complete Form 433-F,
Collection Information State-
ment, which asks for infor-
mation including your assets,
liabilities and income.

Whatever the reason for an
owner’s October 15 anxiety,
it’s a good idea to meet with
an accountant or other finan-
cial adviser to figure out how
to prevent it from becoming
an annual occurrence. Since
the year is nearly three-quar-
ters over, “people should be
thinking about getting organ-
ised for next year’s tax plan-
ning,” Wind said.

“And if they’re going to
talk to a CPA about 2008,
they should spend a few min-
utes talking about 2009,” he
said.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





TEAK FURNITURE
Â¥* SALE xx

10-50% OFF

Gifts, Handicrafts & Batik Clothing
Sept. 26th - 24th Oct.
OPEN 10am - 5pm

KURA KURA

26 Virginia St., Tel: 325 - 1389

1 bik west of Hilton hotel enirance, in large two storey
ene building, on one a westbound street



UE aL 0 UT
MAS RCL
US eT are ACL

GN-919

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF

THE REAL PROPERTY TAX
ACT, 1969

Pursuant to Section 7(2) of the Real Property Tax Act, 1969, as amended,
the Chief Valuation Officer hereby gives notice:-

(a) that copies of the assessment list are available as required by
subsection (4) of Section 7 of the Real Property Tax Act, 1969
(hereinafter in this notice referred to as the Act) and may be
inspected at the Valuation Office or the Treasury, on or after 15th
October, 2009.

that a Notice of Assessment addressed to each owner of property
liable to tax under the Act is available at the Valuation Office,
located at Frederick House, Frederick Street and may be collected
there from by or on behalf of the owner of such property during
normal working hours;

that pursuant to subsection (3) of Section 7 of the Act, upon the
expiration of five (5) days after the publication of this notice, a
Notice of Assessment shall be deemed to have been served on
every owner of property liable to tax under the Act;

that without prejudice to the provision of subsection (3) of Section
7 of the Act, the Chief Valuation Officer may at any time after the
publication in the Gazette of this notice send by post, a Notice of
Assessment addressed to any owner of property liable to tax under
the Act;

That pursuant to Section 11(1) any person aggrieved by a notice
of assessment deemed to have been served under this Act may
object thereto by serving on Chief Valuation Officer within thirty
days after the date on which the notice of assessment is deemed
to have been served, a notice in writing of such objection stating
the grounds upon which he relies.

that pursuant to Section 18 of the Act (but subject to provisions of
Section 11(1)* of the Act) the tax in respect of property will be
due and payable by the owners of property not later than sixty days
after the date on which notice of assessment is deemed to have
been served. Accordingly, it is the duty of each taxpayer to ensure
that he receives a Notice of Assessment;

that the exemption has been allowed for 2009 on those properties
which have been declared as owner-occupied residences, and have
satisfied the conditions under Section 2(d) of the Real Property
Tax (amendment) Act 2009. However, owners are by law, Section
(43)(1) required to disclose to the Chief Valuation Officer any
change in the circumstances of occupation which does not entitle
the property to the exemption allowed. *(Section 43 is reproduced
below):

that pursuant to Section 7 (3) of the Act, persons receiving a Notice
of Assessment and Demand Note for the first time should therefore
examine the columns labeled ‘Current Tax’, ‘Accumulated Arrears
of Tax’ and ‘Total Now Due’, as it would indicate the amount due
for current and prior years.

that if you are a Bahamian citizen/company and own improved
property situate in New Providence or a non-Bahamian
citizen/company (less than 60 percent of shares beneficially owned
by citizens of The Bahamas) and own property situate in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and have never received a Notice
of Assessment and Demand Note, you are required by Section (10)
of the Act to make a declaration of your property not later than
31st December, 2009. Declaration forms for this purpose are
available at the Valuation Section or online at
https:/Aforms.bahamas.gov.bs and should be returned accompanied
by documentary proof of Bahamian citizenship and in the case of
a Bahamian Company, a copy of the Company’s latest annual
statement of return.

* Section 11 (1) is as follows:-

The Chief Valuation Officer shall dismiss any such objection unless the
whole of the tax payable under the Notice of Assessment shall have been
deposited with him or for good cause, the Chief Valuation Officer determines
that the objector shall be relieved of the requirements of this subsection
in whole or in part and is satisfied that the objector has complied with any
such determination which gives partial relief only.

Section 43 is as follows:-

(1) Any owner who is granted an exemption under the provisions of
Section 42(1)(f), by reason of the property qualifying as owner-
occupied property, shall where he is aware of any circumstances
or facts which do not entitle the property to the exemption disclose
to the Chief Valuation Officer those circumstances or facts;

Any owner who knowingly fails to comply with the requirements
of subsection (1) is guilty of an offense and liable on summary

conviction to a fine of one thousand dollars or to imprisonment

for a term of three months or to both such fine and imprisonment;
and the court shall upon conviction of an offender, in addition to
any other penalty imposed, order the offender to pay to the Treasurer
a sum equivalent to twice the amount of the tax which would have
been payable but for the exemption had the disclosure been made;

No limitations as to the time within which proceedings may be
brought for the prosecution of a summary offense shall apply to
proceedings under subsection (2).

Chief valuation Officer/
Controller Of Inland Revenue
Ministry Of Finance

Sandals exec
blasts Exum, with imoney

Top attorney
is charged

laundering

Chamber DOSS. «on:

FROM page 1B

resulted in hundreds of
Bahamians without their
livelihoods. This is not a path
we intend to follow, and for
that reason we will take the
time we need to ensure suc-
cess and do not welcome let-
ters such as yours.

“Not only is it impossible
to provide the information
you have asked for, it’s not
your place to ask for it. As a
businessman, I’m sure you
would take the perceived lack
of information at this present

time and exchange it for a
successful resort in the
future.”

Mr DaCosta pointed to
Sandals’ 14 years of operat-
ing in the Bahamas, and its
“strong affinity” and “deep
love for the people”.

He added that Sandals had
“continued to invest when
others have not, and the
acquisition of Sandals Emer-
ald Bay has once again
demonstrated our love for
these islands and its people.

“The success of our organ-
isation is based on a tried and

tested formula, a fundamental
part of which is sound plan-
ning. We leave nothing to
chance, and everything hap-
pens for a reason. It is due to
this that we can boast some
of the highest average occu-
pancies in the region, bene-
fiting economies and commu-
nities in which we are.”

Mr DaCosta said Sandals
was open and easy to work
with “providing one respects
the boundaries of the part-
nership, and doesn’t overstep
the mark, as has happened
here”.

Tie cle

aetna Com aT

Homes, Apartanet

UU a

Pea Le hs

DUE TO THE LACK OF A QUORUM
ALL MEMBERS Of
Bahama Islands Resorts & Casinos
Cooperative Credit Union (BIRCCCU)
Limited Are Urged To Attend The
Special Called Meeting
Which Will NOW Be Held

Date:

Saturday, October 3", 2009

Location:

Grounds Of The Credit Union

Time:
10:00 A.M.

Purpose of The Meeting:
To Discuss & Vote On The Proposed Opening

Up Of Our Bond To Allow Your Family To
Become Members Of BIRCCCU Ltd.



surrounding Mr Cambridge.

The indictment then
alleged that Eggelleton
offered to provide the under-
cover FBI agents with con-
tacts in the Bahamian finan-
cial services industry around
July 31, 2006, stating that “ in
the Bahamas, he does not
have to adhere to the ethical
restrictions he has in the Unit-
ed States”.

That offer was repeated in
October 2006, the indictment
alleged, Eggelleton the fol-
lowing month telling an
unnamed hotelier with
Bahamas connections that the
FBI agents needed help in
establishing a Bahamian bank
account and company.

However, the hotelier and
another man, referred to as
‘E.D’, who had “very good
connections in the Bahamas”,
were “frightened” and “scep-
tical” about helping Eggel-
leton and the FBI agents,
especially after the latter told
Eggelleton they wanted to
hide and launder proceeds
from a fictitious ‘fraudulent’
investment scheme.

Instead, Eggelleton alleged-
ly introduced the undercover
agents to the two other defen-
dants in the case, Joel
Williams and Ronald Owens,
who would assist them with
their banking needs.

The pair met an undercov-
er FBI agent in Nassau on
March 6, 2007. After hearing
of the need to conceal and
launder proceeds from the
fake financial fraud, Williams
was alleged to have said that
“in the Bahamas, they did not
call it money laundering as
long as the money did not
come from arms, drugs or ter-
rorists”.

Agent

Around the same time, the
FBI agent and the two defen-
dants allegedly met with Mr
Cambridge. He was said to
have provided the undercover
agent with an application
form for opening a Bahamian
International Business Com-
pany (IBC) and wiring
instructions to the attorney’s
trust account at First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas).

Then, on March 20, 2007,
the undercover agents
allegedly sent Mr Cambridge
a $100,000 wire transfer from
a Miami bank. Eight days lat-
er, the Bahamian attorney
allegedly took the FBI agent
to meet ‘S.B’, a First-
Caribbean banker, to be inter-
viewed and sign bank account
opening documents for Hexa-
gon Development.

The indictment alleged that
the undercover agent paid
$7,000 to be shared between
Mr Cambridge and the other
defendants on March 30,
2007.

From then on, Mr Cam-
bridge was alleged to have
transferred $97,000 from his
trust account to the Hexagon
Development account on
April 4, 2007, and received a
$200,000 wire transfer in May
2007. He then allegedly trans-
ferred $199,000 from the
Hexagon Development
account with FirstCaribbean
to a bank account in St Croix.

Betweeen August 30, 2007,
and November 23, 2007, Cam-
bridge was alleged to have
received three wire transfers,
valued at $200,000 each, from
the undercover agents.

“On or about November
23, 2007, at Nassau, Bahamas,
defendant Cambridge was
told by an undercover agent
that the funds came from a
‘Ponzi’ scheme,” the indict-
ment alleged. “After acknowl-
edging his understanding of
the purported source of the
funds, defendant Cambridge
instructed undercover agents
how to launder the proceeds
in the Bahamas.”

That same day, Mr Cam-
bridge was alleged to have
told the FBI agent he
received $2,000, not $1,000,
for laundering the money, and
the same day gave him a
$399,000 cheque to deposit
into the Hexagon bank
account at FirstCaribbean
International Bank
(Bahamas).

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 9B



Cable attacks ‘flawed’ retail price analysis

FROM page 1B

As a result, there was “no
justification” to introduce new
retail price regulations with
respect to any of its services
due to price level concerns,
Cable Bahamas argued.

The company compared 16
other Caribbean countries to
the monthly fee charged for
its CoralWave Jazz Internet
service, priced at $21.70, with
a download speed of 1,500
kilobytes per second and
upload of 256 kilobytes per
second.

“The average monthly sub-
scription price for compara-
ble services in the other 17
Caribbean countries surveyed

(excluding the Bahamas) is
$47.33, which is about 118 per
cent higher than Cable
Bahamas monthly price of
$21.70,” Cable Bahamas said
in its submission to the Utili-
ties Regulatory and Compe-
tition Authority (URCA).

“Looking at the price per
kilobytes, the average
(excluding the Bahamas) is
$0.039, which is about 178 per
cent higher than Cable
Bahamas’ per channel price
of $0.014. These results indi-
cate the robustness of the con-
clusion that Cable Bahamas
prices are lower.”

On the cable TV front,
Cable Bahamas used as its
benchmark its SuperBASIC

UST SELL

Re: Lot # 12, Block # 86, Richmond Park

Subdivision, Unit 3R Freeport, Grand Bahama

oes
cently Constructed Six-Plex

Re

Five Units:
One bedroom one bathroom, living and dining
area, kitchen and laundry area.

One Unit:
Four bedrooms, two bathrooms, a powder room,
living and dining room, family room, kitchen,
office and laundry room and arctic area.

Potential Income:
One bedroom units $3,250.00 per month
Four bedrooms unit $1,400.00 per month.

For conditions of sale and any
other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
@ 502-0929 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should
submit offer in writing addressed to
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
P. O. Box N-7518 Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us before October 9th, 2009

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
INTHE SUPREME COURT
Common Law & Equity Division

2009/CLE/gen/00040

BETWEEN
SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Plaintiff
AND
BARBARAA. DEVEAUX
Defendant
To: Barbara Deveuax

TAKE NOTICE that

1. An action has been commenced against you by
Scotiabank (Bahamas) limited in the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas by Writ of Summons filed on the 15th of January
2009 being Action No. 2009/CLE/ gen/00040, wherein the
Plaintiff's claim is for the total sum of $34,279.08 which
represents the principal sum of $24,266.51, accrued
interest on the said principal in the sum of $9,316.57,
add-on charges in the sum of $616.00, interest on the said
add-on charges in the sum of $127.14 and late fees in the
sum of $80.00 due under a loan numbered 1746456.

2. It has been ordered that service of the Writ of
Summons in the said action be effected on you
by virtue of this advertisement

3. You must within 21 days from the publication of this
advertisement inclusive of the day of such publication,
acknowledge service of the said Writ of Summons
by entering an Memorandum of Appearance on the
Attorneys whose name and address appear below,
otherwise judgment may be entered against you.

Dated the 22nd day of September A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Plaintiff



service that includes between
48 to 54 video channels at a
monthly price of $30.

The BISX-listed utility
provider said: “The average
monthly subscription price for
comparable services in the
other 12 Caribbean countries
surveyed (excluding the
Bahamas) is $38.39, which is
about 28 per cent higher than
Cable Bahamas’ monthly
price of $30.

“Looking at the price per
channel, the average (exclud-
ing the Bahamas) is $0.75,
which is also about 28 per
cent higher than Cable
Bahamas per channel price of
$0.60.”

To further back its case,
Cable Bahamas pointed to
the fact that Bahamian gross
domestic product (GDP) per
capita, based on purchasing
power parity, was relatively
high in the Caribbean con-
text.

In addition, the Bahamas’
population density was one
of the lowest in the region,
preventing the company from
exploiting economies of den-
sity, as it alleged that it was
further disadvantaged by hav-
ing to provide services to mul-
tiple islands - instead of the

one normally served by rivals.

Cable Bahamas then
moved to justify its case for a
rise in the $30 per month rate
for its basic cable TV pack-
age it has been forced to levy
since 1994, pointing out that
the Bahamian all-items infla-
tion index had increased by
30 per cent over the same 15-
year period.

“More specially in the case
of Cable Bahamas’ operating
costs, since 1995 Cable
Bahamas’ programming costs
per subscriber for basic cable
TV service have increased by
roughly 95 per cent,” the com-
pany said.

“Salary and benefit costs
per subscriber (for customer
service, technical and IT and
administrative personnel have
increased by over 200 per
cent, and other operating
expenses per subscriber
(including plant maintenance,
electricity, vehicles) have also
increased by over 200 per
cent.”

Cable Bahamas contrasted
this situation with what had
happened in the US, pointing
out that in response to
increased operating costs,
cable companies there had on
average increased basic TV

package fees from $22 per
month in 1995 to $49.65 in
2008, a 122 per cent increase.
Over the same period, infla-
tion, as measured by the US
consumer price index, grew
by just 38 per cent.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

“Cable Bahamas is simply
not in a position to hold basic
cable TV service price con-
stant at $30 indefinitely with-
out significant deterioration
in the quality of that service,”
Cable Bahamas said.

2009/CLE/gen/00119

Common Law & Equity Division

BETWEEN

SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

Plaintiff

AND
KELPHINE D. JOHNSON

To: Kelphine D. Johnson

TAKE NOTICE that

Defendant

1. An action has been commenced against you

by Scotiabank (Bahamas)

Umited in the Supreme

Licensing Authority

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Licensing Authority wishes to remind the public
that in accordance with the instructions issued, with
every Music and Dancing License, it is an offense to
disturb the peace in any way, whether by the volume
of the music being played in your establishment or by
the behaviour of the patrons of your establishment.

Over the past several months the Board has received
many complaints related to disturbance. Investigation
by the Police has proven that many owners and operators
of establishments are abusing their Music and Dancing
License and causing much distress to their neighbours.

The Board wishes to reiterate its policies with regard
to Music and Dancing Licenses. All establishments
holding Music and Dancing Licenses are required to
contain their music within the confines of their building
and that music should not be heard outside of the
building. Further, at no time should music be played on
the outside of the building. Recently some establishments
have circumvented these rules by applying for Occasional
Licenses covering days of the week when they wish to
move music out onto the street and to extend their hours.
In many cases their requests are submitted as medical
cookouts or promotional days and, being
accommodating, the Board has often granted these
requests only to discover subsequently that the entire
neighbourhood has been disrupted and disturbed.

The Board hereby gives notice that no further Occasional
Licenses will be given for any space directly outside
any establishment. The Board wishes to commend
owners and operators who put on promotional events
and encourage them to hold these events in public areas
designated for such events and for which there is already
in place the means by which police monitoring and
oversight can be offered. Places include Public Parks,
RM. Bailey Park, Arawak Cay, Western Esplanade,
and Goodman’s Bay and other areas approved by the
police.

The method of obtaining such license is as follows:

For liquor only: make application to Roads and Parks,
Ministry of Works and Transport or the relevant
Government agency to use the chosen site; if granted,
take this permit to the Officer in Charge of Licensing
at Police District Headquarters and request a Vendor’s
Permit.

We suggest that this be done at least one week in advance
of your function.

Upon receipt of permission from the Police, take your
documents to The Licensing Authority and you will
receive your license within two working days.

For food sold with liquor: In addition to the above,
you must also obtain a health certificate for at least two
persons and request that Environmental Health inspect
the place where the food will be prepared and issue you
a Food Vendors Permit.

For food only: Environmental Health Food Vendor’s
Permit and a Police Vendor’s Permit are required. No
permit from the Licensing Authority is required.

The Board
The Licensing Authority of New Providence



Court of The Bahamas by Writ of Summons filed on
the 30th of January 2009 being Action No. 2009/CLE/
gen/00119, wherein the Plaintiff's claim is for the total
5um of $28,367.40 which represents the principal
sum of $15,047.39, accrued interest on the said
principal in the sum of $10,751.51, add-on charges
in the sum of $912.85, and interest on the said add-
on charges in the sum of $1,655.65 due under a loan
numbered 1579053 and the principal sum of $1,118.76
due under a Mastercard No. 5449 68501002 7759.

2. It has been ordered that service of the Writ of
Summons in the said action be effected on you by virtue of
this advertisement

3. You must within 21 days from the publication of this
advertisement inclusive of the day of such publication,
acknowledge service of the said Writ of Summons
by entering an Memorandum of Appearance on the
Attorneys whose name and address appear below,
otherwise judgment may be entered against you.

Dated the 22nd day of September A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Plaintiff

ar

JUDICIAL AND LEGAL SERVICE COMMISSION
VACANCY NOTICE

Stipendiary & Circuit Magistrate
Office Of The Judiciary
New Providence & The Family Islands

Applications are invited from suitably qualified
persons for appointment as resident Stipendiary
and Circuit Magistrates in:

(a) New Providence;
(b) Abaco;

(c) Andros;

(d) Eleuthera;

(e) Exuma;

(f) Long Island.

Applicants must be members of the English, Irish,
Scottish or Bahamian Bars or of the Bar of any
country of the Commonwealth to which a member
of The Bahamas Bar is admitted without
examination. In addition, they must be at least five
(5) years in the above-mentioned countries.

The duties of the post are as set out in The
Magistrates Act Chapter 42 of the Statute Laws of
The Bahamas and all other applicable Statutes as
well as The Common Law, where applicable, and
all rules made thereunder, and all other statutory
duties which may be prescribed from time to time.

The Salary of the post is in Scale JL14 - $49,800
x 700 to 55,400 per annum, with a Responsibility
Allowance of $4,000 per annum and a Scarcity
Allowance of $7,500 per annum. Housing and
Utilities, along with a vehicle, are attached to the
positions in the Family Islands only.

Serving officers must apply through their Heads
of Departments.

Application forms may be obtained from the
Judicial & Legal Service Commission, 3rd Floor,
Ansbacher House, East Street & Bank Lane, and
should be returned to the Secretary, P.O. Box N-
167, Nassau, The Bahamas, not later than Friday,
16th October, 2009.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Asian markets lower as
monthslong rally sputters

BANGKOK (AP) —
Asian stock markets fell
Wednesday as a monthslong
rally sputtered and investors
waited for clues from the US
Federal Reserve about the
global recovery’s strength.
European shares were high-
er.

Oil prices hovered above
$71 a barrel following a big
jump overnight while the US
dollar continued to languish,
falling against the yen and
euro. Japan’s market was
closed for a national holiday.

Asian markets were invig-
orated Tuesday by the Asian
Development Bank raising its
growth forecasts for China
and India, two of the region’s
biggest economies.

Investors have piled into
Asian equities this year but
some analysts say the rally,
fueled by loose monetary pol-
icy and government stimulus
spending, has gotten ahead of
economic reality.

Markets in Europe were
higher in early trade with
benchmarks in Germany,

France and Britain up 0.5 per
cent or more.

Hong Kong’s Hang Seng
index fell 105.62, or 0.5 per
cent, to 21,595.52 and South
Korea’s Kospi dropped 7.41,
or 0.4 per cent, to 1,711.47.
Australia’s benchmark gained
1.5 per cent while China’s
Shanghai index shed 1.9 per
cent as investors cashed out
ahead of a slew of new initial
public offerings.

Elsewhere, New Zealand’s
market rose 0.2 per cent after
its economy unexpectedly

grew in the second quarter.
Singapore’s index was frac-
tionally higher and Taiwan
fell 1.9 per cent. India’s Sen-
sex was down 0.1 per cent.

“All the markets are over-
bought and people are waiting
for a reason or catalyst to take
profits,” said Peter Lai, invest-
ment manager at DBS Vick-
ers in Hong Kong.

Some economic data from
the US, the world’s largest
economy, has showed signs of
improvement but unemploy-
ment is likely to continue ris-







NOTICE is hereby given that

MARIE MARTHE BELLOT

of P.O. Box AB-20554, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO,

Medical

Sales Representative




BAHAMAS,

is applying to the Minister responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a



Introduction:

ing, resulting in a weak recov-
ery, he said.

Investors will watch closely
what the Fed has to say about
the economy and the scale of
the recovery after its meeting
wraps up Wednesday. The
Fed is widely expected to
leave rock-bottom interest
rates unchanged, though
investors will be looking for
clues in the central bank’s
statement about when hikes
might start.

Also toward the end of the
week, markets will be focus-
ing on the Group of 20 meet-
ing of the world’s leading
economies on Thursday and
Friday in Pittsburgh.

In the US Tuesday, the
Dow Jones industrial average
rose 51.01, or 0.5 per cent, to
9,829.87, its highest close since
October 6, when it finished at
9,956.

Poor’s 500 index gained 7.00,
or 0.7 per cent, to 1,071.66,
while the Nasdaq composite
index rose 8.26, or 0.4 per
cent, to 2,146.30. Both index-
es are at 11-month highs.

Futures pointed to gains
Wednesday on Wall Street.
Dow futures were up 19, or
0.2 per cent, at 9,790.

Oil prices hovered above
$71 a barrel in Asia as signs of
weak crude demand were off-
set by a slumping US dollar.
Benchmark crude for Novem-
ber delivery was down eight
cents at $71.68 a barrel by late
afternoon Singapore time in
electronic trading on the New
York Mercantile Exchange.
The contract added $1.83 a
barrel to settle at $71.76 on
Tuesday.

In currencies, the dollar fell
to 90.97 yen from 91.15 yen.
The euro rose to $1.4795 from

citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 17 day of September, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

i'm lovin’ it



The broader Standard & = $1.4788.

A local healthcare supplier is currently looking to
recruit a Medical Sales Representative to sell
medical and surgical products in the local market.
With this position experience in the healthcare
field would be an asset but is not essential. NOTICE is hereby given that KENOL LOUIS PIERRE of P.O.
Box AB-20541, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 17" day of September, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WILSON AUSTRAL of TREASURE
CAY, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 17" day of September, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-
7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Job Specification:

wan Purpose of the Medical Sales Representative:
To achieve sales targets for the various product
lines through planned activity.
Maintain business records for all Health Care
Professionals and key accounts within the local
healthcare industry to help select and deliver
business management objectives linked to sales
and market share growth.

Road Traffic Department
Road Safety Competition

ecufet place tn cries fhe: road’?

Skills/Experience Requirements:
- Excellent communication and interpersonal
skills.
Tenacious, driven and resilient.
Good planning and organizational skills.
Self discipline and self motivated.
Interested in the healthcare industry.
Ability to interpret data.
Ambitious and keen to develop a career ina
successful organization
- * - Able to provide evidence of individual
achievement in line with core competencies of
a medical representative, this can be from other
fields of employment, education and social and
L sporting activities.

Heine Ox RAINE the read what shauld you do

the falkrwing read sign meus?

Vv PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, NAWAKO KIKI ROLLE of
STAPLEDON GARDENS, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, intend
fo change the name to MAWAKO KIKI ROLLE. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objectionstotheChiefPassportOfficer,P.0.BoxN-742, Nassau, Bahamas
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

Education Requirements:
- Degree Level or equivalent, ideally in sales or
medical related

UME:
UTR ES§:
= The area covered is the Caribbean. You will live

TEL EHSOME: in the Bahamas and be prepared to travel.

The Salary offered for the Medical Representative
is competitive and depends on experience +
bonus + benefits.

THPETITUIY BELES

To apply for this position, candidates must be

eligible to live and work in the Bahamas. a te ee DEPARTMENT

OF CIVIL AVIATION

Please send resume's to
RISC hOPHUMSTWESOUrSE Se EIN. com

ik
red momma A OR AW PC AA Ms pol oti Fea rath

PUBLICATION BY THE MINISTRY OF
TRANSPORT & AVIATION DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL
AVIATION PARTICULARS OF AN APPLICATION TO

OPERATE SCHEDULED AIR SERVICES

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Roney ot Work

In accordance with the provisions of Regulation
9 of the Civil Aviation (Licensing of Air Services)
Regulations 1976, the Minister responsible for
Aviation hereby publishes the following particulars
of the under-mentioned applicant to operate
scheduled air services to and from The Bahamas.

crac? becoa Me TA TL
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 22 SEPTEMBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,513.89| CHG -0.77| %CHG -0.05 | YTD -198.47 | YTD % -11.59
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
Security Daily Vol. Div $

AML Foods Limited

Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank ($1)

Previous Close Today's Close Change

PARTICULARS OF APPLICATION
1. Application: LEAIR CHARTER SERVICE LTD.

Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol ($)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 0.00
Premier Real Estate 0.00

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Daily Vol.

2. Date of first publication: 17th September, 2009

3. Routes: BETWEEN NASSAU ON THE ONE
HAND AND ANDROS TOWN ON THE OTHER.
4. Purpose of services: Passenger, mail and freight.

ec000000000000000
geo0o0o000s=0g00000002
e000c0o0ooMmo0q000000H2

Q
Qo
Qo

Local Times
0630/0645 Daily
1530/1545 “
0700/0715 “
1600/1615 “

5. Provisional time table:
NASSAU/ANDROS TOWN

5S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low Security Last Sale Interest
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series ©) +

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13 100.00
FBB15 100.00

risen’ Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

7%
Prime + 1.75%
7%

1000.00

1000.00 Prime + 1.75%

ANDROS TOWN/NASSAU

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.0
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
2,

6. Frequency of flights: See above time-table.

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund

1.3344
2.8952
1.4119
3.0941
12.3870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund

7. Type of Aircraft: EMBRAER-110, CESSNA 402-C &
PIPER AZTECS

Any representation regarding or objection thereto in
accordance with Regulation 10 must be received by the
Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Tourism & Aviation & the
Department of Civil Aviation within fourteen (14) days after

the date of first publication of this Notice.

1.0000
9.0775
1.0000

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund 4.93
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

1.0000

1.0000 31-Aug-09

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
in

Signed
HYACINTH PRATT
PERMANENT SECRETARY

N/M - Net Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM






ls

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST











ically, itt

ii





Ta NY































































zi Today Friday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
sf | “ ai —a High = Low W High Low W NASSAU Today: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 86° F
= %. — > 0| 1|2 3|4|5\¢ ’ 8|9|1 | FC FIC FC FIC Friday: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 86° F
_ i we | : Acapulco 91/32 79/26 pe 92/33 79/26 pc FREEPORT Today: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 86° F
ht AYN — li Low | MoDerATE J HicH } HIGH J EX. © Amsterdam 65/18 51/10 s 63/17 52/11 pe Friday: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 86° F
‘ ORLANDO N Ankara, Turkey 75/23 43/6 s 77ie5 47/8 pe = ABACO ‘Today: E at 8-16 Knots 3-6 Feet 10 Miles 85° F
High:91°F/33°C i Sun and some clouds Patchy clouds with a Partly sunny, a t-storm Brilliant sunshine. Partly sunny, a t-storm Partly sunny. The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 77/25 64/17 s 79/26 66/18 pc Friday: E at 8-16 Knots 3-5 Feet 6 Miles 85° F
yf rae rorenc —4 with a shower. stray shower. in spots. possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 65/18 56/13 1 616 53/11 +
<«e 7 é ‘ é Bangkok 90/32 77/25 sh 89/31 78/25 +
1 N igh: 88° L - 79° oe - oe a Coe ie Tee - Barbados 86/30 78/25 pc 87/30 77/25 pc
TAMPA Ly . ig OW: OW: OW: Ow: OW: TIDES FOR NASSAU Barcelona 78/25 63/17 s 75/23 63/17 s 's U.S. F
as i f- 7 ment ae: Ta Uae YN MS BS SS
i hs 4° ° “it a 3 é 3 sare sans — : Beijing 78/25 54/12 s 75/23 62/16 pe
ge: 81 E33" a =e Ta a ai High HLL} Low Ht) beirut 79/26 71/21 s 78/25 72/22 s
Low: 75° F/24°C ry r, ee of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 11:40am. 3.1 5:13am. 0.7 Belgrade 89/97 58/14 s 76/24 54/12 pc
a @ : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 11:59pm. 25 6:11pm. 1.2 aah 6518 47/8 s 63/17 46/7 :
. — CT ne Friday t2dopm. 29 an i Bermuda 81/27 74/23 sh 80/26 70/21 pe
”, | ee AUp.m. 7. Bogota 68/20 38/3 pc 70/21 =41/5 pc Billings
2 “ie a Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday 57am. 24 703am. 12 Brussels 69/20 46/7 pc 66/18 46/7 pc Mest ep
i ‘1 ABACO Temperature 1:35pm. 28 8:11pm. 14 Budapest 81/27 56/13 s 73/22 50/10 pc
f ; =» High: 89° F/32° C THUD .cessacenara Setar tare dtcrarcee 91° F/33° C Silay Iam, 24 Gubam, 13 Buenos Aires 64/17 46/7 s 68/20 50/10 pe (H) 1
: - Reema p LOW ceeccccssseesee 78° F/26° C 2:35pm. 28 9:09pm. 14 Cairo 90/32 65/18 s 91/32 68/20 s chitso
c - “* ae ow: 76° F/24 Normal high... arratG 93/33 84/28 r 91/32 83/28 Ronee
- F Normal low . 74° F/24° C Calgary 85/29 39/3 s 74/23 44/6 s 60100
5 = @ WEST PALM BEACH AT Last year's HIQh uo... esses 90° F/32° C SUN ay Ty ify Cancun 90/32 73/22 t 89/31 73/22 t
: aioe High: 89° F/32° C Y bi Last year's IOW: stented 77° F/25° C Caracas 81/27 72/22 t 82/27 72/22 t
——- Low: 79° F/26° C o- ie Precipitation Sunrise. ..... 6:59am. Moonrise ...12:41 p.m. Casablanca 83/28 62/16 s 81/27 61/16 p
aa ye AS of 2 p.m. yeSterday .ecsccsesisnsnstenntnetn 0.15" Sunset... 704 p.m. Moonset....11:17p.m. Copenhagen 60/15 50/10 sh 63/17 52/11 ¢
cm, FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Ar Year to date 30, First Full Last New Dublin 61/16 48/8 pe 63/17 50/10 pc
High: 89° F/32° C @ High: 88° F/31°C Normal year to date .......c.ccsessesscsssssecseeseene 36.74" 7 7 Frankfurt 64/17 48/8 c 6518 47/8 pc
Low: 78° F/26°C Low: 75° F/24°C Geneva 73/22 54/12 pc 68/20 50/10 pc
ip EF AccuWeather.com Halifax 64/17 45/7 pc 59/15 43/6 pc
Ce @ — Forecasts and graphics provided by - he Havana 91/32 73/22 t 88/31 71/21 5 =< Miata
e ‘ MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Sep.26 Oct.4 Oct.11. Oct. 18 ~—_—_—+Helsinki 57/13 39/3 pc 55/12 50/10 c aie 88/79
a High: 88° F/31°C = Hong Kong 88/31 81/27 t 90/32 79/26 s Rai
Low: 79° F/26°C NASSAU High: 90° F/32° C Islamabad 107/41 73/22 s 110/43 72/22 s au Cold =peonts
F 5h. QO ° Low: 76° F/24°C Istanbul 76/24 64/17 pc 76/24 63/7 s Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
High: 88° F/31°C i ] p y
Low: 79° F/26° C Jerusalem 81/27 60/15 s 81/27 59/15 s Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm afd.
7 = “i Johannesburg 77/25 54/12 pc 61/16 52/11 + [v=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mangum
KEY WEST = * Kingston 88/31 80/26 r 89/31 79/26 sh f “BOs 60s 70s 80s /G0s) AU0sNNinS)
High: 88° F/31°C Xr A CAT ISLAND Lima 74/23 87/13 pe 73/22 8/14 po s/s 10s 20s [308)) 40s
Low: 79° F/26°C \ High: 87° F/31° London 70/21 50/10 pc 70/21 52/11 s
: — © Low: 75° F/24°C Madrid 82/27 54/12 s 82/27 54/12 s
ye, Manila 86/30 77/25 t 85/29 76/24 +
AS . a Mexico City 73/22 54/12 t 73/22 55/12 t .
N he = Monterrey 82/27 63/17 c 82/27 64/17 po H e * * IC AN 7 Ths he UJ RANG =
_ GREAT EXUMA ~~ \ SAN SALVADOR Montreal 72/22 46/7 pe 6417 45/7 s
High: 87° F/31°C High: 89° F/32°C Moscow 55/12 45/7 c 54/12 41/5 +
AY Low: 75°F/24°C eo Munich 72/22 51/10 c 6116 45/7 c
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS : peer Nairobi 87/30 55/12 pe 88/31 55/12 s
highs and tonighis’s lows. Ve High: 89° F/32° C ro New Delhi 99/37 79/26 s 101/38 77/25 s
Za Low: 76° F/24°C a % Oslo 59/15 48/8 pc 64/17 52/11 c
te AY Paris 72/22 54/12 c 70/21 49/9 s an eC OW’?
Y Prague 62/16 46/7 sh 64/17 45/7 pc
LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 74/23 65/18 sh 73/22 65/18 pc y ny
a rere ae sozr oie s 82ers way peelic
Low: 78° F/26°C Rome 82/27 61/16 s 82/27 61/16 s "
Ti anes ae cas Tiel aaa = * MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 88/31 79/26 pc 88/31 80/26 s Moy you can rest easy knowing
High tow Wo High Low Ww High tow Wo High Low) w High tow Wo High Low w We Mocerran’c Sa ua 7996 467 8 —B6RD_40/9 that you have excellent INSBIANCE
FIC FIC FIC FC FIC FIC FIC =F /C FIC F/C FIC FIC NY Low: 77° F/25° C an ava Ol co rave no matter whic
Albuquerque 68/20 49/9 pc 78/25 55/12 s Indianapolis 81/27 5915 t 79/26 57/13 + Philadelphia 84/28 G16 t 73/22 53/11 CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS Santiago 73/22 48/8 s 64/17 43/6 c waw the wind blows.
Anchorage 47/8 41/5 r 49/9 41/5 + Jacksonville 87/30 72/22 t 90/32 71/21 pc Phoenix 97/36 72/22 s 100/37 75/23 s oe Ui santo Daring ete sh CEU eae y .
Atlanta 86/30 69/20 pc 87/30 67/19 c Kansas City 74/23 56/13 pc 76/24 58/411 c Pittsburgh 78/25 54/12 po 73/22 49/9 s RAGGEDISLAND — Migh:89°F/s2°c - — — ar r ae scr s c
Atlantic City 86/30 56/13 t 70/21 45/7 s Las Vegas 96/35 66/18 s 99/37 71/21 s Portland, OR 77/25 52/41 s 79/26 53/11 s High: 88° F/31°C Low: 79° F/26°C Sea ma : ia pe ee a ee Nobody does it better
Baltimore 85/29 58/14 t 75/23 5140 s Little Rock 79/26 63/17 t 78/25 64/17 ¢ Raleigh-Durham 89/31 66/18 pc 80/26 58/14 pc Low:76°F/24°C = % sen — Tao. ESA? , Rar SOAs - 3
Boston 77/25 5412 po 66/18 45/7 s LosAngeles 94/34 66/18 s 90/32 64/17 5 St. Louis 92/27 6417 t 74/23 63/17 t . om ae ETDS = ETS A
Buffalo 74/23 48/8 po 65/18 45/7 s Louisville 95/29 64/17 t 83/28 64/17 1 Salt Lake City 78/25 55/12 pc 84/28 55/12 s GREATINAGUA wr Tala 70/96 66/18 s 77/95 cores
Charleston, SC 87/30 70/21 pc 86/30 65/18 c Memphis 93/28 69/20 t 84/28 69/20 t San Antonio 74/23 62/16 t 84/28 67/19 pc High: 92° F/33°C aaa 74/23 50/10 pc GAAS
Chicago 81/27 55/12 po 71/21 56/13 1 Miami 88/31 79/26 pc 989/31 79/26 pc San Diego 83/28 63/17 s 80/26 64/17 pc Low 77°F25°C Trinidad 80/07 GA/I7 00/32 72/22 pe
Cleveland 77/25 52/11 po 74/23 50/10 s Minneapolis 77/25 5945 pe 69/20 54/12 + San Francisco 77/25 5542 pe 79/26 57/13 pe ; yaReRO 66/18 50/10 65/18 54/12 pc et men INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 75/23 57413 t 80/26 62/16 pc Nashville 88/31 6719 t 83/28 68/20 t Seattle 69/20 48/8 s 72/22 52/11 s Vienna 70/21 55/12 po 64/17 50/10 po
Denver 60/15 40/4 sh 66/18 44/6 pc NewOrleans 989/31 76/24 t 89/31 76/24 t Tallahassee 92/33 72/22 t 92/33 71/21 pe in
i Warsaw 64/17 50/10 c 63/17 48/8 pc
Detroit 79/26 53/11 po 71/21 5140 s New York 82/27 6216 t 68/20 52/11 s Tampa 91/32 75/23 t 91/32 76/24 t Winnipeg 77/95 BA/12 s 73/22 55/12 pc
Honolulu 89/31 75/23 s 89/31 76/24 s Oklahoma City 75/23 52/11 c 78/25 55/12 c Tucson 91/32 64/17 s 95/35 65/18 s Vw ;
Houston 82/27 68/20 t 85/29 73/22 t Orlando 91/32 75/23 t 92/33 75/23 pc Washington,DC 86/30 62/16 t 78/25 54/12 s Teh ee ie ee


sayy V4
CIT a eA by

The Tribune

RELIGIOUS
NEWS,
STORIES
AND
CHURCH
EVENTS


PG 22 Thursday, September 24, 2009

RELIGION

The Tribune



Carmichael Baptist Holiness Church
Ferguson Sub-Division; Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 361-5798 P.O. Box CR-55785
Pastor Rev. Paul J. McPhee J.P.
Assistant Pastor Gertrude Miller

Re: 4th Pastoral Anniversary
Theme: "A MAN WALKING
BY FAITH"

Date: 23rd September - 25th
September 2009

Wednesday night:
Asst. Pastor Gertrude Miller

Thursday Night:
Rev. Albert Kerr

Friday Night:
Min. Lennis McPhee

Services Begin at 7:45 pm nightly
Closing out on Sunday 27th at 3:00pm
Guest speaker: Pastor Lawrence McPhee
Greater Pentecostal Church of God







FACULTY and board members of Hope College shown here at an Open
House over the weekend.

HOPE COLLEGE

TO OFFER RELIGIOUS DEGREES

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

WITH the national average down for the Fall 2009 BGCSE examina
tions-dropping to a ‘D’ this academic year, there is no doubt that many
class of 2009 graduates received reject letters from local colleges they
desired to attend this semester.

For such persons, this desire to continue their education was tarnished,
leaving them with little option, which includes finding work in a depressing
job market. One institution is offering an alternative solution for such indi-
viduals, with a message of hope.

Hope College, located on JFK Drive in the Christian Life Centre (CLC)
pitched its degree programs to the public in an open house over the weekend,
and began registering new students for the Fall 2009 academic year.

The Christian based college, spareheaded by the Assemblies of Brethren in
the Bahamas is targeting those whose aspirations for higher education were
tarnished by unsatisfactory BGCSE results, Dr June Wilson, Research and
Education Director at the college told The Tribune yesterday.

In addition to secular training, the college seeks to equip persons interest-
ed in entering Christian ministry, providing an at-home ministry training
experience however, for aspiring church-workers in the Associate of Arts
Divinity degree (A. T-H.).

Institutes that offer Biblical studies at home are very limited; leaving aspir-
ing pastors with a starkly brisk decision where they should receive their min-
istry training.

“Church members who want to take on leadership positions but don’t have
knowledge on Biblical principles can equip themselves with these classes and
upgrade themselves so that they can be impactful in ministry,” said Dr Wilson.

Studies show that the success of church’s growth,and impact in the com-
munity it is in, is directly attributed to whether the church’s pastor has
received any formal biblical training.

“When it comes to the school of divinity, leaders and members can take
those classes and not necessarily enroll in Associate degree programs at this
time but they will receive certificate verifying that they completed the class,”
she explained.

Courses offered in the School of Divinity include: BIB 193 Biblical
Interpretation and Hermeneutics, MIN 403 Homiletics, TH 202 Systematic
Theology I, and TH 401 Women of the Bible.

In a press statement to Tribune Religion, representatives expressed their
vision as follows for the college:

“The mission of Hope College is to educate students for lives of leadership
and courage in the global environment, through academic and co-circular

SEE page 26
The Tribune RELIGION Thur mber 24, 2009 ® PG 23

(CY MEDITATION

Do we need
a revival? |LOANS BY PHONE

LAST Sunday l >
evening the discussion oo at ) f /
centered around the
topic of revival. The we ~ REV. ANGELA
approach took the “ - FT ; ee8

form of four questions A. PALACIOUS

and the persons pres-
ent were invited to give
individual responses.

The answers are not in any particular order of importance. : @ e (ash In Hand
You are also invited to engage in the same exercise. Before

reading the suggestions, write your answers down if you like, and | e

foster dialogue between members of your family colleagues, fel- e Vacation Loans e (ar Loans

lowship groups, or church sisters and brothers and amoung the

youth. Add more questions and be prayerfully open to the move- 7

eect et + Medical Loans - School Fee Loans

- Home-Improvement Loans

ro #1 WHAT ARE THE SIGNS OF REVIVAL?
- Loans, Loans, Loans



1. Care and concern for others

. Engaging in personal spiritual devotions and disciplines

. Young people worshipping regularly and with enthusiasm
. A deep love for the Lord

. Love in the heart and kindness towards others
Involvement in church activities

. Testimonies, occasional altar calls

. Forgiveness, healing and joy

QUESTION #2 BLOCKS TO REVIVAL F AST TU RN ARO U N D TI Mi E
1. Laziness

2. Resistance to change
3. Not being holy as God’s people

4. Not accepting God’s condition, * if you turn to me...confess, ° NO LONG WAIT ) 4 LIVE ASSISTANTS ° N0 MACHINES

then I will heal”

5. Lack of a Ninevah-like spirit of repentance
6. A mind-set fixed in stone

7. Limited resources

8. Pushing our own agenda, not God’s agenda Requirements:
1 Ongoing prayer both personal and corporate Job Letter, Passport, NIB, Pay Slip

2.Sermons, seminars, workshops, teaching, and prayer ministry
3. The alliance of area ministers to combine their efforts and

4 To be open and expectant as « people ALT Government, B.E.C, Batelco,
QUESTION #4 HOW CAN | HELP AS AN INDIVIDUAL? WSC and Salary Deduction Employees

AADMABRWNE

LIMITED TIME ONLY!!! CALL NOW!! ACT TODAY!

225-1075

The Tribune wants to hear from people
who are making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are

raising funds for a good cause,
campaigning for improvements in the ¢
area or have won an award. :
If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your

story.


SE

PG 24 ® Thursday, September 24, 2009

RELIGION
(oy THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS



The Tribune

Part 45




History of Trinity Methodist Church Nassau

TRINITY Methodist Church, Nassau,
Bahamas was founded in 1861 and was
opened for worship in 1865.

The District Synod's report of 1861
states:

"The new chapel (Trinity) has not yet
been commenced, the builder's estimate
of costs being so much in advance of the
contemplated expenditure, it is wisely
judged that delay is preferable to embar-
rassment!”

However, the foundation stone of the
new church was laid on August 21, 1861
by His Honour Charles Nesbitt, Esq.
Lieutenant-Governor of the Bahamas.

It was estimated that the new chapel
would cost about £6,200. Plans were fur-
nished by W.W. Pocock, Esq of London.
The building was intended to serve as a
Chapel and a schoolroom and to accom-
modate a congregation of 800 persons.
However, difficulties were experienced as
the work progressed. Due to the Civil
War in the United States of America, the
builder was unable to get timber from the
southern states. In addition, in 1864 an
epidemic of yellow fever struck Nassau
and four of the carpenters imported from
Glasgow to work on the church died, and
the remaining two fled to the United
States of America.

In a letter to the Mission House in
London, Rev Hilton Cheesbrough,
Minister of Trinity Church and District
Superintendent, writes: "Trinity Church
was officially opened on April 2, 1865 at a
cost of £8,000 of which the Government
gave £2,000."

Writing to the Methodist Missionary
Society in 1866 Rev Cheesbrough states:
"On the evening of September 30, 1866
whilst conducting divine service in our
beautiful Trinity Chapel in this city, a
fresh breeze was blowing from the north

” The next day October 1, 1866 Trinity



DEACON Bradley Miller (on the right)
assists Fr Enrique Miller during a midday
mass held in the chapel of Addington
House yesterday. Deacon Miller will be
ordained to the priesthood next Tuesday.

S/ iv
} LAWLOR

Church was completely demolished by
this “fresh breeze" which turned out to be
the worst hurricane this city has experi-
enced to date. This hurricane destroyed
or badly damaged ten Methodist chapels.

The "Nassau Guardian", a daily news-
paper, says in its October 3, 1866 issue:
"The Wesleyans, we believe, suffered
most, their new and beautiful Trinity
Chapel, Frederick Street, with its large
and powerful organ being entirely demol-
ished, leaving only the class and school-
rooms beneath entire.

Before Rev Cheesbrough left the
Colony in 1869 the Church had been re-
built, and he was its first minister. Rev
Cheesbrough is described as an able and
eloquent preacher, a wise administrator,
and a kind and sympathetic friend. He
died in Liverpool, England on May
17,1882.

On September 16, 1928, Trinity Church
again suffered considerable damage by
another hurricane. Two-thirds of its roof
at its western end was blown away. The
gallery disappeared and the remains of
the pipe organ was found in the base-
ment.

The minister of the church at that time,
Rev Walter H Richards, M.B.E., and the
trustees had insured the building for its
full value, and this sum was sufficient to
restore the church building to its former
glory. The building was restored by Fred
Dillet, one of Nassau's premier builders
of a bygone era.

Restoration took just over a year and

during that period members worshipped
in Victoria Hall, the building which for-
merly housed Queen's College, a
Methodist School.

A new organ from a firm in
Connecticut, USA was installed in 1929,
and gave excellent service for 36 years. In
1964, a three manual Wick's organ was
installed.

Trinity's beautiful stained glass win-
dows were installed in 1973 and dedicated
on Trinity Sunday, June 17, 1973.

In 1960 during the ministry of Rev
Harold Slater (1957-1962) the whole
building was thoroughly renovated. It
was painted, the pews and the floor revar-
nished and a new red floor matting laid.
Due to the generosity of the late PM
Lightbourne, an elevator was installed at
the western end of the church for the ben-
efit of the elderly and those not so old.
The basement hall and classrooms were
renovated for the use of youth groups and
men's and women's meetings after the
departure of the Queen's College
Preparatory Department in September
1961 to their new campus on Village
Road.

From 1865 to 1986, Trinity Church had
30 ministers. Twenty-eight of them came
from the United Kingdom and two from
the Caribbean and the Americas.
Ministers who served were as follows:

Hilton Cheesbrough (1865-1869);
Henry Bleby (1869-1879); Jonathan C.
Richardson (1879-1884); Francis Moon
(1884-1889); Thomas Raspass (1889-
1891); George Lester (1892-1896);
Frederick W. Gostick (1896-1904); W.H.E
"Willie" Bleby (1904-1916); Allworth
Eardley (1916-1921); W.T. Kilbride (1921
- 1923); T. H. Howitt (1923-1925); W.H.
Richards, M.B.E. (1925-1931); A.E.
Nelson (1932); H.S.F. Rossiter (1932); E.
Vosper Paget (1932-1937); Herbert S.
Clarke (1937-1947); W.H. Armstrong

(1947-1950); George T. Start (1950-1952);
Willie Rhodes (1952 -1955); G. I. George
Jones (1954-1956); William T Makepeace
(1955-1957); Harold Slater (1957-1962);
Frank E Poad (1960-1974); Philip
Blackburn (1962 -1966); David
Livingstone (1966-1968); Godfrey S
Johns (1968-1972); Peter B Swinglehurst
(1972-1976); Eric St. C Clarke (1976-
1978); John Bilverstone (1978-1980);
Nymphas R Edwards (1980 to 1986).

Since 1986, Bahamian Ministers, Rev
Henley Perry and Rev Franklyn Knowles
served and during the period of the
autonomy issue American ministers,
including Rev Gene Zimmerman filled
in. Another Bahamian, Rev Bill Higgs,
has been the Minister at Trinity since
January 2000.

In September 1986, Eddie Sykes of the
United Kingdom was appointed by the
Bahamas/Turks & Caicos Islands District
of the Methodist Church to serve as a
Youth Worker at Trinity. He made a pos-
itive impact on the young people of the
community. Trinity now has a créche and
Children's Storytime. Their scholarship
fund assists able students to attend
Queen's College.

Trinity Methodist Church has had an
interesting history during which time it
worked energetically for the Kingdom of
God. Over the years this Church has
made a significant contribution to the
religious, social, economic and political
life of the Bahamas. It has a strong Bible
Study Group, A Cottage Prayer Group,
A Soup Kitchen and a Ministry to the
Poor.

Today as always it 'seeKs to serve the
present age’ by becoming more involved
in some of the pressing social problems of
the community of which it is a part and to
be faithful to the calling of her Lord and
Master, Jesus Christ.

Deacon Miller to be ordained
to the Sacred Priesthood

REV’D Deacon Bradley Hayward
Miller will be ordained to the Sacred
Priesthood by Reverend Laish Zane
Boyd, Sr on Tuesday, September 29,
The Feast of St Michael and All

Angels.
The concelebrated mass will take
place at historic Christ Church

Cathedral, George Street, at 7pm. The
chief celebrant will be Bishop Boyd,
who will be assisted by con-celebrants

Reverend Drexel Gomez, Rev'd
Gilbert Thompson and Rev’d Fr G
Kingsley Knowles. Rev’d Fr Rodney
Burrows will deliver the sermon.

A descendant of Green Castle,
Eleuthera, Deacon Miller received his
early education at the Green Castle
Primary School, and Rock Sound
Senior High (now Preston H
Albury). He is a graduate of The
College of The Bahamas, where he

attained an Associate’s Degree in
Biblical Studies. In 2006 he entered
Codrington Theological College,
Barbados, and graduated in 2008 with a
Diploma in Theology and Pastoral
Studies. He is currently the Assistant
Curate at Christ the King Church,
Ridgeland Park, West.

Deacon Miller is married to the for-
mer Vernalee Duncombe and they are
the parents of six children.
The Tribune

RELIGION

When church folks
couldn't care less!

IT IS amazing how easy it is these
days to get a group of people to gather
and protest. The slightest problem at a
worksite results in people leaving their
work station to go outside to demon-
strate, bearing placards. Sometimes it is
a lunch-time demonstration.
Sometimes the demonstration makes
the city centre of Bay Street, often with
the general public not fully aware of the
rationale for the public show of dis-
pleasure.

When a church, the place where

Christians meet for corporate prayer
and worship to almighty God, is razed,
or in Bahamian language, 'yucked out
of the ground’, and there is no mass out-
cry and mass public demonstration of
Christians from everywhere in the
nation, there must be a message being
sent, and I am not quite sure what it
is...
Our hearts palpitate at a media
report of vandals breaking and entering
a church and desecrating the altar.
What do we feel when, because of a dis-
pute, an entire church building is will-
fully demolished?

Being aware of those in the ‘moneyed
class’ who often wait with bated breath
to defend their honour in the court sys-
tem against anything /anyone they per-
ceive to be libelous, I would declare my
intention at the outset, which is not to
malign anyone's good name. My inten-

tion is to cause fellow Christians to
reflect on their position and the mes-
sage they send when they choose
silence in the face of opposition (as in
Ephesians 6:12).

In early 2007, the general public and
members of Firetrail Ministries Church
pastored by Dave and Michelle Baker,
saw their church and the foundation for
their new church on the adjacent prop-
erty demolished, only to be replaced by
homes in the private subdivision on Fire
Trail Road which was later named ‘Ros
Davis Estates’ by the developer. Some
years ago, residents living in eastern
New Providence served by Prince
Charles Drive tearfully experienced the
result of heavy equipment demolishing
a portion of the new church building
being constructed by Rhema Christian
Ministries, pastored by Pastors Eugene
& Dr Rosetta V Clare, obviously the
result of an unresolved dispute.

In mid September, 2009, the news
media reported the demolition of the
Canaan Baptist Church and there were
further media reports that other church
buildings could face the same fate.

All of these matters have business,
financial and legal sides, to which I do
not speak. I draw attention to the spir-
itual side. In all that is happening in our
little country today, can Christians
“look the other way” when a “House of
God”, a Christian church in a ‘Christian

‘Strap ya back’

It is indeed amazing how our nation's
foundation was built on Christian val-
ues yet every now and then we still
manage to put "old wives fables” into
our mindset.

I was thinking about my name and
how common it is. This does not bother
me, because I know within myself that
there is only one me. In January of
(while employed at The Tribune) one of
the funeral homes brought in their obit-
uaries. Immediately my interest was
sparked because one of the deceased
persons was named Allison Miller.

When I explained to the funeral
home worker why I was staring at the
photo, he said jokingly to me, "well you
better strap ya back."

At first I didn't know how to

ALLISON
MILLER



respond to his remark but realised that
I could not let that put fear in me. So I
said to him, "You know what, it does-
n’t matter what happens, when it is my
time to go I will. Since there are some
things that God still has for me to do
and I want to do them, I don't think
that will be anytime soon." He looked
at me as if to say, "well that's true, you
will be fine."

nation’ is smashed and removed to
make way for commercial housing
works?

Prophets and prophetesses of the
Bahamas--what is God saying about His
houses of prayer being “yucked up?”

God the Father, in Jesus Christ, was
greatly upset even when the activities in
His house were inappropriate (see
Luke 19:46). Will God judge His
“called out” ones, His Ecclesia, for
being so silent when churches are being
demolished? Bishop Ian Brathwaite’s
fellowship group called “Pastors of
Prayer” reportedly labeled the Canaan
Baptist Church tragedy as the “darkest
day” in the history of the church in The
Bahamas. (See TRIBUNE RELI-
GION, September 17, 2009). Well, it is
not the first blackout, and, reportedly,
there are more dark days ahead...

Some years ago, the public will recall,
from the media, Temple Christian
Academy discovered that a portion of
their new school building under con-
struction was sitting on land reportedly
owned by Thompson Trading
Company.

As the latter entity had not yet been
built on Shirley Street, there was an
obvious mistake, by someone, some
persons or some entities. I well remem-
ber the public outcry by Christians gen-
erally and by churches connected to
that denomination and Fellowship.

You see for me God has the last say
in all things. Only what he says really
matters. However, that does not
excuse the fact that life and death is in
the power of the tongue. Many times
we allow people to say negative things
in and over our lives and we don't can-
cel it with the word of God which
speaks life to us. Negativity just ends
up playing out in our lives. We have to
cancel the negative things spoken over
our lives. This gentleman meant no
harm, he thought that he was doing me
a favor by telling me to protect myself
regardless of the manner he said it in.

However, I had to cancel the
deadly joke that was spoken to me.
The Bible tells us to “let a thing be
established in the mouth of two or
three witness” (Matt 18:16). It is
important that we know the word of
God and the power that words have
whether it is a joke or not. Sometimes
things are said in casual conversation

Thursday, September 24, 2009 ® PG 25



DR ALBERT S.

Our hearts palpitate at a
media report of vandals
breaking and entering a
church and desecrating the

altar. What do we feel when,
because of a dispute, an
entire church building is
willfully demolished?



In this case, this was a Christian
SCHOOL. We are talking today about
churches being uprooted. Can actions
of this nature be pleasing to God? If
they are not, will this nation not be held
accountable and judged for their apa-
thetic silence?

In promoting the 2009 Artist Against
Violence Concert initiative, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham quoted 18th
century politician, Edmund Burke,
who said that all that is necessary for
the triumph of (the forces of) evil is that
good men do nothing. I feel that his
words are worthy of deep, deep consid-
eration, over and over again, by all of
us, especially professing Christians...

¢ Dr Albert S. Ferguson, J.P., is a former
senior-level corporate manager, a former
Associate Professor of Management
Studies, an ordained Minister of Religion
for over 30 years and a transformational
leader. Contact Dr Ferguson at email
albertsferguson@gmail.com.

and we just let it go without even
being aware of the negative things
that can happen to us.

Because we don't cancel negative
words spoken over and in our lives,
words take root and destroy many
lives. In a harsh and hurtful conversa-
tion I was told that, "I won't have any-
thing, I won't be anyone, I don't count
and I should die."

If I did not omit them, those words
would probably be my story. I know
that the Devil is a liar and those words
won't happen. God Almighty is Alpha
and Omega and only what He says
matters and will stand.

We have to cancel negative words
said in and over our lives. It does not
matter if it was said casually or jok-
ingly, they still have to be omitted bot-
tom line. God gave us His words
which is truth and life. Let's speak
that over and in our lives and the lives
of others.
PG 26 ® Thursday, September 24, 2009 RELIGION The Tribune



Ma Becca laid to rest in

FAMILY and Friends of Rebecca
Williams last week said goodbye to the
matriarch last Saturday in Cat Island.
She was 86.

Mrs Williams or Ma “Becca” as she
was affectionately called was an avid
Anglican, a cornerstone in the commu-
nity and a pillar in the Anglican
Church.

Her funeral was held at the St
Andrew’s Anglican Church in Arthur’s
‘Town, the church where she had been
baptisied, confirmed and married.

She was described as a “ giant of a
lady and saluted as a modern day hero-
ine. She was one of the island's premier



ambassadors who entertained prime
ministers, dignitaries, bishops, priests
and deacons.

She was also remembered for going
above and beyond the call of duty in
her devotion to the Anglican Church.

She delivered a yeoman service
organising many bake sales, cook outs
and church programs.

Tributes were given by George
Johnson (Anglican Church Men
President -St. Saviour's Parish) her
niece Cleomie Burrows, Rose Pratt
Rolle, Charles’ Dommie' King, Island
Administrator for Cat Island District
and Canon Warren Rolle.

ee a alae!
Friends of Rebecca
Williams last week
said goodbye to the

BeCWieueiee
Saturday in Cat
Island. She was 86.

In his
Seymour

sermon Edward

exemplified what

fame or remuneration.

the wider Cat Island community.



> Hope College to offer
__ Religious Degrees

FROM page 22

: programmes of recognised excellence in
i the context of the historical Christian
i faith.”

“Hope College plans to operate on

: Bible-based principles, and has a non-
? denominational posture to attract students
? of all religious backgrounds.”

“We are trying to reach high school grad-

? uates who are not equipped to enter col-
i lege,” Dr Wilson explained.
? many who have graduated high school, but
i haven’t had the qualifications to enter a
? college.”

“There are

The College will offer BGCSE and Pre-

i College Classes in English, Math, History,
? Geography, Biology, Religious Knowledge,
i Accounts and Economics at $350 per
? course.

As it stands, the Ministry of Education

? does not have a systematic approach to
? dealing with persons who miserably fail
i BGCSE subject tests. Before the written
? examination is taken, students must com-
i plete sufficient coursework.

“We’re really focusing on the exam, and

? what it takes to get them through the exam.

her birth place Cat Island '

? Bahamas require that students pass at least
i 5 of the major BGCSE’s. If the student

'Rex' } passes at least 3 of the examinations, they

Assistant Priest for St? are required to take college prep courses
Saviour's Parish said Ma Becka dis- }
played many strong attributes and
every member :
should offer their God, priest and :
church in terms of true and laudable :

service without seeking any personal :

We are screening faculty and staff who
have taken students through the BGCSE
with a successful track record of students
who passed.

Guidelines for acceptance into a pro-
gram of study at the College of the

that don’t credit toward their degree pro-
gram.

If they meet neither standard--unsuc-
cessfully completing at least 3 BGCSE’--
they are referred to the Bahamas Baptist
College to bring themselves up to speed.

Hope College offers an alternative how-

Fr Chester Burton, Priest in Charge : ever, and will register students for its Fall

of St Saviour's Parish challenged the ; S°Mester up to next week.
family and friends to leave a legacy just : ‘ ; :
: payment plans are available for incoming

as Ma Becka left an indelible mark on } fb ochinen cai.

the pages of the Anglican Church and }

in the Arthurs Town community and in ? man of the school’s steering committee,

: they have been “working consistently over
i the last few months to ensure that the facil-
i ities, programs and plans are in place to

Financial assistance opportunities and

According to Barton Duncanson, chair-

m: accomplish the fall semester opening of

i on that date.
i Bachelor’s degrees in The Arts, Business
? Administration, Education, and Divinity
i are tentative for January 2010.

: October 5.”

New Student orientation will take place
Plans for Associate and

Admissions applications for the school

are available at the college’s campus at the
i? Christian Life Centre on John F Kennedy
i Drive.

To be considered for admission, first

: time students, transfer students, continuing
i education and diploma students must pro-
i vide the following:

-completed application form
-$25 application fee

-Official high school transcript
-Letter of Recommendation
The Tribune

Sa HASTE 2

* COCONUT Grove Temple will
hold its five day long Spiritual
Warfare Conference 2009 on
September 27- October 2 at the
church on Coconut Grove and
Crooked Island Street. The con-
ference is being held under the
theme “ Weapons of Power
Spiritual Warfare and Prophetic
Move.” Sessions begin 7 pm
nightly.

Speakers throughout the week
will include Roger Williams
Conference Host (Coconut Grove
Temple), Bishop Lindo Wallace
Host Pastor ( Coconut Grove
Temple), Evangelist Origin
Deleveaux (First Baptist Church),
Minister Antonio Rolle (Kingdom
Come Ministries), Evangelist Alisa
Collie (Living Faith Seventh Day
Adventist), Prophet Don Clarke
(First Baptist Church), and
Evangelist Marie McDonald
(Coconut Grove Temple).







* A Comm-Uni-Tee- Social
event will be held at the Gardens
of Gray’s Music Center on
September 26 at pm. There will be
local Bahamian entertainers,
refreshments, and giveaways. This
social event is uplifting, empower-
ing, and the host of the event is
requesting a donation of $15 for
adults and $2 for children under
the age of 12.

CSE

@ Did you recently give birth to
the newest little angel on earth?
Have you and your beloved
recently tied the knot? Is your
church planning a special event?
Tribune Religion wants to hear
from you!

We want to know about the
special things going on in your
life, so go ahead and send in your
wedding photographs, birth
announcements and church activi-
ties schedule to be posted in
upcoming Tribune Religion sec-
tions.

This service is free. Send all
information, including (especial-
ly) photographs, to features@tri-
bunemedia.net. Information can
be hand delivered to The Tribune
at Shirley and Deveaux Streets or
call the Religion section @
502.2368.

RELIGIO Thursday, September 24, 2009 ® PG 27



Cat Islanders celebrate Holy Cross
— Anglican Church Feast of Title

ANGLICANS recently marked
the Feast of Title of Holy Cross in
Dumfries, Cat Island by turning out
in droves to welcome Fr Bernard
Been, the assistant priest at St
Agnes Parish Blue Hill Road, New
Providence. It was Fr Been first
visit to the church and he took his
text from the parable of the Good
Samaritian from the gospel of Luke.

He told the congregation that
“everyone in the church is on a jour-
ney and we cannot manipulate this
trek without Almighty God”. He
added that the whole Anglican
community be they Cat Islanders,
Abaconians or Exumians will one
day complete this arduous task and
be called to give an account of the
way they live, adding that no bishop,
priest or deacon can answer or
defend anyone's journey. Only the
person who completes their own
course can do this task,he explained.

After the mass, members
marched to Turning Point
Resturant and Bar for lunch.


PG 28 © Thursday, September 24, 2009 RELIGION The Tribune

=

St Christopher Church, located
in Lyford Cay and led by
Deacon Keith Cartwright has
been established for many
years. Their dedication to the
Anglican faith and to the peo-
ple of this country has brought
them recognition and appreci-
ation throughout the years.

- il:

Bei’






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Bahamian lawyer is indicted over money laundering allegations N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.252THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER PARTLY SUNNY WITH SHOWER HIGH 88F LOW 79F Hollywood star r eliv es son’s death The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com I N S I D E CLASSIFIEDSTRADER CLASSIFIEDSTRADER CLASSIFIEDSTRADER I N S I D E OBITUARIES and RELIGION INTODAY’STRIBUNE JOBSAND HELPWANTED L L O O A A D D S S O O F F CARS! CARS! CARS! TRAVOLTA TRIAL: D AYTHREE By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net HOLLYWOOD superstar John Travolta yesterday recalled the efforts that he and others made to save the life of his 16-year-old son Jett after he suffered a seizure. Mr Travolta was the only witness to take the stand yesterday as the case against for mer PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater and former ambulance driver Tarino Lightbourne continued in the Supreme Court. The pair are accused of attempting to extort $25 million from him. The grieving actor, who wore a black suit and grey tie, was escorted into the court room by a security detail shortly after 10am yesterday. His wife Kelly Preston sat in the public gallery. Appearing somber and composed, Mr Travolta testified that on December 29, 2008, he and his wife, with their son Jett and daughter Ella, eight, travelled to Freeport, Grand Bahama. Accompanying them on the family trip were four nannies, he said. Mr Travolta told the court his family stayed at a condo at the Old Bahama Bay resort. Travolta: Jett’s final moments US ACTOR John Travolta and wife Kelly Preston leave the court building. VINCENT Lloyd Ferguson (pictured home yesterday morning after an illness with prostate cancer. The former teacher/admin istrator, sporting icon and sports administrator extraor dinaire, had celebrated his 71st birthday on August 25th. Winston “Tappy” Davis, who had a long affiliation with the deceased, broke down when he was asked to describe his former friend and team-mate. “It’s so sad that he had to leave us,” said Davis, who tried to contain himself. “Vince was a straight forward intelligent, honest and hard working individual. “He believed in everything he was into and he cared a whole lot about it. I never knew that people that had the kind of passion and commit ment in what they did the way Vince did.” n SEE SPORTS FOR FULL STORY T T r r i i b b u u t t e e s s t t o o s s p p o o r r t t i i n n g g i i c c o o n n SEE page nine AN attorney and partner with a top Bahamian law firm, Callender’s & Co, was yesterday indicted by the US f ederal authorities over allegations that he knowingly helped launder hundreds of thousands of dollars in pro-c eeds from a purported investment fraud. Sidney Cambridge, a senior Progressive Liberal Party ( PLP) member who has served as its vice-chairman, was charged following a Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI “sting” operation, involving undercover agents posing as persons who wanted to launder funds from a fictitious European-based financial fraud. A copy of the indictment obtained by The Tribun e a lleged: “On or about November 23, 2007, at Nassau, Bahamas, defendant Cambridge was told by an undercover agent that the funds came from a ‘Ponzi’ scheme. “After acknowledging his understanding of the purported source of the funds, defendant Cambridge instruct e d undercover agents how to launder the proceeds in the Bahamas.” Sidney Cambridge charged in US after FBI ‘sting’ operation By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net POLICE are searching for the thug who robbed a high school principal as she tried to enter her home in the east ern area of New Providence. The victim St Augustine's College Principal Sonia Knowles arrived at her home in the Eastern Estates subdivision at around 10pm on Tuesday when a man accosted her and demanded cash. Police said he made off with the victim's handbag, which contained cash and per sonal effects, before fleeing the area in a nearby vehicle believed to be a Honda. Investigators are still trying to determine whether the thief targeted his victim or simply struck when he saw an opportunity. Last night police said they did not have a full description of the attacker, who is said to be a slim built, dark-skinned male. According to police, Ms Knowles was not seriously harmed during the robbery. The incident occurred SAC principal robbed by thug See Tribune Business for full story SEE page ten AP Photo /Kris Ingaham By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A LEADING UK judge claims cases from other countries such as The Bahamas are taking up too much British time and resources, and he would like to see the burden reduced. Referring to the caseload of the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council, Lord Nicholas Phillip’s comments have been seen by some as a sign that Britain may soon make moves to shake off the colonial hangover the institution represents, leaving countries like the Bahamas to find or create another final court of appeal. Speaking to the Financial Times newspaper, Lord Phillips, PresUK judge: Cases fr om countries like Bahamas taking up too much time SEE page 11 SEE page ten

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B y PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter p turnquest@tribunemedia.net SENATOR Jerome Fitzgerald will join the ranks of candidates making a bid for the deputy leadership of the PLP when he officially launches his c ampaign tonight at the Sun And resort. C iting his extensive business background and experience a round the world, Mr Fitzger ald said that he hopes to be able to assist PLP leader Perry Christie in implementing his vision for the Bahamas. I am running for deputy leader and the role that I seef or the deputy leader is to assist the leader, and of course with m yself having some input in his decision-making, but at the end of the day it is his vision. The other qualities I intend to bring to the table is that I think I have a close affinity and relationship to the young generation, and it i s obvious to me that the party has a void that needs to be f illed in ensuring that we have a message that is relevant to the younger generation. And in that regard I think that they will be looking to see whether or n ot the PLP is really willing to embrace the sort of change that t hey demand at this time,” Mr Fitzgerald said. Persons wanting to be a part of the candidate’s launch can either join the senator at the Sun And resort at 7pm tonight, or watch it live on his website. With profile pictures of him self and his family, Mr Fitzgera ld’s website records the endorsements of other success f ul businessmen such as Nassau Guardian publisher Antho-n y Ferguson and Philip Kemp. Mr Ferguson’s endorsement r eads: “I think the country is looking for young visionary leadership and I think Jerome, a s a family man, as a businessman and as true friend, Jeromec an add a lot of value. This is what the county needs at this p articular time.” Mr Kemp’s reads: “One of the things we lack today are persons who have a vision of where this country should go. J erome has always impressed me with his vision for the coun t ry.” Attor ne y An attorney by profession, Mr Fitzgerald is the chairman and a director of RND Holdings Limited, a diversified com p any he co-founded in 1993 with several subsidiaries. S enator Fitzgerald is also a director of A Scott Fitzgerald I nsurance Brokers and Agents, an insurance firm started by his m other over 20 years ago. Additionally, he holds direct orships on the boards of three public companies namely RND Holdings Limited, Bahamas Waste Limited, Freeport Concrete Company Limited and the p rivately held Global United Limited. By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A SUSPECT is being quest ioned by police in connection with the murder of 35-year-old Randy Williams at the Seagrape Shopping Centre on Prince Charles Drive on Tuesday evening. Mr Williams, of Gladstone Road, was stabbed several times when an argument with a nother man escalated into violence at around 5pm. He was rushed to the Princess Margaret Hospital and died half an hour later, according to police sources. Supt Leon Bethel, officer incharge of the homicide department in the Criminal Investig ation Unit, said he expects the suspect will be charged in court before the end of the week. Police reported that Mr Williams and another man were in the shopping centre car park, n ear the entrance of Body Zone Fitness gym, when they started to argue. “The argument resulted in a f ight between the two men,” Supt Bethel said. “One of the men produced a weapon and stabbed the other. He was stabbed a number of times about the body, and we are waiting for the pathologist’s report to tell us exactly how many times he was stabbed. A sharp-pointed object was used but we are not sure yet what it was. The victim was taken to hospital and pronounced dead shortly after.” Mr Williams is the country’s 63rd murder victim this year. His murder was the third in New Providence in just three d ays. Rashad Morris, 21, a manager at Burger King on Frederick Street, and former manager of Burger King on Tonique Williams-Darling Highway, was beaten and stabbed to death outside the Tonique WilliamsDarling Highway restaurant at around 1.30am on Sunday. Burger King has put up a $10,000 reward for any inform ation which could lead to the arrest or conviction of his killer. Soaring Just hours later on Sunday, Bahamasair pilot Lionel Lewis McQueen, 29, was shot dead at his home in Golden Palm Estates, near the Kennedy Subd ivision. A police investigation into the suspicious deaths of four people killed in a house fire last Thursday morning could lead to the reclassification of those deaths as homicides and send the murder count soaring to 67 this year. That would amount to ten m ore homicides this year than the 57 recorded at the same time last year. Supt Bethel is appealing to the public to come forward with any information which could help solve all of the above crimes. “We have lots of assistance from members of the public and we do appreciate t hat, but we do believe that with more assistance from the public we will see a better rate of solution and we would see a reduction in the number of murders,” he said. Anyone with information should call 911 or 919 urgently, or call Crime S toppers anonymously on 328TIPS (8477 Stoppers are answered in the United States and ensure total anonymity. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THREE police related shooting deaths will be examined in three separate inquests set to take place in the Coroner’s Court over the next two weeks. On September 25, an inquest into the death of Dario McKenzie will begin, followed by an inquiry into the death of Lincoln Mettelus on September 28 and Drexel Rolle on October 5. Also set to be begin at the Coroner’s Court today is an inquest into the death of Trevor Ferguson stemming from a traffic collision in Andros. Meanwhile, on October 29 and 30, an inquest will be held into the death of Peter McWeeney, brother of former Attorney General Sean McWeeney, who died in October 2003. The Coroner’s Court recently recorded a verdict of “death by accident” in the case of the shooting of security guard Troy Russell in 2003. Mr Russell, who worked at the Shell Service Station opposite Saunders Beach on West Bay Street, had been shot by the manager of the station, Marcelles Saunders, during a robbery. Mr Saunders said he mistook Mr Russell for a burglar when he saw him running towards him from the direction of the cashier’s cage on December 24, 2003. Jurors delivered their verdict on August 12, 2009. Inquests into police related shooting deaths Police quiz suspect over Seagrape Shopping Centre stabbing death Senator Jerome Fitzgerald in bid for PLP deputy lead ership In brief JEROMEFITZGERALD M URDER: R ANDYWILLIAMS, 35 By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net S TUDENTS at C I Gibson High missed out on lessons for the third day yesterday as teachers continued their protest o ver inadequate working conditions at the school. The entire teaching body of around 80 teachers who started t heir “sit-in” on Monday said t hey will not return to work until there are enough desks and chairs for all students, and a science teacher and vice-princ ipal are in place. Bahamas Union of Teachers (BUT son said students at the senior h igh school in Marathon E states are forced to stand or sit on desks during lessons because there is not enough fur niture to accommodate everyone in a class. The teachers are a lso angry that the vice-princi pal position has not been filled s ince the previous vice-principal resigned two weeks ago. Security is another major issue at the high school as 11 knives and an ice-pick haveb een found on the property this term. Since the industrial actionb egan, four security officers and three teachers have been poste d at C I Gibson, one of three public schools disrupted by industrial action this week. The “sit-ins” started at Uriah McPhee Primary School onK emp Road on Friday as teachers refused to work until airc onditioning was restored on the second and third floors of t he school building. Work was done over the weekend to repair the air-conditioning and students returned to their classes at around 11am o n Monday. Staff at Anatol Rodgers High School in Faith A venue staged a two-day “sitin” on Monday and Tuesday o ver inadequate staffing and furniture provisions. They resumed teaching yesterday after receiving furniture and a new English language t eacher. A second English language teacher is expected to a rrive this morning. Minister of Education Carl B ethel failed to return T he Tribune’s calls yesterday to explain w hy his department did not ensure schools were sufficiently staffed and furnished at the start of the new school year. Mrs Wilson has criticised the m inistry for being reactionary, rather than proactive in itsw ork, and she is calling on par ents to speak out for the good of their children’s education. The BUT president said: “It is really disheartening that one month into the school year we are scrambling for teachers, supplies, security officers, desks and chairs. C I Gibson students miss classes for third day T EACHERS’ PROTEST

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EDITOR, The Tribune. Arawak Cay port which consultant supported using t he Cay for a Port? I listened to the live broadcast from the FNM Headquart ers in August and was struck by the responses and the arrogance of the tone of the voice of the various participants. Why can’t our politicians take the licks? W e are now seeing this attitude in the US – the most recent one being that of Barn ey Franks when he held a community meeting on the Health Care proposals his arrogance was absolutely unacceptable when one considers he is there in that position simplyb ecause the people voted him in. Getting back to the issue of this letter Minister of State L aing said on this broadcast as a response to a fax read by Wendall Jones that consideration of the pluses for Arawak C ay were excluded in one of the Studies. The Minister knows full well as we have been there manyt imes that the last Study, socalled the Ecory’s Study, was specifically for the then “chosen site” subject to their study results. It is my understanding that there was no intent to study any alternative as that h ad already been completed by Coastal International. The Minister seems not to understand that even the 19proposed shareholders of the now Arawak Cay proposal paid 50 per cent of the Ecory’s Study cost so we surely have toa ccept they were on board with the government if everything came out favourably they w ould support the location at Clifton, or am I crazy? For the Minister to say that Arawak Cay was excluded is v ery irresponsible and, in my opinion a deliberate attempt to confuse. Which study said Arawak w as the place, Minister? Can The Tribune collect all t he studies made on the port proposal over the years from C hecci forward and publish the conclusion section so we Joe P ublic can understand which location was supported and w hich certainly were not – The Tribune will do the country and u s a considerable favour by doing this....we wait. ABRAHAM MOSS N assau, A ugust, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm W E WERE surprised yesterday morning after the rambling 90-minute speech to theU N of Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi to hear news commentators wonder out loud if p eople like Kadafi and Iran’s President Ahmadinejad should be allowed into the United States. This is what we would have expected to hear and did hear from the protesters int he streets, but were surprised that news commentators did not seem to know thatt he United Nations on First Street in Man hattan, New York, is located on interna-t ional and not American territory. Of course, the United States could stop such persons landing at New York’s airports, but if they were denied landing rights and free passage to the international area, the U N would have to be removed from the U.S. However, there is prestige involved in h aving this international body in its present location. It is a distinction that we doubt N ew York would give up lightly. Wrapped in his flowing coffee-coloured robes, Kadafi’s disjointed speech touched on every topic including the jet lag from which he was suffering to get to New York. He highlighted the sins of the world, sidestepping his own oppressive human rights atrocities. He was highly critical of the Secu rity Council, which to him was elitist with a h andful of superpowers US, Britain, France, Russia and China controlling the world. He complained of the limits placed on visitors like himself in travelling around New York, likening it to being imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay. We wonder what freedom others from the outside world would have in Tripoli if the tables were turned. Of c ourse, Kadafi was in New York to point out the moat in his brother’s eye, not to examine his own and so there wasn’t even a whisper about the aircraft blown upby a Libyan terrorist over Lockerbie, Scotland a subject so much in the news in recent weeks. We must admit that in the early days we were not a great fan of the UN, dismissing it a s a debating society that spent too much money, often unwisely. H owever, as a graduate student of Columbia University’s Journalism School in the late fifties we were assigned to the Associated Press desk at the UN. On February 8, 1958 we saw the true worth of theU N. This was during the height of the Algerian-Tunisian war of independence from F rance. Early that morning French aircraft from Algeria bombed the Tunisian border village of Sakhiet Sidi Youssef. It was as t hough the bomb had been dropped in the centre of the UN. Delegates scattered tof ind their counterparts from around the world. They huddled in deep negotiations. T hey desperately tried to extinguish the Mediterranean fire. This was the advantage of heads of the world’s nations being together under one roof and being able to meet together quickly to solve world problems. A s for Iran’s Mahmoud Ahmadinejad with his downtrodden look and apologeticf rame, he believes that the Holocaust is a lie created by the West to justify the existence o f Israel. He too was in New York to bring his message of “peace” to the UN, while back in Teheran, his government is forging ahead with its controversial nuclear programme, o stensibly to protect itself from Israel. Ahmadinejad was born 11 years after the s econd world war, and so has no first hand knowledge of the events of those times. B ut for those who lived during the war years and still have vivid memories of those days, Ahmadinejad can be dismissed as an hallucinating nut case. We probably remember more than the average Bahamian, because we grew up in a newspaper office where local and world news daily swirled. We shall never forget our first sight of d eath. In The Tribune that particular morning was Life magazine’s first edition showing bodies tumbling out of the ovens of Auschwitz. We were struck dumb in disbelief. Men with sunken eyes, open mouths and thin skin pulled over skeleton frames thrown one on top of the other at all angles. Trenches filled with naked skeletons horror upon h orror upon horror. As a child we could not believe that men could stoop to such bes tiality. There is a photograph that has haunted us all our life. It is a picture of sad faced Jews lined up to be loaded into trains for the gas chambers. In front there is a little boy, no more than six years old, with the sadness of the world in his eyes, a cloth cap is on his h ead. He is clinging to his mother’s hand. Help l ess, hopeless, lost. How could any human being treat a small, innocent child like this. The Nazis were a special breed they were less than human. Whatever boat they shipped out on for Hades, we hope that it ist he Devil who is now stoking the flames under them. A s for President Ahamdinejad and those who think like him, we hope that the world will be spared their pathetic ignorance. Which study said Arawak Cay was the place for a port? LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net United Nations hears its detractors E DITOR, The Tribune. Far too much has been made from the outcry of one Congressman Wilson during the recent speech of President Obama at the joint session of the US House. There is accepted and appropriate “parliam entary language” although some might say the u se of the words “that’s a lie” might not be disc reet enough the facts say it all in an open democracy no man is above scrutiny and cert ainly no president is or no prime minister because neither are infallible and make all kinds o f mistakes. Certainly it is interesting that Cable Channels l ike MSNBC have made a big issue over Repres entative Wilson’s comment but in true reality when a speaker misquotes or says something toc ause praise (applause ilar and just part of the democratic process and w e should not be so thinned skinned? Now the incredible rather stupid statement of an ex-US President Jimmy Carter I seriouslys uggest that it would be best for the good gentleman to remain on his peanut farm and stay qui et as his comment does not merit comment as President Obama was elected by whites-blacks-l atinos and everyone else. E ditor, we have this prevailing thought amongst many who sit in parliament, be it theH ouse of Assembly or the Senate, that when certain people speak the “world” has to stop.A ll representatives are elected, except in our case the Senate, and therefore their colleagues have within accepted form (regrettably it seems t he current speaker is restricting this privilege and limiting the verbage that can be used) can say so long established exclamations as “shame” toi ndicate their personal unacceptance of a statement. In this day where MPs are unable to ad-lib, s peak without written speeches, there is no excuse f or inaccurate statements. Mr Speaker, please n ote this is not permitted. Politicians have to understand that their free spending irresponsible policies and lacking of definitive economic policy is what is causing the massive grass-root protests. I suggest the man i n the street has better housekeeping qualifica tions than most politicians and they recognise you can’t continue to spend-spend and spend irrationally. W THOMPSON Nassau, S eptember 16, 2009. Too much made from Congressman Wilson’s comment E DITOR, The Tribune. I am writing to ask about the status of the College of the B ahamas' fabulous, new, “state of the art” publicly funded theatre that opened with much fanfare at the earlier part of the year and, as far as I know (and I stand to be corrected), has notb een used for a public event s ince. A t the inaugural event the Colour of Harmony it was stated that the theatre had been built at much expense for the use of the country's artists and it was hoped that it would be constantly in use. It is indeed a magnificent t heatre and I applaud whoms oever is responsible for accomp lishing such a feat but I would like to find out what exactly is the criteria for use of the theatre, and whether the theatre is going to remain, as d o many of our Bahamian “living parlours”, covered in plasticf or “show only” for only certain “exclusive” events, or is it i ntended to be actually filled with cultural enthusiasts anxious to drink from the well of Bahamian creativity and talent? These thoughts came to mind as the time rapidlya pproaches for one of the most e xciting dramatic events in the c ountry the Shakespeare in Paradise Festival due to take place from October 5-12 which, through the rich talent of dedicated and hard working Bahamian artists, is poised to present first class dramatic talent to the people of The B ahamas and the world. I magine what such a festiv al can do to fill the literary starved minds of our commu nity? Imagine how such an event, if properly nourished, can grow into a spectacle that w ill not only offer our community avenues to express theirc reativity and talent on the stage, but will inspire more pers ons to write plays and books, provide the original music for dramatic events, design stage scenery and costumes, learn how to work the lights and sound stage, exercise their pro-m otional and marketing skills . .....the possibilities are endless. I venture to speculate that most of the work being done for this Festival is a “labour of love” by the participants and I applaud any entity who is offering them much needed sponsorship. So I wish to ask the question: “Why isn't the COB T heatre listed as one of the v enues on the ‘Shakespeare in P aradise’ timetable?” PAM BURNSIDE Nassau, September 23, 2009 What is the status of COB’s ‘state-of-the-art’ theatre?

PAGE 4

By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net SWINE flu vaccinations will be made available in the Bahamas from the World H ealth Organisation’s global supply, or if government makes a direct request to suppliers and manufacturers in the United States. T he vaccinations to protect individuals from serious illness or death resulting from the highly infectious H1N1 influenz a were approved by the United States government Food and Drug Administration last week. Around half of the US population, that is 160 millionA mericans are expected to receive the inoculations from mid-October. At risk groups will take priority for the inocul ations, including pregnant women, healthcare workers, children and young adults, as well as the chronically ill in the US. People caring for infantsw ill also receive priority. Dr Minnis said healthcare workers would take priority in the Bahamas as they are most at risk of infection, and the M inistry of Health is taking a pro-active approach by worki ng with schools to prepare children and staff for the possibility of an outbreak in the upcoming flu season. The Minister said supplies w ill be ordered through the World Health Organisation ( WHO) when necessary, as the WHO retains a supply of vacc inations for developing countries around the world. He added: “We will watch World Health Organisation reports and communicate witht hem and purchase the vaccinations as necessary. We will not be left out in the cold.” L ocal pharmaceutical companies in the Bahamas which have tried to order the vaccinations have been told by suppliers and manufacturers theyc annot purchase the live vaccinations without a special request from the Bahamas government as the new inoculat ions are in limited supply. Nassau Agencies Barbara Donathan-Henderson said: “At least one doctor has been harassing us to bring it in, but the only way we can do that is if it was being sold to government in a government purchase order, and even then they may n ot order it through us. “If we had the option we would have brought it in so people would b e able to take it if they wanted to, but it is up to the government to make that decision.” L owe’s Wholesale Pharmac eutical has also failed to bring i n the inoculations. Sales Manager Carrol Sands said: “I have n ot had any confirmation as to when we will be getting any as y et. “I have been communicating with companies that we deal with, and they have told me their first priority is providing itt o institutions in the US.” A representative from Commonwealth Drugs and Medical S upplies told T he Tribune : “It is all being sold directly to gove rnment and we have had no indication from the government as to whether or not they would want us to bring in any.” There have been at least 29 c onfirmed cases of swine flu in the Bahamas this year, and a lthough the virus has a high infection rate, Dr Minnis said it i s far less deathly than regular flu as about 40,000 people in t he United States die as a result of the regular flu every year, while just 600 people have died from the H1N1 virus since it became apparent earlier this y ear. B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT – The trial of t wo men accused of murdering a policeman resumed in the Supreme Court on Tuesday. Edwin Bauld Jr and Wilfred M cPhee Jr are accused of the murder, kidnapping and robbery of Police Corporal Eddison Bain in October 2007. A cting Justice Jethro Miller is presiding over the trial, which was interrupted briefly when Bauld made a loud outburst in t he courtroom as a prosecution w itness was giving testimony in the witness box. Justice Miller advised Bauld’s attorney that the out-b urst was not acceptable and initiated a five minute break. Bauld was later escorted from the courtroom by two police o fficers to give him time to cool o ff. The decomposed body of Corporal Eddison Bain was discovered on October 22, 2007, in a ditch near the CasuarinaB ridge. Bain’s hands and feet were bound and a large stone was on his head. The body was covered with tree shrubs and s tones in a four-foot deep ditch. K Brian Hanna represents B auld and Mario Gray represents McPhee. It is alleged thatt he accused men kidnapped Bain, robbed him of his ATM b ank card and withdrew money from his account. On Monday, the prosecution produced a video that showed one of the accused men withdrawing mon-e y using Bain’s ATM card. Hospital pathologist Dr Corn elius Kachali gave evidence in the trial on Tuesday. D r Kachali, who performed an autopsy on Corporal Bain, said the cause of death was a blunt force trauma to the head. He said that the skull was p enetrated as a result of the blunt force. He added that Bain w as alive when he sustained the injury because there was a s welling of the brain which can only occur if a person is alive at the time. Lawyer Brian Hanna asked if Bain could have survived his i njuries if he had been taken to hospital. Dr Kachali said that B ain’s chances of survival were “very slim.” “Statistically sur v ival is not good, he would have lived only for two minutes after s ustaining injuries,” he said. Lawyer Mario Gray asked Dr Kachali if Bain, while b ound, could have sustained the injury himself by falling and hitting his head. Dr Kachali said that it was impossible because the deceased was found face up in the ditch with a huge stone on his head. Also giving evidence was Gahnise Campbell, the girlf riend of Edwin Bauld Jr. Ms Campbell told the court that she was Bauld’s girlfriend during 2007. She said that she a nd Bauld had been dating for six months. She said she had known Wilfred McPhee Jr all her life as he was her cousin and they grew up in the same neighbourhood. Ms Campbell said a week before October 20 she went fora ride with Edwin and Eddison. S he said Eddison was Edwin’s cousin. She said Edwin and Eddison went into a liquor store for two Guinness. They t hen went to Commonwealth Bank because she wanted to check her account. “I gave Edwin my ATM card to check if the money he had put on the card was on my account,” she said. Ms Campbell said they went to Bell Channel Resort. S he was given $100 and went to pay for a room for the night. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Swine flu vaccinations to be made available in Bahamas Policeman’s death: Murder trial resumes DR HUBERT MINNIS

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BY AVA TURNQUEST USING an old teacher's cottage given by the Ministry of Works and Ministry of Education, the newly formed Rotary Club Cat Island plans to create a state-of-the-art community resource centre and library. With an estimated completion date of September 2010, the library is a much needed resource on the island as the club hopes it will bring a fresh and exciting challenge for the youth. The club, currently totalling 21 members and directors, is the first and only Rotary Club on Cat Island. President-elect Gwendolyn Rolle, former member of the Rotary Club of Lucaya Freeport, Grand Bahama, says the club began meeting in November 2008with a group of professionals at the island's resource centre. “Rotary brings a new kind of hope to the community,” said Ms Rolle, “the youth and the elderly at large.” The club believes that the library is most needed, bringing a fresh and exciting challenge for the youth of Cat Island. The library, located in Bennett’s Harbour, will be the club's maiden civic project since its official installation and charter to the global association June 13, 2009. “Ready students need a safe and informative environment in order to complete school projects, do research, and be in touch with the world in a controlled environment,” said Ms Rolle. HISTORY The world's first service club, the Rotary Club of Chicago, was formed in 1905 by Paul Harris, an attorney who wished to capture in a professional club the same friendly spirit he had felt in the small towns of his youth. Now Rotary International is a global network of volunteers, enhancing their com m unities and promoting inter national goodwill through club projects, scholarships and grants for development and humanitarian projects. Rotary Club of Cat Island is part of Rotary District 7020 comprising 10 countries and 16 islands in the Caribbean, being one of the 75 clubs in the District with over 2400 Rotarians, all men and women with the finest credentials. Area District Governor Felix Stubbs spoke to the newly installed club, encouraging them to utilise tools and opportunities the organisation presents. “My personal gratitude and appreciation to the business and professional community of Cat Island for embracing Rotary wholeheartedly and to the Rotary Club of South East Nassau for the sponsorship and duly represented by the Club President David Moncur, President-elect Anna deGregory and other members of that Club. “This is your opportunity to exploit the immense possibilities for your community,” Mr. Stubbs said. “The onus is on you to create friendship and fellowship, to invite the best amongst your vocations to join hands with you, to do good so as to give back, and to be recognised in the world as an important segment of the world community.” DONATIONS The Rotary Club of Cat Island has received numerous donations from both the pub lic and private sectors. The government, through the Ministry of Works and Ministry of Education, has donated the cottage with supplies and books and has also committed to provide a librarian upon its completion. The club has set up a registry for material at Kelly’s Lumber Yard and Marathon Mall location. To access this registry, interested persons should contact Mr. Robert Plank. The public can purchase discounted items on the “Rotary Club of Cat Island Material for Library List” that Kelly’s will ship to Cat Island at the start of the project. Private companies that have also provided outstanding support to this project have been Cat Island Air, The Christie Estate, Orange Creek Car Rental, Neighbourhood Food Store and many more. Local contractors on the i sland have also donated their t ime, which has allowed the c lub to save on labour costs. Mr Allworth Rolle drew the renovation plans and Mr. Lewis Sweeting has committed to all the electrical wiring. “I would really like to acknowledge all members of the community and the club that has donated their time and funds,” said Ms Rolle, “working tirelessly to see this project brought to reality. C OOK-OUT The club will host its first cook-out from noon to 6 pm on Saturday, October 3, on the grounds of the library in Bennett’s Harbour. Joining them will be representatives from the various Rotary families in the Bahamas as they kick off the first phase of the renovation project. “This will be a day of fun, with work as well as play,” said Ms Rolle. “There will bea lot of local goodies on sale and we are eager to share this experience with the community and our visiting clubs.” In addition to their scheduled civic duties, the club also plans to renovate local parks and play areas and raise funds for a multi-purpose sport facility for the community. “I have great faith in your brand new club and its promising membership,” said Mr Stubbs. “I truly believe that the club will make a strong statement that indeed a new entrant is no less versatile and vibrant than a veteran in the world of service and fel lowship.” Donations can also be sent to The Rotary, Arthur’s Town Post Office, Cat Island. The club meets every Thursday at7 pm at The Boggie Pond Restaurant in Arthur’s Town. All visiting Rotarians are welcome. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Plans for state-of-the-art resource centre, library BY KATHRYN CAMPBELL THE Road Traffic Department has a vital role to play in providing services and cont ributing to the economic and s ocial development of the Bahamas, Public Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant said. “Each staff memb er therefore has the responsibility of ensuring that these services are provided to the satisfaction of customers.” M r Grant officially opened t he first of a two-day workshop for staff of the Road Traffic Department on Tuesday at Workers House. The t heme for the workshop is “Forward in Growth Together for Excellence.” One hundred staff members r epresenting various units in t he Department participated in the workshop designed to enhance customer service skills. The workshop is in k eeping with the government’s service improvement programme that aims to formulate strategies for internal and e xternal service improvement. T he programme was implemented in six key service delivery agencies within thep ublic service. Speakers for both days included PhilipT urner, Controller of Department of Road Traffic, who s poke on the topic “The Way Forward for the Road Traffic Department”; Elma Garraway, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Education,o n “Dress Code and Work Ethics”, and Rev James Pala-c ious on the topic “Setting Standards for Excellence.” Excellence in service delivery is challenging under normal circumstances. However, it presents an even greater challenge in today’s society from a general per spective in both the publica nd private sectors,” Minister Grant said. “Globalisation has h ad a significant impact on customers’ expectations. We n ow see an increasing demand by customers for better ser vice in a work environment that reflects current economic circumstances where more e fficiency in the use of resources is required.” Road Traffic Department holds customer service workshop CATISLAND: Rotary Club proposal PUBLIC Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant gives the opening remarks at the launch of a twoday workshop for s taff of the Road Traffic Department on Tuesday. Road Traffic Controller Philip Turner is pictured int he background. L e t i s h a H e n d e r s o n / B I S Rotary brings a n ew kind of hope t o the community, t he youth and the elderly at large.” Gwendolyn Rolle

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BY LINDSAY THOMPSON DEPUTY Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette leftt he country yesterday to address the 64th Session of t he United Nations General Assembly in New York on a number of issues relevant tot he Bahamas. He will also sign a Tax I nformation Exchange Agreement (TIEA Republic of San Marino, ink eeping with standards set out by the Organisation for E conomic and Cooperation and Development (OECD Mr Symonette, along with o ther CARICOM leaders will address the session tomorrow on the vulnerability of Small Island Developing States (SIDSd evise ways for a more cohesive union. He is being accompanied by Minister oft he Environment Earl Deveaux and Senator Dion F oulkes, Minister of Labour. Issues Main issues for the session are the Millennium Devel-o pment Goals; the world financial and economic crisis a nd its impact on development; climate change; disarmament; United Nationsr eform; review of the peacebuilding commission and the Human Rights Council. Yesterday, United States President Barack Obamag ave his first speech to the U N General Assembly. In a speech that was described as “audacious” by some observers, he said his coun-t ry is committed to “a new chapter of international c ooperation.” “Those who used to chastise America for actinga lone in the world cannot now stand by and wait for America to solve the world's p roblems alone,” President Obama said. The UN, headquartered in New York is an international organisa-t ion founded in 1945, after World War II. The 192 m ember-states have committed to maintaining international peace and security,d eveloping friendly relations a mong nations and promoting social progress, better living standards and human rights. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Minister of Foreign Affairs to address the United Nations PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA , right, and United Nations SecretaryGeneral Ban Ki-Moon offer a toast at a luncheon during the United Nations General Assembly, Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2009. H e n n y R a y A b r a m s / A P P h o t o BRENT SYMONETTE EARL DEVEAUX No IPTC Header found DION FOULKES DPM Symonette accompanied by Ministers Earl Deveaux, Dion Foulkes

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BY NOELLE NICOLLS W ITH the ongoing debate about the proposed amendment to the Sexual Offences and Domestic Violence Act of 1991, I became very curious about the perspectives of the Bahamas Christian Council. I decided to attend a meeting, but when I arrived the group gathered was actually a rogue Christian group, known as the Bahamas Christian Consortium (BCC and learned five interesting lessons. Marriage is the ultimate form of martyrdom When a man and a woman join as one in marriage they literally give up their individual selves to become one body under God, not in a metaphorical sense, but physically. A miracle happens and their bodies join up like congenital twins, which means they are incapable of raping each other. “Marriage is a covenant [with] your life long partner. You are no longer to operate as individuals but a bond where the two are to become one. So how can one rape themselves, especially when you vowed to fulfil each other sexually?” Ingenious words of Keith Ferguson, who is not a member of the BCC, but considered a prophet. Men marry to avoid the sin of fornication. Since men are sexual beasts at heart and prime fornicators, marriage is the best solution: a sacred space where sexual relations are acceptable to God not just for procreation. Marriage is an unrestricted pleasure club for men and women: once signing the mar riage contract both parties agree to “upfront, implicit, open-ended sexual consent”. This is not what the actual Marriage Act says or implies, but the moral law of God, according to the Bahamas Christian Council sanctions this interpretation. Thism akes sense, considering it is m uch easier for a woman to give her man a key to the house so he does not have to knock on the door to gain entry every time he wants to get in. S exual violence in marriage is sacred and intimate. The Bahamas Christian Council in their official statement said one of the questions causing grave concern over the proposed amendments was: “How far should the government be going with things that are sacred and intimate?” A marriage is sacred no mat ter how unhealthy it is, even where the most extreme forms of sexual violence exist. An assault against men who rape their wives is an assault against all married men and women. The Christian community has a responsibility to uphold the moral laws of God and protect these sacred and intimate marriages. If there is no violence in the lead up to rape then no violent act occurred. The BCC is very concerned about a complete “multi-generational breakdown” in society if the government is allowed to make men answerable to the law for raping their wives. Spiritual icon of the movement Myles Munroe believes the law “could” be or “perhaps should” be amended only if the activities leading up to the “sexual intercourse” are abusive, violent and forceful. So the sexually violent act of rape itself is not sufficient to warrant the government get ting into the marriage bed. The lead up to “sexual intercourse” also has to be violent. Lesbian feminists are trying to destroy marriage. The valid concern of the BCC is there are many “malignant, evil, spiteful, whoremonger” women who are itching for the opportunity to get back at their husbands “because of some unfortunate circumstance” and married men in unhealthy violent relationships need to be protected by the church. If the feminists succeed in passing this amendment it will open the gates of hell for all homosexuals to wield political power in the Bahamas. After the meeting I heard people asking the question on whose behalf does Reverend Patrick Paul speak. He speaks for the Bahamas Christian Council, as their President, not for the Bahamas Christian Consortium (BCC Despite their names, neither organisation represents Catholics, Methodists, and Seventh-Day Adventists, who all support the amendment. The Bahamas Christian Council is a public front primarily representing Baptist and Church of God members. The BCC seems to be a rogue organisation, or revolutionary, depending on one’s perspective, run by a few ministers in New Providence. They speak for themselves. I realised they are so forward thinking that normal people cannot keep up with their logic. Noelle Nicolls is a PanCaribbean writer trained as a professional journalist. She is also a political commentator and new media entrepreneur. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM INVITATION FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (EOI FOR THE PROVISION OF PROFESSIONAL SERVICES TO CONDUCT A COMPREHENSIVE ENGINEEERING ASSESSMENT OFTHE PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL NASSAU, BAHAMAS The Public Hospitals Authority of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas is seeking proposals from qualied professional engineering rms to provide consultancy services for completing a comprehensive assessment of the HVAC, ELECTRICAL, PLUMBING, and STRUCTUALSYSTEMS within the Princess Margaret Hospital. The purpose of this assessment is to develop a comprehensive Engineering Report for the Princess Margaret Hospital. T he selected rm will be required to design and lead the assessment process and deliver a full report on the current situation, detailing and benchmarking against acceptable standards and trends for the proposed redevelopment of the Princess Margaret Hospital. Note: The project will follow GOVERNMENTOF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS MINISTRYOF WORKS Standard Form of Agreement between Authority and Consultant (Engineer Hospitals Authority. The principal project goals of the Firm are to: condition at the Princess Margaret Hospital; redevelopment; andthe Princess Margaret Hospital Redevelopment Project. Firms should emphasize: (iii ence in hospital redevelopment service within an Acute Hospital; (iii of appropriate skill sets within the rm. This Expressions of Interest will be evaluated based on the qualications and relevant experience of the rm and the results will be used to prepare a shortlist of no more than six (6Those included in the shortlist will subsequently be invited to present technical and economical proposals on the basis of a Request-for-Proposals (RFP the detailed Terms of Reference. Name, Addresses and Contact Point (s Address: The Public Hospitals Authority Building B, Third and West Terrace, Collins Avenue Contact: Managing Director, Attn: Herbert Brown, P.O. Box N-8200, Nassau, Bahamas; Tel: (242242 Interested Professional Engineering Firms should submit their expression of interest to the address above no later than 5th October2009 during ofce hours (9:00am :00pm The five interesting lessons I learned at a Bahamas Christian Consortium meeting LOOKINGATVIOLENCEANDMARRIAGE OUR S AY The BCC seems to be a rogue o rganisation, or r evolutionary, depending on o ne’s perspective, run by a few ministers in NewP rovidence. They speak for themselves. I realisedt hey are so forward t hinking that n ormal people cannot keep upw ith their logic.’

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Mr Travolta, 55, explained how Jett was autistic and suffered from a seizure disorder. He said Jett would suffer a seizure every five to 10 days. Each time the seizures would last for about 45 seconds. Mr Travolta recalled that around 10.15am on January 2, he was wakened by Eli Wheaton, one of Jett’s nannies, who was pounding on his bedroom door. The actor said that he and his wife ran downstairs to help their son. “I saw him on the bathroom floor. Jeff Kathrein, his other nanny and a woman from Old Bahama Bay were doing CPR,” Mr Travolta said. Mr Travolta said that he took the place of the woman doing CPR. “Jeff Kathrein was doing compression and I was doing breathing,” Mr Travolta said.Mr Travolta said that while all this was taking place, his wife was holding their son’s head. Mr Travolta told the court that Jared McGrath, who wasa part of a group visiting for a party he was having for employees, also continued the compressions. Mr Travolta said that he knew McGrath to have medical expertise and he fitted his son with a defibrillator. Mr Travolta testified that after 35 minutes an ambulance came and Jett was placed on a gurney and takento the ambulance while Jared continued the compressions. Mr Travolta told the court that outside the condo, he spoke to the ambulance driver and following that exchange he received a liability release document which he signed. Mr Travolta admitted that hed id not read the document. Time was of the essence,” Mr Travolta told the court, when asked by lead prosecutor and Director of Public Prosecutions Bernard Turner why he had not read the document. Mr Travolta said he told the ambulance driver to take Jett to the airport at Old Bahama Bay, the reason being, he said, was so that he could take his son on a jet to West Palm Beach rather than taking him to the Freeport hospital. Mr Travolta testified, however, that Jett was taken to the Freeport hospital by ambulance. “I was in the back of the ambulance. There was EMT and one other person,” Mr Travolta told the court. When asked by the prosecutor whether anything happened on the way to the hos-p ital, Mr Travolta said that “there was a stop where there was a switching of drivers.” Mr Travolta told the court that once they arrived at the hospital, he stayed with Jett in the hospital room until he was asked to leave. He said the last time he saw Jett at the hospital he was not alive. Mr Travolta said he stayed on Grand Bahama for about four days after Jett’s death, then returned to his home in the United States. Both defence attorneys Murrio Ducille and Carlson Shurland opted not to crossexamine Mr Travolta yesterday as the actor is expected to be recalled after certain other witnesses have given evidence. Bridgewater, 49, and Lightbourne, 47, are accused of conspiring to extort anda ttempting to extort money from Mr Travolta between January 2 and 20 by means of threats. Bridgewater is also accused of abetment to extortion. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Travolta: Jett’s final moments F ROM page one JETTTRAVOLTA US ACTOR John Travolta, left, and wife Kelly Preston leave the court building in Nassau yesterday. T i m A y l e n / A P P h o t o

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ident of the UK’s new Supreme C ourt, said he is looking for ways to reduce the “disproportionate” amount of time judges who staff that court also spend on cases coming from outsidet he UK. The President questioned whether some Privy Council cases, which have ranged from J amaican death row appeals to fights over press freedom in Bermuda,needed to be heard by a panel of five of Britain’s most senior judges. R obert Hazell, director of The Constitution Unit at University College London,claims it is a “minor public scandal” t hat judges in the country’s top court spend almost half their time on business “of no interest t o anyone in the UK”, referr ing to those cases originating in places like the Bahamas. One former Governor General told BBC Caribbean thath e sees Lord Phillip’s message as one telling Caribbean and other Commonwealth countries to “get your house in order and d o what you have to do” to p repare for the eventuality that final appeals may in the future no longer be made to the London-based Privy Council. The message,” said Sir Probyn Innis, former Governor General of St Kitts and Nevis, “is loud and clear.” Enough is enough is e nough. Allow us to get on with our business of modernising our legal system in the United Kingdom.” Yesterday former Attorney G eneral and MP for Fort Charl otte Alfred Sears said the time is “long overdue” for the Bahamas to make a “contingency plan” for the likely even-t uality that the Privy Council will not act as the final court of appeal forever. “I think it’s our responsibilit y to provide the critical instit utions of governance for ourselves and the time has come, before the British tell us to go a likelihood that will only i ncrease as the demands of their own society call for giving priority to their needs that we assume the responsibility for o urselves,” said Mr Sears. H e noted that the Bahamas already helps fund the Caribbean Court of Justice despite not using it as a final court of appeal. M eanwhile, he said, he has n o doubt that there is sufficient legal talent within the Caribbean region and the rest of the Commonwealth to deala dequately with any legal issues that may arise. Many Bahamians have called for the Bahamas to end its d ependence on the Privy Counc il since it ruled in 2006 that it was unconstitutional for the death penalty to be mandatory, perceiving a foreign court toh ave placed an unfair impediment to convicted Bahamian killers receiving their just deserts. H owever, Mr Sears said that t his in itself is no argument in favour of a national or Caribbean court as such a court could make the same ruling a s it did in South Africa. Nonetheless, he said, he does believe the issue of capital punishment should be decided by a c ourt “in our region”, rather t han Europe. PLP leadership contender Paul Moss raised the issue of the final court of appeal pub-l icly during his campaign launch on Tuesday evening, telling his audience that he would bring “unparalleled focus to fixing the administration of justice,” culminating in the “removal”o f the Privy Council as the final court of appeal. Y esterday Mr Moss said he feels it is unlikely that Britain w ill itself move to stop other countries appealing to the Privy Council as he believes it is “an industry” for the country. However, he said, he strongl y believes The Bahamas “should not outsource” its finalc ourt of appeal, whether to Britain or the Caribbean Court o f Justice. “The judiciary is part of government. We do not have a foreign prime minister why then should we have foreigners sitting on another arm of government, such as the judiciary,” he s aid. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 38%/,& 12 A3-semester program of study designed to produce Licensed Practical Nurses with the technical knowledge and practical skills required to assist the Registered Nurse or Physician in providing safe and competent nursing care to clients in a variety of healthcare settings ALicensed Practical Nurse (LPN is a nursing professional who is trained to perform a wide variety of tasks under the supervision of a Registered Nurse (RN In The Bahamas, the LPN is known as the Trained Clinical Nurse (TCN LPNs work in a variety of healthcare settings such as hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, residential care facilities, schools, laboratories, birthing centers and insurance companies.Entry Requirement: High school graduate with 2.5. GPA C urrent Health Certificate Program Length: 12 months (3 semesters Total Credits Required: 45• Students will be trained to practice within The Bahamas and to write the NCLEX-PN exam for minimum U.S. certification • College-level courses transferable to degree programs Affordable fees, payment plan available Convenient evening class times, ideal for working peopleRegister today! S pace is limited!! Contact us at 242-394-8570a Certificate Course forLicensed Practical Nurse Mr Cambridge was alleged to have facilitated the scheme by creating a Bahamian International Business Company (IBC gon Development, and setting up a bank account for the company at FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas H e then allegedly handled wire transfers totalling hundreds of thousands of dollars. The “sting” was part of an FBI investigation into public official corruption in the Miami area, and one of Mr Cambridge’s fellow d efendants is former vice-mayor of Broward County and Broward County Commissioner, Josephus Eggelleton. In 2006, Eggelleton was alleged to have told an FBI agent and “cooperating witness”: “If you wanna do some deals in the Bahamas, let me know. “Yes sir. In fact, I’m gonna be raising some money for the Prime Minister of the Bahamas that’s running for re-election.” That appears to imply that he was going to donate to the PLP’s 2007 election campaign, although there is nothing to suggest the party o r Mr Christie did anything wrong in relation to this or the situation surrounding Mr Cambridge. See Tribune Business for full story. Lawyer indicted in US F ROM page one UK judge: Cases from countries like Bahamas taking up too much time F ROM page one I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 11 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM about five hours after a man was fatally stabbed during a scuffle at the nearby Sea grapes shopping centre on Prince Charles Drive. Inspector Warren Rodgers, of the Elizabeth Estates police station, said patrols have been intensified as police try to crack down on crimein the area. "We have a lot of patrols in the night-time. We also have been getting a lot of reserve officers to come out and assist in the night-time to reassure the communities in this area that t he police are out working and also to deter the criminals," he told The Tribune yesterday. Police launched investigations after at least two rapes and two attempted rapes occurred in eastern New Providence since March. However, The Tribune has received reports that this number may be greater than reported. On an internet message board, a poster c laimed a woman had been attacked and near ly raped two weeks ago by a man who lurked outside her home in the eastern area. Yesterday, police at the Elizabeth Estates station said they had no knowledge of the reported attack. SAC principal robbed by thug FROM page one F URTHERING the local food production initiative, four schools in Long Island received greenhouses during special assemblies last week. T he greenhouses went to N orth Long High, NGM Major High, Glinton’s Primary, and Simms’ Primary. Three greenhouses came from the BahamasA gricultural and Industrial Corp oration (BAIC through the Food and Agriculture Organisation’s Initiative on Soaring Food Prices. A mong the dignitaries present were Minister of Agriculture and Marine Resources and M ember of Parliament for Long Island and Raged Island, Larry Cartwright; BAIC executive chairman Edison Key; administrator Roderick Bowe, a nd Ministry of Education and l ocal government officials. Mr Cartwright told the students that agriculture is for life. “Everybody needs food,” he s aid. And the greatest thrill of one’s life is to be able to grow one’s own food.” Mr Key underscored BAIC’s t heme to ‘grow what you eat and eat what you grow’. He said there is no need for t he Bahamas to be importing some $500 million in food each year when the means are here to produce much of that. “If there is a magical word i n agriculture today, that word i s ‘greenhouses’,” agricultural officer, Maurice Minnis told students. “The appeal of growing p lants in a controlled environm ent protected from the open sun without most of the physical labour normally associated with production on the open f ield makes the attraction of greenhouses almost irresistible.” Schools in Long Island receive greenhouses AGRICULTURE MINISTER Larry Cartwright (rightfrom left BAIC’s assistant general manager of Agriculture Arnold Dorsett, Long Island administrator Roderick Bowe, and local government official Wellington Taylor.

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TODAY’S column is not your usual one. I just had to pause and reflect on the life of the late Vincent Lloyd Ferguson, a sporting icon of the highest order, not just as an athlete, but an administrator as well. When I got the news that the 71-year-old had passed away yesterday after his battle with prostate cancer, the first thing that really came to mindwas how I first got to know him in a personal way. I was attending my first major international event at the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona, Spain, and as a young reporter on the curb, I was eager to make the trip. But when I got to Barcelona, I was staying quite a ways out from everything that was going on. And not being able to speak Spanish didn’t help. Ferguson, the Bahamas Olympic Association’s treasurer at the time, served as the Chef de Mission for the team at the Olympics. Being a very small team, there was more than adequate space in the Games Village. Upon the insistence of triple jumper Frank Rutherford and quarter-miler Pauline Davis-Thompson, I moved into the Games Village where I was able to hang out with the team. However, Ferguson was not informed initially and when he found out, he almost hit the roof. He insisted that the BOA would not be responsible for me being in the village as the press was not allowed. That actually showed me the seriousness of Ferguson, who is known as a disciplinarian. Anybody who got to know Ferguson can attest to his firmness and his commitment to being the best out of everybody and ensuring that nothing was left to chance. After his sting as a semiprofessional baseball player in the major leagues, Ferguson returned home and took up a long and successful teaching career. It started at his alma mater at St Augustine’s College where he and the late Leviticus ‘Uncle Lou’ Adderley were responsible for coining the school’s nickname The Big Red Machine after the Cincinnati Reds in the 1960s. He last taught at the A F Adderley High School before he retired in 1994. Ferguson leaves behind his beloved wife Marie, a former teacher of mine, and two children, Anne-Marie and Vincent Alex. He had also compiled a rsum that speaks for itself. Here’s a glance at his career: Attended St Augustine’s College from 1950-1955 where he participated in basketball, softball, volleyball and track and field Enrolled at St Anselm’s College, Manchester, New Hampshire, on a basketball scholarship in 1957 and graduated with a BA in English and a minor in Philosophy in 1961 Started playing professional basketball with the Milwaukee Braves (now Atlanta minor league in 1964-1967, although he never got to play in the majors Obtained a Master of Science degree in Education Administration from Mankato State University in 1974 Taught locally in the classroom at SAC from 19611968 Served as an administrator at SAC from 1968-1975 Vice principal at R M Bailey from 1975-1977 and acting principal from 19771978 Principal at Aquinas College from 1978-1993 Acting principal at A F Adderley from 1993-1994 Served as the longest president of the Bahamas Amateur Basketball Association from 1966-1983. Founded the Bahamas Association of Basketball Officials (BABO First FIBA certified referee for the English speaking Caribbean after he refereed at the Central American and Caribbean Championships in Cuba in 197 Founding member and president of the Bahamas Association of Former and Present Professional Baseball Players. Inducted into the Minnesota State University Mankato in 2004 when he was presented with the Distinguished Alumni Achievement Award. My condolences to his entire family. May his soul rest in peace. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 13 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ‘A sporting icon of the highest order’ OPINION STUBBS P h o t o s : F e l i p M a j o r T r i b u n e s t a f f Champion T ruckers put on probation stated,” Seymour said. I don’t know where this thing about a sus pension or probation came from. They are only trying to blow this thing up more than it is because they lost money on what they call a big night when two top teams were supposed to meet. But we didn’t have enough players to play and so we lost the game by default.” As far as the constitution is concerned, Seymour said a team is allowed three defaults, but they are not allowed to have two backto-back. He said they have a game scheduled to play on Friday and they will show up to play that game. “The Mighty Mitts defaulted a game the other day and nobody made no noise,” Seymour said. “Two girls teams lost by default and nobody made any noise. I think because it’s the Truckers, everybody was making an issue out of it.” “When was the last time a Nassau team went anywhere,” Seymour asked. “They are only worrying about themselves. They have to start worrying about the players. They are upset because they might have lost a big night, but things happened.” Seymour said the NPSA knows that his team was struggling to get players out. He said three of their players had to work, but they came late and about five of them played in a number of softball games in other leagues, so the players might have been tired. “It’s not the first time something like this has happened on a Saturday night,” he said. “The last Saturday we played, I only had 10 players and one had to leave.” The NPSA, according to Fernander, is preparing to wind down its regular season so that they can start the playoffs as they march towards the BSF’s National Round Robin in November. FROM page 15 Rain delays softball game... THE senior boys’ game between the Big Red Machine and the Nassau Christian Academy Crusaders was stopped in the bottom of the fifth inning when the rain came pouring down. SOME of the players can be seen in action here

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By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net REMEMBER the name Leroy ‘Kid Nassau’ Brown? The former light welterweight champion, who dominated the local scene back in the days when Oswald ‘Elisha Obed’ Ferguson was makinga name for himself, has resurfaced, but this time to give back to the sport of boxing. Brown, a 61-year-old recovering drug addict with the Bahamas Association of Social Health (BASH past 16 months, is planning to form his own amateur boxing club. He has already started the facility on the site that used to host BASH’s car wash off Columbus Drive in Chippingham, but is in need of some additional material to complete the wooden structure. During BASH’s Earth Village Fun Day on Monday, October 12, Brown will reintroduce himself to the public as he stages an amateur exhibition boxing show. “We’re going to show the people what we have to offer,” Brown said. “Ray Minus Jr is assisting me. He will put down a boxing ring that we will use and he will bring some of his boxers to compete.” Kid Nassau, as he was affectionately called, was one of the top local boxers along with Obed and Baby Boy Rolle. But he would be the first to tell you that he was the best in his time, having posted an impressive record of 29-1. “They really didn’t recognise me back then,” said Brown, whose only loss was against an American in Miami, Florida. “I wasn’t in condition when the people called me for that fight.” Having fought and defeated just about all of the big name fighters whom Obed was matched against, Brown said he decided to quit after a fight between himself and Obed was canceled. “He and his trainers watched me and they said I was too heavy to fight Obed,” s aid Brown, who noted that at t he time he was just one p ound over the weight limit. We fought guys who were 2 0-30 pounds heavier than we were. I was a junior midd leweight and he was a welterweight, but they used it as a n excuse because they didn’t want him to lose.” After the fight was called off, Brown hung up his boxing gear and he walked away from the sport. H owever, he continued in his latter years to watch the sport that he perfected more as a technician. But he found t he urge to come back and g ive back to the sport. I had the style like Cass ius Clay. I was the crowd pleaser,” Brown recalled. That was why everybody w anted me to fight.” T hrough his boxing club, B rown said he intends to b ring back the art of the sport. The only thing I see out there is the brute force. The m an who can punch the hardest win. But they want to see something that they can enjoy,” Brown said. “Although I got strung out on drugs, I came back, thanks t o BASH. Now I can contribute to my immediate community and society.” Brown is encouraging any a nd all young men who have a n interest in boxing to come o ut and participate in the g ym, which he hopes to have completed after they have a cquired the much-needed m aterial and equipment. We need boxing bags, t raining gloves, head gears, s kipping ropes, mouth pieces, cups to protect the groins, s peed bags and a few more items,” he said. I’m appealing to the public to be a part of this by lending a helping hand.” Already BASH has gotten a lot of support from Premier Importers and the New Provi dence Community Church in getting the structure to near completion. However, Brown said they a re still looking for corporate B ahamas to assist in provid i ng them with plywood, c ement and a rug to put on the floor once it’s completed. Interested persons can con tact Brown or Wesley Fin layson, the marketing and media liaison for BASH/Earth Village at 3562274. Finlayson, a cousin of Alpheus ‘Hawk’ Finlayson, said they are throwing their full support behind Brown in his venture into getting the gym opened. “He’s been an inspiration to all of us,” Finlayson said. “He’s been a role model, someone who’s been there and done that and is moving on. I’m very proud of him and this is his way of giving back to the community. So I feel good about it. I think after the gym opens, it’s going to be good.” C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS P AGE 14, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Former boxer ‘Kid Nassau’ plans to form amateur club LEROY BROWN (right BASH’s car wash off Columbus Drive in Chippingham... Leroy Brown to stage exhibition boxing show at BASH’s Earth Village Fun Day next month LEROY BROWN (shown P h o t o s : F e l i p M a j o r T r i b u n e s t a f f

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By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net VINCENT Lloyd Ferguson, who was battling prostate cancer, died at his home while having breakfast yesterday morning. The former teacher/admin istrator, sporting icon and sports administrator extraordinaire just celebrated his 71st birthday on August 25. Winston ‘Tappy’ Davis, who had a long affiliation with Ferguson, broke down whenhe was asked to describe his former friend and teammate. “It’s so sad that he had to leave us,” said Davis, who tried to contain himself. “Vince was a straight forward intelligent, honest and hard working individual. “He believed in everything he was into and he cared a whole lot about it. I never knew that people had the kind of passion and commitment in what they did the way Vince did.” Davis and Ferguson were a part of an historic committee that was commissioned by the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture to put together the history of the game of basketball in the country. The committee was scheduled to meet again today. Tom ‘the Bird’ Grant, who was also a part of the committee, said the Bahamas has certainly lost a giant of a man. “He was a no nonsense man period,” Grant stated. “He did all he could for sports, but he was an individual all by himself. He wasn’t one to follow the crowd. “He did things his way. At times we couldn’t see eye to eye, but I knew he meant well. We were going down the same road. It’s just that we did it on different paths. That was just Vince.” Basketball standout Reggie Forbes, who shaped his life after his disciplinarian mentor, said it’s a sad day for sports. “Vince was one of the rare Bahamians, real men, an icon, who has served the Bahamas in many capacities, both academically, athletically, social ly and has made immeasur able contributions to the building of our nation,” Forbes said. “Today is a sad day. It causes us to reflect on the contribution he has made and the impact he has made in the lives of both men and women. To me, he has made an invaluable contribution in my life as I developed through the ranks of playing basketball.” Having had the pleasure of working with him as a teacher at Aquinas College, Forbes, now the Dean of Student Affairs at SAC, said Ferguson always tried to get the best of everybody he came in contact with. “To his wife and children, God knows best. Just hold on and be strong,” he said. We just wish that his legacy will live on in each of them.” Ferguson had a storied career. It began as a multiple ath lete at St Augustine’s College, to his collegiate days at St Anselm’s College, to his professional baseball sting with the Milwaukee Braves, to his return home as a high school administrator, to his latest role as the founder of the Bahamas Association of For mer and Present Professional Baseball Players, and his contribution on the committee for the history of basketball in the country. Ferguson leaves behind his beloved wife Marie and his two children, Anne-Marie and Vincent Alex. See column (Stubbs’ Opinion) on page 13 for more on Ferguson’s achievement C M Y K C M Y K THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 P AGE 13 Stubbs’ Opinion... TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM VINCENT FERGUSON Sporting icon dies at 71 THE Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools’ softball season got started yesterday. But at St Augustine’s College, the senior boys’ game between the Big Red Machine and the Nassau Christian Academy Crusaders was stopped in the bottom of the fifth inning when the rain came pouring down. The game was tied 11-11 when it was halted by plate umpire Michael Hanna. As the seven-inning game was not official, it will have to continue from that point at a date to be announced. SOME of the players can be seen in action here and on page 13 Rain delays BAISS softball game between SAC and NCA... P h o t o s : F e l i p M a j o r T r i b u n e s t a f f By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THE New Providence Softball Association (NPSA has placed the defending champions Commando Security Truckers on probation after they defaulted a live television game against the Heavy Lift Dorsey Park Boyz that was set to be played on Saturday night. As a result, a number of dedicated fans were disgruntled. So in an effort to lure them back to the park, Fer nander said the NPSA designated Tuesday and Wednesday as fan appreciation nights when softball lovers were able to watch the game free of charge. Calling the default an embarrassment for the league, NPSA president Sidney ‘Bobby Baylor’ Fernander said they are not going to showcase the Truckers in any radio or television game, nor will they “recommend them for any national team consideration.” “We will hope that the BSF (Bahamas Softball Federation) will uphold what we do because we will not rec ommend them for any national team consideration,” he said. “Any team traveling out of New Providence going anywhere, they will not be recommended for team play based on our sanctions that we will put on them.” But Truckers manager Perry Seymour said it’s not fair to his team because they didn’t do anything wrong, exceptl ose a game by default. With a defaulted game, the constitution states that you are allowed to pay a $50 fine and you are reinChampion Truckers put on probation SEE page 13

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM YOUNG Bahamian Marine Scientists ( YBMS), an educational component of the Danguillecourt Project, hosted a seven-day summer camp on Little Farmers Cay, Exuma. Seventeen students between the ages of 10 and 18 attended the camp, where they were introduced to different aspects of the Bahamian environment. The mornings were spent in the classroom discussing and learning the important facts about each daily topic. Afternoons were spent o utdoors in the field. Nikita Shiel-Rolle, director and founder of YBMS, said: “For many of these students it was their first time putting on a mask and snorkel, their first time swimming with sharks in 70 feet of w ater, their first time walking through mangrove creeks where they identified the four different types of mangroves and their first time making the connection that these same mangroves act as nurseries to countless juvenile creatures which,w hen grown, relocate onto nearby coral reefs.” Each day brought a new topic of discussion a nd adventure. A full day was dedicated to invasive species where lionfish were the focus. Comm unity members accompanied the students on a lionfish hunt after the morning discussion which addressed the environmental threats associated with this predator. The day ended with a grill-out on the Farmer’s Cay government dock wheref ishermen, who just hours before swore that they would never consume the deadly creature,c racked jokes and savoured the white meat of the lionfish. The summer camp would not have b een complete without a trip to the Exuma Cays Land and Sea Park, a protected area established by the Bahamas National Trust in 1959. Students visited the park’s headquarters on Warderick Wells and learned about the importance of m arine conservation and the spill-over effect, gaining an understanding of how wildlife in thesep rotected areas can flourish resulting in an abundance of species that will eventually take up res i dence outside the designated protected area. Upon exploring the area, the group saw the skeleton of a sperm whale that had died as a result of pollution, and observed hutia, the largest native mammal in the Bahamas, as well as artif acts left from the days of the Loyalists’ occupation. Stromatolites, ancient microbial reefs unique to t he Exuma cays, were another topic of study. These living layered outcrop structures called s tromatolites date back to the origins of the planet, when their photosynthetic properties were a ttributed to creating Earth’s atmosphere. Students visited the Danguillecourt Project’s r esearch lab located on Little Darby Island where Dr Pamela Reid of the University of Miami along with researchers from 12 other institutions, includ i ng NASA, are conducting ground-breaking scientific studies. O n the last day of the YBMS summer camp students gave a presentation to the local comm unity highlighting the events of the week. Government officials from George Town, Great Exum a, made the trip to Little Farmers Cay along with residents from neighbouring cays. The stu dents’ demonstrations included poetry about the invasive lionfish, a song about coral reefs and a dance illustrating the four mangrove communities. In closing remarks, the visiting George Town administrator said that YBMS camps should bed uplicated in every local fishing community. He added that it was particularly nice to have B ahamians running this programme as opposed to having foreigners educating us about our coun try. The 2009 YBMS summer programme was run by George Allen, Kristal Ambrose, Nikita Shiel-Rolle and Ryan Winder all Bahamians who are between the ages of 19 and 23. Camp Summer Young Bahamian Marine Scientists hos t STUDENTS between the ages of 10 a nd 18 a ttended the camp, where they were introduced tod ifferent aspects of the Bahamian environment.

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* Top attorney says Bahamas ‘can compete m ore effectively than any other international financial centre’ in attracting companies, h igh net-worths to base t hemselves here as p rimary domicile * Investment to ‘stay in the g ame’ increasing, but l awyer confident Bahamas has ‘wherewithal’ to compete By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T HE Bahamas “can com pete more effectively than any other international financialc entre” when it comes to attracting companies and high-net worth individuals tou se this nation as their prim ary operational base, a lead ing attorney said yesterday, asserting that this nation has the wherewithal to stay in the game”. John Delaney, managing p artner at Higgs & Johnson, urged attendees at a seminar organised by his law firm to “not believe the doomsayers” who claimed that the Bahamas was finished as an international financial services centre due to the concerted, and increasing attacks on such jurisdictions by the G20/OECD grouping. Warning that the Bahamas “must invest more in educa tion” if its international financial services sector was to sur vive and grow market share, Mr Delaney said: “There is a place in the world for an international financial centre that maintains alignment with evolving standards, and is prepared to invest in human cap ital and infrastructure in what is a highly competitive envi ronment. “The space is getting small er and smaller, and the investment needed to stay in the game has increased significantly. More and more are falling by the wayside, but I believe we have the whereC M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.16 $4.14 $4.26 ‘The perfect location’ for the wealthy, companies SEE page 4B JOHN DELANEY * BISX-listed firm says own analysis shows cable TV and Internet prices 28% and 118% lower than Caribbean regional average * Warns that programming costs up 95% in 15 years, with other operating expenses up 200%, to justify basic cable TV fee rise By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Cable Bahamas has argued that a ‘benchmarking’ exercise designed to justify retail price regulation in the Bahamian communications industry “is flawed and does not provide a valid basis” for regulating either its cable TVor Internet services, arguing that its prices for the latter market are 118 per cent below the Caribbean average. In its response to the request for feedback on retail price regulations for the Bahamian communications sector, the BISX-listed utility provider said its own “more comprehensive” benchmark ing exercise showed that its prices for cable TV, Internet and other data services were below Caribbean comparatives. Cable attacks ‘flawed’ retail price analysis SEE page 9B B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A p rominent Bahamian attor ney was yesterday i ndicted in the US on allegations that he helped to knowingly laund er hundreds of thousands of doll ars in proceeds from an investment fraud, after being seemingly being caught in a Federal Bureau o f Investigation (FBI ation. Sidney Cambridge, an attorney a nd partner with Callender’s & C o, was named as a defendant along with the former vice-mayor o f Broward County and Broward County Commissioner, Josephus Eggelleton, in an indictment unveiled yesterday by the US Dis t rict Attorney’s Office for south Florida in connection with a mul ti-year FBI investigation into public sector corruption in the Miami area. Mr Cambridge did not return T ribune Business’s calls seeking comment before press deadline yesterday, despite this newspaper leaving detailed messages on hisc ell phone and with his assistant asking for an urgent reply. However, his indictment is like ly to stun many in Nassau’s legal circles, where he is held in high regard for his ability and integrity. The Callender’s & Co attorney a nd partner is well-known in both legal and political circles, having served as vice-chair of the Pro-g ressive Liberal Party (PLP He is also the attorney representing CLICO (Bahamas uidator Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez i n that liquidation, and is also acting for Mr Gomez in another p rominent court-supervised liqu idation, that involving Leadenhall Bank & Trust. There is nothing to suggest that C allender’s & Co has done any thing wrong, and the firm is not named in the indictment relatingt o Mr Cambridge. Mr Cambridge is understood to still be in the Bahamas, although all his fellow d efendants appeared in court in Miami yesterday. The indictment alleged that FBI undercover agents made contact w ith Eggelleton in February 27, 2006, then donated a $5,000 cheque to one of his charities. Eggelleton then allegedly said, on May 30, 2006, to an FBI agent and ‘cooperating witness’: “If youw anna do some deals in the Bahamas, let me know. “Yes sir. In fact, I’m gonna be raising some money for the PrimeM inister of the Bahamas that’s running for re-election.” That appears to imply that he wasg oing to donate to the PLP’s 2007 e lection campaign, although there is nothing to suggest the party or Mr Christie did anything wrongi n relation to this or the situation Top attorney is charged with money laundering * Callender’s & Co partner, a nd PLP vice-chair, indicted in Miami * Co-accused bragged of allegedly helping to fund r aise for ex-PM Christie’ s 2007 election campaign SEE page 8B B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor A SENIOR Sandals executive has b lasted the Exuma Chamber of Comm erce’s president for making the most “inappropriate, misplaced and unprofessional” demands of the resort chain that he has ever seen, in relation to its plans for re-opening the Emerald Bay resort. F loyd Armbrister, the Chamber’s president, in a September 10, 2009, communication sent to senior Sandals executives had demanded that they answer a number of questions, and p rovide details, on the resort chain’s p lans for the Emerald Bay resort, w arning that he could not simply stand by and watch “the total disregard” for the island’s business community. H e also railed at the alleged “rape and pillage” of Exuma’s economy byp revious investors who had failed to d eliver on their promises. M r Armbrister, in a communication o btained by Tribune Business, said he was “surprised at the lack of informa t ion being provided to the local community to date”, saying what Exumians knew of Sandals plans had come from the media and a press release. H e added that he had been unsuc cessful in contacting Gordon ‘Butch’ Stewart, Sandals’ chairman, as had others, in seeking to learn how they could help Sandals, but added that the ‘word on the street’ regarding ther esort chain’s plans “does not seem very positive”. Stating that he was “elated that Exu ma, the Bahamas was to be beauty b ehind it all” when it came to Sandals’ latest resort acquisition, Mr Armbrister wrote: “I am aware of the repeated rape and pillage of the Exu ma economy in the past. “Many have come, they have got c oncessions and did not perform for the concessions received. All that the Government gives belongs to the people, and thus makes the people investors in the company receiving the concessions. “As president of the Exuma Chamber of Commerce, I cannot stand and watch the total disregard for the business community by any individual or g roup...... The Chamber expects to get a return phone call. We expect that with this acquisition that your corporate social responsibility would lead y ou to honour the triple bottom line: p eople, planet, profits.” Mr Armbrister then demanded that S andals disclose a variety of details r egarding its plans, including the total dollar value of concessions it was receiving from the Government; how m any non-Bahamians it was planning t o bring in; whether Bahamian cons truction workers would be employed in upgrades to Emerald Bay; when s taff would be hired and trained; and how non-local staff would be housed. Other demands related to Sandals’ p lans for water sports and ground t ransportation; its “vision for the comm unity”; its “attitude towards local people; and its expectations of them. T he concern generated by letters such as Mr Armbrister’s is that the content could potentially scare awayp rospective investors in the Bahamas, although there is no sign of this happening with Sandals. H owever, the resort chain may now be wondering about the quality of the reception it will get in some circles in Exuma, despite having effectively res c ued the island’s economy by acquir ing Emerald Bay for a price believed to be in the $20-$30 million range -m ore than two years after it was placed in receivership under the pre vious ownership. I n a withering response to Mr Arm brister, Sandals’ director of operations, Shawn DaCosta, wrote to the Exuma Chamber president on September 11,2 009, to express “displeasure” over the previous day’s letter following his conversation with Mr Stewart. We have worked with various Chambers of Commerce throughout the world, but never in all the years of our operation have I seen opening dis c ussion so inappropriate, misplaced and unprofessional as yours,” Mr DaCosta wrote. Need I remind you that one hotel has already failed on this island, which Sandals exec blasts Exuma Chamber boss SEE page 8B

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DURING a training session this morning, I had todeal with a recruit who we w ill call ‘Jeff’. Jeff was stronger and more aggressive than his partner, who we will call ‘Peter’. As the various drills were given out, I observed how Jeff would throw and toss Peter around the floor as if he was a ragd oll. On the other hand, when the roles were switched unexpectedly, the rough and aggressive response was not given. Jeff’s action became more aggressive to the point where I had to step in anda dmonish him about his actions, which in my opinion equated to abuse. However, in Jeff’s opinion he was not doing anything wrong, as he felt that he was in control and stressed the fact that Peter was doing the samet hing. Jeff’s perspective is what he operated on, so he madea decision to act accordingly. If this action was not checked, the end result could have been injury. We a re observing various behaviours in our society that, for whatever reason, are going unchecked. They are being allowed to fester and grow. Compounding this is that what we believe is unusual, dangerous and unsafe, based o n our norms and culture, is not necessarily the case. We are seeing before us the evolution of a very different Bahamas. The sleepy islandh as awakened, and the perception of risks to survival is being met head on with the same violent and aggressive force. Unfortunately, those of us w ho hold fast to now ancient and historic beliefs are not t aking the necessary steps to reduce the potential for large-scale loss that may r esult from our inaction or d isregard. We prefer to sing a nd hold prayer services in o ur attempt to pacify the eruption around us. Not g ood enough, so sorry! Agreed, prayer can move mountains, but who is goingt o move if everybody is d own on their knees prayi ng. Now, we all have our own way of managing events, be they loss or criminal in nature. Who is to say whichi s the right way or, as some would say, reasonable. One thing for certain is that choosing not to do something or ignoring the event is action within itself. T he time is long past, in my opinion, for peace rallies and prayers that are not backed or supported by spe c ific actions to change behaviour. The change in behaviour is not limited to the would-be-criminal but, more importantly in my o pinion, this change is for us w ho are at risk. How do we reduce the risk of loss and crime? Risk, too, is relative to culture, location, time of day and individuals oro rganisations being exposed t o the threat. Thus what we p erceive as the crime risk is not recognised in the same way by the police. When I speak of the police in this instance, I speak regarding the organisation, not any one individual. Their view, in many instances, becomes perplexing as it appears they take a v ery nonchalant approach to c onditions that we believe to be extreme. Just as Jeff’s actions to the untrained eyem ay be seen as ‘horsing around’, the trained eye seesh im taking advantage of a p erceived weaker partner a nd abusing that relationship. But again this, too, is relative as Jeff also stated he w as reacting to a threat, and rather than seek assistance from the authority figure( me in this instance)m he d ecided to resolve this issue his way. Is Jeff wrong for this, or is h e just acting the part that he has so efficiently been taught over the last 18 or soy ears. Can we blame him or any other individual completely for actions that essentially have brought t hem this far in life. No, we cannot, but we as a society must take part of the blame, a nd incarceration and hangings cannot be our escape. It is false to think that we c an live in a society free of c rime and loss, since both have been with us since time began. Loss is associatedw ith the removal of cherished possessions or people, and crime relates to them eans by which the event occurred. Bear in mind that all crime is loss, but not all lossi s crime. For example, loss resulting from a hurricane, floods and other naturallyoccurring events is not crime. However, loss from stealing, rape and murder isc rime. Many work-related incidents, such as extended lunch hours and tardiness, are also loss events. We must also consider that crimes such as driving without the proper vehicle i nspection certificate or licensing are also crimes, but because they are seen as minor threats to safety they are regularly disregarded. Yet as the story described earlier, if they go unchecked they create a breeding g round for more serious offences. What can be done about this? Do we give up hope or do we press on with the ensuing battle? Unfortu-n ately, we cannot completely remove ourselves from any of these occurrences; they will happen in one form or the other. With that said we must now develop pre-v entative and preparatory measures so we might adeq uately deal with them as they occur. This is and has been the premise for my c olumn, to recommend solut ions to the challenges of c rime and loss that may pres ent themselves. As crime is on the minds a nd, in some instances, the hearts of many, it is only appropriate to address thesei ssues and provide realistic s olutions to this dilemma. A s it pertains to loss events, this is a bit more complex, so preventative solutions that pertain to management styles will be suggested. A no rules’ society that is free from defined crime; some have dared to say is the way to go. This ‘survival of the fittest’ mentality would take us back to ‘uncivilised’ and c haotic times, very similar to the times we are living now here in the Bahamas. N B: Gamal Newry is the president of Preventative Measures, a loss prevention a nd asset protection training and consulting company, specialising in policy andp rocedure development, b usiness security reviews and audits, and emergency and crisis management.C omments can be sent to P.O. Box N-3154 Nassau, Bahamas or e-mailg newry@gmail.com or visit us at www.preventativemea sures.net C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ‘Playing a role’ in stopping loss Safe & Secure b y Gamal Newry

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Real Estate Association’s (BREA dent yesterday urged the Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA persons with real estate l icences, arguing that this was c reating unfair competition in the Freeport market and leave consumers exposed. William Wong told Tribune Business: “For several years now, we’ve been trying to get the Port Authority not to issue persons with licences tos ell real estate because they’re not mandated to do so. They can issue licences, but not fort he selling of real estate. They’re unleashing untrained people on the market inF reeport.” M r Wong said the issue was c ausing BREA’s 70-plus members in Freeport and G rand Bahama “a lot of frus tration and a lot of stress, and it’s been going on for at leastt he last 10 years.” T he BREA president said that for the last four to five years, the organisation had been trying to get the Port Authority to recognise it as the only licensing body forr ealtors in Grand Bahama and Freeport, but without success. M r Wong said BREA’s p osition was that the 1995 Real Estate Act empowered i t as the sole boy to licence practising realtors throughout the Bahamas including Freeport and Grand Bahama.T he profession, he added, had been placed on par with the l ikes of architects, doctors and attorneys in terms of beinga ble to self-regulate. For anyone to practice r eal estate in Freeport they n eed to be licensed by us,” Mr Wong told Tribune Busin ess. “They [the Port Authority] need to recognise this and stop doing what they’red oing.” B REA said a legal opinion on the issue that was drafted on its behalf had been sent to t he Port Authority, but no reply had been received. “All the complaints we h ave heard about in Freeport recently have come from people the Port has given a licence to. People have beenp utting themselves forward as real estate agents and they’re not. That’s against the law,” M r Wong said. “We are trying to bring some order to this Wild Wild West. It’s in everyone’s inter e sts for people to be licensed so the public are protected. We have 70-plus people in Freeport paying dues, playing by the rules, and the Port is licensing people not play i ng by the rules. Right now, the public are not protected. “BREA is the only authority to licence realtors anywhere in the Bahamas, and that’s set out in an Act of Par l iament.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM btrt tfr f r!%* &'!$()))!*&*#tffn""bnff !$ %#&!*&*# !%** Port urged to stop licensing realtors W ILLIAM WONG “For several years now, we’ve been trying to get the Port Authority not to issue persons with licences to sell real estate because they’re not mandated to do so. They can issue licences, but not for the selling of real estate. They’re unleashing untrained people on the market in Freeport.” William Wong T o advertise, call 502-2371 INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays

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w ithal to stay in the game.” M r Delaney said the G20/OECD offensive was aimed at controlling international financial centres and the offshore world, rather t han eliminating it altogether. A s a result, he advocated that there “is a place for international financial centres” that were able to create efficient structures, aggregate investment capital from across t he globe and send it into G20/OECD states. These centres also needed to be wellregulated and have a strong brand reputation. “Bahamian financial institutions have been preparingf or years for this sort of thing. Since 200, they’ve been trying to ensure they have a tax compliant book of customers,” Mr Delaney said, adding that banks and trust c ompanies regularly sought o pinions from tax attorneys in their clients’ home countries to ensure structures and s olutions were compliant. Still, the Higgs & Johnson managing partner urged: “We must act. Nature has proven very unkind to those who will not adapt to change. One thing is certain, and that isc hange. We must adapt, and must ensure all the ingredients required for success exist.” Among these ingredients, Mr Delaney suggested, were p ossessing the “best talent”, w hich meant the Bahamas “must invest more in education that we have up till now”. The Bahamian workforce in the financial services indus-t ry also needed to be “supplemented” with specialist, skilled and high-end expatria te talent, Mr Delaney sugg ested that this nation needed to examine its Immigration policies and, if necessary,m ake some changes if these were not conducive to that o bjective. O ther prerequisites, he suggested, were improving the a dministration of justice, plus the efficiency and effectiveness of the enforcement and regulatory agencies. While the Bahamas neede d to implement a “greater effort” when it came to longterm planning, and “invest more in selling the brand”, Mr Delaney said this nation had the “potential to be the l ocation of choice” for companies who wanted to move t heir operational base and substantial activities offshore, plus high net-worth individuals wanting to use this jurisdiction as their primary domicile. “That is an area where we c an compete more effectively than any other international financial centre,” Mr Delaney said, pointing out that the Bahamas’ 20-plus inhabited islands created “ample room f or high-end residential develo pments”. This nation’s location, close to US metropolitan areas and in the US east coast time zone, meant that the Bahamasw as “ideal” as a base for both companies and high net worth individuals. M r Delaney said the B ahamas needed to “aggressively go after” this market, as the land purchase andb uilding boom it might cre ate would generate employm ent in sectors such as real e state and construction. Crime, though, would need t o be tackled. “We are in a period of significant global change that is impacting our way of life,” Mr Delaney said. “I have everyc onfidence we will be able to survive, and every confidence we can get the job done.” To achieve this, the Bahamas would need to exploit its size and respond w ith agility and efficiency. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM :$17(' ‘The perfect location’ for the wealthy, companies FROM page 1B

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B y JOE McDONALD AP Business Writer BEIJING (AP is pressing for a bigger voice i n the International Monetary F und and says Group of 20 leaders at their Pittsburgh summit should start making good on promises to give developing countries more IMF votes. T he G-20 has agreed in principle but could face an obstacle: European governments, which hold a big share of the IMF board seats and are reluctant to accept changes that might reducet heir own status in the IMF. For many of them, it’s the only way they can do some grandstanding globally,” saidDaniel Gros, director of the Centre for European Policy S tudies in Brussels, the center of the 27-nation European Union. “They don’t evenw ant to talk about it.” The agenda at the September 24-25 summit includes possible curbs on financial industry pay, joint economic policy and whether to start winding down stimulus spend-i ng. But for China, the prize is greater representation in the IMF, which Beijing sees as a way to influence global economic policy. Working through such a multilateral b ody could help to allay u nease abroad about rising Chinese economic and politi cal power. T he change holds symbolic appeal for Beijing, rearranging a global order that dates t o World War II and signifyi ng the start of a new era. By tradition the IMF boss is a European, while an Americ an leads its sister institution, the World Bank. The IMF Executive Board has eight directors from individual gov e rnments the United States, Japan, France, Britain, Germany, China, Russia andS audi Arabia. Sixteen seats are assigned to groups of nations from the Middle East,C aribbean and other regions, many of them represented by a European government such a s Ireland or Belgium. I ncreasing developing countries’ voting power might require cutting the number of European seats or creating joint European Union seats. Beijing has been unusually a ssertive in pressing its d emands, reflecting its growing confidence as an economy that has suffered little damage from the worst global downturn since the 1930s. Its banks avoided the turmoil t hat battered Western l enders, it has $2 trillion in foreign reserves and it is expected to be the first economy to recover from the slump. We believe the Pittsburgh s ummit should work toward t ransferring voting power from developed countries to d eveloping countries,” said a deputy governor of China’s c entral bank, Guo Qingping, at a news conference this week. “At the same time, we hope there will be more members from developing countries int he senior management of the I MF,” Guo said. “This will help to increase representation and legitimacy of the s enior management.” Beijing wants developing and developed countries toh ave equal voting shares in t he IMF and World Bank, said Zhu Guangyao, a deputy finance minister. Currently, developed countries hold 57 per cent of IMF shares and 56 per cent of World Banks hares. China announced September 2 it would buy the equivalent of $50 billion of the IMF’s first bond sale. It is parto f the Fund’s effort to raise $ 500 billion for lending to economies battered by the global downturn. This month in London, G20 finance ministers reaffirmed the group’s promise of r eforms at the two institut ions. They stopped short of committing to specific changes but said World Bank reforms will be completed by the first half of 2010 and the next IMF quota review w hich decides voting rights b y January 2011. In March, EU leaders endorsed IMF reforms to reflect “relative economic weights in the world econo-m y” a reference to new e conomic powers such as Chin a, Brazil and India. Britain, Germany and France are confident they can retain a leading role. But mid-s ize nations such as the N etherlands, with just 20 million people, and Spain worry about their status. European politicians know this and have hinted that Europe could help defend its v oting share by increasing its c ontribution to the new IMF lending facility to 125 billion euros ($180 billion per cent of the total. “Maintaining a significant share would ensure that EU m ember states’ views are adeq uately represented,” German Finance Minister Peer Steinbrueck and his French counterpart, Christine Lagarde, said in a joint state-m ent this month. E uropean governments are r esistant to accepting a joint EU seat. “We need to have a European leader who is basicallyb old enough to overcome this i mpasse” and persuade Europeans to a reduction in their representation, Gros said. But before that happens, m any years could pass.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM P lease submit resumeto: Human ResourcesDepartment | Doctors Hospital P.O.BoxN-3018||Nassau,Bahamas|orEmail:info@doctorshosp.com Vacancy: Physician Liaison Officer P hysician Liaison: www.doctorshosp.com Position:Responsible for the support of the development of clinical information systems that assist physicians in the delivery of patient care. Participates as a member of the MIS department in representing the needs and requirements of the physician community and serves as an advocate of management in promoting the use of information technology in the clinical setting. Works in partnership with Physician Care Management Design and Implementation Teams to translate clinician requirements into specifications for new clinical systems. Helpslead,andfacilitateclinicianadvisorygroupsinthedesignofclinical systemstosupportexcellenceinpatientcare.Engagespatientcareproviderswith varyingrolesincludingphysicians,nursingpractitioners,nursingstaff,ancillary departmentpersonnel,&medicalrecordsprofessionalstocontributetothe developmentanduseoftheclinicalinformationsystem.Developsempathy& understandingofphysicianneeds&buildsrelationshipswithphysicianstogains upportofITinitiatives. t echnical and application implementation strategies and assists in the development o f strategic plans for clinical information systems.Education & Experience: PhD qualification in medicine or a related clinical background. (no physician licensing necessary for the post)S pecial Range of Skills:Possess excellent interpersonal skills and can work effectively with a diversity of personalities. Must be approachable, show respect for others and be able to present data with effective communication and presentation skills. Must be an effective consensus builder. Possess a good grasp of clinician work flow in both inpatient and outpatient settings, interest in clinical information system and outcomes measurement. China pushing for bigger IMF role at G-20 I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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By JOYCE M R OSENBERG AP Business Writer NEW YORK (AP T hese are anxious times for some small business owners w ho face an October 15 due date for their 2008 income tax returns. These owners got extensions of the deadline for f iling their returns back in A pril but aren’t ready to file. Or, they can’t pay the government the money they owe. Some of them are just disorganised. Others might be having a cash flow crunch. N o matter what the probl em is, if you’re one of these owners, you must submit your return by the deadline or faceb ig penalties for late filing. And not filing your return will only prolong the agony. I f your issue is disorganisat ion, it’s time to rethink not just how you’re running your taxes, but your overall busin ess. And maybe more than that. “My observation of these t ypes of people is that it’s not j ust their business that runs this way, it’s their life,” said G ordon Spoor, a certified public accountant in St Petersburg, Florida. Despite the availability and s implicity of software that helps small businesses keep their books and compile their tax returns, many of these owners have piles of receipts, invoices and statements that they bundle up and take to t heir CPAs or tax lawyers each year. Tax professionals call these owners “shoeboxc lients,” and many preparers d on’t want to work with them, especially since they tend to show up right before the filing d eadline looking for service. The solution for these owners is clear: Get help, eitherf rom software, or get some one else to help you keep your accounts year-round.T here are good, even critical reasons for doing this. Spoor pointed out that a CPA who charges a client $300 an hourf or tax prep will also charge $300 an hour to sort through piles of receipts and invoices. That is money badly spent. Moreover, a disorganised owner often doesn’t have a good handle on how the business is doing, and that could be a threat to the company’s s urvival. S ome business owners just d on’t want to work with computers. Gregg Wind, a CPA with Wind Bremer Hocken-b erg LLP in Los Angeles, suggests some easy, low-techo rganisation tips: “If you do nothing else, set up folders a nd drop invoices in there.” The good news is there is still time to sort through the p aper, input the data into a programme and get it to a tax professional. It may take ad ay or two, but it’ll save mone y in the long run. If your papers are so disorganised that you have manym issing checks or invoices, or can’t figure out which receipts go with which payments, dot he best you can. But be upfront with the government and tell the IRS you’re filing an estimated return. You cana lways amend it in the future. Spoor recalled the case of a client whose disorganisation, the result of serious personal problems, extended back more than a decade. Whent he client, who hadn’t filed returns during that time, decided to settle up with the government, many of his records didn’t exist. “We constructed estimates based on what we knew,” Spoor said. “The IRS accept ed it.” October 15 is generally a hard and fast deadline for filing a return if you’ve had an extension. The IRS has been known to make exceptions in some cases, but Spoor noted, being a disorganised small b usiness owner is not a reas onable cause.” Wind noted that e-filing, or submitting your return to theg overnment online, can buy you a little more time. T he IRS is quite clear on its Web site, www.irs.gov, a bout the reasons you should file your return on time. “If taxes are owed, a delay in fil i ng may result in penalty and interest charges that could increase your tax bill by 25p ercent or more.” T he government does rec ognize that not everyone can afford to pay their taxes righta way. While it will charge interest on taxes not paid on time, it is willing to work out ap ayment schedule. If you owe the government $25,000 or less in taxes, penal ties and interest, you can a pply to set up an installment agreement. There are several ways to do this. One is to download and complete IRS Form 9465, Installment Agreement Request. Or, youc an use the Online Payment Agreement Application at www.irs.gov/individuals/article/0,,id149373,00.html. However, if you can pay the IRS your entire bill with in 120 days, the agency says you can avoid the fees for set ting up an agreement. You need to call an IRS toll-free number, 1-800-829-1040 to arrange for this option. If you owe the government more than $25,000, you may need to complete Form 433-F, Collection Information State ment, which asks for information including your assets, liabilities and income. Whatever the reason for an owner’s October 15 anxiety, it’s a good idea to meet with an accountant or other finan cial adviser to figure out how to prevent it from becoming an annual occurrence. Since the year is nearly three-quar ters over, “people should be thinking about getting organised for next year’s tax planning,” Wind said. “And if they’re going to talk to a CPA about 2008, they should spend a few min utes talking about 2009,” he said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f 'LUHFWRU Small business angst rises as tax deadline draws near Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your story. “My observation of these types of people is that it’s not just their business that runs this way, it’s their life. Gor don Spoor, certified public accountant

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Top attorney is charged with money laundering surrounding Mr Cambridge. The indictment then alleged that Eggelleton offered to provide the underc over FBI agents with cont acts in the Bahamian financ ial services industry around July 31, 2006, stating that “ in the Bahamas, he does not have to adhere to the ethical restrictions he has in the Unit-e d States”. That offer was repeated in October 2006, the indictment a lleged, Eggelleton the following month telling an unnamed hotelier withB ahamas connections that the FBI agents needed help in establishing a Bahamian banka ccount and company. H owever, the hotelier and another man, referred to as ‘E.D’, who had “very good c onnections in the Bahamas”, were “frightened” and “sceptical” about helping Eggel l eton and the FBI agents, e specially after the latter told Eggelleton they wanted to hide and launder proceeds from a fictitious ‘fraudulent’ investment scheme. Instead, Eggelleton allegedl y introduced the undercover agents to the two other defen dants in the case, Joel Williams and Ronald Owens, who would assist them with their banking needs. T he pair met an undercove r FBI agent in Nassau on March 6, 2007. After hearing of the need to conceal andl aunder proceeds from the fake financial fraud, Williams was alleged to have said that “in the Bahamas, they did notc all it money laundering as long as the money did not come from arms, drugs or ter r orists”. Agent A round the same time, the FBI agent and the two defen dants allegedly met with Mr C ambridge. He was said to have provided the undercover agent with an applicationf orm for opening a Bahamian International Business Company (IBCi nstructions to the attorney’s trust account at FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas Then, on March 20, 2007, the undercover agents allegedly sent Mr Cambridgea $100,000 wire transfer from a Miami bank. Eight days later, the Bahamian attorneya llegedly took the FBI agent to meet ‘S.B’, a First Caribbean banker, to be inter viewed and sign bank account opening documents for Hexagon Development. The indictment alleged that the undercover agent paid $7,000 to be shared between Mr Cambridge and the other defendants on March 30, 2007. From then on, Mr Cam bridge was alleged to have transferred $97,000 from his trust account to the Hexagon Development account on April 4, 2007, and received a $200,000 wire transfer in May 2007. He then allegedly transferred $199,000 from the Hexagon Development account with FirstCaribbean to a bank account in St Croix. Betweeen August 30, 2007, and November 23, 2007, Cambridge was alleged to have received three wire transfers, valued at $200,000 each, from the undercover agents. “On or about November 23, 2007, at Nassau, Bahamas, defendant Cambridge was told by an undercover agent that the funds came from a ‘Ponzi’ scheme,” the indictment alleged. “After acknowl edging his understanding of the purported source of the funds, defendant Cambridge instructed undercover agents how to launder the proceeds in the Bahamas.” That same day, Mr Cambridge was alleged to have told the FBI agent he received $2,000, not $1,000, for laundering the money, and the same day gave him a $399,000 cheque to deposit into the Hexagon bank account at FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas F ROM page 1B Sandals exec blasts Exuma Chamber boss resulted in hundreds of Bahamians without their livelihoods. This is not a path we intend to follow, and for that reason we will take thet ime we need to ensure success and do not welcome letters such as yours. “Not only is it impossible to provide the information y ou have asked for, it’s not y our place to ask for it. As a businessman, I’m sure you w ould take the perceived lack of information at this present time and exchange it for a successful resort in thef uture.” Mr DaCosta pointed to Sandals’ 14 years of operating in the Bahamas, and its “strong affinity” and “deep love for the people”. He added that Sandals had continued to invest when o thers have not, and the acquisition of Sandals Emerald Bay has once again demonstrated our love for these islands and its people. “The success of our organisation is based on a tried and tested formula, a fundamental part of which is sound plan-n ing. We leave nothing to chance, and everything happens for a reason. It is due to this that we can boast some of the highest average occupancies in the region, benefiting economies and commu-n ities in which we are.” M r DaCosta said Sandals was open and easy to work with “providing one respects the boundaries of the partnership, and doesn’t overstep the mark, as has happened here”. To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today! FROM page 1B

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As a result, there was “no justification” to introduce new retail price regulations withr espect to any of its services d ue to price level concerns, Cable Bahamas argued. The company compared 16 other Caribbean countries to the monthly fee charged for its CoralWave Jazz Internet s ervice, priced at $21.70, with a download speed of 1,500 kilobytes per second and upload of 256 kilobytes per second. “The average monthly subs cription price for comparab le services in the other 17 C aribbean countries surveyed (excluding the Bahamas $47.33, which is about 118 per cent higher than Cable Bahamas monthly price of$ 21.70,” Cable Bahamas said in its submission to the Utilit ies Regulatory and Competition Authority (URCA “Looking at the price per kilobytes, the average (excluding the Bahamas$ 0.039, which is about 178 per cent higher than Cable Bahamas’ per channel price of $0.014. These results indicate the robustness of the conclusion that Cable Bahamas prices are lower.” O n the cable TV front, C able Bahamas used as its benchmark its SuperBASIC service that includes between 48 to 54 video channels at a monthly price of $30. The BISX-listed utility p rovider said: “The average monthly subscription price for c omparable services in the other 12 Caribbean countries surveyed (excluding the Bahamas) is $38.39, which is about 28 per cent higher thanC able Bahamas’ monthly price of $30. “Looking at the price per channel, the average (excluding the Bahamas) is $0.75, which is also about 28 per cent higher than CableB ahamas per channel price of $ 0.60.” To further back its case, Cable Bahamas pointed to the fact that Bahamian gross domestic product (GDP capita, based on purchasingp ower parity, was relatively high in the Caribbean cont ext. I n addition, the Bahamas’ population density was one of the lowest in the region, preventing the company from e xploiting economies of dens ity, as it alleged that it was f urther disadvantaged by having to provide services to mul tiple islands instead of the one normally served by rivals. Cable Bahamas then moved to justify its case for a rise in the $30 per month ratef or its basic cable TV package it has been forced to levy s ince 1994, pointing out that the Bahamian all-items inflation index had increased by 30 per cent over the same 15year period. More specially in the case of Cable Bahamas’ operating costs, since 1995 Cable Bahamas’ programming costs per subscriber for basic cable TV service have increased by roughly 95 per cent,” the com-p any said. Salary and benefit costs per subscriber (for customer service, technical and IT and administrative personnel have increased by over 200 per cent, and other operatinge xpenses per subscriber (including plant maintenance, e lectricity, vehicles) have also i ncreased by over 200 per cent.” Cable Bahamas contrasted this situation with what had h appened in the US, pointing o ut that in response to i ncreased operating costs, cable companies there had on average increased basic TV package fees from $22 per month in 1995 to $49.65 in 2008, a 122 per cent increase. Over the same period, infla-t ion, as measured by the US consumer price index, grew b y just 38 per cent. “Cable Bahamas is simply not in a position to hold basic cable TV service price constant at $30 indefinitely with-o ut significant deterioration in the quality of that service,” C able Bahamas said. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009, PAGE 9B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM &20021:($/7+(%$+$0$6 ,17+((0(&2857 &RPPRQ/DZt(TXLW\'LYLVLRQ %(7:((1 6&27,$%$1.%$+$0$6f/,0,7(' 3ODLQWLII $1' . (/3+,1('-2+1621 'HIHQGDQW 7R.HOSKLQH'-RKQVRQ 7 $.(,&(WKDW $QDFWLRQKDVEHHQFRPPHQFHGDJDLQVW\RX 6FRWLDEDQN%DKDPDVf8PLWHGLQWKH6XSUHPH &RXUWRI7KH%DKDPDV:ULWRI6XPPRQVRQ WKHRI-DQXDU\EHLQJ$FWLRQ ZKHUHLQWKH3ODLQWLIIFODLPLVIRUWKHWRWDO RIZKLFKUHSUHVHQWVWKHSULQFLSDO VXPRIDFFUXHGLQWHUHVWRQWKHVDLG SULQFLSDOLQWKHVXPRIDGGRQFKDUJHV LQWKHVXPRIDQGLQWHUHVWRQWKHVDLGDGG RQFKDUJHVLQWKHVXPRIGXHXQGHUORDQ QXPEHUHGDQGWKHSULQFLSDOVXPRI GXHXQGHU0DVWHUFDUG ,WKDVEHHQRUGHUHGWKDWVHUYLFHRIWKH:ULWRI 6XPPRQVLQWKHVDLGDFWLRQEHHIIHFWHGRQ\RXYLUWXHRI WKLVDGYHUWLVHPHQW
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0,1,675<285,60t$9,$7,21'(3$570(17 2)&,9,/$9,$7,21 38%/,&$7,21%<+(,1,675< 75$163257t$9,$7,21'(3$570(17 $9,$7,21$57,&8/$56)$1$33/,&$7,21 23(5$7(&+('8/('$,5(59,&(6,QDFFRUGDQFHZLWKWKHSURYLVLRQVRI 5HJXODWLRQ RIWKH&LYLO$YLDWLRQ/LFHQVLQJRI$LU6HUYLFHVf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sian stock markets fell Wednesday as a monthslong rally sputtered and investors waited for clues from the US Federal Reserve about the global recovery’s strength.E uropean shares were higher. Oil prices hovered above $71 a barrel following a big jump overnight while the US dollar continued to languish, f alling against the yen and e uro. Japan’s market was closed for a national holiday. A sian markets were invigorated Tuesday by the Asian Development Bank raising its growth forecasts for China and India, two of the region’s biggest economies. Investors have piled into A sian equities this year but some analysts say the rally, fueled by loose monetary policy and government stimulus spending, has gotten ahead of economic reality. M arkets in Europe were h igher in early trade with benchmarks in Germany, F rance and Britain up 0.5 per cent or more. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index fell 105.62, or 0.5 per cent, to 21,595.52 and South Korea’s Kospi dropped 7.41, or 0.4 per cent, to 1,711.47.A ustralia’s benchmark gained 1.5 per cent while China’s Shanghai index shed 1.9 per cent as investors cashed out ahead of a slew of new initial public offerings. E lsewhere, New Zealand’s m arket rose 0.2 per cent after its economy unexpectedly g rew in the second quarter. Singapore’s index was fractionally higher and Taiwan fell 1.9 per cent. India’s Sensex was down 0.1 per cent. “All the markets are overbought and people are waitingf or a reason or catalyst to take profits,” said Peter Lai, investment manager at DBS Vickers in Hong Kong. Some economic data from the US, the world’s largest e conomy, has showed signs of i mprovement but unemployment is likely to continue risi ng, resulting in a weak recovery, he said. Investors will watch closely what the Fed has to say about the economy and the scale of the recovery after its meeting wraps up Wednesday. TheF ed is widely expected to leave rock-bottom interest rates unchanged, though investors will be looking for clues in the central bank’s statement about when hikes m ight start. A lso toward the end of the week, markets will be focusing on the Group of 20 meeting of the world’s leading economies on Thursday andF riday in Pittsburgh. In the US Tuesday, the Dow Jones industrial average r ose 51.01, or 0.5 per cent, to 9 ,829.87, its highest close since October 6, when it finished at 9,956. T he broader Standard & P oor’s 500 index gained 7.00, or 0.7 per cent, to 1,071.66, while the Nasdaq composite index rose 8.26, or 0.4 per cent, to 2,146.30. Both indexes are at 11-month highs. Futures pointed to gains W ednesday on Wall Street. Dow futures were up 19, or 0.2 per cent, at 9,790. Oil prices hovered above $71 a barrel in Asia as signs of weak crude demand were offs et by a slumping US dollar. B enchmark crude for November delivery was down eight cents at $71.68 a barrel by late afternoon Singapore time in electronic trading on the NewY ork Mercantile Exchange. The contract added $1.83 a barrel to settle at $71.76 on T uesday. I n currencies, the dollar fell to 90.97 yen from 91.15 yen. The euro rose to $1.4795 from$ 1.4788. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1 .811.03AML Foods Limited1.141.03-0.111,0000.1270.0008.10.00% 1 1.809.90Bahamas Property Fund10.7510.750.000.9920.20010.81.86% 9 .305.90Bank of Bahamas5.905.900.000.2440.26024.24.41% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.00Cable Bahamas10.0310.030.001.4060.2507.12.49% 2.882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.002360.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.26Commonwealth Bank (S1 5.925.920.000.4190.30014.15.07% 3.851.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.623.44-0.180.1110.05231.01.51%2 .851.32Doctor's Hospital2.052.050.000.3820.0805.43.90% 8.206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.508.80Finco9.309.300.000.3220.52028.95.59% 11.7110.00FirstCaribbean Bank10.0010.000.000.7940.35012.63.50% 5.534.95Focol (S 4.994.990.000.3320.15015.03.01% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.27Freeport Concrete0.270.270.000.0350.0007.70.00% 9.025.49ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.009.98J. S. Johnson9.989.980.000.9520.64010.56.41% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100000 100000 FidelityBankNote13(SeriC)+ FBB13 10000 000 TUESDAY, 22 SEPTEMBER 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,513.89| CHG -0.77| %CHG -0.05 | YTD -198.47 | YTD % -11.59BISX LISTEDDEBTSECURITIES (BondstradeonaPercentagePricingbases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% BISXLISTED& TRADEDSECURITIES AS OF: 30May2013 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM| TELEPHONE:242-323-2330|FACSIMILE:242-323-232019 October 2022 InterestFINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31% 1000 . 00 1000 . 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 . 00 0 . 00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.607.92Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.00-2.2460.000N/M0.00% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref2.006.254.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.40381.3344CFAL Bond Fund1.40383.725.20 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8990-1.39-4.16 1.48921.4119CFAL Money Market Fund1.48923.875.47 3.60903.0941Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.0941-8.61-13.59 13.048412.3870Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.11363.935.87 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.40759.0775FidelityInternationalInvestmentFund9.33992.69-1.41 1.07071.0000FGFinancialPreferredIncomeFund1.07073.385.14 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0319-0.112.05 1.06731.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.06732.894.93BISXALLSHAREINDEX -19Dec02=1,000.00 YIELD -last12monthdividendsdividedbyclosingprice 52wk-Hi -Highestclosingpriceinlast52weeks Bid$ -BuyingpriceofColinaandFidelity 52wk-Low -Lowestclosingpriceinlast52weeks Ask $ -SellingpriceofColinaandfidelity PreviousClose -Previousday'sweightedpricefordailyvolume LastPrice -Lasttradedover-the-counterprice Today'sClose -Currentday'sweightedpricefordailyvolume WeeklyVol. -Tradingvolumeofthepriorweek Change -Changeinclosingpricefromdaytoday EPS$ -Acompany'sreportedearningspershareforthelast12mths DailyVol. -Numberoftotalsharestradedtoday NAV -NetAssetValue DIV$ -Dividendspersharepaidinthelast12months N/M -NotMeaningful P/E -Closingpricedividedbythelast12monthearnings FINDEX -TheFidelityBahamasStockIndex.January1,1994=100 (S)-4-for-1StockSplit-EffectiveDate8/8/2007 (S1)-3-for-1StockSplit-EffectiveDate7/11/200731-Aug-09 Prime + 1.75% 7% 31-Aug-09 30-Jun-09 31-Aug-09 NAV Date 31-Aug-09FidelityOver-The-CounterSecurities ColinaOver-The-CounterSecurities BISX ListedMutualFunds 30 May 2013 29 May 2015TOTRADECALL:COLINA242-502-7010|ROYALFIDELITY242-356-7764|FGCAPITALMARKETS242-396-4000|COLONIAL242-502-752531-Aug-09 30-Jun-09 31-Dec-07 31-Jul-09 31-Aug-09 11-Sep-09 31-Aug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sian markets lower as monthslong rally sputters

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 75F/24C Low: 75F/24C Low: 79F/26C Low: 78F/26C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 79F/26C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 91F/33C High: 91F/33C High: 89 F/32 C High: 89 F/32 C High: 88F/31C High: 88 F/31C High: 88F/31C Low: 76F/24C High: 89F/32C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 90F/32C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 76F/24C High: 88 F/31 C Low: 75F/24C High: 87 F/31 Low: 75F/24C High: 87F/31C Low: 76 F/24C High: 89F/32C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 89F/32C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 88F/31C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 87F/31C Low: 77F/25C High: 92 F/33 C Low: 76F/24C High: 89F/32C High: 88 F/31 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24 TH , 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Sun and some clouds with a shower. Patchy clouds with a stray shower. Partly sunny, a t-storm in spots. Brilliant sunshine. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 88 Low: 79 High: 89 High: 89 High: 88 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny. High: 88 Low: 77 Low: 78 Low: 78 AccuWeather RealFeel 99F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 82F 101-81F 94-84F 97-89F 103-85F Low: 77 TODAYTONIGHTFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................91F/33C Low ....................................................78F/26C Normal high ......................................87F/31C Normal low ........................................74F/24C Last year's high .................................. 90 F/32C Last year's low .................................. 77 F/25C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.15" Year to date ................................................30.51" Normal year to date ....................................36.74" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU First Full Last New Sep. 26 Oct. 4Oct. 11Oct. 18 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:59 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:04 p.m. Moonrise . . . 12:41 p.m. Moonset . . . . 11:17 p.m. Today Friday Saturday Sunday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 11:40 a.m.3.15:13 a.m.0.7 11:59 p.m.2.56:11 p.m.1.2 12:36 p.m.2.96:05 a.m.1.0 -----7:10 p.m.1.3 12:57 a.m.2.47:03 a.m.1.2 1:35 p.m.2.88:11 p.m.1.4 2:00 a.m.2.48:05 a.m.1.3 2:35 p.m.2.89:09 p.m.1.4 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco91/3279/26pc92/3379/26pc Amsterdam65/1851/10s63/1752/11pc Ankara, Turkey75/2343/6s77/2547/8pc Athens77/2564/17s79/2666/18pc Auckland65/1856/13r61/1653/11r Bangkok90/3277/25sh89/3178/25r Barbados86/3078/25pc87/3077/25pc Barcelona78/2563/17s75/2363/17s Beijing78/2554/12s75/2362/16pc Beirut79/2671/21s78/2572/22s Belgrade82/2758/14s76/2454/12pc Berlin65/1847/8s63/1746/7c Bermuda81/2774/23sh80/2670/21pc Bogota68/2038/3pc70/2141/5pc Brussels69/2046/7pc66/1846/7pc Budapest81/2756/13s73/2250/10pc Buenos Aires64/1746/7s68/2050/10pc Cairo90/3265/18s91/3268/20s Calcutta93/3384/28r91/3283/28r Calgary85/2939/3s74/2344/6s Cancun90/3273/22t89/3173/22t Caracas81/2772/22t82/2772/22t Casablanca83/2862/16s81/2761/16pc Copenhagen60/1550/10sh63/1752/11c Dublin61/1648/8pc63/1750/10pc Frankfurt64/1748/8c65/1847/8pc Geneva 73/22 54/12 pc 68/2050/10pc Halifax 64/17 45/7 pc 59/15 43/6 pc Havana 91/32 73/22 t 88/31 71/21 r Helsinki 57/13 39/3pc55/1250/10c Hong Kong 88/31 81/27 t 90/32 79/26s Islamabad 107/41 73/22 s 110/43 72/22 s Istanbul76/2464/17pc76/2463/17s Jerusalem 81/27 60/15s81/2759/15s Johannesburg 77/2554/12pc61/1652/11r Kingston 88/3180/26r89/3179/26sh Lima74/2357/13pc73/2258/14pc London70/2150/10pc70/2152/11s Madrid82/2754/12s82/2754/12s Manila86/3077/25t85/2976/24r Mexico City73/2254/12t73/2255/12t Monterrey82/2763/17c82/2764/17pc Montreal72/2246/7pc64/1745/7s Moscow55/1245/7c54/1241/5r Munich72/2251/10c61/1645/7c Nairobi87/3055/12pc88/3155/12s New Delhi 99/3779/26s101/3877/25s Oslo59/1548/8pc64/1752/11c Paris72/2254/12c70/2149/9s Prague 62/16 46/7 sh 64/17 45/7 pc Rio de Janeiro74/2365/18sh73/2265/18pc Riyadh99/3774/23s100/3773/22s Rome 82/27 61/16 s 82/27 61/16 s St. Thomas88/3179/26pc88/3180/26s San Juan79/2645/7s86/3049/9s San Salvador 87/30 73/22 t 87/30 73/22 t Santiago 73/2248/8s64/1743/6c Santo Domingo87/3074/23sh86/3073/22r Sao Paulo 65/18 54/12 r 67/19 60/15s Seoul79/2659/15pc79/2658/14pc Stockholm 55/12 41/5 r 63/17 52/11 pc Sydney 73/22 55/12 s81/2759/15s Taipei89/3177/25sh88/3177/25pc T okyo 79/26 66/18 s 77/25 66/18 s T oronto 74/2350/10pc64/1748/8s Trinidad82/2764/17c90/3272/22pc V ancouver 66/18 50/10 s 65/1854/12pc Vienna 70/2155/12pc64/1750/10pc W arsaw 64/17 50/10 c 63/17 48/8 pc Winnipeg 77/25 54/12 s 73/2255/12pc H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles86F Friday:E at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles86F Today:E at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles86F Friday:E at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles86F Today:E at 8-16 Knots3-6 Feet10 Miles85F Friday:E at 8-16 Knots3-5 Feet6 Miles85F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque68/2049/9pc78/2555/12s Anchorage47/841/5r49/941/5r Atlanta86/3069/20pc87/3067/19c Atlantic City86/3056/13t70/2145/7s Baltimore85/2958/14t75/2351/10s Boston77/2554/12pc66/1845/7s Buffalo74/2348/8pc65/1845/7s Charleston, SC87/3070/21pc86/3065/18c Chicago81/2755/12pc71/2156/13r Cleveland77/2552/11pc74/2350/10s Dallas75/2357/13t80/2662/16pc Denver60/1540/4sh66/1844/6pc Detroit79/2653/11pc71/2151/10s Honolulu89/3175/23s89/3176/24s Houston82/2768/20t85/2973/22t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday TodayFridayTodayFriday Indianapolis81/2759/15t79/2657/13r Jacksonville87/3072/22t90/3271/21pc Kansas City74/2356/13pc76/2453/11c Las Vegas96/3566/18s99/3771/21s Little Rock79/2663/17t78/2564/17t Los Angeles94/3466/18s90/3264/17s Louisville85/2964/17t83/2864/17r Memphis83/2869/20t84/2869/20t Miami88/3179/26pc89/3179/26pc Minneapolis77/2559/15pc69/2054/12r Nashville88/3167/19t83/2868/20t New Orleans89/3176/24t89/3176/24t New York82/2762/16t68/2052/11s Oklahoma City75/2352/11c78/2555/12c Orlando91/3275/23t92/3375/23pc Philadelphia84/2861/16t73/2253/11s Phoenix 97/36 72/22 s 100/3775/23s Pittsburgh78/2554/12pc73/2249/9s Portland, OR 77/2552/11s79/2653/11s Raleigh-Durham 89/31 66/18 pc 80/26 58/14 pc St. Louis82/2764/17t74/2363/17t Salt Lake City 78/25 55/12 pc 84/2855/12s San Antonio 74/23 62/16 t 84/28 67/19 pc San Diego83/2863/17s80/2664/17pc San Francisco 77/25 55/12 pc 79/2657/13pc Seattle69/2048/8s72/2252/11s T allahassee 92/3372/22t92/3371/21pc T ampa 91/32 75/23 t 91/32 76/24t Tucson91/3264/17s95/3565/18s W ashington, DC 86/30 62/16t78/2554/12s UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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RELIGIOUS NEWS, STORIES AND CHURCH EVENTS The Tribune THURSDAY September 24, 2009

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The Tribune PG 22 Thursday, September 24 , 2009 RELIGION By REUBEN SHEARER Tribune Features Reporter WITH the national average down for the Fall 2009 BGCSE examinations-dropping to a ‘D’ this academic year, there is no doubt that many class of 2009 gr aduat es received reject letters from local colleges they desired to attend this semester. For such persons, this desire to continue their education was tarnished, leaving them with little option, which includes finding work in a depr essing job market. One institution is of fering an alter native solution for such individuals, with a message of hope. Hope College, located on JFK Drive in the Christian Life Centr e (CLC pitched its degr ee programs to the public in an open house over the weekend, and began r egistering new students for the Fall 2009 academic year . The Christian based college, spar eheaded by the Assemblies of Brethren in the Bahamas is targeting those whose aspirations for higher education were tarnished by unsatisfactory BGCSE results, Dr June Wilson, Research and Education Dir ector at the college told The T ribune yester day. In addition to secular training, the college seeks to equip persons interested in entering Christian ministry, providing an at-home ministry training experience however, for aspiring church-workers in the Associate of Arts Divinity degree (A. T.H.). Institutes that offer Biblical studies at home are very limited; leaving aspiring pastors with a starkly brisk decision where they should receive their ministr y training. “Chur ch members who want to take on leadership positions but don’ t have knowledge on Biblical principles can equip themselves with these classes and upgrade themselves so that they can be impactful in ministry,” said Dr Wilson. Studies show that the success of church’s growth,and impact in the community it is in, is directly attributed to whether the church’s pastor has received any formal biblical training. “When it comes to the school of divinity, leaders and members can take those classes and not necessarily enroll in Associate degree programs at this time but they will r eceive certificate verifying that they completed the class,” she explained. Courses offered in the School of Divinity include: BIB 193 Biblical Interpretation and Hermeneutics, MIN 403 Homiletics, TH 202 Systematic Theology I, and TH 401 Women of the Bible. In a press statement to Tribune Religion , representatives expressed their vision as follows for the college: “The mission of Hope College is to educate students for lives of leadership and courage in the global envir onment, through academic and co-circular HOPE COLLEGE T O OFFER RELIGIOUS DEGREES SEE page 26 FACULTY and board members of Hope College shown here at an Open House over the weekend.

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LASTSunday evening the discussion centered around the topic of revival. The approach took the form of four questions and the persons present wer e invited to give individual responses. The answers are not in any particular order of importance. You are also invited to engage in the same exercise. Before r eading the suggestions, write your answers down if you like, and foster dialogue between members of your family colleagues, fellowship gr oups, or church sisters and brothers and amoung the youth. Add more questions and be prayerfully open to the movement of the Spirit. QUES TION #1 WHA T ARE THE SIGNS OF REVIVAL? 1. Care and concern for others 2. Engaging in personal spiritual devotions and disciplines 3. Young people worshipping regularly and with enthusiasm 4. A deep love for the Lord 5. Love in the heart and kindness towards others 6. Involvement in chur ch activities 7. T estimonies, occasional altar calls 8. For giveness, healing and joy QUESTION #2 BLOCKS TO REVIVAL 1. Laziness 2. Resistance to change 3. Not being holy as God’s people. 4. Not accepting God’s condition, “ if you turn to me...confess, then I will heal” 5. Lack of a Ninevah-like spirit of r epentance 6. A mind-set fixed in stone 7. Limited resources 8. Pushing our own agenda, not God’s agenda QUESTION #3 HOW CAN WE HELP AS THE CHURCH 1. Ongoing prayer both personal and corporate 2.Sermons, seminars, workshops, teaching, and prayer ministry 3. The alliance of ar ea ministers to combine their efforts and prayers 4. To be open and expectant as a people QUESTION #4 HOW CAN I HELP AS AN INDIVIDUAL? The Tribune Thursday, September 24 , 2009 PG 23 RELIGION Do we need a revival? REV.ANGELA C BOSFIELD PALACIOUS MEDITATION Share your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your stor y.

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THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS The Tribune PG 24 Thursday, September 24 , 2009 RELIGION History of Trinity Methodist Church Nassau TRINITY Methodist Church, Nassau, Bahamas was founded in 1861 and was opened for worship in 1865. The District Synod's report of 1861 s tates: "The new chapel (Trinity) has not yet been commenced, the builder's estimate of costs being so much in advance of the contemplated expenditure, it is wisely judged that delay is preferable to embarrassment!" However, the foundation stone of the new church was laid on August 21, 1861by His Honour Charles Nesbitt, Esq. Lieutenant-Governor of the Bahamas. It was estimated that the new chapel would cost about ,200. Plans wer e furnished by W.W. Pocock, Esq of London.The building was intended to serve as a Chapel and a schoolroom and to accommodate a congregation of 800 persons. However , difficulties were experienced as the work progressed. Due to the CivilW ar in the United States of America, the builder was unable to get timber fr om the souther n states. In addition, in 1864 an epidemic of yellow fever struck Nassau and four of the carpenters imported from Glasgow to work on the chur ch died, and the r emaining two fled to the United States of America. In a letter to the Mission House in London, Rev Hilton Cheesbrough, Minister of Trinity Church and District Superintendent, writes: "Trinity Church was of ficially opened on April 2, 1865 at a cost of ,000 of which the Government gave ,000." Writing to the Methodist Missionary Society in 1866 Rev Cheesbrough states: "On the evening of September 30, 1866 whilst conducting divine service in our beautiful Trinity Chapel in this city, a fresh breeze was blowing from the north ... " The next day October 1, 1866 Trinity Church was completely demolished by this "fresh breeze" which turned out to be the worst hurricane this city has experienced to date. This hurricane destroyed or badly damaged ten Methodist chapels. The "Nassau Guar dian", a daily news paper, says in its October 3, 1866 issue: "The Wesleyans, we believe, suffered most, their new and beautiful Trinity Chapel, Frederick Street, with its large and power ful organ being entirely demolished, leaving only the class and schoolrooms beneath entire. Before Rev Cheesbrough left the Colony in 1869 the Church had been rebuilt, and he was its first minister. Rev Cheesbrough is described as an able and eloquent preacher, a wise administrator, and a kind and sympathetic friend. He died in Liverpool, England on May 17,1882. On September 16, 1928, T rinity Chur ch again suf fered considerable damage by another hurricane. Two-thirds of its roof at its western end was blown away. The galler y disappeared and the remains of the pipe organ was found in the basement. The minister of the church at that time, Rev Walter H Richards, M.B.E., and the tr ustees had insured the building for its full value, and this sum was sufficient to r estor e the chur ch building to its former glor y . The building was restored by Fred Dillet, one of Nassau's pr emier builders of a bygone era. Restoration took just over a year and during that period members worshipped in Victoria Hall, the building which formerly housed Queen's College, a Methodist School. A new organ from a firm in Connecticut, USA was installed in 1929, and gave excellent service for 36 years. In 1964, a three manual Wick's organ was installed. Trinity's beautiful stained glass windows were installed in 1973 and dedicated on Trinity Sunday, June 17, 1973. In 1960 during the ministry of Rev Harold Slater (1957-1962 building was thoroughly renovated. It was painted, the pews and the floor revarnished and a new r ed floor matting laid. Due to the generosity of the late PM Lightbourne, an elevator was installed at the western end of the church for the benefit of the elderly and those not so old. The basement hall and classr ooms were renovated for the use of youth groups and men's and women's meetings after the depar tur e of the Queen's College Pr eparatory Department in September 1961 to their new campus on Village Road. Fr om 1865 to 1986, Trinity Church had 30 ministers. T wenty-eight of them came from the United Kingdom and two from the Caribbean and the Americas. Ministers who served were as follows: Hilton Cheesbrough (1865-1869 Henry Bleby (1869 Richar dson (1879-1884 (1884-1889); Thomas Raspass (18891891); Geor ge Lester (1892-1896 Frederick W. Gostick (1896-1904.H.F. "Willie" Bleby (1904-1916 Eardley (1916-1921.T. Kilbride (1921); T. H. Howitt (1923-1925.H. Richards, M.B.E. (1925-1931 Nelson (1932. Rossiter (1932 V osper Paget (1932-1937 Clarke (1937-1947.H. Armstrong (1947-1950. Start (1950-1952 Willie Rhodes (1952 -1955 Jones (1954-1956illiam T Makepeace (1955-19571957-1962F rank E Poad (1960-1974 Blackburn (1962 -1966 Livingstone (1966-1968 Johns (1968-1972 (1972); Eric St. C Clarke (19761978); John Bilverstone (1978-1980); Nymphas R Edwards (1980 to 1986 Since 1986, Bahamian Ministers, Rev Henley Perry and Rev Franklyn Knowles served and during the period of the autonomy issue American ministers, including Rev Gene Zimmerman filled in. Another Bahamian, Rev Bill Higgs, has been the Minister at Trinity since January 2000. In September 1986, Eddie Sykes of the United Kingdom was appointed by the Bahamas/T urks & Caicos Islands District of the Methodist Church to serve as aY outh W orker at Trinity. He made a positive impact on the young people of the community . Trinity now has a crche and Children's Storytime. Their scholarship fund assists able students to attend Queen's College. T rinity Methodist Chur ch has had an interesting history during which time it worked energetically for the Kingdom of God. Over the years this Church has made a significant contribution to the religious, social, economic and political life of the Bahamas. It has a str ong Bible Study Group, A Cottage Prayer Group, A Soup Kitchen and a Ministr y to the Poor. Today as always it 'seeks to serve the present age' by becoming more involved in some of the pressing social problems of the community of which it is a part and to be faithful to the calling of her Lord and Master , Jesus Christ. JIM LAWLOR Part 45 REV’DDeacon Bradley Hayward Miller will be ordained to the Sacred Priesthood by Rever end Laish Zane Boyd, Sr on T uesday , September 29, The Feast of St Michael and All Angels. The concelebrated mass will take place at historic Christ Chur ch Cathedral, Geor ge Street, at 7pm.The chief celebrant will be Bishop Boyd, who will be assisted by con-celebrants Reverend Drexel Gomez, Rev’d Gilbert Thompson and Rev’d Fr G Kingsley Knowles. Rev’d Fr Rodney Bur r ows will deliver the sermon. A descendant of Green Castle, Eleuthera, Deacon Miller received his early education at the Green Castle Primar y School, and Rock Sound Senior High (now Pr eston H Albury).He is a graduate of The College of The Bahamas, where he attained an Associate’s Degree in Biblical Studies. In 2006 he entered Codrington Theological College, Barbados, and graduated in 2008 with a Diploma in Theology and Pastoral Studies. He is currently the Assistant Curate at Christ the King Church, Ridgeland Park, W est. Deacon Miller is mar ried to the former Vernalee Duncombe and they are the parents of six children. Deacon Miller to be ordained to the Sacred Priesthood DEACON Bradley Miller (on the right assists Fr Enrique Miller during a midday mass held in the chapel of Addington House yesterday . Deacon Miller will be ordained to the priesthood next Tuesday.

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IT ISamazing how easy it is these days to get a group of people to gather a nd protest. The slightest problem at a worksite results in people leaving their work station to go outside to demonstrate, bearing placards. Sometimes it is a lunch-time demonstration. Sometimes the demonstration makes the city centre of Bay Street, often with the general public not fully aware of the rationale for the public show of displeasure. When a church, the place where Christians meet for corporate prayer and worship to almighty God, is razed, or in Bahamian language, 'yucked outof the ground', and there is no mass outcr y and mass public demonstration of Christians from everywhere in the nation, ther e must be a message being sent, and I am not quite sure what it is. Our hear ts palpitate at a media r epor t of vandals breaking and entering a chur ch and desecrating the altar . What do we feel when, because of a dispute, an entir e chur ch building is willfully demolished? Being aware of those in the 'moneyed class' who often wait with bated br eath to defend their honour in the cour t sys tem against anything /anyone they per ceive to be libelous, I would declare my intention at the outset, which is not to malign anyone's good name. My intention is to cause fellow Christians to reflect on their position and the mess age they send when they choose silence in the face of opposition (as in Ephesians 6:12). In early 2007, the general public and members of Firetrail Ministries Church pastored by Dave and Michelle Baker, saw their church and the foundation for their new church on the adjacent property demolished, only to be replaced by homes in the private subdivision on Fire Trail Road which was later named 'Ros Davis Estates' by the developer . Some years ago, r esidents living in eastern New Pr ovidence served by Prince Charles Drive tearfully experienced ther esult of heavy equipment demolishing a portion of the new church building being constr ucted by Rhema Christian Ministries, pastored by Pastors Eugene& Dr Rosetta V Clare, obviously the r esult of an unresolved dispute. In mid September , 2009, the news media r epor ted the demolition of the Canaan Baptist Church and there were fur ther media r eports that other church buildings could face the same fate. All of these matters have business, financial and legal sides, to which I do not speak. I draw attention to the spir itual side. In all that is happening in our little country today, can Christians “look the other way” when a “House of God”, a Christian church in a 'Christian nation' is smashed and removed to make way for commercial housing w orks? Prophets and prophetesses of the Bahamas--what is God saying about His houses of prayer being “yucked up?” God the Father, in Jesus Christ, was greatly upset even when the activities in His house were inappropriate (see Luke 19:46). Will God judge His “called out” ones, His Ecclesia, for being so silent when churches are being demolished? Bishop Ian Brathwaite's fellowship gr oup called “Pastors of Prayer” r eportedly labeled the Canaan Baptist Chur ch tragedy as the “darkest day” in the history of the church in The Bahamas. (See TRIBUNE RELI GION, September 17, 2009). Well, it is not the first blackout, and, r eportedly, there are more dark days ahead Some years ago, the public will recall, fr om the media, Temple Christian Academy discover ed that a por tion of their new school building under con struction was sitting on land reportedly owned by Thompson T rading Company. As the latter entity had not yet been built on Shirley Str eet, there was an obvious mistake, by someone, some persons or some entities. I well r emem ber the public outcry by Christians generally and by churches connected to that denomination and Fellowship. In this case, this was a Christian SCHOOL. We are talking today about churches being uprooted. Can actions of this nature be pleasing to God? If they ar e not, will this nation not be held accountable and judged for their apathetic silence? In promoting the 2009 Artist Against Violence Concert initiative, Prime Minister Huber t Ingraham quoted 18th century politician, Edmund Burke, who said that all that is necessar y for the triumph of ( the forces of ) evil is that good men do nothing. I feel that his words are worthy of deep, deep consideration, over and over again, by all of us, especially pr ofessing Christians Dr Albert S. Ferguson, J.P ., is a former senior-level corporate manager, a former Associate Professor of Management Studies, an ordained Minister of Religion for over 30 years and a transformational leader. Contact Dr Ferguson at email albertsferguson@gmail.com. The Tribune T hursday, September 24 , 2009 PG 25 RELIGION When church folks couldn’t care less ! DR ALBERT S. FERGUSON,JP It is indeed amazing how our nation's foundation was built on Christian val ues yet every now and then we still manage to put "old wives fables” into our mindset. I was thinking about my name and how common it is. This does not bother me, because I know within myself that there is only one me. In January of (while employed at The Tribune) one of the funeral homes brought in their obituaries. Immediately my inter est was sparked because one of the deceased persons was named Allison Miller . When I explained to the funeral home worker why I was staring at the photo, he said jokingly to me, "well you better strap ya back." At first I didn't know how to r espond to his remark but realised that I could not let that put fear in me. So I said to him, "You know what, it doest matter what happens, when it is my time to go I will. Since there are some things that God still has for me to do and I want to do them, I don't think that will be anytime soon." He looked at me as if to say, "well that's true, you will be fine." You see for me God has the last say in all things. Only what he says r eally matters. However, that does not excuse the fact that life and death is in the power of the tongue. Many times we allow people to say negative things in and over our lives and we don't cancel it with the word of God which speaks life to us. Negativity just ends up playing out in our lives. W e have to cancel the negative things spoken over our lives. This gentleman meant no harm, he thought that he was doing me a favor by telling me to protect myself r egar dless of the manner he said it in. However, I had to cancel the deadly joke that was spoken to me. The Bible tells us to “let a thing be established in the mouth of two or thr ee witness” (Matt 18:16 important that we know the word of God and the power that words have whether it is a joke or not. Sometimes things ar e said in casual conversation and we just let it go without even being awar e of the negative things that can happen to us. Because we don't cancel negative words spoken over and in our lives, wor ds take root and destroy many lives. In a harsh and hurtful conversation I was told that, "I won't have anything, I won't be anyone, I don't count and I should die." If I did not omit them, those wor ds would probably be my story. I know that the Devil is a liar and those words won't happen. God Almighty is Alpha and Omega and only what He says matters and will stand. We have to cancel negative words said in and over our lives. It does not matter if it was said casually or jok ingly , they still have to be omitted bot tom line. God gave us His words which is truth and life. Let's speak that over and in our lives and the lives of others. ‘Strap ya back’ ALLISON MILLER Our hearts palpitate at a media report of vandals breaking and entering a church and desecrating the altar. What do we feel when, because of a dispute, an entire church building is willfully demolished?

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The Tribune PG 26 Thursday, September 24 , 2009 RELIGION F AMIL Y and Friends of Rebecca W illiams last week said goodbye to the matriarch last Saturday in Cat Island. She was 86. Mrs Williams or Ma “Becca” as she was af fectionately called was an avid Anglican, a cor nerstone in the community and a pillar in the Anglican Church. Her funeral was held at the St Andrew’s Anglican Church in Arthur’s Town, the church where she had been baptisied, confirmed and married. She was described as a “ giant of a lady and saluted as a modern day heroine. She was one of the island's premier ambassadors who enter tained prime ministers, dignitaries, bishops, priests and deacons. She was also remembered for going above and beyond the call of duty in her devotion to the Anglican Chur ch. She deliver ed a yeoman service organising many bake sales, cook outs and church programs. Tributes were given by George Johnson (Anglican Church Men President -St. Saviour's Parish) her niece Cleomie Burrows, Rose Pratt Rolle, Charles' Dommie' King, Island Administrator for Cat Island District and Canon Warren Rolle. In his ser mon Edwar d 'Rex' Seymour Assistant Priest for St Saviour's Parish said Ma Becka displayed many strong attributes and exemplified what every member should of fer their God, priest and chur ch in terms of true and laudable service without seeking any personal fame or remuneration. Fr Chester Burton, Priest in Charge of St Saviour's Parish challenged the family and friends to leave a legacy just as Ma Becka left an indelible mark on the pages of the Anglican Chur ch and in the Arthurs Town community and in the wider Cat Island community. Ma Becca laid to rest in her birth place Cat Island FAMILY and Friends of Rebecca Williams last week said goodbye to the matriarch last Saturday in Cat Island. She was 86. p rogrammes of recognised excellence in the context of the historical Christian f aith.” “Hope College plans to operate on Bible-based principles, and has a nondenominational posture to attract students of all religious backgrounds.” e are trying to reach high school graduates who are not equipped to enter college,” Dr Wilson explained. “There are many who have graduated high school, but haven’t had the qualifications to enter a college.” The College will offer BGCSE and PreCollege Classes in English, Math, History, Geography, Biology, Religious Knowledge, Accounts and Economics at $350 per course. As it stands, the Ministry of Education does not have a systematic approach to dealing with persons who miserably fail BGCSE subject tests. Before the written examination is taken, students must complete suf ficient coursework. e’re really focusing on the exam, and what it takes to get them through the exam. We are screening faculty and staff who have taken students through the BGCSE with a successful track record of students who passed. Guidelines for acceptance into a program of study at the College of the Bahamas require that students pass at least 5 of the major BGCSE’s. If the student passes at least 3 of the examinations, they are required to take college prep courses that don’ t credit toward their degree program. If they meet neither standar d--unsuc cessfully completing at least 3 BGCSE’-they are referred to the Bahamas Baptist College to bring themselves up to speed. Hope College of fers an alternative however, and will register students for its Fall semester up to next week. Financial assistance opportunities and payment plans are available for incoming fr eshmen students. According to Barton Duncanson, chairman of the school’s steering committee, they have been “working consistently over the last few months to ensur e that the facilities, programs and plans are in place to accomplish the fall semester opening of October 5.” New Student orientation will take place on that date. Plans for Associate and Bachelor s degrees in The Arts, Business Administration, Education, and Divinity are tentative for January 2010. Admissions applications for the school are available at the college’s campus at the Christian Life Centre on John F Kennedy Drive. To be considered for admission, first time students, transfer students, continuing education and diploma students must provide the following: -completed application form -$25 application fee -Official high school transcript -Letter of Recommendation Hope College to offer Religious Degrees FROM page 22

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The Tribune Thursday, September 24 , 2009 PG 27 RELIGION n Did you recently give birth to the newest little angel on earth? Have you and your belovedr ecently tied the knot? Is your church planning a special event? Tribune Religion wants to hear fr om you! W e want to know about the special things going on in your life, so go ahead and send in your wedding photographs, birth announcements and chur ch activities schedule to be posted in upcoming Tribune Religion sections. This ser vice is free. Send all information, including (especially) photographs, to features@tribunemedia.net. Infor mation can be hand delivered to The Tribune at Shirley and Deveaux Streets or call the Religion section @ 502.2368. RELIGIOUS NOTES COCONUT Grove Temple will hold its five day long SpiritualW arfare Conference 2009 on September 27October 2 at the church on Coconut Grove and Crooked Island Street. The conference is being held under the t heme “ Weapons of Power Spiritual Warfare and Prophetic Move.” Sessions begin 7 pm nightly. Speakers throughout the week will include Roger Williams Conference Host (Coconut Grove Temple), Bishop Lindo WallaceHost Pastor ( Coconut Grove Temple), Evangelist Origin Deleveaux (First Baptist Church Minister Antonio Rolle (Kingdom Come Ministries), Evangelist Alisa Collie (Living Faith Seventh Day Adventist), Prophet Don Clarke (First Baptist Church Evangelist Marie McDonald (Coconut Grove Temple A Comm-Uni-TeeSocial event will be held at the Gardens of Gray’s Music Center on September 26 at pm. There will be local Bahamian entertainers, refreshments, and giveaways. This social event is uplifting, empowering, and the host of the event is requesting a donation of $15 for adults and $2 for children under the age of 12. ] ] WE W ANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!! ANGLICANSrecently marked the Feast of Title of Holy Cross in Dumfries, Cat Island by turning out in droves to welcome Fr Bernard Been, the assistant priest at St Agnes Parish Blue Hill Road, New Providence. It was Fr Been first visit to the church and he took his text from the parable of the Good Samaritian from the gospel of Luke. He told the congr egation that “everyone in the church is on a journey and we cannot manipulate this tr ek without Almighty God”. He added that the whole Anglican community be they Cat Islanders, Abaconians or Exumians will one day complete this ar duous task and be called to give an account of the way they live, adding that no bishop, priest or deacon can answer or defend anyone's jour ney . Only the person who completes their own course can do this task,he explained. After the mass, members mar ched to T ur ning Point Resturant and Bar for lunch. Cat Islanders celebrate Holy Cross Anglican Chur ch Feast of T itle

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The Tribune PG 28 Thursday, September 24 , 2009 RELIGION CHURCH WEEK OF THE St Christopher Church, located in Lyford Cay and led by Deacon Keith Cartwright has been established for many years. Their dedication to the Anglican faith and to the peo ple of this country has brought them recognition and appreciation throughout the years.