Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 105 No.228





CLASSIFIEDS TRADER CL







The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

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OBITUARIES

Lime
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

Lawyers to seek
Union cash prove

President wants
police investigation
of ‘transferred funds’

LAWYERS working on
behalf of the president of
the Bahamas Hotel Cater-
ing and Allied Workers
Union say they will file a
police complaint in connec-
tion with almost $700,000
allegedly transferred by
union executives.

Attorney Damian Gomez
said it was of "urgent" con-
cern for the union to try to
recoup the money to meet
expenses. He said he would
also seek a Supreme Court
order to freeze the transfers.

"They have to first of all
locate funds in (those)
accounts, the union has a lot
of claims for sick benefits,

and finding in the short term
$665,000 is not an easy
task," he told The Tribune.

Yesterday, union presi-
dent Roy Colebrook said he
did not think the money dis-
pute would affect the
union's capability of meeting
payroll for its employees,
but added it was too early
to say conclusively.

"The fact of the matter is
we have to wait and see,"
Mr Colebrook said.

Mr Gomez called the act a
clear "abuse" of power and
said the union plans to press
criminal charges.

SEE page 11

Man in custody after
shooting incident

A MAN was taken into custody after a shooting incident in
which a relative received leg injuries, according to police.

While the identities of those involved have not been released,
police said the victim in hospital is in a “non life-threatening”
condition. Police, who seized a weapon, said investigations

are continuing.

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ABOVE: Two of the four cars dam-
aged in the fender-bender.

RIGHT: Minister of Culture Charles
Maynard inspects the damage to
his Crown car yesterday

A FENDER-BENDER at
the junction of Deveaux and
Dowdeswell Streets caused
damage to four cars — includ-
ing the parked Crown car of
Minister of Culture Charles
Maynard — yesterday.

A woman driving a Nissan
Altima heading west on
Dowdeswell Street and another
woman driving a Nissan Maxi-
ma heading south on Deveaux
Street collided, causing the first
driver to swerve out of the way,
witnesses said.

The first driver then crashed
into a Ford Explorer — parked
in front of the 102.9 FM radio
station — which backed into
the parked Crown sedan dri-
ven by Mr Maynard.

Mr Maynard, and the owner
of the SUV, radio personality
Eddie Carter were inside the
station at the time of the acci-
dent.

Police and EMS were called
to the scene but no one was
seriously injured.

ST THUMP aT
TENET ST DT

AS A second man is
charged in connection with
the July murder of a
Bahamian man in Florida,
police in that State are now
saying the victim came to
the US to conduct a large
drug transaction.

Last week Eric White, 31
of West Palm Beach was
first to be charged with first
degree murder and armed
robbery with a firearm in
connection with the killing
of Kahlil Holmes.

Now Alonzo Benjamin,





Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

_
ii

31, of Lake Park, has also
been charged, appearing in
court earlier this week.
And for the first time,
police in West Palm Beach
have revealed some hint
into the circumstances sur-
rounding Holmes’ death —
saying he had come to do a
drug deal, according to the
Florida Sun-Sentinel.
Holmes’ half-sister Juliet
had told The Tribune that
she did not know why her

SEE page 10

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Customs officers
could hold mass
demonstration

CUSTOMS officers could
hold a "massive demonstra-
tion” as early as the weekend
if Government does not meet
a Friday deadline to halt the
transfer and interdiction of
some 30 officers.

President of the Bahamas
Public Service Union (BPSU)
John Pinder said the threat of
large scale industrial action at
the Department of Customs
would be next. He alleged
that Government violated its
industrial agreement and did
not follow procedure in its
move to transfer and interdict
the officers.

"If they don't reply by Fri-
day we will take the next
step... There could be a mas-
sive demonstration. We wrote
to the permanent secretary
and the minister for the pub-
lic service and we have not
gotten any response,” said Mr
Pinder.

On July 31 the Ministry of
Finance said that 16 officers
were being interdicted pend-
ing the outcome of miscon-
duct charges against them.
Ten more officers were
advised that they were to be
transferred to other depart-
ments.

Three other officers were
retired in the public interest
and one was being given ear-
ly retirement.

SEE page 10

Bahamas could
be affected
by Tropical

Storm Danny

FORECASTERS are
hoping the projected path
for Tropical Storm Danny
does not change in the next
12 hours, as a shift to the
west could spell trouble for
the Abacos.

At press time last night,
the storm system was pre-
dicted to move along a par-
allel path to the east of the
Bahamas, missing Abaco by
approximately 250 miles.

However, meteorologists
at the US-based forecast
company AccuWeather said
there is still a slight chance
Danny will track farther
west.

The forecast models yes-
terday indicated that the
Abacos would make a lucky
escape and only be affected
by slightly increased winds
and some rain showers at
around 8 o’clock tonight.

AccuWeather said they
predict Danny will become a
hurricane by tomorrow or
early Saturday.

While the Bahamas is not

SEE page 10





PAGE 2, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





RBDF photo/Able Mechanic Al Rahming





RBDF MARINES direct the disembarking of the immigrants from the two Defence
Force vessels, P-48 and P 49.

RBDF apprehends
196 Haitian migrants

A TOTAL of 196 Haitian migrants were appre-
hended in the Exuma chain after they were spot-
ted by members of the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force on Monday morning.

While on routine patrol, Defence Force vessel
P-42 under the command of Petty Officer Lincoln
Rolle spotted a 40-foot Haitian sailing sloop five
nautical miles southwest of Darby Island.

Upon further investigation, they discovered the
migrants — 149 men and 47 women — who all

appeared to be in fair health.

The Haitian migrants did not possess the nec-
essary documents to enter the country and were
subsequently taken into custody. They were
removed from their unsanitary vessel and taken
onboard two Defence Force craft, P-48 and P-
49. Both vessels arrived in New Providence at
approximately 11pm on Tuesday.

The migrants were handed over to Immigra-
tion officials for further processing.

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THE international commu-
nity yesterday mourned the
death of Senator Edward
“Ted” Kennedy who died at
his home in New England
after a long battle with brain
cancer.

The 77-year-old was the
only one of his three broth-
ers to die a natural death.

He was the youngest broth-
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Kennedy and Senator Robert
Kennedy, both victims of
assassinations.

His oldest brother Joseph
Patrick Kennedy, Jr, 29, was
killed on August 12, 1944 dur-
ing World War IT when the
plane — filled with explosives
— that he was piloting from
England to France exploded
before he and another crew
member could bail out.

Senator Kennedy came to
office in November 1962, and
at the time of his death was
the second most senior mem-
ber of the Senate after Robert
Byrd of West Virginia, and
the third-longest-serving sen-
ator in United States history.

He was graduated from
Harvard in 1956 and from the
University of Virginia School
of Law in 1959.

His 1958 marriage to Vir-
ginia Joan Bennett produced
three children and ended in
divorce in 1982. In 1992 he
married Victoria Anne Reg-
gie, a Washington lawyer.

He was a manager in his
brother John's successful 1960
campaign for the presidency.

He then worked as an
Assistant District Attorney
for Suffolk County, Massa-
chusetts.

He entered the Senate in a
1962 special election to fill the
seat once held by his brother
John.

Senator Kennedy was seri-
ously injured in an airplane
crash in 1964 and suffered
from lifelong back pain as a
result.

He was elected to his first
six-year Senate term in 1964

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d Kennedy

SENATOR EDWARD ‘TED’ KENNEDY (AP)

and was re-elected in 1970,
1976, 1982, 1988, 1994, 2000
and 2006.

Senator Kennedy battled a
malignant brain tumour first
diagnosed in May 2008, which
greatly limited his appear-
ances in the Senate; though
he survived longer than doc-
tors first predicted, he died
just before midnight on Tues-
day at his home in Hyannis
Port, Massachusetts.

Yesterday, President
Barack Obama led tributes to
the deceased politician,



describing him as a colleague,
counsellor and a friend.

President Obama, whom
Senator Kennedy endorsed
during last year’s presidential
race, said: "His ideas and
ideals are stamped on scores
of laws and reflected in mil-
lions of lives.”

Funeral services for Sena-
tor Kennedy will be held on
Saturday morning at a
Boston, Massachusetts,
church before his burial in
Arlington National Ceme-
tery.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Closure of Vista
Marina access

THE Ministry of
Works and Transport
announced that the
access to Vista Marina
west of the Shell Ser-
vice Station has been
closed to traffic to
effect the construction
of Corridor 18, part of
the New Providence
Road Improvement
Project.

“The Ministry of
Works and Transport
takes this opportunity
to apologise to the pub-
lic for any inconve-
nience that may be
caused by this closure
and requests that the
public use the alternate
route — Grove Avenue
through Coral Drive,”
said the ministry in a
statement.

“We anticipate that
the contractor, Jose
Cartellone Construc-
ciones Civiles, will
carefully carry out the
works in accordance
with the contract speci-
fications.

“We look forward to
your full co-operation
and encourage the dri-
ving public to exercise
patience and caution
when travelling in the
area during the con-
struction phase,” it
said.

BEC problems in
Central Andros

THE Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation
admitted that it contin-
ues to experience “gen-
eration problems” in
Central Andros.

BEC issued a State-
ment yesterday explain-
ing that a mobile genera-
tor is being sent to the
power station in Fresh
Creek.

electricity supply will be
restored by week's end,”
it said.

“Our staff will contin-
ue to work diligently to
correct these generation
problems for our con-
sumers in Central
Andros.

“The corporation apol-
ogises for any inconve-
nience caused.”

Low-cost
airline
plans flights
to Nassau

A LOW-COST airline
designed for business
travellers has filed appli-
cations with the US
Department of Trans-
portation to begin flying
into Nassau.

AirTran Airways yes-
terday announced plans
to start service to three
Caribbean destinations,
including the Bahamas,
Aruba and Jamaica, lat-
er this year and early in
2010 from a combination
of key American cities.

The Florida-based
airline said it proposes
to service Nassau and
Montego Bay, Jamaica,
from Atlanta, Baltimore
and Orlando; while ser-
vice to Aruba would
originate in Atlanta and
Orlando.

"Adding our low-cost,
high-quality service from
some of our largest
operations to some of
the most popular desti-
nations in the Caribbean
is a win-win for con-
sumers and for AirTran
Airways," said Kevin
Healy, senior vice-presi-
dent of marketing and
planning in a statement.

"There's nothing
quite like jetting off toa
tropical island in the
middle of winter, and we
look forward to making
that possible from some
of the largest cities in
our network."

“We anticipate that the }

CROWDS outside of the RIU Hotel on Monday evening.



No charges over
hij acked@’ furniture

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ALTHOUGH describing their behaviour as
“absolutely wrong” a Social Services official
said the department will not be pressing charges
against those who “hijacked” furniture des-
tined for the under-privileged.

The source said that while the Department
took steps to determine who the culprits were
and acted on tips to find out who might have
received furniture from these individuals, it
will not be pursuing the matter any further.

“Tt’s a sad thing that people take advantage
said the official, adding however
that to press charges would cause a “whole

of things,”

host of other problems.”

This comes after pandemonium broke out at
RM Bailey school on Monday afternoon when
unwanted furniture from the RIU Hotel on
Paradise Island, which is undergoing renova-
tions, was taken by delivery men who were
supposed to be driving it to the school so it
could be donated to the poor.

Hundreds of people had gathered at the
school as well as outside the hotel waiting for
their chance to get a pick of desks, television

sets, mattresses and other household items that
were to be given away in a generous gesture by
the operators of RIU hotel in a Social Services
co-lead operation.

But the delivery men reportedly “hijacked”
a number of trucks loaded with these items
and took them to other locations where they
either sold them or handed them out to family

members and friends.

anymore.

Minister of State for
Social Services Loretta
Butler-Turner said that
she was very disturbed by
the events and could now
see why other hotels “just
get rid of their stuff”
when they don’t want it

The Social Services
source yesterday told The j /
Tribune that the delivery [iRjpnewemReailtn(te
drivers involved were
identified and will not be doing any work for
the department in the future.



In a tribune242.com poll, only four respon-

dents said that the hard economic times led to
the furniture being hijacked, while 77 thought
“weak morality” was to blame.

GB Shipyard expat
workforce reduced

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— The expa-
triate workforce at the Grand
Bahama Shipyard has been
reduced as a result of a
decline in business this sum-
mer.

Carl Gustaf-Rotkirch,
chairman and CEO, said that
none of the Bahamian work-
ers have been laid off.

“We have had a very slow
summer, but we expect that
business will pick up from
mid-September and then we
will have a very good work
load up to the beginning of
spring,” Mr Gustaf-Rotkirch
told The Tribune.

He reported that the ship-
yard now employs a total of
750 workers, having reduced
its workforce from around 800
workers. There are 320
Bahamians employed there.

“We have laid off and our

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numbers has been going
down; we have reduced dur-
ing this summer period...
and had sent some expatriate
workers home, but we have
not sent any Bahamians
home,” said the executive.

The company instead
entered into arrangements
with union representatives for
“rolling” or temporary lay-
offs for its Bahamian work-
ers.

Employees

“We have had rolling lay-
offs during July and August.
It was something that was
negotiated with the union
where we had an arrangement

. in such a way that during
the four week period there
was a one week lay-off for
employees, but from a rolling
basis when the yard was inop-
erable,” he said.

“This arrangement did not
affect employees’ income; we
paid some compensation and
we also paid some wage relat-
ed costs.”

According to Gustaf-
Rotkirch, the management
started noticing a decline in
business in May. However, he
expects to bring in some
workers when the load picks

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up in September.

In March, the shipyard
experienced one of its busiest
periods. During that time, the
facility acquired its third dock
at a cost of $60 million.

The shipyard is the largest
ship care facility in the region,
with the largest dry dock in
the region. Operations began
in 1999, and grew from an
enterprise earning a few mil-
lion dollars a year and with
under 100 employees to a full
scale facility earning revenue
of over $130 million.

There have been reports of
a possible strike at the facility
over allegations that two
union shop stewards were
wrongfully dismissed.

The Grand Bahama Port
Authority Workers Union has
filed a dispute with the
Department Labour and has
threatened to take a strike
vote if the workers are not
reinstated.

Mr Gustaf-Rotkirch did not
wish to comment on the mat-
ter. He said the shipyard has
not met with employees.

“T have read the reports of
wrongful dismissal of two
shop stewards and at this
stage we would not like to
comment because it is in
process,” he said.






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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

New energy needed in Mid-East peace

PRINCETON, N.J. — Two international
opinion polls released this summer indicate
that global views toward the U.S. are improv-
ing — in no small part due to the election of
Barack Obama as president.

The polls, by the Pew Global Attitudes
Project and worldpublicopinion.org, both
stress that President Obama is viewed posi-
tively in most of the countries surveyed, but
questions remain in the Middle East about
the direction of U:S. policies.

Conducting an informal survey of analysts
from or based in the Arab world, the experts
with whom we spoke emphatically agree: To
increase and sustain U.S. standing in the Mid-
dle East, Obama must achieve some gains
— quickly — with the Israeli-Palestinian
peace process. In the Middle East, “People
seem to trust President Obama and are will-
ing to give him the benefit of the doubt,”
said Amjad Attallah, director of the Middle
East programme at the New America Foun-
dation, a think tank. The analysts concur that
since taking office the president has made
all the right moves, speaking with a respect-
ful and rational tone to Arabs and Muslims
about US. foreign policy toward the region.

While the U'S. presence in Iraq, as well as
democracy and human rights in the region,
are key issues, “the Palestinian-Israeli issue is
on the consciousness of every Arab and Mus-
lim everywhere in the world,” said Selamah
Nematt, international editor for the popular
Daily Beast blog.

Faris Brizat, a pollster and adjunct profes-
sor at Qatar University, warned, “There is a
growing sense of apathy, people are losing
faith,” in the Arab world that Mideast peace
can be achieved. Summing up the thoughts of
every expert with whom we spoke, Nematt
stated, “President Obama has got to deliver
something.”

Even as the White House has set in motion
a multi-pronged diplomatic initiative in the
region, the environment in which the Obama
administration must operate in many ways
could not be more challenging: In the Pales-
tinian territories the long-dominant Fatah
party controls the West Bank, while the rad-
icalized Hamas, which refuses to recognize
Israel, controls Gaza.

Indeed, Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah
recently lamented that such internal divisions
have done more damage “in a few months” to
the Palestinians’ cause than had years of con-
flict with Israel. And while Israel’s Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has come to
endorse the two-state solution supported by
the White House, Netanyahu, citing security
concerns, thus far has refused to freeze Israeli
settlement activity in the West Bank, and has
insisted that the issue of Palestinian refugees
must be solved outside Israel’s borders.

Subsequently, Saad Eddin Ibrahim, an
Egyptian scholar and democracy activist,
argues that whatever plan Obama devises,

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THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

“ The way to face Christ as judge
is to know Him as your saviour.”

SUNDAY SERVICES

he should “speak to Israelis and Palestinians
directly about the benefits of resolving the
conflict, and in doing so bring people back
into the political process, rather than rely-
ing on their leaders who have been dragging
their feet for over 60 years.”

In fact, in August senior White House offi-
cials told reporters that the Obama adminis-
tration, building on the success of the presi-
dent’s June speech in Cairo, plans to launch
a public relations campaign directed at Israeli,
Palestinian, and Arab publics, to articulate the
president’s comprehensive vision for Mideast
peace. This plan was echoed by a recent
report, “Window of Opportunity for a Two-
State Solution,” from the Centre for Ameri-
can Progress, a think tank, which encouraged
the Obama administration to launch a “pub-
lic outreach and strategic communications
effort in the Middle East,” with the aim of
“building the foundations of public support
and to prepare public opinion for the likely
concessions involved” in any final deal.

Such a campaign, the report’s authors
assert, “cannot wait for an actual negotiated
agreement that can then be ‘sold’” to these
publics. Achieving gains in the peace process
involves overcoming vast historical, diplo-
matic, and policy challenges, which cannot
be swept aside by a PR campaign. But failing
to engage in a strategic outreach initiative
and conducting effective public diplomacy
in the pursuit of policy interests does have
consequences for peace.

For example, Hady Amr, director of the
Brookings Doha Centre think tank in Qatar,
asserted that the Arab League has lost a cru-
cial opportunity to effectively explain its
peace plan, endorsed by all of its members, to
Israelis. “If the Arab countries really wanted
to eliminate all doubts that they’re serious
about the plan, they would’ve translated their
peace plan into Hebrew, “taken out ads about
it in Israeli newspapers,” Amr said. “This is
an era of global public relations.”

Though major foreign policy decisions and
high-level diplomacy should not be deter-
mined by public opinion polls, in the Mideast
Obama clearly has a chance to build on his
reputation and what some experts described
as his likeability based on his personal nar-
rative. “The industry of America-bashing is
not thriving as it was before Obama,”
quipped Ibrahim. The U.S. should commu-
nicate that it is serious about its commitment
to the peace process, demonstrating to all
parties that the benefits of peace, particular-
ly in the form of U.S. support and solidarity,
outweigh the costs of conflict. Otherwise, the
White House risks squandering such leverage
and losing credibility with publics in a region
critical to America’s interests.

(This article was written by Steven Barnes
and Nadia Bilbassy - c.2009 Hearst Newspa-

pers).



700am, S00am, 11:15am
PASTOR EARLE FRANCES JUP_0.0.

Martia

Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448

Officer, Counsell, Itlarceascr
D2d-AS2 © 0-578
Fax: d26-d4eeod-diie

My three
ways to
cut crime

EDITOR, The Tribune.

With yet another senseless
crime, the people are again up
in arms demanding the police,
the government or somebody
do something about crime.
Ordinary citizens are crying out
for justice, pastors are preach-
ing. What are they saying?
Hang, Hang, Hang!

Sigh. Here we go again.
Every time there is another
senseless crime in this country,
there is this huge chorus crying
out to hang the perpetrators,
as if that in and of itself would
cause crime to cease instantly.
Not withstanding research
proving the world over that this
is simply not the case, and the
fact that it is inhumane, they
still cry out for it. Why? Simply
answer, they don't know what
else to do and unfortunately
apparently neither does the
police force or our government!

In a recent Tribune article
the Minister of National Secu-
rity asserted that, crime was a
personal choice and to para-
phrase him, if we were able to
put two police officers in every
home we could do something
about it, but unfortunately that
was not feasible. People need to
make better choices. With that
type of attitude from the very
top it’s no wonder that the
country is in the state it is in.

Where there is no vision the
people will suffer!

To be fair to the Minister
this crime situation did not hap-
pen overnight and neither can it
be resolved overnight. But the
attitude he presents is as if to
throw his hands up and say

LETTERS

letters@triobunemedia.net



there's nothing that can be
done. Coming from the man
who is supposed to be leading
the fight against crime this is
disturbing to say the least.

Let me present three areas
that the Government could
address that will cause crime to
decrease significantly within the
next five years.

Court/Legal System

The court system in this
country has to be more effi-
cient. There are too many cases
before the courts to be dealt
with by the number of Justices
available. The minister should
actively engage professionals
within the sector and outside
analyst to come up with solu-
tions and then implement them.
Secondly, the bail system needs
serious review and correction.
It is a known fact that a large
percentage of crimes are com-
mitted by persons on bail.
Therefore correcting this sys-
tem could have the most imme-
diate impact on crime in this
country.

Penal System

Her Majesty's Fox Hill
Prison is legendary for its harsh
conditions. This prison has to
be upgraded to a more modern
facility and expanded to avoid
over crowding. In addition the
whole purpose of the facility
has to be re-evaluated. The cur-
rent model is just not working;
according to a prison reform
report in 2003 there is a 70 per

cent recidivism rate in this
country. The focus in prison has
to be placed on education,
vocational training and life
counseling. Basically we need
to focus more on rehabilitation
rather than retribution.

Education

For more than a decade the
graduating grade average has
been D or lower. Many stu-
dents are simply given leaving
certificates because they do not
meet the minimum grade
required to graduate. These
persons are functioning illiter-
ates, unable to think through
complex problems, make logi-
cal leaps to find solutions, can-
not think in the abstract, cannot
comprehend and are easily
influenced. With these statis-
tics is anyone seriously sur-
prised that crime has been
increasing at an alarming rate?
There is a direct correlation
between crime and education.
For instance, in 1993 two thirds
of all incarcerated men in the
USA did not graduate high
school (Freeman, 1996). Unfor-
tunately definitive Bahamian
statistics are not readily avail-
able, but it follows that they
would be similar.

There needs to be a para-
digm shift in this country in
regards to these three areas. It
is time for our leaders to make
bold decisions, step to the front
and lead. We cannot continue
doing the same things and
somehow expecting better
results.

GR WILSON
Nassau,
August 25, 2009

My view on the port location controversy

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There are a lot of issues per-
taining to the Port location.
Some people have issues, some
trying to find issues, some along
racial lines but what I know is it
has the country divided. In my
opinion what I heard in many
settings is that the “Bay Street
Guys” don’t want to drive all
the way to Clifton because
some of them too old, some
want to save on the cost of gas
so, Arawak Cay is closer and
as we all know they are the
ones who control the finance
in the country and are the
financial engine of the FNM.
What concerns me most is what
those in their inner circle are
saying. It is claimed they do not
want to drive through the “nig-
ger” areas to get to work espe-
cially at night and having to
travel along Carmichael Road.











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To me, in 2009 this kind of
thinking is deplorable but it
appears to me they have no
intention of putting prejudice
aside. One is claimed to have
said they could more take the
"black Bahamians" but to have
to deal with all those filthy
Haitians and their nasty chil-
dren is too much for them. My
reason for writing this letter is
simple because before the Port
issue came up I suggested in
1987 that it would make sense
to move the capital to Andros.
Istated in previous letters that
when I suggested that Minister
Peter Bethell responded that I
want Andros because I am
from there and I told him —
put it in Eleuthera then because
New Providence is too con-
gested so we need to make a
serious move. Not only have I
said move the capital but move
all Government offices to
Andros and let those who work
in those offices commute to
Andros. It only takes 10 min-
utes by air and if the port is at
Clifton then it should only take
about 30 minutes by Fast Ferry.
In two years Andros, South
Abaco and the Berry Islands
would benefit if the port is at



Clifton because farmers and
fishermen would be able to
bring their produce and catch
into New Providence in the
morning and be back home in
the evening. This is common
sense to me but like we say
common sense ain’t common.
We are spending million of dol-
lars to repair Lynden Pindling
Airport why not take that mon-
ey beautify the airport and
build a new larger airport in
Andros to accommodate large
air craft from Europe and Asia,
name the airport Clarence A
Bain Airport and use the air-
port as a Hub for Turks Island,
Cuba, Haiti and the Cayman
Islands. When I heard both
Governments talking about
building a university in New
Providence and now they are
looking for land in New Provi-
dence to build a hospital. Well
the last time I heard such fool-
ishness is when Christopher
Columbus said he discovered
The Bahamas and then said he
met Indians here.

AUDLEY D HANNA Sr
Nassau,
August, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE



The Bahamas to expand
war on drug trafficking

THE Bahamas is expand-
ing its efforts in the war on
narcotics trafficking to
include stopping the diver-
sion of pharmaceuticals and
precursor chemicals from
“licit into illicit” channels,
National Security Perma-
nent Secretary Missouri
Sherman-Peter said.

She said these efforts
would include the imple-
mentation of “systems rec-
ommended to tackle those
issues.”

The Bahamas has been
“resolute in its efforts” to
counter the trafficking of
drugs and psychotropic sub-
stances, she asserted.

Legislation

“We have decisively
addressed pivotal matters
such as money laundering,
have amended and/ or
adopted legislation as
appropriate, and have
established mechanisms
including the Financial
Intelligence Unit,” said Mrs
Sherman-Peter.

“The areas generally tar-
geted by National Anti-
Drug Plans are well-known
to us in the Bahamas (as)
we have worked relentless-
ly and tirelessly in these
areas for decades.”

Mrs Sherman-Peter was
addressing officials from
several government agen-
cies attending a three-day
training workshop on the
Bahamas National Anti-
Drug Plan, 2010-2014.

Those agencies included
the National Anti-Drug
Secretariat, Bahamas
National Drug Council,
Bahamas National Drug
Agency, the Ministry of
Health, the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force, Her
Majesty’s Prison, the Cus-
toms Department and the
Port Department.



LOCAL NEWS

NATIONAL SECURITY Permanent Secretary Missouri Sherman-Peter

Officials from the Min-
istry of National Security
also attended the workshop.
They are expected to help
draft the country’s next
National Anti-Drug Plan.

The workshop covered
topics such as institutional
framework analysis, legal
framework analysis, strate-
gic planning and social
analysis.

Mrs Sherman-Peter said
the lessons learned would
culminate in the launch of a
“new phase” in the
Bahamas’ drug control
efforts in the form of a sec-
ond five-year National
Anti-Drug Plan. The first
plan ends this year.

The workshop was hosted
by the Inter-American
Drug Abuse Control Com-
mission (CICAD), in con-
junction with the Bahamas’
National Anti-Drug Secre-
tariat, and was facilitated
by Maria Beatriz Galvis,
CICAD Specialist.

CICAD was established
in 1986 by the General
Assembly of the Organisa-
tion of American States

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Each member-state
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regional co-operation and
co-ordination among the 34
OAS member-states
through action programmes
carried out by the Perma-
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Its core mission is to
strengthen human and insti-
tutional capabilities and har-
ness the collective energy of
its member-states to reduce
the production, trafficking
and use and abuse of drugs
in the Americas.

“Drug control is serious
work and the National Anti-
Drug Plan we develop here,
must provide the framework
in which we continue to do
this serious work,” Mrs
Sherman Peter-said.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamians remember former

South Korean President Kim

SIR ARTHUR FOULKES is administered the oath of office as

Deputy to the Governor-General by Chief Justice Michael Barnett.
Derek Smith/BIS ;

The new Chief Justice

conducts first official act.

MICHAEL Barnett conducted his first official act as Chief
Justice when he swore in Sir Arthur Foulkes as Deputy to the }

Governor-General at Government House yesterday.

Governor-General Arthur Hanna and Mrs Beryl Hanna

are on a visit to Miami.

Sir Arthur is the director general at Bahamas Informa-

tion Services.

Mr Barnett’s appointment was announced over the week-

end and he was sworn in on Monday.

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IN RECOGNITION of the
death of former South Korean
President Kim Dae-jung, Gov-
ernor-General Arthur Hanna
and other government officials
signed the Book of Condolence
at Zode House on Tuesday.

Mr Kim is remembered
mostly for his passionate
efforts to unify North and
South Korea.

As president, he led the his-
toric inter-Korean summit in
June 2000, the first of its kind
since the division of country 55
years ago.

His ‘Sunshine Policy’ helped
lessen the hostility between
South and North Korea and led
to a new wave of reconciliation,
co-operation and peace on the
Korean peninsula.

In December 2000, he was
awarded the Nobel Peace Prize
in recognition of his contribu-
tion to promoting democracy
and human rights in Asian
countries and his pursuit of
policies to achieve inter-Kore-
an reconciliation.

ce
ca
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cc
_
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o
a



GOVERNOR-GENERAL Arthur
Hanna signs the Book of Condo-
lence while Honorary Consul for
Korea Maxwell Gibson observes.

RIGHT: Newly sworn in Chief Justice Michael Barnett signs the
Book of Condolence on the passing of South Korean
President Kim Dae-jung.

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explained that as Providence Advisors celebrates their 3-year anniversary this
summer, the group decided to continue its commitment to contribute to the positive
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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Manatee dies despite
Atlantis team’s efforts

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE the efforts of a
dedicated team from Atlantis’
marine rehabilitation centre a
severely emaciated manatee
which came from Florida to
make the Bahamas its new
home has died.

The journeying sea creature
had been spotted in various
locations throughout the
Bahamian islands - finally being
rescued from waters off
Clarence Town, Long Island,
last Thursday - but by the time
it got help it was too late.

Despite “round-the-clock
care” the manatee expired 48
hours after the rescue.

At that time, the endangered
Florida manatee - nicknamed
“Crusoe” after the British
adventurer - weighed 750
pounds, less than half the
amount of a healthy adult man-
atee.

Charles Manire, a veterinar-
ian with Dolphin Cay at
Atlantis said the manatee’s
death was a sobering occasion
for him and his team of marine
mammal specialists.

“We've really wanted to be
able to help her and its sad for
all of us to not be able to do
more than what we were able
to,” he told The Tribune.

According to the veterinari-
an, tests found nothing med-
ically wrong with the manatee -
believed to be around 30 years
old - but the waters of the
Bahamas offer an inadequate
supply of the type of vegeta-
tion the species feeds on.

Consequently, “Crusoe” end-
ed up extremely weak from
chronic malnutrition and suf-
fering from an electrolyte
imbalance.

“She arrived in very critical
condition and her chances of
survival were very slim from
the outset,” said Dr Manire.

Dolphin Cay is home to one
of the only live marine mam-
mal rescue centres and is part

a



THE TEAM from Atlantis’ marine rehabilitation centre attempted to save the manatee.

of the Bahamas Marine Mam-
mal Stranding Network.

Their swift rescue attempt
last week came after Dr Manire
received information indicating
that the manatee had shown up
in Long Island, some 30 to 40
miles from Rum Cay, where it
was last sighted in April, 2009.

With the approval of the
Bahamian government and the
US Fish and Wildlife Service,
Dr Manire flew to the site only
to find “Crusoe” in an even less
healthy state than it had been in
when previously spotted.

“We were preparing to res-
cue her in Rum Cay and she
disappeared and didn’t show
back up until last week,” said
Dr Manire.

More marine mammal spe-
cialists flew to Long Island to
assist with the effort and they
were able to get the manatee
onto a DC-3 cargo plane and
fly it to Nassau, where it was
transferred to Dolphin Cay.

TMF airlines provided the
plane that was used for the res-
cue and the Miami Seaquari-
um had agreed to provide a
home for the manatee if the
marine specialists were able to
stabilise it.

A release issued by Atlantis
yesterday stated: “Despite the
unfortunate outcome, Crusoe
will yield valuable information
to researchers worldwide by

adding to the growing body of
knowledge about this unique
mammal.”

Meanwhile, Dr Manire told
The Tribune that manatees
could actually become a more
common sight in the Bahamas.

“It’s not very common but it

seems to be happening more
and more and there’s some
thought that as the population
is increasing in Florida they
may be actually be expanding
their range and showing up in
the Bahamas more and more,”
he said.

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The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are making
news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
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have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and
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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



FROM LEFT:
MARTY Smith,
paint technician at
AID; Dr Iva Dahl,
BTVI manager
and consultant;
Don Bain, BTVI
instructor, and
Juan Cardenas,
Martin-Senour
Paints’ district
sales manager



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TWO local companies are
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the opportunity to learn new
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Martin-Senour Paints and
Automotive and Industrial
Distributors (AID) recently
donated a $15,000 high-tech
tech base mixing system for
use in the institute's auto-
motive programme.

The donation, which was
facilitated by Juan Carde-
nas, district sales manager,
the Martin-Senour Compa-
ny, and Marty Smith, paint
technician at AID, is the lat-
est example of the recent
partnerships between BTVI
and the two companies.

“AID has been a valued
partner for many years,”
said Don Bain, head of the
department for the automo-
tive programme at BTVI.
“In particular, Jason Wat-
son, manager at AID has
been there for our pro-
gramme whenever we need-
ed his advice or assistance.”

“They help us with
resources and we give them
every opportunity to hire
our best students.”

Yesterday and today Mar-
tin-Senour Paints used the
institute as a resource for
training and providing work-

shops for paint technicians
in the area.

"This is a wonderful
opportunity for us too,” said
Sean Adderley, public rela-
tions officer.

"Not only has Martin-
Senour Paints donated a
tech base mixing system, but
our students and instructors
also have the chance to par-
ticipate in their factory train-
ing here on campus. They
will be able to learn first-
hand the latest in technology
from the manufacturers
themselves."

With this partnership, stu-
dents graduating from
BTVI's automotive pro-
gramme will have general
knowledge of Martin-
Senour Paints brand, which
will make them highly
employable as prospective
technicians, the company
said.

Companies like AID and
Martin-Senour Paints are
instrumental in helping us,”
said Dr Iva Dahl, manager
and consultant at BTVI.
"And this contribution will
be a tremendous help to the
students."



A TWO-DAY workshop for 200 junior and senior high school
teachers opened at the Church of God of Prophecy, East Street, on
August 25. It was sponsored by the Royal Bank of Canada and RBC
FINCO. Pictured at the lectern is Nathaniel Beneby, vice-president
and country head for RBC Royal Bank of Canada in the Bahamas,
addressing the participants. Seated right is Elma Garraway, per-
manent secretary in the Ministry of Education.

PICTURED ARE some of the participants in attendance

5. JOHNSON

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Treasure Cay Billfish
Tournament 2010
date is announced

THE Treasure Cay Hotel
Resort and Marina announced
that its 27th Annual Treasure Cay
Billfish Tournament (TCBT) will
be held from June 13-18, 2010.

This tournament follows the
remarkable 2009 victory by a 13-
year-old boy who out-fished sea-
soned anglers for first place. Fish-
ing aboard Team Galati, junior
angler Chris Galati of Anna
Maria, Florida, released two blue
marlin in one day, the largest
weighing nearly 500 Ibs.

The TCBT modified release
tournament offers four days of
fishing, social parties, dinners and
fun competitions.

It will continue its popular
guaranteed cash pay-out intro-
duced last year, ranging from
$10,000 for a minimum of ten
boats and up to $50,000 for par-
ticipation of 50 boats.

Open to the public, the tour-
nament format consists of multi-
ple awards for billfish, plus awards
for tuna, dolphin and wahoo.
Release point standings are veri-
fied by the participant’s own dig-
ital and/or video camera with an
image that can verify the time and
date the photo was taken.

Registration for up to six team
members, including boat entry,
cash prize eligibility, dinners,
cocktail parties, team goody bag
with t-shirts and hats and room
discounts is $2,950 per team.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS

Miss Bahamas Tourism Queen among
the favourites for international title



IN the final days leading up
to the Miss Tourism Queen
International competition,
one of the world’s leading
pageant websites is taking
note of Bahamian beauty
Tiara Cooper.

The statuesque beauty has
been named as one of the
favourites to win the coveted
title by the experts of the web-
site Global Beauties.

Tiara, who won the Miss
Bahamas Tourism Queen title
during the 2008 Miss
Bahamas World pageant, has
been competing at the
pageant in China for the last
three weeks.

She has visited several
provinces, experienced the
unique culture of China while

A
MISS BAHAMAS Tourism Queen Tiara Cooper.



promoting Bahamian culture
in the process.

There are 98 delegates
competing in the pageant
which culminates with the
grand finale on Friday.

The Miss Tourism Queen
International Pageant was
founded by Charlie See in
1949. In 1993, the Miss
Tourism Queen Organisation
held the first world final com-
petition in Sri Lanka, and lat-
er in the United States, Rus-
sia, Brazil, Germany, Japan,
Singapore, and many other
countries as well.

The contest then moved to
China in 2004, and has been
held there ever since, grow-
ing to the point where it is
now considered to be a ‘grand

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“10+ years expenence dealing with customers.

“10+ years expenance in emergency respanse.

“Knowledge of rasponse and incident command systams.

"Experience creating, analyzing and working within budgets.

"Experience writing and implementing processes and procedures.

‘Excelent computer skills, including ability to easily use MS Office Suite, process flowchart software,
vanous email, intemet, and other programs; ERP system knowledge preferred.

‘Excelent English communications skills, both in oral and written.

“Provan abiliy to generate excellent informational reports and presantahions.

“Ability 10 multitask,

“Experience implementing capital improvement projects; experience in project management preferred.
‘Demonstrated understanding of envirormental, DOT, USOG, safety, health and requiatory requirements
“Customer service (pus including the ability to speak diplomatically; problem solver.

‘Must have a minimum ot a Bachelor's Degree, Technical or Business major is pretered.

Ability to tunction in a high pressure environment.

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‘Experienced in ‘Change-Management

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slam pageant’ — one of the top
four in the world. With each
country's tourism ambas-
sadors coming together for
the event, Miss Tourism
Queen International aims to
enhance tourism develop-
ment, friendship among the
countries, and international
culture exchange.

Bahamians are encouraged
to boost Tiara’s chances in the
pageant by voting for her
online.

The contestant receiving
the highest number of votes
automatically advances to the
finals.

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



RUSSELL’S WAREHOUSE
CLOSING SALE
Rivet Rite Shelving, Gomdolas, Glass Shelves.

2. 4 Ann Display Racks, Graiwall, Slareall,
Slotted Standards, and Hardware. Asst Fixtures and Fittings,
Men's Cowerall’s 35.00), 5/5 & LOS Whie Shins 51-55,
Blank CDOs S50, Men’s Jeans sx. 46-50, 515,
Blank [0 Cards, 16° Stand Fans $20.04),

BIk School Shoes, 55.00) & S740), AND WORE,

Location: Whadeira Shopping Center

Behond Mystical Cayen = Entrance io Acuinas
First belt = First stairs on left,

Hours: Mion. to Thors. Sana to Spm
Contact: 465-848

REGISTRATION

Paralegal Associate Degree
Human Resource Management
ines aR M LC Ce

Institute of Business and Commerce - 324-4625

Registration for the 2009-2010 Swim
Year will take place at Queen & College
Pool on Saturday, 29th August, 2009 from
9:00am to 11:00am.

ALL SWIM GROUPS MUST REGISTER

(1) LEARN TO SWIM FOR CHILDREN
(2) COMPETITIVE SWIMMERS

x J “
=" Registration forms available
a on the website:
In addition, see our website for start dates,
prices and full swim schedules:
www. barracudaswimMmiing.or

Pa

Customs officers

FROM page one

Those outside of the group of
officers who were interdicted
were being moved as part of an
“ongoing restructuring exer-
cise”, said the Ministry.

"Article 35 (of the industrial
agreement) speaks to an offi-
cer having the right to refuse
any transfer if it will cause hard-
ship on him and in General

Orders, 604 speaks to the same | 1%

thing," he told The Tribune.
Mr Pinder also argued that
customs officers are afforded

five days notice of a transfer, but claimed
that in some cases officers were given 48
hours and some only 24 hours to respond.

Proceedings for the officers’ dismissal

Second man
charged in
connection with
Bahamian’s
murder in US
FROM page one

brother — who was said to
own a car and scooter rental
business — went to the U.S.



were said to be underway
before the 14-day period within
which the interdicted officers
had to respond to government,
Mr Pinder claimed.

He added that many customs
officers were up in arms because
they fear being unjustly treat-
ed by government as well.

"The majority of customs offi-
| cers are upset in the manner of
which it was done so they are
=| of the view that they might be
| next, so that's why we must
(end) this behaviour," said Mr
Pinder.

Attempts to reach the minis-
ter responsible for the public service, State
Finance Minister Zhirvargo Laing and
Comptroller of Customs Glenn Gomez
were unsuccessful yesterday.

Bahamas could be
alfected by Tropical
Storm Danny

Hurricane Centre (NHC)
said the centre of Tropi-
cal Storm Danny was

k 1
‘ ©

t
io

JOHN PINDER

FROM page one



but he had promised to return
to the Bahamas after only a
day to be at his sick father’s
side.

Jail records show the men
accused of killing Holmes
have both got drug-related
criminal records.

According to the Sun-Sen-
tinel, White was arrested at
least eight times since 1998,
and Benjamin at least five
times, mostly on traffic and
drug charges and for failing
to appear in court.

Records also show White
was in state prison from April
to September of 1998, and
Benjamin from July 2003 to
August 2004, both for convic-
tions on drug charges.

SUPERVISOR OF FINANCE

A leading Bahamian company, is secking applications tor a Supervisor of Finance

Jon OBJECTIVE:

To promde financal leadership for the company by managing the financal resources, supervising
the certain key aspects of the company’s accounting function and maintaining appropriate relations

with investors and regularney agencies.

(URGANTZATIONAL POSITION:
Reports to the Director of Finance

PRINCIPAL DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:

Core responsibilities include:
Assisting in managing the financal allairs of the company

Sapervise key components of the finance department

Ensure accurate and timely interim and annual financial reporting in accordance with

International Accomnting Standards

Assist in the annual budeer exercise

expected to be affected
by the storm, people on
the United States’ east
coast should monitor the
system closely.

Tropical Storm Danny
formed yesterday 470
miles east of the
Bahamas. It was expect-
ed to move on a north-
westward track through-
out today, staying east of
the Bahamas, before
turning more toward the
north tomorrow and
finally curving to the
north-east over the week-
end.

In its 5pm update, the
Miami-based National

located about 390 miles
east of Nassau.

It was moving toward
the west-northwest at
around 12mph with max-
imum sustained winds of
near 45mph.

Meanwhile, weather
experts have also started
watching another tropi-
cal wave coming off the
coast of Africa just south-
east of the Cape Verde
Islands. While conditions
are favourable for this
system to become more
organised, development
was not expected to
occur before early next
week.

a
ss

Colinalmperial

CAREER OPPORTUNITY
Reinsurance Consultant

‘Hooded men
Silay 12 in

could hold protest:

? forms without insignias on
i Wednesday killed 12 members
i of the Awa indigenous group,
? including five children, on a
? reserve in a region plagued by
? the cocaine trade, authorities
i said, according to Associated
i Press.

BOGOTA

HOODED men in uni-

Indigenous leaders said the

i killings took place at 5 a.m on
? the Gran Rosario reserve
? about 50 miles (80 kilometers)
? inland from the Pacific port of
? Tumaco. The reserve has
? about 1,500 Awa.

The state governor, Anto-

i nio Navarro, told The Asso-
i ciated Press that the victims
? were all related. The attack
i killed five men, two women,
? two boys, two girls and a baby.
i He said two males, a 10-year-
i old and a 20-year-old, were
? wounded in the gunfire but
i fled and survived.

The identity of the killers

; was not immediately known.

In February, Revolutionary

? Armed Forces of Colombia
i rebels acknowledged killing
? eight Awa Indians at a differ-
? ent but nearby reservation for
? allegedly working as infor-
i mants for the army.

The area is rife with coca

i plantations and illegal armed
: groups — leftist rebels as well
i as far-right militias — that
i process the leaf into cocaine
i and smuggle it out of Colom-
: bia, typically down rivers that
i are the region’s main high-
i ways.

Navarro said he could not

i remember a massacre of so
i many people in Narino state.
i He said the
i described the killers as tall,
: fair-haired men with mustach-
; es, ruling out local Indians.

survivors

The director of operations

: of Colombia’s national police,
: Gen.
? announced a reward for infor-
i mation leading to the arrest
i of the killers.

Orlando Paez,

Massacres of the magnitude

? of Wednesday’s have been
i rare since President Alvaro
i Uribe first took office in 2002
? and far-right militias demobi-
i lized in a peace deal with his
i conservative government.

We are looking for a Reinsurance Consultant to review the
process flows for reinsurance administration and establish
process flows for all new business to ensure that procedures
are in accordance with provisions of the Company’s reinsur-

ance treaties.

Qualifications/Experience/Skills:

Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science, Finance or related

discipline;

In-depth financial services experience;

5-10 years experience in testing, implementation and
assessment of systems;

Ability to identify and recommend solutions to internal
control weaknesses within business systems and
processes;

Excellent organizational,
interpersonal skills; and
Project management or leadership expertise.

Assist in the taining and development of line accounting staff
(Coordinate the annual audit pirencess

Assist in managing cashflow and tessury funcons

Any other related duties as considered necessary

and

time management

REQUIREMENTS & PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

Candidates must meet the following criteria:
Bacheloc’s Degree oc higher in accounting or related financial field
Professional accounting designation recognized by The Bahamas Inseinate of Chartered To apply:
Accountants
Send electronic résumé via email to

careers@colinaimperial.com

Subject: Reinsurance Consultant

Minimum of seven years experience in accounting, finance and budgeting.
Leadership, management and direct supervision experience is required. Previous
direct experience in planning and executing all aspects of financial accounting and
hudgetary functions

Bahamian citizen ls
Accounting softaure experience

Proficient in the ust of the Microsoft range of appbcations Send resume to:

Human Resources Manager
308 East Bay Street

P.O. Box N-4728

Nassau, Bahamas

Strong technical and manaperial skills

Excellent weiring, communication, analyncal and reasoning stalls

Excellent organizational and time management skalls

Team Player with the ability to add value ard strength to the eam and team poals

Howest, burdworking and ability to meet deadlines

The position offers an attractive salary and benefits package, reflecting the successful
applicant's experience and qualifications, including a pension plan, medical, life, dental
and vision coverage.

Applications must be received by 10 September 2009.

(Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes including references befnee August 31"
2109 te: Eenail: finsuperrisoritemail.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 11



Lawyers to seek union cash probe

FROM page one

"Each of the payments out
would have represented an
advantage to the persons who
were in clear violation of
their position, (basically)
abusing their office," Mr
Gomez said.

"We are now in the process
off attempting to... prevent
the expenditure of that mon-
ey.
“First we go to the police
and the police then do their
job, once we've gotten the
information we'll try and get
freezing (orders) from the
Supreme Court,” he added.

The embattled union was
thrown into disarray on Tues-
day when members learned
that some members of the
fractured executive council
had requested the liquidation
of two fixed deposits of more
than $468,000.

It was later discovered that
$665,000 was allegedly taken
out of the union's account.

Mr Colebrooke maintains
that the union executives who
requested the transfer were
not authorised to do so. He
claimed that one of the three
— purported union assistant
secretary general Raymond
Wright — was no longer
employed with the union.

A union bank statement
revealed that $140,000 in pay-
ment was transferred to Com-
mercial Law Advocates —
whose principal attorney is
Keod Smith — presumably
for legal fees; $54,113.15 to
accountant John Bain and
several hundred thousand for
outstanding salary payments.

According to a newspaper
report, letters requesting the
transfers were allegedly
signed by assistant treasurer
Samantha Gray, trustee Ian
Neely, and Mr Wright just
days after Nicole Martin was
ousted as the union's presi-
dent.

The earlier article claimed
that Mr Wright was to receive
$73,600 of the requested
funds, while Ms Gray and Ms
Neely were to receive $21,450
and $30,026 respectively. The
earlier article said $140,000
was requested to pay Com-
mercial Law Advocates,
whose principal attorney is
Keod Smith, and $50,000 to
Obie Ferguson and Co.

Union first vice-president
Kirk Wilson initiated the
court battle which led to a
Supreme Court ruling that
removed Ms Martin from her
post.

Mr Smith represented Mr
Wilson in this challenge and
was assisted by Mr Ferguson.

Another $54,113 was
requested for HLB Galanis
Bain chartered accountants’



partner John Bain for out-
standing fees, according to
the earlier article.

Mr Gomez alleged that
this was evidence of a clear
"abuse" of power.

Late yesterday evening,
the faction led by Kirk Wil-
son responded, issuing a
statement that said that the
union has “marked a signifi-
cant milestone” by paying
“several long-standing debts
that were owed to its profes-
sionals and many members
of the executive council who
were not paid their regular
salaries for as many as 18
months.”

The group said the pay-
ments were in accordance
with “the Supreme Court
Order of Mr Justice Jon
Isaacs of August 19, 2009.”

The statement, which was
sent out by Commercial Law
Advocates, Keod Smith’s law
firm, said: “Following the
ruling by Justice Isaacs by
which the current executive
council was re-instated,
instructions of the council
were given to the union’s
bank to settle the outstand-
ing unpaid salaries and pro-

fessional fees... The pay-
ment of these funds came
from fixed deposits of the
union held with the bank and
does not disrupt the balance
sheet of the union in as much
as the monies paid were paid
pursuant to the court’s order
to cover the union’s liability
to the persons involved.”

Meanwhile, the account-
ing firm HLB Galanis Bain
has weighed in concerning
its part in the dispute.

The firm issued a state-
ment yesterday which said:
“HLB Galanis Bain has not-
ed with concern that the
public is not being told the
entire truth regarding the
payments to this firm for
professional fees.”

It said the facts “are a mat-
ter of public record” as pub-
lished in the ruling of Justice
K Neville Adderley on May
21, 2009.

(2008/CLE/GEN/00614).

The firm then went on to
quote parts of the ruling,
including:

¢ (Paragraph 12) “The
court also ordered that HLB
Galanis Bain, Chartered

& ‘Si Bahamas

Technical & Verational Institute
ee me hl eg

i Pal

other

approved by the Council }
could be employed to con- }

duct a forensic audit, to give ; funeral will be held for former

a report on the financial } secretary to the Cabinet Her-

transaction in question, and }

based on the results the

Council should take such ? at St Barnabas Anglican

action as it deemed fit.”

address me on cost.”

_ State-recognised funeral for former

Secretary to the Cabinet H C Walkine

Accountants (‘Bain’) or such } By LINDSAY THOMPSON

accounting firm } Bahamas Information

Services

A STATE-RECOGNISED

bert Cleveland Walkine, CMG,

! CVO, OBE, at 3pm on Friday

? Church on Wulff and Baillou
i Hill Roads, the Cabinet Office

e (Paragraph 31.) “Invoic- }
es due for the preparation of
the Bain Report are to be }
made out of the assets of the ;
union. I invite counsel to }

HLB Bain’s statement }
said: “The facts above are }
clear for all to see. HLB per- }
formed a forensic audit in }

mendations of the court and }

issued a report to the Exec- : November 28, 1929, in Crooked

? Island, where he began his pub-

<4 : = :
The evidence is that both } fic service career as a monitor at

utive Council.

the Executive Council and :

the court accepted the } From there, he won a scholar-

report. The learned judge }
ruled that the report should }
be paid for out of the assets {

of the union.

court order.”

announced Wednesday.

His body will be interred at
Lake View Memorial Gardens
Mausoleums on John F
Kennedy Drive.

Mr Walkine died of cancer
on Thursday, August 20, at the
University of Miami Hospital
in Miami, Florida. He was 79.
He is survived by his wife Pam

accordance with the recom- : Salen an ee iets eee

and Imogene Walkine.
Mr Walkine was born on

the public school on that island.

ship to attend Government
High School in Nassau. After
graduating from GHS, he con-

: tinued his education at the

“On August 25, 2009, the :
union complied with that }
i versity of Manchester.

Bahamas Teacher’s Training
College, Nassau and the Uni-

LOOK WHAT'S HAPPENING



Mr Walkine has had a var-
ied and well-rounded career in
the Public Service. He began
as a teacher and then served as
a Family Island Commissioner
for 10 years from 1958 to 1968
when he was appointed assis-
tant secretary in the Cabinet
Office.

Mr Walkine rose steadily
through the ranks and in 1974
he was appointed Permanent
Secretary. He had served as
permanent secretary in the
Ministry of Labour, the Min-
istry of Education, the Ministry
of Works and Utilities and the
Ministry of National Security,
before he was once again
appointed to the Cabinet
Office, this time as Secretary
to the Cabinet.

Protessional Development

Accounting | (12 Weeks)
Fri, 18, 6pm
Accounting 11 (12 Weeks)
Fri, 0a, Opie

Sat. 89, Gaol pen

Quick Books (12 Weeks)

Fri. 218, & 10pm

A+ Review Certification Exam (12 Weeks)
Fr. 18, 6-] Oe SSRI)

Basle Moe Print Reading &
Estimating | Residential (10 Weeks)
Sal, WLS, Far Apr $50
Basic Blue Print Reading &

Estimating 0 Commercial (10) Weeks

Fin. S18, bpii- | Opes S375
‘Electrical Single Phase (12 Weeks)
Sat. 919) Gamelan SARS
Cabinet Making (1) Weeks)

Sat. 9/19, Fam-I pm SoG

“Wake-up Artistry (10) Weeks)
Divurs. 417, 6-4pm SM)
Et ete Rito tame mea tL

(1 year)

Mon, thin Thits, RL, i [pin

Massie Dheraps
SHIH
“Esthetician (2 semesters}
Mion, tind Wed, 81, bpm SSH)
Barbering (2 semesters)
Alom. thro Wed. 21, 6-90
Sall Technology (2 semesters)
Mien, the Wed, 221, 6-9pm

S100

[jon

MORE HAPPENINGS!

ol

Cl





Window Treatment Drapery & Valenee
(10) Weeks)

Kelom Wied. 9/14, Sam- | pm

Tics. Thre, 21S, 4 -

S140

Una
Sewmloag tf (1 Weeks)
Thre. Fri, O17, &pen-l am a0
Uphalstery Il

Vehick Keforbishnent (10 Weeks)
Moe. Wed, 914, 6-10pen S380
Strow Craft 1 (10 Weeks)
Pelion, Wied, 14, Seam | pte
Straw Craft Advanced [1 (10 Weeks)
Aton. Wed. 914, f-10pm
Shell Souvenir Manufacturing (11) Weekes)
Pelion. Weed, S04, Sharm | pets

Mon. Wed. 9°14, 6pe- pen

SHI

a]

Thurs WT, apm-Tlpm 525)

Small Engine Repair (10 Weeks)
Sal, W19, Sandan

CLASS SCHEDULE

1D WEEK PROGRAMMES |
Sepember |4- November 21,200 |
Ii WEEK FROKPRAMMES |

| September 8» December 5, 2014

2 SEMESTERS PROGRAMMES |

August 31- December 3, 21K
= oe ss

$350

SMe UPAR TH

me) Pe el be

Mey
Monday-Friday * Sam-5Spm

BTV! reserves the right to cancel
courdes if a minimum number of
SG a MC CELL B
Students will receive a full refund
MS Se Me Mer ed soe | sy
ietiotiiel a

Ua Mma meee Lal
Ue A sd eC
Course Schedule and Course
Foie

et ate se eg

cancellations.

Non-Bahamians are required to
Ve bbe Uru



KEEP SHOPPING!

You have TWO more chances to Shop and Hop!
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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Hunter’s

TATE MM ICU o
leads Angels 4

past Tigers

Learn To Swim

Begins September 7th 2009

Competitive Swimming
Begins August 31st, 2009

Registration

Saturday ry 27th 2009 at
The College of The Bahamas
Swimming Complex
10:00am - 12 noon

Monday August 31st, 2007
at The College of The Bahamas $wimming Complex
or Betty Kelly Kenning
Aquatic Center: dpm-4pm



LOS ANGELES Angels’ Chone Figgins, right, attempts to steal home plate against Detroit Tigers’
Gerald Laird in the seventh inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Wednesday, Aug. 26,



2009. Figgins was sent back to third base.

BASEBALL
ANAHEIM, Calif.
Associated Press

TORII Hunter hit an early
two-run homer, Joe Saunders
pitched five effective innings
in his return to the Angels’
rotation and Los Angeles
snapped its three-game skid
with a 4-2 victory over the
Detroit Tigers on Wednesday.

Kendry Morales and Chone
Figgins added run-scoring hits
for Los Angeles, the only
major league club without
four straight losses. The AL
West-leading Angels also
avoided being swept at home
for the first time since June
2007 and prevented Detroit’s
first road sweep of the Angels
since August 1993.

Hunter connected for his
18th homer in the first inning
against Edwin Jackson (10-6),
who took his first loss since

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July 19.

Adam Everett hit a two-run
homer for the AL Central-
leading Tigers, who had won
eight of 12.

Saunders (10-7) was cool in
the 97-degree Orange County
heat while making his first
start since Aug. 7, after which
he went on the disabled list
with a sore shoulder. The left-
hander had been struggling
for over a month before his
DL stint, but the Angels’
opening day starter allowed
four hits and two walks while
striking out six.

Four Los Angeles relievers
collaborated on four scoreless
innings. In his first appear-
ance in eight days, closer Bri-
an Fuentes hit two batters but
hung on for his 36th save in 41
chances.

Aside from MHunter’s
homer, Los Angeles got back
to manufacturing its offense

Jae C. Hong/AP Photo



SPORTS

naa



-Atearful Ricky
Hatton meets
Muhammad Al

: BOXING
: MANCHESTER, England
i Associated Press

RICKY HATTON wel-

i comed Muhammad Ali to
i his gym Wednesday and
i? said that not even a meet-
i ing with The Greatest could
i persuade him to get back
: in the ring again.

Hatton, the former world

: light welterweight champi-
: on, hasn’t fought since a
i second-round knockout
i loss to Manny Pacquiao in
i May and is now a promot-
i er.

The 30-year-old Briton,

: known for his aggressive,
: body-punching style, said
i he was reduced to tears
i when meeting 67-year-old
? Ali, who has Parkinson’s

i disease and makes rare

with hits, walks and sharp
baserunning in the style that’s
worked so well for a club with
eight starters hitting at least
.293 entering the day. The
Angels stole five bases against
Detroit, matching a season
high.

Figgins even appeared to
steal home after Hunter’s
strikeout in the seventh
inning, but third-base umpire
Chad Fairchild had called
time on the field. Angels man-
ager Mike Scioscia argued to
no avail.

Miguel Cabrera extended
his hitting streak to 11 games
with a sixth-inning double, but
went 1 for 4. The Detroit slug-
ger was 6 for 10 with two
homers and seven RBIs in the
first two games.

Jackson yielded eight hits
and four walks in 6 1-3 innings
during his first loss in seven
starts.

eit

Boh Mal

i public appearances.

“He’s not just one of the

: greatest boxers of all time,
i he’s one of the greatest
: men of all time. He’s made
; the entertainment side of
: boxing what it is today,”
: Hatton said.

“Bearing in mind how

i poorly he is, for him still to
i come to the gym, raise his
i hands to the fans and have
i a picture, that’s why he’s
i the greatest.”

Joined by wife Lonnie,

i Ali is touring Britain and
? Ireland. He is making
i appearances at a series of
i dinners to raise money for
i his charities, including the
? Muhammad Ali Center in
i his hometown of Louisville,

Hatton has only two loss-

i es in a 47-fight career. He
i said he is no closer to
? deciding whether to fight
i again.

It’s Back to School time, but before you go,

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 13



LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Minister
Signs
stadium
lighting
contract

As construction of the new
state of the art national stadium
continues, the government of
the Bahamas took a major step
forward in creating a new light-
ing system.

The Ministry of
Youth Sports and
Culture signed a
contract with
Campbell’s Elec-
tric to replace the



) high mass lighting
Desmond @t the stadium
: worth over

Bannister $700,000.
The base of the

contract is $669,425 for services
rendered, with a 10 percent
contingency worth $66,942.50,
bringing the total to
$736,367.50. Minister of Youth
Sports and Culture, The Hon-
orable Desmond Bannister,
said the need for a new lighting
system had become imperative
due to the dilapidated state of
the current infrastructure.

“The current lighting system
has not only fallen into a severe
state of disrepair, but also pose
a significant safety hazard to
users of this facility,” he said,
“The lighting towers have dete-
riorated to a stage where the
structures are considered to be
in critical condition requiring
urgent remedial work.”

Bannister said, with the first
step in a lengthy line of
improvements the stadium
should become a welcome
atmosphere for participants and
spectators alike.

“We are pleased that we are
able to do this now,” he said,
“And to ensure that the next
track season or whatever activ-
ities are held out here at this
facility we will be able to have
the athletes, parents, fans, fam-
ilies will be able to watch in a
safe environment that there will
be no problem with lighting fix-
tures of lights falling.”

The project is scheduled to
begin 1n approximately two
weeks with a tentative date of
completion set for March 2010.

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RUNNING SHOE (WhiSlv/Furp)

cele

Langerhans’ HR sends M's over A's in 10



Elaine Thompson/AP Photo

SEATTLE Mariners’ Russell Branyan watches his home run
against the Oakland Athletics in the second inning of a base-
ball game Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2009, in Seattle.

BASEBALL
SEATTLE
Associated Press

DEFENSIVE-replacement
Ryan Langerhans homered
off Craig Breslow with one
out in the bottom of the 10th
inning to send the Seattle
Mariners to a 4-2 victory over
the Oakland Athletics on
Tuesday night.

Franklin Gutierrez’s singled
with one out in the 10th off
Breslow (5-7), who entered
the game tied in losses among
AL relievers. It was Gutier-
rez’s fifth hit and seventh time
on base in the two games he’s
been leading off while Ichiro
Suzuki rests a tight calf mus-
cle.

Then Langerhans, who
entered for defense the inning
before, smacked a 2-2 pitch
into the first row of seats
beyond right field. It was his
second game-ending home
run as a late-game substitute
in three weeks.

Mark Lowe (2-6) pitched
the 10th for the win.

Seattle’s Ken Griffey Jr. got
the small, quiet crowd on its
feet with a pinch-hitting
appearance with a man on and
one out in the eighth against
Michael Wuertz. Griffey was 4
for 6 with two home runs
against him, but the 39-year-
old slugger struck out waving
over a 2-2 pitch in the dirt.

Gutierrez stole second on
that pitch. Then Jose Lopez
chopped a ball to the right of
charging third baseman Adam
Kennedy. Gutierrez slowed
his run to third, veered onto
the infield grass and almost
looped around the ball, seem-
ingly obscuring Kennedy’s
view of the ball until it clanged
off his glove for a game-tying
error.

Lopez then stole second on
a play in which replays
appeared to show he was out.
But Mike Sweeney, who spent
last season with Oakland,
struck out on a full-count pitch
to end the inning and keep it
tied at 2.

Kennedy’s single that

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scored Mark Ellis in the sev-
enth inning had put Oakland
up 2-1.

That was the last pitch
thrown by Seattle starter Ryan
Rowland-Smith, who allowed
nine hits and two runs in 6 1-3
innings.

After reliever Shawn Kel-
ley got Rajai Davis to ground
out, Kurt Suzuki flied out to
strand runners at second and

third and keep the Mariners
close.

A’s rookie Brett Anderson
allowed one run and six hits
with eight strikeouts in seven
impressive innings. The 21-
year-old left-hander, Oak-
land’s centerpiece in the trade
that sent Dan Haren to Ari-
zona following the 2007 sea-
son, leads major league rook-
ies with 117 strikeouts.

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Bolt’s heroics turned Berlin

sames into a ecenes ‘ dream

By BRENT STUBBS

HE trip to Berlin,

Germany for the

IAAF's = 12th

World Champi-
onships in Athletics was quite
an eventful one.

It was a reporter's dream to
have had the opportunity to
cover an event where a phe-
nomenal athlete like Jamaica's
Usain Bolt was able to stretch
the world record in both the
100 and 200 metres into anoth-
er hemisphere — no let's go a
litter further, into another plan-
et.

Like Bolt, who could be
regarded as a "Freak of
Nature," it's going to take
another specially gifted athlete
to come along and surpass what
he has achieved.

9.58 seconds in the 100 and
19.99 in the 200.

Two times never heard off.

Yet, the astonishing question
that came up after he did it —
making it look like there was
two separate races going on at
the same time — was just as ‘hair
raising, eye popping and mouth
dropping’ feats that one will
have to cherish for quite a
while.

When he did the triple-triple
world record breaking perfor-
mance in Beijing, China at the
Olympic Games last year, I
thought I was watching a video
game. When he did the double-
double, me and my collegiate
Kwame Laurence from the
Trinidad Express, who sat next
to each other in the press tri-
bune, could only turn and once
again offer our congratulations
to Kayon Raynor of the
Jamaica Observer.

In fact, we spent more time
shaking Raynor's hands for the
splendid job that the Jamaican
team did at these champi-
onships — a total of 26, inclu-
sive of 13 gold, nine silver and
four bronze — to finish second
to only the United States in the
medal count and third in the
placing standings behind the
Americans and the Russians.

Trinidad & Tobago, on the
other hand, was just ahead of











OPINION

the Bahamas with three medals
— one of which should have
been the Bahamas' — for a tied
20th spot with France in the
medal hunt. The Bahamas had
two and was tied with Japan at
number 22.

Trinidad ended up 13th in
the placing table, while the
Bahamas finished tied with
Japan for the 16th spot.

The only other Caribbean
English-speaking country to
medal was Barbados with a
gold. They were tied with Croa-
tia, New Zealand and

Slovenia for 16th spot. How-
ever, they were tied with
Cyprus. Finland, Hungary and
Sweden for 33rd in the placing
table.

Cuba had 12 medals — one of
which actually should have
been the Bahamas’ own — for
12th on the medal table and
they were ninth in the placing
table.

Two of the heart-wrenching
disappointing performances
that just didn't pan itself out,
resulted in the Bahamas not

being able to move a little high-
er in the standings.

While I was able to bask in
the Caribbean dominance in
the sprints, winning, my most
hurtful moment came from
Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown in the
men's 400. Having fallen short
in the past two championships
as well as the Olympics last
year, this was expected to be
the year that he finally got on
the podium to celebrate his first
individual medal.

He came so close, but yet
was so far. Once again, rown
didn't have anything left to gut
it out in the winding minutes
after running an excellent 350-
380 metres. In the final 20, he
was passed twice and had to
settle for a disappointing fifth.

His spot on the medal stand
was occupied by Trinidad's
Renny Quow, which gave me
reason to congratulate Lau-
rence, who had predicted that
his man was going to upset
Brown and follow Americans
Oympic champion LaShawn
Merrit and past World's cham-
pion Jeremy Wariner in that
order.

Never anticipated it though.
Still can't believe that Brown
didn't pull it off.

Also equated in the drama
was Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands,
who was sitting in third place
until Cuba's Alexis Copello
emerged from fifth to snatch
the bronze medal. The Olympic
bronze medallist had to cele-
brate his 27th birthday with
fourth place. He also served
some jail time as he and Copel-
lo were taken into custody and
questioned for at least 11 hours
over a bottle throwing scuffle at
a nightclub on the eve of the
closing of the championships.

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JAMAICA'S
Usain Bolt
poses beside
the indicating
board after
setting a new
Men's 100m
World Record
in Berlin on

| August 16.

Sands adamantly stated that he
and hurdler Shamar Sands were
only there to give evidence
when they were taken in with
high jumper Donald Thomas,
an American and two Cubans,
including Copello.

Apparently, it was a situa-
tion that really put a damper
on the Bahamian team.
Nobody expected to hear any
such report of Bahamians being
taken into custody, especially
in such a foreign nation.

We just thank God that all
is well that ends well. No
charges were levied against any
of the athletes — yet — although
an investigation was expected
to be carried out this week.
We're keeping our fingers
crossed that there will be no
further action taken against any
of the athletes.

Despite the fact that all three
Bahamians involved had some
heart-breaking performances,
they performed as best as they
could under the circumstances.
The championships were
extremely competitive this year.

And based on the four dis-
qualifications that the team
experienced — Michael Math-
ieu and Christine Amertil in
the 400 and both the men and
women 4 x 400 relay teams — it
was a clear indication that the
officials was not taking anything
for granted.

Bahamas team officials were
kept quite busy dealing with
the disqualifications and even
trying to get Osbourne Moxey
inserted into the men's long
jump, but to no avail. They
exhausted every avenue of
appeal and nothing changed.

As team manager Ralph
McKinney noted: "The little
things we take for granted, they
were not tolerating over there."
If anybody should know, it's
McKinney. He serves as the
president of the Bahamas Asso-
ciation of Certified Officials,
the organization in charge of
officiating at our local track and
field meets.

The performances at the
championships should also
serve as an impetus for our
future stars as it gives them an
indication just exactly where
they could be, if they dedicate
themselves to putting in the
time to properly prepare.

The future will only get
brighter for track and field in
the Bahamas.

ran

Bain targets October 15
for return to full training

FROM page 15

shortly before the 2009 season began in leading to a series of dis-
appointing performances.

His personal best for the season was a time of 46.02s in a June 27
run in New Providence.

“T will resume full training October 15th,” Bain said, “I am
hoping to be back to 100 percent as soon as possible now that I can
start treatment on the root cause of my injuries. So, by the official
start of training I should be back fully healthy.”

After leaving Berlin to see a series of specialists, Bain said the
root cause of the injury was discovered, allowing him to establish
a strict rehab regime and schedule a timetable for a return to
competition.

“T strained my right oblique which was causing severe tight-
ness in my right gluteus and hamstring, so they found that is what
was continuously causing the problem,” he said, “But I should be
ready and I will run indoors again this upcoming year so the
indoor season will be my comeback.”

Bain, the NCAA 2008 Indoor and Outdoor champion during his
senior season at Oral Roberts University, who has enjoyed a vir-
tually injury free career thus far said his first major setback has
taught him several valuable lessons applicable to life on and off the
track.

“T think this has definitely made me hungrier. I have learned and
matured a lot. I am a better person, and athlete because of it,” he
said, “The injury, it was a reality check. That is why I am constantly
thanking God that I was able to complete my Master's Degree in
Business, because one injury can end season, and in some cases a
career. But I'm trusting 2010 will be a great year for the Bahami-
an Dream”

Bain expressed regret at the unfortunate disqualification of his
fellow 4x400m teammates in Berlin. The event compounded the
effects of a major injury.

“IT was motivated long before the DQ. My motivation came
after the injury ended my season prematurely and without me
achieving any of my goals,” he said, “But it definitely adds to it and
we all will come back hungrier and more determined when we have
the opportunity.”

Move to boost softball profile
FROM page 15

"The BSF will be experiencing a very busy season in the
upcoming months and it is an exciting time for the players, fans
and we in the administration.

“We begin with the National Slow Pitch Championships set
for Grand Bahama either the first weekend in October or for
the Discovery Day weekend for those islands that play slow
pitch in various categories men's, ladies and co-eds.

“The next event on the calendar will be the Austin
"Kingsnake" Knowles tournament for senior boys and girls dur-
ing the mid term break for local schools,” he said, "This tourna-
ment is of the utmost importance to the BSF because it high-
lights the future talent of the country in a competitive format
and assist the overall development of the game while providing
an opportunity for young athletes to showcase their talents.
Long Island has been a dominant factor in these champ over the
last few years, however, Eleuthera made their presence felt win-
ning both titles last year and promises to return to defend their
titles. The following weekend, October 29th- Nov. will be the
CAST tournament, an international venture for the BSF. We
already have confirmation from the Cayman Islands, Belize,
Jamaica, Turks and Caicos, Bermuda, USVI and have also
began talks with teams from Israel and England which have
expressed interest.

“Following that will be the National Round Robin Champi-
onship where champions of member associations will descend
upon New Providence vying for a national crown.”

Dorsett said the year will conclude with an appearance at the
ISF Congress which should have a direct impact on the
Bahamas and its stake in regional softball.

"We will then take part in the ISF Congress. This edition will
be held in Venezuela with more than 110 countries taking place.
This is an election year for the ISF and in addition an additional
VP post will be added for the English speaking Caribbean," he
said, "The ISF has stated they will realign and the Bahamas will
be placed in the Americas region, thus creating the necessity for
the post.

“The IFS has also confirmed that the CAC Games will be
held in Puerto Rico in July of 2010. The men's national team
will have at least two trips of very important tournaments we
need to take part in.”

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15

THE TRIBUNE PAGE

S | | S
k

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27,

Bain eyes Oct tu
retuen to training

Quarter-miler
in rehab over
injured
hamstring

by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net



2009

Move to

boost
softball
protile

by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

TE
C















The Bahamas Softball
Federation looks to begin
implementation of its short
term and long term goals to
benefit the future of the
local game and strengthen
its profile on the interna-
tional stage.

The BSF is preparing for
the fall section of its calen-
dar year in what federation
executives call the "busy
season."

The most pressing mat-
ter on the upcoming calen-
dar is the selection of both
Men's and Ladies National
teams to represent the
country at the upcoming
CAST tournament, sched-
uled for October 29th to
November 1st here in the
capital.

Burket Dorsett, BSF
President, outlined the
highlights of the upcoming
calendar for the Federation
which features several local
and regional tournaments
and concludes with an
appearance at the Interna-

After suffering a major setback
in his 2009 season on the pro cir-
cuit, one of the country’s premier
quarter milers is currently in rehab
and has been given a timetable for
his return to the track.

After undergoing a battery of
tests to treat his injured hamstring,
Andretti “The Bahamian Dream”
Bain is scheduled to resume full
training on October 15.

Bain was forced to withdraw
from the 12th IAAF World Cham-
pionships in Germany earlier this
month when at training camp he
re-aggravated the season long ham-
string injury which first sidelined

: : him in April.
tional Softball Federation Bain first injured the hamstring
Congress.
SEE page 14 SEE page 14



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TRI ER
eee
Te
ee a
al

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

The Bahamas is the
last major international
financial centre in the
Western Hemisphere on
the G-20/OECD ‘grey
list’ of nations, some-
thing that a Bahamian
attorney yesterday said
could damage this
nation’s competitiveness
by creating the percep-
tion it was lagging its
rivals.

Ryan Pinder, the
Bahamas-based attorney
and representative for
US law firm, Becker
Poliakoff, said the effec-
tiveness of the Govern-
ment’s recent statement
announcing that it
would meet the OECD’s
target of having 12 Tax
Information Exchange
Agreements (TIEAs) in
place by 2009 year-end,
and identifying the
nations it was negotiat-
ing with, was “being
diminished” by the
apparent failure to make
concrete progress.

While the Bahamas
to-date still has a soli-
tary TIEA with the US
that it signed back in
2002, all three of the
Cayman Islands, the
British Virgin Islands
and Bermuda are now
sitting on the G-
20/OECD so-called
‘white list’, having met
the standards on tax
transparency and infor-
mation exchange.

The Bahamas, though,
is still on the ‘grey’ list
of countries that had
committed to meeting
these standards but have
yet to do so. It also has
fewer TIEAs than the
likes of Antigua & Bar-
buda and the Nether-
lands Antilles, which
both have seven, Liecht-
enstein and Monaco,
which have three and
four respectively, and
market leaders like Sin-
gapore and Switzerland,
which have five and
three TIEAs in place.

Mr Pinder told Tri-
bune Business that while

SEE page 9B



You'll find it all at Palm Cay



THE TRIBUNE

T Hou R SA Y.

isine



AUGUST 27,



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Project awaits extra
$362m investmen

Mi Baker's Bay developers invest $203m to date, with $26m spent with
Bahamian firms and Treasury receiving $23m
BB One of few resort projects to progress has $4.8m staff payroll, and ‘in
excess’ of $6m per annum contractor wages, with Government to receive
further $315m in taxes over next 10 years
MW ‘Two major milestones’ passed on marina and golf course

J Some 70-80 lot sales ‘in various stages of closing’, with developers
hoping to start custom homes construction in next six to 12 months

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Investors behind a major
Bahamas-based mixed-use
resort project yesterday said
they anticipate investing a
further $362 million in the
development, having sunk
$203 million into the ground
to date, having achieved
“two big milestones” by
opening the 165-slip marina
and grassing much of the
golf course.

Dr Livingstone Marshall,
senior vice-president of
environmental and commu-
nity affairs for the Abaco-
based Baker’s Bay Golf &
Ocean Club, told Tribune

Business that to date the
project’s developers, Ari-
zona-based Discovery Land
Company, had spent $26
million with Bahamian-
owned and associated com-
panies, chiefly vendors and
contractors.

Adding that “a significant
portion of that ended up in
the local Abaco communi-
ty”, Dr Marshall said Bak-
er’s Bay, which currently
employs 135 persons, had an
annual payroll of $4.8 mil-
lion, some 90 per cent of
which went to Bahamians.

That was separate from
the payroll of contractors
hired to work on the projec-

Casino’s loss rises
157% to hit $401,000

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Freeport’s sole casino
operator yesterday con-
firmed it will pull out of the
Bahamas “no later than
October 31” this year, as the
property’s fiscal 2010 first
quarter operating loss more
than doubled to $401,000.

Unveiling its results for
the three months to July 26,
2009, Isle of Capri revealed
that the net operating loss
it had suffered from running
Our Lucaya’s casino had
increased by 157 per cent
compared to the $156,000
loss sustained during the
comparative period during

The increased net operat-
ing loss was incurred as the
Isle-Lucaya casino also
experienced a 40.3 per cent
decline in year-over-year
revenues, which for the 2010
first quarter fell to $2.134
million compared to $3.573
million the year before.

The reasons for Isle of
Capri to terminate its lease
with Our Lucaya, thus end-

SEE page 7B

SM Me Eat ae
* Private membertip to Governces Club

eek deena ee et | HEIL

ee Lelia a

tJ
as RE bi eh be that a)

ce

Pst eee ee sD eer

x mC,

NASSAU # FAHAMAS

eRe
aOR ae Fe)

WW, PAL MCAS OM



Isle of Capri
confirms
Freeport

pull-out no
later than

October 31,

2009

t’s construction, which
“exceeds $6 million” per
annum, some 75-80 per cent
of which went into Bahami-
an hands. Baker’s Bay’s con-
tractors had another 170
employees on-site.

Baker’s Bay’s developers
had also paid $23 million to
the Government to date in
the form of transfer taxes,
Stamp Tax, import duties
and real property taxes, and
Dr Marshall added: “Over
the next 10 years, we esti-
mate we will pay in excess of
$315 million to the Treasury.

“To date, we estimate

SEE page 10B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be. held
responsible for errors and/or omission |
from the daily report,



Money Safe.
Money Fast.

MoneyGram.

iideriatiota! Maeney Trane fer

© Bank of The Bahamas

[HS TERNATIOANAL

Online at
BankBahamasOnline.com



Benchmark’s $3m

property eyes
70-80% occupancy
before finish

* Carmichael project on target for December
completion, with $1.3m invested to date

* Company suffers $904,654 or $0.18 per share
loss for half-year

* Alliance sees 10% assets under administration
growth in Q2, with total level now standing at
$200m

* BISX-listed entity hoping for stock market
turnaround in 2009 fourth quarter, as it sees
price stabilisation signs

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Benchmark (Bahamas) yes-
terday said based on the “very
strong” inquiries it continued to
receive from potential tenants
that it expected to have 70-80
per cent of its Carmichael Road
commercial centre leased by the
time the building was construct-
ed in December 2009, despite

SEE page 8B er BROWN

Courier firms are
still ‘unprofitable’

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net



BAHAMIAN courier companies are continuing to feel the
financial squeeze from new import procedures, the president of
GWS Worldwide Express said yesterday, despite the Customs
Comptroller’s argument that steps made to alleviate pressures on
freight forwarders have been working.

Walt Saunders, who is president of the Bahamas Courier Asso-
ciation, said all courier companies have suffered a downturn in busi-
ness since the implementation of the C-13 Customs clearing pro-
cedure. Mr Saunders said the new procedure continues to deter
business due to the high brokerage fees involved, which the couri-
ers must pass on to customers.

Those same fees caused business for couriers in Grand Bahama
to decline so substantially over the past three months, that the
Comptroller, Glen Gomez, was forced to rescind the new cus-

SEE page 14B

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eisha Wemyss,
the 34 year old
daughter of

former Inspector of
Police and now
President & CEO of
WemCo Security Mr.
Henry and Mrs. Judy
Wemyss graduated |
MagnaCum Laudeand_|
a member of the Sigma
Beta Delta Honours ~
Society at DeVry
University on 18 July
in Miramar, Florida.

Ms. Wemyss received a
Bachelor of Science in

Business Administration

Accounting Concentration.

“T am proud of my

accomplishments. [I am

grateful to my parents and

to the company to afford

me this opportunity. I hope

that my eventual full return

to WemCo will strengthen

the company’s manage-

ment structure as we con-

tinue to serve the Bahamian

public as the best security

company in the country bar

none”- Keisha Wemyss

“T believe that it is important for our
company and our family to ensure that the
next generation of leadership is strong.
I congratulate Keisha on this wonderful
accomplishment.”

Ms. Wemyss, who is the Vice President for
Finance and Security for WemCo, took a
leave of absence to further her studies. She
completed two years of requirements in a
year, and while enrolled she was a Deanfs
List student through the entire time at Devry
University. She was chosen Graduate speaker
representing both Undergraduates at DeVry
University and Keller Graduate School
of Management for graduation this year.

Keisha is currently continuing — her
studies in the fall at Keller Graduate
School of Management where she is
reading for a double Masters Degree in
Finance and Accounting preparing to take
the Certified Public Accountant’s exam
over the next year. She will also start her
studies in the field of ‘Project Management

While pursuing her studies, she was also
i i Mix’, which is also offered at Keller.

actively communicating and involved in the
day to day running of her portfolio at
WemCo Security. “It was like she never left
her chair’, said Mr. Wemyss.

Ms. Wemyss is an award winning former
officer of the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force.

DEVELOPMENT FOR SALE

MARINA & SEAFOOD PROCESSING PLANT
ALLIGATOR BAY, NORTH LONG ISLAND

Approx. 6 acres of Waterfront property with a 152 feet wide canal. Prop-
erty comprises three buildings:

Building A: Seafood Processing Plant include a reception area, an
office, three bathrooms, a receiving room, a dressing room, a packing
room, a storage room, a laboratory and a processing room, (8) 10 ft
x 30 ft blast freezers, and (1) 15ft x 15 ft and (1) 10 ft x15 ft holding
freezers.

Building B: Generator House

Building C: The Water Plant consists of a reverse osmosis water
system that converts salt water into drinking water with a 10,000 stor-
age capacity.

Interested persons should submit offers to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management,
P. O. Box N-7518,
Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us on or before October 2nd , 2009

For further information, please contact us at 502-0929,
356-1685 or 356-1608

PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Businesses urged
to mobilise for
the crime fight

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tripunemedia.net

THE BAHAMAS Cham-
ber of Commerce’s presi-
dent yesterday appealed to
the business community to
mobilise on issues of violent
crime in the Bahamas, and
to invest in education to mit-
igate the problem.

Khaalis Rolle said the
business community,
churches and civic groups
have to stop relying on gov-
ernment for crime manage-
ment, and the education and
social development of
Bahamian youth,and begin
to duly invest in those areas
themselves.

Mr Rolle argued that if
these entities invest in the
early educational develop-
ment and socialisation of
Bahamian youth, instances
of violent crime can be
curbed within the next gen-
eration.

He said that though edu-
cation was not the only
ingredient, there was a
strong correlation with
crime levels.

“It is poor education and
poor socialisation,” said Mr
Rolle. “Our mindset has
been degraded to the point
where it is just as easy to kill
someone now, as it was in
the past to hit them with a
bottle or a bat.

“There is easy access to
guns, and the mindset that
they have developed over
the past decade is they don’t
think twice about killing.
The lack of exposure and
lack of knowledge leads to

Gea a a

lack of compassion, and that
leads to far more violent
crimes than we have ever
seen.”

Mr Rolle cited the latest,
senseless killing of a woman
robbed while on her job asa
need for businesses and
business people to organise
and begin dialogue on the
way forward.

“This is not a government
problem. No part of society
is isolated or insulated from
it,” he said.

“Every stakeholder needs
to address it.

“The business communi-
ty has to mobilise, as well as
churches and civil society.
Parents have to take own-
ership for their children, and
the underlying pathology of
the problem has to be
addressed.”

Mr Rolle said that if his
platform for educational and
social reform for the youth



was the only thing brought
to fruition at the culmina-
tion of his term as Chamber
president, “I would have
been successful.”

“You have to start some-
where and you have to start
with a message. People have
to recognise that message
and subscribe to it,” said Mr
Rolle.

“It is a major issue. and at
the surface I would say the
issue is insurmountable.
You're dealing with chang-
ing the DNA of people.”

Mr Rolle said there need-
ed to be more social activism
and community involve-
ment, citing Cynthia ‘Moth-
er’ Pratt as a model for
social reform at a commu-
nity and national level.

“We need to refocus our
efforts on our entire exis-
tence, or we're not going to
have the kind of country we
envision,” said Mr Rolle.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 3B



Bahamas urged to grow
Pageant ‘seed’ into fruit

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce’s executive
director yesterday said the
exposure from the Miss Uni-
verse Pageant could open
up the Bahamas island chain
to diversification in the
tourism sector.

Philip Simon said many
intangibles came out of the
Miss Universe Pageant,
including a renewed sense
of national pride. Those
intangible exposures are
what the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation and
Atlantis have touted since
the announcement of the
Bahamas as the host country
for the annual Pageant, seen
in over 150 countries.

“T can imagine that the
impact of Miss Universe is
like a seed that has just been
planted, which we will have
to water to help it grow over
time and become a great
fruit-bearing asset over
time,” said Mr Simon.

He added that the images
of sites throughout the
Bahamas showed viewers
what has been right in front
of our eyes, but which we
have not paid much atten-
tion to.

He said the world, in a
two-hour television produc-
tion, experienced a culture
that was brand new to them,
but something that can be
scripted as eloquently as it
was last Sunday in order to
change the facade of this
country’s tourism product.

RT

Mr Simon argued that
Sunday night’s worldwide
broadcast changed the defi-
nition of tourism for the
Bahamas, and reasserted its
potential.

Response

Local response to the
scenes shot by the Miss Uni-
verse contingent has been
overwhelming. Many indi-
viduals agreed that the
Bahamas had never been
depicted so beautifully
before, and praised the



pageant’s production team.

Mr Simon said the wider
business community should
embrace the potential for
the expansion of the tourism
industry that this vast expo-
sure could bring to these
islands.

“There has to be encour-
agment on behalf of the pol-
icymakers to include quality
ideas and products,” he
said.

Mr Simon added that
entrepreneurship can be gar-
nished from the opportuni-
ties the Miss Universe

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Pageant created.

He lauded Atlantis’s par-
ticipation in hosting the
event, and suggested the
exposure for the resort itself
has been phenomenal.

However, Mr Simon said
the opportunities for small-
er Family Island hotels can-
not be understated as many
of the 84 pageant contes-
tants, through direction from
the Ministry of Tourism, vis-
ited several different islands
during their three-week stay
in the Bahamas.

Mr Simon said personal
destination choices can be
found throughout the islands
of the Bahamas.

“Visitors will be more so
appreciative of the smaller
facilities that are uniquely
Bahamian,” he said. “Going
to a large resort could be
just as good as sitting under
a Dilly tree listeing to folk-
lore.”

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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





New consultancy says
erowth prospects exis

A newly-formed Bahami-
an business consultancy yes-
terday said there were still
profit and growth opportu-
nities in many economic sec-
tors despite the recession.

“The world didn’t come
to an end when the econo-
my took a nosedive. There
are still opportunities for
growth in many sectors.

Smart companies just need
to know where to look,” said
Debra Cartwright, president
of Business Works, a newly-
formed consulting firm
offering strategic planning
services to small and medi-
um-sized companies.
Calling for businesses to
undertake disciplined and
focused planning, she added:

“When we prepare a busi-
ness plan, it is more than just
a lot of numbers and words
on paper.

Succeed
“Businesses succeed

because of the proper exe-
cution of ideas, so we take














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Tel: 326-1111 «

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POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR
AUDIT MANAGER

PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancy in its Nassau and Freeport Offices for
Audit Managers whose qualifications make the individuals eligible for membership in
the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants. Prospective candidates should
be employed in public accounting and have at least one (1) year of
experience at the Assistant Manager/Manager level in managing a portfolio of
diverse client engagements. Candidates are also required to have a high level of
computer literacy.

The position offers challenging work in the financial services industry and
other areas of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which recognizes different
levels of experience and skill, is designed to reward high performance.
In addition, the Firm provides excellent medical insurance and provident fund benefits.

Please submit an application letter with your Curriculum Vitae to:

Human Resources Partner
“Audit Manager Position
PricewaterhouseCoopers

P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.coh.edu.ds

STAFF VACANCY

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the following
position:

Assistant Director — Utilities, AD-I, who will be responsible for the man-
agement, direction and coordination of the activities, operations and main-
tenance of the Physical Plant Utility Systems and the trades of plumbing,
electnician, and air conditioning at all campuses of The College of The
Bahamas. The successful applicant must be able to prioritize and perform
under pressure in both a customer contact and administrative capacity.
Outstanding human resource management skills are necessary.

Specific duties and responsibilities include, but are not limited to, manag-
ing, directing and coordinating the activities, operations and maintenance
of the Physical Plant buildings and grounds and establishing preventative,
predictive and replacement maintenance programmes of campus equip-
ment including the vehicle fleet of The College.

Applicants should possess a Bachelor's Degree in mechanical (preferred)
or electrical engineering and a minimum of five (5) years’ professional
experience directly related to the physical plant management of utility sys-
tems or an equivalent combination of education, training and experience,
with considerable Knowledge of physical plant management, personnel
management, safety and budgetary practices. For a detailed job descrip-
hon, visit www.cob.edubs/hrapply. Interested candidates should submut a
detailed resume and cover letter of interest no later than Wednesday,

September 2, 2009 to: The Director, Human Resources, The College of

The Bahamas, P.O.Box N-4912, Nassau, Bahamas or hrapply @ cob.edu.bs.

our clients through the rig-
orous process of under-
standing all aspects of their
business - from marketing
to financial to operations.

“They need to realize how
everything is interconnect-
ed, and that that all deci-
sions flow from a clear
insight into the marketing
need they are seeking to ful-
fill.

“There are young compa-
nies out there experiencing
real growth in their rev-
enues, and many of these
owners have very little idea
of how to profitably man-
age that growth. Question-
able decisions in hiring,
inventory management,
profit-taking, accounting

practices, and in other key
business areas are stalling
the growth potential of
many of these businesses.”
BusinessWorks offers
various business consulting
services, including Entre-
preneurs Bootcamp, Brain-
storming Business Opportu-
nities, and Business Check-
up. The Business Check-up
is an analysis of critical
aspects of a business — plan-
ning, financial, marketing,
operations and human
resources. At the end of the
Business Check-Up the
company receives a report
highlighting areas requiring
attention, and a written sum-
mary outlining steps to
improve their success.

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Contact 326-6121

eee v ea

Sheraton
to host
major

convention

The 694-room Sheraton
Nassau Beach Resort will
host this year’s Luxury
Meetings Summit, focusing
on the luxury group meet-
ings business throughout the
Caribbean.

The summit, taking place
from October 24-27, 2009,
will give over 70 qualified
meeting planners the chance
to learn about 50 different
luxury Caribbean hotels
from hoteliers and destina-
tion suppliers.

Planners will have the
chance to attend one-on-one
meetings with up to 22 dif-
ferent properties, attend
educational sessions, and
conduct site inspections,
which will help them gain
new ideas and foster new
relationships, leading to bet-
ter business and meetings.

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invites qualified applicants to apply for the
position of Technician | (Instrument), responsible for conducting calibrations, repairs, routine
checks and tests control instrumentation in its Generation Power Plant.

The successtul candidate 1s expected to lead instrument technicians m fault finding,
Iroubleshooting and repairs on instrument and control system.

Duties and tasks are as follows:

* Directs instrument technicians when required
Assist with the writing of procedures,
Prepares reports on failures and repairs,
Maintain historical records.
Analyze and calibrates control systems.
Plans jobs and secures necessary tools and equipment.
Calibrates electronic & pneumatic instruments,
Troubleshoot and mstall instrument and control system problems.
Repairs pneumatic and electronic instruments.
Trains subordinates in instrument repairs.
Capable of working from manufactures blueprints or sketches with limited supervision.
Responsible for safety and training of men working with him.
Perform any other tasks as assigned

Applicants must have a High School Diploma, BGCSE passes of C or better in Math, English
and a Technological Certificate in Electronics or its equivalent from an accredited institution.
Applicants must also have a minimum of five (5) years power station or equivalent industrial
experience or three (3) years ata Technician Il level in the Maintenance Department of an
industrial facility.

Applications with supporting documentation including a clean Police Certificate and proof of
Bahamian citizenship should be sent to:-

WTO etch ok

At
LIMITED

Ue ee
@

GRAND GAHAMA POWER COMPANY

Fiptnes ead Ried) Aacier Figg

Freeport, Grand Bahama

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

ing its involvement in the
Bahamian gaming market,
would thus appear relative-
ly obvious.

James B. Perry, Isle of
Capri’s chairman and chief
executive, said in a state-
ment yesterday: “We remain
on track to exit our interna-
tional operations in the near
term, as we will exit the
Bahamas no later than
October 31.”

This corresponds to Vin-
cent Vanderpool-Wallace,
the minister of tourism and
aviation, previously telling
Tribune Business that Octo-
ber 31 was a “drop dead
date” for finding and
installing a replacement for
Isle of Capri in Freeport.

He said then that the
Government was in the
process of informing Isle of
Capri and all the other bid-
ders that it had identified a
preferred candidate to
replace the company as the
casino operator, with the
hand over set to take place
within the next 60 days if all
went well.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
added: “We are likely to
find ourselves, in the next
60 days, handing over to a
new casino operator provid-
ed they meet the require-
ments of licensing and the
Gaming Board.”

Finding a replacement for
Isle of Capri will potentially
safeguard some 234 jobs at
the casino, with the Gov-
ernment having delivered on
the first part of its agree-
ment with Isle of Capri.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said the Government had to
inform the existing operator
that it had identified its

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 7B

Casino’s loss rises
157% to hit $401,000

Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace

replacement by August 31,
2009, and having now done
so Isle of Capri “will remain
in place until the end of
October”, when the licens-
ing process and transi-
tion/handover are scheduled
to be completed.

Shortlist

The minister told Tribune
Business that the winning
operator was selected from a
shortlist of four that the
Government “thought
would be appropriate for
what we are trying to do”
with the casino and the
Grand Bahama tourism
product in general. Smaller
casino operators, he said,
were rejected because they
did not bring the synergies,
scale, brand name and mar-
keting reach sought.

When asked whether it
was a major casino brand,
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
hinted that the deal could
be broader than just the
casino operations.

Although he gave no
explicit details, his com-
ments left open the possibil-

“We are likely to
find ourselves, in
the next 60 days,
handing over to a
new casino
operator
provided they
meet the
requirements of
licensing and the
Gaming Board.”

ity that the new operator
might also brand the Our
Lucaya hotel, possibly even
taking over its manage-
ment/operations. Given that
the property has not been
profitable for owner Hutchi-
son Whampoa, a purchase
of the hotel may not even
be out of the question.

“The answer is maybe,”
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace,
when asked whether it was a
major brand lined up to
replace Isle of Capri.

“That is the best way to
put it.

“It really depends entirely
on how much of the opera-
tions they will get involved
in.

“One of the great impedi-
ments in Grand Bahama has
been the separation of the
hotel operations and the
casino operations, and we
are seeking to integrate that.
It is the degree to which all
parties integrate that will
determine whether it is seen
as a major brand.

“We've never seen a suc-
cessful casino operation
unless it is integrated with
the hotel.”

PRICEVWATERHOUSE(COPERS

POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR
SENIOR ASSOCIATES

PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancies for qualified accountants whose
qualifications make them eligible for membership in the Bahamas Institute of
Chartered Accountants. Prospective candidates should have at least three (3)
recent years of public accounting and auditing experience and _ be
computer literate.

The positions offer challenging work in the financial services industry and
other areas of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which recognizes
different levels of experience and skill, is designed to reward high performance.
In addition, the Firm provides excellent medical insurance and provident fund
benefits.

Please submit an application letter with your Curriculum Vitae to:

Human Resources Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas

NOTICE
CENSUS PRE-TEST

The Census Office of the Department of Statistics will conduct a Pre-Census Test
beginning Monday, August 17 — Sunday, August 30, 2009, in New Providence
and Grand Bahama. The Pre-test is an integral part of the Census of Population
and Housing which takes place in May 2010.

The main focus of this exercise is to test the questionnaire for Census 2010 in
terms of relevancy, as it relates to the census questions, average length of time
it takes to complete the questionnaire, weaknesses in the questions, instructions
or the design of the questionnaire, etc. To this end, enumerators with official
identification will visit households in New Providence and Grand Bahama in
order to collect information on households and individuals. The Census Pre-test
requires that the public provide information on the following:

Housing Characteristics such as type of dwelling, year the dwelling was built,
main source of water supply, number of bedrooms, etc

Population Characteristics which include information on age, sex, marital status,
health, disability, education, income, etc.

The data generated from the Pre-test will be held in strictest confidence.
All persons are urged to co-operate in this very important national exercise.





PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Benchmark’s $3m property eyes
70-80% occupancy before finish

FROM page 1B

the company suffering a net
$904,654 loss for this year’s
first half.

Blaming the $1.109 million
decline in the total unrealised
value of its equities portfolio
for much of the $0.18 per
share loss during the six
months to June 30, 2009,
Julian Brown, Benchmark
(Bahamas) president, said the
BISX-listed company was see-
ing signs of price stabilisation
that might indicate the
Bahamian stock market was
poised for some recovery in
the fourth quarter.

He added that the
Carmichael Road project,
Benchmark (Bahamas) first
real estate investment project,
was “going to be a very good
contributor to normalising
and smoothing out earnings”
fluctuations caused by price
volatility in the Bahamian
stock market.

“We will not have the gyra-
tions in earnings we have suf-
fered in the past because the
revenue streams coming from
Carmichael Road are going
to have quite an impact on
the overall profit of Bench-
mark,” said Mr Brown,







“It’s looking very good, and
I'm very confident we’re going
to get 70 per cent of the space
leased before the half-year

mark.”



explaining the rationale for
the company’s move into real
estate via its Benchmark
properties subsidiary.

The 15,000 square feet
commercial centre, located at
the Carmichael and Fire Trail
Roads intersection, has
already secured a 5,000 square
foot anchor tenant in the
shape of a Bank of the
Bahamas International
branch, with another compa-
ny - who Mr Brown decline
to name - said to be interested
in leasing a further 2,000
square feet.

“If we go out with just
Bank of the Bahamas, that
5,000 square feet alone is suf-
ficient to service the debt and
leave a little on the table in
terms of bottom line impact
and free cash flow,” Mr

DATA ENTRY CLERK & CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE






We require an experienced individual to fill the position of Data
Entry Clerk and Customer Service Representative for a Leading
General Insurance Company in the Cartbbean. Reporting to the
Country Manager, the successful candidate will be primarily
responsible for data entry and communicating with the Company's
Agents, ensuring that service standards are met,

Qualification & Experience:

Bachelors Degree in Business Administration [position more

suitable to a recent graduate]

Enrolment in a General Insurance Programme through either
the Chartered Insurance Institute or the Insurance Institute of

Canada

Minimum of six (6) BOCSE subjects
Minimum of two (2) years experience in the General Insurance
Industry in Customer Service or Underwriting

Nia LER MUI a

© The ability to work on own initiative and communicate
effectively in oral and written form.
The ability to deal with Agents courteously and professionally,
Computer skills (that 1s competence in the use of word
processing and spreadsheet software programmes and the
ability to leam and function effectively using the Company's

General Insurance Application)

Interested persons should send a detailed resume
accompanied by 4 letter of application to:

Data Entry Clerk & Customer Service Representative
P.O. Box §5-19023

Nassau, Hahamas

Or email to:
csands(@icwi.com

The closing date for all applications is
31" August, 2009
Only short-listed candidates will be contacted

Jt JOSE CARTELLONE

Coc

CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES S.A.

Julian Brown

Brown told Tribune Business.

“It’s looking very good, and
I’m very confident we’re
going to get 70 per cent of the
space leased before the half-
year mark.

:We’ve had very good
inquiries from companies, and
we are very pleased with the
interest that we’ve seen so far.
I don’t believe we’re going to
have any difficulty in getting it
leased..”

The Benchmark (Bahamas)
chief executive added: “We
have in principle an agree-
ment with another company
to take 2,000 square feet, and
have been working with them
for the last two months.

“Based on inquiries, we
probably have 5,000 square
feet left. We’ve had a num-
ber of inquiries before we
even got started on the space.
If we mark it by inquiries,
we’re going to have 70-80 per
cent leased by the time we’re
done on construction.”

Bank of the Bahamas Inter-

Sd DOCTORS HOSPITAL

| Collections

Education:

national is set to have its own
exclusive 5,000 square foot
building in the commercial
centre, which has a $3 million
price tag attached to its con-
struction.

Mr Brown said Benchmark
(Bahamas) had invested some
$1.3 million into the project
to date, some $500,000 hav-
ing gone on the initial land
acquisition, with a further
$800,000 spent on vertical
construction costs.

“We’ve done all that on our
own,” he added,” and are
beginning to finance the bal-
ance of it. We’re about half-
way through in terms of con-
struction. We’re actually pret-
ty much on schedule and are
getting ready to put the roof
on. It’s scheduled to be com-
pleted in December, and I
suppose we’re two weeks
here, two weeks there, either
side of the deadline.”

Mr Brown said _ the
Carmichael area’s demo-
graphics, and being the loca-
tion with the fastest popula-
tion growth on New Provi-
dence, were driving interest
in Benchmark (Bahamas)
development despite the
recession.

Businesses and entrepre-
neurs, he added, were look-
ing into the future and decid-
ing to base themselves in the
Carmichael area.

For the six months to June
30, 2009, the only real posi-
tive for Benchmark
(Bahamas) in terms of its

Health For Life

Officer

Associate Degree in Business or Management, or its equivalent.

Experience:

Previous collections experience at least 2 years. Well organized and
experience with portfolio management. An understanding of insurance

verification and requirements,

Qualifications:
* Basic computer skills
* Leadership skills Required.

* Excellent written and oral communication skills.
* Ability to apply skills with all levels of internal and external customers.

This includes, but is not limited to:

* Medical staff

* Patients & families

¢ Clinical personal

¢ Support and technical staff

* Outside agencies

¢ And members of the community

Position Summary:

To monitor and manage receivables under your portfolio. To monitor
self-pay admissions to the hospital. Follow-up on delinquent accounts as
needed. Communicate with internal & external customers on a regular basis.
Answer patient/customer queries in an informed manner. Continuously
participate in performance improvement to enhance service to our
customers throughout the Health System. Any other duties assigned by the
Supervisor or Coordinator of Credit and Collections Department.

Ace eM RU ACOA UNCON cel ace Der] tern lee
Doctors Hospital | P.O. Box N-3018 | Nassau, Bahamas
nwatkins@doctorshosp.com or Fax: 242-302-4738

COMPLETION OF NEW PROVIDENCE ROAD
IMPROVEMENT PROJECT

CLOSURE OF VISTA MARINA ACCESS
Effective 23 August 2009 the Vista Marina Access, just west of the Shell Service Station
will be closed to implement the works on Corridor 18.

Motorists travelling from West Bay

Street may
Subdivisian West

accesa
through Grove

The Grove

Avenue travelling southbound and
through Marine Drive and Poinsettia
Avenue travelling northbound.

Sorry for any inconvenience caused

and we look

forward ta

the

cooperation of the motoring public.

Quenes?’ Contact us at (242) 322-
BS41 / (242) 322-2610 Mondays to
Fridays, from 8:00 am to 06:00 pm
Email:joocneighboursigcartellane, com, ar

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

2

Kioz =}
NUABERY || =
PRESCHOOL]
|
FE

MARU ney He
= = a

if-

== eon on |

BAUNMCER i
BEACH '
==PEHeLL fF
SERVICE
STATION
ROAD TO
BE CLOSED |

financial results was the posi-
tive $204,024 in net invest-
ment income earned.

The net movement in the
unrealised value of its equi-
ties portfolio produced a
$737,136 loss, while the com-
pany’s three subsidiaries -
Benchmark Advisors, Bench-
mark Properties and Alliance
Investment Management gen-
erated half-year losses of
$12,510, $350 and $154,658
respectively.

Mr Brown said Benchmark
(Bahamas) management and
Board were “not really” con-
cerned about the company
falling into possible negative
equity, given that total equity
had stood at $500,000 at year-
end 2008 and further losses
had been incurred since then.

“We think we’re in good
shape, but are keeping an eye
on that number and certainly
have plans in place to deal
with situations like that,” Mr









Brown said of the equity posi-
tion. As it relates to the com-
pany, I don’t think we have a
need for major concern,
because the underlying fun-
damentals are solid and we
had no debt on the books at
the end of last year, although
we will have a small amount
to draw down to complete the
building on Carmichael.

“Overall, we think we’re in
a good position, and if we
need to respond I don’t think
it will be too difficult to
achieve at this point in time.”

Mr Brown said Alliance,
the company’s international
broker/dealer subsidiary, had
seen its assets under adminis-
tration grow by 10 per cent in
the 2009 second quarter, and
new business and clients con-
tinued to come in.

It had expanded, he said,
from $20 million to some $200
million in client assets under
administration.

Wayne R. Munroe






is pleased to announce

the opening of the firm

of

Munroe W) Associ ates

—$< rs

=

Counsel and Atborneys-at-Law
« Nogaries Pohlie »

CHAMBERS:

4th Floor, Gold Circle House * East Bay Street

BO, Bow N-8332 * Nassau, The Bahamas

Tel: 242-394-8888 © Facsimile: 242-394-2910)

Email: infot@munroclawbahamas.com

weewwmunroelawbahamas.com

Road Traffic Department
Road Safety Competition

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fe: oad Te:



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 9B



The Bahamas last major cenire in
region in OECD ‘grey’ tax category

FROM page 1B

Key international financial
centre rivals had been
making “distinct and
aggressive moves” to
escape the OECD ‘grey’
list, “it is a significant issue
that the Bahamas,
although it seems to have

been in negotiations with a
number of nations, has not
been able yet to get to the
point of signing an agree-
ment”.

He added that his con-
cern was that in industries
such as financial services,
perception was more
important than reality, and

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KILMAMENE CORP.

even became the reality.

“Tf the Bahamas is not
moving in step with its com-
petitors, and if it is not
ahead of its competitors, the
perception might be that it is
not as capable as other
countries,” Mr Pinder told
Tribune Business.

“The Government has
pledged to sign the required
12 TIEAs by the end of the
year, but the longer it takes
to sign them, the more the
perception that our com-
petitors are more ahead of
the game than we are.

We’ve not signed any, while
our competitors have signed
a number of them.”

Mr Pinder added that it
was “not a good sign” that
competitors such as the Cay-
man Islands and BVI were
now on the ‘white’ list, and
suggested that the Bahamas
would have to move quickly
during the last four months
of 2009 to accomplish its
goal of escaping the ‘grey’
list and having 12 TIEAs in
place.

“This is an issue where we
could have jumped out in

front and taken the lead.
Leading the charge and sign-
ing the required agreements
could have been one of the
things done to demonstrate
we were ahead of the game
and our competition,” Mr
Pinder told Tribune Busi-
ness.

However, Craig A. ‘Tony’
Gomez, the Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Board’s
(BFSB) chairman, told Tri-
bune Business that he did
not believe Cayman,
Bermuda and _ BVI’s
achievement on getting to

the ‘white’ list would give
them a competitive advan-
tage “in any way” over the
Bahamas.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of KILMAMENE CORP.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CUVENTUS INC.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of VAL SALVAN CORP. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
PROWELL VALLEY LTD.

—_—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PROWELL VALLEY LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DAVINCI PRIZE INC.

—_— -)——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of DAVINCI PRIZE INC.

has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





Legal Notice

NOTICE
VAL SALVAN CORP.

——__

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of VAL SALVAN CORP. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RASBORA WELLS INC.

—_

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of RASBORA WELLS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



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Legal Notice

NOTICE
YASHIMA ALPS INC.

—

Fi

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of YASHIMA ALPS INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MODELLISTA LIMITED

— f)—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MODELLISTA LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



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PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Project awaits extra $362m investment

FROM page 1B

we've estimate we’ve invest-
ed $203 million in Baker’s
Bay, and think we have
another $362 million to
invest in terms of sales,
operations and the Marina
Village condos.












“A big encouragement for
us is that we’ve been able to
continue with the quality of
the development that we
envisaged, even in the face
of the economic slowdown.”

Baker’s Bay has, along
with Albany and Ginn, been
one of the few Bahamas-
based mixed-use resort pro-

jects to continue making
development progress in the
face of the credit crunch,
then the global recession,
which brought many of their
peers in this nation and the
wider Caribbean to a stand-
still. While development
work on the Baker’s Bay
build-out was set to go into a
slower phase for the next
two to three months, coin-
ciding with the tourism sea-
son’s low point, Dr Marshall
said that while the marina
was “not 100 per cent oper-
ational”, the developers had
been able to open it from
March onwards.

“We are working towards
Blue Flag certification,” he

next year. We had some of
the Blue Flag committee
members out last week to
help us identify any poten-
tial gaps. Right now, we are
receiving boats, and are see-
ing a steady increase in
boats coming in as the word
spreads.”

Dr Marshall said “25 per
cent of the marina is fully
operational”, with all
required safety equipment,
pump out stations, water
receptacles and tanks in
place. A Code of Conduct
was being developed for the
marina, while the fact the
marina bottom could be
seen from the docks indicat-
ed the flushing channel was






















































added of the marina. “We
are really gearing up for

working to perfection.
Meanwhile, the project’s

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT
OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
INVITATION FOR TENDERS

Ministry of Finance
Public Notice
Prohibited and Restricted Imports

The Government of the Bahamas is inviting
tenders for the supply of Servicing,
maintenance and repair of _ tractor
equipment, Solid Waste site off Tonique
Williams-Darling Hwy. (Harold Rd).

The public is hereby reminded that trailers or
caravans for use as living quarters, offices,
workshops, or similar purposes, unless specifically
authorized by the Minister of Finance, are
restricted items, and cannot therefore, be imported into
The Bahamas.

Approval may be granted for the temporary
importation of such items in special circumstances,
and under specific conditions.

Interested parties may obtain further
information including — eligibility to
participate and may collect the bidding
document upon payment of a non refundable
fee of fifty dollars ($50.00) as of August 20th
2009 from:

The Department of Environmental Health
Services Farrington Road Nassau, Bahamas
P. O. Box SS-19048

Any person wishing to import such items are advised
Telephone No. (242) 322-8037, Facsimile that:
No. (242) 322-8073 between the hours of

9:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M. Monday to Friday.

¢ Approval in writing must be obtained from
the Ministry of Finance before the item is
imported into the country.

¢ If approval for temporary importation, the
item must be exported at the end of the
approved period.

* Containers which are part of the shipping
trade will not be granted temporary
importation for warehousing or similar
purposes.

¢ Approval will not be granted for trailers
already landed in the country.

The method of payment will be certified
cheque or cash.

Tenders are to be submitted in triplicate (3)
in sealed envelope (s) addressed to:

The Tenders Board

C/O The Financial Secretary
Ministry of Finance

Cecil V. Wallace Whitfield Centre
P. O. Box N-3017

Nassau, N.P.

The Bahamas

Importers of trailers presently in The Bahamas, are
reminded that each trailer is to be exported at the end
of the approved period.

No later than September 7th 2009. Further enquiries on the matter may be directed to the
Comptroller of Customs, Custom House, P.O. Box
N-155, New Providence, The Bahamas or Telephone
(242) 326-4401

Tenders will be open at 10:00 A.M. on
September 8th 2009 at the office of the
Tenders Board, Ministry of Finance.

Ehurd Cunningham
Financial Secretary (Actg)

The government reserves the right to reject
any or all Tenders

FG CAPITAL

MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

cics rcs AT AS TL

ROYAL = FIDELITY EJ

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 25 AUGUST 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,577.62| CHG 0.06| %CHG 0.00 | YTD -134.74 | YTD % -7.87
FINDEX: CLOSE 790.64 | YTD -5.30% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
Abaco Markets 1.34 1.34 0.00 0.127
Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.382

10.00
6.25
0.63
3.15
2.14
10.18
2.74
5.50 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.00 6.00 0.00
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.71 3.77 0.06
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.00 2.00 0.00
6.60 Famguard 6.60 6.60 0.00
10.00 Finco 10.63 10.63 0.00
10.30 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.30 10.30 0.00
4.95 Focol (S) 5.13 5.13 0.00
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30 0.00
5.49 ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 0.00
10.39 J. S. Johnson 10.39 10.39 0.00
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
8.42 14.00 = N/M
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00 N/M
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55 256.6
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00 9.03
0.45 0.55 0.55 261.90
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
YTD% Last 12 Months
3.48 5.15
-1.20 -3.66
1.4842 3.53 5.55
3.1143 -8.01 -12.43
13.0484 3.41 5.84
101.6693 1.10 1.67
96.7398 0.35 -4.18
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.3399 2.69 -1.41
1.0622 2.56 6.22
1.0243 -0.84 2.43
1.0585 2.04 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Bank of Bahamas 6.25 6.25 0.00
Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00
Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00
Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00
Cable Bahamas 11.35 11.35 0.00
Colina Holdings 2.74 2.74 0.00

0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180
ases)
Interest

55.6

52wk-Hi__52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
1.4075 CFAL Money Market Fund
3.1031 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
12.3870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

NAV
1.4005
2.9047

Div $ NAV Date
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
14-Aug-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09

1.3320
2.8952

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
last 52 weeks
‘8 weighted price for daily volume
ghted price for daily volume
Change - Change
Daily Vol. - Numb: ded today
DIV $ - Dividends per the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamin: gs
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/6/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

day to day EPS $ - A company’s reported earings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

18-hole Tom Fazio-designed
golf course is scheduled to
be finished at the end of
December, Dr Marshall
describing this and the mari-
na as “two big milestones in
the project”. The course was
set to be ready for play ear-
ly in 2010, certainly by
March/April time.

“We have grassed at this
stage about 14 holes, and
everything is pretty much
shaped,” Dr Marshall told
Tribune Business. “In
another week or so, we will
have everything grassed......

“In the Marina Village, 14
units are near construction
completion, retail and living
quarters. One home has
been completed and the
downstairs converted into a
temporary restaurant. We’re
doing a lot of streetscaping
around the Marina Village.

“We anticipate some addi-
tional hires in the next six
to 12 months as the golf
course comes on stream, and
we'd like to think that
between the golf course, the
Homeowners Association
and more activity in the
marina, that we will be ina
position to add somewhere
between a handful to a
dozen jobs.”

While real estate and lot
sales had slowed due to the
economic climate, Dr Mar-
shall said Baker’s Bay had
managed to “close a couple
of sales for the year, and we
have a number in the
pipeline”.

Baker’s Bay was antici-
pating that it would receive
a strong level of guest and
members visits when the
peak winter season kicked
in, and Dr Marshall told Tri-
bune Business: “We are in
various Stages of having
closed, attempting to close
or sold 70-80 lots, so those
persons will be coming in as
members and bringing in
their guests.

“We are continuing to try
and increase that by having
persons come down, look at
the property and close
sales.”

Dr Marshall said the Bak-
er’s Bay developers hoped
to “aggressively” move on
the construction of custom
homes at the project site, a
move that designed to not
only stimulate sales but
boost the Bahamian con-

struction industry.

With some 385 home sites
for sale at Baker’s Bay, and
construction likely to be
phased according to when
they are sold and buyer
wishes, the Bahamian con-
struction industry is likely
to be kept busy by the pro-
ject for the next 10 years.

“What we are looking for-
ward to in the next six to 12
months is construction of
the custom homes,” Dr Mar-
shall told Tribune Business.
“Five to six buyers are very
interested in starting con-
struction, and it is estimated
that these homes will range
in price on average to $5
million.

“If we get five to six of
those going in the next 12
to 18 months, that will be a
nice shot in the arm for the
construction industry. We’re
in talks now with about
three local Bahamian con-
tractors on that.”

Some 100 condo units,
some of which will be
homes, will also be present
in the Marina Village. Four
of these condo units - typi-
cally two-bed properties -
have been completed, and
Dr Marshall said the devel-
opers expected between 75
to 100 beds to be placed in
the hotel rental pool at any
one time.

Dr Marshall said Baker’s
Bay was transitioning from a
monitoring and assessment
phase to one of manage-
ment, execution and imple-
mentation, with the devel-
opers hoping to substantial-
ly complete key construc-
tion and infrastructure in
time for when the US and
world economies emerged
from recession on the turn-
around path.

“That’s what we’re hop-
ing for; the perfect conver-
sion,” Dr Marshall told Tri-
bune Business. “Overall, we
think we’re in very good
shape and are very opti-
mistic for the next six to 12
months. We started off with
a very good model to begin
with, and it was just a ques-
tion of executing that from a
financial perspective, a
human resources perspec-
tive. Tremendous planning
went into this project, and
those plans were intended
to take us on a successful
path.”

PUBLIC NOTICE

The House of Assembly has appointed a
select committee to look into the disposition
of all publicly held lands. This includes crown
land, land owned by the Treasurer and land
owned by public corporations like the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation (BEC) and Bahamas
Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC). The
Committee members are Fred Mitchell MP Fox Hill
Chairman, Charles Maynard MP for Golden
Isles and Minister of State for Culture, Deputy
Chairman, Branville McCartney MP Bamboo Town,
Minister of State for Immigration, Philip Davis MP
for Cat Island, Rum Cay and San Salvador and
Kenyatta Gibson MP for Kennedy.

The Committee by this notice is soliciting
information from the public on their concerns
about publicly owned lands. The deadline for
the return of information is 31st August. The
information should be sent to the Chief Clerk,
House of Assembly at P.O. Box N 3003 Nassau
Bahamas or at fax no 322-1118 or at the email
address: house of assembly@bahamas.gov.bs or
by hand at the House of Assembly, Bay Street,

Nassau.

The Committee has been empowered to send for
persons and papers, to sit from place to place and
to sit during the recess and members of the public
should indicate whether they would wish to appear
before the Committee in person under oath and
whether or not they would wish for their identity

to be protected.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 11B



Agency that insures bank

deposits may

STEVENSON JACOBS,
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK

The government agency
that guarantees you won't
lose your money in a bank
failure may need a lifeline
of its own.

The coffers of the Federal
Deposit Insurance Corp.
have been so depleted by
the epidemic of collapsing
financial institutions that
analysts warn it could sink
into the red by the end of
this year.

That has happened only
once before — during the
savings-and-loan crisis of the
early 1990s, when the FDIC
was forced to borrow $15
billion from the Treasury
and repay it later with inter-
est.

On Thursday, the agency
reveals how much is left in
its reserves. FDIC Chairman
Sheila Bair may also use the
quarterly briefing to say how
the agency plans to shore up
its accounts.

Small and midsize banks
across the country have
been hurt by rising loan
defaults in the recession.
When they fail, the FDIC is
responsible for making sure
depositors don't lose a cent.

It has two options to
replenish its insurance fund
in the short run: It can
charge banks higher fees or
it can take the more radical
step of borrowing from the
USS. Treasury.

None of this means bank
customers have anything to
worry about. The FDIC is
fully backed by the govern-
ment, which means deposi-
tors' accounts are guaran-
teed up to $250,000 per
account. And it still has bil-
lions in loss reserves apart
from the insurance fund.

On Thursday, Bair will
also update the number of
banks on the FDIC's list of
troubled institutions. That
number shot up to 305 in the
first quarter — the highest
since 1994 and up from 252
late last year.

Because of surging bank
failures, the FDIC's board
was expected Wednesday
afternoon to make it easier
for private investors to buy
failed financial institutions.

Private equity funds have
been criticized for taking too
many risks and paying man-
agers too much. But these
days fewer healthy banks
are willing to buy ailing
banks, and the depth of the
banking crisis appears to
have softened the FDIC's
resistance to private buyers.

At least in theory, allow-
ing private investors to buy
failing banks would mean
the FDIC could charge a
higher price, shrinking the
amount of losses the agency
would have to cover.

Bair has not ruled out hik-
ing premiums on banks for
the second time this year or
asking the Treasury for a
short-term loan. She has said
taking the longer-term step
of drawing on the Treasury
credit line is only for emer-
gencies.

So far this year, 81 banks
have failed, compared with
just 25 last year — and only
three in 2007. Hundreds
more banks are expected to
fall in coming years because
of souring loans for com-
mercial real estate. That
threatens to deplete the
FDIC's fund.

"T think the public should
expect the fund to go nega-
tive at some point,” said
Gerard Cassidy, a banking
analyst at RBC Capital Mar-
kets, which has predicted
that up to 1,000 banks — or
one in eight — could disap-
pear within three years.

Either lifeline for the
FDIC carries risks. Borrow-
ing from the Treasury could
be seen as another taxpayer
bailout. But charging more
in premiums would shrink
profits at healthy banks,
squeeze troubled ones and
make lending even tighter.

"The more you levy these
assessments on banks, the
less money they have to lend
to the general population,"
said Camden Fine, president
of the Independent Com-



=

need help

AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari, file

Corp. (FDIC) Chairwoman Sheila Bair reviews her notes on Capi-
tol Hill. Hit by an epidemic of bank failures, the Federal Deposit
Insurance Corp. will reveal Thursday, Aug. 27, 2009, how much
is left in its deposit insurance fund, which has sunk to its lowest
level in 17 years.

munity Bankers of Ameri-
ca, an industry group that
represents 5,000 banks.
Last week's failure of
Guaranty Bank in Texas,
the second-largest this year,
is expected to cost the FDIC
$3 billion. The FDIC record-
ed more than $19 billion in
losses just through March.
The agency figures it will
need $70 billion to cover
bank failures through 2013,
more than five times the $13
billion that was in the fund
in March. The last time it
was that low was during the
S&L crisis in 1992, when the

fund was down to $178 mil-
lion. Some critics say regu-
lators have taken too long
to shut down troubled
banks. Chicago's Corus
Bankshares, for example,
has staggered for weeks
under the weight of bad real
estate loans.

FDIC spokesman Andrew
Gray said the agency seeks
to strike a balance between
helping troubled banks work
through their problems "so
there's zero cost to the
deposit fund,” and interven-
ing quickly if there are no
other options.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOZIE TELFORE of EAST
STREET SOUTH, MALCOLM ROAD, P.O. BOX N-2557,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as

a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20" day of August, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



HELP
WANTED

An Established Medical Facility

seeks to fill the following position:

REGISTERED
PHYSICIAN

General / Family Practice (Full-time)

Kindly submit application to:

P.O. Box CR-55050
Nassau, Bahamas

Via email to: a_1_phyneeded@live.com

PROGRESSIVE SERVICE ORIENTED COMPANY
LOOKING FOR A FEW GOOD PEOPLE.

PARTS AND SERVICE COORDINATOR

Extensive background in managing an OEM
Heavy Truck Service/ Parts facility a must.
Background in Parts and Service management and
coordination required on a daily basis. Must be able
to effectively administer all facits of business.
Minimum of 10 years experience preferred. Good
people skills a must. Must have prior experience
in parts order and supervising employees. Computer
skills required on a daily basis. Must be self
motivated and work with little or no supervision.

Competitive Wages

We thank all applicants however, only candidates to
be interviewed will be contacted.

Please hand deliver your resumes and references to

Bahamas Mack Truck Sales Ltd.
Rock Crusher Road
Nassau, Bahamas



as

MINISTRY OF FINANCE
VACANCY NOTICE

The Ministry of Finance invites interested persons to apply for the

position of Director of Management Information Systems.

The Terms of Reference of the position are as follows:

The Director of Management Information Systems (DMIS) will
guide the Government of The Bahamas in the procurement and

implementation _ of

Management Information

appropriate
Technology (MIT). The DMIs will be responsible for coordination
of the Government’s Management Information Systems (MIS) to
meet the needs of Government’s mission statement. This person will
plan and direct the implementation of automated systems to meet
current and future needs of the Government by performing the
following activities:

Have general supervision of all

overnment-related Information

Communication of Technology (ICT) functions.

1.

16.

Advise on the selection of appropriate technology, hardware
and software, for any system proposal submitted by any
Ministry or Department of the Government of The Bahamas.

Design organization structures for computer sections within
the Government to enable a controlled decentralization.

Assist the agencies of the Government of The Bahamas with
the selection and recruitment of appropriate computer
personnel.

Review and recommend the operational procedures of
computer departments, units or sections within the
Public Service.

Implementation of the recommendations of the MIS
Strategic Plan designed for the Government.

Formulate and subsequently review the system development
and implementation of software projects.

Provide plans for integrating the systems located in various
agencies of the Government for sharing of information.

Translate the Government’s request for necessary
management decision information into computerized
requirements

Coordinate the Government’s MIS budgets and Schedules
for Ministries and Department base on the Government’s
stated priorities.

Evaluate and advise on the cost benefits of proposed, current
and future MIS projects

Make presentations to top management on the status of the
action plans to address outstanding and future MIS issues.

Establish and coordinate the use of a Government MIS
resources teams within Ministries/Department.

Align MIS technology with the Government’s requirements.

Provide technical guidance for current environment with the
view to positioning the Government to be able to more
readily take advantage of future MIS technologies.
Knowledge of products in current environment.

Minimize and control the costs of implementation and
operations of the Government’s resource team where
applicable,

Organize MIS seminars for managers.

Qualifications:

A degree in the Information Technology, Management Information

Systems or related field, preferably a
experience workin

asters, with at least 10 years
in the field. Conversant with the latest

technology and techniques in the following area:

IBM Platforms
PC and mainframe networks .
Data Bases in PC and mainframes .
Exposure to UNIX and Client-Server Databases &
Systems
¢ Information Technology budgeting

Reporting:

The DMIS will report to the Financial Secretary.

The term for the Director of Management Information Systems will
be for duration of three (3) years in the first instance but renewable
thereafter. Salary and benefits to be negotiated.

Curriculum Vitae should be sent to:

The Financial Secretary
Ministry of Finance

P. O. Box N-3017

Cecil Wallace-Whitfield Centre
Cable Beach

or by e-mail to ecunningham@bahamas.gov.bs so as to arrive not
later than Monday 24 August, 2009.

No telephone calls please.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a; > ---
Cash for Clunkers generates 700K new car sales



(AP Photo/Gary Malerba)
FORD EMPLOYEES work as the 2010 Ford Focus rolls down the
pre-delivery area of the Wayne Stamping and Assembly plant in
Wayne, Mich., Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2009. Cash for Clunkers gener-
ated nearly 700,000 new car sales and ended under its $3 billion bud-
get, the Transportation Department said Wednesday.






























Legal Notice

NOTICE
VALCOLLA S.A.

— 4)—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of VALCOLLA S.A. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

KEN THOMAS and
STEPHEN
MANNING,
WASHINGTON

Cash for Clunkers gener-
ated nearly 700,000 new car
sales and ended under its $3
billion budget, the Trans-
portation Department said
Wednesday, according to
Associated Press.

Releasing final data, the
government said dealers
submitted 690,114 vouchers
totaling $2.88 billion. New
car sales through the pro-
gram ended late Monday
and dealers were allowed to
submit paperwork to the
government until late Tues-
day.

Japanese automakers
Toyota, Honda and Nissan
accounted for 41 percent of
the new vehicle sales, out-
pacing Detroit automakers
General Motors, Ford and
Chrysler, which had a share
of nearly 39 percent. Toy-
ota Motor Corp. led the
industry with 19.4 percent
of new sales, followed by
General Motors Co. with
17.6 percent and Ford
Motor Co. with 14.4 percent.

The Toyota Corolla was
the most popular new vehi-
cle purchased under the pro-
gram, followed by the Hon-
da Civic, Toyota Camry and
Ford Focus.

Transportation Secretary
Ray LaHood said U.S. con-

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DOLE HOLLOW LIMITED

—_—_

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of DOLE HOLLOW LIMITED has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

sumers and workers were
"the clear winners" under
the program. "Manufactur-
ing plants have added shifts
and recalled workers. Mori-
bund showrooms were
brought back to life and con-
sumers bought fuel-efficient
cars that will save them
money and improve the
environment," he said.

The White House Council
of Economic Advisers said
the program will boost eco-
nomic growth in the third
quarter by 0.3 to 0.4 per-
centage points because of
the increased auto sales in
July and August. An esti-
mated 42,000 jobs will be
created or saved during the
second half of the year, the
White House said.

The program, which
began in late July, offered
consumers rebates of $3,500
or $4,500 off the price of a
new vehicle in return for
trading in their older, less
fuel-efficient vehicles. The
trade-in vehicles needed to
get 18 miles per gallon or
less and were then scrapped.

It proved far more popu-
lar than lawmakers original-
ly thought.

Congress was forced to
add another $2 billion to the
original $1 billion budget
when the first pot of money
nearly ran out in a week.
The extra money was sup-
posed to last through Labor
Day, but in the end, Cash
for Clunkers ran only about
a month.

Dealers loved the new
sales, but reported major
hassles trying to get the gov-
ernment to repay them for

the rebates they gave cus-
tomers. The government
extended the deadline for
them to file deals, but many
still haven't received their
money.

Peter Kitzmiller, president
of the Maryland Automo-
bile Dealers Association,
said most dealers appeared
to get their paperwork in by
the Tuesday night deadline.
He expressed hope the pace
of repayments would pick
up now that government
officials are working through
the backlog.

The Transportation
Department said Wednes-
day that 2,000 people are
processing dealer applica-
tions, but Kitzmiller said the
rate of repayment hasn't
increased.

"I'm a little concerned
that we haven't seen any
improvement," he said.

The government said 84
percent of the trade-ins were
trucks and 59 percent of the
new vehicles were passen-
ger cars.

New vehicles bought
through Cash for Clunkers
had an average fuel-effi-
ciency of 24.9 miles per gal-
lon, compared with an aver-
age of 15.8 mpg for trade-
ins, a 58 percent improve-
ment.

American companies
accounted for all the top-10
traded-in vehicles. The Ford
Explorer four-wheel-drive
was the most popular, fol-
lowed by the Ford F-150
Pickup two-wheel-drive, the
Jeep Grand Cherokee four-
wheel-drive and Ford
Explorer two-wheel-drive.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SEA BLACK TIGER SLOPES INC.

— 4)—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SEA BLACK TIGER SLOPES INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEO RENAISSANCE INC.

— -)——

Fd

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NEO RENAISSANCE INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DELTA JUNCTION LTD.

—*,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of DELTA JUNCTION LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AVENARIUS INC.

— 4)—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of AVENARIUS INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
COURCELLES GREENS INC.

—_— -*)—

é

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of COURCELLES GREENS INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued

and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORANGE GROVE VALLEY INC.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ORANGE GROVE VALLEY INC. has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued

and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ROCCOLEONE INC.

— )—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ROCCOLEONE INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
COPPERPOTTE INC.

—¢*,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of COPPERPOTTE INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEUDOREF VILLAGE INC.

— -*)——

Fd

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NEUDORF VILLAGE INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

a |

5-Day FORECAST

9% ORLANDO.












=|





Th a OTN
Vv
'|8|9|

HIGH | \.HIGH



o|1|2

LOW

3|4[5

MODERATE















High:92°F/33°C = Ss Partly sunny, a couple of Mostly cloudy. Sunshine with a heavy Sunny to partly cloudy. Partly sunny, a t-storm Partly sunny with a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
Pein dhe 2 ® , i-storms. thunderstorm. possible. shower possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
Low: 76° F/24°C _, : : ; S : . : :
a & et High: 90 High: 91 High: 90 High: 89
c le Ff High: 90° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 80° Low: 79° Low: 79° see ERT
TAMPA ie aE A
High: 90° F/32° C , 100° F 107°-85° F 103°-90° F 102°-89° F 102°-83° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft
Low: 75° F/24°C on r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 1:32am. 23 7:32am. 05
a @ ’ 2 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 2:15pm. 28 8:37pm. 07
i ae my -347pm. 27 9:38pm. 08
; ~ Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday 331am. 22 O3lam. 06
L er ABACO Temperature 4:18pm. 27 10:35pm. 07
, 4 > e VGN esses ceeees Qaceescnee taceregancestcceeeses 91° F/33° C : :
; P54 High: 91° F/33° C incon Sunday 432am. 2.2 10:31am. 0.6
; me ee Of eat! LOW ecesssseenee 80° F/27° C
ua aX — Low: 80° F/27°C Normal high... Ce ee
- : ee Normal low 76° F/24° C
4 pe) @ WEST PALM BEACH i Last year's HIQH ccc or F33°C | ONT VIM UII
4 ll High: 90° F/32° C 5 Last year's ]OW oe eee 82° F/28° C
" ‘ Low: 75° F/24°C SP Precipitation .j j_| ~~ Sunrise...... 6:49 a.m. Moonrise .... 1:58 p.m.
ee >a . € As of 2 p.m. yesterday ...csccsscccsscseeessseeeen trace ‘ Sumset....... 7:34 p.m. Moonset......... hone
Wall, . FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT 7 Year to date a 20: First Full Last New
High: 90° F/32° C @ High: 89° F/32° C Normal year to date oes 30.28" : is -
Low: 78° F/26°C Pa > il Low: 78° F/26° C oe yh ae
+ /., AccuWeather.com 3 Gai ee
@ ‘ Forecasts and graphics provided by : a: ty
4 MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Aug. 27 Sep. 4 Sep. 11 Sep. 18
yy High: 91° F/33° C High: 91° F/33°C
i Low: 77° F/25° C NASSAU L ; 79° F/26°C
High: 90° F/32° C oe
= Low: 79° F/26° C
3 i. , @ ere
KEY WEST ee Soe CATISLAND
High: 89° F/32" C High: 87° F/31° C
Low: 79° F/26° C —_ " Low: 75° F/24°C
7. GREAT EXUMA ee
- REAT EXUN SAN SALVADOR
all High: 88° F/31°C 5 he ON? E/99°
Low: 76°F/24° C re Tie ©
; : Low: 76° F/24° C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ier ce 5 f
highs and tonights's lows. — : ——- ‘
. : ef Low: 77° F/25°C i. ra & ,
LONG ISLAND
ee itz
Low: 76° F/24° C ‘
Today Friday Today Friday Today Friday *. 4 MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W alll i High: 89° F/32° C
FIC FIC Fic FC FIC FIC FIC = F/C FC F/C FIC = FIC 4 Low: 75° F/24° C
Albuquerque 88/31 64/117 pce 87/80 62/16 s Indianapolis 84/28 65/18 t 80/26 65/18 t Philadelphia 86/30 65/18 pc 80/26 65/18 c :
Anchorage 63/17 5110 +r 64/117 53/41 sh Jacksonville 88/31 72/22 t 88/31 71/21 ¢t Phoenix 108/42 84/28 s 109/42 34/28 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 88/31 68/20 t 83/28 68/20 t Kansas City 80/26 G16 t 83/28 6216 pc Pittsburgh 77/25 58/14 po 73/22 60/15 t RAGGEDISLAND — igh:92°F/83°¢
Atlantic City 85/29 6146 pc 77/25 64/17 pc LasVegas 105/40 76/24 s 107/41 81/27 s Portland,OR 93/33 58/14 pc 78/25 60/15 pe High: 89° F/32° C Low:77°F/25°C
Baltimore 85/29 64/417 pe 78/25 6447 1 Little Rock 91/32 70/21 s 87/30 67/19 t Raleigh-Durham 94/34 69/20 s 85/29 68/20 t Low: 74°F/23°C eo.
Boston 76/24 56/13 s 70/21 56/13 $s Los Angeles 95/35 64/17 s 90/32 64/17 $s St. Louis 88/31 68/20 t 81/27 66/18 t .
Buffalo 73/22 51/0 s 72/22 60/15 pc Louisville 90/32 69/20 pc 85/29 68/20 t Salt Lake City 93/83 63/17 s 93/33 63/17 $s GREAT INAGUA = ttn
Charleston, SC 88/31 73/22 t 87/30 70/21 t Memphis 92/33 72/22 s 89/31 70/21 t San Antonio 99/37 73/22 t 100/37 72/22 t High: 92° F/33° C
Chicago 74/23 60415 sh 77/25 60415 t Miami 91/32 77/25 t 89/31 76/24 t San Diego 85/29 66/18 s 81/27 67/19 s Low. 78° F/26°C
Cleveland 74/23 60/15 pe 78/25 62/16 t Minneapolis 78/25 58/14 $s 77/25 54412 pe San Francisco 84/28 59/15 pc 78/25 58/14 pc y
Dallas 94/34 72/22 t 92/33 71/21 pc Nashville 90/32 68/20 s 89/31 68/20 t Seattle 88/31 55/12 pe 71/21 56/13 pc
Denver 84/28 55/12 s 90/32 53/11 $s New Orleans 90/32 72/22 t 90/32 74/23 pc Tallahassee 88/31 70/21 t 86/30 71/21 t lie %
Detroit 75/23 58414 pe 77/25 6246 t New York 81/27 66/18 s 76/24 67/49 pc Tampa 90/32 75/23 t 90/32 77/25 t
Honolulu 89/31 76/24 s 89/31 75/23 ¢$ Oklahoma City 88/31 64/17 t 85/29 63/17 $s Tucson 102/38 76/24 pc 101/88 76/24 pc Vw
Houston 95/35 74/23 t 95/35 74/23 t Orlando 92/33 76/24 t 90/32 75/23 t Washington, DC 89/31 69/20 pc 78/25 68/20 r

A

Wor.p Cities



Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
90/32
73/22
81/27
838/31
62/16
91/32
86/30
81/27
90/32
81/27
93/33
80/26
86/30
69/20
77/25
87/30
77/25
94/34
90/32
78/25
91/32
81/27
86/30
71/21
63/17
84/28
83/28
71/21
91/32
66/18
93/33
103/39
85/29
82/27
69/20
88/31
73/22
73/22
95/35
90/32
77/25
102/38
66/18
72/22
84/28
79/26
91/32
63/17
77/25
82/27
74/23
105/40
88/31
88/31
89/31
86/30
79/26
90/32
70/21
86/30
72/22
73/22
95/35
82/27
68/20
93/33
78/25
84/28
81/27
75/23

iil

Today

Low
F/C
eiZe
57/13
50/10
72/22
52/11
79/26
77/25
69/20
70/21
75/23
69/20
63/17
80/26
42/5
59/15
66/18
61/16
74/23
79/26
48/8
75/23
71/21
71/21
63/17
50/10
63/17
58/14
52/11
73/22
55/12
82/27
80/26
69/20
61/16
44/6
77/25
60/15
55/12
61/16
79/26
55/12
73/22
46/7
55/12
59/15
51/10
79/26
52/11
61/16
60/15
67/19
81/27
68/20
79/26
50/10
72/22
43/8
73/22
58/14
68/20
60/15
50/10
82/27
73/22
52/11
70/21
59/15
69/20
61/16
55/12









es

pc
s
r
pe
s
pe
pc
s
s
pe
s
pc
pc

High
F/C
90/32
70/21
83/28
90/32
62/16
90/32
86/30
81/27
81/27
81/27
90/32
79/26
86/30
67/19
70/21
90/32
81/27
94/34
90/32
72/22
91/32
82/27
91/32
74/23
64/17
81/27
80/26
72/22
89/31
72/22
93/33
102/38
86/30
83/28
64/17
88/31
74/23
70/21
100/37
84/28
77/25
102/38
66/18
72/22
84/28
82/27
95/35
65/18
73/22
83/28
76/24
105/40
88/31
87/30
91/32
88/31
75/23
86/30
71/21
86/30
72/22
75/23
95/35
86/30
68/20
93/33
70/21
88/31
82/27
64/17

Friday

Low
F/C
79/26
54/12
52/11
72/22
52/11
78/25
78/25
71/21
64/17
75/23
67/19
54/12
80/26
44/6
50/10
68/20
63/17
73/22
82/27
48/8
76/24
72/22
75/23
53/11
48/8
52/11
55/12
52/11
73/22
57/13
84/28
80/26
72/22
64/17
44/6
78/25
60/15
52/11
63/17
77/25
55/12
74/23
52/11
52/11
53/11
53/11
81/27
48/8
54/12
58/14
68/20
80/26
68/20
79/26
52/11
72/22
48/8
74/23
60/15
66/18
60/15
55/12
82/27
77/25
57/13
72/22
57/13
70/21
57/13
50/10

WwW

oO

wo Bas oo oa ge
—

noms eo eso Set SS
co ie ao Oo <

pe

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

USN AS a a



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 85° F
Friday: NE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 7-15 Miles 85° F
FREEPORT Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 85° F
Friday: NE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 7-15 Miles 85° F
ABACO Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 84° F
Friday: NE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 7-15 Miles 84° F



(COOLER)

in|

cote [een

Miami
91/77

Showers
T-storms
Rain







Fronts
= Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and eas
Bk.) Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm .titenfitenifite
[v_=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Meaguali
10s| ts [0s | 10s 20s [Osi] 40s sts 60s 70s 80s G0s//ii0eN ii)



‘FYou Can Be BI
Away Bony Hurricane

Or you_can rest easy knowing
that youyhave excellent insurance
coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS





PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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FROM page 1B

toms procedure and revert to the unaccompanied baggage decla-
ration form that had been traditionally used by courier services to
clear parcels. Customs had required that a C-13 (home consump-
tion entry) form be filled out for any item imported to the
Bahamas, requiring couriers to hire brokers and lodge bonds to
clear the items.

“The hardship that Freeport is faced with is the same that is hap-
pening to the couriers in Nassau,” said Mr Saunders.

He said the new C-13 procedure simply slowed down the process
for declaring goods too much, with an overwhelming increase in
paperwork. Mr Saunders said that under the old procedure, couri-
ers were able to fill out one form and present a product invoice, pay
the necessary duty and the goods would be cleared. Now, the
enormous amount of paperwork and added brokerage fees have
stunted business. Mr Saunders said theGovernment has to form leg-
islation for courier companies in order to standardise the proce-
dures for the importation of goods in this country.

“No matter who comes into office we should have legislation that
protects the industry,” said Mr Saunders. He added that the new-
Comptroller simply had to curb the corruption within the depart-
ment and increase screening measures in order to recoup rev-
enue lost over the years. Mr Saunders contended that Customs has
no Statistical data to show the new procedures have increased
Customs’ revenue, as there was no statistical data prior to the
new procedures being implemented. He asserted that the new
procedures could “kill the goose that laid the golden egg.”

Mr Gomez told Tribune Business recently that the new process-
es put in place by the Customs department since his appointment
have always been the right procedures, but had not been enforced
for decades. He suggested that courier services wanted a system
that was illegal to operate. However, Mr Saunders said they want
a system that works and does not drain the freight forwarding
companies as much as it helps them. He said next day delivery ser-
vice has been hit the hardest by the new Customs procedures.

He said the purpose of the old unaccompanied baggage decla-
ration form was to collect revenues and regulate imports, just as the
customs model requires. He said the C-13 now treats courier com-
pany cargo “as cargo on the Betty K”. “We are not profitable
because we can’t get top dollar any more, because of the amount
of brokerage work that has to be done,” said Mr Saunders.

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The Trib une oe"
OBIMUARIES
RELIGION

\ ~The Tribune

—‘\ ee
» \0
707.9

SS hour chaice for ine family:



The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, August 27, 2009 ©PG 21

‘The New Redeemed ‘Tabernacle
Church of God In Christ

] 47 Pastoral & Church

Anniversar y

Pastor: Bishop Tony L. Hanna
&
Lady Nancy Alma Ruth Hanna

Theme:

“Hold Fast Until He Comes”

Revelations 2:25

| Date: Wed. Aug. 26th; Fri. Aug. 28th 2009
Sun. Aug. 30th, 2009

Time: 730p.m. nightly and
Sunday 3:00p.m. chmaxing

N ' i G | eo 8 S N i WS U Venue: The New Redeemed Tabernacle C.O.GL.C
STORIES AND ff; 0 gs, Bahamas
CHURCH EVENTS ff:





PG 22 ® Thursday, August 27, 2009

ST. PAUL'S BAPTIST CHURCH

LOCATION- BERNARD ROAD,FOX HILL

EVENT
CHURCH'S 139TH ANNIVERSARY

and

ORDINATION SERVICE
TIME
ANNIVERSARY SERVICE 7:30am and 11am
ORDINATION SERVICE @ 4pm

THEME

"A CHURCH AND PEOPLE WITH\=

A DIVINE CALL TO SERVE"

DATE

AUGUST 30th, 2009

SCRIPTURE TEXT
EPHESIANS CHAPTER 3 vs.1 -13

ANNIVERSARY SPEAKER

PRESIDENT BAHAMAS NATIONAL BAPTIST

REV. DR. WILLIAM THOMPSON

ORDINATION SPEAKER
PRESIDENT BETHEL

=| ASSOCIATION - REV. TIMOTHY STEWART |=)

Host Pastor- REV. DR. J. CARL and
MINISTER EVANGELINE RAHMING





RELIGION

a.

The Tribune



GOSPEL Recording group Shaback is releasing its first two disk album and DVD which
debuts this Friday from Golden Gates World Outreach Centre on Carmichael Road.

Shaback,
This Is It

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

GOSPEL recording group
Shaback continued with its
songs of praise with the
release of the group’s first
two disk album and DVD

tiled Shaback, This Is It.

The group on Wednesday presented
Minister for Culture Charles Maynard
with one of the first official copies of
the album.

Thanking Shaback for maintaining
their standard of excellence in
Christian music over the past years,
Mr Maynard said he will continue to
do all he can to assist in their future
development.

“T would like to congratulate
Shaback who have become a premiere
gospel group in the Bahamas over the
years.

“They have gone a very long way
both locally and internationally to
make a name for themselves and
spread the word of the gospel the
same time. We are extremely pleased
that we were able to be a small part of
the whole process for them in this lat-
est process, they are the beneficiaries
of some support from the government
in terms of the production of the CD
initially, and we are happy that the

product is done and ready for the mar-
ket and encourage the Bahamian peo-
ple to continue to support them.”

Director for the group Clint Watson
explained that over the past two
weeks, the group has been on a US
tour representing the Bahamas and
sharing their music in major cities
including New York, New Jersey,
Baltimore, and Washington DC.

During that time he said the group
had a chance to display their talents to
some of the biggest names in the
gospel music arena.

“We were fortunate to be able to
minister at some of the great churches
of some gospel artists like Bishop
Hezekiah Walker, and Donnie
McClurkin.

“We had an exciting time and now
we are happy to be back home on our
own soil to officially release this proj-
ect to the Bahamian people.”

Mr Watson said the group has
arranged a special concert launch for
the album this Friday at the Golden
Gates World Outreach Centre.

He explained: “During the free con-
cert persons will have a chance to
obtain this new album on sale at a dis-
counted rate.

“We have also planned a few per-
formances with a number of our col-
leagues in the industry like the Mount
Tabor Praise and Worship Team,

SEE page 25



The Tribune

RELIGION

(CY MEDITATION

Getting it right

How are we to navigate the shoals
of parenting and our children to sur-
vive our trial and error efforts? Only
by the grace of God I am sure. These
are indeed difficult times for both.

Our words of wisdom for our youth
may be categorised as some of the
following:

1. Work hard and enjoy success
achieved honourably

2. Study diligently as a student
learning comes easier when young
3. Explore possible gifts learning
from the best

4. Listen attentively to those who
have mastered their craft

5. Let your good name be your
path to fame

6. Gain knowledge, wisdom,
insight and understanding you will
need them all

7. Let God be your guide

8. Prepare for the future while
learning for the past

9. Find fulfillment and contentment
somewhere in each day

10. Cooperation with parents
makes it easier to be trusted

and rewarded

Our words of wisdom for our
parents include these recommen-
dations:

1. Pay attention to each child and
celebrate each one’s uniqueness
2. Pray for patience daily and
exhibit it even when stressed,
angry or tired

3. Choose timing, tone and place
to maximise effectiveness of

a. REV, ANGELA

*. PALACIOUS

discipline

4. Listen to feelings and words

5. Allow humour to keep you calm
where possible

6. Be consistent and persistent
with moral and spiritual principles
7. Lead by example

8. Try new approaches to get
desired results

9. Make the teacher your ally to
bring out the best in your child
10. Offer a united front as parents
having prayed and discussed your
position in advance

As a community let us model our
best and mentor with love both par-
ents and children.

Let family life be a priority when
we make plans in our organisations.
Encourage parents to spend more
time at home in the school years to
monitor their children’s homework,
friends, progress in sports and the
arts, and spiritual development.

Let parenting be a ministry and
childhood a joy. It should be a bless-
ing to have wise and loving parents
and to have bright and obedient chil-
dren. We have to get back to the
place where it is exciting to learn and
to do excel at school. We need to get
it right with God’s help at home,
work and school.

“Let family lite be a priority when we
make plans in our organisations.
Encourage parents to spend more

time at home in the school years to
monitor their children's homework,
triends, progress in sports and the
arts, and spiritual development.”

Thursday, August 27, 2009 ® PG 23

BE ANXIOUS FOR NOTHING!

Text: Philippians 4:4-7:

“Rejoice in the Lord always. Again | say, Rejoice! Let
your moderation be known to all men. The Lord is at
hand. Do not be anxious (apprehensive, concerned,
fearful, fretful, nervous, restless, uneasy, or worried)
about anything, but in everything by prayer and
supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be
made known to God. The peace of God which passes
all understanding shall keep your hearts and minds

P Ben Bail :
So ee through Christ Jesus.”

The Prophetic Voice
P. O. Box N-9518
Nassau, Bahamas
Tpv.inc@coralwave.com

The fact that Paul mentioned the word Rejoice twice
indicates it is the privilege of Christians to Rejoice in
the Lord. They rejoice because there is a God and
Saviour; and they have a relationship with Him. The
Christian should always be a happy man: Everything else may change, yet the
Lord does not change; if the sources of all other joy are dried up, yet this one
never does; and there is never a moment of a Christian’s life in which he may
not find Joy in the Character, Law, and Promises of God.

The word “moderation” refers to restraint on the passions, general soberness
(alertness) of living, being free from all excesses (unrestrained behaviour). The
word properly means that which is suitable, and then respectability, kindness,
and compassion: They were never to indulge in excess of passion, or dress,
or eating, or drinking; appetite is the doorway for every kind of excess and
indulgence to enter a person’s life; whether alcoholism, drug addiction, a faulty
thought-life, or gluttony.

Christians were expected to govern their appetites, control their temper, and
to be examples of what was proper for people in view of the expectation that
their Lord and Saviour would soon appear. Moderation, says Dr. Macknight,
“means meekness under provocation, readiness to forgive injuries, fairness in
the management of business, honesty in judging the characters and actions
of others, sweetness of spirit (temperament), and the entire government of the
passion.”

People indulge their passions, and are extravagant in their plans of this life, and

in their expectations of earthly good for themselves and for their families,
because they have no comprehension of the truth that there is before them a
vast eternity (time without end). We are encouraged throughout Scripture to
look forward to the city Abraham sought, Whose Builder and Maker is God; to
Seek ye first the Kingdom of God and His Righteousness; and to Seek the Lord
while He may be found, and call upon Him while He is near.

Everything in reference to the supply of your wants, and the wants of your
families: everything in respect to afflictions, embarrassments, and trials; and
everything relating to your spiritual condition. There is nothing exempted which
pertains to body, mind, property, friends, conflicts, losses, trials, hopes, and
fears: We can go and spread it all out before the Lord. The greatest sufferer
that lives in this world of redeeming love, and who has the offer of heaven
before him, has cause of gratitude. We can always find something to be thankful
for, no matter what may be the burden of our wants, or the special subject of
our petitions.

Let your request be made known unto God: God need not to be informed of
our necessities, but he requires that we come and express them to him; compare
Ezekiel 36:37, “Thus saith the Lord God, | will yet for this be inquired of by the
house of Israel to do it for them.” God knows the difficulties you are enduring,
and await your request for help.

The way to find peace, and to have the heart (the seat of all your affections and
passions, and minds: your judgment, understanding, and conscience [sense
of right and wrong] through Christ Jesus) kept from trouble, is to go and spread
out all before the Lord; compare Isaiah 26:20; Isaiah 37:1-7. The word rendered
here “shall keep,” is a military term, and means that the mind would be guarded
as . aa or castle is. It would be preserved from the attack of anxious fears
and alarms.

Isaiah 26:3-4 states, “You will keep him in Perfect Peace whose mind is stayed
on You; because he trusteth in You.” The Peace referred to here, is that which
is felt when we have no anxious care about the supply of our needs, and when
we go confidently and commit everything into the hands of God. No confidence
that a man can have in his own powers; no reliance which he can rest on his
own plans, or on the promises, or fidelity of his fellow-men; and no calculations
which he can make on the course of events, can impart such peace to the soul
as simple confidence in God.

It is only in Christ Jesus, the Saviour, that the Mind can be Preserved in Peace.





PG 24 ® Thursday, August 27, 2009

New



THERE is absolutely nothing that man
can ever say or do, that will catch Father
Yahweh by surprise. Despite man's aca-
demic accomplishments, their allegedly
deep spiritual understandings and anoint-
ing, we all have this one common denom-
inator which is; we're subject to error.

New Age teaching is so spiritually sub-

SINGLES MEcZeUiTe tells

ea, eer fe Sey rors
ce ey, Qi faster aD oily palit



RELIGION

tle if it's possible even God's very elect
would be deceived. This teaching can be
likened to an individual unknowingly get-
ting on bus #21, and believing that they're
on bus # 15.

Now, if this person doesn't come to
their senses quickly and get off bus # 21,
at the end of the ride they would have
arrived at the wrong destination; bearing
in mind that bus #21 goes in the southern
direction and bus # 15 the northern direc-
tion.

Watch this !

Look at the close similarities of these
two buses: They both have drivers that
may wear the same type uniforms, both
buses are the same size and the same
color, and they both park at the same ter-
minal to load passengers. The major dif-
ference with these buses is they have dif-
ferent routes and destinations.

New Age teachings is a contaminated
version of the truth. It sounds good, and
skillfully uses the Bible or whatever
means necessary to accomplish it's mis-
sion. Remember, that there is nothing
that man can do, that will ever catch God
by surprise.

Here's the deadly deception:
Whenever the devil deceives a person /
people, he's just doing his job because
he’s a deceiver. The deadly deception
comes into play when we deceive our-
selves; something like this -knowing that
there is a fly in the soup and yet denying
this fact; thereby eating and serving the
soup to others.

Listen, based upon the way things are
going right now in the Bahamas (a mur-
der per week, a constipated judicial sys-
tem, etc) and most of all the lack of true
Godly leadership, I'm by no means sur-
prised to hear the erroneous religious
teaching that God (Yahweh) has a wife.
Now, for those of you who want to ascribe
to this sort of teaching, go ahead; get on
bus #21. I can assure you that at the end
of the day the driver of this bus and all of
his passengers will be crying as a result of
their heated destination.

Think about this: In the natural, every
man great and small embraces every
opportunity to highlight and acknowl-
edge his mother. Take an athlete for
example; after winning a big race, a
championship or some other event, the
first person he would acknowledge or call
out too would be his mother (Hi Mom).

WHERE, WHERE; in the scripture
can it be found that Yeshuwa Messiah
(Jesus the Christ) ever referred to or
made mention of God, His father having
a wife. This religious New Age teaching
of God having a wife is just the beginning
of what's coming down the religious pipe
from which the Bahamian public is fed.

In Proverb.8: 1-38. The bible speaks of
wisdom being possessed by the Lord in
the beginning of his way.

The Tribune

W Age — Deadly deception

It's from this premise and other scrip-
ture verses taken out of context that this
erroneous teachings of God having a wife
comes from. But as the apostle Paul said
to the churches of Galatia so say I unto
the churches in the Bahamas. Gal.3:1. O
foolish

Galatians, who hath bewitched you,
that ye should not obey the truth, before
whose eyes Jesus Christ hath been evi-
dently set forth, crucified among you?

I would want to believe that it's
through ignorance that any Bahamian
church leader would give into this New
Age — Deadly Deception teaching of God
having a wife. This contrary spirit is so
crafty and cunning that it will erroneous-
ly fill the hearts of its victims with scrip-
tures taken out of context to prove or jus-
tify the New Age teaching.

As it relates to marriage and heaven
and spiritual matters here's what
Yeshuwa Messiah said, when questioned
of the same by some religious leaders.

NLT:

Matt.22: 23. That same day some

Sadducees stepped forward--a group of

Jews who say there is no resurrection

after death. They posed this question:

: 24. "Teacher, Moses said, ‘If a man dies

without children, his brother should

marry the widow and have a child who
will be the brother's heir.’

: 25. Well, there were seven brothers.

The oldest married and then died without

children, so the second brother married

the widow.

: 26. This brother also died without

children, and the wife was married to the

next brother, and so on until she had
been the wife of each of them.

: 27. And then she also died.

: 28. So tell us, whose wife will she be

in the resurrection? For she was the wife

of all seven of them!"

: 29. Jesus replied, "Your problem is that

you don't know the Scriptures, and you

don't know the power of God.

: 30. For when the dead rise, they won't

be married. They will be like the angels in

heaven.

Here we see in verses 29 & 30
Yeshuwa saying to these religious lead-
ers that they err in not Knowing the
truth of the scriptures and the power of
God. For in heaven there is no such
thing as marriage or given in marriage;
so the teachings and beliefs of God hav-
ing a wife is a very, very erroneous
teaching.

May the FOG (Favor of God) be with
you and your family:

¢ For questions or comments contact us
via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com

or Ph.1-242-441-2021

Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen
Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int'l,



PG 26 ® Thursday, August 27, 2009

(Coy THE HISTORY OF



RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS

RELIGION

The Tribune





gchar ae



ROMAN CATHOLIC PIONEERS: GABRIEL ROERIG

IN 1894, Abbot Bernard of St John's
Minnesota sent two newly ordained
priests -Father Gabriel Roerig and
Father Melchior Bahner to support the
mission in the Bahamas.

Father Gabriel followed that old
Benedictine principle Ora et Labora
(pray and work) - daily labour to build
their physical ecclesiastical buildings
and homes. They had to be jack-of-all-
trades because there was never enough
money for the basic essentials. He was
sent to Andros where he built by hand
St Saviour's Chapel at Behring Point
settlement - an apostolate that was to
last for 56 years, the most extended
service of any Catholic priest in the
Bahamas.

Hearing that rocks had to be carried
in a pail, Father Bernard sent a wheel-
barrow from New York. On the first
day, Father Gabriel sent a man to haul
rocks - the man hauled the rocks out of
the bush in the wheelbarrow - but then
carried the wheelbarrow up the hill on
his head! Father Gabriel, a handy
mason soon completed the church.
And he built it so well that it withstood
the fierce hurricane of 1899 and several
more.

In 1897, after visiting his mother in
Germany he was granted an audience
with Pope Leo XIII, who was interest-
ed and encouraging about the Bahamas
mission. Father Gabriel brought back
his brother Joseph, who was later
ordained as Father Leander and served
in Andros until his death by drowning
off Bimini in 1955.



y JIM.
» LAWLOR
——

In 1907, Father Gabriel was consid-
ered to take charge of Bahamas
Mission with Father Chrysostrom to be
appointed to succeed Abbot Alexius of
St Anselm's New York but the move
fell through because of Father
Chrysostrom's demands.

A new mission to Mangrove Cay was
instigated in 1921 and the following
year Fr Gabriel baptised 50 persons
there and administered Holy
Communion to them.

Father Gabriel acted as Vicar
Forane during Father Chrysostrom's
malaria in 1920...but was glad when it
was over so that the honour and burden
should rest on the broad shoulders of
Father Chrysostrom. And that burden
affected the mission many times from
1912, Father Chrysostrom felt that he
and Father Gabriel needed assistance
as their labour was only half as effec-
tive over the years. They spent many a
lonely Christmas among poor and
faced terrible calamities. The year 1926
was one of terrible destruction and dis-
tress for the poor property on the
Andros missions. Three hurricanes
destroyed 48 of the 58 houses at
Behring's point and the chapel, school

and other buildings were damaged.

When Father Chrysostrom took ill
and wished to retire to San Salvador,
Father Gabriel built a house and chapel
in San Salvador for him. After
Chrysostrom's death in January 1928,
Cardinal Hayes came to Nassau for an
inspection of the Benedictine mission
in the Bahamas and was delighted with
what he saw. A dinner was held on
January 29 to honour the 58th birthday
of Father Gabriel and his thirty four
years of service in the Bahamas.

It was said that the early missionaries
to the Bahamas had iron constitutions.
Certainly Father Gabriel lived alone on
Andros for fifty five years and survived
on the simplest fare that was brought to
him by his devoted people. Fittingly
two of them were recognised in 1935,
the 25th anniversary of King George V,
when Governor, Sir Bede Clifford con-
ferred the O.B.E on Father Gabriel
Roerig and the MBE on Father

Cornelius Osendorf for their work
among the people.
In 1937, Fathers Anthony

Ronellenfitsch, Herbert Buerschinger,
E F Callan and Charles Blesch all
began work in the Bahamas giving sup-
port to the veterans Fathers Gabriel,
Leander, Bonaventure and Arnold -
these names had already moved into
the religious folklore of the Bahama
Islands.

Father Gabriel was a worker priest,
preaching the Gospel and teaching the
use of tools and the worth of manual
labour. His breviary, the Bible, the

Gospel catechism and the Holy Rule,
were constantly in his hand; so was the
hammer, chisel, trowel and measuring
tape. He fortified himself each day with
prayer, divine reading and meditation
before traveling by foot or boat to the
scattered settlements of Andros to cat-
echise, baptise and comfort the sick.
Strangers were always welcome in his
house. His own reward was_ the
Benedictine Pax, the peace which his
own soul knew and radiated and which
caused his flock to look at him as a pure
spiritual guide.

In 1950, Father Gabriel was brought
to the Priory because of his weakened
condition. He pleaded with his care
givers to allow him to go back to
Andros, “I am not strong enough to do
anything but I could sit in the church
and help and instruct the people, espe-
cially the children”. In his last days he
was given the Apostolic Blessing by
Pope Pius XII.

In June 1950, plans were afoot to
consecrate Father Leonard Haggarty
as the second bishop of the Bahamas.
While these plans were being formulat-
ed, Father Gabriel Roerig OSB, aged
eighty one years, died on 30th August
1950. His withered body lay in St
Francis Xavier Cathedral before his
many friends accompanied the remains
to the cemetery of the new St
Augustine's Monastery for the first
burial there.

Author Richard Le Gallienne wrote
about Father Gabriel's piety and toil in
his book Pieces of Eight.

RELIGIOUS NOTES NO Ue

TRINITY CITY OF PRAISE - BACK-2-
SCHOOL NATIONAL PRAYER RALLY

e Apostles Ed & Lee Watson and
the family of Trinity City of Praise will
host a Back to School National Prayer
Rally to cover the country’s education
system on Sunday, August 30 from
Spm to 6:30 pm on Rawson
Square. The Minister of Education
Carl Bethel and the Minister of Sports
Desmond Banister have been invited
to join with parents, teachers, students
in this prayer event. The organisers
believe that this time of prayer will
help those facing challenges in this
new school year.

“Our prayers will focus on the stu-
dents’ success in the classroom,
teacher commitment, provision of
resources for the parents, overall safe-

ty on the school grounds and during
transit and for the structure of the
education system as a whole.

Local clergy including Rev Patrick
Paul, the Bahamas Christian Council
President, will also speak blessings
over the education system.

HOLY CROSS YOUTH- JAM CONCERT

e Holy Cross Anglican Church is
having its annual Youth-Jam concert
this Saturday to help prepare kids for
the new school semester.

According to Father Ethan
Ferguson, assistant priest and youth
minister for the church, the event is all
about the children.

He explained: “It is originally an
outdoor concert, we bring in various
gospel artists, along with other drama
groups and entertainment just to get

the kids all hyped about going back to
school.”

With this year’s theme being
‘Children Of God Arise,’ his ministry
hopes to cater to the needs of the chil-
dren from the inside out.

“We usually have short presenta-
tions on issues relevant to youngsters
such as drug use, prevention, sex, vio-
lence, and how to study.”

He explained that the event is really
a fun day for the children to help them
celebrate the end of the summer,
which gaining the necessary skills for
the school year.

It all happens this Saturday with
artists like Ricardo Clark, Kenyatta
Taylor, Ryan Jupp, Lyrically Blessed,
Holy Cross Dance Team, and others at
the church ground’s Highbury Park,
Soldier Road.

Did you recently give birth to
the newest little angel on earth?
Have you and your beloved recently
tied the knot? Is your church plan-
ning a special event? Tribune
Religion wants to hear from you!

We want to know about the spe-
cial things going on in your life, so
go ahead and send in your wedding
photographs, birth announcements
and church activities schedule to be
posted in upcoming Tribune Religion
sections.

This service is free. Send all infor-
mation, including (especially) photo-
graphs, to
features@tribunemedia.net.
Information can be hand delivered
to The Tribune at Shirley and
Deveaux Streets or call the Religion
section @ 502.2368.



The Tribune



BEM hosts The Kin

THE programme focused on
preparing delegates to teach the
Kingdom of God through a 3-day
intensive seminar with topics includ-
ing, The Long Human _ Search,
Rediscovering the Original Kingdom,
How to Influence Your Society, The
Kingdom Concept and The Mind of
Jesus.

In the session the Quality of
Kingdoms, Dr Munroe said humans
are hungry for a deeper meaning of
life that religion cannot fulfill. He
explained that Jesus Christ did not
bring religion to the world, but taught
the message of the Kingdom of God
through parables and declarations.
"The problem is that what we're doing
in different religions is not completing
our lives and we still live in spiritual
poverty. This is why religious people
are always pre-occupied with busy-
ness, because if you're busy you don't
have time to think about your empti-
ness," said Dr Munroe.

Pastors from all over the world
attended the MMI Kingdom Seminar.

RELIGION

Florida Pastor Christian Garcia was
excited to be a part of the first
Kingdom Seminar and plans to bring
members of his church to other con-
ferences hosted by Dr Munroe. "My
wife and I, we had such a wonderful
time here. Dr Munroe invited us to
The Bahamas earlier this year and we
decided to come down for this event.
It has been amazing, it's changed our
lives. And it wasn't just about the sem-
inar we got to go sightseeing in Nassau
and visit some of the other hotels and
we're definitely coming back," he said.

Pastor Jide-David Modede of
London, UK, a frequent seminar
attendee of Dr Munroe's events said
that every time he visits The Bahamas,
he has a new experience. "This is my
second time to The Bahamas in the
last four weeks, my wife and family
come together on an annual basis, and
while this time was not a vacation time
for me, I still had a great time learning
and getting to experience different
things about Bahamian culture,"he
explained.

Thursday, August 27, 2009 ® PG 27

INTERNATIONAL Delegates attend The Kingdom
Seminar at Bahamas Faith Ministries International.



Dr. Munroe and Deputy Director of Tourism, Religious Group, Linville Johnson.



PG 28 ® Thursday, August 27, 2009

IN keeping with their church's vision, “Love
God, Love People, Serve the World”, and a
mandate from their senior pastor, Pastor
Wilbur Outten, to become more service ori-
ented, the youth ministry of Freeport Bible
Church recently took a very special mission
trip to Abaco August 5 - 10, 2009. A group of
twenty five persons including nine leaders and
sixteen students travelled to Dundas Town,
Abaco to conduct a few service projects in the
area.

Quoting the scripture, “I tell you the truth,
whatever you did for one of the least of these
brothers of mine, you did for me” (Matt
25:40), Minister Kyle Maycock, Youth
Coordinator at Freeport Bible Church said:
“Jesus told His disciples that whoever wants to
be great among men must first become a ser-
vant.

“Our trip to Abaco was a small step taken to
cultivate and nurture an attitude of compas-
sion and service within our students. We felt
the need to expose our students to local
opportunities to serve their neighbours with
compassion and love as Jesus would. “Our
goal is to ultimately make Christian service a
permanent part of the Bahamian psyche and
culture.”

While in Abaco the group did house clean-
ing and lawn maintenance for senior citizens
and assisted a local church with the construc-
tion of their new sanctuary by putting up sheet
rock, site cleaning and offered assistance in
any other way they could.

The residents were quite appreciative of
their kind gestures.

The local Department of Social Services
identified the work projects for the students
and the group was hosted by one of their affil-
iated churches, Friendship Tabernacle Church,
where Pastor Silbert Mills is the pastor.

The students all claimed to have been
greatly impacted by the trip. One female par-
ticipant said she has become more grateful
for what she has after seeing the way that
some people live.

Prior to the Abaco trip, the students con-
ducted a “Service Auction” where they pro-
vided services in the areas of car washing,
lawn maintenance, and filing. The service
auction served a two fold purpose; it assisted
in subsidising the cost of the trip while also
affording the students the opportunity to
gain some work experience. They wish to
express their sincere thanks to all who sup-
ported the auction. A special thank you is
extended to Paul Ross and the staff of Nassau
Insurance Brokers (formerly Trinity
Insurance Ltd.). The group also extends grat-
itude to Pastor Silbert Mills and the family of
Friendship Tabernacle Church, Abaco, for
their hospitality.

While the students enjoyed the opportunity
to be able to travel together and have fun as
young people, the experience of unselfishly
volunteering their service to help others, made
this summer vacation a truly enriching one.

RELIGION

An enriching summer experience

The Tribune

ABOVE: Malaika McKenzie
& Tyeasha Lewis gives the
kitchen of a local senior citi-
zen a make-over.

CENTER: A few of the youth
work hard to clean the yard
of a local senior citizen in
Abaco.

LEFT: Randall Cooper jr,
Dickenson Cepoudy, Lester
Rolle, Jason Gibbs and
Micheal Roker assisting a
local church in Abaco with
the construction of its new
sanctuary.





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Volume: 105 No.228





CLASSIFIEDS TRADER CL







The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

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=







THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

R CLASSIFIEDS TRADER





OBITUARIES

Lime
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

Lawyers to seek
Union cash prove

President wants
police investigation
of ‘transferred funds’

LAWYERS working on
behalf of the president of
the Bahamas Hotel Cater-
ing and Allied Workers
Union say they will file a
police complaint in connec-
tion with almost $700,000
allegedly transferred by
union executives.

Attorney Damian Gomez
said it was of "urgent" con-
cern for the union to try to
recoup the money to meet
expenses. He said he would
also seek a Supreme Court
order to freeze the transfers.

"They have to first of all
locate funds in (those)
accounts, the union has a lot
of claims for sick benefits,

and finding in the short term
$665,000 is not an easy
task," he told The Tribune.

Yesterday, union presi-
dent Roy Colebrook said he
did not think the money dis-
pute would affect the
union's capability of meeting
payroll for its employees,
but added it was too early
to say conclusively.

"The fact of the matter is
we have to wait and see,"
Mr Colebrook said.

Mr Gomez called the act a
clear "abuse" of power and
said the union plans to press
criminal charges.

SEE page 11

Man in custody after
shooting incident

A MAN was taken into custody after a shooting incident in
which a relative received leg injuries, according to police.

While the identities of those involved have not been released,
police said the victim in hospital is in a “non life-threatening”
condition. Police, who seized a weapon, said investigations

are continuing.

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ABOVE: Two of the four cars dam-
aged in the fender-bender.

RIGHT: Minister of Culture Charles
Maynard inspects the damage to
his Crown car yesterday

A FENDER-BENDER at
the junction of Deveaux and
Dowdeswell Streets caused
damage to four cars — includ-
ing the parked Crown car of
Minister of Culture Charles
Maynard — yesterday.

A woman driving a Nissan
Altima heading west on
Dowdeswell Street and another
woman driving a Nissan Maxi-
ma heading south on Deveaux
Street collided, causing the first
driver to swerve out of the way,
witnesses said.

The first driver then crashed
into a Ford Explorer — parked
in front of the 102.9 FM radio
station — which backed into
the parked Crown sedan dri-
ven by Mr Maynard.

Mr Maynard, and the owner
of the SUV, radio personality
Eddie Carter were inside the
station at the time of the acci-
dent.

Police and EMS were called
to the scene but no one was
seriously injured.

ST THUMP aT
TENET ST DT

AS A second man is
charged in connection with
the July murder of a
Bahamian man in Florida,
police in that State are now
saying the victim came to
the US to conduct a large
drug transaction.

Last week Eric White, 31
of West Palm Beach was
first to be charged with first
degree murder and armed
robbery with a firearm in
connection with the killing
of Kahlil Holmes.

Now Alonzo Benjamin,





Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

_
ii

31, of Lake Park, has also
been charged, appearing in
court earlier this week.
And for the first time,
police in West Palm Beach
have revealed some hint
into the circumstances sur-
rounding Holmes’ death —
saying he had come to do a
drug deal, according to the
Florida Sun-Sentinel.
Holmes’ half-sister Juliet
had told The Tribune that
she did not know why her

SEE page 10

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Customs officers
could hold mass
demonstration

CUSTOMS officers could
hold a "massive demonstra-
tion” as early as the weekend
if Government does not meet
a Friday deadline to halt the
transfer and interdiction of
some 30 officers.

President of the Bahamas
Public Service Union (BPSU)
John Pinder said the threat of
large scale industrial action at
the Department of Customs
would be next. He alleged
that Government violated its
industrial agreement and did
not follow procedure in its
move to transfer and interdict
the officers.

"If they don't reply by Fri-
day we will take the next
step... There could be a mas-
sive demonstration. We wrote
to the permanent secretary
and the minister for the pub-
lic service and we have not
gotten any response,” said Mr
Pinder.

On July 31 the Ministry of
Finance said that 16 officers
were being interdicted pend-
ing the outcome of miscon-
duct charges against them.
Ten more officers were
advised that they were to be
transferred to other depart-
ments.

Three other officers were
retired in the public interest
and one was being given ear-
ly retirement.

SEE page 10

Bahamas could
be affected
by Tropical

Storm Danny

FORECASTERS are
hoping the projected path
for Tropical Storm Danny
does not change in the next
12 hours, as a shift to the
west could spell trouble for
the Abacos.

At press time last night,
the storm system was pre-
dicted to move along a par-
allel path to the east of the
Bahamas, missing Abaco by
approximately 250 miles.

However, meteorologists
at the US-based forecast
company AccuWeather said
there is still a slight chance
Danny will track farther
west.

The forecast models yes-
terday indicated that the
Abacos would make a lucky
escape and only be affected
by slightly increased winds
and some rain showers at
around 8 o’clock tonight.

AccuWeather said they
predict Danny will become a
hurricane by tomorrow or
early Saturday.

While the Bahamas is not

SEE page 10


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





RBDF photo/Able Mechanic Al Rahming





RBDF MARINES direct the disembarking of the immigrants from the two Defence
Force vessels, P-48 and P 49.

RBDF apprehends
196 Haitian migrants

A TOTAL of 196 Haitian migrants were appre-
hended in the Exuma chain after they were spot-
ted by members of the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force on Monday morning.

While on routine patrol, Defence Force vessel
P-42 under the command of Petty Officer Lincoln
Rolle spotted a 40-foot Haitian sailing sloop five
nautical miles southwest of Darby Island.

Upon further investigation, they discovered the
migrants — 149 men and 47 women — who all

appeared to be in fair health.

The Haitian migrants did not possess the nec-
essary documents to enter the country and were
subsequently taken into custody. They were
removed from their unsanitary vessel and taken
onboard two Defence Force craft, P-48 and P-
49. Both vessels arrived in New Providence at
approximately 11pm on Tuesday.

The migrants were handed over to Immigra-
tion officials for further processing.

International community










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THE international commu-
nity yesterday mourned the
death of Senator Edward
“Ted” Kennedy who died at
his home in New England
after a long battle with brain
cancer.

The 77-year-old was the
only one of his three broth-
ers to die a natural death.

He was the youngest broth-
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Kennedy and Senator Robert
Kennedy, both victims of
assassinations.

His oldest brother Joseph
Patrick Kennedy, Jr, 29, was
killed on August 12, 1944 dur-
ing World War IT when the
plane — filled with explosives
— that he was piloting from
England to France exploded
before he and another crew
member could bail out.

Senator Kennedy came to
office in November 1962, and
at the time of his death was
the second most senior mem-
ber of the Senate after Robert
Byrd of West Virginia, and
the third-longest-serving sen-
ator in United States history.

He was graduated from
Harvard in 1956 and from the
University of Virginia School
of Law in 1959.

His 1958 marriage to Vir-
ginia Joan Bennett produced
three children and ended in
divorce in 1982. In 1992 he
married Victoria Anne Reg-
gie, a Washington lawyer.

He was a manager in his
brother John's successful 1960
campaign for the presidency.

He then worked as an
Assistant District Attorney
for Suffolk County, Massa-
chusetts.

He entered the Senate in a
1962 special election to fill the
seat once held by his brother
John.

Senator Kennedy was seri-
ously injured in an airplane
crash in 1964 and suffered
from lifelong back pain as a
result.

He was elected to his first
six-year Senate term in 1964

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SENATOR EDWARD ‘TED’ KENNEDY (AP)

and was re-elected in 1970,
1976, 1982, 1988, 1994, 2000
and 2006.

Senator Kennedy battled a
malignant brain tumour first
diagnosed in May 2008, which
greatly limited his appear-
ances in the Senate; though
he survived longer than doc-
tors first predicted, he died
just before midnight on Tues-
day at his home in Hyannis
Port, Massachusetts.

Yesterday, President
Barack Obama led tributes to
the deceased politician,



describing him as a colleague,
counsellor and a friend.

President Obama, whom
Senator Kennedy endorsed
during last year’s presidential
race, said: "His ideas and
ideals are stamped on scores
of laws and reflected in mil-
lions of lives.”

Funeral services for Sena-
tor Kennedy will be held on
Saturday morning at a
Boston, Massachusetts,
church before his burial in
Arlington National Ceme-
tery.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Closure of Vista
Marina access

THE Ministry of
Works and Transport
announced that the
access to Vista Marina
west of the Shell Ser-
vice Station has been
closed to traffic to
effect the construction
of Corridor 18, part of
the New Providence
Road Improvement
Project.

“The Ministry of
Works and Transport
takes this opportunity
to apologise to the pub-
lic for any inconve-
nience that may be
caused by this closure
and requests that the
public use the alternate
route — Grove Avenue
through Coral Drive,”
said the ministry in a
statement.

“We anticipate that
the contractor, Jose
Cartellone Construc-
ciones Civiles, will
carefully carry out the
works in accordance
with the contract speci-
fications.

“We look forward to
your full co-operation
and encourage the dri-
ving public to exercise
patience and caution
when travelling in the
area during the con-
struction phase,” it
said.

BEC problems in
Central Andros

THE Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation
admitted that it contin-
ues to experience “gen-
eration problems” in
Central Andros.

BEC issued a State-
ment yesterday explain-
ing that a mobile genera-
tor is being sent to the
power station in Fresh
Creek.

electricity supply will be
restored by week's end,”
it said.

“Our staff will contin-
ue to work diligently to
correct these generation
problems for our con-
sumers in Central
Andros.

“The corporation apol-
ogises for any inconve-
nience caused.”

Low-cost
airline
plans flights
to Nassau

A LOW-COST airline
designed for business
travellers has filed appli-
cations with the US
Department of Trans-
portation to begin flying
into Nassau.

AirTran Airways yes-
terday announced plans
to start service to three
Caribbean destinations,
including the Bahamas,
Aruba and Jamaica, lat-
er this year and early in
2010 from a combination
of key American cities.

The Florida-based
airline said it proposes
to service Nassau and
Montego Bay, Jamaica,
from Atlanta, Baltimore
and Orlando; while ser-
vice to Aruba would
originate in Atlanta and
Orlando.

"Adding our low-cost,
high-quality service from
some of our largest
operations to some of
the most popular desti-
nations in the Caribbean
is a win-win for con-
sumers and for AirTran
Airways," said Kevin
Healy, senior vice-presi-
dent of marketing and
planning in a statement.

"There's nothing
quite like jetting off toa
tropical island in the
middle of winter, and we
look forward to making
that possible from some
of the largest cities in
our network."

“We anticipate that the }

CROWDS outside of the RIU Hotel on Monday evening.



No charges over
hij acked@’ furniture

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ALTHOUGH describing their behaviour as
“absolutely wrong” a Social Services official
said the department will not be pressing charges
against those who “hijacked” furniture des-
tined for the under-privileged.

The source said that while the Department
took steps to determine who the culprits were
and acted on tips to find out who might have
received furniture from these individuals, it
will not be pursuing the matter any further.

“Tt’s a sad thing that people take advantage
said the official, adding however
that to press charges would cause a “whole

of things,”

host of other problems.”

This comes after pandemonium broke out at
RM Bailey school on Monday afternoon when
unwanted furniture from the RIU Hotel on
Paradise Island, which is undergoing renova-
tions, was taken by delivery men who were
supposed to be driving it to the school so it
could be donated to the poor.

Hundreds of people had gathered at the
school as well as outside the hotel waiting for
their chance to get a pick of desks, television

sets, mattresses and other household items that
were to be given away in a generous gesture by
the operators of RIU hotel in a Social Services
co-lead operation.

But the delivery men reportedly “hijacked”
a number of trucks loaded with these items
and took them to other locations where they
either sold them or handed them out to family

members and friends.

anymore.

Minister of State for
Social Services Loretta
Butler-Turner said that
she was very disturbed by
the events and could now
see why other hotels “just
get rid of their stuff”
when they don’t want it

The Social Services
source yesterday told The j /
Tribune that the delivery [iRjpnewemReailtn(te
drivers involved were
identified and will not be doing any work for
the department in the future.



In a tribune242.com poll, only four respon-

dents said that the hard economic times led to
the furniture being hijacked, while 77 thought
“weak morality” was to blame.

GB Shipyard expat
workforce reduced

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— The expa-
triate workforce at the Grand
Bahama Shipyard has been
reduced as a result of a
decline in business this sum-
mer.

Carl Gustaf-Rotkirch,
chairman and CEO, said that
none of the Bahamian work-
ers have been laid off.

“We have had a very slow
summer, but we expect that
business will pick up from
mid-September and then we
will have a very good work
load up to the beginning of
spring,” Mr Gustaf-Rotkirch
told The Tribune.

He reported that the ship-
yard now employs a total of
750 workers, having reduced
its workforce from around 800
workers. There are 320
Bahamians employed there.

“We have laid off and our

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numbers has been going
down; we have reduced dur-
ing this summer period...
and had sent some expatriate
workers home, but we have
not sent any Bahamians
home,” said the executive.

The company instead
entered into arrangements
with union representatives for
“rolling” or temporary lay-
offs for its Bahamian work-
ers.

Employees

“We have had rolling lay-
offs during July and August.
It was something that was
negotiated with the union
where we had an arrangement

. in such a way that during
the four week period there
was a one week lay-off for
employees, but from a rolling
basis when the yard was inop-
erable,” he said.

“This arrangement did not
affect employees’ income; we
paid some compensation and
we also paid some wage relat-
ed costs.”

According to Gustaf-
Rotkirch, the management
started noticing a decline in
business in May. However, he
expects to bring in some
workers when the load picks

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up in September.

In March, the shipyard
experienced one of its busiest
periods. During that time, the
facility acquired its third dock
at a cost of $60 million.

The shipyard is the largest
ship care facility in the region,
with the largest dry dock in
the region. Operations began
in 1999, and grew from an
enterprise earning a few mil-
lion dollars a year and with
under 100 employees to a full
scale facility earning revenue
of over $130 million.

There have been reports of
a possible strike at the facility
over allegations that two
union shop stewards were
wrongfully dismissed.

The Grand Bahama Port
Authority Workers Union has
filed a dispute with the
Department Labour and has
threatened to take a strike
vote if the workers are not
reinstated.

Mr Gustaf-Rotkirch did not
wish to comment on the mat-
ter. He said the shipyard has
not met with employees.

“T have read the reports of
wrongful dismissal of two
shop stewards and at this
stage we would not like to
comment because it is in
process,” he said.






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380-FLIX |


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

New energy needed in Mid-East peace

PRINCETON, N.J. — Two international
opinion polls released this summer indicate
that global views toward the U.S. are improv-
ing — in no small part due to the election of
Barack Obama as president.

The polls, by the Pew Global Attitudes
Project and worldpublicopinion.org, both
stress that President Obama is viewed posi-
tively in most of the countries surveyed, but
questions remain in the Middle East about
the direction of U:S. policies.

Conducting an informal survey of analysts
from or based in the Arab world, the experts
with whom we spoke emphatically agree: To
increase and sustain U.S. standing in the Mid-
dle East, Obama must achieve some gains
— quickly — with the Israeli-Palestinian
peace process. In the Middle East, “People
seem to trust President Obama and are will-
ing to give him the benefit of the doubt,”
said Amjad Attallah, director of the Middle
East programme at the New America Foun-
dation, a think tank. The analysts concur that
since taking office the president has made
all the right moves, speaking with a respect-
ful and rational tone to Arabs and Muslims
about US. foreign policy toward the region.

While the U'S. presence in Iraq, as well as
democracy and human rights in the region,
are key issues, “the Palestinian-Israeli issue is
on the consciousness of every Arab and Mus-
lim everywhere in the world,” said Selamah
Nematt, international editor for the popular
Daily Beast blog.

Faris Brizat, a pollster and adjunct profes-
sor at Qatar University, warned, “There is a
growing sense of apathy, people are losing
faith,” in the Arab world that Mideast peace
can be achieved. Summing up the thoughts of
every expert with whom we spoke, Nematt
stated, “President Obama has got to deliver
something.”

Even as the White House has set in motion
a multi-pronged diplomatic initiative in the
region, the environment in which the Obama
administration must operate in many ways
could not be more challenging: In the Pales-
tinian territories the long-dominant Fatah
party controls the West Bank, while the rad-
icalized Hamas, which refuses to recognize
Israel, controls Gaza.

Indeed, Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah
recently lamented that such internal divisions
have done more damage “in a few months” to
the Palestinians’ cause than had years of con-
flict with Israel. And while Israel’s Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has come to
endorse the two-state solution supported by
the White House, Netanyahu, citing security
concerns, thus far has refused to freeze Israeli
settlement activity in the West Bank, and has
insisted that the issue of Palestinian refugees
must be solved outside Israel’s borders.

Subsequently, Saad Eddin Ibrahim, an
Egyptian scholar and democracy activist,
argues that whatever plan Obama devises,

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he should “speak to Israelis and Palestinians
directly about the benefits of resolving the
conflict, and in doing so bring people back
into the political process, rather than rely-
ing on their leaders who have been dragging
their feet for over 60 years.”

In fact, in August senior White House offi-
cials told reporters that the Obama adminis-
tration, building on the success of the presi-
dent’s June speech in Cairo, plans to launch
a public relations campaign directed at Israeli,
Palestinian, and Arab publics, to articulate the
president’s comprehensive vision for Mideast
peace. This plan was echoed by a recent
report, “Window of Opportunity for a Two-
State Solution,” from the Centre for Ameri-
can Progress, a think tank, which encouraged
the Obama administration to launch a “pub-
lic outreach and strategic communications
effort in the Middle East,” with the aim of
“building the foundations of public support
and to prepare public opinion for the likely
concessions involved” in any final deal.

Such a campaign, the report’s authors
assert, “cannot wait for an actual negotiated
agreement that can then be ‘sold’” to these
publics. Achieving gains in the peace process
involves overcoming vast historical, diplo-
matic, and policy challenges, which cannot
be swept aside by a PR campaign. But failing
to engage in a strategic outreach initiative
and conducting effective public diplomacy
in the pursuit of policy interests does have
consequences for peace.

For example, Hady Amr, director of the
Brookings Doha Centre think tank in Qatar,
asserted that the Arab League has lost a cru-
cial opportunity to effectively explain its
peace plan, endorsed by all of its members, to
Israelis. “If the Arab countries really wanted
to eliminate all doubts that they’re serious
about the plan, they would’ve translated their
peace plan into Hebrew, “taken out ads about
it in Israeli newspapers,” Amr said. “This is
an era of global public relations.”

Though major foreign policy decisions and
high-level diplomacy should not be deter-
mined by public opinion polls, in the Mideast
Obama clearly has a chance to build on his
reputation and what some experts described
as his likeability based on his personal nar-
rative. “The industry of America-bashing is
not thriving as it was before Obama,”
quipped Ibrahim. The U.S. should commu-
nicate that it is serious about its commitment
to the peace process, demonstrating to all
parties that the benefits of peace, particular-
ly in the form of U.S. support and solidarity,
outweigh the costs of conflict. Otherwise, the
White House risks squandering such leverage
and losing credibility with publics in a region
critical to America’s interests.

(This article was written by Steven Barnes
and Nadia Bilbassy - c.2009 Hearst Newspa-

pers).



700am, S00am, 11:15am
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Martia

Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448

Officer, Counsell, Itlarceascr
D2d-AS2 © 0-578
Fax: d26-d4eeod-diie

My three
ways to
cut crime

EDITOR, The Tribune.

With yet another senseless
crime, the people are again up
in arms demanding the police,
the government or somebody
do something about crime.
Ordinary citizens are crying out
for justice, pastors are preach-
ing. What are they saying?
Hang, Hang, Hang!

Sigh. Here we go again.
Every time there is another
senseless crime in this country,
there is this huge chorus crying
out to hang the perpetrators,
as if that in and of itself would
cause crime to cease instantly.
Not withstanding research
proving the world over that this
is simply not the case, and the
fact that it is inhumane, they
still cry out for it. Why? Simply
answer, they don't know what
else to do and unfortunately
apparently neither does the
police force or our government!

In a recent Tribune article
the Minister of National Secu-
rity asserted that, crime was a
personal choice and to para-
phrase him, if we were able to
put two police officers in every
home we could do something
about it, but unfortunately that
was not feasible. People need to
make better choices. With that
type of attitude from the very
top it’s no wonder that the
country is in the state it is in.

Where there is no vision the
people will suffer!

To be fair to the Minister
this crime situation did not hap-
pen overnight and neither can it
be resolved overnight. But the
attitude he presents is as if to
throw his hands up and say

LETTERS

letters@triobunemedia.net



there's nothing that can be
done. Coming from the man
who is supposed to be leading
the fight against crime this is
disturbing to say the least.

Let me present three areas
that the Government could
address that will cause crime to
decrease significantly within the
next five years.

Court/Legal System

The court system in this
country has to be more effi-
cient. There are too many cases
before the courts to be dealt
with by the number of Justices
available. The minister should
actively engage professionals
within the sector and outside
analyst to come up with solu-
tions and then implement them.
Secondly, the bail system needs
serious review and correction.
It is a known fact that a large
percentage of crimes are com-
mitted by persons on bail.
Therefore correcting this sys-
tem could have the most imme-
diate impact on crime in this
country.

Penal System

Her Majesty's Fox Hill
Prison is legendary for its harsh
conditions. This prison has to
be upgraded to a more modern
facility and expanded to avoid
over crowding. In addition the
whole purpose of the facility
has to be re-evaluated. The cur-
rent model is just not working;
according to a prison reform
report in 2003 there is a 70 per

cent recidivism rate in this
country. The focus in prison has
to be placed on education,
vocational training and life
counseling. Basically we need
to focus more on rehabilitation
rather than retribution.

Education

For more than a decade the
graduating grade average has
been D or lower. Many stu-
dents are simply given leaving
certificates because they do not
meet the minimum grade
required to graduate. These
persons are functioning illiter-
ates, unable to think through
complex problems, make logi-
cal leaps to find solutions, can-
not think in the abstract, cannot
comprehend and are easily
influenced. With these statis-
tics is anyone seriously sur-
prised that crime has been
increasing at an alarming rate?
There is a direct correlation
between crime and education.
For instance, in 1993 two thirds
of all incarcerated men in the
USA did not graduate high
school (Freeman, 1996). Unfor-
tunately definitive Bahamian
statistics are not readily avail-
able, but it follows that they
would be similar.

There needs to be a para-
digm shift in this country in
regards to these three areas. It
is time for our leaders to make
bold decisions, step to the front
and lead. We cannot continue
doing the same things and
somehow expecting better
results.

GR WILSON
Nassau,
August 25, 2009

My view on the port location controversy

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There are a lot of issues per-
taining to the Port location.
Some people have issues, some
trying to find issues, some along
racial lines but what I know is it
has the country divided. In my
opinion what I heard in many
settings is that the “Bay Street
Guys” don’t want to drive all
the way to Clifton because
some of them too old, some
want to save on the cost of gas
so, Arawak Cay is closer and
as we all know they are the
ones who control the finance
in the country and are the
financial engine of the FNM.
What concerns me most is what
those in their inner circle are
saying. It is claimed they do not
want to drive through the “nig-
ger” areas to get to work espe-
cially at night and having to
travel along Carmichael Road.











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To me, in 2009 this kind of
thinking is deplorable but it
appears to me they have no
intention of putting prejudice
aside. One is claimed to have
said they could more take the
"black Bahamians" but to have
to deal with all those filthy
Haitians and their nasty chil-
dren is too much for them. My
reason for writing this letter is
simple because before the Port
issue came up I suggested in
1987 that it would make sense
to move the capital to Andros.
Istated in previous letters that
when I suggested that Minister
Peter Bethell responded that I
want Andros because I am
from there and I told him —
put it in Eleuthera then because
New Providence is too con-
gested so we need to make a
serious move. Not only have I
said move the capital but move
all Government offices to
Andros and let those who work
in those offices commute to
Andros. It only takes 10 min-
utes by air and if the port is at
Clifton then it should only take
about 30 minutes by Fast Ferry.
In two years Andros, South
Abaco and the Berry Islands
would benefit if the port is at



Clifton because farmers and
fishermen would be able to
bring their produce and catch
into New Providence in the
morning and be back home in
the evening. This is common
sense to me but like we say
common sense ain’t common.
We are spending million of dol-
lars to repair Lynden Pindling
Airport why not take that mon-
ey beautify the airport and
build a new larger airport in
Andros to accommodate large
air craft from Europe and Asia,
name the airport Clarence A
Bain Airport and use the air-
port as a Hub for Turks Island,
Cuba, Haiti and the Cayman
Islands. When I heard both
Governments talking about
building a university in New
Providence and now they are
looking for land in New Provi-
dence to build a hospital. Well
the last time I heard such fool-
ishness is when Christopher
Columbus said he discovered
The Bahamas and then said he
met Indians here.

AUDLEY D HANNA Sr
Nassau,
August, 2009.

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Qualified individuals should submit a
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THE TRIBUNE



The Bahamas to expand
war on drug trafficking

THE Bahamas is expand-
ing its efforts in the war on
narcotics trafficking to
include stopping the diver-
sion of pharmaceuticals and
precursor chemicals from
“licit into illicit” channels,
National Security Perma-
nent Secretary Missouri
Sherman-Peter said.

She said these efforts
would include the imple-
mentation of “systems rec-
ommended to tackle those
issues.”

The Bahamas has been
“resolute in its efforts” to
counter the trafficking of
drugs and psychotropic sub-
stances, she asserted.

Legislation

“We have decisively
addressed pivotal matters
such as money laundering,
have amended and/ or
adopted legislation as
appropriate, and have
established mechanisms
including the Financial
Intelligence Unit,” said Mrs
Sherman-Peter.

“The areas generally tar-
geted by National Anti-
Drug Plans are well-known
to us in the Bahamas (as)
we have worked relentless-
ly and tirelessly in these
areas for decades.”

Mrs Sherman-Peter was
addressing officials from
several government agen-
cies attending a three-day
training workshop on the
Bahamas National Anti-
Drug Plan, 2010-2014.

Those agencies included
the National Anti-Drug
Secretariat, Bahamas
National Drug Council,
Bahamas National Drug
Agency, the Ministry of
Health, the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force, Her
Majesty’s Prison, the Cus-
toms Department and the
Port Department.



LOCAL NEWS

NATIONAL SECURITY Permanent Secretary Missouri Sherman-Peter

Officials from the Min-
istry of National Security
also attended the workshop.
They are expected to help
draft the country’s next
National Anti-Drug Plan.

The workshop covered
topics such as institutional
framework analysis, legal
framework analysis, strate-
gic planning and social
analysis.

Mrs Sherman-Peter said
the lessons learned would
culminate in the launch of a
“new phase” in the
Bahamas’ drug control
efforts in the form of a sec-
ond five-year National
Anti-Drug Plan. The first
plan ends this year.

The workshop was hosted
by the Inter-American
Drug Abuse Control Com-
mission (CICAD), in con-
junction with the Bahamas’
National Anti-Drug Secre-
tariat, and was facilitated
by Maria Beatriz Galvis,
CICAD Specialist.

CICAD was established
in 1986 by the General
Assembly of the Organisa-
tion of American States

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Each member-state
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sion, which meets twice a
year. CICAD promotes
regional co-operation and
co-ordination among the 34
OAS member-states
through action programmes
carried out by the Perma-
nent Secretariat.

Its core mission is to
strengthen human and insti-
tutional capabilities and har-
ness the collective energy of
its member-states to reduce
the production, trafficking
and use and abuse of drugs
in the Americas.

“Drug control is serious
work and the National Anti-
Drug Plan we develop here,
must provide the framework
in which we continue to do
this serious work,” Mrs
Sherman Peter-said.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamians remember former

South Korean President Kim

SIR ARTHUR FOULKES is administered the oath of office as

Deputy to the Governor-General by Chief Justice Michael Barnett.
Derek Smith/BIS ;

The new Chief Justice

conducts first official act.

MICHAEL Barnett conducted his first official act as Chief
Justice when he swore in Sir Arthur Foulkes as Deputy to the }

Governor-General at Government House yesterday.

Governor-General Arthur Hanna and Mrs Beryl Hanna

are on a visit to Miami.

Sir Arthur is the director general at Bahamas Informa-

tion Services.

Mr Barnett’s appointment was announced over the week-

end and he was sworn in on Monday.

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IN RECOGNITION of the
death of former South Korean
President Kim Dae-jung, Gov-
ernor-General Arthur Hanna
and other government officials
signed the Book of Condolence
at Zode House on Tuesday.

Mr Kim is remembered
mostly for his passionate
efforts to unify North and
South Korea.

As president, he led the his-
toric inter-Korean summit in
June 2000, the first of its kind
since the division of country 55
years ago.

His ‘Sunshine Policy’ helped
lessen the hostility between
South and North Korea and led
to a new wave of reconciliation,
co-operation and peace on the
Korean peninsula.

In December 2000, he was
awarded the Nobel Peace Prize
in recognition of his contribu-
tion to promoting democracy
and human rights in Asian
countries and his pursuit of
policies to achieve inter-Kore-
an reconciliation.

ce
ca
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a
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eS
cc
_
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o
a



GOVERNOR-GENERAL Arthur
Hanna signs the Book of Condo-
lence while Honorary Consul for
Korea Maxwell Gibson observes.

RIGHT: Newly sworn in Chief Justice Michael Barnett signs the
Book of Condolence on the passing of South Korean
President Kim Dae-jung.

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Children’s Home. (Photo by Leah Davis)

While the children at The Bilney Lane Home are certainly not thinking about going
back to school, the team at Providence Advisors is being proactive and have made a
donation towards preparing them for the new academic school year. Kenwood Kerr,
CEO and President of the 100% Bahamian owned financial services company,
explained that as Providence Advisors celebrates their 3-year anniversary this
summer, the group decided to continue its commitment to contribute to the positive
development of Bahamian youth. Janet Brown, Administrator for the home, was on
hand to accept the donation and expressed gratitude, stating that the funds will go a
long way in the purchase of uniforms and school supplies for the eight children in
her care. With over $400 million in assets under management, Providence Advisors
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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Manatee dies despite
Atlantis team’s efforts

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE the efforts of a
dedicated team from Atlantis’
marine rehabilitation centre a
severely emaciated manatee
which came from Florida to
make the Bahamas its new
home has died.

The journeying sea creature
had been spotted in various
locations throughout the
Bahamian islands - finally being
rescued from waters off
Clarence Town, Long Island,
last Thursday - but by the time
it got help it was too late.

Despite “round-the-clock
care” the manatee expired 48
hours after the rescue.

At that time, the endangered
Florida manatee - nicknamed
“Crusoe” after the British
adventurer - weighed 750
pounds, less than half the
amount of a healthy adult man-
atee.

Charles Manire, a veterinar-
ian with Dolphin Cay at
Atlantis said the manatee’s
death was a sobering occasion
for him and his team of marine
mammal specialists.

“We've really wanted to be
able to help her and its sad for
all of us to not be able to do
more than what we were able
to,” he told The Tribune.

According to the veterinari-
an, tests found nothing med-
ically wrong with the manatee -
believed to be around 30 years
old - but the waters of the
Bahamas offer an inadequate
supply of the type of vegeta-
tion the species feeds on.

Consequently, “Crusoe” end-
ed up extremely weak from
chronic malnutrition and suf-
fering from an electrolyte
imbalance.

“She arrived in very critical
condition and her chances of
survival were very slim from
the outset,” said Dr Manire.

Dolphin Cay is home to one
of the only live marine mam-
mal rescue centres and is part

a



THE TEAM from Atlantis’ marine rehabilitation centre attempted to save the manatee.

of the Bahamas Marine Mam-
mal Stranding Network.

Their swift rescue attempt
last week came after Dr Manire
received information indicating
that the manatee had shown up
in Long Island, some 30 to 40
miles from Rum Cay, where it
was last sighted in April, 2009.

With the approval of the
Bahamian government and the
US Fish and Wildlife Service,
Dr Manire flew to the site only
to find “Crusoe” in an even less
healthy state than it had been in
when previously spotted.

“We were preparing to res-
cue her in Rum Cay and she
disappeared and didn’t show
back up until last week,” said
Dr Manire.

More marine mammal spe-
cialists flew to Long Island to
assist with the effort and they
were able to get the manatee
onto a DC-3 cargo plane and
fly it to Nassau, where it was
transferred to Dolphin Cay.

TMF airlines provided the
plane that was used for the res-
cue and the Miami Seaquari-
um had agreed to provide a
home for the manatee if the
marine specialists were able to
stabilise it.

A release issued by Atlantis
yesterday stated: “Despite the
unfortunate outcome, Crusoe
will yield valuable information
to researchers worldwide by

adding to the growing body of
knowledge about this unique
mammal.”

Meanwhile, Dr Manire told
The Tribune that manatees
could actually become a more
common sight in the Bahamas.

“It’s not very common but it

seems to be happening more
and more and there’s some
thought that as the population
is increasing in Florida they
may be actually be expanding
their range and showing up in
the Bahamas more and more,”
he said.

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Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are making
news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning for
improvements in the area or
have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.

The Brass & Leather Shops Ltd
Charlotte Street Off Bay Street Tel: 322 3806
Mall At Marathon Tel: 394 5676
Marsh Harbour, Abaco Shopping Center Tel: 367 3643




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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



FROM LEFT:
MARTY Smith,
paint technician at
AID; Dr Iva Dahl,
BTVI manager
and consultant;
Don Bain, BTVI
instructor, and
Juan Cardenas,
Martin-Senour
Paints’ district
sales manager



Stet lw waar

Ee Pep Repo ti pe Bia | seit des ake oe Reng

After the Bell

The Ater-Sichod! IMAGINATION STATION 4



15. JOHNSON



BUSINESS HOURS:

Approved by. Min.

Local companies open
up new opportunities
for BIVI students

TWO local companies are
giving students of the
Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute (BTVD
the opportunity to learn new
skills which will make them

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more employable.

Martin-Senour Paints and
Automotive and Industrial
Distributors (AID) recently
donated a $15,000 high-tech
tech base mixing system for
use in the institute's auto-
motive programme.

The donation, which was
facilitated by Juan Carde-
nas, district sales manager,
the Martin-Senour Compa-
ny, and Marty Smith, paint
technician at AID, is the lat-
est example of the recent
partnerships between BTVI
and the two companies.

“AID has been a valued
partner for many years,”
said Don Bain, head of the
department for the automo-
tive programme at BTVI.
“In particular, Jason Wat-
son, manager at AID has
been there for our pro-
gramme whenever we need-
ed his advice or assistance.”

“They help us with
resources and we give them
every opportunity to hire
our best students.”

Yesterday and today Mar-
tin-Senour Paints used the
institute as a resource for
training and providing work-

shops for paint technicians
in the area.

"This is a wonderful
opportunity for us too,” said
Sean Adderley, public rela-
tions officer.

"Not only has Martin-
Senour Paints donated a
tech base mixing system, but
our students and instructors
also have the chance to par-
ticipate in their factory train-
ing here on campus. They
will be able to learn first-
hand the latest in technology
from the manufacturers
themselves."

With this partnership, stu-
dents graduating from
BTVI's automotive pro-
gramme will have general
knowledge of Martin-
Senour Paints brand, which
will make them highly
employable as prospective
technicians, the company
said.

Companies like AID and
Martin-Senour Paints are
instrumental in helping us,”
said Dr Iva Dahl, manager
and consultant at BTVI.
"And this contribution will
be a tremendous help to the
students."



A TWO-DAY workshop for 200 junior and senior high school
teachers opened at the Church of God of Prophecy, East Street, on
August 25. It was sponsored by the Royal Bank of Canada and RBC
FINCO. Pictured at the lectern is Nathaniel Beneby, vice-president
and country head for RBC Royal Bank of Canada in the Bahamas,
addressing the participants. Seated right is Elma Garraway, per-
manent secretary in the Ministry of Education.

PICTURED ARE some of the participants in attendance

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Treasure Cay Billfish
Tournament 2010
date is announced

THE Treasure Cay Hotel
Resort and Marina announced
that its 27th Annual Treasure Cay
Billfish Tournament (TCBT) will
be held from June 13-18, 2010.

This tournament follows the
remarkable 2009 victory by a 13-
year-old boy who out-fished sea-
soned anglers for first place. Fish-
ing aboard Team Galati, junior
angler Chris Galati of Anna
Maria, Florida, released two blue
marlin in one day, the largest
weighing nearly 500 Ibs.

The TCBT modified release
tournament offers four days of
fishing, social parties, dinners and
fun competitions.

It will continue its popular
guaranteed cash pay-out intro-
duced last year, ranging from
$10,000 for a minimum of ten
boats and up to $50,000 for par-
ticipation of 50 boats.

Open to the public, the tour-
nament format consists of multi-
ple awards for billfish, plus awards
for tuna, dolphin and wahoo.
Release point standings are veri-
fied by the participant’s own dig-
ital and/or video camera with an
image that can verify the time and
date the photo was taken.

Registration for up to six team
members, including boat entry,
cash prize eligibility, dinners,
cocktail parties, team goody bag
with t-shirts and hats and room
discounts is $2,950 per team.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS

Miss Bahamas Tourism Queen among
the favourites for international title



IN the final days leading up
to the Miss Tourism Queen
International competition,
one of the world’s leading
pageant websites is taking
note of Bahamian beauty
Tiara Cooper.

The statuesque beauty has
been named as one of the
favourites to win the coveted
title by the experts of the web-
site Global Beauties.

Tiara, who won the Miss
Bahamas Tourism Queen title
during the 2008 Miss
Bahamas World pageant, has
been competing at the
pageant in China for the last
three weeks.

She has visited several
provinces, experienced the
unique culture of China while

A
MISS BAHAMAS Tourism Queen Tiara Cooper.



promoting Bahamian culture
in the process.

There are 98 delegates
competing in the pageant
which culminates with the
grand finale on Friday.

The Miss Tourism Queen
International Pageant was
founded by Charlie See in
1949. In 1993, the Miss
Tourism Queen Organisation
held the first world final com-
petition in Sri Lanka, and lat-
er in the United States, Rus-
sia, Brazil, Germany, Japan,
Singapore, and many other
countries as well.

The contest then moved to
China in 2004, and has been
held there ever since, grow-
ing to the point where it is
now considered to be a ‘grand

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slam pageant’ — one of the top
four in the world. With each
country's tourism ambas-
sadors coming together for
the event, Miss Tourism
Queen International aims to
enhance tourism develop-
ment, friendship among the
countries, and international
culture exchange.

Bahamians are encouraged
to boost Tiara’s chances in the
pageant by voting for her
online.

The contestant receiving
the highest number of votes
automatically advances to the
finals.

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



RUSSELL’S WAREHOUSE
CLOSING SALE
Rivet Rite Shelving, Gomdolas, Glass Shelves.

2. 4 Ann Display Racks, Graiwall, Slareall,
Slotted Standards, and Hardware. Asst Fixtures and Fittings,
Men's Cowerall’s 35.00), 5/5 & LOS Whie Shins 51-55,
Blank CDOs S50, Men’s Jeans sx. 46-50, 515,
Blank [0 Cards, 16° Stand Fans $20.04),

BIk School Shoes, 55.00) & S740), AND WORE,

Location: Whadeira Shopping Center

Behond Mystical Cayen = Entrance io Acuinas
First belt = First stairs on left,

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Contact: 465-848

REGISTRATION

Paralegal Associate Degree
Human Resource Management
ines aR M LC Ce

Institute of Business and Commerce - 324-4625

Registration for the 2009-2010 Swim
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ALL SWIM GROUPS MUST REGISTER

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In addition, see our website for start dates,
prices and full swim schedules:
www. barracudaswimMmiing.or

Pa

Customs officers

FROM page one

Those outside of the group of
officers who were interdicted
were being moved as part of an
“ongoing restructuring exer-
cise”, said the Ministry.

"Article 35 (of the industrial
agreement) speaks to an offi-
cer having the right to refuse
any transfer if it will cause hard-
ship on him and in General

Orders, 604 speaks to the same | 1%

thing," he told The Tribune.
Mr Pinder also argued that
customs officers are afforded

five days notice of a transfer, but claimed
that in some cases officers were given 48
hours and some only 24 hours to respond.

Proceedings for the officers’ dismissal

Second man
charged in
connection with
Bahamian’s
murder in US
FROM page one

brother — who was said to
own a car and scooter rental
business — went to the U.S.



were said to be underway
before the 14-day period within
which the interdicted officers
had to respond to government,
Mr Pinder claimed.

He added that many customs
officers were up in arms because
they fear being unjustly treat-
ed by government as well.

"The majority of customs offi-
| cers are upset in the manner of
which it was done so they are
=| of the view that they might be
| next, so that's why we must
(end) this behaviour," said Mr
Pinder.

Attempts to reach the minis-
ter responsible for the public service, State
Finance Minister Zhirvargo Laing and
Comptroller of Customs Glenn Gomez
were unsuccessful yesterday.

Bahamas could be
alfected by Tropical
Storm Danny

Hurricane Centre (NHC)
said the centre of Tropi-
cal Storm Danny was

k 1
‘ ©

t
io

JOHN PINDER

FROM page one



but he had promised to return
to the Bahamas after only a
day to be at his sick father’s
side.

Jail records show the men
accused of killing Holmes
have both got drug-related
criminal records.

According to the Sun-Sen-
tinel, White was arrested at
least eight times since 1998,
and Benjamin at least five
times, mostly on traffic and
drug charges and for failing
to appear in court.

Records also show White
was in state prison from April
to September of 1998, and
Benjamin from July 2003 to
August 2004, both for convic-
tions on drug charges.

SUPERVISOR OF FINANCE

A leading Bahamian company, is secking applications tor a Supervisor of Finance

Jon OBJECTIVE:

To promde financal leadership for the company by managing the financal resources, supervising
the certain key aspects of the company’s accounting function and maintaining appropriate relations

with investors and regularney agencies.

(URGANTZATIONAL POSITION:
Reports to the Director of Finance

PRINCIPAL DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:

Core responsibilities include:
Assisting in managing the financal allairs of the company

Sapervise key components of the finance department

Ensure accurate and timely interim and annual financial reporting in accordance with

International Accomnting Standards

Assist in the annual budeer exercise

expected to be affected
by the storm, people on
the United States’ east
coast should monitor the
system closely.

Tropical Storm Danny
formed yesterday 470
miles east of the
Bahamas. It was expect-
ed to move on a north-
westward track through-
out today, staying east of
the Bahamas, before
turning more toward the
north tomorrow and
finally curving to the
north-east over the week-
end.

In its 5pm update, the
Miami-based National

located about 390 miles
east of Nassau.

It was moving toward
the west-northwest at
around 12mph with max-
imum sustained winds of
near 45mph.

Meanwhile, weather
experts have also started
watching another tropi-
cal wave coming off the
coast of Africa just south-
east of the Cape Verde
Islands. While conditions
are favourable for this
system to become more
organised, development
was not expected to
occur before early next
week.

a
ss

Colinalmperial

CAREER OPPORTUNITY
Reinsurance Consultant

‘Hooded men
Silay 12 in

could hold protest:

? forms without insignias on
i Wednesday killed 12 members
i of the Awa indigenous group,
? including five children, on a
? reserve in a region plagued by
? the cocaine trade, authorities
i said, according to Associated
i Press.

BOGOTA

HOODED men in uni-

Indigenous leaders said the

i killings took place at 5 a.m on
? the Gran Rosario reserve
? about 50 miles (80 kilometers)
? inland from the Pacific port of
? Tumaco. The reserve has
? about 1,500 Awa.

The state governor, Anto-

i nio Navarro, told The Asso-
i ciated Press that the victims
? were all related. The attack
i killed five men, two women,
? two boys, two girls and a baby.
i He said two males, a 10-year-
i old and a 20-year-old, were
? wounded in the gunfire but
i fled and survived.

The identity of the killers

; was not immediately known.

In February, Revolutionary

? Armed Forces of Colombia
i rebels acknowledged killing
? eight Awa Indians at a differ-
? ent but nearby reservation for
? allegedly working as infor-
i mants for the army.

The area is rife with coca

i plantations and illegal armed
: groups — leftist rebels as well
i as far-right militias — that
i process the leaf into cocaine
i and smuggle it out of Colom-
: bia, typically down rivers that
i are the region’s main high-
i ways.

Navarro said he could not

i remember a massacre of so
i many people in Narino state.
i He said the
i described the killers as tall,
: fair-haired men with mustach-
; es, ruling out local Indians.

survivors

The director of operations

: of Colombia’s national police,
: Gen.
? announced a reward for infor-
i mation leading to the arrest
i of the killers.

Orlando Paez,

Massacres of the magnitude

? of Wednesday’s have been
i rare since President Alvaro
i Uribe first took office in 2002
? and far-right militias demobi-
i lized in a peace deal with his
i conservative government.

We are looking for a Reinsurance Consultant to review the
process flows for reinsurance administration and establish
process flows for all new business to ensure that procedures
are in accordance with provisions of the Company’s reinsur-

ance treaties.

Qualifications/Experience/Skills:

Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science, Finance or related

discipline;

In-depth financial services experience;

5-10 years experience in testing, implementation and
assessment of systems;

Ability to identify and recommend solutions to internal
control weaknesses within business systems and
processes;

Excellent organizational,
interpersonal skills; and
Project management or leadership expertise.

Assist in the taining and development of line accounting staff
(Coordinate the annual audit pirencess

Assist in managing cashflow and tessury funcons

Any other related duties as considered necessary

and

time management

REQUIREMENTS & PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

Candidates must meet the following criteria:
Bacheloc’s Degree oc higher in accounting or related financial field
Professional accounting designation recognized by The Bahamas Inseinate of Chartered To apply:
Accountants
Send electronic résumé via email to

careers@colinaimperial.com

Subject: Reinsurance Consultant

Minimum of seven years experience in accounting, finance and budgeting.
Leadership, management and direct supervision experience is required. Previous
direct experience in planning and executing all aspects of financial accounting and
hudgetary functions

Bahamian citizen ls
Accounting softaure experience

Proficient in the ust of the Microsoft range of appbcations Send resume to:

Human Resources Manager
308 East Bay Street

P.O. Box N-4728

Nassau, Bahamas

Strong technical and manaperial skills

Excellent weiring, communication, analyncal and reasoning stalls

Excellent organizational and time management skalls

Team Player with the ability to add value ard strength to the eam and team poals

Howest, burdworking and ability to meet deadlines

The position offers an attractive salary and benefits package, reflecting the successful
applicant's experience and qualifications, including a pension plan, medical, life, dental
and vision coverage.

Applications must be received by 10 September 2009.

(Qualified individuals should submit complete resumes including references befnee August 31"
2109 te: Eenail: finsuperrisoritemail.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 11



Lawyers to seek union cash probe

FROM page one

"Each of the payments out
would have represented an
advantage to the persons who
were in clear violation of
their position, (basically)
abusing their office," Mr
Gomez said.

"We are now in the process
off attempting to... prevent
the expenditure of that mon-
ey.
“First we go to the police
and the police then do their
job, once we've gotten the
information we'll try and get
freezing (orders) from the
Supreme Court,” he added.

The embattled union was
thrown into disarray on Tues-
day when members learned
that some members of the
fractured executive council
had requested the liquidation
of two fixed deposits of more
than $468,000.

It was later discovered that
$665,000 was allegedly taken
out of the union's account.

Mr Colebrooke maintains
that the union executives who
requested the transfer were
not authorised to do so. He
claimed that one of the three
— purported union assistant
secretary general Raymond
Wright — was no longer
employed with the union.

A union bank statement
revealed that $140,000 in pay-
ment was transferred to Com-
mercial Law Advocates —
whose principal attorney is
Keod Smith — presumably
for legal fees; $54,113.15 to
accountant John Bain and
several hundred thousand for
outstanding salary payments.

According to a newspaper
report, letters requesting the
transfers were allegedly
signed by assistant treasurer
Samantha Gray, trustee Ian
Neely, and Mr Wright just
days after Nicole Martin was
ousted as the union's presi-
dent.

The earlier article claimed
that Mr Wright was to receive
$73,600 of the requested
funds, while Ms Gray and Ms
Neely were to receive $21,450
and $30,026 respectively. The
earlier article said $140,000
was requested to pay Com-
mercial Law Advocates,
whose principal attorney is
Keod Smith, and $50,000 to
Obie Ferguson and Co.

Union first vice-president
Kirk Wilson initiated the
court battle which led to a
Supreme Court ruling that
removed Ms Martin from her
post.

Mr Smith represented Mr
Wilson in this challenge and
was assisted by Mr Ferguson.

Another $54,113 was
requested for HLB Galanis
Bain chartered accountants’



partner John Bain for out-
standing fees, according to
the earlier article.

Mr Gomez alleged that
this was evidence of a clear
"abuse" of power.

Late yesterday evening,
the faction led by Kirk Wil-
son responded, issuing a
statement that said that the
union has “marked a signifi-
cant milestone” by paying
“several long-standing debts
that were owed to its profes-
sionals and many members
of the executive council who
were not paid their regular
salaries for as many as 18
months.”

The group said the pay-
ments were in accordance
with “the Supreme Court
Order of Mr Justice Jon
Isaacs of August 19, 2009.”

The statement, which was
sent out by Commercial Law
Advocates, Keod Smith’s law
firm, said: “Following the
ruling by Justice Isaacs by
which the current executive
council was re-instated,
instructions of the council
were given to the union’s
bank to settle the outstand-
ing unpaid salaries and pro-

fessional fees... The pay-
ment of these funds came
from fixed deposits of the
union held with the bank and
does not disrupt the balance
sheet of the union in as much
as the monies paid were paid
pursuant to the court’s order
to cover the union’s liability
to the persons involved.”

Meanwhile, the account-
ing firm HLB Galanis Bain
has weighed in concerning
its part in the dispute.

The firm issued a state-
ment yesterday which said:
“HLB Galanis Bain has not-
ed with concern that the
public is not being told the
entire truth regarding the
payments to this firm for
professional fees.”

It said the facts “are a mat-
ter of public record” as pub-
lished in the ruling of Justice
K Neville Adderley on May
21, 2009.

(2008/CLE/GEN/00614).

The firm then went on to
quote parts of the ruling,
including:

¢ (Paragraph 12) “The
court also ordered that HLB
Galanis Bain, Chartered

& ‘Si Bahamas

Technical & Verational Institute
ee me hl eg

i Pal

other

approved by the Council }
could be employed to con- }

duct a forensic audit, to give ; funeral will be held for former

a report on the financial } secretary to the Cabinet Her-

transaction in question, and }

based on the results the

Council should take such ? at St Barnabas Anglican

action as it deemed fit.”

address me on cost.”

_ State-recognised funeral for former

Secretary to the Cabinet H C Walkine

Accountants (‘Bain’) or such } By LINDSAY THOMPSON

accounting firm } Bahamas Information

Services

A STATE-RECOGNISED

bert Cleveland Walkine, CMG,

! CVO, OBE, at 3pm on Friday

? Church on Wulff and Baillou
i Hill Roads, the Cabinet Office

e (Paragraph 31.) “Invoic- }
es due for the preparation of
the Bain Report are to be }
made out of the assets of the ;
union. I invite counsel to }

HLB Bain’s statement }
said: “The facts above are }
clear for all to see. HLB per- }
formed a forensic audit in }

mendations of the court and }

issued a report to the Exec- : November 28, 1929, in Crooked

? Island, where he began his pub-

<4 : = :
The evidence is that both } fic service career as a monitor at

utive Council.

the Executive Council and :

the court accepted the } From there, he won a scholar-

report. The learned judge }
ruled that the report should }
be paid for out of the assets {

of the union.

court order.”

announced Wednesday.

His body will be interred at
Lake View Memorial Gardens
Mausoleums on John F
Kennedy Drive.

Mr Walkine died of cancer
on Thursday, August 20, at the
University of Miami Hospital
in Miami, Florida. He was 79.
He is survived by his wife Pam

accordance with the recom- : Salen an ee iets eee

and Imogene Walkine.
Mr Walkine was born on

the public school on that island.

ship to attend Government
High School in Nassau. After
graduating from GHS, he con-

: tinued his education at the

“On August 25, 2009, the :
union complied with that }
i versity of Manchester.

Bahamas Teacher’s Training
College, Nassau and the Uni-

LOOK WHAT'S HAPPENING



Mr Walkine has had a var-
ied and well-rounded career in
the Public Service. He began
as a teacher and then served as
a Family Island Commissioner
for 10 years from 1958 to 1968
when he was appointed assis-
tant secretary in the Cabinet
Office.

Mr Walkine rose steadily
through the ranks and in 1974
he was appointed Permanent
Secretary. He had served as
permanent secretary in the
Ministry of Labour, the Min-
istry of Education, the Ministry
of Works and Utilities and the
Ministry of National Security,
before he was once again
appointed to the Cabinet
Office, this time as Secretary
to the Cabinet.

Protessional Development

Accounting | (12 Weeks)
Fri, 18, 6pm
Accounting 11 (12 Weeks)
Fri, 0a, Opie

Sat. 89, Gaol pen

Quick Books (12 Weeks)

Fri. 218, & 10pm

A+ Review Certification Exam (12 Weeks)
Fr. 18, 6-] Oe SSRI)

Basle Moe Print Reading &
Estimating | Residential (10 Weeks)
Sal, WLS, Far Apr $50
Basic Blue Print Reading &

Estimating 0 Commercial (10) Weeks

Fin. S18, bpii- | Opes S375
‘Electrical Single Phase (12 Weeks)
Sat. 919) Gamelan SARS
Cabinet Making (1) Weeks)

Sat. 9/19, Fam-I pm SoG

“Wake-up Artistry (10) Weeks)
Divurs. 417, 6-4pm SM)
Et ete Rito tame mea tL

(1 year)

Mon, thin Thits, RL, i [pin

Massie Dheraps
SHIH
“Esthetician (2 semesters}
Mion, tind Wed, 81, bpm SSH)
Barbering (2 semesters)
Alom. thro Wed. 21, 6-90
Sall Technology (2 semesters)
Mien, the Wed, 221, 6-9pm

S100

[jon

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ol

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Window Treatment Drapery & Valenee
(10) Weeks)

Kelom Wied. 9/14, Sam- | pm

Tics. Thre, 21S, 4 -

S140

Una
Sewmloag tf (1 Weeks)
Thre. Fri, O17, &pen-l am a0
Uphalstery Il

Vehick Keforbishnent (10 Weeks)
Moe. Wed, 914, 6-10pen S380
Strow Craft 1 (10 Weeks)
Pelion, Wied, 14, Seam | pte
Straw Craft Advanced [1 (10 Weeks)
Aton. Wed. 914, f-10pm
Shell Souvenir Manufacturing (11) Weekes)
Pelion. Weed, S04, Sharm | pets

Mon. Wed. 9°14, 6pe- pen

SHI

a]

Thurs WT, apm-Tlpm 525)

Small Engine Repair (10 Weeks)
Sal, W19, Sandan

CLASS SCHEDULE

1D WEEK PROGRAMMES |
Sepember |4- November 21,200 |
Ii WEEK FROKPRAMMES |

| September 8» December 5, 2014

2 SEMESTERS PROGRAMMES |

August 31- December 3, 21K
= oe ss

$350

SMe UPAR TH

me) Pe el be

Mey
Monday-Friday * Sam-5Spm

BTV! reserves the right to cancel
courdes if a minimum number of
SG a MC CELL B
Students will receive a full refund
MS Se Me Mer ed soe | sy
ietiotiiel a

Ua Mma meee Lal
Ue A sd eC
Course Schedule and Course
Foie

et ate se eg

cancellations.

Non-Bahamians are required to
Ve bbe Uru



KEEP SHOPPING!

You have TWO more chances to Shop and Hop!
This August win a dream vacation to Abaco
Inn (Hope Town, Abaco) or Shop in September
and win a trip to Paradise Sands, Eleuthera!






a a —— . | }
oe rah Natasha Darl Soe er Aad. Shonale Grin Sale, tty Thanks to all OUR SPONSORS
i ! 5 F : ,
a iskand Winner. Chantel Robinson a Sales and ere and Dawn Forbes Palais — C fol (iis ewehag.corane Sky Bahamas
= scott Ferguson (GB General Manag arketing) Assitant NUE ca /
ie 9 Se receas WW
“T' WeESsTern A



ee | Gray aes

Left to right, 5 : , Jee Griffin (Sales), Carolyn aod i

Zovia Cash i ie (GB General Manager), _ hi aa and Dawn Forbes (Executive ees Fy

(Sales ox inner), Cynthia Rohinen, (San 5a ; ;
?and Chantel Robinson (Sales in Assistant Sales and Marketing) Nassau * Grand Bahama « World Wide Web

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Hunter’s

TATE MM ICU o
leads Angels 4

past Tigers

Learn To Swim

Begins September 7th 2009

Competitive Swimming
Begins August 31st, 2009

Registration

Saturday ry 27th 2009 at
The College of The Bahamas
Swimming Complex
10:00am - 12 noon

Monday August 31st, 2007
at The College of The Bahamas $wimming Complex
or Betty Kelly Kenning
Aquatic Center: dpm-4pm



LOS ANGELES Angels’ Chone Figgins, right, attempts to steal home plate against Detroit Tigers’
Gerald Laird in the seventh inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Wednesday, Aug. 26,



2009. Figgins was sent back to third base.

BASEBALL
ANAHEIM, Calif.
Associated Press

TORII Hunter hit an early
two-run homer, Joe Saunders
pitched five effective innings
in his return to the Angels’
rotation and Los Angeles
snapped its three-game skid
with a 4-2 victory over the
Detroit Tigers on Wednesday.

Kendry Morales and Chone
Figgins added run-scoring hits
for Los Angeles, the only
major league club without
four straight losses. The AL
West-leading Angels also
avoided being swept at home
for the first time since June
2007 and prevented Detroit’s
first road sweep of the Angels
since August 1993.

Hunter connected for his
18th homer in the first inning
against Edwin Jackson (10-6),
who took his first loss since

CP) TOYOTA moving forward

ANEW
GENERATION
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pote
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HILUX DOUBLE CAB FEATURES:

2.7 litre VVTI engine o
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July 19.

Adam Everett hit a two-run
homer for the AL Central-
leading Tigers, who had won
eight of 12.

Saunders (10-7) was cool in
the 97-degree Orange County
heat while making his first
start since Aug. 7, after which
he went on the disabled list
with a sore shoulder. The left-
hander had been struggling
for over a month before his
DL stint, but the Angels’
opening day starter allowed
four hits and two walks while
striking out six.

Four Los Angeles relievers
collaborated on four scoreless
innings. In his first appear-
ance in eight days, closer Bri-
an Fuentes hit two batters but
hung on for his 36th save in 41
chances.

Aside from MHunter’s
homer, Los Angeles got back
to manufacturing its offense

Jae C. Hong/AP Photo



SPORTS

naa



-Atearful Ricky
Hatton meets
Muhammad Al

: BOXING
: MANCHESTER, England
i Associated Press

RICKY HATTON wel-

i comed Muhammad Ali to
i his gym Wednesday and
i? said that not even a meet-
i ing with The Greatest could
i persuade him to get back
: in the ring again.

Hatton, the former world

: light welterweight champi-
: on, hasn’t fought since a
i second-round knockout
i loss to Manny Pacquiao in
i May and is now a promot-
i er.

The 30-year-old Briton,

: known for his aggressive,
: body-punching style, said
i he was reduced to tears
i when meeting 67-year-old
? Ali, who has Parkinson’s

i disease and makes rare

with hits, walks and sharp
baserunning in the style that’s
worked so well for a club with
eight starters hitting at least
.293 entering the day. The
Angels stole five bases against
Detroit, matching a season
high.

Figgins even appeared to
steal home after Hunter’s
strikeout in the seventh
inning, but third-base umpire
Chad Fairchild had called
time on the field. Angels man-
ager Mike Scioscia argued to
no avail.

Miguel Cabrera extended
his hitting streak to 11 games
with a sixth-inning double, but
went 1 for 4. The Detroit slug-
ger was 6 for 10 with two
homers and seven RBIs in the
first two games.

Jackson yielded eight hits
and four walks in 6 1-3 innings
during his first loss in seven
starts.

eit

Boh Mal

i public appearances.

“He’s not just one of the

: greatest boxers of all time,
i he’s one of the greatest
: men of all time. He’s made
; the entertainment side of
: boxing what it is today,”
: Hatton said.

“Bearing in mind how

i poorly he is, for him still to
i come to the gym, raise his
i hands to the fans and have
i a picture, that’s why he’s
i the greatest.”

Joined by wife Lonnie,

i Ali is touring Britain and
? Ireland. He is making
i appearances at a series of
i dinners to raise money for
i his charities, including the
? Muhammad Ali Center in
i his hometown of Louisville,

Hatton has only two loss-

i es in a 47-fight career. He
i said he is no closer to
? deciding whether to fight
i again.

It’s Back to School time, but before you go,

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 13



LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Minister
Signs
stadium
lighting
contract

As construction of the new
state of the art national stadium
continues, the government of
the Bahamas took a major step
forward in creating a new light-
ing system.

The Ministry of
Youth Sports and
Culture signed a
contract with
Campbell’s Elec-
tric to replace the



) high mass lighting
Desmond @t the stadium
: worth over

Bannister $700,000.
The base of the

contract is $669,425 for services
rendered, with a 10 percent
contingency worth $66,942.50,
bringing the total to
$736,367.50. Minister of Youth
Sports and Culture, The Hon-
orable Desmond Bannister,
said the need for a new lighting
system had become imperative
due to the dilapidated state of
the current infrastructure.

“The current lighting system
has not only fallen into a severe
state of disrepair, but also pose
a significant safety hazard to
users of this facility,” he said,
“The lighting towers have dete-
riorated to a stage where the
structures are considered to be
in critical condition requiring
urgent remedial work.”

Bannister said, with the first
step in a lengthy line of
improvements the stadium
should become a welcome
atmosphere for participants and
spectators alike.

“We are pleased that we are
able to do this now,” he said,
“And to ensure that the next
track season or whatever activ-
ities are held out here at this
facility we will be able to have
the athletes, parents, fans, fam-
ilies will be able to watch in a
safe environment that there will
be no problem with lighting fix-
tures of lights falling.”

The project is scheduled to
begin 1n approximately two
weeks with a tentative date of
completion set for March 2010.

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Langerhans’ HR sends M's over A's in 10



Elaine Thompson/AP Photo

SEATTLE Mariners’ Russell Branyan watches his home run
against the Oakland Athletics in the second inning of a base-
ball game Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2009, in Seattle.

BASEBALL
SEATTLE
Associated Press

DEFENSIVE-replacement
Ryan Langerhans homered
off Craig Breslow with one
out in the bottom of the 10th
inning to send the Seattle
Mariners to a 4-2 victory over
the Oakland Athletics on
Tuesday night.

Franklin Gutierrez’s singled
with one out in the 10th off
Breslow (5-7), who entered
the game tied in losses among
AL relievers. It was Gutier-
rez’s fifth hit and seventh time
on base in the two games he’s
been leading off while Ichiro
Suzuki rests a tight calf mus-
cle.

Then Langerhans, who
entered for defense the inning
before, smacked a 2-2 pitch
into the first row of seats
beyond right field. It was his
second game-ending home
run as a late-game substitute
in three weeks.

Mark Lowe (2-6) pitched
the 10th for the win.

Seattle’s Ken Griffey Jr. got
the small, quiet crowd on its
feet with a pinch-hitting
appearance with a man on and
one out in the eighth against
Michael Wuertz. Griffey was 4
for 6 with two home runs
against him, but the 39-year-
old slugger struck out waving
over a 2-2 pitch in the dirt.

Gutierrez stole second on
that pitch. Then Jose Lopez
chopped a ball to the right of
charging third baseman Adam
Kennedy. Gutierrez slowed
his run to third, veered onto
the infield grass and almost
looped around the ball, seem-
ingly obscuring Kennedy’s
view of the ball until it clanged
off his glove for a game-tying
error.

Lopez then stole second on
a play in which replays
appeared to show he was out.
But Mike Sweeney, who spent
last season with Oakland,
struck out on a full-count pitch
to end the inning and keep it
tied at 2.

Kennedy’s single that

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scored Mark Ellis in the sev-
enth inning had put Oakland
up 2-1.

That was the last pitch
thrown by Seattle starter Ryan
Rowland-Smith, who allowed
nine hits and two runs in 6 1-3
innings.

After reliever Shawn Kel-
ley got Rajai Davis to ground
out, Kurt Suzuki flied out to
strand runners at second and

third and keep the Mariners
close.

A’s rookie Brett Anderson
allowed one run and six hits
with eight strikeouts in seven
impressive innings. The 21-
year-old left-hander, Oak-
land’s centerpiece in the trade
that sent Dan Haren to Ari-
zona following the 2007 sea-
son, leads major league rook-
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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Bolt’s heroics turned Berlin

sames into a ecenes ‘ dream

By BRENT STUBBS

HE trip to Berlin,

Germany for the

IAAF's = 12th

World Champi-
onships in Athletics was quite
an eventful one.

It was a reporter's dream to
have had the opportunity to
cover an event where a phe-
nomenal athlete like Jamaica's
Usain Bolt was able to stretch
the world record in both the
100 and 200 metres into anoth-
er hemisphere — no let's go a
litter further, into another plan-
et.

Like Bolt, who could be
regarded as a "Freak of
Nature," it's going to take
another specially gifted athlete
to come along and surpass what
he has achieved.

9.58 seconds in the 100 and
19.99 in the 200.

Two times never heard off.

Yet, the astonishing question
that came up after he did it —
making it look like there was
two separate races going on at
the same time — was just as ‘hair
raising, eye popping and mouth
dropping’ feats that one will
have to cherish for quite a
while.

When he did the triple-triple
world record breaking perfor-
mance in Beijing, China at the
Olympic Games last year, I
thought I was watching a video
game. When he did the double-
double, me and my collegiate
Kwame Laurence from the
Trinidad Express, who sat next
to each other in the press tri-
bune, could only turn and once
again offer our congratulations
to Kayon Raynor of the
Jamaica Observer.

In fact, we spent more time
shaking Raynor's hands for the
splendid job that the Jamaican
team did at these champi-
onships — a total of 26, inclu-
sive of 13 gold, nine silver and
four bronze — to finish second
to only the United States in the
medal count and third in the
placing standings behind the
Americans and the Russians.

Trinidad & Tobago, on the
other hand, was just ahead of











OPINION

the Bahamas with three medals
— one of which should have
been the Bahamas' — for a tied
20th spot with France in the
medal hunt. The Bahamas had
two and was tied with Japan at
number 22.

Trinidad ended up 13th in
the placing table, while the
Bahamas finished tied with
Japan for the 16th spot.

The only other Caribbean
English-speaking country to
medal was Barbados with a
gold. They were tied with Croa-
tia, New Zealand and

Slovenia for 16th spot. How-
ever, they were tied with
Cyprus. Finland, Hungary and
Sweden for 33rd in the placing
table.

Cuba had 12 medals — one of
which actually should have
been the Bahamas’ own — for
12th on the medal table and
they were ninth in the placing
table.

Two of the heart-wrenching
disappointing performances
that just didn't pan itself out,
resulted in the Bahamas not

being able to move a little high-
er in the standings.

While I was able to bask in
the Caribbean dominance in
the sprints, winning, my most
hurtful moment came from
Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown in the
men's 400. Having fallen short
in the past two championships
as well as the Olympics last
year, this was expected to be
the year that he finally got on
the podium to celebrate his first
individual medal.

He came so close, but yet
was so far. Once again, rown
didn't have anything left to gut
it out in the winding minutes
after running an excellent 350-
380 metres. In the final 20, he
was passed twice and had to
settle for a disappointing fifth.

His spot on the medal stand
was occupied by Trinidad's
Renny Quow, which gave me
reason to congratulate Lau-
rence, who had predicted that
his man was going to upset
Brown and follow Americans
Oympic champion LaShawn
Merrit and past World's cham-
pion Jeremy Wariner in that
order.

Never anticipated it though.
Still can't believe that Brown
didn't pull it off.

Also equated in the drama
was Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands,
who was sitting in third place
until Cuba's Alexis Copello
emerged from fifth to snatch
the bronze medal. The Olympic
bronze medallist had to cele-
brate his 27th birthday with
fourth place. He also served
some jail time as he and Copel-
lo were taken into custody and
questioned for at least 11 hours
over a bottle throwing scuffle at
a nightclub on the eve of the
closing of the championships.

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JAMAICA'S
Usain Bolt
poses beside
the indicating
board after
setting a new
Men's 100m
World Record
in Berlin on

| August 16.

Sands adamantly stated that he
and hurdler Shamar Sands were
only there to give evidence
when they were taken in with
high jumper Donald Thomas,
an American and two Cubans,
including Copello.

Apparently, it was a situa-
tion that really put a damper
on the Bahamian team.
Nobody expected to hear any
such report of Bahamians being
taken into custody, especially
in such a foreign nation.

We just thank God that all
is well that ends well. No
charges were levied against any
of the athletes — yet — although
an investigation was expected
to be carried out this week.
We're keeping our fingers
crossed that there will be no
further action taken against any
of the athletes.

Despite the fact that all three
Bahamians involved had some
heart-breaking performances,
they performed as best as they
could under the circumstances.
The championships were
extremely competitive this year.

And based on the four dis-
qualifications that the team
experienced — Michael Math-
ieu and Christine Amertil in
the 400 and both the men and
women 4 x 400 relay teams — it
was a clear indication that the
officials was not taking anything
for granted.

Bahamas team officials were
kept quite busy dealing with
the disqualifications and even
trying to get Osbourne Moxey
inserted into the men's long
jump, but to no avail. They
exhausted every avenue of
appeal and nothing changed.

As team manager Ralph
McKinney noted: "The little
things we take for granted, they
were not tolerating over there."
If anybody should know, it's
McKinney. He serves as the
president of the Bahamas Asso-
ciation of Certified Officials,
the organization in charge of
officiating at our local track and
field meets.

The performances at the
championships should also
serve as an impetus for our
future stars as it gives them an
indication just exactly where
they could be, if they dedicate
themselves to putting in the
time to properly prepare.

The future will only get
brighter for track and field in
the Bahamas.

ran

Bain targets October 15
for return to full training

FROM page 15

shortly before the 2009 season began in leading to a series of dis-
appointing performances.

His personal best for the season was a time of 46.02s in a June 27
run in New Providence.

“T will resume full training October 15th,” Bain said, “I am
hoping to be back to 100 percent as soon as possible now that I can
start treatment on the root cause of my injuries. So, by the official
start of training I should be back fully healthy.”

After leaving Berlin to see a series of specialists, Bain said the
root cause of the injury was discovered, allowing him to establish
a strict rehab regime and schedule a timetable for a return to
competition.

“T strained my right oblique which was causing severe tight-
ness in my right gluteus and hamstring, so they found that is what
was continuously causing the problem,” he said, “But I should be
ready and I will run indoors again this upcoming year so the
indoor season will be my comeback.”

Bain, the NCAA 2008 Indoor and Outdoor champion during his
senior season at Oral Roberts University, who has enjoyed a vir-
tually injury free career thus far said his first major setback has
taught him several valuable lessons applicable to life on and off the
track.

“T think this has definitely made me hungrier. I have learned and
matured a lot. I am a better person, and athlete because of it,” he
said, “The injury, it was a reality check. That is why I am constantly
thanking God that I was able to complete my Master's Degree in
Business, because one injury can end season, and in some cases a
career. But I'm trusting 2010 will be a great year for the Bahami-
an Dream”

Bain expressed regret at the unfortunate disqualification of his
fellow 4x400m teammates in Berlin. The event compounded the
effects of a major injury.

“IT was motivated long before the DQ. My motivation came
after the injury ended my season prematurely and without me
achieving any of my goals,” he said, “But it definitely adds to it and
we all will come back hungrier and more determined when we have
the opportunity.”

Move to boost softball profile
FROM page 15

"The BSF will be experiencing a very busy season in the
upcoming months and it is an exciting time for the players, fans
and we in the administration.

“We begin with the National Slow Pitch Championships set
for Grand Bahama either the first weekend in October or for
the Discovery Day weekend for those islands that play slow
pitch in various categories men's, ladies and co-eds.

“The next event on the calendar will be the Austin
"Kingsnake" Knowles tournament for senior boys and girls dur-
ing the mid term break for local schools,” he said, "This tourna-
ment is of the utmost importance to the BSF because it high-
lights the future talent of the country in a competitive format
and assist the overall development of the game while providing
an opportunity for young athletes to showcase their talents.
Long Island has been a dominant factor in these champ over the
last few years, however, Eleuthera made their presence felt win-
ning both titles last year and promises to return to defend their
titles. The following weekend, October 29th- Nov. will be the
CAST tournament, an international venture for the BSF. We
already have confirmation from the Cayman Islands, Belize,
Jamaica, Turks and Caicos, Bermuda, USVI and have also
began talks with teams from Israel and England which have
expressed interest.

“Following that will be the National Round Robin Champi-
onship where champions of member associations will descend
upon New Providence vying for a national crown.”

Dorsett said the year will conclude with an appearance at the
ISF Congress which should have a direct impact on the
Bahamas and its stake in regional softball.

"We will then take part in the ISF Congress. This edition will
be held in Venezuela with more than 110 countries taking place.
This is an election year for the ISF and in addition an additional
VP post will be added for the English speaking Caribbean," he
said, "The ISF has stated they will realign and the Bahamas will
be placed in the Americas region, thus creating the necessity for
the post.

“The IFS has also confirmed that the CAC Games will be
held in Puerto Rico in July of 2010. The men's national team
will have at least two trips of very important tournaments we
need to take part in.”

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
15

THE TRIBUNE PAGE

S | | S
k

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27,

Bain eyes Oct tu
retuen to training

Quarter-miler
in rehab over
injured
hamstring

by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net



2009

Move to

boost
softball
protile

by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

TE
C















The Bahamas Softball
Federation looks to begin
implementation of its short
term and long term goals to
benefit the future of the
local game and strengthen
its profile on the interna-
tional stage.

The BSF is preparing for
the fall section of its calen-
dar year in what federation
executives call the "busy
season."

The most pressing mat-
ter on the upcoming calen-
dar is the selection of both
Men's and Ladies National
teams to represent the
country at the upcoming
CAST tournament, sched-
uled for October 29th to
November 1st here in the
capital.

Burket Dorsett, BSF
President, outlined the
highlights of the upcoming
calendar for the Federation
which features several local
and regional tournaments
and concludes with an
appearance at the Interna-

After suffering a major setback
in his 2009 season on the pro cir-
cuit, one of the country’s premier
quarter milers is currently in rehab
and has been given a timetable for
his return to the track.

After undergoing a battery of
tests to treat his injured hamstring,
Andretti “The Bahamian Dream”
Bain is scheduled to resume full
training on October 15.

Bain was forced to withdraw
from the 12th IAAF World Cham-
pionships in Germany earlier this
month when at training camp he
re-aggravated the season long ham-
string injury which first sidelined

: : him in April.
tional Softball Federation Bain first injured the hamstring
Congress.
SEE page 14 SEE page 14



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TRI ER
eee
Te
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By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

The Bahamas is the
last major international
financial centre in the
Western Hemisphere on
the G-20/OECD ‘grey
list’ of nations, some-
thing that a Bahamian
attorney yesterday said
could damage this
nation’s competitiveness
by creating the percep-
tion it was lagging its
rivals.

Ryan Pinder, the
Bahamas-based attorney
and representative for
US law firm, Becker
Poliakoff, said the effec-
tiveness of the Govern-
ment’s recent statement
announcing that it
would meet the OECD’s
target of having 12 Tax
Information Exchange
Agreements (TIEAs) in
place by 2009 year-end,
and identifying the
nations it was negotiat-
ing with, was “being
diminished” by the
apparent failure to make
concrete progress.

While the Bahamas
to-date still has a soli-
tary TIEA with the US
that it signed back in
2002, all three of the
Cayman Islands, the
British Virgin Islands
and Bermuda are now
sitting on the G-
20/OECD so-called
‘white list’, having met
the standards on tax
transparency and infor-
mation exchange.

The Bahamas, though,
is still on the ‘grey’ list
of countries that had
committed to meeting
these standards but have
yet to do so. It also has
fewer TIEAs than the
likes of Antigua & Bar-
buda and the Nether-
lands Antilles, which
both have seven, Liecht-
enstein and Monaco,
which have three and
four respectively, and
market leaders like Sin-
gapore and Switzerland,
which have five and
three TIEAs in place.

Mr Pinder told Tri-
bune Business that while

SEE page 9B



You'll find it all at Palm Cay



THE TRIBUNE

T Hou R SA Y.

isine



AUGUST 27,



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Project awaits extra
$362m investmen

Mi Baker's Bay developers invest $203m to date, with $26m spent with
Bahamian firms and Treasury receiving $23m
BB One of few resort projects to progress has $4.8m staff payroll, and ‘in
excess’ of $6m per annum contractor wages, with Government to receive
further $315m in taxes over next 10 years
MW ‘Two major milestones’ passed on marina and golf course

J Some 70-80 lot sales ‘in various stages of closing’, with developers
hoping to start custom homes construction in next six to 12 months

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Investors behind a major
Bahamas-based mixed-use
resort project yesterday said
they anticipate investing a
further $362 million in the
development, having sunk
$203 million into the ground
to date, having achieved
“two big milestones” by
opening the 165-slip marina
and grassing much of the
golf course.

Dr Livingstone Marshall,
senior vice-president of
environmental and commu-
nity affairs for the Abaco-
based Baker’s Bay Golf &
Ocean Club, told Tribune

Business that to date the
project’s developers, Ari-
zona-based Discovery Land
Company, had spent $26
million with Bahamian-
owned and associated com-
panies, chiefly vendors and
contractors.

Adding that “a significant
portion of that ended up in
the local Abaco communi-
ty”, Dr Marshall said Bak-
er’s Bay, which currently
employs 135 persons, had an
annual payroll of $4.8 mil-
lion, some 90 per cent of
which went to Bahamians.

That was separate from
the payroll of contractors
hired to work on the projec-

Casino’s loss rises
157% to hit $401,000

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Freeport’s sole casino
operator yesterday con-
firmed it will pull out of the
Bahamas “no later than
October 31” this year, as the
property’s fiscal 2010 first
quarter operating loss more
than doubled to $401,000.

Unveiling its results for
the three months to July 26,
2009, Isle of Capri revealed
that the net operating loss
it had suffered from running
Our Lucaya’s casino had
increased by 157 per cent
compared to the $156,000
loss sustained during the
comparative period during

The increased net operat-
ing loss was incurred as the
Isle-Lucaya casino also
experienced a 40.3 per cent
decline in year-over-year
revenues, which for the 2010
first quarter fell to $2.134
million compared to $3.573
million the year before.

The reasons for Isle of
Capri to terminate its lease
with Our Lucaya, thus end-

SEE page 7B

SM Me Eat ae
* Private membertip to Governces Club

eek deena ee et | HEIL

ee Lelia a

tJ
as RE bi eh be that a)

ce

Pst eee ee sD eer

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NASSAU # FAHAMAS

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WW, PAL MCAS OM



Isle of Capri
confirms
Freeport

pull-out no
later than

October 31,

2009

t’s construction, which
“exceeds $6 million” per
annum, some 75-80 per cent
of which went into Bahami-
an hands. Baker’s Bay’s con-
tractors had another 170
employees on-site.

Baker’s Bay’s developers
had also paid $23 million to
the Government to date in
the form of transfer taxes,
Stamp Tax, import duties
and real property taxes, and
Dr Marshall added: “Over
the next 10 years, we esti-
mate we will pay in excess of
$315 million to the Treasury.

“To date, we estimate

SEE page 10B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be. held
responsible for errors and/or omission |
from the daily report,



Money Safe.
Money Fast.

MoneyGram.

iideriatiota! Maeney Trane fer

© Bank of The Bahamas

[HS TERNATIOANAL

Online at
BankBahamasOnline.com



Benchmark’s $3m

property eyes
70-80% occupancy
before finish

* Carmichael project on target for December
completion, with $1.3m invested to date

* Company suffers $904,654 or $0.18 per share
loss for half-year

* Alliance sees 10% assets under administration
growth in Q2, with total level now standing at
$200m

* BISX-listed entity hoping for stock market
turnaround in 2009 fourth quarter, as it sees
price stabilisation signs

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Benchmark (Bahamas) yes-
terday said based on the “very
strong” inquiries it continued to
receive from potential tenants
that it expected to have 70-80
per cent of its Carmichael Road
commercial centre leased by the
time the building was construct-
ed in December 2009, despite

SEE page 8B er BROWN

Courier firms are
still ‘unprofitable’

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net



BAHAMIAN courier companies are continuing to feel the
financial squeeze from new import procedures, the president of
GWS Worldwide Express said yesterday, despite the Customs
Comptroller’s argument that steps made to alleviate pressures on
freight forwarders have been working.

Walt Saunders, who is president of the Bahamas Courier Asso-
ciation, said all courier companies have suffered a downturn in busi-
ness since the implementation of the C-13 Customs clearing pro-
cedure. Mr Saunders said the new procedure continues to deter
business due to the high brokerage fees involved, which the couri-
ers must pass on to customers.

Those same fees caused business for couriers in Grand Bahama
to decline so substantially over the past three months, that the
Comptroller, Glen Gomez, was forced to rescind the new cus-

SEE page 14B

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eisha Wemyss,
the 34 year old
daughter of

former Inspector of
Police and now
President & CEO of
WemCo Security Mr.
Henry and Mrs. Judy
Wemyss graduated |
MagnaCum Laudeand_|
a member of the Sigma
Beta Delta Honours ~
Society at DeVry
University on 18 July
in Miramar, Florida.

Ms. Wemyss received a
Bachelor of Science in

Business Administration

Accounting Concentration.

“T am proud of my

accomplishments. [I am

grateful to my parents and

to the company to afford

me this opportunity. I hope

that my eventual full return

to WemCo will strengthen

the company’s manage-

ment structure as we con-

tinue to serve the Bahamian

public as the best security

company in the country bar

none”- Keisha Wemyss

“T believe that it is important for our
company and our family to ensure that the
next generation of leadership is strong.
I congratulate Keisha on this wonderful
accomplishment.”

Ms. Wemyss, who is the Vice President for
Finance and Security for WemCo, took a
leave of absence to further her studies. She
completed two years of requirements in a
year, and while enrolled she was a Deanfs
List student through the entire time at Devry
University. She was chosen Graduate speaker
representing both Undergraduates at DeVry
University and Keller Graduate School
of Management for graduation this year.

Keisha is currently continuing — her
studies in the fall at Keller Graduate
School of Management where she is
reading for a double Masters Degree in
Finance and Accounting preparing to take
the Certified Public Accountant’s exam
over the next year. She will also start her
studies in the field of ‘Project Management

While pursuing her studies, she was also
i i Mix’, which is also offered at Keller.

actively communicating and involved in the
day to day running of her portfolio at
WemCo Security. “It was like she never left
her chair’, said Mr. Wemyss.

Ms. Wemyss is an award winning former
officer of the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force.

DEVELOPMENT FOR SALE

MARINA & SEAFOOD PROCESSING PLANT
ALLIGATOR BAY, NORTH LONG ISLAND

Approx. 6 acres of Waterfront property with a 152 feet wide canal. Prop-
erty comprises three buildings:

Building A: Seafood Processing Plant include a reception area, an
office, three bathrooms, a receiving room, a dressing room, a packing
room, a storage room, a laboratory and a processing room, (8) 10 ft
x 30 ft blast freezers, and (1) 15ft x 15 ft and (1) 10 ft x15 ft holding
freezers.

Building B: Generator House

Building C: The Water Plant consists of a reverse osmosis water
system that converts salt water into drinking water with a 10,000 stor-
age capacity.

Interested persons should submit offers to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management,
P. O. Box N-7518,
Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us on or before October 2nd , 2009

For further information, please contact us at 502-0929,
356-1685 or 356-1608

PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Businesses urged
to mobilise for
the crime fight

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tripunemedia.net

THE BAHAMAS Cham-
ber of Commerce’s presi-
dent yesterday appealed to
the business community to
mobilise on issues of violent
crime in the Bahamas, and
to invest in education to mit-
igate the problem.

Khaalis Rolle said the
business community,
churches and civic groups
have to stop relying on gov-
ernment for crime manage-
ment, and the education and
social development of
Bahamian youth,and begin
to duly invest in those areas
themselves.

Mr Rolle argued that if
these entities invest in the
early educational develop-
ment and socialisation of
Bahamian youth, instances
of violent crime can be
curbed within the next gen-
eration.

He said that though edu-
cation was not the only
ingredient, there was a
strong correlation with
crime levels.

“It is poor education and
poor socialisation,” said Mr
Rolle. “Our mindset has
been degraded to the point
where it is just as easy to kill
someone now, as it was in
the past to hit them with a
bottle or a bat.

“There is easy access to
guns, and the mindset that
they have developed over
the past decade is they don’t
think twice about killing.
The lack of exposure and
lack of knowledge leads to

Gea a a

lack of compassion, and that
leads to far more violent
crimes than we have ever
seen.”

Mr Rolle cited the latest,
senseless killing of a woman
robbed while on her job asa
need for businesses and
business people to organise
and begin dialogue on the
way forward.

“This is not a government
problem. No part of society
is isolated or insulated from
it,” he said.

“Every stakeholder needs
to address it.

“The business communi-
ty has to mobilise, as well as
churches and civil society.
Parents have to take own-
ership for their children, and
the underlying pathology of
the problem has to be
addressed.”

Mr Rolle said that if his
platform for educational and
social reform for the youth



was the only thing brought
to fruition at the culmina-
tion of his term as Chamber
president, “I would have
been successful.”

“You have to start some-
where and you have to start
with a message. People have
to recognise that message
and subscribe to it,” said Mr
Rolle.

“It is a major issue. and at
the surface I would say the
issue is insurmountable.
You're dealing with chang-
ing the DNA of people.”

Mr Rolle said there need-
ed to be more social activism
and community involve-
ment, citing Cynthia ‘Moth-
er’ Pratt as a model for
social reform at a commu-
nity and national level.

“We need to refocus our
efforts on our entire exis-
tence, or we're not going to
have the kind of country we
envision,” said Mr Rolle.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 3B



Bahamas urged to grow
Pageant ‘seed’ into fruit

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce’s executive
director yesterday said the
exposure from the Miss Uni-
verse Pageant could open
up the Bahamas island chain
to diversification in the
tourism sector.

Philip Simon said many
intangibles came out of the
Miss Universe Pageant,
including a renewed sense
of national pride. Those
intangible exposures are
what the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation and
Atlantis have touted since
the announcement of the
Bahamas as the host country
for the annual Pageant, seen
in over 150 countries.

“T can imagine that the
impact of Miss Universe is
like a seed that has just been
planted, which we will have
to water to help it grow over
time and become a great
fruit-bearing asset over
time,” said Mr Simon.

He added that the images
of sites throughout the
Bahamas showed viewers
what has been right in front
of our eyes, but which we
have not paid much atten-
tion to.

He said the world, in a
two-hour television produc-
tion, experienced a culture
that was brand new to them,
but something that can be
scripted as eloquently as it
was last Sunday in order to
change the facade of this
country’s tourism product.

RT

Mr Simon argued that
Sunday night’s worldwide
broadcast changed the defi-
nition of tourism for the
Bahamas, and reasserted its
potential.

Response

Local response to the
scenes shot by the Miss Uni-
verse contingent has been
overwhelming. Many indi-
viduals agreed that the
Bahamas had never been
depicted so beautifully
before, and praised the



pageant’s production team.

Mr Simon said the wider
business community should
embrace the potential for
the expansion of the tourism
industry that this vast expo-
sure could bring to these
islands.

“There has to be encour-
agment on behalf of the pol-
icymakers to include quality
ideas and products,” he
said.

Mr Simon added that
entrepreneurship can be gar-
nished from the opportuni-
ties the Miss Universe

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Pageant created.

He lauded Atlantis’s par-
ticipation in hosting the
event, and suggested the
exposure for the resort itself
has been phenomenal.

However, Mr Simon said
the opportunities for small-
er Family Island hotels can-
not be understated as many
of the 84 pageant contes-
tants, through direction from
the Ministry of Tourism, vis-
ited several different islands
during their three-week stay
in the Bahamas.

Mr Simon said personal
destination choices can be
found throughout the islands
of the Bahamas.

“Visitors will be more so
appreciative of the smaller
facilities that are uniquely
Bahamian,” he said. “Going
to a large resort could be
just as good as sitting under
a Dilly tree listeing to folk-
lore.”

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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





New consultancy says
erowth prospects exis

A newly-formed Bahami-
an business consultancy yes-
terday said there were still
profit and growth opportu-
nities in many economic sec-
tors despite the recession.

“The world didn’t come
to an end when the econo-
my took a nosedive. There
are still opportunities for
growth in many sectors.

Smart companies just need
to know where to look,” said
Debra Cartwright, president
of Business Works, a newly-
formed consulting firm
offering strategic planning
services to small and medi-
um-sized companies.
Calling for businesses to
undertake disciplined and
focused planning, she added:

“When we prepare a busi-
ness plan, it is more than just
a lot of numbers and words
on paper.

Succeed
“Businesses succeed

because of the proper exe-
cution of ideas, so we take














ADVANCED FAMILY MEDICINE CENTER & MEDISPA
#145 Shir i {* PO. Box £ on.

Tel: 326-1111 «

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~ Summer Campaign

Take advantage of the summer break
and get your physical done Today!

This summer before school starts, annual physicals
are one of the most important things on your “To Do List",

E- (6236 « Nassau, Bahamas
Fax 326-1112

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Family Medicine & Skin Care Clinic Mon - Sat 9-6

POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR
AUDIT MANAGER

PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancy in its Nassau and Freeport Offices for
Audit Managers whose qualifications make the individuals eligible for membership in
the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants. Prospective candidates should
be employed in public accounting and have at least one (1) year of
experience at the Assistant Manager/Manager level in managing a portfolio of
diverse client engagements. Candidates are also required to have a high level of
computer literacy.

The position offers challenging work in the financial services industry and
other areas of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which recognizes different
levels of experience and skill, is designed to reward high performance.
In addition, the Firm provides excellent medical insurance and provident fund benefits.

Please submit an application letter with your Curriculum Vitae to:

Human Resources Partner
“Audit Manager Position
PricewaterhouseCoopers

P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.coh.edu.ds

STAFF VACANCY

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the following
position:

Assistant Director — Utilities, AD-I, who will be responsible for the man-
agement, direction and coordination of the activities, operations and main-
tenance of the Physical Plant Utility Systems and the trades of plumbing,
electnician, and air conditioning at all campuses of The College of The
Bahamas. The successful applicant must be able to prioritize and perform
under pressure in both a customer contact and administrative capacity.
Outstanding human resource management skills are necessary.

Specific duties and responsibilities include, but are not limited to, manag-
ing, directing and coordinating the activities, operations and maintenance
of the Physical Plant buildings and grounds and establishing preventative,
predictive and replacement maintenance programmes of campus equip-
ment including the vehicle fleet of The College.

Applicants should possess a Bachelor's Degree in mechanical (preferred)
or electrical engineering and a minimum of five (5) years’ professional
experience directly related to the physical plant management of utility sys-
tems or an equivalent combination of education, training and experience,
with considerable Knowledge of physical plant management, personnel
management, safety and budgetary practices. For a detailed job descrip-
hon, visit www.cob.edubs/hrapply. Interested candidates should submut a
detailed resume and cover letter of interest no later than Wednesday,

September 2, 2009 to: The Director, Human Resources, The College of

The Bahamas, P.O.Box N-4912, Nassau, Bahamas or hrapply @ cob.edu.bs.

our clients through the rig-
orous process of under-
standing all aspects of their
business - from marketing
to financial to operations.

“They need to realize how
everything is interconnect-
ed, and that that all deci-
sions flow from a clear
insight into the marketing
need they are seeking to ful-
fill.

“There are young compa-
nies out there experiencing
real growth in their rev-
enues, and many of these
owners have very little idea
of how to profitably man-
age that growth. Question-
able decisions in hiring,
inventory management,
profit-taking, accounting

practices, and in other key
business areas are stalling
the growth potential of
many of these businesses.”
BusinessWorks offers
various business consulting
services, including Entre-
preneurs Bootcamp, Brain-
storming Business Opportu-
nities, and Business Check-
up. The Business Check-up
is an analysis of critical
aspects of a business — plan-
ning, financial, marketing,
operations and human
resources. At the end of the
Business Check-Up the
company receives a report
highlighting areas requiring
attention, and a written sum-
mary outlining steps to
improve their success.

ENERGY SAVING
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For more information or survey

Email: energysavingsconsultants @ hotmail.com

Contact 326-6121

eee v ea

Sheraton
to host
major

convention

The 694-room Sheraton
Nassau Beach Resort will
host this year’s Luxury
Meetings Summit, focusing
on the luxury group meet-
ings business throughout the
Caribbean.

The summit, taking place
from October 24-27, 2009,
will give over 70 qualified
meeting planners the chance
to learn about 50 different
luxury Caribbean hotels
from hoteliers and destina-
tion suppliers.

Planners will have the
chance to attend one-on-one
meetings with up to 22 dif-
ferent properties, attend
educational sessions, and
conduct site inspections,
which will help them gain
new ideas and foster new
relationships, leading to bet-
ter business and meetings.

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invites qualified applicants to apply for the
position of Technician | (Instrument), responsible for conducting calibrations, repairs, routine
checks and tests control instrumentation in its Generation Power Plant.

The successtul candidate 1s expected to lead instrument technicians m fault finding,
Iroubleshooting and repairs on instrument and control system.

Duties and tasks are as follows:

* Directs instrument technicians when required
Assist with the writing of procedures,
Prepares reports on failures and repairs,
Maintain historical records.
Analyze and calibrates control systems.
Plans jobs and secures necessary tools and equipment.
Calibrates electronic & pneumatic instruments,
Troubleshoot and mstall instrument and control system problems.
Repairs pneumatic and electronic instruments.
Trains subordinates in instrument repairs.
Capable of working from manufactures blueprints or sketches with limited supervision.
Responsible for safety and training of men working with him.
Perform any other tasks as assigned

Applicants must have a High School Diploma, BGCSE passes of C or better in Math, English
and a Technological Certificate in Electronics or its equivalent from an accredited institution.
Applicants must also have a minimum of five (5) years power station or equivalent industrial
experience or three (3) years ata Technician Il level in the Maintenance Department of an
industrial facility.

Applications with supporting documentation including a clean Police Certificate and proof of
Bahamian citizenship should be sent to:-

WTO etch ok

At
LIMITED

Ue ee
@

GRAND GAHAMA POWER COMPANY

Fiptnes ead Ried) Aacier Figg

Freeport, Grand Bahama

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

ing its involvement in the
Bahamian gaming market,
would thus appear relative-
ly obvious.

James B. Perry, Isle of
Capri’s chairman and chief
executive, said in a state-
ment yesterday: “We remain
on track to exit our interna-
tional operations in the near
term, as we will exit the
Bahamas no later than
October 31.”

This corresponds to Vin-
cent Vanderpool-Wallace,
the minister of tourism and
aviation, previously telling
Tribune Business that Octo-
ber 31 was a “drop dead
date” for finding and
installing a replacement for
Isle of Capri in Freeport.

He said then that the
Government was in the
process of informing Isle of
Capri and all the other bid-
ders that it had identified a
preferred candidate to
replace the company as the
casino operator, with the
hand over set to take place
within the next 60 days if all
went well.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
added: “We are likely to
find ourselves, in the next
60 days, handing over to a
new casino operator provid-
ed they meet the require-
ments of licensing and the
Gaming Board.”

Finding a replacement for
Isle of Capri will potentially
safeguard some 234 jobs at
the casino, with the Gov-
ernment having delivered on
the first part of its agree-
ment with Isle of Capri.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said the Government had to
inform the existing operator
that it had identified its

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 7B

Casino’s loss rises
157% to hit $401,000

Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace

replacement by August 31,
2009, and having now done
so Isle of Capri “will remain
in place until the end of
October”, when the licens-
ing process and transi-
tion/handover are scheduled
to be completed.

Shortlist

The minister told Tribune
Business that the winning
operator was selected from a
shortlist of four that the
Government “thought
would be appropriate for
what we are trying to do”
with the casino and the
Grand Bahama tourism
product in general. Smaller
casino operators, he said,
were rejected because they
did not bring the synergies,
scale, brand name and mar-
keting reach sought.

When asked whether it
was a major casino brand,
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
hinted that the deal could
be broader than just the
casino operations.

Although he gave no
explicit details, his com-
ments left open the possibil-

“We are likely to
find ourselves, in
the next 60 days,
handing over to a
new casino
operator
provided they
meet the
requirements of
licensing and the
Gaming Board.”

ity that the new operator
might also brand the Our
Lucaya hotel, possibly even
taking over its manage-
ment/operations. Given that
the property has not been
profitable for owner Hutchi-
son Whampoa, a purchase
of the hotel may not even
be out of the question.

“The answer is maybe,”
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace,
when asked whether it was a
major brand lined up to
replace Isle of Capri.

“That is the best way to
put it.

“It really depends entirely
on how much of the opera-
tions they will get involved
in.

“One of the great impedi-
ments in Grand Bahama has
been the separation of the
hotel operations and the
casino operations, and we
are seeking to integrate that.
It is the degree to which all
parties integrate that will
determine whether it is seen
as a major brand.

“We've never seen a suc-
cessful casino operation
unless it is integrated with
the hotel.”

PRICEVWATERHOUSE(COPERS

POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR
SENIOR ASSOCIATES

PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancies for qualified accountants whose
qualifications make them eligible for membership in the Bahamas Institute of
Chartered Accountants. Prospective candidates should have at least three (3)
recent years of public accounting and auditing experience and _ be
computer literate.

The positions offer challenging work in the financial services industry and
other areas of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which recognizes
different levels of experience and skill, is designed to reward high performance.
In addition, the Firm provides excellent medical insurance and provident fund
benefits.

Please submit an application letter with your Curriculum Vitae to:

Human Resources Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas

NOTICE
CENSUS PRE-TEST

The Census Office of the Department of Statistics will conduct a Pre-Census Test
beginning Monday, August 17 — Sunday, August 30, 2009, in New Providence
and Grand Bahama. The Pre-test is an integral part of the Census of Population
and Housing which takes place in May 2010.

The main focus of this exercise is to test the questionnaire for Census 2010 in
terms of relevancy, as it relates to the census questions, average length of time
it takes to complete the questionnaire, weaknesses in the questions, instructions
or the design of the questionnaire, etc. To this end, enumerators with official
identification will visit households in New Providence and Grand Bahama in
order to collect information on households and individuals. The Census Pre-test
requires that the public provide information on the following:

Housing Characteristics such as type of dwelling, year the dwelling was built,
main source of water supply, number of bedrooms, etc

Population Characteristics which include information on age, sex, marital status,
health, disability, education, income, etc.

The data generated from the Pre-test will be held in strictest confidence.
All persons are urged to co-operate in this very important national exercise.


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Benchmark’s $3m property eyes
70-80% occupancy before finish

FROM page 1B

the company suffering a net
$904,654 loss for this year’s
first half.

Blaming the $1.109 million
decline in the total unrealised
value of its equities portfolio
for much of the $0.18 per
share loss during the six
months to June 30, 2009,
Julian Brown, Benchmark
(Bahamas) president, said the
BISX-listed company was see-
ing signs of price stabilisation
that might indicate the
Bahamian stock market was
poised for some recovery in
the fourth quarter.

He added that the
Carmichael Road project,
Benchmark (Bahamas) first
real estate investment project,
was “going to be a very good
contributor to normalising
and smoothing out earnings”
fluctuations caused by price
volatility in the Bahamian
stock market.

“We will not have the gyra-
tions in earnings we have suf-
fered in the past because the
revenue streams coming from
Carmichael Road are going
to have quite an impact on
the overall profit of Bench-
mark,” said Mr Brown,







“It’s looking very good, and
I'm very confident we’re going
to get 70 per cent of the space
leased before the half-year

mark.”



explaining the rationale for
the company’s move into real
estate via its Benchmark
properties subsidiary.

The 15,000 square feet
commercial centre, located at
the Carmichael and Fire Trail
Roads intersection, has
already secured a 5,000 square
foot anchor tenant in the
shape of a Bank of the
Bahamas International
branch, with another compa-
ny - who Mr Brown decline
to name - said to be interested
in leasing a further 2,000
square feet.

“If we go out with just
Bank of the Bahamas, that
5,000 square feet alone is suf-
ficient to service the debt and
leave a little on the table in
terms of bottom line impact
and free cash flow,” Mr

DATA ENTRY CLERK & CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE






We require an experienced individual to fill the position of Data
Entry Clerk and Customer Service Representative for a Leading
General Insurance Company in the Cartbbean. Reporting to the
Country Manager, the successful candidate will be primarily
responsible for data entry and communicating with the Company's
Agents, ensuring that service standards are met,

Qualification & Experience:

Bachelors Degree in Business Administration [position more

suitable to a recent graduate]

Enrolment in a General Insurance Programme through either
the Chartered Insurance Institute or the Insurance Institute of

Canada

Minimum of six (6) BOCSE subjects
Minimum of two (2) years experience in the General Insurance
Industry in Customer Service or Underwriting

Nia LER MUI a

© The ability to work on own initiative and communicate
effectively in oral and written form.
The ability to deal with Agents courteously and professionally,
Computer skills (that 1s competence in the use of word
processing and spreadsheet software programmes and the
ability to leam and function effectively using the Company's

General Insurance Application)

Interested persons should send a detailed resume
accompanied by 4 letter of application to:

Data Entry Clerk & Customer Service Representative
P.O. Box §5-19023

Nassau, Hahamas

Or email to:
csands(@icwi.com

The closing date for all applications is
31" August, 2009
Only short-listed candidates will be contacted

Jt JOSE CARTELLONE

Coc

CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES S.A.

Julian Brown

Brown told Tribune Business.

“It’s looking very good, and
I’m very confident we’re
going to get 70 per cent of the
space leased before the half-
year mark.

:We’ve had very good
inquiries from companies, and
we are very pleased with the
interest that we’ve seen so far.
I don’t believe we’re going to
have any difficulty in getting it
leased..”

The Benchmark (Bahamas)
chief executive added: “We
have in principle an agree-
ment with another company
to take 2,000 square feet, and
have been working with them
for the last two months.

“Based on inquiries, we
probably have 5,000 square
feet left. We’ve had a num-
ber of inquiries before we
even got started on the space.
If we mark it by inquiries,
we’re going to have 70-80 per
cent leased by the time we’re
done on construction.”

Bank of the Bahamas Inter-

Sd DOCTORS HOSPITAL

| Collections

Education:

national is set to have its own
exclusive 5,000 square foot
building in the commercial
centre, which has a $3 million
price tag attached to its con-
struction.

Mr Brown said Benchmark
(Bahamas) had invested some
$1.3 million into the project
to date, some $500,000 hav-
ing gone on the initial land
acquisition, with a further
$800,000 spent on vertical
construction costs.

“We’ve done all that on our
own,” he added,” and are
beginning to finance the bal-
ance of it. We’re about half-
way through in terms of con-
struction. We’re actually pret-
ty much on schedule and are
getting ready to put the roof
on. It’s scheduled to be com-
pleted in December, and I
suppose we’re two weeks
here, two weeks there, either
side of the deadline.”

Mr Brown said _ the
Carmichael area’s demo-
graphics, and being the loca-
tion with the fastest popula-
tion growth on New Provi-
dence, were driving interest
in Benchmark (Bahamas)
development despite the
recession.

Businesses and entrepre-
neurs, he added, were look-
ing into the future and decid-
ing to base themselves in the
Carmichael area.

For the six months to June
30, 2009, the only real posi-
tive for Benchmark
(Bahamas) in terms of its

Health For Life

Officer

Associate Degree in Business or Management, or its equivalent.

Experience:

Previous collections experience at least 2 years. Well organized and
experience with portfolio management. An understanding of insurance

verification and requirements,

Qualifications:
* Basic computer skills
* Leadership skills Required.

* Excellent written and oral communication skills.
* Ability to apply skills with all levels of internal and external customers.

This includes, but is not limited to:

* Medical staff

* Patients & families

¢ Clinical personal

¢ Support and technical staff

* Outside agencies

¢ And members of the community

Position Summary:

To monitor and manage receivables under your portfolio. To monitor
self-pay admissions to the hospital. Follow-up on delinquent accounts as
needed. Communicate with internal & external customers on a regular basis.
Answer patient/customer queries in an informed manner. Continuously
participate in performance improvement to enhance service to our
customers throughout the Health System. Any other duties assigned by the
Supervisor or Coordinator of Credit and Collections Department.

Ace eM RU ACOA UNCON cel ace Der] tern lee
Doctors Hospital | P.O. Box N-3018 | Nassau, Bahamas
nwatkins@doctorshosp.com or Fax: 242-302-4738

COMPLETION OF NEW PROVIDENCE ROAD
IMPROVEMENT PROJECT

CLOSURE OF VISTA MARINA ACCESS
Effective 23 August 2009 the Vista Marina Access, just west of the Shell Service Station
will be closed to implement the works on Corridor 18.

Motorists travelling from West Bay

Street may
Subdivisian West

accesa
through Grove

The Grove

Avenue travelling southbound and
through Marine Drive and Poinsettia
Avenue travelling northbound.

Sorry for any inconvenience caused

and we look

forward ta

the

cooperation of the motoring public.

Quenes?’ Contact us at (242) 322-
BS41 / (242) 322-2610 Mondays to
Fridays, from 8:00 am to 06:00 pm
Email:joocneighboursigcartellane, com, ar

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

2

Kioz =}
NUABERY || =
PRESCHOOL]
|
FE

MARU ney He
= = a

if-

== eon on |

BAUNMCER i
BEACH '
==PEHeLL fF
SERVICE
STATION
ROAD TO
BE CLOSED |

financial results was the posi-
tive $204,024 in net invest-
ment income earned.

The net movement in the
unrealised value of its equi-
ties portfolio produced a
$737,136 loss, while the com-
pany’s three subsidiaries -
Benchmark Advisors, Bench-
mark Properties and Alliance
Investment Management gen-
erated half-year losses of
$12,510, $350 and $154,658
respectively.

Mr Brown said Benchmark
(Bahamas) management and
Board were “not really” con-
cerned about the company
falling into possible negative
equity, given that total equity
had stood at $500,000 at year-
end 2008 and further losses
had been incurred since then.

“We think we’re in good
shape, but are keeping an eye
on that number and certainly
have plans in place to deal
with situations like that,” Mr









Brown said of the equity posi-
tion. As it relates to the com-
pany, I don’t think we have a
need for major concern,
because the underlying fun-
damentals are solid and we
had no debt on the books at
the end of last year, although
we will have a small amount
to draw down to complete the
building on Carmichael.

“Overall, we think we’re in
a good position, and if we
need to respond I don’t think
it will be too difficult to
achieve at this point in time.”

Mr Brown said Alliance,
the company’s international
broker/dealer subsidiary, had
seen its assets under adminis-
tration grow by 10 per cent in
the 2009 second quarter, and
new business and clients con-
tinued to come in.

It had expanded, he said,
from $20 million to some $200
million in client assets under
administration.

Wayne R. Munroe






is pleased to announce

the opening of the firm

of

Munroe W) Associ ates

—$< rs

=

Counsel and Atborneys-at-Law
« Nogaries Pohlie »

CHAMBERS:

4th Floor, Gold Circle House * East Bay Street

BO, Bow N-8332 * Nassau, The Bahamas

Tel: 242-394-8888 © Facsimile: 242-394-2910)

Email: infot@munroclawbahamas.com

weewwmunroelawbahamas.com

Road Traffic Department
Road Safety Competition

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ene Heatrord,

fe: oad Te:
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 9B



The Bahamas last major cenire in
region in OECD ‘grey’ tax category

FROM page 1B

Key international financial
centre rivals had been
making “distinct and
aggressive moves” to
escape the OECD ‘grey’
list, “it is a significant issue
that the Bahamas,
although it seems to have

been in negotiations with a
number of nations, has not
been able yet to get to the
point of signing an agree-
ment”.

He added that his con-
cern was that in industries
such as financial services,
perception was more
important than reality, and

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KILMAMENE CORP.

even became the reality.

“Tf the Bahamas is not
moving in step with its com-
petitors, and if it is not
ahead of its competitors, the
perception might be that it is
not as capable as other
countries,” Mr Pinder told
Tribune Business.

“The Government has
pledged to sign the required
12 TIEAs by the end of the
year, but the longer it takes
to sign them, the more the
perception that our com-
petitors are more ahead of
the game than we are.

We’ve not signed any, while
our competitors have signed
a number of them.”

Mr Pinder added that it
was “not a good sign” that
competitors such as the Cay-
man Islands and BVI were
now on the ‘white’ list, and
suggested that the Bahamas
would have to move quickly
during the last four months
of 2009 to accomplish its
goal of escaping the ‘grey’
list and having 12 TIEAs in
place.

“This is an issue where we
could have jumped out in

front and taken the lead.
Leading the charge and sign-
ing the required agreements
could have been one of the
things done to demonstrate
we were ahead of the game
and our competition,” Mr
Pinder told Tribune Busi-
ness.

However, Craig A. ‘Tony’
Gomez, the Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Board’s
(BFSB) chairman, told Tri-
bune Business that he did
not believe Cayman,
Bermuda and _ BVI’s
achievement on getting to

the ‘white’ list would give
them a competitive advan-
tage “in any way” over the
Bahamas.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of KILMAMENE CORP.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CUVENTUS INC.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of VAL SALVAN CORP. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
PROWELL VALLEY LTD.

—_—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PROWELL VALLEY LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DAVINCI PRIZE INC.

—_— -)——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of DAVINCI PRIZE INC.

has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





Legal Notice

NOTICE
VAL SALVAN CORP.

——__

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of VAL SALVAN CORP. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RASBORA WELLS INC.

—_

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of RASBORA WELLS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



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Legal Notice

NOTICE
YASHIMA ALPS INC.

—

Fi

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of YASHIMA ALPS INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MODELLISTA LIMITED

— f)—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MODELLISTA LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Project awaits extra $362m investment

FROM page 1B

we've estimate we’ve invest-
ed $203 million in Baker’s
Bay, and think we have
another $362 million to
invest in terms of sales,
operations and the Marina
Village condos.












“A big encouragement for
us is that we’ve been able to
continue with the quality of
the development that we
envisaged, even in the face
of the economic slowdown.”

Baker’s Bay has, along
with Albany and Ginn, been
one of the few Bahamas-
based mixed-use resort pro-

jects to continue making
development progress in the
face of the credit crunch,
then the global recession,
which brought many of their
peers in this nation and the
wider Caribbean to a stand-
still. While development
work on the Baker’s Bay
build-out was set to go into a
slower phase for the next
two to three months, coin-
ciding with the tourism sea-
son’s low point, Dr Marshall
said that while the marina
was “not 100 per cent oper-
ational”, the developers had
been able to open it from
March onwards.

“We are working towards
Blue Flag certification,” he

next year. We had some of
the Blue Flag committee
members out last week to
help us identify any poten-
tial gaps. Right now, we are
receiving boats, and are see-
ing a steady increase in
boats coming in as the word
spreads.”

Dr Marshall said “25 per
cent of the marina is fully
operational”, with all
required safety equipment,
pump out stations, water
receptacles and tanks in
place. A Code of Conduct
was being developed for the
marina, while the fact the
marina bottom could be
seen from the docks indicat-
ed the flushing channel was






















































added of the marina. “We
are really gearing up for

working to perfection.
Meanwhile, the project’s

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT
OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
INVITATION FOR TENDERS

Ministry of Finance
Public Notice
Prohibited and Restricted Imports

The Government of the Bahamas is inviting
tenders for the supply of Servicing,
maintenance and repair of _ tractor
equipment, Solid Waste site off Tonique
Williams-Darling Hwy. (Harold Rd).

The public is hereby reminded that trailers or
caravans for use as living quarters, offices,
workshops, or similar purposes, unless specifically
authorized by the Minister of Finance, are
restricted items, and cannot therefore, be imported into
The Bahamas.

Approval may be granted for the temporary
importation of such items in special circumstances,
and under specific conditions.

Interested parties may obtain further
information including — eligibility to
participate and may collect the bidding
document upon payment of a non refundable
fee of fifty dollars ($50.00) as of August 20th
2009 from:

The Department of Environmental Health
Services Farrington Road Nassau, Bahamas
P. O. Box SS-19048

Any person wishing to import such items are advised
Telephone No. (242) 322-8037, Facsimile that:
No. (242) 322-8073 between the hours of

9:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M. Monday to Friday.

¢ Approval in writing must be obtained from
the Ministry of Finance before the item is
imported into the country.

¢ If approval for temporary importation, the
item must be exported at the end of the
approved period.

* Containers which are part of the shipping
trade will not be granted temporary
importation for warehousing or similar
purposes.

¢ Approval will not be granted for trailers
already landed in the country.

The method of payment will be certified
cheque or cash.

Tenders are to be submitted in triplicate (3)
in sealed envelope (s) addressed to:

The Tenders Board

C/O The Financial Secretary
Ministry of Finance

Cecil V. Wallace Whitfield Centre
P. O. Box N-3017

Nassau, N.P.

The Bahamas

Importers of trailers presently in The Bahamas, are
reminded that each trailer is to be exported at the end
of the approved period.

No later than September 7th 2009. Further enquiries on the matter may be directed to the
Comptroller of Customs, Custom House, P.O. Box
N-155, New Providence, The Bahamas or Telephone
(242) 326-4401

Tenders will be open at 10:00 A.M. on
September 8th 2009 at the office of the
Tenders Board, Ministry of Finance.

Ehurd Cunningham
Financial Secretary (Actg)

The government reserves the right to reject
any or all Tenders

FG CAPITAL

MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

cics rcs AT AS TL

ROYAL = FIDELITY EJ

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 25 AUGUST 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,577.62| CHG 0.06| %CHG 0.00 | YTD -134.74 | YTD % -7.87
FINDEX: CLOSE 790.64 | YTD -5.30% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
Abaco Markets 1.34 1.34 0.00 0.127
Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.382

10.00
6.25
0.63
3.15
2.14
10.18
2.74
5.50 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.00 6.00 0.00
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.71 3.77 0.06
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.00 2.00 0.00
6.60 Famguard 6.60 6.60 0.00
10.00 Finco 10.63 10.63 0.00
10.30 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.30 10.30 0.00
4.95 Focol (S) 5.13 5.13 0.00
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30 0.00
5.49 ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 0.00
10.39 J. S. Johnson 10.39 10.39 0.00
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
8.42 14.00 = N/M
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00 N/M
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55 256.6
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00 9.03
0.45 0.55 0.55 261.90
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
YTD% Last 12 Months
3.48 5.15
-1.20 -3.66
1.4842 3.53 5.55
3.1143 -8.01 -12.43
13.0484 3.41 5.84
101.6693 1.10 1.67
96.7398 0.35 -4.18
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.3399 2.69 -1.41
1.0622 2.56 6.22
1.0243 -0.84 2.43
1.0585 2.04 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Bank of Bahamas 6.25 6.25 0.00
Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00
Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00
Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00
Cable Bahamas 11.35 11.35 0.00
Colina Holdings 2.74 2.74 0.00

0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180
ases)
Interest

55.6

52wk-Hi__52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
1.4075 CFAL Money Market Fund
3.1031 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
12.3870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

NAV
1.4005
2.9047

Div $ NAV Date
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
14-Aug-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09

1.3320
2.8952

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
last 52 weeks
‘8 weighted price for daily volume
ghted price for daily volume
Change - Change
Daily Vol. - Numb: ded today
DIV $ - Dividends per the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamin: gs
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/6/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

day to day EPS $ - A company’s reported earings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

18-hole Tom Fazio-designed
golf course is scheduled to
be finished at the end of
December, Dr Marshall
describing this and the mari-
na as “two big milestones in
the project”. The course was
set to be ready for play ear-
ly in 2010, certainly by
March/April time.

“We have grassed at this
stage about 14 holes, and
everything is pretty much
shaped,” Dr Marshall told
Tribune Business. “In
another week or so, we will
have everything grassed......

“In the Marina Village, 14
units are near construction
completion, retail and living
quarters. One home has
been completed and the
downstairs converted into a
temporary restaurant. We’re
doing a lot of streetscaping
around the Marina Village.

“We anticipate some addi-
tional hires in the next six
to 12 months as the golf
course comes on stream, and
we'd like to think that
between the golf course, the
Homeowners Association
and more activity in the
marina, that we will be ina
position to add somewhere
between a handful to a
dozen jobs.”

While real estate and lot
sales had slowed due to the
economic climate, Dr Mar-
shall said Baker’s Bay had
managed to “close a couple
of sales for the year, and we
have a number in the
pipeline”.

Baker’s Bay was antici-
pating that it would receive
a strong level of guest and
members visits when the
peak winter season kicked
in, and Dr Marshall told Tri-
bune Business: “We are in
various Stages of having
closed, attempting to close
or sold 70-80 lots, so those
persons will be coming in as
members and bringing in
their guests.

“We are continuing to try
and increase that by having
persons come down, look at
the property and close
sales.”

Dr Marshall said the Bak-
er’s Bay developers hoped
to “aggressively” move on
the construction of custom
homes at the project site, a
move that designed to not
only stimulate sales but
boost the Bahamian con-

struction industry.

With some 385 home sites
for sale at Baker’s Bay, and
construction likely to be
phased according to when
they are sold and buyer
wishes, the Bahamian con-
struction industry is likely
to be kept busy by the pro-
ject for the next 10 years.

“What we are looking for-
ward to in the next six to 12
months is construction of
the custom homes,” Dr Mar-
shall told Tribune Business.
“Five to six buyers are very
interested in starting con-
struction, and it is estimated
that these homes will range
in price on average to $5
million.

“If we get five to six of
those going in the next 12
to 18 months, that will be a
nice shot in the arm for the
construction industry. We’re
in talks now with about
three local Bahamian con-
tractors on that.”

Some 100 condo units,
some of which will be
homes, will also be present
in the Marina Village. Four
of these condo units - typi-
cally two-bed properties -
have been completed, and
Dr Marshall said the devel-
opers expected between 75
to 100 beds to be placed in
the hotel rental pool at any
one time.

Dr Marshall said Baker’s
Bay was transitioning from a
monitoring and assessment
phase to one of manage-
ment, execution and imple-
mentation, with the devel-
opers hoping to substantial-
ly complete key construc-
tion and infrastructure in
time for when the US and
world economies emerged
from recession on the turn-
around path.

“That’s what we’re hop-
ing for; the perfect conver-
sion,” Dr Marshall told Tri-
bune Business. “Overall, we
think we’re in very good
shape and are very opti-
mistic for the next six to 12
months. We started off with
a very good model to begin
with, and it was just a ques-
tion of executing that from a
financial perspective, a
human resources perspec-
tive. Tremendous planning
went into this project, and
those plans were intended
to take us on a successful
path.”

PUBLIC NOTICE

The House of Assembly has appointed a
select committee to look into the disposition
of all publicly held lands. This includes crown
land, land owned by the Treasurer and land
owned by public corporations like the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation (BEC) and Bahamas
Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC). The
Committee members are Fred Mitchell MP Fox Hill
Chairman, Charles Maynard MP for Golden
Isles and Minister of State for Culture, Deputy
Chairman, Branville McCartney MP Bamboo Town,
Minister of State for Immigration, Philip Davis MP
for Cat Island, Rum Cay and San Salvador and
Kenyatta Gibson MP for Kennedy.

The Committee by this notice is soliciting
information from the public on their concerns
about publicly owned lands. The deadline for
the return of information is 31st August. The
information should be sent to the Chief Clerk,
House of Assembly at P.O. Box N 3003 Nassau
Bahamas or at fax no 322-1118 or at the email
address: house of assembly@bahamas.gov.bs or
by hand at the House of Assembly, Bay Street,

Nassau.

The Committee has been empowered to send for
persons and papers, to sit from place to place and
to sit during the recess and members of the public
should indicate whether they would wish to appear
before the Committee in person under oath and
whether or not they would wish for their identity

to be protected.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 11B



Agency that insures bank

deposits may

STEVENSON JACOBS,
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK

The government agency
that guarantees you won't
lose your money in a bank
failure may need a lifeline
of its own.

The coffers of the Federal
Deposit Insurance Corp.
have been so depleted by
the epidemic of collapsing
financial institutions that
analysts warn it could sink
into the red by the end of
this year.

That has happened only
once before — during the
savings-and-loan crisis of the
early 1990s, when the FDIC
was forced to borrow $15
billion from the Treasury
and repay it later with inter-
est.

On Thursday, the agency
reveals how much is left in
its reserves. FDIC Chairman
Sheila Bair may also use the
quarterly briefing to say how
the agency plans to shore up
its accounts.

Small and midsize banks
across the country have
been hurt by rising loan
defaults in the recession.
When they fail, the FDIC is
responsible for making sure
depositors don't lose a cent.

It has two options to
replenish its insurance fund
in the short run: It can
charge banks higher fees or
it can take the more radical
step of borrowing from the
USS. Treasury.

None of this means bank
customers have anything to
worry about. The FDIC is
fully backed by the govern-
ment, which means deposi-
tors' accounts are guaran-
teed up to $250,000 per
account. And it still has bil-
lions in loss reserves apart
from the insurance fund.

On Thursday, Bair will
also update the number of
banks on the FDIC's list of
troubled institutions. That
number shot up to 305 in the
first quarter — the highest
since 1994 and up from 252
late last year.

Because of surging bank
failures, the FDIC's board
was expected Wednesday
afternoon to make it easier
for private investors to buy
failed financial institutions.

Private equity funds have
been criticized for taking too
many risks and paying man-
agers too much. But these
days fewer healthy banks
are willing to buy ailing
banks, and the depth of the
banking crisis appears to
have softened the FDIC's
resistance to private buyers.

At least in theory, allow-
ing private investors to buy
failing banks would mean
the FDIC could charge a
higher price, shrinking the
amount of losses the agency
would have to cover.

Bair has not ruled out hik-
ing premiums on banks for
the second time this year or
asking the Treasury for a
short-term loan. She has said
taking the longer-term step
of drawing on the Treasury
credit line is only for emer-
gencies.

So far this year, 81 banks
have failed, compared with
just 25 last year — and only
three in 2007. Hundreds
more banks are expected to
fall in coming years because
of souring loans for com-
mercial real estate. That
threatens to deplete the
FDIC's fund.

"T think the public should
expect the fund to go nega-
tive at some point,” said
Gerard Cassidy, a banking
analyst at RBC Capital Mar-
kets, which has predicted
that up to 1,000 banks — or
one in eight — could disap-
pear within three years.

Either lifeline for the
FDIC carries risks. Borrow-
ing from the Treasury could
be seen as another taxpayer
bailout. But charging more
in premiums would shrink
profits at healthy banks,
squeeze troubled ones and
make lending even tighter.

"The more you levy these
assessments on banks, the
less money they have to lend
to the general population,"
said Camden Fine, president
of the Independent Com-



=

need help

AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari, file

Corp. (FDIC) Chairwoman Sheila Bair reviews her notes on Capi-
tol Hill. Hit by an epidemic of bank failures, the Federal Deposit
Insurance Corp. will reveal Thursday, Aug. 27, 2009, how much
is left in its deposit insurance fund, which has sunk to its lowest
level in 17 years.

munity Bankers of Ameri-
ca, an industry group that
represents 5,000 banks.
Last week's failure of
Guaranty Bank in Texas,
the second-largest this year,
is expected to cost the FDIC
$3 billion. The FDIC record-
ed more than $19 billion in
losses just through March.
The agency figures it will
need $70 billion to cover
bank failures through 2013,
more than five times the $13
billion that was in the fund
in March. The last time it
was that low was during the
S&L crisis in 1992, when the

fund was down to $178 mil-
lion. Some critics say regu-
lators have taken too long
to shut down troubled
banks. Chicago's Corus
Bankshares, for example,
has staggered for weeks
under the weight of bad real
estate loans.

FDIC spokesman Andrew
Gray said the agency seeks
to strike a balance between
helping troubled banks work
through their problems "so
there's zero cost to the
deposit fund,” and interven-
ing quickly if there are no
other options.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOZIE TELFORE of EAST
STREET SOUTH, MALCOLM ROAD, P.O. BOX N-2557,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as

a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20" day of August, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



HELP
WANTED

An Established Medical Facility

seeks to fill the following position:

REGISTERED
PHYSICIAN

General / Family Practice (Full-time)

Kindly submit application to:

P.O. Box CR-55050
Nassau, Bahamas

Via email to: a_1_phyneeded@live.com

PROGRESSIVE SERVICE ORIENTED COMPANY
LOOKING FOR A FEW GOOD PEOPLE.

PARTS AND SERVICE COORDINATOR

Extensive background in managing an OEM
Heavy Truck Service/ Parts facility a must.
Background in Parts and Service management and
coordination required on a daily basis. Must be able
to effectively administer all facits of business.
Minimum of 10 years experience preferred. Good
people skills a must. Must have prior experience
in parts order and supervising employees. Computer
skills required on a daily basis. Must be self
motivated and work with little or no supervision.

Competitive Wages

We thank all applicants however, only candidates to
be interviewed will be contacted.

Please hand deliver your resumes and references to

Bahamas Mack Truck Sales Ltd.
Rock Crusher Road
Nassau, Bahamas



as

MINISTRY OF FINANCE
VACANCY NOTICE

The Ministry of Finance invites interested persons to apply for the

position of Director of Management Information Systems.

The Terms of Reference of the position are as follows:

The Director of Management Information Systems (DMIS) will
guide the Government of The Bahamas in the procurement and

implementation _ of

Management Information

appropriate
Technology (MIT). The DMIs will be responsible for coordination
of the Government’s Management Information Systems (MIS) to
meet the needs of Government’s mission statement. This person will
plan and direct the implementation of automated systems to meet
current and future needs of the Government by performing the
following activities:

Have general supervision of all

overnment-related Information

Communication of Technology (ICT) functions.

1.

16.

Advise on the selection of appropriate technology, hardware
and software, for any system proposal submitted by any
Ministry or Department of the Government of The Bahamas.

Design organization structures for computer sections within
the Government to enable a controlled decentralization.

Assist the agencies of the Government of The Bahamas with
the selection and recruitment of appropriate computer
personnel.

Review and recommend the operational procedures of
computer departments, units or sections within the
Public Service.

Implementation of the recommendations of the MIS
Strategic Plan designed for the Government.

Formulate and subsequently review the system development
and implementation of software projects.

Provide plans for integrating the systems located in various
agencies of the Government for sharing of information.

Translate the Government’s request for necessary
management decision information into computerized
requirements

Coordinate the Government’s MIS budgets and Schedules
for Ministries and Department base on the Government’s
stated priorities.

Evaluate and advise on the cost benefits of proposed, current
and future MIS projects

Make presentations to top management on the status of the
action plans to address outstanding and future MIS issues.

Establish and coordinate the use of a Government MIS
resources teams within Ministries/Department.

Align MIS technology with the Government’s requirements.

Provide technical guidance for current environment with the
view to positioning the Government to be able to more
readily take advantage of future MIS technologies.
Knowledge of products in current environment.

Minimize and control the costs of implementation and
operations of the Government’s resource team where
applicable,

Organize MIS seminars for managers.

Qualifications:

A degree in the Information Technology, Management Information

Systems or related field, preferably a
experience workin

asters, with at least 10 years
in the field. Conversant with the latest

technology and techniques in the following area:

IBM Platforms
PC and mainframe networks .
Data Bases in PC and mainframes .
Exposure to UNIX and Client-Server Databases &
Systems
¢ Information Technology budgeting

Reporting:

The DMIS will report to the Financial Secretary.

The term for the Director of Management Information Systems will
be for duration of three (3) years in the first instance but renewable
thereafter. Salary and benefits to be negotiated.

Curriculum Vitae should be sent to:

The Financial Secretary
Ministry of Finance

P. O. Box N-3017

Cecil Wallace-Whitfield Centre
Cable Beach

or by e-mail to ecunningham@bahamas.gov.bs so as to arrive not
later than Monday 24 August, 2009.

No telephone calls please.



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PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a; > ---
Cash for Clunkers generates 700K new car sales



(AP Photo/Gary Malerba)
FORD EMPLOYEES work as the 2010 Ford Focus rolls down the
pre-delivery area of the Wayne Stamping and Assembly plant in
Wayne, Mich., Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2009. Cash for Clunkers gener-
ated nearly 700,000 new car sales and ended under its $3 billion bud-
get, the Transportation Department said Wednesday.






























Legal Notice

NOTICE
VALCOLLA S.A.

— 4)—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of VALCOLLA S.A. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

KEN THOMAS and
STEPHEN
MANNING,
WASHINGTON

Cash for Clunkers gener-
ated nearly 700,000 new car
sales and ended under its $3
billion budget, the Trans-
portation Department said
Wednesday, according to
Associated Press.

Releasing final data, the
government said dealers
submitted 690,114 vouchers
totaling $2.88 billion. New
car sales through the pro-
gram ended late Monday
and dealers were allowed to
submit paperwork to the
government until late Tues-
day.

Japanese automakers
Toyota, Honda and Nissan
accounted for 41 percent of
the new vehicle sales, out-
pacing Detroit automakers
General Motors, Ford and
Chrysler, which had a share
of nearly 39 percent. Toy-
ota Motor Corp. led the
industry with 19.4 percent
of new sales, followed by
General Motors Co. with
17.6 percent and Ford
Motor Co. with 14.4 percent.

The Toyota Corolla was
the most popular new vehi-
cle purchased under the pro-
gram, followed by the Hon-
da Civic, Toyota Camry and
Ford Focus.

Transportation Secretary
Ray LaHood said U.S. con-

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DOLE HOLLOW LIMITED

—_—_

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of DOLE HOLLOW LIMITED has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

sumers and workers were
"the clear winners" under
the program. "Manufactur-
ing plants have added shifts
and recalled workers. Mori-
bund showrooms were
brought back to life and con-
sumers bought fuel-efficient
cars that will save them
money and improve the
environment," he said.

The White House Council
of Economic Advisers said
the program will boost eco-
nomic growth in the third
quarter by 0.3 to 0.4 per-
centage points because of
the increased auto sales in
July and August. An esti-
mated 42,000 jobs will be
created or saved during the
second half of the year, the
White House said.

The program, which
began in late July, offered
consumers rebates of $3,500
or $4,500 off the price of a
new vehicle in return for
trading in their older, less
fuel-efficient vehicles. The
trade-in vehicles needed to
get 18 miles per gallon or
less and were then scrapped.

It proved far more popu-
lar than lawmakers original-
ly thought.

Congress was forced to
add another $2 billion to the
original $1 billion budget
when the first pot of money
nearly ran out in a week.
The extra money was sup-
posed to last through Labor
Day, but in the end, Cash
for Clunkers ran only about
a month.

Dealers loved the new
sales, but reported major
hassles trying to get the gov-
ernment to repay them for

the rebates they gave cus-
tomers. The government
extended the deadline for
them to file deals, but many
still haven't received their
money.

Peter Kitzmiller, president
of the Maryland Automo-
bile Dealers Association,
said most dealers appeared
to get their paperwork in by
the Tuesday night deadline.
He expressed hope the pace
of repayments would pick
up now that government
officials are working through
the backlog.

The Transportation
Department said Wednes-
day that 2,000 people are
processing dealer applica-
tions, but Kitzmiller said the
rate of repayment hasn't
increased.

"I'm a little concerned
that we haven't seen any
improvement," he said.

The government said 84
percent of the trade-ins were
trucks and 59 percent of the
new vehicles were passen-
ger cars.

New vehicles bought
through Cash for Clunkers
had an average fuel-effi-
ciency of 24.9 miles per gal-
lon, compared with an aver-
age of 15.8 mpg for trade-
ins, a 58 percent improve-
ment.

American companies
accounted for all the top-10
traded-in vehicles. The Ford
Explorer four-wheel-drive
was the most popular, fol-
lowed by the Ford F-150
Pickup two-wheel-drive, the
Jeep Grand Cherokee four-
wheel-drive and Ford
Explorer two-wheel-drive.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SEA BLACK TIGER SLOPES INC.

— 4)—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SEA BLACK TIGER SLOPES INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEO RENAISSANCE INC.

— -)——

Fd

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NEO RENAISSANCE INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DELTA JUNCTION LTD.

—*,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of DELTA JUNCTION LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AVENARIUS INC.

— 4)—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of AVENARIUS INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
COURCELLES GREENS INC.

—_— -*)—

é

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of COURCELLES GREENS INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued

and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORANGE GROVE VALLEY INC.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ORANGE GROVE VALLEY INC. has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued

and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ROCCOLEONE INC.

— )—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ROCCOLEONE INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
COPPERPOTTE INC.

—¢*,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of COPPERPOTTE INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEUDOREF VILLAGE INC.

— -*)——

Fd

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NEUDORF VILLAGE INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

a |

5-Day FORECAST

9% ORLANDO.












=|





Th a OTN
Vv
'|8|9|

HIGH | \.HIGH



o|1|2

LOW

3|4[5

MODERATE















High:92°F/33°C = Ss Partly sunny, a couple of Mostly cloudy. Sunshine with a heavy Sunny to partly cloudy. Partly sunny, a t-storm Partly sunny with a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
Pein dhe 2 ® , i-storms. thunderstorm. possible. shower possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
Low: 76° F/24°C _, : : ; S : . : :
a & et High: 90 High: 91 High: 90 High: 89
c le Ff High: 90° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 80° Low: 79° Low: 79° see ERT
TAMPA ie aE A
High: 90° F/32° C , 100° F 107°-85° F 103°-90° F 102°-89° F 102°-83° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft
Low: 75° F/24°C on r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 1:32am. 23 7:32am. 05
a @ ’ 2 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 2:15pm. 28 8:37pm. 07
i ae my -347pm. 27 9:38pm. 08
; ~ Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday 331am. 22 O3lam. 06
L er ABACO Temperature 4:18pm. 27 10:35pm. 07
, 4 > e VGN esses ceeees Qaceescnee taceregancestcceeeses 91° F/33° C : :
; P54 High: 91° F/33° C incon Sunday 432am. 2.2 10:31am. 0.6
; me ee Of eat! LOW ecesssseenee 80° F/27° C
ua aX — Low: 80° F/27°C Normal high... Ce ee
- : ee Normal low 76° F/24° C
4 pe) @ WEST PALM BEACH i Last year's HIQH ccc or F33°C | ONT VIM UII
4 ll High: 90° F/32° C 5 Last year's ]OW oe eee 82° F/28° C
" ‘ Low: 75° F/24°C SP Precipitation .j j_| ~~ Sunrise...... 6:49 a.m. Moonrise .... 1:58 p.m.
ee >a . € As of 2 p.m. yesterday ...csccsscccsscseeessseeeen trace ‘ Sumset....... 7:34 p.m. Moonset......... hone
Wall, . FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT 7 Year to date a 20: First Full Last New
High: 90° F/32° C @ High: 89° F/32° C Normal year to date oes 30.28" : is -
Low: 78° F/26°C Pa > il Low: 78° F/26° C oe yh ae
+ /., AccuWeather.com 3 Gai ee
@ ‘ Forecasts and graphics provided by : a: ty
4 MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Aug. 27 Sep. 4 Sep. 11 Sep. 18
yy High: 91° F/33° C High: 91° F/33°C
i Low: 77° F/25° C NASSAU L ; 79° F/26°C
High: 90° F/32° C oe
= Low: 79° F/26° C
3 i. , @ ere
KEY WEST ee Soe CATISLAND
High: 89° F/32" C High: 87° F/31° C
Low: 79° F/26° C —_ " Low: 75° F/24°C
7. GREAT EXUMA ee
- REAT EXUN SAN SALVADOR
all High: 88° F/31°C 5 he ON? E/99°
Low: 76°F/24° C re Tie ©
; : Low: 76° F/24° C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ier ce 5 f
highs and tonights's lows. — : ——- ‘
. : ef Low: 77° F/25°C i. ra & ,
LONG ISLAND
ee itz
Low: 76° F/24° C ‘
Today Friday Today Friday Today Friday *. 4 MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W alll i High: 89° F/32° C
FIC FIC Fic FC FIC FIC FIC = F/C FC F/C FIC = FIC 4 Low: 75° F/24° C
Albuquerque 88/31 64/117 pce 87/80 62/16 s Indianapolis 84/28 65/18 t 80/26 65/18 t Philadelphia 86/30 65/18 pc 80/26 65/18 c :
Anchorage 63/17 5110 +r 64/117 53/41 sh Jacksonville 88/31 72/22 t 88/31 71/21 ¢t Phoenix 108/42 84/28 s 109/42 34/28 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 88/31 68/20 t 83/28 68/20 t Kansas City 80/26 G16 t 83/28 6216 pc Pittsburgh 77/25 58/14 po 73/22 60/15 t RAGGEDISLAND — igh:92°F/83°¢
Atlantic City 85/29 6146 pc 77/25 64/17 pc LasVegas 105/40 76/24 s 107/41 81/27 s Portland,OR 93/33 58/14 pc 78/25 60/15 pe High: 89° F/32° C Low:77°F/25°C
Baltimore 85/29 64/417 pe 78/25 6447 1 Little Rock 91/32 70/21 s 87/30 67/19 t Raleigh-Durham 94/34 69/20 s 85/29 68/20 t Low: 74°F/23°C eo.
Boston 76/24 56/13 s 70/21 56/13 $s Los Angeles 95/35 64/17 s 90/32 64/17 $s St. Louis 88/31 68/20 t 81/27 66/18 t .
Buffalo 73/22 51/0 s 72/22 60/15 pc Louisville 90/32 69/20 pc 85/29 68/20 t Salt Lake City 93/83 63/17 s 93/33 63/17 $s GREAT INAGUA = ttn
Charleston, SC 88/31 73/22 t 87/30 70/21 t Memphis 92/33 72/22 s 89/31 70/21 t San Antonio 99/37 73/22 t 100/37 72/22 t High: 92° F/33° C
Chicago 74/23 60415 sh 77/25 60415 t Miami 91/32 77/25 t 89/31 76/24 t San Diego 85/29 66/18 s 81/27 67/19 s Low. 78° F/26°C
Cleveland 74/23 60/15 pe 78/25 62/16 t Minneapolis 78/25 58/14 $s 77/25 54412 pe San Francisco 84/28 59/15 pc 78/25 58/14 pc y
Dallas 94/34 72/22 t 92/33 71/21 pc Nashville 90/32 68/20 s 89/31 68/20 t Seattle 88/31 55/12 pe 71/21 56/13 pc
Denver 84/28 55/12 s 90/32 53/11 $s New Orleans 90/32 72/22 t 90/32 74/23 pc Tallahassee 88/31 70/21 t 86/30 71/21 t lie %
Detroit 75/23 58414 pe 77/25 6246 t New York 81/27 66/18 s 76/24 67/49 pc Tampa 90/32 75/23 t 90/32 77/25 t
Honolulu 89/31 76/24 s 89/31 75/23 ¢$ Oklahoma City 88/31 64/17 t 85/29 63/17 $s Tucson 102/38 76/24 pc 101/88 76/24 pc Vw
Houston 95/35 74/23 t 95/35 74/23 t Orlando 92/33 76/24 t 90/32 75/23 t Washington, DC 89/31 69/20 pc 78/25 68/20 r

A

Wor.p Cities



Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
90/32
73/22
81/27
838/31
62/16
91/32
86/30
81/27
90/32
81/27
93/33
80/26
86/30
69/20
77/25
87/30
77/25
94/34
90/32
78/25
91/32
81/27
86/30
71/21
63/17
84/28
83/28
71/21
91/32
66/18
93/33
103/39
85/29
82/27
69/20
88/31
73/22
73/22
95/35
90/32
77/25
102/38
66/18
72/22
84/28
79/26
91/32
63/17
77/25
82/27
74/23
105/40
88/31
88/31
89/31
86/30
79/26
90/32
70/21
86/30
72/22
73/22
95/35
82/27
68/20
93/33
78/25
84/28
81/27
75/23

iil

Today

Low
F/C
eiZe
57/13
50/10
72/22
52/11
79/26
77/25
69/20
70/21
75/23
69/20
63/17
80/26
42/5
59/15
66/18
61/16
74/23
79/26
48/8
75/23
71/21
71/21
63/17
50/10
63/17
58/14
52/11
73/22
55/12
82/27
80/26
69/20
61/16
44/6
77/25
60/15
55/12
61/16
79/26
55/12
73/22
46/7
55/12
59/15
51/10
79/26
52/11
61/16
60/15
67/19
81/27
68/20
79/26
50/10
72/22
43/8
73/22
58/14
68/20
60/15
50/10
82/27
73/22
52/11
70/21
59/15
69/20
61/16
55/12









es

pc
s
r
pe
s
pe
pc
s
s
pe
s
pc
pc

High
F/C
90/32
70/21
83/28
90/32
62/16
90/32
86/30
81/27
81/27
81/27
90/32
79/26
86/30
67/19
70/21
90/32
81/27
94/34
90/32
72/22
91/32
82/27
91/32
74/23
64/17
81/27
80/26
72/22
89/31
72/22
93/33
102/38
86/30
83/28
64/17
88/31
74/23
70/21
100/37
84/28
77/25
102/38
66/18
72/22
84/28
82/27
95/35
65/18
73/22
83/28
76/24
105/40
88/31
87/30
91/32
88/31
75/23
86/30
71/21
86/30
72/22
75/23
95/35
86/30
68/20
93/33
70/21
88/31
82/27
64/17

Friday

Low
F/C
79/26
54/12
52/11
72/22
52/11
78/25
78/25
71/21
64/17
75/23
67/19
54/12
80/26
44/6
50/10
68/20
63/17
73/22
82/27
48/8
76/24
72/22
75/23
53/11
48/8
52/11
55/12
52/11
73/22
57/13
84/28
80/26
72/22
64/17
44/6
78/25
60/15
52/11
63/17
77/25
55/12
74/23
52/11
52/11
53/11
53/11
81/27
48/8
54/12
58/14
68/20
80/26
68/20
79/26
52/11
72/22
48/8
74/23
60/15
66/18
60/15
55/12
82/27
77/25
57/13
72/22
57/13
70/21
57/13
50/10

WwW

oO

wo Bas oo oa ge
—

noms eo eso Set SS
co ie ao Oo <

pe

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

USN AS a a



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 85° F
Friday: NE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 7-15 Miles 85° F
FREEPORT Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 85° F
Friday: NE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 7-15 Miles 85° F
ABACO Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 84° F
Friday: NE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 7-15 Miles 84° F



(COOLER)

in|

cote [een

Miami
91/77

Showers
T-storms
Rain







Fronts
= Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and eas
Bk.) Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm .titenfitenifite
[v_=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Meaguali
10s| ts [0s | 10s 20s [Osi] 40s sts 60s 70s 80s G0s//ii0eN ii)



‘FYou Can Be BI
Away Bony Hurricane

Or you_can rest easy knowing
that youyhave excellent insurance
coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS


PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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FROM page 1B

toms procedure and revert to the unaccompanied baggage decla-
ration form that had been traditionally used by courier services to
clear parcels. Customs had required that a C-13 (home consump-
tion entry) form be filled out for any item imported to the
Bahamas, requiring couriers to hire brokers and lodge bonds to
clear the items.

“The hardship that Freeport is faced with is the same that is hap-
pening to the couriers in Nassau,” said Mr Saunders.

He said the new C-13 procedure simply slowed down the process
for declaring goods too much, with an overwhelming increase in
paperwork. Mr Saunders said that under the old procedure, couri-
ers were able to fill out one form and present a product invoice, pay
the necessary duty and the goods would be cleared. Now, the
enormous amount of paperwork and added brokerage fees have
stunted business. Mr Saunders said theGovernment has to form leg-
islation for courier companies in order to standardise the proce-
dures for the importation of goods in this country.

“No matter who comes into office we should have legislation that
protects the industry,” said Mr Saunders. He added that the new-
Comptroller simply had to curb the corruption within the depart-
ment and increase screening measures in order to recoup rev-
enue lost over the years. Mr Saunders contended that Customs has
no Statistical data to show the new procedures have increased
Customs’ revenue, as there was no statistical data prior to the
new procedures being implemented. He asserted that the new
procedures could “kill the goose that laid the golden egg.”

Mr Gomez told Tribune Business recently that the new process-
es put in place by the Customs department since his appointment
have always been the right procedures, but had not been enforced
for decades. He suggested that courier services wanted a system
that was illegal to operate. However, Mr Saunders said they want
a system that works and does not drain the freight forwarding
companies as much as it helps them. He said next day delivery ser-
vice has been hit the hardest by the new Customs procedures.

He said the purpose of the old unaccompanied baggage decla-
ration form was to collect revenues and regulate imports, just as the
customs model requires. He said the C-13 now treats courier com-
pany cargo “as cargo on the Betty K”. “We are not profitable
because we can’t get top dollar any more, because of the amount
of brokerage work that has to be done,” said Mr Saunders.

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The Trib une oe"
OBIMUARIES
RELIGION

\ ~The Tribune

—‘\ ee
» \0
707.9

SS hour chaice for ine family:
The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, August 27, 2009 ©PG 21

‘The New Redeemed ‘Tabernacle
Church of God In Christ

] 47 Pastoral & Church

Anniversar y

Pastor: Bishop Tony L. Hanna
&
Lady Nancy Alma Ruth Hanna

Theme:

“Hold Fast Until He Comes”

Revelations 2:25

| Date: Wed. Aug. 26th; Fri. Aug. 28th 2009
Sun. Aug. 30th, 2009

Time: 730p.m. nightly and
Sunday 3:00p.m. chmaxing

N ' i G | eo 8 S N i WS U Venue: The New Redeemed Tabernacle C.O.GL.C
STORIES AND ff; 0 gs, Bahamas
CHURCH EVENTS ff:


PG 22 ® Thursday, August 27, 2009

ST. PAUL'S BAPTIST CHURCH

LOCATION- BERNARD ROAD,FOX HILL

EVENT
CHURCH'S 139TH ANNIVERSARY

and

ORDINATION SERVICE
TIME
ANNIVERSARY SERVICE 7:30am and 11am
ORDINATION SERVICE @ 4pm

THEME

"A CHURCH AND PEOPLE WITH\=

A DIVINE CALL TO SERVE"

DATE

AUGUST 30th, 2009

SCRIPTURE TEXT
EPHESIANS CHAPTER 3 vs.1 -13

ANNIVERSARY SPEAKER

PRESIDENT BAHAMAS NATIONAL BAPTIST

REV. DR. WILLIAM THOMPSON

ORDINATION SPEAKER
PRESIDENT BETHEL

=| ASSOCIATION - REV. TIMOTHY STEWART |=)

Host Pastor- REV. DR. J. CARL and
MINISTER EVANGELINE RAHMING





RELIGION

a.

The Tribune



GOSPEL Recording group Shaback is releasing its first two disk album and DVD which
debuts this Friday from Golden Gates World Outreach Centre on Carmichael Road.

Shaback,
This Is It

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

GOSPEL recording group
Shaback continued with its
songs of praise with the
release of the group’s first
two disk album and DVD

tiled Shaback, This Is It.

The group on Wednesday presented
Minister for Culture Charles Maynard
with one of the first official copies of
the album.

Thanking Shaback for maintaining
their standard of excellence in
Christian music over the past years,
Mr Maynard said he will continue to
do all he can to assist in their future
development.

“T would like to congratulate
Shaback who have become a premiere
gospel group in the Bahamas over the
years.

“They have gone a very long way
both locally and internationally to
make a name for themselves and
spread the word of the gospel the
same time. We are extremely pleased
that we were able to be a small part of
the whole process for them in this lat-
est process, they are the beneficiaries
of some support from the government
in terms of the production of the CD
initially, and we are happy that the

product is done and ready for the mar-
ket and encourage the Bahamian peo-
ple to continue to support them.”

Director for the group Clint Watson
explained that over the past two
weeks, the group has been on a US
tour representing the Bahamas and
sharing their music in major cities
including New York, New Jersey,
Baltimore, and Washington DC.

During that time he said the group
had a chance to display their talents to
some of the biggest names in the
gospel music arena.

“We were fortunate to be able to
minister at some of the great churches
of some gospel artists like Bishop
Hezekiah Walker, and Donnie
McClurkin.

“We had an exciting time and now
we are happy to be back home on our
own soil to officially release this proj-
ect to the Bahamian people.”

Mr Watson said the group has
arranged a special concert launch for
the album this Friday at the Golden
Gates World Outreach Centre.

He explained: “During the free con-
cert persons will have a chance to
obtain this new album on sale at a dis-
counted rate.

“We have also planned a few per-
formances with a number of our col-
leagues in the industry like the Mount
Tabor Praise and Worship Team,

SEE page 25
The Tribune

RELIGION

(CY MEDITATION

Getting it right

How are we to navigate the shoals
of parenting and our children to sur-
vive our trial and error efforts? Only
by the grace of God I am sure. These
are indeed difficult times for both.

Our words of wisdom for our youth
may be categorised as some of the
following:

1. Work hard and enjoy success
achieved honourably

2. Study diligently as a student
learning comes easier when young
3. Explore possible gifts learning
from the best

4. Listen attentively to those who
have mastered their craft

5. Let your good name be your
path to fame

6. Gain knowledge, wisdom,
insight and understanding you will
need them all

7. Let God be your guide

8. Prepare for the future while
learning for the past

9. Find fulfillment and contentment
somewhere in each day

10. Cooperation with parents
makes it easier to be trusted

and rewarded

Our words of wisdom for our
parents include these recommen-
dations:

1. Pay attention to each child and
celebrate each one’s uniqueness
2. Pray for patience daily and
exhibit it even when stressed,
angry or tired

3. Choose timing, tone and place
to maximise effectiveness of

a. REV, ANGELA

*. PALACIOUS

discipline

4. Listen to feelings and words

5. Allow humour to keep you calm
where possible

6. Be consistent and persistent
with moral and spiritual principles
7. Lead by example

8. Try new approaches to get
desired results

9. Make the teacher your ally to
bring out the best in your child
10. Offer a united front as parents
having prayed and discussed your
position in advance

As a community let us model our
best and mentor with love both par-
ents and children.

Let family life be a priority when
we make plans in our organisations.
Encourage parents to spend more
time at home in the school years to
monitor their children’s homework,
friends, progress in sports and the
arts, and spiritual development.

Let parenting be a ministry and
childhood a joy. It should be a bless-
ing to have wise and loving parents
and to have bright and obedient chil-
dren. We have to get back to the
place where it is exciting to learn and
to do excel at school. We need to get
it right with God’s help at home,
work and school.

“Let family lite be a priority when we
make plans in our organisations.
Encourage parents to spend more

time at home in the school years to
monitor their children's homework,
triends, progress in sports and the
arts, and spiritual development.”

Thursday, August 27, 2009 ® PG 23

BE ANXIOUS FOR NOTHING!

Text: Philippians 4:4-7:

“Rejoice in the Lord always. Again | say, Rejoice! Let
your moderation be known to all men. The Lord is at
hand. Do not be anxious (apprehensive, concerned,
fearful, fretful, nervous, restless, uneasy, or worried)
about anything, but in everything by prayer and
supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be
made known to God. The peace of God which passes
all understanding shall keep your hearts and minds

P Ben Bail :
So ee through Christ Jesus.”

The Prophetic Voice
P. O. Box N-9518
Nassau, Bahamas
Tpv.inc@coralwave.com

The fact that Paul mentioned the word Rejoice twice
indicates it is the privilege of Christians to Rejoice in
the Lord. They rejoice because there is a God and
Saviour; and they have a relationship with Him. The
Christian should always be a happy man: Everything else may change, yet the
Lord does not change; if the sources of all other joy are dried up, yet this one
never does; and there is never a moment of a Christian’s life in which he may
not find Joy in the Character, Law, and Promises of God.

The word “moderation” refers to restraint on the passions, general soberness
(alertness) of living, being free from all excesses (unrestrained behaviour). The
word properly means that which is suitable, and then respectability, kindness,
and compassion: They were never to indulge in excess of passion, or dress,
or eating, or drinking; appetite is the doorway for every kind of excess and
indulgence to enter a person’s life; whether alcoholism, drug addiction, a faulty
thought-life, or gluttony.

Christians were expected to govern their appetites, control their temper, and
to be examples of what was proper for people in view of the expectation that
their Lord and Saviour would soon appear. Moderation, says Dr. Macknight,
“means meekness under provocation, readiness to forgive injuries, fairness in
the management of business, honesty in judging the characters and actions
of others, sweetness of spirit (temperament), and the entire government of the
passion.”

People indulge their passions, and are extravagant in their plans of this life, and

in their expectations of earthly good for themselves and for their families,
because they have no comprehension of the truth that there is before them a
vast eternity (time without end). We are encouraged throughout Scripture to
look forward to the city Abraham sought, Whose Builder and Maker is God; to
Seek ye first the Kingdom of God and His Righteousness; and to Seek the Lord
while He may be found, and call upon Him while He is near.

Everything in reference to the supply of your wants, and the wants of your
families: everything in respect to afflictions, embarrassments, and trials; and
everything relating to your spiritual condition. There is nothing exempted which
pertains to body, mind, property, friends, conflicts, losses, trials, hopes, and
fears: We can go and spread it all out before the Lord. The greatest sufferer
that lives in this world of redeeming love, and who has the offer of heaven
before him, has cause of gratitude. We can always find something to be thankful
for, no matter what may be the burden of our wants, or the special subject of
our petitions.

Let your request be made known unto God: God need not to be informed of
our necessities, but he requires that we come and express them to him; compare
Ezekiel 36:37, “Thus saith the Lord God, | will yet for this be inquired of by the
house of Israel to do it for them.” God knows the difficulties you are enduring,
and await your request for help.

The way to find peace, and to have the heart (the seat of all your affections and
passions, and minds: your judgment, understanding, and conscience [sense
of right and wrong] through Christ Jesus) kept from trouble, is to go and spread
out all before the Lord; compare Isaiah 26:20; Isaiah 37:1-7. The word rendered
here “shall keep,” is a military term, and means that the mind would be guarded
as . aa or castle is. It would be preserved from the attack of anxious fears
and alarms.

Isaiah 26:3-4 states, “You will keep him in Perfect Peace whose mind is stayed
on You; because he trusteth in You.” The Peace referred to here, is that which
is felt when we have no anxious care about the supply of our needs, and when
we go confidently and commit everything into the hands of God. No confidence
that a man can have in his own powers; no reliance which he can rest on his
own plans, or on the promises, or fidelity of his fellow-men; and no calculations
which he can make on the course of events, can impart such peace to the soul
as simple confidence in God.

It is only in Christ Jesus, the Saviour, that the Mind can be Preserved in Peace.


PG 24 ® Thursday, August 27, 2009

New



THERE is absolutely nothing that man
can ever say or do, that will catch Father
Yahweh by surprise. Despite man's aca-
demic accomplishments, their allegedly
deep spiritual understandings and anoint-
ing, we all have this one common denom-
inator which is; we're subject to error.

New Age teaching is so spiritually sub-

SINGLES MEcZeUiTe tells

ea, eer fe Sey rors
ce ey, Qi faster aD oily palit



RELIGION

tle if it's possible even God's very elect
would be deceived. This teaching can be
likened to an individual unknowingly get-
ting on bus #21, and believing that they're
on bus # 15.

Now, if this person doesn't come to
their senses quickly and get off bus # 21,
at the end of the ride they would have
arrived at the wrong destination; bearing
in mind that bus #21 goes in the southern
direction and bus # 15 the northern direc-
tion.

Watch this !

Look at the close similarities of these
two buses: They both have drivers that
may wear the same type uniforms, both
buses are the same size and the same
color, and they both park at the same ter-
minal to load passengers. The major dif-
ference with these buses is they have dif-
ferent routes and destinations.

New Age teachings is a contaminated
version of the truth. It sounds good, and
skillfully uses the Bible or whatever
means necessary to accomplish it's mis-
sion. Remember, that there is nothing
that man can do, that will ever catch God
by surprise.

Here's the deadly deception:
Whenever the devil deceives a person /
people, he's just doing his job because
he’s a deceiver. The deadly deception
comes into play when we deceive our-
selves; something like this -knowing that
there is a fly in the soup and yet denying
this fact; thereby eating and serving the
soup to others.

Listen, based upon the way things are
going right now in the Bahamas (a mur-
der per week, a constipated judicial sys-
tem, etc) and most of all the lack of true
Godly leadership, I'm by no means sur-
prised to hear the erroneous religious
teaching that God (Yahweh) has a wife.
Now, for those of you who want to ascribe
to this sort of teaching, go ahead; get on
bus #21. I can assure you that at the end
of the day the driver of this bus and all of
his passengers will be crying as a result of
their heated destination.

Think about this: In the natural, every
man great and small embraces every
opportunity to highlight and acknowl-
edge his mother. Take an athlete for
example; after winning a big race, a
championship or some other event, the
first person he would acknowledge or call
out too would be his mother (Hi Mom).

WHERE, WHERE; in the scripture
can it be found that Yeshuwa Messiah
(Jesus the Christ) ever referred to or
made mention of God, His father having
a wife. This religious New Age teaching
of God having a wife is just the beginning
of what's coming down the religious pipe
from which the Bahamian public is fed.

In Proverb.8: 1-38. The bible speaks of
wisdom being possessed by the Lord in
the beginning of his way.

The Tribune

W Age — Deadly deception

It's from this premise and other scrip-
ture verses taken out of context that this
erroneous teachings of God having a wife
comes from. But as the apostle Paul said
to the churches of Galatia so say I unto
the churches in the Bahamas. Gal.3:1. O
foolish

Galatians, who hath bewitched you,
that ye should not obey the truth, before
whose eyes Jesus Christ hath been evi-
dently set forth, crucified among you?

I would want to believe that it's
through ignorance that any Bahamian
church leader would give into this New
Age — Deadly Deception teaching of God
having a wife. This contrary spirit is so
crafty and cunning that it will erroneous-
ly fill the hearts of its victims with scrip-
tures taken out of context to prove or jus-
tify the New Age teaching.

As it relates to marriage and heaven
and spiritual matters here's what
Yeshuwa Messiah said, when questioned
of the same by some religious leaders.

NLT:

Matt.22: 23. That same day some

Sadducees stepped forward--a group of

Jews who say there is no resurrection

after death. They posed this question:

: 24. "Teacher, Moses said, ‘If a man dies

without children, his brother should

marry the widow and have a child who
will be the brother's heir.’

: 25. Well, there were seven brothers.

The oldest married and then died without

children, so the second brother married

the widow.

: 26. This brother also died without

children, and the wife was married to the

next brother, and so on until she had
been the wife of each of them.

: 27. And then she also died.

: 28. So tell us, whose wife will she be

in the resurrection? For she was the wife

of all seven of them!"

: 29. Jesus replied, "Your problem is that

you don't know the Scriptures, and you

don't know the power of God.

: 30. For when the dead rise, they won't

be married. They will be like the angels in

heaven.

Here we see in verses 29 & 30
Yeshuwa saying to these religious lead-
ers that they err in not Knowing the
truth of the scriptures and the power of
God. For in heaven there is no such
thing as marriage or given in marriage;
so the teachings and beliefs of God hav-
ing a wife is a very, very erroneous
teaching.

May the FOG (Favor of God) be with
you and your family:

¢ For questions or comments contact us
via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com

or Ph.1-242-441-2021

Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen
Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int'l,
PG 26 ® Thursday, August 27, 2009

(Coy THE HISTORY OF



RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS

RELIGION

The Tribune





gchar ae



ROMAN CATHOLIC PIONEERS: GABRIEL ROERIG

IN 1894, Abbot Bernard of St John's
Minnesota sent two newly ordained
priests -Father Gabriel Roerig and
Father Melchior Bahner to support the
mission in the Bahamas.

Father Gabriel followed that old
Benedictine principle Ora et Labora
(pray and work) - daily labour to build
their physical ecclesiastical buildings
and homes. They had to be jack-of-all-
trades because there was never enough
money for the basic essentials. He was
sent to Andros where he built by hand
St Saviour's Chapel at Behring Point
settlement - an apostolate that was to
last for 56 years, the most extended
service of any Catholic priest in the
Bahamas.

Hearing that rocks had to be carried
in a pail, Father Bernard sent a wheel-
barrow from New York. On the first
day, Father Gabriel sent a man to haul
rocks - the man hauled the rocks out of
the bush in the wheelbarrow - but then
carried the wheelbarrow up the hill on
his head! Father Gabriel, a handy
mason soon completed the church.
And he built it so well that it withstood
the fierce hurricane of 1899 and several
more.

In 1897, after visiting his mother in
Germany he was granted an audience
with Pope Leo XIII, who was interest-
ed and encouraging about the Bahamas
mission. Father Gabriel brought back
his brother Joseph, who was later
ordained as Father Leander and served
in Andros until his death by drowning
off Bimini in 1955.



y JIM.
» LAWLOR
——

In 1907, Father Gabriel was consid-
ered to take charge of Bahamas
Mission with Father Chrysostrom to be
appointed to succeed Abbot Alexius of
St Anselm's New York but the move
fell through because of Father
Chrysostrom's demands.

A new mission to Mangrove Cay was
instigated in 1921 and the following
year Fr Gabriel baptised 50 persons
there and administered Holy
Communion to them.

Father Gabriel acted as Vicar
Forane during Father Chrysostrom's
malaria in 1920...but was glad when it
was over so that the honour and burden
should rest on the broad shoulders of
Father Chrysostrom. And that burden
affected the mission many times from
1912, Father Chrysostrom felt that he
and Father Gabriel needed assistance
as their labour was only half as effec-
tive over the years. They spent many a
lonely Christmas among poor and
faced terrible calamities. The year 1926
was one of terrible destruction and dis-
tress for the poor property on the
Andros missions. Three hurricanes
destroyed 48 of the 58 houses at
Behring's point and the chapel, school

and other buildings were damaged.

When Father Chrysostrom took ill
and wished to retire to San Salvador,
Father Gabriel built a house and chapel
in San Salvador for him. After
Chrysostrom's death in January 1928,
Cardinal Hayes came to Nassau for an
inspection of the Benedictine mission
in the Bahamas and was delighted with
what he saw. A dinner was held on
January 29 to honour the 58th birthday
of Father Gabriel and his thirty four
years of service in the Bahamas.

It was said that the early missionaries
to the Bahamas had iron constitutions.
Certainly Father Gabriel lived alone on
Andros for fifty five years and survived
on the simplest fare that was brought to
him by his devoted people. Fittingly
two of them were recognised in 1935,
the 25th anniversary of King George V,
when Governor, Sir Bede Clifford con-
ferred the O.B.E on Father Gabriel
Roerig and the MBE on Father

Cornelius Osendorf for their work
among the people.
In 1937, Fathers Anthony

Ronellenfitsch, Herbert Buerschinger,
E F Callan and Charles Blesch all
began work in the Bahamas giving sup-
port to the veterans Fathers Gabriel,
Leander, Bonaventure and Arnold -
these names had already moved into
the religious folklore of the Bahama
Islands.

Father Gabriel was a worker priest,
preaching the Gospel and teaching the
use of tools and the worth of manual
labour. His breviary, the Bible, the

Gospel catechism and the Holy Rule,
were constantly in his hand; so was the
hammer, chisel, trowel and measuring
tape. He fortified himself each day with
prayer, divine reading and meditation
before traveling by foot or boat to the
scattered settlements of Andros to cat-
echise, baptise and comfort the sick.
Strangers were always welcome in his
house. His own reward was_ the
Benedictine Pax, the peace which his
own soul knew and radiated and which
caused his flock to look at him as a pure
spiritual guide.

In 1950, Father Gabriel was brought
to the Priory because of his weakened
condition. He pleaded with his care
givers to allow him to go back to
Andros, “I am not strong enough to do
anything but I could sit in the church
and help and instruct the people, espe-
cially the children”. In his last days he
was given the Apostolic Blessing by
Pope Pius XII.

In June 1950, plans were afoot to
consecrate Father Leonard Haggarty
as the second bishop of the Bahamas.
While these plans were being formulat-
ed, Father Gabriel Roerig OSB, aged
eighty one years, died on 30th August
1950. His withered body lay in St
Francis Xavier Cathedral before his
many friends accompanied the remains
to the cemetery of the new St
Augustine's Monastery for the first
burial there.

Author Richard Le Gallienne wrote
about Father Gabriel's piety and toil in
his book Pieces of Eight.

RELIGIOUS NOTES NO Ue

TRINITY CITY OF PRAISE - BACK-2-
SCHOOL NATIONAL PRAYER RALLY

e Apostles Ed & Lee Watson and
the family of Trinity City of Praise will
host a Back to School National Prayer
Rally to cover the country’s education
system on Sunday, August 30 from
Spm to 6:30 pm on Rawson
Square. The Minister of Education
Carl Bethel and the Minister of Sports
Desmond Banister have been invited
to join with parents, teachers, students
in this prayer event. The organisers
believe that this time of prayer will
help those facing challenges in this
new school year.

“Our prayers will focus on the stu-
dents’ success in the classroom,
teacher commitment, provision of
resources for the parents, overall safe-

ty on the school grounds and during
transit and for the structure of the
education system as a whole.

Local clergy including Rev Patrick
Paul, the Bahamas Christian Council
President, will also speak blessings
over the education system.

HOLY CROSS YOUTH- JAM CONCERT

e Holy Cross Anglican Church is
having its annual Youth-Jam concert
this Saturday to help prepare kids for
the new school semester.

According to Father Ethan
Ferguson, assistant priest and youth
minister for the church, the event is all
about the children.

He explained: “It is originally an
outdoor concert, we bring in various
gospel artists, along with other drama
groups and entertainment just to get

the kids all hyped about going back to
school.”

With this year’s theme being
‘Children Of God Arise,’ his ministry
hopes to cater to the needs of the chil-
dren from the inside out.

“We usually have short presenta-
tions on issues relevant to youngsters
such as drug use, prevention, sex, vio-
lence, and how to study.”

He explained that the event is really
a fun day for the children to help them
celebrate the end of the summer,
which gaining the necessary skills for
the school year.

It all happens this Saturday with
artists like Ricardo Clark, Kenyatta
Taylor, Ryan Jupp, Lyrically Blessed,
Holy Cross Dance Team, and others at
the church ground’s Highbury Park,
Soldier Road.

Did you recently give birth to
the newest little angel on earth?
Have you and your beloved recently
tied the knot? Is your church plan-
ning a special event? Tribune
Religion wants to hear from you!

We want to know about the spe-
cial things going on in your life, so
go ahead and send in your wedding
photographs, birth announcements
and church activities schedule to be
posted in upcoming Tribune Religion
sections.

This service is free. Send all infor-
mation, including (especially) photo-
graphs, to
features@tribunemedia.net.
Information can be hand delivered
to The Tribune at Shirley and
Deveaux Streets or call the Religion
section @ 502.2368.
The Tribune



BEM hosts The Kin

THE programme focused on
preparing delegates to teach the
Kingdom of God through a 3-day
intensive seminar with topics includ-
ing, The Long Human _ Search,
Rediscovering the Original Kingdom,
How to Influence Your Society, The
Kingdom Concept and The Mind of
Jesus.

In the session the Quality of
Kingdoms, Dr Munroe said humans
are hungry for a deeper meaning of
life that religion cannot fulfill. He
explained that Jesus Christ did not
bring religion to the world, but taught
the message of the Kingdom of God
through parables and declarations.
"The problem is that what we're doing
in different religions is not completing
our lives and we still live in spiritual
poverty. This is why religious people
are always pre-occupied with busy-
ness, because if you're busy you don't
have time to think about your empti-
ness," said Dr Munroe.

Pastors from all over the world
attended the MMI Kingdom Seminar.

RELIGION

Florida Pastor Christian Garcia was
excited to be a part of the first
Kingdom Seminar and plans to bring
members of his church to other con-
ferences hosted by Dr Munroe. "My
wife and I, we had such a wonderful
time here. Dr Munroe invited us to
The Bahamas earlier this year and we
decided to come down for this event.
It has been amazing, it's changed our
lives. And it wasn't just about the sem-
inar we got to go sightseeing in Nassau
and visit some of the other hotels and
we're definitely coming back," he said.

Pastor Jide-David Modede of
London, UK, a frequent seminar
attendee of Dr Munroe's events said
that every time he visits The Bahamas,
he has a new experience. "This is my
second time to The Bahamas in the
last four weeks, my wife and family
come together on an annual basis, and
while this time was not a vacation time
for me, I still had a great time learning
and getting to experience different
things about Bahamian culture,"he
explained.

Thursday, August 27, 2009 ® PG 27

INTERNATIONAL Delegates attend The Kingdom
Seminar at Bahamas Faith Ministries International.



Dr. Munroe and Deputy Director of Tourism, Religious Group, Linville Johnson.
PG 28 ® Thursday, August 27, 2009

IN keeping with their church's vision, “Love
God, Love People, Serve the World”, and a
mandate from their senior pastor, Pastor
Wilbur Outten, to become more service ori-
ented, the youth ministry of Freeport Bible
Church recently took a very special mission
trip to Abaco August 5 - 10, 2009. A group of
twenty five persons including nine leaders and
sixteen students travelled to Dundas Town,
Abaco to conduct a few service projects in the
area.

Quoting the scripture, “I tell you the truth,
whatever you did for one of the least of these
brothers of mine, you did for me” (Matt
25:40), Minister Kyle Maycock, Youth
Coordinator at Freeport Bible Church said:
“Jesus told His disciples that whoever wants to
be great among men must first become a ser-
vant.

“Our trip to Abaco was a small step taken to
cultivate and nurture an attitude of compas-
sion and service within our students. We felt
the need to expose our students to local
opportunities to serve their neighbours with
compassion and love as Jesus would. “Our
goal is to ultimately make Christian service a
permanent part of the Bahamian psyche and
culture.”

While in Abaco the group did house clean-
ing and lawn maintenance for senior citizens
and assisted a local church with the construc-
tion of their new sanctuary by putting up sheet
rock, site cleaning and offered assistance in
any other way they could.

The residents were quite appreciative of
their kind gestures.

The local Department of Social Services
identified the work projects for the students
and the group was hosted by one of their affil-
iated churches, Friendship Tabernacle Church,
where Pastor Silbert Mills is the pastor.

The students all claimed to have been
greatly impacted by the trip. One female par-
ticipant said she has become more grateful
for what she has after seeing the way that
some people live.

Prior to the Abaco trip, the students con-
ducted a “Service Auction” where they pro-
vided services in the areas of car washing,
lawn maintenance, and filing. The service
auction served a two fold purpose; it assisted
in subsidising the cost of the trip while also
affording the students the opportunity to
gain some work experience. They wish to
express their sincere thanks to all who sup-
ported the auction. A special thank you is
extended to Paul Ross and the staff of Nassau
Insurance Brokers (formerly Trinity
Insurance Ltd.). The group also extends grat-
itude to Pastor Silbert Mills and the family of
Friendship Tabernacle Church, Abaco, for
their hospitality.

While the students enjoyed the opportunity
to be able to travel together and have fun as
young people, the experience of unselfishly
volunteering their service to help others, made
this summer vacation a truly enriching one.

RELIGION

An enriching summer experience

The Tribune

ABOVE: Malaika McKenzie
& Tyeasha Lewis gives the
kitchen of a local senior citi-
zen a make-over.

CENTER: A few of the youth
work hard to clean the yard
of a local senior citizen in
Abaco.

LEFT: Randall Cooper jr,
Dickenson Cepoudy, Lester
Rolle, Jason Gibbs and
Micheal Roker assisting a
local church in Abaco with
the construction of its new
sanctuary.








PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Lawyers to seek union cash probe C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.228THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY WITH T-STORMS HIGH 90F LOW 79F LAWYERS working on behalf of the president of the Bahamas Hotel Cater-i ng and Allied Workers U nion say they will file a police complaint in connection with almost $700,000 allegedly transferred by union executives. Attorney Damian Gomez said it was of "urgent" concern for the union to try to recoup the money to meet expenses. He said he would also seek a Supreme Court order to freeze the transfers. "They have to first of all locate funds in (those accounts, the union has a lot of claims for sick benefits, and finding in the short term $665,000 is not an easy task," he told The Tribune . Y esterday, union presi d ent Roy Colebrook said he did not think the money dispute would affect the union's capability of meeting payroll for its employees, but added it was too early to say conclusively. "The fact of the matter is we have to wait and see," Mr Colebrook said. Mr Gomez called the act a clear "abuse" of power and said the union plans to press criminal charges. President wants police investigation of ‘transferred funds’ The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com I N S I D E CLASSIFIEDSTRADER CLASSIFIEDSTRADER CLASSIFIEDSTRADER I N S I D E OBITUARIES and RELIGION INTODAY’STRIBUNE JOBSAND HELPWANTED L L O O A A D D S S O O F F CARS! CARS! CARS! SEE page 11 A FENDER-BENDER at the junction of Deveaux and Dowdeswell Streets caused damage to four cars includ ing the parked Crown car of Minister of Culture Charles Maynard yesterday. A woman driving a Nissan Altima heading west on Dowdeswell Street and another woman driving a Nissan Maxima heading south on Deveaux Street collided, causing the first driver to swerve out of the way, witnesses said. The first driver then crashed into a Ford Explorer parked in front of the 102.9 FM radio station which backed into the parked Crown sedan driven by Mr Maynard. Mr Maynard, and the owner of the SUV, radio personality Eddie Carter were inside the station at the time of the accident. Police and EMS were called to the scene but no one was seriously injured. ABOVE: Two of the four cars damaged in the fender-bender. RIGHT: Minister of Culture Charles Maynard inspects the damage to his Crown car yesterday T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f MINIS TER’S CAR ONE OF FOUR IN CRASH CUSTOMS officers could h old a "massive demonstrat ion" as early as the weekend i f Government does not meet a Friday deadline to halt the transfer and interdiction of s ome 30 officers. President of the Bahamas P ublic Service Union (BPSU J ohn Pinder said the threat of large scale industrial action at the Department of Customs would be next. He alleged t hat Government violated its i ndustrial agreement and did not follow procedure in its m ove to transfer and interdict t he officers. "If they don't reply by Friday we will take the nexts tep There could be a mas s ive demonstration. We wrote to the permanent secretary and the minister for the public service and we have not gotten any response," said Mr Pinder. O n July 31 the Ministry of Finance said that 16 officers were being interdicted pending the outcome of miscon d uct charges against them. Ten more officers were advised that they were to be transferred to other depart ments. T hree other officers were retired in the public interest a nd one was being given early retirement. Customs officers could hold mass demonstration AS A second man is charged in connection with the July murder of a Bahamian man in Florida, police in that State are now saying the victim came to the US to conduct a large drug transaction. Last week Eric White, 31 of West Palm Beach was first to be charged with first degree murder and armed robbery with a firearm in connection with the killing of Kahlil Holmes. Now Alonzo Benjamin, 31, of Lake Park, has also been charged, appearing in court earlier this week. And for the first time, police in West Palm Beach have revealed some hint into the circumstances surrounding Holmes’ death saying he had come to do a drug deal, according to the Florida Sun-Sentinel. Holmes’ half-sister Juliet had told The Tribune that she did not know why her Second man charged in connection with Bahamian’s murder in Florida SEE page 10 FORECASTERS are hoping the projected path for Tropical Storm Danny does not change in the next 12 hours, as a shift to the west could spell trouble for the Abacos. At press time last night, the storm system was predicted to move along a par allel path to the east of the Bahamas, missing Abaco by approximately 250 miles. However, meteorologists at the US-based forecast company AccuWeather said there is still a slight chance Danny will track farther west. The forecast models yesterday indicated that the Abacos would make a lucky escape and only be affected by slightly increased winds and some rain showers at around 8 o’clock tonight. AccuWeather said they predict Danny will become a hurricane by tomorrow or early Saturday. While the Bahamas is not SEE page 10 Bahamas could be affected by Tropical Storm Danny SEE page 10 A MAN was taken into custody after a shooting incident in which a relative received leg injuries, according to police. While the identities of those involved have not been released, police said the victim in hospital is in a “non life-threatening” condition. Police, who seized a weapon, said investigations are continuing. Man in custody after shooting incident

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THE international community yesterday mourned the death of Senator Edward “Ted” Kennedy who died at his home in New England after a long battle with brain cancer. T he 77-year-old was the only one of his three brothers to die a natural death. H e was the youngest brother of President John F Kennedy and Senator Robert Kennedy, both victims of assassinations. His oldest brother Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Jr, 29, was killed on August 12, 1944 during World War II when thep lane filled with explosives that he was piloting from England to France explodedb efore he and another crew member could bail out. Senator Kennedy came to o ffice in November 1962, and a t the time of his death was the second most senior mem ber of the Senate after Robert B yrd of West Virginia, and the third-longest-serving senator in United States history. H e was graduated from H arvard in 1956 and from the University of Virginia School of Law in 1959. H is 1958 marriage to Vir ginia Joan Bennett produced three children and ended ind ivorce in 1982. In 1992 he m arried Victoria Anne Reggie, a Washington lawyer. He was a manager in his b rother John's successful 1960 campaign for the presidency. He then worked as an A ssistant District Attorney for Suffolk County, Massa chusetts. He entered the Senate in a 1 962 special election to fill the seat once held by his brother John. Senator Kennedy was seriously injured in an airplane crash in 1964 and sufferedf rom lifelong back pain as a result. He was elected to his first six-year Senate term in 1964 and was re-elected in 1970, 1 976, 1982, 1988, 1994, 2000 and 2006. Senator Kennedy battled a m alignant brain tumour first diagnosed in May 2008, which greatly limited his appear-a nces in the Senate; though h e survived longer than doc tors first predicted, he died just before midnight on Tuesd ay at his home in Hyannis Port, Massachusetts. Yesterday, President B arack Obama led tributes to the deceased politician, describing him as a colleague, c ounsellor and a friend. President Obama, whom Senator Kennedy endorsed d uring last year’s presidential race, said: "His ideas and ideals are stamped on scoreso f laws and reflected in mill ions of lives.” Funeral services for Senator Kennedy will be held on S aturday morning at a Boston, Massachusetts, church before his burial inA rlington National Cemetery. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM RBDF apprehends 196 Haitian migrants A TOTAL of 196 Haitian migrants were appreh ended in the Exuma chain after they were spott ed by members of the Royal Bahamas Defence F orce on Monday morning. While on routine patrol, Defence Force vessel P-42 under the command of Petty Officer Lincoln Rolle spotted a 40-foot Haitian sailing sloop five nautical miles southwest of Darby Island. Upon further investigation, they discovered the migrants 149 men and 47 women who all appeared to be in fair health. T he Haitian migrants did not possess the nece ssary documents to enter the country and were s ubsequently taken into custody. They were removed from their unsanitary vessel and taken onboard two Defence Force craft, P-48 and P49. Both vessels arrived in New Providence at approximately 11pm on Tuesday. The migrants were handed over to Immigration officials for further processing. International community mourns Edward Kennedy RBDF MARINES direct the disembarking of the immigrants from the two Defence Force vessels, P-48 and P 49. R B D F p h o t o / A b l e M e c h a n i c A l R a h m i n g SENATOR EDWARD ‘TED’ KENNEDY(AP

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By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – The expa t riate workforce at the Grand Bahama Shipyard has been reduced as a result of ad ecline in business this summ er. Carl Gustaf-Rotkirch, chairman and CEO, said that none of the Bahamian workers have been laid off. “We have had a very slow s ummer, but we expect that business will pick up from mid-September and then we will have a very good work load up to the beginning of spring,” Mr Gustaf-Rotkirch told The Tribune. He reported that the shipyard now employs a total of 750 workers, having reduced its workforce from around 800w orkers. There are 320 Bahamians employed there. “We have laid off and our numbers has been going d own; we have reduced during this summer period . . . and had sent some expatriatew orkers home, but we have not sent any Bahamians home,” said the executive. T he company instead entered into arrangements with union representatives for “rolling” or temporary lay-o ffs for its Bahamian work ers. Employees “We have had rolling lay o ffs during July and August. It was something that was negotiated with the union where we had an arrangement. . . in such a way that during the four week period there was a one week lay-off fore mployees, but from a rolling basis when the yard was inoperable,” he said. “This arrangement did not affect employees’ income; we paid some compensation and we also paid some wage related costs.” According to GustafRotkirch, the management started noticing a decline in business in May. However, he expects to bring in some workers when the load picks up in September. I n March, the shipyard experienced one of its busiest periods. During that time, thef acility acquired its third dock at a cost of $60 million. The shipyard is the largest s hip care facility in the region, with the largest dry dock in the region. Operations began in 1999, and grew from ane nterprise earning a few mil lion dollars a year and with under 100 employees to a full scale facility earning revenue of over $130 million. There have been reports of a possible strike at the facility over allegations that two union shop stewards were wrongfully dismissed. The Grand Bahama Port Authority Workers Union has filed a dispute with the Department Labour and has threatened to take a strike vote if the workers are not reinstated. Mr Gustaf-Rotkirch did not w ish to comment on the mat ter. He said the shipyard has not met with employees. “I have read the reports of wrongful dismissal of two shop stewards and at this stage we would not like to comment because it is in process,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net ALTHOUGHdescribing their behaviour as “absolutely wrong” a Social Services official said the department will not be pressing charges against those who “hijacked” furniture des-t ined for the under-privileged. The source said that while the Department took steps to determine who the culprits were a nd acted on tips to find out who might have r eceived furniture from these individuals, it will not be pursuing the matter any further. “It’s a sad thing that people take advantage o f things,” said the official, adding however that to press charges would cause a “whole host of other problems.” T his comes after pandemonium broke out at R M Bailey school on Monday afternoon when u nwanted furniture from the RIU Hotel on Paradise Island, which is undergoing renovat ions, was taken by delivery men who were supposed to be driving it to the school so it could be donated to the poor. H undreds of people had gathered at the s chool as well as outside the hotel waiting for their chance to get a pick of desks, television sets, mattresses and other household items that were to be given away in a generous gesture byt he operators of RIU hotel in a Social Services c o-lead operation. But the delivery men reportedly “hijacked” a number of trucks loaded with these items and took them to other locations where they either sold them or handed them out to familym embers and friends. Minister of State for S ocial Services Loretta B utler-Turner said that s he was very disturbed by t he events and could now see why other hotels “just g et rid of their stuff” when they don’t want it anymore. T he Social Services s ource yesterday told T he T ribune t hat the delivery drivers involved were i dentified and will not be doing any work for the department in the future. In a tribune242.com poll, only four respond ents said that the hard economic times led to t he furniture being hijacked, while 77 thought “weak morality” was to blame. No charges over ‘hijacked’ furniture THE Ministry of Works and Transport announced that the a ccess to Vista Marina w est of the Shell Serv ice Station has been closed to traffic to effect the constructionof Corridor 18, part of the New Providence Road ImprovementP roject. “The Ministry of Works and Transport takes this opportunity to apologise to the public for any inconvenience that may be c aused by this closure and requests that the public use the alternate r oute – Grove Avenue through Coral Drive,” said the ministry in a s tatement. We anticipate that t he contractor, Jose C artellone Construcciones Civiles, will c arefully carry out the works in accordance w ith the contract specifications. “We look forward to y our full co-operation and encourage the driv ing public to exercise patience and caution when travelling in thea rea during the construction phase,” it s aid. Closure of Vista Marina access A LOW-COSTairline designed for business travellers has filed appli cations with the US Department of Transportation to begin flying into Nassau. AirTran Airways yesterday announced plans to start service to three Caribbean destinations, including the Bahamas, Aruba and Jamaica, lat er this year and early in 2010 from a combination of key American cities. The Florida-based airline said it proposes to service Nassau and Montego Bay, Jamaica, from Atlanta, Baltimore and Orlando; while service to Aruba would originate in Atlanta and Orlando. "Adding our low-cost, high-quality service from some of our largest operations to some of the most popular desti nations in the Caribbeanis a win-win for consumers and for AirTran Airways," said Kevin Healy, senior vice-president of marketing and planning in a statement. "There's nothing quite like jetting off to a tropical island in the middle of winter, and we look forward to making that possible from some of the largest cities in our network." GBShipyard expat workforce reduced T HEBahamas Elect ricity Corporation a dmitted that it continues to experience “generation problems” inC entral Andros. B EC issued a state ment yesterday explaini ng that a mobile generat or is being sent to the power station in Fresh Creek. “We anticipate that the e lectricity supply will be restored by week's end,”it said. “Our staff will continue to work diligently to correct these generation problems for our con s umers in Central A ndros. “The corporation apologises for any inconven ience caused.” Low-cost airline plans flights to Nassau BEC pr oblems in Central Andros Loretta Butler-Turner CROWDS outside of the RIUHotel on Monday evening.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. T here are a lot of issues pertaining to the Port location. Some people have issues, some trying to find issues, some along r acial lines but what I know is it has the country divided. In my opinion what I heard in many settings is that the “Bay StreetG uys” don’t want to drive all the way to Clifton because some of them too old, some want to save on the cost of gas so, Arawak Cay is closer anda s we all know they are the ones who control the finance in the country and are the financial engine of the FNM. W hat concerns me most is what those in their inner circle are saying. It is claimed they do not want to drive through the “nig ger” areas to get to work espe cially at night and having to travel along Carmichael Road. To me, in 2009 this kind of thinking is deplorable but it a ppears to me they have no i ntention of putting prejudice aside. One is claimed to have said they could more take the "black Bahamians" but to have to deal with all those filthy Haitians and their nasty child ren is too much for them. My r eason for writing this letter is simple because before the Port issue came up I suggested in 1987 that it would make sense to move the capital to Andros. I stated in previous letters that w hen I suggested that Minister P eter Bethell responded that I w ant Andros because I am f rom there and I told him put it in Eleuthera then because New Providence is too con gested so we need to make a serious move. Not only have I said move the capital but move all Government offices to Andros and let those who work in those offices commute to Andros. It only takes 10 minutes by air and if the port is at Clifton then it should only take about 30 minutes by Fast Ferry. In two years Andros, South Abaco and the Berry Islands would benefit if the port is at Clifton because farmers and fishermen would be able to bring their produce and catch into New Providence in the morning and be back home in the evening. This is commons ense to me but like we say common sense ain’t common. We are spending million of doll ars to repair Lynden Pindling A irport why not take that mon e y beautify the airport and build a new larger airport in Andros to accommodate large air craft from Europe and Asia, name the airport Clarence A Bain Airport and use the airport as a Hub for Turks Island, Cuba, Haiti and the Cayman I slands. When I heard both Governments talking about building a university in New Providence and now they are looking for land in New Providence to build a hospital. Well the last time I heard such foolishness is when Christopher Columbus said he discovered The Bahamas and then said he met Indians here. AUDLEY D HANNA Sr Nassau, August, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune . W ith yet another senseless crime, the people are again up in arms demanding the police, the government or somebody d o something about crime. Ordinary citizens are crying out for justice, pastors are preaching. What are they saying? Hang, Hang, Hang! S igh. Here we go again. Every time there is another senseless crime in this country, there is this huge chorus crying out to hang the perpetrators, as if that in and of itself would cause crime to cease instantly. Not withstanding researchp roving the world over that this is simply not the case, and thef act that it is inhumane, they still cry out for it. Why? Simply a nswer, they don't know what else to do and unfortunately apparently neither does the police force or our government! In a recent Tribune article t he Minister of National Security asserted that, crime was ap ersonal choice and to para phrase him, if we were able to p ut two police officers in every home we could do something a bout it, but unfortunately that was not feasible. People need to make better choices. With that type of attitude from the very top it’s no wonder that the c ountry is in the state it is in. Where there is no vision the p eople will suffer! To be fair to the Minister t his crime situation did not hap pen overnight and neither can it be resolved overnight. But the attitude he presents is as if to throw his hands up and say there's nothing that can be done. Coming from the man who is supposed to be leading the fight against crime this isd isturbing to say the least. Let me present three areas that the Government could address that will cause crime to d ecrease significantly within the next five years. C ourt/Legal System The court system in this c ountry has to be more effi cient. There are too many cases b efore the courts to be dealt with by the number of Justices available. The minister should actively engage professionals within the sector and outsidea nalyst to come up with solutions and then implement them.S econdly, the bail system needs serious review and correction. I t is a known fact that a large percentage of crimes are committed by persons on bail. Therefore correcting this system could have the most imme d iate impact on crime in this country. P enal System Her Majesty's Fox Hill P rison is legendary for its harsh conditions. This prison has to be upgraded to a more modern facility and expanded to avoid over crowding. In addition the w hole purpose of the facility has to be re-evaluated. The cur r ent model is just not working; according to a prison reform r eport in 2003 there is a 70 per cent recidivism rate in this country. The focus in prison has t o be placed on education, vocational training and life counseling. Basically we need to focus more on rehabilitation r ather than retribution. Education For more than a decade the graduating grade average has been D or lower. Many stud ents are simply given leaving certificates because they do not meet the minimum grade required to graduate. These persons are functioning illiterates, unable to think through complex problems, make logical leaps to find solutions, can-n ot think in the abstract, cannot comprehend and are easilyi nfluenced. With these statis tics is anyone seriously surp rised that crime has been increasing at an alarming rate? There is a direct correlation between crime and education. For instance, in 1993 two thirdso f all incarcerated men in the USA did not graduate highs chool (Freeman, 1996 tunately definitive Bahamian s tatistics are not readily available, but it follows that they w ould be similar. There needs to be a paradigm shift in this country in regards to these three areas. It is time for our leaders to make b old decisions, step to the front and lead. We cannot continued oing the same things and somehow expecting better r esults. GR WILSON Nassau, August 25, 2009 C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm PRINCETON, N.J. Two international o pinion polls released this summer indicate t hat global views toward the U.S. are improving in no small part due to the election of Barack Obama as president. T he polls, by the Pew Global Attitudes Project and worldpublicopinion.org, both stress that President Obama is viewed positively in most of the countries surveyed, but questions remain in the Middle East aboutt he direction of U.S. policies. Conducting an informal survey of analysts f rom or based in the Arab world, the experts with whom we spoke emphatically agree: To i ncrease and sustain U.S. standing in the Middle East, Obama must achieve some gains quickly with the Israeli-Palestinian peace process. In the Middle East, “People seem to trust President Obama and are will-i ng to give him the benefit of the doubt,” said Amjad Attallah, director of the MiddleE ast programme at the New America Foun dation, a think tank. The analysts concur thats ince taking office the president has made all the right moves, speaking with a respectf ul and rational tone to Arabs and Muslims about U.S. foreign policy toward the region. While the U.S. presence in Iraq, as well as democracy and human rights in the region, are key issues, “the Palestinian-Israeli issue is o n the consciousness of every Arab and Muslim everywhere in the world,” said Selamah N ematt, international editor for the popular Daily Beast blog. F aris Brizat, a pollster and adjunct professor at Qatar University, warned, “There is a g rowing sense of apathy, people are losing faith,” in the Arab world that Mideast peace can be achieved. Summing up the thoughts of every expert with whom we spoke, Nematt stated, “President Obama has got to deliver s omething.” Even as the White House has set in motion a multi-pronged diplomatic initiative in the region, the environment in which the Obama a dministration must operate in many ways could not be more challenging: In the Palestinian territories the long-dominant Fatah party controls the West Bank, while the rad icalized Hamas, which refuses to recognize I srael, controls Gaza. Indeed, Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah r ecently lamented that such internal divisions have done more damage “in a few months” to t he Palestinians’ cause than had years of con flict with Israel. And while Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has come toe ndorse the two-state solution supported by the White House, Netanyahu, citing security c oncerns, thus far has refused to freeze Israeli settlement activity in the West Bank, and has i nsisted that the issue of Palestinian refugees must be solved outside Israel’s borders. Subsequently, Saad Eddin Ibrahim, an Egyptian scholar and democracy activist, argues that whatever plan Obama devises, he should “speak to Israelis and Palestinians d irectly about the benefits of resolving the c onflict, and in doing so bring people back into the political process, rather than relying on their leaders who have been draggingt heir feet for over 60 years.” In fact, in August senior White House officials told reporters that the Obama administration, building on the success of the president’s June speech in Cairo, plans to launcha public relations campaign directed at Israeli, Palestinian, and Arab publics, to articulate thep resident’s comprehensive vision for Mideast peace. This plan was echoed by a recent r eport, “Window of Opportunity for a TwoState Solution,” from the Centre for American Progress, a think tank, which encouraged the Obama administration to launch a “public outreach and strategic communicationse ffort in the Middle East,” with the aim of “building the foundations of public supporta nd to prepare public opinion for the likely concessions involved” in any final deal. S uch a campaign, the report’s authors assert, “cannot wait for an actual negotiated a greement that can then be ‘sold’” to these publics. Achieving gains in the peace process involves overcoming vast historical, diplomatic, and policy challenges, which cannot be swept aside by a PR campaign. But failing t o engage in a strategic outreach initiative and conducting effective public diplomacy i n the pursuit of policy interests does have consequences for peace. F or example, Hady Amr, director of the Brookings Doha Centre think tank in Qatar, a sserted that the Arab League has lost a cru cial opportunity to effectively explain its peace plan, endorsed by all of its members, to Israelis. “If the Arab countries really wanted to eliminate all doubts that they’re serious a bout the plan, they would’ve translated their peace plan into Hebrew, “taken out ads abouti t in Israeli newspapers,” Amr said. “This is an era of global public relations.” T hough major foreign policy decisions and high-level diplomacy should not be determined by public opinion polls, in the Mideast Obama clearly has a chance to build on his reputation and what some experts described a s his likeability based on his personal nar rative. “The industry of America-bashing isn ot thriving as it was before Obama,” quipped Ibrahim. The U.S. should commu n icate that it is serious about its commitment to the peace process, demonstrating to all parties that the benefits of peace, particular l y in the form of U.S. support and solidarity, outweigh the costs of conflict. Otherwise, the W hite House risks squandering such leverage and losing credibility with publics in a region c ritical to America’s interests. (This article was written by Steven Barnes and Nadia Bilbassy c.2009 Hearst Newspapers). My three ways to cut crime LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net New energy needed in Mid-East peace POSITION AVAILABLEPERSONAL ASSISTANTJOB REQUIREMENTS, SKILLS & RESPONSIBILITIES:The applicant must be fully versed in the Microsoft Ofce Suite of programs (Word, Excel, PowerPoint) -Must have excellent oral & written communication skills and be able to follow instructions -Must be self motivated -Must be able to use the Apple Mactintosh computer platform -Must be well organized and be able to manage time efciently in a fast paced environment Qualied individuals should submit a PDF / Word Doc. rsum to: nassaujob@hotmail.com My view on the port location controversy

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THEBahamas is expanding its efforts in the war on narcotics trafficking to include stopping the diversion of pharmaceuticals and precursor chemicals from “licit into illicit” channels, National Security Permanent Secretary MissouriS herman-Peter said. She said these efforts w ould include the implem entation of “systems reco mmended to tackle those issues.” The Bahamas has been resolute in its efforts” to c ounter the trafficking of d rugs and psychotropic substances, she asserted. Legislation We have decisively addressed pivotal matters s uch as money laundering, have amended and/ or adopted legislation asa ppropriate, and have established mechanisms including the Financial I ntelligence Unit,” said Mrs S herman-Peter. The areas generally targeted by National AntiDrug Plans are well-knownt o us in the Bahamas (as we have worked relentlessly and tirelessly in thesea reas for decades.” Mrs Sherman-Peter was addressing officials from several government agen-c ies attending a three-day t raining workshop on the Bahamas National AntiD rug Plan, 2010-2014. T hose agencies included the National Anti-DrugS ecretariat, Bahamas National Drug Council, B ahamas National Drug Agency, the Ministry ofH ealth, the Royal Bahamas Defence Force, Her Majesty’s Prison, the Cus toms Department and the P ort Department. O fficials from the Mini stry of National Security a lso attended the workshop. T hey are expected to help draft the country’s next National Anti-Drug Plan. The workshop covered topics such as institutional framework analysis, legal framework analysis, strateg ic planning and social a nalysis. Mrs Sherman-Peter said t he lessons learned would c ulminate in the launch of a new phase” in the Bahamas’ drug control efforts in the form of a sec-o nd five-year National Anti-Drug Plan. The first plan ends this year. T he workshop was hosted by the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Com mission (CICAD j unction with the Bahamas’ N ational Anti-Drug Secre tariat, and was facilitated by Maria Beatriz Galvis,C ICAD Specialist. CICAD was established in 1986 by the General Assembly of the Organisa t ion of American States ( OAS) as the Western H emisphere’s policy forum o n all aspects of the drug p roblem. Programmes E ach member-state appoints a high-ranking representative to the commis-s ion, which meets twice a year. CICAD promotes r egional co-operation and co-ordination among the 34 O ASmember-states t hrough action programmes carried out by the Perman ent Secretariat. Its core mission is to strengthen human and institutional capabilities and harness the collective energy of its member-states to reduce the production, traffickinga nd use and abuse of drugs in the Americas. “Drug control is serious w ork and the National AntiDrug Plan we develop here, must provide the framework in which we continue to dot his serious work,” Mrs S herman Peter-said. The Bahamas to expand war on drug trafficking NATIONAL SECURITY Permanent Secretary Missouri Sherman-Peter

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM WhilethechildrenatTheBilneyLaneHomearecertainlynotthinkingaboutgoing back to school, theteamatProvidenceAdvisorsisbeingproactiveandhavemadea donationtowardspreparingthemforthenewacademicschoolyear.Kenwood Kerr, explained that as Providence Advisors celebrates their 3-year anniversary this summer, the group decided to continue its commitment to contribute to the positive development of Bahamian youth. Janet Brown, Administrator for the home, was on hand to accept the donation and expressed gratitude, stating that the funds will go a long way in the purchase of uniforms and school supplies for the eight children in her care. With over $400 million in assets under management, Providence Advisors Limited is the largest pension administrator in The Bahamas offering a full range Bahamas Chamber of Commerce Business Awards.PROVIDENCE ADVISORS PREPARES BILNEY LANE FOR BACK TO SCHOOL Pictured (L-R, CFO, Providence Advisors; Kenwood Kerr, CEO & President, Providence Advisors; Janet Brown, Administrator, Bilney Lane Children’s Home. (Photo by Leah Davis Goodman’sBayCorporateCentre|P.O.BoxAP59223,Slot409|WestBayStreet, Nassau, The Bahamas | T:: 242.328.7115 though 9 | F:: 242.328.7129 E:: info@providenceadvisors.net | W:: www.providenceadvisors.net IN RECOGNITIONof the death of former South Korean President Kim Dae-jung, Governor-General Arthur Hanna and other government officials s igned the Book of Condolence at Zode House on Tuesday. Mr Kim is remembered mostly for his passionate efforts to unify North and South Korea. A s president, he led the hist oric inter-Korean summit in J une 2000, the first of its kind s ince the division of country 55 y ears ago. H is ‘Sunshine Policy’ helped l essen the hostility between S outh and North Korea and led t o a new wave of reconciliation, co-operation and peace on the Korean peninsula. I n December 2000, he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in recognition of his contribution to promoting democracy a nd human rights in Asian countries and his pursuit of policies to achieve inter-Korea n reconciliation. Bahamians remember former South Korean President Kim MICHAEL Barnett conducted his first official act as Chief Justice when he swore in Sir Arthur Foulkes as Deputy to the G overnor-General at Government House yesterday. Governor-General Arthur Hanna and Mrs Beryl Hanna are on a visit to Miami. S ir Arthur is the director general at Bahamas Informat ion Services. Mr Barnett’s appointment was announced over the weekend and he was sworn in on Monday. The new Chief Justice conducts first official act SIR ARTHUR FOULKES is administered the oath of office as Deputy to the Governor-General by Chief Justice Michael Barnett. D erek Smith / BIS R IGHT: N ewly sworn in Chief Justice Michael Barnett signs the Book of Condolence on the passing of South Korean President Kim Dae-jung. G OVERNOR-GENERAL A rthur Hanna signs the Book of Condolence while Honorary Consul forK orea Maxwell Gibson observes. P e t e r R a m s a y / B I S

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By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net DESPITE the efforts of a dedicated team from Atlantis’ marine rehabilitation centre a severely emaciated manatee which came from Florida to make the Bahamas its new home has died. The journeying sea creature had been spotted in various locations throughout the Bahamian islands finally being rescued from waters off Clarence Town, Long Island, last Thursday but by the time it got help it was too late. Despite “round-the-clock care” the manatee expired 48 hours after the rescue. At that time, the endangered Florida manatee nicknamed “Crusoe” after the British adventurer weighed 750 pounds, less than half the amount of a healthy adult manatee. Charles Manire, a veterinar ian with Dolphin Cay at Atlantis said the manatee’s death was a sobering occasion for him and his team of marine mammal specialists. “We’ve really wanted to be able to help her and its sad forall of us to not be able to do more than what we were able to,” he told The Tribune. According to the veterinarian, tests found nothing medically wrong with the manatee believed to be around 30 years old but the waters of the Bahamas offer an inadequatesupply of the type of vegetation the species feeds on. Consequently, “Crusoe” ended up extremely weak from chronic malnutrition and suf fering from an electrolyte imbalance. “She arrived in very critical condition and her chances of survival were very slim from the outset,” said Dr Manire. Dolphin Cay is home to one of the only live marine mammal rescue centres and is part of the Bahamas Marine Mammal Stranding Network. Their swift rescue attempt last week came after Dr Manire received information indicating that the manatee had shown up in Long Island, some 30 to 40 miles from Rum Cay, where it was last sighted in April, 2009. With the approval of the Bahamian government and the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Dr Manire flew to the site only to find “Crusoe” in an even less healthy state than it had been in when previously spotted. “We were preparing to rescue her in Rum Cay and she disappeared and didn’t show back up until last week,” said Dr Manire. More marine mammal spe cialists flew to Long Island to assist with the effort and they were able to get the manatee onto a DC-3 cargo plane and fly it to Nassau, where it was transferred to Dolphin Cay. TMF airlines provided the plane that was used for the rescue and the Miami Seaquarium had agreed to provide a home for the manatee if the marine specialists were able to stabilise it. A release issued by Atlantis yesterday stated: “Despite the unfortunate outcome, Crusoe will yield valuable information to researchers worldwide by adding to the growing body of knowledge about this unique mammal.” Meanwhile, Dr Manire told The Tribune that manatees could actually become a more common sight in the Bahamas. “It’s not very common but it seems to be happening more and more and there’s some thought that as the population is increasing in Florida they may be actually be expanding their range and showing up in the Bahamas more and more,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Manatee dies despite Atlantis team’s efforts THE TEAM from Atlantis’ marine rehabilitation centre attempted to save the manatee. Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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TWO local companies are giving students of the Bahamas Technical and V ocational Institute (BTVI t he opportunity to learn new s kills which will make them more employable. Martin-Senour Paints and Automotive and Industrial D istributors (AID d onated a $15,000 high-tech t ech base mixing system for use in the institute's automotive programme. The donation, which was facilitated by Juan Cardenas, district sales manager,t he Martin-Senour Compan y, and Marty Smith, paint t echnician at AID, is the late st example of the recent partnerships between BTVI and the two companies. “AID has been a valued partner for many years,” s aid Don Bain, head of the department for the automot ive programme at BTVI. “In particular, Jason Watson, manager at AID hasb een there for our programme whenever we neede d his advice or assistance.” “They help us with resources and we give them e very opportunity to hire our best students.” Y esterday and today Martin-Senour Paints used the institute as a resource for training and providing workshops for paint technicians in the area. "This is a wonderful o pportunity for us too," said S ean Adderley, public relat ions officer. "Not only has MartinSenour Paints donated a tech base mixing system, but our students and instructors also have the chance to par-t icipate in their factory traini ng here on campus. They w ill be able to learn firsth and the latest in technology from the manufacturers themselves." With this partnership, students graduating from B TVI's automotive programme will have general k nowledge of MartinSenour Paints brand, which will make them highlye mployable as prospective technicians, the company s aid. Companies like AID and Martin-Senour Paints are i nstrumental in helping us," said Dr Iva Dahl, manager a nd consultant at BTVI. "And this contribution will be a tremendous help to the students." C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM My home is my castle -my retreat -my biggest investmentNassau Collins Ave 242 322 2341 Thompson Blvd 242 325 8776 Soldier Rd North 242 393 6286 Family Islands Freeport 242 352 7119 Abaco 242 367 2688 Exuma 242 336 2420www.jsjohnson.com ADWORKS 2009 Local companies open up new opportunities for BTVI students FROMLEFT: MARTY Smith, paint technician atA ID; Dr Iva Dahl, BTVI manager and consultant;Don Bain, BTVI instructor, and Juan Cardenas, Martin-SenourP aints’ district s ales manager TEACHERSWORKSHOP A TWO-DAY w orkshop for 200 junior and senior high school teachers opened at the Church of God of Prophecy, East Street, on August 25. It was sponsored by the Royal Bank of Canada and RBCF INCO. Pictured at the lectern is Nathaniel Beneby, vice-president and country head for RBC Royal Bank of Canada in the Bahamas, addressing the participants. Seated right is Elma Garraway, per manent secretary in the Ministry of Education. PICTURED ARE some of the participants in attendance Treasure Cay Billfish T our nament 2010 date is announced THE Treasure Cay Hotel Resort and Marina announced that its 27th Annual Treasure Cay Billfish Tournament (TCBT be held from June 13-18, 2010. This tournament follows the remarkable 2009 victory by a 13year-old boy who out-fished sea soned anglers for first place. Fishing aboard Team Galati, junior angler Chris Galati of Anna Maria, Florida, released two blue marlin in one day, the largest weighing nearly 500 lbs. The TCBT modified release tournament offers four days of fishing, social parties, dinners and fun competitions. It will continue its popular guaranteed cash pay-out introduced last year, ranging from $10,000 for a minimum of ten boats and up to $50,000 for participation of 50 boats. Open to the public, the tournament format consists of multi ple awards for billfish, plus awards for tuna, dolphin and wahoo. Release point standings are verified by the participant’s own dig ital and/or video camera with an image that can verify the time and date the photo was taken. Registration for up to six team members, including boat entry, cash prize eligibility, dinners, cocktail parties, team goody bag with t-shirts and hats and room discounts is $2,950 per team.

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IN the final days leading up to the Miss Tourism QueenI nternational competition, o ne of the world’s leading pageant websites is taking note of Bahamian beauty Tiara Cooper. The statuesque beauty has b een named as one of the favourites to win the coveted t itle by the experts of the website Global Beauties. Tiara, who won the Miss Bahamas Tourism Queen title during the 2008 MissB ahamas World pageant, has been competing at the pageant in China for the last three weeks. She has visited several provinces, experienced the unique culture of China while promoting Bahamian culture in the process. T here are 98 delegates c ompeting in the pageant which culminates with the grand finale on Friday. The Miss Tourism Queen International Pageant was f ounded by Charlie See in 1949.In 1993, the Miss T ourism Queen Organisation held the first world final competition in Sri Lanka, and later in the United States, Russia, Brazil, Germany, Japan,S ingapore, and many other countries as well. The contest then moved to China in 2004, and has been held there ever since, growing to the point where it is now considered to be a ‘grand slam pageant’ – one of the top four in the world. With eachc ountry's tourism ambass adors coming together for the event, Miss Tourism Queen International aims to enhance tourism development, friendship among the c ountries, and international culture exchange. B ahamians are encouraged to boost Tiara’s chances in the pageant by voting for her online. The contestant receiving t he highest number of votes automatically advances to the finals. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM The Mercedes M-Class. Beauty, brains and brawn. TYREFLEX STAR MOTORSCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz M-Class at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667When you think of the average SUV on the road today, you think of roadhogging, air-polluting gas guzzlers that wouldnt know the meaning of h igh precision and fuel efficiency if it were emblazoned on their windshields. But there is an alternative. The refined M-Class from Mercedes-Benz. Withits superior German styling utilising only high-grade materials, its robust engine power delivering exemplary turn-on-a-dime performance whilst stillb eing frugal on fuel and its handling of pot-holed roads and 1.5 ft. flooded streets, the Mercedes-Benz M-Class is clearly the best choice in SUVs. Miss Bahamas Tourism Queen among the favourites for international title MISS BAHAMAS Tourism Queen Tiara Cooper.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM CAREER OPPORTUNITY Reinsurance Consultant We are looking for a Reinsurance Consultant to review the process flows for reinsurance administration and establish process flows for all new business to ensure that procedures are in accordance with provisions of the Company’s reinsurance treaties. Qualifications/Experience/Skills: xBachelors Degree in Computer Science, Finance or related discipline; xIn-depth financial services experience; x5-10 years experience in testing, implementation and assessment of systems; xAbility to identify and recommend solutions to internal control weaknesses within business systems and processes; xExcellent organizational, time management and interpersonal skills; and xProject management or leadership expertise. To apply: Send electronic rsum via email to careers@colinaimperial.com Subject: Reinsurance Consultant or Send rsum to: Human Resources Manager308 East Bay Street P.O. Box N-4728 Nassau, Bahamas Applications must be received by 10 September 2009. 5(*,675$7,21 b rother who was said to own a car and scooter rental business went to the U.S. b ut he had promised to return to the Bahamas after only a day to be at his sick father’ss ide. J ail records show the men accused of killing Holmes have both got drug-related criminal records. According to the Sun-Sentinel, White was arrested atl east eight times since 1998, and Benjamin at least five times, mostly on traffic and drug charges and for failingt o appear in court. Records also show White was in state prison from April t o September of 1998, and Benjamin from July 2003 to August 2004, both for convic t ions on drug charges. e xpected to be affected by the storm, people on t he United States’ east coast should monitor the system closely. Tropical Storm Danny formed yesterday 470m iles east of the Bahamas. It was expecte d to move on a northwestward track throughout today, staying east of t he Bahamas, before turning more toward the north tomorrow and finally curving to then orth-east over the weeke nd. In its 5pm update, the M iami-based National Hurricane Centre (NHC s aid the centre of Tropical Storm Danny was located about 390 miles east of Nassau. It was moving toward the west-northwest at around 12mph with maxi mum sustained winds of n ear 45mph. M eanwhile, weather e xperts have also started w atching another tropi c al wave coming off the coast of Africa just south east of the Cape Verde I slands. While conditions a re favourable for this system to become more organised, developmentw as not expected to occur before early next week. Those outside of the group of officers who were interdicted were being moved as part of an “ongoing restructuring exerc ise”, said the Ministry. " Article 35 (of the industrial agreement) speaks to an officer having the right to refuse any transfer if it will cause hardship on him and in General Orders, 604 speaks to the same thing," he told The Tribune. Mr Pinder also argued that c ustoms officers are afforded f ive days notice of a transfer, but claimed t hat in some cases officers were given 48 h ours and some only 24 hours to respond. P roceedings for the officers' dismissal were said to be underway before the 14-day period within which the interdicted officers had to respond to government, Mr Pinder claimed. H e added that many customs officers were up in arms because they fear being unjustly treated by government as well. "The majority of customs officers are upset in the manner of which it was done so they are o f the view that they might be next, so that's why we must (end P inder. Attempts to reach the minister responsible for the public service, State F inance Minister Zhirvargo Laing and C omptroller of Customs Glenn Gomez w ere unsuccessful yesterday. Customs officers could hold protest FROM page one Second man charged in connection with Bahamian’s murder in US FROM page one Bahamas could be affected by Tropical Storm Danny FROM page one BOGOTA HOODEDmen in uniforms without insignias on Wednesday killed 12 members of the Awa indigenous group, including five children, on a reserve in a region plagued by the cocaine trade, authorities said, according to Associated Press. Indigenous leaders said the killings took place at 5 a.m on the Gran Rosario reserve about 50 miles (80 kilometers inland from the Pacific port of Tumaco. The reserve has about 1,500 Awa. The state governor, Antonio Navarro, told The Associated Press that the victims were all related. The attack killed five men, two women, two boys, two girls and a baby. He said two males, a 10-yearold and a 20-year-old, were wounded in the gunfire but fled and survived. The identity of the killers was not immediately known. In February, Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia rebels acknowledged killing eight Awa Indians at a different but nearby reservation for allegedly working as informants for the army. The area is rife with coca plantations and illegal armed groups leftist rebels as well as far-right militias that process the leaf into cocaine and smuggle it out of Colombia, typically down rivers that are the region’s main highways. Navarro said he could not remember a massacre of so many people in Narino state. He said the survivors described the killers as tall, fair-haired men with mustaches, ruling out local Indians. The director of operations of Colombia’s national police, Gen. Orlando Paez, announced a reward for infor mation leading to the arrest of the killers. Massacres of the magnitude of Wednesday’s have been rare since President Alvaro Uribe first took office in 2002 and far-right militias demobilized in a peace deal with his conservative government. J OHN PINDER Hooded men slay 12 in Colombia

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"Each of the payments out w ould have represented an a dvantage to the persons who w ere in clear violation of their position, (basically abusing their office," Mr Gomez said. "We are now in the process o ff attempting to prevent the expenditure of that money. “First we go to the police and the police then do their job, once we've gotten the information we'll try and getf reezing (orders S upreme Court," he added. The embattled union was thrown into disarray on Tuesday when members learned that some members of the fractured executive councilhad requested the liquidation o f two fixed deposits of more than $468,000. It was later discovered that $665,000 was allegedly taken out of the union's account. Mr Colebrooke maintains t hat the union executives who requested the transfer were n ot authorised to do so. He claimed that one of the three purported union assistant s ecretary general Raymond Wright was no longer employed with the union. A union bank statement r evealed that $140,000 in payment was transferred to Commercial Law Advocates w hose principal attorney is Keod Smith presumably for legal fees; $54,113.15 toa ccountant John Bain and s everal hundred thousand for outstanding salary payments. According to a newspaper report, letters requesting the transfers were allegedly signed by assistant treasurerS amantha Gray, trustee Ian Neely, and Mr Wright just days after Nicole Martin was ousted as the union's presi d ent. The earlier article claimed that Mr Wright was to receive$ 73,600 of the requested funds, while Ms Gray and Ms Neely were to receive $21,450a nd $30,026 respectively. The earlier article said $140,000was requested to pay Com mercial Law Advocates, w hose principal attorney is Keod Smith, and $50,000 to Obie Ferguson and Co. U nion first vice-president Kirk Wilson initiated the court battle which led to aS upreme Court ruling that r emoved Ms Martin from her post. Mr Smith represented Mr Wilson in this challenge andwas assisted by Mr Ferguson. Another $54,113 was requested for HLB GalanisBain chartered accountants' partner John Bain for outstanding fees, according to the earlier article. M r Gomez alleged that t his was evidence of a clear "abuse" of power. Late yesterday evening, the faction led by Kirk Wilson responded, issuing a statement that said that theu nion has “marked a signific ant milestone” by paying “several long-standing debts that were owed to its professionals and many members of the executive council who were not paid their regular s alaries for as many as 18 m onths.” The group said the payments were in accordance with “the Supreme Court Order of Mr Justice Jon Isaacs of August 19, 2009.” The statement, which was s ent out by Commercial Law Advocates, Keod Smith’s law firm, said: “Following the ruling by Justice Isaacs byw hich the current executive council was re-instated, instructions of the council were given to the union’s bank to settle the outstanding unpaid salaries and professional fees The payment of these funds came from fixed deposits of theu nion held with the bank and d oes not disrupt the balance sheet of the union in as much as the monies paid were paid pursuant to the court’s order to cover the union’s liability to the persons involved.” M eanwhile, the accounti ng firm HLB Galanis Bain has weighed in concerning its part in the dispute. The firm issued a statement yesterday which said: “HLB Galanis Bain has note d with concern that the p ublic is not being told the entire truth regarding the payments to this firm for professional fees.” It said the facts “are a matter of public record” as published in the ruling of Justice K Neville Adderley on May 21, 2009. (2008/CLE/GEN/00614 The firm then went on to q uote parts of the ruling, including: (Paragraph 12 court also ordered that HLB Galanis Bain, Chartered Accountants (‘Bain’ other accounting firm approved by the Councilc ould be employed to cond uct a forensic audit, to give a report on the financial transaction in question, and based on the results the Council should take such action as it deemed fit.” (Paragraph 31. es due for the preparation of the Bain Report are to be made out of the assets of the union. I invite counsel to address me on cost.” H LB Bain’s statement s aid: “The facts above are clear for all to see. HLB performed a forensic audit in accordance with the recommendations of the court and issued a report to the Executive Council. The evidence is that both the Executive Council and the court accepted the report. The learned judger uled that the report should be paid for out of the assets of the union. “On August 25, 2009, the union complied with that court order.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 11 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Lawyers to seek union cash probe F ROM page one ByLINDSAY THOMPSON Bahamas Information Services A STATE-RECOGNISED funeral will be held for former Secretary to the Cabinet Herbert Cleveland Walkine, CMG, CVO, OBE, at 3pm on Friday at St Barnabas Anglican Church on Wulff and Baillou Hill Roads, the Cabinet Office announced Wednesday. His body will be interred at Lake View Memorial Gardens Mausoleums on John F Kennedy Drive. Mr Walkine died of cancer on Thursday, August 20, at the University of Miami Hospital in Miami, Florida. He was 79. He is survived by his wife Pam Walkine and daughters Angel and Imogene Walkine. Mr Walkine was born on November 28, 1929, in Crooked Island, where he began his public service career as a monitor at the public school on that island. From there, he won a scholarship to attend Government High School in Nassau. After graduating from GHS, he continued his education at the Bahamas Teacher’s Training College, Nassau and the University of Manchester. Mr Walkine has had a varied and well-rounded career in the Public Service. He began as a teacher and then served as a Family Island Commissioner for 10 years from 1958 to 1968 when he was appointed assistant secretary in the Cabinet Office. Mr Walkine rose steadily through the ranks and in 1974 he was appointed Permanent Secretary. He had served as permanent secretary in the Ministry of Labour, the Ministry of Education, the Ministry of Works and Utilities and the Ministry of National Security, before he was once again appointed to the Cabinet Office, this time as Secretary to the Cabinet. State-recognised funeral for former Secretary to the Cabinet H C Walkine

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONALSPORTS PAGE 12, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS T O DISCUSS ST ORIES ON THIS P A GE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM BOXING MANCHESTER, England Associated Press RICKY HATTONwelcomed Muhammad Ali to his gym Wednesday and said that not even a meeting with The Greatest could persuade him to get back in the ring again. Hatton, the former world light welterweight champion, hasn’t fought since a second-round knockout loss to Manny Pacquiao in May and is now a promoter. The 30-year-old Briton, known for his aggressive, body-punching style, said he was reduced to tears when meeting 67-year-old Ali, who has Parkinson’s disease and makes rare public appearances. “He’s not just one of the greatest boxers of all time, he’s one of the greatest men of all time. He’s made the entertainment side of boxing what it is today,” Hatton said. “Bearing in mind how poorly he is, for him still to come to the gym, raise his hands to the fans and have a picture, that’s why he’s the greatest.” Joined by wife Lonnie, Ali is touring Britain and Ireland. He is making appearances at a series of dinners to raise money for his charities, including theM uhammad Ali Center in his hometown of Louisville, Ky. Hatton has only two loss es in a 47-fight career. He said he is no closer to deciding whether to fighta gain. SPORTS IN BRIEF A tearful Ricky Hatton meets Muhammad Ali B ASEBALL ANAHEIM, Calif. Associated Press TORII Hunter hit an early two-run homer, Joe Saunders pitched five effective innings in his return to the Angels’ rotation and Los Angeles snapped its three-game skid with a 4-2 victory over the Detroit Tigers on Wednesday. Kendry Morales and Chone Figgins added run-scoring hits for Los Angeles, the only major league club without four straight losses. The AL West-leading Angels also avoided being swept at home for the first time since June 2007 and prevented Detroit’s first road sweep of the Angels since August 1993. Hunter connected for his 18th homer in the first inning against Edwin Jackson (10-6 who took his first loss since July 19. Adam Everett hit a two-run homer for the AL Centralleading Tigers, who had won eight of 12. Saunders (10-7 the 97-degree Orange County heat while making his first start since Aug. 7, after which he went on the disabled list with a sore shoulder. The lefthander had been struggling for over a month before his DL stint, but the Angels’ opening day starter allowed four hits and two walks while striking out six. Four Los Angeles relievers collaborated on four scoreless innings. In his first appear ance in eight days, closer Brian Fuentes hit two batters but hung on for his 36th save in 41 chances. Aside from Hunter’s homer, Los Angeles got back to manufacturing its offense with hits, walks and sharp baserunning in the style that’s worked so well for a club with eight starters hitting at least .293 entering the day. The Angels stole five bases against Detroit, matching a season high. Figgins even appeared to steal home after Hunter’s strikeout in the seventh inning, but third-base umpire Chad Fairchild had called time on the field. Angels manager Mike Scioscia argued to no avail. Miguel Cabrera extended his hitting streak to 11 games with a sixth-inning double, but went 1 for 4. The Detroit slug ger was 6 for 10 with two homers and seven RBIs in the first two games. Jackson yielded eight hits and four walks in 6 1-3 innings during his first loss in seven starts. Hunter’s early homer leads Angels past Tigers LOS ANGELES Angels' Chone Figgins, right, attempts to steal home plate against Detroit Tigers' G erald Laird in the seventh inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2009. Figgins was sent back to third base. Jae C. Hong/ AP Photo

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BASEBALL SEATTLE Associated Press DEFENSIVE-replacement Ryan Langerhans homered off Craig Breslow with one out in the bottom of the 10th inning to send the Seattle Mariners to a 4-2 victory over the Oakland Athletics on Tuesday night. Franklin Gutierrez’s singled with one out in the 10th off Breslow (5-7 the game tied in losses among AL relievers. It was Gutierrez’s fifth hit and seventh time on base in the two games he’s been leading off while Ichiro Suzuki rests a tight calf musc le. T hen Langerhans, who e ntered for defense the inning before, smacked a 2-2 pitch into the first row of seats beyond right field. It was his second game-ending home run as a late-game substitute in three weeks. Mark Lowe (2-6 the 10th for the win. Seattle’s Ken Griffey Jr. got the small, quiet crowd on its feet with a pinch-hitting appearance with a man on and one out in the eighth against Michael Wuertz. Griffey was 4 for 6 with two home runs against him, but the 39-yearold slugger struck out waving over a 2-2 pitch in the dirt. Gutierrez stole second on that pitch. Then Jose Lopez chopped a ball to the right of charging third baseman Adam Kennedy. Gutierrez slowed his run to third, veered onto the infield grass and almost looped around the ball, seem ingly obscuring Kennedy’s view of the ball until it clanged off his glove for a game-tying error. Lopez then stole second on a play in which replays appeared to show he was out. But Mike Sweeney, who spent last season with Oakland, struck out on a full-count pitch to end the inning and keep it tied at 2. K ennedy’s single that scored Mark Ellis in the seventh inning had put Oakland up 2-1. That was the last pitch thrown by Seattle starter Ryan Rowland-Smith, who allowed nine hits and two runs in 6 1-3 innings. After reliever Shawn Kelley got Rajai Davis to ground out, Kurt Suzuki flied out to strand runners at second and third and keep the Mariners close. A’s rookie Brett Anderson allowed one run and six hits with eight strikeouts in seven impressive innings. The 21year-old left-hander, Oakland’s centerpiece in the trade that sent Dan Haren to Arizona following the 2007 season, leads major league rookies with 117 strikeouts. C M Y K C M Y K LOCALANDINTERNATIONAL SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 13 Only forty-eight nautical miles east of Miami, Florida, situated on the North end of North Bimini, Bahamas Bimini Bay Resort & Marina complex rests on over 740 acres of pristine Bahamian beaches. Long known as a paradise for anglers and divers alike, Bimini Bay Resort offers a plethora of options for the most discriminating traveller. Bimini Bay Management Ltd. owns and operates Bimini Bay Resort & Marina.Bimini Bay Resort & Marina seeks to hire professional individuals for the following position:SECURITY OFFICERSRequirements: 0XVWEH\HDUVRUROGHU &RPSOHWLRQRI+LJK6FKRRO'LSORPD&HUWLFDWH 2XWJRLQJ3HUVRQDOLW\ *RRG2UDO&RPPXQLFDWLRQ6NLOOV *RRG:ULWLQJ6NLOOV : LOOLQJWRDFFHSW7UDLQLQJ 1R&ULPLQDO&RQYLFWLRQV :HRIIHUDQH[FHOOHQWEHQHWVSDFNDJHDQG competitive compensation. For full consideration, all interested applicants should forward a copy of t heir resum to the attention of Tc rolle@biminibayresort.com RUID[WR . TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Langerhans’ HR sends M’s over As in 10 SEATTLE Mariners' Russell Branyan watches his home run a gainst the Oakland Athletics in the second inning of a base ball game Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2009, in Seattle. Elaine Thompson/ AP Photo As construction of the new s tate of the art national stadium continues, the government of the Bahamas took a major step forward in creating a new lighting system. The Ministry of Youth Sports and Culture signed a contract with C ampbell’s Electric to replace the high mass lighting at the stadium worth over $700,000. The base of the contract is $669,425 for services rendered, with a 10 percent c ontingency worth $66,942.50, bringing the total to $736,367.50. Minister of Youth Sports and Culture, The Hono rable Desmond Bannister, s aid the need for a new lighting system had become imperative d ue to the dilapidated state of t he current infrastructure. “The current lighting system has not only fallen into a severe state of disrepair, but also pose a significant safety hazard to users of this facility,” he said, The lighting towers have deteriorated to a stage where the s tructures are considered to be in critical condition requiring urgent remedial work.” Bannister said, with the first step in a lengthy line ofi mprovements the stadium should become a welcomea tmosphere for participants and spectators alike. “We are pleased that we are able to do this now,” he said, “And to ensure that the next t rack season or whatever activ ities are held out here at thisf acility we will be able to have the athletes, parents, fans, fami lies will be able to watch in a safe environment that there will be no problem with lighting fixtures of lights falling.” The project is scheduled to b egin in approximately two weeks with a tentative date ofc ompletion set for March 2010. Minister signs stadium lighting contract Desmond Bannister

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B y BRENT STUBBS T HE trip to Berlin, Germany for theI AAF's 12th World Championships in Athletics was quite an eventful one. I t was a reporter's dream to h ave had the opportunity to cover an event where a phenomenal athlete like Jamaica's Usain Bolt was able to stretch t he world record in both the 100 and 200 metres into another hemisphere – no let's go a litter further, into another plane t. L ike Bolt, who could be regarded as a "Freak of Nature," it's going to take another specially gifted athlete t o come along and surpass what he has achieved. 9.58 seconds in the 100 and 19.99 in the 200. T wo times never heard off. Yet, the astonishing question that came up after he did it – making it look like there was two separate races going on at the same time – was just as 'hair r aising, eye popping and mouth dropping' feats that one will have to cherish for quite a while. W hen he did the triple-triple w orld record breaking performance in Beijing, China at the Olympic Games last year, I thought I was watching a video g ame. When he did the doubledouble, me and my collegiate Kwame Laurence from the Trinidad Express, who sat nextt o each other in the press trib une, could only turn and once again offer our congratulations t o Kayon Raynor of the Jamaica Observer. I n fact, we spent more time shaking Raynor's hands for the s plendid job that the Jamaican team did at these champio nships – a total of 26, inclusive of 13 gold, nine silver and four bronze – to finish second to only the United States in the medal count and third in the p lacing standings behind the Americans and the Russians. T rinidad & Tobago, on the other hand, was just ahead of t he Bahamas with three medals – one of which should have b een the Bahamas' – for a tied 20th spot with France in the medal hunt. The Bahamas had t wo and was tied with Japan at n umber 22. T rinidad ended up 13th in the placing table, while the B ahamas finished tied with Japan for the 16th spot. T he only other Caribbean English-speaking country to medal was Barbados with a gold. They were tied with Croatia, New Zealand and S lovenia for 16th spot. However, they were tied with C yprus. Finland, Hungary and Sweden for 33rd in the placing t able. Cuba had 12 medals – one of which actually should have been the Bahamas' own – for 12th on the medal table and they were ninth in the placing table. T wo of the heart-wrenching disappointing performancest hat just didn't pan itself out, resulted in the Bahamas not being able to move a little highe r in the standings. While I was able to bask in the Caribbean dominance in the sprints, winning, my most h urtful moment came from C hris 'Fireman' Brown in the men's 400. Having fallen short in the past two championships as well as the Olympics last y ear, this was expected to be the year that he finally got on the podium to celebrate his first individual medal. H e came so close, but yet w as so far. Once again, rown didn't have anything left to gut it out in the winding minutesa fter running an excellent 350380 metres. In the final 20, hew as passed twice and had to settle for a disappointing fifth. H is spot on the medal stand was occupied by Trinidad's Renny Quow, which gave me reason to congratulate Laurence, who had predicted thath is man was going to upset Brown and follow AmericansO ympic champion LaShawn Merrit and past World's champ ion Jeremy Wariner in that order. Never anticipated it though. Still can't believe that Brown didn't pull it off. A lso equated in the drama was Leevan 'Superman' Sands, w ho was sitting in third place until Cuba's Alexis Copello e merged from fifth to snatch the bronze medal. The Olympic b ronze medallist had to cele brate his 27th birthday with fourth place. He also served some jail time as he and Copello were taken into custody and q uestioned for at least 11 hours over a bottle throwing scuffle at a nightclub on the eve of the closing of the championships. Sands adamantly stated that he a nd hurdler Shamar Sands were only there to give evidence when they were taken in with high jumper Donald Thomas, a n American and two Cubans, i ncluding Copello. Apparently, it was a situation that really put a damper on the Bahamian team. N obody expected to hear any such report of Bahamians being taken into custody, especially in such a foreign nation. W e just thank God that all i s well that ends well. No charges were levied against any of the athletes – yet – althougha n investigation was expected to be carried out this week.W e're keeping our fingers crossed that there will be no f urther action taken against any of the athletes. Despite the fact that all three Bahamians involved had some heart-breaking performances,t hey performed as best as they could under the circumstances.T he championships were extremely competitive this year. A nd based on the four disqualifications that the team experienced – Michael Mathieu and Christine Amertil in the 400 and both the men and w omen 4 x 400 relay teams – it was a clear indication that the o fficials was not taking anything for granted. B ahamas team officials were kept quite busy dealing with t he disqualifications and even trying to get Osbourne Moxey inserted into the men's long jump, but to no avail. They exhausted every avenue of a ppeal and nothing changed. As team manager Ralph M cKinney noted: "The little things we take for granted, they w ere not tolerating over there." If anybody should know, it's McKinney. He serves as the president of the Bahamas Association of Certified Officials, t he organization in charge of officiating at our local track and f ield meets. The performances at the c hampionships should also serve as an impetus for our future stars as it gives them an indication just exactly where they could be, if they dedicate t hemselves to putting in the time to properly prepare. T he future will only get brighter for track and field in t he Bahamas. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM shortly before the 2009 season began in leading to a series of disa ppointing performances. H is personal best for the season was a time of 46.02s in a June 27 run in New Providence. “I will resume full training October 15th,” Bain said, “I am hoping to be back to 100 percent as soon as possible now that I can s tart treatment on the root cause of my injuries. So, by the official start of training I should be back fully healthy.” After leaving Berlin to see a series of specialists, Bain said the root cause of the injury was discovered, allowing him to establish a strict rehab regime and schedule a timetable for a return to c ompetition. “I strained my right oblique which was causing severe tightness in my right gluteus and hamstring, so they found that is what was continuously causing the problem,” he said, “But I should be r eady and I will run indoors again this upcoming year so the indoor season will be my comeback.” Bain, the NCAA 2008 Indoor and Outdoor champion during his senior season at Oral Roberts University, who has enjoyed a vir-t ually injury free career thus far said his first major setback has taught him several valuable lessons applicable to life on and off the track. “I think this has definitely made me hungrier. I have learned and m atured a lot. I am a better person, and athlete because of it,” he said, “The injury, it was a reality check. That is why I am constantly thanking God that I was able to complete my Master's Degree in Business, because one injury can end season, and in some cases a career. But I'm trusting 2010 will be a great year for the Bahami-a n Dream” Bain expressed regret at the unfortunate disqualification of his fellow 4x400m teammates in Berlin. The event compounded the e ffects of a major injury. I was motivated long before the DQ. My motivation came after the injury ended my season prematurely and without mea chieving any of my goals,” he said, “But it definitely adds to it and we all will come back hungrier and more determined when we have t he opportunity.” Bain targets October 15 for return to full training F ROM page 15 Bolt’s heroics turned Berlin games into a reporter’s dream "The BSF will be experiencing a very busy season in the u pcoming months and it is an exciting time for the players, fans and we in the administration. We begin with the National Slow Pitch Championships set for Grand Bahama either the first weekend in October or fort he Discovery Day weekend for those islands that play slow pitch in various categories men's, ladies and co-eds. “The next event on the calendar will be the Austin "Kingsnake" Knowles tournament for senior boys and girls during the mid term break for local schools," he said, "This tournam ent is of the utmost importance to the BSF because it highlights the future talent of the country in a competitive format a nd assist the overall development of the game while providing an opportunity for young athletes to showcase their talents. L ong Island has been a dominant factor in these champ over the last few years, however, Eleuthera made their presence felt winn ing both titles last year and promises to return to defend their titles. The following weekend, October 29thNov. will be the CAST tournament, an international venture for the BSF. We already have confirmation from the Cayman Islands, Belize, Jamaica, Turks and Caicos, Bermuda, USVI and have also b egan talks with teams from Israel and England which have expressed interest. Following that will be the National Round Robin Championship where champions of member associations will descend u pon New Providence vying for a national crown." Dorsett said the year will conclude with an appearance at the ISF Congress which should have a direct impact on the Bahamas and its stake in regional softball. "We will then take part in the ISF Congress. This edition will b e held in Venezuela with more than 110 countries taking place. This is an election year for the ISF and in addition an additionalV P post will be added for the English speaking Caribbean," he said, "The ISF has stated they will realign and the Bahamas will b e placed in the Americas region, thus creating the necessity for the post. “The IFS has also confirmed that the CAC Games will be held in Puerto Rico in July of 2010. The men's national team will have at least two trips of very important tournaments wen eed to take part in." OPINION STUBBS JAMAICA'S Usain Bolt poses beside the indicating board after setting a new Men's 100m World Record in Berlin on August 16. Move to boost softball profile FROM page 15

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C M Y K C M Y K THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 P AGE 14 Reflecting on Berlin games TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM #4 Patton & Rosetta Sts, Palmdale ( Next to City Market) P .O. Box N-10620 Nassau, BahamasEmail:sales@dctpc.com T el: 242-328-0048 Fax:242-328-0049 COMPUTER COMPUTER DESKS DESKS S TARTING AT STARTING AT$39.00 $39.00 COMPUTER COMPUTER CHAIRS CHAIRSSTARTING AT STARTING AT$39.00 $39.00 HP OFFICEJET H P OFFICEJET K 5400 PRINTERS K5400 PRINTERSONLY ONLY$80.00 $80.00 NORTON NORTON ANTIVIRUS A NTIVIRUS PRODUCTS P RODUCTS20% OFF 20% OFF ALL INK ALL INK CARTRIDGES CARTRIDGES20% OFF 20% OFF ALL TONER ALL TONER CARTRIDGES CARTRIDGES15% OFF 15% OFF ALL ALL EDUCATIONAL EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE S OFTWARE25% OFF 25% OFFBUY ONE BUY ONE GET ONE GET ONE 50%OFF 50%OFF( Must be equal or lesser value) VALID: SATURDAYAUGUST 29th, 2009M ouse / MousePads K eyboards Cleaning Kits CDs/DVDs CD Labels Canon, Epson, HP, Lexmark PhotoPaperCannot becombinedwith anyother offerA LL MARKVISION A LL MARKVISION USB FLASH U SB FLASH D RIVES D RIVES25% OFF 25% OFF by RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter r dorsett@tribunemedia.net A fter suffering a major setback in his 2009 season on the pro circ uit, one of the country’s premier quarter milers is currently in rehab and has been given a timetable for his return to the track. After undergoing a battery of tests to treat his injured hamstring, Andretti “The Bahamian Dream” B ain is scheduled to resume full training on October 15. B ain was forced to withdraw from the 12th IAAF World Cham p ionships in Germany earlier this month when at training camp he re-aggravated the season long hamstring injury which first sidelined him in April. B ain first injured the hamstring Bain eyes Oct 15 return to training A NDRETTI ‘THE BAHAMIAN DREAM’ BAIN SEE page 14 by RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net T he Bahamas Softball Federation looks to begin implementation of its short term and long term goals to benefit the future of the local game and strengtheni ts profile on the international stage. T he BSF is preparing for the fall section of its calend ar year in what federation executives call the "busy season." The most pressing matter on the upcoming calen-d ar is the selection of both Men's and Ladies Nationalt eams to represent the country at the upcoming C AST tournament, scheduled for October 29th to N ovember 1st here in the capital. Burket Dorsett, BSF President, outlined the highlights of the upcoming c alendar for the Federation which features several locala nd regional tournaments and concludes with an a ppearance at the Interna tional Softball Federation Congress. Move to boost softball profile SEE page 14 Quarter-miler in rehab over injured hamstring

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Benchmark’s $3m property eyes 70-80% occupancy before finish C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.96 $4.27 $4.05 By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor Freeport’s sole casino o perator yesterday con firmed it will pull out of the Bahamas “no later than October 31” this year, as the property’s fiscal 2010 firstq uarter operating loss more than doubled to $401,000. U nveiling its results for the three months to July 26, 2009, Isle of Capri revealed that the net operating loss it had suffered from running Our Lucaya’s casino had increased by 157 per cent compared to the $156,000 loss sustained during the comparative period during 2008. The increased net operating loss was incurred as the Isle-Lucaya casino also experienced a 40.3 per cent decline in year-over-year revenues, which for the 2010 first quarter fell to $2.134 million compared to $3.573 million the year before. The reasons for Isle of Capri to terminate its lease with Our Lucaya, thus endCasino’s loss rises 157% to hit $401,000 Isle of Capri confirms Freeport pull-out no later than October 31, 2009 SEE page 7B * Carmichael project on target for December completion, with $1.3m invested to date * Company suffers $904,654 or $0.18 per share loss for half-year* Alliance sees 10% assets under administration growth in Q2, with total level now standing at $200m* BISX-listed entity hoping for stock market turnaround in 2009 fourth quarter, as it sees price stabilisation signs By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Benchmark (Bahamas terday said based on the “very strong” inquiries it continued to receive from potential tenants that it expected to have 70-80 per cent of its Carmichael Road commercial centre leased by the time the building was constructed in December 2009, despite JULIAN BROWN SEE page 8B B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor I nvestors behind a major Bahamas-based mixed-use resort project yesterday said they anticipate investing a further $362 million in thed evelopment, having sunk $203 million into the ground to date, having achieved two big milestones” by opening the 165-slip marina a nd grassing much of the golf course. Dr Livingstone Marshall, s enior vice-president of environmental and commun ity affairs for the Abacobased Baker’s Bay Golf & Ocean Club, told Tribune Business that to date the project’s developers, Ari z ona-based Discovery Land Company, had spent $26 m illion with Bahamianowned and associated companies, chiefly vendors andc ontractors. Adding that “a significant p ortion of that ended up in the local Abaco community”, Dr Marshall said Bak-e r’s Bay, which currently employs 135 persons, had an annual payroll of $4.8 million, some 90 per cent of which went to Bahamians. T hat was separate from the payroll of contractors hired to work on the project’s construction, which “exceeds $6 million” pera nnum, some 75-80 per cent of which went into Bahami a n hands. Baker’s Bay’s con tractors had another 170 employees on-site. B aker’s Bay’s developers had also paid $23 million to t he Government to date in the form of transfer taxes, Stamp Tax, import dutiesa nd real property taxes, and Dr Marshall added: “Over the next 10 years, we estimate we will pay in excess of $315 million to the Treasury. To date, we estimate Project awaits extra $362m investment Baker’s Bay developers invest $203m to date, with $26m spent with Bahamian firms and Treasury receiving $23m One of few resort projects to progress has $4.8m staff payroll, and ‘in excess’ of $6m per annum contractor wages, with Government to receive further $315m in taxes over next 10 years wo major milestones’ passed on marina and golf course Some 70-80 lot sales ‘in various stages of closing’, with developers hoping to start custom homes construction in next six to 12 months SEE page 10B By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net BAHAMIAN courier companies are continuing to feel the financial squeeze from new import procedures, the president of G WS Worldwide Express said yesterday, despite the Customs Comptroller’s argument that steps made to alleviate pressures on f reight forwarders have been working. Walt Saunders, who is president of the Bahamas Courier Assoc iation, said all courier companies have suffered a downturn in business since the implementation of the C-13 Customs clearing pro cedure. Mr Saunders said the new procedure continues to deter business due to the high brokerage fees involved, which the couri ers must pass on to customers. Those same fees caused business for couriers in Grand Bahama to decline so substantially over the past three months, that theC omptroller, Glen Gomez, was forced to rescind the new cusCourier firms are still ‘unpr ofitable’ SEE page 14B B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Bahamas is the last major internationalf inancial centre in the Western Hemisphere on t he G-20/OECD ‘grey list’ of nations, something that a Bahamiana ttorney yesterday said could damage this n ation’s competitiveness by creating the perception it was lagging itsr ivals. Ryan Pinder, the Bahamas-based attorney and representative for US law firm, BeckerP oliakoff, said the effectiveness of the Government’s recent statement announcing that it would meet the OECD’st arget of having 12 Tax Information Exchange Agreements (TIEAsp lace by 2009 year-end, and identifying the n ations it was negotiating with, was “being diminished” by thea pparent failure to make concrete progress. While the Bahamas to-date still has a solitary TIEA with the USt hat it signed back in 2002, all three of the Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands and Bermuda are nows itting on the G20/OECD so-called ‘white list’, having met the standards on tax transparency and infor-m ation exchange. The Bahamas, though, is still on the ‘grey’ list of countries that had committed to meeting these standards but have yet to do so. It also has fewer TIEAs than the likes of Antigua & Barbuda and the Netherlands Antilles, which both have seven, Liechtenstein and Monaco, which have three and four respectively, and market leaders like Singapore and Switzerland, which have five and three TIEAs in place. Mr Pinder told Tribune Business that while Bahamas last major centre in region in OECD ‘grey’ tax category SEE page 9B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM MARINA & SEAFOOD PROCESSING PLANT ALLIGATOR BAY, NORTH LONG ISLANDApprox. 6 acres of Waterfront property with a 152 feet wide canal. Property comprises three buildings: Building A:Seafood Processing Plant include a reception area, an room, a storage room, a laboratory and a processing room, (3x 30 ft blast freezers, and (1x 15 ft and (110 ft x15 ft holding freezers. Building B:Generator House Building C:The Water Plant age capacity. Interested persons should submit offers to: The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P. O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas To reach us on or before October 2nd , 2009For further information, please contact us at 502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608DEVELOPMENT FOR SALE Keisha Wemyss, the 34 year old daughter of f ormer Inspector of Police and now President & CEO of WemCo Security Mr. Henry and Mrs. Judy Wemyss graduated M agna Cum Laude and a member of the Sigma Beta Delta Honours Society at DeVry University on 18 July in Miramar, Florida.Ms. Wemyss received a B achelor of Science in B usiness Administration Accounting Concentration. “I am proud of my accomplishments. I am grateful to my parents and to the company to afford me this opportunity. I hope that my eventualfull return to WemCo will strengthen the company’s management structure as we continue to serve the Bahamian public as the best security company in the country bar none”Keisha Wemyss Ms. Wemyss, who is the Vice President for F inance and Security for WemCo, took a leave of absence to further her studies. She completed two years of requirements in a year, and while enrolled she was a Deans List student through the entire time at Devry U niversity. She was chosen Graduate speaker representing both Undergraduates at DeVry U niversity and Keller Graduate School of Management for graduation this year. W hile pursuing her studies, she was also actively communicating and involved in the d ay to day running of her portfolio at WemCo Security. “It was like she never left her chair”, said Mr. Wemyss. “I believe that it is important for our company and our family to ensure that the next generation of leadership is strong. I congratulate Keisha on this wonderful accomplishment.” K eisha is currently continuing her studies in the fall at Keller Graduate S chool of Management where she is reading for a double Masters Degree in F inance and Accounting preparing to take o ver the next year. She will also start her Ms. Wemyss is an award winning former Force.Keisha WemyssVP WemCo Security Graduates From DeVry B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE BAHAMAS Chamber of Commerce’s president yesterday appealed to the business community to mobilise on issues of violentc rime in the Bahamas, and to invest in education to mitigate the problem. K haalis Rolle said the business community, c hurches and civic groups have to stop relying on government for crime manage-m ent, and the education and social development of B ahamian youth,and begin to duly invest in those areas themselves. M r Rolle argued that if these entities invest in the early educational develop-m ent and socialisation of Bahamian youth, instances o f violent crime can be curbed within the next gen eration. H e said that though education was not the only i ngredient, there was a strong correlation with crime levels. It is poor education and poor socialisation,” said Mr R olle. “Our mindset has been degraded to the point where it is just as easy to kills omeone now, as it was in the past to hit them with a bottle or a bat. “There is easy access to guns, and the mindset thatt hey have developed over the past decade is they don’t think twice about killing.T he lack of exposure and lack of knowledge leads to lack of compassion, and that leads to far more violentc rimes than we have ever seen.” M r Rolle cited the latest, senseless killing of a woman robbed while on her job as an eed for businesses and business people to organise a nd begin dialogue on the way forward. “This is not a government p roblem. No part of society is isolated or insulated from it,” he said. “Every stakeholder needs to address it. The business community has to mobilise, as well as churches and civil society. Parents have to take ownership for their children, andt he underlying pathology of the problem has to be addressed.” M r Rolle said that if his platform for educational and s ocial reform for the youth was the only thing brought to fruition at the culmina t ion of his term as Chamber president, “I would have b een successful.” “You have to start somewhere and you have to startw ith a message. People have to recognise that message a nd subscribe to it,” said Mr Rolle. “It is a major issue. and at t he surface I would say the issue is insurmountable. You’re dealing with changing the DNA of people.” Mr Rolle said there need e d to be more social activism and community involvement, citing Cynthia ‘Moth er’ Pratt as a model for social reform at a commu n ity and national level. “We need to refocus our efforts on our entire exis t ence, or we're not going to have the kind of country we e nvision,” said Mr Rolle. Businesses urged to mobilise for the crime fight K HAALIS ROLLE

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By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s executive d irector yesterday said the exposure from the Miss Universe Pageant could open up the Bahamas island chaint o diversification in the tourism sector. P hilip Simon said many intangibles came out of the Miss Universe Pageant,i ncluding a renewed sense of national pride.Those i ntangible exposures are what the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation andA tlantis have touted since the announcement of the Bahamas as the host countryf or the annual Pageant, seen in over 150 countries. I can imagine that the impact of Miss Universe is like a seed that has just been p lanted, which we will have to water to help it grow over t ime and become a great fruit-bearing asset over time,” said Mr Simon. H e added that the images of sites throughout the Bahamas showed viewers what has been right in frontof our eyes, but which we h ave not paid much atten tion to. He said the world, in a two-hour television produc tion, experienced a culture t hat was brand new to them, but something that can be scripted as eloquently as itw as last Sunday in order to change the facade of this c ountry’s tourism product. Mr Simon argued that Sunday night’s worldwideb roadcast changed the definition of tourism for theB ahamas, and reasserted its potential. Response Local response to the s cenes shot by the Miss Universe contingent has been o verwhelming. Many individuals agreed that the Bahamas had never beend epicted so beautifully before, and praised the pageant’s production team. Mr Simon said the wider b usiness community should embrace the potential fort he expansion of the tourism industry that this vast expo sure could bring to these i slands. “There has to be encour a gment on behalf of the policymakers to include quality ideas and products,” hes aid. Mr Simon added that e ntrepreneurship can be gar nished from the opportunities the Miss Universe Pageant created. He lauded Atlantis’s part icipation in hosting the event, and suggested the exposure for the resort itself has been phenomenal. However, Mr Simon said t he opportunities for smalle r Family Island hotels cann ot be understated as many of the 84 pageant contest ants, through direction from the Ministry of Tourism, visited several different islandsd uring their three-week stay in the Bahamas. M r Simon said personal destination choices can be found throughout the islandso f the Bahamas. “Visitors will be more so appreciative of the smaller facilities that are uniquelyB ahamian,” he said. “Going to a large resort could be j ust as good as sitting under a Dilly tree listeing to folklore.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM btrt tfb r f r !%* '!$()))!*&*# tffn""bnff ! $ %#&!*&*# !%** www.rdicaribbean.com Recruiting Now for the October 2009 intake 27499 Riverview Center Boulevard, Suite 111, Bonita Springs, Florida 34134 USA • Tel 1 239 444 1730 email info@rdicaribbean.com your goalsCall 1 888 496 6173 (toll free to fast-track your career MBA University of Bradford, University of Sunderland, University of Wales MSc in Public Administration & Development University of Birmingham MSc Marketing & Management University of Bradford MSc Finance, Accounting & Management University of Bradford MSc Information Technology University of Teesside MSc Telecommunications Birmingham City University MSc International Hospitality Management Hallam University Diploma in Management University of Wales (pre-MBA for non-degree holders) University of WalesOnline/distance learning from RDI in the Bahamas Develop your career while studying No attendance requirement • Tutor and student support included Free membership of International Management Academy UNIVERSITY OF WALES University of Wales BA (Hons Business (top up Marketing, Finance, Banking University of Sunderland BA(Hons Business&Management(top up), BA (Hons Financial Management (top up University of Derby BSc (Hons Psychology University of Teesside LLB, BSc (Hons) Business Computing (top up) BSc (Hons Tourism (top up BACHELOR DEGREE COURSES MASTERS nn " *+4$'#65+(6-'9'%65+7'3'4+&'/%'+4-0%#5'&0/ #*#-(#%3'-0507'3-00,+/)5*':(03&#:-(%0634' +)*5''/005*+)*%'+-+/)4'+)*005*+)*3'/%*&0034 .#3$-'(-0034%#4'.'/58+/&084#/&#/01'/1-#/ 1307+&'#1#/03#.+%7+'80(5*':(03&#:0-(0634' ( 30.#---+7+/)#3'#4 *+4.0&'3/'9'%65+7'*0.'+/44#4.04513'45+)+064 % 0..6/+5:+4#7#+-#$-'(03+..'&+#5'0%%61#/%:03+/(03.#5+0/%#-'3+064+/26+3+'40/-: Bahamas urged to grow Pageant ‘seed’ into fruit P HILIP SIMON

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A newly-formed Bahamia n business consultancy yesterday said there were still profit and growth opportunities in many economic sectors despite the recession. The world didn’t come t o an end when the economy took a nosedive. There are still opportunities forg rowth in many sectors. Smart companies just need t o know where to look,” said Debra Cartwright, president of BusinessWorks, a newlyformed consulting firm offering strategic plannings ervices to small and mediu m-sized companies. Calling for businesses to undertake disciplined andf ocused planning, she added: “When we prepare a busin ess plan, it is more than just a lot of numbers and words on paper. Succeed “Businesses succeed b ecause of the proper execution of ideas, so we take our clients through the rigo rous process of understanding all aspects of their business from marketing to financial to operations. “They need to realize how e verything is interconnecte d, and that that all decisions flow from a clear insight into the marketingn eed they are seeking to fulfill. “There are young compan ies out there experiencing real growth in their reve nues, and many of these owners have very little idea of how to profitably man-a ge that growth. Questionable decisions in hiring, inventory management,p rofit-taking, accounting practices, and in other key b usiness areas are stalling the growth potential of many of these businesses.” BusinessWorks offers various business consultings ervices, including Entrep reneurs Bootcamp, Brainstorming Business Opportunities, and Business Check-u p. The Business Check-up is an analysis of critical aspects of a business – plan-n ing, financial, marketing, operations and human r esources. At the end of the Business Check-Up the company receives a reporth ighlighting areas requiring attention, and a written summary outlining steps toi mprove their success. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR AUDIT MANAGER Human Resources Partner “Audit Manager Position PricewaterhouseCoopers P.O. Box N-3910 Nassau, The Bahamas New consultancy says growth prospects exist The 694-room Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort will h ost this year's Luxury Meetings Summit, focusing on the luxury group meetings business throughout the Caribbean. The summit, taking place from October 24-27, 2009, will give over 70 qualified meeting planners the chance to learn about 50 different luxury Caribbean hotels from hoteliers and destination suppliers. Planners will have the chance to attend one-on-one meetings with up to 22 different properties, attend educational sessions, and c onduct site inspections, w hich will help them gain n ew ideas and foster new relationships, leading to better business and meetings. Sheraton to host major convention Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps y ou are raising funds for a good cause,c ampaigning for impr o vements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 7B 127,&(&(1686((677KH&HQVXV2IFHRIWKH'HSDUWPHQWRI6WDWLVWLFVZLOOFRQGXFW3UH&HQVXV7HVW EHJLQQLQJ 0RQGD\$XJXVW6XQGD\$XJXVW LQ 1HZ3URYLGHQFH DQG*UDQG%DKDPD7KH3UHWHVWLVDQLQWHJUDOSDUWRIWKH&HQVXVRI3RSXODWLRQ DQG+RXVLQJZKLFKWDNHVSODFHLQD\ 7KHPDLQIRFXVRIWKLVH[HUFLVHLVWRWHVWWKHTXHVWLRQQDLUHIRU&HQVXVLQ WHUPVRIUHOHYDQF\DVLWUHODWHVWRWKHFHQVXVTXHVWLRQVDYHUDJHOHQJWKRIWLPH LWWDNHVWRFRPSOHWHWKHTXHVWLRQQDLUHZHDNQHVVHVLQWKHTXHVWLRQVLQVWUXFWLRQVRU WKHGHVLJQRIWKHTXHVWLRQQDLUH7WKLVHQXPHUDWRUVZLWKRIFLDO LGHQWLFDWLRQZLOOYLVLWKRXVHKROGVLQ1HZ3URYLGHQFHDQG*UDQG%DKDPDLQ RUGHUWRFROOHFWLQIRUPDWLRQRQKRXVHKROGVDQGLQGLYLGXDOV7KH&HQVXV3UHWHVW UHTXLUHVWKDWWKHSXEOLFSURYLGHLQIRUPDWLRQRQWKHIROORZLQJ +RXVLQJ&KDUDFWHULVWLFV VXFKDVW\SHRIGZHOOLQJ\HDUWKHGZHOOLQJZDVEXLOW PDLQVRXUFHRIZDWHUVXSSO\QXPEHURIEHGURRPVHWF 3RSXODWLRQ&KDUDFWHULVWLFV ZKLFK LQFOXGHLQIRUPDWLRQRQPDULWDOVWDWXV KHDOWKGLVDELOLW\HGXFDWLRQLQFRPHHWF 7KHGDWDJHQHUDWHGIURPWKHUHWHVWZLOOEHKHOGLQ VWULFWHVW FRQGHQFH $OOSHUVRQVDUHXUJHGWRFRRSHUDWHLQWKLVYHU\LPSRUWDQWQDWLRQDOH[HUFLVH POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR SENIOR ASSOCIATES Human Resources Partner PricewaterhouseCoopers P.O. Box N-3910 Nassau, The Bahamas Casino’s loss rises 157% to hit $401,000 i ng its involvement in the B ahamian gaming market, would thus appear relatively obvious. James B. Perry, Isle of Capri’s chairman and chiefe xecutive, said in a statement yesterday: “We remain on track to exit our international operations in the near term, as we will exit the Bahamas no later thanO ctober 31.” This corresponds to Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace,t he minister of tourism and aviation, previously telling T ribune Business t hat October 31 was a “drop dead date” for finding andi nstalling a replacement for Isle of Capri in Freeport. H e said then that the Government was in the process of informing Isle ofC apri and all the other bidders that it had identified a p referred candidate to replace the company as the casino operator, with theh and over set to take place within the next 60 days if all went well. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace added: “We are likely tof ind ourselves, in the next 60 days, handing over to a new casino operator provid-e d they meet the requirements of licensing and the G aming Board.” Finding a replacement for I sle of Capri will potentially safeguard some 234 jobs at the casino, with the Gov e rnment having delivered on the first part of its agreem ent with Isle of Capri. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said the Government had toi nform the existing operator that it had identified its replacement by August 31, 2 009, and having now done so Isle of Capri “will remain i n place until the end of October”, when the licensing process and transi-t ion/handover are scheduled to be completed. Shortlist T he minister told T ribune Business that the winning o perator was selected from a shortlist of four that the Government “thoughtw ould be appropriate for what we are trying to do” w ith the casino and the Grand Bahama tourism product in general. Smallerc asino operators, he said, were rejected because they did not bring the synergies, scale, brand name and marketing reach sought. W hen asked whether it was a major casino brand, Mr Vanderpool-Wallaceh inted that the deal could be broader than just the c asino operations. Although he gave no explicit details, his com-m ents left open the possibility that the new operator m ight also brand the Our Lucaya hotel, possibly even t aking over its management/operations. Given that the property has not beenp rofitable for owner Hutchison Whampoa, a purchase o f the hotel may not even be out of the question. “The answer is maybe,” M r Vanderpool-Wallace, when asked whether it was a major brand lined up tor eplace Isle of Capri. “That is the best way to p ut it. “It really depends entirely on how much of the opera-t ions they will get involved in. One of the great impediments in Grand Bahama has b een the separation of the hotel operations and the casino operations, and wea re seeking to integrate that. It is the degree to which all p arties integrate that will determine whether it is seen as a major brand. “We’ve never seen a suc cessful casino operation unless it is integrated witht he hotel.” F ROM page 1B We are likely to f ind ourselves, in the next 60 days, h anding over to a n ew casino o perator provided they m eet the r equirements of licensing and the Gaming Board.” V incent Vanderpool-Wallace

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the company suffering a net $904,654 loss for this year’s first half. Blaming the $1.109 million decline in the total unrealised value of its equities portfolio for much of the $0.18 per share loss during the six months to June 30, 2009, Julian Brown, Benchmark (Bahamas BISX-listed company was seeing signs of price stabilisation that might indicate the Bahamian stock market was poised for some recovery in the fourth quarter. He added that the Carmichael Road project, Benchmark (Bahamas real estate investment project, was “going to be a very good contributor to normalising and smoothing out earnings” fluctuations caused by price volatility in the Bahamian stock market. “We will not have the gyrations in earnings we have suffered in the past because the revenue streams coming from Carmichael Road are going to have quite an impact on the overall profit of Benchmark,” said Mr Brown, explaining the rationale for the company’s move into real estate via its Benchmark properties subsidiary. The 15,000 square feet commercial centre, located at the Carmichael and Fire Trail Roads intersection, has already secured a 5,000 square foot anchor tenant in the shape of a Bank of the Bahamas International branch, with another compa ny who Mr Brown decline to name said to be interested in leasing a further 2,000 square feet. “If we go out with just Bank of the Bahamas, that 5,000 square feet alone is suff icient to service the debt and l eave a little on the table in t erms of bottom line impact and free cash flow,” Mr Brown told Tribune Business . “It’s looking very good, and I’m very confident we’re going to get 70 per cent of the space leased before the halfyear mark. :We’ve had very good inquiries from companies, and we are very pleased with the interest that we’ve seen so far.I don’t believe we’re going to have any difficulty in getting it leased..” The Benchmark (Bahamas chief executive added: “We have in principle an agreement with another company to take 2,000 square feet, and have been working with them for the last two months. Based on inquiries, we p robably have 5,000 square f eet left. We’ve had a number of inquiries before we even got started on the space. If we mark it by inquiries, we’re going to have 70-80 per cent leased by the time we’red one on construction.” Bank of the Bahamas International is set to have its own exclusive 5,000 square foot building in the commercial centre, which has a $3 million price tag attached to its construction. Mr Brown said Benchmark (Bahamas $1.3 million into the project to date, some $500,000 having gone on the initial land acquisition, with a further $800,000 spent on vertical construction costs. “We’ve done all that on our own,” he added,” and are beginning to finance the balance of it. We’re about halfway through in terms of construction. We’re actually pretty much on schedule and are getting ready to put the roof on. It’s scheduled to be completed in December, and I suppose we’re two weeks here, two weeks there, either side of the deadline.” Mr Brown said the Carmichael area’s demographics, and being the location with the fastest population growth on New Providence, were driving interest in Benchmark (Bahamas development despite the recession. Businesses and entrepreneurs, he added, were looking into the future and deciding to base themselves in the Carmichael area. For the six months to June 30, 2009, the only real positive for Benchmark (Bahamas financial results was the positive $204,024 in net investment income earned. The net movement in the unrealised value of its equities portfolio produced a $737,136 loss, while the company’s three subsidiaries Benchmark Advisors, Benchmark Properties and Alliance Investment Management generated half-year losses of $12,510, $350 and $154,658 respectively. Mr Brown said Benchmark (Bahamas Board were “not really” concerned about the company falling into possible negative equity, given that total equity had stood at $500,000 at yearend 2008 and further losses had been incurred since then. “We think we’re in good shape, but are keeping an eye on that number and certainly have plans in place to deal with situations like that,” Mr Brown said of the equity position. As it relates to the company, I don’t think we have a need for major concern, because the underlying fundamentals are solid and we had no debt on the books at the end of last year, although we will have a small amount to draw down to complete the building on Carmichael. “Overall, we think we’re in a good position, and if we need to respond I don’t think it will be too difficult to achieve at this point in time.” Mr Brown said Alliance, the company’s international broker/dealer subsidiary, had seen its assets under administration grow by 10 per cent in the 2009 second quarter, and new business and clients continued to come in. It had expanded, he said, from $20 million to some $200 million in client assets under administration. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Education:A ssociate Degree in Business or Management, or its equivalent.Experience:Previouscollectionsexperienceatleast2years.Wellorganizedand e xperience with portfolio management. An understanding of insurance verification and requirements.Qualifications: This includes, but is not limited to: Medical staff Patients & families Clinical personal Support and technical staff PositionSummary:Tomonitorandmanagereceivablesunderyourportfolio.Tomonitor self-pay admissions to the hospital. Follow-up on delinquent accounts as needed.Communicatewithinternal&externalcustomersonaregularbasis. Answerpatient/customerqueriesinaninformedmanner.Continuously participateinperformanceimprovementtoenhanceservicetoour customers throughout the Health System. Any other duties assigned by the SupervisororCoordinatorofCreditandCollectionsDepartment. Collections Officer [VACANT POSITIONS]Pleasesubmitresumeto:HumanResourcesDepartment DoctorsHospital|P.O.BoxN-3018|Nassau,Bahamas nwatkins@doctorshosp.comorFax:242-302-4738 Benchmark’s $3m property eyes 70-80% occupancy before finish F ROM page 1B “It’s looking very good, and I’m very confident we’re going to get 70 per cent of the space leased before the half-year mark.” Julian Brown

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key international financial centre rivals had been making “distinct anda ggressive moves” to escape the OECD ‘grey’ list, “it is a significant issue that the Bahamas,a lthough it seems to have been in negotiations with a n umber of nations, has not been able yet to get to the point of signing an agreement”. He added that his conc ern was that in industries such as financial services, perception was more important than reality, and even became the reality. If the Bahamas is not moving in step with its competitors, and if it is not ahead of its competitors, the perception might be that it isn ot as capable as other countries,” Mr Pinder told Tribune Business. “The Government has p ledged to sign the required 12 TIEAs by the end of the y ear, but the longer it takes to sign them, the more the perception that our com-p etitors are more ahead of the game than we are. We’ve not signed any, while o ur competitors have signed a number of them.” Mr Pinder added that it was “not a good sign” that competitors such as the Cay-m an Islands and BVI were now on the ‘white’ list, and suggested that the Bahamas would have to move quicklyd uring the last four months of 2009 to accomplish its g oal of escaping the ‘grey’ list and having 12 TIEAs in place. This is an issue where we could have jumped out in front and taken the lead. L eading the charge and signing the required agreements could have been one of the things done to demonstrate we were ahead of the gamea nd our competition,” Mr Pinder told Tribune Business. However, Craig A. ‘Tony’ G omez, the Bahamas Financial Services Board’s ( BFSB) chairman, told Tribune Business that he did not believe Cayman,B ermuda and BVI’s achievement on getting to the ‘white’ list would give t hem a competitive advantage “in any way” over the Bahamas. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 9B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM The Bahamas last major centre in region in OECD ‘grey’tax category FROM page 1B I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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we’ve estimate we’ve investe d $203 million in Baker’s Bay, and think we have another $362 million to invest in terms of sales, operations and the Marina Village condos. “A big encouragement for us is that we’ve been able to continue with the quality oft he development that we e nvisaged, even in the face of the economic slowdown.” Baker’s Bay has, along with Albany and Ginn, been one of the few Bahamas-b ased mixed-use resort projects to continue making development progress in the face of the credit crunch,t hen the global recession, w hich brought many of their peers in this nation and the wider Caribbean to a standstill. While development work on the Baker’s Bayb uild-out was set to go into a slower phase for the next two to three months, coinciding with the tourism season’s low point, Dr Marshalls aid that while the marina was “not 100 per cent operational”, the developers had been able to open it from March onwards. “We are working towards B lue Flag certification,” he added of the marina. “We are really gearing up for next year. We had some of the Blue Flag committee members out last week toh elp us identify any potent ial gaps. Right now, we are receiving boats, and are seeing a steady increase in boats coming in as the word spreads.” D r Marshall said per cent of the marina is fully operational”, with all required safety equipment, pump out stations, waterr eceptacles and tanks in place. A Code of Conduct was being developed for the marina, while the fact the marina bottom could be seen from the docks indicat-e d the flushing channel was working to perfection. Meanwhile, the project’s 18-hole Tom Fazio-designed golf course is scheduled to be finished at the end ofD ecember, Dr Marshall d escribing this and the marina as “two big milestones in the project”. The course was set to be ready for play early in 2010, certainly byM arch/April time. “We have grassed at this stage about 14 holes, and everything is pretty much shaped,” Dr Marshall toldT ribune Business. “In another week or so, we will have everything grassed...... “In the Marina Village, 14 units are near construction completion, retail and livingq uarters. One home has been completed and the downstairs converted into at emporary restaurant. We’re doing a lot of streetscaping a round the Marina Village. “We anticipate some additional hires in the next sixt o 12 months as the golf course comes on stream, and we’d like to think thatb etween the golf course, the Homeowners Association a nd more activity in the marina, that we will be in a position to add somewhereb etween a handful to a dozen jobs.” W hile real estate and lot sales had slowed due to the economic climate, Dr Mar-s hall said Baker’s Bay had managed to “close a couple o f sales for the year, and we have a number in the pipeline”. B aker’s Bay was anticipating that it would receive a strong level of guest and members visits when the peak winter season kickedi n, and Dr Marshall told Tri bune Business: “We are in various stages of having closed, attempting to close or sold 70-80 lots, so thosep ersons will be coming in as members and bringing in their guests. We are continuing to try and increase that by having p ersons come down, look at the property and close sales.” D r Marshall said the Baker’s Bay developers hoped to “aggressively” move on the construction of custom homes at the project site, am ove that designed to not only stimulate sales but boost the Bahamian con struction industry. With some 385 home sites for sale at Baker’s Bay, andc onstruction likely to be p hased according to when they are sold and buyer wishes, the Bahamian construction industry is likely to be kept busy by the pro-j ect for the next 10 years. “What we are looking forward to in the next six to 12 months is construction of the custom homes,” Dr Mar-s hall told Tribune Business. “Five to six buyers are very interested in starting construction, and it is estimated that these homes will range in price on average to $5m illion. “If we get five to six of those going in the next 12t o 18 months, that will be a nice shot in the arm for the c onstruction industry. We’re in talks now with about three local Bahamian con-t ractors on that.” Some 100 condo units, some of which will beh omes, will also be present in the Marina Village. Four o f these condo units typi cally two-bed properties have been completed, andD r Marshall said the devel opers expected between 75 t o 100 beds to be placed in the hotel rental pool at any one time. D r Marshall said Baker’s Bay was transitioning from a m onitoring and assessment phase to one of manage ment, execution and imple m entation, with the developers hoping to substantial ly complete key construc tion and infrastructure in time for when the US andw orld economies emerged from recession on the turnaround path. “That’s what we’re hop ing for; the perfect convers ion,” Dr Marshall told Tri bune Business. “Overall, we think we’re in very goods hape and are very opti mistic for the next six to 12 m onths. We started off with a very good model to begin with, and it was just a ques-t ion of executing that from a financial perspective, a human resources perspective. Tremendous planning went into this project, andt hose plans were intended to take us on a successful path.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.811.28Abaco Markets1.341.340.000.1270.00010.60.00% 11.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9 .306.25Bank of Bahamas6.256.250.000.2440.26025.64.16% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3 .493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2 .372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3511.350.002001.4060.2508.12.20% 2 .882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S1)6.006.000.002,0000.4190.30014.35.00% 3.851.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.713.770.060.1110.05234.01.38% 2 .851.32Doctor's Hospital2.002.000.000.3820.0805.24.00% 8.206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.5010.00Finco10.6310.630.000.3220.52033.04.89% 1 1.7110.30FirstCaribbean Bank10.3010.300.000.7940.35013.03.40% 5.534.95Focol (S)5.135.130.000.3320.15015.52.92% 1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.49ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 1 2.0010.39J. S. Johnson10.3910.390.000.9520.64010.96.16% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1 000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100000 100000 FidelitBkNote13(SeriC)+ FBB13 10000 000 TUESDAY, 25 AUGUST 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,577.62| CHG 0.06| %CHG 0.00 | YTD -134.74 | YTD % -7.87BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)M aturity 19 October 2017 7 % Prime + 1.75% 7% B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: 30May2013 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 I nterestFINDEX: CLOSE 790.64 | YTD -5.30% | 2008 -12.31% 1000 . 00 1000 . 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 . 00 0 . 00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.607.92Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.00-2.2460.000N/M0.00% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref2.006.254.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.40051.3320CFAL Bond Fund1.40053.485.15 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.9047-1.20-3.66 1.48421.4075CFAL Money Market Fund1.48423.535.55 3.60903.1031Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1143-8.01-12.43 13.048412.3870Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.04843.415.84 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.40759.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.33992.69-1.41 1.06221.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.06222.566.22 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0243-0.842.43 1.05851.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05852.045.85 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-Jul-09 Prime + 1.75% 7% 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 NAV Date 30-Jun-09Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds 30 May 2013 29 May 2015TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Jul-09 30-Jun-09 31-Dec-07 31-Jul-09 31-Jul-09 14-Aug-09 31-Jul-09MARKET TERMS PUBLIC NOTICE The House of Assembly has appointed a select committee to look into the disposition of all publicly held lands. This includes crown land, land owned by the Treasurer and land owned by public corporations like the Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAICThe Committee members are Fred Mitchell MPFox Hill Chairman, Charles Maynard MPfor Golden Isles and Minister of State for Culture, Deputy Chairman, Branville McCartney MPBamboo Town, Minister of State for Immigration, Philip Davis MP for Cat Island, Rum Cay and San Salvador and Kenyatta Gibson MP for Kennedy. The Committee by this notice is soliciting information from the public on their concerns about publicly owned lands. The deadline for the return of information is 31st August. The information should be sent to the Chief Clerk, House of Assembly at P.O. Box N 3003 Nassau Bahamas or at fax no 322-1118 or at the email address: house of assembly@bahamas.gov.bs or by hand at the House of Assembly, Bay Street, Nassau. The Committee has been empowered to send for persons and papers, to sit from place to place and to sit during the recess and members of the public should indicate whether they would wish to appear before the Committee in person under oath and whether or not they would wish for their identity to be protected. GN 901 M inistry of Finance Public Notice Prohibited and Restricted ImportsThe public is hereby reminded that trailers or authorized by the Minister of Finance, are r estricted items, and cannot therefore, be imported into The Bahamas. Approval may be granted for the temporary importation of such items in special circumstances, Any person wishing to import such items are advised that: the Ministry of Finance before the item is imported into the country. item must be exported at the end of the approved period. trade will not be granted temporary importation for warehousing or similar purposes. already landed in the country. Importers of trailers presently in The Bahamas, are reminded that each trailer is to be exported at the end of the approved period. Further enquiries on the matter may be directed to the N-155, New Providence, The Bahamas or Telephone (242 Financial Secretary (Actg GN 898 M INISTRY OFTHE ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICESG OVERNMENT NOTICE INVITATION FOR TENDERS The Government of the Bahamas is inviting t enders for the supply of Servicing, maintenance and repair of tractor equipment, Solid Waste site off Tonique W illiams-Darling Hwy. (Harold Rd Interested parties may obtain further i nformation including eligibility to participate and may collect the bidding d ocument upon payment of a non refundable T he Department of Environmental Health Services Farrington Road Nassau, Bahamas cheque or cash. The Tenders Board C/O The Financial Secretary Nassau, N.P. The Bahamas The government reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders Project awaits extra $362m investment F ROM page 1B

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STEVENSON JACOBS, A P Business Writer NEW YORK The government agency that guarantees you won't lose your money in a bankf ailure may need a lifeline o f its own. The coffers of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. have been so depleted by the epidemic of collapsingf inancial institutions that analysts warn it could sink into the red by the end oft his year. T hat has happened only once before during the s avings-and-loan crisis of the early 1990s, when the FDIC was forced to borrow $15 b illion from the Treasury and repay it later with intere st. On Thursday, the agency reveals how much is left ini ts reserves. FDIC Chairman S heila Bair may also use the quarterly briefing to say how the agency plans to shore upi ts accounts. Small and midsize banks a cross the country have been hurt by rising loan defaults in the recession.W hen they fail, the FDIC is responsible for making sure d epositors don't lose a cent. It has two options to replenish its insurance fundi n the short run: It can charge banks higher fees or it can take the more radical s tep of borrowing from the U.S. Treasury. None of this means bank c ustomers have anything to worry about. The FDIC is f ully backed by the government, which means depositors' accounts are guaran-t eed up to $250,000 per account. And it still has billions in loss reserves apart from the insurance fund. On Thursday, Bair will a lso update the number of banks on the FDIC's list of troubled institutions. That number shot up to 305 in the first quarter the highests ince 1994 and up from 252 late last year. Because of surging bank failures, the FDIC's boardwas expected Wednesday a fternoon to make it easier for private investors to buy failed financial institutions. P rivate equity funds have been criticized for taking too many risks and paying mana gers too much. But these days fewer healthy banks are willing to buy ailing banks, and the depth of the banking crisis appears to have softened the FDIC's resistance to private buyers. At least in theory, allow ing private investors to buy failing banks would mean the FDIC could charge a higher price, shrinking the amount of losses the agency would have to cover. Bair has not ruled out hik ing premiums on banks for the second time this year or asking the Treasury for a short-term loan. She has said taking the longer-term stepof drawing on the Treasury credit line is only for emergencies. So far this year, 81 banks have failed, compared with just 25 last year and only three in 2007. Hundreds more banks are expected to fall in coming years becauseof souring loans for com mercial real estate. That threatens to deplete the FDIC's fund. "I think the public should expect the fund to go negative at some point," said Gerard Cassidy, a banking analyst at RBC Capital Markets, which has predicted that up to 1,000 banks or one in eight could disappear within three years. Either lifeline for the FDIC carries risks. Borrowing from the Treasury couldbe seen as another taxpayer bailout. But charging more in premiums would shrink profits at healthy banks, squeeze troubled ones and make lending even tighter. "The more you levy these assessments on banks, the less money they have to lend to the general population," said Camden Fine, presidentof the Independent Com munity Bankers of America, an industry group that represents 5,000 banks. L ast week's failure of Guaranty Bank in Texas, t he second-largest this year, is expected to cost the FDIC $3 billion. The FDIC record-e d more than $19 billion in losses just through March. T he agency figures it will need $70 billion to cover bank failures through 2013,m ore than five times the $13 billion that was in the fund in March. The last time it was that low was during the S&L crisis in 1992, when the fund was down to $178 million. Some critics say regulators have taken too longt o shut down troubled banks. Chicago's Corus B ankshares, for example, has staggered for weeks under the weight of bad reale state loans. FDIC spokesman Andrew G ray said the agency seeks to strike a balance between helping troubled banks workt hrough their problems "so there's zero cost to the deposit fund," and intervening quickly if there are no other options. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009, PAGE 11B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 5(*,67(5(' 3+<6,&,$1 +(/3 NOTICE is hereby given that JOZIE TELFORE of EAST STREET SOUTH, MALCOLM ROAD, P.O. BOX N-2557, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any r eason why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20th day of August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE M INISTRY OF FINANCE V ACANCY NOTICET he Ministry of Finance invites interested persons to apply for the p osition of Director of Management Information Systems. T he Terms of Reference of the position are as follows: T he Director of Management Information Systems (DMISwill g uide the Government of The Bahamas in the procurement and i mplementation of appropriate Management Information Technology (MITThe DMIS will be responsible for coordination o f the Government’s Management Information Systems (MIS meet the needs of Government’s mission statement. This person will p lan and direct the implementation of automated systems to meet current and future needs of the Government by performing the f ollowing activities: Have general supervision of all government-related Information C ommunication of Technology (ICT 1 . Advise on the selection of appropriate technology, hardware and software, for any system proposal submitted by any Ministry or Department of the Government of The Bahamas. 2. Design organization structures for computer sections within t he Government to enable a controlled decentralization. 3 . Assist the agencies of the Government of The Bahamas with the selection and recruitment of appropriate computer p ersonnel. 4. Review and recommend the operational procedures of computer departments, units or sections within the Public Service. 5. Implementation of the recommendations of the MIS S trategic Plan designed for the Government. 6.Formulate and subsequently review the system development a nd implementation of software projects. 7 .Provide plans for integrating the systems located in various agencies of the Government for sharing of information. 8.Translate the Government’s request for necessary management decision information into computerized requirements 9.Coordinate the Government’s MIS budgets and Schedules for Ministries and Department base on the Government’s stated priorities. and future MIS projects 11.Make presentations to top management on the status of the action plans to address outstanding and future MIS issues. 12.Establish and coordinate the use of a Government MIS resources teams within Ministries/Department. 13.Align MIS technology with the Government’s requirements. 14.Provide technical guidance for current environment with the view to positioning the Government to be able to more readily take advantage of future MIS technologies. Knowledge of products in current environment. 15.Minimize and control the costs of implementation and operations of the Government’s resource team where applicable, 16.Organize MIS seminars for managers. A degree in the Information Technology, Management Information technology and techniques in the following area: Systems Reporting: The DMIS will report to the Financial Secretary. The term for the Director of Management Information Systems will Curriculum Vitae should be sent to: or by e-mail to ecunningham@bahamas.gov.bs so as to arrive not later than Monday 24 August, 2009. No telephone calls please. GN 900 PROGRESSIVE SERVICE ORIENTED COMPANY LOOKING FOR A FEW GOOD PEOPLE.PARTS AND SERVICE COORDINATORExtensive background in managing an OEM Heavy Truck Service/ Parts facility a must. Background in Parts and Service management and coordination required on a daily basis. Must be able to effectively administer all facits of business. Minimum of 10 years experience preferred. Good people skills a must. Must have prior experience in parts order and supervising employees. Computer skills required on a daily basis. Must be self motivated and work with little or no supervision.Competitive WagesWe thank all applicants however, only candidates to be interviewed will be contacted. Please hand deliver your resumes and references to Bahamas Mack Truck Sales Ltd. Rock Crusher Road Nassau, Bahamas Agency that insures bank deposits may need help IN THIS SEPT. 17, 2008 file photo, Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. (FDIC tol Hill. Hit by an epidemic of bank failures, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. will reveal Thursday, Aug. 27, 2009, how much is left in its deposit insurance fund, which has sunk to its lowest level in 17 years. A P P h o t o / H a r a z N . G h a n b a r i , f i l e

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KEN THOMAS and STEPHEN MANNING,W ASHINGTON Cash for Clunkers generated nearly 700,000 new car sales and ended under its $3b illion budget, the Transportation Department said Wednesday, according to Associated Press . Releasing final data, the g overnment said dealers submitted 690,114 vouchers totaling $2.88 billion. New car sales through the program ended late Mondaya nd dealers were allowed to submit paperwork to the g overnment until late Tuesday. J apanese automakers Toyota, Honda and Nissan accounted for 41 percent of the new vehicle sales, outpacing Detroit automakersG eneral Motors, Ford and Chrysler, which had a share of nearly 39 percent. Toyota Motor Corp. led the industry with 19.4 percento f new sales, followed by G eneral Motors Co. with 17.6 percent and Ford Motor Co. with 14.4 percent. The Toyota Corolla was the most popular new vehi-c le purchased under the program, followed by the Honda Civic, Toyota Camry and Ford Focus. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said U.S. cons umers and workers were "the clear winners" under the program. "Manufacturing plants have added shifts and recalled workers. Mori-b und showrooms were brought back to life and consumers bought fuel-efficient cars that will save them money and improve thee nvironment," he said. T he White House Council of Economic Advisers said the program will boost economic growth in the third quarter by 0.3 to 0.4 per-c entage points because of the increased auto sales in July and August. An estimated 42,000 jobs will be created or saved during the second half of the year, theW hite House said. The program, which began in late July, offeredc onsumers rebates of $3,500 or $4,500 off the price of a n ew vehicle in return for trading in their older, less fuel-efficient vehicles. Thet rade-in vehicles needed to get 18 miles per gallon or l ess and were then scrapped. It proved far more popular than lawmakers original-l y thought. Congress was forced to a dd another $2 billion to the original $1 billion budget when the first pot of moneyn early ran out in a week. The extra money was supposed to last through Labor Day, but in the end, Cash for Clunkers ran only abouta month. Dealers loved the new sales, but reported majorh assles trying to get the government to repay them for t he rebates they gave customers. The government extended the deadline for them to file deals, but many still haven't received theirm oney. Peter Kitzmiller, president of the Maryland Automobile Dealers Association, said most dealers appearedt o get their paperwork in by t he Tuesday night deadline. He expressed hope the pace of repayments would pick up now that government officials are working throught he backlog. The Transportation Department said Wednesday that 2,000 people are processing dealer applications, but Kitzmiller said ther ate of repayment hasn't increased. "I'm a little concerned t hat we haven't seen any improvement," he said. T he government said 84 percent of the trade-ins were trucks and 59 percent of then ew vehicles were passenger cars. N ew vehicles bought through Cash for Clunkers had an average fuel-effi-c iency of 24.9 miles per gallon, compared with an avera ge of 15.8 mpg for tradeins, a 58 percent improvement. A merican companies accounted for all the top-10 traded-in vehicles. The Ford Explorer four-wheel-drive was the most popular, fol-l owed by the Ford F-150 Pickup two-wheel-drive, the Jeep Grand Cherokee four-w heel-drive and Ford Explorer two-wheel-drive. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Cash for Clunkers generates 700K new car sales ( AP Photo /Gary Malerba) FORD EMPLOYEES work as the 2010 Ford Focus rolls down the pre-delivery area of the Wayne Stamping and Assembly plant in Wayne, Mich., Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2009. Cash for Clunkers generated nearly 700,000 new car sales and ended under its $3 billion budget, the Transportation Department said Wednesday.

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 76F/24C Low: 75F/24C Low: 75F/24C Low: 78F/26C Low: 77 F/25 C Low: 79F/26C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 92F/33C High: 90F/32C High: 90 F/32 C High: 90 F/32 C High: 91F/33C High: 89 F/32C High: 90F/32C Low: 80F/27C High: 91F/33C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 91F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 74F/23C High: 89 F/32 C Low: 76F/24C High: 88 F/31 Low: 75F/24C High: 87F/31C Low: 76 F/24C High: 90F/32C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 92F/33C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 90F/32C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 89F/32C Low: 78F/26C High: 92 F/33 C Low: 77F/25C High: 90F/32C High: 89 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 27 TH , 2009, PAGE 13B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny, a couple of t-storms. Mostly cloudy.Sunshine with a heavy thunderstorm. Sunny to partly cloudy. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 90 Low: 79 High: 90 High: 91 High: 90 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny with a shower possible. High: 89 Low: 79 Low: 80 Low: 79 AccuWeather RealFeel 100F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 88F 107-85F 103-90F 102-89F 102-83F Low: 79 TODAYTONIGHTFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAY MONDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................91F/33C Low ....................................................80F/27C Normal high ......................................89F/31C Normal low ........................................76F/24C Last year's high .................................. 91 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 82 F/28C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................trace Year to date ................................................23.99" Normal year to date ....................................30.28" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU First Full Last New Aug. 27 Sep. 4Sep. 11Sep. 18 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:49 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:34 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 1:58 p.m. Moonset . . . . . . . . . none Today Friday Saturday Sunday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 1:32 a.m.2.37:32 a.m.0.5 2:15 p.m.2.88:37 p.m.0.7 2:29 a.m.2.28:30 a.m.0.6 3:17 p.m.2.79:38 p.m.0.8 3:31 a.m.2.29:31 a.m.0.6 4:18 p.m.2.710:35 p.m.0.7 4:32 a.m.2.210:31 a.m.0.6 5:14 p.m.2.711:27 p.m.0.7 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco90/3275/23t90/3279/26pc Amsterdam73/2257/13c70/2154/12r Ankara, Turkey81/2750/10s83/2852/11s Athens88/3172/22s90/3272/22s Auckland62/1652/11sh62/1652/11s Bangkok91/3279/26sh90/3278/25t Barbados86/3077/25sh86/3078/25sh Barcelona81/2769/20s81/2771/21s Beijing90/3270/21s81/2764/17pc Beirut81/2775/23s81/2775/23t Belgrade93/3369/20s90/3267/19pc Berlin80/2663/17pc79/2654/12pc Bermuda86/3080/26pc86/3080/26s Bogota69/2042/5pc67/1944/6c Brussels77/2559/15pc70/2150/10pc Budapest87/3066/18pc90/3268/20pc Buenos Aires77/2561/16s81/2763/17s Cairo94/3474/23s94/3473/22s Calcutta90/3279/26t90/3282/27sh Calgary78/2548/8s72/2248/8s Cancun91/3275/23pc91/3276/24t Caracas81/2771/21pc82/2772/22t Casablanca86/3071/21s91/3275/23s Copenhagen71/2163/17sh74/2353/11c Dublin63/1750/10r64/1748/8sh Frankfurt84/2863/17pc81/2752/11pc Geneva 83/28 58/14 s 80/2655/12s Halifax 71/21 52/11 s 72/22 52/11 s Havana 91/32 73/22 t 89/31 73/22 sh Helsinki 66/18 55/12pc72/2257/13pc Hong Kong 93/33 82/27 s 93/33 84/28s Islamabad 103/39 80/26 s 102/38 80/26 s Istanbul85/2969/20s86/3072/22s Jerusalem 82/27 61/16s83/2864/17s Johannesburg 69/2044/6pc64/1744/6s Kingston 88/3177/25t88/3178/25s Lima73/2260/15pc74/2360/15s London73/2255/12pc70/2152/11pc Madrid95/3561/16s100/3763/17s Manila90/3279/26t84/2877/25t Mexico City77/2555/12t77/2555/12t Monterrey102/3873/22s102/3874/23pc Montreal66/1846/7s66/1852/11s Moscow72/2255/12pc72/2252/11sh Munich84/2859/15sh84/2853/11t Nairobi79/2651/10pc82/2753/11pc New Delhi 91/3279/26t95/3581/27t Oslo63/1752/11sh65/1848/8r Paris77/2561/16pc73/2254/12pc Prague 82/27 60/15 s 83/28 58/14 pc Rio de Janeiro74/2367/19pc76/2468/20s Riyadh105/4081/27s105/4080/26s Rome 88/31 68/20 pc 88/31 68/20 s St. Thomas88/3179/26pc87/3079/26s San Juan89/3150/10s91/3252/11s San Salvador 86/30 72/22 t 88/31 72/22 t Santiago 79/2648/8s75/2348/8pc Santo Domingo90/3273/22pc86/3074/23sh Sao Paulo 70/21 58/14 s 71/21 60/15s Seoul86/3068/20r86/3066/18s Stockholm 72/22 60/15 pc 72/22 60/15 pc Sydney 73/22 50/10 s75/2355/12s Taipei95/3582/27pc95/3582/27s T okyo 82/27 73/22 pc 86/30 77/25 pc T oronto 68/2052/11s68/2057/13pc Trinidad93/3370/21s93/3372/22s V ancouver 78/25 59/15 pc 70/2157/13sh Vienna 84/2869/20s88/3170/21pc W arsaw 81/27 61/16 pc 82/27 57/13 s Winnipeg 75/23 55/12 pc 64/1750/10pc H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T.S. D ANNY F ORECAST P ATH M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-15 Miles85F Friday:NE at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet7-15 Miles85F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-15 Miles85F Friday:NE at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet7-15 Miles85F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-15 Miles84F Friday:NE at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet7-15 Miles84F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque88/3164/17pc87/3062/16s Anchorage63/1751/10r64/1753/11sh Atlanta88/3168/20t83/2868/20t Atlantic City85/2961/16pc77/2564/17pc Baltimore85/2964/17pc78/2564/17r Boston76/2456/13s70/2156/13s Buffalo73/2251/10s72/2260/15pc Charleston, SC88/3173/22t87/3070/21t Chicago74/2360/15sh77/2560/15t Cleveland74/2360/15pc78/2562/16t Dallas94/3472/22t92/3371/21pc Denver84/2855/12s90/3253/11s Detroit75/2358/14pc77/2562/16t Honolulu89/3176/24s89/3175/23s Houston95/3574/23t95/3574/23t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday TodayFridayTodayFriday Indianapolis84/2865/18t80/2665/18t Jacksonville88/3172/22t88/3171/21t Kansas City80/2661/16t83/2862/16pc Las Vegas105/4076/24s107/4181/27s Little Rock91/3270/21s87/3067/19t Los Angeles95/3564/17s90/3264/17s Louisville90/3269/20pc85/2968/20t Memphis92/3372/22s89/3170/21t Miami91/3277/25t89/3176/24t Minneapolis78/2558/14s77/2554/12pc Nashville90/3268/20s89/3168/20t New Orleans90/3272/22t90/3274/23pc New York81/2766/18s76/2467/19pc Oklahoma City88/3164/17t85/2963/17s Orlando92/3376/24t90/3275/23t Philadelphia86/3065/18pc80/2665/18c Phoenix 108/42 84/28 s 109/4284/28s Pittsburgh77/2558/14pc73/2260/15t Portland, OR 93/3358/14pc78/2560/15pc Raleigh-Durham 94/34 69/20 s 85/29 68/20 t St. Louis88/3168/20t81/2766/18t Salt Lake City 93/33 63/17 s 93/3363/17s San Antonio 99/37 73/22 t 100/37 72/22 t San Diego85/2966/18s81/2767/19s San Francisco 84/28 59/15 pc 78/2558/14pc Seattle88/3155/12pc71/2156/13pc T allahassee 88/3170/21t86/3071/21t T ampa 90/32 75/23 t 90/32 77/25t Tucson102/3876/24pc101/3876/24pc W ashington, DC 89/31 69/20pc78/2568/20r UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Certified Service at a bush mechanic!s price !!! In these economic times, W e are here to support your engine!M &E will do the job for you with Caterpillar certified t echnicians, Caterpillar original parts and will guarantee the jobs!!! Call us323 5701 (Nassau) 352 5081 (Freeport) Discount applies for truck engines Valid until September 30, 2009Other offers available include: Engine oil analysis Electronic diagnostic Fuel tank cleaning Valve and Injectors adjustment Get a full truck engine service starting at $550 including oil, oil filter, fuel filter and labour. Call us today to schedule your servicing needs. toms procedure and revert to the unaccompanied baggage declaration form that had been traditionally used by courier services to clear parcels. Customs had required that a C-13 (home consumpt ion entry) form be filled out for any item imported to the B ahamas, requiring couriers to hire brokers and lodge bonds to clear the items. “The hardship that Freeport is faced with is the same that is happening to the couriers in Nassau,” said Mr Saunders. H e said the new C-13 procedure simply slowed down the process for declaring goods too much, with an overwhelming increase in paperwork. Mr Saunders said that under the old procedure, couriers were able to fill out one form and present a product invoice, pay t he necessary duty and the goods would be cleared. Now, the e normous amount of paperwork and added brokerage fees have stunted business. Mr Saunders said theGovernment has to form legislation for courier companies in order to standardise the procedures for the importation of goods in this country. No matter who comes into office we should have legislation that protects the industry,” said Mr Saunders. He added that the newComptroller simply had to curb the corruption within the department and increase screening measures in order to recoup reve nue lost over the years. Mr Saunders contended that Customs has n o statistical data to show the new procedures have increased Customs’ revenue, as there was no statistical data prior to the new procedures being implemented. He asserted that the new procedures could “kill the goose that laid the golden egg.” M r Gomez told Tribune Business recently that the new processes put in place by the Customs department since his appointment have always been the right procedures, but had not been enforced for decades. He suggested that courier services wanted a system t hat was illegal to operate. However, Mr Saunders said they want a system that works and does not drain the freight forwarding companies as much as it helps them. He said next day delivery service has been hit the hardest by the new Customs procedures. He said the purpose of the old unaccompanied baggage declaration form was to collect revenues and regulate imports, just as the c ustoms model requires. He said the C-13 now treats courier company cargo “as cargo on the Betty K”. “We are not profitable because we can’t get top dollar any more, because of the amount of brokerage work that has to be done,” said Mr Saunders. Courier firms are still ‘unprofitable’ FROM page 1B

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The Tribune The T ribune M y V o i c e , M y N e w s p a p e r ! Thursday, August 27th, 2009

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The Tribune Thursday, August 27, 2009 PG 21 RELIGION RELIGIOUS NEWS, STORIES AND CHURCH EVENTS

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The Tribune PG 22 Thursday, August 27, 2009 RELIGION By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net GOSPEL recording group Shaback continued with its songs of praise with the release of the group’s first tw o disk album and D VD titled Shaback, This Is It. The gr oup on W ednesday presented Minister for Culture Charles Maynard with one of the first official copies of the album. Thanking Shaback for maintaining their standard of excellence in Christian music over the past years, Mr Maynard said he will continue to do all he can to assist in their future development. “I would like to congratulate Shaback who have become a premiere gospel gr oup in the Bahamas over the years. “They have gone a very long way both locally and internationally to make a name for themselves and spread the word of the gospel the same time. W e are extremely pleased that we were able to be a small part of the whole pr ocess for them in this lat est pr ocess, they ar e the beneficiaries of some suppor t fr om the government in ter ms of the pr oduction of the CD initially, and we are happy that the pr oduct is done and r eady for the mar ket and encourage the Bahamian peo ple to continue to support them.” Dir ector for the group Clint Watson explained that over the past two weeks, the group has been on a US tour representing the Bahamas and sharing their music in major cities including New York, New Jersey, Baltimor e, and W ashington DC. During that time he said the gr oup had a chance to display their talents to some of the biggest names in the gospel music ar ena. e were fortunate to be able to minister at some of the great churches of some gospel artists like Bishop Hezekiah Walker, and Donnie McClurkin. e had an exciting time and now we are happy to be back home on our own soil to of ficially r elease this pr oj ect to the Bahamian people.” Mr Watson said the group has arranged a special concert launch for the album this Friday at the Golden Gates World Outreach Centre. He explained: “During the fr ee con cert persons will have a chance to obtain this new album on sale at a discounted rate. e have also planned a few per formances with a number of our colleagues in the industry like the Mount Tabor Praise and Worship Team, Shaback, This Is It GOSPEL Recording group Shaback is releasing its first two disk album and DVD which debuts this Friday from Golden Gates World Outreach Centre on Carmichael Road. SEE page 25

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The Tribune Thursday, August 27, 2009 PG 23 RELIGION H ow are we to navigate the shoals of parenting and our children to survive our trial and error efforts? Only by the grace of God I am sure. These are indeed difficult times for both. Our words of wisdom for our youth may be categorised as some of the following: 1. Work hard and enjoy success achieved honourably 2. Study diligently as a student learning comes easier when young 3. Explore possible gifts learning from the best 4. Listen attentively to those who have mastered their craft 5. Let your good name be your path to fame 6. Gain knowledge, wisdom, insight and understanding you will need them all 7. Let God be your guide 8. Prepare for the future while learning for the past 9. Find fulfillment and contentment somewhere in each day 10. Cooperation with parents makes it easier to be trusted and rewarded Our wor ds of wisdom for our par ents include these r ecommen dations: 1. Pay attention to each child and celebrate each one’ s uniqueness 2. Pray for patience daily and exhibit it even when stressed, angr y or tired 3. Choose timing, tone and place to maximise effectiveness of discipline 4. Listen to feelings and words 5. Allow humour to keep you calm where possible 6. Be consistent and persistent with moral and spiritual principles 7. Lead by example 8. Try new approaches to get desired results 9. Make the teacher your ally to bring out the best in your child 10. Offer a united front as parents having prayed and discussed your position in advance As a community let us model our best and mentor with love both parents and children. Let family life be a priority when we make plans in our organisations. Encourage parents to spend more time at home in the school years to monitor their children’s homework, friends, pr ogr ess in sports and the ar ts, and spiritual development. Let parenting be a ministry and childhood a joy . It should be a bless ing to have wise and loving par ents and to have bright and obedient childr en. W e have to get back to the place wher e it is exciting to learn and to do excel at school. We need to get it right with God’ s help at home, work and school. Getting it right REV.ANGELA C BOSFIELD PALACIOUS MEDITATION Let family life be a priority when we make plans in our organisations. Encourage parents to spend more time at home in the school years to monitor their children’s homework, friends, progress in sports and the arts, and spiritual development.

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THERE is absolutely nothing that man can ever say or do, that will catch Father Yahweh by surprise. Despite man's academic accomplishments, their allegedly deep spiritual understandings and anointing, we all have this one common denominator which is; we're subject to error. New Age teaching is so spiritually subtle if it's possible even God's very elect would be deceived. This teaching can be likened to an individual unknowingly getting on bus #21, and believing that they're on bus # 15. Now, if this person doesn't come to their senses quickly and get off bus # 21, at the end of the ride they would have arrived at the wrong destination; bearing in mind that bus #21 goes in the southernd irection and bus # 15 the northern direction. W atch this ! Look at the close similarities of these two buses: They both have drivers that may wear the same type uniforms, both buses are the same size and the same color, and they both park at the same terminal to load passengers. The major difference with these buses is they have different routes and destinations. New Age teachings is a contaminated version of the truth. It sounds good, and skillfully uses the Bible or whatever means necessary to accomplish it's mission. Remember , that ther e is nothing that man can do, that will ever catch God by surprise. Here's the deadly deception: Whenever the devil deceives a person / people, he's just doing his job because he's a deceiver. The deadly deception comes into play when we deceive ourselves; something like this -knowing that there is a fly in the soup and yet denying this fact; ther eby eating and serving the soup to others. Listen, based upon the way things are going right now in the Bahamas (a murder per week, a constipated judicial sys tem, etc) and most of all the lack of tr ue Godly leadership, I'm by no means surprised to hear the erroneous religious teaching that God (Yahweh) has a wife. Now, for those of you who want to ascribe to this sort of teaching, go ahead; get on bus #21. I can assure you that at the end of the day the driver of this bus and all of his passengers will be cr ying as a r esult of their heated destination. Think about this: In the natural, every man great and small embraces every opportunity to highlight and acknowledge his mother. Take an athlete for example; after winning a big race, a championship or some other event, the first person he would acknowledge or call out too would be his mother (Hi Mom WHERE, WHERE; in the scripture can it be found that Yeshuwa Messiah (Jesus the Christ made mention of God, His father havinga wife. This religious New Age teaching of God having a wife is just the beginning of what's coming down the religious pipe from which the Bahamian public is fed. In Pr overb.8: 1-38. The bible speaks of wisdom being possessed by the Lor d in the beginning of his way . It's from this premise and other scripture verses taken out of context that this erroneous teachings of God having a wife comes from. But as the apostle Paul said to the churches of Galatia so say I unto the churches in the Bahamas. Gal.3:1. O foolish Galatians, who hath bewitched you, that ye should not obey the truth, before whose eyes Jesus Christ hath been evi-d ently set forth, crucified among you? I would want to believe that it's t hrough ignorance that any Bahamian church leader would give into this New Age – Deadly Deception teaching of God having a wife. This contrary spirit is so crafty and cunning that it will erroneously fill the hearts of its victims with scriptures taken out of context to prove or justify the New Age teaching. As it relates to marriage and heaven and spiritual matters here's what Yeshuwa Messiah said, when questioned of the same by some religious leaders. NLT: Matt.22: 23. That same day some Sadducees stepped for ward--a group of Jews who say there is no resurrection after death. They posed this question: : 24. "Teacher, Moses said, 'If a man dies without children, his brother should marr y the widow and have a child who will be the brother's heir.' : 25. Well, there were seven brothers. The oldest married and then died without children, so the second brother married the widow . : 26. This brother also died without children, and the wife was married to the next brother , and so on until she had been the wife of each of them. : 27. And then she also died. : 28. So tell us, whose wife will she be in the resurrection? For she was the wife of all seven of them!" : 29. Jesus replied, "Y our problem is that you don't know the Scriptures, and you don't know the power of God. : 30. For when the dead rise, they won't be married. They will be like the angels in heaven. Here we see in verses 29 & 30 Yeshuwa saying to these religious leaders that they err in not knowing the tr uth of the scriptur es and the power of God. For in heaven ther e is no such thing as mar riage or given in mar riage; so the teachings and beliefs of God having a wife is a very, very erroneous teaching. May the FOG (Favor of God you and your family: For questions or comments contact us via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or Ph.1-242-441-2021 Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int'l, The Tribune PG 24 Thursday, August 27, 2009 RELIGION New Age – Deadly deception PASTOR MATTHEW ALLEN

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The Tribune PG 26 Thursday, August 27, 2009 RELIGION THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS ROMAN CATHOLIC PIONEERS: GABRIEL ROERIG IN 1894, Abbot Bernard of St John's Minnesota sent two newly ordained priests -Father Gabriel Roerig and Father Melchior Bahner to support the mission in the Bahamas. Father Gabriel followed that old Benedictine principle Ora et Labora (pray and workdaily labour to build their physical ecclesiastical buildings and homes. They had to be jack-of-alltrades because there was never enough money for the basic essentials. He was sent to Andros where he built by hand St Saviour's Chapel at Behring Point settlement an apostolate that was to last for 56 years, the most extended service of any Catholic priest in the Bahamas. Hearing that r ocks had to be carried in a pail, Father Bernard sent a wheelbarrow from New York. On the first day, Father Gabriel sent a man to haul rocks the man hauled the rocks out of the bush in the wheelbarrow but then car ried the wheelbar r ow up the hill on his head! Father Gabriel, a handy mason soon completed the church. And he built it so well that it withstood the fier ce hur ricane of 1899 and several mor e. In 1897, after visiting his mother in Ger many he was granted an audience with Pope Leo XIII, who was interested and encouraging about the Bahamas mission. Father Gabriel br ought back his brother Joseph, who was later or dained as Father Leander and ser ved in Andros until his death by drowning off Bimini in 1955. In 1907, Father Gabriel was considered to take charge of Bahamas Mission with Father Chrysostrom to be appointed to succeed Abbot Alexius of St Anselm's New York but the move fell thr ough because of Father Chrysostrom's demands. A new mission to Mangrove Cay was instigated in 1921 and the following year Fr Gabriel baptised 50 persons there and administered Holy Communion to them. Father Gabriel acted as Vicar Forane during Father Chrysostrom's malaria in 1920but was glad when it was over so that the honour and burden should rest on the broad shoulders of Father Chr ysostrom. And that burden af fected the mission many times fr om 1912, Father Chr ysostr om felt that he and Father Gabriel needed assistance as their labour was only half as ef fec tive over the years. They spent many a lonely Christmas among poor and faced terrible calamities. The year 1926 was one of terrible destruction and distr ess for the poor pr oper ty on the Andros missions. Three hurricanes destroyed 48 of the 58 houses at Behring's point and the chapel, school and other buildings were damaged. When Father Chrysostrom took ill and wished to retire to San Salvador, Father Gabriel built a house and chapel in San Salvador for him. After Chrysostrom's death in January 1928, Cardinal Hayes came to Nassau for an inspection of the Benedictine mission in the Bahamas and was delighted with what he saw . A dinner was held on January 29 to honour the 58th birthday of Father Gabriel and his thirty four years of service in the Bahamas. It was said that the early missionaries to the Bahamas had iron constitutions. Cer tainly Father Gabriel lived alone on Andros for fifty five years and survived on the simplest fare that was brought to him by his devoted people. Fittingly two of them were recognised in 1935, the 25th anniversary of King George V, when Governor, Sir Bede Clifford conferred the O.B.E on Father Gabriel Roerig and the MBE on Father Cor nelius Osendor f for their work among the people. In 1937, Fathers Anthony Ronellenfitsch, Herber t Buerschinger, E F Callan and Charles Blesch all began work in the Bahamas giving sup port to the veterans Fathers Gabriel, Leander , Bonaventur e and Arnold these names had already moved into the religious folklore of the Bahama Islands. Father Gabriel was a worker priest, pr eaching the Gospel and teaching the use of tools and the worth of manual labour. His breviary, the Bible, the Gospel catechism and the Holy Rule , were constantly in his hand; so was the hammer, chisel, trowel and measuring tape. He fortified himself each day with prayer, divine reading and meditation before traveling by foot or boat to the scattered settlements of Andros to catechise, baptise and comfort the sick. Strangers were always welcome in his house. His own r eward was the Benedictine Pax, the peace which his own soul knew and radiated and which caused his flock to look at him as a pure spiritual guide. In 1950, Father Gabriel was brought to the Prior y because of his weakened condition. He pleaded with his care givers to allow him to go back to Andr os, “I am not strong enough to do anything but I could sit in the church and help and instruct the people, especially the children”. In his last days he was given the Apostolic Blessing by Pope Pius XII. In June 1950, plans wer e afoot to consecrate Father Leonard Haggarty as the second bishop of the Bahamas. While these plans wer e being formulated, Father Gabriel Roerig OSB, aged eighty one years, died on 30th August 1950. His withered body lay in St Francis Xavier Cathedral befor e his many friends accompanied the remains to the cemetery of the new St Augustine's Monaster y for the first burial there. Author Richar d Le Gallienne wr ote about Father Gabriel's piety and toil in his book Pieces of Eight. JIM LAWLOR P P a a r r t t 4 4 1 1 TRINIT Y CIT Y OF PRAISE BACK-2SCHOOL N A TIONAL PRAYER RALLY Apostles Ed & Lee Watson and the family of Trinity City of Praise will host a Back to School National Prayer Rally to cover the countr s education system on Sunday , August 30from 5pm to 6:30 pm on Rawson Squar e. The Minister of Education Carl Bethel and the Minister of Spor ts Desmond Banister have been invited to join with parents, teachers, students in this prayer event. The organisers believe that this time of prayer will help those facing challenges in this new school year. “Our prayers will focus on the students’ success in the classr oom, teacher commitment, pr ovision of r esources for the parents, overall safety on the school gr ounds and during transit and for the str uctur e of the education system as a whole. Local clergy including Rev Patrick Paul, the Bahamas Christian Council President, will also speak blessings over the education system. HOLY CROSS YOUTHJAM CONCERT Holy Cr oss Anglican Chur ch is having its annual Youth-Jam concert this Saturday to help prepare kids for the new school semester . Accor ding to Father Ethan Ferguson, assistant priest and youth minister for the church, the event is all about the children. He explained: “It is originally an outdoor concert, we bring in various gospel ar tists, along with other drama gr oups and enter tainment just to get the kids all hyped about going back to school.” With this year’s theme being ‘Children Of God Arise,’ his ministry hopes to cater to the needs of the chil dr en fr om the inside out. e usually have short presentations on issues relevant to youngsters such as drug use, prevention, sex, violence, and how to study He explained that the event is really a fun day for the children to help them celebrate the end of the summer, which gaining the necessar y skills for the school year . It all happens this Satur day with artists like Ricardo Clark, Kenyatta Taylor, Ryan Jupp, Lyrically Blessed, Holy Cross Dance Team, and others at the chur ch gr ound’s Highbury Park, Soldier Road. n Did you r ecently give birth to the newest little angel on earth? Have you and your beloved r ecently tied the knot? Is your church planning a special event? Tribune Religion wants to hear fr om you! We want to know about the special things going on in your life, so go ahead and send in your wedding photographs, bir th announcements and church activities schedule to be posted in upcoming T ribune Religion sections. This ser vice is fr ee. Send all information, including (especially graphs, to features@tribunemedia.net. Information can be hand delivered to The T ribune at Shirley and Deveaux Streets or call the Religion section @ 502.2368. RELIGIOUS NOTES WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!!

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The Tribune Thursday, August 27, 2009 PG 27 RELIGION THEprogramme focused on preparing delegates to teach the Kingdom of God through a 3-day intensive seminar with topics including, The Long Human Search, Rediscovering the Original Kingdom, How to Influence Y our Society , The Kingdom Concept and The Mind of Jesus. In the session the Quality of Kingdoms, Dr Munroe said humans are hungry for a deeper meaning of life that religion cannot fulfill. He explained that Jesus Christ did not bring religion to the world, but taught the message of the Kingdom of God through parables and declarations. "The problem is that what we're doing in dif fer ent r eligions is not completing our lives and we still live in spiritual poverty. This is why religious people are always pre-occupied with busyness, because if you're busy you don't have time to think about your empti ness," said Dr Munr oe. Pastors from all over the world attended the MMI Kingdom Seminar . Florida Pastor Christian Garcia was excited to be a part of the first Kingdom Seminar and plans to bring members of his church to other conferences hosted by Dr Munroe. "My wife and I, we had such a wonderful time her e. Dr Munr oe invited us to The Bahamas earlier this year and we decided to come down for this event. It has been amazing, it's changed our lives. And it wasn't just about the seminar we got to go sightseeing in Nassau and visit some of the other hotels and we're definitely coming back," he said. Pastor Jide-David Modede of London, UK, a fr equent seminar attendee of Dr Munroe's events said that every time he visits The Bahamas, he has a new experience. "This is my second time to The Bahamas in the last four weeks, my wife and family come together on an annual basis, and while this time was not a vacation time for me, I still had a gr eat time lear ning and getting to experience dif ferent things about Bahamian culture,"he explained. BFM hosts The Kingdom Seminar INTERNA TIONAL Delegates attend The Kingdom Seminar at Bahamas Faith Ministries International. Dr . Munroe and Deputy Director of T ourism, Religious Group, Linville Johnson.

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The Tribune RELIGION PG 28 Thursday, August 27, 2009 INkeeping with their church's vision, “Love God, Love People, Serve the World”, and a mandate from their senior pastor, Pastor Wilbur Outten, to become more service oriented, the youth ministry of Freeport Bible Church recently took a very special mission trip to Abaco August 5 10, 2009. A group of twenty five persons including nine leaders and sixteen students travelled to Dundas Town, Abaco to conduct a few service projects in the a rea. Quoting the scripture, “I tell you the truth, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers of mine, you did for me” (Matt 25:40), Minister Kyle Maycock, Youth Coordinator at Freeport Bible Church said: “Jesus told His disciples that whoever wants to be great among men must first become a servant. “Our trip to Abaco was a small step taken to cultivate and nur ture an attitude of compassion and ser vice within our students. We felt the need to expose our students to local oppor tunities to ser ve their neighbours with compassion and love as Jesus would. “Our goal is to ultimately make Christian service a per manent par t of the Bahamian psyche and culture.” While in Abaco the group did house cleaning and lawn maintenance for senior citizens and assisted a local church with the construction of their new sanctuar y by putting up sheet rock, site cleaning and offered assistance in any other way they could. The residents were quite appreciative of their kind gestures. The local Department of Social Services identified the work projects for the students and the group was hosted by one of their affiliated chur ches, Friendship T aber nacle Chur ch, where Pastor Silbert Mills is the pastor. The students all claimed to have been greatly impacted by the trip. One female participant said she has become more grateful for what she has after seeing the way that some people live. Prior to the Abaco trip, the students con ducted a “Service Auction” where they provided services in the areas of car washing, lawn maintenance, and filing. The service auction served a two fold purpose; it assisted in subsidising the cost of the trip while also affording the students the opportunity to gain some work experience. They wish to expr ess their sincere thanks to all who suppor ted the auction. A special thank you is extended to Paul Ross and the staf f of Nassau Insurance Brokers (formerly Trinity Insurance Ltd.). The gr oup also extends grat itude to Pastor Silbert Mills and the family of Friendship T aber nacle Chur ch, Abaco, for their hospitality . While the students enjoyed the opportunity to be able to travel together and have fun as young people, the experience of unselfishly volunteering their service to help others, made this summer vacation a tr uly enriching one. An enriching summer experience ABOVE: Malaika McKenzie & Tyeasha Lewis gives the kitchen of a local senior citizen a make-over . CENTER : A few of the youth work hard to clean the yard of a local senior citizen in Abaco. LEFT: Randall Cooper jr, Dickenson Cepoudy, Lester Rolle, Jason Gibbs and Micheal Roker assisting a local chur ch in Abaco with the construction of its new sanctuary.