Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
{T)\

Pim blowin’ it

SOF
SOF

HIGH
LOW

PARTLY SUNNY,


www.tribune242.com

Volume: 105 No.250 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009

VICTIM OF TRAGIC ACCIDENT? OR
ee Se

Victim of

m@ PRESTON FERGUSON

PULLING
TOGETHER:
(sitting) Henri-
ette Smith and
Eloise Moxey;
(standing) Frederick Fergu-
son, Olga Fordes, Deidre
) Gray, Dale Ferguson Joseph
s| and Merv Johnson.

East, near the Forest, Exuma, on
the morning of August 2. Police ini-
tially suspected that he had run off
the road and hit a utility pole, how-
ever, his family believes the acci-
dent was “staged.”

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

DISTRAUGHT family mem-
bers of Preston Ferguson say that
they are certain he was murdered

and blame police for mishandling
the investigation into his death.

The Taste
on
Tuesdays!!

Ferguson, 38, a resident of Exu-
ma and father of one, was found
dead in a truck on the side of the
road in the area of Ocean Addition

POLICE NAME SLAIN BURGER KING MANAGER
© PAGE FIVE

Valarge

IZzZa wilh MEN FIRE DEATHS ‘TO BE TREATED AS HOMICIDES’

© PAGE SIX

The Tribu

“WAKE UP!

Sausage & Egg
Burrito



ACCUSED: Former PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater pictured on her

way to court.

Defendants plead not guilty to
Jolin Travolta extortion charges

FORMER PARAMEDIC Tarino Light-
bourne going to court yesterday.

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

AJURY was selected yes-
terday in the case of former
PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater and former
paramedic Tarino Light-
bourne, who are accused of
attempting to extort $25 mil-
lion from Hollywood actor
John Travolta.

Six women and three men
were selected to hear evi-
dence in the case, which will
take place before Senior Jus-

| tice Anita Allen.

The prosecution is expect-

} ed to open its case this morn-

ing.

SEE page five

Tim Clarke/Tribune Staff

Help Your Favourite Teacher WIN $1000!
Nominate a Teacher by September 30th, 2009 for

The Fidelity Sir Gerald Cash National Distinguished Teachers’ Awards

Download a Nomination Form from:

el me te Ce et

http://www.fidelitygroup.com/ndta



INVAVOSR YEN! AUD) 185740 6 CA NY

ISLANDS) LEADING NEWSPAPER

=) FIDELITY |





PAGE 2, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009
LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



MS ee



Unanswered

The family of Preston Ferguson say the
police’s version of how he died is com-

pletely at odds with the evidence. They
have posed a number of questions to
senior officers, including:

WeIQNt LOSS...
Health Gain

CEN Ee CEP Ee

Ph: 327.5483/6



FOR ALL YOUR DECORATING
“Lowest Prices On The Island” golutt

STORE HOURS:
Monday - Saturday
8:30am - 5:30pm

BILLY’S DREAM
STILL ALIVE

FREE DELIVERY ANY WHERE IN NASSAU AND TO THE MAIL BOAT

¢ E-Z CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE

Donald's Furniture
And Appliance Centre

SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322-1731 OR 322-3875



¢ IF Preston died while sitting upright in the driver's seat, why is there no blood in this area,
whereas the passenger’s side of the gearbox, console and floor covered in it?

¢ IF Preston died as a result of major trauma caused by his head striking a utility pole, how
was it that he was found sitting in the driver's seat, with his head against the head-rest? How
did the impact force necessary to create his massive head injury not propel any part of his
body across into the passenger’s side?



¢ IF his body was found sitting on top of a pile of smashed glass in the seat with no glass
whatsoever on top of his body.



¢ IF Preston died because his
exposed head struck this util-
ity pole, how did he come to

| be driving several feet off the
| road in the first place?
| ¢ IF this was the case, how

did he manage to steer back
on to the road after suffering
massive head trauma?

¢ IF his was out of the dri-
ver’s window at the time,
should he not have struck
the side of his head, rather

Pe) than the middle of his fore-



¢ IF this is the scuff marks the
impact of Preston’s head
against the utility pole — caus-
ing massive trauma — how is
there no trace of blood on the
pole, the ground, or either side
of the driver's door?

¢ IF the window was smashed
as a result of the vehicle strik-
ing the poll, why is there no
smashed glass at the base of
the pole, but covers the ground
where the vehicle came to rest
20 yards down the road?

¢ IF Preston had his head out of
the window at the time of the
accident, the window must

have been down. If so, how did |

it shatter upon impact, filling
the interior with glass?

head?

¢ DOES the police’s version
not suggest he was looking
directly at the utility pole as it
approached his face?

¢ IF the police’s version is
correct, would it not mean
Preston was attempting to
spit directly into the wind?



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Ue a



VICTIM O

murder?



By NATARIO McKENZIE « Tribune Staff Reporter ¢ nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

DISTRAUGHT family members of
Preston Ferguson say that they are
certain he was murdered and
blame police for mishandling the
investigation into his death.

Ferguson, 38, a resident of Exuma and father of
one, was found dead in a truck on the side of the
road in the area of Ocean Addition East, near the
Forest, Exuma, on the morning of August 2. Police
initially suspected that he had run off the road and
hit a utility pole, however, his family believes the
accident was “staged.”

They claim they know of an individual with a
motive to kill Preston. According to his sister, Eloise
Moxey, it is believed that her brother was having an
affair with a married woman.

“He promised my brother he was going to kill
him,” Mrs Moxey alleged.

According to Preston’s family, the minimal dam-
age to the vehicle he was found in was not consistent
with his massive injury and that the impact could not
have caused his death. According to Mr Ferguson’s
family, police had raised the theory that Mr Fergu-
son had perhaps stuck his head out of the truck’s
window to spit and hit his head on the lamp pole.
The second theory was that Mr Ferguson had fallen
asleep and his head fell out of the window.

Merv Johnson who had been with his uncle earlier
that night said that Mr Ferguson was found sitting
upright in the driver’s seat of the truck with his head
slumped back.

“That was the only visible mark of any kind of
trauma to him. There wasn’t any visible damage to
the truck. The front of the truck was intact, the wind-
shield was intact, the only damage was a scrape to
the driver’s side of the truck and they were saying
that’s what killed him,” Mr Johnson said.

The family also highlighted the fact that most of
the blood was found on the passenger side. “The
only thing broken on the truck is the side mirror, not
one single drop of blood on the driver’s side,” Mrs
Moxey said. She also noted that no broken glass was
found on her brother’s body but was found mainly
on the passenger seat.

“The window was broken out. It’s obvious that the
glass was up and was hit from the outside to look like
an accident because most of the glass is on the pas-
senger side. He was sitting on glass. “How could he
sit on glass if the glass was broken on impact?” Mrs
Ferguson wanted to know. She also noted that the air
conditioning was left on which further suggested that









+2 is. © i BP id =

¢ IF Preston died of a massive head injury suffered while driving alone, how did
his vehicle come to a stop about 20 yards down the road from the scene of the

accident?

the windows had been up. The family claims that
their evidence suggests that Mr Ferguson was the
victim of murder.

“The police are deeming this an accident, but we
know that this is a murder and we have evidence to
substantiate our claim that it was a murder,” Mrs
Moxey alleged. According to Mr Ferguson’s family,
the deceased was last seen leaving Rolleville with his
female friend.

“She picked him up as she was leaving Rolleville
and he drove with her supposedly back to his place.
He said he was going home; he had no reason to
come back out,” Mr Ferguson’s nephew said.

Mrs Moxey said that she has met with Commis-
sioner of Police Reginald Ferguson regarding the
matter and was recently informed that an investiga-
tion is continuing and that “experts are conducting a
re-enactment of the accident.” Mrs Moxey said she
also met with National Security Minister Tommy
Turnquest.

Commissioner Ferguson told The Tribune, “We
are conducting a thorough investigation into this
matter. [am aware of the suspicions as to how he
may have died. We have been in touch with his fami-
ly and will have a meeting very soon to inform them
of our findings.”

“Someone drove that vehicle to where they staged
this and drove it up against the lamp post. What con-
cerns us is the way this was handled by police,” Mrs
Moxey said.

“They have gotten rid of every single piece of evi-
dence. They sent the truck back to Grand Isles
because my brother worked in the landscaping
department at Grand Isles. That was a company
truck. That’s the reason he didn’t go out in the truck
that night.”

Mr Ferguson’s family is also wondering whatever
became of his clothing and hair samples or DNA that
could be extracted from them. They say that the indi-
vidual they suspect has not as yet been questioned by
police. They also say that the woman who was the
last person to be seen with him has not been ques-
tioned either. The family says that they have been
awaiting the results of a toxicology report for about a
month.

“He left to go home that night. He left with a cer-
tain lady who was supposed to be taking him home.
The next morning he is dead and who shows up at
the door? This lady with her husband to say that he
is dead,” Mrs Moxey said.

Mr Ferguson who was employed at Grand Isle Vil-
las as a Landscaping Supervisor was the youngest of
12 children. He was laid to rest August 21. He is sur-
vived by his son, Preston Jr.

¢ IF Preston did indeed die
sitting upright in the dri-
ver’s seat of the vehicle,
why can blood clearly be
seen pouring into the dri-
ver’s side of the vehicle
from the passenger’s side?

sis
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
eR AO TS
Pay
322-2197

UU

UN

-?
OT «

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



_ ie

de ae Le

TUBA

Home Accessories
Candle Holders

t eee : a if

Lae ee

Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 * Robinson Rd.[242] 322-3080

CSO





z Fabulous
| Designer
Dresies

by
lccale be lL
















Ratablished in 1956 by an old Bohemian family

Peyeipmmcmt Strat (ruse Tay 2) The 190904 vor ORTH
+ Pad 75-995)
Conte Oomrt ot Atieetin, Fecedios Inuoed Tet 3615
7

aettlgetcg eins rics |
reall: hah Prowl cote ae coe | PCr, Bor BELG



CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

THe Moar THOaah0H RRsToR ATION & CLeAXTNO Eves, o@ THR ve 6 Peep!
Nasa" s Oey PROTEEOMAL, CORTE Sto Cappo & Uses CARE Sesto

* Carpet, Uphokiery, Sin an Matte Cleaning &
Hesiorahion Spectabet

® Peochon Cleaning Syens romowes Deepa Howey
Soil, Haciena, Crease, Watermarks aad Sure from
Carpeting & Pumivire, revoring usm oo like mew
gin fraction of repbcemerni creat
Carpet, Sofas, Lowrecat, Chitra, Dining Chairs, Car,
Bours, Grout. Tiles, Marble 2 ‘Stone

* Perian Wool & Sik Caner Cleasing Special
* Mable Polshing, Ronen & Coe

* Word Floor Bewteration

Amhorised Stone Tech Profisisiogal Contract

CALL FROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594

OMY WE CAN 00 IT BMGT?

* aga Ge pervade

UE LOA aa Ce Pa

PROCHIEM SWS TEM tae)

Home Fabrics

SEPTEMBER 17'-OCTOBER 3'

Lamour
* Bridal
«Silk

*Linen

* Brocades
*Colfon

* Chiffon

* Special Occasion

0%

ENTIRE STOCK
OF FABRICS*

Remnants
$1.99yd

* Drapery Fabric
* Jacquards

* Cotton Prints

* Brocades

¢ Upholstery

° Waverly

30% OFF SELECTED | 15°" Bahamas Batik & Allover

&
15%?" outdoor Fabric

j ananed «Fragonard nH

30% Sale at both Madeira and
Robinson Road Stores.
*Net Price Fabric Excluded

*Vinyl, Plastic, Felt, Net & Tulle not on Sale



PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master







































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama war choice: Escalate or scale back

WASHINGTON — Escalate or scale back.

The blunt conclusion laid out by the top
American commander in Afghanistan —
"The status quo will lead to failure" — poses
a stark and urgent choice for President Barack
Obama: Intensify the foundering conflict with
more troops or narrow the mission to target-
ing terrorists instead of protecting Afghans.

In his report to Obama, Gen. Stanley
McChrystal makes clear his view that ulti-
mate success in Afghanistan requires over-
coming two main threats: the insurgency and
a "crisis of confidence" among Afghans in
their own government. Both must be
addressed, and together they require more
resources, he says.

"Insufficiently addressing either principal
threat will result in failure,” the general con-
cludes.

The McChrystal assessment puts to the
test Obama's assertion just six months ago
that he would put the war effort on a path to
success by providing what the previous White
House didn't.

"For six years, Afghanistan has been
denied the resources that it demands because
of the war in Iraq," Obama said March 27.
"Now, we must make a commitment that can
accomplish our goals." He approved the dis-
patch of 21,000 more U.S. troops and
promised a comprehensive improvement in
the US. effort to stabilize the country, train its
security forces and advance justice and eco-
nomic opportunity.

Obama also said then that he would re-
evaluate after the Afghan presidential elec-
tion, which was held August 20. The charges
of widespread fraud and ballot-rigging that
emerged after the election have only added to
doubts in Washington about whether the
Afghan government can be counted on as a
reliable partner. The president thus far has not
endorsed the McChrystal approach, saying
in television interviews over the weekend that
he needs to be convinced that sending more
troops would make Americans safer from al-
Qaida. Tellingly, Obama reiterated in those
interviews that his core goal is to destroy al- who our counterparts are, and we have to
Qaida, which is not present in significant num- make it clear that in return for X, we expect
bers in Afghanistan. He did not focus on sav- Ye"
ing Afghanistan. Anthony Cordesman, a military analyst at

"I'm not interested in just being in the Centre for Strategic and International
Afghanistan for the sake of being in Studies who advised McChrystal in Kabul
Afghanistan or saving face," Obama told this summer, said in a telephone interview
NBC's "Meet the Press” on Sunday. Monday that Obama has invited doubt about

On Monday, two senior administration his commitment to succeeding in Afghanistan
officials said that among the options under by putting off a decision on devoting more
consideration at the White House is stepping resources.
up missile strikes by U.S. aerial drones on "The truth is that we don't have that much
the Pakistan side of the Afghan border. Tal- time," Cordesman said. "Waiting to see what
iban and associated Afghan rebel groups who happens with existing resources and existing
operate with relative impunity on the Pak- troop levels, when the commanding general
istani side of the border already are being has already said that's an unacceptable risk,
targeted by U.S. Predator drone strikes, with basically invites defeat." He added: "The
limited success. president has yet to show he can lead in this

McChrystal's report, first made public war.”

Monday by The Washington Post, was not (This article was written by Robert Burns,
intended to present Obama with a list of mil- AP National Security Writer).

itary options. The general left no doubt where
he stands. He believes a full-scale, compre-
hensive counterinsurgency campaign is what
is required, and that time is of the essence.

But White House officials say the president
is considering more than the McChrystal
assessment as he weighs courses of action.
He's relying on the views of key Cabinet
aides, including Defence Secretary Robert
Gates, who said last week that he has yet to
make up his mind on the wisdom of commit-
ting more troops.

Gates has said, however, that he does not
believe that a scaled-back approach that
focuses mainly on killing al-Qaida leaders —
rather than the McChrystal view that coun-
terterrorism operations should be part of a
broader campaign to build up Afghan support
for their government — is the right answer.

"The notion that you can conduct a pure-
ly counterterrorist kind of campaign and do it
from a distance simply does not accord with
reality," Gates told reporters earlier this
month. "The reality is that even if you want to
focus on counterterrorism, you cannot do
that successfully without local law enforce-
ment, without internal security, without intel-
ligence" — without a major presence in Kab-
ul. McChrystal's immediate superior, Gen.
David Petraeus, sees it similarly.

"He (McChrystal) is the first to recognise
not just the extraordinary capabilities but also
the limitations of counterterrorism forces in
Afghanistan,” Petraeus wrote in an opinion
article published Friday in The Times of Lon-
don.

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton
underlined the importance of seeking views
beyond McChrystal's report.

"It's critically important, but it's a part of
the overall process and there are many other
considerations that we have to take into
account," Clinton said in an interview airing
Monday on The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer.
Clinton also said that no decision would be
made until the outcome of the Afghan elec-
tion is known, "because we have to know

Features:

“4 cylinder 1.8L * CD/Radio wimp3 Plug
“Automatic * Air Bags, Seat Belts
“Fog Lights * Air Condition
“Immobilizer * Power Package

3 Year Factory Warranty
ALMERA SHIFT _the way you move vest

ELITE MOTORS LID. SANPINMOTORS LIMITED "7THEStorreiinonc wim

—

; COMMONWEALTH Bei hes
Thompson Blvd. « Oakes Field

t. 242.326.6377 * f, 242.326.6315
&, sanping@coralwave.com

4289 Wull ood
PO), Box Nata
t (242) Saga? | f0a9) 309.8038

INSURANCE AVASLABLE 1TH
ADWANTAGE WSURANCE
BROKESS & AGENTS LTD.

We need to

offer hope

and help to
hurting wives

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thank you for allowing
me the space to respond to
the published position of the
Bahamas Christian Council
on the proposed marital
rape law, published in the
media and appearing in The
Tribune on September 4,
2009 at page six, under the
title Christian Council
response to proposed mari-
tal rape law.

One of the main thrusts
of the argument against the
proposed law is that it would
be subject to abuse.

All laws are subject to
abuse, but that fact alone
does not stop us as a people
from enacting laws to cor-
rect situations or actions that
we consider wrong.

For example, the fact that
a person may make a false
accusation of robbery or
child abduction, out of a
desire for revenge, has not
and would not cause us to
repeal the law of robbery or
child abduction so that those
actions are no longer crimi-
nal. We must ask ourselves
as Bahamians: Do we want
to protect wives from what
we understand to be the
crime (or offence) of rape?
Because if so, what alterna-
tive are we offering to those
wives who have been sub-
jected to having sexual inter-
course against their will?
The only suggestion con-
tained in the statement pub-
lished by the Council is that
of counselling, which, since
this already exists through
church, state and private
bodies, cannot be seen to be
a solution as it is obviously
an insufficient remedy.

We currently have the
crime of rape on the statute
books. Stealing is also a
criminal offence. Coun-
selling may be offered to a
first offender for having
committed the crime of
stealing, but this is on the
basis that stealing is indeed a
crime. How can the Council
speak about offering or rec-
ommending counselling for
a first offence of marital
rape, when it is not even
prepared to call rape what
it is and punish it according-
ly? I wonder what is the hus-
band’s right that the Council
is seeking to protect or pre-

LETTERS

letters@tripbunemedia.net



serve and what in the Coun-
cil’s view is the wife’s right
as regards her own person
(body).

The other dimension of
the abuse argument is the
call for there to be “checks
and balances” in place
before we as a nation should
even consider amending the
law. Let us therefore exam-
ine what procedures cur-
rently apply to criminal
complaints and in particu-
lar, where a complaint of
rape is made.

These are as follows:

1) A complaint is made to
the Police.

2) A Police officer takes a
statement from the person
who makes the complaint.

3) The Police take a state-
ment from the accused (if
he wishes to say anything).

4) The complaint is inves-
tigated, and physical or med-
ical evidence is obtained.

5) A senior Police officer
being someone other than
the investigating officer
decides whether to charge
the accused person.

6) If charged, the person
must appear in court. From
this point a legal tribunal has
control of the matter of the
complaint, which is prose-
cuted by the Attorney Gen-
eral, not by the person who
made the complaint. Wit-
ness must testify and be
cross-examined and eventu-
ally a decision is made on
the evidence.

Having regard to this
process I must ask “What
are the additional ‘checks
and balances’ that need to
be put in place before the
marital rape law can be
enacted?” It is simply not
the case that a wife could,
under the proposed amend-
ment, make a complaint this
evening that her husband
raped her, and tonight he is
locked up in Her Majesty’s
Prison for a decade or the
rest of his life.

I disagree with Reverend
Paul that the marriage con-
tract implies open-ended
consent, if he means that the
consent is always operating.

DON STAINTON
PROTECTION
WE SELL OUTER SPACE

TELEPHONE: 322-8219 322-8160

ALL ALUMINUM PATIO ROOF OR
SCREENED ROOM

a

ALL ALUMINUM CAR PORT
Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978

1 Corinthians 7:5 says in part
“Do not deprive one anoth-
er except with consent for a
time” (NKJV). It would
seem that the consent can-
not be open-ended in the
sense described, if it could
be withdrawn at any time.
Furthermore, this verse
demonstrates that consent
is an essential element in the
sexual relationship between
husband and wife.

Their freedom or licence
to have intercourse with
each other at any time can-
not and does not amount to
a licence to have intercourse
with the spouse without his
or her consent.

In the daily life of mar-
ried couples they are each
consenting or agreeing to
intimacy on each and every
occasion that it occurs.

Rev Paul argues on behalf
of the Council that on their
marriage day “in the sight
of God and in the company
of witnesses, they pledged
to give themselves to each
other in holy matrimony and
thereby gave each other
upfront, implicit, open end-
ed sexual consent.” It is
upon this basis that he
argues that it is not right,
and could never be right to
bring married couples under
the authority of a law that
has hitherto only applied to
non-married couples. The
difficulty with this argument
is that we do not, for exam-
ple, have a separate or dif-
ferent law for Christian cou-
ples and non-Christian cou-
ples when it comes to the
subject of divorce. Nor am I
suggesting that it should be
so. But the same way that
the law recognises that non-
married persons or
estranged married persons
do have “sexual relations”
that go wrong, the law
should be brought to bear
in situations involving mar-
ried couples where the rela-
tionship has gone wrong.
His argument makes no
allowance for the human
condition, for husbands who
cruelly abuse their wives
sexually.

What to do with the hus-
band who refuses to buy
groceries, or to pay the
mortgage or rent, refuses to
pay the school fees, and
allows the lights to be turned
off, but has a sweetheart or
two, has STD’s and
demands that his wife give
him sex. If she wants gro-
ceries in the house, or if she
wants the lights back on
then she is forced to give in
to want her husband wants.
No physical violence there,
but no wife’s consent either.

But because in the com-
pany of witnesses he
pledged himself to her and
she to him she must submit?

And what about those
cases of repeated, horrible
physical violence?

Let me be sure to state for
the record, that I am neither
anti-marriage, nor anti-male.
I believe that in this country
there are many good hus-
bands, who outnumber the
“bad”, who care for and sup-
port their wives and fami-
lies. In fact I am personally
acquainted with a number
of such. However, there is
such a thing as marital rape.

It exists in fact, if not yet
in law. I do hope that Sec-
tion 15 is repealed, that we
will call a spade “a spade”,
and offer some hope and
help to those hurting wives.

I believe that one of the
unintended consequences of
this new law will be that per-
sons will enter into marriage
more soberly, more serious-
ly, and will be more likely
to accord to their spouse the
respect that he or she
deserves as a fellow human
being.

CAROL MISIEWICZ
Nassau,
September 4, 2009



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

TRAVOLTA TRIAL: DAY ONE
Defendants plead ‘absolutely, positively, 100 per

Police name slain
Burger King hoss

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



THE Burger King manager

outside the fast-food chain’s

cent not guilty’ to John Travolta extortion charges | 2: »<::22
los

FROM page one

Ms Bridgewater, 49, and Mr Light-
bourne, 47, are accused of conspiring to
extort and attempting to extort money
from Mr Travolta between January 2 and
January 20 by means of threats.

Ms Bridgewater is also accused of abet-
ment to extortion. She is represented by
lawyers Murrio Ducille and Krysta Smith.

Mr Lightbourne is represented by Carl-
son Shurland and Mary Bain.

Director of Public Prosecutions
Bernard Turner, Neil Brathwaite and
Garvin Gaskin are prosecuting the case.
They are expected to call 14 witnesses,
among them Mr Travolta, PLP Senator
Allyson Maynard-Gibson and West End
and Bimini MP Obie Wilchcombe.

Arraigned

Ms Bridgewater and Mr Lightbourne
were first arraigned on the charges in
late January and arraigned again before
Senior Justice Allen on April 28 after
prosecutors presented a Voluntary Bill of
Indictment.

The charges were again read to the
defendants yesterday in the presence of
the jury.

When asked to enter a plea to the
charges both replied: “Absolutely, posi-
tively, 100 per cent not guilty.”

Both Ms Bridgewater and Mr Light-
bourne are on $50,000 bail.

Senior Justice Allen yesterday acceded
to a request by their attorneys for the
two defendants to be allowed to sit
behind their lawyers during the trial
rather than in the prisoner’s dock.

Reports of the alleged extortion
attempt emerged days after Jett Travol-
ta, the 16-year-old son of actors John
Travolta, 54, and Kelly Preston, 46, died
of a seizure at the family’s vacation home
in Freeport, Grand Bahama, on January

Ms Bridgewater announced her resig-
nation from the Senate days after the
police brought charges against her.

FORMER PARAMEDIC Tarino Lightbourne

at court yesterday.

COURT SHORTS

MAGISTRATE’S COURT: Melbourne Bain, 26
Man charged with murder

of mother during robbery

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A MAN charged in the murder of a moth-
er-of-three who was gunned down at her
workplace in a daring daylight robbery last
month was arraigned in the Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Police have charged Melbourne Bain, 26,
of Durham Street, in the August 21 murder
of Wendy Bullard.

Bain, alias “Snatcher”, is also accused of
robbing Ms Bullard of $694 which belonged
to 21st Century Steel Welding on Royal
Palm Lane.

Ms Bullard, 34, was shot in the face when
two gunmen attacked her workplace situ-
ated just yards away from St George’s Angli-
can Church.

She was the country’s 53rd homicide vic-
tim for the year.

Inside Court 1, Bank Lane, yesterday, Ms
Bullard’s relatives looked on as Bain was
arraigned before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez.

Bain, who is represented by lawyer Ian
Cargill, was not required to enter a plea to
the armed robbery and murder charges.

He pleaded guilty, however, to possession
of an unlicensed shotgun.

Firearm

Court dockets state that Bain was found in
possession of the firearm on September 17.
He is expected to be sentenced on Septem-
ber 30 on the firearm charge.

In the meantime, Bain has been remand-
ed to Her Majesty’s Prison.

His armed robbery and murder cases have
been transferred to Court 11, Nassau Street,
and adjourned to September 29.

MAGISTRATE’S COURT: Wade Rolle Jr, 19, Leonardo Wright, 26



Two men accused of murdering
Bertha’s Go-Go Ribs employee

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

TWO men charged in the
murder of a Bertha’s Go-
Go Ribs employee were
arraigned in the Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Wade Rolle Jr, 19, of
Union Village, alias
“Bumpy”, and Leonardo
Wright, 26, of Millennium
Gardens, alias “Fox”, are
accused of the armed rob-
bery and murder of Nelson
Goodman.

Last week, David Rolle,
34, of Big Pond was
arraigned in the Magistrate’s
Court for Mr Goodman’s
murder.

Mr Goodman, 44, of
Pinewood Gardens, was

gunned down outside
Bertha’s Go-Go Ribs on
Poinciana Avenue, Coconut
Grove, just before midnight
on Wednesday, September
8.

Cash

It is alleged that the three
men robbed Mr Goodman
of $200 cash, the property
of Bertha’s Go-Go Ribs,
and intentionally caused his
death.

According to initial
reports by police, the victim
was approached by several
people just before gunshots
were heard.

Rolle and Wright, who
were arraigned before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez in

Court 1, Bank Lane, were
not required to enter a plea
to the charges. Both men are
represented by lawyer
Devard Francis.

Mr Francis told the court
yesterday that Rolle, who
had complained of being
abused by police, was
denied medical attention.

Chief Magistrate Gomez
ordered that Rolle receive
medical attention.

Both men were remand-
ed to Her Majesty’s Prison
and the case was adjourned
to September 25.

Inspector David Lockhart
told the court yesterday that
both men are also expected
to appear in Court 11, Nas-
sau Street, on armed rob-
bery charges.

se

Ue ee

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD

Anailatia in Grand Bahama at Qealty Auto Sales |Fresport) = Queens Hwy, 252-6122 # Abapo Motor Mall, Don MacKay Bld, 367-2916

.

fi
er

A BR a Pa

TRADITIOMAL CORGLLA,





= te oF |

oy es —_—

-o > Ss er

gay Es or =

~mar Fs: -

= Ss 4 =. =
; er =

aie -

ieee =
ie ary =,

“es wee = -
ik =

ee hs i =

ets Bo - =

i To Res i

ay Se “ _ =.

“Ea Bt Tt —_ . =

mer es = i

mr Be ol 4 =

= =: “ :=
ees - 35
i =

—=

Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway location has been
identified by police as Rashad
Morris, 21.

Mr Morris lived on John
Street, off Baillou Hill Road,
and police believe he was
abducted and driven to the
restaurant where his killer or
killers demanded he open the
safe.

When Mr Morris, the man-
ager of Burger King on Fred-
erick Street and former man-
ager of the Tonique-Williams-
Darling restaurant, failed to
open the safe he was beaten in
the manager’s office and
dragged outside where he was
stabbed several times.

A witness saw him being bru-
tally beaten outside the restau-
rant and called the police. Offi-
cers arrived at the scene within
minutes and found Mr Morris
dead in a pool of blood at
around 1.30am on Sunday.

Bahamasair pilot Lionel
Lewis McQueen, 29, was also
killed early Sunday morning.

He was shot several times
and found dead at his home in
Golden Palm Estates, near the
Kennedy Subdivision, shortly
after 4am.

His cousin and roommate
Montez Saunders was also shot
multiple times and remains in
serious condition at the Inten-
sive Care Unit of Princess Mar-
garet Hospital.

Police have launched inten-
sive investigations into both
matters.

Anyone with information
which may assist in the investi-
gations should call police
urgently on 911, 919 or call
Crime Stoppers anonymously
on 328-TIPS (8477).

tale
se

eR
PHONE: 822-2157



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff








cee

LOPROLLA

2 AAAIALEEE



Auto Mall, Shirley Street (opp. St. Matihew's Church}

Open Mon to Fri fam - 5:30pm ;
Sat sam - |2neon

Tel: 397-1700

E-mail: execmotoriabatelmet. bs

Parts and service guaranteed



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 6, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

PENIMAU meee Colm!

gangsters in their home



By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A FAMILY of four have been driven
out of their home after gangsters pelted
the house with bottles and rocks for weeks,
and injured a mother and her son in the
attacks.

Newspaper vendor Michael Johnson, 43,
said gangsters in the Kemp Road area
accused his eight-year-old son of stealing a
gun from them and started targeting the
house on September 6.

Attacks on the home have persisted on
almost a daily basis since, and Mr John-
son’s wife and son have been injured on
two different occasions.

Mr Johnson, who sells newspapers in
Shirley Street near the junction with Kemp
Road, reported every incident to officers at
the Wulff Road Police Station, but his com-
plaints have not been taken seriously, he
said.

His wife Justine Johnson, 44, was badly
cut when bottles and rocks were thrown
through the living room window during the
first attack, and a glass bottle hit her in the
head.

; TARGET OF ATTACK: Gangsters
Hospital pelted the property with bottles and
rocks for weeks.

Michael, eight, was hit in the head with a
rock while in the shower on the morning of
Sunday, September 13. Although he wasn’t
bleeding, his father took him to Princess
Margaret Hospital to be examined for con-
cussion or brain damage.

They reported the incident to police after
leaving the hospital, but Mr Johnson said
officers only told him to “get out” and “go
back home.”

The following day Mrs Johnson and her
children, Michael and Michaelette, 13,
moved out of the house in Periwinkle
Alley, off Williams Lane, Kemp Road, and
Mr Johnson has been at home alone while
the attacks have persisted.

Mrs Johnson said: “This neighbourhood
must be getting worse because we never
had problems like this before. It’s a horri-
ble thing, really scary.”

Mr Johnson does not want his family to
return home until he is sure they will be
safe.

He said: “They accuse my son of stealing
a gun, which he didn’t do, and one of the
young fellas tried to interfere with my
daughter. It’s getting worse and worse.

“Sometimes we can’t even sleep in the

house because bottles and rocks are
coming in through the window. They
have damaged every window in my
house.”

Mr Johnson said the men who are
targetting the family are not local
and are likely to be a part of a gang
who gamble in the area on weekends
and fight with rocks and bottles.

He criticised police for not taking
action to protect his family.

The newspaper vendor said: “They
have driven us out of our house and
all the police are doing is taking state-
ments to see what they can do, but
nothing has been done. But some-
thing is going to have to be done
because I can’t allow my wife and
children to be out there when they
should be at home with me.”

SMASHED: A broken window is a calling

card of the rock-throwing gangsters.

TROe PEA ePS rigs 4G Fal Wwoeee

PUBLIC NOTICE

Tender for “Used & Salvaged Vehicles”

| | vehicle type || ehicle Type
1998 Ford F-25090 Truth
Pais | 1996 Ford 150 von | 2001 [1998 Ford F-250 P/U Truck
1998 Ford F-250 P/U Truck
[tas [1998 150 van | 2008 [1998 Ford F-250 P/UTruck
[sue | 1994 6-150van | 2004 [1998 Ford F-250 P/U Truck
F350 | 1990 F350 LIA Truck | 861 [1996 Ford F-450 Lift Truck

1997 Ford F-150 Lift Truck
2026 | 1999 Ford Ranger P/UT
1996 Ford Ranger P/U T 1991 Nissan Civilian
1998 Ford Ranger P/UT 1998 Ford F-800 Truck
1999 Ford Ranger P/U T 1999 Ford Ranger P/U Trock
; 13

2010]
[2014 | 1998 Ford RangerP/UT [13 [2007 Avalon
[2020 [1999 Ford Ranger P/UT | 107? [1998 Ford Ranger
ee
[£1008 995 Ford Ranger

Vehicles can be viewed at Perpall Tract from 9:00 a.m. and
4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Interested persons should submit bids to BIC's Head Office lo-
cated at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, Bids
should be received by 5:00 pm, Wednesday, September 30,
2009. Bids are to be clearly marked, “Used & Salvaged Ve-
hicles” and should be addressed to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin

ACTING PRESIDENT & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive, P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

BIC RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY, OR




























Fire deaths
likely to be
treated as
homicides

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE deaths of four people killed in a fire last week were expect-
ed to be classified as homicides last night, as police said they are cer-
tain an arsonist sparked the deadly blaze in their home.

Theresa Brown, 51; her daughter Kayshala Bodie, 18; grand-
daughter Telair Johnson, one; and neighbour Savanna Stuart, 18,
all died of smoke inhalation when the family home in Wilson
Tract caught fire shortly after 7am last Thursday.

Supt Leon Bethel, head of the Royal Bahamas Police Force
homicide unit, said police suspect an object was thrown through the
front window into the living room of the house, igniting the fire.

Detectives are still examing the crime scene in an effort to iden-
tify the object which could have broken the front window of the
house off Wulff Road.

Supt Bethel said police are “almost certain” the fire was an
arson attack, but was unable to confirm this suspicion before The
Tribune went to press.

His officers will continue to interview relatives, friends and
neighbours of the victims in an effort to identify a suspect or sus-
pects, he said. Preliminary examinations by a pathologist have
shown all four victims died as a result of smoke inhalation. Their
bodies were not badly burned in the blaze, Mr Bethel said.

He denied reports claiming the victims were shot or attacked
before they died in their home, and he refuted neighbours’ alle-
gations that the killer nailed the doors and windows shut to trap the
sleeping victims inside. However Mr Bethel said the residents
had bolted the doors from the inside and there are bars on the win-
dows which may have hindered their escape.

He added: “It seems like someone was able to set the place
ablaze from the outside by throwing something in through the
front window.

“They were trying to get out through the door and windows, but
they were all barred up, and because they were overwhelmed by the
smoke that might have inhibited their judgment.

“They would have been inhaling smoke for quite a while.”

The homicide chief said: “We are still investigating, and we
continue to visit the area to gather information and search for
evidence associated with this matter.

“We are chasing all angles and don’t want to target anyone
specifically until this investigation has been completed.”

Anyone with any information which may assist investigations
should call police urgently on 911, 919 or call Crime Stoppers on
328-TIPS (8477).

Defence Force marine in

coma after

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A YOUNG Defence Force
marine is clinging to life in a
coma after nearly drowning dur-
ing a training exercise at the
community pools in South
Beach.

The male marine seaman was
swimming laps in one of the
pools during a scuba diving les-
son along with several fellow
officers. As his colleagues sur-
faced at one end of the pool,
someone noticed that the
marine was motionless at the
bottom. His colleagues scram-
bled to pull him out and per-
formed CPR until an ambu-
lance arrived.

While the identity of the
marine not yet been released,
The Tribune understands he is
21-year-old Marine Seaman
Charles Heastie.

Although the incident hap-
pened around llam on

76 BOSTON WHALER OUTRAGE
WITH BRAND NEW! TRAILER

Yer: 2001
Price: 30,0000
Hulk Fiberglass

ear drowning
een ies The public or persons within
the organisation should know,"
said an outraged Defence Force
officer who spoke on condition
of anonymity.

The officer said he wonders if
the incident would have been
avoided if there had been more
instructors at the pool.

When contacted to confirm
the incident yesterday, Minis-
ter of National Security Tom-
my Turnquest - who has
responsibility for the Defence
Force — said officials are not try-
ing to cover anything up.

"There wasn't any reason
why they shouldn't have given a
report, it was an official




Tommy Turnquest

Wednesday of last week, it was
not reported to the press,
prompting concerned citizens
to contact The Tribune fearing
the matter was being “hushed
up".

"You don't keep things like
that under wraps — if it was me
or anybody else — regardless if it
was an accident or negligence.

Engine: Twin Wercery O01 OFT) bias, 225 HP 450 Hors

WW SSSR LS

25 Outrage in great conciiion! fully ieded ath Autc-pilct, fish Hinder, Chart pita GPS,
Shere! 0D, Hed, Freshwater, Boe cushions, Boaeened with bwin Mercury 22) Optra aed

anaait oralt gauges

Standard Equi pant

integral bow palit w/anchae roller and chart plate
Bow mrehor orgs ahoich
Port 2 curiae” forward deck marage
‘obama eae

binge wr ddbers

Port So aoe” fhe boo ain
Prd bolder

ali prep ace

Locloabde comeucke anor ig viipkeal dar
Lieb aah cd art

Yer Beal reed Sebchert a] Soneyerd deck eral
Saf baling fergie ocho

SAL meering wheel

Sh commode punk rail

rink Hodeier

eee ee eH

hbo gan baepe cine
Lrenveriiet tamer ws rarkdowr:
forwaed comming bottien
Hyduake dene edt

a ee ee

Optional Dquiprent

® Porte potti sy pemp- cat SCE cite
THtop op pun ou icigg ae
a ay ac hy cc

= Wemllss
Lwar
Tell electresicy incheding redar. hari ple.
quta-pilct, toh finder, WH". wares



Defence Force activity,” he said.

Mr Turnquest said he was
told about the incident by
Defence Force Commodore
Clifford Scavella on Wednes-
day and has been receiving rou-
tine updates on the marine's
condition.

"It was a dive course. They
were taking scuba diving lessons
at the Betty Kelly Kenning
pools and they were doing
breathing exercises, breath
holding and snorkel clearing.

"When (the other officers)
got to the other end, someone
shouted out to them that one
of their divers was underwater
and that's when they got him
surfaced and administered CPR
until the ambulance arrived,"
Mr Turnquest told The Tribune
yesterday.

Mr Turnquest declined to
comment when asked if a short-
age of certified instructors at
the pool contributed to the inci-
dent. Sources close to the Force
revealed that the marine is in a
coma and breathing with the
assistance of a respirator, but
Mr Turnquest did not confirm
or deny this. It is unclear if the
marine — who has been on the
Force for less than five years —
had any pre-existing health
issues. Mr Turnquest said the
officer, like all his colleagues,
would have taken part in an
annual physical last January.

A brief press release issued
by the Force after The Tribune
made inquiries said the marine
was admitted to Doctor's Hos-
pital "following a diving exer-
cise" at the Betty Kelly Ken-
ning Swim Complex.

The statement added that the
marine was in critical, but stable
condition.

An investigation into the inci-
dent is underway.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 7



OEE
CUE
POT
and guns

SIR RONALD SANDERS



A FORMER diplomat is
calling on the United
States to urgently imple-
ment a new and direct
strategy to tackle the drug
and gun problem in the
Caribbean region.

Sir Ronald Sanders —a
Tribune weekly columnist
and former chairman of
the Caribbean Financial
Action Task Force against
drug trafficking and money
laundering — warned that if
the US does not lead the
way in curbing the traffick-
ing of firearms and illegal
drugs through the region,
countries in the Caribbean
will suffer even further.

Addressing a recent
gathering of high-ranking
military officers at the
Royal College of Defence
Studies in London, Sir
Roland said: “Almost
every country (in the
Caribbean) has the same
problem and many of the
smuggled weapons, when
captured are traceable to
the United States. This
suggests that the absence
of a vigorous policy to curb
arms sales is unintentional-
ly contributing to crime in
Central America and the
Caribbean.”

Resources

“In many cases, (the)
police forces (in those
countries) are out-gunned
by the weapons available
to drug gangs and they lack
the numbers, the equip-
ment and other resources
to combat the problem.”

Sir Roland said the US
government could make an
“enormous contribution”
to resolving the drugs and
weapons problem “by
passing legislation and
implementing machinery
to control arms smuggling;
by reviewing the practice
of deporting convicted
felons to their countries of
origin, and by adopting
measures to stop legal sale
of assault weapons.”

Caribbean countries, Sir
Roland said, are being
overrun by crime that
stems from the drug trade.

“In conditions of eco-
nomic decline and
increased unemployment,
drug trafficking and its
attendant other crimes
escalate, as they are now
doing throughout the
region,” he said.

The former diplomat
called on the US to lead
the way in organising col-
laborative arrangements
with Europe, Latin Ameri-
ca and the Caribbean to
establish an anti-narcotic
programme which address-
es both supply and
demand.

“Tf this is not done, the
problem of drug-trafficking
and its attendant high
crime will continue to
plague Central America
and the Caribbean with a
terrible destabilising effect
on the small economies
that are least able to cope,”
he said.

Sela a

For the stories

behind the news,
beste e Jie] 41 4
on Mondays



DEATH OF LLOYD ALLEN ALBURY
Inmate set to be charged with

murder of fellow prisoner

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

AN inmate at Her
Majesty's Prison is expected
to be charged with the mur-
der of fellow prisoner Lloyd
Allen Albury sometime
today, according to a senior
police officer.

Albury died on Septem-
ber 10, two days after he was
admitted to hospital follow-
ing a fight in a cell at the
prison.

Police have now conclud-
ed their probe into his death
and are set to charge anoth-
er man with his homicide.

"We have done our inves-
tigations and we are expect-
ing to take that to court
(today) — we intend to
charge another inmate for
his death," head of the homi-
cide squad Assistant Super-
intendent Leon Bethel told



"We have done our investiga-
tions and we are expecting to
take that to court (today) — we
intend to charge another inmate

for his death."



Assistant Superintendent Leon Bethel

The Tribune yesterday.

Mr Bethel declined to
release details surrounding
Albury's injuries, nor would
he say what was the inmate's
official cause of death.

"All I can say is that he
died as a result of injuries
received," Mr Bethel said.

Albury, 55, was admitted
to Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal on September 8 — less
than a week after being

imprisoned on a vagrancy
charge.

"From our information he
was sent to prison for
vagrancy and he was placed
in a cell. While in the cell he
received injuries and that’s
what we're looking into right
now.

"He was in prison for less
than a week," Mr Bethel
said in an earlier interview.

Albury's homicide marked

OE RO aS!

the country's 60th for the
year.

On Sunday, Burger King
employee Rashard Morris,
22, was beaten and then
stabbed to death after being
abducted. He was reported-
ly taken to the fast-food
chain's Tonique Williams
Darling location, where he
was beaten and then stabbed
to death after he failed to
open the store's safe for his
kidnapper.

Just hours later, around 4
am, Bahamasair pilot Lionel
Lewis McQueen was found
dead in his blood-splattered
home in Golden Palms
Estates. He had been shot
several times while his room-
mate Martez Saunders —
who was also shot multiple
times — was found alive in
front of the home.

Their murders marked
homicides 61 and 62, respec-
tively, Mr Bethel said.



(Photo: Peter Ramsay/B!S)

RENOWNED BAHAMIAN artist Max Taylor officially opened his exhibition, Paper Work 1960-1992, under the patronage of Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham and Mrs Delores Ingraham at the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas on Friday. Mr Taylor is pictured here talking with

Prime Minister Ingraham about the more than 150 works on display.

Profile of an exemplary East Nassau Rotarian

Rotarian Jeff Albury has
been an active member of the
Rotary Club of East Nassau for
30 years.

He was drawn to Rotary
because of the organisation’s
commitment to community ser-
vice and in the hope of being
able to help those less fortunate
in our community.

Over the years, Jeff has been
involved in numerous clubs
activities, from helping organ-
ise weekly lunch programmes
to the club fair, which he was
especially fond of as it put the
whole club to work in an effort
to help others.

Jeff also recruited his wife,
Susan, and together they
wrapped more than $3,000
worth of coins, the majority of
which were donated by Mall at
Marathon. The funds were put
to use in Rotary Club of East
Nassau’s youth programmes.

Jeff's most treasured Rotary



Aleve le hd

memory was when he was first
elected to the club’s board of
directors.

The position enabled him to
help direct the club’s activities
and maintain its reputation in
the community.

He says he is proud of what
the Rotary Club of East Nas-

a
&jntague

Are eee ee ae

Hub Caps For Sale

13, 14, &15 inch,
set of 4 just

$5.00

Call Us at 394-0323/5 or 394-1377

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



sau and Rotary International
(RI) stand for and have
achieved so far, but acknowl-
edges that the future of Rotary
depends on the constant induc-
tion of new members and keep-
ing Rotarians involved in club
affairs and local projects like
the Fox Hill Run and RI’s goals
such as ridding the world of
polio.

When not busy with Rotary
work, Jeff enjoys boating and
spending time with his family.
He said his proudest achieve-
ment in life was the day he fin-

ished paying for his children’s
education. A truly down to
earth individual who epitomises
the saying “actions speak loud-
er than words”, Jeff defines suc-
cess as “the satisfaction of a job
well done.”

He lives his life according to
the best pieces of advice he ever
received — treat everyone with
respect, and Rotary’s Four-Way
Test: Is it the truth?; Is it fair
to all concerned? Will it build
good will and better friend-
ships? Will it be beneficial to
all concerned?

YOO? CORWEICTION-TO lar WoeLe



0 In brief

Mitchell rounts
on critics of
Raynard Righy

ar TaIN Re Tan

FOX Hill MP Fred Mitchell
has condemned persons who
are seeking to vilify former
PLP chairman Raynard Rigby
for raising concerns about
West End and Bimini MP
Obie Wilchcombe chairing
the party’s upcoming conven-
tion while running for the
deputy leadership at the same
time.

Mr Rigby charged that Mr
Wilchcombe clearly "does not
understand the principles of
conflict of interest and fair-
ness and transparency.”

"He appears not to recog-
nise the perceptions that are
created by continuing to serve
in the capacity of convention
chair."

Mr Rigby said that in his
opinion these are matters that
go to the issue of one's fitness
to serve and character.

"Even though Mr Wilch-
combe may not be able to
define what a conflict is, I
know one when I see one and
so does the public. The pre-
sent facts surely satisfy the
test.

"It must also follow that if,
in Mr Wilchcombe's own
words, at 50 years he does not
have the experience to serve
as leader he must also not be
competent to serve as the par-
ty's deputy.

"His election to the post
would in fact take the PLP
backwards. I have one agen-
da, and that is to serve the
best interests of the PLP and
to ensure that we ready the
party to fight and win the next
general election,” he said.

Mr Mitchell thanked Mr
Rigby for his timely interven-
tion in the public domain on
behalf of the PLP.

“(US President) John
Kennedy said that the men
who criticise those who have
power, play just as valuable a
role as those who do, particu-
larly if that criticism is a disin-
terested criticism.

“Mr Rigby is not seeking
any office, reward or nomina-
tion, just a better PLP, and
thereby a better Bahamas. I
do not support any attempt to
vilify his public contribution. I
defend his right to say it. I
have canvassed a number of
other colleagues who share
this view,” Mr Mitchell said in
a statement.

The Fox Hill MP said that
the question is not what Mr.
Rigby says, but whether or
not what he says is “to the
point, true and of some value
to the public debate.”

“There is a lot of lip service
to the role of dissent in public
life, but as soon as it rears its
head there is vilification of the
messenger instead of listen-
ing,” Mr Mitchell said.

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER

For the Disposal of Scrap Underground
& Aerial Copper Cable

The Bohamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.

is curnently

tendering the Disposal of Scrap Underground & Ariel Copper
Cable. All interested companies are asked te collect a Proposal
ot the Security Desk at JFK Head Office.

Bids must be submitted no later than Friday, September 25, 2007
by 5:00 pum. All bids should be addressed as follows:

Tender for the Disposal $crap Underground & Aerial Copper Coble

Attention:

Mr. |. Kirk Griffin
Aching President & CEQ

The Bahamas Telecamrmunications Company Lid
P.O). Box N-3048, NHossau, Bahonvs

BTC RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY, OR ALL





PAGE 8, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Bahamas maintains a backward approach
to informing citizens about their rights

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

N THE Bahamas, it

appears that many

Bahamians display a

complete ignorance
of their Constitutional rights
and the country’s laws. Today,
unless it is a right given under
the numerated rights of the
Constitution, the only
supreme instrument that gives
and guarantees the right of
every citizen is the Constitu-
tion.

Last week Thursday,
American citizens celebrated
Constitution Day, a stark con-
trast to the Bahamas that still
maintains a backward
approach to enlightening its
citizens about their guaran-
teed rights and/or the statutes
that speak to the legality or
illegality of their actions.

In the United States,
aspects of the constitution are
taught during elementary
school. In this country, there
is a dire need for civics to be
comprehensively taught at the
primary school level and,
even more, for the publica-
tion of a “You and your con-
stitution” book that simpli-
fies, in everyday parlance, the
rights conferred upon the
populace and other elements
of this supreme law.

Do Bahamians really know
the amount of power they
bestow upon an MP when he
is sent to Parliament, or are
we too consumed with the
catchy slogans and the revelry
and social ambiance at politi-
cal rallies?

Frankly, Bahamians must
endeavour to learn the sci-
ence of citizenship and appre-
ciate that no right is granted
without a certain level of
responsibility—taking into
account the public and pri-
vate domain—and, in some
instances, a cost (i.e. the state
may have to raise taxes to

YOUNG MAN’s VIEW

ADRIAN

deliver certain rights, for e.g.,
education or national health-
care).

In speaking about our con-
stitutional rights, recent trav-
els onboard the national flag
carrier—Bahamasair—come
to mind.

As a Bahamian, I have a
right to travel anywhere in the
Bahamas; however, Bahama-
sair’s policy—where they
demand my passport, which
is a document used for inter-
national travel—infringes
upon my right to freedom of
movement within the archi-
pelago.

Passport

When has the passport
become a necessary require-
ment for inter-island travel in
the Bahamas’ archipelago?
The Americans don’t show
passports when they travel
from state to state, so why
must we when we travel from
New Providence to the Fami-
ly Islands?

One of the incidences of
Bahamian citizenship, which
is an integral part of the bun-
dle of rights granted by the
Constitution, is the freedom
of every Bahamian to travel
unreservedly throughout the
islands.

In the Bahamas, security
concerns allow for the sus-
pension of the constitution
and the imposition of martial
law in emergency cases.

In the case of Bahamasair’s
policy, is this an instance
where the danger is such that
they have to suspend rights?
Isn’t the Constitution the

GIBSON

supreme law of the land?
What happens if a traveller
doesn’t have his/her passport
and has never sought a license
to drive?

What happens when I fly
Bahamasair again and exer-
cise my right to free internal
movement within the
Bahamas and refuse to show
my passport?

It appears that the economy
of the Bahamas dictates our
sovereignty, particularly as a
policy such as Bahamasair’s
violate people’s fundamental
rights because the govern-
ment has had its arm twisted
since September 11, 2001, due
to our nearly desperate need
for airlift to sustain our wan-
ing tourism industry.

If Bahamian citizens have
to conform to their “passport-
showing obligations” relative
to the boarding of inter-island
Bahamasair flights, do the civ-
il aviation authorities employ
a discriminatory, double-stan-
dard when dealing with the
owners of private aircraft who
show no identification and
merely travel in and out of
the Bahamas—unchecked?
Should every airport or

The treasury and the Penal Code (Chapter 84)

If law enforcement authorities in the
Bahamas are serious about enforcing the
laws and reducing instances of serious crime
while also earning the treasury quite a bit of
money through fines, it must address the pet-

ty crimes.

Using section 212 of the Penal Code
(Chapter 84), the Ministry of National Secu-
rity and the Commissioner of Police should
see to it that throngs of police officers are
deployed onto the streets to conduct a drag-

net operation.

On any given evening, such an operation
would net thousands in fines, lead to the
apprehension of wanted criminals and tar-
get those individuals who are selling food
out of trunks of vehicle without health cer-
tificates and business licenses, who illegally
light fires and destroy government property,

port—private or not—then
have these same unconstitu-
tional strictures? Why is
Bahamasair’s approach not
applied across the board to
private charter companies as
well?

On this issue, I spoke with
medical doctor, lawyer and
law professor Dr Dexter
Johnson, who said:

“T’m not showing my pass-
port. The situation at
Bahamasair is an example of
government’s knee-jerk reac-
tion after 9/11. The govern-

Why must Bahamians fill out immigration cards?

Every time I’m returning from overseas, midway in the
flight to the Bahamas I’m often irritated when it’s stipulat-
ed that I must fill-out an immigration form to land at the
Lynden Pindling International airport. Frankly, the distrib-

ution of these immigration forms to Bahamian travellers is
an archaic practice that must be dispensed with. Bahamian
travellers should not be mandated to waste time completing
these unnecessary forms, since we all have a right to be
here and it’s not as if the immigration department can put a
Bahamian on a plane and send him/her elsewhere.

Now Servicing
Fresh Creek Andros
Beginning Segtamber 2548 2008



6" Antal’

Abaco

arrest persons who unlawfully affix signs on
buildings or public property (poles), fine per-
sons who do not have a permit from the
Commissioner of Police to ply their wares
or to hold demonstrations, fine hawkers, loi-



terers and phone card peddlers, sellers of

ment acted in haste and over-
reacted. Horrendous things
have happened in other coun-
tries long before 9/11—Britain
was bombed by the Nazis, the
IRA, etc—so why do the
Americans think that they
have to superimpose their will
on the world? It appears to
be a misjudged attempt to
comply with the FAA.

Regulations

“Ts this to do with our secu-
rity, is this in compliance with
international regulations and
how does it fit in with
Bahamian law as regards the
rights of citizens? Is this part
of Bahamian law to the extent
that the international treaties
and regulations have been
accepted by the Bahamian
government?” Dr Johnson
said.

If it is that Bahamasair is
complying with FAA regula-
tions, is this then a condition
of using the airport?

Should it now be under-

uv

Business
WMutlook

fruits and clothes who do not have the prop-
er documentation, fine persons who play
music or make noise to the annoyance of
others, and so on.

I’m told by persons who lived in Freeport
that the minor illegal acts that Nassauvians
get away with could never openly transpire
under the governance of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority.

With this in mind, is there any wonder why
serious acts of criminality have permeated
nearly every community on New Providence?



stood that in order to fly
Bahamasair or use the airport,
a Bahamian must give up a
right as a condition for using
that aircraft/facility?

And, while [’m at it, what-
ever happened to all those ‘x-
ray’ machines that outfitted
several Family Island airports
immediately after 9/11?

It is high-time that the
Bahamas takes a page out of
Jamaica’s book and institutes
a national ID.

Air travel in the Bahamas
is not so bad that it justifies
citizens either choosing to
show a document whose pur-
pose is for external travel or
having their rights suspend-
ed. If this continues, this will
no doubt lead to Bahamians
mounting legal action—a con-
stitutional challenge.

T encourage any citizen who
has had experiences where
their entitlement to their
rights has been forbidden to
demand it through the courts
by means of a constitutional
motion

SEMINAR

{et cog Monta only
You can fly dor the intradecdeey price af

Renewed Optimism 7
Embracing New Opportunities

$80 round trip ticket
$45 = one way ticket

Daily Flight Times From: 9am - Wed . : +93 . 09
New Vision Ministries Centre
Marsh Harbour Abaco

Nessa Fresh Creek

Mari T00 a.m,

6:30 a.m,
4:00 pm, 4:3 p.m
Highly qualified Pikts with over 19 yrs

flying experience

Tues -Sun 630 gum. 7:00 a.m. KEYNOTE SPEAKER:

Sen, Hon. Vincent Vanderpool: Wallace,

Minisler of Toursm and Aviclicn;

19-481 Air-tondilion cabin a0 p.m, 340 om

Twin Turbo prop aircraft makes for an
* ASK abou our special mound trip retes for school
And crurch groups.

SPEAKERS INCLUDE:

Michael Brarynen, Dire:

Eric Corey, Geecutive Derecto: Bohomas Notonal Rusk
Algemean Cargill, Directo: Mahonal Ireueoincn Boeck

Isaac Collie, ower ond Econceniat:

L. Chesher CoopeetProcidant 2 CEO, Brith Amaroan Anorcial
Rev. Lennie Eenne, Preeident, Abaco Coopentive Society:
Kevin Basden,Generd Monoger BEC

Ann Albury, Vion Secicer;

Or Pearl Me Millan, Director of Pubie Hoot

register TODAY!

www .tclevents.com

@>

enjoyable flight

The ufimate in comfort and lueury

Friendly and courteous start,

For Reservations contact us at:

Info@lealrcharters.com
242-377-2356 (Office)
242-377-2357 (Fax)

EILEEN AiBLDER. THE COUNSELLORS LTD
T: POSS TSOS « Fs 2a BS
mena: efelderltrecoursalosid.com

TCLGEROUP

WYHSOME E

MINGTET OF TOURGM, ADACO

1; Pa - Fe
emat wiesguson@iboahama.com

IRSTCARIBBEAN [RS

Tiamat

LEATOMA CHAR,

ABACO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Te Sada

ena: bemonosgnal.com



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 9
SPORTS

Nassau Yacht Club champions
of this year’s dual golf tourney Feaaey



Photos by





LARRY BLACK (right), tournament director, presents Thomas Bethel
with his award for winning the men’s longest drive on hole 2...

LARRY BLACK (right), presents Dilys Anderson with her award for © LARRY BLACK (right), presents a representative of Nassau Yacht Club LARRY BLACK (right), presents Phil Andrews with his award for
winning the women’s longest drive on hole 13... with the floating trophy... winning the closest to the pin category on hole 14...

26th September 2009

Shirley Street
& Highland Terrace



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 10, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



ope

The.



Offi

Bes a eo a 7



Bahamas Optimist National Championships...

‘Another grand success’

A NUMBER of young
sailors competed in this year’s
Bahamas Optimist National
Championships at Montagu
Bay, New Providence.

National sailing director
Jimmy Knowles said the two-
day event was another grand
success.

The boats are shown here
in the harbour.

Photos by
Felipé Major/
Tribune staff

Mr Olympia: Can Joel
make the top 10?

FROM page 11

American Dexter Jackson. Jay Cutler,
another American who relinquished his
title to Jackson, is also entered. He won
back-to-back titles in 2006 and 2007.

Mr Olympia, which originated in 1965
with Larry Scott winning the first two titles,
has had such champions as California Gov-
ernor Arnold Schwarzenegger (1970-1975
and 1980).

But Lee Haney (1984-1991) and Ron-
nie Coleman (1998-2005) have both held
the title more than any other competitor.

Although he doesn’t feel that he hasn’t
arrived to the point where he can chal-
lenge for the title, Stubbs said he has put
together a routine that will definitely make
him a contender for consideration.

“T just want them to give me a honest
ranking,” he said.

The Bahamasair pilot, who got into
building after he went through therapy for
a broken leg he sustained playing basket-
ball, said he originally only wanted to test
his skills at CAC.

But after winning the crown, Stubbs said
Bahamas Bodybuilding and Fitness Fed-
eration president Danny Sumner and oth-
ers encouraged him to take it a step further
in the pro ranks.

“When I went out there for the first time
in the pro ranks, I left a statement out
there with my back,” he insisted. “They
had never seen such a phenomenal back
developed like my own.

“Tt was all over the Internet and in the
magazines that I indeed had the best back
in the world. They labeled me ahead of
two Mr Olympia.”

That episode in 2005 inspired Stubbs to
go on and try to further develop his entire
body so that he can get a chance to contest

for the ultimate - the Mr Olympia title.

“T decided to continue on, being moti-
vated by a lot of people out there and I got
a little more mass and structure and was
able to place in the top ten, but never got in
the top three to qualify for Mr Olympia
until I did in Dallas.

“T think this is a gate opened for me
now to move my programme to another
notch, another level to getting to the point
where I can compete for the Mr Olympia
title.”

Coleman, according to Stubbs, won the
Mr Olympia title at 42, so he doesn’t see
why he shouldn’t be able to achieve the
same goal.

“Tt’s not so much an age thing. It’s the
genetic of the body, the nutritional level
and how you keep your body,” said Stubbs,
who competed in a total of 13 pro shows to
finally get to the big stage.

In 2005, Stubbs competed in his first two
pro shows. He increased it to three in 2006
and entered two more in 2007, three more
in 2008 and just two so far this year.

Now Stubbs said he’s quite confident
with his conditioning, his body fat and his
diet to get prepared for the Mr Olympia.

“In this sport you have to do what you
have to do,” he insisted. “You just have to
put the metal to the pedal and drive ahead
at full speed and see what happens at the
end of the day.

“But I feel good going into Mr Olympia.
I’m working daily, especially in my pos-
ing routine, so I’m really polished. But it’s
just a matter of time before I get to really
see what I’ve been doing for the past few
weeks in my preparation.”

After this weekend, Stubbs said he wants
Bahamians to feel very proud of his accom-
plishment in Las Vegas.



© - “Are
a = se en r
ae = Ta. = . =
Ta 5 .
iS aS ee
ci ames cn has
ee a oat a

















el = ee ee:



a

DANNY de CARDENAS (shown) repeated as champion of the Bahamas Optimist National Champi-
onships over the weekend. The 14-year-old St Andrew’s School ninth grader completed the two-day
event in Montagu Bay by accumulating a total of 15 points, but ended up with a net of 10 after he
dropped his worse race score of 5 points. Competing out of the red group for competitors 13-15 years
old, he said he felt he went out and competed very well in the seven races contested. “I just tried to
stay focussed and got some good starts because | knew that the competition was going to be a lot
stiffer than it was last year,” said de Cardenas, the Royal Nassau Sailing Club member who also plays
baseball and soccer. “There was a lot of people who caught up to me on the last day. But | think | got
off to a good start on the first day and | was able to hold onto my lead,” he said.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

-
TUESDAY,



PAGE 11

r

SEPTEMBER 22, 2009



ts

Mr Olympia:
Can Joel make
the top 107

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

hen Joel

Stubbs

heads to

Las Vegas,

Nevada,
for his debut in the Mr
Olympia this weekend, he will
be on stage with the top 26
ranked competitors in the
world.

Stubbs, who qualified at a
tournament in Dallas, Texas,
will leave town on Wednes-
day for the world’s biggest
bodybuilding show where he

will participate in the pre-
judging on 7pm Friday. The
final is set for Saturday at the
same time.

Based on his preparation,
Stubbs said he has something
in store for the public.

“T think this is the best that
anybody would have seen me
on stage,” Stubbs said. “I’m
in much better condition from
what they saw me in earlier
this year.

“T pretty much brought my
legs up a bit in the volume,
not so much in the size. But I
have them looking more
fuller. As you know, body-
building is all about an illu-

sion, so if can present it as a
gain to the judges, I’m sure I
can leave an impression in
Las Vegas.”

Having qualified for the
first time since he turned pro-
fessional when he won his
card by winning the Central
American and Caribbean
Bodybuilding Championships
in 2003, Stubbs said if he can
finish in the top 10, he would
feel quite content.

“With all of the names that
are in place, I think they are
all pretty much established,”
pointed out Stubbs, who has
yet to win his first pro show.

“But from my mind set, I

New NPWBA
boss welcomes
‘challenge’ with

Open arms

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

TWO years ago, Simone
Beneby introduced the Elec-
tro Telecom Cybots Lady
Queens to the New Provi-
dence Women’s Basketball
Association.

Two months later, she has
been introduced as the new
president of the league.

At the recent election of
officers, Beneby was voted in
to replace Antoinette
Knowles, who opted not to
return for another term in
office.

In an interview with The
Tribune yesterday, Beneby
said she feels it’s going to be a
challenge, but one that she
welcomes with open arms.

“It’s a bit different. It’s a
challenge, but I’m just doing
the best that I can to advance
women’s basketball in the
country,” she stressed.

Beneby will work along
with the following executive
members — Jeannie Minus,
first vice president, Cindy
Fox, second vice president,
Sharel Cash, third vice presi-
dent, Anthony Swaby, fourth
vice president, Laverne Wild-
goose, treasurer, Natasha
Gibson, secretary and Freddie
Brown, commissioner.

“T think [have a good slate
of officers. Based on our
executive meetings we’ve had
thus far, it’s a good slate of
persons who are willing to
work,” she said.

“T think they have all been
working very hard trying to
get all of the things that we
want accomplished, accom-
plished for this league. So it’s
a good hard working aggres-
sive team.”

On November 7 at the D
W Davis Gymnasium, the

SIMONE BENEBY

league is expected to official-
ly start its 2009/2010 regular
season. But over the week-
end of October 23-24, there
will be a pre-season jam-
boree.

Along with Beneby’s Elec-
tro Telecom, the league is
once again expected to be
made up of six teams. Among
them are defending champi-
ons Johnson’s Lady Truckers,
runners-up Bommer George
Lady Angels, Sunshine Auto
Lady Cheetahs, the Royal
Bahamas Defense Force and
the Junior Nationals.

The part-time Gospel
comedian said she intends to
be back as the coach of the
Lady Queens, but if it



Photo by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

becomes a conflict of inter-
est, she will have no problem
relinquishing her duties.

In the meantime, Beneby
said her aim this year is to get
some key elements into the
women’s league.

“We’re in the process right
now of creating a web page
that would give our audience
some information on the
league, outside of just our
game time,” she pointed out.

“We want to provide them
with some information on the
past players, the history of the
league and some of the leg-
ends who played the game.”

Additionally, Beneby said
they are also going to focus
on developing a feeder sys-



JOEL STUBBS is scheduled to depart for Las Vegas on Wednesday to take part in Mr Olympia...

want to give them a phenom-
enal package that at the end
of the day, they will have to
go back to their books and try
to determine just exactly
where they will place Joel

SPORTS

a

BASKETBALL
CYBOTS WIN TITLE



COACH Wayde Watson
and his Electro Telecom
Cybots celebrated another
milestone on Saturday night
at the D W Davis Gymnasi-
um.

Fresh off winning the New
Providence Basketball Asso-
ciation title, Watson and his
Cybots captured the Bahamas
Government Departmental
Basketball Association crown.

They did it by dethroning
the Police Crimestoppers 103-
91 in the fourth game of their
best-of-five championship
series. They ended up taking a
3-1 decision in the showdown.

Mark Hanna led the attack
for the Cybots with a game
high 39 points. Billy Sands
added 18. Valentino Richard-
son scored a side high 37 and
Adorn Charlow chipped in
with 18 in a losing effort.

BOXING
MACKEY OFF
TO CANADA

JERMAINE ‘Choo Choo’
Mackey and his handlers, Ray
and Michelle Minus, are
scheduled to leave town today
for Montreal, Canada, where
Mackey will fight Haitian-
born Canadian Adonis
‘Superman’ Stevensen on Fri-
day night at the Bell Center.

tem for the league where they
incorporate the high school
system so as to attract a lot
of the younger players.

“We want the younger girls
who don’t get the opportuni-
ty to go off to school to be
able to look at this as a viable
alternative where we can
have some coaches from the
United States come and see
them,” she said.

“Tn term, we hope to send
some of our teams off to the
United States to play in tour-
naments so that the coaches
over there can also see them
with the view of getting some
of them off to school.”

The league, according to
Beneby, is also looking at the
possibility of generating some
revenue where they can even-
tually get in one or two live
television games.

Stubbs. A top ten would be
very good for me for my first
showdown.”

Stubbs, 42, will be one of
just two competitors from the
Caribbean who will be partic-

The fight comes after
Mackey spent three weeks in
Berlin, Germany, sparring
with world champion Mikkel
Kessler in August and it
comes just before Mackey
gets set to defend his British
Commonwealth title against
Charles Adamu of Ghana
next month at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium.

SOCCER
COB LOSES
DOUBLE HEADER

THE College of the
Bahamas’ men and women
soccer teams both lost their
soccer matches to Webber
International University as
they concluded their tour of
the Sun Belt Coast in Florida.

While the men lost 5-1, the
women were whitewashed 12-

The men’s soccer team is
now expected to participate

tpating in the show. The other
is Trinidad & Tobago’s Dar-
ren Charles.

Back to defend his title is

SEE page 10

in the Bahamas Football
Association’s senior league,
which commences on Octo-
ber 25, while the women’s
team will commence its off-
season programme for next
Fall’s season.

VOLLEYBALL
COB PREPARES
FOR SEASON

THE College of the
Bahamas will continue its
Athletics calendar with their
women’s volleyball team trav-
eling to Miami, Florida, to
play St Thomas University
and Florida Memorial Uni-
versity over the weekend of
October 16-17.

In preparation for the col-
legiate tour, the Lady Caribs
will play in the New Provi-
dence Volleyball Association
(NPVA) that starts play this
weekend at the D W Davis
Gymnasium.

UG

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 12, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

Greenhouse For

Duncan



THE BAIC CHIEF offers words of encouragement to students of the
Ragged Island Public School.

DUNCAN TOWN, Ragged Island —

n an effort to boost food production in far-flung commu-
nities, the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corpo-
ration is donating a greenhouse to the public school here.

And, to help get the programme underway, BAIC is con-
tributing $500 for seeds and fertilisers, executive chairman Edi-
son Key said.

Mr Key headed a team which travelled to Ragged Island
last weekend for the presentation of certificates to persons
BAIC trained in straw craft.

They were joined by Exuma and Ragged Island administra-
tor Ivan Ferguson, BAIC’s assistant general manager in charge
of handicrafts Donnalee Bowe and executive secretary Lovelee
McQueen.

The craft graduates were: Sade Lockhart-Bain; Rhesa
Boodram; Lovell Lockhart; Nino Frances, Jr; Ashton Brooks;
Myron Lockhart-Bain, Jr; Verva Wallace; Charlene Lockhart-
Bain; Angela Cyrille; Elma Wilson, and Pauline Maycock. They
were tutored by celebrated craft trainer Eloise Smith.

Using silver top palms and sisal plants, they produced a vari-
ety of bags, hats, caps, and mats, utilising popular Bahamian
plaits. Goatskin mats were also featured.

A successful farmer himself, Mr Key urged Ragged Islanders
to focus on feeding themselves and lessening their dependence
on foreign imports.

“There is no reason why we can’t start producing our own
food even right here in Ragged Island,” said Mr Key to a rous-
ing round of applause.

“T know you are self-sufficient in conch and fish, but plant
whatever fruit trees you can find. They will grow right here. And
we will do everything we can to help you.”

MR EDISON KEY More than $500 million in food is imported each year, he said.
: “Why are we not producing even a quarter of that amount?
pledges his support D know h h ds of jobs th oe
for Ragged Islanders. o you know how many thousands of jobs that can ideas
MR EDISON KEY AND Mr Key commended Ragged Islanders for the “excellent
HIS TEAM were warmly quality” of their straw work.
received in Ragged He urged them to tap into the more than $200 million sou-
Island. A contingent venir market, which is currently being supplied by imports
from the public school from other countries.
joined community lead- “Let us teach our people to produce these products. There is
ers in welcoming them. a tremendous market for them,” he said.

“Let us take advantage of everything we can in developing our
people to be an active part of the economy. We want to make
sure that Ragged Island is not left out.”

Ragged Island and Exuma administrator Ivan Ferguson con-
gratulated Mr Key for “the excellent work you are doing in this
country.”

G | a d sto n e “T see this as a stepping-stone for bigger and better things to
happen on Ragged Island,” he said.
Th t “One of our problems is that we do not prepare our people
U rs 0 n adequately to meet the challenges of this global community.

“Mr Key and BAIC are preparing Ragged Islanders for what
is expected to come to this island. They are empowering the peo-
ple of this country.”

BACARDI Zam

48 Caps for Free 375ml
Bacardi Superior or Gold

120 Caps for Free Litre
Bacardi Superior or Gold
150 Caps for Free Litre RAGGED ISLAND grades othe aa saw raft rogram show of ha certs nts pho
Bacardi Anejo
Redemption Center
Bristol Wines & Spirits
Gladstone Road
Nassau, Bahamas





fae” 7 i’
i! Teak h aly i
Pe ae

| “OE abe eee

RT, CE ee ee ee ee

See Thru



| MR EDISON KEY is presented with an authentic Ragged Island goat skin. Pictured from left are: chief
OFFER GOOD WHILE SUPPLIES LAST! councillor Phicol Wallace, secretary for local government Charlene Lockhart-Bain, Mr Key, and

Ragged Island and Exuma administrator Ivan Ferguson.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





Construction

reality worse

than statistics
with ‘50%
less starts’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

T H E
Bahamian |
Contractors
Association’s
(BCA) presi-
dent yesterday
said that while
official figures
showed mort-
gage commit-
ments for new
construction
fell by 26.1 per
cent year-over-year for the
2009 second quarter, the mar-
ketplace reality was fare
worse with “50 per cent less
starts” as financing recipients
held off on their projects.

Stephen Wrinkle said Cen-
tral Bank of the Bahamas’
data showing that mortgage
commitments for new con-
struction and repairs - both
residential and commercial -
fell by 26.1 per cent to $56.1
million for the three months
to June 30, 2009, was “better
news than what we expect-
ed”.

However, he suggested
there was a disconnect
between those figures and was
actually occurring in the
Bahamian construction mar-
ket, with recipients of bank
debt financing reluctant to
commence new builds due to
the lack of confidence caused
by the recession.

“Our impression is that
only 25 per cent of mortgage
applications are currently
being approved,” Mr Wrin-
kle told Tribune Business.
“[’m sure that’s in keeping
with what’s happening in the
marketplace. We probably
started to see a fall in that this
time last year, but I’m sur-
prised that’s [the 26.1 per cent
drop] all it is.”

Mortgage financing actual-
ly released to borrowers for
new construction and repairs
fell by 25.4 per cent to $64.3
million during the 2009 sec-
ond quarter, providing fur-
ther evidence of the weaken-
ing economy and its impact
on the housing and construc-
tion sector.

“It seems like there’s less
work in the marketplace,” Mr
Wrinkle told Tribune Busi-
ness. “The numbers may say
different, but there appears
to be more of a fall-off in the
marketplace than that.

“Tt seems as if those peo-
ple who received approvals
may not have proceeded with
their projects. As a result,
there’s some _ disparity

SEE page 2B



WRINKLE

Peru pe

THE TRIBUNE

usine

TUESDAY,

SEPTEMBER 22,





2009

ROYAL FIDELITY

aL e 4

RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company



NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com

Coca-Cola distributor

plans 2011 plant open

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

Ground broken for new facility on Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway, with construction and transfer to take two years

oca-Cola’s Bahamian

bottler and distributor
has matched its global
counterparts through
sales
demand for its products, its president
telling Tribune Business yesterday that

unwavering

stream by 2011.

its new bottling plant will come on

Walter Wells, head of Caribbean
Bottling, revealed that the company
broke ground for the new plant on
Tonique Williams-Darling Highway

Fashion show suffers ‘offset’
impact from the recession

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN designers
“have not moved as aggres-
sively as they could” to devel-
op a local fashion industry
through exploiting events
such as Miss Universe, the
organiser of an upcoming
Bahamas-based fashion show
saying yesterday that his
event had both benefited and
been negatively impacted by
the global recession.

Owen Bethel, president
and chief executive of the

* While designer numbers set to drop from 38 to 20 at
Islands of the World, cancellation/downsizing at other
Caribbean events set to boost buyer attendance

* Bahamian designers ‘have not moved as aggressively
as they could’ to develop local industry

* Miss Universe designer approached by ‘major
buyer’ for purchases, with local sector having
potential to generate ‘fashion tourism’

Nassau-based Montaque
Group, whose Modes Illes
subsidiary is currently organ-
ising the second Islands of the

World fashion show, said that
while the designer line-up had

SEE page 4B

Bahamas pursues investment and
double tax deals ‘where offered’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government is pur-
suing double taxation agree-
ments and investment treaties
with all countries offering
those options in negotiations
over Tax Information
Exchange Agreements
(TIEAS), a minister saying
yesterday that he was “confi-
dent” the Bahamas would
meet the necessary standards
by the required deadlines.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, told Tribune
Business that the Govern-
ment’s negotiations were
“going extremely well” as it
seeks to meet the G-
20/OECD minimum require-
ments of having 12 TIEAs in
place by year-end.

When asked whether the
Bahamas was likely to meet
the deadline it had set itself to
implement its commitments
on tax transparency and the
exchange of tax information,
Mr Laing told this newspa-
per: “I’m very confident that
we will.

“T think our negotiations

a: re . oe ;

SANDYPORT #51 10 Tastefully decorated 3 bed,2.5 bath townhouse with
recent renovations and numerous upgrades. Perfectly positioned with an ex-
tended deck to enjoy excellent ocean and lagoon views. Oversized unit with
| 897 sq. ft. of living space and upgraded with a 12 KW Kohler generator, new
high-efficiency central A/C system, hurricane shutters and partial furnishings.
Attractively priced at $649,000 gross. Call today to view.
Lana.Rademaker@SothebysRealty.com c 242.457.0406

Damianos

Sothebys

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Member of
SIRbahamas.com | t 242.322.2305 | £242322.2033 | the Bohamas MLS



with any number of countries
are going extremely well. We
have reached very satisfacto-
ry conclusions with any num-
ber of them.”

Michael Paton, a former
Bahamas Financial Services
Board (BFSB) chairman, told
Tribune Business last week
that his only concern was that
this nation did not run into
trouble with the G-20/OECD

by failing to meet its commit-
ments as a result of their
members’ “scheduling con-
flicts”.

He expressed concern that
some might say they were too
busy to conclude a TIEA with
the Bahamas in the timeframe
this nation had committed to,

SEE page 5B

last month, and expects the construc-
tion and transfer from the current
Thompson Boulevard location to take
two two years.

Mr Wells said the new plant will
leave the company better positioned

to move with the market and meet
demand when the Bahamian economy
turns around.

"We're upbeat and optimistic about

SEE page 6B

‘We want to be nearer forecasts’

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

GOVERNMENT revenues
are still $30 million behind
2009-2010 Budget predictions,
the minister of state for
finance said yesterday, with
the Government wanting “to
be nearer forecast than that”.

With the first quarter of the
Government’s 2009-2010 fis-
cal year due to end on Sep-
tember 30, Zhivargo Laing
said it was “much too early”
to say whether Budgetary
forecasts and spending plans
would have to be adjusted,
indicating the Government
would see how revenue trends
fared for the remainder of
2009.

“We are still looking at $30
million or so behind forecast,
so that’s something which we
will continue to keep under
watch. We’d like to be nearer
forecast than that,” Mr Laing
told Tribune Business.

He explained that the Gov-
ernment was also watching to
see if there was the same kind
of steep decline in revenue
that occurred post-September
2008, when Lehman Brothers
collapsed and nearly took the
global financial system and
economy with it.

Mr Laing also said that
year-over-year revenue com-
parisons were “much narrow-

Government
revenues still $30m
behind forecast,

but ‘much too early
to say’ whether
Budget predictions
have to be revised or
spending cuts occur

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



Sure you'll retire at 40!

Now what's Plan B?

> We can get you there. Royal Fidelity.

ey
Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

FU 7 Ve lek

St. Michael: 246.435.1955

royalfidelity.com

[ Learn more at royalfidelity.com ]

ROYAL @ FIDELITY

Money at Work

idsLQW Mme /LS Ley gra) e1 KG ol e1) er 1 614





PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Realtor to outline

‘vision’ for Abaco






AN independent real estate
broker and consultant, and
past local government exec-
utive, Ann Albury, is the
‘vision speaker’ at the upcom-
ing Abaco Business Outlook.

The sixth Annual Abaco
Business Outlook Seminar is
scheduled for tomorrow at the
New Vision Ministries Cen-
tre in Marsh Harbour, Abaco,
and Ms Albury will give those
attending a visual of Abaco
past, Abaco present and a
taste of what’s to come in
Abaco’s future.

“We are going to take a
look at where Abaco was and
what it has evolved into,” said
Ms Albury. “We are also
going to explore what we are

hoping for futuristically.”

A Justice of the Peace, Ms
Albury is also a former mem-
ber of North Abaco District
Council, a former member of
the North Abaco Licensing
Board and the deputy chair-
man of North Abaco Town
Planning.

She served on the Ministry
of Tourism’s advisory com-
mittee, is a founding member
of the Abaco Swim Club and
is a director of both the Aba-
co Chamber of Commerce
and Friends of the Environ-
ment.

The seminar’s keynote
speaker is Senator Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace, minis-
ter of tourism and aviation.

KING'S

REAL ESTATE

JOB OPPORTUNITY

Real Estate Agents

Applicants must have:
* Outstanding personality
«Current BREA license

* Minimum 2-years experience

¢ Proven

sales record

Apply to bahamas@kingsrealty.com
Deadline: September 4M), 2049
Information: 394-4397

The Bahamas Society of Engineers

The Public is Cordially Invited to Attend
The Monthly Luncheon Presentation

Hosted by
The Bahamas Society of Engineers

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009
Tapie:
“UTILITY OPERATIONS IN AN
ARCHIPELAGIC ENVIRONMENT -
CHALLENGES & SOLUTIONS”

Guest Speaker:
ENG. KEVIN BASDEN
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Place:
KAST VILLA RESTAURANT
(East Bay Street)

TIME: 12:00PM
Financial Members: $2000)
Students; $15.00)

Public:

525, (MK)

If Possihbe Please Confirm Your Attendance fy E-mail
pmuicesharmalls i yahoo.com or
JEE bot bahamaselectnicity.com or quentin know les) amelie com

PO. Bax EE-15928. Nassau, Bahama

Tel

747 3a?

Baw hahamasengi recrsAre



Other speakers include Eric
Carey, executive director,
Bahamas National Trust;
Algernon Cargill, director,
National Insurance Board;
Isaac Collie, lawyer and econ-
omist; I. Chester Cooper,
president and chief executive,
British American Financial;
Rev Lennie Etienne, presi-
dent of Abaco Farmers Coop-
erative Society; and Dr Pearl
McMillan, director of Public
Health.

Abaco Business Outlook is
a one-day seminar coordinat-
ed by The Counsellors. The
seminar, in its sixth year, is
themed: Renewed Optimism:
Embracing New Opportuni-
ties.

ANN ALBURY is the ‘vision speaker at the upcoming Abaco Business Outlook...

Construction reality worse than
statistics with ‘50% less starts’

FROM page 1B

between what those figures
are saying and what is hap-
pening in the marketplace.
Some people may be quali-
fied and not moving forward,
because they’re afraid of what
is happening.

“It’s better news than we
expected, but the physical
marketplace indicates there
is less than that going ahead.
There may be 25 per cent less
approvals, but 50 per cent less
starts.”

Further depressing the

Bahamian construction indus-
try is the more than 50 per
cent contraction in foreign
purchases of this nation’s land
and real estate during the
2009 second quarter, which
fell to $50 million. Net for-
eign direct investment inflows
into the Bahamas during
those three months fell by 20
per to $175.8 million, a $43.6
million decline from the pre-
vious year’s $219.4 million.
The BCA president told
Tribune Business there was
no sign that the current trends
impacting the Bahamian con-

Uy;

CR em mentees

Specializing in Low Voltage Cabling,
Voice and Data dd

Roe ao

Corporate /SOHO

Structured Wiring (Voice, Dota & Video) Installations

ite Rois) Na Dea

em

Caté and

Fiber Optic (Single and Multi Mode)
Be feRO = mele ene eo R@ ents)

SSR eM (es )e ule gicas) (ene

Coax Compression Head Termination for Cable TV

ite le calc e Mec e eR alle Peron n ik:

Visio Network Drawing
Pee Lai 0 ane 600g

Provide Data Patch Panels and 110 Telephone Blocks

pric ie Beem ale et
Telephone, asia eT

x Tals eel st
ee a Mio}



struction industry would turn-
around soon.

He added: “Many contrac-
tors are struggling, and it’s
due to circumstances beyond
the ordinary person’s control
and, indeed, the Governmen-
t’s control. None of this will
resolve this without a stimulus
by external forces. Baha Mar
represents the brightest hope
of turning this trend around.”

Mr Wrinkle said major con-
struction projects, such as
mixed-use resort develop-
ments, usually translated into
smaller and medium-sized
developments that Bahamian
contractors could work on,
yet the sector was suffering
from an almost-total absence
of these currently.

With foreign direct invest-
ment, the key driver of the
Bahamian economy, down by
anywhere between 20-33 per
cent and no recovery immi-
nent, the BCA president
urged Bahamians to “take
control of our own destiny”
by investing more in their
own economy.

“Right now, there’s a lot of
vacant commercial space on
the island, and a lot of busi-
nesses are struggling,” Mr
Wrinkle said. “We will see
some filtering out of com-
mercial businesses. It’s going
to take us a little while to fill

this void. Unless we generate
some internal income for the
country, we will be dependent
on external forces.”

He called for Bahamians to
“put together or be part of
the [major] deals” to reduce
the reliance on foreign direct
investment, but acknowl-
edged that due to exchange
control restrictions it was very
difficult for them to raise debt
financing at rates and terms
that were competitive with
foreigners.

“Tt’s coming to catastroph-
ic proportions,” Mr Wrinkle
told Tribune Business.
“Unless we have a national
development plan we can
work on, we’re just going to
continue treading water.

“IT know of two major
developments in Nassau, not
Albany, where foreigners got
permits to come in and buy
the land, develop it and then
sell it back to Bahamians at a
huge profit, taking the money
out of the country.

“T think that’s inherently
wrong, just because they have
access to financing and for-
eign money. That has pre-
vented Bahamians from
accessing that development
market. We have to focus on
changing that, otherwise we’ll
keep on bleeding money out
of here.”

‘We want to be
nearer forecasts’

FROM page 1B

er, much more in line” with
the year before.

He added: “The revenue
forecast is important to us in
the sense that you predicate
your expenditure on that.
Clearly, one has to look at
revenue and how it has per-
formed, and make some
determinations, if that per-
formance has lapsed, for what
you said you wanted to do.
That has to be taken into con-
sideration, along with other
factors.”

However, he added that it
was “much too early for us to
say” whether spending cuts
would result if government
revenues remained stubborn-
ly below forecast.







i)



hasiiâ„¢

browns



$4





TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 3B



FirstCaribbean
sees 14.1 per

cent dro

in profit

FirstCaribbean Internation-
al Bank (Bahamas) suffered a
14.1 per cent decline in net
income to $49.205 million for
the first nine months of its
2009 financial year, a drop
largely caused by a 34.8 per
cent increase in loan loss pro-
visions.

The bank, the largest listing
on the Bahamas International
Securities Exchange (BISX)
by market capitalisation, has
been impacted by the same
deterioration in asset/loan
portfolio quality as other insti-
tutions, forcing it to raise pro-
visions for the nine months to
July 31, 2009, to $20.253 mil-
lion compared to $15.026 mil-
lion in 2008.

With total income flat at
$121.452 million, the $5 mil-

alae
> Santander

lion loan loss provision
increase and almost $3 million
rise in operating expenses -
due to bank licence fee
increases and salary rises asso-
ciated with a union agreement
- caused net income for the
first nine months to fall to
$49.205 million, compared to
$57.263 million the year
before.

For the third quarter, First-
Caribbean saw net income fall
by 27.2 per cent to $19.436 mil-
lion, compared to $26.706 mil-
hon in 2008. The fall was large-
ly induced by a $5 million
swing in operating income,
which fell from $13.348 mil-
lion to $7.835 million.

In his message to First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) shareholders,

chairman Michael Mansoor
said the bank had been able
to grow its loan book by $139
million or 6 per cent to $2.609
billion during the first nine
months despite the recession.

Mr Mansoor added that for
the first nine months of fiscal
2009, FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank (Bahamas) saw
operating income improve by
$4 million to $15.5 million,
although lower international
interest rates - partially offset
by the increased loan volume -
caused net interest income to
drop by $3.9 million to $105.9
million.

Mr Mansoor said the bank
remained well-capitalised with
a Tier I capital ratio of 17.7
per cent, well above the mini-
mum 14 per cent requirement.

SANTANDER BANK & TRUST LTD

has an immediate vacancy for a

“REDIT RISK MANAGER

Applicants must hold the following:

- Bachelors in Business Administration or related degree

- Minimum of 10 years experience in Private Banking with 5 years directly in the area

of Credit Risk.

Applicants should also be capable of the following:

|. Management and servicing of loan portfolios involving Spanish lending officers
and clients, liaison with other group units.

2, Good organizational and planning skills.

3, Effective management and supervision of Credit Risk Department,

4, Excellent communications skills in both English and Spanish essential.

5. Be proficient in all Microsoft Office applications.

Applications in writing with details of education and experience should be addressed
to the Human Resources Manager, P.O. Box N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas not later than

October 9, 2009.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

For the stories
Wa Uy
ia a
MEA
TEES

Legal Notice

NOTICE

CABEX INTERNACIONAL LTD.

Notice is hereby given that the winding up and dis-

solution of CABEX INTERNACIONAL LTD.
has been completed in accordance with the Articles
of Dissolution and that the Company has been
struck from the Register of Companies on the 12th

day of August, 2009.

Maria M. Férére
Joint Liquidators



LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.
“Eattage Lat With Private Beach
FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!

Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million
Web Listing # 8377

Tel: 242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013

nme .com
www.marocareyred

Tribune

com

As

Mario Carey Realty
Dt's abaut yaw... Let's talk.

sen
asd
.

ie

eee
jue

Pr

ee eer

Tel: 502 2356 agg

for ad rates



CR-V

Head-turning styling. Side curtain airbags and power moonroof available.
Talk about pure bliss. Presenting the all-new CR-V. It’s something new to crave.

Shirley Street, 328-2288

www.hondabahamas.com

(HONDA

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Fashion show suffers ‘offset’
impact from the recession

NOTICE

In the Estate of DARNELL AMY
DEVEAUX, late of Sea Breeze Lane in the
Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Civil
Servant, Deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claims or demands against the
above-named Estate are requested to send
the same duly certified in writing to the
undersigned on or before Friday, the 25th
day of September, A.D. 2009, after which

date the Administratrix will proceed to
distribute the assets of the deceased among
the persons entitled thereto having regard
only to the claims of which the undersigned
shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons indebted to the said Estate are
requested to make full settlement on or before
the date hereinbefore mentioned.

DUPUCH & TURNQUEST & CO.
Chambers
308 East Bay Street
P. O. Box N-8181
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Administratrix



FROM page 1B

been affected by the global
economy, the Bahamian
event was likely to benefit
from an increased audience
as other Caribbean shows
cancelled.

Acknowledging that this
year’s Islands of the World
designer line-up was “actual-
ly reduced to about 20 design-
ers, compared to 38 at last
year’s inaugural event, Mr
Bethel told Tribune Business:
“We cut back on a lot of per-
sons who really were not
ready to produce what the
buyers wanted them to do.

“A number of designers
also came back to us and said
they were prevented from
coming because of the eco-
nomic and financial situation.

“We had applications from
30 designers this year. Out of
that, we said ‘no’ to about five
because they were not pre-
pared, while three to four said
they had to pull out at the last
minute because of the finan-
cial situation, with sponsors
withdrawing.”

While 20 designers was “a
good practical number” to
work with for Islands of the
World, Mr Bethel said his
main disappointment was that
representatives from all geo-
graphical regions - especially
those from further afield -
would not be present.

“Those are designers able
and prepared to carry through
their designs on a consistent
basis, able to consolidate
them from season to season,”
Mr Bethel said of those would
present during Islands of the
World fashion week.



OWEN BETHEL

“T don’t think we have any
regrets in terms of numbers,
but the disappointment is that
designers from the Pacific
Islands and the Indian Ocean
are not represented because
of the costs. We have one
from Madagascar, when last
year we had designers from
Fiji, Indonesia and Mauri-
tius.”

But, on the positive side,
Mr Bethel said Islands of the
World was likely to experi-
ence a boost in buyer, fash-
ion industry and media atten-
dance as a result of other
Caribbean nations cancelling
their own fashion weeks.

Pointing to the fact that the
Virgin Islands had just can-
celled its own fashion week,
he added: “A number have
downsized or cancelled alto-
gether their Fashion Weeks.

“The interest in our event
has continued, and we’re get-
ting a lot of media coverage
worldwide. I know a number
of those who were planning
to go to the Virgin Islands and
Trinidad are coming here for
this fashion week. What num-
ber that might be, I have no
idea.”

Yet moves by Bahamian
designers to exploit the foun-
dation and exposure events
such as Islands of the World,
plus the recent Miss Universe
Pageant, have generated for
them have been slow.

“T don’t think the local
designers have moved as
aggressively as they could or
as one might have thought
they would,” Mr Bethel said.
“T think there’s a lot of room
and opportunities for them to
take the industry to the next
level.

“That may be the result of
two things. One is a factor of
the economic situation and
the financial impact that has
had on a number of design-
ers. The second is just not
having a full grasp of the busi-
ness and marketing side of the
business, as opposed to the
creative side - just designing.

“It will be a learning
process that they will have to
undertake. A lot of appetites
have been whetted, but they
have generally not had the
ability to take advantage of
any initiative built on that
enthusiasm.”

As an example of what
these events could generate,
Mr Bethel said “a major buy-
er” who attended the Miss
Universe Pageant’s Fashion
Show had been in touch with
one of the three Bahamian

designers whose products
were showcased by the con-
testants, with a view to pur-
chasing their products.

Development of a thriving
home grown Bahamian fash-
ion industry holds tremen-
dous potential for this nation,
as it could help diversify the
economy and, more signifi-
cantly, act as a foreign
exchange earner if garments
and designs could exported.

Acknowledging that the
sector held “that value” for
the Bahamas, Mr Bethel said
it could also create ‘fashion
tourism’ for this nation.
“Where it does have that abil-
ity to be exposed through
tourism, tourists can see it has
quality, is something they can
buy and brings value to
them,” Mr Bethel added.

Developing a_ strong
Bahamian fashion industry
could also generate jobs for
technicians, such as make-up
artists and stylists, plus design-
ers and creators of the actual
fabric - such as Bahama Hand
Prints and Androsia, both of
whom were featured in the
Miss Universe Pageant
designs.

Mr Bethel said the sector
could also be developed as “a
cottage industry” from peo-
ple’s homes, avoiding the
need for great overhead costs.

Of the 20 designers set to
be featured at Islands of the
World, some four to five
Bahamians will appear in the
‘next generation’ section, with
another two among “the more
seasoned designers”.

Islands of the World will be
held from November 4-8,
2009, at the Sheraton Cable
Beach Resort.

Job Vacancies

Multi-Unit General Manager

Position Summary

The “Multi-Unit General Manager” function is the primary strategic business
leader of seven (7) business entities spread between two locations in Jupiter,
Florida AND Abaco, Bahamas.

Position oversees the development and implementation of club strategies
and ensures implementation of the brand service strategy and brand initiatives.

The position ensures that the clubs’ operations meet the brand’s target
customer needs, maximizes associate satisfaction and focuses on growing
revenues and the overall financial performance of all departments. As the
leader of both properties’ Guidance Teams, M-UGM develops and implements
Club-wide strategies that deliver products and services to meet or exceed.
the needs and expectations of the brand’s target customer and associates and
provides a return on investment to the owners and the Company.

Expected Contributions
* Energizes the Gold Standards of the Company and ensures brand

initiatives are implemented to meet or exceed member, employee and
financial expectations. Continuously challenges the team to improve
operations, and ensures compliance with brand standards to protect
brand integrity.
Leverages synergies among both properties to maximize market
penetration, operational excellence, and overall business performance.
Selects, develops and retains a diverse leadership team capable of
delivering the expected performance contributions and with growth
potential, and holds others accountable for doing the same. Leads the
guidance team and leverages additional corporate and regional resources
to develop and implement destination club-wide strategies that are
aligned with the company’s Key Success Factors. Facilitates talent
development and leverages opportunities to share and maximize talent
among the Areas Clubs and Residences.
Focuses the team on delivering services and products to meet or exceed
owner expectations, create owner loyalty, and grow market share. Builds
relationships with key customers.

Qualifications
* 4-year bachelor's degree in Business Administration, Hotel and Restaurant

Management, or related major
15+ years of progressive experience in private club industry with
exposure to multiple disciplines
Prior General Manager or equivalent experience in a luxury market
environment
Property Management certifications required by the State of Florida
Prior multi-property oversight preferred

Skills & Knowledge

* Leadership - Visible, proactive, personally involved leader with excellent
organizational skills, capable of providing focused leadership and
contributing to establish the club and residences prominent position
within the market. A well-developed capability for strategic decision-
making and a track record of proven results in the areas of customer
satisfaction, operational excellence, employee satisfaction, revenue and
profit.
Financial Acumen - Business savvy leader with demonstrated financial
acumen, capable of providing strong P&L results oriented financial
leadership.
Operations - Excellent sense of product and service quality, a passion
for excellence and an understanding of the sophisticated needs of the
luxury customer. Creative and innovative operations leadership, capable
of delivering products and services that will differentiate the clubs and
residences in the region’s luxury residential market.
Governance - Property Management designations or certifications
required by the State of Florida are required. Responsible for Rules
and Enforcement, Property Maintenance, Services Communications,
Finances, Administration, Asset Protection and assistance with Policy
Development all in accordance with local and state statutes.

Director of Operations

Position Summary
Functions as the strategic business leader of food and beverage/culinary
operations and acts as General Manager in his/her absence. Areas of

responsibility include: Front Office, Business Centre, Recreation/Fitness
Department, Retail/Gift Shops, Housekeeping, Food and Beverage/Culinary
and Event Management. Position oversees the development and
implementation of departmental strategies and ensures implementation of
the brand service strategy and brand initiatives. The position ensures that
food and beverage/culinary operations meet the brand’s target customer
needs, maximizes associate satisfaction, focuses on growing revenues and
the overall financial performance of the departments. As a member of the
Guidance Team, develops and implements hotel-wide strategies that deliver
products and services to meet or exceed the needs and expectations of the
brand’s target customer and associates and provides a return on investment
to the owners and Ritz-Carlton.

Responsibilities

* Demonstrating Leadership

* Achieving Goals

* Exceeding Customer Expectations

* Improving Profit

* Maintaining Balance Between Profit and Service Satisfaction
* Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates

* Destination Club and Residential Management

Qualifications

* 4-year bachelor's degree in Business Administration, Hotel and Restaurant
Management, or related major

* 5 years experience in executive management position in a five star
resort

* Ritz-Carlton Hotel or Destination Club experience preferred

Skills & Knowledge

* Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes
for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer
needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and daily
evaluation of existing customer satisfaction measurement processes.
Management of Financial Resources - Determining how money will
be spent and available resources utilized to get the work done and daily
accounting for these expenditures.

Analytical/Critical Thinking - The ability to gather and organize
information using a logical and systematic process; recognize patterns
and relationships in complex data; examine data to identify implications,
problems and draw appropriate conclusions; generate alternative solutions
to problems; evaluate strengths, weaknesses and consequences of
alternative solutions and approaches to solving problems.

Applied Business Knowledge - Understanding market dynamics involved
in running a private membership club under development, enterprise
level objectives and important aspects of ultra-luxury club / resort
business to accurately diagnose strengths and weaknesses, anticipate
opportunities and risks, identify issues, and develop strategies and plans.
Aligning individual and team actions with strategies and plans to drive
business results.

Pastry Chef

Position Summary

Create and maintain a positive work environment through coaching and leading
staff while establishing creative and exciting menu products, both appetizing and
visually appealing. Work and maintain good working relationships with other
work areas. Meet with meeting planners and social catering event coordinators
to develop personalized dessert products. Direct, train and monitor performance
of Pastry staff. Maintain organization, cleanliness and sanitation of work areas

and equipment.
Essential Job Functions

* Train, coach, lead and hold Pastry team accountable to the job functions
listed below. Meet daily to review assignments, schedules, anticipated
business levels, employee performance issues and other information
pertinent to job performance.

Maintain and strictly abide by sanitation/health regulations and the
hotel’s food safety program requirements. Ensure all Pastry employees
maintain food handlers’ certification.

Meet with Executive Chef to review assignments, anticipated business
levels, changes and other information pertinent to the job performance

on a daily basis.

Prepare and assign production and prep work for Pastry staff to complete;
review priorities.

Communicate additions or changes to the assignments as they arise
throughout the shift. Identify situations, which compromise the
department's standards and delegate these tasks.

Prepare amenity orders for room service in accordance with specified
requirements and hotel standards.

Prepare all dishes following recipes and yield guides, according to Ritz-
Carlton standards.

Monitor performance of Pastry staff and ensure all procedures are
completed to the department standards

Assist Pastry staff wherever required to ensure excellent service to
guests.

Ensure all Pastry staff assignments are completed before they leave
work area.

Review status of work and follow-up actions required with the Executive
Chef before leaving.

Qualifications, Skills & Knowledge
* Certification of culinary training or apprenticeship.
¢ 5 years experience in F&B leadership position at a luxury club, hotel
or restaurant.
¢ Knowledge of food and beverage cost controls.
¢ Ability to plan and develop menus and recipes.

Director of Sales

Position Summary

Designing, implementing and continuously evaluating all sales processes;
Maintaining content and direction on Training and Motivation of Sales
Leadership and Field Sales Force; Developing and maintaining visibility
over Sales Standards and Accountability Measures; Providing related sales
input to New Site Feasibility and Business Planning Processes

Essential Job Functions

* Monitor and evaluate sales processes while maintaining visibility over
daily sales progress against budgets

* Create and implement specific sales and marketing field operations
best practices, policies and guidelines

* Create and implement structured sales presentation training and sales
executive evaluation
Develop sales management training programs as well as create system
succession strategy to identify/groom key sales professionals
Insure performance management is implemented and maintained
consistently across the system
Review all sales related assumptions in the feasibility process, ensuring
strategic and operational reasonableness, comparability among PEPS,
budgets, forecasts and LRP
Provide Brand with product and business development recommendations.
Relate information regarding competitive tactics and products.

Qualifications, Skills & Knowledge
College degree
Minimum of ten years in the vacation ownership industry
Minimum of five years ownership sales and sales management experience
Strong verbal and written communications skills; ability to communicate
effectively with senior management
Experience in designing products, processes, policies and training
manuals
Ritz Carlton Club experience preferred

Please send resume to the attention of:
Director of Human Resources
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB-20571
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Bahamas

OR

Email: Freddie. Munnings@ritzcarlton.com
Deadline for applications is Friday, September 25, 2009



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 5B



Bahamas pursues
investment and
double tax deals
‘where offered’

FROM page 1B

meaning that it would be
unfair for the G-20/OECD to
take action against this nation
because it was their members
who had caused the problem.

However, Mr Laing’s opti-
mism indicates this is unlikely
to be an issue.

The Bahamas, having
signed its first TIEA with the
US in January 2002, conclud-
ed its second, with fellow
international financial centre
Monaco, last week, thus leav-
ing it requiring 10 more
before year-end to meet G-
20/OECD requirements.

In addition, the Bahamas
and Monaco are also negoti-
ating a double taxation treaty,
something that would see the
latter’s residents, for exam-
ple, taxed only in the
Bahamas on assets, income
and business interests
held/generated here, and not
in Monaco.

Confirming that the Gov-
ernment was pursuing double
taxation and international
investment treaties with all
nations where this was an
option, Mr Laing confirmed:
“To the extent to which coun-
tries may offer that possibility,
clearly we are minded to go
that route. I believe that is in
keeping with our long-term
interests.

“All of the things that allow
us to be a leading jurisdiction
for international investment

we are seeking to include in
discussions with countries we
are negotiating with.”

The Government previous-
ly stated it had started nego-
tiations on tax information
exchange agreements with
Canada, the United Kingdom,
Australia, Spain, Germany,
France, Turkey and the
Nordic countries (Norway,
Sweden, Finland, Denmark,
Iceland, Greenland the Faroe
Islands).

The Bahamas added that it
had also initiated discussions
on tax information exchange
agreements with China, and
proposed to do the same with
Brazil, Mexico, Japan, Ire-
land, South Africa and India.

Meanwhile, Mr Laing said
it was “difficult to know what
more” the Bahamas could do
to form a satisfactory rela-
tionship on tax matters with
the US other than have a
TIEA with Washington.

Influential Democratic sen-
ator Carl Levin last week
demanded that international
financial centres and their insti-
tutions be barred from access-
ing the US and international
financial systems if they ‘fail’ to
aid the fight against tax eva-
sion, and urged the Obama
administration to broaden the
scope of TIEAs beyond
requests for specific taxpay-
er information to a catch-all
demand for details on all US
citizens.

While he had not seen the

Senator’s comments, Mr
Laing said yesterday: “It’s
worth noting that we have a
TIEA with the US, and I
don’t know what more we can
do in respect of that than have
that kind of relationship with
the US.

“T cannot be responsible for
how the Senator is reviewing
the matter, but I do know we
have an arrangement that is
an internationally acceptable
standard in respect to how
these matters are dealt with.”

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd

Client Relationship Officer

EFC International

Vice President

EFG International is a global private banking group headquartered in
Switzerland, offering private banking and asset management services. EPG
International's private banking businesses currently operate in 55 locations
in over 30 countries, with circa 2,400 employees.

EFG Bank & Tr

Bahamas) L

continues to expand as evidenced by

Career
Opportunity

SENIOR TRUST MANAGER

J. P. Morgan is currently seeking applications for a Senior Trust Manager.

The successful candidate will work with Trust and related partners to
ensure that fiduciary services are delivered in a manner consistent with all
legal, regulatory and internal requirements. The candidate will also serve
as a technical resource to wealth advisors, investors and relationship
managers. The Senior Trust Manager will be expected to develop direct
relationships with clients and have the flexibility to travel.

Prospective applicants should have 6+ years of trust experience, with 3+
yearsin mentoring others. Abachelor’s degree or a professional qualification
ideally in law with strong analytical skills; knowledge of investment product
services, fiduciary and trust regulatory requirements and onshore and
offshore jurisdictions; excellent written/verbal communication and creative
problem solving skills; and the ability to assess risk in fiduciary and trust
matters.

J.P. Morgan Private Bank offers competitive compensation and
benefits packages. Interest applicants should submit their resume/
curriculum vitae marked “Private and Confidential” to the Human
Resources Manager, J.P. Morgan Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited,
P.O. Box N-4899, Nassau, Bahamas.

J.P. Morgan Trust Company
(Bahamas) Limited

Oe ee TT ae
UE MMC ey eT PC
just call 502-2371 today!

BS! OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BS| Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
international private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is
presently accepting applications for

PRIVATE BANKING RELATIONSHIP MANAGER/MANAGED
PORTFOLIOS ADMINISTRATOR

Applicants for the position of must have a banking/financial degree or 7-10
years experiance in tha offshore banking sector, have knowledge of
intemational investment instruments & money market, ability to partner with
taam mambers, must be confident regarding customer relations, investments

its new premises at Lyford Cay. EFG Bahamas has over 40 experienced
professionals and offers a full range of solutions for wealthy clients around
the globe. EPG's unique corporate culture attracts the most entrepreneurial
and most experienced professionals in the industry, To learn more, please
VISIT WAALe Wh 1

& portfolio management and have thorough knowledge of local legislation,
regulatory & statutory matters as well as international banking practices,
Fluency in Italian is absolutely required

1OT

Personal qualities :-

We are looking for a seasoned professional with at least 10 years of sales
and marketing experience in providing financial solutions to high net worth
clients and companies. Specifically, we require a professional fluent in
Portuguese, Spanish and English. The candidate must possess a solid
knowledge of investments, banking and trust services. The ability to service
and grow his/her own client book is extremely important. EPG provides a
unique and uninhibited global marketing opportunity, an open architecture
platform, and multiple booking centers.

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-onented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Cammitment to quality and service axcellence

Able to work with minimal supervision

Strang Team athtude

Financial and analybcal background

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure

Responsibilities --
The candidate must have a university degree. The individual must have the Service & advise customers
Maintain & follaw up account relahonships

Liaise directly with customers or their investment advisors

Monitar, analyze positions and evaluate reparts

Ensure that managed portfolios are implemented according to the relevant
policies

Liaise with Portfolio Managers and other Relationship Mangers on

Meet deadlines on timely basis

required qualifications and accreditations to be registered with The Bahamas
securities Commission. The ability to go on frequent business development
trips and work within very tight deadlines is also a necessity.

EPG offers an attractive compensation plan that includes salary, benefits
and a bonus structure directly related to profitability. Salary will be determined
by experience, and qualifications.

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum
vitee to:-

Only qualified professionals should submit applications by 9th October
2009 to:

Human Resources Manager

BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre
P.O. Box N-7130

Nassau, Bahamas

EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd
Human Resources
Centre of Commerce, 2â„¢ Floor
1 Bay Street
P.O. Box 5S 6289
Nassau, The Bahamas
Fax (242) 502-5487

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Coca-Cola distributor
plans 2011 plant open

FROM page 1B

the future,” he said.






















Legal Notice

NOTICE

FIVE ELEMENTS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 17th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

Mr Wells said Caribbean
Bottling has steady sales num-
bers year-over-year for 2009

to date, despite the decline in
tourist arrivals that affected
hotel and resort demand for

soft drinks.
Mr Wells said efficiency
upgrades to the existing plant

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SIMA OVERSEAS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 17th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

and effective budgeting have
kept the company in good
stead through 2009.

"We are watching our pen-
nies,” he said. "Generally,
things are progressing well."

The Coca Cola brand was
voted best global brand this
year, carrying a value of $67.5
billion.

According to business-
week.com, the company has
seen only a 1 per cent decline
since 2005, due to a waning
demand for sodas, but it has
released a host of other prod-
ucts to keep the brand mar-
ketable.

Locally, Caribbean Bottling
produces multiple products,
including Fanta sodas,
Schweppes and, recently, V8.

Mr Wells said the company
would like to shift its focus

uct and branch out in other
directions.

Taxation

With the US eyeing the tax-
ation of carbonated drinks,
Mr Wells said he was not sure
how it might affect the impor-
tation of sodas into the
Bahamas, but suggested it
may simply be a point-of-sale
tax that won't be transferred.

As Caribbean Bottling
invests in its new plant it has
also set out a community ser-
vice agenda and aided in the
resurfacing of a basketball
court in the Grove and in Sta-
pledon Gardens.

"We try to support the
community which supports
us," said Mr Wells. "We
would like to see it continued

away from carbonated prod-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JASON DORMEUS
of CARMICHEAL ROAD, ROCKY PINE, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 15" day of
September, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

on an ongoing basis."



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

WUPATKI LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

BEGNINS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 17th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 17th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that MATILAS FLORVIL of
JOHN STREET, FO, BOX GT-2935 NASSAU, THE
BAHAMAS, & applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citzenship, for registrstion/naturalization
a6 a dtizan of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should mot be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
fram the 15° day of September, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizanship, P.O. Box
NLT 147, Nassau, Bahamas

Medical
Sales Representative

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Introduction:

A local healthcare supplier is currently looking to
recruit a Medical Sales Representative to sell
medical and surgical products in the local market.
With this position experience in the healthcare
field would be an asset but is not essential.

ROYAL B FIDELITY

Moray at Work
Cty LIN TAL
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 21 SEPTEMBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,514.66] CHG -20.33| %CHG -1.32 | YTD -197.70 | YTD % -11.55 ces .
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31% Job Specification:
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320 Main Purpose of the Medical Sales Representative:
52wk-Low Security Previous Close Today's Close Change DailyVol. EPS$ _Div$ P/E - To achieve sales targets for the various product
1.14 AML Foods Limited 115 114 “0.01 0127 0.000 90 lines th hol ed activit
9.90 Bahamas Property Fund 10.75 10.75 0.00 0992 0200 108 INES TAROUGN Planned activity,
5.90 Bank of Bahamas 6.18 5.90 -0.28 0.244 0.260 24.2 Maintain business records for all Health Care
0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00 0.877 0.000 NM . ee SS iar aie oe | .
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.078 0.080 404 Professionals and key accounts within the local
healthcare industry to help select and deliver
business management objectives linked to sales

2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055 0.040 43.1
10.00 Cable Bahamas 10.03 10.03 0.00 1.406 0.250 7.1
and market share growth.

2.74 Colina Holdings 2.74 2.74 0.00 0.249 0.040 11.0
5.26 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 5.92 5.92 0.00 0.419 0.300 14.1
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.64 3.62 -0.02 0.111 0.052 32.6
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.05 2.05 0.00 0.382 0.080 5.4

6.60 Famguard 6.60 6.60 0.00 0.420 0.240 157 i i j X
8.80 Finco 9.30 9.30 0.00 0.322 0.520 28.9 Skills/Experience Requirements:

10.00 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.29 10.00 -0.29 0794 0350 126 - Excellent communication and interpersonal
495 Focol (S) 4.99 4.99 0.00 0332 0150 15.0 skills
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 N/M : 7

0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.27 -0.03 0.035 0000 7.7 Tenacious, driven and resilient.
5.49 ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 0.00 0.407 0500 13.5 ‘ rr ‘
9.98 J. 8. Johnson 9.98 9.98 0.00 0952 0640 105 Good planning and organizational skills.
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.180 0.000 55.6 Self discipline and self motivated,
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases) . .
52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interested in the healthcare industry.
7000-00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) > FBB17 700.00 0.00 7% Ability to interpret data.
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% wa: :
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7% Ambitious and keen to develop a Career In a
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% successful organization
Able to provide evidence of individual
achievement in line with core competencies of
a medical representative, this can be from other

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price WeeklyVol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

fields of employment, education and social and
sporting activities.

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.00 -2.246 0.000 N/M
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00 0.000 0.480 N/M
0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55 0.001 0.000 256.6
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
29.00 ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 4.540 0.000 9.03
0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55 0.002 0.000 261.90
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $
CFAL Bond Fund 1.4038 3.72 6.20
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.8990 -1.39 -4.16
1.4119 CFAL Money Market Fund 1.4892 3.87 5.47
3.0941 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.0941 -8.61 -13.59
12.3870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.1136 3.93 5.87
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 101.6693 1.10 1.67
93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96.7398 0.35 -4.18
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.0775 — Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.3399 2.69 -1.41
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0707 3.38 5.14
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0319 -0.11 2.05
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0673 2.89 4.93
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

0.00%|

52wk-Low
1.3344
2.8952

Yield % NAV Date
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
11-Sep-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09

Education Requirements:
- Degree Level or equivalent, ideally in sales or
medical related

The area covered is the Caribbean. You will live
in the Bahamas and be prepared to travel.

The Salary offered for the Medical Representative
is competitive and depends on experience +
bonus + benefits.

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

To apply for this position, candidates must be
eligible to live and work in the Bahamas.

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $-A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Please send resume's to
medrephumanresources@qmail.com



THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22np, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

ii

Today

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

MARINE FORECAST
WINDS

Dae cnn Wortp CITIES





Wednesday WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.



















y | > a High Low W High Low W NASSAU Today: E at 10-20 Knots 2-3 Feet 4 Miles 84°F
i — fy ® “a wy - -F - -F - 0| 1 |2 3|4|5|6 ‘ 8|9|1 D FIC FIC FIC FIC Wednesday: ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 8 Miles 84°F
hy, f ' Veal all i | _ Acapulco 91/32 77/25 pe 89/31 78/25 t FREEPORT Today: ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 5 Miles 85° F
in, a a a Low | MoveraTe | High | V.HIGH Amsterdam 6719 56/13 pc 63/17 50/10 pc Wednesday: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 8 Miles 95° F
ORLANDO A Ankara, Turkey 66/18 43/6 sh 70/21 43/6 Ss = ABACO ‘Today: E at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 6 Miles 84° F
High:90°F32°C = Variable clouds with a Partly cloudy, a t-storm; Some sun; a shower or Partly sunny with a A stray shower or Partly sunny. The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 76/24 61/16 pc 77/25 63/17 s Wednesday: E at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 9 Miles 84° F
a Low: 75° F/24° c 4. t-storm. breezy. t-storm. shower possible. t-storm possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 62/16 50/10 pc 6317 61/16 r
: x t ‘anil . Hi h: gg° Hi h: 88° Hi h: 89° Hi h: 87° Bangkok 89/31 78/25 t 90/32 78/25 t
lu @ g x é é es ide ne Ign or Barbados 87/30 77/25 s 86/30 77/25 s
TAMPA ta | High: 89 Low: 80 Low: 79 Low: 79 Low: 77 Low: 78 yas Posy Barcelona 75/23 63/17 pc 74/23 63/17 s Topay's U.S. FORECAST
a = - ae ay Bicol ETUC ume irel Bair 81/27 54/12 s 78/25 60/15 vc
igh: ) [FC er] F 97°-86° F 99°-80° F 98°-85° F 95°-83° F L.(ft.) Low
High: 91° F/33°C . : High _Ht(ft.) _ .
ce i — <0 * : —_ Beirut 76/24 71/21 s 76/24 69/20 s
Low: 75° F/24°C ry! r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 10:01am. 35 3:42am. 03 Belgrade 80/26 55/12 s 82/97 58/14 s
. s - levati the h body— thing that effects h Id feels. Te tl flect the high and the low for the day. : :
a a elevation on tne numan boay—everytning that elects now warm or cold a person leels. lemperatures renect tné nign an é 1OW Tor the day. . ~ _m. - se p.m. Berlin 73/22 55/12 pe 79/29 BOI pe
* > Ce Wednesd am. 33 426am. 0. Bermuda 82/27 74/23 s 82/27 73/22 s (WARMER)
’ or sae a are : ses" 44:06 pm. 26 5:17pm. 09 Bogota 66/18 47/8 sh 65/18 45/7 + ain Qo
ie ») tatistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday T140am. 31 513am. 07 Brussels 72/22 50/10 s 72/22 52/11 pe Billings, oe Minneapolis
ft ' ABACO Temperature Thursday 50pm, 25 641pm. 12 Budapest 83/28 56/13 s 82/27 57/13 s tee
F, os i. r 5 ahs O° F/99° IGM, ssesecesepe chs ec eeeseeeiene ecm 90° F/32° C - ; ; Buenos Aires 59/15 37/2 sh 59/15 36/2 s
7 J Fa ll ee LOW assciocsnssscit gicrio7¢ Friday = F286 Pm. 28 a ae : Cairo 99/37 71/21 s 92/33 67/19 s (H)"
: - ore ow: 77° F/25 Normal high... er FatG COM 89/31 83/28 t 92/33 84/28 + &
” : Py Normal low 75° F/24° C Calgary 80/26 46/7 s 83/28 44/6 s ener
; oe Swe @ WEST PALMBEACH i LS t/8206 Nh pctrrsiecenmcerce 91° F/83° C Sun AND Moon earch 90/32 75/23 pc 90/32 74/23 t eee
: iol High: 88° F/31°C ar Last year's low ssdusapurhsseaceuaeneeaceoaddt 78° F/26° C " " Caracas 83/28 72/22 pc 82/27 72/22 t
oor Low: 77° F/25°C er Precipitation a ate a a.m. La aa am. Casablanca 80/26 61/16 s 82/27 63/17 s
>a all As of 2 p.m. yesterday 0.0... 0.02" unsel....... ‘Vo p.m. Moonset..... 09 P.M. Copenhagen 64/17 50/10 sh 66/18 47/8 sh (COOLER)
© . FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT ae Year to date 30. First Full on New Dublin 6317 48/8 pc 61/16 46/7 sh "EIPaso
High: 88° F/31°C Qa High: 89° F/32°C Normal year to date 2... 36.27" : bass - Frankfurt 75/23 50/10 pc 75/23 52/11 pc N76/53)
Low: 80° F/27°C — Low: 76° F/24° C i - Geneva 74/23 53/11 s 77/25 52/11 s
a AccuWeather.com g Halifax 68/20 53/11 s 70/21 50/10 pc
. @ j am Forecasts and graphics provided by Hic: a Havana 90/32 73/22 t 87/30 72/22 r ENNY Showers Miami
; : MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Sep.26 Oct.4 Oct.11 Oct.18 —_ Helsinki 63/17 52/11 sh 59/15 46/7 pc T-storms 87/79
a High: 87° F/31°C 5 Hong Kong 88/31 79/26 t 88/31 81/27 t Rain Fronts
-_, Low: 79° F/26°C NASSAU High: 89° F/32° C Islamabad 104/40 73/22 s 105/40 74/23 s Flurries _ Cold
F «ot ano a Low: 77° F/25° C Istanbul 72/22 59/15 s 74/23 60/15 s Shown are noon positions of weather systems and a aa
High: 89° F/32° C Snow Warm
~—£ Low: 80° FZ7°C Jerusalem a2e7 668s «B17 B7/N3 s . ee a ae
a i. a —— Johannesburg 81/27 54/12 pc 78/25 52/11 pc : i ¢
KEY WEST all. of Kingston 88/31 79/26 t 88/31 79/26 + ts [05 10s 20s {B03)) 40s |50s 60s 70s ‘80s 0s) N00elliile)
High: 88° F/31°C ‘i CAT ISLAND Lima 74/23 58/14 s 73/22 58/14 pe
Low: 79° F/26°C : High: 87° F/31° London 72/22 55/12 pc 68/20 50/10 pc
: Ay Low: 74° F/23°C Madrid 81/27 54/12 s 79/26 54/12 pe
@ ~y Manila 88/31 79/26 t 84/28 77/25 1
- : hy Mexico City 75/23 55/12 t 75/23 55/12 t
_. © | Monterrey 9082 70/21 t 79/28 66/18 t HURRICANE INSURANCE
> ontrea r pc
| GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR Montreal 72/22 59/15 72/22 54/12
i High: 86° F/30° C High: 89° F/32° Moscow 63/17 45/7 pc 5713 48/8 pc
igh: 89° F/32°C ;
Low: 78° F/26° C Low: 75° 6 Munich 77/25 50/10 s 80/26 52/11 s a
. ow: 75° F/24°C vb 7
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS f Nairobi 88/31 56/13 pe 87/30 57/13 pe
j j ! : 5 ew Velnl 2 $ ;
highs and tonights's lows. ve High: 89° F/32° C omy . New Delh 97/36 81/27 98/36 79/26 ,
Za Low: 76° F/24° C oar a Oslo 65/18 45/7 sh 61/16 42/5 sh t Yo u an J B Bl n
; ~ - HY Paris 74/23 52/11 s 75/23 54/12 s i OW
Prague 76/24 55/12 s 77/25 54/12 s
LONGISLAND Rode Janel (7om8 72221 50.7578 o Away UITICAaANC
High: 89° F/32° C iya s s
er i rpc fom 71s 647 TO OT s
Today Wednesday Today Wednesday Today Wednesday ‘ MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 88/31 80/26 sh 88/31 79/26 s that y Bday. ve _ y knowing
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W ae High: 89° F/32° C San Juan 53/11 35/1 Fr 75/23 42/5 s t at yo ave excellent insur ance
incomes mmemnienioumineions wesmmneceniovemeionion lames eee ee coverage no matter which
uquerque pc pc ndianapolis iladelphia pc . th
Anchorage 49/9 38/3 sh 49/9 38/3 pc Jacksonville 88/31 72/22 t 88/31 72/22 t Phoenix 97/36 69/20 s 95/35 71/21 s CROOKED ISLAND A ACKLINS Sai Eee Ele Ee ae way he wind blows.
Atlanta 84/28 69/20 pc 86/30 69/20 c — Kansas City 74/23 55/12 c 77/25 56/12 c Pittsburgh «78/25 59/15 sh 81/27 62/16 t RAGGEDISLAND — High:90°F/s2°c ee aor ce s
Atlantic City 78/25 64/17 pc 82/27 6246 t Las Vegas 90/32 63/17 s 92/33 66/18 s Portland, OR 96/35 57/13 s 95/35 S713 s High:so°Fa2"¢ LOW 78° F/26°C Sea ie aaa aE anaeeart Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 78/25 64/17 po 82/27 64/17 t Little Rock 82/27 68/20 t 83/28 67/19 t Raleigh-Durham 82/27 68/20 t 86/30 68/20 t Low:75°F/24°C = % sen 7 ae Ea , re Aen -
Boston 77/25 6417 pc 82/27 64417 pc LosAngeles 96/35 68/20 s 100/37 70/21 s St.Louis 80/26 6719 t 82/27 6719 ¢t . on ae aE - ie Fs
Buffalo 74/23 61/16 po 75/23 56/413 pc Louisville 84/28 68/20 t 86/30 67/19 ¢t Salt Lake City 69/20 45/7 s 72/22 S53/11_ s GREATINAGUA wr Tula 77/95 68/20 am 76/94 67/419
Charleston, SC 85/29 70/21 t 86/30 70/21 t Memphis 84/28 70/21 t 85/29 70/21 ¢t San Antonio 83/28 64/17 t 85/29 68/20 pc High: 90° F/32° C Taal TR Be 77105 85/12 pe
Chicago 82/27 61/16 t 83/28 59/15 pe Miami 87/30 79/26 t 90/32 79/26 t San Diego 90/32 63/17 s 89/31 63417 pc Low. 78° F/26°C Trinidad 91/32 73/29 t 79/96 57/13 t av!
Cleveland 78/25 58/14 pe 81/27 60/15 pc Minneapolis 74/23 61/16 $s 79/26 60/15 s San Francisco 86/30 55/12 s 86/30 56/13 pc . TaNeoney 78/95 57/13 s 74/23 B73 s (BAHAMAS | LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 75/23 60/15 t 79/26 66/18 s Nashville 84/28 67/19 t 86/30 69/20 c _ Seattle 88/31 55/12 s 84/28 54/12 s Gianna 74/23 BO/15 s 76/24 60/15 s
Denver 54/12 36/2 r 5412 39/3 c New Orleans 88/31 77/25 t 90/32 77/25 t Tallahassee 90/32 71/21 pe 91/82 72/22 pc Warsaw 72/22 56/13 5 72/29 52/11 po | | /
Detroit 80/26 63/17 po 85/29 61/16 pc — New York 76/24 67/19 po 84/28 67/19 pc Tampa 91/32 75/23 t 91/32 75/23 t a Winnipeg 70/21 47/8 s er Seats SSD Fak (PAZ) IET-A20 ff Wa (242) 32-2862 Ff Tek (22) TOG-2004
Honolulu 88/31 73/22 s 80/31 75/23 s OklahomaCity 72/22 58/11 c 77/25 56/13 pc Tucson 94/34 64/17 s 91/82 BING s i ;
Houston 86/30 70/21 t 81/27 70/21 t Orlando 90/32 75/23 t 89/31 75/23 t Washington, DC 78/25 66/18 pc 83/28 68/20 t Te hc ee





PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune



B O







a>



Help save
the smallest
miracles

By JEFFARAH GIBSON

sophisticated and expensive piece of

equipment at Princess Margaret Hospital

is making the difference between life and
death for its tiniest patients.

Ananda Pyfrom gave birth
to little Sophia on April 30,
2007 at the Princess Margaret
Hospital, via caesarian deliv-
ery, but wasn’t expecting
until July 2007.

A few months before her
delivery, she was diagnosed
with Intrauterine Growth
Restriction which is a condi-
tion where the fetus is small-
er than expected for a par-
ticular number of weeks.

Because of this diagnosis
her labor was induced and
she gave birth at 32 weeks.
Sophia weighed two pounds
and four ounces. The little
girl was immediately placed
in an incubator.

Mrs. Pyfrom says it was a
day she will never forget both
joyous and overwhelming.

“After finding out the con-
dition of Sophia, it was scary.
The doctors immediately
instilled faith and confidence
and assured my husband
(Michael Pyfrom) and I that
she would be okay. It was
however very hard not being
able to take her home right
after she was born,” she said.

“There are three levels of
NICU (Neonatal Intensive
Care Unit) NICU 1, NICU
2, and special care. Sophia
was in the second level at the
NICU, where she was placed
in an incubator and closely
monitored by the doctors and
nurses. The doctors told us
that when Sophia reached
four pounds we would be
able to take her home, so she
spent approximately six and a
half weeks at the hospital
before she was released”, she
said.

During those weeks Mr

You are what you eat

By REUBEN SHEARER

and Mrs Pyfrom developed
and maintained a close bond
with their newborn by visiting
and talking to her everyday

At two years, Sophia is
thriving, doing very well, and
maintaining a healthy life.
“She is fantastic, indepen-
dent, and her speech is devel-
oped. She is a little bit small,
but her body is propor-
tioned.”

After their experience, Mr
and Mrs Pyfrom can certain-
ly relate to Lynette Burrows
who gave birth to their god-
daughter Te’hilah Burrows,
who was born under similar
circumstances.

Ms Burrows gave birth
three months earlier than her
due date because she suf-
fered eclampsia ( coma and
convulsions before, during,
or shortly after childbirth).

“T was due to have the
baby on July 2, 2007, but I
gave birth on April 1 2007.
After birth, Te’*hilah weighed
one pound and peice ounces
or 0.680 kg. She was extreme-
ly ill, very small and I could
hold her in the palm of my
hands,” she said.

She was placed on the Ist
level on the NICU ,and after
progressing she was moved
to the 2nd level. “She stayed
in the hospital for about 2
months. I would go to the
hospital and spend the entire
day with her. It was not easy
at the time, and the only way
I felt better was to be there
with her.”

Mrs Burrows also noted
that when she found out that
her baby was very ill she was
devastated. “I felt inadequate
because I thought it was

respiratory problems, asthma and

something I did or did not do
that caused my baby to be so
small. The doctors then told
me that they have seen
babies a lot smaller than
Te’hilah.”

Her daughter spent two
months spent in the hospital
under the watchful eyes of
the doctors and nurses. She
eventually got better, gained
extra pounds and was
released. She is now also two
and her health is in great
shape.

Without the help of the
incubator these once prema-
ture infants, Sophia Pyfrom
and Te’hilah Burrows, would
have not been able to thrive,
grow, and live healthy
lifestyles.

According to
www.ebme.co.uk one of the
most important elements of a
new born survival is the
infant’s temperature regula-
tion. The infant has several
disadvantages in terms of
thermal regulation. An infant
has a relatively large surface
area, poor thermal insulation,
and a small amount of mass
to act as a heat sink. The
newborn has little ability to
conserve heat by changing
posture and no ability to
adjust their own clothing in a
response to thermal stress”,
this is why an incubator is
necessary

The incubators in the
NICU at PMH are truly life-
savers, but need to be updat-
ed.

In an effort to save the life
of newborns like Sophia and
Te’hilah, The Tribune Media
Group, The Tile King,
Builders Mall, Doctors Hos-
pital, and the Rotary Club of
East Nassau have partnered
to supply critically needed
ventilators and incubators for
the Neonatal Intensive Care
Unit at Princess Margaret
Hospital. Their goal is to
raise $300,000, and they are
encouraging all to make a
contribution.

liver and muscles.

SOPHIA is now 2
years old and liv-
ing a healthy life.

Tribune Features Reporter

CHILDREN learn what they
live. That’s an age-old statement
that encompasses many aspects of
growing up. There are many val-
ues and practices that a parent
pours into their child, and healthy
eating habits are no exception.
However, according to one neuro
psychiatrist, parents are dropping
the ball when it comes to equip-
ping children with realistic eating
habits.

One expert says the answer lies
in parents educating themselves
with good information on diet and
exercise and teaching their chil-
dren to follow suit. Childhood
obesity is on the rise in the
Bahamas, Dr Brian Humblestone
said at a recent lecture at Doc-
tor’s Hospital.

According to Dr Humblestone,
there are increased cases of young
children and teens developing type
2 diabetes, and eventually obesity,
which is normally prevalent in
those over 35.

Childhood obesity issues are
early signs of illnesses like dia-
betes, hypertension, coronary
heart disease, gall bladder disease,

reproductive hormonal problems.

Ironically enough, he added,
“one of the manifestations of civil-
isation is that we have half of the
world dying of diseases caused by
being overfed, and other parts
where people are dying of starva-
tion.”

“But it’s not just the amount of
food people are eating, but the
kind of foods as well,” Dr Hum-
blestone explained. “If your child
is having a muffin or Danish and
an orange juice for breakfast, they
may feel energised to go to school,
but it is very likely they will feel
famished, experience a energy
crash hours later, and need more
carbs.”

He said that carb-loaded break-
fasts are not the best to start your
day with, adding that most cereals
do not hold to the health benefits
that they claim on television ads.

Cereals are largely loaded with
refined carbohydrates, which
shoot the blood sugar up, Dr
Humblestone explained. Refined
carbs cause your blood sugar to
rise fast, and a lot of insulin is pro-
duced from the pancreas.

The insulin sends the sugar into
the blood, which moves into the

blood sugar goes down fast as a
result of too much insulin, you get
hungry. This normally causes a
person to want more sugar and
thus get hungry again. “That’s why
a carbohydrate breakfast is not a
good breakfast.”

Dr Humblestone said fast food
restaurants’ constant bombard-
ment with advertising needs to be
analysed and rejected. “It takes
motivation and tenacity, to per-
sist against seduction by the
media--which has a major effect
on the majority of people who are
overeating,” Dr Humblestone told
Tribune Health. “Food is com-
fort, and it will always be that
way.”

However, when you overeat, let
alone the wrong foods, physical
problems develop. Studies reveal
that persons who fall in this cate-
gory have experienced more
headaches, and feel really
depressed and exhausted.

“It’s not real hard eating junk
food all the time, because it taste
good, and it makes you feel good
at the moment,” Dr Humblestone
said. “You'll eat some, and just a
while later you’ll be hungry
again.”

The problem he says is when
there’s increased intake of these
kinds of junk foods, because there
must be a balance of exercise to go
along with it.

Finally, Dr Humblestone advis-
es parents to educate themselves
about ingredients, so they know
what they are feeding their family.
For example, he noted that any
ingredient ending in “ose” should
be avoided, as it represents a high
sugar content.

According to the Super Size Me
documentary, companies spend
billions to make the public aware
of their product. They market
through T-shirts, coupons, toys for
children, and restaurant place-
mats, and kids are drawn to that.

Mcdonalds spent 1.4 billion dol-
lars worldwide in direct media
advertising in 2001. Pepsi spent
more than one billion dollars on
direct media advertising. To
advertise its candy, Hershey’s
Food spent under a mere $200 mil-
lion dollars internationally.

However, in its peak year, the
five-a-day fruit and vegetable cam-
paign’s total advertising budget in
all media was just $2 million; 100
times less than the direct media
budget of just one candy company.








THIS is Sophia
at 4 weeks in

NICU II (about
4 weeks old).

a Tay Ua)
a eels

“The important thing is to start the
day right with a meal that has pro-
tein, like from a cereal, or from
marine produce like sardine,
grouper, or some other source. |
eat eggs sometimes, and a little bit
of meat. | try to draw from more
sources of protein (Seafood, nuts
and seeds,) and salads made from
fresh produce. Stay far away from
refined carbs, and eat less white
flour, cake, cookies, and pasta. Get
some exercise too. | try to walk
briskly three times a week for forty
minutes.”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 9B





(Co LOVING RELATIONSHIPS

Why do people cheat?

"Why do people cheat?’ is like a
million dollar question. We could
spend hours speculating because
the odds of getting it right would be
like shooting for the stars. As an
outsider, looking in we all think the
answer is obvious, but clinical prac-
tice shows us the complicated web
that joins two people.

Certainly, there are those who
seemed to be wired differently and
who find the whole concept of
monogamy inconceivable. They
may not admit it but their lack of
remorse reinforces their underlying
thought pattern. Living life in such
a fashion is habit forming and
many in no way want to change.
Some are honest and upfront about
their intentions, while others live
life surrounded with deceit and lies.

Then, there are some people
whose psychopathology predeter-
mines their behaviour and conse-
quently have difficulty changing.
By the time we reach midlife, there
is a good chance we have met or
been involved with such a person.
From the first time we become
aware of it, we change the course

@ \’ GREEN SCleNie By Gardener Jack



of our lives. Do we work at forgiv-
ing the first ttme? What happens if
it happens again? Does the deceiv-
er become comfortable knowing
that you will always be there? Does
the betrayed worry they will be
perceived as weak by taking their
partner back?

As devastating as it is to discover
your dating partner is being
unfaithful, it still provides a way
out. There may have been verbal
commitment, but no formal agree-
ment or vows were made. These
are pivotal moments in a couple's
life and the course of their relation-
ship is decided from that moment.
Facing the reasons why a certain
behaviour has taken place is excru-
ciatingly painful. Understanding
the need to talk about it is over-

cenek peppers

shadowed by the heavy weight of
anger and rejection. Blame is
quickly slammed on the wrong
doer who in turn reacts defensively.
For many, time passes and day to
day life keeps them busy. Many of
us are procrastinators and find
putting things off much easier.
Trust has quickly been extin-
guished and secrecy often prevails.
The core principles of relation-
ship therapy is to work at restoring
the intimate bond between a cou-
ple. Consciously working at main-
taining this delicate bond, and
ensuring the glue that keeps peo-
ple together, does not come
unstuck. For many, there are
underlining relationship and sexual
issues. Basic primary needs have
been overlooked or ignored. Feel-
ings of betrayal prevent a willing-
ness to listen to the other person's

story and so things remain in limbo.

The ability to express and listen to
unmet needs proves a daunting
task for many. When the pain is so
great just being in the room, look-
ing in the eye, or having to interact
with that person seems impossible.

Years of not feeling truly connect-
ed, or even understood means that
a foundation for forgiveness is even
harder.

Pride can get in the way of seek-
ing out a trained professional. The
very idea of saying out loud details
of our private life may seem
embarrassing. It may seem easier
and more satisfying to find some-
one to fulfill those missing needs. It
may solve the problem today but
the reality is that it usually ends up
making things more complicated.
They are able to justify their
actions and believe they ‘had no
choice’.

Thoughts of something new and
refreshing in our lives are not
uncommon. Our minds play para-
doxical games between what is
expected of us and the things we
desire. This is how fantasies are
formed. But making them reality
crosses the border and we need to
acknowledge that clear choices
were made.

Without a doubt ‘crisis’ often dri-
ves us to seek out a therapist. The
sadness, anger and humiliation pro-



vokes so many questions from the
betrayed. Talking to a third person
in the room allows things to be said
and heard which otherwise would
probably not be said.

The role of the therapist is to
gradually help all concerned find
some personal and interpersonal
meaning, to the chaotic mess. Time
puts a different perspective on
things. Persevering through the cri-
sis, and salvaging the couple, allows
healing and future relating. Affairs
are often the prelude to divorce. It
is interesting to contemplate that if
all couples considering divorce
were to come for counseling how
many relationships could be saved.
Can we really put a cost on the
damage, both financial and emo-
tional, if we leave things unattend-
ed? At least by getting professional
help you will be able to say you
really tried.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual and
Couples Relationship Therapist. She is
a Registered Nurse and a Certified
Clinical Sex Therapist. Call for an
appointment- Relate Bahamas at 364-
7230, or email
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com.
She is also available for speaking
engagements.



SWEET peppers are added
to so many meals in The
Bahamas that their presence is
almost ubiquitous. Conch sal-
ad without sweet peppers is
untraditional, smothered pork
chops untenable, and salsas
unthinkable. That makes
growing sweet peppers in the
garden a priority.

First, let us do some math.
Green sweet peppers sell in
my friendly neighbourhood
supermarket for close to $3 a
pound. Individual peppers
that are red, yellow, brown,
purple or orange sell for up
to $6 each. A packet of pep-
pers rarely costs more than $2
and for that you get at least a
dozen seeds, often many
more. In a season you should
get a dozen or more peppers
from each plant. Sweet pep-
pers that are any other colour
than green are no more diffi-
cult to grow than green ones.
Are you doing the maths?

The answer is: Grow pep-
pers. Sweet or bell peppers
are a warm-weather crop so
they can be started in Sep-
tember. The seeds should be
planted a quarter-inch deep
and the soil around them
should be firmed down to
press out air pockets. If you
start in pots or a seed bed,
transplant when the seed leaf

Smelly
feet!!

TODAY, I will address a
topic that I am asked about on
a daily basis - smelly feet (or
its scientific term 'Bromidro-
sis'). If you are one of many
people who suffer from foot
odor (smelly feet), you are not
alone. Did you know that most
of what we call foot odor is
actually shoe odor? As you will
discover later in this article,
some people are more prune
to smelly feet, and there are a
lot of factors that contribute to
nasty shoe odors. This condi-
tion is referred to as 'shoe der-
matitis'.

Shoe dermatitis is a medical
condition which is caused by
contact of the foot with chemi-
cals in the material of footwear.
This condition can be either
irritant or allergic.

Irritant shoe dermatitis is
often caused by wearing shoes
that are wet, poorly fitting or
that have uneven linings. How-
ever, in the case of allergic (con-
tact) dermatitis, there are many
different substances that can
cause this condition, which is
quite common and is frequent-
ly complicated by secondary
infections or eczema.

I am certain that we are all
owners of a variety of footwear
styles: casual, formal, work and
athletic shoes. The majority of
our footwear is imported and
made from leather, rubber and
other synthetic materials. The
most recent US statistics
revealed that ninety-eight per
cent percent of all shoes are
imported, therefore it is impos-
sible to identify precisely all
their constituent components.
It is during the manufacturing
and finishing of footwear many
chemicals are used.

Sources of Shoe Contact

begins to wither, when the
seedling is 5-6 inches tall. It is
important that

the transplant not be any
lower than the soil level. It
can be slightly raised above
soil level but never allowed to
have soil touching the stem.
You may grow your seeds
straight into the ground

and in this case you should
have the soil well worked and
enriched with soil-retaining
commercial cow manure or
compost. I like to work time-
release fertiliser into the soil
before planting.

Pepper plants suffer when
there is insufficient moisture
so it is best to make a point of
watering them daily.

Sometimes pepper plants
put out flowers when they are
only 6-8 inches tall. If this hap-
pens, nip off the flowers. A
small pepper plant that bears
a full-sized pepper will be use-
less and unproductive there-
after.

One enemy of pepper fruits
is the sun. If the leaf cover is
insufficient you may get sun-
scald on your pepper fruits. A
paper bag to cover or a branch
from the bush to shield will
give protection.

Sunscald usually happens
during the early summer
months rather than the



Dermatitis:

Historically, leather, dyes and
rubber allergens were seen as
the most common cause of shoe
dermatitis. Today, shoe der-
matitis may occur if a person is
sensitive to the rubber or elastic
compounds in shoes, form
inserts or from elastic glues
used to bind shoe components.
Other identifiable causes of
shoe dermatitis are cements,
dichromate used in tanning,
dyes, anti-mildew agents,
formaldehyde, and nickel eye-
lets or nickel arch supports.

Some signs and symptoms of
shoe dermatitis:

The most common site first
involved with shoe dermatitis
is the dorsal (top) surface of
the big toe and on the insteps
(top of foot). It later extends
by spreading to the other toes
and dorsal (top) aspect of the
foot. Skin lesions may be acute,
presenting as red, blistering,
oozing and usually symmetri-
cal.

This dermatitis can range
from mild, itchy rash to severe
itching with swelling and small
blisters. In severe cases, open
sores may present and can
result in secondary bacterial
infections. If any such signs are
present, I urge that you seek
professional help for proper
diagnosis and treatment.

Prevent shoe dermatitis:

As a pedorthist and a mem-
ber of the health care team, the
design of footwear determines
to a large extent the appear-
ance of shoe dermatitis. Once
such condition is observed it is
the professional duty of a
Pedorthist to refer the individ-
ual to a physician for medical

autumn months.

Whenever I grow green bell
peppers I leave them to ripen
fully and rarely pick them
green. Green peppers turn red
as they ripen and become real-
ly sweet. If you only eat green
peppers you may wonder why
on earth they are called sweet
peppers for there is precious
little sweet about them.

Those coloured peppers we
mentioned earlier tend to be
sweeter than green peppers
but still have to be allowed to
mature in order to attain full
sweetness.

In addition to blocky bell
peppers you can grow Italian-
type Cubanelle sweet pep-
pers. These are much longer,
usually two or three times
longer than they are wide.
They can be used when they
are yellow or red, again the
ripe red ones being by far the
sweeter. I love to sweat them
in a pan with a little olive oil
until they collapse. Banana
peppers are quite like
Cubanelles but tend to have
thinner walls.

The sweet pepper plants
you establish in September
should last you into next sum-
mer. You will find, however,
that no matter how well you
fertilise and water your plants
they will grow less productive

evaluation. Once this condition
is diagnosed, footwear is than a
part of the treatment.

A pedorthist as an expert in
footwear can aid the physician
and the patient with the selec-
tion of footwear without mate-
rials that may cause shoe der-
matitis. Substituting products
made of different materials that
do not cause allergic reactions
will lessen the likelihood of
future episodes of shoe der-
matitis. “Vegetable-tanned”
footwear can be substituted as
an alternative for the hyper-
sensitive individual. This type
of footwear contains no rubber
or formaldehyde.

Finally, it is important to
recognise that shoe dermatitis is
quite common, affecting chil-
dren and adults regardless of
race. Patients with shoe der-
matitis can use special types of
shoes prepared from non-sen-
sitising substances. I would also
suggest measures to control
sweating may be very helpful
for the patient who suffers from
shoe dermatitis. Socks or stock-
ings made of absorbent cotton
(e.g. Thorlos or Balega socks
has a unique rapid moisture
evaporation system) should
always be worn. Avoid wet
shoes, poorly fitting shoes or
self treatment and seek profes-
sional help to treat or prevent
shoe dermatitis.

«Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board
Certified & licensed Pedorthist, is
the proprietor of Foot Solutions,
a health and wellness franchise
that focuses on foot care and
proper shoe fit, located in the
Sandyport Plaza, Nassau. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to
nassau@footsolutions.com or
327-FEET (3338).

"The views expressed are those
of the author and does not nec-
essarily represent those of Foot
Solutions Incorporated or any of
its subsidiary and/or affiliated
companies.

and bear smaller and smaller
fruits. For this reason I usual-
ly sow Cubanelles and a new
crop of bell peppers approach-
ing Easter.

Pepper plants have few ene-
mies but the undersides of the
leaves should be inspected
regularly as this is the usual
point of attack. If you have a
dozen plants or fewer it is easy
enough to wipe away any

insect eggs from the leaves.
Sometimes pepper plants
just heel over and die. This is
caused by a virus and there is
little one can do except
destroy the plant and hope
the virus has not spread to too
many plants. Pepper plants
suffering from a virus usually
have a strained appearance,
the leaves looking as if they
have been stretched. Most

GREEN peppers cost
the same to grow as
red, yellow, orange,
brown, purple, etc., so
why not choose your
colour and beat the
supermarket prices.



viral attacks occur in seedlings
bought from a nursery rather
than those you start from
seed.

e j.hardy @ coralwave.com

aD with Nih\, Ah tad

4

eS

The sign of great things to come!

Alacta Plus Advanced formulation is the only milk food

for growing children enriched with 34 nutrients,

such as iron, iodine and zinc, as well as DHA, ARA,

and Sialic Acid, which are integral building

blocks for the brain.

They'll go much further in life

(Meadjohnson’-

Nutritionals



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE







Are you communicating

to inform and inspire

“An inspired speaker does more than
just inform; instead the give people the
inspiration to dream beyond their cir-
cumstances.”

~ Michelle M. Miller ~

Information is the key to transfor-
mation, whether it is positive or neg-
ative. What is the objective of the
information that you communicate?

Most people pay no real attention
to their information intake; they lis-
ten to anything, believe anything and
for the most part, repeat anything.
However, if you desire to cultivate a
positive disposition, you must be very
discriminate about the information
that you consume. This is funda-
mental to your communication effec-
tiveness, if you are focused on posi-
tive change.

Holding the public's attention, par-
ticularly in small communities, ought
to be viewed as a privilege opportu-
nity in which to highlight the good.
You must therefore be very clear
about your intentions; as undeclared
intentions can quickly become emp-
ty rhetoric.

Whose Dream Will You Inspire?
Those who pursue their dreams
arm themselves with words of wis-

Falling into

Fashion

dom from old sages who inspire them
to dream even in the midst of
despair.

The - “I have a dream” speech by
Dr Martin Luther King Jr, is a per-
fect example of how an inspired com-
municator can elevate consciousness
and positively change mindsets.
Each of us has something unique to
share with the world but most of us
lack the inspiration to achieve. As
the world continues to change, how-
ever, and people explore new ideas of
substance and meaning; they will
hunger for words that inspire them to
stay the course.

Will you be ready to satisfy this
need?

Final Thoughts...

While change is never easy, it is
essential; make it a habit to consis-
tently evaluate the rhythm of your
communication.

On a broader level, the general
tempo of our dialogues says much
about our sense of self; despite living
in a beautiful paradise of peace and
plenty, we still possess a combative
disposition; hell bent on reporting
and repeating negatives as a priority.

This creates desensitised mindsets,
oblivious to the bigger world where

FALL

MUSTHAVES

FROM page 12

many shoes.

Located in the Mall at Marathon,
Catch 22’s fall catalogue includes a
wide variety of trendy shoes, ranging
from gladiator flats to patent plat-
forms. “Patent platforms, gladiator
flats, sneakers, and wedges are all
styles that are in for the fall, also shoes
in metallic gold, metallic silver, fushia,
white, snake’s skin, and multi-colors
are very popular,” Sherraine Dean,
the store’s senior manager told T7ri-

El Morro: History
written on stone

EL MORRO NATIONAL
MONUMENT, N.M.
Associated Press

FOR CENTURIES, Span-
ish explorers, U.S. Army
troops, wagon train emi-
grants and railroad survey-
ors carved their names on a
huge sandstone outcrop in
what's now a national monu-
ment famed for those inscrip-
tions.

But the softness of the rock
that allowed names to be
chipped into the cliff at El
Morro National Monument
also is letting those signatures
erode — jeopardizing the his-
tory the park is meant to pro-
tect.

Over the years, officials
have reattached fallen
inscriptions, developed grout
to keep moisture out of
cracks and experimented
with coatings to prevent sig-
natures from wearing away.

El Morro — Spanish for
headlands — became a stop-
ping point because of its reli-
able water, a pool fed by
runoff from the cliff.

Hundreds of travelers left
their names — some famous;
others with stories behind
them.

"All those things together
make them historic," said
Steve Baumann, archacolo-
gist at the northwest New
Mexico monument.

"Pasa por aqui,” wrote
provincial governor Don
Juan de Onate in 1605,
"passed by here.”

Onate's inscription, one of
the earliest, partially covers
one of the prehistoric Amer-



bune Woman.

Detailed accessories brings life to
an outfit. Long necklaces, matching
bags, clutches, and belts are a must
have to spice up a simple outfit and
turn it into an elaborate one. “Bags
are definitely “the in thing” and they
include the crossover bags, fanny
packs, duffle bags, tote bags, clutches ,
and wallets with matching belts”, Ms
Dean added.

While fashion for women in the
Bahamas is always redefining itself,
fashion for the men in your life will
change but less often.

At Bonneville Bones, located on Bay
Street, there are some new trends that
are fashion forward for Fall. “In men’s
wear there isn’t much of a drastic
change in trends like it is with women’s
wear. However, the style now for the
men is amuch more fitted look. Jeans
before were made slack and baggy, but
now they are made to fit. In the dress
wear neck- ties are made slender and
more narrow than before” says Eddie
Robinson, Owner of Bonneville Bones.

Another men’s store, Fine Threads
emphasises dark colours in dress suits,
like black brown and lavender.

These new trends and accessories
are a Fall must have:

ican Indian petroglyphs also
carved on the rock.

Don Diego de Vargas, who
led the Spanish reconquest
of New Mexico in 1692 after
a Pueblo Indian revolt,
signed his name that year,
saying his conquest was "for
the Holy Faith and for the
Royal Crown ... at his own
expense."

Twelve-year-old Sallie Fox
— who came through in a
wagon train — wrote her
proper name, Sarah, in 1858.

The deeply incised, print-
er-like inscription of "P.
Gilmer Breckinridge, 1859
VA," is marred by a chip bit-
ing into the C in his last name
and edging up to the 9 in the
date.

Breckinridge came through
El Morro with 25 camels
from a short-lived Army
experiment. He would later
resign, join the Confederacy
and die in the Civil War.

The same expedition
included "E. Pen Long, Bal-
timore,” who left a large sig-
nature in flowing, perfect old-
fashioned script.

The group, doing recon-
naissance, "had all kind of
tools with them for marking
features on the landscape for
mapping purposes," Bau-
mann said. "They would
have been well-equipped to
make some nice inscrip-
tions."

Although the expedition
was in 1857, Breckinridge
didn't carve his name until
another trip in 1859.

He wasn't the only person
to visit El Morro more than
once.

@ Plaid Patterns

¢ Tunic Tops

e Sheer tops

@ Linen shorts

@ Skinny jeans

¢ Platform, gladiator,

stilettos, or Ed hardy
sneakers



@ Broad belts
¢ Costume Jewelry
e Tote bags

e Metallic Clutches
with matching belts

many face real wars and severe depri-
vation. Ironically, against this steady
discourse of emotional dissatisfac-
tion, young people are expected to
excel and are openly chastised for
their apparent lack of positive
demeanor.

We fail to recognise that the qual-
ity of what the mind produces is only
as good as the quality of the infor-
mation it intakes. The society that
we have is the exact society that we
have created. And until we shift
towards a more mindful discourse,
we will remain in a state of social
dissatisfaction.

No doubt, we need inspired com-
municators. While you may believe
that you are not a good speaker or
that you don't have the skills to
inspire others; suppose you are
wrong?

What if you are the change that
this nation and the world are waiting
on?

We each have responsibility to
raise our voices for the good; to build
this nation and to add value to the
world. History would have been
written differently had Dr King
declined to voice his views. Similar-
ly, you too have no idea of how many
little boys and girls are anxiously





Heather Clark/AP Photo :

THIS PHOTO taken Sept. 2, 2009 shows Steve Baumann, archeologist at El Morro National Monu-
ment, walking along the base of the sandstone cliffs that make up Inscription Rock at the north-
west New Mexico monument.

awaiting your words, your speech to
inspire their dreams.

Remember positive words have
the power to build up, to give hope,
to change conditions and to inspire.
On the same token, negative words
have the power to do the exact oppo-
site.

Yes you can become an inspired
speaker; if you are willing to allow
your words to light the way; giving
others the confidence to do the same.

Why not raise your voice for the
good and make something better
happen.

If you are ready to Speak with
Confidence & Power- Sign Up Now
for SpeakUP! - learn how your words
can Inspire a Dream! Contact The
Coaching Studio today call 326-3332
or 429-6770 - or send an email to
coach4ward@Yahoo.com

¢ Michelle M Miller is a certified Life-
Coach and Stress Management Con-
sultant. She is the Principal Coach of
the Coaching Studio, which located in
the Jovan Plaza, Madeira Street.
Questions or comments can be sent to
P.O. Box CB-13060 - email -
coach4ward@yahoo.com or telephone
429-6770.

"The Boys Are Back’
_ Is refreshingly
_ Unsentimental

'} LOS ANGELES
Associated Preess

? THE true-life drama "The
i Boys Are Back" delicately
: and deftly finds a balance
i that's hard to strike: It depicts
? death, and the way a family
? rebuilds and redefines itself
? afterward, without any mawk-
? ishness.
: Director Scott Hicks’ film,
i with its dreamlike, sun-
i? splashed landscapes of South-
? ern Australia, is visually
i arresting (the work of cine-
: matographer Greig Fraser,
? who recently shot Jane Cam-
: pion's luminous "Bright
? Star"). But the content of
? Allan Cubitt's script, based on
: Simon Carr's memoir, is
? meaty and straightforward,
? which gives it an unexpected
i power.
i This is easily Hicks' best
? film since the Oscar-winning
: "Shine" way back in 1996 —
? since then, his work has
? included the admirable but
? uneven “Hearts in Atlantis"
? and "No Reservations." Much
i? of the allure of "The Boys Are
? Back" comes from Clive
? Owen's complex performance;
? as aman learning how to func-
? tion as a single father after the
? death of his wife, Owen shows
great liveliness but also a nat-
? ural vulnerability.
i His character, sportswriter
i Joe Warr, takes a "Just Say
|: Yes" attitude in raising his 6-
|: year-old son (Nicholas McAn-
|: ulty, disarming in his film
? debut), which makes for a lot of
| | fun but it also results in chaos.
? Joe's frustration in figuring
? out this whole parenting thing
i by himself provides
i inescapable reminders of
? Dustin Hoffman in "Kramer
: vs. Kramer": Once again we
i have two men sharing a home,
i realizing they don't really
|? know each other and unsure
? of how to relate as they work
? through their grief in differ-
? ent ways. Joe has traveled
? constantly for work, feeling
? secure that young Artie's dai-
? ly routine was in the capable
i hands of his wife, Katy (Laura
: Fraser). Once Katy dies of
? cancer, Joe is left with all
? those responsibilities and not
? aclue about where to begin.
? When he fixes the boy's
i breakfast and drives him to
i school, for example, he finds
? that little things like leaving
: the crusts on his toast send
? Artie into a tizzy. Meanwhile,
: Artie handles the much larger
? matter of his mother's death
| with surprising strength. At
? one point he asks Joe if he can
: die, too, so he can be with
? Mummy, and he does it with
? the kind of startling honesty
: that's peculiar to children.
i But then the arrival of Har-
? ry (George MacKay), Joe's
? teenage son from his first mar-
? riage, changes the dynamic all
? over again. Harry has come
? from England for the summer
? with hopes of getting to know
i the father he always felt
rejected him; in the process,
i he also becomes the big broth-
er to a little boy he's never
? met, just when Artie could use
? some guidance the most.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM











THE TRIBUNE

nN TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 200%

SECTION Be HEALTH: Body and mind







ered bats
Fashion

By JEFFARAH GIBSON Although there hasn’t been a
ee significant change in styles from

the Summer fashion semester, Fall

inny jeans

sk

KINNY jea ns or leg- fashion offers a selection of trends

: 2 ; to dress up or dress down. For

>, gings june fops OF 2 instance, maxi dresses, which were
i sheer 2 Purple or grey? hot this Summer can also work for

The Fall fashion season Fall and be dressed up by adding a

bri scoffed hic: long necklace, and a broad belt.
rings a mix OF edgy, sopnis They can be dressed down for an

ticated, and youthful patterns outing at the beach, by wearing

less accessories and adding a pair
easy fo emulate. of trendy gladiator sandals to ome
plete the look.

Gia Hart, Manager at the Cat-
walk Boutique located on Robinson Road says bright colours are
in this season. “Usually Fall colours included dark shades. But
this season bright colours from Summer fashion are in for the fall
as well.”

Bermuda shorts were “yesterday.” Linen shorts are taking the
lead and being worn with sexy embellished tunics, adding a little
sophistication and a flattering polish to an evening look.

Skinny jeans and pencil skirts have been in for a few seasons. Peo-
ple are wearing pencil skirts for an office look, dressing them up
with broad belts.

Since fashion repeats itself there are some classic retro styles that
are coming back. For instance
plaid is back in many forms.
Designers are making plaid
shirts, blouses, skirts, shorts and
accessories in a variety of col-
ors like red, purple, yellow, and
orange.

And who said shawls are
only for dress wear? Dressing

= up a pair of jeans and T-shirt
with a fine cashmere pashmina
shawl is a new fun expressive
style.

“Pashminas shawls are being
worn casually. There are some
made of thick fabric, but the
ones that are worn casually are
made of a more thin fabric”,
Mrs Hart said.

Shoes are a big deal in wom-
en’s fashion. An outfit is never
complete without the right pair
of shoes or accessories and no,
a woman can never have too

=

tunic fops



SEE page 10

Original
Scent

Cherry-Almond

jie

i i Bo
COMFORTS & NOURISHES



Full Text


{T)\

Pim blowin’ it

SOF
SOF

HIGH
LOW

PARTLY SUNNY,


www.tribune242.com

Volume: 105 No.250 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009

VICTIM OF TRAGIC ACCIDENT? OR
ee Se

Victim of

m@ PRESTON FERGUSON

PULLING
TOGETHER:
(sitting) Henri-
ette Smith and
Eloise Moxey;
(standing) Frederick Fergu-
son, Olga Fordes, Deidre
) Gray, Dale Ferguson Joseph
s| and Merv Johnson.

East, near the Forest, Exuma, on
the morning of August 2. Police ini-
tially suspected that he had run off
the road and hit a utility pole, how-
ever, his family believes the acci-
dent was “staged.”

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

DISTRAUGHT family mem-
bers of Preston Ferguson say that
they are certain he was murdered

and blame police for mishandling
the investigation into his death.

The Taste
on
Tuesdays!!

Ferguson, 38, a resident of Exu-
ma and father of one, was found
dead in a truck on the side of the
road in the area of Ocean Addition

POLICE NAME SLAIN BURGER KING MANAGER
© PAGE FIVE

Valarge

IZzZa wilh MEN FIRE DEATHS ‘TO BE TREATED AS HOMICIDES’

© PAGE SIX

The Tribu

“WAKE UP!

Sausage & Egg
Burrito



ACCUSED: Former PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater pictured on her

way to court.

Defendants plead not guilty to
Jolin Travolta extortion charges

FORMER PARAMEDIC Tarino Light-
bourne going to court yesterday.

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

AJURY was selected yes-
terday in the case of former
PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater and former
paramedic Tarino Light-
bourne, who are accused of
attempting to extort $25 mil-
lion from Hollywood actor
John Travolta.

Six women and three men
were selected to hear evi-
dence in the case, which will
take place before Senior Jus-

| tice Anita Allen.

The prosecution is expect-

} ed to open its case this morn-

ing.

SEE page five

Tim Clarke/Tribune Staff

Help Your Favourite Teacher WIN $1000!
Nominate a Teacher by September 30th, 2009 for

The Fidelity Sir Gerald Cash National Distinguished Teachers’ Awards

Download a Nomination Form from:

el me te Ce et

http://www.fidelitygroup.com/ndta



INVAVOSR YEN! AUD) 185740 6 CA NY

ISLANDS) LEADING NEWSPAPER

=) FIDELITY |


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009
LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



MS ee



Unanswered

The family of Preston Ferguson say the
police’s version of how he died is com-

pletely at odds with the evidence. They
have posed a number of questions to
senior officers, including:

WeIQNt LOSS...
Health Gain

CEN Ee CEP Ee

Ph: 327.5483/6



FOR ALL YOUR DECORATING
“Lowest Prices On The Island” golutt

STORE HOURS:
Monday - Saturday
8:30am - 5:30pm

BILLY’S DREAM
STILL ALIVE

FREE DELIVERY ANY WHERE IN NASSAU AND TO THE MAIL BOAT

¢ E-Z CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE

Donald's Furniture
And Appliance Centre

SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322-1731 OR 322-3875



¢ IF Preston died while sitting upright in the driver's seat, why is there no blood in this area,
whereas the passenger’s side of the gearbox, console and floor covered in it?

¢ IF Preston died as a result of major trauma caused by his head striking a utility pole, how
was it that he was found sitting in the driver's seat, with his head against the head-rest? How
did the impact force necessary to create his massive head injury not propel any part of his
body across into the passenger’s side?



¢ IF his body was found sitting on top of a pile of smashed glass in the seat with no glass
whatsoever on top of his body.



¢ IF Preston died because his
exposed head struck this util-
ity pole, how did he come to

| be driving several feet off the
| road in the first place?
| ¢ IF this was the case, how

did he manage to steer back
on to the road after suffering
massive head trauma?

¢ IF his was out of the dri-
ver’s window at the time,
should he not have struck
the side of his head, rather

Pe) than the middle of his fore-



¢ IF this is the scuff marks the
impact of Preston’s head
against the utility pole — caus-
ing massive trauma — how is
there no trace of blood on the
pole, the ground, or either side
of the driver's door?

¢ IF the window was smashed
as a result of the vehicle strik-
ing the poll, why is there no
smashed glass at the base of
the pole, but covers the ground
where the vehicle came to rest
20 yards down the road?

¢ IF Preston had his head out of
the window at the time of the
accident, the window must

have been down. If so, how did |

it shatter upon impact, filling
the interior with glass?

head?

¢ DOES the police’s version
not suggest he was looking
directly at the utility pole as it
approached his face?

¢ IF the police’s version is
correct, would it not mean
Preston was attempting to
spit directly into the wind?



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Ue a



VICTIM O

murder?



By NATARIO McKENZIE « Tribune Staff Reporter ¢ nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

DISTRAUGHT family members of
Preston Ferguson say that they are
certain he was murdered and
blame police for mishandling the
investigation into his death.

Ferguson, 38, a resident of Exuma and father of
one, was found dead in a truck on the side of the
road in the area of Ocean Addition East, near the
Forest, Exuma, on the morning of August 2. Police
initially suspected that he had run off the road and
hit a utility pole, however, his family believes the
accident was “staged.”

They claim they know of an individual with a
motive to kill Preston. According to his sister, Eloise
Moxey, it is believed that her brother was having an
affair with a married woman.

“He promised my brother he was going to kill
him,” Mrs Moxey alleged.

According to Preston’s family, the minimal dam-
age to the vehicle he was found in was not consistent
with his massive injury and that the impact could not
have caused his death. According to Mr Ferguson’s
family, police had raised the theory that Mr Fergu-
son had perhaps stuck his head out of the truck’s
window to spit and hit his head on the lamp pole.
The second theory was that Mr Ferguson had fallen
asleep and his head fell out of the window.

Merv Johnson who had been with his uncle earlier
that night said that Mr Ferguson was found sitting
upright in the driver’s seat of the truck with his head
slumped back.

“That was the only visible mark of any kind of
trauma to him. There wasn’t any visible damage to
the truck. The front of the truck was intact, the wind-
shield was intact, the only damage was a scrape to
the driver’s side of the truck and they were saying
that’s what killed him,” Mr Johnson said.

The family also highlighted the fact that most of
the blood was found on the passenger side. “The
only thing broken on the truck is the side mirror, not
one single drop of blood on the driver’s side,” Mrs
Moxey said. She also noted that no broken glass was
found on her brother’s body but was found mainly
on the passenger seat.

“The window was broken out. It’s obvious that the
glass was up and was hit from the outside to look like
an accident because most of the glass is on the pas-
senger side. He was sitting on glass. “How could he
sit on glass if the glass was broken on impact?” Mrs
Ferguson wanted to know. She also noted that the air
conditioning was left on which further suggested that









+2 is. © i BP id =

¢ IF Preston died of a massive head injury suffered while driving alone, how did
his vehicle come to a stop about 20 yards down the road from the scene of the

accident?

the windows had been up. The family claims that
their evidence suggests that Mr Ferguson was the
victim of murder.

“The police are deeming this an accident, but we
know that this is a murder and we have evidence to
substantiate our claim that it was a murder,” Mrs
Moxey alleged. According to Mr Ferguson’s family,
the deceased was last seen leaving Rolleville with his
female friend.

“She picked him up as she was leaving Rolleville
and he drove with her supposedly back to his place.
He said he was going home; he had no reason to
come back out,” Mr Ferguson’s nephew said.

Mrs Moxey said that she has met with Commis-
sioner of Police Reginald Ferguson regarding the
matter and was recently informed that an investiga-
tion is continuing and that “experts are conducting a
re-enactment of the accident.” Mrs Moxey said she
also met with National Security Minister Tommy
Turnquest.

Commissioner Ferguson told The Tribune, “We
are conducting a thorough investigation into this
matter. [am aware of the suspicions as to how he
may have died. We have been in touch with his fami-
ly and will have a meeting very soon to inform them
of our findings.”

“Someone drove that vehicle to where they staged
this and drove it up against the lamp post. What con-
cerns us is the way this was handled by police,” Mrs
Moxey said.

“They have gotten rid of every single piece of evi-
dence. They sent the truck back to Grand Isles
because my brother worked in the landscaping
department at Grand Isles. That was a company
truck. That’s the reason he didn’t go out in the truck
that night.”

Mr Ferguson’s family is also wondering whatever
became of his clothing and hair samples or DNA that
could be extracted from them. They say that the indi-
vidual they suspect has not as yet been questioned by
police. They also say that the woman who was the
last person to be seen with him has not been ques-
tioned either. The family says that they have been
awaiting the results of a toxicology report for about a
month.

“He left to go home that night. He left with a cer-
tain lady who was supposed to be taking him home.
The next morning he is dead and who shows up at
the door? This lady with her husband to say that he
is dead,” Mrs Moxey said.

Mr Ferguson who was employed at Grand Isle Vil-
las as a Landscaping Supervisor was the youngest of
12 children. He was laid to rest August 21. He is sur-
vived by his son, Preston Jr.

¢ IF Preston did indeed die
sitting upright in the dri-
ver’s seat of the vehicle,
why can blood clearly be
seen pouring into the dri-
ver’s side of the vehicle
from the passenger’s side?

sis
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
eR AO TS
Pay
322-2197

UU

UN

-?
OT «

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



_ ie

de ae Le

TUBA

Home Accessories
Candle Holders

t eee : a if

Lae ee

Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 * Robinson Rd.[242] 322-3080

CSO





z Fabulous
| Designer
Dresies

by
lccale be lL
















Ratablished in 1956 by an old Bohemian family

Peyeipmmcmt Strat (ruse Tay 2) The 190904 vor ORTH
+ Pad 75-995)
Conte Oomrt ot Atieetin, Fecedios Inuoed Tet 3615
7

aettlgetcg eins rics |
reall: hah Prowl cote ae coe | PCr, Bor BELG



CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

THe Moar THOaah0H RRsToR ATION & CLeAXTNO Eves, o@ THR ve 6 Peep!
Nasa" s Oey PROTEEOMAL, CORTE Sto Cappo & Uses CARE Sesto

* Carpet, Uphokiery, Sin an Matte Cleaning &
Hesiorahion Spectabet

® Peochon Cleaning Syens romowes Deepa Howey
Soil, Haciena, Crease, Watermarks aad Sure from
Carpeting & Pumivire, revoring usm oo like mew
gin fraction of repbcemerni creat
Carpet, Sofas, Lowrecat, Chitra, Dining Chairs, Car,
Bours, Grout. Tiles, Marble 2 ‘Stone

* Perian Wool & Sik Caner Cleasing Special
* Mable Polshing, Ronen & Coe

* Word Floor Bewteration

Amhorised Stone Tech Profisisiogal Contract

CALL FROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594

OMY WE CAN 00 IT BMGT?

* aga Ge pervade

UE LOA aa Ce Pa

PROCHIEM SWS TEM tae)

Home Fabrics

SEPTEMBER 17'-OCTOBER 3'

Lamour
* Bridal
«Silk

*Linen

* Brocades
*Colfon

* Chiffon

* Special Occasion

0%

ENTIRE STOCK
OF FABRICS*

Remnants
$1.99yd

* Drapery Fabric
* Jacquards

* Cotton Prints

* Brocades

¢ Upholstery

° Waverly

30% OFF SELECTED | 15°" Bahamas Batik & Allover

&
15%?" outdoor Fabric

j ananed «Fragonard nH

30% Sale at both Madeira and
Robinson Road Stores.
*Net Price Fabric Excluded

*Vinyl, Plastic, Felt, Net & Tulle not on Sale
PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master







































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama war choice: Escalate or scale back

WASHINGTON — Escalate or scale back.

The blunt conclusion laid out by the top
American commander in Afghanistan —
"The status quo will lead to failure" — poses
a stark and urgent choice for President Barack
Obama: Intensify the foundering conflict with
more troops or narrow the mission to target-
ing terrorists instead of protecting Afghans.

In his report to Obama, Gen. Stanley
McChrystal makes clear his view that ulti-
mate success in Afghanistan requires over-
coming two main threats: the insurgency and
a "crisis of confidence" among Afghans in
their own government. Both must be
addressed, and together they require more
resources, he says.

"Insufficiently addressing either principal
threat will result in failure,” the general con-
cludes.

The McChrystal assessment puts to the
test Obama's assertion just six months ago
that he would put the war effort on a path to
success by providing what the previous White
House didn't.

"For six years, Afghanistan has been
denied the resources that it demands because
of the war in Iraq," Obama said March 27.
"Now, we must make a commitment that can
accomplish our goals." He approved the dis-
patch of 21,000 more U.S. troops and
promised a comprehensive improvement in
the US. effort to stabilize the country, train its
security forces and advance justice and eco-
nomic opportunity.

Obama also said then that he would re-
evaluate after the Afghan presidential elec-
tion, which was held August 20. The charges
of widespread fraud and ballot-rigging that
emerged after the election have only added to
doubts in Washington about whether the
Afghan government can be counted on as a
reliable partner. The president thus far has not
endorsed the McChrystal approach, saying
in television interviews over the weekend that
he needs to be convinced that sending more
troops would make Americans safer from al-
Qaida. Tellingly, Obama reiterated in those
interviews that his core goal is to destroy al- who our counterparts are, and we have to
Qaida, which is not present in significant num- make it clear that in return for X, we expect
bers in Afghanistan. He did not focus on sav- Ye"
ing Afghanistan. Anthony Cordesman, a military analyst at

"I'm not interested in just being in the Centre for Strategic and International
Afghanistan for the sake of being in Studies who advised McChrystal in Kabul
Afghanistan or saving face," Obama told this summer, said in a telephone interview
NBC's "Meet the Press” on Sunday. Monday that Obama has invited doubt about

On Monday, two senior administration his commitment to succeeding in Afghanistan
officials said that among the options under by putting off a decision on devoting more
consideration at the White House is stepping resources.
up missile strikes by U.S. aerial drones on "The truth is that we don't have that much
the Pakistan side of the Afghan border. Tal- time," Cordesman said. "Waiting to see what
iban and associated Afghan rebel groups who happens with existing resources and existing
operate with relative impunity on the Pak- troop levels, when the commanding general
istani side of the border already are being has already said that's an unacceptable risk,
targeted by U.S. Predator drone strikes, with basically invites defeat." He added: "The
limited success. president has yet to show he can lead in this

McChrystal's report, first made public war.”

Monday by The Washington Post, was not (This article was written by Robert Burns,
intended to present Obama with a list of mil- AP National Security Writer).

itary options. The general left no doubt where
he stands. He believes a full-scale, compre-
hensive counterinsurgency campaign is what
is required, and that time is of the essence.

But White House officials say the president
is considering more than the McChrystal
assessment as he weighs courses of action.
He's relying on the views of key Cabinet
aides, including Defence Secretary Robert
Gates, who said last week that he has yet to
make up his mind on the wisdom of commit-
ting more troops.

Gates has said, however, that he does not
believe that a scaled-back approach that
focuses mainly on killing al-Qaida leaders —
rather than the McChrystal view that coun-
terterrorism operations should be part of a
broader campaign to build up Afghan support
for their government — is the right answer.

"The notion that you can conduct a pure-
ly counterterrorist kind of campaign and do it
from a distance simply does not accord with
reality," Gates told reporters earlier this
month. "The reality is that even if you want to
focus on counterterrorism, you cannot do
that successfully without local law enforce-
ment, without internal security, without intel-
ligence" — without a major presence in Kab-
ul. McChrystal's immediate superior, Gen.
David Petraeus, sees it similarly.

"He (McChrystal) is the first to recognise
not just the extraordinary capabilities but also
the limitations of counterterrorism forces in
Afghanistan,” Petraeus wrote in an opinion
article published Friday in The Times of Lon-
don.

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton
underlined the importance of seeking views
beyond McChrystal's report.

"It's critically important, but it's a part of
the overall process and there are many other
considerations that we have to take into
account," Clinton said in an interview airing
Monday on The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer.
Clinton also said that no decision would be
made until the outcome of the Afghan elec-
tion is known, "because we have to know

Features:

“4 cylinder 1.8L * CD/Radio wimp3 Plug
“Automatic * Air Bags, Seat Belts
“Fog Lights * Air Condition
“Immobilizer * Power Package

3 Year Factory Warranty
ALMERA SHIFT _the way you move vest

ELITE MOTORS LID. SANPINMOTORS LIMITED "7THEStorreiinonc wim

—

; COMMONWEALTH Bei hes
Thompson Blvd. « Oakes Field

t. 242.326.6377 * f, 242.326.6315
&, sanping@coralwave.com

4289 Wull ood
PO), Box Nata
t (242) Saga? | f0a9) 309.8038

INSURANCE AVASLABLE 1TH
ADWANTAGE WSURANCE
BROKESS & AGENTS LTD.

We need to

offer hope

and help to
hurting wives

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thank you for allowing
me the space to respond to
the published position of the
Bahamas Christian Council
on the proposed marital
rape law, published in the
media and appearing in The
Tribune on September 4,
2009 at page six, under the
title Christian Council
response to proposed mari-
tal rape law.

One of the main thrusts
of the argument against the
proposed law is that it would
be subject to abuse.

All laws are subject to
abuse, but that fact alone
does not stop us as a people
from enacting laws to cor-
rect situations or actions that
we consider wrong.

For example, the fact that
a person may make a false
accusation of robbery or
child abduction, out of a
desire for revenge, has not
and would not cause us to
repeal the law of robbery or
child abduction so that those
actions are no longer crimi-
nal. We must ask ourselves
as Bahamians: Do we want
to protect wives from what
we understand to be the
crime (or offence) of rape?
Because if so, what alterna-
tive are we offering to those
wives who have been sub-
jected to having sexual inter-
course against their will?
The only suggestion con-
tained in the statement pub-
lished by the Council is that
of counselling, which, since
this already exists through
church, state and private
bodies, cannot be seen to be
a solution as it is obviously
an insufficient remedy.

We currently have the
crime of rape on the statute
books. Stealing is also a
criminal offence. Coun-
selling may be offered to a
first offender for having
committed the crime of
stealing, but this is on the
basis that stealing is indeed a
crime. How can the Council
speak about offering or rec-
ommending counselling for
a first offence of marital
rape, when it is not even
prepared to call rape what
it is and punish it according-
ly? I wonder what is the hus-
band’s right that the Council
is seeking to protect or pre-

LETTERS

letters@tripbunemedia.net



serve and what in the Coun-
cil’s view is the wife’s right
as regards her own person
(body).

The other dimension of
the abuse argument is the
call for there to be “checks
and balances” in place
before we as a nation should
even consider amending the
law. Let us therefore exam-
ine what procedures cur-
rently apply to criminal
complaints and in particu-
lar, where a complaint of
rape is made.

These are as follows:

1) A complaint is made to
the Police.

2) A Police officer takes a
statement from the person
who makes the complaint.

3) The Police take a state-
ment from the accused (if
he wishes to say anything).

4) The complaint is inves-
tigated, and physical or med-
ical evidence is obtained.

5) A senior Police officer
being someone other than
the investigating officer
decides whether to charge
the accused person.

6) If charged, the person
must appear in court. From
this point a legal tribunal has
control of the matter of the
complaint, which is prose-
cuted by the Attorney Gen-
eral, not by the person who
made the complaint. Wit-
ness must testify and be
cross-examined and eventu-
ally a decision is made on
the evidence.

Having regard to this
process I must ask “What
are the additional ‘checks
and balances’ that need to
be put in place before the
marital rape law can be
enacted?” It is simply not
the case that a wife could,
under the proposed amend-
ment, make a complaint this
evening that her husband
raped her, and tonight he is
locked up in Her Majesty’s
Prison for a decade or the
rest of his life.

I disagree with Reverend
Paul that the marriage con-
tract implies open-ended
consent, if he means that the
consent is always operating.

DON STAINTON
PROTECTION
WE SELL OUTER SPACE

TELEPHONE: 322-8219 322-8160

ALL ALUMINUM PATIO ROOF OR
SCREENED ROOM

a

ALL ALUMINUM CAR PORT
Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978

1 Corinthians 7:5 says in part
“Do not deprive one anoth-
er except with consent for a
time” (NKJV). It would
seem that the consent can-
not be open-ended in the
sense described, if it could
be withdrawn at any time.
Furthermore, this verse
demonstrates that consent
is an essential element in the
sexual relationship between
husband and wife.

Their freedom or licence
to have intercourse with
each other at any time can-
not and does not amount to
a licence to have intercourse
with the spouse without his
or her consent.

In the daily life of mar-
ried couples they are each
consenting or agreeing to
intimacy on each and every
occasion that it occurs.

Rev Paul argues on behalf
of the Council that on their
marriage day “in the sight
of God and in the company
of witnesses, they pledged
to give themselves to each
other in holy matrimony and
thereby gave each other
upfront, implicit, open end-
ed sexual consent.” It is
upon this basis that he
argues that it is not right,
and could never be right to
bring married couples under
the authority of a law that
has hitherto only applied to
non-married couples. The
difficulty with this argument
is that we do not, for exam-
ple, have a separate or dif-
ferent law for Christian cou-
ples and non-Christian cou-
ples when it comes to the
subject of divorce. Nor am I
suggesting that it should be
so. But the same way that
the law recognises that non-
married persons or
estranged married persons
do have “sexual relations”
that go wrong, the law
should be brought to bear
in situations involving mar-
ried couples where the rela-
tionship has gone wrong.
His argument makes no
allowance for the human
condition, for husbands who
cruelly abuse their wives
sexually.

What to do with the hus-
band who refuses to buy
groceries, or to pay the
mortgage or rent, refuses to
pay the school fees, and
allows the lights to be turned
off, but has a sweetheart or
two, has STD’s and
demands that his wife give
him sex. If she wants gro-
ceries in the house, or if she
wants the lights back on
then she is forced to give in
to want her husband wants.
No physical violence there,
but no wife’s consent either.

But because in the com-
pany of witnesses he
pledged himself to her and
she to him she must submit?

And what about those
cases of repeated, horrible
physical violence?

Let me be sure to state for
the record, that I am neither
anti-marriage, nor anti-male.
I believe that in this country
there are many good hus-
bands, who outnumber the
“bad”, who care for and sup-
port their wives and fami-
lies. In fact I am personally
acquainted with a number
of such. However, there is
such a thing as marital rape.

It exists in fact, if not yet
in law. I do hope that Sec-
tion 15 is repealed, that we
will call a spade “a spade”,
and offer some hope and
help to those hurting wives.

I believe that one of the
unintended consequences of
this new law will be that per-
sons will enter into marriage
more soberly, more serious-
ly, and will be more likely
to accord to their spouse the
respect that he or she
deserves as a fellow human
being.

CAROL MISIEWICZ
Nassau,
September 4, 2009
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

TRAVOLTA TRIAL: DAY ONE
Defendants plead ‘absolutely, positively, 100 per

Police name slain
Burger King hoss

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



THE Burger King manager

outside the fast-food chain’s

cent not guilty’ to John Travolta extortion charges | 2: »<::22
los

FROM page one

Ms Bridgewater, 49, and Mr Light-
bourne, 47, are accused of conspiring to
extort and attempting to extort money
from Mr Travolta between January 2 and
January 20 by means of threats.

Ms Bridgewater is also accused of abet-
ment to extortion. She is represented by
lawyers Murrio Ducille and Krysta Smith.

Mr Lightbourne is represented by Carl-
son Shurland and Mary Bain.

Director of Public Prosecutions
Bernard Turner, Neil Brathwaite and
Garvin Gaskin are prosecuting the case.
They are expected to call 14 witnesses,
among them Mr Travolta, PLP Senator
Allyson Maynard-Gibson and West End
and Bimini MP Obie Wilchcombe.

Arraigned

Ms Bridgewater and Mr Lightbourne
were first arraigned on the charges in
late January and arraigned again before
Senior Justice Allen on April 28 after
prosecutors presented a Voluntary Bill of
Indictment.

The charges were again read to the
defendants yesterday in the presence of
the jury.

When asked to enter a plea to the
charges both replied: “Absolutely, posi-
tively, 100 per cent not guilty.”

Both Ms Bridgewater and Mr Light-
bourne are on $50,000 bail.

Senior Justice Allen yesterday acceded
to a request by their attorneys for the
two defendants to be allowed to sit
behind their lawyers during the trial
rather than in the prisoner’s dock.

Reports of the alleged extortion
attempt emerged days after Jett Travol-
ta, the 16-year-old son of actors John
Travolta, 54, and Kelly Preston, 46, died
of a seizure at the family’s vacation home
in Freeport, Grand Bahama, on January

Ms Bridgewater announced her resig-
nation from the Senate days after the
police brought charges against her.

FORMER PARAMEDIC Tarino Lightbourne

at court yesterday.

COURT SHORTS

MAGISTRATE’S COURT: Melbourne Bain, 26
Man charged with murder

of mother during robbery

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A MAN charged in the murder of a moth-
er-of-three who was gunned down at her
workplace in a daring daylight robbery last
month was arraigned in the Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Police have charged Melbourne Bain, 26,
of Durham Street, in the August 21 murder
of Wendy Bullard.

Bain, alias “Snatcher”, is also accused of
robbing Ms Bullard of $694 which belonged
to 21st Century Steel Welding on Royal
Palm Lane.

Ms Bullard, 34, was shot in the face when
two gunmen attacked her workplace situ-
ated just yards away from St George’s Angli-
can Church.

She was the country’s 53rd homicide vic-
tim for the year.

Inside Court 1, Bank Lane, yesterday, Ms
Bullard’s relatives looked on as Bain was
arraigned before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez.

Bain, who is represented by lawyer Ian
Cargill, was not required to enter a plea to
the armed robbery and murder charges.

He pleaded guilty, however, to possession
of an unlicensed shotgun.

Firearm

Court dockets state that Bain was found in
possession of the firearm on September 17.
He is expected to be sentenced on Septem-
ber 30 on the firearm charge.

In the meantime, Bain has been remand-
ed to Her Majesty’s Prison.

His armed robbery and murder cases have
been transferred to Court 11, Nassau Street,
and adjourned to September 29.

MAGISTRATE’S COURT: Wade Rolle Jr, 19, Leonardo Wright, 26



Two men accused of murdering
Bertha’s Go-Go Ribs employee

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

TWO men charged in the
murder of a Bertha’s Go-
Go Ribs employee were
arraigned in the Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Wade Rolle Jr, 19, of
Union Village, alias
“Bumpy”, and Leonardo
Wright, 26, of Millennium
Gardens, alias “Fox”, are
accused of the armed rob-
bery and murder of Nelson
Goodman.

Last week, David Rolle,
34, of Big Pond was
arraigned in the Magistrate’s
Court for Mr Goodman’s
murder.

Mr Goodman, 44, of
Pinewood Gardens, was

gunned down outside
Bertha’s Go-Go Ribs on
Poinciana Avenue, Coconut
Grove, just before midnight
on Wednesday, September
8.

Cash

It is alleged that the three
men robbed Mr Goodman
of $200 cash, the property
of Bertha’s Go-Go Ribs,
and intentionally caused his
death.

According to initial
reports by police, the victim
was approached by several
people just before gunshots
were heard.

Rolle and Wright, who
were arraigned before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez in

Court 1, Bank Lane, were
not required to enter a plea
to the charges. Both men are
represented by lawyer
Devard Francis.

Mr Francis told the court
yesterday that Rolle, who
had complained of being
abused by police, was
denied medical attention.

Chief Magistrate Gomez
ordered that Rolle receive
medical attention.

Both men were remand-
ed to Her Majesty’s Prison
and the case was adjourned
to September 25.

Inspector David Lockhart
told the court yesterday that
both men are also expected
to appear in Court 11, Nas-
sau Street, on armed rob-
bery charges.

se

Ue ee

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD

Anailatia in Grand Bahama at Qealty Auto Sales |Fresport) = Queens Hwy, 252-6122 # Abapo Motor Mall, Don MacKay Bld, 367-2916

.

fi
er

A BR a Pa

TRADITIOMAL CORGLLA,





= te oF |

oy es —_—

-o > Ss er

gay Es or =

~mar Fs: -

= Ss 4 =. =
; er =

aie -

ieee =
ie ary =,

“es wee = -
ik =

ee hs i =

ets Bo - =

i To Res i

ay Se “ _ =.

“Ea Bt Tt —_ . =

mer es = i

mr Be ol 4 =

= =: “ :=
ees - 35
i =

—=

Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway location has been
identified by police as Rashad
Morris, 21.

Mr Morris lived on John
Street, off Baillou Hill Road,
and police believe he was
abducted and driven to the
restaurant where his killer or
killers demanded he open the
safe.

When Mr Morris, the man-
ager of Burger King on Fred-
erick Street and former man-
ager of the Tonique-Williams-
Darling restaurant, failed to
open the safe he was beaten in
the manager’s office and
dragged outside where he was
stabbed several times.

A witness saw him being bru-
tally beaten outside the restau-
rant and called the police. Offi-
cers arrived at the scene within
minutes and found Mr Morris
dead in a pool of blood at
around 1.30am on Sunday.

Bahamasair pilot Lionel
Lewis McQueen, 29, was also
killed early Sunday morning.

He was shot several times
and found dead at his home in
Golden Palm Estates, near the
Kennedy Subdivision, shortly
after 4am.

His cousin and roommate
Montez Saunders was also shot
multiple times and remains in
serious condition at the Inten-
sive Care Unit of Princess Mar-
garet Hospital.

Police have launched inten-
sive investigations into both
matters.

Anyone with information
which may assist in the investi-
gations should call police
urgently on 911, 919 or call
Crime Stoppers anonymously
on 328-TIPS (8477).

tale
se

eR
PHONE: 822-2157



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff








cee

LOPROLLA

2 AAAIALEEE



Auto Mall, Shirley Street (opp. St. Matihew's Church}

Open Mon to Fri fam - 5:30pm ;
Sat sam - |2neon

Tel: 397-1700

E-mail: execmotoriabatelmet. bs

Parts and service guaranteed



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

PENIMAU meee Colm!

gangsters in their home



By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A FAMILY of four have been driven
out of their home after gangsters pelted
the house with bottles and rocks for weeks,
and injured a mother and her son in the
attacks.

Newspaper vendor Michael Johnson, 43,
said gangsters in the Kemp Road area
accused his eight-year-old son of stealing a
gun from them and started targeting the
house on September 6.

Attacks on the home have persisted on
almost a daily basis since, and Mr John-
son’s wife and son have been injured on
two different occasions.

Mr Johnson, who sells newspapers in
Shirley Street near the junction with Kemp
Road, reported every incident to officers at
the Wulff Road Police Station, but his com-
plaints have not been taken seriously, he
said.

His wife Justine Johnson, 44, was badly
cut when bottles and rocks were thrown
through the living room window during the
first attack, and a glass bottle hit her in the
head.

; TARGET OF ATTACK: Gangsters
Hospital pelted the property with bottles and
rocks for weeks.

Michael, eight, was hit in the head with a
rock while in the shower on the morning of
Sunday, September 13. Although he wasn’t
bleeding, his father took him to Princess
Margaret Hospital to be examined for con-
cussion or brain damage.

They reported the incident to police after
leaving the hospital, but Mr Johnson said
officers only told him to “get out” and “go
back home.”

The following day Mrs Johnson and her
children, Michael and Michaelette, 13,
moved out of the house in Periwinkle
Alley, off Williams Lane, Kemp Road, and
Mr Johnson has been at home alone while
the attacks have persisted.

Mrs Johnson said: “This neighbourhood
must be getting worse because we never
had problems like this before. It’s a horri-
ble thing, really scary.”

Mr Johnson does not want his family to
return home until he is sure they will be
safe.

He said: “They accuse my son of stealing
a gun, which he didn’t do, and one of the
young fellas tried to interfere with my
daughter. It’s getting worse and worse.

“Sometimes we can’t even sleep in the

house because bottles and rocks are
coming in through the window. They
have damaged every window in my
house.”

Mr Johnson said the men who are
targetting the family are not local
and are likely to be a part of a gang
who gamble in the area on weekends
and fight with rocks and bottles.

He criticised police for not taking
action to protect his family.

The newspaper vendor said: “They
have driven us out of our house and
all the police are doing is taking state-
ments to see what they can do, but
nothing has been done. But some-
thing is going to have to be done
because I can’t allow my wife and
children to be out there when they
should be at home with me.”

SMASHED: A broken window is a calling

card of the rock-throwing gangsters.

TROe PEA ePS rigs 4G Fal Wwoeee

PUBLIC NOTICE

Tender for “Used & Salvaged Vehicles”

| | vehicle type || ehicle Type
1998 Ford F-25090 Truth
Pais | 1996 Ford 150 von | 2001 [1998 Ford F-250 P/U Truck
1998 Ford F-250 P/U Truck
[tas [1998 150 van | 2008 [1998 Ford F-250 P/UTruck
[sue | 1994 6-150van | 2004 [1998 Ford F-250 P/U Truck
F350 | 1990 F350 LIA Truck | 861 [1996 Ford F-450 Lift Truck

1997 Ford F-150 Lift Truck
2026 | 1999 Ford Ranger P/UT
1996 Ford Ranger P/U T 1991 Nissan Civilian
1998 Ford Ranger P/UT 1998 Ford F-800 Truck
1999 Ford Ranger P/U T 1999 Ford Ranger P/U Trock
; 13

2010]
[2014 | 1998 Ford RangerP/UT [13 [2007 Avalon
[2020 [1999 Ford Ranger P/UT | 107? [1998 Ford Ranger
ee
[£1008 995 Ford Ranger

Vehicles can be viewed at Perpall Tract from 9:00 a.m. and
4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Interested persons should submit bids to BIC's Head Office lo-
cated at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, Bids
should be received by 5:00 pm, Wednesday, September 30,
2009. Bids are to be clearly marked, “Used & Salvaged Ve-
hicles” and should be addressed to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin

ACTING PRESIDENT & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive, P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

BIC RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY, OR




























Fire deaths
likely to be
treated as
homicides

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE deaths of four people killed in a fire last week were expect-
ed to be classified as homicides last night, as police said they are cer-
tain an arsonist sparked the deadly blaze in their home.

Theresa Brown, 51; her daughter Kayshala Bodie, 18; grand-
daughter Telair Johnson, one; and neighbour Savanna Stuart, 18,
all died of smoke inhalation when the family home in Wilson
Tract caught fire shortly after 7am last Thursday.

Supt Leon Bethel, head of the Royal Bahamas Police Force
homicide unit, said police suspect an object was thrown through the
front window into the living room of the house, igniting the fire.

Detectives are still examing the crime scene in an effort to iden-
tify the object which could have broken the front window of the
house off Wulff Road.

Supt Bethel said police are “almost certain” the fire was an
arson attack, but was unable to confirm this suspicion before The
Tribune went to press.

His officers will continue to interview relatives, friends and
neighbours of the victims in an effort to identify a suspect or sus-
pects, he said. Preliminary examinations by a pathologist have
shown all four victims died as a result of smoke inhalation. Their
bodies were not badly burned in the blaze, Mr Bethel said.

He denied reports claiming the victims were shot or attacked
before they died in their home, and he refuted neighbours’ alle-
gations that the killer nailed the doors and windows shut to trap the
sleeping victims inside. However Mr Bethel said the residents
had bolted the doors from the inside and there are bars on the win-
dows which may have hindered their escape.

He added: “It seems like someone was able to set the place
ablaze from the outside by throwing something in through the
front window.

“They were trying to get out through the door and windows, but
they were all barred up, and because they were overwhelmed by the
smoke that might have inhibited their judgment.

“They would have been inhaling smoke for quite a while.”

The homicide chief said: “We are still investigating, and we
continue to visit the area to gather information and search for
evidence associated with this matter.

“We are chasing all angles and don’t want to target anyone
specifically until this investigation has been completed.”

Anyone with any information which may assist investigations
should call police urgently on 911, 919 or call Crime Stoppers on
328-TIPS (8477).

Defence Force marine in

coma after

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A YOUNG Defence Force
marine is clinging to life in a
coma after nearly drowning dur-
ing a training exercise at the
community pools in South
Beach.

The male marine seaman was
swimming laps in one of the
pools during a scuba diving les-
son along with several fellow
officers. As his colleagues sur-
faced at one end of the pool,
someone noticed that the
marine was motionless at the
bottom. His colleagues scram-
bled to pull him out and per-
formed CPR until an ambu-
lance arrived.

While the identity of the
marine not yet been released,
The Tribune understands he is
21-year-old Marine Seaman
Charles Heastie.

Although the incident hap-
pened around llam on

76 BOSTON WHALER OUTRAGE
WITH BRAND NEW! TRAILER

Yer: 2001
Price: 30,0000
Hulk Fiberglass

ear drowning
een ies The public or persons within
the organisation should know,"
said an outraged Defence Force
officer who spoke on condition
of anonymity.

The officer said he wonders if
the incident would have been
avoided if there had been more
instructors at the pool.

When contacted to confirm
the incident yesterday, Minis-
ter of National Security Tom-
my Turnquest - who has
responsibility for the Defence
Force — said officials are not try-
ing to cover anything up.

"There wasn't any reason
why they shouldn't have given a
report, it was an official




Tommy Turnquest

Wednesday of last week, it was
not reported to the press,
prompting concerned citizens
to contact The Tribune fearing
the matter was being “hushed
up".

"You don't keep things like
that under wraps — if it was me
or anybody else — regardless if it
was an accident or negligence.

Engine: Twin Wercery O01 OFT) bias, 225 HP 450 Hors

WW SSSR LS

25 Outrage in great conciiion! fully ieded ath Autc-pilct, fish Hinder, Chart pita GPS,
Shere! 0D, Hed, Freshwater, Boe cushions, Boaeened with bwin Mercury 22) Optra aed

anaait oralt gauges

Standard Equi pant

integral bow palit w/anchae roller and chart plate
Bow mrehor orgs ahoich
Port 2 curiae” forward deck marage
‘obama eae

binge wr ddbers

Port So aoe” fhe boo ain
Prd bolder

ali prep ace

Locloabde comeucke anor ig viipkeal dar
Lieb aah cd art

Yer Beal reed Sebchert a] Soneyerd deck eral
Saf baling fergie ocho

SAL meering wheel

Sh commode punk rail

rink Hodeier

eee ee eH

hbo gan baepe cine
Lrenveriiet tamer ws rarkdowr:
forwaed comming bottien
Hyduake dene edt

a ee ee

Optional Dquiprent

® Porte potti sy pemp- cat SCE cite
THtop op pun ou icigg ae
a ay ac hy cc

= Wemllss
Lwar
Tell electresicy incheding redar. hari ple.
quta-pilct, toh finder, WH". wares



Defence Force activity,” he said.

Mr Turnquest said he was
told about the incident by
Defence Force Commodore
Clifford Scavella on Wednes-
day and has been receiving rou-
tine updates on the marine's
condition.

"It was a dive course. They
were taking scuba diving lessons
at the Betty Kelly Kenning
pools and they were doing
breathing exercises, breath
holding and snorkel clearing.

"When (the other officers)
got to the other end, someone
shouted out to them that one
of their divers was underwater
and that's when they got him
surfaced and administered CPR
until the ambulance arrived,"
Mr Turnquest told The Tribune
yesterday.

Mr Turnquest declined to
comment when asked if a short-
age of certified instructors at
the pool contributed to the inci-
dent. Sources close to the Force
revealed that the marine is in a
coma and breathing with the
assistance of a respirator, but
Mr Turnquest did not confirm
or deny this. It is unclear if the
marine — who has been on the
Force for less than five years —
had any pre-existing health
issues. Mr Turnquest said the
officer, like all his colleagues,
would have taken part in an
annual physical last January.

A brief press release issued
by the Force after The Tribune
made inquiries said the marine
was admitted to Doctor's Hos-
pital "following a diving exer-
cise" at the Betty Kelly Ken-
ning Swim Complex.

The statement added that the
marine was in critical, but stable
condition.

An investigation into the inci-
dent is underway.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 7



OEE
CUE
POT
and guns

SIR RONALD SANDERS



A FORMER diplomat is
calling on the United
States to urgently imple-
ment a new and direct
strategy to tackle the drug
and gun problem in the
Caribbean region.

Sir Ronald Sanders —a
Tribune weekly columnist
and former chairman of
the Caribbean Financial
Action Task Force against
drug trafficking and money
laundering — warned that if
the US does not lead the
way in curbing the traffick-
ing of firearms and illegal
drugs through the region,
countries in the Caribbean
will suffer even further.

Addressing a recent
gathering of high-ranking
military officers at the
Royal College of Defence
Studies in London, Sir
Roland said: “Almost
every country (in the
Caribbean) has the same
problem and many of the
smuggled weapons, when
captured are traceable to
the United States. This
suggests that the absence
of a vigorous policy to curb
arms sales is unintentional-
ly contributing to crime in
Central America and the
Caribbean.”

Resources

“In many cases, (the)
police forces (in those
countries) are out-gunned
by the weapons available
to drug gangs and they lack
the numbers, the equip-
ment and other resources
to combat the problem.”

Sir Roland said the US
government could make an
“enormous contribution”
to resolving the drugs and
weapons problem “by
passing legislation and
implementing machinery
to control arms smuggling;
by reviewing the practice
of deporting convicted
felons to their countries of
origin, and by adopting
measures to stop legal sale
of assault weapons.”

Caribbean countries, Sir
Roland said, are being
overrun by crime that
stems from the drug trade.

“In conditions of eco-
nomic decline and
increased unemployment,
drug trafficking and its
attendant other crimes
escalate, as they are now
doing throughout the
region,” he said.

The former diplomat
called on the US to lead
the way in organising col-
laborative arrangements
with Europe, Latin Ameri-
ca and the Caribbean to
establish an anti-narcotic
programme which address-
es both supply and
demand.

“Tf this is not done, the
problem of drug-trafficking
and its attendant high
crime will continue to
plague Central America
and the Caribbean with a
terrible destabilising effect
on the small economies
that are least able to cope,”
he said.

Sela a

For the stories

behind the news,
beste e Jie] 41 4
on Mondays



DEATH OF LLOYD ALLEN ALBURY
Inmate set to be charged with

murder of fellow prisoner

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

AN inmate at Her
Majesty's Prison is expected
to be charged with the mur-
der of fellow prisoner Lloyd
Allen Albury sometime
today, according to a senior
police officer.

Albury died on Septem-
ber 10, two days after he was
admitted to hospital follow-
ing a fight in a cell at the
prison.

Police have now conclud-
ed their probe into his death
and are set to charge anoth-
er man with his homicide.

"We have done our inves-
tigations and we are expect-
ing to take that to court
(today) — we intend to
charge another inmate for
his death," head of the homi-
cide squad Assistant Super-
intendent Leon Bethel told



"We have done our investiga-
tions and we are expecting to
take that to court (today) — we
intend to charge another inmate

for his death."



Assistant Superintendent Leon Bethel

The Tribune yesterday.

Mr Bethel declined to
release details surrounding
Albury's injuries, nor would
he say what was the inmate's
official cause of death.

"All I can say is that he
died as a result of injuries
received," Mr Bethel said.

Albury, 55, was admitted
to Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal on September 8 — less
than a week after being

imprisoned on a vagrancy
charge.

"From our information he
was sent to prison for
vagrancy and he was placed
in a cell. While in the cell he
received injuries and that’s
what we're looking into right
now.

"He was in prison for less
than a week," Mr Bethel
said in an earlier interview.

Albury's homicide marked

OE RO aS!

the country's 60th for the
year.

On Sunday, Burger King
employee Rashard Morris,
22, was beaten and then
stabbed to death after being
abducted. He was reported-
ly taken to the fast-food
chain's Tonique Williams
Darling location, where he
was beaten and then stabbed
to death after he failed to
open the store's safe for his
kidnapper.

Just hours later, around 4
am, Bahamasair pilot Lionel
Lewis McQueen was found
dead in his blood-splattered
home in Golden Palms
Estates. He had been shot
several times while his room-
mate Martez Saunders —
who was also shot multiple
times — was found alive in
front of the home.

Their murders marked
homicides 61 and 62, respec-
tively, Mr Bethel said.



(Photo: Peter Ramsay/B!S)

RENOWNED BAHAMIAN artist Max Taylor officially opened his exhibition, Paper Work 1960-1992, under the patronage of Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham and Mrs Delores Ingraham at the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas on Friday. Mr Taylor is pictured here talking with

Prime Minister Ingraham about the more than 150 works on display.

Profile of an exemplary East Nassau Rotarian

Rotarian Jeff Albury has
been an active member of the
Rotary Club of East Nassau for
30 years.

He was drawn to Rotary
because of the organisation’s
commitment to community ser-
vice and in the hope of being
able to help those less fortunate
in our community.

Over the years, Jeff has been
involved in numerous clubs
activities, from helping organ-
ise weekly lunch programmes
to the club fair, which he was
especially fond of as it put the
whole club to work in an effort
to help others.

Jeff also recruited his wife,
Susan, and together they
wrapped more than $3,000
worth of coins, the majority of
which were donated by Mall at
Marathon. The funds were put
to use in Rotary Club of East
Nassau’s youth programmes.

Jeff's most treasured Rotary



Aleve le hd

memory was when he was first
elected to the club’s board of
directors.

The position enabled him to
help direct the club’s activities
and maintain its reputation in
the community.

He says he is proud of what
the Rotary Club of East Nas-

a
&jntague

Are eee ee ae

Hub Caps For Sale

13, 14, &15 inch,
set of 4 just

$5.00

Call Us at 394-0323/5 or 394-1377

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



sau and Rotary International
(RI) stand for and have
achieved so far, but acknowl-
edges that the future of Rotary
depends on the constant induc-
tion of new members and keep-
ing Rotarians involved in club
affairs and local projects like
the Fox Hill Run and RI’s goals
such as ridding the world of
polio.

When not busy with Rotary
work, Jeff enjoys boating and
spending time with his family.
He said his proudest achieve-
ment in life was the day he fin-

ished paying for his children’s
education. A truly down to
earth individual who epitomises
the saying “actions speak loud-
er than words”, Jeff defines suc-
cess as “the satisfaction of a job
well done.”

He lives his life according to
the best pieces of advice he ever
received — treat everyone with
respect, and Rotary’s Four-Way
Test: Is it the truth?; Is it fair
to all concerned? Will it build
good will and better friend-
ships? Will it be beneficial to
all concerned?

YOO? CORWEICTION-TO lar WoeLe



0 In brief

Mitchell rounts
on critics of
Raynard Righy

ar TaIN Re Tan

FOX Hill MP Fred Mitchell
has condemned persons who
are seeking to vilify former
PLP chairman Raynard Rigby
for raising concerns about
West End and Bimini MP
Obie Wilchcombe chairing
the party’s upcoming conven-
tion while running for the
deputy leadership at the same
time.

Mr Rigby charged that Mr
Wilchcombe clearly "does not
understand the principles of
conflict of interest and fair-
ness and transparency.”

"He appears not to recog-
nise the perceptions that are
created by continuing to serve
in the capacity of convention
chair."

Mr Rigby said that in his
opinion these are matters that
go to the issue of one's fitness
to serve and character.

"Even though Mr Wilch-
combe may not be able to
define what a conflict is, I
know one when I see one and
so does the public. The pre-
sent facts surely satisfy the
test.

"It must also follow that if,
in Mr Wilchcombe's own
words, at 50 years he does not
have the experience to serve
as leader he must also not be
competent to serve as the par-
ty's deputy.

"His election to the post
would in fact take the PLP
backwards. I have one agen-
da, and that is to serve the
best interests of the PLP and
to ensure that we ready the
party to fight and win the next
general election,” he said.

Mr Mitchell thanked Mr
Rigby for his timely interven-
tion in the public domain on
behalf of the PLP.

“(US President) John
Kennedy said that the men
who criticise those who have
power, play just as valuable a
role as those who do, particu-
larly if that criticism is a disin-
terested criticism.

“Mr Rigby is not seeking
any office, reward or nomina-
tion, just a better PLP, and
thereby a better Bahamas. I
do not support any attempt to
vilify his public contribution. I
defend his right to say it. I
have canvassed a number of
other colleagues who share
this view,” Mr Mitchell said in
a statement.

The Fox Hill MP said that
the question is not what Mr.
Rigby says, but whether or
not what he says is “to the
point, true and of some value
to the public debate.”

“There is a lot of lip service
to the role of dissent in public
life, but as soon as it rears its
head there is vilification of the
messenger instead of listen-
ing,” Mr Mitchell said.

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER

For the Disposal of Scrap Underground
& Aerial Copper Cable

The Bohamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.

is curnently

tendering the Disposal of Scrap Underground & Ariel Copper
Cable. All interested companies are asked te collect a Proposal
ot the Security Desk at JFK Head Office.

Bids must be submitted no later than Friday, September 25, 2007
by 5:00 pum. All bids should be addressed as follows:

Tender for the Disposal $crap Underground & Aerial Copper Coble

Attention:

Mr. |. Kirk Griffin
Aching President & CEQ

The Bahamas Telecamrmunications Company Lid
P.O). Box N-3048, NHossau, Bahonvs

BTC RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY, OR ALL


PAGE 8, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Bahamas maintains a backward approach
to informing citizens about their rights

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

N THE Bahamas, it

appears that many

Bahamians display a

complete ignorance
of their Constitutional rights
and the country’s laws. Today,
unless it is a right given under
the numerated rights of the
Constitution, the only
supreme instrument that gives
and guarantees the right of
every citizen is the Constitu-
tion.

Last week Thursday,
American citizens celebrated
Constitution Day, a stark con-
trast to the Bahamas that still
maintains a backward
approach to enlightening its
citizens about their guaran-
teed rights and/or the statutes
that speak to the legality or
illegality of their actions.

In the United States,
aspects of the constitution are
taught during elementary
school. In this country, there
is a dire need for civics to be
comprehensively taught at the
primary school level and,
even more, for the publica-
tion of a “You and your con-
stitution” book that simpli-
fies, in everyday parlance, the
rights conferred upon the
populace and other elements
of this supreme law.

Do Bahamians really know
the amount of power they
bestow upon an MP when he
is sent to Parliament, or are
we too consumed with the
catchy slogans and the revelry
and social ambiance at politi-
cal rallies?

Frankly, Bahamians must
endeavour to learn the sci-
ence of citizenship and appre-
ciate that no right is granted
without a certain level of
responsibility—taking into
account the public and pri-
vate domain—and, in some
instances, a cost (i.e. the state
may have to raise taxes to

YOUNG MAN’s VIEW

ADRIAN

deliver certain rights, for e.g.,
education or national health-
care).

In speaking about our con-
stitutional rights, recent trav-
els onboard the national flag
carrier—Bahamasair—come
to mind.

As a Bahamian, I have a
right to travel anywhere in the
Bahamas; however, Bahama-
sair’s policy—where they
demand my passport, which
is a document used for inter-
national travel—infringes
upon my right to freedom of
movement within the archi-
pelago.

Passport

When has the passport
become a necessary require-
ment for inter-island travel in
the Bahamas’ archipelago?
The Americans don’t show
passports when they travel
from state to state, so why
must we when we travel from
New Providence to the Fami-
ly Islands?

One of the incidences of
Bahamian citizenship, which
is an integral part of the bun-
dle of rights granted by the
Constitution, is the freedom
of every Bahamian to travel
unreservedly throughout the
islands.

In the Bahamas, security
concerns allow for the sus-
pension of the constitution
and the imposition of martial
law in emergency cases.

In the case of Bahamasair’s
policy, is this an instance
where the danger is such that
they have to suspend rights?
Isn’t the Constitution the

GIBSON

supreme law of the land?
What happens if a traveller
doesn’t have his/her passport
and has never sought a license
to drive?

What happens when I fly
Bahamasair again and exer-
cise my right to free internal
movement within the
Bahamas and refuse to show
my passport?

It appears that the economy
of the Bahamas dictates our
sovereignty, particularly as a
policy such as Bahamasair’s
violate people’s fundamental
rights because the govern-
ment has had its arm twisted
since September 11, 2001, due
to our nearly desperate need
for airlift to sustain our wan-
ing tourism industry.

If Bahamian citizens have
to conform to their “passport-
showing obligations” relative
to the boarding of inter-island
Bahamasair flights, do the civ-
il aviation authorities employ
a discriminatory, double-stan-
dard when dealing with the
owners of private aircraft who
show no identification and
merely travel in and out of
the Bahamas—unchecked?
Should every airport or

The treasury and the Penal Code (Chapter 84)

If law enforcement authorities in the
Bahamas are serious about enforcing the
laws and reducing instances of serious crime
while also earning the treasury quite a bit of
money through fines, it must address the pet-

ty crimes.

Using section 212 of the Penal Code
(Chapter 84), the Ministry of National Secu-
rity and the Commissioner of Police should
see to it that throngs of police officers are
deployed onto the streets to conduct a drag-

net operation.

On any given evening, such an operation
would net thousands in fines, lead to the
apprehension of wanted criminals and tar-
get those individuals who are selling food
out of trunks of vehicle without health cer-
tificates and business licenses, who illegally
light fires and destroy government property,

port—private or not—then
have these same unconstitu-
tional strictures? Why is
Bahamasair’s approach not
applied across the board to
private charter companies as
well?

On this issue, I spoke with
medical doctor, lawyer and
law professor Dr Dexter
Johnson, who said:

“T’m not showing my pass-
port. The situation at
Bahamasair is an example of
government’s knee-jerk reac-
tion after 9/11. The govern-

Why must Bahamians fill out immigration cards?

Every time I’m returning from overseas, midway in the
flight to the Bahamas I’m often irritated when it’s stipulat-
ed that I must fill-out an immigration form to land at the
Lynden Pindling International airport. Frankly, the distrib-

ution of these immigration forms to Bahamian travellers is
an archaic practice that must be dispensed with. Bahamian
travellers should not be mandated to waste time completing
these unnecessary forms, since we all have a right to be
here and it’s not as if the immigration department can put a
Bahamian on a plane and send him/her elsewhere.

Now Servicing
Fresh Creek Andros
Beginning Segtamber 2548 2008



6" Antal’

Abaco

arrest persons who unlawfully affix signs on
buildings or public property (poles), fine per-
sons who do not have a permit from the
Commissioner of Police to ply their wares
or to hold demonstrations, fine hawkers, loi-



terers and phone card peddlers, sellers of

ment acted in haste and over-
reacted. Horrendous things
have happened in other coun-
tries long before 9/11—Britain
was bombed by the Nazis, the
IRA, etc—so why do the
Americans think that they
have to superimpose their will
on the world? It appears to
be a misjudged attempt to
comply with the FAA.

Regulations

“Ts this to do with our secu-
rity, is this in compliance with
international regulations and
how does it fit in with
Bahamian law as regards the
rights of citizens? Is this part
of Bahamian law to the extent
that the international treaties
and regulations have been
accepted by the Bahamian
government?” Dr Johnson
said.

If it is that Bahamasair is
complying with FAA regula-
tions, is this then a condition
of using the airport?

Should it now be under-

uv

Business
WMutlook

fruits and clothes who do not have the prop-
er documentation, fine persons who play
music or make noise to the annoyance of
others, and so on.

I’m told by persons who lived in Freeport
that the minor illegal acts that Nassauvians
get away with could never openly transpire
under the governance of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority.

With this in mind, is there any wonder why
serious acts of criminality have permeated
nearly every community on New Providence?



stood that in order to fly
Bahamasair or use the airport,
a Bahamian must give up a
right as a condition for using
that aircraft/facility?

And, while [’m at it, what-
ever happened to all those ‘x-
ray’ machines that outfitted
several Family Island airports
immediately after 9/11?

It is high-time that the
Bahamas takes a page out of
Jamaica’s book and institutes
a national ID.

Air travel in the Bahamas
is not so bad that it justifies
citizens either choosing to
show a document whose pur-
pose is for external travel or
having their rights suspend-
ed. If this continues, this will
no doubt lead to Bahamians
mounting legal action—a con-
stitutional challenge.

T encourage any citizen who
has had experiences where
their entitlement to their
rights has been forbidden to
demand it through the courts
by means of a constitutional
motion

SEMINAR

{et cog Monta only
You can fly dor the intradecdeey price af

Renewed Optimism 7
Embracing New Opportunities

$80 round trip ticket
$45 = one way ticket

Daily Flight Times From: 9am - Wed . : +93 . 09
New Vision Ministries Centre
Marsh Harbour Abaco

Nessa Fresh Creek

Mari T00 a.m,

6:30 a.m,
4:00 pm, 4:3 p.m
Highly qualified Pikts with over 19 yrs

flying experience

Tues -Sun 630 gum. 7:00 a.m. KEYNOTE SPEAKER:

Sen, Hon. Vincent Vanderpool: Wallace,

Minisler of Toursm and Aviclicn;

19-481 Air-tondilion cabin a0 p.m, 340 om

Twin Turbo prop aircraft makes for an
* ASK abou our special mound trip retes for school
And crurch groups.

SPEAKERS INCLUDE:

Michael Brarynen, Dire:

Eric Corey, Geecutive Derecto: Bohomas Notonal Rusk
Algemean Cargill, Directo: Mahonal Ireueoincn Boeck

Isaac Collie, ower ond Econceniat:

L. Chesher CoopeetProcidant 2 CEO, Brith Amaroan Anorcial
Rev. Lennie Eenne, Preeident, Abaco Coopentive Society:
Kevin Basden,Generd Monoger BEC

Ann Albury, Vion Secicer;

Or Pearl Me Millan, Director of Pubie Hoot

register TODAY!

www .tclevents.com

@>

enjoyable flight

The ufimate in comfort and lueury

Friendly and courteous start,

For Reservations contact us at:

Info@lealrcharters.com
242-377-2356 (Office)
242-377-2357 (Fax)

EILEEN AiBLDER. THE COUNSELLORS LTD
T: POSS TSOS « Fs 2a BS
mena: efelderltrecoursalosid.com

TCLGEROUP

WYHSOME E

MINGTET OF TOURGM, ADACO

1; Pa - Fe
emat wiesguson@iboahama.com

IRSTCARIBBEAN [RS

Tiamat

LEATOMA CHAR,

ABACO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Te Sada

ena: bemonosgnal.com



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 9
SPORTS

Nassau Yacht Club champions
of this year’s dual golf tourney Feaaey



Photos by





LARRY BLACK (right), tournament director, presents Thomas Bethel
with his award for winning the men’s longest drive on hole 2...

LARRY BLACK (right), presents Dilys Anderson with her award for © LARRY BLACK (right), presents a representative of Nassau Yacht Club LARRY BLACK (right), presents Phil Andrews with his award for
winning the women’s longest drive on hole 13... with the floating trophy... winning the closest to the pin category on hole 14...

26th September 2009

Shirley Street
& Highland Terrace



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 10, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



ope

The.



Offi

Bes a eo a 7



Bahamas Optimist National Championships...

‘Another grand success’

A NUMBER of young
sailors competed in this year’s
Bahamas Optimist National
Championships at Montagu
Bay, New Providence.

National sailing director
Jimmy Knowles said the two-
day event was another grand
success.

The boats are shown here
in the harbour.

Photos by
Felipé Major/
Tribune staff

Mr Olympia: Can Joel
make the top 10?

FROM page 11

American Dexter Jackson. Jay Cutler,
another American who relinquished his
title to Jackson, is also entered. He won
back-to-back titles in 2006 and 2007.

Mr Olympia, which originated in 1965
with Larry Scott winning the first two titles,
has had such champions as California Gov-
ernor Arnold Schwarzenegger (1970-1975
and 1980).

But Lee Haney (1984-1991) and Ron-
nie Coleman (1998-2005) have both held
the title more than any other competitor.

Although he doesn’t feel that he hasn’t
arrived to the point where he can chal-
lenge for the title, Stubbs said he has put
together a routine that will definitely make
him a contender for consideration.

“T just want them to give me a honest
ranking,” he said.

The Bahamasair pilot, who got into
building after he went through therapy for
a broken leg he sustained playing basket-
ball, said he originally only wanted to test
his skills at CAC.

But after winning the crown, Stubbs said
Bahamas Bodybuilding and Fitness Fed-
eration president Danny Sumner and oth-
ers encouraged him to take it a step further
in the pro ranks.

“When I went out there for the first time
in the pro ranks, I left a statement out
there with my back,” he insisted. “They
had never seen such a phenomenal back
developed like my own.

“Tt was all over the Internet and in the
magazines that I indeed had the best back
in the world. They labeled me ahead of
two Mr Olympia.”

That episode in 2005 inspired Stubbs to
go on and try to further develop his entire
body so that he can get a chance to contest

for the ultimate - the Mr Olympia title.

“T decided to continue on, being moti-
vated by a lot of people out there and I got
a little more mass and structure and was
able to place in the top ten, but never got in
the top three to qualify for Mr Olympia
until I did in Dallas.

“T think this is a gate opened for me
now to move my programme to another
notch, another level to getting to the point
where I can compete for the Mr Olympia
title.”

Coleman, according to Stubbs, won the
Mr Olympia title at 42, so he doesn’t see
why he shouldn’t be able to achieve the
same goal.

“Tt’s not so much an age thing. It’s the
genetic of the body, the nutritional level
and how you keep your body,” said Stubbs,
who competed in a total of 13 pro shows to
finally get to the big stage.

In 2005, Stubbs competed in his first two
pro shows. He increased it to three in 2006
and entered two more in 2007, three more
in 2008 and just two so far this year.

Now Stubbs said he’s quite confident
with his conditioning, his body fat and his
diet to get prepared for the Mr Olympia.

“In this sport you have to do what you
have to do,” he insisted. “You just have to
put the metal to the pedal and drive ahead
at full speed and see what happens at the
end of the day.

“But I feel good going into Mr Olympia.
I’m working daily, especially in my pos-
ing routine, so I’m really polished. But it’s
just a matter of time before I get to really
see what I’ve been doing for the past few
weeks in my preparation.”

After this weekend, Stubbs said he wants
Bahamians to feel very proud of his accom-
plishment in Las Vegas.



© - “Are
a = se en r
ae = Ta. = . =
Ta 5 .
iS aS ee
ci ames cn has
ee a oat a

















el = ee ee:



a

DANNY de CARDENAS (shown) repeated as champion of the Bahamas Optimist National Champi-
onships over the weekend. The 14-year-old St Andrew’s School ninth grader completed the two-day
event in Montagu Bay by accumulating a total of 15 points, but ended up with a net of 10 after he
dropped his worse race score of 5 points. Competing out of the red group for competitors 13-15 years
old, he said he felt he went out and competed very well in the seven races contested. “I just tried to
stay focussed and got some good starts because | knew that the competition was going to be a lot
stiffer than it was last year,” said de Cardenas, the Royal Nassau Sailing Club member who also plays
baseball and soccer. “There was a lot of people who caught up to me on the last day. But | think | got
off to a good start on the first day and | was able to hold onto my lead,” he said.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

-
TUESDAY,



PAGE 11

r

SEPTEMBER 22, 2009



ts

Mr Olympia:
Can Joel make
the top 107

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

hen Joel

Stubbs

heads to

Las Vegas,

Nevada,
for his debut in the Mr
Olympia this weekend, he will
be on stage with the top 26
ranked competitors in the
world.

Stubbs, who qualified at a
tournament in Dallas, Texas,
will leave town on Wednes-
day for the world’s biggest
bodybuilding show where he

will participate in the pre-
judging on 7pm Friday. The
final is set for Saturday at the
same time.

Based on his preparation,
Stubbs said he has something
in store for the public.

“T think this is the best that
anybody would have seen me
on stage,” Stubbs said. “I’m
in much better condition from
what they saw me in earlier
this year.

“T pretty much brought my
legs up a bit in the volume,
not so much in the size. But I
have them looking more
fuller. As you know, body-
building is all about an illu-

sion, so if can present it as a
gain to the judges, I’m sure I
can leave an impression in
Las Vegas.”

Having qualified for the
first time since he turned pro-
fessional when he won his
card by winning the Central
American and Caribbean
Bodybuilding Championships
in 2003, Stubbs said if he can
finish in the top 10, he would
feel quite content.

“With all of the names that
are in place, I think they are
all pretty much established,”
pointed out Stubbs, who has
yet to win his first pro show.

“But from my mind set, I

New NPWBA
boss welcomes
‘challenge’ with

Open arms

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

TWO years ago, Simone
Beneby introduced the Elec-
tro Telecom Cybots Lady
Queens to the New Provi-
dence Women’s Basketball
Association.

Two months later, she has
been introduced as the new
president of the league.

At the recent election of
officers, Beneby was voted in
to replace Antoinette
Knowles, who opted not to
return for another term in
office.

In an interview with The
Tribune yesterday, Beneby
said she feels it’s going to be a
challenge, but one that she
welcomes with open arms.

“It’s a bit different. It’s a
challenge, but I’m just doing
the best that I can to advance
women’s basketball in the
country,” she stressed.

Beneby will work along
with the following executive
members — Jeannie Minus,
first vice president, Cindy
Fox, second vice president,
Sharel Cash, third vice presi-
dent, Anthony Swaby, fourth
vice president, Laverne Wild-
goose, treasurer, Natasha
Gibson, secretary and Freddie
Brown, commissioner.

“T think [have a good slate
of officers. Based on our
executive meetings we’ve had
thus far, it’s a good slate of
persons who are willing to
work,” she said.

“T think they have all been
working very hard trying to
get all of the things that we
want accomplished, accom-
plished for this league. So it’s
a good hard working aggres-
sive team.”

On November 7 at the D
W Davis Gymnasium, the

SIMONE BENEBY

league is expected to official-
ly start its 2009/2010 regular
season. But over the week-
end of October 23-24, there
will be a pre-season jam-
boree.

Along with Beneby’s Elec-
tro Telecom, the league is
once again expected to be
made up of six teams. Among
them are defending champi-
ons Johnson’s Lady Truckers,
runners-up Bommer George
Lady Angels, Sunshine Auto
Lady Cheetahs, the Royal
Bahamas Defense Force and
the Junior Nationals.

The part-time Gospel
comedian said she intends to
be back as the coach of the
Lady Queens, but if it



Photo by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

becomes a conflict of inter-
est, she will have no problem
relinquishing her duties.

In the meantime, Beneby
said her aim this year is to get
some key elements into the
women’s league.

“We’re in the process right
now of creating a web page
that would give our audience
some information on the
league, outside of just our
game time,” she pointed out.

“We want to provide them
with some information on the
past players, the history of the
league and some of the leg-
ends who played the game.”

Additionally, Beneby said
they are also going to focus
on developing a feeder sys-



JOEL STUBBS is scheduled to depart for Las Vegas on Wednesday to take part in Mr Olympia...

want to give them a phenom-
enal package that at the end
of the day, they will have to
go back to their books and try
to determine just exactly
where they will place Joel

SPORTS

a

BASKETBALL
CYBOTS WIN TITLE



COACH Wayde Watson
and his Electro Telecom
Cybots celebrated another
milestone on Saturday night
at the D W Davis Gymnasi-
um.

Fresh off winning the New
Providence Basketball Asso-
ciation title, Watson and his
Cybots captured the Bahamas
Government Departmental
Basketball Association crown.

They did it by dethroning
the Police Crimestoppers 103-
91 in the fourth game of their
best-of-five championship
series. They ended up taking a
3-1 decision in the showdown.

Mark Hanna led the attack
for the Cybots with a game
high 39 points. Billy Sands
added 18. Valentino Richard-
son scored a side high 37 and
Adorn Charlow chipped in
with 18 in a losing effort.

BOXING
MACKEY OFF
TO CANADA

JERMAINE ‘Choo Choo’
Mackey and his handlers, Ray
and Michelle Minus, are
scheduled to leave town today
for Montreal, Canada, where
Mackey will fight Haitian-
born Canadian Adonis
‘Superman’ Stevensen on Fri-
day night at the Bell Center.

tem for the league where they
incorporate the high school
system so as to attract a lot
of the younger players.

“We want the younger girls
who don’t get the opportuni-
ty to go off to school to be
able to look at this as a viable
alternative where we can
have some coaches from the
United States come and see
them,” she said.

“Tn term, we hope to send
some of our teams off to the
United States to play in tour-
naments so that the coaches
over there can also see them
with the view of getting some
of them off to school.”

The league, according to
Beneby, is also looking at the
possibility of generating some
revenue where they can even-
tually get in one or two live
television games.

Stubbs. A top ten would be
very good for me for my first
showdown.”

Stubbs, 42, will be one of
just two competitors from the
Caribbean who will be partic-

The fight comes after
Mackey spent three weeks in
Berlin, Germany, sparring
with world champion Mikkel
Kessler in August and it
comes just before Mackey
gets set to defend his British
Commonwealth title against
Charles Adamu of Ghana
next month at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium.

SOCCER
COB LOSES
DOUBLE HEADER

THE College of the
Bahamas’ men and women
soccer teams both lost their
soccer matches to Webber
International University as
they concluded their tour of
the Sun Belt Coast in Florida.

While the men lost 5-1, the
women were whitewashed 12-

The men’s soccer team is
now expected to participate

tpating in the show. The other
is Trinidad & Tobago’s Dar-
ren Charles.

Back to defend his title is

SEE page 10

in the Bahamas Football
Association’s senior league,
which commences on Octo-
ber 25, while the women’s
team will commence its off-
season programme for next
Fall’s season.

VOLLEYBALL
COB PREPARES
FOR SEASON

THE College of the
Bahamas will continue its
Athletics calendar with their
women’s volleyball team trav-
eling to Miami, Florida, to
play St Thomas University
and Florida Memorial Uni-
versity over the weekend of
October 16-17.

In preparation for the col-
legiate tour, the Lady Caribs
will play in the New Provi-
dence Volleyball Association
(NPVA) that starts play this
weekend at the D W Davis
Gymnasium.

UG

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 12, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

Greenhouse For

Duncan



THE BAIC CHIEF offers words of encouragement to students of the
Ragged Island Public School.

DUNCAN TOWN, Ragged Island —

n an effort to boost food production in far-flung commu-
nities, the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corpo-
ration is donating a greenhouse to the public school here.

And, to help get the programme underway, BAIC is con-
tributing $500 for seeds and fertilisers, executive chairman Edi-
son Key said.

Mr Key headed a team which travelled to Ragged Island
last weekend for the presentation of certificates to persons
BAIC trained in straw craft.

They were joined by Exuma and Ragged Island administra-
tor Ivan Ferguson, BAIC’s assistant general manager in charge
of handicrafts Donnalee Bowe and executive secretary Lovelee
McQueen.

The craft graduates were: Sade Lockhart-Bain; Rhesa
Boodram; Lovell Lockhart; Nino Frances, Jr; Ashton Brooks;
Myron Lockhart-Bain, Jr; Verva Wallace; Charlene Lockhart-
Bain; Angela Cyrille; Elma Wilson, and Pauline Maycock. They
were tutored by celebrated craft trainer Eloise Smith.

Using silver top palms and sisal plants, they produced a vari-
ety of bags, hats, caps, and mats, utilising popular Bahamian
plaits. Goatskin mats were also featured.

A successful farmer himself, Mr Key urged Ragged Islanders
to focus on feeding themselves and lessening their dependence
on foreign imports.

“There is no reason why we can’t start producing our own
food even right here in Ragged Island,” said Mr Key to a rous-
ing round of applause.

“T know you are self-sufficient in conch and fish, but plant
whatever fruit trees you can find. They will grow right here. And
we will do everything we can to help you.”

MR EDISON KEY More than $500 million in food is imported each year, he said.
: “Why are we not producing even a quarter of that amount?
pledges his support D know h h ds of jobs th oe
for Ragged Islanders. o you know how many thousands of jobs that can ideas
MR EDISON KEY AND Mr Key commended Ragged Islanders for the “excellent
HIS TEAM were warmly quality” of their straw work.
received in Ragged He urged them to tap into the more than $200 million sou-
Island. A contingent venir market, which is currently being supplied by imports
from the public school from other countries.
joined community lead- “Let us teach our people to produce these products. There is
ers in welcoming them. a tremendous market for them,” he said.

“Let us take advantage of everything we can in developing our
people to be an active part of the economy. We want to make
sure that Ragged Island is not left out.”

Ragged Island and Exuma administrator Ivan Ferguson con-
gratulated Mr Key for “the excellent work you are doing in this
country.”

G | a d sto n e “T see this as a stepping-stone for bigger and better things to
happen on Ragged Island,” he said.
Th t “One of our problems is that we do not prepare our people
U rs 0 n adequately to meet the challenges of this global community.

“Mr Key and BAIC are preparing Ragged Islanders for what
is expected to come to this island. They are empowering the peo-
ple of this country.”

BACARDI Zam

48 Caps for Free 375ml
Bacardi Superior or Gold

120 Caps for Free Litre
Bacardi Superior or Gold
150 Caps for Free Litre RAGGED ISLAND grades othe aa saw raft rogram show of ha certs nts pho
Bacardi Anejo
Redemption Center
Bristol Wines & Spirits
Gladstone Road
Nassau, Bahamas





fae” 7 i’
i! Teak h aly i
Pe ae

| “OE abe eee

RT, CE ee ee ee ee

See Thru



| MR EDISON KEY is presented with an authentic Ragged Island goat skin. Pictured from left are: chief
OFFER GOOD WHILE SUPPLIES LAST! councillor Phicol Wallace, secretary for local government Charlene Lockhart-Bain, Mr Key, and

Ragged Island and Exuma administrator Ivan Ferguson.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


Construction

reality worse

than statistics
with ‘50%
less starts’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

T H E
Bahamian |
Contractors
Association’s
(BCA) presi-
dent yesterday
said that while
official figures
showed mort-
gage commit-
ments for new
construction
fell by 26.1 per
cent year-over-year for the
2009 second quarter, the mar-
ketplace reality was fare
worse with “50 per cent less
starts” as financing recipients
held off on their projects.

Stephen Wrinkle said Cen-
tral Bank of the Bahamas’
data showing that mortgage
commitments for new con-
struction and repairs - both
residential and commercial -
fell by 26.1 per cent to $56.1
million for the three months
to June 30, 2009, was “better
news than what we expect-
ed”.

However, he suggested
there was a disconnect
between those figures and was
actually occurring in the
Bahamian construction mar-
ket, with recipients of bank
debt financing reluctant to
commence new builds due to
the lack of confidence caused
by the recession.

“Our impression is that
only 25 per cent of mortgage
applications are currently
being approved,” Mr Wrin-
kle told Tribune Business.
“[’m sure that’s in keeping
with what’s happening in the
marketplace. We probably
started to see a fall in that this
time last year, but I’m sur-
prised that’s [the 26.1 per cent
drop] all it is.”

Mortgage financing actual-
ly released to borrowers for
new construction and repairs
fell by 25.4 per cent to $64.3
million during the 2009 sec-
ond quarter, providing fur-
ther evidence of the weaken-
ing economy and its impact
on the housing and construc-
tion sector.

“It seems like there’s less
work in the marketplace,” Mr
Wrinkle told Tribune Busi-
ness. “The numbers may say
different, but there appears
to be more of a fall-off in the
marketplace than that.

“Tt seems as if those peo-
ple who received approvals
may not have proceeded with
their projects. As a result,
there’s some _ disparity

SEE page 2B



WRINKLE

Peru pe

THE TRIBUNE

usine

TUESDAY,

SEPTEMBER 22,





2009

ROYAL FIDELITY

aL e 4

RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company



NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com

Coca-Cola distributor

plans 2011 plant open

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

Ground broken for new facility on Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway, with construction and transfer to take two years

oca-Cola’s Bahamian

bottler and distributor
has matched its global
counterparts through
sales
demand for its products, its president
telling Tribune Business yesterday that

unwavering

stream by 2011.

its new bottling plant will come on

Walter Wells, head of Caribbean
Bottling, revealed that the company
broke ground for the new plant on
Tonique Williams-Darling Highway

Fashion show suffers ‘offset’
impact from the recession

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN designers
“have not moved as aggres-
sively as they could” to devel-
op a local fashion industry
through exploiting events
such as Miss Universe, the
organiser of an upcoming
Bahamas-based fashion show
saying yesterday that his
event had both benefited and
been negatively impacted by
the global recession.

Owen Bethel, president
and chief executive of the

* While designer numbers set to drop from 38 to 20 at
Islands of the World, cancellation/downsizing at other
Caribbean events set to boost buyer attendance

* Bahamian designers ‘have not moved as aggressively
as they could’ to develop local industry

* Miss Universe designer approached by ‘major
buyer’ for purchases, with local sector having
potential to generate ‘fashion tourism’

Nassau-based Montaque
Group, whose Modes Illes
subsidiary is currently organ-
ising the second Islands of the

World fashion show, said that
while the designer line-up had

SEE page 4B

Bahamas pursues investment and
double tax deals ‘where offered’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government is pur-
suing double taxation agree-
ments and investment treaties
with all countries offering
those options in negotiations
over Tax Information
Exchange Agreements
(TIEAS), a minister saying
yesterday that he was “confi-
dent” the Bahamas would
meet the necessary standards
by the required deadlines.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, told Tribune
Business that the Govern-
ment’s negotiations were
“going extremely well” as it
seeks to meet the G-
20/OECD minimum require-
ments of having 12 TIEAs in
place by year-end.

When asked whether the
Bahamas was likely to meet
the deadline it had set itself to
implement its commitments
on tax transparency and the
exchange of tax information,
Mr Laing told this newspa-
per: “I’m very confident that
we will.

“T think our negotiations

a: re . oe ;

SANDYPORT #51 10 Tastefully decorated 3 bed,2.5 bath townhouse with
recent renovations and numerous upgrades. Perfectly positioned with an ex-
tended deck to enjoy excellent ocean and lagoon views. Oversized unit with
| 897 sq. ft. of living space and upgraded with a 12 KW Kohler generator, new
high-efficiency central A/C system, hurricane shutters and partial furnishings.
Attractively priced at $649,000 gross. Call today to view.
Lana.Rademaker@SothebysRealty.com c 242.457.0406

Damianos

Sothebys

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Member of
SIRbahamas.com | t 242.322.2305 | £242322.2033 | the Bohamas MLS



with any number of countries
are going extremely well. We
have reached very satisfacto-
ry conclusions with any num-
ber of them.”

Michael Paton, a former
Bahamas Financial Services
Board (BFSB) chairman, told
Tribune Business last week
that his only concern was that
this nation did not run into
trouble with the G-20/OECD

by failing to meet its commit-
ments as a result of their
members’ “scheduling con-
flicts”.

He expressed concern that
some might say they were too
busy to conclude a TIEA with
the Bahamas in the timeframe
this nation had committed to,

SEE page 5B

last month, and expects the construc-
tion and transfer from the current
Thompson Boulevard location to take
two two years.

Mr Wells said the new plant will
leave the company better positioned

to move with the market and meet
demand when the Bahamian economy
turns around.

"We're upbeat and optimistic about

SEE page 6B

‘We want to be nearer forecasts’

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

GOVERNMENT revenues
are still $30 million behind
2009-2010 Budget predictions,
the minister of state for
finance said yesterday, with
the Government wanting “to
be nearer forecast than that”.

With the first quarter of the
Government’s 2009-2010 fis-
cal year due to end on Sep-
tember 30, Zhivargo Laing
said it was “much too early”
to say whether Budgetary
forecasts and spending plans
would have to be adjusted,
indicating the Government
would see how revenue trends
fared for the remainder of
2009.

“We are still looking at $30
million or so behind forecast,
so that’s something which we
will continue to keep under
watch. We’d like to be nearer
forecast than that,” Mr Laing
told Tribune Business.

He explained that the Gov-
ernment was also watching to
see if there was the same kind
of steep decline in revenue
that occurred post-September
2008, when Lehman Brothers
collapsed and nearly took the
global financial system and
economy with it.

Mr Laing also said that
year-over-year revenue com-
parisons were “much narrow-

Government
revenues still $30m
behind forecast,

but ‘much too early
to say’ whether
Budget predictions
have to be revised or
spending cuts occur

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



Sure you'll retire at 40!

Now what's Plan B?

> We can get you there. Royal Fidelity.

ey
Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

FU 7 Ve lek

St. Michael: 246.435.1955

royalfidelity.com

[ Learn more at royalfidelity.com ]

ROYAL @ FIDELITY

Money at Work

idsLQW Mme /LS Ley gra) e1 KG ol e1) er 1 614


PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Realtor to outline

‘vision’ for Abaco






AN independent real estate
broker and consultant, and
past local government exec-
utive, Ann Albury, is the
‘vision speaker’ at the upcom-
ing Abaco Business Outlook.

The sixth Annual Abaco
Business Outlook Seminar is
scheduled for tomorrow at the
New Vision Ministries Cen-
tre in Marsh Harbour, Abaco,
and Ms Albury will give those
attending a visual of Abaco
past, Abaco present and a
taste of what’s to come in
Abaco’s future.

“We are going to take a
look at where Abaco was and
what it has evolved into,” said
Ms Albury. “We are also
going to explore what we are

hoping for futuristically.”

A Justice of the Peace, Ms
Albury is also a former mem-
ber of North Abaco District
Council, a former member of
the North Abaco Licensing
Board and the deputy chair-
man of North Abaco Town
Planning.

She served on the Ministry
of Tourism’s advisory com-
mittee, is a founding member
of the Abaco Swim Club and
is a director of both the Aba-
co Chamber of Commerce
and Friends of the Environ-
ment.

The seminar’s keynote
speaker is Senator Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace, minis-
ter of tourism and aviation.

KING'S

REAL ESTATE

JOB OPPORTUNITY

Real Estate Agents

Applicants must have:
* Outstanding personality
«Current BREA license

* Minimum 2-years experience

¢ Proven

sales record

Apply to bahamas@kingsrealty.com
Deadline: September 4M), 2049
Information: 394-4397

The Bahamas Society of Engineers

The Public is Cordially Invited to Attend
The Monthly Luncheon Presentation

Hosted by
The Bahamas Society of Engineers

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009
Tapie:
“UTILITY OPERATIONS IN AN
ARCHIPELAGIC ENVIRONMENT -
CHALLENGES & SOLUTIONS”

Guest Speaker:
ENG. KEVIN BASDEN
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Place:
KAST VILLA RESTAURANT
(East Bay Street)

TIME: 12:00PM
Financial Members: $2000)
Students; $15.00)

Public:

525, (MK)

If Possihbe Please Confirm Your Attendance fy E-mail
pmuicesharmalls i yahoo.com or
JEE bot bahamaselectnicity.com or quentin know les) amelie com

PO. Bax EE-15928. Nassau, Bahama

Tel

747 3a?

Baw hahamasengi recrsAre



Other speakers include Eric
Carey, executive director,
Bahamas National Trust;
Algernon Cargill, director,
National Insurance Board;
Isaac Collie, lawyer and econ-
omist; I. Chester Cooper,
president and chief executive,
British American Financial;
Rev Lennie Etienne, presi-
dent of Abaco Farmers Coop-
erative Society; and Dr Pearl
McMillan, director of Public
Health.

Abaco Business Outlook is
a one-day seminar coordinat-
ed by The Counsellors. The
seminar, in its sixth year, is
themed: Renewed Optimism:
Embracing New Opportuni-
ties.

ANN ALBURY is the ‘vision speaker at the upcoming Abaco Business Outlook...

Construction reality worse than
statistics with ‘50% less starts’

FROM page 1B

between what those figures
are saying and what is hap-
pening in the marketplace.
Some people may be quali-
fied and not moving forward,
because they’re afraid of what
is happening.

“It’s better news than we
expected, but the physical
marketplace indicates there
is less than that going ahead.
There may be 25 per cent less
approvals, but 50 per cent less
starts.”

Further depressing the

Bahamian construction indus-
try is the more than 50 per
cent contraction in foreign
purchases of this nation’s land
and real estate during the
2009 second quarter, which
fell to $50 million. Net for-
eign direct investment inflows
into the Bahamas during
those three months fell by 20
per to $175.8 million, a $43.6
million decline from the pre-
vious year’s $219.4 million.
The BCA president told
Tribune Business there was
no sign that the current trends
impacting the Bahamian con-

Uy;

CR em mentees

Specializing in Low Voltage Cabling,
Voice and Data dd

Roe ao

Corporate /SOHO

Structured Wiring (Voice, Dota & Video) Installations

ite Rois) Na Dea

em

Caté and

Fiber Optic (Single and Multi Mode)
Be feRO = mele ene eo R@ ents)

SSR eM (es )e ule gicas) (ene

Coax Compression Head Termination for Cable TV

ite le calc e Mec e eR alle Peron n ik:

Visio Network Drawing
Pee Lai 0 ane 600g

Provide Data Patch Panels and 110 Telephone Blocks

pric ie Beem ale et
Telephone, asia eT

x Tals eel st
ee a Mio}



struction industry would turn-
around soon.

He added: “Many contrac-
tors are struggling, and it’s
due to circumstances beyond
the ordinary person’s control
and, indeed, the Governmen-
t’s control. None of this will
resolve this without a stimulus
by external forces. Baha Mar
represents the brightest hope
of turning this trend around.”

Mr Wrinkle said major con-
struction projects, such as
mixed-use resort develop-
ments, usually translated into
smaller and medium-sized
developments that Bahamian
contractors could work on,
yet the sector was suffering
from an almost-total absence
of these currently.

With foreign direct invest-
ment, the key driver of the
Bahamian economy, down by
anywhere between 20-33 per
cent and no recovery immi-
nent, the BCA president
urged Bahamians to “take
control of our own destiny”
by investing more in their
own economy.

“Right now, there’s a lot of
vacant commercial space on
the island, and a lot of busi-
nesses are struggling,” Mr
Wrinkle said. “We will see
some filtering out of com-
mercial businesses. It’s going
to take us a little while to fill

this void. Unless we generate
some internal income for the
country, we will be dependent
on external forces.”

He called for Bahamians to
“put together or be part of
the [major] deals” to reduce
the reliance on foreign direct
investment, but acknowl-
edged that due to exchange
control restrictions it was very
difficult for them to raise debt
financing at rates and terms
that were competitive with
foreigners.

“Tt’s coming to catastroph-
ic proportions,” Mr Wrinkle
told Tribune Business.
“Unless we have a national
development plan we can
work on, we’re just going to
continue treading water.

“IT know of two major
developments in Nassau, not
Albany, where foreigners got
permits to come in and buy
the land, develop it and then
sell it back to Bahamians at a
huge profit, taking the money
out of the country.

“T think that’s inherently
wrong, just because they have
access to financing and for-
eign money. That has pre-
vented Bahamians from
accessing that development
market. We have to focus on
changing that, otherwise we’ll
keep on bleeding money out
of here.”

‘We want to be
nearer forecasts’

FROM page 1B

er, much more in line” with
the year before.

He added: “The revenue
forecast is important to us in
the sense that you predicate
your expenditure on that.
Clearly, one has to look at
revenue and how it has per-
formed, and make some
determinations, if that per-
formance has lapsed, for what
you said you wanted to do.
That has to be taken into con-
sideration, along with other
factors.”

However, he added that it
was “much too early for us to
say” whether spending cuts
would result if government
revenues remained stubborn-
ly below forecast.







i)



hasiiâ„¢

browns



$4





TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 3B



FirstCaribbean
sees 14.1 per

cent dro

in profit

FirstCaribbean Internation-
al Bank (Bahamas) suffered a
14.1 per cent decline in net
income to $49.205 million for
the first nine months of its
2009 financial year, a drop
largely caused by a 34.8 per
cent increase in loan loss pro-
visions.

The bank, the largest listing
on the Bahamas International
Securities Exchange (BISX)
by market capitalisation, has
been impacted by the same
deterioration in asset/loan
portfolio quality as other insti-
tutions, forcing it to raise pro-
visions for the nine months to
July 31, 2009, to $20.253 mil-
lion compared to $15.026 mil-
lion in 2008.

With total income flat at
$121.452 million, the $5 mil-

alae
> Santander

lion loan loss provision
increase and almost $3 million
rise in operating expenses -
due to bank licence fee
increases and salary rises asso-
ciated with a union agreement
- caused net income for the
first nine months to fall to
$49.205 million, compared to
$57.263 million the year
before.

For the third quarter, First-
Caribbean saw net income fall
by 27.2 per cent to $19.436 mil-
lion, compared to $26.706 mil-
hon in 2008. The fall was large-
ly induced by a $5 million
swing in operating income,
which fell from $13.348 mil-
lion to $7.835 million.

In his message to First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) shareholders,

chairman Michael Mansoor
said the bank had been able
to grow its loan book by $139
million or 6 per cent to $2.609
billion during the first nine
months despite the recession.

Mr Mansoor added that for
the first nine months of fiscal
2009, FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank (Bahamas) saw
operating income improve by
$4 million to $15.5 million,
although lower international
interest rates - partially offset
by the increased loan volume -
caused net interest income to
drop by $3.9 million to $105.9
million.

Mr Mansoor said the bank
remained well-capitalised with
a Tier I capital ratio of 17.7
per cent, well above the mini-
mum 14 per cent requirement.

SANTANDER BANK & TRUST LTD

has an immediate vacancy for a

“REDIT RISK MANAGER

Applicants must hold the following:

- Bachelors in Business Administration or related degree

- Minimum of 10 years experience in Private Banking with 5 years directly in the area

of Credit Risk.

Applicants should also be capable of the following:

|. Management and servicing of loan portfolios involving Spanish lending officers
and clients, liaison with other group units.

2, Good organizational and planning skills.

3, Effective management and supervision of Credit Risk Department,

4, Excellent communications skills in both English and Spanish essential.

5. Be proficient in all Microsoft Office applications.

Applications in writing with details of education and experience should be addressed
to the Human Resources Manager, P.O. Box N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas not later than

October 9, 2009.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

For the stories
Wa Uy
ia a
MEA
TEES

Legal Notice

NOTICE

CABEX INTERNACIONAL LTD.

Notice is hereby given that the winding up and dis-

solution of CABEX INTERNACIONAL LTD.
has been completed in accordance with the Articles
of Dissolution and that the Company has been
struck from the Register of Companies on the 12th

day of August, 2009.

Maria M. Férére
Joint Liquidators



LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.
“Eattage Lat With Private Beach
FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!

Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million
Web Listing # 8377

Tel: 242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013

nme .com
www.marocareyred

Tribune

com

As

Mario Carey Realty
Dt's abaut yaw... Let's talk.

sen
asd
.

ie

eee
jue

Pr

ee eer

Tel: 502 2356 agg

for ad rates



CR-V

Head-turning styling. Side curtain airbags and power moonroof available.
Talk about pure bliss. Presenting the all-new CR-V. It’s something new to crave.

Shirley Street, 328-2288

www.hondabahamas.com

(HONDA

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Fashion show suffers ‘offset’
impact from the recession

NOTICE

In the Estate of DARNELL AMY
DEVEAUX, late of Sea Breeze Lane in the
Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Civil
Servant, Deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claims or demands against the
above-named Estate are requested to send
the same duly certified in writing to the
undersigned on or before Friday, the 25th
day of September, A.D. 2009, after which

date the Administratrix will proceed to
distribute the assets of the deceased among
the persons entitled thereto having regard
only to the claims of which the undersigned
shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons indebted to the said Estate are
requested to make full settlement on or before
the date hereinbefore mentioned.

DUPUCH & TURNQUEST & CO.
Chambers
308 East Bay Street
P. O. Box N-8181
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Administratrix



FROM page 1B

been affected by the global
economy, the Bahamian
event was likely to benefit
from an increased audience
as other Caribbean shows
cancelled.

Acknowledging that this
year’s Islands of the World
designer line-up was “actual-
ly reduced to about 20 design-
ers, compared to 38 at last
year’s inaugural event, Mr
Bethel told Tribune Business:
“We cut back on a lot of per-
sons who really were not
ready to produce what the
buyers wanted them to do.

“A number of designers
also came back to us and said
they were prevented from
coming because of the eco-
nomic and financial situation.

“We had applications from
30 designers this year. Out of
that, we said ‘no’ to about five
because they were not pre-
pared, while three to four said
they had to pull out at the last
minute because of the finan-
cial situation, with sponsors
withdrawing.”

While 20 designers was “a
good practical number” to
work with for Islands of the
World, Mr Bethel said his
main disappointment was that
representatives from all geo-
graphical regions - especially
those from further afield -
would not be present.

“Those are designers able
and prepared to carry through
their designs on a consistent
basis, able to consolidate
them from season to season,”
Mr Bethel said of those would
present during Islands of the
World fashion week.



OWEN BETHEL

“T don’t think we have any
regrets in terms of numbers,
but the disappointment is that
designers from the Pacific
Islands and the Indian Ocean
are not represented because
of the costs. We have one
from Madagascar, when last
year we had designers from
Fiji, Indonesia and Mauri-
tius.”

But, on the positive side,
Mr Bethel said Islands of the
World was likely to experi-
ence a boost in buyer, fash-
ion industry and media atten-
dance as a result of other
Caribbean nations cancelling
their own fashion weeks.

Pointing to the fact that the
Virgin Islands had just can-
celled its own fashion week,
he added: “A number have
downsized or cancelled alto-
gether their Fashion Weeks.

“The interest in our event
has continued, and we’re get-
ting a lot of media coverage
worldwide. I know a number
of those who were planning
to go to the Virgin Islands and
Trinidad are coming here for
this fashion week. What num-
ber that might be, I have no
idea.”

Yet moves by Bahamian
designers to exploit the foun-
dation and exposure events
such as Islands of the World,
plus the recent Miss Universe
Pageant, have generated for
them have been slow.

“T don’t think the local
designers have moved as
aggressively as they could or
as one might have thought
they would,” Mr Bethel said.
“T think there’s a lot of room
and opportunities for them to
take the industry to the next
level.

“That may be the result of
two things. One is a factor of
the economic situation and
the financial impact that has
had on a number of design-
ers. The second is just not
having a full grasp of the busi-
ness and marketing side of the
business, as opposed to the
creative side - just designing.

“It will be a learning
process that they will have to
undertake. A lot of appetites
have been whetted, but they
have generally not had the
ability to take advantage of
any initiative built on that
enthusiasm.”

As an example of what
these events could generate,
Mr Bethel said “a major buy-
er” who attended the Miss
Universe Pageant’s Fashion
Show had been in touch with
one of the three Bahamian

designers whose products
were showcased by the con-
testants, with a view to pur-
chasing their products.

Development of a thriving
home grown Bahamian fash-
ion industry holds tremen-
dous potential for this nation,
as it could help diversify the
economy and, more signifi-
cantly, act as a foreign
exchange earner if garments
and designs could exported.

Acknowledging that the
sector held “that value” for
the Bahamas, Mr Bethel said
it could also create ‘fashion
tourism’ for this nation.
“Where it does have that abil-
ity to be exposed through
tourism, tourists can see it has
quality, is something they can
buy and brings value to
them,” Mr Bethel added.

Developing a_ strong
Bahamian fashion industry
could also generate jobs for
technicians, such as make-up
artists and stylists, plus design-
ers and creators of the actual
fabric - such as Bahama Hand
Prints and Androsia, both of
whom were featured in the
Miss Universe Pageant
designs.

Mr Bethel said the sector
could also be developed as “a
cottage industry” from peo-
ple’s homes, avoiding the
need for great overhead costs.

Of the 20 designers set to
be featured at Islands of the
World, some four to five
Bahamians will appear in the
‘next generation’ section, with
another two among “the more
seasoned designers”.

Islands of the World will be
held from November 4-8,
2009, at the Sheraton Cable
Beach Resort.

Job Vacancies

Multi-Unit General Manager

Position Summary

The “Multi-Unit General Manager” function is the primary strategic business
leader of seven (7) business entities spread between two locations in Jupiter,
Florida AND Abaco, Bahamas.

Position oversees the development and implementation of club strategies
and ensures implementation of the brand service strategy and brand initiatives.

The position ensures that the clubs’ operations meet the brand’s target
customer needs, maximizes associate satisfaction and focuses on growing
revenues and the overall financial performance of all departments. As the
leader of both properties’ Guidance Teams, M-UGM develops and implements
Club-wide strategies that deliver products and services to meet or exceed.
the needs and expectations of the brand’s target customer and associates and
provides a return on investment to the owners and the Company.

Expected Contributions
* Energizes the Gold Standards of the Company and ensures brand

initiatives are implemented to meet or exceed member, employee and
financial expectations. Continuously challenges the team to improve
operations, and ensures compliance with brand standards to protect
brand integrity.
Leverages synergies among both properties to maximize market
penetration, operational excellence, and overall business performance.
Selects, develops and retains a diverse leadership team capable of
delivering the expected performance contributions and with growth
potential, and holds others accountable for doing the same. Leads the
guidance team and leverages additional corporate and regional resources
to develop and implement destination club-wide strategies that are
aligned with the company’s Key Success Factors. Facilitates talent
development and leverages opportunities to share and maximize talent
among the Areas Clubs and Residences.
Focuses the team on delivering services and products to meet or exceed
owner expectations, create owner loyalty, and grow market share. Builds
relationships with key customers.

Qualifications
* 4-year bachelor's degree in Business Administration, Hotel and Restaurant

Management, or related major
15+ years of progressive experience in private club industry with
exposure to multiple disciplines
Prior General Manager or equivalent experience in a luxury market
environment
Property Management certifications required by the State of Florida
Prior multi-property oversight preferred

Skills & Knowledge

* Leadership - Visible, proactive, personally involved leader with excellent
organizational skills, capable of providing focused leadership and
contributing to establish the club and residences prominent position
within the market. A well-developed capability for strategic decision-
making and a track record of proven results in the areas of customer
satisfaction, operational excellence, employee satisfaction, revenue and
profit.
Financial Acumen - Business savvy leader with demonstrated financial
acumen, capable of providing strong P&L results oriented financial
leadership.
Operations - Excellent sense of product and service quality, a passion
for excellence and an understanding of the sophisticated needs of the
luxury customer. Creative and innovative operations leadership, capable
of delivering products and services that will differentiate the clubs and
residences in the region’s luxury residential market.
Governance - Property Management designations or certifications
required by the State of Florida are required. Responsible for Rules
and Enforcement, Property Maintenance, Services Communications,
Finances, Administration, Asset Protection and assistance with Policy
Development all in accordance with local and state statutes.

Director of Operations

Position Summary
Functions as the strategic business leader of food and beverage/culinary
operations and acts as General Manager in his/her absence. Areas of

responsibility include: Front Office, Business Centre, Recreation/Fitness
Department, Retail/Gift Shops, Housekeeping, Food and Beverage/Culinary
and Event Management. Position oversees the development and
implementation of departmental strategies and ensures implementation of
the brand service strategy and brand initiatives. The position ensures that
food and beverage/culinary operations meet the brand’s target customer
needs, maximizes associate satisfaction, focuses on growing revenues and
the overall financial performance of the departments. As a member of the
Guidance Team, develops and implements hotel-wide strategies that deliver
products and services to meet or exceed the needs and expectations of the
brand’s target customer and associates and provides a return on investment
to the owners and Ritz-Carlton.

Responsibilities

* Demonstrating Leadership

* Achieving Goals

* Exceeding Customer Expectations

* Improving Profit

* Maintaining Balance Between Profit and Service Satisfaction
* Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates

* Destination Club and Residential Management

Qualifications

* 4-year bachelor's degree in Business Administration, Hotel and Restaurant
Management, or related major

* 5 years experience in executive management position in a five star
resort

* Ritz-Carlton Hotel or Destination Club experience preferred

Skills & Knowledge

* Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes
for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer
needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and daily
evaluation of existing customer satisfaction measurement processes.
Management of Financial Resources - Determining how money will
be spent and available resources utilized to get the work done and daily
accounting for these expenditures.

Analytical/Critical Thinking - The ability to gather and organize
information using a logical and systematic process; recognize patterns
and relationships in complex data; examine data to identify implications,
problems and draw appropriate conclusions; generate alternative solutions
to problems; evaluate strengths, weaknesses and consequences of
alternative solutions and approaches to solving problems.

Applied Business Knowledge - Understanding market dynamics involved
in running a private membership club under development, enterprise
level objectives and important aspects of ultra-luxury club / resort
business to accurately diagnose strengths and weaknesses, anticipate
opportunities and risks, identify issues, and develop strategies and plans.
Aligning individual and team actions with strategies and plans to drive
business results.

Pastry Chef

Position Summary

Create and maintain a positive work environment through coaching and leading
staff while establishing creative and exciting menu products, both appetizing and
visually appealing. Work and maintain good working relationships with other
work areas. Meet with meeting planners and social catering event coordinators
to develop personalized dessert products. Direct, train and monitor performance
of Pastry staff. Maintain organization, cleanliness and sanitation of work areas

and equipment.
Essential Job Functions

* Train, coach, lead and hold Pastry team accountable to the job functions
listed below. Meet daily to review assignments, schedules, anticipated
business levels, employee performance issues and other information
pertinent to job performance.

Maintain and strictly abide by sanitation/health regulations and the
hotel’s food safety program requirements. Ensure all Pastry employees
maintain food handlers’ certification.

Meet with Executive Chef to review assignments, anticipated business
levels, changes and other information pertinent to the job performance

on a daily basis.

Prepare and assign production and prep work for Pastry staff to complete;
review priorities.

Communicate additions or changes to the assignments as they arise
throughout the shift. Identify situations, which compromise the
department's standards and delegate these tasks.

Prepare amenity orders for room service in accordance with specified
requirements and hotel standards.

Prepare all dishes following recipes and yield guides, according to Ritz-
Carlton standards.

Monitor performance of Pastry staff and ensure all procedures are
completed to the department standards

Assist Pastry staff wherever required to ensure excellent service to
guests.

Ensure all Pastry staff assignments are completed before they leave
work area.

Review status of work and follow-up actions required with the Executive
Chef before leaving.

Qualifications, Skills & Knowledge
* Certification of culinary training or apprenticeship.
¢ 5 years experience in F&B leadership position at a luxury club, hotel
or restaurant.
¢ Knowledge of food and beverage cost controls.
¢ Ability to plan and develop menus and recipes.

Director of Sales

Position Summary

Designing, implementing and continuously evaluating all sales processes;
Maintaining content and direction on Training and Motivation of Sales
Leadership and Field Sales Force; Developing and maintaining visibility
over Sales Standards and Accountability Measures; Providing related sales
input to New Site Feasibility and Business Planning Processes

Essential Job Functions

* Monitor and evaluate sales processes while maintaining visibility over
daily sales progress against budgets

* Create and implement specific sales and marketing field operations
best practices, policies and guidelines

* Create and implement structured sales presentation training and sales
executive evaluation
Develop sales management training programs as well as create system
succession strategy to identify/groom key sales professionals
Insure performance management is implemented and maintained
consistently across the system
Review all sales related assumptions in the feasibility process, ensuring
strategic and operational reasonableness, comparability among PEPS,
budgets, forecasts and LRP
Provide Brand with product and business development recommendations.
Relate information regarding competitive tactics and products.

Qualifications, Skills & Knowledge
College degree
Minimum of ten years in the vacation ownership industry
Minimum of five years ownership sales and sales management experience
Strong verbal and written communications skills; ability to communicate
effectively with senior management
Experience in designing products, processes, policies and training
manuals
Ritz Carlton Club experience preferred

Please send resume to the attention of:
Director of Human Resources
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB-20571
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Bahamas

OR

Email: Freddie. Munnings@ritzcarlton.com
Deadline for applications is Friday, September 25, 2009



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 5B



Bahamas pursues
investment and
double tax deals
‘where offered’

FROM page 1B

meaning that it would be
unfair for the G-20/OECD to
take action against this nation
because it was their members
who had caused the problem.

However, Mr Laing’s opti-
mism indicates this is unlikely
to be an issue.

The Bahamas, having
signed its first TIEA with the
US in January 2002, conclud-
ed its second, with fellow
international financial centre
Monaco, last week, thus leav-
ing it requiring 10 more
before year-end to meet G-
20/OECD requirements.

In addition, the Bahamas
and Monaco are also negoti-
ating a double taxation treaty,
something that would see the
latter’s residents, for exam-
ple, taxed only in the
Bahamas on assets, income
and business interests
held/generated here, and not
in Monaco.

Confirming that the Gov-
ernment was pursuing double
taxation and international
investment treaties with all
nations where this was an
option, Mr Laing confirmed:
“To the extent to which coun-
tries may offer that possibility,
clearly we are minded to go
that route. I believe that is in
keeping with our long-term
interests.

“All of the things that allow
us to be a leading jurisdiction
for international investment

we are seeking to include in
discussions with countries we
are negotiating with.”

The Government previous-
ly stated it had started nego-
tiations on tax information
exchange agreements with
Canada, the United Kingdom,
Australia, Spain, Germany,
France, Turkey and the
Nordic countries (Norway,
Sweden, Finland, Denmark,
Iceland, Greenland the Faroe
Islands).

The Bahamas added that it
had also initiated discussions
on tax information exchange
agreements with China, and
proposed to do the same with
Brazil, Mexico, Japan, Ire-
land, South Africa and India.

Meanwhile, Mr Laing said
it was “difficult to know what
more” the Bahamas could do
to form a satisfactory rela-
tionship on tax matters with
the US other than have a
TIEA with Washington.

Influential Democratic sen-
ator Carl Levin last week
demanded that international
financial centres and their insti-
tutions be barred from access-
ing the US and international
financial systems if they ‘fail’ to
aid the fight against tax eva-
sion, and urged the Obama
administration to broaden the
scope of TIEAs beyond
requests for specific taxpay-
er information to a catch-all
demand for details on all US
citizens.

While he had not seen the

Senator’s comments, Mr
Laing said yesterday: “It’s
worth noting that we have a
TIEA with the US, and I
don’t know what more we can
do in respect of that than have
that kind of relationship with
the US.

“T cannot be responsible for
how the Senator is reviewing
the matter, but I do know we
have an arrangement that is
an internationally acceptable
standard in respect to how
these matters are dealt with.”

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd

Client Relationship Officer

EFC International

Vice President

EFG International is a global private banking group headquartered in
Switzerland, offering private banking and asset management services. EPG
International's private banking businesses currently operate in 55 locations
in over 30 countries, with circa 2,400 employees.

EFG Bank & Tr

Bahamas) L

continues to expand as evidenced by

Career
Opportunity

SENIOR TRUST MANAGER

J. P. Morgan is currently seeking applications for a Senior Trust Manager.

The successful candidate will work with Trust and related partners to
ensure that fiduciary services are delivered in a manner consistent with all
legal, regulatory and internal requirements. The candidate will also serve
as a technical resource to wealth advisors, investors and relationship
managers. The Senior Trust Manager will be expected to develop direct
relationships with clients and have the flexibility to travel.

Prospective applicants should have 6+ years of trust experience, with 3+
yearsin mentoring others. Abachelor’s degree or a professional qualification
ideally in law with strong analytical skills; knowledge of investment product
services, fiduciary and trust regulatory requirements and onshore and
offshore jurisdictions; excellent written/verbal communication and creative
problem solving skills; and the ability to assess risk in fiduciary and trust
matters.

J.P. Morgan Private Bank offers competitive compensation and
benefits packages. Interest applicants should submit their resume/
curriculum vitae marked “Private and Confidential” to the Human
Resources Manager, J.P. Morgan Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited,
P.O. Box N-4899, Nassau, Bahamas.

J.P. Morgan Trust Company
(Bahamas) Limited

Oe ee TT ae
UE MMC ey eT PC
just call 502-2371 today!

BS! OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BS| Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
international private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is
presently accepting applications for

PRIVATE BANKING RELATIONSHIP MANAGER/MANAGED
PORTFOLIOS ADMINISTRATOR

Applicants for the position of must have a banking/financial degree or 7-10
years experiance in tha offshore banking sector, have knowledge of
intemational investment instruments & money market, ability to partner with
taam mambers, must be confident regarding customer relations, investments

its new premises at Lyford Cay. EFG Bahamas has over 40 experienced
professionals and offers a full range of solutions for wealthy clients around
the globe. EPG's unique corporate culture attracts the most entrepreneurial
and most experienced professionals in the industry, To learn more, please
VISIT WAALe Wh 1

& portfolio management and have thorough knowledge of local legislation,
regulatory & statutory matters as well as international banking practices,
Fluency in Italian is absolutely required

1OT

Personal qualities :-

We are looking for a seasoned professional with at least 10 years of sales
and marketing experience in providing financial solutions to high net worth
clients and companies. Specifically, we require a professional fluent in
Portuguese, Spanish and English. The candidate must possess a solid
knowledge of investments, banking and trust services. The ability to service
and grow his/her own client book is extremely important. EPG provides a
unique and uninhibited global marketing opportunity, an open architecture
platform, and multiple booking centers.

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-onented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Cammitment to quality and service axcellence

Able to work with minimal supervision

Strang Team athtude

Financial and analybcal background

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure

Responsibilities --
The candidate must have a university degree. The individual must have the Service & advise customers
Maintain & follaw up account relahonships

Liaise directly with customers or their investment advisors

Monitar, analyze positions and evaluate reparts

Ensure that managed portfolios are implemented according to the relevant
policies

Liaise with Portfolio Managers and other Relationship Mangers on

Meet deadlines on timely basis

required qualifications and accreditations to be registered with The Bahamas
securities Commission. The ability to go on frequent business development
trips and work within very tight deadlines is also a necessity.

EPG offers an attractive compensation plan that includes salary, benefits
and a bonus structure directly related to profitability. Salary will be determined
by experience, and qualifications.

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum
vitee to:-

Only qualified professionals should submit applications by 9th October
2009 to:

Human Resources Manager

BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre
P.O. Box N-7130

Nassau, Bahamas

EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd
Human Resources
Centre of Commerce, 2â„¢ Floor
1 Bay Street
P.O. Box 5S 6289
Nassau, The Bahamas
Fax (242) 502-5487

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Coca-Cola distributor
plans 2011 plant open

FROM page 1B

the future,” he said.






















Legal Notice

NOTICE

FIVE ELEMENTS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 17th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

Mr Wells said Caribbean
Bottling has steady sales num-
bers year-over-year for 2009

to date, despite the decline in
tourist arrivals that affected
hotel and resort demand for

soft drinks.
Mr Wells said efficiency
upgrades to the existing plant

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SIMA OVERSEAS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 17th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

and effective budgeting have
kept the company in good
stead through 2009.

"We are watching our pen-
nies,” he said. "Generally,
things are progressing well."

The Coca Cola brand was
voted best global brand this
year, carrying a value of $67.5
billion.

According to business-
week.com, the company has
seen only a 1 per cent decline
since 2005, due to a waning
demand for sodas, but it has
released a host of other prod-
ucts to keep the brand mar-
ketable.

Locally, Caribbean Bottling
produces multiple products,
including Fanta sodas,
Schweppes and, recently, V8.

Mr Wells said the company
would like to shift its focus

uct and branch out in other
directions.

Taxation

With the US eyeing the tax-
ation of carbonated drinks,
Mr Wells said he was not sure
how it might affect the impor-
tation of sodas into the
Bahamas, but suggested it
may simply be a point-of-sale
tax that won't be transferred.

As Caribbean Bottling
invests in its new plant it has
also set out a community ser-
vice agenda and aided in the
resurfacing of a basketball
court in the Grove and in Sta-
pledon Gardens.

"We try to support the
community which supports
us," said Mr Wells. "We
would like to see it continued

away from carbonated prod-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JASON DORMEUS
of CARMICHEAL ROAD, ROCKY PINE, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 15" day of
September, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

on an ongoing basis."



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

WUPATKI LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

BEGNINS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 17th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 17th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that MATILAS FLORVIL of
JOHN STREET, FO, BOX GT-2935 NASSAU, THE
BAHAMAS, & applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citzenship, for registrstion/naturalization
a6 a dtizan of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should mot be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
fram the 15° day of September, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizanship, P.O. Box
NLT 147, Nassau, Bahamas

Medical
Sales Representative

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Introduction:

A local healthcare supplier is currently looking to
recruit a Medical Sales Representative to sell
medical and surgical products in the local market.
With this position experience in the healthcare
field would be an asset but is not essential.

ROYAL B FIDELITY

Moray at Work
Cty LIN TAL
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 21 SEPTEMBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,514.66] CHG -20.33| %CHG -1.32 | YTD -197.70 | YTD % -11.55 ces .
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31% Job Specification:
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320 Main Purpose of the Medical Sales Representative:
52wk-Low Security Previous Close Today's Close Change DailyVol. EPS$ _Div$ P/E - To achieve sales targets for the various product
1.14 AML Foods Limited 115 114 “0.01 0127 0.000 90 lines th hol ed activit
9.90 Bahamas Property Fund 10.75 10.75 0.00 0992 0200 108 INES TAROUGN Planned activity,
5.90 Bank of Bahamas 6.18 5.90 -0.28 0.244 0.260 24.2 Maintain business records for all Health Care
0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00 0.877 0.000 NM . ee SS iar aie oe | .
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.078 0.080 404 Professionals and key accounts within the local
healthcare industry to help select and deliver
business management objectives linked to sales

2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055 0.040 43.1
10.00 Cable Bahamas 10.03 10.03 0.00 1.406 0.250 7.1
and market share growth.

2.74 Colina Holdings 2.74 2.74 0.00 0.249 0.040 11.0
5.26 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 5.92 5.92 0.00 0.419 0.300 14.1
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.64 3.62 -0.02 0.111 0.052 32.6
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.05 2.05 0.00 0.382 0.080 5.4

6.60 Famguard 6.60 6.60 0.00 0.420 0.240 157 i i j X
8.80 Finco 9.30 9.30 0.00 0.322 0.520 28.9 Skills/Experience Requirements:

10.00 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.29 10.00 -0.29 0794 0350 126 - Excellent communication and interpersonal
495 Focol (S) 4.99 4.99 0.00 0332 0150 15.0 skills
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 N/M : 7

0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.27 -0.03 0.035 0000 7.7 Tenacious, driven and resilient.
5.49 ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 0.00 0.407 0500 13.5 ‘ rr ‘
9.98 J. 8. Johnson 9.98 9.98 0.00 0952 0640 105 Good planning and organizational skills.
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.180 0.000 55.6 Self discipline and self motivated,
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases) . .
52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interested in the healthcare industry.
7000-00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) > FBB17 700.00 0.00 7% Ability to interpret data.
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% wa: :
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7% Ambitious and keen to develop a Career In a
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% successful organization
Able to provide evidence of individual
achievement in line with core competencies of
a medical representative, this can be from other

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price WeeklyVol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

fields of employment, education and social and
sporting activities.

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.00 -2.246 0.000 N/M
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00 0.000 0.480 N/M
0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55 0.001 0.000 256.6
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
29.00 ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 4.540 0.000 9.03
0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55 0.002 0.000 261.90
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $
CFAL Bond Fund 1.4038 3.72 6.20
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.8990 -1.39 -4.16
1.4119 CFAL Money Market Fund 1.4892 3.87 5.47
3.0941 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.0941 -8.61 -13.59
12.3870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.1136 3.93 5.87
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 101.6693 1.10 1.67
93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96.7398 0.35 -4.18
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.0775 — Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.3399 2.69 -1.41
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0707 3.38 5.14
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0319 -0.11 2.05
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0673 2.89 4.93
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

0.00%|

52wk-Low
1.3344
2.8952

Yield % NAV Date
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
11-Sep-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09

Education Requirements:
- Degree Level or equivalent, ideally in sales or
medical related

The area covered is the Caribbean. You will live
in the Bahamas and be prepared to travel.

The Salary offered for the Medical Representative
is competitive and depends on experience +
bonus + benefits.

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

To apply for this position, candidates must be
eligible to live and work in the Bahamas.

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $-A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Please send resume's to
medrephumanresources@qmail.com
THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22np, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

ii

Today

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

MARINE FORECAST
WINDS

Dae cnn Wortp CITIES





Wednesday WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.



















y | > a High Low W High Low W NASSAU Today: E at 10-20 Knots 2-3 Feet 4 Miles 84°F
i — fy ® “a wy - -F - -F - 0| 1 |2 3|4|5|6 ‘ 8|9|1 D FIC FIC FIC FIC Wednesday: ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 8 Miles 84°F
hy, f ' Veal all i | _ Acapulco 91/32 77/25 pe 89/31 78/25 t FREEPORT Today: ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 5 Miles 85° F
in, a a a Low | MoveraTe | High | V.HIGH Amsterdam 6719 56/13 pc 63/17 50/10 pc Wednesday: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 8 Miles 95° F
ORLANDO A Ankara, Turkey 66/18 43/6 sh 70/21 43/6 Ss = ABACO ‘Today: E at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 6 Miles 84° F
High:90°F32°C = Variable clouds with a Partly cloudy, a t-storm; Some sun; a shower or Partly sunny with a A stray shower or Partly sunny. The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 76/24 61/16 pc 77/25 63/17 s Wednesday: E at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 9 Miles 84° F
a Low: 75° F/24° c 4. t-storm. breezy. t-storm. shower possible. t-storm possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 62/16 50/10 pc 6317 61/16 r
: x t ‘anil . Hi h: gg° Hi h: 88° Hi h: 89° Hi h: 87° Bangkok 89/31 78/25 t 90/32 78/25 t
lu @ g x é é es ide ne Ign or Barbados 87/30 77/25 s 86/30 77/25 s
TAMPA ta | High: 89 Low: 80 Low: 79 Low: 79 Low: 77 Low: 78 yas Posy Barcelona 75/23 63/17 pc 74/23 63/17 s Topay's U.S. FORECAST
a = - ae ay Bicol ETUC ume irel Bair 81/27 54/12 s 78/25 60/15 vc
igh: ) [FC er] F 97°-86° F 99°-80° F 98°-85° F 95°-83° F L.(ft.) Low
High: 91° F/33°C . : High _Ht(ft.) _ .
ce i — <0 * : —_ Beirut 76/24 71/21 s 76/24 69/20 s
Low: 75° F/24°C ry! r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 10:01am. 35 3:42am. 03 Belgrade 80/26 55/12 s 82/97 58/14 s
. s - levati the h body— thing that effects h Id feels. Te tl flect the high and the low for the day. : :
a a elevation on tne numan boay—everytning that elects now warm or cold a person leels. lemperatures renect tné nign an é 1OW Tor the day. . ~ _m. - se p.m. Berlin 73/22 55/12 pe 79/29 BOI pe
* > Ce Wednesd am. 33 426am. 0. Bermuda 82/27 74/23 s 82/27 73/22 s (WARMER)
’ or sae a are : ses" 44:06 pm. 26 5:17pm. 09 Bogota 66/18 47/8 sh 65/18 45/7 + ain Qo
ie ») tatistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday T140am. 31 513am. 07 Brussels 72/22 50/10 s 72/22 52/11 pe Billings, oe Minneapolis
ft ' ABACO Temperature Thursday 50pm, 25 641pm. 12 Budapest 83/28 56/13 s 82/27 57/13 s tee
F, os i. r 5 ahs O° F/99° IGM, ssesecesepe chs ec eeeseeeiene ecm 90° F/32° C - ; ; Buenos Aires 59/15 37/2 sh 59/15 36/2 s
7 J Fa ll ee LOW assciocsnssscit gicrio7¢ Friday = F286 Pm. 28 a ae : Cairo 99/37 71/21 s 92/33 67/19 s (H)"
: - ore ow: 77° F/25 Normal high... er FatG COM 89/31 83/28 t 92/33 84/28 + &
” : Py Normal low 75° F/24° C Calgary 80/26 46/7 s 83/28 44/6 s ener
; oe Swe @ WEST PALMBEACH i LS t/8206 Nh pctrrsiecenmcerce 91° F/83° C Sun AND Moon earch 90/32 75/23 pc 90/32 74/23 t eee
: iol High: 88° F/31°C ar Last year's low ssdusapurhsseaceuaeneeaceoaddt 78° F/26° C " " Caracas 83/28 72/22 pc 82/27 72/22 t
oor Low: 77° F/25°C er Precipitation a ate a a.m. La aa am. Casablanca 80/26 61/16 s 82/27 63/17 s
>a all As of 2 p.m. yesterday 0.0... 0.02" unsel....... ‘Vo p.m. Moonset..... 09 P.M. Copenhagen 64/17 50/10 sh 66/18 47/8 sh (COOLER)
© . FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT ae Year to date 30. First Full on New Dublin 6317 48/8 pc 61/16 46/7 sh "EIPaso
High: 88° F/31°C Qa High: 89° F/32°C Normal year to date 2... 36.27" : bass - Frankfurt 75/23 50/10 pc 75/23 52/11 pc N76/53)
Low: 80° F/27°C — Low: 76° F/24° C i - Geneva 74/23 53/11 s 77/25 52/11 s
a AccuWeather.com g Halifax 68/20 53/11 s 70/21 50/10 pc
. @ j am Forecasts and graphics provided by Hic: a Havana 90/32 73/22 t 87/30 72/22 r ENNY Showers Miami
; : MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Sep.26 Oct.4 Oct.11 Oct.18 —_ Helsinki 63/17 52/11 sh 59/15 46/7 pc T-storms 87/79
a High: 87° F/31°C 5 Hong Kong 88/31 79/26 t 88/31 81/27 t Rain Fronts
-_, Low: 79° F/26°C NASSAU High: 89° F/32° C Islamabad 104/40 73/22 s 105/40 74/23 s Flurries _ Cold
F «ot ano a Low: 77° F/25° C Istanbul 72/22 59/15 s 74/23 60/15 s Shown are noon positions of weather systems and a aa
High: 89° F/32° C Snow Warm
~—£ Low: 80° FZ7°C Jerusalem a2e7 668s «B17 B7/N3 s . ee a ae
a i. a —— Johannesburg 81/27 54/12 pc 78/25 52/11 pc : i ¢
KEY WEST all. of Kingston 88/31 79/26 t 88/31 79/26 + ts [05 10s 20s {B03)) 40s |50s 60s 70s ‘80s 0s) N00elliile)
High: 88° F/31°C ‘i CAT ISLAND Lima 74/23 58/14 s 73/22 58/14 pe
Low: 79° F/26°C : High: 87° F/31° London 72/22 55/12 pc 68/20 50/10 pc
: Ay Low: 74° F/23°C Madrid 81/27 54/12 s 79/26 54/12 pe
@ ~y Manila 88/31 79/26 t 84/28 77/25 1
- : hy Mexico City 75/23 55/12 t 75/23 55/12 t
_. © | Monterrey 9082 70/21 t 79/28 66/18 t HURRICANE INSURANCE
> ontrea r pc
| GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR Montreal 72/22 59/15 72/22 54/12
i High: 86° F/30° C High: 89° F/32° Moscow 63/17 45/7 pc 5713 48/8 pc
igh: 89° F/32°C ;
Low: 78° F/26° C Low: 75° 6 Munich 77/25 50/10 s 80/26 52/11 s a
. ow: 75° F/24°C vb 7
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS f Nairobi 88/31 56/13 pe 87/30 57/13 pe
j j ! : 5 ew Velnl 2 $ ;
highs and tonights's lows. ve High: 89° F/32° C omy . New Delh 97/36 81/27 98/36 79/26 ,
Za Low: 76° F/24° C oar a Oslo 65/18 45/7 sh 61/16 42/5 sh t Yo u an J B Bl n
; ~ - HY Paris 74/23 52/11 s 75/23 54/12 s i OW
Prague 76/24 55/12 s 77/25 54/12 s
LONGISLAND Rode Janel (7om8 72221 50.7578 o Away UITICAaANC
High: 89° F/32° C iya s s
er i rpc fom 71s 647 TO OT s
Today Wednesday Today Wednesday Today Wednesday ‘ MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 88/31 80/26 sh 88/31 79/26 s that y Bday. ve _ y knowing
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W ae High: 89° F/32° C San Juan 53/11 35/1 Fr 75/23 42/5 s t at yo ave excellent insur ance
incomes mmemnienioumineions wesmmneceniovemeionion lames eee ee coverage no matter which
uquerque pc pc ndianapolis iladelphia pc . th
Anchorage 49/9 38/3 sh 49/9 38/3 pc Jacksonville 88/31 72/22 t 88/31 72/22 t Phoenix 97/36 69/20 s 95/35 71/21 s CROOKED ISLAND A ACKLINS Sai Eee Ele Ee ae way he wind blows.
Atlanta 84/28 69/20 pc 86/30 69/20 c — Kansas City 74/23 55/12 c 77/25 56/12 c Pittsburgh «78/25 59/15 sh 81/27 62/16 t RAGGEDISLAND — High:90°F/s2°c ee aor ce s
Atlantic City 78/25 64/17 pc 82/27 6246 t Las Vegas 90/32 63/17 s 92/33 66/18 s Portland, OR 96/35 57/13 s 95/35 S713 s High:so°Fa2"¢ LOW 78° F/26°C Sea ie aaa aE anaeeart Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 78/25 64/17 po 82/27 64/17 t Little Rock 82/27 68/20 t 83/28 67/19 t Raleigh-Durham 82/27 68/20 t 86/30 68/20 t Low:75°F/24°C = % sen 7 ae Ea , re Aen -
Boston 77/25 6417 pc 82/27 64417 pc LosAngeles 96/35 68/20 s 100/37 70/21 s St.Louis 80/26 6719 t 82/27 6719 ¢t . on ae aE - ie Fs
Buffalo 74/23 61/16 po 75/23 56/413 pc Louisville 84/28 68/20 t 86/30 67/19 ¢t Salt Lake City 69/20 45/7 s 72/22 S53/11_ s GREATINAGUA wr Tula 77/95 68/20 am 76/94 67/419
Charleston, SC 85/29 70/21 t 86/30 70/21 t Memphis 84/28 70/21 t 85/29 70/21 ¢t San Antonio 83/28 64/17 t 85/29 68/20 pc High: 90° F/32° C Taal TR Be 77105 85/12 pe
Chicago 82/27 61/16 t 83/28 59/15 pe Miami 87/30 79/26 t 90/32 79/26 t San Diego 90/32 63/17 s 89/31 63417 pc Low. 78° F/26°C Trinidad 91/32 73/29 t 79/96 57/13 t av!
Cleveland 78/25 58/14 pe 81/27 60/15 pc Minneapolis 74/23 61/16 $s 79/26 60/15 s San Francisco 86/30 55/12 s 86/30 56/13 pc . TaNeoney 78/95 57/13 s 74/23 B73 s (BAHAMAS | LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 75/23 60/15 t 79/26 66/18 s Nashville 84/28 67/19 t 86/30 69/20 c _ Seattle 88/31 55/12 s 84/28 54/12 s Gianna 74/23 BO/15 s 76/24 60/15 s
Denver 54/12 36/2 r 5412 39/3 c New Orleans 88/31 77/25 t 90/32 77/25 t Tallahassee 90/32 71/21 pe 91/82 72/22 pc Warsaw 72/22 56/13 5 72/29 52/11 po | | /
Detroit 80/26 63/17 po 85/29 61/16 pc — New York 76/24 67/19 po 84/28 67/19 pc Tampa 91/32 75/23 t 91/32 75/23 t a Winnipeg 70/21 47/8 s er Seats SSD Fak (PAZ) IET-A20 ff Wa (242) 32-2862 Ff Tek (22) TOG-2004
Honolulu 88/31 73/22 s 80/31 75/23 s OklahomaCity 72/22 58/11 c 77/25 56/13 pc Tucson 94/34 64/17 s 91/82 BING s i ;
Houston 86/30 70/21 t 81/27 70/21 t Orlando 90/32 75/23 t 89/31 75/23 t Washington, DC 78/25 66/18 pc 83/28 68/20 t Te hc ee


PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune



B O







a>



Help save
the smallest
miracles

By JEFFARAH GIBSON

sophisticated and expensive piece of

equipment at Princess Margaret Hospital

is making the difference between life and
death for its tiniest patients.

Ananda Pyfrom gave birth
to little Sophia on April 30,
2007 at the Princess Margaret
Hospital, via caesarian deliv-
ery, but wasn’t expecting
until July 2007.

A few months before her
delivery, she was diagnosed
with Intrauterine Growth
Restriction which is a condi-
tion where the fetus is small-
er than expected for a par-
ticular number of weeks.

Because of this diagnosis
her labor was induced and
she gave birth at 32 weeks.
Sophia weighed two pounds
and four ounces. The little
girl was immediately placed
in an incubator.

Mrs. Pyfrom says it was a
day she will never forget both
joyous and overwhelming.

“After finding out the con-
dition of Sophia, it was scary.
The doctors immediately
instilled faith and confidence
and assured my husband
(Michael Pyfrom) and I that
she would be okay. It was
however very hard not being
able to take her home right
after she was born,” she said.

“There are three levels of
NICU (Neonatal Intensive
Care Unit) NICU 1, NICU
2, and special care. Sophia
was in the second level at the
NICU, where she was placed
in an incubator and closely
monitored by the doctors and
nurses. The doctors told us
that when Sophia reached
four pounds we would be
able to take her home, so she
spent approximately six and a
half weeks at the hospital
before she was released”, she
said.

During those weeks Mr

You are what you eat

By REUBEN SHEARER

and Mrs Pyfrom developed
and maintained a close bond
with their newborn by visiting
and talking to her everyday

At two years, Sophia is
thriving, doing very well, and
maintaining a healthy life.
“She is fantastic, indepen-
dent, and her speech is devel-
oped. She is a little bit small,
but her body is propor-
tioned.”

After their experience, Mr
and Mrs Pyfrom can certain-
ly relate to Lynette Burrows
who gave birth to their god-
daughter Te’hilah Burrows,
who was born under similar
circumstances.

Ms Burrows gave birth
three months earlier than her
due date because she suf-
fered eclampsia ( coma and
convulsions before, during,
or shortly after childbirth).

“T was due to have the
baby on July 2, 2007, but I
gave birth on April 1 2007.
After birth, Te’*hilah weighed
one pound and peice ounces
or 0.680 kg. She was extreme-
ly ill, very small and I could
hold her in the palm of my
hands,” she said.

She was placed on the Ist
level on the NICU ,and after
progressing she was moved
to the 2nd level. “She stayed
in the hospital for about 2
months. I would go to the
hospital and spend the entire
day with her. It was not easy
at the time, and the only way
I felt better was to be there
with her.”

Mrs Burrows also noted
that when she found out that
her baby was very ill she was
devastated. “I felt inadequate
because I thought it was

respiratory problems, asthma and

something I did or did not do
that caused my baby to be so
small. The doctors then told
me that they have seen
babies a lot smaller than
Te’hilah.”

Her daughter spent two
months spent in the hospital
under the watchful eyes of
the doctors and nurses. She
eventually got better, gained
extra pounds and was
released. She is now also two
and her health is in great
shape.

Without the help of the
incubator these once prema-
ture infants, Sophia Pyfrom
and Te’hilah Burrows, would
have not been able to thrive,
grow, and live healthy
lifestyles.

According to
www.ebme.co.uk one of the
most important elements of a
new born survival is the
infant’s temperature regula-
tion. The infant has several
disadvantages in terms of
thermal regulation. An infant
has a relatively large surface
area, poor thermal insulation,
and a small amount of mass
to act as a heat sink. The
newborn has little ability to
conserve heat by changing
posture and no ability to
adjust their own clothing in a
response to thermal stress”,
this is why an incubator is
necessary

The incubators in the
NICU at PMH are truly life-
savers, but need to be updat-
ed.

In an effort to save the life
of newborns like Sophia and
Te’hilah, The Tribune Media
Group, The Tile King,
Builders Mall, Doctors Hos-
pital, and the Rotary Club of
East Nassau have partnered
to supply critically needed
ventilators and incubators for
the Neonatal Intensive Care
Unit at Princess Margaret
Hospital. Their goal is to
raise $300,000, and they are
encouraging all to make a
contribution.

liver and muscles.

SOPHIA is now 2
years old and liv-
ing a healthy life.

Tribune Features Reporter

CHILDREN learn what they
live. That’s an age-old statement
that encompasses many aspects of
growing up. There are many val-
ues and practices that a parent
pours into their child, and healthy
eating habits are no exception.
However, according to one neuro
psychiatrist, parents are dropping
the ball when it comes to equip-
ping children with realistic eating
habits.

One expert says the answer lies
in parents educating themselves
with good information on diet and
exercise and teaching their chil-
dren to follow suit. Childhood
obesity is on the rise in the
Bahamas, Dr Brian Humblestone
said at a recent lecture at Doc-
tor’s Hospital.

According to Dr Humblestone,
there are increased cases of young
children and teens developing type
2 diabetes, and eventually obesity,
which is normally prevalent in
those over 35.

Childhood obesity issues are
early signs of illnesses like dia-
betes, hypertension, coronary
heart disease, gall bladder disease,

reproductive hormonal problems.

Ironically enough, he added,
“one of the manifestations of civil-
isation is that we have half of the
world dying of diseases caused by
being overfed, and other parts
where people are dying of starva-
tion.”

“But it’s not just the amount of
food people are eating, but the
kind of foods as well,” Dr Hum-
blestone explained. “If your child
is having a muffin or Danish and
an orange juice for breakfast, they
may feel energised to go to school,
but it is very likely they will feel
famished, experience a energy
crash hours later, and need more
carbs.”

He said that carb-loaded break-
fasts are not the best to start your
day with, adding that most cereals
do not hold to the health benefits
that they claim on television ads.

Cereals are largely loaded with
refined carbohydrates, which
shoot the blood sugar up, Dr
Humblestone explained. Refined
carbs cause your blood sugar to
rise fast, and a lot of insulin is pro-
duced from the pancreas.

The insulin sends the sugar into
the blood, which moves into the

blood sugar goes down fast as a
result of too much insulin, you get
hungry. This normally causes a
person to want more sugar and
thus get hungry again. “That’s why
a carbohydrate breakfast is not a
good breakfast.”

Dr Humblestone said fast food
restaurants’ constant bombard-
ment with advertising needs to be
analysed and rejected. “It takes
motivation and tenacity, to per-
sist against seduction by the
media--which has a major effect
on the majority of people who are
overeating,” Dr Humblestone told
Tribune Health. “Food is com-
fort, and it will always be that
way.”

However, when you overeat, let
alone the wrong foods, physical
problems develop. Studies reveal
that persons who fall in this cate-
gory have experienced more
headaches, and feel really
depressed and exhausted.

“It’s not real hard eating junk
food all the time, because it taste
good, and it makes you feel good
at the moment,” Dr Humblestone
said. “You'll eat some, and just a
while later you’ll be hungry
again.”

The problem he says is when
there’s increased intake of these
kinds of junk foods, because there
must be a balance of exercise to go
along with it.

Finally, Dr Humblestone advis-
es parents to educate themselves
about ingredients, so they know
what they are feeding their family.
For example, he noted that any
ingredient ending in “ose” should
be avoided, as it represents a high
sugar content.

According to the Super Size Me
documentary, companies spend
billions to make the public aware
of their product. They market
through T-shirts, coupons, toys for
children, and restaurant place-
mats, and kids are drawn to that.

Mcdonalds spent 1.4 billion dol-
lars worldwide in direct media
advertising in 2001. Pepsi spent
more than one billion dollars on
direct media advertising. To
advertise its candy, Hershey’s
Food spent under a mere $200 mil-
lion dollars internationally.

However, in its peak year, the
five-a-day fruit and vegetable cam-
paign’s total advertising budget in
all media was just $2 million; 100
times less than the direct media
budget of just one candy company.








THIS is Sophia
at 4 weeks in

NICU II (about
4 weeks old).

a Tay Ua)
a eels

“The important thing is to start the
day right with a meal that has pro-
tein, like from a cereal, or from
marine produce like sardine,
grouper, or some other source. |
eat eggs sometimes, and a little bit
of meat. | try to draw from more
sources of protein (Seafood, nuts
and seeds,) and salads made from
fresh produce. Stay far away from
refined carbs, and eat less white
flour, cake, cookies, and pasta. Get
some exercise too. | try to walk
briskly three times a week for forty
minutes.”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 9B





(Co LOVING RELATIONSHIPS

Why do people cheat?

"Why do people cheat?’ is like a
million dollar question. We could
spend hours speculating because
the odds of getting it right would be
like shooting for the stars. As an
outsider, looking in we all think the
answer is obvious, but clinical prac-
tice shows us the complicated web
that joins two people.

Certainly, there are those who
seemed to be wired differently and
who find the whole concept of
monogamy inconceivable. They
may not admit it but their lack of
remorse reinforces their underlying
thought pattern. Living life in such
a fashion is habit forming and
many in no way want to change.
Some are honest and upfront about
their intentions, while others live
life surrounded with deceit and lies.

Then, there are some people
whose psychopathology predeter-
mines their behaviour and conse-
quently have difficulty changing.
By the time we reach midlife, there
is a good chance we have met or
been involved with such a person.
From the first time we become
aware of it, we change the course

@ \’ GREEN SCleNie By Gardener Jack



of our lives. Do we work at forgiv-
ing the first ttme? What happens if
it happens again? Does the deceiv-
er become comfortable knowing
that you will always be there? Does
the betrayed worry they will be
perceived as weak by taking their
partner back?

As devastating as it is to discover
your dating partner is being
unfaithful, it still provides a way
out. There may have been verbal
commitment, but no formal agree-
ment or vows were made. These
are pivotal moments in a couple's
life and the course of their relation-
ship is decided from that moment.
Facing the reasons why a certain
behaviour has taken place is excru-
ciatingly painful. Understanding
the need to talk about it is over-

cenek peppers

shadowed by the heavy weight of
anger and rejection. Blame is
quickly slammed on the wrong
doer who in turn reacts defensively.
For many, time passes and day to
day life keeps them busy. Many of
us are procrastinators and find
putting things off much easier.
Trust has quickly been extin-
guished and secrecy often prevails.
The core principles of relation-
ship therapy is to work at restoring
the intimate bond between a cou-
ple. Consciously working at main-
taining this delicate bond, and
ensuring the glue that keeps peo-
ple together, does not come
unstuck. For many, there are
underlining relationship and sexual
issues. Basic primary needs have
been overlooked or ignored. Feel-
ings of betrayal prevent a willing-
ness to listen to the other person's

story and so things remain in limbo.

The ability to express and listen to
unmet needs proves a daunting
task for many. When the pain is so
great just being in the room, look-
ing in the eye, or having to interact
with that person seems impossible.

Years of not feeling truly connect-
ed, or even understood means that
a foundation for forgiveness is even
harder.

Pride can get in the way of seek-
ing out a trained professional. The
very idea of saying out loud details
of our private life may seem
embarrassing. It may seem easier
and more satisfying to find some-
one to fulfill those missing needs. It
may solve the problem today but
the reality is that it usually ends up
making things more complicated.
They are able to justify their
actions and believe they ‘had no
choice’.

Thoughts of something new and
refreshing in our lives are not
uncommon. Our minds play para-
doxical games between what is
expected of us and the things we
desire. This is how fantasies are
formed. But making them reality
crosses the border and we need to
acknowledge that clear choices
were made.

Without a doubt ‘crisis’ often dri-
ves us to seek out a therapist. The
sadness, anger and humiliation pro-



vokes so many questions from the
betrayed. Talking to a third person
in the room allows things to be said
and heard which otherwise would
probably not be said.

The role of the therapist is to
gradually help all concerned find
some personal and interpersonal
meaning, to the chaotic mess. Time
puts a different perspective on
things. Persevering through the cri-
sis, and salvaging the couple, allows
healing and future relating. Affairs
are often the prelude to divorce. It
is interesting to contemplate that if
all couples considering divorce
were to come for counseling how
many relationships could be saved.
Can we really put a cost on the
damage, both financial and emo-
tional, if we leave things unattend-
ed? At least by getting professional
help you will be able to say you
really tried.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual and
Couples Relationship Therapist. She is
a Registered Nurse and a Certified
Clinical Sex Therapist. Call for an
appointment- Relate Bahamas at 364-
7230, or email
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com.
She is also available for speaking
engagements.



SWEET peppers are added
to so many meals in The
Bahamas that their presence is
almost ubiquitous. Conch sal-
ad without sweet peppers is
untraditional, smothered pork
chops untenable, and salsas
unthinkable. That makes
growing sweet peppers in the
garden a priority.

First, let us do some math.
Green sweet peppers sell in
my friendly neighbourhood
supermarket for close to $3 a
pound. Individual peppers
that are red, yellow, brown,
purple or orange sell for up
to $6 each. A packet of pep-
pers rarely costs more than $2
and for that you get at least a
dozen seeds, often many
more. In a season you should
get a dozen or more peppers
from each plant. Sweet pep-
pers that are any other colour
than green are no more diffi-
cult to grow than green ones.
Are you doing the maths?

The answer is: Grow pep-
pers. Sweet or bell peppers
are a warm-weather crop so
they can be started in Sep-
tember. The seeds should be
planted a quarter-inch deep
and the soil around them
should be firmed down to
press out air pockets. If you
start in pots or a seed bed,
transplant when the seed leaf

Smelly
feet!!

TODAY, I will address a
topic that I am asked about on
a daily basis - smelly feet (or
its scientific term 'Bromidro-
sis'). If you are one of many
people who suffer from foot
odor (smelly feet), you are not
alone. Did you know that most
of what we call foot odor is
actually shoe odor? As you will
discover later in this article,
some people are more prune
to smelly feet, and there are a
lot of factors that contribute to
nasty shoe odors. This condi-
tion is referred to as 'shoe der-
matitis'.

Shoe dermatitis is a medical
condition which is caused by
contact of the foot with chemi-
cals in the material of footwear.
This condition can be either
irritant or allergic.

Irritant shoe dermatitis is
often caused by wearing shoes
that are wet, poorly fitting or
that have uneven linings. How-
ever, in the case of allergic (con-
tact) dermatitis, there are many
different substances that can
cause this condition, which is
quite common and is frequent-
ly complicated by secondary
infections or eczema.

I am certain that we are all
owners of a variety of footwear
styles: casual, formal, work and
athletic shoes. The majority of
our footwear is imported and
made from leather, rubber and
other synthetic materials. The
most recent US statistics
revealed that ninety-eight per
cent percent of all shoes are
imported, therefore it is impos-
sible to identify precisely all
their constituent components.
It is during the manufacturing
and finishing of footwear many
chemicals are used.

Sources of Shoe Contact

begins to wither, when the
seedling is 5-6 inches tall. It is
important that

the transplant not be any
lower than the soil level. It
can be slightly raised above
soil level but never allowed to
have soil touching the stem.
You may grow your seeds
straight into the ground

and in this case you should
have the soil well worked and
enriched with soil-retaining
commercial cow manure or
compost. I like to work time-
release fertiliser into the soil
before planting.

Pepper plants suffer when
there is insufficient moisture
so it is best to make a point of
watering them daily.

Sometimes pepper plants
put out flowers when they are
only 6-8 inches tall. If this hap-
pens, nip off the flowers. A
small pepper plant that bears
a full-sized pepper will be use-
less and unproductive there-
after.

One enemy of pepper fruits
is the sun. If the leaf cover is
insufficient you may get sun-
scald on your pepper fruits. A
paper bag to cover or a branch
from the bush to shield will
give protection.

Sunscald usually happens
during the early summer
months rather than the



Dermatitis:

Historically, leather, dyes and
rubber allergens were seen as
the most common cause of shoe
dermatitis. Today, shoe der-
matitis may occur if a person is
sensitive to the rubber or elastic
compounds in shoes, form
inserts or from elastic glues
used to bind shoe components.
Other identifiable causes of
shoe dermatitis are cements,
dichromate used in tanning,
dyes, anti-mildew agents,
formaldehyde, and nickel eye-
lets or nickel arch supports.

Some signs and symptoms of
shoe dermatitis:

The most common site first
involved with shoe dermatitis
is the dorsal (top) surface of
the big toe and on the insteps
(top of foot). It later extends
by spreading to the other toes
and dorsal (top) aspect of the
foot. Skin lesions may be acute,
presenting as red, blistering,
oozing and usually symmetri-
cal.

This dermatitis can range
from mild, itchy rash to severe
itching with swelling and small
blisters. In severe cases, open
sores may present and can
result in secondary bacterial
infections. If any such signs are
present, I urge that you seek
professional help for proper
diagnosis and treatment.

Prevent shoe dermatitis:

As a pedorthist and a mem-
ber of the health care team, the
design of footwear determines
to a large extent the appear-
ance of shoe dermatitis. Once
such condition is observed it is
the professional duty of a
Pedorthist to refer the individ-
ual to a physician for medical

autumn months.

Whenever I grow green bell
peppers I leave them to ripen
fully and rarely pick them
green. Green peppers turn red
as they ripen and become real-
ly sweet. If you only eat green
peppers you may wonder why
on earth they are called sweet
peppers for there is precious
little sweet about them.

Those coloured peppers we
mentioned earlier tend to be
sweeter than green peppers
but still have to be allowed to
mature in order to attain full
sweetness.

In addition to blocky bell
peppers you can grow Italian-
type Cubanelle sweet pep-
pers. These are much longer,
usually two or three times
longer than they are wide.
They can be used when they
are yellow or red, again the
ripe red ones being by far the
sweeter. I love to sweat them
in a pan with a little olive oil
until they collapse. Banana
peppers are quite like
Cubanelles but tend to have
thinner walls.

The sweet pepper plants
you establish in September
should last you into next sum-
mer. You will find, however,
that no matter how well you
fertilise and water your plants
they will grow less productive

evaluation. Once this condition
is diagnosed, footwear is than a
part of the treatment.

A pedorthist as an expert in
footwear can aid the physician
and the patient with the selec-
tion of footwear without mate-
rials that may cause shoe der-
matitis. Substituting products
made of different materials that
do not cause allergic reactions
will lessen the likelihood of
future episodes of shoe der-
matitis. “Vegetable-tanned”
footwear can be substituted as
an alternative for the hyper-
sensitive individual. This type
of footwear contains no rubber
or formaldehyde.

Finally, it is important to
recognise that shoe dermatitis is
quite common, affecting chil-
dren and adults regardless of
race. Patients with shoe der-
matitis can use special types of
shoes prepared from non-sen-
sitising substances. I would also
suggest measures to control
sweating may be very helpful
for the patient who suffers from
shoe dermatitis. Socks or stock-
ings made of absorbent cotton
(e.g. Thorlos or Balega socks
has a unique rapid moisture
evaporation system) should
always be worn. Avoid wet
shoes, poorly fitting shoes or
self treatment and seek profes-
sional help to treat or prevent
shoe dermatitis.

«Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board
Certified & licensed Pedorthist, is
the proprietor of Foot Solutions,
a health and wellness franchise
that focuses on foot care and
proper shoe fit, located in the
Sandyport Plaza, Nassau. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to
nassau@footsolutions.com or
327-FEET (3338).

"The views expressed are those
of the author and does not nec-
essarily represent those of Foot
Solutions Incorporated or any of
its subsidiary and/or affiliated
companies.

and bear smaller and smaller
fruits. For this reason I usual-
ly sow Cubanelles and a new
crop of bell peppers approach-
ing Easter.

Pepper plants have few ene-
mies but the undersides of the
leaves should be inspected
regularly as this is the usual
point of attack. If you have a
dozen plants or fewer it is easy
enough to wipe away any

insect eggs from the leaves.
Sometimes pepper plants
just heel over and die. This is
caused by a virus and there is
little one can do except
destroy the plant and hope
the virus has not spread to too
many plants. Pepper plants
suffering from a virus usually
have a strained appearance,
the leaves looking as if they
have been stretched. Most

GREEN peppers cost
the same to grow as
red, yellow, orange,
brown, purple, etc., so
why not choose your
colour and beat the
supermarket prices.



viral attacks occur in seedlings
bought from a nursery rather
than those you start from
seed.

e j.hardy @ coralwave.com

aD with Nih\, Ah tad

4

eS

The sign of great things to come!

Alacta Plus Advanced formulation is the only milk food

for growing children enriched with 34 nutrients,

such as iron, iodine and zinc, as well as DHA, ARA,

and Sialic Acid, which are integral building

blocks for the brain.

They'll go much further in life

(Meadjohnson’-

Nutritionals



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE







Are you communicating

to inform and inspire

“An inspired speaker does more than
just inform; instead the give people the
inspiration to dream beyond their cir-
cumstances.”

~ Michelle M. Miller ~

Information is the key to transfor-
mation, whether it is positive or neg-
ative. What is the objective of the
information that you communicate?

Most people pay no real attention
to their information intake; they lis-
ten to anything, believe anything and
for the most part, repeat anything.
However, if you desire to cultivate a
positive disposition, you must be very
discriminate about the information
that you consume. This is funda-
mental to your communication effec-
tiveness, if you are focused on posi-
tive change.

Holding the public's attention, par-
ticularly in small communities, ought
to be viewed as a privilege opportu-
nity in which to highlight the good.
You must therefore be very clear
about your intentions; as undeclared
intentions can quickly become emp-
ty rhetoric.

Whose Dream Will You Inspire?
Those who pursue their dreams
arm themselves with words of wis-

Falling into

Fashion

dom from old sages who inspire them
to dream even in the midst of
despair.

The - “I have a dream” speech by
Dr Martin Luther King Jr, is a per-
fect example of how an inspired com-
municator can elevate consciousness
and positively change mindsets.
Each of us has something unique to
share with the world but most of us
lack the inspiration to achieve. As
the world continues to change, how-
ever, and people explore new ideas of
substance and meaning; they will
hunger for words that inspire them to
stay the course.

Will you be ready to satisfy this
need?

Final Thoughts...

While change is never easy, it is
essential; make it a habit to consis-
tently evaluate the rhythm of your
communication.

On a broader level, the general
tempo of our dialogues says much
about our sense of self; despite living
in a beautiful paradise of peace and
plenty, we still possess a combative
disposition; hell bent on reporting
and repeating negatives as a priority.

This creates desensitised mindsets,
oblivious to the bigger world where

FALL

MUSTHAVES

FROM page 12

many shoes.

Located in the Mall at Marathon,
Catch 22’s fall catalogue includes a
wide variety of trendy shoes, ranging
from gladiator flats to patent plat-
forms. “Patent platforms, gladiator
flats, sneakers, and wedges are all
styles that are in for the fall, also shoes
in metallic gold, metallic silver, fushia,
white, snake’s skin, and multi-colors
are very popular,” Sherraine Dean,
the store’s senior manager told T7ri-

El Morro: History
written on stone

EL MORRO NATIONAL
MONUMENT, N.M.
Associated Press

FOR CENTURIES, Span-
ish explorers, U.S. Army
troops, wagon train emi-
grants and railroad survey-
ors carved their names on a
huge sandstone outcrop in
what's now a national monu-
ment famed for those inscrip-
tions.

But the softness of the rock
that allowed names to be
chipped into the cliff at El
Morro National Monument
also is letting those signatures
erode — jeopardizing the his-
tory the park is meant to pro-
tect.

Over the years, officials
have reattached fallen
inscriptions, developed grout
to keep moisture out of
cracks and experimented
with coatings to prevent sig-
natures from wearing away.

El Morro — Spanish for
headlands — became a stop-
ping point because of its reli-
able water, a pool fed by
runoff from the cliff.

Hundreds of travelers left
their names — some famous;
others with stories behind
them.

"All those things together
make them historic," said
Steve Baumann, archacolo-
gist at the northwest New
Mexico monument.

"Pasa por aqui,” wrote
provincial governor Don
Juan de Onate in 1605,
"passed by here.”

Onate's inscription, one of
the earliest, partially covers
one of the prehistoric Amer-



bune Woman.

Detailed accessories brings life to
an outfit. Long necklaces, matching
bags, clutches, and belts are a must
have to spice up a simple outfit and
turn it into an elaborate one. “Bags
are definitely “the in thing” and they
include the crossover bags, fanny
packs, duffle bags, tote bags, clutches ,
and wallets with matching belts”, Ms
Dean added.

While fashion for women in the
Bahamas is always redefining itself,
fashion for the men in your life will
change but less often.

At Bonneville Bones, located on Bay
Street, there are some new trends that
are fashion forward for Fall. “In men’s
wear there isn’t much of a drastic
change in trends like it is with women’s
wear. However, the style now for the
men is amuch more fitted look. Jeans
before were made slack and baggy, but
now they are made to fit. In the dress
wear neck- ties are made slender and
more narrow than before” says Eddie
Robinson, Owner of Bonneville Bones.

Another men’s store, Fine Threads
emphasises dark colours in dress suits,
like black brown and lavender.

These new trends and accessories
are a Fall must have:

ican Indian petroglyphs also
carved on the rock.

Don Diego de Vargas, who
led the Spanish reconquest
of New Mexico in 1692 after
a Pueblo Indian revolt,
signed his name that year,
saying his conquest was "for
the Holy Faith and for the
Royal Crown ... at his own
expense."

Twelve-year-old Sallie Fox
— who came through in a
wagon train — wrote her
proper name, Sarah, in 1858.

The deeply incised, print-
er-like inscription of "P.
Gilmer Breckinridge, 1859
VA," is marred by a chip bit-
ing into the C in his last name
and edging up to the 9 in the
date.

Breckinridge came through
El Morro with 25 camels
from a short-lived Army
experiment. He would later
resign, join the Confederacy
and die in the Civil War.

The same expedition
included "E. Pen Long, Bal-
timore,” who left a large sig-
nature in flowing, perfect old-
fashioned script.

The group, doing recon-
naissance, "had all kind of
tools with them for marking
features on the landscape for
mapping purposes," Bau-
mann said. "They would
have been well-equipped to
make some nice inscrip-
tions."

Although the expedition
was in 1857, Breckinridge
didn't carve his name until
another trip in 1859.

He wasn't the only person
to visit El Morro more than
once.

@ Plaid Patterns

¢ Tunic Tops

e Sheer tops

@ Linen shorts

@ Skinny jeans

¢ Platform, gladiator,

stilettos, or Ed hardy
sneakers



@ Broad belts
¢ Costume Jewelry
e Tote bags

e Metallic Clutches
with matching belts

many face real wars and severe depri-
vation. Ironically, against this steady
discourse of emotional dissatisfac-
tion, young people are expected to
excel and are openly chastised for
their apparent lack of positive
demeanor.

We fail to recognise that the qual-
ity of what the mind produces is only
as good as the quality of the infor-
mation it intakes. The society that
we have is the exact society that we
have created. And until we shift
towards a more mindful discourse,
we will remain in a state of social
dissatisfaction.

No doubt, we need inspired com-
municators. While you may believe
that you are not a good speaker or
that you don't have the skills to
inspire others; suppose you are
wrong?

What if you are the change that
this nation and the world are waiting
on?

We each have responsibility to
raise our voices for the good; to build
this nation and to add value to the
world. History would have been
written differently had Dr King
declined to voice his views. Similar-
ly, you too have no idea of how many
little boys and girls are anxiously





Heather Clark/AP Photo :

THIS PHOTO taken Sept. 2, 2009 shows Steve Baumann, archeologist at El Morro National Monu-
ment, walking along the base of the sandstone cliffs that make up Inscription Rock at the north-
west New Mexico monument.

awaiting your words, your speech to
inspire their dreams.

Remember positive words have
the power to build up, to give hope,
to change conditions and to inspire.
On the same token, negative words
have the power to do the exact oppo-
site.

Yes you can become an inspired
speaker; if you are willing to allow
your words to light the way; giving
others the confidence to do the same.

Why not raise your voice for the
good and make something better
happen.

If you are ready to Speak with
Confidence & Power- Sign Up Now
for SpeakUP! - learn how your words
can Inspire a Dream! Contact The
Coaching Studio today call 326-3332
or 429-6770 - or send an email to
coach4ward@Yahoo.com

¢ Michelle M Miller is a certified Life-
Coach and Stress Management Con-
sultant. She is the Principal Coach of
the Coaching Studio, which located in
the Jovan Plaza, Madeira Street.
Questions or comments can be sent to
P.O. Box CB-13060 - email -
coach4ward@yahoo.com or telephone
429-6770.

"The Boys Are Back’
_ Is refreshingly
_ Unsentimental

'} LOS ANGELES
Associated Preess

? THE true-life drama "The
i Boys Are Back" delicately
: and deftly finds a balance
i that's hard to strike: It depicts
? death, and the way a family
? rebuilds and redefines itself
? afterward, without any mawk-
? ishness.
: Director Scott Hicks’ film,
i with its dreamlike, sun-
i? splashed landscapes of South-
? ern Australia, is visually
i arresting (the work of cine-
: matographer Greig Fraser,
? who recently shot Jane Cam-
: pion's luminous "Bright
? Star"). But the content of
? Allan Cubitt's script, based on
: Simon Carr's memoir, is
? meaty and straightforward,
? which gives it an unexpected
i power.
i This is easily Hicks' best
? film since the Oscar-winning
: "Shine" way back in 1996 —
? since then, his work has
? included the admirable but
? uneven “Hearts in Atlantis"
? and "No Reservations." Much
i? of the allure of "The Boys Are
? Back" comes from Clive
? Owen's complex performance;
? as aman learning how to func-
? tion as a single father after the
? death of his wife, Owen shows
great liveliness but also a nat-
? ural vulnerability.
i His character, sportswriter
i Joe Warr, takes a "Just Say
|: Yes" attitude in raising his 6-
|: year-old son (Nicholas McAn-
|: ulty, disarming in his film
? debut), which makes for a lot of
| | fun but it also results in chaos.
? Joe's frustration in figuring
? out this whole parenting thing
i by himself provides
i inescapable reminders of
? Dustin Hoffman in "Kramer
: vs. Kramer": Once again we
i have two men sharing a home,
i realizing they don't really
|? know each other and unsure
? of how to relate as they work
? through their grief in differ-
? ent ways. Joe has traveled
? constantly for work, feeling
? secure that young Artie's dai-
? ly routine was in the capable
i hands of his wife, Katy (Laura
: Fraser). Once Katy dies of
? cancer, Joe is left with all
? those responsibilities and not
? aclue about where to begin.
? When he fixes the boy's
i breakfast and drives him to
i school, for example, he finds
? that little things like leaving
: the crusts on his toast send
? Artie into a tizzy. Meanwhile,
: Artie handles the much larger
? matter of his mother's death
| with surprising strength. At
? one point he asks Joe if he can
: die, too, so he can be with
? Mummy, and he does it with
? the kind of startling honesty
: that's peculiar to children.
i But then the arrival of Har-
? ry (George MacKay), Joe's
? teenage son from his first mar-
? riage, changes the dynamic all
? over again. Harry has come
? from England for the summer
? with hopes of getting to know
i the father he always felt
rejected him; in the process,
i he also becomes the big broth-
er to a little boy he's never
? met, just when Artie could use
? some guidance the most.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM








THE TRIBUNE

nN TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 200%

SECTION Be HEALTH: Body and mind







ered bats
Fashion

By JEFFARAH GIBSON Although there hasn’t been a
ee significant change in styles from

the Summer fashion semester, Fall

inny jeans

sk

KINNY jea ns or leg- fashion offers a selection of trends

: 2 ; to dress up or dress down. For

>, gings june fops OF 2 instance, maxi dresses, which were
i sheer 2 Purple or grey? hot this Summer can also work for

The Fall fashion season Fall and be dressed up by adding a

bri scoffed hic: long necklace, and a broad belt.
rings a mix OF edgy, sopnis They can be dressed down for an

ticated, and youthful patterns outing at the beach, by wearing

less accessories and adding a pair
easy fo emulate. of trendy gladiator sandals to ome
plete the look.

Gia Hart, Manager at the Cat-
walk Boutique located on Robinson Road says bright colours are
in this season. “Usually Fall colours included dark shades. But
this season bright colours from Summer fashion are in for the fall
as well.”

Bermuda shorts were “yesterday.” Linen shorts are taking the
lead and being worn with sexy embellished tunics, adding a little
sophistication and a flattering polish to an evening look.

Skinny jeans and pencil skirts have been in for a few seasons. Peo-
ple are wearing pencil skirts for an office look, dressing them up
with broad belts.

Since fashion repeats itself there are some classic retro styles that
are coming back. For instance
plaid is back in many forms.
Designers are making plaid
shirts, blouses, skirts, shorts and
accessories in a variety of col-
ors like red, purple, yellow, and
orange.

And who said shawls are
only for dress wear? Dressing

= up a pair of jeans and T-shirt
with a fine cashmere pashmina
shawl is a new fun expressive
style.

“Pashminas shawls are being
worn casually. There are some
made of thick fabric, but the
ones that are worn casually are
made of a more thin fabric”,
Mrs Hart said.

Shoes are a big deal in wom-
en’s fashion. An outfit is never
complete without the right pair
of shoes or accessories and no,
a woman can never have too

=

tunic fops



SEE page 10

Original
Scent

Cherry-Almond

jie

i i Bo
COMFORTS & NOURISHES




PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.250TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER PARTLY SUNNY, T-STORM POSSIBLE HIGH 89F LOW 80F The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com Victim of murder? VICTIM OFTRAGICACCIDENT? OR WAS PRESTON FERGUSON A ... PULLING TOGETHER: (sitting ette Smith and Eloise Moxey; (standing son, Olga Fordes, Deidre Gray, Dale Ferguson Joseph and Merv Johnson. ACCUSED: Former PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater pictured on her way to court. TRAVOLTA TRIAL: DAYONE FORMER PARAMEDIC Tarino Light bourne going to court yesterday. POLICENAME SLAINBURGERKING MANAGER PAGE FIVE MANACCUSEDOF WENDYBULLARD MURDER PAGE FIVE FIREDEATHSTOBETREATEDASHOMICIDES’ PAGE SIX INMATESETTOFACEMURDERCHARGE TODAY PAGE SEVEN INSIDE n PRESTONFERGUSON PHOTOS: Tim Clarke/ Tribune Staff By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A JURY was selected yes terday in the case of former PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater and former paramedic Tarino Lightbourne, who are accused of attempting to extort $25 million from Hollywood actor John Travolta. Six women and three men were selected to hear evi dence in the case, which will take place before Senior Justice Anita Allen. The prosecution is expected to open its case this morning. Defendants plead not guilty to John Travolta extortion charges SEE page five By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net DISTRAUGHT family mem bers of Preston Ferguson say that they are certain he was murdered and blame police for mishandling the investigation into his death. Ferguson, 38, a resident of Exuma and father of one, was found dead in a truck on the side of the road in the area of Ocean Addition East, near the Forest, Exuma, on the morning of August 2. Police initially suspected that he had run off the road and hit a utility pole, however, his family believes the acci dent was “staged.” FULLSTORYON PAGES TWOAND THREE

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM PRESTON FERGUSON’S FAMILY: ‘WE KNOW The family of Preston Ferguson say the p olice’s version of how he died is completely at odds with the evidence. They have posed a number of questions to senior officers, including: Unanswered Questions IF Preston died because his exposed head struck this utility pole, how did he come to be driving several feet off the road in the first place? IF this was the case, how did he manage to steer back on to the road after suffering massive head trauma? IF his was out of the driver’s window at the time, should he not have struck the side of his head, rather than the middle of his forehead? DOES the police’s version not suggest he was looking directly at the utility pole as it approached his face? IF the police’s version is correct, would it not mean Preston was attempting to spit directly into the wind? IF his body was found sitting on top of a pile of smashed glass in the seat with no glass w hatsoever on top of his body. I F Preston died while sitting upright in the driver’s seat, why is there no blood in this area, whereas the passenger’s side of the gearbox, console and floor covered in it? IF Preston died as a result of major trauma caused by his head striking a utility pole, how was it that he was found sitting in the driver’s seat, with his head against the head-rest? How did the impact force necessary to create his massive head injury not propel any part of his body across into the passenger’s side? IF this is the scuff marks the impact of Preston’s head against the utility pole – causing massive trauma – how is there no trace of blood on the pole, the ground, or either side of the driver’s door? IF the window was smashed as a result of the vehicle strik ing the poll, why is there no smashed glass at the base of the pole, but covers the ground where the vehicle came to rest 20 yards down the road? IF Preston had his head out of the window at the time of the accident, the window must have been down. If so, how did it shatter upon impact, filling the interior with glass?

PAGE 3

murder C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THAT HIS DEATH WAS NOT AN ACCIDENT IF Preston died of a massive head injur y suffered while driving alone, how did his vehicle come to a stop about 20 yards down the road from the scene of the accident? IF Preston did indeed die sitting upright in the driver’s seat of the vehicle, why can blood clearly be seen pouring into the dri ver’s side of the vehicle from the passenger’s side? VICTIM OF ? By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net D ISTRAUGHT family members of Preston Ferguson say that they are c ertain he was murdered and blame police for mishandling thei nvestigation into his death. Ferguson, 38, a resident of Exuma and father of one, was found dead in a truck on the side of the road in the area of Ocean Addition East, near the Forest, Exuma, on the morning of August 2. Police initially suspected that he had run off the road and hit a utility pole, however, his family believes the accident was “staged.” They claim they know of an individual with a motive to kill Preston. According to his sister, Eloise Moxey, it is believed that her brother was having an affair with a married woman. “He promised my brother he was going to kill him,” Mrs Moxey alleged. According to Preston’s family, the minimal damage to the vehicle he was found in was not consistent with his massive injury and that the impact could not have caused his death. According to Mr Ferguson’s family, police had raised the theory that Mr Ferguson had perhaps stuck his head out of the truck’s window to spit and hit his head on the lamp pole. The second theory was that Mr Ferguson had fallen asleep and his head fell out of the window. Merv Johnson who had been with his uncle earlier that night said that Mr Ferguson was found sitting upright in the driver’s seat of the truck with his head slumped back. “That was the only visible mark of any kind of trauma to him. There wasn’t any visible damage to the truck. The front of the truck was intact, the windshield was intact, the only damage was a scrape to the driver’s side of the truck and they were saying that’s what killed him,” Mr Johnson said. The family also highlighted the fact that most of the blood was found on the passenger side. “The only thing broken on the truck is the side mirror, not one single drop of blood on the driver’s side,” Mrs Moxey said. She also noted that no broken glass was found on her brother’s body but was found mainly on the passenger seat. “The window was broken out. It’s obvious that the glass was up and was hit from the outside to look like an accident because most of the glass is on the pas senger side. He was sitting on glass. “How could he sit on glass if the glass was broken on impact?” Mrs Ferguson wanted to know. She also noted that the air conditioning was left on which further suggested that the windows had been up. The family claims that their evidence suggests that Mr Ferguson was the victim of murder. “The police are deeming this an accident, but we know that this is a murder and we have evidence to substantiate our claim that it was a murder,” Mrs Moxey alleged. According to Mr Ferguson’s family, the deceased was last seen leaving Rolleville with his female friend. “She picked him up as she was leaving Rolleville and he drove with her supposedly back to his place. He said he was going home; he had no reason to come back out,” Mr Ferguson’s nephew said. Mrs Moxey said that she has met with Commissioner of Police Reginald Ferguson regarding the matter and was recently informed that an investigation is continuing and that “experts are conducting a re-enactment of the accident.” Mrs Moxey said she also met with National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest. Commissioner Ferguson told The Tribune , “We are conducting a thorough investigation into this matter. I am aware of the suspicions as to how he may have died. We have been in touch with his family and will have a meeting very soon to inform them of our findings.” “Someone drove that vehicle to where they staged this and drove it up against the lamp post. What concerns us is the way this was handled by police,” Mrs Moxey said. “They have gotten rid of every single piece of evidence. They sent the truck back to Grand Isles because my brother worked in the landscaping department at Grand Isles. That was a company truck. That’s the reason he didn’t go out in the truck that night.” Mr Ferguson’s family is also wondering whatever became of his clothing and hair samples or DNA that could be extracted from them. They say that the individual they suspect has not as yet been questioned by police. They also say that the woman who was the last person to be seen with him has not been questioned either. The family says that they have been awaiting the results of a toxicology report for about a month. “He left to go home that night. He left with a cer tain lady who was supposed to be taking him home. The next morning he is dead and who shows up at the door? This lady with her husband to say that he is dead,” Mrs Moxey said. Mr Ferguson who was employed at Grand Isle Villas as a Landscaping Supervisor was the youngest of1 2 children. He was laid to rest August 21. He is survived by his son, Preston Jr. Preston Ferguson

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. Thank you for allowing me the space to respond tot he published position of the Bahamas Christian Council on the proposed maritalr ape law, published in the media and appearing in The T ribune on September 4, 2009 at page six, under the title Christian Councilr esponse to proposed marital rape law. O ne of the main thrusts of the argument against the proposed law is that it wouldb e subject to abuse. All laws are subject to a buse, but that fact alone does not stop us as a people from enacting laws to cor-r ect situations or actions that we consider wrong. For example, the fact that a person may make a false accusation of robbery orc hild abduction, out of a desire for revenge, has not and would not cause us to repeal the law of robbery or child abduction so that thosea ctions are no longer crimi nal. We must ask ourselves a s Bahamians: Do we want to protect wives from what we understand to be thec rime (or offence Because if so, what alterna t ive are we offering to those wives who have been subjected to having sexual inter c ourse against their will? The only suggestion contained in the statement pub lished by the Council is that of counselling, which, sincet his already exists through church, state and private bodies, cannot be seen to bea solution as it is obviously an insufficient remedy. W e currently have the crime of rape on the statute books. Stealing is also ac riminal offence. Counselling may be offered to a f irst offender for having committed the crime of stealing, but this is on the basis that stealing is indeed a crime. How can the Council speak about offering or recommending counselling fora first offence of marital rape, when it is not even prepared to call rape what it is and punish it according ly? I wonder what is the husband’s right that the Council is seeking to protect or pre serve and what in the Counc il’s view is the wife’s right as regards her own person (body T he other dimension of the abuse argument is the call for there to be “checksa nd balances” in place before we as a nation should e ven consider amending the law. Let us therefore examine what procedures cur-r ently apply to criminal complaints and in particul ar, where a complaint of rape is made. These are as follows:1 ) A complaint is made to the Police. 2 ) A Police officer takes a statement from the person who makes the complaint. 3 ) The Police take a statement from the accused (if he wishes to say anything). 4 ) The complaint is inves tigated, and physical or med ical evidence is obtained. 5 ) A senior Police officer being someone other than t he investigating officer decides whether to charge the accused person. 6 ) If charged, the person must appear in court. From t his point a legal tribunal has control of the matter of the complaint, which is prose c uted by the Attorney General, not by the person who made the complaint. Wit ness must testify and be cross-examined and eventu-a lly a decision is made on the evidence. Having regard to this process I must ask “What are the additional ‘checksa nd balances’ that need to be put in place before the marital rape law can bee nacted?” It is simply not the case that a wife could, under the proposed amend m ent, make a complaint this evening that her husband raped her, and tonight he is locked up in Her Majesty’s Prison for a decade or the rest of his life. I disagree with Reverend Paul that the marriage contract implies open-ended consent, if he means that the consent is always operating. 1 Corinthians 7:5 says in part Do not deprive one another except with consent for a time” (NKJVs eem that the consent cannot be open-ended in the sense described, if it couldb e withdrawn at any time. Furthermore, this verse d emonstrates that consent is an essential element in the sexual relationship betweenh usband and wife. Their freedom or licence t o have intercourse with each other at any time cannot and does not amount toa licence to have intercourse with the spouse without his o r her consent. In the daily life of married couples they are eachc onsenting or agreeing to intimacy on each and every occasion that it occurs. Rev Paul argues on behalf of the Council that on theirm arriage day “in the sight of God and in the company of witnesses, they pledged to give themselves to each other in holy matrimony andt hereby gave each other upfront, implicit, open ende d sexual consent.” It is upon this basis that he argues that it is not right,a nd could never be right to bring married couples under t he authority of a law that has hitherto only applied to non-married couples. Thed ifficulty with this argument is that we do not, for example, have a separate or dif ferent law for Christian couples and non-Christian cou-p les when it comes to the subject of divorce. Nor am I suggesting that it should be so. But the same way that the law recognises that non-m arried persons or estranged married persons do have “sexual relations”t hat go wrong, the law should be brought to bear i n situations involving mar ried couples where the relationship has gone wrong. His argument makes no allowance for the human condition, for husbands who cruelly abuse their wives sexually. What to do with the husband who refuses to buy groceries, or to pay the mortgage or rent, refuses to pay the school fees, and allows the lights to be turned off, but has a sweetheart or two, has STD’s and demands that his wife give him sex. If she wants groceries in the house, or if she wants the lights back on then she is forced to give in to want her husband wants. No physical violence there, but no wife’s consent either. But because in the company of witnesses he pledged himself to her and she to him she must submit? And what about those cases of repeated, horrible physical violence? Let me be sure to state for the record, that I am neither anti-marriage, nor anti-male.I believe that in this country there are many good husbands, who outnumber the “bad”, who care for and sup port their wives and fami lies. In fact I am personally acquainted with a number of such. However, there is such a thing as marital rape. It exists in fact, if not yet in law. I do hope that Sec tion 15 is repealed, that we will call a spade “a spade”, and offer some hope and help to those hurting wives. I believe that one of the unintended consequences of this new law will be that persons will enter into marriage more soberly, more serious ly, and will be more likely to accord to their spouse the respect that he or she deserves as a fellow human being. CAROL MISIEWICZ Nassau, September 4, 2009 C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WASHINGTON Escalate or scale back. The blunt conclusion laid out by the top A merican commander in Afghanistan "The status quo will lead to failure" poses a stark and urgent choice for President Barack O bama: Intensify the foundering conflict with m ore troops or narrow the mission to target ing terrorists instead of protecting Afghans. I n his report to Obama, Gen. Stanley McChrystal makes clear his view that ulti m ate success in Afghanistan requires overcoming two main threats: the insurgency anda "crisis of confidence" among Afghans in their own government. Both must be a ddressed, and together they require more resources, he says. "Insufficiently addressing either principal threat will result in failure," the general concludes. T he McChrystal assessment puts to the test Obama's assertion just six months agot hat he would put the war effort on a path to success by providing what the previous White House didn't. "For six years, Afghanistan has been denied the resources that it demands because o f the war in Iraq," Obama said March 27. "Now, we must make a commitment that cana ccomplish our goals." He approved the dispatch of 21,000 more U.S. troops and p romised a comprehensive improvement in the U.S. effort to stabilize the country, train its security forces and advance justice and economic opportunity. Obama also said then that he would ree valuate after the Afghan presidential election, which was held August 20. The chargeso f widespread fraud and ballot-rigging that emerged after the election have only added to d oubts in Washington about whether the Afghan government can be counted on as a reliable partner. The president thus far has not endorsed the McChrystal approach, saying in television interviews over the weekend that h e needs to be convinced that sending more troops would make Americans safer from alQ aida. Tellingly, Obama reiterated in those interviews that his core goal is to destroy alQ aida, which is not present in significant num bers in Afghanistan. He did not focus on sav ing Afghanistan. "I'm not interested in just being in Afghanistan for the sake of being in A fghanistan or saving face," Obama told NBC's "Meet the Press" on Sunday. O n Monday, two senior administration officials said that among the options underc onsideration at the White House is stepping up missile strikes by U.S. aerial drones on t he Pakistan side of the Afghan border. Tali ban and associated Afghan rebel groups who operate with relative impunity on the Pak i stani side of the border already are being targeted by U.S. Predator drone strikes, with l imited success. McChrystal's report, first made public Monday by The Washington Post, was not intended to present Obama with a list of military options. The general left no doubt where he stands. He believes a full-scale, compreh ensive counterinsurgency campaign is what is required, and that time is of the essence. But White House officials say the president i s considering more than the McChrystal a ssessment as he weighs courses of action. He's relying on the views of key Cabinet a ides, including Defence Secretary Robert Gates, who said last week that he has yet to m ake up his mind on the wisdom of committing more troops. G ates has said, however, that he does not believe that a scaled-back approach that f ocuses mainly on killing al-Qaida leaders rather than the McChrystal view that coun terterrorism operations should be part of a broader campaign to build up Afghan support for their government is the right answer. " The notion that you can conduct a purely counterterrorist kind of campaign and do itf rom a distance simply does not accord with reality," Gates told reporters earlier this month. "The reality is that even if you want to focus on counterterrorism, you cannot do that successfully without local law enforcem ent, without internal security, without intel ligence" without a major presence in Kab-u l. McChrystal's immediate superior, Gen. David Petraeus, sees it similarly. " He (McChrystal not just the extraordinary capabilities but also the limitations of counterterrorism forces in Afghanistan," Petraeus wrote in an opinion article published Friday in The Times of Lond on. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton u nderlined the importance of seeking views beyond McChrystal's report. " It's critically important, but it's a part of the overall process and there are many other considerations that we have to take into account," Clinton said in an interview airing Monday on The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer. C linton also said that no decision would be made until the outcome of the Afghan elect ion is known, "because we have to know who our counterparts are, and we have to m ake it clear that in return for X, we expect Y." Anthony Cordesman, a military analyst at the Centre for Strategic and International Studies who advised McChrystal in Kabul t his summer, said in a telephone interview Monday that Obama has invited doubt about h is commitment to succeeding in Afghanistan by putting off a decision on devoting morer esources. "The truth is that we don't have that much t ime," Cordesman said. "Waiting to see what h appens with existing resources and existing troop levels, when the commanding general h as already said that's an unacceptable risk, basically invites defeat." He added: "The p resident has yet to show he can lead in this war." (This article was written by Robert Burns, AP National Security Writer). We need to offer hope and help to hurting wives LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Obama war choice: Escalate or scale back

PAGE 5

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM FORMER PARAMEDIC Tarino Lightbourne at court yesterday. Defendants plead ‘absolutely, positively, 100 per cent not guilty’ to John Travolta extortion charges Ms Bridgewater, 49, and Mr Lightbourne, 47, are accused of conspiring to extort and attempting to extort money from Mr Travolta between January 2 and January 20 by means of threats. Ms Bridgewater is also accused of abetment to extortion. She is represented by lawyers Murrio Ducille and Krysta Smith. Mr Lightbourne is represented by Carlson Shurland and Mary Bain. Director of Public Prosecutions Bernard Turner, Neil Brathwaite andGarvin Gaskin are prosecuting the case. They are expected to call 14 witnesses, among them Mr Travolta, PLP Senator Allyson Maynard-Gibson and West End and Bimini MP Obie Wilchcombe. Arraigned Ms Bridgewater and Mr Lightbourne were first arraigned on the charges in late January and arraigned again before Senior Justice Allen on April 28 after prosecutors presented a Voluntary Bill of Indictment. The charges were again read to the defendants yesterday in the presence of the jury. When asked to enter a plea to the charges both replied: “Absolutely, posi-t ively, 100 per cent not guilty.” Both Ms Bridgewater and Mr Lightbourne are on $50,000 bail. Senior Justice Allen yesterday acceded to a request by their attorneys for the two defendants to be allowed to sit behind their lawyers during the trial rather than in the prisoner’s dock. Reports of the alleged extortion attempt emerged days after Jett Travol ta, the 16-year-old son of actors John Travolta, 54, and Kelly Preston, 46, died of a seizure at the family’s vacation homein Freeport, Grand Bahama, on January 2. Ms Bridgewater announced her resignation from the Senate days after the police brought charges against her. By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net TWO men charged in the murder of a Bertha’s GoGo Ribs employee were arraigned in the Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Wade Rolle Jr, 19, of Union Village, alias “Bumpy”, and Leonardo Wright, 26, of Millennium Gardens, alias “Fox”, are accused of the armed rob bery and murder of Nelson Goodman. Last week, David Rolle, 34, of Big Pond was arraigned in the Magistrate’s Court for Mr Goodman’s murder. Mr Goodman, 44, of Pinewood Gardens, was gunned down outside Bertha’s Go-Go Ribs on Poinciana Avenue, Coconut Grove, just before midnight on Wednesday, September8. Cash It is alleged that the three men robbed Mr Goodman of $200 cash, the property of Bertha’s Go-Go Ribs, and intentionally caused his death. According to initial reports by police, the victim was approached by several people just before gunshots were heard. Rolle and Wright, who were arraigned before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court 1, Bank Lane, were not required to enter a plea to the charges. Both men are represented by lawyer Devard Francis. Mr Francis told the court yesterday that Rolle, who had complained of being abused by police, was denied medical attention. Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered that Rolle receive medical attention. Both men were remand ed to Her Majesty’s Prison and the case was adjourned to September 25. Inspector David Lockhart told the court yesterday that both men are also expected to appear in Court 11, Nassau Street, on armed robbery charges. Two men accused of murdering Bertha’s Go-Go Ribs employee B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net T HE Burger King manager beaten and stabbed to death outside the fast-food chain’s Tonique Williams-Darling H ighway location has been identified by police as Rashad Morris, 21. Mr Morris lived on John Street, off Baillou Hill Road,a nd police believe he was abducted and driven to the restaurant where his killer or killers demanded he open the s afe. When Mr Morris, the manager of Burger King on Frederick Street and former manager of the Tonique-Williams-D arling restaurant, failed to open the safe he was beaten in the manager’s office and dragged outside where he was s tabbed several times. A witness saw him being brutally beaten outside the restaurant and called the police. Officers arrived at the scene withinm inutes and found Mr Morris dead in a pool of blood at around 1.30am on Sunday. Bahamasair pilot Lionel Lewis McQueen, 29, was also killed early Sunday morning. H e was shot several times a nd found dead at his home in G olden Palm Estates, near the Kennedy Subdivision, shortly a fter 4am. His cousin and roommate M ontez Saunders was also shot multiple times and remains in serious condition at the Intens ive Care Unit of Princess Marg aret Hospital. P olice have launched intensive investigations into both m atters. Anyone with information w hich may assist in the investigations should call police urgently on 911, 919 or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477 Police name slain Burger King boss By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A MAN charged in the murder of a mother-of-three who was gunned down at her workplace in a daring daylight robbery last month was arraigned in the Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Police have charged Melbourne Bain, 26, of Durham Street, in the August 21 murder of Wendy Bullard. Bain, alias “Snatcher”, is also accused of robbing Ms Bullard of $694 which belonged to 21st Century Steel Welding on Royal Palm Lane. Ms Bullard, 34, was shot in the face when two gunmen attacked her workplace situ ated just yards away from St George’s Anglican Church. She was the country’s 53rd homicide victim for the year. Inside Court 1, Bank Lane, yesterday, Ms B ullard’s relatives looked on as Bain was arraigned before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez. Bain, who is represented by lawyer Ian Cargill, was not required to enter a plea to the armed robbery and murder charges. He pleaded guilty, however, to possession of an unlicensed shotgun. Firearm Court dockets state that Bain was found in possession of the firearm on September 17. He is expected to be sentenced on September 30 on the firearm charge. In the meantime, Bain has been remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. His armed robbery and murder cases have been transferred to Court 11, Nassau Street, and adjourned to September 29. Man charged with murder of mother during robbery TRAVOLTATRIAL: DAYONE F ROM page one T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f COURTSHORTS MAGISTRATE’SCOURT: Melbourne Bain, 26 MAGISTRATE’SCOURT: Wade Rolle Jr, 19, Leonardo Wright, 26

PAGE 6

By TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A YOUNG Defence Force m arine is clinging to life in a coma after nearly drowning dur ing a training exercise at the community pools in South Beach. The male marine seaman was swimming laps in one of thep ools during a scuba diving les son along with several fellow o fficers. As his colleagues sur faced at one end of the pool, someone noticed that the marine was motionless at the bottom. His colleagues scrambled to pull him out and performed CPR until an ambu lance arrived. While the identity of the marine not yet been released, The Tribune understands he is 21-year-old Marine Seaman Charles Heastie. Although the incident happened around 11am on Wednesday of last week, it was not reported to the press, prompting concerned citizens to contact The Tribune fearing the matter was being "hushed up". "You don't keep things like that under wraps – if it was me or anybody else – regardless if it was an accident or negligence. The public or persons within t he organisation should know," said an outraged Defence Force o fficer who spoke on condition of anonymity. T he officer said he wonders if the incident would have been avoided if there had been more instructors at the pool. When contacted to confirm t he incident yesterday, Minis ter of National Security Tom my Turnquest – who has responsibility for the Defence Force – said officials are not try-i ng to cover anything up. "There wasn't any reason w hy they shouldn't have given a report, it was an official Defence Force activity," he said. Mr Turnquest said he was told about the incident by Defence Force Commodore Clifford Scavella on Wednesday and has been receiving routine updates on the marine's condition. "It was a dive course. They were taking scuba diving lessons at the Betty Kelly Kenning pools and they were doing breathing exercises, breath holding and snorkel clearing. "When (the other officers got to the other end, someone shouted out to them that one of their divers was underwater and that's when they got him surfaced and administered CPR until the ambulance arrived," Mr Turnquest told The Tribune yesterday. Mr Turnquest declined to comment when asked if a short age of certified instructors at the pool contributed to the incident. Sources close to the Force revealed that the marine is in a coma and breathing with the assistance of a respirator, but Mr Turnquest did not confirm or deny this. It is unclear if the marine – who has been on the Force for less than five years – had any pre-existing health issues. Mr Turnquest said the officer, like all his colleagues, would have taken part in an annual physical last January. A brief press release issued by the Force after The Tribune made inquiries said the marine was admitted to Doctor's Hospital "following a diving exer cise" at the Betty Kelly Ken ning Swim Complex. The statement added that the marine was in critical, but stable condition. An investigation into the inci dent is underway. By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net THE deaths of four people killed in a fire last week were expected to be classified as homicides last night, as police said they are cert ain an arsonist sparked the deadly blaze in their home. T heresa Brown, 51; her daughter Kayshala Bodie, 18; granddaughter Telair Johnson, one; and neighbour Savanna Stuart, 18, all died of smoke inhalation when the family home in Wilson Tract caught fire shortly after 7am last Thursday. S upt Leon Bethel, head of the Royal Bahamas Police Force homicide unit, said police suspect an object was thrown through the front window into the living room of the house, igniting the fire. D etectives are still examing the crime scene in an effort to identify the object which could have broken the front window of the house off Wulff Road. Supt Bethel said police are “almost certain” the fire was an arson attack, but was unable to confirm this suspicion before The T ribune w ent to press. His officers will continue to interview relatives, friends and n eighbours of the victims in an effort to identify a suspect or suspects, he said. Preliminary examinations by a pathologist have s hown all four victims died as a result of smoke inhalation. Their bodies were not badly burned in the blaze, Mr Bethel said. He denied reports claiming the victims were shot or attacked before they died in their home, and he refuted neighbours’ allegations that the killer nailed the doors and windows shut to trap thes leeping victims inside. However Mr Bethel said the residents had bolted the doors from the inside and there are bars on the win-d ows which may have hindered their escape. He added: “It seems like someone was able to set the place a blaze from the outside by throwing something in through the front window. They were trying to get out through the door and windows, but they were all barred up, and because they were overwhelmed by the smoke that might have inhibited their judgment. “They would have been inhaling smoke for quite a while.”The homicide chief said: “We are still investigating, and we c ontinue to visit the area to gather information and search for evidence associated with this matter. We are chasing all angles and don’t want to target anyone specifically until this investigation has been completed.” A nyone with any information which may assist investigations should call police urgently on 911, 919 or call Crime Stoppers on 328-TIPS (8477 C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Defence Force marine in coma after near drowning By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A FAMILY of four have been driven out of their home after gangsters pelted the house with bottles and rocks for weeks, a nd injured a mother and her son in the a ttacks. Newspaper vendor Michael Johnson, 43, said gangsters in the Kemp Road area accused his eight-year-old son of stealing a g un from them and started targeting the house on September 6. Attacks on the home have persisted on almost a daily basis since, and Mr Johns on’s wife and son have been injured on t wo different occasions. Mr Johnson, who sells newspapers in Shirley Street near the junction with Kemp Road, reported every incident to officers at t he Wulff Road Police Station, but his complaints have not been taken seriously, he said. His wife Justine Johnson, 44, was badly c ut when bottles and rocks were thrown through the living room window during the first attack, and a glass bottle hit her in the head. Hospital M ichael, eight, was hit in the head with a rock while in the shower on the morning of S unday, September 13. Although he wasn’t bleeding, his father took him to Princess Margaret Hospital to be examined for concussion or brain damage. They reported the incident to police after l eaving the hospital, but Mr Johnson said officers only told him to “get out” and “gob ack home.” The following day Mrs Johnson and her c hildren, Michael and Michaelette, 13, moved out of the house in Periwinkle Alley, off Williams Lane, Kemp Road, and Mr Johnson has been at home alone while the attacks have persisted. M rs Johnson said: “This neighbourhood must be getting worse because we never h ad problems like this before. It’s a horri ble thing, really scary.” M r Johnson does not want his family to return home until he is sure they will be safe. He said: “They accuse my son of stealing a gun, which he didn’t do, and one of the y oung fellas tried to interfere with my daughter. It’s getting worse and worse. Sometimes we can’t even sleep in the h ouse because bottles and rocks are coming in through the window. Theyh ave damaged every window in my house.” M r Johnson said the men who are targetting the family are not local and are likely to be a part of a gang who gamble in the area on weekends and fight with rocks and bottles. H e criticised police for not taking action to protect his family. T he newspaper vendor said: “They have driven us out of our house and all the police are doing is taking statements to see what they can do, but nothing has been done. But somet hing is going to have to be done because I can’t allow my wife andc hildren to be out there when they should be at home with me.” Family of four targeted by gangsters in their home Fire deaths likely to be treated as homicides Tommy Turnquest TARGETOFATTACK: Gangsters pelted the property with bottles and rocks for weeks. SMASHED: A broken window is a calling card of the rock-throwing gangsters.

PAGE 7

R otarian Jeff Albury has been an active member of the Rotary Club of East Nassau for 30 years. He was drawn to Rotary because of the organisation’s commitment to community ser vice and in the hope of being able to help those less fortunate in our community. Over the years, Jeff has been involved in numerous clubs activities, from helping organise weekly lunch programmes to the club fair, which he was especially fond of as it put the whole club to work in an effort to help others. Jeff also recruited his wife, Susan, and together they wrapped more than $3,000 worth of coins, the majority of which were donated by Mall at Marathon. The funds were put to use in Rotary Club of East Nassau’s youth programmes. Jeff’s most treasured Rotary memory was when he was first elected to the club’s board of directors. The position enabled him to help direct the club’s activities and maintain its reputation in the community. He says he is proud of what the Rotary Club of East Nass au and Rotary International (RI achieved so far, but acknowledges that the future of Rotary depends on the constant induc tion of new members and keeping Rotarians involved in club affairs and local projects like the Fox Hill Run and RI’s goals such as ridding the world of polio. When not busy with Rotary work, Jeff enjoys boating and spending time with his family. He said his proudest achievement in life was the day he fin i shed paying for his children’s education. A truly down to earth individual who epitomises the saying “actions speak louder than words”, Jeff defines suc cess as “the satisfaction of a job well done.” He lives his life according to the best pieces of advice he ever received – treat everyone with respect, and Rotary’s Four-Way Test: Is it the truth?; Is it fair to all concerned? Will it build good will and better friend ships? Will it be beneficial to all concerned? C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net AN inmate at Her M ajesty's Prison is expected to be charged with the murder of fellow prisoner Lloyd Allen Albury sometime today, according to a seniorp olice officer. Albury died on Septemb er 10, two days after he was admitted to hospital followi ng a fight in a cell at the prison. Police have now conclude d their probe into his death and are set to charge anothe r man with his homicide. "We have done our investigations and we are expect-i ng to take that to court (today charge another inmate forh is death," head of the homicide squad Assistant Superi ntendent Leon Bethel told T he Tribune y esterday. Mr Bethel declined to release details surroundingA lbury's injuries, nor would he say what was the inmate's o fficial cause of death. "All I can say is that he died as a result of injuriesr eceived," Mr Bethel said. Albury, 55, was admitted t o Princess Margaret Hospital on September 8 less than a week after being i mprisoned on a vagrancy charge. "From our information he w as sent to prison for vagrancy and he was placed i n a cell. While in the cell he received injuries and that's what we're looking into rightn ow. "He was in prison for less t han a week," Mr Bethel said in an earlier interview. Albury's homicide marked the country's 60th for the y ear. O n Sunday, Burger King employee Rashard Morris, 22, was beaten and then stabbed to death after being abducted. He was reported-l y taken to the fast-food chain's Tonique Williams Darling location, where hew as beaten and then stabbed t o death after he failed to open the store's safe for his k idnapper. Just hours later, around 4 am, Bahamasair pilot LionelL ewis McQueen was found dead in his blood-splattered h ome in Golden Palms Estates. He had been shot several times while his room-m ate Martez Saunders who was also shot multiple t imes was found alive in front of the home. Their murders marked h omicides 61 and 62, respectively, Mr Bethel said. Inmate set to be charged with murder of fellow prisoner A FORMER diplomat is calling on the United S tates to urgently implement a new and direct strategy to tackle the druga nd gun problem in the Caribbean region. S ir Ronald Sanders – a Tribune weekly columnist and former chairman oft he Caribbean Financial Action Task Force against drug trafficking and money laundering – warned that if the US does not lead thew ay in curbing the trafficking of firearms and illegal drugs through the region,c ountries in the Caribbean will suffer even further. Addressing a recent g athering of high-ranking military officers at the R oyal College of Defence Studies in London, Sir Roland said: “Almoste very country (in the Caribbean) has the same problem and many of the smuggled weapons, when captured are traceable tot he United States. This suggests that the absence of a vigorous policy to curb arms sales is unintentionally contributing to crime inC entral America and the Caribbean.” Resources “In many cases, (the p olice forces (in those countries) are out-gunned by the weapons available to drug gangs and they lack the numbers, the equip m ent and other resources to combat the problem.” Sir Roland said the US government could make an “enormous contribution” to resolving the drugs and weapons problem “by passing legislation and implementing machinery to control arms smuggling; by reviewing the practice of deporting convicted felons to their countries of origin, and by adopting measures to stop legal sale of assault weapons.” Caribbean countries, Sir Roland said, are being overrun by crime that stems from the drug trade. “In conditions of economic decline and increased unemployment, drug trafficking and its attendant other crimes escalate, as they are now doing throughout the region,” he said. The former diplomat called on the US to lead the way in organising collaborative arrangements with Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean to establish an anti-narcotic programme which addresses both supply and demand. “If this is not done, the problem of drug-trafficking and its attendant high crime will continue to plague Central America and the Caribbean with a terrible destabilising effect on the small economies that are least able to cope,” he said. US urged to act on new plan to tackle drugs and guns (Photo: Peter Ramsay/BIS RENOWNED BAHAMIAN artist Max Taylor officially opened his exhibition, Paper Work 1960, under the patronage of Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and Mrs Delores Ingraham at the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas on Friday. Mr Taylor is pictured here talking with Prime Minister Ingraham about the more than 150 works on display. Pr ofile of an exemplar y East Nassau Rotarian F OX Hill MP Fred Mitchell has condemned persons who are seeking to vilify former PLP chairman Raynard Rigby f or raising concerns about West End and Bimini MP Obie Wilchcombe chairing the party’s upcoming conven-t ion while running for the deputy leadership at the samet ime. Mr Rigby charged that Mr W ilchcombe clearly "does not understand the principles of conflict of interest and fairness and transparency." "He appears not to recogn ise the perceptions that are created by continuing to servei n the capacity of convention chair." M r Rigby said that in his opinion these are matters that go to the issue of one's fitness to serve and character. "Even though Mr Wilchcombe may not be able to define what a conflict is, I k now one when I see one and so does the public. The pre-s ent facts surely satisfy the test. " It must also follow that if, in Mr Wilchcombe's own words, at 50 years he does not have the experience to serve as leader he must also not be c ompetent to serve as the party's deputy. " His election to the post would in fact take the PLP b ackwards. I have one agen da, and that is to serve the best interests of the PLP and to ensure that we ready the party to fight and win the next g eneral election,” he said. Mr Mitchell thanked Mr R igby for his timely intervention in the public domain on b ehalf of the PLP. “(US President Kennedy said that the men who criticise those who have power, play just as valuable a role as those who do, particu larly if that criticism is a disinterested criticism. “Mr Rigby is not seeking any office, reward or nomination, just a better PLP, andt hereby a better Bahamas. I do not support any attempt to vilify his public contribution. I defend his right to say it. I have canvassed a number of other colleagues who share this view,” Mr Mitchell said in a statement. The Fox Hill MP said that the question is not what Mr. Rigby says, but whether or not what he says is “to the point, true and of some value to the public debate.” “There is a lot of lip service to the role of dissent in public life, but as soon as it rears its head there is vilification of the messenger instead of listen ing,” Mr Mitchell said. Mitchell rounds on critics of Raynard Rigby SIR RONALD SANDERS JEFF ALBURY In brief DEATHOFLLOYDALLENALBURY "We have done our investigations and we are expecting to take that to court (today intend to charge another inmate for his death." A ssistant Superintendent Leon Bethel I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s FRED MITCHELL MAXTAYLOROPENSHISARTEXHIBITION

PAGE 8

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By ADRIAN GIBSON ajbahama@hotmail.com I N THE Bahamas, it appears that many Bahamians display a complete ignorance of their Constitutional rights and the country’s laws. Today, unless it is a right given under the numerated rights of the C onstitution, the only s upreme instrument that gives and guarantees the right of every citizen is the Constitution. Last week Thursday, American citizens celebrated Constitution Day, a stark contrast to the Bahamas that stillm aintains a backward approach to enlightening its citizens about their guaranteed rights and/or the statutes that speak to the legality or illegality of their actions. In the United States, aspects of the constitution are taught during elementary school. In this country, there is a dire need for civics to be comprehensively taught at the primary school level and, even more, for the publication of a “You and your con-s titution” book that simplifies, in everyday parlance, the rights conferred upon the populace and other elements of this supreme law. Do Bahamians really know the amount of power they bestow upon an MP when he is sent to Parliament, or are we too consumed with the catchy slogans and the revelry and social ambiance at politi cal rallies? Frankly, Bahamians must endeavour to learn the sci ence of citizenship and appreciate that no right is granted without a certain level of responsibilitytaking into account the public and private domainand, in some instances, a cost (i.e. the state may have to raise taxes to deliver certain rights, for e.g., education or national healthcare). In speaking about our constitutional rights, recent travels onboard the national flag carrierBahamasaircome to mind. As a Bahamian, I have a right to travel anywhere in the Bahamas; however, Bahamasair’s policywhere they demand my passport, which is a document used for international travelinfringes u pon my right to freedom of m ovement within the archip elago. P assport When has the passport become a necessary requirement for inter-island travel in the Bahamas’ archipelago? The Americans don’t show passports when they travel from state to state, so why must we when we travel from New Providence to the Family Islands? One of the incidences of Bahamian citizenship, which is an integral part of the bundle of rights granted by the Constitution, is the freedom of every Bahamian to travel unreservedly throughout the islands. In the Bahamas, security concerns allow for the suspension of the constitution and the imposition of martial law in emergency cases. In the case of Bahamasair’s policy, is this an instance where the danger is such that they have to suspend rights? Isn’t the Constitution the supreme law of the land? What happens if a traveller doesn’t have his/her passport and has never sought a license to drive? What happens when I fly Bahamasair again and exercise my right to free internal movement within the Bahamas and refuse to show my passport? It appears that the economy of the Bahamas dictates our sovereignty, particularly as a policy such as Bahamasair’s v iolate people’s fundamental r ights because the governm ent has had its arm twisted since September 11, 2001, due to our nearly desperate need for airlift to sustain our waning tourism industry. If Bahamian citizens have to conform to their “passportshowing obligations” relative to the boarding of inter-island Bahamasair flights, do the civil aviation authorities employ a discriminatory, double-stan dard when dealing with the owners of private aircraft who show no identification and merely travel in and out of the Bahamasunchecked? Should every airport or p ortprivate or notthen have these same unconstitutional strictures? Why is Bahamasair’s approach not applied across the board to private charter companies as well? On this issue, I spoke with medical doctor, lawyer and law professor Dr Dexter Johnson, who said: “I’m not showing my passport. The situation at Bahamasair is an example of government’s knee-jerk reac tion after 9/11. The governm ent acted in haste and overreacted. Horrendous things have happened in other countries long before 9/11Britain was bombed by the Nazis, the IRA, etcso why do the Americans think that they have to superimpose their will on the world? It appears to be a misjudged attempt to comply with the FAA. Regulations “Is this to do with our security, is this in compliance with international regulations and how does it fit in with Bahamian law as regards the rights of citizens? Is this part of Bahamian law to the extent that the international treaties and regulations have been accepted by the Bahamian government?” Dr Johnson said. If it is that Bahamasair is complying with FAA regula tions, is this then a condition of using the airport? Should it now be unders tood that in order to fly Bahamasair or use the airport, a Bahamian must give up a right as a condition for using that aircraft/facility? And, while I’m at it, what ever happened to all those ‘xray’ machines that outfitted several Family Island airports immediately after 9/11? It is high-time that the Bahamas takes a page out of Jamaica’s book and institutes a national ID. Air travel in the Bahamas is not so bad that it justifies citizens either choosing to show a document whose purpose is for external travel or having their rights suspended. If this continues, this will no doubt lead to Bahamians mounting legal actiona con stitutional challenge. I encourage any citizen who has had experiences where their entitlement to their rights has been forbidden to demand it through the courts by means of a constitutional motion Bahamas maintains a backward approach to informing citizens about their rights Y OUNG M AN S V IEW ADRIANGIBSON If law enforcement authorities in the Bahamas are serious about enforcing the laws and reducing instances of serious crime while also earning the treasury quite a bit of money through fines, it must address the petty crimes. Using section 212 of the Penal Code (Chapter 84 rity and the Commissioner of Police should see to it that throngs of police officers are deployed onto the streets to conduct a dragnet operation. On any given evening, such an operation would net thousands in fines, lead to the apprehension of wanted criminals and target those individuals who are selling food out of trunks of vehicle without health cert ificates and business licenses, who illegally light fires and destroy government property, arrest persons who unlawfully affix signs on buildings or public property (poles sons who do not have a permit from the Commissioner of Police to ply their wares or to hold demonstrations, fine hawkers, loiterers and phone card peddlers, sellers of fruits and clothes who do not have the proper documentation, fine persons who play music or make noise to the annoyance of others, and so on. I’m told by persons who lived in Freeport t hat the minor illegal acts that Nassauvians get away with could never openly transpire under the governance of the Grand Bahama Port Authority. With this in mind, is there any wonder why serious acts of criminality have permeated nearly every community on New Providence? The treasury and the Penal Code (Chapter 84 Every time I’m returning from overseas, midway in the flight to the Bahamas I’m often irritated when it’s stipulat ed that I must fill-out an immigration form to land at the Lynden Pindling International airport. Frankly, the distribution of these immigration forms to Bahamian travellers is an archaic practice that must be dispensed with. Bahamiant ravellers should not be mandated to waste time completing t hese unnecessary forms, since we all have a right to be here and it’s not as if the immigration department can put a Bahamian on a plane and send him/her elsewhere. Why must Bahamians fill out immigration car ds?

PAGE 9

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM LARRY BLACK (right w ith his award for winning the men’s longest drive on hole 2... C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS T RIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 9 Nassau Yacht Club champions of this year’s dual golf tourney LARRY BLACK (right winning the women’s longest drive on hole 13... LARRY BLACK (right with the floating trophy... L ARRY BLACK ( right), presents Phil Andrews with his award for winning the closest to the pin category on hole 14... Photos by Felip Major/ Tribune staff LARRY BLACK (far right

PAGE 10

C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS P AGE 10, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A NUMBER of young sailors competed in this year’sB ahamas Optimist National C hampionships at Montagu B ay, New Providence. National sailing director Jimmy Knowles said the two-d ay event was another grand success. T he boats are shown here i n the harbour. Photos b y F elip Major/ T r ibune staff ‘Another grand success’ Bahamas Optimist National Championships... DANNY de CARDENAS (shown onships over the weekend. The 14-year-old St Andrew’s School ninth grader completed the two-day event in Montagu Bay by accumulating a total of 15 points, but ended up with a net of 10 after he dropped his worse race score of 5 points. Competing out of the red group for competitors 13-15 years old, he said he felt he went out and competed very well in the seven races contested. “I just tried to stay focussed and got some good starts because I knew that the competition was going to be a lot stiffer than it was last year,” said de Cardenas, the Royal Nassau Sailing Club member who also plays baseball and soccer. “There was a lot of people who caught up to me on the last day. But I think I got off to a good start on the first day and I was able to hold onto my lead,” he said. Mr Olympia: Can Joel make the top 10? American Dexter Jackson. Jay Cutler, another American who relinquished his title to Jackson, is also entered. He won back-to-back titles in 2006 and 2007. Mr Olympia, which originated in 1965 with Larry Scott winning the first two titles, has had such champions as California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (1970-1975 and 1980). But Lee Haney (1984-1991 nie Coleman (1998-2005 the title more than any other competitor. Although he doesn’t feel that he hasn’t arrived to the point where he can challenge for the title, Stubbs said he has put together a routine that will definitely make him a contender for consideration. “I just want them to give me a honest ranking,” he said. The Bahamasair pilot, who got into building after he went through therapy for a broken leg he sustained playing basketball, said he originally only wanted to test his skills at CAC. But after winning the crown, Stubbs said Bahamas Bodybuilding and Fitness Federation president Danny Sumner and others encouraged him to take it a step further in the pro ranks. “When I went out there for the first time in the pro ranks, I left a statement out there with my back,” he insisted. “They had never seen such a phenomenal back developed like my own. “It was all over the Internet and in the magazines that I indeed had the best back in the world. They labeled me ahead of two Mr Olympia.” That episode in 2005 inspired Stubbs to go on and try to further develop his entire body so that he can get a chance to contest for the ultimate the Mr Olympia title. “I decided to continue on, being motivated by a lot of people out there and I got a little more mass and structure and was able to place in the top ten, but never got in the top three to qualify for Mr Olympia until I did in Dallas. “I think this is a gate opened for me now to move my programme to another notch, another level to getting to the point where I can compete for the Mr Olympia title.” Coleman, according to Stubbs, won the Mr Olympia title at 42, so he doesn’t see why he shouldn’t be able to achieve the same goal. “It’s not so much an age thing. It’s the genetic of the body, the nutritional level and how you keep your body,” said Stubbs, who competed in a total of 13 pro shows to finally get to the big stage. In 2005, Stubbs competed in his first two pro shows. He increased it to three in 2006 and entered two more in 2007, three more in 2008 and just two so far this year. Now Stubbs said he’s quite confident with his conditioning, his body fat and his diet to get prepared for the Mr Olympia. “In this sport you have to do what you have to do,” he insisted. “You just have to put the metal to the pedal and drive ahead at full speed and see what happens at the end of the day. “But I feel good going into Mr Olympia. I’m working daily, especially in my pos ing routine, so I’m really polished. But it’s just a matter of time before I get to really see what I’ve been doing for the past few weeks in my preparation.” After this weekend, Stubbs said he wants Bahamians to feel very proud of his accomplishment in Las Vegas. FROM page 11

PAGE 11

By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net TWO years ago, Simone Beneby introduced the Electro Telecom Cybots Lady Queens to the New Provi dence Women’s Basketball Association. Two months later, she has been introduced as the new president of the league. At the recent election of officers, Beneby was voted in to replace Antoinette Knowles, who opted not to return for another term in office. In an interview with The Tribune yesterday, Beneby said she feels it’s going to be a challenge, but one that she welcomes with open arms. “It’s a bit different. It’s a challenge, but I’m just doing the best that I can to advance women’s basketball in the country,” she stressed. Beneby will work along with the following executive members – Jeannie Minus, first vice president, Cindy Fox, second vice president, Sharel Cash, third vice presi dent, Anthony Swaby, fourth vice president, Laverne Wildgoose, treasurer, Natasha Gibson, secretary and Freddie Brown, commissioner. “I think I have a good slate of officers. Based on our executive meetings we’ve had thus far, it’s a good slate of persons who are willing to work,” she said. think they have all been working very hard trying to get all of the things that we want accomplished, accom plished for this league. So it’sa good hard working aggres sive team.” On November 7 at the D W Davis Gymnasium, the league is expected to officially start its 2009/2010 regular season. But over the weekend of October 23-24, there will be a pre-season jam boree. Along with Beneby’s Elec tro Telecom, the league is once again expected to be made up of six teams. Among them are defending champi ons Johnson’s Lady Truckers, runners-up Bommer George Lady Angels, Sunshine Auto Lady Cheetahs, the Royal Bahamas Defense Force and the Junior Nationals. The part-time Gospel comedian said she intends to be back as the coach of the Lady Queens, but if it becomes a conflict of interest, she will have no problem relinquishing her duties. In the meantime, Beneby said her aim this year is to get some key elements into the women’s league. “We’re in the process right now of creating a web page that would give our audience some information on the league, outside of just our game time,” she pointed out. “We want to provide them with some information on the past players, the history of the league and some of the legends who played the game.” Additionally, Beneby said they are also going to focus on developing a feeder system for the league where they incorporate the high school system so as to attract a lot of the younger players. “We want the younger girls who don’t get the opportuni ty to go off to school to be able to look at this as a viable alternative where we can have some coaches from the United States come and see them,” she said. “In term, we hope to send some of our teams off to the United States to play in tour naments so that the coaches over there can also see them with the view of getting some of them off to school.” The league, according to Beneby, is also looking at the possibility of generating some revenue where they can even tually get in one or two live television games. By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net W hen Joel Stubbs h eads to Las Vegas, Nevada, for his debut in the Mr Olympia this weekend, he will be on stage with the top 26 ranked competitors in the world. Stubbs, who qualified at a tournament in Dallas, Texas, will leave town on Wednesday for the world’s biggest bodybuilding show where he will participate in the prejudging on 7pm Friday. The final is set for Saturday at the same time. Based on his preparation, Stubbs said he has something in store for the public. “I think this is the best that a nybody would have seen me on stage,” Stubbs said. “I’m in much better condition from what they saw me in earlier this year. “I pretty much brought my legs up a bit in the volume,n ot so much in the size. But I have them looking more fuller. As you know, bodybuilding is all about an illusion, so if I can present it as a gain to the judges, I’m sure I can leave an impression in Las Vegas.” Having qualified for the first time since he turned professional when he won his card by winning the CentralA merican and Caribbean Bodybuilding Championships in 2003, Stubbs said if he can finish in the top 10, he would feel quite content. “With all of the names that are in place, I think they area ll pretty much established,” pointed out Stubbs, who has yet to win his first pro show. “But from my mind set, I want to give them a phenomenal package that at the end of the day, they will have to go back to their books and try to determine just exactly where they will place Joel Stubbs. A top ten would be very good for me for my first showdown.” Stubbs, 42, will be one of just two competitors from the Caribbean who will be participating in the show. The other is Trinidad & Tobago’s Darren Charles. Back to defend his title is BASKETBALL CYBOTS WIN TITLE COACH Wayde Watson and his Electro Telecom Cybots celebrated another milestone on Saturday night at the D W Davis Gymnasi um. Fresh off winning the New Providence Basketball Association title, Watson and his Cybots captured the Bahamas Government Departmental Basketball Association crown. They did it by dethroning the Police Crimestoppers 10391 in the fourth game of their best-of-five championship series. They ended up taking a 3-1 decision in the showdown. Mark Hanna led the attack for the Cybots with a game high 39 points. Billy Sands added 18. Valentino Richardson scored a side high 37 and Adorn Charlow chipped in with 18 in a losing effort. BOXING MACKEY OFF TO CANADA JERMAINE ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey and his handlers, Ray and Michelle Minus, are scheduled to leave town today for Montreal, Canada, where Mackey will fight Haitianborn Canadian Adonis ‘Superman’ Stevensen on Friday night at the Bell Center. The fight comes after Mackey spent three weeks in Berlin, Germany, sparring with world champion Mikkel Kessler in August and it comes just before Mackey gets set to defend his British Commonwealth title against Charles Adamu of Ghana next month at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. SOCCER COB LOSES DOUBLE HEADER THE College of the Bahamas’ men and women soccer teams both lost their soccer matches to Webber International University as they concluded their tour of the Sun Belt Coast in Florida. While the men lost 5-1, the women were whitewashed 120. The men’s soccer team is now expected to participate in the Bahamas Football Association’s senior league, which commences on October 25, while the women’s team will commence its off season programme for next Fall’s season. VOLLEYBALL COB PREPARES FOR SEASON THE College of the Bahamas will continue its Athletics calendar with their women’s volleyball team trav eling to Miami, Florida, to play St Thomas University and Florida Memorial University over the weekend of October 16-17. In preparation for the collegiate tour, the Lady Caribs will play in the New Provi dence Volleyball Association (NPVA weekend at the D W Davis Gymnasium. SPOR TS IN BRIEF C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 9 Dual golf tourney awards... TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Mr Olympia: Can Joel make the top 10? J OEL STUBBS i s scheduled to depart for Las Vegas on Wednesday to take part in Mr Olympia... SEE page 10 SIMONE BENEBY Photo by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff Ne w NPWBA boss w elcomes halleng e’ with open ar ms

PAGE 12

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM DUNCAN TOWN, Ragged Island – I n an effort to boost food production in far-flung commun ities, the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corpor ation is donating a greenhouse to the public school here. And, to help get the programme underway, BAIC is contributing $500 for seeds and fertilisers, executive chairman Edi-s on Key said. Mr Key headed a team which travelled to Ragged Island last weekend for the presentation of certificates to persons BAIC trained in straw craft. They were joined by Exuma and Ragged Island administrator Ivan Ferguson, BAIC’s assistant general manager in charge o f handicrafts Donnalee Bowe and executive secretary Lovelee McQueen. The craft graduates were: Sade Lockhart-Bain; Rhesa Boodram; Lovell Lockhart; Nino Frances, Jr; Ashton Brooks;M yron Lockhart-Bain, Jr; Verva Wallace; Charlene LockhartB ain; Angela Cyrille; Elma Wilson, and Pauline Maycock. They were tutored by celebrated craft trainer Eloise Smith. Using silver top palms and sisal plants, they produced a variety of bags, hats, caps, and mats, utilising popular Bahamian p laits. Goatskin mats were also featured. A successful farmer himself, Mr Key urged Ragged Islanders to focus on feeding themselves and lessening their dependence on foreign imports. There is no reason why we can’t start producing our own f ood even right here in Ragged Island,” said Mr Key to a rousing round of applause. “I know you are self-sufficient in conch and fish, but plant whatever fruit trees you can find. They will grow right here. And w e will do everything we can to help you.” More than $500 million in food is imported each year, he said. Why are we not producing even a quarter of that amount? Do you know how many thousands of jobs that can create?” M r Key commended Ragged Islanders for the “excellent quality” of their straw work. He urged them to tap into the more than $200 million sou venir market, which is currently being supplied by imports from other countries. Let us teach our people to produce these products. There is a tremendous market for them,” he said. Let us take advantage of everything we can in developing our people to be an active part of the economy. We want to make s ure that Ragged Island is not left out.” Ragged Island and Exuma administrator Ivan Ferguson congratulated Mr Key for “the excellent work you are doing in this country.” “I see this as a stepping-stone for bigger and better things to h appen on Ragged Island,” he said. “One of our problems is that we do not prepare our people a dequately to meet the challenges of this global community. “Mr Key and BAIC are preparing Ragged Islanders for what i s expected to come to this island. They are empowering the peo ple of this country.” Duncan TOWN FOR Greenhouse THE BAIC CHIEF offers words of encouragement to students of the Ragged Island Public School. WELCOME TORAGGEDISLAND WORDS OFWISDOM MR EDISON KEY is presented with an authentic Ragged Island goat skin. Pictured from left are: chief councillor Phicol Wallace, secretary for local government Charlene Lockhart-Bain, Mr Key, and Ragged Island and Exuma administrator Ivan Ferguson. AUTHENTICGOATSKIN RAGGED ISLAND graduates of the BAIC straw craft programme show off their certificates in this photo with executive chairman Edison Key and community leaders. GRADUATESWITHCERTIFICATES PHOTOS: Gladstone Thurston /BIS MR EDISON KEY AND H IS TEAM w ere warmly received in Ragged Island. A contingent from the public school joined community leaders in welcoming them. MR EDISON KEY pledges his support for Ragged Islanders.

PAGE 13

B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor GOVERNMENT revenues a re still $30 million behind 2009-2010 Budget predictions, the minister of state forf inance said yesterday, with the Government wanting “to be nearer forecast than that”. With the first quarter of the G overnment’s 2009-2010 fiscal year due to end on Sep tember 30, Zhivargo Laing s aid it was “much too early” to say whether Budgetary forecasts and spending plans would have to be adjusted,i ndicating the Government would see how revenue trends fared for the remainder of 2 009. “We are still looking at $30 million or so behind forecast,s o that’s something which we w ill continue to keep under watch. We’d like to be nearer forecast than that,” Mr Laingt old Tribune Business. He explained that the Government was also watching to see if there was the same kind of steep decline in revenue that occurred post-September2 008, when Lehman Brothers collapsed and nearly took theg lobal financial system and economy with it. Mr Laing also said that year-over-year revenue com parisons were “much narrowBy NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor THE Government is pur suing double taxation agreem ents and investment treaties with all countries offering those options in negotiations over Tax Information Exchange Agreements (TIEAS yesterday that he was “confi d ent” the Bahamas would meet the necessary standards by the required deadlines. Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, told Tribune Business that the Government’s negotiations were “going extremely well” as it seeks to meet the G20/OECD minimum require ments of having 12 TIEAs in place by year-end. When asked whether the Bahamas was likely to meet the deadline it had set itself to implement its commitments on tax transparency and the exchange of tax information, Mr Laing told this newspaper: “I’m very confident that we will. “I think our negotiations with any number of countries a re going extremely well. We have reached very satisfactory conclusions with any num b er of them.” Michael Paton, a former Bahamas Financial Services Board (BFSB , told T ribune Business last week that his only concern was that this nation did not run intot rouble with the G-20/OECD by failing to meet its commit m ents as a result of their members’ “scheduling conflicts”. H e expressed concern that some might say they were too busy to conclude a TIEA with the Bahamas in the timeframe t his nation had committed to, B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor T HE B ahamian C ontractors A ssociation’s (BCA d ent yesterday said that while o fficial figures s howed mortg age commitm ents for new construction fell by 26.1 per cent year-over-year for the 2009 second quarter, the mar k etplace reality was fare worse with per cent less s tarts” as financing recipients held off on their projects. Stephen Wrinkle said Central Bank of the Bahamas’ data showing that mortgage c ommitments for new construction and repairs both residential and commercial -f ell by 26.1 per cent to $56.1 million for the three months to June 30, 2009, was “better n ews than what we expected”. However, he suggested there was a disconnect b etween those figures and was actually occurring in the Bahamian construction mark et, with recipients of bank debt financing reluctant to commence new builds due tot he lack of confidence caused b y the recession. “Our impression is that only 25 per cent of mortgage a pplications are currently being approved,” Mr Wrinkle told Tribune Business. I’m sure that’s in keeping w ith what’s happening in the marketplace. We probably started to see a fall in that thist ime last year, but I’m surprised that’s [the 26.1 per cent drop] all it is.” M ortgage financing actually released to borrowers for new construction and repairs fell by 25.4 per cent to $64.3 m illion during the 2009 second quarter, providing further evidence of the weaken ing economy and its impact on the housing and construction sector. “It seems like there’s less work in the marketplace,” Mr Wrinkle told Tribune Business. “The numbers may say different, but there appearsto be more of a fall-off in the marketplace than that. “It seems as if those people who received approvalsmay not have proceeded with their projects. As a result, there’s some disparity B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter c robards@tribunemedia.net C o ca-Cola’s Bahamian bottler and distributor has matched its global c ounterparts through unwavering sales d emand for its products, its president t elling Tribune Business yesterday that its new bottling plant will come on s tream by 2011. W alter Wells, head of Caribbean Bottling, revealed that the company broke ground for the new plant on T onique Williams-Darling Highway last month, and expects the construct ion and transfer from the current T hompson Boulevard location to take two two years. Mr Wells said the new plant will l eave the company better positioned to move with the market and meet d emand when the Bahamian economy t urns around. "We're upbeat and optimistic about C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information c ontained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible fore rrors and/or o mission from the d aily report. $4.25 $4.14 $4.26 '%, ,$1t ,'/& '-+/!, **&'.,!'&+&-%'-+-(*$1('+!,!/!, & ,,'"'1$&,$''&.!/+.+!-&!,/!, +$!.!+-(*/!,' $'*/ !*$+1+, -**!+ -,,+,!-*&!+ !&+ **(+-'(!&#*&-*&+!,-*-$ B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor BAHAMIAN designers “have not moved as aggress ively as they could” to develop a local fashion industry through exploiting eventss uch as Miss Universe, the organiser of an upcoming Bahamas-based fashion show s aying yesterday that his event had both benefited and been negatively impacted byt he global recession. O wen Bethel, president and chief executive of the Nassau-based Montaque G roup, whose Modes Illes subsidiary is currently organising the second Islands of the World fashion show, said that w hile the designer line-up had Fashion show suffers ‘offset’ impact from the recession * While designer numbers set to drop from 38 to 20 at Islands of the World, cancellation/downsizing at other Caribbean events set to boost buyer attendance * Bahamian designers ‘have not moved as aggressively a s they could’ to develop local industry * Miss Universe designer approached by ‘major b uyer’ for purchases, with local sector having potential to generate ‘fashion tourism’ S EE page 4B SEE page 5B SEE page 6B Coca-Cola distributor plans 2011 plant open Construction reality worse than statistics with % less starts’ Ground broken for new facility on Tonique Williams-Darling Highway, with construction and transfer to take two years W RINKLE SEE page 2B S EE page 2B Bahamas pursues investment and double tax deals ‘where offered’ e want to be nearer forecasts’ G overnment r evenues still $30m b ehind forecast, b ut ‘much too early t o say’ whether B udget predictions have to be revised or spending cuts occur

PAGE 14

between what those figures are saying and what is happening in the marketplace. Some people may be qualified and not moving forward, b ecause they’re afraid of what i s happening. “It’s better news than we expected, but the physicalm arketplace indicates there is less than that going ahead. There may be 25 per cent less approvals, but 50 per cent lesss tarts.” Further depressing the Bahamian construction industry is the more than 50 per c ent contraction in foreign purchases of this nation’s land and real estate during the2 009 second quarter, which f ell to $50 million. Net foreign direct investment inflows into the Bahamas during those three months fell by 20 per to $175.8 million, a $43.6 million decline from the pre v ious year’s $219.4 million. The BCA president told Tribune Business there was no sign that the current trends i mpacting the Bahamian construction industry would turnaround soon. H e added: “Many contrac tors are struggling, and it’s due to circumstances beyondt he ordinary person’s control a nd, indeed, the Government’s control. None of this will resolve this without a stimulus by external forces. Baha Mar represents the brightest hope of turning this trend around.” M r Wrinkle said major construction projects, such as mixed-use resort developments, usually translated into s maller and medium-sized developments that Bahamian contractors could work on,y et the sector was suffering from an almost-total absence of these currently. W ith foreign direct invest ment, the key driver of the Bahamian economy, down by anywhere between 20-33 perc ent and no recovery immi nent, the BCA president urged Bahamians to “take c ontrol of our own destiny” by investing more in their own economy. Right now, there’s a lot of v acant commercial space on the island, and a lot of businesses are struggling,” Mr W rinkle said. “We will see some filtering out of commercial businesses. It’s goingt o take us a little while to fill this void. Unless we generate some internal income for the c ountry, we will be dependent on external forces.” He called for Bahamians to put together or be part of t he [major] deals” to reduce the reliance on foreign direct investment, but acknowledged that due to exchange control restrictions it was very difficult for them to raise debtf inancing at rates and terms that were competitive with foreigners. “It’s coming to catastroph i c proportions,” Mr Wrinkle told Tribune Business. “Unless we have a nationald evelopment plan we can work on, we’re just going to continue treading water. I know of two major developments in Nassau, not Albany, where foreigners got permits to come in and buyt he land, develop it and then sell it back to Bahamians at a huge profit, taking the money o ut of the country. “I think that’s inherently wrong, just because they havea ccess to financing and fore ign money. That has pre vented Bahamians from accessing that development m arket. We have to focus on changing that, otherwise we’ll keep on bleeding money outo f here.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM AN independent real estate broker and consultant, and past local government exec-u tive, Ann Albury, is the ‘vision speaker’ at the upcom-i ng Abaco Business Outlook. The sixth Annual Abaco Business Outlook Seminar is scheduled for tomorrow at the New Vision Ministries Cen-t re in Marsh Harbour, Abaco, and Ms Albury will give those attending a visual of Abaco past, Abaco present and a taste of what’s to come in Abaco’s future. “We are going to take a l ook at where Abaco was and what it has evolved into,” said M s Albury. “We are also going to explore what we are hoping for futuristically.” A Justice of the Peace, Ms Albury is also a former mem-b er of North Abaco District Council, a former member oft he North Abaco Licensing Board and the deputy chairman of North Abaco Town Planning. She served on the Ministry o f Tourism’s advisory committee, is a founding member of the Abaco Swim Club and is a director of both the Abaco Chamber of Commerce and Friends of the Environment. T he seminar’s keynote speaker is Senator Vincent V anderpool-Wallace, minister of tourism and aviation. Other speakers include Eric Carey, executive director, Bahamas National Trust;A lgernon Cargill, director, National Insurance Board;I saac Collie, lawyer and economist; I. Chester Cooper, president and chief executive, British American Financial; Rev Lennie Etienne, presi-d ent of Abaco Farmers Cooperative Society; and Dr Pearl McMillan, director of Public Health. Abaco Business Outlook is a one-day seminar coordinated by The Counsellors. The s eminar, in its sixth year, is themed: Renewed Optimism: E mbracing New Opportunities . Realtor to outline ‘vision’ for Abaco A NN ALBURY i s the ‘vision speaker’ at the upcoming Abaco Business Outlook... Construction reality worse than statistics with % less starts’ F ROM page 1B e want to be nearer forecasts’ er, much more in line” with the year before. He added: “The revenue forecast is important to us in the sense that you predicate your expenditure on that. Clearly, one has to look at revenue and how it has per formed, and make some determinations, if that performance has lapsed, for what you said you wanted to do. That has to be taken into con sideration, along with other factors.” However, he added that it was “much too early for us to say” whether spending cuts would result if government revenues remained stubbornly below forecast. INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, r ead Insight on Mondays FROM page 1B

PAGE 15

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas 14.1 per cent decline in net income to $49.205 million for the first nine months of its 2 009 financial year, a drop largely caused by a 34.8 per c ent increase in loan loss provisions. The bank, the largest listing on the Bahamas International Securities Exchange (BISX by market capitalisation, has been impacted by the samed eterioration in asset/loan portfolio quality as other institutions, forcing it to raise provisions for the nine months to July 31, 2009, to $20.253 million compared to $15.026 million in 2008. With total income flat at $121.452 million, the $5 million loan loss provision increase and almost $3 million rise in operating expenses due to bank licence fee increases and salary rises assoc iated with a union agreement caused net income for the f irst nine months to fall to $49.205 million, compared to $57.263 million the year before. For the third quarter, FirstCaribbean saw net income fall by 27.2 per cent to $19.436 mil-l ion, compared to $26.706 million in 2008. The fall was largely induced by a $5 million swing in operating income, which fell from $13.348 million to $7.835 million. In his message to First Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas chairman Michael Mansoor said the bank had been able to grow its loan book by $139 million or 6 per cent to $2.609 billion during the first nine m onths despite the recession. Mr Mansoor added that for t he first nine months of fiscal 2009, FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas operating income improve by $4 million to $15.5 million, although lower international interest rates partially offsetb y the increased loan volume caused net interest income to drop by $3.9 million to $105.9 million. Mr Mansoor said the bank remained well-capitalised with a Tier I capital ratio of 17.7 per cent, well above the minimum 14 per cent requirement. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM btrt tfr f r !%* '!$() ))!*&*#tffn""bnff ! $ %#&!*&*# !%** For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y. FirstCaribbean sees 14.1 per cent drop in profits

PAGE 16

C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Fashion show suffers ‘offset’ impact from the recession been affected by the global economy, the Bahamiane vent was likely to benefit f rom an increased audience as other Caribbean shows cancelled. Acknowledging that this year’s Islands of the World designer line-up was “actual-l y reduced to about 20 designe rs, compared to 38 at last year’s inaugural event, Mr Bethel told Tribune Business: “We cut back on a lot of persons who really were notr eady to produce what the buyers wanted them to do. “A number of designers a lso came back to us and said they were prevented from coming because of the eco-n omic and financial situation. “We had applications from 3 0 designers this year. Out of t hat, we said ‘no’ to about five b ecause they were not prepared, while three to four said they had to pull out at the last m inute because of the finan cial situation, with sponsors withdrawing.” W hile 20 designers was “a g ood practical number” to work with for Islands of the World, Mr Bethel said his main disappointment was that representatives from all geographical regions especiallyt hose from further afield would not be present. “Those are designers able and prepared to carry through their designs on a consistent basis, able to consolidate them from season to season,”M r Bethel said of those would present during Islands of the World fashion week. I don’t think we have any regrets in terms of numbers, but the disappointment is that d esigners from the Pacific I slands and the Indian Ocean are not represented because of the costs. We have onef rom Madagascar, when last year we had designers from Fiji, Indonesia and Mauri-t ius.” B ut, on the positive side, Mr Bethel said Islands of the World was likely to experie nce a boost in buyer, fashion industry and media attendance as a result of otherC aribbean nations cancelling t heir own fashion weeks. Pointing to the fact that the Virgin Islands had just cancelled its own fashion week, he added: “A number have downsized or cancelled alto g ether their Fashion Weeks. “The interest in our event h as continued, and we’re getting a lot of media coverage worldwide. I know a number of those who were planning to go to the Virgin Islands and Trinidad are coming here for this fashion week. What num-b er that might be, I have no idea.” Yet moves by Bahamian designers to exploit the foundation and exposure events such as Islands of the World, p lus the recent Miss Universe P ageant, have generated for them have been slow. “I don’t think the local designers have moved as aggressively as they could ora s one might have thought they would,” Mr Bethel said. “I think there’s a lot of room a nd opportunities for them to t ake the industry to the next level. “That may be the result of t wo things. One is a factor of the economic situation and t he financial impact that has h ad on a number of designers. The second is just not h aving a full grasp of the business and marketing side of the business, as opposed to the creative side just designing. “It will be a learning p rocess that they will have to undertake. A lot of appetites have been whetted, but they have generally not had the ability to take advantage of any initiative built on that e nthusiasm.” A s an example of what these events could generate, Mr Bethel said “a major buy-e r” who attended the Miss Universe Pageant’s Fashion Show had been in touch with o ne of the three Bahamian designers whose products w ere showcased by the contestants, with a view to purchasing their products. Development of a thriving home grown Bahamian fashion industry holds tremendous potential for this nation,a s it could help diversify the economy and, more significantly, act as a foreign exchange earner if garments and designs could exported. Acknowledging that the s ector held “that value” for t he Bahamas, Mr Bethel said it could also create ‘fashion tourism’ for this nation. “Where it does have that ability to be exposed throught ourism, tourists can see it has quality, is something they can buy and brings value to t hem,” Mr Bethel added. D eveloping a strong Bahamian fashion industry could also generate jobs fort echnicians, such as make-up artists and stylists, plus designe rs and creators of the actual f abric such as Bahama Hand Prints and Androsia, both of w hom were featured in the Miss Universe Pageant designs. Mr Bethel said the sector could also be developed as “ac ottage industry” from people’s homes, avoiding the need for great overhead costs. Of the 20 designers set to be featured at Islands of the World, some four to five B ahamians will appear in the next generation’ section, with another two among “the more seasoned designers”. I slands of the World will be held from November 4-8, 2009, at the Sheraton Cable B each Resort. OWEN BETHEL F ROM page 1B

PAGE 17

C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Bahamas pursues investment and double tax deals ‘where offered’ meaning that it would be unfair for the G-20/OECD tot ake action against this nation b ecause it was their members who had caused the problem. H owever, Mr Laing’s optim ism indicates this is unlikely to be an issue. T he Bahamas, having signed its first TIEA with the US in January 2002, conclud e d its second, with fellow i nternational financial centre Monaco, last week, thus leaving it requiring 10 more b efore year-end to meet G2 0/OECD requirements. In addition, the Bahamas a nd Monaco are also negotiating a double taxation treaty, something that would see the latter’s residents, for example, taxed only in the B ahamas on assets, income and business interests h eld/generated here, and not in Monaco. Confirming that the Government was pursuing double taxation and international i nvestment treaties with all n ations where this was an option, Mr Laing confirmed: To the extent to which countries may offer that possibility, c learly we are minded to go t hat route. I believe that is in keeping with our long-term interests. All of the things that allow u s to be a leading jurisdiction for international investment we are seeking to include in discussions with countries we are negotiating with.” The Government previousl y stated it had started negot iations on tax information exchange agreements with C anada, the United Kingdom, Australia, Spain, Germany, France, Turkey and the Nordic countries (Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Iceland, Greenland the Faroe I slands). T he Bahamas added that it had also initiated discussions on tax information exchange a greements with China, and proposed to do the same with Brazil, Mexico, Japan, Ire-l and, South Africa and India. Meanwhile, Mr Laing said it was “difficult to know what more” the Bahamas could do to form a satisfactory relationship on tax matters with the US other than have aT IEA with Washington. Influential Democratic senator Carl Levin last week demanded that international financial centres and their institutions be barred from accessing the US and international financial systems if they ‘fail’ to aid the fight against tax eva sion , and urged the Obama a dministration to broaden the scope of TIEAs beyond requests for specific taxpay er information to a catch-all d emand for details on all US citizens. While he had not seen the Senator’s comments, Mr Laing said yesterday: “It’s worth noting that we have a TIEA with the US, and I d on’t know what more we can d o in respect of that than have that kind of relationship with t he US. “I cannot be responsible for how the Senator is reviewing the matter, but I do know we have an arrangement that is an internationally acceptable s tandard in respect to how t hese matters are dealt with.” To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in cir culation, just call 502-2371 today! Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour h oods. Per haps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. FROM page 1B

PAGE 18

t he future," he said. M r Wells said Caribbean B ottling has steady sales numb ers year-over-year for 2009 t o date, despite the decline in t ourist arrivals that affected h otel and resort demand for s oft drinks. M r Wells said efficiency u pgrades to the existing plant a nd effective budgeting have k ept the company in good s tead through 2009. "We are watching our pennies," he said. "Generally, things are progressing well." The Coca Cola brand was v oted best global brand this year, carrying a value of $67.5 billion. According to businessweek.com, the company has seen only a 1 per cent decline since 2005, due to a waningd emand for sodas, but it has r eleased a host of other produ cts to keep the brand mark etable. Locally, Caribbean Bottling produces multiple products, i ncluding Fanta sodas, Schweppes and, recently, V8. Mr Wells said the company w ould like to shift its focus away from carbonated prod u ct and branch out in other d irections. Taxation With the US eyeing the taxation of carbonated drinks,M r Wells said he was not sure how it might affect the importation of sodas into the Bahamas, but suggested it may simply be a point-of-sale tax that won't be transferred. As Caribbean Bottling i nvests in its new plant it has a lso set out a community serv ice agenda and aided in the r esurfacing of a basketball court in the Grove and in Stapledon Gardens. " We try to support the community which supports us," said Mr Wells. "Wew ould like to see it continued on an ongoing basis." C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y P revious CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1 .811.14AML Foods Limited1.151.14-0.0122,7600.1270.0009.00.00% 1 1.809.90Bahamas Property Fund10.7510.750.000.9920.20010.81.86% 9 .305.90Bank of Bahamas6.185.90-0.2842,2000.2440.26024.24.41% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3 .493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.00Cable Bahamas10.0310.030.001.4060.2507.12.49%2 .882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.0010,1000.2490.04011.01.46% 7 .505.26Commonwealth Bank (S1 5.925.920.002160.4190.30014.15.07% 3 .851.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.643.62-0.020.1110.05232.61.44% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital2.052.050.000.3820.0805.43.90% 8.206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.508.80Finco9.309.300.002000.3220.52028.95.59% 1 1.7110.00FirstCaribbean Bank10.2910.00-0.2925,0000.7940.35012.63.50% 5 .534.95Focol (S 4.994.990.002250.3320.15015.03.01% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.27Freeport Concrete0.300.27-0.031,0000.0350.0007.70.00% 9.025.49ICD Utilities5.505.500.004060.4070.50013.59.09% 12.009.98J. S. Johnson9.989.980.000.9520.64010.56.41% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100000 100000 FidelityBankNote13(SeriC)+ FBB13 10000 000 M ONDAY,21SEPTEMBER2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,514.66| CHG -20.33| %CHG -1.32 | YTD -197.70 | YTD % -11.55BISX LISTEDDEBTSECURITIES (BondstradeonaPercentagePricingbases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% B ISXLISTED& TRADEDSECURITIES AS OF: 30May2013 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM| TELEPHONE:242-323-2330|FACSIMILE:242-323-232019 October 2022 InterestFINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31% 1000 . 00 1000 . 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 . 00 0 . 00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.607.92Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.00-2.2460.000N/M0.00% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref2.006.254.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.40381.3344CFAL Bond Fund1.40383.725.20 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8990-1.39-4.16 1.48921.4119CFAL Money Market Fund1.48923.875.47 3.60903.0941Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.0941-8.61-13.59 13.048412.3870Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.11363.935.87 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.40759.0775FidelityInternationalInvestmentFund9.33992.69-1.41 1.07071.0000FGFinancialPreferredIncomeFund1.07073.385.14 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0319-0.112.05 1.06731.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.06732.894.93BISXALLSHAREINDEX -19Dec02=1,000.00 YIELD -last12monthdividendsdividedbyclosingprice 52wk-Hi -Highestclosingpriceinlast52weeks Bid$ -BuyingpriceofColinaandFidelity 52wk-Low -Lowestclosingpriceinlast52weeks Ask $ -SellingpriceofColinaandfidelity PreviousClose -Previousday'sweightedpricefordailyvolume LastPrice -Lasttradedover-the-counterprice Today'sClose -Currentday'sweightedpricefordailyvolume WeeklyVol. -Tradingvolumeofthepriorweek Change -Changeinclosingpricefromdaytoday EPS$ -Acompany'sreportedearningspershareforthelast12mths DailyVol. -Numberoftotalsharestradedtoday NAV -NetAssetValue DIV$ -Dividendspersharepaidinthelast12months N/M -NotMeaningful P/E -Closingpricedividedbythelast12monthearnings FINDEX -TheFidelityBahamasStockIndex.January1,1994=100 (S)-4-for-1StockSplit-EffectiveDate8/8/2007 (S1)-3-for-1StockSplit-EffectiveDate7/11/200731-Aug-09 Prime + 1.75% 7% 31-Aug-09 30-Jun-09 31-Aug-09 NAV Date 31-Aug-09FidelityOver-The-CounterSecurities ColinaOver-The-CounterSecurities BISX ListedMutualFunds 30 May 2013 29 May 2015TOTRADECALL:COLINA242-502-7010|ROYALFIDELITY242-356-7764|FGCAPITALMARKETS242-396-4000|COLONIAL242-502-752531-Aug-09 30-Jun-09 31-Dec-07 31-Jul-09 31-Aug-09 11-Sep-09 31-Aug-09MARKETTERMS 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW -$621'250(86 RI&$50,&+($/52$'52&.<1$66$8 %$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU 1 DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQ D V D FLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKR N QRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOG Q RWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQW R I WKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH WK G RI 6HSWHPEHU WRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\ DQG&LWL]HQVKLS 127,&( /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ W GD\RI6HSWHPEHU 7KH/LTXLGDWRU L V $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ W GD\RI6HSWHPEHU 7KH/LTXLGDWRU L V $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ W GD\RI6HSWHPEHU 7KH/LTXLGDWRU L V $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ W GD\RI6HSWHPEHU 7KH/LTXLGDWRU L V $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV Coca-Cola distributor plans 2011 plant open F ROM page 1B

PAGE 19

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 75F/24C Low: 75F/24C Low: 77F/25C Low: 80F/27C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 79F/26C Low: 80 F/27 C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 90F/32C High: 91F/33C High: 88 F/31 C High: 88 F/31 C High: 87F/31C High: 88 F/31C High: 89F/32C Low: 77F/25C High: 89F/32C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 89F/32C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 75F/24C High: 89 F/32 C Low: 78F/26C High: 86 F/30 Low: 74F/23C High: 87F/31C Low: 75 F/24C High: 89F/32C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 90F/32C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 89F/32C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 89F/32C Low: 78F/26C High: 90 F/32 C Low: 76F/24C High: 89F/32C High: 89 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22 ND , 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Variable clouds with a t-storm. Partly cloudy, a t-storm; breezy. Some sun; a shower or t-storm. Partly sunny with a shower possible. A stray shower or t-storm possible. High: 89 Low: 80 High: 89 High: 88 High: 89 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny. High: 87 Low: 79 Low: 79 Low: 77 AccuWeather RealFeel 98F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 84F 97-86F 99-80F 98-85F 95-83F Low: 78 TODAYTONIGHTWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAY SATURDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................90F/32C Low ....................................................81F/27C Normal high ......................................87F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 91 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 78 F/26C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.02" Year to date ................................................30.27" Normal year to date ....................................36.27" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU First Full Last New Sep. 26 Oct. 4Oct. 11Oct. 18 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:59 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:06 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 10:46 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 9:38 p.m. Today Wednesday Thursday Friday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 10:01 a.m.3.53:42 a.m.0.3 10:18 p.m.2.84:27 p.m.0.6 10:49 a.m.3.34:26 a.m.0.4 11:06 p.m.2.65:17 p.m.0.9 11:40 a.m.3.15:13 a.m.0.7 11:59 p.m.2.56:11 p.m.1.2 12:36 p.m.2.96:05 a.m.1.0 -----7:10 p.m.1.3 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco91/3277/25pc89/3178/25t Amsterdam67/1956/13pc63/1750/10pc Ankara, Turkey66/1843/6sh70/2143/6s Athens76/2461/16pc77/2563/17s Auckland62/1650/10pc63/1761/16r Bangkok89/3178/25t90/3278/25t Barbados87/3077/25s86/3077/25s Barcelona75/2363/17pc74/2363/17s Beijing81/2754/12s78/2560/15pc Beirut76/2471/21s76/2469/20s Belgrade80/2655/12s82/2758/14s Berlin73/2255/12pc72/2252/11pc Bermuda82/2774/23s82/2773/22s Bogota66/1847/8sh65/1845/7r Brussels72/2250/10s72/2252/11pc Budapest83/2856/13s82/2757/13s Buenos Aires59/1537/2sh59/1536/2s Cairo99/3771/21s92/3367/19s Calcutta89/3183/28t92/3384/28r Calgary80/2646/7s83/2844/6s Cancun90/3275/23pc90/3274/23t Caracas83/2872/22pc82/2772/22t Casablanca80/2661/16s82/2763/17s Copenhagen64/1750/10sh66/1847/8sh Dublin63/1748/8pc61/1646/7sh Frankfurt75/2350/10pc75/2352/11pc Geneva 74/23 53/11 s 77/2552/11s Halifax 68/20 53/11 s 70/21 50/10 pc Havana 90/32 73/22 t 87/30 72/22 r Helsinki 63/17 52/11sh59/1546/7pc Hong Kong 88/31 79/26 t 88/31 81/27t Islamabad 104/40 73/22 s 105/40 74/23 s Istanbul72/2259/15s74/2360/15s Jerusalem 82/27 65/18s81/2757/13s Johannesburg 81/2754/12pc78/2552/11pc Kingston 88/3179/26t88/3179/26r Lima74/2358/14s73/2258/14pc London72/2255/12pc68/2050/10pc Madrid81/2754/12s79/2654/12pc Manila88/3179/26t84/2877/25r Mexico City75/2355/12t75/2355/12t Monterrey90/3270/21t79/2666/18t Montreal72/2259/15r72/2254/12pc Moscow63/1745/7pc57/1348/8pc Munich77/2550/10s80/2652/11s Nairobi88/3156/13pc87/3057/13pc New Delhi 97/3681/27s98/3679/26s Oslo65/1845/7sh61/1642/5sh Paris74/2352/11s75/2354/12s Prague 76/24 55/12 s 77/25 54/12 s Rio de Janeiro79/2672/22r86/3075/23c Riyadh101/3872/22s98/3673/22s Rome 77/25 63/17 t 79/26 63/17 s St. Thomas88/3180/26sh88/3179/26s San Juan53/1135/1r75/2342/5s San Salvador 86/30 68/20 t 86/30 73/22 t Santiago 68/2045/7pc72/2245/7s Santo Domingo90/3274/23t85/2973/22r Sao Paulo 73/22 63/17 r 77/25 63/17c Seoul79/2655/12s79/2653/11pc Stockholm 61/16 48/8 r 63/17 45/7 pc Sydney 84/28 57/13 r69/2048/8pc Taipei88/3179/26pc87/3077/25sh T okyo 77/25 68/20 pc 76/24 67/19 s T oronto 76/2457/13pc77/2555/12pc Trinidad91/3273/22t79/2657/13t V ancouver 78/25 57/13 s 74/2357/13s Vienna 74/2360/15s76/2460/15s W arsaw 72/22 56/13 s 72/22 52/11 pc Winnipeg 70/21 47/8 s 81/2753/11s H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 10-20 Knots2-3 Feet4 Miles84F Wednesday:ESE at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet8 Miles84F Today:ESE at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet5 Miles85F Wednesday:E at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet8 Miles85F Today:E at 8-16 Knots2-4 Feet6 Miles84F Wednesday:E at 8-16 Knots2-4 Feet9 Miles84F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque65/1847/8pc68/2051/10pc Anchorage49/938/3sh49/938/3pc Atlanta84/2869/20pc86/3069/20c Atlantic City78/2564/17pc82/2762/16t Baltimore78/2564/17pc82/2764/17t Boston77/2564/17pc82/2764/17pc Buffalo74/2361/16pc75/2356/13pc Charleston, SC85/2970/21t86/3070/21t Chicago82/2761/16t83/2859/15pc Cleveland78/2558/14pc81/2760/15pc Dallas75/2360/15t79/2666/18s Denver54/1236/2r54/1239/3c Detroit80/2663/17pc85/2961/16pc Honolulu88/3173/22s89/3175/23s Houston86/3070/21t81/2770/21t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday TodayWednesdayTodayWednesday Indianapolis84/2866/18t85/2965/18t Jacksonville88/3172/22t88/3172/22t Kansas City74/2355/12c77/2555/12c Las Vegas90/3263/17s92/3366/18s Little Rock82/2768/20t83/2867/19t Los Angeles96/3568/20s100/3770/21s Louisville84/2868/20t86/3067/19t Memphis84/2870/21t85/2970/21t Miami87/3079/26t90/3279/26t Minneapolis74/2361/16sh79/2660/15s Nashville84/2867/19t86/3069/20c New Orleans88/3177/25t90/3277/25t New York76/2467/19pc84/2867/19pc Oklahoma City72/2253/11c77/2556/13pc Orlando90/3275/23t89/3175/23t Philadelphia78/2566/18pc84/2868/20t Phoenix 97/36 69/20 s 95/3571/21s Pittsburgh78/2559/15sh81/2762/16t Portland, OR 96/3557/13s95/3557/13s Raleigh-Durham 82/27 68/20 t 86/30 68/20 t St. Louis80/2667/19t82/2767/19t Salt Lake City 69/20 45/7 s 72/2253/11s San Antonio 83/28 64/17 t 85/29 68/20 pc San Diego90/3263/17s89/3163/17pc San Francisco 86/30 55/12 s 86/3056/13pc Seattle88/3155/12s84/2854/12s T allahassee 90/3271/21pc91/3272/22pc T ampa 91/32 75/23 t 91/32 75/23t Tucson94/3464/17s91/3261/16s W ashington, DC 78/25 66/18pc83/2868/20t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

PAGE 20

A nanda Pyfrom gave birth to little Sophia on April 30, 2007 at the Princess MargaretH ospital, via caesarian delivery, but wasn’t expecting until July 2007. A few months before her d elivery, she was diagnosed with Intrauterine Growth Restriction which is a condit ion where the fetus is small er than expected for a par ticular number of weeks. B ecause of this diagnosis h er labor was induced and she gave birth at 32 weeks. Sophia weighed two poundsa nd four ounces. The little girl was immediately placed in an incubator. M rs. Pyfrom says it was a day she will never forget both joyous and overwhelming. “After finding out the cond ition of Sophia, it was scary. The doctors immediately instilled faith and confidence a nd assured my husband (Michael Pyfrom she would be okay. It wash owever very hard not being able to take her home right after she was born,” she said. There are three levels of NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit) NICU 1, NICU 2, and special care. Sophiaw as in the second level at the NICU, where she was placed in an incubator and closely monitored by the doctors and nurses. The doctors told us that when Sophia reachedfour pounds we would be able to take her home, so she spent approximately six and a half weeks at the hospital before she was released”, she said. During those weeks Mr a nd Mrs Pyfrom developed and maintained a close bond with their newborn by visitinga nd talking to her everyday At two years, Sophia is thriving, doing very well, and m aintaining a healthy life. She is fantastic, independent, and her speech is developed. She is a little bit small, b ut her body is propor tioned.” After their experience, Mr a nd Mrs Pyfrom can certainl y relate to Lynette Burrows who gave birth to their god daughter Te’hilah Burrows, w ho was born under similar circumstances. Ms Burrows gave birth t hree months earlier than her due date because she suf fered eclampsia ( coma and convulsions before, during, o r shortly after childbirth). “I was due to have the baby on July 2, 2007, but I g ave birth on April 1 2007. After birth, Te’hilah weighed one pound and peice ounceso r 0.680 kg. She was extremely ill, very small and I could hold her in the palm of myh ands,” she said. She was placed on the 1st level on the NICU ,and after progressing she was movedt o the 2nd level. “She stayed in the hospital for about 2 months. I would go to the hospital and spend the entire day with her. It was not easy at the time, and the only wayI felt better was to be there with her.” Mrs Burrows also noted that when she found out that her baby was very ill she was devastated. “I felt inadequate because I thought it was something I did or did not do that caused my baby to be so small. The doctors then toldm e that they have seen babies a lot smaller than Te’hilah.” Her daughter spent two months spent in the hospital under the watchful eyes of t he doctors and nurses. She e ventually got better, gained extra pounds and was released. She is now also twoa nd her health is in great shape. Without the help of the i ncubator these once premat ure infants, Sophia Pyfrom and Te’hilah Burrows, would have not been able to thrive, g row, and live healthy lifestyles. According to w ww.ebme.co.uk one of the m ost important elements of a new born survival is the infant’s temperature regula-t ion. The infant has several disadvantages in terms of thermal regulation. An infant h as a relatively large surface area, poor thermal insulation, and a small amount of mass to act as a heat sink. The n ewborn has little ability to conserve heat by changing posture and no ability to a djust their own clothing in a response to thermal stress”, this is why an incubator isn ecessary The incubators in the NICU at PMH are truly life-s avers, but need to be updated. In an effort to save the life of newborns like Sophia andT e’hilah, T he Tribune Media Group , The Tile King, Builders Mall, Doctors Hospital, and the Rotary Club of East Nassau have partnered to supply critically needed ventilators and incubators for the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Princess Margaret Hospital. Their goal is to raise $300,000, and they are encouraging all to make a contribution. C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM health B ODYANDMIND T h e T r i b u n e By REUBEN SHEARER Tribune Features Reporter CHILDREN learn what they live. That’s an age-old statement that encompasses many aspects of growing up. There are many val ues and practices that a parent pours into their child, and healthy eating habits are no exception. However, according to one neuro psychiatrist, parents are dropping the ball when it comes to equip ping children with realistic eating habits. One expert says the answer lies in parents educating themselves with good information on diet and exercise and teaching their chil dren to follow suit. Childhood obesity is on the rise in the Bahamas, Dr Brian Humblestone said at a recent lecture at Doc tor’s Hospital. According to Dr Humblestone, there are increased cases of young children and teens developing type 2 diabetes, and eventually obesity, which is normally prevalent in those over 35. Childhood obesity issues are early signs of illnesses like dia betes, hypertension, coronary heart disease, gall bladder disease, respiratory problems, asthma and reproductive hormonal problems. Ironically enough, he added, “one of the manifestations of civil isation is that we have half of the world dying of diseases caused by being overfed, and other parts where people are dying of starva tion.” “But it’s not just the amount of food people are eating, but the kind of foods as well,” Dr Humblestone explained. “If your child is having a muffin or Danish and an orange juice for breakfast, they may feel energised to go to school, but it is very likely they will feel famished, experience a energy crash hours later, and need more carbs.” He said that carb-loaded breakfasts are not the best to start your day with, adding that most cereals do not hold to the health benefits that they claim on television ads. Cereals are largely loaded with refined carbohydrates, which shoot the blood sugar up, Dr Humblestone explained. Refined carbs cause your blood sugar to rise fast, and a lot of insulin is pro duced from the pancreas. The insulin sends the sugar into the blood, which moves into the liver and muscles. When that blood sugar goes down fast as a result of too much insulin, you get hungry. This normally causes a person to want more sugar and thus get hungry again. “That’s why a carbohydrate breakfast is not a good breakfast.” Dr Humblestone said fast food restaurants’ constant bombard ment with advertising needs to be analysed and rejected. “It takes motivation and tenacity, to persist against seduction by the media--which has a major effect on the majority of people who are overeating,” Dr Humblestone told Tribune Health . “Food is comfort, and it will always be that way.” However, when you overeat, let alone the wrong foods, physical problems develop. Studies reveal that persons who fall in this category have experienced more headaches, and feel really depressed and exhausted. “It’s not real hard eating junk food all the time, because it taste good, and it makes you feel good at the moment,” Dr Humblestone said. “You’ll eat some, and just a while later you’ll be hungry again.” The problem he says is when there’s increased intake of these kinds of junk foods, because there must be a balance of exercise to go along with it. Finally, Dr Humblestone advises parents to educate themselves about ingredients, so they know what they are feeding their family. For example, he noted that any ingredient ending in “ose” should be avoided, as it represents a high sugar content. According to the Super Size Me documentary, companies spend billions to make the public aware of their product. They market through T-shirts, coupons, toys for children, and restaurant placemats, and kids are drawn to that. Mcdonalds spent 1.4 billion dollars worldwide in direct media advertising in 2001. Pepsi spent more than one billion dollars on direct media advertising. To advertise its candy, Hershey’s Food spent under a mere $200 million dollars internationally. However, in its peak year, the five-a-day fruit and vegetable campaign’s total advertising budget in all media was just $2 million; 100 times less than the direct media budget of just one candy company. You are what you eat DR. HUMBLES TONE’S WELLNESS ADVICE: “The important thing is to start the day right with a meal that has pro tein, like from a cereal, or from marine produce like sardine, grouper, or some other source. I eat eggs sometimes, and a little bit of meat. I try to draw from more sources of protein (seafood, nuts and seeds,) and salads made from fresh produce. Stay far away from refined carbs, and eat less white flour, cake, cookies, and pasta. Get some exercise too. I try to walk briskly three times a week for forty minutes.” By JEFFARAH GIBSON A s ophisticated and expensive piece of equipment at Princess Margaret Hospital i s making the difference between life and death for its tiniest patients. Help save the smallest miracles WHEN baby Te'hila Burrows was born she weighed 1pound and 9 ounces. THIS is Sophia a t 4 weeks in N ICU II (about 4 weeks old). SOPHIA is now 2 years old and living a healthy life.

PAGE 21

TODAY, I will address a topic that I am asked about on a daily basis smelly feet (or its scientific term 'Bromidrosis'). If you are one of many people who suffer from foot odor (smelly feet alone. Did you know that most of what we call foot odor is actually shoe odor? As you will discover later in this article, some people are more prune to smelly feet, and there are a lot of factors that contribute to nasty shoe odors. This condi tion is referred to as 'shoe dermatitis' . Shoedermatitis is a medical condition which is caused by contact of the foot with chemicals in the material of footwear. Thi s condition can be either irritant or allergic. Irritant shoe dermatitis is often caused by wearing shoes that are wet, poorly fitting or that have uneven linings. However, in the case of allergic (con tact) dermatitis , there are many different substances that can cause this condition, which is quite common and is frequently complicated by secondary infections or eczema. I am certain that we are all owners of a variety of footwear styles: casual, formal, work and athletic shoes. The majority of our footwear is imported and made from leather, rubber and other synthetic materials. The most recent US statistics revealed that ninety-eight per cent percent of all shoes are imported, therefore it is impossible to identify precisely all their constituent components. It is during the manufacturing and finishing of footwear many chemicals are used. Sources of Shoe Contact Dermatitis: Historically, leather, dyes and rubber allergens were seen as the most common cause of shoe dermatitis. Today, shoe dermatitis may occur if a person is sensitive to the rubber or elastic compounds in shoes, form inserts or from elastic glues used to bind shoe components. Other identifiable causes of shoe dermatitis are cements, dichromate used in tanning, dyes, anti-mildew agents, formaldehyde, and nickel eyelets or nickel arch supports. Some signs and symptoms of shoe dermatitis: The most common site first involved with shoe dermatitis is the dorsal (top the big toe and on the insteps (top of foot by spreading to the other toes and dorsal (top foot. Skin lesions may be acute, presenting as red, blistering, oozing and usually symmetri cal. This dermatitis can range from mild, itchy rash to severe itching with swelling and small blisters. In severe cases, open sores may present and can result in secondary bacterial infections. If any such signs are present, I urge that you seek professional help for proper diagnosis and treatment. Prevent shoe dermatitis: As a pedorthist and a mem ber of the health care team, the design of footwear determines to a large extent the appearance of shoe dermatitis. Once such condition is observed it is the professional duty of a Pedorthist to refer the individual to a physician for medical evaluation. Once this condition is diagnosed, footwear is than a part of the treatment. A pedorthist as an expert in footwear can aid the physician and the patient with the selection of footwear without materials that may cause shoe dermatitis. Substituting products made of different materials that do not cause allergic reactions will lessen the likelihood of future episodes of shoe dermatitis. “Vegetable-tanned” footwear can be substituted as an alternative for the hyper sensitive individual. This type of footwear contains no rubber or formaldehyde. Finally, it is important to recognise that shoe dermatitis is quite common, affecting chil dren and adults regardless of race. Patients with shoe dermatitis can use special types of shoes prepared from non-sensitising substances. I would also suggest measures to control sweating may be very helpful for the patient who suffers from shoe dermatitis. Socks or stock ings made of absorbent cotton (e.g. Thorlos or Balega socks has a unique rapid moisture evaporation system) should always be worn. Avoid wet shoes, poorly fitting shoes or self treatment and seek professional help to treat or prevent shoe dermatitis. Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board Certified & licensed Pedorthist, is the proprietor of Foot Solutions, a health and wellness franchise that focuses on foot care and proper shoe fit, located in the Sandyport Plaza, Nassau. Please direct any questions or comments to nassau@footsolutions.com or 327-FEET (3338 "The views expressed are those of the author and does not nec essarily represent those of Foot Solutions Incorporated or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated companies. S WEET peppers are added to so many meals in The Bahamas that their presence is almost ubiquitous. Conch sala d without sweet peppers is u ntraditional, smothered pork chops untenable, and salsas u nthinkable. That makes growing sweet peppers in the garden a priority. First, let us do some math. Green sweet peppers sell in my friendly neighbourhood supermarket for close to $3 a pound. Individual pepperst hat are red, yellow, brown, purple or orange sell for up to $6 each. A packet of pep p ers rarely costs more than $2 and for that you get at least a dozen seeds, often manym ore. In a season you should g et a dozen or more peppers from each plant. Sweet pep pers that are any other colour than green are no more diffi cult to grow than green ones. Are you doing the maths? T he answer is: Grow peppers. Sweet or bell peppers are a warm-weather crop so they can be started in Sep-t ember. The seeds should be planted a quarter-inch deep and the soil around them should be firmed down to press out air pockets. If you start in pots or a seed bed, transplant when the seed leaf b egins to wither, when the seedling is 5-6 inches tall. It is important that the transplant not be any l ower than the soil level. It c an be slightly raised above soil level but never allowed to h ave soil touching the stem. You may grow your seeds straight into the ground and in this case you should have the soil well worked and enriched with soil-retaining commercial cow manure or compost. I like to work time-r elease fertiliser into the soil before planting. Pepper plants suffer when t here is insufficient moisture so it is best to make a point of watering them daily. S ometimes pepper plants p ut out flowers when they are only 6-8 inches tall. If this hap pens, nip off the flowers. A small pepper plant that bears a full-sized pepper will be use less and unproductive therea fter. One enemy of pepper fruits is the sun. If the leaf cover is insufficient you may get sun-s cald on your pepper fruits. A paper bag to cover or a branch from the bush to shield will give protection. Sunscald usually happens during the early summer months rather than the a utumn months. Whenever I grow green bell peppers I leave them to ripen fully and rarely pick them g reen. Green peppers turn red a s they ripen and become really sweet. If you only eat green p eppers you may wonder why on earth they are called sweet peppers for there is precious little sweet about them. Those coloured peppers we mentioned earlier tend to be sweeter than green peppers but still have to be allowed tom ature in order to attain full sweetness. In addition to blocky bell p eppers you can grow Italiantype Cubanelle sweet peppers. These are much longer,u sually two or three times l onger than they are wide. They can be used when they are yellow or red, again the ripe red ones being by far the sweeter. I love to sweat them in a pan with a little olive oilu ntil they collapse. Banana peppers are quite like Cubanelles but tend to have thinner walls. T he sweet pepper plants you establish in September should last you into next summer. You will find, however, that no matter how well you fertilise and water your plants they will grow less productive a nd bear smaller and smaller fruits. For this reason I usually sow Cubanelles and a new crop of bell peppers approach ing Easter. Pepper plants have few enemies but the undersides of thel eaves should be inspected regularly as this is the usual point of attack. If you have ad ozen plants or fewer it is easy enough to wipe away any insect eggs from the leaves. S ometimes pepper plants just heel over and die. This is caused by a virus and there is l ittle one can do except destroy the plant and hope the virus has not spread to toom any plants. Pepper plants suffering from a virus usually have a strained appearance, the leaves looking as if they have been stretched. Most v iral attacks occur in seedlings bought from a nursery rather than those you start from seed. j.hardy@coralwave.com GREEN SCENE By Gardener Jack ' Why do people cheat?' is like a m illion dollar question. We could spend hours speculating because the odds of getting it right would be like shooting for the stars. As an outsider, looking in we all think the answer is obvious, but clinical practice shows us the complicated webt hat joins two people. Certainly, there are those who seemed to be wired differently and who find the whole concept of monogamy inconceivable. They may not admit it but their lack of remorse reinforces their underlyingt hought pattern. Living life in such a fashion is habit forming and many in no way want to change. Some are honest and upfront about their intentions, while others live life surrounded with deceit and lies. T hen, there are some people whose psychopathology predeterm ines their behaviour and conse q uently have difficulty changing. By the time we reach midlife, there i s a good chance we have met or been involved with such a person. From the first time we become a ware of it, we change the course of our lives. Do we work at forgiving the first time? What happens if it happens again? Does the deceiver become comfortable knowing that you will always be there? Does the betrayed worry they will bep erceived as weak by taking their partner back? As devastating as it is to discover your dating partner is being unfaithful, it still provides a way out. There may have been verbal c ommitment, but no formal agreement or vows were made. These a re pivotal moments in a couple's l ife and the course of their relationship is decided from that moment. F acing the reasons why a certain behaviour has taken place is excruciatingly painful. Understanding t he need to talk about it is overs hadowed by the heavy weight of a nger and rejection. Blame is quickly slammed on the wrong doer who in turn reacts defensively. For many, time passes and day to day life keeps them busy. Many of us are procrastinators and find putting things off much easier.T rust has quickly been extinguished and secrecy often prevails. The core principles of relationship therapy is to work at restoring the intimate bond between a couple. Consciously working at maintaining this delicate bond, ande nsuring the glue that keeps people together, does not come unstuck. For many, there are underlining relationship and sexual issues. Basic primary needs have been overlooked or ignored. Feeli ngs of betrayal prevent a willingness to listen to the other person's s tory and so things remain in limbo. T he ability to express and listen to unmet needs proves a daunting t ask for many. When the pain is so great just being in the room, looking in the eye, or having to interact w ith that person seems impossible. Y ears of not feeling truly connecte d, or even understood means that a foundation for forgiveness is even harder. Pride can get in the way of seeking out a trained professional. The very idea of saying out loud details of our private life may seeme mbarrassing. It may seem easier and more satisfying to find someone to fulfill those missing needs. It may solve the problem today but the reality is that it usually ends up making things more complicated. They are able to justify theira ctions and believe they 'had no choice'. Thoughts of something new and refreshing in our lives are not uncommon. Our minds play paradoxical games between what is e xpected of us and the things we desire. This is how fantasies are f ormed. But making them reality c rosses the border and we need to acknowledge that clear choices w ere made. Without a doubt 'crisis' often drives us to seek out a therapist. The s adness, anger and humiliation provokes so many questions from the betrayed. Talking to a third person in the room allows things to be said a nd heard which otherwise would p robably not be said. The role of the therapist is to gradually help all concerned find some personal and interpersonal meaning, to the chaotic mess. Timep uts a different perspective on t hings. Persevering through the cris is, and salvaging the couple, allows healing and future relating. Affairs are often the prelude to divorce. It is interesting to contemplate that if all couples considering divorcew ere to come for counseling how m any relationships could be saved. C an we really put a cost on the damage, both financial and emotional, if we leave things unattended? At least by getting professional help you will be able to say your eally tried. Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist. Call for an appointmentRelate Bahamas at 3647 230, oremail r elatebahamas@yahoo.com or www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com. She is also available for speaking engagements. LOVING RELATIONSHIPS C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 9B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Why do people cheat? B y MAGGIE B AIN Sweet peppers GREEN peppers cost the same to grow as red, yellow, orange, b rown, purple, etc., so w hy not choose your c olour and beat the s upermarket prices. Smelly feet!! By BERNADETTE GIBSON

PAGE 22

C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Are you communicating to inform and inspire “An inspired speaker does more than j ust inform; instead the give people the inspiration to dream beyond their circumstances.” ~ Michelle M. Miller ~ Information is the key to transformation, whether it is positive or negative. What is the objective of thei nformation that you communicate? M ost people pay no real attention to their information intake; they listen to anything, believe anything and for the most part, repeat anything. However, if you desire to cultivate a positive disposition, you must be veryd iscriminate about the information t hat you consume. This is fundamental to your communication effectiveness, if you are focused on positive change. H olding the public's attention, particularly in small communities, ought to be viewed as a privilege opportun ity in which to highlight the good. Y ou must therefore be very clear about your intentions; as undeclared intentions can quickly become empty rhetoric. Whose Dream Will You Inspire? Those who pursue their dreams a rm themselves with words of wisdom from old sages who inspire them t o dream even in the midst of despair. The “I have a dream” speech by Dr Martin Luther King Jr, is a perfect example of how an inspired com-m unicator can elevate consciousness and positively change mindsets. Each of us has something unique to share with the world but most of us lack the inspiration to achieve. As the world continues to change, however, and people explore new ideas ofs ubstance and meaning; they will h unger for words that inspire them to stay the course. Will you be ready to satisfy this need? Final Thoughts W hile change is never easy, it is essential; make it a habit to consist ently evaluate the rhythm of your c ommunication. On a broader level, the general tempo of our dialogues says much about our sense of self; despite living i n a beautiful paradise of peace and p lenty, we still possess a combative d isposition; hell bent on reporting and repeating negatives as a priority. This creates desensitised mindsets, o blivious to the bigger world where many face real wars and severe depriv ation. Ironically, against this steady discourse of emotional dissatisfaction, young people are expected to excel and are openly chastised for their apparent lack of positived emeanor. We fail to recognise that the quality of what the mind produces is only as good as the quality of the information it intakes. The society that we have is the exact society that we have created. And until we shiftt owards a more mindful discourse, w e will remain in a state of social dissatisfaction. No doubt, we need inspired communicators. While you may believe that you are not a good speaker or that you don't have the skills toi nspire others; suppose you are wrong? W hat if you are the change that t his nation and the world are waiting on? We each have responsibility to raise our voices for the good; to build t his nation and to add value to the w orld. History would have been w ritten differently had Dr King declined to voice his views. Similar ly, you too have no idea of how many l ittle boys and girls are anxiously awaiting your words, your speech to i nspire their dreams. Remember positive words have the power to build up, to give hope, to change conditions and to inspire. On the same token, negative wordsh ave the power to do the exact opposite. Yes you can become an inspired speaker; if you are willing to allow your words to light the way; giving others the confidence to do the same. Why not raise your voice for the g ood and make something better h appen. If you are ready to Speak with Confidence & PowerSign Up Now for SpeakUP ! learn how your words can Inspire a Dream! Contact The Coaching Studio today call 326-3332o r 429-6770 or send an email to coach4ward@Yahoo.com Michelle M Miller is a certified LifeC oach and Stress Management Cons ultant. She is the Principal Coach of the Coaching Studio, which located in the Jovan Plaza, Madeira Street.Q uestions or comments can be sent to P.O. Box CB-13060 email coach4ward@yahoo.com or telephone4 29-6770. By Michelle M M iller, CC many shoes. L ocated in the Mall at Marathon, Catch 22’s fall catalogue includes a wide variety of trendy shoes, rangingf rom gladiator flats to patent platf orms. “Patent platforms, gladiator flats, sneakers, and wedges are all s tyles that are in for the fall, also shoes in metallic gold, metallic silver, fushia, white, snake’s skin, and multi-colors are very popular,” Sherraine Dean,t he store’s senior manager told T ribune Woman. Detailed accessories brings life to a n outfit. Long necklaces, matching bags, clutches, and belts are a must have to spice up a simple outfit and t urn it into an elaborate one. “Bags are definitely “the in thing” and they include the crossover bags, fannyp acks, duffle bags, tote bags, clutches , a nd wallets with matching belts”, Ms Dean added. While fashion for women in the B ahamas is always redefining itself, fashion for the men in your life will change but less often. A t Bonneville Bones, located on Bay Street, there are some new trends that are fashion forward for Fall. “In men’s wear there isn’t much of a drasticc hange in trends like it is with women’s wear. However, the style now for the men is a much more fitted look. Jeans b efore were made slack and baggy, but now they are made to fit. In the dress wear neckties are made slender and more narrow than before” says EddieR obinson, Owner of Bonneville Bones. Another men’s store, Fine Threads emphasises dark colours in dress suits,l ike black brown and lavender. These new trends and accessories are a Fall must have: L OS ANGELES A ssociated Preess THEtrue-life drama "The Boys Are Back" delicately and deftly finds a balance t hat's hard to strike: It depicts death, and the way a family rebuilds and redefines itself afterward, without any mawk ishness. Director Scott Hicks' film, with its dreamlike, sunsplashed landscapes of South ern Australia, is visually arresting (the work of cine matographer Greig Fraser, who recently shot Jane Campion's luminous "Bright Star"). But the content of Allan Cubitt's script, based on Simon Carr's memoir, is meaty and straightforward, which gives it an unexpectedp ower. This is easily Hicks' best film since the Oscar-winning "Shine" way back in 1996 s ince then, his work has i ncluded the admirable but uneven "Hearts in Atlantis" and "No Reservations." Much of the allure of "The Boys Are Back" comes from Clive Owen's complex performance; as a man learning how to function as a single father after the death of his wife, Owen shows great liveliness but also a nat u ral vulnerability. His character, sportswriter Joe Warr, takes a "Just Say Yes" attitude in raising his 6year-old son (Nicholas McAnulty, disarming in his film debut), which makes for a lot of fun b ut it also results in chaos. Joe's frustration in figuring out this whole parenting thing by himself provides inescapable reminders of Dustin Hoffman in "Kramer vs. Kramer": Once again we have two men sharing a home, realizing they don't really know each other and unsure of how to relate as they work through their grief in differ ent ways. Joe has traveled constantly for work, feeling secure that young Artie's daily routine was in the capable hands of his wife, Katy (Laura Fraser). Once Katy dies of cancer, Joe is left with all those responsibilities and nota clue about where to begin. When he fixes the boy's breakfast and drives him to school, for example, he finds that little things like leaving the crusts on his toast send Artie into a tizzy. Meanwhile, Artie handles the much larger matter of his mother's death with surprising strength. At one point he asks Joe if he can die, too, so he can be with Mummy, and he does it with the kind of startling honesty that's peculiar to children. But then the arrival of Harry (George MacKay teenage son from his first marriage, changes the dynamic all over again. Harry has come from England for the summer with hopes of getting to know the father he always felt rejected him; in the process, he also becomes the big broth er to a little boy he's never met, just when Artie could use some guidance the most. 'The Boys Are Back' is refreshingly unsentimental Falling into Fashion FROM page 12 Plaid Patterns Tunic Tops Sheer tops Linen shorts Skinny jeans Platfor m, gladiator , stilettos, or Ed hardy sneakers Broad belts Costume Jewelr y T ote bags Metallic Clutches with matching belts FALL MUST -HAVES EL MORRO NATIONAL MONUMENT, N.M. Associated Press FOR CENTURIES, Spanish explorers, U.S. Army troops, wagon train emigrants and railroad surveyors carved their names on a huge sandstone outcrop in what's now a national monu ment famed for those inscriptions. But the softness of the rock that allowed names to be chipped into the cliff at El Morro National Monument also is letting those signatures erode jeopardizing the his tory the park is meant to pro tect. Over the years, officials have reattached fallen inscriptions, developed grout to keep moisture out of cracks and experimented with coatings to prevent signatures from wearing away. El Morro Spanish for headlands became a stopping point because of its reli able water, a pool fed by runoff from the cliff. Hundreds of travelers left their names some famous; others with stories behind them. "All those things together make them historic," said Steve Baumann, archaeolo gist at the northwest New Mexico monument. "Pasa por aqui," wrote provincial governor Don Juan de Onate in 1605, "passed by here." Onate's inscription, one of the earliest, partially covers one of the prehistoric American Indian petroglyphs also carved on the rock. Don Diego de Vargas, who led the Spanish reconquest of New Mexico in 1692 after a Pueblo Indian revolt, signed his name that year, saying his conquest was "for the Holy Faith and for the Royal Crown ... at his own expense." Twelve-year-old Sallie Fox who came through in a wagon train wrote her proper name, Sarah, in 1858. The deeply incised, printer-like inscription of "P. Gilmer Breckinridge, 1859 VA," is marred by a chip biting into the C in his last name and edging up to the 9 in the date. Breckinridge came through El Morro with 25 camels from a short-lived Army experiment. He would later resign, join the Confederacy and die in the Civil War. The same expedition included "E. Pen Long, Bal timore," who left a large signature in flowing, perfect oldfashioned script. The group, doing reconnaissance, "had all kind of tools with them for marking features on the landscape for mapping purposes," Bau mann said. "They would have been well-equipped to make some nice inscrip tions." Although the expedition was in 1857, Breckinridge didn't carve his name until another trip in 1859. He wasn't the only person to visit El Morro more than once. El Morro: History written on stone THIS PHOTO taken Sept. 2, 2009 shows Steve Baumann, archeologist at El Morro National Monu ment, walking along the base of the sandstone cliffs that make up Inscription Rock at the north west New Mexico monument. Heather Clark/ AP Photo

PAGE 23

C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONB HEALTH: Body and mind TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 Falling Fashion into Although there hasn’t been a s ignificant change in styles from t he Summer fashion semester, Fall fashion offers a selection of trends to dress up or dress down. Fori nstance, maxi dresses, which were hot this Summer can also work for Fall and be dressed up by adding al ong necklace, and a broad belt. T hey can be dressed down for an outing at the beach, by wearing less accessories and adding a pairo f trendy gladiator sandals to complete the look. Gia Hart, Manager at the Cat w alk Boutique located on Robinson Road says bright colours are in this season. “Usually Fall colours included dark shades. But this season bright colours from Summer fashion are in for the fall as well.” Bermuda shorts were “yesterday.” Linen shorts are taking the lead and being worn with sexy embellished tunics, adding a little sophistication and a flattering polish to an evening look. Skinny jeans and pencil skirts have been in for a few seasons. Peo ple are wearing pencil skirts for an office look, dressing them up with broad belts. Since fashion repeats itself there are some classic retro styles that are coming back. For instance plaid is back in many forms. Designers are making plaid shirts, blouses, skirts, shorts and accessories in a variety of col ors like red, purple, yellow, and orange. And who said shawls are only for dress wear? Dressing up a pair of jeans and T-shirt with a fine cashmere pashmina shawl is a new fun expressive style. “Pashminas shawls are being worn casually. There are some made of thick fabric, but the ones that are worn casually are made of a more thin fabric”, Mrs Hart said. Shoes are a big deal in wom en’s fashion. An outfit is never complete without the right pair of shoes or accessories and no, a woman can never have too B y JEFFARAH GIBSON S KINNY jeans or leg gings? Tunic tops or sheer ? Purple or grey? The Fall fashion season brings a mix of edgy, sophisticated, and youthful patterns easy to emulate. SEE page 10 s k i n n y j e a n s gladiator sandals t u n i c t o p s MUST-HAVES FOR THE NEW SEASON