Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Pim bowin’ it

SOF
80F

HIGH
LOW

SOME SUN,

—
Volume: 105 No.249



TSTORM POSSIBLE



The Tribune

USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

y





PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Sunday

MB BURGER KING BOSS BEATEN AND MURDERED
MB PILOT SHOT DEAD, OTHER MAN ‘CRITICAL

TWO men became the vic-
tims of violent murders yes-
terday in the space of less
than three hours.

A Burger King manager
was beaten and then stabbed
to death after being abducted
and a Bahamasair pilot was
shot dead in his home.

Both murders occurred just
hours after Bahamians gath-
ered for a peace concert at
Arawak Cay on Saturday
night to protest the “shock-
ing” levels of criminal activity
in the Bahamas.

The pilot, Lionel Lewis
McQueen, 29, was found dead
in his blood-splattered Gold-
en Palms Estates home, near
Kennedy subdivision, shortly
after 4am. He had been shot
several times. A second man,
the pilot’s cousin and room-
mate Martez Saunders, who
also suffered multiple gunshot
wounds, was found alive in
front of the home. At press

time last night he was still in
critical condition in the inten-
sive care unit. Mr McQueen’s
colleagues at Bahamasair yes-
terday remembered him as a
“quiet” man who was well
liked by all. A fellow pilot
said that no one at the airline
can imagine why someone
would have wanted to kill Mr
McQueen. He was engaged
to be married in February
next year.

The Burger King employ-
ee was reportedly abducted
and taken to the fast-food
chain’s Harrold Road loca-
tion where he was beaten and
then stabbed to death after
failing to open the restauran-
t’s safe for his kidnapper.

Shortly after 1.30am, police
were called to a “disturbance”
at Burger King restaurant on

Harrold Road.

SEE page seven

Christie: Don’t confuse
kindness for weakness

= ae

aA OASIS

30x60 Desk
wi Return

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

HITTING back at his
detractors, PLP Leader Perry
Christie cautioned his would-
be contenders to not confuse
his kindness for weakness as
he aggressively defended his
legacy and ability to remain
as leader of the PLP.

Speaking with radio talk-
show host Wendal Jones on
his programme ‘Jones and Co’

SEE page seven





Felipé Major/Tribune staff

THE AFTERMATH of the horrific traffic accident which killed a one-year-old baby girl and a 20-year-old woman. The picture shows the cov-
ered bodies. The accident occurred near the Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant at the Mall at Marathon.

Baby girl and aunt die in crash horror

A one-year old baby girl and her aunt
died in what police yesterday described
as an “horrific” traffic accident that left
family members distraught with grief.

A 20-year-old woman and her niece
were passengers in a water truck travel-
ling on Marathon Road when it crashed
into a maroon coloured Cadillac Seville,

causing it to flip over.

Both the woman and the young child
were thrown from the truck and sus-
tained fatal injuries. The accident
occurred just after 4.40pm near the Ken-
tucky Fried Chicken restaurant at the

Mall at Marathon.

As the bodies of the victims were lying
in the road covered by white sheets, the
father of the baby rushed onto the scene.
He was able to get past the officers of the

SEE page seven

A BODY is taken away from the scene of the crash.



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

PLP ‘would scrap Arawak Cay container port project’

FORMER Prime Minister
Perry Christie again warned
would-be investors in the
relocation of the container
port that if the PLP were to
be returned to power they
would scrap government’s
current project and place the
port somewhere else.

As the guest on Wendal
Jones’ radio programme
Jones and Co, Mr Christie
reiterated his government’s
history in studying where the
placement of the container
should be and reminded the

listening audience that the
container port should not be

at Arawak Cay.

“Buyers, investors,
beware!” Mr _ Christie
exclaimed.

When asked how he could
make such a declaration hav-
ing criticised the current gov-
ernment for not continuing
projects left in place by the
PLP, Mr Christie said the dif-
ference is that his position on
this matter has been well
known for sometime now.

“T spoke in Parliament and

said Mr Ingraham I want you
to hear my words. If these
people are not listening to you
and you telling them that that
is wrong, tell them to go to
Hell. I said in Parliament, ‘tell
them to go to Hell’. He has
since developed a proposition
where the government will
have the majority of shares.
It would be easier to move it
then. It would be easier to
move it,” he said.

Having caused a tremen-
dous stir in the community
with the decision to move the

port to Arawak Cay, Mr
Christie said this decision is
not in the best interest of the
Bahamas as it is wrongly
motivated.

“And it is a bloody shame I
am telling you, Mr Jones,
when you have a government,
see don’t tell me I will be
duplicitous, when you have a
government which has plan-
ning documents opposite and
you know they have made a

SEE page seven

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS





ZACK BONZACK, Phil Andrews and Chris Birch celebrate as the best teain from the Royal Nassau Sailing
Club. Missing is 11-year-old Spencer Andrews.

THE team of Larry The team of Phil Andrews, 12-year-old
Black, Thomas Bethel Spencer Andrews, Chris Birch and Zack Bon-
and Hank Coleman zack produced the best score for the Royal
turned in the best Nassau Sailing Club on Saturday in the dual
team score for the golf tournament between the Nassau Yacht

Nassau Yacht Club on Saturday in | | Club at Ocean Club. The tournament was held as a fund rais-

the dual golf tournament between | | er for the Bahamas Sailing Association.

the Royal Nassau Sailing Club at

the Ocean Golf Club. i

Tae comcaairent a2 Meae se See the Sports Page for more details.
fund raiser for the Bahamas Sailing
Association. A total of $4,270.00



was raised and presented to the
association to assist with the junior a
sailing competition. Felipé Major a Ay
af | | deg Shorts Page tor more | TET metal Seeded)
; , ; etails.
THOMAS BETHEL, Hank Coleman and Larry Black celebrate with their trophies for the best score for the el | a 322-21 LY |



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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 3



New generation of leaders must

lead PLP light — Obie Wilchcombe

Pro-hanging
march set for
October 12

IN view of ever-increas-
ing homicide numbers, the
Workers Party in conjunc-
tion with the families of
murder victims is planning
to stage a pro-hanging
march on October 12,
starting from Arawak Cay.

Leader of the Workers
Party Rodney Moncur said
that in his opinion concerts
like the one held on Satur-
day night by Artists4Peace
in protest of crime in the
country are “useless.”

He believes that only
hanging those currently on
death row will serve as a
deterrent and “put the fear
in worthless, criminal-
minded young men.”

Mr Moncur is also call-
ing for bail to be abolished
for all those charged with
murder.

Police detain
murder suspect

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Police arrested
murder suspect Godfrey
Virgill Jr, alias “Dollar Mur-
der”, on Saturday evening.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
said police acting on a tip
from the public went to
Fawcett Lane and arrested
Virgill around 11.30pm.

Virgill is wanted for ques-
tioning in connection with a
murder.

Thanked

Ms Mackey thanked the
Grand Bahama community
and the media for their con-
tinual support.

She said police are seek-
ing the
public’s
assistance
in locat-
ing Eric
Shervin
Stubbs Jr,
who is
wanted
for ques-

RSE E RE Honing in
connec-

tion with
housebreaking and stealing.
Stubbs, 30, is of medium
brown complexion with
brown eyes and short hair.
He is about 6'1" tall of slim
build and weighs about 160 -
170 pounds. Anyone who
has information concerning
Stubbs is asked to call police
at 352-1919, 351-9111, 351-
9991, 352-8351, 352-9076,
and 350-3125 or, 911.



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ADDRESSING PLP stal-
wart councillors in New Provi-
dence and Grand Bahama over
the radio yesterday, PLP can-
didate for deputy leader Obie
Wilchcombe reminded those
stalwarts in attendance and lis-
tening around the country that
the story of the PLP has not
ended.

Asking for their support in
his bid to become the deputy
leader, the West End and Bimi-
ni MP said that the second
chapter of the “rise of the
Bahamian people” must be
written by a “new generation
of leaders” who must take up
the fight and continue the for-
ward march.

“Now is the time, this is our
moment and our great PLP
party must lead the way. We
must repower the PLP to
empower the Bahamian peo-
ple. Now is the time if we wish
to see our people happy again.
Now is the time if we wish to
eliminate the misery index.
Now is the time if we wish to
introduce gross national hap-
piness. Now is the time for us to
dream again. Now is the time to
repower the PLP to empower













PLP DEPUTY LEADER HOPEFUL Obie Wilchcombe speaks with stalwart
councillors before his address on ZNS and Gems Radio.

the Bahamian people,” the MP
said.

This process Mr Wilchcombe
said will begin at the party’s
October convention, which he
also will be co-chairing.

Asking the party faithful to
give him a chance to serve as
their next deputy leader, Mr
Wilchcombe said he would
commit himself to working full-
time to prepare the party for
the next general election.

“As your deputy leader I will
lead the way in writing the his-
tory of our party. The story
must be told. We must tell the
youth today and the genera-
tions yet unborn of the rich his-

tory. We must tell their story
and the role you stalwart coun-
cillors have played in this jour-
ney. We must return to basics
and to the people. We are the
party of the people. We must
let them know,” he said.

Mr Wilchcombe added that
he sees a Bahamas that can
boast unmatched health care
where Bahamians no longer
will have to die because they
cannot afford health care.

“IT see a Bahamas with an
educational system that cap-
tures the attention of the world.
Where our young people, be it
in academics or technical or
sports, will rise to a competi-

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Andros MP Picewell Forbes at his address at the Sheraton Resort yesterday.

tive level that will make us all
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“T see a Bahamas where at
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In his bid to become deputy
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San Salvador Philip Davis, Sen-
ator Jerome Fitzgerald, and
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Golden Gates Shane Gibson.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Boat thefts are big business

ABACONIANS fear that boat thefts on
that island could further threaten their
tourist industry.

In June Mr John Bethell, president of
the newly-formed Marina Operator’s Asso-
ciation, said insurers were insisting on “extra
theft protection” for boats entering the
Bahamas, because of rising boat thefts, espe-
cially in Abaco. He said that more than $6
million worth of vessels were involved.

Abaconians fear that this extra fee, cou-
pled with fuel prices and the depressed econ-
omy, will cripple the resort/marina and sec-
ond homeowner markets on that island, Tri-
bune Business reported in June.

At the time the residents of Abaco threat-
ened that if police were not more active in
stamping out what they described as a high-
ly sophisticated criminal enterprise, vigilante
justice would soon follow.

Some of the thefts were linked to human
trafficking to Florida in which it is believed
that several go-fast powerboats — some
worth more than $50,000 — were involved.
These boats are stolen from marinas and
private moorings. It is also believed that the
boats are hot-wired and used in drug traf-
ficking.

It was even reported earlier this year that
Prime Minister Ingraham’s 21-foot “run-
about” was removed from its Green Turtle
Cay moorings and used for a criminal enter-
prise. Although police at the time were not
confirming the report, the locals maintained
that the fishing boat was taken from the
Green Turtle Cay marina and returned lat-
er, but not before being used to steal from
another boat two Yamaha 250 engines worth
$60,000.

An American second home owner
reported that his boat had been stolen and
tampered with twice within just a few
months.

Here in Nassau the situation is no better.

Recently a Paradise Island resident went
off on vacation leaving his Boston Whaler
hoisted up on his dock in the care of friends.

One day a marine mechanic, who has
worked on many of these boats and knows
them well, was passing the Sailing Club when
he thought he recognised this particular
Whaler anchored in the vicinity. He called
the person who had been left in charge of the
Whaler to find out if it was still on the hoist
or if it was missing. It was missing.

The young man left in charge immedi-
ately reported the theft to the Paradise
Island police station, got on a jet ski and
headed for the Sailing Club. He saw no sign
of the missing boat. He continued west as far
as Prince George dock and the cruise ships,

Mang Kalidalios

scouring every marina and hidden cove along
the way. Nothing.

The mechanic who had first spotted the
boat called around 1 pm. He said that anoth-
er friend had also lost a similar boat with the
same size engine over the weekend. It had
been found in the Sea Breeze canal. He
suggested that he and his son take the young
man in search of the vacationing resident’s
boat.

They started from the ocean side of Sea
Breeze, approaching the abandoned end of
the canal until they neared the residential
area. Their boat weaved in an out of the
canals. In a remote area they spotted an
Abaco skiff, which the marine mechanic
knew had been stolen. He later found its
owner, who had bought it as a gift for his
daughter.

As they moved into the more developed
residential area, they saw their boat, still in
the water. It was tied to a tree on an empty
lot. Already the boat thieves had started to
work on it. The name of the boat had been
scraped off, the registration number had
been removed and its top had been taken.
No one was in sight and so the young man
who had the boat’s key jumped in the
Whaler, turned the key and “stole it back.”
Although the engine was intact, it had to be
repaired. The Whaler has been moved for
safety to another location. However, from
the same private dock a larger boat was
stolen earlier this year. It has never been
found.

It is believed it is busy running drugs. We
were told that this boat was also on a hoist —
owners believing that it is more difficult to
steal a boat out of water. The large boat
had complicated safety cables, locks and
other modern safety gadgets. In other words,
it was believed to be “thief proof.” But
because the private dock is in a remote loca-
tion, the thieves probably worked most of
the night to saw the chains, melt the locks
and lower the boat into the water.

“We are helpless,” said a boat owner.
However, on this particular dock, there are
going to be cameras, alarms and every wake-
up device that will be activated on the
approach of a human. As soon as anyone
steps onto that particular dock they will be
quickly escorted off in handcuffs.

When a boat is missing it would be a
good idea to head for Sea Breeze before
the crooks have time to dismantle it for spare
parts or to ship it off to join the drug trade.

Also it would be a good idea for the
police harbour patrol to be more vigilant in
the Sea Breeze area, because that is where
the action is.



An open letter to
the PM on new
BEC power plant

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This is an open letter to the
Prime Minister for publica-
tion.

Dear Honourable
Prime Minister,

This is in reference to the
new BEC Power Plant being
constructed at the old Wilson
City site.

I’m writing to congratulate
you and your government for
once again moving Abaco for-
ward to meet the challenges
of future growth and devel-
opment on this island. I know
as native Abaconians, neither
you nor Fred Gottlieb would
ever do anything to hurt Aba-
co.
For those that were not
here or those who don’t want
to remember. Here is a list of
major infrastructual changes

letters@tripbunemedia.net



and improvements made in
Abaco, under your adminis-
tration.

1) Beautiful paved high-
ways from north to south.

2) Electricity along those
roads from north to south.

3) Cable Bahamas service
to give Abaconians easy
access to entertainment and
world news.

4) A new Port facility. We
should all remember picking
up freight from the “old
dock”.

5) The long awaited new
runway at the airport in
Marsh Harbour in the final
stages of completion.

Also, congratulations on
your future plans for a new
hospital and Government

Administration Complex,
with a new Post Office and
courthouse.

No government is perfect,
and they all need to answer
and be accountable for their
actions when questioned. I
think you have done this and
more, on the new Power
Plant. So, I say to you Hon-
ourable Prime minister, Fred
Gottlieb and Minister Ney-
mour hurry up and finish this
facility, as I’m tired of the
inadequate service we now
have with the present outdat-
ed plant.

My family were some of the
early settlers in Abaco, some
of them lived and worked in
Wilson City. As a mother of
three young Bahamians, I say
“keep up the good work.”

JANEEN ELIZABETH
ALBURY-COOPER
Abaco,

September, 2009.

Legislation must be passed so people
become responsible animal owners

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I do agree with some of Dr Leatendore Per-
centie’s article entitled “Ban pit bulls”, I just feel
that we have missed that opportunity years ago.

The Bahamas Humane Society called for this
ban in 1982 when we first started to see the influx
of pitbulls coming into New Providence but this
all fell on deaf ears.

What we now need is for the purpose new
Animal Protection and Control Act to be passed
in parliament so that stiff fines can be levied
against owners of dangerous dogs and regula-
tions can be in place to govern breeders of any
type of dogs, to ensure that these persons become
responsible animal owners.

We have so many backyard breeders and 95
per cent of them breed pitbulls, there is sup-
posed to be a regulation in place that you cannot
import a pitbull dog into the Bahamas, but with
so many persons breeding this type of dog, that
serves no purpose.

What needs to be put in place is to have every
imported dog neutered before it enters the
Bahamas and only if you are a licensed breeder,

can you import a un-neutered dog into the coun-
try, at a quota of two per year.

This way we can ensure that dogs are neutered,
thus less roaming/stray dogs and this should lead
to less animal cruelty because there would be
fewer dogs around to trespass on other persons’
premises.

This new proposed Act would ensure that
owners of animals become responsible by having
to make provision for their animals, also pet
stores and security dog companies would have
firm guidelines to follow.

All of this would help safeguard both people
and animals in this country, no one should have
to walk the streets in fear of being attacked by
dogs, we have too many children on our streets to
protect, so please let’s have this Act put into law
so that people can become responsible animal
owners,

STEPHEN TURNQUEST
The Bahamas Humane Society
Executive Director

Nassau,

September 20, 2009.

Why we need the ‘Read to Lead’ programme

EDITOR, Tribune.

The “Read to Lead” pro-
gramme initiated by the Min-
istry of Education but brain-
stormed by a select committee
understands what is required to
uplift the country from its
depths of despair. Eloquent
speeches from charismatic polit-
ical leaders cannot and will not
reverse the dire situation, res
ipsa loquitur. The committee
recognized that it requires all
hands on deck.

The “Read to Lead” Pro-
gramme is necessary action
requiring participation by all
right thinking Bahamians who

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Nassau,
September 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Ivoine Ingraham to contest FNM chairmanship

WELL known FNM politi-
cal activist Ivoine Ingraham has
offered himself as a candidate
for the post of chairman at the
party’s national convention slat-
ed for November.

In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune yesterday, Mr
Ingraham said that it is time for
the FNM to raise its game and
change the way it does things,
not just for the sake of change
but because the populace
“demands it.”

“We must adjust how we
interact with people because of
the high demand for us to be
more accountable for our
actions. We must, by whatever
we do, make sure that we lift
the spirits of all regardless of
our personal feelings. We must
sacrifice self for the good of the
country. We should, however
not sacrifice the good of the
country for the good of the par-
ly

“Gone are the days when
being a diehard makes sense.
It is country above self, and
country above party. Therefore
the position of chairman is a
very special one. It is a balanc-

OES aI |

ing act
between the
party’s posi-
tion and the
needs of the
people, and
the people
should
always win,”
he said.

In the past
and up to the
present date,
Mr Ingraham said that the
FNM has been blessed with
chairmen who have made
“invaluable contributions to the
party and the country at large.

“But nothing lasts forever
and everything must change,”
Mr Ingraham said. “Nothing
stays the same. In fact change
should be welcomed, lest we
are saddled with old, stale ideas
that will put us at a disadvan-
tage when we are compared
with others who oppose us.

“At this time when the
Bahamian people are demand-
ing so much, should expect so
much, we need people who are
personable and capable in key
positions. We must design

IVOINE
INGRAHAM

SRSA





PHILIP Davis, PLP candi-
date for deputy leadership, was
in Long Island and Cat Island
over the weekend to meet with
stalwart councillors and PLP
supporters as he continues his
campaign ahead of the party’s
national convention.

Carrying the message to sup-
porters to “Be Brave — change
the Bahamas”, Mr Davis met
with supporters in Deadman’s
Cay and in the southern and
northern settlements of Long
Island on Friday. According to
a statement issued by Mr Davis’
communications team, the PLP
candidate was “humbled by his
support” and “visibly moved”
by the candid expressions of
neglect in the communities.

Explaining that politics in the
Bahamas has broken, Mr Davis
said, “We [politicians] have
been too busy rowing amongst
ourselves and too focused on
seeing our picture in the paper.
We have to change the way we

do things; our
people are
suffering for
it.”

Mr Davis is
reportedly
going to continue his campaign
throughout the islands as he
stops to talk with and listen to
the concerns of residents
throughout the Bahamas.

Yesterday Mr Davis also
paid a visit to his hometown of
Cat Island to join supporters in
a church service held in his hon-
our. Prayers and words of
encouragement were offered to
the PLP candidate who is
expected to face a considerable
challenge at the party’s con-
vention on October 18.

In addition to Mr Davis, PLP
MP for West End and Bimini
Obie Wilchcombe and PLP
Senator Jerome Fitzgerald are
all expected to contest the par-
ty’s deputy leadership post.



everything we do to help peo-
ple’s lives become more bear-
able. We must literally serve
people and a positive attitude is
the greatest asset,” he said.

Noting that the government
has put in place numerous ini-
tiatives set out to better the
lives of all Bahamians, Mr
Ingraham said the party must
now take the people and the
country “higher” by encourag-
ing and including their young.

“In keeping with all of this, I
am prepared to help the cause
by offering myself for further
service. My entire life I have
served in one capacity or anoth-
er. I was introduced to politics
by Sir Arthur Foulkes at
Bahamian Times in the mid-
1960s. I had the best teacher
and will admit that I have been
an attentive student. So I am
no stranger to sacrificing my
time and family towards help-
ing others. I have gained
tremendous satisfaction from
seeing the smiles on the faces
that I have helped.

“T have been behind the
scenes, putting out fires, doing
damage control and helping in





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any way possible to keep the
FNM relevant. My contribu-
tions 2002-2007, especially
when the spirits of FNM were
low, are common knowledge. I
am prepared to do more.

“As chairman, I will be more

aggressive putting forth the
FNM agenda, and defending
the party’s position in a timely
manner. I will be highly and
consistently visible,” he said.
Noting that he has canvassed
many party players, including

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behind him, Mr Ingraham said
he feels the party will benefit
tremendously from his chair-
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PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Getting US attention for the
Caribbean: Must it be chaos?

By Ronald Sanders
(The writer is a Consul-
tant and former
Caribbean Diplomat)

D URING this
month, I was invit-

ed to deliver a lecture to 85
high-ranking military offi-
cers from Europe, North
America, Latin America,
Africa, Asia and the Mid-
dle-East on the subject of
US relations with its Cen-
tral American and
Caribbean neighbours.

In preparing the lecture, a
comment on the
Caribbean’s weakness and
lack of capacity to command
international attention
preyed on my mind.

The comment was made
by my friend and colleague,
David Jessop, of the
Caribbean Council for
Europe. In his weekly col-
umn, the week before he
said this: “Taken at face val-
ue the region has a very
weak hand. The Caribbean
does not have conflicts that
threaten to escalate into
global confrontations;
thankfully it has neither
nuclear weapons nor terror-
ism, nor does it have a sig-
nificant military presence or
the economic ability to
change global financial or
trade flows. In short it has
little that would make big-
ger, wealthier and more
influential states take
notice.”

There is much merit in
Jessop’s observation, and I
used it as a point of depar-
ture for the lecture to these
seasoned military officers.

During the Cold war -
particularly with Soviet
troops and military hard-

_— aa
i Nnsi
os =
'
> “7 _ eee ”

WORLD VIEW -

_
Sir Ronald Sanders



ware in Cuba — the
Caribbean was strategically
important to the US because
much of its oil requirements
had to transit Caribbean
waters, and the Caribbean
was an important passage-
way for US military supplies
to Western Europe.

But with the collapse of
the Soviet Union in 1991
and the retreat of commu-
nism, the Caribbean and
Central America slipped
down the pole of American
priorities.

The preoccupation of the
government of George W
Bush between 2001 and
2008 with American involve-

nt

ment in Afghanistan and
Iraq caused Central Ameri-
ca and the Caribbean to fall
even further away from
American attention except
for issues related to drug
trafficking, and illegal migra-
tion. Since the mid-1990s,
US aid to the Caribbean and
Central America dwindled,
preferential access for
Caribbean and Central
American goods to the US
market eroded, and there
was no longer any pressure
by the US on Europe to
help the region by paying
preferential prices for its
commodities especially
bananas and sugar.

In this context, Caribbean
and Central American
economies declined, and
their already bad situation
worsened in the present
global recession.

The IMF World Eco-
nomic Outlook, published
in April 2009, suggests that
Latin American economies
will contract by 1.5 percent
in 2009 before recovering in
2010. But, the likelihood of a
start of recovery by many
Caribbean economies, which
are dependent on tourism
and financial services, is very
unlikely until 2011, even if
the economies of the US
and Europe pull out of
recession this year.

It is in this milieu that the
Caribbean and Central
America face the greatest
destabilising force — drug



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“The most worrying problem for
the US in Central America and the
Caribbean should be their economic
situation, for conditions of economic
decline lead to social and political
unease, and instability.”



trafficking and its attendant
crime including illegal arms
smuggling and distribution,
robberies and executions.
The US government
could make an enormous
contribution to resolving this
huge problem by passing
legislation and implement-
ing machinery to control
arms smuggling; by review-
ing the practice of deport-
ing convicted felons to their
countries of origin; and by
adopting measures to stop

legal sale of assault
weapons.
Collaborative

Beyond this, the United
States should take the lead
in organising collaborative
arrangements with Europe
and Latin America and the
Caribbean to establish a
comprehensive anti-nar-
cotics programme that
addresses both supply and
demand. If this is not done,
the problem of drug-traf-
ficking and its attendant
high crime will continue to
plague Central America and
the Caribbean with a terri-
ble destabilising effect on
the small economies that are
least able to cope.

The most worrying prob-
lem for the US in Central
America and the Caribbean
should be their economic sit-



uation, for conditions of eco-
nomic decline lead to social
and political unease, and
instability.

It is simply a fact that,
with few exceptions, Cen-
tral American and
Caribbean governments
have either limited or no
capacity to finance policies
to address shocks to their
economies such as the effect
of the current global reces-
sion. In the Caribbean par-
ticularly, small or poor pop-
ulations do not produce suf-
ficient savings; there is not
enough access to credit, and
budgets are already in deficit
or pretty close to it. In these
circumstances, governments
have no room to pay for the
size of stimulus programmes
that are required to improve
these economies.

The US could be enor-
mously helpful to these
countries if it led the way in
encouraging the interna-
tional and hemispheric
financial institutions to pro-
vide them with funds on far
less onerous conditions than
they have in the past.

As an example, the US
should use its influence with
other countries who govern
the World Bank to reverse
the graduation of many of
these countries from access
to concessionary financing.
At the moment, they do not

Ae ee eet el ee

have access to such funds
because they are regarded
as middle-income countries
with no regard for the high
costs which their smallness
and remoteness imposes
upon them.

Of critical importance is
help with the debt of these
countries. Much of their
debt, apart from those who
owe Venezuela for oil as
part of PetroCaribe, is com-
mercial debt, though their
official debt is also high.
Some effort should be made
to help these countries to
reschedule debt to all
sources on a payment
scheme that should include
some forgiveness and a real-
istic repayment scheme.

In this regard, the IMF
could play an important role
in providing financing that
(a) is not necessarily linked
to the countries’ Special
Drawing Rights; and (b) is
not subject to the usual pre-
scription of raising taxes,
reducing public sector
spending; freezing wages,
and repaying foreign debt.

If governments in the
industrialised world could
bail out some companies
and financial institutions on
the basis that their
economies could not allow
these firms to collapse, sure-
ly this is also a basis for
arguing that the collapse of
states should be avoided.

But, I suspect the region
will continue to be ignored,
and, sadly, it will take chaos
or grave upheaval before it
is paid serious attention.

(Responses, previous com-
mentaries and the lecture at:
www.sirronaldsanders.com
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 7



FROM PAGE ONE

Bloody Sunday



Two murdered in space
of less than three hours

FROM page one

Arriving at the scene, police
officers found the body of
man who had apparently been
beaten and then stabbed to
death. The victim’s body was
found lying in a large pool of
blood that was flowing like a
rivulet into the parking lot,
which led police to believe
that he bled to death.

Superintendent Leon
Bethel, head of the Criminal
Detective Unit's homicide
department, told The Tribune
that the victim had multiple
stab wounds and lacerations
about the body. The victim,
whose name the police have
not released, was pronounced
dead at the scene.

The victim was a former
manager of the Harrold Road
Burger King, but at the time
of his murder headed the fast-
food chain’s Frederick Street

branch. A source close to the
investigation told The Tribune
that it is believed that the
manager was abducted and
taken to the restaurant in the
west, where his kidnapper
demanded he open the safe.
Police have evidence that the
manager was forced to open
the store and there are signs
that a forced attempt was
then made to open the safe.

The current manager of
Burger King on Harrold
Road closed the restaurant at
midnight on Saturday. He
turned on the alarm system
at 12.04am and with his staff
left the premises.

Security System Interna-
tional (SST) realised that
something was wrong when
the alarm system was deacti-
vated sometime after lam. A
SSI staff member called the
fast-food outlet, but got no
answer. A call was then put
through to the police.

The police were called a
second time by a good Samar-
itan who was passing in his
car and saw a man being vio-
lently beaten outside the
Burger King location on Har-
rold Road.

Within a few minutes police
were at the store where they
found the body of a man who
had been brutally beaten and
stabbed.

According to reports, the
victim was ordered to open
the safe by a large masked
man, wearing gloves. There
is evidence that the victim,
when he failed to open the
safe, was brutally beaten in
the manager’s office and then
dragged outside, where he
was seen by the passerby
again being beaten.

The deaths of the Burger
King manager and Mr
McQueen bring the country’s
murder count up to 62 for the
year.

mae ee eT a SC

PMs

Setedednd J Tae

HUNDREDS of young
and old people came
out on Saturday night
to listen to their
favourite artists at the
Arawak Cay. The
peace concert took
place during a week-
end of violence in the
Bahamas.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

BODIES are removed after the accident.

Baby girl and aunt die in



traffic

FROM page one

Traffic Division and duck under the crime
scene tape. By the time the officers were able
to get to him he had already lifted the sheet off
his daughter’s body, immediately falling back-

wards in grief.

Other family members also gathered on
Marathon Road, demanding confirmation
from the police that the victims of the crash

were in fact their loved ones.

Shortly afterwards, the father got into an
altercation with the baby’s mother who had

also arrived on the scene.

According to eyewitnesses and the police,

accident horror

the Cadillac Seville was travelling south on
Marathon Road and was signalling to turn
into the Mall’s entrance close to the KFC.

As he was turning, the water truck attempt-
ed to overtake the Cadillac, clipping the small-
er vehicle on its right side in the process.

The impact with the Cadillac caused the
truck to spin out of control and ultimately
overturn.

Police said the driver of the Cadillac is cur-
rently assisting them with their investigation
into the accident while the truck’s driver has
been taken to hospital to be treated for his
injuries.

The number of traffic fatalities for the year
now stands at 37.



Christie: Don’t confuse
kindness for weakness

FROM page one

yesterday, Mr Christie said he
is not fearful of losing the
leadership of his party, not-
ing that he has unfinished
business to do.

“Tam not a weak person.
Do not confuse the compas-
sion that has been the centre-
fold of my political and public
life. Do not confuse my sensi-
tivity to the needs of people
with weakness,” Mr Christie
warned.

Surprised

When asked if he would be

surprised if his long time
friend and colleague Dr
Bernard Nottage were to
challenge him at the upcom-
ing convention, Mr Christie
admitted that he would,
adding that such a challenge
would be very “disappoint-
ing.”
“Tam sure that if BJ was
actually going to do that I pre-
sume that by now he would
have told me and, of course, I
would have expressed major
disappointment because it
would really be surprising to
me.
“Obviously it is a right for
him and persons who support
him to aspire to any position
in the PLP and I have assured
him of that; that he must in
coming back, and my assisting
him in being reintegrated into
the party, I did so because I
see him to be an able man
and one who is able to make a
major contribution as we
move forward,” Mr Christie
said.

Container
port project

FROM page one

big jump to jump over all of
the advice and planning which
was agreed to you know by
the very same people own the
ports. And then suddenly,
boom! No man, that is
wrong,” he said.

While not seeking to
answer whether or not he felt
it would be a degree of
treachery or ungratefulness if
Dr Nottage were to run
against him, Mr Christie said
he would leave such questions
up to the judgment of the
people.

“T can only say this, I am
absolutely prepared for this
moment. Everything about
me has now climaxed at this
point where I am ready to go.
One only has to look at my
career and see the arrows and
the darts and the punishing
criticism that I have received.
Clearly that prepares some-
one — it makes you stronger.

“And contrary to percep-
tions that people try to put
out there. J am a strong and
purposeful person connected
to people. And so Iam confi-
dent, and I know at the end of
the convention I will be the
leader of the PLP,” he said.

In fact, Mr Christie said, he
has already started to meet
with new candidates for the

party on Monday evenings at
the party’s headquarters in
preparation for the next gen-
eral election.

“So this is only one stage
of the journey I am on and it
is a journey that will not be
interrupted in my own con-
sidered view,” he said.

Mr Christie also warned
those within his own party
who seek to blame him for
the PLP’s loss at the polls,
noting that they should in fact
look at themselves first and
see if they can carry some of
the responsibility.

“In any event, I have to rest
with the point of view that I
am in a democratic organisa-
tion, and that any person has
the right to challenge me as
leader of the PLP and that I
would expect that within the
organisation that if that point
of view is held by someone
then they should step forward
and challenge me and present
that point of view to the peo-
ple at our convention so they
can make a choice. And after

they have made the choice we
can regroup and move for-
ward,” he said.

Mr Christie also down-
played the significance of the
Greenberg Quinlan Rosner
report commissioned by the
PLP which suggested that Mr
Christie’s perceived “weak
leadership” was the primary
reason why the party lost the
2007 election. In fact, Mr
Christie blamed this percep-
tion mostly on the successful
“propaganda” utilised by the
FNM during the last election.

“Yes I have been very nice
to people and they have bit
me and there are others
doubtless who are ready to
bite again,” he said.

Claw

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on Mondays



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PAGE 8, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Demonstration outside GB Power

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Community activist
Troy Garvey and a small number of
protesters demonstrated on Friday at
the Power Company’s customer ser-
vice office in the Grand Bahama Port
Authority Building. Motorists honked
their car horns in support of the pro-
testers who picketed for an hour along
Pioneer’s Way.

Several senior police officers were
present at the demonstration, which
started around 8.30am.

Last Friday, police were called in to
stop an illegal protest because Mr Gar-
vey did not have a permit to demon-
strate.

Mr Garvey said consumers are fed
up and frustrated with the Grand
Bahama Power Company over the
high cost of electricity on the island.
Concerns have also been raised over
the frequent power outages, weekend




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TROY GARVEY and onan are seen demonstrating outside Grand Bahama
Power Company's customer service office, located in the Grand Bahama Port

Authority building.

disconnections, and the high deposits
required by residential consumers.
Grand Bahama Power is the sole sup-

plier of electricity on the island.
Marubeni/Taqa of Japan owns 50 per
cent of the company, and ICDU,

which is a public traded company on
BISX, owns the other 50 per cent.
EMERA of Canada owns 50 per cent
of ICDU, 40 per cent are public shares,
and Marubeni owns the other 10 per
cent.

Investors

Mr Garvey claims the new investors
of the Power Company have not been
“good investors” for Grand Bahama.

“We want them out of Grand
Bahama and we are calling on the
Prime Minister to please remove them
because they are not good for this
country.

“We want ‘investor friendly’
investors here,” he said.

He claimed that Grand Bahamians
were being oppressed.

Protester Edgar Roberts said gov-
ernment needs to regulate the Power
Company. He complained that the cost
of getting power is “ridiculously” high.

“T called the Power Company a few
days ago and asked what it would cost
to get power and I was told it would
cost $500 — that is just ridiculous.

“We need some sort of regulation at
the power company because they just
arbitrarily change the surcharge fees
whenever they want to,” said Mr
Roberts. Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham and Grand Bahama Port Author-
ity president Ian Rolle have also
expressed concerns about the GBPC.
During a recent visit to Grand
Bahama, Mr Ingraham said he was
disappointed with the new Japanese
company.

He said he is concerned that the
company has not “reinvested adequate
sums of money into its generation and
distribution system, and has over the
years taken its profits out in cash
rather than reinvesting it in its opera-
tion.”

The Tribune contacted the Grand
Bahama Power Company, but officials
did not want to comment.

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Government ‘fully committed’ to the
country’s artistic and cultural heritage deal with Monaco

PRIME Minster Hubert
Ingraham said Friday that his
government is fully committed
to the development of art forms
and the preservation of impor-
tant heritage sites and artifacts
wherever feasible.

Speaking at the opening of
an exhibition at the National
Art Gallery dedicated to
renowned Bahamian artist
Maxwell Taylor titled,
“Maxwell Taylor; Paperwork
1960-1992,” Prime Minister
Ingraham said that Bahamians
have “a rich architectural her-
itage that is being diminished
as modernization and develop-
ment transforms or demolishes
historical structures to make
way for new, modern edifices.”

“The importance of such
developments cannot be under-
estimated. It is necessary so as
to nurture in our people self
respect, cultural pride and iden-
tity, as well as a sense of place
in the growth and development

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of our country,” Prime Minister
Ingraham said.

“Knowledge brings about
concern and connection and
when it happens in the realm
of culture, recognition of our
strength as a community can
evolve, providing the basis for
much-needed national pride
and impetus for us to move for-
ward as a nation,” the Prime
Minister said. Mr Ingraham
praised Mr Taylor for his art
work, saying that they were
“not the traditional sun, sand
and sea paintings many of us
have come to regard as typical
Bahamian art.”

“He reaches for something
different, a feeling and connec-
tion to our past and with his
audience,” he said.

“It is so right for Mr. Tay-
lor’s work to be admired, held
up for praise and displayed here
in our National Art Gallery,”
he said. Prime Minister Ingra-
ham also commended the
gallery’s board, directors and
staff for their efforts to preserve
the rich artistic heritage of The
Bahamas. Mr Taylor has been
an artist for more than 40 years
working in Nassau and the
United States. Much of his
work includes images of black
Bahamian women.




Bahamas signs
tax information

THE Bahamas Government
and the Principality of Monaco
has concluded negotiations for
a Tax Information Exchange
Agreement (TIEA).

State Minister for Finance
Zhivargo Laing and Ambas-
sador of the Principality of
Monaco His Excellency Gilles
Noghés signed the agreement
at the Ministry of Finance on
Friday.

Mr Laing said both countries
have also agreed to continue
dialogue towards further coop-
eration in the tax area by nego-
tiating a Double Taxation
Agreement.

“The Bahamas and Monaco
share much in common,” he
said. “Both are small nations
with the major portion of eco-
nomic activities concentrated
in the hospitality and financial
services industries.”

Mr Laing added: “We look
forward to a productive and
cooperative relationship with
the Principality of Monaco as
our nations strive to adjust to
the changing global financial
and economic landscape and
the emerging rules that are
being developed to accommo-
date it.”

He said the Bahamas-Mona-
co TIEA is the first of many

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similar agreements the Gov-
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stantial progress in negotiations
with a number of Organisation
for Economic Cooperation and
Development (OECD) and G-
20 countries.

“These negotiations are part
of the effort made by the Gov-
ernment of the Bahamas to
meet its commitment to imple-
ment the standards for trans-
parency and information
exchange in tax matters that
were developed by the
OECD,” Mr Laing said.

Mr Laing said the United
Nations also adopted the stan-
dards and are supported by the
declarations of the G-20 Group
of Nations.

“The Government is confi-
dent that this agreement with
Monaco and other pending
agreements will allow The
Bahamas to meet its commit-
ment within the near future,”
he said. The TIEA signed with
Monaco is the second the
Bahamas Government has con-
cluded, the first being with the
United States on January 24,
2002. Ambassador Noghés said
this is only the beginning of
cooperation between the two
countries and within the coming
months a larger agreement
between Monaco and the
Bahamas will be signed.

Mr Noghes and Financial
Secretary Ehurd Cunningham
also signed an agreement on
administrative arrangements
for the implementation of the
TIEA. The OECD created the
Agreement on Exchange of
Information on Tax Matters to
address harmful tax practices.

A 2008 OECD report titled,
“Harmful Tax Competition: An
Emerging Global Issue,” iden-
tified “the lack of effective
exchange of information” as
one of the key criteria in deter-
mining harmful tax practices.

It mandated a working group
to develop a legal instrument
that could be used to establish
effective exchange of informa-
tion.

technical knowledge and practical skills required to assist the Registered Nurse or Physician in
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A Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) is a nursing professional who is trained to perform a
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 9



Workshop prepares educators for Influenza A (H1N1) virus

By Betty Vedrine
Bahamas Information
Services

OVER 100 district superin-
tendents, teachers and senior
officers participated in a pre-
paredness workshop for the
Influenza A (H1N1) virus at
the Paul Farquharson Confer-
ence Room at Police Head-
quarters on East Street on Fri-
day.

Entitled, “Preparedness
Workshop for Eventuality of
2nd Wave of Influenza A H1N1
Virus,” the workshop objectives
include providing educators
with the characteristics on Pan-
demic Influenza A (H1N1),
providing technical support,
reviewing the Ministry of Edu-

cation Integrated Plan and pre-
senting implementation strate-
gies of the Ministry’s Integrated
Plan.

The workshop covered sev-
eral key areas such as Preven-
tion, Preparedness, Response
and Recovery (PPRR).

Education Minister Carl W
Bethel said the workshop was
critical. Mr Bethel said, “We
have gathered to put our minds,
hearts and heads together to
ensure the health and safety of
our most precious asset, the
children of the nation.”

He explained that govern-
ment has charged the Ministries
of Health Education with the
development of a national
HIN1 Pandemic Influenza Pre-
paredness and Response Plan.

“As a result of this mandate,
we have partnered with the
Ministry of Health, and are now
seeking to bring all stakehold-
ers together in this proactive
approach.”

Mr Bethel said while the aim
is not to instil panic and fear,
stakeholders should not wait
for a second wave of the virus
before taking action.

“Out of today’s session, we
hope to gain more enlighten-
ment from the health care pro-
fessionals about the virus and
provide feedback on the Min-
istry of Education’s Proposed
Pandemic Response Plan,” he
said.

Permanent Secretary at the
Ministry of Education, Elma
Garraway highlighted the Min-

istry’s objectives and the objec-
tive of the workshop.

“This workshop will provide
the opportunity for all persons
living in The Bahamas, to
obtain knowledge, skills, val-
ues and attitudes required for a
successful life and work in a

democratic country guided by
Christian principles,” said Mrs
Garraway. Presentations were
also made by Health Minister
Dr Hubert Minnis; Permanent
Secretary, Ministry of Health,
Camille Johnson; Chief Med-
ical Officer, Dr Merceline

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By Betty Vedrine
Bahamas Information Services





HIS Excellency Zdenek Rozhold, Ambassador
of the Slovak Republic, presented his Letters of
Commission to Governor General Arthur D
Hanna at Government House on Thursday.

“IT am pleased to accept your letters of cre-
dence accrediting you as Ambassador extraordi-
nary and plenipotentiary of the Slovak Republic
to The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and
the letters of recall of your predecessor, His
Excellency Dr Ivo Hlavacek,” the Governor
General said. Ambassador Rozhold conveyed
the “personal greetings” of the President of the
Slovak Republic His Excellency Ivan Gasparovic
to the Governor General, the Government and
people of the Bahamas.

He said that all over the world the Bahamas is
known not only for the thousands of unspoiled
beautiful islands, but also for decades of good
governance, a stable and reliable legal system
and strong economic development, which have
created a prosperous and equitable population.

“While we are aware of the immense geo-
graphical distance that separates our two coun-
tries,” said Mr Rozhold, “we are confident that
this is not an insurmountable hindrance for the
effectiveness of our bilateral relationship, includ-
ing mutual support within international organi-
sations as well as economic and cultural cooper-
ation.”

The Governor General said that distance
should not be a barrier to the development of
mutually beneficial relations.

“In the context of multiculturalism, we have
already proven this,” he said. “We have given

t |

BIS PHOTO: Peter Ramsay
HIS EXCELLENCY Zdenek Rozhold, Ambas-
sador of the Slovak Republic (left) gives Gov-
ernor General Arthur Hanna a gift after pre-
senting his Letters of Commission, Thursday,
September 17, at Government House.

each other, for example, support in internation-
al fora such as the United Nations, and by the
Schengen Visa Waiver agreement signed May,
2009, with the European community, of which
your country is a member since 2004.”

He said the Bahamas looks forward to similar
“fruitful” results from collaboration in and nego-
tiation of other priority areas, including the Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreement, which The
Bahamas signed in conjunction with the
Caribbean Community (CARICOM) in Octo-
ber 2008, and the second five-year revision of
the Cotonou Agreement to be concluded in Feb-
ruary 2010. “I must also add the sustainable
development of Small Island Developing States
and the deepening of the partnership with our
hemisphere through the organisation of Ameri-
can States,” the Governor General said.

The Slovak Ambassador pledged to devote
all of his energy and efforts to “further strength-
ening the warm relations” that exist between the
two countries. The Governor General also
applauded the international contribution that
the Slovak Republic has made through mem-
bership and leadership in international bodies
such as the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation,
the International Court of Justice and the Unit-
ed Nations Economic Commission for Europe.

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

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Bethel Brothers Morticians
~ Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

ANDRE BALDWIN DAVIS, 61

of Sandilands Village Road
will be held on Wednesday,
September 23, 10am at St
Anne's Anglican Church,
Fox Hill. Fr Crosley
Walkine will officiate.
Interment will follow in the
church's cemetery.

Left to cherish fond
memories are his wife of
40 years, LaGloria Davis;
sons, Kenyetta Davis and
Patrick Ward; daughter,
Zelpha Davis; daughter-
in-law, Jill Ward; grand-
children, Linsey and Giles Ward; step mother, Charlotte
Davis; mother-in-law, Muriel Sears; aunts, Lucille
Ferguson and Beryl Wright; brothers, Albert Rolle,
Donavon, Trevor, and Berkhoff Davis; sisters, Patricia
Major, Lana Gatrey, Villel Reid and Joyanne Thompson,
brothers-in-law, Ron Gatrey, Sydney Reid, Errol
Thompson, Henry and Basil Sears, sisters-in-law, Susan
and Sharon Davis, Sandra, Vanria, Gloria Sears and
Pamela Sears-Brown; nephews, Keno, Donavon Jr. and
Darrel Davis, RL Gatrey, Sydney and Willie Lionel Reid,
Errol Thompson Jr., Kevin Munroe, Quentin Bowe, Basil
Sears Jr., David Sears, Nolen Brown, Enrique Sears and
Alaric Nixon; nieces, Cherita Miller, Monique Sandaire
and Charlene Major, LaRhonda and Lorren Gatrey,
Sheniqua, Tredika, Kadassa and Deshante Davis, Donelle
Davis, Tristan Thompson, Earline, Reid, Denise Sears,
Lorraine Bowleg, Shenique Taylor, Tanya Wright and
Sharla Sears; other relatives and friends including,
David, Darron, Gloria, Tyler, Malik, Michael, Terrico,
Melvern Davis and family, Linda, Tenaya and Terucco,
Kendal Davis and family, Billy Davis, Floyd and Betty
Davis, Daphne, Deidra, Delaree and Deandra, Dianne
Bingham and family, Shane Davis and family, Stewart
Davis and family, Keith Davis and family, Marguerite
Ferguson, Raleigh Ferguson, Bernadette Baptiste, Rubie
Brown and family, Sophie Rolle and family, Marguerite
Davis and family, Anthony Davis and family, Cedric
Davis and family, Debbie Davis, Diane Ferguson and
family, Fred and Florence Ramsey, Cora Mackey and
family, Clarence Fergusen and family, Cedric Kemp and
family, Stephanie McKinney, Anthony Butterfield, Prince
Livingston, Fr. and Mrs. Walkine, Fr. and Mrs. Bartlett,
Fr. and Mrs. Adderley, Rosetta Gibson and family, Betty
Mackey and family, Eudene Brown and family, Alison
Prince and family, Olrick and Julie Turnquest, Maurice
and Paula Tynes, Roger and Sharon Brown, Benson
Brown and Family, the Sears family, the Taylor family,
The Johnson family, Mary Wilson and family, St. Anne's
Choir, St. Anne's ACW and ACM, Carla Emmanuel and
family, Batelco employees, BCPOU members and others
too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respect at Bethel Brothers
Morticians, #44 Nassau Street on Tuesday from 10am
to 6pm and on Wednesday at the Church from 9am until
service time.

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118 retirees are recognised at
Public Service Awards ceremony

BIS Photos/Raymond A. Bethel

BAHAMAS COMMUNICATIONS and Public Officers Retirees Asso-
ciation 2nd Awards Banquet at Government House, on Friday, Sep-
tember 18, 2009. Picture shows Retirees and others in attendance.

ONE hundred and eighteen retired public servants were
honoured for their many years of service in the Public Service
at Government House, Wednesday, September 16.

The event coincides with the 10th annual Public Service
Recognition and Retirement Week, which started September
14 under the theme, “The Public Service — Striving for Excel-
lence in Customer Service.”

“Tt is a singular pleasure for me to congratulate the public
officers gathered here today who have given, in many instances,
more than half their lives in service to the people of The
Bahamas,” said Governor General Arthur D Hanna.

The retirees represented a cross-section of disciplines in the
public service. The Governor General said each retiree has
been instrumental in putting down the foundation upon which
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said. “So from that perspective alone, you would have con-
tributed to the development, progress and prosperity of our
nation.”

The Governor-General, Minister of State for the Public Ser-
vice Zhivargo Laing, and Secretary to the Cabinet, Anita
Bernard presented the retirees with plaques.

A reception followed on the patio of Government House.

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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 12

S r
MONDAY,

SEPTEMBER 21,
PAGE 15

Debbie,

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ts

2009



ith the track and
field season just
about over, two
veteran Bahami-
an sprinters con-
tinue to perform well in the first of
two final events in eastern Asia. Ss '

Yesterday at the 2009 Shanghai a. a
Grand Prix in China, Debbie Fer- 5 . =
guson-McKenzie and Chandra Stur-
rup produced third place finishes in
their signature events.

In the women’s 200m, Ferguson-
McKenzie came through in a photo
finish with Cydonie Mothersill of
the Cayman Islands in 22.45 sec-
onds.

However, Mothersill was awarded
second place as she turned in a sea-
son’s best time, while Ferguson-

er

PFELWA

ma



DEBBIE FERGUSON-McKENZIE (left) competes in 200m during Shanghai Golden
Grand Prix in China. Also shown is Allyson Felix, of the US, who won the race with
the time of 22.37. Ferguson finished in third place...

(AP Photo: Eugene Hoshiko)

Wildcats, Dorsey
Park Boyz continue
impressive run...

McKenzie had to settle for third.
The race was won by American
Allyson Felix in 22.37.

Felix was the gold medallist in the
12th IAAF World Championships
in Athletics in Berlin, Germany, last
month. She also took the victory in
the IAAF/VTB Bank World Ath-
letics Final in Thessaloniki, Greece,
last week.

Ferguson-McKenzie, 33, was the
bronze medallist in the 200 in Berlin
and she got fourth in the 200 and
sixth in the 100.

Meanwhile, Sturrup’s third place
came in the women’s 100. She
clocked 11.03 in the straight away
race.

American Carmelita Jeter took
the victory in the world’s leading
time, surpassing her previous best
mark of 10.67 and she also erased
the stadium mark of 10.79 that was
set by China’s Li Xuemei in 1997.

See page 14

Chandra finish third in Shanghai

Jeter was the bronze medallist in
Berlin.

Veronica Campbell-Brown, the
silver medallist in the 200 in Berlin,
had a season’s best of 10.89 for sec-
ond place.

Sturrup, 36, was fourth in Thessa-
loniki.

The duo were the only two
Bahamians competing in the meet
that saw American Tyson Gay
bounce back to turn the tables on
Jamaican Asafa Powell in a stadi-
um and national record of 9.69 in
the men’s 100. Powell did 9.85, fol-
lowed by American Darvis Patton in
a personal best of 9.89.

The men’s 400 was won by Amer-
ican Olympic and world champion
LaShawn Merritt in 45.28.

They are now heading to Japan
to compete in the Super Track and
Field Meet in Kawasaki 2009 on
Wednesday.


































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de Cardenas repeats as champion

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

DANNY de Cardenas sur-
prised himself when he
repeated as champion of the
Bahamas Optimist National
Championships yesterday.

de Cardenas, 14, complet-
ed the two-day championships
in Montagu Bay by accumu-
lating a total of 15 points, but
ended up with a net of 10 after
he dropped his worse race
score of 5 points.

Competing out of the red
group for competitors 13-15
years old, the St Andrew’s
ninth grader said he felt he
went out and competed very
well in the seven races con-
tested.

“T just tried to stay focussed
and got some good starts
because I knew that the com-
petition was going to be a lot
stiffer than it was last year,”
said de Cardenas, the Royal
Nassau Sailing Club member
who also plays baseball and
soccer.

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“There was a lot of people
who caught up to me on the
last day. But I think I got off
to a good start on the first day
and I was able to hold onto
my lead.”

Spencer Cartwright, one of
those competitors who made a
gallant effort to come back to
try and dethrone de Carde-
nas, had one major problem
that destroyed his chance of
winning.

The Bahamas Sailing Asso-
ciation member, who compet-
ed out of the white fleet for
competitors 7-10, didn’t start
the third race, which didn’t

allow him to gain any points.

He had to settle for second
with a net total of 13 points.

“Tt was good. I sailed very
well,” said the nine-year-old
fifth grader at Queen’s Col-
lege. “But I was really sur-
prised that I was right up there
with Danny. I really wanted
to beat him.”

Finishing in third was Bruce
Hall of the Royal Nassau Sail-
ing Club with his net total of
17 points.

Jeremy Pleydell-Bouverie,
the first Family Island com-
petitor, was fourth with a net
of 32. He represented the
Man-O-War Sailing Club and
he competed in the Blue Fleet
for ages 11-12.

His mother, Ann Pleydell-
Bouverie, said they were not
just proud of her son, but the
entire eight-member team that
represented Abaco.

“T think they all went out
there and they performed
exceptionally well,” she said
of their contingent that includ-
ed four competitors from
Guana Cay.

“T think they are learning
how to get along with the oth-
er competitors and I think that
has helped them tremendous-
ly in their performances.”

Rounding out the top five
was twin brother DeVaughn
Williamson with a net of 32.0.

SEE page 14

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Tender
CATERING SERVICES - CAFETERIA

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the above named services,

Bidders are required ta collect bid packages fram
the Corporation's Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads.

Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 307-1158

Tenders are to be addressed ta:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
$th October 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 711/09
CATERING SERVICES - CAFETERIA
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all proposals.






SPORTS

Wildcats, Dorsey Park Boyz
continue impressive run

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

BOTH the pennant winning
Pineapple Air Wildcats and
the Heavy Lift Dorsey Park
Boyz continued their impres-
sive run through the New
Providence Softball Associa-
tion on Saturday night, but in
different fashion.

The Wildcats wasted very
little time in stopping the
defending champions Sigma
Brackettes in five innings in
the opening game at the
Banker's Field at the Baillou
Hill Sporting Complex to
improve their record to 20-1.

The Dorsey Park Boyz also
improved to 20-1, but they did-
n't get to sweat at all after their
much anticipated rematch with
the defending champions
Commando Security Truckers
live on national television nev-
er happened.

The Truckers only had sev-
en players, including two
coaches in uniform to play. As
a result, Heavy Lift was award-
ed the victory by forfeiture as
they won the head-to-head
encounter with a 2-1 advan-
tage.

Bobby Saunders, one of the
coaches for the Truckers, said
it was a tough loss, but they
are dealing with an internal
matter that he wished not to
further discuss.

Apparently, the NPSA had
suspended Truckers’ infielder
Martin Burrows Jr and Dorsey
Park Boyz’ infielder Dwayne
Pratt for an off-the-field alter-
cation that involved a fight
between their family members
on Thursday night.

The Truckers felt that it was-
n't a justifiable move by the
association and so they refused
to accept the decision. To top
it off, the Truckers would have
had to play without veteran
Stephen ‘Slugger’ Brown, who

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was suspended for the remain-
der of the year from the New
Providence Oldtimers Softball
Association for an incident
involving a game official.

The suspension is expected
to be carried over into the
NPSA.

NPSA president Sidney
"Bobby Baylor’ Fernander also
refused to elaborate on the
suspensions, only to note that
they were quite disappointed
in the Truckers refusal to play
on Saturday night.

"It's a big disappointment
for us seeing that people
always want to see things going
their way,” Fernander said.
"But we will have to deal with
that because we can't allow
things like this to continue."

Fernander was especially
peeved because they had to
turn away so many fans at the
gate and they lost revenue by
not having the live television
game which many had antici-
pated as the regular season
winds down and the playoffs
get set to start.

"We will meet on Sunday or
Monday and look at all of the
facts and make a decision on
exactly what will happen,” Fer-
nander said. "This may affect
the rest of the regular season
because we may not have to
play all of the games remain-
ing. We might just decide to
go right into the playoffs."

Whatever decision is made,
the Dorsey Park Boyz are
waiting for the outcome.

Ace pitcher Edney ‘the
Heat' Bethel, who has been on
a strike out streak, racking up
almost 40 in their last two
games and is close to accumu-
lating a record 300-plus for the
regular season, was not sur-
prised at all that the Truckers
didn't show up.

"I heard the talk earlier in
the day that they were not
coming,” Bethel said. "If they
did decide to come, we would

have been ready for them.
We're eager to play and we
had everybody out here for the
game. I just think it was bad
for the fans and the league that
they didn't play."

After clinching the pennant,
Bethel said their season won't
be complete until they go on
and be crowned the NPSA
champions and represent the
NPSA in the Bahamas Soft-
ball Federation's National
Round Robin next month.

Also looking ahead to the
playoffs with renewed vigor is
the Wildcats.

After failing to make the
final last year, the Wildcats
have dominated the regular
season and they boosted their
confidence as they destroyed
the Brackettes 10-1 in the
opener.

"Our team is playing excel-
lent,” said ace pitcher Mary
‘Cruise’ Sweeting. "We wanted
to send a message to the
Brackettes that we are ready
for the playoffs and that one
game they won, we gave them
that.

"Our team is well oiled. We
have the pitching staff, we have
the hitters and we have players
to go all the way and recap-
ture the title. We are well bal-
anced this year and that is
because we don't want to be
watching the championship
again this year.”

Sweeting came up big once
again, tossing a three-hitter
with five strike outs to out-duel
veteran Ernestine Stubbs on
the mound. Stubbs gave up 10
hits with a pair of strike outs
for the Brackettes.

The Wildcats took control
of the game from the top of
the first inning when they
exploded for five runs on as
many hits, highlighted by Dor-
nette Edwards’ two-run dou-
ble, Marvell Miller's run-pro-
ducing triple and Linda
Knowles’ RBI ground out.

Sigma Brackettes scored
their only run in the bottom
of the frame when Vandette
Smith got hit by a pitch from
Sweeting. After Zella Symon-
ette singled, Smith eventually
scored on an error.

The Wildcats went wild
again in the third, sparked by a
would-you-believe-it bunt
from Sweeting after Edwards
opened the frame with her sec-
ond hit of the game. With two-
out, Candice Smith con-
tributed a RBI single and
Vernie Curry added a two-run
single.

Pineapple Air went on to
add their tenth and final run
in the fifth as Linda Knowles
got all the way to second base
on a one-out error, advanced
to third on a passed ball and
caught a ride home on
Jeanette Hilton's RBI single.

The Brackettes, who blew a
big scoring opportunity in the
third, ran into a rare double
play when young Ketrel
Dorsette singled, but she was
called out on the tap going to
second by Natasha Sears, who
then threw the ball to Linda
Knowles at first to beat out
batter Vandette Smith.

Brackettes’ coach Burton
Saunders argued the call, but
to no avail.

Sweeting then struck out
Theola Williams to end the
game.

"We didn't have it offen-
sively tonight, but it didn't real-
ly matter because this game
doesn't mean anything to us,”
said Brackettes’ catcher Cassie
Smith. "We're not feeling any
pressure. We will be ready for
the playoffs."

And she too sent a message
to the Pineapple Air.

"The Wildcats are just a
bunch of jokey girls," she
stressed. "We just want them
to know that we will be ready
for them, if we meet in the
championship this year.”

de Cardenas repeats as champion

His other half, Donovan Williamson was ninth

with a net of 51.0.

“Tt feels good, but I felt I could have done
better,” said the 11-year-old DeVaughn
Williamson, who competed out of the blue
fleet. “A lot of the early races, I finished in
the top five, but in the last two I don’t know

what happened.”

The Aquinas College eighth grader said he
will definitely be back to improve on his per-

formance.

Jared Collison, a Canadian, won the
White/Blue/Red Fleet combined with a net of

ca

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16 points. However, he was not eligible for the

overall title as he was not a Bahamian by birth.

And Donovan Knowles, competing for Long
Island, won the Green Fleet with a net of 15.0.
National sailing director Jimmy Knowles
said the championship was another grand suc-
cess, but he was disappointed that the 20-plus

competitors from Grand Bahama were not

able to travel here.
Along with New Providence and Abaco,

competitors also competed from Harbour

Island and Governor’s Harbour in Eleuthera
and Long Island.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 15



More than $4,200 raised for
junior sailing programme

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THOMAS Bethel is one of
the bright young golfers in the
country today, having repre-
sented the Bahamas on a
number of national teams.

But on Saturday, he joined
Larry Black and Hank Cole-
man in producing the best
score of the Nassau Yacht
Club teams.

Their performances enabled
the NYC to emerge as this
year’s champions of the annu-
al dual golf tournament
between the Royal Nassau
Sailing Club that took place
at the Ocean Club Golf
course.

They won the title with a
combined score of 268.

“We performed very well,”
Bethel said. “I think each of
the players went out there and
did what they had to do. So it
was avery good team effort.”

Bethel, however, said the
goal was to beat the Royal
Nassau Sailing Club and they
proudly achieved that feat, so
they can have bragging rights
until next year.

The team of Phil Andrews,
11-year-old Spencer Andrews,
Chris Birch and Zack Bonza-
ck had the best team score for
the RNSC.

“We did excellent,” said
Bonzack. “We were able to
put it all together and bring it
home for the Sailing Club. We
had a very diverse team with
an 11-year-old boy and a 70-
year-old. So it was good for

*

4
$4,271.00

ih



LARRY BLACK, tournament director, presents a cheque to a Bahamas

Sailing Association representative...
Photo by Felipé Major/Tribune staff

In the individual categories,
Bethel also won the men’s
longest drive on hole number
two, while Dilys Anderson
took the ladies longest drive
on hole number 13.

In the closest to the pin,
Victor Leniuk won on hole
number three, Scott Saunders
on hole eight, Terry McCabe
on hole 12 and Phil Andrews
on hole 14.

The tournament was a joint
venture between the Nassau
Yacht Club and the Royal
Nassau Sailing Club as they
assisted the Bahamas Sailing
Association.

A total of $4,270.00 was
raised for the junior sailing
programme.

Larry Black, the tourna-
ment director, said they were
quite pleased with the turnout
of the tournament.

He noted that the aim was
to assist the Bahamas Sailing
Association and he was

pleased with what they
achieved.

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Colinalmperial

THE TRIBUNE
D ul .

SECTION B e business@tribunemedia.net

ine

MONDAY,



SEPTEMBER 21,

2009

Confidence For Life





$16m start-up targets
5,000 first-year clients

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

$16 million Bahami-
an telecoms start-up
is “conservatively”
projecting that it will
attract 5,000 sub-
scribers to its ‘multiple-play’ product
during its first operational year, and
is aiming to launch its service by the
2009 fourth quarter/early 2010.
Edison Sumner, IP Solutions
International’s president and chief
executive, told Tribune Business that
the company’s ‘go live’ date depend-
ed on how successful the initial $16
million capital raising was, but it was
“very confident” it could raise the
full amount by the time its private
placement closed.

AML Foods targets
early 2010 dividend

* “Multiple-play’ provider aims to expand into Caribbean and Latin America by second/third
year of existence, with ‘just over $10m’ required for infrastructure build-out

* Seeking to launch service to Bahamian customers by 2009 Q4/early 2010

* Looking beyond existing platform to data services, e-commerce,
data services, disaster recovery and e-government

* Letters of Intent signed with hotels, as gated communities another key target

IP Solutions International is aim-
ing to raise $8 million in equity cap-
ital from Bahamian investors, tar-
geted institutions and high net-worth
individuals, with the balance com-
ing from a $4 million preference

By NEIL HARTNELL

share issue and $4 million in bank
debt financing.

Out of the $16 million target, Mr
Sumner said “just over $10 million”
would be used to finance IP Solu-
tions International’s initial capital

spending needs. That involves the
construction of its wireless broad-
band infrastructure, including head-
end facilities and a Network Opera-
tions Centre that will serve not only
the Bahamas but, eventually, the

entire Caribbean and Latin America.

“The Bahamas is really our first
stop,” Mr Sumner told Tribune Busi-
ness. “We intend to take the business

SEE page 8B

Port chair work permit renewed to year-end

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A M L
Foods, the
BISX-listed
retail group, 1s
targeting Feb-
ruary/March
2010 for when
it will make
the first divi-
dend payment WATCHORN
to sharehold-
ers in some seven-eight years,
its president and chief execu-

SEE page 6B



* BISX-listed retail group
sees customer transaction
count rise 15% yeat-to
date despite recession, as
half-year profits increase
almost 10-fold to $2.2m

* Company expects to repay
bank debt by first week
in December, and will
reassign funds to
preference debt

* But average customer
spend falls in August
for Back-to-School

Price controls 'work against
the interests of consumers'

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

PRICE controls are “work-
ing against the interests of
consumers in the long-term”,
especially lower and middle
income class families, because
they force retailers to raise
prices higher than they might
on some products to compen-
sate for the losses the law
requires them to absorb on
breadbasket items.

Gavin Watchorn, AML
Foods’ president and chief
executive, told Tribune Busi-
ness: “There’s a real miscon-
ception with what price con-
trol is really doing for the cus-
tomer.”

The retail executive, whose

company owns the Solomon’s
SuperCentre and Cost Right
formats, explained: “The real-
ity, if you speak to any retail-
er, is that price control is
working against consumers,
because it eliminates gross
profits and gross profit mar-
gins on 10 per cent, 15 per
cent, 20 per cent of your sales
base.”

While the landed cost of
goods and produce was effec-
tively out of the control of
Bahamian retailers, Mr
Watchorn said AML Foods’
operating costs were effec-
tively 25 per cent of sales — a
level he described as “quite
good” when it came to cov-

SEE page 9B

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and dining strip. Membership amenities include a fitness center, pool, tennis
courts and more. This home gives you the best value at Bayroc. Offered by
Mario Carey Realty at $1,669,000. Web Listing # 8324.

NA

MARIO CAREY REALTY

Tel: 242-677-TALK (8255) | Fax: 242-677-8256 | Cell: 242-357-7013
info@mariocareyrealty.com | www.mariocareyrealty.com



Tribune Business Editor

THE Government has only
extended the work permit of
Grand Bahama Port Author-
ity (GBPA) chairman Hannes
Babak until year-end, sources
have confirmed to Tribune
Business, a tactic they say is
designed to push the warring
Hayward and St George fac-
tions towards settlement of
the almost three-year-old
ownership dispute.

Multiple sources have con-
firmed to this newspaper that
Mr Babak’s work permit
renewal, the subject of much
controversy and opposition
from the late Edward St
George’s estate, was granted
until year-end, as the Gov-
ernment mounts a final push
to create the circumstances in
which the GBPA owners can
reach a settlement.

It is understood that Mr
Babak’s work permit is
unlikely to further be extend-

Move designed to push for GBPA ownership dispute
settlement, as two sides said to be close to deal

ed by the Government and
the Immigration Department,
with sources informing Tri-
bune Business that both
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham and his government, plus
the GBPA’s key business
partner, Hutchison Wham-
poa, were reluctant to deal
with the Austrian chairman
for their own separate rea-
sons.

One source, familiar with
recent developments,
described Mr Babak as “epit-
omizing the divisions”
between the Hayward fami-
ly, in the shape of the Sir Jack
Hayward Family Trust, and
the late Edward St George’s
estate.

The latter has been res-
olutely opposed to Mr
Babak’s chairmanship almost
from day one, while he has

received strong backing from
the Hayward camp, especial-
ly Sir Jack. Yet other mem-
bers of the Hayward family
appear to have cooled in their
backing for Mr Babak, with
Sir Jack’s son, Rick, telling
this newspaper some months
ago that he and other family
members had settled their dif-
ferences with the St Georges
and all were aligned against
the GBPA chairman.

It thus appears that the
Government’s decision on Mr
Babak’s work permit renewal
may have been designed, at
least in part, to create pres-
sure for a severance of the ties
between himself and Sir Jack
in a push for settlement by
Christmas 2009.

Tribune Business can also

SEE page 4B

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The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report





























































MATIOMAL
Ohi Dar

| Yes! | No! Our company / school will participate in Lee National Denim Day On
October 2", 2009,

We will allow our employees / students to show their support and in honor of a loved one on
National Denim Day by wearing jeans In exchange for a donation per person.

British American Financial encourages additional corporate sponsorship to help meet our National Breast
Cancer Awareness Goals, For every $ amount donated by the Employee! Student, we hope companies /
achools will match their donation.

Company / School:

Number of Participants;
Contact Person:

Phone:

E-Mail:

Indicate #/ Item below:

r-shinssiom S| |] M [| ul | om] mm

Pink Ribbon Car Magnets - $5.00 [ Pink Bands - $5.00 [ ]

L

Fax 328-8994 or E-Mail: spmgaicoralwave.com or dstorriahabfinaneial.com

Denim Day Questions? Please call 323-4434 / 322-8718
Please make cheques payable to British American Financial
Re: National Breast Cancer Awareness

Thank you for supporting the National Breast Cancer Awareness Initiative Fund, the Bahamas
Cancer Soclety and the Sister, Sister Cancer Support Group.

PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Business faces
S40k cost hike
from NIB rise

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE National Insurance
Board’s (NIB) proposed con-
tribution rate increase, when
combined with the 50 per cent
insurable wage ceiling rise,
will add $40,000 to one
Bahamian company’s annual
operating costs and increase
total payments to the social
security scheme by almost 70
per cent.

A senior executive, who
requested anonymity for him-
self and his business, which
employs around 100 staff
ranging from line staff to
supervisory/managerial level,
told Tribune Business that
after crunching the numbers
to determine the impact of
the NIB changes, it was dis-
covered that the total employ-
ee contribution to NIB (the
sum coming out of staff
salaries) would increase by
40.83 per cent.

Describing this as a “40 per
cent hit to the average
employee’s take home pay”,
the executive added that the
company’s calculations
showed that its share of NIB

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
tle MET fel eT 4
on Mondays

RUBINS
(9 J eneanteoera Lee
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ALL SALES FINAL - LESS 5% FOR CREDIT CARDS - EXCLUDING DOCKERS, LEVTS & HANDBAGS

Wee

Says employer and employee
contributions to rise by 40.83%
and 28.98% respectively

contributions would increase
by 28.98 per cent per annum.

“For us, it’s another $40,000
a year on top of payroll costs,
another $40,000 a year com-
ing off the employer and
employee earnings in the case
of one company,” the senior
executive told Tribune Busi-
ness.

“There goes another two
additional hires to fund the
unemployment benefit via the
Government’s coffers. I sup-
pose in a way it’s a back-
handed compliment that the
Government thinks we’re so
robust and resilient that they
think we can underwrite these
benefits on their behalf.

“But obviously operational
expenses are going up by
$40,000 alone, so prices will
be increased to cover the
increased cost.”

Apart from increasing
NIB’s contribution rate from
8.8 per cent to 10.8 per cent to
finance the unemployment
benefit and National Pre-
scription Drug Programme,
the Government is also plan-
ning to raise the social securi-
ty programme’s insurable
wage ceiling from $400 to
$600 per week in early 2010.

This, the business executive
said, amounted to a “double
increase” on managerial,
supervisory and other high-
salaried employees. “Some
people are going to be facing
an increase in contributions
direct to $5,000 or more from
their salaries,” he added.

While the Government
constantly touted that social
security contribution rates

were much lower in the

Bahamas than the likes of

Barbados, which had a 17 per
cent rate, the business execu-
tive told Tribune Business: “It
won’t be long before they
have us up there and beyond
them, especially if they intro-
duce National Health Insur-
ance.

“T’m going to make sure the
employees know it’s not the
company taking the money
from their pay cheque; it’s the
Government.

“My employee’s take home
pay will drop, and in no
uncertain terms my employ-
ees will know it’s the Gov-
ernment taking more of their
money.”

The Nassau Institute, the
Bahamian economic think-
tank, had previously used the
real-life example of a compa-
ny with three employees, to
illustrate that it faced an 84
per cent increase in NIB con-
tributions to over $10,000 per
annum once the changes were
implemented.

Rick Lowe, a senior Nas-
sau Institute official, told Tri-
bune Business this was “a
huge jump”, and said many
businesses would either be
forced to avoid paying NIB
contributions or lay-off/not
hire workers.

“Particularly when things
are so tough, the last thing the
Government should do is
increase taxes when the econ-
omy is on the slide and so bur-
dened that it pushes people
over the edge,” Mr Lowe said.

“Tf people are hanging on
by their fingertips, it may be
the thing that causes them to
push another employee out
the door. That’s the concern
we all have.”

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

NASSAU MOTOR Com-
pany (NMC) yesterday said
it expected to complete its
new customer reception office
within the next three weeks,
having spent just over
$500,000 to-date on as expan-
sion designed to make it more
efficient and "the place of
choice" for Honda and Gen-
eral Motors-manufactured
cars.

Rick Lowe, the company's
operations manager, told Tri-
bune Business that it was
"probably three weeks away"
from opening its new cus-
tomer service area, once the
furniture was installed and the
front door put on.

He added that rather than
knocking down the current
client reception area, and con-
verting it into two additional
service bays, Mr Lowe said
Nassau Motor Company had
decided to place its transmis-
sion room and staff lunch area
in the existing structure.

"We're moving them to
where the existing reception
office is," Mr Lowe said of
the two facilities. "Instead of
knocking it down and mak-

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 3B
Motor dealer eyes 3-week
finish for reception area

ing two more bays, we will
move them temporarily until
we decide whether we're
going ahead with Phase II."

He added that Nassau
Motor Company could also
potentially leave the trans-
mission room and lunch area
there, rather than proceed
with the initial plans, "killing
two birds with one stone”.

With the firm having spent
just over $500,000 to date on
its expansion, and “a little
more to go", Mr Lowe
acknowledged that investing
during a recession was always
risky.

"Tt sure is," he added, "but
you've got to remain hopeful
things will turn around. Cus-
tomers have to service vehi-
cles, and hopefully we will be
the place of choice for Honda,
Chevrolet and Cadillac own-
ers."

He told Tribune Business
that Nassau Motor Company
had experienced no fall-off in
demand for vehicle servicing
as a result of the recession,
the only recent decline hav-
ing resulted from the compa-
ny's expansion project, with
customers placed on a three-
week as opposed to one-week
wait.

"T think it will be a bit more
convenient for our cus-
tomers," Mr Lowe told Tri-
bune Business of the new cus-
tomer service centre. "Rather
than having to traipse through
cars running back and forth,
there will be a nice area for
them to sit in. It will be a little
more convenient.

"We're getting on with the
paving, the levelling off of the
ground. I think our customers
will like it. When they come
in, it will be more customer
friendly."

He added that Nassau
Motor Company hoped to ini-
tiate a programme where
clients in a hurry could have
their vehicles serviced in a
short period of time, "getting
them in and out as fast as pos-
sible. It's something General
Motors and Honda continu-
ally stress".

As for the six bays with
hydraulic lifts that Nassau
Motor Company had installed
some five months to go as
part of the first phase expan-
sion, Mr Lowe said: "They've
been wonderful. It makes the
technicians’ lives a lot easier.
They don't have to jack the
car up by hand or put a jack
stand under each corner."

LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.

FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!
Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million

Web Listing # 8377

Mario A. Carey, CRS, CIPS, CLHMS

Tel: 242-677-8251 Cell: 357-7013

www.marioca reyrea

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BS! OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
intemational private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is
presently accepting applications for

PRIVATE BANKING RELATIONSHIP MANAGER/MANAGED
PORTFOLIOS ADMINISTRATOR

Applicants for the position of must have a banking/financial degree or 7-10
years experience in the offshore banking sector, have knowledge of
international investment instruments & money market, ability to partner with
team members, must be confident regarding customer relations, investments
& portfolio management and have thorough knowledge of local legislation,
regulatory & statutory matters as well as international banking practices.
Fluency in Italian is absolutely required,

Personal qualities ;-

Excellant organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Commitment to quality and service excellence

Able to work with minimal supervision

Strong Team attitude

Financial and analytical background

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure

Responsibilities :-

Service & advise customers

Mainiain & follow up account relationships

Liaise directly with customers or their investment advisors

Monitor, analyze positions and evaluate reports

Ensure that managed porifolios are implemented according to the relevant
policies

Liaise with Portfolio Managers and other Relationship Mangers on

Meet deadlines on timely basis

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum
vitae to:

Human Resources Manager

BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre
P. 0. Box N-7130

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerrm@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted

Tei

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ever

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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



=
Port chair work permit

renewed to year-end

Career
Opportunity

SENIOR TRUST MANAGER

J. P. Morgan is currently seeking applications for a Senior Trust Manager.





























The successful candidate will work with Trust and related partners to
ensure that fiduciary services are delivered in a manner consistent with all
legal, regulatory and internal requirements. The candidate will also serve
as a technical resource to wealth advisors, investors and relationship
managers. The Senior Trust Manager will be expected to develop direct
relationships with clients and have the flexibility to travel.

Prospective applicants should have 6+ years of trust experience, with 3+
yearsin mentoring others. Abachelor’s degree or a professional qualification
ideally in law with strong analytical skills; knowledge of investment product
services, fiduciary and trust regulatory requirements and onshore and
offshore jurisdictions; excellent written/verbal communication and creative
problem solving skills; and the ability to assess risk in fiduciary and trust
matters.

J.P. Morgan Private Bank offers competitive compensation and
benefits packages. Interest applicants should submit their resume/
curriculum vitae marked “Private and Confidential” to the Human
Resources Manager, J.P. Morgan Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited,
P.O. Box N-4899, Nassau, Bahamas.

J.P. Morgan Trust Company
(Bahamas) Limited

To advertise in The Tribune -
Cea MWA ry BRU
just call 502-2371 today!

FOUR CONWECTION@TO THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER
Public Relations Assistance for
The Bahamas Telecommunications
Company Limited

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Lim-
ited is pleased to invite tenders to assist with Public
Relations initiatives for the company.

Interested firms or individuals may collect a Tender
Specification from the BTC's security desk at John F.
Kennedy, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:30
p.m., Monday through Friday from September 18th,
2009.

The deadline for submission of tenders is Thursday Oc-
tober 2nd, 2009. lenders should be sealed and marked
‘PROPOSAL FOR PUBLIC RELATIONS ASSISTANCE INI-
TIATIVES FOR THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS
COMPANY LIMITED’ and should be delivered to the at
fention of the ‘Mr. |. Kirk Griffin Acting President and
CEO.’

BIC RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY,
OR ALL TENDERS

palin yy |) ' i

allt

FROM page 1B

reveal that discussions on a
settlement between the Hay-
ward and St George sides
have been ongoing for sever-
al months in London. Some
sources have suggested that
the two parties may be close
to a deal, although the terms
are presently unknown.

This newspaper did reveal,
though, that the St George
estate rejected a previous
Hayward Family Trust offer
to give it a 37 per cent equity
stake in Intercontinental
Diversified Corporation
(IDC), the holding company
for the GBPA and its Port
Group Ltd affiliate.

That, though, was speedily
rejected, given that the
Bahamian Supreme Court
had ruled that the ownership
split between the two sides

(srupoa

Santander

was 50/50, although this has
been appealed.

The Prime Minister is
understood to want the
GBPA ownership dispute
resolved as rapidly as possi-
ble, and once and for all. He is
thought to see it as an obsta-
cle to his plans to revive
Grand Bahama and its econ-
omy, a hot-bed of FNM sup-
port, especially given his focus
on a new cruise port for the
island and, possibly, liquefied
natural gas (LNG) to follow.

The ownership dispute
paralysed the GBPA at the
worst possible time, giving the
impression that Freeport and
Grand Bahama were rudder-
less and badly damaging busi-
ness and investor confidence
when it was needed most in
the aftermath of the Royal
Oasis closure and, more
recently, the global recession.

It is unclear whether one

or both of the families would
retain GBPA ownership if a
settlement was reached, or if
an outside buyer would take
over. While Roddie Fleming
has disappeared from the
scene, Hutchison Whampoa
is still potentially waiting in
the wings, especially given the
increasing Chinese interest in
the Bahamas.

The St George had object-
ed to Mr Babak’s work per-
mit renewal on the grounds
that his contract dispute, in
which he had claimed $5 mil-
lion and could expose the
GBPA to a potential $75-$100
million liability, had not been
resolved. In response, the
GBPA’s attorneys accused
the St George estate of com-
mitting “an improper abuse”
by continuing to threaten the
company over issues such as
the renewal of Mr Babak’s
work permit.

SANTANDER BANK & TRUST LTD

has an immediate vacancy for a

“REDIT RISK MANAGER

Applicants must hold the following:

- Bachelors in Business Administration or related degree

- Minimum of 10 years experience in Private Banking with 5 years directly in the area

of Credit Risk,

Applicants should also be capable of the following:

1, Management and servicing of loan portfolios involving Spanish lending officers
and clients, liaison with other group units.
, Good organizational and planning skills,
3. Effective management and supervision of Credit Risk Department,
. Excellent communications skills in both English and Spanish essential.
. Be proficient in all Microsoft Office applications,

Applications in writing with details of education and experience should be addressed
to the Human Resources Manager, P.O. Box N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas not later than

October 9, 2000,

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.hy

EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST

EOL

FOR PREQUALIFICATION FOR

DESIGN, SUPPLY AND INSTALLATION OF
FURNITURE, FIXTURES & EQUIPMENT:

The College of The Bahamas (COB) is secking Expressions of Interest from qualified ven-
dors'firms to provide services and products for the design, supply and installation of fur-
niture, fixtures and equipment (FF&E) for

{i} the Harry Wloore Library and Information Centre presently under consiniction at
the Oakes Field Campus of The College and
{ii} the new Northern Bahamas Campus of The College presently under construction
in Freeport, Grand Bahama

Inleresied parties may obtain further inlormalion and purchase a copy of the Bxpressians
Of Interest Prequaliicwtion Application form trom:

The OMfice of the Vice President Finance

College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field
Nassau, Bahamas

The Office of the Associate Vice President

College of The bahamas

Northern Bahamas Campus

Freeport, (irand Bahama

Tel: 242-352-9761

An infeerrmration meeting will be held in Nassau, on Tuesday, 2h September, 20049 and on
Wednesday, 30th September, 2008 in Freeport ala time and venue to be announced,

EOl"s are io be submitted to the location(s) indicated in the EOL Prequalification Porm in
a scaled envelope appropriately marked:

Vice President, Finance
College of The Bahamas

EXPRESSIONOF INTEREST - FEE -

insert name of applicable facility

Firms must submit a separale EO! for each facility. All BOs are to be submitted hy 12:00
pm (mid-day) on Friday, 9th October, 200%,

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 5B



0.9m spend on
three alternate
energy studies

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE GOVERNMENT is
spending a $0.9 million grant
on studies conducted by Ger-
man firm Fitchner, which will
look at increasing energy effi-
ciency and security in the
Bahamas through three pilot
programmes, an advisor to the
Ministry of the Environment
revealed.

Glenn Laville, who is also
acting deputy general manag-
er at the Water and Sewerage
Corporation, said solar water
heating systems, Photovoltaic
power generating systems and
an incandescent to fluorescent
light bulb switch-out pro-
gramme will all be studied
during the 10-month grant
period.

Mr Laville, chairman of the
National Energy Policy (NEP)
committee, BEST Commis-
sion head Philip Weech, and
member of the renewable
energy committee at BEC,
Berlington Strachan, present-
ed a report on their progress
to members of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce and
the general public last Thurs-
day.

According to Mr Weech,
the Bahamas spent $0.8 bil-
lion on petroleum products in
2008 as the price of oil per
barrel peaked at $147 mid-
year. This cost translated into
higher fuel surcharge charges
for BEC consumers, and
caused the disconnection of
some 6,000 homes by late last
year.

The minister in charge of
BEC, Phenton Neymour, said
the NEP is being used to cre-

ate more energy security
throughout the Bahamas, and
to prevent such widespread
service disconnections by
cushioning the impact of
volatile oil prices should the
market hit record highs again.

BEC has constructed its
own alternative energy divi-
sion and issued a request for
proposals for alternative ener-
gy providers.

Mr Strachan said 13 firms
have already been shortlisted.
He said various methods of
alternative energy production
will be tested throughout New
Providence, Abaco, Long
Island and Eleuthera.

Some of the alternative
energy sources proposed by
firms who have looked at the
Bahamas’ potential have been
waste to energy, solar, wind,
solar/wind hybrids, and wave
energy.

The Bahamas’ national
energy demand has increased
by an average of 8 per cent
per annum, and is expected to
continue to rise.

"Renewable and locally
produced energy is also
expected to improve, increas-
ing the long-term economic
impact of the national energy
bill as the cost of energy
increases over time,” the
report said.

"Investing in these energy
options is expected to create
new employment opportuni-
ties and increase the portion
of the national energy bill that
is multiplied locally.”

The report suggests that 90
per cent of the energy con-
sumed in the Bahamas is pro-
duced through the burning of
fossil fuels. Even as these fos-
sil fuel consumption numbers

NN

Sars

N

Nassau Airport

Development Company

continue, the Government
continues its investment in -
and construction of - fuel oil-
burning power generators.

The newest plant is being
built in Wilson City, Abaco,
but construction was recently
halted to give BEC time to
obtain the necessary permits.

One downtown business
person, which wished not to
go on record, said the studies
government is doing are a
waste of time.

"They have been proven to
work in other countries. Why
must government waste time
and money on that,” said the
business person. "It's work-
ing in Germany, right, and we
have the same sun."

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Nassau Airport Development Company Limited (NAD) is seeking a Proponent or
Proponents (individual, consortium or joint venture that must include an experienced
newsstand operator) to finance, design, develop, operate and manage three newsstand,
bookstore and convenience shop locations in the new U.S. Departures Terminal currently
under construction at the Lynden Pindling International Airport. These stores will be
world class in operation, design and appearance with a distinctive ‘sense of place’ and
will offer a broad selection of newspapers, magazines, books, sundry & convenience
items and miscellaneous gifts at competitive prices.

1 (a) NEWSSTAND/BOOKSTORE/GIFTS in the U.S. Departures lounge
(b) NEWSSTAND KIOSK/COFFEE BAR/BAR in the U.S, Departures Concourse

2 NEWSSTAND/CONVENIENCE STORE/COFFEE BAR in U.5, Check-in.

Locations 1a) and 1{b) must be bid together. NAD will consider individual proposals for
I{al/(b) and 2 above or combined proposals for all locations.

Mandatory qualifications

i. Proponents must be Bahamian and incorporated in The Bahamas.

ii, Proponents must have operated a similar newsstand/books/gifts facility within
the last three (3) years.

NAD’S goals and objectives are to:

(a) achieve a high standard of excellence and customer service;

(b) offer a mix of concepts that will help to enhance the image of LPIA as.a world
class airport;

(c) offer retail and food & beverage choices to passengers at fair prices;

(d) offer a mix of local, regional and national and international brand-name
companies;

(e) develop and design retail facilities that complement the qualities of the new
terminal while recognizing the distinctive spirit, character and ‘sense of place’
of The Bahamas; and

(Fl optimize revenue to NAD.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs






















EXTERNAL LANDSCAPING, LIGHTING & IRRIGATION SYSTEMS
The College of The Bahamas (COB) is seeking Expressions of Interest from qualified
firms to provide services and products for the design, supply and installation of the exter-

nal landscaping, lighting and irrigation systems for

(i) the Harry Moore Library and Information Centre presently under construction at
the Oakes Field Campus of The College and

(ii} the new Northern Bahamas Campus of The College presently under construction
in Freeport, Grand Bahama

Interested parties may obtain further information and purchase a copy of the Expressions
of Interest Prequalification Application form from:

The Office of the Vice President Finance
College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field
Nassau, Bahamas

Ur

The Office of the Associate Vice President
College of The Bahamas
Northern Campus
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Tel: 242-352-9761

An information meeting will be held in Nassau, on Tuesday, 29th September, 2009 and on
Wednesday, 30th September, 2009 in Freeport at a time and venue to be announced.

EO!'s are to be submitted to the location(s) indicated in the EO! Prequalification Form in
a sealed envelope appropriately marked:

Vice President, Finance

College of The Bahamas

EXPRESSIONOF INTEREST - FEE -
insert name of applicable facility

Firms must submit a separate EO] tor each facility, All EOWs are to be submitted by 12:0)
pi (mid-day) on Friday, 9th October, 2009,

REQUEST FOR
ROPOSAL

NEWSSTANDS, BOOKS, GIFTS AND
CONVENIENCE SHOPS

Qualified and interested parties may pick-up the Request for Proposal package at NAD)'s
offices at the reception desk on the second floor Domestic/International Terminal at
Lynden Pindling International Airport between the hours of 9:00am and 4:00pm, from
September 15th to September 28th, 2009, A mandatory pre-proposal briefing for
those who have picked up packages will be held in the Arawak Lounge at the Airport on
Wednesday, September 30th at 10:00am.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 6B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE












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FROM page 1B

tive has confirmed, with the
group’s customer transaction
count defying the recession
by running some 15 per cent
ahead of 2008 year-to-date.
Speaking to this newspaper
after unveiling a dramatic
increase in fiscal 2010 second
quarter profits, which rose

from just $162,000 last year
to $1.18 million for the three
months to July 31, 2009,
Gavin Watchorn said that
despite generating a “full $4
million profit on a rolling
basis for the last 12 months”
and generating a “tremendous
improvement”, AML Foods
was “still not where we want
to be on the bottom line”.

Legal Notice

SOL SIGNUM INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,

And even though net prof-
its for the fiscal 2010 were
more than nine times last
year’s comparative, standing
at $2.2 million compared to
$244,000, Mr Watchorn said
the BISX-listed group felt
there was “room for improve-
ment on shrinkage” and
opportunities for sales growth
that had not been exploited.

“We feel there is further
room for growth for us,” the
AML Foods president and
chief executive told Tribune
Business, signifying how far
the company — in its previous
incarnation as Abaco Markets
— has come from the dark
days of fiscal 2003, when it
recorded a $25.2 million net
loss.

“For the year-to-date, our
customer transaction count is
up 15 per cent pretty much

are coming into the stores,
sales are up and we’re holding
our fixed costs flat.

“We’re offering quality
brands at good prices and cus-
tomers are seeing value,
although things are obviously
tight in the economy. There’s
a lot of noise in the market-
place. What the Solomon’s
[SuperCentre] and Cost-Right
brands, as well as the Domi-
no’s Pizza brand, offer is qual-
ity with value and quality with
savings, offering real value.”

Mr Watchorn told Tribune
Business that AML Foods
expected to have completely
repaid its debt to Royal Bank
of Canada (RBC) by the first
week in December 2009, with
“just over” $200,000 out-
standing, some $1.5 million
having already been repaid
this year. As at July 31, 2009,










some $1.36 million had been
repaid to RBC, some
$850,000 of that coming in the
second quarter.

“We’re going to bump the

across the board,” Mr
Watchorn told Tribune Busi-
ness. “Having more people
coming into the store tells you
you’re doing something right.
That’s behind the increase in
profitability — more people

the dissolution of SOL SIGNUM INC. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.

SEE next page

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

f (EN THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
(Liquidator) =

Viet our website af wwer.cob eda by

NOTICE

Town Meeting for Master of Law (LLM)
in Maritime Law Degree Programme in
collaboration with the University of London,
Monday 5th October, 2009,
Executive Boardroom,

Michael Eldon Complex, 3rd Floor
6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m,

Legal Notice

MONTRES INTERNATIONAL

VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of MONTRES INTERNATIONAL
VENTURES LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.



S.A. T. PREPARATION
CLASSES

AT KINGSWAY ACADEMY

FALTEORY CONSBERS
Chanboes Beginning Saturday September 26 through Saturday

age Apa ARGOSA CORP INC. December 5, 2009, Kingsway Academy will hold

(Liquidator)

S.A.T. Preparation Classes from 9:00 a.m. to
12:00 noon culminating in the writing of the S. A. T.
Examination in January. The cost is $250.00 per

person and includes all materials.

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work Interested persons are asked to contact the

Business Office at telephone 324-6887 / 324-6269
or the Guidance Conselor at 324-8811 or 324-3409,

COLONTAL
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:

THURSDAY, 17 SEPTEMBER 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,534.77| CHG -0.47| %CHG -0.03 | YTD -177.59 | YTD % -10.37
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Security Daily Vol. EPS$ Div$ P/E
1.15 AML Foods Limited 0.127 9.1
9.90 Bahamas Property Fund 0.992 10.8
6.18 Bank of Bahamas 0.244 25.3
0.63 Benchmark -0.877 N/M
3.15 Bahamas Waste 0.078 40.4
2.14 Fidelity Bank 0.055 43.1
10.00 Cable Bahamas 1.406 7A
2.74 Colina Holdings 0.249 11.0
5.26 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 0.419 141
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 0.111 33.6
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 0.382 5.4
6.60 Famguard 0.420 15.7
8.80 Finco 0.322 285
10.29 FirstCaribbean Bank 0.794 13.0
4.95 Focol (8) 0.332 15.0
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 0.000 N/M
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.035 8.6
5.49 ICD Utilities 0.407 13.5
9.98 J. S. Johnson 10.09 9.98 -0.11 0.952 10.5
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.180 55.6

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) FBB17 100.00 0.00 71%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price

492 8.42 14.00
2.00 6.25 4.00
0.35 0.40 0.55
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4038 3.72 5.20
2.8990 -1.39 -4.16
1.4892 3.87 5.47
3.0941 -8.61 -13.59
13.1136 3.93 5.87
101.6693 1.10 1.67
96.7398 0.35 -4.18
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.3399 2.69 -1.41
1.0707 3.38 5.14
1.0319 -0.11 2.05
1.0673 2.89 493
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask §$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index, January 1, 1994 = 100



52wk-Hi Previous Close Today's Close
1.15 1.15
10.75 10.75
6.18 6.18
0.63 0.63
3.15 3.15
2.37 2.37
10.00 10.00
2.74 2.74
5.92 5.92
3.74 3.73
2.05 2.05
6.60 6.60
9.30 9.30
10.29 10.29
4.99 4.99
1.00 1.00
0.30 0.30
5.50 5.50

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.01
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Legal Notice

SAGO ALPS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of SAGO ALPS INC. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

350
15,650
2,000

19,879
3,253

52wk-Hi Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

EPS$ __Div$
0.000
0.480

0.000

52wk-Low Symbol
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.
N/M
N/M

256.6

29.00 ABDAB Legal Notice

0.40 RND Holdings

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

52wk-Low

1.3344
2.8952
1.4119
3.0941
12.3870

100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
11-Sep-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

IRISH LORD MANAGEMENT INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of IRISH LORD MANAGEMENT INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 7B





AML Foods targets early 2010 dividend

monthly repayments on the
bank debt with the preference
share redemption fund,” Mr
Watchorn told Tribune Busi-
ness, explaining that the mon-
ey AML Foods had previous-
ly been setting aside to repay
RBC would now be allocat-
ed to meeting payments to the
company’s preference share
investors.

This meant that some
$75,000 previously allocated
to repaying RBC per month
would be combined with
$87,000 set aside for the pref-
erence share investors, Mr
Watchorn telling Tribune
Business: “We’ve put the
$165,000 in a preference share
redemption fund. We had
$1.2 million ring-fenced in
fixed deposits at the end of
July. Our expectation is that
we will have $1.8 million by
the end of January.”

The first redemption to
AML Foods’ preference
shareholders is due in March
2010, although Tribune Busi-
ness understands that they
and the company are in dis-
cussions to possibly extend
the debt’s maturity and roll it
over. This, if it happens,
would allow the company to
finance its anchor food store,
planned for western New
Providence’s new Town Cen-
tre, with no debt. Mr
Watchorn declined to com-
ment.

He added, though, that
AML Foods was working
with a California-based
designer on the new store,
and hoped to have its plans
ready by year-end, with ten-
ders put out for the store’s
equipment, plumbing and
refrigeration. The company
hoped to take possession of
the building from the devel-
oper by August 2010, and
open the store to the public
by April 2011.

Meanwhile, AML Foods’
liquidity position has also con-
tinued to improve, rising by
$937,000 during the fiscal 2010
first half to reach a net cash
position of $648,000 inclusive
of the $1.2 million set aside
to repay the preference share-
holders.

Mr Watchorn, though,
added that there were signs
the recession was taking an
increasingly heavy toll on
Bahamian consumers and
their disposable incomes, with
the overall customer market
shrinking and average per
capita spend dropping during
the Back-to-School period —
the second most-important
sales period for most retail-
ers behind Christmas.

While AML Foods had
done “fairly well” during this

not as high as seen for the first
six months of the year, but
net profits were along the
same trend in terms of being
higher for the year.

“We’ve seen a change in
customer spending habits,
which indicates less money
out there..... We’re not los-
ing market share, the market
itself is just shrinking a bit.
That’s our expectation for
Christmas.

“Sales for Back-to-School
were up just slightly, but not
at the level seen for this year.
We’ve seen a 15 per cent cus-
tomer transaction rise, but the
average spend dropped for
August.” In addition, Mr
Watchorn said AML Foods
and other Bahamian grocery
retailers did not ‘benefit’ from
the temporary spike seen in
August last year when con-
sumers stocked up in prepa-
ration for a possible hurricane
strike.

The AML Foods president
said costright.com, the com-
pany’s planned e-commerce
website, would be “made big-
ger than originally intended.
We hope to do live testing by
the end of the following week
for a public launch some time
at the end of October”.

He added: “We've had a lot
of interest from Family Island
households and businesses.
They’re seeing the website as
a way to shop in Nassau with-
out the cost of transportation
to Nassau.

“Other than that, we’re
gearing up for Christmas.

We’re just focused on having
a great Christmas season and
getting ready for that. I think
that, while we expect soften-
ing of our sales, we expect we
will continue to be profitable,
beat last year’s numbers and
end up with quite a good year
once January comes around.

“We think that will allow
us to negotiate some kind of
dividend payment in Febru-
ary/March next year. I think
the rest of the year will allow
us to do that. The dividend
payment will be based on the
fourth quarter numbers,
which come in during Febru-
ary. The dividend will be paid
in March, with the declara-
tion in February.”

Mr Watchorn said of the
dividend: “That’s what we’re
gearing towards. We feel it’s
achievable. I think the rest of
the year will be challenging,
not just for us but a lot of
Bahamian businesses. But we
feel confident that if we keep
doing what we’ve been doing
for the last 12-18 months we’ll
be fine.”

For the quarter to July 31,
2009, AML Foods’ rising
profitability was driven by its
increased sales and customer
transaction volume, with gross
margin dollars rising by 20 per
cent for the period and by 17
per cent year-to-date.

The second quarter saw
AML Foods’ shrinkage fall
by 20 per cent in dollar terms,
and by 29 per cent as a per-
centage of sales, compared to
the 2008 year ago period. For

The National Insurance Board

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

Notice to Vendors

The National Insurance Board (NIB) 1s preparing to make payments to vendors by direct
bank deposits. To facilitate this, the NIB 1s requesting that vendors provide the necessary
banking information. Forms will be distributed to vendors for completion. If you do not
receive one, please contact us at one of the following to obtain a copy of the form:

1. APBankinginfo@nib-bahamas.com
2. Telephone No.: (242) 502-1838, or
3. Collect a Form from any New Providence NIB Local Office

The NIB requests the cooperation of all vendors as we seek to provide mote efficient service.

the fiscal 2010 first half, shrink
as a percentage of sales
dropped by 17 per cent.

“For the first time in a
while, we’ve been able to
record a sizeable decrease in
shrinkage in both percentage
of sales and dollar terms,” Mr
Watchorn said. “We’re
pleased with what happened
with shrinkage. We’ve put a
lot of effort into shrinkage,
and have six people employed
in our Loss Prevention
Department.

“But it’s still well above
acceptable standards for us,
and we’re going to focus on
internal shrinkage.” He
explained that this was not so
much employee theft, as
AML Foods was developing a
reputation as a company
where there were conse-
quences for this, but areas
such as receiving and file
maintenance.

For the fiscal 2010 second
quarter, Solomon’s and Cost
Right combined generated a
14 per cent year-over-year
sales increase to $21.3 million.
For the first-half, these two
formats saw sales rise by 13.1
per cent to $41.5 million.

In the case of Domino’s
Pizza, second quarter sales
were up 11 per cent to $2.8
million year-over-year, and
ahead by 6.1 per cent at $5.3
million for the first half.

AML Foods’ total sales
stood at $24.1 million for the
second quarter, an increase
of 13.6 per cent compared to
2008 figures, with first half

sales up 12.3 per cent at $46.8
million.

“We’re very happy,” said
Mr Watchorn. “Given the
increasingly challenged envi-
ronment out there, and hear-
ing from other businesses

experiencing negative sales,
we’re pleased we’re remain-
ing positive and getting our
fair share of the market right
now. Once you increase sales
and keep your fixed costs flat,
that falls to your bottom line.”

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at weew.cob,edubs

NOTICE

Deadline for applications for
Spring (January) 2010 admission
Friday, September 25th, 2009 at 4:00 pm.

Applications may be accessed online at
www.cob.edu.bs or collected from the
Office of Admissions.

yt HE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

View ovr website of www.coh.edn.As

NOTICE

Master of Science in Elementary Education Degree
Programme in collaboration with Wheelock College.

Applications are available from:

The Graduate Programmes Office,
The College of The Bahamas, Michael H. Eldon
Complex, Room 26 Thompson Blyd,
For more informtaion call: 397-2601/2 or
send emails to: swisdomiecob.edu.hs

Application Deadline: L6th October, 2109,

oka Cole

wiial Hilton Hetel

larlborqugh St., Shop #1

Clearance SALE

Everything is

20

We offer Stringing Services, Repairs, Knotting,
Wiring, Driling and The Snack Fix System and
The Mystery Clasps

Pearls and Beads Strands Wholesale and Retail
P.O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tal: 242-323-1865
Email: gems-peans@hotmail.com

bune Business:

period, Mr Watchorn told Tri-
“For the
month of August, sales were



All information will be treated as strictly confidential.







Legal Notice

DOUBLE SCREEN INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of DOUBLE SCREEN INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

MOMENTS IN TIME CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of MOMENTS IN TIME CORPORATION
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

GOLDEN GATES ASSETS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of GOLDEN GATES ASSETS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

MUTZKO LAPINOU INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of MUTZKO LAPINOU INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

clases starts

Jewerl kin
Se prem er sign up now

Legal Notice



GREENWICH VALLEY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of GREENWICH VALLEY LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EASTERN WEALTH
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, which commenced on the 7th day of September
2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box

N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 8B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

Chairman's Report — (i, 2K

Te te watt geeal poten: dist D oeie br pera Boe

the first tine ot Chenier of the Bead of Panties ce

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ioe who we we aed wher we do whde remo a lnk mo Our poor. “Les a beesh sm
JH y doer war forded dete
wires Wl iT Maree t h

lreds nocegengy challerenp economic conditions and a change morketple, wy rect

bey Gur birt feu on the pe sath dnb de we {ike a é

margin dollars hare increased, shank in our sno

ar

c etrangs becuse that has weld pose nears opener atnes

nde edie

dicrcaecd) andl car lquadity hae enced wath bank det further reduced [ni Our ceebtniuedd effete

to reduce chonk, we hee ineested beh om secunt ecpapenen: and serveces, wo-hevues

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the benchite of the umisinent th nah we bel the @ on a jrtcall part oF ihe parteriice me we

alae vy ae aN Moke Tha number of aaa tances hoe mcr rant in all liecanicore: while the

TWETHE CLT noncn bee ceoreeed marmeadli w

ach ® retleciee of the ounrenr eT i

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ayn logetics hewe ees mech impecresd andl ow

mprovemens on our shrek — all otwtech hes naindaned eno a much impenmed prohinalider

We ace very plerasd with the soled perfonercnce of ML. #

acd agnifcant =ymergE

cat (decd oe the erst of strainer: fr

and

18

?hou branch oo deher onicecred cinnmer sermce and emer tales 00 Oi CLEnOmer, conerol cos

aot peesihde: ad achiicet key ener on benny cot) koeiece ae cht
Cheped We de, bewver, hae in be alee mm ie
TenTin economy taoes incising challenges alone wih mew

air Wilke we capect an etysict on cur Bukwies on done level, we ser

wTece at Hie mtiirketphace
ef the porwuhng morket conden ga
nd creed Gomme ber ce

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THE TRIBUNE



$16m start-up targets

throughout the rest of the
Caribbean. [When] depends
on the success rate in the
Bahamas initially, but we
think we can move into the
Caribbean in years two to
three.

“We’ve begun discussions
with other Caribbean coun-
tries. We want to use the
Bahamas as a showcase; to
prove that we can outfit an
entire country. Our primary
goal is to get the Bahamas
outfitted for wireless broad-
band from the local loop, but
we will go as far as the fibre
reaches. Wherever the fibre
drop reaches is how far we
can take our services.”

As for the start of con-
sumer services, Mr Sumner
told Tribune Business: “That
will be dependent on what the
financing looks like at the end
of the day. We are anticipat-
ing being able to launch ser-
vices by the end of the fourth
quarter of this year, and cer-
tainly by 2010......

“We feel that in six months
we will be able to wirelessly
connect the entire country
through a wireless delivery
system, but everything is con-
tingent on the points we have
to go through before we deliv-
er connectivity to the end
users.”

IP Solutions International
is targeting Bahamian con-
sumers with a ‘multiple play’
proposition of services deliv-
ered via a wireless Internet
infrastructure. Among the
product offering will be news,
entertainment, movies, TV
and video-type games of a
non-casino variety.

Apart from Bahamian busi-
nesses and households, the
key markets for IP Solutions
International will also be the
nation’s hotel industry and
private gated communities.
Confirming that the compa-
ny had already signed Letters
of Intent to provide its ser-
vices to a number of
Bahamas-based hotels, Mr
Sumner said its plans had
elicited a “very, very good
response from this industry.

“Even before we got to this

stage, we got Letters of Intent
from a number of hotels
around the country,” he told
Tribune Business. “They have
been extremely interested in
the products and services. We
are reconfiguring their hotels
with upgraded technology,
new products and services.

“They’re all keenly inter-
ested in what we’re doing,
especially those hotels in the
Family Islands that do not
currently get these services.
We’re very satisfied with our
efforts and the response we’ve
gotten from the hotels as well
as gated communities. We’re
talking to gated communities
in New Providence and the
Family Islands, and they’re
very excited. I think that’s
going to represent a large part
of our business.”

Mr Sumner added that IP
Solutions International was
looking to broaden its product
offering beyond the ‘multiple
play’ core. He explained:
“We’re going to bring in oth-
er services — data services, dis-
aster recovery management
services. We’re going to be
dealing with those as well.
We’re going to convert the
Government’s e-business plat-
form, putting the Govern-
ment on one platform. We’re
also going to be dealing with
e-commerce and long-dis-
tance learning.”

Mr Sumner based his con-
fidence in IP Solutions Inter-
national’s ability to raise the
necessary financing on the
reaction to its proposal during
an investor presentation last
Thursday night.

With more than 100 repre-
sentatives of potential insti-
tutional investors and high
net-worth individuals present,
Mr Sumner said: “We were
very pleased with the turnout.
The people who came were
receptive to the company, the
technology and the prospects
that lie ahead for this invest-
ment. A lot of those there
gave commitments to become
investors in the company. We
had a tremendous turnout,
and are very pleased with it.”

IP Solutions International’s

Ministry of Housing

$16 million private placement
formally launches today, and
is due to close on October 30,
2009. “That gives us a chance
to get everyone on board with
us, to complete the regulatory
work and the work necessary
to deliver the service,” Mr
Sumner said.

When asked how confident
the company was that it
would raise the necessary
start-up financing, especially
given that the Bahamian and
world economies were mired
in recession, Mr Sumner
replied: “I would say that
we’re extremely confident
that we’re going to raise what
we’re looking for, based on
the interest we’ve already got,
the commitments we’ve got-
ten from people who attended
the investor presentation
night.

“Based on all the indica-
tions we’ve gotten, I’m very
confident we’re going to be
successful in this capital rais-
ing.”

IP Solutions International
has already moved to give
itself instant credibility among
investors, having appointed a
Board chaired by former gov-
ernor-general, Sir Orville
Turnquest, which also fea-
tures realtor Virginia Dami-
anos.

The company’s full-scale
launch, which has been on the
cards for more than a year, is
possibly the first positive
proof that the seeds of elec-
tronic communications sector
liberalization in the Bahamas
could bear a ripe fruit.

Mr Sumner confirmed to
Tribune Business that the
company had submitted its
first application to the new-
ly-formed Utilities Regulato-
ry and Competition Authori-
ty (URCA), seeking to trans-
fer its initial licence over from
former supervisor, the Public
Utilities Commission (PUC).

IP Solutions International
was now “putting in the bal-
ance of the substantive appli-
cation” to URCA, having
applied for both an individ-

SEE next page

ARDASTRA ESTATES - ROAD CONSTRUCTION

INVITATION TO TENDER

The Governement of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas through the Ministry
of Housing Invites qualified contractors to submit tenders for the completion of
the new road construction in the Ardastra Estates Subdivision on the Island of
New Providence in accordance with the design and specification approved by
the Ministry of Works and Transport

Interested parties may obtain further information and purchase a copy of the

invitation to Tender form:

The Office of the Permanent Secretary

Ministry of Housing
Claughton House

Shirley and Charlote Sts.

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 242-322-6005/6006

For a non-refundable fee of $100. The method of payment may be cash or
a certified cheque made payable to the “Ministry of Housing.” The documents
will be ready for collection beginning Wednesday 23rd, September, 2009 and
ending Wednesday 30th September, 2009 between the hours of 9:30 am to 4:
30 pm. An information meeting will be held on Thursday 1st October, 2009 in
conference room at the Ministry of Housing, Claughton House.

Tenders are to be submitted in a sealed envelope marked as indicated in the

Tender Document to:

The Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance

3rd Floor, Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building

No later than 1

West Bay St.
Nassau, Bahamas

m_on Ti 20th

. Tenders will be

publicly opened at 10:01 am on Tuesday 20th October, 2009 in the conference
room at the Tenders Board Meeting at the Ministry of Finance, 3rd Floor, Cecil
Wallace Whitfield Building, West Bay St., Nassau, Bahamas. The Government
reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.

DOH/32



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 9B

OO US INES
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS



5,000 first-year clients

ual licence and a spectrum
licence, in preparation for
offering an ever-widening
array of products.

The delay in IP Solutions
International’s formal launch
is likely to actually benefit it,
as its private placement offer-
ing will close some 16 days
after Cable Bahamas’ 15-year
exclusive monopoly on cable
TV services. Thus will thus
enable the start-up to poten-
tially offer more services if it
so wishes.

“We have revised our pro-
jections again, based on the
current economic situation,
and feel we’ll get about 5,000
subscribers in a year’s time,”
Mr Sumner told Tribune
Business, adding that while
the forecast was “conserva-
tive” and “scaled back”, IP
Solutions International was
confident it could beat them.

“Tt is a tough time, which
is why we’re taking a very
conservative approach to it,”
Mr Sumner told Tribune

new service, and when you
bring something to the mar-
ket, there is likely to be a shift
in the customer base, the ser-
vice base.”

Pointing out that IP Solu-
tions was also looking to serve
isolated Bahamian communi-
ties that had to date been
bypassed by electronic com-
munications services, Mr
Sumner added: “Bahamians
like new things, new services,
and we think we’ve got the
ability to attract people com-
ing in. I think we’ve got the
right business model, tech-
nology and product that the
Bahamian public will be inter-
ested in and will want to be a
part of it.”

Mr Sumner said contracts
for IP Solutions Internation-
al’s video and TV content had
already been signed with
“major distributors from
around the world”, the com-
pany having only decided to
use content it was able to
commercially and legally

is currently scouting possible
locations for its Network
Operations Centre, and host-
ing and redundancy features
will be supplied by its New
York-based partner and sup-
plier, GlobeCom. The latter
will be supplying consultant
engineers to help get the
Bahamian company’s systems
up and running.

Mr Sumner said IP Solu-
tions International was seek-
ing to get its head office “set
up in the next month or so”,
staffed by a full-time staff of
10 that will expand as the
company grows over the next
five years.

Among the initial employ-
ees will be managers, admin-
istrators and technical staff,
although the company will be
able to lean on GlobeCom for
the latter. Mr Sumner said IP
Solutions International
intended to “have employed
as many Bahamians as we
can”, and trained in all aspects
of the business, especially

position:

ADMINISTRATIVE VA

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the following

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.hy

ANCY

Dean, Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute (CHMI) will serve as
chief academic and stakeholder liaison officer for CHMI providing vision,
leadership, management and advocacy for tourism, hospitality and culinary
arts, ils programmes, faculty and staff within the College of The Bahamas.

Specific duties and responsibilities will involve formulating with key
stakeholders long- and short-range goals for CHMI, including updating the
College's master plan, strategic plan and other planning documents and
processes; providing leadership and coordination in the recruitment, selec-
tion and assignment of faculty and staff; liaising and collaborating with rel-
evant industry, NGOs and private sector stakeholders and working closely
with the employment community to review, develop and implement curtic-

ula, courses and certification programmes based upon defined needs.

Applicants should possess a doctoral degree in one of the disciplines of
lourism, hospitality, management or a related field, a minimum of five (5)
years of successful academic leadership at the level of department chair or
above or ten (10) years experience at an executive level within the hospi-
tality industry or an appropriate combination of academic qualification and
training. Por a detailed job description, visit www.coob.edu.bs/hrapply.
Interested candidates should submit a detailed resume and cover letter of
interest to: The Director, Human Resources, The College of The Bahamas,
P.O.Box N-4912, Nassau, Bahamas or www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply no later
than Wednesday, September 30, 2009.

secure.
IP Solutions International

Business. “But we’re coming
with a new company. This is a

once the sales and marketing
effort kicks-in.

Price controls 'work against the interests of consumers'

ing against the interests of consumers in the
long-term. You’re forced to offset it [the
impact of price controls] against other items,
and in the Bahamas you know operating costs
are higher than regional counterparts.”

As an example, Mr Watchorn said it was
impossible for any Bahamian retailer to make
a profit from selling eggs, as price controls
only allowed them to charge consumers a 9
per cent mark-up. “You can never make a
profit out of eggs,” he added.

Apart from retailers, he added that Bahami-
an wholesalers were also feeling the effects of
price controls, as they were only allowed a 13
per cent margin/mark-up on many breadbasket
items.

The current downward pressure on pricing,
Mr Watchorn said, was resulting from an
increase in competition in the Bahamian mar-
ket over the past six to eight weeks.

FROM page 1B

ering payroll, administrative costs and elec-
tricity.

Yet, as an example, he said that for 20 per
cent of a company’s sales, they were only
allowed by price controls to impose an average
14 per cent retail margin, meaning that there
was effectively a negative 11 per cent gross
operating marginal loss — the difference
between operating costs and the margin per-
mitted by price controls.

Explaining the implications of this, Mr
Watchorn told Tribune Business: “You’re los-
ing money on 20 per cent of your sales volume.
The pricing of other items has to compensate
for it.

“It’s pricing a lot of items out of the reach of
lower and middle income families, and work-

To advertise in The Tribune -
the #1 newspaper in circulation,
just call 502-2371 today!



Job Vacancies

Multi-Unit General Manager

Position Summary

The “Multi-Unit General Manager” function is the primary strategic business
leader of seven (7) business entities spread between two locations in Jupiter,
Florida AND Abaco, Bahamas.

Position oversees the development and implementation of club strategies
and ensures implementation of the brand service strategy and brand initiatives.
The position ensures that the clubs’ operations meet the brand’s target
customer needs, maximizes associate satisfaction and focuses on growing
revenues and the overall financial performance of all departments. As the
leader of both properties’ Guidance Teams, M-UGM develops and implements
Club-wide strategies that deliver products and services to meet or exceed
the needs and expectations of the brand’s target customer and associates and
provides a return on investment to the owners and the Company.

Expected Contributions
° Energizes the Gold Standards of the Company and ensures brand

initiatives are implemented to meet or exceed member, employee and
financial expectations. Continuously challenges the team to improve
operations, and ensures compliance with brand standards to protect
brand integrity.
Leverages synergies among both properties to maximize market
penetration, operational excellence, and overall business performance.
Selects, develops and retains a diverse leadership team capable of
delivering the expected performance contributions and with growth
potential, and holds others accountable for doing the same. Leads the
guidance team and leverages additional corporate and regional resources
to develop and implement destination club-wide strategies that are
aligned with the company’s Key Success Factors. Facilitates talent
development and leverages opportunities to share and maximize talent
among the Areas Clubs and Residences.
Focuses the team on delivering services and products to meet or exceed
owner expectations, create owner loyalty, and grow market share. Builds
relationships with key customers.

Qualifications
* 4-year bachelor's degree in Business Administration, Hotel and Restaurant

Management, or related major
15+ years of progressive experience in private club industry with
exposure to multiple disciplines
Prior General Manager or equivalent experience in a luxury market
environment
Property Management certifications required by the State of Florida
Prior multi-property oversight preferred

Skills & Knowledge

*¢ Leadership - Visible, proactive, personally involved leader with excellent
organizational skills, capable of providing focused leadership and
contributing to establish the club and residences prominent position
within the market. A well-developed capability for strategic decision-
making and a track record of proven results in the areas of customer
satisfaction, operational excellence, employee satisfaction, revenue and
profit.
Financial Acumen - Business savvy leader with demonstrated financial
acumen, capable of providing strong P&L results oriented financial
leadership.
Operations - Excellent sense of product and service quality, a passion
for excellence and an understanding of the sophisticated needs of the
luxury customer. Creative and innovative operations leadership, capable
of delivering products and services that will differentiate the clubs and
residences in the region’s luxury residential market.
Governance - Property Management designations or certifications
required by the State of Florida are required. Responsible for Rules
and Enforcement, Property Maintenance, Services Communications,
Finances, Administration, Asset Protection and assistance with Policy
Development all in accordance with local and state statutes.

Director of Operations

Position Summary
Functions as the strategic business leader of food and beverage/culinary
operations and acts as General Manager in his/her absence. Areas of

responsibility include: Front Office, Business Centre, Recreation/Fitness
Department, Retail/Gift Shops, Housekeeping, Food and Beverage/Culinary
and Event Management. Position oversees the development and
implementation of departmental strategies and ensures implementation of
the brand service strategy and brand initiatives. The position ensures that
food and beverage/culinary operations meet the brand’s target customer
needs, maximizes associate satisfaction, focuses on growing revenues and
the overall financial performance of the departments. As a member of the
Guidance Team, develops and implements hotel-wide strategies that deliver
products and services to meet or exceed the needs and expectations of the
brand’s target customer and associates and provides a return on investment
to the owners and Ritz-Carlton.

Responsibilities

* Demonstrating Leadership

¢ Achieving Goals

¢ Exceeding Customer Expectations

¢ Improving Profit

* Maintaining Balance Between Profit and Service Satisfaction
* Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates

¢ Destination Club and Residential Management

Qualifications
* 4-year bachelor's degree in Business Administration, Hotel and Restaurant
Management, or related major
© 5 years experience in executive management position in a five star
resort
* Ritz-Carlton Hotel or Destination Club experience preferred

Skills & Knowledge

* Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes
for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer
needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and daily
evaluation of existing customer satisfaction measurement processes.
Management of Financial Resources - Determining how money will
be spent and available resources utilized to get the work done and daily
accounting for these expenditures.
Analytical/Critical Thinking - The ability to gather and organize
information using a logical and systematic process; recognize patterns
and relationships in complex data; examine data to identify implications,
problems and draw appropriate conclusions; generate altemative solutions
to problems; evaluate strengths, weaknesses and consequences of
alternative solutions and approaches to solving problems.
Applied Business Knowledge - Understanding market dynamics involved
in running a private membership club under development, enterprise
level objectives and important aspects of ultra-luxury club / resort
business to accurately diagnose strengths and weaknesses, anticipate
opportunities and risks, identify issues, and develop strategies and plans.
Aligning individual and team actions with strategies and plans to drive
business results.

Pastry Chef

Position Summary

Create and maintain a positive work environment through coaching and leading
staff while establishing creative and exciting menu products, both appetizing and.
visually appealing. Work and maintain good working relationships with other
work areas. Meet with meeting planners and social catering event coordinators
to develop personalized dessert products. Direct, train and monitor performance
of Pastry staff. Maintain organization, cleanliness and sanitation of work areas
and equipment.

Essential Job Functions

* Train, coach, lead and hold Pastry team accountable to the job functions
listed below. Meet daily to review assignments, schedules, anticipated
business levels, employee performance issues and other information
pertinent to job performance.
Maintain and strictly abide by sanitation/health regulations and the
hotel’s food safety program requirements. Ensure all Pastry employees
maintain food handlers’ certification.
Meet with Executive Chef to review assignments, anticipated business
levels, changes and other information pertinent to the job performance

on a daily basis.

Prepare and assign production and prep work for Pastry staff to complete;
review priorities.

Communicate additions or changes to the assignments as they arise
throughout the shift. Identify situations, which compromise the
department's standards and delegate these tasks.

Prepare amenity orders for room service in accordance with specified
Tequirements and hotel standards.

Prepare all dishes following recipes and yield guides, according to Ritz-
Carlton standards.

Monitor performance of Pastry staff and ensure all procedures are
completed to the department standards

Assist Pastry staff wherever required to ensure excellent service to
guests.

Ensure all Pastry staff assignments are completed before they leave
work area.

Review status of work and follow-up actions required with the Executive
Chef before leaving.

Qualifications, Skills & Knowledge
¢ Certification of culinary training or apprenticeship.
* 5 years experience in F&B leadership position at a luxury club, hotel
or restaurant.
¢ Knowledge of food and beverage cost controls.
* Ability to plan and develop menus and recipes.

Director of Sales

Position Summary

Designing, implementing and continuously evaluating all sales processes;
Maintaining content and direction on Training and Motivation of Sales
Leadership and Field Sales Force; Developing and maintaining visibility
over Sales Standards and Accountability Measures; Providing related sales
input to New Site Feasibility and Business Planning Processes

Essential Job Functions

* Monitor and evaluate sales processes while maintaining visibility over
daily sales progress against budgets

¢ Create and implement specific sales and marketing field operations
best practices, policies and guidelines
Create and implement structured sales presentation training and sales
executive evaluation
Develop sales management training programs as well as create system
succession strategy to identify/groom key sales professionals
Insure performance management is implemented and maintained
consistently across the system
Review all sales related assumptions in the feasibility process, ensuring
strategic and operational reasonableness, comparability among PEPS,
budgets, forecasts and LRP
Provide Brand with product and business development recommendations.
Relate information regarding competitive tactics and products.

Qualifications, Skills & Knowledge

* College degree

¢ Minimum of ten years in the vacation ownership industry

* Minimum of five years ownership sales and sales management experience

* Strong verbal and written communications skills; ability to communicate
effectively with senior management
Experience in designing products, processes, policies and training
manuals
Ritz Carlton Club experience preferred

Please send resume to the attention of:
Director of Human Resources
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB-20571
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Bahamas

OR

Email: Freddie. Munnings@ritzcarlton.com
Deadline for applications is Friday, September 25, 2009



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 10B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

eA



By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

LAST week, Bahamian

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BEORAH BELINDA SMITH-
DAVIS of #7 AZURE PLACE, P.O. BOX F-42636, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21st day of
SEPTEMBER, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

DEVAUGHN HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 17th day of
September 2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.
Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

GANAS TRADING LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 17th day of
September 2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., PO.
Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Ministry Finance
RE: Real property tax Surcharge Waiver Notice

The general public is here by advised of the
provisions of the Real Property Tax Act. The
principal Act is amended by the insertion
immediately after section 21 of the following
new section 21 A and 21 B respectfully;

Section 21 A Waiver of surcharge.

Notwithstanding section 21, any surcharge
which has accumulated in respcct of

* (a) Owner-occupies property with a market
value of up to two hundred and fifty
thousand dollars ($250,000.00) shall be
waived.

* (b) owner-occupied property which exceeds
two hundred and fifty thousand dollars,
shall be waived if the outstanding real
property tax is paid on or before
December 31,2009: and

* (c) other property, shall be waived by fifty
per cent if the outstanding real property
tax is paid before December 31,2009.

Section 21 B Revival of Surcharge
lf after December 31,2009 any real property
tax remains outstanding in respect of

* (a) Owner-occupied property with a market
with a market value of up to two hundred
and fifty thousand dollars ($250,000.00)

* (b) owner-occupied property which exceeds

two hundred and fifty thousand.
(c) other property

The owner of such property, shall be liable to
pay a new surcharge of five per centum (5%)
of such tax tax per annum.



investors traded in 11 out of
the 24 listed securities, of
which four advanced, three
declined and four remained

unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 65,855 shares
changed hands, representing a
decrease of 111,756 shares,
compared to the previous
week's trading volume of
177,611 shares.

ICD Utilities (CD) was
the volume leader trading
20,335 shares, although its
stock price remained

unchanged at $5.50.

The Bahamas Property
Fund (BPF) led the
advancers, its share price
increasing by $0.85 on a vol-



ume of 1,925 shares to close
the week at $10.75.

J. S. Johnson & Company
(JSJ) was the lead decliner,
its share price falling by $0.11
to a new 52-week low of
$9.98, on a volume of 3,253
shares.

BOND MARKET

There were 19 Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas)15 Series D
notes traded in the Bahamian
market last week, with a value
of $19,000.

COMPANY NEWS
Premier Commercial Real

Legal Notice





TITUSEDEN LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)






Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of TITUSEDEN LTD. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

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Legal Notice

MENNARD CAUSEWAY LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 17th day of
September 2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., PO.
Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOCHE AZUL INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of NOCHE AZUL INC. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Estate Investment Corpora-
tion (PRE) released its unau-
dited financial results for the
quarter ending June 30, 2009.

For the quarter, PRE
reported net income of about
$169,000, compared to a loss
of $381,000 during the same
period last year, an improve-
ment of $550,000.

Total income of $374,000
was consistent with the prior
period, but total expenses of
$205,000 declined by $560,000
from the amount reported in
the June 30, 2008, quarter
end.

Total assets and liabilities
at June 30, 2009, were $17
million and $3.5 million
respectively, with net asset
value per share being $16.01
compared to $15.98 per share
for the same quarter last year.

Dividend Notes

¢ Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) has declared a divi-
dend of $0.05 per share,
payable on September 30,
2009, to all ordinary share-
holders of record date Sep-
tember 15, 2009.

¢ Doctor's Hospital
Healthcare Systems (DHS)
has declared a dividend of
$0.02 per share, payable on
September 30, 2009, to all
ordinary shareholders of
record date September 17,
2009.

¢ Cable Bahamas (CAB)
has declared a dividend of
$0.07 per share, payable on
September 30, 2009, to all
ordinary shareholders of
record date September 15,
2009.

e¢ Consolidated Water
BDRs has declared a divi-
dend of $0.015 per share,
payable on November 6,
2009, to all ordinary share-
holders of record date Octo-
ber 1, 2009.

AGM Notice

Premier Commercial Real
Estate Investment Corpora-
tion (PRE) will hold its annu-
al general meeting on Thurs-
day, September 24, 2009, at
liam at the company’s regis-
tered office, Experta Trust

Company (Bahamas).

KING'S

REAL ESTATE

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Real Estate Agents

Applicants must have:

* Outstanding personality

* Current BREA license

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* Proven sales record

Apply to bahamas@kingsrealty.com
Deadline: September 30, 2009
Information: 394-4397

Legal Notice

ORANGE SANDCREST INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 17th day of
September 2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., RO.
Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

RAINBOW ASSET PTE LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of RAINBOW ASSET PTE LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 11B





Development
aims to fulfil
its Destini

Administrators for the 49-
lot Destini Lakes community
have said they are experienc-
ing relatively good sales given
the economic climate, with
potential buyers contacting
their offices daily.

Lorraine Hamilton and Lil-
lian Roberts said the commu-
nity, located on Lake Killar-
ney off J. F. Kennedy Drive in
western New Providence, is
suited for business profes-
sionals as well as single fami-
lies through potential family,
duplex and four-plex struc-
tures. The standard lot size is
95 x 100, with each home fea-
turing its own unique design,
and individual prices ranging
from $120,000 to $135,000.

“Tt is our hope that Destini
Lakes will be the number one
choice for young professional
families who are looking to
start off in a nice area and
raise their children. I think
the location is perfect for rais-
ing a family. The new gated
subdivision is located about
five to 10 minutes from the
airport and another five min-
utes from Cable Beach, and
only 15 minutes from Down
Town. So residents will cer-
tainly have easy access to
everything from New Provi-
dence,” said Ms. Hamilton.

Ms Roberts said the com-
pany was attempting to make
it easier for prospective
homeowners by arranging in-
house financing through
Bahamian financial institu-
tions.

BFSB opens 2009 Award nominations

The Bahamas Financial
Services Board has opened
nominations for the
2009 Financial Services Indus-
try Excellence Awards.

As in previous years,
awardees will be chosen for
(1) Executive of the Year —
chief executive level; (2) Pro-
fessional of the Year - Any
level of management or
supervision (3) Achiever of
the Year - Junior and support
levels and (4) Financial Ser-
vices Development and Pro-
motion awards. The deadline
for nominations is October 2,
2009.

BFSB’s chief executive and
executive director, Wendy C.
Warren, said: “The annu-
al Awards Programme, now
in its ninth year, recognises
one of the most important
assets of our financial services
industry: ‘people
power’. Without a doubt,
capacity building — human
resource development — is of
critical significance to the
ongoing success of the finan-
cial services sector.”

This initiative was launched
in 2001, in collaboration with
the Professional Industry
Association Working Group
(PIAWG) as part of the
Financial Centre Focus (FCF)

For the stories
ATRL Ee

er 4
ML ES



Legal Notice

NOTICE
QUILL HILL LTD.

—_— —



WENDY WARREN

outreach, designed to profile
the industry. Specifically, this
recognition programme pro-
files role models in the indus-

try for their outstanding per-
formance and contribution to
the growth and development
of the industry here in the
Bahamas.

The Presentations Cere-
mony for the 2009 Financial
Services Industry Excellence
Awards has been scheduled
for Thursday, October 22.
The event will be hosted again
at the Sandals Royal Bahami-
an Resort & Spa, but will take
on a new format. Rather than
an Awards Banquet, the
awards ceremony will occur
as a separate event, followed
by a Cocktail Reception
immediately afterwards.

Also set to be recognised
at the Awards Ceremony will

Legal Notice

OPPORTUNE VICTORY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of OPPORTUNE VICTORY LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

KEDGEWICK INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

be the Financial Services Stu- dent of the Year.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ACCRINGTON HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 17th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

Common Law & Equity Division

2009/CLE/gen/qui/01193

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
comprising Eight hundred and Fifty-nine thousandths (.859) of
an acre situate on the Southern side of Haynes Avenue in the
Settlement of Governor’s Harbour in the Island of Eleuthera.

AND
IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Ian A. Gray and Ellen
M. Gray
NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of IAN A. GRAY AND ELLEN M. GRAY of
Ontario, Canada in respect of:-

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate on the Southern
side of Haynes Avenue in the Settlement of Governor’s Harbour
in the Island of Eleuthera comprising Eight hundred and Fifty-
nine thousandths (.859) of an acre and which said parcel of
land is bounded on the NORTHNORTHEAST by Haynes

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 .
Avenue and running thereon Fifteen and Forty-one hundredths

(15.41) feet on the NORTHEAST by Buccaneer Hill said to
be the property of Tanya Melich-Crone and running thereon
One hundred and Forty-nine and Ninety-three hundredths
(149.43) feet on the NORTHWEST by the said Buccaneer Hill
and running thereon Twenty-four and Ninety-four hundredths
(24.94) feet on the NORTHEAST by the said Buccaneer Hill
and by land said to be the property of Paul Petty and running

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
the dissolution of KEDGEWICK INTERNATIONAL LIM-
ITED has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of QUILL HILL LTD. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-
pany has therefore been struck off the Register. been issued and the company has therefore been struck off the

Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was 17th

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

CABEX INTERNACIONAL LTD.

Notice is hereby given that the winding up and dis-
solution of CABEX INTERNACIONAL LTD.
has been completed in accordance with the Articles
of Dissolution and that the Company has been
struck from the Register of Companies on the 12th

day of August, 2007.

Maria M. Férére
Joint Liquidators

Legal Notice

SCANDANIVIAN PEAKS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 17th day of
September 2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., PO.
Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

day of August, 2009.

Re: Lot # 12, Block # 86, Richmond Park
Subdivision, Unit 3R Freeport, Grand Bahama

Recently Constructed Six-Plex

Five Units:
One bedroom one bathroom, living and dining
area, kitchen and laundry area.

One Unit:
Four bedrooms, two bathrooms, a powder room,
living and dining room, family room, kitchen,
office and laundry room and arctic area.

Potential Income:
One bedroom units $3,250.00 per month
Four bedrooms unit $1,400.00 per month.

For conditions of sale and any
other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
@ 502-0929 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should
submit offer in writing addressed to
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
P. O. Box N-7518 Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us before October 9th, 2009



thereon Fifty-eight and Seventy-eight hundredths (58.78) feet
and One hundred and Nine and Fifty-eight hundredths (109.58)
feet respectively on the SOUTHEAST by a chain-linked
fence separating it from the property of the said Paul Petty and
running thereon One hundred and Forty-three and Eighty-one
hundredths (143.81) feet on the SOUTHWEST again by the
property of the said Paul Petty and by the property of Bishop
Clifford and Velma Petty and running thereon Seventy-four
and Twenty-seven hundredths (74.27) feet and Eighty-nine
and Thirty-four hundredths (89.34) feet respectively on
the SOUTHEAST by the property of the said Bishop and
Velma Petty and running thereon Twenty-five and Forty-one
hundredths (25.41) feet on the SOUTHWEST by the property
of Pamela Moss and Trevor Pyfrom and running thereon in
total Seventy-nine and Twenty hundredths (79.20) feet on the
NORTHWEST by the property of the said Trevor Pyfrom and
running thereon Nineteen and Thirty-nine hundredths (19.39)
feet and on the NORTH and WEST by the property of the
Estate of David Sweeting and running thereon in several courses
Eighteen and Twenty-nine hundredths (18.29) feet, Six and
Two hundredths (6.02) feet, Seventy-nine and Fifty hundredths
(79.50) feet, Eleven and Sixty-one hundredths (11.61) feet and
Sixty-eight and Forty-one hundredths (68.41) feet and which
said parcel of land has such position shape marks boundaries
and dimensions as are shown on the plan filed herein which is
recorded in the Department of Lands and Surveys as “Plan No.
935 EL” and thereon outlined in Pink.”

IAN A. GRAY AND ELLEN M. GRAY claim to be the
owners in fee simple in possession of the said land free from
encumbrances and has made application to the Supreme Court
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section 3 of The
Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have their title to the said land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.A plan of the
said land may be inspected during normal office hours in the
following places:The Registry of the Supreme Court in the
said City of Nassau;The Chambers of McKinney, Bancroft
& Hughes, Mareva House, 4 George Street in the City of
Nassau, Attorneys for the Petitioners; and The office of the
Administrator at Governor’s Harbour, Eleuthera.

Notice is hereby given that any persons having dower or a
right of dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition shall on or before the 20% day of October, 2009
file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a statement of their claim in the prescribed form,
verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such
person to file and serve a statement of his claim on or before the
said 20" day of | October, A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to
such claim.

Dated the 26" day of August, A.D., 2009

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Mareva House
4 George Street
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioners



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

“iS

ELBOW CAY — ABACO, the third largest and
fastest-growing economy in the country, has
so far retained its natural beauty by virtue of a

somewhat independent economy

sustained

by a steady stream of boaters and second
homeowners who flee to Great Abaco and its
chain of cays in search of somewhere to
escape, unwind, and get away from it all. Even

in a recession...





> Cla 1

The stories behind the news



Another piece of paradise
destined for destruction?

By MEGAN REYNOLDS

hat sets the

islands of the

Bahamas apart

from other

tourist destina-
tions in the Caribbean is that in this
splendid chain of islands, each has its
own character.

Abaco, the third largest and
fastest-growing economy in the
country, has so far retained its nat-
ural beauty by virtue of a somewhat
independent economy sustained by
a steady stream of boaters and sec-
ond homeowners who flee to Great
Abaco and its chain of cays in search
of somewhere to escape, unwind,
and get away from it all. Even in a
recession.

But both Abaconians and second
homeowners who find peace in Aba-
co’s pristine beaches, clear waters
and expanse of creeks that lace
Great Abaco’s coastline, fear the
Abaco they know is slipping away,
and that they have little power to
prevent it.

Abaco is at a point where further

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DEVELOPMENT in the Abacos has raised local fears
that the land both Abaconians and visitors hold dear
is doomed to become another big city destined for
destruction. Insight explores the problems and the
progress Abaco is facing, and the alternatives...

development is imminent, and there
are groups who want to have a say in
the direction it steers towards the
future, but they feel their concerns
are falling on deaf ears.

They were insulted to learn about
the development of a Bunker C fuel
power plant in Wilson City in a pub-
lic meeting on September 10, over a
month after construction had
already begun.

The Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
ration (BEC) admitted it was wrong

not to inform the Abaco public ear-
lier, as nearly 1,000 concerned resi-
dents attended the meeting request-
ed by local conservationist group
Friends of the Environment because
of the high level of public concern.

Not all who attended the meet-
ing were against the project, but
there were many who had questions
they wanted to be answered.

They knew the power plant was
planned for Snake Cay, an environ-
mentally sensitive area on Great

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Abaco’s east coast, and opposition
formed, as people feared the
destructive impact it could have on
the environment and the health of
the community.

Hence when government and
BEC decided to plough ahead with
the plans for a $105 million, 48 mw
power plant burning Bunker C
(HFO) fuel in a new site at Wilson
City — an area intrinsically linked to
the environmentally sensitive Snake
Cay by a complex network of blue

holes — plans were kept quiet.

BEC chairman Fred Gottlieb con-
firmed the project had been agreed
by the Christie administration in
2005, and signed off by the Ingra-
ham government in December 2007,
but as plans moved forward, Aba-
co’s permanent and part-time resi-
dents were left in the dark.

Dundas Town resident and moth-
er of two Leazona Bethel-Richard

SEE next page





PAGE 2C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Another piece of paradise destined

FROM page 1B

said: “I don’t think they even
consulted people in Abaco
who know the area, people
who have lived here all their
lives and who can offer some
serious input; that’s what’s
insulting.”

Residents fear the Bunker
C plant will pollute Abaco’s
clean air, land and sea, and
Mrs Bethel-Richard, and oth-
ers, feel there was not suffi-
cient exploration of alterna-
tive, renewable energy
sources.

Part-time resident and wind
turbine designer David Pit-
cairn said figures presented

at the meeting showing winds
blowing southeast across
Great Abaco at around seven
mph were misleading, as his
own Internet research had
shown winds are likely to be
around 18 mph and blowing
northwest.

Mr Pitcairn said investing
in a data logging wind tower
could confirm this, and mean
a different future for Abaco.

Mrs Bethel-Richard said: “I
have not got the impression
that they wanted renewable
energy to be looked into in a
meaningful way.

“T don’t want for our kids
to have to be burdened with
still having to buy fossil fuels

in the future, when they could
put the money they are
putting into the power plant
into a renewable energy plant,
even if it isn’t completely
renewable.”

She added: “We need pow-
er, without a doubt, but I
think we need to be more
responsible.

“There’s this impression
that people who love the envi-
ronment don’t like develop-
ment and that’s not true.

“We want something
responsible that can be sus-
tained for a long amount of
time.

“T would like for Abaco to
be the greenest island in the

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Caribbean.”

Designating Abaco as an
energy-efficient island would
certainly be one path towards
development that would set
the main island and cays apart
from the rest.

And power plant develop-
ers MAN Diesel Group is
known to have built renew-
able energy plants elsewhere,
but BEC and government
have made clear Bunker C is

A VIEW of Hope Town, Abaco...

the only option they will con-
sider for Abaco right now.

An Abaco woman, who
asked to remain anonymous,
told Insight she feels there is
something more going on.

She said: “I firmly believe
something is fishy about the
fuel supply contract, because
if it wasn’t, why would they
be so hell bent about sticking
with Bunker C?

“They have said the differ-

Legal Notice

BLOMINSDALT INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 17th day of
September 2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.
Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

LOURDES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of LOURDES INC. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

SOLID VAULT INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 17th day of
September 2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.
Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



ence in price between diesel
and Bunker C is upwards of
$9m, but it could be as little as
$3m, and that’s nothing con-
sidering the health implica-
tions.

“T think somebody is going
to get the contract for the
HFO and giving kickbacks,
that’s what makes this country
go around,” she speculated.

Others fear the power plant
will only pave the way for
over zealous development.

It is feared that a large-scale
development of South Aba-
co, including three hotels, two
golf courses, and an
amphitheatre in an area near
the Abaco National Park,
may be coming in behind the
new power plant, and is per-
haps linked to the $105 mil-
lon investment of “local”
funds for the plant.

The Valencia development
sparked controversy when it
was proposed last year, and
has since gone so quiet that
even the website about the
project has vanished.

But it is rumoured the
developers are now hoping to
put their plans back in action.

There are some Abaconi-
ans who feel such large-scale
developments are not need-
ed in Abaco, as it has a steady
stream of visitors who are
attracted by the fact that it is
less developed than New
Providence and Grand
Bahama.

And more than that, they
fear developments on that
scale could be doomed to fail.

Marsh Harbour real estate
broker Brent Cartwright said:
“We really don’t need any
developments right now
because the ones we already
have are struggling, so we
would hate to see any other
developments come on in the
next five or ten years when
we have two here which have
the volume and capacity to
bring a lot more growth just
between them.

“Tjust don’t see how many
more could be successful on
the island and I don’t want to
see other projects come on
and not make it. I think rapid
growth could be detrimental
for Abaco.”

Abaco suffered less than
other islands when the eco-
nomic crisis hit last year as
small-scale development was
kept alive by second home-
owners equipped with enough
disposable income to vacation
when most potential visitors
were tightening their belts.

Meanwhile the Four Sea-
sons resort in Exuma was
forced to close, and thousands
of people in the hotel sector
lost their jobs at Atlantis, the
Wyndham, and hotels across
New Providence and Grand
Bahama.

Many Abaco residents say
they would like to see more
sustainable models of devel-
opment, like Schooner Bay in
South Abaco, and allow such
models to characterise the
area’s growth.

Schooner Bay is intended
to be a sustainable communi-
ty with a farm and farmers
market growing food for the
residents of its 600 homes, as
well as providing a mixture of
shops, restaurants, offices and
boutiques.

One Abaco woman told
Insight: “Valencia is the kind
of development Abaco peo-
ple don’t want, and we don’t

SEE next page

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 3C

INSIGHT

for destruction?

have a say about what hap-
pens in our own island.

“Decisions are made in
Nassau and then they come
here and shove it down our
throats.

“T think developments like
Schooner Bay, which are not
too big but big enough for
developers to make some
money on, would be a better
model.

“They are trying to involve
locals as much as they can in
terms of creating business
opportunities on site, where
as Baker’s Bay (in Guana
Cay) wants to be gated, and
private, with Bahamians
sweeping floors, mopping
floors and serving drinks.”

As a farmer, she would also
like to see agriculture devel-
oped in Abaco so the island
can be independent and sus-
tainable.

She said food shortages
could become a serious con-
cern for Abaco, and after the
September 11 attacks in 2001,
food imports didn’t reach the
island for nine weeks.

South Abaco MP Edison
Key, as executive chairman
of the Bahamas Agricultural

and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC), is supportive of the
cause to develop farming in
Abaco.

He is also supportive of the
move for a Bunker C power
plant in Wilson City, and of
the Baker’s Bay development,
as well as others like it, and
does not see agriculture as an
alternative, but an additional
form of development.

The BAIC currently has
charge of around 10,000 acres
of former sugar plantations
south of Spring City, 640 acres
of which have been divided
into five and ten acre farm-
ing plots which have already
attracted Chinese investment.

Mr Key said: “There’s a
tremendous amount of inter-
est being shown by a lot of
people, especially since the
economy has slowed down.

“People have realised it’s
not just tourism we need, we
need another industry to pro-
vide jobs and agriculture is
one of the most important at
this time to supply the country
with food.

“Agriculture has the poten-
tial for employment for thou-
sands of people, and there’s

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
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The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Contact: Mrs. Elvina Bastian at 302-4516

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Ms. Cheryl Simms
V. P., Finance
The College of The Baharnies

Deadline for submission
September Jtth, 2009 at Spon,

Tender document should be marked as folbiws:
Tender 1404
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The College of The Bahamas
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tremendous potential for food
security in our country.”

However, farmers in Abaco
said they have been hindered
from making a profit on fruits
and vegetables because of the
over-complicated application
process to reduce import duty
on farm supplies and equip-
ment.

“There is too much red
tape going through all this,”
Mr Key said.

“Tt should be very simple,
and hopefully we will get to
that stage, but right now, this
is how it has to be done.”

If the growing population
of Haitian migrants, thou-
sands of whom have settled
in the slums of The Mud and
Pigeon Pea in Marsh Har-
bour, could also be mobilised
to work through a more sim-



ple work permit application
process, there would also be a
tremendous potential work
force to develop agriculture.

Mr Key said: “We need
people to work on the farms,
and they could be helping to
develop the agriculture indus-
try that’s already in the coun-
try.

“There must be some way
to put these people to work
and help to support us in the
food industry while they can
also help themselves.”

Many of those in the Hait-
lan community come from an
agricultural background, but
are unable to work because
of the difficult work permit
applications.

SEE page 8C

INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGES
AND CULTURES
INSTITUTE










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2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box
N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



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High: 92°F/33°C ~~. Some sun with a Partly cloudy, a Partly sunny, a t-storm; Partly sunny, a t-storm Partly sunny with a Partly sunny, a t-storm The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
pee ae le shower or t-storm. thunderstorm; warm. breezy. possible. shower possible. in spots. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
Low: 75°F/24°C a . ; , ; ,
@ Woo High: 89 High: 89 High: 90 High: 89
- \*\. 1 . oO . oO . oO . oO . oO . °
c a High: 89 Low: 80 Low: 80 Low: 79 Low: 79 Low: 77 see ERE
TAMPA fifa Ah ae a
High: 91° F/33° C | « 103° F Q6°-86° F 96°-84° F Q6°-86° F High HEL(ft.) Low —_Ht.(ft
Low: 75° F/24°C oe r, The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and 9:15am. 3.6 2:58am. 0.0
a @ - . elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 9:32pm. 3.0 3:38pm. 0.3
€ Nese 40:18pm. 28 4:27pm. 06
) he a Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Wednesday 10:40am. 33 4:26am. 04
_ = ABACO Temperature 11:06 p.m. 26 5:17pm. 09
7 : en | hs OO 0 IGM sess sasadvssensslacetsonaetecstectiateds aactane 91° F/33° C 71-40 37 5413 07
A - High: 89° F/32°C LOW oeeeeeeeeeeeee 81° F/27° C Thursday 41.59 pan 25 Sion, 19
f a A ; a Low: 77° F/25°C Normal high... errs G qo.
7 . me , Normal low 75° F/24° C
a, eS @ WEST PALMBEACH i Last year's high... or Fsc | ONT MIM (II
4 — High: 89° F/32° C on Last year's lOW oo... eseseeeeeeeeeeeeeeees 75° F/24° C a aes ae a
—_= Low: 78° F/26°C i ~~ Precipitation = = = = = ==S—s—CSs—S—S—SsSS rise... ‘58am. Moonrise. .... 46 a.m.
ra - @ i -_, As of 2 p.m. yesterday oo... ices 0.00" Sunset....... 7:07 p.m. Moonset ..... 8:54 p.m.
alll ; FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT wes Year to date ... 30. First Full Last New
High: 89° F/32° C @ High: 89° F/32° C Normal year to date ......c.ccsecsecsesscsseesecseeee 36.03" 7 7 -
| Low: 79° F/26°C — Low: 76° F/24°C e Gee. de
a AccuWeather.com as Wes ee
@ i ay Forecasts and graphics provided by - _ ay
hy “ MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Sep.26 Oct.4 Oct.11 Oct. 18
eee ie ELEUTHERA
“ft Low: 79° F/26° C NASSAU Mit rome
High: 89° F/32°C oe:
_- ——- Low: 80° F/27°C
a ge -* i. @ - ‘
KEY WEST : i So —_ CATISLAND
High: 90° F/32" C High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 80° F/27° C " " Low: 75° F/24°C
ie
GREAT EXUMA “at SAN SALVADOR
oe ao 4 High: 88° F/31°C
de Low: 76° F/24°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | “ f
highs and tonights's lows. High: 91° F/33° C —>- Ns
Low: 76° F/24°C i. , he
ne , Ay
LONG ISLAND
Low: 76° F/24° C
Today Tuesday Today Tuesday Today Tuesday ll MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 87° F/31°C
FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FIC FIC FIC F/C = ei Low: 75° F/24° C
Albuquerque 82/27 52/11 pe 67/9 47/8 pc Indianapolis 81/27 63/17 t 84/28 64/17 t Philadelphia 78/25 63/17 $s 78/25 66/18 pc ;
Anchorage 5412 43/6 c 50/10 38/3 sh Jacksonville 88/31 72/22 t 88/31 72/22 t Phoenix 105/40 75/23 s 100/37 71/21 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 80/26 68/20 t 85/29 69/20 pc Kansas City 76/24 55/12 t 73/22 56/12 c Pittsburgh 71/21 6216 t — 78/25 59/15 sh RAGGEDISLAND — Migh:89°F/82°c
Atlantic City 78/25 61/16 s 77/25 64417 pc Las Vegas 98/36 69/20 s 98/36 65418 s Portland,OR 93/33 54/12 s 96/35 57/13 s High: 87° F/31° C Low: 78° F/26°C
Baltimore 76/24 62/16 pce 78/25 64/17 pc Little Rock 87/30 67/19 pce 82/27 68/20 t Raleigh-Durham 82/27 64/17 pce 984/28 65/18 t Low: 75° F/24°C - %
Boston 77/25 59/15 s 75/23 647 pc Los Angeles 88/31 66/18 s 96/35 68/20 $s St. Louis 86/30 67/19 pe 83/28 67/19 t .
Buffalo 77/25 6216 4+ 75/23 616 pc Louisville 81/27 68/20 t 85/29 66/18 t Salt Lake City 68/20 43/6 s 73/22 52/1 $s GREAT INAGUA vw
Charleston, SC 86/30 69/20 t 85/29 72/22 t Memphis 86/30 71/21 t 84/28 70/21 t San Antonio 90/32 73/22 s 83/28 65/18 ft High: 90° F/32° C
Chicago 81/27 60/15 pe 79/26 58/14 t Miami 89/31 79/26 t 89/31 79/26 t San Diego 83/28 65/18 s 90/32 63/17 s Low 77°F25°C
Cleveland 78/25 66/18 r 79/26 58/14 pc Minneapolis 76/24 60/15 t 74/23 59/15 c San Francisco 89/31 57/13 s 90/32 55/12 s ‘i
Dallas 90/32 66/18 pce 79/26 60/15 t Nashville 83/28 67/19 t 82/27 67/19 t Seattle 81/27 54/12 s 88/31 55/12 s
Denver 58/14 344 4+ 50/10 36/2 1 New Orleans 89/31 76/24 t 88/31 75/23 t Tallahassee 91/32 71/21 t 91/32 71/21 pc j i
Detroit 74/23 64/17 + 83/28 61/16 pc New York 78/25 65/18 s 77/25 68/20 pc Tampa 91/32 75/23 t 91/32 75/23 t —_
Honolulu 88/31 74/23 s 88/31 73/22 s Oklahoma City 84/28 59/15 t 72/22 53/1 ¢ Tucson 96/35 69/20 s 96/35 62/16 s en
Houston 91/32 74/23 pc 86/30 70/21 t Orlando 92/33 75/23 t 90/32 75/23 t Washington, DC 77/25 65/18 pc 79/26 66/18 pc

o|1|2

LOW








3|4|5|6

MODERATE |

TS a NY



“HIGH




iv
[slo

ee oe

10
V. HIGH EXT.














Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
88/31
65/18
64/17
75/23
63/17
93/33
86/30
72/22
75/23
76/24
75/23
72/22
79/26
66/18
73/22
81/27
68/20
93/33
91/32
71/21
89/31
83/28
76/24
65/18
61/16
73/22
67/19
71/21
88/31
63/17
93/33
105/40
72/22
74/23
77/25
89/31
74/23
70/21
77/25
84/28
73/22
96/35
75/23
58/14
73/22
87/30
93/33
61/16
73/22
77/25
76/24
102/38
76/24
88/31
87/30
87/30
66/18
86/30
69/20
68/20
63/17
73/22
88/31
74/23
73/22
82/27
72/22
75/23
73/22
69/20

ii

Today

Low
F/C
80/26
52/11
45/7
64/17
52/11
77/25
78/25
60/15
43/8
70/21
54/12
51/10
74/23
45/7
51/10
54/12
49/9
70/21
81/27
41/5
74/23
73/22
59/15
51/10
45/7
54/12
53/11
52/11
72/22
50/10
79/26
75/23
59/15
60/15
54/12
79/26
58/14
54/12
50/10
77/25
52/11
71/21
57/13
47/8
52/11
54/12
79/26
48/8
52/11
52/11
69/20
73/22
64/17
78/25
50/10
72/22
39/3
73/22
62/16
54/12
52/11
57/13
77/25
68/20
57/13
67/19
54/12
59/15
56/13
50/10

pc

High
F/C
89/31
65/18
64/17
76/24
60/15
90/32
87/30
75/23
79/26
76/24
80/26
73/22
82/27
66/18
69/20
83/28
64/17
95/35
90/32
76/24
89/31
83/28
80/26
61/16
61/16
74/23
71/21
70/21
88/31
61/16
91/32
104/40
69/20
79/26
81/27
89/31
74/23
72/22
81/27
83/28
73/22
96/35
72/22
62/16
78/25
88/31
93/33
62/16
74/23
74/23
81/27
101/38
79/26
88/31
54/12
85/29
61/16
85/29
75/23
77/25
61/16
75/23
88/31
79/26
17/25
91/32
78/25
75/23
70/21
69/20

Tuesday
Low
F/C
81/27
56/13
46/7
61/16
50/10
78/25
77/25
63/17
50/10
71/21
55/12
56/13
76/24
45/7
54/12
54/12
45/7
71/21
83/28
46/7
73/22
72/22
61/16
54/12
48/8
57/13
53/11
53/11
72/22
52/11
81/27
73/22
59/15
59/15
56/13
79/26
58/14
54/12
54/12
77/25
53/11
70/21
Sls
44/6
50/10
54/12
75/23
48/8
53/11
55/12
72/22
72/22
61/16
80/26
39/3
73/22
37/2





INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

WwW

pe

74/23

63/17
55/12
50/10
59/15
17/25
66/18
57/13
70/21
57/13
60/15
50/10

47/8

pe
s

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st, 2009, PAGE 7C





MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 7-14 Knots 1-2 Feet 6 Miles 85° F
Tuesday: ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 4 Miles 85° F
FREEPORT Today: ENE at 6-12 Knots 1-3 Feet 5 Miles 86° F
Tuesday: E at 7-14 Knots 1-3 Feet 5 Miles 86° F
ABACO Today: E at 4-8 Knots 3-5 Feet 7 Miles 85° F
Tuesday: ESE at 8-16 Knots 3-6 Feet 10 Miles 85° F











qh
aa
a
A
a
+
a
4m
ad
Ie_¢_4 Hain Fronts
=. Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and os
Bk.) Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm infinite
[yv_Â¥] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Meagan
10s| 0s Os 10s 20s [06] 40s [50s Gos 70s (80s /G0s\)/il0eN/iins!





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PAGE 8C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

FROM page 3C

An Abaco farmer told
Insight how she waited for 20
months to get a work permit
for one Haitian employee, as
Haitians who may have lived
in the Bahamas for decades
and held several work permits
are still forced to return to
Haiti at a high cost to the
employer in order to go
through the application
process before they can be
hired.

The process divides fami-
lies, and puts the applicant in
a position where they are
unable to work for months on
end.

“Tt’s a tremendous expense
to the person who needs the
labour,” Mr Key said.

“The Immigration Depart-
ment needs to make it easier
to employ them in areas such
as agriculture and common
labour.”

But, according to the
farmer who waited 20 months
for a labourer: “It’s a ploy to
get them to give up or to get
money under the table.”

The system certainly does-
n’t seem to be benefiting
Abaconians, who want resi-
dents of The Mud and Pigeon
Pea to be regularised and
housed in a safe and sanitary
environment.

Regular raids on the shan-
tytowns have failed to stop
the communities from
expanding over the last 30
years, and have only bred
resentment in the Haitian
community as sources say V10-
lence is used and families are
separated.

Commenting on the large-
scale raid carried out by
Immigration and Royal
Bahamas Defence Force offi-
cers on July 30, an Abaconian
told Insight: “The raids were
absolutely atrocious. They
take women and children out
of their beds at 3am without
letting them put on their
clothes, take six-week-old
babies, these are human rights
violations.

“Fifty per cent of the peo-
ple they pick up are Bahami-
an, but they would not let
them go back to their homes
to get their papers.

“There was a man standing
there in his Jockey’s and they
hold a gun and a flashlight in
his face; he asks to go in to
get. his passport, and they say
no.’

Mr Cartwright expressed
his disappointment that in 30
years neither government has
been able to take control of
the migrant community.

He said: “It needs to be
addressed now and it needed

Legal Notice

PLANETE NATURE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 17th day of
September 2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.
Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



to be addressed 15 years ago.

“They have these raids, and
I think they are necessary but
I cannot agree with the way
they are done. They are quite
inhumane, specifically with
the children.

“What they need to do is
have constant patrols to mon-
itor who is there because
there is a constant influx of
people.”

Abaconians who are so
connected to the issues of the
island are full of ideas about
the way their community can
be helped, how it can grow,
and they are keen to commu-
nicate about a common goal.

But with projects as huge
as the Bunker C power plant
going ahead without public
consultation, and suspicions
over big developments being
pushed through without
informing residents, Abaco-
nians fear their beloved home
will develop at such a rate it
will spiral out of control.

While it has a good econo-
my, and great potential,
development must follow a
delicate balance, bearing the
island’s unique resources and
issues in mind to help it grow
in an organic way, and the
best way for Abaco.

But if the people who care
about Abaco, and the people
who know it best are not even
consulted about major
changes in their community,
they will one day wake up and
feel they are no longer in their
home.

As one Abaconian told
Insight: “People in Abaco are
not dumb. It’s like they think
we have not educated our-
selves to any degree, and a lot
of people are frustrated.

“This was meant to be a
new transparent government,
getting people involved, and
they’re not.

“They are just sweeping our
concerns under the carpet.”

It seems the people in Aba-
co simply want to be heard.
They want the government
they elected to listen to their
concerns, consider their ideas,
and treat them with respect
before making plans in arro-
gance, which they fear, could
be the ruin of Abaco.

What do you think?
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

.s ey
Lnspireda Dy
,

UGGIE:

_

HuGGIE:

_



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Full Text

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Bloody Sunday N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.249MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SOMESUN, T-STORM POSSIBLE HIGH 89F LOW 80F The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com n BU RGER KINGBOSS BEATEN AND MURDERED n PILOT SHOTDEAD, OTHER MAN ‘CRITICAL THE AFTERMATH of the horrific traffic accident which killed a one-year-old baby girl and a 20-year-old woman. The picture shows the cov ered bodies. The accident occurred near the Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant at the Mall at Marathon. Christie: Don’t confuse kindness for weakness Perry Christie By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net HITTING back at his detractors, PLP Leader Perry Christie cautioned his wouldbe contenders to not confuse his kindness for weakness as he aggressively defended his legacy and ability to remain as leader of the PLP. Speaking with radio talkshow host Wendal Jones on his programme ‘ Jones and Co TWO men became the vic tims of violent murders yes terday in the space of less than three hours. A Burger King manager was beaten and then stabbed to death after being abducteda nd a Bahamasair pilot was shot dead in his home. Both murders occurred just hours after Bahamians gath ered for a peace concert at Arawak Cay on Saturday night to protest the “shock-i ng” levels of criminal activity i n the Bahamas. The pilot, Lionel Lewis McQueen, 29, was found dead in his blood-splattered Gold en Palms Estates home, near Kennedy subdivision, shortly after 4am. He had been shot several times. A second man, the pilot’s cousin and room mate Martez Saunders, who also suffered multiple gunshot wounds, was found alive in front of the home. At press time last night he was still in critical condition in the inten sive care unit. Mr McQueen’s colleagues at Bahamasair yesterday remembered him as a “quiet” man who was well liked by all. A fellow pilots aid that no one at the airline can imagine why someone would have wanted to kill Mr McQueen. He was engaged to be married in February next year. The Burger King employe e was reportedly abducted a nd taken to the fast-food chain’s Harrold Road location where he was beaten and then stabbed to death after failing to open the restauran t’s safe for his kidnapper. Shortly after 1.30am, police were called to a “disturbance” at Burger King restaurant on Harrold Road. SEE page seven SEE page seven A one-year old baby girl and her aunt died in what police yesterday described as an “horrific” traffic accident that left family members distraught with grief. A 20-year-old woman and her niece were passengers in a water truck travel ling on Marathon Road when it crashed into a maroon coloured Cadillac Seville, causing it to flip over. Both the woman and the young child were thrown from the truck and sustained fatal injuries. The accident occurred just after 4.40pm near the Ken tucky Fried Chicken restaurant at the Mall at Marathon. As the bodies of the victims were lying in the road covered by white sheets, the father of the baby rushed onto the scene. He was able to get past the officers of the Baby girl and aunt die in crash horror A BODY is taken away from the scene of the crash. SEE page seven FORMER Prime Minister Perry Christie again warned would-be investors in the relocation of the container port that if the PLP were to be returned to power they would scrap government’s current project and place the port somewhere else. As the guest on Wendal Jones’ radio programme Jones and Co, Mr Christie reiterated his government’s history in studying where the placement of the container should be and reminded the listening audience that the container port should not be at Arawak Cay. “Buyers, investors, beware!” Mr Christie exclaimed. When asked how he could make such a declaration having criticised the current gov ernment for not continuing projects left in place by the PLP, Mr Christie said the difference is that his position on this matter has been well known for sometime now. “I spoke in Parliament and said Mr Ingraham I want you to hear my words. If these people are not listening to you and you telling them that that is wrong, tell them to go to Hell. I said in Parliament, ‘tell them to go to Hell’. He has since developed a proposition where the government will have the majority of shares. It would be easier to move it then. It would be easier to move it,” he said. Having caused a tremendous stir in the community with the decision to move the port to Arawak Cay, Mr Christie said this decision is not in the best interest of the Bahamas as it is wrongly motivated. “And it is a bloody shame I am telling you, Mr Jones, when you have a government, see don’t tell me I will be duplicitous, when you have a government which has plan ning documents opposite and you know they have made a PLP ‘would scrap Arawak Cay container port project’ F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page seven

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THOMAS BETHEL , Hank Coleman and Larry Black celebrate with their trophies for the best score for the Nassau Yacht Club. ZACK BONZACK , Phil Andrews and Chris Birch celebrate as the best team from the Royal Nassau Sailing Club. Missing is 11-year-old Spencer Andrews. GOLF TOURNAMENT FUND RAISER THE team of Larry Black, Thomas Bethel and Hank Coleman turned in the best team score for the Nassau Yacht Club on Saturday in the dual golf tournament between the Royal Nassau Sailing Club at t he Ocean Golf Club. T he tournament was held as a f und raiser for the Bahamas Sailing Association. A total of $4,270.00 w as raised and presented to the association to assist with the junior sailing competition. See the Sports Page for more details. The team of Phil Andrews, 12-year-old Spencer Andrews, Chris Birch and Zack Bon-z ack produced the best score for the Royal Nassau Sailing Club on Saturday in the dual g olf tournament between the Nassau Yacht Club at Ocean Club. The tournament was held as a fund raiser for the Bahamas Sailing Association. See the Sports Page for more details. PHOTOS: Felip Major /Tribune staff

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ADDRESSING PLP stalwart councillors in New Providence and Grand Bahama over t he radio yesterday, PLP candidate for deputy leader Obie Wilchcombe reminded those stalwarts in attendance and listening around the country that the story of the PLP has not ended. Asking for their support in his bid to become the deputy l eader, the West End and Bimini MP said that the second chapter of the “rise of the Bahamian people” must be written by a “new generation of leaders” who must take up the fight and continue the forward march. “Now is the time, this is our m oment and our great PLP party must lead the way. We must repower the PLP to empower the Bahamian people. Now is the time if we wish to see our people happy again. Now is the time if we wish to eliminate the misery index. Now is the time if we wish to introduce gross national hap-p iness. Now is the time for us to dream again. Now is the time to repower the PLP to empower the Bahamian people,” the MP said. T his process Mr Wilchcombe said will begin at the party’s October convention, which he also will be co-chairing. Asking the party faithful to g ive him a chance to serve as their next deputy leader, Mr Wilchcombe said he would commit himself to working fullt ime to prepare the party for the next general election. “As your deputy leader I will lead the way in writing the hist ory of our party. The story must be told. We must tell the y outh today and the generations yet unborn of the rich his tory. We must tell their story and the role you stalwart counc illors have played in this journey. We must return to basics and to the people. We are the party of the people. We must let them know,” he said. M r Wilchcombe added that he sees a Bahamas that can boast unmatched health care where Bahamians no longer w ill have to die because they cannot afford health care. “I see a Bahamas with an educational system that capt ures the attention of the world. Where our young people, be it i n academics or technical or sports, will rise to a competi tive level that will make us all p roud. I see a Bahamas where at least 10,000 jobs are created annually in the tourism sector, the financial services sector, m anufacturing, agriculture, heavy industry and health care. “I see a Bahamas where Grand Bahama takes its rightf ul place in our national development, where big industry, t ourism, film and manufacture c reate thousands of jobs and Bahamian ownership,” he said. In his bid to become deputy leader, Mr Wilchcombe will f ace PLP MP for Cat Island and San Salvador Philip Davis, Senator Jerome Fitzgerald, and quite possibly even the MP for G olden Gates Shane Gibson. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Grand Bahama Police arrestedm urder suspect Godfrey Virgill Jr, alias “Dollar Murd er”, on Saturday evening. Asst Supt Loretta Mackey s aid police acting on a tip from the public went to Fawcett Lane and arrested V irgill around 11.30pm. Virgill is wanted for ques t ioning in connection with a murder. Thanked Ms Mackey thanked the G rand Bahama community and the media for their con tinual support. She said police are seeking thep ublic’s assistance in locat ing Eric ShervinS tubbs Jr, who is wanted f or ques tioning in connec tion with housebreaking and stealing.S tubbs, 30, is of medium brown complexion with brown eyes and short hair. He is about 6'1" tall of slim build and weighs about 160 170 pounds. Anyone who has information concerning Stubbs is asked to call police at 352-1919 , 351-9111 , 3519991 , 352-8351 , 352-9076 , and 350-3125 or, 911 . Police detain murder suspect New generation of leaders must lead PLP fight – Obie Wilchcombe PLP DEPUTY LEADER HOPEFUL Obie Wilchcombe speaks with stalwart councillors before his address on ZNS and Gems Radio. WEST END AND BIMINI MP Obie Wilchcombe shares a moment with South Andros MP Picewell Forbes at his address at the Sheraton Resort yesterday. In brief ERIC STUBBS IN view of ever-increasing homicide numbers, theW orkers Party in conjunction with the families of murder victims is planning to stage a pro-hanging march on October 12,s tarting from Arawak Cay. Leader of the Workers Party Rodney Moncur said that in his opinion concerts like the one held on Satur-d ay night by Artists4Peace in protest of crime in the country are “useless.” He believes that only h anging those currently on death row will serve as a d eterrent and “put the fear in worthless, criminalminded young men.” M r Moncur is also calling for bail to be abolished f or all those charged with murder. Pro-hanging march set for October 12

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E DITOR, The Tribune. T his is an open letter to the Prime Minister for publication. Dear Honourable Prime Minister, This is in reference to the new BEC Power Plant being constructed at the old Wilson City site. I’m writing to congratulate you and your government for once again moving Abaco forward to meet the challenges of future growth and development on this island. I know as native Abaconians, neither you nor Fred Gottlieb would ever do anything to hurt Abaco. For those that were not here or those who don’t want to remember. Here is a list of major infrastructual changes and improvements made in Abaco, under your administration. 1) Beautiful paved highways from north to south. 2) Electricity along those roads from north to south. 3) Cable Bahamas service to give Abaconians easy access to entertainment and world news. 4) A new Port facility. We should all remember picking up freight from the “old dock”. 5) The long awaited new runway at the airport in Marsh Harbour in the final stages of completion. Also, congratulations on your future plans for a new hospital and Government A dministration Complex, w ith a new Post Office and c ourthouse. No government is perfect, and they all need to answer and be accountable for their actions when questioned. I think you have done this and more, on the new Power Plant. So, I say to you Honourable Prime minister, Fred Gottlieb and Minister Neymour hurry up and finish this facility, as I’m tired of the inadequate service we now have with the present outdated plant. My family were some of the early settlers in Abaco, some of them lived and worked in Wilson City. As a mother of three young Bahamians, I say “keep up the good work.” JANEEN ELIZABETH ALBURY-COOPER Abaco, September, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 WEBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm A BACONIANS fear that boat thefts on that island could further threaten theirt ourist industry. In June Mr John Bethell, president of t he newly-formed Marina Operator’s Association, said insurers were insisting on “extra theft protection” for boats entering the Bahamas, because of rising boat thefts, especially in Abaco. He said that more than $6m illion worth of vessels were involved. Abaconians fear that this extra fee, coup led with fuel prices and the depressed econ omy, will cripple the resort/marina and seco nd homeowner markets on that island, Tribune Business reported in June. At the time the residents of Abaco threate ned that if police were not more active in stamping out what they described as a highl y sophisticated criminal enterprise, vigilante justice would soon follow. S ome of the thefts were linked to human trafficking to Florida in which it is believed that several go-fast powerboats some worth more than $50,000 – were involved. These boats are stolen from marinas and private moorings. It is also believed that the boats are hot-wired and used in drug trafficking. It was even reported earlier this year that P rime Minister Ingraham’s 21-foot “runabout” was removed from its Green TurtleCay moorings and used for a criminal enterprise. Although police at the time were not confirming the report, the locals maintained that the fishing boat was taken from the Green Turtle Cay marina and returned later, but not before being used to steal from another boat two Yamaha 250 engines worth $ 60,000. An American second home owner reported that his boat had been stolen and tampered with twice within just a few months. Here in Nassau the situation is no better. Recently a Paradise Island resident went off on vacation leaving his Boston Whaler hoisted up on his dock in the care of friends. O ne day a marine mechanic, who has worked on many of these boats and knows t hem well, was passing the Sailing Club when he thought he recognised this particular Whaler anchored in the vicinity. He called the person who had been left in charge of the Whaler to find out if it was still on the hoisto r if it was missing. It was missing. The young man left in charge immedia tely reported the theft to the Paradise Island police station, got on a jet ski and h eaded for the Sailing Club. He saw no sign of the missing boat. He continued west as far as Prince George dock and the cruise ships, s couring every marina and hidden cove along the way. Nothing. T he mechanic who had first spotted the boat called around 1 pm. He said that anothe r friend had also lost a similar boat with the same size engine over the weekend. It had been found in the Sea Breeze canal. He suggested that he and his son take the young man in search of the vacationing resident’sb oat. They started from the ocean side of Sea B reeze, approaching the abandoned end of the canal until they neared the residential a rea. Their boat weaved in an out of the canals. In a remote area they spotted an Abaco skiff, which the marine mechanic k new had been stolen. He later found its owner, who had bought it as a gift for his d aughter. As they moved into the more developed r esidential area, they saw their boat, still in the water. It was tied to a tree on an empty lot. Already the boat thieves had started to work on it. The name of the boat had been scraped off, the registration number had been removed and its top had been taken. No one was in sight and so the young man who had the boat’s key jumped in the Whaler, turned the key and “stole it back.” A lthough the engine was intact, it had to be repaired. The Whaler has been moved for safety to another location. However, from the same private dock a larger boat was stolen earlier this year. It has never been found. It is believed it is busy running drugs. We were told that this boat was also on a hoist owners believing that it is more difficult to s teal a boat out of water. The large boat had complicated safety cables, locks and other modern safety gadgets. In other words, it was believed to be “thief proof.” But because the private dock is in a remote loca tion, the thieves probably worked most of the night to saw the chains, melt the locks and lower the boat into the water. “We are helpless,” said a boat owner. H owever, on this particular dock, there are going to be cameras, alarms and every wakeu p device that will be activated on the approach of a human. As soon as anyone steps onto that particular dock they will be quickly escorted off in handcuffs. When a boat is missing it would be a g ood idea to head for Sea Breeze before the crooks have time to dismantle it for spare p arts or to ship it off to join the drug trade. Also it would be a good idea for the p olice harbour patrol to be more vigilant in the Sea Breeze area, because that is where the action is. An open letter to the PM on new BEC power plant LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Boat thefts are big business EDITOR, The Tribune. I do agree with some of Dr Leatendore Percentie’s article entitled “Ban pit bulls”, I just feel t hat we have missed that opportunity years ago. The Bahamas Humane Society called for this b an in 1982 when we first started to see the influx o f pitbulls coming into New Providence but this all fell on deaf ears. W hat we now need is for the purpose new Animal Protection and Control Act to be passed in parliament so that stiff fines can be levieda gainst owners of dangerous dogs and regulations can be in place to govern breeders of any t ype of dogs, to ensure that these persons become responsible animal owners. We have so many backyard breeders and 95 p er cent of them breed pitbulls, there is supposed to be a regulation in place that you cannot i mport a pitbull dog into the Bahamas, but with so many persons breeding this type of dog, that serves no purpose. What needs to be put in place is to have every imported dog neutered before it enters the Bahamas and only if you are a licensed breeder, can you import a un-neutered dog into the count ry, at a quota of two per year. This way we can ensure that dogs are neutered, thus less roaming/stray dogs and this should lead t o less animal cruelty because there would be fewer dogs around to trespass on other persons’ p remises. T his new proposed Act would ensure that owners of animals become responsible by having t o make provision for their animals, also pet stores and security dog companies would have firm guidelines to follow. A ll of this would help safeguard both people and animals in this country, no one should have t o walk the streets in fear of being attacked by dogs, we have too many children on our streets to protect, so please let’s have this Act put into laws o that people can become responsible animal owners, STEPHEN TURNQUEST The Bahamas Humane Society Executive Director Nassau, September 20, 2009. Legislation must be passed so people become responsible animal owners EDITOR, Tribune . T he “Read to Lead” programme initiated by the Min i stry of Education but brainstormed by a select committee understands what is required to uplift the country from its depths of despair. Eloquents peeches from charismatic polit ical leaders cannot and will notr everse the dire situation, r es ipsa loquitur. The committee r ecognized that it requires all hands on deck. The “Read to Lead” Programme is necessary action requiring participation by all right thinking Bahamians who would share a reading and mentoring moment with our future generation. While the mentor i ng aspect of the programme has to be deeply thought through given the unacceptable rate of paedophilia in the coun try, the purpose of this important programme is without question laudable. The Ministry of Education ought to market this programme aggressively and con sistently. The mandate should be to sustain this programme given our history of stick-to-itness or lack thereof; the pro gramme should be devoid of politics, it’s too important to be handicapped by personalities. It’s also important that Corporate Bahamas embrace this p rogramme allowing employees to visit schools and read to/mentor our children, and ensure the necessary books, supplies, and materials are at the ready to sustain the effort. The Ministry of Education deserves kudos for implementing a positive programme that gets the entire country involved in the well being of our future generation, I pray we sustain. R. McKENZIE Nassau, September 2009. Why we need the ‘Read to Lead’ pr ogramme

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PHILIP Davis, PLP candid ate for deputy leadership, was i n Long Island and Cat Island over the weekend to meet with stalwart councillors and PLP supporters as he continues his campaign ahead of the party’sn ational convention. C arrying the message to supp orters to “Be Brave change the Bahamas”, Mr Davis met with supporters in Deadman’s Cay and in the southern andn orthern settlements of Long I sland on Friday. According to a statement issued by Mr Davis’ communications team, the PLP candidate was “humbled by his support” and “visibly moved” b y the candid expressions of n eglect in the communities. Explaining that politics in the Bahamas has broken, Mr Davis said, “We [politicians] have been too busy rowing amongst o urselves and too focused on s eeing our picture in the paper. W e have to change the way we do things; our people ares uffering for it.” Mr Davis is reportedly going to continue his campaign throughout the islands as hes tops to talk with and listen to t he concerns of residents throughout the Bahamas. Y esterday Mr Davis also paid a visit to his hometown of Cat Island to join supporters in a church service held in his hono ur. Prayers and words of encouragement were offered to the PLP candidate who is expected to face a considerable challenge at the party’s con v ention on October 18. In addition to Mr Davis, PLP M P for West End and Bimini Obie Wilchcombe and PLP S enator Jerome Fitzgerald are all expected to contest the par-t y’s deputy leadership post. W ELL known FNM political activist Ivoine Ingraham has offered himself as a candidate for the post of chairman at the p arty’s national convention slate d for November. In an exclusive interview with The Tribune yesterday, Mr Ingraham said that it is time for t he FNM to raise its game and change the way it does things, not just for the sake of change but because the populace demands it.” We must adjust how we interact with people because of the high demand for us to be more accountable for our a ctions. We must, by whatever we do, make sure that we lift the spirits of all regardless of our personal feelings. We must s acrifice self for the good of the country. We should, however not sacrifice the good of the country for the good of the par-ty. “Gone are the days when being a diehard makes sense.It is country above self, and country above party. Therefore t he position of chairman is a very special one. It is a balanci ng act between the party’s position and the n eeds of the p eople, and the people should always win,” h e said. In the past and up to the present date, Mr Ingraham said that the F NM has been blessed with chairmen who have made “invaluable contributions to the p arty and the country at large. “But nothing lasts forever a nd everything must change,” Mr Ingraham said. “Nothing stays the same. In fact change s hould be welcomed, lest we are saddled with old, stale ideas that will put us at a disadvantage when we are compared with others who oppose us. At this time when the Bahamian people are demanding so much, should expect so m uch, we need people who are personable and capable in key p ositions. We must design e verything we do to help people’s lives become more bearable. We must literally serve people and a positive attitude is the greatest asset,” he said. Noting that the government h as put in place numerous initiatives set out to better the lives of all Bahamians, Mr Ingraham said the party must now take the people and the country “higher” by encouraging and including their young. “In keeping with all of this, I am prepared to help the cause b y offering myself for further service. My entire life I have served in one capacity or another. I was introduced to politics by Sir Arthur Foulkes at Bahamian Times in the mid1960s. I had the best teacher and will admit that I have been an attentive student. So I am n o stranger to sacrificing my time and family towards helping others. I have gained tremendous satisfaction from seeing the smiles on the faces that I have helped. “I have been behind the scenes, putting out fires, doing damage control and helping in a ny way possible to keep the FNM relevant. My contributions 2002-2007, especially when the spirits of FNM were l ow, are common knowledge. I a m prepared to do more. “As chairman, I will be more a ggressive putting forth the FNM agenda, and defending the party’s position in a timely manner. I will be highly and c onsistently visible,” he said. N oting that he has canvassed many party players, including M embers of Parliament and cabinet ministers who he claims are throwing their support behind him, Mr Ingraham said h e feels the party will benefit t remendously from his chairmanship. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM IVOINE INGRAHAM Ivoine Ingraham to contest FNM chairmanship Philip Davis meets residents in Long Island, Cat Island P LEASEDTOMEET YOU: Philip ‘Brave’ D avis with residents on Long Island.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By Ronald Sanders ( The writer is a Consultant and former Caribbean Diplomat) D U RING this month, I was invited to deliver a lecture to 85 high-ranking military officers from Europe, North America, Latin America,A frica, Asia and the Middle-East on the subject of US relations with its Cen-t ral American and Caribbean neighbours. I n preparing the lecture, a comment on the Caribbean’s weakness andl ack of capacity to command international attention p reyed on my mind. The comment was made by my friend and colleague,D avid Jessop, of the Caribbean Council for Europe. In his weekly col-u mn, the week before he said this: “Taken at face valu e the region has a very weak hand. The Caribbean does not have conflicts thatt hreaten to escalate into global confrontations; t hankfully it has neither nuclear weapons nor terrorism, nor does it have a sig-n ificant military presence or the economic ability to change global financial or trade flows. In short it has little that would make big-g er, wealthier and more influential states take notice.” There is much merit in Jessop’s observation, and Iu sed it as a point of departure for the lecture to these seasoned military officers. D uring the Cold war – particularly with Soviet t roops and military hardware in Cuba the C aribbean was strategically important to the US because m uch of its oil requirements had to transit Caribbean waters, and the Caribbeanw as an important passageway for US military supplies t o Western Europe. But with the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991a nd the retreat of communism, the Caribbean and Central America slipped d own the pole of American priorities. The preoccupation of the government of George W Bush between 2001 and2 008 with American involve ment in Afghanistan and I raq caused Central Americ a and the Caribbean to fall even further away from American attention exceptf or issues related to drug trafficking, and illegal migration. Since the mid-1990s,U S aid to the Caribbean and Central America dwindled, p referential access for Caribbean and Central American goods to the USm arket eroded, and there was no longer any pressure b y the US on Europe to help the region by paying preferential prices for itsc ommodities especially bananas and sugar. I n this context, Caribbean and Central American economies declined, andt heir already bad situation worsened in the present global recession. The IMF World Economic Outlook, publishedi n April 2009, suggests that Latin American economies will contract by 1.5 percent i n 2009 before recovering in 2010. But, the likelihood of a start of recovery by manyC aribbean economies, which are dependent on tourism a nd financial services, is very unlikely until 2011, even if the economies of the USa nd Europe pull out of recession this year. It is in this milieu that the Caribbean and Central America face the greatestd estabilising force – drug trafficking and its attendant c rime including illegal arms smuggling and distribution, r obberies and executions. The US government could make an enormousc ontribution to resolving this huge problem by passing l egislation and implementing machinery to control arms smuggling; by review-i ng the practice of deporting convicted felons to their countries of origin; and bya dopting measures to stop legal sale of assault w eapons. Collaborative B eyond this, the United States should take the lead i n organising collaborative arrangements with Europe and Latin America and theC aribbean to establish a comprehensive anti-narcotics programme that addresses both supply and demand. If this is not done,t he problem of drug-traf ficking and its attendant high crime will continue top lague Central America and the Caribbean with a terri b le destabilising effect on the small economies that are least able to cope. T he most worrying prob lem for the US in Central America and the Caribbean should be their economic sit uation, for conditions of econ omic decline lead to social and political unease, and i nstability. It is simply a fact that, with few exceptions, Cen-t ral American and Caribbean governments h ave either limited or no capacity to finance policies to address shocks to theire conomies such as the effect of the current global recession. In the Caribbean par t icularly, small or poor populations do not produce suff icient savings; there is not enough access to credit, and budgets are already in deficit or pretty close to it. In these c ircumstances, governments have no room to pay for the size of stimulus programmes that are required to improve these economies. T he US could be enormously helpful to these countries if it led the way in encouraging the interna tional and hemispheric f inancial institutions to pro vide them with funds on far l ess onerous conditions than they have in the past. As an example, the US s hould use its influence with other countries who govern t he World Bank to reverse the graduation of many of these countries from accesst o concessionary financing. At the moment, they do not have access to such funds because they are regardeda s middle-income countries with no regard for the high costs which their smallness and remoteness imposes upon them. O f critical importance is help with the debt of these countries. Much of their debt, apart from those whoo we Venezuela for oil as part of PetroCaribe, is commercial debt, though theiro fficial debt is also high. Some effort should be made t o help these countries to reschedule debt to all sources on a payments cheme that should include some forgiveness and a reali stic repayment scheme. In this regard, the IMF could play an important rolei n providing financing that (a t o the countries’ Special Drawing Rights; and (b not subject to the usual pre-s cription of raising taxes, reducing public sector spending; freezing wages, and repaying foreign debt. If governments in the i ndustrialised world could bail out some companies and financial institutions ont he basis that their economies could not allow these firms to collapse, surel y this is also a basis for arguing that the collapse of s tates should be avoided. But, I suspect the region will continue to be ignored,a nd, sadly, it will take chaos or grave upheaval before it is paid serious attention. ( Responses, previous com mentaries and the lecture at: w ww.sirronaldsanders.com ) Getting US attention for the Caribbean: Must it be chaos? Sir Ronald Sanders WORLDVIEW The most worrying problem for t he US in Central America and the Caribbean should be their economic s ituation, for conditions of economic d ecline lead to social and political u nease, and instability.”

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yesterday, Mr Christie said he is not fearful of losing the leadership of his party, noting that he has unfinished business to do. am not a weak person. Do not confuse the compassion that has been the centrefold of my political and public life. Do not confuse my sensitivity to the needs of people with weakness,” Mr Christie warned. Surpr ised When asked if he would be surprised if his long time friend and colleague Dr Bernard Nottage were to challenge him at the upcoming convention, Mr Christie admitted that he would, adding that such a challenge would be very “disappointing.” “I am sure that if BJ was actually going to do that I presume that by now he would have told me and, of course, I would have expressed major disappointment because it would really be surprising to me. “Obviously it is a right for him and persons who support him to aspire to any position in the PLP and I have assured him of that; that he must in coming back, and my assisting him in being reintegrated into the party, I did so because I see him to be an able man and one who is able to make a major contribution as we move forward,” Mr Christie said. While not seeking to answer whether or not he felt it would be a degree of treachery or ungratefulness if Dr Nottage were to run against him, Mr Christie said he would leave such questions up to the judgment of the people. “I can only say this, I am absolutely prepared for this moment. Everything about me has now climaxed at this point where I am ready to go. One only has to look at my career and see the arrows and the darts and the punishing criticism that I have received. Clearly that prepares someone it makes you stronger. “And contrary to percep tions that people try to put out there. I am a strong and purposeful person connected to people. And so I am confident, and I know at the end of the convention I will be the leader of the PLP,” he said. In fact, Mr Christie said, he has already started to meet with new candidates for the party on Monday evenings at the party’s headquarters in preparation for the next general election. “So this is only one stage of the journey I am on and it is a journey that will not be interrupted in my own con sidered view,” he said. Mr Christie also warned those within his own party who seek to blame him for the PLP’s loss at the polls, noting that they should in fact look at themselves first and see if they can carry some of the responsibility. “In any event, I have to rest with the point of view that I am in a democratic organisation, and that any person has the right to challenge me as leader of the PLP and that I would expect that within the organisation that if that point of view is held by someone then they should step forward and challenge me and present that point of view to the people at our convention so they can make a choice. And after they have made the choice we can regroup and move for ward,” he said. Mr Christie also downplayed the significance of the Greenberg Quinlan Rosner report commissioned by the PLP which suggested that Mr Christie’s perceived “weak leadership” was the primary reason why the party lost the 2007 election. In fact, Mr Christie blamed this perception mostly on the successful “propaganda” utilised by the FNM during the last election. “Yes I have been very nice to people and they have bit me and there are others doubtless who are ready to bite again,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ,167,787()%86,1(66$1'&200(5&( FROMPAGEONE Arriving at the scene, police officers found the body of man who had apparently been beaten and then stabbed to death. The victim’s body was found lying in a large pool of blood that was flowing like a rivulet into the parking lot, which led police to believe that he bled to death. Superintendent Leon Bethel, head of the Criminal Detective Unit's homicide department, told The Tribune that the victim had multiple stab wounds and lacerations about the body. The victim, whose name the police have not released, was pronounced dead at the scene. The victim was a former manager of the Harrold Road Burger King, but at the time of his murder headed the fastfood chain’s Frederick Street branch. A source close to the investigation told The Tribune that it is believed that the manager was abducted and taken to the restaurant in the west, where his kidnapper demanded he open the safe. Police have evidence that the manager was forced to open the store and there are signs that a forced attempt was then made to open the safe. The current manager of Burger King on Harrold Road closed the restaurant at midnight on Saturday. He turned on the alarm system at 12.04am and with his staff left the premises. Security System International (SSI something was wrong when the alarm system was deactivated sometime after 1am. A SSI staff member called the fast-food outlet, but got no answer. A call was then put through to the police. The police were called a second time by a good Samaritan who was passing in his car and saw a man being violently beaten outside the Burger King location on Harrold Road. Within a few minutes police were at the store where they found the body of a man who had been brutally beaten and stabbed. According to reports, the victim was ordered to open the safe by a large masked man, wearing gloves. There is evidence that the victim, when he failed to open the safe, was brutally beaten in the manager’s office and then dragged outside, where he was seen by the passerby again being beaten. The deaths of the Burger King manager and Mr McQueen bring the country’s murder count up to 62 for the year. F ROM page one Bloody Sunday Two murdered in space of less than three hours Baby girl and aunt die in traffic accident horror Traffic Division and duck under the crime scene tape. By the time the officers were able to get to him he had already lifted the sheet off his daughter’s body, immediately falling backwards in grief. Other family members also gathered on Marathon Road, demanding confirmation from the police that the victims of the crash were in fact their loved ones. Shortly afterwards, the father got into an altercation with the baby’s mother who had also arrived on the scene. According to eyewitnesses and the police, the Cadillac Seville was travelling south on Marathon Road and was signalling to turn into the Mall’s entrance close to the KFC. As he was turning, the water truck attempted to overtake the Cadillac, clipping the smaller vehicle on its right side in the process. The impact with the Cadillac caused the truck to spin out of control and ultimately overturn. Police said the driver of the Cadillac is cur rently assisting them with their investigation into the accident while the truck’s driver has been taken to hospital to be treated for his injuries. The number of traffic fatalities for the year now stands at 37. BODIES are removed after the accident. F ROM page one F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Christie: Don’t confuse kindness for weakness FROM page one big jump to jump over all of the advice and planning which was agreed to you know by the very same people own the ports. And then suddenly, boom! No man, that is wrong,” he said. Container port project FROM page one I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s ...while at Arawak Cay a peace concert was held HUNDREDS of young and old people came out on Saturday night to listen to their favourite artists at the Arawak Cay. The peace concert took place during a weekend of violence in the Bahamas. F elip Major / Tribune staff

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PRIME Minster Hubert I ngraham said Friday that his government is fully committed to the development of art forms and the preservation of impor-t ant heritage sites and artifacts w herever feasible. Speaking at the opening of an exhibition at the National Art Gallery dedicated to r enowned Bahamian artist Maxwell Taylor titled, Maxwell Taylor; Paperwork 1960-1992,” Prime Minister I ngraham said that Bahamians have “a rich architectural her itage that is being diminished as modernization and develop ment transforms or demolishesh istorical structures to make way for new, modern edifices.” The importance of such developments cannot be undere stimated. It is necessary so as to nurture in our people self respect, cultural pride and identity, as well as a sense of place in the growth and development of our country,” Prime Minister I ngraham said. “Knowledge brings about concern and connection and when it happens in the realmo f culture, recognition of our s trength as a community can evolve, providing the basis for much-needed national pride and impetus for us to move forw ard as a nation,” the Prime Minister said. Mr Ingraham p raised Mr Taylor for his art work, saying that they were not the traditional sun, sand and sea paintings many of us have come to regard as typical Bahamian art.” “He reaches for something d ifferent, a feeling and connec tion to our past and with his a udience,” he said. “It is so right for Mr. Tayl or’s work to be admired, held up for praise and displayed here in our National Art Gallery,” he said. Prime Minister Ingra ham also commended theg allery’s board, directors and staff for their efforts to preserve t he rich artistic heritage of The Bahamas. Mr Taylor has been a n artist for more than 40 years working in Nassau and the United States. Much of his work includes images of black Bahamian women. T HE Bahamas Government and the Principality of Monaco h as concluded negotiations for a Tax Information Exchange A greement (TIEA State Minister for Finance Z hivargo Laing and Ambas s ador of the Principality of Monaco His Excellency GillesN oghs signed the agreement at the Ministry of Finance on F riday. Mr Laing said both countries h ave also agreed to continue dialogue towards further coop e ration in the tax area by nego tiating a Double Taxation Agreement. “The Bahamas and Monaco share much in common,” he s aid. “Both are small nations with the major portion of eco n omic activities concentrated in the hospitality and financial s ervices industries.” Mr Laing added: “We look forward to a productive and cooperative relationship with the Principality of Monaco as o ur nations strive to adjust to the changing global financial a nd economic landscape and the emerging rules that are b eing developed to accommodate it.” He said the Bahamas-Monaco TIEA is the first of many s imilar agreements the Government expects to sign in the w eeks ahead, having made substantial progress in negotiations w ith a number of Organisation for Economic Cooperation andD evelopment (OECD 2 0 countries. “These negotiations are part o f the effort made by the Government of the Bahamas to m eet its commitment to implement the standards for trans p arency and information exchange in tax matters that w ere developed by the OECD,” Mr Laing said. Mr Laing said the United Nations also adopted the standards and are supported by the d eclarations of the G-20 Group of Nations. The Government is confi dent that this agreement with M onaco and other pending agreements will allow The Bahamas to meet its commitment within the near future,” he said. The TIEA signed with M onaco is the second the Bahamas Government has con c luded, the first being with the United States on January 24, 2 002. Ambassador Noghs said this is only the beginning of cooperation between the two countries and within the coming months a larger agreement b etween Monaco and the Bahamas will be signed. M r Noghes and Financial Secretary Ehurd Cunningham a lso signed an agreement on administrative arrangements for the implementation of the TIEA. The OECD created the Agreement on Exchange of Information on Tax Matters to address harmful tax practices. A 2008 OECD report titled, “Harmful Tax Competition: An E merging Global Issue,” iden tified “the lack of effective exchange of information” as one of the key criteria in determining harmful tax practices. It mandated a working group to develop a legal instrument that could be used to establish effective exchange of information. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A3-semester program of study designed to produce Licensed Practical Nurses with the technical knowledge and practical skills required to assist the Registered Nurse or Physician in providing safe and competent nursing care to clients in a variety of healthcare settings ALicensed Practical Nurse (LPN is a nursing professional who is trained to perform a wide variety of tasks under the supervision of a Registered Nurse (RN In The Bahamas, the LPN is known as the Trained Clinical Nurse (TCN LPNs work in a variety of healthcare settings such as hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, residential care facilities, schools, laboratories, birthing centers and insurance companies.Entry Requirement: High school graduate with 2.5. GPA Current Health Certificate Program Length: 12 months (3 semesters Total Credits Required: 45 Students will be trained to practice within The Bahamas and to write the NCLEX-PN exam for minimum U.S. certification College-level courses transferable to degree programs Affordable fees, payment plan available Convenient evening class times, ideal for working peopleRegister today! Space is limited!! Contact us at 242-394-8570a Certificate Course forLicensed Practical Nurse Government ‘fully committed’ to the countrs artistic and cultural heritage Bahamas signs tax information deal with Monaco H UBERT INGRAHAM PM speaks at opening of National Art Gallery exhibition B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT – Community activist T roy Garvey and a small number of protesters demonstrated on Friday at the Power Company’s customer service office in the Grand Bahama Port A uthority Building. Motorists honked their car horns in support of the protesters who picketed for an hour along Pioneer’s Way. S everal senior police officers were p resent at the demonstration, which started around 8.30am. Last Friday, police were called in to stop an illegal protest because Mr Garv ey did not have a permit to demonstrate. Mr Garvey said consumers are fed up and frustrated with the Grand B ahama Power Company over the h igh cost of electricity on the island. Concerns have also been raised over the frequent power outages, weekend d isconnections, and the high deposits required by residential consumers. Grand Bahama Power is the sole supp lier of electricity on the island. Marubeni/Taqa of Japan owns 50 per cent of the company, and ICDU, which is a public traded company on BISX, owns the other 50 per cent. E MERA of Canada owns 50 per cent of ICDU, 40 per cent are public shares, and Marubeni owns the other 10 per cent. Investors Mr Garvey claims the new investors of the Power Company have not been “good investors” for Grand Bahama. We want them out of Grand Bahama and we are calling on the Prime Minister to please remove them because they are not good for this country. “We want ‘investor friendly’ investors here,” he said. He claimed that Grand Bahamians were being oppressed. P rotester Edgar Roberts said government needs to regulate the Power Company. He complained that the cost of getting power is “ridiculously” high. “I called the Power Company a few days ago and asked what it would cost t o get power and I was told it would cost $500 – that is just ridiculous. “We need some sort of regulation at the power company because they just arbitrarily change the surcharge fees whenever they want to,” said Mr Roberts. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and Grand Bahama Port Authority president Ian Rolle have also e xpressed concerns about the GBPC. During a recent visit to Grand Bahama, Mr Ingraham said he was disappointed with the new Japanese company. He said he is concerned that the company has not “reinvested adequate sums of money into its generation and distribution system, and has over the y ears taken its profits out in cash rather than reinvesting it in its operation.” The Tribune contacted the Grand Bahama Power Company, but officials did not want to comment. Demonstration outside GB Power TROY GARVEY and protesters are seen demonstrating outside Grand Bahama Power Company's customer service office, located in the Grand Bahama Port Authority building.

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By Betty Vedrine Bahamas InformationS ervices OVER 100 district superintendents, teachers and senior o fficers participated in a prep aredness workshop for the Influenza A (H1N1 the Paul Farquharson Conference Room at Police Head-q uarters on East Street on Friday. Entitled, “Preparedness Workshop for Eventuality of 2 nd Wave of Influenza A H1N1 Virus,” the workshop objectives include providing educators with the characteristics on Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1p roviding technical support, reviewing the Ministry of Educ ation Integrated Plan and presenting implementation strategies of the Ministry’s Integrated Plan. T he workshop covered several key areas such as Prevention, Preparedness, Response and Recovery (PPRR Education Minister Carl W B ethel said the workshop was critical. Mr Bethel said, “We have gathered to put our minds, hearts and heads together to e nsure the health and safety of our most precious asset, the children of the nation.” He explained that government has charged the Ministrieso f Health Education with the development of a national H1N1 Pandemic Influenza Preparedness and Response Plan. As a result of this mandate, we have partnered with the Ministry of Health, and are now seeking to bring all stakehold-e rs together in this proactive approach.” Mr Bethel said while the aim is not to instil panic and fear, stakeholders should not wait f or a second wave of the virus before taking action. “Out of today’s session, we hope to gain more enlightenm ent from the health care professionals about the virus and provide feedback on the Ministry of Education’s Proposed Pandemic Response Plan,” hes aid. Permanent Secretary at the Ministry of Education, Elma Garraway highlighted the Mini stry’s objectives and the objective of the workshop. “This workshop will provide the opportunity for all personsl iving in The Bahamas, to obtain knowledge, skills, values and attitudes required for a successful life and work in a d emocratic country guided by Christian principles,” said Mrs Garraway. Presentations were also made by Health MinisterD r Hubert Minnis; Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Health, Camille Johnson; Chief Medical Officer, Dr Merceline D ahl-Regis, Pan American Health Organisation/World Health Organisation (PAHO/WHOt ive, Dr Merle Lewis and Deputy Director in the Ministry of Education, Patricia Collins. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Sporty meets sophistication.It all starts the moment you set eyes on the new Mercedes-Benz CLC Sports Coup. Expressive styling and visible dynamism appeal to the heart, the mind and the eye in equal measure. Its distinctive wedge shaped design exudes energy and the desire to be on the move at all times. Its agile sportiness coupled with a high standard of comfort makes this Sports Coup heads and shoulders above the rest. Anyone opting for a CLC buys far more than just a car. You own engineering excellence. Come into Tyreflex Star Motors and test drive a MercedesBenz CLC-Class today.OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT IS FULLY STOCKED WITH EVERY COMPONENT NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT YOUR MERCEDES RUNS TROUBLE FREE. TRAINED TECHNICIANS ON DUTY.TYREFLEX STAR MOTORSCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz CLC-Class at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667 By Betty Vedrine B ahamas Information Services HIS Excellency Zdenek Rozhold, Ambassador of the Slovak Republic, presented his Letters of Commission to Governor General Arthur D Hanna at Government House on Thursday. I am pleased to accept your letters of credence accrediting you as Ambassador extraordi-n ary and plenipotentiary of the Slovak Republic to The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and t he letters of recall of your predecessor, His Excellency Dr Ivo Hlavacek,” the Governor General said. Ambassador Rozhold conveyed the “personal greetings” of the President of the Slovak Republic His Excellency Ivan Gasparovict o the Governor General, the Government and people of the Bahamas. H e said that all over the world the Bahamas is known not only for the thousands of unspoiled b eautiful islands, but also for decades of good governance, a stable and reliable legal system a nd strong economic development, which have created a prosperous and equitable population. “While we are aware of the immense geographical distance that separates our two coun tries,” said Mr Rozhold, “we are confident that t his is not an insurmountable hindrance for the effectiveness of our bilateral relationship, includ-i ng mutual support within international organisations as well as economic and cultural coopera tion.” The Governor General said that distance should not be a barrier to the development of mutually beneficial relations. “In the context of multiculturalism, we have a lready proven this,” he said. “We have given each other, for example, support in internationa l fora such as the United Nations, and by the Schengen Visa Waiver agreement signed May, 2009, with the European community, of which your country is a member since 2004.” He said the Bahamas looks forward to similar fruitful” results from collaboration in and negotiation of other priority areas, including the Eco-n omic Partnership Agreement, which The Bahamas signed in conjunction with the C aribbean Community (CARICOM ber 2008, and the second five-year revision of t he Cotonou Agreement to be concluded in Feb ruary 2010. “I must also add the sustainable development of Small Island Developing States and the deepening of the partnership with our hemisphere through the organisation of Americ an States,” the Governor General said. The Slovak Ambassador pledged to devote a ll of his energy and efforts to “further strengthening the warm relations” that exist between the t wo countries. The Governor General also applauded the international contribution that the Slovak Republic has made through mem bership and leadership in international bodies such as the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation, the International Court of Justice and the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe. Ambassador of The Slovak Republic presents Letters of Commission Workshop prepares educators for Influenza A (H1N1 BIS PHOTO: Peter Ramsay HIS EXCELLENCY Zdenek Rozhold, Ambassador of the Slovak Republic (left ernor General Arthur Hanna a gift after presenting his Letters of Commission, Thursday, September 17, at Government House.

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ONE hundred and eighteen retired public servants were honoured for their many years of service in the Public Service at Government House, Wednesday, September 16. The event coincides with the 10th annual Public Service Recognition and Retirement Week, which started September 14 under the theme, “The Public Service – Striving for Excellence in Customer Service.” “It is a singular pleasure for me to congratulate the public officers gathered here today who have given, in many instances, more than half their lives in service to the people of The Bahamas,” said Governor General Arthur D Hanna. The retirees represented a cross-section of disciplines in the public service. The Governor General said each retiree has been instrumental in putting down the foundation upon which young, aspiring public officers can build. “There are those of you who would have pioneered various techniques, processes or systems in the public service,” he said. “So from that perspective alone, you would have con tributed to the development, progress and prosperity of our nation.” The Governor-General, Minister of State for the Public Ser vice Zhivargo Laing, and Secretary to the Cabinet, Anita Bernard presented the retirees with plaques. A reception followed on the patio of Government House. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 118 retirees are recognised at Public Service Awards ceremony MINISTER OF FOR FINANCE , Zhivargo Laing (at lectern remarks at Bahamas Communications and Public Officers Retirees Association 2nd Awards Banquet at Government House, on Friday, September 18, 2009. BAHAMAS COMMUNICATIONS and Public Officers Retirees Association 2nd Awards Banquet at Government House, on Friday, September 18, 2009. Picture shows Retirees and others in attendance. B I S P h o t o s / R a y m o n d A . B e t h e l

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By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net DANNY de Cardenas surprised himself when he repeated as champion of the B ahamas Optimist National C hampionships yesterday. de Cardenas, 14, completed the two-day championships in Montagu Bay by accumu l ating a total of 15 points, but ended up with a net of 10 after he dropped his worse race score of 5 points. Competing out of the red g roup for competitors 13-15 years old, the St Andrew’s ninth grader said he felt he went out and competed very w ell in the seven races con tested. “I just tried to stay focussed and got some good startsb ecause I knew that the comp etition was going to be a lot stiffer than it was last year,” said de Cardenas, the Royal Nassau Sailing Club member who also plays baseball and soccer. “There was a lot of people w ho caught up to me on the last day. But I think I got off to a good start on the first day and I was able to hold ontom y lead.” Spencer Cartwright, one of those competitors who made a gallant effort to come back to t ry and dethrone de Carde n as, had one major problem that destroyed his chance of winning. The Bahamas Sailing Association member, who compet-e d out of the white fleet for c ompetitors 7-10, didn’t start the third race, which didn’t allow him to gain any points. H e had to settle for second with a net total of 13 points. “It was good. I sailed very w ell,” said the nine-year-old fifth grader at Queen’s College. “But I was really surprised that I was right up there with Danny. I really wanted t o beat him.” Finishing in third was Bruce Hall of the Royal Nassau Sailing Club with his net total of1 7 points. Jeremy Pleydell-Bouverie, the first Family Island com petitor, was fourth with a net of 32. He represented theM an-O-War Sailing Club and he competed in the Blue Fleet for ages 11-12. His mother, Ann PleydellB ouverie, said they were not just proud of her son, but the e ntire eight-member team that represented Abaco. “I think they all went out there and they performed e xceptionally well,” she said of their contingent that includ ed four competitors from Guana Cay. “I think they are learning h ow to get along with the other competitors and I think that has helped them tremendously in their performances.” Rounding out the top five was twin brother DeVaughn Williamson with a net of 32.0. By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net W ith the track and f ield season just about over, two veteran Bahamian sprinters continue to perform well in the first of two final events in eastern Asia. Yesterday at the 2009 Shanghai Grand Prix in China, Debbie Fer-g uson-McKenzie and Chandra Sturr up produced third place finishes in their signature events. In the women’s 200m, FergusonMcKenzie came through in a photo finish with Cydonie Mothersill of t he Cayman Islands in 22.45 seconds. However, Mothersill was awarded second place as she turned in a season’s best time, while FergusonMcKenzie had to settle for third. The race was won by American Allyson Felix in 22.37. Felix was the gold medallist in the 1 2th IAAF World Championships in Athletics in Berlin, Germany, last month. She also took the victory in the IAAF/VTB Bank World Ath-l etics Final in Thessaloniki, Greece, last week. Ferguson-McKenzie, 33, was the b ronze medallist in the 200 in Berlin and she got fourth in the 200 and s ixth in the 100. Meanwhile, Sturrup’s third place c ame in the women’s 100. She clocked 11.03 in the straight away race. American Carmelita Jeter took t he victory in the world’s leading time, surpassing her previous bestm ark of 10.67 and she also erased the stadium mark of 10.79 that was set by China’s Li Xuemei in 1997. Jeter was the bronze medallist in Berlin. Veronica Campbell-Brown, the silver medallist in the 200 in Berlin, h ad a season’s best of 10.89 for second place. Sturrup, 36, was fourth in Thessaloniki. T he duo were the only two Bahamians competing in the meet that saw American Tyson Gayb ounce back to turn the tables on Jamaican Asafa Powell in a stadiu m and national record of 9.69 in the men’s 100. Powell did 9.85, fol-l owed by American Darvis Patton in a personal best of 9.89. The men’s 400 was won by American Olympic and world champion L aShawn Merritt in 45.28. They are now heading to Japan t o compete in the Super Track and Field Meet in Kawasaki 2009 on Wednesday. C M Y K C M Y K MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 12 P AGE 15 Money raised for junior sailing programme... TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM DEBBIE FERGUSON-McKENZIE (left Grand Prix in China. Also shown is Allyson Felix, of the US, who won the race with the time of 22.37. Ferguson finished in third place... ( AP Photo: Eugene Hoshiko) Debbie, Chandra finish third in Shanghai de Cardenas repeats as champion S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 4 4 DE CARDENAS in action... Photo by Felip Major/ T ribune staff Wildcats, Dorsey Park Boyz continue impressive run... S ee page 14

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Wildcats, Dorsey Park Boyz continue impressive run By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net BOTH the pennant winning Pineapple Air Wildcats and the Heavy Lift Dorsey Park Boyz continued their impressive run through the New Providence Softball Association on Saturday night, but in different fashion. The Wildcats wasted very little time in stopping the defending champions Sigma Brackettes in five innings in the opening game at the Banker's Field at the Baillou Hill Sporting Complex to improve their record to 20-1. The Dorsey Park Boyz also improved to 20-1, but they didn't get to sweat at all after theirm uch anticipated rematch with the defending championsC ommando Security Truckers l ive on national television neve r happened. T he Truckers only had sev e n players, including two c oaches in uniform to play. As a result, Heavy Lift was awarde d the victory by forfeiture as t hey won the head-to-head e ncounter with a 2-1 advantage. B obby Saunders, one of the c oaches for the Truckers, said it was a tough loss, but they a re dealing with an internal m atter that he wished not to further discuss. A pparently, the NPSA had suspended Truckers' infielder M artin Burrows Jr and Dorsey P ark Boyz' infielder Dwayne Pratt for an off-the-field altercation that involved a fight between their family members on Thursday night. The Truckers felt that it wasn't a justifiable move by the association and so they refused to accept the decision. To top it off, the Truckers would have had to play without veteran Stephen 'Slugger' Brown, who was suspended for the remaind er of the year from the New Providence Oldtimers Softball A ssociation for an incident i nvolving a game official. The suspension is expected to be carried over into theN PSA. N PSA president Sidney 'Bobby Baylor' Fernander alsor efused to elaborate on the s uspensions, only to note that t hey were quite disappointed i n the Truckers refusal to play on Saturday night. " It's a big disappointment f or us seeing that people always want to see things goingt heir way," Fernander said. " But we will have to deal with t hat because we can't allow t hings like this to continue." Fernander was especially peeved because they had to turn away so many fans at the gate and they lost revenue by not having the live television g ame which many had anticipated as the regular season winds down and the playoffs get set to start. "We will meet on Sunday or Monday and look at all of the f acts and make a decision on e xactly what will happen," Fernander said. "This may affect t he rest of the regular season because we may not have top lay all of the games remaini ng. We might just decide to go right into the playoffs." Whatever decision is made, t he Dorsey Park Boyz are w aiting for the outcome. Ace pitcher Edney 'the H eat' Bethel, who has been on a strike out streak, racking up a lmost 40 in their last two games and is close to accumulating a record 300-plus for the regular season, was not surprised at all that the Truckers didn't show up. " I heard the talk earlier in the day that they were not coming," Bethel said. "If they did decide to come, we would have been ready for them. W e're eager to play and we had everybody out here for the g ame. I just think it was bad f or the fans and the league that they didn't play." After clinching the pennant, B ethel said their season won't b e complete until they go on and be crowned the NPSAc hampions and represent the N PSA in the Bahamas Softb all Federation's National R ound Robin next month. Also looking ahead to the p layoffs with renewed vigor is t he Wildcats. After failing to make the f inal last year, the Wildcats h ave dominated the regular s eason and they boosted their c onfidence as they destroyed the Brackettes 10-1 in the opener. "Our team is playing excel lent," said ace pitcher Mary 'Cruise' Sweeting. "We wanted t o send a message to the Brackettes that we are ready for the playoffs and that one game they won, we gave them that. "Our team is well oiled. We h ave the pitching staff, we have t he hitters and we have players to go all the way and recapt ure the title. We are well balanced this year and that isb ecause we don't want to be w atching the championship again this year." Sweeting came up big once a gain, tossing a three-hitter w ith five strike outs to out-duel veteran Ernestine Stubbs on t he mound. Stubbs gave up 10 h its with a pair of strike outs f or the Brackettes. The Wildcats took control of the game from the top of the first inning when they exploded for five runs on as many hits, highlighted by Dor-n ette Edwards' two-run double, Marvell Miller's run-producing triple and Linda Knowles' RBI ground out. Sigma Brackettes scored t heir only run in the bottom of the frame when Vandette S mith got hit by a pitch from S weeting. After Zella Symonette singled, Smith eventually scored on an error. T he Wildcats went wild a gain in the third, sparked by a would-you-believe-it buntf rom Sweeting after Edwards o pened the frame with her seco nd hit of the game. With twoo ut, Candice Smith contributed a RBI single andV ernie Curry added a two-run s ingle. Pineapple Air went on to a dd their tenth and final run i n the fifth as Linda Knowles g ot all the way to second base o n a one-out error, advanced to third on a passed ball and caught a ride home on Jeanette Hilton's RBI single. The Brackettes, who blew a big scoring opportunity in the t hird, ran into a rare double play when young Ketrel Dorsette singled, but she was called out on the tap going to second by Natasha Sears, who then threw the ball to Linda K nowles at first to beat out b atter Vandette Smith. Brackettes' coach Burton S aunders argued the call, but to no avail. S weeting then struck out T heola Williams to end the game. "We didn't have it offens ively tonight, but it didn't reall y matter because this game doesn't mean anything to us," s aid Brackettes' catcher Cassie S mith. "We're not feeling any p ressure. We will be ready for the playoffs." And she too sent a message to the Pineapple Air. "The Wildcats are just a bunch of jokey girls," shes tressed. "We just want them to know that we will be ready for them, if we meet in the championship this year." C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM His other half, Donovan Williamson was ninth with a net of 51.0. It feels good, but I felt I could have done better,” said the 11-year-old DeVaughn Williamson, who competed out of the bluef leet. “A lot of the early races, I finished in t he top five, but in the last two I don’t know w hat happened.” The Aquinas College eighth grader said he will definitely be back to improve on his per f ormance. J ared Collison, a Canadian, won the White/Blue/Red Fleet combined with a net of 16 points. However, he was not eligible for the overall title as he was not a Bahamian by birth. A nd Donovan Knowles, competing for Long Island, won the Green Fleet with a net of 15.0. National sailing director Jimmy Knowles s aid the championship was another grand suc c ess, but he was disappointed that the 20-plus c ompetitors from Grand Bahama were not able to travel here. Along with New Providence and Abaco, c ompetitors also competed from Harbour I sland and Governor’s Harbour in Eleuthera and Long Island. de Cardenas repeats as champion

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By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THOMAS Bethel is one of the bright young golfers in the country today, having represented the Bahamas on a number of national teams. But on Saturday, he joined Larry Black and Hank Coleman in producing the best score of the Nassau Yacht Club teams. Their performances enabled the NYC to emerge as this year’s champions of the annual dual golf tournament between the Royal Nassau Sailing Club that took place at the Ocean Club Golf course. They won the title with a combined score of 268. We performed very well,” B ethel said. “I think each of t he players went out there and d id what they had to do. So it w as a very good team effort.” B ethel, however, said the g oal was to beat the Royal Nassau Sailing Club and they proudly achieved that feat, so they can have bragging rights until next year. The team of Phil Andrews, 11-year-old Spencer Andrews, Chris Birch and Zack Bonzac k had the best team score for the RNSC. “We did excellent,” said B onzack. “We were able to put it all together and bring it home for the Sailing Club. We had a very diverse team with an 11-year-old boy and a 70year-old. So it was good for u s.” In the individual categories, Bethel also won the men’s longest drive on hole number two, while Dilys Anderson took the ladies longest drive on hole number 13. In the closest to the pin, Victor Leniuk won on hole number three, Scott Saunders on hole eight, Terry McCabe on hole 12 and Phil Andrews on hole 14. T he tournament was a joint v enture between the Nassau Yacht Club and the Royal N assau Sailing Club as they assisted the Bahamas SailingA ssociation. A total of $4,270.00 was r aised for the junior sailing p rogramme. L arry Black, the tournam ent director, said they were quite pleased with the turnout of the tournament. He noted that the aim was to assist the Bahamas Sailing Association and he was pleased with what they achieved. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 15 NewExtendedBanking Hours Money Centre @ Robin HoodPersonal Loans Savings Accounts Mortgages Visa Cash Card Western Union Asue TM [ Accepts all banks Visa Cards ]Phone CardsProducts & Services Meet Our Team MonFri9:30am7:00pm Saturdays9:00am5:00pm P ictured form (Left to RightJason Ferguson, Operations Manager Shameca Knowles, Personal Banking Ofcer Michelle Bethel, Branch Manager Clarice Gibson, Operations Representative Julie Nixon, Ambassador & Customer Service Representative TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM More than $4,200 raised for junior sailing programme L ARRY BLACK , tournament director, presents a cheque to a Bahamas Sailing Association representative... Photo by Felip Major/Tribune staff

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Government has only extended the work permit of Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA Babak until year-end, sources have confirmed to Tribune Business, a tactic they say is designed to push the warring Hayward and St George fac tions towards settlement of the almost three-year-old ownership dispute. Multiple sources have confirmed to this newspaper that Mr Babak’s work permit renewal, the subject of much controversy and opposition from the late Edward St George’s estate, was granted until year-end, as the Gov ernment mounts a final push to create the circumstances in which the GBPA owners can reach a settlement. It is understood that Mr Babak’s work permit is unlikely to further be extended by the Government and the Immigration Department, with sources informing Tribune Business that both Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and his government, plus the GBPA’s key business partner, Hutchison Whampoa, were reluctant to deal with the Austrian chairman for their own separate reasons. One source, familiar with recent developments, described Mr Babak as “epitomizing the divisions” between the Hayward family, in the shape of the Sir Jack Hayward Family Trust, and the late Edward St George’s estate. The latter has been res olutely opposed to Mr Babak’s chairmanship almost from day one, while he has received strong backing from the Hayward camp, especially Sir Jack. Yet other members of the Hayward family appear to have cooled in their backing for Mr Babak, with Sir Jack’s son, Rick, telling this newspaper some months ago that he and other family members had settled their dif ferences with the St Georges and all were aligned against the GBPA chairman. It thus appears that the Government’s decision on Mr Babak’s work permit renewal may have been designed, at least in part, to create pres sure for a severance of the ties between himself and Sir Jack in a push for settlement by Christmas 2009. Tribune Business can also C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.25 $4.14 $4.26 b b f f f f &&& b nrfr n n b b t t r!", (!',&'(!!!%" ,"(" "%' "*!%&!'(%-&,& ,"('" *'%& &'%#!&&#""'!! "(%'&,"( t By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A $16 million Bahamian telecoms start-up i s “conservatively” p rojecting that it will attract 5,000 subscribers to its ‘multiple-play’ product during its first operational year, and is aiming to launch its service by the 2009 fourth quarter/early 2010. Edison Sumner, IP Solutions International’s president and chief executive, told Tribune Business that the company’s ‘go live’ date depended on how successful the initial $16 million capital raising was, but it was “very confident” it could raise the full amount by the time its private placement closed. I P Solutions International is aim ing to raise $8 million in equity capital from Bahamian investors, targeted institutions and high net-worth individuals, with the balance coming from a $4 million preference s hare issue and $4 million in bank debt financing. Out of the $16 million target, Mr Sumner said “just over $10 million” would be used to finance IP Solutions International’s initial capital s pending needs. That involves the construction of its wireless broadband infrastructure, including headend facilities and a Network Operations Centre that will serve not only the Bahamas but, eventually, the e ntire Caribbean and Latin America. “The Bahamas is really our first stop,” Mr Sumner told Tribune Business. “We intend to take the business $16m start-up targets 5,000 first-year clients By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor AML Foods, the BISX-listed retail group, is targeting Feb ruary/March 2010 for when it will make the first divi dend payment to shareholders in some seven-eight years, its president and chief execuAML Foods targets early 2010 dividend By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor PRICE controls are “working against the interests of consumers in the long-term”, especially lower and middle income class families, because they force retailers to raise prices higher than they might on some products to compensate for the losses the law requires them to absorb on breadbasket items. Gavin Watchorn, AML Foods’ president and chief executive, told Tribune Busi ness: “There’s a real misconception with what price control is really doing for the customer.” The retail executive, whose company owns the Solomon’s SuperCentre and Cost Right formats, explained: “The real ity, if you speak to any retailer, is that price control is working against consumers, because it eliminates gross profits and gross profit margins on 10 per cent, 15 per cent, 20 per cent of your sales base.” While the landed cost of goods and produce was effectively out of the control of Bahamian retailers, Mr Watchorn said AML Foods’ operating costs were effectively 25 per cent of sales – a level he described as “quite good” when it came to covPrice controls 'work against the interests of consumers' * ‘Multiple-play’ provider aims to expand into Caribbean and Latin America by second/third year of existence, with ‘just over $10m’ required for infrastructure build-out * Seeking to launch service to Bahamian customers by 2009 Q4/early 2010 * Looking beyond existing platform to data services, e-commerce, data services, disaster recovery and e-government * Letters of Intent signed with hotels, as gated communities another key target * BISX-listed retail group sees customer transaction c ount rise 15% year-to date despite recession, as half-year profits increase almost 10-fold to $2.2m * Company expects to repay b ank debt by first week in December, and will r eassign funds to p reference debt * But average customer s pend falls in August for Back-to-School S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 B B WATCHORN Port chair work permit renewed to year-end Move designed to push for GBPA ownership dispute settlement, as two sides said to be close to deal

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE National Insurance Board’s (NIBt ribution rate increase, when combined with the 50 per centi nsurable wage ceiling rise, will add $40,000 to one Bahamian company’s annual o perating costs and increase total payments to the social security scheme by almost 70 p er cent. A senior executive, who requested anonymity for hims elf and his business, which employs around 100 staff ranging from line staff to s upervisory/managerial level, t old Tribune Business that a fter crunching the numbers t o determine the impact of t he NIB changes, it was disc overed that the total employee contribution to NIB (the sum coming out of staff salaries) would increase by 40.83 per cent. Describing this as a per cent hit to the average e mployee’s take home pay”, t he executive added that the c ompany’s calculations s howed that its share of NIB contributions would increase by 28.98 per cent per annum. “For us, it’s another $40,000 a year on top of payroll costs, another $40,000 a year comi ng off the employer and employee earnings in the case of one company,” the senior executive told Tribune Busin ess. “There goes another two additional hires to fund the u nemployment benefit via the G overnment’s coffers. I supp ose in a way it’s a backh anded compliment that the G overnment thinks we’re so r obust and resilient that they think we can underwrite these benefits on their behalf. “But obviously operational expenses are going up by $40,000 alone, so prices will be increased to cover the i ncreased cost.” A part from increasing N IB’s contribution rate from 8 .8 per cent to 10.8 per cent to f inance the unemployment b enefit and National Prescription Drug Programme, the Government is also plan-n ing to raise the social security programme’s insurable wage ceiling from $400 to $600 per week in early 2010. T his, the business executive said, amounted to a “double increase” on managerial, supervisory and other high-s alaried employees. “Some p eople are going to be facing an increase in contributions direct to $5,000 or more fromt heir salaries,” he added. While the Government constantly touted that social security contribution ratesw ere much lower in the Bahamas than the likes of Barbados, which had a 17 per cent rate, the business executive told Tribune Business: “It w on’t be long before they have us up there and beyond t hem, especially if they introduce National Health Insurance. “I’m going to make sure the e mployees know it’s not the company taking the money from their pay cheque; it’s the G overnment. My employee’s take home p ay will drop, and in no u ncertain terms my employe es will know it’s the Gove rnment taking more of their money.” The Nassau Institute, the Bahamian economic thinktank, had previously used the real-life example of a company with three employees, to i llustrate that it faced an 84 p er cent increase in NIB cont ributions to over $10,000 per a nnum once the changes were i mplemented. R ick Lowe, a senior Nassau Institute official, told Tri bune Business this was “a h uge jump”, and said many businesses would either be forced to avoid paying NIB contributions or lay-off/noth ire workers. “Particularly when things are so tough, the last thing the Government should do isi ncrease taxes when the econo my is on the slide and so burdened that it pushes people over the edge,” Mr Lowe said. If people are hanging on by their fingertips, it may be the thing that causes them to push another employee outt he door. That’s the concern we all have.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Business faces $40k cost hike from NIB rise Says employer and employee contributions to rise by 40.83% and 28.98% respectively Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in theirn eighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a g ood cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM btrt tfr f r !%* '!$()))!*&*#tffn""bnff ! $ %#&!*&*# !%** By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor NASSAU MOTOR Company (NMCit expected to complete its new customer reception office within the next three weeks, having spent just over $500,000 to-date on as expansion designed to make it more efficient and "the place of choice" for Honda and General Motors-manufactured cars. Rick Lowe, the company's operations manager, told Tribune Business that it was "probably three weeks away" from opening its new customer service area, once the furniture was installed and the front door put on. He added that rather than k nocking down the current client reception area, and converting it into two additional service bays, Mr Lowe said Nassau Motor Company had decided to place its transmission room and staff lunch area in the existing structure. "We're moving them to where the existing reception office is," Mr Lowe said of the two facilities. "Instead of knocking it down and making two more bays, we will move them temporarily until w e decide whether we're g oing ahead with Phase III." H e added that Nassau Motor Company could also potentially leave the transmission room and lunch area there, rather than proceed with the initial plans, "killing two birds with one stone". With the firm having spent just over $500,000 to date on its expansion, and "a little more to go", Mr Lowe acknowledged that investing during a recession was always r isky. "It sure is," he added, "but you've got to remain hopeful things will turn around. Customers have to service vehicles, and hopefully we will be the place of choice for Honda, Chevrolet and Cadillac owners." He told Tribune Business that Nassau Motor Company had experienced no fall-off in demand for vehicle servicing as a result of the recession, the only recent decline having resulted from the company's expansion project, with customers placed on a threew eek as opposed to one-week w ait. "I think it will be a bit more convenient for our cust omers," Mr Lowe told Trib une Business of the new cust omer service centre. "Rather than having to traipse through cars running back and forth, there will be a nice area for them to sit in. It will be a little more convenient. "We're getting on with the paving, the levelling off of the ground. I think our customers will like it. When they come in, it will be more customer friendly." He added that Nassau M otor Company hoped to initiate a programme where clients in a hurry could have their vehicles serviced in a short period of time, "getting them in and out as fast as possible. It's something General Motors and Honda continually stress". As for the six bays with hydraulic lifts that Nassau Motor Company had installed some five months to go as part of the first phase expansion, Mr Lowe said: "They've been wonderful. It makes the technicians' lives a lot easier. They don't have to jack the c ar up by hand or put a jack s tand under each corner." Motor dealer eyes 3-week finish for reception area

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM reveal that discussions on a settlement between the Hayward and St George sides have been ongoing for severa l months in London. Some s ources have suggested that the two parties may be close to a deal, although the terms are presently unknown. This newspaper did reveal, though, that the St George estate rejected a previous Hayward Family Trust offer to give it a 37 per cent equity stake in Intercontinental Diversified Corporation (IDC for the GBPA and its Port G roup Ltd affiliate. T hat, though, was speedily rejected, given that the Bahamian Supreme Court had ruled that the ownership split between the two sides was 50/50, although this has been appealed. The Prime Minister is understood to want the GBPA ownership dispute resolved as rapidly as possible, and once and for all. He is thought to see it as an obstacle to his plans to revive Grand Bahama and its economy, a hot-bed of FNM support, especially given his focus on a new cruise port for the island and, possibly, liquefiedn atural gas (LNG The ownership dispute paralysed the GBPA at the worst possible time, giving the impression that Freeport and Grand Bahama were rudderless and badly damaging business and investor confidence when it was needed most in the aftermath of the Royal Oasis closure and, more recently, the global recession. It is unclear whether one or both of the families would retain GBPA ownership if a settlement was reached, or if an outside buyer would take over. While Roddie Fleming has disappeared from the scene, Hutchison Whampoa is still potentially waiting in the wings, especially given the increasing Chinese interest in the Bahamas. The St George had objected to Mr Babak’s work permit renewal on the groundst hat his contract dispute, in which he had claimed $5 million and could expose the GBPA to a potential $75-$100 million liability, had not been resolved. In response, the GBPA’s attorneys accused the St George estate of committing “an improper abuse” by continuing to threaten the company over issues such as the renewal of Mr Babak’s work permit. Port chair work permit renewed to year-end To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in cir culation, just call 502-2371 today! F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter c robards@tribunemedia.net T HE GOVERNMENT is spending a $0.9 million granton studies conducted by German firm Fitchner, which will look at increasing energy efficiency and security in the Bahamas through three pilot p rogrammes, an advisor to the M inistry of the Environment revealed. G lenn Laville, who is also a cting deputy general manager at the Water and Sewerage Corporation, said solar water heating systems, Photovoltaic p ower generating systems and an incandescent to fluorescent light bulb switch-out programme will all be studied d uring the 10-month grant period. Mr Laville, chairman of the National Energy Policy (NEPc ommittee, BEST Commiss ion head Philip Weech, and m ember of the renewable e nergy committee at BEC, Berlington Strachan, presented a report on their progress to members of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce and the general public last Thursday. According to Mr Weech, t he Bahamas spent $0.8 billion on petroleum products in 2008 as the price of oil perb arrel peaked at $147 midyear. This cost translated into h igher fuel surcharge charges for BEC consumers, and caused the disconnection ofs ome 6,000 homes by late last y ear. The minister in charge of BEC, Phenton Neymour, said the NEP is being used to create more energy security throughout the Bahamas, and to prevent such widespread service disconnections by c ushioning the impact of volatile oil prices should the market hit record highs again. BEC has constructed its own alternative energy division and issued a request for proposals for alternative energy providers. Mr Strachan said 13 firms have already been shortlisted. H e said various methods of a lternative energy production will be tested throughout New Providence, Abaco, Long Island and Eleuthera. S ome of the alternative e nergy sources proposed by firms who have looked at the Bahamas' potential have been waste to energy, solar, wind, s olar/wind hybrids, and wave e nergy. T he Bahamas’ national energy demand has increased by an average of 8 per cent per annum, and is expected to continue to rise. "Renewable and locally produced energy is also e xpected to improve, increasi ng the long-term economic i mpact of the national energy bill as the cost of energy increases over time," the report said. " Investing in these energy options is expected to create new employment opportuni ties and increase the portion of the national energy bill that i s multiplied locally." The report suggests that 90 per cent of the energy consumed in the Bahamas is prod uced through the burning of fossil fuels. Even as these fos sil fuel consumption numbers continue, the Government continues its investment in and construction of fuel oilburning power generators. T he newest plant is being built in Wilson City, Abaco, but construction was recently halted to give BEC time to obtain the necessary permits. One downtown business person, which wished not to go on record, said the studies government is doing are a waste of time. " They have been proven to w ork in other countries. Why must government waste time and money on that," said the business person. "It's worki ng in Germany, right, and we h ave the same sun." $0.9m spend on three alternate energy studies Share your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y.

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tive has confirmed, with the group’s customer transaction count defying the recession by running some 15 per cent ahead of 2008 year-to-date. Speaking to this newspaper after unveiling a dramatic increase in fiscal 2010 second quarter profits, which rose from just $162,000 last year to $1.18 million for the three months to July 31, 2009, Gavin Watchorn said that despite generating a “full $4 million profit on a rolling basis for the last 12 months” and generating a “tremendous improvement”, AML Foods was “still not where we want to be on the bottom line”. And even though net profits for the fiscal 2010 were more than nine times last year’s comparative, standing at $2.2 million compared to $244,000, Mr Watchorn said the BISX-listed group felt there was “room for improvement on shrinkage” and opportunities for sales growth that had not been exploited. “We feel there is further room for growth for us,” the AML Foods president and chief executive told Tribune Business, signifying how far the company – in its previous incarnation as Abaco Markets has come from the dark days of fiscal 2003, when it recorded a $25.2 million net loss. “For the year-to-date, our customer transaction count is up 15 per cent pretty much across the board,” Mr Watchorn told Tribune Business. “Having more people coming into the store tells you you’re doing something right. That’s behind the increase in profitability – more people are coming into the stores, sales are up and we’re holding our fixed costs flat. “We’re offering quality brands at good prices and customers are seeing value, although things are obviously tight in the economy. There’s a lot of noise in the marketplace. What the Solomon’s [SuperCentre] and Cost-Right brands, as well as the Domino’s Pizza brand, offer is quality with value and quality with savings, offering real value.” Mr Watchorn told Tribune Business that AML Foods expected to have completely repaid its debt to Royal Bank of Canada (RBC week in December 2009, with “just over” $200,000 outstanding, some $1.5 million having already been repaid this year. As at July 31, 2009, some $1.36 million had been repaid to RBC, some $850,000 of that coming in the second quarter. “We’re going to bump the C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B S S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e

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monthly repayments on the bank debt with the preference share redemption fund,” Mr Watchorn told Tribune Business, explaining that the money AML Foods had previously been setting aside to repay RBC would now be allocated to meeting payments to the company’s preference share investors. This meant that some $75,000 previously allocated to repaying RBC per month would be combined with $87,000 set aside for the preference share investors, Mr Watchorn telling Tribune Business: “We’ve put the $165,000 in a preference share redemption fund. We had $1.2 million ring-fenced in fixed deposits at the end of July. Our expectation is that we will have $1.8 million by the end of January.” The first redemption to AML Foods’ preference shareholders is due in March 2 010, although Tribune Busin ess understands that they a nd the company are in discussions to possibly extend the debt’s maturity and roll it over. This, if it happens, would allow the company to finance its anchor food store, planned for western New Providence’s new Town Centre, with no debt. Mr Watchorn declined to comment. He added, though, that AML Foods was working w ith a California-based designer on the new store, and hoped to have its plans ready by year-end, with tenders put out for the store’s equipment, plumbing and refrigeration. The company hoped to take possession of the building from the devel oper by August 2010, and open the store to the public by April 2011. Meanwhile, AML Foods’ liquidity position has also continued to improve, rising by $937,000 during the fiscal 2010 first half to reach a net cash position of $648,000 inclusive of the $1.2 million set asideto repay the preference shareholders. Mr Watchorn, though, added that there were signs the recession was taking an increasingly heavy toll on Bahamian consumers and their disposable incomes, with the overall customer market shrinking and average per capita spend dropping during the Back-to-School period – the second most-importantsales period for most retail ers behind Christmas. While AML Foods had done “fairly well” during this period, Mr Watchorn told Tri bune Business: “For the month of August, sales were not as high as seen for the first six months of the year, but net profits were along the same trend in terms of being higher for the year. “We’ve seen a change in customer spending habits, which indicates less money out there.. We’re not losing market share, the market itself is just shrinking a bit. That’s our expectation for Christmas. “Sales for Back-to-School were up just slightly, but not at the level seen for this year. We’ve seen a 15 per cent customer transaction rise, but the average spend dropped for August.” In addition, Mr Watchorn said AML Foods and other Bahamian grocery retailers did not ‘benefit’ from the temporary spike seen in August last year when consumers stocked up in preparation for a possible hurricane strike. The AML Foods president s aid costright.com, the comp any’s planned e-commerce w ebsite, would be “made bigger than originally intended. We hope to do live testing by the end of the following week for a public launch some time at the end of October”. He added: “We’ve had a lot of interest from Family Island households and businesses. They’re seeing the website as a way to shop in Nassau without the cost of transportation to Nassau. Other than that, we’re gearing up for Christmas. We’re just focused on having a great Christmas season and getting ready for that. I think that, while we expect softening of our sales, we expect we will continue to be profitable, beat last year’s numbers and end up with quite a good year once January comes around. “We think that will allow us to negotiate some kind of dividend payment in February/March next year. I think the rest of the year will allow us to do that. The dividend payment will be based on the fourth quarter numbers, which come in during February. The dividend will be paid in March, with the declaration in February.” Mr Watchorn said of the dividend: “That’s what we’re gearing towards. We feel it’s achievable. I think the rest of the year will be challenging, not just for us but a lot of Bahamian businesses. But we feel confident that if we keep d oing what we’ve been doing f or the last 12-18 months we’ll b e fine.” For the quarter to July 31, 2009, AML Foods’ rising profitability was driven by its increased sales and customer transaction volume, with gross margin dollars rising by 20 per cent for the period and by 17 per cent year-to-date. The second quarter saw AML Foods’ shrinkage fall by 20 per cent in dollar terms, and by 29 per cent as a perc entage of sales, compared to the 2008 year ago period. For the fiscal 2010 first half, shrink as a percentage of sales dropped by 17 per cent. “For the first time in a while, we’ve been able to record a sizeable decrease in shrinkage in both percentage of sales and dollar terms,” Mr Watchorn said. “We’re pleased with what happened with shrinkage. We’ve put a lot of effort into shrinkage, and have six people employed in our Loss Prevention Department. “But it’s still well above acceptable standards for us, and we’re going to focus on internal shrinkage.” He explained that this was not so much employee theft, as AML Foods was developing a reputation as a company where there were consequences for this, but areas such as receiving and file maintenance. For the fiscal 2010 second quarter, Solomon’s and Cost R ight combined generated a 1 4 per cent year-over-year s ales increase to $21.3 million. For the first-half, these two formats saw sales rise by 13.1 per cent to $41.5 million. In the case of Domino’s Pizza, second quarter sales were up 11 per cent to $2.8 million year-over-year, and ahead by 6.1 per cent at $5.3 million for the first half. AML Foods’ total sales stood at $24.1 million for the second quarter, an increase o f 13.6 per cent compared to 2008 figures, with first half sales up 12.3 per cent at $46.8 million. “We’re very happy,” said Mr Watchorn. “Given the increasingly challenged environment out there, and hearing from other businesses experiencing negative sales, we’re pleased we’re remaining positive and getting our fair share of the market right now. Once you increase sales and keep your fixed costs flat, that falls to your bottom line.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 7B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Legal NoticeNOTICEEASTERN WEALTH INVESTMENTS LTD.(In Voluntary Liquidation)Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the7th day of September 2009.TheLiquidator isArgosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas. ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator The National Insurance Board The National Insurance Board The National Insurance Board The National Insurance Board The National Insurance Boardof the Commonwealth of The Bahamas The National Insurance Board (NIB bank deposits.To facilitate this, the NIB is requesting that vendors provide the necessary banking information. Forms will be distributed to vendors for completion. If you do not receive one, please contact us at one of the following to obtain a copy of the form: 1.APBankinginfo@nib-bahamas.com 2 .Telephone No.: (242 3.Collect a Form from any New Providence NIB Local Office The NIB requests the cooperation of all vendors as we seek to provide more efficient service. All information will be treated as strictly confidential. Notice to Vendors AML Foods targets early 2010 dividend

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM $5'$675$(67$7(6$'&216758&7,21 $16m start-up targets throughout the rest of the Caribbean. [When] depends on the success rate in the Bahamas initially, but we think we can move into the Caribbean in years two to three. “We’ve begun discussions with other Caribbean countries. We want to use the Bahamas as a showcase; to prove that we can outfit an entire country. Our primary goal is to get the Bahamas outfitted for wireless broadband from the local loop, but we will go as far as the fibre reaches. Wherever the fibre drop reaches is how far we can take our services.” As for the start of consumer services, Mr Sumner told Tribune Business: “That will be dependent on what the financing looks like at the end of the day. We are anticipating being able to launch services by the end of the fourth quarter of this year, and certainly by 2010 “We feel that in six months we will be able to wirelessly connect the entire country through a wireless delivery system, but everything is contingent on the points we have to go through before we deliver connectivity to the end users.” IP Solutions International is targeting Bahamian consumers with a ‘multiple play’ proposition of services delivered via a wireless Internet infrastructure. Among the product offering will be news, entertainment, movies, TV and video-type games of a non-casino variety. Apart from Bahamian businesses and households, the key markets for IP Solutions International will also be the nation’s hotel industry and private gated communities. Confirming that the company had already signed Letters of Intent to provide its ser vices to a number of Bahamas-based hotels, Mr Sumner said its plans had elicited a “very, very good response from this industry. “Even before we got to this stage, we got Letters of Intent from a number of hotels around the country,” he told Tribune Business. “They have been extremely interested in the products and services. We are reconfiguring their hotels with upgraded technology, new products and services. “They’re all keenly interested in what we’re doing, especially those hotels in the Family Islands that do not currently get these services. We’re very satisfied with our efforts and the response we’ve gotten from the hotels as well as gated communities. We’re talking to gated communities in New Providence and the Family Islands, and they’re very excited. I think that’s going to represent a large part of our business.” Mr Sumner added that IP Solutions International was looking to broaden its product offering beyond the ‘multiple play’ core. He explained: “We’re going to bring in other services – data services, disaster recovery management services. We’re going to be dealing with those as well. We’re going to convert the Government’s e-business platform, putting the Government on one platform. We’re also going to be dealing with e-commerce and long-distance learning.” Mr Sumner based his confidence in IP Solutions International’s ability to raise the necessary financing on the reaction to its proposal during an investor presentation last Thursday night. With more than 100 representatives of potential institutional investors and high net-worth individuals present, Mr Sumner said: “We were very pleased with the turnout. The people who came were receptive to the company, the technology and the prospects that lie ahead for this invest ment. A lot of those there gave commitments to become investors in the company. We had a tremendous turnout, and are very pleased with it.” IP Solutions International’s $16 million private placement formally launches today, and is due to close on October 30, 2009. “That gives us a chance to get everyone on board with us, to complete the regulatory work and the work necessary to deliver the service,” Mr Sumner said. When asked how confident the company was that it would raise the necessary start-up financing, especially given that the Bahamian and world economies were mired in recession, Mr Sumner replied: “I would say that we’re extremely confident that we’re going to raise what we’re looking for, based on the interest we’ve already got, the commitments we’ve gotten from people who attended the investor presentation night. “Based on all the indications we’ve gotten, I’m very confident we’re going to be successful in this capital raising.” IP Solutions International has already moved to give itself instant credibility among investors, having appointed a Board chaired by former governor-general, Sir Orville Turnquest, which also features realtor Virginia Damianos. The company’s full-scale launch, which has been on the cards for more than a year, is possibly the first positive proof that the seeds of electronic communications sector liberalization in the Bahamas could bear a ripe fruit. Mr Sumner confirmed to Tribune Business that the company had submitted its first application to the newly-formed Utilities Regulatory and Competition Authority (URCA fer its initial licence over from former supervisor, the Public Utilities Commission (PUC IP Solutions International was now “putting in the balance of the substantive application” to URCA, having applied for both an individS S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e

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ual licence and a spectrum licence, in preparation for offering an ever-widening array of products. The delay in IP Solutions International’s formal launch is likely to actually benefit it, as its private placement offering will close some 16 days after Cable Bahamas’ 15-year exclusive monopoly on cableTV services. Thus will thus enable the start-up to potentially offer more services if it so wishes. “We have revised our projections again, based on the current economic situation, and feel we’ll get about 5,000 subscribers in a year’s time,”Mr Sumner told Tribune Business, adding that while the forecast was “conservative” and “scaled back”, IP Solutions International was confident it could beat them. “It is a tough time, which is why we’re taking a very conservative approach to it,”Mr Sumner told Tribune Business. “But we’re coming with a new company. This is a new service, and when you bring something to the market, there is likely to be a shift in the customer base, the service base.” Pointing out that IP Solutions was also looking to serve isolated Bahamian communities that had to date been bypassed by electronic communications services, Mr Sumner added: “Bahamians like new things, new services, and we think we’ve got the ability to attract people coming in. I think we’ve got the right business model, technology and product that the Bahamian public will be interested in and will want to be a part of it.” Mr Sumner said contracts for IP Solutions International’s video and TV content had already been signed with “major distributors from around the world”, the company having only decided to use content it was able to commercially and legally secure. IP Solutions International is currently scouting possible locations for its Network Operations Centre, and hosting and redundancy features will be supplied by its New York-based partner and supplier, GlobeCom. The latter will be supplying consultant engineers to help get the Bahamian company’s systems up and running. Mr Sumner said IP Solutions International was seeking to get its head office “set up in the next month or so”, staffed by a full-time staff of 10 that will expand as the company grows over the next five years. Among the initial employees will be managers, administrators and technical staff, although the company will be able to lean on GlobeCom for the latter. Mr Sumner said IP Solutions International intended to “have employed as many Bahamians as we can”, and trained in all aspects of the business, especially once the sales and marketing effort kicks-in. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 9B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 5,000 first-year clients To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today! Price controls 'work against the interests of consumers' ering payroll, administrative costs and electricity. Yet, as an example, he said that for 20 per cent of a company’s sales, they were only allowed by price controls to impose an average 14 per cent retail margin, meaning that there was effectively a negative 11 per cent gross operating marginal loss – the difference between operating costs and the margin permitted by price controls. Explaining the implications of this, Mr Watchorn told Tribune Business: “You’re losing money on 20 per cent of your sales volume. The pricing of other items has to compensate for it. “It’s pricing a lot of items out of the reach of lower and middle income families, and working against the interests of consumers in the long-term. You’re forced to offset it [the impact of price controls] against other items, and in the Bahamas you know operating costs are higher than regional counterparts.” As an example, Mr Watchorn said it was i mpossible for any Bahamian retailer to make a profit from selling eggs, as price controls only allowed them to charge consumers a 9 per cent mark-up. “You can never make a profit out of eggs,” he added. Apart from retailers, he added that Bahamian wholesalers were also feeling the effects of price controls, as they were only allowed a 13p er cent margin/mark-up on many breadbasket items. The current downward pressure on pricing, Mr Watchorn said, was resulting from an increase in competition in the Bahamian market over the past six to eight weeks. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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By RoyalFidelity Capital Markets LAST week, Bahamian investors traded in 11 out of t he 24 listed securities, of which four advanced, three declined and four remained unchanged. E E Q Q U U I I T T Y Y M M A A R R K K E E T T A total of 65,855 shares changed hands, representing ad ecrease of 111,756 shares, compared to the previous week's trading volume of 177,611 shares. I CD Utilities (ICD the volume leader trading 20,335 shares, although its stock price remainedu nchanged at $5.50. The Bahamas Property Fund (BPF advancers, its share price increasing by $0.85 on a volume of 1,925 shares to close t he week at $10.75. J. S. Johnson & Company (JSJ its share price falling by $0.11t o a new 52-week low of $9.98, on a volume of 3,253 shares. B B O O N N D D M M A A R R K K E E T T There were 19 Fidelity Bank (Bahamas notes traded in the Bahamianm arket last week, with a value of $19,000. C C O O M M P P A A N N Y Y N N E E W W S S Premier Commercial Real Estate Investment Corporat ion (PRE dited financial results for the quarter ending June 30, 2009. For the quarter, PRE r eported net income of about $169,000, compared to a loss of $381,000 during the same period last year, an improvem ent of $550,000. Total income of $374,000 was consistent with the prior period, but total expenses of$ 205,000 declined by $560,000 from the amount reported in the June 30, 2008, quarter end. Total assets and liabilities at June 30, 2009, were $17 million and $3.5 million respectively, with net asset v alue per share being $16.01 compared to $15.98 per share for the same quarter last year. D D i i v v i i d d e e n n d d N N o o t t e e s s Commonwealth Bank (CBLd end of $0.05 per share, p ayable on September 30, 2009, to all ordinary share holders of record date September 15, 2009. Doctor's Hospital H ealthcare Systems (DHS has declared a dividend of $0.02 per share, payable on September 30, 2009, to allo rdinary shareholders of record date September 17, 2009. Cable Bahamas (CAB has declared a dividend of $0.07 per share, payable on September 30, 2009, to allo rdinary shareholders of record date September 15, 2009. Consolidated Water BDRs has declared a dividend of $0.015 per share, payable on November 6, 2 009, to all ordinary shareholders of record date October 1, 2009. A A G G M M N N o o t t i i c c e e Premier Commercial Real Estate Investment Corpora-t ion (PRE a l general meeting on Thursday, September 24, 2009, at 11am at the company's registered office, Experta Trust Company (Bahamas C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 10B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 0LQLVWU\)LQDQFH5(HDOSURSHUW\WD[XUFKDUJH:DLYHURWLFH 7KHJHQHUDOSXEOLFLVKHUHDGYLVHGRIWKH SURYLVLRQVRIWKH5HDO3URSHUW\7D[$FWKH SULQFLSDO$FWLVDPHQGHGWKHLQVHUWLRQ LPPHGLDWHO\DIWHUVHFWLRQRIWKHIROORZLQJ QHZVHFWLRQ$DQGUHVSHFWIXOO\ $DLYHURIVXUFKDUJH 1RWZLWKVWDQGLQJVHFWLRQDQ\VXUFKDUJH ZKLFKKDVDFFXPXODWHGLQUHVSFFWRI DfRZQHURFFXSLHVSURSHUW\ZLWKDPDUNHW EfRZQHURFFXSLHGSURSHUW\ZKLFKH[FHHGV IW\WKRXVDQGGROODUV VKDOOEHZDLYHGLIWKHRXWVWDQGLQJUHDO VKDOOEHZDLYHGE\IW\ SHUFHQWLIWKHRXWVWDQGLQJUHDOSURSHUW\ 6HFWLRQ%HYLYDORIXUFKDUJH ,IDIWHU'HFHPEHUDQ\UHDOSURSHUW\ WD[UHPDLQVRXWVWDQGLQJLQUHVSHFWRI DfRZQHURFFXSLHGSURSHUW\ZLWKDPDUNHW EfRZQHURFFXSLHGSURSHUW\ZKLFKH[FHHGV IW\WKRXVDQG 7KHRZQHURIVXFKSURSHUW\VKDOOEHOLDEOHWR SD\DQHZVXUFKDUJHRI RIVXFKWD[WD[SHUDQQXP ROYAL FIDELITY MARKETWRAP To advertise, call 502-2371

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The Bahamas Financial Services Board has opened nominations for the 2009Financial Services Industry Excellence Awards. As in previous years, awardees will be chosen for (1 chief executive level; (2 fessional of the Year Any level of management or supervision (3 the Year Junior and support l evels and (4 v ices Development and Promotionawards. The deadline for nominations is October 2, 2009. BFSB’s chief executive and executive director, Wendy C. Warren, said: “The annualAwards Programme, now in itsninth year, recognises one of the most important assets of our financial services industry: ‘people power’.Without a doubt, capacity building – human resource development – is of critical significance to the ongoing success of the financial services sector.” This initiative was launched in 2001, in collaboration with the Professional Industry Association Working Group (PIAWG Financial Centre Focus (FCF outreach, designed to profile the industry. Specifically, this recognition programme profiles role models in the industry for their outstanding performance and contribution to the growth and development of the industry here in the Bahamas. ThePresentations Ceremony for the 2009 Financial Services Industry Excellence Awards has been scheduled for Thursday,October 22. Theeventwill be hosted again at the Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa, but will take o n a new format. Rather than a n Awards Banquet, the awards ceremony will occur as a separate event, followed by a Cocktail Reception immediately afterwards. Also set to be recognised at the Awards Ceremony will be the Financial Services Stu-dent of the Year. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 11B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM &20021:($/7+) ,17+((0(&2857 &RPPRQ/DZt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t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f 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI6HSWHPEHU 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV BFSB opens 2009 Award nominations Administrators for the 49lot Destini Lakes community have said they are experiencing relatively good sales given the economic climate, with potential buyers contacting their offices daily. Lorraine Hamilton and Lillian Roberts said the community, located on Lake Killarney off J. F. Kennedy Drive in western New Providence, is suited for business professionals as well as single families through potential family, duplex and four-plex structures. The standard lot size is 95 x 100, with each home featuring its own unique design, and individual prices ranging from $120,000 to $135,000. It is our hope that Destini L akes will be the number one c hoice for young professional families who are looking to start off in a nice area and raise their children. I think the location is perfect for raising a family. The new gated subdivision is located about five to 10 minutes from the airport and another five minutes from Cable Beach, and only 15 minutes from Down Town. So residents will certainly have easy access to e verything from New Providence,” said Ms. Hamilton. Ms Roberts said the company was attempting to make it easier for prospective homeowners by arranging inhouse financing through Bahamian financial institutions. Development aims to fulfil its Destini WENDY WARREN For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays

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INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT M ONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009 The stories behind the news By MEGAN REYNOLDS W hat sets the islands of the Bahamas apart from other tourist destina tions in the Caribbean is that in this splendid chain of islands, each has its own character. Abaco, the third largest and fastest-growing economy in the country, has so far retained its natural beauty by virtue of a somewhat independent economy sustained by a steady stream of boaters and sec ond homeowners who flee to Great Abaco and its chain of cays in search of somewhere to escape, unwind, and get away from it all. Even in a recession. But both Abaconians and second homeowners who find peace in Abaco’s pristine beaches, clear waters and expanse of creeks that lace Great Abaco’s coastline, fear the Abaco they know is slipping away, and that they have little power to prevent it. Abaco is at a point where further development is imminent, and there are groups who want to have a say in the direction it steers towards the future, but they feel their concerns are falling on deaf ears. They were insulted to learn about the development of a Bunker C fuel power plant in Wilson City in a public meeting on September 10, over a month after construction had already begun. The Bahamas Electricity Corpo ration (BEC not to inform the Abaco public ear lier, as nearly 1,000 concerned residents attended the meeting request ed by local conservationist group Friends of the Environment because of the high level of public concern. Not all who attended the meeting were against the project, but there were many who had questions they wanted to be answered. They knew the power plant was planned for Snake Cay, an environ mentally sensitive area on Great Abaco’s east coast, and opposition formed, as people feared the destructive impact it could have on the environment and the health of the community. Hence when government and BEC decided to plough ahead with the plans for a $105 million, 48 mw power plant burning Bunker C (HFO City an area intrinsically linked to the environmentally sensitive Snake Cay by a complex network of blue holes plans were kept quiet. BEC chairman Fred Gottlieb confirmed the project had been agreed by the Christie administration in 2005, and signed off by the Ingraham government in December 2007, but as plans moved forward, Abaco’s permanent and part-time residents were left in the dark. Dundas Town resident and moth er of two Leazona Bethel-Richard T T T T h h h h e e e e A A A A b b b b a a a a c c c c o o o o s s s s . . . . . . . . . . . . Another piece of paradise destined for destruction? DEVELOPMENT in the Abacos has raised local fears that the land both Abaconians and visitor s hold dear is doomed to become another big city destined f or destruction. Insight explores the problems and the progress Abaco is facing, and the alternatives... ELBOW CAY ABACO , the third largest and fastest-growing economy in the country, has so far retained its natural beauty by virtue of a somewhat independent economy sustained by a steady stream of boaters and second homeowners who flee to Great Abaco and its chain of cays in search of somewhere to escape, unwind, and get away from it all. Even in a recession... S S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e

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said: “I don’t think they even consulted people in Abaco who know the area, people who have lived here all their lives and who can offer some serious input; that’s what’s insulting.” Residents fear the Bunker C plant will pollute Abaco’s clean air, land and sea, and Mrs Bethel-Richard, and others, feel there was not sufficient exploration of alternative, renewable energy sources. Part-time resident and wind turbine designer David Pitcairn said figures presented at the meeting showing winds blowing southeast across Great Abaco at around seven mph were misleading, as his own Internet research had shown winds are likely to be around 18 mph and blowing northwest. Mr Pitcairn said investing in a data logging wind tower could confirm this, and meana different future for Abaco. Mrs Bethel-Richard said: “I have not got the impression that they wanted renewable energy to be looked into in a meaningful way. “I don’t want for our kids to have to be burdened with still having to buy fossil fuels in the future, when they could put the money they are putting into the power plant into a renewable energy plant, even if it isn’t completely renewable.” She added: “We need power, without a doubt, but I think we need to be more responsible. “There’s this impression that people who love the environment don’t like development and that’s not true. “We want something responsible that can be sustained for a long amount of time. “I would like for Abaco to be the greenest island in the Caribbean.” Designating Abaco as an energy-efficient island would certainly be one path towards development that would sett he main island and cays apart from the rest. And power plant developers MAN Diesel Group is known to have built renewable energy plants elsewhere, but BEC and government have made clear Bunker C is the only option they will consider for Abaco right now. An Abaco woman, who asked to remain anonymous, told Insight she feels there iss omething more going on. She said: “I firmly believe something is fishy about the fuel supply contract, because if it wasn’t, why would they be so hell bent about sticking with Bunker C? “They have said the differ ence in price between diesel and Bunker C is upwards of $9m, but it could be as little as $3m, and that’s nothing considering the health implica-t ions. “I think somebody is going to get the contract for the HFO and giving kickbacks, that’s what makes this country go around,” she speculated. Others fear the power plant will only pave the way for over zealous development. It is feared that a large-scale development of South Aba co, including three hotels, two golf courses, and an amphitheatre in an area near the Abaco National Park, may be coming in behind the new power plant, and is per haps linked to the $105 million investment of “local” funds for the plant. The Valencia development sparked controversy when it was proposed last year, and has since gone so quiet that even the website about the project has vanished. But it is rumoured the developers are now hoping to put their plans back in action. There are some Abaconi ans who feel such large-scale developments are not needed in Abaco, as it has a steady stream of visitors who are attracted by the fact that it is less developed than New Providence and Grand Bahama. And more than that, they fear developments on that scale could be doomed to fail. Marsh Harbour real estate broker Brent Cartwright said: “We really don’t need any developments right now because the ones we already have are struggling, so we would hate to see any other developments come on in the next five or ten years when we have two here which have the volume and capacity to bring a lot more growth just between them. “I just don’t see how many more could be successful on the island and I don’t want to see other projects come on and not make it. I think rapid growth could be detrimental for Abaco.” Abaco suffered less than other islands when the economic crisis hit last year as small-scale development was kept alive by second homeowners equipped with enough disposable income to vacation when most potential visitors were tightening their belts. Meanwhile the Four Sea sons resort in Exuma was forced to close, and thousands of people in the hotel sector lost their jobs at Atlantis, the Wyndham, and hotels across New Providence and Grand Bahama. Many Abaco residents say they would like to see more sustainable models of development, like Schooner Bay in South Abaco, and allow such models to characterise the area’s growth. Schooner Bay is intended to be a sustainable community with a farm and farmers market growing food for the residents of its 600 homes, as well as providing a mixture of shops, restaurants, offices and boutiques. One Abaco woman told Insight: “Valencia is the kind of development Abaco people don’t want, and we don’t C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 2C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM WCVH6800 DCVH680E * StunningPRACTICAL 322-2188/9 You’ll wonder how you ever got along without it. $2575.0 0 Another piece of paradise destined F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B A VIEW o f Hope Town, Abaco... S S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e

PAGE 27

have a say about what happens in our own island. “Decisions are made in Nassau and then they come here and shove it down our throats. “I think developments like Schooner Bay, which are not too big but big enough for developers to make some money on, would be a better model. “They are trying to involve locals as much as they can in terms of creating business opportunities on site, where as Baker’s Bay (in Guana Cay) wants to be gated, and private, with Bahamians sweeping floors, mopping floors and serving drinks.” As a farmer, she would also like to see agriculture developed in Abaco so the island can be independent and sustainable. She said food shortages c ould become a serious concern for Abaco, and after the September 11 attacks in 2001, food imports didn’t reach the island for nine weeks. South Abaco MP Edison Key, as executive chairman of the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC cause to develop farming in Abaco. He is also supportive of the move for a Bunker C power plant in Wilson City, and of the Baker’s Bay development, as well as others like it, and does not see agriculture as an alternative, but an additional form of development. The BAIC currently has charge of around 10,000 acres of former sugar plantations south of Spring City, 640 acres of which have been divided into five and ten acre farming plots which have already attracted Chinese investment. Mr Key said: “There’s a tremendous amount of interest being shown by a lot of people, especially since the economy has slowed down. “People have realised it’s not just tourism we need, we n eed another industry to provide jobs and agriculture is one of the most important at this time to supply the country with food. “Agriculture has the potential for employment for thousands of people, and there’s tremendous potential for food security in our country.” However, farmers in Abaco said they have been hindered from making a profit on fruits and vegetables because of the over-complicated application process to reduce import duty on farm supplies and equipment. “There is too much red tape going through all this,” Mr Key said. “It should be very simple, and hopefully we will get to that stage, but right now, this is how it has to be done.” If the growing population of Haitian migrants, thousands of whom have settled in the slums of The Mud and Pigeon Pea in Marsh Harbour, could also be mobilised to work through a more simple work permit application process, there would also be a tremendous potential work force to develop agriculture. Mr Key said: “We need people to work on the farms, and they could be helping to develop the agriculture industry that’s already in the country. “There must be some way to put these people to work and help to support us in the food industry while they can also help themselves.” Many of those in the Haitian community come from an agricultural background, but are unable to work because of the difficult work permit applications. C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 3C TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM for destruction? Legal NoticeNOTICEEBURY LTD.(In Voluntary Liquidation)Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the7th day of September 2009.TheLiquidator isArgosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas. ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 C C

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 75F/24C Low: 75F/24C Low: 78F/26C Low: 79F/26C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 80F/27C Low: 80 F/27 C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 92F/33C High: 91F/33C High: 89 F/32 C High: 89 F/32 C High: 89F/32C High: 90 F/32C High: 89F/32C Low: 77F/25C High: 89F/32C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 90F/32C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 75F/24C High: 87 F/31 C Low: 78F/26C High: 87 F/31 Low: 75F/24C High: 86F/30C Low: 76 F/24C High: 88F/31C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 89F/32C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 88F/31C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 87F/31C Low: 77F/25C High: 90 F/32 C Low: 76F/24C High: 91F/33C High: 89 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21 ST , 2009, PAGE 7C THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Some sun with a shower or t-storm. Partly cloudy, a thunderstorm; warm. Partly sunny, a t-storm; breezy. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. Partly sunny with a shower possible. High: 89 Low: 80 High: 89 High: 89 High: 90 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny, a t-storm in spots. High: 89 Low: 80 Low: 79 Low: 79 AccuWeather RealFeel 103F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 82F 96-86F 96-84F 96-86F 97-83F Low: 77 TODAYTONIGHTTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................91F/33C Low ....................................................81F/27C Normal high ......................................87F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 91 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 75 F/24C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ................................................30.25" Normal year to date ....................................36.03" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU First Full Last New Sep. 26 Oct. 4Oct. 11Oct. 18 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:58 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:07 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 9:46 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 8:54 p.m. Today Tuesday Wednesday Thursday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 9:15 a.m.3.62:58 a.m.0.0 9:32 p.m.3.03:38 p.m.0.3 10:01 a.m.3.53:42 a.m.0.3 10:18 p.m.2.84:27 p.m.0.6 10:49 a.m.3.34:26 a.m.0.4 11:06 p.m.2.65:17 p.m.0.9 11:40 a.m.3.15:13 a.m.0.7 11:59 p.m.2.56:11 p.m.1.2 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco88/3180/26t89/3181/27pc Amsterdam65/1852/11pc65/1856/13pc Ankara, Turkey64/1745/7sh64/1746/7c Athens75/2364/17pc76/2461/16s Auckland63/1752/11pc60/1550/10pc Bangkok93/3377/25t90/3278/25t Barbados86/3078/25pc87/3077/25s Barcelona72/2260/15pc75/2363/17s Beijing75/2348/8s79/2650/10s Beirut76/2470/21sh76/2471/21s Belgrade75/2354/12s80/2655/12s Berlin72/2251/10s73/2256/13pc Bermuda79/2674/23sh82/2776/24s Bogota66/1845/7sh66/1845/7r Brussels73/2251/10pc69/2054/12pc Budapest81/2754/12s83/2854/12s Buenos Aires68/2049/9s64/1745/7pc Cairo93/3370/21s95/3571/21s Calcutta91/3281/27t90/3283/28r Calgary71/2141/5pc76/2446/7pc Cancun89/3174/23t89/3173/22sh Caracas83/2873/22t83/2872/22t Casablanca76/2459/15s80/2661/16s Copenhagen65/1851/10s61/1654/12pc Dublin61/1645/7sh61/1648/8pc Frankfurt73/2254/12c74/2357/13s Geneva 67/19 53/11 t 71/2153/11s Halifax 71/21 52/11 s 70/21 53/11 pc Havana 88/31 72/22 sh 88/31 72/22 r Helsinki 63/17 50/10sh61/1652/11r Hong Kong 93/33 79/26 pc 91/32 81/27pc Islamabad 105/40 75/23 s 104/40 73/22 s Istanbul72/2259/15sh69/2059/15sh Jerusalem 74/23 60/15sh79/2659/15s Johannesburg 77/2554/12s81/2756/13pc Kingston 89/3179/26sh89/3179/26r Lima74/2358/14s74/2358/14s London70/2154/12pc72/2254/12pc Madrid77/2550/10pc81/2754/12pc Manila84/2877/25t83/2877/25r Mexico City73/2252/11t73/2253/11pc Monterrey96/3571/21pc96/3570/21s Montreal75/2357/13s72/2257/13sh Moscow58/1447/8pc62/1644/6c Munich73/2252/11t78/2550/10s Nairobi87/3054/12pc88/3154/12pc New Delhi 93/3379/26pc93/3375/23pc Oslo61/1648/8pc62/1648/8c Paris73/2252/11pc74/2353/11s Prague 77/25 52/11 sh 74/23 55/12 s Rio de Janeiro76/2469/20sh81/2772/22c Riyadh102/3873/22s101/3872/22s Rome 76/24 64/17 t 79/26 61/16 c St. Thomas88/3178/25sh88/3180/26sh San Juan87/3050/10s54/1239/3r San Salvador 87/30 72/22 t 85/29 73/22 t Santiago 66/1839/3pc61/1637/2sh Santo Domingo86/3073/22r85/2974/23r Sao Paulo 69/20 62/16 r 75/23 63/17t Seoul68/2054/12sh77/2555/12pc Stockholm 63/17 52/11 pc 61/16 50/10 r Sydney 73/22 57/13 pc75/2359/15sh Taipei88/3177/25pc88/3177/25pc T okyo 74/23 68/20 pc 79/26 66/18 pc T oronto 73/2257/13r77/2557/13pc Trinidad82/2767/19c91/3270/21t V ancouver 72/22 54/12 pc 78/2557/13s Vienna 75/2359/15s75/2360/15s W arsaw 73/22 56/13 s 70/21 50/10 pc Winnipeg 69/20 50/10 pc 69/2047/8s H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 7-14 Knots1-2 Feet6 Miles85F Tuesday:ESE at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet4 Miles85F Today:ENE at 6-12 Knots1-3 Feet5 Miles86F Tuesday:E at 7-14 Knots1-3 Feet5 Miles86F Today:E at 4-8 Knots3-5 Feet7 Miles85F Tuesday:ESE at 8-16 Knots3-6 Feet10 Miles85F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque82/2752/11pc67/1947/8pc Anchorage54/1243/6c50/1038/3sh Atlanta80/2668/20t85/2969/20pc Atlantic City78/2561/16s77/2564/17pc Baltimore76/2462/16pc78/2564/17pc Boston77/2559/15s75/2364/17pc Buffalo77/2562/16r75/2361/16pc Charleston, SC86/3069/20t85/2972/22t Chicago81/2760/15pc79/2658/14t Cleveland78/2566/18r79/2658/14pc Dallas90/3266/18pc79/2660/15t Denver58/1434/1r50/1036/2r Detroit74/2364/17r83/2861/16pc Honolulu88/3174/23s88/3173/22s Houston91/3274/23pc86/3070/21t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday TodayTuesdayTodayTuesday Indianapolis81/2763/17t84/2864/17t Jacksonville88/3172/22t88/3172/22t Kansas City76/2455/12t73/2255/12c Las Vegas98/3669/20s98/3665/18s Little Rock87/3067/19pc82/2768/20t Los Angeles88/3166/18s96/3568/20s Louisville81/2768/20t85/2966/18t Memphis86/3071/21t84/2870/21t Miami89/3179/26t89/3179/26t Minneapolis76/2460/15t74/2359/15c Nashville83/2867/19t82/2767/19t New Orleans89/3176/24t88/3175/23t New York78/2565/18s77/2568/20pc Oklahoma City84/2859/15t72/2253/11c Orlando92/3375/23t90/3275/23t Philadelphia78/2563/17s78/2566/18pc Phoenix 105/40 75/23 s 100/3771/21s Pittsburgh71/2162/16t78/2559/15sh Portland, OR 93/3354/12s96/3557/13s Raleigh-Durham 82/27 64/17 pc 84/28 65/18 t St. Louis86/3067/19pc83/2867/19t Salt Lake City 68/20 43/6 s 73/2252/11s San Antonio 90/32 73/22 s 83/28 65/18 t San Diego83/2865/18s90/3263/17s San Francisco 89/31 57/13 s 90/3255/12s Seattle81/2754/12s88/3155/12s T allahassee 91/3271/21t91/3271/21pc T ampa 91/32 75/23 t 91/32 75/23t Tucson96/3569/20s96/3562/16s W ashington, DC 77/25 65/18pc79/2666/18pc UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 8C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM An Abaco farmer told Insight how she waited for 20 m onths to get a work permit f or one Haitian employee, as H aitians who may have lived in the Bahamas for decades and held several work permits are still forced to return to Haiti at a high cost to the employer in order to go through the application process before they can be hired. The process divides families, and puts the applicant in a position where they are unable to work for months on end. “It’s a tremendous expense to the person who needs the labour,” Mr Key said. “The Immigration Department needs to make it easier to employ them in areas such as agriculture and common labour.” But, according to the farmer who waited 20 months for a labourer: “It’s a ploy to get them to give up or to get money under the table.” The system certainly doesn’t seem to be benefiting Abaconians, who want residents of The Mud and Pigeon P ea to be regularised and h oused in a safe and sanitary e nvironment. Regular raids on the shantytowns have failed to stop the communities from expanding over the last 30 years, and have only bred resentment in the Haitian community as sources say violence is used and families are separated. Commenting on the largescale raid carried out by Immigration and Royal Bahamas Defence Force officers on July 30, an Abaconian told Insight: “The raids were absolutely atrocious. They take women and children out of their beds at 3am without letting them put on their clothes, take six-week-old babies, these are human rights violations. “Fifty per cent of the people they pick up are Bahamian, but they would not let them go back to their homes to get their papers. “There was a man standing there in his Jockey’s and they hold a gun and a flashlight in his face; he asks to go in to get his passport, and they say no.” Mr Cartwright expressed his disappointment that in 30 years neither government has been able to take control of the migrant community. He said: “It needs to be addressed now and it needed to be addressed 15 years ago. “They have these raids, and I think they are necessary but I cannot agree with the way they are done. They are quite inhumane, specifically with the children. “What they need to do is have constant patrols to monitor who is there because there is a constant influx of people.” Abaconians who are so connected to the issues of the island are full of ideas about the way their community can be helped, how it can grow, and they are keen to communicate about a common goal. But with projects as huge as the Bunker C power plant going ahead without public consultation, and suspicions over big developments being pushed through without informing residents, Abaconians fear their beloved home will develop at such a rate it will spiral out of control. While it has a good economy, and great potential, development must follow a delicate balance, bearing the island’s unique resources and issues in mind to help it grow in an organic way, and the best way for Abaco. But if the people who care about Abaco, and the people who know it best are not evenc onsulted about major changes in their community, they will one day wake up and feel they are no longer in their home. As one Abaconian told Insight: “People in Abaco are not dumb. It’s like they think we have not educated ourselves to any degree, and a lot of people are frustrated. “This was meant to be a new transparent government, g etting people involved, and t hey’re not. They are just sweeping our concerns under the carpet.” It seems the people in Abaco simply want to be heard. They want the government they elected to listen to their concerns, consider their ideas, and treat them with respect before making plans in arrogance, which they fear, could be the ruin of Abaco. W W h h a a t t d d o o y y o o u u t t h h i i n n k k ? ? m m r r e e y y n n o o l l d d s s @ @ t t r r i i b b u u n n e e m m e e d d i i a a . . n n e e t t F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 3 3 C C


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Volume: 105 No.249



TSTORM POSSIBLE



The Tribune

USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

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PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Sunday

MB BURGER KING BOSS BEATEN AND MURDERED
MB PILOT SHOT DEAD, OTHER MAN ‘CRITICAL

TWO men became the vic-
tims of violent murders yes-
terday in the space of less
than three hours.

A Burger King manager
was beaten and then stabbed
to death after being abducted
and a Bahamasair pilot was
shot dead in his home.

Both murders occurred just
hours after Bahamians gath-
ered for a peace concert at
Arawak Cay on Saturday
night to protest the “shock-
ing” levels of criminal activity
in the Bahamas.

The pilot, Lionel Lewis
McQueen, 29, was found dead
in his blood-splattered Gold-
en Palms Estates home, near
Kennedy subdivision, shortly
after 4am. He had been shot
several times. A second man,
the pilot’s cousin and room-
mate Martez Saunders, who
also suffered multiple gunshot
wounds, was found alive in
front of the home. At press

time last night he was still in
critical condition in the inten-
sive care unit. Mr McQueen’s
colleagues at Bahamasair yes-
terday remembered him as a
“quiet” man who was well
liked by all. A fellow pilot
said that no one at the airline
can imagine why someone
would have wanted to kill Mr
McQueen. He was engaged
to be married in February
next year.

The Burger King employ-
ee was reportedly abducted
and taken to the fast-food
chain’s Harrold Road loca-
tion where he was beaten and
then stabbed to death after
failing to open the restauran-
t’s safe for his kidnapper.

Shortly after 1.30am, police
were called to a “disturbance”
at Burger King restaurant on

Harrold Road.

SEE page seven

Christie: Don’t confuse
kindness for weakness

= ae

aA OASIS

30x60 Desk
wi Return

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

HITTING back at his
detractors, PLP Leader Perry
Christie cautioned his would-
be contenders to not confuse
his kindness for weakness as
he aggressively defended his
legacy and ability to remain
as leader of the PLP.

Speaking with radio talk-
show host Wendal Jones on
his programme ‘Jones and Co’

SEE page seven





Felipé Major/Tribune staff

THE AFTERMATH of the horrific traffic accident which killed a one-year-old baby girl and a 20-year-old woman. The picture shows the cov-
ered bodies. The accident occurred near the Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant at the Mall at Marathon.

Baby girl and aunt die in crash horror

A one-year old baby girl and her aunt
died in what police yesterday described
as an “horrific” traffic accident that left
family members distraught with grief.

A 20-year-old woman and her niece
were passengers in a water truck travel-
ling on Marathon Road when it crashed
into a maroon coloured Cadillac Seville,

causing it to flip over.

Both the woman and the young child
were thrown from the truck and sus-
tained fatal injuries. The accident
occurred just after 4.40pm near the Ken-
tucky Fried Chicken restaurant at the

Mall at Marathon.

As the bodies of the victims were lying
in the road covered by white sheets, the
father of the baby rushed onto the scene.
He was able to get past the officers of the

SEE page seven

A BODY is taken away from the scene of the crash.



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

PLP ‘would scrap Arawak Cay container port project’

FORMER Prime Minister
Perry Christie again warned
would-be investors in the
relocation of the container
port that if the PLP were to
be returned to power they
would scrap government’s
current project and place the
port somewhere else.

As the guest on Wendal
Jones’ radio programme
Jones and Co, Mr Christie
reiterated his government’s
history in studying where the
placement of the container
should be and reminded the

listening audience that the
container port should not be

at Arawak Cay.

“Buyers, investors,
beware!” Mr _ Christie
exclaimed.

When asked how he could
make such a declaration hav-
ing criticised the current gov-
ernment for not continuing
projects left in place by the
PLP, Mr Christie said the dif-
ference is that his position on
this matter has been well
known for sometime now.

“T spoke in Parliament and

said Mr Ingraham I want you
to hear my words. If these
people are not listening to you
and you telling them that that
is wrong, tell them to go to
Hell. I said in Parliament, ‘tell
them to go to Hell’. He has
since developed a proposition
where the government will
have the majority of shares.
It would be easier to move it
then. It would be easier to
move it,” he said.

Having caused a tremen-
dous stir in the community
with the decision to move the

port to Arawak Cay, Mr
Christie said this decision is
not in the best interest of the
Bahamas as it is wrongly
motivated.

“And it is a bloody shame I
am telling you, Mr Jones,
when you have a government,
see don’t tell me I will be
duplicitous, when you have a
government which has plan-
ning documents opposite and
you know they have made a

SEE page seven

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS





ZACK BONZACK, Phil Andrews and Chris Birch celebrate as the best teain from the Royal Nassau Sailing
Club. Missing is 11-year-old Spencer Andrews.

THE team of Larry The team of Phil Andrews, 12-year-old
Black, Thomas Bethel Spencer Andrews, Chris Birch and Zack Bon-
and Hank Coleman zack produced the best score for the Royal
turned in the best Nassau Sailing Club on Saturday in the dual
team score for the golf tournament between the Nassau Yacht

Nassau Yacht Club on Saturday in | | Club at Ocean Club. The tournament was held as a fund rais-

the dual golf tournament between | | er for the Bahamas Sailing Association.

the Royal Nassau Sailing Club at

the Ocean Golf Club. i

Tae comcaairent a2 Meae se See the Sports Page for more details.
fund raiser for the Bahamas Sailing
Association. A total of $4,270.00



was raised and presented to the
association to assist with the junior a
sailing competition. Felipé Major a Ay
af | | deg Shorts Page tor more | TET metal Seeded)
; , ; etails.
THOMAS BETHEL, Hank Coleman and Larry Black celebrate with their trophies for the best score for the el | a 322-21 LY |



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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 3



New generation of leaders must

lead PLP light — Obie Wilchcombe

Pro-hanging
march set for
October 12

IN view of ever-increas-
ing homicide numbers, the
Workers Party in conjunc-
tion with the families of
murder victims is planning
to stage a pro-hanging
march on October 12,
starting from Arawak Cay.

Leader of the Workers
Party Rodney Moncur said
that in his opinion concerts
like the one held on Satur-
day night by Artists4Peace
in protest of crime in the
country are “useless.”

He believes that only
hanging those currently on
death row will serve as a
deterrent and “put the fear
in worthless, criminal-
minded young men.”

Mr Moncur is also call-
ing for bail to be abolished
for all those charged with
murder.

Police detain
murder suspect

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Police arrested
murder suspect Godfrey
Virgill Jr, alias “Dollar Mur-
der”, on Saturday evening.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
said police acting on a tip
from the public went to
Fawcett Lane and arrested
Virgill around 11.30pm.

Virgill is wanted for ques-
tioning in connection with a
murder.

Thanked

Ms Mackey thanked the
Grand Bahama community
and the media for their con-
tinual support.

She said police are seek-
ing the
public’s
assistance
in locat-
ing Eric
Shervin
Stubbs Jr,
who is
wanted
for ques-

RSE E RE Honing in
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has information concerning
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at 352-1919, 351-9111, 351-
9991, 352-8351, 352-9076,
and 350-3125 or, 911.



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ADDRESSING PLP stal-
wart councillors in New Provi-
dence and Grand Bahama over
the radio yesterday, PLP can-
didate for deputy leader Obie
Wilchcombe reminded those
stalwarts in attendance and lis-
tening around the country that
the story of the PLP has not
ended.

Asking for their support in
his bid to become the deputy
leader, the West End and Bimi-
ni MP said that the second
chapter of the “rise of the
Bahamian people” must be
written by a “new generation
of leaders” who must take up
the fight and continue the for-
ward march.

“Now is the time, this is our
moment and our great PLP
party must lead the way. We
must repower the PLP to
empower the Bahamian peo-
ple. Now is the time if we wish
to see our people happy again.
Now is the time if we wish to
eliminate the misery index.
Now is the time if we wish to
introduce gross national hap-
piness. Now is the time for us to
dream again. Now is the time to
repower the PLP to empower













PLP DEPUTY LEADER HOPEFUL Obie Wilchcombe speaks with stalwart
councillors before his address on ZNS and Gems Radio.

the Bahamian people,” the MP
said.

This process Mr Wilchcombe
said will begin at the party’s
October convention, which he
also will be co-chairing.

Asking the party faithful to
give him a chance to serve as
their next deputy leader, Mr
Wilchcombe said he would
commit himself to working full-
time to prepare the party for
the next general election.

“As your deputy leader I will
lead the way in writing the his-
tory of our party. The story
must be told. We must tell the
youth today and the genera-
tions yet unborn of the rich his-

tory. We must tell their story
and the role you stalwart coun-
cillors have played in this jour-
ney. We must return to basics
and to the people. We are the
party of the people. We must
let them know,” he said.

Mr Wilchcombe added that
he sees a Bahamas that can
boast unmatched health care
where Bahamians no longer
will have to die because they
cannot afford health care.

“IT see a Bahamas with an
educational system that cap-
tures the attention of the world.
Where our young people, be it
in academics or technical or
sports, will rise to a competi-

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tive level that will make us all
proud.

“T see a Bahamas where at
least 10,000 jobs are created
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“I see a Bahamas where
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create thousands of jobs and
Bahamian ownership,” he said.
In his bid to become deputy
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San Salvador Philip Davis, Sen-
ator Jerome Fitzgerald, and
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Golden Gates Shane Gibson.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Boat thefts are big business

ABACONIANS fear that boat thefts on
that island could further threaten their
tourist industry.

In June Mr John Bethell, president of
the newly-formed Marina Operator’s Asso-
ciation, said insurers were insisting on “extra
theft protection” for boats entering the
Bahamas, because of rising boat thefts, espe-
cially in Abaco. He said that more than $6
million worth of vessels were involved.

Abaconians fear that this extra fee, cou-
pled with fuel prices and the depressed econ-
omy, will cripple the resort/marina and sec-
ond homeowner markets on that island, Tri-
bune Business reported in June.

At the time the residents of Abaco threat-
ened that if police were not more active in
stamping out what they described as a high-
ly sophisticated criminal enterprise, vigilante
justice would soon follow.

Some of the thefts were linked to human
trafficking to Florida in which it is believed
that several go-fast powerboats — some
worth more than $50,000 — were involved.
These boats are stolen from marinas and
private moorings. It is also believed that the
boats are hot-wired and used in drug traf-
ficking.

It was even reported earlier this year that
Prime Minister Ingraham’s 21-foot “run-
about” was removed from its Green Turtle
Cay moorings and used for a criminal enter-
prise. Although police at the time were not
confirming the report, the locals maintained
that the fishing boat was taken from the
Green Turtle Cay marina and returned lat-
er, but not before being used to steal from
another boat two Yamaha 250 engines worth
$60,000.

An American second home owner
reported that his boat had been stolen and
tampered with twice within just a few
months.

Here in Nassau the situation is no better.

Recently a Paradise Island resident went
off on vacation leaving his Boston Whaler
hoisted up on his dock in the care of friends.

One day a marine mechanic, who has
worked on many of these boats and knows
them well, was passing the Sailing Club when
he thought he recognised this particular
Whaler anchored in the vicinity. He called
the person who had been left in charge of the
Whaler to find out if it was still on the hoist
or if it was missing. It was missing.

The young man left in charge immedi-
ately reported the theft to the Paradise
Island police station, got on a jet ski and
headed for the Sailing Club. He saw no sign
of the missing boat. He continued west as far
as Prince George dock and the cruise ships,

Mang Kalidalios

scouring every marina and hidden cove along
the way. Nothing.

The mechanic who had first spotted the
boat called around 1 pm. He said that anoth-
er friend had also lost a similar boat with the
same size engine over the weekend. It had
been found in the Sea Breeze canal. He
suggested that he and his son take the young
man in search of the vacationing resident’s
boat.

They started from the ocean side of Sea
Breeze, approaching the abandoned end of
the canal until they neared the residential
area. Their boat weaved in an out of the
canals. In a remote area they spotted an
Abaco skiff, which the marine mechanic
knew had been stolen. He later found its
owner, who had bought it as a gift for his
daughter.

As they moved into the more developed
residential area, they saw their boat, still in
the water. It was tied to a tree on an empty
lot. Already the boat thieves had started to
work on it. The name of the boat had been
scraped off, the registration number had
been removed and its top had been taken.
No one was in sight and so the young man
who had the boat’s key jumped in the
Whaler, turned the key and “stole it back.”
Although the engine was intact, it had to be
repaired. The Whaler has been moved for
safety to another location. However, from
the same private dock a larger boat was
stolen earlier this year. It has never been
found.

It is believed it is busy running drugs. We
were told that this boat was also on a hoist —
owners believing that it is more difficult to
steal a boat out of water. The large boat
had complicated safety cables, locks and
other modern safety gadgets. In other words,
it was believed to be “thief proof.” But
because the private dock is in a remote loca-
tion, the thieves probably worked most of
the night to saw the chains, melt the locks
and lower the boat into the water.

“We are helpless,” said a boat owner.
However, on this particular dock, there are
going to be cameras, alarms and every wake-
up device that will be activated on the
approach of a human. As soon as anyone
steps onto that particular dock they will be
quickly escorted off in handcuffs.

When a boat is missing it would be a
good idea to head for Sea Breeze before
the crooks have time to dismantle it for spare
parts or to ship it off to join the drug trade.

Also it would be a good idea for the
police harbour patrol to be more vigilant in
the Sea Breeze area, because that is where
the action is.



An open letter to
the PM on new
BEC power plant

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This is an open letter to the
Prime Minister for publica-
tion.

Dear Honourable
Prime Minister,

This is in reference to the
new BEC Power Plant being
constructed at the old Wilson
City site.

I’m writing to congratulate
you and your government for
once again moving Abaco for-
ward to meet the challenges
of future growth and devel-
opment on this island. I know
as native Abaconians, neither
you nor Fred Gottlieb would
ever do anything to hurt Aba-
co.
For those that were not
here or those who don’t want
to remember. Here is a list of
major infrastructual changes

letters@tripbunemedia.net



and improvements made in
Abaco, under your adminis-
tration.

1) Beautiful paved high-
ways from north to south.

2) Electricity along those
roads from north to south.

3) Cable Bahamas service
to give Abaconians easy
access to entertainment and
world news.

4) A new Port facility. We
should all remember picking
up freight from the “old
dock”.

5) The long awaited new
runway at the airport in
Marsh Harbour in the final
stages of completion.

Also, congratulations on
your future plans for a new
hospital and Government

Administration Complex,
with a new Post Office and
courthouse.

No government is perfect,
and they all need to answer
and be accountable for their
actions when questioned. I
think you have done this and
more, on the new Power
Plant. So, I say to you Hon-
ourable Prime minister, Fred
Gottlieb and Minister Ney-
mour hurry up and finish this
facility, as I’m tired of the
inadequate service we now
have with the present outdat-
ed plant.

My family were some of the
early settlers in Abaco, some
of them lived and worked in
Wilson City. As a mother of
three young Bahamians, I say
“keep up the good work.”

JANEEN ELIZABETH
ALBURY-COOPER
Abaco,

September, 2009.

Legislation must be passed so people
become responsible animal owners

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I do agree with some of Dr Leatendore Per-
centie’s article entitled “Ban pit bulls”, I just feel
that we have missed that opportunity years ago.

The Bahamas Humane Society called for this
ban in 1982 when we first started to see the influx
of pitbulls coming into New Providence but this
all fell on deaf ears.

What we now need is for the purpose new
Animal Protection and Control Act to be passed
in parliament so that stiff fines can be levied
against owners of dangerous dogs and regula-
tions can be in place to govern breeders of any
type of dogs, to ensure that these persons become
responsible animal owners.

We have so many backyard breeders and 95
per cent of them breed pitbulls, there is sup-
posed to be a regulation in place that you cannot
import a pitbull dog into the Bahamas, but with
so many persons breeding this type of dog, that
serves no purpose.

What needs to be put in place is to have every
imported dog neutered before it enters the
Bahamas and only if you are a licensed breeder,

can you import a un-neutered dog into the coun-
try, at a quota of two per year.

This way we can ensure that dogs are neutered,
thus less roaming/stray dogs and this should lead
to less animal cruelty because there would be
fewer dogs around to trespass on other persons’
premises.

This new proposed Act would ensure that
owners of animals become responsible by having
to make provision for their animals, also pet
stores and security dog companies would have
firm guidelines to follow.

All of this would help safeguard both people
and animals in this country, no one should have
to walk the streets in fear of being attacked by
dogs, we have too many children on our streets to
protect, so please let’s have this Act put into law
so that people can become responsible animal
owners,

STEPHEN TURNQUEST
The Bahamas Humane Society
Executive Director

Nassau,

September 20, 2009.

Why we need the ‘Read to Lead’ programme

EDITOR, Tribune.

The “Read to Lead” pro-
gramme initiated by the Min-
istry of Education but brain-
stormed by a select committee
understands what is required to
uplift the country from its
depths of despair. Eloquent
speeches from charismatic polit-
ical leaders cannot and will not
reverse the dire situation, res
ipsa loquitur. The committee
recognized that it requires all
hands on deck.

The “Read to Lead” Pro-
gramme is necessary action
requiring participation by all
right thinking Bahamians who

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would share a reading and men-
toring moment with our future
generation. While the mentor-
ing aspect of the programme
has to be deeply thought
through given the unacceptable
rate of paedophilia in the coun-
try, the purpose of this impor-
tant programme is without
question laudable.

The Ministry of Education
ought to market this pro-
gramme aggressively and con-
sistently. The mandate should
be to sustain this programme
given our history of stick-to-it-
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in the well being of our future
generation, I pray we sustain.

R. McKENZIE
Nassau,
September 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Ivoine Ingraham to contest FNM chairmanship

WELL known FNM politi-
cal activist Ivoine Ingraham has
offered himself as a candidate
for the post of chairman at the
party’s national convention slat-
ed for November.

In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune yesterday, Mr
Ingraham said that it is time for
the FNM to raise its game and
change the way it does things,
not just for the sake of change
but because the populace
“demands it.”

“We must adjust how we
interact with people because of
the high demand for us to be
more accountable for our
actions. We must, by whatever
we do, make sure that we lift
the spirits of all regardless of
our personal feelings. We must
sacrifice self for the good of the
country. We should, however
not sacrifice the good of the
country for the good of the par-
ly

“Gone are the days when
being a diehard makes sense.
It is country above self, and
country above party. Therefore
the position of chairman is a
very special one. It is a balanc-

OES aI |

ing act
between the
party’s posi-
tion and the
needs of the
people, and
the people
should
always win,”
he said.

In the past
and up to the
present date,
Mr Ingraham said that the
FNM has been blessed with
chairmen who have made
“invaluable contributions to the
party and the country at large.

“But nothing lasts forever
and everything must change,”
Mr Ingraham said. “Nothing
stays the same. In fact change
should be welcomed, lest we
are saddled with old, stale ideas
that will put us at a disadvan-
tage when we are compared
with others who oppose us.

“At this time when the
Bahamian people are demand-
ing so much, should expect so
much, we need people who are
personable and capable in key
positions. We must design

IVOINE
INGRAHAM

SRSA





PHILIP Davis, PLP candi-
date for deputy leadership, was
in Long Island and Cat Island
over the weekend to meet with
stalwart councillors and PLP
supporters as he continues his
campaign ahead of the party’s
national convention.

Carrying the message to sup-
porters to “Be Brave — change
the Bahamas”, Mr Davis met
with supporters in Deadman’s
Cay and in the southern and
northern settlements of Long
Island on Friday. According to
a statement issued by Mr Davis’
communications team, the PLP
candidate was “humbled by his
support” and “visibly moved”
by the candid expressions of
neglect in the communities.

Explaining that politics in the
Bahamas has broken, Mr Davis
said, “We [politicians] have
been too busy rowing amongst
ourselves and too focused on
seeing our picture in the paper.
We have to change the way we

do things; our
people are
suffering for
it.”

Mr Davis is
reportedly
going to continue his campaign
throughout the islands as he
stops to talk with and listen to
the concerns of residents
throughout the Bahamas.

Yesterday Mr Davis also
paid a visit to his hometown of
Cat Island to join supporters in
a church service held in his hon-
our. Prayers and words of
encouragement were offered to
the PLP candidate who is
expected to face a considerable
challenge at the party’s con-
vention on October 18.

In addition to Mr Davis, PLP
MP for West End and Bimini
Obie Wilchcombe and PLP
Senator Jerome Fitzgerald are
all expected to contest the par-
ty’s deputy leadership post.



everything we do to help peo-
ple’s lives become more bear-
able. We must literally serve
people and a positive attitude is
the greatest asset,” he said.

Noting that the government
has put in place numerous ini-
tiatives set out to better the
lives of all Bahamians, Mr
Ingraham said the party must
now take the people and the
country “higher” by encourag-
ing and including their young.

“In keeping with all of this, I
am prepared to help the cause
by offering myself for further
service. My entire life I have
served in one capacity or anoth-
er. I was introduced to politics
by Sir Arthur Foulkes at
Bahamian Times in the mid-
1960s. I had the best teacher
and will admit that I have been
an attentive student. So I am
no stranger to sacrificing my
time and family towards help-
ing others. I have gained
tremendous satisfaction from
seeing the smiles on the faces
that I have helped.

“T have been behind the
scenes, putting out fires, doing
damage control and helping in





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any way possible to keep the
FNM relevant. My contribu-
tions 2002-2007, especially
when the spirits of FNM were
low, are common knowledge. I
am prepared to do more.

“As chairman, I will be more

aggressive putting forth the
FNM agenda, and defending
the party’s position in a timely
manner. I will be highly and
consistently visible,” he said.
Noting that he has canvassed
many party players, including

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behind him, Mr Ingraham said
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tremendously from his chair-
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PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Getting US attention for the
Caribbean: Must it be chaos?

By Ronald Sanders
(The writer is a Consul-
tant and former
Caribbean Diplomat)

D URING this
month, I was invit-

ed to deliver a lecture to 85
high-ranking military offi-
cers from Europe, North
America, Latin America,
Africa, Asia and the Mid-
dle-East on the subject of
US relations with its Cen-
tral American and
Caribbean neighbours.

In preparing the lecture, a
comment on the
Caribbean’s weakness and
lack of capacity to command
international attention
preyed on my mind.

The comment was made
by my friend and colleague,
David Jessop, of the
Caribbean Council for
Europe. In his weekly col-
umn, the week before he
said this: “Taken at face val-
ue the region has a very
weak hand. The Caribbean
does not have conflicts that
threaten to escalate into
global confrontations;
thankfully it has neither
nuclear weapons nor terror-
ism, nor does it have a sig-
nificant military presence or
the economic ability to
change global financial or
trade flows. In short it has
little that would make big-
ger, wealthier and more
influential states take
notice.”

There is much merit in
Jessop’s observation, and I
used it as a point of depar-
ture for the lecture to these
seasoned military officers.

During the Cold war -
particularly with Soviet
troops and military hard-

_— aa
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os =
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> “7 _ eee ”

WORLD VIEW -

_
Sir Ronald Sanders



ware in Cuba — the
Caribbean was strategically
important to the US because
much of its oil requirements
had to transit Caribbean
waters, and the Caribbean
was an important passage-
way for US military supplies
to Western Europe.

But with the collapse of
the Soviet Union in 1991
and the retreat of commu-
nism, the Caribbean and
Central America slipped
down the pole of American
priorities.

The preoccupation of the
government of George W
Bush between 2001 and
2008 with American involve-

nt

ment in Afghanistan and
Iraq caused Central Ameri-
ca and the Caribbean to fall
even further away from
American attention except
for issues related to drug
trafficking, and illegal migra-
tion. Since the mid-1990s,
US aid to the Caribbean and
Central America dwindled,
preferential access for
Caribbean and Central
American goods to the US
market eroded, and there
was no longer any pressure
by the US on Europe to
help the region by paying
preferential prices for its
commodities especially
bananas and sugar.

In this context, Caribbean
and Central American
economies declined, and
their already bad situation
worsened in the present
global recession.

The IMF World Eco-
nomic Outlook, published
in April 2009, suggests that
Latin American economies
will contract by 1.5 percent
in 2009 before recovering in
2010. But, the likelihood of a
start of recovery by many
Caribbean economies, which
are dependent on tourism
and financial services, is very
unlikely until 2011, even if
the economies of the US
and Europe pull out of
recession this year.

It is in this milieu that the
Caribbean and Central
America face the greatest
destabilising force — drug



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“The most worrying problem for
the US in Central America and the
Caribbean should be their economic
situation, for conditions of economic
decline lead to social and political
unease, and instability.”



trafficking and its attendant
crime including illegal arms
smuggling and distribution,
robberies and executions.
The US government
could make an enormous
contribution to resolving this
huge problem by passing
legislation and implement-
ing machinery to control
arms smuggling; by review-
ing the practice of deport-
ing convicted felons to their
countries of origin; and by
adopting measures to stop

legal sale of assault
weapons.
Collaborative

Beyond this, the United
States should take the lead
in organising collaborative
arrangements with Europe
and Latin America and the
Caribbean to establish a
comprehensive anti-nar-
cotics programme that
addresses both supply and
demand. If this is not done,
the problem of drug-traf-
ficking and its attendant
high crime will continue to
plague Central America and
the Caribbean with a terri-
ble destabilising effect on
the small economies that are
least able to cope.

The most worrying prob-
lem for the US in Central
America and the Caribbean
should be their economic sit-



uation, for conditions of eco-
nomic decline lead to social
and political unease, and
instability.

It is simply a fact that,
with few exceptions, Cen-
tral American and
Caribbean governments
have either limited or no
capacity to finance policies
to address shocks to their
economies such as the effect
of the current global reces-
sion. In the Caribbean par-
ticularly, small or poor pop-
ulations do not produce suf-
ficient savings; there is not
enough access to credit, and
budgets are already in deficit
or pretty close to it. In these
circumstances, governments
have no room to pay for the
size of stimulus programmes
that are required to improve
these economies.

The US could be enor-
mously helpful to these
countries if it led the way in
encouraging the interna-
tional and hemispheric
financial institutions to pro-
vide them with funds on far
less onerous conditions than
they have in the past.

As an example, the US
should use its influence with
other countries who govern
the World Bank to reverse
the graduation of many of
these countries from access
to concessionary financing.
At the moment, they do not

Ae ee eet el ee

have access to such funds
because they are regarded
as middle-income countries
with no regard for the high
costs which their smallness
and remoteness imposes
upon them.

Of critical importance is
help with the debt of these
countries. Much of their
debt, apart from those who
owe Venezuela for oil as
part of PetroCaribe, is com-
mercial debt, though their
official debt is also high.
Some effort should be made
to help these countries to
reschedule debt to all
sources on a payment
scheme that should include
some forgiveness and a real-
istic repayment scheme.

In this regard, the IMF
could play an important role
in providing financing that
(a) is not necessarily linked
to the countries’ Special
Drawing Rights; and (b) is
not subject to the usual pre-
scription of raising taxes,
reducing public sector
spending; freezing wages,
and repaying foreign debt.

If governments in the
industrialised world could
bail out some companies
and financial institutions on
the basis that their
economies could not allow
these firms to collapse, sure-
ly this is also a basis for
arguing that the collapse of
states should be avoided.

But, I suspect the region
will continue to be ignored,
and, sadly, it will take chaos
or grave upheaval before it
is paid serious attention.

(Responses, previous com-
mentaries and the lecture at:
www.sirronaldsanders.com
m/> )

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 7



FROM PAGE ONE

Bloody Sunday



Two murdered in space
of less than three hours

FROM page one

Arriving at the scene, police
officers found the body of
man who had apparently been
beaten and then stabbed to
death. The victim’s body was
found lying in a large pool of
blood that was flowing like a
rivulet into the parking lot,
which led police to believe
that he bled to death.

Superintendent Leon
Bethel, head of the Criminal
Detective Unit's homicide
department, told The Tribune
that the victim had multiple
stab wounds and lacerations
about the body. The victim,
whose name the police have
not released, was pronounced
dead at the scene.

The victim was a former
manager of the Harrold Road
Burger King, but at the time
of his murder headed the fast-
food chain’s Frederick Street

branch. A source close to the
investigation told The Tribune
that it is believed that the
manager was abducted and
taken to the restaurant in the
west, where his kidnapper
demanded he open the safe.
Police have evidence that the
manager was forced to open
the store and there are signs
that a forced attempt was
then made to open the safe.

The current manager of
Burger King on Harrold
Road closed the restaurant at
midnight on Saturday. He
turned on the alarm system
at 12.04am and with his staff
left the premises.

Security System Interna-
tional (SST) realised that
something was wrong when
the alarm system was deacti-
vated sometime after lam. A
SSI staff member called the
fast-food outlet, but got no
answer. A call was then put
through to the police.

The police were called a
second time by a good Samar-
itan who was passing in his
car and saw a man being vio-
lently beaten outside the
Burger King location on Har-
rold Road.

Within a few minutes police
were at the store where they
found the body of a man who
had been brutally beaten and
stabbed.

According to reports, the
victim was ordered to open
the safe by a large masked
man, wearing gloves. There
is evidence that the victim,
when he failed to open the
safe, was brutally beaten in
the manager’s office and then
dragged outside, where he
was seen by the passerby
again being beaten.

The deaths of the Burger
King manager and Mr
McQueen bring the country’s
murder count up to 62 for the
year.

mae ee eT a SC

PMs

Setedednd J Tae

HUNDREDS of young
and old people came
out on Saturday night
to listen to their
favourite artists at the
Arawak Cay. The
peace concert took
place during a week-
end of violence in the
Bahamas.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

BODIES are removed after the accident.

Baby girl and aunt die in



traffic

FROM page one

Traffic Division and duck under the crime
scene tape. By the time the officers were able
to get to him he had already lifted the sheet off
his daughter’s body, immediately falling back-

wards in grief.

Other family members also gathered on
Marathon Road, demanding confirmation
from the police that the victims of the crash

were in fact their loved ones.

Shortly afterwards, the father got into an
altercation with the baby’s mother who had

also arrived on the scene.

According to eyewitnesses and the police,

accident horror

the Cadillac Seville was travelling south on
Marathon Road and was signalling to turn
into the Mall’s entrance close to the KFC.

As he was turning, the water truck attempt-
ed to overtake the Cadillac, clipping the small-
er vehicle on its right side in the process.

The impact with the Cadillac caused the
truck to spin out of control and ultimately
overturn.

Police said the driver of the Cadillac is cur-
rently assisting them with their investigation
into the accident while the truck’s driver has
been taken to hospital to be treated for his
injuries.

The number of traffic fatalities for the year
now stands at 37.



Christie: Don’t confuse
kindness for weakness

FROM page one

yesterday, Mr Christie said he
is not fearful of losing the
leadership of his party, not-
ing that he has unfinished
business to do.

“Tam not a weak person.
Do not confuse the compas-
sion that has been the centre-
fold of my political and public
life. Do not confuse my sensi-
tivity to the needs of people
with weakness,” Mr Christie
warned.

Surprised

When asked if he would be

surprised if his long time
friend and colleague Dr
Bernard Nottage were to
challenge him at the upcom-
ing convention, Mr Christie
admitted that he would,
adding that such a challenge
would be very “disappoint-
ing.”
“Tam sure that if BJ was
actually going to do that I pre-
sume that by now he would
have told me and, of course, I
would have expressed major
disappointment because it
would really be surprising to
me.
“Obviously it is a right for
him and persons who support
him to aspire to any position
in the PLP and I have assured
him of that; that he must in
coming back, and my assisting
him in being reintegrated into
the party, I did so because I
see him to be an able man
and one who is able to make a
major contribution as we
move forward,” Mr Christie
said.

Container
port project

FROM page one

big jump to jump over all of
the advice and planning which
was agreed to you know by
the very same people own the
ports. And then suddenly,
boom! No man, that is
wrong,” he said.

While not seeking to
answer whether or not he felt
it would be a degree of
treachery or ungratefulness if
Dr Nottage were to run
against him, Mr Christie said
he would leave such questions
up to the judgment of the
people.

“T can only say this, I am
absolutely prepared for this
moment. Everything about
me has now climaxed at this
point where I am ready to go.
One only has to look at my
career and see the arrows and
the darts and the punishing
criticism that I have received.
Clearly that prepares some-
one — it makes you stronger.

“And contrary to percep-
tions that people try to put
out there. J am a strong and
purposeful person connected
to people. And so Iam confi-
dent, and I know at the end of
the convention I will be the
leader of the PLP,” he said.

In fact, Mr Christie said, he
has already started to meet
with new candidates for the

party on Monday evenings at
the party’s headquarters in
preparation for the next gen-
eral election.

“So this is only one stage
of the journey I am on and it
is a journey that will not be
interrupted in my own con-
sidered view,” he said.

Mr Christie also warned
those within his own party
who seek to blame him for
the PLP’s loss at the polls,
noting that they should in fact
look at themselves first and
see if they can carry some of
the responsibility.

“In any event, I have to rest
with the point of view that I
am in a democratic organisa-
tion, and that any person has
the right to challenge me as
leader of the PLP and that I
would expect that within the
organisation that if that point
of view is held by someone
then they should step forward
and challenge me and present
that point of view to the peo-
ple at our convention so they
can make a choice. And after

they have made the choice we
can regroup and move for-
ward,” he said.

Mr Christie also down-
played the significance of the
Greenberg Quinlan Rosner
report commissioned by the
PLP which suggested that Mr
Christie’s perceived “weak
leadership” was the primary
reason why the party lost the
2007 election. In fact, Mr
Christie blamed this percep-
tion mostly on the successful
“propaganda” utilised by the
FNM during the last election.

“Yes I have been very nice
to people and they have bit
me and there are others
doubtless who are ready to
bite again,” he said.

Claw

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Demonstration outside GB Power

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Community activist
Troy Garvey and a small number of
protesters demonstrated on Friday at
the Power Company’s customer ser-
vice office in the Grand Bahama Port
Authority Building. Motorists honked
their car horns in support of the pro-
testers who picketed for an hour along
Pioneer’s Way.

Several senior police officers were
present at the demonstration, which
started around 8.30am.

Last Friday, police were called in to
stop an illegal protest because Mr Gar-
vey did not have a permit to demon-
strate.

Mr Garvey said consumers are fed
up and frustrated with the Grand
Bahama Power Company over the
high cost of electricity on the island.
Concerns have also been raised over
the frequent power outages, weekend




VILLAGE ROAD NEAR SHIRLEY STREET

Hub Caps For Sale



TROY GARVEY and onan are seen demonstrating outside Grand Bahama
Power Company's customer service office, located in the Grand Bahama Port

Authority building.

disconnections, and the high deposits
required by residential consumers.
Grand Bahama Power is the sole sup-

plier of electricity on the island.
Marubeni/Taqa of Japan owns 50 per
cent of the company, and ICDU,

which is a public traded company on
BISX, owns the other 50 per cent.
EMERA of Canada owns 50 per cent
of ICDU, 40 per cent are public shares,
and Marubeni owns the other 10 per
cent.

Investors

Mr Garvey claims the new investors
of the Power Company have not been
“good investors” for Grand Bahama.

“We want them out of Grand
Bahama and we are calling on the
Prime Minister to please remove them
because they are not good for this
country.

“We want ‘investor friendly’
investors here,” he said.

He claimed that Grand Bahamians
were being oppressed.

Protester Edgar Roberts said gov-
ernment needs to regulate the Power
Company. He complained that the cost
of getting power is “ridiculously” high.

“T called the Power Company a few
days ago and asked what it would cost
to get power and I was told it would
cost $500 — that is just ridiculous.

“We need some sort of regulation at
the power company because they just
arbitrarily change the surcharge fees
whenever they want to,” said Mr
Roberts. Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham and Grand Bahama Port Author-
ity president Ian Rolle have also
expressed concerns about the GBPC.
During a recent visit to Grand
Bahama, Mr Ingraham said he was
disappointed with the new Japanese
company.

He said he is concerned that the
company has not “reinvested adequate
sums of money into its generation and
distribution system, and has over the
years taken its profits out in cash
rather than reinvesting it in its opera-
tion.”

The Tribune contacted the Grand
Bahama Power Company, but officials
did not want to comment.

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Government ‘fully committed’ to the
country’s artistic and cultural heritage deal with Monaco

PRIME Minster Hubert
Ingraham said Friday that his
government is fully committed
to the development of art forms
and the preservation of impor-
tant heritage sites and artifacts
wherever feasible.

Speaking at the opening of
an exhibition at the National
Art Gallery dedicated to
renowned Bahamian artist
Maxwell Taylor titled,
“Maxwell Taylor; Paperwork
1960-1992,” Prime Minister
Ingraham said that Bahamians
have “a rich architectural her-
itage that is being diminished
as modernization and develop-
ment transforms or demolishes
historical structures to make
way for new, modern edifices.”

“The importance of such
developments cannot be under-
estimated. It is necessary so as
to nurture in our people self
respect, cultural pride and iden-
tity, as well as a sense of place
in the growth and development

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of our country,” Prime Minister
Ingraham said.

“Knowledge brings about
concern and connection and
when it happens in the realm
of culture, recognition of our
strength as a community can
evolve, providing the basis for
much-needed national pride
and impetus for us to move for-
ward as a nation,” the Prime
Minister said. Mr Ingraham
praised Mr Taylor for his art
work, saying that they were
“not the traditional sun, sand
and sea paintings many of us
have come to regard as typical
Bahamian art.”

“He reaches for something
different, a feeling and connec-
tion to our past and with his
audience,” he said.

“It is so right for Mr. Tay-
lor’s work to be admired, held
up for praise and displayed here
in our National Art Gallery,”
he said. Prime Minister Ingra-
ham also commended the
gallery’s board, directors and
staff for their efforts to preserve
the rich artistic heritage of The
Bahamas. Mr Taylor has been
an artist for more than 40 years
working in Nassau and the
United States. Much of his
work includes images of black
Bahamian women.




Bahamas signs
tax information

THE Bahamas Government
and the Principality of Monaco
has concluded negotiations for
a Tax Information Exchange
Agreement (TIEA).

State Minister for Finance
Zhivargo Laing and Ambas-
sador of the Principality of
Monaco His Excellency Gilles
Noghés signed the agreement
at the Ministry of Finance on
Friday.

Mr Laing said both countries
have also agreed to continue
dialogue towards further coop-
eration in the tax area by nego-
tiating a Double Taxation
Agreement.

“The Bahamas and Monaco
share much in common,” he
said. “Both are small nations
with the major portion of eco-
nomic activities concentrated
in the hospitality and financial
services industries.”

Mr Laing added: “We look
forward to a productive and
cooperative relationship with
the Principality of Monaco as
our nations strive to adjust to
the changing global financial
and economic landscape and
the emerging rules that are
being developed to accommo-
date it.”

He said the Bahamas-Mona-
co TIEA is the first of many

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similar agreements the Gov-
ernment expects to sign in the
weeks ahead, having made sub-
stantial progress in negotiations
with a number of Organisation
for Economic Cooperation and
Development (OECD) and G-
20 countries.

“These negotiations are part
of the effort made by the Gov-
ernment of the Bahamas to
meet its commitment to imple-
ment the standards for trans-
parency and information
exchange in tax matters that
were developed by the
OECD,” Mr Laing said.

Mr Laing said the United
Nations also adopted the stan-
dards and are supported by the
declarations of the G-20 Group
of Nations.

“The Government is confi-
dent that this agreement with
Monaco and other pending
agreements will allow The
Bahamas to meet its commit-
ment within the near future,”
he said. The TIEA signed with
Monaco is the second the
Bahamas Government has con-
cluded, the first being with the
United States on January 24,
2002. Ambassador Noghés said
this is only the beginning of
cooperation between the two
countries and within the coming
months a larger agreement
between Monaco and the
Bahamas will be signed.

Mr Noghes and Financial
Secretary Ehurd Cunningham
also signed an agreement on
administrative arrangements
for the implementation of the
TIEA. The OECD created the
Agreement on Exchange of
Information on Tax Matters to
address harmful tax practices.

A 2008 OECD report titled,
“Harmful Tax Competition: An
Emerging Global Issue,” iden-
tified “the lack of effective
exchange of information” as
one of the key criteria in deter-
mining harmful tax practices.

It mandated a working group
to develop a legal instrument
that could be used to establish
effective exchange of informa-
tion.

technical knowledge and practical skills required to assist the Registered Nurse or Physician in
providing safe and competent nursing care to clients in a variety of healthcare settings

A Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) is a nursing professional who is trained to perform a
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In The Bahamas, the LPN is known as the Trained Clinical Nurse (TCN)

LPNs work in a variety of healthcare settings such as hospitals, clinics, nursing homes,
residential care facilities, schools, laboratories, birthing centers and insurance

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Entry Requirement:
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 9



Workshop prepares educators for Influenza A (H1N1) virus

By Betty Vedrine
Bahamas Information
Services

OVER 100 district superin-
tendents, teachers and senior
officers participated in a pre-
paredness workshop for the
Influenza A (H1N1) virus at
the Paul Farquharson Confer-
ence Room at Police Head-
quarters on East Street on Fri-
day.

Entitled, “Preparedness
Workshop for Eventuality of
2nd Wave of Influenza A H1N1
Virus,” the workshop objectives
include providing educators
with the characteristics on Pan-
demic Influenza A (H1N1),
providing technical support,
reviewing the Ministry of Edu-

cation Integrated Plan and pre-
senting implementation strate-
gies of the Ministry’s Integrated
Plan.

The workshop covered sev-
eral key areas such as Preven-
tion, Preparedness, Response
and Recovery (PPRR).

Education Minister Carl W
Bethel said the workshop was
critical. Mr Bethel said, “We
have gathered to put our minds,
hearts and heads together to
ensure the health and safety of
our most precious asset, the
children of the nation.”

He explained that govern-
ment has charged the Ministries
of Health Education with the
development of a national
HIN1 Pandemic Influenza Pre-
paredness and Response Plan.

“As a result of this mandate,
we have partnered with the
Ministry of Health, and are now
seeking to bring all stakehold-
ers together in this proactive
approach.”

Mr Bethel said while the aim
is not to instil panic and fear,
stakeholders should not wait
for a second wave of the virus
before taking action.

“Out of today’s session, we
hope to gain more enlighten-
ment from the health care pro-
fessionals about the virus and
provide feedback on the Min-
istry of Education’s Proposed
Pandemic Response Plan,” he
said.

Permanent Secretary at the
Ministry of Education, Elma
Garraway highlighted the Min-

istry’s objectives and the objec-
tive of the workshop.

“This workshop will provide
the opportunity for all persons
living in The Bahamas, to
obtain knowledge, skills, val-
ues and attitudes required for a
successful life and work in a

democratic country guided by
Christian principles,” said Mrs
Garraway. Presentations were
also made by Health Minister
Dr Hubert Minnis; Permanent
Secretary, Ministry of Health,
Camille Johnson; Chief Med-
ical Officer, Dr Merceline

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By Betty Vedrine
Bahamas Information Services





HIS Excellency Zdenek Rozhold, Ambassador
of the Slovak Republic, presented his Letters of
Commission to Governor General Arthur D
Hanna at Government House on Thursday.

“IT am pleased to accept your letters of cre-
dence accrediting you as Ambassador extraordi-
nary and plenipotentiary of the Slovak Republic
to The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and
the letters of recall of your predecessor, His
Excellency Dr Ivo Hlavacek,” the Governor
General said. Ambassador Rozhold conveyed
the “personal greetings” of the President of the
Slovak Republic His Excellency Ivan Gasparovic
to the Governor General, the Government and
people of the Bahamas.

He said that all over the world the Bahamas is
known not only for the thousands of unspoiled
beautiful islands, but also for decades of good
governance, a stable and reliable legal system
and strong economic development, which have
created a prosperous and equitable population.

“While we are aware of the immense geo-
graphical distance that separates our two coun-
tries,” said Mr Rozhold, “we are confident that
this is not an insurmountable hindrance for the
effectiveness of our bilateral relationship, includ-
ing mutual support within international organi-
sations as well as economic and cultural cooper-
ation.”

The Governor General said that distance
should not be a barrier to the development of
mutually beneficial relations.

“In the context of multiculturalism, we have
already proven this,” he said. “We have given

t |

BIS PHOTO: Peter Ramsay
HIS EXCELLENCY Zdenek Rozhold, Ambas-
sador of the Slovak Republic (left) gives Gov-
ernor General Arthur Hanna a gift after pre-
senting his Letters of Commission, Thursday,
September 17, at Government House.

each other, for example, support in internation-
al fora such as the United Nations, and by the
Schengen Visa Waiver agreement signed May,
2009, with the European community, of which
your country is a member since 2004.”

He said the Bahamas looks forward to similar
“fruitful” results from collaboration in and nego-
tiation of other priority areas, including the Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreement, which The
Bahamas signed in conjunction with the
Caribbean Community (CARICOM) in Octo-
ber 2008, and the second five-year revision of
the Cotonou Agreement to be concluded in Feb-
ruary 2010. “I must also add the sustainable
development of Small Island Developing States
and the deepening of the partnership with our
hemisphere through the organisation of Ameri-
can States,” the Governor General said.

The Slovak Ambassador pledged to devote
all of his energy and efforts to “further strength-
ening the warm relations” that exist between the
two countries. The Governor General also
applauded the international contribution that
the Slovak Republic has made through mem-
bership and leadership in international bodies
such as the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation,
the International Court of Justice and the Unit-
ed Nations Economic Commission for Europe.

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

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MINISTER OF FOR FINANCE, Faivarao Laing (at lectern) bringing
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September 18, 2009.




























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Bethel Brothers Morticians
~ Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
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FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

ANDRE BALDWIN DAVIS, 61

of Sandilands Village Road
will be held on Wednesday,
September 23, 10am at St
Anne's Anglican Church,
Fox Hill. Fr Crosley
Walkine will officiate.
Interment will follow in the
church's cemetery.

Left to cherish fond
memories are his wife of
40 years, LaGloria Davis;
sons, Kenyetta Davis and
Patrick Ward; daughter,
Zelpha Davis; daughter-
in-law, Jill Ward; grand-
children, Linsey and Giles Ward; step mother, Charlotte
Davis; mother-in-law, Muriel Sears; aunts, Lucille
Ferguson and Beryl Wright; brothers, Albert Rolle,
Donavon, Trevor, and Berkhoff Davis; sisters, Patricia
Major, Lana Gatrey, Villel Reid and Joyanne Thompson,
brothers-in-law, Ron Gatrey, Sydney Reid, Errol
Thompson, Henry and Basil Sears, sisters-in-law, Susan
and Sharon Davis, Sandra, Vanria, Gloria Sears and
Pamela Sears-Brown; nephews, Keno, Donavon Jr. and
Darrel Davis, RL Gatrey, Sydney and Willie Lionel Reid,
Errol Thompson Jr., Kevin Munroe, Quentin Bowe, Basil
Sears Jr., David Sears, Nolen Brown, Enrique Sears and
Alaric Nixon; nieces, Cherita Miller, Monique Sandaire
and Charlene Major, LaRhonda and Lorren Gatrey,
Sheniqua, Tredika, Kadassa and Deshante Davis, Donelle
Davis, Tristan Thompson, Earline, Reid, Denise Sears,
Lorraine Bowleg, Shenique Taylor, Tanya Wright and
Sharla Sears; other relatives and friends including,
David, Darron, Gloria, Tyler, Malik, Michael, Terrico,
Melvern Davis and family, Linda, Tenaya and Terucco,
Kendal Davis and family, Billy Davis, Floyd and Betty
Davis, Daphne, Deidra, Delaree and Deandra, Dianne
Bingham and family, Shane Davis and family, Stewart
Davis and family, Keith Davis and family, Marguerite
Ferguson, Raleigh Ferguson, Bernadette Baptiste, Rubie
Brown and family, Sophie Rolle and family, Marguerite
Davis and family, Anthony Davis and family, Cedric
Davis and family, Debbie Davis, Diane Ferguson and
family, Fred and Florence Ramsey, Cora Mackey and
family, Clarence Fergusen and family, Cedric Kemp and
family, Stephanie McKinney, Anthony Butterfield, Prince
Livingston, Fr. and Mrs. Walkine, Fr. and Mrs. Bartlett,
Fr. and Mrs. Adderley, Rosetta Gibson and family, Betty
Mackey and family, Eudene Brown and family, Alison
Prince and family, Olrick and Julie Turnquest, Maurice
and Paula Tynes, Roger and Sharon Brown, Benson
Brown and Family, the Sears family, the Taylor family,
The Johnson family, Mary Wilson and family, St. Anne's
Choir, St. Anne's ACW and ACM, Carla Emmanuel and
family, Batelco employees, BCPOU members and others
too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respect at Bethel Brothers
Morticians, #44 Nassau Street on Tuesday from 10am
to 6pm and on Wednesday at the Church from 9am until
service time.

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118 retirees are recognised at
Public Service Awards ceremony

BIS Photos/Raymond A. Bethel

BAHAMAS COMMUNICATIONS and Public Officers Retirees Asso-
ciation 2nd Awards Banquet at Government House, on Friday, Sep-
tember 18, 2009. Picture shows Retirees and others in attendance.

ONE hundred and eighteen retired public servants were
honoured for their many years of service in the Public Service
at Government House, Wednesday, September 16.

The event coincides with the 10th annual Public Service
Recognition and Retirement Week, which started September
14 under the theme, “The Public Service — Striving for Excel-
lence in Customer Service.”

“Tt is a singular pleasure for me to congratulate the public
officers gathered here today who have given, in many instances,
more than half their lives in service to the people of The
Bahamas,” said Governor General Arthur D Hanna.

The retirees represented a cross-section of disciplines in the
public service. The Governor General said each retiree has
been instrumental in putting down the foundation upon which
young, aspiring public officers can build.

“There are those of you who would have pioneered various
techniques, processes or systems in the public service,” he
said. “So from that perspective alone, you would have con-
tributed to the development, progress and prosperity of our
nation.”

The Governor-General, Minister of State for the Public Ser-
vice Zhivargo Laing, and Secretary to the Cabinet, Anita
Bernard presented the retirees with plaques.

A reception followed on the patio of Government House.

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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 12

S r
MONDAY,

SEPTEMBER 21,
PAGE 15

Debbie,

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ts

2009



ith the track and
field season just
about over, two
veteran Bahami-
an sprinters con-
tinue to perform well in the first of
two final events in eastern Asia. Ss '

Yesterday at the 2009 Shanghai a. a
Grand Prix in China, Debbie Fer- 5 . =
guson-McKenzie and Chandra Stur-
rup produced third place finishes in
their signature events.

In the women’s 200m, Ferguson-
McKenzie came through in a photo
finish with Cydonie Mothersill of
the Cayman Islands in 22.45 sec-
onds.

However, Mothersill was awarded
second place as she turned in a sea-
son’s best time, while Ferguson-

er

PFELWA

ma



DEBBIE FERGUSON-McKENZIE (left) competes in 200m during Shanghai Golden
Grand Prix in China. Also shown is Allyson Felix, of the US, who won the race with
the time of 22.37. Ferguson finished in third place...

(AP Photo: Eugene Hoshiko)

Wildcats, Dorsey
Park Boyz continue
impressive run...

McKenzie had to settle for third.
The race was won by American
Allyson Felix in 22.37.

Felix was the gold medallist in the
12th IAAF World Championships
in Athletics in Berlin, Germany, last
month. She also took the victory in
the IAAF/VTB Bank World Ath-
letics Final in Thessaloniki, Greece,
last week.

Ferguson-McKenzie, 33, was the
bronze medallist in the 200 in Berlin
and she got fourth in the 200 and
sixth in the 100.

Meanwhile, Sturrup’s third place
came in the women’s 100. She
clocked 11.03 in the straight away
race.

American Carmelita Jeter took
the victory in the world’s leading
time, surpassing her previous best
mark of 10.67 and she also erased
the stadium mark of 10.79 that was
set by China’s Li Xuemei in 1997.

See page 14

Chandra finish third in Shanghai

Jeter was the bronze medallist in
Berlin.

Veronica Campbell-Brown, the
silver medallist in the 200 in Berlin,
had a season’s best of 10.89 for sec-
ond place.

Sturrup, 36, was fourth in Thessa-
loniki.

The duo were the only two
Bahamians competing in the meet
that saw American Tyson Gay
bounce back to turn the tables on
Jamaican Asafa Powell in a stadi-
um and national record of 9.69 in
the men’s 100. Powell did 9.85, fol-
lowed by American Darvis Patton in
a personal best of 9.89.

The men’s 400 was won by Amer-
ican Olympic and world champion
LaShawn Merritt in 45.28.

They are now heading to Japan
to compete in the Super Track and
Field Meet in Kawasaki 2009 on
Wednesday.


































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de Cardenas repeats as champion

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

DANNY de Cardenas sur-
prised himself when he
repeated as champion of the
Bahamas Optimist National
Championships yesterday.

de Cardenas, 14, complet-
ed the two-day championships
in Montagu Bay by accumu-
lating a total of 15 points, but
ended up with a net of 10 after
he dropped his worse race
score of 5 points.

Competing out of the red
group for competitors 13-15
years old, the St Andrew’s
ninth grader said he felt he
went out and competed very
well in the seven races con-
tested.

“T just tried to stay focussed
and got some good starts
because I knew that the com-
petition was going to be a lot
stiffer than it was last year,”
said de Cardenas, the Royal
Nassau Sailing Club member
who also plays baseball and
soccer.

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Tribune staff

“There was a lot of people
who caught up to me on the
last day. But I think I got off
to a good start on the first day
and I was able to hold onto
my lead.”

Spencer Cartwright, one of
those competitors who made a
gallant effort to come back to
try and dethrone de Carde-
nas, had one major problem
that destroyed his chance of
winning.

The Bahamas Sailing Asso-
ciation member, who compet-
ed out of the white fleet for
competitors 7-10, didn’t start
the third race, which didn’t

allow him to gain any points.

He had to settle for second
with a net total of 13 points.

“Tt was good. I sailed very
well,” said the nine-year-old
fifth grader at Queen’s Col-
lege. “But I was really sur-
prised that I was right up there
with Danny. I really wanted
to beat him.”

Finishing in third was Bruce
Hall of the Royal Nassau Sail-
ing Club with his net total of
17 points.

Jeremy Pleydell-Bouverie,
the first Family Island com-
petitor, was fourth with a net
of 32. He represented the
Man-O-War Sailing Club and
he competed in the Blue Fleet
for ages 11-12.

His mother, Ann Pleydell-
Bouverie, said they were not
just proud of her son, but the
entire eight-member team that
represented Abaco.

“T think they all went out
there and they performed
exceptionally well,” she said
of their contingent that includ-
ed four competitors from
Guana Cay.

“T think they are learning
how to get along with the oth-
er competitors and I think that
has helped them tremendous-
ly in their performances.”

Rounding out the top five
was twin brother DeVaughn
Williamson with a net of 32.0.

SEE page 14

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Tender
CATERING SERVICES - CAFETERIA

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the above named services,

Bidders are required ta collect bid packages fram
the Corporation's Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads.

Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 307-1158

Tenders are to be addressed ta:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
$th October 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 711/09
CATERING SERVICES - CAFETERIA
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all proposals.






SPORTS

Wildcats, Dorsey Park Boyz
continue impressive run

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

BOTH the pennant winning
Pineapple Air Wildcats and
the Heavy Lift Dorsey Park
Boyz continued their impres-
sive run through the New
Providence Softball Associa-
tion on Saturday night, but in
different fashion.

The Wildcats wasted very
little time in stopping the
defending champions Sigma
Brackettes in five innings in
the opening game at the
Banker's Field at the Baillou
Hill Sporting Complex to
improve their record to 20-1.

The Dorsey Park Boyz also
improved to 20-1, but they did-
n't get to sweat at all after their
much anticipated rematch with
the defending champions
Commando Security Truckers
live on national television nev-
er happened.

The Truckers only had sev-
en players, including two
coaches in uniform to play. As
a result, Heavy Lift was award-
ed the victory by forfeiture as
they won the head-to-head
encounter with a 2-1 advan-
tage.

Bobby Saunders, one of the
coaches for the Truckers, said
it was a tough loss, but they
are dealing with an internal
matter that he wished not to
further discuss.

Apparently, the NPSA had
suspended Truckers’ infielder
Martin Burrows Jr and Dorsey
Park Boyz’ infielder Dwayne
Pratt for an off-the-field alter-
cation that involved a fight
between their family members
on Thursday night.

The Truckers felt that it was-
n't a justifiable move by the
association and so they refused
to accept the decision. To top
it off, the Truckers would have
had to play without veteran
Stephen ‘Slugger’ Brown, who

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was suspended for the remain-
der of the year from the New
Providence Oldtimers Softball
Association for an incident
involving a game official.

The suspension is expected
to be carried over into the
NPSA.

NPSA president Sidney
"Bobby Baylor’ Fernander also
refused to elaborate on the
suspensions, only to note that
they were quite disappointed
in the Truckers refusal to play
on Saturday night.

"It's a big disappointment
for us seeing that people
always want to see things going
their way,” Fernander said.
"But we will have to deal with
that because we can't allow
things like this to continue."

Fernander was especially
peeved because they had to
turn away so many fans at the
gate and they lost revenue by
not having the live television
game which many had antici-
pated as the regular season
winds down and the playoffs
get set to start.

"We will meet on Sunday or
Monday and look at all of the
facts and make a decision on
exactly what will happen,” Fer-
nander said. "This may affect
the rest of the regular season
because we may not have to
play all of the games remain-
ing. We might just decide to
go right into the playoffs."

Whatever decision is made,
the Dorsey Park Boyz are
waiting for the outcome.

Ace pitcher Edney ‘the
Heat' Bethel, who has been on
a strike out streak, racking up
almost 40 in their last two
games and is close to accumu-
lating a record 300-plus for the
regular season, was not sur-
prised at all that the Truckers
didn't show up.

"I heard the talk earlier in
the day that they were not
coming,” Bethel said. "If they
did decide to come, we would

have been ready for them.
We're eager to play and we
had everybody out here for the
game. I just think it was bad
for the fans and the league that
they didn't play."

After clinching the pennant,
Bethel said their season won't
be complete until they go on
and be crowned the NPSA
champions and represent the
NPSA in the Bahamas Soft-
ball Federation's National
Round Robin next month.

Also looking ahead to the
playoffs with renewed vigor is
the Wildcats.

After failing to make the
final last year, the Wildcats
have dominated the regular
season and they boosted their
confidence as they destroyed
the Brackettes 10-1 in the
opener.

"Our team is playing excel-
lent,” said ace pitcher Mary
‘Cruise’ Sweeting. "We wanted
to send a message to the
Brackettes that we are ready
for the playoffs and that one
game they won, we gave them
that.

"Our team is well oiled. We
have the pitching staff, we have
the hitters and we have players
to go all the way and recap-
ture the title. We are well bal-
anced this year and that is
because we don't want to be
watching the championship
again this year.”

Sweeting came up big once
again, tossing a three-hitter
with five strike outs to out-duel
veteran Ernestine Stubbs on
the mound. Stubbs gave up 10
hits with a pair of strike outs
for the Brackettes.

The Wildcats took control
of the game from the top of
the first inning when they
exploded for five runs on as
many hits, highlighted by Dor-
nette Edwards’ two-run dou-
ble, Marvell Miller's run-pro-
ducing triple and Linda
Knowles’ RBI ground out.

Sigma Brackettes scored
their only run in the bottom
of the frame when Vandette
Smith got hit by a pitch from
Sweeting. After Zella Symon-
ette singled, Smith eventually
scored on an error.

The Wildcats went wild
again in the third, sparked by a
would-you-believe-it bunt
from Sweeting after Edwards
opened the frame with her sec-
ond hit of the game. With two-
out, Candice Smith con-
tributed a RBI single and
Vernie Curry added a two-run
single.

Pineapple Air went on to
add their tenth and final run
in the fifth as Linda Knowles
got all the way to second base
on a one-out error, advanced
to third on a passed ball and
caught a ride home on
Jeanette Hilton's RBI single.

The Brackettes, who blew a
big scoring opportunity in the
third, ran into a rare double
play when young Ketrel
Dorsette singled, but she was
called out on the tap going to
second by Natasha Sears, who
then threw the ball to Linda
Knowles at first to beat out
batter Vandette Smith.

Brackettes’ coach Burton
Saunders argued the call, but
to no avail.

Sweeting then struck out
Theola Williams to end the
game.

"We didn't have it offen-
sively tonight, but it didn't real-
ly matter because this game
doesn't mean anything to us,”
said Brackettes’ catcher Cassie
Smith. "We're not feeling any
pressure. We will be ready for
the playoffs."

And she too sent a message
to the Pineapple Air.

"The Wildcats are just a
bunch of jokey girls," she
stressed. "We just want them
to know that we will be ready
for them, if we meet in the
championship this year.”

de Cardenas repeats as champion

His other half, Donovan Williamson was ninth

with a net of 51.0.

“Tt feels good, but I felt I could have done
better,” said the 11-year-old DeVaughn
Williamson, who competed out of the blue
fleet. “A lot of the early races, I finished in
the top five, but in the last two I don’t know

what happened.”

The Aquinas College eighth grader said he
will definitely be back to improve on his per-

formance.

Jared Collison, a Canadian, won the
White/Blue/Red Fleet combined with a net of

ca

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16 points. However, he was not eligible for the

overall title as he was not a Bahamian by birth.

And Donovan Knowles, competing for Long
Island, won the Green Fleet with a net of 15.0.
National sailing director Jimmy Knowles
said the championship was another grand suc-
cess, but he was disappointed that the 20-plus

competitors from Grand Bahama were not

able to travel here.
Along with New Providence and Abaco,

competitors also competed from Harbour

Island and Governor’s Harbour in Eleuthera
and Long Island.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 15



More than $4,200 raised for
junior sailing programme

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THOMAS Bethel is one of
the bright young golfers in the
country today, having repre-
sented the Bahamas on a
number of national teams.

But on Saturday, he joined
Larry Black and Hank Cole-
man in producing the best
score of the Nassau Yacht
Club teams.

Their performances enabled
the NYC to emerge as this
year’s champions of the annu-
al dual golf tournament
between the Royal Nassau
Sailing Club that took place
at the Ocean Club Golf
course.

They won the title with a
combined score of 268.

“We performed very well,”
Bethel said. “I think each of
the players went out there and
did what they had to do. So it
was avery good team effort.”

Bethel, however, said the
goal was to beat the Royal
Nassau Sailing Club and they
proudly achieved that feat, so
they can have bragging rights
until next year.

The team of Phil Andrews,
11-year-old Spencer Andrews,
Chris Birch and Zack Bonza-
ck had the best team score for
the RNSC.

“We did excellent,” said
Bonzack. “We were able to
put it all together and bring it
home for the Sailing Club. We
had a very diverse team with
an 11-year-old boy and a 70-
year-old. So it was good for

*

4
$4,271.00

ih



LARRY BLACK, tournament director, presents a cheque to a Bahamas

Sailing Association representative...
Photo by Felipé Major/Tribune staff

In the individual categories,
Bethel also won the men’s
longest drive on hole number
two, while Dilys Anderson
took the ladies longest drive
on hole number 13.

In the closest to the pin,
Victor Leniuk won on hole
number three, Scott Saunders
on hole eight, Terry McCabe
on hole 12 and Phil Andrews
on hole 14.

The tournament was a joint
venture between the Nassau
Yacht Club and the Royal
Nassau Sailing Club as they
assisted the Bahamas Sailing
Association.

A total of $4,270.00 was
raised for the junior sailing
programme.

Larry Black, the tourna-
ment director, said they were
quite pleased with the turnout
of the tournament.

He noted that the aim was
to assist the Bahamas Sailing
Association and he was

pleased with what they
achieved.

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THE TRIBUNE
D ul .

SECTION B e business@tribunemedia.net

ine

MONDAY,



SEPTEMBER 21,

2009

Confidence For Life





$16m start-up targets
5,000 first-year clients

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

$16 million Bahami-
an telecoms start-up
is “conservatively”
projecting that it will
attract 5,000 sub-
scribers to its ‘multiple-play’ product
during its first operational year, and
is aiming to launch its service by the
2009 fourth quarter/early 2010.
Edison Sumner, IP Solutions
International’s president and chief
executive, told Tribune Business that
the company’s ‘go live’ date depend-
ed on how successful the initial $16
million capital raising was, but it was
“very confident” it could raise the
full amount by the time its private
placement closed.

AML Foods targets
early 2010 dividend

* “Multiple-play’ provider aims to expand into Caribbean and Latin America by second/third
year of existence, with ‘just over $10m’ required for infrastructure build-out

* Seeking to launch service to Bahamian customers by 2009 Q4/early 2010

* Looking beyond existing platform to data services, e-commerce,
data services, disaster recovery and e-government

* Letters of Intent signed with hotels, as gated communities another key target

IP Solutions International is aim-
ing to raise $8 million in equity cap-
ital from Bahamian investors, tar-
geted institutions and high net-worth
individuals, with the balance com-
ing from a $4 million preference

By NEIL HARTNELL

share issue and $4 million in bank
debt financing.

Out of the $16 million target, Mr
Sumner said “just over $10 million”
would be used to finance IP Solu-
tions International’s initial capital

spending needs. That involves the
construction of its wireless broad-
band infrastructure, including head-
end facilities and a Network Opera-
tions Centre that will serve not only
the Bahamas but, eventually, the

entire Caribbean and Latin America.

“The Bahamas is really our first
stop,” Mr Sumner told Tribune Busi-
ness. “We intend to take the business

SEE page 8B

Port chair work permit renewed to year-end

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A M L
Foods, the
BISX-listed
retail group, 1s
targeting Feb-
ruary/March
2010 for when
it will make
the first divi-
dend payment WATCHORN
to sharehold-
ers in some seven-eight years,
its president and chief execu-

SEE page 6B



* BISX-listed retail group
sees customer transaction
count rise 15% yeat-to
date despite recession, as
half-year profits increase
almost 10-fold to $2.2m

* Company expects to repay
bank debt by first week
in December, and will
reassign funds to
preference debt

* But average customer
spend falls in August
for Back-to-School

Price controls 'work against
the interests of consumers'

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

PRICE controls are “work-
ing against the interests of
consumers in the long-term”,
especially lower and middle
income class families, because
they force retailers to raise
prices higher than they might
on some products to compen-
sate for the losses the law
requires them to absorb on
breadbasket items.

Gavin Watchorn, AML
Foods’ president and chief
executive, told Tribune Busi-
ness: “There’s a real miscon-
ception with what price con-
trol is really doing for the cus-
tomer.”

The retail executive, whose

company owns the Solomon’s
SuperCentre and Cost Right
formats, explained: “The real-
ity, if you speak to any retail-
er, is that price control is
working against consumers,
because it eliminates gross
profits and gross profit mar-
gins on 10 per cent, 15 per
cent, 20 per cent of your sales
base.”

While the landed cost of
goods and produce was effec-
tively out of the control of
Bahamian retailers, Mr
Watchorn said AML Foods’
operating costs were effec-
tively 25 per cent of sales — a
level he described as “quite
good” when it came to cov-

SEE page 9B

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Tribune Business Editor

THE Government has only
extended the work permit of
Grand Bahama Port Author-
ity (GBPA) chairman Hannes
Babak until year-end, sources
have confirmed to Tribune
Business, a tactic they say is
designed to push the warring
Hayward and St George fac-
tions towards settlement of
the almost three-year-old
ownership dispute.

Multiple sources have con-
firmed to this newspaper that
Mr Babak’s work permit
renewal, the subject of much
controversy and opposition
from the late Edward St
George’s estate, was granted
until year-end, as the Gov-
ernment mounts a final push
to create the circumstances in
which the GBPA owners can
reach a settlement.

It is understood that Mr
Babak’s work permit is
unlikely to further be extend-

Move designed to push for GBPA ownership dispute
settlement, as two sides said to be close to deal

ed by the Government and
the Immigration Department,
with sources informing Tri-
bune Business that both
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham and his government, plus
the GBPA’s key business
partner, Hutchison Wham-
poa, were reluctant to deal
with the Austrian chairman
for their own separate rea-
sons.

One source, familiar with
recent developments,
described Mr Babak as “epit-
omizing the divisions”
between the Hayward fami-
ly, in the shape of the Sir Jack
Hayward Family Trust, and
the late Edward St George’s
estate.

The latter has been res-
olutely opposed to Mr
Babak’s chairmanship almost
from day one, while he has

received strong backing from
the Hayward camp, especial-
ly Sir Jack. Yet other mem-
bers of the Hayward family
appear to have cooled in their
backing for Mr Babak, with
Sir Jack’s son, Rick, telling
this newspaper some months
ago that he and other family
members had settled their dif-
ferences with the St Georges
and all were aligned against
the GBPA chairman.

It thus appears that the
Government’s decision on Mr
Babak’s work permit renewal
may have been designed, at
least in part, to create pres-
sure for a severance of the ties
between himself and Sir Jack
in a push for settlement by
Christmas 2009.

Tribune Business can also

SEE page 4B

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Please make cheques payable to British American Financial
Re: National Breast Cancer Awareness

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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Business faces
S40k cost hike
from NIB rise

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE National Insurance
Board’s (NIB) proposed con-
tribution rate increase, when
combined with the 50 per cent
insurable wage ceiling rise,
will add $40,000 to one
Bahamian company’s annual
operating costs and increase
total payments to the social
security scheme by almost 70
per cent.

A senior executive, who
requested anonymity for him-
self and his business, which
employs around 100 staff
ranging from line staff to
supervisory/managerial level,
told Tribune Business that
after crunching the numbers
to determine the impact of
the NIB changes, it was dis-
covered that the total employ-
ee contribution to NIB (the
sum coming out of staff
salaries) would increase by
40.83 per cent.

Describing this as a “40 per
cent hit to the average
employee’s take home pay”,
the executive added that the
company’s calculations
showed that its share of NIB

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
tle MET fel eT 4
on Mondays

RUBINS
(9 J eneanteoera Lee
0 /o STOREWIDE

ALL SALES FINAL - LESS 5% FOR CREDIT CARDS - EXCLUDING DOCKERS, LEVTS & HANDBAGS

Wee

Says employer and employee
contributions to rise by 40.83%
and 28.98% respectively

contributions would increase
by 28.98 per cent per annum.

“For us, it’s another $40,000
a year on top of payroll costs,
another $40,000 a year com-
ing off the employer and
employee earnings in the case
of one company,” the senior
executive told Tribune Busi-
ness.

“There goes another two
additional hires to fund the
unemployment benefit via the
Government’s coffers. I sup-
pose in a way it’s a back-
handed compliment that the
Government thinks we’re so
robust and resilient that they
think we can underwrite these
benefits on their behalf.

“But obviously operational
expenses are going up by
$40,000 alone, so prices will
be increased to cover the
increased cost.”

Apart from increasing
NIB’s contribution rate from
8.8 per cent to 10.8 per cent to
finance the unemployment
benefit and National Pre-
scription Drug Programme,
the Government is also plan-
ning to raise the social securi-
ty programme’s insurable
wage ceiling from $400 to
$600 per week in early 2010.

This, the business executive
said, amounted to a “double
increase” on managerial,
supervisory and other high-
salaried employees. “Some
people are going to be facing
an increase in contributions
direct to $5,000 or more from
their salaries,” he added.

While the Government
constantly touted that social
security contribution rates

were much lower in the

Bahamas than the likes of

Barbados, which had a 17 per
cent rate, the business execu-
tive told Tribune Business: “It
won’t be long before they
have us up there and beyond
them, especially if they intro-
duce National Health Insur-
ance.

“T’m going to make sure the
employees know it’s not the
company taking the money
from their pay cheque; it’s the
Government.

“My employee’s take home
pay will drop, and in no
uncertain terms my employ-
ees will know it’s the Gov-
ernment taking more of their
money.”

The Nassau Institute, the
Bahamian economic think-
tank, had previously used the
real-life example of a compa-
ny with three employees, to
illustrate that it faced an 84
per cent increase in NIB con-
tributions to over $10,000 per
annum once the changes were
implemented.

Rick Lowe, a senior Nas-
sau Institute official, told Tri-
bune Business this was “a
huge jump”, and said many
businesses would either be
forced to avoid paying NIB
contributions or lay-off/not
hire workers.

“Particularly when things
are so tough, the last thing the
Government should do is
increase taxes when the econ-
omy is on the slide and so bur-
dened that it pushes people
over the edge,” Mr Lowe said.

“Tf people are hanging on
by their fingertips, it may be
the thing that causes them to
push another employee out
the door. That’s the concern
we all have.”

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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THE TRIBUNE

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

NASSAU MOTOR Com-
pany (NMC) yesterday said
it expected to complete its
new customer reception office
within the next three weeks,
having spent just over
$500,000 to-date on as expan-
sion designed to make it more
efficient and "the place of
choice" for Honda and Gen-
eral Motors-manufactured
cars.

Rick Lowe, the company's
operations manager, told Tri-
bune Business that it was
"probably three weeks away"
from opening its new cus-
tomer service area, once the
furniture was installed and the
front door put on.

He added that rather than
knocking down the current
client reception area, and con-
verting it into two additional
service bays, Mr Lowe said
Nassau Motor Company had
decided to place its transmis-
sion room and staff lunch area
in the existing structure.

"We're moving them to
where the existing reception
office is," Mr Lowe said of
the two facilities. "Instead of
knocking it down and mak-

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 3B
Motor dealer eyes 3-week
finish for reception area

ing two more bays, we will
move them temporarily until
we decide whether we're
going ahead with Phase II."

He added that Nassau
Motor Company could also
potentially leave the trans-
mission room and lunch area
there, rather than proceed
with the initial plans, "killing
two birds with one stone”.

With the firm having spent
just over $500,000 to date on
its expansion, and “a little
more to go", Mr Lowe
acknowledged that investing
during a recession was always
risky.

"Tt sure is," he added, "but
you've got to remain hopeful
things will turn around. Cus-
tomers have to service vehi-
cles, and hopefully we will be
the place of choice for Honda,
Chevrolet and Cadillac own-
ers."

He told Tribune Business
that Nassau Motor Company
had experienced no fall-off in
demand for vehicle servicing
as a result of the recession,
the only recent decline hav-
ing resulted from the compa-
ny's expansion project, with
customers placed on a three-
week as opposed to one-week
wait.

"T think it will be a bit more
convenient for our cus-
tomers," Mr Lowe told Tri-
bune Business of the new cus-
tomer service centre. "Rather
than having to traipse through
cars running back and forth,
there will be a nice area for
them to sit in. It will be a little
more convenient.

"We're getting on with the
paving, the levelling off of the
ground. I think our customers
will like it. When they come
in, it will be more customer
friendly."

He added that Nassau
Motor Company hoped to ini-
tiate a programme where
clients in a hurry could have
their vehicles serviced in a
short period of time, "getting
them in and out as fast as pos-
sible. It's something General
Motors and Honda continu-
ally stress".

As for the six bays with
hydraulic lifts that Nassau
Motor Company had installed
some five months to go as
part of the first phase expan-
sion, Mr Lowe said: "They've
been wonderful. It makes the
technicians’ lives a lot easier.
They don't have to jack the
car up by hand or put a jack
stand under each corner."

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BS! OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
intemational private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is
presently accepting applications for

PRIVATE BANKING RELATIONSHIP MANAGER/MANAGED
PORTFOLIOS ADMINISTRATOR

Applicants for the position of must have a banking/financial degree or 7-10
years experience in the offshore banking sector, have knowledge of
international investment instruments & money market, ability to partner with
team members, must be confident regarding customer relations, investments
& portfolio management and have thorough knowledge of local legislation,
regulatory & statutory matters as well as international banking practices.
Fluency in Italian is absolutely required,

Personal qualities ;-

Excellant organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Commitment to quality and service excellence

Able to work with minimal supervision

Strong Team attitude

Financial and analytical background

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure

Responsibilities :-

Service & advise customers

Mainiain & follow up account relationships

Liaise directly with customers or their investment advisors

Monitor, analyze positions and evaluate reports

Ensure that managed porifolios are implemented according to the relevant
policies

Liaise with Portfolio Managers and other Relationship Mangers on

Meet deadlines on timely basis

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum
vitae to:

Human Resources Manager

BS! Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre
P. 0. Box N-7130

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerrm@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted

Tei

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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



=
Port chair work permit

renewed to year-end

Career
Opportunity

SENIOR TRUST MANAGER

J. P. Morgan is currently seeking applications for a Senior Trust Manager.





























The successful candidate will work with Trust and related partners to
ensure that fiduciary services are delivered in a manner consistent with all
legal, regulatory and internal requirements. The candidate will also serve
as a technical resource to wealth advisors, investors and relationship
managers. The Senior Trust Manager will be expected to develop direct
relationships with clients and have the flexibility to travel.

Prospective applicants should have 6+ years of trust experience, with 3+
yearsin mentoring others. Abachelor’s degree or a professional qualification
ideally in law with strong analytical skills; knowledge of investment product
services, fiduciary and trust regulatory requirements and onshore and
offshore jurisdictions; excellent written/verbal communication and creative
problem solving skills; and the ability to assess risk in fiduciary and trust
matters.

J.P. Morgan Private Bank offers competitive compensation and
benefits packages. Interest applicants should submit their resume/
curriculum vitae marked “Private and Confidential” to the Human
Resources Manager, J.P. Morgan Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited,
P.O. Box N-4899, Nassau, Bahamas.

J.P. Morgan Trust Company
(Bahamas) Limited

To advertise in The Tribune -
Cea MWA ry BRU
just call 502-2371 today!

FOUR CONWECTION@TO THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER
Public Relations Assistance for
The Bahamas Telecommunications
Company Limited

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Lim-
ited is pleased to invite tenders to assist with Public
Relations initiatives for the company.

Interested firms or individuals may collect a Tender
Specification from the BTC's security desk at John F.
Kennedy, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:30
p.m., Monday through Friday from September 18th,
2009.

The deadline for submission of tenders is Thursday Oc-
tober 2nd, 2009. lenders should be sealed and marked
‘PROPOSAL FOR PUBLIC RELATIONS ASSISTANCE INI-
TIATIVES FOR THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS
COMPANY LIMITED’ and should be delivered to the at
fention of the ‘Mr. |. Kirk Griffin Acting President and
CEO.’

BIC RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY,
OR ALL TENDERS

palin yy |) ' i

allt

FROM page 1B

reveal that discussions on a
settlement between the Hay-
ward and St George sides
have been ongoing for sever-
al months in London. Some
sources have suggested that
the two parties may be close
to a deal, although the terms
are presently unknown.

This newspaper did reveal,
though, that the St George
estate rejected a previous
Hayward Family Trust offer
to give it a 37 per cent equity
stake in Intercontinental
Diversified Corporation
(IDC), the holding company
for the GBPA and its Port
Group Ltd affiliate.

That, though, was speedily
rejected, given that the
Bahamian Supreme Court
had ruled that the ownership
split between the two sides

(srupoa

Santander

was 50/50, although this has
been appealed.

The Prime Minister is
understood to want the
GBPA ownership dispute
resolved as rapidly as possi-
ble, and once and for all. He is
thought to see it as an obsta-
cle to his plans to revive
Grand Bahama and its econ-
omy, a hot-bed of FNM sup-
port, especially given his focus
on a new cruise port for the
island and, possibly, liquefied
natural gas (LNG) to follow.

The ownership dispute
paralysed the GBPA at the
worst possible time, giving the
impression that Freeport and
Grand Bahama were rudder-
less and badly damaging busi-
ness and investor confidence
when it was needed most in
the aftermath of the Royal
Oasis closure and, more
recently, the global recession.

It is unclear whether one

or both of the families would
retain GBPA ownership if a
settlement was reached, or if
an outside buyer would take
over. While Roddie Fleming
has disappeared from the
scene, Hutchison Whampoa
is still potentially waiting in
the wings, especially given the
increasing Chinese interest in
the Bahamas.

The St George had object-
ed to Mr Babak’s work per-
mit renewal on the grounds
that his contract dispute, in
which he had claimed $5 mil-
lion and could expose the
GBPA to a potential $75-$100
million liability, had not been
resolved. In response, the
GBPA’s attorneys accused
the St George estate of com-
mitting “an improper abuse”
by continuing to threaten the
company over issues such as
the renewal of Mr Babak’s
work permit.

SANTANDER BANK & TRUST LTD

has an immediate vacancy for a

“REDIT RISK MANAGER

Applicants must hold the following:

- Bachelors in Business Administration or related degree

- Minimum of 10 years experience in Private Banking with 5 years directly in the area

of Credit Risk,

Applicants should also be capable of the following:

1, Management and servicing of loan portfolios involving Spanish lending officers
and clients, liaison with other group units.
, Good organizational and planning skills,
3. Effective management and supervision of Credit Risk Department,
. Excellent communications skills in both English and Spanish essential.
. Be proficient in all Microsoft Office applications,

Applications in writing with details of education and experience should be addressed
to the Human Resources Manager, P.O. Box N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas not later than

October 9, 2000,

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.hy

EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST

EOL

FOR PREQUALIFICATION FOR

DESIGN, SUPPLY AND INSTALLATION OF
FURNITURE, FIXTURES & EQUIPMENT:

The College of The Bahamas (COB) is secking Expressions of Interest from qualified ven-
dors'firms to provide services and products for the design, supply and installation of fur-
niture, fixtures and equipment (FF&E) for

{i} the Harry Wloore Library and Information Centre presently under consiniction at
the Oakes Field Campus of The College and
{ii} the new Northern Bahamas Campus of The College presently under construction
in Freeport, Grand Bahama

Inleresied parties may obtain further inlormalion and purchase a copy of the Bxpressians
Of Interest Prequaliicwtion Application form trom:

The OMfice of the Vice President Finance

College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field
Nassau, Bahamas

The Office of the Associate Vice President

College of The bahamas

Northern Bahamas Campus

Freeport, (irand Bahama

Tel: 242-352-9761

An infeerrmration meeting will be held in Nassau, on Tuesday, 2h September, 20049 and on
Wednesday, 30th September, 2008 in Freeport ala time and venue to be announced,

EOl"s are io be submitted to the location(s) indicated in the EOL Prequalification Porm in
a scaled envelope appropriately marked:

Vice President, Finance
College of The Bahamas

EXPRESSIONOF INTEREST - FEE -

insert name of applicable facility

Firms must submit a separale EO! for each facility. All BOs are to be submitted hy 12:00
pm (mid-day) on Friday, 9th October, 200%,

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 5B



0.9m spend on
three alternate
energy studies

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE GOVERNMENT is
spending a $0.9 million grant
on studies conducted by Ger-
man firm Fitchner, which will
look at increasing energy effi-
ciency and security in the
Bahamas through three pilot
programmes, an advisor to the
Ministry of the Environment
revealed.

Glenn Laville, who is also
acting deputy general manag-
er at the Water and Sewerage
Corporation, said solar water
heating systems, Photovoltaic
power generating systems and
an incandescent to fluorescent
light bulb switch-out pro-
gramme will all be studied
during the 10-month grant
period.

Mr Laville, chairman of the
National Energy Policy (NEP)
committee, BEST Commis-
sion head Philip Weech, and
member of the renewable
energy committee at BEC,
Berlington Strachan, present-
ed a report on their progress
to members of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce and
the general public last Thurs-
day.

According to Mr Weech,
the Bahamas spent $0.8 bil-
lion on petroleum products in
2008 as the price of oil per
barrel peaked at $147 mid-
year. This cost translated into
higher fuel surcharge charges
for BEC consumers, and
caused the disconnection of
some 6,000 homes by late last
year.

The minister in charge of
BEC, Phenton Neymour, said
the NEP is being used to cre-

ate more energy security
throughout the Bahamas, and
to prevent such widespread
service disconnections by
cushioning the impact of
volatile oil prices should the
market hit record highs again.

BEC has constructed its
own alternative energy divi-
sion and issued a request for
proposals for alternative ener-
gy providers.

Mr Strachan said 13 firms
have already been shortlisted.
He said various methods of
alternative energy production
will be tested throughout New
Providence, Abaco, Long
Island and Eleuthera.

Some of the alternative
energy sources proposed by
firms who have looked at the
Bahamas’ potential have been
waste to energy, solar, wind,
solar/wind hybrids, and wave
energy.

The Bahamas’ national
energy demand has increased
by an average of 8 per cent
per annum, and is expected to
continue to rise.

"Renewable and locally
produced energy is also
expected to improve, increas-
ing the long-term economic
impact of the national energy
bill as the cost of energy
increases over time,” the
report said.

"Investing in these energy
options is expected to create
new employment opportuni-
ties and increase the portion
of the national energy bill that
is multiplied locally.”

The report suggests that 90
per cent of the energy con-
sumed in the Bahamas is pro-
duced through the burning of
fossil fuels. Even as these fos-
sil fuel consumption numbers

NN

Sars

N

Nassau Airport

Development Company

continue, the Government
continues its investment in -
and construction of - fuel oil-
burning power generators.

The newest plant is being
built in Wilson City, Abaco,
but construction was recently
halted to give BEC time to
obtain the necessary permits.

One downtown business
person, which wished not to
go on record, said the studies
government is doing are a
waste of time.

"They have been proven to
work in other countries. Why
must government waste time
and money on that,” said the
business person. "It's work-
ing in Germany, right, and we
have the same sun."

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Nassau Airport Development Company Limited (NAD) is seeking a Proponent or
Proponents (individual, consortium or joint venture that must include an experienced
newsstand operator) to finance, design, develop, operate and manage three newsstand,
bookstore and convenience shop locations in the new U.S. Departures Terminal currently
under construction at the Lynden Pindling International Airport. These stores will be
world class in operation, design and appearance with a distinctive ‘sense of place’ and
will offer a broad selection of newspapers, magazines, books, sundry & convenience
items and miscellaneous gifts at competitive prices.

1 (a) NEWSSTAND/BOOKSTORE/GIFTS in the U.S. Departures lounge
(b) NEWSSTAND KIOSK/COFFEE BAR/BAR in the U.S, Departures Concourse

2 NEWSSTAND/CONVENIENCE STORE/COFFEE BAR in U.5, Check-in.

Locations 1a) and 1{b) must be bid together. NAD will consider individual proposals for
I{al/(b) and 2 above or combined proposals for all locations.

Mandatory qualifications

i. Proponents must be Bahamian and incorporated in The Bahamas.

ii, Proponents must have operated a similar newsstand/books/gifts facility within
the last three (3) years.

NAD’S goals and objectives are to:

(a) achieve a high standard of excellence and customer service;

(b) offer a mix of concepts that will help to enhance the image of LPIA as.a world
class airport;

(c) offer retail and food & beverage choices to passengers at fair prices;

(d) offer a mix of local, regional and national and international brand-name
companies;

(e) develop and design retail facilities that complement the qualities of the new
terminal while recognizing the distinctive spirit, character and ‘sense of place’
of The Bahamas; and

(Fl optimize revenue to NAD.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs






















EXTERNAL LANDSCAPING, LIGHTING & IRRIGATION SYSTEMS
The College of The Bahamas (COB) is seeking Expressions of Interest from qualified
firms to provide services and products for the design, supply and installation of the exter-

nal landscaping, lighting and irrigation systems for

(i) the Harry Moore Library and Information Centre presently under construction at
the Oakes Field Campus of The College and

(ii} the new Northern Bahamas Campus of The College presently under construction
in Freeport, Grand Bahama

Interested parties may obtain further information and purchase a copy of the Expressions
of Interest Prequalification Application form from:

The Office of the Vice President Finance
College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field
Nassau, Bahamas

Ur

The Office of the Associate Vice President
College of The Bahamas
Northern Campus
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Tel: 242-352-9761

An information meeting will be held in Nassau, on Tuesday, 29th September, 2009 and on
Wednesday, 30th September, 2009 in Freeport at a time and venue to be announced.

EO!'s are to be submitted to the location(s) indicated in the EO! Prequalification Form in
a sealed envelope appropriately marked:

Vice President, Finance

College of The Bahamas

EXPRESSIONOF INTEREST - FEE -
insert name of applicable facility

Firms must submit a separate EO] tor each facility, All EOWs are to be submitted by 12:0)
pi (mid-day) on Friday, 9th October, 2009,

REQUEST FOR
ROPOSAL

NEWSSTANDS, BOOKS, GIFTS AND
CONVENIENCE SHOPS

Qualified and interested parties may pick-up the Request for Proposal package at NAD)'s
offices at the reception desk on the second floor Domestic/International Terminal at
Lynden Pindling International Airport between the hours of 9:00am and 4:00pm, from
September 15th to September 28th, 2009, A mandatory pre-proposal briefing for
those who have picked up packages will be held in the Arawak Lounge at the Airport on
Wednesday, September 30th at 10:00am.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE












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FROM page 1B

tive has confirmed, with the
group’s customer transaction
count defying the recession
by running some 15 per cent
ahead of 2008 year-to-date.
Speaking to this newspaper
after unveiling a dramatic
increase in fiscal 2010 second
quarter profits, which rose

from just $162,000 last year
to $1.18 million for the three
months to July 31, 2009,
Gavin Watchorn said that
despite generating a “full $4
million profit on a rolling
basis for the last 12 months”
and generating a “tremendous
improvement”, AML Foods
was “still not where we want
to be on the bottom line”.

Legal Notice

SOL SIGNUM INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,

And even though net prof-
its for the fiscal 2010 were
more than nine times last
year’s comparative, standing
at $2.2 million compared to
$244,000, Mr Watchorn said
the BISX-listed group felt
there was “room for improve-
ment on shrinkage” and
opportunities for sales growth
that had not been exploited.

“We feel there is further
room for growth for us,” the
AML Foods president and
chief executive told Tribune
Business, signifying how far
the company — in its previous
incarnation as Abaco Markets
— has come from the dark
days of fiscal 2003, when it
recorded a $25.2 million net
loss.

“For the year-to-date, our
customer transaction count is
up 15 per cent pretty much

are coming into the stores,
sales are up and we’re holding
our fixed costs flat.

“We’re offering quality
brands at good prices and cus-
tomers are seeing value,
although things are obviously
tight in the economy. There’s
a lot of noise in the market-
place. What the Solomon’s
[SuperCentre] and Cost-Right
brands, as well as the Domi-
no’s Pizza brand, offer is qual-
ity with value and quality with
savings, offering real value.”

Mr Watchorn told Tribune
Business that AML Foods
expected to have completely
repaid its debt to Royal Bank
of Canada (RBC) by the first
week in December 2009, with
“just over” $200,000 out-
standing, some $1.5 million
having already been repaid
this year. As at July 31, 2009,










some $1.36 million had been
repaid to RBC, some
$850,000 of that coming in the
second quarter.

“We’re going to bump the

across the board,” Mr
Watchorn told Tribune Busi-
ness. “Having more people
coming into the store tells you
you’re doing something right.
That’s behind the increase in
profitability — more people

the dissolution of SOL SIGNUM INC. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.

SEE next page

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

f (EN THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
(Liquidator) =

Viet our website af wwer.cob eda by

NOTICE

Town Meeting for Master of Law (LLM)
in Maritime Law Degree Programme in
collaboration with the University of London,
Monday 5th October, 2009,
Executive Boardroom,

Michael Eldon Complex, 3rd Floor
6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m,

Legal Notice

MONTRES INTERNATIONAL

VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of MONTRES INTERNATIONAL
VENTURES LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.



S.A. T. PREPARATION
CLASSES

AT KINGSWAY ACADEMY

FALTEORY CONSBERS
Chanboes Beginning Saturday September 26 through Saturday

age Apa ARGOSA CORP INC. December 5, 2009, Kingsway Academy will hold

(Liquidator)

S.A.T. Preparation Classes from 9:00 a.m. to
12:00 noon culminating in the writing of the S. A. T.
Examination in January. The cost is $250.00 per

person and includes all materials.

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work Interested persons are asked to contact the

Business Office at telephone 324-6887 / 324-6269
or the Guidance Conselor at 324-8811 or 324-3409,

COLONTAL
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:

THURSDAY, 17 SEPTEMBER 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,534.77| CHG -0.47| %CHG -0.03 | YTD -177.59 | YTD % -10.37
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Security Daily Vol. EPS$ Div$ P/E
1.15 AML Foods Limited 0.127 9.1
9.90 Bahamas Property Fund 0.992 10.8
6.18 Bank of Bahamas 0.244 25.3
0.63 Benchmark -0.877 N/M
3.15 Bahamas Waste 0.078 40.4
2.14 Fidelity Bank 0.055 43.1
10.00 Cable Bahamas 1.406 7A
2.74 Colina Holdings 0.249 11.0
5.26 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 0.419 141
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 0.111 33.6
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 0.382 5.4
6.60 Famguard 0.420 15.7
8.80 Finco 0.322 285
10.29 FirstCaribbean Bank 0.794 13.0
4.95 Focol (8) 0.332 15.0
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 0.000 N/M
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.035 8.6
5.49 ICD Utilities 0.407 13.5
9.98 J. S. Johnson 10.09 9.98 -0.11 0.952 10.5
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.180 55.6

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) FBB17 100.00 0.00 71%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price

492 8.42 14.00
2.00 6.25 4.00
0.35 0.40 0.55
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4038 3.72 5.20
2.8990 -1.39 -4.16
1.4892 3.87 5.47
3.0941 -8.61 -13.59
13.1136 3.93 5.87
101.6693 1.10 1.67
96.7398 0.35 -4.18
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.3399 2.69 -1.41
1.0707 3.38 5.14
1.0319 -0.11 2.05
1.0673 2.89 493
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask §$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index, January 1, 1994 = 100



52wk-Hi Previous Close Today's Close
1.15 1.15
10.75 10.75
6.18 6.18
0.63 0.63
3.15 3.15
2.37 2.37
10.00 10.00
2.74 2.74
5.92 5.92
3.74 3.73
2.05 2.05
6.60 6.60
9.30 9.30
10.29 10.29
4.99 4.99
1.00 1.00
0.30 0.30
5.50 5.50

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.01
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Legal Notice

SAGO ALPS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of SAGO ALPS INC. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

350
15,650
2,000

19,879
3,253

52wk-Hi Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

EPS$ __Div$
0.000
0.480

0.000

52wk-Low Symbol
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.
N/M
N/M

256.6

29.00 ABDAB Legal Notice

0.40 RND Holdings

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

52wk-Low

1.3344
2.8952
1.4119
3.0941
12.3870

100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
11-Sep-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

IRISH LORD MANAGEMENT INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of IRISH LORD MANAGEMENT INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 7B





AML Foods targets early 2010 dividend

monthly repayments on the
bank debt with the preference
share redemption fund,” Mr
Watchorn told Tribune Busi-
ness, explaining that the mon-
ey AML Foods had previous-
ly been setting aside to repay
RBC would now be allocat-
ed to meeting payments to the
company’s preference share
investors.

This meant that some
$75,000 previously allocated
to repaying RBC per month
would be combined with
$87,000 set aside for the pref-
erence share investors, Mr
Watchorn telling Tribune
Business: “We’ve put the
$165,000 in a preference share
redemption fund. We had
$1.2 million ring-fenced in
fixed deposits at the end of
July. Our expectation is that
we will have $1.8 million by
the end of January.”

The first redemption to
AML Foods’ preference
shareholders is due in March
2010, although Tribune Busi-
ness understands that they
and the company are in dis-
cussions to possibly extend
the debt’s maturity and roll it
over. This, if it happens,
would allow the company to
finance its anchor food store,
planned for western New
Providence’s new Town Cen-
tre, with no debt. Mr
Watchorn declined to com-
ment.

He added, though, that
AML Foods was working
with a California-based
designer on the new store,
and hoped to have its plans
ready by year-end, with ten-
ders put out for the store’s
equipment, plumbing and
refrigeration. The company
hoped to take possession of
the building from the devel-
oper by August 2010, and
open the store to the public
by April 2011.

Meanwhile, AML Foods’
liquidity position has also con-
tinued to improve, rising by
$937,000 during the fiscal 2010
first half to reach a net cash
position of $648,000 inclusive
of the $1.2 million set aside
to repay the preference share-
holders.

Mr Watchorn, though,
added that there were signs
the recession was taking an
increasingly heavy toll on
Bahamian consumers and
their disposable incomes, with
the overall customer market
shrinking and average per
capita spend dropping during
the Back-to-School period —
the second most-important
sales period for most retail-
ers behind Christmas.

While AML Foods had
done “fairly well” during this

not as high as seen for the first
six months of the year, but
net profits were along the
same trend in terms of being
higher for the year.

“We’ve seen a change in
customer spending habits,
which indicates less money
out there..... We’re not los-
ing market share, the market
itself is just shrinking a bit.
That’s our expectation for
Christmas.

“Sales for Back-to-School
were up just slightly, but not
at the level seen for this year.
We’ve seen a 15 per cent cus-
tomer transaction rise, but the
average spend dropped for
August.” In addition, Mr
Watchorn said AML Foods
and other Bahamian grocery
retailers did not ‘benefit’ from
the temporary spike seen in
August last year when con-
sumers stocked up in prepa-
ration for a possible hurricane
strike.

The AML Foods president
said costright.com, the com-
pany’s planned e-commerce
website, would be “made big-
ger than originally intended.
We hope to do live testing by
the end of the following week
for a public launch some time
at the end of October”.

He added: “We've had a lot
of interest from Family Island
households and businesses.
They’re seeing the website as
a way to shop in Nassau with-
out the cost of transportation
to Nassau.

“Other than that, we’re
gearing up for Christmas.

We’re just focused on having
a great Christmas season and
getting ready for that. I think
that, while we expect soften-
ing of our sales, we expect we
will continue to be profitable,
beat last year’s numbers and
end up with quite a good year
once January comes around.

“We think that will allow
us to negotiate some kind of
dividend payment in Febru-
ary/March next year. I think
the rest of the year will allow
us to do that. The dividend
payment will be based on the
fourth quarter numbers,
which come in during Febru-
ary. The dividend will be paid
in March, with the declara-
tion in February.”

Mr Watchorn said of the
dividend: “That’s what we’re
gearing towards. We feel it’s
achievable. I think the rest of
the year will be challenging,
not just for us but a lot of
Bahamian businesses. But we
feel confident that if we keep
doing what we’ve been doing
for the last 12-18 months we’ll
be fine.”

For the quarter to July 31,
2009, AML Foods’ rising
profitability was driven by its
increased sales and customer
transaction volume, with gross
margin dollars rising by 20 per
cent for the period and by 17
per cent year-to-date.

The second quarter saw
AML Foods’ shrinkage fall
by 20 per cent in dollar terms,
and by 29 per cent as a per-
centage of sales, compared to
the 2008 year ago period. For

The National Insurance Board

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

Notice to Vendors

The National Insurance Board (NIB) 1s preparing to make payments to vendors by direct
bank deposits. To facilitate this, the NIB 1s requesting that vendors provide the necessary
banking information. Forms will be distributed to vendors for completion. If you do not
receive one, please contact us at one of the following to obtain a copy of the form:

1. APBankinginfo@nib-bahamas.com
2. Telephone No.: (242) 502-1838, or
3. Collect a Form from any New Providence NIB Local Office

The NIB requests the cooperation of all vendors as we seek to provide mote efficient service.

the fiscal 2010 first half, shrink
as a percentage of sales
dropped by 17 per cent.

“For the first time in a
while, we’ve been able to
record a sizeable decrease in
shrinkage in both percentage
of sales and dollar terms,” Mr
Watchorn said. “We’re
pleased with what happened
with shrinkage. We’ve put a
lot of effort into shrinkage,
and have six people employed
in our Loss Prevention
Department.

“But it’s still well above
acceptable standards for us,
and we’re going to focus on
internal shrinkage.” He
explained that this was not so
much employee theft, as
AML Foods was developing a
reputation as a company
where there were conse-
quences for this, but areas
such as receiving and file
maintenance.

For the fiscal 2010 second
quarter, Solomon’s and Cost
Right combined generated a
14 per cent year-over-year
sales increase to $21.3 million.
For the first-half, these two
formats saw sales rise by 13.1
per cent to $41.5 million.

In the case of Domino’s
Pizza, second quarter sales
were up 11 per cent to $2.8
million year-over-year, and
ahead by 6.1 per cent at $5.3
million for the first half.

AML Foods’ total sales
stood at $24.1 million for the
second quarter, an increase
of 13.6 per cent compared to
2008 figures, with first half

sales up 12.3 per cent at $46.8
million.

“We’re very happy,” said
Mr Watchorn. “Given the
increasingly challenged envi-
ronment out there, and hear-
ing from other businesses

experiencing negative sales,
we’re pleased we’re remain-
ing positive and getting our
fair share of the market right
now. Once you increase sales
and keep your fixed costs flat,
that falls to your bottom line.”

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at weew.cob,edubs

NOTICE

Deadline for applications for
Spring (January) 2010 admission
Friday, September 25th, 2009 at 4:00 pm.

Applications may be accessed online at
www.cob.edu.bs or collected from the
Office of Admissions.

yt HE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

View ovr website of www.coh.edn.As

NOTICE

Master of Science in Elementary Education Degree
Programme in collaboration with Wheelock College.

Applications are available from:

The Graduate Programmes Office,
The College of The Bahamas, Michael H. Eldon
Complex, Room 26 Thompson Blyd,
For more informtaion call: 397-2601/2 or
send emails to: swisdomiecob.edu.hs

Application Deadline: L6th October, 2109,

oka Cole

wiial Hilton Hetel

larlborqugh St., Shop #1

Clearance SALE

Everything is

20

We offer Stringing Services, Repairs, Knotting,
Wiring, Driling and The Snack Fix System and
The Mystery Clasps

Pearls and Beads Strands Wholesale and Retail
P.O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tal: 242-323-1865
Email: gems-peans@hotmail.com

bune Business:

period, Mr Watchorn told Tri-
“For the
month of August, sales were



All information will be treated as strictly confidential.







Legal Notice

DOUBLE SCREEN INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of DOUBLE SCREEN INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

MOMENTS IN TIME CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of MOMENTS IN TIME CORPORATION
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

GOLDEN GATES ASSETS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of GOLDEN GATES ASSETS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

MUTZKO LAPINOU INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of MUTZKO LAPINOU INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

clases starts

Jewerl kin
Se prem er sign up now

Legal Notice



GREENWICH VALLEY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of GREENWICH VALLEY LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EASTERN WEALTH
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, which commenced on the 7th day of September
2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box

N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

Chairman's Report — (i, 2K

Te te watt geeal poten: dist D oeie br pera Boe

the first tine ot Chenier of the Bead of Panties ce

AT. Pacey Loewy Ar our WM oe July. our shangholden supporned che chomee in ree better

ioe who we we aed wher we do whde remo a lnk mo Our poor. “Les a beesh sm
JH y doer war forded dete
wires Wl iT Maree t h

lreds nocegengy challerenp economic conditions and a change morketple, wy rect

bey Gur birt feu on the pe sath dnb de we {ike a é

margin dollars hare increased, shank in our sno

ar

c etrangs becuse that has weld pose nears opener atnes

nde edie

dicrcaecd) andl car lquadity hae enced wath bank det further reduced [ni Our ceebtniuedd effete

to reduce chonk, we hee ineested beh om secunt ecpapenen: and serveces, wo-hevues

Prevention depammenr aad our imemal decipline process. As a west, we ane nce begeaning 1 see

the benchite of the umisinent th nah we bel the @ on a jrtcall part oF ihe parteriice me we

alae vy ae aN Moke Tha number of aaa tances hoe mcr rant in all liecanicore: while the

TWETHE CLT noncn bee ceoreeed marmeadli w

ach ® retleciee of the ounrenr eT i

Soe bois. We hart mare people in the shores, cur fut oot bee has eerie well controlled, ou

ayn logetics hewe ees mech impecresd andl ow

mprovemens on our shrek — all otwtech hes naindaned eno a much impenmed prohinalider

We ace very plerasd with the soled perfonercnce of ML. #

acd agnifcant =ymergE

cat (decd oe the erst of strainer: fr

and

18

?hou branch oo deher onicecred cinnmer sermce and emer tales 00 Oi CLEnOmer, conerol cos

aot peesihde: ad achiicet key ener on benny cot) koeiece ae cht
Cheped We de, bewver, hae in be alee mm ie
TenTin economy taoes incising challenges alone wih mew

air Wilke we capect an etysict on cur Bukwies on done level, we ser

wTece at Hie mtiirketphace
ef the porwuhng morket conden ga
nd creed Gomme ber ce

Comino ui case

Sere et anid a pers 1 Trent the Pact Ty Sonn sie i oe what gay honer taper ot 1g Soe

©. our brnds. reledesdy pursiine savers for our casiomers and smmnpeady managing what ae

Oe forme Hie one

We thask you foc poe conmnued suppor as me book forgand oo de nee eco ahead for lA!

scemiber bo, Zieh

pie
am

ISTERIM UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE QUARTER EXDED JULY 31, 2104

COASC0L 1A TED AALASCE SHEET
(Ereund fa noid of Faber ar doves!

January 41
ks

A,sae ts HL eee?

Liabilities CRS

COSS0LIDATED STATEMENT CF DMOOME
(Expreced ia Aaa of Borba dollars)

Quaner Erebed Cainer Eniked
ube 31, SUR July SL, Scaes

Saks ; 24,058 21am
Cos of sales C6 7 (13 571}
Cries profit

Selling, genoral ond sdnuresiraiee caper
Lihat Gecriling woomec

et oper pratt

[inserest capes?
Dividends on preference shang

Rat arom om oorwiraiiz @ OBtlion
Ret protnt om diaconiinued opocatara
Pact prvi

Prot per shore

UNS LIDA TOR STATESEST CAF IMUM SOUS TTS LED
(eal of fiioeia al Sabai ova!

Secs Aicnihes: Picked
July 31, SHR

Sirs Adicmibe. Prick
July 31, 2008

Saks 5 Ms, Tred ‘Ls
Line of eakes [324475 {2 A1)

Cireas prot 1317 12a

Selling, ptdcral atl alsiieieealres oo pore (life aR
Other operating inom 15 21h

Hel Gptrhaling profe 1a) ies
Pr-opening ooo

[nee £5 pees

Dividends on predereace shares

Mel pr on Gani p Operas
et (oe pet on deported oporanions
Met prot

Penéin por shang

USS LIDA TROIS TATEATE ST CRF CASH FLORA S

(Riise ip dsiinis of eke deities

Sin Months Ended Sin Months Ended

ily 31. He fully 3), 20s

Set profil fer poral

Sot esh proekdiod br opgramng acne maps

Wet cash used an inwewting activites

Set cosh (used my provalad by Gremcing actinic
leer tiknioe) in cash

EXPLANATORY WONT
TON TERIA UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Six Months Enaed July 71, 200%

AUTO DENCs ULICIES

These Tineke! POSES foee boon prepared in accordanens with [ecm athena! Fl nerezial
Reponing Stamiands asiag te ame accounting polices. and methods of ponpatation a
fac Crmeclidaied Frooncal Satemenia tecluded i ie TS Aenual Reperi

The: ooreidaied Ginasciil sancnces inelide the sooo of AML Foods Larated
fommeny Abaco Marloes Limdigd, ("the Cnopany”) and ms signticant wally owen
wubsidianca: Solomon's Supercentrc (heme) Lorie, Coat Right Mowe | atte
Soles Club (Freeper Lamia, Thieme Wholesale Linited, Cankbean Francie
Holdings Limited and Sokomon's Fresh Market Linvied

2. DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS

in March 9. 24M he Company ced operations in One Hight Aho, Accondingty
he beabihties of Cot Right Abace are treated as decertied as of July 3], 200.

The Company fas signed a three year lease for fe balling used by fe former sore
Dh hese Inchudes an opien to purchoes the bonding ai the ond of the lease tor $2 km

The equipment of the former birdies wor eed for SON rolling i a GN OF

fiapreal of 8h

a fe adie? Marea! solver oar fe ofvale! fc

dognier alo a fia ae
ti Brodie Given, af A Frei Cepporote Oi of Ten Ceaine Atoll, Ate Ala
Rel Mascnon, Tine Piha, val! 42 677 7M



THE TRIBUNE



$16m start-up targets

throughout the rest of the
Caribbean. [When] depends
on the success rate in the
Bahamas initially, but we
think we can move into the
Caribbean in years two to
three.

“We’ve begun discussions
with other Caribbean coun-
tries. We want to use the
Bahamas as a showcase; to
prove that we can outfit an
entire country. Our primary
goal is to get the Bahamas
outfitted for wireless broad-
band from the local loop, but
we will go as far as the fibre
reaches. Wherever the fibre
drop reaches is how far we
can take our services.”

As for the start of con-
sumer services, Mr Sumner
told Tribune Business: “That
will be dependent on what the
financing looks like at the end
of the day. We are anticipat-
ing being able to launch ser-
vices by the end of the fourth
quarter of this year, and cer-
tainly by 2010......

“We feel that in six months
we will be able to wirelessly
connect the entire country
through a wireless delivery
system, but everything is con-
tingent on the points we have
to go through before we deliv-
er connectivity to the end
users.”

IP Solutions International
is targeting Bahamian con-
sumers with a ‘multiple play’
proposition of services deliv-
ered via a wireless Internet
infrastructure. Among the
product offering will be news,
entertainment, movies, TV
and video-type games of a
non-casino variety.

Apart from Bahamian busi-
nesses and households, the
key markets for IP Solutions
International will also be the
nation’s hotel industry and
private gated communities.
Confirming that the compa-
ny had already signed Letters
of Intent to provide its ser-
vices to a number of
Bahamas-based hotels, Mr
Sumner said its plans had
elicited a “very, very good
response from this industry.

“Even before we got to this

stage, we got Letters of Intent
from a number of hotels
around the country,” he told
Tribune Business. “They have
been extremely interested in
the products and services. We
are reconfiguring their hotels
with upgraded technology,
new products and services.

“They’re all keenly inter-
ested in what we’re doing,
especially those hotels in the
Family Islands that do not
currently get these services.
We’re very satisfied with our
efforts and the response we’ve
gotten from the hotels as well
as gated communities. We’re
talking to gated communities
in New Providence and the
Family Islands, and they’re
very excited. I think that’s
going to represent a large part
of our business.”

Mr Sumner added that IP
Solutions International was
looking to broaden its product
offering beyond the ‘multiple
play’ core. He explained:
“We’re going to bring in oth-
er services — data services, dis-
aster recovery management
services. We’re going to be
dealing with those as well.
We’re going to convert the
Government’s e-business plat-
form, putting the Govern-
ment on one platform. We’re
also going to be dealing with
e-commerce and long-dis-
tance learning.”

Mr Sumner based his con-
fidence in IP Solutions Inter-
national’s ability to raise the
necessary financing on the
reaction to its proposal during
an investor presentation last
Thursday night.

With more than 100 repre-
sentatives of potential insti-
tutional investors and high
net-worth individuals present,
Mr Sumner said: “We were
very pleased with the turnout.
The people who came were
receptive to the company, the
technology and the prospects
that lie ahead for this invest-
ment. A lot of those there
gave commitments to become
investors in the company. We
had a tremendous turnout,
and are very pleased with it.”

IP Solutions International’s

Ministry of Housing

$16 million private placement
formally launches today, and
is due to close on October 30,
2009. “That gives us a chance
to get everyone on board with
us, to complete the regulatory
work and the work necessary
to deliver the service,” Mr
Sumner said.

When asked how confident
the company was that it
would raise the necessary
start-up financing, especially
given that the Bahamian and
world economies were mired
in recession, Mr Sumner
replied: “I would say that
we’re extremely confident
that we’re going to raise what
we’re looking for, based on
the interest we’ve already got,
the commitments we’ve got-
ten from people who attended
the investor presentation
night.

“Based on all the indica-
tions we’ve gotten, I’m very
confident we’re going to be
successful in this capital rais-
ing.”

IP Solutions International
has already moved to give
itself instant credibility among
investors, having appointed a
Board chaired by former gov-
ernor-general, Sir Orville
Turnquest, which also fea-
tures realtor Virginia Dami-
anos.

The company’s full-scale
launch, which has been on the
cards for more than a year, is
possibly the first positive
proof that the seeds of elec-
tronic communications sector
liberalization in the Bahamas
could bear a ripe fruit.

Mr Sumner confirmed to
Tribune Business that the
company had submitted its
first application to the new-
ly-formed Utilities Regulato-
ry and Competition Authori-
ty (URCA), seeking to trans-
fer its initial licence over from
former supervisor, the Public
Utilities Commission (PUC).

IP Solutions International
was now “putting in the bal-
ance of the substantive appli-
cation” to URCA, having
applied for both an individ-

SEE next page

ARDASTRA ESTATES - ROAD CONSTRUCTION

INVITATION TO TENDER

The Governement of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas through the Ministry
of Housing Invites qualified contractors to submit tenders for the completion of
the new road construction in the Ardastra Estates Subdivision on the Island of
New Providence in accordance with the design and specification approved by
the Ministry of Works and Transport

Interested parties may obtain further information and purchase a copy of the

invitation to Tender form:

The Office of the Permanent Secretary

Ministry of Housing
Claughton House

Shirley and Charlote Sts.

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 242-322-6005/6006

For a non-refundable fee of $100. The method of payment may be cash or
a certified cheque made payable to the “Ministry of Housing.” The documents
will be ready for collection beginning Wednesday 23rd, September, 2009 and
ending Wednesday 30th September, 2009 between the hours of 9:30 am to 4:
30 pm. An information meeting will be held on Thursday 1st October, 2009 in
conference room at the Ministry of Housing, Claughton House.

Tenders are to be submitted in a sealed envelope marked as indicated in the

Tender Document to:

The Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance

3rd Floor, Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building

No later than 1

West Bay St.
Nassau, Bahamas

m_on Ti 20th

. Tenders will be

publicly opened at 10:01 am on Tuesday 20th October, 2009 in the conference
room at the Tenders Board Meeting at the Ministry of Finance, 3rd Floor, Cecil
Wallace Whitfield Building, West Bay St., Nassau, Bahamas. The Government
reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.

DOH/32



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 9B

OO US INES
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS



5,000 first-year clients

ual licence and a spectrum
licence, in preparation for
offering an ever-widening
array of products.

The delay in IP Solutions
International’s formal launch
is likely to actually benefit it,
as its private placement offer-
ing will close some 16 days
after Cable Bahamas’ 15-year
exclusive monopoly on cable
TV services. Thus will thus
enable the start-up to poten-
tially offer more services if it
so wishes.

“We have revised our pro-
jections again, based on the
current economic situation,
and feel we’ll get about 5,000
subscribers in a year’s time,”
Mr Sumner told Tribune
Business, adding that while
the forecast was “conserva-
tive” and “scaled back”, IP
Solutions International was
confident it could beat them.

“Tt is a tough time, which
is why we’re taking a very
conservative approach to it,”
Mr Sumner told Tribune

new service, and when you
bring something to the mar-
ket, there is likely to be a shift
in the customer base, the ser-
vice base.”

Pointing out that IP Solu-
tions was also looking to serve
isolated Bahamian communi-
ties that had to date been
bypassed by electronic com-
munications services, Mr
Sumner added: “Bahamians
like new things, new services,
and we think we’ve got the
ability to attract people com-
ing in. I think we’ve got the
right business model, tech-
nology and product that the
Bahamian public will be inter-
ested in and will want to be a
part of it.”

Mr Sumner said contracts
for IP Solutions Internation-
al’s video and TV content had
already been signed with
“major distributors from
around the world”, the com-
pany having only decided to
use content it was able to
commercially and legally

is currently scouting possible
locations for its Network
Operations Centre, and host-
ing and redundancy features
will be supplied by its New
York-based partner and sup-
plier, GlobeCom. The latter
will be supplying consultant
engineers to help get the
Bahamian company’s systems
up and running.

Mr Sumner said IP Solu-
tions International was seek-
ing to get its head office “set
up in the next month or so”,
staffed by a full-time staff of
10 that will expand as the
company grows over the next
five years.

Among the initial employ-
ees will be managers, admin-
istrators and technical staff,
although the company will be
able to lean on GlobeCom for
the latter. Mr Sumner said IP
Solutions International
intended to “have employed
as many Bahamians as we
can”, and trained in all aspects
of the business, especially

position:

ADMINISTRATIVE VA

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the following

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.hy

ANCY

Dean, Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute (CHMI) will serve as
chief academic and stakeholder liaison officer for CHMI providing vision,
leadership, management and advocacy for tourism, hospitality and culinary
arts, ils programmes, faculty and staff within the College of The Bahamas.

Specific duties and responsibilities will involve formulating with key
stakeholders long- and short-range goals for CHMI, including updating the
College's master plan, strategic plan and other planning documents and
processes; providing leadership and coordination in the recruitment, selec-
tion and assignment of faculty and staff; liaising and collaborating with rel-
evant industry, NGOs and private sector stakeholders and working closely
with the employment community to review, develop and implement curtic-

ula, courses and certification programmes based upon defined needs.

Applicants should possess a doctoral degree in one of the disciplines of
lourism, hospitality, management or a related field, a minimum of five (5)
years of successful academic leadership at the level of department chair or
above or ten (10) years experience at an executive level within the hospi-
tality industry or an appropriate combination of academic qualification and
training. Por a detailed job description, visit www.coob.edu.bs/hrapply.
Interested candidates should submit a detailed resume and cover letter of
interest to: The Director, Human Resources, The College of The Bahamas,
P.O.Box N-4912, Nassau, Bahamas or www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply no later
than Wednesday, September 30, 2009.

secure.
IP Solutions International

Business. “But we’re coming
with a new company. This is a

once the sales and marketing
effort kicks-in.

Price controls 'work against the interests of consumers'

ing against the interests of consumers in the
long-term. You’re forced to offset it [the
impact of price controls] against other items,
and in the Bahamas you know operating costs
are higher than regional counterparts.”

As an example, Mr Watchorn said it was
impossible for any Bahamian retailer to make
a profit from selling eggs, as price controls
only allowed them to charge consumers a 9
per cent mark-up. “You can never make a
profit out of eggs,” he added.

Apart from retailers, he added that Bahami-
an wholesalers were also feeling the effects of
price controls, as they were only allowed a 13
per cent margin/mark-up on many breadbasket
items.

The current downward pressure on pricing,
Mr Watchorn said, was resulting from an
increase in competition in the Bahamian mar-
ket over the past six to eight weeks.

FROM page 1B

ering payroll, administrative costs and elec-
tricity.

Yet, as an example, he said that for 20 per
cent of a company’s sales, they were only
allowed by price controls to impose an average
14 per cent retail margin, meaning that there
was effectively a negative 11 per cent gross
operating marginal loss — the difference
between operating costs and the margin per-
mitted by price controls.

Explaining the implications of this, Mr
Watchorn told Tribune Business: “You’re los-
ing money on 20 per cent of your sales volume.
The pricing of other items has to compensate
for it.

“It’s pricing a lot of items out of the reach of
lower and middle income families, and work-

To advertise in The Tribune -
the #1 newspaper in circulation,
just call 502-2371 today!



Job Vacancies

Multi-Unit General Manager

Position Summary

The “Multi-Unit General Manager” function is the primary strategic business
leader of seven (7) business entities spread between two locations in Jupiter,
Florida AND Abaco, Bahamas.

Position oversees the development and implementation of club strategies
and ensures implementation of the brand service strategy and brand initiatives.
The position ensures that the clubs’ operations meet the brand’s target
customer needs, maximizes associate satisfaction and focuses on growing
revenues and the overall financial performance of all departments. As the
leader of both properties’ Guidance Teams, M-UGM develops and implements
Club-wide strategies that deliver products and services to meet or exceed
the needs and expectations of the brand’s target customer and associates and
provides a return on investment to the owners and the Company.

Expected Contributions
° Energizes the Gold Standards of the Company and ensures brand

initiatives are implemented to meet or exceed member, employee and
financial expectations. Continuously challenges the team to improve
operations, and ensures compliance with brand standards to protect
brand integrity.
Leverages synergies among both properties to maximize market
penetration, operational excellence, and overall business performance.
Selects, develops and retains a diverse leadership team capable of
delivering the expected performance contributions and with growth
potential, and holds others accountable for doing the same. Leads the
guidance team and leverages additional corporate and regional resources
to develop and implement destination club-wide strategies that are
aligned with the company’s Key Success Factors. Facilitates talent
development and leverages opportunities to share and maximize talent
among the Areas Clubs and Residences.
Focuses the team on delivering services and products to meet or exceed
owner expectations, create owner loyalty, and grow market share. Builds
relationships with key customers.

Qualifications
* 4-year bachelor's degree in Business Administration, Hotel and Restaurant

Management, or related major
15+ years of progressive experience in private club industry with
exposure to multiple disciplines
Prior General Manager or equivalent experience in a luxury market
environment
Property Management certifications required by the State of Florida
Prior multi-property oversight preferred

Skills & Knowledge

*¢ Leadership - Visible, proactive, personally involved leader with excellent
organizational skills, capable of providing focused leadership and
contributing to establish the club and residences prominent position
within the market. A well-developed capability for strategic decision-
making and a track record of proven results in the areas of customer
satisfaction, operational excellence, employee satisfaction, revenue and
profit.
Financial Acumen - Business savvy leader with demonstrated financial
acumen, capable of providing strong P&L results oriented financial
leadership.
Operations - Excellent sense of product and service quality, a passion
for excellence and an understanding of the sophisticated needs of the
luxury customer. Creative and innovative operations leadership, capable
of delivering products and services that will differentiate the clubs and
residences in the region’s luxury residential market.
Governance - Property Management designations or certifications
required by the State of Florida are required. Responsible for Rules
and Enforcement, Property Maintenance, Services Communications,
Finances, Administration, Asset Protection and assistance with Policy
Development all in accordance with local and state statutes.

Director of Operations

Position Summary
Functions as the strategic business leader of food and beverage/culinary
operations and acts as General Manager in his/her absence. Areas of

responsibility include: Front Office, Business Centre, Recreation/Fitness
Department, Retail/Gift Shops, Housekeeping, Food and Beverage/Culinary
and Event Management. Position oversees the development and
implementation of departmental strategies and ensures implementation of
the brand service strategy and brand initiatives. The position ensures that
food and beverage/culinary operations meet the brand’s target customer
needs, maximizes associate satisfaction, focuses on growing revenues and
the overall financial performance of the departments. As a member of the
Guidance Team, develops and implements hotel-wide strategies that deliver
products and services to meet or exceed the needs and expectations of the
brand’s target customer and associates and provides a return on investment
to the owners and Ritz-Carlton.

Responsibilities

* Demonstrating Leadership

¢ Achieving Goals

¢ Exceeding Customer Expectations

¢ Improving Profit

* Maintaining Balance Between Profit and Service Satisfaction
* Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates

¢ Destination Club and Residential Management

Qualifications
* 4-year bachelor's degree in Business Administration, Hotel and Restaurant
Management, or related major
© 5 years experience in executive management position in a five star
resort
* Ritz-Carlton Hotel or Destination Club experience preferred

Skills & Knowledge

* Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes
for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer
needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and daily
evaluation of existing customer satisfaction measurement processes.
Management of Financial Resources - Determining how money will
be spent and available resources utilized to get the work done and daily
accounting for these expenditures.
Analytical/Critical Thinking - The ability to gather and organize
information using a logical and systematic process; recognize patterns
and relationships in complex data; examine data to identify implications,
problems and draw appropriate conclusions; generate altemative solutions
to problems; evaluate strengths, weaknesses and consequences of
alternative solutions and approaches to solving problems.
Applied Business Knowledge - Understanding market dynamics involved
in running a private membership club under development, enterprise
level objectives and important aspects of ultra-luxury club / resort
business to accurately diagnose strengths and weaknesses, anticipate
opportunities and risks, identify issues, and develop strategies and plans.
Aligning individual and team actions with strategies and plans to drive
business results.

Pastry Chef

Position Summary

Create and maintain a positive work environment through coaching and leading
staff while establishing creative and exciting menu products, both appetizing and.
visually appealing. Work and maintain good working relationships with other
work areas. Meet with meeting planners and social catering event coordinators
to develop personalized dessert products. Direct, train and monitor performance
of Pastry staff. Maintain organization, cleanliness and sanitation of work areas
and equipment.

Essential Job Functions

* Train, coach, lead and hold Pastry team accountable to the job functions
listed below. Meet daily to review assignments, schedules, anticipated
business levels, employee performance issues and other information
pertinent to job performance.
Maintain and strictly abide by sanitation/health regulations and the
hotel’s food safety program requirements. Ensure all Pastry employees
maintain food handlers’ certification.
Meet with Executive Chef to review assignments, anticipated business
levels, changes and other information pertinent to the job performance

on a daily basis.

Prepare and assign production and prep work for Pastry staff to complete;
review priorities.

Communicate additions or changes to the assignments as they arise
throughout the shift. Identify situations, which compromise the
department's standards and delegate these tasks.

Prepare amenity orders for room service in accordance with specified
Tequirements and hotel standards.

Prepare all dishes following recipes and yield guides, according to Ritz-
Carlton standards.

Monitor performance of Pastry staff and ensure all procedures are
completed to the department standards

Assist Pastry staff wherever required to ensure excellent service to
guests.

Ensure all Pastry staff assignments are completed before they leave
work area.

Review status of work and follow-up actions required with the Executive
Chef before leaving.

Qualifications, Skills & Knowledge
¢ Certification of culinary training or apprenticeship.
* 5 years experience in F&B leadership position at a luxury club, hotel
or restaurant.
¢ Knowledge of food and beverage cost controls.
* Ability to plan and develop menus and recipes.

Director of Sales

Position Summary

Designing, implementing and continuously evaluating all sales processes;
Maintaining content and direction on Training and Motivation of Sales
Leadership and Field Sales Force; Developing and maintaining visibility
over Sales Standards and Accountability Measures; Providing related sales
input to New Site Feasibility and Business Planning Processes

Essential Job Functions

* Monitor and evaluate sales processes while maintaining visibility over
daily sales progress against budgets

¢ Create and implement specific sales and marketing field operations
best practices, policies and guidelines
Create and implement structured sales presentation training and sales
executive evaluation
Develop sales management training programs as well as create system
succession strategy to identify/groom key sales professionals
Insure performance management is implemented and maintained
consistently across the system
Review all sales related assumptions in the feasibility process, ensuring
strategic and operational reasonableness, comparability among PEPS,
budgets, forecasts and LRP
Provide Brand with product and business development recommendations.
Relate information regarding competitive tactics and products.

Qualifications, Skills & Knowledge

* College degree

¢ Minimum of ten years in the vacation ownership industry

* Minimum of five years ownership sales and sales management experience

* Strong verbal and written communications skills; ability to communicate
effectively with senior management
Experience in designing products, processes, policies and training
manuals
Ritz Carlton Club experience preferred

Please send resume to the attention of:
Director of Human Resources
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB-20571
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Bahamas

OR

Email: Freddie. Munnings@ritzcarlton.com
Deadline for applications is Friday, September 25, 2009



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PAGE 10B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

eA



By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

LAST week, Bahamian

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BEORAH BELINDA SMITH-
DAVIS of #7 AZURE PLACE, P.O. BOX F-42636, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21st day of
SEPTEMBER, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

DEVAUGHN HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 17th day of
September 2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.
Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

GANAS TRADING LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 17th day of
September 2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., PO.
Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Ministry Finance
RE: Real property tax Surcharge Waiver Notice

The general public is here by advised of the
provisions of the Real Property Tax Act. The
principal Act is amended by the insertion
immediately after section 21 of the following
new section 21 A and 21 B respectfully;

Section 21 A Waiver of surcharge.

Notwithstanding section 21, any surcharge
which has accumulated in respcct of

* (a) Owner-occupies property with a market
value of up to two hundred and fifty
thousand dollars ($250,000.00) shall be
waived.

* (b) owner-occupied property which exceeds
two hundred and fifty thousand dollars,
shall be waived if the outstanding real
property tax is paid on or before
December 31,2009: and

* (c) other property, shall be waived by fifty
per cent if the outstanding real property
tax is paid before December 31,2009.

Section 21 B Revival of Surcharge
lf after December 31,2009 any real property
tax remains outstanding in respect of

* (a) Owner-occupied property with a market
with a market value of up to two hundred
and fifty thousand dollars ($250,000.00)

* (b) owner-occupied property which exceeds

two hundred and fifty thousand.
(c) other property

The owner of such property, shall be liable to
pay a new surcharge of five per centum (5%)
of such tax tax per annum.



investors traded in 11 out of
the 24 listed securities, of
which four advanced, three
declined and four remained

unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 65,855 shares
changed hands, representing a
decrease of 111,756 shares,
compared to the previous
week's trading volume of
177,611 shares.

ICD Utilities (CD) was
the volume leader trading
20,335 shares, although its
stock price remained

unchanged at $5.50.

The Bahamas Property
Fund (BPF) led the
advancers, its share price
increasing by $0.85 on a vol-



ume of 1,925 shares to close
the week at $10.75.

J. S. Johnson & Company
(JSJ) was the lead decliner,
its share price falling by $0.11
to a new 52-week low of
$9.98, on a volume of 3,253
shares.

BOND MARKET

There were 19 Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas)15 Series D
notes traded in the Bahamian
market last week, with a value
of $19,000.

COMPANY NEWS
Premier Commercial Real

Legal Notice





TITUSEDEN LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)






Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of TITUSEDEN LTD. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

: Pharmacy Technician

Course

Be first, only 20 American
Certification Exam
Application available.

Register Now for October Session
Call Hepson at:
356-4860

Legal Notice

MENNARD CAUSEWAY LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 17th day of
September 2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., PO.
Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOCHE AZUL INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of NOCHE AZUL INC. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Estate Investment Corpora-
tion (PRE) released its unau-
dited financial results for the
quarter ending June 30, 2009.

For the quarter, PRE
reported net income of about
$169,000, compared to a loss
of $381,000 during the same
period last year, an improve-
ment of $550,000.

Total income of $374,000
was consistent with the prior
period, but total expenses of
$205,000 declined by $560,000
from the amount reported in
the June 30, 2008, quarter
end.

Total assets and liabilities
at June 30, 2009, were $17
million and $3.5 million
respectively, with net asset
value per share being $16.01
compared to $15.98 per share
for the same quarter last year.

Dividend Notes

¢ Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) has declared a divi-
dend of $0.05 per share,
payable on September 30,
2009, to all ordinary share-
holders of record date Sep-
tember 15, 2009.

¢ Doctor's Hospital
Healthcare Systems (DHS)
has declared a dividend of
$0.02 per share, payable on
September 30, 2009, to all
ordinary shareholders of
record date September 17,
2009.

¢ Cable Bahamas (CAB)
has declared a dividend of
$0.07 per share, payable on
September 30, 2009, to all
ordinary shareholders of
record date September 15,
2009.

e¢ Consolidated Water
BDRs has declared a divi-
dend of $0.015 per share,
payable on November 6,
2009, to all ordinary share-
holders of record date Octo-
ber 1, 2009.

AGM Notice

Premier Commercial Real
Estate Investment Corpora-
tion (PRE) will hold its annu-
al general meeting on Thurs-
day, September 24, 2009, at
liam at the company’s regis-
tered office, Experta Trust

Company (Bahamas).

KING'S

REAL ESTATE

JOB OPPORTUNITY
Real Estate Agents

Applicants must have:

* Outstanding personality

* Current BREA license

* Minimum 2-years experience
* Proven sales record

Apply to bahamas@kingsrealty.com
Deadline: September 30, 2009
Information: 394-4397

Legal Notice

ORANGE SANDCREST INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 17th day of
September 2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., RO.
Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

RAINBOW ASSET PTE LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of RAINBOW ASSET PTE LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 11B





Development
aims to fulfil
its Destini

Administrators for the 49-
lot Destini Lakes community
have said they are experienc-
ing relatively good sales given
the economic climate, with
potential buyers contacting
their offices daily.

Lorraine Hamilton and Lil-
lian Roberts said the commu-
nity, located on Lake Killar-
ney off J. F. Kennedy Drive in
western New Providence, is
suited for business profes-
sionals as well as single fami-
lies through potential family,
duplex and four-plex struc-
tures. The standard lot size is
95 x 100, with each home fea-
turing its own unique design,
and individual prices ranging
from $120,000 to $135,000.

“Tt is our hope that Destini
Lakes will be the number one
choice for young professional
families who are looking to
start off in a nice area and
raise their children. I think
the location is perfect for rais-
ing a family. The new gated
subdivision is located about
five to 10 minutes from the
airport and another five min-
utes from Cable Beach, and
only 15 minutes from Down
Town. So residents will cer-
tainly have easy access to
everything from New Provi-
dence,” said Ms. Hamilton.

Ms Roberts said the com-
pany was attempting to make
it easier for prospective
homeowners by arranging in-
house financing through
Bahamian financial institu-
tions.

BFSB opens 2009 Award nominations

The Bahamas Financial
Services Board has opened
nominations for the
2009 Financial Services Indus-
try Excellence Awards.

As in previous years,
awardees will be chosen for
(1) Executive of the Year —
chief executive level; (2) Pro-
fessional of the Year - Any
level of management or
supervision (3) Achiever of
the Year - Junior and support
levels and (4) Financial Ser-
vices Development and Pro-
motion awards. The deadline
for nominations is October 2,
2009.

BFSB’s chief executive and
executive director, Wendy C.
Warren, said: “The annu-
al Awards Programme, now
in its ninth year, recognises
one of the most important
assets of our financial services
industry: ‘people
power’. Without a doubt,
capacity building — human
resource development — is of
critical significance to the
ongoing success of the finan-
cial services sector.”

This initiative was launched
in 2001, in collaboration with
the Professional Industry
Association Working Group
(PIAWG) as part of the
Financial Centre Focus (FCF)

For the stories
ATRL Ee

er 4
ML ES



Legal Notice

NOTICE
QUILL HILL LTD.

—_— —



WENDY WARREN

outreach, designed to profile
the industry. Specifically, this
recognition programme pro-
files role models in the indus-

try for their outstanding per-
formance and contribution to
the growth and development
of the industry here in the
Bahamas.

The Presentations Cere-
mony for the 2009 Financial
Services Industry Excellence
Awards has been scheduled
for Thursday, October 22.
The event will be hosted again
at the Sandals Royal Bahami-
an Resort & Spa, but will take
on a new format. Rather than
an Awards Banquet, the
awards ceremony will occur
as a separate event, followed
by a Cocktail Reception
immediately afterwards.

Also set to be recognised
at the Awards Ceremony will

Legal Notice

OPPORTUNE VICTORY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of OPPORTUNE VICTORY LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

KEDGEWICK INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

be the Financial Services Stu- dent of the Year.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ACCRINGTON HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 17th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

Common Law & Equity Division

2009/CLE/gen/qui/01193

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
comprising Eight hundred and Fifty-nine thousandths (.859) of
an acre situate on the Southern side of Haynes Avenue in the
Settlement of Governor’s Harbour in the Island of Eleuthera.

AND
IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Ian A. Gray and Ellen
M. Gray
NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of IAN A. GRAY AND ELLEN M. GRAY of
Ontario, Canada in respect of:-

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate on the Southern
side of Haynes Avenue in the Settlement of Governor’s Harbour
in the Island of Eleuthera comprising Eight hundred and Fifty-
nine thousandths (.859) of an acre and which said parcel of
land is bounded on the NORTHNORTHEAST by Haynes

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 .
Avenue and running thereon Fifteen and Forty-one hundredths

(15.41) feet on the NORTHEAST by Buccaneer Hill said to
be the property of Tanya Melich-Crone and running thereon
One hundred and Forty-nine and Ninety-three hundredths
(149.43) feet on the NORTHWEST by the said Buccaneer Hill
and running thereon Twenty-four and Ninety-four hundredths
(24.94) feet on the NORTHEAST by the said Buccaneer Hill
and by land said to be the property of Paul Petty and running

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
the dissolution of KEDGEWICK INTERNATIONAL LIM-
ITED has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of QUILL HILL LTD. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-
pany has therefore been struck off the Register. been issued and the company has therefore been struck off the

Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was 17th

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

CABEX INTERNACIONAL LTD.

Notice is hereby given that the winding up and dis-
solution of CABEX INTERNACIONAL LTD.
has been completed in accordance with the Articles
of Dissolution and that the Company has been
struck from the Register of Companies on the 12th

day of August, 2007.

Maria M. Férére
Joint Liquidators

Legal Notice

SCANDANIVIAN PEAKS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 17th day of
September 2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., PO.
Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

day of August, 2009.

Re: Lot # 12, Block # 86, Richmond Park
Subdivision, Unit 3R Freeport, Grand Bahama

Recently Constructed Six-Plex

Five Units:
One bedroom one bathroom, living and dining
area, kitchen and laundry area.

One Unit:
Four bedrooms, two bathrooms, a powder room,
living and dining room, family room, kitchen,
office and laundry room and arctic area.

Potential Income:
One bedroom units $3,250.00 per month
Four bedrooms unit $1,400.00 per month.

For conditions of sale and any
other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
@ 502-0929 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should
submit offer in writing addressed to
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
P. O. Box N-7518 Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us before October 9th, 2009



thereon Fifty-eight and Seventy-eight hundredths (58.78) feet
and One hundred and Nine and Fifty-eight hundredths (109.58)
feet respectively on the SOUTHEAST by a chain-linked
fence separating it from the property of the said Paul Petty and
running thereon One hundred and Forty-three and Eighty-one
hundredths (143.81) feet on the SOUTHWEST again by the
property of the said Paul Petty and by the property of Bishop
Clifford and Velma Petty and running thereon Seventy-four
and Twenty-seven hundredths (74.27) feet and Eighty-nine
and Thirty-four hundredths (89.34) feet respectively on
the SOUTHEAST by the property of the said Bishop and
Velma Petty and running thereon Twenty-five and Forty-one
hundredths (25.41) feet on the SOUTHWEST by the property
of Pamela Moss and Trevor Pyfrom and running thereon in
total Seventy-nine and Twenty hundredths (79.20) feet on the
NORTHWEST by the property of the said Trevor Pyfrom and
running thereon Nineteen and Thirty-nine hundredths (19.39)
feet and on the NORTH and WEST by the property of the
Estate of David Sweeting and running thereon in several courses
Eighteen and Twenty-nine hundredths (18.29) feet, Six and
Two hundredths (6.02) feet, Seventy-nine and Fifty hundredths
(79.50) feet, Eleven and Sixty-one hundredths (11.61) feet and
Sixty-eight and Forty-one hundredths (68.41) feet and which
said parcel of land has such position shape marks boundaries
and dimensions as are shown on the plan filed herein which is
recorded in the Department of Lands and Surveys as “Plan No.
935 EL” and thereon outlined in Pink.”

IAN A. GRAY AND ELLEN M. GRAY claim to be the
owners in fee simple in possession of the said land free from
encumbrances and has made application to the Supreme Court
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section 3 of The
Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have their title to the said land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.A plan of the
said land may be inspected during normal office hours in the
following places:The Registry of the Supreme Court in the
said City of Nassau;The Chambers of McKinney, Bancroft
& Hughes, Mareva House, 4 George Street in the City of
Nassau, Attorneys for the Petitioners; and The office of the
Administrator at Governor’s Harbour, Eleuthera.

Notice is hereby given that any persons having dower or a
right of dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition shall on or before the 20% day of October, 2009
file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a statement of their claim in the prescribed form,
verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such
person to file and serve a statement of his claim on or before the
said 20" day of | October, A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to
such claim.

Dated the 26" day of August, A.D., 2009

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Mareva House
4 George Street
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioners



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

“iS

ELBOW CAY — ABACO, the third largest and
fastest-growing economy in the country, has
so far retained its natural beauty by virtue of a

somewhat independent economy

sustained

by a steady stream of boaters and second
homeowners who flee to Great Abaco and its
chain of cays in search of somewhere to
escape, unwind, and get away from it all. Even

in a recession...





> Cla 1

The stories behind the news



Another piece of paradise
destined for destruction?

By MEGAN REYNOLDS

hat sets the

islands of the

Bahamas apart

from other

tourist destina-
tions in the Caribbean is that in this
splendid chain of islands, each has its
own character.

Abaco, the third largest and
fastest-growing economy in the
country, has so far retained its nat-
ural beauty by virtue of a somewhat
independent economy sustained by
a steady stream of boaters and sec-
ond homeowners who flee to Great
Abaco and its chain of cays in search
of somewhere to escape, unwind,
and get away from it all. Even in a
recession.

But both Abaconians and second
homeowners who find peace in Aba-
co’s pristine beaches, clear waters
and expanse of creeks that lace
Great Abaco’s coastline, fear the
Abaco they know is slipping away,
and that they have little power to
prevent it.

Abaco is at a point where further

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DEVELOPMENT in the Abacos has raised local fears
that the land both Abaconians and visitors hold dear
is doomed to become another big city destined for
destruction. Insight explores the problems and the
progress Abaco is facing, and the alternatives...

development is imminent, and there
are groups who want to have a say in
the direction it steers towards the
future, but they feel their concerns
are falling on deaf ears.

They were insulted to learn about
the development of a Bunker C fuel
power plant in Wilson City in a pub-
lic meeting on September 10, over a
month after construction had
already begun.

The Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
ration (BEC) admitted it was wrong

not to inform the Abaco public ear-
lier, as nearly 1,000 concerned resi-
dents attended the meeting request-
ed by local conservationist group
Friends of the Environment because
of the high level of public concern.

Not all who attended the meet-
ing were against the project, but
there were many who had questions
they wanted to be answered.

They knew the power plant was
planned for Snake Cay, an environ-
mentally sensitive area on Great

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Abaco’s east coast, and opposition
formed, as people feared the
destructive impact it could have on
the environment and the health of
the community.

Hence when government and
BEC decided to plough ahead with
the plans for a $105 million, 48 mw
power plant burning Bunker C
(HFO) fuel in a new site at Wilson
City — an area intrinsically linked to
the environmentally sensitive Snake
Cay by a complex network of blue

holes — plans were kept quiet.

BEC chairman Fred Gottlieb con-
firmed the project had been agreed
by the Christie administration in
2005, and signed off by the Ingra-
ham government in December 2007,
but as plans moved forward, Aba-
co’s permanent and part-time resi-
dents were left in the dark.

Dundas Town resident and moth-
er of two Leazona Bethel-Richard

SEE next page


PAGE 2C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Another piece of paradise destined

FROM page 1B

said: “I don’t think they even
consulted people in Abaco
who know the area, people
who have lived here all their
lives and who can offer some
serious input; that’s what’s
insulting.”

Residents fear the Bunker
C plant will pollute Abaco’s
clean air, land and sea, and
Mrs Bethel-Richard, and oth-
ers, feel there was not suffi-
cient exploration of alterna-
tive, renewable energy
sources.

Part-time resident and wind
turbine designer David Pit-
cairn said figures presented

at the meeting showing winds
blowing southeast across
Great Abaco at around seven
mph were misleading, as his
own Internet research had
shown winds are likely to be
around 18 mph and blowing
northwest.

Mr Pitcairn said investing
in a data logging wind tower
could confirm this, and mean
a different future for Abaco.

Mrs Bethel-Richard said: “I
have not got the impression
that they wanted renewable
energy to be looked into in a
meaningful way.

“T don’t want for our kids
to have to be burdened with
still having to buy fossil fuels

in the future, when they could
put the money they are
putting into the power plant
into a renewable energy plant,
even if it isn’t completely
renewable.”

She added: “We need pow-
er, without a doubt, but I
think we need to be more
responsible.

“There’s this impression
that people who love the envi-
ronment don’t like develop-
ment and that’s not true.

“We want something
responsible that can be sus-
tained for a long amount of
time.

“T would like for Abaco to
be the greenest island in the

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Caribbean.”

Designating Abaco as an
energy-efficient island would
certainly be one path towards
development that would set
the main island and cays apart
from the rest.

And power plant develop-
ers MAN Diesel Group is
known to have built renew-
able energy plants elsewhere,
but BEC and government
have made clear Bunker C is

A VIEW of Hope Town, Abaco...

the only option they will con-
sider for Abaco right now.

An Abaco woman, who
asked to remain anonymous,
told Insight she feels there is
something more going on.

She said: “I firmly believe
something is fishy about the
fuel supply contract, because
if it wasn’t, why would they
be so hell bent about sticking
with Bunker C?

“They have said the differ-

Legal Notice

BLOMINSDALT INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 17th day of
September 2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.
Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

LOURDES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of LOURDES INC. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

SOLID VAULT INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 17th day of
September 2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.
Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



ence in price between diesel
and Bunker C is upwards of
$9m, but it could be as little as
$3m, and that’s nothing con-
sidering the health implica-
tions.

“T think somebody is going
to get the contract for the
HFO and giving kickbacks,
that’s what makes this country
go around,” she speculated.

Others fear the power plant
will only pave the way for
over zealous development.

It is feared that a large-scale
development of South Aba-
co, including three hotels, two
golf courses, and an
amphitheatre in an area near
the Abaco National Park,
may be coming in behind the
new power plant, and is per-
haps linked to the $105 mil-
lon investment of “local”
funds for the plant.

The Valencia development
sparked controversy when it
was proposed last year, and
has since gone so quiet that
even the website about the
project has vanished.

But it is rumoured the
developers are now hoping to
put their plans back in action.

There are some Abaconi-
ans who feel such large-scale
developments are not need-
ed in Abaco, as it has a steady
stream of visitors who are
attracted by the fact that it is
less developed than New
Providence and Grand
Bahama.

And more than that, they
fear developments on that
scale could be doomed to fail.

Marsh Harbour real estate
broker Brent Cartwright said:
“We really don’t need any
developments right now
because the ones we already
have are struggling, so we
would hate to see any other
developments come on in the
next five or ten years when
we have two here which have
the volume and capacity to
bring a lot more growth just
between them.

“Tjust don’t see how many
more could be successful on
the island and I don’t want to
see other projects come on
and not make it. I think rapid
growth could be detrimental
for Abaco.”

Abaco suffered less than
other islands when the eco-
nomic crisis hit last year as
small-scale development was
kept alive by second home-
owners equipped with enough
disposable income to vacation
when most potential visitors
were tightening their belts.

Meanwhile the Four Sea-
sons resort in Exuma was
forced to close, and thousands
of people in the hotel sector
lost their jobs at Atlantis, the
Wyndham, and hotels across
New Providence and Grand
Bahama.

Many Abaco residents say
they would like to see more
sustainable models of devel-
opment, like Schooner Bay in
South Abaco, and allow such
models to characterise the
area’s growth.

Schooner Bay is intended
to be a sustainable communi-
ty with a farm and farmers
market growing food for the
residents of its 600 homes, as
well as providing a mixture of
shops, restaurants, offices and
boutiques.

One Abaco woman told
Insight: “Valencia is the kind
of development Abaco peo-
ple don’t want, and we don’t

SEE next page

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009, PAGE 3C

INSIGHT

for destruction?

have a say about what hap-
pens in our own island.

“Decisions are made in
Nassau and then they come
here and shove it down our
throats.

“T think developments like
Schooner Bay, which are not
too big but big enough for
developers to make some
money on, would be a better
model.

“They are trying to involve
locals as much as they can in
terms of creating business
opportunities on site, where
as Baker’s Bay (in Guana
Cay) wants to be gated, and
private, with Bahamians
sweeping floors, mopping
floors and serving drinks.”

As a farmer, she would also
like to see agriculture devel-
oped in Abaco so the island
can be independent and sus-
tainable.

She said food shortages
could become a serious con-
cern for Abaco, and after the
September 11 attacks in 2001,
food imports didn’t reach the
island for nine weeks.

South Abaco MP Edison
Key, as executive chairman
of the Bahamas Agricultural

and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC), is supportive of the
cause to develop farming in
Abaco.

He is also supportive of the
move for a Bunker C power
plant in Wilson City, and of
the Baker’s Bay development,
as well as others like it, and
does not see agriculture as an
alternative, but an additional
form of development.

The BAIC currently has
charge of around 10,000 acres
of former sugar plantations
south of Spring City, 640 acres
of which have been divided
into five and ten acre farm-
ing plots which have already
attracted Chinese investment.

Mr Key said: “There’s a
tremendous amount of inter-
est being shown by a lot of
people, especially since the
economy has slowed down.

“People have realised it’s
not just tourism we need, we
need another industry to pro-
vide jobs and agriculture is
one of the most important at
this time to supply the country
with food.

“Agriculture has the poten-
tial for employment for thou-
sands of people, and there’s

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Visit oar website at werw.cob,edubs

NOTICE

Tenders are invited forthe provision of cooked fond services at
The College of The Bohomas’ Grosvenor Close Campus,
Shirley Street

Tender documents may be collected frm:
Portia Smith Student Services. Centre
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Contact: Mrs. Elvina Bastian at 302-4516

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Ms. Cheryl Simms
V. P., Finance
The College of The Baharnies

Deadline for submission
September Jtth, 2009 at Spon,

Tender document should be marked as folbiws:
Tender 1404
PROPOSAL TO PROVIDE COOKED FOOD ON
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS*
GROSVENOR CLOSE CAMPUS

The College of The Bahamas
reserves the right te accept or reject wll proposals

Site visit will take place on Monday Sepiember 230d,
Parties are to meet al the Physical Plant burldine,

The College of The Bahamas, Oakes Field Compus at )0o.m.

For all enquiries regarding the site visit
Contact Mr. Julion Miller at
(242)-302-4207, (242)-302-4325 or (242 )-376-5021

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tremendous potential for food
security in our country.”

However, farmers in Abaco
said they have been hindered
from making a profit on fruits
and vegetables because of the
over-complicated application
process to reduce import duty
on farm supplies and equip-
ment.

“There is too much red
tape going through all this,”
Mr Key said.

“Tt should be very simple,
and hopefully we will get to
that stage, but right now, this
is how it has to be done.”

If the growing population
of Haitian migrants, thou-
sands of whom have settled
in the slums of The Mud and
Pigeon Pea in Marsh Har-
bour, could also be mobilised
to work through a more sim-



ple work permit application
process, there would also be a
tremendous potential work
force to develop agriculture.

Mr Key said: “We need
people to work on the farms,
and they could be helping to
develop the agriculture indus-
try that’s already in the coun-
try.

“There must be some way
to put these people to work
and help to support us in the
food industry while they can
also help themselves.”

Many of those in the Hait-
lan community come from an
agricultural background, but
are unable to work because
of the difficult work permit
applications.

SEE page 8C

INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGES
AND CULTURES
INSTITUTE










IL

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Legal Notice

NOTICE
EBURY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, which commenced on the 7th day of September
2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box
N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



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High: 92°F/33°C ~~. Some sun with a Partly cloudy, a Partly sunny, a t-storm; Partly sunny, a t-storm Partly sunny with a Partly sunny, a t-storm The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
pee ae le shower or t-storm. thunderstorm; warm. breezy. possible. shower possible. in spots. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
Low: 75°F/24°C a . ; , ; ,
@ Woo High: 89 High: 89 High: 90 High: 89
- \*\. 1 . oO . oO . oO . oO . oO . °
c a High: 89 Low: 80 Low: 80 Low: 79 Low: 79 Low: 77 see ERE
TAMPA fifa Ah ae a
High: 91° F/33° C | « 103° F Q6°-86° F 96°-84° F Q6°-86° F High HEL(ft.) Low —_Ht.(ft
Low: 75° F/24°C oe r, The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and 9:15am. 3.6 2:58am. 0.0
a @ - . elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 9:32pm. 3.0 3:38pm. 0.3
€ Nese 40:18pm. 28 4:27pm. 06
) he a Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Wednesday 10:40am. 33 4:26am. 04
_ = ABACO Temperature 11:06 p.m. 26 5:17pm. 09
7 : en | hs OO 0 IGM sess sasadvssensslacetsonaetecstectiateds aactane 91° F/33° C 71-40 37 5413 07
A - High: 89° F/32°C LOW oeeeeeeeeeeeee 81° F/27° C Thursday 41.59 pan 25 Sion, 19
f a A ; a Low: 77° F/25°C Normal high... errs G qo.
7 . me , Normal low 75° F/24° C
a, eS @ WEST PALMBEACH i Last year's high... or Fsc | ONT MIM (II
4 — High: 89° F/32° C on Last year's lOW oo... eseseeeeeeeeeeeeeeees 75° F/24° C a aes ae a
—_= Low: 78° F/26°C i ~~ Precipitation = = = = = ==S—s—CSs—S—S—SsSS rise... ‘58am. Moonrise. .... 46 a.m.
ra - @ i -_, As of 2 p.m. yesterday oo... ices 0.00" Sunset....... 7:07 p.m. Moonset ..... 8:54 p.m.
alll ; FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT wes Year to date ... 30. First Full Last New
High: 89° F/32° C @ High: 89° F/32° C Normal year to date ......c.ccsecsecsesscsseesecseeee 36.03" 7 7 -
| Low: 79° F/26°C — Low: 76° F/24°C e Gee. de
a AccuWeather.com as Wes ee
@ i ay Forecasts and graphics provided by - _ ay
hy “ MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Sep.26 Oct.4 Oct.11 Oct. 18
eee ie ELEUTHERA
“ft Low: 79° F/26° C NASSAU Mit rome
High: 89° F/32°C oe:
_- ——- Low: 80° F/27°C
a ge -* i. @ - ‘
KEY WEST : i So —_ CATISLAND
High: 90° F/32" C High: 86° F/30° C
Low: 80° F/27° C " " Low: 75° F/24°C
ie
GREAT EXUMA “at SAN SALVADOR
oe ao 4 High: 88° F/31°C
de Low: 76° F/24°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | “ f
highs and tonights's lows. High: 91° F/33° C —>- Ns
Low: 76° F/24°C i. , he
ne , Ay
LONG ISLAND
Low: 76° F/24° C
Today Tuesday Today Tuesday Today Tuesday ll MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 87° F/31°C
FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FIC FIC FIC F/C = ei Low: 75° F/24° C
Albuquerque 82/27 52/11 pe 67/9 47/8 pc Indianapolis 81/27 63/17 t 84/28 64/17 t Philadelphia 78/25 63/17 $s 78/25 66/18 pc ;
Anchorage 5412 43/6 c 50/10 38/3 sh Jacksonville 88/31 72/22 t 88/31 72/22 t Phoenix 105/40 75/23 s 100/37 71/21 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 80/26 68/20 t 85/29 69/20 pc Kansas City 76/24 55/12 t 73/22 56/12 c Pittsburgh 71/21 6216 t — 78/25 59/15 sh RAGGEDISLAND — Migh:89°F/82°c
Atlantic City 78/25 61/16 s 77/25 64417 pc Las Vegas 98/36 69/20 s 98/36 65418 s Portland,OR 93/33 54/12 s 96/35 57/13 s High: 87° F/31° C Low: 78° F/26°C
Baltimore 76/24 62/16 pce 78/25 64/17 pc Little Rock 87/30 67/19 pce 82/27 68/20 t Raleigh-Durham 82/27 64/17 pce 984/28 65/18 t Low: 75° F/24°C - %
Boston 77/25 59/15 s 75/23 647 pc Los Angeles 88/31 66/18 s 96/35 68/20 $s St. Louis 86/30 67/19 pe 83/28 67/19 t .
Buffalo 77/25 6216 4+ 75/23 616 pc Louisville 81/27 68/20 t 85/29 66/18 t Salt Lake City 68/20 43/6 s 73/22 52/1 $s GREAT INAGUA vw
Charleston, SC 86/30 69/20 t 85/29 72/22 t Memphis 86/30 71/21 t 84/28 70/21 t San Antonio 90/32 73/22 s 83/28 65/18 ft High: 90° F/32° C
Chicago 81/27 60/15 pe 79/26 58/14 t Miami 89/31 79/26 t 89/31 79/26 t San Diego 83/28 65/18 s 90/32 63/17 s Low 77°F25°C
Cleveland 78/25 66/18 r 79/26 58/14 pc Minneapolis 76/24 60/15 t 74/23 59/15 c San Francisco 89/31 57/13 s 90/32 55/12 s ‘i
Dallas 90/32 66/18 pce 79/26 60/15 t Nashville 83/28 67/19 t 82/27 67/19 t Seattle 81/27 54/12 s 88/31 55/12 s
Denver 58/14 344 4+ 50/10 36/2 1 New Orleans 89/31 76/24 t 88/31 75/23 t Tallahassee 91/32 71/21 t 91/32 71/21 pc j i
Detroit 74/23 64/17 + 83/28 61/16 pc New York 78/25 65/18 s 77/25 68/20 pc Tampa 91/32 75/23 t 91/32 75/23 t —_
Honolulu 88/31 74/23 s 88/31 73/22 s Oklahoma City 84/28 59/15 t 72/22 53/1 ¢ Tucson 96/35 69/20 s 96/35 62/16 s en
Houston 91/32 74/23 pc 86/30 70/21 t Orlando 92/33 75/23 t 90/32 75/23 t Washington, DC 77/25 65/18 pc 79/26 66/18 pc

o|1|2

LOW








3|4|5|6

MODERATE |

TS a NY



“HIGH




iv
[slo

ee oe

10
V. HIGH EXT.














Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
88/31
65/18
64/17
75/23
63/17
93/33
86/30
72/22
75/23
76/24
75/23
72/22
79/26
66/18
73/22
81/27
68/20
93/33
91/32
71/21
89/31
83/28
76/24
65/18
61/16
73/22
67/19
71/21
88/31
63/17
93/33
105/40
72/22
74/23
77/25
89/31
74/23
70/21
77/25
84/28
73/22
96/35
75/23
58/14
73/22
87/30
93/33
61/16
73/22
77/25
76/24
102/38
76/24
88/31
87/30
87/30
66/18
86/30
69/20
68/20
63/17
73/22
88/31
74/23
73/22
82/27
72/22
75/23
73/22
69/20

ii

Today

Low
F/C
80/26
52/11
45/7
64/17
52/11
77/25
78/25
60/15
43/8
70/21
54/12
51/10
74/23
45/7
51/10
54/12
49/9
70/21
81/27
41/5
74/23
73/22
59/15
51/10
45/7
54/12
53/11
52/11
72/22
50/10
79/26
75/23
59/15
60/15
54/12
79/26
58/14
54/12
50/10
77/25
52/11
71/21
57/13
47/8
52/11
54/12
79/26
48/8
52/11
52/11
69/20
73/22
64/17
78/25
50/10
72/22
39/3
73/22
62/16
54/12
52/11
57/13
77/25
68/20
57/13
67/19
54/12
59/15
56/13
50/10

pc

High
F/C
89/31
65/18
64/17
76/24
60/15
90/32
87/30
75/23
79/26
76/24
80/26
73/22
82/27
66/18
69/20
83/28
64/17
95/35
90/32
76/24
89/31
83/28
80/26
61/16
61/16
74/23
71/21
70/21
88/31
61/16
91/32
104/40
69/20
79/26
81/27
89/31
74/23
72/22
81/27
83/28
73/22
96/35
72/22
62/16
78/25
88/31
93/33
62/16
74/23
74/23
81/27
101/38
79/26
88/31
54/12
85/29
61/16
85/29
75/23
77/25
61/16
75/23
88/31
79/26
17/25
91/32
78/25
75/23
70/21
69/20

Tuesday
Low
F/C
81/27
56/13
46/7
61/16
50/10
78/25
77/25
63/17
50/10
71/21
55/12
56/13
76/24
45/7
54/12
54/12
45/7
71/21
83/28
46/7
73/22
72/22
61/16
54/12
48/8
57/13
53/11
53/11
72/22
52/11
81/27
73/22
59/15
59/15
56/13
79/26
58/14
54/12
54/12
77/25
53/11
70/21
Sls
44/6
50/10
54/12
75/23
48/8
53/11
55/12
72/22
72/22
61/16
80/26
39/3
73/22
37/2





INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

WwW

pe

74/23

63/17
55/12
50/10
59/15
17/25
66/18
57/13
70/21
57/13
60/15
50/10

47/8

pe
s

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st, 2009, PAGE 7C





MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 7-14 Knots 1-2 Feet 6 Miles 85° F
Tuesday: ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 4 Miles 85° F
FREEPORT Today: ENE at 6-12 Knots 1-3 Feet 5 Miles 86° F
Tuesday: E at 7-14 Knots 1-3 Feet 5 Miles 86° F
ABACO Today: E at 4-8 Knots 3-5 Feet 7 Miles 85° F
Tuesday: ESE at 8-16 Knots 3-6 Feet 10 Miles 85° F











qh
aa
a
A
a
+
a
4m
ad
Ie_¢_4 Hain Fronts
=. Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and os
Bk.) Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm infinite
[yv_Â¥] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Meagan
10s| 0s Os 10s 20s [06] 40s [50s Gos 70s (80s /G0s\)/il0eN/iins!





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PAGE 8C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

FROM page 3C

An Abaco farmer told
Insight how she waited for 20
months to get a work permit
for one Haitian employee, as
Haitians who may have lived
in the Bahamas for decades
and held several work permits
are still forced to return to
Haiti at a high cost to the
employer in order to go
through the application
process before they can be
hired.

The process divides fami-
lies, and puts the applicant in
a position where they are
unable to work for months on
end.

“Tt’s a tremendous expense
to the person who needs the
labour,” Mr Key said.

“The Immigration Depart-
ment needs to make it easier
to employ them in areas such
as agriculture and common
labour.”

But, according to the
farmer who waited 20 months
for a labourer: “It’s a ploy to
get them to give up or to get
money under the table.”

The system certainly does-
n’t seem to be benefiting
Abaconians, who want resi-
dents of The Mud and Pigeon
Pea to be regularised and
housed in a safe and sanitary
environment.

Regular raids on the shan-
tytowns have failed to stop
the communities from
expanding over the last 30
years, and have only bred
resentment in the Haitian
community as sources say V10-
lence is used and families are
separated.

Commenting on the large-
scale raid carried out by
Immigration and Royal
Bahamas Defence Force offi-
cers on July 30, an Abaconian
told Insight: “The raids were
absolutely atrocious. They
take women and children out
of their beds at 3am without
letting them put on their
clothes, take six-week-old
babies, these are human rights
violations.

“Fifty per cent of the peo-
ple they pick up are Bahami-
an, but they would not let
them go back to their homes
to get their papers.

“There was a man standing
there in his Jockey’s and they
hold a gun and a flashlight in
his face; he asks to go in to
get. his passport, and they say
no.’

Mr Cartwright expressed
his disappointment that in 30
years neither government has
been able to take control of
the migrant community.

He said: “It needs to be
addressed now and it needed

Legal Notice

PLANETE NATURE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 17th day of
September 2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.
Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



to be addressed 15 years ago.

“They have these raids, and
I think they are necessary but
I cannot agree with the way
they are done. They are quite
inhumane, specifically with
the children.

“What they need to do is
have constant patrols to mon-
itor who is there because
there is a constant influx of
people.”

Abaconians who are so
connected to the issues of the
island are full of ideas about
the way their community can
be helped, how it can grow,
and they are keen to commu-
nicate about a common goal.

But with projects as huge
as the Bunker C power plant
going ahead without public
consultation, and suspicions
over big developments being
pushed through without
informing residents, Abaco-
nians fear their beloved home
will develop at such a rate it
will spiral out of control.

While it has a good econo-
my, and great potential,
development must follow a
delicate balance, bearing the
island’s unique resources and
issues in mind to help it grow
in an organic way, and the
best way for Abaco.

But if the people who care
about Abaco, and the people
who know it best are not even
consulted about major
changes in their community,
they will one day wake up and
feel they are no longer in their
home.

As one Abaconian told
Insight: “People in Abaco are
not dumb. It’s like they think
we have not educated our-
selves to any degree, and a lot
of people are frustrated.

“This was meant to be a
new transparent government,
getting people involved, and
they’re not.

“They are just sweeping our
concerns under the carpet.”

It seems the people in Aba-
co simply want to be heard.
They want the government
they elected to listen to their
concerns, consider their ideas,
and treat them with respect
before making plans in arro-
gance, which they fear, could
be the ruin of Abaco.

What do you think?
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

.s ey
Lnspireda Dy
,

UGGIE:

_

HuGGIE:

_



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