Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Pim blowin’ it

HIGH
LOW

FSTORM





90F
79F

SUNNY WITH

maT
Rea air li

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PM ‘happy tor tall
& Caicos

with

Turk

Ingraham opens
door to discuss
‘federation’

PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham left the door open
for discussions of a federation
between the Bahamas and
Turks and Caicos once the cur-
rent constitutional crisis in the
British territory is resolved.

Mr Ingraham said in a state-
ment yesterday that the gov-
ernment would be happy to dis-
cuss the further strengthening
of the “historic relationship”
between the Bahamas and the
people of the Turks and Caicos
Islands in accordance with the
will of its peoples.

“My colleagues and I have
taken note of the comments
reportedly made by former Pre-
mier of the Turks and Caicos

Islands Michael Misick in an
interview with The Tribune
suggesting that the time has
come to explore the possibility
of creating a federation
between The Bahamas and the
Turks and Caicos.

“We are fully conscious of
the fact that the Bahamas and
the Turks and Caicos share the
same archipelago and, indeed,
at one time together constituted
a colony of Great Britain
administered from Nassau. We
are also keenly aware of and
treasure the close familial ties
between the people of The
Bahamas and the people of

SEE page eight

Sandals resort lays
off 80 employees

By PAUL G TURNQUEST

a r
DLO) O10) Aste)



Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

SANDALS Royal Bahamian Resort laid
off 80 employees yesterday as the hotel
reported lower than expected bookings for
the autumn and winter seasons.

According to Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes, Sandals has informed the staff that if
circumstances were to turn around before
December 1, some of them would re-

SEE page eight

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urricane

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ier Sy ereenls . fl eal We NE)

NASSAU AND BAHAM

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Euma



m Lhe Tribune

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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com



A YOUNGSTER eats a ‘Eat Cookies Not Turtles’ cookie during a sore contest held at the
‘Save the Turtles’ Art Show recently at Doongalik Gallery. Contestants thoroughly enjoyed their medium
of edible markers to colour in a cookie and chance to learn a little more about the importance of turtle con-
servation. Last week, the government announced that all harvesting, possession, purchase and sale of sea
¢ SEE THE ARTS SECTION

turtles will now be prohibited.

Minister: protecting students
from abuse ‘too serious’ for
consultation with the BUT

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE issue of protecting students from
possible abuse is too “serious to warrant
niceties” like consultation with the Bahamas
Union of Teachers, the Minister of Educa-
tion said.

While he can “understand the union’s
ordinary entitlement for consultation,” Min-
ister Carl Bethel asserted that the need to
ensure the welfare of students in this regard
is “sufficiently serious not to warrant” the
Ministry going through that process “at this
time.”

SEE page eight

5

Quiznos

’ Prices May Vary

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009 PRICE -—75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Ss
a
AND REAL Las

SPE Tt




—

PM ‘listening’ to all voices
on the marital rape issue
By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham
has said he is “listening” to all voices
responding to the government’s plan to

outlaw marital rape.

Declining to say whether some of the
loud objections to the ban would influ-
ence whether his government moves
ahead with it, Mr Ingraham simply said
he is taking the comments into consid-
eration.

“T’m listening,” he told The Tribune.
“It’s out in the public, and the public
can say what they wish.”

SEE page eight








J Cynthia Pratt
has chosen
replacement

candidate

PLP Deputy says
she will campaign
on their behalf

By PAUL G
TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

PLP DEPUTY leader
Cynthia Pratt says she has
chosen who she feels is
the best candidate to
replace her — and will
campaign on his behalf.

Confirming she will no
longer contest for the
deputy leadership position
at the party convention,
Mrs Pratt said she has
spoken with each poten-
tial candidate “with the
exception of one.”

But she is remaining
tight-lipped on who gets
her backing.

SEE page eight

Tropical Storm
Erika moves in the
Bahamas’ direction

A WEATHER system trav-
elling in the general direction of
the Bahamas developed into
Tropical Storm Erika with
winds of 50mph yesterday
evening.

Current forecasts have the
storm reaching the south-east-
ern Bahamas by Sunday, and
New Providence by Monday.

However, Chief Meteorology
Officer Basil Dean told The
Tribune that the system is mov-
ing very slowly at this time and
may not reach the capital until
Tuesday.

Weather experts at the US
National Hurricane Centre and
AccuWeather are predicting
paths for the storm which
would have it passing slightly
to the east of the Bahamas.

It is uncertain what strength
the storm will be at when it

SEE page eight



School tests for TB
after student contracts

disease on vacation

STUDENTS and teachers at C H Reeves
Junior High were yesterday tested for tuber-
culosis after a ninth grader at the school
contracted the disease over the summer
vacation.

School officials yesterday said that the
testing is merely a precautionary measure to
ensure that no one who came into contact
with the student has contracted TB.

The student, whose name has not been
released, was treated for the infectious dis-
ease and is doing well, the school said.

Tuberculosis is a common and sometimes
deadly disease that is carried through the
air.

Symptoms include chronic cough with
blood-tinged sputum, fever and night
sweats.

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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

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Visit our website at www.coh.eduby

STAFF VACANCY

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the following
position:

Assistant Director — Utilities, AD-I, who will be responsible for the man-
agement, direction and coordination of the activities, operations and matin-
tenance of the Physical Plant Utility Systems and the trades of plumbing,
electrician, and air conditioning at all campuses of The College of The
Bahamas. The successful applicant must be able to priontize and perform
under pressure in both a customer contact and administrative capacity.
Outstanding human resource management skills are necessary.

Specific duties and responsibilities include, but are not limited to, manag-
ing, directing and coordinating the activities, operations and maintenance
of the Physical Plant buildings and grounds and establishing preventative,
predictive and replacement maintenance programmes of campus equip-
ment including the vehicle fleet of The College.

Applicants should possess a Bachelor's Degree in mechanical (preferred)
or electrical engineering and a minimum of five (5) years’ professional
experience directly related to the physical plant management of utility sys-
tems of an equivalent combination of education, training and experience,
with considerable knowledge of physical plant management, personnel
management, safety and budgetary practices. For a detailed job descrip-
hon, visit www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply. Interested candidates should submit a
detailed resume and cover letter of interest no later than Wednesday,

September 2, 2009 to: The Director, Human Resources, The College of

The Bahamas, P.O.Box N-49]2, Nassau, Bahamas or brapply @cob.edu.bs,

RASHAD MARCHE

DEVAUGHN BROWN

eo) FY

i Oa IO

meer ey

eH eee

Teachers employment amendment

BAHAMAS UNION of Teach-
ers president Belinda Wilson has
advised teachers not to sign an
amendment to their conditions of
employment stipulating that they
are prohibited from engaging in
sexual acts with their students. The
Ministry of Education has pro-
posed the amendment, but Mrs
Wilson says education officials
failed to consult the union.

The Tribune asked the public
yesterday what they thought the
teachers should do.

Rashad Marche, 25, Bahamas
Food Services

“All teachers know that what is
going on is wrong. I think that it
should be signed. They are sup-
posed to be our role models and
have great influence on our youth.

They should sign the amendment
so that if they are prosecuted they
can be penalised to the full extent
of the law. Why should they be dif-
ferent — because they’re teachers? "

Colin Trotman, 47

"T understand that this is proto-
col because there is a union con-
tract between the teachers and the

FOR PEST PROBLEMS

government and therefore they
should be informed on things like
this and the ministry should have
sought their advice. However at
the same time, given the current
atmosphere, I don't feel it’s neces-
sary. If a teacher has nothing to
fear they should sign it, and that’s
the bottom line. As far as I'm con-

TE
EXTERMINATORS

PHONE: 322-2157

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The National Insurance Boar
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas



Request for Contractors Pre-Qualification

The National Insurance Board (NIB) is seeking to pre-qualify contractors to bid on
works to construct a Government Complex at Marsh Harbour, Abaco; the project is
a joint venture of NIB and The Bahamas Government. Contractors must be in
compliance with the National Insurance Act (social security programme), and in
good standing with the relevant Government agencies.

Pre-qualification documents may be collected from the Security Booth at NIB’s
Clifford Darling Complex, Blue Hill Road, from September 3 to September 9, 2009.

Pre-Qualification documents should be signed, sealed and dropped in the pre-
qualification box at the Security Booth, Clifford Darling Complex on or before 12:00
Noon on September 15, 2009.



REVA
LORRAINE
GRANT, 92

of South Beach, New |
Providence and formerly of |
Bight Mile Rock, Grand
Bahama will be held on |
Saturday, September 5, 2009 at
10:00 a.m at Church of God of
Prophecy, Coral Road, Freeport, |
Girnind Bahama, Olliciating will |
be Bishop Cleophas Capron, assisted by Bishop Rudalph Arihur |
and other Ministers of the Gospel. Interment will follow in the
Harbour West Public Cemetery, Bartlett Hill, Eight Mile Rock, |
rind Kahana |

Left to cherish ber memories are her children: Marie and Peter
Whitfield, Jane Knowles and the Honourable Neko and Barbara
Grint; erindgchildren: Karen Grant, Kelly Whitfield, Earyla and |
Julian Marshall, Krivoy and Stephen Smith, Kendra and Kyra
Knowles, Nekearla Grant and Neko Carlson Grant Il; great- |
grand children: Kellyia and K’Lisa Whitield, Aaliyah Marshall,
Kazmyn Smith and Dantel Grant; nephew; Redwin Grant; |
adopted sester and brvther-in-law: Pearline and Dennis Hall and |
children; grand nieces and nephews: Gordon and Martin Rolle,
Alfred and Paulette Bartlett, David and Dole Dean, Sandy, |
Condi, and Joy Anne Sareyer, Annette Darling and family, Audrey |
Adderiey and sons, Gary anc Dwight Cooper, Tracy and Bridgette |
Cooper and children, Dwight Grant, Chery! Grant-Bethell,
Dellareece Grant, Vernica Ferguson-Johneon and family and a |
host of other relatives and friends including: Judith Rolle,
Delphine Miller, Yernita Cirant, Fote Grant and family, Beshop |
Brace H. Thompsin and family, 0M. Pinder and family, Derathy |
Horton and family, OJ. Bevans and family, Violet Wright and
family, Charles Adderiey and family, Jackie Rolle and family, |
Brenda and Olivia Robinson, Pam and Tony Granger, Sheila
Symonette, Loretta Young, Bishop Cephas Ferguson, Bishap |
Romeo Ferguson, Bro, Hurai Ferguson, Sister Nora McClain,
Helping Hands Ministry and the membership of Church of God
of Prophecy, East Street and Pinedale, Grand Bahama. |

Viewing will be held at Restview Mortuary and Crematorium |
Limited, Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, New Providence
on Wednesday. from 1OC00 am to 1:00pm and in the “Serenity
Suite” of Restiew Memonal Mortuary dt Crematorum Limited, |
11-4 East Coral Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama on Thursday,
from 10) pom. to 5:00 om. at Church of God of Prophecy,
Pinedale, Grand Bahama on Friday from 1:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. |
and on Saturday at the Church from 8:30 a.m, until service time
at the church.

cerned they can just meet, they can
meet now and then sign it."

Stephen Pratt, 42

"I think that they should sign it
man and get rid of those same
teachers that are there doing
garbage. Set an example so that
the rest can stay on the right road
because we have to protect our
children, they are the future of our
country.”

Lashanda Turnquest,
real estate employee

"T feel that it should be signed.
Teachers have a civic duty to
uphold as our children's role mod-
els. What has been happening is
wrong and they need to be pun-
ished to the fullest extent. I agree
that government should have given
them a heads-up and discussed
their plans with them, but regard-
less of this it is something that
needs to be done. It should be con-
crete what the consequences are
for something like this."

Capt Francis, 45, boat captain

"If this was something that is
just to state belief or moral point of
view, then I feel as though it is each
teacher's personal choice whether
or not they want to sign. However,
if they are being asked to sign it as
a policy and to understand that this
is the criteria in order to have this
job, then yes, it should be signed.
As long as the terms are clearly
defined as to what is deemed inap-
propriate, I feel that of course it
should be signed."

Lilymae Gaitor, 66, retired,

"Twas brought up to believe that
any person that you have to say
‘Mr?’ or ‘Mrs’ to, you and them are
no company. I don't know what is
in the amendment that they are
against but I feel that this isn't
something that they should have a
problem with. Especially with all
these allegations and reports com-
ing out; they should be delighted
about this."

Devaughn Brown, 32

"I feel that yes they should sign
it. (Sex between teachers and stu-
dents) is inappropriate and they
should be penalised. If you’re not
guilty then you shouldn't have a
problem with signing it.

Renee Johnson, 46, salon
employee

"You can't infringe on any-
body's rights — this is a democratic
society. If something is written
down it can't be set in stone until
there is a discussion about it. Why
wait until school opens to demand
this? The issue has always been
there, they had enough time to get
this sorted out before the new
school year began. I think its poor
timing for something so important.
In the end however we need to
think about what's best for the chil-
dren and doing everything to
ensure their protection."

Annmarie Scott, 38,
housekeeper

"I can understand why the
Union would be displeased with
the ministry's actions. I think when-
ever any amendment is made to a
pre-existing agreement all parties
involved should be included in dis-
cussion — it's common courtesy.
They should talk to the teachers
and give them that respect, just to
explain what the amendment
entails so that they can make an
educated decision."



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

| Man in serious condition

Two injured
in Potters
Cay explosion

TWO men were injured
in a propane gas explosion
on Potters Cay Dock.

A 38-year-old man and a
17-year-old boy were near
the docked m/v Matilda at
2pm on Monday when an
explosion occurred.

It is believed that there
was an accident with a
propane bottle that was
being filled.

Both men were taken to
hospital to be treated for
their injuries. The 38-year-
old received 16 per cent
burns to his hands, arms,
face and head. He was
detained in hospital.

The 17-year-old was
treated and discharged
after receiving 7 per cent
burns to his left arm, face
and shoulder areas. An
investigation has been
launched into the exact
cause of the explosion.

Illegal firearm,
ammunition
Seized hy DEU

DRUG Enforcement
Unit officers seized an
illegal firearm and

ammunition from an area }

off Carmichael Road on
Monday.

Acting ona tip froma
member of the public,
DEU officers carried out
a search of the Evansville
neighbourhood.

They discovered a .38
handgun with one live

round of ammunition ina }

derelict truck.

The weapon is in police

possession. No one was
arrested.

Man accused
of causing
grievous harm

A MAN accused of
causing grievous harm to
two men and being found
in possession of a handgun
was arraigned in the Mag-
istrate’s Court yesterday.

Richard McKinney of
Woods Alley was
arraigned before Magis-
trate Derrence Rolle in
Court 5, Bank Lane, yes-
terday on two counts of
causing grievous harm and
one count of possession of
a handgun. It is alleged
that on Thursday, August
27, McKinney caused
grievous harm to Marvin
Martin and Anthony Hep-
burn.

He was not required to
enter a plea to the charge.

It is also alleged that McK-

inney was in possession of
a handgun with intent to
commit an indictable
offence.

McKinney was not
required to plead to the
charge.

He was remanded into
custody and is expected
back in court today for a
bail hearing.

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

ANIMAL lovers are calling
on the government to improve
the “horrific” state of the dog
pound after the deplorable
conditions there were high-
lighted in The Tribune.

Kirsh Duncombe, a 14-year-
old Queen’s College student
was so disgusted by the “unsan-
itary dog slaughter” at the
Canine Control Unit in Chip-
pingham Road, that he wrote a
letter to the editor urging
Bahamians to address the
“unacceptable” situation.

The pound holds stray dogs
found roaming the streets and
public areas for up to four days
before destroying the animals
in accordance with the law. The
Dog Licence Act dictates that
all animals must be licenced for
a fee ranging between 25 cents
and $6 per year. If owners do
not produce a licence for a dog
held at the pound within four
days, the animals are put down.

Kirsh visited the site with a
small summer camp group last
month and in his letter to The
Tribune said he was saddened,
disappointed and disgusted by
what he saw.

He said: “It seemed to be an
unsanitary dog slaughter.
Knowing most of the dogs have
incurable diseases or no homes
to live in and spend basically
their last living days at the
pound, they should be proper-
ly fed and watered.

“Some of the dogs had no
water and some looked like
they were starving. The staff
told us they were going to be
put to sleep the next day any-
way.”

Tribune reporters were
denied access to the pound yes-
terday, but animal rights
activists and concerned citizens
who have had a rare opportu-
nity to see the inner workings
of the pound spoke out in sup-
port of the schoolboy’s claims.

A source who has recently
visited the site, run by the
Department of Agriculture and
Marine Resources’ Canine
Control Unit, described it as
“Dickensian and gloomy.”

She said: “The dogs are
euthanised on Fridays so if a
dog comes in at the beginning
of the week they’re lucky to
get fed, and they might get
water. It’s a one-way street
mostly for those poor animals.”

The source, who did not
want to be named, said there
are between 20 and 30 kennels,
and the number of dogs held
depends on how many are
rounded up during the week.

Feral cats and animals
imported illegally are also kept
at the unit, as are roosters tor-
mented in illegal cock fights,
the source said.

Animal rights activist Jane
Mather said she was horrified
by conditions at the pound
when she assisted with the
euthanasia of dogs as president
of animal rights activist group
ARK several years ago.

She said: “I can’t tell you
some of the horrors that hap-
pened there. It’s really disgust-
ing. If you want to walk into
hell, go there.

“The government has really
got to be chastised for this. It’s
really wicked, the things that I

Call for the govt to
improve ‘horrific
‘state of dog

Ere



Wis AA
Fi Po,

—

CANINE U

have seen.”

Kirsh told The Tribune he
came across the awful sight,
and awful smell, of a dead dog
locked in a cage with a living
dog — because, staff said, they
could not find the key. He was
also disturbed by the broken
fences, dirty walls and aban-
doned vehicles around the
facility.

Bahamas Humane Society
inspector Percy Grant said a
lack of resources and staff
shortages have prevented the
Canine Control Unit from ful-
filling its mandate.

The unit is responsible for
rounding up stray animals
found wandering the streets,
public areas and trespassing on
private property between 10pm
and 6am, but Inspector Grant
said this job is largely left to
the not-for-profit Humane
Society.

He told The Tribune: “The
problem is the government
never gave a hoot about canine
control in this country so it is
just left there and there’s never
been a strict regulation.

“Tt needs fixing and the gov-
ernment needs to take an inter-
est in it; neither the FNM nor
the PLP seem to have taken an
interest in it.”

Inspector Grant said he
would like to see the unit reg-
ulated and sufficiently staffed
so stray dogs are collected from
the streets at night and cared
for at weekends.

The Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety will take healthy dogs from











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i A 31-YEAR-OLD man is in
? serious condition in hospital after
: being shot in the back by a per-
? son known to him.

? The victim was sitting in a car
? on Dorsette and Grants Streets
? sometime after 8am on Monday
? when he saw a man who he knew
i approaching his vehicle with a

after being shot in back

The 31-year-old man got out
of the car and tried to flee into a
private residence on the street.
As he was running towards the
house the gunman opened fire,
hitting him in the back.

He was taken to hospital to
be treated for gunshot wounds.
Police have launched an inten-
sive investigation into this matter.

= —— eel

THE TRIBUNE was denied access to the dog pound



NIT vans parked outside of the dog pound in the Botani-
cal Gardens appear to be left unused.

: gun.

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Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

the pound to care for them
when space allows, Inspector
Grant said.

Department of Agriculture
and Fisheries assistant director
Charmaine Price said she could
not grant the press access to
the facility, and that the matter
is being investigated and a
statement will be released
today.

Baypar! Building on Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-6145
Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6527, Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
email:info@colesofnassau.com

Dee ee a

The Communications Act 2009 [Comms Acti, which gives Utilities Regulation &
Competition Authority (URCA) full powers of regulation and of oversight of the
electronic communications sector im The Bahamas, came into force on 1 September
2009.

This date signals the start of the transition to a new regulatory regime, Greater
competition will be introduced in the electronic communications sector, to the benefit
of the economy and of all persons in The Bahamas.

To facilitate as smooth a transition to the new licensing regime as possible, a number of
hew documents were published on 1 September 2009 and are available at URCA’s
website (www.urcabahamas.bs). These include:
* Preliminary Determination covering several Class Operating and Spectrum

licences, Exemptions, and Types of Fees

Individual Operating and Spectrum licences

Draft Class Operating and Spectrum licences

Licensing Guidelines

Fee schedule

Radio Spectrum Statement (Existing Allocation and Assignment)

Various forms - Full Details Form and Notice of Objection Farm for the transition,

and an Application Form for a licence,

Until new URCA regulatory measures are adopted, all existing regulatory measures
adopted by the Public Utilities Cornmmission and the Television Regulatory Authority
continue in force to the extent that they do not conflict with provisions of the Comms
Act, the Uhlthes Regulation & Competition Authority Act, 2005; the Utilities Tribunal
Act, 2009 and any new regulatory measures adopted under these Acts,

The new regime encourages participation by all - the website will also give you an
opoortunity to learn more about the new regime with updates on Competition Policy,
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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
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Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Teachers’ duties now laid out

WE ARE surprised at Bahamas Union
of Teachers President Belinda Wilson’s deci-
sion to encourage teachers not to sign a cir-
cular notice issued by the Ministry of Edu-
cation informing them of the legal conse-
quences should they indulge in inappropriate
sexual behaviour with their students.

Apparently the circular asks teachers to
acknowledge an amendment to their con-
ditions of service.

The circular, which required each
teacher’s signature, became necessary
because of growing and alarming allegations
of some teachers abusing their positions of
trust with their students.

In answering Mrs Wilson’s claim that the
union was not consulted before the circular
was issued, Education Minister Carl Bethel
said the issue of protecting students from
possible abuse was “too serious” to warrant
such “niceties” as consultation with the
union.

The Minister said that while he under-
stood the “union’s ordinary entitlement for
consultation,” the need to ensure students
welfare was “sufficiently serious not to war-
rant” the Ministry “going through that
process at this time.”

On page 2 of today’s Tribune at least two
of the respondents to The Tribune’s ques-
tions as to whether teachers should sign the
circular, could understand the union’s dis-
pleasure. The others thought that the issue
was too important for the teachers not to
sign.

"T can understand,” said one of those sid-
ing with the teachers, “why the union would
be displeased with the ministry's actions. I
think whenever any amendment is made to
a pre-existing agreement all parties involved
should be included in discussion — it's com-
mon courtesy. They should talk to the teach-
ers and give them that respect, just to explain
what the amendment entails so that they
can make an educated decision."

We think there is a lot of confusion and
misunderstanding about this “amendment”.
What the Ministry has proposed in no way
changes any agreement the teachers have
with government.

It only serves to make the teachers fully
aware of the law that, regardless of the
agreement, applies to them.

It appears that the Ministry is just making
its teachers aware of the penalties under the

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law should any one of them take liberties
with children in their care.

So, teachers are not being asked to
“make an educated decision” as to whether
they should sign the circular or not.

All the circular is doing is educating them
as to the dangers they face if they break the
law as they carry out their duties.

So really, it does not matter whether they
sign or not.

There has been sufficient publicity over
this matter that all teachers are now fully
aware of the penalties they face should they
break the law while on the job. And this
particular law, regardless of what contract
they might have, will follow them even when
they are off the job.

And so what the Ministry has asked them
to sign has nothing to do with any pre-exist-
ing agreement, and needs no discussion as a
discussion will not change the terms of their
agreement or even that of the law.

Because, according to allegations, some
teachers are behaving as though they are
unaware of the law, the Ministry has put
them all on notice by asking them to sign the
circular informing them of this section of
the Penal Code.

Whether Mrs Wilson or her teachers like
it or not what they have been asked to sign
has tacitly always been a part of their con-
tract, as it is the law of the land, and whether
they sign or not is of no interest to the law
when it comes in search of an offender.

If teachers think they are protected by not
signing, then they should think again because
ignorance of the law is no defence.

The controversial document, which was
circulated to teachers on August 19, defines
“inappropriate behaviour” as “including but
not limited to sexual contact (including inter-
course or buggery), exposure to porno-
graphic material, inappropriate suggestions
and touching.”

This unnecessary noise from the union
cannot be used as a smokescreen to cover
up what appears — if the allegations prove
to be true — a very serious situation in our
schools.

It’s bad enough that our schools are turn-
ing out D grade students, but molestation is
not acceptable and must be punished.

In the best interest of their students, teach-
ers should join hands with government in
protecting them.



T

Education:
the price of
dysfunctional
schools

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Another summer has passed
and while it’s been a sizzling
summer it’s time to go back to
school! The hope is that you
enjoyed your vacations and
family events, and have now
geared up to send the children
back to school.

All of us know, one of the
keys to personal success is a
good education.

In a Monday, May 29, 1972
Time Magazine article entitled;
“The Price of Ignorance”, the
author wrote; “What does it
cost to drop out of school? Bil-
lions, everyone agrees, but it
remained for Henry M Levin
of the Stanford University
School of Education to attempt
some computation of how
many billions. In a study made
for the Senate Select Commit-
tee on Equal Educational
Opportunity, Levin focused on
the 3,180,000 American males
now between 25 and 34 who
failed to win a high school
diploma as of 1969. He then fig-
ured that dropping out would
cost them a total of $237 bil-
lion (about $74,000 each)
because of lower incomes dur-
ing a working lifetime. As for
the government’s loss, it would
have cost $40 billion to com-
plete the dropouts’ education,
but the tax collector would have
taken in an additional $71 bil-
lion on their higher incomes.”

As we embark on a new

school year some 40 years after
this study, the questions in the
Bahamas are: “What is the long
term cost to The Bahamas of
financing public schools that
effectively produce approxi-
mately 65 per cent dropouts?
What is the social and cultural
cost of producing dysfunctional
citizens with a resultant
immoral and criminal proclivi-
ty?
Tae what is the national
impact of the dilution of our
sovereignty and consequent
greater reliance on foreign
ownership, brain power and
expertise?

Many years ago, in the days
of minority rule, our great little
nation decided that public edu-
cation was of such great value
that we should make it both
free and mandatory.

There was a merit system in
which, “one had to study to
show himself approved”.

Truant officers roamed the
streets to ensure that our chil-
dren attended school and that
parents were accountable if
they did not.

In many family island com-

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LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



munities our introduction to
education started in an all-in-
one, all age school, interesting-
ly with mostly foreign teachers.

With the assistance of gov-
ernment subsidy, our parents
were determined that we all got
a better education than they
did.

They were diligent and
worked hard to send their kids
to Nassau in search of a higher
education.

The entire community
became our tutor and in Great
Inagua, during the summer
breaks, Mr Farquharson inter-
rogated the minds of the return-
ing students in his convenience
store and rewarded correct
answers with sweets and can-
dies.

Amazingly, the joy and
sweetness of education was
interrupted by the great libera-
tors of majority rule.

Firstly, government discon-
tinued the educational subsis-
tence allowance to Family
Island students and later.

Secondly, by insidiously
introducing social promotion
into the public school system
in the 1980’s. Suddenly, under
this new regime, students
gained “success” without
process and thus began our
slide down the slippery slope
of dysfunctional mediocrity and
a national ‘D’ average.

Change in education is long
overdue. Now is the time to
head towards an ‘A’, despite
the tough economic environ-
ment by immediately discon-
tinuing social promotion.

It is a sacrifice that the future
of our nation demands.

We cannot wait for the long
term change promised in the
form of an educational restruc-
turing programme.

Social promotion is not an
educational system, the results
proves this assertion. Any sys-
tem that produces approxi-
mately 65 per cent illiteracy
and/or dysfunctionality must be
classified as the very antithesis
of an educational system.

In solving the problem we
must first kill social promotion
and reinstate a merit system.
Next, in preparing students for
the society we live in, we must
recognise that the world is fast
becoming a high-tech global
community.

This means that in preparing

our children for today’s world
we must supplement the books
and paper that plague our
school age children with high-
tech learning tools. We must
expedite the initiative to have a
lap top or computer station on
each and every desk in all our
schools.

Either a lap top issued at the
beginning of school and turned
back in at the end of the school
year or parents can be required
to provide their children with
their own.

Ordinarily, parents are
required to purchase around
five or six text books along with
notebooks, pencils, pens and
paper. But this is the informa-
tion age, the age of the com-
puter, and the age of the inter-
net.

That’s the way our modern
society works.

What is the purpose of keep-
ing our children in the dark
ages of the Third world?
Shouldn’t we be teaching the
leaders of the future how to get
information and learn using a
method that is utilized by the
industrialised, First World?

In the old days, our colonial
masters recognised that the cost
of ignorance was too high.
Learning to read and write was
considered a value to our
nation.

In a modern Bahamas are we
are not willing to pay to get our
children the education that will
prepare them for globalisation?

Is the cost to equip public
schools with modern technolo-
gy too great a sacrifice?

Shouldn’t we be obliged to
employ teachers with the skills
that are necessary for using
technology in the classroom?

The problems identified are
not new. Any analysis of our
nation’s social ills will
inescapably link our failing edu-
cational systems to our societal
problems.

The obvious solutions are
suggested.

Tam satisfied that preparing
our children’s future for the
global environment in which
we live is worth the cost and
that we truly cannot afford to
confuse the cost of a quality,
productive, functional, educa-
tional system with the price of a
failing, non productive social
promotion system that breeds
ignorance.

D HALSON MOULTRIE
Nassau.
August 31, 2009.

I find Mr Fitzgerald's behaviour strange

EDITOR, The Tribune.

HELLO; I find it very strange that Mr Fitzgerald is up in arms
about this government transparency, when he was very quiet
about the Cable Beach deal that his party signed and the details of
that deal was not known to the public.

In my opinion Mr Fitzgerald lacks credibility. Why do you
suppose that the leader of the PLP is quiet on the matter?

CLIFFORD RAHMING
Nassau,
August, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009, PAGE 5



Bahamas to be showcased

Tourism Ministry :

Makes global
outreach to
religious market

THE Ministry of
Tourism is seeking to
attract more religious
tourism by emphasising
the country’s outstand-
ing conference and
meeting facilities.

Ministry officials
took the opportunity to
pitch their message to
pastors from the United
States, Cuba and even
places as far away as
China, Africa, Italy and
Great Britain at a gath-
ering of spiritual lead-
ers in Nassau last
month.

The pastors were in
town for the “Kingdom
Leadership Confer-
ence” at the Diplomat
Centre under the direc-
tion of renowned
Bahamian spiritual
leader, Pastor Myles
Munroe, president and
senior pastor of
Bahamas Faith Min-
istries International.

The group of pastors,
representing 10 nations,
were a part of a delega-
tion of about 185 con-
ference participants.

During their visit, the
church leaders were
given a tour of some of
Nassau’s finest hotels
and resorts before
being treated toa
reception at their host
hotel, the Wyndham
Nassau Resort on
Cable Beach.

Religious travel is an
$18 billion global mar-
Ket.

The Bahamas, boast-
ing the largest assort-
ment of vacation spots
of any tropical destina-
tion, has the potential
take advantage of a
larger share of this
growing market,
tourism officials say.

' I | a
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“i r =
SUPERSTAR Mariah Carey



THE Bahamas and all it has to
offer could be showcased to millions
of people around the world as the
Ministry of Tourism embarks on a
unique new attempt to advertise the
country.

Yesterday, former minister of
tourism Obie Wilchcombe hailed gov-
ernment’s decision to place a feature
advertisement in the upcoming Mari-
ah Carey album ‘Memoirs of an
Imperfect Angel’ set to debut on
August 15.

At a cost of $35,000, Mr Wilch-
combe said this advertisement, which
reportedly showcases the islands of
the Bahamas, is a creative idea and
will undoubtedly attract a substan-
tial return on the investment.

“T applaud them, because in this
new age of communication you have
to think of new and creative ways of
getting your message out. So the min-
istry has to consider these things and

we must always remember that the
best way is through entertainment,
and Mariah Carey remains a top
recording artist and I don’t think any
other country has done this. So again
it is a great idea, and the return on the
investment can be significant,” Mr
Wilchcombe remarked.

With total career albums sales top-
ping 200 million, Mariah Carey con-
tinues to set records in the recording
industry with her last album, E=MC2
selling 463,000 copies in its first week.
This album went on to sell 1.3 million
copies in the United States, with
another 380,000 sold collectively in
Japan, the United Kingdom and Aus-
tralia.

According to Hitfix.com, Island
Def Jam Music Group’s chairman
Antonio Reid said that the idea is
really very simple.

“We sell millions of records, so you
should advertise with us. My artists

in new Mariah Carey album

have substantial circulation — when
you sell two million, five million, eight
million, that’s a lot of eyeballs. Most
magazines aren’t as successful as
those records,” he said.

According to entertainment
experts, with ‘Memoirs of an Imper-
fect Angel’ Mariah Carey is set to
make history again, as the album will
become the first to bundle a CD with
lifestyle ads in a 34-page booklet.

The booklet is rumoured to be a
co-production with Elle Magazine
that will feature advertisements for
the Bahamas, Elizabeth Arden and
Le Métier De Beauté cosmetics,
Angel pink champagne and Carmen
Steffens shoes from Brazil.

According to Island Def Jam
records, this new product integration
deal is set to cover the costs of record-
ing the album, which is said to have
also been completed in the Bahamas
at a cost of more than $7 million.

Govt to disclose how much was

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net

THE government intends to disclose
exactly how much it spent on the Miss
Universe pageant, according to Minis-
ter of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace.

Following calls for the government to
disclose exactly how much was invested
in the event, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said the figures will be disclosed “in copi-
ous detail”.

This comes after opposition parlia-
mentarians urged the government to
reveal the full cost to the taxpayer of
bringing the pageant to the Bahamas.

Senator Jerome Fitzgerald said: “A
lot was spent and it showcased the coun-
try. But at the end of the day was it worth
it?”

He added that the public needs to
know “who really benefitted” from the
investment — whether it be Kerzner
International, the NBC network, pageant
organisers or the Bahamian people.

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MISS VENEZUELA Stefania Fernandez waves after being crowned Miss Universe 2009 at

the Miss Universe beauty pageant in Nassau, Bahamas, Sunday, Aug. 23, 2009.

Tourism officials credit the pageant —
which aired on Sunday, August 23 on
NBC live from the Atlantis resort on
Paradise Island — with bringing unprece-
dented exposure to the country.

According to international reports, six

million viewers in the United States
watched the show while local tourism
insiders estimate that nearly one billion
people worldwide tuned in.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace has previ-
ously stated that the Bahamas made an

“extremely competitive bid” to the
pageant organisers to host the event,
winning the right to do so in the face of
stiff competition from locations such as
Las Vegas.

When asked by The Tribune about
the proper procedure in such a situation,
Chamber of Commerce president
Khaalis Rolle said any time the govern-
ment spends money on behalf of the
public, the relevant details should be
released.

He said the pageant brought substan-
tial benefits to the Bahamas and as far as
he knows, there is no reason to believe
the government would want to avoid dis-
closing the costs.

“T think the government has to give an
account,” he said. “They invested on
behalf of the Bahamian people so I think
it’s only proper to provide an account. I
don't see any legitimate reason why not.
It is just the proper thing to do.

“It was a good initiative and we got a
lot of visibility from it, so why would we
not want to discuss what the investment
was?” Mr Rolle asked.

invested in Miss Universe pageant

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Publicity on Bahamian blue holes
will exceed Miss Universe exposure

By LARRY SMITH

WHEN National Geographic
breaks its magazine cover story,
television documentary and
online coverage of the Bahami-
an blue holes expedition next
summer, the impact is likely to
surpass this year's Miss Universe
spectacle in terms of promo-
tional value for the Bahamas —
and at virtually no cost to the
public treasury.

In contrast, the Miss Universe
pageant has cost the Bahamas
big-time. Although the exact
breakdown has not been forth-
coming, those costs include a
hosting fee (said to be $7 mil-
lion) paid to the Miss Universe
Organisation, a $2.9 million con-
tribution by the Nassau/Paradise
Island Promotion Board in cash,
goods and services, plus govern-
ment spending on road paving
and other fix-ups.

There are, of course, unde-
niable benefits from the 13
pageant events that were held
here last month. The Miss Uni-
verse telecast included some nine
minutes of footage of the
Bahamas that amounted to a
prime time commercial aired in
at least 85 countries. Almost six
million Americans tuned in, and
the Ministry of Tourism's web-
site received a big traffic boost
before, during and after the
pageant.

Officials say the long-term
benefits will far outweigh the
immediate direct returns, such
as the booking of 3,000 extra
room nights during a slow peri-
od, or the injection of a couple
million dollars in cash for local
firms that worked on pageant
events.

"We had thousands of posi-
tive media reports on the
Bahamas from around the world
during the pageant," BHA exec-
utive director Frank Comito told
me. "You just can't buy that
stuff. The cachet from this event
will be parlayed into future busi-
ness, and especially group busi-
ness at Atlantis. This puts us on
a whole new level.”

But National Geographic will
have a similar impact. The tv
documentary (which is being co-
produced with PBS’ top-rated
Nova science series) will reach
over 270 million households in
166 countries. Some 12 million
people will read the magazine
article, and millions of students
will be exposed to Bahamas-
related school materials. The
Society's high-traffic website will
feature linked coverage of the
Bahamas expedition.

So what's the point? Well,
almost no-one in the Bahamas
knows what the hell National
Geographic is up to — including
the Ministry of Tourism and just
about everyone I spoke to for
this article.

They do, however, appreciate

the significance when it is
explained to them, as this email
response from Tourism Minis-
ter Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace
confirms:

“When speaking about beau-
tiful women, there is no better
partner for The Bahamas than
the recently held Miss Universe
event. When speaking about the
bounty that nature has bestowed
on The Bahamas, there is no bet-
ter, more respected and credi-
ble global authority than Nation-
al Geographic.”

According to one tourism
official we questioned, the chal-
lenge will be to capitalise on the
“halo of interest” that National
Geographic will produce. He
said the Ministry would
approach the Society "to see
how we can assist with the pro-
motion of the telecast and activ-
ity across other media platforms.
For example, placing commer-
cials in the telecast, linking from
bahamas.com to the blue hole
feature on their site, e-mail
blasts, etc.."

And just what, you may ask,
is National Geographic up to?
Well. it is sponsoring a high-pow-
ered team of scientists, divers
and filmmakers on an expedi-
tion around the islands aimed at
unlocking the secrets of Bahami-
an blue holes. These geological
features have been described as
one of the final frontiers for
human exploration on the plan-
et. It's the stuff that great docu-
mentaries are made of.

"We pitched the project to
National Geographic early this
year with material gathered dur-
ing scouting trips last year,"
expedition leader Dr Kenny
Broad, an ecological anthropol-
ogist at the University of Mia-
mi, told me recently. "And we
actually came out as the top pro-
ject among those that received
significant financing. When you
include in-kind contributions,
the total expedition funding is
about $750,000."

Those in-kind contributions
included vehicle use, office
space, dockage, hotel rooms and
other forms of assistance from
individuals, businesses, and
groups on several islands.
Among the Bahamian organisa-
tions that have helped are the
Andros Conservancy, Abaco
Friends of the Environment, the
Antiquities, Monuments &
Museums Corporation, and the
College of the Bahamas.

"We did an eight-day social
science survey of Andros in June
with 20 students from the COB,"



Broad said. "Also participat-
ing were three Bahamian experts
— Jessica Minnis, a social scien-
tist at COB; Michael Pateman,
an archaeologist with the
AMMG; and Nikita Shiel-Rolle,
who is studying marine biology
at the University of Miami.”

Broad has been coming to
the Bahamas for years, conduct-
ing research on how people
interact with the natural envi-
ronment. He is a leader in the
design of marine reserve net-
works, and has participated in
and led scientific and film expe-
ditions around the globe, includ-
ing the exploration of one of the
world's deepest caves in Mexico.

He was joined by other top
researchers like Dr David Stead-
man, curator of birds at the
Florida Museum of Natural His-
tory in Gainesville; Jennifer
Lynn Macalady, an astrobiolo-
gist from Penn State University
who studies the origin of life;
and Dr Tom Iliffe, a marine biol-
ogist from Texas A & M in
Galveston whose work has led to
the discovery of more than 250
new species in submerged caves
around the world.

These scientists were accom-
panied by a top-drawer film crew
led by Wes Skiles; veteran cave
diver Brian Kakuk, who oper-
ates a Bahamian-owned adven-
ture diving and training facility in
Abaco; and Nancy Albury, pro-
ject coordinator for the Antiq-
uities, Monuments and Muse-
ums Corporation.

They lived aboard the 63-foot
Key West-based research ves-
sel, Tiburon, criss-crossing the
Bahamas over six weeks from
early June to mid-August explor-
ing submerged caverns, con-
ducting original research and
producing spectacular videos and
stills for print, broadcast, online
and educational applications.

The Bahamas expedition is
one of 9,000 research projects
that National Geographic has
funded around the world. This
puts Bahamian blue holes in the
same league as polar expeditions
by Robert Peary, excavation of
the lost Inca city of Machu Pic-
chu, Louis and Mary Leakey's
research into early hominids in
East Africa, and underwater
explorations by Titanic discov-
erer Robert Ballard.

The expedition's roots go
back to 2004 when Brian Kakuk
discovered the complete skele-
ton of an extinct tortoise in a
blue hole called Sawmill Sink in
the pinelands of south-central
Abaco. Later investigations in

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

NOTICE

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT

(CHAPTER 326)

It is hereby notified pursuant to Section Five (5) of the Industries Encouragement
Act, Chapter 301, that the Minister is about to consider whether the manufacturer
specified in the first column of the table below should be declared an
"APPROVED MANUFACTURER" in relation to the products specified in the

third column.

MANUFACTURER

Supply Koen
Manufacturing Co. Laub

~ LOCATION OF
FACTORY PREMISES

Abundant Life Road
Industrial Park, Nassau,
Bahamas

PRODUCTS

Radiator Fluids, Coolunts,

Household Chemicals,
(Cleaning Chemicals

Any interested person having any objection to such a declaration should give
notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of the
Prime Minister, before the 14" day of September, 2009, by letter addressed to :-

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

P.O), Bos CB-1RD
NASSAL, N. P.
THE BAHAMAS

COLIN HIGGS
Permanent Secretary

Tanya Mona Lisa



DEAN’S BLUE HOLE: the world’s deepest blue hole. Situated in

Dean’s Long Island.

this undisturbed cave turned up
a range of impressive fossils —
the prehistoric reptiles, birds,
and mammals that once roamed
Abaco.

A few human bones were
also found, and dated to about a
thousand years ago. This is the
earliest evidence so far for
human occupation of the
Bahamian archipelago.

"We spent a lot of time in the
islands last year on scouting trips
from Mayaguana to Grand
Bahama looking for the best
sites that give the most bang for
the buck visually speaking,"
Broad told me. "It costs a lot to
get scientists in here, but when
you can go in one hole and pull
out a lot of stuff, that makes it
more feasible."

Both plant and animal fossils
from Sawmill Sink are extreme-
ly well preserved, and they pro-
vide a unique opportunity to
reconstruct ancient Bahamian
environments. One of the most
significant finds is an undisturbed
12,000-year-old owl roost where
the remains of dozens of bird
and mammal species have been
identified. It is thought that these
extinct owls may have given rise
to the legend of the chick charnie
in Andros.

But Sawmill Sink is only one
of many blue holes around the
country that the expedition is
exploring. In one cave they
investigated a fully articulated
crocodile skeleton and its trail
of petrified turds the size of a
human baby. On Andros they
recovered Lucayan remains
from the Sanctuary blue hole.
From Dan's Cave on Abaco
they retrieved a 350,000-year-
old mineral formation called a
speleothem, which can help sci-
entists reconstruct past climate
change.

According to National Geo-
graphic producer Jill Heinerth,
the expedition team is “recov-
ering Lucayan Indian remains,
taking deep samples of Sahara
dust and speleothems that will
help illustrate former sea level
stands, studying ancient paleo-
animals in sinks and caves, and
documenting biological
resources. The show will tell the
story of the significance of
Bahamian Blue Holes and, we
hope, will create a public interest
in their protection.”

After the initial discoveries
at Sawmill Sink a few years ago,
responsibility for the research
was assumed by the Antiquities,
Monuments and Museums Cor-
poration, with Marsh Harbour
cave diver Nancy Albury
appointed as the corporation's
representative and project coor-
dinator. She also took part in
the Nat Geo expedition.

"Nancy provided formidable
help in both the filming and the
science aspects," said Broad. "Dr
Keith Tinker of the AMMC saw
the potential in all this and it is
primarily because of him that
this expedition is taking place.
Friends of the Environment has
also been a major supporter in
terms of giving time and
resources."

Friends provided logistical
support to the National Geo-
graphic team, which used their
facilities as a base while in Aba-
co. And according to Executive
Director Kristin Williams, "We
are working with AMMC,
Bahamas Underground and the
BNT to develop a proposal to
protect a cave system in South
Abaco that includes Sawmill
Sink.

"The groundbreaking dis-
coveries made on Abaco have
only scratched the surface in
terms of our knowledge of the
ecological and geographical his-
tory of The Bahamas," she said.
"It is important that we preserve
the condition and health of our
blue holes and caves as this
research continues, and for the
future."

In recognition of their sup-
port and participation, both
Albury and Tinker have had
newly-discovered species from
Sawmill Sink named after them.
An extinct tortoise has been
dubbed alburi, while a living
shrimp has been named tinkeri.

Wes Skiles, the expedition's
director of photography, is a top
Florida-based outdoor filmmak-
er whose credits include a PBS
broadcast on the Everglades
restoration, a feature film by
Sony Pictures called The Cave,
several National Geographic
documentaries, as well as natur-
al history shows for the History
Channel, A&E, the BBC and
the Discovery Channel.

"We've done Andros, Grand
Bahama, Eleuthera, Exuma and

New Providence, but Abaco has
the perfect everything for what
we want ," Skiles told me.
"Deep complex labyrinths, fresh
water and salt water caves that
blow your mind with unusual
lifeforms, The blue holes of
Abaco are magically diverse
and multi-dimensional. There's
no place on Earth like it.”

Skiles is a high school grad-
uate who began exploring caves
in the Bahamas in 1978 with the
late Dennis Williams, an Apol-
lo engineer stationed at
NASA's downrange tracking
station on Grand Bahama. It
was Williams who explored the
longest underwater cave system
in the Bahamas — the six-mile-
long Lucayan Cavern in the
Lucayan National Park.

But interestingly, that record
is about to be broken by an
underwater cave system on
Abaco.

According to Brian Kakuk,
the expedition will soon be able
to finish their exploration and
connect Dan's Cave with
Ralph's Cave, making this sys-
tem some 30 per cent longer
than the Lucayan Cavern.

"IT have worked everywhere
in the Bahamas but Abaco is
special,” Kakuk said. "And all
of this research is designed to
give people the big picture —
why we should care about a
hole in the ground. These blue
holes are probably the last place
on Earth you can physically go
to explore. They are truly a final
frontier, and our team is thor-
oughly documenting this fron-
tier for the first time.”

Founded in 1888, the Nation-
al Geographic Society is one of
the world's largest nonprofit sci-
entific and educational organi-
zations, reaching more than 325
million people a month through
its magazines, cable channel,
books, websites and school pub-
lishing programmes.

The Miss Universe Pageant
in August was essentially a one-
shot deal — and the publicity
it provided did not come with-
out a hefty price tag. Our blue
holes offer the other side of the
Bahamian coin — the natural
environment. And National
Geographic is paying for the
privilege of giving us exposure.
It's a lesson that any environ-
mentalist would point to with
glee.

CORRECTION

¢ We inadvertantly used the
wrong word in describing the
diameter of the fuel pipeline
from the dock to the Wilson
City power plant on Abaco. It
should have been 12 inches, not
12 feet.

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

NOTICE

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT

(CHAPTER 326)

It is hereby notified pursuant to Section Seven (7) of the Industries Encouragement
Act that the Minister is about to consider whether the following products shaulcl be
declared "APPROVED PRODUCTS" for the purpeses of that Act.

PRODUCTS

Radiator Fluids, Coolants, Household

‘RAW MATERIALS TOBE USED IN
MANUFACTURE

Varin Chemicals, Labels, Plastic

Chemicals, Cleaning Chemicals

Kotiles, Tubing, (onmtainers, Kettle (apa,
Bunes,

Any interested person having any objection to such a declaration should give
noice in writing of his objection and of ihe grounds thereat to the Office of the
Prime Minister, before the 14" day of September, 2009, by letter addressed to :-

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

PO. Bos CR-10080
NASSAU, Bi, P.,
THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS

Permanent Secretary



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

Disgruntled $= FROM page one Cynthia Pratt has chosen

fishermen call replacement candidate
meeting over and for the one who offers solutions to the

blems of this country,” she said.
turtle ban vf

As a long-time party supporter, Mr
: Davis has been seen in many circles as a

A PUBLIC meeting for all }
those opposed to the govern- }

strong contender for the deputy leader-

ship post. With Mrs Pratt’s support, a par-

ment’s newly imposed ban on } ty insider yesterday claimed he may be

turtle harvesting has been called } unbeatable — even against other top

by disgruntled fishermen. : names such as Bain and Grant’s Town MP

The meeting, which will } Dr Bernard Nottage and West End and
reportedly culminate in the cre- }
ation of the Commercial Fisher- }



“T have decided to announce my choice at
convention because I do not wish to influ-
ence or interfere during this present phase of
campaigning,” she said.

While Mrs Pratt seeks to withhold this
candidate’s identify, a closer look at her
statement and the many innuendoes littered
throughout the text, it is believed her support
rests firmly with PLP MP for Cat Island and
Rum Cay Philip ‘Brave’ Davis.

“Many well-intentioned and well-quali-
fied PLPs have faithfully served this party
behind the scenes,” Mrs Pratt hinted. “They
have served in tragedy and triumphs; wins
and losses and they never asked for any-
thing more than the opportunity to serve.

can identify with my own personal story
of struggle and hard work,” she said.

“There is something to be said of some-
one who has had to earn their way, but
even more can be said of a person who
excels through hard work and looks back to
give brother and sister a hand-up. That is a
man.

“As we look ahead, the PLP and indeed
this country will benefit from a deputy
leader/deputy Prime Minister who listens

Mrs Pratt said she will be speaking more —_ and respects the views of all — even if he

Bimini MP Obie Wilchcombe.
men’s

bune).

views?”

All those who answer “yes” }
are being asked to gather at }
Henry Bannister’s stall on the }
east side of Potter’s Cay at lpm }

on Thursday.

Meanwhile, Marilyn Ayearst-
Hartley, a supporter of the ban, }
said in a letter to The Tribune }
that many people were “over- :
whelmed with joy” at hearing }
the government’s approval to

ban “killing of all sea turtles”.

“What a great message for ;
children, the future generation :

and leaders of the Bahamas.

“Someone is listening out
there! If you speak up, you will }

be heard!

“This is truly an inspiration :
for young children who under- }
stand the responsibility of shar- }

ing planet Earth with all life.”

Two men and
three minors on
robbery charges

TWO men and three
juveniles were arraigned in
the Magistrate’s Court yes-
terday on robbery charges.

Vincent Artise, 20, of
Pinedale; Craig Taylor, 18,
of Pinedale and two under-
age boys, 16 and 17 years
old, both of Pinedale, as
well as a 15-year-old boy of
Union Village appeared
before Magistrate Derrence
Rolle in Court 5, Bank
Lane. They were charged
with two counts of robbery.

It is alleged that the
accused on August 24, while
at Claridge Road, robbed
Franchelo Martin of a
Motorola cellular phone
valued at $250. It is further

alleged that on the same day

the accused robbed
La'Sheikh Major of $250
cash.

The accused pleaded not
guilty to the charges and

were granted bail in the sum i

of $2,500. The case was
adjourned to November 18.
Sergeant Godfrey Brennen
was the prosecutor.

LT

Accountant

We are looking for a recent college graduate who is interested
in working under the supervision of experienced accountants
and has the goal of eventually sitting the CPA Exam. We
are a small, fast growing retail business owned and operated
by young, dynamic entrepreneurs. This is an exciting
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learn the practice of accounting as well as the principles of

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Qualifications/Experience/Skills

¢ Bachelors Degree in Accounting (Associates Degree
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* Be proficient in all Microsoft Office Applications

* Ability to research technical issues and apply
Accounting Theory

Assocoation, was :
announced in an advertisement :
(see page five of today’s Tri- }

The ad reads: “Turtle fishing :
in the Bahamas has been banned }
to satisfy the demands of asmall }
group of agitators. What’s next? }

“Are you tired of having laws }
and policies passed that affect :
you and yet do not reflect your

“And so as we head into convention I
thought it was important to implore PLPs far
and wide to look within for those who would
lead. Look for those who choose service
above self; for those who continue to unify
and not divide; for those who demonstrate
patience and do not pronounce entitlement

FROM page one

His comments come after BUT Pres-
ident Belinda Wilson expressed her out-
rage at the government’s issuance of a
circular asking teachers to acknowledge
an amendment to their conditions of
service brought about in the wake of
rising reports of sex abuse of students by
teachers.

The amendment — which in fact
applies to all employees of the Depart-
ment of Education — states that “no
teacher/officer while employed with the
Government of the Bahamas shall inter-
act in an inappropriate manner with any
student of a government school whether
with or without the consent of that stu-
dent parent or guardian.”

Circulated on August 19, 2009, the
document defines “inappropriate behav-

extensively on the issue at the convention,
highlighting that she has spoken with all of
the potential candidates “with the excep-

tion of one.”

“Suffice it to say my choice for the par-
ty’s next deputy leader and indeed next
Deputy Prime Minister is someone who

Minister of Education

iour” as “including but not limited to
sexual contact (including intercourse or
buggery), exposure to pornographic
material, inappropriate suggestions and
touching.”

Teachers were asked to sign the cir-
cular — which will apply to all teachers
regardless of whether they sign or not —
to acknowledge that they know that it
exists.

Notwithstanding having sent out this
advice to teachers, another allegation
of sexual impropriety surfaced this week
in the form of a claim that a C.C. Sweet-
ing High school teacher drugged and
abused a male student. That matter, said
to have stemmed from an August 27
encounter, is now under active police
investigation, while the teacher has been

in his heart.”

placed on leave by the Department of
Education.

However, Mrs Wilson “condemned”
the move to alter the teacher’s condi-
tions of service without consultation and
advised BUT members not to sign the
document.

Yesterday Mr Bethel denied Mrs
Wilson’s accusation that the Ministry of
Education may have been inspired by
“panic” over a spate of recent sex alle-
gations against teachers to send out the
circular without discussing it with the
union.

He said: “It’s not a question of pan-
icking it’s a question of doing what is
absolutely necessary to ensure the pro-
tection and the safety and the welfare of
all of the 56,000 children who are in our
care and in our custody.

“This is a result of a deliberate policy
by the ministry. We feel that a very

disagrees with the message; someone who
cares about people and will fight for the
unpopular or less glamorous cause if it
means the poor and disenfranchised will
receive justice; and one who may not speak
with the tongues of angels, but has charity

Ase eeu



important signal to each and every per-
son at our schools whether it’s teachers
or support staff know exactly what the
law is and exactly what will happen to
them if they transgress the boundaries
that they ought to be aware of in terms
of their relations with students,” said
Mr Bethel.

Mr Bethel added that the Ministry of
Education obtained legal advice before
anything was done and “based on that
legal advice we determined to act.”

He said that his Ministry continues
to “welcome all dialogue with the union”
and “will continue to have a respectful
dialogue” but reasserted that there “are
some matters that just are fundamental
and it is on that basis that the ministry
and the department of education took
this step.”

A message left for Mrs Wilson was
not returned up to press time.

FROM page one

Turks and Caicos that has exist-
ed for many generations despite
the accidents of history that sep-
arated us constitutionally,” Mr
Ingraham said.

His statement comes after for-
mer Premier Michael Misick,
who visited the Bahamas last
week, said in an interview with
The Tribune that there is sup-
port from the people of Turks
and Caicos for joining the
Bahamas.

The former premier, who
resigned in March in the face of
corruption allegations, said that
such an arrangement would be
mutually beneficial, as the Turks
and Caicos islands have attract-
ed huge investments, and Prov-
idenciales could serve as the
“New Providence of the south-
ern Bahamas.”

Misick’s comments come in
the same month as the Turks
and Caicos lost their right to
self-rule for a period of two
years after Britain suspended
parts of its constitution in
response to findings of “systemic
corruption” in the island’s gov-
ernment headed by Mr Misick.
The former premier has denied
any wrongdoing on his part.

Prime Minister Ingraham said
that like the rest of the

PM ‘happy for talks’ with turks & Caicos

Turks and Caicos Islands that
resulted in the suspension of
their Constitution and the impo-
sition of direct rule by Great
Britain.

“The people of The Bahamas
and Turks and Caicos will be
aware that we have been in con-
sultation with CARICOM and
have been a party to certain
diplomatic initiatives designed
to help bring about a resolution
of the current crisis,” the prime
minister said.

However, he said that at this
time it must be a priority for all
concerned for there to be a res-
olution of the current crisis that
will restore normality and con-
stitutional order to Turks and
Caicos before moves are made
to formalize an agreement
between the two entities.

“When that is achieved, my
colleagues and I would be happy
to discuss the further strength-
ening of our historic relation-

ship in accordance with the will
of the people of The Bahamas
and the people of the Turks and
Caicos Islands,” he said.

There seems to be support for
such a move on the opposition
side as well.

Responding to Mr Misick’s
comments on Monday, former
minister of foreign affairs Fred
Mitchell told The Tribune that
while he could not say if the
move is something that the PLP
is in favour of, the joining of the
Bahamas and the Turks and
Caicos is a “fascinating idea
worth exploring.”

Nonetheless, he noted that
prior periods in which the two
countries were unified in this
way were not “entirely happy”
but punctuated by disputes over
whether Turks and Caicos got
adequate representation and its
fair share of revenue from the
Nassau-based central govern-
ment at the time.

Tropical Storm Erika

FROM page one

arrives, but thunderstorms and heavy rain showers are expected to

hit the country.

PM ‘listening’ to all voices
FROM page one

This comes as the Bahamas Conference of the Methodist
Church yesterday followed the Catholic Archdiocese in sup-

3 porting the proposed amendments.

Influential groupings such as the Catholic Church and the

Seventh-Day Adventist Church in the Bahamas, the Bahamas

Crisis Centre, along with individuals such as former Cabinet

: Minister Janet Bostwick, therapist Barrington Brennen and
: Minister of Social Development Loretta Butler-Turner have
? spoken out in favour of amending the Sexual Offences Act to
i outlaw marital rape.

Many say it will provide much needed protection for spouses,

i who have traditionally been denied the same rights as others
? under the law as it presently stands, and who have been subject
i to this abuse without recourse.

However, others have questioned the wisdom of the amend-

: ment, such as Attorney and former Bar Association President
? Wayne Munroe, Pastor Cedric Moss, Senator Allyson Maynard

Gibson and many callers to talk shows nationwide.
Some say allowing spouses the legal option of accusing their

: partners of rape within a marriage will promote a plethora of neg-

ative consequences, including the erosion of the institution of

: marriage, false accusations by angry spouses or even the refusal
i of wives to have sex with their husbands.

Speaking on the proposed amendment as she tabled it in

July, Minister of State for Social Development Loretta Butler
? Turner noted that many countries in the world have “updated”
i their laws to allow for husbands/wives to be held legally account-

able for raping their spouses. Meanwhile, The Bahamas has

been censured by members of the United Nations Human Rights

Council for not doing enough to protect women from sexual or
domestic violence in this regard.
Asked yesterday how soon Government might proceed

towards amending the Sexual Offences Act, Mr Ingraham
; responded: “I can listen as long as people want to talk about it.”

While the system has a well-defined surface centre, Mr Dean said
that upper-level conditions are at this time not favourable towards
more development.

“We will first have to see what happens after the systems gets
past those conditions,” he said.

AccuWeather said the storm was able to develop thanks to the
warm sea surface temperatures between 83 and 86 degrees in that
part of the Atlantic.

And as it moves closer to the Bahamas the storm will encounter
even warmer waters.

At press time last night the centre of the storm was located
around 390 miles east of the northern Leeward Islands.

The system was moving in a west-northwest direction at a speed
of 9mph.

Tropical Storm Erika is the fifth named storm of the 2009
Atlantic hurricane season.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MUELMY MAZARD
of HAMPTON STREET, P.O. Box N-556, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26'" day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Caribbean Community, the gov-
ernment has been dismayed at
the recent turn of events in the

FROM page one

employed.

Mr Foulkes said: “The
hotel’s prospects going into
Christmas are very low, much
lower than their expectations.
The Department of Labour is
ensuring that the employees
receive their full benefits and
any other benefits that are
owed to them.

“We as a government are
doing all we can to ease the
burden on all unemployed
persons including the 80 at
Sandals through the unem-
ployment scheme, and all of
them would qualify for the
benefit.

“Additionally we are con-
sidering reopening the nation-
al training programme for
those 80 persons to join if they
wish to participate.”

Attempts to reach Sandals
for comment on the lay offs
were unsuccessful.

This latest round of job cuts
is yet another grim reminder
of the state of the local econ-
















Sandals

omy which continues to suf-
fer as a result the recession in
the United States.

Yesterday, eight managers
and two line staff at Atlantis
were let go from the hotel’s
food and beverage division
and its reservation depart-
ments.

However the losses were
not only felt in the Bahamas,
as the hotel also laid-off four
people in its Fort Lauderdale
office.

Earlier this year, resort
executives pointed to the can-
cellation of group trips, such
as those traditionally taken by
staff from North American
corporations, as one of the
reasons hitting occupancy lev-
els at Atlantis.

As the resort goes into a
typically slow period for hotels
(September/October), occu-
pancy levels were forecast to
drop to as low as 30 per cent
within weeks, executives said.

* Ability to continually develop and expand on
technical skills

* Ability to clearly and adequately document work
and maintain an effective audit trail

* Present ideas and facts persuasively and confidently
through verbal and written communication

* A self-starter who demonstrates creativity in looking
for ways to simplify and improve processes

* Aneffective listener, one who also seeks and accepts
advice and provides feedback

* Able to project a poised and self-confident manner
and be perceived as a leader

* Demonstrates a willingness to take on new
challenges and responsibilities

* Willing to spend time working in the retail operations
serving customers

Interested candidates should submit a
letter of interest and resume to:
accountant.open@ gmail.com

No Resumes will be received after September 11, 2009



NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that, in accordance with
Section 50 (1) (b) of the Supreme Court Act, 1996,
against the estate of

anyone having claims
Fernando Rafael Zanartu Velasco should send written
notification thereof to Santander Bank & Trust Ltd.,
3rd Floor, Goodman’s Bay Corporate Centre, P.O. Box
N1682, Nassau Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAXENE BAZILE of OKRA
HILL,off SHIRLEY ST. NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 2nd September, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O.
Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WISLINE BENJAMIN of
KEMP ROAD, P.O. Box SS-5139, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 26'" day of August, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CAROL CUNNINGHAM of
#7 EASTERN CLOSE, P.O. Box FH-14364, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26" day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



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TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009, PAGE 9



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



BRITISH SOCCER

UN tw
aT SS Mee Ce eater Ts

N

ARSENAL'S EDUARDO is seen on the substitute bench
before the English Premier League soccer match against
Manchester United at Old Trafford Stadium, Manchester,
England, Saturday Aug. 29, 2009.

NYON, Switzerland

Arsenal striker Eduardo da Silva has been
banned for two Champions League matches for
diving to earn a penalty kick in a qualifying
match against Celtic.

European soccer’s governing body made the
ruling Tuesday. Its disciplinary panel said the
Brazilian-born Croatia forward deceived the ref-
eree. Eduardo was challenged on the play by
Celtic goalkeeper Artur Boruc and appeared to
deliberately throw himself to the ground.

Eduardo made the penalty kick and Arsenal
won 3-1 last Wednesday, advancing to the group
stage. He will miss Arsenal’s Group H matches at
Standard Liege on Sept. 16 and at home to
Olympiakos on Sept. 29.

Arsenal can appeal within three days.

Adu loaned again among
low-key transfers

LONDON

Freddy Adu’s career faltered again with a low-key loan to
Belenenses, and Ajax captured a ball-juggling Brazilian as
the transfer window closed on Tuesday.

There were no signs of any big stars moving for huge, last-
ditch transfers fees like a year ago. Instead, the market was
dominated by loan deals or lesser-known players moving for
relatively small fees. Adu made headlines at 10, and was con-
sidered a rising star at 13. Although a regular in the U.S
national team, the 20-year-old Adu has struggled to make an
impact at club level, despite a move to Benfica, once one of
European soccer’s strongest teams.

He scored five goals in 21 appearances and Benfica loaned
him to AS Monaco last season.

Now he’s off to Belenenses, Lisbon’s third team after
Benfica and Sporting, which barely avoided relegation last
season.

Striker Kerlon’s move from Inter Milan to Ajax was one
of the eye-catching loans.

The 21-year-old Brazilian is known as “the seal” because
of his ability to run past defenders while juggling the ball on
his head. Ajax fans may have to wait to see his skills, how-
ever, while he proves his fitness after serious ankle and
knee injuries.

“IT am sure he can be a valuable addition,” said Ajax
coach Martin Jol.

Benfica also loaned midfielder Hassan Yebda to
Portsmouth which had already announced the signing of Tal
Ben Haim from Manchester City and was talking to anoth-
er defender, Nicky Shorey, about a move from Aston Villa.

The lack of major transfer activity contrasted from last
year ago when Manchester City splashed out $58 million on
Real Madrid star Robinho, Tottenham gave Dimitar Berba-
tov to Manchester United for $55 million and acquired
Roman Pavlyuchenko from Moscow Spartak for $25 million.



Jack at the Masters,

ut only for 1 hole



AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)

IN THIS APRIL 8, 2009, file photo, former Masters’ champions Jack Nicklaus, left, and Arnold
Palmer wait while playing the Par 3 contest before the Masters golf tournament at the Augusta
National Golf Club in Augusta, Ga. Nicklaus said he would never be a ceremonial player, and just because
he'll be on the first tee with Arnold Palmer at Augusta National next April doesn't change that. Nick-
laus and Arnold Palmer will be honorary starters, not ceremonial ones. But if they decide to hit more

than a tee shot, the lines get blurred.

By DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer
NORTON, Mass.

Je Nicklaus has said all along he would
never become a ceremonial player, and
just because he will be on the first tee at Augus-
ta National next April doesn’t change that.

Nicklaus agreed to join Arnold Palmer as hon-
orary — not ceremonial — starters at the Mas-
ters. The difference between those words only
becomes blurred if they decide to hit more than
the opening tee shot.

Nicklaus already was reaching ceremonial sta-
tus in 2005 when he played his last Masters with-
out telling anyone. Then, he played his final
major in the British Open at St. Andrews with the
world watching, some weeping.

That spring, he was asked if it bothered him
that fans only wanted to see him play.

“No, I think that’s very nice,” he said. “I'd
like to have them see me, the real Jack Nick-
laus. I will put as much effort through as I can to
do that. That’s what I’ve always done, all my
life. I just know that there’s a certain point in time
— and I’m sure that time is there — that I can’t
do that, give them what I think they really paid to
see.”

What did they come to see?

The winner of 18 majors, the benchmark of
greatness in golf? Or someone who can barely
reach some of the fairways?

The Golden Bear or the Olden Bear?

“I don’t think he ever wants to be looked at
like a museum piece,” Brad Faxon said Tues-
day. Palmer, a four-time champion who turns 80
next week, stopped playing the Masters in 2004
and agreed to become the honorary starter in
2007. Nicklaus said that wasn’t for him, but
changed his mind at Palmer’s invitation.

“He is so deserving of this honor, and thus I felt
it was his time, not mine,” Nicklaus said. ““Recent-
ly, I was invited by both Augusta National and
Arnold to join him on the first tee, and because
he enthusiastically supported the invitation, it
became an easy decision for me.”

Don’t be surprised to see Gary Player, the
other member of the “Big Three,” join them
over the next few years.

Now would seem to be a good time to restore
some tradition at the Masters, a major already
loaded with it.

The practice of an honorary starter began in
1963, although it goes back even further. Fred
McLeod (1908 U.S. Open) and Jock Hutchin-
son (1920 PGA Championship, 1921 British
Open) were both in their 70s when they were
assigned the first tee time in 1954 and “led the
field” during the first round.

Nine years later, they became the inaugural

honorary starters. After they died — McLeod
in 1976, Hutchison in 1977 — the honorary starter
was revived in 1981 with Gene Sarazen, Byron
Nelson and Sam Snead. They often played the
front nine, giving fans a glimpse of living history.
No one took it too seriously, except for one time
when Ken Venturi was asked to fill in for Nelson
in 1983. “We played nine holes, me and Gene
Sarazen,” Venturi once said. “That might have
been the best I played. I had four birdies and a
bogey, and I told Gene, ’Let’s keep going. I might
be leading the tournament.’ And Gene said, ’Are
you crazy? We’re going for lunch.”’

Before long, the honorary starters were skip-
ping holes, and it wasn’t much longer that they hit
only the opening tee shot.

Sarazen once considered not even hitting the
tee shot, worried that his game was not in shape.
That’s when the late Masters chairman Hord
Hardin said to him, “Gene, they don’t want to see
you play, they just want to see if you’re still
alive.”

What would be so wrong with Nicklaus and
Palmer chasing after their tee shot and going at it
for nine holes, or even all 18?

“It’s not out of the realm of possibility,” said
Zach Johnson, a Masters champion who knows
that nothing it out of any realm when it comes to
Augusta National. “As a fan of the game, as a fan
of Jack, as a player ... he’s the best who ever
played. You want to see him play.”

Scott Verplank played the first two rounds
with Nicklaus in 1986, the year he went on to
capture his sixth green jacket. He wouldn’t mind
seeing Nicklaus and Palmer hit more than one
shot, either. “But only if they wanted to,” he
said. “It needs to be their idea. And they would
get to play the member tees.”

That isn’t the Nicklaus way, though. It never
has been. The only thing he enjoyed more than
competing in majors was preparing for them.
Nicklaus never played a lot of recreational golf,
and he still doesn’t. His last real competition —
even though it was fake — was a Skins game
against Tiger Woods, Kenny Perry and Stewart
Cink at the Memorial this year. Nicklaus felt an
adrenaline rush that day, even though he could
barely reach three fairways. Woods won on the
final hole with a chip-in from 25 yards.

It was his first time playing with Nicklaus in
nine years, although one thing didn’t change.

“Anyone who has ever played at the highest
level always wants to play at the highest level,”
Woods said. Would the Masters turn into a car-
nival by having Nicklaus and Palmer play a round
that doesn’t count? No. It already is the only
major with a Par 3 Tournament on Wednesday,
and the only major with an honorary starter.

To have Nicklaus join Palmer on the first tee is
an honor, one he earned. Anything more would
be a ceremony, the one thing he disdains.

Ga EUS Ra GCG Uae MU aD



A WATER BLOTTING MACHINE attempts to dry the pitch before England's Twenty20 International cricket match against Australia is abandoned

due to rain at Old Trafford cricket ground Manchester, England, Tuesday Sept. 1, 2009.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

run-ups were waterlogged.

AP Photo/Jon Super

Friday

AUSTRALIAN PLAYERS including their captain Michael Clarke,
right, are seen on the pitch as their team's Twenty20 International
cricket match against England is abandoned due to rain at Old Traf-
ford cricket ground Manchester, England, Tuesday Sept. 1, 2009.

O US soccer

WASHINGTON
ASSOCIATED PRESS

D.C. United have screamed
it loud and clear, on the Inter-
net and in full-page newspa-
per ads: “WE WIN TRO-
PHIES.”

The Seattle Sounders hear
screams as well, echoing from
the 30,000 or so people who
come to every home game:
We have lots of fans.

So it is that United and the
Sounders are playing
Wednesday at RFK Stadium
in the championship of the
US. Open Cup, a 95-year-old
single-elimination tournament
that is open to amateur and
professional teams across the
country.

The event has some charm
but is usually ignored outside
the hardcore soccer commu-
nity. A little bit of controver-
sy is giving the game a needed
boost.

Both teams wanted to host
the final. Four-time MLS Cup
champions United had tradi-
tion on their side; the first-
year expansion team
Sounders could offer a big
turnout. When U.S. Soccer
chose United, Seattle general
manager Adrian Hanauer
cried foul, saying he was
“frustrated and somewhat
skeptical of the process.”

“Our fans deserve some
answers,” Hanauer said.
“And, by the way, U.S. Soccer
has been trying to raise the
profile of the U.S. Open Cup.
A game in front of 10,000 fans
at RFK, I don’t believe, is
going to raise the profile as
much as a game in front of a
sold-out Qwest Field.”

United president Kevin
Payne says nothing was
underhanded. He said Unit-
ed “bid aggressively” for the
game, in part because the
team has been playing extra
road games as part of the
international CONCACAF
Champions League. While
U.S. Soccer won’t say why
one bid is favored over anoth-
er, Payne noted that RFK has
grass, instead of Qwest Field-
’s artificial surface, and that
Seattle could only host the
game in the afternoon
because of scheduling issues.

“We thought it was very
important strategically to play
at home in this final,” Payne
said. Of course, it would be
embarrassing to have such a
fuss over the home field and
then have a tiny crowd show
up, so United launched into
aggressive marketing mode.
The “WE WIN TROPHIES”
ads feature the 12 national
and international titles won
by the club: four MLS Cups,
two U.S. Open Cups, four
MLS Supporters’ Shields (for
best regular season record),
one CONCACAF Champi-
ons Cup and one InterAmer-
ican Cup. In addition, Unit-
ed are charging 1996 prices
for the game, with tickets
starting at $12 and hot dogs
and beers at $2. Payne said
he’s expecting 15,000-20,000,
perhaps double the number
that came to RFK to watch
United win last year’s final.

AP Photo/Jon Super



Fans at Old Trafford were again left disappointed as the
second of England's Twenty20 internationals against Aus-
tralia was washed out without a ball being bowled.

After Sunday's match was abandoned seven balls into
the England reply, Tuesday's day/night clash went the same
way at 8pm local time after officials ruled that the bowlers’

It is a frustrating way for the series to finish and leaves
both sides short of Twenty20 practise ahead of next April's
World Twenty20 in the West Indies.

The one-day leg of the tour continues with seven one-day
internationals, the first of which takes place at The Oval on





PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009
SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPREADING THE WORD

Coach George Cleare has chance to share his expertise throughout the region

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

AFTER successfully passing his IAAF Lec-
turer’s Course last year, coach George Cleare is
now being afforded the opportunity to share
his expertise throughout the region.

On Saturday, Cleare will be heading to St.
Kitts & Nevis to lead in a Lecturer’s Course
for primary school physical education teachers
in a bid to have as many of them become certi-
fied IAAF level one coaches.

“Their main goal is to get that type of coach-
ing on the island from the primary school level
to the high school level so that they can have the
knowledge to start developing their athletes,”
said Cleare, who is a level four coach and a lev-
el one lecturer.

The course is similar to these held throughout
the region and there are plans for one to be
held in the Bahamas either by the end of the

year, or early in 2010. “Most of the physical
education teachers are not certified or they
don’t have the knowledge that is required today
to coach track and field,” Cleare said.

Changing

“The information is changing every day and
so we need to start looking at ways of making
sure that we are not left too far behind.”

The course in St. Kitts is the last of a two-part
series. Cleare said he actually missed the first
one having had to travel with the national team
to the IAAF’s 12th World Championships in
Athletics in Berlin, Germany last month.

“They are actually educating their physical
education teachers now so that they can start
enhancing their potential so that they can have
better athletes in the future,” Cleare said.

During the 10-day course, Cleare will be lec-
turing on theory and understanding the differ-

ences of young athletes. He will be providing
pointers on every aspect of track and field. At
the end of session, every candidate will sit an
examination that will be marked by Cleare and
the local lecturer from St. Kitts & Nevis, who
will be sharing in the course.

“It’s just a course where they have to show
their ability to understand theory, the method-
ology behind training and the ability to work on
the outside where they can instruct and demon-
strate their ability in all disciplines in track and
field.

Cleare, who is also a Pan American certified
elite coach, is due to return home on September
16.

Denied the opportunity to sit the level five
coaching course when David Charlton and Fritz
Grant traveled to Mexico a few years ago,
Cleare said he’s delighted to have been afford-
ed the opportunity to sit the lecturer’s course.

Now he can pass on his expertise to other

coaches, especially around the Caribbean. Course

GEORGE CLEARE: Going
& Nevis to lead in a Lecturer’s



to St. Kitts

PPO ACTLL
Oe
to win medal’

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

WHEN hardly anybody expected the
women’s 4 x 100 metre relay team to secure
a medal at the IAAF’s 12th World Cham-
pionships in Athletics, coach George Cleare
said he knew that they had the potential to
do it.

“Allin all, [have to give a lot of credit to
Debbie (Ferguson-McKenzie) and Chan-
dra (Sturrup),” said Cleare, who served as
an. assistant team on the 24-member team in
Berlin, Germany last month.

“Although this was my first major inter-
national meet working with them, they were
very open to our new ideas and what we
were trying to do and they really
worked, even sacrificing their rest
time from their individual events
to help the relay team get ready.”

Cleare commented both Sturrup,
who ran a brilliant second leg and

“They went

beyond what we
expected of them

Ferguson-McKenzie, who
anchored the team to the silver
medal behind the United States.

He said with the two veterans
leading the way, it made it quite
easy to insert Auburn-bound
Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson and quar-
ter-miler Christine Amertil in the
line-up on pop off and third leg
respectively.

“They went beyond what we
expected of them and I think the
team was of one unit and their
time (42.29 seconds), compared to
the team we had in 2000 when they
ran 41.92, showed how well they
worked together,” Cleare said.

“We knew that we didn’t have the foot
speed as the team in 2000, but we ran a
very decent time because we were able to go
out there and execute with the baton the
way they should have.”

When asked why the decision was made
not to use any of the other sprinters - Tim-
icka Clarke or Jerniece Saunders - Cleare
said it was evident that they wanted to go
with what they felt was the right combina-
tion and it turned out to be the correct one.

“We got to the point that this was the

and I think the
team was of one
unit and their time
(42.29 seconds),
compared to the
team we had in
2000 when they
ran 41.92, showed
how well they

worked together,”
eT

first time that what we
though was the A team
would run together and
I decided that we could-
n't a medal unless we
got to the final and then
we could correct the
mistakes,” he said.

“So had we had the
luxury of having a meet
to run in just before the
championships, we
would have probably ran a few more com-
binations.

:But only having two shots at it, the first
goal was to make sure we got into the final
and the next thing was to correct any mis-
takes so that we could run faster in the
final.”

Cleare said while the Bahamas came up
with two medals - a bronze from Ferguson-
McKenzie in the 200 to along with the silver
by the relay team - they could have easily
had a total of five to their ledger.

But he noted that it was quite disap-

pointing that Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands was
just barely beaten out in the men’s triple
jump, Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown ended up fifth
in the men’s 400 and the men’s 4 x 400 relay
team got disqualified.

Unfortunate

“It’s unfortunate that Leevan and Chris
came so close to winning a medal and they
didn’t,” Cleare said.

“As for the relay team, they made a mis-
take that I don’t think they will make again.
But it happened on the biggest stage and it
was so unfortunate.

“But the team was in a position to do a
whole lot better than it did, but we have to
start redeveloping our athletes to be able to
compete with the rest of the world.”

Not taking anything away from Sturrup,
who at age 37, and Ferguson-McKenzie, 33,
were two of the oldest female sprinters com-
peting in the meet, but Cleare said more
emphasis will have to be placed on the

SILVER LADIES: The women’s 4 x 100 metre relay team which won silver in Berlin. From left are Chandra Sturrup, Christine
Amertil, Sheniqua Ferguson and Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie.

younger athletes. He noted how Trinidad &
Tobago had a 19-year-old, who placed
fourth in the men’s 400 hurdles; Grenada
had a 17-year-old who ran 45 after winning
every junior event and Jamaica had a core
of 21-23 sprinters and hurdlers.

“We tried to keep the standard where
we go to America and allow them to keep
up our standard and that is not working for
us because by the time our athletes are fin-
ished with college, they are burned out,”
Cleare said.

“But we’ve seen how the Jamaicans are
keeping their athletes at home and they are
now beating the Americans and so we as
Bahamians have to look within ourselves
to see how we can develop the same type of
programmes that the other Caribbean coun-
tries have developed.”

The first, however, Cleare said the
Bahamas must close the generation gap
between Sturrup and Ferguson-McKenzie
and Sheniqua Ferguson, the next top sprint-
er.

Darlings season hit by injury

FROM page 11

Copper, Amani Toomer, Bobby Engram.

He started each of the team's three preseason games and
recorded three catches for 19 yards in the Chiefs' rebuilding
offensive attack.

Despite Darling's injury, the Chiefs released the 13 year
veteran Toomer.

Bradley is expected to fill in for Darling to start the team's
final preseason game, Thursday, September 3rd against the
St. Louis Rams.

The injury bug hit the Chiefs organization in a major way
against the Seawhawks on their home field.

Not only did the team lose Darling, but lost marquee
free agent quarterback Matt Cassel to a knee injury which
reports have indicated may be a strained MCL according to
ProFootballTalk.com.

The Chiefs remain tight lipped on a schedule for his
return.

Second year vet and starting cornerback Brandon Flow-
ers was also forced to leave the field with a shoulder injury.

Flowers had been playing well and caught an interception
which he returned for a touchdown.

Darling tore his ACL running a typical out pattern, late in
the third quarter, virtually without contact and came up
hobbling.

The fifth year vet was expected to come into his own this

te

The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is considered
the most important of four major ligaments located in the
knee, providing most of its stability.

Knee movements that often place a high level of strain

on the ligament can cause an ACL injury and it is gen-
erally common among athletes.

Tiger Woods famously completed the 2008 U.S Open
with a torn ACL, and Patriots perennial Pro-Bowl quar-
terback, Tom Brady, was sidelined for the entire 2008 sea-
son when he tore his ACL in the opening week of the
season against the Chiefs.



year, and had the confidence of the new coaching staff
behind him, evident in his three consecutive postseason
starts.

After playing sparingly in his rookie and sophomore sea-
sons with the Baltimore Ravens, Darling's play in his third
year sparked int erst from franchises around the league.

He caught 18 passes for 326 yards, including a nationally
televised breakout performance against the Cleveland
Browns when he recorded a career high four receptions
for 107 yards and one touchdown.



Carl Hield ‘goes back to
drawing board’ after loss

FROM page 11

you have to knock out your opponent or put up a very good
performance in order to win.

Today, Knowles will be the last to carry the Bahamian flag
when he compete in his first round bout in the lightweight or 60
kiloclass against Joseph Njogu from Kenya.

“My hometown boy went down, so I can’t let my country
down too,” said Knowles as he prepared for his battle. “?’m
going to go in there with my hopes up and I know I’m going to
come out on top.

“That’s what I’m going to do. I’m going to do this one for the
people.”

Best

With this being the World Championships, Knowles said
that the tournament has the best amateur boxers competing,
which mean that every time out, you have to bring your A
game.

“From what I’ve seen today, you got to be clean and perfect
if you want to win,” he insisted. “I think I’m ready to go out
there and perform. I really want to do very well.”

Coach Seymour agreed that Knowles should be in a much
better frame of mind to compete today, having watched the first
day of action yesterday. “We’re going in with a mind to win,”
Seymour stressed. “We’re not taking anybody lightly in this
championships. We have already lost one boxer, but we expect
to come out with at least one or two victories from Valentino.”

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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 11

r
b
WEDNESDAY,

SEPTEMBER 2,



ts

2009





INSIDE ¢ Arsenal’s Eduardo barred for CL two games



KANSAS CITY CHIEFS WIDE RECEIVER DIAGNOSED WITH A TORN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT
| A, BAA ‘4 > “

Darling's § *, .s
season hit!
by injury

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
renaldodorsett@yahoo.com





A promising season for the country’s most high profile
gridiron star ended abruptly in his last preseason outing,
however, the fifth year receiver has reason to feel confident
in his immediate future with his organization

Kansas City Chiefs wide receiver Devard Darling was
officially diagnosed with a torn Anterior Cruciate Liga-
ment, suffered in the third quarter of Friday’s preseason con-
test against the Seattle Seahawks, and was placed on the
injured reserve list late yesterday afternoon.

Darling was expected to challenge for a starting spot
opposite the team's main reciving target, Dwayne Bowe,
with a mix of players that included Ashley Lelie, Terrance

fo a

cae? le,
a i ee one a a
Sea ST



AP Photo/Reed Hoffmann

_ "es

ing (81) is helped from the field during the first h
against the Seattle Seahawks in Kansas City, Mo., Saturday, Aug. 29, 2009.

alf of their preseason NFL football game



SEE page ten
AIBA WORLD BOXING CHAMPIONSHIPS

Carl Hield ‘goes back to



drawing board’ after loss

i
CARL HIELD: He ‘performed well’ despite loss.

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

CARL Hield’s third
appearance at the AIBA
World Boxing Championships
didn’t last as long as he had
anticipated. But Valentino
Knowles promised that his
second appearance won’t be
as short.

Yesterday in the first round
of the week-long champi-
onships in Milan, Italy, Hield
dropped a 9-3 decision to
hometown boy, Dario Van-
geli, to be eliminated from the
lightweight or 64 kiloclass.

“Tt was a fight to the end,
but I just wasn’t scoring no
points,” said a somewhat dis-
appointed Hield.

“It was a good perfor-
mance. It was better than the
other two times.”

Hield said he will just have
to go back to the drawing
board and start preparing for
another year.

Coach Andre Seymour said
despite the loss, Hield per-
formed very well.

“Carl performed well. I
think he should have gotten
more than the three points in
the people hometown,” Sey-



Today Valentino
Knowles carries
Bahamian flag

mour said. “But he fought
extremely well.”

Looking back at his perfor-
mance, Seymour said the Ital-
ians had a chance to really
watch all of the boxers and so
they had the upperhand on
all of the competitors they
faced.

“Once they realized that
they had Carl, I think they
studied the film they had on
him,” Seymour said. “So they
were really able to counter
his style once the draw came
out. That’s how it is with tech-
nology.”

The Bahamian team spent
three weeks in a training
camp in Rome prior to the
start of the championships.

Seymour, a two-time
Olympic boxer, said that it’s
obvious that fighting against a
hometown competitor, either

SEE page ten

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NIB
prosecuting
100 firms
monthly
on non-
payment

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE National Insurance
Board (NIB) is prosecuting
more than 100 companies and
self-employed persons per
month for their alleged fail-
ure to pay due contribution,
Tribune Business was told
yesterday, the crackdown
being credited with improv-
ing the social security pro-
gramme’s 2009 revenues and
profitability.

Algernon Cargill, NIB’s
director, said it will have a
more profitable year than
expected due to the shake-
down and prosecution of
companies - more than 100
cases per month in New Prov-
idence and the Family Islands
combined.

“The projections are
exceeding our business plan
objective for the year in terms
of collections,” said Mr
Cargill.

Some high profile cases
involving alleged non-pay-
ment of NIB contributions are
set to reappear in court on
September 15, including Jones
Communications, Solomon’s
Mines, Bertha's Ribs, Glob-
al United and More 94 FM.

Mr Cargill said the team
assembled specifically to trace
delinquent employers and
self-employed persons had
done an excellent job.

He said the team focused
on those employers who
allegedly would deduct con-
tributions from their employ-
ees but not turn the payments
over to NIB, adding that
some employers had become
more crafty in how they
defrauded the govern-
ment/NIB.

“There are some pretty cre-
ative employers in the mar-
ketplace,” said Mr Cargill.
“They would not produce
accurate statements, but there
are many ways to find out
(about the inaccuracies).”

However, he said that due
to the depressed economy,
NIB has been working with
companies in order to help
them fulfill their payment

SEE page 4B
























The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

Sale Ends
September 5th

THE TRIBUNE

usiness

WEDNESDAY,

SEPTEMBER 2,

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Firm loses $100,000
equipment to surges

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

Bahamian

business has

seen $100,000

worth of

equipment

and electrical components
fried by power surges and
spikes, its chief executive argu-
ing that by switching to gen-
erator usage its electricity
costs have fallen to 35 per cent
of what they were previously.
Steve Howes, chief execu-
tive of Fenestration and Glass
Services, in an August 17,
2009, letter to Grand Bahama

* Grand Bahama-based company says costs have fallen
to 35% of power provider’s through generator use

* Argues electricity costs ‘six times and more’ higher
than developed world making it ‘impossible to
run profitable manufacturing business’

Power Company’s president
and chief executive, E. O. Fer-
rell, said the monopoly power
producer’s prices - “six times
(and more)” higher than many
developed countries - made it

“impossible to run a profitable
manufacturing business” on
Grand Bahama.

Arguing that this under-
mined Freeport’s attractive-
ness as a manufacturing/indus-

trial base, and impeded its
world competitiveness, Mr
Howes said the poor, unreli-
able electrical supply provided

SEE page 3B



Logistics Centre 25 per cent completed

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMAS Logistics Centre, a $16
million storage facility complex, replete
with a disaster recovery facility that is
hurricane-resistant up to a category five
storm, yesterday said it had already rent-
ed two of the existing six storage facilities
after recently opening the first phase.

Juan Carlos Gomez, its accounts man-
ager, said even though only 25 per cent of
the complex, on Munnings Drive off
Gladstone Road, has been completed, it
has received a favourable response from
Bahamian businesses. It has already rent-
ed two of six storage facilities capable

Cable $40m
offer ‘fully

subscribed’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas has com-
pleted a key step in the buy-
out of its largest shareholder,
Columbus Communications,
after its $40 million prefer-
ence share issue that closed
on Monday was fully sub-
scribed, sources confirmed to
Tribune Business.

This newspaper under-
stands that the offering, which
will help finance the $80 mil-
lion purchase of Columbus’s
30.2 per cent stake, was in fact
slightly oversubscribed, mean-
ing that high net-worth and
institutional investors sought
more shares than were actu-
ally available.

The only outstanding issue
to completing the Columbus
transaction, sources have told
Tribune Business, is the
receipt of approval for the
buyout from the Federal
Communications Commission
(FCC), the US communica-
tions regulator.

This is required because
Cable Bahamas’ fibre optic
cable infrastructure connects
with the US, meaning the
change of ownership requires
regulatory approval at the
Federal level.

The fact Cable Bahamas’
$40 million private placement
was fully subscribed does not
come as a surprise, the com-
pany’s officials having indi-
cated last week this was like-
ly to be the case.

SEE page 4B
CASH
r

CARRY
ONLY

MEAD Back - ne.

of holding the contents of eight 40-foot
containers.

Each facility has been constructed with
dedicated on-loading and offloading
docks, with steel according doors import-
ed from Europe, instead of the conven-
tional steel roll-up doors often seen at the
average storage facility.

According to office manager Janice
Taylor, doors on both sides of the storage
facility are completely storm resistant,
with each panel of the according door
locking in place independently.

“The Bahamas Logistics Centre has
been developed with the intention of
optimising and making more cost-effec-
tive storage and distribution for new
and established businesses in Nassau,”

ROYAL FIDELITY

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RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company

BAHAMAS

Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

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said Ms Taylor.

“It provides state-of-the-art protec-
tion, built with reinforced concrete
imported from Italy, and other structur-
al components that reduce maintenance
and vulnerabilities to rust and corrosion,
as opposed to steal which is commonly
used.”

Bahamas Logistics is a disaster recov-
ery facility which would house business-
es, such as banks or insurance firms, that
need a secure office with all the facilities
needed to operate after a major storm or
natural disaster.

The logistics centre features two dis-
aster recovery offices, with storage, that

SEE page 4B

Where do you want to be? >

We can get you there!

ROYAL FIDELITY

RULE §

RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com

90% asset
return for
80 clients
of collapsed
broker

* Liquidator of firm with
$25m trading hole says
release process ‘arduous
and time consuming
to say the least’

* More than 100 smaller
Caledonia clients still
awaiting asset return,
although some concerned
at 8% asset retention

* Real Estate Association
turns down licence
application by Caledonia’s
former head trader

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

EIGHTY clients of a for-
mer Bahamian broker/dealer
that collapsed after suffering a
$25 million trading loss have
had 90 per cent of their assets
returned to them, the compa-
ny’s liquidator has confirmed,
although more than 100 oth-
ers with small accounts are
still outstanding in a process
that has been described as
“arduous and time consum-
ing to say the least”.

A July 29, 2009, update sent
to Caledonia Corporate Man-

SEE page 4B

| Learn more at royalfidelity.com |

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Money at Work

Back-to-School SALE

oe Student Project Beards Washable Markers ir



J s Pr 2
Tel: 394-5656
Top-of-the-Hill, Mackey Street
www.bossbahamas.com



PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

View our website of eww.cobedn.bs

NOTICE

Town Meeting for Master of Law (LLM)
in Maritime Law Degree Programme in
collaboration with the University of London,
Monday 5th October, 2009,
Executive Boardroom,

Michael Eldon Complex, 3rd Floor
6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

PC Ge TT
TR ae IR aren ya rE

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

Common Law & Equity Division

2009/CLE/gen/qui/01193

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
comprising Eight hundred and Fifty-nine thousandths (.859) of
an acre situate on the Southern side of Haynes Avenue in the
Settlement of Governor’s Harbour in the Island of Eleuthera.

AND
IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Ian A. Gray and Ellen
M. Gray
NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of IAN A. GRAY AND ELLEN M. GRAY of
Ontario, Canada in respect of:-

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate on the Southern
side of Haynes Avenue in the Settlement of Governor’s Harbour
in the Island of Eleuthera comprising Eight hundred and Fifty-
nine thousandths (.859) of an acre and which said parcel of
land is bounded on the NORTHNORTHEAST by Haynes
Avenue and running thereon Fifteen and Forty-one hundredths
(15.41) feet on the NORTHEAST by Buccaneer Hill said to
be the property of Tanya Melich-Crone and running thereon
One hundred and Forty-nine and Ninety-three hundredths
(149.43) feet on the NORTHWEST by the said Buccaneer Hill
and running thereon Twenty-four and Ninety-four hundredths
(24.94) feet on the NORTHEAST by the said Buccaneer Hill
and by land said to be the property of Paul Petty and running
thereon Fifty-eight and Seventy-eight hundredths (58.78) feet
and One hundred and Nine and Fifty-eight hundredths (109.58)
feet respectively on the SOUTHEAST by a chain-linked
fence separating it from the property of the said Paul Petty and
running thereon One hundred and Forty-three and Eighty-one
hundredths (143.81) feet on the SOUTHWEST again by the
property of the said Paul Petty and by the property of Bishop
Clifford and Velma Petty and running thereon Seventy-four
and Twenty-seven hundredths (74.27) feet and Eighty-nine
and Thirty-four hundredths (89.34) feet respectively on
the SOUTHEAST by the property of the said Bishop and
Velma Petty and running thereon Twenty-five and Forty-one

Secrets to making
the right hirings

ASK any manager, vice-
president or business owner
what is one of the biggest
challenges they face in mak-
ing their revenue numbers,
and they will tell you it is
identifying, hiring and retain-
ing good sales representatives.
If you are familiar with my
management philosophy,
then you have heard me talk
about the 80/20 rule in sales,
and all you have to do is look
at your own company or
industry to know it is still true:
“80 per cent of the sales and
revenue is made by the top
20 per cent”.

So how do you identify
who the top 20 per cent are
BEFORE you spend all that
time and money on hiring,
training and then hoping they
perform? There are many
ways to try to identify these
characteristics in advance, and
a whole industry of profiling
and assessment testing has
sprouted up to help you make
the right choice.

But there are easier ways
to identify who the potential
top producers are.

Secret Number One) The
best predictor of future
behaviour and performance

is past behaviour and perfor-
mance. This is a well known
fact in psychology, and it is
one you can use to predict
how a new sales representa-
tive is likely to perform for

you.

The bottom line is that
however much your candi-
date earned in income in their
last job, and the job before
that, it is mostly likely the
amount they are going to earn
working for you as well.

What you must determine
is exactly how much money
that was. Ask your candidate
to provide you with pay stubs
or verification of income for
the last six months and, in
addition, ask them what they
earned in income for each of
the last three years. Find a
way to verify this.

Finally, determine how
much of your product or ser-
vice your candidate would
have to sell to generate that
kind of income again, and ask
yourself if you would be hap-
py with that level of perfor-
mance because that is most
likely what you are going to
get.

Secret Number Two)
Determine what is really

CARDIOTHORACIC/
VASCULAR
SURGEON

Experience:
-10 YEARS
-PEDIATRICS
CALL
242-326-2346



DATA ENTRY CLERK & CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE

Promotional
Marketing

mooie era arITrey TT



motivating your candidate.
What we were exposing in the
first real secret was your can-
didate’s comfort zone. We all
have comfort zones, and sales
reps, in particular, will always
live up to - and most likely
down to - their comfort zone,
especially in terms of income.

So if your candidate is real-
ly looking to your company
aS an opportunity to better
themselves and earn more
money, find out what is dri-
ving this need and desire for
more money. Have their life
circumstances changed? For
example, have they recently
gotten married, had a child,
purchased a home?

If so, then they may have a
real motivation to work hard-
er, make more money and
enlarge their comfort zone.

If their situation has not
changed, then you can be
pretty sure they will not be
motivated to work harder,
learn more skills and make
more sales. In essence, they
will continue to live down to
their current comfort level
and you may once again be
hiring another 80 per cent
producer.

Secret Number Three)
Assess their sales skills and
previous training. This is one
of my favourites. During the
interview, I ask my candidates
how they think they would do
selling my product. They all
say: “I'd do great!” I then do
two things:

1) Lask them to sell me on
the product. What I am look-
ing for is for them to ask me
qualifying questions, rather

than just start pitching. Those
who just dive right in and
start pitching reveal them-
selves as middle to low 80 per
cent producers. Top 20 per
cent producers, on the other
hand, start asking me ques-
tions and gathering informa-
tion. They are the ones I am
interested in.

2) Next, I give them a cou-
ple of objections and watch
and listen to how they han-
dle them. You can immedi-
ately tell how much training
someone has had, and how
successful they were, by lis-
tening to them handle age old
objections like “The price is
too high” and “Ill have to
talk to.....”

These techniques have
saved me hundreds of hours
of poor hires, and they have
often revealed who the real
top producers were. Use
them, and you will love how
they will work for you as well.

All of these marketing
strategies are certain to keep
your business on top during
these challenging economic
times. Have a productive and
profitable week!

Remember, THOSE WHO
MARKET WILL MAKE IT.

NB: Scott Farrington is
president of SunTee
EmbroidMe, a promotional
and marketing company spe-
cialising in uniforms, embroi-
dery, silkscreen printing and
promotional products. Estab-
lished over 27 years ago, Sun-
Tee EmbroidMe has assisted
Bahamian businesses from
various industries in market-
ing themselves.

Readers can contact Mr
Farrington at SunTee
EmbroidMe on East Shirley
Street, by e-mail at
scott@sun-tee.com or by tele-
phone at 242-393-3104.

NOTICE

GEN-E MANAGEMENT LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000 that GEN-E MANAGEMENT LIMITED
is in dissolution. The dissolution of the Company

commenced on the 10th day of August, 2009. The
Liquidator is Wence Martin of Gibson, Rigby & Co.
Chambers, Dowdeswell Street, PO. Box SS-6836,

hundredths (25.41) feet on the SOUTHWEST by the property

of Pamela Moss and Trevor Pyfrom and running thereon in We require an experienced individual to fill the position of Data

total Seventy-nine and Twenty hundredths (79.20) feet on the
NORTHWEST by the property of the said Trevor Pyfrom and
running thereon Nineteen and Thirty-nine hundredths (19.39)
feet and on the NORTH and WEST by the property of the
Estate of David Sweeting and running thereon in several courses
Eighteen and Twenty-nine hundredths (18.29) feet, Six and
Two hundredths (6.02) feet, Seventy-nine and Fifty hundredths
(79.50) feet, Eleven and Sixty-one hundredths (11.61) feet and
Sixty-eight and Forty-one hundredths (68.41) feet and which
said parcel of land has such position shape marks boundaries
and dimensions as are shown on the plan filed herein which is
recorded in the Department of Lands and Surveys as “Plan No.
935 EL” and thereon outlined in Pink.”

IAN A. GRAY AND ELLEN M. GRAY claim to be the
owners in fee simple in possession of the said land free from
encumbrances and has made application to the Supreme Court
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section 3 of The
Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have their title to the said land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.A plan of the
said land may be inspected during normal office hours in the
following places:The Registry of the Supreme Court in the
said City of Nassau;The Chambers of McKinney, Bancroft
& Hughes, Mareva House, 4 George Street in the City of
Nassau, Attorneys for the Petitioners; and The office of the
Administrator at Governor’s Harbour, Eleuthera.

Notice is hereby given that any persons having dower or a
right of dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition shall on or before the 20" day of October, 2009
file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a statement of their claim in the prescribed form,
verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such
person to file and serve a statement of his claim on or before the
said 20" day of | October, A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to
such claim.

Dated the 26" day of August, A.D., 2009

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Mareva House
4 George Street
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioners



Entry Clerk and Customer Service Representative for a Leading
General Insurance Company in the Caribbean, Reporting to the
Country Manager, the successful candidate will be primarily
responsible for data entry and communicating with the Company's
Agents, ensuring that service standards are met.

(Qualification & Experience:
Bachelors Degree in Business Administration [position more
suitable to a recent graduate |
Enrolment in a General Insurance Programme through either
the Chartered Insurance Institute or the Insurance Institute of
Canada
Minimum of six (6) BGCSE subjects
Minimum of two (2) years experience in the General Insurance
Industry in Customer Service or Underwriting

Required Competencies:
The ability to work on own initiative and communicate
effectively in oral and wnitten form.
The ability to deal with Agents courteously and professionally,
Computer skills (that is competence in the use of word
processing and spreadsheet software programmes and the
ability to learn and function effectively using the Company's
General Insurance Application)

Interested persons should send a detailed resume
accompanied by a letter of application to:

Data Entry Clerk & Customer Service Representative
P.O. Box S5-19023
Nassau, Bahamas

Or email to:
csandsialewlcom

The closing date for all applications ts
September ard, 2009
Only short-listed candidates will be contacted



Nassau, New Providence.

Wence Martin
Liquidator



Cre PCG

CRMC ACER ICDs 0 oer

aude The se ns

Tr sania

for ad rates



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE



Regulator gets full power
as Act takes effect

THE Communications Act came into
force yesterday, giving the newly-creat-
ed regulator its full powers for regulation
and oversight of the electronic commu-
nications sector.

With the Utilities Regulation and
Competition Authority (URCA) now
possessing its full powers, the transition
to a new regulatory regime has begun.

During the transition, URCA is
required to act to ensure maximum con-
tinuity. For this purpose, the functions
and powers previously vested in the Pub-
lic Utilities Commission (PUC) and the
Television Regulatory Authority are
transferred to URCA by law.

Firms and individuals authorised to
provide services and to operate networks
under the Telecommunications Act and
the Broadcasting Act will be able to
apply for a licence under the Communi-
cations Act. URCA is also contacting
all existing licensees and will run a press
campaign to inform the public.

To facilitate as smooth a transition as
possible to the new licensing regime, a
number of new documents were pub-

lished on 1 September, 2009.

These include:

* Preliminary Determination cover-
ing several class operating and spectrum
licences, exemptions, and types of fees

* Individual operating and spectrum
licences

* Draft class operating and spectrum
licences

* Licensing Guidelines

* Fee schedule

* Radio Spectrum statement (existing
allocation and assignment)

* Various forms - Full Details Form
and Notice of Objection Form for the
transition, and an Application Form for
a licence.

Until new URCA regulatory measures
are adopted, all existing regulatory mea-
sures adopted by the Public Utilities
Commission and the Television Regula-
tory Authority continue in force to the
extent that they do not conflict with pro-
visions of the Communications Act, the
Utilities Regulation and Competition
Authority Act, 2009; the Utilities Tri-

bunal Act 2009 and any new regulatory
measures adopted under these Acts.

Michael Symonette, the regulator’s
chief executive, said:

“URCA is obligated to regulate the
electronic communications sector in such
a way as to ensure that new investments
are attracted to the sector, competition
between the operators is sustainable, fair
and balanced, and consumers are pro-
vided with choice and high quality prod-
ucts and services at reasonable/afford-
able prices.

“Given the right conditions, operators
and investors will bring much-needed
innovation to the communications mar-
ket in terms of new products and ser-
vices, and so create new opportunities for
individuals who would wish to partici-
pate in this sector of the economy.

“At all times, URCA will be vigilant to
ensure that the interest of consumers
are protected, and would therefore urge
consumers to avail themselves of the
consumer protection services established
for them as outlined on URCA’s web-
site.”

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009, PAGE 3B

EXECUTIVE HOME FOR RENT

4-BEDROOM, 4 1/2-BATHROOM EXECUTIVE HOME
ON LYFORD CAY GOLF COURSE

For Immediate Occupancy

This beautiful executive residence is located on
a half-acre lot overlooking the Lyford Cay Golf course.

Eighteen-foot high ceilings, eight-foot high French doors,
marble floors, casement windows and an open plan
provide a panoramic view of the Lyford Cay Golf Course

from all living areas.

This modern executive home in Nassau’s most prestigious
community is available for immediate occupancy.

For information call 327-8536.
Serious inquiries only.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT 2000

SHOREWOOD INC.

FIRM, from 1B In Voluntary Liquidation

by Grand Bahama Power
Company meant it had
breached its contract with
Fenestration and Glass Ser-
vices, not the other way round.

Railing at a $23,000 month-
ly bill received from Grand
Bahama Power Company,
despite the company not yet
being operational and having
no roof on its premises, Mr
Howes said: “Since we have
opened the Freeport opera-
tion we have had nothing but
excess charges, power outages,
power surges and spiking that
has burned out and fried more
than $100,000 worth of equip-
ment and electrical compo-
nents.

“One piece of equipment (a
Corona treatment system),
after waiting for three months
for delivery from Germany,
only to have it fried on the
fifth day of use. That alone
was $25,000 (plus shipping
costs), and we still don’t have
it back in production. Every
time we have equipment fried
our production stops, but the
wage bill and overheads don’t.
Your spiking and surges are
almost a daily, and certainly
a weekly, occurrence.”

Mr Howes said his Florida-
based accounts department
was compiling a list of equip-
ment that had allegedly been
ruined by power spikes and
surges, in addition to labour
and lost production costs, in
preparation to mount a com-
pensation claim against Grand
Bahama Power Company.

“In my 20 years of opera-
tion in Florida, where we man-
ufacture with similar equip-
ment and experience nearly
identical weather phenomena,
I have not had but a few
instances of lightning strike
power surges. In just seven
months I have had dozens of
incidents with your company
in charge of my power at Fen-
estration and Glass Services.
Can you explain?” Mr Howes

company’s shares via a 50 per
cent interest in BISX-listed
ICD Utilities.

This, effectively, meant that
the company was being regu-
lated by its owner. The situa-
tion is again likely to lead for
calls for Grand Bahama Pow-
er Company to be placed
under the regulatory ambit of
an authority such as the new-
ly-formed Utilities Regulation
and Competition Authority
(URCA).

Mr Howes told Mr Ferrell:
“You proudly advertise the
best prices in the Caribbean
for power, yet it is no good
for Freeport to have its power
company happy to be better
than Haiti. You need to com-
pete with the US, Mexico and
China if Freeport wants to be
successful as a world class-
manufacturing base.

“Tt is common knowledge
this island is in dire straits, and
its people are struggling to sur-
vive. Grand Bahama cannot
compete in the tourist market
(what little there is), so the
only chance for the people of
Grand Bahamas to survive is
to bring in foreign investment
in offshore manufacturing.

“The only product the Port
Authority has is no taxes, but
in other countries a company
has to make a profit to pay
taxes, so if a company invests
in Freeport and cannot make
a profit there is no benefit to
come in the first place and the
Port Authority has no prod-
uct.

“It is your company’s
extremely high prices, poor
operation and diabolical prod-
uct that will destroy Grand
Bahama as a successful man-

ufacturing base.”

Grand Bahama Power
Company declined to com-
ment on Mr Ferrell’s letter,
which alleged that during his
meeting with Mr Howes, he
purportedly said the power
producer would increase rates
for residential customers if
businesses such as Fenestra-
tion and Glass Services
switched en masse to gener-
ating their own power.

“By my company running
our own generator we have
proved that after one month,
we can produce consistent
power with no damaged
equipment at about 35 per
cent of the cost that Grand
Bahama Power Company
charges,” Mr Howes said.

“Ts it the loss of revenue
from my company or all the
other companies finding out
about our results that you are
in fear of? Remember, it is
your company’s inability to
supply a safe and quality prod-
uct at a competitive price that
has forced us to run our own
generator.”

Mr Howes and Mr Ferrell
had met over the latter’s
objection to the company gen-
erating its own power, and the
former suggested a number of
ways to resolve the dispute.

One was for Grand Bahama
Power Company to keep com-
pensating Fenestration and
Glass Services for all equip-
ment damaged by power
spikes, and reduce its tariffs,
while another was for the
power producer to make the
first move.

Mr Howes also indicated he
was open to initiating court
action to break Grand

\ THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit cur website af wwer.cobeda by

Bahama Power Company’s
monopoly, adding: “Think of a
cow, me pulling the head you
pulling the tail (smelly end)
and 10 lawyers and barristers
milking it. Funny but true.... I
love a battle.”

A final option, he added,
was for Fenestration and
Glass Services to close its
doors, lay-off 300 persons and
move its manufacturing facili-
ty to China.

“Can you imagine the blow
to Freeport again and the bad
international press, probably
destroying the future of for-
eign investment, not to men-
tion the hardship for the excel-
lent trained people that work
for us,” Mr Howes asked.

His letter’s release could not
have come at a worse time for
Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany, which is already under
pressure from its customer
base over poor, unreliable ser-
vice that has resulted in
numerous power outages this
summer. This has made the
relatively high tariffs even
harder to swallow, along with
the company’s toughened pol-
icy that has seen numerous
customers cut off for late or
non-payment.

The service problems have
been even harder to swallow
because Grand Bahama Pow-
er Company’s three major
shareholders are global power
giants - Marubeni from Japan,
Canadian power producer
Emera, and the Dubai-state
owned electricity generator.

The situation in Grand
Bahama, though, could also
equally apply to BEC on New
Providence.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, SHOREWOOD INC. is in

Dissolution

The date of commencement of dissolution was the Ist day of
September , 2009.

Diane E. Fletcher of Buen Retiro, Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator
of SHOREWOOD INC.

NOTICE

INTERCITRUS INVESTMENTS LIMITED
Incorporated under the International Business Companies Act, 2000 of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

Registration Number 113539 B

(Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, commencing on the 31st day of August, 2009.

Articles of Dissolution have been duly registered by the Registrar. The
Liquidator is Dartley Bank & Trust Limited, The SG Hambros (Bah)
Ltd. Building, West Bay, West Bay Street, Cable Beach, P.O. Box CB
13391, Nassau, The Bahamas. Persons having a Claim against the
above-named Company are required on or before the 31st of
September, 2009 to send their names, addresses and particulars of
their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the Company, or in default
thereof they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
before such claim is proved.

Dated this 31st day of August, 2009

E | 1 ht
Lf feat
Dartley Bank & Trust Limited
Liquidator
Dartley Bank & Trust Limited
Cable Beach, West Bay Street
The SG Hambros (Bahamas) Ltd. Building

P.O. Box CB-13319
Nassau,N.P. Bahamas



LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.

FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!
Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million

Web Listing # 8377

Mario A. Carey, CRS, CIPS, CLHMS
Mario Carey Realty

t's adaut yaw... Let's talhr.

NOTICE

Master of Science in Elementary Education Degree
Programme in collaboration with Wheelock College.

asked Mr Ferrell.

He added: “It is impossible
to run a profitable manufac-
turing business on this island
with the types and volume of
machines we have if they use
the Grand Bahama Power
Company.

“Maybe you could give me
an example of a Freeport
manufacturing company who
has modern manufacturing
machinery and is profitable
and happy with your product
and service. I have yet to find
one and have spoken to
almost every other commer-
cial customer of yours. I know
that my other three manufac-
turing companies, Florida,
China and England, are happy
with their power supplier and,
in fact, power is so insignifi-
cant as a percentage of cost it
has never even been a factor.
*T do not believe it is possible
for a manufacturing business
to operate in Freeport and still
compete with the rest of the
world with a power company
six times (and more) of the
price of power in the USA
and China and Europe.”

Mr Howes also pointed out
that Grand Bahama Power
Company effectively operat-
ed without a regulator, in
addition to its monopoly posi-
tion. Its tariffs are nominally

Applications are available from:
The Graduate Programmes (fice,
The College of The Bahamas, Michael H. Eldon
Complex, Room 46 Thompson Bhd.
For more informtaion call; 397-2601/2 or
send emails to: swiscdomicohedubs

Application Deadline: l6th October, 2009,

Tel: 242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013
info@mariocareyrealty.com
www.mariocareyrea .com

INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGES
AND CULTURES
INSTIT

ILC

COURSE OFFERING: Beginning September 14th, 2009

NOTICE
RADES INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Incorporated under the International Business Companies Act, 2000 of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
Registration Number 97369 B
(Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, commencing on the 31st day of August, 2009.

Articles of Dissolution have been duly registered by the Registrar. The
Liquidator is Dartley Bank & Trust Limited, The SG Hambros (Bah)
Ltd. Building, West Bay, West Bay Street, Cable Beach, P.O. Box CB
13319, Nassau, The Bahamas. Persons having a Claim against the
above-named Company are required on or before the 31st of
September, 2009 to send their names, addresses and particulars of
their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the Company, or in default
thereof they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
before such claim is proved.

Dated this 31st day of August, 2009

CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE | & II
CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I-Â¥V
CONVERSATIONAL MANDARIN IT, [1 & I

PRICE: § 250.00 per course

LOCATION: Munnings Bldg
“next to KFC across from COB

approved by the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) but, until recently,
that company’s 50 per cent
shareholder, Lady Henrietta
St George (formerly her hus-
band, Edward) was also hold-
er of 25 per cent of the power

LL e
Dartley Bank & Trust Limited

Liquidator

Dartley Bank & Trust Limited

Cable Beach, West Bay Street

The SG Hambros (Bahamas) Ltd. Building
P. 0. Box CB-13319

Nassau,N.P. Bahamas

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE I

CONVERSATIONAL GERMAN I

TELEPHONE; 302-4584, 302-4587 or 302-4563

DURATION: 10 Weeks

E-MAIL: ilei@cob.edu.bs



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



=
90% asset return for 80 clients of collapsed broker

FROM page 1B

agement clients on behalf of the lig-
uidator, Anthony Kikivarakis,
informed them that returning 90 per
cent of their assets, in compliance
with two Supreme Court orders, was
the “number one priority” for the
court-supervised liquidation.

Tiffany Russell, an agent for
Deloitte & Touche (Bahamas) part-
ner and accountant, Mr Kikivarakis,
wrote that the liquidation team had
spent most of its time complying
with the October 21, 2008, and
December 19, 2008, orders of for-
mer senior justice John Lyons to
release 90 per cent of all client assets.

“This task has been arduous and
time-consuming to say the least,”
the client update said. “Due to the
challenges faced in this process, Mr
Kikivarakis approached Senior Jus-
tice John Lyons and explained the
situation to him.

“In response to this, Justice Lyons
instructed him to continue with the
release of 90 per cent of clients’
assets to them, and to make this his
number one priority.”

Ms Russell added, though, that
the return of client assets had been
interrupted by Justice Lyons’ retire-
ment, as his and the Supreme
Court’s permission was being sought
before any asset releases. Currently,
the Caledonia liquidation has yet to
be assigned to another judge.

Logistics Centre 25 per cent completed

“Tt should be noted that Mr Kiki-
varakis and his agents have already
issued instructions to release most
of the assets held on behalf of clients
to them,” the Caledonia client
update revealed.

“Nevertheless, we are working on
returning assets to over 100 clients,
primarily clients with small asset bal-
ances. However, this process was
interrupted with Justice Lyons’
retirement as a judge in the Supreme
Court of the Bahamas.

“Previously, Justice Lyons had
approved the release of 90 per cent
of 80 clients’ assets to them. After
Justice Lyons’ retirement, the com-
pany’s liquidation case has not been
transferred to a new judge as yet,
and therefore we have not been able
to obtain the court’s approval to
release additional batches of client
assets.”

Caledonia Corporate Manage-
ment collapsed and fell into what
ultimately became a court super-
vised liquidation after one of its
clients was allowed to operate an
overdrawn margin account, which
was not properly collateralised,
plunging the company into a $25 mil-
lion trading loss.

The man directing activity in this
trading account, George Georgiou,
has since been charged by the US
federal authorities with running a
fraudulent stock manipulation

scheme, and his trial is due to take
place later this year.

Caledonia’s trading clients had all
their assets pooled into one omnibus
account by its Canadian correspon-
dent broker, Jitney. To cover the
margin loss created by the activities
of Mr Georgiou and his associates,
Jitney sold off securities and other
assets belonging to other Caledonia
clients, leaving many suffering a
severe loss and hardship.

Justice Lyons has already advised
“that the loss incurred in the Jitney
account would be borne by the spe-
cific clients’ whose securities and
cash had been used to cover the
shortfall in the Jitney accounts”.

Mr Kikivarakis, in his client
update, revealed that he had been
haising with Denys Bourbeau, a
member of the Caledonia Client
Monitoring Committee assisting him
with the liquidation, and Richard
Perdue, providing them with such
assistance as the court allowed as
they mulled bringing a lawsuit
against Jitney and the chief Cana-
dian custodian used by Caledonia,
Penson Financial Services.

Judging by Caledonia’s balance
sheet as at March 7, 2008, Mr Kiki-
varakis as liquidator is in no posi-
tion to take action against Jitney and
other involved in the company’s col-
lapse, as liabilities exceed assets by
$23.814 million.

The Caledonia liquidation seem-
ingly continues to move forward,
although sources have told Tribune
Business that there is disquiet among
some clients and attorneys over the
December 19, 2008, court order that
authorised Mr Kikivarakis to retain
a further 8 per cent of client assets.

An initial 2 per cent of client assets
were retained to cover the liquida-
tor’s costs, and placed in escrow at
EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas), but
Justice Lyons authorised a further
8 per cent to be retained to cover
“a shortfall of at least $500,000” in
client accounts other than at Jitney.

“Thus I did not have 100 per cent
of the clients’ assets in my possession
or under my control, and therefore I
was unable to comply with” the pre-
vious court order, authorising the
return of 90 per cent of client assets,
Mr Kikivarakis had said in his sec-
ond report to the Supreme Court.

The Securities Commission has
also been criticised by some Cale-
donia clients, who have openly ques-
tioned to Tribune Business why the
capital markets regulator has yet to
undertake an in-depth investigation
of the events that led up to the com-
pany’s collapse.

In response, Hillary Deveaux, the
Securities Commission’s executive
director, told Tribune Business: “We
are still investigating the matter.”

He added: “We are concerned as

to how the public perceives the
Commission to be executing its man-
date. We need to fully investigate
these matters before we can deal
with these things. It takes a long time
to investigate these situations.

“We rely, to a great extent, on the
forensic determinations of the liq-
uidator. We are well aware of the
situation. The company is in the
hands of the liquidator, and we don’t
want this to end up like other situa-
tions. People have to see justice
being done.

“We are still investigating the mat-
ter, and the major part of our inves-
tigation will be the results of the
findings of the liquidator.”

Elsewhere, Tribune Business has
learnt that the Bahamas Real Estate
Association (BREA) has turned
down an application by Robert
Dunkley, the former head of trading
at Caledonia, for a realtor’s licence.

Sources close to BREA confirmed
that, following an interview, Mr
Dunkley’s licence application was
rejected. It is understood that this
decision was partly due to concerns
about the Caledonia situation, and
also the fact that H. G. Christie, the
company Mr Dunkley is working
for, had named him in advertise-
ments as the primary listing agent
for Doctor’s Hospital’s $9 million
Western Medical Plaza prior to him
obtaining a realtor’s licence.

NIB prosecuting
100 firms monthly
on non-payment

could operate off of three
back-up generators should the
power be lost indefinitely at
the business's central location.

Each storage facility at
Bahamas Logistics is raised
at least 48 inches from the
ground in case of flooding,
and features outlets for Inter-
net and phone in case a busi-

ness has to set up temporary
offices from the facility. There
are even provisions for bath-
room facilities in each stor-
age unit, connected to each
of the two disaster recovery
facility.

And each disaster recovery
facility is equipped with spe-
cial flooring that allows for a

number of wiring configura-
tions for the implementation
of desks, computers and oth-
er hardware.

Mr Gomez said the entire
project is slated to be com-
plete by 2010. He said all the
prefabrication of the struc-
ture’s walls have been done
on site, and have all been

raised by Bahamas Logistic
Centre.

“We have built our own
complex,” he said.

All of the concrete struc-
ture’s walls and beams were
mixed here in the Bahamas.
“We employed mostly
Bahamian firms and labour,”
said Ms Taylor.

When the entire facility is
complete it will employ 10
permanent staff positions.

“The project is divided into
three phases,” said Ms Tay-
lor. “The first phase was com-
pleted 14 months after break-
ing ground. There is very little
space available in this first
phase.”

Cable $40m offer ‘fully subscribed’

FROM page 1B




Barry Williams, Cable

Bahamas’ vice-president of

Share your news























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area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

NOTICE





VAZON LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the Ist day of September , 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial Centre,
Shirley & Charlotte Streets, PO.Box N-3023, Nassau, The

Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE

OF

BARU HOLDINGS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the Ist day of September , 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial Centre,
Shirley & Charlotte Streets, PO.Box N-3023, Nassau, The

Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

finance, said then: “Because
of some circumstances that
some of the particular

investors were having, our
advisers said it was prudent
to extend it for one month.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that REGINALD SALOMON of #15A
TASMAN CLOSE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
2nd day of SEPTEMBER, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

SANDY SHORES
HOLDINGS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the Ist day of September , 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial Centre,
Shirley & Charlotte Streets, PO.Box N-3023, Nassau, The

Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE

GEN-E MANAGEMENT LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000 that GEN-E MANAGEMENT LIMITED
is in dissolution. The dissolution of the Company
commenced on the 10th day of August, 2009. The
Liquidator is Wence Martin of Gibson, Rigby & Co.
Chambers, Dowdeswell Street, P.O. Box SS-6836,

Nassau, New Providence.

Wence Martin
Liquidator

It’s gone very well, and it’s
going to be pretty much fully
subscribed.”

The offering was extended
to give institutional investors
and high-net worths extra
time to decide on whether to
participate, given that key
executives and decisionmak-
ers were off-island on vaca-
tion during July.

In particular, Tribune Busi-
ness understands through
informed sources that the key
investor for whom the exten-
sion was targeted at is the
National Insurance Board
(NIB) and, by extension, the
Government, which will have
the ultimate say on whether
NIB participates. As the sec-
ond-largest shareholder in
Cable Bahamas behind
Columbus, its participation
seems likely.

obligations before filing a
complaint with the courts.

“Legal action only happens
when employers choose not
to settle with NIB,” said Mr
Cargill. “We understand it is a
challenge because of the
economy.”

There has been such a vol-
ume of cases - almost 100 per
month - that NIB has made
arrangements with private
legal firms to assist with the
matters.

The NIB director also
revealed yesterday that a
number of individuals have
attempted to defraud the
newly-initiated unemploy-
ment benefit programme.

Mr Cargill said he was not
pleased with the delay in pros-
ecuting those who have tried
to defraud the unemployment
benefit scheme.

According to him, some
individuals have successfully
been collecting from he
unemployment benefit pro-
gramme while being
employed. He said the fraud-
ulent activity was discovered
when contributions come in
from an employer for a per-
son on their unemployment
benefit programme list.

“There have been several
cases sent to the police,” he
said. According to Mr Cargill,
the Prime Minister is set to
table NIB's 2008 annual
report in the House of
Assembly today.

oN THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at ww. cob, edubs

NOTICE

Town Meeting for Master of Education in
School and Guidance Counselling Degree
Programme in collaboration with
Kent State University
Saturday, 19th September, 2009,
Executive Boardroom,
Michael Eldon Complex, 3rd Floor
10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(No. 46 of 2000)

VINELAND INTERNATIONAL INC.

Registration Number 109555B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138(4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 46 or 2000)
VINELAND INTERNATIONAL INC. is in Dissolution.

Any person having any

INTERNATIONAL _ INC.,

claim

against VINELAND
required on or before

the 29th day of September 2009 to send their name,

address

and particulars of the debt or claim to the

Liquidator of the company, or in default thereof they
may have excluded from benefit of any distribution made

before such claim is approved.

GSO Corporate Services Ltd., of 303 Shirley Street, Nassau,
The Bahamas is Liquidator of VINELAND INTERNATIONAL

INC.

GSO Corporate Services Ltd.
Liquidator



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST



SRS See

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

- es a Fi (BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

TTT Worn Cres Marne Fonecast
























Today Thursday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
High = Low W High = Low NASSAU Today: Eat5-10Knots | O-2Feet 7-15Miles | OOF
——e o|1 |2 3|4|5|6 O}1 FC FIC FC _ F/C Thursday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 86° F
a ae a Acapulco 93/33 77/25 pe 87/30 79/26 t = FREEPORT Today: —_—_E at 5-10 Knots 0-2Feet —7-15 Miles 85° F
i LOW | MODERATE | HIGH | HIGH | EXT. areca oe ne sh es ae Thursday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 85° F
eh ORLANDO nkara, Turkey s S RBACO Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 83° F
High: 90° F/32°C_ Partly sunny with a Patchy clouds, a t-storm Partly sunny with a Clouds and sun, a Partly sunny, at-storm | Partly sunny, a t-storm The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 84/28 70/21 s 86/30 72/22 s Thursday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 84° F
tg ap be thunderstorm. in spots. thunderstorm. t-storm possible. possible. possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 59/15 45/7 s 5442 40/4 pc
Low: 74° F/23° C :
alla é é 6 $ Bangkok 90/32 78/25 t 90/32 79/26 t
i e@ % pees — High: 90° High: 90° High: 90° High: 90° Barbados 90/32 78/25 t 87/30 78/25 po SLES SH Cy
TAMPA High: 88 Low: 79 Low: 79 Low: 79 Low: 79 Low: 79 Se eS Barcelona 83/28 70/21 pc 83/28 70/21 s
a a , ETE mila TMC Bei 3/95 67/49 34/28 67/19 cone att
High: 88° F/31° C ae 102° F 106-84" F 99°-87° F 98°-88° F High _Htu(f.) Low ay RTI ee Nestle
Pandan : I — a : —__ A” Beirut 79/26 76/24 s 80/26 76/24 s tanta COMBI. 4 Wilmington
Low: 73° F/23°C ae # The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 659am. 2.6 12:52am. 04 Belgrade 89/31 64/17 s 92/33 68/20 pe Atlanta \I Myrtle Beach
Ms Q@ ‘ ! elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 7:24p.m. 29 1:01pm. 04 Berlin 77/25 59/15 s 79/22 54/12 sh Montgomery Savanah *Charleston BBEAUOA
| y —— CU ne Thursday 20am. 27 1:20am. 03 Bermuda 86/30 79/26 s 86/30 79/26 s Mobile pen oe ell
% “i | = 8:00 p.m. 2.9 1:43 p.m. 0.4 Bogota 69/20 42/5 pc 68/20 43/6 pc 0 oJ i ta
| EY c Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday eriday Si5am. 20 04am. 03 Brussels 68/20 54/12 pc 64/17 50/10 sh LiletisBsce § Daytona Beach
i a — ABACO Temperature 8:35pm. 29 2:22pm. 03 Budapest 84/28 59/15 s 86/30 59/15 ¢c Tampa, * Orlando
if % > High: 89° F/32°C HOU. ceeseeta ite auacctideeen 91° F/33° C 350am. 30 238am. 02 Buenos Aires 6116 48/8 ¢ S713 43/6 + a) Freeport
y “4 mera UemeneRerC Oe ects Teppsc Say opm, 29 S0lpm. 03 Cairo 95/35 72/22 s 94/34 74/23 s Miamis Nassau
C va a : Normal high. ... see F/3i2C Calcutta 91/32 83/28 + 91/32 81/27 + id ce
F ree Normal low 75° F/24° C Calgary 82/27 50/10 s 73/22 41/5 pc Key West yey,
4) = = @ WEST PALM BEACH i Last year's Nigh cesses 90° F/32° C SuN ayy iyi Cancun 91/32 75/23 pe 90/32 72/22 pe —iavang BANAMAS
4 a ed High: 88° F/31°C — Last year's low ssiuesapunicssacomenedlenainnest 80° F/27° C " " Caracas 82/27 73/22 t 81/27 72/22 t Se a : la
—— Low: 75° F/24° C > Precipitation == —“‘“‘CS™SCSC~*C«SS inrisee...... 6:51am. Moonrise ....6:17 p.m. Casablanca 79/26 60/15 § 79/26 63/17 s Sahtiago d dex jfurks & p
a: Ps FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT ~ As of 2 p.m, yesterday vosccccscscscscsssssesessssen 0.00" Sunset....... 7:28 p.m. Moonset ..... 4:59am. Copenhagen 70/21 59/15 ¢ 66/18 58/14 sh -Cuba—°
all Year to date 24, Last New First Dublin 59/15 50/10 r 61416 48/8 sh CAYMAN :
mt ia eee C @ High: 86° F/30° C Normal year to date oo... eects 31.56" " Frankfurt 73/22 55/12 pc 68/20 52/11 + a aos mae
ow: 75° F/24°C . Low: 77° F/25° C i Geneva 75/23 58/14 pc 71/21 55/12 + e
Py AccuWeather.com ¥ y Halifax 70/21 55/12 s 72/22 55/12 s “DOMINICA
alll i 0
- @ d He Forecasts and graphics provided by ie Havana 90/32 72/22 t 89/31 72/22 SAINT LUCIA: 5
i MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Sep. 4 he 11 Sep.18 Sep. 26 —“Helsinki 72/22 56/13 pc 70/21 54/12 pc Aruba Curacao GRENADA BARBADOS
PS, High: 88° F/31°C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 90/32 82/27 s 90/32 82/27 s Pa ‘as
Low: 76°F/24°C NASSAU High: 88° F/31° C Islamabad 95/35 75/23 pc 92/33 70/21 r a am LinwS eS D TRINIDAD
High: 88° F/31°C Low: 79° F/26° C Istanbul 79/26 62/16 s 82/27 68/20 s oO cae -
79° ° Jerusalem 82/27 60/15 s 83/28 60/15 s
> . Lae == Johannesburg 76/24 53/11 pe 81/27 50/10 s \ Rot
KEY WEST -_, @ i. e CATISLAND Kingston 88/31 79/26 t 88/31 79/26 + 50
High: 89° F/32°C i = ° - Lima 73/22 60/15 s 75/23 61/16 s
Low: 80° F/27°C Be ernare London 66/18 55/12 + 68/20 54/12 sh
3 a ow: Madrid 90/32 57/13 pc 88/31 57/13 pc
@ a Manila 84/28 77/25 1 85/29 77/25 ¢ io a in vl (or N im NJ i. e Peet Cc im
aa r hms Mexico City 77/25 55/12 t 77/25 55/12 t
Ss - Monterrey 82/27 70/21 t 82/27 72/22 t
>a GREAT EXUMA - SAN SALVADOR Montreal 79/26 65/12 s 79/26 57/13 s
all High: 87° F/31°C High: 88° F/31°C Moscow 73/22 54/12 s 75/23 52/11 s
j Low:77°F/25° C Low: 76°F/24°C Munich 73/22 59/15 sh 79/26 56/13 t
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ere \ ‘ NaC oe oa ; oa oe : B Bl
highs and tonights's lows. : a , al :
: , Low: 77° F/25° C ee, S & . Oslo 61/16 50/10 sh 6317 52/11 sh an O VW n
a ; a Patis 68/20 57/13 pc 68/20 54/12 sh iy
Prague 74/23 57/13 ¢ 77/25 56/13 5 way ulTl Cane
LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 87/30 75/23 s 92/33 76/24 s
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Pim blowin’ it

HIGH
LOW

FSTORM





90F
79F

SUNNY WITH

maT
Rea air li

SS a





PM ‘happy tor tall
& Caicos

with

Turk

Ingraham opens
door to discuss
‘federation’

PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham left the door open
for discussions of a federation
between the Bahamas and
Turks and Caicos once the cur-
rent constitutional crisis in the
British territory is resolved.

Mr Ingraham said in a state-
ment yesterday that the gov-
ernment would be happy to dis-
cuss the further strengthening
of the “historic relationship”
between the Bahamas and the
people of the Turks and Caicos
Islands in accordance with the
will of its peoples.

“My colleagues and I have
taken note of the comments
reportedly made by former Pre-
mier of the Turks and Caicos

Islands Michael Misick in an
interview with The Tribune
suggesting that the time has
come to explore the possibility
of creating a federation
between The Bahamas and the
Turks and Caicos.

“We are fully conscious of
the fact that the Bahamas and
the Turks and Caicos share the
same archipelago and, indeed,
at one time together constituted
a colony of Great Britain
administered from Nassau. We
are also keenly aware of and
treasure the close familial ties
between the people of The
Bahamas and the people of

SEE page eight

Sandals resort lays
off 80 employees

By PAUL G TURNQUEST

a r
DLO) O10) Aste)



Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

SANDALS Royal Bahamian Resort laid
off 80 employees yesterday as the hotel
reported lower than expected bookings for
the autumn and winter seasons.

According to Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes, Sandals has informed the staff that if
circumstances were to turn around before
December 1, some of them would re-

SEE page eight

HURRICANE INSURANCE

You
Away

Blown
urricane

Or you can rest easy knowing
that you have excellent insurance
coverage no matter which
way ‘the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

i
ier Sy ereenls . fl eal We NE)

NASSAU AND BAHAM

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Euma



m Lhe Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com



A YOUNGSTER eats a ‘Eat Cookies Not Turtles’ cookie during a sore contest held at the
‘Save the Turtles’ Art Show recently at Doongalik Gallery. Contestants thoroughly enjoyed their medium
of edible markers to colour in a cookie and chance to learn a little more about the importance of turtle con-
servation. Last week, the government announced that all harvesting, possession, purchase and sale of sea
¢ SEE THE ARTS SECTION

turtles will now be prohibited.

Minister: protecting students
from abuse ‘too serious’ for
consultation with the BUT

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE issue of protecting students from
possible abuse is too “serious to warrant
niceties” like consultation with the Bahamas
Union of Teachers, the Minister of Educa-
tion said.

While he can “understand the union’s
ordinary entitlement for consultation,” Min-
ister Carl Bethel asserted that the need to
ensure the welfare of students in this regard
is “sufficiently serious not to warrant” the
Ministry going through that process “at this
time.”

SEE page eight

5

Quiznos

’ Prices May Vary

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009 PRICE -—75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Ss
a
AND REAL Las

SPE Tt




—

PM ‘listening’ to all voices
on the marital rape issue
By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham
has said he is “listening” to all voices
responding to the government’s plan to

outlaw marital rape.

Declining to say whether some of the
loud objections to the ban would influ-
ence whether his government moves
ahead with it, Mr Ingraham simply said
he is taking the comments into consid-
eration.

“T’m listening,” he told The Tribune.
“It’s out in the public, and the public
can say what they wish.”

SEE page eight








J Cynthia Pratt
has chosen
replacement

candidate

PLP Deputy says
she will campaign
on their behalf

By PAUL G
TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

PLP DEPUTY leader
Cynthia Pratt says she has
chosen who she feels is
the best candidate to
replace her — and will
campaign on his behalf.

Confirming she will no
longer contest for the
deputy leadership position
at the party convention,
Mrs Pratt said she has
spoken with each poten-
tial candidate “with the
exception of one.”

But she is remaining
tight-lipped on who gets
her backing.

SEE page eight

Tropical Storm
Erika moves in the
Bahamas’ direction

A WEATHER system trav-
elling in the general direction of
the Bahamas developed into
Tropical Storm Erika with
winds of 50mph yesterday
evening.

Current forecasts have the
storm reaching the south-east-
ern Bahamas by Sunday, and
New Providence by Monday.

However, Chief Meteorology
Officer Basil Dean told The
Tribune that the system is mov-
ing very slowly at this time and
may not reach the capital until
Tuesday.

Weather experts at the US
National Hurricane Centre and
AccuWeather are predicting
paths for the storm which
would have it passing slightly
to the east of the Bahamas.

It is uncertain what strength
the storm will be at when it

SEE page eight



School tests for TB
after student contracts

disease on vacation

STUDENTS and teachers at C H Reeves
Junior High were yesterday tested for tuber-
culosis after a ninth grader at the school
contracted the disease over the summer
vacation.

School officials yesterday said that the
testing is merely a precautionary measure to
ensure that no one who came into contact
with the student has contracted TB.

The student, whose name has not been
released, was treated for the infectious dis-
ease and is doing well, the school said.

Tuberculosis is a common and sometimes
deadly disease that is carried through the
air.

Symptoms include chronic cough with
blood-tinged sputum, fever and night
sweats.

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ORPEDO

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[ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

>

KIA MOTORS

The Power to Sura

The 2009 Carens is an all-new modal, only the name of the
previous model has been retained. Longer, wider and taller
than its predecessor (by 55, 50 and 40 mm respectively),
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model and its smoother éxterior, with alagant detailing,
results in significantly improved aerodynamics.

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\ THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.coh.eduby

STAFF VACANCY

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the following
position:

Assistant Director — Utilities, AD-I, who will be responsible for the man-
agement, direction and coordination of the activities, operations and matin-
tenance of the Physical Plant Utility Systems and the trades of plumbing,
electrician, and air conditioning at all campuses of The College of The
Bahamas. The successful applicant must be able to priontize and perform
under pressure in both a customer contact and administrative capacity.
Outstanding human resource management skills are necessary.

Specific duties and responsibilities include, but are not limited to, manag-
ing, directing and coordinating the activities, operations and maintenance
of the Physical Plant buildings and grounds and establishing preventative,
predictive and replacement maintenance programmes of campus equip-
ment including the vehicle fleet of The College.

Applicants should possess a Bachelor's Degree in mechanical (preferred)
or electrical engineering and a minimum of five (5) years’ professional
experience directly related to the physical plant management of utility sys-
tems of an equivalent combination of education, training and experience,
with considerable knowledge of physical plant management, personnel
management, safety and budgetary practices. For a detailed job descrip-
hon, visit www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply. Interested candidates should submit a
detailed resume and cover letter of interest no later than Wednesday,

September 2, 2009 to: The Director, Human Resources, The College of

The Bahamas, P.O.Box N-49]2, Nassau, Bahamas or brapply @cob.edu.bs,

RASHAD MARCHE

DEVAUGHN BROWN

eo) FY

i Oa IO

meer ey

eH eee

Teachers employment amendment

BAHAMAS UNION of Teach-
ers president Belinda Wilson has
advised teachers not to sign an
amendment to their conditions of
employment stipulating that they
are prohibited from engaging in
sexual acts with their students. The
Ministry of Education has pro-
posed the amendment, but Mrs
Wilson says education officials
failed to consult the union.

The Tribune asked the public
yesterday what they thought the
teachers should do.

Rashad Marche, 25, Bahamas
Food Services

“All teachers know that what is
going on is wrong. I think that it
should be signed. They are sup-
posed to be our role models and
have great influence on our youth.

They should sign the amendment
so that if they are prosecuted they
can be penalised to the full extent
of the law. Why should they be dif-
ferent — because they’re teachers? "

Colin Trotman, 47

"T understand that this is proto-
col because there is a union con-
tract between the teachers and the

FOR PEST PROBLEMS

government and therefore they
should be informed on things like
this and the ministry should have
sought their advice. However at
the same time, given the current
atmosphere, I don't feel it’s neces-
sary. If a teacher has nothing to
fear they should sign it, and that’s
the bottom line. As far as I'm con-

TE
EXTERMINATORS

PHONE: 322-2157

and Cromaloviam Limiled

Otel tiy

POL Bow Fd212
Tobephone: (24) TT 11S | BE) TT
Prager: old) SCHR) + Frag: (NS) STE





ar
‘Oy

The National Insurance Boar
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas



Request for Contractors Pre-Qualification

The National Insurance Board (NIB) is seeking to pre-qualify contractors to bid on
works to construct a Government Complex at Marsh Harbour, Abaco; the project is
a joint venture of NIB and The Bahamas Government. Contractors must be in
compliance with the National Insurance Act (social security programme), and in
good standing with the relevant Government agencies.

Pre-qualification documents may be collected from the Security Booth at NIB’s
Clifford Darling Complex, Blue Hill Road, from September 3 to September 9, 2009.

Pre-Qualification documents should be signed, sealed and dropped in the pre-
qualification box at the Security Booth, Clifford Darling Complex on or before 12:00
Noon on September 15, 2009.



REVA
LORRAINE
GRANT, 92

of South Beach, New |
Providence and formerly of |
Bight Mile Rock, Grand
Bahama will be held on |
Saturday, September 5, 2009 at
10:00 a.m at Church of God of
Prophecy, Coral Road, Freeport, |
Girnind Bahama, Olliciating will |
be Bishop Cleophas Capron, assisted by Bishop Rudalph Arihur |
and other Ministers of the Gospel. Interment will follow in the
Harbour West Public Cemetery, Bartlett Hill, Eight Mile Rock, |
rind Kahana |

Left to cherish ber memories are her children: Marie and Peter
Whitfield, Jane Knowles and the Honourable Neko and Barbara
Grint; erindgchildren: Karen Grant, Kelly Whitfield, Earyla and |
Julian Marshall, Krivoy and Stephen Smith, Kendra and Kyra
Knowles, Nekearla Grant and Neko Carlson Grant Il; great- |
grand children: Kellyia and K’Lisa Whitield, Aaliyah Marshall,
Kazmyn Smith and Dantel Grant; nephew; Redwin Grant; |
adopted sester and brvther-in-law: Pearline and Dennis Hall and |
children; grand nieces and nephews: Gordon and Martin Rolle,
Alfred and Paulette Bartlett, David and Dole Dean, Sandy, |
Condi, and Joy Anne Sareyer, Annette Darling and family, Audrey |
Adderiey and sons, Gary anc Dwight Cooper, Tracy and Bridgette |
Cooper and children, Dwight Grant, Chery! Grant-Bethell,
Dellareece Grant, Vernica Ferguson-Johneon and family and a |
host of other relatives and friends including: Judith Rolle,
Delphine Miller, Yernita Cirant, Fote Grant and family, Beshop |
Brace H. Thompsin and family, 0M. Pinder and family, Derathy |
Horton and family, OJ. Bevans and family, Violet Wright and
family, Charles Adderiey and family, Jackie Rolle and family, |
Brenda and Olivia Robinson, Pam and Tony Granger, Sheila
Symonette, Loretta Young, Bishop Cephas Ferguson, Bishap |
Romeo Ferguson, Bro, Hurai Ferguson, Sister Nora McClain,
Helping Hands Ministry and the membership of Church of God
of Prophecy, East Street and Pinedale, Grand Bahama. |

Viewing will be held at Restview Mortuary and Crematorium |
Limited, Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, New Providence
on Wednesday. from 1OC00 am to 1:00pm and in the “Serenity
Suite” of Restiew Memonal Mortuary dt Crematorum Limited, |
11-4 East Coral Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama on Thursday,
from 10) pom. to 5:00 om. at Church of God of Prophecy,
Pinedale, Grand Bahama on Friday from 1:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. |
and on Saturday at the Church from 8:30 a.m, until service time
at the church.

cerned they can just meet, they can
meet now and then sign it."

Stephen Pratt, 42

"I think that they should sign it
man and get rid of those same
teachers that are there doing
garbage. Set an example so that
the rest can stay on the right road
because we have to protect our
children, they are the future of our
country.”

Lashanda Turnquest,
real estate employee

"T feel that it should be signed.
Teachers have a civic duty to
uphold as our children's role mod-
els. What has been happening is
wrong and they need to be pun-
ished to the fullest extent. I agree
that government should have given
them a heads-up and discussed
their plans with them, but regard-
less of this it is something that
needs to be done. It should be con-
crete what the consequences are
for something like this."

Capt Francis, 45, boat captain

"If this was something that is
just to state belief or moral point of
view, then I feel as though it is each
teacher's personal choice whether
or not they want to sign. However,
if they are being asked to sign it as
a policy and to understand that this
is the criteria in order to have this
job, then yes, it should be signed.
As long as the terms are clearly
defined as to what is deemed inap-
propriate, I feel that of course it
should be signed."

Lilymae Gaitor, 66, retired,

"Twas brought up to believe that
any person that you have to say
‘Mr?’ or ‘Mrs’ to, you and them are
no company. I don't know what is
in the amendment that they are
against but I feel that this isn't
something that they should have a
problem with. Especially with all
these allegations and reports com-
ing out; they should be delighted
about this."

Devaughn Brown, 32

"I feel that yes they should sign
it. (Sex between teachers and stu-
dents) is inappropriate and they
should be penalised. If you’re not
guilty then you shouldn't have a
problem with signing it.

Renee Johnson, 46, salon
employee

"You can't infringe on any-
body's rights — this is a democratic
society. If something is written
down it can't be set in stone until
there is a discussion about it. Why
wait until school opens to demand
this? The issue has always been
there, they had enough time to get
this sorted out before the new
school year began. I think its poor
timing for something so important.
In the end however we need to
think about what's best for the chil-
dren and doing everything to
ensure their protection."

Annmarie Scott, 38,
housekeeper

"I can understand why the
Union would be displeased with
the ministry's actions. I think when-
ever any amendment is made to a
pre-existing agreement all parties
involved should be included in dis-
cussion — it's common courtesy.
They should talk to the teachers
and give them that respect, just to
explain what the amendment
entails so that they can make an
educated decision."



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

| Man in serious condition

Two injured
in Potters
Cay explosion

TWO men were injured
in a propane gas explosion
on Potters Cay Dock.

A 38-year-old man and a
17-year-old boy were near
the docked m/v Matilda at
2pm on Monday when an
explosion occurred.

It is believed that there
was an accident with a
propane bottle that was
being filled.

Both men were taken to
hospital to be treated for
their injuries. The 38-year-
old received 16 per cent
burns to his hands, arms,
face and head. He was
detained in hospital.

The 17-year-old was
treated and discharged
after receiving 7 per cent
burns to his left arm, face
and shoulder areas. An
investigation has been
launched into the exact
cause of the explosion.

Illegal firearm,
ammunition
Seized hy DEU

DRUG Enforcement
Unit officers seized an
illegal firearm and

ammunition from an area }

off Carmichael Road on
Monday.

Acting ona tip froma
member of the public,
DEU officers carried out
a search of the Evansville
neighbourhood.

They discovered a .38
handgun with one live

round of ammunition ina }

derelict truck.

The weapon is in police

possession. No one was
arrested.

Man accused
of causing
grievous harm

A MAN accused of
causing grievous harm to
two men and being found
in possession of a handgun
was arraigned in the Mag-
istrate’s Court yesterday.

Richard McKinney of
Woods Alley was
arraigned before Magis-
trate Derrence Rolle in
Court 5, Bank Lane, yes-
terday on two counts of
causing grievous harm and
one count of possession of
a handgun. It is alleged
that on Thursday, August
27, McKinney caused
grievous harm to Marvin
Martin and Anthony Hep-
burn.

He was not required to
enter a plea to the charge.

It is also alleged that McK-

inney was in possession of
a handgun with intent to
commit an indictable
offence.

McKinney was not
required to plead to the
charge.

He was remanded into
custody and is expected
back in court today for a
bail hearing.

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

ANIMAL lovers are calling
on the government to improve
the “horrific” state of the dog
pound after the deplorable
conditions there were high-
lighted in The Tribune.

Kirsh Duncombe, a 14-year-
old Queen’s College student
was so disgusted by the “unsan-
itary dog slaughter” at the
Canine Control Unit in Chip-
pingham Road, that he wrote a
letter to the editor urging
Bahamians to address the
“unacceptable” situation.

The pound holds stray dogs
found roaming the streets and
public areas for up to four days
before destroying the animals
in accordance with the law. The
Dog Licence Act dictates that
all animals must be licenced for
a fee ranging between 25 cents
and $6 per year. If owners do
not produce a licence for a dog
held at the pound within four
days, the animals are put down.

Kirsh visited the site with a
small summer camp group last
month and in his letter to The
Tribune said he was saddened,
disappointed and disgusted by
what he saw.

He said: “It seemed to be an
unsanitary dog slaughter.
Knowing most of the dogs have
incurable diseases or no homes
to live in and spend basically
their last living days at the
pound, they should be proper-
ly fed and watered.

“Some of the dogs had no
water and some looked like
they were starving. The staff
told us they were going to be
put to sleep the next day any-
way.”

Tribune reporters were
denied access to the pound yes-
terday, but animal rights
activists and concerned citizens
who have had a rare opportu-
nity to see the inner workings
of the pound spoke out in sup-
port of the schoolboy’s claims.

A source who has recently
visited the site, run by the
Department of Agriculture and
Marine Resources’ Canine
Control Unit, described it as
“Dickensian and gloomy.”

She said: “The dogs are
euthanised on Fridays so if a
dog comes in at the beginning
of the week they’re lucky to
get fed, and they might get
water. It’s a one-way street
mostly for those poor animals.”

The source, who did not
want to be named, said there
are between 20 and 30 kennels,
and the number of dogs held
depends on how many are
rounded up during the week.

Feral cats and animals
imported illegally are also kept
at the unit, as are roosters tor-
mented in illegal cock fights,
the source said.

Animal rights activist Jane
Mather said she was horrified
by conditions at the pound
when she assisted with the
euthanasia of dogs as president
of animal rights activist group
ARK several years ago.

She said: “I can’t tell you
some of the horrors that hap-
pened there. It’s really disgust-
ing. If you want to walk into
hell, go there.

“The government has really
got to be chastised for this. It’s
really wicked, the things that I

Call for the govt to
improve ‘horrific
‘state of dog

Ere



Wis AA
Fi Po,

—

CANINE U

have seen.”

Kirsh told The Tribune he
came across the awful sight,
and awful smell, of a dead dog
locked in a cage with a living
dog — because, staff said, they
could not find the key. He was
also disturbed by the broken
fences, dirty walls and aban-
doned vehicles around the
facility.

Bahamas Humane Society
inspector Percy Grant said a
lack of resources and staff
shortages have prevented the
Canine Control Unit from ful-
filling its mandate.

The unit is responsible for
rounding up stray animals
found wandering the streets,
public areas and trespassing on
private property between 10pm
and 6am, but Inspector Grant
said this job is largely left to
the not-for-profit Humane
Society.

He told The Tribune: “The
problem is the government
never gave a hoot about canine
control in this country so it is
just left there and there’s never
been a strict regulation.

“Tt needs fixing and the gov-
ernment needs to take an inter-
est in it; neither the FNM nor
the PLP seem to have taken an
interest in it.”

Inspector Grant said he
would like to see the unit reg-
ulated and sufficiently staffed
so stray dogs are collected from
the streets at night and cared
for at weekends.

The Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety will take healthy dogs from











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i A 31-YEAR-OLD man is in
? serious condition in hospital after
: being shot in the back by a per-
? son known to him.

? The victim was sitting in a car
? on Dorsette and Grants Streets
? sometime after 8am on Monday
? when he saw a man who he knew
i approaching his vehicle with a

after being shot in back

The 31-year-old man got out
of the car and tried to flee into a
private residence on the street.
As he was running towards the
house the gunman opened fire,
hitting him in the back.

He was taken to hospital to
be treated for gunshot wounds.
Police have launched an inten-
sive investigation into this matter.

= —— eel

THE TRIBUNE was denied access to the dog pound



NIT vans parked outside of the dog pound in the Botani-
cal Gardens appear to be left unused.

: gun.

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with a fine selection of Linens.

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the pound to care for them
when space allows, Inspector
Grant said.

Department of Agriculture
and Fisheries assistant director
Charmaine Price said she could
not grant the press access to
the facility, and that the matter
is being investigated and a
statement will be released
today.

Baypar! Building on Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-6145
Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6527, Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
email:info@colesofnassau.com

Dee ee a

The Communications Act 2009 [Comms Acti, which gives Utilities Regulation &
Competition Authority (URCA) full powers of regulation and of oversight of the
electronic communications sector im The Bahamas, came into force on 1 September
2009.

This date signals the start of the transition to a new regulatory regime, Greater
competition will be introduced in the electronic communications sector, to the benefit
of the economy and of all persons in The Bahamas.

To facilitate as smooth a transition to the new licensing regime as possible, a number of
hew documents were published on 1 September 2009 and are available at URCA’s
website (www.urcabahamas.bs). These include:
* Preliminary Determination covering several Class Operating and Spectrum

licences, Exemptions, and Types of Fees

Individual Operating and Spectrum licences

Draft Class Operating and Spectrum licences

Licensing Guidelines

Fee schedule

Radio Spectrum Statement (Existing Allocation and Assignment)

Various forms - Full Details Form and Notice of Objection Farm for the transition,

and an Application Form for a licence,

Until new URCA regulatory measures are adopted, all existing regulatory measures
adopted by the Public Utilities Cornmmission and the Television Regulatory Authority
continue in force to the extent that they do not conflict with provisions of the Comms
Act, the Uhlthes Regulation & Competition Authority Act, 2005; the Utilities Tribunal
Act, 2009 and any new regulatory measures adopted under these Acts,

The new regime encourages participation by all - the website will also give you an
opoortunity to learn more about the new regime with updates on Competition Policy,
Consultation results and determinations and latest news of the regime, This new regime
and the Comms Act coming into force for the electronic communications sector is the
beginning of a new day for all persons in The Bahamas.

AT URCA WE WILL BE DOING OUR BEST TO MINIMISE DISRUPTIONS.

UTILITIES REGULATION & COMPETITION AUTHORITY
Pull, Boot N=$550 Nassau, Bahamas | T 343 377 4437
wi. urcabahanmnas, bs

1 Ae Ue

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Teachers’ duties now laid out

WE ARE surprised at Bahamas Union
of Teachers President Belinda Wilson’s deci-
sion to encourage teachers not to sign a cir-
cular notice issued by the Ministry of Edu-
cation informing them of the legal conse-
quences should they indulge in inappropriate
sexual behaviour with their students.

Apparently the circular asks teachers to
acknowledge an amendment to their con-
ditions of service.

The circular, which required each
teacher’s signature, became necessary
because of growing and alarming allegations
of some teachers abusing their positions of
trust with their students.

In answering Mrs Wilson’s claim that the
union was not consulted before the circular
was issued, Education Minister Carl Bethel
said the issue of protecting students from
possible abuse was “too serious” to warrant
such “niceties” as consultation with the
union.

The Minister said that while he under-
stood the “union’s ordinary entitlement for
consultation,” the need to ensure students
welfare was “sufficiently serious not to war-
rant” the Ministry “going through that
process at this time.”

On page 2 of today’s Tribune at least two
of the respondents to The Tribune’s ques-
tions as to whether teachers should sign the
circular, could understand the union’s dis-
pleasure. The others thought that the issue
was too important for the teachers not to
sign.

"T can understand,” said one of those sid-
ing with the teachers, “why the union would
be displeased with the ministry's actions. I
think whenever any amendment is made to
a pre-existing agreement all parties involved
should be included in discussion — it's com-
mon courtesy. They should talk to the teach-
ers and give them that respect, just to explain
what the amendment entails so that they
can make an educated decision."

We think there is a lot of confusion and
misunderstanding about this “amendment”.
What the Ministry has proposed in no way
changes any agreement the teachers have
with government.

It only serves to make the teachers fully
aware of the law that, regardless of the
agreement, applies to them.

It appears that the Ministry is just making
its teachers aware of the penalties under the

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law should any one of them take liberties
with children in their care.

So, teachers are not being asked to
“make an educated decision” as to whether
they should sign the circular or not.

All the circular is doing is educating them
as to the dangers they face if they break the
law as they carry out their duties.

So really, it does not matter whether they
sign or not.

There has been sufficient publicity over
this matter that all teachers are now fully
aware of the penalties they face should they
break the law while on the job. And this
particular law, regardless of what contract
they might have, will follow them even when
they are off the job.

And so what the Ministry has asked them
to sign has nothing to do with any pre-exist-
ing agreement, and needs no discussion as a
discussion will not change the terms of their
agreement or even that of the law.

Because, according to allegations, some
teachers are behaving as though they are
unaware of the law, the Ministry has put
them all on notice by asking them to sign the
circular informing them of this section of
the Penal Code.

Whether Mrs Wilson or her teachers like
it or not what they have been asked to sign
has tacitly always been a part of their con-
tract, as it is the law of the land, and whether
they sign or not is of no interest to the law
when it comes in search of an offender.

If teachers think they are protected by not
signing, then they should think again because
ignorance of the law is no defence.

The controversial document, which was
circulated to teachers on August 19, defines
“inappropriate behaviour” as “including but
not limited to sexual contact (including inter-
course or buggery), exposure to porno-
graphic material, inappropriate suggestions
and touching.”

This unnecessary noise from the union
cannot be used as a smokescreen to cover
up what appears — if the allegations prove
to be true — a very serious situation in our
schools.

It’s bad enough that our schools are turn-
ing out D grade students, but molestation is
not acceptable and must be punished.

In the best interest of their students, teach-
ers should join hands with government in
protecting them.



T

Education:
the price of
dysfunctional
schools

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Another summer has passed
and while it’s been a sizzling
summer it’s time to go back to
school! The hope is that you
enjoyed your vacations and
family events, and have now
geared up to send the children
back to school.

All of us know, one of the
keys to personal success is a
good education.

In a Monday, May 29, 1972
Time Magazine article entitled;
“The Price of Ignorance”, the
author wrote; “What does it
cost to drop out of school? Bil-
lions, everyone agrees, but it
remained for Henry M Levin
of the Stanford University
School of Education to attempt
some computation of how
many billions. In a study made
for the Senate Select Commit-
tee on Equal Educational
Opportunity, Levin focused on
the 3,180,000 American males
now between 25 and 34 who
failed to win a high school
diploma as of 1969. He then fig-
ured that dropping out would
cost them a total of $237 bil-
lion (about $74,000 each)
because of lower incomes dur-
ing a working lifetime. As for
the government’s loss, it would
have cost $40 billion to com-
plete the dropouts’ education,
but the tax collector would have
taken in an additional $71 bil-
lion on their higher incomes.”

As we embark on a new

school year some 40 years after
this study, the questions in the
Bahamas are: “What is the long
term cost to The Bahamas of
financing public schools that
effectively produce approxi-
mately 65 per cent dropouts?
What is the social and cultural
cost of producing dysfunctional
citizens with a resultant
immoral and criminal proclivi-
ty?
Tae what is the national
impact of the dilution of our
sovereignty and consequent
greater reliance on foreign
ownership, brain power and
expertise?

Many years ago, in the days
of minority rule, our great little
nation decided that public edu-
cation was of such great value
that we should make it both
free and mandatory.

There was a merit system in
which, “one had to study to
show himself approved”.

Truant officers roamed the
streets to ensure that our chil-
dren attended school and that
parents were accountable if
they did not.

In many family island com-

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LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



munities our introduction to
education started in an all-in-
one, all age school, interesting-
ly with mostly foreign teachers.

With the assistance of gov-
ernment subsidy, our parents
were determined that we all got
a better education than they
did.

They were diligent and
worked hard to send their kids
to Nassau in search of a higher
education.

The entire community
became our tutor and in Great
Inagua, during the summer
breaks, Mr Farquharson inter-
rogated the minds of the return-
ing students in his convenience
store and rewarded correct
answers with sweets and can-
dies.

Amazingly, the joy and
sweetness of education was
interrupted by the great libera-
tors of majority rule.

Firstly, government discon-
tinued the educational subsis-
tence allowance to Family
Island students and later.

Secondly, by insidiously
introducing social promotion
into the public school system
in the 1980’s. Suddenly, under
this new regime, students
gained “success” without
process and thus began our
slide down the slippery slope
of dysfunctional mediocrity and
a national ‘D’ average.

Change in education is long
overdue. Now is the time to
head towards an ‘A’, despite
the tough economic environ-
ment by immediately discon-
tinuing social promotion.

It is a sacrifice that the future
of our nation demands.

We cannot wait for the long
term change promised in the
form of an educational restruc-
turing programme.

Social promotion is not an
educational system, the results
proves this assertion. Any sys-
tem that produces approxi-
mately 65 per cent illiteracy
and/or dysfunctionality must be
classified as the very antithesis
of an educational system.

In solving the problem we
must first kill social promotion
and reinstate a merit system.
Next, in preparing students for
the society we live in, we must
recognise that the world is fast
becoming a high-tech global
community.

This means that in preparing

our children for today’s world
we must supplement the books
and paper that plague our
school age children with high-
tech learning tools. We must
expedite the initiative to have a
lap top or computer station on
each and every desk in all our
schools.

Either a lap top issued at the
beginning of school and turned
back in at the end of the school
year or parents can be required
to provide their children with
their own.

Ordinarily, parents are
required to purchase around
five or six text books along with
notebooks, pencils, pens and
paper. But this is the informa-
tion age, the age of the com-
puter, and the age of the inter-
net.

That’s the way our modern
society works.

What is the purpose of keep-
ing our children in the dark
ages of the Third world?
Shouldn’t we be teaching the
leaders of the future how to get
information and learn using a
method that is utilized by the
industrialised, First World?

In the old days, our colonial
masters recognised that the cost
of ignorance was too high.
Learning to read and write was
considered a value to our
nation.

In a modern Bahamas are we
are not willing to pay to get our
children the education that will
prepare them for globalisation?

Is the cost to equip public
schools with modern technolo-
gy too great a sacrifice?

Shouldn’t we be obliged to
employ teachers with the skills
that are necessary for using
technology in the classroom?

The problems identified are
not new. Any analysis of our
nation’s social ills will
inescapably link our failing edu-
cational systems to our societal
problems.

The obvious solutions are
suggested.

Tam satisfied that preparing
our children’s future for the
global environment in which
we live is worth the cost and
that we truly cannot afford to
confuse the cost of a quality,
productive, functional, educa-
tional system with the price of a
failing, non productive social
promotion system that breeds
ignorance.

D HALSON MOULTRIE
Nassau.
August 31, 2009.

I find Mr Fitzgerald's behaviour strange

EDITOR, The Tribune.

HELLO; I find it very strange that Mr Fitzgerald is up in arms
about this government transparency, when he was very quiet
about the Cable Beach deal that his party signed and the details of
that deal was not known to the public.

In my opinion Mr Fitzgerald lacks credibility. Why do you
suppose that the leader of the PLP is quiet on the matter?

CLIFFORD RAHMING
Nassau,
August, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009, PAGE 5



Bahamas to be showcased

Tourism Ministry :

Makes global
outreach to
religious market

THE Ministry of
Tourism is seeking to
attract more religious
tourism by emphasising
the country’s outstand-
ing conference and
meeting facilities.

Ministry officials
took the opportunity to
pitch their message to
pastors from the United
States, Cuba and even
places as far away as
China, Africa, Italy and
Great Britain at a gath-
ering of spiritual lead-
ers in Nassau last
month.

The pastors were in
town for the “Kingdom
Leadership Confer-
ence” at the Diplomat
Centre under the direc-
tion of renowned
Bahamian spiritual
leader, Pastor Myles
Munroe, president and
senior pastor of
Bahamas Faith Min-
istries International.

The group of pastors,
representing 10 nations,
were a part of a delega-
tion of about 185 con-
ference participants.

During their visit, the
church leaders were
given a tour of some of
Nassau’s finest hotels
and resorts before
being treated toa
reception at their host
hotel, the Wyndham
Nassau Resort on
Cable Beach.

Religious travel is an
$18 billion global mar-
Ket.

The Bahamas, boast-
ing the largest assort-
ment of vacation spots
of any tropical destina-
tion, has the potential
take advantage of a
larger share of this
growing market,
tourism officials say.

' I | a
ie
ii of |

“i r =
SUPERSTAR Mariah Carey



THE Bahamas and all it has to
offer could be showcased to millions
of people around the world as the
Ministry of Tourism embarks on a
unique new attempt to advertise the
country.

Yesterday, former minister of
tourism Obie Wilchcombe hailed gov-
ernment’s decision to place a feature
advertisement in the upcoming Mari-
ah Carey album ‘Memoirs of an
Imperfect Angel’ set to debut on
August 15.

At a cost of $35,000, Mr Wilch-
combe said this advertisement, which
reportedly showcases the islands of
the Bahamas, is a creative idea and
will undoubtedly attract a substan-
tial return on the investment.

“T applaud them, because in this
new age of communication you have
to think of new and creative ways of
getting your message out. So the min-
istry has to consider these things and

we must always remember that the
best way is through entertainment,
and Mariah Carey remains a top
recording artist and I don’t think any
other country has done this. So again
it is a great idea, and the return on the
investment can be significant,” Mr
Wilchcombe remarked.

With total career albums sales top-
ping 200 million, Mariah Carey con-
tinues to set records in the recording
industry with her last album, E=MC2
selling 463,000 copies in its first week.
This album went on to sell 1.3 million
copies in the United States, with
another 380,000 sold collectively in
Japan, the United Kingdom and Aus-
tralia.

According to Hitfix.com, Island
Def Jam Music Group’s chairman
Antonio Reid said that the idea is
really very simple.

“We sell millions of records, so you
should advertise with us. My artists

in new Mariah Carey album

have substantial circulation — when
you sell two million, five million, eight
million, that’s a lot of eyeballs. Most
magazines aren’t as successful as
those records,” he said.

According to entertainment
experts, with ‘Memoirs of an Imper-
fect Angel’ Mariah Carey is set to
make history again, as the album will
become the first to bundle a CD with
lifestyle ads in a 34-page booklet.

The booklet is rumoured to be a
co-production with Elle Magazine
that will feature advertisements for
the Bahamas, Elizabeth Arden and
Le Métier De Beauté cosmetics,
Angel pink champagne and Carmen
Steffens shoes from Brazil.

According to Island Def Jam
records, this new product integration
deal is set to cover the costs of record-
ing the album, which is said to have
also been completed in the Bahamas
at a cost of more than $7 million.

Govt to disclose how much was

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net

THE government intends to disclose
exactly how much it spent on the Miss
Universe pageant, according to Minis-
ter of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace.

Following calls for the government to
disclose exactly how much was invested
in the event, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said the figures will be disclosed “in copi-
ous detail”.

This comes after opposition parlia-
mentarians urged the government to
reveal the full cost to the taxpayer of
bringing the pageant to the Bahamas.

Senator Jerome Fitzgerald said: “A
lot was spent and it showcased the coun-
try. But at the end of the day was it worth
it?”

He added that the public needs to
know “who really benefitted” from the
investment — whether it be Kerzner
International, the NBC network, pageant
organisers or the Bahamian people.

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MISS VENEZUELA Stefania Fernandez waves after being crowned Miss Universe 2009 at

the Miss Universe beauty pageant in Nassau, Bahamas, Sunday, Aug. 23, 2009.

Tourism officials credit the pageant —
which aired on Sunday, August 23 on
NBC live from the Atlantis resort on
Paradise Island — with bringing unprece-
dented exposure to the country.

According to international reports, six

million viewers in the United States
watched the show while local tourism
insiders estimate that nearly one billion
people worldwide tuned in.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace has previ-
ously stated that the Bahamas made an

“extremely competitive bid” to the
pageant organisers to host the event,
winning the right to do so in the face of
stiff competition from locations such as
Las Vegas.

When asked by The Tribune about
the proper procedure in such a situation,
Chamber of Commerce president
Khaalis Rolle said any time the govern-
ment spends money on behalf of the
public, the relevant details should be
released.

He said the pageant brought substan-
tial benefits to the Bahamas and as far as
he knows, there is no reason to believe
the government would want to avoid dis-
closing the costs.

“T think the government has to give an
account,” he said. “They invested on
behalf of the Bahamian people so I think
it’s only proper to provide an account. I
don't see any legitimate reason why not.
It is just the proper thing to do.

“It was a good initiative and we got a
lot of visibility from it, so why would we
not want to discuss what the investment
was?” Mr Rolle asked.

invested in Miss Universe pageant

CALLING ALL INTERESTED BAHAMIAN
FISHERMEN

TURTLE FISHING IN BAHAMIAN WATERS HAS NOW
BEEN BANNED TO SATISFY THE DEMANDS OF A SMALL
GROUP OF AGITATORS. WHAT NEXT?

ARE YOU TIRED OF HAVING LAWS AND POLICIES

REFLECT YOUR VIEWS?

PASSED THAT AFFECT YOU AND YET DO NOT

If so, please attend a public meeting for the formation of a
Commercial Fisherman’s Association

THURSDAY 3" September 2009 @ lpm

Call 434 9559

@Henry Bannister’s Stall, East Side Potter’s Cay,



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Publicity on Bahamian blue holes
will exceed Miss Universe exposure

By LARRY SMITH

WHEN National Geographic
breaks its magazine cover story,
television documentary and
online coverage of the Bahami-
an blue holes expedition next
summer, the impact is likely to
surpass this year's Miss Universe
spectacle in terms of promo-
tional value for the Bahamas —
and at virtually no cost to the
public treasury.

In contrast, the Miss Universe
pageant has cost the Bahamas
big-time. Although the exact
breakdown has not been forth-
coming, those costs include a
hosting fee (said to be $7 mil-
lion) paid to the Miss Universe
Organisation, a $2.9 million con-
tribution by the Nassau/Paradise
Island Promotion Board in cash,
goods and services, plus govern-
ment spending on road paving
and other fix-ups.

There are, of course, unde-
niable benefits from the 13
pageant events that were held
here last month. The Miss Uni-
verse telecast included some nine
minutes of footage of the
Bahamas that amounted to a
prime time commercial aired in
at least 85 countries. Almost six
million Americans tuned in, and
the Ministry of Tourism's web-
site received a big traffic boost
before, during and after the
pageant.

Officials say the long-term
benefits will far outweigh the
immediate direct returns, such
as the booking of 3,000 extra
room nights during a slow peri-
od, or the injection of a couple
million dollars in cash for local
firms that worked on pageant
events.

"We had thousands of posi-
tive media reports on the
Bahamas from around the world
during the pageant," BHA exec-
utive director Frank Comito told
me. "You just can't buy that
stuff. The cachet from this event
will be parlayed into future busi-
ness, and especially group busi-
ness at Atlantis. This puts us on
a whole new level.”

But National Geographic will
have a similar impact. The tv
documentary (which is being co-
produced with PBS’ top-rated
Nova science series) will reach
over 270 million households in
166 countries. Some 12 million
people will read the magazine
article, and millions of students
will be exposed to Bahamas-
related school materials. The
Society's high-traffic website will
feature linked coverage of the
Bahamas expedition.

So what's the point? Well,
almost no-one in the Bahamas
knows what the hell National
Geographic is up to — including
the Ministry of Tourism and just
about everyone I spoke to for
this article.

They do, however, appreciate

the significance when it is
explained to them, as this email
response from Tourism Minis-
ter Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace
confirms:

“When speaking about beau-
tiful women, there is no better
partner for The Bahamas than
the recently held Miss Universe
event. When speaking about the
bounty that nature has bestowed
on The Bahamas, there is no bet-
ter, more respected and credi-
ble global authority than Nation-
al Geographic.”

According to one tourism
official we questioned, the chal-
lenge will be to capitalise on the
“halo of interest” that National
Geographic will produce. He
said the Ministry would
approach the Society "to see
how we can assist with the pro-
motion of the telecast and activ-
ity across other media platforms.
For example, placing commer-
cials in the telecast, linking from
bahamas.com to the blue hole
feature on their site, e-mail
blasts, etc.."

And just what, you may ask,
is National Geographic up to?
Well. it is sponsoring a high-pow-
ered team of scientists, divers
and filmmakers on an expedi-
tion around the islands aimed at
unlocking the secrets of Bahami-
an blue holes. These geological
features have been described as
one of the final frontiers for
human exploration on the plan-
et. It's the stuff that great docu-
mentaries are made of.

"We pitched the project to
National Geographic early this
year with material gathered dur-
ing scouting trips last year,"
expedition leader Dr Kenny
Broad, an ecological anthropol-
ogist at the University of Mia-
mi, told me recently. "And we
actually came out as the top pro-
ject among those that received
significant financing. When you
include in-kind contributions,
the total expedition funding is
about $750,000."

Those in-kind contributions
included vehicle use, office
space, dockage, hotel rooms and
other forms of assistance from
individuals, businesses, and
groups on several islands.
Among the Bahamian organisa-
tions that have helped are the
Andros Conservancy, Abaco
Friends of the Environment, the
Antiquities, Monuments &
Museums Corporation, and the
College of the Bahamas.

"We did an eight-day social
science survey of Andros in June
with 20 students from the COB,"



Broad said. "Also participat-
ing were three Bahamian experts
— Jessica Minnis, a social scien-
tist at COB; Michael Pateman,
an archaeologist with the
AMMG; and Nikita Shiel-Rolle,
who is studying marine biology
at the University of Miami.”

Broad has been coming to
the Bahamas for years, conduct-
ing research on how people
interact with the natural envi-
ronment. He is a leader in the
design of marine reserve net-
works, and has participated in
and led scientific and film expe-
ditions around the globe, includ-
ing the exploration of one of the
world's deepest caves in Mexico.

He was joined by other top
researchers like Dr David Stead-
man, curator of birds at the
Florida Museum of Natural His-
tory in Gainesville; Jennifer
Lynn Macalady, an astrobiolo-
gist from Penn State University
who studies the origin of life;
and Dr Tom Iliffe, a marine biol-
ogist from Texas A & M in
Galveston whose work has led to
the discovery of more than 250
new species in submerged caves
around the world.

These scientists were accom-
panied by a top-drawer film crew
led by Wes Skiles; veteran cave
diver Brian Kakuk, who oper-
ates a Bahamian-owned adven-
ture diving and training facility in
Abaco; and Nancy Albury, pro-
ject coordinator for the Antiq-
uities, Monuments and Muse-
ums Corporation.

They lived aboard the 63-foot
Key West-based research ves-
sel, Tiburon, criss-crossing the
Bahamas over six weeks from
early June to mid-August explor-
ing submerged caverns, con-
ducting original research and
producing spectacular videos and
stills for print, broadcast, online
and educational applications.

The Bahamas expedition is
one of 9,000 research projects
that National Geographic has
funded around the world. This
puts Bahamian blue holes in the
same league as polar expeditions
by Robert Peary, excavation of
the lost Inca city of Machu Pic-
chu, Louis and Mary Leakey's
research into early hominids in
East Africa, and underwater
explorations by Titanic discov-
erer Robert Ballard.

The expedition's roots go
back to 2004 when Brian Kakuk
discovered the complete skele-
ton of an extinct tortoise in a
blue hole called Sawmill Sink in
the pinelands of south-central
Abaco. Later investigations in

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THE PERMANENT SECRETARY

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

P.O), Bos CB-1RD
NASSAL, N. P.
THE BAHAMAS

COLIN HIGGS
Permanent Secretary

Tanya Mona Lisa



DEAN’S BLUE HOLE: the world’s deepest blue hole. Situated in

Dean’s Long Island.

this undisturbed cave turned up
a range of impressive fossils —
the prehistoric reptiles, birds,
and mammals that once roamed
Abaco.

A few human bones were
also found, and dated to about a
thousand years ago. This is the
earliest evidence so far for
human occupation of the
Bahamian archipelago.

"We spent a lot of time in the
islands last year on scouting trips
from Mayaguana to Grand
Bahama looking for the best
sites that give the most bang for
the buck visually speaking,"
Broad told me. "It costs a lot to
get scientists in here, but when
you can go in one hole and pull
out a lot of stuff, that makes it
more feasible."

Both plant and animal fossils
from Sawmill Sink are extreme-
ly well preserved, and they pro-
vide a unique opportunity to
reconstruct ancient Bahamian
environments. One of the most
significant finds is an undisturbed
12,000-year-old owl roost where
the remains of dozens of bird
and mammal species have been
identified. It is thought that these
extinct owls may have given rise
to the legend of the chick charnie
in Andros.

But Sawmill Sink is only one
of many blue holes around the
country that the expedition is
exploring. In one cave they
investigated a fully articulated
crocodile skeleton and its trail
of petrified turds the size of a
human baby. On Andros they
recovered Lucayan remains
from the Sanctuary blue hole.
From Dan's Cave on Abaco
they retrieved a 350,000-year-
old mineral formation called a
speleothem, which can help sci-
entists reconstruct past climate
change.

According to National Geo-
graphic producer Jill Heinerth,
the expedition team is “recov-
ering Lucayan Indian remains,
taking deep samples of Sahara
dust and speleothems that will
help illustrate former sea level
stands, studying ancient paleo-
animals in sinks and caves, and
documenting biological
resources. The show will tell the
story of the significance of
Bahamian Blue Holes and, we
hope, will create a public interest
in their protection.”

After the initial discoveries
at Sawmill Sink a few years ago,
responsibility for the research
was assumed by the Antiquities,
Monuments and Museums Cor-
poration, with Marsh Harbour
cave diver Nancy Albury
appointed as the corporation's
representative and project coor-
dinator. She also took part in
the Nat Geo expedition.

"Nancy provided formidable
help in both the filming and the
science aspects," said Broad. "Dr
Keith Tinker of the AMMC saw
the potential in all this and it is
primarily because of him that
this expedition is taking place.
Friends of the Environment has
also been a major supporter in
terms of giving time and
resources."

Friends provided logistical
support to the National Geo-
graphic team, which used their
facilities as a base while in Aba-
co. And according to Executive
Director Kristin Williams, "We
are working with AMMC,
Bahamas Underground and the
BNT to develop a proposal to
protect a cave system in South
Abaco that includes Sawmill
Sink.

"The groundbreaking dis-
coveries made on Abaco have
only scratched the surface in
terms of our knowledge of the
ecological and geographical his-
tory of The Bahamas," she said.
"It is important that we preserve
the condition and health of our
blue holes and caves as this
research continues, and for the
future."

In recognition of their sup-
port and participation, both
Albury and Tinker have had
newly-discovered species from
Sawmill Sink named after them.
An extinct tortoise has been
dubbed alburi, while a living
shrimp has been named tinkeri.

Wes Skiles, the expedition's
director of photography, is a top
Florida-based outdoor filmmak-
er whose credits include a PBS
broadcast on the Everglades
restoration, a feature film by
Sony Pictures called The Cave,
several National Geographic
documentaries, as well as natur-
al history shows for the History
Channel, A&E, the BBC and
the Discovery Channel.

"We've done Andros, Grand
Bahama, Eleuthera, Exuma and

New Providence, but Abaco has
the perfect everything for what
we want ," Skiles told me.
"Deep complex labyrinths, fresh
water and salt water caves that
blow your mind with unusual
lifeforms, The blue holes of
Abaco are magically diverse
and multi-dimensional. There's
no place on Earth like it.”

Skiles is a high school grad-
uate who began exploring caves
in the Bahamas in 1978 with the
late Dennis Williams, an Apol-
lo engineer stationed at
NASA's downrange tracking
station on Grand Bahama. It
was Williams who explored the
longest underwater cave system
in the Bahamas — the six-mile-
long Lucayan Cavern in the
Lucayan National Park.

But interestingly, that record
is about to be broken by an
underwater cave system on
Abaco.

According to Brian Kakuk,
the expedition will soon be able
to finish their exploration and
connect Dan's Cave with
Ralph's Cave, making this sys-
tem some 30 per cent longer
than the Lucayan Cavern.

"IT have worked everywhere
in the Bahamas but Abaco is
special,” Kakuk said. "And all
of this research is designed to
give people the big picture —
why we should care about a
hole in the ground. These blue
holes are probably the last place
on Earth you can physically go
to explore. They are truly a final
frontier, and our team is thor-
oughly documenting this fron-
tier for the first time.”

Founded in 1888, the Nation-
al Geographic Society is one of
the world's largest nonprofit sci-
entific and educational organi-
zations, reaching more than 325
million people a month through
its magazines, cable channel,
books, websites and school pub-
lishing programmes.

The Miss Universe Pageant
in August was essentially a one-
shot deal — and the publicity
it provided did not come with-
out a hefty price tag. Our blue
holes offer the other side of the
Bahamian coin — the natural
environment. And National
Geographic is paying for the
privilege of giving us exposure.
It's a lesson that any environ-
mentalist would point to with
glee.

CORRECTION

¢ We inadvertantly used the
wrong word in describing the
diameter of the fuel pipeline
from the dock to the Wilson
City power plant on Abaco. It
should have been 12 inches, not
12 feet.

What do you think?
Send comments to

larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

NOTICE

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT

(CHAPTER 326)

It is hereby notified pursuant to Section Seven (7) of the Industries Encouragement
Act that the Minister is about to consider whether the following products shaulcl be
declared "APPROVED PRODUCTS" for the purpeses of that Act.

PRODUCTS

Radiator Fluids, Coolants, Household

‘RAW MATERIALS TOBE USED IN
MANUFACTURE

Varin Chemicals, Labels, Plastic

Chemicals, Cleaning Chemicals

Kotiles, Tubing, (onmtainers, Kettle (apa,
Bunes,

Any interested person having any objection to such a declaration should give
noice in writing of his objection and of ihe grounds thereat to the Office of the
Prime Minister, before the 14" day of September, 2009, by letter addressed to :-

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

PO. Bos CR-10080
NASSAU, Bi, P.,
THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS

Permanent Secretary



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

Disgruntled $= FROM page one Cynthia Pratt has chosen

fishermen call replacement candidate
meeting over and for the one who offers solutions to the

blems of this country,” she said.
turtle ban vf

As a long-time party supporter, Mr
: Davis has been seen in many circles as a

A PUBLIC meeting for all }
those opposed to the govern- }

strong contender for the deputy leader-

ship post. With Mrs Pratt’s support, a par-

ment’s newly imposed ban on } ty insider yesterday claimed he may be

turtle harvesting has been called } unbeatable — even against other top

by disgruntled fishermen. : names such as Bain and Grant’s Town MP

The meeting, which will } Dr Bernard Nottage and West End and
reportedly culminate in the cre- }
ation of the Commercial Fisher- }



“T have decided to announce my choice at
convention because I do not wish to influ-
ence or interfere during this present phase of
campaigning,” she said.

While Mrs Pratt seeks to withhold this
candidate’s identify, a closer look at her
statement and the many innuendoes littered
throughout the text, it is believed her support
rests firmly with PLP MP for Cat Island and
Rum Cay Philip ‘Brave’ Davis.

“Many well-intentioned and well-quali-
fied PLPs have faithfully served this party
behind the scenes,” Mrs Pratt hinted. “They
have served in tragedy and triumphs; wins
and losses and they never asked for any-
thing more than the opportunity to serve.

can identify with my own personal story
of struggle and hard work,” she said.

“There is something to be said of some-
one who has had to earn their way, but
even more can be said of a person who
excels through hard work and looks back to
give brother and sister a hand-up. That is a
man.

“As we look ahead, the PLP and indeed
this country will benefit from a deputy
leader/deputy Prime Minister who listens

Mrs Pratt said she will be speaking more —_ and respects the views of all — even if he

Bimini MP Obie Wilchcombe.
men’s

bune).

views?”

All those who answer “yes” }
are being asked to gather at }
Henry Bannister’s stall on the }
east side of Potter’s Cay at lpm }

on Thursday.

Meanwhile, Marilyn Ayearst-
Hartley, a supporter of the ban, }
said in a letter to The Tribune }
that many people were “over- :
whelmed with joy” at hearing }
the government’s approval to

ban “killing of all sea turtles”.

“What a great message for ;
children, the future generation :

and leaders of the Bahamas.

“Someone is listening out
there! If you speak up, you will }

be heard!

“This is truly an inspiration :
for young children who under- }
stand the responsibility of shar- }

ing planet Earth with all life.”

Two men and
three minors on
robbery charges

TWO men and three
juveniles were arraigned in
the Magistrate’s Court yes-
terday on robbery charges.

Vincent Artise, 20, of
Pinedale; Craig Taylor, 18,
of Pinedale and two under-
age boys, 16 and 17 years
old, both of Pinedale, as
well as a 15-year-old boy of
Union Village appeared
before Magistrate Derrence
Rolle in Court 5, Bank
Lane. They were charged
with two counts of robbery.

It is alleged that the
accused on August 24, while
at Claridge Road, robbed
Franchelo Martin of a
Motorola cellular phone
valued at $250. It is further

alleged that on the same day

the accused robbed
La'Sheikh Major of $250
cash.

The accused pleaded not
guilty to the charges and

were granted bail in the sum i

of $2,500. The case was
adjourned to November 18.
Sergeant Godfrey Brennen
was the prosecutor.

LT

Accountant

We are looking for a recent college graduate who is interested
in working under the supervision of experienced accountants
and has the goal of eventually sitting the CPA Exam. We
are a small, fast growing retail business owned and operated
by young, dynamic entrepreneurs. This is an exciting
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learn the practice of accounting as well as the principles of

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* Ability to research technical issues and apply
Accounting Theory

Assocoation, was :
announced in an advertisement :
(see page five of today’s Tri- }

The ad reads: “Turtle fishing :
in the Bahamas has been banned }
to satisfy the demands of asmall }
group of agitators. What’s next? }

“Are you tired of having laws }
and policies passed that affect :
you and yet do not reflect your

“And so as we head into convention I
thought it was important to implore PLPs far
and wide to look within for those who would
lead. Look for those who choose service
above self; for those who continue to unify
and not divide; for those who demonstrate
patience and do not pronounce entitlement

FROM page one

His comments come after BUT Pres-
ident Belinda Wilson expressed her out-
rage at the government’s issuance of a
circular asking teachers to acknowledge
an amendment to their conditions of
service brought about in the wake of
rising reports of sex abuse of students by
teachers.

The amendment — which in fact
applies to all employees of the Depart-
ment of Education — states that “no
teacher/officer while employed with the
Government of the Bahamas shall inter-
act in an inappropriate manner with any
student of a government school whether
with or without the consent of that stu-
dent parent or guardian.”

Circulated on August 19, 2009, the
document defines “inappropriate behav-

extensively on the issue at the convention,
highlighting that she has spoken with all of
the potential candidates “with the excep-

tion of one.”

“Suffice it to say my choice for the par-
ty’s next deputy leader and indeed next
Deputy Prime Minister is someone who

Minister of Education

iour” as “including but not limited to
sexual contact (including intercourse or
buggery), exposure to pornographic
material, inappropriate suggestions and
touching.”

Teachers were asked to sign the cir-
cular — which will apply to all teachers
regardless of whether they sign or not —
to acknowledge that they know that it
exists.

Notwithstanding having sent out this
advice to teachers, another allegation
of sexual impropriety surfaced this week
in the form of a claim that a C.C. Sweet-
ing High school teacher drugged and
abused a male student. That matter, said
to have stemmed from an August 27
encounter, is now under active police
investigation, while the teacher has been

in his heart.”

placed on leave by the Department of
Education.

However, Mrs Wilson “condemned”
the move to alter the teacher’s condi-
tions of service without consultation and
advised BUT members not to sign the
document.

Yesterday Mr Bethel denied Mrs
Wilson’s accusation that the Ministry of
Education may have been inspired by
“panic” over a spate of recent sex alle-
gations against teachers to send out the
circular without discussing it with the
union.

He said: “It’s not a question of pan-
icking it’s a question of doing what is
absolutely necessary to ensure the pro-
tection and the safety and the welfare of
all of the 56,000 children who are in our
care and in our custody.

“This is a result of a deliberate policy
by the ministry. We feel that a very

disagrees with the message; someone who
cares about people and will fight for the
unpopular or less glamorous cause if it
means the poor and disenfranchised will
receive justice; and one who may not speak
with the tongues of angels, but has charity

Ase eeu



important signal to each and every per-
son at our schools whether it’s teachers
or support staff know exactly what the
law is and exactly what will happen to
them if they transgress the boundaries
that they ought to be aware of in terms
of their relations with students,” said
Mr Bethel.

Mr Bethel added that the Ministry of
Education obtained legal advice before
anything was done and “based on that
legal advice we determined to act.”

He said that his Ministry continues
to “welcome all dialogue with the union”
and “will continue to have a respectful
dialogue” but reasserted that there “are
some matters that just are fundamental
and it is on that basis that the ministry
and the department of education took
this step.”

A message left for Mrs Wilson was
not returned up to press time.

FROM page one

Turks and Caicos that has exist-
ed for many generations despite
the accidents of history that sep-
arated us constitutionally,” Mr
Ingraham said.

His statement comes after for-
mer Premier Michael Misick,
who visited the Bahamas last
week, said in an interview with
The Tribune that there is sup-
port from the people of Turks
and Caicos for joining the
Bahamas.

The former premier, who
resigned in March in the face of
corruption allegations, said that
such an arrangement would be
mutually beneficial, as the Turks
and Caicos islands have attract-
ed huge investments, and Prov-
idenciales could serve as the
“New Providence of the south-
ern Bahamas.”

Misick’s comments come in
the same month as the Turks
and Caicos lost their right to
self-rule for a period of two
years after Britain suspended
parts of its constitution in
response to findings of “systemic
corruption” in the island’s gov-
ernment headed by Mr Misick.
The former premier has denied
any wrongdoing on his part.

Prime Minister Ingraham said
that like the rest of the

PM ‘happy for talks’ with turks & Caicos

Turks and Caicos Islands that
resulted in the suspension of
their Constitution and the impo-
sition of direct rule by Great
Britain.

“The people of The Bahamas
and Turks and Caicos will be
aware that we have been in con-
sultation with CARICOM and
have been a party to certain
diplomatic initiatives designed
to help bring about a resolution
of the current crisis,” the prime
minister said.

However, he said that at this
time it must be a priority for all
concerned for there to be a res-
olution of the current crisis that
will restore normality and con-
stitutional order to Turks and
Caicos before moves are made
to formalize an agreement
between the two entities.

“When that is achieved, my
colleagues and I would be happy
to discuss the further strength-
ening of our historic relation-

ship in accordance with the will
of the people of The Bahamas
and the people of the Turks and
Caicos Islands,” he said.

There seems to be support for
such a move on the opposition
side as well.

Responding to Mr Misick’s
comments on Monday, former
minister of foreign affairs Fred
Mitchell told The Tribune that
while he could not say if the
move is something that the PLP
is in favour of, the joining of the
Bahamas and the Turks and
Caicos is a “fascinating idea
worth exploring.”

Nonetheless, he noted that
prior periods in which the two
countries were unified in this
way were not “entirely happy”
but punctuated by disputes over
whether Turks and Caicos got
adequate representation and its
fair share of revenue from the
Nassau-based central govern-
ment at the time.

Tropical Storm Erika

FROM page one

arrives, but thunderstorms and heavy rain showers are expected to

hit the country.

PM ‘listening’ to all voices
FROM page one

This comes as the Bahamas Conference of the Methodist
Church yesterday followed the Catholic Archdiocese in sup-

3 porting the proposed amendments.

Influential groupings such as the Catholic Church and the

Seventh-Day Adventist Church in the Bahamas, the Bahamas

Crisis Centre, along with individuals such as former Cabinet

: Minister Janet Bostwick, therapist Barrington Brennen and
: Minister of Social Development Loretta Butler-Turner have
? spoken out in favour of amending the Sexual Offences Act to
i outlaw marital rape.

Many say it will provide much needed protection for spouses,

i who have traditionally been denied the same rights as others
? under the law as it presently stands, and who have been subject
i to this abuse without recourse.

However, others have questioned the wisdom of the amend-

: ment, such as Attorney and former Bar Association President
? Wayne Munroe, Pastor Cedric Moss, Senator Allyson Maynard

Gibson and many callers to talk shows nationwide.
Some say allowing spouses the legal option of accusing their

: partners of rape within a marriage will promote a plethora of neg-

ative consequences, including the erosion of the institution of

: marriage, false accusations by angry spouses or even the refusal
i of wives to have sex with their husbands.

Speaking on the proposed amendment as she tabled it in

July, Minister of State for Social Development Loretta Butler
? Turner noted that many countries in the world have “updated”
i their laws to allow for husbands/wives to be held legally account-

able for raping their spouses. Meanwhile, The Bahamas has

been censured by members of the United Nations Human Rights

Council for not doing enough to protect women from sexual or
domestic violence in this regard.
Asked yesterday how soon Government might proceed

towards amending the Sexual Offences Act, Mr Ingraham
; responded: “I can listen as long as people want to talk about it.”

While the system has a well-defined surface centre, Mr Dean said
that upper-level conditions are at this time not favourable towards
more development.

“We will first have to see what happens after the systems gets
past those conditions,” he said.

AccuWeather said the storm was able to develop thanks to the
warm sea surface temperatures between 83 and 86 degrees in that
part of the Atlantic.

And as it moves closer to the Bahamas the storm will encounter
even warmer waters.

At press time last night the centre of the storm was located
around 390 miles east of the northern Leeward Islands.

The system was moving in a west-northwest direction at a speed
of 9mph.

Tropical Storm Erika is the fifth named storm of the 2009
Atlantic hurricane season.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MUELMY MAZARD
of HAMPTON STREET, P.O. Box N-556, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26'" day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Caribbean Community, the gov-
ernment has been dismayed at
the recent turn of events in the

FROM page one

employed.

Mr Foulkes said: “The
hotel’s prospects going into
Christmas are very low, much
lower than their expectations.
The Department of Labour is
ensuring that the employees
receive their full benefits and
any other benefits that are
owed to them.

“We as a government are
doing all we can to ease the
burden on all unemployed
persons including the 80 at
Sandals through the unem-
ployment scheme, and all of
them would qualify for the
benefit.

“Additionally we are con-
sidering reopening the nation-
al training programme for
those 80 persons to join if they
wish to participate.”

Attempts to reach Sandals
for comment on the lay offs
were unsuccessful.

This latest round of job cuts
is yet another grim reminder
of the state of the local econ-
















Sandals

omy which continues to suf-
fer as a result the recession in
the United States.

Yesterday, eight managers
and two line staff at Atlantis
were let go from the hotel’s
food and beverage division
and its reservation depart-
ments.

However the losses were
not only felt in the Bahamas,
as the hotel also laid-off four
people in its Fort Lauderdale
office.

Earlier this year, resort
executives pointed to the can-
cellation of group trips, such
as those traditionally taken by
staff from North American
corporations, as one of the
reasons hitting occupancy lev-
els at Atlantis.

As the resort goes into a
typically slow period for hotels
(September/October), occu-
pancy levels were forecast to
drop to as low as 30 per cent
within weeks, executives said.

* Ability to continually develop and expand on
technical skills

* Ability to clearly and adequately document work
and maintain an effective audit trail

* Present ideas and facts persuasively and confidently
through verbal and written communication

* A self-starter who demonstrates creativity in looking
for ways to simplify and improve processes

* Aneffective listener, one who also seeks and accepts
advice and provides feedback

* Able to project a poised and self-confident manner
and be perceived as a leader

* Demonstrates a willingness to take on new
challenges and responsibilities

* Willing to spend time working in the retail operations
serving customers

Interested candidates should submit a
letter of interest and resume to:
accountant.open@ gmail.com

No Resumes will be received after September 11, 2009



NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that, in accordance with
Section 50 (1) (b) of the Supreme Court Act, 1996,
against the estate of

anyone having claims
Fernando Rafael Zanartu Velasco should send written
notification thereof to Santander Bank & Trust Ltd.,
3rd Floor, Goodman’s Bay Corporate Centre, P.O. Box
N1682, Nassau Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAXENE BAZILE of OKRA
HILL,off SHIRLEY ST. NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 2nd September, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O.
Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WISLINE BENJAMIN of
KEMP ROAD, P.O. Box SS-5139, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 26'" day of August, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CAROL CUNNINGHAM of
#7 EASTERN CLOSE, P.O. Box FH-14364, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26" day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



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TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009, PAGE 9



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



BRITISH SOCCER

UN tw
aT SS Mee Ce eater Ts

N

ARSENAL'S EDUARDO is seen on the substitute bench
before the English Premier League soccer match against
Manchester United at Old Trafford Stadium, Manchester,
England, Saturday Aug. 29, 2009.

NYON, Switzerland

Arsenal striker Eduardo da Silva has been
banned for two Champions League matches for
diving to earn a penalty kick in a qualifying
match against Celtic.

European soccer’s governing body made the
ruling Tuesday. Its disciplinary panel said the
Brazilian-born Croatia forward deceived the ref-
eree. Eduardo was challenged on the play by
Celtic goalkeeper Artur Boruc and appeared to
deliberately throw himself to the ground.

Eduardo made the penalty kick and Arsenal
won 3-1 last Wednesday, advancing to the group
stage. He will miss Arsenal’s Group H matches at
Standard Liege on Sept. 16 and at home to
Olympiakos on Sept. 29.

Arsenal can appeal within three days.

Adu loaned again among
low-key transfers

LONDON

Freddy Adu’s career faltered again with a low-key loan to
Belenenses, and Ajax captured a ball-juggling Brazilian as
the transfer window closed on Tuesday.

There were no signs of any big stars moving for huge, last-
ditch transfers fees like a year ago. Instead, the market was
dominated by loan deals or lesser-known players moving for
relatively small fees. Adu made headlines at 10, and was con-
sidered a rising star at 13. Although a regular in the U.S
national team, the 20-year-old Adu has struggled to make an
impact at club level, despite a move to Benfica, once one of
European soccer’s strongest teams.

He scored five goals in 21 appearances and Benfica loaned
him to AS Monaco last season.

Now he’s off to Belenenses, Lisbon’s third team after
Benfica and Sporting, which barely avoided relegation last
season.

Striker Kerlon’s move from Inter Milan to Ajax was one
of the eye-catching loans.

The 21-year-old Brazilian is known as “the seal” because
of his ability to run past defenders while juggling the ball on
his head. Ajax fans may have to wait to see his skills, how-
ever, while he proves his fitness after serious ankle and
knee injuries.

“IT am sure he can be a valuable addition,” said Ajax
coach Martin Jol.

Benfica also loaned midfielder Hassan Yebda to
Portsmouth which had already announced the signing of Tal
Ben Haim from Manchester City and was talking to anoth-
er defender, Nicky Shorey, about a move from Aston Villa.

The lack of major transfer activity contrasted from last
year ago when Manchester City splashed out $58 million on
Real Madrid star Robinho, Tottenham gave Dimitar Berba-
tov to Manchester United for $55 million and acquired
Roman Pavlyuchenko from Moscow Spartak for $25 million.



Jack at the Masters,

ut only for 1 hole



AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)

IN THIS APRIL 8, 2009, file photo, former Masters’ champions Jack Nicklaus, left, and Arnold
Palmer wait while playing the Par 3 contest before the Masters golf tournament at the Augusta
National Golf Club in Augusta, Ga. Nicklaus said he would never be a ceremonial player, and just because
he'll be on the first tee with Arnold Palmer at Augusta National next April doesn't change that. Nick-
laus and Arnold Palmer will be honorary starters, not ceremonial ones. But if they decide to hit more

than a tee shot, the lines get blurred.

By DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer
NORTON, Mass.

Je Nicklaus has said all along he would
never become a ceremonial player, and
just because he will be on the first tee at Augus-
ta National next April doesn’t change that.

Nicklaus agreed to join Arnold Palmer as hon-
orary — not ceremonial — starters at the Mas-
ters. The difference between those words only
becomes blurred if they decide to hit more than
the opening tee shot.

Nicklaus already was reaching ceremonial sta-
tus in 2005 when he played his last Masters with-
out telling anyone. Then, he played his final
major in the British Open at St. Andrews with the
world watching, some weeping.

That spring, he was asked if it bothered him
that fans only wanted to see him play.

“No, I think that’s very nice,” he said. “I'd
like to have them see me, the real Jack Nick-
laus. I will put as much effort through as I can to
do that. That’s what I’ve always done, all my
life. I just know that there’s a certain point in time
— and I’m sure that time is there — that I can’t
do that, give them what I think they really paid to
see.”

What did they come to see?

The winner of 18 majors, the benchmark of
greatness in golf? Or someone who can barely
reach some of the fairways?

The Golden Bear or the Olden Bear?

“I don’t think he ever wants to be looked at
like a museum piece,” Brad Faxon said Tues-
day. Palmer, a four-time champion who turns 80
next week, stopped playing the Masters in 2004
and agreed to become the honorary starter in
2007. Nicklaus said that wasn’t for him, but
changed his mind at Palmer’s invitation.

“He is so deserving of this honor, and thus I felt
it was his time, not mine,” Nicklaus said. ““Recent-
ly, I was invited by both Augusta National and
Arnold to join him on the first tee, and because
he enthusiastically supported the invitation, it
became an easy decision for me.”

Don’t be surprised to see Gary Player, the
other member of the “Big Three,” join them
over the next few years.

Now would seem to be a good time to restore
some tradition at the Masters, a major already
loaded with it.

The practice of an honorary starter began in
1963, although it goes back even further. Fred
McLeod (1908 U.S. Open) and Jock Hutchin-
son (1920 PGA Championship, 1921 British
Open) were both in their 70s when they were
assigned the first tee time in 1954 and “led the
field” during the first round.

Nine years later, they became the inaugural

honorary starters. After they died — McLeod
in 1976, Hutchison in 1977 — the honorary starter
was revived in 1981 with Gene Sarazen, Byron
Nelson and Sam Snead. They often played the
front nine, giving fans a glimpse of living history.
No one took it too seriously, except for one time
when Ken Venturi was asked to fill in for Nelson
in 1983. “We played nine holes, me and Gene
Sarazen,” Venturi once said. “That might have
been the best I played. I had four birdies and a
bogey, and I told Gene, ’Let’s keep going. I might
be leading the tournament.’ And Gene said, ’Are
you crazy? We’re going for lunch.”’

Before long, the honorary starters were skip-
ping holes, and it wasn’t much longer that they hit
only the opening tee shot.

Sarazen once considered not even hitting the
tee shot, worried that his game was not in shape.
That’s when the late Masters chairman Hord
Hardin said to him, “Gene, they don’t want to see
you play, they just want to see if you’re still
alive.”

What would be so wrong with Nicklaus and
Palmer chasing after their tee shot and going at it
for nine holes, or even all 18?

“It’s not out of the realm of possibility,” said
Zach Johnson, a Masters champion who knows
that nothing it out of any realm when it comes to
Augusta National. “As a fan of the game, as a fan
of Jack, as a player ... he’s the best who ever
played. You want to see him play.”

Scott Verplank played the first two rounds
with Nicklaus in 1986, the year he went on to
capture his sixth green jacket. He wouldn’t mind
seeing Nicklaus and Palmer hit more than one
shot, either. “But only if they wanted to,” he
said. “It needs to be their idea. And they would
get to play the member tees.”

That isn’t the Nicklaus way, though. It never
has been. The only thing he enjoyed more than
competing in majors was preparing for them.
Nicklaus never played a lot of recreational golf,
and he still doesn’t. His last real competition —
even though it was fake — was a Skins game
against Tiger Woods, Kenny Perry and Stewart
Cink at the Memorial this year. Nicklaus felt an
adrenaline rush that day, even though he could
barely reach three fairways. Woods won on the
final hole with a chip-in from 25 yards.

It was his first time playing with Nicklaus in
nine years, although one thing didn’t change.

“Anyone who has ever played at the highest
level always wants to play at the highest level,”
Woods said. Would the Masters turn into a car-
nival by having Nicklaus and Palmer play a round
that doesn’t count? No. It already is the only
major with a Par 3 Tournament on Wednesday,
and the only major with an honorary starter.

To have Nicklaus join Palmer on the first tee is
an honor, one he earned. Anything more would
be a ceremony, the one thing he disdains.

Ga EUS Ra GCG Uae MU aD



A WATER BLOTTING MACHINE attempts to dry the pitch before England's Twenty20 International cricket match against Australia is abandoned

due to rain at Old Trafford cricket ground Manchester, England, Tuesday Sept. 1, 2009.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

run-ups were waterlogged.

AP Photo/Jon Super

Friday

AUSTRALIAN PLAYERS including their captain Michael Clarke,
right, are seen on the pitch as their team's Twenty20 International
cricket match against England is abandoned due to rain at Old Traf-
ford cricket ground Manchester, England, Tuesday Sept. 1, 2009.

O US soccer

WASHINGTON
ASSOCIATED PRESS

D.C. United have screamed
it loud and clear, on the Inter-
net and in full-page newspa-
per ads: “WE WIN TRO-
PHIES.”

The Seattle Sounders hear
screams as well, echoing from
the 30,000 or so people who
come to every home game:
We have lots of fans.

So it is that United and the
Sounders are playing
Wednesday at RFK Stadium
in the championship of the
US. Open Cup, a 95-year-old
single-elimination tournament
that is open to amateur and
professional teams across the
country.

The event has some charm
but is usually ignored outside
the hardcore soccer commu-
nity. A little bit of controver-
sy is giving the game a needed
boost.

Both teams wanted to host
the final. Four-time MLS Cup
champions United had tradi-
tion on their side; the first-
year expansion team
Sounders could offer a big
turnout. When U.S. Soccer
chose United, Seattle general
manager Adrian Hanauer
cried foul, saying he was
“frustrated and somewhat
skeptical of the process.”

“Our fans deserve some
answers,” Hanauer said.
“And, by the way, U.S. Soccer
has been trying to raise the
profile of the U.S. Open Cup.
A game in front of 10,000 fans
at RFK, I don’t believe, is
going to raise the profile as
much as a game in front of a
sold-out Qwest Field.”

United president Kevin
Payne says nothing was
underhanded. He said Unit-
ed “bid aggressively” for the
game, in part because the
team has been playing extra
road games as part of the
international CONCACAF
Champions League. While
U.S. Soccer won’t say why
one bid is favored over anoth-
er, Payne noted that RFK has
grass, instead of Qwest Field-
’s artificial surface, and that
Seattle could only host the
game in the afternoon
because of scheduling issues.

“We thought it was very
important strategically to play
at home in this final,” Payne
said. Of course, it would be
embarrassing to have such a
fuss over the home field and
then have a tiny crowd show
up, so United launched into
aggressive marketing mode.
The “WE WIN TROPHIES”
ads feature the 12 national
and international titles won
by the club: four MLS Cups,
two U.S. Open Cups, four
MLS Supporters’ Shields (for
best regular season record),
one CONCACAF Champi-
ons Cup and one InterAmer-
ican Cup. In addition, Unit-
ed are charging 1996 prices
for the game, with tickets
starting at $12 and hot dogs
and beers at $2. Payne said
he’s expecting 15,000-20,000,
perhaps double the number
that came to RFK to watch
United win last year’s final.

AP Photo/Jon Super



Fans at Old Trafford were again left disappointed as the
second of England's Twenty20 internationals against Aus-
tralia was washed out without a ball being bowled.

After Sunday's match was abandoned seven balls into
the England reply, Tuesday's day/night clash went the same
way at 8pm local time after officials ruled that the bowlers’

It is a frustrating way for the series to finish and leaves
both sides short of Twenty20 practise ahead of next April's
World Twenty20 in the West Indies.

The one-day leg of the tour continues with seven one-day
internationals, the first of which takes place at The Oval on


PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009
SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPREADING THE WORD

Coach George Cleare has chance to share his expertise throughout the region

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

AFTER successfully passing his IAAF Lec-
turer’s Course last year, coach George Cleare is
now being afforded the opportunity to share
his expertise throughout the region.

On Saturday, Cleare will be heading to St.
Kitts & Nevis to lead in a Lecturer’s Course
for primary school physical education teachers
in a bid to have as many of them become certi-
fied IAAF level one coaches.

“Their main goal is to get that type of coach-
ing on the island from the primary school level
to the high school level so that they can have the
knowledge to start developing their athletes,”
said Cleare, who is a level four coach and a lev-
el one lecturer.

The course is similar to these held throughout
the region and there are plans for one to be
held in the Bahamas either by the end of the

year, or early in 2010. “Most of the physical
education teachers are not certified or they
don’t have the knowledge that is required today
to coach track and field,” Cleare said.

Changing

“The information is changing every day and
so we need to start looking at ways of making
sure that we are not left too far behind.”

The course in St. Kitts is the last of a two-part
series. Cleare said he actually missed the first
one having had to travel with the national team
to the IAAF’s 12th World Championships in
Athletics in Berlin, Germany last month.

“They are actually educating their physical
education teachers now so that they can start
enhancing their potential so that they can have
better athletes in the future,” Cleare said.

During the 10-day course, Cleare will be lec-
turing on theory and understanding the differ-

ences of young athletes. He will be providing
pointers on every aspect of track and field. At
the end of session, every candidate will sit an
examination that will be marked by Cleare and
the local lecturer from St. Kitts & Nevis, who
will be sharing in the course.

“It’s just a course where they have to show
their ability to understand theory, the method-
ology behind training and the ability to work on
the outside where they can instruct and demon-
strate their ability in all disciplines in track and
field.

Cleare, who is also a Pan American certified
elite coach, is due to return home on September
16.

Denied the opportunity to sit the level five
coaching course when David Charlton and Fritz
Grant traveled to Mexico a few years ago,
Cleare said he’s delighted to have been afford-
ed the opportunity to sit the lecturer’s course.

Now he can pass on his expertise to other

coaches, especially around the Caribbean. Course

GEORGE CLEARE: Going
& Nevis to lead in a Lecturer’s



to St. Kitts

PPO ACTLL
Oe
to win medal’

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

WHEN hardly anybody expected the
women’s 4 x 100 metre relay team to secure
a medal at the IAAF’s 12th World Cham-
pionships in Athletics, coach George Cleare
said he knew that they had the potential to
do it.

“Allin all, [have to give a lot of credit to
Debbie (Ferguson-McKenzie) and Chan-
dra (Sturrup),” said Cleare, who served as
an. assistant team on the 24-member team in
Berlin, Germany last month.

“Although this was my first major inter-
national meet working with them, they were
very open to our new ideas and what we
were trying to do and they really
worked, even sacrificing their rest
time from their individual events
to help the relay team get ready.”

Cleare commented both Sturrup,
who ran a brilliant second leg and

“They went

beyond what we
expected of them

Ferguson-McKenzie, who
anchored the team to the silver
medal behind the United States.

He said with the two veterans
leading the way, it made it quite
easy to insert Auburn-bound
Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson and quar-
ter-miler Christine Amertil in the
line-up on pop off and third leg
respectively.

“They went beyond what we
expected of them and I think the
team was of one unit and their
time (42.29 seconds), compared to
the team we had in 2000 when they
ran 41.92, showed how well they
worked together,” Cleare said.

“We knew that we didn’t have the foot
speed as the team in 2000, but we ran a
very decent time because we were able to go
out there and execute with the baton the
way they should have.”

When asked why the decision was made
not to use any of the other sprinters - Tim-
icka Clarke or Jerniece Saunders - Cleare
said it was evident that they wanted to go
with what they felt was the right combina-
tion and it turned out to be the correct one.

“We got to the point that this was the

and I think the
team was of one
unit and their time
(42.29 seconds),
compared to the
team we had in
2000 when they
ran 41.92, showed
how well they

worked together,”
eT

first time that what we
though was the A team
would run together and
I decided that we could-
n't a medal unless we
got to the final and then
we could correct the
mistakes,” he said.

“So had we had the
luxury of having a meet
to run in just before the
championships, we
would have probably ran a few more com-
binations.

:But only having two shots at it, the first
goal was to make sure we got into the final
and the next thing was to correct any mis-
takes so that we could run faster in the
final.”

Cleare said while the Bahamas came up
with two medals - a bronze from Ferguson-
McKenzie in the 200 to along with the silver
by the relay team - they could have easily
had a total of five to their ledger.

But he noted that it was quite disap-

pointing that Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands was
just barely beaten out in the men’s triple
jump, Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown ended up fifth
in the men’s 400 and the men’s 4 x 400 relay
team got disqualified.

Unfortunate

“It’s unfortunate that Leevan and Chris
came so close to winning a medal and they
didn’t,” Cleare said.

“As for the relay team, they made a mis-
take that I don’t think they will make again.
But it happened on the biggest stage and it
was so unfortunate.

“But the team was in a position to do a
whole lot better than it did, but we have to
start redeveloping our athletes to be able to
compete with the rest of the world.”

Not taking anything away from Sturrup,
who at age 37, and Ferguson-McKenzie, 33,
were two of the oldest female sprinters com-
peting in the meet, but Cleare said more
emphasis will have to be placed on the

SILVER LADIES: The women’s 4 x 100 metre relay team which won silver in Berlin. From left are Chandra Sturrup, Christine
Amertil, Sheniqua Ferguson and Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie.

younger athletes. He noted how Trinidad &
Tobago had a 19-year-old, who placed
fourth in the men’s 400 hurdles; Grenada
had a 17-year-old who ran 45 after winning
every junior event and Jamaica had a core
of 21-23 sprinters and hurdlers.

“We tried to keep the standard where
we go to America and allow them to keep
up our standard and that is not working for
us because by the time our athletes are fin-
ished with college, they are burned out,”
Cleare said.

“But we’ve seen how the Jamaicans are
keeping their athletes at home and they are
now beating the Americans and so we as
Bahamians have to look within ourselves
to see how we can develop the same type of
programmes that the other Caribbean coun-
tries have developed.”

The first, however, Cleare said the
Bahamas must close the generation gap
between Sturrup and Ferguson-McKenzie
and Sheniqua Ferguson, the next top sprint-
er.

Darlings season hit by injury

FROM page 11

Copper, Amani Toomer, Bobby Engram.

He started each of the team's three preseason games and
recorded three catches for 19 yards in the Chiefs' rebuilding
offensive attack.

Despite Darling's injury, the Chiefs released the 13 year
veteran Toomer.

Bradley is expected to fill in for Darling to start the team's
final preseason game, Thursday, September 3rd against the
St. Louis Rams.

The injury bug hit the Chiefs organization in a major way
against the Seawhawks on their home field.

Not only did the team lose Darling, but lost marquee
free agent quarterback Matt Cassel to a knee injury which
reports have indicated may be a strained MCL according to
ProFootballTalk.com.

The Chiefs remain tight lipped on a schedule for his
return.

Second year vet and starting cornerback Brandon Flow-
ers was also forced to leave the field with a shoulder injury.

Flowers had been playing well and caught an interception
which he returned for a touchdown.

Darling tore his ACL running a typical out pattern, late in
the third quarter, virtually without contact and came up
hobbling.

The fifth year vet was expected to come into his own this

te

The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is considered
the most important of four major ligaments located in the
knee, providing most of its stability.

Knee movements that often place a high level of strain

on the ligament can cause an ACL injury and it is gen-
erally common among athletes.

Tiger Woods famously completed the 2008 U.S Open
with a torn ACL, and Patriots perennial Pro-Bowl quar-
terback, Tom Brady, was sidelined for the entire 2008 sea-
son when he tore his ACL in the opening week of the
season against the Chiefs.



year, and had the confidence of the new coaching staff
behind him, evident in his three consecutive postseason
starts.

After playing sparingly in his rookie and sophomore sea-
sons with the Baltimore Ravens, Darling's play in his third
year sparked int erst from franchises around the league.

He caught 18 passes for 326 yards, including a nationally
televised breakout performance against the Cleveland
Browns when he recorded a career high four receptions
for 107 yards and one touchdown.



Carl Hield ‘goes back to
drawing board’ after loss

FROM page 11

you have to knock out your opponent or put up a very good
performance in order to win.

Today, Knowles will be the last to carry the Bahamian flag
when he compete in his first round bout in the lightweight or 60
kiloclass against Joseph Njogu from Kenya.

“My hometown boy went down, so I can’t let my country
down too,” said Knowles as he prepared for his battle. “?’m
going to go in there with my hopes up and I know I’m going to
come out on top.

“That’s what I’m going to do. I’m going to do this one for the
people.”

Best

With this being the World Championships, Knowles said
that the tournament has the best amateur boxers competing,
which mean that every time out, you have to bring your A
game.

“From what I’ve seen today, you got to be clean and perfect
if you want to win,” he insisted. “I think I’m ready to go out
there and perform. I really want to do very well.”

Coach Seymour agreed that Knowles should be in a much
better frame of mind to compete today, having watched the first
day of action yesterday. “We’re going in with a mind to win,”
Seymour stressed. “We’re not taking anybody lightly in this
championships. We have already lost one boxer, but we expect
to come out with at least one or two victories from Valentino.”

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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 11

r
b
WEDNESDAY,

SEPTEMBER 2,



ts

2009





INSIDE ¢ Arsenal’s Eduardo barred for CL two games



KANSAS CITY CHIEFS WIDE RECEIVER DIAGNOSED WITH A TORN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT
| A, BAA ‘4 > “

Darling's § *, .s
season hit!
by injury

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
renaldodorsett@yahoo.com





A promising season for the country’s most high profile
gridiron star ended abruptly in his last preseason outing,
however, the fifth year receiver has reason to feel confident
in his immediate future with his organization

Kansas City Chiefs wide receiver Devard Darling was
officially diagnosed with a torn Anterior Cruciate Liga-
ment, suffered in the third quarter of Friday’s preseason con-
test against the Seattle Seahawks, and was placed on the
injured reserve list late yesterday afternoon.

Darling was expected to challenge for a starting spot
opposite the team's main reciving target, Dwayne Bowe,
with a mix of players that included Ashley Lelie, Terrance

fo a

cae? le,
a i ee one a a
Sea ST



AP Photo/Reed Hoffmann

_ "es

ing (81) is helped from the field during the first h
against the Seattle Seahawks in Kansas City, Mo., Saturday, Aug. 29, 2009.

alf of their preseason NFL football game



SEE page ten
AIBA WORLD BOXING CHAMPIONSHIPS

Carl Hield ‘goes back to



drawing board’ after loss

i
CARL HIELD: He ‘performed well’ despite loss.

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

CARL Hield’s third
appearance at the AIBA
World Boxing Championships
didn’t last as long as he had
anticipated. But Valentino
Knowles promised that his
second appearance won’t be
as short.

Yesterday in the first round
of the week-long champi-
onships in Milan, Italy, Hield
dropped a 9-3 decision to
hometown boy, Dario Van-
geli, to be eliminated from the
lightweight or 64 kiloclass.

“Tt was a fight to the end,
but I just wasn’t scoring no
points,” said a somewhat dis-
appointed Hield.

“It was a good perfor-
mance. It was better than the
other two times.”

Hield said he will just have
to go back to the drawing
board and start preparing for
another year.

Coach Andre Seymour said
despite the loss, Hield per-
formed very well.

“Carl performed well. I
think he should have gotten
more than the three points in
the people hometown,” Sey-



Today Valentino
Knowles carries
Bahamian flag

mour said. “But he fought
extremely well.”

Looking back at his perfor-
mance, Seymour said the Ital-
ians had a chance to really
watch all of the boxers and so
they had the upperhand on
all of the competitors they
faced.

“Once they realized that
they had Carl, I think they
studied the film they had on
him,” Seymour said. “So they
were really able to counter
his style once the draw came
out. That’s how it is with tech-
nology.”

The Bahamian team spent
three weeks in a training
camp in Rome prior to the
start of the championships.

Seymour, a two-time
Olympic boxer, said that it’s
obvious that fighting against a
hometown competitor, either

SEE page ten

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Kills flying and crawling insects
with a long lasting effect.

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Madeira St., Palmdale
Nassau, BAHAMAS
Tel: 242-322-677-1441

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A FAMILY COMPANY



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM






NIB
prosecuting
100 firms
monthly
on non-
payment

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE National Insurance
Board (NIB) is prosecuting
more than 100 companies and
self-employed persons per
month for their alleged fail-
ure to pay due contribution,
Tribune Business was told
yesterday, the crackdown
being credited with improv-
ing the social security pro-
gramme’s 2009 revenues and
profitability.

Algernon Cargill, NIB’s
director, said it will have a
more profitable year than
expected due to the shake-
down and prosecution of
companies - more than 100
cases per month in New Prov-
idence and the Family Islands
combined.

“The projections are
exceeding our business plan
objective for the year in terms
of collections,” said Mr
Cargill.

Some high profile cases
involving alleged non-pay-
ment of NIB contributions are
set to reappear in court on
September 15, including Jones
Communications, Solomon’s
Mines, Bertha's Ribs, Glob-
al United and More 94 FM.

Mr Cargill said the team
assembled specifically to trace
delinquent employers and
self-employed persons had
done an excellent job.

He said the team focused
on those employers who
allegedly would deduct con-
tributions from their employ-
ees but not turn the payments
over to NIB, adding that
some employers had become
more crafty in how they
defrauded the govern-
ment/NIB.

“There are some pretty cre-
ative employers in the mar-
ketplace,” said Mr Cargill.
“They would not produce
accurate statements, but there
are many ways to find out
(about the inaccuracies).”

However, he said that due
to the depressed economy,
NIB has been working with
companies in order to help
them fulfill their payment

SEE page 4B
























The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

Sale Ends
September 5th

THE TRIBUNE

usiness

WEDNESDAY,

SEPTEMBER 2,

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Firm loses $100,000
equipment to surges

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

Bahamian

business has

seen $100,000

worth of

equipment

and electrical components
fried by power surges and
spikes, its chief executive argu-
ing that by switching to gen-
erator usage its electricity
costs have fallen to 35 per cent
of what they were previously.
Steve Howes, chief execu-
tive of Fenestration and Glass
Services, in an August 17,
2009, letter to Grand Bahama

* Grand Bahama-based company says costs have fallen
to 35% of power provider’s through generator use

* Argues electricity costs ‘six times and more’ higher
than developed world making it ‘impossible to
run profitable manufacturing business’

Power Company’s president
and chief executive, E. O. Fer-
rell, said the monopoly power
producer’s prices - “six times
(and more)” higher than many
developed countries - made it

“impossible to run a profitable
manufacturing business” on
Grand Bahama.

Arguing that this under-
mined Freeport’s attractive-
ness as a manufacturing/indus-

trial base, and impeded its
world competitiveness, Mr
Howes said the poor, unreli-
able electrical supply provided

SEE page 3B



Logistics Centre 25 per cent completed

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMAS Logistics Centre, a $16
million storage facility complex, replete
with a disaster recovery facility that is
hurricane-resistant up to a category five
storm, yesterday said it had already rent-
ed two of the existing six storage facilities
after recently opening the first phase.

Juan Carlos Gomez, its accounts man-
ager, said even though only 25 per cent of
the complex, on Munnings Drive off
Gladstone Road, has been completed, it
has received a favourable response from
Bahamian businesses. It has already rent-
ed two of six storage facilities capable

Cable $40m
offer ‘fully

subscribed’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas has com-
pleted a key step in the buy-
out of its largest shareholder,
Columbus Communications,
after its $40 million prefer-
ence share issue that closed
on Monday was fully sub-
scribed, sources confirmed to
Tribune Business.

This newspaper under-
stands that the offering, which
will help finance the $80 mil-
lion purchase of Columbus’s
30.2 per cent stake, was in fact
slightly oversubscribed, mean-
ing that high net-worth and
institutional investors sought
more shares than were actu-
ally available.

The only outstanding issue
to completing the Columbus
transaction, sources have told
Tribune Business, is the
receipt of approval for the
buyout from the Federal
Communications Commission
(FCC), the US communica-
tions regulator.

This is required because
Cable Bahamas’ fibre optic
cable infrastructure connects
with the US, meaning the
change of ownership requires
regulatory approval at the
Federal level.

The fact Cable Bahamas’
$40 million private placement
was fully subscribed does not
come as a surprise, the com-
pany’s officials having indi-
cated last week this was like-
ly to be the case.

SEE page 4B
CASH
r

CARRY
ONLY

MEAD Back - ne.

of holding the contents of eight 40-foot
containers.

Each facility has been constructed with
dedicated on-loading and offloading
docks, with steel according doors import-
ed from Europe, instead of the conven-
tional steel roll-up doors often seen at the
average storage facility.

According to office manager Janice
Taylor, doors on both sides of the storage
facility are completely storm resistant,
with each panel of the according door
locking in place independently.

“The Bahamas Logistics Centre has
been developed with the intention of
optimising and making more cost-effec-
tive storage and distribution for new
and established businesses in Nassau,”

ROYAL FIDELITY

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RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company

BAHAMAS

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Freeport: 242.351.3010

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said Ms Taylor.

“It provides state-of-the-art protec-
tion, built with reinforced concrete
imported from Italy, and other structur-
al components that reduce maintenance
and vulnerabilities to rust and corrosion,
as opposed to steal which is commonly
used.”

Bahamas Logistics is a disaster recov-
ery facility which would house business-
es, such as banks or insurance firms, that
need a secure office with all the facilities
needed to operate after a major storm or
natural disaster.

The logistics centre features two dis-
aster recovery offices, with storage, that

SEE page 4B

Where do you want to be? >

We can get you there!

ROYAL FIDELITY

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RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com

90% asset
return for
80 clients
of collapsed
broker

* Liquidator of firm with
$25m trading hole says
release process ‘arduous
and time consuming
to say the least’

* More than 100 smaller
Caledonia clients still
awaiting asset return,
although some concerned
at 8% asset retention

* Real Estate Association
turns down licence
application by Caledonia’s
former head trader

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

EIGHTY clients of a for-
mer Bahamian broker/dealer
that collapsed after suffering a
$25 million trading loss have
had 90 per cent of their assets
returned to them, the compa-
ny’s liquidator has confirmed,
although more than 100 oth-
ers with small accounts are
still outstanding in a process
that has been described as
“arduous and time consum-
ing to say the least”.

A July 29, 2009, update sent
to Caledonia Corporate Man-

SEE page 4B

| Learn more at royalfidelity.com |

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Money at Work

Back-to-School SALE

oe Student Project Beards Washable Markers ir



J s Pr 2
Tel: 394-5656
Top-of-the-Hill, Mackey Street
www.bossbahamas.com
PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

View our website of eww.cobedn.bs

NOTICE

Town Meeting for Master of Law (LLM)
in Maritime Law Degree Programme in
collaboration with the University of London,
Monday 5th October, 2009,
Executive Boardroom,

Michael Eldon Complex, 3rd Floor
6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

PC Ge TT
TR ae IR aren ya rE

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

Common Law & Equity Division

2009/CLE/gen/qui/01193

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
comprising Eight hundred and Fifty-nine thousandths (.859) of
an acre situate on the Southern side of Haynes Avenue in the
Settlement of Governor’s Harbour in the Island of Eleuthera.

AND
IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Ian A. Gray and Ellen
M. Gray
NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of IAN A. GRAY AND ELLEN M. GRAY of
Ontario, Canada in respect of:-

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate on the Southern
side of Haynes Avenue in the Settlement of Governor’s Harbour
in the Island of Eleuthera comprising Eight hundred and Fifty-
nine thousandths (.859) of an acre and which said parcel of
land is bounded on the NORTHNORTHEAST by Haynes
Avenue and running thereon Fifteen and Forty-one hundredths
(15.41) feet on the NORTHEAST by Buccaneer Hill said to
be the property of Tanya Melich-Crone and running thereon
One hundred and Forty-nine and Ninety-three hundredths
(149.43) feet on the NORTHWEST by the said Buccaneer Hill
and running thereon Twenty-four and Ninety-four hundredths
(24.94) feet on the NORTHEAST by the said Buccaneer Hill
and by land said to be the property of Paul Petty and running
thereon Fifty-eight and Seventy-eight hundredths (58.78) feet
and One hundred and Nine and Fifty-eight hundredths (109.58)
feet respectively on the SOUTHEAST by a chain-linked
fence separating it from the property of the said Paul Petty and
running thereon One hundred and Forty-three and Eighty-one
hundredths (143.81) feet on the SOUTHWEST again by the
property of the said Paul Petty and by the property of Bishop
Clifford and Velma Petty and running thereon Seventy-four
and Twenty-seven hundredths (74.27) feet and Eighty-nine
and Thirty-four hundredths (89.34) feet respectively on
the SOUTHEAST by the property of the said Bishop and
Velma Petty and running thereon Twenty-five and Forty-one

Secrets to making
the right hirings

ASK any manager, vice-
president or business owner
what is one of the biggest
challenges they face in mak-
ing their revenue numbers,
and they will tell you it is
identifying, hiring and retain-
ing good sales representatives.
If you are familiar with my
management philosophy,
then you have heard me talk
about the 80/20 rule in sales,
and all you have to do is look
at your own company or
industry to know it is still true:
“80 per cent of the sales and
revenue is made by the top
20 per cent”.

So how do you identify
who the top 20 per cent are
BEFORE you spend all that
time and money on hiring,
training and then hoping they
perform? There are many
ways to try to identify these
characteristics in advance, and
a whole industry of profiling
and assessment testing has
sprouted up to help you make
the right choice.

But there are easier ways
to identify who the potential
top producers are.

Secret Number One) The
best predictor of future
behaviour and performance

is past behaviour and perfor-
mance. This is a well known
fact in psychology, and it is
one you can use to predict
how a new sales representa-
tive is likely to perform for

you.

The bottom line is that
however much your candi-
date earned in income in their
last job, and the job before
that, it is mostly likely the
amount they are going to earn
working for you as well.

What you must determine
is exactly how much money
that was. Ask your candidate
to provide you with pay stubs
or verification of income for
the last six months and, in
addition, ask them what they
earned in income for each of
the last three years. Find a
way to verify this.

Finally, determine how
much of your product or ser-
vice your candidate would
have to sell to generate that
kind of income again, and ask
yourself if you would be hap-
py with that level of perfor-
mance because that is most
likely what you are going to
get.

Secret Number Two)
Determine what is really

CARDIOTHORACIC/
VASCULAR
SURGEON

Experience:
-10 YEARS
-PEDIATRICS
CALL
242-326-2346



DATA ENTRY CLERK & CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE

Promotional
Marketing

mooie era arITrey TT



motivating your candidate.
What we were exposing in the
first real secret was your can-
didate’s comfort zone. We all
have comfort zones, and sales
reps, in particular, will always
live up to - and most likely
down to - their comfort zone,
especially in terms of income.

So if your candidate is real-
ly looking to your company
aS an opportunity to better
themselves and earn more
money, find out what is dri-
ving this need and desire for
more money. Have their life
circumstances changed? For
example, have they recently
gotten married, had a child,
purchased a home?

If so, then they may have a
real motivation to work hard-
er, make more money and
enlarge their comfort zone.

If their situation has not
changed, then you can be
pretty sure they will not be
motivated to work harder,
learn more skills and make
more sales. In essence, they
will continue to live down to
their current comfort level
and you may once again be
hiring another 80 per cent
producer.

Secret Number Three)
Assess their sales skills and
previous training. This is one
of my favourites. During the
interview, I ask my candidates
how they think they would do
selling my product. They all
say: “I'd do great!” I then do
two things:

1) Lask them to sell me on
the product. What I am look-
ing for is for them to ask me
qualifying questions, rather

than just start pitching. Those
who just dive right in and
start pitching reveal them-
selves as middle to low 80 per
cent producers. Top 20 per
cent producers, on the other
hand, start asking me ques-
tions and gathering informa-
tion. They are the ones I am
interested in.

2) Next, I give them a cou-
ple of objections and watch
and listen to how they han-
dle them. You can immedi-
ately tell how much training
someone has had, and how
successful they were, by lis-
tening to them handle age old
objections like “The price is
too high” and “Ill have to
talk to.....”

These techniques have
saved me hundreds of hours
of poor hires, and they have
often revealed who the real
top producers were. Use
them, and you will love how
they will work for you as well.

All of these marketing
strategies are certain to keep
your business on top during
these challenging economic
times. Have a productive and
profitable week!

Remember, THOSE WHO
MARKET WILL MAKE IT.

NB: Scott Farrington is
president of SunTee
EmbroidMe, a promotional
and marketing company spe-
cialising in uniforms, embroi-
dery, silkscreen printing and
promotional products. Estab-
lished over 27 years ago, Sun-
Tee EmbroidMe has assisted
Bahamian businesses from
various industries in market-
ing themselves.

Readers can contact Mr
Farrington at SunTee
EmbroidMe on East Shirley
Street, by e-mail at
scott@sun-tee.com or by tele-
phone at 242-393-3104.

NOTICE

GEN-E MANAGEMENT LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000 that GEN-E MANAGEMENT LIMITED
is in dissolution. The dissolution of the Company

commenced on the 10th day of August, 2009. The
Liquidator is Wence Martin of Gibson, Rigby & Co.
Chambers, Dowdeswell Street, PO. Box SS-6836,

hundredths (25.41) feet on the SOUTHWEST by the property

of Pamela Moss and Trevor Pyfrom and running thereon in We require an experienced individual to fill the position of Data

total Seventy-nine and Twenty hundredths (79.20) feet on the
NORTHWEST by the property of the said Trevor Pyfrom and
running thereon Nineteen and Thirty-nine hundredths (19.39)
feet and on the NORTH and WEST by the property of the
Estate of David Sweeting and running thereon in several courses
Eighteen and Twenty-nine hundredths (18.29) feet, Six and
Two hundredths (6.02) feet, Seventy-nine and Fifty hundredths
(79.50) feet, Eleven and Sixty-one hundredths (11.61) feet and
Sixty-eight and Forty-one hundredths (68.41) feet and which
said parcel of land has such position shape marks boundaries
and dimensions as are shown on the plan filed herein which is
recorded in the Department of Lands and Surveys as “Plan No.
935 EL” and thereon outlined in Pink.”

IAN A. GRAY AND ELLEN M. GRAY claim to be the
owners in fee simple in possession of the said land free from
encumbrances and has made application to the Supreme Court
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section 3 of The
Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have their title to the said land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act.A plan of the
said land may be inspected during normal office hours in the
following places:The Registry of the Supreme Court in the
said City of Nassau;The Chambers of McKinney, Bancroft
& Hughes, Mareva House, 4 George Street in the City of
Nassau, Attorneys for the Petitioners; and The office of the
Administrator at Governor’s Harbour, Eleuthera.

Notice is hereby given that any persons having dower or a
right of dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition shall on or before the 20" day of October, 2009
file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a statement of their claim in the prescribed form,
verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such
person to file and serve a statement of his claim on or before the
said 20" day of | October, A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to
such claim.

Dated the 26" day of August, A.D., 2009

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Mareva House
4 George Street
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioners



Entry Clerk and Customer Service Representative for a Leading
General Insurance Company in the Caribbean, Reporting to the
Country Manager, the successful candidate will be primarily
responsible for data entry and communicating with the Company's
Agents, ensuring that service standards are met.

(Qualification & Experience:
Bachelors Degree in Business Administration [position more
suitable to a recent graduate |
Enrolment in a General Insurance Programme through either
the Chartered Insurance Institute or the Insurance Institute of
Canada
Minimum of six (6) BGCSE subjects
Minimum of two (2) years experience in the General Insurance
Industry in Customer Service or Underwriting

Required Competencies:
The ability to work on own initiative and communicate
effectively in oral and wnitten form.
The ability to deal with Agents courteously and professionally,
Computer skills (that is competence in the use of word
processing and spreadsheet software programmes and the
ability to learn and function effectively using the Company's
General Insurance Application)

Interested persons should send a detailed resume
accompanied by a letter of application to:

Data Entry Clerk & Customer Service Representative
P.O. Box S5-19023
Nassau, Bahamas

Or email to:
csandsialewlcom

The closing date for all applications ts
September ard, 2009
Only short-listed candidates will be contacted



Nassau, New Providence.

Wence Martin
Liquidator



Cre PCG

CRMC ACER ICDs 0 oer

aude The se ns

Tr sania

for ad rates



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE



Regulator gets full power
as Act takes effect

THE Communications Act came into
force yesterday, giving the newly-creat-
ed regulator its full powers for regulation
and oversight of the electronic commu-
nications sector.

With the Utilities Regulation and
Competition Authority (URCA) now
possessing its full powers, the transition
to a new regulatory regime has begun.

During the transition, URCA is
required to act to ensure maximum con-
tinuity. For this purpose, the functions
and powers previously vested in the Pub-
lic Utilities Commission (PUC) and the
Television Regulatory Authority are
transferred to URCA by law.

Firms and individuals authorised to
provide services and to operate networks
under the Telecommunications Act and
the Broadcasting Act will be able to
apply for a licence under the Communi-
cations Act. URCA is also contacting
all existing licensees and will run a press
campaign to inform the public.

To facilitate as smooth a transition as
possible to the new licensing regime, a
number of new documents were pub-

lished on 1 September, 2009.

These include:

* Preliminary Determination cover-
ing several class operating and spectrum
licences, exemptions, and types of fees

* Individual operating and spectrum
licences

* Draft class operating and spectrum
licences

* Licensing Guidelines

* Fee schedule

* Radio Spectrum statement (existing
allocation and assignment)

* Various forms - Full Details Form
and Notice of Objection Form for the
transition, and an Application Form for
a licence.

Until new URCA regulatory measures
are adopted, all existing regulatory mea-
sures adopted by the Public Utilities
Commission and the Television Regula-
tory Authority continue in force to the
extent that they do not conflict with pro-
visions of the Communications Act, the
Utilities Regulation and Competition
Authority Act, 2009; the Utilities Tri-

bunal Act 2009 and any new regulatory
measures adopted under these Acts.

Michael Symonette, the regulator’s
chief executive, said:

“URCA is obligated to regulate the
electronic communications sector in such
a way as to ensure that new investments
are attracted to the sector, competition
between the operators is sustainable, fair
and balanced, and consumers are pro-
vided with choice and high quality prod-
ucts and services at reasonable/afford-
able prices.

“Given the right conditions, operators
and investors will bring much-needed
innovation to the communications mar-
ket in terms of new products and ser-
vices, and so create new opportunities for
individuals who would wish to partici-
pate in this sector of the economy.

“At all times, URCA will be vigilant to
ensure that the interest of consumers
are protected, and would therefore urge
consumers to avail themselves of the
consumer protection services established
for them as outlined on URCA’s web-
site.”

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009, PAGE 3B

EXECUTIVE HOME FOR RENT

4-BEDROOM, 4 1/2-BATHROOM EXECUTIVE HOME
ON LYFORD CAY GOLF COURSE

For Immediate Occupancy

This beautiful executive residence is located on
a half-acre lot overlooking the Lyford Cay Golf course.

Eighteen-foot high ceilings, eight-foot high French doors,
marble floors, casement windows and an open plan
provide a panoramic view of the Lyford Cay Golf Course

from all living areas.

This modern executive home in Nassau’s most prestigious
community is available for immediate occupancy.

For information call 327-8536.
Serious inquiries only.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT 2000

SHOREWOOD INC.

FIRM, from 1B In Voluntary Liquidation

by Grand Bahama Power
Company meant it had
breached its contract with
Fenestration and Glass Ser-
vices, not the other way round.

Railing at a $23,000 month-
ly bill received from Grand
Bahama Power Company,
despite the company not yet
being operational and having
no roof on its premises, Mr
Howes said: “Since we have
opened the Freeport opera-
tion we have had nothing but
excess charges, power outages,
power surges and spiking that
has burned out and fried more
than $100,000 worth of equip-
ment and electrical compo-
nents.

“One piece of equipment (a
Corona treatment system),
after waiting for three months
for delivery from Germany,
only to have it fried on the
fifth day of use. That alone
was $25,000 (plus shipping
costs), and we still don’t have
it back in production. Every
time we have equipment fried
our production stops, but the
wage bill and overheads don’t.
Your spiking and surges are
almost a daily, and certainly
a weekly, occurrence.”

Mr Howes said his Florida-
based accounts department
was compiling a list of equip-
ment that had allegedly been
ruined by power spikes and
surges, in addition to labour
and lost production costs, in
preparation to mount a com-
pensation claim against Grand
Bahama Power Company.

“In my 20 years of opera-
tion in Florida, where we man-
ufacture with similar equip-
ment and experience nearly
identical weather phenomena,
I have not had but a few
instances of lightning strike
power surges. In just seven
months I have had dozens of
incidents with your company
in charge of my power at Fen-
estration and Glass Services.
Can you explain?” Mr Howes

company’s shares via a 50 per
cent interest in BISX-listed
ICD Utilities.

This, effectively, meant that
the company was being regu-
lated by its owner. The situa-
tion is again likely to lead for
calls for Grand Bahama Pow-
er Company to be placed
under the regulatory ambit of
an authority such as the new-
ly-formed Utilities Regulation
and Competition Authority
(URCA).

Mr Howes told Mr Ferrell:
“You proudly advertise the
best prices in the Caribbean
for power, yet it is no good
for Freeport to have its power
company happy to be better
than Haiti. You need to com-
pete with the US, Mexico and
China if Freeport wants to be
successful as a world class-
manufacturing base.

“Tt is common knowledge
this island is in dire straits, and
its people are struggling to sur-
vive. Grand Bahama cannot
compete in the tourist market
(what little there is), so the
only chance for the people of
Grand Bahamas to survive is
to bring in foreign investment
in offshore manufacturing.

“The only product the Port
Authority has is no taxes, but
in other countries a company
has to make a profit to pay
taxes, so if a company invests
in Freeport and cannot make
a profit there is no benefit to
come in the first place and the
Port Authority has no prod-
uct.

“It is your company’s
extremely high prices, poor
operation and diabolical prod-
uct that will destroy Grand
Bahama as a successful man-

ufacturing base.”

Grand Bahama Power
Company declined to com-
ment on Mr Ferrell’s letter,
which alleged that during his
meeting with Mr Howes, he
purportedly said the power
producer would increase rates
for residential customers if
businesses such as Fenestra-
tion and Glass Services
switched en masse to gener-
ating their own power.

“By my company running
our own generator we have
proved that after one month,
we can produce consistent
power with no damaged
equipment at about 35 per
cent of the cost that Grand
Bahama Power Company
charges,” Mr Howes said.

“Ts it the loss of revenue
from my company or all the
other companies finding out
about our results that you are
in fear of? Remember, it is
your company’s inability to
supply a safe and quality prod-
uct at a competitive price that
has forced us to run our own
generator.”

Mr Howes and Mr Ferrell
had met over the latter’s
objection to the company gen-
erating its own power, and the
former suggested a number of
ways to resolve the dispute.

One was for Grand Bahama
Power Company to keep com-
pensating Fenestration and
Glass Services for all equip-
ment damaged by power
spikes, and reduce its tariffs,
while another was for the
power producer to make the
first move.

Mr Howes also indicated he
was open to initiating court
action to break Grand

\ THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit cur website af wwer.cobeda by

Bahama Power Company’s
monopoly, adding: “Think of a
cow, me pulling the head you
pulling the tail (smelly end)
and 10 lawyers and barristers
milking it. Funny but true.... I
love a battle.”

A final option, he added,
was for Fenestration and
Glass Services to close its
doors, lay-off 300 persons and
move its manufacturing facili-
ty to China.

“Can you imagine the blow
to Freeport again and the bad
international press, probably
destroying the future of for-
eign investment, not to men-
tion the hardship for the excel-
lent trained people that work
for us,” Mr Howes asked.

His letter’s release could not
have come at a worse time for
Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany, which is already under
pressure from its customer
base over poor, unreliable ser-
vice that has resulted in
numerous power outages this
summer. This has made the
relatively high tariffs even
harder to swallow, along with
the company’s toughened pol-
icy that has seen numerous
customers cut off for late or
non-payment.

The service problems have
been even harder to swallow
because Grand Bahama Pow-
er Company’s three major
shareholders are global power
giants - Marubeni from Japan,
Canadian power producer
Emera, and the Dubai-state
owned electricity generator.

The situation in Grand
Bahama, though, could also
equally apply to BEC on New
Providence.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, SHOREWOOD INC. is in

Dissolution

The date of commencement of dissolution was the Ist day of
September , 2009.

Diane E. Fletcher of Buen Retiro, Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator
of SHOREWOOD INC.

NOTICE

INTERCITRUS INVESTMENTS LIMITED
Incorporated under the International Business Companies Act, 2000 of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

Registration Number 113539 B

(Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, commencing on the 31st day of August, 2009.

Articles of Dissolution have been duly registered by the Registrar. The
Liquidator is Dartley Bank & Trust Limited, The SG Hambros (Bah)
Ltd. Building, West Bay, West Bay Street, Cable Beach, P.O. Box CB
13391, Nassau, The Bahamas. Persons having a Claim against the
above-named Company are required on or before the 31st of
September, 2009 to send their names, addresses and particulars of
their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the Company, or in default
thereof they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
before such claim is proved.

Dated this 31st day of August, 2009

E | 1 ht
Lf feat
Dartley Bank & Trust Limited
Liquidator
Dartley Bank & Trust Limited
Cable Beach, West Bay Street
The SG Hambros (Bahamas) Ltd. Building

P.O. Box CB-13319
Nassau,N.P. Bahamas



LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.

FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!
Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million

Web Listing # 8377

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Mario Carey Realty

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NOTICE

Master of Science in Elementary Education Degree
Programme in collaboration with Wheelock College.

asked Mr Ferrell.

He added: “It is impossible
to run a profitable manufac-
turing business on this island
with the types and volume of
machines we have if they use
the Grand Bahama Power
Company.

“Maybe you could give me
an example of a Freeport
manufacturing company who
has modern manufacturing
machinery and is profitable
and happy with your product
and service. I have yet to find
one and have spoken to
almost every other commer-
cial customer of yours. I know
that my other three manufac-
turing companies, Florida,
China and England, are happy
with their power supplier and,
in fact, power is so insignifi-
cant as a percentage of cost it
has never even been a factor.
*T do not believe it is possible
for a manufacturing business
to operate in Freeport and still
compete with the rest of the
world with a power company
six times (and more) of the
price of power in the USA
and China and Europe.”

Mr Howes also pointed out
that Grand Bahama Power
Company effectively operat-
ed without a regulator, in
addition to its monopoly posi-
tion. Its tariffs are nominally

Applications are available from:
The Graduate Programmes (fice,
The College of The Bahamas, Michael H. Eldon
Complex, Room 46 Thompson Bhd.
For more informtaion call; 397-2601/2 or
send emails to: swiscdomicohedubs

Application Deadline: l6th October, 2009,

Tel: 242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013
info@mariocareyrealty.com
www.mariocareyrea .com

INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGES
AND CULTURES
INSTIT

ILC

COURSE OFFERING: Beginning September 14th, 2009

NOTICE
RADES INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Incorporated under the International Business Companies Act, 2000 of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
Registration Number 97369 B
(Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, commencing on the 31st day of August, 2009.

Articles of Dissolution have been duly registered by the Registrar. The
Liquidator is Dartley Bank & Trust Limited, The SG Hambros (Bah)
Ltd. Building, West Bay, West Bay Street, Cable Beach, P.O. Box CB
13319, Nassau, The Bahamas. Persons having a Claim against the
above-named Company are required on or before the 31st of
September, 2009 to send their names, addresses and particulars of
their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the Company, or in default
thereof they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
before such claim is proved.

Dated this 31st day of August, 2009

CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE | & II
CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I-Â¥V
CONVERSATIONAL MANDARIN IT, [1 & I

PRICE: § 250.00 per course

LOCATION: Munnings Bldg
“next to KFC across from COB

approved by the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) but, until recently,
that company’s 50 per cent
shareholder, Lady Henrietta
St George (formerly her hus-
band, Edward) was also hold-
er of 25 per cent of the power

LL e
Dartley Bank & Trust Limited

Liquidator

Dartley Bank & Trust Limited

Cable Beach, West Bay Street

The SG Hambros (Bahamas) Ltd. Building
P. 0. Box CB-13319

Nassau,N.P. Bahamas

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE I

CONVERSATIONAL GERMAN I

TELEPHONE; 302-4584, 302-4587 or 302-4563

DURATION: 10 Weeks

E-MAIL: ilei@cob.edu.bs



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



=
90% asset return for 80 clients of collapsed broker

FROM page 1B

agement clients on behalf of the lig-
uidator, Anthony Kikivarakis,
informed them that returning 90 per
cent of their assets, in compliance
with two Supreme Court orders, was
the “number one priority” for the
court-supervised liquidation.

Tiffany Russell, an agent for
Deloitte & Touche (Bahamas) part-
ner and accountant, Mr Kikivarakis,
wrote that the liquidation team had
spent most of its time complying
with the October 21, 2008, and
December 19, 2008, orders of for-
mer senior justice John Lyons to
release 90 per cent of all client assets.

“This task has been arduous and
time-consuming to say the least,”
the client update said. “Due to the
challenges faced in this process, Mr
Kikivarakis approached Senior Jus-
tice John Lyons and explained the
situation to him.

“In response to this, Justice Lyons
instructed him to continue with the
release of 90 per cent of clients’
assets to them, and to make this his
number one priority.”

Ms Russell added, though, that
the return of client assets had been
interrupted by Justice Lyons’ retire-
ment, as his and the Supreme
Court’s permission was being sought
before any asset releases. Currently,
the Caledonia liquidation has yet to
be assigned to another judge.

Logistics Centre 25 per cent completed

“Tt should be noted that Mr Kiki-
varakis and his agents have already
issued instructions to release most
of the assets held on behalf of clients
to them,” the Caledonia client
update revealed.

“Nevertheless, we are working on
returning assets to over 100 clients,
primarily clients with small asset bal-
ances. However, this process was
interrupted with Justice Lyons’
retirement as a judge in the Supreme
Court of the Bahamas.

“Previously, Justice Lyons had
approved the release of 90 per cent
of 80 clients’ assets to them. After
Justice Lyons’ retirement, the com-
pany’s liquidation case has not been
transferred to a new judge as yet,
and therefore we have not been able
to obtain the court’s approval to
release additional batches of client
assets.”

Caledonia Corporate Manage-
ment collapsed and fell into what
ultimately became a court super-
vised liquidation after one of its
clients was allowed to operate an
overdrawn margin account, which
was not properly collateralised,
plunging the company into a $25 mil-
lion trading loss.

The man directing activity in this
trading account, George Georgiou,
has since been charged by the US
federal authorities with running a
fraudulent stock manipulation

scheme, and his trial is due to take
place later this year.

Caledonia’s trading clients had all
their assets pooled into one omnibus
account by its Canadian correspon-
dent broker, Jitney. To cover the
margin loss created by the activities
of Mr Georgiou and his associates,
Jitney sold off securities and other
assets belonging to other Caledonia
clients, leaving many suffering a
severe loss and hardship.

Justice Lyons has already advised
“that the loss incurred in the Jitney
account would be borne by the spe-
cific clients’ whose securities and
cash had been used to cover the
shortfall in the Jitney accounts”.

Mr Kikivarakis, in his client
update, revealed that he had been
haising with Denys Bourbeau, a
member of the Caledonia Client
Monitoring Committee assisting him
with the liquidation, and Richard
Perdue, providing them with such
assistance as the court allowed as
they mulled bringing a lawsuit
against Jitney and the chief Cana-
dian custodian used by Caledonia,
Penson Financial Services.

Judging by Caledonia’s balance
sheet as at March 7, 2008, Mr Kiki-
varakis as liquidator is in no posi-
tion to take action against Jitney and
other involved in the company’s col-
lapse, as liabilities exceed assets by
$23.814 million.

The Caledonia liquidation seem-
ingly continues to move forward,
although sources have told Tribune
Business that there is disquiet among
some clients and attorneys over the
December 19, 2008, court order that
authorised Mr Kikivarakis to retain
a further 8 per cent of client assets.

An initial 2 per cent of client assets
were retained to cover the liquida-
tor’s costs, and placed in escrow at
EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas), but
Justice Lyons authorised a further
8 per cent to be retained to cover
“a shortfall of at least $500,000” in
client accounts other than at Jitney.

“Thus I did not have 100 per cent
of the clients’ assets in my possession
or under my control, and therefore I
was unable to comply with” the pre-
vious court order, authorising the
return of 90 per cent of client assets,
Mr Kikivarakis had said in his sec-
ond report to the Supreme Court.

The Securities Commission has
also been criticised by some Cale-
donia clients, who have openly ques-
tioned to Tribune Business why the
capital markets regulator has yet to
undertake an in-depth investigation
of the events that led up to the com-
pany’s collapse.

In response, Hillary Deveaux, the
Securities Commission’s executive
director, told Tribune Business: “We
are still investigating the matter.”

He added: “We are concerned as

to how the public perceives the
Commission to be executing its man-
date. We need to fully investigate
these matters before we can deal
with these things. It takes a long time
to investigate these situations.

“We rely, to a great extent, on the
forensic determinations of the liq-
uidator. We are well aware of the
situation. The company is in the
hands of the liquidator, and we don’t
want this to end up like other situa-
tions. People have to see justice
being done.

“We are still investigating the mat-
ter, and the major part of our inves-
tigation will be the results of the
findings of the liquidator.”

Elsewhere, Tribune Business has
learnt that the Bahamas Real Estate
Association (BREA) has turned
down an application by Robert
Dunkley, the former head of trading
at Caledonia, for a realtor’s licence.

Sources close to BREA confirmed
that, following an interview, Mr
Dunkley’s licence application was
rejected. It is understood that this
decision was partly due to concerns
about the Caledonia situation, and
also the fact that H. G. Christie, the
company Mr Dunkley is working
for, had named him in advertise-
ments as the primary listing agent
for Doctor’s Hospital’s $9 million
Western Medical Plaza prior to him
obtaining a realtor’s licence.

NIB prosecuting
100 firms monthly
on non-payment

could operate off of three
back-up generators should the
power be lost indefinitely at
the business's central location.

Each storage facility at
Bahamas Logistics is raised
at least 48 inches from the
ground in case of flooding,
and features outlets for Inter-
net and phone in case a busi-

ness has to set up temporary
offices from the facility. There
are even provisions for bath-
room facilities in each stor-
age unit, connected to each
of the two disaster recovery
facility.

And each disaster recovery
facility is equipped with spe-
cial flooring that allows for a

number of wiring configura-
tions for the implementation
of desks, computers and oth-
er hardware.

Mr Gomez said the entire
project is slated to be com-
plete by 2010. He said all the
prefabrication of the struc-
ture’s walls have been done
on site, and have all been

raised by Bahamas Logistic
Centre.

“We have built our own
complex,” he said.

All of the concrete struc-
ture’s walls and beams were
mixed here in the Bahamas.
“We employed mostly
Bahamian firms and labour,”
said Ms Taylor.

When the entire facility is
complete it will employ 10
permanent staff positions.

“The project is divided into
three phases,” said Ms Tay-
lor. “The first phase was com-
pleted 14 months after break-
ing ground. There is very little
space available in this first
phase.”

Cable $40m offer ‘fully subscribed’

FROM page 1B




Barry Williams, Cable

Bahamas’ vice-president of

Share your news























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area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

NOTICE





VAZON LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the Ist day of September , 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial Centre,
Shirley & Charlotte Streets, PO.Box N-3023, Nassau, The

Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE

OF

BARU HOLDINGS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the Ist day of September , 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial Centre,
Shirley & Charlotte Streets, PO.Box N-3023, Nassau, The

Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

finance, said then: “Because
of some circumstances that
some of the particular

investors were having, our
advisers said it was prudent
to extend it for one month.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that REGINALD SALOMON of #15A
TASMAN CLOSE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
2nd day of SEPTEMBER, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

SANDY SHORES
HOLDINGS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the Ist day of September , 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial Centre,
Shirley & Charlotte Streets, PO.Box N-3023, Nassau, The

Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE

GEN-E MANAGEMENT LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000 that GEN-E MANAGEMENT LIMITED
is in dissolution. The dissolution of the Company
commenced on the 10th day of August, 2009. The
Liquidator is Wence Martin of Gibson, Rigby & Co.
Chambers, Dowdeswell Street, P.O. Box SS-6836,

Nassau, New Providence.

Wence Martin
Liquidator

It’s gone very well, and it’s
going to be pretty much fully
subscribed.”

The offering was extended
to give institutional investors
and high-net worths extra
time to decide on whether to
participate, given that key
executives and decisionmak-
ers were off-island on vaca-
tion during July.

In particular, Tribune Busi-
ness understands through
informed sources that the key
investor for whom the exten-
sion was targeted at is the
National Insurance Board
(NIB) and, by extension, the
Government, which will have
the ultimate say on whether
NIB participates. As the sec-
ond-largest shareholder in
Cable Bahamas behind
Columbus, its participation
seems likely.

obligations before filing a
complaint with the courts.

“Legal action only happens
when employers choose not
to settle with NIB,” said Mr
Cargill. “We understand it is a
challenge because of the
economy.”

There has been such a vol-
ume of cases - almost 100 per
month - that NIB has made
arrangements with private
legal firms to assist with the
matters.

The NIB director also
revealed yesterday that a
number of individuals have
attempted to defraud the
newly-initiated unemploy-
ment benefit programme.

Mr Cargill said he was not
pleased with the delay in pros-
ecuting those who have tried
to defraud the unemployment
benefit scheme.

According to him, some
individuals have successfully
been collecting from he
unemployment benefit pro-
gramme while being
employed. He said the fraud-
ulent activity was discovered
when contributions come in
from an employer for a per-
son on their unemployment
benefit programme list.

“There have been several
cases sent to the police,” he
said. According to Mr Cargill,
the Prime Minister is set to
table NIB's 2008 annual
report in the House of
Assembly today.

oN THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at ww. cob, edubs

NOTICE

Town Meeting for Master of Education in
School and Guidance Counselling Degree
Programme in collaboration with
Kent State University
Saturday, 19th September, 2009,
Executive Boardroom,
Michael Eldon Complex, 3rd Floor
10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(No. 46 of 2000)

VINELAND INTERNATIONAL INC.

Registration Number 109555B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138(4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 46 or 2000)
VINELAND INTERNATIONAL INC. is in Dissolution.

Any person having any

INTERNATIONAL _ INC.,

claim

against VINELAND
required on or before

the 29th day of September 2009 to send their name,

address

and particulars of the debt or claim to the

Liquidator of the company, or in default thereof they
may have excluded from benefit of any distribution made

before such claim is approved.

GSO Corporate Services Ltd., of 303 Shirley Street, Nassau,
The Bahamas is Liquidator of VINELAND INTERNATIONAL

INC.

GSO Corporate Services Ltd.
Liquidator



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST



SRS See

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

- es a Fi (BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

TTT Worn Cres Marne Fonecast
























Today Thursday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
High = Low W High = Low NASSAU Today: Eat5-10Knots | O-2Feet 7-15Miles | OOF
——e o|1 |2 3|4|5|6 O}1 FC FIC FC _ F/C Thursday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 86° F
a ae a Acapulco 93/33 77/25 pe 87/30 79/26 t = FREEPORT Today: —_—_E at 5-10 Knots 0-2Feet —7-15 Miles 85° F
i LOW | MODERATE | HIGH | HIGH | EXT. areca oe ne sh es ae Thursday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 85° F
eh ORLANDO nkara, Turkey s S RBACO Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 83° F
High: 90° F/32°C_ Partly sunny with a Patchy clouds, a t-storm Partly sunny with a Clouds and sun, a Partly sunny, at-storm | Partly sunny, a t-storm The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 84/28 70/21 s 86/30 72/22 s Thursday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 84° F
tg ap be thunderstorm. in spots. thunderstorm. t-storm possible. possible. possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 59/15 45/7 s 5442 40/4 pc
Low: 74° F/23° C :
alla é é 6 $ Bangkok 90/32 78/25 t 90/32 79/26 t
i e@ % pees — High: 90° High: 90° High: 90° High: 90° Barbados 90/32 78/25 t 87/30 78/25 po SLES SH Cy
TAMPA High: 88 Low: 79 Low: 79 Low: 79 Low: 79 Low: 79 Se eS Barcelona 83/28 70/21 pc 83/28 70/21 s
a a , ETE mila TMC Bei 3/95 67/49 34/28 67/19 cone att
High: 88° F/31° C ae 102° F 106-84" F 99°-87° F 98°-88° F High _Htu(f.) Low ay RTI ee Nestle
Pandan : I — a : —__ A” Beirut 79/26 76/24 s 80/26 76/24 s tanta COMBI. 4 Wilmington
Low: 73° F/23°C ae # The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 659am. 2.6 12:52am. 04 Belgrade 89/31 64/17 s 92/33 68/20 pe Atlanta \I Myrtle Beach
Ms Q@ ‘ ! elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 7:24p.m. 29 1:01pm. 04 Berlin 77/25 59/15 s 79/22 54/12 sh Montgomery Savanah *Charleston BBEAUOA
| y —— CU ne Thursday 20am. 27 1:20am. 03 Bermuda 86/30 79/26 s 86/30 79/26 s Mobile pen oe ell
% “i | = 8:00 p.m. 2.9 1:43 p.m. 0.4 Bogota 69/20 42/5 pc 68/20 43/6 pc 0 oJ i ta
| EY c Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday eriday Si5am. 20 04am. 03 Brussels 68/20 54/12 pc 64/17 50/10 sh LiletisBsce § Daytona Beach
i a — ABACO Temperature 8:35pm. 29 2:22pm. 03 Budapest 84/28 59/15 s 86/30 59/15 ¢c Tampa, * Orlando
if % > High: 89° F/32°C HOU. ceeseeta ite auacctideeen 91° F/33° C 350am. 30 238am. 02 Buenos Aires 6116 48/8 ¢ S713 43/6 + a) Freeport
y “4 mera UemeneRerC Oe ects Teppsc Say opm, 29 S0lpm. 03 Cairo 95/35 72/22 s 94/34 74/23 s Miamis Nassau
C va a : Normal high. ... see F/3i2C Calcutta 91/32 83/28 + 91/32 81/27 + id ce
F ree Normal low 75° F/24° C Calgary 82/27 50/10 s 73/22 41/5 pc Key West yey,
4) = = @ WEST PALM BEACH i Last year's Nigh cesses 90° F/32° C SuN ayy iyi Cancun 91/32 75/23 pe 90/32 72/22 pe —iavang BANAMAS
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Low: 76°F/24°C NASSAU High: 88° F/31° C Islamabad 95/35 75/23 pc 92/33 70/21 r a am LinwS eS D TRINIDAD
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Low: 80° F/27°C Be ernare London 66/18 55/12 + 68/20 54/12 sh
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Today eis Today ade Today ae BLRYAGUANA St Thomas 91/92 7025 pe 80/81. 7926 s that You have excellent insurance
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Anchorage 5015 499 +r 62/16 49/9 c Jacksonville 82/27 69/20 t 85/29 67/19 t Phoenix 104/40 84/28 pc 103/39 83/28 t Che. ACKLINS aaa ama aaa nt s eo ane s y
Atlanta 80/26 60/15 po 81/27 6015 pc Kansas City 80/26 5713 pc 76/24 58/14 t Pittsburgh 77/25 5010 s 78/25 SIMO s RAGGEDISLAND — Ulish:91°F/33° a0 Paulo s s .
Atlantic City 78/25 58/14 s 78/25 6015 po Las Vegas 102/88 77/25 pc 105/40 82/27 pc Portland, OR 82/27 58/14 s 77/25 S713 ea Low: 77° F/25°C eae EET re Nobody does it better,
Baltimore 78/25 56/13 s 81/27 58/14 pc _Little Rock 86/30 60/15 s 84/28 64/17 t Raleigh-Durham 79/26 60/15 pc 77/25 62416 sh Low: 74°F/23°C ¢ ~ sen _ ce, den : Tone SOND -
Boston 74/23 58/14 s 78/25 6IN6 s LosAngeles 91/32 66/18 pc 87/30 66/8 pc St. Louis 80/26 5915 s 84/28 BING s . a. a ae aa am aoa er
Buffalo 76/24 5110 s 78/25 521 s Louisville 82/27 59/15 s 83/28 6015 pc SaltLake City 88/31 6317 s 89/31 62/16 pc GREATINAGUA Tala Te eee eee
Charleston, SC 78/25 66/18 r 80/26 65/18 c Memphis 84/28 65/18 s 87/30 67/19 pc San Antonio 96/35 73/22 pe 94/384 72/22 pc High: 93° F/34° C Taal 75/23 54/12 ¢ 75/23 58/14 s INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Chicago 77/725 499 s 77/25 50H0 s Miami 88/31 76/24 t 91/82 76/24 t San Diego 80/26 69/20 pc 79/26 66/18 pc Low. 76°F24°C Trinidad 95/35 73/22. pc 03/33 72/22 pc ' wt =e
Cleveland 73/22 49 s 78/25 54/12 5s Minneapolis 76/24 57/13 pe 80/26 58/14 s San Francisco 72/22 56/13 pe 71/21 57/13 pc ; ee 71/21 BBA s 6719 55/12 c (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 92/33 73/22 s 91/32 71/21 Nashville 82/27 59/15 s 82/27 58/14 pc _ Seattle 76/24 57/13 s 73/22 56/13 c , Gianna 80/26 67/19 pc 78/25 66/18 t Shaco Eleuthera —
Denver 84/28 55/12 $s 85/29 54/12 pc New Orleans 88/31 71/21 pce 89/31 72/22 pc Tallahassee 88/31 66/18 t 85/29 65/18 t :
om Warsaw 75/23 58/14 pc 73/22 55/12 pc \
Detroit 76/24 55/12 s 80/26 56/13 s New York 78/25 64/17 s 80/26 67/19 s Tampa 88/31 73/22 t 86/30 73/22 t Winnipeg 78/95 BB/I2 s 79/96 56/13 s Del (242) SGP-A204 fF Tek: (242) 352-2862 ff Tel: (242) TDS
Honolulu 89/31 76/24 s 89/31 76/24 s Oklahoma City 90/32 66/18 pc 87/30 64/17 t Tucson 98/36 75/23 pc 95/35 74/23 t — ae Weathor (iW): 8-4uniih pt bay cloudy; e-loudy:sh-showers, thunder
Houston 92/33 68/20 pc 93/33 70/21 t Orlando 90/32 74/23 t 91/32 71/21 t — Washington, DC 79/26 60/15 s 79/26 61/16 pc sions, Frain; 4@-anw Wines, «n-shaw ieee, Pepeprecipiiaton, Te t1ace








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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R PM ‘happy for talks’ with Turks & Caicos C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.233WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNYWITH T-STORM HIGH 90F LOW 79F F E A T U R E S SEETHEARTSSECTION ‘Redefining the Portrait’ N E W S SEEPAGEFIVE Bahamas to be showcased in Mariah Carey album PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham left the door open for discussions of a federation b etween the Bahamas and Turks and Caicos once the cur r ent constitutional crisis in the British territory is resolved. M r Ingraham said in a state ment yesterday that the government would be happy to dis cuss the further strengthening of the “historic relationship” b etween the Bahamas and the people of the Turks and CaicosI slands in accordance with the will of its peoples. My colleagues and I have taken note of the comments reportedly made by former Prem ier of the Turks and Caicos Islands Michael Misick in an interview with The Tribune suggesting that the time has c ome to explore the possibility of creating a federationb etween The Bahamas and the Turks and Caicos. We are fully conscious of the fact that the Bahamas and the Turks and Caicos share the same archipelago and, indeed, at one time together constituted a colony of Great Britain administered from Nassau. Wea re also keenly aware of and treasure the close familial ties b etween the people of The Bahamas and the people of Ingraham opens door to discuss eder ation’ The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Cynthia Pratt has chosen replacement candidate By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter p turnquest@ tribunemedia.net PLP DEPUTY leader C ynthia Pratt says she has chosen who she feels is the best candidate to replace her – and will campaign on his behalf. C onfirming she will no longer contest for thed eputy leadership position at the party convention, M rs Pratt said she has spoken with each potential candidate “with the exception of one.” But she is remaining t ight-lipped on who gets her backing. PLP Deputy says she will campaign on their behalf SEE page eight By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net SANDALS Royal Bahamian Resort laid off 80 employees yesterday as the hotel reported lower than expected bookings for the autumn and winter seasons. According to Labour Minister Dion Foulkes, Sandals has informed the staff that if circumstances were to turn around before December 1, some of them would reSandals resort lays off 80 employees SEE page eight SEE page eight A WEATHER system travelling in the general direction of the Bahamas developed into Tropical Storm Erika with winds of 50mph yesterday evening. C urrent forecasts have the storm reaching the south-easte rn Bahamas by Sunday, and New Providence by Monday. H owever, Chief Meteorology Officer Basil Dean told The Tribune that the system is moving very slowly at this time and may not reach the capital until Tuesday. Weather experts at the US National Hurricane Centre and AccuWeather are predicting paths for the storm which would have it passing slightly to the east of the Bahamas. It is uncertain what strength the storm will be at when it T r opical Storm Erika moves in the Bahamas’ dir ection SEE page eight By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE issue of protecting students from possible abuse is too “serious to warrant niceties” like consultation with the Bahamas Union of Teachers, the Minister of Educa tion said. While he can “understand the union’s ordinary entitlement for consultation,” Min ister Carl Bethel asserted that the need to ensure the welfare of students in this regard is “sufficiently serious not to warrant” the Ministry going through that process “at this time.” By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham has said he is “listening” to all voices responding to the government’s plan to outlaw marital rape. Declining to say whether some of the loud objections to the ban would influ ence whether his government moves ahead with it, Mr Ingraham simply said he is taking the comments into consid eration. “I’m listening,” he told The Tribune . “It’s out in the public, and the public can say what they wish.” STUDENTS and teachers at C H Reeves Junior High were yesterday tested for tuber culosis after a ninth grader at the school contracted the disease over the summer vacation. School officials yesterday said that the testing is merely a precautionary measure to ensure that no one who came into contact with the student has contracted TB. The student, whose name has not been released, was treated for the infectious dis ease and is doing well, the school said. Tuberculosis is a common and sometimes deadly disease that is carried through the air. Symptoms include chronic cough with blood-tinged sputum, fever and night sweats. Minister: protecting students from abuse ‘too serious’ for consultation with the BUT SEE page eight PM ‘listening’ to all voices on the marital rape issue School tests for TB after student contracts disease on vacation SEE page eight AYOUNGSTER eats a ‘Eat Cookies Not Turtles’ cookie during a colouring contest held at the ‘Save the Turtles’ Art Show recently at Doongalik Gallery. Contestants thoroughly enjoyed their medium of edible markers to colour in a cookie and chance to learn a little more about the importance of turtle conservation. Last week, the government announced that all harvesting, possession, purchase and sale of sea turtles will now be prohibited. SEETHEARTSSECTION TURTLECONSERVATIONCOOKIESAREAHIT DION FOULKES

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B AHAMAS UNIONof Teache rs president Belinda Wilson has advised teachers not to sign an a mendment to their conditions of e mployment stipulating that they are prohibited from engaging in sexual acts with their students. TheM inistry of Education has prop osed the amendment, but Mrs Wilson says education officials failed to consult the union. The Tribune asked the public y esterday what they thought the teachers should do. R ashad Marche, 25, Bahamas F ood Services "All teachers know that what is going on is wrong. I think that its hould be signed. They are sup p osed to be our role models and have great influence on our youth. T hey should sign the amendment s o that if they are prosecuted they can be penalised to the full extent o f the law. Why should they be dif f erent – because they’re teachers?" Colin Trotman, 47 " I understand that this is protoc ol because there is a union con tract between the teachers and the government and therefore theys hould be informed on things like t his and the ministry should have sought their advice. However at the same time, given the current atmosphere, I don't feel it’s neces s ary. If a teacher has nothing to fear they should sign it, and that’s the bottom line. As far as I'm con c erned they can just meet, they can m eet now and then sign it." S tephen Pratt, 42 " I think that they should sign it man and get rid of those same teachers that are there doing g arbage. Set an example so that t he rest can stay on the right road because we have to protect our children, they are the future of ourc ountry.” Lashanda Turnquest, real estate employee "I feel that it should be signed. T eachers have a civic duty to uphold as our children's role mod els. What has been happening is wrong and they need to be pun-i shed to the fullest extent. I agree that government should have given them a heads-up and discussed t heir plans with them, but regard l ess of this it is something that needs to be done. It should be concrete what the consequences are f or something like this." Capt Francis, 45, boat captain "If this was something that is j ust to state belief or moral point of view, then I feel as though it is each teacher's personal choice whether or not they want to sign. However,i f they are being asked to sign it as a policy and to understand that this is the criteria in order to have thisj ob, then yes, it should be signed. As long as the terms are clearly defined as to what is deemed inappropriate, I feel that of course its hould be signed." Lilymae Gaitor, 66, retired, "I was brought up to believe that any person that you have to say ‘Mr’ or ‘Mrs’ to, you and them are no company. I don't know what is in the amendment that they are against but I feel that this isn't something that they should have a problem with. Especially with all these allegations and reports com ing out; they should be delighted about this." Devaughn Brown, 32 "I feel that yes they should sign it. (Sex between teachers and stu dents) is inappropriate and they should be penalised. If you’re not guilty then you shouldn't have a problem with signing it. Renee Johnson, 46, salon employee "You can't infringe on anybody's rights – this is a democratic society. If something is written down it can't be set in stone until there is a discussion about it. Why wait until school opens to demand this? The issue has always been there, they had enough time to get this sorted out before the new school year began. I think its poor timing for something so important. In the end however we need to think about what's best for the children and doing everything to ensure their protection." Annmarie Scott, 38, housekeeper "I can understand why the Union would be displeased with the ministry's actions. I think whenever any amendment is made to a pre-existing agreement all parties involved should be included in discussion – it's common courtesy. They should talk to the teachers and give them that respect, just to explain what the amendment entails so that they can make an educated decision." C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Request for Contractors Pre-QualificationThe National Insurance Board (NIB works to construct a Government Complex at Marsh Harbour, Abaco; the project isa joint venture of NIB and The Bahamas Government. Contractors must be in compliance with the National Insurance Act (social security programme good standing with the relevant Government agencies. Pre-qualification documents may be collected from the Security Booth at NIB’s Clifford Darling Complex, Blue Hill Road, from September 3 to September 9, 2009. Pre–Qualification documents should be signed, sealed and dropped in the prequalification box at the Security Booth, Clifford Darling Complex on or before 12:00 Noon on September 15, 2009. The National Insurance Boardof the Commonwealth of The Bahamas T ALK STREET RASHAD MARCHE COLIN TROTMAN STEPHENPRATT L ASHANDA TURNQUEST C APT FRANCIS L ILYMAE GAITOR DEVAUGHN BROWN RENEE JOHNSON ANNMARIE SCOTT Teachers employment amendment

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B y MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net ANIMAL lovers are calling o n the government to improve the “horrific” state of the dog pound after the deplorable conditions there were highl ighted in T he Tribune. K irsh Duncombe, a 14-yearold Queen’s College student was so disgusted by the “unsanitary dog slaughter” at theC anine Control Unit in Chippingham Road, that he wrote a letter to the editor urging Bahamians to address the unacceptable” situation. T he pound holds stray dogs found roaming the streets and public areas for up to four days before destroying the animals in accordance with the law. The D og Licence Act dictates that all animals must be licenced for a fee ranging between 25 cents and $6 per year. If owners do not produce a licence for a dogh eld at the pound within four days, the animals are put down. K irsh visited the site with a small summer camp group last m onth and in his letter to T he Tribune said he was saddened, disappointed and disgusted by what he saw. He said: “It seemed to be an u nsanitary dog slaughter. Knowing most of the dogs havei ncurable diseases or no homes to live in and spend basically t heir last living days at the pound, they should be properl y fed and watered. “Some of the dogs had no water and some looked like they were starving. The staff told us they were going to be p ut to sleep the next day anyway.” T ribune r eporters were denied access to the pound yest erday, but animal rights activists and concerned citizens who have had a rare opportunity to see the inner workings of the pound spoke out in supp ort of the schoolboy’s claims. A source who has recently v isited the site, run by the Department of Agriculture and M arine Resources’ Canine Control Unit, described it as Dickensian and gloomy.” She said: “The dogs are euthanised on Fridays so if a dog comes in at the beginning of the week they’re lucky to g et fed, and they might get water. It’s a one-way streetm ostly for those poor animals.” The source, who did not want to be named, said there are between 20 and 30 kennels, and the number of dogs held depends on how many are rounded up during the week. Feral cats and animals imported illegally are also kept at the unit, as are roosters tor mented in illegal cock fights, the source said. Animal rights activist Jane Mather said she was horrified by conditions at the pound when she assisted with the euthanasia of dogs as president of animal rights activist group ARK several years ago. She said: “I can’t tell you some of the horrors that happened there. It’s really disgusting. If you want to walk into hell, go there. “The government has really got to be chastised for this. It’s really wicked, the things that I have seen.” K irsh told T he Tribune h e came across the awful sight, a nd awful smell, of a dead dog locked in a cage with a living d og – because, staff said, they could not find the key. He was also disturbed by the broken fences, dirty walls and aban doned vehicles around the facility. Bahamas Humane Society inspector Percy Grant said a lack of resources and staff s hortages have prevented the Canine Control Unit from ful filling its mandate. The unit is responsible for rounding up stray animals found wandering the streets, public areas and trespassing on private property between 10pm and 6am, but Inspector Grant s aid this job is largely left to the not-for-profit Humane Society. He told The Tribune: “The problem is the government never gave a hoot about canine control in this country so it is just left there and there’s never been a strict regulation. “It needs fixing and the government needs to take an interest in it; neither the FNM nor the PLP seem to have taken an interest in it.” Inspector Grant said he would like to see the unit reg ulated and sufficiently staffed so stray dogs are collected from the streets at night and cared for at weekends. The Bahamas Humane Society will take healthy dogs from the pound to care for them w hen space allows, Inspector Grant said. D epartment of Agriculture and Fisheries assistant director C harmaine Price said she could not grant the press access to the facility, and that the matter is being investigated and a statement will be released today. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $3,730 $3,730 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $3,940 $3,940Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank L L a a F F r r o o n n t t e e r r a a L L a a F F r r o o n n t t e e r r a a Call for the govt to improve ‘horrific’ state of dog pound A 31-YEAR-OLD man is in serious condition in hospital after being shot in the back by a pers on known to him. T he victim was sitting in a car on Dorsette and Grants Streets sometime after 8am on Monday when he saw a man who he knew a pproaching his vehicle with a gun. The 31-year-old man got out of the car and tried to flee into a private residence on the street. A s he was running towards the h ouse the gunman opened fire, hitting him in the back. He was taken to hospital to be treated for gunshot wounds. P olice have launched an intensive investigation into this matter. M an in serious condition after being shot in back THE TRIBUNE was denied access to the dog pound CANINE UNIT vans parked outside of the dog pound in the Botanical Gardens appear to be left unused. TWO men were injured in a propane gas explosion on Potters Cay Dock. A 38-year-old man and a 17-year-old boy were near the docked m/v Matilda at 2 pm on Monday when an explosion occurred. It is believed that there was an accident with a propane bottle that was being filled. Both men were taken to hospital to be treated for their injuries. The 38-yearo ld received 16 per cent burns to his hands, arms, face and head. He was detained in hospital. The 17-year-old was treated and discharged after receiving 7 per cent burns to his left arm, face and shoulder areas. An i nvestigation has been launched into the exact cause of the explosion. Two injured in Potters Cay explosion DRUG Enforcement U nit officers seized an illegal firearm and a mmunition from an area off Carmichael Road on Monday. A cting on a tip from a member of the public, D EU officers carried out a search of the Evansville neighbourhood. They discovered a .38 handgun with one live round of ammunition in ad erelict truck. The weapon is in police possession. No one wasa rrested. Illegal firearm, ammunition seized by DEU A MAN accused of causing grievous harm to two men and being found in possession of a handgun was arraigned in the Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Richard McKinney of Woods Alley was arraigned before Magistrate Derrence Rolle in Court 5, Bank Lane, yesterday on two counts of causing grievous harm and one count of possession of a handgun. It is alleged that on Thursday, August 27, McKinney caused grievous harm to Marvin Martin and Anthony Hep burn. He was not required to enter a plea to the charge. It is also alleged that McKinney was in possession of a handgun with intent to commit an indictable offence. McKinney was not required to plead to the charge. He was remanded into custody and is expected back in court today for a bail hearing. Man accused of causing grievous har m T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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EDITOR, The Tribune. Another summer has passed and while it’s been a sizzling summer it’s time to go back to school! The hope is that you enjoyed your vacations and family events, and have now geared up to send the children back to school. All of us know, one of the keys to personal success is a good education. I n a Monday, May 29, 1972 T ime Magazine article entitled; “The Price of Ignorance”, the author wrote; “What does it c ost to drop out of school? Billions, everyone agrees, but itr emained for Henry M Levin of the Stanford University School of Education to attempt some computation of how many billions. In a study made for the Senate Select Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity, Levin focused on the 3,180,000 American males now between 25 and 34 who f ailed to win a high school d iploma as of 1969. He then fig ured that dropping out wouldc ost them a total of $237 bil lion (about $74,000 each b ecause of lower incomes dur ing a working lifetime. As for the government’s loss, it would h ave cost $40 billion to complete the dropouts’ education,b ut the tax collector would have taken in an additional $71 bil l ion on their higher incomes.” A s we embark on a new school year some 40 years after this study, the questions in the Bahamas are: “What is the long term cost to The Bahamas of financing public schools that effectively produce approximately 65 per cent dropouts? What is the social and cultural cost of producing dysfunctional c itizens with a resultant immoral and criminal proclivi ty? And, what is the national impact of the dilution of our s overeignty and consequent greater reliance on foreign ownership, brain power and e xpertise? Many years ago, in the days o f minority rule, our great little nation decided that public education was of such great value that we should make it both free and mandatory. There was a merit system in which, “one had to study to show himself approved”. T ruant officers roamed the streets to ensure that our chil dren attended school and that parents were accountable if they did not. In many family island communities our introduction to education started in an all-inone, all age school, interestingl y with mostly foreign teachers. With the assistance of government subsidy, our parents were determined that we all got a better education than they did. T hey were diligent and w orked hard to send their kids t o Nassau in search of a higher e ducation. The entire community b ecame our tutor and in Great Inagua, during the summer b reaks, Mr Farquharson interrogated the minds of the return-i ng students in his convenience store and rewarded correct a nswers with sweets and candies. Amazingly, the joy and s weetness of education was interrupted by the great liberat ors of majority rule. Firstly, government discon t inued the educational subsistence allowance to Family I sland students and later. Secondly, by insidiously introducing social promotion into the public school system in the 1980’s. Suddenly, under t his new regime, students gained “success” without p rocess and thus began our slide down the slippery slope o f dysfunctional mediocrity and a national ‘D’ average. Change in education is long overdue. Now is the time to head towards an ‘A’, despite t he tough economic environ ment by immediately discont inuing social promotion. It is a sacrifice that the future o f our nation demands. We cannot wait for the long term change promised in the form of an educational restruc turing programme. S ocial promotion is not an educational system, the results p roves this assertion. Any system that produces approxi m ately 65 per cent illiteracy and/or dysfunctionality must be classified as the very antithesis of an educational system. In solving the problem we must first kill social promotion and reinstate a merit system. Next, in preparing students for the society we live in, we must recognise that the world is fast becoming a high-tech global community. This means that in preparing our children for today’s world we must supplement the books a nd paper that plague our school age children with hightech learning tools. We must expedite the initiative to have a lap top or computer station one ach and every desk in all our schools. Either a lap top issued at the beginning of school and turned back in at the end of the school year or parents can be required to provide their children witht heir own. Ordinarily, parents are required to purchase around f ive or six text books along with n otebooks, pencils, pens and paper. But this is the information age, the age of the computer, and the age of the internet. That’s the way our modern s ociety works. What is the purpose of keepi ng our children in the dark a ges of the Third world? Shouldn’t we be teaching the leaders of the future how to get i nformation and learn using a method that is utilized by the industrialised, First World? I n the old days, our colonial m asters recognised that the cost of ignorance was too high. Learning to read and write was considered a value to our nation. In a modern Bahamas are we a re not willing to pay to get our children the education that will prepare them for globalisation? I s the cost to equip public schools with modern technolo gy too great a sacrifice? S houldn’t we be obliged to employ teachers with the skills that are necessary for using technology in the classroom? The problems identified are not new. Any analysis of our nation’s social ills will i nescapably link our failing educational systems to our societal problems. T he obvious solutions are suggested. I am satisfied that preparing o ur children’s future for the global environment in which we live is worth the cost andt hat we truly cannot afford to c onfuse the cost of a quality, productive, functional, educational system with the price of af ailing, non productive social promotion system that breeds ignorance. D HALSON MOULTRIE Nassau. August 31, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WE ARE surprised at Bahamas Union o f Teachers President Belinda Wilson’s decision to encourage teachers not to sign a circular notice issued by the Ministry of Education informing them of the legal conse quences should they indulge in inappropriate sexual behaviour with their students. A pparently the circular asks teachers to a cknowledge an amendment to their conditions of service. The circular, which required each teacher’s signature, became necessary because of growing and alarming allegations o f some teachers abusing their positions of trust with their students. In answering Mrs Wilson’s claim that the union was not consulted before the circular was issued, Education Minister Carl Bethel s aid the issue of protecting students from possible abuse was “too serious” to warrant s uch “niceties” as consultation with the union. The Minister said that while he understood the “union’s ordinary entitlement for c onsultation,” the need to ensure students w elfare was “sufficiently serious not to war r ant” the Ministry “going through that process at this time.” On page 2 of today’s Tribune at least two o f the respondents to The Tribune’s quest ions as to whether teachers should sign the c ircular, could understand the union’s dis pleasure. The others thought that the issue was too important for the teachers not to s ign. " I can understand,” said one of those sidi ng with the teachers, “why the union would be displeased with the ministry's actions. I think whenever any amendment is made to a pre-existing agreement all parties involved should be included in discussion – it's common courtesy. They should talk to the teach ers and give them that respect, just to explain what the amendment entails so that they can make an educated decision." We think there is a lot of confusion and m isunderstanding about this “amendment”. What the Ministry has proposed in no way changes any agreement the teachers have with government. It only serves to make the teachers fully aware of the law that, regardless of the agreement, applies to them. It appears that the Ministry is just making its teachers aware of the penalties under the law should any one of them take liberties w ith children in their care. So, teachers are not being asked to “make an educated decision” as to whether they should sign the circular or not. All the circular is doing is educating them as to the dangers they face if they break the l aw as they carry out their duties. S o really, it does not matter whether they sign or not. There has been sufficient publicity over this matter that all teachers are now fully aware of the penalties they face should they b reak the law while on the job. And this particular law, regardless of what contract they might have, will follow them even when they are off the job. And so what the Ministry has asked them t o sign has nothing to do with any pre-existing agreement, and needs no discussion as a d iscussion will not change the terms of their agreement or even that of the law. Because, according to allegations, some teachers are behaving as though they are u naware of the law, the Ministry has put t hem all on notice by asking them to sign the c ircular informing them of this section of the Penal Code. Whether Mrs Wilson or her teachers like i t or not what they have been asked to sign h as tacitly always been a part of their cont ract, as it is the law of the land, and whether they sign or not is of no interest to the law when it comes in search of an offender. I f teachers think they are protected by not s igning, then they should think again because i gnorance of the law is no defence. The controversial document, which was circulated to teachers on August 19, defines “inappropriate behaviour” as “including but not limited to sexual contact (including intercourse or buggery), exposure to porno graphic material, inappropriate suggestions and touching.” This unnecessary noise from the union cannot be used as a smokescreen to coveru p what appears if the allegations prove to be true a very serious situation in our schools. It’s bad enough that our schools are turn ing out D grade students, but molestation is not acceptable and must be punished. In the best interest of their students, teach ers should join hands with government in protecting them. Education: the price of dysfunctional schools LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Teachers’ duties now laid out For Rente premier choice for serious business”1,550 sq.ft.$5,425.00 p. month incl. CAM fees 1,056 sq.ft.$3,432.00 p. month incl. CAM feesContact Mr. Simon Chappell on 327 1575 or 477-7610Email: simon@cavesheights.comCaves Village Professional Turn Key Office Suites MARINE NAVIGATION COURSESTraining is necessary in order to voyage over Free First Class of the Terrestrial Navigation Course Seamanship and Celestial NavigationVisit www.bsmn.biz RUSSELL’S WAREHOUSE CLOSING SALE20’x30’Tent $2,500.00, 5 Ton Split A/C Unit $1,500, 15kw diesel Generator, Asst. Fixtures and Fittings,Rivet Rite Shelving, Gondolas, Glass Shelves, 2 & 4 Arm Display Racks, Gridwall, Slatwall, Slotted Standards, and Hardware. Men’s Coverall’s $5.00, S/S & L/S White Shirts $1-$5, Blank CD’s $0.50, Men’s Jeans sz. 48-50, $15, Blank ID Cards bx of 500 $45.00, 16” Stand Fans $20.00, And moreLocation: Madeira Shopping Center Behind Mystical Gym Entrance to Aquinas First left-First stairs on left. Hours: Tuesday Thursday 9:00am. to 5:00pm Contact: 465-8648 EDITOR, The Tribune. HELLO; I find it very strange that Mr Fitzgerald is up in arms about this government transparency, when he was very quiet about the Cable Beach deal that his party signed and the details of that deal was not known to the public. In my opinion Mr Fitzgerald lacks credibility. Why do you suppose that the leader of the PLP is quiet on the matter? CLIFFORD RAHMING Nassau, August, 2009. I find Mr Fitzgerald’s behaviour strange

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THEMinistryof Tourism is seeking to attract more religioust ourism by emphasising the country’s outstanding conference and meeting facilities. Ministry officials t ook the opportunity to pitch their message to pastors from the United States, Cuba and even places as far away asC hina, Africa, Italy and G reat Britain at a gathe ring of spiritual leaders in Nassau last m onth. The pastors were in town for the “KingdomL eadership Conference” at the Diplomat C entre under the direction of renowned Bahamian spirituall eader, Pastor Myles Munroe, president and senior pastor ofB ahamas Faith Ministries International. T he group of pastors, representing 10 nations, were a part of a delega t ion of about 185 conference participants. D uring their visit, the church leaders were given a tour of some ofN assau’s finest hotels and resorts before being treated to a reception at their host hotel, the WyndhamN assauResorton Cable Beach. Religious travel is an $18 billion global market. T he Bahamas, boasting the largest assort ment of vacation spots o f any tropical destination, has the potential t ake advantage of a larger share of this growing market,t ourism officials say. By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net T HE government intends to disclose exactly how much it spent on the MissU niverse pageant, according to Minis ter of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool-Wall ace. Following calls for the government to disclose exactly how much was invested in the event, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said the figures will be disclosed “in copi-o us detail”. This comes after opposition parliam entarians urged the government to reveal the full cost to the taxpayer of b ringing the pageant to the Bahamas. Senator Jerome Fitzgerald said: “A lot was spent and it showcased the country. But at the end of the day was it worth it?” H e added that the public needs to know “who really benefitted” from the i nvestment – whether it be Kerzner International, the NBC network, pageant o rganisers or the Bahamian people. Tourism officials credit the pageant – which aired on Sunday, August 23 on NBC live from the Atlantis resort on Paradise Island – with bringing unpreced ented exposure to the country. According to international reports, six million viewers in the United States watched the show while local tourism insiders estimate that nearly one billion people worldwide tuned in. M r Vanderpool-Wallace has previ ously stated that the Bahamas made an “extremely competitive bid” to the pageant organisers to host the event, winning the right to do so in the face ofs tiff competition from locations such as L as Vegas. When asked by The Tribune about the proper procedure in such a situation, Chamber of Commerce president K haalis Rolle said any time the government spends money on behalf of the public, the relevant details should be released. He said the pageant brought substan t ial benefits to the Bahamas and as far as he knows, there is no reason to believe t he government would want to avoid dis closing the costs. I think the government has to give an account,” he said. “They invested on behalf of the Bahamian people so I think it’s only proper to provide an account. I don't see any legitimate reason why not. I t is just the proper thing to do. “It was a good initiative and we got a l ot of visibility from it, so why would we not want to discuss what the investment w as?” Mr Rolle asked. Govt to disclose how much was invested in Miss Universe pageant THE Bahamas and all it has to offer could be showcased to millions of people around the world as the Ministry of Tourism embarks on a unique new attempt to advertise the country. Y esterday, former minister of t ourism Obie Wilchcombe hailed government’s decision to place a feature advertisement in the upcoming Mariah Carey album ‘Memoirs of an Imperfect Angel’ set to debut on August 15. At a cost of $35,000, Mr Wilchcombe said this advertisement, which r eportedly showcases the islands of t he Bahamas, is a creative idea and will undoubtedly attract a substantial return on the investment. “I applaud them, because in this new age of communication you have to think of new and creative ways of getting your message out. So the mini stry has to consider these things and we must always remember that the best way is through entertainment, and Mariah Carey remains a top recording artist and I don’t think any other country has done this. So again it is a great idea, and the return on the i nvestment can be significant,” Mr W ilchcombe remarked. With total career albums sales topping 200 million, Mariah Carey continues to set records in the recording industry with her last album, E=MC2 selling 463,000 copies in its first week. This album went on to sell 1.3 million copies in the United States, with a nother 380,000 sold collectively in J apan, the United Kingdom and Australia. According to Hitfix.com, Island Def Jam Music Group’s chairman Antonio Reid said that the idea is really very simple. “We sell millions of records, so you s hould advertise with us. My artists have substantial circulation – when you sell two million, five million, eight million, that’s a lot of eyeballs. Most magazines aren’t as successful as those records,” he said. According to entertainment e xperts, with ‘Memoirs of an Imperf ect Angel’ Mariah Carey is set to make history again, as the album will become the first to bundle a CD with lifestyle ads in a 34-page booklet. The booklet is rumoured to be a co-production with Elle Magazine that will feature advertisements for the Bahamas, Elizabeth Arden and L e Mtier De Beaut cosmetics, A ngel pink champagne and Carmen Steffens shoes from Brazil. According to Island Def Jam records, this new product integration deal is set to cover the costs of recording the album, which is said to have also been completed in the Bahamas a t a cost of more than $7 million. Bahamas to be showcased in new Mariah Carey album SUPERSTAR Mariah Carey T ourism Ministry makes global outreach to religious market MISS VENEZUELA Stefania Fernandez waves after being crowned Miss Universe 2009 at the Miss Universe beauty pageant in Nassau, Bahamas, Sunday, Aug. 23, 2009. A n d r e s L e i g h t o n / A P

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C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM B y LARRY SMITH WHEN National Geographic breaks its magazine cover story, television documentary and online coverage of the Bahamian blue holes expedition next summer, the impact is likely to surpass this year's Miss Universe spectacle in terms of promotional value for the Bahamas and at virtually no cost to the public treasury. In contrast, the Miss Universe pageant has cost the Bahamas big-time. Although the exact breakdown has not been forthcoming, those costs include a h osting fee (said to be $7 million) paid to the Miss Universe Organisation, a $2.9 million contribution by the Nassau/Paradise Island Promotion Board in cash, goods and services, plus government spending on road pavingand other fix-ups. There are, of course, undeniable benefits from the 13 pageant events that were held here last month. The Miss Universe telecast included some nine minutes of footage of the Bahamas that amounted to a prime time commercial aired in at least 85 countries. Almost six million Americans tuned in, and the Ministry of Tourism's website received a big traffic boost before, during and after the pageant. Officials say the long-term benefits will far outweigh the immediate direct returns, suchas the booking of 3,000 extra room nights during a slow period, or the injection of a couple million dollars in cash for local firms that worked on pageant events. "We had thousands of positive media reports on the Bahamas from around the world during the pageant," BHA executive director Frank Comito toldme. "You just can't buy that stuff. The cachet from this event will be parlayed into future busi ness, and especially group business at Atlantis. This puts us on a whole new level." But National Geographic will have a similar impact. The tv documentary (which is being coproduced with PBS' top-rated Nova science series) will reach over 270 million households in 166 countries. Some 12 million people will read the magazine article, and millions of students will be exposed to Bahamasrelated school materials. The Society's high-traffic website will feature linked coverage of the Bahamas expedition. So what's the point? Well, almost no-one in the Bahamas knows what the hell National Geographic is up to including the Ministry of Tourism and just about everyone I spoke to for t his article. They do, however, appreciate the significance when it is e xplained to them, as this email response from Tourism Minister Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace confirms: “When speaking about beautiful women, there is no better partner for The Bahamas than the recently held Miss Universe event. When speaking about the b ounty that nature has bestowed on The Bahamas, there is no better, more respected and credible global authority than National Geographic.” According to one tourism official we questioned, the chal lenge will be to capitalise on the "halo of interest" that National Geographic will produce. He said the Ministry would approach the Society "to see how we can assist with the promotion of the telecast and activity across other media platforms. For example, placing commercials in the telecast, linking from bahamas.com to the blue hole feature on their site, e-mail b lasts, etc.." And just what, you may ask, is National Geographic up to? Well. it is sponsoring a high-powered team of scientists, divers and filmmakers on an expedition around the islands aimed at unlocking the secrets of Bahamian blue holes. These geological f eatures have been described as one of the final frontiers for human exploration on the planet. It's the stuff that great documentaries are made of. "We pitched the project to National Geographic early this year with material gathered dur ing scouting trips last year,"e xpedition leader Dr Kenny Broad, an ecological anthropologist at the University of Miami, told me recently. "And we actually came out as the top project among those that received significant financing. When you include in-kind contributions, the total expedition funding isa bout $750,000." Those in-kind contributions included vehicle use, office space, dockage, hotel rooms and other forms of assistance from individuals, businesses, and groups on several islands. Among the Bahamian organisations that have helped are theA ndros Conservancy, Abaco Friends of the Environment, the Antiquities, Monuments & Museums Corporation, and the College of the Bahamas. "We did an eight-day social science survey of Andros in June with 20 students from the COB," Broad said. "Also participati ng were three Bahamian experts Jessica Minnis, a social scientist at COB; Michael Pateman, an archaeologist with the AMMC; and Nikita Shiel-Rolle, who is studying marine biology at the University of Miami." Broad has been coming to the Bahamas for years, conducti ng research on how people interact with the natural environment. He is a leader in the design of marine reserve networks, and has participated in and led scientific and film expeditions around the globe, includ ing the exploration of one of the world's deepest caves in Mexico. He was joined by other top researchers like Dr David Steadman, curator of birds at the Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville; Jennifer Lynn Macalady, an astrobiologist from Penn State University who studies the origin of life; and Dr Tom Iliffe, a marine biologist from Texas A & M in G alveston whose work has led to the discovery of more than 250 new species in submerged caves around the world. These scientists were accompanied by a top-drawer film crew led by Wes Skiles; veteran cave diver Brian Kakuk, who operates a Bahamian-owned advent ure diving and training facility in Abaco; and Nancy Albury, project coordinator for the Antiquities, Monuments and Museums Corporation. They lived aboard the 63-foot Key West-based research ves sel, Tiburon, criss-crossing the Bahamas over six weeks frome arly June to mid-August explor ing submerged caverns, conducting original research and producing spectacular videos and stills for print, broadcast, online and educational applications. The Bahamas expedition is one of 9,000 research projects that National Geographic hasf unded around the world. This puts Bahamian blue holes in the same league as polar expeditions by Robert Peary, excavation of the lost Inca city of Machu Picchu, Louis and Mary Leakey's research into early hominids in East Africa, and underwater explorations by Titanic discov e rer Robert Ballard. The expedition's roots go back to 2004 when Brian Kakuk discovered the complete skeleton of an extinct tortoise in a blue hole called Sawmill Sink in the pinelands of south-central Abaco. Later investigations in this undisturbed cave turned up a range of impressive fossils the prehistoric reptiles, birds, and mammals that once roamed Abaco. A few human bones were also found, and dated to about a thousand years ago. This is the earliest evidence so far for human occupation of the Bahamian archipelago. "We spent a lot of time in the islands last year on scouting trips from Mayaguana to Grand Bahama looking for the best sites that give the most bang for the buck visually speaking," Broad told me. "It costs a lot to get scientists in here, but when you can go in one hole and pull out a lot of stuff, that makes it more feasible." Both plant and animal fossils from Sawmill Sink are extremely well preserved, and they provide a unique opportunity to reconstruct ancient Bahamian environments. One of the most significant finds is an undisturbed 12,000-year-old owl roost where the remains of dozens of bird and mammal species have been identified. It is thought that these extinct owls may have given rise to the legend of the chick charnie in Andros. But Sawmill Sink is only one of many blue holes around the country that the expedition is exploring. In one cave they investigated a fully articulated crocodile skeleton and its trail of petrified turds the size of a human baby. On Andros they recovered Lucayan remains from the Sanctuary blue hole. From Dan's Cave on Abaco they retrieved a 350,000-yearold mineral formation called a speleothem, which can help scientists reconstruct past climate change. According to National Geographic producer Jill Heinerth, the expedition team is "recov ering Lucayan Indian remains, taking deep samples of Sahara dust and speleothems that will help illustrate former sea level stands, studying ancient paleoanimals in sinks and caves, and documenting biological resources. The show will tell the story of the significance of Bahamian Blue Holes and, we hope, will create a public interest in their protection." After the initial discoveries at Sawmill Sink a few years ago, responsibility for the research was assumed by the Antiquities, Monuments and Museums Corporation, with Marsh Harbour cave diver Nancy Albury appointed as the corporation's representative and project coordinator. She also took part in the Nat Geo expedition. "Nancy provided formidable help in both the filming and the science aspects," said Broad. "Dr Keith Tinker of the AMMC saw the potential in all this and it is primarily because of him that this expedition is taking place. Friends of the Environment has also been a major supporter in terms of giving time and resources." Friends provided logistical support to the National Geographic team, which used their facilities as a base while in Abaco. And according to Executive Director Kristin Williams, "We are working with AMMC, Bahamas Underground and the BNT to develop a proposal to protect a cave system in South Abaco that includes Sawmill Sink. "The groundbreaking discoveries made on Abaco have only scratched the surface in terms of our knowledge of the ecological and geographical his tory of The Bahamas," she said. "It is important that we preserve the condition and health of our blue holes and caves as this research continues, and for the future." In recognition of their sup port and participation, both Albury and Tinker have had newly-discovered species from Sawmill Sink named after them. An extinct tortoise has been dubbed alburi, while a living shrimp has been named tinkeri. Wes Skiles, the expedition's director of photography, is a top Florida-based outdoor filmmak er whose credits include a PBS broadcast on the Everglades restoration, a feature film by Sony Pictures called The Cave, several National Geographic documentaries, as well as natur al history shows for the History Channel, A&E, the BBC and the Discovery Channel. "We've done Andros, Grand Bahama, Eleuthera, Exuma and N ew Providence, but Abaco has the perfect everything for what we want ," Skiles told me. "Deep complex labyrinths, fresh water and salt water caves that blow your mind with unusual lifeforms, The blue holes of Abaco are magically diverse and multi-dimensional. There's no place on Earth like it." Skiles is a high school graduate who began exploring caves in the Bahamas in 1978 with the late Dennis Williams, an Apollo engineer stationed at NASA's downrange tracking station on Grand Bahama. It was Williams who explored the l ongest underwater cave system in the Bahamas the six-milelong Lucayan Cavern in the Lucayan National Park. But interestingly, that record is about to be broken by an underwater cave system on Abaco. According to Brian Kakuk, the expedition will soon be able to finish their exploration and connect Dan's Cave with Ralph's Cave, making this system some 30 per cent longer than the Lucayan Cavern. "I have worked everywhere in the Bahamas but Abaco is special," Kakuk said. "And all of this research is designed to give people the big picture why we should care about a hole in the ground. These blue holes are probably the last place on Earth you can physically go to explore. They are truly a final frontier, and our team is thoroughly documenting this frontier for the first time." Founded in 1888, the National Geographic Society is one of the world's largest nonprofit scientific and educational organizations, reaching more than 325 million people a month through its magazines, cable channel, books, websites and school publishing programmes. The Miss Universe Pageant in August was essentially a oneshot deal and the publicity it provided did not come without a hefty price tag. Our blue holes offer the other side of the Bahamian coin the natural environment. And National Geographic is paying for the privilege of giving us exposure. It's a lesson that any environmentalist would point to with glee. CORRECTION We inadvertantly used the wrong word in describing the diameter of the fuel pipeline from the dock to the Wilson City power plant on Abaco. It should have been 12 inches, not 12 feet. What do you think? Send comments to l arry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com Publicity on Bahamian blue holes will exceed Miss Universe exposure DEAN’S BLUE HOLE: the world’s deepest blue hole. Situated in Dean’s Long Island. T anya Mona Lisa

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Turks and Caicos that has existe d for many generations despite the accidents of history that sepa rated us constitutionally,” Mr Ingraham said. His statement comes after form er Premier Michael Misick, who visited the Bahamas lastw eek, said in an interview with The Tribune that there is supp ort from the people of Turks and Caicos for joining the Bahamas. The former premier, who resigned in March in the face of c orruption allegations, said that such an arrangement would bem utually beneficial, as the Turks and Caicos islands have attracte d huge investments, and Prov idenciales could serve as the “New Providence of the southern Bahamas.” Misick’s comments come in t he same month as the Turks and Caicos lost their right to s elf-rule for a period of two years after Britain suspended p arts of its constitution in response to findings of “systemic corruption” in the island’s government headed by Mr Misick. The former premier has denied a ny wrongdoing on his part. Prime Minister Ingraham said t hat like the rest of the Caribbean Community, the gov e rnment has been dismayed at the recent turn of events in the Turks and Caicos Islands that resulted in the suspension of their Constitution and the impo-s ition of direct rule by Great Britain. The people of The Bahamas and Turks and Caicos will be a ware that we have been in con sultation with CARICOM and have been a party to certain diplomatic initiatives designed to help bring about a resolution o f the current crisis,” the prime minister said. H owever, he said that at this time it must be a priority for all c oncerned for there to be a resolution of the current crisis that will restore normality and constitutional order to Turks and Caicos before moves are made to formalize an agreement between the two entities. When that is achieved, my colleagues and I would be happy t o discuss the further strengthening of our historic relationship in accordance with the will of the people of The Bahamas and the people of the Turks andC aicos Islands,” he said. There seems to be support for s uch a move on the opposition side as well. R esponding to Mr Misick’s comments on Monday, former minister of foreign affairs Fred Mitchell told The Tribune that while he could not say if the m ove is something that the PLP is in favour of, the joining of theB ahamas and the Turks and Caicos is a “fascinating idea w orth exploring.” Nonetheless, he noted that prior periods in which the two countries were unified in this way were not “entirely happy” but punctuated by disputes over whether Turks and Caicos got a dequate representation and its fair share of revenue from the N assau-based central government at the time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men and three juveniles were arraigned in the Magistrate’s Court yes terday on robbery charges. Vincent Artise, 20, of P inedale; Craig Taylor, 18, of Pinedale and two under-a ge boys, 16 and 17 years old, both of Pinedale, as w ell as a 15-year-old boy of Union Village appeared before Magistrate DerrenceRolle in Court 5, Bank Lane. They were charged w ith two counts of robbery. It is alleged that the a ccused on August 24, while at Claridge Road, robbed F ranchelo Martin of a Motorola cellular phone valued at $250. It is further alleged that on the same day the accused robbed La'Sheikh Major of $250 cash. T he accused pleaded not guilty to the charges and w ere granted bail in the sum of $2,500. The case was adjourned to November 18. Sergeant Godfrey Brennen was the prosecutor. A PUBLIC meeting for all those opposed to the government’snewly imposed ban on turtle harvesting has been called b y disgruntled fishermen. The meeting, which will reportedly culminate in the creation of the Commercial Fisherm en’s Assocoation, was a nnounced in an advertisement (see page five of today’s Tribune ). The ad reads: “Turtle fishing i n the Bahamas has been banned to satisfy the demands of a small group of agitators. What’s next? “Are you tired of having laws a nd policies passed that affect you and yet do not reflect your views?” All those who answer “yes” a re being asked to gather at Henry Bannister’s stall on the east side of Potter’s Cay at 1pm on Thursday. Meanwhile, Marilyn AyearstH artley, a supporter of the ban, said in a letter to The Tribune that many people were “overwhelmed with joy” at hearing the government’s approval to ban “killing of all sea turtles”. What a great message for children, the future generationa nd leaders of the Bahamas. “Someone is listening out t here! If you speak up, you will be heard! “This is truly an inspiration for young children who understand the responsibility of shar i ng planet Earth with all life.” Disgruntled fishermen call meeting over turtle ban His comments come after BUT President Belinda Wilson expressed her outrage at the government’s issuance of a c ircular asking teachers to acknowledge an amendment to their conditions of service brought about in the wake of rising reports of sex abuse of students by t eachers. The amendment which in fact applies to all employees of the Department of Education states that “not eacher/officer while employed with the Government of the Bahamas shall inter-a ct in an inappropriate manner with any student of a government school whether w ith or without the consent of that student parent or guardian.” Circulated on August 19, 2009, the document defines “inappropriate behavi our” as “including but not limited to sexual contact (including intercourse or buggery), exposure to pornographic material, inappropriate suggestions and t ouching.” Teachers were asked to sign the circular which will apply to all teachers regardless of whether they sign or not to acknowledge that they know that ite xists. Notwithstanding having sent out this advice to teachers, another allegation of sexual impropriety surfaced this week in the form of a claim that a C.C. Sweeting High school teacher drugged anda bused a male student. That matter, said to have stemmed from an August 27e ncounter, is now under active police investigation, while the teacher has been placed on leave by the Department of Education. H owever, Mrs Wilson “condemned” the move to alter the teacher’s conditions of service without consultation and advised BUT members not to sign the document. Y esterday Mr Bethel denied Mrs Wilson’s accusation that the Ministry of Education may have been inspired by “panic” over a spate of recent sex alleg ations against teachers to send out the circular without discussing it with the union. He said: “It’s not a question of pani cking it’s a question of doing what is absolutely necessary to ensure the prot ection and the safety and the welfare of all of the 56,000 children who are in our c are and in our custody. This is a result of a deliberate policy by the ministry. We feel that a very important signal to each and every person at our schools whether it’s teachers o r support staff know exactly what the law is and exactly what will happen to them if they transgress the boundaries that they ought to be aware of in terms of their relations with students,” saidM r Bethel. Mr Bethel added that the Ministry of Education obtained legal advice before anything was done and “based on that l egal advice we determined to act.” He said that his Ministry continues to “welcome all dialogue with the union” and “will continue to have a respectful d ialogue” but reasserted that there “are some matters that just are fundamental a nd it is on that basis that the ministry and the department of education took t his step.” A message left for Mrs Wilson was not returned up to press time. This comes as the Bahamas Conference of the Methodist C hurch yesterday followed the Catholic Archdiocese in supporting the proposed amendments. I nfluential groupings such as the Catholic Church and the Seventh-Day Adventist Church in the Bahamas, the Bahamas C risis Centre, along with individuals such as former Cabinet Minister Janet Bostwick, therapist Barrington Brennen and M inister of Social Development Loretta Butler-Turner have spoken out in favour of amending the Sexual Offences Act to outlaw marital rape. Many say it will provide much needed protection for spouses, who have traditionally been denied the same rights as others u nder the law as it presently stands, and who have been subject to this abuse without recourse. H owever, others have questioned the wisdom of the amendment, such as Attorney and former Bar Association President W ayne Munroe, Pastor Cedric Moss, Senator Allyson Maynard Gibson and many callers to talk shows nationwide. Some say allowing spouses the legal option of accusing their partners of rape within a marriage will promote a plethora of neg ative consequences, including the erosion of the institution ofm arriage, false accusations by angry spouses or even the refusal of wives to have sex with their husbands. S peaking on the proposed amendment as she tabled it in July, Minister of State for Social Development Loretta Butler T urner noted that many countries in the world have “updated” their laws to allow for husbands/wives to be held legally account a ble for raping their spouses. Meanwhile, The Bahamas has been censured by members of the United Nations Human Rights Council for not doing enough to protect women from sexual or domestic violence in this regard. Asked yesterday how soon Government might proceed t owards amending the Sexual Offences Act, Mr Ingraham responded: “I can listen as long as people want to talk about it.” “I have decided to announce my choice at convention because I do not wish to influence or interfere during this present phase of campaigning,” she said. While Mrs Pratt seeks to withhold this c andidate’s identify, a closer look at her statement and the many innuendoes littered throughout the text, it is believed her support rests firmly with PLP MP for Cat Island and Rum Cay Philip ‘Brave’ Davis. “Many well-intentioned and well-qualified PLPs have faithfully served this party behind the scenes,” Mrs Pratt hinted. “They have served in tragedy and triumphs; wins a nd losses and they never asked for anything more than the opportunity to serve. “And so as we head into convention I thought it was important to implore PLPs far and wide to look within for those who would lead. Look for those who choose service above self; for those who continue to unify and not divide; for those who demonstrate patience and do not pronounce entitlement a nd for the one who offers solutions to the p roblems of this country,” she said. As a long-time party supporter, Mr Davis has been seen in many circles as a strong contender for the deputy leader-s hip post. With Mrs Pratt’s support, a party insider yesterday claimed he may be unbeatable even against other top names such as Bain and Grant’s Town MP D r Bernard Nottage and West End and B imini MP Obie Wilchcombe. Mrs Pratt said she will be speaking more extensively on the issue at the convention, highlighting that she has spoken with all oft he potential candidates “with the exception of one.” “Suffice it to say my choice for the party’s next deputy leader and indeed next D eputy Prime Minister is someone who c an identify with my own personal story o f struggle and hard work,” she said. “There is something to be said of someone who has had to earn their way, but even more can be said of a person whoe xcels through hard work and looks back to give brother and sister a hand-up. That is a man. “As we look ahead, the PLP and indeed t his country will benefit from a deputy l eader/deputy Prime Minister who listens and respects the views of all even if he disagrees with the message; someone who cares about people and will fight for theu npopular or less glamorous cause if it means the poor and disenfranchised will receive justice; and one who may not speak with the tongues of angels, but has charity i n his heart.” a rrives, but thunderstorms and heavy rain showers are expected to hit the country. W hile the system has a well-defined surface centre, Mr Dean said that upper-level conditions are at this time not favourable towards m ore development. “We will first have to see what happens after the systems gets past those conditions,” he said. AccuWeather said the storm was able to develop thanks to the w arm sea surface temperatures between 83 and 86 degrees in that part of the Atlantic. And as it moves closer to the Bahamas the storm will encounter even warmer waters. At press time last night the centre of the storm was located a round 390 miles east of the northern Leeward Islands. The system was moving in a west-northwest direction at a speed of 9mph. Tropical Storm Erika is the fifth named storm of the 2009 Atlantic hurricane season. Two men and three minors on robbery charges F ROM page one Cynthia Pratt has chosen replacement candidate CYNTHIA PRATT employed. Mr Foulkes said: “The hotel’s prospects going into Christmas are very low, much lower than their expectations. The Department of Labour ise nsuring that the employees receive their full benefits and any other benefits that are owed to them. “We as a government are doing all we can to ease the burden on all unemployed persons including the 80 at Sandals through the unem ployment scheme, and all of them would qualify for the benefit. “Additionally we are considering reopening the nation al training programme for those 80 persons to join if they wish to participate.” Attempts to reach Sandals for comment on the lay offs were unsuccessful. This latest round of job cuts is yet another grim reminder of the state of the local econ omy which continues to suffer as a result the recession in the United States. Yesterday, eight managers and two line staff at Atlantis were let go from the hotel’s food and beverage division and its reservation depart ments. However the losses were not only felt in the Bahamas, as the hotel also laid-off four people in its Fort Lauderdale office. Earlier this year, resort executives pointed to the cancellation of group trips, such as those traditionally taken by staff from North American corporations, as one of the reasons hitting occupancy lev els at Atlantis. As the resort goes into a typically slow period for hotels (September/October pancy levels were forecast to drop to as low as 30 per cent within weeks, executives said. FROM page one Minister of Education FROM page one PM ‘happy for talks’ with Turks & Caicos FROM page one T r opical Storm Erika Sandals FROM page one PM ‘listening’ to all voices FROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A WATER BLOTTING MACHINE attempts to dry the pitch before England's Twenty20 International cricket match against Australia is abandoned due to rain at Old Trafford cricket ground Manchester, England, Tuesday Sept. 1, 2009. A P P h o t o / J o n S u p e r A P P h o t o / J o n S u p e r AUSTRALIAN PLAYERS including their captain Michael Clarke, right, are seen on the pitch as their team's Twenty20 International cricket match against England is abandoned due to rain at Old Trafford cricket ground Manchester, England, Tuesday Sept. 1, 2009. RAINFORCESENGLAND-AUSTRALIA CRICKETMATCHTOBEABANDONED Fans at Old Trafford were again left disappointed as the second of England's Twenty20 internationals against Australia was washed out without a ball being bowled. After Sunday's match was abandoned seven balls into the England reply, Tuesday's day/night clash went the same way at 8pm local time after officials ruled that the bowlers' run-ups were waterlogged. It is a frustrating way for the series to finish and leaves both sides short of Twenty20 practise ahead of next April's World Twenty20 in the West Indies. The one-day leg of the tour continues with seven one-day internationals, the first of which takes place at The Oval on Friday LONDON Freddy Adu’s career faltered again with a low-key loan to Belenenses, and Ajax captured a ball-juggling Brazilian as the transfer window closed on Tuesday. There were no signs of any big stars moving for huge, lastd itch transfers fees like a year ago. Instead, the market was dominated by loan deals or lesser-known players moving for relatively small fees. Adu made headlines at 10, and was considered a rising star at 13. Although a regular in the U.S national team, the 20-year-old Adu has struggled to make ani mpact at club level, despite a move to Benfica, once one of European soccer’s strongest teams. He scored five goals in 21 appearances and Benfica loaned h im to AS Monaco last season. Now he’s off to Belenenses, Lisbon’s third team after B enfica and Sporting, which barely avoided relegation last season. Striker Kerlon’s move from Inter Milan to Ajax was one o f the eye-catching loans. The 21-year-old Brazilian is known as “the seal” because of his ability to run past defenders while juggling the ball on his head. Ajax fans may have to wait to see his skills, how ever, while he proves his fitness after serious ankle and knee injuries. “I am sure he can be a valuable addition,” said Ajax coach Martin Jol. Benfica also loaned midfielder Hassan Yebda to Portsmouth which had already announced the signing of Tal Ben Haim from Manchester City and was talking to another defender, Nicky Shorey, about a move from Aston Villa. The lack of major transfer activity contrasted from last year ago when Manchester City splashed out $58 million on Real Madrid star Robinho, Tottenham gave Dimitar Berba tov to Manchester United for $55 million and acquired Roman Pavlyuchenko from Moscow Spartak for $25 million. ARSENAL'S EDUARDO is seen on the substitute bench before the English Premier League soccer match against Manchester United at Old Trafford Stadium, Manchester, England, Saturday Aug. 29, 2009. NYON, Switzerland A rsenal striker Eduardo da Silva has been banned for two Champions League matches for d iving to earn a penalty kick in a qualifying match against Celtic. European soccer’s governing body made the r uling Tuesday. Its disciplinary panel said the Brazilian-born Croatia forward deceived the refe ree. Eduardo was challenged on the play by Celtic goalkeeper Artur Boruc and appeared to deliberately throw himself to the ground. E duardo made the penalty kick and Arsenal won 3-1 last Wednesday, advancing to the group stage. He will miss Arsenal’s Group H matches at Standard Liege on Sept. 16 and at home to Olympiakos on Sept. 29. A rsenal can appeal within three days. EDUARDO BARRED FOR 2 CHAMPIONS LEAGUE GAMES Adu loaned again among low-key transfers WASHINGTON ASSOCIATED PRESS D .C. United have screamed i t loud and clear, on the Internet and in full-page newspaper ads: “WE WIN TROPHIES.” T he Seattle Sounders hear screams as well, echoing from the 30,000 or so people who come to every home game: W e have lots of fans. So it is that United and the Sounders are playing Wednesday at RFK Stadium i n the championship of the U.S. Open Cup, a 95-year-old single-elimination tournament that is open to amateur and professional teams across thec ountry. The event has some charm but is usually ignored outside the hardcore soccer community. A little bit of controversy is giving the game a needed boost. Both teams wanted to host t he final. Four-time MLS Cup champions United had tradi-t ion on their side; the firstyear expansion team S ounders could offer a big turnout. When U.S. Soccer chose United, Seattle general manager Adrian Hanauer cried foul, saying he was frustrated and somewhat skeptical of the process.” Our fans deserve some answers,” Hanauer said. And, by the way, U.S. Soccer has been trying to raise the p rofile of the U.S. Open Cup. A game in front of 10,000 fans at RFK, I don’t believe, is going to raise the profile as much as a game in front of a s old-out Qwest Field.” United president Kevin P ayne says nothing was underhanded. He said Unite d “bid aggressively” for the game, in part because the team has been playing extra road games as part of the international CONCACAF C hampions League. While U.S. Soccer won’t say whyo ne bid is favored over another, Payne noted that RFK has g rass, instead of Qwest Field - ’s artificial surface, and that Seattle could only host the game in the afternoon because of scheduling issues. We thought it was very important strategically to playa t home in this final,” Payne said. Of course, it would be e mbarrassing to have such a fuss over the home field and then have a tiny crowd show up, so United launched into aggressive marketing mode. The “WE WIN TROPHIES” ads feature the 12 national and international titles won by the club: four MLS Cups, two U.S. Open Cups, four MLS Supporters’ Shields (for best regular season record), one CONCACAF Champions Cup and one InterAmerican Cup. In addition, Unit ed are charging 1996 prices for the game, with tickets starting at $12 and hot dogs and beers at $2. Payne said he’s expecting 15,000-20,000, perhaps double the number that came to RFK to watch United win last year’s final. H ome-field squabble adds spice toO pen Cup final US soccer B y DOUG FERGUSON A P Golf Writer NORTON, Mass. J a ck Nicklaus has said all along he would never become a ceremonial player, and just because he will be on the first tee at Augusta National next April doesn’t change that. N icklaus agreed to join Arnold Palmer as hono rary not ceremonial starters at the Masters. The difference between those words only becomes blurred if they decide to hit more than the opening tee shot. N icklaus already was reaching ceremonial sta tus in 2005 when he played his last Masters with o ut telling anyone. Then, he played his final major in the British Open at St. Andrews with the w orld watching, some weeping. That spring, he was asked if it bothered him that fans only wanted to see him play. “No, I think that’s very nice,” he said. “I’d like to have them see me, the real Jack Nickl aus. I will put as much effort through as I can to do that. That’s what I’ve always done, all myl ife. I just know that there’s a certain point in time and I’m sure that time is there that I can’t d o that, give them what I think they really paid to see.” What did they come to see? The winner of 18 majors, the benchmark of greatness in golf? Or someone who can barely r each some of the fairways? The Golden Bear or the Olden Bear? I don’t think he ever wants to be looked at like a museum piece,” Brad Faxon said Tuesd ay. Palmer, a four-time champion who turns 80 next week, stopped playing the Masters in 2004 and agreed to become the honorary starter in 2007. Nicklaus said that wasn’t for him, but changed his mind at Palmer’s invitation. He is so deserving of this honor, and thus I felt it was his time, not mine,” Nicklaus said. “Recent l y, I was invited by both Augusta National and Arnold to join him on the first tee, and because he enthusiastically supported the invitation, it became an easy decision for me.” Don’t be surprised to see Gary Player, the other member of the “Big Three,” join them over the next few years. Now would seem to be a good time to restore some tradition at the Masters, a major already loaded with it. The practice of an honorary starter began in 1963, although it goes back even further. Fred McLeod (1908 U.S. Open son (1920 PGA Championship, 1921 British Open) were both in their 70s when they were assigned the first tee time in 1954 and “led the field” during the first round. Nine years later, they became the inaugural h onorary starters. After they died McLeod in 1976, Hutchison in 1977 the honorary starter was revived in 1981 with Gene Sarazen, Byron Nelson and Sam Snead. They often played the front nine, giving fans a glimpse of living history.N o one took it too seriously, except for one time when Ken Venturi was asked to fill in for Nelsoni n 1983. “We played nine holes, me and Gene Sarazen,” Venturi once said. “That might have b een the best I played. I had four birdies and a bogey, and I told Gene, ’Let’s keep going. I might be leading the tournament.’ And Gene said, ’Are you crazy? We’re going for lunch.”’ Before long, the honorary starters were skip p ing holes, and it wasn’t much longer that they hit only the opening tee shot. S arazen once considered not even hitting the tee shot, worried that his game was not in shape. T hat’s when the late Masters chairman Hord Hardin said to him, “Gene, they don’t want to see you play, they just want to see if you’re still alive.” What would be so wrong with Nicklaus and P almer chasing after their tee shot and going at it for nine holes, or even all 18? It’s not out of the realm of possibility,” said Zach Johnson, a Masters champion who knows t hat nothing it out of any realm when it comes to Augusta National. “As a fan of the game, as a fan of Jack, as a player ... he’s the best who ever played. You want to see him play.” Scott Verplank played the first two rounds w ith Nicklaus in 1986, the year he went on to capture his sixth green jacket. He wouldn’t mind s eeing Nicklaus and Palmer hit more than one shot, either. “But only if they wanted to,” he s aid. “It needs to be their idea. And they would get to play the member tees.” That isn’t the Nicklaus way, though. It never has been. The only thing he enjoyed more than competing in majors was preparing for them. N icklaus never played a lot of recreational golf, and he still doesn’t. His last real competition e ven though it was fake was a Skins game against Tiger Woods, Kenny Perry and StewartC ink at the Memorial this year. Nicklaus felt an adrenaline rush that day, even though he could b arely reach three fairways. Woods won on the f inal hole with a chip-in from 25 yards. It was his first time playing with Nicklaus in n ine years, although one thing didn’t change. “Anyone who has ever played at the highest l evel always wants to play at the highest level,” Woods said. Would the Masters turn into a carnival by having Nicklaus and Palmer play a round that doesn’t count? No. It already is the only major with a Par 3 Tournament on Wednesday, and the only major with an honorary starter. To have Nicklaus join Palmer on the first tee is an honor, one he earned. Anything more would be a ceremony, the one thing he disdains. Jack at the Masters, but only for 1 hole IN THIS APRIL 8 , 2009, file photo, former Masters' champions Jack Nicklaus, left, and Arnold Palmer wait while playing the Par 3 contest before the Masters golf tournament at the Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Ga. Nicklaus said he would never be a ceremonial player, and just because he'll be on the first tee with Arnold Palmer at Augusta National next April doesn't change that. Nicklaus and Arnold Palmer will be honorary starters, not ceremonial ones. But if they decide to hit more than a tee shot, the lines get blurred. A P P h o t o / D a v i d J . P h i l l i p , F i l e ) BRITISH SOCCER

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By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net WHEN hardly anybody expected the women’s 4 x 100 metre relay team to securea medal at the IAAF’s 12th World Championships in Athletics, coach George Cleare said he knew that they had the potential to do it. “All in all, I have to give a lot of credit to Debbie (Ferguson-McKenzie dra (Sturrup an assistant team on the 24-member team in Berlin, Germany last month. “Although this was my first major international meet working with them, they were very open to our new ideas and what we were trying to do and they really worked, even sacrificing their rest time from their individual events to help the relay team get ready.” Cleare commented both Sturrup, who ran a brilliant second leg and Ferguson-McKenzie, who anchored the team to the silver medal behind the United States. He said with the two veterans leading the way, it made it quite easy to insert Auburn-bound Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson and quarter-miler Christine Amertil in the line-up on pop off and third leg r espectively. They went beyond what we expected of them and I think the team was of one unit and their time (42.29 seconds the team we had in 2000 when they ran 41.92, showed how well they worked together,” Cleare said. “We knew that we didn’t have the foot speed as the team in 2000, but we ran a very decent time because we were able to go out there and execute with the baton the way they should have.” When asked why the decision was made not to use any of the other sprinters Timicka Clarke or Jerniece Saunders Cleare said it was evident that they wanted to go with what they felt was the right combination and it turned out to be the correct one. “We got to the point that this was the first time that what we though was the A team would run together andI decided that we couldn’t a medal unless we got to the final and then we could correct the mistakes,” he said. “So had we had the luxury of having a meet to run in just before the championships, we would have probably ran a few more com binations. :But only having two shots at it, the first goal was to make sure we got into the final and the next thing was to correct any mistakes so that we could run faster in the final.” Cleare said while the Bahamas came up with two medals a bronze from FergusonMcKenzie in the 200 to along with the silver by the relay team they could have easily had a total of five to their ledger. But he noted that it was quite disap pointing that Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands was just barely beaten out in the men’s triple jump, Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown ended up fifth in the men’s 400 and the men’s 4 x 400 relay team got disqualified. Unf or tunate “It’s unfortunate that Leevan and Chris came so close to winning a medal and they didn’t,” Cleare said. “As for the relay team, they made a mis take that I don’t think they will make again. But it happened on the biggest stage and it was so unfortunate. “But the team was in a position to do a whole lot better than it did, but we have to start redeveloping our athletes to be able to compete with the rest of the world.” Not taking anything away from Sturrup, who at age 37, and Ferguson-McKenzie, 33, were two of the oldest female sprinters com peting in the meet, but Cleare said more emphasis will have to be placed on the younger athletes. He noted how Trinidad & Tobago had a 19-year-old, who placed fourth in the men’s 400 hurdles; Grenada had a 17-year-old who ran 45 after winning every junior event and Jamaica had a core of 21-23 sprinters and hurdlers. “We tried to keep the standard where we go to America and allow them to keep up our standard and that is not working for us because by the time our athletes are fin ished with college, they are burned out,” Cleare said. “But we’ve seen how the Jamaicans are keeping their athletes at home and they are now beating the Americans and so we as Bahamians have to look within ourselves to see how we can develop the same type of programmes that the other Caribbean coun tries have developed.” The first, however, Cleare said the Bahamas must close the generation gap between Sturrup and Ferguson-McKenzie and Sheniqua Ferguson, the next top sprint er. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM After being a reserve at last year’s IAAF World Championships in Athletics, Ramon Miller has emerged as a contender for the men’s 400m at the 12th edition of the event in Berlin, Germany. This year, I’m a totally different guy,” said 22-yearold Miller, the reigning NAIA champion from Dickinson State, who was runnerup to Chris “Bay” Brown at the BAAA Nationals in June. “This year, I’m definitely looking forward to going out there and putting my best performance forth and hopefully with the help of God, I will be able to do very well.” Miller will join Brown as two of the three representatives for the Bahamas in the men’s 400 when the preliminaries are held on August 18w ith the semifinal on August 19 and the final August 21. “I’m not concerned one bit. I’m just going to go out there and run my race,” said Miller, when asked if he’s concerned about the field of competitors expected in Berlin, many of whom have ran much faster times thanh e has. “Times really don’t matter t o me. This is track and field. Anything could happen.” The other competitor will come from either newcomer Latoy Williams, last year’s NCAA champion Andretti Bain or Michael Mathieu. A decision is to be made by the coaching staff at the training camp leading up to the cham-p ionships. The staff, inclusive of Tyrone Burrows, George Cleare and Frank “Pancho” Rahming, will also make a determination on who will get to run in the relay. Miller, Brown, Williams, Bain and Mathieu will be joined by Avard Moncur and Nathaniel McKinney for thet eam selection. “I feel good about the relay team. I know the guys are ready to run and hopefully if we all can stay healthy, we can go out therea nd run very well,” said Miller, who ran in the pre-l iminaries of the relay team that went on to win the silver medal at last year’s Olympic Games in Beijing, China. One of those competitors who is hoping to also make an impact on the team is McKinney. Back in the mix after sitting out the past two trips, McKinney has qualifiedf or the 200. His preliminaries and quar t er-final is set for August 18. If he qualifies, the semifinal will take place August 19 with the final to be staged on August 20. “Unfortunately, injuries will do it for you, but if you focus on what’s there, it’s nota matter of whether you run fast or slow, you just have to make your time,” McKinney said. “It’s like a job, so I just have to stay focused. Thank God for people like my Grammy, who has been praying for me. I’m trying to stay focused.” McKinney, 27, said he’s n ot going to talk too much about running a leg on the relay team. He noted that he will “let my performance speak for itself.” Also making a return to one of the major international meets since missing the last five years is Osbourne Moxey, who will compete in the qualifying round of them en’s long jump on August 20 with the final set for August 22. “My expectations really is just to compete hard and go through the rounds,” he said. “My ultimate goal is to make it to the final and everything else will speak for itself. When asked if there’s anyt hing he’s looking forward to, Moxey quickly quipped: “I j ust want to go there and compete well.” Making his debut at the Team Bahamas off to training camp C M Y K C M Y K THURSDAY, AUGUST 6, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 PAGE 12 International sports newsBAAA couldn’t h ave selected a better team for IAAF World Championships...See page 13 By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas opened competition with an historic win in the first tournament of its kind hosted locally and sanctioned by cricket’s international governing body. I n its opening match of the International Cricket Council (ICC cricket tournament, the Bahamas won by eight wickets over the Cayman Islands. The Cayman Islands batted first and scored a total of 81 runs all out, with their top scorer netting 13 runs. In their turn at bat, the Bahamas scored 82 runs for the loss of one wicket to taket he match. Turan “Geronimo” Brown was the top scorer with 31 runs, not out, while Ashmeid Allie added 26 runs not out. The Bahamas’ next match will be Friday against Belize at Haynes Oval. The three team tournament which includes Belize, Cayman Islands and the host country Bahamas, is running August 5-10. All matches will be played at the Haynes Oval and will be of 30 overs in duration. Bahamas Cricket Association representative Paul Thompson, said this is the first time the Bahamas Cricket Association will be hosting such an event and they have pledged that it will be hosted properly. “It is so important for the Bahamas and for the local cricket community to have a tournament of this stature to be hosted here in the Bahamas. It is something that has not been really receiving much attention but it is a monumental step for the game and our regional status,” he said.An historic win for the Bahamas in cricket By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net HEAD coach Tyrone Burrows said the hardest part for the Bahamas Association of AthleticA ssociations was trying to finalize the team going to the 12th IAAF W orld Championships in Athletics. The 24-member team left yesterday from New Providence and throughout the United States for a training camp that will be staged in Berlin, Germany, over the next few days before the championships officially get underway on August 15. “The main thing right now is to p ull everyone together at a reasonable time, that is why the training camp is so important,” Burrows said. “We have two 16 year olds who have never competed at this level and we have the re-emergence of the 4 x 100, so we need those girls to come together and gel together so that they can get the stick around.” W hile he doesn’t have any specific expectations, Burrows said he’s confident that the Bahamas has an excellent chance of doing very well, especially with veteran sprinters Chandra Sturrup and Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie leading the way. But BAAA president Curt Hollingsworth said the only thing that had them concerned was the amount of injuries that the male quarter-milers experienced over the last few weeks. “We feel pretty good now that we know that those athletes we were looking at for the 4 x 4, are looking very well right now,” he said. “So I’m excited about our chances in Berlin.” Hollingsworth said he doesn’t want to sound over ambitious, but he certainly believes that the team will perform exceptionally well at the championships. “We have two veteran female sprinters who are performing well and we also have Chris Brown running very well in the 400,” he said. “But we also have three relays, so we should be able to medal in at least one, if not two of them.” With two youngsters joining the team, Katrina Seymour and Rashad Brown, Hollingsworth said once they can get their feet wet, they should be in a better position to help the team at the Olympics in 2012. George Cleare, one of the assistant coaches, said with Sturrup and Ferguson-McKenzie leading the women’s squad and Chris Brown and Leevan Sands heading the men’s squad, the Bahamas will be well represented. “We have a few younger ones coming in like Sheniqua, Jernice and Latoy, so they should be able to learn a lot from the seniors when they go to the camp to see how they function at this level,” he said. According to Cleare, the team is loaded with talent, but everybody will have to step up and carry their load, especially Sturrup and Ferguson-McKenzie. “They will have to bring their A game. If they can do that and conserve some energy, they should be able to make it through to the final,” he said. “We had some misfortunes with the men’s 400 runners, but they have worked that out and they seemed to be back on track. So if they can do what they have been doing all year, we should be able to win a couple of medals.”Coaches confident 24-member team will perform well TYRONE BURROWSCURT HOLLINGSWORTHGEORGE CLEARE RALPH McKINNEY FRANK RAHMING RAMON MILLER has emerged as a contender for the men’s 400m...‘This year, I’m a totally different guy...’Athletes share thoughts on IAAF World Championships in BerlinF e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f fS EEpage14e had some misfortunes with the men’s 400 runners, but they have worked that out and they seemed to be back on track. So if they can do what they have been doing all year, we should be able to win a couple of medals.” George Cleare By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net AFTER successfully passing his IAAF Lecturer’s Course last year, coach George Cleare is now being afforded the opportunity to share his expertise throughout the region. On Saturday, Cleare will be heading to St. Kitts & Nevis to lead in a Lecturer’s Course for primary school physical education teachers in a bid to have as many of them become certified IAAF level one coaches. “Their main goal is to get that type of coaching on the island from the primary school level to the high school level so that they can have the knowledge to start developing their athletes,” said Cleare, who is a level four coach and a level one lecturer. The course is similar to these held throughout the region and there are plans for one to be held in the Bahamas either by the end of the year, or early in 2010. “Most of the physical education teachers are not certified or they don’t have the knowledge that is required today to coach track and field,” Cleare said. Changing “The information is changing every day and so we need to start looking at ways of making sure that we are not left too far behind.” The course in St. Kitts is the last of a two-part series. Cleare said he actually missed the first one having had to travel with the national team to the IAAF’s 12th World Championships in Athletics in Berlin, Germany last month. “They are actually educating their physical education teachers now so that they can start enhancing their potential so that they can have better athletes in the future,” Cleare said. During the 10-day course, Cleare will be lecturing on theory and understanding the differences of young athletes. He will be providing pointers on every aspect of track and field. At the end of session, every candidate will sit an examination that will be marked by Cleare and the local lecturer from St. Kitts & Nevis, who will be sharing in the course. “It’s just a course where they have to show their ability to understand theory, the methodology behind training and the ability to work on the outside where they can instruct and demonstrate their ability in all disciplines in track and field. Cleare, who is also a Pan American certified elite coach, is due to return home on September 16. Denied the opportunity to sit the level five coaching course when David Charlton and Fritz Grant traveled to Mexico a few years ago, Cleare said he’s delighted to have been afforded the opportunity to sit the lecturer’s course. N ow he can pass on his expertise to other coaches, especially around the Caribbean. SPREADINGTHEWORD SILVER LADIES: The women’s 4 x 100 metre relay team which won silver in Berlin. From left are Chandra Sturrup, Christine Amertil, Sheniqua Ferguson and Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie. Coach George Cleare has chance to share his expertise throughout the region GEORGE CLEARE: Going to St. Kitts & Nevis to lead in a Lecturer’s Course ‘I knew team had potential to win medal’ “They went beyond what we expected of them and I think the team was of one unit and their time (42.29 seconds compared to the team we had in 2000 when they ran 41.92, showed how well they worked together Copper, Amani Toomer, Bobby Engram. He started each of the team's three preseason games and recorded three catches for 19 yards in the Chiefs' rebuilding offensive attack. Despite Darling's injury, the Chiefs released the 13 year veteran Toomer. Bradley is expected to fill in for Darling to start the team's final preseason game, Thursday, September 3rd against the St. Louis Rams. The injury bug hit the Chiefs organization in a major way against the Seawhawks on their home field. Not only did the team lose Darling, but lost marquee free agent quarterback Matt Cassel to a knee injury which reports have indicated may be a strained MCL according to ProFootballTalk.com. The Chiefs remain tight lipped on a schedule for his return. Second year vet and starting cornerback Brandon Flowers was also forced to leave the field with a shoulder injury. Flowers had been playing well and caught an interception which he returned for a touchdown. Darling tore his ACL running a typical out pattern, late in the third quarter, virtually without contact and came up hobbling. The fifth year vet was expected to come into his own this year, and had the confidence of the new coaching staff behind him, evident in his three consecutive postseason starts. After playing sparingly in his rookie and sophomore seasons with the Baltimore Ravens, Darling's play in his third year sparked int erst from franchises around the league. He caught 18 passes for 326 yards, including a nationally televised breakout performance against the Cleveland Browns when he recorded a career high four receptions for 107 yards and one touchdown. FROM page 11 Darling’s season hit by injury you have to knock out your opponent or put up a very good performance in order to win. Today, Knowles will be the last to carry the Bahamian flag when he compete in his first round bout in the lightweight or 60 kiloclass against Joseph Njogu from Kenya. “My hometown boy went down, so I can’t let my country down too,” said Knowles as he prepared for his battle. “I’m going to go in there with my hopes up and I know I’m going to come out on top. “That’s what I’m going to do. I’m going to do this one for the people.” Best With this being the World Championships, Knowles said that the tournament has the best amateur boxers competing, which mean that every time out, you have to bring your A game. “From what I’ve seen today, you got to be clean and perfect if you want to win,” he insisted. “I think I’m ready to go out there and perform. I really want to do very well.” Coach Seymour agreed that Knowles should be in a much better frame of mind to compete today, having watched the first day of action yesterday. “We’re going in with a mind to win,” Seymour stressed. “We’re not taking anybody lightly in this championships. We have already lost one boxer, but we expect to come out with at least one or two victories from Valentino.” Carl Hield ‘goes back to drawing board’ after loss FROM page 11 The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL the most important of four major ligaments located in the knee, providing most of its stability. Knee movements that often place a high level of strain on the ligament can cause an ACL injury and it is gen erally common among athletes. Tiger Woods famously completed the 2008 U.S Open with a torn ACL, and Patriots perennial Pro-Bowl quar terback, Tom Brady, was sidelined for the entire 2008 season when he tore his ACL in the opening week of the season against the Chiefs. THE INJUR Y

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C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE Arsenal’s Eduardo barred for CL two games TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM KANSAS CITY CHIEFS wide receiver Devard Darling (81 against the Seattle Seahawks in Kansas City, Mo., Saturday, Aug. 29, 2009. By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter renaldodorsett@yahoo.com A promising season for the country’s most high profile gridiron star ended abruptly in his last preseason outing, however, the fifth year receiver has reason to feel confident in his immediate future with his organization Kansas City Chiefs wide receiver Devard Darling was officially diagnosed with a torn Anterior Cruciate Liga ment, suffered in the third quarter of Friday’s preseason con t est against the Seattle Seahawks, and was placed on the injured reserve list late yesterday afternoon. Darling was expected to challenge for a starting spot o pposite the team's main reciving target, Dwayne Bowe, with a mix of players that included Ashley Lelie, Terrance Darling’s season hit by injury A P P h o t o / R e e d H o f f m a n n K ANSAS C ITY C HIEFSWIDERECEIVERDIAGNOSEDWITHATORN A NTERIOR C RUCIATE L IGAMENT SEE page ten By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net CARL Hield’s third appearance at the AIBA World Boxing Championships didn’t last as long as he had anticipated. But Valentino Knowles promised that his second appearance won’t be as short. Yesterday in the first round of the week-long championships in Milan, Italy, Hield dropped a 9-3 decision to hometown boy, Dario Vangeli, to be eliminated from the lightweight or 64 kiloclass. “It was a fight to the end, but I just wasn’t scoring no points,” said a somewhat disappointed Hield. “It was a good performance. It was better than the other two times.” Hield said he will just have to go back to the drawing board and start preparing for another year. Coach Andre Seymour said despite the loss, Hield performed very well. “Carl performed well. I think he should have gotten more than the three points in the people hometown,” Seymour said. “But he fought extremely well.” Looking back at his performance, Seymour said the Ital ians had a chance to really watch all of the boxers and so they had the upperhand on all of the competitors they faced. “Once they realized that they had Carl, I think they studied the film they had on him,” Seymour said. “So they were really able to counter his style once the draw came out. That’s how it is with tech nology.” The Bahamian team spent three weeks in a training camp in Rome prior to the start of the championships. Seymour, a two-time Olympic boxer, said that it’s obvious that fighting against a hometown competitor, either Carl Hield ‘goes back to drawing board’ after loss AIBA WORLD BOXING CHAMPIONSHIPS CARL HIELD: He ‘performed well’ despite loss. SEE page ten Today Valentino Knowles carries Bahamian flag

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NIB prosecuting 100 firms monthly on nonpayment C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.27 $4.27 $4.05 * Liquidator of firm with $25m trading hole says release process ‘arduous and time consuming to say the least’ * More than 100 smaller Caledonia clients still awaiting asset return, although some concerned at 8% asset retention * Real Estate Association turns down licence application by Caledonia’ s former head trader By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor EIGHTY clients of a for mer Bahamian broker/dealer that collapsed after suffering a $25 million trading loss have had 90 per cent of their assets returned to them, the compa ny’s liquidator has confirmed, although more than 100 others with small accounts are still outstanding in a process that has been described as “arduous and time consuming to say the least”. A July 29, 2009, update sent to Caledonia Corporate Man 90% asset return for 80 clients of collapsed broker By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A Bahamian business has seen $100,000 worth of equipment and electrical components fried by power surges and spikes, its chief executive arguing that by switching to generator usage its electricity costs have fallen to 35 per cent of what they were previously. Steve Howes, chief execu tive of Fenestration and Glass Services, in an August 17, 2009, letter to Grand Bahama Power Company’s president and chief executive, E. O. Ferrell, said the monopoly power producer’s prices - “six times (and more developed countries made it “impossible to run a profitable manufacturing business” on Grand Bahama. Arguing that this undermined Freeport’s attractiveness as a manufacturing/industrial base, and impeded its world competitiveness, Mr Howes said the poor, unreliable electrical supply provided Firm loses $100,000 equipment to surges By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE National Insurance Board (NIB more than 100 companies and self-employed persons per month for their alleged fail ure to pay due contribution, Tribune Business was told yesterday, the crackdown being credited with improving the social security programme’s 2009 revenues and profitability. Algernon Cargill, NIB’s director, said it will have a more profitable year than expected due to the shake down and prosecution of companies more than 100 cases per month in New Prov idence and the Family Islands combined. “The projections are exceeding our business plan objective for the year in terms of collections,” said Mr Cargill. S ome high profile cases i nvolving alleged non-payment of NIB contributions are set to reappear in court on September 15, including Jones Communications, Solomon’s Mines, Bertha's Ribs, Global United and More 94 FM. M r Cargill said the team assembled specifically to trace delinquent employers and self-employed persons had done an excellent job. He said the team focused on those employers who allegedly would deduct contributions from their employees but not turn the payments over to NIB, adding that some employers had become more crafty in how they defrauded the government/NIB. “There are some pretty cre ative employers in the marketplace,” said Mr Cargill. “They would not produce accurate statements, but there are many ways to find out (about the inaccuracies However, he said that due to the depressed economy, NIB has been working with companies in order to help them fulfill their payment By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net BAHAMAS Logistics Centre, a $16 million storage facility complex, replete with a disaster recovery facility that is hurricane-resistant up to a category five storm, yesterday said it had already rented two of the existing six storage facilities after recently opening the first phase. Juan Carlos Gomez, its accounts man a ger, said even though only 25 per cent of the complex, on Munnings Drive off Gladstone Road, has been completed, it has received a favourable response from Bahamian businesses. It has already rented two of six storage facilities capable of holding the contents of eight 40-foot containers. Each facility has been constructed with dedicated on-loading and offloading docks, with steel according doors imported from Europe, instead of the conven tional steel roll-up doors often seen at the average storage facility. According to office manager Janice Taylor, doors on both sides of the storage facility are completely storm resistant, with each panel of the according door locking in place independently. “The Bahamas Logistics Centre has been developed with the intention of optimising and making more cost-effec tive storage and distribution for new andestablished businesses in Nassau,” said Ms Taylor. “It provides state-of-the-art protection, built with reinforced concrete imported from Italy, and other structural components that reduce maintenance and vulnerabilities to rust and corrosion, as opposed to steal which is commonly used.” Bahamas Logistics is a disaster recovery facility which would house businesses, such as banks or insurance firms, that need a secure office with all the facilities needed to operate after a major storm or natural disaster. The logistics centre features two dis aster recovery offices, with storage, that Logistics Centre 25 per cent completed * Grand Bahama-based company says costs have fallen to 35% of power provider’s through generator use * Argues electricity costs ‘six times and more’ higher than developed world making it ‘impossible to run profitable manufacturing business’ By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor CABLE Bahamas has completed a key step in the buyout of its largest shareholder, Columbus Communications, after its $40 million preference share issue that closed on Monday was fully sub scribed, sources confirmed to Tribune Business. This newspaper understands that the offering, which will help finance the $80 million purchase of Columbus’s 30.2 per cent stake, was in fact slightly oversubscribed, mean ing that high net-worth and institutional investors sought more shares than were actually available. The only outstanding issue to completing the Columbus transaction, sources have told Tribune Business, is the receipt of approval for the buyout from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC tions regulator. This is required because Cable Bahamas’ fibre optic cable infrastructure connects with the US, meaning the change of ownership requires regulatory approval at the Federal level. The fact Cable Bahamas’ $40 million private placement was fully subscribed does not come as a surprise, the company’s officials having indi cated last week this was likely to be the case. Cable $40m offer ‘fully subscribed’ S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B

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ASK any manager, vicepresident or business owner what is one of the biggest challenges they face in maki ng their revenue numbers, a nd they will tell you it is identifying, hiring and retaining good sales representatives. If you are familiar with mym anagement philosophy, then you have heard me talk about the 80/20 rule in sales, and all you have to do is looka t your own company or industry to know it is still true: per cent of the sales and revenue is made by the top 2 0 per cent”. S o how do you identify who the top 20 per cent areB EFORE you spend all that time and money on hiring, training and then hoping they perform? There are many ways to try to identify these characteristics in advance, and a whole industry of profiling and assessment testing has sprouted up to help you make the right choice. But there are easier ways t o identify who the potential t op producers are. S S e e c c r r e e t t N N u u m m b b e e r r O O n n e e ) ) The best predictor of future behaviour and performance is past behaviour and performance. This is a well known fact in psychology, and it is one you can use to predict h ow a new sales representat ive is likely to perform for you. The bottom line is that however much your candi-d ate earned in income in their last job, and the job before that, it is mostly likely the amount they are going to earnw orking for you as well. What you must determine is exactly how much money that was. Ask your candidate t o provide you with pay stubs o r verification of income for the last six months and, ina ddition, ask them what they earned in income for each of the last three years. Find a way to verify this. Finally, determine how much of your product or serv ice your candidate would have to sell to generate that kind of income again, and ask yourself if you would be happy with that level of perfor-m ance because that is most l ikely what you are going to get. S S e e c c r r e e t t N N u u m m b b e e r r T T w w o o ) ) Determine what is really motivating your candidate. W hat we were exposing in the first real secret was your candidate’s comfort zone. We all have comfort zones, and sales reps, in particular, will alwaysl ive up to and most likely down to their comfort zone, especially in terms of income. So if your candidate is really looking to your company as an opportunity to better themselves and earn more money, find out what is driving this need and desire form ore money. Have their life circumstances changed? For e xample, have they recently gotten married, had a child, purchased a home? If so, then they may have a r eal motivation to work harder, make more money and e nlarge their comfort zone. If their situation has not changed, then you can be pretty sure they will not bem otivated to work harder, learn more skills and make m ore sales. In essence, they will continue to live down tot heir current comfort level and you may once again be hiring another 80 per cent producer. S S e e c c r r e e t t N N u u m m b b e e r r T T h h r r e e e e ) ) A ssess their sales skills and previous training. This is oneo f my favourites. During the interview, I ask my candidates how they think they would do selling my product. They alls ay: “I’d do great!” I then do two things: 1) I ask them to sell me on the product. What I am look ing for is for them to ask me q ualifying questions, rather than just start pitching. Those who just dive right in and start pitching reveal themselves as middle to low 80 per c ent producers. Top 20 per c ent producers, on the other hand, start asking me questions and gathering information. They are the ones I ami nterested in. 2) Next, I give them a couple of objections and watcha nd listen to how they handle them. You can immediately tell how much training someone has had, and how s uccessful they were, by list ening to them handle age old objections like “The price ist oo high” and “I’ll have to talk to.....” These techniques have saved me hundreds of hours of poor hires, and they have often revealed who the real t op producers were. Use them, and you will love how they will work for you as well. All of these marketing strategies are certain to keepy our business on top during t hese challenging economic times. Have a productive and profitable week! Remember, THOSE WHO M ARKET WILL MAKE IT. N N B B : : S S c c o o t t t t F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n i i s s p p r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t o o f f S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e , , a a p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l a a n n d d m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g c c o o m m p p a a n n y y s s p p e e c c i i a a l l i i s s i i n n g g i i n n u u n n i i f f o o r r m m s s , , e e m m b b r r o o i i d d e e r r y y , , s s i i l l k k s s c c r r e e e e n n p p r r i i n n t t i i n n g g a a n n d d p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l p p r r o o d d u u c c t t s s . . E E s s t t a a b b l l i i s s h h e e d d o o v v e e r r 2 2 7 7 y y e e a a r r s s a a g g o o , , S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e h h a a s s a a s s s s i i s s t t e e d d B B a a h h a a m m i i a a n n b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s e e s s f f r r o o m m v v a a r r i i o o u u s s i i n n d d u u s s t t r r i i e e s s i i n n m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g t t h h e e m m s s e e l l v v e e s s . . R R e e a a d d e e r r s s c c a a n n c c o o n n t t a a c c t t M M r r F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n a a t t S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e o o n n E E a a s s t t S S h h i i r r l l e e y y S S t t r r e e e e t t , , b b y y e e m m a a i i l l a a t t s s c c o o t t t t @ @ s s u u n n t t e e e e . . c c o o m m o o r r b b y y t t e e l l e e p p h h o o n n e e a a t t 2 2 4 4 2 2 3 3 9 9 3 3 3 3 1 1 0 0 4 4 . . 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Secrets to making the right hirings Promotional M arketing by Scott Farrington

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b y Grand Bahama Power C ompany meant it had breached its contract with Fenestration and Glass Services, not the other way round. R ailing at a $23,000 monthl y bill received from Grand B ahama Power Company, despite the company not yet being operational and havingno roof on its premises, Mr H owes said: “Since we have opened the Freeport opera tion we have had nothing but excess charges, power outages, power surges and spiking that has burned out and fried moret han $100,000 worth of equip ment and electrical compo nents. “One piece of equipment (a Corona treatment system), after waiting for three monthsf or delivery from Germany, o nly to have it fried on the fifth day of use. That alone was $25,000 (plus shipping costs), and we still don’t havei t back in production. Every time we have equipment fried our production stops, but thew age bill and overheads don’t. Your spiking and surges are almost a daily, and certainlya weekly, occurrence.” Mr Howes said his Floridab ased accounts department w as compiling a list of equipment that had allegedly been ruined by power spikes and surges, in addition to labour and lost production costs, inp reparation to mount a com pensation claim against Grand Bahama Power Company. “In my 20 years of operation in Florida, where we man ufacture with similar equipment and experience nearly identical weather phenomena, I have not had but a few instances of lightning strike power surges. In just seven months I have had dozens of incidents with your company in charge of my power at Fen estration and Glass Services. Can you explain?” Mr Howes asked Mr Ferrell. He added: “It is impossible to run a profitable manufacturing business on this island with the types and volume of machines we have if they use the Grand Bahama Power Company. “Maybe you could give me an example of a Freeport manufacturing company who has modern manufacturing machinery and is profitable and happy with your product and service. I have yet to find one and have spoken to almost every other commercial customer of yours. I know that my other three manufacturing companies, Florida, China and England, are happy with their power supplier and, in fact, power is so insignifi cant as a percentage of cost it has never even been a factor. do not believe it is possible for a manufacturing business to operate in Freeport and still compete with the rest of the world with a power company six times (and more price of power in the USA and China and Europe.” Mr Howes also pointed out that Grand Bahama Power Company effectively operat ed without a regulator, in addition to its monopoly position. Its tariffs are nominally approved by the Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA that company’s 50 per cent shareholder, Lady Henrietta St George (formerly her hus band, Edward) was also holder of 25 per cent of the power c ompany’s shares via a 50 per c ent interest in BISX-listed ICD Utilities. This, effectively, meant that the company was being regul ated by its owner. The situat ion is again likely to lead for c alls for Grand Bahama Power Company to be placed under the regulatory ambit of an authority such as the newl y-formed Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCA Mr Howes told Mr Ferrell: “You proudly advertise the best prices in the Caribbeanf or power, yet it is no good for Freeport to have its power company happy to be better than Haiti. You need to com pete with the US, Mexico and China if Freeport wants to bes uccessful as a world classm anufacturing base. “It is common knowledge this island is in dire straits, and its people are struggling to sur v ive. Grand Bahama cannot compete in the tourist market (what little there iso nly chance for the people of Grand Bahamas to survive is to bring in foreign investment in offshore manufacturing. “The only product the Port A uthority has is no taxes, but i n other countries a company has to make a profit to pay taxes, so if a company invests in Freeport and cannot makea profit there is no benefit to c ome in the first place and the Port Authority has no prod uct. “It is your company’s extremely high prices, poor operation and diabolical product that will destroy Grand Bahama as a successful manu facturing base.” G rand Bahama Power Company declined to comment on Mr Ferrell’s letter, which alleged that during his m eeting with Mr Howes, he p urportedly said the power p roducer would increase rates for residential customers if businesses such as Fenestra tion and Glass Services s witched en masse to generating their own power. “By my company running our own generator we have proved that after one month, we can produce consistentp ower with no damaged equipment at about 35 per cent of the cost that Grand Bahama Power Company charges,” Mr Howes said. “Is it the loss of revenue f rom my company or all the o ther companies finding out about our results that you are in fear of? Remember, it is your company’s inability tos upply a safe and quality prod uct at a competitive price that has forced us to run our owng enerator.” Mr Howes and Mr Ferrell had met over the latter’s objection to the company gen erating its own power, and thef ormer suggested a number of w ays to resolve the dispute. One was for Grand Bahama Power Company to keep compensating Fenestration and Glass Services for all equip m ent damaged by power spikes, and reduce its tariffs, while another was for the power producer to make the first move. Mr Howes also indicated he was open to initiating court action to break Grand B ahama Power Company’s m onopoly, adding: “Think of a cow, me pulling the head you pulling the tail (smelly end and 10 lawyers and barristers m ilking it. Funny but true.... I l ove a battle.” A final option, he added, was for Fenestration and Glass Services to close its doors, lay-off 300 persons and m ove its manufacturing facility to China. “Can you imagine the blow to Freeport again and the bad international press, probably destroying the future of for e ign investment, not to men tion the hardship for the excel lent trained people that work for us,” Mr Howes asked. His letter’s release could not have come at a worse time forG rand Bahama Power Comp any, which is already under pressure from its customer base over poor, unreliable ser vice that has resulted inn umerous power outages this summer. This has made the relatively high tariffs evenh arder to swallow, along with the company’s toughened policy that has seen numerous customers cut off for late or non-payment. T he service problems have b een even harder to swallow because Grand Bahama Power Company’s three major shareholders are global power giants Marubeni from Japan,C anadian power producer Emera, and the Dubai-state owned electricity generator. The situation in Grand Bahama, though, could also equally apply to BEC on New Providence. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM btrt tfr f r!%* '!$()))!*&*#tffn""bnff !$ %#&!*&*# !%** nn n! 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With the Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCA possessing its full powers, the transition to a new regulatory regime has begun. During the transition, URCA is required to act to ensure maximum continuity.For this purpose, the functions and powers previously vested in the Public Utilities Commission (PUC Television Regulatory Authority are transferred to URCA by law. Firms and individuals authorised to provide services and to operate networks under the Telecommunications Act and the Broadcasting Act will be able to apply for a licence under the Communic ations Act.URCA is also contacting all existing licensees and will run a press campaign to inform the public. To facilitate as smooth a transition as possible to the new licensing regime, a number of new documents were published on 1 September, 2009. These include:* Preliminary Determination covering several class operating and spectrum licences,exemptions, and types of fees * Individual operating and spectrum licences * Draft class operating and spectrum licences * Licensing Guidelines * Fee schedule * Radio Spectrum statement (existing allocation and assignment) * Various forms Full Details Form and Notice of Objection Form for the transition, and an Application Form for a licence. Until new URCA regulatory measures are adopted, all existing regulatory measures adopted by the Public Utilities C ommission and the Television Regulatory Authority continue in force to the extent that they do not conflict with provisions of the Communications Act, the Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority Act, 2009; the Utilities Tribunal Act 2009 and any new regulatory measures adopted under these Acts. Michael Symonette, the regulator’s chief executive, said: “URCA is obligated to regulate the electronic communications sector in such a way as to ensure that new investments are attracted to the sector, competition between the operators is sustainable, fair and balanced, and consumers are provided with choice and high quality products and services at reasonable/affordable prices. “Given the right conditions, operators and investors will bring much-needed innovation to the communications market in terms of new products and services, and so create new opportunities for individuals who would wish to participate in this sector of the economy. “At all times, URCA will be vigilant to e nsure that the interest of consumers are protected, and would therefore urge consumers to avail themselves of the consumer protection services established for them as outlined on URCA’s website.” Regulator gets full power as Act takes effect F F I I R R M M , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B

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Barry Williams, Cable Bahamas’ vice-president of finance, said then: “Because of some circumstances that some of the particular investors were having, our advisers said it was prudent to extend it for one month. It’s gone very well, and it’s going to be pretty much fully subscribed.” The offering was extended to give institutional investors and high-net worths extra time to decide on whether to participate, given that key executives and decisionmak ers were off-island on vaca tion during July. In particular, Tribune Busi ness understands through informed sources that the key investor for whom the extension was targeted at is the National Insurance Board (NIB Government, which will have the ultimate say on whether NIB participates. As the second-largest shareholder in Cable Bahamas behind Columbus, its participations eems likely. could operate off of three back-up generators should the power be lost indefinitely at the business's central location. Each storage facility at Bahamas Logistics is raised at least 48 inches from the ground in case of flooding, and features outlets for Inter-net and phone in case a business has to set up temporary offices from the facility.There are even provisions for bathroom facilities in each storage unit, connected to each of the two disaster recovery facility. And each disaster recovery facility is equipped with special flooring that allows for a number of wiring configurations for the implementation of desks, computers and other hardware. Mr Gomez said the entire project is slated to be complete by 2010. He said all the prefabrication of the structure’s walls have been done on site, and have all been raised by Bahamas Logistic Centre. “We have built our own complex,” he said. All of the concrete structure's walls and beams were mixed here in the Bahamas. “We employed mostly Bahamian firms and labour,” said Ms Taylor. When the entire facility is complete it will employ 10 permanent staff positions. “The project is divided into three phases,” said Ms Taylor. “The first phase was completed 14 months after break ing ground. There is very little space available in this first phase.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 90% asset return for 80 clients of collapsed broker agement clients on behalf of the liquidator, Anthony Kikivarakis, informed them that returning 90 per cent of their assets, in compliance with two Supreme Court orders, was the “number one priority” for the court-supervised liquidation. Tiffany Russell, an agent for Deloitte & Touche (Bahamas ner and accountant, Mr Kikivarakis, wrote that the liquidation team had spent most of its time complying with the October 21, 2008, and December 19, 2008, orders of former senior justice John Lyons to release 90 per cent of all client assets. “This task has been arduous and time-consuming to say the least,” the client update said. “Due to the challenges faced in this process, Mr Kikivarakis approached Senior Justice John Lyons and explained the situation to him. “In response to this, Justice Lyons instructed him to continue with the release of 90 per cent of clients’ assets to them, and to make this his number one priority.” Ms Russell added, though, that the return of client assets had been interrupted by Justice Lyons’ retirement, as his and the Supreme Court’s permission was being sought before any asset releases. Currently,t he Caledonia liquidation has yet to b e assigned to another judge. “It should be noted that Mr Kikivarakis and his agents have already issued instructions to release most of the assets held on behalf of clients to them,” the Caledonia client update revealed. “Nevertheless, we are working on returning assets to over 100 clients, primarily clients with small asset balances. However, this process was interrupted with Justice Lyons’ retirement as a judge in the Supreme Court of the Bahamas. “Previously, Justice Lyons had a pproved the release of 90 per cent o f 80 clients’ assets to them. After Justice Lyons’ retirement, the company’s liquidation case has not been transferred to a new judge as yet, and therefore we have not been able to obtain the court’s approval to release additional batches of client assets.” Caledonia Corporate Management collapsed and fell into what ultimately became a court supervised liquidation after one of its clients was allowed to operate an overdrawn margin account, which was not properly collateralised, plunging the company into a $25 million trading loss. The man directing activity in this trading account, George Georgiou, has since been charged by the US federal authorities with running a fraudulent stock manipulation scheme, and his trial is due to take place later this year. Caledonia’s trading clients had all their assets pooled into one omnibus account by its Canadian correspondent broker, Jitney. To cover the margin loss created by the activities of Mr Georgiou and his associates, Jitney sold off securities and other assets belonging to other Caledonia clients, leaving many suffering a severe loss and hardship. Justice Lyons has already advised “that the loss incurred in the Jitney a ccount would be borne by the spec ific clients’ whose securities and cash had been used to cover the shortfall in the Jitney accounts”. Mr Kikivarakis, in his client update, revealed that he had been liaising with Denys Bourbeau, a member of the Caledonia Client Monitoring Committee assisting him with the liquidation, and Richard Perdue, providing them with such assistance as the court allowed as they mulled bringing a lawsuit against Jitney and the chief Canadian custodian used by Caledonia, Penson Financial Services. Judging by Caledonia’s balance sheet as at March 7, 2008, Mr Kikivarakis as liquidator is in no position to take action against Jitney and other involved in the company’s collapse, as liabilities exceed assets by $23.814 million. The Caledonia liquidation seemingly continues to move forward, although sources have told Tribune Business that there is disquiet among some clients and attorneys over the December 19, 2008, court order that authorised Mr Kikivarakis to retain a further 8 per cent of client assets. An initial 2 per cent of client assets were retained to cover the liquidator’s costs, and placed in escrow at EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas Justice Lyons authorised a further 8 per cent to be retained to cover a shortfall of at least $500,000” in c lient accounts other than at Jitney. “Thus I did not have 100 per cent of the clients’ assets in my possession or under my control, and therefore I was unable to comply with” the previous court order, authorising the return of 90 per cent of client assets, Mr Kikivarakis had said in his second report to the Supreme Court. The Securities Commission has also been criticised by some Caledonia clients, who have openly questioned to Tribune Business why the capital markets regulator has yet to undertake an in-depth investigation of the events that led up to the company’s collapse. In response, Hillary Deveaux, the Securities Commission’s executive director, told Tribune Business: “We are still investigating the matter.” He added: “We are concerned as to how the public perceives the Commission to be executing its mandate. We need to fully investigate these matters before we can deal with these things. It takes a long time to investigate these situations. “We rely, to a great extent, on the forensic determinations of the liquidator. We are well aware of the situation. The company is in the hands of the liquidator, and we don’t want this to end up like other situations. People have to see justice being done. We are still investigating the matt er, and the major part of our investigation will be the results of the findings of the liquidator.” Elsewhere, Tribune Business has learnt that the Bahamas Real Estate Association (BREA down an application by Robert Dunkley, the former head of trading at Caledonia, for a realtor’s licence. Sources close to BREA confirmed that, following an interview, Mr Dunkley’s licence application was rejected. It is understood that this decision was partly due to concerns about the Caledonia situation, and also the fact that H. G. Christie, the company Mr Dunkley is working for, had named him in advertisements as the primary listing agent for Doctor’s Hospital’s $9 million Western Medical Plaza prior to him obtaining a realtor’s licence. Cable $40m offer ‘fully subscribed’ Logistics Centre 25 per cent completed NIB prosecuting 100 firms monthly on non-payment o bligations before filing a complaint with the courts. Legal action only happens when employers choose not to settle with NIB,” said Mr Cargill. “We understand it is a challenge because of thee conomy.” T here has been such a vol ume of cases almost 100 per month that NIB has made arrangements with private legal firms to assist with the matters. The NIB director also revealed yesterday that a number of individuals have attempted to defraud the newly-initiated unemployment benefit programme. Mr Cargill said he was not pleased with the delay in pros ecuting those who have tried to defraud the unemployment benefit scheme. According to him, some individuals have successfully been collecting from he unemployment benefit programme while being employed. He said the fraud ulent activity was discovered when contributions come in from an employer for a per son on their unemployment benefit programme list. “There have been several cases sent to the police,” he said. According to Mr Cargill, the Prime Minister is set to table NIB's 2008 annual report in the House of Assembly today. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are m aking news in their n eighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an a ward. I f so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 74F/23C Low: 73F/23C Low: 75F/24C Low: 75F/24C Low: 76 F/24 C Low: 80F/27C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 90F/32C High: 88F/31C High: 88 F/31 C High: 87 F/31 C High: 88F/31C High: 89 F/32C High: 88F/31C Low: 80F/27C High: 89F/32C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 88F/31C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 74F/23C High: 88 F/31 C Low: 77F/25C High: 87 F/31 Low: 76F/24C High: 87F/31C Low: 76 F/24C High: 88F/31C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 91F/33C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 88F/31C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 91F/33C Low: 76F/24C High: 93 F/34 C Low: 77F/25C High: 89F/32C High: 86 F/30 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2 ND 2009, PAGE 9B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. Patchy clouds, a t-storm in spots. Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. Clouds and sun, a t-storm possible. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 88 Low: 79 High: 90 High: 90 High: 90 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 90 Low: 79 Low: 79 Low: 79 AccuWeather RealFeel 102F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 86F 98-87F 106-84F 99-87F 98-88F Low: 79 TODAYTONIGHTTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................91F/33C Low ....................................................77F/25C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 90 F/32C Last year's low .................................. 80 F/27C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ................................................24.59" Normal year to date ....................................31.56" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Full Last New First Sep. 4 Sep. 11Sep. 18Sep. 26 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:51 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:28 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 6:17 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 4:59 a.m. Today Thursday Friday Saturday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 6:59 a.m.2.612:52 a.m.0.4 7:24 p.m.2.91:01 p.m.0.4 7:38 a.m.2.71:29 a.m.0.3 8:00 p.m.2.91:43 p.m.0.4 8:15 a.m.2.92:04 a.m.0.3 8:35 p.m.2.92:22 p.m.0.3 8:50 a.m.3.02:38 a.m.0.2 9:10 p.m.2.93:01 p.m.0.3 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco93/3377/25pc87/3079/26t Amsterdam66/1854/12sh68/2055/12r Ankara, Turkey79/2643/6s77/2546/7s Athens84/2870/21s86/3072/22s Auckland59/1545/7s54/1240/4pc Bangkok90/3278/25t90/3279/26t Barbados90/3278/25t87/3078/25pc Barcelona83/2870/21pc83/2870/21s Beijing78/2567/19c84/2867/19pc Beirut79/2676/24s80/2676/24s Belgrade89/3164/17s92/3368/20pc Berlin77/2559/15s72/2254/12sh Bermuda86/3079/26s86/3079/26s Bogota69/2042/5pc68/2043/6pc Brussels68/2054/12pc64/1750/10sh Budapest84/2859/15s86/3059/15c Buenos Aires61/1648/8c57/1343/6r Cairo95/3572/22s94/3474/23s Calcutta91/3283/28r91/3281/27r Calgary82/2750/10s73/2241/5pc Cancun91/3275/23pc90/3272/22pc Caracas82/2773/22t81/2772/22t Casablanca79/2660/15s79/2663/17s Copenhagen70/2159/15c66/1858/14sh Dublin59/1550/10r61/1648/8sh Frankfurt73/2255/12pc68/2052/11r Geneva 75/23 58/14 pc 71/2155/12r Halifax 70/21 55/12 s 72/22 55/12 s Havana 90/32 72/22 t 89/31 72/22 r Helsinki 72/22 56/13pc70/2154/12pc Hong Kong 90/32 82/27 s 90/32 82/27s Islamabad 95/35 75/23 pc 92/33 70/21 r Istanbul79/2662/16s82/2768/20s Jerusalem 82/27 60/15s83/2860/15s Johannesburg 76/2453/11pc81/2750/10s Kingston 88/3179/26t88/3179/26r Lima73/2260/15s75/2361/16s London66/1855/12r68/2054/12sh Madrid90/3257/13pc88/3157/13pc Manila84/2877/25r85/2977/25r Mexico City77/2555/12t77/2555/12t Monterrey82/2770/21t82/2772/22t Montreal79/2655/12s79/2657/13s Moscow73/2254/12s75/2352/11s Munich73/2259/15sh79/2656/13t Nairobi80/2654/12r81/2754/12c New Delhi 95/3581/27t88/3178/25t Oslo61/1650/10sh63/1752/11sh Paris68/2057/13pc68/2054/12sh Prague 74/23 57/13 c 77/25 56/13 r Rio de Janeiro87/3075/23s92/3376/24s Riyadh103/3978/25s104/4078/25s Rome 86/30 68/20 s 88/31 70/21 t St. Thomas91/3279/26pc89/3179/26s San Juan68/2040/4c65/1840/4pc San Salvador 88/31 70/21 t 86/30 73/22 t Santiago 54/1237/2sh64/1745/7pc Santo Domingo90/3274/23s86/3073/22s Sao Paulo 85/29 66/18 s 87/30 64/17s Seoul86/3059/15s85/2961/16s Stockholm 72/22 54/12 sh 68/20 55/12 pc Sydney 70/21 46/7 s72/2250/10c Taipei87/3079/26sh88/3179/26sh T okyo 77/25 72/22 r 82/27 72/22 r T oronto 75/2354/12s75/2358/14s Trinidad95/3573/22pc93/3372/22pc V ancouver 71/21 58/14 s 67/1955/12c Vienna 80/2667/19pc78/2566/18t W arsaw 75/23 58/14 pc 73/22 55/12 pc Winnipeg 78/25 55/12 s 79/2656/13s H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace E RIKA S F ORECAST P ATH M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-15 Miles86F Thursday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-15 Miles86F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-15 Miles85F Thursday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-15 Miles85F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-15 Miles83F Thursday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-15 Miles84F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque89/3165/18pc88/3162/16t Anchorage59/1549/9r62/1649/9c Atlanta80/2660/15pc81/2760/15pc Atlantic City78/2558/14s78/2560/15pc Baltimore78/2556/13s81/2758/14pc Boston74/2358/14s78/2561/16s Buffalo76/2451/10s78/2552/11s Charleston, SC78/2566/18r80/2665/18c Chicago77/2549/9s77/2550/10s Cleveland73/2249/9s78/2554/12s Dallas92/3373/22s91/3271/21t Denver84/2855/12s85/2954/12pc Detroit76/2455/12s80/2656/13s Honolulu89/3176/24s89/3176/24s Houston92/3368/20pc93/3370/21t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday TodayThursdayTodayThursday Indianapolis80/2655/12s80/2658/14s Jacksonville82/2769/20t85/2967/19t Kansas City80/2657/13pc76/2458/14t Las Vegas102/3877/25pc105/4082/27pc Little Rock86/3060/15s84/2864/17t Los Angeles91/3266/18pc87/3066/18pc Louisville82/2759/15s83/2860/15pc Memphis84/2865/18s87/3067/19pc Miami88/3176/24t91/3276/24t Minneapolis76/2457/13pc80/2658/14s Nashville82/2759/15s82/2758/14pc New Orleans88/3171/21pc89/3172/22pc New York78/2564/17s80/2667/19s Oklahoma City90/3266/18pc87/3064/17t Orlando90/3274/23t91/3271/21t Philadelphia79/2658/14s81/2760/15s Phoenix 104/40 84/28 pc 103/3983/28t Pittsburgh77/2550/10s78/2551/10s Portland, OR 82/2758/14s77/2557/13c Raleigh-Durham 79/26 60/15 pc 77/25 62/16 sh St. Louis80/2659/15s84/2861/16s Salt Lake City 88/31 63/17 s 89/3162/16pc San Antonio 96/35 73/22 pc 94/34 72/22 pc San Diego80/2669/20pc79/2666/18pc San Francisco 72/22 56/13 pc 71/2157/13pc Seattle76/2457/13s73/2256/13c T allahassee 88/3166/18t85/2965/18t T ampa 88/31 73/22 t 86/30 73/22t Tucson98/3675/23pc95/3574/23t W ashington, DC 79/26 60/15s79/2661/16pc UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. AccuW eather .com