Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
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By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE economic strangle-
hold gripping many cash-
strapped parents may be the
reason for an influx of stu-
dents registering at public
schools.

The government school sys-
tem has been inundated with
about 3,000 more registered
students this year, a spike one
ministry official said may be
due to the current economic
downturn.

Ministry of Education Per-
manent Secretary Elma Gar-
raway believes the enrolment
increase is, in part, due to stu-
dent transfers from the pri-
vate school system along with
many first time students,
whose parents would prefer a
private institution.

Tuition at a typical private
high school is around $1,100 a
term while a parent might pay
around $700 a term for a pri-
vate primary school.



"According to preliminary
reports from the pre-registra-
tion period at the end of the
summer term, there was an
indication that a significant
number of students had come
to the public school system
from the private schools.

"(We had) 3,000 additional
students join our school over
the usual number," Ms Gar-
raway told The Tribune yes-
terday, adding that she doubt-
ed typical levels of population
growth would lead to such a
large enrolment increase.

"The normal population
growth over the years would
contribute to the usual num-
bers that we admit every year
— this year there has been a
significant increase in the
intake so we know that's not
caused by the population
growth. Rather by those who
would have normally sought
admission to private schools."

She said she could not pro-
vide a more specific analysis

SEE page six

The Taste

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=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009

Ss
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Maer ime
BAHAMAS BIGGEST Riis

PUunIC Schools
number's Focnet

3,000 more students
register this year;

spike may be due to
economic downturn

Tim Clark/Tribune staff







SEE PAGE ELEVEN

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Management jobs go in
Atlantis restructuring

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

EIGHT managers and
two line staff are now
without a job as Atlantis
yesterday announced that
it has restructured its Food
and Beverage division and
centralised its reservation
system.

Days after lauding the
promotional success of the
massive Miss Universe
pageant event, hosted at
Atlantis, for its capacity
to boost future arrivals to
the resort, Kerzner Inter-



national said the job loss-
es are part of an overall
effort to make the resort
“more efficient.”

“We are consistently
reviewing our business
globally with a view to
making our operations as
efficient as possible, while
at the same time providing
a high level of service for
our customers.

“In this instance, group
business, which has been
impacted industry wide on
a global basis, demanded
that adjustments be made

SEE page six



MANY STUDENTS across the nation were back in the classroom yesterday. By Wednesday, all students should be at their desks for

the new school year.

Teacher alleged to have
drugged, molested student

is taken off active duty

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

MINISTRY of Education
officials confirmed that the
teacher under investigation
for allegedly drugging and
molesting a minor at CC
Sweeting Senior High has
been taken off active duty
and will not be allowed on
campus as long as the
police’s investigations con-
tinue.

Elma Garraway, the Per-
manent Secretary in the
Ministry of Education, said

SEE page six

August 2009 '

|
11
ys 18

“4

Fr

Second man in court accused
of businessman’s murder

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A second
man accused of murdering
retired police officer and
businessman Leslie May-
cock was arraigned in
Freeport Magistrate’s Court
on Monday.

Dudley Jamaal Seide Jr,
22, of Freeport, appeared
before Magistrate Debbye
Ferguson in Court One on
charges of armed robbery
and murder. He was not
required to enter a plea to
the charges.

It is alleged that on July

15, the accused being con-
cerned with another or oth-
ers robbed Leslie Maycock
of a black pouch, valued at
$100, and $700 cash that was
contained in the pouch.

It is also alleged that on
July 23, the accused being
concerned with another
intentionally caused the
death of Maycock by the use
of a hand gun.

Maycock, 50, a retired
police officer and owner of
the Hawksbill Mini Mart,
was robbed and shot after
closing his convenience
store in Hawksbill. He died
of his injuries a week later in

SEE page six



GET READY FOR

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September 2009

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA TSCANDS? FEADING NEWSPAPER

Union in talks over ‘20
pending jo losses’ at KFC

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

TALKS are taking place
between the Bahamas Hotel
Catering and Allied Work-
ers Union and fast food
giant Kentucky Fried Chick-
en over “20 pending job
losses”.

Union President Roy
Colebrooke told The Tri-
bune yesterday that the
union, which represents
KFC workers, is in discus-
sion with senior manage-
ment at the chain.

“Their business has shown
a steady decline,” said Mr

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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009



THE TRIBUNE



FORMER Turks and Caicos Premier
Michael Misick has suggested that the British
territory should become an autonomous
Bahamas state. The Tribune hit the streets
yesterday to see what the public thinks about
this idea.

TROY HALBERT, 44,
ENTREPRENEUR:

"T don't know anything about Turks and
Caicos. I don't think we should stop anyone
that wants to be a part of the Bahamas. Let
them come, I'll give them the ‘blue light’ dis-
count."

LEON, RESIDENT OF THE GROVE

"T think this would make things a lot easi-
er for both countries. Lots of people have
family members living there and it would be
good to have them be a part of the Bahamas
again."

TONY COLLIE, 24, PMH EMPLOYEE

"L support this initiative. Forming a feder-
ation would be mutually beneficial for both
countries — our cultures are closely inter-
twined and we share common industries such
as conch farming.

“ T think that there is a lot of room for
investment and growth as their economy is
not bad and our governance is similar."

P ANTHONY WHITE, RETIRED
JOURNALIST

"At this time I would discourage our gov-
ernment from getting involved.

“Politically they are unstable and it would

LOCAL NEWS

Bahamians weigh in on
Turks and Caicos issue

STREET

ALK

be too complicated with all of the allega-
tions of scandal and corruption."

EAMON ADDERLEY, 35, MANAGER
OF UPTOWN BAKERY AND DELI

"I'm unfamiliar with all the details, but I
feel that as long as it will be beneficial to
the Bahamas we should be open to discus-
sion."

KENNETH MCCARTNEY, 55

"As long as we exercise caution and fully
assess both short-term and long-term con-
sequences, I would fully support the deci-
sion to form a federation with the Turks and
Caicos."

GLENROY MCKENZIE,
ASST SUPERINTENDENT, RBPF

"T don't think it should be a problem. We
are historically linked to Turks and Caicos,
and most people are not even aware of the
strong family ties between the islands."

FELITA WILLIAMS, 39, PMH NURSE

"T have family and friends living over there
that I would love to see more. Perhaps if
they become a part of the Bahamas it would
make traveling there accessible to more peo-
ple."

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making news in their
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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009, PAGE 3



Man accused of
having sex with —
13-year-old girl

of Sandilands Village
Road, accused of having
sexual intercourse with a
13-year-old girl, was
arraigned in the Magis-
trates Court yesterday.

Police have charged
Donovan Sturrup with
having sexual intercourse
with a girl under the age
of 14. It is alleged that
Sturrup committed the
offence on Saturday, July
18, 2009.

Sturrup, who was
arraigned before Magis-
trate Carolita Bethel in
Court 8, Bank Lane, was
not required to enter a
plea to the charge. He was
granted bail in the sum of
$10,000 with two sureties.
Sturrup was ordered to
report to the Elizabeth
Estates Police Station
every Monday, Wednes-
day and Saturday before
6pm. He was also ordered
not to have any contact
with the virtual com-
plainant or witnesses in
the case. Sturrup is
expected to appear in
Court 5, Bank Lane, today
for a fixture hearing.

e TWO women and a
man charged in last
week’s seizure of two and
a half pounds of cocaine
from a private residence
were arraigned in the
Magistrate’s Court yester-
day.

Sherwin Laroda, 49;
Vanessa Rolle Laroda, 37,
and Althemese Rolle Lar-
oda, 19 — all of Button-
wood Avenue, Pinewood
Gardens — appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel in Court 8, Bank
Lane, yesterday charged
with possession of cocaine
with intent to supply.

Police reportedly seized
2.5lbs of cocaine with a
street value of $12,000
while searching a home in
Pinewood Gardens.

All of the accused, who
were represented by attor-
ney Willie Moss, pleaded
not guilty to the charges
and were each granted
bail in the sum of $10,000
with two sureties. The
three accused were also
ordered to surrender their
travel documents and to
report to the East Street
South Police Station every
Saturday before 6pm.

The case was adjourned
to February 15.

¢ A 39-year-old man of
Redland Acres accused of
raping and causing harm
to a 38-year-old woman
last Wednesday was
arraigned in the Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday.

Police charged Poence
Bodie with the Wednes-
day, August 26, rape of a
38-year-old woman. He is
also accused of causing
harm to the woman. Bod-
ie, who was arraigned
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel in Court 8 yester-
day, was not required to
enter a plea to the
charges.

He was granted bail in
the sum of $10,000 with
two sureties. Bodie, who
was represented by attor-
ney Willie Moss, was
ordered to report to the
East Street South Police
Station every Tuesday and
Saturday before 6pm. He
is expected to appear in
Court 5, Bank Lane, today
for a fixture hearing.

e A Cancer Society
employee accused of
hacking into another
woman’s e-mail account
was arraigned in the Mag-
istrate’s Court yesterday.

Sheryl Rolle, 25, was
arraigned in Court 8,
Bank Lane, yesterday
charged with unauthorised
access to computer mater-
ial.

It is alleged that on
Tuesday, August 21, 2009,
Rolle unlawfully accessed
the e-mail account of
Kathy Ingraham for the
purpose of securing access
to her private e-mails.
Rolle, who was arraigned
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel, pleaded not guilty
to the charge and was
granted $2,500 bail.

She is represented by
attorney Godfrey Pinder.

Rolle is expected to
appear in Court 10, Nas-
sau Street, on September

LOCAL NEWS

Mitchell: idea of federation with

THE joining of The Bahamas and the
Turks and Caicos islands as a Federation is
a “fascinating idea worth exploring”, for-
mer foreign minister Fred Mitchell said
yesterday.

Nonetheless, Mr Mitchell said the sug-
gestion made by its ex-premier Michael
Misick is one which would “require thought
and study” and a commitment on the part
of both peoples to enter into the Federa-
tion.

Meanwhile, he added that even if The
Bahamas was interested in such a relation-
ship with its neighbour, it would have to be
careful of offending the United Kingdom,
of which the islands are a territory.

Interview

He was responding to comments made by
Mr Misick in an exclusive interview with
The Tribune when he suggested that rather
than being a burden on The Bahamas, the
Turks and Caicos would have much to offer
if the two countries entered into a federa-
tion.

Mr Misick asserted that, despite not hav-
ing had a referendum on the issue, the peo-
ple of the Turks and Caicos islands have
expressed an interest in their territory
becoming an autonomous state under the
Bahamas government.

This after allegations of systematic gov-
ernment corruption emerging from a Com-
mission of Inquiry led by the British in
Turks and Caicos ultimately resulted in the
United Kingdom suspending the island’s
self-government last month.

Explaining some of the proposed benefits
of the idea, Mr Misick told The Tribune:
“We just built hundreds of millions of dol-

lars worth of hospitals that can be there
for the people of Inagua and Mayaguana
and the other islands of the south. We have
a modern society that can service the south-
oo and take the strain off (Nas-
sau).”

Mr Mitchell noted that a federation of
Turks and Caicos and The Bahamas is not
unprecedented — as both countries were
allied in such a way at various times prior to
Bahamian independence.

And he added that the history of The
Bahamas and Turks and Caicos in this
regard “is not entirely happy.”

“There was a dispute about adequate
representation with seat of government
being in Nassau and over the sharing of
revenue and taxes,” he noted.

However, the suggestion made by Mr
Misick is not one proposed by him alone.

An August 20, 2009, article in The Econ-
omist, commenting on the removal of 33
years of self-rule in the Turks and Caicos
Islands, said there has “long been a debate
on whether the Turks and Caicos and oth-
er micro-states in the region are viable as
self-governing entities.”

Candidate

Noting that “for most of the imperial
period the islands were run from Jamaica or
the Bahamas” the article suggested The
Bahamas “having made great strides in
overcoming its own corruption and drugs
problems of the 1980s, would seem a good
candidate to take the islands back under its
wing one day.”

A message left for Minister of Foreign
Affairs Brent Symonette was not returned
yesterday as he was said to be in meetings.

BPSU president set for

tO NLC ae

talks with Prime Minister

AS the dispute sur-
rounding the interdiction
and transfer of 30 Customs
officers from the public
service continues,
Bahamas Public Service
Union president John Pin-
der said he will be meet-
ing with Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham later this
week.

In a brief interview with
The Tribune yesterday, Mr
Pinder said he will be rep-
resenting the union in
these discussions with the
prime minister with a view
to determining the BPSU’s
next move.

Transfer

Mr Pinder has been
adamant in his position
that government violated
its industrial agreement
and failed to follow proce-
dure in its move to transfer
and interdict the Customs
officers.

On July 31, the Ministry
of Finance announced that
16 officers were being
interdicted pending the
outcome of misconduct
charges against them. Ten
more officers were advised

CLARIFICATION

IN AN article published
in Saturday’s Tribune,
Chamber of Commerce
president Khaalis Rolle
was quoted in a story
under the headline “Govt
urged to reveal pageant
costs” as saying that the
government is obligated to
justify every dollar it spent
on the Miss Universe
Competition.

Mr Rolle would like to
make it clear that his com-
ments were not intended
to criticise government —
which has said it made all
relevant information avail-
able — but simply to state
what the proper procedure
should be whenever an
investment is made on
behalf of the Bahamian
people.

The Tribune would also
like to clarify that Mr
Rolle was speaking on
behalf of the Chamber,
and that the placement of
comments by politicians
alongside his quotes was
entirely coincidental and
in no way a reflection of
Mr Rolle’s political affilia-
tion.

that they were to be trans-
ferred to other depart-
ments.

Three other officers
were retired in the public
interest and one was giv-
en early retirement.

Those outside of the
group of officers who were
interdicted were moved as
part of an “ongoing
restructuring exercise,” the
ministry said.

“Article 35 (of the indus-
trial agreement) speaks to
an officer having the right
to refuse any transfer if it
will cause hardship on him
and in General Orders, 604
speaks to the same thing,”
Mr Pinder said.

The BPSU president
also argued that Customs
officers are afforded five
days notice of a transfer,
but claimed that in some
cases officers were given
48 hours and others only

24 hours to respond.

Proceedings for the dis-
missals were said to be
underway before the 14-
day period within which
the interdicted officers had
to respond to government,
Mr Pinder claimed.

Officers

He added that the
remaining Customs offi-
cers are also up in arms
because they fear that gov-
ernment will treat them as
“unjustly” as it did their
former colleagues.

“The majority of Cus-
toms officers are upset
(because) of the manner of
which it was done so they
are of the view that they
might be next, so that’s
why we must (end) this
behaviour,” said Mr Pin-
der.



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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Turks too tarnished to touch

FORMER chief minister Michael Misick
was in town last week to promote the idea of
the Turks and Caicos islands becoming an
autonomous state under the Bahamas gov-
ernment.

Considering the Turks’ present situation
and its history of an inability to govern with-
out indulging in corruption, we think that Mr
Misick is offering a very tainted packet. And
being himself discredited by a recent British
inquiry, he is the last person who should be
trying to broker the deal.

The Turks and Caicos is an overseas ter-
ritory of the UK, located between the
Bahamas and Haiti. It has a population of
23,000, all British citizens.

Last year Britain appointed a Commis-
sion of Inquiry to look into allegations of
corruption against Mr Misick and other offi-
cials. It was suggested that officials had mis-
used public money and had profited from the
sale of government-owned land.

Hearings earlier this year revealed details
of Mr Misick’s lavish spending after taking
office in 2003. Although he insisted on his
innocence, he was forced to resign in March.

Sir Robin Auld, QC, who was a lawyer in
one of the Bahamas’ own Commissions of
Inquiry several years ago —now serves on
Bermuda’s court of appeal — led the inves-
tigation in the Turks’ case. Sir Robin said he
found “clear signs of political amorality and
immaturity and general administrative
incompetence.”

On August 14 Britain imposed direct rule
on the islands as a result of the Commis-
sion’s findings. The Turks and Caicos gov-
ernment and legislature were suspended and
a British Foreign Office-appointed gover-
nor was put in charge.

British Foreign Minister Chris Bryant
said the suspension could last up to two
years while Governor Gordon Wetherell
“put the islands’ affairs back in good order.”
He suggested that elections for a new Turks
and Caicos government could be held by
July, 2011.

We suggest that nothing should be done to
take Mr Misick’s proposal any further until
the British government has accomplished
its mission of trying to give the island honest
government. If at any time after that, Mr
Misick’s suggestion should prove to have
some merit, it should certainly not be
explored with any of those tainted by the
inquiry.

The Bahamas has had a checkered histo-
ry in Turks island since 1766, when a running
battle was started with the Bermudians who
seasonally raked Turks islands’ salt pans.
The Bahamas believed it had a right to tax
the salt. The Bermudians refused to pay the

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tax. Eventually in 1819 the British govern-
ment assigned political control of the Turks
and Caicos to the Bahamas. It retained that
control until 1848. That year the inhabitants
of the Turks successfully petitioned to be a
separate colony governed by a council pres-
ident under the supervision of the governor
of Jamaica.

In 1873 the islands were annexed to
Jamaica with a commissioner and a legisla-
tive board. In 1959 the islands got their own
administration under an administrator. The
Jamaican governor remained their gover-
nor until 1962 when Jamaica became inde-
pendent of Britain and the Turks became a
crown colony. From 1965 the Bahamas gov-
ernor was also governor of the Turks until
the Bahamas became independent in 1973.
The Turks then got its own governor.

However, it wasn’t long before the islands
were showing signs that its administrators
could be corrupted.

Norman Sanders was elected chief minis-
ter when his PAP won the islands’ 1984 elec-
tion. The following year he and two of his
ministers were convicted and jailed in the
United States on various drug charges. One
of those ministers was Stafford Missick, first
cousin of Michael Misick. Stafford Missick,
who before returning to the Turks and enter-
ing politics there, was for several years on the
staff of the Bahamas’ Central Bank.

The following year — July 24, 1986 — the
Turks governor dissolved the government
and replaced it with an advisory council after
allegations of arson and fraud found the
chief minister, Nathaniel Francis, — who
had replaced Saunders — and four other
PAP officials unfit to rule.

One wonders if Michael Misick, who has
influential friends in the Bahamas, has made
this pitch to get from under Britain, and is
cosying up to the Bahamas in the hopes of
regaining his position in an autonomous
Turks and Caicos under the Bahamas’
umbrella?

It has been suggested that Britain would
not want to lose the Turks. This couldn’t be
further from the truth. A former Bahamas
diplomat has told us that British officials
have for years expressed an interest in some
sort of association between the Bahamas
and the Turks and Caicos islands. His
impression was that the UK would be
pleased to be rid of these islands.

However, this transfer cannot be done
at the expense of the Bahamas, which knows
only too well what it is like to wrestle with a
tarnished image in the public arena.

Maybe in the future, but for the immedi-
ate present, an association with the Turks
and Caicos islands would be bad news.



Te

No justice
for suffering
Haitians

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I wish you in the name of the
Lord, please don’t let anybody
know my address and I want
you please to put this in The
Tribune some time this week
so every Tribune reader can
read it.

Please allow me to say some-
thing about the crime issue here
in the Bahamas.

I read in the Punch this
morning in page seven: The
crime problem in the Bahamas
is a Haitian problem for if the
writer is talking about Haitian-
Bahamian origins and Creole
killer culture, is all about Hait-
ian. I buy the Tribune Monday
to Saturday and the Punch
every Monday and Thursday.
It’s not so often to find a Hait-
lan coming out from the court
for stealing, murder, rape or
any other related crime, you
will find them on the papers for
illegal or victim of....I don’t say
that they don’t’ do these kind of
thing.

I don’t like when they talking
about Haitian-Bahamian, a
Haitian-Bahamian should be a
child between a Bahamian and
a Haitian. If a child is born in
the Bahamas by a non citizen of
the Bahamas this child is a
Bahamian for he’s born on
Bahamian soil except if by acci-
dent I have one here for my
one will be a Haitian.

The crime is a Bahamian-
rooted problem. Because
Bahamians cannot resolve their
conflict without a knife, a gun, a
cutlass or any kind of object
that can take out your life. The
police cannot stop crime in the
Bahamas. The police don’t
have time to make patrols to
protect the citizens living in the
country. In Haiti, when I was
in school, they taught me that

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



the police force is created to
protect every citizen living in a
country. In the Bahamas, it is
very different. The RBPF have
more time to run behind poor
Haitians to make $2, 3, 4, and 5
from them, the time that they
take to run behind them and to
make the deal can help them
to stop a killing.

Let me tell you that, believe
me or not, the Bahamas is little
over 300,000 people, even if you
put 200,000 Bahamian police,
you will still have crime
between them, and one will kill
another. And another problem
I see with the crime is the con-
stitution, the parliamentarians
and the court system. The bail
system is a big mistake, when
you release a criminal on bail
he’s going to kill another for
he knows he will be released
on bail, a lot of criminal do that.
Why they don’t’ change that
law so they can keep them in
Fox Hill? And bring the death
penalty when you kill a person,
you are found guilty and you
get killed too, you will not be
going to kill another person.

Instead of doing so, they
focus on Haitians. Some
Bahamians don’t see the value
of the Haitian, and they don’t
see what Haitians are doing for
the Bahamas, that’s why on
page seven this morning the
writer says that human life
doesn’t mean anything in Haiti.
Ican say fortunately for him or
her and unfortunately for Hait-
ian. I can ask him or her to
recall the history, he or her will
find that Bahamians went to
Haiti for food, for freedom and

it’s not too late for Bahamians
to go to Haiti again, for nobody
knows tomorrow.

The tourist is the main
resource of the Bahamas. If you
can ask all Haitians to stop
working in the Bahamas just
for one week, you will see the
difference. You can recall the
history in the Bible where the
rich man says: Now I have
everything I am supposed to,
my soul relaxes, you don’t have
anything, you don’t produce
too much, you import 90 per
cent of all your goods.

Haitians are humans too,
mistreat them, beat them in the
detention centre, they always
say investigation ongoing and
never find justice. God will say
enough is enough. I don’t think
this is what you call a Christ-
ian nation. I’m living in the
Bahamas for almost 12 years,
I know what my fellow Haitians
are suffering and they never
find justice, but let me tell you
that day will come when Haiti
will serve as another Miami for
the Bahamas. By that time
Bahamians will know that God
has the power, he can give it to
whomever he wants and he can
take the high head down and
take the low head high.

Forgive me please if you get
mad by what I say. I say that
because they (Bahamians) talk-
ing bad too much about
Haitians and they don’t try to
resolve the real problems of the
country.

One second, put this please
in The Tribune for I love The
Tribune or reply to me. But
don’t put my address.

NO NAME
Nassau,
August, 2009.

What the FNM manifestos said about Arawak Gay

EDITOR, The Tribune.

What did the Manifestos of
the FNM really say about
‘Arawak Cay’ - versions 1992 -
1997 & 2007?

Seeing that it was no other
persons than Hon Brent
Symonette who raised this and
so-said he quoted presumably
accurately from the text of the
various FNM Manifestos this
caused me to dust-off my copies
and guess what — indiscrimi-
nate misquoting as follows:

(1) The Deliverance 1992
Manifesto — page 12: Tourism:
clean up Arawak Cay and
make it available for develop-
ment as a tourist resort.

(2) The Agenda 1997 Mani-
festo — page 39 Youth Devel-

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opment: complete works at the
“Down Home Fish Fry” on
Arawak Cay to include: a gaze-
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parking areas, sidewalks, light-
ing, landscaping and a culvert to
improve tidal flow in the area.

(3) The Matter of Trust Man-
ifesto 2007 page: 21 Parks and
Open Green Spaces: Make
Arawak Cay and environs a
Cultural and recreational cen-
tre.

Page: 30- Heritage -Make
Arawak Cay a major Cultural
Festival site for the enjoyment
of Bahamian families and visi-
tors alike.

Page: 31- across from
page:30-Sports and Leisure:
develop a plan for the com-
mercial and recreational devel-
opment of Arawak Cay.

Editor your readers will see
in these official policy state-
ments of the FNM, 1992-1997-
2007 at no time, implied or sug-
gested, did the FNM propose
a Container Port for Arawak
Cay.

Mr Symonette quoted or
passed to Minister Zhivargo
Laing a copy of what seemed
to be the 2007 Manifesto and
he quoted page: 31 under
Sports and Leisure the FNM
will develop a commercial and
recreational base for Arawak
Cay — the ‘commercial’ men-
tion did not then nor now can
suggest a port that’s really beg-
ging the question. The com-

mercial development was the
creation of commerce in restau-
rants, etc.

I trust the Prime Minister —
he has said that his government
wrote to the proposers of the
Container Port at Arawak Cay
and have stated that the pro-
posers must show proof that
the environment nor the traffic
as a result of this proposal will
negatively impact the confines
and the route between Arawak
Cay and Gladstone Road.

As long as those retained to
complete these studies are com-
petent and have an Interna-
tional reputation I leave my
decision solely in the hands of
the Prime Minister as I am 100
per cent assured there is no
consultant or consultancy who
will be able to support this pro-
posal as it is obvious there will
be environmental impact from
noise and pollution — there will
be a high capacity of negative
traffic increase which will snarl
the corridor under construction
as part of the New Providence
Road Improvement pro-
gramme.

Editor — if you do not
believe this writer pull out your
Manifesto copies and see for
yourself — the Thomas’s
amongst will be shown up.

W THOMPSON
Nassau,
August 22, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

FNM grateful for Catholic support
of amendment to Sexual Offences Act

Govt encourages other denominations to follow its lead

Final offer =
under EPA ‘will
reserve key
sectors for
Bahamians’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter :
alowe@tribunemedia.net :

DESPITE some delays
in finalising its services
offer under the Econom-
ic Partnership Agree-
ment (EPA) to the Euro-
pean Union in light of
European concerns, the
final offer will still keep
key sectors reserved for
Bahamians, Minister of
State for Finance Zhivar-
go Laing said.

After re-consideration
by Cabinet, the offer is
expected to again be for-
warded to the EU by
“the end of this month”,
he added.

Mr Laing previously
acknowledged that after
submitting the services
offer earlier this year
“with some clarifica-
tions”, the EU had
“come back to ask us
some additional ques-
tions and make some
additional suggestions”
in relation to what the
Bahamas was agreeing to
do under the EPA.

Mr Laing said the gov-
ernment would have to
“give full consideration”
to those suggestions and
then make some determi- }
nations. :

This comes after a
source close to the EPA
negotiating process told
Tribune Business in April
that the services offer the :
Bahamas made had been
opposed by the EU at :
that stage because it “just }
did not meet the require- :
ments and the agreed
percentage amounts to
be liberalised.”

This raised the ques-
tion of whether the
Bahamas would be pres-
sured into conceding
greater foreign participa-
tion in sectors of the
economy which are cur-
rently reserved for
Bahamians alone, after
having assured that the
services offer “mirrors
the National Investment |
Policy” that keeps 13 sec- :
tors closed to foreign :
competition and outlines
how foreigners can
engage in others.”

Asked yesterday
whether the governmen-

t’s reaction to the EU’s
suggestions in reference

to its initial offer would =}
see any of these currently }
reserved sectors opening
up for foreign participa-
tion, Mr Laing said it
would not.

“In fact it’s fairer to
say that what we are
seeking to do would
bring that clarity to the
EU in terms of the mir-
roring of the two (the
offer and the National
Investment Policy as it
currently exists),” said
Mr Laing.

He asserted that the
exchange between the
Bahamas and the EU
was more in terms of

“clarifying” the offer that

is being made by this
country.

The EPA is a trade
agreement between the
EU African, Caribbean
and Pacific countries that
clarifies the terms upon
which the countries
involved trade in goods
and services.

THE FNM yesterday
expressed its “thanks and
delight” for the Catholic
Church’s support of the pro-
posed amendment to the
Sexual Offences Act, and
encouraged other religious
denominations to follow its
lead.

Last week, Archbishop
Patrick Pinder, of the
Roman Catholic Archdio-
cese in the Bahamas and the
Turks and Caicos Islands,
offered the church’s
“prayerful support” of gov-
ernment’s proposed amend-
ment to outlaw marital rape.

In response, the FNM,
through the party’s chair-
man Senator Johnley Fer-
guson, expressed its thanks
for the declaration of sup-
port by one of the “largest
and most respected religious
denominations in the coun-
try.”

Mr Ferguson urged other
religious groups, especially
mainline denominations, to
come out and declare sup-
port for what he says they
know is “right and proper



ARCHBISHOP Patrick Pinder
offered the Catholic Church’s
‘prayerful support’ of govern-
ment’s proposed amendment
to outlaw marital rape.

in the sight of God.”
Expanding on the issue,

the chairman is calling on

FNMs everywhere to urge

their church pastors and
people to come out in loud
support of the amendment.

“The Free National
Movement is grateful and
delighted for the declaration
by Archbishop Patrick Pin-
der that the Roman Catholic
Church is in full support of
the government’s proposed
amendment to the Sexual
Offences Act which would
outlaw marital rape in the
Bahamas.

“In point of fact, the pro-
posed amendment reflects
precisely the party’s long
tradition of defence, hon-
our, respect, dignity, and
upliftment of Bahamian
women,” Mr Ferguson said.

The chairman said the
FNM is proud of State Min-
ister of Social Services
Loretta Butler’s dedication
and determination in push-
ing the amendment, “and in
going full-speed in the com-
munities to gain public
understanding and support
for the legislation.”

During the FNM’s first
term as government, Mr

Unified bus system
plans still in low gear

PLANS for a unified bus
system appear to be moving
ahead at a snail’s pace, with
the Minister of Works and
Transport still awaiting the
final draft of the proposal to
be submitted to Cabinet.

Yesterday, Minister Neko
Grant said although govern-
ment is still "looking" at the
proposed initiative, it
remains in the preliminary
stages.

"Tam awaiting a final draft
on that to take to another
place (Cabinet), where a
decision can be made on it,"
he said.

He did not, however, say
when this draft is expected
nor when it will be presented
to parliament.

As reported previously, as
far back as 2006 jitney drivers and fran-
chise owners called on the government
to implement a unified bus system, bring-
ing all bus operators under one entity in
which both private owners and the gov-
ernment would have a stake.

The plan was intended to improve the
safety and reliability of bus services,
reducing the recklessness that has given
the industry a bad name, while encour-
aging more people to utilise public trans-
portation and lessen traffic congestion.

Two in court over firearm
anid ammunition possession

NEKO GRANT



Governor General Arthur
Hanna in his speech from the
throne in 2006 declared that
the PLP government would
bring legislation to parlia-
ment to enact the plan.

But despite proclamations
throughout 2006 and 2007
that the government’s plan
was in the process of being
“fine tuned”, nothing ever
materialised.

Former Works and Trans-
port Minister Earl Deveaux
was a proponent of the view
that a unified bus system
would have little impact on
the service provided if other
core issues were not
addressed, such as route
rationalisation and the pro-
fessionalism of drivers.

In June 2008, Mr Deveaux,
in conjunction with the Road Traffic
Department, the United Transportation
Company and the Public Transport Asso-
ciation, committed to a “100-day chal-
lenge” for buses to improve their services
- for drivers to be more courteous, reduc-
ing speed, cleaning up their vehicles and
stopping at designated sites.

Mr Deveaux said the challenge would
have “measurable” goals and results
would be published publicly. However,
this did not happen.

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Two men
were arraigned on firearm
and ammunition possession
charges in the Freeport
Magistrate’s Court yester-
day.

Appearing in Court One
before Magistrate Debbye
Ferguson were Don
Phillippe, 30, and Ethan
Rolle, 32, of Freeport.

Lawyers Murrio Ducille
and Simeon Brown

appeared on behalf of Rolle.

It is alleged that on
August 28, at Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Phillippe
and Rolle were found in
possession of a firearm,
namely a .40 Glock pistol
with 12 live rounds of
ammunition.

They pleaded not guilty
to the charges and were
each granted $10,000 bail
with one surety on the first
count, and $5,000 cash bail
on the second count.

The matter was adjourned
until February 15, 2010 for
trial.

Huge chest of drawers hoisted aboard space station

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

The astronauts will remove the cylindrical

ASTRONAUTS hitched a giant chest of
drawers to the international space station on
Monday that contained a brand new freezer,
sleeping compartment and treadmill bearing
a TV comedian’s name, according to Associat-
ed Press.

The Italian-built chest — nicknamed Leonar-
do, as in Leonardo da Vinci — was moved
from space shuttle Discovery via a hefty robot
arm and hoisted onto the space station.

It’s loaded with nearly 8 tons of equipment
and science experiments for the orbiting out-
post and its six residents.

Much of the gear is stored in portable racks;
the bedroom is the size of a phone booth.

Leonardo will remain secured to the space
station for the next week.

vessel — 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter —
and place it back on space shuttle Discovery for
return to Earth. By that time, it will be loaded
with trash and unneeded items.

NASA’s brand new $5 million treadmill —
officially called the Combined Operational
Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill,
or COLBERT for short — is in pieces and will
need to be assembled after Discovery leaves.

The TV comedian ended up with an exercise
machine named in his honor after he won an
online vote for christening rights to a space
station room.

Unwilling to go with Colbert for the yet-to-
be-launched room, NASA opted for Tran-
quility to commemorate the Apollo 11 moon
landing 40 years ago this summer. The treadmill
was a consolation prize.

Transmission) and responsive handling

Ferguson said, three quali-
fied and capable Bahamian
women -— Dame Ivy
Dumont, Janet Bostwick
and Theresa Moxey-Ingra-
ham — were made Cabinet
ministers and served with
productivity and distinction.

“On that watch, a quali-
fied and capable Bahamian
jurist, Dame Joan Sawyer,
became Chief Justice of the
Bahamas, and later, presi-
dent of the Bahamas Court
of Appeal. Mrs Justice Ani-
ta Allen was also appointed
to the high court on the
FNM’s watch.

“In 2001, the FNM gov-
ernment caused the appoint-
ment of Dame Ivy Dumont
as the sixth Bahamian Gov-

ernor-General, and the first
female ever to become
Head of State,” he said.

Mr Ferguson also point-
ed to what he described as
the FNM’s “bold, brave and
defiant step of proposing a
Referendum for the amend-
ing of the Constitution of
the Bahamas, which includ-
ed an amendment which
would have brought essen-
tial elements of new equali-
ty for the women of the
Bahamas.”

aie) (e718
asa ue

RH UE
PHONE: 322-2157



Contact:

Chris Eldon
a.k.a. Yakka.

Time longer than Rope.



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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Public schools
numbers rocket

FROM page one

of this year's enrolment figures, saying the director of edu-
cation had those numbers.

When asked if she felt the enrolment increase would
place a strain on public school performance, Ms Garraway
said no, adding that many of the country's secondary schools
were previously underpopulated.

To tackle levels of overpopulation in government primary
schools in the southwestern district, the Ministry of Edu-
cation built two more classrooms at Carmichael Primary
with an additional three classrooms being built at Garvin
Tynes Primary, she said.

The public school system has about 3,500 teachers
throughout the country, including teachers aides and art
instructors.

Representatives from the Catholic and Anglican boards
of education — while not reporting any large increase in
2009/2010 enrolment — yesterday said registration levels are
not dismal.

Hillary Valencia Saunders, director of education for the
Anglican system's four schools, said the group has seen a
slight increase from 960 registered students last year to
985 for 2009/2010 academic year.

The Catholic educational system — which has 14 schools
throughout the nation — has seen about a 98 per cent
return of former students for the new academic year.

"We anticipated that there would be a small attrition
but it's not what we had anticipated because we have the
majority of our students back — we have about 98 per
cent of our students who have returned.

"Our greatest challenge is in the family islands, of course,
within Grand Bahama and Eleuthera but in New Provi-
dence the enrolment is pretty consistent with last year," said
Director of Catholic Education Claudette Rolle.

Both systems have long-standing payment plans for strug-
gling parents and have not raised tuition fees this year —a
move both women said was not related to the current eco-
nomic turbulence.

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MEMBERS of the Beta Beta Lambda Chapter of the international Phi Beta Sigma fraternity, chartered at the College of the Bahamas,
donated school supplies to the Albury Sayles primary school. Pictured left to right are Brother D'Angelo Reid; Albury Sayles primary
principal Mary Mortimer; Brother Ramon Mcintosh; Albury Sayles primary senior mistress Deborah Rolle; Brother Keron Wood and
students. Phi Beta Sigma is a fraternity of college-educated men dedicated to brotherhood, scholarship, and service. The Bahamian chap-
ter has dedicated itself to aid wherever possible in the education of the country’s youth.

Management jobs go in
Atlantis restructuring

FROM page one

in the relevant departments,”
said a statement issued yes-
terday.

Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes said his Department
was informed of the pending
redundancies early last week.

Trainers Needed

The Ministry of Tourism and Aviation is seeking
Trainers to deliver the Bahamahost Certification
Programme throughout The Islands of The Bahamas
with effect from January, 2010.

Workshop areas include:

1. Bahamas Product Knowledge,
- History, Geography, Civics, Culture

2. Customer Service Excellence,
- Customer Service
- Fundamentals of Communication
- Customer Diversity

3. Sustainable Tourism Development

4. Leadership Excellence

: ABachelor Degree with a minimum of 3 years training or teaching

BXpPerience: or

» A minimum of 10 years relevant experience in tourism and/or allied
industries and a minimum of 3 years training experience, or

* Teaching certificate with a minimum of 5 years training or teaching

experience,

—





| persons oe Ld ae

Ms. Lestie Norville

TT mee] mre gree] eT

FFT =| FEE

STRAT Sy eT ea

Submission deadline is September 15, 2009.



The company said the
restructuring — which also
saw four jobs made redundant
in the company’s Fort Laud-
erdale office — came in light
of “adjusted forecasts for
group related business,” indi-
cating that the company had
received new signals that
group arrivals are to be fewer
than initially expected.

Earlier this year, resort
executives pointed to the can-
cellation of group trips —
such as those traditionally tak-
en by staff from North Amer-

ican corporations — in the
wake of the global financial
crisis that had seriously
impacted occupancy levels at
Atlantis.

While hotel occupancy lev-
els temporarily rose to around
85 per cent during the recent
Miss Universe pageant, which
was hosted at Atlantis for
much of August, Ed Fields,
Senior Vice President of Pub-
lic Affairs for Atlantis, point-
ed out in a statement last
week that many of the rooms
occupied were complimenta-

ry, according to Kerzner
International’s agreement
with the Miss Universe

Organisation.
As the resort heads into the
typically slow

September/October period
occupancy levels were fore-
cast to drop to as low as 30
per cent within weeks, execu-
tives stated.

The move comes nine
months after Atlantis let go
10 per cent of its workforce
— 800 people — citing low
occupancy levels.

Union in talks over ‘20
pending job losses’ at KFC

Lauderdale, Florida.

While the news could be seen as a gloomy
sign of the times, it would appear that local
food outlet Bamboo Shack is currently thriv-
Messages left at KFC's head office seeking ing.
Company chiefs yesterday revealed that

FROM page one

Colebrooke.

comment were not returned.

The news of KFC's pending lay-offs comes
on the same day as Atlantis announced it is
letting 14 people go as it restructures two
departments — the Group and Conventions
department in the Food and Beverage Divi-
sion and the reservations department. Six of
the jobs are from Atlantis, four from Ocean
Club and another four from the company’s
Group and Conventions department in Fort

increased.

despite the poor economy and its affect on
most businesses, its flow of customers has

Devard Williams, speaking on behalf of
the 19-year-old company, yesterday revealed
that on top of anew “Bamboo Stew Shack”
soon to open on Nassau Street, the restau-
rant chain plans to open three more loca-
tions within the next year.

Teacher taken off active duty

FROM page one

she is confident that the
excellent administrative
team at CC Sweeting Senior
High will have enacted all
of the protocols that the
ministry has in place for sit-
uations such as this.

On Thursday evening last
week, the male teacher was
alleged to have drugged and
later performed oral sex on
a male student who attends
the senior high institution.

The student reportedly
complained to another
teacher about the matter,
which caused the school to
contact the police, resulting
in the teacher’s arrest.

While his name has been
withheld there are reports
that he could be charged in
court sometime this week.

Police Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson con-
firmed that officers at the
Central Detective Unit are
investigating the matter.

However he said that the
file has yet to reach his desk,
which normally indicates
that the investigators have
yet to complete their work.

Originally it was alleged
that the incident had

involved a teacher at CC
Sweeting Junior High.

However The Tribune was
able to confirm yesterday
that it had in-fact involved a
teacher from the senior high
school, and not the junior,
which actually has been
renamed TA Thompson
Junior High.

This confusion, the prin-
cipal at TA Thompson said,
forced him to meet with
teachers and parents yester-
day morning to assure them
that the matter did not
involve any of the staff at
his institution.

“My teachers first got
wind of it through your
newspaper,” Mr Franklyn
Lightbourne said, “and they
then directed me to the arti-
cle.

“They said they wanted
to find out if it was true.
But I only confirmed and
told my teachers that it was
not TA Thompson,” he
said.

As with attempts Sunday
to reach Education Minis-
ter Carl Bethel for com-
ment on the matter, all
efforts yesterday proved
fruitless.

Second man accused of
businessman’s murder

FROM page one

hospital.

Seide Jr, was arrested by police on Friday, August 28, some-
time around 6.15pm in the downtown area.

Coderold Keil Wallace, aka Coderold Miller, was charged on
August 24 in relation to the armed robbery and murder of
Maycock. He also appeared before Magistrate Debbye Fer-

guson.

Wallace was represented by K Brian Hanna.
Both Wallace and Seide Jr, denied bail, were remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison in New Providence until a preliminary

inquiry on February 10, 2010.

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009, PAGE 7



Famous author
marks 100th
Bahamas visit

AUTHOR AND PUBLIC SPEAKER Dr N Cindy Trimm with Minis-

ter of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace.

BEST-SELLING author Dr N Cindy Trimm
made a courtesy call on Minister of Tourism and
Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace during her
100th visit to the country recently.

Dr Trimm, author of such books as ‘The Rules of
Engagement’ and ‘Commanding Your Morning’,
has been visiting the Bahamas for more than five
years. On her most recent visit, she conducted a
two-day conference at Trinity City of Praise with
host pastor Apostle Lee Watson.

In addition to her books, Dr Trimm is known for
being featured on many television programmes,
radio shows and internet broadcasts.

Open bid process for revitalisation
project of downtown Freeport

A FIRST occurred in
Grand Bahama Port
Authority history as execu-
tives hosted an “open bid
process” meeting for the
construction of the new
Grand Bahama Arts and
Craft Centre in July.

As a part of GBPA’s
modus operandi, a second
open bid process meeting
was held last week.

This time, it was for down-
town turnaround’s land-
scape and irrigation phase
one of the revitalisation
campaign.

Five landscapers publicly
presented their bids for the
revamp landscape and irri-
gation proposal which
encompasses 37 acres of the
designated downtown area.
President of the GBPA Ian
Rolle said: “Today’s proce-
dures, where business own-
ers have an opportunity to
publicly announce their bid
for a proposed GBPA pro-
ject, is right in line with our
“making it happen’ initia-
tives.”

Proposals

The GBPA is now in the
process of investigating pro-
posals submitted, as the ten-
der that is chosen will not be
solely based on financial
submissions.

“Tt is the intent of the
Grand Bahama Port
Authority to take the
approach where most
licensees who are qualified
to engage in the particular
works would have the
opportunity to do so on all
appropriate projects.

“This event is the continu-
ation of the new era of
transparency in project deal-
ings and GBPA’s open bid
process is now a permanent
part of the way that GBPA
conducts business,” the com-
pany said in a statement.





THREE-DAY CYBER CRIME CONFERENCE

Battling computer
and financial crime



UNITED STATES Embassy Chargé d’Affaires Timothy Zuniga-Brown is flanked by the cyber crime workshop facilitators and participants.

the conference was sponsored by the US Department of Defence in cooperation with US Southern Command.

Cyber security measures
seen as vital to Bahamas

IT is vital to the Bahamas’ economic
prosperity and national security to
ensure the necessary cyber security
measures are in place so that the coun-
try can ward off potential computer
and financial crimes.

This was one of the determinations
made following a three-day cyber crime
conference sponsored by the US
Department of Defence in cooperation
with US Southern Command.

US Embassy Chargé d’Affaires Tim-
othy Zuniga-Brown giving remarks at
the workshop’s closing ceremony on
Friday said that cyber threats are “one
of the most serious economic and
national security challenges we face
today.”

“For this reason, it was of the utmost
importance to hold this conference now
and work to address these issues,” he
said.

around’s landscape and irrigation project phase one on Friday at GBPA Headquarters.



PICTURED (front row from left to right): DUDLEY Francis, Sr, building inspector of building and
development services for GBPA; Nakira Wilchcombe, environmental manager for GBPA; Arthur Jones,
vice-president of building and development services for GBPA; Andrea Grant, planning compliance
official for GBPA;
(back row from left to right): Charles Pratt, commercial manager for GBPA; Rico Cargill, environmen-
tal manager for GBPA; Olethea Gardiner, environmental inspector for GBPA and Allison Campbell,
deputy director of building and development services.

The conference, held at the Sheraton
Cable Beach Hotel from August 25-
27, included 25 participants from the
Royal Bahamas Defence Force, the
Royal Bahamas Police Force, the
National Emergency Management
Agency, Department of Social Services,
BTC and the Water and Sewerage Cor-
poration.

Participants shared ideas and dis-
cussed security measures at the con-
ference, which was designed for offi-
cials with responsibility for protecting
and enhancing computer and intranet

security.

The participants also discussed the
potential for computer crimes, financial
crimes and various computer-related
issues. The facilitators and presenters
for the course included members from
the Rhode Island National Guard.

The conference was brought about
by the Rhode Island State Partnership
Programme and the Traditional Com-
mander’s Activities Programme — two
initiatives that highlight the close and
enduring relationship between the
Bahamas and the US.

Butler’s Funeral Homes



& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.

P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

Memorial Service for

Mrs. Susan
Ann
twright,

63

of Lakeview
Road, will be
held on
Wednesday,

September 02, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. at St.
Matthew’s Anglican Episcopal Church,
East Shirley and Church Streets.



Moultrie.



Officiating will be Rev. Dr. James B.

She is survived by her husband Jan,
two daughters; Sian Cleare-Cartwright
and Amyee Kerr, one son; Alexander
Hugh Cartwright, her mother; Mary
Gloyn of Portcall, South Wales, two
grand children; Morgan and Teagan
Kerr and other relatives and friends.

In lieu of flowers the family has
requested that donations be made to

the Kidney Foundation. P. O. Box N-
$202, Nassau Bahamas.



Funeral arrangements are being
handled by Butlers’ Funeral Homes
and Crematorium Ernest and York
Streets.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 8, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009
The Zonta Club of

Nassau welcomes
fashion entrepreneur



AT its recent meeting, the
Zonta Club of Nassau wel-
comed Tryrina Neely, owner
and operator of Primadona, a
virtual fashion network, who
made a short presentation on
her business.

She said that Primadona is a
unique woman-led business,
one that explores fashion
designs, trends, taste, and status.

Often referred to as the new
fashion shopping and network-
ing concept for women of influ-
ence, it features monthly
designer high-end shows at
upscale venues such as Villa-
gio.

Women can shop for upscale
items at prices 30 to 60 per cent

gourmet taste of style, personal
fashion mapping consultations,
interactions on trends, and
learning from industry experts
all within five to six hours of
non-stop entertainment and
action.

The Primadona Anniversary
Soiree and Humanitarian
Award presentation, which
recognised programmes that
create economic change and
business networking support
for young professionals, took
place on Saturday, at Paradise
Island.

This year the Humanitarian
Small Business Leadership
Award was presented to
Desmond Bannister, Minister

off. These shows provide a of Youth Sports and Culture.



FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED

Chairman's review of the anaudited results
For the nine months ended July 31, 200%

We wish tw report that the Bank incurred a net profit of $3,350-968 for the three month period ended
July 31, 2009 and a net profit of $3,050,641 for the nine month period then ended, When compared to
the comesponding periods Last year, the peofit represents a decrease of $2,069,347 and $8,523,327 for
the three and nine month periods, respectively. The company's financial performance for these 3
months 18 an improvement over the performance in the first two quarters of this fiscal year und can be
attributed io a more disciplined focus on delinquency management, a3 well as effective cost
management.

The Bank continues to experience good mortgage growth and the demand for mortgages remains
relatively strong. However, adverse economic conditions arc expected to continue for the balance af
this fiscal year and non-accrual loans are expected to remain high, impacting the Bank's loan loss
provision,

The Bank's risk profile continues to remain within its risk appetite and the Bank's capital ratios,
which are better than the regulatory requirement, rank among the highest in the industry.

An Interim dividend 0.13¢ per share was declared for the quarter ended July 31, 2009 and payable on
15 September, 2009 to all shareholders of record as of 8!" September, 2009.

[Aarne 7

Managing) Director |

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET (Unaudited)

Aa of July 31, 200% and October $1, 208

(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

July 31, 200 October 31, T008
Cash
Statutory repens account wrh
The Central Bank of The Bahamas
tovestenta
Loans - Met
Fited assets - Het
Osher assets
TOTAL
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS EQUITY
LIABILITIES
Deposits
Drdends Payable (Mote 7)
Other babiknes
Total batnbhes
SHAREHOLDERS EQUITY
Share capatal
Share premom
General reserve
Retemed sarrenpe
Total shareholders’ equety
TOTAL

53,497,453 23,028,462
42455, 46
42,050,094

ATE TS

2,515,056
14la 53s

70,989,559

31,874,902
45,370,098
697,078,638
ATT LS2
491,296

800,627,245

155,954,070 Od0,510,132
26,700,000
L7T5,434

FOS, 185,616

2,347,585
786,297,761

5,333,334
2od2 258

$00,000

TS, 7LSBO
$4,092,272
70,389,533

5,331,334
2552,238

500,000
43,050,040
91,441,032
800,527,048

THE TRIBUNE



BO aa Cm OO ae

IN TIME for the start of the new school
year, Dennis Nairn, president of Power Design
Engineering Consultants (PDEC), presented
10 Dell desktop computers to the Abaco Dis-
trict Education Office for distribution to Aba-
co schools.

Accepting the computers, Lenora Black,
school superintendent, said that students from
the 14 government schools on the island

PICTURED FOLLOWING her presentation are, from left: Joanna Bowe, treasurer of the Zonta Club of Nassau; Tryrina Neely; Patricia Fran-
cis, president of the Zonta Club of Nassau, and Janet Johnson, president-elect of the Zonta Club of Nassau.

USOT GURU

achieved grades higher than the national aver-
age in the BJC and BGCSE examinations. Mr
Nairn, noting that his firm has built up strong
ties with Abaco over the past year, said it was
an easy and pleasurable decision to make a
contribution to the future of the islands. The
Nassau-based electrical firm has been engaged
at the Baker’s Bay Development at Guana
Cay in the Abacos for over a year.

PICTURED AT THE PRESENTATION, left to right are Tim Sands, PTA president at Cherokee Primary;
Ruth Smith, office manager, DOE; Dennis Nairn, president of PDEC; Lenora Black, superintendent,

Abaco Schools; Vanessa James, principal, Abaco Cen

tral High School; Sandy Edwards, education offi-

cer, DOE and Leslie Rolle, senior education officer, DOE.

FINANCE CORPORATION (FF PAH AMAS LIMITED
OONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INOOME (Unmanned)
Sime Mooths Exceed July 2, orb

(Expressed in Hahgenicn deliars)

Three fl onthe
Fivdeed
July 41. 200
[RCOME
Het peered micore i
Prowugon dor ood eee
Het ire. afer provision for credit keases
Feege mind ¢ Dias Se
Tal come
OM INTEREST EXPENSES
Terie sce-rtarart axpacane 3912558

MET IROORLE 5 3,350 048

TH33m
(hema)
5 or aay
Sts

dai san

FISAMCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
OOSSOLIDATED STATEMEST OF CHANGES IN EQ
Ming Miaaths Ended Jaly 31, De

(Expressed in Bahamian dolkirs)

Share

Capital Premium Reserve

Balance at October 31, 2007
Het prokt for the penod
Dovadends

Balance at Juby 31, 2008

$5,337 3h

$5,337.35

Balance at October 31, 2008
Met profit for the penod
Davadends

Balance at Jhaly 21, 209

$5,331 5H

$5, 3933

FISASCE CORPORATION OF RAHAMAS LIM

Thre Mancha
Ended
Joly M1, Share

Mine Micha
F inten dt
Joly 41, Soe

5 7L4en |
Tans

39

TH tH

Baad bs

M31
(L0e12357)
2708
LM 50)
bishisn

Z1,224511
(hiTs ny
Tea se
ES2LGST
as

2310 Levarr?

3241515 f
5 54m 15 5 30801 4.1 a 11573 Sat

FTW (Ul npucliteed)

Share Ganeral Retained
Earnings
2442243 = =6500,000 94,800,153 92,184,445
1L573,908 LL574,908
LLF35,994)) C1 L.799,994)

81,540,787 92,026,379

> En
2,552,753

500,000

7 ff} he
oy ey oP

500,000 63,054,040
3,030,041
(10,400,001)

75, 70d, 690

IL#4L692
9,050,054 |
(10,400,001)

2,552,785 44,092,772

$00,000

TED

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLAWS (Unaudited)

Sine Vlonths Eeded July 31, 2008
(Expressed in Bahamian cinilars)

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Net eect
Adqustments bar
Depreciation
Provision for credit losses
Lows on dusposal of fxed assets

Changes in operating assets and babobtes

Increase in ines and advances, net
increas: in depots
Net cash rem operating actethies
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Purchase of fred assets
Hat (Parckase) Procesde of mverinenis
Het cash fem iovestmg achyies
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITY
Dowdends pod

NET INCREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, BEGINNING OF THE PERM

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, EXD OF THE PERIOD i

July 31, 2008 July 31, 2008

4050, 641 11,375,588

a7, S0T
LLda17,932
46,200
15.157, 900

4LL a5
STS SLE
Ha2
15,250,153

(77341280)

(37,415,064)

10444,544
13,348,059

(2,253,103)

(57,957,145)
54881479
11,851,185

(24,3510
2 FaT 24
2507, 854

(173,475)

62902
(LOADS OL) (6,633,734)
5.453,791

TO2E A482
33487453

5,843,751
V7.337 2
23,154,433

FISASCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
Aotes to Unedited Interim Consolidated Financial Statements

Nine Months Ended July 31, 2000

1, ACCOUNTING POLICIES

These intcnim condensed financial statements have been peepared im oceondance with

Intemational Accounting Standard 34 Interim

1 Financrl Reporting. The accounting policies

used in the prepamition of these interim financial statements are consisbent with those used in

the audited financial statements for the year ct

DMNIDEN DS PAYABLE

In June 2009, dividends totaling $34.7 mi

ded Chetober 31, 2008.

Ilion, which were awing to FINCO's parent

company were pul. The parent company has placed the total ofthis payment on deposit with

FINCO.



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TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009, PAGE 9



FOOTBALL: EXTRA TIME

AUC ILIR
GTR URI
AC Milan slumps

AP Photo/Sang Tan

CHELSEA'S MANAGER Carlo Ancelotti reacts during their
English Premier League soccer match against Burnley at
Stamford Bridge, London, Saturday, Aug. 29, 2009.

ROBERT MILLWARD,
AP Soccer Writer
LONDON

| looks like Carlo Ancelotti broke from AC Milan at the
right time.

A few weeks into his first season in English soccer, Chelsea
is perfect in the Premier League with four wins in four games.
He already has won a trophy at Wembley and has the Blues fans
believing the league title is coming back to Stamford Bridge
after three years at Manchester United's Old Trafford.

Ancelotti has devised a tactical system the players appear to
like and has two of the game's biggest egos — strikers Didier
Drogba and Nicolas Anelka — playing in harmony.

After Chelsea's 3-0 victory over Burnley, Ancelotti sur-
prised an interviewer by saying he wouldn't be watching on TV
when Milan faced Inter later in the day. Maybe he knew that
Milan, with whom he won the European Cup as a player and
coach, would be on the wrong end of a 4-0 drubbing.

Ancelotti's most recent triumphs with AC Milan were as
recent as the 2007 Champions League followed by the Euro-
pean Super Cup although the team's last Serie A triumph was
three seasons before that. He was criticized for hanging on to
aging players for too long, and Milan finished well behind
Inter in the title race in his final three seasons at the club.

Now in the unfamiliar surroundings of English soccer,
Ancelotti is out to help Chelsea regain the Premier League title
and maybe capture its first Champions League crown.

Chelsea leads the league on goal difference over Totten-
ham. Its play has delighted Ancelotti, whose team also won a
penalty-kick shootout over United after a 2-2 draw in the
Community Shield at Wembley.

"We have to maintain this situation and now the play
improves with improved confidence," he said.

Asked whether his team could win the league title, he replied:
"We started well but we know the season is very long. It will be
difficult for sure this season but we have the possibility to step
up.

Seer week we work to play well and for a coach it is
important to see that the players play well. The most important
thing for me is that we are on the right way, to train and to
work.”

In the league, Chelsea has so far faced four clubs who are
likely to finish well below them in the standings — Hull, Sun-
derland, Fulham and Burnley. The first real test will come
against Tottenham on Sept. 20 and against Liverpool, Man
United, Arsenal and Manchester City in the following months.

But Ancelotti, the fifth man to lead Chelsea in two years, is
relying on the stars who flopped in the league last season,
rather than importing some of his big names from Milan.

As well as getting the best out of Drogba and Anelka, he has
revived the form of Portuguese midfielder Deco, who was a big
disappointment last season under Luiz Felipe Scolari and Guus
Hiddink. Ancelotti has even ended Andriy Shevchenko's trou-
bled spell at Stamford Bridge.

One of Milan's greatest goal scorers during Ancelotti's reign
at San Siro, Shevchenko moved to Chelsea in 2006 but failed to
make an impact. He was sent back on loan to Milan last season.
Even Ancelotti, however, made little use of the Ukraine strik-
er, who is returning to his original club, Dynamo Kiev.

Ancelotti explained that he would not be able to give
Shevchenko many starts at Chelsea. While it might appear
that the coach has turned his back on a player who helped
him capture some big titles, Ancelotti has no room for senti-
ment.

Shevchenko, like AC Milan, is Ancelotti's past. Chelsea is his
present and future.

AP Photo/Akira Suemori

CHELSEA'S John Terry, centre left, and oat eee centre
right, lift the trophy after winning the English FA Community
Shield soccer match against Manchester United at Wembley
Stadium in London, Sunday, Aug. 9, 2009.





SPORTS

For the second tournament

ANOTHER FLINCH



DOUG FERGUSON,
AP Golf Writer
JERSEY CITY, N.J.

Mi to his chagrin,
Tiger Woods has

put some suspense back into
golf.

Give him the lead going
into the final round of the
major, and victory is no
longer as certain as death,
taxes and Woods wearing a
red shirt on Sunday. Watch
him hit a clutch shot to the
18th green, and there is no
guarantee he'll make the putt.

Y.E. Yang delivered a
shocker two weeks ago at the
PGA Championship when he
became the first player to
beat golf's best closer, rallying
from two shots behind Woods
for a three-shot victory at
Hazeltine.

Woods rarely looked so
human. And then on Sunday
at Liberty National, he bled a
little more.

He was on the cusp of con-
tention for most of the final
round at The Barclays until
the bell rang for the final lap.
Then, Woods made a 10-foot
birdie on the 14th to move
closer to the lead, a 15-foot
par putt on the next hole to
stay there, and a deft chip-
and-run to 3 feet for birdie
on the 16th that pulled him
within one shot.

Needing a birdie on the
final hole to post the club-
house lead — at least force a
playoff, maybe enough win
— he drilled a 6-iron from
189 yards to the back pin at
the 18th and listened to those
familiar roars as the ball set-
tled 7 feet from the cup.

Heath Slocum and Steve
Stricker, tied for the lead,
were on the 18th tee as
Woods stood over his birdie
putt. Even from 467 yards
away, it was not difficult to
figure out what was going on.
If the cheers weren't enough,
that red shirt is hard to miss.

"Usually he makes it,”
Slocum said. "Ho-hum for
him."

Surprise!

The ball slid by on the left
side of the cup, and they
could hear the groans —
twice. Because the large video
boards and TVs in corporate
chalets had about a 10-sec-
ond delay, the big news
reached some people later
than others. "It's kind of fun-
ny, actually,” Slocum said,
referring to the double dose
of reaction. "But I knew that
he had missed it."

That wasn't the case for
Slocum. Despite hitting a fair-
way bunker, playing short of
the green and hitting a wedge
to 20 feet, he rolled in the
best par putt of his life for a
one-shot victory. Stricker had
a chance to tie, but missed
from 10 feet.

"T guess you can't make
‘em all," Slocum said.

Yang was the first to see
for himself when he took
down the biggest name in
golf. Slocum beat a bunch of
‘| stars. The group one shot
| behind featured Woods,
Stricker, Ernie Els and
Padraig Harrington, who
have combined to win 20
majors. All of them have
been at least No. 3 in the
world at some point.

The common thread in
both tournaments was












Woods having a chance to
win, and Woods finishing sec-
ond.

"That's the way it goes
sometimes," he said.

Along with his 81 victories
worldwide, he has finished
second 32 times in tourna-
ments recognized by the
world golf rankings.

Even so, this was only the
fifth time in his career that
Woods has finished runner-
up in consecutive tourna-
ments. The last time it hap-
pened was at the end of his
2006 season, when he was
second to Yang at the HSBC
Champions in Shanghai, then
surrendered a lead on the
back nine to Harrington and
lost to him in a playoff at the
Dunlop Phoenix in Japan.

Go back to 2005 to find the
last time it happened in
America. Woods was runner-
up to Michael Campbell in
the U.S. Open, then tied for
second at the Western Open
in Chicago. Unlike the other
four occasions, Woods had a
realistic chance of winning
both times as he stood on the
18th tee. And the reason fail-
ure stands out so much is that
it rarely happened before.

No other greens confound-
ed Woods quite like the ones
at Liberty National. It was
only fitting that he missed a 7-
foot putt at the end because
he had done that all week.
On his first hole of the tour-
nament, Woods hit a pure 5-
iron to 10 feet behind the
hole at No. 10 and looked
perplexed when it broke
away from the cup.

Even as he tried to make a
move Saturday, his 67 was
slowed by missing an 8-foot
eagle putt at No. 6 that
stunned even one his playing
partners, Zach Johnson. He
missed from 5 feet later in the
third round on No. 15 and
was spewing expletives all the
way to the next tee.

"It happens,” Woods said
Sunday. "Not too many golf
courses that you misread
putts that badly. This golf
course is one."

Another course he men-
tioned was Fancourt in South
Africa for the Presidents Cup
in 2003. But that's where
Woods made a putt he called
one of the most nerve-racking
of his career. He was on the
third playoff hole against Els,
in near darkness, facing a 15-
foot par putt that broke both
ways, right up the ridge, then
left as it moved down toward
the hole.

The most famous putt was
his 6-foot birdie on the 72nd
hole of the 2000 PGA Cham-
pionship which he made to
force a playoff that he won
against Bob May on his way
to four consecutive majors.

This year, Woods won his
first PGA Tour event since
returning from reconstructive
knee surgery by making a 15-
foot birdie putt on the final
hole at Bay Hill. It was the
same green where he made a
25-foot birdie putt a year ear-
lier to win by one shot, where
he made a 15-footer to beat
Phil Mickelson in 2001.

The list is long. It will take
more than two tournaments
to put a dent in Woods’ mys-
tique. Besides, his loss is golf's
gain, for it now puts some
doubt into the outcome — if
not in Woods' head, then the
people watching, and even
those trying to beat him.










































TIGER WOODS
looks on as Zach
Johnson (not pic-
tured) putts on
the 14th hole
during the final
round of The Bar-
clays golf tourna-
ment, Sunday,
Aug. 30, 2009, at
Liberty National
Golf Club in Jer-
sey City, N.J.



























































































(APhoto/
Rich Schultz)



It happens.
Not too many
golf courses
that you mis-
read putts that
badly. This golf
course is One.

(AP Photo/Rich Schultz)
TIGER WOODS tees off on the 15th hole during the final round of The Barclays golf tournament, Sunday, Aug. 30, 2009, at Liberty National
Golf Club in Jersey City, N.J.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 10, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Football AIBA WORLD BOXING CHAMPIONSHIPS: MILAN, ITALY

Woes

FROM page 11

determined the Chiefs
already thin receiver corps
took a major blow.

During his two day clinic
here in New Providence
Darling expressed his high
expectations for the upcom-
ing Season.

Goal

“T expect to have a big
year, my ultimate goal is a
1,000 yard season, a Pro-
Bowl invite and to get my
team a championship,” he
said.

Darling could not be
reached for comment on the
injury, up to press time.

In three-preseason game
thus far he has recorded
three catches for 19 yards,
the longest an 11-yard grab
against the Vikings, August
21st.

your
news

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Carl Hield, Valentino
prepare for Italian job

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

CARL Hield, making his
third consecutive appearance,
will be the first of the two
Bahamians to see action at
the AIBA World Boxing
Championships in Milan,
Italy.

The championships, now
into its XV edition with more
than 700 competitors from
143 countries participating,
will take place at the Medi-
olanum Forum that has a
seating capacity of 11,500.

The stadium hosts the
biggest Indoor Multisport
Arena in Italy, is equipped
for swimming, ice skating, fit-
ness, dance, squash, archery,
bowling, 2-a-side soccer and
martial arts.

Hield, preparing to begin
competition on the first of the
nine days of competition, is
expected to have his hands
full as he has been drawn to
compete against a hometown
competitor in the 569 kilo-
gram class.

“All the training and stuff
was good.

“Everything has gone in
order. I’m just resting and
waiting for tomorrow
(today),” said Hield, in an
interview with The Tribune
yesterday at their hotel.

“[’m just going in there to
upset them because I know
they are coming in with their
plan to win.

“But ?m going to upset
them tomorrow. I know it’s
not going to be an easy fight,
but he just have to show me
that he want it more than me
and I want it more.”

While coach Andre Sey-

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Hield is preparing to compete on the first of the nine days of competition.

mour attended the opening
ceremonies with Valentino
Knowles, the other boxer on
the team, Hield remained at
the hotel resting.

Knowles is not expected to
compete until Wednesday.

For Hield, as long as he go
into the ring and execute the
way he was taught, he said
he’s confident that he can win
today.

Prior to going to Milan, the
Bahamian team spent about
three weeks in Rome in a
training camp, which accord-

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ing to Hield was quite benefi-
cial.

“The training camp was
nice. It gave me the opportu-
nity to meet different people
from different countries,” he
pointed out.

“T got to meet a lot of peo-
ple, especially some of the
people who I will meet in my
weight class. So it was great.”

Not having the chance to
see the Mediolanum Forum
as he didn’t attend the open-
ing ceremonies, Hield said he
heard that it was a fantastic

BRITISH GRAND PRIX

arena and he’s just eager to
go there today and compete.

“The gym we trained at was
very nice. They had every-
thing there,” he said.

“And they told us that the
gym we will be competing in
is much better than that, so I
know it should be good.

“But I just want to start
competing.”

With this being his third
appearance in the biannual
championships and not
advancing out of the first
round, Hield said he’s con-



vinced that his experience will
pull him through this time
around.

“This is my third one, so I
have the experience of what
to do and how to deal with
the matter, So I’m just going
to go out there and do what I
have to do,” he insisted.

Hield, who was trying to
enjoy a movie in Italian, said
Knowles is just as pumped up
as he is and is ready to start
competition when he get into
the ring on Wednesday.

But Hield said his goal is
to go out there and start the
pace for the Bahamas today.

Wellington Miller, the pres-
ident of the Amateur Boxing
Association of the Bahamas,
said the expectations is burst-
ing through the seams for the
two boxers.

“They are in good shape,
their spirits are high and they
are ready to roll,” Miller said.
“They’ve been training in
Cuba for a while and then
they went to Italy where they
had a good training camp for
the last three weeks.

“T understood that they had
some very good sparring with
the boxers over there.

“So I expect them to do
very well. Talking with the
coach, they are in excellent
shape and their spirits are
high. So they should do very
well. I expect a world cham-
pion to come back home.”

Miller said this was defi-
nitely the best position that
the Bahamas has ever been
in, having been afforded the
scholarship by AIBA to
attend the training camp.

He assured the public that
the boxers will certainly show
their appreciation by their
performances.

Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie and
Chandra Sturrup continue to impress



SHAMAR SANDS (centre) competing in this file photo. He is now in Britain.

FROM page 11

13.91, almost a week after he got second in
his first post-World’s meet in Tallinn on
August 25 when he ran 13.50 behind Amer-
ican David Oliver’s winning time of 13.46.
While some of the Bahamians were com-
peting in Gateshead, some of the Jamaicans
were attending the Zagreb 2009 in Croatia

yesterday as well.

Today, the next meet on the internation-
al schedule is in Rovereto, Italy, but it’s not
known if any of the Bahamian athletes will

be competing.

However, a number of Bahamians are
expected to line up to compete in the sixth
and final IAAF Golden League meeting at
the Memorial Van Damme in Bruxelles,

Belgium on Friday.

Two days later, it’s the Rieti 2009 Grand
Prix in Rieti, Italy on Sunday.

Reminiscent to the World’s, the top
ranked athletes will all head to Thessaloni-
ki, Greece for the IAAF/VTB Bank World
Athletics Final from September 12-13.

At this point, Sturrup and Ferguson-
McKenzie are both eligible for the 100; Fer-
guson-McKenzie in the 200; Chris ‘Fireman’
Brown in the men’s 400; Leevan ‘Super-
man’ Sands in the men’s triple jump and
Donald Thomas in the men’s high jump.

CHANDRA STURRUP in action in a file photo.



The top eight athletes on the track and the
top 12 on the field will qualify to compete in
the World Athletics Final.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 12, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Lessons from Mexico for next wave of swine flu

By MARTHA MENDOZA
Associated Press Writer

MEXICO CITY (AP) —
Mexico is preparing for a sec-
ond wave of swine flu, looking
at what worked and what did-
mt last spring when it banned
everything from dining out to
attending school in an effort
to control the virus.

As the Northern Hemi-

miss UNIVERSE

sphere flu season begins, the
rest of the world is also study-
ing Mexico’s experience,
looking for measures to repli-
cate and costly mistakes to
avoid.

So what worked? Public
awareness; rapid diagnosis,
treatment and quarantine;
and a near-compulsive out-
break of hand-washing.

What didn’t? Travel bans,

school closures, overuse of
antibiotics and those flimsy
paper face masks that tangled
hair, slid down necks and hid
the beautiful smiles of this
gargantuan city.

When swine flu first flared
up in Mexico in April, the
government erred on the side
of caution, closing schools and
museums, banning public
gatherings, playing soccer

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games to empty stadiums and
telling people not to shake
hands or kiss one another on
the cheek. This bustling city of
18 million became eerily hol-
low.

Mexican health officials say
they made the right call.

“Since we were the first
country affected by the flu,
we didn’t know the possible
magnitude and severity, so we
took measures that we now
know can be (focused),” said
Dr. Pablo Kuri, the health
secretary’s special influenza
adviser.

In hindsight, Mexico’s most
effective action — one now
emulated around the world
— was immediately telling its
own citizens when the new
virus was detected.

Not every country has been
so candid when facing an epi-
demic: China was heavily crit-
icized for its slow response to
SARS in 2003, while Argenti-
na refused to declare a nation-
al public health emergency
when swine flu flared there
in July.

But Mexico’s openness did-
n’t come cheap: Economists
say the outbreak cost the
country billions of dollars,
mostly in losses from tourism.

“Mexico shared informa-
tion early and frequently,”
said Dr. Jon Andrus at the
Pan American Health Orga-
nization’s headquarters in
Washington. “Mexico did this
at great cost to its economy,
but it was the right thing to
do.”

At the height of the epi-
demic in March, you could
hardly make it a block in
Mexico City without a
masked public health work-
er, maitre d’, bus driver or
store owner squeezing a dol-
lop of antiseptic gel onto your
hands.

Health experts say hand-
washing offered the best
defense — while the masks
probably did little to stop the
virus from spreading. Masks
are now advised only for
health care workers and peo-
ple who are already infected.

Fear also left behind a



A SCHOOL OFFICIAL holds a bottle of antibacterial gel during a
screening of students at the entrance to school in Mexico City...
(AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

cleaner city: Crews now regu-
larly scrub subways and buses,
park benches and offices —
something almost unheard of
before the epidemic.

“Clearly, millions of Mexi-
canos wore masks this spring
everywhere they went, but
HIN1 continued to spread,”
said Laurie Garrett, a senior
fellow at the New York-based
Council on Foreign Relations.
“Tt now seems clear that the
best personal protections are
regular hand-washing, avoid-
ing crowded places, and —
when it is available — vacci-
nation.”

Many Mexicans wait until
they suffer full-blown symp-
toms before going to a doc-
tor, if at all. Often, people
self-diagnose and go to a
pharmacy to treat themselves
since few drugs require a pre-
scription. Since April, how-
ever, certain anti-flu drugs are
distributed only at hospitals.

Millions of uniformed Mex-
ican children were greeted
with a dash of anti-bacterial
gel as they returned to school
last Monday.

Classes were postponed
until mid-September in south-
ern Chiapas state because of
an uptick in swine flu cases in
the past month.

Chiapas has had 3,400
swine flu cases to date, the
most in the country.

Schools nationwide are

checking for possible signs of
swine flu among children and
teachers and are sending
home anyone who seems sick.
They also have added new
curriculum guidelines to
ensure children learn about
personal hygiene and basic
sanitation.

But this time, schools will
be closed only if so many sick
children or teachers get sick
that education is compro-
mised. Plans are already
under way to continue lessons
at home.

“We aren’t going to panic,
but we are being more careful
here this year,” said Cecilia
McGregor, spokeswoman for
Colegio Ciudad de Mexico,
an 1,100-student private
school in Mexico City.

Janitors are required to
wash doorknobs every two
hours, she said, and an on-
campus doctor was perform-
ing checks.

Despite all the precautions,
Mexico’s health advisers say
the most important lesson
they have learned about swine
flu is that in most cases, it’s
fairly mild.

Swine flu caused 164 deaths
in three months in Mexico,
where tobacco-related ill-
nesses kill that number every
day.

“So now we can put into
context what actually hap-
pened,” Kuri said.

e1sha Wemyss

VP WemCo Security

eisha Wemyss,

the 34 year old

daughter of
former Inspector of
Police and now
President & CEO of
WemCo Security Mr.
Henry and Mrs. Judy
Wemyss graduated
Magna Cum Laude and
a member of the Sigma
Beta Delta Honours
Society at DeVry
University on 18 July
in Miramar, Florida.

Ms. Wemyss received a
Bachelor of Science in

Business Administration

Accounting Concentration.

“Tam proud of my
accomplishments. I am
grateful to my parents and
to the company to afford
me this opportunity. I hope
that my eventual full return
to WemCo will strengthen
the company’s manage-
ment Structure as we con-
tinue to serve the Bahamian
public as the best security
company in the country bar
none”- Keisha Wemyss

Ms. Wemyss, who is the Vice President for
Finance and Security for WemCo, took a
leave of absence to further her studies. She

“T believe that it is important for our
company and our family to ensure that the

completed two years of requirements in a

year, and while enrolled she was a Deanis
List student through the entire time at Devry
University. She was chosen Graduate speaker
representing both Undergraduates at DeVry
University and Keller Graduate School
of Management for graduation this year.

While pursuing her studies, she was also
actively communicating and involved in the

Keisha is

next generation of leadership is strong.
I congratulate Keisha on this wonderful
accomplishment.”

currently continuing — her
studies in the fall at Keller Graduate
School of Management where she is
reading for a double Masters Degree in
Finance and Accounting preparing to take
the Certified Public Accountant’s exam

over the next year. She will also start her

day to day running of her portfolio at

WemCo Security. “It was like she never left
her chair”, said Mr. Wemyss.

studies in the field of ‘Project Management
Mix’, which is also offered at Keller.

Ms. Wemyss is an award winning former

officer of the Royal Bahamas Defence

Force.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM











ZHIVARGO LAING

Reform
proposals
plan to
‘optimally
serve’
businesses

* Government planning to
rationalise all business
support services, and
have proposals in hand
by beginning of 2010,
with current structure
failing to meet
requirements

* Chamber chief calls for
consolidation into SBA-
type body, and better

co-ordination

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government is assess-
ing proposals for the “ratio-
nalisation” of all its agencies
and programmes that support
Bahamian small and medium-
sized businesses in a bid to
“optimally serve” this sector,

SEE page 4B

Buyer pledges to honour
Morton union agreement

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE European salt pro-
ducer set to acquire Morton
Salt’s Inagua facility has
pledged to honour the exist-
ing terms and conditions in
the industrial agreement with
the union representing the
majority of the company’s line
workers, Tribune Business
was told yesterday, something

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Disney starts $25m
island expansion

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunebusiness.net

isney has begun the
$25 million develop-
ment of its Bahamian
private island, Cast-
away Cay, the perma-
nent secretary in the Office of the
Prime Minister confirmed yesterday.

David Davis told Tribune Business
that government concessions for the
project under the Family Island Devel-
opment Encouragement Act and
Hotels Encouragement Act have
allowed Disney to cut $3.4 million
from the total cost of the expansion,
now pegged at $24.2 million.

The entertainment giant also has
plans to launch a new cruise ship by
2011, with a Bahamas itinerary and
capacity for 4,000 passengers.

Disney Cruise Lines’ spokesman,
Jason Lasecki, told Tribune Business
yesterday that work on the expansion
of Castaway Cay has commenced with
an expected completion scheduled for
summer 2010.

Back-to-scholl Credit squeeze tightens
sales stay flat fo business, consumers

Price-conscious consumer
target cheaper items

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunebusiness.net

Investment incentives slash costs by $3.4m



According to Mr Lasecki, the idea
to expand services and infrastructure
on the island was born from the pop-
ularity of the Cay as disclosed by guest
surveys.

Disney plans to include Castaway
Cay twice on one of its ships’ itinerary,
in order to give passengers more time
on the private island.

“Castaway Cay has been a more
popular port of call, and our passen-
gers asked us to spend more time at
the island, so this is our response to
our guest wants and needs,” said Mr
Lasecki.

Tour operators and shore excursion
providers have railed against these
private islands, suggesting they absorb
a large amount of cruise ship passen-
ger spending before the ships reach
ports such as Nassau and Freeport.

Mr Lasecki said Disney has seen
many of their guests spending at both
ports of call, adding that the company

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BUSINESSES and home purchasers are
finding it increasingly difficult to obtain debt
financing for their projects, industry profes-
sionals told Tribune Business yesterday, urging

lenders to “find a balance” as banks denied the

BACK-TO-school sales
were relatively flat compared
to 2008 for most Bahamian
retailers, Tribune Business
was told yesterday, with con-
sumers purchasing more low-

Bahamas was headed for its own version of the
‘credit crunch’.

William Wong, the Bahamas Real Estate
Association’s (BREA) president, said the
increasingly risk-averse appetite of Bahamian
commercial banks and other lending institu-

tions, which had seen them toughen borrower

SEE page 2B

that was described as “a good
first step”.

Obie Ferguson, president
of the Trades Union Congress
(TUC) and attorney for the
Bahamas Industrial, Manu-
facturing and Allied Workers
Union (BIMAWU), said he
had received a letter from
German-headquartered K +
S Aktienesellschaft on August

SEE page 3B

Sothebys

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

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offers an array of shore excursion in
Nassau, including Atlantis’ Dolphin
Cay and an upscale wine experience at
Graycliff.

“Most of our guests will opt to do
shore excursions in Nassau,” he said.
“We definitely look for new and inter-
esting things to offer our guests in
Nassau.”

Disney’s expansion of Castaway
Cay will include a family beach, more
water recreation options, private
cabanas, several more eateries and a
floating slide platform, which will be
one of the first additions ready for use
by early 2010.

The expansion will also create five
to eight additional permanent posi-
tions for “qualified Bahamians”.

Several construction jobs will be
created for Bahamians when the pro-
ject begins in earnest, according to Mr
Davis.

He said Disney committed within

* Realtors’ chief says ‘lucky’ if one

borrower approved if four sent to banks

* Chamber president says private
sector telling him obtaining debt
financing increasingly difficult

* But bank head says institutions
still open for lending, which
has ‘not contracted but slowed’

loan default levels, had dampened real estate

sales in a major way.

SEE page 4B

Where do you want to be?

the Heads of Agreement to do its best
to use Bahamian labour, which gives
the government of the Bahamas,
through the work permit system, the
prerogative to deny access to foreign
workers if qualified labour can be
found locally.

Mr Davis said concessions for Dis-
ney have been limited to building
materials and heavy equipment for
land clearing under the Family Island
Development Encouragement Act,
while incentives for the development
of shops and restaurants have been
given to the entertainment giant
through the Hotels Encouragement
Act.

The company also plans to expand
transportation on Castaway Cay
through its tram system, which will
move guests to the newer part of the
island following the development.
Only about 10 per cent of the island
has been developed thus far.

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS ee
Bahamas must address public service obstacles

THE passing of Senator
Edward M. Kennedy this past
week brought to focus the
probable closing chapter in
the dominance of America’s
greatest political family...the
Kennedys. It is very doubtful
that any members of the cur-
rent generation will be more
than minor players in Ameri-
ca’s future political landscape.

In honouring the life of Ted
Kennedy, it quickly became
obvious that the media pre-

sented a moving tribute to a
‘life of public service’ of not
just one, but three, extraor-
dinary brothers from a
wealthy and politically-con-
nected family. They were the
sons of an extremely success-
ful businessman who also
served as a Congressman and
later US Ambassador.
President John F. Kennedy
in 1960 became the second-
youngest President of the US.
He was assassinated in

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November 1963, leaving a
legacy that included major
support of the civil rights
movement, the launch of the
space programme and the
successful handling of the
Cuban Missile Crisis.

Senator Robert F. Kennedy
served as Attorney-General
in the administration of his
brother, John. In 1964 he
became a Senator for the
state of New York. Robert
was assassinated in 1968 as he
was seeking the Democratic
Party presidential nomination.

Senator Edward (Ted)
Kennedy served for 46 years
in the US Senate. At the time
of his death, he was the sec-
ond most senior member of
the Senate, and the third-
longest-serving senator in US
history. He played a major
role in passing many laws,
including laws addressing
immigration, cancer
research, health insurance,
apartheid, disability dis-
crimination, AIDS care, civil
rights, mental health benefits,
children's health insurance,
education and volunteering.

While the Kennedys’ con-
tribution to public service is
undisputed, many would
argue that had it not been for
the security of the Kennedy
Trust Funds, it may not have
been possible for this family
to give back so much, through
politics and general philan-
thropy.

Ability to serve

This point was brought to
the forefront in the Bahamian
context last week, when
Desmond Bannister purport-
edly expressed his misgivings
about the level of ministerial
salaries while appearing on a
radio show.

According to a local news-
paper, the Minister said:
"And whenever politicians
raise this issue with respect to
the income they make, I think
it’s so clouded by political
rhetoric that Bahamians don’t

By Larry Gibson



really get to analyse what the
issues are: That professional
people leave their firms...
and so we all have to consider
what is in the best interests
of our families when we do
this (because) you have to be
able to live and survive. Quite
frankly, for a minister to live
on a salary that we pay is an
amazing thing.” Minister Ban-
nister said life after politics
could be especially difficult
for individuals, particularly on
their wallets.

"If you care and you are
doing what you would need
to do to take care of your con-
stituents, and if you’re not
taking kickbacks, if you’re not
cutting corrupt deals, if you’re
doing your job properly, you
will end up as many politi-
cians have ended up - in real-
ly difficult and dire circum-
stances," he said. This partic-
ular observation goes directly
to the heart of the largest
problem inherent in our polit-
ical system as practiced today.

I absolutely applaud the
Minister for having the
courage to put this issue on
the table for national discus-
sion. If the general popula-
tion feels that not enough of
our capable ‘sons and daugh-
ters’ are coming forward to
serve, then the issue raised by
the Minister must be
addressed. The argument is
really no different than the
argument for an appropriate
level of compensation for
Judges.

Ministerial Salary

Are we serious when a
Minister of government has a
base salary of around
$70,000? It is substantially less
than the salary of a Perma-

nent Secretary, it is less than
most union leaders, it is less
than most senior managers in
the private sector and it is less
than senior management in
government-owned public
corporations. Yet there is a
general perception that politi-
cians are grossly overpaid and
ripping off the country. We
need to put petty politics
aside and get sensible on this
national issue.

Is it enough to merely say
“that is the nature of politics,
if you can’t stand the heat,
stay out of the kitchen”, or
should we be more pragmatic
in our approach to this very
important issue? Should we,
by default, resign ourselves to
having our political system
dominated by those who are
independently wealthy, for
whom high office represents a
massive pay rise (and who
perhaps lack the experience
and competence that the post
require) or, finally, those who
are prepared to ‘cut some
deals’?

Call to Service

With the opening of the air-
waves, there is no shortage of
opinions on every imaginable
subject. However, when it
comes to personal service and
giving of one’s time, talents
or money...there is general-
ly a dearth of volunteers.

National service should not
be synonymous with commit-
ting ‘financial suicide’. How-
ever, the great irony is that
when highly-qualified and
competent candidates answer
the call to national service,
they very often must also
endure massive criticism and
character assassination.

A case in point is the recent
appointment of Michael Bar-
nett as Chief Justice. I am
amazed at those who are
attempting to stir a ‘tempest
in a teacup’ over his appoint-
ment for purely political rea-
sons. Mr Barnett is well-qual-
ified for the position, and he

will do the country proud.
Had he been a foreign
appointment, nobody would
have said a word, but because
he is one of our own, it’s a
different story. For a man
who has spent his entire pro-
fessional career distinguish-
ing himself in his chosen pro-
fession, is it appropriate to
now presuppose that he is
incapable of being impartial
and professional in the dis-
charge of his duties? This
appointment is not breaking
any new ground, as such
appointments under identical
or very similar circumstances
have taken place throughout
the Commonwealth over the
years.

This is my view on the sub-
ject, but I do appreciate the
opposing views, which togeth-
er put all sides of the issue on
the table for national discus-
sion.

Conclusion

These are daunting issues
that the Bahamian people
must deal with at some point
in the not too distant future.
With maturity, the country
should really be prepared to
address these issues in a sen-
sible and bipartisan manner.
Otherwise...it will be more
business as usual.

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice-president - pensions,
Colonial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance
and is a major shareholder of
Security & General Insurance
Company in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do
not necessarily represent
those of Colonial Group
International or any of its sub-
sidiary and/or affiliated com-
panies. Please direct any
questions or comments to
rlgibson@atlantichouse.com.b
s

Back-to-school sales stay flat

FROM page 1B

er-cost items.

Manager at Bookworld and
Stationers, Deron Wong, said
sales at the store on Mackey
Street have been flat com-
pared to 2008. However he
said shoppers have exhibited
a slightly different shopping
pattern over last year.

He argued that customers
have been waiting until the
end of the week and the
weekend to shop, and are not
buying items in bulk.

“They have been waiting

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

COMMERCIAL

until the weekend,” said Mr
Wong. “A lot of people came
in on Saturday. People are
buying when they have the
money - when funds are avail-
able.”

He added that more peo-
ple seem to have gone to
credit unions for money to
purchase school supplies,
while being more careful and
discerning in product pur-
chases in terms of cost.

Mr Wong said Bookworld
also offered more discounts
this year, as the economic sit-
uation has burdened much of

2009

COM/COM/00052

IN THE MATTER OF BAC BAHAMAS BANK LTD.
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT 1992

ADVERTISEMENT

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that (i) the Order

its client base. He said the
store had as many calls for
donations and receipt of cor-
porate sponsors as last year.

The downturn in the econ-
omy also forced Bookworld
to buy smarter and demand
better rates from its suppli-
ers. Mr Wong said because
many of the store’s items
come from the UK, the
exchange rate presented more
of a financial challenge.

“We had to buy smarter

and earlier to get better rates
from the suppliers,” he said.
“In the end you have to pay
earlier even when the funds
aren’t there. After the con-
version there is nothing you
can do (with the pricing), oth-
erwise you start losing mon-
ey.”
“We try to keep things low
because of the economic situ-
ation and not raise prices as
much unless we have to.”

Gavin Watchorn, president
of Abaco Foods, owners of
Solomons SuperCentre and
Cost Right, said their sale

shave also been relatively flat
compared to 2008.

“A couple of stores are up
and a couple of stores are
down,” he said. “It’s the same
as last year, which is no great
surprise. The market place got
more competitive.”

He said despite the rise in
competition, stores have been
able to keep sales transaction
counts up or above last year’s.

Mr Watchorn said con-
sumers have shopped around
more this year than in 2008,
and have paid attention to ads
for sales and price reductions.

“Overall we were more or
less flat with last year,” said
Mr Watchorn. We are happy
to be enjoying sales growth
even in these conditions and
the tightening up of the mar-
ketplace.”

He said consumers have
prepared a budget this year
and seem to be committed to
staying within the bracket
they “have allocated toward
grocery and back to school”
items.

UionM

Pi CSL bk &

of the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas dated the 21st July, A.D. 2009 confirming

POSITION AVAILABLE

Required Competencies:

© The ability to work on own initiative and communicate
effectively in oral and written form.
The ability to deal with Agents courteously and professionally,
Computer skills (that is competence in the use of word
processing and spreadsheet software programmes and the
ability to learn and function effectively using the Company's
General Insurance Application)

the reduction of the capital of BAC Bahamas Bank
Ltd. (BAC Bahamas’) from US$24,000,000.00 to
US$18,000,000.00 and (ii) the Minute approved by

Office Assistant /
Training Coordinator

Skill sets:
Experience with coordinating events
Good Computer Skills
Great in time management,
communication and organizational skills
Personable attitude with good customer
service skills
Effective Telephone Skills
Must be able to work well with others

the Court showing (with respect the capital of BAC

Bahamas as altered) this several particulars required
by the Companies Act 1992, were registered by the
Interested persons should send a detailed resume

accompanied by a letter of application to: Registrar of Companies on or about 26th August,

A.D. 2009.
Data Entry Clerk & Customer Service Representative
P, O, Box $5-19023

Dated the 27th day of August A.D., 2009
Nassau, Bahamas

SEND RESUME TO:
Lignum Technologies (Rahamas) Ltd.
The Harbour Bay Shopping Plaza
vial
Fax: 394-4971
info@lignumtech.com
P.O. Box 88-6295

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Deltec House, Lyford Cay,
New Providence, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioner,
BAC Bahamas Bank Ltd.

Or email to:
csands(@iewi.com

The closing date for all applications is

September Ind, 2009
Only short-listed candidates will be contacted

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009, PAGE 3B





Realtors chief eyes Miss
Universe Pageant sales boost

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

HOSTING the Miss Uni-
verse Pageant will help to
boost sales of Bahamian real
estate to high net worth buy-
ers from around the globe,
the Bahamas Real Estate
Association’s (BREA) presi-
dent said yesterday, television
images having showcased this
nation in the best possible
light.

William Wong told Tribune
Business: “I think the Gov-
ernment made a very bold
move by hosting this Miss
Universe Pageant, and it’s
going to reap us some serious
benefits over the years.

“The way the Ministry of
Tourism organised things, the
way people around the world
saw the stuff, enhanced our
image and will bring people
here to buy second homes.”

He added: “This was our

stimulus package, where the
Bahamas can be seen around
the world, and will only bring
us huge dividends.

“Tf I was living abroad and
saw those wonderful shots of
the beaches, the islands and
the people, it will really
enhance our sales. It may not
happen overnight, but that
kind of advertising was defi-
nitely a plus.

“T think that really, over a
long period of time, it will

help our people with their
sales, the real estate and the
second home market. It was a
positive thing the Govern-
ment did, a bold move, they
pulled it off, and we should
be proud of it as Bahamians.”

Mr Wong said the Bahami-
an real estate market
remained soft, and would
likely continue in this state
until the US economy picked
up.
“For the next 12-18

Buyer pledges to honour
Morton union agreement

FROM page 1B

21, 2009, pledging to work
with the union once the acqui-
sition was completed.

“T got a letter from K + $
dated August 21, indicating
they are purchasing Morton
Salt and that they will be
looking forward to a smooth
transition with the union, hav-
ing regard for the other union
they have within the region,”
Mr Ferguson told Tribune
Business.

“Tt appears as if they’re try-
ing to avoid any unnecessary
hassle and are willing to com-
ply with the existing industri-
al agreement..... K + S said
they would adhere to the
existing terms and conditions
of the industrial agreement.”

Mr Ferguson said Europe’s
largest salt producer had
informed him it wanted to
minimise disruption and
ensure continuity when it
completed its acquisition of
Morton International, of
which the Inagua-based com-
pany and plant is part.

“Tt is clear the company is
attempting to start off on a
good foot with the workers
and the union at Morton Salt,
which is really the concern in
situations like this. We’re
looking forward to the com-
pletion of the sale with K +
S, for the process to begin and
the union and the company
to work together as much as
we can.... It is a good first
step.”

Mr Ferguson added: “We
are prepared as a union to
work with the company and
do what is necessary to make
sure everyone benefits.”

Dow Chemical Company
earlier this year placed Mor-
ton (Bahamas) and its parent,
Morton International, up for
sale to finance its acquisition
of their former owner, Rohm
& Haas, agreeing a $1.675 bil-
lion deal with K + Sin April
2009.

However, the transaction
has not been completed yet
because it is still being scruti-
nised by the Us antitrust
authorities to ensure it com-
plies with all their competi-
tion requirements.

As a result, no decision has
been taken on the multi-mil-
lion dollar investment
required to rebuild Morton’s
Inagua facilities following the
damage wrought by Hurri-
cane Ike in 2008, something
that has been left toK + S.

A Dow spokeswoman told
Tribune Business: “That will
definitely be a question for K
+ S. [know Dow and Morton

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





OBIE FERGUSON

International are not starting
any new investments.”

Confirming that the trans-
action was not yet complet-
ed, she added: “It’s still pend-
ing. Right now, the transac-
tion is under review by the
Federal Trade Commission.
There are ongoing discussions
with the FTC on the transac-
tion.

“We expect that the Fed-
eral Trade Commission will
clear the transaction in the
next one to two months, and
at that time the divestiture
transaction will close and K+S
will be the owner.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No 46 of 2000)

BASE CONSULTING GROUP LTD.
IBC No. 145424 B
(Un Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given that as follows:

(a) That BASE CONSULTING GROUP LTD. is in Dissolution under the
provisions of The International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 28th day of
August, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted and

registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the Company is Sterling (Bahamas) Limited of 2nd Floor
Satfrey Square, Bank Lane and Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas

(d) Any person having Claim against the above name Company are required
on or before the 27th day of September, 2009 to send their name, address
and particulars of the debt or claim to the Liquidator of the Company, or in
default thereof they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution of
any made before such claim is approved.

Sterling (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE TO SHAREHOLDERS

As a result of the Bank’s financial

results for the third quarter ending 315!
July 2009, the Board of Directors of

Finance Corporation of Bahamas

Limited hereby notifies all of its

Shareholders that an interim dividend

of thirteen cents (13 cents) per Ordinary

Share payable on | sth September

2009, to all shareholders of record as
of 8th September 2009.

D. BURROWS-HAINES
CORPORATE SECRETARY

Dated this 18' September 2009

“In the meantime, Dow
does not have any plans for
new investments in the Mor-
ton Salt assets in the
Bahamas. It will be up to K+S
to speak to any future plans
or investments there.”

months, we need to hunker
down and do the best we can
to ride out the storm. The
Miss Universe contest was a

big plus for us,” he added, cit-
ing the mid-market - proper-
ties priced at $500,000 and up
- as being especially weak.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



5
Credit squeeze tightens for business, consumers

FROM page 1B

“Tf we send four clients to
the bank, we'll be lucky if one
makes it through,” Mr Wong
told Tribune Business. “Of
course, if the client can’t get
qualified to get a loan it
makes it difficult for them to
buy a house or lot.”

Khaalis Rolle, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce’s
president, said the banking
sector’s understandable cau-
tion on originating new com-
mercial loans, at a time when
19.21 per cent of all business
loans were in default, was
already impacting the private
sector and their plans.

“This morning, I had a con-
versation with a non-member
who has a thriving business
and is trying to borrow funds
from one of the commercial

banks,” Mr Rolle told Tri-
bune Business. “He said it
was taking him a lot more
time and effort to go through
this process than it has in the
past.”

Acknowledging that this
had the “potential for a major
impact” on the Bahamian
business community, Mr
Rolle said the banks and pri-
vate sector needed to “find a
balance” that satisfied the
requirements of both parties.

While the easiest move
would be to call for the banks
to loosen the lending purse
strings, the Chamber presi-
dent said: “The reality is that
they can’t. The reality is that
there has to be a balanced
approach to this.

“Bankers need to deter-
mine where that fine line is,
and businesses need to deter-
mine what their minimum

The Tribune

52wk-Low

Securit y
Abaco Markets

ROYAL BFIDELITY

Maney at Work

requirements are and operate
within those parameters.

“This shows the importance
of planning. Businesses need
to go back into the laboratory
and develop plans that will
allow them to maximise their
returns with very little input.
This means becoming more
efficient and far more effec-
tive with the use of their
assets.”

Mr Rolle predicted that the
tight Bahamian credit market
would “endure over the next
18 to 24 months, until the
banks see strong signs of
recovery, unemployment
starts to slow and key indica-
tors turn around”.

He added: “If I’m an
investor, and banks are in the
investment business, and I’m
unsure whether you will be
able to pay me back or get a
return on my investment, I’m



Eo

CFAL

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 31 AUGUST 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,575.84] CHG -0.04| %CHG 0.00 | YTD -136.52 | YTD % -7.97
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.76 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (81)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

2.74
5.50
1.27
1.32
6.60
10.00
10.30
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.49
10.09
10.00

Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)}

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

52wk-Low

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b

Security Last Sale

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

2.74
6.00
3.72
2.03
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.12
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.09
10.00

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.04
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

2.74
6.00
3.68
2.03
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.12
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.09
10.00

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $
7.92
2.00

Ask $

0.20 RND Holdings 0.35

Last Price
14.00
4.00
0.55

Weekly Vol.
8.42
6.25
0.40

29.00 ABDAB

0.40 RND Holdings

52wk-Low

Fund Name

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTID% Last 12 Months

1.3320
2.8952
1.4088
3.1031
12.3870
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

CFAL Bond Fund

CFAL MS! Preferred Fund

CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.4005
2.9047
1.4855
3.1143
13.0484
101.6693
96.7398
1.0000
9.3399
1.0663
1.0215
1.0611

-1.20

-8.01

-1.11

3.48 5.15
-3.66
5.44
-12.43
5.84
1.67
4.18
0.00
-1.41
6.63
2.15
6.11

3.61

3.41
1.10
0.35
0.00
2.69
2.59

2.29

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV §$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

going to be very cautious
about making an investment.

“One of the corresponding
impacts for the business sector
is that it will impede the
growth of business. If you’re
unable to get credit, your
access to capital is reduced,
and you'll have a correspond-
ing reduction in business
activity.

“In many respects, that’s
the difference between the life
and death of a business. That
will mean a reduction in
inventory purchases, a reduc-
tion in staffing levels. Busi-
ness turnover will certainly be
impacted.”

Paul McWeeney, Bank of
the Bahamas International’s
managing director, yesterday
agreed with Mr Rolle’s analy-
sis, placing a recovery in the
economy and bank lending
activities at least 18 months
away, towards the end of
2010.

“We don’t expect to see
any sustained turnaround
until towards the end of next
year,” Mr McWeeney told
Tribune Business. “By sum-
mer next year we may expe-
rience some _ sustained
momentum if all things

remain the same.”

He disagreed, though, with
the notion that the Bahamas
was experiencing its own
national ‘credit crunch’, telling
Tribune Business that the
doors of all Bahamian com-
mercial banks were still open
for lending.

Arguing that the Bahamas
was witnessing a slowdown in
lending growth, rather than a
contraction, Mr McWeeney
said: “Nationally, we are see-
ing a slowdown in credit
opportunities, but the banks
are still open for business. The
banks want to be able to
advance funds to qualified
and suitable borrowers. That
is taking place. It’s not a con-
traction, just slowed growth.”

According to the Central
Bank of the Bahamas’ latest
figures for the half-year to
June 2009, private sector cred-
it growth had actually fallen
by $15.19 million compared
to 2008 for the first six
months, with consumer lend-
ing down $35.13 million year-
to-date.

However, the decline in
credit growth could be the
result of reduced credit
demand among consumers

and borrowers, as much as
tougher lending criteria set by
the banks.

Mr McWeeney pointed out
that the situation in the
Bahamas was different from
the US, as the supply of sur-
plus liquidity/assets in the
commercial banking system
stood at $513.92 million at
end-June 2009, a healthy lev-
el that was more than $200
million higher than the 2008
comparative point.

While the US and global
‘crunch’ had resulted from liq-
uidity drying up, as financial
institutions stopped lending
to each other and borrowers
due to a loss of confidence
and uncertainty over who had
sub-prime mortgage market
exposure, the Bahamian slow-
down had resulted from the
economic environment, rising
unemployment and the inabil-
ity of borrowers to meet
tougher terms.

“We have to align borrow-
er creditworthiness with the
bank’s risk appetite,” Mr
McWeeney explained. “One
important aspect is the com-
pany’s capital adequacy, and
its ability to absorb the risk it
takes on.”

Reform proposals plan to
‘optimally serve’ businesses

Tribune Business was told
yesterday, something the
Chamber of Commerce’s
president believes could boost
the success rate for entrepre-
neurs and start-ups.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, told this
newspaper that he hoped to
have “a new set of proposals”
in his possession by the begin-
ning of 2010, revealing that
the Government was
analysing a number of sug-
gestions on how the “target-
ing” and operations of its
small business/entrepreneurial
assistance programmes could
be accomplished.

“There are some proposals
under active consideration
right now,” Mr Laing con-
firmed to Tribune Business.
“Clearly, there has to be such
a rationalisation, because it is
conceivable that each of these
programmes could satisfy and
address the perceived needs
of small business in the coun-

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

EPS $

COy LIN TAL

Div $ P/E
0.127
0.992

0.244

-0.877

7%

Prime + 1.75%

7%

Prime + 1.75%

EPS $
-2.246

0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.382
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

ases)

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

Div $
0.000
0.480
0.000

N/M
N/M
256.6

0.000
0.001

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

0.00%

Yield % NAV Date
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
21-Aug-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



“Tt’s my hope that we will
be in a position by the begin-
ning of next year to have a
new set of proposals as to how
we rationalise these govern-
ment programmes.

“There’s no question that
it has to happen, because the
entrepreneur, the small and
medium-sized business per-
son, today is not being opti-
mally served by the way in
which the programmes oper-
ate and are being targeted.”

The minister explained:
“Clearly, a young, high
growth business has very dif-
ferent needs to a new venture,
an upstart, that is coming into
being. While a term loan may
satisfy the one, maybe equity
participation with complete
management control may sat-
isfy the other.”

The goal, Mr Laing added,
was to “better serve the small
business community of the
Bahamas”, pointing out that
while the Bahamas Develop-
ment Bank and the Govern-
ment-sponsored venture cap-
ital programme served differ-
ent purposes and both played
a vital role, there were over-
laps between the two.

Apart from these two
organisations, the other Gov-
ernment entities focused on
the development of small and
medium-sized Bahamian busi-
nesses, plus entrepreneurs,
include the Bahamas Agri-
cultural and Industrial Cor-
poration (BAIC), the Self-
Starters Programme and the
Government-guaranteed loan
programme.

Mr Laing told Tribune
Business that apart from
ensuring the Government’s
small business support pro-
grammes eliminated overlaps
and bureaucracy, and were
targeted correctly, the pro-
posals under review were also
designed to provide business-
men with the information that
allowed them to determine
which entity was suitable for
meeting their needs.

He explained: “When we
are finished, it is my expecta-
tion that every entity in the
country, whether it’s some-
one starting a business or
someone who has a business
with growth potential and
requires something for expan-
sion purposes, they will clear-
ly know that this is the Gov-
ernment programme to which
they may look.

“And the Government pro-
gramme will be set up to
know this is a client they
should be targeting.”

Mr Laing told Tribune
Business that the Govern-
ment wanted to ensure entre-

preneurs and small businesses
that used its support services
were “more accountable and
responsible”, especially when
it came to repaying loans or
other forms of financial assis-
tance.

The Government also
wanted to increase its due dili-
gence and monitoring, to
ensure goods imported duty-
free under its support pro-
grammes were being used for
the intended purposes.

The Government’s propos-
als are likely to be supported
by Chamber of Commerce
president Khaalis Rolle, who
told Tribune Business recent-
ly that all the Government
entities assisting the small
business community should
be consolidated into one
organisation, along the lines
of the Small Business Agency
(SBA) in the US.

Arguing that the Govern-
ment agencies all currently
“operate in silos and under
different mandates”, Mr Rolle
said of such a consolidation:
“You would get more bank
for your buck. I think there
are some different priorities
for all the agencies, but quite
a number of overlapping
areas.

“T don’t think there are too
many organisation, but the
resources and planning aspect
of it need to be refined.

“BAIC and the Develop-
ment Bank serve somewhat
of the same population. One
is far more geared to offering
technical support, and one is
geared towards lending, but
the Development Bank still
has to offer technical support
to ensure its borrowers bet-
ter perform. That’s one of the
reasons for the high level of
defaults - it does not have the
ability to provide the level of
technical support needed to
ensure these businesses do
not fail.”

The Chamber president
said that by consolidating
these agencies and their coun-
terparts, and adopting a more
co-ordinated approach, “the
rate of success of small busi-
ness in this country will prob-
ably soar”.

Stating that his preferred
structure was to merge all
business support entities into
an SBA-type organisation,
which would direct the oper-
ations of BAIC, the Devel-
opment Bank and others, Mr
Rolle added: ‘The individu-
als that get involved in busi-
ness have to understand pre-
cisely what role those organi-
sations play and try and take
advantage of them a little bet-
ter than we have done in the
past.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BOSNEL BRUTUS of
MARKET STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 1st September, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box N-7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.





PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a ae
mat —





Acnegenic
ingredients
to avoid in
your skin
care

YOU may have heard of
comedogenic ingredients that
cause or promote comedones
in skin. You may not be as
familiar with acnegenic ingre-
dients - those that cause or
exacerbate acne. These com-
mon ingredients can be hiding
within acne treatment prod-
ucts, causing ineffective treat-
ment of your breakouts.
Here's what to look for:

Lanolin: Derived from the
words "lana" for wool and
"oleum" for oil, Lanolin is a
fatty substance obtained from
the sheep's wool. While it's a
known emollient with mois-
turising properties, it can have
skin-clogging capabilities, trig-
gering the cycle of breakouts.

Fragrance: Artificial fra-
grances can increase acne
infection, skin sensitisation
and photosensitivity.

D & Cred pigments: Some
of these dyes, which are coal
tar derivatives, have exhibited
highly comedogenic and acne-
genic properties.

Mineral Oil: Mineral Oil is
an occlusive (something that
physically blocks water loss
in the Stratum corneum). It's
used in many products, how-
ever, it has been shown to
cause and exacerbate acne.

Speak with your profes-
sional skin therapist about
products free of comedogenic
and acnegenic ingredients,
and that contain known
botanical extracts that help
inhibit the growth of acne-
genic bacteria.

Heat stroke occurs when
the dog’s ability to regulate
its body temperature is lost.

A dog regulates body tem-
perature primarily through
respiration. When the respi-
ratory tract can not evacuate
heat quickly enough, the body
temperature rises.

Normal body temperature
is less than 103F, but once the
temperature goes over 105F
a number of physiologic
events can occur that make it
even more difficult for the
animal to regain control of its
temperature. At this time,
oxygen delivery to the system
can not keep up with rapidly
elevating demand.

If the temperature exceeds
a certain limit a number of
organ systems including the
kidneys, liver, gastrointesti-
nal tract, heart and brain are
at risk for permanent dam-
age. The extent of the cellular
damage depends on the mag-
nitude and the duration of the
temperature elevation. Clear-
ly, this can be a life-threaten-
ing situation, but for those
animals that survive there is

Top neurosurgeon visits Bahamas

By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

HUNDREDS of Bahami-
ans and medical profession-
als attended a black tie dinner
on Friday evening to hear
renowned neurosurgeon Dr
Benjamin Carson give an
inspiring talk of how he rose
from an impoverished child-
hood to become the youngest
head of surgery at one of the
United States’ best hospitals.

Dr Carson whose life story
was depicted in the novel and
movie Gifted Hands became
the head of pediatric neuro-
surgery at the prestigious
Johns Hopkins Hospital in
Baltimore, Maryland at the
very young age of 33 in 1984.

Since that time, he has
maintained an exhaustive
schedule performing over 500
surgeries a year on some of
the sickest children from
around the world.

Dr Carson focuses on trau-
matic brain injuries, brain and
spinal cord tumors, achon-
droplasia, neurological and
congenital disorders, cran-
1osynostosis, epilepsy and
trigeminal neuralgia. He is
also interested in maximising
the intellectual potential of

every child.

He received world wide
attention and acclaim in Sep-
tember 1987 as the lead sur-
geon on a team of more than
70 medical professionals who
successfully separated a pair
of seven-month-old German
Siamese twins joined at the
head.

Other notable surgeries
included the 1998 successful
separation of Luka and
Joseph Banda, infant boys
from Zambia- the first set of
twins joined at the tops of
their heads to be separated.
This surgery according to Dr
Carson was noteworthy
because it was performed at a
hospital in South Africa
despite the lack of sophisti-
cated medical equipment.
There was also the attempt in
2003 to separate conjoined
adult Iranian sisters Ladan
and Laleh Biyani- neither of
whom survived the surgery.
He also received an Ameri-
can presidential Medal of
Freedom Award from former
president George Bush on
June 19, 2008.

Dr Duane Sands, cardio-
vascular surgeon, who gave
brief remarks said that it was
an honour to be in Dr Car-
son’s company. He said that



DR BENJAMIN CARSON

while studying in Maryland,
he had heard numerous sto-
ries about the gifted surgeon
and said that he has been
inspired by him throughout
his own career.

Psycharitrist Dr Timothy
Barrett and Medical Associa-
tion President said of Dr Car-

son, “ there is something good
about him and to be a good
doctor, you have to be a very
good person”

During his presentation, Dr
Carson explained how his
mother, despite her own lim-
ited education, motivated her
sons to become the very best
they could be by cutting their
television viewing to two pro-
grams a week and making
them produce two book
reports for her each week.
This enabled him to rise from
the bottom of his class to
receive scholarships to attend
both Yale University and the
University of Michigan Med-
ical School.

His mother never took on a
victim’s mentality despite the
challenges she faced raising
her two sons alone while
working several jobs as a
domestic worker in Detroit,
he said adding that too many
people use this victum excuse
to not change the course of
their lives.

Dr Carson added that his
mother never accepted excus-
es from him, which led him
to be a much better person
because when “someone
won't accept excuses, you
have to learn to find solu-
tions.”

He stressed that success is a
mental state saying that if you
leave a CEO broke and in the
ghetto, he will soon rise to the
top again because he has the
tools to succeed whereas if
you make a bum a CEO he
will soon be back in the
streets because he does not.

Dr Carson pointed out that
truly successful people are
those who learn from their
mistakes. He noted that in
particular young Black peo-
ple need to see more role
models who are not from the
sports or music arenas but
rather in educational and
vocational fields.

He further said that true
success comes from using the
talent given to you to help
elevate other people.

The dinner held at the
British Colonial Hilton was
organised as part of the CEO
Network conference held last
weekend in conjunction with
local members of the Sigma
Pi Phi (Boule) Fraternity.

During his visit to the
Bahamas, Dr Carson a devout
Seventh Day Adventist also
held a session with children
on Saturday morning before
speaking at the Seventh Day
Adventist Church in Center-
ville.

Why aren’t we on the same page?

By MAGGIE BAIN

AS we grow in to young adults our
talents become more evident. We
may discover that we have a natural
ability to lean towards science, music,
written word, or languages. When
things feel more natural, and come
more easily for us, we spend more
time and our interests develop.

Our passion for our talent often
fills our life and other areas fall by
the wayside. It makes sense then that
a similar passion requires equal
amounts of time and energy. Most of
us conduct our relationships in a
manner that feels comfortable and
suits us. We believe we are being
authentic, and if we ever step outside
‘our norm’ it feels unnatural and we
fall back into our old ways. This
explains why it is so difficult for most
of us to change our behaviour, as it
feels as if we are ‘going against the
grain’ or ‘swimming up stream’.

Foreign languages are areas that
seem to pose a problem for many
people. ‘Not having an ear’ for it,
and the steep learning curve, deter a
lot of people from even starting. The
mere challenge of communicating
with a person speaking another lan-
guage can be frustrating and demor-
alising.

It entails reading body language,
facial expressions, and in turn often
completely misunderstanding their
message. Both persons feel the oth-
er is not trying hard enough to

Heat

understand the other and the rela-
tionship remains on one level with-
out developing.

Love languages can feel like for-
eign languages for many. Clinical
practice reveals a clear lack of know-
ing, let alone understanding, the lan-
guages of love. Growing up without
having witnessed loving adult part-
nerships undoubtedly puts an indi-
vidual at a huge disadvantage.

Just because we had both parents
in the home does not necessarily
mean that we know how to love.
Completely dysfunctional parents
have a difficult time deciding what to
do about the relationship. Some do a
disservice to their children by believ-
ing they are staying ‘because of the
children’, whilst not appreciating the
affect it will have on their own future
relationships.

Others foresee losing the father
from the home will probably mean
very little future involvement in their
children's lives. Even the interaction
between extended family households
teaches us many values about rela-
tionships. Relationship therapy often

reveals a defective foundation that
has to be rebuilt from scratch. But
like any good foundation it is worth
its weight in gold because it prevents
structural damage later on in life.

We may feel as if we go round in
circles talking about relationships
but invariably return to the point.
Different childhoods and bring pre-
vious life experiences means that we
are all unique and no two relation-
ships are alike. As we mature we
start to really understand ourselves
and the forms of love that complete
us. Many have written these as
‘needs' rather than 'wants', while
others describe them as ‘love lan-
guages’. Both accurately define the
concept of ‘what is right for one is
not right for another’.

The idea that these are as essential
as oxygen to sustain us is truly accu-
rate. Just wanting something is
almost inconsequential whilst need-
ing something is irrefutable. It is
grasping this idea and truly trying to
listen to your partner that allows us
to fulfill each other.

For those of us who understand
ourselves, the forms of love that
seem essential are; sex, love and
attention, love actions, gifts and time.
You may well consider that you need
a bit of all to feel complete but for
many of us one area is a top priority.
For example, if your partner cuts the
grass, makes a bookshelf, and takes
the children to the movies, then he is
showing his love through love

stroke in dogs

actions. They certainly are things you
want him to do but he is completely
omitting to recognise your need for
love and attention. Something will
always feel missing and you will feel
a void. Alternatively, you may be an
attentive homemaker, cook, clean
and take care of the children. But
all you partner really needs is to be
greeted at the door with hugs and
kisses. Both are reading the same
book but just not on the same page.

These love languages are also
reflected in the sexual intimacy. One
may prefer silence with eyes closed.
The other may need interaction,
feedback, or role-play during love-
making. It takes an open loving heart
to accommodate the others sexual
needs in order to allow the other to
feel complete. A free generosity of
spirit is the ultimate language of love.
If you can relate to some or all of
these instances then Know that it is
never too late to make changes and
learn your partner’s love language.
That feeling of ‘missing out’ can be
filled in to complete the total pic-
ture.

e Margaret Bain is an Individual
and Couples Relationship Therapist.
She is a Registered Nurse and a Cer-
tified Clinical Sex Therapist. Call for
an appointment- Relate Bahamas at
364- 7230, or email relateba-
hamas@yahoo.com orwww.relateba-
hamas.blogspot.com. She is also
available for speaking engagements.



the possibility of long term
problems after the occur-
rence.

There are a number of pre-
disposing factors for heat
stroke; some of which include:
heat, humidity, muscular
activity, high body mass, anx-
iety, poor ventilation, dehy-
dration, obesity, antihista-
mines, phenothiazines (some
medications for vomiting),
bracycephalic breeds (short-
nosed breeds), and increased
age.

Dogs experiencing heat
stroke will have a muddy pink
color of their gums instead of
the nice red-pink color that
normally exists. Their heart
rate will be dramatically ele-
vated and they will be panting
furiously. They tend to stand
or walk very slowly without
regard to where they are.
Some will lie on their ster-
num. Most dogs will have a
wild panicked expression and
are not particularly aware of
their environment.

Any combination of these
systems should have an own-
er aggressively seeking vet-



erinary assistance and taking
steps necessary to help drive
the temperature back down.
Significantly delaying the
treatment of a heat stroke can
dramatically increase the risk
of long-term consequences or
death.

Heat stroke is an emer-
gency that requires veterinary
assistance, but you can effec-
tively initiate treatment in

most cases before heading for
the veterinary hospital. You
must aggressively assist the
dog’s efforts to lower its body
temperature with the use of
water and air. Since the lungs
can not keep up with the heat
buildup, we now have to cool
the skin and associated blood
vessels so the body’s temper-
ature will decrease. Submer-
sion of the dog in cool water
will start to bring the temper-
ature down quickly. If you
are unable to submerge the
dog, you can start wetting him
down with a hose. Wet the
dog all over and let the water
run continuously on the groin
area since there are large
numbers of significant and
relatively superficial blood
vessels in that are that will
allow for more rapid cooling
of the blood. The dog should
be in a well-ventilated, shady
area to allow evaporation of
the water. Evaporation cools
body temperatures very effec-
tively.

When transporting the dog
to the veterinary hospital,
keep the air conditioner on

or the windows open, or use
the back of a truck to increase
evaporation. Do not use an
enclosed style crate since it
allows for little evaporation
or fresh cool air for the lungs.
Do not cover the dog with a
wet towel, as it will also pre-
vent evaporation. It is advis-
able in most cases to start
these animals on intravenous
fluids and monitor kidney and
liver functions for a few days.
The necessity for this labora-
tory work depends on the
magnitude and the duration
of the elevated temperature.

Obviously prevention of
heat stroke is a far better
alternative than treatment.
Everyone is aware of the risks
of having a dog in a vehicle in
the summer, but there are
some less obvious risk factors
that we all need to be aware
of. Even moderate environ-
mental temperatures can be
very significant when there is
little or no ventilation. Own-
ers should also be aware that
heat stroke does not only
occur in the summer months.
Heat stroke has a tendency

to catch owners unaware dur-
ing the spring and winter
months, when they are less
likely to take the proper pre-
cautions to safeguard against
heat stroke. Heavy muscular
activity drives body temper-
atures up with alarming
speed.

Following intervals of high
activity, return the dog to an
air conditioned vehicle, or wet
the dog down and go to an
area that is shaded and prefer-
ably breezy to allow for evap-
oration. Make sure there is
access to reasonable volumes
of cool fresh water both
before and after activity. We
also need to be conscious of
those animals that are at
increased risk, which would
include those dogs that have
high body mass, older dogs,
and those that are carrying
more weight than is normal
for them.

Being aware of the various
risk factors as well as the envi-
ronmental considerations
should help all of us avoid this
potentially devastating prob-
lem.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009, PAGE 7B



HEALTH





o
S
=
O
q

z
E

B OD

©

A N D M |



i 6D

ith





THE COST OF DRUGS is very pricey these days, and doctors fear that it will drive more persons to order medication from “shady” online pharmacies...

Doctors fear costly drugs could
drive ‘shady’ online pharmacies

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features
Reporter

here’s no doubt

about it. The cost

of drugs is very

pricey these days,
and doctors fear that it will
drive more persons to order
medication from “shady”
online pharmacies. One local
ophthalmologist describes the
mark-up on pharmaceuticals
as “gluttonous, and said it is
even greater than the mark-
up of the banks in the
Bahamas.”

Diamox, a drug that he
treats his patients with for
glaucoma cost only 50 cents
or less to make a tablet, he
says. Yet according to him,
some local companies are
retailing this drug for over
$250. “More and more physi-
cians are claiming patients just
can’t afford prescription
drugs,” he said.

With things still slow in the
economy; inflation of prices
on medication are predicted
to only make things worse for
struggling persons who need
treatment right away. Fear
looms that more and more,
people will turn to online
pharmacies based in foreign
countries for prescribed med-
ication that they cannot afford
at home.

If you are feeling the pinch
on your pocket, and you need
to fill a doctor’s prescription
right away, getting it online
may be a cheaper avenue,
right? Not so fast warns Dr
Vanria Rolle, chief pharma-
cist at Public Hospitals
Authority who gave a pre-
sentation on the subject at the
CEO Network conference at
the British Colonial Hilton
last week. Dr Rolle said that
persons are at a greater risk
when they purchase drugs
from an online pharmacy,
because of the prevalent
occurrences of people receiv-
ing counterfeit or fake drugs.
If taken, the substance can be
harmful to your health, and
even kill you she said.

Perhaps this is the first time
you are reading about this
matter, and asking how these

WHATS REAL AND WHATS

NOT?

154-1536-2004

Can vou reallw tall?



COUNTERFEIT/AUTHENTIC drugs can be seen here...

drugs go undetected. The
unfortunate reality about
counterfeit drugs is that even
a manufacturer cannot tell by
just looking at it whether a
drug is authentic or not.
“These drugs are fake med-

ications that are deliberately,
and fraudulently mislabeled
with respect to identity and
or source,” Dr Rolle said.
“They often have the wrong
ingredients, are without active
ingredients, may have fake

packaging, or may be dis-
pensed with the wrong
dosage.”

Over the years, there have
been reported cases by the
World Health Organisation
on unexplained side effects

that persons who took coun-
terfeit drugs experienced.
Strange elements like boric
acid, heavy metals, road paint,
and floor wax were reported-
ly used to coat pills in such
cases to give them a shine.
Clearly, these elements can
have devastating effects on
anyone’s health. In other cas-
es, persons had no reaction,
because the pills were place-
bos, or of a “sugar pill” base,
which is harmless.

According to Dr Rolle, the
counterfeiters main target
group is Internet shoppers.
They retail mostly fake
“lifestyle drugs,” such as med-
ication for hair loss, antibac-
terials, antipsychotics, sexual
dysfunction, obesity, and hor-
mones. The counterfeiters
produce these and many oth-
er drugs without much over-
sight or regulation laws, and
sell them at seemingly unbe-
lievable prices that are hard to
resist. Oftentimes, it would
appear that you can get more
for your money from them,
like two drugs for the price
of what one authentic drug
would cost.

Although the majority of
Bahamians may have a low
interest in Internet commerce,
Dr Rolle says that you can
encounter counterfeit drugs
without knowing by simply
filling a prescription at an
unlicensed pharmacy.

She says that it is safer to
stick with licensed, reputable
pharmacies who get their
drugs from authorised deal-
ers like Nassau Agencies,
Lowes Wholesale, and other
providers that have regula-
tions, and proper storage
facilities.

You may recall the incident
last year, where a shipment
of counterfeit Viagra was
delivered to Nassau Agencies
by mistake. Officials there
realised that the shipment was
not meant for a local distrib-
utor at that particular time.
A Viagra manufacturer took
samples, investigations were
done, and it was discovered
that the product was in fact
counterfeit.

“In a perfect world, we
would not have to deal with

these things,” Dr Rolle said.

So, how do you protect
yourself? Dr Rolle lists these
red flags to watch out for in
your medication, and to
report to your doctor:

If the drug has a spelling
error--

If the packaging or color
looks different--

If the seal doesn’t look
right--

If it taste or smells funny

If you have strange side
effects--

She stressed that patients
should only buy prescription
medications from licensed
pharmacies in the Bahamas.
Finally, Dr Rolle advised that
if you purchase a drug and
notice on the insert that it is
written in a different lan-
guage, “Do not buy it, it’s dis-
respectful for patient care and
patient safety.”

In May, an active bill called
the ‘Pharmacy Act 2009’ was
designed to tighten regula-
tions in the pharmaceutical
industry. These are the pro-
visions;

Requirements that apply to
prescribed international stan-
dards for imported drugs--

Prohibits the manufactur-
ing or importation of drugs
unless factory or warehouse
is registered and licensed--

Requirements regarding
the sale of drugs via an auto-
matic device or the Internet--

Requirements for the
appointment of trained
inspectors by the Minister of
Health to inspect premises of
wholesale distributors--

TS

i D8

PS
GSE
ir



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





For the very best features . . .

VASNAIN
WW



tribune 24



* iin : ee a
mwas fee's rear hhs Na





Are you an effective communicator?

“Effective communication is 20 per cent what
you know and 80 per cent how you feel about
what you know.”

~ Jim Rohn ~

NO matter how great your ideas or how far-
reaching your solutions, they are of no value if
you cannot effectively communicate them to
others.

Effective communication skills are a key
ingredient of success. Learning how to speak
with confidence can open doors beyond your
wildest dreams; yet, very few people take time
to work on their communication effectiveness.

One of my favorite sayings is ‘its better to be
prepared for an opportunity and not have one,
than to have an opportunity for which you are
unprepared.” Regardless of your starting point,
anything is possible - there are no limits.

While public speaking and communication
skills are crucial they are not readily pursued
because most people have a real fear of public
speaking.

The Fear of Public Speaking
For most people, public speaking brings a

serious source of stress and nervousness. So as
much as possible, people try to avoid having to

speak in front of an
audience.

But whether you
work alone or with
a large group of
people, at some
point, you will
need to speak
openly to get cer-
tain tasks accom- |
plished. Moreover,
if you aspire to be
a leader or
desirous of great
achievements; you
will need to be — = =
comfortable speak-
ing to groups large or small in order to be suc-
cessful.

First of all, this fear is not real. I know it
feels real; but this fear is mostly an illusion
that stems from your subconscious beliefs
about yourself.

You may be surprised to learn that as chil-
dren, many people suffer from a small sense of
self, handed down through the ages from par-
ents or guardians. And while their intent was
to protect us from perceived dangers, this inad-
vertently conditioned us into non-risk takers,





playing it safe; eventually becoming shy and
withdrawn; unable to confidently speak-up
and express their point of view.

The good news here is - you can unlearn
this behavior and adopt new habits that sup-
port rather than impede your confidence as an
effective speaker.

To change your behaviour - you must
change your beliefs; because what you believe
determines how you behave. Start to tell your-
self uplifting things about yourself and what is
possible for your life.

Positive self-talk is essential to rewiring your
subconscious mind so that you can tap into
your inner power to voice your views.

Final Thought...

The first black President of the United
States, Barak Obama, won the hearts of the
American people and the world, in part,
because of his incredible ability to inspire peo-
ple from all walks of life, through effective
communication.

Think about the many opportunities that
you find yourself in meetings or settings; you
can hear that inner voice shouting for you to
speak-up and say something. But for some
strange reason, the words seem trapped in

your mouth. You are not alone - this feeling
has been experienced by every great speaker.

Being comfortable speaking in front a group
can be intimidating; the butterflies and wobbly
knees are a part of the process. But if you
want it bad enough and believe that you can do
it - it will be done.

Remember - communication is the key to
success; no leader can be effective if he or she
is unable to get their point across.

Lying dormant inside you is a great speech
that can inspire the world. Prepare yourself to
make something better happen.

e If you are ready to Speak with Confidence
& Power- Sign Up Now for SpeakUP! - learn
how to Speak your way to the top! Contact
The Coaching Studio today call 326-3332 or
429-6770 - or send an email to
coach4ward@ Yahoo.com

Michelle M. Miller is a certified Life-Coach
and Stress Management Consultant. She is the
Principal Coach of the Coaching Studio, which
located in the Jovan Plaza, Madeira Street.
Questions or comments can be sent to P.O.
Box CB-13060 - email -
coach4ward@yahoo.com or telephone 429-
6770.

The gar den in September

TO sow or not to sow, that is the
question... Does one start one’s veg-
etable garden in September or wait
until the more favourable month of
October. There are merits in both
stances but most experienced gar-
deners will already have seeds in by
the beginning of September.

If things go wrong they will start
again in late September and sow
another crop in October.

Last year I made the mistake of
using heirloom tomatoes for my first
crop. Heirloom tomatoes generally
take longer to produce and bear
more sparsely than hybrid types.
This year I will start with hybrids
like Better Boy and leave the heir-
looms until October.

Bell peppers can be started early
in September, along with eggplants,
cabbages, pumpkins and beans. Most
other crops — carrots and root crops,
peas, spinach, squashes, broccoli and
cauliflower — are best sown in Octo-
ber.

Blessed are they that covered their
vegetable gardens with clear plastic
for the summer months. When the
time comes to start the new veg-
etable season they will only have to
remove the plastic and apply some
water and fertiliser. The ground will
be ready for transplants and free of
weed seeds and nematodes.

This is the season of seagrapes,
early hog plums and late Keitt man-
goes. Carambolas (star fruit) are on
their first production run of the year.
They will flower and fruit again in
October but with fruit from the first
crop still on the tree it will appear to
be one continuous crop.

Believe it or not, it is time to think
about Christmas. Annuals for Christ-
mas could be sown in September,
early October at the latest.

Annuals from seed are far, far
cheaper than buying sets. The choice
is often greater, too. Virtually any
popular annual will flower well dur-
ing our cool season months. Among
the favourites in Bahamian gardens
are impatiens and petunias. Remem-
ber to put down snail bait with your
seeds as the young seedlings will be
attractive to snails and slugs.

If you have some of last year’s

by

poinsettias in the ground, do not
prune them any more. The tissue
that will form the brightly coloured
bracts may be cut away with a late
pruning.

There are still a couple of months
of intensive lawn care ahead of us,
requiring weekly mowing. Many St
Augustine lawns put out seed stalks
in August and September. If your
lawn needs thickening out you may
consider not mowing it until the
seeds are ready. With steady water-
ing after the subsequent mowing you
will develop a thicker lawn over the
cool season months.

The main worry in September
concerns tropical storms and hurri-
canes. As I write this the Weather
Channel shows a string of potential
hurricanes crossing Africa like a
necklace of destruction. Very few
Septembers pass without one or the
other disturbing the peace of The
Bahamas. A tropical storm may
bring some welcome rain but can
totally denude a carambola tree of
fruit. Winds of less than hurricane
strength can desiccate shrubs and
palms and leave them stressed for
many months.

Wind is the biggest natural enemy
of plants and when it reaches hurri-
cane force there is bound to be trau-
ma. Prune flowering shrubs and
small fruit trees to allow the wind
to pass through the centre. Cut down
long branches that are likely to be
broken off in a hurricane and trim
smaller plants to reduce their size.

Any heavy plants in pots should
be well watered and then laid on the
ground in an area where they will
be contained. All materials in the
yard that can be blown around
should be stored in your garden shed
or utility room.

The pace of the year quickens in
September and a new year in the
garden begins.

j-hardy@coralwave.com

THIS IS WHAT it is all about... A few offerings from Gardener Jack's garden last

year demonstrate the range of vegetables we can grow in one season...



























































IT IS SEAGRAPE season and the pickin’ is easy...

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT k,

5-Day FORECAST

High:90°F/32°C = Partly sunny with a Partly cloudy with a Partly sunny with a Partly sunny, a t-storm Partly sunny, a t-storm Clouds and sun with a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
eS eee thunderstorm. shower, thunderstorm. possible. possible. thunderstorm. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
Low: 73° F/23°C at 2 : 6 .
eq | High: 90 High: 90 High: 90 High: 90
. a ‘ High: 88° Low: 78° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 79° see Ey
TAMPA ia AccuWeather RealFeel
High: 90° F/32° C oe, ee High __Ht.(ft.)_ Low
Low: 75° F/24°C et r tee Tv Tc ESTE Oto eT Today 6:16am. 25 12:12am. 0.6
am @ = elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 6:45pm. 28 12:16pm. 05
i ; =a 6:59am. 26 12:52am. 0.4
’ 1, CO Weinestay 74pm. 29 1:01pm. 04
) oe r Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thursday 738am. 0.7 120am. 03
f : ~~ ABACO 7 oom 8:00pm. 29 1:43pm. 0.4
; : is € High: 89° F/32° C ee ee eee ee ee eee ee eee 79° F/26° C Friday 8:15 a.m. 29 2:04 a.m. 0.3
J - “i Cy Low: 77° F/25°C Normal high ee —— ee ee
- ' 7, Normal low 75° F/24° C
4 fo @ WEST PALM BEACH i Last year's MIgh ..cccccsscssseseessiee or F3sc | ONIN
4 al High: 90° F/32° C — Last year's VOW eesti 81° F/27° C " "
' <= Low: 75° F/24°C a 7 Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:51 a.m. Moonrise + 8:43 p.m.
€ ai a, As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....ccccccssssecscseeecssseeeee 0.30" Sunset....... 7:29 p.m. Moonset... 4:06 a.m.
im FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Orr ate o ao 4 ae
High: 88° F/31°C @ High: 87° F/31°C Normal year to date oo... 31.32" = . sj
Low: 76° F/24°C Fm Low: 77° F/25° C
Gf AccuWeather.com |”
s @ a a Forecasts and graphics provided by Ohh -
: MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Sep. 4 sep. 11 Sep.18 — Sep. 26
-. High: 89° F/32° C ELEUTHERA
ot Low: 78°F/26° ¢ NASSAU alah: 89" Faz’
= Low: 78° F/26°C
2 i. Y a cz
KEY WEST ae “og ~—_CATISLAND
High: 90° F/32°C | High: 85° F/29° C
Low: 80° F/27°C i. Low: 75° F/24°C
i ae GREAT EXUMA wt SAN SALVADOR
ae i High: 87° F/31°C High: 87° F/31°C
Low: 77° F/25° C Low:77° F/25°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | ,
highs and tonights's lows. High: 90° F/32° C —- \
Low: 75° F/24° C i. : Sa.
a â„¢
LONG ISLAND
Low: 76° F/24°C
Today Wednesday Today Wednesday Today Wednesday 4 MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W alll High: 86° F/30° C
FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FC F/C FIC FC i Low: 76° F/24° C
Albuquerque 90/32 65/18 pc 89/31 63/17 pc Indianapolis 78/25 52/1 s 80/26 57/13 s Philadelphia 79/26 56/13 s 81/27 61/16 s
Anchorage 62/16 50410 sh 5915 49/9 fF Jacksonville 88/31 70/21 t 84/28 69/20 t Phoenix 107/41 84/28 pc 105/40 84/28 pc CROKE rs
Atlanta 78/25 63/17 c 82/27 60/15 pc Kansas City 77/25 58/14 s 79/26 59/15 pc _ Pittsburgh 73/22 47/8 s 77/25 50/10 s RAGGEDISLAND Tigh:90°F/s2"c
Atlantic City 76/24 55/12 pc 78/25 58/14 s Las Vegas 104/40 78/25 t 105/40 82/27 pc Portland, OR 84/28 58/14 pc 78/25 58/14 s High: 88° F/31° C Low: 78° F/26°C —
Baltimore 78/25 55/12 pe 80/26 59/15 s Little Rock 84/28 58/14 s 86/30 60/15 s Raleigh-Durham 76/24 59/15 pc 79/26 60/15 pc Low: 74°F/23°C a
Boston 71/21 55/12 s 74/23 61/16 $s Los Angeles 91/32 66/18 s 87/30 66/18 pc St. Louis 80/26 56/13 s 83/28 59/15 $s . We.
Buffalo 70/21 48/8 s 76/24 53/11 $s Louisville 80/26 58/14 s 82/27 61/16 $s Salt Lake City 90/82 62/16 s 90/32 63/17 pc GREAT INAGUA AK \*)\,
Charleston, SC 82/27 65/18 t 81/27 6618 fF Memphis 84/28 60/15 s 84/28 65/18 ¢s San Antonio 91/32 71/21 pce 94/34 73/22 pc High: 90° F/32° C
Chicago 74/23 48/8 s 75/23 49/9 s Miami 89/31 78/25 t 89/31 76/24 t San Diego 80/26 68/20 pe 78/25 67/19 pc Low. 78° F/26°C
Cleveland 74/23 49/9 s 76/24 51/10 s Minneapolis 75/23 54/12 s 76/24 57/13 pe San Francisco 72/22 57/13 pe 72/22 58/14 pc 7
Dallas 92/33 71/21 s 93/33 70/21 $s Nashville 84/28 59/15 s 83/28 59/15 $s Seattle 76/24 55/12 pe 73/22 55/12 s
Denver 92/33 57/13 pe 87/380 53/11 pc New Orleans 88/31 71/21 pe 87/80 71/21 s Tallahassee 89/31 70/21 t 85/29 66/18 t i
Detroit 75/23 53/11 = s 77/25 53/1 $s New York 77/25 60/15 s 79/26 64/17 $s Tampa 90/32 75/23 t 88/31 73/22 t ;
Honolulu 89/31 76/24 s 89/31 76/24 pc Oklahoma City 86/380 64/17 s 88/31 64/17 $s Tucson 100/37 75/23 t 97/36 75/23 pc —
Houston 90/32 67/19 pc 92/83 70/21 s Orlando 90/32 73/22 t 88/31 74/23 t Washington, DC 78/25 59/15 pc 80/26 62/16 s



ORLANDO






a ¢ atts i & .
TTS NG

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LOW

3|4|5|6

MODERATE





HIGH | V.HIGH

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aicclince, LUD IATT









Wor_p Cities

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

ii

Today

High
F/C
90/32
70/21
83/28
86/30
60/15
90/32
87/30
79/26
81/27
81/27
83/28
85/29
82/27
69/20
73/22
82/27
63/17
96/35
90/32
78/25
91/32
82/27
81/27
75/23
61/16
82/27
82/27
66/18
91/32
66/18
91/32
95/35
76/24
83/28
77/25
89/31
73/22
72/22
90/32
88/31
75/23
84/28
73/22
72/22
85/29
84/28
91/32
67/19
72/22
81/27
85/29
103/39
86/30
89/31
67/19
838/31
59/15
90/32
80/26
82/27
72/22
68/20
93/33
82/27
72/22
95/35
71/21
82/27
74/23
79/26






Low W
F/C
77/25 t
55/12 4
54/12 pc
70/21 s
48/8 pc
77/25 +
77/25 sh
68/20 p
61/16 s
74/23 s
56/13 s
63/17 s
76/24 s
45/7 p
50/10 r
52/11 s
43/8 p
72/22 $s
81/27 sh
54/12 s
75/23 pc
72/22 t
62/16 s
64/17 s
43/8 sh
57/13 t
62/16 pc
50/10 s
72/22 t
55/12 sh
81/27 t
77/25 t
65/18 sh
59/15 s
51/10 pc
79/26 t
59/15 s
54/12 sh
61/16 p
79/26 t
54/12 t
70/21 t
54/12 s
50/10 s
SMES
53/11 p
81/27 t
58/14 r
54/12 4
54/12 s
74/23 s
79/26 s
63/17 s
pi
pi
t
C
pi
t
s
pi
Ss
p
r
s

oO

oO

80/26
41/5
70/21
46/7
73/22
61/16
57/13
59/15
52/11
80/26
73/22
54/12
73/22 pc
56/13 pc
63/17 s
54/12 s
54/12 s

Wednesday

High
F/C
92/33
66/18
79/26
84/28
59/15
88/31
86/30
77/25
81/27
79/26
85/29
77/25
82/27
69/20
72/22
84/28
63/17
95/35
91/32
73/22
90/32
82/27
77/25
68/20
59/15
77/25
73/22
70/21
88/31
72/22
91/32
96/35
77/25
82/27
76/24
88/31
73/22
70/21
91/32
84/28
77/25
87/30
79/26
73/22
73/22
81/27
90/32
65/18
70/21
74/23
87/30
103/39
82/27
89/31
62/16
88/31
55/12
86/30
85/29
81/27
68/20
70/21
91/32
77/25
73/22
93/33
73/22
80/26
73/22
78/25

Low
F/C
78/25
52/11
48/8
67/19
45/7
78/25
78/25
68/20
59/15
76/24
59/15
59/15
75/23
42/5
54/12
56/13
48/8
69/20
81/27
48/8
USES
73/22
63/17
57/13
50/10
55/12
50/10
55/12
71/21
54/12
81/27
75/23
64/17
62/16
51/10
79/26
60/15
55/12
57/13
77/25
55/12
72/22
55/12
55/12
52/11
53/11

Ww

pec
sh
pc
$
$
t
pc
pc

>

io > [Gon mr fee ms Keog — ioe Cc) foe 0 ioe er ee iS
=>

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78/25 t

54/12
50/10
52/11
77/25
78/25
63/17
79/26

38/3
73/22

37/2
74/23
66/18
59/15
52/11
57/13
81/27
72/22
57/13
73/22
58/14
65/18
55/12
53/11

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pc
$
pc
$
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pc
$

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 01st, 2009, PAGE 9B



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MariINE FORECAST






WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 86° F
Wednesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 86° F
FREEPORT Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 85° F
Wednesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 85° F
ABACO Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 83° F
Wednesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 84° F



Miami
89/78

Showers
T-storms







Rain Fronts

=. 4) Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and -
Be] Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm finfitentie
[v=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Megumi
10s Os [/0s/ 10s 20s (805i) 40s (50s Gos 70s (80s [G0s///i0neNits]



Ny.

Be Bl
gu Gan J Hurricane

Or you can & easy knowing

that 3 have excellent insurance
4 coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

P| | INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
y (BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

aaah ee at a ial icran ae eeed segue ct





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1,



2009

For the very best features . . .
WWW. nibune?42. CO



tos Mo

Li
ok. a: . wT.

ss feels eae = Aa





One lucky woman will be chosen to represent the Bahamas...

MODELS show off their swimsuits. Do



you have what it takes to become Miss
Swimsuit USA International?

Sixty to vie for Miss
Swimsuit USA title

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

or the second time this
year, the Bahamas will be
the host country of an
international pageant.
Sixty gorgeous women from coun-
tries across the earth will gather at
the Nassau Wyndham Resort on
November 15 to compete for the
title of Miss Swimsuit USA Inter-
national. The stakes are high, and
one lucky woman will be chosen to
represent the Bahamas as host
queen.
The competition to decide who



that lucky lady is four weeks from
now, when 15 ladies in the country
will compete for the crown of Miss
Swimsuit USA Bahamas, and you
may have what it takes.

Do you have the perfect combi-
nation of beauty and brains, do you
possess a sexy swimsuit body, have a
memorable personality, and are you
between the ages of 18-28? If you
answered yes to all of those ques-
tions, then you may be a candidate
for the Miss Swimsuit USA
Bahamas competition which will
take place in a matter of weeks.

This competition will prove a great
opportunity for the right candidates,

=

4
”

’
‘

talent and model scout OilinSha
Coakley, coordinator for the Swim-
suit USA Bahamas Competition told
Tribune Features yesterday.

Final

The final competition on Septem-
ber 26 at the British Colonial Hilton
will precede three weeks of fiercely
televised competition between 15
beautiful women. “In each episode,
they will be coached on how to walk,
how to take pictures, they will shoot
commercials, and have fitness chal-
lenges devised by some of the lead-
ing fitness gurus in The Bahamas.”

On September 26, the ladies will
compete for the title of Miss Swim-
suit Bahamas USA. The winner will
receive a $1,000 cash prize, profes-
sional coaching by Mr Coakley him-
self, who will instruct them on how
to present their best self to advance
through the preliminary rounds of
the international pageant.

The winner of Miss Bahamas
USA will go on to compete against
50 women in the Miss Swimsuit
USA International competition.
The top 15 finalists will receive a
complimentary personal photo shoot
and will appear in the Swimsuit USA
Calendar. World renowned profes-

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway * 394-1759



sional photographers Doug Carter,
Steve Nix and Mickey Sehorn will
photograph the beauties.

If you are interested in compet-
ing in the Swimsuit USA Bahamas
competition on September 26, you
can call OilinSha Models and Tal-
ents at 325-5288 or email a head-
shot, and any photos of yourself,
including contact information to
supermodelbahamas@yahoo.com.



You can also visit their studio on
Collins Avenue, Ninth terrace- locat-
ed on the right hand side of Frank
Hanna Cleaning company. Appli-
cations are available at their office at
any time during the day.



Full Text

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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.232TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY WITH T-STORM HIGH 88F LOW 78F F E A T U R E S S EEWOMANSECTION S P O R T S Bahamas to host Miss Swimsuit USA International S EEPAGEELEVEN Bahamas’ dynamic duo By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net TALKS are taking place between the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Work ers Union and fast food giant Kentucky Fried Chicken over pending job losses”. Union President Roy Colebrooke told The Tri bune yesterday that the union, which represents KFC workers, is in discus sion with senior manage ment at the chain. “Their business has shown a steady decline,” said Mr The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com Robin Hoodextended banking hours: Mon-Fri9:30am-7pmSat9am-5pm BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE economic strangle hold gripping many cashstrapped parents may be the reason for an influx of students registering at public schools. The government school system has been inundated with about 3,000 more registered students this year, a spike one ministry official said may be due to the current economic downturn. Ministry of Education Per manent Secretary Elma Garraway believes the enrolment increase is, in part, due to stu dent transfers from the private school system along with many first time students, whose parents would prefer a private institution. Tuition at a typical private high school is around $1,100 a term while a parent might pay around $700 a term for a private primary school. "According to preliminary reports from the pre-registra tion period at the end of the summer term, there was an indication that a significant number of students had come to the public school system from the private schools. "(We had students join our school over the usual number," Ms Gar raway told The Tribune yesterday, adding that she doubt ed typical levels of population growth would lead to such a large enrolment increase. "The normal population growth over the years would contribute to the usual numbers that we admit every year this year there has been a significant increase in the intake so we know that's not caused by the population growth. Rather by those who would have normally sought admission to private schools." She said she could not provide a more specific analysis Public schools numbers r ocket 3,000 more students register this year; spike may be due to economic downturn SEE page six By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net EIGHT managers and two line staff are now without a job as Atlantis yesterday announced that it has restructured its Food and Beverage division and centralised its reservation system. Days after lauding the promotional success of the massive Miss Universe pageant event, hosted at Atlantis, for its capacity to boost future arrivals to the resort, Kerzner International said the job losses are part of an overall effort to make the resort “more efficient.” “We are consistently reviewing our business globally with a view to making our operations as efficient as possible, while at the same time providing a high level of service for our customers. “In this instance, group business, which has beeni mpacted industry wide on a global basis, demanded that adjustments be made Management jobs go in Atlantis restructuring SEE page six STUDENTSHEADBACKTOSCHOOL FORTHENEWTERM MANYSTUDENTS across the nation were back in the classroom yesterday. By Wednesday, all students should be at their desks for the new school year. T i m C l a r k / T r i b u n e s t a f f By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – A second man accused of murdering retired police officer and businessman Leslie Maycock was arraigned in Freeport Magistrate’s Court on Monday. Dudley Jamaal Seide Jr, 22, of Freeport, appeared before Magistrate Debbye Ferguson in Court One on charges of armed robbery and murder. He was not required to enter a plea to the charges. It is alleged that on July 15, the accused being con cerned with another or others robbed Leslie Maycock of a black pouch, valued at $100, and $700 cash that was contained in the pouch. It is also alleged that on July 23, the accused being concerned with another intentionally caused the death of Maycock by the use of a hand gun. Maycock, 50, a retired police officer and owner of the Hawksbill Mini Mart, was robbed and shot after closing his convenience store in Hawksbill. He died of his injuries a week later in Second man in court accused of businessman’ s murder SEE page six Union in talks over pending job losses’ at KFC SEE page six By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net MINISTRY of Education officials confirmed that the teacher under investigation for allegedly drugging and molesting a minor at CC Sweeting Senior High has been taken off active duty and will not be allowed on campus as long as the police’s investigations continue. Elma Garraway, the Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Education, said Teacher alleged to have drugged, molested student is taken off active duty SEE page six

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FORMER Turks and Caicos Premier Michael Misick has suggested that the British territory should become an autonomous Bahamas state. The Tribune hit the streets y esterday to see what the public thinks about this idea. TROYHALBERT, 44, ENTREPRENEUR: " I don't know anything about Turks and Caicos. I don't think we should stop anyone that wants to be a part of the Bahamas. Let them come, I'll give them the 'blue light' discount." LEON, RESIDENT OF THE GROVE " I think this would make things a lot easier for both countries. Lots of people have f amily members living there and it would be good to have them be a part of the Bahamas again." TONY COLLIE, 24, PMH EMPLOYEE " I support this initiative. Forming a federation would be mutually beneficial for both countries – our cultures are closely inter-t wined and we share common industries such as conch farming. I think that there is a lot of room for investment and growth as their economy isnot bad and our governance is similar." P ANTHONY WHITE, RETIRED JOURNALIST " At this time I would discourage our government from getting involved. Politically they are unstable and it would be too complicated with all of the allegations of scandal and corruption." E AMON ADDERLEY, 35, MANAGER OF UPTOWN BAKERY AND DELI "I'm unfamiliar with all the details, but I feel that as long as it will be beneficial to the Bahamas we should be open to discus-s ion." KENNETH MCCARTNEY, 55 " As long as we exercise caution and fully a ssess both short-term and long-term consequences, I would fully support the decis ion to form a federation with the Turks and Caicos." G LENROY MCKENZIE, ASST SUPERINTENDENT, RBPF " I don't think it should be a problem. We are historically linked to Turks and Caicos, and most people are not even aware of thes trong family ties between the islands." F ELITA WILLIAMS, 39, PMH NURSE "I have family and friends living over there that I would love to see more. Perhaps ift hey become a part of the Bahamas it would make traveling there accessible to more peop le." C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM COOL JETTINGENJOYATRIPTOFORTLAUDERDALEORLANDOORNEWYORK WITHUPTADEBITCARD PURCHASEANYDUNKIN’DONUTSCOLDBEVERAGE*TOENTER* EXCLUDESALLBOTTLEDBEVERAGES Certain restrictions apply. Visit www.dunkinbahamas.com for details. ENTER To Win Round-trip Flights on Bahamians weigh in on Turks and Caicos issue T ALK STREET TROYHALBERT T ONY COLLIE P ANTHONY WHITE EAMON ADDERLEY KENNETH MCCARTNEY G LENROY MCKENZIE F ELITA WILLIAMS LEON Share your news The T ribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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A S the dispute sur rounding the interdiction and transfer of 30 Customs officers from the public service continues,B ahamas Public Service Union president John Pin der said he will be meeting with Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham later thisw eek. In a brief interview with The Tribune yesterday, Mr P inder said he will be representing the union in t hese discussions with the prime minister with a view to determining the BPSU’sn ext move. T r ansf er Mr Pinder has been adamant in his position that government violated its industrial agreement and failed to follow proce dure in its move to transfer and interdict the Customs officers. On July 31, the Ministry of Finance announced that 16 officers were being interdicted pending the outcome of misconduct charges against them. Ten more officers were advised t hat they were to be trans ferred to other departments. Three other officers were retired in the publici nterest and one was giv en early retirement. Those outside of the group of officers who were interdicted were moved asp art of an “ongoing restructuring exercise,” the ministry said. Article 35 (of the industrial agreement) speaks to a n officer having the right to refuse any transfer if it will cause hardship on hima nd in General Orders, 604 speaks to the same thing,” Mr Pinder said. The BPSU president also argued that Customs officers are afforded five days notice of a transfer,but claimed that in some cases officers were given 48 hours and others only 2 4 hours to respond. Proceedings for the dismissals were said to be underway before the 14day period within whicht he interdicted officers had to respond to government, Mr Pinder claimed. Officers He added that the r emaining Customs officers are also up in arms because they fear that government will treat them as “unjustly” as it did theirf ormer colleagues. “The majority of Cus toms officers are upset( because) of the manner of which it was done so they are of the view that they might be next, so that’s why we must (end behaviour,” said Mr Pin der. A 26-YEAR-OLD man of Sandilands Village Road, accused of having sexual intercourse with a 13-year-old girl, was arraigned in the Magistrates Court yesterday. Police have charged Donovan Sturrup with having sexual intercourse with a girl under the age of 14. It is alleged that Sturrup committed the offence on Saturday, July 18, 2009. Sturrup, who was arraigned before Magistrate Carolita Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane, was not required to enter a plea to the charge. He was granted bail in the sum of $10,000 with two sureties. Sturrup was ordered to report to the Elizabeth Estates Police Station every Monday, Wednesday and Saturday before 6pm. He was also ordered not to have any contact with the virtual complainant or witnesses in the case. Sturrup is expected to appear in Court 5, Bank Lane, today for a fixture hearing. TWO women and a man charged in last week’s seizure of two and a half pounds of cocaine from a private residence were arraigned in the Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Sherwin Laroda, 49; Vanessa Rolle Laroda, 37, and Althemese Rolle Laroda, 19 all of Button-wood Avenue, Pinewood Gardens appeared before Magistrate Carolita Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane, yesterday chargedwith possession of cocaine with intent to supply. Police reportedly seized 2.5lbs of cocaine with a street value of $12,000 while searching a home in Pinewood Gardens. A ll of the accused, who w ere represented by attor ney Willie Moss, pleaded not guilty to the chargesand were each granted bail in the sum of $10,000 with two sureties. The three accused were alsoo rdered to surrender their travel documents and to report to the East StreetSouth Police Station every Saturday before 6pm. The case was adjourned to February 15. A 39-year-old man of Redland Acres accused of raping and causing harm to a 38-year-old woman last Wednesday was arraigned in the Magis trate’s Court yesterday. Police charged Poence Bodie with the Wednesday, August 26, rape of a 38-year-old woman. He is also accused of causing harm to the woman. Bodie, who was arraigned before Magistrate Carolita Bethel in Court 8 yesterday, was not required to enter a plea to the charges. He was granted bail in the sum of $10,000 with two sureties. Bodie, who was represented by attor-ney Willie Moss, was ordered to report to the East Street South Police Station every Tuesday and Saturday before 6pm. He is expected to appear in Court 5, Bank Lane, today for a fixture hearing. A Cancer Society employee accused of hacking into another woman’s e-mail account was arraigned in the Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Sheryl Rolle, 25, was arraigned in Court 8, Bank Lane, yesterday charged with unauthorised access to computer mater ial. It is alleged that on Tuesday, August 21, 2009, Rolle unlawfully accessed the e-mail account of Kathy Ingraham for the purpose of securing access to her private e-mails. Rolle, who was arraigned before Magistrate Carolita Bethel, pleaded not guilty to the charge and was granted $2,500 bail. She is represented by attorney Godfrey Pinder. Rolle is expected to appear in Court 10, Nas-sau Street, on September 4. THE joining of The Bahamas and the Turks and Caicos islands as a Federation isa “fascinating idea worth exploring”, form er foreign minister Fred Mitchell said yesterday. Nonetheless, Mr Mitchell said the suggestion made by its ex-premier Michael Misick is one which would “require thoughta nd study” and a commitment on the part of both peoples to enter into the Federation. Meanwhile, he added that even if The Bahamas was interested in such a relation-s hip with its neighbour, it would have to be c areful of offending the United Kingdom, of which the islands are a territory. Interview He was responding to comments made by Mr Misick in an exclusive interview with T he Tribune w hen he suggested that rather than being a burden on The Bahamas, the T urks and Caicos would have much to offer if the two countries entered into a federation. M r Misick asserted that, despite not having had a referendum on the issue, the peop le of the Turks and Caicos islands have expressed an interest in their territory becoming an autonomous state under theB ahamas government. This after allegations of systematic government corruption emerging from a Commission of Inquiry led by the British in Turks and Caicos ultimately resulted in theU nited Kingdom suspending the island’s self-government last month. Explaining some of the proposed benefits o f the idea, Mr Misick told T he Tribune : “We just built hundreds of millions of dollars worth of hospitals that can be there for the people of Inagua and Mayaguana and the other islands of the south. We havea modern society that can service the southern Bahamas and take the strain off (Nassau).” Mr Mitchell noted that a federation of Turks and Caicos and The Bahamas is notu nprecedented as both countries were allied in such a way at various times prior to Bahamian independence. And he added that the history of The Bahamas and Turks and Caicos in thisr egard “is not entirely happy.” There was a dispute about adequate representation with seat of government being in Nassau and over the sharing ofr evenue and taxes,” he noted. However, the suggestion made by Mr Misick is not one proposed by him alone. A n August 20, 2009, article in The Economist, commenting on the removal of 33 y ears of self-rule in the Turks and Caicos Islands, said there has “long been a debate on whether the Turks and Caicos and oth-e r micro-states in the region are viable as self-governing entities.” Candidate Noting that “for most of the imperial p eriod the islands were run from Jamaica or the Bahamas” the article suggested The Bahamas “having made great strides in overcoming its own corruption and drugs problems of the 1980s, would seem a goodc andidate to take the islands back under its wing one day.” A message left for Minister of Foreign A ffairs Brent Symonette was not returned yesterday as he was said to be in meetings. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Mitchell:idea of federation with Turks and Caicos ‘worth exploring’ Man accused of having sex with 13-year-old girl BPSU president set for talks with Prime Minister FREDMITCHELL MICHAELMISICK IN AN article published in Saturday’s Tribune, Chamber of Commerce president Khaalis Rolle was quoted in a story under the headline “Govt urged to reveal pageant costs” as saying that the government is obligated to justify every dollar it spent on the Miss Universe Competition. Mr Rolle would like to make it clear that his comments were not intended to criticise government – which has said it made all relevant information avail able – but simply to state what the proper procedure should be whenever an investment is made on behalf of the Bahamian people. The Tribune would also like to clarify that Mr Rolle was speaking on behalf of the Chamber, and that the placement of comments by politicians alongside his quotes was entirely coincidental and in no way a reflection of Mr Rolle’s political affiliation. CLARIFICATION

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EDITOR, The Tribune. What did the Manifestos of the FNM really say about ‘Arawak Cay’ versions 1992 1997 & 2007? Seeing that it was no other persons than Hon Brent Symonette who raised this and so-said he quoted presumably accurately from the text of the various FNM Manifestos this caused me to dust-off my copies a nd guess what indiscriminate misquoting as follows: (1 M anifesto page 12: Tourism: clean up Arawak Cay and make it available for development as a tourist resort. (2 festo page 39 Youth Devel opment: complete works at the “Down Home Fish Fry” on Arawak Cay to include: a gaze bo and stage, toilet facilities, parking areas, sidewalks, lighting, landscaping and a culvert to improve tidal flow in the area. (3 ifesto 2007 page: 21 Parks and Open Green Spaces: Make Arawak Cay and environs a Cultural and recreational centre. P age: 30– Heritage –Make Arawak Cay a major Cultural F estival site for the enjoyment of Bahamian families and visi t ors alike. Page: 31– across from page:30–Sports and Leisure: develop a plan for the commercial and recreational development of Arawak Cay. Editor your readers will see in these official policy state ments of the FNM, 1992-19972007 at no time, implied or suggested, did the FNM propose a Container Port for Arawak Cay. Mr Symonette quoted or passed to Minister Zhivargo Laing a copy of what seemed to be the 2007 Manifesto and he quoted page: 31 under Sports and Leisure the FNM will develop a commercial and recreational base for Arawak Cay the ‘commercial’ mention did not then nor now can suggest a port that’s really beg ging the question. The commercial development was the creation of commerce in restaurants, etc. I trust the Prime Minister he has said that his government wrote to the proposers of the C ontainer Port at Arawak Cay and have stated that the pro p osers must show proof that the environment nor the traffic as a result of this proposal willn egatively impact the confines and the route between Arawak Cay and Gladstone Road. As long as those retained to complete these studies are com petent and have an International reputation I leave my decision solely in the hands of the Prime Minister as I am 100 per cent assured there is no consultant or consultancy who will be able to support this proposal as it is obvious there will be environmental impact from noise and pollution – there will be a high capacity of negative traffic increase which will snarl the corridor under construction as part of the New Providence Road Improvement programme. Editor if you do not believe this writer pull out your Manifesto copies and see for yourself the Thomas’s amongst will be shown up. W THOMPSON Nassau, August 22, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. I wish you in the name of the Lord, please don’t let anybody know my address and I want you please to put this in The Tribune some time this week s o every Tribune reader can r ead it. Please allow me to say something about the crime issue here in the Bahamas. I read in the Punch this morning in page seven: The crime problem in the Bahamas i s a Haitian problem for if the w riter is talking about HaitianBahamian origins and Creole killer culture, is all about Haitian. I buy the Tribune Monday t o Saturday and the Punch every Monday and Thursday. It’s not so often to find a Haiti an coming out from the court f or stealing, murder, rape or any other related crime, youw ill find them on the papers for i llegal or victim of.I don’t say that they don’t’ do these kind of t hing. I don’t like when they talking about Haitian-Bahamian, a H aitian-Bahamian should be a child between a Bahamian and a Haitian. If a child is born in the Bahamas by a non citizen of the Bahamas this child is aB ahamian for he’s born on Bahamian soil except if by accident I have one here for my one will be a Haitian. T he crime is a Bahamianrooted problem. Because Bahamians cannot resolve their conflict without a knife, a gun, a cutlass or any kind of object that can take out your life. The police cannot stop crime in the B ahamas. The police don’t have time to make patrols to protect the citizens living in the country. In Haiti, when I was in school, they taught me that t he police force is created to protect every citizen living in a country. In the Bahamas, it is very different. The RBPF have more time to run behind poorH aitians to make $2, 3, 4, and 5 from them, the time that they take to run behind them and to make the deal can help them t o stop a killing. L et me tell you that, believe m e or not, the Bahamas is little over 300,000 people, even if youp ut 200,000 Bahamian police, you will still have crime b etween them, and one will kill another. And another problem I see with the crime is the constitution, the parliamentarians and the court system. The bails ystem is a big mistake, when you release a criminal on bailh e’s going to kill another for he knows he will be released o n bail, a lot of criminal do that. Why they don’t’ change that law so they can keep them in Fox Hill? And bring the death penalty when you kill a person,y ou are found guilty and you get killed too, you will not be g oing to kill another person. Instead of doing so, they f ocus on Haitians. Some Bahamians don’t see the value of the Haitian, and they don’t see what Haitians are doing for the Bahamas, that’s why on p age seven this morning the writer says that human life d oesn’t mean anything in Haiti. I can say fortunately for him or h er and unfortunately for Hait ian. I can ask him or her to recall the history, he or her will find that Bahamians went to Haiti for food, for freedom and it’s not too late for Bahamians t o go to Haiti again, for nobody knows tomorrow. The tourist is the main resource of the Bahamas. If you c an ask all Haitians to stop working in the Bahamas just for one week, you will see the difference. You can recall the h istory in the Bible where the r ich man says: Now I have everything I am supposed to, my soul relaxes, you don’t have anything, you don’t produce t oo much, you import 90 per c ent of all your goods. Haitians are humans too, mistreat them, beat them in the detention centre, they always say investigation ongoing andn ever find justice. God will say enough is enough. I don’t think t his is what you call a Christian nation. I’m living in the Bahamas for almost 12 years, I know what my fellow Haitians a re suffering and they never f ind justice, but let me tell you that day will come when Haiti w ill serve as another Miami for the Bahamas. By that timeB ahamians will know that God has the power, he can give it tow homever he wants and he can take the high head down and take the low head high. Forgive me please if you get mad by what I say. I say thatb ecause they (Bahamians ing bad too much aboutH aitians and they don’t try to resolve the real problems of the country. One second, put this please in The Tribune for I love The T ribune or reply to me. But don’t put my address. NO NAME Nassau, August, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm F ORMER chief minister Michael Misick was in town last week to promote the idea of t he Turks and Caicos islands becoming an autonomous state under the Bahamas gov-e rnment. Considering the Turks’ present situation a nd its history of an inability to govern without indulging in corruption, we think that Mr Misick is offering a very tainted packet. And b eing himself discredited by a recent British inquiry, he is the last person who should be t rying to broker the deal. The Turks and Caicos is an overseas terr itory of the UK, located between the Bahamas and Haiti. It has a population of 2 3,000, all British citizens. Last year Britain appointed a Commission of Inquiry to look into allegations of c orruption against Mr Misick and other officials. It was suggested that officials had mis u sed public money and had profited from the sale of government-owned land. H earings earlier this year revealed details of Mr Misick’s lavish spending after taking office in 2003. Although he insisted on his innocence, he was forced to resign in March. Sir Robin Auld, QC, who was a lawyer in o ne of the Bahamas’ own Commissions of Inquiry several years ago now serves onB ermuda’s court of appeal led the investigation in the Turks’ case. Sir Robin said he f ound “clear signs of political amorality and immaturity and general administrative incompetence.” On August 14 Britain imposed direct rule on the islands as a result of the Commis s ion’s findings. The Turks and Caicos government and legislature were suspended and a British Foreign Office-appointed gover nor was put in charge. B ritish Foreign Minister Chris Bryant said the suspension could last up to two years while Governor Gordon Wetherell “put the islands’ affairs back in good order.” He suggested that elections for a new Turks a nd Caicos government could be held by July, 2011. W e suggest that nothing should be done to take Mr Misick’s proposal any further until t he British government has accomplished its mission of trying to give the island honest g overnment. If at any time after that, Mr Misick’s suggestion should prove to have some merit, it should certainly not be explored with any of those tainted by thei nquiry. The Bahamas has had a checkered histo ry in Turks island since 1766, when a running battle was started with the Bermudians who seasonally raked Turks islands’ salt pans. The Bahamas believed it had a right to tax the salt. The Bermudians refused to pay the t ax. Eventually in 1819 the British government assigned political control of the Turks a nd Caicos to the Bahamas. It retained that control until 1848. That year the inhabitantso f the Turks successfully petitioned to be a separate colony governed by a council presi dent under the supervision of the governor of Jamaica. In 1873 the islands were annexed to J amaica with a commissioner and a legislative board. In 1959 the islands got their own a dministration under an administrator. The Jamaican governor remained their gover-n or until 1962 when Jamaica became inde pendent of Britain and the Turks became a c rown colony. From 1965 the Bahamas governor was also governor of the Turks until the Bahamas became independent in 1973. T he Turks then got its own governor. However, it wasn’t long before the islands w ere showing signs that its administrators could be corrupted. N orman Sanders was elected chief minis ter when his PAP won the islands’ 1984 election. The following year he and two of his ministers were convicted and jailed in the United States on various drug charges. One o f those ministers was Stafford Missick, first cousin of Michael Misick. Stafford Missick,w ho before returning to the Turks and entering politics there, was for several years on the s taff of the Bahamas’ Central Bank. The following year July 24, 1986 the Turks governor dissolved the government and replaced it with an advisory council after allegations of arson and fraud found the c hief minister, Nathaniel Francis, who had replaced Saunders and four other P AP officials unfit to rule. One wonders if Michael Misick, who has i nfluential friends in the Bahamas, has made this pitch to get from under Britain, and is cosying up to the Bahamas in the hopes of regaining his position in an autonomous Turks and Caicos under the Bahamas’ u mbrella? It has been suggested that Britain would n ot want to lose the Turks. This couldn’t be further from the truth. A former Bahamas d iplomat has told us that British officials have for years expressed an interest in some s ort of association between the Bahamas and the Turks and Caicos islands. His impression was that the UK would be pleased to be rid of these islands. H owever, this transfer cannot be done at the expense of the Bahamas, which knows only too well what it is like to wrestle with a tarnished image in the public arena. Maybe in the future, but for the immediate present, an association with the Turks and Caicos islands would be bad news. No justice for suffering Haitians LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net T urks too tarnished to touch What the FNM manifestos said about Arawak Cay

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THE FNM yesterday expressed its “thanks andd elight” for the Catholic Church’s support of the proposed amendment to the Sexual Offences Act, and encouraged other religiousd enominations to follow its lead. Last week, Archbishop Patrick Pinder, of the Roman Catholic Archdio-c ese in the Bahamas and the T urks and Caicos Islands, offered the church’s “prayerful support” of gov-e rnment’s proposed amendment to outlaw marital rape. I n response, the FNM, through the party’s chairman Senator Johnley Fer-g uson, expressed its thanks for the declaration of supp ort by one of the “largest and most respected religious denominations in the coun-t ry.” Mr Ferguson urged other religious groups, especiallym ainline denominations, to come out and declare supp ort for what he says they know is “right and proper in the sight of God.” E xpanding on the issue, the chairman is calling on F NMs everywhere to urge their church pastors and people to come out in louds upport of the amendment. “The Free National Movement is grateful and delighted for the declaration by Archbishop Patrick Pin-d er that the Roman Catholic Church is in full support of the government’s proposed amendment to the Sexual Offences Act which wouldo utlaw marital rape in the B ahamas. “In point of fact, the proposed amendment reflectsp recisely the party’s long tradition of defence, hono ur, respect, dignity, and upliftment of Bahamian women,” Mr Ferguson said. T he chairman said the FNM is proud of State Mini ster of Social Services Loretta Butler’s dedication and determination in push-i ng the amendment, “and in going full-speed in the communities to gain publicu nderstanding and support for the legislation.” D uring the FNM’s first term as government, Mr Ferguson said, three qualified and capable Bahamianw omen – Dame Ivy Dumont, Janet Bostwick and Theresa Moxey-Ingraham – were made Cabinet ministers and served withp roductivity and distinction. “On that watch, a qualified and capable Bahamian jurist, Dame Joan Sawyer, became Chief Justice of theB ahamas, and later, presid ent of the Bahamas Court of Appeal. Mrs Justice Anita Allen was also appointedt o the high court on the FNM’s watch. In 2001, the FNM government caused the appointment of Dame Ivy Dumonta s the sixth Bahamian Governor-General, and the first female ever to becomeH ead of State,” he said. Mr Ferguson also pointed to what he described as the FNM’s “bold, brave and defiant step of proposing aR eferendum for the amending of the Constitution of the Bahamas, which included an amendment which would have brought essen-t ial elements of new equalit y for the women of the Bahamas.” PLANS for a unified bus system appear to be moving ahead at a snail’s pace, with the Minister of Works andT ransport still awaiting the final draft of the proposal to be submitted to Cabinet. Y esterday, Minister Neko Grant said although governm ent is still "looking" at the proposed initiative, it remains in the preliminarys tages. "I am awaiting a final draft on that to take to another place (Cabinet decision can be made on it,"h e said. He did not, however, say when this draft is expected nor when it will be presented to parliament. A s reported previously, as far back as 2006 jitney drivers and franchise owners called on the government to implement a unified bus system, bringing all bus operators under one entity in which both private owners and the gov-e rnment would have a stake. The plan was intended to improve the safety and reliability of bus services, reducing the recklessness that has given the industry a bad name, while encour aging more people to utilise public transportation and lessen traffic congestion. Governor General Arthur Hanna in his speech from the throne in 2006 declared that the PLP government wouldb ring legislation to parlia ment to enact the plan. But despite proclamations t hroughout 2006 and 2007 that the government’s plan w as in the process of being “fine tuned”, nothing ever materialised. F ormer Works and Transport Minister Earl Deveaux was a proponent of the view that a unified bus system would have little impact ont he service provided if other core issues were not addressed, such as route rationalisation and the professionalism of drivers. I n June 2008, Mr Deveaux, in conjunction with the Road Traffic Department, the United Transportation Company and the Public Transport Association, committed to a -day chal lenge” for buses to improve their services for drivers to be more courteous, reducing speed, cleaning up their vehicles and stopping at designated sites. Mr Deveaux said the challenge would have “measurable” goals and results would be published publicly. However, this did not happen. By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net D ESPITE some delays i n finalising its services offer under the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA pean Union in light ofE uropean concerns, the f inal offer will still keep key sectors reserved for B ahamians, Minister of State for Finance Zhivargo Laing said. A fter re-consideration by Cabinet, the offer is expected to again be for-w arded to the EU by “the end of this month”, h e added. Mr Laing previously acknowledged that afters ubmitting the services offer earlier this year with some clarifica tions”, the EU had “come back to ask uss ome additional questions and make some a dditional suggestions” in relation to what the Bahamas was agreeing tod o under the EPA. Mr Laing said the government would have to “give full consideration” to those suggestions andt hen make some determinations. This comes after a s ource close to the EPA negotiating process told T ribune Business i n April that the services offer the Bahamas made had beeno pposed by the EU at that stage because it “just d id not meet the require ments and the agreed percentage amounts tob e liberalised.” This raised the question of whether the Bahamas would be pres sured into conceding g reater foreign participation in sectors of the economy which are currently reserved for Bahamians alone, afterh aving assured that the services offer “mirrors the National InvestmentP olicy” that keeps 13 sec tors closed to foreign competition and outlines how foreigners can engage in others.” A sked yesterday whether the governmen t’s reaction to the EU’s suggestions in reference to its initial offer would see any of these currently reserved sectors opening up for foreign participa tion, Mr Laing said it would not. “In fact it’s fairer to say that what we are seeking to do would bring that clarity to the EU in terms of the mir-roring of the two (the offer and the National Investment Policy as it currently exists),” said Mr Laing. He asserted that the exchange between the Bahamas and the EU was more in terms of “clarifying” the offer that is being made by this country. The EPA is a trade agreement between the EU African, Caribbean and Pacific countries that clarifies the terms upon which the countries involved trade in goods and services. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Final offer under EPA ‘will reserve key sectors for Bahamians’ By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Two men were arraigned on firearm and ammunition possession charges in the Freeport Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Appearing in Court One before Magistrate Debbye Ferguson were Don Phillippe, 30, and Ethan Rolle, 32, of Freeport. Lawyers Murrio Ducille andSimeonBrown appeared on behalf of Rolle. It is alleged that on August 28, at Freeport, Grand Bahama, Phillippe and Rolle were found in possession of a firearm, namely a .40 Glock pistol with 12 live rounds of ammunition. They pleaded not guilty to the charges and were each granted $10,000 bail with one surety on the first count, and $5,000 cash bail on the second count. The matter was adjourned until February 15, 2010 for trial. Two in court over firearm and ammunition possession Unified bus system plans still in low gear FNM grateful for Catholic support of amendment to Sexual Offences Act ARCHBISHOP Patrick Pinder offered the Catholic Church’s ‘prayerful support’ of government’s proposed amendment to outlaw marital rape. Govt encourages other denominations to follow its lead NEKO GRANT CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. ASTRONAUTS hitched a giant chest of drawers to the international space station on Monday that contained a brand new freezer, sleeping compartment and treadmill bearing a TV comedian’s name, according to Associated Press. The Italian-built chest nicknamed Leonardo, as in Leonardo da Vinci was moved from space shuttle Discovery via a hefty robot arm and hoisted onto the space station. It’s loaded with nearly 8 tons of equipment and science experiments for the orbiting outpost and its six residents. Much of the gear is stored in portable racks; the bedroom is the size of a phone booth. Leonardo will remain secured to the space station for the next week. The astronauts will remove the cylindrical vessel 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter and place it back on space shuttle Discovery for return to Earth. By that time, it will be loaded with trash and unneeded items. NASA’s brand new $5 million treadmill officially called the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill, or COLBERT for short is in pieces and will need to be assembled after Discovery leaves. The TV comedian ended up with an exercise machine named in his honor after he won an online vote for christening rights to a space station room. Unwilling to go with Colbert for the yet-tobe-launched room, NASA opted for Tranquility to commemorate the Apollo 11 moon landing 40 years ago this summer. The treadmill was a consolation prize. Huge chest of drawers hoisted aboar d space station

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in the relevant departments,” said a statement issued yes terday. Labour Minister Dion Foulkes said his Department was informed of the pending redundancies early last week. The company said the restructuring which also saw four jobs made redundant in the company’s Fort Lauderdale office came in light of “adjusted forecasts for group related business,” indicating that the company had received new signals that group arrivals are to be fewer than initially expected. Earlier this year, resort executives pointed to the cancellation of group trips such as those traditionally tak en by staff from North American corporations in the wake of the global financial crisis that had seriously impacted occupancy levels at Atlantis. While hotel occupancy lev els temporarily rose to around 85 per cent during the recent Miss Universe pageant, which was hosted at Atlantis for much of August, Ed Fields, Senior Vice President of Public Affairs for Atlantis, pointed out in a statement last week that many of the rooms occupied were complimentary, according to Kerzner International’s agreement with the Miss Universe Organisation. As the resort heads into the typically slow September/October period occupancy levels were forecast to drop to as low as 30 per cent within weeks, executives stated. The move comes nine months after Atlantis let go 10 per cent of its workforce 800 people citing low occupancy levels. she is confident that the excellent administrative team at CC Sweeting Senior High will have enacted all of the protocols that the ministry has in place for sit uations such as this. On Thursday evening last week, the male teacher was alleged to have drugged and later performed oral sex ona male student who attends the senior high institution. The student reportedly complained to another teacher about the matter, which caused the school to contact the police, resulting in the teacher’s arrest. While his name has been withheld there are reports that he could be charged in court sometime this week. Police Commissioner Reginald Ferguson confirmed that officers at the Central Detective Unit are investigating the matter. However he said that the file has yet to reach his desk, which normally indicates that the investigators have yet to complete their work. Originally it was alleged that the incident had involved a teacher at CC Sweeting Junior High. However The Tribune was able to confirm yesterday that it had in-fact involved a teacher from the senior high school, and not the junior, which actually has been renamed TA Thompson Junior High. This confusion, the principal at TA Thompson said, forced him to meet with teachers and parents yesterday morning to assure them that the matter did not involve any of the staff at his institution. “My teachers first got wind of it through your newspaper,” Mr Franklyn Lightbourne said, “and they then directed me to the article. “They said they wanted to find out if it was true. But I only confirmed and told my teachers that it was not TA Thompson,” he said. As with attempts Sunday to reach Education Minister Carl Bethel for com ment on the matter, all efforts yesterday proved fruitless. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM R USSELL’S WAREHOUSE CLOSING SALE20’x30’Tent $2,500.00, 5 Ton Split A/C Unit $1,500, 15kw diesel Generator, Asst. Fixtures and Fittings,Rivet Rite Shelving, Gondolas, Glass Shelves, 2 & 4 Arm Display Racks, Gridwall, Slatwall, Slotted Standards, and Hardware. Men’s Coverall’s $5.00, S/S & L/S White Shirts $1-$5, Blank CD’s $0.50, Men’s Jeans sz. 48-50, $15, Blank ID Cards bx of 500 $45.00, 16” Stand Fans $20.00, And moreLocation: Madeira Shopping Center Behind Mystical Gym Entrance to Aquinas First left-First stairs on left. Hours: Tuesday Thursday 9:00am. to 5:00pm C ontact: 465-8648 of this year's enrolment figures, saying the director of education had those numbers. When asked if she felt the enrolment increase would place a strain on public school performance, Ms Garraway said no, adding that many of the country's secondary schools were previously underpopulated. To tackle levels of overpopulation in government primary schools in the southwestern district, the Ministry of Education built two more classrooms at Carmichael Primary with an additional three classrooms being built at Garvin Tynes Primary, she said. The public school system has about 3,500 teachers throughout the country, including teachers aides and art instructors. Representatives from the Catholic and Anglican boards of education while not reporting any large increase in 2009/2010 enrolment yesterday said registration levels are not dismal. Hillary Valencia Saunders, director of education for the Anglican system's four schools, said the group has seen a slight increase from 960 registered students last year to 985 for 2009/2010 academic year. The Catholic educational system which has 14 schools throughout the nation has seen about a 98 per cent return of former students for the new academic year. "We anticipated that there would be a small attrition but it's not what we had anticipated because we have the majority of our students back we have about 98 per cent of our students who have returned. "Our greatest challenge is in the family islands, of course, within Grand Bahama and Eleuthera but in New Providence the enrolment is pretty consistent with last year," said Director of Catholic Education Claudette Rolle. Both systems have long-standing payment plans for strugg ling parents and have not raised tuition fees this year a move both women said was not related to the current eco-nomic turbulence. hospital. Seide Jr, was arrested by police on Friday, August 28, sometime around 6.15pm in the downtown area. Coderold Keil Wallace, aka Coderold Miller, was charged on August 24 in relation to the armed robbery and murder of Maycock. He also appeared before Magistrate Debbye Ferguson. Wallace was represented by K Brian Hanna. Both Wallace and Seide Jr, denied bail, were remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison in New Providence until a preliminary inquiry on February 10, 2010. Public schools numbers rocket FROM page one M EMBERS o f the Beta Beta Lambda Chapter of the international Phi Beta Sigma fraternity, chartered at the College of the Bahamas, donated school supplies to the Albury Sayles primary school. Pictured left to right are Brother D'Angelo Reid; Albury Sayles primary principal Mary Mortimer; Brother Ramon McIntosh; Albury Sayles primary senior mistress Deborah Rolle; Brother Keron Wood ands tudents. Phi Beta Sigma is a fraternity of college-educated men dedicated to brotherhood, scholarship, and service. The Bahamian chapter has dedicated itself to aid wherever possible in the education of the country’s youth. P HI BETA SIGMA FRATERNITY DONATES SUPPLIES TO ALBURY SAYLES PRIMARY SCHOOL Tim Clarke /Tribune staff Teacher taken off active duty FROM page one Management jobs go in Atlantis r estr uctur ing FROM page one FROM page one Second man accused of businessman’s murder Colebrooke. Messages left at KFC's head office seeking comment were not returned. The news of KFC's pending lay-offs comes on the same day as Atlantis announced it is letting 14 people go as it restructures two departments the Group and Conventions department in the Food and Beverage Division and the reservations department. Six of the jobs are from Atlantis, four from Ocean Club and another four from the company's Group and Conventions department in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. While the news could be seen as a gloomy sign of the times, it would appear that local food outlet Bamboo Shack is currently thriving. Company chiefs yesterday revealed that despite the poor economy and its affect on most businesses, its flow of customers has increased. Devard Williams, speaking on behalf of the 19-year-old company, yesterday revealed that on top of a new “Bamboo Stew Shack” soon to open on Nassau Street, the restaurant chain plans to open three more loca tions within the next year. Union in talks over pending job losses’ at KFC FROM page one

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Famous author marks 100th Bahamas visit C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A FIRST occurred in Grand Bahama Port Authority history as execu t ives hosted an “open bid process” meeting for the construction of the new Grand Bahama Arts and Craft Centre in July. As a part of GBPA’s modus operandi, a second open bid process meeting was held last week. This time, it was for downtown turnaround’s landscape and irrigation phase one of the revitalisation campaign. Fivelandscapers publicly presented their bids for the revamp landscape and irrigation proposal which encompasses 37 acres of the designated downtown area. President of the GBPA Ian Rolle said: “Today’s proce dures, where business own ers have an opportunity to publicly announce their bid for a proposed GBPA project, is right in line with our ‘making it happen’ initiatives.” Proposals The GBPA is now in the process of investigating proposals submitted, as the ten der that is chosen will not be solely based on financial submissions. “It is the intent of the Grand Bahama Port Authority to take the approach where most licensees who are qualified to engage in the particular works would have the opportunity to do so on all appropriate projects. “This event is the continuation of the new era of transparency in project deal ings and GBPA’s open bid process is now a permanent part of the way that GBPA conducts business,” the company said in a statement. Open bid process for revitalisation project of downtown Freeport LICENSED landscapers in attendance at the ‘open bid process’ meeting held for downtown turn around’s landscape and irrigation project phase one on Friday at GBPA Headquarters. PICTURED (front row from left to right DUDLEY Francis, Sr, building inspector of building and development services for GBPA; Nakira Wilchcombe, environmental manager for GBPA; Arthur Jones, vice-president of building and development services for GBPA; Andrea Grant, planning compliance official for GBPA; (back row from left to right Charles Pratt, commercial manager for GBPA; Rico Cargill, environmen tal manager for GBPA; Olethea Gardiner, environmental inspector for GBPA and Allison Campbell, deputy director of building and development services. I T is vital to the Bahamas’ economic prosperity and national security to ensure the necessary cyber securitym easures are in place so that the country can ward off potential computer a nd financial crimes. This was one of the determinations made following a three-day cyber crimec onference sponsored by the US Department of Defence in cooperation w ith US Southern Command. US Embassy Charg d’Affaires Tim othy Zuniga-Brown giving remarks at t he workshop’s closing ceremony on Friday said that cyber threats are “one of the most serious economic and national security challenges we face today.” For this reason, it was of the utmost importance to hold this conference now and work to address these issues,” he said. The conference, held at the Sheraton Cable Beach Hotel from August 25-2 7, included 25 participants from the Royal Bahamas Defence Force, the Royal Bahamas Police Force, the National Emergency Management Agency, Department of Social Services,B TC and the Water and Sewerage Corporation. Participants shared ideas and disc ussed security measures at the conference, which was designed for offic ials with responsibility for protecting and enhancing computer and intranet security. The participants also discussed the p otential for computer crimes, financial crimes and various computer-related issues. The facilitators and presenters for the course included members from the Rhode Island National Guard. T he conference was brought about by the Rhode Island State Partnership Programme and the Traditional Com-m ander’s Activities Programme two initiatives that highlight the close and e nduring relationship between the Bahamas and the US. Battling computer and financial crime UNITED STATES Embassy Charg d’Affaires Timothy Zuniga-Brown is flanked by the cyber crime workshop facilitators and participants. t he conference was sponsored by the US Department of Defence in cooperation with US Southern Command. THREE-DAY CYBER CRIME CONFERENCE Cyber security measures seen as vital to Bahamas B EST-SELLING author Dr N Cindy Trimm made a courtesy call on Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace during her1 00th visit to the country recently. Dr Trimm, author of such books as ‘The Rules of E ngagement’ and ‘Commanding Your Morning’, has been visiting the Bahamas for more than five years. On her most recent visit, she conducted at wo-day conference at Trinity City of Praise with host pastor Apostle Lee Watson. I n addition to her books, Dr Trimm is known for being featured on many television programmes, radio shows and internet broadcasts. AUTHOR AND PUBLIC SPEAKER Dr N Cindy Trimm with Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM AT its recent meeting, the Zonta Club of Nassau welcomed Tryrina Neely, owner and operator of Primadona, a virtual fashion network, who made a short presentation on h er business. S he said that Primadona is a u nique woman-led business, one that explores fashion designs, trends, taste, and status. Often referred to as the new fashion shopping and networking concept for women of influence, it features monthly designer high-end shows at upscale venues such as Villagio. Women can shop for upscale items at prices 30 to 60 per cent off. These shows provide a gourmet taste of style, personal fashion mapping consultations, interactions on trends, and learning from industry experts all within five to six hours of non-stop entertainment and a ction. T he Primadona Anniversary S oiree and Humanitarian Award presentation, which recognised programmes that create economic change and business networking support for young professionals, took place on Saturday, at Paradise Island. This year the Humanitarian Small Business Leadership Award was presented to Desmond Bannister, Minister of Youth Sports and Culture. The Zonta Club of Nassau welcomes fashion entrepreneur IN TIMEfor the start of the new school year, Dennis Nairn, president of Power Design Engineering Consultants (PDEC 10 Dell desktop computers to the Abaco District Education Office for distribution to Abaco schools. Accepting the computers, Lenora Black, school superintendent, said that students from the 14 government schools on the island achieved grades higher than the national average in the BJC and BGCSE examinations. Mr Nairn, noting that his firm has built up strong ties with Abaco over the past year, said it was an easy and pleasurable decision to make a contribution to the future of the islands. The Nassau-based electrical firm has been engaged at the Baker’s Bay Development at Guana Cay in the Abacos for over a year. PICTURED FOLLOWING her presentation are, from left: Joanna Bowe, treasurer of the Zonta Club of Nassau; Tryrina Neely; Patricia Francis, president of the Zonta Club of Nassau, and Janet Johnson, president-elect of the Zonta Club of Nassau. ENGINEERING FIRM DONATES COMPUTERS TO ABACO SCHOOL PICTURED AT THE PRESENTATION , left to right are Tim Sands, PTA president at Cherokee Primary; Ruth Smith, office manager, DOE; Dennis Nairn, president of PDEC; Lenora Black, superintendent, Abaco Schools; Vanessa James, principal, Abaco Central High School; Sandy Edwards, education officer, DOE and Leslie Rolle, senior education officer, DOE.

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ROBERT MILLWARD, A P Soccer Writer LONDON I t looks like Carlo Ancelotti broke from AC Milan at the r ight time. A few weeks into his first season in English soccer, Chelsea is perfect in the Premier League with four wins in four games. He already has won a trophy at Wembley and has the Blues fans believing the league title is coming back to Stamford Bridge a fter three years at Manchester United's Old Trafford. Ancelotti has devised a tactical system the players appear to l ike and has two of the game's biggest egos strikers Didier Drogba and Nicolas Anelka playing in harmony. A fter Chelsea's 3-0 victory over Burnley, Ancelotti surprised an interviewer by saying he wouldn't be watching on TV when Milan faced Inter later in the day. Maybe he knew that Milan, with whom he won the European Cup as a player and coach, would be on the wrong end of a 4-0 drubbing. A ncelotti's most recent triumphs with AC Milan were as recent as the 2007 Champions League followed by the Euro p ean Super Cup although the team's last Serie A triumph was three seasons before that. He was criticized for hanging on to a ging players for too long, and Milan finished well behind Inter in the title race in his final three seasons at the club. Now in the unfamiliar surroundings of English soccer, A ncelotti is out to help Chelsea regain the Premier League title and maybe capture its first Champions League crown. C helsea leads the league on goal difference over Totten ham. Its play has delighted Ancelotti, whose team also won a penalty-kick shootout over United after a 2-2 draw in the Community Shield at Wembley. "We have to maintain this situation and now the play improves with improved confidence," he said. Asked whether his team could win the league title, he replied: "We started well but we know the season is very long. It will be difficult for sure this season but we have the possibility to step up. "Every week we work to play well and for a coach it is important to see that the players play well. The most important thing for me is that we are on the right way, to train and to work." In the league, Chelsea has so far faced four clubs who are likely to finish well below them in the standings Hull, Sunderland, Fulham and Burnley. The first real test will come against Tottenham on Sept. 20 and against Liverpool, Man United, Arsenal and Manchester City in the following months. But Ancelotti, the fifth man to lead Chelsea in two years, is relying on the stars who flopped in the league last season, rather than importing some of his big names from Milan. As well as getting the best out of Drogba and Anelka, he has revived the form of Portuguese midfielder Deco, who was a big disappointment last season under Luiz Felipe Scolari and Guus Hiddink. Ancelotti has even ended Andriy Shevchenko's troubled spell at Stamford Bridge. One of Milan's greatest goal scorers during Ancelotti's reign at San Siro, Shevchenko moved to Chelsea in 2006 but failed to make an impact. He was sent back on loan to Milan last season. Even Ancelotti, however, made little use of the Ukraine strik er, who is returning to his original club, Dynamo Kiev. Ancelotti explained that he would not be able to give Shevchenko many starts at Chelsea. While it might appear that the coach has turned his back on a player who helped him capture some big titles, Ancelotti has no room for sentiment. Shevchenko, like AC Milan, is Ancelotti's past. Chelsea is his present and future. CHELSEA'S MANAGER Carlo Ancelotti reacts during their English Premier League soccer match against Burnley at Stamford Bridge, London, Saturday, Aug. 29, 2009. A P P h o t o / S a n g T a n Ancelotti has Chelsea top as AC Milan slumps F F O O O O T T B B A A L L L L : : EXTRATIME CHELSEA'S John Terry, centre left, and Frank Lampard, centre right, lift the trophy after winning the English FA Community Shield soccer match against Manchester United at Wembley Stadium in London, Sunday, Aug. 9, 2009. A P P h o t o / A k i r a S u e m o r i DOUG FERGUSON, AP Golf Writer JERSEY CITY, N.J. M uch to his chagrin, Tiger Woods has put some suspense back intog olf. Give him the lead going into the final round of the major, and victory is no l onger as certain as death, taxes and Woods wearing a red shirt on Sunday. Watch him hit a clutch shot to the 18th green, and there is nog uarantee he'll make the putt. Y.E. Yang delivered a shocker two weeks ago at the PGA Championship when he b ecame the first player to beat golf's best closer, rallying from two shots behind Woods for a three-shot victory at Hazeltine. Woods rarely looked so human. And then on Sunday at Liberty National, he bled a l ittle more. He was on the cusp of cont ention for most of the final round at The Barclays until the bell rang for the final lap. T hen, Woods made a 10-foot birdie on the 14th to move c loser to the lead, a 15-foot par putt on the next hole tos tay there, and a deft chipand-run to 3 feet for birdie o n the 16th that pulled him within one shot. Needing a birdie on the final hole to post the clubhouse lead at least force ap layoff, maybe enough win he drilled a 6-iron from1 89 yards to the back pin at the 18th and listened to those f amiliar roars as the ball settled 7 feet from the cup. Heath Slocum and Steve Stricker, tied for the lead, were on the 18th tee as W oods stood over his birdie putt. Even from 467 yardsa way, it was not difficult to figure out what was going on. I f the cheers weren't enough, that red shirt is hard to miss. "Usually he makes it," Slocum said. "Ho-hum for him." S urprise! The ball slid by on the left s ide of the cup, and they could hear the groans t wice. Because the large video boards and TVs in corporate chalets had about a 10-second delay, the big news reached some people later t han others. "It's kind of fun ny, actually," Slocum said, r eferring to the double dose of reaction. "But I knew that h e had missed it." That wasn't the case for S locum. Despite hitting a fair way bunker, playing short of the green and hitting a wedge to 20 feet, he rolled in the best par putt of his life for a one-shot victory. Stricker had a chance to tie, but missed from 10 feet. "I guess you can't make ' em all," Slocum said. Yang was the first to see for himself when he took down the biggest name in golf. Slocum beat a bunch of stars. The group one shot behind featured Woods, Stricker, Ernie Els and Padraig Harrington, who have combined to win 20 majors. All of them have been at least No. 3 in the world at some point. The common thread in both tournaments was Woods having a chance to win, and Woods finishing second. "That's the way it goes sometimes," he said. A long with his 81 victories worldwide, he has finished second 32 times in tournaments recognized by the world golf rankings. Even so, this was only the fifth time in his career that Woods has finished runnerup in consecutive tournam ents. The last time it happened was at the end of his 2006 season, when he was second to Yang at the HSBC Champions in Shanghai, then surrendered a lead on the back nine to Harrington and lost to him in a playoff at the Dunlop Phoenix in Japan. G o back to 2005 to find the last time it happened in America. Woods was runnerup to Michael Campbell in the U.S. Open, then tied for second at the Western Open in Chicago. Unlike the other four occasions, Woods had a realistic chance of winning both times as he stood on the1 8th tee. And the reason failure stands out so much is thati t rarely happened before. No other greens confounde d Woods quite like the ones at Liberty National. It was only fitting that he missed a 7foot putt at the end because he had done that all week.O n his first hole of the tournament, Woods hit a pure 5-i ron to 10 feet behind the hole at No. 10 and looked p erplexed when it broke away from the cup. Even as he tried to make a m ove Saturday, his 67 was slowed by missing an 8-foot e agle putt at No. 6 that stunned even one his playing p artners, Zach Johnson. He missed from 5 feet later in the third round on No. 15 and was spewing expletives all the way to the next tee. " It happens," Woods said Sunday. "Not too many golf c ourses that you misread putts that badly. This golf c ourse is one." Another course he men tioned was Fancourt in South Africa for the Presidents Cup in 2003. But that's where Woods made a putt he called one of the most nerve-racking of his career. He was on the third playoff hole against Els, i n near darkness, facing a 15foot par putt that broke both ways, right up the ridge, then left as it moved down toward the hole. The most famous putt was his 6-foot birdie on the 72nd hole of the 2000 PGA Championship which he made to f orce a playoff that he won against Bob May on his way t o four consecutive majors. This year, Woods won his first PGA Tour event since returning from reconstructive knee surgery by making a 15-f oot birdie putt on the final hole at Bay Hill. It was the same green where he made a 25-foot birdie putt a year ear lier to win by one shot, where he made a 15-footer to beat Phil Mickelson in 2001. The list is long. It will take more than two tournaments to put a dent in Woods' mystique. Besides, his loss is golf's gain, for it now puts some doubt into the outcome if not in Woods' head, then the people watching, and even those trying to beat him. ANOTHER FLINCH TIGER by For the second tournament (AP Photo/Rich Schultz TIGER WOODS tees off on the 15th hole during the final round of The Barclays golf tournament, Sunday, Aug. 30, 2009, at Liberty National Golf Club in Jersey City, N.J. It happens. Not too many golf courses that you misr ead putts that badly. This golf course is one. TIGER WOODS looks on as Zach Johnson (not pictured) putts on the 14th hole during the final round of The Barclays golf tournament, Sunday, Aug. 30, 2009, at Liberty National Golf Club in Jersey City, N.J. (APhoto/ Rich Schultz)

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By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net CARL Hield, making his third consecutive appearance, will be the first of the two Bahamians to see action at the AIBA World Boxing Championships in Milan, Italy. The championships, now into its XV edition with more than 700 competitors from 143 countries participating, will take place at the Mediolanum Forum that has a seating capacity of 11,500. The stadium hosts the biggest Indoor Multisport Arena in Italy, is equipped for swimming, ice skating, fitness, dance, squash, archery, bowling, 2-a-side soccer and martial arts. Hield, preparing to begin competition on the first of the nine days of competition, is expected to have his hands full as he has been drawn to compete against a hometown competitor in the 569 kilogram class. “All the training and stuff was good. “Everything has gone in order. I’m just resting and waiting for tomorrow (today interview with The Tribune yesterday at their hotel. “I’m just going in there to upset them because I know they are coming in with their plan to win. “But I’m going to upset them tomorrow. I know it’s not going to be an easy fight, but he just have to show me that he want it more than me and I want it more.” While coach Andre Seymour attended the opening ceremonies with Valentino Knowles, the other boxer on the team, Hield remained at the hotel resting. Knowles is not expected to compete until Wednesday. For Hield, as long as he go into the ring and execute the way he was taught, he said he’s confident that he can win today. Prior to going to Milan, the Bahamian team spent about three weeks in Rome in a training camp, which according to Hield was quite beneficial. “The training camp was nice. It gave me the opportu nity to meet different people from different countries,” he pointed out. “I got to meet a lot of people, especially some of the people who I will meet in my weight class. So it was great.” Not having the chance to see the Mediolanum Forum as he didn’t attend the opening ceremonies, Hield said he heard that it was a fantastic arena and he’s just eager to go there today and compete. “The gym we trained at was very nice. They had every thing there,” he said. “And they told us that the gym we will be competing in is much better than that, so I know it should be good. “But I just want to start competing.” With this being his third appearance in the biannual championships and not advancing out of the first round, Hield said he’s convinced that his experience will pull him through this time around. “This is my third one, so I have the experience of what to do and how to deal with the matter, So I’m just going to go out there and do what I have to do,” he insisted. Hield, who was trying to enjoy a movie in Italian, said Knowles is just as pumped up as he is and is ready to start competition when he get into the ring on Wednesday. But Hield said his goal is to go out there and start the pace for the Bahamas today. Wellington Miller, the presi dent of the Amateur Boxing A ssociation of the Bahamas, s aid the expectations is bursting through the seams for the two boxers. “They are in good shape, their spirits are high and they are ready to roll,” Miller said. “They’ve been training in Cuba for a while and then they went to Italy where they had a good training camp for the last three weeks. “I understood that they had some very good sparring with the boxers over there. “So I expect them to do very well. Talking with the coach, they are in excellent shape and their spirits are high. So they should do very well. I expect a world champion to come back home.” Miller said this was definitely the best position that the Bahamas has ever been in, having been afforded the scholarship by AIBA to attend the training camp. He assured the public that the boxers will certainly show their appreciation by their performances. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 13.91, almost a week after he got second in his first post-World’s meet in Tallinn on August 25 when he ran 13.50 behind American David Oliver’s winning time of 13.46. While some of the Bahamians were competing in Gateshead, some of the Jamaicans were attending the Zagreb 2009 in Croatia yesterday as well. Today, the next meet on the international schedule is in Rovereto, Italy, but it’s not known if any of the Bahamian athletes will be competing. However, a number of Bahamians are expected to line up to compete in the sixth and final IAAF Golden League meeting at the Memorial Van Damme in Bruxelles, Belgium on Friday. Two days later, it’s the Rieti 2009 Grand Prix in Rieti, Italy on Sunday. Reminiscent to the World’s, the top ranked athletes will all head to Thessaloni ki, Greece for the IAAF/VTB Bank World Athletics Final from September 12-13. At this point, Sturrup and FergusonMcKenzie are both eligible for the 100; Ferguson-McKenzie in the 200; Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown in the men’s 400; Leevan ‘Super man’ Sands in the men’s triple jump and Donald Thomas in the men’s high jump. The top eight athletes on the track and the top 12 on the field will qualify to compete in the World Athletics Final. Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie and Chandra Sturrup continue to impress BRITISHGRANDPRIX SHAMAR SANDS (centre FROM page 11 Carl Hield, Valentino prepare for Italian job F IGHTINGFORM: P ictured, from the left, are Carl Hield, Valentino Knowles and coach Andre Seymour. Hield is preparing to compete on the first of the nine days of competition. AIBA WORLD BOXING CHAMPIONSHIPS: MILAN, ITALY determined the Chiefs already thin receiver corpst ook a major blow. During his two day clinic here in New Providence Darling expressed his high expectations for the upcom-i ng season. Goal I expect to have a big y ear, my ultimate goal is a 1,000 yard season, a Pro-B owl invite and to get my team a championship,” he s aid. Darling could not be reached for comment on thei njury, up to press time. In three-preseason game t hus far he has recorded three catches for 19 yards,t he longest an 11-yard grab against the Vikings, August 2 1st. Football woes Share your news T he Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 a nd shar e your stor y . F ROM page 11 CHANDRA STURRUP in action in a file photo .

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ROBERT MILLWARD, A P Soccer Writer LONDON I t looks like Carlo Ancelotti broke from AC Milan at the r ight time. A few weeks into his first season in English soccer, Chelsea is perfect in the Premier League with four wins in four games. He already has won a trophy at Wembley and has the Blues fans believing the league title is coming back to Stamford Bridge a fter three years at Manchester United's Old Trafford. Ancelotti has devised a tactical system the players appear to l ike and has two of the game's biggest egos strikers Didier Drogba and Nicolas Anelka playing in harmony. A fter Chelsea's 3-0 victory over Burnley, Ancelotti surprised an interviewer by saying he wouldn't be watching on TV when Milan faced Inter later in the day. Maybe he knew that Milan, with whom he won the European Cup as a player and coach, would be on the wrong end of a 4-0 drubbing. A ncelotti's most recent triumphs with AC Milan were as recent as the 2007 Champions League followed by the Euro p ean Super Cup although the team's last Serie A triumph was three seasons before that. He was criticized for hanging on to a ging players for too long, and Milan finished well behind Inter in the title race in his final three seasons at the club. Now in the unfamiliar surroundings of English soccer, A ncelotti is out to help Chelsea regain the Premier League title and maybe capture its first Champions League crown. C helsea leads the league on goal difference over Totten ham. Its play has delighted Ancelotti, whose team also won a penalty-kick shootout over United after a 2-2 draw in the Community Shield at Wembley. "We have to maintain this situation and now the play improves with improved confidence," he said. Asked whether his team could win the league title, he replied: "We started well but we know the season is very long. It will be difficult for sure this season but we have the possibility to step up. "Every week we work to play well and for a coach it is important to see that the players play well. The most important thing for me is that we are on the right way, to train and to work." In the league, Chelsea has so far faced four clubs who are likely to finish well below them in the standings Hull, Sunderland, Fulham and Burnley. The first real test will come against Tottenham on Sept. 20 and against Liverpool, Man United, Arsenal and Manchester City in the following months. But Ancelotti, the fifth man to lead Chelsea in two years, is relying on the stars who flopped in the league last season, rather than importing some of his big names from Milan. As well as getting the best out of Drogba and Anelka, he has revived the form of Portuguese midfielder Deco, who was a big disappointment last season under Luiz Felipe Scolari and Guus Hiddink. Ancelotti has even ended Andriy Shevchenko's troubled spell at Stamford Bridge. One of Milan's greatest goal scorers during Ancelotti's reign at San Siro, Shevchenko moved to Chelsea in 2006 but failed to make an impact. He was sent back on loan to Milan last season. Even Ancelotti, however, made little use of the Ukraine strik er, who is returning to his original club, Dynamo Kiev. Ancelotti explained that he would not be able to give Shevchenko many starts at Chelsea. While it might appear that the coach has turned his back on a player who helped him capture some big titles, Ancelotti has no room for sentiment. Shevchenko, like AC Milan, is Ancelotti's past. Chelsea is his present and future. CHELSEA'S MANAGER Carlo Ancelotti reacts during their English Premier League soccer match against Burnley at Stamford Bridge, London, Saturday, Aug. 29, 2009. A P P h o t o / S a n g T a n Ancelotti has Chelsea top as AC Milan slumps F F O O O O T T B B A A L L L L : : EXTRATIME CHELSEA'S John Terry, centre left, and Frank Lampard, centre right, lift the trophy after winning the English FA Community Shield soccer match against Manchester United at Wembley Stadium in London, Sunday, Aug. 9, 2009. A P P h o t o / A k i r a S u e m o r i DOUG FERGUSON, AP Golf Writer JERSEY CITY, N.J. M uch to his chagrin, Tiger Woods has put some suspense back intog olf. Give him the lead going into the final round of the major, and victory is no l onger as certain as death, taxes and Woods wearing a red shirt on Sunday. Watch him hit a clutch shot to the 18th green, and there is nog uarantee he'll make the putt. Y.E. Yang delivered a shocker two weeks ago at the PGA Championship when he b ecame the first player to beat golf's best closer, rallying from two shots behind Woods for a three-shot victory at Hazeltine. Woods rarely looked so human. And then on Sunday at Liberty National, he bled a l ittle more. He was on the cusp of cont ention for most of the final round at The Barclays until the bell rang for the final lap. T hen, Woods made a 10-foot birdie on the 14th to move c loser to the lead, a 15-foot par putt on the next hole tos tay there, and a deft chipand-run to 3 feet for birdie o n the 16th that pulled him within one shot. Needing a birdie on the final hole to post the clubhouse lead at least force ap layoff, maybe enough win he drilled a 6-iron from1 89 yards to the back pin at the 18th and listened to those f amiliar roars as the ball settled 7 feet from the cup. Heath Slocum and Steve Stricker, tied for the lead, were on the 18th tee as W oods stood over his birdie putt. Even from 467 yardsa way, it was not difficult to figure out what was going on. I f the cheers weren't enough, that red shirt is hard to miss. "Usually he makes it," Slocum said. "Ho-hum for him." S urprise! The ball slid by on the left s ide of the cup, and they could hear the groans t wice. Because the large video boards and TVs in corporate chalets had about a 10-second delay, the big news reached some people later t han others. "It's kind of fun ny, actually," Slocum said, r eferring to the double dose of reaction. "But I knew that h e had missed it." That wasn't the case for S locum. Despite hitting a fair way bunker, playing short of the green and hitting a wedge to 20 feet, he rolled in the best par putt of his life for a one-shot victory. Stricker had a chance to tie, but missed from 10 feet. "I guess you can't make ' em all," Slocum said. Yang was the first to see for himself when he took down the biggest name in golf. Slocum beat a bunch of stars. The group one shot behind featured Woods, Stricker, Ernie Els and Padraig Harrington, who have combined to win 20 majors. All of them have been at least No. 3 in the world at some point. The common thread in both tournaments was Woods having a chance to win, and Woods finishing second. "That's the way it goes sometimes," he said. A long with his 81 victories worldwide, he has finished second 32 times in tournaments recognized by the world golf rankings. Even so, this was only the fifth time in his career that Woods has finished runnerup in consecutive tournam ents. The last time it happened was at the end of his 2006 season, when he was second to Yang at the HSBC Champions in Shanghai, then surrendered a lead on the back nine to Harrington and lost to him in a playoff at the Dunlop Phoenix in Japan. G o back to 2005 to find the last time it happened in America. Woods was runnerup to Michael Campbell in the U.S. Open, then tied for second at the Western Open in Chicago. Unlike the other four occasions, Woods had a realistic chance of winning both times as he stood on the1 8th tee. And the reason failure stands out so much is thati t rarely happened before. No other greens confounde d Woods quite like the ones at Liberty National. It was only fitting that he missed a 7foot putt at the end because he had done that all week.O n his first hole of the tournament, Woods hit a pure 5-i ron to 10 feet behind the hole at No. 10 and looked p erplexed when it broke away from the cup. Even as he tried to make a m ove Saturday, his 67 was slowed by missing an 8-foot e agle putt at No. 6 that stunned even one his playing p artners, Zach Johnson. He missed from 5 feet later in the third round on No. 15 and was spewing expletives all the way to the next tee. " It happens," Woods said Sunday. "Not too many golf c ourses that you misread putts that badly. This golf c ourse is one." Another course he men tioned was Fancourt in South Africa for the Presidents Cup in 2003. But that's where Woods made a putt he called one of the most nerve-racking of his career. He was on the third playoff hole against Els, i n near darkness, facing a 15foot par putt that broke both ways, right up the ridge, then left as it moved down toward the hole. The most famous putt was his 6-foot birdie on the 72nd hole of the 2000 PGA Championship which he made to f orce a playoff that he won against Bob May on his way t o four consecutive majors. This year, Woods won his first PGA Tour event since returning from reconstructive knee surgery by making a 15-f oot birdie putt on the final hole at Bay Hill. It was the same green where he made a 25-foot birdie putt a year ear lier to win by one shot, where he made a 15-footer to beat Phil Mickelson in 2001. The list is long. It will take more than two tournaments to put a dent in Woods' mystique. Besides, his loss is golf's gain, for it now puts some doubt into the outcome if not in Woods' head, then the people watching, and even those trying to beat him. ANOTHER FLINCH TIGER by For the second tournament (AP Photo/Rich Schultz TIGER WOODS tees off on the 15th hole during the final round of The Barclays golf tournament, Sunday, Aug. 30, 2009, at Liberty National Golf Club in Jersey City, N.J. It happens. Not too many golf courses that you misr ead putts that badly. This golf course is one. TIGER WOODS looks on as Zach Johnson (not pictured) putts on the 14th hole during the final round of The Barclays golf tournament, Sunday, Aug. 30, 2009, at Liberty National Golf Club in Jersey City, N.J. (APhoto/ Rich Schultz)

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B y MARTHA MENDOZA A ssociated Press Writer MEXICO CITY (AP Mexico is preparing for a second wave of swine flu, lookingat what worked and what didn ’t last spring when it banned e verything from dining out to attending school in an effort to control the virus. As the Northern Hemisphere flu season begins, the r est of the world is also studyi ng Mexico’s experience, looking for measures to replicate and costly mistakes to avoid. So what worked? Public awareness; rapid diagnosis, treatment and quarantine;a nd a near-compulsive outbreak of hand-washing. What didn’t? Travel bans, school closures, overuse of a ntibiotics and those flimsy p aper face masks that tangled hair, slid down necks and hid the beautiful smiles of this gargantuan city. When swine flu first flared up in Mexico in April, the government erred on the sideo f caution, closing schools and museums, banning public gatherings, playing soccer games to empty stadiums and t elling people not to shake h ands or kiss one another on the cheek. This bustling city of 18 million became eerily hollow. Mexican health officials say they made the right call. “Since we were the first c ountry affected by the flu, we didn’t know the possible magnitude and severity, so we took measures that we now know can be (focused D r. Pablo Kuri, the health secretary’s special influenza a dviser. In hindsight, Mexico’s most effective action one now emulated around the world was immediately telling its own citizens when the new virus was detected. Not every country has been so candid when facing an epidemic: China was heavily criticized for its slow response toS ARS in 2003, while Argentin a refused to declare a nationa l public health emergency w hen swine flu flared there in July. But Mexico’s openness didn’t come cheap: Economists say the outbreak cost the c ountry billions of dollars, mostly in losses from tourism. Mexico shared informat ion early and frequently,” said Dr. Jon Andrus at the P an American Health Organization’s headquarters inW ashington. “Mexico did this a t great cost to its economy, b ut it was the right thing to d o.” At the height of the epid emic in March, you could hardly make it a block inM exico City without a m asked public health worker, maitre d’, bus driver or store owner squeezing a dollop of antiseptic gel onto your hands. H ealth experts say handwashing offered the best d efense while the masks p robably did little to stop the virus from spreading. Masks are now advised only forh ealth care workers and people who are already infected. Fear also left behind a c leaner city: Crews now regul arly scrub subways and buses, park benches and offices something almost unheard ofb efore the epidemic. Clearly, millions of Mexic anos wore masks this spring e verywhere they went, but H1N1 continued to spread,” said Laurie Garrett, a senior fellow at the New York-based Council on Foreign Relations. It now seems clear that the best personal protections are regular hand-washing, avoiding crowded places, and when it is available vaccination.” Many Mexicans wait until t hey suffer full-blown symptoms before going to a doctor, if at all. Often, peoples elf-diagnose and go to a pharmacy to treat themselves since few drugs require a pres cription. Since April, howe ver, certain anti-flu drugs are distributed only at hospitals. Millions of uniformed Mexi can children were greeted with a dash of anti-bacterial gel as they returned to schooll ast Monday. Classes were postponed until mid-September in south e rn Chiapas state because of a n uptick in swine flu cases in the past month. Chiapas has had 3,400 s wine flu cases to date, the most in the country. Schools nationwide are c hecking for possible signs of s wine flu among children and teachers and are sending home anyone who seems sick.T hey also have added new c urriculum guidelines to e nsure children learn about p ersonal hygiene and basic sanitation. But this time, schools will be closed only if so many sick children or teachers get sickt hat education is compromised. Plans are already under way to continue lessons at home. “We aren’t going to panic, but we are being more careful here this year,” said CeciliaM cGregor, spokeswoman for Colegio Ciudad de Mexico, an 1,100-student privates chool in Mexico City. Janitors are required to wash doorknobs every two h ours, she said, and an onc ampus doctor was performing checks. Despite all the precautions, M exico’s health advisers say the most important lesson they have learned about swinef lu is that in most cases, it’s fairly mild. Swine flu caused 164 deaths i n three months in Mexico, w here tobacco-related ill nesses kill that number every day. So now we can put into context what actually happened,” Kuri said. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS PAGE 12, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Keisha Wemyss, the 34 year old daughter of former Inspector of Police and now President & CEO of WemCo Security Mr. Henry and Mrs. Judy Wemyss graduated Magna Cum Laude and a member of the Sigma Beta Delta Honours Society at DeVry University on 18 July in Miramar, Florida.Ms. Wemyss received a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Accounting Concentration. “I am proud of my accomplishments. I am grateful to my parents and to the company to afford me this opportunity. I hope that my eventualfull return to WemCo will strengthen the company’s management structure as we continue to serve the Bahamian public as the best security company in the country bar none”Keisha Wemyss Ms. Wemyss, who is the Vice President for Finance and Security for WemCo, took a leave of absence to further her studies. She completed two years of requirements in a year, and while enrolled she was a Deans List student through the entire time at Devry University. She was chosen Graduate speaker representing both Undergraduates at DeVry University and Keller Graduate School of Management for graduation this year. While pursuing her studies, she was also actively communicating and involved in the day to day running of her portfolio at WemCo Security. “It was like she never left her chair”, said Mr. Wemyss. “I believe that it is important for our company and our family to ensure that the next generation of leadership is strong. I congratulate Keisha on this wonderful accomplishment.” Keisha is currently continuing her studies in the fall at Keller Graduate School of Management where she is reading for a double Masters Degree in Finance and Accounting preparing to take over the next year. She will also start her Ms. Wemyss is an award winning former Force.Keisha WemyssVP WemCo Security Graduates From DeVry Lessons from Mexico for next wave of swine flu A SCHOOL OFFICIAL h olds a bottle of antibacterial gel during a screening of students at the entrance to school in Mexico City... (AP Photo/Gregory Bull

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Back-to-school sales stay flat * Government planning to rationalise all business support services, and have proposals in hand by beginning of 2010, w ith current structure f ailing to meet r equirements * Chamber chief calls for consolidation into SBAtype body , and better co-ordination B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Government is assessing proposals for the “rationalisation” of all its agencies and programmes that support Bahamian small and mediumsized businesses in a bid to “optimally serve” this sector, By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunebusiness.net D isney has begun the $25 million development of its Bahamian private island, Castaway Cay, the permanent secretary in the Office of the Prime Minister confirmed yesterday. David Davis told Tribune Business that government concessions for the project under the Family Island Devel opment Encouragement Act and Hotels Encouragement Act have allowed Disney to cut $3.4 million from the total cost of the expansion, now pegged at $24.2 million. The entertainment giant also has plans to launch a new cruise ship by 2011, with a Bahamas itinerary and capacity for 4,000 passengers. Disney Cruise Lines’ spokesman, Jason Lasecki, told Tribune Business yesterday that work on the expansion of Castaway Cay has commenced with an expected completion scheduled for summer 2010. According to Mr Lasecki, the idea to expand services and infrastructure on the island was born from the popularity of the Cay as disclosed by guest surveys. Disney plans to include Castaway Cay twice on one of its ships’ itinerary, in order to give passengers more time on the private island. “Castaway Cay has been a more popular port of call, and our passengers asked us to spend more time at the island, so this is our response to our guest wants and needs,” said Mr L asecki. T our operators and shore excursion providers have railed against these private islands, suggesting they absorb a large amount of cruise ship passenger spending before the ships reach ports such as Nassau and Freeport. Mr Lasecki said Disney has seen many of their guests spending at bothp orts of call, adding that the company offers an array of shore excursion in Nassau, including Atlantis' Dolphin Cay and an upscale wine experience at Graycliff. “Most of our guests will opt to do shore excursions in Nassau,” he said. “We definitely look for new and interesting things to offer our guests in Nassau.” Disney’s expansion of Castaway Cay will include a family beach, more water recreation options, private cabanas, several more eateries and a floating slide platform, which will be o ne of the first additions ready for use b y early 2010. The expansion will also create five to eight additional permanent positions for “qualified Bahamians”. Several construction jobs will be created for Bahamians when the pro ject begins in earnest, according to Mr Davis. H e said Disney committed within the Heads of Agreement to do its best to use Bahamian labour, which gives the government of the Bahamas, through the work permit system, the prerogative to deny access to foreign workers if qualified labour can be found locally. Mr Davis said concessions for Disney have been limited to building materials and heavy equipment for land clearing under the Family Island Development Encouragement Act, while incentives for the development of shops and restaurants have been g iven to the entertainment giant t hrough the Hotels Encouragement Act. The company also plans to expand transportation on Castaway Cay through its tram system, which will move guests to the newer part of the island following the development. Only about 10 per cent of the islandh as been developed thus far. C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/oro mission from the daily report. $4.27 $4.27 $4.05 % ()%$t)!#'% (%$)$%#')$(%% &%#% !$# $($$%!# %$! #%%$%&#$ &$)( $ %$%#% ),/'+%"#$,./#)#" '"#-0#* #.,.1'#2'+% '"-%#!,+0!0#*#. #*#.0&# 303!,*! Reform proposals plan to ‘optimally serve’ businesses By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE European salt pro ducer set to acquire Morton Salt’s Inagua facility has pledged to honour the existing terms and conditions in the industrial agreement with the union representing the majority of the company’s line workers, Tribune Business was told yesterday, something that was described as “a good first step”. Obie Ferguson, president of the Trades Union Congress (TUC Bahamas Industrial, Manufacturing and Allied Workers Union (BIMAWU had received a letter from German-headquartered K + S Aktienesellschaft on August Buyer pledges to honour Morton union agreement By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BUSINESSES and home purchasers are finding it increasingly difficult to obtain debt financing for their projects, industry professionals told Tribune Business yesterday, urging lenders to “find a balance” as banks denied the Bahamas was headed for its own version of the ‘credit crunch’. William Wong, the Bahamas Real Estate Association’s (BREA increasingly risk-averse appetite of Bahamian commercial banks and other lending institutions, which had seen them toughen borrower qualification requirements amid increasing loan default levels, had dampened real estate sales in a major way. Cr edit squeeze tightens for business, consumers * Realtors’ chief says ‘lucky’ if one borrower approved if four sent to banks * Chamber president says private sector telling him obtaining debt financing increasingly difficult * But bank head says institutions still open for lending, which has ‘not contracted but slowed’ S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B Disney starts $25m island expansion Investment incentives slash costs by $3.4m P rice-conscious consumer target cheaper items By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter crobards@tribunebusiness.net BACK-TO-school sales were relatively flat compared to 2008 for most Bahamian retailers, Tribune Businessw as told yesterday, with consumers purchasing more lowS S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B ZHIVARGO LAING

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er-cost items. Manager at Bookworld and Stationers, Deron Wong, said sales at the store on Mackey Street have been flat com pared to 2008. However he said shoppers have exhibiteda slightly different shopping pattern over last year. He argued that customers have been waiting until the end of the week and the weekend to shop, and are not buying items in bulk. “They have been waiting until the weekend,” said Mr Wong. “A lot of people came in on Saturday. People are buying when they have the money when funds are avail able.” He added that more people seem to have gone to credit unions for money to purchase school supplies, while being more careful and discerning in product pur c hases in terms of cost. M r Wong said Bookworld also offered more discounts this year, as the economic situation has burdened much of its client base. He said the store had as many calls for donations and receipt of cor porate sponsors as last year. The downturn in the econ omy also forced Bookworld to buy smarter and demand better rates from its suppliers. Mr Wong said because many of the store’s items come from the UK, the exchange rate presented moreo f a financial challenge. We had to buy smarter and earlier to get better rates from the suppliers,” he said. “In the end you have to pay earlier even when the funds aren’t there. After the con version there is nothing you can do (with the pricing erwise you start losing money.” “We try to keep things low because of the economic situation and not raise prices as much unless we have to.” Gavin Watchorn, president of Abaco Foods, owners of Solomons SuperCentre and Cost Right, said their sale shave also been relatively flat compared to 2008. “A couple of stores are up and a couple of stores are down,” he said. “It’s the same as last year, which is no great surprise. The market place got more competitive.” He said despite the rise in competition, stores have been able to keep sales transaction counts up or above last year’s. M r Watchorn said cons umers have shopped around more this year than in 2008, and have paid attention to ads for sales and price reductions. “Overall we were more or less flat with last year,” said Mr Watchorn.We are happy to be enjoying sales growth even in these conditions and the tightening up of the marketplace.” He said consumers have prepared a budget this year and seem to be committed to staying within the bracket they “have allocated toward grocery and back to school” items. Bahamas must address public service obstacles THE passing of Senator Edward M. Kennedy this past week brought to focus the probable closing chapter in the dominance of America’s greatest political familythe Kennedys. It is very doubtful that any members of the current generation will be more than minor players in America’s future political landscape. In honouring the life of Ted Kennedy, it quickly became obvious that the media presented a moving tribute to a ‘life of public service’ of not just one, but three, extraordinary brothers from a wealthy and politically-connected family. They were the sons of an extremely successful businessman who also served as a Congressman and later US Ambassador. President John F. Kennedy in 1960 became the secondyoungest President of the US. He was assassinated in November 1963, leaving a legacy that included major support of the civil rights movement, the launch of the space programme and the successful handling of the Cuban Missile Crisis. Senator Robert F. Kennedy served as Attorney-General in the administration of his brother, John. In 1964 he became a Senator for the state of New York. Robert was assassinated in 1968 as he was seeking the Democratic Party presidential nomination. Senator Edward (Ted Kennedy served for 46 years in the US Senate. At the time of his death, he was the second most senior member of the Senate, and the thirdlongest-serving senator in US history. He played a major role in passing many laws, including laws addressing immigration, cancer research, health insurance, apartheid, disability discrimination, AIDS care, civil rights, mental health benefits, children's health insurance, education and volunteering. While the Kennedys’ cont ribution to public service is undisputed, many would argue that had it not been for the security of the Kennedy Trust Funds, it may not have been possible for this family to give back so much, through politics and general philanthropy. A A b b i i l l i i t t y y t t o o s s e e r r v v e e This point was brought to the forefront in the Bahamian c ontext last week, when D esmond Bannister purporte dly expressed his misgivings about the level of ministerial salaries while appearing on a radio show. According to a local newspaper, the Minister said: "And whenever politicians raise this issue with respect to the income they make, I think it’s so clouded by political rhetoric that Bahamians don’t really get to analyse what the issues are: That professional people leave their firms . . . and so we all have to consider what is in the best interests of our families when we do this (because able to live and survive. Quite frankly, for a minister to live on a salary that we pay is an amazing thing." Minister Bannister said life after politics could be especially difficult for individuals, particularly on their wallets. "If you care and you are doing what you would need to do to take care of your constituents, and if you’re not taking kickbacks, if you’re not cutting corrupt deals, if you’re doing your job properly, you will end up as many politicians have ended up in really difficult and dire circumstances," he said. This particular observation goes directly to the heart of the largest problem inherent in our political system as practiced today. I absolutely applaud the Minister for having the courage to put this issue on the table for national discussion. If the general population feels that not enough of our capable ‘sons and daughters’ are coming forward to serve, then the issue raised by the Minister must be addressed. The argument is really no different than the argument for an appropriate level of compensation for Judges. M M i i n n i i s s t t e e r r i i a a l l S S a a l l a a r r y y Are we serious when a Minister of government has a base salary of around$ 70,000? It is substantially less than the salary of a Permanent Secretary, it is less than most union leaders, it is less than most senior managers in the private sector and it is less than senior management in government-owned public corporations. Yet there is a general perception that politicians are grossly overpaid and ripping off the country. We need to put petty politics aside and get sensible on this national issue. Is it enough to merely say “that is the nature of politics, if you can’t stand the heat, stay out of the kitchen”, or should we be more pragmatic in our approach to this very important issue? Should we, by default, resign ourselves to having our political system dominated by those who are independently wealthy, for whom high office represents a massive pay rise (and who perhaps lack the experience and competence that the post require) or, finally, those who are prepared to ‘cut some deals’? C C a a l l l l t t o o S S e e r r v v i i c c e e With the opening of the airw aves, there is no shortage of opinions on every imaginable subject. However, when it comes to personal service and giving of one’s time, talents or moneythere is generally a dearth of volunteers. National service should not be synonymous with committing ‘financial suicide’. However, the great irony is that when highly-qualified and competent candidates answer t he call to national service, t hey very often must also e ndure massive criticism and character assassination. A case in point is the recent appointment of Michael Bar nett as Chief Justice. I am amazed at those who are attempting to stir a ‘tempest in a teacup’ over his appoint ment for purely political reasons. Mr Barnett is well-qualified for the position, and he will do the country proud. Had he been a foreign appointment, nobody would have said a word, but because he is one of our own, it’s a different story. For a man who has spent his entire professional career distinguishing himself in his chosen profession, is it appropriate to now presuppose that he is incapable of being impartial and professional in the discharge of his duties? This appointment is not breaking any new ground, as such appointments under identical or very similar circumstances have taken place throughout the Commonwealth over the years. This is my view on the subject, but I do appreciate the opposing views, which together put all sides of the issue on the table for national discussion. C C o o n n c c l l u u s s i i o o n n These are daunting issues that the Bahamian people must deal with at some point in the not too distant future. With maturity, the countrys hould really be prepared to address these issues in a sensible and bipartisan manner. Otherwiseit will be more business as usual. N N B B : : L L a a r r r r y y R R . . G G i i b b s s o o n n , , a a C C h h a a r r t t e e r r e e d d F F i i n n a a n n c c i i a a l l A A n n a a l l y y s s t t , , i i s s v v i i c c e e p p r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t p p e e n n s s i i o o n n s s , , C C o o l l o o n n i i a a l l P P e e n n s s i i o o n n s s S S e e r r v v i i c c e e s s ( ( B B a a h h a a m m a a s s ) ) , , a a w w h h o o l l l l y y o o w w n n e e d d s s u u b b s s i i d d i i a a r r y y o o f f C C o o l l o o n n i i a a l l G G r r o o u u p p I I n n t t e e r r n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l , , w w h h i i c c h h o o w w n n s s A A t t l l a a n n t t i i c c M M e e d d i i c c a a l l I I n n s s u u r r a a n n c c e e a a n n d d i i s s a a m m a a j j o o r r s s h h a a r r e e h h o o l l d d e e r r o o f f S S e e c c u u r r i i t t y y & & G G e e n n e e r r a a l l I I n n s s u u r r a a n n c c e e C C o o m m p p a a n n y y i i n n t t h h e e B B a a h h a a m m a a s s . . T T h h e e v v i i e e w w s s e e x x p p r r e e s s s s e e d d a a r r e e t t h h o o s s e e o o f f t t h h e e a a u u t t h h o o r r a a n n d d d d o o n n o o t t n n e e c c e e s s s s a a r r i i l l y y r r e e p p r r e e s s e e n n t t t t h h o o s s e e o o f f C C o o l l o o n n i i a a l l G G r r o o u u p p I I n n t t e e r r n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l o o r r a a n n y y o o f f i i t t s s s s u u b b s s i i d d i i a a r r y y a a n n d d / / o o r r a a f f f f i i l l i i a a t t e e d d c c o o m m p p a a n n i i e e s s . . P P l l e e a a s s e e d d i i r r e e c c t t a a n n y y q q u u e e s s t t i i o o n n s s o o r r c c o o m m m m e e n n t t s s t t o o r r l l g g i i b b s s o o n n @ @ a a t t l l a a n n t t i i c c h h o o u u s s e e . . c c o o m m . . b b s s C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM WANTEDCARDIOTHORACIC/ VASCULAR SURGEONExperience:-10 YEARS -PEDIATRICS CALL 242-326-2346 F inancial Focus By Larry Gibson Back-to-school sales stay flat F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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2 1, 2009, pledging to work w ith the union once the acquisition was completed. got a letter from K + S dated August 21, indicating they are purchasing Morton Salt and that they will be looking forward to a smooth transition with the union, having regard for the other union they have within the region,” Mr Ferguson told Tribune Business. “It appears as if they’re trying to avoid any unnecessary hassle and are willing to comply with the existing industri al agreement..... K + S said they would adhere to the existing terms and conditionsof the industrial agreement.” Mr Ferguson said Europe’s largest salt producer had informed him it wanted to minimise disruption and ensure continuity when it completed its acquisition ofMorton International, of which the Inagua-based com pany and plant is part. “It is clear the company is attempting to start off on agood foot with the workers and the union at Morton Salt, which is really the concern in situations like this. We’re looking forward to the com pletion of the sale with K + S, for the process to begin and the union and the company to work together as much as we can.... It is a good first step.” Mr Ferguson added: “We are prepared as a union to work with the company and do what is necessary to make sure everyone benefits.” Dow Chemical Company earlier this year placed Morton (Bahamas Morton International, up for sale to finance its acquisition of their former owner, Rohm & Haas, agreeing a $1.675 billion deal with K + S in April 2009. However, the transaction has not been completed yet because it is still being scrutinised by the Us antitrust authorities to ensure it com plies with all their competition requirements. As a result, no decision has been taken on the multi-million dollar investment required to rebuild Morton’s Inagua facilities following the damage wrought by Hurricane Ike in 2008, something that has been left to K + S. A Dow spokeswoman told Tribune Business: “That will definitely be a question for K + S. I know Dow and Morton International are not starting any new investments.” Confirming that the transaction was not yet completed, she added: “It’s still pending. Right now, the transaction is under review by the Federal Trade Commission. T here are ongoing discussions with the FTC on the transaction. “We expect that the Federal Trade Commission will clear the transaction in the next one to two months, and at that time the divestiture transaction will close and K+S will be the owner. “In the meantime, Dow does not have any plans for new investments in the Morton Salt assets in the Bahamas. It will be up to K+S to speak to any future plans or investments there.” By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor HOSTING the Miss Univ erse Pageant will help to boost sales of Bahamian real estate to high net worth buyers from around the globe,t he Bahamas Real Estate Association’s (BREA dent said yesterday, television images having showcased this n ation in the best possible light. William Wong told Tribune Business: “I think the Government made a very bold move by hosting this Miss Universe Pageant, and it’s going to reap us some serious b enefits over the years. “The way the Ministry of Tourism organised things, the way people around the world s aw the stuff, enhanced our image and will bring people here to buy second homes.” He added: “This was our stimulus package, where the Bahamas can be seen around the world, and will only bring us huge dividends. “If I was living abroad and saw those wonderful shots of t he beaches, the islands and the people, it will really enhance our sales. It may not happen overnight, but that k ind of advertising was definitely a plus. “I think that really, over a long period of time, it will help our people with their sales, the real estate and the second home market. It was a positive thing the Government did, a bold move, they pulled it off, and we should b e proud of it as Bahamians.” Mr Wong said the Bahamian real estate market remained soft, and would l ikely continue in this state until the US economy picked up. “For the next 12-18 months, we need to hunker down and do the best we can to ride out the storm. The Miss Universe contest was a big plus for us,” he added, citing the mid-market properties priced at $500,000 and up as being especially weak. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM btrt tfr f r!%* '!$()))!*&*#tffn""bnff !$ %#&!*&*# !%** nn " *+4$'#65+(6-'9'%65+7'3'4+&'/%'+4-0%#5'&0/ # *##%3'-0507'3-00,+/)5*':(03&#:-(%0634' )*5''/005*+)*%'+-+/)4'+)*005*+)*3'/%*&0034 .#3$-'(-0034%#4'.'/58+/&084#/&#/01'/1-#/ 1 307+&'#1#/03#.+%7+'80(5*':(03&#:0-(0634' ( 30.#---+7+/)#3'#4 *+4.0&'3/'9'%65+7'*0.'+/44#4.04513'45+)+064 % 0..6/+5:+4#7#+-#$-'(03+..'&+#5'0%%61#/%:03+/(03.#5+0/%#-'3+064+/26+3+'40/-: Realtors chief eyes Miss Universe Pageant sales boost Buyer pledges to honour Morton union agreement Share your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B OBIE FERGUSON

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Tribune Business was told yesterday, something the Chamber of Commerce’s president believes could boost the success rate for entrepreneurs and start-ups. Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, told this newspaper that he hoped to have “a new set of proposals” in his possession by the beginning of 2010, revealing that the Government was analysing a number of sug gestions on how the “targeting” and operations of its small business/entrepreneurial assistance programmes could be accomplished. “There are some proposals under active consideration right now,” Mr Laing confirmed to Tribune Business. Clearly, there has to be such a rationalisation, because it is conceivable that each of these programmes could satisfy and address the perceived needs of small business in the coun try...... “It’s my hope that we will be in a position by the beginning of next year to have a new set of proposals as to how we rationalise these government programmes. “There’s no question that it has to happen, because the entrepreneur, the small and medium-sized business person, today is not being optimally served by the way in which the programmes oper ate and are being targeted.” The minister explained: “Clearly, a young, high growth business has very dif ferent needs to a new venture, an upstart, that is coming into being. While a term loan may satisfy the one, maybe equity participation with completem anagement control may satisfy the other.” The goal, Mr Laing added, was to “better serve the small business community of the Bahamas”, pointing out that while the Bahamas Develop-m ent Bank and the Governm ent-sponsored venture capital programme served differ ent purposes and both played a vital role, there were over laps between the two. Apart from these two organisations, the other Government entities focused on the development of small and medium-sized Bahamian busi nesses, plus entrepreneurs, include the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC Starters Programme and the Government-guaranteed loan programme. Mr Laing told Tribune Business that apart from ensuring the Government’s small business support programmes eliminated overlaps and bureaucracy, and were targeted correctly, the proposals under review were also designed to provide business men with the information that allowed them to determine which entity was suitable for meeting their needs. He explained: “When we are finished, it is my expecta tion that every entity in the country, whether it’s someone starting a business or someone who has a business with growth potential and requires something for expansion purposes, they will clearly know that this is the Government programme to which they may look. “And the Government programme will be set up to know this is a client they should be targeting.” Mr Laing told Tribune Business that the Government wanted to ensure entrepreneurs and small businesses that used its support services were “more accountable and responsible”, especially when it came to repaying loans or other forms of financial assistance. The Government also wanted to increase its due dili gence and monitoring, to ensure goods imported dutyfree under its support programmes were being used for the intended purposes. The Government’s proposals are likely to be supported by Chamber of Commerce president Khaalis Rolle, who told Tribune Business recently that all the Government entities assisting the small business community should be consolidated into oneo rganisation, along the lines of the Small Business Agency (SBA Arguing that the Govern ment agencies all currently “operate in silos and under different mandates”, Mr Rolles aid of such a consolidation: You would get more bank for your buck. I think there are some different priorities for all the agencies, but quitea number of overlapping areas. “I don’t think there are too many organisation, but the resources and planning aspect of it need to be refined. “BAIC and the Develop ment Bank serve somewhat of the same population. One is far more geared to offering technical support, and one is geared towards lending, but the Development Bank still has to offer technical support to ensure its borrowers bet ter perform. That’s one of the reasons for the high level of defaults it does not have the ability to provide the level of technical support needed to ensure these businesses do not fail.” The Chamber president said that by consolidating these agencies and their counterparts, and adopting a more co-ordinated approach, “the rate of success of small busi ness in this country will probably soar”. Stating that his preferred structure was to merge all business support entities into an SBA-type organisation, which would direct the operations of BAIC, the Development Bank and others, Mr Rolle added: ‘The individuals that get involved in business have to understand pre cisely what role those organisations play and try and take advantage of them a little better than we have done in the past.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.811.25Abaco Markets1.261.260.000.1270.0009.90.00% 1 1.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.306.25Bank of Bahamas6.256.250.000.2440.26025.64.16% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00%3 .493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 1 4.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3511.350.001.4060.2508.12.20% 2.882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S1)6.006.000.000.4190.30014.35.00% 3 .851.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.723.68-0.040.1110.05233.21.41% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital2.032.030.000.3820.0805.33.94% 8.206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.5010.00Finco10.6310.630.000.3220.52033.04.89% 11.7110.30FirstCaribbean Bank10.3010.300.000.7940.35013.03.40% 5.534.95Focol (S)5.125.120.000.3320.15015.42.93% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9 .025.49ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 1 2.0010.09J. S. Johnson10.0910.090.000.9520.64010.66.34% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100000 100000 FidelitBkNote13(SeriC)+ FBB13 10000 000 M ONDAY, 31 AUGUST 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,575.84| CHG -0.04| %CHG 0.00 | YTD -136.52 | YTD % -7.97BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7 % Prime + 1.75% 7% BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: 30May2013 W W W.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 InterestF INDEX: CLOSE 789.76 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31% 1000 . 00 1000 . 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 . 00 0 . 00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.607.92Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.00-2.2460.000N/M0.00% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref2.006.254.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.40051.3320CFAL Bond Fund1.40053.485.15 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.9047-1.20-3.66 1.48551.4088CFAL Money Market Fund1.48553.615.44 3.60903.1031Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1143-8.01-12.43 13.048412.3870Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.04843.415.84 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.40759.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.33992.69-1.41 1.06631.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.06632.596.63 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0215-1.112.15 1.06111.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.06112.296.11 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-Jul-09 Prime + 1.75% 7% 31-Jul-09 30-Jun-09 31-Jul-09 NAV Date 31-Jul-09Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds 30 May 2013 29 May 2015TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Jul-09 30-Jun-09 31-Dec-07 31-Jul-09 31-Jul-09 21-Aug-09 31-Jul-09MARKET TERMS 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW %261(/%58786RI 0$5.(7675((71$66$8%$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWR WKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRU UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQG WKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQ QDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQ DQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKWGD\V IURPWKH 6HSWHPEHU WR WKH 0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOH IRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[1DVVDX %DKDPDV127,&( Credit squeeze tightens for business, consumers “If we send four clients to the bank, we’ll be lucky if one makes it through,” Mr Wong told Tribune Business. “Of course, if the client can’t get qualified to get a loan it makes it difficult for them to buy a house or lot.” Khaalis Rolle, the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s president, said the banking sector’s understandable caution on originating new commercial loans, at a time when 19.21 per cent of all business loans were in default, was already impacting the private sector and their plans. “This morning, I had a conversation with a non-member who has a thriving business and is trying to borrow funds from one of the commercial banks,” Mr Rolle told Tribune Business. “He said it was taking him a lot more time and effort to go through this process than it has in the past.” Acknowledging that this had the “potential for a major impact” on the Bahamian business community, Mr Rolle said the banks and private sector needed to “find a balance” that satisfied the requirements of both parties. While the easiest move would be to call for the banks to loosen the lending purse strings, the Chamber president said: “The reality is that they can’t. The reality is that there has to be a balanced approach to this. “Bankers need to determine where that fine line is, and businesses need to determine what their minimum requirements are and operate within those parameters. “This shows the importance of planning. Businesses need to go back into the laboratory and develop plans that will allow them to maximise their returns with very little input. This means becoming more efficient and far more effective with the use of their assets.” Mr Rolle predicted that the tight Bahamian credit market would “endure over the next 18 to 24 months, until the banks see strong signs of recovery, unemployment starts to slow and key indicators turn around”. He added: “If I’m an investor, and banks are in the investment business, and I’m unsure whether you will be able to pay me back or get a return on my investment, I’m going to be very cautious about making an investment. “One of the corresponding impacts for the business sector is that it will impede the growth of business. If you’re unable to get credit, your access to capital is reduced, and you’ll have a corresponding reduction in business activity. “In many respects, that’s the difference between the life and death of a business. That will mean a reduction in inventory purchases, a reduction in staffing levels. Business turnover will certainly be impacted.” Paul McWeeney, Bank of the Bahamas International’s managing director, yesterday agreed with Mr Rolle’s analysis, placing a recovery in the economy and bank lending activities at least 18 months away, towards the end of 2010. “We don’t expect to see any sustained turnaround until towards the end of next year,” Mr McWeeney told Tribune Business. “By summer next year we may experience some sustained momentum if all things remain the same.” He disagreed, though, with the notion that the Bahamas was experiencing its own national ‘credit crunch’, telling Tribune Business that the doors of all Bahamian commercial banks were still open for lending. Arguing that the Bahamas was witnessing a slowdown in lending growth, rather than a contraction, Mr McWeeney said: “Nationally, we are seeing a slowdown in credit opportunities, but the banks are still open for business. The banks want to be able to advance funds to qualified and suitable borrowers. That is taking place. It’s not a contraction, just slowed growth.” According to the Central Bank of the Bahamas’ latest figures for the half-year to June 2009, private sector credit growth had actually fallen by $15.19 million compared to 2008 for the first six months, with consumer lending down $35.13 million yearto-date. However, the decline in credit growth could be the result of reduced credit demand among consumers and borrowers, as much as tougher lending criteria set by the banks. Mr McWeeney pointed out that the situation in the Bahamas was different from the US, as the supply of surplus liquidity/assets in the commercial banking system stood at $513.92 million at end-June 2009, a healthy level that was more than $200 million higher than the 2008 comparative point. While the US and global ‘crunch’ had resulted from liquidity drying up, as financial institutions stopped lending to each other and borrowers due to a loss of confidence and uncertainty over who had sub-prime mortgage market exposure, the Bahamian slowdown had resulted from the economic environment, rising unemployment and the inability of borrowers to meet tougher terms. “We have to align borrower creditworthiness with the bank’s risk appetite,” Mr McWeeney explained. “One important aspect is the company’s capital adequacy, and its ability to absorb the risk it takes on.” Reform proposals plan to ‘optimally serve’ businesses F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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By CARA BRENNENBETHEL Tribune Features Editor HUNDREDS of Bahamians and medical professionals attended a black tie dinner on Friday evening to hear renowned neurosurgeon Dr Benjamin Carson give an inspiring talk of how he rose from an impoverished childhood to become the youngest head of surgery at one of the United States’ best hospitals. Dr Carson whose life story was depicted in the novel and movie Gifted Hands became the head of pediatric neurosurgery at the prestigious Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland at the very young age of 33 in 1984. Since that time, he has maintained an exhaustive schedule performing over 500 surgeries a year on some of t he sickest children from a round the world. D r Carson focuses on traumatic brain injuries, brain and spinal cord tumors, achondroplasia, neurological and congenital disorders, craniosynostosis, epilepsy and trigeminal neuralgia. He is also interested in maximising the intellectual potential of every child. He received world wide attention and acclaim in September 1987 as the lead surgeon on a team of more than 70 medical professionals who successfully separated a pair of seven-month-old German Siamese twins joined at the head. Other notable surgeries included the 1998 successful separation of Luka and Joseph Banda, infant boys from Zambiathe first set of twins joined at the tops of their heads to be separated. This surgery according to Dr Carson was noteworthy because it was performed at a hospital in South Africa despite the lack of sophisticated medical equipment. There was also the attempt in 2003 to separate conjoined adult Iranian sisters Ladan and Laleh Bijanineither of whom survived the surgery. He also received an American presidential Medal of Freedom Award from former president George Bush on June 19, 2008. Dr Duane Sands, cardiovascular surgeon, who gave brief remarks said that it was an honour to be in Dr Carson’s company. He said that while studying in Maryland, he had heard numerous stories about the gifted surgeon and said that he has been inspired by him throughout his own career. Psycharitrist Dr Timothy Barrett and Medical Association President said of Dr Car son, “ there is something good about him and to be a good doctor, you have to be a very good person” During his presentation, Dr Carson explained how his mother, despite her own limited education, motivated her sons to become the very best they could be by cutting their television viewing to two programs a week and making them produce two book reports for her each week. This enabled him to rise from the bottom of his class to receive scholarships to attend both Yale University and the University of Michigan Medical School. His mother never took on a victim’s mentality despite the challenges she faced raising her two sons alone while working several jobs as a domestic worker in Detroit, he said adding that too many people use this victum excuse to not change the course of their lives. Dr Carson added that his mother never accepted excuses from him, which led him to be a much better person because when “someone won’t accept excuses, you have to learn to find solutions.” He stressed that success is a mental state saying that if you leave a CEO broke and in the ghetto, he will soon rise to the top again because he has the tools to succeed whereas if you make a bum a CEO he will soon be back in the streets because he does not. Dr Carson pointed out that truly successful people are those who learn from their mistakes. He noted that in particular young Black people need to see more role models who are not from the sports or music arenas but rather in educational and vocational fields. He further said that true success comes from using the talent given to you to help elevate other people. The dinner held at the British Colonial Hilton was organised as part of the CEO Network conference held last weekend in conjunction with local members of the Sigma Pi Phi (Boule During his visit to the Bahamas, Dr Carson a devout Seventh Day Adventist also held a session with children on Saturday morning before speaking at the Seventh Day Adventist Church in Centerville. Why aren’t we on the same page? YOU may have heard of comedogenic ingredients that cause or promote comedones in skin. You may not be as familiar with acnegenic ingre dients those that cause or exacerbate acne. These common ingredients can be hiding within acne treatment products, causing ineffective treat ment of your breakouts. Here's what to look for: L L a a n n o o l l i i n n : : Derived from the words "lana" for wool and "oleum" for oil, Lanolin is a fatty substance obtained from the sheep's wool. While it's a known emollient with mois turising properties, it can have skin-clogging capabilities, trig-g ering the cycle of breakouts. F F r r a a g g r r a a n n c c e e : : Artificial fragrances can increase acne infection, skin sensitisation and photosensitivity. D D & & C C r r e e d d p p i i g g m m e e n n t t s s : : S ome of these dyes, which are coal tar derivatives, have exhibited highly comedogenic and acnegenic properties. M M i i n n e e r r a a l l O O i i l l : : Mineral Oil is a n occlusive (something that physically blocks water loss in the Stratum corneum). It's used in many products, however, it has been shown to cause and exacerbate acne. Speak with your professional skin therapist about products free of comedogenic and acnegenic ingredients, and that contain known botanical extracts that help inhibit the growth of acnegenic bacteria. SKIN CARE SOLUTIONS by SARAH BEEK C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By MAGGIE BAIN AS we grow in to young adults our talents become more evident. We may discover that we have a natural ability to lean towards science, music, written word, or languages. When things feel more natural, and come more easily for us, we spend more time and our interests develop. Our passion for our talent often fills our life and other areas fall by the wayside. It makes sense then that a similar passion requires equala mounts of time and energy. Most of u s conduct our relationships in a m anner that feels comfortable and s uits us. We believe we are being authentic, and if we ever step outside 'our norm' it feels unnatural and we fall back into our old ways. This explains why it is so difficult for most of us to change our behaviour, as it feels as if we are 'going against the grain' or 'swimming up stream'. Foreign languages are areas that seem to pose a problem for many people. 'Not having an ear' for it, and the steep learning curve, deter a lot of people from even starting. The mere challenge of communicating with a person speaking another language can be frustrating and demoralising. It entails reading body language, facial expressions, and in turn often completely misunderstanding their message. Both persons feel the other is not trying hard enough to u nderstand the other and the relationship remains on one level witho ut developing. L ove languages can feel like foreign languages for many. Clinical p ractice reveals a clear lack of knowi ng, let alone understanding, the lan guages of love. Growing up without having witnessed loving adult part nerships undoubtedly puts an individual at a huge disadvantage. Just because we had both parents in the home does not necessarily mean that we know how to love. Completely dysfunctional parents have a difficult time deciding what to d o about the relationship. Some do a disservice to their children by believing they are staying 'because of the children', whilst not appreciating the affect it will have on their own future relationships. Others foresee losing the father from the home will probably mean very little future involvement in their children's lives. Even the interaction between extended family households teaches us many values about relationships. Relationship therapy often reveals a defective foundation that has to be rebuilt from scratch. But like any good foundation it is worth its weight in gold because it prevents structural damage later on in life. We may feel as if we go round in circles talking about relationships but invariably return to the point. Different childhoods and bring previous life experiences means that we are all unique and no two relationships are alike. As we mature we start to really understand ourselves and the forms of love that completeu s. Many have written these as ' needs' rather than 'wants', while o thers describe them as 'love lang uages'. Both accurately define the concept of 'what is right for one is not right for another'. The idea that these are as essential as oxygen to sustain us is truly accu rate. Just wanting something is almost inconsequential whilst needing something is irrefutable. It is grasping this idea and truly trying to listen to your partner that allows us to fulfill each other. For those of us who understand ourselves, the forms of love that seem essential are; sex, love and attention, love actions, gifts and time. You may well consider that you need a bit of all to feel complete but for many of us one area is a top priority. For example, if your partner cuts the grass, makes a bookshelf, and takes the children to the movies, then he is showing his love through love actions. They certainly are things you want him to do but he is completely omitting to recognise your need for love and attention. Something will always feel missing and you will feel a void. Alternatively, you may be an attentive homemaker, cook, clean and take care of the children. But all you partner really needs is to be greeted at the door with hugs and kisses. Both are reading the same book but just not on the same page. These love languages are also reflected in the sexual intimacy. Onem ay prefer silence with eyes closed. T he other may need interaction, f eedback, or role-play during lovem aking. It takes an open loving heart to accommodate the others sexual needs in order to allow the other to feel complete. A free generosity of spirit is the ultimate language of love. If you can relate to some or all of these instances then know that it is never too late to make changes and learn your partner’s love language. That feeling of 'missing out' can be filled in to complete the total picture. Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist. Call for an appointmentRelate Bahamas at 3647230, oremail relatebahamas@yahoo.com orwww.relatebahamas.blogspot.com. She is also available for speaking engagements. Top neurosurgeon visits Bahamas Heat stroke occurs when the dog’s ability to regulate its body temperature is lost. A dog regulates body temperature primarily through respiration. When the respiratory tract can not evacuate heat quickly enough, the body temperature rises. Normal body temperature is less than 103F, but once the temperature goes over 105F a number of physiologic events can occur that make it even more difficult for the animal to regain control of its temperature. At this time, oxygen delivery to the system can not keep up with rapidly elevating demand. If the temperature exceeds a certain limit a number of organ systems including the kidneys, liver, gastrointestinal tract, heart and brain are at risk for permanent damage. The extent of the cellular damage depends on the mag nitude and the duration of the temperature elevation. Clearly, this can be a life-threatening situation, but for those animals that survive there is the possibility of long term problems after the occurrence. There are a number of predisposing factors for heat stroke; some of which include: heat, humidity, muscular activity, high body mass, anxiety, poor ventilation, dehydration, obesity, antihista mines, phenothiazines (some medications for vomiting), bracycephalic breeds (shortnosed breeds), and increased age. Dogs experiencing heat stroke will have a muddy pink color of their gums instead of the nice red-pink color that normally exists. Their heart rate will be dramatically elevated and they will be panting furiously. They tend to stand or walk very slowly without regard to where they are. Some will lie on their sternum. Most dogs will have a wild panicked expression and are not particularly aware of their environment. Any combination of these systems should have an owner aggressively seeking veterinary assistance and taking steps necessary to help drive the temperature back down. Significantly delaying the treatment of a heat stroke can dramatically increase the risk of long-term consequences or death. Heat stroke is an emergency that requires veterinary assistance, but you can effectively initiate treatment in most cases before heading for the veterinary hospital. You must aggressively assist the dog’s efforts to lower its body temperature with the use of water and air. Since the lungs can not keep up with the heat buildup, we now have to cool the skin and associated blood vessels so the body’s temper ature will decrease. Submersion of the dog in cool water will start to bring the temperature down quickly. If you are unable to submerge the dog, you can start wetting him down with a hose. Wet the dog all over and let the water run continuously on the groin area since there are large numbers of significant and relatively superficial blood vessels in that are that will allow for more rapid cooling of the blood. The dog should be in a well-ventilated, shady area to allow evaporation of the water. Evaporation cools body temperatures very effectively. When transporting the dog to the veterinary hospital, keep the air conditioner on or the windows open, or use the back of a truck to increase evaporation. Do not use an enclosed style crate since it allows for little evaporation or fresh cool air for the lungs. Do not cover the dog with a wet towel, as it will also prevent evaporation. It is advisable in most cases to start these animals on intravenous fluids and monitor kidney and liver functions for a few days. The necessity for this laboratory work depends on the magnitude and the duration of the elevated temperature. Obviously prevention of heat stroke is a far better alternative than treatment. Everyone is aware of the risks of having a dog in a vehicle in the summer, but there are some less obvious risk factors that we all need to be aware of. Even moderate environmental temperatures can be very significant when there is little or no ventilation. Owners should also be aware that heat stroke does not only occur in the summer months. Heat stroke has a tendency to catch owners unaware dur ing the spring and winter months, when they are less likely to take the proper precautions to safeguard against heat stroke. Heavy muscular activity drives body temper atures up with alarming speed. Following intervals of high activity, return the dog to an air conditioned vehicle, or wet the dog down and go to an area that is shaded and preferably breezy to allow for evaporation. Make sure there is access to reasonable volumes of cool fresh water both before and after activity. We also need to be conscious of those animals that are at increased risk, which would include those dogs that have high body mass, older dogs, and those that are carrying more weight than is normal for them. Being aware of the various risk factors as well as the environmental considerations should help all of us avoid this potentially devastating problem. Heat stroke in dogs Acnegenic ingredients to avoid in your skin care By DR BASIL SANDS LOVING RELATIONSHIPS by MAGGIE BAIN DR BENJAMIN CARSON

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C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009, PAGE 7B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM health BODYANDMIND T T h h e e T T r r i i b b u u n n e e B y REUBEN SHEARER T ribune Features Reporter T here’s no doubt about it. The cost of drugs is very p ricey these days, and doctors fear that it will drive more persons to order medication from “shady” online pharmacies. One local ophthalmologist describes the mark-up on pharmaceuticals as “gluttonous, and said it is even greater than the markup of the banks in the Bahamas.” Diamox, a drug that he treats his patients with for glaucoma cost only 50 cents or less to make a tablet, he says. Yet according to him, some local companies are retailing this drug for over $250. “More and more physicians are claiming patients just can’t afford prescription drugs,” he said. With things still slow in the economy; inflation of prices on medication are predicted to only make things worse for struggling persons who need treatment right away. Fear looms that more and more, people will turn to online pharmacies based in foreign countries for prescribed med ication that they cannot afford at home. If you are feeling the pinch on your pocket, and you need to fill a doctor’s prescription right away, getting it online may be a cheaper avenue, right? Not so fast warns Dr Vanria Rolle, chief pharma cist at Public Hospitals Authority who gave a pre sentation on the subject at the CEO Network conference at the British Colonial Hilton last week. Dr Rolle said that persons are at a greater risk when they purchase drugs from an online pharmacy, because of the prevalent occurrences of people receiv ing counterfeit or fake drugs. If taken, the substance can be harmful to your health, and even kill you she said. Perhaps this is the first time you are reading about this matter, and asking how these drugs go undetected. The unfortunate reality about counterfeit drugs is that even a manufacturer cannot tell by just looking at it whether a drug is authentic or not. “These drugs are fake medications that are deliberately, and fraudulently mislabeled with respect to identity and or source,” Dr Rolle said. “They often have the wrong ingredients, are without active ingredients, may have fake packaging, or may be dis pensed with the wrong dosage.” Over the years, there have been reported cases by the World Health Organisation on unexplained side effects that persons who took counterfeit drugs experienced. Strange elements like boric acid, heavy metals, road paint, and floor wax were reported ly used to coat pills in such cases to give them a shine. Clearly, these elements can have devastating effects on anyone’s health. In other cas es, persons had no reaction, because the pills were place bos, or of a “sugar pill” base, which is harmless. According to Dr Rolle, the counterfeiters main target group is Internet shoppers. They retail mostly fake “lifestyle drugs,” such as med ication for hair loss, antibacterials, antipsychotics, sexual dysfunction, obesity, and hor mones. The counterfeiters produce these and many other drugs without much oversight or regulation laws, and sell them at seemingly unbelievable prices that are hard to resist. Oftentimes, it would appear that you can get more for your money from them, like two drugs for the price of what one authentic drug would cost. Although the majority of Bahamians may have a low interest in Internet commerce, Dr Rolle says that you can encounter counterfeit drugs without knowing by simply filling a prescription at an unlicensed pharmacy. She says that it is safer to stick with licensed, reputable pharmacies who get their drugs from authorised deal ers like Nassau Agencies, Lowes Wholesale, and other providers that have regulations, and proper storage facilities. You may recall the incident last year, where a shipment of counterfeit Viagra was delivered to Nassau Agencies by mistake. Officials there realised that the shipment was not meant for a local distributor at that particular time. A Viagra manufacturer took samples, investigations were done, and it was discovered that the product was in fact counterfeit. “In a perfect world, we would not have to deal with these things,” Dr Rolle said. So, how do you protect yourself? Dr Rolle lists these red flags to watch out for in your medication, and to report to your doctor: If the drug has a spelling error-If the packaging or color looks different-If the seal doesn’t look right-If it taste or smells funny If you have strange side effects-She stressed that patients should only buy prescription medications from licensed pharmacies in the Bahamas. Finally, Dr Rolle advised that if you purchase a drug and notice on the insert that it is written in a different language, “Do not buy it, it’s disrespectful for patient care and patient safety.” In May, an active bill called the ‘Pharmacy Act 2009’ was designed to tighten regula tions in the pharmaceutical industry. These are the provisions; Requirements that apply to prescribed international standards for imported drugs-Prohibits the manufactur ing or importation of drugs unless factory or warehouse is registered and licensed-Requirements regarding the sale of drugs via an automatic device or the Internet-Requirements for the appointment of trained inspectors by the Minister of Health to inspect premises of wholesale distributors-Doctors fear costly drugs could drive ‘shady’ online pharmacies INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, r ead Insight on Mondays COUNTERFEIT/AUTHENTIC drugs can be seen here... THE COST OF DRUGS is very pricey these days, and doctors fear that it will drive more persons to order medication from “shady” online pharmacies...

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C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM “Effective communication is 20 per cent what you know and 80 per cent how you feel about what you know.” ~ Jim Rohn ~ NO matter how great your ideas or how farreaching your solutions, they are of no value if you cannot effectively communicate them to others. Effective communication skills are a key ingredient of success. Learning how to speak with confidence can open doors beyond your wildest dreams; yet, very few people take time to work on their communication effectiveness. One of my favorite sayings is 'its better to be prepared for an opportunity and not have one, than to have an opportunity for which you are unprepared.” Regardless of your starting point, anything is possible there are no limits. While public speaking and communication skills are crucial they are not readily pursued because most people have a real fear of public speaking. T T h h e e F F e e a a r r o o f f P P u u b b l l i i c c S S p p e e a a k k i i n n g g For most people, public speaking brings a serious source of stress and nervousness. So as much as possible, people try to avoid having to speak in front of an audience. But whether you work alone or with a large group of people, at some point, you will need to speak openly to get certain tasks accomplished. Moreover, if you aspire to be a leader or desirous of great achievements; you will need to be comfortable speaking to groups large or small in order to be successful. First of all, this fear is not real. I know it feels real; but this fear is mostly an illusion that stems from your subconscious beliefs about yourself. You may be surprised to learn that as children, many people suffer from a small sense of self, handed down through the ages from parents or guardians. And while their intent was to protect us from perceived dangers, this inadvertently conditioned us into non-risk takers, playing it safe; eventually becoming shy and withdrawn; unable to confidently speak-up and express their point of view. The good news here is you can unlearn this behavior and adopt new habits that support rather than impede your confidence as an effective speaker. To change your behaviour you must change your beliefs; because what you believe determines how you behave. Start to tell yourself uplifting things about yourself and what is possible for your life. Positive self-talk is essential to rewiring your subconscious mind so that you can tap into your inner power to voice your views. F F i i n n a a l l T T h h o o u u g g h h t t The first black President of the United States, Barak Obama, won the hearts of the American people and the world, in part, because of his incredible ability to inspire people from all walks of life, through effective communication. Think about the many opportunities that you find yourself in meetings or settings; you can hear that inner voice shouting for you to speak-up and say something. But for some strange reason, the words seem trapped in your mouth. You are not alone this feeling has been experienced by every great speaker. Being comfortable speaking in front a group can be intimidating; the butterflies and wobbly knees are a part of the process. But if you want it bad enough and believe that you can do it it will be done. Remember communication is the key to success; no leader can be effective if he or she is unable to get their point across. Lying dormant inside you is a great speech that can inspire the world. Prepare yourself to make something better happen. If you are ready to Speak with Confidence & PowerSign Up Now for SpeakUP! learn how to Speak your way to the top! Contact The Coaching Studio today call 326-3332 or 429-6770 or send an email to coach4ward@Yahoo.com Michelle M. Miller is a certified Life-Coach and Stress Management Consultant. She is the Principal Coach of the Coaching Studio, which located in the Jovan Plaza, Madeira Street. Questions or comments can be sent to P.O. Box CB-13060 email coach4ward@yahoo.com or telephone 4296770. Are you an effective communicator? By Michelle M Miller, CC TO sow or not to sow, that is the question Does one start one’s veg etable garden in September or wait until the more favourable month of October. There are merits in both stances but most experienced gardeners will already have seeds in by the beginning of September. If things go wrong they will start again in late September and sow another crop in October. Last year I made the mistake of using heirloom tomatoes for my first crop. Heirloom tomatoes generally take longer to produce and bear more sparsely than hybrid types. This year I will start with hybrids like Better Boy and leave the heirlooms until October. Bell peppers can be started early in September, along with eggplants, cabbages, pumpkins and beans. Most other crops – carrots and root crops, peas, spinach, squashes, broccoli and cauliflower – are best sown in Octo ber. Blessed are they that covered their vegetable gardens with clear plastic for the summer months. When the time comes to start the new vegetable season they will only have to remove the plastic and apply some water and fertiliser. The ground will be ready for transplants and free of weed seeds and nematodes. This is the season of seagrapes, early hog plums and late Keitt mangoes. Carambolas (star fruit their first production run of the year. They will flower and fruit again in October but with fruit from the first crop still on the tree it will appear to be one continuous crop. Believe it or not, it is time to think about Christmas. Annuals for Christmas could be sown in September, early October at the latest. Annuals from seed are far, far cheaper than buying sets. The choice is often greater, too. Virtually any popular annual will flower well during our cool season months. Among the favourites in Bahamian gardens are impatiens and petunias. Remember to put down snail bait with your seeds as the young seedlings will be attractive to snails and slugs. If you have some of last year’s poinsettias in the ground, do not prune them any more. The tissue that will form the brightly coloured bracts may be cut away with a late pruning. There are still a couple of months o f intensive lawn care ahead of us, requiring weekly mowing. Many St Augustine lawns put out seed stalks in August and September. If your lawn needs thickening out you may consider not mowing it until the seeds are ready. With steady water-i ng after the subsequent mowing you will develop a thicker lawn over the cool season months. The main worry in September concerns tropical storms and hurri canes. As I write this the Weather Channel shows a string of potential hurricanes crossing Africa like a necklace of destruction. Very few Septembers pass without one or the other disturbing the peace of The Bahamas. A tropical storm may bring some welcome rain but can totally denude a carambola tree of fruit. Winds of less than hurricane strength can desiccate shrubs and palms and leave them stressed for many months. Wind is the biggest natural enemy of plants and when it reaches hurricane force there is bound to be trauma. Prune flowering shrubs and small fruit trees to allow the wind to pass through the centre. Cut down long branches that are likely to be broken off in a hurricane and trim smaller plants to reduce their size. Any heavy plants in pots should be well watered and then laid on the ground in an area where they will be contained. All materials in the yard that can be blown around should be stored in your garden shed or utility room. The pace of the year quickens in September and a new year in the garden begins. j.hardy@coralwave.com The gar den in Se ptember by JACK HARDY IT IS SEAGRAPE season and the pickin’ is easy... THIS IS WHAT it is all about... A few offerings from Gardener Jack's garden last year demonstrate the range of vegetables we can grow in one season...

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 73F/23C Low: 75F/24C Low: 75F/24C Low: 76F/24C Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 80F/27C Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 90F/32C High: 90F/32C High: 90 F/32 C High: 88 F/31 C High: 89F/32C High: 90 F/32C High: 88F/31C Low: 77F/25C High: 89F/32C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 89F/32C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 74F/23C High: 88 F/31 C Low: 77F/25C High: 87 F/31 Low: 75F/24C High: 85F/29C Low: 77 F/25C High: 87F/31C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 90F/32C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 87F/31C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 86F/30C Low: 78F/26C High: 90 F/32 C Low: 75F/24C High: 90F/32C High: 87 F/31 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 01 ST , 2009, PAGE 9B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. Partly cloudy with a shower. Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 88 Low: 78 High: 90 High: 90 High: 90 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Clouds and sun with a thunderstorm. High: 90 Low: 79 Low: 79 Low: 79 AccuWeather RealFeel 94F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 82F 97-85F 95-87F 96-88F 96-83F Low: 79 TODAYTONIGHTWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................92F/33C Low ....................................................78F/26C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 91 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 81 F/27C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.30" Year to date ................................................24.59" Normal year to date ....................................31.32" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Full Last New First Sep. 4 Sep. 11Sep. 18Sep. 26 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:51 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:29 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 5:43 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 4:06 a.m. Today Wednesday Thursday Friday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 6:16 a.m.2.512:12 a.m.0.6 6:45 p.m.2.812:16 p.m.0.5 6:59 a.m.2.612:52 a.m.0.4 7:24 p.m.2.91:01 p.m.0.4 7:38 a.m.2.71:29 a.m.0.3 8:00 p.m.2.91:43 p.m.0.4 8:15 a.m.2.92:04 a.m.0.3 8:35 p.m.2.92:22 p.m.0.3 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco90/3277/25t92/3378/25pc Amsterdam70/2155/12r66/1852/11sh Ankara, Turkey83/2854/12pc79/2648/8pc Athens86/3070/21s84/2867/19s Auckland60/1548/8pc59/1545/7s Bangkok90/3277/25r88/3178/25t Barbados87/3077/25sh86/3078/25pc Barcelona79/2668/20pc77/2568/20pc Beijing81/2761/16s81/2759/15c Beirut81/2774/23s79/2676/24s Belgrade83/2856/13s85/2959/15s Berlin85/2963/17s77/2559/15pc Bermuda82/2776/24s82/2775/23s Bogota69/2045/7pc69/2042/5pc Brussels73/2250/10r72/2254/12pc Budapest82/2752/11s84/2856/13s Buenos Aires63/1748/8pc63/1748/8pc Cairo96/3572/22s95/3569/20s Calcutta90/3281/27sh91/3281/27r Calgary78/2554/12s73/2248/8s Cancun91/3275/23pc90/3275/23pc Caracas82/2772/22t82/2773/22t Casablanca81/2762/16s77/2563/17s Copenhagen75/2364/17s68/2057/13pc Dublin61/1648/8sh59/1550/10r Frankfurt82/2757/13t77/2555/12pc Geneva 82/27 62/16 pc 73/2250/10t Halifax 66/18 50/10 s 70/21 55/12 s Havana 91/32 72/22 t 88/31 71/21 r Helsinki 66/18 55/12sh72/2254/12pc Hong Kong 91/32 81/27 t 91/32 81/27t Islamabad 95/35 77/25 t 96/35 75/23 t Istanbul76/2465/18sh77/2564/17s Jerusalem 83/28 59/15s82/2762/16s Johannesburg 77/2551/10pc76/2451/10pc Kingston 89/3179/26t88/3179/26sh Lima73/2259/15s73/2260/15s London72/2254/12sh70/2155/12r Madrid90/3261/16pc91/3257/13s Manila88/3179/26t84/2877/25r Mexico City75/2354/12t77/2555/12t Monterrey84/2870/21t87/3072/22t Montreal73/2254/12s79/2655/12s Moscow72/2250/10s73/2255/12s Munich85/2957/13s73/2252/11c Nairobi84/2853/11pc81/2753/11sh New Delhi 91/3281/27t90/3278/25t Oslo67/1958/14r65/1854/12sh Paris72/2254/12r70/2150/10sh Prague 81/27 54/12 s 74/23 52/11 pc Rio de Janeiro85/2974/23s87/3077/25s Riyadh103/3979/26s103/3978/25s Rome 86/30 63/17 s 82/27 63/17 s St. Thomas89/3180/26pc89/3179/26s San Juan67/1941/5pc62/1638/3c San Salvador 88/31 70/21 t 88/31 73/22 s Santiago 59/1546/7c55/1237/2sh Santo Domingo90/3273/22pc86/3074/23pc Sao Paulo 80/26 61/16 t 85/29 66/18s Seoul82/2757/13s81/2759/15s Stockholm 72/22 59/15 pc 68/20 52/11 sh Sydney 68/20 52/11 s70/2157/13s Taipei93/3380/26pc91/3281/27sh T okyo 82/27 73/22 r 77/25 72/22 pc T oronto 72/2254/12s73/2257/13s Trinidad95/3573/22pc93/3373/22pc V ancouver 71/21 56/13 pc 73/2258/14s Vienna 82/2763/17s80/2665/18pc W arsaw 74/23 54/12 s 73/22 55/12 pc Winnipeg 79/26 54/12 s 78/2553/11s H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-15 Miles86F Wednesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-15 Miles86F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-15 Miles85F Wednesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-15 Miles85F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-15 Miles83F Wednesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-15 Miles84F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque90/3265/18pc89/3163/17pc Anchorage62/1650/10sh59/1549/9r Atlanta78/2563/17c82/2760/15pc Atlantic City76/2455/12pc78/2558/14s Baltimore78/2555/12pc80/2659/15s Boston71/2155/12s74/2361/16s Buffalo70/2148/8s76/2453/11s Charleston, SC82/2765/18t81/2766/18r Chicago74/2348/8s75/2349/9s Cleveland74/2349/9s76/2451/10s Dallas92/3371/21s93/3370/21s Denver92/3357/13pc87/3053/11pc Detroit75/2353/11s77/2553/11s Honolulu89/3176/24s89/3176/24pc Houston90/3267/19pc92/3370/21s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday TodayWednesdayTodayWednesday Indianapolis78/2552/11s80/2657/13s Jacksonville88/3170/21t84/2869/20t Kansas City77/2558/14s79/2659/15pc Las Vegas104/4078/25t105/4082/27pc Little Rock84/2858/14s86/3060/15s Los Angeles91/3266/18s87/3066/18pc Louisville80/2658/14s82/2761/16s Memphis84/2860/15s84/2865/18s Miami89/3178/25t89/3176/24t Minneapolis75/2354/12s76/2457/13pc Nashville84/2859/15s83/2859/15s New Orleans88/3171/21pc87/3071/21s New York77/2560/15s79/2664/17s Oklahoma City86/3064/17s88/3164/17s Orlando90/3273/22t88/3174/23t Philadelphia79/2656/13s81/2761/16s Phoenix 107/41 84/28 pc 105/4084/28pc Pittsburgh73/2247/8s77/2550/10s Portland, OR 84/2858/14pc78/2558/14s Raleigh-Durham 76/24 59/15 pc 79/26 60/15 pc St. Louis80/2656/13s83/2859/15s Salt Lake City 90/32 62/16 s 90/3263/17pc San Antonio 91/32 71/21 pc 94/34 73/22 pc San Diego80/2668/20pc78/2567/19pc San Francisco 72/22 57/13 pc 72/2258/14pc Seattle76/2455/12pc73/2255/12s T allahassee 89/3170/21t85/2966/18t T ampa 90/32 75/23 t 88/31 73/22t Tucson100/3775/23t97/3675/23pc W ashington, DC 78/25 59/15pc80/2662/16s UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

PAGE 21

By REUBEN SHEARER Tribune Features Reporter F or the second time this year, the Bahamas will be the host country of an international pageant. Sixty gorgeous women from coun tries across the earth will gather at the Nassau Wyndham Resort on November 15 to compete for the title of Miss Swimsuit USA International. The stakes are high, and one lucky woman will be chosen to represent the Bahamas as host queen. The competition to decide who that lucky lady is four weeks from now, when 15 ladies in the country will compete for the crown of Miss Swimsuit USA Bahamas, and you may have what it takes. Do you have the perfect combi nation of beauty and brains, do you possess a sexy swimsuit body, have a memorable personality, and are you between the ages of 18-28? If you answered yes to all of those questions, then you may be a candidate for the Miss Swimsuit USA Bahamas competition which will take place in a matter of weeks. This competition will prove a great opportunity for the right candidates, talent and model scout OilinSha Coakley, coordinator for the Swimsuit USA Bahamas Competition told Tribune Features yesterday. Final The final competition on September 26 at the British Colonial Hilton will precede three weeks of fiercely televised competition between 15 beautiful women. “In each episode, they will be coached on how to walk, how to take pictures, they will shoot commercials, and have fitness chal lenges devised by some of the leading fitness gurus in The Bahamas.” On September 26, the ladies will compete for the title of Miss Swimsuit Bahamas USA. The winner will receive a $1,000 cash prize, profes sional coaching by Mr Coakley himself, who will instruct them on how to present their best self to advance through the preliminary rounds of the international pageant. The winner of Miss Bahamas USA will go on to compete against 50 women in the Miss Swimsuit USA International competition. The top 15 finalists will receive a complimentary personal photo shoot and will appear in the Swimsuit USA Calendar. World renowned professional photographers Doug Carter, Steve Nix and Mickey Sehorn will photograph the beauties. If you are interested in compet ing in the Swimsuit USA Bahamas competition on September 26, you can call OilinSha Models and Talents at 325-5288 or email a headshot, and any photos of yourself, including contact information to supermodelbahamas@yahoo.com . You can also visit their studio on Collins Avenue, Ninth terracelocat ed on the right hand side of Frank Hanna Cleaning company. Appli cations are available at their office at any time during the day. C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONC HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009 Sixty to vie for Miss Swimsuit USA title MODELS show off their swimsuits. Do you have what it takes to become Miss Swimsuit USA International? One lucky woman will be chosen to represent the Bahamas...




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By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE economic strangle-
hold gripping many cash-
strapped parents may be the
reason for an influx of stu-
dents registering at public
schools.

The government school sys-
tem has been inundated with
about 3,000 more registered
students this year, a spike one
ministry official said may be
due to the current economic
downturn.

Ministry of Education Per-
manent Secretary Elma Gar-
raway believes the enrolment
increase is, in part, due to stu-
dent transfers from the pri-
vate school system along with
many first time students,
whose parents would prefer a
private institution.

Tuition at a typical private
high school is around $1,100 a
term while a parent might pay
around $700 a term for a pri-
vate primary school.



"According to preliminary
reports from the pre-registra-
tion period at the end of the
summer term, there was an
indication that a significant
number of students had come
to the public school system
from the private schools.

"(We had) 3,000 additional
students join our school over
the usual number," Ms Gar-
raway told The Tribune yes-
terday, adding that she doubt-
ed typical levels of population
growth would lead to such a
large enrolment increase.

"The normal population
growth over the years would
contribute to the usual num-
bers that we admit every year
— this year there has been a
significant increase in the
intake so we know that's not
caused by the population
growth. Rather by those who
would have normally sought
admission to private schools."

She said she could not pro-
vide a more specific analysis

SEE page six

The Taste

Cel feel) mel mil ties he



m Lhe Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009

Ss
a

Maer ime
BAHAMAS BIGGEST Riis

PUunIC Schools
number's Focnet

3,000 more students
register this year;

spike may be due to
economic downturn

Tim Clark/Tribune staff







SEE PAGE ELEVEN

—

Mag htly ro

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



Management jobs go in
Atlantis restructuring

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

EIGHT managers and
two line staff are now
without a job as Atlantis
yesterday announced that
it has restructured its Food
and Beverage division and
centralised its reservation
system.

Days after lauding the
promotional success of the
massive Miss Universe
pageant event, hosted at
Atlantis, for its capacity
to boost future arrivals to
the resort, Kerzner Inter-



national said the job loss-
es are part of an overall
effort to make the resort
“more efficient.”

“We are consistently
reviewing our business
globally with a view to
making our operations as
efficient as possible, while
at the same time providing
a high level of service for
our customers.

“In this instance, group
business, which has been
impacted industry wide on
a global basis, demanded
that adjustments be made

SEE page six



MANY STUDENTS across the nation were back in the classroom yesterday. By Wednesday, all students should be at their desks for

the new school year.

Teacher alleged to have
drugged, molested student

is taken off active duty

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

MINISTRY of Education
officials confirmed that the
teacher under investigation
for allegedly drugging and
molesting a minor at CC
Sweeting Senior High has
been taken off active duty
and will not be allowed on
campus as long as the
police’s investigations con-
tinue.

Elma Garraway, the Per-
manent Secretary in the
Ministry of Education, said

SEE page six

August 2009 '

|
11
ys 18

“4

Fr

Second man in court accused
of businessman’s murder

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A second
man accused of murdering
retired police officer and
businessman Leslie May-
cock was arraigned in
Freeport Magistrate’s Court
on Monday.

Dudley Jamaal Seide Jr,
22, of Freeport, appeared
before Magistrate Debbye
Ferguson in Court One on
charges of armed robbery
and murder. He was not
required to enter a plea to
the charges.

It is alleged that on July

15, the accused being con-
cerned with another or oth-
ers robbed Leslie Maycock
of a black pouch, valued at
$100, and $700 cash that was
contained in the pouch.

It is also alleged that on
July 23, the accused being
concerned with another
intentionally caused the
death of Maycock by the use
of a hand gun.

Maycock, 50, a retired
police officer and owner of
the Hawksbill Mini Mart,
was robbed and shot after
closing his convenience
store in Hawksbill. He died
of his injuries a week later in

SEE page six



GET READY FOR

-
September 2009

5 6 fF ; "6
12413 44 45
19 20 24
26 27 28 25



NASSAU AND BAHAMA TSCANDS? FEADING NEWSPAPER

Union in talks over ‘20
pending jo losses’ at KFC

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

TALKS are taking place
between the Bahamas Hotel
Catering and Allied Work-
ers Union and fast food
giant Kentucky Fried Chick-
en over “20 pending job
losses”.

Union President Roy
Colebrooke told The Tri-
bune yesterday that the
union, which represents
KFC workers, is in discus-
sion with senior manage-
ment at the chain.

“Their business has shown
a steady decline,” said Mr

SEE page six

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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009



THE TRIBUNE



FORMER Turks and Caicos Premier
Michael Misick has suggested that the British
territory should become an autonomous
Bahamas state. The Tribune hit the streets
yesterday to see what the public thinks about
this idea.

TROY HALBERT, 44,
ENTREPRENEUR:

"T don't know anything about Turks and
Caicos. I don't think we should stop anyone
that wants to be a part of the Bahamas. Let
them come, I'll give them the ‘blue light’ dis-
count."

LEON, RESIDENT OF THE GROVE

"T think this would make things a lot easi-
er for both countries. Lots of people have
family members living there and it would be
good to have them be a part of the Bahamas
again."

TONY COLLIE, 24, PMH EMPLOYEE

"L support this initiative. Forming a feder-
ation would be mutually beneficial for both
countries — our cultures are closely inter-
twined and we share common industries such
as conch farming.

“ T think that there is a lot of room for
investment and growth as their economy is
not bad and our governance is similar."

P ANTHONY WHITE, RETIRED
JOURNALIST

"At this time I would discourage our gov-
ernment from getting involved.

“Politically they are unstable and it would

LOCAL NEWS

Bahamians weigh in on
Turks and Caicos issue

STREET

ALK

be too complicated with all of the allega-
tions of scandal and corruption."

EAMON ADDERLEY, 35, MANAGER
OF UPTOWN BAKERY AND DELI

"I'm unfamiliar with all the details, but I
feel that as long as it will be beneficial to
the Bahamas we should be open to discus-
sion."

KENNETH MCCARTNEY, 55

"As long as we exercise caution and fully
assess both short-term and long-term con-
sequences, I would fully support the deci-
sion to form a federation with the Turks and
Caicos."

GLENROY MCKENZIE,
ASST SUPERINTENDENT, RBPF

"T don't think it should be a problem. We
are historically linked to Turks and Caicos,
and most people are not even aware of the
strong family ties between the islands."

FELITA WILLIAMS, 39, PMH NURSE

"T have family and friends living over there
that I would love to see more. Perhaps if
they become a part of the Bahamas it would
make traveling there accessible to more peo-
ple."

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The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009, PAGE 3



Man accused of
having sex with —
13-year-old girl

of Sandilands Village
Road, accused of having
sexual intercourse with a
13-year-old girl, was
arraigned in the Magis-
trates Court yesterday.

Police have charged
Donovan Sturrup with
having sexual intercourse
with a girl under the age
of 14. It is alleged that
Sturrup committed the
offence on Saturday, July
18, 2009.

Sturrup, who was
arraigned before Magis-
trate Carolita Bethel in
Court 8, Bank Lane, was
not required to enter a
plea to the charge. He was
granted bail in the sum of
$10,000 with two sureties.
Sturrup was ordered to
report to the Elizabeth
Estates Police Station
every Monday, Wednes-
day and Saturday before
6pm. He was also ordered
not to have any contact
with the virtual com-
plainant or witnesses in
the case. Sturrup is
expected to appear in
Court 5, Bank Lane, today
for a fixture hearing.

e TWO women and a
man charged in last
week’s seizure of two and
a half pounds of cocaine
from a private residence
were arraigned in the
Magistrate’s Court yester-
day.

Sherwin Laroda, 49;
Vanessa Rolle Laroda, 37,
and Althemese Rolle Lar-
oda, 19 — all of Button-
wood Avenue, Pinewood
Gardens — appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel in Court 8, Bank
Lane, yesterday charged
with possession of cocaine
with intent to supply.

Police reportedly seized
2.5lbs of cocaine with a
street value of $12,000
while searching a home in
Pinewood Gardens.

All of the accused, who
were represented by attor-
ney Willie Moss, pleaded
not guilty to the charges
and were each granted
bail in the sum of $10,000
with two sureties. The
three accused were also
ordered to surrender their
travel documents and to
report to the East Street
South Police Station every
Saturday before 6pm.

The case was adjourned
to February 15.

¢ A 39-year-old man of
Redland Acres accused of
raping and causing harm
to a 38-year-old woman
last Wednesday was
arraigned in the Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday.

Police charged Poence
Bodie with the Wednes-
day, August 26, rape of a
38-year-old woman. He is
also accused of causing
harm to the woman. Bod-
ie, who was arraigned
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel in Court 8 yester-
day, was not required to
enter a plea to the
charges.

He was granted bail in
the sum of $10,000 with
two sureties. Bodie, who
was represented by attor-
ney Willie Moss, was
ordered to report to the
East Street South Police
Station every Tuesday and
Saturday before 6pm. He
is expected to appear in
Court 5, Bank Lane, today
for a fixture hearing.

e A Cancer Society
employee accused of
hacking into another
woman’s e-mail account
was arraigned in the Mag-
istrate’s Court yesterday.

Sheryl Rolle, 25, was
arraigned in Court 8,
Bank Lane, yesterday
charged with unauthorised
access to computer mater-
ial.

It is alleged that on
Tuesday, August 21, 2009,
Rolle unlawfully accessed
the e-mail account of
Kathy Ingraham for the
purpose of securing access
to her private e-mails.
Rolle, who was arraigned
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel, pleaded not guilty
to the charge and was
granted $2,500 bail.

She is represented by
attorney Godfrey Pinder.

Rolle is expected to
appear in Court 10, Nas-
sau Street, on September

LOCAL NEWS

Mitchell: idea of federation with

THE joining of The Bahamas and the
Turks and Caicos islands as a Federation is
a “fascinating idea worth exploring”, for-
mer foreign minister Fred Mitchell said
yesterday.

Nonetheless, Mr Mitchell said the sug-
gestion made by its ex-premier Michael
Misick is one which would “require thought
and study” and a commitment on the part
of both peoples to enter into the Federa-
tion.

Meanwhile, he added that even if The
Bahamas was interested in such a relation-
ship with its neighbour, it would have to be
careful of offending the United Kingdom,
of which the islands are a territory.

Interview

He was responding to comments made by
Mr Misick in an exclusive interview with
The Tribune when he suggested that rather
than being a burden on The Bahamas, the
Turks and Caicos would have much to offer
if the two countries entered into a federa-
tion.

Mr Misick asserted that, despite not hav-
ing had a referendum on the issue, the peo-
ple of the Turks and Caicos islands have
expressed an interest in their territory
becoming an autonomous state under the
Bahamas government.

This after allegations of systematic gov-
ernment corruption emerging from a Com-
mission of Inquiry led by the British in
Turks and Caicos ultimately resulted in the
United Kingdom suspending the island’s
self-government last month.

Explaining some of the proposed benefits
of the idea, Mr Misick told The Tribune:
“We just built hundreds of millions of dol-

lars worth of hospitals that can be there
for the people of Inagua and Mayaguana
and the other islands of the south. We have
a modern society that can service the south-
oo and take the strain off (Nas-
sau).”

Mr Mitchell noted that a federation of
Turks and Caicos and The Bahamas is not
unprecedented — as both countries were
allied in such a way at various times prior to
Bahamian independence.

And he added that the history of The
Bahamas and Turks and Caicos in this
regard “is not entirely happy.”

“There was a dispute about adequate
representation with seat of government
being in Nassau and over the sharing of
revenue and taxes,” he noted.

However, the suggestion made by Mr
Misick is not one proposed by him alone.

An August 20, 2009, article in The Econ-
omist, commenting on the removal of 33
years of self-rule in the Turks and Caicos
Islands, said there has “long been a debate
on whether the Turks and Caicos and oth-
er micro-states in the region are viable as
self-governing entities.”

Candidate

Noting that “for most of the imperial
period the islands were run from Jamaica or
the Bahamas” the article suggested The
Bahamas “having made great strides in
overcoming its own corruption and drugs
problems of the 1980s, would seem a good
candidate to take the islands back under its
wing one day.”

A message left for Minister of Foreign
Affairs Brent Symonette was not returned
yesterday as he was said to be in meetings.

BPSU president set for

tO NLC ae

talks with Prime Minister

AS the dispute sur-
rounding the interdiction
and transfer of 30 Customs
officers from the public
service continues,
Bahamas Public Service
Union president John Pin-
der said he will be meet-
ing with Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham later this
week.

In a brief interview with
The Tribune yesterday, Mr
Pinder said he will be rep-
resenting the union in
these discussions with the
prime minister with a view
to determining the BPSU’s
next move.

Transfer

Mr Pinder has been
adamant in his position
that government violated
its industrial agreement
and failed to follow proce-
dure in its move to transfer
and interdict the Customs
officers.

On July 31, the Ministry
of Finance announced that
16 officers were being
interdicted pending the
outcome of misconduct
charges against them. Ten
more officers were advised

CLARIFICATION

IN AN article published
in Saturday’s Tribune,
Chamber of Commerce
president Khaalis Rolle
was quoted in a story
under the headline “Govt
urged to reveal pageant
costs” as saying that the
government is obligated to
justify every dollar it spent
on the Miss Universe
Competition.

Mr Rolle would like to
make it clear that his com-
ments were not intended
to criticise government —
which has said it made all
relevant information avail-
able — but simply to state
what the proper procedure
should be whenever an
investment is made on
behalf of the Bahamian
people.

The Tribune would also
like to clarify that Mr
Rolle was speaking on
behalf of the Chamber,
and that the placement of
comments by politicians
alongside his quotes was
entirely coincidental and
in no way a reflection of
Mr Rolle’s political affilia-
tion.

that they were to be trans-
ferred to other depart-
ments.

Three other officers
were retired in the public
interest and one was giv-
en early retirement.

Those outside of the
group of officers who were
interdicted were moved as
part of an “ongoing
restructuring exercise,” the
ministry said.

“Article 35 (of the indus-
trial agreement) speaks to
an officer having the right
to refuse any transfer if it
will cause hardship on him
and in General Orders, 604
speaks to the same thing,”
Mr Pinder said.

The BPSU president
also argued that Customs
officers are afforded five
days notice of a transfer,
but claimed that in some
cases officers were given
48 hours and others only

24 hours to respond.

Proceedings for the dis-
missals were said to be
underway before the 14-
day period within which
the interdicted officers had
to respond to government,
Mr Pinder claimed.

Officers

He added that the
remaining Customs offi-
cers are also up in arms
because they fear that gov-
ernment will treat them as
“unjustly” as it did their
former colleagues.

“The majority of Cus-
toms officers are upset
(because) of the manner of
which it was done so they
are of the view that they
might be next, so that’s
why we must (end) this
behaviour,” said Mr Pin-
der.



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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Turks too tarnished to touch

FORMER chief minister Michael Misick
was in town last week to promote the idea of
the Turks and Caicos islands becoming an
autonomous state under the Bahamas gov-
ernment.

Considering the Turks’ present situation
and its history of an inability to govern with-
out indulging in corruption, we think that Mr
Misick is offering a very tainted packet. And
being himself discredited by a recent British
inquiry, he is the last person who should be
trying to broker the deal.

The Turks and Caicos is an overseas ter-
ritory of the UK, located between the
Bahamas and Haiti. It has a population of
23,000, all British citizens.

Last year Britain appointed a Commis-
sion of Inquiry to look into allegations of
corruption against Mr Misick and other offi-
cials. It was suggested that officials had mis-
used public money and had profited from the
sale of government-owned land.

Hearings earlier this year revealed details
of Mr Misick’s lavish spending after taking
office in 2003. Although he insisted on his
innocence, he was forced to resign in March.

Sir Robin Auld, QC, who was a lawyer in
one of the Bahamas’ own Commissions of
Inquiry several years ago —now serves on
Bermuda’s court of appeal — led the inves-
tigation in the Turks’ case. Sir Robin said he
found “clear signs of political amorality and
immaturity and general administrative
incompetence.”

On August 14 Britain imposed direct rule
on the islands as a result of the Commis-
sion’s findings. The Turks and Caicos gov-
ernment and legislature were suspended and
a British Foreign Office-appointed gover-
nor was put in charge.

British Foreign Minister Chris Bryant
said the suspension could last up to two
years while Governor Gordon Wetherell
“put the islands’ affairs back in good order.”
He suggested that elections for a new Turks
and Caicos government could be held by
July, 2011.

We suggest that nothing should be done to
take Mr Misick’s proposal any further until
the British government has accomplished
its mission of trying to give the island honest
government. If at any time after that, Mr
Misick’s suggestion should prove to have
some merit, it should certainly not be
explored with any of those tainted by the
inquiry.

The Bahamas has had a checkered histo-
ry in Turks island since 1766, when a running
battle was started with the Bermudians who
seasonally raked Turks islands’ salt pans.
The Bahamas believed it had a right to tax
the salt. The Bermudians refused to pay the

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tax. Eventually in 1819 the British govern-
ment assigned political control of the Turks
and Caicos to the Bahamas. It retained that
control until 1848. That year the inhabitants
of the Turks successfully petitioned to be a
separate colony governed by a council pres-
ident under the supervision of the governor
of Jamaica.

In 1873 the islands were annexed to
Jamaica with a commissioner and a legisla-
tive board. In 1959 the islands got their own
administration under an administrator. The
Jamaican governor remained their gover-
nor until 1962 when Jamaica became inde-
pendent of Britain and the Turks became a
crown colony. From 1965 the Bahamas gov-
ernor was also governor of the Turks until
the Bahamas became independent in 1973.
The Turks then got its own governor.

However, it wasn’t long before the islands
were showing signs that its administrators
could be corrupted.

Norman Sanders was elected chief minis-
ter when his PAP won the islands’ 1984 elec-
tion. The following year he and two of his
ministers were convicted and jailed in the
United States on various drug charges. One
of those ministers was Stafford Missick, first
cousin of Michael Misick. Stafford Missick,
who before returning to the Turks and enter-
ing politics there, was for several years on the
staff of the Bahamas’ Central Bank.

The following year — July 24, 1986 — the
Turks governor dissolved the government
and replaced it with an advisory council after
allegations of arson and fraud found the
chief minister, Nathaniel Francis, — who
had replaced Saunders — and four other
PAP officials unfit to rule.

One wonders if Michael Misick, who has
influential friends in the Bahamas, has made
this pitch to get from under Britain, and is
cosying up to the Bahamas in the hopes of
regaining his position in an autonomous
Turks and Caicos under the Bahamas’
umbrella?

It has been suggested that Britain would
not want to lose the Turks. This couldn’t be
further from the truth. A former Bahamas
diplomat has told us that British officials
have for years expressed an interest in some
sort of association between the Bahamas
and the Turks and Caicos islands. His
impression was that the UK would be
pleased to be rid of these islands.

However, this transfer cannot be done
at the expense of the Bahamas, which knows
only too well what it is like to wrestle with a
tarnished image in the public arena.

Maybe in the future, but for the immedi-
ate present, an association with the Turks
and Caicos islands would be bad news.



Te

No justice
for suffering
Haitians

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I wish you in the name of the
Lord, please don’t let anybody
know my address and I want
you please to put this in The
Tribune some time this week
so every Tribune reader can
read it.

Please allow me to say some-
thing about the crime issue here
in the Bahamas.

I read in the Punch this
morning in page seven: The
crime problem in the Bahamas
is a Haitian problem for if the
writer is talking about Haitian-
Bahamian origins and Creole
killer culture, is all about Hait-
ian. I buy the Tribune Monday
to Saturday and the Punch
every Monday and Thursday.
It’s not so often to find a Hait-
lan coming out from the court
for stealing, murder, rape or
any other related crime, you
will find them on the papers for
illegal or victim of....I don’t say
that they don’t’ do these kind of
thing.

I don’t like when they talking
about Haitian-Bahamian, a
Haitian-Bahamian should be a
child between a Bahamian and
a Haitian. If a child is born in
the Bahamas by a non citizen of
the Bahamas this child is a
Bahamian for he’s born on
Bahamian soil except if by acci-
dent I have one here for my
one will be a Haitian.

The crime is a Bahamian-
rooted problem. Because
Bahamians cannot resolve their
conflict without a knife, a gun, a
cutlass or any kind of object
that can take out your life. The
police cannot stop crime in the
Bahamas. The police don’t
have time to make patrols to
protect the citizens living in the
country. In Haiti, when I was
in school, they taught me that

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



the police force is created to
protect every citizen living in a
country. In the Bahamas, it is
very different. The RBPF have
more time to run behind poor
Haitians to make $2, 3, 4, and 5
from them, the time that they
take to run behind them and to
make the deal can help them
to stop a killing.

Let me tell you that, believe
me or not, the Bahamas is little
over 300,000 people, even if you
put 200,000 Bahamian police,
you will still have crime
between them, and one will kill
another. And another problem
I see with the crime is the con-
stitution, the parliamentarians
and the court system. The bail
system is a big mistake, when
you release a criminal on bail
he’s going to kill another for
he knows he will be released
on bail, a lot of criminal do that.
Why they don’t’ change that
law so they can keep them in
Fox Hill? And bring the death
penalty when you kill a person,
you are found guilty and you
get killed too, you will not be
going to kill another person.

Instead of doing so, they
focus on Haitians. Some
Bahamians don’t see the value
of the Haitian, and they don’t
see what Haitians are doing for
the Bahamas, that’s why on
page seven this morning the
writer says that human life
doesn’t mean anything in Haiti.
Ican say fortunately for him or
her and unfortunately for Hait-
ian. I can ask him or her to
recall the history, he or her will
find that Bahamians went to
Haiti for food, for freedom and

it’s not too late for Bahamians
to go to Haiti again, for nobody
knows tomorrow.

The tourist is the main
resource of the Bahamas. If you
can ask all Haitians to stop
working in the Bahamas just
for one week, you will see the
difference. You can recall the
history in the Bible where the
rich man says: Now I have
everything I am supposed to,
my soul relaxes, you don’t have
anything, you don’t produce
too much, you import 90 per
cent of all your goods.

Haitians are humans too,
mistreat them, beat them in the
detention centre, they always
say investigation ongoing and
never find justice. God will say
enough is enough. I don’t think
this is what you call a Christ-
ian nation. I’m living in the
Bahamas for almost 12 years,
I know what my fellow Haitians
are suffering and they never
find justice, but let me tell you
that day will come when Haiti
will serve as another Miami for
the Bahamas. By that time
Bahamians will know that God
has the power, he can give it to
whomever he wants and he can
take the high head down and
take the low head high.

Forgive me please if you get
mad by what I say. I say that
because they (Bahamians) talk-
ing bad too much about
Haitians and they don’t try to
resolve the real problems of the
country.

One second, put this please
in The Tribune for I love The
Tribune or reply to me. But
don’t put my address.

NO NAME
Nassau,
August, 2009.

What the FNM manifestos said about Arawak Gay

EDITOR, The Tribune.

What did the Manifestos of
the FNM really say about
‘Arawak Cay’ - versions 1992 -
1997 & 2007?

Seeing that it was no other
persons than Hon Brent
Symonette who raised this and
so-said he quoted presumably
accurately from the text of the
various FNM Manifestos this
caused me to dust-off my copies
and guess what — indiscrimi-
nate misquoting as follows:

(1) The Deliverance 1992
Manifesto — page 12: Tourism:
clean up Arawak Cay and
make it available for develop-
ment as a tourist resort.

(2) The Agenda 1997 Mani-
festo — page 39 Youth Devel-

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opment: complete works at the
“Down Home Fish Fry” on
Arawak Cay to include: a gaze-
bo and stage, toilet facilities,
parking areas, sidewalks, light-
ing, landscaping and a culvert to
improve tidal flow in the area.

(3) The Matter of Trust Man-
ifesto 2007 page: 21 Parks and
Open Green Spaces: Make
Arawak Cay and environs a
Cultural and recreational cen-
tre.

Page: 30- Heritage -Make
Arawak Cay a major Cultural
Festival site for the enjoyment
of Bahamian families and visi-
tors alike.

Page: 31- across from
page:30-Sports and Leisure:
develop a plan for the com-
mercial and recreational devel-
opment of Arawak Cay.

Editor your readers will see
in these official policy state-
ments of the FNM, 1992-1997-
2007 at no time, implied or sug-
gested, did the FNM propose
a Container Port for Arawak
Cay.

Mr Symonette quoted or
passed to Minister Zhivargo
Laing a copy of what seemed
to be the 2007 Manifesto and
he quoted page: 31 under
Sports and Leisure the FNM
will develop a commercial and
recreational base for Arawak
Cay — the ‘commercial’ men-
tion did not then nor now can
suggest a port that’s really beg-
ging the question. The com-

mercial development was the
creation of commerce in restau-
rants, etc.

I trust the Prime Minister —
he has said that his government
wrote to the proposers of the
Container Port at Arawak Cay
and have stated that the pro-
posers must show proof that
the environment nor the traffic
as a result of this proposal will
negatively impact the confines
and the route between Arawak
Cay and Gladstone Road.

As long as those retained to
complete these studies are com-
petent and have an Interna-
tional reputation I leave my
decision solely in the hands of
the Prime Minister as I am 100
per cent assured there is no
consultant or consultancy who
will be able to support this pro-
posal as it is obvious there will
be environmental impact from
noise and pollution — there will
be a high capacity of negative
traffic increase which will snarl
the corridor under construction
as part of the New Providence
Road Improvement pro-
gramme.

Editor — if you do not
believe this writer pull out your
Manifesto copies and see for
yourself — the Thomas’s
amongst will be shown up.

W THOMPSON
Nassau,
August 22, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

FNM grateful for Catholic support
of amendment to Sexual Offences Act

Govt encourages other denominations to follow its lead

Final offer =
under EPA ‘will
reserve key
sectors for
Bahamians’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter :
alowe@tribunemedia.net :

DESPITE some delays
in finalising its services
offer under the Econom-
ic Partnership Agree-
ment (EPA) to the Euro-
pean Union in light of
European concerns, the
final offer will still keep
key sectors reserved for
Bahamians, Minister of
State for Finance Zhivar-
go Laing said.

After re-consideration
by Cabinet, the offer is
expected to again be for-
warded to the EU by
“the end of this month”,
he added.

Mr Laing previously
acknowledged that after
submitting the services
offer earlier this year
“with some clarifica-
tions”, the EU had
“come back to ask us
some additional ques-
tions and make some
additional suggestions”
in relation to what the
Bahamas was agreeing to
do under the EPA.

Mr Laing said the gov-
ernment would have to
“give full consideration”
to those suggestions and
then make some determi- }
nations. :

This comes after a
source close to the EPA
negotiating process told
Tribune Business in April
that the services offer the :
Bahamas made had been
opposed by the EU at :
that stage because it “just }
did not meet the require- :
ments and the agreed
percentage amounts to
be liberalised.”

This raised the ques-
tion of whether the
Bahamas would be pres-
sured into conceding
greater foreign participa-
tion in sectors of the
economy which are cur-
rently reserved for
Bahamians alone, after
having assured that the
services offer “mirrors
the National Investment |
Policy” that keeps 13 sec- :
tors closed to foreign :
competition and outlines
how foreigners can
engage in others.”

Asked yesterday
whether the governmen-

t’s reaction to the EU’s
suggestions in reference

to its initial offer would =}
see any of these currently }
reserved sectors opening
up for foreign participa-
tion, Mr Laing said it
would not.

“In fact it’s fairer to
say that what we are
seeking to do would
bring that clarity to the
EU in terms of the mir-
roring of the two (the
offer and the National
Investment Policy as it
currently exists),” said
Mr Laing.

He asserted that the
exchange between the
Bahamas and the EU
was more in terms of

“clarifying” the offer that

is being made by this
country.

The EPA is a trade
agreement between the
EU African, Caribbean
and Pacific countries that
clarifies the terms upon
which the countries
involved trade in goods
and services.

THE FNM yesterday
expressed its “thanks and
delight” for the Catholic
Church’s support of the pro-
posed amendment to the
Sexual Offences Act, and
encouraged other religious
denominations to follow its
lead.

Last week, Archbishop
Patrick Pinder, of the
Roman Catholic Archdio-
cese in the Bahamas and the
Turks and Caicos Islands,
offered the church’s
“prayerful support” of gov-
ernment’s proposed amend-
ment to outlaw marital rape.

In response, the FNM,
through the party’s chair-
man Senator Johnley Fer-
guson, expressed its thanks
for the declaration of sup-
port by one of the “largest
and most respected religious
denominations in the coun-
try.”

Mr Ferguson urged other
religious groups, especially
mainline denominations, to
come out and declare sup-
port for what he says they
know is “right and proper



ARCHBISHOP Patrick Pinder
offered the Catholic Church’s
‘prayerful support’ of govern-
ment’s proposed amendment
to outlaw marital rape.

in the sight of God.”
Expanding on the issue,

the chairman is calling on

FNMs everywhere to urge

their church pastors and
people to come out in loud
support of the amendment.

“The Free National
Movement is grateful and
delighted for the declaration
by Archbishop Patrick Pin-
der that the Roman Catholic
Church is in full support of
the government’s proposed
amendment to the Sexual
Offences Act which would
outlaw marital rape in the
Bahamas.

“In point of fact, the pro-
posed amendment reflects
precisely the party’s long
tradition of defence, hon-
our, respect, dignity, and
upliftment of Bahamian
women,” Mr Ferguson said.

The chairman said the
FNM is proud of State Min-
ister of Social Services
Loretta Butler’s dedication
and determination in push-
ing the amendment, “and in
going full-speed in the com-
munities to gain public
understanding and support
for the legislation.”

During the FNM’s first
term as government, Mr

Unified bus system
plans still in low gear

PLANS for a unified bus
system appear to be moving
ahead at a snail’s pace, with
the Minister of Works and
Transport still awaiting the
final draft of the proposal to
be submitted to Cabinet.

Yesterday, Minister Neko
Grant said although govern-
ment is still "looking" at the
proposed initiative, it
remains in the preliminary
stages.

"Tam awaiting a final draft
on that to take to another
place (Cabinet), where a
decision can be made on it,"
he said.

He did not, however, say
when this draft is expected
nor when it will be presented
to parliament.

As reported previously, as
far back as 2006 jitney drivers and fran-
chise owners called on the government
to implement a unified bus system, bring-
ing all bus operators under one entity in
which both private owners and the gov-
ernment would have a stake.

The plan was intended to improve the
safety and reliability of bus services,
reducing the recklessness that has given
the industry a bad name, while encour-
aging more people to utilise public trans-
portation and lessen traffic congestion.

Two in court over firearm
anid ammunition possession

NEKO GRANT



Governor General Arthur
Hanna in his speech from the
throne in 2006 declared that
the PLP government would
bring legislation to parlia-
ment to enact the plan.

But despite proclamations
throughout 2006 and 2007
that the government’s plan
was in the process of being
“fine tuned”, nothing ever
materialised.

Former Works and Trans-
port Minister Earl Deveaux
was a proponent of the view
that a unified bus system
would have little impact on
the service provided if other
core issues were not
addressed, such as route
rationalisation and the pro-
fessionalism of drivers.

In June 2008, Mr Deveaux,
in conjunction with the Road Traffic
Department, the United Transportation
Company and the Public Transport Asso-
ciation, committed to a “100-day chal-
lenge” for buses to improve their services
- for drivers to be more courteous, reduc-
ing speed, cleaning up their vehicles and
stopping at designated sites.

Mr Deveaux said the challenge would
have “measurable” goals and results
would be published publicly. However,
this did not happen.

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Two men
were arraigned on firearm
and ammunition possession
charges in the Freeport
Magistrate’s Court yester-
day.

Appearing in Court One
before Magistrate Debbye
Ferguson were Don
Phillippe, 30, and Ethan
Rolle, 32, of Freeport.

Lawyers Murrio Ducille
and Simeon Brown

appeared on behalf of Rolle.

It is alleged that on
August 28, at Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Phillippe
and Rolle were found in
possession of a firearm,
namely a .40 Glock pistol
with 12 live rounds of
ammunition.

They pleaded not guilty
to the charges and were
each granted $10,000 bail
with one surety on the first
count, and $5,000 cash bail
on the second count.

The matter was adjourned
until February 15, 2010 for
trial.

Huge chest of drawers hoisted aboard space station

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

The astronauts will remove the cylindrical

ASTRONAUTS hitched a giant chest of
drawers to the international space station on
Monday that contained a brand new freezer,
sleeping compartment and treadmill bearing
a TV comedian’s name, according to Associat-
ed Press.

The Italian-built chest — nicknamed Leonar-
do, as in Leonardo da Vinci — was moved
from space shuttle Discovery via a hefty robot
arm and hoisted onto the space station.

It’s loaded with nearly 8 tons of equipment
and science experiments for the orbiting out-
post and its six residents.

Much of the gear is stored in portable racks;
the bedroom is the size of a phone booth.

Leonardo will remain secured to the space
station for the next week.

vessel — 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter —
and place it back on space shuttle Discovery for
return to Earth. By that time, it will be loaded
with trash and unneeded items.

NASA’s brand new $5 million treadmill —
officially called the Combined Operational
Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill,
or COLBERT for short — is in pieces and will
need to be assembled after Discovery leaves.

The TV comedian ended up with an exercise
machine named in his honor after he won an
online vote for christening rights to a space
station room.

Unwilling to go with Colbert for the yet-to-
be-launched room, NASA opted for Tran-
quility to commemorate the Apollo 11 moon
landing 40 years ago this summer. The treadmill
was a consolation prize.

Transmission) and responsive handling

Ferguson said, three quali-
fied and capable Bahamian
women -— Dame Ivy
Dumont, Janet Bostwick
and Theresa Moxey-Ingra-
ham — were made Cabinet
ministers and served with
productivity and distinction.

“On that watch, a quali-
fied and capable Bahamian
jurist, Dame Joan Sawyer,
became Chief Justice of the
Bahamas, and later, presi-
dent of the Bahamas Court
of Appeal. Mrs Justice Ani-
ta Allen was also appointed
to the high court on the
FNM’s watch.

“In 2001, the FNM gov-
ernment caused the appoint-
ment of Dame Ivy Dumont
as the sixth Bahamian Gov-

ernor-General, and the first
female ever to become
Head of State,” he said.

Mr Ferguson also point-
ed to what he described as
the FNM’s “bold, brave and
defiant step of proposing a
Referendum for the amend-
ing of the Constitution of
the Bahamas, which includ-
ed an amendment which
would have brought essen-
tial elements of new equali-
ty for the women of the
Bahamas.”

aie) (e718
asa ue

RH UE
PHONE: 322-2157



Contact:

Chris Eldon
a.k.a. Yakka.

Time longer than Rope.



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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Public schools
numbers rocket

FROM page one

of this year's enrolment figures, saying the director of edu-
cation had those numbers.

When asked if she felt the enrolment increase would
place a strain on public school performance, Ms Garraway
said no, adding that many of the country's secondary schools
were previously underpopulated.

To tackle levels of overpopulation in government primary
schools in the southwestern district, the Ministry of Edu-
cation built two more classrooms at Carmichael Primary
with an additional three classrooms being built at Garvin
Tynes Primary, she said.

The public school system has about 3,500 teachers
throughout the country, including teachers aides and art
instructors.

Representatives from the Catholic and Anglican boards
of education — while not reporting any large increase in
2009/2010 enrolment — yesterday said registration levels are
not dismal.

Hillary Valencia Saunders, director of education for the
Anglican system's four schools, said the group has seen a
slight increase from 960 registered students last year to
985 for 2009/2010 academic year.

The Catholic educational system — which has 14 schools
throughout the nation — has seen about a 98 per cent
return of former students for the new academic year.

"We anticipated that there would be a small attrition
but it's not what we had anticipated because we have the
majority of our students back — we have about 98 per
cent of our students who have returned.

"Our greatest challenge is in the family islands, of course,
within Grand Bahama and Eleuthera but in New Provi-
dence the enrolment is pretty consistent with last year," said
Director of Catholic Education Claudette Rolle.

Both systems have long-standing payment plans for strug-
gling parents and have not raised tuition fees this year —a
move both women said was not related to the current eco-
nomic turbulence.

RUSSELL’S WAREHOUSE CLOSING SALE
20’x30? Tent $2,500.00, 5 Ton Split A/C Unit $1,500,
15kw diesel Generator, Asst. Fixtures and Fittings,
Rivet Rite Shelving, Gondolas, Glass Shelves, 2 & 4 Arm Display Racks
Gridwall, Slatwall, Slotted Standards, and Hardware.
Men’s Coverall’s $5.00, S/S & L/S White Shirts $1-$5,

Blank CD’s $0.50, Men’s Jeans sz. 48-50, $15,
Blank ID Cards bx of 500 $45.00, 16” Stand Fans $20.00,
AUBIN Ks
Location: Madeira Shopping Center
Behind Mystical Gym - Entrance to Aquinas - First left-First stairs on left.
Hours: Tuesday - Thursday 9:00am. to 5:00pm
OU GRE URE it)





MEMBERS of the Beta Beta Lambda Chapter of the international Phi Beta Sigma fraternity, chartered at the College of the Bahamas,
donated school supplies to the Albury Sayles primary school. Pictured left to right are Brother D'Angelo Reid; Albury Sayles primary
principal Mary Mortimer; Brother Ramon Mcintosh; Albury Sayles primary senior mistress Deborah Rolle; Brother Keron Wood and
students. Phi Beta Sigma is a fraternity of college-educated men dedicated to brotherhood, scholarship, and service. The Bahamian chap-
ter has dedicated itself to aid wherever possible in the education of the country’s youth.

Management jobs go in
Atlantis restructuring

FROM page one

in the relevant departments,”
said a statement issued yes-
terday.

Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes said his Department
was informed of the pending
redundancies early last week.

Trainers Needed

The Ministry of Tourism and Aviation is seeking
Trainers to deliver the Bahamahost Certification
Programme throughout The Islands of The Bahamas
with effect from January, 2010.

Workshop areas include:

1. Bahamas Product Knowledge,
- History, Geography, Civics, Culture

2. Customer Service Excellence,
- Customer Service
- Fundamentals of Communication
- Customer Diversity

3. Sustainable Tourism Development

4. Leadership Excellence

: ABachelor Degree with a minimum of 3 years training or teaching

BXpPerience: or

» A minimum of 10 years relevant experience in tourism and/or allied
industries and a minimum of 3 years training experience, or

* Teaching certificate with a minimum of 5 years training or teaching

experience,

—





| persons oe Ld ae

Ms. Lestie Norville

TT mee] mre gree] eT

FFT =| FEE

STRAT Sy eT ea

Submission deadline is September 15, 2009.



The company said the
restructuring — which also
saw four jobs made redundant
in the company’s Fort Laud-
erdale office — came in light
of “adjusted forecasts for
group related business,” indi-
cating that the company had
received new signals that
group arrivals are to be fewer
than initially expected.

Earlier this year, resort
executives pointed to the can-
cellation of group trips —
such as those traditionally tak-
en by staff from North Amer-

ican corporations — in the
wake of the global financial
crisis that had seriously
impacted occupancy levels at
Atlantis.

While hotel occupancy lev-
els temporarily rose to around
85 per cent during the recent
Miss Universe pageant, which
was hosted at Atlantis for
much of August, Ed Fields,
Senior Vice President of Pub-
lic Affairs for Atlantis, point-
ed out in a statement last
week that many of the rooms
occupied were complimenta-

ry, according to Kerzner
International’s agreement
with the Miss Universe

Organisation.
As the resort heads into the
typically slow

September/October period
occupancy levels were fore-
cast to drop to as low as 30
per cent within weeks, execu-
tives stated.

The move comes nine
months after Atlantis let go
10 per cent of its workforce
— 800 people — citing low
occupancy levels.

Union in talks over ‘20
pending job losses’ at KFC

Lauderdale, Florida.

While the news could be seen as a gloomy
sign of the times, it would appear that local
food outlet Bamboo Shack is currently thriv-
Messages left at KFC's head office seeking ing.
Company chiefs yesterday revealed that

FROM page one

Colebrooke.

comment were not returned.

The news of KFC's pending lay-offs comes
on the same day as Atlantis announced it is
letting 14 people go as it restructures two
departments — the Group and Conventions
department in the Food and Beverage Divi-
sion and the reservations department. Six of
the jobs are from Atlantis, four from Ocean
Club and another four from the company’s
Group and Conventions department in Fort

increased.

despite the poor economy and its affect on
most businesses, its flow of customers has

Devard Williams, speaking on behalf of
the 19-year-old company, yesterday revealed
that on top of anew “Bamboo Stew Shack”
soon to open on Nassau Street, the restau-
rant chain plans to open three more loca-
tions within the next year.

Teacher taken off active duty

FROM page one

she is confident that the
excellent administrative
team at CC Sweeting Senior
High will have enacted all
of the protocols that the
ministry has in place for sit-
uations such as this.

On Thursday evening last
week, the male teacher was
alleged to have drugged and
later performed oral sex on
a male student who attends
the senior high institution.

The student reportedly
complained to another
teacher about the matter,
which caused the school to
contact the police, resulting
in the teacher’s arrest.

While his name has been
withheld there are reports
that he could be charged in
court sometime this week.

Police Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson con-
firmed that officers at the
Central Detective Unit are
investigating the matter.

However he said that the
file has yet to reach his desk,
which normally indicates
that the investigators have
yet to complete their work.

Originally it was alleged
that the incident had

involved a teacher at CC
Sweeting Junior High.

However The Tribune was
able to confirm yesterday
that it had in-fact involved a
teacher from the senior high
school, and not the junior,
which actually has been
renamed TA Thompson
Junior High.

This confusion, the prin-
cipal at TA Thompson said,
forced him to meet with
teachers and parents yester-
day morning to assure them
that the matter did not
involve any of the staff at
his institution.

“My teachers first got
wind of it through your
newspaper,” Mr Franklyn
Lightbourne said, “and they
then directed me to the arti-
cle.

“They said they wanted
to find out if it was true.
But I only confirmed and
told my teachers that it was
not TA Thompson,” he
said.

As with attempts Sunday
to reach Education Minis-
ter Carl Bethel for com-
ment on the matter, all
efforts yesterday proved
fruitless.

Second man accused of
businessman’s murder

FROM page one

hospital.

Seide Jr, was arrested by police on Friday, August 28, some-
time around 6.15pm in the downtown area.

Coderold Keil Wallace, aka Coderold Miller, was charged on
August 24 in relation to the armed robbery and murder of
Maycock. He also appeared before Magistrate Debbye Fer-

guson.

Wallace was represented by K Brian Hanna.
Both Wallace and Seide Jr, denied bail, were remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison in New Providence until a preliminary

inquiry on February 10, 2010.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009, PAGE 7



Famous author
marks 100th
Bahamas visit

AUTHOR AND PUBLIC SPEAKER Dr N Cindy Trimm with Minis-

ter of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace.

BEST-SELLING author Dr N Cindy Trimm
made a courtesy call on Minister of Tourism and
Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace during her
100th visit to the country recently.

Dr Trimm, author of such books as ‘The Rules of
Engagement’ and ‘Commanding Your Morning’,
has been visiting the Bahamas for more than five
years. On her most recent visit, she conducted a
two-day conference at Trinity City of Praise with
host pastor Apostle Lee Watson.

In addition to her books, Dr Trimm is known for
being featured on many television programmes,
radio shows and internet broadcasts.

Open bid process for revitalisation
project of downtown Freeport

A FIRST occurred in
Grand Bahama Port
Authority history as execu-
tives hosted an “open bid
process” meeting for the
construction of the new
Grand Bahama Arts and
Craft Centre in July.

As a part of GBPA’s
modus operandi, a second
open bid process meeting
was held last week.

This time, it was for down-
town turnaround’s land-
scape and irrigation phase
one of the revitalisation
campaign.

Five landscapers publicly
presented their bids for the
revamp landscape and irri-
gation proposal which
encompasses 37 acres of the
designated downtown area.
President of the GBPA Ian
Rolle said: “Today’s proce-
dures, where business own-
ers have an opportunity to
publicly announce their bid
for a proposed GBPA pro-
ject, is right in line with our
“making it happen’ initia-
tives.”

Proposals

The GBPA is now in the
process of investigating pro-
posals submitted, as the ten-
der that is chosen will not be
solely based on financial
submissions.

“Tt is the intent of the
Grand Bahama Port
Authority to take the
approach where most
licensees who are qualified
to engage in the particular
works would have the
opportunity to do so on all
appropriate projects.

“This event is the continu-
ation of the new era of
transparency in project deal-
ings and GBPA’s open bid
process is now a permanent
part of the way that GBPA
conducts business,” the com-
pany said in a statement.





THREE-DAY CYBER CRIME CONFERENCE

Battling computer
and financial crime



UNITED STATES Embassy Chargé d’Affaires Timothy Zuniga-Brown is flanked by the cyber crime workshop facilitators and participants.

the conference was sponsored by the US Department of Defence in cooperation with US Southern Command.

Cyber security measures
seen as vital to Bahamas

IT is vital to the Bahamas’ economic
prosperity and national security to
ensure the necessary cyber security
measures are in place so that the coun-
try can ward off potential computer
and financial crimes.

This was one of the determinations
made following a three-day cyber crime
conference sponsored by the US
Department of Defence in cooperation
with US Southern Command.

US Embassy Chargé d’Affaires Tim-
othy Zuniga-Brown giving remarks at
the workshop’s closing ceremony on
Friday said that cyber threats are “one
of the most serious economic and
national security challenges we face
today.”

“For this reason, it was of the utmost
importance to hold this conference now
and work to address these issues,” he
said.

around’s landscape and irrigation project phase one on Friday at GBPA Headquarters.



PICTURED (front row from left to right): DUDLEY Francis, Sr, building inspector of building and
development services for GBPA; Nakira Wilchcombe, environmental manager for GBPA; Arthur Jones,
vice-president of building and development services for GBPA; Andrea Grant, planning compliance
official for GBPA;
(back row from left to right): Charles Pratt, commercial manager for GBPA; Rico Cargill, environmen-
tal manager for GBPA; Olethea Gardiner, environmental inspector for GBPA and Allison Campbell,
deputy director of building and development services.

The conference, held at the Sheraton
Cable Beach Hotel from August 25-
27, included 25 participants from the
Royal Bahamas Defence Force, the
Royal Bahamas Police Force, the
National Emergency Management
Agency, Department of Social Services,
BTC and the Water and Sewerage Cor-
poration.

Participants shared ideas and dis-
cussed security measures at the con-
ference, which was designed for offi-
cials with responsibility for protecting
and enhancing computer and intranet

security.

The participants also discussed the
potential for computer crimes, financial
crimes and various computer-related
issues. The facilitators and presenters
for the course included members from
the Rhode Island National Guard.

The conference was brought about
by the Rhode Island State Partnership
Programme and the Traditional Com-
mander’s Activities Programme — two
initiatives that highlight the close and
enduring relationship between the
Bahamas and the US.

Butler’s Funeral Homes



& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.

P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

Memorial Service for

Mrs. Susan
Ann
twright,

63

of Lakeview
Road, will be
held on
Wednesday,

September 02, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. at St.
Matthew’s Anglican Episcopal Church,
East Shirley and Church Streets.



Moultrie.



Officiating will be Rev. Dr. James B.

She is survived by her husband Jan,
two daughters; Sian Cleare-Cartwright
and Amyee Kerr, one son; Alexander
Hugh Cartwright, her mother; Mary
Gloyn of Portcall, South Wales, two
grand children; Morgan and Teagan
Kerr and other relatives and friends.

In lieu of flowers the family has
requested that donations be made to

the Kidney Foundation. P. O. Box N-
$202, Nassau Bahamas.



Funeral arrangements are being
handled by Butlers’ Funeral Homes
and Crematorium Ernest and York
Streets.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009
The Zonta Club of

Nassau welcomes
fashion entrepreneur



AT its recent meeting, the
Zonta Club of Nassau wel-
comed Tryrina Neely, owner
and operator of Primadona, a
virtual fashion network, who
made a short presentation on
her business.

She said that Primadona is a
unique woman-led business,
one that explores fashion
designs, trends, taste, and status.

Often referred to as the new
fashion shopping and network-
ing concept for women of influ-
ence, it features monthly
designer high-end shows at
upscale venues such as Villa-
gio.

Women can shop for upscale
items at prices 30 to 60 per cent

gourmet taste of style, personal
fashion mapping consultations,
interactions on trends, and
learning from industry experts
all within five to six hours of
non-stop entertainment and
action.

The Primadona Anniversary
Soiree and Humanitarian
Award presentation, which
recognised programmes that
create economic change and
business networking support
for young professionals, took
place on Saturday, at Paradise
Island.

This year the Humanitarian
Small Business Leadership
Award was presented to
Desmond Bannister, Minister

off. These shows provide a of Youth Sports and Culture.



FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED

Chairman's review of the anaudited results
For the nine months ended July 31, 200%

We wish tw report that the Bank incurred a net profit of $3,350-968 for the three month period ended
July 31, 2009 and a net profit of $3,050,641 for the nine month period then ended, When compared to
the comesponding periods Last year, the peofit represents a decrease of $2,069,347 and $8,523,327 for
the three and nine month periods, respectively. The company's financial performance for these 3
months 18 an improvement over the performance in the first two quarters of this fiscal year und can be
attributed io a more disciplined focus on delinquency management, a3 well as effective cost
management.

The Bank continues to experience good mortgage growth and the demand for mortgages remains
relatively strong. However, adverse economic conditions arc expected to continue for the balance af
this fiscal year and non-accrual loans are expected to remain high, impacting the Bank's loan loss
provision,

The Bank's risk profile continues to remain within its risk appetite and the Bank's capital ratios,
which are better than the regulatory requirement, rank among the highest in the industry.

An Interim dividend 0.13¢ per share was declared for the quarter ended July 31, 2009 and payable on
15 September, 2009 to all shareholders of record as of 8!" September, 2009.

[Aarne 7

Managing) Director |

FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET (Unaudited)

Aa of July 31, 200% and October $1, 208

(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

July 31, 200 October 31, T008
Cash
Statutory repens account wrh
The Central Bank of The Bahamas
tovestenta
Loans - Met
Fited assets - Het
Osher assets
TOTAL
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS EQUITY
LIABILITIES
Deposits
Drdends Payable (Mote 7)
Other babiknes
Total batnbhes
SHAREHOLDERS EQUITY
Share capatal
Share premom
General reserve
Retemed sarrenpe
Total shareholders’ equety
TOTAL

53,497,453 23,028,462
42455, 46
42,050,094

ATE TS

2,515,056
14la 53s

70,989,559

31,874,902
45,370,098
697,078,638
ATT LS2
491,296

800,627,245

155,954,070 Od0,510,132
26,700,000
L7T5,434

FOS, 185,616

2,347,585
786,297,761

5,333,334
2od2 258

$00,000

TS, 7LSBO
$4,092,272
70,389,533

5,331,334
2552,238

500,000
43,050,040
91,441,032
800,527,048

THE TRIBUNE



BO aa Cm OO ae

IN TIME for the start of the new school
year, Dennis Nairn, president of Power Design
Engineering Consultants (PDEC), presented
10 Dell desktop computers to the Abaco Dis-
trict Education Office for distribution to Aba-
co schools.

Accepting the computers, Lenora Black,
school superintendent, said that students from
the 14 government schools on the island

PICTURED FOLLOWING her presentation are, from left: Joanna Bowe, treasurer of the Zonta Club of Nassau; Tryrina Neely; Patricia Fran-
cis, president of the Zonta Club of Nassau, and Janet Johnson, president-elect of the Zonta Club of Nassau.

USOT GURU

achieved grades higher than the national aver-
age in the BJC and BGCSE examinations. Mr
Nairn, noting that his firm has built up strong
ties with Abaco over the past year, said it was
an easy and pleasurable decision to make a
contribution to the future of the islands. The
Nassau-based electrical firm has been engaged
at the Baker’s Bay Development at Guana
Cay in the Abacos for over a year.

PICTURED AT THE PRESENTATION, left to right are Tim Sands, PTA president at Cherokee Primary;
Ruth Smith, office manager, DOE; Dennis Nairn, president of PDEC; Lenora Black, superintendent,

Abaco Schools; Vanessa James, principal, Abaco Cen

tral High School; Sandy Edwards, education offi-

cer, DOE and Leslie Rolle, senior education officer, DOE.

FINANCE CORPORATION (FF PAH AMAS LIMITED
OONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INOOME (Unmanned)
Sime Mooths Exceed July 2, orb

(Expressed in Hahgenicn deliars)

Three fl onthe
Fivdeed
July 41. 200
[RCOME
Het peered micore i
Prowugon dor ood eee
Het ire. afer provision for credit keases
Feege mind ¢ Dias Se
Tal come
OM INTEREST EXPENSES
Terie sce-rtarart axpacane 3912558

MET IROORLE 5 3,350 048

TH33m
(hema)
5 or aay
Sts

dai san

FISAMCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
OOSSOLIDATED STATEMEST OF CHANGES IN EQ
Ming Miaaths Ended Jaly 31, De

(Expressed in Bahamian dolkirs)

Share

Capital Premium Reserve

Balance at October 31, 2007
Het prokt for the penod
Dovadends

Balance at Juby 31, 2008

$5,337 3h

$5,337.35

Balance at October 31, 2008
Met profit for the penod
Davadends

Balance at Jhaly 21, 209

$5,331 5H

$5, 3933

FISASCE CORPORATION OF RAHAMAS LIM

Thre Mancha
Ended
Joly M1, Share

Mine Micha
F inten dt
Joly 41, Soe

5 7L4en |
Tans

39

TH tH

Baad bs

M31
(L0e12357)
2708
LM 50)
bishisn

Z1,224511
(hiTs ny
Tea se
ES2LGST
as

2310 Levarr?

3241515 f
5 54m 15 5 30801 4.1 a 11573 Sat

FTW (Ul npucliteed)

Share Ganeral Retained
Earnings
2442243 = =6500,000 94,800,153 92,184,445
1L573,908 LL574,908
LLF35,994)) C1 L.799,994)

81,540,787 92,026,379

> En
2,552,753

500,000

7 ff} he
oy ey oP

500,000 63,054,040
3,030,041
(10,400,001)

75, 70d, 690

IL#4L692
9,050,054 |
(10,400,001)

2,552,785 44,092,772

$00,000

TED

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLAWS (Unaudited)

Sine Vlonths Eeded July 31, 2008
(Expressed in Bahamian cinilars)

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Net eect
Adqustments bar
Depreciation
Provision for credit losses
Lows on dusposal of fxed assets

Changes in operating assets and babobtes

Increase in ines and advances, net
increas: in depots
Net cash rem operating actethies
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Purchase of fred assets
Hat (Parckase) Procesde of mverinenis
Het cash fem iovestmg achyies
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITY
Dowdends pod

NET INCREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, BEGINNING OF THE PERM

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, EXD OF THE PERIOD i

July 31, 2008 July 31, 2008

4050, 641 11,375,588

a7, S0T
LLda17,932
46,200
15.157, 900

4LL a5
STS SLE
Ha2
15,250,153

(77341280)

(37,415,064)

10444,544
13,348,059

(2,253,103)

(57,957,145)
54881479
11,851,185

(24,3510
2 FaT 24
2507, 854

(173,475)

62902
(LOADS OL) (6,633,734)
5.453,791

TO2E A482
33487453

5,843,751
V7.337 2
23,154,433

FISASCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED
Aotes to Unedited Interim Consolidated Financial Statements

Nine Months Ended July 31, 2000

1, ACCOUNTING POLICIES

These intcnim condensed financial statements have been peepared im oceondance with

Intemational Accounting Standard 34 Interim

1 Financrl Reporting. The accounting policies

used in the prepamition of these interim financial statements are consisbent with those used in

the audited financial statements for the year ct

DMNIDEN DS PAYABLE

In June 2009, dividends totaling $34.7 mi

ded Chetober 31, 2008.

Ilion, which were awing to FINCO's parent

company were pul. The parent company has placed the total ofthis payment on deposit with

FINCO.



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TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009, PAGE 9



FOOTBALL: EXTRA TIME

AUC ILIR
GTR URI
AC Milan slumps

AP Photo/Sang Tan

CHELSEA'S MANAGER Carlo Ancelotti reacts during their
English Premier League soccer match against Burnley at
Stamford Bridge, London, Saturday, Aug. 29, 2009.

ROBERT MILLWARD,
AP Soccer Writer
LONDON

| looks like Carlo Ancelotti broke from AC Milan at the
right time.

A few weeks into his first season in English soccer, Chelsea
is perfect in the Premier League with four wins in four games.
He already has won a trophy at Wembley and has the Blues fans
believing the league title is coming back to Stamford Bridge
after three years at Manchester United's Old Trafford.

Ancelotti has devised a tactical system the players appear to
like and has two of the game's biggest egos — strikers Didier
Drogba and Nicolas Anelka — playing in harmony.

After Chelsea's 3-0 victory over Burnley, Ancelotti sur-
prised an interviewer by saying he wouldn't be watching on TV
when Milan faced Inter later in the day. Maybe he knew that
Milan, with whom he won the European Cup as a player and
coach, would be on the wrong end of a 4-0 drubbing.

Ancelotti's most recent triumphs with AC Milan were as
recent as the 2007 Champions League followed by the Euro-
pean Super Cup although the team's last Serie A triumph was
three seasons before that. He was criticized for hanging on to
aging players for too long, and Milan finished well behind
Inter in the title race in his final three seasons at the club.

Now in the unfamiliar surroundings of English soccer,
Ancelotti is out to help Chelsea regain the Premier League title
and maybe capture its first Champions League crown.

Chelsea leads the league on goal difference over Totten-
ham. Its play has delighted Ancelotti, whose team also won a
penalty-kick shootout over United after a 2-2 draw in the
Community Shield at Wembley.

"We have to maintain this situation and now the play
improves with improved confidence," he said.

Asked whether his team could win the league title, he replied:
"We started well but we know the season is very long. It will be
difficult for sure this season but we have the possibility to step
up.

Seer week we work to play well and for a coach it is
important to see that the players play well. The most important
thing for me is that we are on the right way, to train and to
work.”

In the league, Chelsea has so far faced four clubs who are
likely to finish well below them in the standings — Hull, Sun-
derland, Fulham and Burnley. The first real test will come
against Tottenham on Sept. 20 and against Liverpool, Man
United, Arsenal and Manchester City in the following months.

But Ancelotti, the fifth man to lead Chelsea in two years, is
relying on the stars who flopped in the league last season,
rather than importing some of his big names from Milan.

As well as getting the best out of Drogba and Anelka, he has
revived the form of Portuguese midfielder Deco, who was a big
disappointment last season under Luiz Felipe Scolari and Guus
Hiddink. Ancelotti has even ended Andriy Shevchenko's trou-
bled spell at Stamford Bridge.

One of Milan's greatest goal scorers during Ancelotti's reign
at San Siro, Shevchenko moved to Chelsea in 2006 but failed to
make an impact. He was sent back on loan to Milan last season.
Even Ancelotti, however, made little use of the Ukraine strik-
er, who is returning to his original club, Dynamo Kiev.

Ancelotti explained that he would not be able to give
Shevchenko many starts at Chelsea. While it might appear
that the coach has turned his back on a player who helped
him capture some big titles, Ancelotti has no room for senti-
ment.

Shevchenko, like AC Milan, is Ancelotti's past. Chelsea is his
present and future.

AP Photo/Akira Suemori

CHELSEA'S John Terry, centre left, and oat eee centre
right, lift the trophy after winning the English FA Community
Shield soccer match against Manchester United at Wembley
Stadium in London, Sunday, Aug. 9, 2009.





SPORTS

For the second tournament

ANOTHER FLINCH



DOUG FERGUSON,
AP Golf Writer
JERSEY CITY, N.J.

Mi to his chagrin,
Tiger Woods has

put some suspense back into
golf.

Give him the lead going
into the final round of the
major, and victory is no
longer as certain as death,
taxes and Woods wearing a
red shirt on Sunday. Watch
him hit a clutch shot to the
18th green, and there is no
guarantee he'll make the putt.

Y.E. Yang delivered a
shocker two weeks ago at the
PGA Championship when he
became the first player to
beat golf's best closer, rallying
from two shots behind Woods
for a three-shot victory at
Hazeltine.

Woods rarely looked so
human. And then on Sunday
at Liberty National, he bled a
little more.

He was on the cusp of con-
tention for most of the final
round at The Barclays until
the bell rang for the final lap.
Then, Woods made a 10-foot
birdie on the 14th to move
closer to the lead, a 15-foot
par putt on the next hole to
stay there, and a deft chip-
and-run to 3 feet for birdie
on the 16th that pulled him
within one shot.

Needing a birdie on the
final hole to post the club-
house lead — at least force a
playoff, maybe enough win
— he drilled a 6-iron from
189 yards to the back pin at
the 18th and listened to those
familiar roars as the ball set-
tled 7 feet from the cup.

Heath Slocum and Steve
Stricker, tied for the lead,
were on the 18th tee as
Woods stood over his birdie
putt. Even from 467 yards
away, it was not difficult to
figure out what was going on.
If the cheers weren't enough,
that red shirt is hard to miss.

"Usually he makes it,”
Slocum said. "Ho-hum for
him."

Surprise!

The ball slid by on the left
side of the cup, and they
could hear the groans —
twice. Because the large video
boards and TVs in corporate
chalets had about a 10-sec-
ond delay, the big news
reached some people later
than others. "It's kind of fun-
ny, actually,” Slocum said,
referring to the double dose
of reaction. "But I knew that
he had missed it."

That wasn't the case for
Slocum. Despite hitting a fair-
way bunker, playing short of
the green and hitting a wedge
to 20 feet, he rolled in the
best par putt of his life for a
one-shot victory. Stricker had
a chance to tie, but missed
from 10 feet.

"T guess you can't make
‘em all," Slocum said.

Yang was the first to see
for himself when he took
down the biggest name in
golf. Slocum beat a bunch of
‘| stars. The group one shot
| behind featured Woods,
Stricker, Ernie Els and
Padraig Harrington, who
have combined to win 20
majors. All of them have
been at least No. 3 in the
world at some point.

The common thread in
both tournaments was












Woods having a chance to
win, and Woods finishing sec-
ond.

"That's the way it goes
sometimes," he said.

Along with his 81 victories
worldwide, he has finished
second 32 times in tourna-
ments recognized by the
world golf rankings.

Even so, this was only the
fifth time in his career that
Woods has finished runner-
up in consecutive tourna-
ments. The last time it hap-
pened was at the end of his
2006 season, when he was
second to Yang at the HSBC
Champions in Shanghai, then
surrendered a lead on the
back nine to Harrington and
lost to him in a playoff at the
Dunlop Phoenix in Japan.

Go back to 2005 to find the
last time it happened in
America. Woods was runner-
up to Michael Campbell in
the U.S. Open, then tied for
second at the Western Open
in Chicago. Unlike the other
four occasions, Woods had a
realistic chance of winning
both times as he stood on the
18th tee. And the reason fail-
ure stands out so much is that
it rarely happened before.

No other greens confound-
ed Woods quite like the ones
at Liberty National. It was
only fitting that he missed a 7-
foot putt at the end because
he had done that all week.
On his first hole of the tour-
nament, Woods hit a pure 5-
iron to 10 feet behind the
hole at No. 10 and looked
perplexed when it broke
away from the cup.

Even as he tried to make a
move Saturday, his 67 was
slowed by missing an 8-foot
eagle putt at No. 6 that
stunned even one his playing
partners, Zach Johnson. He
missed from 5 feet later in the
third round on No. 15 and
was spewing expletives all the
way to the next tee.

"It happens,” Woods said
Sunday. "Not too many golf
courses that you misread
putts that badly. This golf
course is one."

Another course he men-
tioned was Fancourt in South
Africa for the Presidents Cup
in 2003. But that's where
Woods made a putt he called
one of the most nerve-racking
of his career. He was on the
third playoff hole against Els,
in near darkness, facing a 15-
foot par putt that broke both
ways, right up the ridge, then
left as it moved down toward
the hole.

The most famous putt was
his 6-foot birdie on the 72nd
hole of the 2000 PGA Cham-
pionship which he made to
force a playoff that he won
against Bob May on his way
to four consecutive majors.

This year, Woods won his
first PGA Tour event since
returning from reconstructive
knee surgery by making a 15-
foot birdie putt on the final
hole at Bay Hill. It was the
same green where he made a
25-foot birdie putt a year ear-
lier to win by one shot, where
he made a 15-footer to beat
Phil Mickelson in 2001.

The list is long. It will take
more than two tournaments
to put a dent in Woods’ mys-
tique. Besides, his loss is golf's
gain, for it now puts some
doubt into the outcome — if
not in Woods' head, then the
people watching, and even
those trying to beat him.










































TIGER WOODS
looks on as Zach
Johnson (not pic-
tured) putts on
the 14th hole
during the final
round of The Bar-
clays golf tourna-
ment, Sunday,
Aug. 30, 2009, at
Liberty National
Golf Club in Jer-
sey City, N.J.



























































































(APhoto/
Rich Schultz)



It happens.
Not too many
golf courses
that you mis-
read putts that
badly. This golf
course is One.

(AP Photo/Rich Schultz)
TIGER WOODS tees off on the 15th hole during the final round of The Barclays golf tournament, Sunday, Aug. 30, 2009, at Liberty National
Golf Club in Jersey City, N.J.

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Football AIBA WORLD BOXING CHAMPIONSHIPS: MILAN, ITALY

Woes

FROM page 11

determined the Chiefs
already thin receiver corps
took a major blow.

During his two day clinic
here in New Providence
Darling expressed his high
expectations for the upcom-
ing Season.

Goal

“T expect to have a big
year, my ultimate goal is a
1,000 yard season, a Pro-
Bowl invite and to get my
team a championship,” he
said.

Darling could not be
reached for comment on the
injury, up to press time.

In three-preseason game
thus far he has recorded
three catches for 19 yards,
the longest an 11-yard grab
against the Vikings, August
21st.

your
news

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Carl Hield, Valentino
prepare for Italian job

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

CARL Hield, making his
third consecutive appearance,
will be the first of the two
Bahamians to see action at
the AIBA World Boxing
Championships in Milan,
Italy.

The championships, now
into its XV edition with more
than 700 competitors from
143 countries participating,
will take place at the Medi-
olanum Forum that has a
seating capacity of 11,500.

The stadium hosts the
biggest Indoor Multisport
Arena in Italy, is equipped
for swimming, ice skating, fit-
ness, dance, squash, archery,
bowling, 2-a-side soccer and
martial arts.

Hield, preparing to begin
competition on the first of the
nine days of competition, is
expected to have his hands
full as he has been drawn to
compete against a hometown
competitor in the 569 kilo-
gram class.

“All the training and stuff
was good.

“Everything has gone in
order. I’m just resting and
waiting for tomorrow
(today),” said Hield, in an
interview with The Tribune
yesterday at their hotel.

“[’m just going in there to
upset them because I know
they are coming in with their
plan to win.

“But ?m going to upset
them tomorrow. I know it’s
not going to be an easy fight,
but he just have to show me
that he want it more than me
and I want it more.”

While coach Andre Sey-

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Hield is preparing to compete on the first of the nine days of competition.

mour attended the opening
ceremonies with Valentino
Knowles, the other boxer on
the team, Hield remained at
the hotel resting.

Knowles is not expected to
compete until Wednesday.

For Hield, as long as he go
into the ring and execute the
way he was taught, he said
he’s confident that he can win
today.

Prior to going to Milan, the
Bahamian team spent about
three weeks in Rome in a
training camp, which accord-

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ing to Hield was quite benefi-
cial.

“The training camp was
nice. It gave me the opportu-
nity to meet different people
from different countries,” he
pointed out.

“T got to meet a lot of peo-
ple, especially some of the
people who I will meet in my
weight class. So it was great.”

Not having the chance to
see the Mediolanum Forum
as he didn’t attend the open-
ing ceremonies, Hield said he
heard that it was a fantastic

BRITISH GRAND PRIX

arena and he’s just eager to
go there today and compete.

“The gym we trained at was
very nice. They had every-
thing there,” he said.

“And they told us that the
gym we will be competing in
is much better than that, so I
know it should be good.

“But I just want to start
competing.”

With this being his third
appearance in the biannual
championships and not
advancing out of the first
round, Hield said he’s con-



vinced that his experience will
pull him through this time
around.

“This is my third one, so I
have the experience of what
to do and how to deal with
the matter, So I’m just going
to go out there and do what I
have to do,” he insisted.

Hield, who was trying to
enjoy a movie in Italian, said
Knowles is just as pumped up
as he is and is ready to start
competition when he get into
the ring on Wednesday.

But Hield said his goal is
to go out there and start the
pace for the Bahamas today.

Wellington Miller, the pres-
ident of the Amateur Boxing
Association of the Bahamas,
said the expectations is burst-
ing through the seams for the
two boxers.

“They are in good shape,
their spirits are high and they
are ready to roll,” Miller said.
“They’ve been training in
Cuba for a while and then
they went to Italy where they
had a good training camp for
the last three weeks.

“T understood that they had
some very good sparring with
the boxers over there.

“So I expect them to do
very well. Talking with the
coach, they are in excellent
shape and their spirits are
high. So they should do very
well. I expect a world cham-
pion to come back home.”

Miller said this was defi-
nitely the best position that
the Bahamas has ever been
in, having been afforded the
scholarship by AIBA to
attend the training camp.

He assured the public that
the boxers will certainly show
their appreciation by their
performances.

Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie and
Chandra Sturrup continue to impress



SHAMAR SANDS (centre) competing in this file photo. He is now in Britain.

FROM page 11

13.91, almost a week after he got second in
his first post-World’s meet in Tallinn on
August 25 when he ran 13.50 behind Amer-
ican David Oliver’s winning time of 13.46.
While some of the Bahamians were com-
peting in Gateshead, some of the Jamaicans
were attending the Zagreb 2009 in Croatia

yesterday as well.

Today, the next meet on the internation-
al schedule is in Rovereto, Italy, but it’s not
known if any of the Bahamian athletes will

be competing.

However, a number of Bahamians are
expected to line up to compete in the sixth
and final IAAF Golden League meeting at
the Memorial Van Damme in Bruxelles,

Belgium on Friday.

Two days later, it’s the Rieti 2009 Grand
Prix in Rieti, Italy on Sunday.

Reminiscent to the World’s, the top
ranked athletes will all head to Thessaloni-
ki, Greece for the IAAF/VTB Bank World
Athletics Final from September 12-13.

At this point, Sturrup and Ferguson-
McKenzie are both eligible for the 100; Fer-
guson-McKenzie in the 200; Chris ‘Fireman’
Brown in the men’s 400; Leevan ‘Super-
man’ Sands in the men’s triple jump and
Donald Thomas in the men’s high jump.

CHANDRA STURRUP in action in a file photo.



The top eight athletes on the track and the
top 12 on the field will qualify to compete in
the World Athletics Final.

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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Lessons from Mexico for next wave of swine flu

By MARTHA MENDOZA
Associated Press Writer

MEXICO CITY (AP) —
Mexico is preparing for a sec-
ond wave of swine flu, looking
at what worked and what did-
mt last spring when it banned
everything from dining out to
attending school in an effort
to control the virus.

As the Northern Hemi-

miss UNIVERSE

sphere flu season begins, the
rest of the world is also study-
ing Mexico’s experience,
looking for measures to repli-
cate and costly mistakes to
avoid.

So what worked? Public
awareness; rapid diagnosis,
treatment and quarantine;
and a near-compulsive out-
break of hand-washing.

What didn’t? Travel bans,

school closures, overuse of
antibiotics and those flimsy
paper face masks that tangled
hair, slid down necks and hid
the beautiful smiles of this
gargantuan city.

When swine flu first flared
up in Mexico in April, the
government erred on the side
of caution, closing schools and
museums, banning public
gatherings, playing soccer

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games to empty stadiums and
telling people not to shake
hands or kiss one another on
the cheek. This bustling city of
18 million became eerily hol-
low.

Mexican health officials say
they made the right call.

“Since we were the first
country affected by the flu,
we didn’t know the possible
magnitude and severity, so we
took measures that we now
know can be (focused),” said
Dr. Pablo Kuri, the health
secretary’s special influenza
adviser.

In hindsight, Mexico’s most
effective action — one now
emulated around the world
— was immediately telling its
own citizens when the new
virus was detected.

Not every country has been
so candid when facing an epi-
demic: China was heavily crit-
icized for its slow response to
SARS in 2003, while Argenti-
na refused to declare a nation-
al public health emergency
when swine flu flared there
in July.

But Mexico’s openness did-
n’t come cheap: Economists
say the outbreak cost the
country billions of dollars,
mostly in losses from tourism.

“Mexico shared informa-
tion early and frequently,”
said Dr. Jon Andrus at the
Pan American Health Orga-
nization’s headquarters in
Washington. “Mexico did this
at great cost to its economy,
but it was the right thing to
do.”

At the height of the epi-
demic in March, you could
hardly make it a block in
Mexico City without a
masked public health work-
er, maitre d’, bus driver or
store owner squeezing a dol-
lop of antiseptic gel onto your
hands.

Health experts say hand-
washing offered the best
defense — while the masks
probably did little to stop the
virus from spreading. Masks
are now advised only for
health care workers and peo-
ple who are already infected.

Fear also left behind a



A SCHOOL OFFICIAL holds a bottle of antibacterial gel during a
screening of students at the entrance to school in Mexico City...
(AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

cleaner city: Crews now regu-
larly scrub subways and buses,
park benches and offices —
something almost unheard of
before the epidemic.

“Clearly, millions of Mexi-
canos wore masks this spring
everywhere they went, but
HIN1 continued to spread,”
said Laurie Garrett, a senior
fellow at the New York-based
Council on Foreign Relations.
“Tt now seems clear that the
best personal protections are
regular hand-washing, avoid-
ing crowded places, and —
when it is available — vacci-
nation.”

Many Mexicans wait until
they suffer full-blown symp-
toms before going to a doc-
tor, if at all. Often, people
self-diagnose and go to a
pharmacy to treat themselves
since few drugs require a pre-
scription. Since April, how-
ever, certain anti-flu drugs are
distributed only at hospitals.

Millions of uniformed Mex-
ican children were greeted
with a dash of anti-bacterial
gel as they returned to school
last Monday.

Classes were postponed
until mid-September in south-
ern Chiapas state because of
an uptick in swine flu cases in
the past month.

Chiapas has had 3,400
swine flu cases to date, the
most in the country.

Schools nationwide are

checking for possible signs of
swine flu among children and
teachers and are sending
home anyone who seems sick.
They also have added new
curriculum guidelines to
ensure children learn about
personal hygiene and basic
sanitation.

But this time, schools will
be closed only if so many sick
children or teachers get sick
that education is compro-
mised. Plans are already
under way to continue lessons
at home.

“We aren’t going to panic,
but we are being more careful
here this year,” said Cecilia
McGregor, spokeswoman for
Colegio Ciudad de Mexico,
an 1,100-student private
school in Mexico City.

Janitors are required to
wash doorknobs every two
hours, she said, and an on-
campus doctor was perform-
ing checks.

Despite all the precautions,
Mexico’s health advisers say
the most important lesson
they have learned about swine
flu is that in most cases, it’s
fairly mild.

Swine flu caused 164 deaths
in three months in Mexico,
where tobacco-related ill-
nesses kill that number every
day.

“So now we can put into
context what actually hap-
pened,” Kuri said.

e1sha Wemyss

VP WemCo Security

eisha Wemyss,

the 34 year old

daughter of
former Inspector of
Police and now
President & CEO of
WemCo Security Mr.
Henry and Mrs. Judy
Wemyss graduated
Magna Cum Laude and
a member of the Sigma
Beta Delta Honours
Society at DeVry
University on 18 July
in Miramar, Florida.

Ms. Wemyss received a
Bachelor of Science in

Business Administration

Accounting Concentration.

“Tam proud of my
accomplishments. I am
grateful to my parents and
to the company to afford
me this opportunity. I hope
that my eventual full return
to WemCo will strengthen
the company’s manage-
ment Structure as we con-
tinue to serve the Bahamian
public as the best security
company in the country bar
none”- Keisha Wemyss

Ms. Wemyss, who is the Vice President for
Finance and Security for WemCo, took a
leave of absence to further her studies. She

“T believe that it is important for our
company and our family to ensure that the

completed two years of requirements in a

year, and while enrolled she was a Deanis
List student through the entire time at Devry
University. She was chosen Graduate speaker
representing both Undergraduates at DeVry
University and Keller Graduate School
of Management for graduation this year.

While pursuing her studies, she was also
actively communicating and involved in the

Keisha is

next generation of leadership is strong.
I congratulate Keisha on this wonderful
accomplishment.”

currently continuing — her
studies in the fall at Keller Graduate
School of Management where she is
reading for a double Masters Degree in
Finance and Accounting preparing to take
the Certified Public Accountant’s exam

over the next year. She will also start her

day to day running of her portfolio at

WemCo Security. “It was like she never left
her chair”, said Mr. Wemyss.

studies in the field of ‘Project Management
Mix’, which is also offered at Keller.

Ms. Wemyss is an award winning former

officer of the Royal Bahamas Defence

Force.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM








ZHIVARGO LAING

Reform
proposals
plan to
‘optimally
serve’
businesses

* Government planning to
rationalise all business
support services, and
have proposals in hand
by beginning of 2010,
with current structure
failing to meet
requirements

* Chamber chief calls for
consolidation into SBA-
type body, and better

co-ordination

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government is assess-
ing proposals for the “ratio-
nalisation” of all its agencies
and programmes that support
Bahamian small and medium-
sized businesses in a bid to
“optimally serve” this sector,

SEE page 4B

Buyer pledges to honour
Morton union agreement

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE European salt pro-
ducer set to acquire Morton
Salt’s Inagua facility has
pledged to honour the exist-
ing terms and conditions in
the industrial agreement with
the union representing the
majority of the company’s line
workers, Tribune Business
was told yesterday, something

FOR SALE BY SEALED BID

SANDYPORT #4746 Newly built 2,175 sq, ft. 3 bed 3.5 bath family home, private
dock and white sandy canal-beach. Landscaped and attractively finished with granite
counter-tops. Large open living/dining room offers great canal views and is the per-
fect space for entertaining. The master suite features a spacious balcony, walk in closet
and ensuite master bath. Closing date for sealed bids: September 30, 2009.
For viewing & bid package, contact Lana Rademaker
Lana.Rademaker@SothebysRealty.com c 242.457.0406

Damianos

Member of
SIRbahamas.com | t 242.322.2305 | £242322.2033 | the Bohamas MLS

THE TRIBUNE

u



y

TUESDAY,



its

SEPTEMBER 1,



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

ROYAL SFIDELITY

Ce eli 4

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NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com



Disney starts $25m
island expansion

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunebusiness.net

isney has begun the
$25 million develop-
ment of its Bahamian
private island, Cast-
away Cay, the perma-
nent secretary in the Office of the
Prime Minister confirmed yesterday.

David Davis told Tribune Business
that government concessions for the
project under the Family Island Devel-
opment Encouragement Act and
Hotels Encouragement Act have
allowed Disney to cut $3.4 million
from the total cost of the expansion,
now pegged at $24.2 million.

The entertainment giant also has
plans to launch a new cruise ship by
2011, with a Bahamas itinerary and
capacity for 4,000 passengers.

Disney Cruise Lines’ spokesman,
Jason Lasecki, told Tribune Business
yesterday that work on the expansion
of Castaway Cay has commenced with
an expected completion scheduled for
summer 2010.

Back-to-scholl Credit squeeze tightens
sales stay flat fo business, consumers

Price-conscious consumer
target cheaper items

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunebusiness.net

Investment incentives slash costs by $3.4m



According to Mr Lasecki, the idea
to expand services and infrastructure
on the island was born from the pop-
ularity of the Cay as disclosed by guest
surveys.

Disney plans to include Castaway
Cay twice on one of its ships’ itinerary,
in order to give passengers more time
on the private island.

“Castaway Cay has been a more
popular port of call, and our passen-
gers asked us to spend more time at
the island, so this is our response to
our guest wants and needs,” said Mr
Lasecki.

Tour operators and shore excursion
providers have railed against these
private islands, suggesting they absorb
a large amount of cruise ship passen-
ger spending before the ships reach
ports such as Nassau and Freeport.

Mr Lasecki said Disney has seen
many of their guests spending at both
ports of call, adding that the company

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BUSINESSES and home purchasers are
finding it increasingly difficult to obtain debt
financing for their projects, industry profes-
sionals told Tribune Business yesterday, urging

lenders to “find a balance” as banks denied the

BACK-TO-school sales
were relatively flat compared
to 2008 for most Bahamian
retailers, Tribune Business
was told yesterday, with con-
sumers purchasing more low-

Bahamas was headed for its own version of the
‘credit crunch’.

William Wong, the Bahamas Real Estate
Association’s (BREA) president, said the
increasingly risk-averse appetite of Bahamian
commercial banks and other lending institu-

tions, which had seen them toughen borrower

SEE page 2B

that was described as “a good
first step”.

Obie Ferguson, president
of the Trades Union Congress
(TUC) and attorney for the
Bahamas Industrial, Manu-
facturing and Allied Workers
Union (BIMAWU), said he
had received a letter from
German-headquartered K +
S Aktienesellschaft on August

SEE page 3B

Sothebys

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

qualification requirements amid increasing

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company

We can get you there!

FUP ERS
Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

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ENA)

offers an array of shore excursion in
Nassau, including Atlantis’ Dolphin
Cay and an upscale wine experience at
Graycliff.

“Most of our guests will opt to do
shore excursions in Nassau,” he said.
“We definitely look for new and inter-
esting things to offer our guests in
Nassau.”

Disney’s expansion of Castaway
Cay will include a family beach, more
water recreation options, private
cabanas, several more eateries and a
floating slide platform, which will be
one of the first additions ready for use
by early 2010.

The expansion will also create five
to eight additional permanent posi-
tions for “qualified Bahamians”.

Several construction jobs will be
created for Bahamians when the pro-
ject begins in earnest, according to Mr
Davis.

He said Disney committed within

* Realtors’ chief says ‘lucky’ if one

borrower approved if four sent to banks

* Chamber president says private
sector telling him obtaining debt
financing increasingly difficult

* But bank head says institutions
still open for lending, which
has ‘not contracted but slowed’

loan default levels, had dampened real estate

sales in a major way.

SEE page 4B

Where do you want to be?

the Heads of Agreement to do its best
to use Bahamian labour, which gives
the government of the Bahamas,
through the work permit system, the
prerogative to deny access to foreign
workers if qualified labour can be
found locally.

Mr Davis said concessions for Dis-
ney have been limited to building
materials and heavy equipment for
land clearing under the Family Island
Development Encouragement Act,
while incentives for the development
of shops and restaurants have been
given to the entertainment giant
through the Hotels Encouragement
Act.

The company also plans to expand
transportation on Castaway Cay
through its tram system, which will
move guests to the newer part of the
island following the development.
Only about 10 per cent of the island
has been developed thus far.

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



> Pension Plans

> Mutual Funds

> Stock Brokerage

> Corporate Finance

> Investment Management
> Trusts & Estate Planning

> Personal Pension Plan Accounts

> Education Investment Accounts

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Ceol 4


PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS ee
Bahamas must address public service obstacles

THE passing of Senator
Edward M. Kennedy this past
week brought to focus the
probable closing chapter in
the dominance of America’s
greatest political family...the
Kennedys. It is very doubtful
that any members of the cur-
rent generation will be more
than minor players in Ameri-
ca’s future political landscape.

In honouring the life of Ted
Kennedy, it quickly became
obvious that the media pre-

sented a moving tribute to a
‘life of public service’ of not
just one, but three, extraor-
dinary brothers from a
wealthy and politically-con-
nected family. They were the
sons of an extremely success-
ful businessman who also
served as a Congressman and
later US Ambassador.
President John F. Kennedy
in 1960 became the second-
youngest President of the US.
He was assassinated in

NOTICE

OSSINA INTERNATIONAL LTD.

Th Vohintany Liqutla ton

Note 12 bearele given thet in scoorknor mith Section
1364) of the Inteaanona Bueress Comper Act

2000 OSTA INTERNATIONAL.

LTT. is im

chaechrianis of Aupiet 28 BOP.

Tnteaneahonal Liquiclatar Senaces Ine. artistes] a 354
React Steet, PO. Bos 197% Belize city Beliseie the

Liquilatcr.

LIQUID ATOR

CARDIOTHORACIC/
VASCULAR
SURGEON
Experience:
-10 YEARS

-PEDIATRICS
CALL

242-326-2346

DATA ENTRY CLERK & CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE

We require an experienced individual to fill the position of Data
Entry Clerk and Customer Service Representative for a Leading
General Insurance Company in the Cartbbean. Reporting to the
Country Manager, the successful candidate will be primarily
responsible for data entry and communicating with the Company's
Agents, ensuring that service standards are met,

TPIT esa ona

Bachelors Degree in Business Administration [position more

suitable to a recent graduate]

Enrolment in a General Insurance Programme through either
the Chartered Insurance Institute or the Insurance Institute of

Canada

Minimurn of six (6) BOCSE subjects
Minimum of two (2) years experience in the General Insurance
Industry in Customer Service or Underwriting

November 1963, leaving a
legacy that included major
support of the civil rights
movement, the launch of the
space programme and the
successful handling of the
Cuban Missile Crisis.

Senator Robert F. Kennedy
served as Attorney-General
in the administration of his
brother, John. In 1964 he
became a Senator for the
state of New York. Robert
was assassinated in 1968 as he
was seeking the Democratic
Party presidential nomination.

Senator Edward (Ted)
Kennedy served for 46 years
in the US Senate. At the time
of his death, he was the sec-
ond most senior member of
the Senate, and the third-
longest-serving senator in US
history. He played a major
role in passing many laws,
including laws addressing
immigration, cancer
research, health insurance,
apartheid, disability dis-
crimination, AIDS care, civil
rights, mental health benefits,
children's health insurance,
education and volunteering.

While the Kennedys’ con-
tribution to public service is
undisputed, many would
argue that had it not been for
the security of the Kennedy
Trust Funds, it may not have
been possible for this family
to give back so much, through
politics and general philan-
thropy.

Ability to serve

This point was brought to
the forefront in the Bahamian
context last week, when
Desmond Bannister purport-
edly expressed his misgivings
about the level of ministerial
salaries while appearing on a
radio show.

According to a local news-
paper, the Minister said:
"And whenever politicians
raise this issue with respect to
the income they make, I think
it’s so clouded by political
rhetoric that Bahamians don’t

By Larry Gibson



really get to analyse what the
issues are: That professional
people leave their firms...
and so we all have to consider
what is in the best interests
of our families when we do
this (because) you have to be
able to live and survive. Quite
frankly, for a minister to live
on a salary that we pay is an
amazing thing.” Minister Ban-
nister said life after politics
could be especially difficult
for individuals, particularly on
their wallets.

"If you care and you are
doing what you would need
to do to take care of your con-
stituents, and if you’re not
taking kickbacks, if you’re not
cutting corrupt deals, if you’re
doing your job properly, you
will end up as many politi-
cians have ended up - in real-
ly difficult and dire circum-
stances," he said. This partic-
ular observation goes directly
to the heart of the largest
problem inherent in our polit-
ical system as practiced today.

I absolutely applaud the
Minister for having the
courage to put this issue on
the table for national discus-
sion. If the general popula-
tion feels that not enough of
our capable ‘sons and daugh-
ters’ are coming forward to
serve, then the issue raised by
the Minister must be
addressed. The argument is
really no different than the
argument for an appropriate
level of compensation for
Judges.

Ministerial Salary

Are we serious when a
Minister of government has a
base salary of around
$70,000? It is substantially less
than the salary of a Perma-

nent Secretary, it is less than
most union leaders, it is less
than most senior managers in
the private sector and it is less
than senior management in
government-owned public
corporations. Yet there is a
general perception that politi-
cians are grossly overpaid and
ripping off the country. We
need to put petty politics
aside and get sensible on this
national issue.

Is it enough to merely say
“that is the nature of politics,
if you can’t stand the heat,
stay out of the kitchen”, or
should we be more pragmatic
in our approach to this very
important issue? Should we,
by default, resign ourselves to
having our political system
dominated by those who are
independently wealthy, for
whom high office represents a
massive pay rise (and who
perhaps lack the experience
and competence that the post
require) or, finally, those who
are prepared to ‘cut some
deals’?

Call to Service

With the opening of the air-
waves, there is no shortage of
opinions on every imaginable
subject. However, when it
comes to personal service and
giving of one’s time, talents
or money...there is general-
ly a dearth of volunteers.

National service should not
be synonymous with commit-
ting ‘financial suicide’. How-
ever, the great irony is that
when highly-qualified and
competent candidates answer
the call to national service,
they very often must also
endure massive criticism and
character assassination.

A case in point is the recent
appointment of Michael Bar-
nett as Chief Justice. I am
amazed at those who are
attempting to stir a ‘tempest
in a teacup’ over his appoint-
ment for purely political rea-
sons. Mr Barnett is well-qual-
ified for the position, and he

will do the country proud.
Had he been a foreign
appointment, nobody would
have said a word, but because
he is one of our own, it’s a
different story. For a man
who has spent his entire pro-
fessional career distinguish-
ing himself in his chosen pro-
fession, is it appropriate to
now presuppose that he is
incapable of being impartial
and professional in the dis-
charge of his duties? This
appointment is not breaking
any new ground, as such
appointments under identical
or very similar circumstances
have taken place throughout
the Commonwealth over the
years.

This is my view on the sub-
ject, but I do appreciate the
opposing views, which togeth-
er put all sides of the issue on
the table for national discus-
sion.

Conclusion

These are daunting issues
that the Bahamian people
must deal with at some point
in the not too distant future.
With maturity, the country
should really be prepared to
address these issues in a sen-
sible and bipartisan manner.
Otherwise...it will be more
business as usual.

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice-president - pensions,
Colonial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance
and is a major shareholder of
Security & General Insurance
Company in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do
not necessarily represent
those of Colonial Group
International or any of its sub-
sidiary and/or affiliated com-
panies. Please direct any
questions or comments to
rlgibson@atlantichouse.com.b
s

Back-to-school sales stay flat

FROM page 1B

er-cost items.

Manager at Bookworld and
Stationers, Deron Wong, said
sales at the store on Mackey
Street have been flat com-
pared to 2008. However he
said shoppers have exhibited
a slightly different shopping
pattern over last year.

He argued that customers
have been waiting until the
end of the week and the
weekend to shop, and are not
buying items in bulk.

“They have been waiting

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

COMMERCIAL

until the weekend,” said Mr
Wong. “A lot of people came
in on Saturday. People are
buying when they have the
money - when funds are avail-
able.”

He added that more peo-
ple seem to have gone to
credit unions for money to
purchase school supplies,
while being more careful and
discerning in product pur-
chases in terms of cost.

Mr Wong said Bookworld
also offered more discounts
this year, as the economic sit-
uation has burdened much of

2009

COM/COM/00052

IN THE MATTER OF BAC BAHAMAS BANK LTD.
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT 1992

ADVERTISEMENT

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that (i) the Order

its client base. He said the
store had as many calls for
donations and receipt of cor-
porate sponsors as last year.

The downturn in the econ-
omy also forced Bookworld
to buy smarter and demand
better rates from its suppli-
ers. Mr Wong said because
many of the store’s items
come from the UK, the
exchange rate presented more
of a financial challenge.

“We had to buy smarter

and earlier to get better rates
from the suppliers,” he said.
“In the end you have to pay
earlier even when the funds
aren’t there. After the con-
version there is nothing you
can do (with the pricing), oth-
erwise you start losing mon-
ey.”
“We try to keep things low
because of the economic situ-
ation and not raise prices as
much unless we have to.”

Gavin Watchorn, president
of Abaco Foods, owners of
Solomons SuperCentre and
Cost Right, said their sale

shave also been relatively flat
compared to 2008.

“A couple of stores are up
and a couple of stores are
down,” he said. “It’s the same
as last year, which is no great
surprise. The market place got
more competitive.”

He said despite the rise in
competition, stores have been
able to keep sales transaction
counts up or above last year’s.

Mr Watchorn said con-
sumers have shopped around
more this year than in 2008,
and have paid attention to ads
for sales and price reductions.

“Overall we were more or
less flat with last year,” said
Mr Watchorn. We are happy
to be enjoying sales growth
even in these conditions and
the tightening up of the mar-
ketplace.”

He said consumers have
prepared a budget this year
and seem to be committed to
staying within the bracket
they “have allocated toward
grocery and back to school”
items.

UionM

Pi CSL bk &

of the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas dated the 21st July, A.D. 2009 confirming

POSITION AVAILABLE

Required Competencies:

© The ability to work on own initiative and communicate
effectively in oral and written form.
The ability to deal with Agents courteously and professionally,
Computer skills (that is competence in the use of word
processing and spreadsheet software programmes and the
ability to learn and function effectively using the Company's
General Insurance Application)

the reduction of the capital of BAC Bahamas Bank
Ltd. (BAC Bahamas’) from US$24,000,000.00 to
US$18,000,000.00 and (ii) the Minute approved by

Office Assistant /
Training Coordinator

Skill sets:
Experience with coordinating events
Good Computer Skills
Great in time management,
communication and organizational skills
Personable attitude with good customer
service skills
Effective Telephone Skills
Must be able to work well with others

the Court showing (with respect the capital of BAC

Bahamas as altered) this several particulars required
by the Companies Act 1992, were registered by the
Interested persons should send a detailed resume

accompanied by a letter of application to: Registrar of Companies on or about 26th August,

A.D. 2009.
Data Entry Clerk & Customer Service Representative
P, O, Box $5-19023

Dated the 27th day of August A.D., 2009
Nassau, Bahamas

SEND RESUME TO:
Lignum Technologies (Rahamas) Ltd.
The Harbour Bay Shopping Plaza
vial
Fax: 394-4971
info@lignumtech.com
P.O. Box 88-6295

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Deltec House, Lyford Cay,
New Providence, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioner,
BAC Bahamas Bank Ltd.

Or email to:
csands(@iewi.com

The closing date for all applications is

September Ind, 2009
Only short-listed candidates will be contacted

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009, PAGE 3B





Realtors chief eyes Miss
Universe Pageant sales boost

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

HOSTING the Miss Uni-
verse Pageant will help to
boost sales of Bahamian real
estate to high net worth buy-
ers from around the globe,
the Bahamas Real Estate
Association’s (BREA) presi-
dent said yesterday, television
images having showcased this
nation in the best possible
light.

William Wong told Tribune
Business: “I think the Gov-
ernment made a very bold
move by hosting this Miss
Universe Pageant, and it’s
going to reap us some serious
benefits over the years.

“The way the Ministry of
Tourism organised things, the
way people around the world
saw the stuff, enhanced our
image and will bring people
here to buy second homes.”

He added: “This was our

stimulus package, where the
Bahamas can be seen around
the world, and will only bring
us huge dividends.

“Tf I was living abroad and
saw those wonderful shots of
the beaches, the islands and
the people, it will really
enhance our sales. It may not
happen overnight, but that
kind of advertising was defi-
nitely a plus.

“T think that really, over a
long period of time, it will

help our people with their
sales, the real estate and the
second home market. It was a
positive thing the Govern-
ment did, a bold move, they
pulled it off, and we should
be proud of it as Bahamians.”

Mr Wong said the Bahami-
an real estate market
remained soft, and would
likely continue in this state
until the US economy picked
up.
“For the next 12-18

Buyer pledges to honour
Morton union agreement

FROM page 1B

21, 2009, pledging to work
with the union once the acqui-
sition was completed.

“T got a letter from K + $
dated August 21, indicating
they are purchasing Morton
Salt and that they will be
looking forward to a smooth
transition with the union, hav-
ing regard for the other union
they have within the region,”
Mr Ferguson told Tribune
Business.

“Tt appears as if they’re try-
ing to avoid any unnecessary
hassle and are willing to com-
ply with the existing industri-
al agreement..... K + S said
they would adhere to the
existing terms and conditions
of the industrial agreement.”

Mr Ferguson said Europe’s
largest salt producer had
informed him it wanted to
minimise disruption and
ensure continuity when it
completed its acquisition of
Morton International, of
which the Inagua-based com-
pany and plant is part.

“Tt is clear the company is
attempting to start off on a
good foot with the workers
and the union at Morton Salt,
which is really the concern in
situations like this. We’re
looking forward to the com-
pletion of the sale with K +
S, for the process to begin and
the union and the company
to work together as much as
we can.... It is a good first
step.”

Mr Ferguson added: “We
are prepared as a union to
work with the company and
do what is necessary to make
sure everyone benefits.”

Dow Chemical Company
earlier this year placed Mor-
ton (Bahamas) and its parent,
Morton International, up for
sale to finance its acquisition
of their former owner, Rohm
& Haas, agreeing a $1.675 bil-
lion deal with K + Sin April
2009.

However, the transaction
has not been completed yet
because it is still being scruti-
nised by the Us antitrust
authorities to ensure it com-
plies with all their competi-
tion requirements.

As a result, no decision has
been taken on the multi-mil-
lion dollar investment
required to rebuild Morton’s
Inagua facilities following the
damage wrought by Hurri-
cane Ike in 2008, something
that has been left toK + S.

A Dow spokeswoman told
Tribune Business: “That will
definitely be a question for K
+ S. [know Dow and Morton

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





OBIE FERGUSON

International are not starting
any new investments.”

Confirming that the trans-
action was not yet complet-
ed, she added: “It’s still pend-
ing. Right now, the transac-
tion is under review by the
Federal Trade Commission.
There are ongoing discussions
with the FTC on the transac-
tion.

“We expect that the Fed-
eral Trade Commission will
clear the transaction in the
next one to two months, and
at that time the divestiture
transaction will close and K+S
will be the owner.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No 46 of 2000)

BASE CONSULTING GROUP LTD.
IBC No. 145424 B
(Un Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given that as follows:

(a) That BASE CONSULTING GROUP LTD. is in Dissolution under the
provisions of The International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 28th day of
August, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted and

registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the Company is Sterling (Bahamas) Limited of 2nd Floor
Satfrey Square, Bank Lane and Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas

(d) Any person having Claim against the above name Company are required
on or before the 27th day of September, 2009 to send their name, address
and particulars of the debt or claim to the Liquidator of the Company, or in
default thereof they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution of
any made before such claim is approved.

Sterling (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE TO SHAREHOLDERS

As a result of the Bank’s financial

results for the third quarter ending 315!
July 2009, the Board of Directors of

Finance Corporation of Bahamas

Limited hereby notifies all of its

Shareholders that an interim dividend

of thirteen cents (13 cents) per Ordinary

Share payable on | sth September

2009, to all shareholders of record as
of 8th September 2009.

D. BURROWS-HAINES
CORPORATE SECRETARY

Dated this 18' September 2009

“In the meantime, Dow
does not have any plans for
new investments in the Mor-
ton Salt assets in the
Bahamas. It will be up to K+S
to speak to any future plans
or investments there.”

months, we need to hunker
down and do the best we can
to ride out the storm. The
Miss Universe contest was a

big plus for us,” he added, cit-
ing the mid-market - proper-
ties priced at $500,000 and up
- as being especially weak.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



5
Credit squeeze tightens for business, consumers

FROM page 1B

“Tf we send four clients to
the bank, we'll be lucky if one
makes it through,” Mr Wong
told Tribune Business. “Of
course, if the client can’t get
qualified to get a loan it
makes it difficult for them to
buy a house or lot.”

Khaalis Rolle, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce’s
president, said the banking
sector’s understandable cau-
tion on originating new com-
mercial loans, at a time when
19.21 per cent of all business
loans were in default, was
already impacting the private
sector and their plans.

“This morning, I had a con-
versation with a non-member
who has a thriving business
and is trying to borrow funds
from one of the commercial

banks,” Mr Rolle told Tri-
bune Business. “He said it
was taking him a lot more
time and effort to go through
this process than it has in the
past.”

Acknowledging that this
had the “potential for a major
impact” on the Bahamian
business community, Mr
Rolle said the banks and pri-
vate sector needed to “find a
balance” that satisfied the
requirements of both parties.

While the easiest move
would be to call for the banks
to loosen the lending purse
strings, the Chamber presi-
dent said: “The reality is that
they can’t. The reality is that
there has to be a balanced
approach to this.

“Bankers need to deter-
mine where that fine line is,
and businesses need to deter-
mine what their minimum

The Tribune

52wk-Low

Securit y
Abaco Markets

ROYAL BFIDELITY

Maney at Work

requirements are and operate
within those parameters.

“This shows the importance
of planning. Businesses need
to go back into the laboratory
and develop plans that will
allow them to maximise their
returns with very little input.
This means becoming more
efficient and far more effec-
tive with the use of their
assets.”

Mr Rolle predicted that the
tight Bahamian credit market
would “endure over the next
18 to 24 months, until the
banks see strong signs of
recovery, unemployment
starts to slow and key indica-
tors turn around”.

He added: “If I’m an
investor, and banks are in the
investment business, and I’m
unsure whether you will be
able to pay me back or get a
return on my investment, I’m



Eo

CFAL

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 31 AUGUST 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,575.84] CHG -0.04| %CHG 0.00 | YTD -136.52 | YTD % -7.97
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.76 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (81)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

2.74
5.50
1.27
1.32
6.60
10.00
10.30
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.49
10.09
10.00

Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)}

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

52wk-Low

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b

Security Last Sale

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

2.74
6.00
3.72
2.03
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.12
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.09
10.00

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.04
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

2.74
6.00
3.68
2.03
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.12
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.09
10.00

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $
7.92
2.00

Ask $

0.20 RND Holdings 0.35

Last Price
14.00
4.00
0.55

Weekly Vol.
8.42
6.25
0.40

29.00 ABDAB

0.40 RND Holdings

52wk-Low

Fund Name

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTID% Last 12 Months

1.3320
2.8952
1.4088
3.1031
12.3870
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

CFAL Bond Fund

CFAL MS! Preferred Fund

CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.4005
2.9047
1.4855
3.1143
13.0484
101.6693
96.7398
1.0000
9.3399
1.0663
1.0215
1.0611

-1.20

-8.01

-1.11

3.48 5.15
-3.66
5.44
-12.43
5.84
1.67
4.18
0.00
-1.41
6.63
2.15
6.11

3.61

3.41
1.10
0.35
0.00
2.69
2.59

2.29

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV §$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

going to be very cautious
about making an investment.

“One of the corresponding
impacts for the business sector
is that it will impede the
growth of business. If you’re
unable to get credit, your
access to capital is reduced,
and you'll have a correspond-
ing reduction in business
activity.

“In many respects, that’s
the difference between the life
and death of a business. That
will mean a reduction in
inventory purchases, a reduc-
tion in staffing levels. Busi-
ness turnover will certainly be
impacted.”

Paul McWeeney, Bank of
the Bahamas International’s
managing director, yesterday
agreed with Mr Rolle’s analy-
sis, placing a recovery in the
economy and bank lending
activities at least 18 months
away, towards the end of
2010.

“We don’t expect to see
any sustained turnaround
until towards the end of next
year,” Mr McWeeney told
Tribune Business. “By sum-
mer next year we may expe-
rience some _ sustained
momentum if all things

remain the same.”

He disagreed, though, with
the notion that the Bahamas
was experiencing its own
national ‘credit crunch’, telling
Tribune Business that the
doors of all Bahamian com-
mercial banks were still open
for lending.

Arguing that the Bahamas
was witnessing a slowdown in
lending growth, rather than a
contraction, Mr McWeeney
said: “Nationally, we are see-
ing a slowdown in credit
opportunities, but the banks
are still open for business. The
banks want to be able to
advance funds to qualified
and suitable borrowers. That
is taking place. It’s not a con-
traction, just slowed growth.”

According to the Central
Bank of the Bahamas’ latest
figures for the half-year to
June 2009, private sector cred-
it growth had actually fallen
by $15.19 million compared
to 2008 for the first six
months, with consumer lend-
ing down $35.13 million year-
to-date.

However, the decline in
credit growth could be the
result of reduced credit
demand among consumers

and borrowers, as much as
tougher lending criteria set by
the banks.

Mr McWeeney pointed out
that the situation in the
Bahamas was different from
the US, as the supply of sur-
plus liquidity/assets in the
commercial banking system
stood at $513.92 million at
end-June 2009, a healthy lev-
el that was more than $200
million higher than the 2008
comparative point.

While the US and global
‘crunch’ had resulted from liq-
uidity drying up, as financial
institutions stopped lending
to each other and borrowers
due to a loss of confidence
and uncertainty over who had
sub-prime mortgage market
exposure, the Bahamian slow-
down had resulted from the
economic environment, rising
unemployment and the inabil-
ity of borrowers to meet
tougher terms.

“We have to align borrow-
er creditworthiness with the
bank’s risk appetite,” Mr
McWeeney explained. “One
important aspect is the com-
pany’s capital adequacy, and
its ability to absorb the risk it
takes on.”

Reform proposals plan to
‘optimally serve’ businesses

Tribune Business was told
yesterday, something the
Chamber of Commerce’s
president believes could boost
the success rate for entrepre-
neurs and start-ups.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, told this
newspaper that he hoped to
have “a new set of proposals”
in his possession by the begin-
ning of 2010, revealing that
the Government was
analysing a number of sug-
gestions on how the “target-
ing” and operations of its
small business/entrepreneurial
assistance programmes could
be accomplished.

“There are some proposals
under active consideration
right now,” Mr Laing con-
firmed to Tribune Business.
“Clearly, there has to be such
a rationalisation, because it is
conceivable that each of these
programmes could satisfy and
address the perceived needs
of small business in the coun-

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

EPS $

COy LIN TAL

Div $ P/E
0.127
0.992

0.244

-0.877

7%

Prime + 1.75%

7%

Prime + 1.75%

EPS $
-2.246

0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.382
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

ases)

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

Div $
0.000
0.480
0.000

N/M
N/M
256.6

0.000
0.001

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

0.00%

Yield % NAV Date
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
21-Aug-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



“Tt’s my hope that we will
be in a position by the begin-
ning of next year to have a
new set of proposals as to how
we rationalise these govern-
ment programmes.

“There’s no question that
it has to happen, because the
entrepreneur, the small and
medium-sized business per-
son, today is not being opti-
mally served by the way in
which the programmes oper-
ate and are being targeted.”

The minister explained:
“Clearly, a young, high
growth business has very dif-
ferent needs to a new venture,
an upstart, that is coming into
being. While a term loan may
satisfy the one, maybe equity
participation with complete
management control may sat-
isfy the other.”

The goal, Mr Laing added,
was to “better serve the small
business community of the
Bahamas”, pointing out that
while the Bahamas Develop-
ment Bank and the Govern-
ment-sponsored venture cap-
ital programme served differ-
ent purposes and both played
a vital role, there were over-
laps between the two.

Apart from these two
organisations, the other Gov-
ernment entities focused on
the development of small and
medium-sized Bahamian busi-
nesses, plus entrepreneurs,
include the Bahamas Agri-
cultural and Industrial Cor-
poration (BAIC), the Self-
Starters Programme and the
Government-guaranteed loan
programme.

Mr Laing told Tribune
Business that apart from
ensuring the Government’s
small business support pro-
grammes eliminated overlaps
and bureaucracy, and were
targeted correctly, the pro-
posals under review were also
designed to provide business-
men with the information that
allowed them to determine
which entity was suitable for
meeting their needs.

He explained: “When we
are finished, it is my expecta-
tion that every entity in the
country, whether it’s some-
one starting a business or
someone who has a business
with growth potential and
requires something for expan-
sion purposes, they will clear-
ly know that this is the Gov-
ernment programme to which
they may look.

“And the Government pro-
gramme will be set up to
know this is a client they
should be targeting.”

Mr Laing told Tribune
Business that the Govern-
ment wanted to ensure entre-

preneurs and small businesses
that used its support services
were “more accountable and
responsible”, especially when
it came to repaying loans or
other forms of financial assis-
tance.

The Government also
wanted to increase its due dili-
gence and monitoring, to
ensure goods imported duty-
free under its support pro-
grammes were being used for
the intended purposes.

The Government’s propos-
als are likely to be supported
by Chamber of Commerce
president Khaalis Rolle, who
told Tribune Business recent-
ly that all the Government
entities assisting the small
business community should
be consolidated into one
organisation, along the lines
of the Small Business Agency
(SBA) in the US.

Arguing that the Govern-
ment agencies all currently
“operate in silos and under
different mandates”, Mr Rolle
said of such a consolidation:
“You would get more bank
for your buck. I think there
are some different priorities
for all the agencies, but quite
a number of overlapping
areas.

“T don’t think there are too
many organisation, but the
resources and planning aspect
of it need to be refined.

“BAIC and the Develop-
ment Bank serve somewhat
of the same population. One
is far more geared to offering
technical support, and one is
geared towards lending, but
the Development Bank still
has to offer technical support
to ensure its borrowers bet-
ter perform. That’s one of the
reasons for the high level of
defaults - it does not have the
ability to provide the level of
technical support needed to
ensure these businesses do
not fail.”

The Chamber president
said that by consolidating
these agencies and their coun-
terparts, and adopting a more
co-ordinated approach, “the
rate of success of small busi-
ness in this country will prob-
ably soar”.

Stating that his preferred
structure was to merge all
business support entities into
an SBA-type organisation,
which would direct the oper-
ations of BAIC, the Devel-
opment Bank and others, Mr
Rolle added: ‘The individu-
als that get involved in busi-
ness have to understand pre-
cisely what role those organi-
sations play and try and take
advantage of them a little bet-
ter than we have done in the
past.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BOSNEL BRUTUS of
MARKET STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 1st September, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box N-7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a ae
mat —





Acnegenic
ingredients
to avoid in
your skin
care

YOU may have heard of
comedogenic ingredients that
cause or promote comedones
in skin. You may not be as
familiar with acnegenic ingre-
dients - those that cause or
exacerbate acne. These com-
mon ingredients can be hiding
within acne treatment prod-
ucts, causing ineffective treat-
ment of your breakouts.
Here's what to look for:

Lanolin: Derived from the
words "lana" for wool and
"oleum" for oil, Lanolin is a
fatty substance obtained from
the sheep's wool. While it's a
known emollient with mois-
turising properties, it can have
skin-clogging capabilities, trig-
gering the cycle of breakouts.

Fragrance: Artificial fra-
grances can increase acne
infection, skin sensitisation
and photosensitivity.

D & Cred pigments: Some
of these dyes, which are coal
tar derivatives, have exhibited
highly comedogenic and acne-
genic properties.

Mineral Oil: Mineral Oil is
an occlusive (something that
physically blocks water loss
in the Stratum corneum). It's
used in many products, how-
ever, it has been shown to
cause and exacerbate acne.

Speak with your profes-
sional skin therapist about
products free of comedogenic
and acnegenic ingredients,
and that contain known
botanical extracts that help
inhibit the growth of acne-
genic bacteria.

Heat stroke occurs when
the dog’s ability to regulate
its body temperature is lost.

A dog regulates body tem-
perature primarily through
respiration. When the respi-
ratory tract can not evacuate
heat quickly enough, the body
temperature rises.

Normal body temperature
is less than 103F, but once the
temperature goes over 105F
a number of physiologic
events can occur that make it
even more difficult for the
animal to regain control of its
temperature. At this time,
oxygen delivery to the system
can not keep up with rapidly
elevating demand.

If the temperature exceeds
a certain limit a number of
organ systems including the
kidneys, liver, gastrointesti-
nal tract, heart and brain are
at risk for permanent dam-
age. The extent of the cellular
damage depends on the mag-
nitude and the duration of the
temperature elevation. Clear-
ly, this can be a life-threaten-
ing situation, but for those
animals that survive there is

Top neurosurgeon visits Bahamas

By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

HUNDREDS of Bahami-
ans and medical profession-
als attended a black tie dinner
on Friday evening to hear
renowned neurosurgeon Dr
Benjamin Carson give an
inspiring talk of how he rose
from an impoverished child-
hood to become the youngest
head of surgery at one of the
United States’ best hospitals.

Dr Carson whose life story
was depicted in the novel and
movie Gifted Hands became
the head of pediatric neuro-
surgery at the prestigious
Johns Hopkins Hospital in
Baltimore, Maryland at the
very young age of 33 in 1984.

Since that time, he has
maintained an exhaustive
schedule performing over 500
surgeries a year on some of
the sickest children from
around the world.

Dr Carson focuses on trau-
matic brain injuries, brain and
spinal cord tumors, achon-
droplasia, neurological and
congenital disorders, cran-
1osynostosis, epilepsy and
trigeminal neuralgia. He is
also interested in maximising
the intellectual potential of

every child.

He received world wide
attention and acclaim in Sep-
tember 1987 as the lead sur-
geon on a team of more than
70 medical professionals who
successfully separated a pair
of seven-month-old German
Siamese twins joined at the
head.

Other notable surgeries
included the 1998 successful
separation of Luka and
Joseph Banda, infant boys
from Zambia- the first set of
twins joined at the tops of
their heads to be separated.
This surgery according to Dr
Carson was noteworthy
because it was performed at a
hospital in South Africa
despite the lack of sophisti-
cated medical equipment.
There was also the attempt in
2003 to separate conjoined
adult Iranian sisters Ladan
and Laleh Biyani- neither of
whom survived the surgery.
He also received an Ameri-
can presidential Medal of
Freedom Award from former
president George Bush on
June 19, 2008.

Dr Duane Sands, cardio-
vascular surgeon, who gave
brief remarks said that it was
an honour to be in Dr Car-
son’s company. He said that



DR BENJAMIN CARSON

while studying in Maryland,
he had heard numerous sto-
ries about the gifted surgeon
and said that he has been
inspired by him throughout
his own career.

Psycharitrist Dr Timothy
Barrett and Medical Associa-
tion President said of Dr Car-

son, “ there is something good
about him and to be a good
doctor, you have to be a very
good person”

During his presentation, Dr
Carson explained how his
mother, despite her own lim-
ited education, motivated her
sons to become the very best
they could be by cutting their
television viewing to two pro-
grams a week and making
them produce two book
reports for her each week.
This enabled him to rise from
the bottom of his class to
receive scholarships to attend
both Yale University and the
University of Michigan Med-
ical School.

His mother never took on a
victim’s mentality despite the
challenges she faced raising
her two sons alone while
working several jobs as a
domestic worker in Detroit,
he said adding that too many
people use this victum excuse
to not change the course of
their lives.

Dr Carson added that his
mother never accepted excus-
es from him, which led him
to be a much better person
because when “someone
won't accept excuses, you
have to learn to find solu-
tions.”

He stressed that success is a
mental state saying that if you
leave a CEO broke and in the
ghetto, he will soon rise to the
top again because he has the
tools to succeed whereas if
you make a bum a CEO he
will soon be back in the
streets because he does not.

Dr Carson pointed out that
truly successful people are
those who learn from their
mistakes. He noted that in
particular young Black peo-
ple need to see more role
models who are not from the
sports or music arenas but
rather in educational and
vocational fields.

He further said that true
success comes from using the
talent given to you to help
elevate other people.

The dinner held at the
British Colonial Hilton was
organised as part of the CEO
Network conference held last
weekend in conjunction with
local members of the Sigma
Pi Phi (Boule) Fraternity.

During his visit to the
Bahamas, Dr Carson a devout
Seventh Day Adventist also
held a session with children
on Saturday morning before
speaking at the Seventh Day
Adventist Church in Center-
ville.

Why aren’t we on the same page?

By MAGGIE BAIN

AS we grow in to young adults our
talents become more evident. We
may discover that we have a natural
ability to lean towards science, music,
written word, or languages. When
things feel more natural, and come
more easily for us, we spend more
time and our interests develop.

Our passion for our talent often
fills our life and other areas fall by
the wayside. It makes sense then that
a similar passion requires equal
amounts of time and energy. Most of
us conduct our relationships in a
manner that feels comfortable and
suits us. We believe we are being
authentic, and if we ever step outside
‘our norm’ it feels unnatural and we
fall back into our old ways. This
explains why it is so difficult for most
of us to change our behaviour, as it
feels as if we are ‘going against the
grain’ or ‘swimming up stream’.

Foreign languages are areas that
seem to pose a problem for many
people. ‘Not having an ear’ for it,
and the steep learning curve, deter a
lot of people from even starting. The
mere challenge of communicating
with a person speaking another lan-
guage can be frustrating and demor-
alising.

It entails reading body language,
facial expressions, and in turn often
completely misunderstanding their
message. Both persons feel the oth-
er is not trying hard enough to

Heat

understand the other and the rela-
tionship remains on one level with-
out developing.

Love languages can feel like for-
eign languages for many. Clinical
practice reveals a clear lack of know-
ing, let alone understanding, the lan-
guages of love. Growing up without
having witnessed loving adult part-
nerships undoubtedly puts an indi-
vidual at a huge disadvantage.

Just because we had both parents
in the home does not necessarily
mean that we know how to love.
Completely dysfunctional parents
have a difficult time deciding what to
do about the relationship. Some do a
disservice to their children by believ-
ing they are staying ‘because of the
children’, whilst not appreciating the
affect it will have on their own future
relationships.

Others foresee losing the father
from the home will probably mean
very little future involvement in their
children's lives. Even the interaction
between extended family households
teaches us many values about rela-
tionships. Relationship therapy often

reveals a defective foundation that
has to be rebuilt from scratch. But
like any good foundation it is worth
its weight in gold because it prevents
structural damage later on in life.

We may feel as if we go round in
circles talking about relationships
but invariably return to the point.
Different childhoods and bring pre-
vious life experiences means that we
are all unique and no two relation-
ships are alike. As we mature we
start to really understand ourselves
and the forms of love that complete
us. Many have written these as
‘needs' rather than 'wants', while
others describe them as ‘love lan-
guages’. Both accurately define the
concept of ‘what is right for one is
not right for another’.

The idea that these are as essential
as oxygen to sustain us is truly accu-
rate. Just wanting something is
almost inconsequential whilst need-
ing something is irrefutable. It is
grasping this idea and truly trying to
listen to your partner that allows us
to fulfill each other.

For those of us who understand
ourselves, the forms of love that
seem essential are; sex, love and
attention, love actions, gifts and time.
You may well consider that you need
a bit of all to feel complete but for
many of us one area is a top priority.
For example, if your partner cuts the
grass, makes a bookshelf, and takes
the children to the movies, then he is
showing his love through love

stroke in dogs

actions. They certainly are things you
want him to do but he is completely
omitting to recognise your need for
love and attention. Something will
always feel missing and you will feel
a void. Alternatively, you may be an
attentive homemaker, cook, clean
and take care of the children. But
all you partner really needs is to be
greeted at the door with hugs and
kisses. Both are reading the same
book but just not on the same page.

These love languages are also
reflected in the sexual intimacy. One
may prefer silence with eyes closed.
The other may need interaction,
feedback, or role-play during love-
making. It takes an open loving heart
to accommodate the others sexual
needs in order to allow the other to
feel complete. A free generosity of
spirit is the ultimate language of love.
If you can relate to some or all of
these instances then Know that it is
never too late to make changes and
learn your partner’s love language.
That feeling of ‘missing out’ can be
filled in to complete the total pic-
ture.

e Margaret Bain is an Individual
and Couples Relationship Therapist.
She is a Registered Nurse and a Cer-
tified Clinical Sex Therapist. Call for
an appointment- Relate Bahamas at
364- 7230, or email relateba-
hamas@yahoo.com orwww.relateba-
hamas.blogspot.com. She is also
available for speaking engagements.



the possibility of long term
problems after the occur-
rence.

There are a number of pre-
disposing factors for heat
stroke; some of which include:
heat, humidity, muscular
activity, high body mass, anx-
iety, poor ventilation, dehy-
dration, obesity, antihista-
mines, phenothiazines (some
medications for vomiting),
bracycephalic breeds (short-
nosed breeds), and increased
age.

Dogs experiencing heat
stroke will have a muddy pink
color of their gums instead of
the nice red-pink color that
normally exists. Their heart
rate will be dramatically ele-
vated and they will be panting
furiously. They tend to stand
or walk very slowly without
regard to where they are.
Some will lie on their ster-
num. Most dogs will have a
wild panicked expression and
are not particularly aware of
their environment.

Any combination of these
systems should have an own-
er aggressively seeking vet-



erinary assistance and taking
steps necessary to help drive
the temperature back down.
Significantly delaying the
treatment of a heat stroke can
dramatically increase the risk
of long-term consequences or
death.

Heat stroke is an emer-
gency that requires veterinary
assistance, but you can effec-
tively initiate treatment in

most cases before heading for
the veterinary hospital. You
must aggressively assist the
dog’s efforts to lower its body
temperature with the use of
water and air. Since the lungs
can not keep up with the heat
buildup, we now have to cool
the skin and associated blood
vessels so the body’s temper-
ature will decrease. Submer-
sion of the dog in cool water
will start to bring the temper-
ature down quickly. If you
are unable to submerge the
dog, you can start wetting him
down with a hose. Wet the
dog all over and let the water
run continuously on the groin
area since there are large
numbers of significant and
relatively superficial blood
vessels in that are that will
allow for more rapid cooling
of the blood. The dog should
be in a well-ventilated, shady
area to allow evaporation of
the water. Evaporation cools
body temperatures very effec-
tively.

When transporting the dog
to the veterinary hospital,
keep the air conditioner on

or the windows open, or use
the back of a truck to increase
evaporation. Do not use an
enclosed style crate since it
allows for little evaporation
or fresh cool air for the lungs.
Do not cover the dog with a
wet towel, as it will also pre-
vent evaporation. It is advis-
able in most cases to start
these animals on intravenous
fluids and monitor kidney and
liver functions for a few days.
The necessity for this labora-
tory work depends on the
magnitude and the duration
of the elevated temperature.

Obviously prevention of
heat stroke is a far better
alternative than treatment.
Everyone is aware of the risks
of having a dog in a vehicle in
the summer, but there are
some less obvious risk factors
that we all need to be aware
of. Even moderate environ-
mental temperatures can be
very significant when there is
little or no ventilation. Own-
ers should also be aware that
heat stroke does not only
occur in the summer months.
Heat stroke has a tendency

to catch owners unaware dur-
ing the spring and winter
months, when they are less
likely to take the proper pre-
cautions to safeguard against
heat stroke. Heavy muscular
activity drives body temper-
atures up with alarming
speed.

Following intervals of high
activity, return the dog to an
air conditioned vehicle, or wet
the dog down and go to an
area that is shaded and prefer-
ably breezy to allow for evap-
oration. Make sure there is
access to reasonable volumes
of cool fresh water both
before and after activity. We
also need to be conscious of
those animals that are at
increased risk, which would
include those dogs that have
high body mass, older dogs,
and those that are carrying
more weight than is normal
for them.

Being aware of the various
risk factors as well as the envi-
ronmental considerations
should help all of us avoid this
potentially devastating prob-
lem.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2009, PAGE 7B



HEALTH





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A N D M |



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THE COST OF DRUGS is very pricey these days, and doctors fear that it will drive more persons to order medication from “shady” online pharmacies...

Doctors fear costly drugs could
drive ‘shady’ online pharmacies

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features
Reporter

here’s no doubt

about it. The cost

of drugs is very

pricey these days,
and doctors fear that it will
drive more persons to order
medication from “shady”
online pharmacies. One local
ophthalmologist describes the
mark-up on pharmaceuticals
as “gluttonous, and said it is
even greater than the mark-
up of the banks in the
Bahamas.”

Diamox, a drug that he
treats his patients with for
glaucoma cost only 50 cents
or less to make a tablet, he
says. Yet according to him,
some local companies are
retailing this drug for over
$250. “More and more physi-
cians are claiming patients just
can’t afford prescription
drugs,” he said.

With things still slow in the
economy; inflation of prices
on medication are predicted
to only make things worse for
struggling persons who need
treatment right away. Fear
looms that more and more,
people will turn to online
pharmacies based in foreign
countries for prescribed med-
ication that they cannot afford
at home.

If you are feeling the pinch
on your pocket, and you need
to fill a doctor’s prescription
right away, getting it online
may be a cheaper avenue,
right? Not so fast warns Dr
Vanria Rolle, chief pharma-
cist at Public Hospitals
Authority who gave a pre-
sentation on the subject at the
CEO Network conference at
the British Colonial Hilton
last week. Dr Rolle said that
persons are at a greater risk
when they purchase drugs
from an online pharmacy,
because of the prevalent
occurrences of people receiv-
ing counterfeit or fake drugs.
If taken, the substance can be
harmful to your health, and
even kill you she said.

Perhaps this is the first time
you are reading about this
matter, and asking how these

WHATS REAL AND WHATS

NOT?

154-1536-2004

Can vou reallw tall?



COUNTERFEIT/AUTHENTIC drugs can be seen here...

drugs go undetected. The
unfortunate reality about
counterfeit drugs is that even
a manufacturer cannot tell by
just looking at it whether a
drug is authentic or not.
“These drugs are fake med-

ications that are deliberately,
and fraudulently mislabeled
with respect to identity and
or source,” Dr Rolle said.
“They often have the wrong
ingredients, are without active
ingredients, may have fake

packaging, or may be dis-
pensed with the wrong
dosage.”

Over the years, there have
been reported cases by the
World Health Organisation
on unexplained side effects

that persons who took coun-
terfeit drugs experienced.
Strange elements like boric
acid, heavy metals, road paint,
and floor wax were reported-
ly used to coat pills in such
cases to give them a shine.
Clearly, these elements can
have devastating effects on
anyone’s health. In other cas-
es, persons had no reaction,
because the pills were place-
bos, or of a “sugar pill” base,
which is harmless.

According to Dr Rolle, the
counterfeiters main target
group is Internet shoppers.
They retail mostly fake
“lifestyle drugs,” such as med-
ication for hair loss, antibac-
terials, antipsychotics, sexual
dysfunction, obesity, and hor-
mones. The counterfeiters
produce these and many oth-
er drugs without much over-
sight or regulation laws, and
sell them at seemingly unbe-
lievable prices that are hard to
resist. Oftentimes, it would
appear that you can get more
for your money from them,
like two drugs for the price
of what one authentic drug
would cost.

Although the majority of
Bahamians may have a low
interest in Internet commerce,
Dr Rolle says that you can
encounter counterfeit drugs
without knowing by simply
filling a prescription at an
unlicensed pharmacy.

She says that it is safer to
stick with licensed, reputable
pharmacies who get their
drugs from authorised deal-
ers like Nassau Agencies,
Lowes Wholesale, and other
providers that have regula-
tions, and proper storage
facilities.

You may recall the incident
last year, where a shipment
of counterfeit Viagra was
delivered to Nassau Agencies
by mistake. Officials there
realised that the shipment was
not meant for a local distrib-
utor at that particular time.
A Viagra manufacturer took
samples, investigations were
done, and it was discovered
that the product was in fact
counterfeit.

“In a perfect world, we
would not have to deal with

these things,” Dr Rolle said.

So, how do you protect
yourself? Dr Rolle lists these
red flags to watch out for in
your medication, and to
report to your doctor:

If the drug has a spelling
error--

If the packaging or color
looks different--

If the seal doesn’t look
right--

If it taste or smells funny

If you have strange side
effects--

She stressed that patients
should only buy prescription
medications from licensed
pharmacies in the Bahamas.
Finally, Dr Rolle advised that
if you purchase a drug and
notice on the insert that it is
written in a different lan-
guage, “Do not buy it, it’s dis-
respectful for patient care and
patient safety.”

In May, an active bill called
the ‘Pharmacy Act 2009’ was
designed to tighten regula-
tions in the pharmaceutical
industry. These are the pro-
visions;

Requirements that apply to
prescribed international stan-
dards for imported drugs--

Prohibits the manufactur-
ing or importation of drugs
unless factory or warehouse
is registered and licensed--

Requirements regarding
the sale of drugs via an auto-
matic device or the Internet--

Requirements for the
appointment of trained
inspectors by the Minister of
Health to inspect premises of
wholesale distributors--

TS

i D8

PS
GSE
ir



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For the very best features . . .

VASNAIN
WW



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mwas fee's rear hhs Na





Are you an effective communicator?

“Effective communication is 20 per cent what
you know and 80 per cent how you feel about
what you know.”

~ Jim Rohn ~

NO matter how great your ideas or how far-
reaching your solutions, they are of no value if
you cannot effectively communicate them to
others.

Effective communication skills are a key
ingredient of success. Learning how to speak
with confidence can open doors beyond your
wildest dreams; yet, very few people take time
to work on their communication effectiveness.

One of my favorite sayings is ‘its better to be
prepared for an opportunity and not have one,
than to have an opportunity for which you are
unprepared.” Regardless of your starting point,
anything is possible - there are no limits.

While public speaking and communication
skills are crucial they are not readily pursued
because most people have a real fear of public
speaking.

The Fear of Public Speaking
For most people, public speaking brings a

serious source of stress and nervousness. So as
much as possible, people try to avoid having to

speak in front of an
audience.

But whether you
work alone or with
a large group of
people, at some
point, you will
need to speak
openly to get cer-
tain tasks accom- |
plished. Moreover,
if you aspire to be
a leader or
desirous of great
achievements; you
will need to be — = =
comfortable speak-
ing to groups large or small in order to be suc-
cessful.

First of all, this fear is not real. I know it
feels real; but this fear is mostly an illusion
that stems from your subconscious beliefs
about yourself.

You may be surprised to learn that as chil-
dren, many people suffer from a small sense of
self, handed down through the ages from par-
ents or guardians. And while their intent was
to protect us from perceived dangers, this inad-
vertently conditioned us into non-risk takers,





playing it safe; eventually becoming shy and
withdrawn; unable to confidently speak-up
and express their point of view.

The good news here is - you can unlearn
this behavior and adopt new habits that sup-
port rather than impede your confidence as an
effective speaker.

To change your behaviour - you must
change your beliefs; because what you believe
determines how you behave. Start to tell your-
self uplifting things about yourself and what is
possible for your life.

Positive self-talk is essential to rewiring your
subconscious mind so that you can tap into
your inner power to voice your views.

Final Thought...

The first black President of the United
States, Barak Obama, won the hearts of the
American people and the world, in part,
because of his incredible ability to inspire peo-
ple from all walks of life, through effective
communication.

Think about the many opportunities that
you find yourself in meetings or settings; you
can hear that inner voice shouting for you to
speak-up and say something. But for some
strange reason, the words seem trapped in

your mouth. You are not alone - this feeling
has been experienced by every great speaker.

Being comfortable speaking in front a group
can be intimidating; the butterflies and wobbly
knees are a part of the process. But if you
want it bad enough and believe that you can do
it - it will be done.

Remember - communication is the key to
success; no leader can be effective if he or she
is unable to get their point across.

Lying dormant inside you is a great speech
that can inspire the world. Prepare yourself to
make something better happen.

e If you are ready to Speak with Confidence
& Power- Sign Up Now for SpeakUP! - learn
how to Speak your way to the top! Contact
The Coaching Studio today call 326-3332 or
429-6770 - or send an email to
coach4ward@ Yahoo.com

Michelle M. Miller is a certified Life-Coach
and Stress Management Consultant. She is the
Principal Coach of the Coaching Studio, which
located in the Jovan Plaza, Madeira Street.
Questions or comments can be sent to P.O.
Box CB-13060 - email -
coach4ward@yahoo.com or telephone 429-
6770.

The gar den in September

TO sow or not to sow, that is the
question... Does one start one’s veg-
etable garden in September or wait
until the more favourable month of
October. There are merits in both
stances but most experienced gar-
deners will already have seeds in by
the beginning of September.

If things go wrong they will start
again in late September and sow
another crop in October.

Last year I made the mistake of
using heirloom tomatoes for my first
crop. Heirloom tomatoes generally
take longer to produce and bear
more sparsely than hybrid types.
This year I will start with hybrids
like Better Boy and leave the heir-
looms until October.

Bell peppers can be started early
in September, along with eggplants,
cabbages, pumpkins and beans. Most
other crops — carrots and root crops,
peas, spinach, squashes, broccoli and
cauliflower — are best sown in Octo-
ber.

Blessed are they that covered their
vegetable gardens with clear plastic
for the summer months. When the
time comes to start the new veg-
etable season they will only have to
remove the plastic and apply some
water and fertiliser. The ground will
be ready for transplants and free of
weed seeds and nematodes.

This is the season of seagrapes,
early hog plums and late Keitt man-
goes. Carambolas (star fruit) are on
their first production run of the year.
They will flower and fruit again in
October but with fruit from the first
crop still on the tree it will appear to
be one continuous crop.

Believe it or not, it is time to think
about Christmas. Annuals for Christ-
mas could be sown in September,
early October at the latest.

Annuals from seed are far, far
cheaper than buying sets. The choice
is often greater, too. Virtually any
popular annual will flower well dur-
ing our cool season months. Among
the favourites in Bahamian gardens
are impatiens and petunias. Remem-
ber to put down snail bait with your
seeds as the young seedlings will be
attractive to snails and slugs.

If you have some of last year’s

by

poinsettias in the ground, do not
prune them any more. The tissue
that will form the brightly coloured
bracts may be cut away with a late
pruning.

There are still a couple of months
of intensive lawn care ahead of us,
requiring weekly mowing. Many St
Augustine lawns put out seed stalks
in August and September. If your
lawn needs thickening out you may
consider not mowing it until the
seeds are ready. With steady water-
ing after the subsequent mowing you
will develop a thicker lawn over the
cool season months.

The main worry in September
concerns tropical storms and hurri-
canes. As I write this the Weather
Channel shows a string of potential
hurricanes crossing Africa like a
necklace of destruction. Very few
Septembers pass without one or the
other disturbing the peace of The
Bahamas. A tropical storm may
bring some welcome rain but can
totally denude a carambola tree of
fruit. Winds of less than hurricane
strength can desiccate shrubs and
palms and leave them stressed for
many months.

Wind is the biggest natural enemy
of plants and when it reaches hurri-
cane force there is bound to be trau-
ma. Prune flowering shrubs and
small fruit trees to allow the wind
to pass through the centre. Cut down
long branches that are likely to be
broken off in a hurricane and trim
smaller plants to reduce their size.

Any heavy plants in pots should
be well watered and then laid on the
ground in an area where they will
be contained. All materials in the
yard that can be blown around
should be stored in your garden shed
or utility room.

The pace of the year quickens in
September and a new year in the
garden begins.

j-hardy@coralwave.com

THIS IS WHAT it is all about... A few offerings from Gardener Jack's garden last

year demonstrate the range of vegetables we can grow in one season...



























































IT IS SEAGRAPE season and the pickin’ is easy...

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT k,

5-Day FORECAST

High:90°F/32°C = Partly sunny with a Partly cloudy with a Partly sunny with a Partly sunny, a t-storm Partly sunny, a t-storm Clouds and sun with a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
eS eee thunderstorm. shower, thunderstorm. possible. possible. thunderstorm. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
Low: 73° F/23°C at 2 : 6 .
eq | High: 90 High: 90 High: 90 High: 90
. a ‘ High: 88° Low: 78° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 79° see Ey
TAMPA ia AccuWeather RealFeel
High: 90° F/32° C oe, ee High __Ht.(ft.)_ Low
Low: 75° F/24°C et r tee Tv Tc ESTE Oto eT Today 6:16am. 25 12:12am. 0.6
am @ = elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 6:45pm. 28 12:16pm. 05
i ; =a 6:59am. 26 12:52am. 0.4
’ 1, CO Weinestay 74pm. 29 1:01pm. 04
) oe r Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thursday 738am. 0.7 120am. 03
f : ~~ ABACO 7 oom 8:00pm. 29 1:43pm. 0.4
; : is € High: 89° F/32° C ee ee eee ee ee eee ee eee 79° F/26° C Friday 8:15 a.m. 29 2:04 a.m. 0.3
J - “i Cy Low: 77° F/25°C Normal high ee —— ee ee
- ' 7, Normal low 75° F/24° C
4 fo @ WEST PALM BEACH i Last year's MIgh ..cccccsscssseseessiee or F3sc | ONIN
4 al High: 90° F/32° C — Last year's VOW eesti 81° F/27° C " "
' <= Low: 75° F/24°C a 7 Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:51 a.m. Moonrise + 8:43 p.m.
€ ai a, As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....ccccccssssecscseeecssseeeee 0.30" Sunset....... 7:29 p.m. Moonset... 4:06 a.m.
im FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Orr ate o ao 4 ae
High: 88° F/31°C @ High: 87° F/31°C Normal year to date oo... 31.32" = . sj
Low: 76° F/24°C Fm Low: 77° F/25° C
Gf AccuWeather.com |”
s @ a a Forecasts and graphics provided by Ohh -
: MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Sep. 4 sep. 11 Sep.18 — Sep. 26
-. High: 89° F/32° C ELEUTHERA
ot Low: 78°F/26° ¢ NASSAU alah: 89" Faz’
= Low: 78° F/26°C
2 i. Y a cz
KEY WEST ae “og ~—_CATISLAND
High: 90° F/32°C | High: 85° F/29° C
Low: 80° F/27°C i. Low: 75° F/24°C
i ae GREAT EXUMA wt SAN SALVADOR
ae i High: 87° F/31°C High: 87° F/31°C
Low: 77° F/25° C Low:77° F/25°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | ,
highs and tonights's lows. High: 90° F/32° C —- \
Low: 75° F/24° C i. : Sa.
a â„¢
LONG ISLAND
Low: 76° F/24°C
Today Wednesday Today Wednesday Today Wednesday 4 MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W alll High: 86° F/30° C
FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FC F/C FIC FC i Low: 76° F/24° C
Albuquerque 90/32 65/18 pc 89/31 63/17 pc Indianapolis 78/25 52/1 s 80/26 57/13 s Philadelphia 79/26 56/13 s 81/27 61/16 s
Anchorage 62/16 50410 sh 5915 49/9 fF Jacksonville 88/31 70/21 t 84/28 69/20 t Phoenix 107/41 84/28 pc 105/40 84/28 pc CROKE rs
Atlanta 78/25 63/17 c 82/27 60/15 pc Kansas City 77/25 58/14 s 79/26 59/15 pc _ Pittsburgh 73/22 47/8 s 77/25 50/10 s RAGGEDISLAND Tigh:90°F/s2"c
Atlantic City 76/24 55/12 pc 78/25 58/14 s Las Vegas 104/40 78/25 t 105/40 82/27 pc Portland, OR 84/28 58/14 pc 78/25 58/14 s High: 88° F/31° C Low: 78° F/26°C —
Baltimore 78/25 55/12 pe 80/26 59/15 s Little Rock 84/28 58/14 s 86/30 60/15 s Raleigh-Durham 76/24 59/15 pc 79/26 60/15 pc Low: 74°F/23°C a
Boston 71/21 55/12 s 74/23 61/16 $s Los Angeles 91/32 66/18 s 87/30 66/18 pc St. Louis 80/26 56/13 s 83/28 59/15 $s . We.
Buffalo 70/21 48/8 s 76/24 53/11 $s Louisville 80/26 58/14 s 82/27 61/16 $s Salt Lake City 90/82 62/16 s 90/32 63/17 pc GREAT INAGUA AK \*)\,
Charleston, SC 82/27 65/18 t 81/27 6618 fF Memphis 84/28 60/15 s 84/28 65/18 ¢s San Antonio 91/32 71/21 pce 94/34 73/22 pc High: 90° F/32° C
Chicago 74/23 48/8 s 75/23 49/9 s Miami 89/31 78/25 t 89/31 76/24 t San Diego 80/26 68/20 pe 78/25 67/19 pc Low. 78° F/26°C
Cleveland 74/23 49/9 s 76/24 51/10 s Minneapolis 75/23 54/12 s 76/24 57/13 pe San Francisco 72/22 57/13 pe 72/22 58/14 pc 7
Dallas 92/33 71/21 s 93/33 70/21 $s Nashville 84/28 59/15 s 83/28 59/15 $s Seattle 76/24 55/12 pe 73/22 55/12 s
Denver 92/33 57/13 pe 87/380 53/11 pc New Orleans 88/31 71/21 pe 87/80 71/21 s Tallahassee 89/31 70/21 t 85/29 66/18 t i
Detroit 75/23 53/11 = s 77/25 53/1 $s New York 77/25 60/15 s 79/26 64/17 $s Tampa 90/32 75/23 t 88/31 73/22 t ;
Honolulu 89/31 76/24 s 89/31 76/24 pc Oklahoma City 86/380 64/17 s 88/31 64/17 $s Tucson 100/37 75/23 t 97/36 75/23 pc —
Houston 90/32 67/19 pc 92/83 70/21 s Orlando 90/32 73/22 t 88/31 74/23 t Washington, DC 78/25 59/15 pc 80/26 62/16 s



ORLANDO






a ¢ atts i & .
TTS NG

i —





o|1|2

LOW

3|4|5|6

MODERATE





HIGH | V.HIGH

SY oe
'|s|9l10

aicclince, LUD IATT









Wor_p Cities

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

ii

Today

High
F/C
90/32
70/21
83/28
86/30
60/15
90/32
87/30
79/26
81/27
81/27
83/28
85/29
82/27
69/20
73/22
82/27
63/17
96/35
90/32
78/25
91/32
82/27
81/27
75/23
61/16
82/27
82/27
66/18
91/32
66/18
91/32
95/35
76/24
83/28
77/25
89/31
73/22
72/22
90/32
88/31
75/23
84/28
73/22
72/22
85/29
84/28
91/32
67/19
72/22
81/27
85/29
103/39
86/30
89/31
67/19
838/31
59/15
90/32
80/26
82/27
72/22
68/20
93/33
82/27
72/22
95/35
71/21
82/27
74/23
79/26






Low W
F/C
77/25 t
55/12 4
54/12 pc
70/21 s
48/8 pc
77/25 +
77/25 sh
68/20 p
61/16 s
74/23 s
56/13 s
63/17 s
76/24 s
45/7 p
50/10 r
52/11 s
43/8 p
72/22 $s
81/27 sh
54/12 s
75/23 pc
72/22 t
62/16 s
64/17 s
43/8 sh
57/13 t
62/16 pc
50/10 s
72/22 t
55/12 sh
81/27 t
77/25 t
65/18 sh
59/15 s
51/10 pc
79/26 t
59/15 s
54/12 sh
61/16 p
79/26 t
54/12 t
70/21 t
54/12 s
50/10 s
SMES
53/11 p
81/27 t
58/14 r
54/12 4
54/12 s
74/23 s
79/26 s
63/17 s
pi
pi
t
C
pi
t
s
pi
Ss
p
r
s

oO

oO

80/26
41/5
70/21
46/7
73/22
61/16
57/13
59/15
52/11
80/26
73/22
54/12
73/22 pc
56/13 pc
63/17 s
54/12 s
54/12 s

Wednesday

High
F/C
92/33
66/18
79/26
84/28
59/15
88/31
86/30
77/25
81/27
79/26
85/29
77/25
82/27
69/20
72/22
84/28
63/17
95/35
91/32
73/22
90/32
82/27
77/25
68/20
59/15
77/25
73/22
70/21
88/31
72/22
91/32
96/35
77/25
82/27
76/24
88/31
73/22
70/21
91/32
84/28
77/25
87/30
79/26
73/22
73/22
81/27
90/32
65/18
70/21
74/23
87/30
103/39
82/27
89/31
62/16
88/31
55/12
86/30
85/29
81/27
68/20
70/21
91/32
77/25
73/22
93/33
73/22
80/26
73/22
78/25

Low
F/C
78/25
52/11
48/8
67/19
45/7
78/25
78/25
68/20
59/15
76/24
59/15
59/15
75/23
42/5
54/12
56/13
48/8
69/20
81/27
48/8
USES
73/22
63/17
57/13
50/10
55/12
50/10
55/12
71/21
54/12
81/27
75/23
64/17
62/16
51/10
79/26
60/15
55/12
57/13
77/25
55/12
72/22
55/12
55/12
52/11
53/11

Ww

pec
sh
pc
$
$
t
pc
pc

>

io > [Gon mr fee ms Keog — ioe Cc) foe 0 ioe er ee iS
=>

wn
—

78/25 t

54/12
50/10
52/11
77/25
78/25
63/17
79/26

38/3
73/22

37/2
74/23
66/18
59/15
52/11
57/13
81/27
72/22
57/13
73/22
58/14
65/18
55/12
53/11

nw
——

YO Gan baw ea
oO

nna nT HN
— of

s
sh
pc
$
pc
$
pc
pc
$

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 01st, 2009, PAGE 9B



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MariINE FORECAST






WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 86° F
Wednesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 86° F
FREEPORT Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 85° F
Wednesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 85° F
ABACO Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 83° F
Wednesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 84° F



Miami
89/78

Showers
T-storms







Rain Fronts

=. 4) Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and -
Be] Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm finfitentie
[v=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Megumi
10s Os [/0s/ 10s 20s (805i) 40s (50s Gos 70s (80s [G0s///i0neNits]



Ny.

Be Bl
gu Gan J Hurricane

Or you can & easy knowing

that 3 have excellent insurance
4 coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

P| | INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
y (BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

aaah ee at a ial icran ae eeed segue ct


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1,



2009

For the very best features . . .
WWW. nibune?42. CO



tos Mo

Li
ok. a: . wT.

ss feels eae = Aa





One lucky woman will be chosen to represent the Bahamas...

MODELS show off their swimsuits. Do



you have what it takes to become Miss
Swimsuit USA International?

Sixty to vie for Miss
Swimsuit USA title

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

or the second time this
year, the Bahamas will be
the host country of an
international pageant.
Sixty gorgeous women from coun-
tries across the earth will gather at
the Nassau Wyndham Resort on
November 15 to compete for the
title of Miss Swimsuit USA Inter-
national. The stakes are high, and
one lucky woman will be chosen to
represent the Bahamas as host
queen.
The competition to decide who



that lucky lady is four weeks from
now, when 15 ladies in the country
will compete for the crown of Miss
Swimsuit USA Bahamas, and you
may have what it takes.

Do you have the perfect combi-
nation of beauty and brains, do you
possess a sexy swimsuit body, have a
memorable personality, and are you
between the ages of 18-28? If you
answered yes to all of those ques-
tions, then you may be a candidate
for the Miss Swimsuit USA
Bahamas competition which will
take place in a matter of weeks.

This competition will prove a great
opportunity for the right candidates,

=

4
”

’
‘

talent and model scout OilinSha
Coakley, coordinator for the Swim-
suit USA Bahamas Competition told
Tribune Features yesterday.

Final

The final competition on Septem-
ber 26 at the British Colonial Hilton
will precede three weeks of fiercely
televised competition between 15
beautiful women. “In each episode,
they will be coached on how to walk,
how to take pictures, they will shoot
commercials, and have fitness chal-
lenges devised by some of the lead-
ing fitness gurus in The Bahamas.”

On September 26, the ladies will
compete for the title of Miss Swim-
suit Bahamas USA. The winner will
receive a $1,000 cash prize, profes-
sional coaching by Mr Coakley him-
self, who will instruct them on how
to present their best self to advance
through the preliminary rounds of
the international pageant.

The winner of Miss Bahamas
USA will go on to compete against
50 women in the Miss Swimsuit
USA International competition.
The top 15 finalists will receive a
complimentary personal photo shoot
and will appear in the Swimsuit USA
Calendar. World renowned profes-

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway * 394-1759



sional photographers Doug Carter,
Steve Nix and Mickey Sehorn will
photograph the beauties.

If you are interested in compet-
ing in the Swimsuit USA Bahamas
competition on September 26, you
can call OilinSha Models and Tal-
ents at 325-5288 or email a head-
shot, and any photos of yourself,
including contact information to
supermodelbahamas@yahoo.com.



You can also visit their studio on
Collins Avenue, Ninth terrace- locat-
ed on the right hand side of Frank
Hanna Cleaning company. Appli-
cations are available at their office at
any time during the day.