Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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BAHAMAS EDITION

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009

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Save Jett wavena

Jurors hear of
efforts to revive
film star’s son



By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

JURORS in the trial of for-
mer PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater and former ambu-
lance driver Tarino Light-
bourne heard several accounts
yesterday of the efforts made
to revive an unresponsive Jett
Travolta as prosecutors opened
their case in the Supreme
Court.

Jett Travolta, 16, the son of
Hollywood actors John Travol-
ta and Kelly Preston died in
Freeport, Grand Bahama on
January 2. Opening the case for
the prosecution yesterday
Director of Public Prosecutions
Bernard Turner said that fol-
lowing Jett’s death, contact was
made with certain persons to
communicate a threat to Mr
Travolta regarding the release
of potentially damaging state-
ments if money were not paid.

SURLY ET)



Former PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater and former para-
medic Tarino Lightbourne are
accused of attempting to extort
$25 million from the Hollywood
actor,

Mr Travolta flies in this
morning to be the first witness
when the case resumes today.
He will be accompanied by his
wife.

SEE page eight

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Tim Clarke/
Tribune ae
staff

AN inmate at Her Majesty's Prison accused of
the murder of a fellow inmate was arraigned in

Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Preston Moss, 36, is charged with the murder
of Lloyd Albury. Albury died on September 10,
two days after he was admitted to hospital fol-



PRESTON MOSS, 36, was charged yesterday with the murder of Lloyd Albury.

lowing a fight in a cell at the prison. Albury, 55,

Climate change seen as threat to Bahamas

EFFECTS from the threat of
climate change could prove
damaging to the Bahamas'
economy, according to Tourism
and Aviation Minister Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace.

A recent study by the World
Bank placed the Bahamas
among the top three of the
most vulnerable Caribbean
countries when it comes to cli-
mate change, emphasizing the
need for a pro-active stance to
curb more damaging effects.

“We know that we cannot
run away from the issues of sea
level rise, salt water intrusions,
beach and shore erosion, and
the many other impacts of cli-

mate change that confront us.

‘Your presence here is a demon-
stration of your commitment to
act before it’s too late,” said Mr
Vanderpool-Wallace during
day one of the Caribsave Coun-
try Partners Symposium.

The World Bank report also
revealed that a five-metre
change in sea level rise could
result in damage to the econo-
my that amounts to 3.5 per cent
of Gross Domestic Product
(GDP) for Surinam.

“Tn the case of the Bahamas,
it estimates that the same level

SEE page eight

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was reportedly imprisoned on a vagrancy charge.

Moss, was arraigned on the murder charge
yesterday before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez
in Court 1, Bank Lane.

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Teachers

Stage ‘sit-in’
protests

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AROUND 200 teach-
ers at three public schools
in New Providence staged

“sit-in’s” yesterday to
protest inadequate
staffing and poor work-
ing conditions.

The industrial action at
Uriah McPhee, Anatol
Rodgers and CI Gibson,
which began Friday has
postponed education for
thousands of students
across New Providence.

At CI Gibson the
action compounded secu-
rity issues at the school
as 11 knives and an ice-
pick were found on the
school property yester-
day, according to reports.

Teachers began taking
action on Monday over

SEE page six



Burger King offers
reward to help
capture killer

By MEGAN REYNOLDS

Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

BURGER King have offered
a $10,000 reward for any infor-
mation that will lead to the
arrest or conviction of those
responsible for the murder of
restaurant manager Rashad
Morris.

Mr Morris, 21, of John
Street, off Baillou Hill Road,
was brutally beaten and
stabbed at the Burger King
restaurant on Harrold Road,
western New Providence,
where he was found dead early
Sunday morning.

SEE page six

OoiiliaBrceenel
63rd homicide

FOLLOWING two bru-
tal murders Sunday, the
country last night recorded
its 63rd homicide.

Details were still sketchy
at press time, but police
said a young man who had
travelled to the Seagrapes
shopping centre on Prince
Charles Drive by car at
Spm got into an altercation
with another man at the
plaza.

The dispute got out of
hand and the victim was
stabbed several times dur-
ing the skirmish. He was
rushed to hospital by
ambulance, but police said
he was unresponsive by
this time. He died a short
time later, at about 7pm.
The matter is being investi-
gated.





PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009



THE TRIBUNE

Campaign highlighting opposition to
sea turtles ban ‘gaining momentum’

Petition has
‘two or three
thousand’
signatures

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A Bahamas-wide campaign
aiming to highlight opposition
to the outright ban on har-
vesting sea turtles has “gained
plenty of momentum”,
according to one of its organ-
isers.

Abner Pinder, fisherman
and chief councillor for Span-
ish Wells, claims “two or
three thousand” signatures
have already been added to
a petition against the ban
launched earlier this month
and more are expected when
all of the Family Islands send
in the signatures attached to
petitions circulated there.

Mr Pinder, along with
numerous other fishermen
and opponents of the ban -
which extends to the taking
or catching of any marine tur-
tles, turtle parts or eggs, for
commercial use or otherwise —
hopes to persuade the gov-
ernment to reverse its posi-
tion and continue to allow
Bahamians to harvest turtles
for personal consumption.

Gathered together on Sep-
tember 3, two days after the
ban was officially enacted in
the name of conservation,

Wr
RU

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
acral) |



A STOCK PHOTO of a sea turtle.

“Turtles are increasing in the
Bahamas on a daily basis but nobody —
(The Department of) Fisheries or any-
body — will go out there to try to do any
type of survey (of the numbers),
because they know that if they did it
would defeat what they are saying.”



they charged that, contrary to
the government and environ-
mentalist’s views that the tur-
tles are in danger of being
wiped out, the creatures are
“plentiful” in Bahamian
waters.

Activists

Their efforts, however,
have already raised the ire of
local environmental activists.

Having hailed the ban as
“wonderful” in August after
pushing for years for the gov-
ernment to enact it, Kim
Aranha, founder of the
Bahamas Sea Turtle Conser-
vation Group, charged that
those against the ban are

Abner Pinder

“speaking from ignorance”.

She noted that the
BSTCG’s own petition
against the slaughter of sea
turtles in the Bahamas gar-
nered around 5,000 signa-
tures.

Meanwhile, Mr Pinder said:
“Turtles are increasing in the
Bahamas on a daily basis but
nobody — (The Department
of) Fisheries or anybody — will
go out there to try to do any
type of survey (of the num-
bers), because they know that
if they did it would defeat
what they are saying.”

The petition against the ban
states: “I do not agree that
the government should ban
all harvesting or eating of tur-

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tle meat by Bahamians, rather
I believe that control or ban-
ning of commercial harvest-
ing and the slaughter of tur-
tles in public are enough to
address the needs of both

environmentalism and
humanity.”
Commercial

Mr Pinder stressed that
most opponents of the ban
are primarily concerned with
ensuring turtles can still be
captured for personal con-
sumption, and are happy to
allow the part of the ban
which relates to commercial
harvesting to remain.

The affect on the overall
turtle population of allowing
individuals to catch them to
eat would be “infinitesimal,”
he suggested.

He claims that although the
ban has been enacted as an
amendment to the Fisheries
Regulations, it is critical that
the opponents make their
voices heard before the next
parliamentary session begins
on September 30 as this is
expected to provide an oppor-
tunity for the ban to be fur-
ther cemented in law.

DISCOVER



Ue TAT At dG Ae
eT og ate SL

BY MATT MAURA



Dorsette’s, Mangrove
Cay - The relaunching of
primary healthcare services
at the Mangrove Cay Com-
munity Clinic will allow for
the “adequate and timely
delivery of high-quality
healthcare” to the residents
of Mangrove Cay, Health
Minister Dr. Hubert Min- — >
nis said. HEALTH MINISTER Dr Hubert Minnis

The relaunching took (centre) prepares to tour the newly
place on Friday, September renovated Mangrove Cay Communi-
18, and is part of the contin- ty Clinic following the relaunching of
uing reconstruction/renova- primary healthcare services in Dorset-
tions of primary healthcare te’s, Friday, September 17. Pictured
facilities throughout the with Dr. Minnis from left: Gina Ben-
Family Islands. Relaunching nett-Rolle, Nursing Officer 1/Clinic
ceremonies have already Supervisor and Patrice Bowleg, Nurs-
taken place in Kemp’s Bay, ing Officer Il. Picewell Forbes, Mem-
South Andros; Nicholls ber of Parliament for South Andros is
Town, North Andros, and pictured in the background.

Grand Cay, North Abaco.

More are scheduled for other parts of the Bahamas. Con-
structed 24 years ago with funding from the National Insurance
Board, the Community Clinic was renovated at a cost of
$500,000. Dr. Minnis said the relaunching of services will allow
healthcare professionals on Mangrove Cay to address those
aspects of primary healthcare that focus on health promotion,
disease prevention and self-empowerment, particularly in the
fight against chronic, non-communicable diseases (CNCDS)
and other public health threats.

“The residents of Mangrove Cay, like those elsewhere in the
Bahamas, are primarily affected by the increasing rates of obe-
sity, hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, cancer, asthma and
other types of chronic, non-communicable diseases, as well as
those related to alcohol consumption,” Dr. Minnis said.

“Now that the clinic building has been renovated, operations
will improve due to the fact that the District Medical Officer will
be able to remain overnight in the facility and the fact that the
clinic will be connected to the Central Patient Record Infor-
mation System which will allow physicians in New Providence
to review the medical records of patients in Mangrove Cay.”

Dr. Minnis said the upgrades to primary healthcare facilities
throughout the Bahamas is part of the Ministry of Health’s
overall objective of ensuring that healthcare facilities through-
out the country are provided with the necessary emergency
medical equipment, and that training opportunities are pro-
vided to ensure that the current knowledge and skills of persons
providing healthcare services, are maintained.

He said as a result, the buildings formerly used to house the
clinic and nurses’ residence in Mangrove Cay, in addition to the
former nurses’ residence in Kemp’s Bay, will be renovated and
used to facilitate the training of medical and nursing students and
physicians from the University of the West Indies’ Bahamas
campus who are pursing post-graduate studies in Family Med-
icine. The Health Minister said officials from the Public Hos-
pitals Authority are also scheduled to provide First Responders
training for residents of Mangrove Cay and Kemp’s Bay, which
should also auger well for the provision of timely services to the
community. “All that remains is for the residents of Mangrove
Cay to work with their healthcare providers to reduce the num-
ber of persons developing chronic, non-communicable diseases
as well as injuries resulting from negative and unhealthy lifestyle
choices and violence,” Dr. Minnis added.



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THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS



Ocourt short

Man charged
with Freeport's
eighth murder
of the year

VIRGILL, wearing a black and
white striped shirt, is escorted
by police officers to the court-
house on Monday to be charged
with murder.

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A man was
charged with murder in the
Freeport Magistrate’s Court
on Monday.

Godfrey Virgill, alias
“Dollar Murder”, was
arraigned before Magistrate
Debbye Ferguson in Court
One in the murder of 20-
year-old Ashley Smith —
the island’s eighth homicide
victim for the year.

It is alleged that on Sep-
tember 12, Virgill intention-
ally caused the death of Mr
Smith by means of unlawful
harm. He was not required
to enter a plea to the charge.

Lawyer K Brian Hanna
represented Virgill.

Magistrate Ferguson
adjourned the case to Janu-
ary 26, 2010 in Magistrate’s
Court 3 for a preliminary
inquiry.



OPPOSITION SENATOR JEROME FITZGERALD TO PRESENT HIS OWN DRAFT LEGISLATION

Pressure mounts on Government
for Freedom of Information Act

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

HOPING to pressure gov-
ernment into enacting the
promised Freedom of Informa-
tion Act, an opposition sena-
tor said he will present his own
draft legislation in the Senate.

Jerome Fitzgerald believes
government should make pass-
ing the law — which would give
the general public a legal right
and avenue to obtain informa-
tion held by public authorities
unless there is a good reason
for confidentiality — more of a
priority. While the attorney
claims he “does not expect” the
government will debate the leg-
islation that he tables, Mr
Fitzgerald hopes that his efforts
will at least bring the issue to
the forefront, causing the gov-
ernment to make their own
moves to create a “sunshine”
law, as promised in the FNM’s
election manifesto in 2007.

Most democracies have
enacted, or moved towards cre-
ating a Freedom of Informa-
tion Act. The United States
passed an FOIA in 1966, with
the UK following in 2000.

Apart from outlining the
right of the public to access cer-
tain information, the law would
also create penalties for public
authorities who withhold docu-
ments. Advocates of the law in
the Bahamas say it would help
reduce scandals and cases of
corruption that often only come

Arawak Gay port protest ‘proving successful’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

OPPONENTS of the
Arawak Cay port move claim
to have been “successful” in
their endeavour of gathering
thousands of signatures against
the government’s plan.

The drive to collect the
names of those who think that
Arawak Cay is an unwise
choice for the relocation of the
container shipping facilities was
launched in mid-August.

Yesterday, PLP Senator
Jerome Fitzgerald said he is
happy with the results so far.

He is now drafting a letter
that he will present with the
petition to Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham “within the
next week.”

Declining to state how many
signatures were collected dur-



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to light years after they occur, if
at all.

Meaningful

Most recently, Callenders
and Co attorney Fred Smith
and others suggested that a
“meaningful” FOIA could have
helped avoid the circumstances
that led to the crown land con-
troversy involving former direc-
tor of Lands and Surveys Tex
Turnquest. For its part, the gov-
ernment has said it remains
committed to passing an FOIA
within its current five year term.

During the June 2009 bud-
get debate, Minister of State
Charles Maynard noted that
two consultants were contract-
ed this year to help “prepare
the entire public service for the
open access to their records.”

Having in recent times been
active in voicing and galvanising

ing the drive, Senator Fitzger-
ald told The Tribune this would
be revealed on the day it is for-
warded to the prime minister.

This development comes
days after PLP leader Perry
Christie warned potential
investors in the Arawak Cay
port project to “beware” —
stating that if his party wins the
2012 election it would scrap the
current plan and move the port
elsewhere.

Independent

Speaking on the Love97 talk
show ‘Jones and Co’ on Sun-
day, Mr Christie reiterated how
the former government
believed south-western New
Providence would be the best
site for a new port based on
independent studies.

In August, Mr Fitzgerald said
he hoped to get around 10,000
signatures in the petition
against the Arawak Cay port
move.

An online version of the peti-
tion yesterday registered 503
signatures.

However, Mr Fitzgerald said
the drive also involved door-
to-door advocacy by a team of
people dedicated to opposing
the Arawak Cay plan.

The senator, who recently
announced his intention to run

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE

opposition to the government’s
intended relocation of the port
to Arawak Cay, Mr Fitzgerald
said his work in this regard has
bolstered his belief that the
public must have new avenues
through which to obtain infor-
mation which they can use to
hold the government account-
able for its decisions and
actions.

“A lot of the information I’ve
been seeking throughout this
exercise has not been forth-
coming,” said the Senator, who
claims that government has so
far been “secretive” about the
port move and failed to justify it
in the face of prior studies that
rated Arawak Cay poorly as a
potential site.

“The need for a Freedom of
Information Act is something
I’m going to start to press very
strongly. I will lay a draft in the
senate, putting it forward for
us to begin to debate.

The Government can decide
whether they’re going to debate
it or not. Mr Fitzgerald, who
recently revealed his intention
to run for the post of Deputy
Leader of the PLP at the par-
ty’s forthcoming convention,
said the issue of access to infor-
mation “goes across party
lines”, with both the FNM and
the PLP at times failing to be as
open as they should.

“Moving forward I think the
public is going to demand that
we have this (an FOIA) so they
can know what the hell is going
on,” he added.

MORLEY

For * i
MEN a,

for the deputy leadership of the
PLP, has denied that his
activism on the issue, which he
began last year, has anything
to do with his political ambi-
tions.

“People will want to link the
two, but that’s not what this is
about,” he said.



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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Removal of the casuarinas

WE HAVE received a letter from a read-
er asking for our opinion on the removal of
the casuarina trees at Saunders Beach. The
writer wants to know if we believe those
who say that these trees destroy our beach-
es, prevent the growth of native vegetation,
resulting in the decline of sand dunes and the
exposure of the coastline to erosion. It
would seem, said the writer, that because
these trees are not indigenous to the
Bahamas they must be eliminated at all cost.

We don’t know what to believe. We agree
that as Neil Sealey pointed out in his article,
“The Casuarina Controversy”, that hurri-
canes Floyd and Frances, during the height
of their swirling fury, blew massive amounts
of sand from Saunders Beach onto the main
road. This is to be expected because the
casuarina grows no foliage at the base of its
trunk, and so between each tree there is a
tremendous gap that is an open highway for
anything being blown from the ocean to pile
up on the main road. However, if low shrubs
were planted beneath the trees to close the
gaps, there would be no opening for the
sand to get through and it would accumulate
on the beach in dune formation.

Do we believe that nothing will grow
beneath the casuarina tree? The scientists
say no, the casuarina is an invasive tree that
poisons everything beneath it. But as Tina
Barry of Harbour Island pointed out in her
group’s campaign to save the Saunders
Beach casuarinas, vegetation will grow under
some casuarina trees — in other words this
group to save the tree does not believe that
all casuarinas are poisonous to native vege-
tation. According to Ms Barry there are 17
varieties of the tree, not all destructive. She
maintains that the non destructive trees are
the ones that have thrived at Saunders for
more than 80 years, and should be left in
peace.

We are not a scientist and so we do not
pretend to know what the scientific truth is.
All we know is that inland vegetation almost
smothers the tall casuarina tree. Our eyes do
not see what the scientists tell us we should
see — except on the seafront and the expla-
nation could be that no one has tried to
plant anything beneath the tree to close the
open spaces.

The National Trust has always supported
the removal of the casuarina from island
coastlines. “Extensive research supports that
removal of casuarinas from coastal areas
and replanting of the dune ridge with native
vegetation will restore the dune and pro-
vide an effective barrier against wave
action,” said the Trust.

However, this is what our reader had to
say on the matter:

“Dear Editor,

“Please tell me honestly: Do you believe
all that these scientists are telling us about
the Saunders Beach casuarina trees?

“Well, I shan’t beat about the bush —
my eyes don’t lie and they do not see what
the scientists are telling us.

“T almost had mental collapse when I
recently drove past a barren, wind swept
Saunders Beach with half the casuarinas
removed and numbers on the remaining
ones to indicate that they are now ready for
the woodsman’s axe. All I know is that those
responsible for their removal had better pray
and pray hard that there is no hurricane this
year or, not only will the sand cover the
road, but it will play host to a great deal of
the Atlantic Ocean. There is absolutely no
protection from ocean storms.

“T read in The Tribune that the planting of
native shrubs at Orange Hill was the pat-
tern to be followed in the future for our
seashore. It is true that the shrubs are knit-
ted tightly together, but they completely
block all view of the ocean and present a
picture of monotonous drabness. However,
I must admit, in the midst of it all I got a
good laugh from one defiant little casuarina.
As if to mock our brilliant scientists and
give the lie to their claims, this little treasure
had thrust itself skyward right up through the
tightly knit native shrubs! I wanted to get
out, stretch my arms and shout “bravo!” to
the little blighter. Isn’t nature wonderful!

“Inland casuarinas were growing with
the native plants, one even had a thick vine
creeping up its tall trunk.

“And they talk about erosion of beaches.
We had magnificent beaches framed by
casuarina trees when I was a child. The first
time that I saw beach erosion was when they
started building large hotels — in the west
and on Paradise Island in the east which has
damaged Montagu Beach.

“They justify their elimination of the
casuarina because it is not native to the
Bahamas. I recommend a read of Bill
Bryson’s book ‘A walk in the Woods’ — on
the Appalachian Trail. He tells of how
seedlings from the 800 plants discovered
during the colonial era in the Appalachian
woods were collected by amateur botanists
and ‘shipped across the ocean to England
and France and Russia, and received with
greedy keenness and trembling fingers.’

“These were plants never before seen in
Europe. Suppose they were all to be
destroyed because they were not indigenous
to Europe, what a dull, dismal place this
world would be. Anyway, let the scientists
prattle, I prefer to believe my own eyes —
and what I see, ain’t what they see!”























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The Bahamas
needs a critical
moral facelift

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Friday, August 21, 2009,
turned out to be a horrific day
for the family of Wendy
Bullard, a young lady working
in the employ of 21st Century
Welding when, while working
to earn an honest dollar for her-
self and her family, she was
ruthlessly gunned down by
thugs who, for whatever rea-
son, saw no purpose or value
to her life and merely regarded
her as an obstruction to their
abominable exploits.

Tragically, like many before
her, she is now a Statistic anda
testament to how we as a peo-
ple and country have failed to
protect our citizens and prevent
our country from becoming a
habitat for freedom of lawless-
ness and severe limitations on
justice. This case, like others
before it, will provoke our
thoughts for a little while and
many of us will seek to blame
some individual or organisation
for the degradation that we
have gotten ourselves and our
society into.

We can blame the Minister
of National Security because in
my opinion his performance in
this capacity has been dismal. It
is also my opinion that he has
demonstrated no real vision for
addressing the crime situation
and his failure to produce real
results is glaring to those of us
who can see beyond the poli-
tics.

We can blame the court sys-
tem where individuals charged
with committing murders or
other heinous crimes are con-
tinuously and almost routinely
released on bail. Sadly, many
of these suspects are back on
the streets committing more
crimes, taking new victims and
creating more work for an
already overloaded law
enforcement system. We are,
in essence, getting the raw
results of justice delayed. The
criminal elements are not facing
any harsh consequences for
felonious actions and, there-
fore, see this as impulse to con-
tinue down the wrong road
causing havoc and giving life to
the old adage — Justice delayed
is Justice denied.

We can blame the police
because in recent times officers
have been so busy arresting one
another they have hardly had
time to focus on society’s crim-
inal elements. Officers are
being charged with all sorts of
malicious and injurious activi-
ties — domestic abuse, child

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



abuse, sexual molestation, rob-
beries, burglaries, rape, etc —
bringing the Royal Bahamas
Police Force to disrepute and
further destroying the public
trust in this organisation.

We can blame drugs, alco-
hol, gangs, lack of home disci-
pline, the schools, the churches,
the prison, the affected estab-
lishments, the unfortunate vic-
tims and whatever substance,
entity or individual we are con-
vinced has played some role in
guiding our descent to criminal
decadence. While we may not
want to accept it, the reality of
the matter is that we also need
to blame ourselves.

A lot of us in Bahamaland
know our relatives and friends
who are involved in criminal
activities. When we tell our kids
to fight it out if someone chal-
lenges them we are grooming
them. When we give them the
impression that they can have
anything they want without
working for it we are setting
them up. When we tell them
what insults to direct at the
teachers and other adults who
reprimand them we are
strengthening them. When we
brag about their bad behav-
ioural antics and fail to admin-
ister discipline we are promot-
ing them. When they show up
with items we know are stolen
and we accept them we are
licensing them. When we drive
them to the house in the “jook-
jook” corner to purchase or sell
iulicit substances we are encour-
aging them. When we see them
with the unlicensed firearms or
other illegal weapons and do
not report them to the police
we have contributed to every
murder that is committed in this
country after the fact.

The other brutal reality is
that nothing and no one will
ever thoroughly eradicate crime
in this country, unless Jehovah
God himself comes down, but
there are solutions to our prob-
lems. The Hon Tommy Turn-
quest needs to be transferred
as Minister of National Securi-
ty as soon as possible. No Gov-
ernment should want to be
accused of playing politics with
such a critical issue as crime
management and, unfortunate-
ly, this appears to be the case
with the present administration.

The only reason Mr Turnquest
does not appear to be playing is
because he has already dropped
the ball.

For offenders who allegedly
commit murder and other hor-
rendous criminal acts the
wheels of justice should move
swiftly. Law enforcement offi-
cers, prosecutors, Supreme
Court judges, the Attorney
General’s Office and persons
responsible for dealing with
such matters should move to
expedite them to ensure that
justice is administered quickly
and appropriately so that vic-
tims’ families do not feel vio-
lated over and over again.

There is no justified reason
as to why families of murder
victims, casualties of armed
robberies and rape, and chil-
dren who have suffered sexual
molestation and exploitation
should have to wait five and six
years for their concerns to be
thoroughly addressed by the
courts. It is time to quit making
excuses, prioritise and get the
job done.

Persons suspected of com-
mitting murder should not be
given bail. Perpetrators con-
victed of murder should be exe-
cuted expeditiously and there
should be no question of
whether they die. Death by exe-
cution as a consequence for
murder should be automatic.

Friday, August 21, 2009, was
a terrible and tragic day for one
more family but, sadly, many
more of days of the week will
be like that until we as a people
and a country shift our attitude
towards felons, strengthen our
resolve against criminal activi-
ties, and renew our commit-
ment to fight the destructive
elements wherever they are and
whoever they may be — includ-
ing family members, friends,
relatives or acquaintances.

We need a critical moral
facelift. We need to change our
mindset about where we want
our country to be and where
we want our future to take us.
We need to reaffirm our val-
ues and determine what is real-
ly important to us. The change
for us has to begin within us.
Until then, we as a people will
continue to reap what we’ve
sown. It is unfortunate that,
because of this, the innocent
will continue to suffer for and
along with the guilty.

MARVIN R Z GIBSON
Nassau,
August, 2009.

So how does China benefit from
its relationship with Bahamas?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There has been much fan-
fare of late regarding the lev-
el of assistance that the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China is pre-
pared to offer to the
Bahamas.

From the sports stadium, to
the road project, to Baha Mar
and finally in today’s Tribune
large scale farming in Abaco.

We recently witnessed the
historic visit of His Excellen-
cy Wu Bangguo, Chairman of
the Standing Committee of
the National People’s Con-
gress of the People’s Republic
of China. During this visit
three agreements were signed

that covered

i) in addition to other
issues, the protection of
investments by Bahamian and
Chinese investors that are
made in each other’s coun-
tries;

ii) an agreement that covers
a loan from the Chinese Exim
Bank for the Airport High-
way project and

iti) an agreement that cov-
ers the construction of the
national sports stadium, which
is a grant from the People’s
Republic of China.

There were also two agree-
ments signed with Baha Mar,
regarding the Cable Beach
project.

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The above is all well and
good....perhaps!? No doubt
there is much benefit to be
achieved by some Bahamians,
with regard to these develop-
ments. But all the media cov-
erage and Government press
releases highlight the benefits
for the Bahamas.

I always stand to be cor-
rected, as I am only human
and will make mistakes, but
so far I can’t seem to find any
coverage on the benefits to
the People’s Republic of Chi-
na for such generosity
bestowed on the Bahamas
and the Bahamian people.
Certainly China benefits from
exporting goods to the
Bahamas, but this does not
seem to justify what we have
learnt over the past couple of
weeks and months. Our
imports from China are only
“peanuts” to that of our
neighbour to the west.

The Highway Project may
be a loan, but we are advised
that the Stadium is a grant.
So what is in it for the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China?

Outside of monetary gain,
and I’m sure long line fishing,
are the Chinese interested in
our relationship and proximi-
ty to the United States of
America or illegal immigra-
tion (ie importation of cheap
labour from China). The Chi-
nese are business people and
as said by Milton Friedman:
“There’s no such thing as a
free lunch.”

So, what have we commit-
ted to the People’s Republic
of China?

JEROME R PINDER
Nassau,
September 17, 2009.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 5



fovernment officials

CAST SN

TWAT (ces

Changes now made to boost
Grand Bahama’s competitiveness

FREEPORT- Government Ministers, Gaming Board officials
and management of the Isle of Capri casino and Hutchison Wham-
poa met with the casino’s employees on Monday night to address
concerns regarding the November 1 transition in casino ownership
to the Treasure Bay group.

Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace
and State Minister for Finance Zhivargo Laing were among officials
at the meeting, organised to answer questions and clarify points of
concern held by workers in the transition period from employment
with Isle of Capri to employment with Treasure Bay.

Minister Vanderpool-Wallace said: “We wanted to be sure
that those persons who, for whatever reason may wish to sever their
relationship with the company, (knew) that whatever severance is
due them — even though there is no change in ownership of the
company which is normally the conditions under which you would
provide that severance — that we are prepared to provide them
with that severance and to give them sufficient time to think about
it, and decide whether they wish to take that option.”

Such a provision is part of the government’s move to ensure the
continuing operation of the island’s sole casino, which employs over
200 Grand Bahamians. Employees who opt for severance would,
as is standard, be required to re-apply with the new company and
negotiate their respective terms of employment. One of the main
operational concerns expressed by employees was the relatively low
volume of guests coming to the casino — a matter the Tourism
Minister said is already being discussed in terms of the integration
of operations between the casino and owners of the Our Lucaya
Resort (Hutchison Whampoa), where the casino is located.

“T said to them (the employees) that I have never seen a casino
completely separated from a resort work, but fortunately even
Isle of Capri in its latter days with definitely a new casino operator
under consideration, were already having a conversation with the
resort owners so that they have access to rooms on different terms
and more favourable terms than I think has been in place before,
because without getting into the complications of it, that is a very
important part of the marketing capacity and capabilities of a
casino operation,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said.

“And so we see the management of Hutchison working much
more closely to ensure they demonstrate that they understand
that and put in place those packages and programmes that we
believe will make a difference.”

Government expects that difference to also be made through its
public/private sector tackling of what was considered one of the
more significant hindrances to Grand Bahama’s competitiveness in
the tourism market — the high cost of airlift to the island.

Minister Vanderpool- Wallace said that in addition to the cost of
the Miami-Grand Bahama route failing to positively compete
with other destinations like Cancun, Montego Bay or Las Vegas,
the cost of airlift also gave rise to domestic competition from the
destinations of Nassau and Paradise Island.

“So we sat with the private sector here and said this is something
that we have to fix and we have come to the point where the gov-
ernment, the private sector — specifically the (Grand Bahama) Air-
port Company, Freeport Flight Services, Hutchison (Whampoa)
have come and put a programme in place where the cost to fly to
Grand Bahama has been reduced sufficiently for Grand Bahama
to become much more competitive, not only against Nassau but
against all of the others,” he said. It is a programme airlines have
demonstrated their approval of by increasing and/or introducing air-
lift to Grand Bahama as of November 1. WestJet will commence
twice-weekly service to Freeport from Toronto, Canada; Delta Air-
lines will begin service four times weekly to Freeport beginning in
December; Spirit Airlines has re-confirmed its commitment to
Grand Bahama from Fort Lauderdale, and American Eagle has
increased its airlift from two flights to four flights per week.



PLP leadership candidate
seeks to woo supporters

Paul Moss pledges to make sweeping changes if elected PM

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

Candidate for the PLP lead-
ership Paul Moss wooed his
supporters last night with
pledges of sweeping changes if
and when he is elected prime
minister.

Holding his official campaign
launch event in the constituen-
cy of St Cecilia, he promised to
bring “unparalleled and
unprecedented” focus on edu-
cation and the judiciary, in an
effort to address the problems
facing these sectors.

Mr Moss asked the crowd at
Cynthia Pratt Park to support
him in bringing every arm of
government and every Bahami-
an into the 21st century through
the largest reform programme
“this region has ever seen.”

“We are going to unleash the
power of the Bahamian imagi-
nation by removing every
obstacle to success in this coun-
try. If you want to be successful,
you will have a partner in my
government.

“On the economy, I can tell
you, for Bahamians who have
not only longed but worked to
achieve their dreams and fell
short because of lack of
resources, those days are gone.
For those who saw opportunity
in helping to bring efficiency to

PAUL MOSS

government by providing pro-
fessional technology services,
and you have found that your
proposals have disappeared
without mention, your day has
come.

“We are going to undertake
a project to overhaul this coun-
try and put the Bahamas at the
cutting edge of technology,
both in delivery services to our
people and in how we deal with
the world,” he said.

Speaking on education, the
candidate said he will not have
anyone telling Bahamian moth-
ers and fathers it is okay for
their children to be earning Ds
and Es.

“We are, in my estimation, a

Crash victims named

THE one-year-old baby
girl and her 20-year-old aunt
who died in a horrific traffic
accident on Marathon Road
on Sunday have been iden-
tified as Randia Dean, and
Levonya Miller.

The pair were passengers
in a water truck that was
travelling along Marathon
Road when it collided with a
maroon coloured Cadillac
Seville that was heading
south, causing it to flip over.

Both passengers were
thrown from the vehicle and
sustained fatal injuries.

According to eyewitness-
es and the police, the Cadil-
lac was signaling to turn into

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.coh,edu.ds

EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (EOD)

FOR PREQUALIFICATION FOR

DESIGN, SUPPLY AND INSTALLATION OF

J IRE, FIXTURES

The College of The Bahamas (COB) is seeking Expressions of Interest from qualified ven-
dors/firms to provide services and products for the design, supply and installation of fur-

niture, fixtures anil equipment iFFAE}) for

(id the Harry Moore Library and Information Centre presently under construction at

the Qakes Field Campus of The College and

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in Freeport, Grand Bahama

Interested parties may obtain further information and a copy of the Expressions of Interest

Prequalification Application form from:

The (fice of the Vice President Finance

College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 242-M2-45 13/45 16

Or

The Office of the Associate Vice Presicbent

College of The Bahamas

Northern Bahamas Campus

Freeport, Grand Bahama
Tel: 242-352-9761

An information meeting will be held in Nassau, on Tuesday, 29th September, 2009 and on
Wednesday, 30th September, 200 in Freeport at a time and venue to be announced.

BOs are to be submitted to the location(s) indicated in the BOW Prequalification Form in

a scaled envelope appropriatcly marked:

Vice President, Finance
College of The Bahamas

EXPRESSIONOF INTEREST - FEE -

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Firms must submit a separate EOL for each facility, All BOs are to be submitted by 12200)

pm (mid-day) on Friday, %th October,



the mall at Marathon’s
entrance close to KFC when
the water truck attempted
to overtake it, clipping the
vehicle and causing the
truck to spin out of control
and ultimately overturn.

The number of traffic
fatalities for the year stands
at 37.

“We are going
to unleash the
power of the
Bahamian
imagination by
removing every
obstacle to

success in this
country. If you
want to be suc-
cessful, you will
have a partner in
my government.”



smart nation, but we will
become an educated nation too,
because education will be the
hallmark in our march into this
new millennium. We will
engender a sense of purpose
and direction that only the
greatest nations have shown.

“Every child — and I mean
every child, will know what it is
like to find something in him
or herself to contribute to mak-
ing this nation and the world a
better place,” he said.

Mr Moss also pledged a low
crime environment. “At last
count,” he said, “the murder
rate stands at an alarming 65. I
am appalled and I am con-
founded that successive gov-

T 4 rT

ernments of this nation have
allowed crime to fester to the
point where it is now an open
sore.

“Bahamians live in fear;
imprisoned in their homes,
while the government shrugs
its shoulders, even as Bahamian
families suffer the pain of loss
of loved ones murdered on our
streets, in their homes and in
broad daylight. That has to
stop,” he said.

Mr Moss also signalled his
willingness to enforce capital
punishment, warning criminals:
“If you take a life, yours will
be taken.”

He said he will “fix” the
administration of justice, and
eventually remove the Privy
Council as the final court of
appeal. Speaking on foreign
policy, Mr Moss said he is “not
interested in any trade agree-
ment until Bahamians domi-
nate the landscape of this coun-
try’s economy, building oppor-
tunities for other Bahamians
and moving across our borders
to establish a new bold Bahami-
an brand.”

Mr Moss also promised that
every Bahamian family will
own a piece of the country
through a new Crown Land
policy “that will provide every
Bahamian household financial
stability and security. That is
what government is for.”

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Burger King reward | Study: adolescents not serious

about HIV/AIDS risk factors

FROM page one

Police believe the former
manager of the Harrold Road
restaurant, and current manag-
er of Burger King in Frederick
Street, was taken to the store by
his killer or killers who then
tried to force him to open the
safe. When he failed to open
the safe, Mr Morris was beaten
in the manager’s office. He was
dragged outside where he was
again beaten and stabbed sev-
eral times.

He was found lying in a pool
of blood with multiple stab
wounds at around 1.30am on
Sunday and pronounced dead
at the scene.

Mr Morris became the 61st
murder victim this year.

Just hours later Bahamasair
pilot Lionel Lewis McQueen,
29, was shot to death in his
Golden Palm Estates home,
raising the murder toll to 62,
according to police.

Mr McQueen’s cousin and
roommate Montez Saunders
was also shot several times
when Mr McQueen was killed
at their home near the Kennedy
Subdivision in New Providence
shortly after 4am on Sunday.
Mr Saunders is being treated
in the Intensive Care Unit at
Princess Margaret Hospital and
his condition is said to be
improving.

Police say the country’s mur-
der count could soar to 66 this
year if the deaths of four people
killed in a fire at their home on
Thursday morning are also clas-
sified as homicides.

That would be nearly dou-
ble the number of homicides at
this time last year.

The deaths of Theresa
Brown, 51; her daughter

Kayshala Bodie, 18; grand-
daughter Telair Johnson, one;
and neighbour Savanna Stuart,
18, who all died as a result of
smoke inhalation, are currently
classified as “suspicious.”

But as investigations contin-
ue police might be able to con-
firm that the fire at their home
in Wilson Tract was started by
an arsonist. Superintendent
Leon Bethel in charge of the
homicide department of the
Criminal Detective Unit said
there had been 57 murders at
this time last year, and it is clear
the murder toll is rising.

He told The Tribune: “It’s an
increase from last year, that’s
obvious and we are confident
about that.

“We are also confident about
detection and we are asking
members of the public to assist.
We need our detection rate to
improve, and if the members
of the public cooperate with us
— the police who they have
entrusted with the investigation
of these matters — we would
have a better rate.

“If we have a better rate of
solution the occurrence of a lot
of these matters will diminish.

“We have lots of assistance
from members of the public
and we do appreciate that, but
we do believe that with more
assistance from the public, we
will see a better rate of solu-
tion and we would see a reduc-
tion in the number of murders.”

Activist Paul Joseph, 55, of
Grand Bahama, said he wants
Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest to step up
and introduce capital punish-
ment to help stem the number

of murders as the toll spirals
out of control.

He said: “Don’t pacify the
public by making this
announcement, and not go
ahead with it.

“This place looks like Iraq,
not the Bahamas, because any-
body can be killing any time in
this country and that’s the sad
reality right now.

“Whoever is in government
has to protect the citizens of
their country and right now
there seems to be no protec-
tion. We are past the scare
point now, this murder is a
national nightmare.”

Nassau resident Terrance
Gilbert, 41, blames the rising
murder rate on a breakdown
of families and relationships.
He called for the church to get
more involved with communi-
ties and encourage people to
not act in anger, but to forgive.

“We are having a family
meltdown in this country, and
it’s a national crisis,” he said.

“We are resorting to murder
because we are under so much
pressure, and the church needs
to pull together to work with
people in the community.”

Police are appealing to the
public for information relating
to the murders of Rashad Mor-
ris, Lionel Lewis McQueen and
the four suspicious deaths by
fire.

Anyone with any informa-
tion should call 911 or 919
urgently, or call Crime Stop-
pers anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477). Calls to Crime Stoppers
are answered in the United
States and ensure total
anonymity.

BY MATT MAURA

A RECENT study of ado-
lescent understanding of and
attitude towards HIV/AIDS
indicated that while some
youngsters are knowledgeable
about the deadly virus, many
are not taking the risk factors
associated with the disease seri-
ously enough, Health Minister
Dr Hubert Minnis said.

Dr Minnis said as a result of
the study’s findings, health pol-
icy-makers, planners and pro-
fessionals must redouble their
efforts to ensure that young
people take HIV/AIDS as seri-
ously as they should.

The study was conducted on
public and private school stu-
dents between the ages of 15
and 17 in New Providence and
the Family Islands. Its aim was
to provide data to support the
planning and implementation
of preventative strategies and
healthcare programmes relat-
ing to HIV/AIDS.

TTR
ITT CRT

THE Rotary Club of
New Providence will hold a
steak/chicken-out at the
Scouts Headquarters on
Dolphin Drive on Satur-
day, September 26. The
price is $10.

















Dr Minnis said while groups
such as the AIDS Foundation
of the Bahamas and the Min-
istry of Health — through its
National AIDS Programme —
continue to promote aggressive
and intensive campaigns against
the spread of HIV/AIDS, ado-
lescents remain among the
fastest growing population of
HIV-infected persons in the
country.

The Health Minister com-
mended the AIDS Foundation
for establishing a temporary
care facility for HIV positive
adolescents. He said the facility
will assist in “stabilising their
health” and is another example
of how the organisation “is
responsive to the needs of the
HIV/AIDS sector of our popu-
lation.”

“In our country, they (ado-
lescents) are extremely vulner-
able,” Dr Minnis said.

“Therefore it is incumbent
upon us to promote a stern mes-
sage detailing preventative mea-

sures about HIV/AIDS to this
group.”

Addressing the opening ses-
sion of an AIDS Foundation of
the Bahamas Workshop, Dr
Minnis said the HIV/AIDS pan-
demic continues to threaten the
economic, national and social
development of countries
around the globe. He said the
Caribbean, including the
Bahamas, has been the “sec-
ond-worst” affected region
globally. “The Ministry of
Health has increased access to
anti-retroviral drugs, particu-
larly for HIV positive pregnant
women. This programme has
led to a dramatic reduction in
the mother-to-child transmis-
sion rate,” Dr Minnis added.

The minister said health offi-
cials must ensure that young
people have “adequate access
to knowledge and treatment”
in order to minimise those
health risks and reduce vulner-
ability to possible HIV infec-
tion.

Teachers stage sit-in protests

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WOHLEN LIMITED

——

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of WOHLEN LIMITED has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WAIRAU INC.

—

é

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of WAIRAU INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGES
AND CULTURES
INSTITUTE

ILC]

COURSE OFFERING: B

CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE 1 & I
CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I-V

CONVERSATIONAL MANDARIN I, IT & III

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE I
CONVERSATIONAL GERMAN I

TELEPHONE: 302-4387 or 4363 or 4384



Legal Notice

NOTICE
PROSPECT MADISON LIMITED

a os

é

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PROSPECT MADISON LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued

and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HENBIT VALLFEY INC.

—f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of HENBIT VALLFEY INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

tember 28th, 2009
PRICE: § 250.00 per course

LOCATION: Munnings Bldg
-next to KFC across from COB

DURATION: 10 Weeks

E-MAIL: ilci@cob.edu.bs

Felipé Major/Tribune staff




Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Ua eas
FROM page one

alleged understaffing, and continued the “sit-in” yesterday. They
want the school to hire an English teacher and a science teacher to
help cope with the work load.

Anatol Rodgers teachers also took action over understaffing,
starting on Monday and continuing yesterday. While some teach-
ers returned to the campus in Faith Avenue yesterday, 18 remained
on their “sit-in”, refusing to work until two language arts teachers
are hired.

Teachers at Uriah McPhee started their “sit-in” on Friday and
continued to take action on Monday over a lack of air-condition-
ing on the third floor of the school building. A senior officer at the
Ministry of Education said the air-conditioning unit was repaired
over the weekend, and the teachers returned to work yesterday.

The Education officer who did not want to be named said she is
concerned about the effect the “sit-out” will have on the children
who have made a fresh commitment to their education this term.

She encouraged parents to speak up and call for teachers to
return to work and resume their duties for the benefit of their chil-
dren’s education.

However, according to Bahamas Union of Teachers (BUT)
president Belinda Wilson, the teachers will not return to work
until their demands are met.

And PLP chairwoman Glenys Hanna Martin released a state-
ment yesterday criticising Minister of Education Carl Bethel for
failing to bring public schools up to scratch.

She said: “We have seen systemic failure on his behalf in a
number of areas, including a failure to complete school repairs and
adequately equip and furnish classrooms in a timely fashion.

“Today we note that well into the academic year that policies
implemented by this government relative to the non-renewal of
contracts of teachers, and the concomitant failure to recruit replace-
ment teachers, has left schools understaffed in critical areas of
the curriculum and led to overcrowding of classrooms in several
schools and gaps in school security.

“Our children are being short-changed.

“In light of the minister’s weak response to the many chal-
lenges and demands which now face our educational system he is
now being invited to seriously consider whether he should continue
at the helm of this important engine of our national develop-
ment.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VANESE INC.

—f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of VANESE INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



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SOME SUN WITH

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Volume: 105 No.251

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=-USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009

eo

ae





Save Jett Iravolta

Jurors hear of
efforts to revive
film star’s son



By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

JURORS in the trial of for-
mer PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater and former ambu-
lance driver Tarino Light-
bourne heard several accounts
yesterday of the efforts made
to revive an unresponsive Jett
Travolta as prosecutors opened
their case in the Supreme
Court.

Jett Travolta, 16, the son of
Hollywood actors John Travol-
ta and Kelly Preston died in
Freeport, Grand Bahama on
January 2. Opening the case for
the prosecution yesterday
Director of Public Prosecutions
Bernard Turner said that fol-
lowing Jett’s death, contact was
made with certain persons to
communicate a threat to Mr
Travolta regarding the release
of potentially damaging state-
ments if money were not paid.

——_
JETT TRAVOLTA



Former PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater and former para-
medic Tarino Lightbourne are
accused of attempting to extort
$25 million from the Hollywood
actor.

Mr Travolta flies in this
morning to be the first witness
when the case resumes today.
He will be accompanied by his
wife.

SEE page eight

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Tim Clarke/
Tribune —-
staff

AN inmate at Her Majesty's Prison accused of
the murder of a fellow inmate was arraigned in

Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Preston Moss, 36, is charged with the murder
of Lloyd Albury. Albury died on September 10,
two days after he was admitted to hospital fol-



Ae
|

PRESTON MOSS, 36, was charged yesterday with the murder of Lloyd Albury.




\V

was reportedly imprisoned on a vagrancy charge.
Moss, was arraigned on the murder charge

yesterday before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez

lowing a fight in a cell at the prison. Albury, 55,

Climate change seen as threat to Bahamas,

EFFECTS from the threat of
climate change could prove
damaging to the Bahamas'
economy, according to Tourism
and Aviation Minister Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace.

A recent study by the World
Bank placed the Bahamas
among the top three of the
most vulnerable Caribbean
countries when it comes to cli-
mate change, emphasizing the
need for a pro-active stance to
curb more damaging effects.

“We know that we cannot
run away from the issues of sea
level rise, salt water intrusions,
beach and shore erosion, and
the many other impacts of cli-

mate change that confront us.

‘Your presence here is a demon-
stration of your commitment to
act before it’s too late,” said Mr
Vanderpool-Wallace during
day one of the Caribsave Coun-
try Partners Symposium.

The World Bank report also
revealed that a five-metre
change in sea level rise could
result in damage to the econo-
my that amounts to 3.5 per cent
of Gross Domestic Product
(GDP) for Surinam.

“In the case of the Bahamas,
it estimates that the same level

SEE page eight

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Teachers

Stage ‘sit-in’
protests

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AROUND 200 teach-
ers at three public schools
in New Providence staged

“sit-in’s” yesterday to
protest inadequate
staffing and poor work-
ing conditions.

The industrial action at
Uriah McPhee, Anatol
Rodgers and CI Gibson,
which began Friday has
postponed education for
thousands of students
across New Providence.

At CI Gibson the
action compounded secu-
rity issues at the school
as 11 knives and an ice-
pick were found on the
school property yester-
day, according to reports.

Teachers began taking
action on Monday over

SEE page six

Burger King offers
reward to help
capture killer

By MEGAN REYNOLDS

Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



BURGER King have offered
a $10,000 reward for any infor-
mation that will lead to the
arrest or conviction of those
responsible for the murder of
restaurant manager Rashad
Morris.

Mr Morris, 21, of John
Street, off Baillou Hill Road,
was brutally beaten and
stabbed at the Burger King
restaurant on Harrold Road,
western New Providence,
where he was found dead early
Sunday morning.

SEE page six

Country records
63rd homicide

FOLLOWING two bru-
tal murders Sunday, the
country last night recorded
its 63rd homicide.

Details were still sketchy
at press time, but police
said a young man who had
travelled to the Seagrapes
shopping centre on Prince
Charles Drive by car at
Spm got into an altercation
with another man at the
plaza.

The dispute got out of
hand and the victim was
stabbed several times dur-
ing the skirmish. He was
rushed to hospital by
ambulance, but police said
he was unresponsive by
this time. He died a short
time later, at about 7pm.
The matter is being investi-
gated.

ce



PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009



THE TRIBUNE

Campaign highlighting opposition to
sea turtles ban ‘gaining momentum’

Petition has
‘two or three
thousand’
signatures

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A Bahamas-wide campaign
aiming to highlight opposition
to the outright ban on har-
vesting sea turtles has “gained
plenty of momentum”,
according to one of its organ-
isers.

Abner Pinder, fisherman
and chief councillor for Span-
ish Wells, claims “two or
three thousand” signatures
have already been added to
a petition against the ban
launched earlier this month
and more are expected when
all of the Family Islands send
in the signatures attached to
petitions circulated there.

Mr Pinder, along with
numerous other fishermen
and opponents of the ban -
which extends to the taking
or catching of any marine tur-
tles, turtle parts or eggs, for
commercial use or otherwise —
hopes to persuade the gov-
ernment to reverse its posi-
tion and continue to allow
Bahamians to harvest turtles
for personal consumption.

Gathered together on Sep-
tember 3, two days after the
ban was officially enacted in
the name of conservation,

Wr
RU

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
acral) |



A STOCK PHOTO of a sea turtle.

“Turtles are increasing in the
Bahamas on a daily basis but nobody —
(The Department of) Fisheries or any-
body — will go out there to try to do any
type of survey (of the numbers),
because they know that if they did it
would defeat what they are saying.”



they charged that, contrary to
the government and environ-
mentalist’s views that the tur-
tles are in danger of being
wiped out, the creatures are
“plentiful” in Bahamian
waters.

Activists

Their efforts, however,
have already raised the ire of
local environmental activists.

Having hailed the ban as
“wonderful” in August after
pushing for years for the gov-
ernment to enact it, Kim
Aranha, founder of the
Bahamas Sea Turtle Conser-
vation Group, charged that
those against the ban are

Abner Pinder

“speaking from ignorance”.

She noted that the
BSTCG’s own petition
against the slaughter of sea
turtles in the Bahamas gar-
nered around 5,000 signa-
tures.

Meanwhile, Mr Pinder said:
“Turtles are increasing in the
Bahamas on a daily basis but
nobody — (The Department
of) Fisheries or anybody — will
go out there to try to do any
type of survey (of the num-
bers), because they know that
if they did it would defeat
what they are saying.”

The petition against the ban
states: “I do not agree that
the government should ban
all harvesting or eating of tur-

UTILITIES REGULATION AND COMPETITION AUTHORITY

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the PUC or licensed under the Broadcasting Act
(Telecommunications, Internet, TV, Broadcasting) to attend its

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tle meat by Bahamians, rather
I believe that control or ban-
ning of commercial harvest-
ing and the slaughter of tur-
tles in public are enough to
address the needs of both

environmentalism and
humanity.”
Commercial

Mr Pinder stressed that
most opponents of the ban
are primarily concerned with
ensuring turtles can still be
captured for personal con-
sumption, and are happy to
allow the part of the ban
which relates to commercial
harvesting to remain.

The affect on the overall
turtle population of allowing
individuals to catch them to
eat would be “infinitesimal,”
he suggested.

He claims that although the
ban has been enacted as an
amendment to the Fisheries
Regulations, it is critical that
the opponents make their
voices heard before the next
parliamentary session begins
on September 30 as this is
expected to provide an oppor-
tunity for the ban to be fur-
ther cemented in law.

DISCOVER



Mangrove Cay Glinic gets facelift;
eT Rog aT AE TS TL

BY MATT MAURA



Dorsette’s, Mangrove
Cay - The relaunching of
primary healthcare services
at the Mangrove Cay Com-
munity Clinic will allow for
the “adequate and timely
delivery of high-quality
healthcare” to the residents
of Mangrove Cay, Health
Minister Dr. Hubert Min- — >
nis said. HEALTH MINISTER Dr Hubert Minnis

The relaunching took (centre) prepares to tour the newly
place on Friday, September renovated Mangrove Cay Communi-
18, and is part of the contin- ty Clinic following the relaunching of
uing reconstruction/renova- primary healthcare services in Dorset-
tions of primary healthcare te’s, Friday, September 17. Pictured
facilities throughout the with Dr. Minnis from left: Gina Ben-
Family Islands. Relaunching nett-Rolle, Nursing Officer 1/Clinic
ceremonies have already Supervisor and Patrice Bowleg, Nurs-
taken place in Kemp’s Bay, ing Officer Il. Picewell Forbes, Mem-
South Andros; Nicholls ber of Parliament for South Andros is
Town, North Andros, and pictured in the background.

Grand Cay, North Abaco.

More are scheduled for other parts of the Bahamas. Con-
structed 24 years ago with funding from the National Insurance
Board, the Community Clinic was renovated at a cost of
$500,000. Dr. Minnis said the relaunching of services will allow
healthcare professionals on Mangrove Cay to address those
aspects of primary healthcare that focus on health promotion,
disease prevention and self-empowerment, particularly in the
fight against chronic, non-communicable diseases (CNCDS)
and other public health threats.

“The residents of Mangrove Cay, like those elsewhere in the
Bahamas, are primarily affected by the increasing rates of obe-
sity, hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, cancer, asthma and
other types of chronic, non-communicable diseases, as well as
those related to alcohol consumption,” Dr. Minnis said.

“Now that the clinic building has been renovated, operations
will improve due to the fact that the District Medical Officer will
be able to remain overnight in the facility and the fact that the
clinic will be connected to the Central Patient Record Infor-
mation System which will allow physicians in New Providence
to review the medical records of patients in Mangrove Cay.”

Dr. Minnis said the upgrades to primary healthcare facilities
throughout the Bahamas is part of the Ministry of Health’s
overall objective of ensuring that healthcare facilities through-
out the country are provided with the necessary emergency
medical equipment, and that training opportunities are pro-
vided to ensure that the current knowledge and skills of persons
providing healthcare services, are maintained.

He said as a result, the buildings formerly used to house the
clinic and nurses’ residence in Mangrove Cay, in addition to the
former nurses’ residence in Kemp’s Bay, will be renovated and
used to facilitate the training of medical and nursing students and
physicians from the University of the West Indies’ Bahamas
campus who are pursing post-graduate studies in Family Med-
icine. The Health Minister said officials from the Public Hos-
pitals Authority are also scheduled to provide First Responders
training for residents of Mangrove Cay and Kemp’s Bay, which
should also auger well for the provision of timely services to the
community. “All that remains is for the residents of Mangrove
Cay to work with their healthcare providers to reduce the num-
ber of persons developing chronic, non-communicable diseases
as well as injuries resulting from negative and unhealthy lifestyle
choices and violence,” Dr. Minnis added.



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THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS



O court short

Man charged
with Freeport's
eighth murder
of the year

VIRGILL, wearing a black and
white striped shirt, is escorted
by police officers to the court-
house on Monday to be charged
with murder.

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A man was
charged with murder in the
Freeport Magistrate’s Court
on Monday.

Godfrey Virgill, alias
“Dollar Murder”, was
arraigned before Magistrate
Debbye Ferguson in Court
One in the murder of 20-
year-old Ashley Smith —
the island’s eighth homicide
victim for the year.

It is alleged that on Sep-
tember 12, Virgill intention-
ally caused the death of Mr
Smith by means of unlawful
harm. He was not required
to enter a plea to the charge.

Lawyer K Brian Hanna
represented Virgill.

Magistrate Ferguson
adjourned the case to Janu-
ary 26, 2010 in Magistrate’s
Court 3 for a preliminary
inquiry.



OPPOSITION SENATOR JEROME FITZGERALD TO PRESENT HIS OWN DRAFT LEGISLATION

Pressure mounts on Government
for Freedom of Information Act

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

HOPING to pressure gov-
ernment into enacting the
promised Freedom of Informa-
tion Act, an opposition sena-
tor said he will present his own
draft legislation in the Senate.

Jerome Fitzgerald believes
government should make pass-
ing the law — which would give
the general public a legal right
and avenue to obtain informa-
tion held by public authorities
unless there is a good reason
for confidentiality — more of a
priority. While the attorney
claims he “does not expect” the
government will debate the leg-
islation that he tables, Mr
Fitzgerald hopes that his efforts
will at least bring the issue to
the forefront, causing the gov-
ernment to make their own
moves to create a “sunshine”
law, as promised in the FNM’s
election manifesto in 2007.

Most democracies have
enacted, or moved towards cre-
ating a Freedom of Informa-
tion Act. The United States
passed an FOIA in 1966, with
the UK following in 2000.

Apart from outlining the
right of the public to access cer-
tain information, the law would
also create penalties for public
authorities who withhold docu-
ments. Advocates of the law in
the Bahamas say it would help
reduce scandals and cases of
corruption that often only come

Arawak Gay port protest ‘proving successful’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

OPPONENTS of the
Arawak Cay port move claim
to have been “successful” in
their endeavour of gathering
thousands of signatures against
the government’s plan.

The drive to collect the
names of those who think that
Arawak Cay is an unwise
choice for the relocation of the
container shipping facilities was
launched in mid-August.

Yesterday, PLP Senator
Jerome Fitzgerald said he is
happy with the results so far.

He is now drafting a letter
that he will present with the
petition to Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham “within the
next week.”

Declining to state how many
signatures were collected dur-



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to light years after they occur, if
at all.

Meaningful

Most recently, Callenders
and Co attorney Fred Smith
and others suggested that a
“meaningful” FOIA could have
helped avoid the circumstances
that led to the crown land con-
troversy involving former direc-
tor of Lands and Surveys Tex
Turnquest. For its part, the gov-
ernment has said it remains
committed to passing an FOIA
within its current five year term.

During the June 2009 bud-
get debate, Minister of State
Charles Maynard noted that
two consultants were contract-
ed this year to help “prepare
the entire public service for the
open access to their records.”

Having in recent times been
active in voicing and galvanising

ing the drive, Senator Fitzger-
ald told The Tribune this would
be revealed on the day it is for-
warded to the prime minister.

This development comes
days after PLP leader Perry
Christie warned potential
investors in the Arawak Cay
port project to “beware” —
stating that if his party wins the
2012 election it would scrap the
current plan and move the port
elsewhere.

Independent

Speaking on the Love97 talk
show ‘Jones and Co’ on Sun-
day, Mr Christie reiterated how
the former government
believed south-western New
Providence would be the best
site for a new port based on
independent studies.

In August, Mr Fitzgerald said
he hoped to get around 10,000
signatures in the petition
against the Arawak Cay port
move.

An online version of the peti-
tion yesterday registered 503
signatures.

However, Mr Fitzgerald said
the drive also involved door-
to-door advocacy by a team of
people dedicated to opposing
the Arawak Cay plan.

The senator, who recently
announced his intention to run

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE

opposition to the government’s
intended relocation of the port
to Arawak Cay, Mr Fitzgerald
said his work in this regard has
bolstered his belief that the
public must have new avenues
through which to obtain infor-
mation which they can use to
hold the government account-
able for its decisions and
actions.

“A lot of the information I’ve
been seeking throughout this
exercise has not been forth-
coming,” said the Senator, who
claims that government has so
far been “secretive” about the
port move and failed to justify it
in the face of prior studies that
rated Arawak Cay poorly as a
potential site.

“The need for a Freedom of
Information Act is something
I’m going to start to press very
strongly. I will lay a draft in the
senate, putting it forward for
us to begin to debate.

The Government can decide
whether they’re going to debate
it or not. Mr Fitzgerald, who
recently revealed his intention
to run for the post of Deputy
Leader of the PLP at the par-
ty’s forthcoming convention,
said the issue of access to infor-
mation “goes across party
lines”, with both the FNM and
the PLP at times failing to be as
open as they should.

“Moving forward I think the
public is going to demand that
we have this (an FOIA) so they
can know what the hell is going
on,” he added.

MORLEY

For * i
MEN a,

for the deputy leadership of the
PLP, has denied that his
activism on the issue, which he
began last year, has anything
to do with his political ambi-
tions.

“People will want to link the
two, but that’s not what this is
about,” he said.



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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Removal of the casuarinas

WE HAVE received a letter from a read-
er asking for our opinion on the removal of
the casuarina trees at Saunders Beach. The
writer wants to know if we believe those
who say that these trees destroy our beach-
es, prevent the growth of native vegetation,
resulting in the decline of sand dunes and the
exposure of the coastline to erosion. It
would seem, said the writer, that because
these trees are not indigenous to the
Bahamas they must be eliminated at all cost.

We don’t know what to believe. We agree
that as Neil Sealey pointed out in his article,
“The Casuarina Controversy”, that hurri-
canes Floyd and Frances, during the height
of their swirling fury, blew massive amounts
of sand from Saunders Beach onto the main
road. This is to be expected because the
casuarina grows no foliage at the base of its
trunk, and so between each tree there is a
tremendous gap that is an open highway for
anything being blown from the ocean to pile
up on the main road. However, if low shrubs
were planted beneath the trees to close the
gaps, there would be no opening for the
sand to get through and it would accumulate
on the beach in dune formation.

Do we believe that nothing will grow
beneath the casuarina tree? The scientists
say no, the casuarina is an invasive tree that
poisons everything beneath it. But as Tina
Barry of Harbour Island pointed out in her
group’s campaign to save the Saunders
Beach casuarinas, vegetation will grow under
some casuarina trees — in other words this
group to save the tree does not believe that
all casuarinas are poisonous to native vege-
tation. According to Ms Barry there are 17
varieties of the tree, not all destructive. She
maintains that the non destructive trees are
the ones that have thrived at Saunders for
more than 80 years, and should be left in
peace.

We are not a scientist and so we do not
pretend to know what the scientific truth is.
All we know is that inland vegetation almost
smothers the tall casuarina tree. Our eyes do
not see what the scientists tell us we should
see — except on the seafront and the expla-
nation could be that no one has tried to
plant anything beneath the tree to close the
open spaces.

The National Trust has always supported
the removal of the casuarina from island
coastlines. “Extensive research supports that
removal of casuarinas from coastal areas
and replanting of the dune ridge with native
vegetation will restore the dune and pro-
vide an effective barrier against wave
action,” said the Trust.

However, this is what our reader had to
say on the matter:

“Dear Editor,

“Please tell me honestly: Do you believe
all that these scientists are telling us about
the Saunders Beach casuarina trees?

“Well, I shan’t beat about the bush —
my eyes don’t lie and they do not see what
the scientists are telling us.

“T almost had mental collapse when I
recently drove past a barren, wind swept
Saunders Beach with half the casuarinas
removed and numbers on the remaining
ones to indicate that they are now ready for
the woodsman’s axe. All I know is that those
responsible for their removal had better pray
and pray hard that there is no hurricane this
year or, not only will the sand cover the
road, but it will play host to a great deal of
the Atlantic Ocean. There is absolutely no
protection from ocean storms.

“T read in The Tribune that the planting of
native shrubs at Orange Hill was the pat-
tern to be followed in the future for our
seashore. It is true that the shrubs are knit-
ted tightly together, but they completely
block all view of the ocean and present a
picture of monotonous drabness. However,
I must admit, in the midst of it all I got a
good laugh from one defiant little casuarina.
As if to mock our brilliant scientists and
give the lie to their claims, this little treasure
had thrust itself skyward right up through the
tightly knit native shrubs! I wanted to get
out, stretch my arms and shout “bravo!” to
the little blighter. Isn’t nature wonderful!

“Inland casuarinas were growing with
the native plants, one even had a thick vine
creeping up its tall trunk.

“And they talk about erosion of beaches.
We had magnificent beaches framed by
casuarina trees when I was a child. The first
time that I saw beach erosion was when they
started building large hotels — in the west
and on Paradise Island in the east which has
damaged Montagu Beach.

“They justify their elimination of the
casuarina because it is not native to the
Bahamas. I recommend a read of Bill
Bryson’s book ‘A walk in the Woods’ — on
the Appalachian Trail. He tells of how
seedlings from the 800 plants discovered
during the colonial era in the Appalachian
woods were collected by amateur botanists
and ‘shipped across the ocean to England
and France and Russia, and received with
greedy keenness and trembling fingers.’

“These were plants never before seen in
Europe. Suppose they were all to be
destroyed because they were not indigenous
to Europe, what a dull, dismal place this
world would be. Anyway, let the scientists
prattle, I prefer to believe my own eyes —
and what I see, ain’t what they see!”























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The Bahamas
needs a critical
moral facelift

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Friday, August 21, 2009,
turned out to be a horrific day
for the family of Wendy
Bullard, a young lady working
in the employ of 21st Century
Welding when, while working
to earn an honest dollar for her-
self and her family, she was
ruthlessly gunned down by
thugs who, for whatever rea-
son, saw no purpose or value
to her life and merely regarded
her as an obstruction to their
abominable exploits.

Tragically, like many before
her, she is now a Statistic anda
testament to how we as a peo-
ple and country have failed to
protect our citizens and prevent
our country from becoming a
habitat for freedom of lawless-
ness and severe limitations on
justice. This case, like others
before it, will provoke our
thoughts for a little while and
many of us will seek to blame
some individual or organisation
for the degradation that we
have gotten ourselves and our
society into.

We can blame the Minister
of National Security because in
my opinion his performance in
this capacity has been dismal. It
is also my opinion that he has
demonstrated no real vision for
addressing the crime situation
and his failure to produce real
results is glaring to those of us
who can see beyond the poli-
tics.

We can blame the court sys-
tem where individuals charged
with committing murders or
other heinous crimes are con-
tinuously and almost routinely
released on bail. Sadly, many
of these suspects are back on
the streets committing more
crimes, taking new victims and
creating more work for an
already overloaded law
enforcement system. We are,
in essence, getting the raw
results of justice delayed. The
criminal elements are not facing
any harsh consequences for
felonious actions and, there-
fore, see this as impulse to con-
tinue down the wrong road
causing havoc and giving life to
the old adage — Justice delayed
is justice denied.

We can blame the police
because in recent times officers
have been so busy arresting one
another they have hardly had
time to focus on society’s crim-
inal elements. Officers are
being charged with all sorts of
malicious and injurious activi-
ties — domestic abuse, child

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



abuse, sexual molestation, rob-
beries, burglaries, rape, etc —
bringing the Royal Bahamas
Police Force to disrepute and
further destroying the public
trust in this organisation.

We can blame drugs, alco-
hol, gangs, lack of home disci-
pline, the schools, the churches,
the prison, the affected estab-
lishments, the unfortunate vic-
tims and whatever substance,
entity or individual we are con-
vinced has played some role in
guiding our descent to criminal
decadence. While we may not
want to accept it, the reality of
the matter is that we also need
to blame ourselves.

A lot of us in Bahamaland
know our relatives and friends
who are involved in criminal
activities. When we tell our kids
to fight it out if someone chal-
lenges them we are grooming
them. When we give them the
impression that they can have
anything they want without
working for it we are setting
them up. When we tell them
what insults to direct at the
teachers and other adults who
reprimand them we are
strengthening them. When we
brag about their bad behav-
ioural antics and fail to admin-
ister discipline we are promot-
ing them. When they show up
with items we know are stolen
and we accept them we are
licensing them. When we drive
them to the house in the “jook-
jook” corner to purchase or sell
iulicit substances we are encour-
aging them. When we see them
with the unlicensed firearms or
other illegal weapons and do
not report them to the police
we have contributed to every
murder that is committed in this
country after the fact.

The other brutal reality is
that nothing and no one will
ever thoroughly eradicate crime
in this country, unless Jehovah
God himself comes down, but
there are solutions to our prob-
lems. The Hon Tommy Turn-
quest needs to be transferred
as Minister of National Securi-
ty as soon as possible. No Gov-
ernment should want to be
accused of playing politics with
such a critical issue as crime
management and, unfortunate-
ly, this appears to be the case
with the present administration.

The only reason Mr Turnquest
does not appear to be playing is
because he has already dropped
the ball.

For offenders who allegedly
commit murder and other hor-
rendous criminal acts the
wheels of justice should move
swiftly. Law enforcement offi-
cers, prosecutors, Supreme
Court judges, the Attorney
General’s Office and persons
responsible for dealing with
such matters should move to
expedite them to ensure that
justice is administered quickly
and appropriately so that vic-
tims’ families do not feel vio-
lated over and over again.

There is no justified reason
as to why families of murder
victims, casualties of armed
robberies and rape, and chil-
dren who have suffered sexual
molestation and exploitation
should have to wait five and six
years for their concerns to be
thoroughly addressed by the
courts. It is time to quit making
excuses, prioritise and get the
job done.

Persons suspected of com-
mitting murder should not be
given bail. Perpetrators con-
victed of murder should be exe-
cuted expeditiously and there
should be no question of
whether they die. Death by exe-
cution as a consequence for
murder should be automatic.

Friday, August 21, 2009, was
a terrible and tragic day for one
more family but, sadly, many
more of days of the week will
be like that until we as a people
and a country shift our attitude
towards felons, strengthen our
resolve against criminal activi-
ties, and renew our commit-
ment to fight the destructive
elements wherever they are and
whoever they may be — includ-
ing family members, friends,
relatives or acquaintances.

We need a critical moral
facelift. We need to change our
mindset about where we want
our country to be and where
we want our future to take us.
We need to reaffirm our val-
ues and determine what is real-
ly important to us. The change
for us has to begin within us.
Until then, we as a people will
continue to reap what we’ve
sown. It is unfortunate that,
because of this, the innocent
will continue to suffer for and
along with the guilty.

MARVIN R Z GIBSON
Nassau,
August, 2009.

So how does China benefit from
its relationship with Bahamas?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There has been much fan-
fare of late regarding the lev-
el of assistance that the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China is pre-
pared to offer to the
Bahamas.

From the sports stadium, to
the road project, to Baha Mar
and finally in today’s Tribune
large scale farming in Abaco.

We recently witnessed the
historic visit of His Excellen-
cy Wu Bangguo, Chairman of
the Standing Committee of
the National People’s Con-
gress of the People’s Republic
of China. During this visit
three agreements were signed

that covered

i) in addition to other
issues, the protection of
investments by Bahamian and
Chinese investors that are
made in each other’s coun-
tries;

ii) an agreement that covers
a loan from the Chinese Exim
Bank for the Airport High-
way project and

iti) an agreement that cov-
ers the construction of the
national sports stadium, which
is a grant from the People’s
Republic of China.

There were also two agree-
ments signed with Baha Mar,
regarding the Cable Beach
project.

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The above is all well and
good....perhaps!? No doubt
there is much benefit to be
achieved by some Bahamians,
with regard to these develop-
ments. But all the media cov-
erage and Government press
releases highlight the benefits
for the Bahamas.

I always stand to be cor-
rected, as I am only human
and will make mistakes, but
so far I can’t seem to find any
coverage on the benefits to
the People’s Republic of Chi-
na for such generosity
bestowed on the Bahamas
and the Bahamian people.
Certainly China benefits from
exporting goods to the
Bahamas, but this does not
seem to justify what we have
learnt over the past couple of
weeks and months. Our
imports from China are only
“peanuts” to that of our
neighbour to the west.

The Highway Project may
be a loan, but we are advised
that the Stadium is a grant.
So what is in it for the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China?

Outside of monetary gain,
and I’m sure long line fishing,
are the Chinese interested in
our relationship and proximi-
ty to the United States of
America or illegal immigra-
tion (ie importation of cheap
labour from China). The Chi-
nese are business people and
as said by Milton Friedman:
“There’s no such thing as a
free lunch.”

So, what have we commit-
ted to the People’s Republic
of China?

JEROME R PINDER
Nassau,
September 17, 2009.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 5



fovernment officials

CAST SN

TWAT (ces

Changes now made to boost
Grand Bahama’s competitiveness

FREEPORT- Government Ministers, Gaming Board officials
and management of the Isle of Capri casino and Hutchison Wham-
poa met with the casino’s employees on Monday night to address
concerns regarding the November 1 transition in casino ownership
to the Treasure Bay group.

Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace
and State Minister for Finance Zhivargo Laing were among officials
at the meeting, organised to answer questions and clarify points of
concern held by workers in the transition period from employment
with Isle of Capri to employment with Treasure Bay.

Minister Vanderpool-Wallace said: “We wanted to be sure
that those persons who, for whatever reason may wish to sever their
relationship with the company, (knew) that whatever severance is
due them — even though there is no change in ownership of the
company which is normally the conditions under which you would
provide that severance — that we are prepared to provide them
with that severance and to give them sufficient time to think about
it, and decide whether they wish to take that option.”

Such a provision is part of the government’s move to ensure the
continuing operation of the island’s sole casino, which employs over
200 Grand Bahamians. Employees who opt for severance would,
as is standard, be required to re-apply with the new company and
negotiate their respective terms of employment. One of the main
operational concerns expressed by employees was the relatively low
volume of guests coming to the casino — a matter the Tourism
Minister said is already being discussed in terms of the integration
of operations between the casino and owners of the Our Lucaya
Resort (Hutchison Whampoa), where the casino is located.

“T said to them (the employees) that I have never seen a casino
completely separated from a resort work, but fortunately even
Isle of Capri in its latter days with definitely a new casino operator
under consideration, were already having a conversation with the
resort owners so that they have access to rooms on different terms
and more favourable terms than I think has been in place before,
because without getting into the complications of it, that is a very
important part of the marketing capacity and capabilities of a
casino operation,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said.

“And so we see the management of Hutchison working much
more closely to ensure they demonstrate that they understand
that and put in place those packages and programmes that we
believe will make a difference.”

Government expects that difference to also be made through its
public/private sector tackling of what was considered one of the
more significant hindrances to Grand Bahama’s competitiveness in
the tourism market — the high cost of airlift to the island.

Minister Vanderpool- Wallace said that in addition to the cost of
the Miami-Grand Bahama route failing to positively compete
with other destinations like Cancun, Montego Bay or Las Vegas,
the cost of airlift also gave rise to domestic competition from the
destinations of Nassau and Paradise Island.

“So we sat with the private sector here and said this is something
that we have to fix and we have come to the point where the gov-
ernment, the private sector — specifically the (Grand Bahama) Air-
port Company, Freeport Flight Services, Hutchison (Whampoa)
have come and put a programme in place where the cost to fly to
Grand Bahama has been reduced sufficiently for Grand Bahama
to become much more competitive, not only against Nassau but
against all of the others,” he said. It is a programme airlines have
demonstrated their approval of by increasing and/or introducing air-
lift to Grand Bahama as of November 1. WestJet will commence
twice-weekly service to Freeport from Toronto, Canada; Delta Air-
lines will begin service four times weekly to Freeport beginning in
December; Spirit Airlines has re-confirmed its commitment to
Grand Bahama from Fort Lauderdale, and American Eagle has
increased its airlift from two flights to four flights per week.



PLP leadership candidate
seeks to woo supporters

Paul Moss pledges to make sweeping changes if elected PM

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

Candidate for the PLP lead-
ership Paul Moss wooed his
supporters last night with
pledges of sweeping changes if
and when he is elected prime
minister.

Holding his official campaign
launch event in the constituen-
cy of St Cecilia, he promised to
bring “unparalleled and
unprecedented” focus on edu-
cation and the judiciary, in an
effort to address the problems
facing these sectors.

Mr Moss asked the crowd at
Cynthia Pratt Park to support
him in bringing every arm of
government and every Bahami-
an into the 21st century through
the largest reform programme
“this region has ever seen.”

“We are going to unleash the
power of the Bahamian imagi-
nation by removing every
obstacle to success in this coun-
try. If you want to be successful,
you will have a partner in my
government.

“On the economy, I can tell
you, for Bahamians who have
not only longed but worked to
achieve their dreams and fell
short because of lack of
resources, those days are gone.
For those who saw opportunity
in helping to bring efficiency to

PAUL MOSS

government by providing pro-
fessional technology services,
and you have found that your
proposals have disappeared
without mention, your day has
come.

“We are going to undertake
a project to overhaul this coun-
try and put the Bahamas at the
cutting edge of technology,
both in delivery services to our
people and in how we deal with
the world,” he said.

Speaking on education, the
candidate said he will not have
anyone telling Bahamian moth-
ers and fathers it is okay for
their children to be earning Ds
and Es.

“We are, in my estimation, a

Crash victims named

THE one-year-old baby
girl and her 20-year-old aunt
who died in a horrific traffic
accident on Marathon Road
on Sunday have been iden-
tified as Randia Dean, and
Levonya Miller.

The pair were passengers
in a water truck that was
travelling along Marathon
Road when it collided with a
maroon coloured Cadillac
Seville that was heading
south, causing it to flip over.

Both passengers were
thrown from the vehicle and
sustained fatal injuries.

According to eyewitness-
es and the police, the Cadil-
lac was signaling to turn into

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.coh,edu.ds

EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (EOD)

FOR PREQUALIFICATION FOR

DESIGN, SUPPLY AND INSTALLATION OF

J IRE, FIXTURES

The College of The Bahamas (COB) is seeking Expressions of Interest from qualified ven-
dors/firms to provide services and products for the design, supply and installation of fur-

niture, fixtures anil equipment iFFAE}) for

(id the Harry Moore Library and Information Centre presently under construction at

the Qakes Field Campus of The College and

(ii) the new Northern Bahamas Campus of The College presently under construction

in Freeport, Grand Bahama

Interested parties may obtain further information and a copy of the Expressions of Interest

Prequalification Application form from:

The (fice of the Vice President Finance

College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 242-M2-45 13/45 16

Or

The Office of the Associate Vice Presicbent

College of The Bahamas

Northern Bahamas Campus

Freeport, Grand Bahama
Tel: 242-352-9761

An information meeting will be held in Nassau, on Tuesday, 29th September, 2009 and on
Wednesday, 30th September, 200 in Freeport at a time and venue to be announced.

BOs are to be submitted to the location(s) indicated in the BOW Prequalification Form in

a scaled envelope appropriatcly marked:

Vice President, Finance
College of The Bahamas

EXPRESSIONOF INTEREST - FEE -

insert name of applicable facility

Firms must submit a separate EOL for each facility, All BOs are to be submitted by 12200)

pm (mid-day) on Friday, %th October,



the mall at Marathon’s
entrance close to KFC when
the water truck attempted
to overtake it, clipping the
vehicle and causing the
truck to spin out of control
and ultimately overturn.

The number of traffic
fatalities for the year stands
at 37.

“We are going
to unleash the
power of the
Bahamian
imagination by
removing every
obstacle to

success in this
country. If you
want to be suc-
cessful, you will
have a partner in
my government.”



smart nation, but we will
become an educated nation too,
because education will be the
hallmark in our march into this
new millennium. We will
engender a sense of purpose
and direction that only the
greatest nations have shown.

“Every child — and I mean
every child, will know what it is
like to find something in him
or herself to contribute to mak-
ing this nation and the world a
better place,” he said.

Mr Moss also pledged a low
crime environment. “At last
count,” he said, “the murder
rate stands at an alarming 65. I
am appalled and I am con-
founded that successive gov-

T 4 rT

ernments of this nation have
allowed crime to fester to the
point where it is now an open
sore.

“Bahamians live in fear;
imprisoned in their homes,
while the government shrugs
its shoulders, even as Bahamian
families suffer the pain of loss
of loved ones murdered on our
streets, in their homes and in
broad daylight. That has to
stop,” he said.

Mr Moss also signalled his
willingness to enforce capital
punishment, warning criminals:
“If you take a life, yours will
be taken.”

He said he will “fix” the
administration of justice, and
eventually remove the Privy
Council as the final court of
appeal. Speaking on foreign
policy, Mr Moss said he is “not
interested in any trade agree-
ment until Bahamians domi-
nate the landscape of this coun-
try’s economy, building oppor-
tunities for other Bahamians
and moving across our borders
to establish a new bold Bahami-
an brand.”

Mr Moss also promised that
every Bahamian family will
own a piece of the country
through a new Crown Land
policy “that will provide every
Bahamian household financial
stability and security. That is
what government is for.”

J

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CREDIT SUISSE

Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch

is presently considering applications for a

Senior Globus System Developer

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

* Qualifications:

- Atleast Five (5) years experience in installation, configuration and
troubleshooting in a banking environment
Superior knowledge of GLOBUS/T24 Banking Application in both support
and development roles

- Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science or equivalent

- Knowledge of AIX 5,1 — 5.3, UNIVERSE/JBASE, PL/SQL

- Expenence in working with Globus/T24 related migration or implementation

projects.

- Personal Qualities:

- Excellent organizational, interpersonal and communication skills

- Good technical and problem solving skills and experience

- Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision

- Enthusiasm, a positive attitude and willingness to work flexible hours as

overtime

~ Previous experience of working in a production support role in maintaining
Globus/T24 system is a plus.

+ Other Duties:

- Answer Helpdesk requests (provide support & troubleshoot)
- Provide UNIVERSE & GLOBUS training to IT Staff

- Ensure comphance to IT guidelines / directives

get

- Ensure that
followed

d2Business Contingency Planning d3 requirements are

- Other duties & projects assigned by the Manager of Department

ny Benefits provided include:
- Competitive salary and performance bonus

- Pension Plan

- Health and Life Insurance
- Ongoing internal and external career development/training program



Applications should be submitted to:

Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE: OCTOBER 7, 27009

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Burger King reward | Study: adolescents not serious

about HIV/AIDS risk factors

FROM page one

Police believe the former
manager of the Harrold Road
restaurant, and current manag-
er of Burger King in Frederick
Street, was taken to the store by
his killer or killers who then
tried to force him to open the
safe. When he failed to open
the safe, Mr Morris was beaten
in the manager’s office. He was
dragged outside where he was
again beaten and stabbed sev-
eral times.

He was found lying in a pool
of blood with multiple stab
wounds at around 1.30am on
Sunday and pronounced dead
at the scene.

Mr Morris became the 61st
murder victim this year.

Just hours later Bahamasair
pilot Lionel Lewis McQueen,
29, was shot to death in his
Golden Palm Estates home,
raising the murder toll to 62,
according to police.

Mr McQueen’s cousin and
roommate Montez Saunders
was also shot several times
when Mr McQueen was killed
at their home near the Kennedy
Subdivision in New Providence
shortly after 4am on Sunday.
Mr Saunders is being treated
in the Intensive Care Unit at
Princess Margaret Hospital and
his condition is said to be
improving.

Police say the country’s mur-
der count could soar to 66 this
year if the deaths of four people
killed in a fire at their home on
Thursday morning are also clas-
sified as homicides.

That would be nearly dou-
ble the number of homicides at
this time last year.

The deaths of Theresa
Brown, 51; her daughter

Kayshala Bodie, 18; grand-
daughter Telair Johnson, one;
and neighbour Savanna Stuart,
18, who all died as a result of
smoke inhalation, are currently
classified as “suspicious.”

But as investigations contin-
ue police might be able to con-
firm that the fire at their home
in Wilson Tract was started by
an arsonist. Superintendent
Leon Bethel in charge of the
homicide department of the
Criminal Detective Unit said
there had been 57 murders at
this time last year, and it is clear
the murder toll is rising.

He told The Tribune: “It’s an
increase from last year, that’s
obvious and we are confident
about that.

“We are also confident about
detection and we are asking
members of the public to assist.
We need our detection rate to
improve, and if the members
of the public cooperate with us
— the police who they have
entrusted with the investigation
of these matters — we would
have a better rate.

“If we have a better rate of
solution the occurrence of a lot
of these matters will diminish.

“We have lots of assistance
from members of the public
and we do appreciate that, but
we do believe that with more
assistance from the public, we
will see a better rate of solu-
tion and we would see a reduc-
tion in the number of murders.”

Activist Paul Joseph, 55, of
Grand Bahama, said he wants
Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest to step up
and introduce capital punish-
ment to help stem the number

of murders as the toll spirals
out of control.

He said: “Don’t pacify the
public by making this
announcement, and not go
ahead with it.

“This place looks like Iraq,
not the Bahamas, because any-
body can be killing any time in
this country and that’s the sad
reality right now.

“Whoever is in government
has to protect the citizens of
their country and right now
there seems to be no protec-
tion. We are past the scare
point now, this murder is a
national nightmare.”

Nassau resident Terrance
Gilbert, 41, blames the rising
murder rate on a breakdown
of families and relationships.
He called for the church to get
more involved with communi-
ties and encourage people to
not act in anger, but to forgive.

“We are having a family
meltdown in this country, and
it’s a national crisis,” he said.

“We are resorting to murder
because we are under so much
pressure, and the church needs
to pull together to work with
people in the community.”

Police are appealing to the
public for information relating
to the murders of Rashad Mor-
ris, Lionel Lewis McQueen and
the four suspicious deaths by
fire.

Anyone with any informa-
tion should call 911 or 919
urgently, or call Crime Stop-
pers anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477). Calls to Crime Stoppers
are answered in the United
States and ensure total
anonymity.

BY MATT MAURA

A RECENT study of ado-
lescent understanding of and
attitude towards HIV/AIDS
indicated that while some
youngsters are knowledgeable
about the deadly virus, many
are not taking the risk factors
associated with the disease seri-
ously enough, Health Minister
Dr Hubert Minnis said.

Dr Minnis said as a result of
the study’s findings, health pol-
icy-makers, planners and pro-
fessionals must redouble their
efforts to ensure that young
people take HIV/AIDS as seri-
ously as they should.

The study was conducted on
public and private school stu-
dents between the ages of 15
and 17 in New Providence and
the Family Islands. Its aim was
to provide data to support the
planning and implementation
of preventative strategies and
healthcare programmes relat-
ing to HIV/AIDS.

TTR
TT REIL

THE Rotary Club of
New Providence will hold a
steak/chicken-out at the
Scouts Headquarters on
Dolphin Drive on Satur-
day, September 26. The
price is $10.

















Dr Minnis said while groups
such as the AIDS Foundation
of the Bahamas and the Min-
istry of Health — through its
National AIDS Programme —
continue to promote aggressive
and intensive campaigns against
the spread of HIV/AIDS, ado-
lescents remain among the
fastest growing population of
HIV-infected persons in the
country.

The Health Minister com-
mended the AIDS Foundation
for establishing a temporary
care facility for HIV positive
adolescents. He said the facility
will assist in “stabilising their
health” and is another example
of how the organisation “is
responsive to the needs of the
HIV/AIDS sector of our popu-
lation.”

“In our country, they (ado-
lescents) are extremely vulner-
able,” Dr Minnis said.

“Therefore it is incumbent
upon us to promote a stern mes-
sage detailing preventative mea-

sures about HIV/AIDS to this
group.”

Addressing the opening ses-
sion of an AIDS Foundation of
the Bahamas Workshop, Dr
Minnis said the HIV/AIDS pan-
demic continues to threaten the
economic, national and social
development of countries
around the globe. He said the
Caribbean, including the
Bahamas, has been the “sec-
ond-worst” affected region
globally. “The Ministry of
Health has increased access to
anti-retroviral drugs, particu-
larly for HIV positive pregnant
women. This programme has
led to a dramatic reduction in
the mother-to-child transmis-
sion rate,” Dr Minnis added.

The minister said health offi-
cials must ensure that young
people have “adequate access
to knowledge and treatment”
in order to minimise those
health risks and reduce vulner-
ability to possible HIV infec-
tion.

Teachers stage sit-in protests

Legal Notice

NOTICE
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——

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Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of WOHLEN LIMITED has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WAIRAU INC.

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é

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of WAIRAU INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

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AND CULTURES
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Legal Notice

NOTICE
PROSPECT MADISON LIMITED

es es

é

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PROSPECT MADISON LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued

and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HENBIT VALLFEY INC.

—f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of HENBIT VALLFEY INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

tember 28th, 2009
PRICE: § 250.00 per course

LOCATION: Munnings Bldg
-next to KFC across from COB

DURATION: 10 Weeks

E-MAIL: ilci@cob.edu.bs

Felipé Major/Tribune staff




Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Ua eas
FROM page one

alleged understaffing, and continued the “sit-in” yesterday. They
want the school to hire an English teacher and a science teacher to
help cope with the work load.

Anatol Rodgers teachers also took action over understaffing,
starting on Monday and continuing yesterday. While some teach-
ers returned to the campus in Faith Avenue yesterday, 18 remained
on their “sit-in”, refusing to work until two language arts teachers
are hired.

Teachers at Uriah McPhee started their “sit-in” on Friday and
continued to take action on Monday over a lack of air-condition-
ing on the third floor of the school building. A senior officer at the
Ministry of Education said the air-conditioning unit was repaired
over the weekend, and the teachers returned to work yesterday.

The Education officer who did not want to be named said she is
concerned about the effect the “sit-out” will have on the children
who have made a fresh commitment to their education this term.

She encouraged parents to speak up and call for teachers to
return to work and resume their duties for the benefit of their chil-
dren’s education.

However, according to Bahamas Union of Teachers (BUT)
president Belinda Wilson, the teachers will not return to work
until their demands are met.

And PLP chairwoman Glenys Hanna Martin released a state-
ment yesterday criticising Minister of Education Carl Bethel for
failing to bring public schools up to scratch.

She said: “We have seen systemic failure on his behalf in a
number of areas, including a failure to complete school repairs and
adequately equip and furnish classrooms in a timely fashion.

“Today we note that well into the academic year that policies
implemented by this government relative to the non-renewal of
contracts of teachers, and the concomitant failure to recruit replace-
ment teachers, has left schools understaffed in critical areas of
the curriculum and led to overcrowding of classrooms in several
schools and gaps in school security.

“Our children are being short-changed.

“In light of the minister’s weak response to the many chal-
lenges and demands which now face our educational system he is
now being invited to seriously consider whether he should continue
at the helm of this important engine of our national develop-
ment.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VANESE INC.

—f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of VANESE INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



A JOURNAL OF AN AMERICAN PHYSICIAN TELLS OF NASSAU LIFE 200 YEARS AGO



Glimpsing through a fascinating
window on a long-lost Bahamas

By Larry Smith

S John Cleese
used to
say..." And now
for something
completely different."

Tough Call enjoyed some
esoteric reading last weekend
that's worth sharing, even
though it's unrelated to any-
thing in particular that's hap-
pening today. It was a “delight-
ful document” published by the
Bahamas Historical Society in
1968. Other than history buffs,
few are familiar with it today,
and it opens a fascinating win-
dow on a long-lost age.

The document in question
was a personal journal kept by
an American physician named
P. S. Townsend, who lived in
Nassau from December 1823
to September 1824. It is,
according to historians Michael
Craton and Gail Saunders, one
of "the three earliest sets of pri-
vate documents still surviv-
ing...from the Loyalist slavery
era."

Townsend's 68-page diary
— lodged between well-worn,
marbled board covers that also
enclosed a 113-page medical
day book — was found decades
ago in a Boston bookshop by
one William Miller, a New
York college professor who
happened to have been born in
Nassau. After his death,
Miller's widow gave the jour-
nal to the Bahamas Historical
Society, which transcribed the
handwritten notes and pub-
lished it as a slim booklet in
1968.

The diary begins with
Townsend's embarkation for
Nassau aboard a square-rigged
sailing ship from New York:
"There being a good breeze
from the northward, the sails
were unbent, and in a few sec-
onds after the ship loosened
from the wharf she was under
weigh,” he wrote on December
10, 1823. His fellow passengers
included wealthy Loyalist mer-
chants and their servants, as
well as several "poor Irish peo-
ple in steerage."

During his sojourn in Nas-
sau, Townsend witnessed the
declining days of the decadent
plantation society that the Loy-
alists had tried to build in the
Bahamas following the Ameri-
can War of Independence. His
notes mostly record the activi-
ties of the Bahamian social elite
and make no political refer-
ences at all. But the slave trade
had already been abolished,
and it would be only a few
more years before slavery itself
came to an end throughout the
British Empire.

Six days after leaving New
York, he and his fellow trav-
ellers were on the lookout for
Hole in the Wall — "a perfo-
rated rock which serves as the
great signpost to mariners going
into this part of the west indies.
It is on the extremity of Aba-
co." This was several years
before a lighthouse was erected
on this spot in 1836 to guide
vessels away from the island's
fringing reef.

"We were not without our
apprehensions of meeting with
pirates, particularly as we had
heard of their having been late-
ly seen off the Hole in the
Wall,” Townsend wrote. It had
been almost a century since the
death of Governor Woodes
Rogers who had put down the
pirate republic of the Bahamas,
but attacks on regional ship-
ping continued well into the
19th century. In 1820, more
than 50 pirate attacks were
reported in the Florida Straits
alone, and wrecking was also a
lucrative trade for Bahamians.

It is clear from Townsend's

od

descriptions that all the islands
he passed from Abaco to New
Providence were covered with
low "brush wood" punctuated
by the occasional tall coconut
palm — with not a casuarina to
be seen. These invasive and
destructive trees, which now
blanket our coastlines, were not
introduced to the Bahamas
until the 1920s.

As they approached Nassau
Dr Townsend noticed several
houses on Rose Island. Just
over the bar they were met in a
small boat by the harbour pilot,
who brought them to a safe
anchorage some 200 yards off
Fort Nassau — where the
British Colonial Hilton now
stands. The passengers were
then rowed in a small boat to
one of the piers built out from
the shore. Even by moonlight,
Townsend marvelled, the water
was so clear they could see the
bottom.

Parade

On landing they passed
through along Bay Street to a
mansion which faced "an
oblong open green.” This was
the western parade, also called
Fleeming Square, and located
roughly where the British Colo-
nial Hilton's driveway is today.
Adjacent to the parade ground
he saw black troops stationed at
Fort Nassau, which was not
demolished until some 13 years
after Townsend's visit.

The grand mansion over-
looking the parade where
Townsend lived for the next 10
months was the home of the
Honourable James Moss, a for-
mer Liverpudlian and member
of the governor's council whom
historians describe as "the
lynchpin of Nassau's new mer-
chant oligarchy.”

Bay Street at this time con-
sisted chiefly of "wooden build-
ings with long sheds or piazzas
and a profusion of windows,
mostly occupied as stores of dry
goods, hardware, etc." South
of the main drag the streets
were more residential "except-
ing the courthouse where the
legislature meet." But,
Townsend noted, "There is a
want of neatness...in fact the
scenery connected with the
quietness of the town gives it a
look of desolation and ruin."

He goes on to describe a for-
mal dinner at Government
House, well lubricated by wine
and champagne. Starters con-
sisted of a mixture of fruit and
nuts, followed by turtle steak
and turtle soup. There were
about 40 guests, including the
house speaker, the chief justice,
and some military men. After-
wards the guests played cards
until midnight.

In fact, Townsend's journal
records an endless succession
of dinners, balls, picnics and
excursions — including sailing
trips to Rose Island and Hog
Island — with upwards of 30
dishes served at a time. These
included roast goose and duck,
corned beef, pigeon pie, ham,
turkey, lamb, baked crab and
local as well as cold water fish.
Often there was dancing in the
courtyard to a piano. The chief
justice's ball on new year's day
was the most lavish celebration
he attended, with about 100
other members of the island's
social elite.

" After coffee, tea, cake, etc
danced a succession of tedious,

Zi > .
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laborious country dances till 4
next morning, allowing a short
time for supper about 1 o'clock.
The music was very good, two
fifes (black) from the garrison,
two or three fiddles, tam-
bourine and drum.”

Townsend also describes
outlying areas of Nassau. Out
east, "by a pleasant good road
along the harbour", there were
houses scattered along the
waterfront for a mile past St
Matthew's Church. Blair at that
time was a small farming estate,
and beyond that on the East-
ern Road was "a group of
handsome buildings and trees
which Mr Moss told me was the
Hermitage, (a country seat)
now deserted and left to go to
ruin in consequence of the fam-
ily feeling a repugnance to
reside where the father and sev-
eral others had died.”

Some distance beyond the
Hermitage he described a col-
lection of "mean houses occu-
pied by (mixed race) fishermen
and wreckers, whose small craft
is moored out a few yards from
shore." This was most likely to
have been Creek Village, a
coastal extension of the Fox
Hill community.

He also visited Vendue
House downtown (now the
Pompey Museum), which he
described as "a place of great
resort (that) serves as a
lounge.” But rather than slaves,
the goods on sale were salvaged
by wreckers, who Townsend
called "licensed smugglers".
Despite this opprobrium, the
general perception was that
without such commerce the

either lineally or collaterally
descended from the founder of
Nassau and his associates
(Blackbeard)...The Nassau peo-
ple are called conchs and the
inhabitants upon the out islands
are denominated as crabs."

And some things never
change. Townsend records
commiserating with a fellow
doctor in Nassau who was
drowning in a sea of uncol-
lectible receivables.

Excursion

His account of an excursion
out west to the Moss farm
known as the Grove (it was
subdivided in the 1920s), notes
that the beaches along the route
were covered with sea grape
trees which "form an excellent
shelter from the sun". The oth-
er side of the road as lined by a
fine stone wall composed of
pieces of coral rock. Fort Char-
lotte, which we passed, is built
of the same."

The farm grew an abun-
dance of herbs, fruits and veg-
etables, and raised deer, geese,
ducks, chickens and pigeons.
During Townsend's stay Moss
"received the visits of some 10
or 12 of his slaves who had
returned from gathering guinea
corn in the fields. There are
about 60 altogether on this
estate and the others near it.
The slaves whom I saw here
and have seen in New Provi-
dence since my arrival are all
comfortably dressed."

His descriptions of the activ-
ities of the black population
focused on Junkanoo and reli-
gion. He noted that the slaves
get a three-day vacation with
extra food and rum at Christ-
mas when whites were "regaled
until 3 or 4 in the morning with
some bad music on hoarse
cracked drums and fifes by
groups of negroes parading the

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to the failed salt pans on Hog
Island near the lighthouse that
were built by a New Yorker
named Seton. He also visited a
deserted barracks on Hog
Island for an afternoon picnic
(or maroon) with the governor
and other wealthy guests. The
snacks included salmon, corned
beef and pickled oysters
washed down with plenty of
wine.

"We embarked about lpm a
little behind the ordnance
house on the parade a few
yards from Mr Moss' (house).
After sailing till 3pm we
debarked at the
barracks...Walked through the
sandy paths among the bay
cedar bushes and wild grape
and other shrubs... to one of
the three small buildings which
compose the barracks."

At the time of Townsend's
visit there were probably 3,000
slaves on New Providence (plus
mulattoes and free blacks) and
less than 1,800 whites. With
such a small isolated elite, visi-
tors were quickly recruited to
the local social scene.
Townsend was persuaded to
play a part in an amateur the-
atrical production (Who Wants
a Guinea, an 1805 comedy by
George Coleman) on a stage
set up in the courthouse.

"Before 7 the house was
crowded — only 160 tickets had
been issued each at a dollar, so
that the company on the bench-
es was composed chiefly of the
first people in town,” he wrote.
"I recognised all my acquain-
tances."

Other activities of the colo-
nial elite included official cere-









uae ed

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ment, and the firing of artillery
salutes. Townsend describes
the funeral of the wife of Abra-
ham Eve, a prominent loyalist
and member of the governor's
council: "Two black persons
went before with lanterns in
case night should come on
before the service is over...The
negroes like to go to funer-
als...They followed to the num-
ber of 20 or 30,.. amounting to
more, I think, than the whites.
Some dozen gigs driven by ser-
vants brought up the rear. The
corpse was carried first in to
the church. The burial ground is
Potter's Field in the western
skirts of the town where all the
whites are placed without dis-
tinction of rank."

During the summer of 1824,
Townsend actually got to prac-
tise medicine in Nassau by
standing in for Dr Tynes, the
chief medical officer, while he
visited Crooked Island. Tynes’
responsibilities included the
poor house, the jail, the public
health department and his pri-
vate patients. And Townsend's
journal ends with a series of
perfunctory comments about
medical treatments given to a
wide range of patients — from
slaves to visiting sailors to the
colonial elite.

He left the Bahamas shortly
after this stint in the real world
— his journal somehow ending
up in an antique bookstore in
Boston, eventually giving us a
glimpse of what life was like in
Nassau 200 years ago.

What do you think? Send com-
ments to larry@tribunemedia.net



Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



‘How we tried to save Jett Travolta’

FROM page one

Also expected to give evidence today is Mr
Travolta’s lawyer, Mike Ossi, and

Ronald Zupancic, who has been on Mr Tra-
volta’s staff for the past 23 years.

In court yesterday Derrex Rolle, an emer-
gency medical technician, said that at about
10.33am on January 2, he and his driver Light-
bourne, left the Eight Mile Rock Clinic for Old
Bahama Bay. Rolle said that when they arrived at
10.45, they met about 10 people standing at the
entrance of room 1021. Rolle testified that in
the bathroom hallway he saw a young male, lat-
er identified as Jett Travolta, lying on his back.

“He was lying down on his back and there
was no sign of life,” Rolle told the court. Rolle
said that he met a young man performing CPR on
Jett with an AED machine. According to Rolle
there was also a physician there.

“He told me to continue doing CPR and take
him (Jett ) to the hospital.” Rolle told the court
that Jett had not yet been pronounced dead.
Rolle said that Jett was put in the ambulance
where he continued performing CPR. According
to Rolle, John Travolta and two other men were
in the back of the ambulance with him while
Travolta’s wife Kelly Preston sat in the front of
the ambulance. He testified that while heading to
the Rand Memorial Hospital, they were inter-
cepted in the area of Bartlett Hill, Eight Mile
Rock, by another ambulance and changed dri-
vers.

According to Rolle, Lightbourne switched
places with Marcus Garvey. Rolle said that the

Legal Notice

two men who were in the back of the ambulance
also got into the unit with Lightbourne while
Selvin Strachan got into the unit with him and the
Travoltas. Rolle said he was responsible for fill-
ing out the transport of patient form, which he
completed at the hospital.

Selvin Strachan, emergency medical service
manager and paramedic told the court that on the
morning of January 2, he heard the call go out to
the West End area and contacted the dispatched
unit, informing them to update him on the nature
of the call because there was conflicting infor-
mation coming from that area.

Strachan said that he subsequently instructed
Garvey to take him to intercept the unit so that
he could administer further medical treatment to
the patient. He testified that once they inter-
cepted the unit, he took over medical care of
the patient who was unresponsive and had no
pulse.

Strachan explained that if a patient is not an
adult and the parents refuse medical assistance
for the child, the child would have to have vital
signs and the parents would have to be informed
of the consequences of not seeking medical atten-
tion.

Inspector Andrew Wells, who was attached to
the West End Police Station at the time of the
incident, said that he went to Old Bahama Bay
around 10.30 am on January 2, after receiving cer-
tain information. Inspector Wells said he pro-
ceeded to room 1022 of the Old Bahama Bay

NOTICE
PROSPECT MADISON LIMITED

as ens

?

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PROSPECT MADISON LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued

and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEW ACCARDI INC.

—

i

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NEW ACCARDI INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

The Bahamas Utilities Co-operative
Credit Union Limited

NOTICE OF SPECIAL
GENERAL MEETING

A Special General Meeting of
the Bahamas Utilities Co-operative
Credit Union Limited
will be held on

Friday, October 2nd, 2009

at
6:00 p.m.
in
The Patrick A. Bain Training Room
at
The Bahamas Co-operative League Building
Russell Road, Oakes Field

PURPOSE OF THE MEETING

The purpose of the meeting is to seek approval
from the membership for a merger with National
Workers Co-operative Credit Union Limited. Note
that the Annual General Meeting held May 28th,
2009, authorized the Board of Directors to seek
alliance with a larger credit union.

Secretary: Dexter Cartwright



FROM page one

of sea rise would result in a
decline in the Bahamas’ GDP
by more than 2.5 per cent and
almost 2.5 per cent for
Guyana," Mr Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said.

He added that these esti-
mates are conservative since
they include only the damage in
zones that would be inundated
by the rise.

They do not include damage
from storm surges, and they use
existing patterns of develop-
ment and land use not taking

Hotel and noticed that a person was receiving
medical attention inside. Inspector Wells said
that as he did not want to get in the way, he
stood outside the room. Inspector Wells testi-
fied that around 1lam an ambulance arrived,
with two occupants — Derrex Rolle and Light-
bourne who he recalled was the passenger.
Inspector Wells told the court that after about 15
minutes the paramedics, John Travolta, Dr Fer-
nandez and his nurse as well as a group of Cau-
casian people left the room and got into the
ambulance.

He said he saw Lightbourne having a conver-
sation with Mr Travolta and then hand him a
clipboard with some papers in it. Inspector Wells
said that shortly thereafter Lightbourne called
him and said that Mr Travolta wanted him to
take his son directly to Freeport International
Airport. According to Inspector Wells, Light-
bourne asked him to witness a refusal for medical
attention. Wells said that he signed the form and
gave it back to Lightbourne. Inspector Wells said
that the ambulance then drove off and he
attempted to follow but could not keep up in
the car he was driving. He said that he later
arrived at the hospital some 20 minutes later to
further investigate the matter.

Nathan Moody, director of operations at Old
Bahama Bay, told the court during cross-exami-
nation by Mr Shurland, that on the morning of
January 2, he picked up Dr Fernandez and his
wife from the West End clinic and took them to

room 1021 at Old Bahama Bay. There he said he
saw John Travolta performing CPR on his son
Jett. Moody told the court that Dr Fernandez
and his wife tended to Jett until the ambulance
arrived. Moody testified that he assisted in putting
Jett on the gurney and that consideration had
been given to taking Jett to the United States by
plane. He admitted that he had given police a
statement in which he indicated that he saw Jett
being taken from one ambulance to the next but
denied saying so yesterday. After perusing his
statement, Mr Shurland then asserted that he
had lied to police. Mr Moody said, however, that
it had not been his intention.

West End and Bimini MP Obie Wilchcombe
is expected to be among the prosecution wit-
nesses to take the witness stand today.

A jury of six women and three men was select-
ed on Monday to hear the case. Bridgewater, 49,
and Lightbourne, 47, are accused of conspiring to
extort and attempting to extort money from Mr
Travolta between January 2 and 20 by means of
threats. Ms Bridgewater is also accused of abet-
ment to extortion. Ms Bridgewater is represent-
ed by attorneys Murrio Ducille and Krysta Smith.
Mr Lightbourne is represented by attorney Carl-
son Shurland and Mary Bain pro bono. Director
of Public Prosecutions Bernard Turner, Neil
Brathwaite and Garvin Gaskin are prosecuting
the case. Prosecutors are expected to call 14 wit-
nesses. Ms Bridgewater and Mr Lightbourne
were arraigned on the charges in late January
and arraigned again before Senior Justice Allen
on April 28 after prosecutors presented a Vol-
untary Bill of Indictment. They have both plead-
ed not guilty to the charges.

Climate change seen as threat to Bahamas economy

into account the “considerable”
development that may occur in
years to come, he continued.

His comments came a day
before American President
Barack Obama warned world
leaders that the threat of cli-
mate change could lead to an
"irreversible catastrophe" if left
unchecked.

"No nation, however large
or small, wealthy or poor, can
escape the impact of climate
change.

“Rising sea levels threaten
every coastline.

“More powerful storms and
floods threaten every continent.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRAND PAVILION
CORPORATION

——

Fs

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

Section 138 (8) of

the International

Business

Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of GRAND
PAVILION CORPORATION has been completed;

a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
BUNT IMP. CORPORATION

as

-

More frequent drought and
crop failures breed hunger and
conflict in places where hunger
and conflict already thrive.

“On shrinking islands, fami-
lies are already being forced to
flee their homes as climate
refugees.

"The security and stability of
each nation and all peoples —
our prosperity, our health, our
safety — are in jeopardy.

"And the time we have to
reverse this tide is running out,"
Mr Obama said during his
speech to the United Nations
on climate change.

Negotiations

As a member of CARICOM,
the Bahamas has been part of
negotiations of a draft of the
UN's Declaration for a New
Climate Change Agreement.
The document will be finalised
in December at the UN Con-
ference of Parties in Denmark.

Caribsave is a partnership
between the Caribbean Com-
munity Climate Change Cen-
tre (CCCCC) and the Univer-
sity of Oxford, which addresses
the impacts and challenges sur-
rounding climate change,
tourism, the environment, eco-

nomic development and the
community livelihoods across
the Caribbean.

Comprising seven core objec-
tives, the Caribsave Partner-
ship, with a projected budget
of $35 million over five years,
focuses on sectoral, destina-
tional and national vulnerabili-
ty and adaptive capacity assess-
ments and strategy develop-
ment.

In addition, the initiative
focuses on socio-economic and
environmental policies and
implementation, the impacts of
climate change on key sectors
and their integral relationship
to tourism in the Caribbean,
the development of carbon off-
set projects and carbon neutral
destination status and capacity
building and skills transfer
across the Caribbean.

In the Bahamas, the island
of Eleuthera will be used for
the case study.

The two-day workshop —
held at the Sheraton Nassau
Beach Resort on September 21-
22 — featured presentations by
a cross-section of stakeholders
in the Caribbean and the Uni-
versity of Oxford.

Inmate charged with murder

FROM page one

It is alleged that between September 7 and 10, Moss intention-

ally caused Albury’s death.

Eleven witnesses are listed on court dockets. Moss was not
required to enter a plea to the murder charge. He will remain on
remand at Her Majesty’s Prison and is expected to appear in
Court 11, Nassau Street, on September 25 for a fixture hearing.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRIDEDON VALLEY INC.

—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BUNT IMP. CORPORATION has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PICADILLIC CIRCUS LTD.

— —

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PICADILLIC CIRCUS LTD. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GRIDEDON VALLEY INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice
NOTICE
GIANT STEPS
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— *,——

f

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Compa-
nies Act 2000, the dissolution of GIANT STEPS
INVESTMENTS LTD. has

Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

been completed; a

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



at Carter/AP P



ABOVE: fadiananalie Colts
quarterback Peyton Manning
celebrates after the Colts
defeated the Miami Dolphins.

LEFT: Indianapolis Colts tight
end Dallas Clark shakes off a

tackle attempt by Miami Dol-

phins safety Gibril Wilson on

his way to a touchdown dur-

ing the first quarter of an NFL
football game Monday, Sept.

21, 2009, in Miami.

Manning rallies Colts to
27-23 win over Dolphins

FOOTBALL
MIAMI
Associated Press

PEYTON Manning stood on the
sideline, arms folded, glancing occa-
sionally at the scoreboard to see the
time ticking off.

But the Miami Dolphins could play
keepaway for only so long. When
Manning eventually made his way onto
the field, the Dolphins couldn’t stop
him.

Manning had the ball for less than 15
minutes but made the most of his
chances, helping the Indianapolis Colts
come from behind four times to beat
Miami 27-23 Monday night.

Manning broke Johnny Unitas’ fran-
chise record for victories by a quar-





SWITZERLAND’ S$ Fabian acai pedals ann a training
session ahead of the road cycling World Championships, in
Mendrisio, Switzerland, Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2009.

Cancellara aims for double | ===";
gold on home roads

terback, and the latest win ranked with
the oddest.

The Dolphins were 15 for 21 on
third-down conversions and 1 for 1 on
fourth down. Their lone turnover came
on the final play, they punted only
once and they controlled the ball for a
team-record 45 minutes.

They had to wonder how they lost.
The answer: Manning.

“To have as few plays as he did and
to do what he did, you just don’t see
that,” Miami quarterback Chad Pen-
nington said.

Manning took only three snaps in
the third quarter and had just three
possessions in the second half. Watch-
ing most of the night from the bench,
he knew he would need to make the
most of his opportunities.

“T hate to say, but we have done it

Alessandro Trovati/AP Photo

before a few times,” he said. “We just
kind of stay loose over there.”

Manning threw an 80-yard touch-
down pass to Dallas Clark on the first
play from scrimmage, and hit Pierre
Garcon for a 48-yard score with 3:18
left for the game’s final points.

“Tt was about being efficient when it
counted, in the fourth quarter,” Man-
ning said. “That’s really what the
game’s about.”

He took a little sheen off the Dol-
phins’ glitzy home opener. They rolled
out an orange carpet for the pregame
arrival of new owner Stephen Ross’
celebrity partners, and the crowd
included Serena and Venus Williams,
Marc Anthony and Jennifer Lopez,
Jimmy Buffett and Colts rooter Tiger
Woods.

But Manning was the big star. He

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CYCLING
MENDRISIO, Switzerland
Associated Press

OLYMPIC champion Fabi-
an Cancellara will attempt to
go for double gold at the road
world championships when he
returns to his native Switzer-
land for the first time in 13
years.

Cancellara is the favorite in
Thursday’s time trial, which
he won in 2006 and ’07. He
also has Sunday’s grueling
road race in his sights.

“I’m waiting with impa-
tience for these races,” Can-
cellara said Tuesday. “For me,
it’s one time in my life that I
have the chance to race to be
the world champion at home.”

Britain’s Bradley Wiggins
will challenge in the time trial,

while a strong Italian team
will chase a record fourth
straight road race title.

Yet the 28-year-old Cancel-
lara, nicknamed “Spartacus”
for his competitive streak and
strength, has proven he can
double up.

He took bronze in the Bei-
jing Olympics road race last
year and struck gold four days
later in the time trial, though
the exertion left him too
exhausted to go for a worlds
hat trick.

Cancellara is relishing the
expectation of his home fans
on the Switzerland-Italy bor-
der.

“We’re in a cycling region
of Switzerland. I feel good. I
have the mentality for win-
ning and that’s important,” he
said.

ii © 0 birch

finished 14 for 23 for 303 yards, and the
Colts improved to 2-0. The Dolphins
fell to 0-2 even though they had 239
yards rushing, including 107 with the
wildcat.

“Nobody is world champion after
two weeks,” Miami linebacker Joey
Porter said, “but we’re not good
enough to give games away.”

The Colts had the ball for only 14:53,
the lowest time of possession for a win-
ning team in the NFL since 1977. They
ran 35 plays to 84 for the Dolphins.

“Tt’s really disheartening,” Miami
coach Tony Sparano said. “That’s
exactly the formula to beat that team.”

Indy trailed 10-7, 13-10 and 20-13,
but each time pulled even. Down 23-20
after Miami scored with 3:50 left, the
Colts rallied one more time with a big
play by Garcon.



TUE
INBRIEF



Jaguars
experiencing
more lapses -
ant more losses

FOOTBALL
JACKSONVILLE, Fla.
Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE
coach Jack Del Rio stood
on the sideline and
watched Kurt Warner pick
his defense apart.

Short passes, missed
tackles, first downs and
scores, Del Rio saw the
same things repeatedly dur-
ing the Jaguars’ 31-17 loss
to Warner and the Arizona
Cardinals on Sunday.

Del Rio considered
doing something about it,
too.

“T thought about doing
a Woody Hayes,” he said,
referring to the former
Ohio State coach who was
fired for punching a Clem-
son player during the 1978
Gator Bowl. “I thought
about coming off the side-
line. I was going to get
somebody down myself.”

The Jags’ defense sure
could have used the help.

Warner completed 24 of
26 passes for 243 yards,
with two touchdowns and
no interceptions, and broke
the NFL single-game
record for completion per-
centage. The Jaguars (0-2)
had no sacks, got little pres-
sure and were victimized
by a short passing game —
some of the same issues
that plagued them last sea-
son.

The most glaring prob-
lem was missed tackles.

“He was throwing the
ball quick and making you
tackle,” Del Rio said.
“Yards after the catch was
a big point of emphasis
leading into this week and
we did not handle that very
well. We did not tackle the
short pass game that we
knew we would get.

“You absolutely cannot
be any good on defense if
you don’t do that. That’s
an area we must and will
improve in.”

Jacksonville struggled
most of last season on
defense, and Del Rio
responded by parting ways
with coordinator Gregg
Williams, secondary coach
Donnie Henderson, line-
backer Mike Peterson, cor-
nerback Brian Williams,
defensive end Paul Spicer
and safety Gerald Sens-
abaugh.

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS
aye BACH ar

OR





VOLLEYBALL
GSSSA MEETING

THE Government Sec-
ondary Schools Sports
Association is scheduled to
hold a meeting for all
coaches 4pm today at R M
Bailey Secondary High
School.

The purpose of the meet-
ing is to discuss final plans
for the start of the GSSSA
volleyball season that is slat-

dio Beano wlaicesy
ec eae MINISTER of Youth, Sports and Culture

VOLLEYBALL Desmond Bannister speaks during the
GSSSA SEASON first annual North and Central Andros
OPENING Back to School Basketball Classic in

THE Government Sec- Staniard Creek...

ondary Schools Sports
Association is scheduled to
begin its 2009 volleyball sea-
son on Monday.

Eight teams are regis-
tered in both the senior
boys and girls divisions,
which will play at the D W
Davis and CI Gibson Gym-
nasiums.

The junior boys and girls
divisions are also made up
of eight teams which will
play at the R M Bailey and
Tom ‘The Bird’ Grant out-
door volleyball courts.

SOFTBALL
BAISS OPENING

THE Bahamas Associa-
tion of Independent Sec-
ondary Schools will begin
its 2009 softball season
today at various playing
Sites.

The senior boys and
junior girls will be in action
today, starting at 4pm. The
senior girls and junior boys
will start competition on

Thursday. BANNISTER looks over craft work by Cynthia Armbrister...

MINISTRY OF LABOUR & SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
THE PRICE CONTROL ACT, 1971
CHAPTER 338
THE PRICE CONTROL
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{ANEMDMENT) {| REGULATIONS, 2002

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MAOMUW WHOLESALE SELLING PRICE
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5 5

INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT

(PARA
NEW PROVIDENCE

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DIESEL OIL
| PART C ;

INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT

CRAND BAHAMA
{EXCLUDING
FREEPORT)

SUN OIL LINITED LEAD FREE bd
[Shel]
JDESELOL | a
PART O
WOT IMGLUDING SEA FREIGHT
ABACO, ANDROS
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NOT IWCLUDING SEA
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PERMANENT SECRETARY



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BANNISTER poses with Staniard Creek resident Donna Cargill, as she
sells her baked goods, such as tarts, cakes and a special sausage
quiche...

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We thank you for your patronage
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any inconvenience caused.



Volleyball to
get underway

FROM page 11

all returning from last year,
along with the introduction
of the Perpgre Enterprise
Champions, the Defence
Force and a youthful team.

“T think it will be another
competitive season, especial-
ly in the men’s division,”
Smith said. “On any given
night, if you don’t come with
your game plan or you don’t
execute it, you could be beat-
en.

“With one of two players
moving around the league
from one team to another, I
think the league will be very
competitive.”

Games will be played night-
ly on Wednesday, Thursday
and Friday, along with Sun-
day afternoons.

Going into the season
opener on Sunday, here’s how
the four coaches assess their
teams:

Lady Vixens

Loaded with national team
players, the Vixens will rely
heavenly on the trio of Laval
Sands, Cherise Rolle and
Tamasine Poitier- Emmanuel.

Coach Joe Smith said the
road to the championships
will once again have to go
through his Scottsdale team.

“We’re looking good. We
have basically the same team
from last year, but we have
our setter, Tia Wilson, back
home from school and _ that
will allow Laval to play our
natural position as the off set-
ter,” Smith said.

“We also have the leader-
ship in veteran Jackie Cony-
ers and we still have the Rolle
sisters (and Cherise), so I still
think we are going to be the
team to beat.

“The championship will still
go through us, regardless of
who the other teams bring.
We will defend our crown and
we will retain our crown. We
think very positive, we train
hard and we play very hard.”

Although his men’s Scotts-
dale team is not playing on
opening day, Smith said they
are also looking very good
with the return home of
Prince Wilson. He is expected
to hook up with veteran
Mario Dean and setter Javari
Southard.

Lady Truckers

DeVince Smith, who dou-
bles as the coach for the run-
ners-up, said he hasn’t had a
full squad out to practice yet,
but he’s convinced that as the
season progresses, they will
round into championship
form.

“Once we put our team
together, we will have to play
our way in shape,” said Smith,
who still has the big three of
Kelsie Johnson, Margaret
‘Muggie’ Albury and Freder-
icka McPhee to rely on.

“T still think we will be com-
petitive because we’ve been
practicing on some defense
and offensively we have
always been strong at the
net.”

Defenders

With a dual coaching role,
DeVince Smith said with
players such as Jan ‘Wire’ Pin-
der, Sherwin Arthurs and
Maurice ‘Cheeks’ Smith, he
doesn’t see why they can’t
repeat as champions.

“We have added a couple
of players like national team
setter Tony Simon and uni-
versal player Shedrick Forbes,
who will provide most of the
offense and defense that the
team kind of lacked last
year,” Smith said. “So once
again, I think we will be a
very competitive team.”

Technicians

With Renaldo Knowles and
Jamaal Ferguson now back
home, coach Adlabert Ingra-
ham said Ron ‘Box’
Demeritte should have all the
help he needs to get back to
championship status.

“We had a lot of problems
last year offensively finishing
a lot of games,” he said. “But
we have sorted out that prob-
lem, so I expect us to be very
competitive.

“Like we always do, we
look at the season as a foot-
stool for us to travel abroad.
But we will be just as com-
petitive as we were last year.
Hopefully this year, we will
be able to recapture the title
with the experience and play-
ers that we have this year.”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE



S
- k.

PAGE 11

OF

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009



ts

PAGE 9 ¢ International sports news

Volleyball to get
underway with
Championship
rematches

MARVIN BAIN, of the Red Bay
Westerners, takes a warm-up
shot during the tourney...

Basketball tourney ‘brought
hope to people of Andros’

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of Youth,
Sports and Culture
Desmond Bannister said
he was very impressed with
what he saw on the first
day of the North/Central
Andros Back-to-School
Basketball Classic.

Bannister was a part of

the visiting delegation that — jyigg gighal Bahamas Jamie B Morris, Minister of State for

was on hand in Staniard
Creek to christen the first

Culture Charles Maynard and MP for South Andros

of four courts that have Picewell Forbes can be seen during the first annual North
been reconstructed by con- and Central Andros Back to School Basketball Classic in
tractor Emile Knowles. Staniard Creek, Andros...

“The event brought a lot
of hope to the people of Andros,” Ban-
nister stated. “There was no bad inci-
dents, just young people looking for
somewhere positive to compete and dis-
play their talents.”

About 14 teams showed up to par-
ticipate in the tournament, which will be
spread over the next three Saturdays
before the eventual champions are
crowned.

From the competition displayed on
the opening day, Bannister said the
remainder of the tournament should be
a very competitive one. He noted that
the players were all enthusiastic about
participating and the fans showed up
in droves to support them.

In addition to the basketball compe-
tition, Bannister said local vendors were
able to take advantage of the opportu-
nity to showcase and sell their crafts,
inclusive of food, drinks and souvenir
items.

“We’re just thankful that we were
able to do it in that community,” said
Bannister, a native son of the soil from
Staniard Creek.

Among the dignitaries joining Ban-
nister were Minister of State for Culture
Charles Maynard, Vincent Peet, MP
for North Andros, Picewell Forbes, MP
for South Andros, Island administra-

tors Dr Huntley Christie and Jackson
McIntosh and Clyde Bowleg, who rep-
resented the Ministry of Education.

Bannister commended Brian Cleare,
the ministry’s Family Island coordinator
from Andros, who was responsible for
organising the tournament.

He also praised Emile Knowles of
Knowles Construction and Develop-
ment Limited for the manner in which
he was able to transform the basket-
ball court.

Knowles has also done the same for
the other three settlements where the
tournament will continue over the next
three Saturdays in Andros.

This Saturday, the tournament will
switch to Red Bays. Then it’s off to
Lowe Sound on Saturday, October 3
before the final is staged in Fresh Creek
on Saturday, October 10.

“T think the people in Red Bays are
very appreciative of the facilities they
have now,” Bannister said. “I know
when I went there before we contracted
Mr Knowles, the facilities there was
really in bad shape.

“Now the kids in Red Bays have
something that is very nice for them to
play on. There is a lot of talent in Red
Bays, so I think we will see some posi-
tive things coming from there.”

MINISTER of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister greets a young basketball fan

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ew Providence

Volleyball

Association

president

DeVince
Smith said with a number of
players returning home from
college, the 2009 season
should be a very competitive
one.

The season is scheduled to
get underway Sunday with a
rematch of last year’s cham-
pionship series in both the
men’s and women’s divisions
at the D W Davis Gymnasi-

CUP eT a ee ee ee ee eee
















Manning
», vallies Colts
to 27-23 win
over Dolphins
See page 9

‘O09 season should be
‘very competitive’

participate in the ladies’ divi-

In the ladies opener at 4 sion are the College of the
pm, runners-up Johnson Lady Bahamas Lady Caribs, the
Truckers will try to knock off | Lady Techs, Lady Hornets
the defending champions and possibly the Royal
Scottsdale Vixens, while in Bahamas Defence Force
the men’s feature contest to Stingrays and another youth-
follow, runners-up Techni- ful team.
cians will face defending The men’s division will
Scotiabank include Da Basement, Police,

Intruders and COB Caribs,

In addition to the above,
the other teams registered to SEE page 10

FOR

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Nassau, Bahamas

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM









Reduced work Cable ur

means ‘ow
not the time
to open up’
legal sector

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

WITH many of the 1,010
attorneys at the Bahamas Bar
unable to find jobs, and new
entrants finding to difficult to
obtain a pupillage, two attor-
neys yesterday argued that
“now is not the time” to open
the Bahamian legal profes-
sion to specialist foreign attor-
neys.

Dr Ear] Cash, the Higgs &
Johnson attorney and part-
ner, addressing a seminar
organised by his law firm, said
both the Bar Association and
Immigration Department
were open to permitting for-
eign attorneys to enter the
Bahamas as registered asso-
ciates to train their Bahamian
counterparts.

Dr Cash, opposing a
motion suggesting that the
Bahamian financial services
industry will contract unless
the legal services profession
‘opens up’, said firms such as
Graham, Thompson & Co,
Callenders & Co and McK-
inney, Bancroft & Hughes
had all brought in foreign
attorneys to help train their
Bahamian lawyers. In addi-
tion, Bahamian attorneys
have gone abroad to train and
work with foreign law firms.

Questioning “how much
further do we need to go”, Dr
Cash said he and others were
“not close minded”, yet were
worried that an unchecked
influx of foreign attorneys
would deprive their Bahami-
an counterparts of jobs, espe-
cially during a recession.

He also called for the
Bahamas Bar Association to
establish some kind of con-
tinued education and training
programme to- ensure
Bahamian attorneys could
compete with their interna-
tional peers, and suggested
that the Dupuch Law School
offer Master’s Degrees in spe-
cialist areas such as law, trusts,
securitisations, shipping, tax-
ation and international busi-
ness transactions.

Dr Cash was supported by
Cheryl Bazard, partner at
Bazard, Lamour & Compa-
ny, who urged that “now is
not the time to open up”.
Instead, she called for
investors and companies to
take advantage of legal advice
from Bahamian attorneys.

THE TRIBUNE ©

uSINeSS

WEDNESDAY,

SEPTEMBER 23,

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

able Bahamas
has warned that
proposals for
retail price reg-
ulation in the
communications sector could
“potentially jeopardise future
investment” in the sector,
again arguing that classifying
the company as having signif-
icant market power (SMP) in
cable TV and high speed data
services was “unfounded”.

Legal sector

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian legal pro-
fession must stop being
“parochial” and “open up” if
this nation’s financial services
industry is to survive and
grow, a leading attorney said
yesterday, with the interna-
tional sector’s contribution to
the $300 million tax revenues
generated per annum by the
banking sector shrinking
every year.

Philip Dunkley, senior part-
ner at Higgs & Johnson, said
the Bahamian financial ser-
vices industry was likely to
keep contracting unless the

* BISX-listed firm warns investment in communications sector

could be ‘potentially jeopardised’ by price regulation proposals



ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com

ges: No TV price control

* Says 20,000 satellite subscribers, with 21%s market share, ‘discipline’ its prices
* Warns $30 basic TV price freeze ‘unsustainable without jeopardising service quality’

* IndiGo says voice citcuit prices down 32%

Submitting its feedback on
the Government’s retail price
consultation, Cable Bahamas
said that while cable TV sub-
scriber numbers had
increased by 17.5 per cent to
74,000 over the past five

years, up from 63,000 in 2004,
it faced competition from
direct-to-home (DTH) satel-
lite services.

While these services were
not licensed to operate in the
Bahamas, they were “never-

theless a commonly used
competitive alternative” to
Cable Bahamas, the BISX-
listed utility provider esti-
mating that there were cur-
rently 20,000 DTH TV ser-
vices in this nation.

‘must open’ for financial sector future

* Attorneys urged to stop being ‘parochial’ and open
doors to offices abroad and allowing specialists in

* Ex-minister says Bahamas losing market share and
contracting because it lacks ‘gatekeepers’ to attract
investment funds, as offshore share of $300m tax
revenues declining every year



JAMES SMITH

legal profession opened up in
two respects - establishing
offices abroad to market this
jurisdiction, its products and
services to international
clients, thus attracting busi-
ness in, and also allowing spe-
cialist, highly-skilled foreign
lawyers to practice from these

shores.

“We're experiencing the
worst recession in living mem-
ory, offshore financial centres
are under an unprecedented
attack from onshore and the
Bahamas has recently lost

SEE page 4B

BTC suffers 80% fixed-line income drop in 4 years

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company (BTC)
has seen the revenues derived
from its international long dis-
tance business fall by 80.7 per
cent between 2004-2008, due
to increased competition,
although the $45 million loss
it suffered in providing fixed-
line access to consumers has
narrowed due to increased
rental charges.

In its feedback to the public
consultation on retail pricing
regulation in the communica-
tions sector, BTC, which is in
the middle of a privatisation
exercise, said it had suffered a
“significant decline” in its
once-core international long
distance revenues since 2003,
due primarily to increased
competition.

Urging newly-incorporated
regulator, the Utilities Regu-
latory and Competition
Authority (URCA), to
remove fixed-line interna-
tional long distance calls from
the services in which it was
deemed to have significant

Bahamas must sign
more than 12 TIEAs

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas will ulti-
mately be forced to sign more
than the minimum 12 Tax
Information Exchange Agree-
ments (TIEAs) demanded by
the G-20/OECD, a leading
Bahamian attorney yesterday
arguing that this nation may
have to employ “the Doctrine
of Steps” in obtaining treaties
with better “trade-based”
advantages.

John Delaney, Higgs &
Johnson’s managing partner,
said that while double taxa-
tion agreements and invest-
ment treaties were the “pre-
ferred course” to take in com-
plying with G-20/0ECD
demands, the need for the
Bahamas to meet the 12
TIEA minimum by year-end
2009 might require this nation
to bide its time in obtaining
the former types of agree-
ment.

Acknowledging that it was
difficult to see what benefits
the Bahamas and its financial
services industry could obtain
from pure TIEAs, Mr
Delaney said that 12 did not
represent the minimum num-
ber of such agreements this

* Nation will be ‘pressed’
for more tax agreements
until most G-20
nations have them

* Leading attorney says
double tax agreements
‘preferred course’ for
Bahamas to take, and
any deals offering
‘trade-based advantages’

* But may have to bide time
in completing them to
ensure TIEA deadline met

nation would sign.

“The major countries will
insist that major international
financial centres such as the
Bahamas go beyond 12,” he
told a Higgs & Johnson-
organised seminar.

“Twelve is the number to
get things going, and they will
press so that the majority, if
not all the G-20 countries,
have an agreement in my
view.”

The G-20/OECD had
already indicated they were

SEE page 4B

* $45m access deficit narrows, but BTC still making loss on line rentals
* Company calls for long distance calls to be removed
from significant market power definition

market power (SMP), BTC
said revenues from this busi-
ness segment fell by 64.5 per
cent between 2004-2005.

For 2005-2006, fixed-line
international long distance
revenues fell by a further 21.7,
and in 2006-2007 and 2007-
2008 they dropped by a fur-
ther 17.3 per cent and 16.6 per
cent respectively.

BTC added that when it
came to inter-island calls, rev-
enues from this source had

fallen by 23.6 per cent during
the period between 2004-
2008. In 2004-2005, they fell
by 5 per cent, with further
declines of 4.3 per cent, 4.8
per cent and 12.2 per cent tak-
ing place in 2005-2006, 2006-
2007, and 2007-2008 respec-
tively.

Apart from proving that
BTC is now effectively a cel-
lular company, this source
accounting for 68 per cent of
its revenues in 2007, these sta-

ROYAL FIDELITY

Ueda arm Veda 4

RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company

tistics show the impact of
competition, not only from
Systems Resource Group’s
(SRG) IndiGo Networks but
also Vonage, Skype and Mag-
ic Jack.

“Given the alternatives
available to end users with
respect to outgoing interna-
tional long distance services,
there is a case to be made to
have international long dis-

SEE page 3B

Where do you want to be?

We can get you there!

US

Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

PU lolol

St. Michael: 246.435.1955

ey EH NAR

This total, Cable Bahamas
said, was estimated to have
“doubled over the last five
years”, up from 10,000 in
2004.

It added: “Thus, DTH
Satellite TV services current-
ly account for just over 21 per
cent of the broadcast distrib-
ution services market in the
Bahamas. DTH satellite TV is
an effective competitive alter-
native to cable-based pay TV
services and, as such, serves
to discipline Cable Bahamas’
cable-based pay-TV service
prices.”

Cable Bahamas pointed out
that market share losses in the
US and Canada had resulted
in the lifting of price regula-
tion on cable T'V providers in
those countries, Canadian
regulators having determined
that once a cable company
showed it had lost 5 per cent
or more of its subscribers to
DTH satellite, its prices would
be deregulated immediately.

“Cable Bahamas believes
there is justification to do the

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



> Pension Plans

> Mutual Funds

> Stock Brokerage

> Corporate Finance

> Investment Management
> Trusts & Estate Planning

> Personal Pension Plan Accounts

> Education Investment Accounts

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Cle ola 4





URGENT NOTICE

DUE TO THE LACK OF A QUORUM
ALL MEMBERS Of
Bahama Islands Resorts & Casinos
Cooperative Credit Union (BIRCCCU)
Limited Are Urged To Attend The
Special Called Meeting
Which Will NOW Be Held

Date:

Saturday, October 3", 2009

Grounds Of The Credit Union
Time:

10:00 A.M.
Purpose of The Meeting:
To Discuss & Vote On The Proposed Opening
Up Of Our Bond To Allow Your Family To
Become Members Of BIRCCCU Ltd.



BS! OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
intemational private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is
presently accepting applications for

PRIVATE BANKING RELATIONSHIP MANAGER/MANAGED
PORTFOLIOS ADMINISTRATOR

Applicants for the position of must have a banking/financial degree or 7-10
yaars axpeneance in the offshore banking sector, have knowladge of
intamational investment instruments & money market, ability to partner with
taam mambers, must be confident regarding customer relations, investments

& portfolio management and have thorough knowledge of local legislation,
regulatory & statutory matters as wall as international banking practices,
Fluency in Italian is absolutely required

Personal qualities ;-

Excallant organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Commitment to quality and service excellence

Able to work with minimal supervision

Strong Team attitude

Financial and analytical background

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure

Responsibilities :-

Service & advise customers

Maintain & follaw up account relationships

Liaise directly with customers or their investment advisors

Monitor, analyze positions and evaluate reports

Ensure that managed portfolios are implemented according to the relevant
policies

Liaise with Portfolio Managers and other Relationship Mangers on

Meet deadlines on timely basis

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum
vitae to:-

Human Resources Manager

BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre
P. 0. Box N-7130

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kern@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted

PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



Cable urges:
No TV price
control

FROM page 1B

same in its case, given the sig-
nificance of DTH satellite
penetration in the Bahamian
market,” the company said.
Meanwhile, Cable
Bahamas also complained
that “there has been no clear-
ly defined or properly func-

tioning price review mecha-
nism in the case of basic pay
TV services. As a result, the
price for Cable Bahamas’
basic cable service has now
literally been frozen for $30
for the last 15 years”.
Calling for such a price
review mechanism to be put
in place, Cable Bahamas
warned: “Maintaining Cable

Bahamas basic cable (Pay
TV) service price at $30 going
forward is simply unsustain-
able without jeopardising ser-
vice quality.”

However, on a brighter
note, Paul Hutton-Ashkenny,
president of Systems
Resource Group (SRG),
operator of IndiGo Networks,
detailed some of the benefits



competition had brought to
Bahamian businesses and res-
idential telecoms consumers
since his firm entered the
fixed-line market in 2004.

He explained that the cost
of digital Tl business voice
circuits had fallen by 32 per
cent, with the cost of inter-
island calling and interna-
tional long distance calls
falling by 57.5 per cent and
83 per cent respectively.

UTS TT
a SIR BRC

US eT are

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

Notice to Vendors

The National Insurance Board (WTB) is prepating te make payments to % eniders by direct
bank deposits. To facilitate this, the NIB is requesting that vendors provide the necessary
banking informanen, Forms wall be distributed te venders for completion, Tf you do not

receive one, please contact us atone of the following to obtain. a copy of the fort:

|. APBankinginfot@imb-bahamas.com
2 Telephone No: (242) 502-1838, of
i.

Calleera Porm trom any New Providence NIB Local Office

The NIB requests the cooperation of all vendors as we seck to provide more efficient service,

All information will be treated as strictly conficlerttial.

>) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.by

EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (EOL
FOR PREQUALIFICATION FOR

The College of The Bahamas (COB) ts secking Expressions of Interest from qualified
hirms lo provide services amd product lor the design, supply and mstallatien of the exter:
nal landscaping, lighting and irngation systems for

(i) the Harry Moore Library and Information Centre presently under constriction at
the Oakes Field Campus of The College and

{il} the new Norther Bahamas Campus of The College presently under construction
in Freeport, Grand Bahu

Interested parties may obtain further information and a copy of the Expressions of Interest
Prequalification Application form fram:

The Office of the Vice President Finance
College of The Bahamas
(Cakes Field
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 242-302-4513/4516
Or

The Office of the Associate Vice President
College of The Bahamas
Northern Campus
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Tel: 242-352-9761

An information meeting will be held in Nassau, on Tuesday, 24th September, 200 and on
Wednesday, 30th September, 2009 in Freeport at a time and venue to be announced.

EOM's are te be submitted to the location(s) indicated in the EOT Prequalification Form in
a scaled envelope appropriately marked:
Viet President, Finance
College of The Bahamas
EXPRESSIONOF INTEREST - FEE -
insert name of applicable facility

Firms must submit a separate BO) for each facility. Al EOM's are to he submitted by 12:00)
pm (mid-day) on Friday, 9th October, 200K).



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 3B



Bad-mouthing rivals
may backfire on you

THIS week’s title sounds
like the real estate slogan:
“Location, location, loca-
tion”. Guess what? You’re
right. However, I’m not going
to talk about where you or
your business is located, but
about how and where you
talk about your competition.

Remember the old saying:
“Tf you can’t say anything
nice, don’t say anything at
all.” It may have been the old
adage years ago when you/we
were growing up, but does
the same hold true in the cut-
throat business world we all
live in? You decide.

The cynical among us
would say: “Of course not.”
Dorothy Parker perhaps
coined it best: “If you can’t
say anything nice, come over
here and sit by me.” Well, my
suggestion is don’t go over
and sit on that couch. Slan-
dering and gossip will not get
you very far.

It’s tempting to disparage
your competition. Pointing
out their weaknesses, faults
and repeating horror stories
of what has maybe happened

Promotional
Marketing

by Scott Farrington



to a client of theirs. Product
issues they have experienced,
delivery issues and so on.

So the next time you are
meeting with a client and you
talk about your competition,
try this and not that.

1. Compliment them -
WHAT? Yeah, that’s right.
Compliment who they are,
what they are etc. I mean,
they must be doing something
right because their doors are
still open. After you have
complimented them you can
then discuss the differences
between your company and
theirs.

2. Giving credibility to the
one company you're trying to
knock down. No one tries to
tear down the worst company
in the world.

If you’re attacking some-
one, even verbally, it must be
because youw’re worried about
them. So they next time you
try to knock down your com-
petition, be careful that you
are not actually doing the
opposite by giving them cred-
ibility.

I know that when some-
one does that with me, flags
go up and, in some cases, it
requires me to mvestigate the
competitor mentioned. Let
me check out the differences
myself.

3. Stop adding an unpleas-
ant aura to your reputation.

By stomping on your oppo-
nent’s neck and/or kicking
them (your competition)
when they are down, it leaves
an unpleasant aura about
who you are and your com-
pany’s corporate image.
Doing this is certainly not a
positive way to be perceived.
So be careful about not only
what you say but how you say
it.

The best way is just to
point out subtle differences

BIC suffers 80% fixed-line income drop in 4 years

FROM page 1B

tance excluded from the basked of price-reg-
ulated services,” BTC said. “The inclusion of
outgoing international long distance as part
of price regulated services impedes BTC’s abil-
ity to compete with licensed and unlicensed
operators.”

Meanwhile, BTC said a 2004 study by
National Economic Research Associates
(NERA) had pegged the access deficit it
incurred - the difference between the cost of
providing fixed line access to Bahamian con-
sumers and the revenues earned from line
rentals - at $45 million, meaning it suffered a
loss of this amount.

However, the incumbent operator added:
“Since the production of that report, the price
of access lines has increased by 58 per cent

for residential customers, from $9.50 to $15,
and by 67 per cent for business customers from
$21.25 to $36.

“While there has been a significant increase
in the price of line rentals, based on rough
estimates of 130,000 fixed lines, the increase
would not be sufficient to eliminate the access
deficit”.

While a rebalancing of BTC’s tariffs was
required, the company warned that there
would be “resistance” from some consumers
and a “buy in” would be necessary.

“This approach will significantly impact the
company’s profits, as it is forced to lower prices
for those services where price is significantly
above the cost of provision without having
the flexibility to increase prices where cost is
significantly above price,” BTC added.

FOUR CONWECTION-To THE WoRLO

PUBLIC

NOTICE

TENDER
Public Relations Assistance for
The Bahamas Telecommunications
Company Limited

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Lim-

ited is pleased to invite tenders to assist with Public
Relations initiatives for the company.

Interested firms or individuals may collect a Tender
Specification from the BTC's security desk at John F.
Kennedy, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:30
p.m., Monday through Friday from September 18th,

2009.

The deadline for submission of tenders is Thursday Oc-
tober 2nd, 2009. Tenders should be sealed and markéd
“PROPOSAL FOR PUBLIC RELATIONS ASSISTANCE INI-
TIATIVES FOR THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS
COMPANY LIMITED’ and should be delivered to the at
lention of the ‘Mr. |. Kirk Griffin Acting President and

CEO.’

BTC RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY,
OR ALL TENDERS

that show how your product
would apply more appropri-
ately than your competitor’s.
Not a positive way to be per-
ceived.

All of these marketing
strategies are certain to keep
your business on top during
these challenging economic
times. Have a productive and
profitable week!

Remember: “THOSE
WHO MARKET WILL
MAKE IT “

NB: Scott Farrington is
president of SunTee
EmbroidMe, a promotional
and marketing company spe-
cialising in uniforms, embroi-
dery, silk screen printing and
promotional products.

Established over 27 years
ago, SunTee EmbroidMe has
assisted Bahamian businesses
from various industries in
marketing themselves. Read-
ers can contact Mr Farring-
ton at SunTee EmbroidMe
on East Shirley Street, or by
e-mail at scott@sun-tee.com
or by telephone at 242-393-
3104.



207
(CLEAQUT-OR4

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
COMMON LAW & EQUITY DIVISION

IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT all that parcel of lot of land being
kncva'n as Jot Number Sixteen (16) Block Number Nineteen (19)
Centreville District, as shown on the Master Plan in the Deparment
of Lands And Surveys in the Island of New Providence.

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE Petition of JULIETTE L, RAMSEY

NOTICE

JULIETTE L. RAMSEY the Petitioner claim to be the owner in
fee simple in possession of the parcel of land and free from
encumbrances, The Petitioner has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas section 3 of the
Quicting Act, 1939 to have their Tithe to the said land investigated
and declared in a certificate of Titles to be printed by the Court in

the acoordance with che provisions of the act.

Copies of the file plan may be inspected daring normal heures. al:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Coun; and
2. The Chambers of Rumsey And Associates, Rames Building,
33 Planol, Nassau, Bahamas

Neatite is hereby piven thal any person or persons having a right
of dower or any advise claim net recoonized in the Petition shall
within thirty (20) days after the publication of the notice herein
fled in the regisiry of the Supreme Court in the city of Nassau
aforesaid and service on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement
af such claim in the prescribed Form, verified by an affidavit to
be filecl therewith. Failure of any such person to file amd serve a
statement of such claim within thirty days (30) herein will operate
asa bar to such claim.

Dated this 17 day of September, A.D, 2009)

RAMSEY AND ASSOCIATES
CHAMBER
Kumes Building
23 Planted Street
Nassau, Bahamas



LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.








FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!
Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million















Tel: 242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013
info@mariocareyrealty.com
www.marioca reyrea

EFG

Web Listing # 8377

As

Mario Carey Realty

“com Dts alaut yaw... Let's tale.

Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd

Client Relationship Officer

EFG International

Vice President

EPG International is a global private banking group headquartered in
Switzerland, offering private banking and asset management services. EPG
International's private banking businesses currently operate in 55 locations |
in over 30 countries, with circa 2,400 employees.

EG Bank & ‘Tr B

mas) Lid continues to expand as evidenced by

its new premises at Lyford Cay. EFG Bahamas has over 40 experienced
professionals and offers a full range of solutions for wealthy chents around
the globe. EPG's unique corporate culture attracts the most entrepreneurial
and most experienced professionals in the industry. To learn more, please
visit www.etgintemational.com

We are looking for a seasoned professional with at least 10 years of sales
and marketing experience in providing financial solutions to high net worth
clients and companies. Specifically, we require a professional fluent in
Portuguese, Spanish and English. The candidate must possess a solid
knowledge of investments, banking and trust services. The ability to service
and grow his/her own client book is extremely important. EPG provides a
unique and uninhibited global marketing opportunity, an open architecture
platform, and multiple booking centers.

The candidate must have a university degree. The individual must have the
required qualifications and accreditations to be registered with The Bahamas
Securities Commission. The ability to go on frequent business development
trips and work within very tight deadlines is also a necessity.

EPG offers an attractive compensation plan that includes salary, benefits
and a bonus structure directly related to profitability, Salary will be determined
by experience, and qualifications,

Only qualified professionals should submit applications by 9th October

2009 to:

EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd

Human Resources

Centre of Commerce, 2â„¢ Floor

1 Bay Street
P.O. Box SS 6289
Nassau, The Bahamas
Fax (242) 302-3487



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PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



OO —ooeaeeUS INES eee
Legal sector ‘must open’ for financial sector future

FROM page 1B

market share,” Mr Dunkley told a
Higgs & Johnson-organised semi-
nar, during a debate on a motion
that the Bahamian financial sector
would continue to contract unless
this nation’s legal profession ‘opens
up’.

“All this indicates the likelihood
that we will contract in our finan-
cial services industry in the future
unless we make a change,” he added.

While the Government and
Bahamian private sector could
always look to develop a competitive
advantage through launching new
products and services, Mr Dunkley
said any benefits were likely to be
shortlived, since other jurisdictions
would merely copy the Bahamas.

“T suggest that the main change
we can make is to open up the legal
profession. We have been closed
when others that have been success-
ful in the offshore industry have
opened up,” he explained.

“There are two aspects to opening
up. The legal profession needs to
open up and develop offices abroad
in key jurisdictions. We also need
to open our borders to the outside so
in our jurisdiction we can have the
specialists we need to compete with

other jurisdictions.”

Mr Dunkley added: “It is impera-
tive that the legal profession not
remain parochial. For too long we
have continued to allow the banks
and trust companies to go off and
market abroad. They don’t have the
same deep roots in this country that
we have.....

“Tf this jurisdiction is finished or
loses market share, the internation-
al banks can choose another juris-
diction. They are far more mobile
than others of us deeper rooted in
this jurisdiction. Lawyers are key to
marketing the home jurisdiction
abroad.”

Mr Dunkley was backed by James
Smith, former minister of state for
finance, who told the seminar that
unless the Bahamas opened up to
specialist foreign attorneys, it would
be unable to penetrate the “fastest
growing” segment of the interna-
tional financial services business -
investment funds and collective
investment schemes.

The CFAL chairman pointed out
that investment funds domiciling in
international financial services
required “specialist gatekeepers”,
including both international and
local attorneys, plus administrators
and managers.

“Fund sponsors seem to prefer

jurisdictions other than the
Bahamas, because they are able to
engage international as well as local
legal professionals to establish and
administer funds in these centres,”
Mr Smith said.

He added that if the Bahamian
international financial services indus-
try was “to grow, we need to attract
that slice of the business”. Some $0.5
trillion was estimated to be held in
collective investment vehicles world-
wide, with half that total in the hedge
fund industry.

Islands

Yet while the British Virgin
Islands and the Cayman Islands had
more than 2,000 and 3,000 invest-
ment funds registered in their juris-
dictions, the Bahamas “continues to
concentrate” on private wealth man-
agement, with just 700 funds domi-
ciled here.

While some $300 million in gov-
ernment revenues were generated
by the financial services industry per
annum, Mr Smith said: “Most of that
is generated by the domestic banks,
and the offshore sector’s share of
that is shrinking every year. If we
are to expand and grow the offshore
industry, we need to aggressively
pursue investment funds and hedge

funds.”

While Higgs & Johnson has
expanded into the Cayman Islands
via acquisition, and the likes of
Lennox Paton and Callender’s & Co
have opened offices overseas in ter-
ritories like the UK and British Vir-
gin Islands, Mr Dunkley said attor-
neys in Bermuda and the Cayman
Islands had been far more effective.

Taking Cayman-based Maples &
Calder and Walkers as an example,
along with Applebys in Bermuda,
Mr Dunkley said all three were
“home grown” but had expanded
abroad into both offshore and
onshore markets, using offices there
to promote the home country.

Maples & Calder advertised itself
as having a presence in Asia/Pacific,
Europe, Latin America, the Middle
East and North America. Its
Asia/Pacific office, in Hong Kong,
advertised itself as offering BVI and
Cayman legal and incorporation ser-
vices through a team of attorneys
fluent in Mandarin and Japanese,
and who had performed transactions
in China, Singapore, Japan and Aus-
tralia.

“There is no doubt that Cayman
and Bermuda have substantially ben-
efited from these home grown law
firms that have gone out and set up
platforms abroad, thereby marketing

their own jurisdictions,” Mr Dunkley
said.

“Unless we want to see a material
reduction in our industry we need
the legal profession to open up.”
Asia and Europe, especially, were
key markets, Mr Dunkley said.

Meanwhile, Mr Smith suggested
that since the Bahamas was seeking
World Trade Organisation (WTO)
membership, and had signed on to
the Economic Partnership Agree-
ment (EPA), the Bahamian legal
profession was likely to be opened to
overseas competition anyway.

“Whether it’s five, 10, 20 years,
the Bahamas will be liberalising all
its professional services, so may be
it’s better to liberalise now ahead of
time and get the requisite experi-
ence,” Mr Smith suggested.

He added that the Bahamas had
helped its rivals to grow through its
own mistakes and moving too slow-
ly, pointing out that John Maples
had first worked in the Bank of
Nova Scotia Trust Company in Nas-
sau in the 1970s before heading to
Cayman to found his own law firm.

“It’s not a question of shrinking
the business, but growing the busi-
ness with legal and financial exper-
tise,” Mr Smith said. “The Bahamas
is an island, but should not operate
as one.”

Bahamas must sign more than

FROM page 1B

likely to review the ‘12 TIEA’
threshold at some point in the
future, on the basis that some
agreements signed by inter-
national financial centres had
more value than others.

To illustrate this point, Mr



Delaney used the example of
last Friday’s signing of a
TIEA between the Bahamas
and Monaco, another inter-
national financial centre,
pointing out that this agree-
ment did “not have the same
value as the Bahamas doing a
deal with the UK or France”.

MUU

NOTICE is hereby given that ESACHAR CESAR of FOX HILL,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed
Statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 23" day of
September, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,


















PQ). Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

MUU

NOTICE is hereby given that ALEXLOUIS JEAN of WHITE LANE, OFF
MACKEY STREET, P.O. BOX $S-5312, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
Statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 23" day
of September, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7 147, Nassau, Bahamas.















RINA & CO. LTD.

(Company number 117,109 B)

An International Business Company
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

|, Renaud Anselin, Liquidator of RINA & CO. LTD.
hereby certify that the winding up and dissolution of
RINA & CO. LTD. has been completed in accordance
with the Articles of Dissolution and that RINA & CO.
LTD. has been dissolved as of 25th day of August,

2009.

Dated this 21st day of September, 2009

Renaud Anselin
Liquidator

Legal Notice

SENTA HOLDINGS LTD.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accomdance with Section 137
of the International Business Companies Act 2000 SENTA
HOLDINGS LTD. is in dissolution.

The Date of the Commencement of Dissolution was 16th
September 2009, David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust
(Bahamas) Ltd., Building 2 Caves Village, P.O, Box N-
3917 is the Liquidator of SENTA HOLDINGS LTD. All
persons having claims against the above-named company
ire required to send their address and particulars of their
debts to the Liquidator before the 16th October 2009.

For that reason, the Mona-
co agreement and similar ones
were likely to come under
scrutiny to assess whether
they met the true definition
of the G-20/OECD’s 12 min-
imum, and a lesser weighting
would likely be given to
treaties between two interna-
tional financial centres.

In addition, Mr Delaney
said the G-20/OECD were
also likely to assess the will-
ingness of jurisdictions to go
beyond 12 TIEAs and moni-
tor their implementation.

“Therefore, in peering into
the future, what do I see?”
Mr Delaney asked. “I see a
whole lot more treaties than
12 treaties, I see a lot of
treaties with the G-20 mem-
bers. The Bahamas has made
a commitment to a certain
standard, and once we’ve
signed on it’s a matter of what
they require and their expec-
tations.”

The Higgs & Johnson man-
aging partner, though, said
that signing TIEAs “does not
do a lot [for the Bahamas]
apart from complying with the
standard”. He added that the
key to how this nation fared
now lay in the type of tax
treaty it signed, and whether
these brought “some trade-
based advantages to us”.

With TIEAs simply allow-
ing requesting states to submit

12 TIEAS

requests for information on
specific taxpayers suspected
of avoiding taxes in criminal
and civil cases, Mr Delaney
said the Bahamas’ commit-
ment to conclude 12 by year-
end was simply to “keep on
side with the OECD”.

Benefits

Yet when it came to bene-
fits for the wider Bahamian
economy and financial ser-
vices industry, Mr Delaney
said other types of agreement
would be more beneficial,
such as a “TIEA plus’.

These agreements, he
explained, “look and read like
a TIEA, but there is a little
bit of a sweetener in there”.
The TIEA the Bahamas
signed with the US in January
2002 was one such example
of this, as it included a con-
vention tax deduction bene-
fit that allowed US business-
men and companies holding
conventions/meetings in the
Bahamas to offset their costs
of attending against their tax
liabilities - meaning the costs
are deducted from their tax
bill.

The 2002 TIEA had also
meant that the Bahamas
earned the Qualified Juris-
diction (QJ) status, and its
institutions the Qualified
Intermediary (QI) designa-

NOTICE
ZERTA HOLDING LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, ZERTA HOLDING LTD. is in dissolution as

of September 16, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, PO. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is

the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

IN HOUSE

INVESTMENTS LTD

NOTICE TO
SHAREHOLDERS

The Board of directors of In House Investments Limited has

declared a quarterly dividend for Preferred Shares to all

shareholders of record at September 15, 2009 as follows:

Preferred Shares 7.25% per annum (payment quarterly).

The payment will be made September 30, 2009 through

Royal Fidelity Share Registrars & Transfer Agents Limited

in the usual manner.

tion, from the Internal Rev-
enue Service (IRS) for with-
holding tax purposes.

However, Mr Delaney said
the better option for the
Bahamas was a double taxa-
tion agreement, which is usu-
ally signed between two
nations who both levy some
form of income tax.

These agreements ensure
that companies and citizens
are not taxed twice, Mr
Delaney using the example of
a Bahamian International
Business Company (IBC) that
owned shares in a US firm.

If the two nations had a
double tax treaty, the with-
holding tax levied on dividend
payments from the US com-
pany to the Bahamian IBC
might be lowered from 30 per
cent to 10 per cent, he sug-
gested, thus making it “attrac-
tive to use Bahamian compa-
nies for holding investments”.

“That’s really the preferred
course,” Mr Delaney said of
double tax treaties, “but the
issue for the Bahamas is that
we have to have a direct tax
so that we can qualify to enter
negotiations for a double tax
agreement.” Other nations
without any form of direct
taxation have been able to
enter such agreements,
though.

Other options, Mr Delaney
said, were bilateral investment

treaties and investment pro-
motion and protection
treaties. These agreements,
he explained, facilitated
investment in one country by
the citizens of another, afford-
ing these investments protec-
tion and, in some cases, giving
them Most Favoured Nation
treatment - ranking them
alongside domestic investors.
“Negotiating a bilateral
investment treaty or invest-
ment promotion and protec-
tion treaty takes a while
longer than negotiating a
TIEA,” Mr Delaney said.
“We have three months to
go before the end of the year.
From that perspective, the
Bahamas may find it has to
pursue the Doctrine of Stages,
taking it step by step. With 12
TIEAs we may get a couple
of double taxation agree-
ments, get a bilateral invest-
ment treaty, get a TIEA-

“This is the sort of thing I
would like to urge the
Bahamas to pursue in the cir-
cumstances.”

Given that the Bahamas
had committed to signing 12
TIEAs by year-end, the Hig-
gs & Johnson managing part-
ner said this nation might
have to simultaneously pur-
sue alternative agreements
with a view to concluding
them at a later date.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

WOODLANDS HOLDINGS LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of WOODLANDS HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.
The date of completion of the dissolution was the 21st day of

August, 2009.

an
tie’
Signed =a ie

Sabra Habey E1Din Meusib El-Sayed

Liquidator

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (4)
(a), (0) and (c) of the International Business
Companies Act, 2000 NOTICE is hereby given
that, SPARK GLOBAL FUND LIMITED is in
dissolution and that the date of commencement
of the dissolution is the 11th day of September

A.D. 2009.

International Protector Group Limited
Liquidators
Montague Sterling Centre
East Bay Street
P.O. Box N-3924
Nassau, The Bahamas

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PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



TASTE



The Tribune







w Le
Faia

TRY SOMETHING

.

INNER

y

S
y









By JEFFARAH GIBSON

eciding what fo cook after a long day at

work can be can be mind- boggling. To

ease some of the stress, here are five
meat recipes sure to please your family. These
recipes are not only easy on the pocket, but
delightful on the palatte. Try a new recipe each
day next week with your own choice of sides.



e¢ HONEY BAKED CHICKEN ¢

Ingredients:
° 2 pounds chicken drumsticks
° 2 tablespoons butter
° 2 tablespoons olive oil or Canola oil
° 1/2 cup flour

1 1/2 teaspoons Creole seasoning or
a seasoned salt blend

° 1/3 cup honey

° 1/4 cup brown sugar

° 4 tablespoons lemon juice

° 2 teaspoons soy sauce
Preparation:

1. Wash chicken a
source: www.about.com



¢ COCONUT SHRIMP ¢

Ingredients



e LAMB CHOPS WITH ORANGE AND THYME ¢

Cook Time: 55 minutes

i eee
4 to 6 lamb shoulder chops,
about 3/4-inch thick
1 teaspoon dried leaf thyme, crushed
1/2 teaspoon finely grated orange peel
1/4 cup orange juice
salt and pepper
8 ounces sliced mushrooms

Preparation:
Trim excess fat from lamb chops. Combine thyme, orange peel, and orange juice. Pour over

chops and marinate for at least 3 hours in the refrigerator. Drain; reserve marinade. Brown the
lamb chops in a small amount of vegetable oil; season lightly with salt and pepper. Add mari-
nade and mushrooms to the lamb chops; cover and simmer for 45 minutes, or until tender.

Uncover the last 5 minutes of cooking to reduce juices a bit.

Glazed Lamb Chops Recipe serves 4 to 6.

legg

1/2 cup all-purpose flour

2/3 cup beer

1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 cup all-purpose flour

2 cups flaked coconut

24 shrimp

3 cups oil for frying

Preparation

1. In medium bowl, combine egg, 1/2 cup flour, beer and
baking powder. Place 1/4 cup flour and coconut in two sepa-
rate bowls.

2. Hold shrimp by tail, and dredge in flour, shaking off
excess flour. Dip in egg/beer batter; allow excess to drip off.
Roll shrimp in coconut, and place on a baking sheet lined

| with wax paper. Refrigerate for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, heat

oil to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) in a deep-fryer.

3. Fry shrimp in batches: cook, turning once, for 2 to 3
minutes, or until golden brown. Using tongs, remove shrimp
to paper towels to drain. Serve warm with your favorite dip-

| ping sauce.

source www.allrecipes.co



¢ BARBECUE SHOULDER STEAK SKILLET ¢

Ingredients
° 3-4 tablespoons oil

° 1 teaspoon seasoning salt or white salt

° 1 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper

° 2 (1 LB) boneless beef shoulder chuck

steaks (about 3/4 to 1-inch thick)
° 2 medium onions, chopped
° 2 tablespoons fresh minced garlic





source : www.southernfood.about.com

° 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
(or to taste, may omit if desired)

1 1/2 cups water (can use beef broth)

1 1/2 cups tomato sauce

5-6 tablespoons lemon juice

6 tablespoons ketchup

2-3 tablespoons brown sugar

1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

1/2 teaspoon mustard powder

Preparation

1. Heat oil in a large skillet or electric frying pan over medi-
um-high heat. In a bowl combine the water with tomato sauce,
lemon juice, ketchup, brown sugar, Worcestershire sauce and
mustard powder until combined; set aside.

2. Season both chuck steaks with salt and pepper (about 1/2
teaspoon of salt and pepper for each steak or can use more if
desired).

3. Brown both sides of the steaks in hot oil then remove to a
plate.

4, Add in onion; sauté for about 3 minutes.

5. Add in garlic and crushed chili flakes; cook stirring for
another 1 minute.

6. Pour in the sauce over and around the meat.

7, Cover and simmer on low heat for about 1-1/2 hours or until
meat is tender.

8. Season with more salt and pepper if needed.

source :www.steakrecipes.ne

@ CHEDDAR AND CRAB CASSEROLE ¢

Ingredients
° 3 tablespoons of plain flour.

3/4 cups of skimmed milk powder.
1/4 teaspoon of mustard powder.
1/4 teaspoons of salt.
1/4 teaspoons of pepper.
1 cup of water.
3 oz strong cheddar cheese, grated.
12 oz Crab meat

| Preparation:

1. In asmall saucepan, combine the flour, mustard powder, milk
powder, salt and pepper.

2. Gradually add water, constantly stirring until the mixture
become thick.

3. Remove from heat.

4, Stir the cheese into the mixture until it has completely melted.
5. Stir in the crab meat.

_ 6. Place in a casserole dish and bake until all ingredients are

thoroughly cooked.

source: www.crabrecipes.net

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 7B





The Tribune



1. The Bahamas Histori-
cal Society will conduct a
free public lecture on
Thursday evening at the
museum on Elizabeth
Avenue on Shirley Street at
6pm. Meteorologist Wayne
Neeley will speak on the
topic "Bahamian Hurri-
canes.” For further infor-
mation call 322-4231.

3.This year, the Terry
McCoy Memorial Regatta
takes place at Montagu
Bay on Saturday and Sun-
day. This event is the last
official Sunfish Regatta
before the 2009 Sunfish
World Championships also
to be held at Montagu in
October. Terry McCoy was
well known in the sailing
community for volunteer-
ing with regattas, both
locally and internationally.
His sons Matthew and Lee,
along with the Bahamas
Sailing Association, start-
ed this regatta to help
keep Sunfish sailing active
in the Bahamas. All are
welcomed, especially
juniors who Terry loved to
see further the sailing tra-
dition. Contact tmc@the-
real.com or visit
www.bahamassailing.org

5. On Monday, Miss Teen
World Junior Bahamas,
Shaquell Demeritte, partic-
ipates in the Miss Princess
of The World (formerly
Miss World Junior
Pageant) in Czech Repub-
lic. She competes with
over 60 contestants to win
the grand prize of
$100,000 in cash and
awards.

CO DIRECTOR of The Tempest, Craig Pinder (Prospero), gives tips to Nicole Fair (Miranda).

Shakespeare

By JEFFARAH GIBSON

“Shakespeare in
Paradise”, a theatre
festival designed to
promote an apprecia-
tion and awareness
of the theatre to the
Bahamas will take

place October 5-12.

The eight day event will
feature seven productions,
three of which are Bahami-
an: “Music of the Bahamas”,
“Love In Two Acts” and
“Light”. The other perfor-

mances include “One White
One Black,” “Zora”,
“Caribbean Voices” and
William Shakespeare’s “The
Tempest.”

At acocktail party held last
Wednesday night at the Gray-
cliff Restaurant, Nicolette
Bethel, Director of Culture,
spoke about the importance
of this festival to the
Bahamas. “Theatre is one of
the most highly developed art
forms in the Bahamas, and we
chose to have this festival
because the Bahamas has to
diversify its products,” she
said.

Paradise

Tempest, Patti -Anne Eli
added :“Out of all the work
Shakespeare has done, The
Tempest was chosen, since
there are various themes that
a Bahamian audience can
relate to. Those themes
include opposition, servitude,
liberation, colonialism, and
power struggle,” she said.
The play has been adapted
to appeal to a Bahamian audi-
ence. “Students from the Col-
lege of the Bahamas under
the guidance of Nicolette
Bethel dramaturged the play
to suit the Bahamian audi-
ence. Characters and names
have been changed, but the

actual text has not been
touched.”

Having worked in Trinidad
for sometime, Mrs Eli says
that the actors have brought
the play to life and have huge
similarities to Trinidadian
actors. “There are twenty
actors in The Tempest, includ-
ing a few professional
Bahamian actors like Craig
Pinder and Dana Ferguson.
What I have noticed working
with the Bahamian actors is
that they are quite similar to
Trinidadian actors. They all
have a certain rhythm about
them that brings stage acts to
life”, she said.

Mrs Eli hopes that when
people hear the name Shake-
speare they won’t think of
complicated language, but a
work of endless imagination
they can understand, love,
enjoy, and appreciate.

“Light” is another play
which has Bahamian related
themes and colloquial themes.
Directed by Deon Simms, it
tells a true story about two





men who engage in conflict
over a lady to gain her love.
The main theme of the play is
to show the importance of
conflict resolution, and to
have a belief about oneself
that is not determined by oth-
ers.

Anton Chekhov’s “The
Bear” and Alfred Sutro “The
Open Door” are two acts in
one play, with each play con-
trasting the other.

“One play is about love
lost, and the other is about
love found under the theme
Tragedy Triumphs,” Mark
Kelly, Director of the play
said.

He also noted that he hopes
the play produces an intimate
setting, so that it is heartfelt.

Showings will be held at
The Dundas Theatre, the
National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, The Hub, Graycliff,
The Marley Resort and Nir-
vana.

For more information go to
www.shakespeareinpar-
adise.org



Summer Madness held no punches

By REUBEN SHEARER

Tribune Features Reporter

JAMES Catalyn pulled all the stops
in his Summer Madness Revue 2009
last week, amusing theatergoers
through typical, topical and timely skits
that made us ‘laugh at wesef.’ For
four nights, his 16 skit production
exposed the double standard in the
Bahamian market, and provided a ter-
rific blend of satire and comedy.

This was the 27th time Mr Catalyn
put on the series for the public who
raved with approval as they identified
with the situations the actors found
themselves in.

Mr Catalyn held no punches, ridi-
culing crooked politicians, and the
average Bahamian who is either
always late or wants something for
free.

The audience was amused as Cat-
lyn’s cast depicted the divide on the
marital rape law between religious fig-
ures in ‘Sexified;’ gambling citizens in
‘Der Gamblin’ Permissioner;’ and a
pair of disinterested parents in “The
School Situation,’ who take the back-
seat in the academic lives of their chil-
dren.

Most of the cast spoke in “Bahami-
anese,” a mix of broken English and
Bahamian slang. Individual mono-
logues set the tone for what topics
would be discussed in each skit.

A personal favorite was ‘Pass it
On.” In this skit, high ranking manag-
er, Ms Greene (played by Chrystal
Bethel) has a hard time convincing
long-time employee Mrs Burrows
(played by Veronica Toppin) to be
flexible, and collaborate with newer
ideas.

Mrs Burrows plays a feisty and
strong-headed character, and inject-
ed great acting into the skit. She want-
ed to squeeze young Ms Greene into
her mold, and was suspicious of the
new, the up-to-date, the different.

Here’s a line taken from Mrs Bur-
rows script: “All yinna young people
wan’ do is change up erryting, say is
mordern time an’ dat we had we day.
Wan’ cast us aside like ol’ dog.”

After back and forth discourse that
goes nowhere, Ms Greene gave Mrs
Burrows an ultimatum, saying that if
she is to remain with the organisation,
she must be open to merge with new
ideas and “change with the times.”

With that, Mrs Burrows suddenly
has a change of heart and is compliant.

Mr Catalyn told Tribune Enter-
tainment that the underlying theme of
this skit was to encourage older

Bahamians to pass on the reigns of
knowledge and experience to the
younger generation so they are more
equipped for the situations of life.

Speaking to Tribune Entertainment,
Mr Catalyn explained: “I wanted to
be the voice for those Bahamians who
are afraid to speak up on issues that
politicians aren’t slow to address, if at
all. That’s why I wrote these plays, I
want to make people think and see
what is happening to us.”

The cast was made up of some of
the best talent the country has to offer.
Some of the main actors were Natasha
Davis, Veronica Toppin, Dion John-
son, Stephanie Braynen, Chrystal
Bethell, Anthonique Farquharson,
Lamorn Miller, Rachel Rolle, Shireen
Hanna, Eric Adderley, Conrad May-
cock, Chrystal Bethell and Neil
Cleare.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

Cg
A number of Bahamian artist gave an astounding pefor-
mance at the Artist 4 Peace concert, held at Arawak Key
on Saturday night.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE



5-Day FORECAST

j

TAMPA
High: 91° F/33°C

Low: 75° F/24°C ae r. The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and 10:49am. 3.3 4:26am.
aa @ ’ 2 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 11:06 p.m. 26 5:17 p.m.
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, ei r Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday 12:36pm. 29 6:05am.
f : ‘ ABACO 7 oS 7:10 p.m.
- : -~ st ano on < FIQTN, gustttgsndazeelececinanesettzediaaziecazieunieas 12:57 a. 94 7:03am.
, ai @ N High: 89° F/32°C LOW eeeeeeeeeeeee 78° F/26° C 135 pm 28 in
f a Low: 77° F/25°C Normal high... er
- wy Normal low 74° F/24° C
q @ WEST PALM BEACH i Last year's HIgh ...ccccsscsssesesstene zeae SUN AND IVIOON
4 —— High: 88° F/31°C : Last year's lOW oe eee 77° F/25° C
oF Low: 79° F/26° C SPY Precipitation ———_—sSunrise....... 6:59.a.m. Moonrise... . 11:45 a.m.
r. a, As of 2 p.m. yesterday oo. eeccceccceee 0.09" Sunset....... 7:05 p.m. Moonset... . 10:26 p.m.
mn FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT << Year dat i) Full Last
High: 88°F/31°C @ High: 88° F/31°C Normal year to date .......c.ccsesscssessseeeeeseeee 36.51" oe 7
Low: 79° F/26°C — Low: 76° F/24° C te
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@ a a Forecasts and graphics provided by eric
- MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Oct. 4 Oct. 11
7; High: 90° F/32° C EL ELT HERA
i Low: 79° F/26° C NASSAU Li : “78° F/26°C
High: 89° F/32°C oe
=a Low: 79° F/26° C
5 i. @ ere
KEY WEST ee So CATISLAND
High: 88° F/31" C High: 87° F/31°C
Low: 79° F/26° C — Low: 75° F/24°C
sr e cx
‘s = a
Z; GREAT EXUMA wt SAN SALVADOR
i High: 88° F/31°C High: 89° F/32°C
Low: 77° F/25° C Low: 75° F/24°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | 5 . f
highs and tonights's lows. High: 90° F/32°C ——- .
Low: 77° F/25° C i. . i.
ee , HY
LONG ISLAND
Low: 75° F/24°C
Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday 4 MAYAGUANA
High Low High Low High Low High Low High Low High Low ae High: 88° F/31° C
F/C FIC FC FC F/C FIC FC FC FC FC Fic FC Low: 74° F/23°C
Albuquerque 65/18 46/7 pc 68/20 49/9 Indianapolis 84/28 65/18 t 82/27 64/17 t Philadelphia 82/27 68/20 t 84/28 61/16 t
Anchorage 51/10 38/3 s 47/8 41/5 Jacksonville 86/30 72/22 t 89/31 72/22 t Phoenix 95/35 71/21 s 97/36 72/22 s CROOKEDISLAND/ACKLINS
Atlanta 84/28 69/20 c 86/30 69/20 Kansas City 74/23 52/11 c 77/25 56/13 pc Pittsburgh 80/26 62/16 t 78/25 56/13 t RAGGEDISLAND — High:91°F/83°¢
Atlantic City 80/26 65/18 t 86/30 61/16 Las Vegas 92/33 64/17 s 96/35 69/20 s Portland,OR 92/33 5713 s 75/23 52/11 s High: 87° F/31°C Low: 77° F/25°C
Baltimore 82/27 66/18 t 83/28 62/16 Little Rock 78/25 65/18 t 79/26 67/19 t Raleigh-Durham 86/30 68/20 c 89/31 66/18 pc Low: 74°F/23°C a +
Boston 82/27 64/47 pe 79/26 56/13 Los Angeles 100/37 70/21 s 96/35 66/18 s St. Louis 80/26 65/18 t 81/27 67/19 pc .
Buffalo 76/24 60/15 t 75/23 56/13 Louisville 86/30 69/20 t 84/28 67/19 t Salt Lake City 78/25 53/11 s 80/26 55/12 pc GREAT INAGUA vw
Charleston, SC 84/28 70/21 t 87/30 70/21 Memphis 82/27 70/21 t 85/29 70/21 t San Antonio 78/25 63/17 pce 82/27 66/18 c High: 92° F/33°C
Chicago 84/28 61/16 t 80/26 59/15 Miami 90/32 79/26 t 88/31 79/26 pc San Diego 88/31 63/17 s 83/28 63/17 $s in 76° F/24°C
Cleveland 80/26 62/16 t 78/25 57/13 Minneapolis 76/24 60/15 s 80/26 59/15 pc San Francisco 80/26 56/13 $s 78/25 55/12 $ ow.
Dallas 78/25 60/15 s 77/25 62/16 Nashville 83/28 67/19 c 86/30 67/19 t Seattle 86/30 54/12 s 69/20 51/10 s
Denver 54412 39/3 4+ 60/115 42/5 New Orleans 86/30 77/25 t 89/31 76/24 t Tallahassee 90/32 72/22 pe 92/33 72/22 t
Detroit 82/27 64/17 t 81/27 57/13 New York 78/25 70/21 pce 83/28 6317 t Tampa 91/32 75/23 t 91/32 75/23 t
Honolulu 89/31 75/23 s 89/31 75/23 Oklahoma City 72/22 52/11 pe 73/22 55/12 t Tucson 91/32 61/116 s 89/31 62/16 s xy
Houston 79/26 68/20 t 85/29 73/22 Orlando 88/31 75/23 t 91/32 75/23 t Washington, DC 84/28 68/20 t 86/30 66/18 t

ORLANDO |
_ High:88°F/31°C a:
Low: 75°F/24°C



THE WEATHER REPORT

~

x



~ \























2|3|4|5|6

MODERATE

Some sun with a Partly cloudy, a t-storm; Partly sunny with a Partly sunny, a t-storm Plenty of sun. Partly sunny with
t-storm; breezy. breezy. shower. in spots. t-storms possible.
. High: 88° High: 89° High: 87° High: 88°
High: 89° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 77° Low: 78° Low: 78°
PETE ae Maer
| 102°-86°F 104°-81° F 93°-82° F High















HIGH |








71 rt Ny

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'|s|9|10
\. HIGH

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

a Posy
t. (ft

Ht. (ft.

Low



Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
91/32
63/17
68/20
77/25
66/18
90/32
86/30
74/23
81/27
76/24
82/27
71/21
81/27
65/18
68/20
82/27
59/15
92/33
92/33
838/31
90/32
82/27
82/27
66/18
61/16
75/23
17/25
67/19
91/32
57/13
90/32

105/40

74/23
78/25
74/23
88/31
75/23
68/20
79/26
84/28
73/22
77/25
75/23
57/13
77/25
87/30
99/37
58/14
75/23
76/24
84/28
98/36
17/25
88/31
75/23
90/32
70/21
90/32
15/23
79/26
63/17
72/22
93/33
79/26
80/26
75/23
74/23
76/24
72/22
74/23

il

Today

Low
F/C
77/25
50/10
43/6
63/17
58/14
78/25
77/25
63/17
52/11
69/20
58/14
52/11
76/24
41/5
52/11
57/13
34/1
65/18
84/28
46/7
73/22
69/20
60/15
47/8
46/7
55/12
52/11
52/11
72/22
48/8
81/27
74/23
60/15
54/12
55/12
79/26
58/14
52/11
54/12
77/25
55/12
63/17
57/13
50/10
52/11
56/13
79/26
43/6
52/11
52/11
72/22
73/22
63/17
79/26
42/5
70/21
46/7
73/22
59/15
55/12
46/7
55/12
78/25
70/21
54/12
63/17
57/13
60/15
55/12
53/11








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High
F/C
91/32
61/16
72/22
81/27
65/18
90/32
86/30
76/24
73/22
79/26
82/27
66/18
82/27
70/21
64/17
81/27
64/17
90/32
93/33
77/25
90/32
81/27
83/28
62/16
61/16
72/22
76/24
68/20
86/30
55/12
88/31

107/41

76/24
81/27
74/23
88/31
74/23
68/20
81/27
84/28
72/22
81/27
72/22
59/15
75/23
87/30
99/37
59/15
77/25
66/18
79/26
99/37
17/25
88/31
80/26
87/30
73/22
87/30
72/22
77/25
61/16
74/23
87/30
80/26
72/22
81/27
63/17
71/21
68/20
79/26

Thursday

Low
F/C
74/23
48/8
43/6
64/17
56/13
77/25
78/25
63/17
60/15
71/21
58/14
46/7
76/24
38/3
50/10
56/13
46/7
65/18
84/28
37/2
74/23
72/22

WwW

ce

a

ome ie ee Oe ee
ce

65/18 s

50/10
48/8
48/8

54/12
46/7

72/22
48/8

81/27

73/22

64/17

60/15

52/11

80/26

57/13

50/10

54/12

77/25

52/11

64/17
46/7
45/7

53/11

55/12

17/25
43/6

54/12
49/9

65/18

72/22

58/14

79/26
46/7

73/22
48/8

74/23

54/12

57/13
45/7

50/10

77/25

67/19

50/10

64/17

50/10

57/13

52/11

54/12

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pc
sh

pe
pc
pe
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pe
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Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace



SUSAR eee a

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WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 85° F
Thursday: _E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 85° F
FREEPORT Today: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 5 Miles 86° F
Thursday: _E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 86° F
ABACO Today: SE at 8-16 Knots 3-6 Feet 10 Miles 85° F
Thursday: _E at 8-16 Knots 3-6 Feet 10 Miles 85° F



Minneapolis

76/60 | â„¢

Showers i] nen
T-storms ~ J
Rain Fronts
Ee PlUUnIes Shown are noon positions of weather systems and oe
Bk.) Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm itentitentia
[v_=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary eug~eafi
10s ts [Os 10s 20s (05) 40s [50s Gos 70s 80s (G0s))/il0eN/iis)
Bee. A rr,

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Shakespeare
in Paradise

see page seven



UntorgettaBULL Moments with winning artist
Tiffany Darling now on her way to Jamaica.

=

Cal

Regular Bahamian
artists shine at Red
Bull art competition

By JEFFARAH GIBSON

AHAMIANS showed off their

artistic abilities at the Bristol &

Wines Red Bull competition,
molding, painting, and creating pieces
on various art mediums, all inspired
and created with Red Bull cans.

The “Art of Can” competition was a creativity contest that
allowed regular Bahamians whose artwork is not publicly
recognised a chance to compete with other competent artists.

Sixteen finalists sailed the imagination boat, and explored a
variety of ideas for their pieces.

And although each contestant displayed great artistic capa-
bilities, only three pieces were chosen for the final competition,
to be held in Kingston, Jamaica.

Tiffany Darling, first place winner, and an employee at Bris-
tol & Wines, will be heading to Kingston on an all expense paid
trip with her art piece, “Unforgettabull Moments”, which was
a wedding cake.

Upon finding out her piece won the contest, she was ecstat-
ic and shocked, since she never considered herself a creative
person.

“When I found out I won the contest it was an amazing feel-
ing. Even though I did expect to win, it was still surprising. I
never had any formal training in art before, but I always had
creative hands and a big imagination” she said.

The idea of her intricate piece “Unforgettabull Moments”
was conceived while surfing the web.

“T wanted to do something so I went on the Internet in
search of something that I could have done, but could not find
anything interesting and different to work with. So since I love
to watch Ace of Cakes on the Food Network, I decided to
create a wedding cake for my piece.”

She found that working on the piece was time consuming, but
a labour of love.

“This piece took so much time to complete. The minute I
came home from work I would immediately begin working
on the cake. Sometimes I would find myself going to bed two
o’clock in the morning, but I enjoyed every moment of it,” she
said.

Her piece was called “Unforgettabull Moments” because a
wedding signifies a special time in a couple’s life that is rarely
forgotten.

Not only was the competition fulfilling for Mrs Darling, but
it unlocked and revealed a special talent she never knew was
there.

“T never knew I had the ability to do what I did. This was a
wonderful experience, and if there is another competition like
this in the future I will surely enter,” she said.

She is going to Jamaica in high spirits, excited to see to what
other’s ideas gave birth.

The second, and third place winners also will be heading to
Jamaica to compete.

The Red Bull competition originated in Australia where the
brand is located. Competitions like this are always held in
Australia.

However, this is the first time the competition has been held
. | inthe Bahamas, and Jamaica.

It was judged by three well known artists, Antonius Roberts,
Sue Katz, and Angelique McKay.



ee ee 2a
Third place piece Flying Bulltish by Dorman
Stubbs.



Red Bull Music by young artist Jave Martin.

Try something new for dinner

see page six








Gives U Wings a work of body paint by Italia
Williams placed second at the Art of Can.

Rosemary McPhee's entry entitled High Glow.
fs a on ge
hs om :



= # fi

eal \ =
a
“Sita

Noted entry Sea Wings by auto body work
specialist Emon Mortimer.



Full Text

PAGE 1

Teachers stage ‘sit-in’ protests B B u u r r g g e e r r K K i i n n g g o o f f f f e e r r s s r r e e w w a a r r d d t t o o h h e e l l p p c c a a p p t t u u r r e e k k i i l l l l e e r r N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.251WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SOMESUN WITH T-STORM, BREEZY HIGH 89F LOW 80F F E A T U R E S S EE‘THEARTS’SECTION S P O R T S Art of SEE PAGENINE CAN Basketball boost for ANDROS Jurors hear of efforts to revive film star’s son The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com I N S I D E SEEPAGESEVEN Larry Smith’s Tough Call TRA VOLTA TRIAL: D AYTWO EFFECTS from the threat of climate change could prove damaging to the Bahamas' economy, according to Tourism and Aviation Minister Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace. A recent study by the World Bank placed the Bahamas among the top three of the most vulnerable Caribbean countries when it comes to climate change, emphasizing the need for a pro-active stance to curb more damaging effects. “We know that we cannot run away from the issues of sea level rise, salt water intrusions, beach and shore erosion, and the many other impacts of cli mate change that confront us. Your presence here is a demon stration of your commitment to act before it’s too late,” said Mr Vanderpool-Wallace during day one of the Caribsave Country Partners Symposium. The World Bank report also revealed that a five-metre change in sea level rise could result in damage to the economy that amounts to 3.5 per cent of Gross Domestic Product (GDP “In the case of the Bahamas, it estimates that the same level Climate change seen as threat to Bahamas economy AN inmate at Her Majesty's Prison accused of the murder of a fellow inmate was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Preston Moss, 36, is charged with the murder of Lloyd Albury. Albury died on September 10, two days after he was admitted to hospital following a fight in a cell at the prison. Albury, 55, was reportedly imprisoned on a vagrancy charge. Moss, was arraigned on the murder charge yesterday before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court 1, Bank Lane. INMATE ACCUSED OF MURDERINGFELLOW PRISONER PRESTON MOSS , 36, was charged yesterday with the murder of Lloyd Albury. Tim Clarke / Tribune staff SEE page eight SEE page eight VINCENT VANDERPOOL-WALLACE By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net BURGER King have offered a $10,000 reward for any infor mation that will lead to the arrest or conviction of those responsible for the murder of restaurant manager RashadM orris. Mr Morris, 21, of John Street, off Baillou Hill Road, was brutally beaten and stabbed at the Burger King restaurant on Harrold Road, western New Providence, where he was found dead early Sunday morning. By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net JURORS in the trial of for m er PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater and former ambul ance driver Tarino Lightbourne heard several accounts yesterday of the efforts made to revive an unresponsive Jett Travolta as prosecutors openedt heir case in the Supreme Court. J ett Travolta, 16, the son of Hollywood actors John Travolta and Kelly Preston died in Freeport, Grand Bahama on January 2. Opening the case for the prosecution yesterday Director of Public Prosecutions Bernard Turner said that following Jett’s death, contact was made with certain persons to communicate a threat to Mr Travolta regarding the release of potentially damaging statements if money were not paid. Former PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater and former para medic Tarino Lightbourne are accused of attempting to extort $25 million from the Hollywood actor. Mr Travolta flies in this morning to be the first witness when the case resumes today. He will be accompanied by his wife. ‘How we tried to save Jett Travolta’ SEE page eight FOLLOWING two brutal murders Sunday, the country last night recorded its 63rd homicide. Details were still sketchy at press time, but police said a young man who had travelled to the Seagrapes shopping centre on Prince Charles Drive by car at 5pm got into an altercation with another man at the plaza. The dispute got out of hand and the victim was stabbed several times during the skirmish. He was rushed to hospital by ambulance, but police said he was unresponsive by this time. He died a short time later, at about 7pm. The matter is being investigated. C C o o u u n n t t r r y y r r e e c c o o r r d d s s 6 6 3 3 r r d d h h o o m m i i c c i i d d e e SEE page six By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net AROUND 200 teache rs at three public schools in New Providence staged “sit-in’s” yesterday to protest inadequate staffing and poor work-i ng conditions. The industrial action at U riah McPhee, Anatol Rodgers and CI Gibson, w hich began Friday has postponed education for thousands of students across New Providence. At CI Gibson the a ction compounded security issues at the school a s 11 knives and an icepick were found on the s chool property yester day, according to reports. Teachers began taking action on Monday over SEE page six JETT TRAVOLTA

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By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A Bahamas-wide campaign aiming to highlight oppositionto the outright ban on harvesting sea turtles has “gained plenty of momentum”, according to one of its organisers. Abner Pinder, fisherman and chief councillor for Spanish Wells, claims “two or three thousand” signatures have already been added toa petition against the ban launched earlier this month and more are expected when all of the Family Islands send in the signatures attached to petitions circulated there. Mr Pinder, along with n umerous other fishermen and opponents of the ban –w hich extends to the taking or catching of any marine turtles, turtle parts or eggs, for commercial use or otherwise – hopes to persuade the government to reverse its position and continue to allow Bahamians to harvest turtles for personal consumption. Gathered together on Sep tember 3, two days after the ban was officially enacted in the name of conservation, they charged that, contrary to the government and environmentalist’s views that the turtles are in danger of being wiped out, the creatures are “plentiful” in Bahamian waters. Activists Their efforts, however, have already raised the ire ofl ocal environmental activists. Having hailed the ban as “wonderful” in August after pushing for years for the government to enact it, Kim Aranha, founder of the Bahamas Sea Turtle Conser v ation Group, charged that those against the ban are “speaking from ignorance”. She noted that the BSTCG’s own petition against the slaughter of sea turtles in the Bahamas garnered around 5,000 signa tures. Meanwhile, Mr Pinder said: “Turtles are increasing in the Bahamas on a daily basis butn obody – (The Department o f) Fisheries or anybody – will go out there to try to do any type of survey (of the numbers), because they know that if they did it would defeat what they are saying.” The petition against the ban states: “I do not agree that the government should ban all harvesting or eating of tur tle meat by Bahamians, rather I believe that control or banning of commercial harvesting and the slaughter of turtles in public are enough to address the needs of both environmentalism and humanity.” Commercial Mr Pinder stressed that most opponents of the ban are primarily concerned with ensuring turtles can still be captured for personal consumption, and are happy to allow the part of the ban which relates to commercial harvesting to remain. The affect on the overall turtle population of allowing individuals to catch them to eat would be “infinitesimal,” he suggested. He claims that although the ban has been enacted as an amendment to the Fisheries Regulations, it is critical that the opponents make their voices heard before the next parliamentary session begins on September 30 as this is expected to provide an opportunity for the ban to be fur ther cemented in law. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM WYNDHAMNASSAURESORT.COM 242.327.6200 WEST BAY STREET AT CABLE BEACHTHE TROPICAL TREASURESOCTOBER 8 12DISCOVERInvite your family, friends, neighbors & co-workers to take Discovery Day Weekend o and come Discover the Tropical Treasures at the Wyndham Nassasu Resort.Join in the Discovery Day Weekend Activities: Take advantage of our Forever Summer Sale with rates starting at $114.00 per room, per night Beach BBQ with fire pits & dancing Pirates Dinner Party on the beach(prize for best-looking pirate) Mystery photo scavenger hunt Volleyball tournaments with prizes for winning team Golf t ournament (green fees additional charge) Dive-in movie with popcorn Daily happy hours on the beach with LIVE music Nightly LIVE entertainment in our 22 Above Night Club featuring the VIP Band Dance contests & prizes 8 restaurants, 6 bars & lounges on property Pool with entertainment, swim-up bar & tables, dance floor, rock slide & water slide Campaign highlighting opposition to sea turtles ban ‘gaining momentum’ BY MATT MAURA Dorsette’s, Mangrove C ay T he relaunching of p rimary healthcare services at the Mangrove Cay Community Clinic will allow for the “adequate and timely d elivery of high-quality healthcare” to the residents of Mangrove Cay, Health Minister Dr. Hubert Minn is said. T he relaunching took place on Friday, September 18, and is part of the continuing reconstruction/renovat ions of primary healthcare facilities throughout the Family Islands. Relaunching ceremonies have already t aken place in Kemp’s Bay, South Andros; Nicholls Town, North Andros, and Grand Cay, North Abaco. More are scheduled for other parts of the Bahamas. Constructed 24 years ago with funding from the National Insurance Board, the Community Clinic was renovated at a cost of $500,000. Dr. Minnis said the relaunching of services will allow healthcare professionals on Mangrove Cay to address those a spects of primary healthcare that focus on health promotion, disease prevention and self-empowerment, particularly in the fight against chronic, non-communicable diseases (CNCDS and other public health threats. The residents of Mangrove Cay, like those elsewhere in the Bahamas, are primarily affected by the increasing rates of obe-s ity, hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, cancer, asthma and other types of chronic, non-communicable diseases, as well as t hose related to alcohol consumption,” Dr. Minnis said. “Now that the clinic building has been renovated, operations will improve due to the fact that the District Medical Officer will be able to remain overnight in the facility and the fact that the clinic will be connected to the Central Patient Record Infor-m ation System which will allow physicians in New Providence to review the medical records of patients in Mangrove Cay.” D r. Minnis said the upgrades to primary healthcare facilities throughout the Bahamas is part of the Ministry of Health’s o verall objective of ensuring that healthcare facilities throughout the country are provided with the necessary emergency medical equipment, and that training opportunities are provided to ensure that the current knowledge and skills of persons providing healthcare services, are maintained. He said as a result, the buildings formerly used to house the clinic and nurses’ residence in Mangrove Cay, in addition to the f ormer nurses’ residence in Kemp’s Bay, will be renovated and used to facilitate the training of medical and nursing students and p hysicians from the University of the West Indies’ Bahamas campus who are pursing post-graduate studies in Family Medi cine. The Health Minister said officials from the Public Hos pitals Authority are also scheduled to provide First Responders training for residents of Mangrove Cay and Kemp’s Bay, which should also auger well for the provision of timely services to the community. “All that remains is for the residents of Mangrove C ay to work with their healthcare providers to reduce the number of persons developing chronic, non-communicable diseases a s well as injuries resulting from negative and unhealthy lifestyle choices and violence,” Dr. Minnis added. Mangrove Cay Clinic gets facelift; health services re-established A STOCK PHOTO of a sea turtle. Petition has ‘two or three thousand’ signatures HEALTH MINISTER Dr Hubert Minnis (centre renovated Mangrove Cay Community Clinic following the relaunching of primary healthcare services in Dorsette’s, Friday, September 17. Pictured with Dr. Minnis from left: Gina Benn ett-Rolle, Nursing Officer 1/Clinic Supervisor and Patrice Bowleg, Nursing Officer II. Picewell Forbes, Member of Parliament for South Andros is pictured in the background. Turtles are increasing in the B ahamas on a daily basis but nobody – ( The Department of) Fisheries or anybody – will go out there to try to do any type of survey (of the numbersb ecause they know that if they did it w ould defeat what they are saying.” Abner Pinder

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B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net O PPONENTS of the Arawak Cay port move claim to have been “successful” in their endeavour of gathering thousands of signatures against t he government’s plan. The drive to collect the n ames of those who think that Arawak Cay is an unwise c hoice for the relocation of the container shipping facilities was launched in mid-August. Yesterday, PLP Senator Jerome Fitzgerald said he is h appy with the results so far. He is now drafting a letter t hat he will present with the petition to Prime Minister H ubert Ingraham “within the next week.” Declining to state how many signatures were collected duri ng the drive, Senator Fitzgerald told The Tribune this would b e revealed on the day it is forwarded to the prime minister. T his development comes days after PLP leader Perry Christie warned potential investors in the Arawak Cay port project to “beware” s tating that if his party wins the 2012 election it would scrap the c urrent plan and move the port elsewhere. Independent Speaking on the Love97 talk show ‘Jones and Co’ on Sunday, Mr Christie reiterated how t he former government believed south-western New P rovidence would be the best site for a new port based on i ndependent studies. In August, Mr Fitzgerald said h e hoped to get around 10,000 signatures in the petition against the Arawak Cay port move. An online version of the petition yesterday registered 503 signatures. However, Mr Fitzgerald said the drive also involved door-t o-door advocacy by a team of people dedicated to opposing the Arawak Cay plan. The senator, who recently announced his intention to run f or the deputy leadership of the PLP, has denied that hisa ctivism on the issue, which he began last year, has anything t o do with his political ambi tions. “People will want to link the two, but that’s not what this is about,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Arawak Cay port protest ‘proving successful’ By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT A man was charged with murder in the Freeport Magistrate’s Court on Monday. Godfrey Virgill, alias “Dollar Murder”, was arraigned before Magistrate Debbye Ferguson in Court One in the murder of 20year-old Ashley Smith the island’s eighth homicide victim for the year. It is alleged that on September 12, Virgill intentionally caused the death of Mr Smith by means of unlawful harm. He was not requiredto enter a plea to the charge. Lawyer K Brian Hanna represented Virgill. Magistrate Ferguson adjourned the case to Janu ary 26, 2010 in Magistrate’s Court 3 for a preliminary inquiry. Man charged with Freeport’s e ighth murder of the year B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net HOPING to pressure gove rnment into enacting the promised Freedom of Information Act, an opposition sena-t or said he will present his own draft legislation in the Senate. J erome Fitzgerald believes government should make passing the law – which would give t he general public a legal right and avenue to obtain informa-t ion held by public authorities unless there is a good reason for confidentiality – more of a p riority. While the attorney claims he “does not expect” theg overnment will debate the legislation that he tables, Mr Fitzgerald hopes that his efforts will at least bring the issue to the forefront, causing the government to make their own m oves to create a “sunshine” l aw, as promised in the FNM’s e lection manifesto in 2007. Most democracies have enacted, or moved towards crea ting a Freedom of Informat ion Act. The United States passed an FOIA in 1966, with the UK following in 2000. Apart from outlining the r ight of the public to access certain information, the law would also create penalties for public authorities who withhold documents. Advocates of the law in the Bahamas say it would help r educe scandals and cases of c orruption that often only come t o light years after they occur, if a t all. M eaningful Most recently, Callenders a nd Co attorney Fred Smith a nd others suggested that a “meaningful” FOIA could have helped avoid the circumstances that led to the crown land con-t roversy involving former direct or of Lands and Surveys Tex Turnquest. For its part, the gove rnment has said it remains c ommitted to passing an FOIA within its current five year term. During the June 2009 budget debate, Minister of StateC harles Maynard noted that t wo consultants were contracted this year to help “prepare the entire public service for the open access to their records.” Having in recent times been active in voicing and galvanising opposition to the government’s intended relocation of the port to Arawak Cay, Mr Fitzgerald said his work in this regard hasb olstered his belief that the public must have new avenues through which to obtain information which they can use to hold the government accountable for its decisions anda ctions. A lot of the information I’ve b een seeking throughout this e xercise has not been forthcoming,” said the Senator, who claims that government has so far been “secretive” about the port move and failed to justify it in the face of prior studies that r ated Arawak Cay poorly as a potential site. “The need for a Freedom of Information Act is something I’m going to start to press verys trongly. I will lay a draft in the senate, putting it forward for us to begin to debate. The Government can decide w hether they’re going to debate it or not. Mr Fitzgerald, who recently revealed his intention to run for the post of Deputy Leader of the PLP at the party’s forthcoming convention, said the issue of access to infor m ation “goes across party l ines”, with both the FNM and the PLP at times failing to be as open as they should. Moving forward I think the p ublic is going to demand that we have this (an FOIA c an know what the hell is going o n,” he added. Pressure mounts on Government for Freedom of Information Act C ourt short V IRGILL, w earing a black and white striped shirt, is escorted b y police officers to the courthouse on Monday to be charged with murder. O PPOSITION S ENATOR J EROME F ITZGERALDTOPRESENTHISOWNDRAFTLEGISLATION JEROME FITZGERALD

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EDITOR, The Tribune. There has been much fanfare of late regarding the lev el of assistance that the People’s Republic of China is pre pared to offer to the Bahamas. From the sports stadium, to the road project, to Baha Mar and finally in today’s Tribune large scale farming in Abaco. We recently witnessed the historic visit of His Excellency Wu Bangguo, Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress of the People’s Republic of China. During this visit three agreements were signed that covered i) in addition to other issues, the protection of investments by Bahamian and Chinese investors that are made in each other’s coun tries; ii) an agreement that covers a loan from the Chinese Exim Bank for the Airport Highway project and iii) an agreement that covers the construction of the national sports stadium, which is a grant from the People’s Republic of China. There were also two agreements signed with Baha Mar, regarding the Cable Beach project. The above is all well and good....perhaps!? No doubt there is much benefit to be achieved by some Bahamians, with regard to these developments. But all the media cov erage and Government press releases highlight the benefits for the Bahamas. I always stand to be corrected, as I am only human and will make mistakes, but so far I can’t seem to find any coverage on the benefits to the People’s Republic of Chi na for such generosity bestowed on the Bahamas and the Bahamian people. Certainly China benefits from exporting goods to the Bahamas, but this does not seem to justify what we have learnt over the past couple of weeks and months. Our imports from China are only “peanuts” to that of our neighbour to the west. The Highway Project may be a loan, but we are advised that the Stadium is a grant. So what is in it for the Peo ple’s Republic of China? Outside of monetary gain, and I’m sure long line fishing, are the Chinese interested in our relationship and proximity to the United States of America or illegal immigration (ie importation of cheap labour from China). The Chi nese are business people and as said by Milton Friedman: “There’s no such thing as a free lunch.” So, what have we committed to the People’s Republic of China? JEROME R PINDER Nassau, September 17, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. F riday, August 21, 2009, t urned out to be a horrific day for the family of Wendy Bullard, a young lady working in the employ of 21st Century W elding when, while working to earn an honest dollar for herself and her family, she was ruthlessly gunned down by t hugs who, for whatever reas on, saw no purpose or value to her life and merely regarded her as an obstruction to their abominable exploits. T ragically, like many before her, she is now a statistic and a testament to how we as a people and country have failed to p rotect our citizens and prevent our country from becoming a habitat for freedom of lawlessness and severe limitations onj ustice. This case, like others before it, will provoke ourt houghts for a little while and many of us will seek to blame s ome individual or organisation for the degradation that we have gotten ourselves and our society into. We can blame the Minister o f National Security because in my opinion his performance int his capacity has been dismal. It is also my opinion that he has d emonstrated no real vision for addressing the crime situation and his failure to produce real results is glaring to those of us who can see beyond the polit ics. We can blame the court syst em where individuals charged with committing murders or o ther heinous crimes are con tinuously and almost routinely released on bail. Sadly, many of these suspects are back on the streets committing more c rimes, taking new victims and creating more work for an a lready overloaded law enforcement system. We are, i n essence, getting the raw results of justice delayed. The criminal elements are not facing any harsh consequences for felonious actions and, theref ore, see this as impulse to continue down the wrong road c ausing havoc and giving life to the old adage – Justice delayedi s justice denied. We can blame the police b ecause in recent times officers have been so busy arresting one another they have hardly had time to focus on society’s criminal elements. Officers are b eing charged with all sorts of malicious and injurious activi t ies – domestic abuse, child abuse, sexual molestation, robberies, burglaries, rape, etc – bringing the Royal Bahamas Police Force to disrepute andf urther destroying the public trust in this organisation. We can blame drugs, alcohol, gangs, lack of home discip line, the schools, the churches, the prison, the affected establishments, the unfortunate victims and whatever substance, entity or individual we are con-v inced has played some role in guiding our descent to criminal decadence. While we may notw ant to accept it, the reality of the matter is that we also needt o blame ourselves. A lot of us in Bahamaland k now our relatives and friends who are involved in criminal activities. When we tell our kids to fight it out if someone challenges them we are groomingt hem. When we give them the impression that they can havea nything they want without working for it we are setting t hem up. When we tell them what insults to direct at the teachers and other adults who reprimand them we are strengthening them. When we b rag about their bad behavioural antics and fail to admin-i ster discipline we are promoting them. When they show up w ith items we know are stolen and we accept them we are licensing them. When we drive them to the house in the “jookjook” corner to purchase or sell i llicit substances we are encouraging them. When we see themw ith the unlicensed firearms or other illegal weapons and do n ot report them to the police we have contributed to every murder that is committed in this country after the fact. The other brutal reality is t hat nothing and no one will ever thoroughly eradicate crimei n this country, unless Jehovah God himself comes down, but t here are solutions to our prob lems. The Hon Tommy Turnquest needs to be transferred as Minister of National Security as soon as possible. No Government should want to be accused of playing politics with such a critical issue as crime management and, unfortunatel y, this appears to be the case with the present administration. The only reason Mr Turnquest does not appear to be playing is b ecause he has already dropped t he ball. For offenders who allegedly commit murder and other horrendous criminal acts the w heels of justice should move swiftly. Law enforcement officers, prosecutors, Supreme Court judges, the Attorney G eneral’s Office and persons r esponsible for dealing with such matters should move to expedite them to ensure that justice is administered quickly a nd appropriately so that victims’ families do not feel violated over and over again. There is no justified reason a s to why families of murder victims, casualties of armed robberies and rape, and children who have suffered sexualm olestation and exploitation should have to wait five and sixy ears for their concerns to be thoroughly addressed by the c ourts. It is time to quit making excuses, prioritise and get the job done. Persons suspected of committing murder should not beg iven bail. Perpetrators convicted of murder should be exe-c uted expeditiously and there should be no question of w hether they die. Death by execution as a consequence for murder should be automatic. Friday, August 21, 2009, was a terrible and tragic day for one m ore family but, sadly, many more of days of the week will b e like that until we as a people and a country shift our attitude t owards felons, strengthen our resolve against criminal activi ties, and renew our commitment to fight the destructive elements wherever they are and w hoever they may be – including family members, friends, r elatives or acquaintances. We need a critical moral f acelift. We need to change our mindset about where we want our country to be and where we want our future to take us. We need to reaffirm our valu es and determine what is really important to us. The change f or us has to begin within us. Until then, we as a people willc ontinue to reap what we’ve sown. It is unfortunate that, b ecause of this, the innocent will continue to suffer for and along with the guilty. MARVIN R Z GIBSON N assau, August, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm W E HAVE received a letter from a reader asking for our opinion on the removal of t he casuarina trees at Saunders Beach. The writer wants to know if we believe those who say that these trees destroy our beach-e s, prevent the growth of native vegetation, resulting in the decline of sand dunes and thee xposure of the coastline to erosion. It would seem, said the writer, that because t hese trees are not indigenous to the Bahamas they must be eliminated at all cost. W e don’t know what to believe. We agree that as Neil Sealey pointed out in his article, “The Casuarina Controversy”, that hurri-c anes Floyd and Frances, during the height of their swirling fury, blew massive amountso f sand from Saunders Beach onto the main road. This is to be expected because the c asuarina grows no foliage at the base of its trunk, and so between each tree there is a t remendous gap that is an open highway for anything being blown from the ocean to pile up on the main road. However, if low shrubs were planted beneath the trees to close the gaps, there would be no opening for the sand to get through and it would accumulate on the beach in dune formation. D o we believe that nothing will grow beneath the casuarina tree? The scientists s ay no, the casuarina is an invasive tree that poisons everything beneath it. But as Tina Barry of Harbour Island pointed out in her group’s campaign to save the Saunders Beach casuarinas, vegetation will grow under some casuarina trees in other words this group to save the tree does not believe that all casuarinas are poisonous to native vegetation. According to Ms Barry there are 17 v arieties of the tree, not all destructive. She maintains that the non destructive trees are the ones that have thrived at Saunders for more than 80 years, and should be left in peace. We are not a scientist and so we do not pretend to know what the scientific truth is. All we know is that inland vegetation almost smothers the tall casuarina tree. Our eyes do n ot see what the scientists tell us we should see except on the seafront and the explanation could be that no one has tried to plant anything beneath the tree to close the open spaces. The National Trust has always supported the removal of the casuarina from island coastlines. “Extensive research supports that removal of casuarinas from coastal areas and replanting of the dune ridge with native vegetation will restore the dune and provide an effective barrier against wave action,” said the Trust. However, this is what our reader had to say on the matter: Dear Editor, “Please tell me honestly: Do you believe a ll that these scientists are telling us about the Saunders Beach casuarina trees? “Well, I shan’t beat about the bush m y eyes don’t lie and they do not see what the scientists are telling us. I almost had mental collapse when I recently drove past a barren, wind swept S aunders Beach with half the casuarinas removed and numbers on the remaining o nes to indicate that they are now ready for the woodsman’s axe. All I know is that those responsible for their removal had better praya nd pray hard that there is no hurricane this year or, not only will the sand cover ther oad, but it will play host to a great deal of the Atlantic Ocean. There is absolutely no p rotection from ocean storms. “I read in The Tribune that the planting of n ative shrubs at Orange Hill was the pattern to be followed in the future for our seashore. It is true that the shrubs are knitted tightly together, but they completely block all view of the ocean and present a picture of monotonous drabness. However, I must admit, in the midst of it all I got a g ood laugh from one defiant little casuarina. As if to mock our brilliant scientists and g ive the lie to their claims, this little treasure had thrust itself skyward right up through the tightly knit native shrubs! I wanted to get out, stretch my arms and shout “bravo!” to the little blighter. Isn’t nature wonderful! “Inland casuarinas were growing with the native plants, one even had a thick vine creeping up its tall trunk. “And they talk about erosion of beaches. W e had magnificent beaches framed by casuarina trees when I was a child. The first time that I saw beach erosion was when they started building large hotels in the west and on Paradise Island in the east which has damaged Montagu Beach. “They justify their elimination of the casuarina because it is not native to the Bahamas. I recommend a read of Bill B ryson’s book ‘A walk in the Woods’ on the Appalachian Trail. He tells of how seedlings from the 800 plants discovered during the colonial era in the Appalachian woods were collected by amateur botanists and ‘shipped across the ocean to England and France and Russia, and received with greedy keenness and trembling fingers.’ “These were plants never before seen in Europe. Suppose they were all to be destroyed because they were not indigenous to Europe, what a dull, dismal place this world would be. Anyway, let the scientists prattle, I prefer to believe my own eyes and what I see, ain’t what they see!” The Bahamas needs a critical moral facelift LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Removal of the casuarinas So how does China benefit fr om its r elationship with Bahamas?

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T HE one-year-old baby girl and her 20-year-old aunt who died in a horrific traffic accident on Marathon Road on Sunday have been iden tified as Randia Dean, and Levonya Miller. The pair were passengers in a water truck that was travelling along Marathon Road when it collided with a maroon coloured Cadillac Seville that was heading south, causing it to flip over. Both passengers were thrown from the vehicle ands ustained fatal injuries. According to eyewitnesses and the police, the Cadil lac was signaling to turn into t he mall at Marathon’s e ntrance close to KFC when the water truck attempted to overtake it, clipping the vehicle and causing thet ruck to spin out of control and ultimately overturn. The number of traffic fatalities for the year stands at 37. By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net Candidate for the PLP leadership Paul Moss wooed his s upporters last night with pledges of sweeping changes if and when he is elected prime minister. Holding his official campaign launch event in the constituency of St Cecilia, he promised to bring “unparalleled and unprecedented” focus on educ ation and the judiciary, in an effort to address the problems facing these sectors. Mr Moss asked the crowd at C ynthia Pratt Park to support him in bringing every arm of government and every Bahamian into the 21st century through t he largest reform programme “this region has ever seen.” “We are going to unleash the power of the Bahamian imagin ation by removing every obstacle to success in this country. If you want to be successful, you will have a partner in myg overnment. “On the economy, I can tell you, for Bahamians who have not only longed but worked to achieve their dreams and fells hort because of lack of resources, those days are gone.F or those who saw opportunity in helping to bring efficiency to government by providing professional technology services, and you have found that your p roposals have disappeared without mention, your day has come. “We are going to undertake a project to overhaul this count ry and put the Bahamas at the cutting edge of technology,b oth in delivery services to our people and in how we deal with t he world,” he said. Speaking on education, the candidate said he will not have anyone telling Bahamian mothers and fathers it is okay fort heir children to be earning Ds and Es. We are, in my estimation, a smart nation, but we will become an educated nation too, because education will be the h allmark in our march into this new millennium. We will engender a sense of purpose and direction that only the greatest nations have shown. Every child – and I mean every child, will know what it isl ike to find something in him or herself to contribute to maki ng this nation and the world a better place,” he said. Mr Moss also pledged a low crime environment. “At last count,” he said, “the murderr ate stands at an alarming 65. I am appalled and I am con-f ounded that successive governments of this nation have allowed crime to fester to the point where it is now an open sore. Bahamians live in fear; imprisoned in their homes, while the government shrugs its shoulders, even as Bahamian f amilies suffer the pain of loss of loved ones murdered on our streets, in their homes and in broad daylight. That has to stop,” he said. Mr Moss also signalled his willingness to enforce capital punishment, warning criminals: “If you take a life, yours will b e taken.” He said he will “fix” the administration of justice, and eventually remove the Privy Council as the final court of appeal. Speaking on foreign p olicy, Mr Moss said he is “not interested in any trade agreem ent until Bahamians dominate the landscape of this country’s economy, building opportunities for other Bahamians and moving across our borderst o establish a new bold Bahamian brand.” Mr Moss also promised that every Bahamian family will o wn a piece of the country through a new Crown Land policy “that will provide every Bahamian household financials tability and security. That is w hat government is for.” FREEPORT– Government Ministers, Gaming Board officials and management of the Isle of Capri casino and Hutchison Whampoa met with the casino’s employees on Monday night to address concerns regarding the November 1 transition in casino ownership to the Treasure Bay group. Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace and State Minister for Finance Zhivargo Laing were among officials a t the meeting, organised to answer questions and clarify points of concern held by workers in the transition period from employment with Isle of Capri to employment with Treasure Bay. Minister Vanderpool-Wallace said: “We wanted to be sure that those persons who, for whatever reason may wish to sever their relationship with the company, (knew due them even though there is no change in ownership of the company which is normally the conditions under which you would provide that severance that we are prepared to provide them w ith that severance and to give them sufficient time to think about it, and decide whether they wish to take that option.” Such a provision is part of the government’s move to ensure the continuing operation of the island’s sole casino, which employs over 2 00 Grand Bahamians. Employees who opt for severance would, a s is standard, be required to re-apply with the new company and n egotiate their respective terms of employment. One of the main operational concerns expressed by employees was the relatively low v olume of guests coming to the casino a matter the Tourism Minister said is already being discussed in terms of the integration o f operations between the casino and owners of the Our Lucaya Resort (Hutchison Whampoa I said to them (the employees completely separated from a resort work, but fortunately even I sle of Capri in its latter days with definitely a new casino operator u nder consideration, were already having a conversation with the resort owners so that they have access to rooms on different terms a nd more favourable terms than I think has been in place before, because without getting into the complications of it, that is a very i mportant part of the marketing capacity and capabilities of a casino operation,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said. And so we see the management of Hutchison working much more closely to ensure they demonstrate that they understand that and put in place those packages and programmes that we believe will make a difference.” Government expects that difference to also be made through its p ublic/private sector tackling of what was considered one of the more significant hindrances to Grand Bahama’s competitiveness in t he tourism market – the high cost of airlift to the island. Minister Vanderpool-Wallace said that in addition to the cost of t he Miami-Grand Bahama route failing to positively compete with other destinations like Cancun, Montego Bay or Las Vegas, t he cost of airlift also gave rise to domestic competition from the destinations of Nassau and Paradise Island. “So we sat with the private sector here and said this is something that we have to fix and we have come to the point where the government, the private sector specifically the (Grand Bahama p ort Company, Freeport Flight Services, Hutchison (Whampoa have come and put a programme in place where the cost to fly to G rand Bahama has been reduced sufficiently for Grand Bahama to become much more competitive, not only against Nassau but a gainst all of the others,” he said. It is a programme airlines have demonstrated their approval of by increasing and/or introducing air lift to Grand Bahama as of November 1. WestJet will commence twice-weekly service to Freeport from Toronto, Canada; Delta Air lines will begin service four times weekly to Freeport beginning in D ecember; Spirit Airlines has re-confirmed its commitment to Grand Bahama from Fort Lauderdale, and American Eagle hasi ncreased its airlift from two flights to four flights per week. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM PLP leadership candidate seeks to woo supporters Government officials address concerns of Isle of Capri employees Changes now made to boost Grand Bahama’s competitiveness Paul Moss pledges to make sweeping changes if elected PM We are going to unleash the power of theB ahamian imagination by removing every obstacle to success in this country. If you want to be successful, you will have a partner in my government.” PAUL MOSS Crash victims named

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B Y MATT MAURA A RECENT study of adolescent understanding of and a ttitude towards HIV/AIDS indicated that while some youngsters are knowledgeable about the deadly virus, many are not taking the risk factorsa ssociated with the disease seriously enough, Health Minister Dr Hubert Minnis said. Dr Minnis said as a result of t he study’s findings, health policy-makers, planners and professionals must redouble their efforts to ensure that young people take HIV/AIDS as seri-o usly as they should. The study was conducted on public and private school students between the ages of 15 a nd 17 in New Providence and the Family Islands. Its aim was to provide data to support the planning and implementation of preventative strategies and healthcare programmes relating to HIV/AIDS. D r Minnis said while groups such as the AIDS Foundation of the Bahamas and the Ministry of Health – through its N ational AIDS Programme – continue to promote aggressive and intensive campaigns against the spread of HIV/AIDS, adolescents remain among thef astest growing population of HIV-infected persons in the country. The Health Minister comm ended the AIDS Foundation for establishing a temporary care facility for HIV positive adolescents. He said the facility will assist in “stabilising theirh ealth” and is another example of how the organisation “is responsive to the needs of the HIV/AIDS sector of our popul ation.” “In our country, they (adolescents) are extremely vulnerable,” Dr Minnis said. “Therefore it is incumbent upon us to promote a stern message detailing preventative meas ures about HIV/AIDS to this group.” Addressing the opening session of an AIDS Foundation of t he Bahamas Workshop, Dr Minnis said the HIV/AIDS pandemic continues to threaten the economic, national and social development of countriesa round the globe. He said the Caribbean, including the Bahamas, has been the “second-worst” affected region g lobally. “The Ministry of Health has increased access to anti-retroviral drugs, particularly for HIV positive pregnant women. This programme hasl ed to a dramatic reduction in the mother-to-child transmission rate,” Dr Minnis added. The minister said health offic ials must ensure that young people have “adequate access to knowledge and treatment” in order to minimise those health risks and reduce vulnerability to possible HIV infection. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Study: adolescents not serious about HIV/AIDS risk factors Police believe the former manager of the Harrold Road restaurant, and current manager of Burger King in Frederick Street, was taken to the store by h is killer or killers who then tried to force him to open the safe. When he failed to open the safe, Mr Morris was beatenin the manager’s office. He was dragged outside where he was again beaten and stabbed several times. He was found lying in a pool o f blood with multiple stab wounds at around 1.30am on Sunday and pronounced dead at the scene. Mr Morris became the 61st murder victim this year. Just hours later Bahamasair pilot Lionel Lewis McQueen, 29, was shot to death in his G olden Palm Estates home, raising the murder toll to 62, according to police. Mr McQueen’s cousin and roommate Montez Saunders was also shot several times when Mr McQueen was killedat their home near the Kennedy Subdivision in New Providence s hortly after 4am on Sunday. Mr Saunders is being treated in the Intensive Care Unit at Princess Margaret Hospital and his condition is said to be improving. P olice say the country’s murder count could soar to 66 this y ear if the deaths of four people killed in a fire at their home on T hursday morning are also classified as homicides. T hat would be nearly double the number of homicides at t his time last year. The deaths of Theresa Brown, 51; her daughter Kayshala Bodie, 18; granddaughter Telair Johnson, one; and neighbour Savanna Stuart, 18, who all died as a result of smoke inhalation, are currently classified as “suspicious.” But as investigations continue police might be able to conf irm that the fire at their home in Wilson Tract was started by an arsonist. Superintendent Leon Bethel in charge of the homicide department of the Criminal Detective Unit said there had been 57 murders at this time last year, and it is clear the murder toll is rising. H e told T he Tribune : “It’s an increase from last year, that’s obvious and we are confident about that. “We are also confident about detection and we are asking members of the public to assist. We need our detection rate to improve, and if the members o f the public cooperate with us the police who they have entrusted with the investigation of these matters we would have a better rate. “If we have a better rate of solution the occurrence of a lotof these matters will diminish. “We have lots of assistance from members of the public a nd we do appreciate that, but we do believe that with more a ssistance from the public, we will see a better rate of solut ion and we would see a reduction in the number of murders.” Activist Paul Joseph, 55, of Grand Bahama, said he wantsM inister of National Security T ommy Turnquest to step up and introduce capital punishment to help stem the number of murders as the toll spirals out of control. He said: “Don’t pacify the public by making this announcement, and not go ahead with it. “This place looks like Iraq, not the Bahamas, because anyb ody can be killing any time in this country and that’s the sad reality right now. “Whoever is in government has to protect the citizens of their country and right now there seems to be no protection. We are past the scare point now, this murder is a n ational nightmare.” Nassau resident Terrance Gilbert, 41, blames the rising murder rate on a breakdown of families and relationships. He called for the church to get more involved with communities and encourage people to not act in anger, but to forgive. We are having a family meltdown in this country, and it’s a national crisis,” he said. “We are resorting to murder because we are under so much pressure, and the church needs to pull together to work with people in the community.” Police are appealing to the public for information relating t o the murders of Rashad Morris, Lionel Lewis McQueen and t he four suspicious deaths by fire. A nyone with any information should call 911 or 919 urgently, or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS ( 8477 ) . Calls to Crime Stoppers a re answered in the United States and ensure total anonymity. a lleged understaffing, and continued the “sit-in” yesterday. They want the school to hire an English teacher and a science teacher to help cope with the work load. Anatol Rodgers teachers also took action over understaffing, starting on Monday and continuing yesterday. While some teache rs returned to the campus in Faith Avenue yesterday, 18 remained on their “sit-in”, refusing to work until two language arts teachers a re hired. Teachers at Uriah McPhee started their “sit-in” on Friday and continued to take action on Monday over a lack of air-conditioning on the third floor of the school building. A senior officer at the Ministry of Education said the air-conditioning unit was repairedo ver the weekend, and the teachers returned to work yesterday. The Education officer who did not want to be named said she is c oncerned about the effect the “sit-out” will have on the children who have made a fresh commitment to their education this term. S he encouraged parents to speak up and call for teachers to return to work and resume their duties for the benefit of their chil dren’s education. However, according to Bahamas Union of Teachers (BUT president Belinda Wilson, the teachers will not return to work until their demands are met. And PLP chairwoman Glenys Hanna Martin released a state ment yesterday criticising Minister of Education Carl Bethel for failing to bring public schools up to scratch. She said: “We have seen systemic failure on his behalf in a number of areas, including a failure to complete school repairs and adequately equip and furnish classrooms in a timely fashion. “Today we note that well into the academic year that policies implemented by this government relative to the non-renewal of contracts of teachers, and the concomitant failure to recruit replacement teachers, has left schools understaffed in critical areas of the curriculum and led to overcrowding of classrooms in several schools and gaps in school security. “Our children are being short-changed. “In light of the minister’s weak response to the many chal lenges and demands which now face our educational system he is now being invited to seriously consider whether he should continue at the helm of this important engine of our national development.” Burger King reward F ROM page one URIAH MCPHEE T HE Rotary Club of New Providence will hold a steak/chicken-out at the Scouts Headquarters on Dolphin Drive on Saturday, September 26. The price is $10. Rotary Club to hold steak/chicken-out CI GIBSON FROM page one Teachers stage sit-in protests F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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Teachers stage ‘sit-in’ protests B B u u r r g g e e r r K K i i n n g g o o f f f f e e r r s s r r e e w w a a r r d d t t o o h h e e l l p p c c a a p p t t u u r r e e k k i i l l l l e e r r N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.251WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SOMESUN WITH T-STORM, BREEZY HIGH 89F LOW 80F F E A T U R E S S EE‘THEARTS’SECTION S P O R T S Art of SEE PAGENINE CAN Basketball boost for ANDROS Jurors hear of efforts to revive film star’s son The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com I N S I D E SEEPAGESEVEN Larry Smith’s Tough Call TRA VOLTA TRIAL: D AYTWO EFFECTS from the threat of climate change could prove damaging to the Bahamas' economy, according to Tourism and Aviation Minister Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace. A recent study by the World Bank placed the Bahamas among the top three of the most vulnerable Caribbean countries when it comes to climate change, emphasizing the need for a pro-active stance to curb more damaging effects. “We know that we cannot run away from the issues of sea level rise, salt water intrusions, beach and shore erosion, and the many other impacts of cli mate change that confront us. Your presence here is a demon stration of your commitment to act before it’s too late,” said Mr Vanderpool-Wallace during day one of the Caribsave Country Partners Symposium. The World Bank report also revealed that a five-metre change in sea level rise could result in damage to the economy that amounts to 3.5 per cent of Gross Domestic Product (GDP “In the case of the Bahamas, it estimates that the same level Climate change seen as threat to Bahamas economy AN inmate at Her Majesty's Prison accused of the murder of a fellow inmate was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Preston Moss, 36, is charged with the murder of Lloyd Albury. Albury died on September 10, two days after he was admitted to hospital following a fight in a cell at the prison. Albury, 55, was reportedly imprisoned on a vagrancy charge. Moss, was arraigned on the murder charge yesterday before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court 1, Bank Lane. INMATE ACCUSED OF MURDERINGFELLOW PRISONER PRESTON MOSS , 36, was charged yesterday with the murder of Lloyd Albury. Tim Clarke / Tribune staff SEE page eight SEE page eight VINCENT VANDERPOOL-WALLACE By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net BURGER King have offered a $10,000 reward for any infor mation that will lead to the arrest or conviction of those responsible for the murder of restaurant manager RashadM orris. Mr Morris, 21, of John Street, off Baillou Hill Road, was brutally beaten and stabbed at the Burger King restaurant on Harrold Road, western New Providence, where he was found dead early Sunday morning. By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net JURORS in the trial of for m er PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater and former ambul ance driver Tarino Lightbourne heard several accounts yesterday of the efforts made to revive an unresponsive Jett Travolta as prosecutors openedt heir case in the Supreme Court. J ett Travolta, 16, the son of Hollywood actors John Travolta and Kelly Preston died in Freeport, Grand Bahama on January 2. Opening the case for the prosecution yesterday Director of Public Prosecutions Bernard Turner said that following Jett’s death, contact was made with certain persons to communicate a threat to Mr Travolta regarding the release of potentially damaging statements if money were not paid. Former PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater and former para medic Tarino Lightbourne are accused of attempting to extort $25 million from the Hollywood actor. Mr Travolta flies in this morning to be the first witness when the case resumes today. He will be accompanied by his wife. ‘How we tried to save Jett Travolta’ SEE page eight FOLLOWING two brutal murders Sunday, the country last night recorded its 63rd homicide. Details were still sketchy at press time, but police said a young man who had travelled to the Seagrapes shopping centre on Prince Charles Drive by car at 5pm got into an altercation with another man at the plaza. The dispute got out of hand and the victim was stabbed several times during the skirmish. He was rushed to hospital by ambulance, but police said he was unresponsive by this time. He died a short time later, at about 7pm. The matter is being investigated. C C o o u u n n t t r r y y r r e e c c o o r r d d s s 6 6 3 3 r r d d h h o o m m i i c c i i d d e e SEE page six By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net AROUND 200 teache rs at three public schools in New Providence staged “sit-in’s” yesterday to protest inadequate staffing and poor work-i ng conditions. The industrial action at U riah McPhee, Anatol Rodgers and CI Gibson, w hich began Friday has postponed education for thousands of students across New Providence. At CI Gibson the a ction compounded security issues at the school a s 11 knives and an icepick were found on the s chool property yester day, according to reports. Teachers began taking action on Monday over SEE page six JETT TRAVOLTA

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By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A Bahamas-wide campaign aiming to highlight opposition to the outright ban on harvesting sea turtles has “gained plenty of momentum”, according to one of its organisers. Abner Pinder, fisherman and chief councillor for Spanish Wells, claims “two or three thousand” signatures have already been added to a petition against the ban launched earlier this month and more are expected when all of the Family Islands send in the signatures attached to petitions circulated there. Mr Pinder, along with n umerous other fishermen and opponents of the ban –w hich extends to the taking or catching of any marine turtles, turtle parts or eggs, for commercial use or otherwise – hopes to persuade the government to reverse its position and continue to allow Bahamians to harvest turtles for personal consumption. Gathered together on Sep tember 3, two days after the ban was officially enacted in the name of conservation, they charged that, contrary to the government and environmentalist’s views that the turtles are in danger of being wiped out, the creatures are “plentiful” in Bahamian waters. Activists Their efforts, however, have already raised the ire ofl ocal environmental activists. Having hailed the ban as “wonderful” in August after pushing for years for the government to enact it, Kim Aranha, founder of the Bahamas Sea Turtle Conser v ation Group, charged that those against the ban are “speaking from ignorance”. She noted that the BSTCG’s own petition against the slaughter of sea turtles in the Bahamas garnered around 5,000 signa tures. Meanwhile, Mr Pinder said: “Turtles are increasing in the Bahamas on a daily basis butn obody – (The Department o f) Fisheries or anybody – will go out there to try to do any type of survey (of the numbers), because they know that if they did it would defeat what they are saying.” The petition against the ban states: “I do not agree that the government should ban all harvesting or eating of tur tle meat by Bahamians, rather I believe that control or banning of commercial harvesting and the slaughter of turtles in public are enough to address the needs of both environmentalism and humanity.” Commercial Mr Pinder stressed that most opponents of the ban are primarily concerned with ensuring turtles can still be captured for personal consumption, and are happy to allow the part of the ban which relates to commercial harvesting to remain. The affect on the overall turtle population of allowing individuals to catch them to eat would be “infinitesimal,” he suggested. He claims that although the ban has been enacted as an amendment to the Fisheries Regulations, it is critical that the opponents make their voices heard before the next parliamentary session begins on September 30 as this is expected to provide an opportunity for the ban to be fur ther cemented in law. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM WYNDHAMNASSAURESORT.COM 242.327.6200 WEST BAY STREET AT CABLE BEACHTHE TROPICAL TREASURESOCTOBER 8 12DISCOVERInvite your family, friends, neighbors & co-workers to take Discovery Day Weekend o and come Discover the Tropical Treasures at the Wyndham Nassasu Resort.Join in the Discovery Day Weekend Activities:Take advantage of our Forever Summer Sale with rates starting at $114.00 per room, per night Beach BBQ with fire pits & dancing Pirates Dinner Party on the beach(prize for best-looking pirate)Mystery photo scavenger hunt Volleyball tournaments with prizes for winning team Golf tournament (green fees additional charge)Dive-in movie with popcorn Daily happy hours on the beach with LIVE music Nightly LIVE entertainment in our 22 Above Night Club featuring the VIP Band Dance contests & prizes 8 restaurants, 6 bars & lounges on property Pool with entertainment, swim-up bar & tables, dance floor, rock slide & water slide W N R 0 5 4 1 / 4 p a g e n e w s p a p e r . i n d d ZIM343856_01a_WNR-054.indd 1 9/21/09 3:45 PM Campaign highlighting opposition to sea turtles ban ‘gaining momentum’ BY MATT MAURA Dorsette’s, Mangrove C ay T he relaunching of p rimary healthcare services at the Mangrove Cay Community Clinic will allow for the “adequate and timely d elivery of high-quality healthcare” to the residents of Mangrove Cay, Health Minister Dr. Hubert Minn is said. T he relaunching took place on Friday, September 18, and is part of the continuing reconstruction/renovat ions of primary healthcare facilities throughout the Family Islands. Relaunching ceremonies have already t aken place in Kemp’s Bay, South Andros; Nicholls Town, North Andros, and Grand Cay, North Abaco. More are scheduled for other parts of the Bahamas. Constructed 24 years ago with funding from the National Insurance Board, the Community Clinic was renovated at a cost of $500,000. Dr. Minnis said the relaunching of services will allow healthcare professionals on Mangrove Cay to address those a spects of primary healthcare that focus on health promotion, disease prevention and self-empowerment, particularly in the fight against chronic, non-communicable diseases (CNCDS and other public health threats. The residents of Mangrove Cay, like those elsewhere in the Bahamas, are primarily affected by the increasing rates of obe-s ity, hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, cancer, asthma and other types of chronic, non-communicable diseases, as well as t hose related to alcohol consumption,” Dr. Minnis said. “Now that the clinic building has been renovated, operations will improve due to the fact that the District Medical Officer will be able to remain overnight in the facility and the fact that the clinic will be connected to the Central Patient Record Infor-m ation System which will allow physicians in New Providence to review the medical records of patients in Mangrove Cay.” D r. Minnis said the upgrades to primary healthcare facilities throughout the Bahamas is part of the Ministry of Health’s o verall objective of ensuring that healthcare facilities throughout the country are provided with the necessary emergency medical equipment, and that training opportunities are provided to ensure that the current knowledge and skills of persons providing healthcare services, are maintained. He said as a result, the buildings formerly used to house the clinic and nurses’ residence in Mangrove Cay, in addition to the f ormer nurses’ residence in Kemp’s Bay, will be renovated and used to facilitate the training of medical and nursing students and p hysicians from the University of the West Indies’ Bahamas campus who are pursing post-graduate studies in Family Medi cine. The Health Minister said officials from the Public Hos pitals Authority are also scheduled to provide First Responders training for residents of Mangrove Cay and Kemp’s Bay, which should also auger well for the provision of timely services to the community. “All that remains is for the residents of Mangrove C ay to work with their healthcare providers to reduce the number of persons developing chronic, non-communicable diseases a s well as injuries resulting from negative and unhealthy lifestyle choices and violence,” Dr. Minnis added. Mangrove Cay Clinic gets facelift; health services re-established A STOCK PHOTO of a sea turtle. Petition has ‘two or three thousand’ signatures HEALTH MINISTER Dr Hubert Minnis (centre renovated Mangrove Cay Community Clinic following the relaunching of primary healthcare services in Dorsette’s, Friday, September 17. Pictured with Dr. Minnis from left: Gina Benn ett-Rolle, Nursing Officer 1/Clinic Supervisor and Patrice Bowleg, Nursing Officer II. Picewell Forbes, Member of Parliament for South Andros is pictured in the background. Turtles are increasing in the B ahamas on a daily basis but nobody – ( The Department of) Fisheries or anybody – will go out there to try to do any type of survey (of the numbersb ecause they know that if they did it w ould defeat what they are saying.” Abner Pinder

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B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net O PPONENTS of the Arawak Cay port move claim to have been “successful” in their endeavour of gathering thousands of signatures against t he government’s plan. The drive to collect the n ames of those who think that Arawak Cay is an unwise c hoice for the relocation of the container shipping facilities was launched in mid-August. Yesterday, PLP Senator Jerome Fitzgerald said he is h appy with the results so far. He is now drafting a letter t hat he will present with the petition to Prime Minister H ubert Ingraham “within the next week.” Declining to state how many signatures were collected duri ng the drive, Senator Fitzgerald told The Tribune this would b e revealed on the day it is forwarded to the prime minister. T his development comes days after PLP leader Perry Christie warned potential investors in the Arawak Cay port project to “beware” s tating that if his party wins the 2012 election it would scrap the c urrent plan and move the port elsewhere. Independent Speaking on the Love97 talk show ‘Jones and Co’ on Sunday, Mr Christie reiterated how t he former government believed south-western New P rovidence would be the best site for a new port based on i ndependent studies. In August, Mr Fitzgerald said h e hoped to get around 10,000 signatures in the petition against the Arawak Cay port move. An online version of the petition yesterday registered 503 signatures. However, Mr Fitzgerald said the drive also involved door-t o-door advocacy by a team of people dedicated to opposing the Arawak Cay plan. The senator, who recently announced his intention to run f or the deputy leadership of the PLP, has denied that hisa ctivism on the issue, which he began last year, has anything t o do with his political ambi tions. “People will want to link the two, but that’s not what this is about,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Arawak Cay port protest ‘proving successful’ By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT A man was charged with murder in the Freeport Magistrate’s Court on Monday. Godfrey Virgill, alias “Dollar Murder”, was arraigned before Magistrate Debbye Ferguson in Court One in the murder of 20year-old Ashley Smith the island’s eighth homicide victim for the year. It is alleged that on September 12, Virgill intentionally caused the death of Mr Smith by means of unlawful harm. He was not required to enter a plea to the charge. Lawyer K Brian Hanna represented Virgill. Magistrate Ferguson adjourned the case to Janu ary 26, 2010 in Magistrate’s Court 3 for a preliminary inquiry. Man charged with Freeport’s e ighth murder of the year B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net HOPING to pressure gove rnment into enacting the promised Freedom of Information Act, an opposition sena-t or said he will present his own draft legislation in the Senate. J erome Fitzgerald believes government should make passing the law – which would give t he general public a legal right and avenue to obtain informa-t ion held by public authorities unless there is a good reason for confidentiality – more of a p riority. While the attorney claims he “does not expect” theg overnment will debate the legislation that he tables, Mr Fitzgerald hopes that his efforts will at least bring the issue to the forefront, causing the government to make their own m oves to create a “sunshine” l aw, as promised in the FNM’s e lection manifesto in 2007. Most democracies have enacted, or moved towards crea ting a Freedom of Informat ion Act. The United States passed an FOIA in 1966, with the UK following in 2000. Apart from outlining the r ight of the public to access certain information, the law would also create penalties for public authorities who withhold documents. Advocates of the law in the Bahamas say it would help r educe scandals and cases of c orruption that often only come t o light years after they occur, if a t all. M eaningful Most recently, Callenders a nd Co attorney Fred Smith a nd others suggested that a “meaningful” FOIA could have helped avoid the circumstances that led to the crown land con-t roversy involving former direct or of Lands and Surveys Tex Turnquest. For its part, the gove rnment has said it remains c ommitted to passing an FOIA within its current five year term. During the June 2009 budget debate, Minister of StateC harles Maynard noted that t wo consultants were contracted this year to help “prepare the entire public service for the open access to their records.” Having in recent times been active in voicing and galvanising opposition to the government’s intended relocation of the port to Arawak Cay, Mr Fitzgerald said his work in this regard hasb olstered his belief that the public must have new avenues through which to obtain information which they can use to hold the government accountable for its decisions anda ctions. A lot of the information I’ve b een seeking throughout this e xercise has not been forthcoming,” said the Senator, who claims that government has so far been “secretive” about the port move and failed to justify it in the face of prior studies that r ated Arawak Cay poorly as a potential site. “The need for a Freedom of Information Act is something I’m going to start to press verys trongly. I will lay a draft in the senate, putting it forward for us to begin to debate. The Government can decide w hether they’re going to debate it or not. Mr Fitzgerald, who recently revealed his intention to run for the post of Deputy Leader of the PLP at the party’s forthcoming convention, said the issue of access to infor m ation “goes across party l ines”, with both the FNM and the PLP at times failing to be as open as they should. Moving forward I think the p ublic is going to demand that we have this (an FOIA c an know what the hell is going o n,” he added. Pressure mounts on Government for Freedom of Information Act C ourt short V IRGILL, w earing a black and white striped shirt, is escorted b y police officers to the courthouse on Monday to be charged with murder. O PPOSITION S ENATOR J EROME F ITZGERALDTOPRESENTHISOWNDRAFTLEGISLATION JEROME FITZGERALD

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EDITOR, The Tribune. There has been much fanfare of late regarding the lev el of assistance that the People’s Republic of China is pre pared to offer to the Bahamas. From the sports stadium, to the road project, to Baha Mar and finally in today’s Tribune large scale farming in Abaco. We recently witnessed the historic visit of His Excellency Wu Bangguo, Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress of the People’s Republic of China. During this visit three agreements were signed that covered i) in addition to other issues, the protection of investments by Bahamian and Chinese investors that are made in each other’s coun tries; ii) an agreement that covers a loan from the Chinese Exim Bank for the Airport Highway project and iii) an agreement that covers the construction of the national sports stadium, which is a grant from the People’s Republic of China. There were also two agreements signed with Baha Mar, regarding the Cable Beach project. The above is all well and good....perhaps!? No doubt there is much benefit to be achieved by some Bahamians, with regard to these developments. But all the media cov erage and Government press releases highlight the benefits for the Bahamas. I always stand to be corrected, as I am only human and will make mistakes, but so far I can’t seem to find any coverage on the benefits to the People’s Republic of Chi na for such generosity bestowed on the Bahamas and the Bahamian people. Certainly China benefits from exporting goods to the Bahamas, but this does not seem to justify what we have learnt over the past couple of weeks and months. Our imports from China are only “peanuts” to that of our neighbour to the west. The Highway Project may be a loan, but we are advised that the Stadium is a grant. So what is in it for the Peo ple’s Republic of China? Outside of monetary gain, and I’m sure long line fishing, are the Chinese interested in our relationship and proximity to the United States of America or illegal immigration (ie importation of cheap labour from China). The Chi nese are business people and as said by Milton Friedman: “There’s no such thing as a free lunch.” So, what have we committed to the People’s Republic of China? JEROME R PINDER Nassau, September 17, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. F riday, August 21, 2009, t urned out to be a horrific day for the family of Wendy Bullard, a young lady working in the employ of 21st Century W elding when, while working to earn an honest dollar for herself and her family, she was ruthlessly gunned down by t hugs who, for whatever reas on, saw no purpose or value to her life and merely regarded her as an obstruction to their abominable exploits. T ragically, like many before her, she is now a statistic and a testament to how we as a people and country have failed to p rotect our citizens and prevent our country from becoming a habitat for freedom of lawlessness and severe limitations onj ustice. This case, like others before it, will provoke ourt houghts for a little while and many of us will seek to blame s ome individual or organisation for the degradation that we have gotten ourselves and our society into. We can blame the Minister o f National Security because in my opinion his performance int his capacity has been dismal. It is also my opinion that he has d emonstrated no real vision for addressing the crime situation and his failure to produce real results is glaring to those of us who can see beyond the polit ics. We can blame the court syst em where individuals charged with committing murders or o ther heinous crimes are con tinuously and almost routinely released on bail. Sadly, many of these suspects are back on the streets committing more c rimes, taking new victims and creating more work for an a lready overloaded law enforcement system. We are, i n essence, getting the raw results of justice delayed. The criminal elements are not facing any harsh consequences for felonious actions and, theref ore, see this as impulse to continue down the wrong road c ausing havoc and giving life to the old adage – Justice delayedi s justice denied. We can blame the police b ecause in recent times officers have been so busy arresting one another they have hardly had time to focus on society’s criminal elements. Officers are b eing charged with all sorts of malicious and injurious activi t ies – domestic abuse, child abuse, sexual molestation, robberies, burglaries, rape, etc – bringing the Royal Bahamas Police Force to disrepute andf urther destroying the public trust in this organisation. We can blame drugs, alcohol, gangs, lack of home discip line, the schools, the churches, the prison, the affected establishments, the unfortunate victims and whatever substance, entity or individual we are con-v inced has played some role in guiding our descent to criminal decadence. While we may notw ant to accept it, the reality of the matter is that we also needt o blame ourselves. A lot of us in Bahamaland k now our relatives and friends who are involved in criminal activities. When we tell our kids to fight it out if someone challenges them we are groomingt hem. When we give them the impression that they can havea nything they want without working for it we are setting t hem up. When we tell them what insults to direct at the teachers and other adults who reprimand them we are strengthening them. When we b rag about their bad behavioural antics and fail to admin-i ster discipline we are promoting them. When they show up w ith items we know are stolen and we accept them we are licensing them. When we drive them to the house in the “jookjook” corner to purchase or sell i llicit substances we are encouraging them. When we see themw ith the unlicensed firearms or other illegal weapons and do n ot report them to the police we have contributed to every murder that is committed in this country after the fact. The other brutal reality is t hat nothing and no one will ever thoroughly eradicate crimei n this country, unless Jehovah God himself comes down, but t here are solutions to our prob lems. The Hon Tommy Turnquest needs to be transferred as Minister of National Security as soon as possible. No Government should want to be accused of playing politics with such a critical issue as crime management and, unfortunatel y, this appears to be the case with the present administration. The only reason Mr Turnquest does not appear to be playing is b ecause he has already dropped t he ball. For offenders who allegedly commit murder and other horrendous criminal acts the w heels of justice should move swiftly. Law enforcement officers, prosecutors, Supreme Court judges, the Attorney G eneral’s Office and persons r esponsible for dealing with such matters should move to expedite them to ensure that justice is administered quickly a nd appropriately so that victims’ families do not feel violated over and over again. There is no justified reason a s to why families of murder victims, casualties of armed robberies and rape, and children who have suffered sexualm olestation and exploitation should have to wait five and sixy ears for their concerns to be thoroughly addressed by the c ourts. It is time to quit making excuses, prioritise and get the job done. Persons suspected of committing murder should not beg iven bail. Perpetrators convicted of murder should be exe-c uted expeditiously and there should be no question of w hether they die. Death by execution as a consequence for murder should be automatic. Friday, August 21, 2009, was a terrible and tragic day for one m ore family but, sadly, many more of days of the week will b e like that until we as a people and a country shift our attitude t owards felons, strengthen our resolve against criminal activi ties, and renew our commitment to fight the destructive elements wherever they are and w hoever they may be – including family members, friends, r elatives or acquaintances. We need a critical moral f acelift. We need to change our mindset about where we want our country to be and where we want our future to take us. We need to reaffirm our valu es and determine what is really important to us. The change f or us has to begin within us. Until then, we as a people willc ontinue to reap what we’ve sown. It is unfortunate that, b ecause of this, the innocent will continue to suffer for and along with the guilty. MARVIN R Z GIBSON N assau, August, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm W E HAVE received a letter from a reader asking for our opinion on the removal of t he casuarina trees at Saunders Beach. The writer wants to know if we believe those who say that these trees destroy our beach-e s, prevent the growth of native vegetation, resulting in the decline of sand dunes and thee xposure of the coastline to erosion. It would seem, said the writer, that because t hese trees are not indigenous to the Bahamas they must be eliminated at all cost. W e don’t know what to believe. We agree that as Neil Sealey pointed out in his article, “The Casuarina Controversy”, that hurri-c anes Floyd and Frances, during the height of their swirling fury, blew massive amountso f sand from Saunders Beach onto the main road. This is to be expected because the c asuarina grows no foliage at the base of its trunk, and so between each tree there is a t remendous gap that is an open highway for anything being blown from the ocean to pile up on the main road. However, if low shrubs were planted beneath the trees to close the gaps, there would be no opening for the sand to get through and it would accumulate on the beach in dune formation. D o we believe that nothing will grow beneath the casuarina tree? The scientists s ay no, the casuarina is an invasive tree that poisons everything beneath it. But as Tina Barry of Harbour Island pointed out in her group’s campaign to save the Saunders Beach casuarinas, vegetation will grow under some casuarina trees in other words this group to save the tree does not believe that all casuarinas are poisonous to native vegetation. According to Ms Barry there are 17 v arieties of the tree, not all destructive. She maintains that the non destructive trees are the ones that have thrived at Saunders for more than 80 years, and should be left in peace. We are not a scientist and so we do not pretend to know what the scientific truth is. All we know is that inland vegetation almost smothers the tall casuarina tree. Our eyes do n ot see what the scientists tell us we should see except on the seafront and the explanation could be that no one has tried to plant anything beneath the tree to close the open spaces. The National Trust has always supported the removal of the casuarina from island coastlines. “Extensive research supports that removal of casuarinas from coastal areas and replanting of the dune ridge with native vegetation will restore the dune and provide an effective barrier against wave action,” said the Trust. However, this is what our reader had to say on the matter: Dear Editor, “Please tell me honestly: Do you believe a ll that these scientists are telling us about the Saunders Beach casuarina trees? “Well, I shan’t beat about the bush m y eyes don’t lie and they do not see what the scientists are telling us. I almost had mental collapse when I recently drove past a barren, wind swept S aunders Beach with half the casuarinas removed and numbers on the remaining o nes to indicate that they are now ready for the woodsman’s axe. All I know is that those responsible for their removal had better praya nd pray hard that there is no hurricane this year or, not only will the sand cover ther oad, but it will play host to a great deal of the Atlantic Ocean. There is absolutely no p rotection from ocean storms. “I read in The Tribune that the planting of n ative shrubs at Orange Hill was the pattern to be followed in the future for our seashore. It is true that the shrubs are knitted tightly together, but they completely block all view of the ocean and present a picture of monotonous drabness. However, I must admit, in the midst of it all I got ag ood laugh from one defiant little casuarina. As if to mock our brilliant scientists and g ive the lie to their claims, this little treasure had thrust itself skyward right up through the tightly knit native shrubs! I wanted to get out, stretch my arms and shout “bravo!” to the little blighter. Isn’t nature wonderful! “Inland casuarinas were growing with the native plants, one even had a thick vine creeping up its tall trunk. “And they talk about erosion of beaches. W e had magnificent beaches framed by casuarina trees when I was a child. The first time that I saw beach erosion was when they started building large hotels in the west and on Paradise Island in the east which has damaged Montagu Beach. “They justify their elimination of the casuarina because it is not native to the Bahamas. I recommend a read of Bill B ryson’s book ‘A walk in the Woods’ on the Appalachian Trail. He tells of how seedlings from the 800 plants discovered during the colonial era in the Appalachian woods were collected by amateur botanists and ‘shipped across the ocean to England and France and Russia, and received with greedy keenness and trembling fingers.’ “These were plants never before seen in Europe. Suppose they were all to be destroyed because they were not indigenous to Europe, what a dull, dismal place this world would be. Anyway, let the scientists prattle, I prefer to believe my own eyes and what I see, ain’t what they see!” The Bahamas needs a critical moral facelift LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Removal of the casuarinas So how does China benefit fr om its r elationship with Bahamas?

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T HE one-year-old baby girl and her 20-year-old aunt who died in a horrific traffic accident on Marathon Road on Sunday have been iden tified as Randia Dean, and Levonya Miller. The pair were passengers in a water truck that was travelling along Marathon Road when it collided with a maroon coloured Cadillac Seville that was heading south, causing it to flip over. Both passengers were thrown from the vehicle ands ustained fatal injuries. According to eyewitnesses and the police, the Cadil lac was signaling to turn into t he mall at Marathon’s e ntrance close to KFC when the water truck attempted to overtake it, clipping the vehicle and causing thet ruck to spin out of control and ultimately overturn. The number of traffic fatalities for the year stands at 37. By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net Candidate for the PLP leadership Paul Moss wooed his s upporters last night with pledges of sweeping changes if and when he is elected prime minister. Holding his official campaign launch event in the constituency of St Cecilia, he promised to bring “unparalleled and unprecedented” focus on educ ation and the judiciary, in an effort to address the problems facing these sectors. Mr Moss asked the crowd at C ynthia Pratt Park to support him in bringing every arm of government and every Bahamian into the 21st century through t he largest reform programme “this region has ever seen.” “We are going to unleash the power of the Bahamian imagin ation by removing every obstacle to success in this country. If you want to be successful, you will have a partner in myg overnment. “On the economy, I can tell you, for Bahamians who have not only longed but worked to achieve their dreams and fells hort because of lack of resources, those days are gone.F or those who saw opportunity in helping to bring efficiency to government by providing professional technology services, and you have found that your p roposals have disappeared without mention, your day has come. “We are going to undertake a project to overhaul this coun-t ry and put the Bahamas at the cutting edge of technology,b oth in delivery services to our people and in how we deal with t he world,” he said. Speaking on education, the candidate said he will not have anyone telling Bahamian mothers and fathers it is okay fort heir children to be earning Ds and Es. We are, in my estimation, a smart nation, but we will become an educated nation too, because education will be the h allmark in our march into this new millennium. We will engender a sense of purpose and direction that only the greatest nations have shown. Every child – and I mean every child, will know what it isl ike to find something in him or herself to contribute to maki ng this nation and the world a better place,” he said. Mr Moss also pledged a low crime environment. “At last count,” he said, “the murderr ate stands at an alarming 65. I am appalled and I am con-f ounded that successive governments of this nation have allowed crime to fester to the point where it is now an open sore. Bahamians live in fear; imprisoned in their homes, while the government shrugs its shoulders, even as Bahamian f amilies suffer the pain of loss of loved ones murdered on our streets, in their homes and in broad daylight. That has to stop,” he said. Mr Moss also signalled his willingness to enforce capital punishment, warning criminals: “If you take a life, yours will b e taken.” He said he will “fix” the administration of justice, and eventually remove the Privy Council as the final court of appeal. Speaking on foreign p olicy, Mr Moss said he is “not interested in any trade agreem ent until Bahamians dominate the landscape of this country’s economy, building opportunities for other Bahamians and moving across our borderst o establish a new bold Bahamian brand.” Mr Moss also promised that every Bahamian family will o wn a piece of the country through a new Crown Land policy “that will provide every Bahamian household financials tability and security. That is w hat government is for.” FREEPORT– Government Ministers, Gaming Board officials and management of the Isle of Capri casino and Hutchison Whampoa met with the casino’s employees on Monday night to address concerns regarding the November 1 transition in casino ownership to the Treasure Bay group. Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace and State Minister for Finance Zhivargo Laing were among officials a t the meeting, organised to answer questions and clarify points of concern held by workers in the transition period from employment with Isle of Capri to employment with Treasure Bay. Minister Vanderpool-Wallace said: “We wanted to be sure that those persons who, for whatever reason may wish to sever their relationship with the company, (knew due them even though there is no change in ownership of the company which is normally the conditions under which you would provide that severance that we are prepared to provide them w ith that severance and to give them sufficient time to think about it, and decide whether they wish to take that option.” Such a provision is part of the government’s move to ensure the continuing operation of the island’s sole casino, which employs over 2 00 Grand Bahamians. Employees who opt for severance would, a s is standard, be required to re-apply with the new company and n egotiate their respective terms of employment. One of the main operational concerns expressed by employees was the relatively low v olume of guests coming to the casino a matter the Tourism Minister said is already being discussed in terms of the integration o f operations between the casino and owners of the Our Lucaya Resort (Hutchison Whampoa I said to them (the employees completely separated from a resort work, but fortunately even I sle of Capri in its latter days with definitely a new casino operator u nder consideration, were already having a conversation with the resort owners so that they have access to rooms on different terms a nd more favourable terms than I think has been in place before, because without getting into the complications of it, that is a very i mportant part of the marketing capacity and capabilities of a casino operation,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said. And so we see the management of Hutchison working much more closely to ensure they demonstrate that they understand that and put in place those packages and programmes that we believe will make a difference.” Government expects that difference to also be made through its p ublic/private sector tackling of what was considered one of the more significant hindrances to Grand Bahama’s competitiveness in t he tourism market – the high cost of airlift to the island. Minister Vanderpool-Wallace said that in addition to the cost of t he Miami-Grand Bahama route failing to positively compete with other destinations like Cancun, Montego Bay or Las Vegas, t he cost of airlift also gave rise to domestic competition from the destinations of Nassau and Paradise Island. “So we sat with the private sector here and said this is something that we have to fix and we have come to the point where the government, the private sector specifically the (Grand Bahama p ort Company, Freeport Flight Services, Hutchison (Whampoa have come and put a programme in place where the cost to fly toG rand Bahama has been reduced sufficiently for Grand Bahama to become much more competitive, not only against Nassau but a gainst all of the others,” he said. It is a programme airlines have demonstrated their approval of by increasing and/or introducing air lift to Grand Bahama as of November 1. WestJet will commence twice-weekly service to Freeport from Toronto, Canada; Delta Air lines will begin service four times weekly to Freeport beginning in D ecember; Spirit Airlines has re-confirmed its commitment to Grand Bahama from Fort Lauderdale, and American Eagle hasi ncreased its airlift from two flights to four flights per week. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM PLP leadership candidate seeks to woo supporters Government officials address concerns of Isle of Capri employees Changes now made to boost Grand Bahama’s competitiveness Paul Moss pledges to make sweeping changes if elected PM We are going to unleash the power of theB ahamian imagination by removing every obstacle to success in this country. If you want to be successful, you will have a partner in my government.” PAUL MOSS Crash victims named

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B Y MATT MAURA A RECENT study of adolescent understanding of and a ttitude towards HIV/AIDS indicated that while some youngsters are knowledgeable about the deadly virus, many are not taking the risk factorsa ssociated with the disease seriously enough, Health Minister Dr Hubert Minnis said. Dr Minnis said as a result of t he study’s findings, health policy-makers, planners and professionals must redouble their efforts to ensure that young people take HIV/AIDS as seri-o usly as they should. The study was conducted on public and private school students between the ages of 15 a nd 17 in New Providence and the Family Islands. Its aim was to provide data to support the planning and implementation of preventative strategies and healthcare programmes relating to HIV/AIDS. D r Minnis said while groups such as the AIDS Foundation of the Bahamas and the Ministry of Health – through its N ational AIDS Programme – continue to promote aggressive and intensive campaigns against the spread of HIV/AIDS, adolescents remain among thef astest growing population of HIV-infected persons in the country. The Health Minister comm ended the AIDS Foundation for establishing a temporary care facility for HIV positive adolescents. He said the facility will assist in “stabilising theirh ealth” and is another example of how the organisation “is responsive to the needs of the HIV/AIDS sector of our popul ation.” “In our country, they (adolescents) are extremely vulnerable,” Dr Minnis said. “Therefore it is incumbent upon us to promote a stern message detailing preventative meas ures about HIV/AIDS to this group.” Addressing the opening session of an AIDS Foundation of t he Bahamas Workshop, Dr Minnis said the HIV/AIDS pandemic continues to threaten the economic, national and social development of countriesa round the globe. He said the Caribbean, including the Bahamas, has been the “second-worst” affected region g lobally. “The Ministry of Health has increased access to anti-retroviral drugs, particularly for HIV positive pregnant women. This programme hasl ed to a dramatic reduction in the mother-to-child transmission rate,” Dr Minnis added. The minister said health offic ials must ensure that young people have “adequate access to knowledge and treatment” in order to minimise those health risks and reduce vulnerability to possible HIV infection. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Study: adolescents not serious about HIV/AIDS risk factors Police believe the former manager of the Harrold Road restaurant, and current manager of Burger King in Frederick Street, was taken to the store by h is killer or killers who then tried to force him to open the safe. When he failed to open the safe, Mr Morris was beaten in the manager’s office. He was dragged outside where he was again beaten and stabbed several times. He was found lying in a pool o f blood with multiple stab wounds at around 1.30am on Sunday and pronounced dead at the scene. Mr Morris became the 61st murder victim this year. Just hours later Bahamasair pilot Lionel Lewis McQueen, 29, was shot to death in his G olden Palm Estates home, raising the murder toll to 62, according to police. Mr McQueen’s cousin and roommate Montez Saunders was also shot several times when Mr McQueen was killed at their home near the Kennedy Subdivision in New Providence s hortly after 4am on Sunday. Mr Saunders is being treated in the Intensive Care Unit at Princess Margaret Hospital and his condition is said to be improving. P olice say the country’s murder count could soar to 66 this y ear if the deaths of four people killed in a fire at their home on T hursday morning are also classified as homicides. T hat would be nearly double the number of homicides at t his time last year. The deaths of Theresa Brown, 51; her daughter Kayshala Bodie, 18; granddaughter Telair Johnson, one; and neighbour Savanna Stuart, 18, who all died as a result of smoke inhalation, are currently classified as “suspicious.” But as investigations continue police might be able to conf irm that the fire at their home in Wilson Tract was started by an arsonist. Superintendent Leon Bethel in charge of the homicide department of the Criminal Detective Unit said there had been 57 murders at this time last year, and it is clear the murder toll is rising. H e told T he Tribune : “It’s an increase from last year, that’s obvious and we are confident about that. “We are also confident about detection and we are asking members of the public to assist. We need our detection rate to improve, and if the members o f the public cooperate with us the police who they have entrusted with the investigation of these matters we would have a better rate. “If we have a better rate of solution the occurrence of a lot of these matters will diminish. “We have lots of assistance from members of the public a nd we do appreciate that, but we do believe that with more a ssistance from the public, we will see a better rate of solut ion and we would see a reduction in the number of murders.” Activist Paul Joseph, 55, of Grand Bahama, said he wantsM inister of National Security T ommy Turnquest to step up and introduce capital punishment to help stem the number of murders as the toll spirals out of control. He said: “Don’t pacify the public by making this announcement, and not go ahead with it. “This place looks like Iraq, not the Bahamas, because anyb ody can be killing any time in this country and that’s the sad reality right now. “Whoever is in government has to protect the citizens of their country and right now there seems to be no protection. We are past the scare point now, this murder is a n ational nightmare.” Nassau resident Terrance Gilbert, 41, blames the rising murder rate on a breakdown of families and relationships. He called for the church to get more involved with communities and encourage people to not act in anger, but to forgive. We are having a family meltdown in this country, and it’s a national crisis,” he said. “We are resorting to murder because we are under so much pressure, and the church needs to pull together to work with people in the community.” Police are appealing to the public for information relating t o the murders of Rashad Morris, Lionel Lewis McQueen and t he four suspicious deaths by fire. A nyone with any information should call 911 or 919 urgently, or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS ( 8477 ) . Calls to Crime Stoppers a re answered in the United States and ensure total anonymity. a lleged understaffing, and continued the “sit-in” yesterday. They want the school to hire an English teacher and a science teacher to help cope with the work load. Anatol Rodgers teachers also took action over understaffing, starting on Monday and continuing yesterday. While some teache rs returned to the campus in Faith Avenue yesterday, 18 remained on their “sit-in”, refusing to work until two language arts teachers a re hired. Teachers at Uriah McPhee started their “sit-in” on Friday and continued to take action on Monday over a lack of air-conditioning on the third floor of the school building. A senior officer at the Ministry of Education said the air-conditioning unit was repairedo ver the weekend, and the teachers returned to work yesterday. The Education officer who did not want to be named said she is c oncerned about the effect the “sit-out” will have on the children who have made a fresh commitment to their education this term. S he encouraged parents to speak up and call for teachers to return to work and resume their duties for the benefit of their chil dren’s education. However, according to Bahamas Union of Teachers (BUT president Belinda Wilson, the teachers will not return to work until their demands are met. And PLP chairwoman Glenys Hanna Martin released a state ment yesterday criticising Minister of Education Carl Bethel for failing to bring public schools up to scratch. She said: “We have seen systemic failure on his behalf in a number of areas, including a failure to complete school repairs and adequately equip and furnish classrooms in a timely fashion. “Today we note that well into the academic year that policies implemented by this government relative to the non-renewal of contracts of teachers, and the concomitant failure to recruit replacement teachers, has left schools understaffed in critical areas of the curriculum and led to overcrowding of classrooms in several schools and gaps in school security. “Our children are being short-changed. “In light of the minister’s weak response to the many chal lenges and demands which now face our educational system he is now being invited to seriously consider whether he should continue at the helm of this important engine of our national development.” Burger King reward F ROM page one URIAH MCPHEE T HE Rotary Club of New Providence will hold a steak/chicken-out at the Scouts Headquarters on Dolphin Drive on Saturday, September 26. The price is $10. Rotary Club to hold steak/chicken-out CI GIBSON FROM page one Teachers stage sit-in protests F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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By Larry Smith A S John Cleese u sed to say..."And now for something completely different." T ough Call enjoyed some esoteric reading last weekend that's worth sharing, even though it's unrelated to anyt hing in particular that's happ ening today. It was a "delightful document" published by the Bahamas Historical Society in 1968. Other than history buffs, f ew are familiar with it today, and it opens a fascinating window on a long-lost age. The document in question w as a personal journal kept by an American physician named P. S. Townsend, who lived inN assau from December 1823 t o September 1824. It is, according to historians Michael Craton and Gail Saunders, one of "the three earliest sets of priv ate documents still surviving...from the Loyalist slavery era." Townsend's 68-page diary lodged between well-worn, m arbled board covers that also enclosed a 113-page medical day book was found decades ago in a Boston bookshop by o ne William Miller, a New York college professor who happened to have been born in Nassau. After his death,M iller's widow gave the jour nal to the Bahamas Historical Society, which transcribed the handwritten notes and published it as a slim booklet in 1 968. The diary begins with T ownsend's embarkation for Nassau aboard a square-rigged s ailing ship from New York: "There being a good breeze from the northward, the sails were unbent, and in a few seconds after the ship loosened f rom the wharf she was under weigh," he wrote on December 1 0, 1823. His fellow passengers included wealthy Loyalist merc hants and their servants, as well as several "poor Irish people in steerage." During his sojourn in Nassau, Townsend witnessed the d eclining days of the decadent plantation society that the Loy a lists had tried to build in the Bahamas following the Ameri c an War of Independence. His notes mostly record the activities of the Bahamian social elite and make no political references at all. But the slave trade h ad already been abolished, and it would be only a few m ore years before slavery itself came to an end throughout the British Empire. Six days after leaving New York, he and his fellow travellers were on the lookout for Hole in the Wall "a perforated rock which serves as the great signpost to mariners going into this part of the west indies. It is on the extremity of Aba co." This was several years before a lighthouse was erected on this spot in 1836 to guide vessels away from the island's fringing reef. "We were not without our apprehensions of meeting with pirates, particularly as we had heard of their having been late ly seen off the Hole in the Wall," Townsend wrote. It had been almost a century since the death of Governor Woodes Rogers who had put down the pirate republic of the Bahamas, but attacks on regional shipping continued well into the 19th century. In 1820, more than 50 pirate attacks were reported in the Florida Straits alone, and wrecking was also a lucrative trade for Bahamians. It is clear from Townsend's descriptions that all the islands he passed from Abaco to New Providence were covered with l ow "brush wood" punctuated b y the occasional tall coconut palm with not a casuarina to be seen. These invasive and destructive trees, which now b lanket our coastlines, were not introduced to the Bahamas until the 1920s. As they approached Nassau D r Townsend noticed several houses on Rose Island. Just over the bar they were met in as mall boat by the harbour pilot, w ho brought them to a safe anchorage some 200 yards off Fort Nassau where the British Colonial Hilton now s tands. The passengers were then rowed in a small boat to one of the piers built out from the shore. Even by moonlight,T ownsend marvelled, the water w as so clear they could see the bottom. Parade O n landing they passed through along Bay Street to a m ansion which faced "an oblong open green." This was t he western parade, also called Fleeming Square, and located roughly where the British Colonial Hilton's driveway is today. Adjacent to the parade ground h e saw black troops stationed at Fort Nassau, which was notd emolished until some 13 years after Townsend's visit. T he grand mansion overlooking the parade where Townsend lived for the next 10 months was the home of the Honourable James Moss, a form er Liverpudlian and member of the governor's council whom h istorians describe as "the lynchpin of Nassau's new merc hant oligarchy." Bay Street at this time con sisted chiefly of "wooden buildings with long sheds or piazzas and a profusion of windows, m ostly occupied as stores of dry goods, hardware, etc." South o f the main drag the streets were more residential "excepti ng the courthouse where the legislature meet." But, Townsend noted, "There is a want of neatness...in fact the scenery connected with the q uietness of the town gives it a look of desolation and ruin." H e goes on to describe a formal dinner at Government House, well lubricated by wine and champagne. Starters consisted of a mixture of fruit and nuts, followed by turtle steak and turtle soup. There were about 40 guests, including the house speaker, the chief justice, and some military men. Afterwards the guests played cards until midnight. In fact, Townsend's journal records an endless succession of dinners, balls, picnics and excursions including sailing trips to Rose Island and Hog Island with upwards of 30 dishes served at a time. These included roast goose and duck, corned beef, pigeon pie, ham, turkey, lamb, baked crab and local as well as cold water fish. Often there was dancing in the courtyard to a piano. The chief justice's ball on new year's day was the most lavish celebration he attended, with about 100 other members of the island's social elite. "After coffee, tea, cake, etc danced a succession of tedious, laborious country dances till 4 next morning, allowing a short time for supper about 1 o'clock. T he music was very good, two f ifes (black two or three fiddles, tambourine and drum." Townsend also describes o utlying areas of Nassau. Out east, "by a pleasant good road along the harbour", there were houses scattered along the w aterfront for a mile past St Matthew's Church. Blair at that time was a small farming estate,a nd beyond that on the Easte rn Road was "a group of handsome buildings and trees which Mr Moss told me was the Hermitage, (a country seat n ow deserted and left to go to ruin in consequence of the family feeling a repugnance to reside where the father and sev-e ral others had died." S ome distance beyond the Hermitage he described a collection of "mean houses occupied by (mixed race a nd wreckers, whose small craft is moored out a few yards from shore." This was most likely to have been Creek Village, ac oastal extension of the Fox Hill community. He also visited Vendue House downtown (now the Pompey Museum), which he d escribed as "a place of great resort (thatl ounge." But rather than slaves, the goods on sale were salvaged b y wreckers, who Townsend called "licensed smugglers". Despite this opprobrium, the general perception was that without such commerce the town would be bankrupt. "The Bahamians are very expert and adroit at (smuggling and wrecking), perhaps owing to an hereditary predisposition ...for if tradition is to be believed all the inhabitants are either lineally or collaterally descended from the founder of Nassau and his associates ( Blackbeard)...The Nassau peop le are called conchs and the inhabitants upon the out islands are denominated as crabs." And some things never c hange. Townsend records commiserating with a fellow doctor in Nassau who was drowning in a sea of uncoll ectible receivables. E xcursion His account of an excursion o ut west to the Moss farm k nown as the Grove (it was subdivided in the 1920s), notes that the beaches along the route were covered with sea grape t rees which "form an excellent shelter from the sun". The other side of the road as lined by af ine stone wall composed of p ieces of coral rock. Fort Charlotte, which we passed, is built of the same." The farm grew an abund ance of herbs, fruits and vegetables, and raised deer, geese, ducks, chickens and pigeons. During Townsend's stay Moss" received the visits of some 10 o r 12 of his slaves who had returned from gathering guinea corn in the fields. There are about 60 altogether on this e state and the others near it. The slaves whom I saw here a nd have seen in New Providence since my arrival are all c omfortably dressed." His descriptions of the activities of the black population focused on Junkanoo and religion. He noted that the slaves g et a three-day vacation with extra food and rum at Christ m as when whites were "regaled until 3 or 4 in the morning with s ome bad music on hoarse cracked drums and fifes by groups of negroes parading the streets. On other nights (the black troops who are stationed opposite the parade, clear the streets of blacks, or rather prevent their walking out after 8pm without a pass." Townsend describes a visit to the failed salt pans on Hog Island near the lighthouse that were built by a New Yorker n amed Seton. He also visited a d eserted barracks on Hog Island for an afternoon picnic (or maroon and other wealthy guests. The s nacks included salmon, corned beef and pickled oysters washed down with plenty of wine. " We embarked about 1pm a l ittle behind the ordnance house on the parade a few yards from Mr Moss' (house After sailing till 3pm we d ebarked at the barracks...Walked through the sandy paths among the bay cedar bushes and wild grapea nd other shrubs... to one of the three small buildings which compose the barracks." A t the time of Townsend's v isit there were probably 3,000 slaves on New Providence (plus mulattoes and free blacks) and less than 1,800 whites. With s uch a small isolated elite, visitors were quickly recruited to the local social scene. Townsend was persuaded top lay a part in an amateur thea trical production (Who Wants a Guinea, an 1805 comedy by George Coleman) on a stage set up in the courthouse. " Before 7 the house was crowded only 160 tickets had been issued each at a dollar, so that the company on the bench-e s was composed chiefly of the first people in town," he wrote. "I recognised all my acquain tances." Other activities of the colon ial elite included official ceremonies such as the proroguing of the legislature or celebration of the king's birthday. These events featured the governor on horseback with his ostrichplumed hat, marching black troops of the West India Regiment, and the firing of artillery salutes. Townsend describes the funeral of the wife of Abrah am Eve, a prominent loyalist a nd member of the governor's council: "Two black persons went before with lanterns in case night should come on b efore the service is over...The negroes like to go to funerals...They followed to the number of 20 or 30,.. amounting to m ore, I think, than the whites. S ome dozen gigs driven by servants brought up the rear. The corpse was carried first in to the church. The burial ground is P otter's Field in the western skirts of the town where all the whites are placed without distinction of rank." D uring the summer of 1824, Townsend actually got to practise medicine in Nassau bys tanding in for Dr Tynes, the c hief medical officer, while he visited Crooked Island. Tynes' responsibilities included the poor house, the jail, the public h ealth department and his private patients. And Townsend's journal ends with a series of perfunctory comments aboutm edical treatments given to a w ide range of patients from slaves to visiting sailors to the colonial elite. He left the Bahamas shortly a fter this stint in the real world his journal somehow ending up in an antique bookstore in Boston, eventually giving us ag limpse of what life was like in Nassau 200 years ago. What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net O r visit www.bahamapundit.com C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ,167,787()%86,1(66$1'&200(5&( Glimpsing through a fascinating window on a long-lost Bahamas AJOURNALOFANAMERICAN PHYSICIAN TELLS OF NASSAU LIFE 200 YEARS AGO

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o f sea rise would result in a d ecline in the Bahamas’ GDP by more than 2.5 per cent anda lmost 2.5 per cent for Guyana," Mr Vanderpool-Wall ace said. He added that these esti m ates are conservative since they include only the damage inz ones that would be inundated b y the rise. They do not include damage f rom storm surges, and they use existing patterns of developm ent and land use not taking into account the “considerable” development that may occur in years to come, he continued. His comments came a day before American President Barack Obama warned worldl eaders that the threat of clim ate change could lead to an " irreversible catastrophe" if left u nchecked. " No nation, however large o r small, wealthy or poor, can escape the impact of climate change. “Rising sea levels threaten every coastline. “More powerful storms and floods threaten every continent. More frequent drought and crop failures breed hunger andc onflict in places where hunger a nd conflict already thrive. “On shrinking islands, famil ies are already being forced to flee their homes as climate refugees. "The security and stability of each nation and all peoples o ur prosperity, our health, our s afety are in jeopardy. "And the time we have to reverse this tide is running out," Mr Obama said during his speech to the United Nations on climate change. Neg otiations A s a member of CARICOM, the Bahamas has been part of negotiations of a draft of the UN's Declaration for a New Climate Change Agreement. The document will be finalisedi n December at the UN Conf erence of Parties in Denmark. C aribsave is a partnership between the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC sity of Oxford, which addresses the impacts and challenges sur-r ounding climate change, t ourism, the environment, eco nomic development and the community livelihoods across the Caribbean. Comprising seven core object ives, the Caribsave Partnership, with a projected budget of $35 million over five years, f ocuses on sectoral, destinational and national vulnerabilit y and adaptive capacity assessments and strategy development. I n addition, the initiative focuses on socio-economic and environmental policies and implementation, the impacts of climate change on key sectorsa nd their integral relationship to tourism in the Caribbean, the development of carbon off-s et projects and carbon neutral destination status and capacity b uilding and skills transfer across the Caribbean. In the Bahamas, the island o f Eleuthera will be used for the case study. T he two-day workshop held at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort on September 21-2 2 featured presentations by a cross-section of stakeholdersi n the Caribbean and the Univ ersity of Oxford. Also expected to give evidence today is Mr Travolta’s lawyer, Mike Ossi, and Ronald Zupancic, who has been on Mr Travolta’s staff for the past 23 years. In court yesterday Derrex Rolle, an emerg ency medical technician, said that at about 10.33am on January 2, he and his driver Lightbourne, left the Eight Mile Rock Clinic for Old Bahama Bay. Rolle said that when they arrived at 10.45, they met about 10 people standing at the entrance of room 1021. Rolle testified that in the bathroom hallway he saw a young male, later identified as Jett Travolta, lying on his back. “He was lying down on his back and there w as no sign of life,” Rolle told the court. Rolle said that he met a young man performing CPR on Jett with an AED machine. According to Rolle there was also a physician there. “He told me to continue doing CPR and take him (Jett that Jett had not yet been pronounced dead. Rolle said that Jett was put in the ambulance where he continued performing CPR. According t o Rolle, John Travolta and two other men were in the back of the ambulance with him while Travolta’s wife Kelly Preston sat in the front of the ambulance. He testified that while heading to the Rand Memorial Hospital, they were intercepted in the area of Bartlett Hill, Eight Mile Rock, by another ambulance and changed drivers. According to Rolle, Lightbourne switched p laces with Marcus Garvey. Rolle said that the t wo men who were in the back of the ambulance also got into the unit with Lightbourne while Selvin Strachan got into the unit with him and the Travoltas. Rolle said he was responsible for filling out the transport of patient form, which hec ompleted at the hospital. Selvin Strachan, emergency medical service manager and paramedic told the court that on the morning of January 2, he heard the call go out to t he West End area and contacted the dispatched unit, informing them to update him on the nature of the call because there was conflicting information coming from that area. Strachan said that he subsequently instructed G arvey to take him to intercept the unit so that he could administer further medical treatment to the patient. He testified that once they intercepted the unit, he took over medical care of t he patient who was unresponsive and had no pulse. Strachan explained that if a patient is not an adult and the parents refuse medical assistance for the child, the child would have to have vital signs and the parents would have to be informed of the consequences of not seeking medical attention. Inspector Andrew Wells, who was attached to t he West End Police Station at the time of the incident, said that he went to Old Bahama Bay around 10.30 am on January 2, after receiving certain information. Inspector Wells said he proceeded to room 1022 of the Old Bahama Bay H otel and noticed that a person was receiving medical attention inside. Inspector Wells said that as he did not want to get in the way, he stood outside the room. Inspector Wells testified that around 11am an ambulance arrived,w ith two occupants Derrex Rolle and Lightbourne who he recalled was the passenger. Inspector Wells told the court that after about 15 minutes the paramedics, John Travolta, Dr Fern andez and his nurse as well as a group of Caucasian people left the room and got into the ambulance. He said he saw Lightbourne having a conversation with Mr Travolta and then hand him ac lipboard with some papers in it. Inspector Wells said that shortly thereafter Lightbourne called him and said that Mr Travolta wanted him to take his son directly to Freeport International A irport. According to Inspector Wells, Lightbourne asked him to witness a refusal for medical attention. Wells said that he signed the form and gave it back to Lightbourne. Inspector Wells said that the ambulance then drove off and he attempted to follow but could not keep up in the car he was driving. He said that he later arrived at the hospital some 20 minutes later to further investigate the matter. N athan Moody, director of operations at Old Bahama Bay, told the court during cross-examination by Mr Shurland, that on the morning of January 2, he picked up Dr Fernandez and his wife from the West End clinic and took them to room 1021 at Old Bahama Bay. There he said he s aw John Travolta performing CPR on his son Jett. Moody told the court that Dr Fernandez and his wife tended to Jett until the ambulance arrived. Moody testified that he assisted in putting Jett on the gurney and that consideration hadb een given to taking Jett to the United States by plane. He admitted that he had given police a statement in which he indicated that he saw Jett being taken from one ambulance to the next but d enied saying so yesterday. After perusing his statement, Mr Shurland then asserted that he had lied to police. Mr Moody said, however, that it had not been his intention. West End and Bimini MP Obie Wilchcombe i s expected to be among the prosecution witnesses to take the witness stand today. A jury of six women and three men was selected on Monday to hear the case. Bridgewater, 49, a nd Lightbourne, 47, are accused of conspiring to extort and attempting to extort money from Mr Travolta between January 2 and 20 by means of threats. Ms Bridgewater is also accused of abetment to extortion. Ms Bridgewater is represent-e d by attorneys Murrio Ducille and Krysta Smith. Mr Lightbourne is represented by attorney Carlson Shurland and Mary Bain pro bono. Director of Public Prosecutions Bernard Turner, Neil B rathwaite and Garvin Gaskin are prosecuting the case. Prosecutors are expected to call 14 witnesses. Ms Bridgewater and Mr Lightbourne were arraigned on the charges in late January and arraigned again before Senior Justice Alleno n April 28 after prosecutors presented a Voluntary Bill of Indictment. They have both pleaded not guilty to the charges. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ‘How we tried to save Jett Travolta’ F ROM page one Climate change seen as threat to Bahamas economy FROM page one It is alleged that between September 7 and 10, Moss intention ally caused Albury’s death. Eleven witnesses are listed on court dockets. Moss was not r equired to enter a plea to the murder charge. He will remain on remand at Her Majesty’s Prison and is expected to appear in Court 11, Nassau Street, on September 25 for a fixture hearing. Inmate charged with murder FROM page one

PAGE 15

o f sea rise would result in a d ecline in the Bahamas’ GDP by more than 2.5 per cent anda lmost 2.5 per cent for Guyana," Mr Vanderpool-Wall ace said. He added that these esti m ates are conservative since they include only the damage inz ones that would be inundated b y the rise. They do not include damage f rom storm surges, and they use existing patterns of developm ent and land use not taking into account the “considerable” development that may occur in years to come, he continued. His comments came a day before American President Barack Obama warned worldl eaders that the threat of clim ate change could lead to an " irreversible catastrophe" if left u nchecked. " No nation, however large o r small, wealthy or poor, can escape the impact of climate change. “Rising sea levels threaten every coastline. “More powerful storms and floods threaten every continent. More frequent drought and crop failures breed hunger andc onflict in places where hunger a nd conflict already thrive. “On shrinking islands, famil ies are already being forced to flee their homes as climate refugees. "The security and stability of each nation and all peoples o ur prosperity, our health, our s afety are in jeopardy. "And the time we have to reverse this tide is running out," Mr Obama said during his speech to the United Nations on climate change. Neg otiations A s a member of CARICOM, the Bahamas has been part of negotiations of a draft of the UN's Declaration for a New Climate Change Agreement. The document will be finalisedi n December at the UN Conf erence of Parties in Denmark. C aribsave is a partnership between the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC sity of Oxford, which addresses the impacts and challenges sur-r ounding climate change, t ourism, the environment, eco nomic development and the community livelihoods across the Caribbean. Comprising seven core object ives, the Caribsave Partnership, with a projected budget of $35 million over five years, f ocuses on sectoral, destinational and national vulnerabilit y and adaptive capacity assessments and strategy development. I n addition, the initiative focuses on socio-economic and environmental policies and implementation, the impacts of climate change on key sectorsa nd their integral relationship to tourism in the Caribbean, the development of carbon off-s et projects and carbon neutral destination status and capacity b uilding and skills transfer across the Caribbean. In the Bahamas, the island o f Eleuthera will be used for the case study. T he two-day workshop held at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort on September 21-2 2 featured presentations by a cross-section of stakeholders i n the Caribbean and the Univ ersity of Oxford. Also expected to give evidence today is Mr Travolta’s lawyer, Mike Ossi, and Ronald Zupancic, who has been on Mr Travolta’s staff for the past 23 years. In court yesterday Derrex Rolle, an emerg ency medical technician, said that at about 10.33am on January 2, he and his driver Lightbourne, left the Eight Mile Rock Clinic for Old Bahama Bay. Rolle said that when they arrived at 10.45, they met about 10 people standing at the entrance of room 1021. Rolle testified that in the bathroom hallway he saw a young male, later identified as Jett Travolta, lying on his back. “He was lying down on his back and there w as no sign of life,” Rolle told the court. Rolle said that he met a young man performing CPR on Jett with an AED machine. According to Rolle there was also a physician there. “He told me to continue doing CPR and take him (Jett that Jett had not yet been pronounced dead. Rolle said that Jett was put in the ambulance where he continued performing CPR. According t o Rolle, John Travolta and two other men were in the back of the ambulance with him while Travolta’s wife Kelly Preston sat in the front of the ambulance. He testified that while heading to the Rand Memorial Hospital, they were intercepted in the area of Bartlett Hill, Eight Mile Rock, by another ambulance and changed drivers. According to Rolle, Lightbourne switched p laces with Marcus Garvey. Rolle said that the t wo men who were in the back of the ambulance also got into the unit with Lightbourne while Selvin Strachan got into the unit with him and the Travoltas. Rolle said he was responsible for filling out the transport of patient form, which hec ompleted at the hospital. Selvin Strachan, emergency medical service manager and paramedic told the court that on the morning of January 2, he heard the call go out to t he West End area and contacted the dispatched unit, informing them to update him on the nature of the call because there was conflicting information coming from that area. Strachan said that he subsequently instructed G arvey to take him to intercept the unit so that he could administer further medical treatment to the patient. He testified that once they intercepted the unit, he took over medical care of t he patient who was unresponsive and had no pulse. Strachan explained that if a patient is not an adult and the parents refuse medical assistance for the child, the child would have to have vital signs and the parents would have to be informed of the consequences of not seeking medical attention. Inspector Andrew Wells, who was attached to t he West End Police Station at the time of the incident, said that he went to Old Bahama Bay around 10.30 am on January 2, after receiving certain information. Inspector Wells said he proceeded to room 1022 of the Old Bahama Bay H otel and noticed that a person was receiving medical attention inside. Inspector Wells said that as he did not want to get in the way, he stood outside the room. Inspector Wells testified that around 11am an ambulance arrived,w ith two occupants Derrex Rolle and Lightbourne who he recalled was the passenger. Inspector Wells told the court that after about 15 minutes the paramedics, John Travolta, Dr Fern andez and his nurse as well as a group of Caucasian people left the room and got into the ambulance. He said he saw Lightbourne having a conversation with Mr Travolta and then hand him ac lipboard with some papers in it. Inspector Wells said that shortly thereafter Lightbourne called him and said that Mr Travolta wanted him to take his son directly to Freeport International A irport. According to Inspector Wells, Lightbourne asked him to witness a refusal for medical attention. Wells said that he signed the form and gave it back to Lightbourne. Inspector Wells said that the ambulance then drove off and he attempted to follow but could not keep up in the car he was driving. He said that he later arrived at the hospital some 20 minutes later to further investigate the matter. N athan Moody, director of operations at Old Bahama Bay, told the court during cross-examination by Mr Shurland, that on the morning of January 2, he picked up Dr Fernandez and his wife from the West End clinic and took them to room 1021 at Old Bahama Bay. There he said he s aw John Travolta performing CPR on his son Jett. Moody told the court that Dr Fernandez and his wife tended to Jett until the ambulance arrived. Moody testified that he assisted in putting Jett on the gurney and that consideration hadb een given to taking Jett to the United States by plane. He admitted that he had given police a statement in which he indicated that he saw Jett being taken from one ambulance to the next but d enied saying so yesterday. After perusing his statement, Mr Shurland then asserted that he had lied to police. Mr Moody said, however, that it had not been his intention. West End and Bimini MP Obie Wilchcombe i s expected to be among the prosecution witnesses to take the witness stand today. A jury of six women and three men was selected on Monday to hear the case. Bridgewater, 49, a nd Lightbourne, 47, are accused of conspiring to extort and attempting to extort money from Mr Travolta between January 2 and 20 by means of threats. Ms Bridgewater is also accused of abetment to extortion. Ms Bridgewater is represent-e d by attorneys Murrio Ducille and Krysta Smith. Mr Lightbourne is represented by attorney Carlson Shurland and Mary Bain pro bono. Director of Public Prosecutions Bernard Turner, Neil B rathwaite and Garvin Gaskin are prosecuting the case. Prosecutors are expected to call 14 witnesses. Ms Bridgewater and Mr Lightbourne were arraigned on the charges in late January and arraigned again before Senior Justice Alleno n April 28 after prosecutors presented a Voluntary Bill of Indictment. They have both pleaded not guilty to the charges. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ‘How we tried to save Jett Travolta’ F ROM page one Climate change seen as threat to Bahamas economy FROM page one It is alleged that between September 7 and 10, Moss intention ally caused Albury’s death. Eleven witnesses are listed on court dockets. Moss was not r equired to enter a plea to the murder charge. He will remain on remand at Her Majesty’s Prison and is expected to appear in Court 11, Nassau Street, on September 25 for a fixture hearing. Inmate charged with murder FROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K S PORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM CYCLING MENDRISIO, Switzerland Associated Press OLYMPIC champion Fabian Cancellara will attempt to go for double gold at the road world championships when he returns to his native Switzer land for the first time in 13 years. Cancellara is the favorite in Thursday’s time trial, which he won in 2006 and . He also has Sunday’s grueling road race in his sights. “I’m waiting with impa tience for these races,” Cancellara said Tuesday. “For me, it’s one time in my life that I have the chance to race to be the world champion at home.” Britain’s Bradley Wiggins will challenge in the time trial, while a strong Italian team will chase a record fourth straight road race title. Yet the 28-year-old Cancellara, nicknamed “Spartacus” for his competitive streak and strength, has proven he can double up. He took bronze in the Bei jing Olympics road race last year and struck gold four days later in the time trial, though the exertion left him too exhausted to go for a worlds hat trick. Cancellara is relishing the expectation of his home fans on the Switzerland-Italy border. “We’re in a cycling region of Switzerland. I feel good. I have the mentality for winning and that’s important,” he said. Cancellara aims for double gold on home roads SWITZERLAND'S Fabian Cancellara pedals during a training session ahead of the road cycling World Championships, in Mendrisio, Switzerland, Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2009. A l e s s a n d r o T r o v a t i / A P P h o t o SPORTS IN BRIEF F OOTBALL J ACKSONVILLE, Fla. Associated Press J ACKSONVILLE c oach Jack Del Rio stood on the sideline and watched Kurt Warner pick his defense apart. Short passes, missed t ackles, first downs and s cores, Del Rio saw the same things repeatedly during the Jaguars’ 31-17 loss t o Warner and the Arizona C ardinals on Sunday. D el Rio considered doing something about it, too. I thought about doing a Woody Hayes,” he said, referring to the formerO hio State coach who was fired for punching a Clemson player during the 1978 Gator Bowl. “I thought about coming off the sideline. I was going to get s omebody down myself.” T he Jags’ defense sure could have used the help. Warner completed 24 of 2 6 passes for 243 yards, with two touchdowns and no interceptions, and broke t he NFL single-game r ecord for completion percentage. The Jaguars (0-2 had no sacks, got little pres-s ure and were victimized by a short passing game some of the same issues that plagued them last seas on. The most glaring problem was missed tackles. He was throwing the ball quick and making you tackle,” Del Rio said. Yards after the catch was a big point of emphasis leading into this week and we did not handle that veryw ell. We did not tackle the short pass game that we knew we would get. You absolutely cannot be any good on defense if you don’t do that. That’s an area we must and will i mprove in.” Jacksonville struggled most of last season on defense, and Del Rio responded by parting ways with coordinator GreggW illiams, secondary coach Donnie Henderson, line backer Mike Peterson, corn erback Brian Williams, defensive end Paul Spicer and safety Gerald Sensabaugh. Jaguars experiencing more lapses and more losses F OOTBALL MIAMI Associated Press P EYTON Manning stood on the sideline, arms folded, glancing occasionally at the scoreboard to see the t ime ticking off. But the Miami Dolphins could play keepaway for only so long. WhenM anning eventually made his way onto the field, the Dolphins couldn’t stop him. M anning had the ball for less than 15 minutes but made the most of his chances, helping the Indianapolis Colts come from behind four times to beatM iami 27-23 Monday night. Manning broke Johnny Unitas’ fran chise record for victories by a quarterback, and the latest win ranked with the oddest. T he Dolphins were 15 for 21 on third-down conversions and 1 for 1 on fourth down. Their lone turnover came o n the final play, they punted only once and they controlled the ball for a team-record 45 minutes. T hey had to wonder how they lost. T he answer: Manning. “To have as few plays as he did and to do what he did, you just don’t see t hat,” Miami quarterback Chad Pen nington said. Manning took only three snaps in t he third quarter and had just three possessions in the second half. Watching most of the night from the bench,h e knew he would need to make the most of his opportunities. “I hate to say, but we have done it before a few times,” he said. “We just kind of stay loose over there.” M anning threw an 80-yard touch down pass to Dallas Clark on the first play from scrimmage, and hit Pierre G arcon for a 48-yard score with 3:18 left for the game’s final points. “It was about being efficient when it c ounted, in the fourth quarter,” Mann ing said. “That’s really what the game’s about.” He took a little sheen off the Dolp hins’ glitzy home opener. They rolled out an orange carpet for the pregame arrival of new owner Stephen Ross’c elebrity partners, and the crowd included Serena and Venus Williams, Marc Anthony and Jennifer Lopez,J immy Buffett and Colts rooter Tiger Woods. But Manning was the big star. He finished 14 for 23 for 303 yards, and the Colts improved to 2-0. The Dolphinsf ell to 0-2 even though they had 239 yards rushing, including 107 with the wildcat. Nobody is world champion after two weeks,” Miami linebacker Joey Porter said, “but we’re not goode nough to give games away.” T he Colts had the ball for only 14:53, the lowest time of possession for a winning team in the NFL since 1977. They r an 35 plays to 84 for the Dolphins. “It’s really disheartening,” Miami coach Tony Sparano said. “That’se xactly the formula to beat that team.” Indy trailed 10-7, 13-10 and 20-13, but each time pulled even. Down 23-20a fter Miami scored with 3:50 left, the Colts rallied one more time with a big play by Garcon. Manning rallies Colts to 27-23 win over Dolphins LEFT: Indianapolis Colts tight end Dallas Clark shakes off a tackle attempt by Miami Dolphins safety Gibril Wilson on his way to a touchdown dur ing the first quarter of an NFLf ootball game Monday, Sept. 2 1, 2009, in Miami. A BOVE: I ndianapolis Colts q uarterback Peyton Manning c elebrates after the Colts d efeated the Miami Dolphins. J . P a t C a r t e r / A P P h o t o J e f f r e y M . B o a n / A P P h o t o

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS P AGE 10, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM VOLLEYBALL GSSSA MEETING THE Government Seco ndary Schools Sports A ssociation is scheduled to h old a meeting for all coaches 4pm today at R M Bailey Secondary High School. The purpose of the meeti ng is to discuss final plans for the start of the GSSSA v olleyball season that is slated to begin on Monday. V OLLEYBALL G SSSA SEASON OPENING T HE Government Secondary Schools SportsA ssociation is scheduled to b egin its 2009 volleyball seas on on Monday. Eight teams are registered in both the senior b oys and girls divisions, which will play at the D W Davis and C I Gibson Gym n asiums. T he junior boys and girls divisions are also made up of eight teams which will play at the R M Bailey and Tom ‘The Bird’ Grant outdoor volleyball courts. SOFTBALL BAISS OPENING T HE Bahamas Association of Independent Sec ondary Schools will begin i ts 2009 softball season today at various playing sites. T he senior boys and junior girls will be in action today, starting at 4pm. The senior girls and junior boysw ill start competition on Thursday. SPORTS IN BRIEF all returning from last year, a long with the introduction of the Perpgre Enterprise Champions, the Defence F orce and a youthful team. “I think it will be another c ompetitive season, especially in the men’s division,” S mith said. “On any given n ight, if you don’t come with your game plan or you don’te xecute it, you could be beaten. “With one of two players moving around the league from one team to another, I think the league will be veryc ompetitive.” G ames will be played nightly on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, along with Sunday afternoons. G oing into the season o pener on Sunday, here’s how the four coaches assess their teams: Lady Vixens L oaded with national team p layers, the Vixens will rely h eavenly on the trio of Laval Sands, Cherise Rolle and Tamasine PoitierEmmanuel. Coach Joe Smith said the r oad to the championships w ill once again have to go through his Scottsdale team. “We’re looking good. We have basically the same teamf rom last year, but we have o ur setter, Tia Wilson, back home from school and that will allow Laval to play our natural position as the off setter,” Smith said. “We also have the leadership in veteran Jackie Cony e rs and we still have the Rolle s isters (and Cherise think we are going to be the team to beat. “The championship will still g o through us, regardless of who the other teams bring. We will defend our crown and we will retain our crown. We think very positive, we train hard and we play very hard.” Although his men’s Scottsdale team is not playing on o pening day, Smith said they are also looking very good with the return home of Prince Wilson. He is expected to hook up with veteran Mario Dean and setter JavariS outhard. Lady Truckers DeVince Smith, who dou bles as the coach for the run ners-up, said he hasn’t had a f ull squad out to practice yet, but he’s convinced that as the season progresses, they will round into championship form. “Once we put our team together, we will have to play our way in shape,” said Smith, who still has the big three of Kelsie Johnson, Margaret ‘Muggie’ Albury and Fredericka McPhee to rely on. “I still think we will be competitive because we’ve been practicing on some defense and offensively we have always been strong at the net.” Defenders With a dual coaching role, DeVince Smith said with players such as Ian ‘Wire’ Pinder, Sherwin Arthurs and Maurice ‘Cheeks’ Smith, he doesn’t see why they can’t repeat as champions. “We have added a couple of players like national team setter Tony Simon and uni versal player Shedrick Forbes, who will provide most of the offense and defense that the team kind of lacked last year,” Smith said. “So once again, I think we will be a very competitive team.” Technicians With Renaldo Knowles and Jamaal Ferguson now back home, coach Adlabert Ingraham said Ron ‘Box’ Demeritte should have all the help he needs to get back to championship status. “We had a lot of problems last year offensively finishinga lot of games,” he said. “But we have sorted out that problem, so I expect us to be very competitive. “Like we always do, we look at the season as a footstool for us to travel abroad. But we will be just as com petitive as we were last year. Hopefully this year, we will be able to recapture the title with the experience and players that we have this year.” Volleyball to get underway F ROM page 11 M INISTER o f Youth, Sports and Culture D esmond Bannister speaks during the first annual North and Central Andros Back to School Basketball Classic in Staniard Creek... P h o t o s b y E r i c R o s e BANNISTER looks over craft work by Cynthia Armbrister... B ANNISTER p oses with Staniard Creek resident Donna Cargill, as she sells her baked goods, such as tarts, cakes and a special sausageq uiche...

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C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 PAGE 9 International sports news TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net N ew Providence Volleyball Associationp resident DeVince Smith said with a number of players returning home from college, the 2009 season should be a very competitive one. T he season is scheduled to g et underway Sunday with a rematch of last year’s cham pionship series in both the m en’s and women’s divisions a t the D W Davis Gymnasi um. I n the ladies opener at 4 p m, runners-up Johnson Lady Truckers will try to knock off the defending championsS cottsdale Vixens, while in t he men’s feature contest to f ollow, runners-up Technicians will face defending champions Scotiabank Defenders. In addition to the above, the other teams registered to participate in the ladies’ divis ion are the College of the B ahamas Lady Caribs, the Lady Techs, Lady Hornets and possibly the RoyalB ahamas Defence Force S tingrays and another youth f ul team. The men’s division will include Da Basement, Police, Intruders and COB Caribs, Volleyball to get underway with championship rematches season should be ery competitiv SEE page 10 Basketball tourney ‘brought hope to people of Andros’ By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net M INISTER of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister said h e was very impressed with what he saw on the first day of the North/Central Andros Back-to-SchoolB asketball Classic. Bannister was a part of the visiting delegation thatw as on hand in Staniard Creek to christen the first of four courts that haveb een reconstructed by contractor Emile Knowles. “The event brought a lot of hope to the people of Andros,” Bannister stated. “There was no bad incidents, just young people looking for somewhere positive to compete and dis play their talents.” About 14 teams showed up to participate in the tournament, which will be spread over the next three Saturdays before the eventual champions are crowned. From the competition displayed on the opening day, Bannister said the remainder of the tournament should be a very competitive one. He noted that the players were all enthusiastic about participating and the fans showed up in droves to support them. In addition to the basketball competition, Bannister said local vendors were able to take advantage of the opportu nity to showcase and sell their crafts, inclusive of food, drinks and souvenir items. “We’re just thankful that we were able to do it in that community,” said Bannister, a native son of the soil from Staniard Creek. Among the dignitaries joining Bannister were Minister of State for Culture Charles Maynard, Vincent Peet, MP for North Andros, Picewell Forbes, MP for South Andros, Island administrators Dr Huntley Christie and Jackson McIntosh and Clyde Bowleg, who represented the Ministry of Education. Bannister commended Brian Cleare, the ministry’s Family Island coordinator from Andros, who was responsible for organising the tournament. He also praised Emile Knowles of Knowles Construction and Develop ment Limited for the manner in which he was able to transform the basketball court. Knowles has also done the same for the other three settlements where the tournament will continue over the next three Saturdays in Andros. This Saturday, the tournament will switch to Red Bays. Then it’s off to Lowe Sound on Saturday, October 3 before the final is staged in Fresh Creek on Saturday, October 10. “I think the people in Red Bays are very appreciative of the facilities they have now,” Bannister said. “I know when I went there before we contracted Mr Knowles, the facilities there was really in bad shape. “Now the kids in Red Bays have something that is very nice for them to play on. There is a lot of talent in Red Bays, so I think we will see some positive things coming from there.” P h o t o s b y E r i c R o s e MISS Global Bahamas Jamie B Morris, Minister of State for Culture Charles Maynard and MP for South Andros Picewell Forbes can be seen during the first annual North and Central Andros Back to School Basketball Classic in Staniard Creek, Andros... M ARVIN BAIN , of the Red Bay Westerners, takes a warm-up s hot during the tourney... MINISTER of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister greets a young basketball fan Manning rallies Colts t o 27-23 win o ver Dolphins See page 9

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor C a ble Bahamas h as warned that proposals for retail price regulation in the communications sector could “potentially jeopardise future investment” in the sector, again arguing that classifyingt he company as having signifi cant market power (SMP c able TV and high speed data services was “unfounded”. Submitting its feedback on the Government’s retail price consultation, Cable Bahamas said that while cable TV sub-s criber numbers had increased by 17.5 per cent to 74,000 over the past five years, up from 63,000 in 2004, it faced competition from direct-to-home (DTH lite services. W hile these services were not licensed to operate in the Bahamas, they were “nevertheless a commonly used competitive alternative” to Cable Bahamas, the BISXlisted utility provider esti-m ating that there were currently 20,000 DTH TV services in this nation. This total, Cable Bahamas said, was estimated to have “doubled over the last five years”, up from 10,000 in2 004. It added: “Thus, DTH Satellite TV services current-l y account for just over 21 per cent of the broadcast distribution services market in the B ahamas. DTH satellite TV is a n effective competitive alternative to cable-based pay TV services and, as such, serves t o discipline Cable Bahamas’ cable-based pay-TV service prices.” C able Bahamas pointed out t hat market share losses in the US and Canada had resulted in the lifting of price regulat ion on cable TV providers in those countries, Canadian regulators having determinedt hat once a cable company showed it had lost 5 per cent or more of its subscribers to DTH satellite, its prices would be deregulated immediately. “Cable Bahamas believes there is justification to do the By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Telecom munications Company (BTC h as seen the revenues derived from its international long distance business fall by 80.7 per cent between 2004-2008, due to increased competition, although the $45 million loss it suffered in providing fixed-l ine access to consumers has narrowed due to increased rental charges. I n its feedback to the public consultation on retail pricing regulation in the communications sector, BTC, which is in t he middle of a privatisation exercise, said it had suffered a “significant decline” in its once-core international long distance revenues since 2003, due primarily to increased competition. Urging newly-incorporated regulator, the Utilities Regulatory and Competition Authority (URCA remove fixed-line international long distance calls from the services in which it was deemed to have significant market power (SMP s aid revenues from this busi ness segment fell by 64.5 per cent between 2004-2005. F or 2005-2006, fixed-line international long distance revenues fell by a further 21.7,a nd in 2006-2007 and 20072008 they dropped by a further 17.3 per cent and 16.6 per cent respectively. B TC added that when it came to inter-island calls, rev enues from this source had fallen by 23.6 per cent during t he period between 20042008. In 2004-2005, they fell by 5 per cent, with furtherd eclines of 4.3 per cent, 4.8 per cent and 12.2 per cent taking place in 2005-2006, 2006-2 007, and 2007-2008 respectively. Apart from proving that BTC is now effectively a cel l ular company, this source accounting for 68 per cent of its revenues in 2007, these statistics show the impact of c ompetition, not only from Systems Resource Group’s (SRGa lso Vonage, Skype and Mag ic Jack. “Given the alternatives a vailable to end users with respect to outgoing international long distance services, there is a case to be made toh ave international long disB y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor THE Bahamian legal prof ession must stop being “parochial” and “open up” ift his nation’s financial services i ndustry is to survive and grow, a leading attorney said yesterday, with the international sector’s contribution to t he $300 million tax revenues g enerated per annum by the banking sector shrinking e very year. Philip Dunkley, senior partner at Higgs & Johnson, said the Bahamian financial serv ices industry was likely to k eep contracting unless the l egal profession opened up in two respects establishing offices abroad to market thisj urisdiction, its products and services to internationalc lients, thus attracting business in, and also allowing spe c ialist, highly-skilled foreign lawyers to practice from these s hores. “We’re experiencing the worst recession in living mem-o ry, offshore financial centres are under an unprecedenteda ttack from onshore and the Bahamas has recently lost By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor WITH many of the 1,010 attorneys at the Bahamas Bar unable to find jobs, and newe ntrants finding to difficult to o btain a pupillage, two attorn eys yesterday argued that “now is not the time” to open the Bahamian legal profession to specialist foreign attorneys. D r Earl Cash, the Higgs & Johnson attorney and partner, addressing a seminar organised by his law firm, said both the Bar Association and Immigration Department w ere open to permitting fore ign attorneys to enter the Bahamas as registered asso ciates to train their Bahamian c ounterparts. Dr Cash, opposing a motion suggesting that the B ahamian financial services industry will contract unless the legal services profession ‘opens up’, said firms such as G raham, Thompson & Co, Callenders & Co and McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes had all brought in foreign attorneys to help train their Bahamian lawyers. In addi-t ion, Bahamian attorneys h ave gone abroad to train and work with foreign law firms. Questioning “how much f urther do we need to go”, Dr Cash said he and others were “not close minded”, yet were worried that an unchecked influx of foreign attorneys would deprive their Bahami an counterparts of jobs, espe c ially during a recession. He also called for the Bahamas Bar Association toe stablish some kind of continued education and training programme to ensure Bahamian attorneys could c ompete with their international peers, and suggested that the Dupuch Law Schoolo ffer Master’s Degrees in spe cialist areas such as law, trusts, securitisations, shipping, taxation and international business transactions. Dr Cash was supported by Cheryl Bazard, partner at Bazard, Lamour & Company, who urged that “now is not the time to open up”. Instead, she called for investors and companies to take advantage of legal advice from Bahamian attorneys. By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas will ulti mately be forced to sign more than the minimum 12 Tax Information Exchange Agree ments (TIEAs the G-20/OECD, a leading Bahamian attorney yesterday arguing that this nation may have to employ “the Doctrine of Steps” in obtaining treaties with better “trade-based” advantages. John Delaney, Higgs & Johnson’s managing partner, said that while double taxation agreements and invest ment treaties were the “pre ferred course” to take in complying with G-20/OECD demands, the need for the Bahamas to meet the 12 TIEA minimum by year-end 2009 might require this nation to bide its time in obtaining the former types of agree ment. Acknowledging that it was difficult to see what benefits the Bahamas and its financial services industry could obtain from pure TIEAs, Mr Delaney said that 12 did not represent the minimum number of such agreements this nation would sign. “The major countries will insist that major international financial centres such as the Bahamas go beyond 12,” he told a Higgs & Johnsonorganised seminar. “Twelve is the number to get things going, and they will press so that the majority, if not all the G-20 countries, have an agreement in my view.” The G-20/OECD had already indicated they were C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report. $4.25 $4.14 $4.26 Bahamas must sign more than 12 TIEAs Legal sector ‘must open’ for financial sector future Reduced work means ‘now not the time to open up’ legal sector * Nation will be ‘pressed’ for more tax agreements until most G-20 nations have them * Leading attorney says double tax agreements ‘preferred course’ for Bahamas to take, and any deals offering ‘trade-based advantages’ * But may have to bide time in completing them to ensure TIEA deadline met SEE page 4B SEE page 4B SEE page 3B SEE page 2B * Attorneys urged to stop being ‘parochial’ and open doors to offices abroad and allowing specialists in * Ex-minister says Bahamas losing market share and contracting because it lacks ‘gatekeepers’ to attract investment funds, as offshore share of $300m tax r evenues declining every year JAMES SMITH BTC suffers 80% fixed-line income drop in 4 years * $45m access deficit narrows, but BTC still making loss on line rentals * Compan y calls f or long distance calls to be removed from significant market power definition Cable urges: No TV price control * BISX-listed firm warns investment in communications sector c ould be ‘potentially jeopardised’ by price regulation proposals * Says 20,000 satellite subscribers, with 21%s market share, ‘discipline’ its prices * Warns $30 basic TV price freeze ‘unsustainable without jeopardising service quality’ * IndiGo says voice circuit prices down 32%

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Cable urges: No TV price control same in its case, given the sign ificance of DTH satellite penetration in the Bahamianm arket,” the company said. Meanwhile, Cable Bahamas also complained that “there has been no clearly defined or properly functioning price review mechanism in the case of basic pay TV services. As a result, the price for Cable Bahamas’ basic cable service has now literally been frozen for $30f or the last 15 years”. C alling for such a price review mechanism to be put in place, Cable Bahamas warned: “Maintaining Cable Bahamas basic cable (Pay TV) service price at $30 going forward is simply unsustainable without jeopardising service quality.” However, on a brighter n ote, Paul Hutton-Ashkenny, p resident of Systems Resource Group (SRG operator of IndiGo Networks, detailed some of the benefits competition had brought to Bahamian businesses and res i dential telecoms consumers since his firm entered the f ixed-line market in 2004. H e explained that the cost of digital T1 business voice circuits had fallen by 32 per cent, with the cost of interi sland calling and internat ional long distance calls f alling by 57.5 per cent and 83 per cent respectively. F ROM page 1B To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today!

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM btrt tfr f r!%* '!$()))!*&*# tffn""bnff !$ %#&!*&*# !%** THIS week’s title sounds l ike the real estate slogan: “Location, location, loca-t ion”. Guess what? You’re right. However, I’m not going to talk about where you or your business is located, but about how and where yout alk about your competition. Remember the old saying: If you can’t say anything nice, don’t say anything at a ll.” It may have been the old adage years ago when you/we were growing up, but does the same hold true in the cutthroat business world we all live in? You decide. T he cynical among us would say: “Of course not.” Dorothy Parker perhaps coined it best: “If you can’ts ay anything nice, come over h ere and sit by me.” Well, my s uggestion is don’t go over a nd sit on that couch. Slandering and gossip will not get y ou very far. I t’s tempting to disparage your competition. Pointingout their weaknesses, faults a nd repeating horror stories o f what has maybe happened to a client of theirs. Product issues they have experienced, delivery issues and so on. So the next time you are m eeting with a client and you talk about your competition,t ry this and not that. 1 . Compliment them W HAT? Yeah, that’s right. C ompliment who they are, w hat they are etc. I mean, they must be doing something right because their doors are s till open. After you have c omplimented them you can then discuss the differences between your company andt heirs. 2 . Giving credibility to the o ne company you’re trying to knock down. No one tries to t ear down the worst company i n the world. If you’re attacking someo ne, even verbally, it must be because you’re worried aboutt hem. So they next time you try to knock down your competition, be careful that you are not actually doing the opposite by giving them cred-i bility. I know that when someo ne does that with me, flags go up and, in some cases, it r equires me to investigate the competitor mentioned. Let me check out the differences myself. 3. Stop adding an unpleasa nt aura to your reputation. By stomping on your opponent’s neck and/or kicking them (your competitionw hen they are down, it leaves a n unpleasant aura about w ho you are and your comp any’s corporate image. Doing this is certainly not a p ositive way to be perceived. S o be careful about not only what you say but how you say it. T he best way is just to p oint out subtle differences that show how your product w ould apply more appropriately than your competitor’s.N ot a positive way to be perceived. All of these marketing strategies are certain to keep your business on top duringt hese challenging economic times. Have a productive andp rofitable week! Remember: “THOSE W HO MARKET WILL MAKE IT “ NB: Scott Farrington is president of SunTee EmbroidMe, a promotional a nd marketing company specialising in uniforms, embroidery, silk screen printing and promotional products. E stablished over 27 years a go, SunTee EmbroidMe has a ssisted Bahamian businesses f rom various industries in marketing themselves. Reade rs can contact Mr Farringt on at SunTee EmbroidMe on East Shirley Street, or by e-mail at scott@sun-tee.como r by telephone at 242-3933 104. Bad-mouthing rivals may backfire on you Promotional Marketing by Scott Farrington BTC suffers 80% fixed-line income drop in 4 years t ance excluded from the basked of price-regu lated services,” BTC said. “The inclusion of o utgoing international long distance as part of price regulated services impedes BTC’s abil ity to compete with licensed and unlicensed o perators.” Meanwhile, BTC said a 2004 study by N ational Economic Research Associates (NERA i ncurred the difference between the cost of p roviding fixed line access to Bahamian con sumers and the revenues earned from line r entals at $45 million, meaning it suffered a loss of this amount. However, the incumbent operator added: “Since the production of that report, the price o f access lines has increased by 58 per cent f or residential customers, from $9.50 to $15, a nd by 67 per cent for business customers from $21.25 to $36. “While there has been a significant increase i n the price of line rentals, based on rough estimates of 130,000 fixed lines, the increase would not be sufficient to eliminate the accessd eficit”. W hile a rebalancing of BTC’s tariffs was required, the company warned that there would be “resistance” from some consumersa nd a “buy in” would be necessary. “This approach will significantly impact the company’s profits, as it is forced to lower prices f or those services where price is significantly above the cost of provision without having the flexibility to increase prices where cost is significantly above price,” BTC added. FROM page 1B

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market share,” Mr Dunkley told a Higgs & Johnson-organised semi-n ar, during a debate on a motion t hat the Bahamian financial sector w ould continue to contract unless this nation’s legal profession ‘opens up’. “All this indicates the likelihood that we will contract in our finan-c ial services industry in the future u nless we make a change,” he added. While the Government and Bahamian private sector could always look to develop a competitive advantage through launching new products and services, Mr Dunkley said any benefits were likely to bes hortlived, since other jurisdictions would merely copy the Bahamas. “I suggest that the main change we can make is to open up the legal profession. We have been closed when others that have been successf ul in the offshore industry have opened up,” he explained. There are two aspects to opening up. The legal profession needs to open up and develop offices abroadi n key jurisdictions. We also need t o open our borders to the outside so in our jurisdiction we can have the specialists we need to compete with other jurisdictions.” Mr Dunkley added: “It is imperat ive that the legal profession not r emain parochial. For too long we h ave continued to allow the banks and trust companies to go off and market abroad. They don’t have the same deep roots in this country that we have..... If this jurisdiction is finished or l oses market share, the international banks can choose another jurisdiction. They are far more mobile than others of us deeper rooted in this jurisdiction. Lawyers are key to marketing the home jurisdictiona broad.” Mr Dunkley was backed by James Smith, former minister of state for finance, who told the seminar that unless the Bahamas opened up to specialist foreign attorneys, it would be unable to penetrate the “fastestg rowing” segment of the internat ional financial services business investment funds and collective investment schemes. The CFAL chairman pointed out that investment funds domiciling in international financial services required “specialist gatekeepers”, including both international andl ocal attorneys, plus administrators and managers. “Fund sponsors seem to prefer jurisdictions other than the Bahamas, because they are able toe ngage international as well as local l egal professionals to establish and a dminister funds in these centres,” Mr Smith said. He added that if the Bahamian international financial services industry was “to grow, we need to attractt hat slice of the business”. Some $0.5 t rillion was estimated to be held in collective investment vehicles worldwide, with half that total in the hedge fund industry. Islands Yet while the British Virgin Islands and the Cayman Islands had more than 2,000 and 3,000 investment funds registered in their jurisdictions, the Bahamas “continues to concentrate” on private wealth man-a gement, with just 700 funds domic iled here. While some $300 million in government revenues were generated by the financial services industry per annum, Mr Smith said: “Most of that is generated by the domestic banks, and the offshore sector’s share of that is shrinking every year. If wea re to expand and grow the offshore industry, we need to aggressively pursue investment funds and hedge funds.” While Higgs & Johnson has e xpanded into the Cayman Islands v ia acquisition, and the likes of L ennox Paton and Callender’s & Co have opened offices overseas in territories like the UK and British Virgin Islands, Mr Dunkley said attorneys in Bermuda and the CaymanI slands had been far more effective. T aking Cayman-based Maples & Calder and Walkers as an example, along with Applebys in Bermuda, Mr Dunkley said all three were “home grown” but had expanded abroad into both offshore ando nshore markets, using offices there to promote the home country. Maples & Calder advertised itself as having a presence in Asia/Pacific, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East and North America. Its Asia/Pacific office, in Hong Kong,a dvertised itself as offering BVI and C ayman legal and incorporation services through a team of attorneys fluent in Mandarin and Japanese, and who had performed transactions in China, Singapore, Japan and Australia. “There is no doubt that Cayman and Bermuda have substantially ben-e fited from these home grown law firms that have gone out and set up platforms abroad, thereby marketing their own jurisdictions,” Mr Dunkley said. Unless we want to see a material r eduction in our industry we need t he legal profession to open up.” Asia and Europe, especially, were key markets, Mr Dunkley said. Meanwhile, Mr Smith suggested that since the Bahamas was seekingW orld Trade Organisation (WTO m embership, and had signed on to the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA profession was likely to be opened to overseas competition anyway. “Whether it’s five, 10, 20 years, t he Bahamas will be liberalising all its professional services, so may be it’s better to liberalise now ahead of time and get the requisite experience,” Mr Smith suggested. He added that the Bahamas had helped its rivals to grow through itso wn mistakes and moving too slowl y, pointing out that John Maples had first worked in the Bank of Nova Scotia Trust Company in Nassau in the 1970s before heading to Cayman to found his own law firm. “It’s not a question of shrinking the business, but growing the business with legal and financial exper-t ise,” Mr Smith said. “The Bahamas is an island, but should not operate as one.” likely to review the TIEA’ t hreshold at some point in the future, on the basis that some agreements signed by intern ational financial centres had m ore value than others. To illustrate this point, Mr D elaney used the example of last Friday’s signing of a TIEA between the Bahamasa nd Monaco, another inter national financial centre, pointing out that this agreem ent did “not have the same v alue as the Bahamas doing a deal with the UK or France”. F or that reason, the Monaco agreement and similar ones were likely to come unders crutiny to assess whether they met the true definition of the G-20/OECD’s 12 mini mum, and a lesser weighting w ould likely be given to treaties between two international financial centres. I n addition, Mr Delaney said the G-20/OECD were also likely to assess the will i ngness of jurisdictions to go b eyond 12 TIEAs and monitor their implementation. “Therefore, in peering into t he future, what do I see?” Mr Delaney asked. “I see a whole lot more treaties than 1 2 treaties, I see a lot of treaties with the G-20 members. The Bahamas has made a commitment to a certain s tandard, and once we’ve signed on it’s a matter of what they require and their expec t ations.” The Higgs & Johnson managing partner, though, saidt hat signing TIEAs “does not do a lot [for the Bahamas] apart from complying with the standard”. He added that thek ey to how this nation fared now lay in the type of tax treaty it signed, and whethert hese brought “some tradebased advantages to us”. With TIEAs simply allowi ng requesting states to submit r equests for information on specific taxpayers suspected of avoiding taxes in criminala nd civil cases, Mr Delaney said the Bahamas’ commitment to conclude 12 by yeare nd was simply to “keep on s ide with the OECD”. Benefits Yet when it came to benefits for the wider Bahamiane conomy and financial serv ices industry, Mr Delaney said other types of agreement would be more beneficial,s uch as a ‘TIEA plus’. These agreements, he explained, “look and read like a TIEA, but there is a little bit of a sweetener in there”. The TIEA the Bahamas signed with the US in January 2 002 was one such example of this, as it included a con vention tax deduction bene f it that allowed US business men and companies holding conventions/meetings in theB ahamas to offset their costs of attending against their tax liabilities meaning the costs are deducted from their taxb ill. The 2002 TIEA had also meant that the Bahamase arned the Qualified Jurisdiction (QJ institutions the QualifiedI ntermediary (QI t ion, from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS holding tax purposes. H owever, Mr Delaney said the better option for the Bahamas was a double taxat ion agreement, which is usua lly signed between two nations who both levy some form of income tax. T hese agreements ensure that companies and citizens are not taxed twice, MrD elaney using the example of a Bahamian International Business Company (IBC owned shares in a US firm. I f the two nations had a double tax treaty, the withholding tax levied on dividend p ayments from the US com pany to the Bahamian IBC might be lowered from 30 per cent to 10 per cent, he sug g ested, thus making it “attrac tive to use Bahamian compa nies for holding investments”. That’s really the preferred course,” Mr Delaney said of double tax treaties, “but thei ssue for the Bahamas is that we have to have a direct tax so that we can qualify to enter negotiations for a double taxa greement.” Other nations without any form of direct taxation have been able toe nter such agreements, though. Other options, Mr Delaney s aid, were bilateral investment t reaties and investment promotion and protection treaties. These agreements,h e explained, facilitated investment in one country by the citizens of another, affordi ng these investments protect ion and, in some cases, giving them Most Favoured Nation treatment ranking them a longside domestic investors. “Negotiating a bilateral investment treaty or invest m ent promotion and protect ion treaty takes a while longer than negotiating a TIEA,” Mr Delaney said. We have three months to go before the end of the year. From that perspective, the B ahamas may find it has to pursue the Doctrine of Stages, taking it step by step. With 12 TIEAs we may get a couple o f double taxation agree ments, get a bilateral invest ment treaty, get a TIEAp lus....... “This is the sort of thing I would like to urge theB ahamas to pursue in the cir cumstances.” Given that the Bahamas had committed to signing 12T IEAs by year-end, the Hig gs & Johnson managing part ner said this nation might h ave to simultaneously pursue alternative agreements with a view to concludingt hem at a later date. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM NOTICE is hereby given that ESACHAR CESAR of FOX HILL, NASSAU, BAHAMAS , is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 23rd day of September, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE NOTICE is hereby given that ALEX LOUIS JEAN of WHITE LANE, OFF M ACKEYSTREET, P.O. BOX SS-5312, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization s hould not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 23rdday of September, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and C itizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE RINA & CO. LTD. (Company number 117,109 B)An International Business Company (In Voluntary Liquidation)I, Renaud Anselin, Liquidator of RINA& CO.LTD. hereby certify that the winding up and dissolution of RINA& CO. LTD. has been completed in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution and that RINA& CO. LTD. has been dissolved as of 25th day of August, 2009. Dated this 21st day of September, 2009 Renaud Anselin Liquidator Bahamas must sign more than 12 TIEAs Legal sector ‘must open’ for financial sector future F ROM page 1B FROM page 1B

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 75F/24C Low: 75F/24C Low: 79F/26C Low: 79F/26C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 79F/26C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 88F/31C High: 91F/33C High: 88 F/31 C High: 88 F/31 C High: 90F/32C High: 88 F/31C High: 89F/32C Low: 77F/25C High: 89F/32C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 90F/32C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 74F/23C High: 87 F/31 C Low: 77F/25C High: 88 F/31 Low: 75F/24C High: 87F/31C Low: 75 F/24C High: 89F/32C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 91F/33C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 89F/32C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 88F/31C Low: 76F/24C High: 92 F/33 C Low: 77F/25C High: 90F/32C High: 88 F/31 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23 RD , 2009, PAGE 9B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Some sun with a t-storm; breezy. Partly cloudy, a t-storm; breezy. Partly sunny with a shower. Partly sunny, a t-storm in spots. Plenty of sun. High: 89 Low: 79 High: 88 High: 89 High: 87 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny with t-storms possible. High: 88 Low: 79 Low: 77 Low: 78 AccuWeather RealFeel 94F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 85F 102-86F 104-81F 93-82F 95-86F Low: 78 TODAYTONIGHTTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................91F/33C Low ....................................................78F/26C Normal high ......................................87F/31C Normal low ........................................74F/24C Last year's high .................................. 90 F/32C Last year's low .................................. 77 F/25C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.09" Year to date ................................................30.36" Normal year to date ....................................36.51" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU First Full Last New Sep. 26 Oct. 4Oct. 11Oct. 18 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:59 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:05 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 11:45 a.m. Moonset . . . . 10:26 p.m. Today Thursday Friday Saturday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 10:49 a.m.3.34:26 a.m.0.4 11:06 p.m.2.65:17 p.m.0.9 11:40 a.m.3.15:13 a.m.0.7 11:59 p.m.2.56:11 p.m.1.2 12:36 p.m.2.96:05 a.m.1.0 -----7:10 p.m.1.3 12:57 a.m.2.47:03 a.m.1.2 1:35 p.m.2.88:11 p.m.1.4 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco91/3277/25t91/3274/23t Amsterdam63/1750/10sh61/1648/8pc Ankara, Turkey68/2043/6pc72/2243/6s Athens77/2563/17s81/2764/17s Auckland66/1858/14r65/1856/13r Bangkok90/3278/25t90/3277/25t Barbados86/3077/25s86/3078/25pc Barcelona74/2363/17s76/2463/17s Beijing81/2752/11pc73/2260/15pc Beirut76/2469/20s79/2671/21s Belgrade82/2758/14s82/2758/14s Berlin71/2152/11pc66/1846/7pc Bermuda81/2776/24sh82/2776/24sh Bogota65/1841/5sh70/2138/3pc Brussels68/2052/11c64/1750/10sh Budapest82/2757/13s81/2756/13pc Buenos Aires59/1534/1s64/1746/7s Cairo92/3365/18s90/3265/18s Calcutta92/3384/28r93/3384/28r Calgary88/3146/7s77/2537/2s Cancun90/3273/22t90/3274/23t Caracas82/2769/20pc81/2772/22pc Casablanca82/2760/15s83/2865/18s Copenhagen66/1847/8sh62/1650/10pc Dublin61/1646/7sh61/1648/8pc Frankfurt75/2355/12pc72/2248/8c Geneva 77/25 52/11 s 76/2454/12pc Halifax 67/19 52/11 pc 68/20 46/7 pc Havana 91/32 72/22 t 86/30 72/22 r Helsinki 57/13 48/8pc55/1248/8sh Hong Kong 90/32 81/27 pc 88/31 81/27sh Islamabad 105/40 74/23 s 107/41 73/22 s Istanbul74/2360/15s76/2464/17s Jerusalem 78/25 54/12s81/2760/15s Johannesburg 74/2355/12pc74/2352/11c Kingston 88/3179/26t88/3180/26r Lima75/2358/14pc74/2357/13pc London68/2052/11sh68/2050/10pc Madrid79/2654/12s81/2754/12s Manila84/2877/25t84/2877/25r Mexico City73/2255/12t72/2252/11t Monterrey77/2563/17t81/2764/17c Montreal75/2357/13pc72/2246/7pc Moscow57/1350/10pc59/1545/7c Munich77/2552/11s75/2353/11pc Nairobi87/3056/13pc87/3055/12pc New Delhi 99/3779/26s99/3777/25s Oslo58/1443/6sh59/1543/6pc Paris75/2352/11s77/2554/12pc Prague 76/24 52/11 pc 66/18 49/9 c Rio de Janeiro84/2872/22sh79/2665/18sh Riyadh98/3673/22s99/3772/22s Rome 77/25 63/17 s 77/25 58/14 pc St. Thomas88/3179/26sh88/3179/26s San Juan75/2342/5s80/2646/7s San Salvador 90/32 70/21 t 87/30 73/22 t Santiago 70/2146/7s73/2248/8s Santo Domingo90/3273/22sh87/3074/23sh Sao Paulo 75/23 59/15 t 72/22 54/12r Seoul79/2655/12s77/2557/13s Stockholm 63/17 46/7 pc 61/16 45/7 c Sydney 72/22 55/12 pc74/2350/10s Taipei93/3378/25pc87/3077/25pc T okyo 79/26 70/21 pc 80/26 67/19 pc T oronto 80/2654/12t72/2250/10pc Trinidad75/2363/17t81/2764/17c V ancouver 74/23 57/13 s 63/1750/10s Vienna 76/2460/15s71/2157/13pc W arsaw 72/22 55/12 pc 68/20 52/11 c Winnipeg 74/23 53/11 s 79/2654/12s H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:ESE at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles85F Thursday:E at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles85F Today:E at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet5 Miles86F Thursday:E at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles86F Today:SE at 8-16 Knots3-6 Feet10 Miles85F Thursday:E at 8-16 Knots3-6 Feet10 Miles85F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque65/1846/7pc68/2049/9pc Anchorage51/1038/3s47/841/5r Atlanta84/2869/20c86/3069/20pc Atlantic City80/2665/18t86/3061/16t Baltimore82/2766/18t83/2862/16t Boston82/2764/17pc79/2656/13pc Buffalo76/2460/15t75/2356/13pc Charleston, SC84/2870/21t87/3070/21pc Chicago84/2861/16t80/2659/15t Cleveland80/2662/16t78/2557/13pc Dallas78/2560/15s77/2562/16c Denver54/1239/3r60/1542/5c Detroit82/2764/17t81/2757/13pc Honolulu89/3175/23s89/3175/23s Houston79/2668/20t85/2973/22t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday TodayThursdayTodayThursday Indianapolis84/2865/18t82/2764/17t Jacksonville86/3072/22t89/3172/22t Kansas City74/2352/11c77/2556/13pc Las Vegas92/3364/17s96/3569/20s Little Rock78/2565/18t79/2667/19t Los Angeles100/3770/21s96/3566/18s Louisville86/3069/20t84/2867/19t Memphis82/2770/21t85/2970/21t Miami90/3279/26t88/3179/26pc Minneapolis76/2460/15s80/2659/15pc Nashville83/2867/19c86/3067/19t New Orleans86/3077/25t89/3176/24t New York78/2570/21pc83/2863/17t Oklahoma City72/2252/11pc73/2255/12t Orlando88/3175/23t91/3275/23t Philadelphia82/2768/20t84/2861/16t Phoenix 95/35 71/21 s 97/3672/22s Pittsburgh80/2662/16t78/2556/13t Portland, OR 92/3357/13s75/2352/11s Raleigh-Durham 86/30 68/20 c 89/31 66/18 pc St. Louis80/2665/18t81/2767/19pc Salt Lake City 78/25 53/11 s 80/2655/12pc San Antonio 78/25 63/17 pc 82/27 66/18 c San Diego88/3163/17s83/2863/17s San Francisco 80/26 56/13 s 78/2555/12s Seattle86/3054/12s69/2051/10s T allahassee 90/3272/22pc92/3372/22t T ampa 91/32 75/23 t 91/32 75/23t Tucson91/3261/16s89/3162/16s W ashington, DC 84/28 68/20t86/3066/18t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM T T h h e e T T r r i i b b u u n n e e B y JEFFARAH GIBSON D eciding what to cook after a long day at work can be can be mindboggling. To ease some of the stress, here are five meat recipes sure to please your family. These recipes are not only easy on the pocket, but delightful on the palatte. T r y a new recipe each day next week with your own choice of sides. TRY SOMETHING FOR DINNER NEW TONIGHT HONEY BAKED CHICKEN Ingredients: 2 pounds chicken drumsticks 2 tablespoons butter 2 tablespoons olive oil or Canola oil 1/2 cup flour 1 1/2 teaspoons Creole seasoning or a seasoned salt blend 1/3 cup honey 1/4 cup brown sugar 4 tablespoons lemon juice 2 teaspoons soy sauce Preparation: 1. Wash chicken a source: www.about.com COCONUT SHRIMP Ingredients 1egg 1/2 cup all-purpose flour 2/3 cup beer 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder 1/4 cup all-purpose flour 2 cups flaked coconut 24 shrimp 3 cups oil for frying Preparation 1. In medium bowl, combine egg, 1/2 cup flour, beer and baking powder. Place 1/4 cup flour and coconut in two separate bowls. 2. Hold shrimp by tail, and dredge in flour, shaking off excess flour. Dip in egg/beer batter; allow excess to drip off. Roll shrimp in coconut, and place on a baking sheet lined with wax paper. Refrigerate for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, heat oil to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C 3. Fry shrimp in batches: cook, turning once, for 2 to 3 minutes, or until golden brown. Using tongs, remove shrimp to paper towels to drain. Serve warm with your favorite dipping sauce. source www.allrecipes.co BARBECUE SHOULDER STEAK SKILLET Ingredients 3-4 tablespoons oil 1 teaspoon seasoning salt or white salt 1 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper 2 (1 LB steaks (about 3/4 to 1-inch thick 2 medium onions, chopped 2 tablespoons fresh minced garlic 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (or to taste, may omit if desired 1 1/2 cups water (can use beef broth 1 1/2 cups tomato sauce 5-6 tablespoons lemon juice 6 tablespoons ketchup 2-3 tablespoons brown sugar 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1/2 teaspoon mustard powder Preparation 1. Heat oil in a large skillet or electric frying pan over medi um-high heat. In a bowl combine the water with tomato sauce, lemon juice, ketchup, brown sugar, Worcestershire sauce and mustard powder until combined; set aside. 2. Season both chuck steaks with salt and pepper (about 1/2 teaspoon of salt and pepper for each steak or can use more if desired). 3. Brown both sides of the steaks in hot oil then remove to a plate. 4. Add in onion; saut for about 3 minutes. 5. Add in garlic and crushed chili flakes; cook stirring for another 1 minute. 6. Pour in the sauce over and around the meat. 7. Cover and simmer on low heat for about 1-1/2 hours or until meat is tender. 8. Season with more salt and pepper if needed. source :www.steakrecipes.ne CHEDDAR AND CRAB CASSEROLE Ingredients 3 tablespoons of plain flour. 3/4 cups of skimmed milk powder. 1/4 teaspoon of mustard powder. 1/4 teaspoons of salt. 1/4 teaspoons of pepper. 1 cup of water. 3 oz strong cheddar cheese, grated. 12 oz Crab meat P P r r e e p p a a r r a a t t i i o o n n : : 1. In a small saucepan, combine the flour, mustard powder, milk powder, salt and pepper. 2. Gradually add water, constantly stirring until the mixture become thick. 3. Remove from heat. 4. Stir the cheese into the mixture until it has completely melted. 5. Stir in the crab meat. 6. Place in a casserole dish and bake until all ingredients are thoroughly cooked. source: www.crabrecipes.net LAMB CHOPS WITH ORANGE AND THYME Cook Time: 55 minutes Ingredients: 4 to 6 lamb shoulder chops, about 3/4-inch thick 1 teaspoon dried leaf thyme, crushed 1/2 teaspoon finely grated orange peel 1/4 cup orange juice salt and pepper 8 ounces sliced mushrooms Preparation: Trim excess fat from lamb chops. Combine thyme, orange peel, and orange juice. Pour over chops and marinate for at least 3 hours in the refrigerator. Drain; reserve marinade. Brown the lamb chops in a small amount of vegetable oil; season lightly with salt and pepper. Add mari nade and mushrooms to the lamb chops; cover and simmer for 45 minutes, or until tender. Uncover the last 5 minutes of cooking to reduce juices a bit. Glazed Lamb Chops Recipe serves 4 to 6. source : www.southernfood.about.com

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By JEFFARAH GIBSON Shakespeare in Paradise”, a theatre f estiv al designed t o promote an appreciation and a wareness of the theatre to the Bahamas will take place Oct ober 5-12. The eight day event will feature seven productions, three of which are Bahami an: “Music of the Bahamas”, “Love In Two Acts” and “Light”. The other performances include “One White One Black,” “Zora”, “Caribbean Voices” and William Shakespeare’s “The Tempest.” At a cocktail party held last Wednesday night at the Gray cliff Restaurant, Nicolette Bethel, Director of Culture, spoke about the importance of this festival to the Bahamas. “Theatre is one of the most highly developed art forms in the Bahamas, and we chose to have this festival because the Bahamas has to diversify its products,” she said. The codirector of The Tempest , Patti -Anne Eli added :“Out of all the work Shakespeare has done, The Tempes t was chosen, since there are various themes thata Bahamian audience can relate to. Those themes include opposition, servitude, liberation, colonialism, and power struggle,” she said. The play has been adapted to appeal to a Bahamian audi ence. “Students from the Col lege of the Bahamas under the guidance of Nicolette Bethel dramaturged the play to suit the Bahamian audi ence. Characters and names have been changed, but the actual text has not been touched.” Having worked in Trinidad for sometime, Mrs Eli says that the actors have brought the play to life and have huge similarities to Trinidadian actors. “There are twenty actors in The Tempest , includ ing a few professional Bahamian actors like Craig Pinder and Dana Ferguson. What I have noticed working with the Bahamian actors ist hat they are quite similar to Trinidadian actors. They all have a certain rhythm about them that brings stage acts to life”, she said. Mrs Eli hopes that when people hear the name Shake-s peare they won’t think of c omplicated language, but a work of endless imagination they can understand, love, enjoy, and appreciate. “Light” is another play which has Bahamian related themes and colloquial themes. Directed by Deon Simms, it tells a true story about two men who engage in conflict over a lady to gain her love. The main theme of the play is to show the importance of conflict resolution, and to have a belief about oneself that is not determined by others. Anton Chekhov’s “The Bear” and Alfred Sutro “The Open Door” are two acts in one play, with each play contrasting the other. “One play is about love l ost, and the other is about love found under the theme Tragedy Triumphs,” Mark Kelly, Director of the play said. He also noted that he hopes the play produces an intimates etting, so that it is heartfelt. S howings will be held at The Dundas Theatre, the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas, The Hub, Graycliff, The Marley Resort and Nir vana. For more information go to www.shakespeareinpar adise.org C M Y K C M Y K TASTE THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 7B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM T T h h e e T T r r i i b b u u n n e e Shakespeare Paradise in things 2 DO 1. The Bahamas Historical Society will conduct a free public lecture onT hursday evening at the museum on Elizabeth A venue on Shirley Street at 6 pm. Meteorologist Wayne Neeley will speak on the topic "Bahamian Hurricanes.” For further information call 322-4231. 2. TYC and Kingdom Dub Entertainment Group w ill host the third annual DJ Counsellor All White Birthday Bash at the BFM cafe on Saturday, September 26 from 7.30-11pm.A dmission for the event is $5. Music will be provided b y Kingdom Dub Music Group and there will be appearances by Mr Lyx, Rubin Heights, Solo, Ricardo Clark, Ryan Jupp and others.T here will be free give aways and awards for theb est dancer and dancer. For more information call 461-6467/434-0217 or v isit www.myspace.com/djcoun sellor 3. This year, the Terry M cCoy Memorial Regatta takes place at Montagu Bay on Saturday and Sund ay. This event is the last official Sunfish Regatta before the 2009 Sunfish World Championships also to be held at Montagu inO ctober. Terry McCoy was well known in the sailing community for volunteering with regattas, both locally and internationally. His sons Matthew and Lee, along with the Bahamas Sailing Association, started this regatta to help keep Sunfish sailing active in the Bahamas. All are welcomed, especially juniors who Terry loved to see further the sailing tra dition. Contact tmc@thereal.com or visit www.bahamassailing.org 4. The Rotary Club of New Providence will hold a Steak-Out at Scouts Headquarters on Dolphin Drive from 12-4pm on Saturday. Chicken and steak dinners will be on sale. Tickets cost $10 and may be pur chased from club members. Contact John Philpot at 393-9011 or 393-5298 or Michael Stubbs at 3563736/8 or 376-2682. 5. On Monday, Miss Teen World Junior Bahamas, Shaquell Demeritte, participates in the Miss Princess of The World (formerly Miss World Junior Pageant) in Czech Republic. She competes with over 60 contestants to win the grand prize of $100,000 in cash and awards. Do you have a special event that you would like featured in Things to Do? Contact Tribune Arts and Entertainment at features@tribunemedia.net or fax us at 32-82398 by the Tuesday prior to your function. CO DIRECTOR of The Tempest, Craig Pinder (ProsperoMiranda D a v i d J o n a t h o n B u r r o w s / P h o t o s By REUBEN SHEARER Tribune Features Reporter JAMES Catalyn pulled all the stops in his Summer Madness Revue 2009 last week, amusing theatergoers through typical, topical and timely skits that made us ‘laugh at wesef.’ For four nights, his 16 skit production exposed the double standard in the Bahamian market, and provided a ter rific blend of satire and comedy. This was the 27th time Mr Catalyn put on the series for the public who raved with approval as they identified with the situations the actors found themselves in. Mr Catalyn held no punches, ridiculing crooked politicians, and the average Bahamian who is either always late or wants something for free. The audience was amused as Catlyn’s cast depicted the divide on the marital rape law between religious figures in ‘Sexified;’ gambling citizens in ‘Der Gamblin’ Permissioner;’ and a pair of disinterested parents in ‘The School Situation,’ who take the back seat in the academic lives of their children. Most of the cast spoke in “Bahamianese,” a mix of broken English and Bahamian slang. Individual monologues set the tone for what topics would be discussed in each skit. A personal favorite was ‘Pass it On.’ In this skit, high ranking manag er, Ms Greene (played by Chrystal Bethel) has a hard time convincing long-time employee Mrs Burrows (played by Veronica Toppin flexible, and collaborate with newer ideas. Mrs Burrows plays a feisty and strong-headed character, and injected great acting into the skit. She wanted to squeeze young Ms Greene into her mold, and was suspicious of the new, the up-to-date, the different. Here’s a line taken from Mrs Bur rows script: “All yinna young people wan’ do is change up erryting, say is mordern time an’ dat we had we day. Wan’ cast us aside like ol’ dog.” After back and forth discourse that goes nowhere, Ms Greene gave Mrs Burrows an ultimatum, saying that if she is to remain with the organisation, she must be open to merge with new ideas and “change with the times.” With that, Mrs Burrows suddenly has a change of heart and is compliant. Mr Catalyn told Tribune Entertainment that the underlying theme of this skit was to encourage older Bahamians to pass on the reigns of knowledge and experience to the younger generation so they are more equipped for the situations of life. Speaking to Tribune Entertainment , Mr Catalyn explained: “I wanted to be the voice for those Bahamians who are afraid to speak up on issues that politicians aren’t slow to address, if at all. That’s why I wrote these plays, I want to make people think and see what is happening to us.” The cast was made up of some of the best talent the country has to offer. Some of the main actors were Natasha Davis, Veronica Toppin, Dion John son, Stephanie Braynen, Chrystal Bethell, Anthonique Farquharson, Lamorn Miller, Rachel Rolle, Shireen Hanna, Eric Adderley, Conrad Maycock, Chrystal Bethell and Neil Cleare. Summer Madness held no punches ACTORS, Mary Knowles, Jovanna Hepburn, and Roger Gibson at work.

PAGE 26

C M Y K C M Y K ARTS PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM artists peace 4 A number of Bahamian artist gave an astounding pefor mance at the Artist 4 Peace concert, held at Arawak Key on Saturday night.

PAGE 27

C M Y K C M Y K I N S I D E Shakespeare in Paradise See page seven WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 Try something new for dinner See page six B y JEFFARAH GIBSON B AHAMIANS showed off their artistic abilities at the Bristol &W ines R ed Bull competition, molding, painting, and creating pieces on v ar ious ar t mediums, all inspir ed and created with Red Bull cans. The “Art of Can” competition was a creativity contest that allowed regular Bahamians whose artwork is not publicly recognised a chance to compete with other competent artists. Sixteen finalists sailed the imagination boat, and explored a variety of ideas for their pieces. And although each contestant displayed great artistic capa bilities, only three pieces were chosen for the final competition, to be held in Kingston, Jamaica. Tiffany Darling, first place winner, and an employee at Bristol & Wines, will be heading to Kingston on an all expense paid trip with her art piece, “Unforgettabull Moments”, which was a wedding cake. Upon finding out her piece won the contest, she was ecstatic and shocked, since she never considered herself a creative person. “When I found out I won the contest it was an amazing feeling. Even though I did expect to win, it was still surprising. I never had any formal training in art before, but I always had creative hands and a big imagination” she said. The idea of her intricate piece “Unforgettabull Moments” was conceived while surfing the web. “I wanted to do something so I went on the Internet in search of something that I could have done, but could not find anything interesting and different to work with. So since I love to watch Ace of Cakes on the Food Network, I decided to create a wedding cake for my piece.” She found that working on the piece was time consuming, but a labour of love. “This piece took so much time to complete. The minute I came home from work I would immediately begin working on the cake. Sometimes I would find myself going to bed two o’clock in the morning, but I enjoyed every moment of it,” she said. Her piece was called “Unforgettabull Moments” because a wedding signifies a special time in a couple’s life that is rarely forgotten. Not only was the competition fulfilling for Mrs Darling, but it unlocked and revealed a special talent she never knew was there. “I never knew I had the ability to do what I did. This was a wonderful experience, and if there is another competition like this in the future I will surely enter,” she said. She is going to Jamaica in high spirits, excited to see to what other’s ideas gave birth. The second, and third place winners also will be heading to Jamaica to compete. The Red Bull competition originated in Australia where the brand is located. Competitions like this are always held in Australia. However, this is the first time the competition has been held in the Bahamas, and Jamaica. It was judged by three well known artists, Antonius Roberts, Sue Katz, and Angelique McKay. art can OF Regular Bahamian artists shine at Red Bull art competition Gives U Wings a work of body paint by Italia Williams placed second at the Ar t of Can. U nforgetta-BULL Moments with winning artist Tiffany Darling now on her way to Jamaica. Third place piece Flying Bullfish by Dorman Stubbs. Red Bull Music by young artist Jave Martin. Rosemar y McPhee's entr y entitled High Glow . Noted entry Sea Wings by auto body work specialist Elmon Mortimer. The Tribune SECTIONB


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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009

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Save Jett wavena

Jurors hear of
efforts to revive
film star’s son



By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

JURORS in the trial of for-
mer PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater and former ambu-
lance driver Tarino Light-
bourne heard several accounts
yesterday of the efforts made
to revive an unresponsive Jett
Travolta as prosecutors opened
their case in the Supreme
Court.

Jett Travolta, 16, the son of
Hollywood actors John Travol-
ta and Kelly Preston died in
Freeport, Grand Bahama on
January 2. Opening the case for
the prosecution yesterday
Director of Public Prosecutions
Bernard Turner said that fol-
lowing Jett’s death, contact was
made with certain persons to
communicate a threat to Mr
Travolta regarding the release
of potentially damaging state-
ments if money were not paid.

SURLY ET)



Former PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater and former para-
medic Tarino Lightbourne are
accused of attempting to extort
$25 million from the Hollywood
actor,

Mr Travolta flies in this
morning to be the first witness
when the case resumes today.
He will be accompanied by his
wife.

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staff

AN inmate at Her Majesty's Prison accused of
the murder of a fellow inmate was arraigned in

Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Preston Moss, 36, is charged with the murder
of Lloyd Albury. Albury died on September 10,
two days after he was admitted to hospital fol-



PRESTON MOSS, 36, was charged yesterday with the murder of Lloyd Albury.

lowing a fight in a cell at the prison. Albury, 55,

Climate change seen as threat to Bahamas

EFFECTS from the threat of
climate change could prove
damaging to the Bahamas'
economy, according to Tourism
and Aviation Minister Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace.

A recent study by the World
Bank placed the Bahamas
among the top three of the
most vulnerable Caribbean
countries when it comes to cli-
mate change, emphasizing the
need for a pro-active stance to
curb more damaging effects.

“We know that we cannot
run away from the issues of sea
level rise, salt water intrusions,
beach and shore erosion, and
the many other impacts of cli-

mate change that confront us.

‘Your presence here is a demon-
stration of your commitment to
act before it’s too late,” said Mr
Vanderpool-Wallace during
day one of the Caribsave Coun-
try Partners Symposium.

The World Bank report also
revealed that a five-metre
change in sea level rise could
result in damage to the econo-
my that amounts to 3.5 per cent
of Gross Domestic Product
(GDP) for Surinam.

“Tn the case of the Bahamas,
it estimates that the same level

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was reportedly imprisoned on a vagrancy charge.

Moss, was arraigned on the murder charge
yesterday before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez
in Court 1, Bank Lane.

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Teachers

Stage ‘sit-in’
protests

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AROUND 200 teach-
ers at three public schools
in New Providence staged

“sit-in’s” yesterday to
protest inadequate
staffing and poor work-
ing conditions.

The industrial action at
Uriah McPhee, Anatol
Rodgers and CI Gibson,
which began Friday has
postponed education for
thousands of students
across New Providence.

At CI Gibson the
action compounded secu-
rity issues at the school
as 11 knives and an ice-
pick were found on the
school property yester-
day, according to reports.

Teachers began taking
action on Monday over

SEE page six



Burger King offers
reward to help
capture killer

By MEGAN REYNOLDS

Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

BURGER King have offered
a $10,000 reward for any infor-
mation that will lead to the
arrest or conviction of those
responsible for the murder of
restaurant manager Rashad
Morris.

Mr Morris, 21, of John
Street, off Baillou Hill Road,
was brutally beaten and
stabbed at the Burger King
restaurant on Harrold Road,
western New Providence,
where he was found dead early
Sunday morning.

SEE page six

OoiiliaBrceenel
63rd homicide

FOLLOWING two bru-
tal murders Sunday, the
country last night recorded
its 63rd homicide.

Details were still sketchy
at press time, but police
said a young man who had
travelled to the Seagrapes
shopping centre on Prince
Charles Drive by car at
Spm got into an altercation
with another man at the
plaza.

The dispute got out of
hand and the victim was
stabbed several times dur-
ing the skirmish. He was
rushed to hospital by
ambulance, but police said
he was unresponsive by
this time. He died a short
time later, at about 7pm.
The matter is being investi-
gated.


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009



THE TRIBUNE

Campaign highlighting opposition to
sea turtles ban ‘gaining momentum’

Petition has
‘two or three
thousand’
signatures

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A Bahamas-wide campaign
aiming to highlight opposition
to the outright ban on har-
vesting sea turtles has “gained
plenty of momentum”,
according to one of its organ-
isers.

Abner Pinder, fisherman
and chief councillor for Span-
ish Wells, claims “two or
three thousand” signatures
have already been added to
a petition against the ban
launched earlier this month
and more are expected when
all of the Family Islands send
in the signatures attached to
petitions circulated there.

Mr Pinder, along with
numerous other fishermen
and opponents of the ban -
which extends to the taking
or catching of any marine tur-
tles, turtle parts or eggs, for
commercial use or otherwise —
hopes to persuade the gov-
ernment to reverse its posi-
tion and continue to allow
Bahamians to harvest turtles
for personal consumption.

Gathered together on Sep-
tember 3, two days after the
ban was officially enacted in
the name of conservation,

Wr
RU

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
acral) |



A STOCK PHOTO of a sea turtle.

“Turtles are increasing in the
Bahamas on a daily basis but nobody —
(The Department of) Fisheries or any-
body — will go out there to try to do any
type of survey (of the numbers),
because they know that if they did it
would defeat what they are saying.”



they charged that, contrary to
the government and environ-
mentalist’s views that the tur-
tles are in danger of being
wiped out, the creatures are
“plentiful” in Bahamian
waters.

Activists

Their efforts, however,
have already raised the ire of
local environmental activists.

Having hailed the ban as
“wonderful” in August after
pushing for years for the gov-
ernment to enact it, Kim
Aranha, founder of the
Bahamas Sea Turtle Conser-
vation Group, charged that
those against the ban are

Abner Pinder

“speaking from ignorance”.

She noted that the
BSTCG’s own petition
against the slaughter of sea
turtles in the Bahamas gar-
nered around 5,000 signa-
tures.

Meanwhile, Mr Pinder said:
“Turtles are increasing in the
Bahamas on a daily basis but
nobody — (The Department
of) Fisheries or anybody — will
go out there to try to do any
type of survey (of the num-
bers), because they know that
if they did it would defeat
what they are saying.”

The petition against the ban
states: “I do not agree that
the government should ban
all harvesting or eating of tur-

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tle meat by Bahamians, rather
I believe that control or ban-
ning of commercial harvest-
ing and the slaughter of tur-
tles in public are enough to
address the needs of both

environmentalism and
humanity.”
Commercial

Mr Pinder stressed that
most opponents of the ban
are primarily concerned with
ensuring turtles can still be
captured for personal con-
sumption, and are happy to
allow the part of the ban
which relates to commercial
harvesting to remain.

The affect on the overall
turtle population of allowing
individuals to catch them to
eat would be “infinitesimal,”
he suggested.

He claims that although the
ban has been enacted as an
amendment to the Fisheries
Regulations, it is critical that
the opponents make their
voices heard before the next
parliamentary session begins
on September 30 as this is
expected to provide an oppor-
tunity for the ban to be fur-
ther cemented in law.

DISCOVER



Ue TAT At dG Ae
eT og ate SL

BY MATT MAURA



Dorsette’s, Mangrove
Cay - The relaunching of
primary healthcare services
at the Mangrove Cay Com-
munity Clinic will allow for
the “adequate and timely
delivery of high-quality
healthcare” to the residents
of Mangrove Cay, Health
Minister Dr. Hubert Min- — >
nis said. HEALTH MINISTER Dr Hubert Minnis

The relaunching took (centre) prepares to tour the newly
place on Friday, September renovated Mangrove Cay Communi-
18, and is part of the contin- ty Clinic following the relaunching of
uing reconstruction/renova- primary healthcare services in Dorset-
tions of primary healthcare te’s, Friday, September 17. Pictured
facilities throughout the with Dr. Minnis from left: Gina Ben-
Family Islands. Relaunching nett-Rolle, Nursing Officer 1/Clinic
ceremonies have already Supervisor and Patrice Bowleg, Nurs-
taken place in Kemp’s Bay, ing Officer Il. Picewell Forbes, Mem-
South Andros; Nicholls ber of Parliament for South Andros is
Town, North Andros, and pictured in the background.

Grand Cay, North Abaco.

More are scheduled for other parts of the Bahamas. Con-
structed 24 years ago with funding from the National Insurance
Board, the Community Clinic was renovated at a cost of
$500,000. Dr. Minnis said the relaunching of services will allow
healthcare professionals on Mangrove Cay to address those
aspects of primary healthcare that focus on health promotion,
disease prevention and self-empowerment, particularly in the
fight against chronic, non-communicable diseases (CNCDS)
and other public health threats.

“The residents of Mangrove Cay, like those elsewhere in the
Bahamas, are primarily affected by the increasing rates of obe-
sity, hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, cancer, asthma and
other types of chronic, non-communicable diseases, as well as
those related to alcohol consumption,” Dr. Minnis said.

“Now that the clinic building has been renovated, operations
will improve due to the fact that the District Medical Officer will
be able to remain overnight in the facility and the fact that the
clinic will be connected to the Central Patient Record Infor-
mation System which will allow physicians in New Providence
to review the medical records of patients in Mangrove Cay.”

Dr. Minnis said the upgrades to primary healthcare facilities
throughout the Bahamas is part of the Ministry of Health’s
overall objective of ensuring that healthcare facilities through-
out the country are provided with the necessary emergency
medical equipment, and that training opportunities are pro-
vided to ensure that the current knowledge and skills of persons
providing healthcare services, are maintained.

He said as a result, the buildings formerly used to house the
clinic and nurses’ residence in Mangrove Cay, in addition to the
former nurses’ residence in Kemp’s Bay, will be renovated and
used to facilitate the training of medical and nursing students and
physicians from the University of the West Indies’ Bahamas
campus who are pursing post-graduate studies in Family Med-
icine. The Health Minister said officials from the Public Hos-
pitals Authority are also scheduled to provide First Responders
training for residents of Mangrove Cay and Kemp’s Bay, which
should also auger well for the provision of timely services to the
community. “All that remains is for the residents of Mangrove
Cay to work with their healthcare providers to reduce the num-
ber of persons developing chronic, non-communicable diseases
as well as injuries resulting from negative and unhealthy lifestyle
choices and violence,” Dr. Minnis added.



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THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS



Ocourt short

Man charged
with Freeport's
eighth murder
of the year

VIRGILL, wearing a black and
white striped shirt, is escorted
by police officers to the court-
house on Monday to be charged
with murder.

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A man was
charged with murder in the
Freeport Magistrate’s Court
on Monday.

Godfrey Virgill, alias
“Dollar Murder”, was
arraigned before Magistrate
Debbye Ferguson in Court
One in the murder of 20-
year-old Ashley Smith —
the island’s eighth homicide
victim for the year.

It is alleged that on Sep-
tember 12, Virgill intention-
ally caused the death of Mr
Smith by means of unlawful
harm. He was not required
to enter a plea to the charge.

Lawyer K Brian Hanna
represented Virgill.

Magistrate Ferguson
adjourned the case to Janu-
ary 26, 2010 in Magistrate’s
Court 3 for a preliminary
inquiry.



OPPOSITION SENATOR JEROME FITZGERALD TO PRESENT HIS OWN DRAFT LEGISLATION

Pressure mounts on Government
for Freedom of Information Act

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

HOPING to pressure gov-
ernment into enacting the
promised Freedom of Informa-
tion Act, an opposition sena-
tor said he will present his own
draft legislation in the Senate.

Jerome Fitzgerald believes
government should make pass-
ing the law — which would give
the general public a legal right
and avenue to obtain informa-
tion held by public authorities
unless there is a good reason
for confidentiality — more of a
priority. While the attorney
claims he “does not expect” the
government will debate the leg-
islation that he tables, Mr
Fitzgerald hopes that his efforts
will at least bring the issue to
the forefront, causing the gov-
ernment to make their own
moves to create a “sunshine”
law, as promised in the FNM’s
election manifesto in 2007.

Most democracies have
enacted, or moved towards cre-
ating a Freedom of Informa-
tion Act. The United States
passed an FOIA in 1966, with
the UK following in 2000.

Apart from outlining the
right of the public to access cer-
tain information, the law would
also create penalties for public
authorities who withhold docu-
ments. Advocates of the law in
the Bahamas say it would help
reduce scandals and cases of
corruption that often only come

Arawak Gay port protest ‘proving successful’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

OPPONENTS of the
Arawak Cay port move claim
to have been “successful” in
their endeavour of gathering
thousands of signatures against
the government’s plan.

The drive to collect the
names of those who think that
Arawak Cay is an unwise
choice for the relocation of the
container shipping facilities was
launched in mid-August.

Yesterday, PLP Senator
Jerome Fitzgerald said he is
happy with the results so far.

He is now drafting a letter
that he will present with the
petition to Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham “within the
next week.”

Declining to state how many
signatures were collected dur-



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at all.

Meaningful

Most recently, Callenders
and Co attorney Fred Smith
and others suggested that a
“meaningful” FOIA could have
helped avoid the circumstances
that led to the crown land con-
troversy involving former direc-
tor of Lands and Surveys Tex
Turnquest. For its part, the gov-
ernment has said it remains
committed to passing an FOIA
within its current five year term.

During the June 2009 bud-
get debate, Minister of State
Charles Maynard noted that
two consultants were contract-
ed this year to help “prepare
the entire public service for the
open access to their records.”

Having in recent times been
active in voicing and galvanising

ing the drive, Senator Fitzger-
ald told The Tribune this would
be revealed on the day it is for-
warded to the prime minister.

This development comes
days after PLP leader Perry
Christie warned potential
investors in the Arawak Cay
port project to “beware” —
stating that if his party wins the
2012 election it would scrap the
current plan and move the port
elsewhere.

Independent

Speaking on the Love97 talk
show ‘Jones and Co’ on Sun-
day, Mr Christie reiterated how
the former government
believed south-western New
Providence would be the best
site for a new port based on
independent studies.

In August, Mr Fitzgerald said
he hoped to get around 10,000
signatures in the petition
against the Arawak Cay port
move.

An online version of the peti-
tion yesterday registered 503
signatures.

However, Mr Fitzgerald said
the drive also involved door-
to-door advocacy by a team of
people dedicated to opposing
the Arawak Cay plan.

The senator, who recently
announced his intention to run

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE

opposition to the government’s
intended relocation of the port
to Arawak Cay, Mr Fitzgerald
said his work in this regard has
bolstered his belief that the
public must have new avenues
through which to obtain infor-
mation which they can use to
hold the government account-
able for its decisions and
actions.

“A lot of the information I’ve
been seeking throughout this
exercise has not been forth-
coming,” said the Senator, who
claims that government has so
far been “secretive” about the
port move and failed to justify it
in the face of prior studies that
rated Arawak Cay poorly as a
potential site.

“The need for a Freedom of
Information Act is something
I’m going to start to press very
strongly. I will lay a draft in the
senate, putting it forward for
us to begin to debate.

The Government can decide
whether they’re going to debate
it or not. Mr Fitzgerald, who
recently revealed his intention
to run for the post of Deputy
Leader of the PLP at the par-
ty’s forthcoming convention,
said the issue of access to infor-
mation “goes across party
lines”, with both the FNM and
the PLP at times failing to be as
open as they should.

“Moving forward I think the
public is going to demand that
we have this (an FOIA) so they
can know what the hell is going
on,” he added.

MORLEY

For * i
MEN a,

for the deputy leadership of the
PLP, has denied that his
activism on the issue, which he
began last year, has anything
to do with his political ambi-
tions.

“People will want to link the
two, but that’s not what this is
about,” he said.



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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Removal of the casuarinas

WE HAVE received a letter from a read-
er asking for our opinion on the removal of
the casuarina trees at Saunders Beach. The
writer wants to know if we believe those
who say that these trees destroy our beach-
es, prevent the growth of native vegetation,
resulting in the decline of sand dunes and the
exposure of the coastline to erosion. It
would seem, said the writer, that because
these trees are not indigenous to the
Bahamas they must be eliminated at all cost.

We don’t know what to believe. We agree
that as Neil Sealey pointed out in his article,
“The Casuarina Controversy”, that hurri-
canes Floyd and Frances, during the height
of their swirling fury, blew massive amounts
of sand from Saunders Beach onto the main
road. This is to be expected because the
casuarina grows no foliage at the base of its
trunk, and so between each tree there is a
tremendous gap that is an open highway for
anything being blown from the ocean to pile
up on the main road. However, if low shrubs
were planted beneath the trees to close the
gaps, there would be no opening for the
sand to get through and it would accumulate
on the beach in dune formation.

Do we believe that nothing will grow
beneath the casuarina tree? The scientists
say no, the casuarina is an invasive tree that
poisons everything beneath it. But as Tina
Barry of Harbour Island pointed out in her
group’s campaign to save the Saunders
Beach casuarinas, vegetation will grow under
some casuarina trees — in other words this
group to save the tree does not believe that
all casuarinas are poisonous to native vege-
tation. According to Ms Barry there are 17
varieties of the tree, not all destructive. She
maintains that the non destructive trees are
the ones that have thrived at Saunders for
more than 80 years, and should be left in
peace.

We are not a scientist and so we do not
pretend to know what the scientific truth is.
All we know is that inland vegetation almost
smothers the tall casuarina tree. Our eyes do
not see what the scientists tell us we should
see — except on the seafront and the expla-
nation could be that no one has tried to
plant anything beneath the tree to close the
open spaces.

The National Trust has always supported
the removal of the casuarina from island
coastlines. “Extensive research supports that
removal of casuarinas from coastal areas
and replanting of the dune ridge with native
vegetation will restore the dune and pro-
vide an effective barrier against wave
action,” said the Trust.

However, this is what our reader had to
say on the matter:

“Dear Editor,

“Please tell me honestly: Do you believe
all that these scientists are telling us about
the Saunders Beach casuarina trees?

“Well, I shan’t beat about the bush —
my eyes don’t lie and they do not see what
the scientists are telling us.

“T almost had mental collapse when I
recently drove past a barren, wind swept
Saunders Beach with half the casuarinas
removed and numbers on the remaining
ones to indicate that they are now ready for
the woodsman’s axe. All I know is that those
responsible for their removal had better pray
and pray hard that there is no hurricane this
year or, not only will the sand cover the
road, but it will play host to a great deal of
the Atlantic Ocean. There is absolutely no
protection from ocean storms.

“T read in The Tribune that the planting of
native shrubs at Orange Hill was the pat-
tern to be followed in the future for our
seashore. It is true that the shrubs are knit-
ted tightly together, but they completely
block all view of the ocean and present a
picture of monotonous drabness. However,
I must admit, in the midst of it all I got a
good laugh from one defiant little casuarina.
As if to mock our brilliant scientists and
give the lie to their claims, this little treasure
had thrust itself skyward right up through the
tightly knit native shrubs! I wanted to get
out, stretch my arms and shout “bravo!” to
the little blighter. Isn’t nature wonderful!

“Inland casuarinas were growing with
the native plants, one even had a thick vine
creeping up its tall trunk.

“And they talk about erosion of beaches.
We had magnificent beaches framed by
casuarina trees when I was a child. The first
time that I saw beach erosion was when they
started building large hotels — in the west
and on Paradise Island in the east which has
damaged Montagu Beach.

“They justify their elimination of the
casuarina because it is not native to the
Bahamas. I recommend a read of Bill
Bryson’s book ‘A walk in the Woods’ — on
the Appalachian Trail. He tells of how
seedlings from the 800 plants discovered
during the colonial era in the Appalachian
woods were collected by amateur botanists
and ‘shipped across the ocean to England
and France and Russia, and received with
greedy keenness and trembling fingers.’

“These were plants never before seen in
Europe. Suppose they were all to be
destroyed because they were not indigenous
to Europe, what a dull, dismal place this
world would be. Anyway, let the scientists
prattle, I prefer to believe my own eyes —
and what I see, ain’t what they see!”























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The Bahamas
needs a critical
moral facelift

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Friday, August 21, 2009,
turned out to be a horrific day
for the family of Wendy
Bullard, a young lady working
in the employ of 21st Century
Welding when, while working
to earn an honest dollar for her-
self and her family, she was
ruthlessly gunned down by
thugs who, for whatever rea-
son, saw no purpose or value
to her life and merely regarded
her as an obstruction to their
abominable exploits.

Tragically, like many before
her, she is now a Statistic anda
testament to how we as a peo-
ple and country have failed to
protect our citizens and prevent
our country from becoming a
habitat for freedom of lawless-
ness and severe limitations on
justice. This case, like others
before it, will provoke our
thoughts for a little while and
many of us will seek to blame
some individual or organisation
for the degradation that we
have gotten ourselves and our
society into.

We can blame the Minister
of National Security because in
my opinion his performance in
this capacity has been dismal. It
is also my opinion that he has
demonstrated no real vision for
addressing the crime situation
and his failure to produce real
results is glaring to those of us
who can see beyond the poli-
tics.

We can blame the court sys-
tem where individuals charged
with committing murders or
other heinous crimes are con-
tinuously and almost routinely
released on bail. Sadly, many
of these suspects are back on
the streets committing more
crimes, taking new victims and
creating more work for an
already overloaded law
enforcement system. We are,
in essence, getting the raw
results of justice delayed. The
criminal elements are not facing
any harsh consequences for
felonious actions and, there-
fore, see this as impulse to con-
tinue down the wrong road
causing havoc and giving life to
the old adage — Justice delayed
is Justice denied.

We can blame the police
because in recent times officers
have been so busy arresting one
another they have hardly had
time to focus on society’s crim-
inal elements. Officers are
being charged with all sorts of
malicious and injurious activi-
ties — domestic abuse, child

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



abuse, sexual molestation, rob-
beries, burglaries, rape, etc —
bringing the Royal Bahamas
Police Force to disrepute and
further destroying the public
trust in this organisation.

We can blame drugs, alco-
hol, gangs, lack of home disci-
pline, the schools, the churches,
the prison, the affected estab-
lishments, the unfortunate vic-
tims and whatever substance,
entity or individual we are con-
vinced has played some role in
guiding our descent to criminal
decadence. While we may not
want to accept it, the reality of
the matter is that we also need
to blame ourselves.

A lot of us in Bahamaland
know our relatives and friends
who are involved in criminal
activities. When we tell our kids
to fight it out if someone chal-
lenges them we are grooming
them. When we give them the
impression that they can have
anything they want without
working for it we are setting
them up. When we tell them
what insults to direct at the
teachers and other adults who
reprimand them we are
strengthening them. When we
brag about their bad behav-
ioural antics and fail to admin-
ister discipline we are promot-
ing them. When they show up
with items we know are stolen
and we accept them we are
licensing them. When we drive
them to the house in the “jook-
jook” corner to purchase or sell
iulicit substances we are encour-
aging them. When we see them
with the unlicensed firearms or
other illegal weapons and do
not report them to the police
we have contributed to every
murder that is committed in this
country after the fact.

The other brutal reality is
that nothing and no one will
ever thoroughly eradicate crime
in this country, unless Jehovah
God himself comes down, but
there are solutions to our prob-
lems. The Hon Tommy Turn-
quest needs to be transferred
as Minister of National Securi-
ty as soon as possible. No Gov-
ernment should want to be
accused of playing politics with
such a critical issue as crime
management and, unfortunate-
ly, this appears to be the case
with the present administration.

The only reason Mr Turnquest
does not appear to be playing is
because he has already dropped
the ball.

For offenders who allegedly
commit murder and other hor-
rendous criminal acts the
wheels of justice should move
swiftly. Law enforcement offi-
cers, prosecutors, Supreme
Court judges, the Attorney
General’s Office and persons
responsible for dealing with
such matters should move to
expedite them to ensure that
justice is administered quickly
and appropriately so that vic-
tims’ families do not feel vio-
lated over and over again.

There is no justified reason
as to why families of murder
victims, casualties of armed
robberies and rape, and chil-
dren who have suffered sexual
molestation and exploitation
should have to wait five and six
years for their concerns to be
thoroughly addressed by the
courts. It is time to quit making
excuses, prioritise and get the
job done.

Persons suspected of com-
mitting murder should not be
given bail. Perpetrators con-
victed of murder should be exe-
cuted expeditiously and there
should be no question of
whether they die. Death by exe-
cution as a consequence for
murder should be automatic.

Friday, August 21, 2009, was
a terrible and tragic day for one
more family but, sadly, many
more of days of the week will
be like that until we as a people
and a country shift our attitude
towards felons, strengthen our
resolve against criminal activi-
ties, and renew our commit-
ment to fight the destructive
elements wherever they are and
whoever they may be — includ-
ing family members, friends,
relatives or acquaintances.

We need a critical moral
facelift. We need to change our
mindset about where we want
our country to be and where
we want our future to take us.
We need to reaffirm our val-
ues and determine what is real-
ly important to us. The change
for us has to begin within us.
Until then, we as a people will
continue to reap what we’ve
sown. It is unfortunate that,
because of this, the innocent
will continue to suffer for and
along with the guilty.

MARVIN R Z GIBSON
Nassau,
August, 2009.

So how does China benefit from
its relationship with Bahamas?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There has been much fan-
fare of late regarding the lev-
el of assistance that the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China is pre-
pared to offer to the
Bahamas.

From the sports stadium, to
the road project, to Baha Mar
and finally in today’s Tribune
large scale farming in Abaco.

We recently witnessed the
historic visit of His Excellen-
cy Wu Bangguo, Chairman of
the Standing Committee of
the National People’s Con-
gress of the People’s Republic
of China. During this visit
three agreements were signed

that covered

i) in addition to other
issues, the protection of
investments by Bahamian and
Chinese investors that are
made in each other’s coun-
tries;

ii) an agreement that covers
a loan from the Chinese Exim
Bank for the Airport High-
way project and

iti) an agreement that cov-
ers the construction of the
national sports stadium, which
is a grant from the People’s
Republic of China.

There were also two agree-
ments signed with Baha Mar,
regarding the Cable Beach
project.

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The above is all well and
good....perhaps!? No doubt
there is much benefit to be
achieved by some Bahamians,
with regard to these develop-
ments. But all the media cov-
erage and Government press
releases highlight the benefits
for the Bahamas.

I always stand to be cor-
rected, as I am only human
and will make mistakes, but
so far I can’t seem to find any
coverage on the benefits to
the People’s Republic of Chi-
na for such generosity
bestowed on the Bahamas
and the Bahamian people.
Certainly China benefits from
exporting goods to the
Bahamas, but this does not
seem to justify what we have
learnt over the past couple of
weeks and months. Our
imports from China are only
“peanuts” to that of our
neighbour to the west.

The Highway Project may
be a loan, but we are advised
that the Stadium is a grant.
So what is in it for the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China?

Outside of monetary gain,
and I’m sure long line fishing,
are the Chinese interested in
our relationship and proximi-
ty to the United States of
America or illegal immigra-
tion (ie importation of cheap
labour from China). The Chi-
nese are business people and
as said by Milton Friedman:
“There’s no such thing as a
free lunch.”

So, what have we commit-
ted to the People’s Republic
of China?

JEROME R PINDER
Nassau,
September 17, 2009.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 5



fovernment officials

CAST SN

TWAT (ces

Changes now made to boost
Grand Bahama’s competitiveness

FREEPORT- Government Ministers, Gaming Board officials
and management of the Isle of Capri casino and Hutchison Wham-
poa met with the casino’s employees on Monday night to address
concerns regarding the November 1 transition in casino ownership
to the Treasure Bay group.

Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace
and State Minister for Finance Zhivargo Laing were among officials
at the meeting, organised to answer questions and clarify points of
concern held by workers in the transition period from employment
with Isle of Capri to employment with Treasure Bay.

Minister Vanderpool-Wallace said: “We wanted to be sure
that those persons who, for whatever reason may wish to sever their
relationship with the company, (knew) that whatever severance is
due them — even though there is no change in ownership of the
company which is normally the conditions under which you would
provide that severance — that we are prepared to provide them
with that severance and to give them sufficient time to think about
it, and decide whether they wish to take that option.”

Such a provision is part of the government’s move to ensure the
continuing operation of the island’s sole casino, which employs over
200 Grand Bahamians. Employees who opt for severance would,
as is standard, be required to re-apply with the new company and
negotiate their respective terms of employment. One of the main
operational concerns expressed by employees was the relatively low
volume of guests coming to the casino — a matter the Tourism
Minister said is already being discussed in terms of the integration
of operations between the casino and owners of the Our Lucaya
Resort (Hutchison Whampoa), where the casino is located.

“T said to them (the employees) that I have never seen a casino
completely separated from a resort work, but fortunately even
Isle of Capri in its latter days with definitely a new casino operator
under consideration, were already having a conversation with the
resort owners so that they have access to rooms on different terms
and more favourable terms than I think has been in place before,
because without getting into the complications of it, that is a very
important part of the marketing capacity and capabilities of a
casino operation,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said.

“And so we see the management of Hutchison working much
more closely to ensure they demonstrate that they understand
that and put in place those packages and programmes that we
believe will make a difference.”

Government expects that difference to also be made through its
public/private sector tackling of what was considered one of the
more significant hindrances to Grand Bahama’s competitiveness in
the tourism market — the high cost of airlift to the island.

Minister Vanderpool- Wallace said that in addition to the cost of
the Miami-Grand Bahama route failing to positively compete
with other destinations like Cancun, Montego Bay or Las Vegas,
the cost of airlift also gave rise to domestic competition from the
destinations of Nassau and Paradise Island.

“So we sat with the private sector here and said this is something
that we have to fix and we have come to the point where the gov-
ernment, the private sector — specifically the (Grand Bahama) Air-
port Company, Freeport Flight Services, Hutchison (Whampoa)
have come and put a programme in place where the cost to fly to
Grand Bahama has been reduced sufficiently for Grand Bahama
to become much more competitive, not only against Nassau but
against all of the others,” he said. It is a programme airlines have
demonstrated their approval of by increasing and/or introducing air-
lift to Grand Bahama as of November 1. WestJet will commence
twice-weekly service to Freeport from Toronto, Canada; Delta Air-
lines will begin service four times weekly to Freeport beginning in
December; Spirit Airlines has re-confirmed its commitment to
Grand Bahama from Fort Lauderdale, and American Eagle has
increased its airlift from two flights to four flights per week.



PLP leadership candidate
seeks to woo supporters

Paul Moss pledges to make sweeping changes if elected PM

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

Candidate for the PLP lead-
ership Paul Moss wooed his
supporters last night with
pledges of sweeping changes if
and when he is elected prime
minister.

Holding his official campaign
launch event in the constituen-
cy of St Cecilia, he promised to
bring “unparalleled and
unprecedented” focus on edu-
cation and the judiciary, in an
effort to address the problems
facing these sectors.

Mr Moss asked the crowd at
Cynthia Pratt Park to support
him in bringing every arm of
government and every Bahami-
an into the 21st century through
the largest reform programme
“this region has ever seen.”

“We are going to unleash the
power of the Bahamian imagi-
nation by removing every
obstacle to success in this coun-
try. If you want to be successful,
you will have a partner in my
government.

“On the economy, I can tell
you, for Bahamians who have
not only longed but worked to
achieve their dreams and fell
short because of lack of
resources, those days are gone.
For those who saw opportunity
in helping to bring efficiency to

PAUL MOSS

government by providing pro-
fessional technology services,
and you have found that your
proposals have disappeared
without mention, your day has
come.

“We are going to undertake
a project to overhaul this coun-
try and put the Bahamas at the
cutting edge of technology,
both in delivery services to our
people and in how we deal with
the world,” he said.

Speaking on education, the
candidate said he will not have
anyone telling Bahamian moth-
ers and fathers it is okay for
their children to be earning Ds
and Es.

“We are, in my estimation, a

Crash victims named

THE one-year-old baby
girl and her 20-year-old aunt
who died in a horrific traffic
accident on Marathon Road
on Sunday have been iden-
tified as Randia Dean, and
Levonya Miller.

The pair were passengers
in a water truck that was
travelling along Marathon
Road when it collided with a
maroon coloured Cadillac
Seville that was heading
south, causing it to flip over.

Both passengers were
thrown from the vehicle and
sustained fatal injuries.

According to eyewitness-
es and the police, the Cadil-
lac was signaling to turn into

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.coh,edu.ds

EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (EOD)

FOR PREQUALIFICATION FOR

DESIGN, SUPPLY AND INSTALLATION OF

J IRE, FIXTURES

The College of The Bahamas (COB) is seeking Expressions of Interest from qualified ven-
dors/firms to provide services and products for the design, supply and installation of fur-

niture, fixtures anil equipment iFFAE}) for

(id the Harry Moore Library and Information Centre presently under construction at

the Qakes Field Campus of The College and

(ii) the new Northern Bahamas Campus of The College presently under construction

in Freeport, Grand Bahama

Interested parties may obtain further information and a copy of the Expressions of Interest

Prequalification Application form from:

The (fice of the Vice President Finance

College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 242-M2-45 13/45 16

Or

The Office of the Associate Vice Presicbent

College of The Bahamas

Northern Bahamas Campus

Freeport, Grand Bahama
Tel: 242-352-9761

An information meeting will be held in Nassau, on Tuesday, 29th September, 2009 and on
Wednesday, 30th September, 200 in Freeport at a time and venue to be announced.

BOs are to be submitted to the location(s) indicated in the BOW Prequalification Form in

a scaled envelope appropriatcly marked:

Vice President, Finance
College of The Bahamas

EXPRESSIONOF INTEREST - FEE -

insert name of applicable facility

Firms must submit a separate EOL for each facility, All BOs are to be submitted by 12200)

pm (mid-day) on Friday, %th October,



the mall at Marathon’s
entrance close to KFC when
the water truck attempted
to overtake it, clipping the
vehicle and causing the
truck to spin out of control
and ultimately overturn.

The number of traffic
fatalities for the year stands
at 37.

“We are going
to unleash the
power of the
Bahamian
imagination by
removing every
obstacle to

success in this
country. If you
want to be suc-
cessful, you will
have a partner in
my government.”



smart nation, but we will
become an educated nation too,
because education will be the
hallmark in our march into this
new millennium. We will
engender a sense of purpose
and direction that only the
greatest nations have shown.

“Every child — and I mean
every child, will know what it is
like to find something in him
or herself to contribute to mak-
ing this nation and the world a
better place,” he said.

Mr Moss also pledged a low
crime environment. “At last
count,” he said, “the murder
rate stands at an alarming 65. I
am appalled and I am con-
founded that successive gov-

T 4 rT

ernments of this nation have
allowed crime to fester to the
point where it is now an open
sore.

“Bahamians live in fear;
imprisoned in their homes,
while the government shrugs
its shoulders, even as Bahamian
families suffer the pain of loss
of loved ones murdered on our
streets, in their homes and in
broad daylight. That has to
stop,” he said.

Mr Moss also signalled his
willingness to enforce capital
punishment, warning criminals:
“If you take a life, yours will
be taken.”

He said he will “fix” the
administration of justice, and
eventually remove the Privy
Council as the final court of
appeal. Speaking on foreign
policy, Mr Moss said he is “not
interested in any trade agree-
ment until Bahamians domi-
nate the landscape of this coun-
try’s economy, building oppor-
tunities for other Bahamians
and moving across our borders
to establish a new bold Bahami-
an brand.”

Mr Moss also promised that
every Bahamian family will
own a piece of the country
through a new Crown Land
policy “that will provide every
Bahamian household financial
stability and security. That is
what government is for.”

J

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CREDIT SUISSE

Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch

is presently considering applications for a

Senior Globus System Developer

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

* Qualifications:

- Atleast Five (5) years experience in installation, configuration and
troubleshooting in a banking environment
Superior knowledge of GLOBUS/T24 Banking Application in both support
and development roles

- Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science or equivalent

- Knowledge of AIX 5,1 — 5.3, UNIVERSE/JBASE, PL/SQL

- Expenence in working with Globus/T24 related migration or implementation

projects.

- Personal Qualities:

- Excellent organizational, interpersonal and communication skills

- Good technical and problem solving skills and experience

- Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision

- Enthusiasm, a positive attitude and willingness to work flexible hours as

overtime

~ Previous experience of working in a production support role in maintaining
Globus/T24 system is a plus.

+ Other Duties:

- Answer Helpdesk requests (provide support & troubleshoot)
- Provide UNIVERSE & GLOBUS training to IT Staff

- Ensure comphance to IT guidelines / directives

get

- Ensure that
followed

d2Business Contingency Planning d3 requirements are

- Other duties & projects assigned by the Manager of Department

ny Benefits provided include:
- Competitive salary and performance bonus

- Pension Plan

- Health and Life Insurance
- Ongoing internal and external career development/training program



Applications should be submitted to:

Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE: OCTOBER 7, 27009

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Burger King reward | Study: adolescents not serious

about HIV/AIDS risk factors

FROM page one

Police believe the former
manager of the Harrold Road
restaurant, and current manag-
er of Burger King in Frederick
Street, was taken to the store by
his killer or killers who then
tried to force him to open the
safe. When he failed to open
the safe, Mr Morris was beaten
in the manager’s office. He was
dragged outside where he was
again beaten and stabbed sev-
eral times.

He was found lying in a pool
of blood with multiple stab
wounds at around 1.30am on
Sunday and pronounced dead
at the scene.

Mr Morris became the 61st
murder victim this year.

Just hours later Bahamasair
pilot Lionel Lewis McQueen,
29, was shot to death in his
Golden Palm Estates home,
raising the murder toll to 62,
according to police.

Mr McQueen’s cousin and
roommate Montez Saunders
was also shot several times
when Mr McQueen was killed
at their home near the Kennedy
Subdivision in New Providence
shortly after 4am on Sunday.
Mr Saunders is being treated
in the Intensive Care Unit at
Princess Margaret Hospital and
his condition is said to be
improving.

Police say the country’s mur-
der count could soar to 66 this
year if the deaths of four people
killed in a fire at their home on
Thursday morning are also clas-
sified as homicides.

That would be nearly dou-
ble the number of homicides at
this time last year.

The deaths of Theresa
Brown, 51; her daughter

Kayshala Bodie, 18; grand-
daughter Telair Johnson, one;
and neighbour Savanna Stuart,
18, who all died as a result of
smoke inhalation, are currently
classified as “suspicious.”

But as investigations contin-
ue police might be able to con-
firm that the fire at their home
in Wilson Tract was started by
an arsonist. Superintendent
Leon Bethel in charge of the
homicide department of the
Criminal Detective Unit said
there had been 57 murders at
this time last year, and it is clear
the murder toll is rising.

He told The Tribune: “It’s an
increase from last year, that’s
obvious and we are confident
about that.

“We are also confident about
detection and we are asking
members of the public to assist.
We need our detection rate to
improve, and if the members
of the public cooperate with us
— the police who they have
entrusted with the investigation
of these matters — we would
have a better rate.

“If we have a better rate of
solution the occurrence of a lot
of these matters will diminish.

“We have lots of assistance
from members of the public
and we do appreciate that, but
we do believe that with more
assistance from the public, we
will see a better rate of solu-
tion and we would see a reduc-
tion in the number of murders.”

Activist Paul Joseph, 55, of
Grand Bahama, said he wants
Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest to step up
and introduce capital punish-
ment to help stem the number

of murders as the toll spirals
out of control.

He said: “Don’t pacify the
public by making this
announcement, and not go
ahead with it.

“This place looks like Iraq,
not the Bahamas, because any-
body can be killing any time in
this country and that’s the sad
reality right now.

“Whoever is in government
has to protect the citizens of
their country and right now
there seems to be no protec-
tion. We are past the scare
point now, this murder is a
national nightmare.”

Nassau resident Terrance
Gilbert, 41, blames the rising
murder rate on a breakdown
of families and relationships.
He called for the church to get
more involved with communi-
ties and encourage people to
not act in anger, but to forgive.

“We are having a family
meltdown in this country, and
it’s a national crisis,” he said.

“We are resorting to murder
because we are under so much
pressure, and the church needs
to pull together to work with
people in the community.”

Police are appealing to the
public for information relating
to the murders of Rashad Mor-
ris, Lionel Lewis McQueen and
the four suspicious deaths by
fire.

Anyone with any informa-
tion should call 911 or 919
urgently, or call Crime Stop-
pers anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477). Calls to Crime Stoppers
are answered in the United
States and ensure total
anonymity.

BY MATT MAURA

A RECENT study of ado-
lescent understanding of and
attitude towards HIV/AIDS
indicated that while some
youngsters are knowledgeable
about the deadly virus, many
are not taking the risk factors
associated with the disease seri-
ously enough, Health Minister
Dr Hubert Minnis said.

Dr Minnis said as a result of
the study’s findings, health pol-
icy-makers, planners and pro-
fessionals must redouble their
efforts to ensure that young
people take HIV/AIDS as seri-
ously as they should.

The study was conducted on
public and private school stu-
dents between the ages of 15
and 17 in New Providence and
the Family Islands. Its aim was
to provide data to support the
planning and implementation
of preventative strategies and
healthcare programmes relat-
ing to HIV/AIDS.

TTR
ITT CRT

THE Rotary Club of
New Providence will hold a
steak/chicken-out at the
Scouts Headquarters on
Dolphin Drive on Satur-
day, September 26. The
price is $10.

















Dr Minnis said while groups
such as the AIDS Foundation
of the Bahamas and the Min-
istry of Health — through its
National AIDS Programme —
continue to promote aggressive
and intensive campaigns against
the spread of HIV/AIDS, ado-
lescents remain among the
fastest growing population of
HIV-infected persons in the
country.

The Health Minister com-
mended the AIDS Foundation
for establishing a temporary
care facility for HIV positive
adolescents. He said the facility
will assist in “stabilising their
health” and is another example
of how the organisation “is
responsive to the needs of the
HIV/AIDS sector of our popu-
lation.”

“In our country, they (ado-
lescents) are extremely vulner-
able,” Dr Minnis said.

“Therefore it is incumbent
upon us to promote a stern mes-
sage detailing preventative mea-

sures about HIV/AIDS to this
group.”

Addressing the opening ses-
sion of an AIDS Foundation of
the Bahamas Workshop, Dr
Minnis said the HIV/AIDS pan-
demic continues to threaten the
economic, national and social
development of countries
around the globe. He said the
Caribbean, including the
Bahamas, has been the “sec-
ond-worst” affected region
globally. “The Ministry of
Health has increased access to
anti-retroviral drugs, particu-
larly for HIV positive pregnant
women. This programme has
led to a dramatic reduction in
the mother-to-child transmis-
sion rate,” Dr Minnis added.

The minister said health offi-
cials must ensure that young
people have “adequate access
to knowledge and treatment”
in order to minimise those
health risks and reduce vulner-
ability to possible HIV infec-
tion.

Teachers stage sit-in protests

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WOHLEN LIMITED

——

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of WOHLEN LIMITED has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WAIRAU INC.

—

é

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of WAIRAU INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGES
AND CULTURES
INSTITUTE

ILC]

COURSE OFFERING: B

CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE 1 & I
CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I-V

CONVERSATIONAL MANDARIN I, IT & III

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE I
CONVERSATIONAL GERMAN I

TELEPHONE: 302-4387 or 4363 or 4384



Legal Notice

NOTICE
PROSPECT MADISON LIMITED

a os

é

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PROSPECT MADISON LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued

and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HENBIT VALLFEY INC.

—f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of HENBIT VALLFEY INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

tember 28th, 2009
PRICE: § 250.00 per course

LOCATION: Munnings Bldg
-next to KFC across from COB

DURATION: 10 Weeks

E-MAIL: ilci@cob.edu.bs

Felipé Major/Tribune staff




Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Ua eas
FROM page one

alleged understaffing, and continued the “sit-in” yesterday. They
want the school to hire an English teacher and a science teacher to
help cope with the work load.

Anatol Rodgers teachers also took action over understaffing,
starting on Monday and continuing yesterday. While some teach-
ers returned to the campus in Faith Avenue yesterday, 18 remained
on their “sit-in”, refusing to work until two language arts teachers
are hired.

Teachers at Uriah McPhee started their “sit-in” on Friday and
continued to take action on Monday over a lack of air-condition-
ing on the third floor of the school building. A senior officer at the
Ministry of Education said the air-conditioning unit was repaired
over the weekend, and the teachers returned to work yesterday.

The Education officer who did not want to be named said she is
concerned about the effect the “sit-out” will have on the children
who have made a fresh commitment to their education this term.

She encouraged parents to speak up and call for teachers to
return to work and resume their duties for the benefit of their chil-
dren’s education.

However, according to Bahamas Union of Teachers (BUT)
president Belinda Wilson, the teachers will not return to work
until their demands are met.

And PLP chairwoman Glenys Hanna Martin released a state-
ment yesterday criticising Minister of Education Carl Bethel for
failing to bring public schools up to scratch.

She said: “We have seen systemic failure on his behalf in a
number of areas, including a failure to complete school repairs and
adequately equip and furnish classrooms in a timely fashion.

“Today we note that well into the academic year that policies
implemented by this government relative to the non-renewal of
contracts of teachers, and the concomitant failure to recruit replace-
ment teachers, has left schools understaffed in critical areas of
the curriculum and led to overcrowding of classrooms in several
schools and gaps in school security.

“Our children are being short-changed.

“In light of the minister’s weak response to the many chal-
lenges and demands which now face our educational system he is
now being invited to seriously consider whether he should continue
at the helm of this important engine of our national develop-
ment.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VANESE INC.

—f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of VANESE INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
AC

hm lowin’ it

HIGH
LOW

SOF
80F

SOME SUN WITH

2 TF STORM, BREEZY

Volume: 105 No.251

6)
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How we tried to =:

Art of

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=-USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009

eo

ae





Save Jett Iravolta

Jurors hear of
efforts to revive
film star’s son



By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

JURORS in the trial of for-
mer PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater and former ambu-
lance driver Tarino Light-
bourne heard several accounts
yesterday of the efforts made
to revive an unresponsive Jett
Travolta as prosecutors opened
their case in the Supreme
Court.

Jett Travolta, 16, the son of
Hollywood actors John Travol-
ta and Kelly Preston died in
Freeport, Grand Bahama on
January 2. Opening the case for
the prosecution yesterday
Director of Public Prosecutions
Bernard Turner said that fol-
lowing Jett’s death, contact was
made with certain persons to
communicate a threat to Mr
Travolta regarding the release
of potentially damaging state-
ments if money were not paid.

——_
JETT TRAVOLTA



Former PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater and former para-
medic Tarino Lightbourne are
accused of attempting to extort
$25 million from the Hollywood
actor.

Mr Travolta flies in this
morning to be the first witness
when the case resumes today.
He will be accompanied by his
wife.

SEE page eight

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i
A

Tim Clarke/
Tribune —-
staff

AN inmate at Her Majesty's Prison accused of
the murder of a fellow inmate was arraigned in

Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Preston Moss, 36, is charged with the murder
of Lloyd Albury. Albury died on September 10,
two days after he was admitted to hospital fol-



Ae
|

PRESTON MOSS, 36, was charged yesterday with the murder of Lloyd Albury.




\V

was reportedly imprisoned on a vagrancy charge.
Moss, was arraigned on the murder charge

yesterday before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez

lowing a fight in a cell at the prison. Albury, 55,

Climate change seen as threat to Bahamas,

EFFECTS from the threat of
climate change could prove
damaging to the Bahamas'
economy, according to Tourism
and Aviation Minister Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace.

A recent study by the World
Bank placed the Bahamas
among the top three of the
most vulnerable Caribbean
countries when it comes to cli-
mate change, emphasizing the
need for a pro-active stance to
curb more damaging effects.

“We know that we cannot
run away from the issues of sea
level rise, salt water intrusions,
beach and shore erosion, and
the many other impacts of cli-

mate change that confront us.

‘Your presence here is a demon-
stration of your commitment to
act before it’s too late,” said Mr
Vanderpool-Wallace during
day one of the Caribsave Coun-
try Partners Symposium.

The World Bank report also
revealed that a five-metre
change in sea level rise could
result in damage to the econo-
my that amounts to 3.5 per cent
of Gross Domestic Product
(GDP) for Surinam.

“In the case of the Bahamas,
it estimates that the same level

SEE page eight

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Teachers

Stage ‘sit-in’
protests

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AROUND 200 teach-
ers at three public schools
in New Providence staged

“sit-in’s” yesterday to
protest inadequate
staffing and poor work-
ing conditions.

The industrial action at
Uriah McPhee, Anatol
Rodgers and CI Gibson,
which began Friday has
postponed education for
thousands of students
across New Providence.

At CI Gibson the
action compounded secu-
rity issues at the school
as 11 knives and an ice-
pick were found on the
school property yester-
day, according to reports.

Teachers began taking
action on Monday over

SEE page six

Burger King offers
reward to help
capture killer

By MEGAN REYNOLDS

Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



BURGER King have offered
a $10,000 reward for any infor-
mation that will lead to the
arrest or conviction of those
responsible for the murder of
restaurant manager Rashad
Morris.

Mr Morris, 21, of John
Street, off Baillou Hill Road,
was brutally beaten and
stabbed at the Burger King
restaurant on Harrold Road,
western New Providence,
where he was found dead early
Sunday morning.

SEE page six

Country records
63rd homicide

FOLLOWING two bru-
tal murders Sunday, the
country last night recorded
its 63rd homicide.

Details were still sketchy
at press time, but police
said a young man who had
travelled to the Seagrapes
shopping centre on Prince
Charles Drive by car at
Spm got into an altercation
with another man at the
plaza.

The dispute got out of
hand and the victim was
stabbed several times dur-
ing the skirmish. He was
rushed to hospital by
ambulance, but police said
he was unresponsive by
this time. He died a short
time later, at about 7pm.
The matter is being investi-
gated.

ce
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009



THE TRIBUNE

Campaign highlighting opposition to
sea turtles ban ‘gaining momentum’

Petition has
‘two or three
thousand’
signatures

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A Bahamas-wide campaign
aiming to highlight opposition
to the outright ban on har-
vesting sea turtles has “gained
plenty of momentum”,
according to one of its organ-
isers.

Abner Pinder, fisherman
and chief councillor for Span-
ish Wells, claims “two or
three thousand” signatures
have already been added to
a petition against the ban
launched earlier this month
and more are expected when
all of the Family Islands send
in the signatures attached to
petitions circulated there.

Mr Pinder, along with
numerous other fishermen
and opponents of the ban -
which extends to the taking
or catching of any marine tur-
tles, turtle parts or eggs, for
commercial use or otherwise —
hopes to persuade the gov-
ernment to reverse its posi-
tion and continue to allow
Bahamians to harvest turtles
for personal consumption.

Gathered together on Sep-
tember 3, two days after the
ban was officially enacted in
the name of conservation,

Wr
RU

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
acral) |



A STOCK PHOTO of a sea turtle.

“Turtles are increasing in the
Bahamas on a daily basis but nobody —
(The Department of) Fisheries or any-
body — will go out there to try to do any
type of survey (of the numbers),
because they know that if they did it
would defeat what they are saying.”



they charged that, contrary to
the government and environ-
mentalist’s views that the tur-
tles are in danger of being
wiped out, the creatures are
“plentiful” in Bahamian
waters.

Activists

Their efforts, however,
have already raised the ire of
local environmental activists.

Having hailed the ban as
“wonderful” in August after
pushing for years for the gov-
ernment to enact it, Kim
Aranha, founder of the
Bahamas Sea Turtle Conser-
vation Group, charged that
those against the ban are

Abner Pinder

“speaking from ignorance”.

She noted that the
BSTCG’s own petition
against the slaughter of sea
turtles in the Bahamas gar-
nered around 5,000 signa-
tures.

Meanwhile, Mr Pinder said:
“Turtles are increasing in the
Bahamas on a daily basis but
nobody — (The Department
of) Fisheries or anybody — will
go out there to try to do any
type of survey (of the num-
bers), because they know that
if they did it would defeat
what they are saying.”

The petition against the ban
states: “I do not agree that
the government should ban
all harvesting or eating of tur-

UTILITIES REGULATION AND COMPETITION AUTHORITY

invites all Persons who would have been licensed by
the PUC or licensed under the Broadcasting Act
(Telecommunications, Internet, TV, Broadcasting) to attend its

CICENSING GUIDELINES

WORKSHOPS

Nassau

10 a.m. - 12 noon Thursday, September 24, 2009
British Colonial Hilton

Grand Bahama

2-4 p.m. Tuesday, September 29, 2009

Marsh Harbour, Abaco
2-4 p.m. Tuesday, October 6, 2009

Spanish Wells, Eleuthera
10-12 a.m. Thursday, October 8, 2009

Governor's Harbour, Eleuthera
3-5 p.m. Thursday, October 8, 2009

George Town, Exuma
Thursday, 2-4 p.m. October 15, 2009

Come find out all you need to know about
URCA’s requirements for transitioning to
the new licensing regime

eres for Family itand workshops to be announced shortly.

PROMOTING COMPETITION, SAFEGUARDING CONSUMERS

Fourth Terrace, Collins Avenue | P.O, Box N-4860 Nassau, Bahamas

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tle meat by Bahamians, rather
I believe that control or ban-
ning of commercial harvest-
ing and the slaughter of tur-
tles in public are enough to
address the needs of both

environmentalism and
humanity.”
Commercial

Mr Pinder stressed that
most opponents of the ban
are primarily concerned with
ensuring turtles can still be
captured for personal con-
sumption, and are happy to
allow the part of the ban
which relates to commercial
harvesting to remain.

The affect on the overall
turtle population of allowing
individuals to catch them to
eat would be “infinitesimal,”
he suggested.

He claims that although the
ban has been enacted as an
amendment to the Fisheries
Regulations, it is critical that
the opponents make their
voices heard before the next
parliamentary session begins
on September 30 as this is
expected to provide an oppor-
tunity for the ban to be fur-
ther cemented in law.

DISCOVER



Mangrove Cay Glinic gets facelift;
eT Rog aT AE TS TL

BY MATT MAURA



Dorsette’s, Mangrove
Cay - The relaunching of
primary healthcare services
at the Mangrove Cay Com-
munity Clinic will allow for
the “adequate and timely
delivery of high-quality
healthcare” to the residents
of Mangrove Cay, Health
Minister Dr. Hubert Min- — >
nis said. HEALTH MINISTER Dr Hubert Minnis

The relaunching took (centre) prepares to tour the newly
place on Friday, September renovated Mangrove Cay Communi-
18, and is part of the contin- ty Clinic following the relaunching of
uing reconstruction/renova- primary healthcare services in Dorset-
tions of primary healthcare te’s, Friday, September 17. Pictured
facilities throughout the with Dr. Minnis from left: Gina Ben-
Family Islands. Relaunching nett-Rolle, Nursing Officer 1/Clinic
ceremonies have already Supervisor and Patrice Bowleg, Nurs-
taken place in Kemp’s Bay, ing Officer Il. Picewell Forbes, Mem-
South Andros; Nicholls ber of Parliament for South Andros is
Town, North Andros, and pictured in the background.

Grand Cay, North Abaco.

More are scheduled for other parts of the Bahamas. Con-
structed 24 years ago with funding from the National Insurance
Board, the Community Clinic was renovated at a cost of
$500,000. Dr. Minnis said the relaunching of services will allow
healthcare professionals on Mangrove Cay to address those
aspects of primary healthcare that focus on health promotion,
disease prevention and self-empowerment, particularly in the
fight against chronic, non-communicable diseases (CNCDS)
and other public health threats.

“The residents of Mangrove Cay, like those elsewhere in the
Bahamas, are primarily affected by the increasing rates of obe-
sity, hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, cancer, asthma and
other types of chronic, non-communicable diseases, as well as
those related to alcohol consumption,” Dr. Minnis said.

“Now that the clinic building has been renovated, operations
will improve due to the fact that the District Medical Officer will
be able to remain overnight in the facility and the fact that the
clinic will be connected to the Central Patient Record Infor-
mation System which will allow physicians in New Providence
to review the medical records of patients in Mangrove Cay.”

Dr. Minnis said the upgrades to primary healthcare facilities
throughout the Bahamas is part of the Ministry of Health’s
overall objective of ensuring that healthcare facilities through-
out the country are provided with the necessary emergency
medical equipment, and that training opportunities are pro-
vided to ensure that the current knowledge and skills of persons
providing healthcare services, are maintained.

He said as a result, the buildings formerly used to house the
clinic and nurses’ residence in Mangrove Cay, in addition to the
former nurses’ residence in Kemp’s Bay, will be renovated and
used to facilitate the training of medical and nursing students and
physicians from the University of the West Indies’ Bahamas
campus who are pursing post-graduate studies in Family Med-
icine. The Health Minister said officials from the Public Hos-
pitals Authority are also scheduled to provide First Responders
training for residents of Mangrove Cay and Kemp’s Bay, which
should also auger well for the provision of timely services to the
community. “All that remains is for the residents of Mangrove
Cay to work with their healthcare providers to reduce the num-
ber of persons developing chronic, non-communicable diseases
as well as injuries resulting from negative and unhealthy lifestyle
choices and violence,” Dr. Minnis added.



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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS



O court short

Man charged
with Freeport's
eighth murder
of the year

VIRGILL, wearing a black and
white striped shirt, is escorted
by police officers to the court-
house on Monday to be charged
with murder.

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A man was
charged with murder in the
Freeport Magistrate’s Court
on Monday.

Godfrey Virgill, alias
“Dollar Murder”, was
arraigned before Magistrate
Debbye Ferguson in Court
One in the murder of 20-
year-old Ashley Smith —
the island’s eighth homicide
victim for the year.

It is alleged that on Sep-
tember 12, Virgill intention-
ally caused the death of Mr
Smith by means of unlawful
harm. He was not required
to enter a plea to the charge.

Lawyer K Brian Hanna
represented Virgill.

Magistrate Ferguson
adjourned the case to Janu-
ary 26, 2010 in Magistrate’s
Court 3 for a preliminary
inquiry.



OPPOSITION SENATOR JEROME FITZGERALD TO PRESENT HIS OWN DRAFT LEGISLATION

Pressure mounts on Government
for Freedom of Information Act

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

HOPING to pressure gov-
ernment into enacting the
promised Freedom of Informa-
tion Act, an opposition sena-
tor said he will present his own
draft legislation in the Senate.

Jerome Fitzgerald believes
government should make pass-
ing the law — which would give
the general public a legal right
and avenue to obtain informa-
tion held by public authorities
unless there is a good reason
for confidentiality — more of a
priority. While the attorney
claims he “does not expect” the
government will debate the leg-
islation that he tables, Mr
Fitzgerald hopes that his efforts
will at least bring the issue to
the forefront, causing the gov-
ernment to make their own
moves to create a “sunshine”
law, as promised in the FNM’s
election manifesto in 2007.

Most democracies have
enacted, or moved towards cre-
ating a Freedom of Informa-
tion Act. The United States
passed an FOIA in 1966, with
the UK following in 2000.

Apart from outlining the
right of the public to access cer-
tain information, the law would
also create penalties for public
authorities who withhold docu-
ments. Advocates of the law in
the Bahamas say it would help
reduce scandals and cases of
corruption that often only come

Arawak Gay port protest ‘proving successful’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

OPPONENTS of the
Arawak Cay port move claim
to have been “successful” in
their endeavour of gathering
thousands of signatures against
the government’s plan.

The drive to collect the
names of those who think that
Arawak Cay is an unwise
choice for the relocation of the
container shipping facilities was
launched in mid-August.

Yesterday, PLP Senator
Jerome Fitzgerald said he is
happy with the results so far.

He is now drafting a letter
that he will present with the
petition to Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham “within the
next week.”

Declining to state how many
signatures were collected dur-



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to light years after they occur, if
at all.

Meaningful

Most recently, Callenders
and Co attorney Fred Smith
and others suggested that a
“meaningful” FOIA could have
helped avoid the circumstances
that led to the crown land con-
troversy involving former direc-
tor of Lands and Surveys Tex
Turnquest. For its part, the gov-
ernment has said it remains
committed to passing an FOIA
within its current five year term.

During the June 2009 bud-
get debate, Minister of State
Charles Maynard noted that
two consultants were contract-
ed this year to help “prepare
the entire public service for the
open access to their records.”

Having in recent times been
active in voicing and galvanising

ing the drive, Senator Fitzger-
ald told The Tribune this would
be revealed on the day it is for-
warded to the prime minister.

This development comes
days after PLP leader Perry
Christie warned potential
investors in the Arawak Cay
port project to “beware” —
stating that if his party wins the
2012 election it would scrap the
current plan and move the port
elsewhere.

Independent

Speaking on the Love97 talk
show ‘Jones and Co’ on Sun-
day, Mr Christie reiterated how
the former government
believed south-western New
Providence would be the best
site for a new port based on
independent studies.

In August, Mr Fitzgerald said
he hoped to get around 10,000
signatures in the petition
against the Arawak Cay port
move.

An online version of the peti-
tion yesterday registered 503
signatures.

However, Mr Fitzgerald said
the drive also involved door-
to-door advocacy by a team of
people dedicated to opposing
the Arawak Cay plan.

The senator, who recently
announced his intention to run

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE

opposition to the government’s
intended relocation of the port
to Arawak Cay, Mr Fitzgerald
said his work in this regard has
bolstered his belief that the
public must have new avenues
through which to obtain infor-
mation which they can use to
hold the government account-
able for its decisions and
actions.

“A lot of the information I’ve
been seeking throughout this
exercise has not been forth-
coming,” said the Senator, who
claims that government has so
far been “secretive” about the
port move and failed to justify it
in the face of prior studies that
rated Arawak Cay poorly as a
potential site.

“The need for a Freedom of
Information Act is something
I’m going to start to press very
strongly. I will lay a draft in the
senate, putting it forward for
us to begin to debate.

The Government can decide
whether they’re going to debate
it or not. Mr Fitzgerald, who
recently revealed his intention
to run for the post of Deputy
Leader of the PLP at the par-
ty’s forthcoming convention,
said the issue of access to infor-
mation “goes across party
lines”, with both the FNM and
the PLP at times failing to be as
open as they should.

“Moving forward I think the
public is going to demand that
we have this (an FOIA) so they
can know what the hell is going
on,” he added.

MORLEY

For * i
MEN a,

for the deputy leadership of the
PLP, has denied that his
activism on the issue, which he
began last year, has anything
to do with his political ambi-
tions.

“People will want to link the
two, but that’s not what this is
about,” he said.



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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Removal of the casuarinas

WE HAVE received a letter from a read-
er asking for our opinion on the removal of
the casuarina trees at Saunders Beach. The
writer wants to know if we believe those
who say that these trees destroy our beach-
es, prevent the growth of native vegetation,
resulting in the decline of sand dunes and the
exposure of the coastline to erosion. It
would seem, said the writer, that because
these trees are not indigenous to the
Bahamas they must be eliminated at all cost.

We don’t know what to believe. We agree
that as Neil Sealey pointed out in his article,
“The Casuarina Controversy”, that hurri-
canes Floyd and Frances, during the height
of their swirling fury, blew massive amounts
of sand from Saunders Beach onto the main
road. This is to be expected because the
casuarina grows no foliage at the base of its
trunk, and so between each tree there is a
tremendous gap that is an open highway for
anything being blown from the ocean to pile
up on the main road. However, if low shrubs
were planted beneath the trees to close the
gaps, there would be no opening for the
sand to get through and it would accumulate
on the beach in dune formation.

Do we believe that nothing will grow
beneath the casuarina tree? The scientists
say no, the casuarina is an invasive tree that
poisons everything beneath it. But as Tina
Barry of Harbour Island pointed out in her
group’s campaign to save the Saunders
Beach casuarinas, vegetation will grow under
some casuarina trees — in other words this
group to save the tree does not believe that
all casuarinas are poisonous to native vege-
tation. According to Ms Barry there are 17
varieties of the tree, not all destructive. She
maintains that the non destructive trees are
the ones that have thrived at Saunders for
more than 80 years, and should be left in
peace.

We are not a scientist and so we do not
pretend to know what the scientific truth is.
All we know is that inland vegetation almost
smothers the tall casuarina tree. Our eyes do
not see what the scientists tell us we should
see — except on the seafront and the expla-
nation could be that no one has tried to
plant anything beneath the tree to close the
open spaces.

The National Trust has always supported
the removal of the casuarina from island
coastlines. “Extensive research supports that
removal of casuarinas from coastal areas
and replanting of the dune ridge with native
vegetation will restore the dune and pro-
vide an effective barrier against wave
action,” said the Trust.

However, this is what our reader had to
say on the matter:

“Dear Editor,

“Please tell me honestly: Do you believe
all that these scientists are telling us about
the Saunders Beach casuarina trees?

“Well, I shan’t beat about the bush —
my eyes don’t lie and they do not see what
the scientists are telling us.

“T almost had mental collapse when I
recently drove past a barren, wind swept
Saunders Beach with half the casuarinas
removed and numbers on the remaining
ones to indicate that they are now ready for
the woodsman’s axe. All I know is that those
responsible for their removal had better pray
and pray hard that there is no hurricane this
year or, not only will the sand cover the
road, but it will play host to a great deal of
the Atlantic Ocean. There is absolutely no
protection from ocean storms.

“T read in The Tribune that the planting of
native shrubs at Orange Hill was the pat-
tern to be followed in the future for our
seashore. It is true that the shrubs are knit-
ted tightly together, but they completely
block all view of the ocean and present a
picture of monotonous drabness. However,
I must admit, in the midst of it all I got a
good laugh from one defiant little casuarina.
As if to mock our brilliant scientists and
give the lie to their claims, this little treasure
had thrust itself skyward right up through the
tightly knit native shrubs! I wanted to get
out, stretch my arms and shout “bravo!” to
the little blighter. Isn’t nature wonderful!

“Inland casuarinas were growing with
the native plants, one even had a thick vine
creeping up its tall trunk.

“And they talk about erosion of beaches.
We had magnificent beaches framed by
casuarina trees when I was a child. The first
time that I saw beach erosion was when they
started building large hotels — in the west
and on Paradise Island in the east which has
damaged Montagu Beach.

“They justify their elimination of the
casuarina because it is not native to the
Bahamas. I recommend a read of Bill
Bryson’s book ‘A walk in the Woods’ — on
the Appalachian Trail. He tells of how
seedlings from the 800 plants discovered
during the colonial era in the Appalachian
woods were collected by amateur botanists
and ‘shipped across the ocean to England
and France and Russia, and received with
greedy keenness and trembling fingers.’

“These were plants never before seen in
Europe. Suppose they were all to be
destroyed because they were not indigenous
to Europe, what a dull, dismal place this
world would be. Anyway, let the scientists
prattle, I prefer to believe my own eyes —
and what I see, ain’t what they see!”























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The Bahamas
needs a critical
moral facelift

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Friday, August 21, 2009,
turned out to be a horrific day
for the family of Wendy
Bullard, a young lady working
in the employ of 21st Century
Welding when, while working
to earn an honest dollar for her-
self and her family, she was
ruthlessly gunned down by
thugs who, for whatever rea-
son, saw no purpose or value
to her life and merely regarded
her as an obstruction to their
abominable exploits.

Tragically, like many before
her, she is now a Statistic anda
testament to how we as a peo-
ple and country have failed to
protect our citizens and prevent
our country from becoming a
habitat for freedom of lawless-
ness and severe limitations on
justice. This case, like others
before it, will provoke our
thoughts for a little while and
many of us will seek to blame
some individual or organisation
for the degradation that we
have gotten ourselves and our
society into.

We can blame the Minister
of National Security because in
my opinion his performance in
this capacity has been dismal. It
is also my opinion that he has
demonstrated no real vision for
addressing the crime situation
and his failure to produce real
results is glaring to those of us
who can see beyond the poli-
tics.

We can blame the court sys-
tem where individuals charged
with committing murders or
other heinous crimes are con-
tinuously and almost routinely
released on bail. Sadly, many
of these suspects are back on
the streets committing more
crimes, taking new victims and
creating more work for an
already overloaded law
enforcement system. We are,
in essence, getting the raw
results of justice delayed. The
criminal elements are not facing
any harsh consequences for
felonious actions and, there-
fore, see this as impulse to con-
tinue down the wrong road
causing havoc and giving life to
the old adage — Justice delayed
is justice denied.

We can blame the police
because in recent times officers
have been so busy arresting one
another they have hardly had
time to focus on society’s crim-
inal elements. Officers are
being charged with all sorts of
malicious and injurious activi-
ties — domestic abuse, child

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



abuse, sexual molestation, rob-
beries, burglaries, rape, etc —
bringing the Royal Bahamas
Police Force to disrepute and
further destroying the public
trust in this organisation.

We can blame drugs, alco-
hol, gangs, lack of home disci-
pline, the schools, the churches,
the prison, the affected estab-
lishments, the unfortunate vic-
tims and whatever substance,
entity or individual we are con-
vinced has played some role in
guiding our descent to criminal
decadence. While we may not
want to accept it, the reality of
the matter is that we also need
to blame ourselves.

A lot of us in Bahamaland
know our relatives and friends
who are involved in criminal
activities. When we tell our kids
to fight it out if someone chal-
lenges them we are grooming
them. When we give them the
impression that they can have
anything they want without
working for it we are setting
them up. When we tell them
what insults to direct at the
teachers and other adults who
reprimand them we are
strengthening them. When we
brag about their bad behav-
ioural antics and fail to admin-
ister discipline we are promot-
ing them. When they show up
with items we know are stolen
and we accept them we are
licensing them. When we drive
them to the house in the “jook-
jook” corner to purchase or sell
iulicit substances we are encour-
aging them. When we see them
with the unlicensed firearms or
other illegal weapons and do
not report them to the police
we have contributed to every
murder that is committed in this
country after the fact.

The other brutal reality is
that nothing and no one will
ever thoroughly eradicate crime
in this country, unless Jehovah
God himself comes down, but
there are solutions to our prob-
lems. The Hon Tommy Turn-
quest needs to be transferred
as Minister of National Securi-
ty as soon as possible. No Gov-
ernment should want to be
accused of playing politics with
such a critical issue as crime
management and, unfortunate-
ly, this appears to be the case
with the present administration.

The only reason Mr Turnquest
does not appear to be playing is
because he has already dropped
the ball.

For offenders who allegedly
commit murder and other hor-
rendous criminal acts the
wheels of justice should move
swiftly. Law enforcement offi-
cers, prosecutors, Supreme
Court judges, the Attorney
General’s Office and persons
responsible for dealing with
such matters should move to
expedite them to ensure that
justice is administered quickly
and appropriately so that vic-
tims’ families do not feel vio-
lated over and over again.

There is no justified reason
as to why families of murder
victims, casualties of armed
robberies and rape, and chil-
dren who have suffered sexual
molestation and exploitation
should have to wait five and six
years for their concerns to be
thoroughly addressed by the
courts. It is time to quit making
excuses, prioritise and get the
job done.

Persons suspected of com-
mitting murder should not be
given bail. Perpetrators con-
victed of murder should be exe-
cuted expeditiously and there
should be no question of
whether they die. Death by exe-
cution as a consequence for
murder should be automatic.

Friday, August 21, 2009, was
a terrible and tragic day for one
more family but, sadly, many
more of days of the week will
be like that until we as a people
and a country shift our attitude
towards felons, strengthen our
resolve against criminal activi-
ties, and renew our commit-
ment to fight the destructive
elements wherever they are and
whoever they may be — includ-
ing family members, friends,
relatives or acquaintances.

We need a critical moral
facelift. We need to change our
mindset about where we want
our country to be and where
we want our future to take us.
We need to reaffirm our val-
ues and determine what is real-
ly important to us. The change
for us has to begin within us.
Until then, we as a people will
continue to reap what we’ve
sown. It is unfortunate that,
because of this, the innocent
will continue to suffer for and
along with the guilty.

MARVIN R Z GIBSON
Nassau,
August, 2009.

So how does China benefit from
its relationship with Bahamas?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There has been much fan-
fare of late regarding the lev-
el of assistance that the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China is pre-
pared to offer to the
Bahamas.

From the sports stadium, to
the road project, to Baha Mar
and finally in today’s Tribune
large scale farming in Abaco.

We recently witnessed the
historic visit of His Excellen-
cy Wu Bangguo, Chairman of
the Standing Committee of
the National People’s Con-
gress of the People’s Republic
of China. During this visit
three agreements were signed

that covered

i) in addition to other
issues, the protection of
investments by Bahamian and
Chinese investors that are
made in each other’s coun-
tries;

ii) an agreement that covers
a loan from the Chinese Exim
Bank for the Airport High-
way project and

iti) an agreement that cov-
ers the construction of the
national sports stadium, which
is a grant from the People’s
Republic of China.

There were also two agree-
ments signed with Baha Mar,
regarding the Cable Beach
project.

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The above is all well and
good....perhaps!? No doubt
there is much benefit to be
achieved by some Bahamians,
with regard to these develop-
ments. But all the media cov-
erage and Government press
releases highlight the benefits
for the Bahamas.

I always stand to be cor-
rected, as I am only human
and will make mistakes, but
so far I can’t seem to find any
coverage on the benefits to
the People’s Republic of Chi-
na for such generosity
bestowed on the Bahamas
and the Bahamian people.
Certainly China benefits from
exporting goods to the
Bahamas, but this does not
seem to justify what we have
learnt over the past couple of
weeks and months. Our
imports from China are only
“peanuts” to that of our
neighbour to the west.

The Highway Project may
be a loan, but we are advised
that the Stadium is a grant.
So what is in it for the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China?

Outside of monetary gain,
and I’m sure long line fishing,
are the Chinese interested in
our relationship and proximi-
ty to the United States of
America or illegal immigra-
tion (ie importation of cheap
labour from China). The Chi-
nese are business people and
as said by Milton Friedman:
“There’s no such thing as a
free lunch.”

So, what have we commit-
ted to the People’s Republic
of China?

JEROME R PINDER
Nassau,
September 17, 2009.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 5



fovernment officials

CAST SN

TWAT (ces

Changes now made to boost
Grand Bahama’s competitiveness

FREEPORT- Government Ministers, Gaming Board officials
and management of the Isle of Capri casino and Hutchison Wham-
poa met with the casino’s employees on Monday night to address
concerns regarding the November 1 transition in casino ownership
to the Treasure Bay group.

Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace
and State Minister for Finance Zhivargo Laing were among officials
at the meeting, organised to answer questions and clarify points of
concern held by workers in the transition period from employment
with Isle of Capri to employment with Treasure Bay.

Minister Vanderpool-Wallace said: “We wanted to be sure
that those persons who, for whatever reason may wish to sever their
relationship with the company, (knew) that whatever severance is
due them — even though there is no change in ownership of the
company which is normally the conditions under which you would
provide that severance — that we are prepared to provide them
with that severance and to give them sufficient time to think about
it, and decide whether they wish to take that option.”

Such a provision is part of the government’s move to ensure the
continuing operation of the island’s sole casino, which employs over
200 Grand Bahamians. Employees who opt for severance would,
as is standard, be required to re-apply with the new company and
negotiate their respective terms of employment. One of the main
operational concerns expressed by employees was the relatively low
volume of guests coming to the casino — a matter the Tourism
Minister said is already being discussed in terms of the integration
of operations between the casino and owners of the Our Lucaya
Resort (Hutchison Whampoa), where the casino is located.

“T said to them (the employees) that I have never seen a casino
completely separated from a resort work, but fortunately even
Isle of Capri in its latter days with definitely a new casino operator
under consideration, were already having a conversation with the
resort owners so that they have access to rooms on different terms
and more favourable terms than I think has been in place before,
because without getting into the complications of it, that is a very
important part of the marketing capacity and capabilities of a
casino operation,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said.

“And so we see the management of Hutchison working much
more closely to ensure they demonstrate that they understand
that and put in place those packages and programmes that we
believe will make a difference.”

Government expects that difference to also be made through its
public/private sector tackling of what was considered one of the
more significant hindrances to Grand Bahama’s competitiveness in
the tourism market — the high cost of airlift to the island.

Minister Vanderpool- Wallace said that in addition to the cost of
the Miami-Grand Bahama route failing to positively compete
with other destinations like Cancun, Montego Bay or Las Vegas,
the cost of airlift also gave rise to domestic competition from the
destinations of Nassau and Paradise Island.

“So we sat with the private sector here and said this is something
that we have to fix and we have come to the point where the gov-
ernment, the private sector — specifically the (Grand Bahama) Air-
port Company, Freeport Flight Services, Hutchison (Whampoa)
have come and put a programme in place where the cost to fly to
Grand Bahama has been reduced sufficiently for Grand Bahama
to become much more competitive, not only against Nassau but
against all of the others,” he said. It is a programme airlines have
demonstrated their approval of by increasing and/or introducing air-
lift to Grand Bahama as of November 1. WestJet will commence
twice-weekly service to Freeport from Toronto, Canada; Delta Air-
lines will begin service four times weekly to Freeport beginning in
December; Spirit Airlines has re-confirmed its commitment to
Grand Bahama from Fort Lauderdale, and American Eagle has
increased its airlift from two flights to four flights per week.



PLP leadership candidate
seeks to woo supporters

Paul Moss pledges to make sweeping changes if elected PM

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

Candidate for the PLP lead-
ership Paul Moss wooed his
supporters last night with
pledges of sweeping changes if
and when he is elected prime
minister.

Holding his official campaign
launch event in the constituen-
cy of St Cecilia, he promised to
bring “unparalleled and
unprecedented” focus on edu-
cation and the judiciary, in an
effort to address the problems
facing these sectors.

Mr Moss asked the crowd at
Cynthia Pratt Park to support
him in bringing every arm of
government and every Bahami-
an into the 21st century through
the largest reform programme
“this region has ever seen.”

“We are going to unleash the
power of the Bahamian imagi-
nation by removing every
obstacle to success in this coun-
try. If you want to be successful,
you will have a partner in my
government.

“On the economy, I can tell
you, for Bahamians who have
not only longed but worked to
achieve their dreams and fell
short because of lack of
resources, those days are gone.
For those who saw opportunity
in helping to bring efficiency to

PAUL MOSS

government by providing pro-
fessional technology services,
and you have found that your
proposals have disappeared
without mention, your day has
come.

“We are going to undertake
a project to overhaul this coun-
try and put the Bahamas at the
cutting edge of technology,
both in delivery services to our
people and in how we deal with
the world,” he said.

Speaking on education, the
candidate said he will not have
anyone telling Bahamian moth-
ers and fathers it is okay for
their children to be earning Ds
and Es.

“We are, in my estimation, a

Crash victims named

THE one-year-old baby
girl and her 20-year-old aunt
who died in a horrific traffic
accident on Marathon Road
on Sunday have been iden-
tified as Randia Dean, and
Levonya Miller.

The pair were passengers
in a water truck that was
travelling along Marathon
Road when it collided with a
maroon coloured Cadillac
Seville that was heading
south, causing it to flip over.

Both passengers were
thrown from the vehicle and
sustained fatal injuries.

According to eyewitness-
es and the police, the Cadil-
lac was signaling to turn into

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.coh,edu.ds

EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (EOD)

FOR PREQUALIFICATION FOR

DESIGN, SUPPLY AND INSTALLATION OF

J IRE, FIXTURES

The College of The Bahamas (COB) is seeking Expressions of Interest from qualified ven-
dors/firms to provide services and products for the design, supply and installation of fur-

niture, fixtures anil equipment iFFAE}) for

(id the Harry Moore Library and Information Centre presently under construction at

the Qakes Field Campus of The College and

(ii) the new Northern Bahamas Campus of The College presently under construction

in Freeport, Grand Bahama

Interested parties may obtain further information and a copy of the Expressions of Interest

Prequalification Application form from:

The (fice of the Vice President Finance

College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 242-M2-45 13/45 16

Or

The Office of the Associate Vice Presicbent

College of The Bahamas

Northern Bahamas Campus

Freeport, Grand Bahama
Tel: 242-352-9761

An information meeting will be held in Nassau, on Tuesday, 29th September, 2009 and on
Wednesday, 30th September, 200 in Freeport at a time and venue to be announced.

BOs are to be submitted to the location(s) indicated in the BOW Prequalification Form in

a scaled envelope appropriatcly marked:

Vice President, Finance
College of The Bahamas

EXPRESSIONOF INTEREST - FEE -

insert name of applicable facility

Firms must submit a separate EOL for each facility, All BOs are to be submitted by 12200)

pm (mid-day) on Friday, %th October,



the mall at Marathon’s
entrance close to KFC when
the water truck attempted
to overtake it, clipping the
vehicle and causing the
truck to spin out of control
and ultimately overturn.

The number of traffic
fatalities for the year stands
at 37.

“We are going
to unleash the
power of the
Bahamian
imagination by
removing every
obstacle to

success in this
country. If you
want to be suc-
cessful, you will
have a partner in
my government.”



smart nation, but we will
become an educated nation too,
because education will be the
hallmark in our march into this
new millennium. We will
engender a sense of purpose
and direction that only the
greatest nations have shown.

“Every child — and I mean
every child, will know what it is
like to find something in him
or herself to contribute to mak-
ing this nation and the world a
better place,” he said.

Mr Moss also pledged a low
crime environment. “At last
count,” he said, “the murder
rate stands at an alarming 65. I
am appalled and I am con-
founded that successive gov-

T 4 rT

ernments of this nation have
allowed crime to fester to the
point where it is now an open
sore.

“Bahamians live in fear;
imprisoned in their homes,
while the government shrugs
its shoulders, even as Bahamian
families suffer the pain of loss
of loved ones murdered on our
streets, in their homes and in
broad daylight. That has to
stop,” he said.

Mr Moss also signalled his
willingness to enforce capital
punishment, warning criminals:
“If you take a life, yours will
be taken.”

He said he will “fix” the
administration of justice, and
eventually remove the Privy
Council as the final court of
appeal. Speaking on foreign
policy, Mr Moss said he is “not
interested in any trade agree-
ment until Bahamians domi-
nate the landscape of this coun-
try’s economy, building oppor-
tunities for other Bahamians
and moving across our borders
to establish a new bold Bahami-
an brand.”

Mr Moss also promised that
every Bahamian family will
own a piece of the country
through a new Crown Land
policy “that will provide every
Bahamian household financial
stability and security. That is
what government is for.”

J

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CREDIT SUISSE

Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch

is presently considering applications for a

Senior Globus System Developer

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

* Qualifications:

- Atleast Five (5) years experience in installation, configuration and
troubleshooting in a banking environment
Superior knowledge of GLOBUS/T24 Banking Application in both support
and development roles

- Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science or equivalent

- Knowledge of AIX 5,1 — 5.3, UNIVERSE/JBASE, PL/SQL

- Expenence in working with Globus/T24 related migration or implementation

projects.

- Personal Qualities:

- Excellent organizational, interpersonal and communication skills

- Good technical and problem solving skills and experience

- Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision

- Enthusiasm, a positive attitude and willingness to work flexible hours as

overtime

~ Previous experience of working in a production support role in maintaining
Globus/T24 system is a plus.

+ Other Duties:

- Answer Helpdesk requests (provide support & troubleshoot)
- Provide UNIVERSE & GLOBUS training to IT Staff

- Ensure comphance to IT guidelines / directives

get

- Ensure that
followed

d2Business Contingency Planning d3 requirements are

- Other duties & projects assigned by the Manager of Department

ny Benefits provided include:
- Competitive salary and performance bonus

- Pension Plan

- Health and Life Insurance
- Ongoing internal and external career development/training program



Applications should be submitted to:

Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE: OCTOBER 7, 27009

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Burger King reward | Study: adolescents not serious

about HIV/AIDS risk factors

FROM page one

Police believe the former
manager of the Harrold Road
restaurant, and current manag-
er of Burger King in Frederick
Street, was taken to the store by
his killer or killers who then
tried to force him to open the
safe. When he failed to open
the safe, Mr Morris was beaten
in the manager’s office. He was
dragged outside where he was
again beaten and stabbed sev-
eral times.

He was found lying in a pool
of blood with multiple stab
wounds at around 1.30am on
Sunday and pronounced dead
at the scene.

Mr Morris became the 61st
murder victim this year.

Just hours later Bahamasair
pilot Lionel Lewis McQueen,
29, was shot to death in his
Golden Palm Estates home,
raising the murder toll to 62,
according to police.

Mr McQueen’s cousin and
roommate Montez Saunders
was also shot several times
when Mr McQueen was killed
at their home near the Kennedy
Subdivision in New Providence
shortly after 4am on Sunday.
Mr Saunders is being treated
in the Intensive Care Unit at
Princess Margaret Hospital and
his condition is said to be
improving.

Police say the country’s mur-
der count could soar to 66 this
year if the deaths of four people
killed in a fire at their home on
Thursday morning are also clas-
sified as homicides.

That would be nearly dou-
ble the number of homicides at
this time last year.

The deaths of Theresa
Brown, 51; her daughter

Kayshala Bodie, 18; grand-
daughter Telair Johnson, one;
and neighbour Savanna Stuart,
18, who all died as a result of
smoke inhalation, are currently
classified as “suspicious.”

But as investigations contin-
ue police might be able to con-
firm that the fire at their home
in Wilson Tract was started by
an arsonist. Superintendent
Leon Bethel in charge of the
homicide department of the
Criminal Detective Unit said
there had been 57 murders at
this time last year, and it is clear
the murder toll is rising.

He told The Tribune: “It’s an
increase from last year, that’s
obvious and we are confident
about that.

“We are also confident about
detection and we are asking
members of the public to assist.
We need our detection rate to
improve, and if the members
of the public cooperate with us
— the police who they have
entrusted with the investigation
of these matters — we would
have a better rate.

“If we have a better rate of
solution the occurrence of a lot
of these matters will diminish.

“We have lots of assistance
from members of the public
and we do appreciate that, but
we do believe that with more
assistance from the public, we
will see a better rate of solu-
tion and we would see a reduc-
tion in the number of murders.”

Activist Paul Joseph, 55, of
Grand Bahama, said he wants
Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest to step up
and introduce capital punish-
ment to help stem the number

of murders as the toll spirals
out of control.

He said: “Don’t pacify the
public by making this
announcement, and not go
ahead with it.

“This place looks like Iraq,
not the Bahamas, because any-
body can be killing any time in
this country and that’s the sad
reality right now.

“Whoever is in government
has to protect the citizens of
their country and right now
there seems to be no protec-
tion. We are past the scare
point now, this murder is a
national nightmare.”

Nassau resident Terrance
Gilbert, 41, blames the rising
murder rate on a breakdown
of families and relationships.
He called for the church to get
more involved with communi-
ties and encourage people to
not act in anger, but to forgive.

“We are having a family
meltdown in this country, and
it’s a national crisis,” he said.

“We are resorting to murder
because we are under so much
pressure, and the church needs
to pull together to work with
people in the community.”

Police are appealing to the
public for information relating
to the murders of Rashad Mor-
ris, Lionel Lewis McQueen and
the four suspicious deaths by
fire.

Anyone with any informa-
tion should call 911 or 919
urgently, or call Crime Stop-
pers anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477). Calls to Crime Stoppers
are answered in the United
States and ensure total
anonymity.

BY MATT MAURA

A RECENT study of ado-
lescent understanding of and
attitude towards HIV/AIDS
indicated that while some
youngsters are knowledgeable
about the deadly virus, many
are not taking the risk factors
associated with the disease seri-
ously enough, Health Minister
Dr Hubert Minnis said.

Dr Minnis said as a result of
the study’s findings, health pol-
icy-makers, planners and pro-
fessionals must redouble their
efforts to ensure that young
people take HIV/AIDS as seri-
ously as they should.

The study was conducted on
public and private school stu-
dents between the ages of 15
and 17 in New Providence and
the Family Islands. Its aim was
to provide data to support the
planning and implementation
of preventative strategies and
healthcare programmes relat-
ing to HIV/AIDS.

TTR
TT REIL

THE Rotary Club of
New Providence will hold a
steak/chicken-out at the
Scouts Headquarters on
Dolphin Drive on Satur-
day, September 26. The
price is $10.

















Dr Minnis said while groups
such as the AIDS Foundation
of the Bahamas and the Min-
istry of Health — through its
National AIDS Programme —
continue to promote aggressive
and intensive campaigns against
the spread of HIV/AIDS, ado-
lescents remain among the
fastest growing population of
HIV-infected persons in the
country.

The Health Minister com-
mended the AIDS Foundation
for establishing a temporary
care facility for HIV positive
adolescents. He said the facility
will assist in “stabilising their
health” and is another example
of how the organisation “is
responsive to the needs of the
HIV/AIDS sector of our popu-
lation.”

“In our country, they (ado-
lescents) are extremely vulner-
able,” Dr Minnis said.

“Therefore it is incumbent
upon us to promote a stern mes-
sage detailing preventative mea-

sures about HIV/AIDS to this
group.”

Addressing the opening ses-
sion of an AIDS Foundation of
the Bahamas Workshop, Dr
Minnis said the HIV/AIDS pan-
demic continues to threaten the
economic, national and social
development of countries
around the globe. He said the
Caribbean, including the
Bahamas, has been the “sec-
ond-worst” affected region
globally. “The Ministry of
Health has increased access to
anti-retroviral drugs, particu-
larly for HIV positive pregnant
women. This programme has
led to a dramatic reduction in
the mother-to-child transmis-
sion rate,” Dr Minnis added.

The minister said health offi-
cials must ensure that young
people have “adequate access
to knowledge and treatment”
in order to minimise those
health risks and reduce vulner-
ability to possible HIV infec-
tion.

Teachers stage sit-in protests

Legal Notice

NOTICE
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——

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of WOHLEN LIMITED has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WAIRAU INC.

—

é

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of WAIRAU INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

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LANGUAGES
AND CULTURES
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NOTICE
PROSPECT MADISON LIMITED

es es

é

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PROSPECT MADISON LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued

and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HENBIT VALLFEY INC.

—f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of HENBIT VALLFEY INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

tember 28th, 2009
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DURATION: 10 Weeks

E-MAIL: ilci@cob.edu.bs

Felipé Major/Tribune staff




Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Ua eas
FROM page one

alleged understaffing, and continued the “sit-in” yesterday. They
want the school to hire an English teacher and a science teacher to
help cope with the work load.

Anatol Rodgers teachers also took action over understaffing,
starting on Monday and continuing yesterday. While some teach-
ers returned to the campus in Faith Avenue yesterday, 18 remained
on their “sit-in”, refusing to work until two language arts teachers
are hired.

Teachers at Uriah McPhee started their “sit-in” on Friday and
continued to take action on Monday over a lack of air-condition-
ing on the third floor of the school building. A senior officer at the
Ministry of Education said the air-conditioning unit was repaired
over the weekend, and the teachers returned to work yesterday.

The Education officer who did not want to be named said she is
concerned about the effect the “sit-out” will have on the children
who have made a fresh commitment to their education this term.

She encouraged parents to speak up and call for teachers to
return to work and resume their duties for the benefit of their chil-
dren’s education.

However, according to Bahamas Union of Teachers (BUT)
president Belinda Wilson, the teachers will not return to work
until their demands are met.

And PLP chairwoman Glenys Hanna Martin released a state-
ment yesterday criticising Minister of Education Carl Bethel for
failing to bring public schools up to scratch.

She said: “We have seen systemic failure on his behalf in a
number of areas, including a failure to complete school repairs and
adequately equip and furnish classrooms in a timely fashion.

“Today we note that well into the academic year that policies
implemented by this government relative to the non-renewal of
contracts of teachers, and the concomitant failure to recruit replace-
ment teachers, has left schools understaffed in critical areas of
the curriculum and led to overcrowding of classrooms in several
schools and gaps in school security.

“Our children are being short-changed.

“In light of the minister’s weak response to the many chal-
lenges and demands which now face our educational system he is
now being invited to seriously consider whether he should continue
at the helm of this important engine of our national develop-
ment.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VANESE INC.

—f—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of VANESE INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



A JOURNAL OF AN AMERICAN PHYSICIAN TELLS OF NASSAU LIFE 200 YEARS AGO



Glimpsing through a fascinating
window on a long-lost Bahamas

By Larry Smith

S John Cleese
used to
say..." And now
for something
completely different."

Tough Call enjoyed some
esoteric reading last weekend
that's worth sharing, even
though it's unrelated to any-
thing in particular that's hap-
pening today. It was a “delight-
ful document” published by the
Bahamas Historical Society in
1968. Other than history buffs,
few are familiar with it today,
and it opens a fascinating win-
dow on a long-lost age.

The document in question
was a personal journal kept by
an American physician named
P. S. Townsend, who lived in
Nassau from December 1823
to September 1824. It is,
according to historians Michael
Craton and Gail Saunders, one
of "the three earliest sets of pri-
vate documents still surviv-
ing...from the Loyalist slavery
era."

Townsend's 68-page diary
— lodged between well-worn,
marbled board covers that also
enclosed a 113-page medical
day book — was found decades
ago in a Boston bookshop by
one William Miller, a New
York college professor who
happened to have been born in
Nassau. After his death,
Miller's widow gave the jour-
nal to the Bahamas Historical
Society, which transcribed the
handwritten notes and pub-
lished it as a slim booklet in
1968.

The diary begins with
Townsend's embarkation for
Nassau aboard a square-rigged
sailing ship from New York:
"There being a good breeze
from the northward, the sails
were unbent, and in a few sec-
onds after the ship loosened
from the wharf she was under
weigh,” he wrote on December
10, 1823. His fellow passengers
included wealthy Loyalist mer-
chants and their servants, as
well as several "poor Irish peo-
ple in steerage."

During his sojourn in Nas-
sau, Townsend witnessed the
declining days of the decadent
plantation society that the Loy-
alists had tried to build in the
Bahamas following the Ameri-
can War of Independence. His
notes mostly record the activi-
ties of the Bahamian social elite
and make no political refer-
ences at all. But the slave trade
had already been abolished,
and it would be only a few
more years before slavery itself
came to an end throughout the
British Empire.

Six days after leaving New
York, he and his fellow trav-
ellers were on the lookout for
Hole in the Wall — "a perfo-
rated rock which serves as the
great signpost to mariners going
into this part of the west indies.
It is on the extremity of Aba-
co." This was several years
before a lighthouse was erected
on this spot in 1836 to guide
vessels away from the island's
fringing reef.

"We were not without our
apprehensions of meeting with
pirates, particularly as we had
heard of their having been late-
ly seen off the Hole in the
Wall,” Townsend wrote. It had
been almost a century since the
death of Governor Woodes
Rogers who had put down the
pirate republic of the Bahamas,
but attacks on regional ship-
ping continued well into the
19th century. In 1820, more
than 50 pirate attacks were
reported in the Florida Straits
alone, and wrecking was also a
lucrative trade for Bahamians.

It is clear from Townsend's

od

descriptions that all the islands
he passed from Abaco to New
Providence were covered with
low "brush wood" punctuated
by the occasional tall coconut
palm — with not a casuarina to
be seen. These invasive and
destructive trees, which now
blanket our coastlines, were not
introduced to the Bahamas
until the 1920s.

As they approached Nassau
Dr Townsend noticed several
houses on Rose Island. Just
over the bar they were met in a
small boat by the harbour pilot,
who brought them to a safe
anchorage some 200 yards off
Fort Nassau — where the
British Colonial Hilton now
stands. The passengers were
then rowed in a small boat to
one of the piers built out from
the shore. Even by moonlight,
Townsend marvelled, the water
was so clear they could see the
bottom.

Parade

On landing they passed
through along Bay Street to a
mansion which faced "an
oblong open green.” This was
the western parade, also called
Fleeming Square, and located
roughly where the British Colo-
nial Hilton's driveway is today.
Adjacent to the parade ground
he saw black troops stationed at
Fort Nassau, which was not
demolished until some 13 years
after Townsend's visit.

The grand mansion over-
looking the parade where
Townsend lived for the next 10
months was the home of the
Honourable James Moss, a for-
mer Liverpudlian and member
of the governor's council whom
historians describe as "the
lynchpin of Nassau's new mer-
chant oligarchy.”

Bay Street at this time con-
sisted chiefly of "wooden build-
ings with long sheds or piazzas
and a profusion of windows,
mostly occupied as stores of dry
goods, hardware, etc." South
of the main drag the streets
were more residential "except-
ing the courthouse where the
legislature meet." But,
Townsend noted, "There is a
want of neatness...in fact the
scenery connected with the
quietness of the town gives it a
look of desolation and ruin."

He goes on to describe a for-
mal dinner at Government
House, well lubricated by wine
and champagne. Starters con-
sisted of a mixture of fruit and
nuts, followed by turtle steak
and turtle soup. There were
about 40 guests, including the
house speaker, the chief justice,
and some military men. After-
wards the guests played cards
until midnight.

In fact, Townsend's journal
records an endless succession
of dinners, balls, picnics and
excursions — including sailing
trips to Rose Island and Hog
Island — with upwards of 30
dishes served at a time. These
included roast goose and duck,
corned beef, pigeon pie, ham,
turkey, lamb, baked crab and
local as well as cold water fish.
Often there was dancing in the
courtyard to a piano. The chief
justice's ball on new year's day
was the most lavish celebration
he attended, with about 100
other members of the island's
social elite.

" After coffee, tea, cake, etc
danced a succession of tedious,

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laborious country dances till 4
next morning, allowing a short
time for supper about 1 o'clock.
The music was very good, two
fifes (black) from the garrison,
two or three fiddles, tam-
bourine and drum.”

Townsend also describes
outlying areas of Nassau. Out
east, "by a pleasant good road
along the harbour", there were
houses scattered along the
waterfront for a mile past St
Matthew's Church. Blair at that
time was a small farming estate,
and beyond that on the East-
ern Road was "a group of
handsome buildings and trees
which Mr Moss told me was the
Hermitage, (a country seat)
now deserted and left to go to
ruin in consequence of the fam-
ily feeling a repugnance to
reside where the father and sev-
eral others had died.”

Some distance beyond the
Hermitage he described a col-
lection of "mean houses occu-
pied by (mixed race) fishermen
and wreckers, whose small craft
is moored out a few yards from
shore." This was most likely to
have been Creek Village, a
coastal extension of the Fox
Hill community.

He also visited Vendue
House downtown (now the
Pompey Museum), which he
described as "a place of great
resort (that) serves as a
lounge.” But rather than slaves,
the goods on sale were salvaged
by wreckers, who Townsend
called "licensed smugglers".
Despite this opprobrium, the
general perception was that
without such commerce the

either lineally or collaterally
descended from the founder of
Nassau and his associates
(Blackbeard)...The Nassau peo-
ple are called conchs and the
inhabitants upon the out islands
are denominated as crabs."

And some things never
change. Townsend records
commiserating with a fellow
doctor in Nassau who was
drowning in a sea of uncol-
lectible receivables.

Excursion

His account of an excursion
out west to the Moss farm
known as the Grove (it was
subdivided in the 1920s), notes
that the beaches along the route
were covered with sea grape
trees which "form an excellent
shelter from the sun". The oth-
er side of the road as lined by a
fine stone wall composed of
pieces of coral rock. Fort Char-
lotte, which we passed, is built
of the same."

The farm grew an abun-
dance of herbs, fruits and veg-
etables, and raised deer, geese,
ducks, chickens and pigeons.
During Townsend's stay Moss
"received the visits of some 10
or 12 of his slaves who had
returned from gathering guinea
corn in the fields. There are
about 60 altogether on this
estate and the others near it.
The slaves whom I saw here
and have seen in New Provi-
dence since my arrival are all
comfortably dressed."

His descriptions of the activ-
ities of the black population
focused on Junkanoo and reli-
gion. He noted that the slaves
get a three-day vacation with
extra food and rum at Christ-
mas when whites were "regaled
until 3 or 4 in the morning with
some bad music on hoarse
cracked drums and fifes by
groups of negroes parading the

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to the failed salt pans on Hog
Island near the lighthouse that
were built by a New Yorker
named Seton. He also visited a
deserted barracks on Hog
Island for an afternoon picnic
(or maroon) with the governor
and other wealthy guests. The
snacks included salmon, corned
beef and pickled oysters
washed down with plenty of
wine.

"We embarked about lpm a
little behind the ordnance
house on the parade a few
yards from Mr Moss' (house).
After sailing till 3pm we
debarked at the
barracks...Walked through the
sandy paths among the bay
cedar bushes and wild grape
and other shrubs... to one of
the three small buildings which
compose the barracks."

At the time of Townsend's
visit there were probably 3,000
slaves on New Providence (plus
mulattoes and free blacks) and
less than 1,800 whites. With
such a small isolated elite, visi-
tors were quickly recruited to
the local social scene.
Townsend was persuaded to
play a part in an amateur the-
atrical production (Who Wants
a Guinea, an 1805 comedy by
George Coleman) on a stage
set up in the courthouse.

"Before 7 the house was
crowded — only 160 tickets had
been issued each at a dollar, so
that the company on the bench-
es was composed chiefly of the
first people in town,” he wrote.
"I recognised all my acquain-
tances."

Other activities of the colo-
nial elite included official cere-









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ment, and the firing of artillery
salutes. Townsend describes
the funeral of the wife of Abra-
ham Eve, a prominent loyalist
and member of the governor's
council: "Two black persons
went before with lanterns in
case night should come on
before the service is over...The
negroes like to go to funer-
als...They followed to the num-
ber of 20 or 30,.. amounting to
more, I think, than the whites.
Some dozen gigs driven by ser-
vants brought up the rear. The
corpse was carried first in to
the church. The burial ground is
Potter's Field in the western
skirts of the town where all the
whites are placed without dis-
tinction of rank."

During the summer of 1824,
Townsend actually got to prac-
tise medicine in Nassau by
standing in for Dr Tynes, the
chief medical officer, while he
visited Crooked Island. Tynes’
responsibilities included the
poor house, the jail, the public
health department and his pri-
vate patients. And Townsend's
journal ends with a series of
perfunctory comments about
medical treatments given to a
wide range of patients — from
slaves to visiting sailors to the
colonial elite.

He left the Bahamas shortly
after this stint in the real world
— his journal somehow ending
up in an antique bookstore in
Boston, eventually giving us a
glimpse of what life was like in
Nassau 200 years ago.

What do you think? Send com-
ments to larry@tribunemedia.net



Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



‘How we tried to save Jett Travolta’

FROM page one

Also expected to give evidence today is Mr
Travolta’s lawyer, Mike Ossi, and

Ronald Zupancic, who has been on Mr Tra-
volta’s staff for the past 23 years.

In court yesterday Derrex Rolle, an emer-
gency medical technician, said that at about
10.33am on January 2, he and his driver Light-
bourne, left the Eight Mile Rock Clinic for Old
Bahama Bay. Rolle said that when they arrived at
10.45, they met about 10 people standing at the
entrance of room 1021. Rolle testified that in
the bathroom hallway he saw a young male, lat-
er identified as Jett Travolta, lying on his back.

“He was lying down on his back and there
was no sign of life,” Rolle told the court. Rolle
said that he met a young man performing CPR on
Jett with an AED machine. According to Rolle
there was also a physician there.

“He told me to continue doing CPR and take
him (Jett ) to the hospital.” Rolle told the court
that Jett had not yet been pronounced dead.
Rolle said that Jett was put in the ambulance
where he continued performing CPR. According
to Rolle, John Travolta and two other men were
in the back of the ambulance with him while
Travolta’s wife Kelly Preston sat in the front of
the ambulance. He testified that while heading to
the Rand Memorial Hospital, they were inter-
cepted in the area of Bartlett Hill, Eight Mile
Rock, by another ambulance and changed dri-
vers.

According to Rolle, Lightbourne switched
places with Marcus Garvey. Rolle said that the

Legal Notice

two men who were in the back of the ambulance
also got into the unit with Lightbourne while
Selvin Strachan got into the unit with him and the
Travoltas. Rolle said he was responsible for fill-
ing out the transport of patient form, which he
completed at the hospital.

Selvin Strachan, emergency medical service
manager and paramedic told the court that on the
morning of January 2, he heard the call go out to
the West End area and contacted the dispatched
unit, informing them to update him on the nature
of the call because there was conflicting infor-
mation coming from that area.

Strachan said that he subsequently instructed
Garvey to take him to intercept the unit so that
he could administer further medical treatment to
the patient. He testified that once they inter-
cepted the unit, he took over medical care of
the patient who was unresponsive and had no
pulse.

Strachan explained that if a patient is not an
adult and the parents refuse medical assistance
for the child, the child would have to have vital
signs and the parents would have to be informed
of the consequences of not seeking medical atten-
tion.

Inspector Andrew Wells, who was attached to
the West End Police Station at the time of the
incident, said that he went to Old Bahama Bay
around 10.30 am on January 2, after receiving cer-
tain information. Inspector Wells said he pro-
ceeded to room 1022 of the Old Bahama Bay

NOTICE
PROSPECT MADISON LIMITED

as ens

?

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PROSPECT MADISON LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued

and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEW ACCARDI INC.

—

i

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NEW ACCARDI INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

The Bahamas Utilities Co-operative
Credit Union Limited

NOTICE OF SPECIAL
GENERAL MEETING

A Special General Meeting of
the Bahamas Utilities Co-operative
Credit Union Limited
will be held on

Friday, October 2nd, 2009

at
6:00 p.m.
in
The Patrick A. Bain Training Room
at
The Bahamas Co-operative League Building
Russell Road, Oakes Field

PURPOSE OF THE MEETING

The purpose of the meeting is to seek approval
from the membership for a merger with National
Workers Co-operative Credit Union Limited. Note
that the Annual General Meeting held May 28th,
2009, authorized the Board of Directors to seek
alliance with a larger credit union.

Secretary: Dexter Cartwright



FROM page one

of sea rise would result in a
decline in the Bahamas’ GDP
by more than 2.5 per cent and
almost 2.5 per cent for
Guyana," Mr Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said.

He added that these esti-
mates are conservative since
they include only the damage in
zones that would be inundated
by the rise.

They do not include damage
from storm surges, and they use
existing patterns of develop-
ment and land use not taking

Hotel and noticed that a person was receiving
medical attention inside. Inspector Wells said
that as he did not want to get in the way, he
stood outside the room. Inspector Wells testi-
fied that around 1lam an ambulance arrived,
with two occupants — Derrex Rolle and Light-
bourne who he recalled was the passenger.
Inspector Wells told the court that after about 15
minutes the paramedics, John Travolta, Dr Fer-
nandez and his nurse as well as a group of Cau-
casian people left the room and got into the
ambulance.

He said he saw Lightbourne having a conver-
sation with Mr Travolta and then hand him a
clipboard with some papers in it. Inspector Wells
said that shortly thereafter Lightbourne called
him and said that Mr Travolta wanted him to
take his son directly to Freeport International
Airport. According to Inspector Wells, Light-
bourne asked him to witness a refusal for medical
attention. Wells said that he signed the form and
gave it back to Lightbourne. Inspector Wells said
that the ambulance then drove off and he
attempted to follow but could not keep up in
the car he was driving. He said that he later
arrived at the hospital some 20 minutes later to
further investigate the matter.

Nathan Moody, director of operations at Old
Bahama Bay, told the court during cross-exami-
nation by Mr Shurland, that on the morning of
January 2, he picked up Dr Fernandez and his
wife from the West End clinic and took them to

room 1021 at Old Bahama Bay. There he said he
saw John Travolta performing CPR on his son
Jett. Moody told the court that Dr Fernandez
and his wife tended to Jett until the ambulance
arrived. Moody testified that he assisted in putting
Jett on the gurney and that consideration had
been given to taking Jett to the United States by
plane. He admitted that he had given police a
statement in which he indicated that he saw Jett
being taken from one ambulance to the next but
denied saying so yesterday. After perusing his
statement, Mr Shurland then asserted that he
had lied to police. Mr Moody said, however, that
it had not been his intention.

West End and Bimini MP Obie Wilchcombe
is expected to be among the prosecution wit-
nesses to take the witness stand today.

A jury of six women and three men was select-
ed on Monday to hear the case. Bridgewater, 49,
and Lightbourne, 47, are accused of conspiring to
extort and attempting to extort money from Mr
Travolta between January 2 and 20 by means of
threats. Ms Bridgewater is also accused of abet-
ment to extortion. Ms Bridgewater is represent-
ed by attorneys Murrio Ducille and Krysta Smith.
Mr Lightbourne is represented by attorney Carl-
son Shurland and Mary Bain pro bono. Director
of Public Prosecutions Bernard Turner, Neil
Brathwaite and Garvin Gaskin are prosecuting
the case. Prosecutors are expected to call 14 wit-
nesses. Ms Bridgewater and Mr Lightbourne
were arraigned on the charges in late January
and arraigned again before Senior Justice Allen
on April 28 after prosecutors presented a Vol-
untary Bill of Indictment. They have both plead-
ed not guilty to the charges.

Climate change seen as threat to Bahamas economy

into account the “considerable”
development that may occur in
years to come, he continued.

His comments came a day
before American President
Barack Obama warned world
leaders that the threat of cli-
mate change could lead to an
"irreversible catastrophe" if left
unchecked.

"No nation, however large
or small, wealthy or poor, can
escape the impact of climate
change.

“Rising sea levels threaten
every coastline.

“More powerful storms and
floods threaten every continent.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRAND PAVILION
CORPORATION

——

Fs

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

Section 138 (8) of

the International

Business

Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of GRAND
PAVILION CORPORATION has been completed;

a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
BUNT IMP. CORPORATION

as

-

More frequent drought and
crop failures breed hunger and
conflict in places where hunger
and conflict already thrive.

“On shrinking islands, fami-
lies are already being forced to
flee their homes as climate
refugees.

"The security and stability of
each nation and all peoples —
our prosperity, our health, our
safety — are in jeopardy.

"And the time we have to
reverse this tide is running out,"
Mr Obama said during his
speech to the United Nations
on climate change.

Negotiations

As a member of CARICOM,
the Bahamas has been part of
negotiations of a draft of the
UN's Declaration for a New
Climate Change Agreement.
The document will be finalised
in December at the UN Con-
ference of Parties in Denmark.

Caribsave is a partnership
between the Caribbean Com-
munity Climate Change Cen-
tre (CCCCC) and the Univer-
sity of Oxford, which addresses
the impacts and challenges sur-
rounding climate change,
tourism, the environment, eco-

nomic development and the
community livelihoods across
the Caribbean.

Comprising seven core objec-
tives, the Caribsave Partner-
ship, with a projected budget
of $35 million over five years,
focuses on sectoral, destina-
tional and national vulnerabili-
ty and adaptive capacity assess-
ments and strategy develop-
ment.

In addition, the initiative
focuses on socio-economic and
environmental policies and
implementation, the impacts of
climate change on key sectors
and their integral relationship
to tourism in the Caribbean,
the development of carbon off-
set projects and carbon neutral
destination status and capacity
building and skills transfer
across the Caribbean.

In the Bahamas, the island
of Eleuthera will be used for
the case study.

The two-day workshop —
held at the Sheraton Nassau
Beach Resort on September 21-
22 — featured presentations by
a cross-section of stakeholders
in the Caribbean and the Uni-
versity of Oxford.

Inmate charged with murder

FROM page one

It is alleged that between September 7 and 10, Moss intention-

ally caused Albury’s death.

Eleven witnesses are listed on court dockets. Moss was not
required to enter a plea to the murder charge. He will remain on
remand at Her Majesty’s Prison and is expected to appear in
Court 11, Nassau Street, on September 25 for a fixture hearing.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRIDEDON VALLEY INC.

—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BUNT IMP. CORPORATION has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PICADILLIC CIRCUS LTD.

— —

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PICADILLIC CIRCUS LTD. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GRIDEDON VALLEY INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice
NOTICE
GIANT STEPS
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— *,——

f

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Compa-
nies Act 2000, the dissolution of GIANT STEPS
INVESTMENTS LTD. has

Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

been completed; a

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



at Carter/AP P



ABOVE: fadiananalie Colts
quarterback Peyton Manning
celebrates after the Colts
defeated the Miami Dolphins.

LEFT: Indianapolis Colts tight
end Dallas Clark shakes off a

tackle attempt by Miami Dol-

phins safety Gibril Wilson on

his way to a touchdown dur-

ing the first quarter of an NFL
football game Monday, Sept.

21, 2009, in Miami.

Manning rallies Colts to
27-23 win over Dolphins

FOOTBALL
MIAMI
Associated Press

PEYTON Manning stood on the
sideline, arms folded, glancing occa-
sionally at the scoreboard to see the
time ticking off.

But the Miami Dolphins could play
keepaway for only so long. When
Manning eventually made his way onto
the field, the Dolphins couldn’t stop
him.

Manning had the ball for less than 15
minutes but made the most of his
chances, helping the Indianapolis Colts
come from behind four times to beat
Miami 27-23 Monday night.

Manning broke Johnny Unitas’ fran-
chise record for victories by a quar-





SWITZERLAND’ S$ Fabian acai pedals ann a training
session ahead of the road cycling World Championships, in
Mendrisio, Switzerland, Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2009.

Cancellara aims for double | ===";
gold on home roads

terback, and the latest win ranked with
the oddest.

The Dolphins were 15 for 21 on
third-down conversions and 1 for 1 on
fourth down. Their lone turnover came
on the final play, they punted only
once and they controlled the ball for a
team-record 45 minutes.

They had to wonder how they lost.
The answer: Manning.

“To have as few plays as he did and
to do what he did, you just don’t see
that,” Miami quarterback Chad Pen-
nington said.

Manning took only three snaps in
the third quarter and had just three
possessions in the second half. Watch-
ing most of the night from the bench,
he knew he would need to make the
most of his opportunities.

“T hate to say, but we have done it

Alessandro Trovati/AP Photo

before a few times,” he said. “We just
kind of stay loose over there.”

Manning threw an 80-yard touch-
down pass to Dallas Clark on the first
play from scrimmage, and hit Pierre
Garcon for a 48-yard score with 3:18
left for the game’s final points.

“Tt was about being efficient when it
counted, in the fourth quarter,” Man-
ning said. “That’s really what the
game’s about.”

He took a little sheen off the Dol-
phins’ glitzy home opener. They rolled
out an orange carpet for the pregame
arrival of new owner Stephen Ross’
celebrity partners, and the crowd
included Serena and Venus Williams,
Marc Anthony and Jennifer Lopez,
Jimmy Buffett and Colts rooter Tiger
Woods.

But Manning was the big star. He

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CYCLING
MENDRISIO, Switzerland
Associated Press

OLYMPIC champion Fabi-
an Cancellara will attempt to
go for double gold at the road
world championships when he
returns to his native Switzer-
land for the first time in 13
years.

Cancellara is the favorite in
Thursday’s time trial, which
he won in 2006 and ’07. He
also has Sunday’s grueling
road race in his sights.

“I’m waiting with impa-
tience for these races,” Can-
cellara said Tuesday. “For me,
it’s one time in my life that I
have the chance to race to be
the world champion at home.”

Britain’s Bradley Wiggins
will challenge in the time trial,

while a strong Italian team
will chase a record fourth
straight road race title.

Yet the 28-year-old Cancel-
lara, nicknamed “Spartacus”
for his competitive streak and
strength, has proven he can
double up.

He took bronze in the Bei-
jing Olympics road race last
year and struck gold four days
later in the time trial, though
the exertion left him too
exhausted to go for a worlds
hat trick.

Cancellara is relishing the
expectation of his home fans
on the Switzerland-Italy bor-
der.

“We’re in a cycling region
of Switzerland. I feel good. I
have the mentality for win-
ning and that’s important,” he
said.

ii © 0 birch

finished 14 for 23 for 303 yards, and the
Colts improved to 2-0. The Dolphins
fell to 0-2 even though they had 239
yards rushing, including 107 with the
wildcat.

“Nobody is world champion after
two weeks,” Miami linebacker Joey
Porter said, “but we’re not good
enough to give games away.”

The Colts had the ball for only 14:53,
the lowest time of possession for a win-
ning team in the NFL since 1977. They
ran 35 plays to 84 for the Dolphins.

“Tt’s really disheartening,” Miami
coach Tony Sparano said. “That’s
exactly the formula to beat that team.”

Indy trailed 10-7, 13-10 and 20-13,
but each time pulled even. Down 23-20
after Miami scored with 3:50 left, the
Colts rallied one more time with a big
play by Garcon.



TUE
INBRIEF



Jaguars
experiencing
more lapses -
ant more losses

FOOTBALL
JACKSONVILLE, Fla.
Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE
coach Jack Del Rio stood
on the sideline and
watched Kurt Warner pick
his defense apart.

Short passes, missed
tackles, first downs and
scores, Del Rio saw the
same things repeatedly dur-
ing the Jaguars’ 31-17 loss
to Warner and the Arizona
Cardinals on Sunday.

Del Rio considered
doing something about it,
too.

“T thought about doing
a Woody Hayes,” he said,
referring to the former
Ohio State coach who was
fired for punching a Clem-
son player during the 1978
Gator Bowl. “I thought
about coming off the side-
line. I was going to get
somebody down myself.”

The Jags’ defense sure
could have used the help.

Warner completed 24 of
26 passes for 243 yards,
with two touchdowns and
no interceptions, and broke
the NFL single-game
record for completion per-
centage. The Jaguars (0-2)
had no sacks, got little pres-
sure and were victimized
by a short passing game —
some of the same issues
that plagued them last sea-
son.

The most glaring prob-
lem was missed tackles.

“He was throwing the
ball quick and making you
tackle,” Del Rio said.
“Yards after the catch was
a big point of emphasis
leading into this week and
we did not handle that very
well. We did not tackle the
short pass game that we
knew we would get.

“You absolutely cannot
be any good on defense if
you don’t do that. That’s
an area we must and will
improve in.”

Jacksonville struggled
most of last season on
defense, and Del Rio
responded by parting ways
with coordinator Gregg
Williams, secondary coach
Donnie Henderson, line-
backer Mike Peterson, cor-
nerback Brian Williams,
defensive end Paul Spicer
and safety Gerald Sens-
abaugh.

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS
aye BACH ar

OR





VOLLEYBALL
GSSSA MEETING

THE Government Sec-
ondary Schools Sports
Association is scheduled to
hold a meeting for all
coaches 4pm today at R M
Bailey Secondary High
School.

The purpose of the meet-
ing is to discuss final plans
for the start of the GSSSA
volleyball season that is slat-

dio Beano wlaicesy
ec eae MINISTER of Youth, Sports and Culture

VOLLEYBALL Desmond Bannister speaks during the
GSSSA SEASON first annual North and Central Andros
OPENING Back to School Basketball Classic in

THE Government Sec- Staniard Creek...

ondary Schools Sports
Association is scheduled to
begin its 2009 volleyball sea-
son on Monday.

Eight teams are regis-
tered in both the senior
boys and girls divisions,
which will play at the D W
Davis and CI Gibson Gym-
nasiums.

The junior boys and girls
divisions are also made up
of eight teams which will
play at the R M Bailey and
Tom ‘The Bird’ Grant out-
door volleyball courts.

SOFTBALL
BAISS OPENING

THE Bahamas Associa-
tion of Independent Sec-
ondary Schools will begin
its 2009 softball season
today at various playing
Sites.

The senior boys and
junior girls will be in action
today, starting at 4pm. The
senior girls and junior boys
will start competition on

Thursday. BANNISTER looks over craft work by Cynthia Armbrister...

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Volleyball to
get underway

FROM page 11

all returning from last year,
along with the introduction
of the Perpgre Enterprise
Champions, the Defence
Force and a youthful team.

“T think it will be another
competitive season, especial-
ly in the men’s division,”
Smith said. “On any given
night, if you don’t come with
your game plan or you don’t
execute it, you could be beat-
en.

“With one of two players
moving around the league
from one team to another, I
think the league will be very
competitive.”

Games will be played night-
ly on Wednesday, Thursday
and Friday, along with Sun-
day afternoons.

Going into the season
opener on Sunday, here’s how
the four coaches assess their
teams:

Lady Vixens

Loaded with national team
players, the Vixens will rely
heavenly on the trio of Laval
Sands, Cherise Rolle and
Tamasine Poitier- Emmanuel.

Coach Joe Smith said the
road to the championships
will once again have to go
through his Scottsdale team.

“We’re looking good. We
have basically the same team
from last year, but we have
our setter, Tia Wilson, back
home from school and _ that
will allow Laval to play our
natural position as the off set-
ter,” Smith said.

“We also have the leader-
ship in veteran Jackie Cony-
ers and we still have the Rolle
sisters (and Cherise), so I still
think we are going to be the
team to beat.

“The championship will still
go through us, regardless of
who the other teams bring.
We will defend our crown and
we will retain our crown. We
think very positive, we train
hard and we play very hard.”

Although his men’s Scotts-
dale team is not playing on
opening day, Smith said they
are also looking very good
with the return home of
Prince Wilson. He is expected
to hook up with veteran
Mario Dean and setter Javari
Southard.

Lady Truckers

DeVince Smith, who dou-
bles as the coach for the run-
ners-up, said he hasn’t had a
full squad out to practice yet,
but he’s convinced that as the
season progresses, they will
round into championship
form.

“Once we put our team
together, we will have to play
our way in shape,” said Smith,
who still has the big three of
Kelsie Johnson, Margaret
‘Muggie’ Albury and Freder-
icka McPhee to rely on.

“T still think we will be com-
petitive because we’ve been
practicing on some defense
and offensively we have
always been strong at the
net.”

Defenders

With a dual coaching role,
DeVince Smith said with
players such as Jan ‘Wire’ Pin-
der, Sherwin Arthurs and
Maurice ‘Cheeks’ Smith, he
doesn’t see why they can’t
repeat as champions.

“We have added a couple
of players like national team
setter Tony Simon and uni-
versal player Shedrick Forbes,
who will provide most of the
offense and defense that the
team kind of lacked last
year,” Smith said. “So once
again, I think we will be a
very competitive team.”

Technicians

With Renaldo Knowles and
Jamaal Ferguson now back
home, coach Adlabert Ingra-
ham said Ron ‘Box’
Demeritte should have all the
help he needs to get back to
championship status.

“We had a lot of problems
last year offensively finishing
a lot of games,” he said. “But
we have sorted out that prob-
lem, so I expect us to be very
competitive.

“Like we always do, we
look at the season as a foot-
stool for us to travel abroad.
But we will be just as com-
petitive as we were last year.
Hopefully this year, we will
be able to recapture the title
with the experience and play-
ers that we have this year.”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE



S
- k.

PAGE 11

OF

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009



ts

PAGE 9 ¢ International sports news

Volleyball to get
underway with
Championship
rematches

MARVIN BAIN, of the Red Bay
Westerners, takes a warm-up
shot during the tourney...

Basketball tourney ‘brought
hope to people of Andros’

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of Youth,
Sports and Culture
Desmond Bannister said
he was very impressed with
what he saw on the first
day of the North/Central
Andros Back-to-School
Basketball Classic.

Bannister was a part of

the visiting delegation that — jyigg gighal Bahamas Jamie B Morris, Minister of State for

was on hand in Staniard
Creek to christen the first

Culture Charles Maynard and MP for South Andros

of four courts that have Picewell Forbes can be seen during the first annual North
been reconstructed by con- and Central Andros Back to School Basketball Classic in
tractor Emile Knowles. Staniard Creek, Andros...

“The event brought a lot
of hope to the people of Andros,” Ban-
nister stated. “There was no bad inci-
dents, just young people looking for
somewhere positive to compete and dis-
play their talents.”

About 14 teams showed up to par-
ticipate in the tournament, which will be
spread over the next three Saturdays
before the eventual champions are
crowned.

From the competition displayed on
the opening day, Bannister said the
remainder of the tournament should be
a very competitive one. He noted that
the players were all enthusiastic about
participating and the fans showed up
in droves to support them.

In addition to the basketball compe-
tition, Bannister said local vendors were
able to take advantage of the opportu-
nity to showcase and sell their crafts,
inclusive of food, drinks and souvenir
items.

“We’re just thankful that we were
able to do it in that community,” said
Bannister, a native son of the soil from
Staniard Creek.

Among the dignitaries joining Ban-
nister were Minister of State for Culture
Charles Maynard, Vincent Peet, MP
for North Andros, Picewell Forbes, MP
for South Andros, Island administra-

tors Dr Huntley Christie and Jackson
McIntosh and Clyde Bowleg, who rep-
resented the Ministry of Education.

Bannister commended Brian Cleare,
the ministry’s Family Island coordinator
from Andros, who was responsible for
organising the tournament.

He also praised Emile Knowles of
Knowles Construction and Develop-
ment Limited for the manner in which
he was able to transform the basket-
ball court.

Knowles has also done the same for
the other three settlements where the
tournament will continue over the next
three Saturdays in Andros.

This Saturday, the tournament will
switch to Red Bays. Then it’s off to
Lowe Sound on Saturday, October 3
before the final is staged in Fresh Creek
on Saturday, October 10.

“T think the people in Red Bays are
very appreciative of the facilities they
have now,” Bannister said. “I know
when I went there before we contracted
Mr Knowles, the facilities there was
really in bad shape.

“Now the kids in Red Bays have
something that is very nice for them to
play on. There is a lot of talent in Red
Bays, so I think we will see some posi-
tive things coming from there.”

MINISTER of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister greets a young basketball fan

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ew Providence

Volleyball

Association

president

DeVince
Smith said with a number of
players returning home from
college, the 2009 season
should be a very competitive
one.

The season is scheduled to
get underway Sunday with a
rematch of last year’s cham-
pionship series in both the
men’s and women’s divisions
at the D W Davis Gymnasi-

CUP eT a ee ee ee ee eee
















Manning
», vallies Colts
to 27-23 win
over Dolphins
See page 9

‘O09 season should be
‘very competitive’

participate in the ladies’ divi-

In the ladies opener at 4 sion are the College of the
pm, runners-up Johnson Lady Bahamas Lady Caribs, the
Truckers will try to knock off | Lady Techs, Lady Hornets
the defending champions and possibly the Royal
Scottsdale Vixens, while in Bahamas Defence Force
the men’s feature contest to Stingrays and another youth-
follow, runners-up Techni- ful team.
cians will face defending The men’s division will
Scotiabank include Da Basement, Police,

Intruders and COB Caribs,

In addition to the above,
the other teams registered to SEE page 10

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Reduced work Cable ur

means ‘ow
not the time
to open up’
legal sector

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

WITH many of the 1,010
attorneys at the Bahamas Bar
unable to find jobs, and new
entrants finding to difficult to
obtain a pupillage, two attor-
neys yesterday argued that
“now is not the time” to open
the Bahamian legal profes-
sion to specialist foreign attor-
neys.

Dr Ear] Cash, the Higgs &
Johnson attorney and part-
ner, addressing a seminar
organised by his law firm, said
both the Bar Association and
Immigration Department
were open to permitting for-
eign attorneys to enter the
Bahamas as registered asso-
ciates to train their Bahamian
counterparts.

Dr Cash, opposing a
motion suggesting that the
Bahamian financial services
industry will contract unless
the legal services profession
‘opens up’, said firms such as
Graham, Thompson & Co,
Callenders & Co and McK-
inney, Bancroft & Hughes
had all brought in foreign
attorneys to help train their
Bahamian lawyers. In addi-
tion, Bahamian attorneys
have gone abroad to train and
work with foreign law firms.

Questioning “how much
further do we need to go”, Dr
Cash said he and others were
“not close minded”, yet were
worried that an unchecked
influx of foreign attorneys
would deprive their Bahami-
an counterparts of jobs, espe-
cially during a recession.

He also called for the
Bahamas Bar Association to
establish some kind of con-
tinued education and training
programme to- ensure
Bahamian attorneys could
compete with their interna-
tional peers, and suggested
that the Dupuch Law School
offer Master’s Degrees in spe-
cialist areas such as law, trusts,
securitisations, shipping, tax-
ation and international busi-
ness transactions.

Dr Cash was supported by
Cheryl Bazard, partner at
Bazard, Lamour & Compa-
ny, who urged that “now is
not the time to open up”.
Instead, she called for
investors and companies to
take advantage of legal advice
from Bahamian attorneys.

THE TRIBUNE ©

uSINeSS

WEDNESDAY,

SEPTEMBER 23,

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

able Bahamas
has warned that
proposals for
retail price reg-
ulation in the
communications sector could
“potentially jeopardise future
investment” in the sector,
again arguing that classifying
the company as having signif-
icant market power (SMP) in
cable TV and high speed data
services was “unfounded”.

Legal sector

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian legal pro-
fession must stop being
“parochial” and “open up” if
this nation’s financial services
industry is to survive and
grow, a leading attorney said
yesterday, with the interna-
tional sector’s contribution to
the $300 million tax revenues
generated per annum by the
banking sector shrinking
every year.

Philip Dunkley, senior part-
ner at Higgs & Johnson, said
the Bahamian financial ser-
vices industry was likely to
keep contracting unless the

* BISX-listed firm warns investment in communications sector

could be ‘potentially jeopardised’ by price regulation proposals



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ges: No TV price control

* Says 20,000 satellite subscribers, with 21%s market share, ‘discipline’ its prices
* Warns $30 basic TV price freeze ‘unsustainable without jeopardising service quality’

* IndiGo says voice citcuit prices down 32%

Submitting its feedback on
the Government’s retail price
consultation, Cable Bahamas
said that while cable TV sub-
scriber numbers had
increased by 17.5 per cent to
74,000 over the past five

years, up from 63,000 in 2004,
it faced competition from
direct-to-home (DTH) satel-
lite services.

While these services were
not licensed to operate in the
Bahamas, they were “never-

theless a commonly used
competitive alternative” to
Cable Bahamas, the BISX-
listed utility provider esti-
mating that there were cur-
rently 20,000 DTH TV ser-
vices in this nation.

‘must open’ for financial sector future

* Attorneys urged to stop being ‘parochial’ and open
doors to offices abroad and allowing specialists in

* Ex-minister says Bahamas losing market share and
contracting because it lacks ‘gatekeepers’ to attract
investment funds, as offshore share of $300m tax
revenues declining every year



JAMES SMITH

legal profession opened up in
two respects - establishing
offices abroad to market this
jurisdiction, its products and
services to international
clients, thus attracting busi-
ness in, and also allowing spe-
cialist, highly-skilled foreign
lawyers to practice from these

shores.

“We're experiencing the
worst recession in living mem-
ory, offshore financial centres
are under an unprecedented
attack from onshore and the
Bahamas has recently lost

SEE page 4B

BTC suffers 80% fixed-line income drop in 4 years

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company (BTC)
has seen the revenues derived
from its international long dis-
tance business fall by 80.7 per
cent between 2004-2008, due
to increased competition,
although the $45 million loss
it suffered in providing fixed-
line access to consumers has
narrowed due to increased
rental charges.

In its feedback to the public
consultation on retail pricing
regulation in the communica-
tions sector, BTC, which is in
the middle of a privatisation
exercise, said it had suffered a
“significant decline” in its
once-core international long
distance revenues since 2003,
due primarily to increased
competition.

Urging newly-incorporated
regulator, the Utilities Regu-
latory and Competition
Authority (URCA), to
remove fixed-line interna-
tional long distance calls from
the services in which it was
deemed to have significant

Bahamas must sign
more than 12 TIEAs

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas will ulti-
mately be forced to sign more
than the minimum 12 Tax
Information Exchange Agree-
ments (TIEAs) demanded by
the G-20/OECD, a leading
Bahamian attorney yesterday
arguing that this nation may
have to employ “the Doctrine
of Steps” in obtaining treaties
with better “trade-based”
advantages.

John Delaney, Higgs &
Johnson’s managing partner,
said that while double taxa-
tion agreements and invest-
ment treaties were the “pre-
ferred course” to take in com-
plying with G-20/0ECD
demands, the need for the
Bahamas to meet the 12
TIEA minimum by year-end
2009 might require this nation
to bide its time in obtaining
the former types of agree-
ment.

Acknowledging that it was
difficult to see what benefits
the Bahamas and its financial
services industry could obtain
from pure TIEAs, Mr
Delaney said that 12 did not
represent the minimum num-
ber of such agreements this

* Nation will be ‘pressed’
for more tax agreements
until most G-20
nations have them

* Leading attorney says
double tax agreements
‘preferred course’ for
Bahamas to take, and
any deals offering
‘trade-based advantages’

* But may have to bide time
in completing them to
ensure TIEA deadline met

nation would sign.

“The major countries will
insist that major international
financial centres such as the
Bahamas go beyond 12,” he
told a Higgs & Johnson-
organised seminar.

“Twelve is the number to
get things going, and they will
press so that the majority, if
not all the G-20 countries,
have an agreement in my
view.”

The G-20/OECD had
already indicated they were

SEE page 4B

* $45m access deficit narrows, but BTC still making loss on line rentals
* Company calls for long distance calls to be removed
from significant market power definition

market power (SMP), BTC
said revenues from this busi-
ness segment fell by 64.5 per
cent between 2004-2005.

For 2005-2006, fixed-line
international long distance
revenues fell by a further 21.7,
and in 2006-2007 and 2007-
2008 they dropped by a fur-
ther 17.3 per cent and 16.6 per
cent respectively.

BTC added that when it
came to inter-island calls, rev-
enues from this source had

fallen by 23.6 per cent during
the period between 2004-
2008. In 2004-2005, they fell
by 5 per cent, with further
declines of 4.3 per cent, 4.8
per cent and 12.2 per cent tak-
ing place in 2005-2006, 2006-
2007, and 2007-2008 respec-
tively.

Apart from proving that
BTC is now effectively a cel-
lular company, this source
accounting for 68 per cent of
its revenues in 2007, these sta-

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tistics show the impact of
competition, not only from
Systems Resource Group’s
(SRG) IndiGo Networks but
also Vonage, Skype and Mag-
ic Jack.

“Given the alternatives
available to end users with
respect to outgoing interna-
tional long distance services,
there is a case to be made to
have international long dis-

SEE page 3B

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We can get you there!

US

Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

PU lolol

St. Michael: 246.435.1955

ey EH NAR

This total, Cable Bahamas
said, was estimated to have
“doubled over the last five
years”, up from 10,000 in
2004.

It added: “Thus, DTH
Satellite TV services current-
ly account for just over 21 per
cent of the broadcast distrib-
ution services market in the
Bahamas. DTH satellite TV is
an effective competitive alter-
native to cable-based pay TV
services and, as such, serves
to discipline Cable Bahamas’
cable-based pay-TV service
prices.”

Cable Bahamas pointed out
that market share losses in the
US and Canada had resulted
in the lifting of price regula-
tion on cable T'V providers in
those countries, Canadian
regulators having determined
that once a cable company
showed it had lost 5 per cent
or more of its subscribers to
DTH satellite, its prices would
be deregulated immediately.

“Cable Bahamas believes
there is justification to do the

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



> Pension Plans

> Mutual Funds

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> Personal Pension Plan Accounts

> Education Investment Accounts

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URGENT NOTICE

DUE TO THE LACK OF A QUORUM
ALL MEMBERS Of
Bahama Islands Resorts & Casinos
Cooperative Credit Union (BIRCCCU)
Limited Are Urged To Attend The
Special Called Meeting
Which Will NOW Be Held

Date:

Saturday, October 3", 2009

Grounds Of The Credit Union
Time:

10:00 A.M.
Purpose of The Meeting:
To Discuss & Vote On The Proposed Opening
Up Of Our Bond To Allow Your Family To
Become Members Of BIRCCCU Ltd.



BS! OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
intemational private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is
presently accepting applications for

PRIVATE BANKING RELATIONSHIP MANAGER/MANAGED
PORTFOLIOS ADMINISTRATOR

Applicants for the position of must have a banking/financial degree or 7-10
yaars axpeneance in the offshore banking sector, have knowladge of
intamational investment instruments & money market, ability to partner with
taam mambers, must be confident regarding customer relations, investments

& portfolio management and have thorough knowledge of local legislation,
regulatory & statutory matters as wall as international banking practices,
Fluency in Italian is absolutely required

Personal qualities ;-

Excallant organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Commitment to quality and service excellence

Able to work with minimal supervision

Strong Team attitude

Financial and analytical background

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure

Responsibilities :-

Service & advise customers

Maintain & follaw up account relationships

Liaise directly with customers or their investment advisors

Monitor, analyze positions and evaluate reports

Ensure that managed portfolios are implemented according to the relevant
policies

Liaise with Portfolio Managers and other Relationship Mangers on

Meet deadlines on timely basis

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum
vitae to:-

Human Resources Manager

BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre
P. 0. Box N-7130

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kern@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted

PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



Cable urges:
No TV price
control

FROM page 1B

same in its case, given the sig-
nificance of DTH satellite
penetration in the Bahamian
market,” the company said.
Meanwhile, Cable
Bahamas also complained
that “there has been no clear-
ly defined or properly func-

tioning price review mecha-
nism in the case of basic pay
TV services. As a result, the
price for Cable Bahamas’
basic cable service has now
literally been frozen for $30
for the last 15 years”.
Calling for such a price
review mechanism to be put
in place, Cable Bahamas
warned: “Maintaining Cable

Bahamas basic cable (Pay
TV) service price at $30 going
forward is simply unsustain-
able without jeopardising ser-
vice quality.”

However, on a brighter
note, Paul Hutton-Ashkenny,
president of Systems
Resource Group (SRG),
operator of IndiGo Networks,
detailed some of the benefits



competition had brought to
Bahamian businesses and res-
idential telecoms consumers
since his firm entered the
fixed-line market in 2004.

He explained that the cost
of digital Tl business voice
circuits had fallen by 32 per
cent, with the cost of inter-
island calling and interna-
tional long distance calls
falling by 57.5 per cent and
83 per cent respectively.

UTS TT
a SIR BRC

US eT are

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

Notice to Vendors

The National Insurance Board (WTB) is prepating te make payments to % eniders by direct
bank deposits. To facilitate this, the NIB is requesting that vendors provide the necessary
banking informanen, Forms wall be distributed te venders for completion, Tf you do not

receive one, please contact us atone of the following to obtain. a copy of the fort:

|. APBankinginfot@imb-bahamas.com
2 Telephone No: (242) 502-1838, of
i.

Calleera Porm trom any New Providence NIB Local Office

The NIB requests the cooperation of all vendors as we seck to provide more efficient service,

All information will be treated as strictly conficlerttial.

>) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.by

EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (EOL
FOR PREQUALIFICATION FOR

The College of The Bahamas (COB) ts secking Expressions of Interest from qualified
hirms lo provide services amd product lor the design, supply and mstallatien of the exter:
nal landscaping, lighting and irngation systems for

(i) the Harry Moore Library and Information Centre presently under constriction at
the Oakes Field Campus of The College and

{il} the new Norther Bahamas Campus of The College presently under construction
in Freeport, Grand Bahu

Interested parties may obtain further information and a copy of the Expressions of Interest
Prequalification Application form fram:

The Office of the Vice President Finance
College of The Bahamas
(Cakes Field
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 242-302-4513/4516
Or

The Office of the Associate Vice President
College of The Bahamas
Northern Campus
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Tel: 242-352-9761

An information meeting will be held in Nassau, on Tuesday, 24th September, 200 and on
Wednesday, 30th September, 2009 in Freeport at a time and venue to be announced.

EOM's are te be submitted to the location(s) indicated in the EOT Prequalification Form in
a scaled envelope appropriately marked:
Viet President, Finance
College of The Bahamas
EXPRESSIONOF INTEREST - FEE -
insert name of applicable facility

Firms must submit a separate BO) for each facility. Al EOM's are to he submitted by 12:00)
pm (mid-day) on Friday, 9th October, 200K).



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 3B



Bad-mouthing rivals
may backfire on you

THIS week’s title sounds
like the real estate slogan:
“Location, location, loca-
tion”. Guess what? You’re
right. However, I’m not going
to talk about where you or
your business is located, but
about how and where you
talk about your competition.

Remember the old saying:
“Tf you can’t say anything
nice, don’t say anything at
all.” It may have been the old
adage years ago when you/we
were growing up, but does
the same hold true in the cut-
throat business world we all
live in? You decide.

The cynical among us
would say: “Of course not.”
Dorothy Parker perhaps
coined it best: “If you can’t
say anything nice, come over
here and sit by me.” Well, my
suggestion is don’t go over
and sit on that couch. Slan-
dering and gossip will not get
you very far.

It’s tempting to disparage
your competition. Pointing
out their weaknesses, faults
and repeating horror stories
of what has maybe happened

Promotional
Marketing

by Scott Farrington



to a client of theirs. Product
issues they have experienced,
delivery issues and so on.

So the next time you are
meeting with a client and you
talk about your competition,
try this and not that.

1. Compliment them -
WHAT? Yeah, that’s right.
Compliment who they are,
what they are etc. I mean,
they must be doing something
right because their doors are
still open. After you have
complimented them you can
then discuss the differences
between your company and
theirs.

2. Giving credibility to the
one company you're trying to
knock down. No one tries to
tear down the worst company
in the world.

If you’re attacking some-
one, even verbally, it must be
because youw’re worried about
them. So they next time you
try to knock down your com-
petition, be careful that you
are not actually doing the
opposite by giving them cred-
ibility.

I know that when some-
one does that with me, flags
go up and, in some cases, it
requires me to mvestigate the
competitor mentioned. Let
me check out the differences
myself.

3. Stop adding an unpleas-
ant aura to your reputation.

By stomping on your oppo-
nent’s neck and/or kicking
them (your competition)
when they are down, it leaves
an unpleasant aura about
who you are and your com-
pany’s corporate image.
Doing this is certainly not a
positive way to be perceived.
So be careful about not only
what you say but how you say
it.

The best way is just to
point out subtle differences

BIC suffers 80% fixed-line income drop in 4 years

FROM page 1B

tance excluded from the basked of price-reg-
ulated services,” BTC said. “The inclusion of
outgoing international long distance as part
of price regulated services impedes BTC’s abil-
ity to compete with licensed and unlicensed
operators.”

Meanwhile, BTC said a 2004 study by
National Economic Research Associates
(NERA) had pegged the access deficit it
incurred - the difference between the cost of
providing fixed line access to Bahamian con-
sumers and the revenues earned from line
rentals - at $45 million, meaning it suffered a
loss of this amount.

However, the incumbent operator added:
“Since the production of that report, the price
of access lines has increased by 58 per cent

for residential customers, from $9.50 to $15,
and by 67 per cent for business customers from
$21.25 to $36.

“While there has been a significant increase
in the price of line rentals, based on rough
estimates of 130,000 fixed lines, the increase
would not be sufficient to eliminate the access
deficit”.

While a rebalancing of BTC’s tariffs was
required, the company warned that there
would be “resistance” from some consumers
and a “buy in” would be necessary.

“This approach will significantly impact the
company’s profits, as it is forced to lower prices
for those services where price is significantly
above the cost of provision without having
the flexibility to increase prices where cost is
significantly above price,” BTC added.

FOUR CONWECTION-To THE WoRLO

PUBLIC

NOTICE

TENDER
Public Relations Assistance for
The Bahamas Telecommunications
Company Limited

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Lim-

ited is pleased to invite tenders to assist with Public
Relations initiatives for the company.

Interested firms or individuals may collect a Tender
Specification from the BTC's security desk at John F.
Kennedy, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:30
p.m., Monday through Friday from September 18th,

2009.

The deadline for submission of tenders is Thursday Oc-
tober 2nd, 2009. Tenders should be sealed and markéd
“PROPOSAL FOR PUBLIC RELATIONS ASSISTANCE INI-
TIATIVES FOR THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS
COMPANY LIMITED’ and should be delivered to the at
lention of the ‘Mr. |. Kirk Griffin Acting President and

CEO.’

BTC RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY,
OR ALL TENDERS

that show how your product
would apply more appropri-
ately than your competitor’s.
Not a positive way to be per-
ceived.

All of these marketing
strategies are certain to keep
your business on top during
these challenging economic
times. Have a productive and
profitable week!

Remember: “THOSE
WHO MARKET WILL
MAKE IT “

NB: Scott Farrington is
president of SunTee
EmbroidMe, a promotional
and marketing company spe-
cialising in uniforms, embroi-
dery, silk screen printing and
promotional products.

Established over 27 years
ago, SunTee EmbroidMe has
assisted Bahamian businesses
from various industries in
marketing themselves. Read-
ers can contact Mr Farring-
ton at SunTee EmbroidMe
on East Shirley Street, or by
e-mail at scott@sun-tee.com
or by telephone at 242-393-
3104.



207
(CLEAQUT-OR4

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
COMMON LAW & EQUITY DIVISION

IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT all that parcel of lot of land being
kncva'n as Jot Number Sixteen (16) Block Number Nineteen (19)
Centreville District, as shown on the Master Plan in the Deparment
of Lands And Surveys in the Island of New Providence.

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE Petition of JULIETTE L, RAMSEY

NOTICE

JULIETTE L. RAMSEY the Petitioner claim to be the owner in
fee simple in possession of the parcel of land and free from
encumbrances, The Petitioner has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas section 3 of the
Quicting Act, 1939 to have their Tithe to the said land investigated
and declared in a certificate of Titles to be printed by the Court in

the acoordance with che provisions of the act.

Copies of the file plan may be inspected daring normal heures. al:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Coun; and
2. The Chambers of Rumsey And Associates, Rames Building,
33 Planol, Nassau, Bahamas

Neatite is hereby piven thal any person or persons having a right
of dower or any advise claim net recoonized in the Petition shall
within thirty (20) days after the publication of the notice herein
fled in the regisiry of the Supreme Court in the city of Nassau
aforesaid and service on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement
af such claim in the prescribed Form, verified by an affidavit to
be filecl therewith. Failure of any such person to file amd serve a
statement of such claim within thirty days (30) herein will operate
asa bar to such claim.

Dated this 17 day of September, A.D, 2009)

RAMSEY AND ASSOCIATES
CHAMBER
Kumes Building
23 Planted Street
Nassau, Bahamas



LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.








FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!
Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million















Tel: 242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013
info@mariocareyrealty.com
www.marioca reyrea

EFG

Web Listing # 8377

As

Mario Carey Realty

“com Dts alaut yaw... Let's tale.

Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd

Client Relationship Officer

EFG International

Vice President

EPG International is a global private banking group headquartered in
Switzerland, offering private banking and asset management services. EPG
International's private banking businesses currently operate in 55 locations |
in over 30 countries, with circa 2,400 employees.

EG Bank & ‘Tr B

mas) Lid continues to expand as evidenced by

its new premises at Lyford Cay. EFG Bahamas has over 40 experienced
professionals and offers a full range of solutions for wealthy chents around
the globe. EPG's unique corporate culture attracts the most entrepreneurial
and most experienced professionals in the industry. To learn more, please
visit www.etgintemational.com

We are looking for a seasoned professional with at least 10 years of sales
and marketing experience in providing financial solutions to high net worth
clients and companies. Specifically, we require a professional fluent in
Portuguese, Spanish and English. The candidate must possess a solid
knowledge of investments, banking and trust services. The ability to service
and grow his/her own client book is extremely important. EPG provides a
unique and uninhibited global marketing opportunity, an open architecture
platform, and multiple booking centers.

The candidate must have a university degree. The individual must have the
required qualifications and accreditations to be registered with The Bahamas
Securities Commission. The ability to go on frequent business development
trips and work within very tight deadlines is also a necessity.

EPG offers an attractive compensation plan that includes salary, benefits
and a bonus structure directly related to profitability, Salary will be determined
by experience, and qualifications,

Only qualified professionals should submit applications by 9th October

2009 to:

EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd

Human Resources

Centre of Commerce, 2â„¢ Floor

1 Bay Street
P.O. Box SS 6289
Nassau, The Bahamas
Fax (242) 302-3487



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



OO —ooeaeeUS INES eee
Legal sector ‘must open’ for financial sector future

FROM page 1B

market share,” Mr Dunkley told a
Higgs & Johnson-organised semi-
nar, during a debate on a motion
that the Bahamian financial sector
would continue to contract unless
this nation’s legal profession ‘opens
up’.

“All this indicates the likelihood
that we will contract in our finan-
cial services industry in the future
unless we make a change,” he added.

While the Government and
Bahamian private sector could
always look to develop a competitive
advantage through launching new
products and services, Mr Dunkley
said any benefits were likely to be
shortlived, since other jurisdictions
would merely copy the Bahamas.

“T suggest that the main change
we can make is to open up the legal
profession. We have been closed
when others that have been success-
ful in the offshore industry have
opened up,” he explained.

“There are two aspects to opening
up. The legal profession needs to
open up and develop offices abroad
in key jurisdictions. We also need
to open our borders to the outside so
in our jurisdiction we can have the
specialists we need to compete with

other jurisdictions.”

Mr Dunkley added: “It is impera-
tive that the legal profession not
remain parochial. For too long we
have continued to allow the banks
and trust companies to go off and
market abroad. They don’t have the
same deep roots in this country that
we have.....

“Tf this jurisdiction is finished or
loses market share, the internation-
al banks can choose another juris-
diction. They are far more mobile
than others of us deeper rooted in
this jurisdiction. Lawyers are key to
marketing the home jurisdiction
abroad.”

Mr Dunkley was backed by James
Smith, former minister of state for
finance, who told the seminar that
unless the Bahamas opened up to
specialist foreign attorneys, it would
be unable to penetrate the “fastest
growing” segment of the interna-
tional financial services business -
investment funds and collective
investment schemes.

The CFAL chairman pointed out
that investment funds domiciling in
international financial services
required “specialist gatekeepers”,
including both international and
local attorneys, plus administrators
and managers.

“Fund sponsors seem to prefer

jurisdictions other than the
Bahamas, because they are able to
engage international as well as local
legal professionals to establish and
administer funds in these centres,”
Mr Smith said.

He added that if the Bahamian
international financial services indus-
try was “to grow, we need to attract
that slice of the business”. Some $0.5
trillion was estimated to be held in
collective investment vehicles world-
wide, with half that total in the hedge
fund industry.

Islands

Yet while the British Virgin
Islands and the Cayman Islands had
more than 2,000 and 3,000 invest-
ment funds registered in their juris-
dictions, the Bahamas “continues to
concentrate” on private wealth man-
agement, with just 700 funds domi-
ciled here.

While some $300 million in gov-
ernment revenues were generated
by the financial services industry per
annum, Mr Smith said: “Most of that
is generated by the domestic banks,
and the offshore sector’s share of
that is shrinking every year. If we
are to expand and grow the offshore
industry, we need to aggressively
pursue investment funds and hedge

funds.”

While Higgs & Johnson has
expanded into the Cayman Islands
via acquisition, and the likes of
Lennox Paton and Callender’s & Co
have opened offices overseas in ter-
ritories like the UK and British Vir-
gin Islands, Mr Dunkley said attor-
neys in Bermuda and the Cayman
Islands had been far more effective.

Taking Cayman-based Maples &
Calder and Walkers as an example,
along with Applebys in Bermuda,
Mr Dunkley said all three were
“home grown” but had expanded
abroad into both offshore and
onshore markets, using offices there
to promote the home country.

Maples & Calder advertised itself
as having a presence in Asia/Pacific,
Europe, Latin America, the Middle
East and North America. Its
Asia/Pacific office, in Hong Kong,
advertised itself as offering BVI and
Cayman legal and incorporation ser-
vices through a team of attorneys
fluent in Mandarin and Japanese,
and who had performed transactions
in China, Singapore, Japan and Aus-
tralia.

“There is no doubt that Cayman
and Bermuda have substantially ben-
efited from these home grown law
firms that have gone out and set up
platforms abroad, thereby marketing

their own jurisdictions,” Mr Dunkley
said.

“Unless we want to see a material
reduction in our industry we need
the legal profession to open up.”
Asia and Europe, especially, were
key markets, Mr Dunkley said.

Meanwhile, Mr Smith suggested
that since the Bahamas was seeking
World Trade Organisation (WTO)
membership, and had signed on to
the Economic Partnership Agree-
ment (EPA), the Bahamian legal
profession was likely to be opened to
overseas competition anyway.

“Whether it’s five, 10, 20 years,
the Bahamas will be liberalising all
its professional services, so may be
it’s better to liberalise now ahead of
time and get the requisite experi-
ence,” Mr Smith suggested.

He added that the Bahamas had
helped its rivals to grow through its
own mistakes and moving too slow-
ly, pointing out that John Maples
had first worked in the Bank of
Nova Scotia Trust Company in Nas-
sau in the 1970s before heading to
Cayman to found his own law firm.

“It’s not a question of shrinking
the business, but growing the busi-
ness with legal and financial exper-
tise,” Mr Smith said. “The Bahamas
is an island, but should not operate
as one.”

Bahamas must sign more than

FROM page 1B

likely to review the ‘12 TIEA’
threshold at some point in the
future, on the basis that some
agreements signed by inter-
national financial centres had
more value than others.

To illustrate this point, Mr



Delaney used the example of
last Friday’s signing of a
TIEA between the Bahamas
and Monaco, another inter-
national financial centre,
pointing out that this agree-
ment did “not have the same
value as the Bahamas doing a
deal with the UK or France”.

MUU

NOTICE is hereby given that ESACHAR CESAR of FOX HILL,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed
Statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 23" day of
September, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,


















PQ). Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

MUU

NOTICE is hereby given that ALEXLOUIS JEAN of WHITE LANE, OFF
MACKEY STREET, P.O. BOX $S-5312, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
Statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 23" day
of September, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7 147, Nassau, Bahamas.















RINA & CO. LTD.

(Company number 117,109 B)

An International Business Company
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

|, Renaud Anselin, Liquidator of RINA & CO. LTD.
hereby certify that the winding up and dissolution of
RINA & CO. LTD. has been completed in accordance
with the Articles of Dissolution and that RINA & CO.
LTD. has been dissolved as of 25th day of August,

2009.

Dated this 21st day of September, 2009

Renaud Anselin
Liquidator

Legal Notice

SENTA HOLDINGS LTD.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accomdance with Section 137
of the International Business Companies Act 2000 SENTA
HOLDINGS LTD. is in dissolution.

The Date of the Commencement of Dissolution was 16th
September 2009, David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust
(Bahamas) Ltd., Building 2 Caves Village, P.O, Box N-
3917 is the Liquidator of SENTA HOLDINGS LTD. All
persons having claims against the above-named company
ire required to send their address and particulars of their
debts to the Liquidator before the 16th October 2009.

For that reason, the Mona-
co agreement and similar ones
were likely to come under
scrutiny to assess whether
they met the true definition
of the G-20/OECD’s 12 min-
imum, and a lesser weighting
would likely be given to
treaties between two interna-
tional financial centres.

In addition, Mr Delaney
said the G-20/OECD were
also likely to assess the will-
ingness of jurisdictions to go
beyond 12 TIEAs and moni-
tor their implementation.

“Therefore, in peering into
the future, what do I see?”
Mr Delaney asked. “I see a
whole lot more treaties than
12 treaties, I see a lot of
treaties with the G-20 mem-
bers. The Bahamas has made
a commitment to a certain
standard, and once we’ve
signed on it’s a matter of what
they require and their expec-
tations.”

The Higgs & Johnson man-
aging partner, though, said
that signing TIEAs “does not
do a lot [for the Bahamas]
apart from complying with the
standard”. He added that the
key to how this nation fared
now lay in the type of tax
treaty it signed, and whether
these brought “some trade-
based advantages to us”.

With TIEAs simply allow-
ing requesting states to submit

12 TIEAS

requests for information on
specific taxpayers suspected
of avoiding taxes in criminal
and civil cases, Mr Delaney
said the Bahamas’ commit-
ment to conclude 12 by year-
end was simply to “keep on
side with the OECD”.

Benefits

Yet when it came to bene-
fits for the wider Bahamian
economy and financial ser-
vices industry, Mr Delaney
said other types of agreement
would be more beneficial,
such as a “TIEA plus’.

These agreements, he
explained, “look and read like
a TIEA, but there is a little
bit of a sweetener in there”.
The TIEA the Bahamas
signed with the US in January
2002 was one such example
of this, as it included a con-
vention tax deduction bene-
fit that allowed US business-
men and companies holding
conventions/meetings in the
Bahamas to offset their costs
of attending against their tax
liabilities - meaning the costs
are deducted from their tax
bill.

The 2002 TIEA had also
meant that the Bahamas
earned the Qualified Juris-
diction (QJ) status, and its
institutions the Qualified
Intermediary (QI) designa-

NOTICE
ZERTA HOLDING LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, ZERTA HOLDING LTD. is in dissolution as

of September 16, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, PO. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is

the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

IN HOUSE

INVESTMENTS LTD

NOTICE TO
SHAREHOLDERS

The Board of directors of In House Investments Limited has

declared a quarterly dividend for Preferred Shares to all

shareholders of record at September 15, 2009 as follows:

Preferred Shares 7.25% per annum (payment quarterly).

The payment will be made September 30, 2009 through

Royal Fidelity Share Registrars & Transfer Agents Limited

in the usual manner.

tion, from the Internal Rev-
enue Service (IRS) for with-
holding tax purposes.

However, Mr Delaney said
the better option for the
Bahamas was a double taxa-
tion agreement, which is usu-
ally signed between two
nations who both levy some
form of income tax.

These agreements ensure
that companies and citizens
are not taxed twice, Mr
Delaney using the example of
a Bahamian International
Business Company (IBC) that
owned shares in a US firm.

If the two nations had a
double tax treaty, the with-
holding tax levied on dividend
payments from the US com-
pany to the Bahamian IBC
might be lowered from 30 per
cent to 10 per cent, he sug-
gested, thus making it “attrac-
tive to use Bahamian compa-
nies for holding investments”.

“That’s really the preferred
course,” Mr Delaney said of
double tax treaties, “but the
issue for the Bahamas is that
we have to have a direct tax
so that we can qualify to enter
negotiations for a double tax
agreement.” Other nations
without any form of direct
taxation have been able to
enter such agreements,
though.

Other options, Mr Delaney
said, were bilateral investment

treaties and investment pro-
motion and protection
treaties. These agreements,
he explained, facilitated
investment in one country by
the citizens of another, afford-
ing these investments protec-
tion and, in some cases, giving
them Most Favoured Nation
treatment - ranking them
alongside domestic investors.
“Negotiating a bilateral
investment treaty or invest-
ment promotion and protec-
tion treaty takes a while
longer than negotiating a
TIEA,” Mr Delaney said.
“We have three months to
go before the end of the year.
From that perspective, the
Bahamas may find it has to
pursue the Doctrine of Stages,
taking it step by step. With 12
TIEAs we may get a couple
of double taxation agree-
ments, get a bilateral invest-
ment treaty, get a TIEA-

“This is the sort of thing I
would like to urge the
Bahamas to pursue in the cir-
cumstances.”

Given that the Bahamas
had committed to signing 12
TIEAs by year-end, the Hig-
gs & Johnson managing part-
ner said this nation might
have to simultaneously pur-
sue alternative agreements
with a view to concluding
them at a later date.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

WOODLANDS HOLDINGS LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of WOODLANDS HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.
The date of completion of the dissolution was the 21st day of

August, 2009.

an
tie’
Signed =a ie

Sabra Habey E1Din Meusib El-Sayed

Liquidator

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (4)
(a), (0) and (c) of the International Business
Companies Act, 2000 NOTICE is hereby given
that, SPARK GLOBAL FUND LIMITED is in
dissolution and that the date of commencement
of the dissolution is the 11th day of September

A.D. 2009.

International Protector Group Limited
Liquidators
Montague Sterling Centre
East Bay Street
P.O. Box N-3924
Nassau, The Bahamas

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PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



TASTE



The Tribune







w Le
Faia

TRY SOMETHING

.

INNER

y

S
y









By JEFFARAH GIBSON

eciding what fo cook after a long day at

work can be can be mind- boggling. To

ease some of the stress, here are five
meat recipes sure to please your family. These
recipes are not only easy on the pocket, but
delightful on the palatte. Try a new recipe each
day next week with your own choice of sides.



e¢ HONEY BAKED CHICKEN ¢

Ingredients:
° 2 pounds chicken drumsticks
° 2 tablespoons butter
° 2 tablespoons olive oil or Canola oil
° 1/2 cup flour

1 1/2 teaspoons Creole seasoning or
a seasoned salt blend

° 1/3 cup honey

° 1/4 cup brown sugar

° 4 tablespoons lemon juice

° 2 teaspoons soy sauce
Preparation:

1. Wash chicken a
source: www.about.com



¢ COCONUT SHRIMP ¢

Ingredients



e LAMB CHOPS WITH ORANGE AND THYME ¢

Cook Time: 55 minutes

i eee
4 to 6 lamb shoulder chops,
about 3/4-inch thick
1 teaspoon dried leaf thyme, crushed
1/2 teaspoon finely grated orange peel
1/4 cup orange juice
salt and pepper
8 ounces sliced mushrooms

Preparation:
Trim excess fat from lamb chops. Combine thyme, orange peel, and orange juice. Pour over

chops and marinate for at least 3 hours in the refrigerator. Drain; reserve marinade. Brown the
lamb chops in a small amount of vegetable oil; season lightly with salt and pepper. Add mari-
nade and mushrooms to the lamb chops; cover and simmer for 45 minutes, or until tender.

Uncover the last 5 minutes of cooking to reduce juices a bit.

Glazed Lamb Chops Recipe serves 4 to 6.

legg

1/2 cup all-purpose flour

2/3 cup beer

1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 cup all-purpose flour

2 cups flaked coconut

24 shrimp

3 cups oil for frying

Preparation

1. In medium bowl, combine egg, 1/2 cup flour, beer and
baking powder. Place 1/4 cup flour and coconut in two sepa-
rate bowls.

2. Hold shrimp by tail, and dredge in flour, shaking off
excess flour. Dip in egg/beer batter; allow excess to drip off.
Roll shrimp in coconut, and place on a baking sheet lined

| with wax paper. Refrigerate for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, heat

oil to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) in a deep-fryer.

3. Fry shrimp in batches: cook, turning once, for 2 to 3
minutes, or until golden brown. Using tongs, remove shrimp
to paper towels to drain. Serve warm with your favorite dip-

| ping sauce.

source www.allrecipes.co



¢ BARBECUE SHOULDER STEAK SKILLET ¢

Ingredients
° 3-4 tablespoons oil

° 1 teaspoon seasoning salt or white salt

° 1 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper

° 2 (1 LB) boneless beef shoulder chuck

steaks (about 3/4 to 1-inch thick)
° 2 medium onions, chopped
° 2 tablespoons fresh minced garlic





source : www.southernfood.about.com

° 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
(or to taste, may omit if desired)

1 1/2 cups water (can use beef broth)

1 1/2 cups tomato sauce

5-6 tablespoons lemon juice

6 tablespoons ketchup

2-3 tablespoons brown sugar

1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

1/2 teaspoon mustard powder

Preparation

1. Heat oil in a large skillet or electric frying pan over medi-
um-high heat. In a bowl combine the water with tomato sauce,
lemon juice, ketchup, brown sugar, Worcestershire sauce and
mustard powder until combined; set aside.

2. Season both chuck steaks with salt and pepper (about 1/2
teaspoon of salt and pepper for each steak or can use more if
desired).

3. Brown both sides of the steaks in hot oil then remove to a
plate.

4, Add in onion; sauté for about 3 minutes.

5. Add in garlic and crushed chili flakes; cook stirring for
another 1 minute.

6. Pour in the sauce over and around the meat.

7, Cover and simmer on low heat for about 1-1/2 hours or until
meat is tender.

8. Season with more salt and pepper if needed.

source :www.steakrecipes.ne

@ CHEDDAR AND CRAB CASSEROLE ¢

Ingredients
° 3 tablespoons of plain flour.

3/4 cups of skimmed milk powder.
1/4 teaspoon of mustard powder.
1/4 teaspoons of salt.
1/4 teaspoons of pepper.
1 cup of water.
3 oz strong cheddar cheese, grated.
12 oz Crab meat

| Preparation:

1. In asmall saucepan, combine the flour, mustard powder, milk
powder, salt and pepper.

2. Gradually add water, constantly stirring until the mixture
become thick.

3. Remove from heat.

4, Stir the cheese into the mixture until it has completely melted.
5. Stir in the crab meat.

_ 6. Place in a casserole dish and bake until all ingredients are

thoroughly cooked.

source: www.crabrecipes.net

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009, PAGE 7B





The Tribune



1. The Bahamas Histori-
cal Society will conduct a
free public lecture on
Thursday evening at the
museum on Elizabeth
Avenue on Shirley Street at
6pm. Meteorologist Wayne
Neeley will speak on the
topic "Bahamian Hurri-
canes.” For further infor-
mation call 322-4231.

3.This year, the Terry
McCoy Memorial Regatta
takes place at Montagu
Bay on Saturday and Sun-
day. This event is the last
official Sunfish Regatta
before the 2009 Sunfish
World Championships also
to be held at Montagu in
October. Terry McCoy was
well known in the sailing
community for volunteer-
ing with regattas, both
locally and internationally.
His sons Matthew and Lee,
along with the Bahamas
Sailing Association, start-
ed this regatta to help
keep Sunfish sailing active
in the Bahamas. All are
welcomed, especially
juniors who Terry loved to
see further the sailing tra-
dition. Contact tmc@the-
real.com or visit
www.bahamassailing.org

5. On Monday, Miss Teen
World Junior Bahamas,
Shaquell Demeritte, partic-
ipates in the Miss Princess
of The World (formerly
Miss World Junior
Pageant) in Czech Repub-
lic. She competes with
over 60 contestants to win
the grand prize of
$100,000 in cash and
awards.

CO DIRECTOR of The Tempest, Craig Pinder (Prospero), gives tips to Nicole Fair (Miranda).

Shakespeare

By JEFFARAH GIBSON

“Shakespeare in
Paradise”, a theatre
festival designed to
promote an apprecia-
tion and awareness
of the theatre to the
Bahamas will take

place October 5-12.

The eight day event will
feature seven productions,
three of which are Bahami-
an: “Music of the Bahamas”,
“Love In Two Acts” and
“Light”. The other perfor-

mances include “One White
One Black,” “Zora”,
“Caribbean Voices” and
William Shakespeare’s “The
Tempest.”

At acocktail party held last
Wednesday night at the Gray-
cliff Restaurant, Nicolette
Bethel, Director of Culture,
spoke about the importance
of this festival to the
Bahamas. “Theatre is one of
the most highly developed art
forms in the Bahamas, and we
chose to have this festival
because the Bahamas has to
diversify its products,” she
said.

Paradise

Tempest, Patti -Anne Eli
added :“Out of all the work
Shakespeare has done, The
Tempest was chosen, since
there are various themes that
a Bahamian audience can
relate to. Those themes
include opposition, servitude,
liberation, colonialism, and
power struggle,” she said.
The play has been adapted
to appeal to a Bahamian audi-
ence. “Students from the Col-
lege of the Bahamas under
the guidance of Nicolette
Bethel dramaturged the play
to suit the Bahamian audi-
ence. Characters and names
have been changed, but the

actual text has not been
touched.”

Having worked in Trinidad
for sometime, Mrs Eli says
that the actors have brought
the play to life and have huge
similarities to Trinidadian
actors. “There are twenty
actors in The Tempest, includ-
ing a few professional
Bahamian actors like Craig
Pinder and Dana Ferguson.
What I have noticed working
with the Bahamian actors is
that they are quite similar to
Trinidadian actors. They all
have a certain rhythm about
them that brings stage acts to
life”, she said.

Mrs Eli hopes that when
people hear the name Shake-
speare they won’t think of
complicated language, but a
work of endless imagination
they can understand, love,
enjoy, and appreciate.

“Light” is another play
which has Bahamian related
themes and colloquial themes.
Directed by Deon Simms, it
tells a true story about two





men who engage in conflict
over a lady to gain her love.
The main theme of the play is
to show the importance of
conflict resolution, and to
have a belief about oneself
that is not determined by oth-
ers.

Anton Chekhov’s “The
Bear” and Alfred Sutro “The
Open Door” are two acts in
one play, with each play con-
trasting the other.

“One play is about love
lost, and the other is about
love found under the theme
Tragedy Triumphs,” Mark
Kelly, Director of the play
said.

He also noted that he hopes
the play produces an intimate
setting, so that it is heartfelt.

Showings will be held at
The Dundas Theatre, the
National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, The Hub, Graycliff,
The Marley Resort and Nir-
vana.

For more information go to
www.shakespeareinpar-
adise.org



Summer Madness held no punches

By REUBEN SHEARER

Tribune Features Reporter

JAMES Catalyn pulled all the stops
in his Summer Madness Revue 2009
last week, amusing theatergoers
through typical, topical and timely skits
that made us ‘laugh at wesef.’ For
four nights, his 16 skit production
exposed the double standard in the
Bahamian market, and provided a ter-
rific blend of satire and comedy.

This was the 27th time Mr Catalyn
put on the series for the public who
raved with approval as they identified
with the situations the actors found
themselves in.

Mr Catalyn held no punches, ridi-
culing crooked politicians, and the
average Bahamian who is either
always late or wants something for
free.

The audience was amused as Cat-
lyn’s cast depicted the divide on the
marital rape law between religious fig-
ures in ‘Sexified;’ gambling citizens in
‘Der Gamblin’ Permissioner;’ and a
pair of disinterested parents in “The
School Situation,’ who take the back-
seat in the academic lives of their chil-
dren.

Most of the cast spoke in “Bahami-
anese,” a mix of broken English and
Bahamian slang. Individual mono-
logues set the tone for what topics
would be discussed in each skit.

A personal favorite was ‘Pass it
On.” In this skit, high ranking manag-
er, Ms Greene (played by Chrystal
Bethel) has a hard time convincing
long-time employee Mrs Burrows
(played by Veronica Toppin) to be
flexible, and collaborate with newer
ideas.

Mrs Burrows plays a feisty and
strong-headed character, and inject-
ed great acting into the skit. She want-
ed to squeeze young Ms Greene into
her mold, and was suspicious of the
new, the up-to-date, the different.

Here’s a line taken from Mrs Bur-
rows script: “All yinna young people
wan’ do is change up erryting, say is
mordern time an’ dat we had we day.
Wan’ cast us aside like ol’ dog.”

After back and forth discourse that
goes nowhere, Ms Greene gave Mrs
Burrows an ultimatum, saying that if
she is to remain with the organisation,
she must be open to merge with new
ideas and “change with the times.”

With that, Mrs Burrows suddenly
has a change of heart and is compliant.

Mr Catalyn told Tribune Enter-
tainment that the underlying theme of
this skit was to encourage older

Bahamians to pass on the reigns of
knowledge and experience to the
younger generation so they are more
equipped for the situations of life.

Speaking to Tribune Entertainment,
Mr Catalyn explained: “I wanted to
be the voice for those Bahamians who
are afraid to speak up on issues that
politicians aren’t slow to address, if at
all. That’s why I wrote these plays, I
want to make people think and see
what is happening to us.”

The cast was made up of some of
the best talent the country has to offer.
Some of the main actors were Natasha
Davis, Veronica Toppin, Dion John-
son, Stephanie Braynen, Chrystal
Bethell, Anthonique Farquharson,
Lamorn Miller, Rachel Rolle, Shireen
Hanna, Eric Adderley, Conrad May-
cock, Chrystal Bethell and Neil
Cleare.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

Cg
A number of Bahamian artist gave an astounding pefor-
mance at the Artist 4 Peace concert, held at Arawak Key
on Saturday night.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE



5-Day FORECAST

j

TAMPA
High: 91° F/33°C

Low: 75° F/24°C ae r. The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and 10:49am. 3.3 4:26am.
aa @ ’ 2 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 11:06 p.m. 26 5:17 p.m.
a at CO gem 23 Gem
bs a 11:59pm. 25 6:11 p.m.
, ei r Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday 12:36pm. 29 6:05am.
f : ‘ ABACO 7 oS 7:10 p.m.
- : -~ st ano on < FIQTN, gustttgsndazeelececinanesettzediaaziecazieunieas 12:57 a. 94 7:03am.
, ai @ N High: 89° F/32°C LOW eeeeeeeeeeeee 78° F/26° C 135 pm 28 in
f a Low: 77° F/25°C Normal high... er
- wy Normal low 74° F/24° C
q @ WEST PALM BEACH i Last year's HIgh ...ccccsscsssesesstene zeae SUN AND IVIOON
4 —— High: 88° F/31°C : Last year's lOW oe eee 77° F/25° C
oF Low: 79° F/26° C SPY Precipitation ———_—sSunrise....... 6:59.a.m. Moonrise... . 11:45 a.m.
r. a, As of 2 p.m. yesterday oo. eeccceccceee 0.09" Sunset....... 7:05 p.m. Moonset... . 10:26 p.m.
mn FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT << Year dat i) Full Last
High: 88°F/31°C @ High: 88° F/31°C Normal year to date .......c.ccsesscssessseeeeeseeee 36.51" oe 7
Low: 79° F/26°C — Low: 76° F/24° C te
oy AccuWeather.com 2
@ a a Forecasts and graphics provided by eric
- MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Oct. 4 Oct. 11
7; High: 90° F/32° C EL ELT HERA
i Low: 79° F/26° C NASSAU Li : “78° F/26°C
High: 89° F/32°C oe
=a Low: 79° F/26° C
5 i. @ ere
KEY WEST ee So CATISLAND
High: 88° F/31" C High: 87° F/31°C
Low: 79° F/26° C — Low: 75° F/24°C
sr e cx
‘s = a
Z; GREAT EXUMA wt SAN SALVADOR
i High: 88° F/31°C High: 89° F/32°C
Low: 77° F/25° C Low: 75° F/24°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | 5 . f
highs and tonights's lows. High: 90° F/32°C ——- .
Low: 77° F/25° C i. . i.
ee , HY
LONG ISLAND
Low: 75° F/24°C
Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday 4 MAYAGUANA
High Low High Low High Low High Low High Low High Low ae High: 88° F/31° C
F/C FIC FC FC F/C FIC FC FC FC FC Fic FC Low: 74° F/23°C
Albuquerque 65/18 46/7 pc 68/20 49/9 Indianapolis 84/28 65/18 t 82/27 64/17 t Philadelphia 82/27 68/20 t 84/28 61/16 t
Anchorage 51/10 38/3 s 47/8 41/5 Jacksonville 86/30 72/22 t 89/31 72/22 t Phoenix 95/35 71/21 s 97/36 72/22 s CROOKEDISLAND/ACKLINS
Atlanta 84/28 69/20 c 86/30 69/20 Kansas City 74/23 52/11 c 77/25 56/13 pc Pittsburgh 80/26 62/16 t 78/25 56/13 t RAGGEDISLAND — High:91°F/83°¢
Atlantic City 80/26 65/18 t 86/30 61/16 Las Vegas 92/33 64/17 s 96/35 69/20 s Portland,OR 92/33 5713 s 75/23 52/11 s High: 87° F/31°C Low: 77° F/25°C
Baltimore 82/27 66/18 t 83/28 62/16 Little Rock 78/25 65/18 t 79/26 67/19 t Raleigh-Durham 86/30 68/20 c 89/31 66/18 pc Low: 74°F/23°C a +
Boston 82/27 64/47 pe 79/26 56/13 Los Angeles 100/37 70/21 s 96/35 66/18 s St. Louis 80/26 65/18 t 81/27 67/19 pc .
Buffalo 76/24 60/15 t 75/23 56/13 Louisville 86/30 69/20 t 84/28 67/19 t Salt Lake City 78/25 53/11 s 80/26 55/12 pc GREAT INAGUA vw
Charleston, SC 84/28 70/21 t 87/30 70/21 Memphis 82/27 70/21 t 85/29 70/21 t San Antonio 78/25 63/17 pce 82/27 66/18 c High: 92° F/33°C
Chicago 84/28 61/16 t 80/26 59/15 Miami 90/32 79/26 t 88/31 79/26 pc San Diego 88/31 63/17 s 83/28 63/17 $s in 76° F/24°C
Cleveland 80/26 62/16 t 78/25 57/13 Minneapolis 76/24 60/15 s 80/26 59/15 pc San Francisco 80/26 56/13 $s 78/25 55/12 $ ow.
Dallas 78/25 60/15 s 77/25 62/16 Nashville 83/28 67/19 c 86/30 67/19 t Seattle 86/30 54/12 s 69/20 51/10 s
Denver 54412 39/3 4+ 60/115 42/5 New Orleans 86/30 77/25 t 89/31 76/24 t Tallahassee 90/32 72/22 pe 92/33 72/22 t
Detroit 82/27 64/17 t 81/27 57/13 New York 78/25 70/21 pce 83/28 6317 t Tampa 91/32 75/23 t 91/32 75/23 t
Honolulu 89/31 75/23 s 89/31 75/23 Oklahoma City 72/22 52/11 pe 73/22 55/12 t Tucson 91/32 61/116 s 89/31 62/16 s xy
Houston 79/26 68/20 t 85/29 73/22 Orlando 88/31 75/23 t 91/32 75/23 t Washington, DC 84/28 68/20 t 86/30 66/18 t

ORLANDO |
_ High:88°F/31°C a:
Low: 75°F/24°C



THE WEATHER REPORT

~

x



~ \























2|3|4|5|6

MODERATE

Some sun with a Partly cloudy, a t-storm; Partly sunny with a Partly sunny, a t-storm Plenty of sun. Partly sunny with
t-storm; breezy. breezy. shower. in spots. t-storms possible.
. High: 88° High: 89° High: 87° High: 88°
High: 89° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 77° Low: 78° Low: 78°
PETE ae Maer
| 102°-86°F 104°-81° F 93°-82° F High















HIGH |








71 rt Ny

oe
'|s|9|10
\. HIGH

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

a Posy
t. (ft

Ht. (ft.

Low



Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
91/32
63/17
68/20
77/25
66/18
90/32
86/30
74/23
81/27
76/24
82/27
71/21
81/27
65/18
68/20
82/27
59/15
92/33
92/33
838/31
90/32
82/27
82/27
66/18
61/16
75/23
17/25
67/19
91/32
57/13
90/32

105/40

74/23
78/25
74/23
88/31
75/23
68/20
79/26
84/28
73/22
77/25
75/23
57/13
77/25
87/30
99/37
58/14
75/23
76/24
84/28
98/36
17/25
88/31
75/23
90/32
70/21
90/32
15/23
79/26
63/17
72/22
93/33
79/26
80/26
75/23
74/23
76/24
72/22
74/23

il

Today

Low
F/C
77/25
50/10
43/6
63/17
58/14
78/25
77/25
63/17
52/11
69/20
58/14
52/11
76/24
41/5
52/11
57/13
34/1
65/18
84/28
46/7
73/22
69/20
60/15
47/8
46/7
55/12
52/11
52/11
72/22
48/8
81/27
74/23
60/15
54/12
55/12
79/26
58/14
52/11
54/12
77/25
55/12
63/17
57/13
50/10
52/11
56/13
79/26
43/6
52/11
52/11
72/22
73/22
63/17
79/26
42/5
70/21
46/7
73/22
59/15
55/12
46/7
55/12
78/25
70/21
54/12
63/17
57/13
60/15
55/12
53/11








no
= —

AMnM*TAVNMNBDBAANA FTI VHV*TGD
= Bao oO

a we”? me? a ie

—-* oa 7TH
oO —a- sz

—~ i Bee oO Bee
oO oO oO

pe
s

High
F/C
91/32
61/16
72/22
81/27
65/18
90/32
86/30
76/24
73/22
79/26
82/27
66/18
82/27
70/21
64/17
81/27
64/17
90/32
93/33
77/25
90/32
81/27
83/28
62/16
61/16
72/22
76/24
68/20
86/30
55/12
88/31

107/41

76/24
81/27
74/23
88/31
74/23
68/20
81/27
84/28
72/22
81/27
72/22
59/15
75/23
87/30
99/37
59/15
77/25
66/18
79/26
99/37
17/25
88/31
80/26
87/30
73/22
87/30
72/22
77/25
61/16
74/23
87/30
80/26
72/22
81/27
63/17
71/21
68/20
79/26

Thursday

Low
F/C
74/23
48/8
43/6
64/17
56/13
77/25
78/25
63/17
60/15
71/21
58/14
46/7
76/24
38/3
50/10
56/13
46/7
65/18
84/28
37/2
74/23
72/22

WwW

ce

a

ome ie ee Oe ee
ce

65/18 s

50/10
48/8
48/8

54/12
46/7

72/22
48/8

81/27

73/22

64/17

60/15

52/11

80/26

57/13

50/10

54/12

77/25

52/11

64/17
46/7
45/7

53/11

55/12

17/25
43/6

54/12
49/9

65/18

72/22

58/14

79/26
46/7

73/22
48/8

74/23

54/12

57/13
45/7

50/10

77/25

67/19

50/10

64/17

50/10

57/13

52/11

54/12

oO me

pc
sh

pe
pc
pe
C
s
pe
c
s

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace



SUSAR eee a

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MAarINE FORECAST


















WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 85° F
Thursday: _E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 85° F
FREEPORT Today: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 5 Miles 86° F
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Shakespeare
in Paradise

see page seven



UntorgettaBULL Moments with winning artist
Tiffany Darling now on her way to Jamaica.

=

Cal

Regular Bahamian
artists shine at Red
Bull art competition

By JEFFARAH GIBSON

AHAMIANS showed off their

artistic abilities at the Bristol &

Wines Red Bull competition,
molding, painting, and creating pieces
on various art mediums, all inspired
and created with Red Bull cans.

The “Art of Can” competition was a creativity contest that
allowed regular Bahamians whose artwork is not publicly
recognised a chance to compete with other competent artists.

Sixteen finalists sailed the imagination boat, and explored a
variety of ideas for their pieces.

And although each contestant displayed great artistic capa-
bilities, only three pieces were chosen for the final competition,
to be held in Kingston, Jamaica.

Tiffany Darling, first place winner, and an employee at Bris-
tol & Wines, will be heading to Kingston on an all expense paid
trip with her art piece, “Unforgettabull Moments”, which was
a wedding cake.

Upon finding out her piece won the contest, she was ecstat-
ic and shocked, since she never considered herself a creative
person.

“When I found out I won the contest it was an amazing feel-
ing. Even though I did expect to win, it was still surprising. I
never had any formal training in art before, but I always had
creative hands and a big imagination” she said.

The idea of her intricate piece “Unforgettabull Moments”
was conceived while surfing the web.

“T wanted to do something so I went on the Internet in
search of something that I could have done, but could not find
anything interesting and different to work with. So since I love
to watch Ace of Cakes on the Food Network, I decided to
create a wedding cake for my piece.”

She found that working on the piece was time consuming, but
a labour of love.

“This piece took so much time to complete. The minute I
came home from work I would immediately begin working
on the cake. Sometimes I would find myself going to bed two
o’clock in the morning, but I enjoyed every moment of it,” she
said.

Her piece was called “Unforgettabull Moments” because a
wedding signifies a special time in a couple’s life that is rarely
forgotten.

Not only was the competition fulfilling for Mrs Darling, but
it unlocked and revealed a special talent she never knew was
there.

“T never knew I had the ability to do what I did. This was a
wonderful experience, and if there is another competition like
this in the future I will surely enter,” she said.

She is going to Jamaica in high spirits, excited to see to what
other’s ideas gave birth.

The second, and third place winners also will be heading to
Jamaica to compete.

The Red Bull competition originated in Australia where the
brand is located. Competitions like this are always held in
Australia.

However, this is the first time the competition has been held
. | inthe Bahamas, and Jamaica.

It was judged by three well known artists, Antonius Roberts,
Sue Katz, and Angelique McKay.



ee ee 2a
Third place piece Flying Bulltish by Dorman
Stubbs.



Red Bull Music by young artist Jave Martin.

Try something new for dinner

see page six








Gives U Wings a work of body paint by Italia
Williams placed second at the Art of Can.

Rosemary McPhee's entry entitled High Glow.
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Noted entry Sea Wings by auto body work
specialist Emon Mortimer.





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