Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
TRY OUR
DOUBLE

FILET--FISH "™*oven’*

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Volume: 105 No.227

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LL Ts SECTION

CHAOS erupted yester-
day as an angry mob
stormed a bank demanding
to know how union chiefs
were able to withdraw near-
ly $500,000 from funds.

Members of Bahamas
Hotel Catering and Allied
Workers Union burst into
the Bank of the Bahamas,
on Harrold Road, wanting
to know how the cash could
be taken out without the
consent of its president.

Yesterday bank bosses
maintained the transactions
were legal, adding that due
to the “sensitive” dispute
surrounding the union's

executive team, the transfers
were only green-lighted after
outside legal consultation.
Union president Roy
Colebrook, who was rein-
stated to the organisation’s
helm after a recent Supreme
Court ruling, claimed he did
not know about the transfer
until yesterday morning.
"It's a sad day because
those banks have clear
instructions on who are the
signatories on any account
of the union — certainly it's
not those individuals who
are purporting to sign,” Mr

SEE page six

Date set for new
hotel union election

A DATE has been set for a new election for the Bahamas
Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union, according to

its first-vice president.

A statement released by Kirk Wilson yesterday said that
new elections for officers and members of the executive

SEE page six

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009

ATTA ae aoe
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Bank stormed in:
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Members demand

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an



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SEE PAGE ELEVEN



Man found dead

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are investigating
the death of a 26-year-old
man found hanging in a clos-
et.

The body of Stephen
Alexander Fernander was
found at around 11pm on
Monday in his apartment on
Dominica Way, Golden
Gates.

A police report revealed
he was “hanging in a closet
from a rod with a laceration
and a belt around his neck.”



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



ANGRY MEMBERS of the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union burst into the Harrold
Road location of Bank of the Bahamas in protest yesterday.

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A MAN has been charged
with the murder of waitress
Schakacan Shonell Moss.

Craig Leo Johnson, who is
understood to have been in a
relationship with Ms Moss,
was also charged with
attempting suicide while in
police custody and causing
$200 worth of damage to an
airconditioning vent in the
Central Detective Unit on
Thompson Boulevard.

Appearing in magistrate’s
court number eight, Johnson,
of Faith Avenue, Nassau, was
clad in khaki trousers and a

SEE page six

HUGE SELE(



38-YEAR- OLD Craig Leo John-

son heads to court yesterday.

hext 36 hours

FORECASTERS are
keeping an eye on a weath-
er system that has a 50 per
cent chance of becoming a
tropical storm within next
36 hours.

The United States’
National Hurricane Centre
(NHC) yesterday advised
the Bahamas to monitor
the progress of the system.

However, Chief Meteo-
rology Officer Basil Dean
said the Bahamas should
only experience some rain
and thunderstorm activity
late today and early tomor-
row due to the system.

SEE page six



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hanging in closet

Police have classified his
death as “suspicious” but
Chief Superintendent
Elsworth Moss, head of the
Central Detective Unit, said it
is being treated “more as a
suicide than anything else” at
this stage.

Chief Supt Moss said that
until an autopsy is conducted,
police are unable to say exact-
ly how Mr Fernander died —
possibly either due to the cut
to his body or the hanging.

Police declined to specu-
late as to how long the vic-
tim had been dead when he
was found.

Ministry's ‘greatest
swine flu concern’
is virus becoming

more severe

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AS THE United States
braces itself for the number
of swine flu cases to jump
this fall, the Bahamas’ Min-
istry of Health said its
“greatest concern” is not
more cases but whether the
virus could become more
severe.

Yesterday, the White
House announced that the
President’s panel of advis-
ers on science and technolo-
gy have estimated that half
of the US population could
become infected with the
Influenza H1N1 virus this
fall or winter as infection
rates escalate after a slow-
down during the late sum-
mer months.

As a result, 1.8 million in
the Bahamas main tourism
market of North America
could be hospitalised and
90,000 could die, claimed the
panel.

While flu cases always rise
during colder winter months,
as the flu virus is hardier at
such times, those figures are
more than double the num-
bers seen in an average flu
season.

This is because the HIN1
virus is relatively new and
therefore predicted to infect
more people as fewer will
have had a chance to devel-
op any immunity.

Panel expert Marc Lip-
sitch, of the Harvard School
of Public Health, described
the figures as “not a predic-
tion, but a possibility” based
on its in-depth analysis.

As a tourism dependent
nation which welcomes
thousands of foreigners to
its shores each week, as well
as Bahamians returning
home from trips abroad, the
Bahamas was forced to
heighten its vigilance earlier

SEE page six

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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Utilities Regulation and Competition

_ Authority Act: new board appointed

Educational:
institution
is heing
phased out

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - One of the
oldest educational institutions }
on Grand Bahama is being }
phased out, but recruitment }
efforts are being made to }
keep the doors of the school }

open.

97 Radio on Tuesday.

“We pump $350,000 a year
to keep that school going and }

you can only give so much,

so we have decided now }
because of the economic sit- }
uation that we could not }
afford to spend $350,000 for }
the school, andso we made a }
decision to phase it out,” he }

said.

on the island for many years,

with an enrolment of more }
than 800 students from :
kindergarten to eighth grade. }

Today, the school caters to }
less than 100 students in }

grades two through six.

Father Demeritte said this :
year will mark 120 years of }
Catholic education in the }

Bahamas.

He noted that the school :
in Hunters will only remain }
open if enrolment is signifi- }

cantly improved.

“There are some new sub- }
divisions in the area and we }
want to canvas those com- }
munities and speak with par- :

ents,” he said.

“The reality is that we are }
phasing out, but if we can }
rebuild enrolment then we :
will cease (from closing the }

school),” said Fr Demeritte.

He said St Vincent de Paul }
School is a very good institu- :
tion. “We offer the best edu- }
cation and we have a good }

record,” he said.

Fr Demeritte said they will i
also launch a major fundrais- }
ing event to raise $120,000 :
for its Education Fund to }
assist those needy children :
who attend St Vincent de }
Paul and Catholic High }

School.











iid
US
Ge hat)
PHONE: 822-2157

Father Reginald:
Demeritte, pastor of St Vin- }
cent de Paul Church, said that }
enrolment at the school in }
Hunters has significantly }
declined over the last decade. }

“Unfortunately, for the ;
past 10 years now we have :
been trying to maintain the }
school and keep it open,” he }
told radio listeners on Love }

The St Vincent de Paul :
School is operated by the }
Catholic Board of Education. }
It has been in existence for }
over 30 years and was one of }
the leading private schools }

ON AUGUST 1 the Utilities Regula-
tion and Competition Authority Act
2009 came into force. In accordance with
the Act a new board has been appointed.

The composition of the board, which
was released yesterday, is as follows:

Mr Wayne Aranha has been appoint-
ed chairman.

Mr Aranha joined Pricewaterhouse-
Coopers in the Bahamas in 1976 and
spent 24 years as a partner before his
retirement in 2008. He is a member and
past president of the Bahamas Institute
of Chartered Accountants and a member
of the American Institute of Certified
Public Accountants. He was a director of
the Institute of Chartered Accountants
of the Caribbean and he is currently a
member of the board of the new Insur-
ance Commission of the Bahamas.

J Paul Morgan and Katherine Doehler
have been appointed non-executive
directors.

Tribune leaders
give views on new
Chief Justice in poll

TRIBUNE readers gave
their view on the recent
appointment of former
Attorney General Michael
Barnett to the post of Chief
Justice in an online poll.

Responding to the ques-
tion “Do you think the
appointment of Michael
Barnett as Chief Justice
was a g00d move?” posted
on tribune242.com, 50 of
the 79 persons who voted
said “no” and 29 said “yes.”

Mr Barnett was sworn in
as Chief Justice on Mon-
day at Government House
despite some controversy.

He resigned his post as
Attorney General last week
to take up the top judicial

NV TCOl a FANsl syne



Mr Morgan is an independent adviser
on policy and regulatory frameworks in
the energy, telecommunications (ICT)
and water sectors.

He has spent his career of 38 years in
utilities.

He is the former chairman of the
Commonwealth Telecommunications
Organisation, former chairman of the
Organisation of Caribbean Utility Reg-
ulators, and former chairman for two
terms of the Office of Utilities Regula-
tion in Jamaica. He is a past president of
the Jamaica Institution of Engineers.

Ms Doehler is a communications spe-
cialist with 25 years experience working
in Canada and internationally in the tele-
coms, broadcasting and cable TV fields.
She is a founding member of the execu-
tive committee of the Canadian Network
for the Advancement of Research,
Industry and Education, a past member
of the Canadian Standards Association

job, having been selected
by Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, in consultation
with opposition leader Per-
ry Christie.

The swearing in came
notwithstanding a formal
objection lodged against
the selection of Mr Barnett
by the Bahamas Bar Asso-
ciation last Friday and a
statement criticising the
move issued by the
Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce over the week-
end.

Both entities suggested
that because of his well
known political affiliations
and former position as a sit-
ting cabinet minister it was
inappropriate for the prime
minister to have offered
him the job of chief justice
and for Mr Barnett to have
accepted it, as it might
“compromise the integrity”

of the judiciary to be seen
as an independent branch
of government.

Some welcomed the
appointment, however,
stating that Mr Barnett has
the experience necessary to
be effective in the key role.
He in turn has promised to
lead reforms which will
help the justice system
“move as expeditiously and
efficiently as (it) can.”

Commenting on the issue
on tribune242.com,
“Roger” said: “The selec-
tion of Mr Barnett is a clear
indication that govern-
ments of the day in the
Banana Republic of the
Bahamas just don’t get the
difference between servant
leadership and arrogance.
Somehow, the former
seems a trait our leaders
are not capable of exhibit-
ing. ”?

Standing Committee on Telecommuni-
cations, and a past director of the board
of the Telecommunications Applications
Research Alliance. She is a partner of
Syntel Consultancy Inc.

Michael Symonette and Usman Saadat
have been appointed executive direc-
tors.

Mr Symonette, Chief Executive Offi-
cer, served as executive director of the
Public Utilities Commission from Octo-
ber 1, 2008 to July 31, 2009.

He was employed with the Bahamas
Telecommunications Corporation which
later became the Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company Limited (BTC) from
1960-2006.

He spent the last 11 years at BTC as
president and CEO. He oversaw the
establishment of URCA and will act as
CEO of URCA during a transition peri-
od until a new CEO is appointed in
accordance with the URCA Act.

oe ae Waactae Piaf

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

P6,7,8,10
VW aie erent er ccran ene cnne nant ine rte arama ee P9

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



Usman Saadat, Director of Policy and
Regulation, Mr Saadat has 14 years of
global communications experience
including five years in economic con-
sulting with UK based National Eco-
nomic Research Associates (NERA) and
Europe Economics.

He served as adviser on major regula-
tory projects for the European Com-
mission, and led projects for European
and Asian national telecommunications
regulators including OFTEL in the UK,
ODTR in Ireland and OFTA in Hong
Kong.

Mr Sadaat also spent three years as
an economist with the regulatory team in
the head office of Cable and Wireless
PLC.

His most recent responsibility was as
chief executive officer of Cable and
Wireless St Lucia, prior to which he
served as business development direc-
tor of Cable and Wireless International.

AIRPORT REDEVELOPMENT IN FULL SWING

—_— |
7
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=
=
2a
=
=
S
a
o
=
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=
ro
irae



WORK ON THE redevelopment of the nGet Pindling Airport — projected to be sariplete in 201 ia is
well underway. These cranes are pictured towering over the existing terminal.



Shipyard executives set
to meet with workers

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— Executives of
the Grand Bahama Shipyard
are expected meet with work-
ers following reports of a pos-
sible strike at the facility.

Carl Gustaf-Rotkirch, chair-
man and CEO, could not be
reached for comment before
press time yesterday regarding
claims that two union shop
stewards were wrongfully dis-
missed.

The Grand Bahama Port
Authority Workers’ Union
filed a dispute with the Depart-
ment Labour over the dis-
missals of Eudencel McPhee
and Simeon Richardson.

The union is now threaten-
ing to take a strike vote if the
two workers are not reinstat-
ed. However, union officials
could not be reached for com-
ment.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009, PAGE 3



Proposed marital rape law backed by

MP Davis holds

‘aunch reception’

‘Seventh Day Adventists representative

PHILIP
“Brave” Davis,
deputy leader
candidate for
the PLP, host-
ed a “launch
reception” for
his candidacy
at the Gover-
nor’s Ballroom
in British Colo-
nial Hilton yes-
terday evening.

ne NAS

Addressing the reception, Mr
Davis said the country is “head- }
ed in the wrong direction” and }

“we must change its course.”

“T want to make a change!”
said the MP for Cat Island, Rum

Cay and San Salvador.

Calling for a return to “atime }
when ‘D’ was not an acceptable }
national grade average” and }
“when one could sleep at night ;
without having to worry about }
being robbed or hurt by crimi- ;
nals,” Mr Davis described the }
PLP as the “vessel to restore the i

dream” of a better Bahamas.

“We PLP’s must always be :
the sober, thoughtful alternative :
and we must promote ideas that }

offer solutions to problems.

“We must ensure that our }
conversation with the Bahamian
people is not simply a celebra- :
tion of our history but we must i
use our history to develop and }
communicate a road map of }
policies and programmes that :
assist them in realising their }
hopes and dreams,” said the ;
MP, who described himself as a }
“tireless fighter for the rights of }

Bahamians.”

Mr Davis is the first person }
to publicly announce his cam- }
paign to become the next i
deputy leader of the PLP, after ;
the current holder of the post, St :
Cecilia MP Cynthia Pratt, :
announced that she will be :

standing down.

The new deputy leader will
be chosen at the party’s con- }

vention in October.



AS THE controversy sur-
rounding the proposed
amendment to the Sexual
Offences Act rages, a rep-
resentative of a large reli-
gious denomination has
come out in support of the
law.

The head of the more than
10,000-member strong Sev-
enth-Day Adventists (SDA)
Church in the Bahamas in a
statement yesterday said that
he believes the proposed
amendment, which would
outlaw marital rape, deserves
“consideration and support,”
but added that there should
have been more consultation
prior to presenting the bill in
parliament.

Pastor Leonard Johnson,
president of the SDA
Bahamas Conference, said:
“T believe that the proposed
amendment to the Sexual
Offences Act is one that
seeks to protect a spouse by
introducing a clause pertain-
ing to rape within marriage
and deserves consideration
and support. Essentially, if
couples respect each other
there is no need to have con-
cern about the proposed
amendment. However, when
the spirit of selfishness and
anger or hate is at work,
problems can be expected.”

Quoting from Bible pas-
sages relevant to the topic —
including First Corinthians
13, First Corinthians 7 and
Ephesians 5 - Pastor John-
son said that these make the
assumption that Christians
operate on a “basis of divine



“I believe that
the proposed
amendment to
the Sexual
Offences Act is
one that seeks
to protect a
spouse by
introducing
a clause
pertaining to
rape within
marriage and
deserves
consideration
and support.



Pastor Leonard
Johnson, president
of the Seventh-Day

Adventists

love.” However, this is not
always the case.

“The preceding passages
govern followers of God. So
it can be assumed that a wife
who operates on the basis of
love will not withhold sex
unnecessarily or spitefully.
Also one who operates on
the basis of love will not

force or take advantage of
his spouse. The principle of
love will inform action and
behaviour,” he said.

“Also, it must be clear
that not everyone operates
on the basis of divine love,
and hence it is necessary to
enact laws and rules govern-
ing behaviour. However, that
is not to say that Christians
are above the law, but as not-
ed it would be hoped that
they would not need to be
guided by them; for they
should be operating on the
basis of a higher principle.”

Pastor Johnson said that
critical to understanding the
Bible is the need for what is
referred to as hermeneutics,
or sound interpretation;
allowing the Bible to speak
for itself as opposed to
imposing meaning on scrip-
ture.

“In doing so, consideration
is given to who spoke, the
audience, the issues, et
cetera. It is also helpful to
have some knowledge of the
language used, whether
Hebrew, Aramaic or Greek.
Otherwise, we may use
today’s understanding and
impose on scripture, thus
forcing it to say what its
writer never intended,” he
said.

“Tt is also necessary that
one be guided by the Holy
Spirit, as it was He who
inspired the Bible writers.”

Pastor Johnson said that
this would be a good time to
raise the age of sexual con-
sent from 16 to 18 years.

Majority of RIU employees
‘will be asked back to work’

IT IS understood that the
majority of RIU employees will
be asked back to work when
the Paradise Island hotel
reopens in November, but gov-
ernment said it will investigate
pay conditions of the staff dur-
ing the three-month closure.

This according to Acting
Minister of Labour Loretta
Butler-Turner, who yesterday
responded to claims that staff
have not been fully informed
about what they are to expect
in terms of pay during the tem-
porary closure of the property
and do not know whether they
will all have their jobs back
when it reopens as the RIU
Palace Paradise Island.

“From what I heard from the
HR (human resources) depart-
ment informally, I think most
of the workers are going to be
re-engaged, but the pay issue
hasn’t been fully resolved. The
Department of Labour will
look into matter,” she said.

“T spoke with some of the
staff members yesterday. Obvi-
ously we are going to try to
meet with the principals so we
can determine the way for-
ward.”

Speaking to The Tribune,
RIU employees expressed con-
cerns about their uncertain
future.

One hotel worker said: “We
understand why they are clos-
ing the hotel, but of course it’s
like a stab in the back. We have
approached our superiors and

Loungers
Drinks Trolleys
Coffee Tables

ek

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

A CROWD outside of the RIU yesterday for the furniture giveaway.

we’re not getting any response
(about the pay issue).

“Management has a list of
people they are not going to
call back but that’s not been
dealt with yet. The only peo-
ple who know are the man-
agers. We, the employees,
have not been told,” she
claimed.

The RIU hotel will be
closed for the next three
months during the tradition-
ally off season for tourism.

The property is set to
undergo a $25 million
makeover, reopening on
November 26, 2009.

Its 379 rooms will be
upgraded and new facilities
will be added.

Mrs Butler-Turner said that

renovation efforts are already
underway.

“The contractors are actual-
ly on the ground and they’ve
already started,” she said.

On Monday, chaos erupted
at RM Bailey High School and
outside the RIU after persons
reportedly made off with fur-
niture and other household
items from the hotel that the
property’s operators had
intended to donate to under-
privileged people.

The giveaway effort by the
RIU, led by the Department
of Social Services, ended in
pandemonium as furniture,
television sets and other items
were “hijacked” by a few
unscrupulous individuals and
reportedly sold or given to

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their family members.
Yesterday the giveaway con-
tinued under much more order-
ly conditions at the RIU prop-
erty, as police officers were on
hand to monitor the situation.

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Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

OUP LOCAL a OF PR

PROCHIEM SYSTEM (an)

Utilities Regulation & Competition Authority, the regulator for the
electronic communications sector is presently transitioning all PUC
licences and will require licensees to complete a "Full Details Form". These
forms & guidelines will be available 1 September 2009 for all PUC license
holders on the website urcabahamas.bs and will also be mailed to licence

holders.

Visit the website for more information

www.urcabahamas.bs

UTILITIES REGULATION & COMPETITION AUTHORITY



|
weacurcabahamas. bs

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Miss Universe showcases the Bahamas

FOR TWO hours Sunday night the
Bahamas held the world’s attention as 83
Miss Universe contestants — young women
from around the world — stepped onto
Atlantis’ stage for one of them to be chosen
by a panel of international judges as the uni-
verse’s new queen. By 11pm the outgoing
Miss Venezuela had crowned another queen
—a second Miss Venezuela, Stefania Fer-
nandez. This was the first time in the history
of the pageant that the same country had
won the pageant back-to-back.

The Miss Universe show — the world’s
largest pageant — received the highest TV
ratings Sunday night as viewers switched
from their regular stations to watch the new
Miss Universe crowned in the Bahamas.

By having the various events on different
islands — Abaco, Grand Bahama, Bimini,
Harbour Island and Exuma — and not just
concentrated in Nassau, the Tourism Min-

night was Anderson Cooper’s AC360, which
panned the Miss Universe entertainment.
His show was repeated into the wee hours of
the morning.

Heidi Montag, the featured performer
had hoped to get her big break on the
Atlantis stage Sunday night to fulfil a dream
of launching herself as a famous pop star.

“Miss Universe was the best experience of
my life,” she gushed on her arrival back in
Los Angeles Monday. “It was a miracle!”

It might have been a miracle for her, but
it certainly wasn’t a miracle for the Bahamas.
“Tam so excited to perform — at Miss Uni-
verse for my first ever live performance,”
she told “People” magazine. “This is such a
miracle in life and I give thanks to God
everyday for this once-in-a-lifetime oppor-
tunity.”

It was also a once-in-a lifetime opportu-
nity for the Bahamas, and she spoiled it.

A sad sight at
Saunders Beach
— but should we

be surprised?

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Yesterday, I was very sad-
dened to see those wonder-
ful old trees being cut down
along Saunders Beach. I was
not alone, as my car crawled
along the road I witnessed
many drivers call out angry
comments at the workmen
doing the job.

I guess I cannot expect
much more when in the past
we have so willingly and wan-
tonly pulled down wonderful
old buildings and homes in
the name of progress, only to
replace them with ugly, for-
eign looking monstrosities.

I remember very clearly
when I was chairman of the
fund raising committee for the
National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas when several very
influential people in high
places urged us to pull down
Villa Doyle and replace it
with a modern building
because it was easier.

Fortunately under the stal-
wart leadership of the late
Vincent d’Aguilar we won
that round, and Villa Doyle
stands proud, and restored,
today.

It has been virtually impos-
sible to make, some surpris-
ingly intelligent people,
understand that those of us

istry succeeded in delivering its message that
a visit to the Bahamas offers many other
islands from which to choose.

Donald Trump, owner of the Miss Uni-
verse Organisation, said that 18 countries
bid for the honour of hosting the beauty
pageant, but the Bahamas got it. “The gov-

According to Anderson Cooper, Heidi
Montag, had found a “fresh new way to
embarrass herself.”

According to Cooper, Montag stole the
Miss Universe show by “her stunning lack of
talent.”

“T don’t know who she is,” he scoffed,

EDITOR, The Tribune.

ernment,” he said, “can be very proud of
themselves” for the manner in which the
country prepared for the event and hosted
the competition. He said the Bahamas
looked “amazing.” Atlantis also deserves
tremendous praise for the enormous part it
played as the background anchor for the
show.

Miss Universe, Miss USA and Miss Teen
USA pageants are a Donald J Trump and
NBC Universal joint venture. The show was
aired live from Paradise Island on NBC and
Telemundo.

The National Host Planning Company,
headed by Owen Bethel, was the pageant
coordinator for the activities on the ground
and Billy Bush, president George W Bush’s
nephew, was the male presenter on stage
Sunday night.

The Bahamas and Atlantis are still getting
exposure on the web, where videos of the

“or who she thinks she is, or where she is
from, or why she’s famous, she can’t dance,
she can’t sing ... but she can Twitter.” He
said she had Twittered to thank God for her
big break.

“T don’t think God had anything to do
with it!” he commented to his co-anchor,
Erica Hills. “If that’s the best God can do
then we’re in trouble!”

Hills and Cooper commented on how
Montag didn’t even know the words to her
new song, “Body Language.” This was to be
her second release, which she was launching
from Atlantis’ stage.

But instead of singing her new release
Cooper and Hills said she lip-synched it all
the way through. This was picked up on the
web and instead of glowing reports about
the Miss Universe show, highlighted was the
flop of a star trying to launch her career
from the Bahamas.

While I understand that my
opinions go directly against
yours (as per your August 20th
article) I trust you will allow
me some space in your paper
to open the eyes of Bahamians
to the facts about Casuarinas
and other invasive species. I
wish to put aside all political
agendas and dramaticism for
simple scientific fact. The doc-
uments, regarding the listing of
protected native and tradition-
al trees, are available for all
Bahamians to access at
www.bahamas.gov.bs or
www.best.bs.

IT recommend all Bahamians
read our National Invasive
Species Strategy, National Wet-
lands policy both of which men-
tion the impact of invasive

various segments of the event are posted
and will be available for some time — all
free advertising.

However, it is a pity that the Miss Uni-
verse organisers were not more discrimi-

This is the one segment of the show that
we could all have done without. As a matter
of fact the audience would have been better
off if all of the entertainment had been

Nam.

species in a Bahamian context.
Your August 20th article
mentions Sri Lanka and Viet

scrubbed. It was a third rate performance
thrown into a first class show.

It’s ashame that whoever she is, or might
one day become, she had to use the Bahamas
on its big night to fall flat on her face.

nating in the selection of the night’s enter-
tainment. It was third rate, and, of course, 24
hours after the event it provided talk show
hosts tremendous chewing fodder.

The first show we watched late Monday

There are two major flaws in
drawing analogs between their
situation and ours. Firstly,
Casuarina is native to that
region so there was no issue in
introduction of an established

letters@triounemedia.net



who wished to preserve the
66 Casuarinas trees lining
Saunders Beach were not “in
love” with casuarinas, nor
were we mistakenly trying to
preserve all casuarinas trees
in the country...just those 66
trees that have been there for
over 80 years and withstood
countless storms, sheltered us
and our kids from the sun,
whispered to us when we held
hands with our childhood
sweethearts and gazed at the
sea whilst full of dreams, and
snacked on countless KFC
snacks growing up. Is that
really that hard to understand,
or are people intentionally
not getting the message?

I worry that the rather
hideous rendition of the “pro-
posed plan”, which is not pro-
posed, but clearly already
decided, will be a garbage
filled, hot and unattractive
stab at an American beach
complex. Just from previous
experience on Arawak Cay
and the Fish Fry and the
deplorable conditions of the
toilets there, imagine how dis-

Can't see the environment

native. Secondly, the fact that
something has been done does
not automatically make it intel-
ligent or effective and their
actions (Sri Lanka) are too
recent to be adequately evalu-
ated.

If you need examples, the
Casuarinas planted on beach-
es in Bermuda, to replace
Cedars killed by blight in 1940s,
are now considered a threat to
all ecosystems there.

Casuarinas planted in Hawaii
are now threatening ecosystems
from the seashore to the moun-
tain top. In the Bahamas, the
Casuarina has entered virtually
all terrestrial ecosystems and
will potentially impact all turtle
nesting beaches and shorebird
habitat within this century.

The main fault I have with
your article, however, is the
“beauty” of Casuarinas and
how cutting them down will
hurt our tourism industry.
Beauty is highly subjective, but
can be considered objectively
in terms of novelty and benefit.
Casuarinas have invaded much
of the world’s tropical coastline
so they can be seen virtually
anywhere. They do not make

tasteful and filthy the Saun-
ders Beach facilities will be
after a few weeks.

I find it disturbing that the
destruction of these trees took
place the day immediately
after Miss Universe was over,
and the eyes of the world had
ceased looking at us....coin-
cidence? I think not!

I find it amazing that we
cannot pass a law to protect
sea turtles, a globally endan-
gered species, without two
years of procrastination and
apparent “consultation” with
every fisherman in the nation,
but can cut down trees, re
arrange beaches, reroute
roads, reclaim land and take
people’s land away from them
for roads can be done with-
out any forewarning whatso-
ever.

Last point, if casuarinas
stop beaches, why is Saunders
beach still there after 80
years? and why did the east-
ern end of Saunders Beach
disappear after the building
of Kelly Island? And what
will the true repercussions be
after the extension of Arawak
Cay?

KIM VICTORIA
ARANHA
Nassau,

August 25, 2009.

for the trees

Saunder’s beach or the
Bahamas special. The benefits
Tribune readers tout of shade
and the wind in the branches
are benefits of all trees, this
does not make them a special
tree.

Benefits of wildlife use and
edible fruit are much more
important. Casuarina is virtu-
ally useless in this regard.

The facts are, Casuarinas
destroy marine turtle and sea
bird nesting beaches and man-
grove habitat that would pro-
vide for numerous other fish
and seafood species (ecosystem
services). Ecosystem services
generate more than $80
through fishing and tourism in
the Caribbean annually.

If you are only concerned
about what tourists will see
after the trees are cut, ask your-
self, “Are we selling the
Bahamas?” If we are marketing
an “Australian pine” beach as a
Bahamian beach we are lost.
Cut them down.

ANCILLENO
O DAVIS M.Sc.
Nassau,

August, 2009.



Shame on selfish men who misuse their strength

EDITOR, The Tribune.

‘Worried About Being Left in the Dark? #P Don Stainton (Protection) Ltd.

SERVING THE BAHAMAS SINCE 1978

HILLSIDE P THOMPSON BOULEVARD I write in regard to the introduction of laws to further protect

Women’s rights. I would like to thank Ms Butler-Turner for her
steps in the right direction by bringing this very important
piece of legislation to the public’s attention. When it is neces-

FREE ESTIMATES 322-8160/322-8219
sary for us to take these types of measures in order to protect

HURRICANE SHUTTERS
Ss a basis human right it tells something about the kind of young

—| men we are producing in society. A woman’s right to refuse her
husband is just that her right when we marry someone it is built
upon a loving and trusting relationship. Rape is a very humil-
iating, embarrassing act that seeks to destroy the other party
physically and mentally. Marriage is the opposite it seeks to
show society the level of commitment, love, honour and respect.

Therefore, all areas that is necessary to protect an individu-
als choice and right to decide what should happen with his or
her body should be taken. Shame on selfish men who use their
strength to bring pain and distress. As for our outstanding
men in society much respect to you for being just that, a man.

A real man would never see the reason behind forcing his
spouse to do something she is unwilling to do.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009, PAGE 5



Castro calls US war in
Afghanistan a mistake

HAVANA i

CUBA'S Fidel Castro is
criticizing President Barack
Obama's stepped-up US.
war in Afghanistan while
backing Obama's effort to :
provide health care coverage }
for all Americans, according }
to Associated Press.

The former Cuban presi-

dent said in an essay pub-
lished Tuesday that he has-
n't the slightest doubt that =}
“the racist right" will do any- }
thing to stop Obama from :
succeeding domestically.

Castro's remarks
appeared on the Cubade-
bate Web site, which pub-
lishes his frequent essays on
global affairs. He formally
stepped down as Cuba's
president in February 2008
after ceding power to his
brother Raul.

LOCAL NEWS

Corrected statistics show 3,047 infants
were born to unwed mothers in 2007

THE Department of Statistics
retracted incorrect live birth statis-
tics recently published on its website
and released new, corrected data on
the subject yesterday.

According to the most recent sta-
tistics, there were 5,126 live infants
born in the Bahamas in 2007 — 3,047
of which were born to unwed moth-
ers — and not 5,177 live births, as orig-
inally stated by the department.

Nearly all of the new statistics for
2007 differed from the data published
by the department earlier this month
except in two areas, young mothers
between the ages of 10 and 14 and

those whose age was not stated.

Changes were noted to the cate-
gories of:

* young girls between the ages of
15 and 19, who accounted for 604
live births in the respective period,
581 of which were out of wedlock

¢ women between 20 and 24 who
accounted for 1,201 live births — 968
of which were born out of wedlock

¢ women between 25 and 29 who
accounted for 1,277 live births — 682
of which were born out of wedlock

¢ women between 30 and 34 who
accounted for 1,141 live births — 466
of which were born out of wedlock

Doctors Hospital makes donation in



The measuring scales dipped
a little lower for the Princess
Margaret Hospital Foundation’s
“Breathe Easy” campaign with
a donation from corporate
sponsor, Doctors Hospital.

Infants born at the Princess
Margaret Hospital can now
‘breathe easy’ thanks to the gen-
erous $10,000 donation, which
will go towards the purchase of
urgently needed ventilators and
incubators.

The campaign aims to raise
$300,000 towards this effort.

Earmarked for high risk, pre-
mature, low birth-weight, or
critically ill newborns, the
donated ventilators will support



BAHAMAS REALTY makes a $5,000 donation to the Breathe Easy Campaign. Pictured (from left) are:
Mark Roberts of Tile King; Robin Brownrigg, president Bahamas Realty; Larry Roberts, CEO of
Bahamas Realty; Sandra Orlander, senior nursing officer of Surgical Area Two at PMH; Paulette Cash,
neonatal nurse at the Neontal Unit, PMH; Dr F Montero Registra, Neonatal Department, PMH.

MANAGER OF LITTLE
WHALE CAY Mark Roberts
presents a cheque for $1,000
from the family of Mr and Mrs
Peter Austin to Thelma Rolle
of the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital Foundation for the pur-
chase of new state-of-the-art
ventilators.

Mr Austin said he was
“delighted and proud to sup-
port the Breathe Easy Bahamas
Campaign.”

“Mark has been managing
our property (Little Whale
Cay) for 12 years. This fundrais-
ing drive is important to all of
our staff and we are pleased to
support Mark’s philanthropic
endeavours,” he said.

Little Whale Cay is located
32 miles northwest of Nassau
in the Berry Island chain and
was previously the summer and
weekend home of Wallace
Groves, founder of Freeport.





breathing until the infants’ res-
piratory efforts are sufficient.

Presenting a check to the
Princess Margaret Hospital
Foundation, Charles Sealy,
CEO of Doctors Hospital said:
“We continue to recognise and
support the public/private part-
nership in the provision of
healthcare to the Bahamian
Community.

“We were pleased last year
to assist in the acquisition of
dialysis machines for Princess
Margaret Hospital. This year,
our participation in providing
ventilators for the Neo-natal
intensive Care Unit (NICU) at

support of Breathe Easy Campaign e -

only NICU in the country pro-
viding this service for our citi-
zenry.

“We are glad to be in a posi-
tion to assist our public part-
ners with its pressing equipment
needs. Our community deserves
the best. This is the posture that
Doctors Hospital has adopted.
We will continue on our quest
to maintain the same.”

Persons interested in making
a donation towards the cam-
paign should contact The Tri-
bune Media Group or drop off
a check made payable to the
“Princess Margaret Hospital
Foundation, Breathe Easy

PMH is very special as it is the



OLDCASTLE BUILDING PRODUCTS





Oldcastle’
SN Us eae ad cate lee
MOST ele tc) ca)

Sa









share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are making
news in their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising funds
for a good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.

RUSSELL’S WAREHOUSE
CLOSING SALE

Rivet Kite Shelving, Giomlolas, Cilass Shelves.
244 Ann Display Racks, Gridwall, Slarwall,
Stoned Standards. amd Hardware. Asst Fixnures and Fintings,
Men's Coverall’s 33.00, 5/5 & LSS Whie Shirts 31-55,
Blank CD's 30.50), Mens Jeans sz. 46-34), S15.
Blank 1D Cards, 16° Stand Fams S20).000,

BIk Scheol Shoes, S50N) 4 S70), AND MICK E

Campaign”.

TRIBUNE NEWS
EDITOR Paco
Nunez accepts a
donation for the
Breathe Easy
campaign from
Thea Glinton,
office manager at
Olcastle Building
Products
(Caribbean), Ltd.

361-2487
www.anaesfabrics, weebly.com
CARMICHAEL ROAD

* women between 35 and 39 who
accounted for 685 live births — 259
of which were born out of wedlock

¢ women between 40 and 44 who
accounted for 184 live births — 73 of
which were born out of wedlock

There was also a change in statis-
tics for women aged 45 and 49, who
accounted for 10 live births in 2007,
four of which were to unwed moth-
ers.

The shocking statistic which
revealed that young girls between 10
and 14 had six live births, all to single
mothers, did not change. Women
aged 50 and over had no live births

_—

ANAE’S

that year.

The department corrected another
mistake published in its earlier sta-
tistics, where it noted that in 1983
there were only 2,047 live births.

The new data reveals that in that
year, there were 5,252 live births,
3,240 of which were to single moth-
ers.

There was also a change to data
published about live births in 1985.

In that year, there were 5,420 live
births; 3,363 to unwed mothers.

The department's data does not
include live births to widowed or
divorced mothers.





FRONT ROW LEFT TO RIGHT: Michele Rassin, VP of operations, Doctors Hospital; Dr Keva Bethel,
director, Doctors Hospital; Barry Rassin, president, Doctors Hospital; Charles Sealy, CEO, Doctors
Hospital; Dr Gwendolyn McDeigan, director, NICU, Princess Margaret Hospital; Patricia Solomon,
nursing officer, NICU, Princess Margaret Hospital; Analee Richards, acting supervisor, Surgical Area 2,
Princess Margaret Hospital; Thelma Rolle, public relations, Princess Margaret Hospital/PMH Founda-
tion; Mark Roberts, Tile King and “Breathe Easy” chairman.



THE ROTARY CLUB of East Nassau makes a $5,000 donation to the Breathe Easy Campaign. Pictured
(from left) are: Mark Roberts of Tile King; Joanne Smith, first vice president of the Rotary Club of East
Nassau; Michele Rassin, president of the Rotary Club of East Nassau; Sandra Olander, senior nursing
officer for Surgical Area Two at PMH; Paulette Cash, neonatal nurse at the Neontal Unit, PMH; Dr F

Montero Registra, Neonatal Department, PMH.

FABRICS

P.O. Box CR-55541
Telephone:

AF Adderley
Anabel Rodgers
Aquinas
Bahamas Ebaptist
Carton Francis
Carmichael

C1 Gibson
CR Walker
CW Sawyer
Garvin Tynes
(Gerald Cash

Ringaway
Mable Walker
Queen's College
§.C McPherson
Sadie Curtis

St, Augustine's
51, John's
Stapleton
Stephen Billet
TA Thimnpson
Yellow Elder



Location: Madeira Shopping Cencet
Behind Mystical Gann - Entrance to Aquinas -
Furst left - Pirst stairs on bef

Hours: When. to Thors, San to Spe
Comtect: 465-648

Directions: Gomer Opp. BFM, 1st night,
3rd building painted white, upstairs.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Tropical
storm could
form in next
36 hours

FROM page one

If it becomes more organ- }
ised, the system would be }
named “Danny” — the }
Atlantic 2009 season’s fourth }
named storm. :

The NHC was last night }
reporting that an area of dis- }
turbed weather associated }
with a trough of low pres- }
sure interacting with an }
upper-level low is centred }
about 325 miles north-north- }
east of San Juan, Puerto }
Rico. :

The system continued to }
show some signs of organi- }
sation, and upper-level winds }
were forecast to become }
more conducive for devel- }
opment during the next day }
or so as the system moves }
west-northwestward at }
around 20mph, the NHC }
said. i

A hurricane tracker air- }
craft was scheduled to inves- }
tigate the area yesterday }
evening. :

Honduras govt
says it doesn't
fear sanctions

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras

INTERIM President Rober- }
to Micheletti said Tuesday he }
doesn’t fear international sanc- }
tions aimed at restoring Manuel }
Zelaya to the presidency, shrug- ;
ging offa U.S. announcement it
will stop issuing most visas at }
its embassy in Honduras, }
according to Associated Press.

Micheletti acknowledged the }
country will suffer consequences }
for refusing to reinstate Zelaya, }
but he suggested that nothing ;
short of armed intervention
could change the situation. :

“We are not afraid of an }
embargo by anybody,” he said :
after meeting with a delegation }
of foreign ministers from the }
Organization of American }
States pressing for Zelaya’s ;
return. “We have already ana- }
lyzed this and the country can
carry on firmly and calmly with-
out your support and that of
other nations.”

“Nobody is coming here to
impose anything on us, unless
troops come from somewhere
else and force us,” Micheletti
said.

He said he places his trust in
a large voter turnout for the
Nov. 29 presidential election to
pick Zelaya’s successor, a ballot
scheduled before the leader was
ousted June 28 amid suspicions
among his opponents that he
wanted to overturn the consti-
tutional provision limiting Hon-
duran presidents to a single
term. He denies that was his
goal.



Bank stormed in
union cash row

FROM page one

Colebrooke told The Tri-
bune outside of the union's
headquarters at Workers
House.

Mr Colebrooke said he
plans to take legal action
against those union mem-
bers who requested the
transfers.

According to a union
bank statement obtained by
The Tribune, two of the
union's fixed-term deposits,
amounting to $468,317.87,
were dissolved to facilitate
several payments.

The news infuriated
dozens of frustrated
BHCAWU members, as
many questioned the
union's future financial
State.

The group then marched
to the nearby Bank of the
Bahamas location with
picket signs.

They later swelled into
the bank, daring employees
to call the police before
they were escorted outside
by security.

Maria Roberts, an oust-
ed trustee of Nicole Mart-
in's A-Team, explained the
group's frustration: "Where
does that leave hotel work-
ers? And the workers of

this country?

"We never break our fix
deposit to help our mem-
bership but these things can
happen for the people who
are supposed to be protect-
ing us."

According to a newspa-
per report, the requests
were allegedly made by
assistant treasurer Saman-
tha Gray, trustee Ian Neely
and purported assistant sec-
retary general Raymond
Wright days after Nicole
Martin was ousted as the
union's president.

The article said Mr
Wright was to receive
$73,600 of the requested
funds, while Ms Gray and
Mr Neely were to receive
$21,450 and $30,026 respec-
tively.

The transfer also includes
$140,000 in legal fees
intended to cover the chal-
lenge led by BHCAWU
first vice-president Kirk
Wilson, which nullified the
May election that brought
Ms Martin into power.

The earlier article said
$140,000 was requested to
pay Commercial Law
Advocates, whose principal
attorney is Keod Smith, and
$50,000 to Obie Ferguson
and Co.

Another $54,113 was

ANGER AT UNION HEADQUARTERS

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

ANGRY UNION MEMBERS outside of the Hotel Union headquarters last night.

requested for HLB Galanis
Bain chartered accountants’



letter requesting the trans-

Yesterday, Bank of

partner John Bain for out-
standing fees, according to
the report.

Earlier this week, Direc-
tor of Labour Harcourt
Brown confirmed to The
Tribune that two of three
— Ms Gray and Mr Neely
—who reportedly signed a

fer are registered elected
officers of the union.

Godfrey Price, ousted
first vice president under
Nicole Martin's team, said
the union now faces hun-
dreds of thousands of dol-
lars in charges for breaking
their fixed-term deposit
with bank.



Ministry’s ‘greatest swine flu concern’
is the virus becoming more severe

FROM page one

this summer as fears over the deadly
potential of swine flu escalated around
the world.

The country recorded its first cases in
June, 2009, and up until late July had

Man charged

FROM page one

striped shirt. He was not required to
enter a plea in connection with any of the
charges and was denied bail.

According to court dockets, 38-year-
old Johnson intentionally caused the
death of Ms Moss on Saturday, August
22, 2009, by means of unlawful harm.

The attempted suicide and causing
damage charges stem from when he was
in police custody on August 24.

Ms Moss, 33, was stabbed on Canaan
Lane, opposite the Nassau Motor Com-
pany. She died in hospital of her injuries.

jis
:
ae

dealt with 28 confirmed cases.

However, fears of the virus’s poten-
tial to cause death or overwhelm health
facilities subsided as trends proved the
virus was less serious than initially indi-
cated.

“The symptoms of Swine flu and reg-
ular flu are basically the same,” said
Dr Minnis yesterday, in response to
queries about whether the Government
was concerned about the US panel’s
predictions and their potential to
impact the Bahamas.

“With swine flu, everyone was con-
cerned initially, especially since this
was a new type of virus.

“It became pandemic and we were
not sure how the mortality would pan
out.

“We were happy that mortality rates
were not as bad as had been expected
and our concern today is not necessar-
ily the swine flu itself — because the
symptoms were mild in most cases and
the number of deaths was mild — but
our great concern is if the virus were to
change.

“Then we would be dealing with a
new virus again,” he added.

=yee

Dr Minnis said the Ministry will be
“monitoring the population very, very
closely” for any signs of flu-like symp-
toms, and particularly more “aggres-
sive” symptoms.

“That may be an indication that the
virus has changed its genetic compo-
nent and that would be of great con-
cern,” said the health minister.

In July, Dr Minnis stated that Gov-
ernment has “sufficient medication”
to handle an outbreak of the H1IN1
virus.

In the meantime, the Ministry of
Health has advised the public to con-
tinue to follow influenza preventative
measures to ensure the protection of
individuals, families and communities.

“These precautionary measures
include covering your nose and mouth
with a tissue when you cough or sneeze,
disposing of the tissue in the trash after
use, along with frequent hand washing
with soap and water.”

If you are experiencing flu-like symp-
toms, avoid contact with others and
stay away from group settings to
decrease the potential for any infec-
tion to spread.

Bahamas managing direc-
tor Paul McWeeney
stressed the bank acted
"legally and in full accor-
dance with its fiduciary
responsibility in executing
disbursements, following
authorisation by and
instructions from the
union."

Date set for
new hotel
union election

FROM page one

council will be held on
Thursday. September 29.

However, union presi-
dent Roy Colebrooke
told The Tribune yester-
day that a special meet-
ing was scheduled at the
union's headquarters last
night to determine a new
election date and that a
date had not been set.

Highlighting the rift
within the union's execu-
tive team, Mr Wilson
said a date was decided
on August, 3 when the
executive council met
and adopted the
Supreme Court order of
Justice Jon Isaacs, which
nullified the union's May
election.

Mr Wilson added that
the union's Triennial
General Meeting is slat-
ed for September 30 at 9
am.

Concerned citizen speaks
ems} Out Over crime situation

Mr Knowles commended Rev Simeon

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By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A concerned citizen
claims that while crime continues to spiral
out of control, many religious ministers
remain in their “ivory towers” ignoring
the country’s crime situation.

Bahamian Julian Knowles walked into
Tribune’s Freeport office to express his
concern over the recent murders of inno-
cent victims in New Providence and
Grand Bahama.

“We are now at 55 murders in this coun-
try and I think it is high time the citizens
of this country stop blaming politicians
and take this country back.

“We can’t let a handful of hoodlums
take this country over, but right now they
are winning because there are more good
people dying than bad people,” he said.

According to reports, the national mur-
der count for 2009 has exceeded the 43
murders that were recorded during the
same period last August.

Mr Knowles said he was very hurt over
the brutal murders of 29-year-old Tagia
Soles-Armony and 34-year-old Wendy
Bullard in New Providence.

“Those young women were killed sense-
lessly and now five children will grow up
without their mothers,” he said.

Mr Knowles said it is time that religious
ministers get out of their gated commu-
nities and go into the ghettos and turn
young criminals to Christ.

Hall for his efforts. However, he criti-
cised four other prominent religious lead-
ers in the country for their “apparent lack
of concern for crime.”

“There are four leading religious min-
isters — the Bentley driving minister, the
big land developer minister, the Lear jet
flying minister, and the renowned book
author minister — who seem to be too busy
praising themselves and forgetting about
the grassroots in the ghetto,” he said.

Mr Knowles believes that crime could
be significantly reduced if these “men of
the cloth” visit crime-filled communities.

“They need to get out there with politi-
cians and community activist and knock
on doors and do something about what
is happening in this country,” he said.

“You cannot blame the Prime Minister
for the crime situation because he has the
entire country to run and he has appoint-
ed a Minister of National Security,” he
said.

Mr Knowles said that government
should consider hiring anti-violence
Youth Leader Carlos Reid as a consul-
tant.

He believes that Mr Reid could be a
great asset in the war against crime in
New Providence.

Mr Knowles also commended Assistant
Commissioner Marvin Dames for the
work he is doing in Grand Bahama. “He
has made a difference here on Grand
Bahama and many people respect what
he is doing in here,” he said.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009, PAGE 7





TT hint
Ovail Rahnags 9

hie 4 arching Hanal

Office in Atlanta, Georgia.



THE GRAND BAHAMA Youth Choir performed during the opening of the Bahamas Consulate

Atlanta welcomes
the Bahamas’
onsul General

KATHERINE Forbes-Smith, the
Bahamas' Consul General in Atlanta,
Georgia, was welcomed into the ranks of
the city's diplomatic corps during a special
reception marking the grand opening of
her office.

Greg Pridgeon, Chief of Staff to Mayor
Shirley Franklin, said he looks forward
to a strengthened relationship between
the Bahamas and Georgia.

“The more than 500,000 people of
Atlanta say that we are friends, brothers
and sisters,” he said. “We are so proud of
being selected as your new partner.”

Scores of Atlanta business representa-
tives were among the hundreds who gath-
ered to celebrate the consulate opening
last Thursday.

They were entertained by the Royal
Bahamas Police Force Pop Band, the
Royal Bahamas Police Force Marching
Band, and the Grand Bahama Youth
Choir.

Special guests included Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham, Minister of Health Dr

Hubert Minnis, Minister of Labour Sena-
tor Dion Foulkes, Ambassador CA Smith,
Consuls-General Carl Smith and Gladys
Johnson-Sands along with numerous
Bahamians who work and study in
Atlanta.



Bahamians working on Nassau Harbour
dredging project learning new skills

By KATHRYN CAMPBELL

WELDING a three-foot wide pipe in 90-
degree temperatures is not easy, but for Lynden
Whyms it provides an opportunity to expand his
knowledge and ability of a profession he loves.

A welder for more than a decade, Mr Whyms
is among 95 Bahamians putting together the
equipment to dredge 1.9 cubic yards of material
from Nassau Harbour onto Arawak Cay.

“It’s an ongoing learning process,” said Mr
Whyms, employed with sub-contractor American
Bridge. “These guys have skills that are a little
different from what I know.

"But learning from them prepares me not just
for other projects but also for work other than
welding. You don’t have one job description
here. Sometimes you’re welding, pile driving or
rigging with the crane operators.

“The foremen on this project have different
working methods. It all boils down to basically the
same — just different technicalities,” Mr Whyms
said.

Trevor “Moose” Cooper employed with Amer-
ican Bridge as a foreman said the majority of
Bahamians on the project are experienced in
their tasks.

“Each job you go on people do things differ-
ently,” he said. "We’re learning different styles
and techniques of how to do things. We’re getting
the job done and we’re doing a good job.

“Everybody is working together as a team and
we’re trying to keep everyone safe. Conditions
are good and everyone is happy.”

Project manager with contractor Boskalis
International BV Frans Thomassen said: “My
supervisors are reporting that they are very hap-
py to work with the guys.”

“Driving a bulldozer in front of a pipe and see-
ing beyond it requires attention. That is where
our supervisors come in - to get the people
relaxed and help them acquire skills they need for
that. You have to be very confident to sit in a
bulldozer and not to sink it.”

Mr Thomassen said he is satisfied with the
welding work being done by the Bahamian team.

“The welding part is 90 per cent complete. We

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TREVOR “MOOSE” COOPER, foreman with sub-
contractor American Bridge, is pictured repairing
a busted pipeline while other Bahamian workers
employed on the Nassau Harbour and Arawak
Cay port projects observe. Welder Lynden
Whyms is shown in far back.

have a very good team of welders whose progress
allowed us to start dredging last weekend. If they
were not progressing we could not start,” he said.

Since the available space on Arawak Cay is
insufficient to accommodate all of the dredged
material, the project also includes the westward
extension of Arawak Cay by approximately 43
acres.

The harbour project is being carried out to
accommodate the new mega Genesis Class Cruise
ships such as the ‘Oasis of the Seas’ which is
expected in Nassau in December on its maiden
voyage.

CONSUL-GENERAL Katherine Forbes-Smith welcomes the observers to the ribbon-cutting
ceremony that marked the official opening of the Consulate-General.

Clifton Heritage Park
receives BTC donation

THE Clifton Heritage
Authority (CHA) has
received a donation of $10,000
from the Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company (BTC)
to help in the restoration of
the slave ruins at the Clifton
Heritage National Park.

CHA’s chairperson Sena-
tor Dr Jacinta Higgs said:
“The donation is a part of our
ongoing efforts to involve cor-
porate citizens in the work of
the park in general, but more

specifically to help preserve
the ruins and provide other
facilities for Bahamians and
visitors alike to enjoy this his-
toric site, the home of three
civilisations.”

On behalf of Clifton’s
board she expressed gratitude
that BTC has joined others in
supporting the work of the
park and is helping in the
preservation of the country’s
rich heritage.

“Other corporate citizens

will be presented with specif-
ic plans as to how they may
contribute to the next phase
in the park’s development
with a specific emphasis on
stabilising and protecting the
ruins, enhancing the visitor
experience and providing
educational materials for
young Bahamians.”

Since its official opening in
April 2009, the Clifton Her-
itage National Park has
received several donations.





ie / i



ABOVE: PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham touched base with
hoteliers, including Andrew
Ingraham (left) and Anthony
Folar of the Latin American
Hoteliers Association, while in
Atlanta, Georgia for the open-
ing of the Bahamas consulate
office.

LEFT: THE Royal Bahamas Police
Force Band was a hit at the open-
ing of the Bahamas’ consulate
office in Atlanta, Georgia.



saturday, August 29, 2009

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





The great Wilson City
power plant mystery

By LARRY SMITH

During a recent visit to
Abaco, concerns were raised
by environmentalists about
the island's new power plant
at Wilson City, which is now
under construction. Very lit-
tle information on this $105
million project has been
divulged by either the gov-
ernment or BEC, so fears are
being fed by rumours. Tough
Call has reviewed the EIA
for the plant that was com-
pleted in October 2008 by
KES Environmental Services
Inc of Florida and will try to
cut through some of the
obscurity.

THE Environmental
Impact Assessment of
BEC's 48 megawatt power
plant now being built on
Abaco is more interesting
for what it reveals about
BEC's environmental man-
agement practices than for
what it tells us about this
huge project deep in the
pine forest.

Tough Call visited the
power plant site a few days
ago. It lies some 14 miles
south of Marsh Harbour,
five miles east of the Abaco
Highway, and about two
miles from the coastal ruins
of Wilson City, the fabulous
lumber town that operated
for about 10 years in the ear-
ly 1900s.

The site consists of a 25-
acre fenced clearing, with
foundations already laid out
for a tank farm, power-
house, transformer substa-

*

sale dates
August

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* except on red tagged and
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tion and office building.
Another 75 acres of forested
land has been assigned to
the site for future expansion,
but not yet cleared.

Access is via the old
tramway that once hauled
logs to the Wilson City
sawmill. This has been
widened from the highway
to the plant for vehicles and
transmission poles, but
before the road gets to Wil-
son City proper, it cuts to
the right, crossing over to
the Bight of Old Robinson,
where a pier and terminal
will be built for tankers to
offload fuel.

Along this road you can
still find bits of iron railroad
ties and fragments of the ter-
ra cotta water pipeline that
once supplied Wilson City.
BEC plans to bury a 12-foot
diameter corrosion-resistant
pipeline under the road and
pump fuel from the dock to
the power plant. New trans-
mission lines also will be
required to supply electrici-
ty to the grid, but EIAs for
these projects are still in
progress.

The plant will enclose
four 12 megawatt generators
supplied by the European
firm Man B&W, which has
supplied engines for BEC
plants on several islands in



the past. A tank farm will
be built within an impervi-
ous area known as a bund.
And a cooling system will
draw water from the under-
ground aquifer and dis-
charge it via a deep injec-
tion well.

Officials say the Wilson
City site was picked because
it is one of the few areas on
the island within reasonable
distance of a coast that can
be approached by a fuel
ship. Expansion of the exist-
ing power plant at Marsh
Harbour would have con-
flicted with the city's devel-
opment. The only other
clear option was Snake Cay,
afew miles south of the city,
where a terminal was built
by Owens-I]linois in the
1950s.

Unfortunately, the entire
coastline around Snake Cay
and Wilson City is a rela-
tively untouched wilderness
of mangroves, tidal crecks
and shallow bights, all con-
nected by a network of blue
holes. In fact, the area is so
ecologically sensitive that
the Bahamas National Trust
and Abaco Friends of the
Environment want to make
it a national park.

And one of the only two
shipping approaches to the
Wilson City fuel terminal

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Mall at Marathon
ACLS anLee Am a ete lis Ree

Tel: Te 393-4002
Fax: (242) 393-4096

Saturday
Sunday closed
Ta ana De srelioe Keel]

9:00am-9:00pm



goes right through the exist-
ing Pelican Cays Land and
Sea Park, an area of great
natural beauty.

So you can see why envi-
ronmentalists are alarmed
about the new power plant,
despite the obvious benefits
it will bring to Abaco's econ-
omy, which suffers through
endless load shedding every
summer. Their concerns are
heightened by the fact that
the plant will run on heavy
fuel oil, like the one at
Clifton that has been such
an environmental disaster
over the years.

In fact, BEC paid scant
attention to such matters
until the mid-1990s, when it
belatedly introduced an
environmental management
policy. According to the
EIA, several third party
audits of that policy over the
years have outlined the cor-
poration's chronic failures.
For example, drains dis-
charged oily water into the
ground for years at Clifton,
resulting in a huge hydro-
carbon plume in the fresh-
water lens and discharges
into the sea from caves
below the cliffs.

als OO) ENT syd i LOLeh



State Utilities Minister
Phenton Neymour admitted
recently that more than a
million gallons of oil had
been recovered from these
caves in recent times, at a
cost of over $1 million so
far.

The EJA also reported
that large areas of the
Clifton plant were covered
in semi-solid oil in 1996 (two
years after the EMP was
introduced) while the Blue
Hills plant did not have an
impervious floor to its bund
enclosure, which "grossly
contaminated" the site.
Chronic problems were also
noted at out island plants,
including “widespread and
undocumented oil dis-
charges, inadequate bund-
ing, no clean-up facilities
and poor drum storage."

The EIA expressed con-
cern over the lack of
resources allocated to BEC's
environmental oversight and
concluded that the corpora-
tion's culture was at fault:
"Clifton has suffered signif-
icant impacts requiring
ongoing assessment and cor-
rective action...Poor han-
dling of materials at Clifton
and Marsh Harbour has
required the need for exten-
sive ground clean up and
plant upgrading to remedy
historical oil pollution prob-
lems."

Added to this history of
gross incompetence is the
risk of a shipping disaster in
pristine waters.

This is not as rare as you
might think.

In 2005, former Transport
Minister Glenys Hanna
Martin reported on several
oil spills around Abaco,
Grand Bahama and New
Providence.

They included the spilling
of over 2,000 gallons of fuel
by BEC at the dock in
Marsh Harbour, several
spills at the Freeport ship
care facility, a wreck off
Xanadu Beach, and the
spilling of tons of lubricant
oil at Clifton during a storm.

But the EIA remains
optimistic that spills like this
will not occur at Wilson
City. Fuel will be transferred
from the tanker via a state-

of-the-art hose system and
pumped to the power plant
through a pipeline with safe-
ty valves installed every 500
feet. And the plant's stor-
age facilities will be built to
international standards with-
in an impervious concrete
bund designed to contain
the catastrophic discharge
of a million-gallon tank.

Clean-up equipment and
supplies also will be based
at the terminal, but the
potential risks should not be
minimised. During a tour of
BEC's Clifton plant last
December, Minister Ney-
mour said, “It is important
that we demonstrate to the
Bahamian people that we
are serious about cleaning
up oil spills and incidents,
and also demonstrate to
BEC and its staff how costly
it is to clean up incidents
after they have occurred."

In addition to the choice
of a conventional power
plant, Abaconians have
complained about the type
of fuel it will use. Oil-fired
electricity generation in the
United States is only a tiny
fraction of total production
because natural gas is a
cheaper and widely avail-
able alternative. And the
costs of pollution controls
and extra maintenance often
outweigh the lower cost of
using fuel oil.

But the EIA says that
renewable energy options
are not yet feasible for Aba-
co on a utility scale — winds
are inconsistent, solar col-
lectors require too much
land, and the island's cur-
rent waste stream cannot
generate enough power to
meet demand.

"This leaves oil-fired gen-
eration as the only reason-
able solution," the EIA said.
"A balance must be found
between meeting the island's
energy needs and environ-
mental responsibility. A no-
development option would
mean more reliance on
small diesel generators,
which are not as clean or
efficient as utility engines.
Doing nothing is not a viable
option."

Critics have pointed to
the air pollution that could
result from the burning of
fuel oil. The Bahamas has
no emissions standards, but
the EIA says that exhaust
from the 106-foot-high
smokestacks at Wilson City
will not exceed US stan-
dards, and BEC will monitor
air quality on a regular basis.

"The plant is unlikely to
contribute significantly, if at
all, to acid rain based on the
use of low sulphur fuel and
engine efficiency. Atmos-
pheric dispersal from the
stacks will be effective."

An incinerator will be
installed at the site to burn
garbage, waste oil and
sludge. Non-burnable items
will be trucked to the landfill
at Snake Cay. And all water
discharges will be moni-
tored.

"Protection of the under-
lying aquifer is of para-
mount importance,” the
EIA said. "In the event of a
discharge, clean-up must
begin immediately in accor-
dance with the environmen-
tal management plan."

The EIA acknowledged
that a fuel or chemical dis-
charge from the power
plant, pipeline or tanker
would be an ecological cata-
strophe.

It says that a strictly
applied environmental man-
agement plan will be essen-
tial to ensure that the plant
operates with the least risk
to the environment.

A Salvadoran construc-
tion company has been sub-
contracted to build the plant
and many Central Ameri-
can workers are already at
the site, with a big influx
expected in the next few
weeks.

The three-storey high gen-
erators will arrive in Novem-
ber and be slowly trucked
from Marsh Harbour to Wil-

son City, entailing the cut-
ting of many power lines
along the way. It is unclear
how many Bahamians will
be employed at the site.

There has also been a
puzzling escalation of the
cost of this project. In 2007
Minister Neymour said the
plant would cost $66 million.
Prime Minister Ingraham
pegged it at $80 million a
year later, and Minister Ney-
mour said $90 million in
June. But in the budget
debate shortly afterward, the
cost was put at $105 million.
A full outline of the project
has never been disclosed,
and no public consultations
have been held on Abaco,
despite frequent requests.

Meanwhile, the existing
25.6 megawatt plant at
Marsh Harbour is barely
keeping up with the demand
from Abaco's 15,000 resi-
dents, 1500 second home
owners, and 100,000 visitors.
Over the past five years
peak energy demand has
risen by 64 per cent, the
EIA said, and planning has
been underway since the
late 1990s to meet this
growth.

But the corporation's
(and by extension, the gov-
ernment's) lack of trans-
parency on this project has
fueled anger and disap-
pointment among environ-
mentalists and other con-
cerned citizens on Abaco,
and this is despite the fact
that BEC's chairman —
Fred Gottlieb — is a popu-
lar Marsh Harbour lawyer.

KEVIN BASDEN



Following Tough Call's
inquiries, we were told that a
town hall meeting is being
planned for mid-September.
Perhaps then Minister Ney-
mour, Chairman Gottlieb
and General Manager Kevin
Basden will be prepared to
respond to the following
questions that they were
unable or unwilling to
answer for this article:

1. What is the reason for
the increase in estimated
costs for this project?

2. What is the actual
signed contract figure?

3. What scope of work
does the contract price cov-
er?

4. Are the engines that
will be installed new or
used?

5. Does Man B&W have
the overall design-build con-
tract?

6. Has Man B&W sub-
contracted the construction
to a Salvadoran firm?

7. How many foreign
workers will be employed at
the site at maximum?

8. Will Bahamian firms
and workers be employed at
the site?

9. When do you expect
power to be delivered by the
plant?

10. Will this be over new
transmission lines?

11. What assurance do we
have that BEC will imple-
ment an effective EMP, giv-
en its past track record?

12. What is your current
assessment of BEC's envi-
ronmental management at
Clifton, Blue Hills, Marsh
Harbour and other family
island sites?

What do you think?
Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit
www.bahamapundit.com

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009, PAGE 9



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Vick set to make
debut Thursday

PHILADELPHIA
Associated Press

MICHAEL VICK will
make his preseason debut
for the Philadelphia Eagles
on Thursday night.

The three-time Pro Bowl
quarterback hasn’t played
in an NFL game since Dec.
31, 2006 with the Atlanta
Falcons. Vick was released
from federal custody July
20 after serving 18 months
of a 23-month sentence for
his role in running a dog-
fighting operation.

“TI can only go off what
[ve seen in practice and it

SPORTS

INBRIEF

Former Dolphins
DL Turner dies at
AG after stroke
FOOTBALL

LUFKIN, Texas
Associated Press



FORMER Miami Dol-
phins defensive lineman
T.J. Turner has died of
complications from a
stroke. He was 46.

Turner’s death was
confirmed by Tims
Funeral Home in Lufkin.
The Lufkin Daily News
said he died Monday at
a Bryan, Texas, hospital
after a stroke last week.

Turner played seven
seasons for the Dolphins
from 1986-92, compiling
16 sacks in 101 career
games. He played defen-
sive end and nose tack-
le.

He was an All-South-
west Conference player
at Houston before the
Dolphins drafted him in
the third round in 1986.



Tim Donaghy

Ex-ref Donaghy
jailed for federal
rule violation

BASKETBALL
TAMPA, Fla.
Associated Press

DISGRACED former
NBA referee Tim Don-
aghy is back behind bars.

Donaghy was being
held without bond Tues-
day for a federal rule vio-
lation, according to Hills-
borough County jail
records.

A message left Tuesday
at the office of Donaghy’s
attorney was not immedi-
ately returned.

Donaghy was given a
15-month sentence last
year after he said he took
money from a profession-
al gambler in exchange for
inside tips on games —
including games he
worked. He pleaded guilty
to conspiracy to engage in
wire fraud and transmit-
ting betting information
through interstate com-
merce.

Donaghy was moved to
a halfway house this year
after serving part his sen-
tence in a federal prison
camp. He was scheduled
for release in October.





looks like he’s moving
around pretty good,”
Eagles coach Andy Reid
said. “Realistically, it’s
been two years. We'll see
how it works out. We’ll
give him a couple shots in
there and see what he can
do.”

It’s unknown how much
Vick will play against Jack-
sonville. Donovan McNabb
and the rest of the starters
are slated to play three
quarters, and Reid said
Vick won’t play in the
fourth quarter. That means
Vick could spell McNabb
and get reps with the first-

team offense. It’s also like-
ly he could be used in a
variation of the wildcat for-
mation. Reid said he’s not
concerned about showing
off such packages in a pre-
season game.

“Tm just going to take it
play by play and see how
he adjusts to game speed,”
Reid said. “If I think that’s
a problem, I'll probably dis-
continue the reps. If I feel
he’s adjusting OK, Pll con-
tinue to give him an oppor-
tunity here and there.”

Vick is eligible to play
the next two preseason
games, but not in the regu-

lar season. NFL commis-
sioner Roger Goodell said
he would consider Vick for
full reinstatement by no lat-
er than Week 6 (Oct. 18-
19).

“He wants to get in. He’s
set this as a goal, as did
we,” Reid said. “You see
him out there conditioning
after practice. He’s condi-
tioning before practice.
He’s excited to get out
there. ’m sure he'll have a
couple butterflies with it
being a couple years since
he’s been in, but he’s excit-
ed to get back doing what
he does.”



Matt Slocum/AP Photo

IN this Sunday, Aug. 16, 2009, file photo, Philadelphia Eagles
quarterback Michael Vick throws during NFL football practice at
team's practice facility in Philadelphia. Vick will make his pre-
season debut for the Philadelphia Eagles on Thursday night,

Aug. 27, 2009.



David J. Phillip/AP Photo

SOUTH Africa's Caster Semenya celebrates as she crosses the finish line to win the gold medal in the final of the Women's 800m during the World Athletics Champi-
onships in Berlin on Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2009.

south Africans rally for gender controversy runner

Working toge
we can do mo



Themba Hadebe/AP Photo

SOUTH Africa's President Jacob Zuma, right, congratulates athlete Caster Semenya, left, during
their meeting at The Presidential Guest House in Pretoria, South Africa, Tuesday Aug. 25, 2009.
Semenya, who is undergoing gender testing after questions arose about her muscular build and
deep voice, returns home Tuesday to celebrations after her 800-meter win at the world champi-

onships.

Track & Field
JOHANNESBURG
Associated Press

LOOKING shy and awk-
ward under the glare of
media attention, South
African runner Caster
Semenya returned home
Tuesday amid questions
about her gender after her
800-meter win at the world
championships and South
Africa’s president vowed that
he would not permit her gold
medal to be taken away, no
matter what gender tests say.

The president of Athletics
South Africa, Leonard
Chuene, was also defiant and
said he had resigned from his
seat on the IAAF board to
protest the organization’s
treatment of Semenya. She
is not accused of trying to
cheat, but of perhaps
unknowingly having a med-
ical condition that blurs her
gender and gives her an
unfair advantage.

“We are not going to allow
Europeans to describe and
define our children,” he told
a news conference, which
Semenya attended although
she did not address
reporters.

Semenya’s victory in
Berlin came after world ath-
letics officials said they were
conducting gender tests after
questions arose about her
muscular build and deep
voice. South Africans have
embraced her achievement
despite the questions.

Semenya was greeted
warmly at the airport in
Johannesburg by several
thousand singing and danc-
ing fans. A homemade
poster held by a fan at the
airport declared Semenya
“our first lady of sport.”

The 18-year-old, dressed
in her team tracksuit with
her gold medal around her
neck, then was brought to a
stage set up in the parking

lot.

“Hi everybody,” Semenya
told the roaring crowd of
fans. Standing in a row with
the other South African
medalists, she gave a
thumbs-up sign and waved
to people in the crowd. The
smiling teenager also joined
in with the dancing for a
short while before being
embraced by her younger
siblings.

Semenya also was wel-
comed home by her parents
and Winnie Madikizela-
Mandela, the former wife of
the country’s first black pres-
ident Nelson Mandela.

“We are here to tell the
whole world how proud we
are of our little girl,” Madik-
izela-Mandela told the cheer-
ing crowd of fans. “They can
write what they like — we
are proud of her.”

Semenya’s mother Dorcus,
wearing a traditional head-
dress, stood beaming at her
daughter.

“She has lifted our hearts,”
she said. “We feel powerful
because of her.”

On Tuesday, Semenya
spoke very briefly at the
presidential guest house in
Pretoria after South African
President Jacob Zuma gave a
speech celebrating the ath-
letes’ return. Semenya strode
confidently to the podium
and described her last race
and those that led to it.

She said that before her
final 800-meter race, her
coach told her, “’last 200, kill
them. I did what he said, but
I took a lead in the last 400. I
celebrated the last 200. It
was great,” she said with a
smile as her teammates stood
up to applaud.

Zuma said South Africa’s
minister of sport and recre-
ation has written to the
IAAF to express “our disap-
pointment and the manner
in which the body has dealt
with the matter,” he said.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

MTT
IE
Wee

represent

NTT

THE WORLD CUP TEAM:
Pictured from left to right
are Keno Turnquest, Chris

Lewis (Bahamas Profession-

al Golf Association Presi-
dent) and Lemon Gorospe

FROM page 11

played for years on the pro
circuit.

Both golfers will be mak-
ing their third trip to the
World Cup Qualifying
event, and have previously
teammed up in 2007.

Gorospe qualified for the
tournament last year with
BPGA President Chris
Lewis.

Turnquest said his third
tournament qualification

looks to be the most effec-
tive thus far because of the
extended preparation time
the team has headed into
the event.

“It was a very good feel-
ing. I thnk we have a strong
team this year and for one of
the first times we have time
and an opportunity to prac-
tice and fully prepare our-
selves for competition.

“The preparation will be
vital for us .

“In the past we have nev-



er really had time to work
together which if crucial
because it is a team event.
We get to work on our
games together, develop a
team chemistry, work on
how we compliment each
other.

“One person can not win
and it obviously has to be a
team effort so with this time
we have to work together
and work on our weakness-
es I think it will make all the
differences in year’s past.”



AP Photo/Michael Sohn

ALLYSON FELIX of the United States of the United States, right, races to the line on her way winning
the gold medal in the final of the Women’s 200m ahead of Jamaica’s Veronica Campbell-Brown, cen-
ter, who took the silver medal and Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie of the Bahamas, bronze, during the
World Athletics Championships in Berlin on Friday, Aug. 21, 2009.

Athletes turn their attention
lo regular seasons in Europe

FROM page 11

The trio of medallists from Berlin will head
the field, Jamaica’s Shelly-Ann Fraser and
Kerron Stewart and bronze medallist Carmeli-
ta Jeter of the United States.

Eight of the nine women in the field

Bahamians to fight Belurus, Bulgaria
at the Judo World Championships

FROM page 11

beyond.” Dr. Ferguson said, "Lil’ Cynthia
Rahming at 48kg is small. She's also cute, but
she'll ruin your day if you line up in front of
her. I know one of these days she's going to
shock the world. At 15 she a coach's dream."

More importantly though is the systems-
based approach that Dr. Ferguson brings to
coaching. In a matter of month Coach Fergu-
son has help the Bahamas make a dent inter-
nationally in terms of their judo development.
66kg Judo Player and Bahamian World Team
member Wellington Mullings says, "Dr. Fer-
guson expects us to win and requires a high


















[>

level of professionalism. I'm not only learning
about judo, I'm developing as a man and an
adult at the same time. I really didn't know
exactly how important reading, studying and
deliberate practice were until now. I'm really
looking forward to competing at the Worlds."

The Bahamas Judo Federation has focused
first on developing winning attitude then
putting in place the necessary training ele-
ments to bring the confidence to win. This
philospophy runs through the program from
the most entry level to its advanced athletes.

Persons interested in finding out more about
the Bahamas Judo program may contact
Bahamas Judo at 364-6773.

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appeared in last weeks 100m final in Berlin
including Lauryn Williams of the United
States, Kelly-Ann Baptiste of Trinidad and
Tobago, and Aleen Bailey of Jamaica.

Verna Sailer of Germany will round out the
field as the lone member not to make the
Berlin as she was eliminated in the semifinals.

Sturrup, who finished seventh in the World
Championship final is ranked second in World
Athletics Tour standings behind Stewart, while
Feguson-McKenzie, who finished sixth, is the
seventh ranked century runner.

Leevan Sands will make his sixth appearance
on the Euro circuit in 2009 in the triple jump.

Despite a season’s best jump of 17.20m,
Sands finished fourth at the World Champi-
onships behind Nelson Evora of Portugal
(17.44m), Phillips Idowu of Great Britain
(17.32m) and Li Yanxi of China (17.27m).

Evora will defend his gold medal, heading
the field in Zurich.

Other top 10 finishers in Berlin are included
in the field, Arnie Giralt of Cuba (17.15m),
Jadel Gregario of Brazil (17.06m) and Igor
Spasovkhodskiy of Russia (17.02).

Sands is currently ranked third on the World
Athletics Tour Standings list with 40 points,
behind Girat and Idowu.

In the 400m, Chris Brown seeks redemp-
tion for a disappointing fifth place finish in
Berlin.

The 400m field in Zurich will nearly mirror
the final at the World Championships with
fourth place finisher Tabarie Henry of the U.S
Virgin Islands replaced by 400m hurdles gold
medallist, Kerron Clement of the United
States.

In Zurich Brown will be joined by World
Championship medallists Lashawn Merritt



CHRIS ‘FIREMAN’ BROWN in action in Berlin.

TENNIS



NDE Rss

(44.06s), Jeremy Wariner (44.60s) of the Unit-
ed States and Renny Quow of Trinidad and
Tobago (45.02s).

The remainder of the field includes David
Gillick of Ireland, Leslie Djhone of France,
and Micahel Bingham of Great Britain.

Brown is currently the top ranked quarter-
miler after the latest update of the World Ath-
letics Tour Standings with 60 points.

Following Zurich, The Golden League will
have just one meet remaining, its finale Sep-
tember 4th in Brussels, Belgium.

Four athletes remain in contention for the
IAAF’s Golden League $1 Million jackpot
including Stewart in the 100m, Sanya Richards
of the United States in the 400m, and Yelena
Isinbayeva of Russia in the Pole Vault.

Kenenisa Bekele of Ethiopia is the lone
male athlete eligible in the 3000m/3000m.
Athletes are required to win at all six meets in
the series to acquire at least a share of athlet-
ics’ biggest yearly payday, however if no ath-
lete manages to claim six event wins and the $1
Million, then anyone with five victories will
share half the original prize, which is $500,000.



S.Williams No. 2 to Safina in US Open seedings

Defending champion Serena Williams was
seeded No. 2 for the U.S. Open on Tuesday,
behind Dinara Safina, because the tournament
stuck to its policy of strictly following the rank-
ings.

Roger Federer was seeded No. | for the fifth
time at the year’s last Grand Slam tournament.
He is ranked No. 1 and has won the U.S. Open
five years in a row.

Safina is No. 1 in the WTA computer, which
calculates rankings based on performances across
tournaments over the preceding 52 weeks. The
younger sister of former men’s No. 1 Marat Safin
is still seeking her first Grand Slam title. She is 0-
3 in major finals, including a loss to Williams at
the Australian Open in January.

Williams has won three of the past four Grand
Slam singles championships and 11 overall, the
most among active women. She will be seeking
her fourth U.S. Open title.

Tournament director Jim Curley said the U'S.
Tennis Association did discuss the possibility of
moving Williams ahead of Safina.

“The U.S. Open has the prerogative of altering
its seedings; it’s something we have not availed
ourselves of in quite some time,” Curley said in a
telephone interview. “We certainly spoke about
it, but it never got to the point where we were
seriously intending to not follow the rankings.”

Since 1997, the USTA has matched its seedings
to the ATP and WTA rankings.

“The players do earn their rankings over a 12-
mointh period, both at Grand Slams and non-
Grand Slam events. At the end of the day,
whether you’re seeded No. 1 or seeded No. 2 at
the U.S. Open, it really doesn’t matter. You’re
either at the top of the draw or the bottom of the
draw, and the rest of the draw is determined by a
coin toss,” Curley said. “From a competition per-
spective, there really isn’t any difference being
seeded 1 or 2.”

The draw will be announced Thursday, and
the tournament begins Monday.

After the top two women, two-time U.S. Open
champion Venus Williams is No. 3, followed by
Beijing Olympics gold medalist Elena Demen-
tieva and 2008 U.S. Open runner-up Jelena
Jankovic.

Maria Sharapova is No. 29 — barely earning
one of the 32 seedings after rising from No. 49 in
the rankings last week. She won the 2006 US.
Open for one of her three major titles but missed
the tournament last year because of a right shoul-
der injury. The Russian had surgery in October
and a long absence from the tour dropped her
ranking.

Sharapova is among a dozen Grand Slam sin-
gles champions seeded at this year’s U.S. Open.
One major champion in the field but not seeded
is 2005 U.S. Open winner Kim Clijsters, who
recently came out of retirement and received a
wild card from the USTA.

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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 11



sports

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009

Golfing duo earn right
to represent country

by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

A duo of Bahamian golf pros earned the right to
represent the country at a series of qualifying events
and continue their trek toward the sport’s World
Cup.

Keno Turnquest and Lemon Gorospe emerged
from a field of nine golfers at a qualifying event
hosted by Lyford Cay Golf Club.

Turnquest shot a combined score of 151to lead
the group, while Gorospe shot a 154.

The team will now have more than two months of
prepartion before they head to the Nations Cup -
Omega Mission Hills Qualifier.

The event, hosted September 21-25 at the Cara-
cas Country Club, with spots for the Omega Mission
Hills World Cup on the line.

Turnquest is a former Bahamas Professional
Golfers Association National Champion, and has a
resume which includes being a multi junior nation-
al champion, representing The Bahamas at previous
World Cup event, former member of the Hoer-
man Cup team and playing on the collegiate scene
for five years.

Goropse is also a former junior national cham-
pion, Hoerman Cup team member, former junior
college champion in North Carolina and he has

SEE page 10



u\

RO Cnn

TURAN

’'m lovin’ it

rarewel





| Bertin ...

hello Golden League

Athletes turn their attention to regular seasons in Europe

by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia. net

ollowing a memorable per-
formance at the 12th IAAF
Championships in Athletics
which fluctuated between a
pair of medal winning performances,
heartbreaking disqualifications and an
unfortunate off-the-field incident,
Bahamians athletes continue their regu-
lar seasons on the European circuits.
Several of the countries elite athletes
left the games in Berlin, Germany fol-
lowing the closing ceremonies and turned
immediately toward preparation for the
fifth leg of the IAAF Golden League
series of meets.
The Weltklasse Zurich scheduled for





DEBBIE FERGUSON-MCKENZIE crosses the
finish line to take the silver in the Women's
4x100m relay during the World Athletics
Championships in Berlin on Saturday, Aug.
22, 2009.

August 28th in Zurich, Switzerland will
feature a number of Bahamian athletes
led by medal winners Debbie Ferguson-



McKenzie and Chandra Sturrup.

Ferguson-McKenzie, the Bahamas’
lone individual medal winner at the
World Championships with her bronze
medal in the 200m, will look to continue
the prolific season she has enjoyed thus
far.

With her time of 22.41s, she finished
behind Allyson Felix (22.02s) and Veron-
ica Campell-Brown (22.35s).

Sturrup joined the 200m specialist
alongside Christine Amertil, and Sheni-
qua Ferguson to return the Women’s
400m relay team to prominence with a
silver medal performance.

Both Ferguson-McKenzie and Stur-
rup will contest the 100m in a star stud-
ded lineup in Zurich.

SEE page 10

Bahamians to fight Belurus, Bulgaria
at the Judo World Championships

Bahamian Judo athletes have spent
the past several months preparing for
the Judo world championships and the
hard work appears to be paying off.
Tomorrow Cynthia Rahming, age 15,
and Wellington Mullings, age 20, will
fight Belurus and Bulgaria at the
Senior Judo World Championships.
These are strong Judo countries with a
wrestling style of Judo, exactly what
the Bahamian team has been prepar-
ing against.

Earlier in the month, the Judo
World Cadet Championships in
Budapest Hungary Cynthia Rahming
(-44Kg) and Alex Martinborough (-
66Kg), both 15 years of age, lost in
first round matches respectively to the
Indian Champion and the Greek
Champion. However, the matches
were quite competitive with Cynthia
going almost the distance against the
Indian Champion and Alex getting off

CTI ML Cel gO TT eka

an impressive attacking sequence
against his opponent before being
pinned.

"Judo is a sport in which if you are
outmatched you can lose in seconds.
The fact that these kids lasted and
indeed dominated certain exchanges
against World class competitors is sig-
nificant.” Said Bahamas Judo Presi-
dent D'Arcy Rahming." At this point
we are looking for improvement and
we are pleased with what we see in
the Bahamas Judo Program,” said
Bahamas BOA President Wellington
Miller.

Judo matches are won by throwing
an opponent to his back or pinning
him to his back for 25 seconds. Judo is
rising in popularity in the Bahamas
and has began to gain the respect and
notice of the World body. "We are
working on several levels; delegates,
athletes and coaches,” says Rahming.

"We have made the commitment to
develop a world class program begin-
ning at the grass roots level. That is
why we are recruiting the best in the
world to help move us forward."

The athletes were prepared by 2004
Olympian Dr. Rhadi Ferguson, of
Bahamian descent. After retiring from
active competition in 2005 Dr. Rhadi
Ferguson coached a 2008 Olympian,
completed his dissertation, earned his
doctorate degree, coached various
Mixed Martial Arts Fighters and
gained worldwide respect and recog-
nition due to his constant onslaught
of marketing and creation of visibility
for the sport of judo worldwide
through social media networking.

"We are definitely looking forward
to the 2009 World Championships and

SEE page 10



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eee Es

Ministry
sees 50%
website
hit rise

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

THE MINISTRY of
Tourism saw a 50 per cent
spike on hits to its website,
Bahamas.com, during and
after the Miss Universe
Pageant, its director-general
said yesterday, with more
than $1 million invested to
garner just that kind of
response form the interna-
tional community.

Vernice Walkine told Tri-
bune Business that it was
much too early to gauge
exactly what government
spending on the pageant
totalled, but she suspected the
amount to be more than $1
million.

“Tam signing some cheques
now,” she said.

The Government has
scheduled a post-mortem
pageant meeting for mid-Sep-
tember to discuss aggregate
spending on the event.

Ms Walkine lauded the
efforts of the Government to
use Bahamian businesses to
cater to the Miss Universe
delegation, including trans-
port, float building and char-
ter flights.

“You're talking about more
than $1 million spent in the
Bahamas,” she said. “That
was a nice benefit of the host-
ing of this event, to re-circu-
late money within the econo-
m —-

She added that the Ministry
of Tourism was awaiting sta-
tistics on ticket sale numbers
and hotel performance in
order to truly evaluate the
cost-benefit from hosting the
event.

However, Ms Walkine said
that from a publicity perspec-
tive she was extremely
pleased with the quality of the
imagery shown in over 180
countries.

The Miss Universe Pageant
was expected to bring immea-
surable public exposure to the
Bahamas and, according to
Ms Walkine, it has.

“We can’t quantify that,”
she said. “The ladies were
exposed to as much of the
Bahamas as they could. The
media moved with them and
there are a lot of great sto-
ries.”

Bahamas.com received
almost 50 per cent more traf-
fic than normal last Sunday
as the beauty competition was
aired around the world,
according to Miss Walkine,
while Monday morning, just
before 9.30am, it had already
received more than 4,000 hits.
She said Bahamas.com
received almost 15,000 hits on
Sunday night.

“The reports we have got-
ten from people and the spike
on the on the website all point
to us having achieved the pri-

SEE page 4B

Sale Ends
September Sth

THE TRIBUNE

USINESS

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net



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Cable sees 5-5% Airline fee increases
premium drop

Mi Company expects $40m preference share issue to be
fully subscribed, amid wait for NIB and other investors

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Cable Bahamas has seen sub-
scriber numbers for its premi-
um cable TV services drop by a
net 3-5 per cent for the year-
to-date due to the recession,
Tribune Business was told yes-
terday, with the BISX-listed
company expecting its $40 mil-
lion private placement to be
“fully subscribed”.

Barry Williams, the compa-
ny’s vice-president of finance,
said that despite the slight
decline in subscriber numbers,
something that was not unex-

pected for its more expensive
premium services as consumers
reduce discretionary spending,
Cable Bahamas was “still man-
aging to stay a little ahead of
the game”.

Mr Williams said Cable
Bahamas was “just behind”
expectations on subscriber
churn for 2009-to-date,
although this was “not signifi-
cant”. While the company was
“about 1 per cent” down on
subscriber numbers for its basic
cable TV service, its Internet
client numbers were “a little
above plan year-to-date”.

As for premium cable TV

Bahamas 240% debt-to-
revenue ratio concerns

* International credit rating agency warns key
indicator among highest for similarly rated
countries, with government debt-to-GDP ratio to

hit 47% next year

* Debt-to-revenue indicator will strike 255% in
2010, says Moody's, as former finance minister
warns: ‘We’re not out of the woods yet’

* Recession ‘still playing itself out’ and
spreading beyond tourism, although decline

rate falling

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas has one of
the highest government debt
to revenue ratios, standing
at 240 per cent, among
nations that enjoy the same
strong sovereign credit rat-
ings, a leading Wall Street
agency has warned, some-
thing that was “potentially
troublesome” and “exacer-
bates fiscal spending rigidi-
ties”,

And data produced by
Moody’s, the international
credit rating agency, in a
credit opinion on the
Bahamas issued on August
11, 2009, showed that in the
short-term at least key fis-
cal ratios will get worse, not
better, with the central gov-
ernment debt-to-GDP ratio
forecast to hit almost 47 per
cent at the end of the 2010
fiscal year.

Moody’s statistics again
highlighted the heavy toll
the recession has exacted
from the Bahamas’ public
finances, with the central
government’s debt-to-rev-
enue ratio having increased
from 207.1 per cent in 2008
to 241.5 per cent for fiscal
2009. This ratio is forecast
to further rise to 255 per
cent in fiscal 2010.

“Government debt as a
percentage of revenues has
risen as a consequence of
the current crisis, and at 240
per cent for 2009 is one of
the highest in its peer
group,” Moody’s said of the
Bahamas.

“This condition exacer-
bates fiscal spending rigidi-
ties and is potentially trou-
blesome, given its exposure

SEE page 2B

rd
er
ONLY

services, Mr Williams said: “We
continue to see a challenge with
the premium services. We con-
tinue to see churn down there.
Year-to-date, we’re probably
down in the net 3-5 per cent
range.

“It’s not something we didn’t
expect or anticipate. We’ve
built into our expectations with
respect to this economic situa-
tion, and so far we’ve estimated
it pretty good in terms of what
has happened to subscriber
numbers and revenues. I think
we’ve done a really good job

SEE page 3B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

ROYAL FIDELITY

Leite An LOL

RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

will ‘wreak havoc’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government will “wreak havoc” on the Bahamian
private airline industry if it pushes ahead with the planned
implementation of new fees/regulations that could raise an
operator’s costs by $100,000 per annum, Tribune Busi-
ness was told yesterday, with the sector handed an “impos-
sible” four-day deadline to review a new draft of the
amendments.

Kevin Turnquest, president of the Bahamas Association
of Air Transport Operators, which represents the more-
than 20 private Bahamian airlines and charter companies,
told Tribune Business that the four days they had been giv-
en by the Civil Aviation Department (CAD) to review the
new draft regulations had expired yesterday,

Explaining that the document was 47 pages long, Mr
Turnquest said the Association and its individual members
had “simply not enough time to respond. The deadline to
reply was today. It’s impossible to provide them with an
informed position”.

The CAD and the Government have continued to place
new advertisements stating that the regulations, initially

SEE page 3B



Cable's gearing ratio outside
MUSA LCD TT

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Cable Bahamas current gearing ratio lies just outside the
limits being proposed by the new electronic communica-
tions sector regulator, which is proposing that it and the
Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC) - the two
operators with significant market power (SMP) - be confined
to a range between 10-30 per cent.

The Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority
(URCA), in its consultation on the cost of capital for
Bahamas-based electronic communications operators with
SMP power, said it had calculated Cable Bahamas’ gearing
ratio as being 30.1 per cent at year-end 2008, compared to
40.1 per cent the previous year.

SEE page 4B



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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





These bad habits will make you unsuccesstul

void these

characteris-

tics and stay

successful.
Here are things you should
avoid like a plague and or
Boiled Barracuda.

Rigidity — In sales you can't
succeed with rigid one-way
thinking, or an unwillingness
to adopt new ideas and new
ways of doing things. Every-
thing is changing fast. If you
are too rigid you will not be
able to adapt. Think of it this
way: Your future should nev-
er be behind you.

Unoriginal - Join the aver-
age parade and you will blend
in with all your competition.
Ever wonder why SunTee’s
building on Shirley Street is
painted with bright colours?
Well, that’s so you don’t run



Promotional
Marketing

Dae rea titcoy









into the building with your
car, silly. If we painted the
building a boring colour then
we have failed to differenti-
ate ourselves from our com-
petitors.

Also, remember you are a
walking billboard. You should
have the proper attire on,
with your company logo
affixed. Remember, image is
everything. Look sharp, pro-
fessional, fun etc, whichever
image fits your business.

Oh, and make sure you buy
from SunTee. Ha-ha.

Uncommitted — If you're
serious about selling, you

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NOTICE
ALGOGENETIC ADVISORY LTD.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 ALGOGENETIC AD-
VISORY LTD. is in dissolution.

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 19th
August 2009. David Thain of Amer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.,
Building 2 Caves Village, P.O. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of
ALGOGENETIC ADVISORY LTD. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their address and
particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 19th
September 2009.



BAHAMAS etf

LIMITED

IT MANAGER

Bahamas Supermarkets Limited operates a leading
supermarket chain in The Bahamas. As a market leader,
the Company prides itself on delivering premier service
through its City Market supermarkets, having a strong
commitment to its customers, associates and community.

An opportunity for an I. T. Manager exists in New
Providence to join this market leader.

Reporting to the CEO, this position involves managing a
staff of tech support personnel who are responsible for the
daily operations of customer service, retail and office
support and network/systems management. Also, the
candidate is responsible for resource planning and
assignments within the group to ensure projects are
delivered on time with a high degree of quality. The ideal
candidate should have 2-3 years of solid measurable
experience in IT Project Management and an excellent
communicator, both oral and written.

QUALIFICATIONS/REQUIREMENTS:

* Prior experience in the role of I. T. Team Leader or
Manager

* Familiarity with change management and the major
aspects of IT governance.

* Excellent analytical ability with strong problem solving
skills

* Works closely with executive management to ensure that
IT projects are aligned with the business and company’s
vision.

* Strong background in managing WAN’s and LAN’s.

* Experience in supporting Microsoft Active Directory
Domains; MCSE certified.

* Excellent communication, negotiation, and organization
skills.

* Microsoft SQL Server and Project Management skills a
definite asset

* Follows the project lifecycle methodology on assigned
projects and tasks

* Defines the Functionality, Usability, Reliability,
Performance, and Supportability requirements of critical
software components

* Analyses, designs, constructs and unit tests of custom
solutions

* Directs the preparation of functional and technical
software specifications that reflect an in-depth
understanding of the business and end-user requirements
while also considering IT standards and technical direction
* Provides functional support for application related issues

Salary and benefits will be commensurate with
experience and qualifications.

If you have what it takes to succeed in this challenging
role, forward your resume and cover letter to:

Human Resources Director
Bahamas Supermarkets Limited
East-West Highway « P. O. Box N 3738 « Nassau, Bahamas
Or e-mail to: humanresources@bahamassupermarkets.com
No telephone inquiries please
Only qualified applicants will be contacted

( p WE } (a / Ket :

AINAUG2409



have to be serious and
focused on a steady diet of
self-improvement. Salespeo-
ple have to increase their
knowledge of their customers,
their client’s products and
market knowledge. I know
this is hard, day in and day
out. Just think what will hap-
pen if you don’t do anything.
That’s right, nothing. That
should motivate you.

Unemotional — Ralph Wal-
do Emerson once said: “Noth-
ing great was ever achieved
without enthusiasm.” Spread
your enthusiasm like a
WIRUS (Bahamian for
virus). You have to be excited
about your work and your
products if you expect your
sales prospects and customers
to get excited about these
things. Make sure your cus-
tomers are catching DA
WIRUS.

Unconvincing — You'll
sound unconvincing if you
don't absolutely love the
products you're selling. If you
lack passion and enthusiasm
for your products and ser-
vices, don't expect a long line
of prospects. There are many
ways to find passion in any

product. No passion, no sales.
If you can’t find any passion,
either change products or
careers.

Unhappy — Ever notice
how unhappy people are?
How grumpy they are? When
you're selling, no matter what
is going on in your world,
leave that emotion behind
you when talking with a
client. You can't remove the
pain that you suffer, but you
can remove your pained
expression. Try this before
your next chat with a client.
Say to yourself 10 times real-
ly fast with ENTUSIASM
(Bahamian for enthusiasm):
“Tm a great salesperson”, and
see if you don’t start laugh-
ing yourself to death. Try it
and let me know.

Unmotivated — If you walk
around like a conch on the
ocean floor, that’s the image
you will reflect, (I reach,
when I reach — like the song
says). If you walk around with
a little pep in your step, this
shows you are alive, motivat-
ed and on a mission.

Our clients today want
things yesterday, and there
are times when we turn-

around orders in less than 24
hours. I know there are days
when you feel like something
the cat dragged in, but you
have to slap yourself in the
face and wake up, because the
show stops for no man or
woman.

Unwelcome — So many
salespeople wear out their
welcome. They stay too long
and talk too much. BLAH,
BLAH, BLAH, BLAH. Get
the message? Say less, listen
more, and as soon as you've
achieved your sales call objec-
tives, end the call. Remem-
ber, take the cotton out of
your ears and put it in your
mouth.

You'll accomplish more
and your customer will appre-
ciate you more. If your cus-
tomer has to end the call for
you, you've overstayed your
welcome.

Uninformed — Educate
yourself. Know what’s hap-
pening locally and globally.
At least have little tid bits of
what’s going on. I’m not the
best conversationalist, but I
can hold my own. Today,
technology makes this easy to
do. Also, be informed about

your client. At least go on
their website and read a bit
about them.

To achieve unlimited sell-
ing success you must throw
these out.

All of these marketing
strategies are certain to keep
your business on top during
these challenging economic
times. Have a productive and
profitable week! Remember,
DEM WHO IS MARKET
MUSSE GONE MAKE IT -
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT.”

NB: Scott Farrington is
president of SunTee
EmbroidMe, a promotional
and marketing company spe-
cialising in uniforms, embroi-
dery, silkscreen printing and
promotional products.

Established over 27 years,
ago SunTee EmbroidMe has
assisted Bahamian business-
es from various industries in
marketing themselves. Read-
ers can contact Mr Farring-
ton at SunTee EmbroidMe on
East Shirley Street or, by e-
mail at scott@sun-tee.com or
by telephone at 242-393-3104.

Bahamas 240% debt-to-revenue ratio concerns

FROM page 1B

to natural disasters and
external shocks. Suscepti-
bility to event risks that
could suddenly lead to a
multiple-notch adjustment
in the country’s ratings,
however, is judged to be low
relative to the universe of
rated countries.”

That gives the Govern-
ment some breathing space,
as it indicates the A3 and
A1 ratings on its foreign cur-
rency and domestic bonds,
and the Aal rating on its
foreign current debt, are not
in jeopardy of being down-
graded - at least in the short-
term.

However, the Moody’s
data, which is usually drawn

—
AP ed

from the Government’s own
Statistics and those supplied
by the likes of the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund
(IMF), again illustrates the



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depth of the challenge facing
the Ingraham administration
when it comes to getting the
public finances back into
line over the short to medi-
um-term.

To date, the Governmen-
t’s strategy appears to be
one pinning its hopes on a
US economic recovery by
the 2010 first half, prior to
the 2010-2011 Budget com-
munication, which in turn
should feed into the
Bahamas some six months
later and avoid the need for
any drastic spending and civ-
il Service cuts.

Moody’s, perhaps opti-
mistically, projected that this
year’s 4.5 per cent contrac-
tion of the Bahamian econ-
omy would be followed by a
modest 0.5 per cent growth
in 2010.

However, the external
debt to current account
receipts ratio was projected
to increase from 24.9 per
cent in 2009 to 26.7 per cent
next year, with the
Bahamas’ external vulnera-
bility indicator rising from
15.8 in 2008 to 18.7 this year,
then 19.2 in 2010.

Reducing the fiscal deficit
and government debt will be
key factors if the Govern-
ment is to secure an
improved credit rating,
Moody’s warned, adding:
“The ratings are limited by a
narrow economic base,
moderate government finan-
cial strength - constrained
by fiscal inflexibility and
comparatively high govern-
ment debt ratios - and vul-
nerability to external
shocks.....

“Continued and perma-
nent deterioration of the
Government’s debt metrics
may result in a downgrade.”
For the first 11 months of
the 2008-2009 fiscal year, the
Government’s deficit rose
by 74 per cent to $219 mil-
lion, as revenues fell 6.1 per

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cent and spending increased
by 4.5 per cent.

Still, Moody’s praised the
Bahamas for its long tradi-
tion of political stability, rel-
atively low external debt,
high standard of living and
strong tourism and financial
services industries.

Moody’s assessment came
as a former finance minister
told Tribune Business that
the Bahamian economy was
“not out of the woods yet”
despite promising rumblings
coming from the US, as the
recession was still “gradual-
ly eating its way through the
economy”.

James Smith, minister of
state for finance in the for-
mer Christie administration,
said that while the rate of
decline in employment and
the overall economy had
slowed, the recession was
now impacting industries
outside the tourism indus-
try, and the Bahamas as a
result was “still continuing
on a downward spiral”.

“We still have to work this
thing out,” Mr Smith told
Tribune Business. “We are
seeing things produced by
the recession, but there are
structural deficiencies in the
economy that are not pick-
ing up the slack.....

“This thing is still playing
itself out, and forcing the
policymakers to accelerate
programmes they may have
put on the back burner for
infrastructure, new schools.”

He added: “We need to
see what happens beyond
our slow tourism season. If
we have a winter season in
2009 that is better than in
2008, it may be an indica-
tion that things will not get
much worse.”

The global economy,
chiefly the US, determined
the rate of economic growth
enjoyed by the Bahamas,
Mr Smith said, adding that
this nation was “not ina
position to provide an
appropriate stimulus”
because it did not have a
hard currency.

He explained that mone-
tary policy in the Bahamian
context was “almost inef-
fective” in a recession, as the
Government and Central
Bank could not print money
because there was no way
to mop up the excess after-
wards.

“When it does turn-
around, if we do not have a
strong economy, we will
have one that is much more
aware of itself,” Mr Smith
said.

“The people left are work-
ing hard at it, so I could see
some productivity gains,
which is always good for an
economy.”

Consumer demand and
confidence, though, were
continuing to be hit by the
continued slippage in the
tourism figures, coupled
with the short-term and per-
manent closure of various
hotel properties.

This was both raising
unemployment and damp-
ening consumer spending.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009, PAGE 3B



Airline fee increases
will ‘wreak havoc’

FROM page 1B

drawn up in 2005, will come
into effect on September 10,
2009, despite the industry’s con-
tinued objections.

“It'll just wreak havoc on the
industry,” Mr Turnquest told
Tribune Business, when asked
what impact implementation of
the regulations would have.

“We’ve not been able to
determine the total impact yet,
but from a preliminary per-
spective one operator has said
they would have to increase
fees by between 40-60 per cent,
and incur $100,000 in increased
annual operating costs. “It'll
just be devastating for the
industry. You can’t pass on
those increases to the con-
sumer. The whole thing is going
to be a disaster - a complete
disaster. Air transport in the
Bahamas is so essential to get-
ting around. How else are you
going to get around from places
like Rum Cay?”

Mr Turnquest said that from
a preliminary look at the new
draft regulations sent to the
Association last week, it
appeared that the CAD and the
Government had omitted the
obligation to justify the fee
increases/regulations through
providing the industry with the
supporting financial data.

“They’re hellbent on imple-
menting the thing, and it’s going
to lead to obvious difficulties,”
Mr Turnquest told Tribune
Business. “The reason it was
not implemented before was
because of difficulties with the
protocol and the process. This is
much too serious to rush to
judgment on. I think that if we
wait, calmer heads will prevail,
we can reconsider things, and it
will be much better for the
industry in the long-run.”

The Association, in its
August 24, 2009, response to
Patrick Rolle, the CAD’s direc-
tor, also urged the Government
to “reconsider their rush to
judgment in this matter. It has
lain dormant for four years and
there is no reason now to allow
expediency to supersede good
judgment”.

The Association added that it
resented the Government/CAD
giving the impression that the
new regulations were “a done
deal” via their advertising, and
warned that failing to follow
the implementation procedures
could see it mount a legal chal-
lenge. “The CAD/Ministry of
Tourism must be aware that the
failure to follow the procedure
governing the regulations could
result in the entire legitimacy
of the exercise being called into
question, the natural result of
which will be a call by the oper-
ators for judicial review,” the
Association warned, calling for
the proposed regulations to be
scrapped and a new National
Plan for Aviation formed.

It added: “We are not
opposed to fee increases, cog-
nisant that from time to time
the costs of doing business will
rise. [The Association] is not
opposed to modest fee increas-
es in landing and licensing fees
in principal, in accordance with
the provisions of the regulation.

” However the increases and
the new categories of fees are
not in keeping with the spirit
and intent of the regulations,
which make provision for grad-
ual increases. The method and
manner of the imposition of this
regulation is unacceptable.

“Imposing draconian taxes

on the local operators to pay
for development of Family
Island airports is equivalent to
making the motoring public
assume the costs for the new
roadworks in Nassau.

“The regulation seeks to
make local charter companies
and airlines liable for the devel-
opment of Family Island air-
ports, while exempting foreign
airlines and Bahamasair, there-
by providing them with an
unfair advantage in direct con-
travention of Government pol-
icy and the provisions of the
International Civil Aviation
Organisation.”

The Association said that the
Government appeared “not to
have a development plan” for
the Family Island airports the
fee increases were supposed to
finance, and said the rises were
inconsistent with the policy of
reducing airlift and air fare
costs in the Bahamas, as stated
by Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace, minister of tourism.

The Bahamian airline opera-
tors also pointed out that the
increases contrasted sharply
with the Ministry of Tourism’s
lobbying of the UK govern-
ment and Parliament to pre-
vent it increasing ticket tax
imposed on flights to this nation
from the UK.

“The fee increase is incon-
sistent with the Government’s
objective to stimulate travel to
the Bahamas, as evidenced by
the recent decision to provide
incentives to the cruise ships
and to reduce the passenger
tax,” the Association wrote.

“In addition, in some
instances such as Marsh Har-
bour and others, the primary
users are the foreign operators.
These principal users must be
consulted in this exercise and,
in accordance with the reason-
ing of this exercise, if necessary,
must therefore bear propor-
tional costs. The Government
cannot reasonably expect the
local operators to bear the costs
if the primary beneficiaries are
the foreign airlines and
Bahamasair.”

Among the carriers that
needed to be involved, the
Association said, were the likes
of Gulfstream and American
Eagle, the primary user of Fam-

BKG/410.03

ily Island airports. It also urged
the Government to ‘level the
playing field’ between them-
selves and Bahamasair, requir-
ing the national flag carrier to
pay the same fees as them-
selves, with the private airlines
also granted similar import
duties exemptions for aircraft
parts. “Bahamasair cannot con-
tinue being given subsidies to
undermine the air charter and
commuter industry through its
predatory hiring and operating
practices,” the Association
argued. “Bahamasair does not
train pilots. They wait until
charter or commuter operators
recruit and invest thousands of
dollars in the training of a pilot
and, when they reach a certain
proficiency level with the req-
uisite number of hours,
Bahamasair goes on the prowl.

“Bahamasair does not create
or stimulate activity on any
route. They wait until the com-
muter such as Sky, Western or
Southern Air invests in new
equipment and promotion of a
particular destination, then they
come calling with reduced sub-
sidised ticket prices to under-
mine the operator and lure
away customers.”

The Government was also
urged to tackle the problem of
unlicensed hackers, “who
appear to be operating with
impunity in the Bahamas”, unli-
censed and unregulated.

With the CAD not having
the powers under law to
enforce sanctions against
alleged hackers, the Associa-
tion said: “The neglect of Gov-
ernment to take corrective
measures and to give the CAD
authority to address this issue is
long overdue. “The charter
companies and airlines cannot
be expected to continue to pay
fees and adhere to regulations
with a rogue group of local and
Foreign Operators skimming
the profits and compromising
the integrity of the system.”

The Association added that
the Government needed to
implement a Flight Information
Region (FIR) for the Bahamas,
something that would end the
payment of overflight fees to
the US and generate $30-$50
million in per annum revenues
for the Government.

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

Sealed tenders for B$81,100,000.00 of 91-Day Treasury Bills
will be received by the Banking Manager, The Central Bank
of The Bahamas, Frederick Street, Nassau up to 3:00 p.m on
Tuesday, August 28, 2009. Successful tenderers, who will be

advised should take up their bills against payment on Thursday,
September 1, 2009. These bills will be in minimum multiples

of B$100.00.

Tenders are to be on special forms obtainable from the Central
Bank of The Bahamas or Commercial Banks.

Tenders must state the net price percent Gn multiples of one
cent) and should be marked “Tender”. The Central Bank of the
Bahamas reserves the night to reject any or all tenders.



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PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancy in its Nassau and Freeport Offices for
Audit Managers whose qualifications make the individuals eligible for membership in
the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants. Prospective candidates should
be employed im public accounting and have at
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diverse client engagements. Candidates are also required to have a high level of

computer literacy.

least

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The position offers challenging work in the financial services industry and
other areas of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which recognizes different

levels

of experience and = skill, is

designed to reward high performance.

In addition, the Firm provides excellent medical insurance and provident fund benefits.

Please submit an application letter with your Curriculum Vitae to:

P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas

Human Resources Partner
“Audit Manager Position
PricewaterhouseCoopers



FROM page 1B

to mitigate that with expense
management. On the revenue
side, we’re basically in line with
what we expected.”

Meanwhile, Mr Williams told
Tribune Business that Cable
Bahamas’ $40 million prefer-
ence share issue, which is now
due to close at end-August
2009, was in good shape.

“It’s going to be closing on
the 31st, next Monday,” he
added. “Because of some cir-
cumstances that some of the
particular investors were hav-
ing, our advisers said it was pru-
dent to extend it for one month.

“It’s gone very well, and it’s
going to be pretty much fully
subscribed.”

The proceeds from the $40
million private placement are
being used to finance the $80
million buyout of Columbus
Communications, Cable
Bahamas’ largest shareholder,
which holds a 30 per cent stake
in the company.

The offering was extended
to give institutional investors
and high-net worths extra time
to decide on whether to partic-
ipate, given that key executives
and decisionmakers were off-
island on vacation during July.

In particular, Tribune Busi-
ness understands through
informed sources that the key
investor for whom the exten-
sion was targeted at is the
National Insurance Board
(NIB) and, by extension, the
Government, which will have
the ultimate say on whether
NIB participates. As the sec-
ond-largest shareholder in
Cable Bahamas behind Colum-
bus, its participation seems like-

Cable premium

ly. Elsewhere, Mr Williams said
that during the 2009 first half
Cable Bahamas had been
“holding expenses back as
much as possible” through a
variety of initiatives.

Its ‘One Tech’ initiative,
which in 2008 had seen a num-
ber of company technicians
trained to perform both cable
TV and Internet work, had
“saved us a lot on the human
resources side” by reducing the
number of personnel Cable
Bahamas needed to send to
solve client problems from one
to two. The electricity manage-
ment system at the company’s
headquarters had reduced ener-
gy costs by turning lights off at
a certain time, and limiting the
air conditioning to certain tem-
peratures at certain hours,
while at weekends Cable
Bahamas was totally closing its
customer service building after
hours - operating solely from
its administration building.

Cable Bahamas was repay-
ing an average $2 million in
debt per quarter, or $8 million
per year, Mr Williams told Tri-
bune Business, with the com-
pany set to launch a ‘Back to
School’ special offering new
subscribers a discount on cer-
tain services.

“Typically, when we get a
new Internet subscriber, if they
sign up for a minimum of a
year, they will be eligible to get
about three months’ of services
free,” Mr Williams explained.

“The marketing guys are
putting together the finishing
touches on a campaign with
respect to that. Obviously,

they’ll be working on a Christ-
mas campaign to repackage
products, provide some dis-
counts, provide some incentives
to make it a little bit more
attractive for customers and
give them some relief in these
times.”

And the Cable Bahamas
executive added: “T think we’ ll
end up with a good year over-
all. We’re anticipating a good
fourth quarter. The fourth
quarter for us has traditionally
been the best quarter of the
year. “Last year, in 2008, when
we started to feel the pinch of
the economic situation and the
hotels started laying-off, we still
ended up with a good fourth
quarter. My view is that our
Bahamian society, when it
comes to Thanksgiving and
Christmas, irrespective of the
economic situation, Bahamians
somehow find a way to have a
great time. That helps us anda
lot of retailers as well.”

Cable Bahamas employs
some 400 persons, including
contract and temporary per-
sonnel, and Mr Williams said
the company had never con-
templated any lay-offs as a
result of the economy.

“All things considered, I
think we’ve done pretty good,”
he said. “It’s a tough environ-
ment out there, but one of the
things we pride ourselves on,
unlike other companies, is that
we've not gone the way of
reducing staff. We’ve main-
tained it, and not by accident.
That will be a very, very last
resort for us, and by really tight-
ly managing expenses we’ve
been able to compensate for
some of the shortfall we’ve
experienced in revenue.”

LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.
“Eattage Lat With Private Beach

FOR SALE

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Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!

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Des ataut yaw... Let's talk



wAT
THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD «< - “

VACANCY NOTICE

we

AGE

\pplicati wis ate invited From suuitakyy cptaalifie dl Pre recnes he fill the: prositicen « CASE MANAGEMENT
SENIOR ASSISTANT MANAGER vothin che Qocupatanal Healeh & Satery Unit of che Marina

Tnsumince Board (S18),

JOB SUMMARY

This officer wall be naponsibble for coondinating appropriate eos efficient bealth cate serviecs with best

on] enralsling the chain Ait [es peach thc highest possible level é aif pluysical aid Metal

henchonings and oversees the general supervision ot the medical billing process.

» Initiate and factitate communication berween the healthcare prowider and the clasmant bor proactive

intervention in the care of the chamant.

aness The min sical ane meric 4] sramas cet the crrically mjured clanmannr during he ref? tlizarion of

while convalescing at home.

. Coordinate an acien plin with bealtheare provider, employer and claimane, for the clairnan’s senairn

to work

. Enforce cott-reducien strategies and recommend options in the manapenvent of claimant's care,

\ppr WE Certain services within a specitiod time period,

. Prepare requests for specific medical services to NIE Modieal Officer.

. Parapate in unlaapon review process,

8. Provide direction, conteel and leadership to staff of responsibiliry while monitoting and assessing
Rerrormame, conduct, artenmienece and orher related marrers

. Sunes systems and procedures eo facilitate achieving objectives in areas of responsibility,

. Perform any orher related duties as may be assigned

T

. Pretenred candatate should havea Bachelor's Depres in Business Ackminsctration or Managemen.

. Should have proven oral and weitten commnunicacion skills and abiliry,

1. Knowledgeable in the lew (Benefits & Assistance Regulations) pertaining to Indusmal Accidents;

+, Know ledirealble in health insurance and medical coe ng! billings Practices

. Effective, interpersonal, communication and customer service skilb;

Register ed Pr fessional Nurse with well rounded CAPCiC nS In merical Case Manapenenie including,

bat acet luted te rehabilitanon, emergency, crincal care and health care admanistration;

\draned certification in case managerncnt and tclaced disciplines

APPLICATION

lorerested persons (Teal apply by sa beruicciiing Ac mpl tel application form, along with che HECess Ar pre wat
of qualificanons on or before Friday, September 4, 20809, to the

Deputy Director Vice President
Human Resources and Training
The National Insurance Board
Clifford Darling Complex
PO). Box Dy= 75018
Niassa, Palins.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Cable's gearing ratio outside proposed 30% regulatory limit

FROM page 1B

Both ratios would be out-
side the new limits proposed
by URCA. The regulator cal-
culated Cable Bahamas’ gear-
ing ratio using its audited

financial statements for both
years, which showed a net
debt of $46.861 million along-
side a combined net debt and
total equity of $155.546 mil-
lion in 2008.

For 2007, the figure used in
the calculation were net debt












































NOTICE
MANTICORE INVESTMENT LTD.

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MANTICORE INVESTMENT LTD. is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
25th August, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro
Associated Lid., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 26" day of August, A. D. 2009



Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE

GLIDER MANAGEMENT LTD.
IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the Inter-
national Business Companies Act 2000 GLIDER MANAGEMENT
LTD. is in dissolution.

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 24th
August 2009. David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.,
Building 2 Caves Village, PRO. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of
GLIDER MANAGEMENT LTD. All persons having claims against
the above-named company are required to send their address and
particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 24th
September 2009.

” :

ng
soo he
1 iy sa

NOTICE
NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) SAO MATEUS LTD. is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 7 July, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro

Associated Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 26" day of August, A. D. 2009



Verduro Associated Lid.
Liquidator

ROYAL FIDELITY

Paoney at Wowk

of $59.177 million and net
debt plus total equity of
$147.471 million. In contrast,
BTC’s 2007 gearing ratio was
0 per cent, since its $135.351
million cash pile exceeded the
$71.536 million in debt on its
books.

Barry Williams, Cable
Bahamas’ vice-president of
finance, told Tribune Busi-
ness he was unable to com-
ment on the regulator’s gear-
ing calculations because he
had yet to read the consulta-
tion document.

He pointed out, though,
that there were various ways
to calculate gearing ratios.

The gearing ratio measures
a company’s financial lever-
age, comparing its level of
debt to shareholder equity,
and showing the extent to
which its operations are fund-
ed by both forms of capital.

URCA, in its consultation
document, said: “BTC’s cur-
rent capital structure may in
large part be explained by the
fact it is currently government
owned.

“However, gearing, like all
other elements of the cost of

capital, must be forward-look-
ing. It is conceivable that, fol-
lowing privatisation, the busi-
ness may become funded
through a greater level of debt
than is currently the case.
URCA has taken this possi-
bility into account when
determining an appropriate
level of gearing for the SMP
operators. Cable’s gearing
over the past two years has
averaged approximately 35
per cent.”

URCA acknowledged that
communications regulators
across the globe had adopted
different approaches towards
gearing, typically imposing
ratios of between 10-50 per
cent. Some regulators, the
Bahamian supervisory body
said, have not seen a need to
regulate this area, on the basis
that companies seeking to
maximise profits took on an
optimal level of borrowing to
minimise capital costs.

Others, though, had adopt-
ed a more interventionist
approach because they felt
companies were prone to bor-
row too much, increasing their
financing and other costs and,

potentially, placing them at
risk of default.

URCA said it was minded
to take the latter option, and
added: “The notion that cor-
porate debt policies are not
solely determined by the tax
advantages of debt is sup-
ported by the observation that
Cable Bahamas has a reason-
ably substantial level of debt.
This suggests to URCA that it
would not be sensible to apply
a notional gearing of 0 per
cent.”

The Bahamian regulator
based its approach on a sam-
ple of 16 global electronic
communications companies
who had a Standard & Poor’s
or Fitch rating of A- or better,
and for whom gearing data
was available.

Almost 70 per cent of these
firms operated with a gearing
ratio of between 0-30 per
cent, something that was
“comfortably within the gear-
ing range allowed by other
regulators recently, 0-50 per
cent”.

As a result, the regulator
concluded: “URCA consid-
ers it unlikely that a gearing

ratio of 0 per cent is optimal
for Bahamian companies.
Therefore, URCA proposes
to apply a gearing range of 10
per cent to 30 per cent, with a
midpoint value of 20 per
cent.”

The Bahamian regulator
said that in assessing the cost
of capital for SMP operators,
they had also taken into
account this nation’s relative-
ly small economy and the
impact its exchange control
regime had on potential
investor decisions.

“The small economy fea-
tures of the Bahamas, as well
as minor Central Bank restric-
tions on the flow of capital in
and out of the country, means
that equity and debt investors
in Bahamian companies may
be more exposed to ‘country
risk’ than investors in larger,
more developed economies,”
URCA said.

“As such, both equity and
debt investors in Bahamian
companies may require a
country risk premium, over
and above the standard mini-
mum risk premium, for the
additional risk they bear.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANTHON GUILLAUME of LEWIS
YARD , EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is
applying tothe Minister responsible tor Nationality and Citizenship,
for registrationmaturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
26th day of AUGUST, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CAROL CUNNINGHAM of
#7 EASTERN CLOSE, P.O. Box FH-14364, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26" day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WISLINE BENJAMIN of
KEMP ROAD, P.O. Box SS-5139, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 26" day of August, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MUELMY MAZARD
of HAMPTON STREET, P.O. Box N-556, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26'" day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

KJ

CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERYICES

Zaa

Clee Fes ST A LL

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 25 AUGUST 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,577.62| CHG 0.06] %CHG 0.00 | YTD -134.74 | YTD % -7.87
FINDEX: CLOSE 790.64 | YTD -5.30% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1}
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S}
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

10.39
10.00

10.39
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol. EPS $

10.39
10.00 zi R 55.6

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13

1000.00
1000.00

1000.00 FBB15

Last Sale

Change Daily Vol. Interest
100.00 0.00 7%

100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
100.00 0.00 7%

Prime + 1.75%

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013

100.00 0.00 29 May 2015

Ministry sees 50%

website hit rise
FROM page 1B

mary objective,” said Ms Walkine. “It was important that in the
final telecast we were able to communicate a multiplicity of
islands and that the island names were put out there. When you
look at the size of the audience it was important that each
islands looks and feels different.”

Ms Walkine said many of the hits to Bahamas.com on Sun-
day originated in European countries such as the UK, Germany
and France, while Monday’s hits came from many Latin Amer-
ican countries, especially Venezuela - home of the outgoing and
incoming Miss Universe.

The Government recently secured airlift from Germany and
France, and has increased the number of flights from the Unit-
ed Kingdom into the Lynden Pindling International Airport.

Ms Walkine said the pageant seemed to have intrigued view-
ers and enticed them to research the Bahamas islands on the
Ministry’s website.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRANCLIN JOSEPH
of PODOLEO STREET, P.O. Box N-1482, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 19" day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KEVIN KIRAN SURUJLAL
of PARADISE ISLAN DRIVE, P.O. Box N-9844,
PARADISE ISLAND, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 19" day of August, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O.
Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PROGRESSIVE SERVICE ORIENTED COMPANY
LOOKING FORA FEW GOOD PEOPLE.

PARTS AND SERVICE COORDINATOR

Extensive background in managing an OEM
Heavy Truck Service/ Parts facility a must.
Background in Parts and Service management and
coordination required on a daily basis. Must be able
to effectively administer all facits of business.
Minimum of 10 years experience preferred. Good
people skills a must. Must have prior experience

in parts order and supervising employees. Computer
skills required on a daily basis. Must be self
motivated and work with little or no supervision.

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price

Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.00

Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00

RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00 : 0.000
0.55 z 0.000

Weekly Vol.
0.000
0.480
0.000

ABDAB

RND Holdings 0.45 0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Fund Name NAV Last 12 Months

CFAL Bond Fund 1.4005

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.9047

CFAL Money Market Fund 1.4842

Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.1143

Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.0484

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

Competitive Wages

Div $

We thank all applicants however, only candidates to
be interviewed will be contacted.

101.6693
96.7398
1.0000
9.3399
1.0622
1.0243
1.0585 t 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina
ri

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Please hand deliver your resumes and references to

Bahamas Mack Truck Sales Ltd.
Rock Crusher Road
Nassau, Bahamas

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wWk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

nted price for daily volume
om day to day

Weekly Vol. -
EPS $-Acom|

ding volume of the prior week

y's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnin: gs
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 6/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
TASTE





The Tribune








THIS bartender said

many locals compare # at
their homemade : - - a
‘Switcha’ to the drink *
their grandmothers f 4
used to make. i



é r f=
By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net
FOR most Bahamians, one of the first signs that you’re
about to enjoy a great meal is when the aroma of the dish 4
catches your attention long before you enter the kitchen. : a
This is certainly true for the recently opened Noni Way . r*
Café. Ft
The gourmet Bahamian restau- other flavourings. oe
rant located in the Coral Harbour The restaurant also offers steak, .
Plaza, features a fine selection of lobster, grouper, garlic mashed
traditional Bahamian dishes along potatoes, sautéed spinach, sautéed
with several popular European style © mushrooms, all of which are pre- 4
entrées. pared with the health of his cus- 2
Stephen St Clair Serrette, the tomers in mind. hs =
owner, explained that beside the Diners can also try the Ortland H *, we
restaurant’s exquisite décor, top Bodie Surf and Turf named after ie
quality waiters, and comfortable the radio talk show who frequents
atmosphere, providing healthy food the establishment at least twice a r ‘
was the inspiration for creating the week.
establishment. There is also the Jay Joh Cracked
“This is a restaurant that empha- Conch named after one of the
sises health, because we cook with restaurant’s chefs who created a
no MSG, we use the extra virgin reputation for top notch cooking
olive oil, coconuts, and our secret during his former emplyment at
ingredient the Noni Juice.” Castaways restaurant some years
Mr St Clair Serrette said the ago.
restaurant features a one of a kind Tribune Taste recently stopped in * "
Noni vinaigrette and a Noni Coolie to sample a few of the delectable \ =
-a beverage made from Tahitian dishes on the menu, including the ws ite a
Noni, with blueberry, grapes and conch and crab cake with Noni



ae

Sar,

iy

_

rf
a?



vinaigrette, the Spicy Curried Beef
Satay, and the guava duff.

At first sight, the conch and crab
cake looked like a colour fiesta with
its bright green garnish on one side,
cucumber, green and red bell pep-
pers, and cabbage salad on the oth-
er end dressed with the vinaigrette.
At the center was the hearty cake
sitting as the star of the dish.

This dish is rather light and
infused with lots of vegetables.
There is a very noticeable fusion of
flavours smoothly bringing together
the crab, conch, veggies, and the
noni.

Toped with a tall glass of home-
made ‘Switcha,’ this dish was the
perfect start to the meal.

Next was the Spicy Curried Beef
Satay.

Prepared by executive Chef Det-
rick Francis who lives by the motto
“People eat with their eyes,” this
dish looked quite pleasing with its
marriage of steak and greens with a
slight simmer, but it also had an
intoxicating scent of curry.

Chef Francis explained: “The cur-
ry Vinaigrette was made from
scratch and the taste is spicy and

tangy flavoured which still has a
slight sweetness from the chutney
used. The beef is center cut sirloin
steak, so it’s the best part of the
steak.”

Chef Francis said even honey is
used to add flavour to the dish. In
the end, it was truly a taste of heav-
en allowing you to enjoy each ele-
ment of its seasoning while being
filled by its content.

The final dish was guava duff.
Made like traditional duff, this dish
was garnished with a diced straw-
berry and a side of whipped cream.

According to one patron, “If
Heaven was made of this exact gua-
va duff, I promise I’ll never sin
again.”

Like the old wedding adage, Noni
Way offers ‘something old, some-
thing new, something borrowed,
and something blue.’

The restaurant is new, some of its
dishes are traditional Bahamian,
others are borrowed from Europe,
and the highlight is the blue bottled
Tahitian Noni Juice.

A perfect spot for breakfast,
lunch, or dinner, the Noni Way Café
is truly the way to go.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009, PAGE 7B





The Tribune



This weekend brings to an
end summer 09’, so why not
end it with a bang and cele-
brate the end of the season as
we welcome in autumn.

4. The Adastra Gardens is
coming to the Marathon Mall
on Friday, well maybe not the
entire zoo, but an awesome
selection of its feathery ten-
ants. Expect to see a number
of exotic animals including
the Moluccan cockatoo which
is indigenous to Eastern
Indonesia and one of the
largest white cockatoos in the
world. There will also be the
Green and Gold Macaw. The
macaw which is considered
the poster image for parrots,
is commonly found in wood-
lands, rainforest environ-
ments, and savannah-like
regions.

There will be additional
information informing kids
and adults about the history
of the birds, their characteris-
tics, and global populations.
This event will be held in the
mall’s center court from noon
until 5pm.

On Saturday at the zoo
grounds, there will be a spe-
cial show to introduce kids to
the other animals at the zoo.
The event will feature various
activities, food, drinks, and
will end with a pep-talk from
the police on back-to-school
safety. Entrance is $8 for
adults and $3 for kids.

2. The Bahamas Interna-
tional Film Festival continues
its film festival series with the
movie Holly. The 2006 poetic
drama directed by Guy Moshe
is set in modern day Cambo-
dia where a Vietnamese girl
called Holly, encounters
Patrick an American resident
who specialises in the sale of
stolen artifacts. The story fol-
lows their strong connection
and her unrelenting efforts to
escape her fate of becoming a
sex slave in the notorious
Cambodian red-light district
of Phnom Pehn. The movie
will be shown on Wednesday
at Galleria JFK at 8pm. Tickets
are $5. The film starts at 8pm.

3. Just in time for back-to-
school, local entertainment
group Make-Em-Listen will
present its first annual Back-
To-School Pep-Rally. The
event takes place at the Town
Centre Mall this Saturday and
will feature a number of local
music icons including |-Rate,
Peter Runks, Broken Mics,
BainTown Boys, Anku Sara,
Death Angel, Professor, and
lots more. There will also be a
special presentation from
Kyran Turnquest - a youth
counselor and motivational
speaker - along with dozens
of give-aways for students
returning to the classroom.
Everyone is invited to this free
community event from noon
until 6pm.

4. Local gospel recording
artist Najie Dunn is gearing
up to release his latest music
project titled Relentless Pur-
suit. Najie is having his offi-
cial aloum release this Friday
at 7.30pm at the Holy Trinity
Activity Center Stapleton Gar-
dens. The artist will perform
several pre-released selec-
tions from the album such as
Inspiration, Pray For You,
They Want Take Life Ft. Mon-
ty G, and Yes Lord. There will
also be special appearances
from Monty G, Ricardo Clark,
i Heights. The event
is $5,

5. The Nahbulunge cloth-
ing line will release its fall
sporting line this Thursday at
Harry’s Haven of Rest on
Queens Street. Featuring the
latest trends in female
sportswear, the company
said its clothing has always
been about defining the
image of beauty for women.
The event starts at 6pm and
promises to be a philan-
thropic extravaganza with
proceeds from the $30 tick-
ets going to the Willie Mae
Pratt School for girls.







On

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

larence Rolle has suc-
cessfully captured the
human spirit in his very
first film-Fresh a riveting
story about overcoming

the challenges of life.

The film, which recently pre-
miered at the Dundas Centre for
the Performing Arts, features an all
Bahamian cast. The plot centers
around Angie ( D’Adra Smith-
Owen) one of 800 plus employees
recently laid-off from the tourism
industry.

As the reality of having no job,
two dependents (her sister Sharon
played by Lakeria Forbes and son
Ram, played by Terran Brown)
sinks in, Angie feels like her luck
has completely run out.

If that isn’t bad enough, her
estranged husband Solomon, played
by Gene Cage is released from
prison and returns to a home far
different than the one he left
behind.

As the story develops, the family
learns to works through their many
problems growing closer through
faith, and an overall commitment
to creating a better life.

Mr Rolle who wrote and directed
the film explained: “The film Fresh
is a theme that I’ve always had in
mind, and to some extent it has
been incorporated in other plays
I’ve done.

“As a society I think we are a bit



materialistic, and we have a need
for instant gratification, and this is
something that I see around every
day, so I thought to also include
that in the film.”

Mr Rolle said with so many per-
sons unemployed and struggling
financially , he hopes Fresh will in
some way reaffirm the benefits of
budgeting and maintaining insur-
ance,

The film was attended by many



CLARENCE ROLLE (RIGHT), Direc-
tor and Writer of Fresh said the
film took about 18 days to shoot.
Also pictured is videographer Craig

i

a
Sy ——- <. a

supporters who also participated in
a brief Q and A session with Mr
Rolle and the cast.

Fresh received rave reviews, with
many audience members saying
never before has a local or interna-
tional movie been successful in
offering a how-to guide toward
financial survival during a reces-
sion.

Now that the film has received its
initial stamp of approval, Mr Rolle

Lenihan, left.



ASCENE from the new Bahamian
movie Fresh. Pictured are actors
D’Adra Smith-Owen and Gene Cage.

said his next goal is to have it shown
in local high schools to help increase
the awareness of the social and eco-
nomic conditions facing many
throughout the community.

Mr Rolle has also written and
directed a number of stage perfor-
mances including The Web Shop
Horror, and Da Rally.

For more information visit Fresh
The Movie on Facebook. The film is
rated A.

INTERNATIONAL BAHAMIAN THEATRE FESTIVAL IS ON ITS WAY!

By KENCOVIA INGRAHAM

SHAKESPEARE in Paradise,
designed to be an annual interna-
tional theatre festival that will place
The Bahamas on a global level, will
soon be making its way to the stage.
Based on similar festivals such as
Scotland's Edinburgh Festival Fringe
and this region's Caribbean Festival
of Arts (CARIFESTA), this event
will take place in Nassau October 5-
12, 2009 at various local venues
including The College of The
Bahamas, the National Art Gallery
of The Bahamas, The Hub, Graycliff
and The Marley Resort.

Although the event is about two
months away, it has already received
positive feedback from individuals
in the Bahamian cultural foreground.
As poet and musician Patrick Rah-
ming has written: "We must commit

resources to create an environment
rich with opportunities to share the
uniqueness of the Bahamas through
the development of attractions.”

With a focus on making this event
the perfect opportunity to help boost
the Bahamian cultural scene as well
as the economy, the week-long
extravaganza will not only increase
the appreciation and awareness of
local and international theatre, but
also provide school visits, workshops,
readings, seminars, student matinees,
and much more to the Bahamian
community.

The festival will feature three
Bahamian productions and three
international productions, all of
which have received critical acclaim
in their hometowns. Plays will be
represented not only from The
Bahamas, but from the United
States, Cayman, and Guyana.

Shakespeare's The Tempest is the

festival's signature work. It was
adapted for a Bahamian audience by
students of The College of The
Bahamas under the guidance of
Nicolette Bethel, and will be co-
directed by Trinidadian native Patti-
Anne Ali, known for her role of
“Soomintra” in The Mystic Masseur,
a Merchant-Ivory Film, and Bahami-
an stage actor and acting coach Craig
Pinder, who has had major roles in
such West End productions as Les
Miserables and Mama Mia Kim
Brockington, known for her recur-
ring TV roles in Guiding Light and
the West Wing, will perform her one-
woman show Zora, about the
African-American folklorist Zora
Neale Hurston. Other productions
include One White One Black from
Cayman, selected shows by Ken
Corsbie, a Guyanese-American per-
former and storyteller, and Track
Road Theatre's productions of Love

in Two Acts and Light.

The Shakespeare in Paradise team
openly welcomes the public to attend
this event. Special invitations are sent
out to students who are passionate
about pursuing theatre as a career
to take full advantage of this one-
week experience.

For more information about this event
visit:
www.shakespeareinparadise.org

For more information about this event
visit:
www.shakespeareinparadise.org
YOU TUBE - Shakespeare In Paradise
Facebook: Bahamian Shakespeare
Facebook Fan Group: Shakespeare In
Paradise

Myspace: www.myspace.com/shake-
speareinparadise

Twitter: www.twitter.com/shake-
speareinparadise

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PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

BAHAMIAN BEACH WEDDING



In an intimate beach
ceremony, Patrick
Rahming married
Sarah Johnson-
Saunders on
Yamacraw Beach on
August 20. The
couple, both Grand
Bahamians, chose to
dress in island wear
for a unique,
authentically
Bahamian wedding.
The couple
exchanged his and
her Bibles to signify
daXcylaxeoyesvennnaentcvels
to God and each
other. The ceremony
VER Ole) we) anetee meni
Bishop Victor A.
Johnson of New
Dimension
Ministries on Joe
Farrington Road.



Homicide ruling, documents

detail death of Jackson

LOS ANGELES

THE Los Angeles County coroner’s
finding that the death of Michael Jack-
son was a homicide could mean crimi-
nal charges for his doctor, who told
investigators he administered a mix of
powerful drugs to treat the pop star’s
insomnia hours before his death,
according to the Associated Press.

The homicide ruling was based on
forensic tests that found the anesthetic
propofol combined with at least two
sedatives to kill Jackson, a law enforce-
ment official told The Associated Press,
speaking on condition of anonymity
because the findings have not been pub-
licly released.

The finding does not necessarily
mean a crime was committed. But it
does help prosecutors if they decide to
file criminal charges against Dr. Conrad
Murray, the Las Vegas cardiologist who
was caring for Jackson when he died
June 25 in a rented Los Angeles man-
sion.

“Tt is an easier prosecution when the
medical examiner calls it a homicide,”
said Dr. Michael Baden, the former
chief medical examiner in New York
City, who is not involved in the Jackson
investigation.

Through his lawyer, Murray has said
he administered nothing that should
have killed Jackson.

Murray told investigators that at the
time of Jackson’s death, he had been
trying to wean the entertainer off
propofol. The doctor said he’d been
treating Jackson for insomnia for about
six weeks with 50 milligrams of the drug
every night via an intravenous drip, a
search warrant affidavit said.

Murray said he feared Jackson was

MUSICREVIEW

becoming addicted to the anesthetic,
which is supposed to be used only in
hospitals and other advanced medical
settings.

Murray told police he was present
when another Las Vegas anesthesiolo-
gist, Dr. David Adams, sedated Jackson
with propofol at an unnamed cosme-
tologist’s office “sometime between
March and April of this year,” accord-
ing to the affidavit.

It was about the time Jackson
requested that Murray become his per-
sonal physician for a European tour,
the affidavit said.

A woman at Adams’ office in Las
Vegas referred calls Tuesday to his
lawyer, Liborius Agwara, who did not
immediately respond to messages seek-
ing comment.

Nevada State Board of Osteopathic
Medicine records show Adams has
been licensed in the state of Nevada
since 2002, and there are no reports of
malpractice and no disciplinary issues
against him. Ongoing investigations are
confidential unless a licensee is named
in a formal administrative complaint.

The affidavit was unsealed in Hous-
ton, where Los Angeles police took
materials from one of Murray’s clinics
last month as part of their manslaughter
investigation. Manslaughter is homi-
cide without malice or premeditation.

The affidavit says Murray told detec-
tives that two days before Jackson’s
death, he had lowered the propofol
dose to 25 milligrams and added the
sedatives lorazepam and midazolam, a
combination that succeeded in helping
the pop star sleep. The next day, Mur-
ray said, he cut off the propofol and
Jackson fell asleep with just the two
sedatives.

Queen Latifah brings back the raps

Queen Latifah,

“PERSONA”



(Flavor Unit Records)

There’s nobody quite like Queen
Latifah, the rough-edged rapper
turned jazz singer and Oscar-nomi-
nated actress. On her new CD, “Per-
sona,” Latifah goes back to the roots
that made her so unique in the first
place.

The album is an enjoyable mix of
singing and rapping, produced by hip-
hop hitmakers Cool & Dre and fea-
turing cameos from the likes of Missy
Elliott, Mary J. Blige, Busta Rhymes
and Marsha Ambrosius. The style
ranges from straight-up hip-hop to
mid-tempo R&B to breathless tech-
no, with a mercifully light sprinkle of
the obligatory Autotune effects.

Latifah has sung on two previous
albums, and her voice is capable, com-
parable to most of the women popu-
lating today’s charts (She’s no Jen-
nifer Hudson, but who is?). Singles

like “Cue the Rain,” “My Couch” and
“With You” are body-moving tales of
the type of hothouse love that blooms
on the dance floor, while “People”
with Mary J. Blige and “The World”
tackle more weighty topics.

Her singing occasionally get sub-
merged beneath Cool & Dre’s dense
instrumentals, and on a few songs it’s
tough to differentiate Latifah from
her guest singers. When she raps,
though, everything changes.

Latifah still has the punch and word-
play of the woman who broke into
entertainment more than 20 years ago
as the rare female rapper who cap-
tured attention with skills instead of
sex. On her new album, you recog-
nize within the first few bars of “The
Light” or “Over the Mountain” that
Latifah is on the mic.

Latifah’s rap voice demands atten-
tion the way her presence does on
screen. That’s not usually the case with
her singing. So big up to Latifah for
continuing to expand her talents —
and for not forgetting where she came
from.



Daniel Gluskoter/AP Photo

AUTHORITIES leave the scene after executing a search warrant at the Red Rock
Canyon Country Club residence of Dr. Conrad Murray, Tuesday, July 28, 2009, in
Las Vegas. Murray is currently under investigation for his alleged role in the

death of pop icon Michael Jackson.



Jaton Johnson/Photo



Chris Brown
sentenced in
Rihanna
assault case

LOS ANGELES

A JUDGE on Tuesday
sentenced Chris Brown to
five years’ probation, six
months’ community labor
for the beating of Rihanna
and ordered the R&B
singer to stay away from
his former girlfriend for
the next five years, accord-
ing to the Associated Press.

Los Angeles Superior
Court Judge Patricia
Schnegg told Brown that
he could be sent to state
prison if he violated any
terms of his sentence,
including an order to stay
100 yards away from
Rihanna unless they’re
attending music industry
events.

A probation report pre-
pared for Tuesday’s sen-
tencing describes two pre-
vious violent incidents.
The first happened about
three months before the
February beating while
the couple was traveling
in Europe; Rihanna
slapped Brown during an
argument, and he shoved
her into a wall. In the sec-
ond instance, Brown
allegedly broke the front
and passenger side win-
dows on a Range Rover
they were driving while
visiting Barbados, Rihan-
na ’s home country. Nei-
ther attack was reported,
the probation report
states.

Brown will serve his
sentence in his home state
— Virginia — and his
community labor will be
overseen by the police
chief in Richmond.

The judge said she
wanted to ensure that
Brown, 20, performs phys-
ical labor instead of com-
munity service, such as
mentoring young people.
He will also undergo a
year of domestic violence
counseling.

Rihanna did not attend
Tuesday’s sentencing.

At one point, Brown,
who was accompanied by
his mother, agreed to the
terms of the sentence before
Schnegg had finished going
through them all.

The hearing had been
planned for Thursday
afternoon, but Brown’s
lawyer, Mark Geragos,
asked to move up the
singer’s sentencing to
Tuesday. A previous
attempt to sentence
Brown was postponed
when Schnegg said she
hadn’t received adequate
assurances that Brown
would perform physical
labor if allowed to serve
probation in Virginia.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26,

2009

Oh so
fresh!

| See page seven



The Noni

i

Way Cafe ’

See page six;



First place finishers in the Adisa Outstanding Children in The Arts competition were presented with grants from
the Minister of Culture Charles Maynard and Adisa founder Patricia Bazard. Pictured from left to; Berlicia Saun-
ders, Quenton Smith, Bernard Farquharson, Adisa Director Patricia Bazard, Culture Minister Charles Maynard,
Benjamin Pinder, Elan Hutchinson, and Adisa programme co-ordinator Persey Francis.

cultivating

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

Five students were recently awarded
scholarship grants after taking part in the
first annual Adisa Outstanding Children in
the Arts programme, for their perfor-
mance and success by Adisa officials and
Culture Minister Charles Maynard.

The initiative which seeks to identify and publicly
acknowledge the successes of students gifted in music,
dance, and drama, has been a long time coming senior
cultural affairs officer and Adisa co-ordinator, Patricia
Bazard said.

“We have so many talented children, those who can
sing, who can dance, who can write, and so first came
the birth of the national children’s choirs.

“However there were all those other children who
couldn’t sing, but who are just as talented and who
also needed a voice with someone speaking for them,

and so the Adisa Foundation was born.”

She said when the applications for the awards were
first issued, the committee never imagined the kind of
response they would receive.

Mrs Bazard said more than 300 forms were returned,
however in the end there could only be one winner in
each category.

During a special awards presentation at the ministry
last Monday, Mr Maynard said the programe was an
important step for culture in the country.

“This whole initiative is driven by the Adisa Foun-
dation and the National Children’s Choir. The awards
programme acknowledges, celebrates, and rewards the
contributions of children to the artistic culture of the
Bahamas,” he said.

The minister said as the access to funding needed to
support these types of initiatives becomes an ever
increasing challenge, it is good to know that Adisa has
been successful in accomplishing its mandate of fos-
tering cultural growth within many of the nation’s
youth.

In music; Berlicia Saunders from Freeport Primary
took first place, Bernard Farquharson from Lyford

Cay won in the junior category, and Benjamin Pinder
from St Andrew’s won in the senior divisiom
In drama; Quenton Smith from North Long Island
High took first place, and Elan Hutchinson from Faith
Temple Christian Academy won in the senior division.
Then in dance open category, Simone Davies from.St
John’s won first place.

We have so
many talented
children, those who
can sing, who can
dance, who can write,
and so first came
the birth of
the national

children’s*choirs.
PATRICIA BAZARD



Full Text
TRY OUR
DOUBLE

FILET--FISH "™*oven’*

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Volume: 105 No.227

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LL Ts SECTION

CHAOS erupted yester-
day as an angry mob
stormed a bank demanding
to know how union chiefs
were able to withdraw near-
ly $500,000 from funds.

Members of Bahamas
Hotel Catering and Allied
Workers Union burst into
the Bank of the Bahamas,
on Harrold Road, wanting
to know how the cash could
be taken out without the
consent of its president.

Yesterday bank bosses
maintained the transactions
were legal, adding that due
to the “sensitive” dispute
surrounding the union's

executive team, the transfers
were only green-lighted after
outside legal consultation.
Union president Roy
Colebrook, who was rein-
stated to the organisation’s
helm after a recent Supreme
Court ruling, claimed he did
not know about the transfer
until yesterday morning.
"It's a sad day because
those banks have clear
instructions on who are the
signatories on any account
of the union — certainly it's
not those individuals who
are purporting to sign,” Mr

SEE page six

Date set for new
hotel union election

A DATE has been set for a new election for the Bahamas
Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union, according to

its first-vice president.

A statement released by Kirk Wilson yesterday said that
new elections for officers and members of the executive

SEE page six

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009

ATTA ae aoe
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Bank stormed in:
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Members demand

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Man found dead

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are investigating
the death of a 26-year-old
man found hanging in a clos-
et.

The body of Stephen
Alexander Fernander was
found at around 11pm on
Monday in his apartment on
Dominica Way, Golden
Gates.

A police report revealed
he was “hanging in a closet
from a rod with a laceration
and a belt around his neck.”



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



ANGRY MEMBERS of the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union burst into the Harrold
Road location of Bank of the Bahamas in protest yesterday.

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A MAN has been charged
with the murder of waitress
Schakacan Shonell Moss.

Craig Leo Johnson, who is
understood to have been in a
relationship with Ms Moss,
was also charged with
attempting suicide while in
police custody and causing
$200 worth of damage to an
airconditioning vent in the
Central Detective Unit on
Thompson Boulevard.

Appearing in magistrate’s
court number eight, Johnson,
of Faith Avenue, Nassau, was
clad in khaki trousers and a

SEE page six

HUGE SELE(



38-YEAR- OLD Craig Leo John-

son heads to court yesterday.

hext 36 hours

FORECASTERS are
keeping an eye on a weath-
er system that has a 50 per
cent chance of becoming a
tropical storm within next
36 hours.

The United States’
National Hurricane Centre
(NHC) yesterday advised
the Bahamas to monitor
the progress of the system.

However, Chief Meteo-
rology Officer Basil Dean
said the Bahamas should
only experience some rain
and thunderstorm activity
late today and early tomor-
row due to the system.

SEE page six



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hanging in closet

Police have classified his
death as “suspicious” but
Chief Superintendent
Elsworth Moss, head of the
Central Detective Unit, said it
is being treated “more as a
suicide than anything else” at
this stage.

Chief Supt Moss said that
until an autopsy is conducted,
police are unable to say exact-
ly how Mr Fernander died —
possibly either due to the cut
to his body or the hanging.

Police declined to specu-
late as to how long the vic-
tim had been dead when he
was found.

Ministry's ‘greatest
swine flu concern’
is virus becoming

more severe

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AS THE United States
braces itself for the number
of swine flu cases to jump
this fall, the Bahamas’ Min-
istry of Health said its
“greatest concern” is not
more cases but whether the
virus could become more
severe.

Yesterday, the White
House announced that the
President’s panel of advis-
ers on science and technolo-
gy have estimated that half
of the US population could
become infected with the
Influenza H1N1 virus this
fall or winter as infection
rates escalate after a slow-
down during the late sum-
mer months.

As a result, 1.8 million in
the Bahamas main tourism
market of North America
could be hospitalised and
90,000 could die, claimed the
panel.

While flu cases always rise
during colder winter months,
as the flu virus is hardier at
such times, those figures are
more than double the num-
bers seen in an average flu
season.

This is because the HIN1
virus is relatively new and
therefore predicted to infect
more people as fewer will
have had a chance to devel-
op any immunity.

Panel expert Marc Lip-
sitch, of the Harvard School
of Public Health, described
the figures as “not a predic-
tion, but a possibility” based
on its in-depth analysis.

As a tourism dependent
nation which welcomes
thousands of foreigners to
its shores each week, as well
as Bahamians returning
home from trips abroad, the
Bahamas was forced to
heighten its vigilance earlier

SEE page six

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Madeira Shopping Plaza - 328-0703 » Marathon Mall - 393-6113 or 393-4155 * RND Plaza, Freeport - 351-3274



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ISLANDS: LEADING NEWSPAPER


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Utilities Regulation and Competition

_ Authority Act: new board appointed

Educational:
institution
is heing
phased out

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - One of the
oldest educational institutions }
on Grand Bahama is being }
phased out, but recruitment }
efforts are being made to }
keep the doors of the school }

open.

97 Radio on Tuesday.

“We pump $350,000 a year
to keep that school going and }

you can only give so much,

so we have decided now }
because of the economic sit- }
uation that we could not }
afford to spend $350,000 for }
the school, andso we made a }
decision to phase it out,” he }

said.

on the island for many years,

with an enrolment of more }
than 800 students from :
kindergarten to eighth grade. }

Today, the school caters to }
less than 100 students in }

grades two through six.

Father Demeritte said this :
year will mark 120 years of }
Catholic education in the }

Bahamas.

He noted that the school :
in Hunters will only remain }
open if enrolment is signifi- }

cantly improved.

“There are some new sub- }
divisions in the area and we }
want to canvas those com- }
munities and speak with par- :

ents,” he said.

“The reality is that we are }
phasing out, but if we can }
rebuild enrolment then we :
will cease (from closing the }

school),” said Fr Demeritte.

He said St Vincent de Paul }
School is a very good institu- :
tion. “We offer the best edu- }
cation and we have a good }

record,” he said.

Fr Demeritte said they will i
also launch a major fundrais- }
ing event to raise $120,000 :
for its Education Fund to }
assist those needy children :
who attend St Vincent de }
Paul and Catholic High }

School.











iid
US
Ge hat)
PHONE: 822-2157

Father Reginald:
Demeritte, pastor of St Vin- }
cent de Paul Church, said that }
enrolment at the school in }
Hunters has significantly }
declined over the last decade. }

“Unfortunately, for the ;
past 10 years now we have :
been trying to maintain the }
school and keep it open,” he }
told radio listeners on Love }

The St Vincent de Paul :
School is operated by the }
Catholic Board of Education. }
It has been in existence for }
over 30 years and was one of }
the leading private schools }

ON AUGUST 1 the Utilities Regula-
tion and Competition Authority Act
2009 came into force. In accordance with
the Act a new board has been appointed.

The composition of the board, which
was released yesterday, is as follows:

Mr Wayne Aranha has been appoint-
ed chairman.

Mr Aranha joined Pricewaterhouse-
Coopers in the Bahamas in 1976 and
spent 24 years as a partner before his
retirement in 2008. He is a member and
past president of the Bahamas Institute
of Chartered Accountants and a member
of the American Institute of Certified
Public Accountants. He was a director of
the Institute of Chartered Accountants
of the Caribbean and he is currently a
member of the board of the new Insur-
ance Commission of the Bahamas.

J Paul Morgan and Katherine Doehler
have been appointed non-executive
directors.

Tribune leaders
give views on new
Chief Justice in poll

TRIBUNE readers gave
their view on the recent
appointment of former
Attorney General Michael
Barnett to the post of Chief
Justice in an online poll.

Responding to the ques-
tion “Do you think the
appointment of Michael
Barnett as Chief Justice
was a g00d move?” posted
on tribune242.com, 50 of
the 79 persons who voted
said “no” and 29 said “yes.”

Mr Barnett was sworn in
as Chief Justice on Mon-
day at Government House
despite some controversy.

He resigned his post as
Attorney General last week
to take up the top judicial

NV TCOl a FANsl syne



Mr Morgan is an independent adviser
on policy and regulatory frameworks in
the energy, telecommunications (ICT)
and water sectors.

He has spent his career of 38 years in
utilities.

He is the former chairman of the
Commonwealth Telecommunications
Organisation, former chairman of the
Organisation of Caribbean Utility Reg-
ulators, and former chairman for two
terms of the Office of Utilities Regula-
tion in Jamaica. He is a past president of
the Jamaica Institution of Engineers.

Ms Doehler is a communications spe-
cialist with 25 years experience working
in Canada and internationally in the tele-
coms, broadcasting and cable TV fields.
She is a founding member of the execu-
tive committee of the Canadian Network
for the Advancement of Research,
Industry and Education, a past member
of the Canadian Standards Association

job, having been selected
by Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, in consultation
with opposition leader Per-
ry Christie.

The swearing in came
notwithstanding a formal
objection lodged against
the selection of Mr Barnett
by the Bahamas Bar Asso-
ciation last Friday and a
statement criticising the
move issued by the
Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce over the week-
end.

Both entities suggested
that because of his well
known political affiliations
and former position as a sit-
ting cabinet minister it was
inappropriate for the prime
minister to have offered
him the job of chief justice
and for Mr Barnett to have
accepted it, as it might
“compromise the integrity”

of the judiciary to be seen
as an independent branch
of government.

Some welcomed the
appointment, however,
stating that Mr Barnett has
the experience necessary to
be effective in the key role.
He in turn has promised to
lead reforms which will
help the justice system
“move as expeditiously and
efficiently as (it) can.”

Commenting on the issue
on tribune242.com,
“Roger” said: “The selec-
tion of Mr Barnett is a clear
indication that govern-
ments of the day in the
Banana Republic of the
Bahamas just don’t get the
difference between servant
leadership and arrogance.
Somehow, the former
seems a trait our leaders
are not capable of exhibit-
ing. ”?

Standing Committee on Telecommuni-
cations, and a past director of the board
of the Telecommunications Applications
Research Alliance. She is a partner of
Syntel Consultancy Inc.

Michael Symonette and Usman Saadat
have been appointed executive direc-
tors.

Mr Symonette, Chief Executive Offi-
cer, served as executive director of the
Public Utilities Commission from Octo-
ber 1, 2008 to July 31, 2009.

He was employed with the Bahamas
Telecommunications Corporation which
later became the Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company Limited (BTC) from
1960-2006.

He spent the last 11 years at BTC as
president and CEO. He oversaw the
establishment of URCA and will act as
CEO of URCA during a transition peri-
od until a new CEO is appointed in
accordance with the URCA Act.

oe ae Waactae Piaf

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

P6,7,8,10
VW aie erent er ccran ene cnne nant ine rte arama ee P9

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



Usman Saadat, Director of Policy and
Regulation, Mr Saadat has 14 years of
global communications experience
including five years in economic con-
sulting with UK based National Eco-
nomic Research Associates (NERA) and
Europe Economics.

He served as adviser on major regula-
tory projects for the European Com-
mission, and led projects for European
and Asian national telecommunications
regulators including OFTEL in the UK,
ODTR in Ireland and OFTA in Hong
Kong.

Mr Sadaat also spent three years as
an economist with the regulatory team in
the head office of Cable and Wireless
PLC.

His most recent responsibility was as
chief executive officer of Cable and
Wireless St Lucia, prior to which he
served as business development direc-
tor of Cable and Wireless International.

AIRPORT REDEVELOPMENT IN FULL SWING

—_— |
7
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=
=
2a
=
=
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a
o
=
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WORK ON THE redevelopment of the nGet Pindling Airport — projected to be sariplete in 201 ia is
well underway. These cranes are pictured towering over the existing terminal.



Shipyard executives set
to meet with workers

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— Executives of
the Grand Bahama Shipyard
are expected meet with work-
ers following reports of a pos-
sible strike at the facility.

Carl Gustaf-Rotkirch, chair-
man and CEO, could not be
reached for comment before
press time yesterday regarding
claims that two union shop
stewards were wrongfully dis-
missed.

The Grand Bahama Port
Authority Workers’ Union
filed a dispute with the Depart-
ment Labour over the dis-
missals of Eudencel McPhee
and Simeon Richardson.

The union is now threaten-
ing to take a strike vote if the
two workers are not reinstat-
ed. However, union officials
could not be reached for com-
ment.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009, PAGE 3



Proposed marital rape law backed by

MP Davis holds

‘aunch reception’

‘Seventh Day Adventists representative

PHILIP
“Brave” Davis,
deputy leader
candidate for
the PLP, host-
ed a “launch
reception” for
his candidacy
at the Gover-
nor’s Ballroom
in British Colo-
nial Hilton yes-
terday evening.

ne NAS

Addressing the reception, Mr
Davis said the country is “head- }
ed in the wrong direction” and }

“we must change its course.”

“T want to make a change!”
said the MP for Cat Island, Rum

Cay and San Salvador.

Calling for a return to “atime }
when ‘D’ was not an acceptable }
national grade average” and }
“when one could sleep at night ;
without having to worry about }
being robbed or hurt by crimi- ;
nals,” Mr Davis described the }
PLP as the “vessel to restore the i

dream” of a better Bahamas.

“We PLP’s must always be :
the sober, thoughtful alternative :
and we must promote ideas that }

offer solutions to problems.

“We must ensure that our }
conversation with the Bahamian
people is not simply a celebra- :
tion of our history but we must i
use our history to develop and }
communicate a road map of }
policies and programmes that :
assist them in realising their }
hopes and dreams,” said the ;
MP, who described himself as a }
“tireless fighter for the rights of }

Bahamians.”

Mr Davis is the first person }
to publicly announce his cam- }
paign to become the next i
deputy leader of the PLP, after ;
the current holder of the post, St :
Cecilia MP Cynthia Pratt, :
announced that she will be :

standing down.

The new deputy leader will
be chosen at the party’s con- }

vention in October.



AS THE controversy sur-
rounding the proposed
amendment to the Sexual
Offences Act rages, a rep-
resentative of a large reli-
gious denomination has
come out in support of the
law.

The head of the more than
10,000-member strong Sev-
enth-Day Adventists (SDA)
Church in the Bahamas in a
statement yesterday said that
he believes the proposed
amendment, which would
outlaw marital rape, deserves
“consideration and support,”
but added that there should
have been more consultation
prior to presenting the bill in
parliament.

Pastor Leonard Johnson,
president of the SDA
Bahamas Conference, said:
“T believe that the proposed
amendment to the Sexual
Offences Act is one that
seeks to protect a spouse by
introducing a clause pertain-
ing to rape within marriage
and deserves consideration
and support. Essentially, if
couples respect each other
there is no need to have con-
cern about the proposed
amendment. However, when
the spirit of selfishness and
anger or hate is at work,
problems can be expected.”

Quoting from Bible pas-
sages relevant to the topic —
including First Corinthians
13, First Corinthians 7 and
Ephesians 5 - Pastor John-
son said that these make the
assumption that Christians
operate on a “basis of divine



“I believe that
the proposed
amendment to
the Sexual
Offences Act is
one that seeks
to protect a
spouse by
introducing
a clause
pertaining to
rape within
marriage and
deserves
consideration
and support.



Pastor Leonard
Johnson, president
of the Seventh-Day

Adventists

love.” However, this is not
always the case.

“The preceding passages
govern followers of God. So
it can be assumed that a wife
who operates on the basis of
love will not withhold sex
unnecessarily or spitefully.
Also one who operates on
the basis of love will not

force or take advantage of
his spouse. The principle of
love will inform action and
behaviour,” he said.

“Also, it must be clear
that not everyone operates
on the basis of divine love,
and hence it is necessary to
enact laws and rules govern-
ing behaviour. However, that
is not to say that Christians
are above the law, but as not-
ed it would be hoped that
they would not need to be
guided by them; for they
should be operating on the
basis of a higher principle.”

Pastor Johnson said that
critical to understanding the
Bible is the need for what is
referred to as hermeneutics,
or sound interpretation;
allowing the Bible to speak
for itself as opposed to
imposing meaning on scrip-
ture.

“In doing so, consideration
is given to who spoke, the
audience, the issues, et
cetera. It is also helpful to
have some knowledge of the
language used, whether
Hebrew, Aramaic or Greek.
Otherwise, we may use
today’s understanding and
impose on scripture, thus
forcing it to say what its
writer never intended,” he
said.

“Tt is also necessary that
one be guided by the Holy
Spirit, as it was He who
inspired the Bible writers.”

Pastor Johnson said that
this would be a good time to
raise the age of sexual con-
sent from 16 to 18 years.

Majority of RIU employees
‘will be asked back to work’

IT IS understood that the
majority of RIU employees will
be asked back to work when
the Paradise Island hotel
reopens in November, but gov-
ernment said it will investigate
pay conditions of the staff dur-
ing the three-month closure.

This according to Acting
Minister of Labour Loretta
Butler-Turner, who yesterday
responded to claims that staff
have not been fully informed
about what they are to expect
in terms of pay during the tem-
porary closure of the property
and do not know whether they
will all have their jobs back
when it reopens as the RIU
Palace Paradise Island.

“From what I heard from the
HR (human resources) depart-
ment informally, I think most
of the workers are going to be
re-engaged, but the pay issue
hasn’t been fully resolved. The
Department of Labour will
look into matter,” she said.

“T spoke with some of the
staff members yesterday. Obvi-
ously we are going to try to
meet with the principals so we
can determine the way for-
ward.”

Speaking to The Tribune,
RIU employees expressed con-
cerns about their uncertain
future.

One hotel worker said: “We
understand why they are clos-
ing the hotel, but of course it’s
like a stab in the back. We have
approached our superiors and

Loungers
Drinks Trolleys
Coffee Tables

ek

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

A CROWD outside of the RIU yesterday for the furniture giveaway.

we’re not getting any response
(about the pay issue).

“Management has a list of
people they are not going to
call back but that’s not been
dealt with yet. The only peo-
ple who know are the man-
agers. We, the employees,
have not been told,” she
claimed.

The RIU hotel will be
closed for the next three
months during the tradition-
ally off season for tourism.

The property is set to
undergo a $25 million
makeover, reopening on
November 26, 2009.

Its 379 rooms will be
upgraded and new facilities
will be added.

Mrs Butler-Turner said that

renovation efforts are already
underway.

“The contractors are actual-
ly on the ground and they’ve
already started,” she said.

On Monday, chaos erupted
at RM Bailey High School and
outside the RIU after persons
reportedly made off with fur-
niture and other household
items from the hotel that the
property’s operators had
intended to donate to under-
privileged people.

The giveaway effort by the
RIU, led by the Department
of Social Services, ended in
pandemonium as furniture,
television sets and other items
were “hijacked” by a few
unscrupulous individuals and
reportedly sold or given to

ne Java Gallery

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y

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ushion is fade and mildew
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their family members.
Yesterday the giveaway con-
tinued under much more order-
ly conditions at the RIU prop-
erty, as police officers were on
hand to monitor the situation.

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Share your news

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from people who are
making news in their
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you are raising funds for a
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area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

OUP LOCAL a OF PR

PROCHIEM SYSTEM (an)

Utilities Regulation & Competition Authority, the regulator for the
electronic communications sector is presently transitioning all PUC
licences and will require licensees to complete a "Full Details Form". These
forms & guidelines will be available 1 September 2009 for all PUC license
holders on the website urcabahamas.bs and will also be mailed to licence

holders.

Visit the website for more information

www.urcabahamas.bs

UTILITIES REGULATION & COMPETITION AUTHORITY



|
weacurcabahamas. bs

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Miss Universe showcases the Bahamas

FOR TWO hours Sunday night the
Bahamas held the world’s attention as 83
Miss Universe contestants — young women
from around the world — stepped onto
Atlantis’ stage for one of them to be chosen
by a panel of international judges as the uni-
verse’s new queen. By 11pm the outgoing
Miss Venezuela had crowned another queen
—a second Miss Venezuela, Stefania Fer-
nandez. This was the first time in the history
of the pageant that the same country had
won the pageant back-to-back.

The Miss Universe show — the world’s
largest pageant — received the highest TV
ratings Sunday night as viewers switched
from their regular stations to watch the new
Miss Universe crowned in the Bahamas.

By having the various events on different
islands — Abaco, Grand Bahama, Bimini,
Harbour Island and Exuma — and not just
concentrated in Nassau, the Tourism Min-

night was Anderson Cooper’s AC360, which
panned the Miss Universe entertainment.
His show was repeated into the wee hours of
the morning.

Heidi Montag, the featured performer
had hoped to get her big break on the
Atlantis stage Sunday night to fulfil a dream
of launching herself as a famous pop star.

“Miss Universe was the best experience of
my life,” she gushed on her arrival back in
Los Angeles Monday. “It was a miracle!”

It might have been a miracle for her, but
it certainly wasn’t a miracle for the Bahamas.
“Tam so excited to perform — at Miss Uni-
verse for my first ever live performance,”
she told “People” magazine. “This is such a
miracle in life and I give thanks to God
everyday for this once-in-a-lifetime oppor-
tunity.”

It was also a once-in-a lifetime opportu-
nity for the Bahamas, and she spoiled it.

A sad sight at
Saunders Beach
— but should we

be surprised?

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Yesterday, I was very sad-
dened to see those wonder-
ful old trees being cut down
along Saunders Beach. I was
not alone, as my car crawled
along the road I witnessed
many drivers call out angry
comments at the workmen
doing the job.

I guess I cannot expect
much more when in the past
we have so willingly and wan-
tonly pulled down wonderful
old buildings and homes in
the name of progress, only to
replace them with ugly, for-
eign looking monstrosities.

I remember very clearly
when I was chairman of the
fund raising committee for the
National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas when several very
influential people in high
places urged us to pull down
Villa Doyle and replace it
with a modern building
because it was easier.

Fortunately under the stal-
wart leadership of the late
Vincent d’Aguilar we won
that round, and Villa Doyle
stands proud, and restored,
today.

It has been virtually impos-
sible to make, some surpris-
ingly intelligent people,
understand that those of us

istry succeeded in delivering its message that
a visit to the Bahamas offers many other
islands from which to choose.

Donald Trump, owner of the Miss Uni-
verse Organisation, said that 18 countries
bid for the honour of hosting the beauty
pageant, but the Bahamas got it. “The gov-

According to Anderson Cooper, Heidi
Montag, had found a “fresh new way to
embarrass herself.”

According to Cooper, Montag stole the
Miss Universe show by “her stunning lack of
talent.”

“T don’t know who she is,” he scoffed,

EDITOR, The Tribune.

ernment,” he said, “can be very proud of
themselves” for the manner in which the
country prepared for the event and hosted
the competition. He said the Bahamas
looked “amazing.” Atlantis also deserves
tremendous praise for the enormous part it
played as the background anchor for the
show.

Miss Universe, Miss USA and Miss Teen
USA pageants are a Donald J Trump and
NBC Universal joint venture. The show was
aired live from Paradise Island on NBC and
Telemundo.

The National Host Planning Company,
headed by Owen Bethel, was the pageant
coordinator for the activities on the ground
and Billy Bush, president George W Bush’s
nephew, was the male presenter on stage
Sunday night.

The Bahamas and Atlantis are still getting
exposure on the web, where videos of the

“or who she thinks she is, or where she is
from, or why she’s famous, she can’t dance,
she can’t sing ... but she can Twitter.” He
said she had Twittered to thank God for her
big break.

“T don’t think God had anything to do
with it!” he commented to his co-anchor,
Erica Hills. “If that’s the best God can do
then we’re in trouble!”

Hills and Cooper commented on how
Montag didn’t even know the words to her
new song, “Body Language.” This was to be
her second release, which she was launching
from Atlantis’ stage.

But instead of singing her new release
Cooper and Hills said she lip-synched it all
the way through. This was picked up on the
web and instead of glowing reports about
the Miss Universe show, highlighted was the
flop of a star trying to launch her career
from the Bahamas.

While I understand that my
opinions go directly against
yours (as per your August 20th
article) I trust you will allow
me some space in your paper
to open the eyes of Bahamians
to the facts about Casuarinas
and other invasive species. I
wish to put aside all political
agendas and dramaticism for
simple scientific fact. The doc-
uments, regarding the listing of
protected native and tradition-
al trees, are available for all
Bahamians to access at
www.bahamas.gov.bs or
www.best.bs.

IT recommend all Bahamians
read our National Invasive
Species Strategy, National Wet-
lands policy both of which men-
tion the impact of invasive

various segments of the event are posted
and will be available for some time — all
free advertising.

However, it is a pity that the Miss Uni-
verse organisers were not more discrimi-

This is the one segment of the show that
we could all have done without. As a matter
of fact the audience would have been better
off if all of the entertainment had been

Nam.

species in a Bahamian context.
Your August 20th article
mentions Sri Lanka and Viet

scrubbed. It was a third rate performance
thrown into a first class show.

It’s ashame that whoever she is, or might
one day become, she had to use the Bahamas
on its big night to fall flat on her face.

nating in the selection of the night’s enter-
tainment. It was third rate, and, of course, 24
hours after the event it provided talk show
hosts tremendous chewing fodder.

The first show we watched late Monday

There are two major flaws in
drawing analogs between their
situation and ours. Firstly,
Casuarina is native to that
region so there was no issue in
introduction of an established

letters@triounemedia.net



who wished to preserve the
66 Casuarinas trees lining
Saunders Beach were not “in
love” with casuarinas, nor
were we mistakenly trying to
preserve all casuarinas trees
in the country...just those 66
trees that have been there for
over 80 years and withstood
countless storms, sheltered us
and our kids from the sun,
whispered to us when we held
hands with our childhood
sweethearts and gazed at the
sea whilst full of dreams, and
snacked on countless KFC
snacks growing up. Is that
really that hard to understand,
or are people intentionally
not getting the message?

I worry that the rather
hideous rendition of the “pro-
posed plan”, which is not pro-
posed, but clearly already
decided, will be a garbage
filled, hot and unattractive
stab at an American beach
complex. Just from previous
experience on Arawak Cay
and the Fish Fry and the
deplorable conditions of the
toilets there, imagine how dis-

Can't see the environment

native. Secondly, the fact that
something has been done does
not automatically make it intel-
ligent or effective and their
actions (Sri Lanka) are too
recent to be adequately evalu-
ated.

If you need examples, the
Casuarinas planted on beach-
es in Bermuda, to replace
Cedars killed by blight in 1940s,
are now considered a threat to
all ecosystems there.

Casuarinas planted in Hawaii
are now threatening ecosystems
from the seashore to the moun-
tain top. In the Bahamas, the
Casuarina has entered virtually
all terrestrial ecosystems and
will potentially impact all turtle
nesting beaches and shorebird
habitat within this century.

The main fault I have with
your article, however, is the
“beauty” of Casuarinas and
how cutting them down will
hurt our tourism industry.
Beauty is highly subjective, but
can be considered objectively
in terms of novelty and benefit.
Casuarinas have invaded much
of the world’s tropical coastline
so they can be seen virtually
anywhere. They do not make

tasteful and filthy the Saun-
ders Beach facilities will be
after a few weeks.

I find it disturbing that the
destruction of these trees took
place the day immediately
after Miss Universe was over,
and the eyes of the world had
ceased looking at us....coin-
cidence? I think not!

I find it amazing that we
cannot pass a law to protect
sea turtles, a globally endan-
gered species, without two
years of procrastination and
apparent “consultation” with
every fisherman in the nation,
but can cut down trees, re
arrange beaches, reroute
roads, reclaim land and take
people’s land away from them
for roads can be done with-
out any forewarning whatso-
ever.

Last point, if casuarinas
stop beaches, why is Saunders
beach still there after 80
years? and why did the east-
ern end of Saunders Beach
disappear after the building
of Kelly Island? And what
will the true repercussions be
after the extension of Arawak
Cay?

KIM VICTORIA
ARANHA
Nassau,

August 25, 2009.

for the trees

Saunder’s beach or the
Bahamas special. The benefits
Tribune readers tout of shade
and the wind in the branches
are benefits of all trees, this
does not make them a special
tree.

Benefits of wildlife use and
edible fruit are much more
important. Casuarina is virtu-
ally useless in this regard.

The facts are, Casuarinas
destroy marine turtle and sea
bird nesting beaches and man-
grove habitat that would pro-
vide for numerous other fish
and seafood species (ecosystem
services). Ecosystem services
generate more than $80
through fishing and tourism in
the Caribbean annually.

If you are only concerned
about what tourists will see
after the trees are cut, ask your-
self, “Are we selling the
Bahamas?” If we are marketing
an “Australian pine” beach as a
Bahamian beach we are lost.
Cut them down.

ANCILLENO
O DAVIS M.Sc.
Nassau,

August, 2009.



Shame on selfish men who misuse their strength

EDITOR, The Tribune.

‘Worried About Being Left in the Dark? #P Don Stainton (Protection) Ltd.

SERVING THE BAHAMAS SINCE 1978

HILLSIDE P THOMPSON BOULEVARD I write in regard to the introduction of laws to further protect

Women’s rights. I would like to thank Ms Butler-Turner for her
steps in the right direction by bringing this very important
piece of legislation to the public’s attention. When it is neces-

FREE ESTIMATES 322-8160/322-8219
sary for us to take these types of measures in order to protect

HURRICANE SHUTTERS
Ss a basis human right it tells something about the kind of young

—| men we are producing in society. A woman’s right to refuse her
husband is just that her right when we marry someone it is built
upon a loving and trusting relationship. Rape is a very humil-
iating, embarrassing act that seeks to destroy the other party
physically and mentally. Marriage is the opposite it seeks to
show society the level of commitment, love, honour and respect.

Therefore, all areas that is necessary to protect an individu-
als choice and right to decide what should happen with his or
her body should be taken. Shame on selfish men who use their
strength to bring pain and distress. As for our outstanding
men in society much respect to you for being just that, a man.

A real man would never see the reason behind forcing his
spouse to do something she is unwilling to do.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009, PAGE 5



Castro calls US war in
Afghanistan a mistake

HAVANA i

CUBA'S Fidel Castro is
criticizing President Barack
Obama's stepped-up US.
war in Afghanistan while
backing Obama's effort to :
provide health care coverage }
for all Americans, according }
to Associated Press.

The former Cuban presi-

dent said in an essay pub-
lished Tuesday that he has-
n't the slightest doubt that =}
“the racist right" will do any- }
thing to stop Obama from :
succeeding domestically.

Castro's remarks
appeared on the Cubade-
bate Web site, which pub-
lishes his frequent essays on
global affairs. He formally
stepped down as Cuba's
president in February 2008
after ceding power to his
brother Raul.

LOCAL NEWS

Corrected statistics show 3,047 infants
were born to unwed mothers in 2007

THE Department of Statistics
retracted incorrect live birth statis-
tics recently published on its website
and released new, corrected data on
the subject yesterday.

According to the most recent sta-
tistics, there were 5,126 live infants
born in the Bahamas in 2007 — 3,047
of which were born to unwed moth-
ers — and not 5,177 live births, as orig-
inally stated by the department.

Nearly all of the new statistics for
2007 differed from the data published
by the department earlier this month
except in two areas, young mothers
between the ages of 10 and 14 and

those whose age was not stated.

Changes were noted to the cate-
gories of:

* young girls between the ages of
15 and 19, who accounted for 604
live births in the respective period,
581 of which were out of wedlock

¢ women between 20 and 24 who
accounted for 1,201 live births — 968
of which were born out of wedlock

¢ women between 25 and 29 who
accounted for 1,277 live births — 682
of which were born out of wedlock

¢ women between 30 and 34 who
accounted for 1,141 live births — 466
of which were born out of wedlock

Doctors Hospital makes donation in



The measuring scales dipped
a little lower for the Princess
Margaret Hospital Foundation’s
“Breathe Easy” campaign with
a donation from corporate
sponsor, Doctors Hospital.

Infants born at the Princess
Margaret Hospital can now
‘breathe easy’ thanks to the gen-
erous $10,000 donation, which
will go towards the purchase of
urgently needed ventilators and
incubators.

The campaign aims to raise
$300,000 towards this effort.

Earmarked for high risk, pre-
mature, low birth-weight, or
critically ill newborns, the
donated ventilators will support



BAHAMAS REALTY makes a $5,000 donation to the Breathe Easy Campaign. Pictured (from left) are:
Mark Roberts of Tile King; Robin Brownrigg, president Bahamas Realty; Larry Roberts, CEO of
Bahamas Realty; Sandra Orlander, senior nursing officer of Surgical Area Two at PMH; Paulette Cash,
neonatal nurse at the Neontal Unit, PMH; Dr F Montero Registra, Neonatal Department, PMH.

MANAGER OF LITTLE
WHALE CAY Mark Roberts
presents a cheque for $1,000
from the family of Mr and Mrs
Peter Austin to Thelma Rolle
of the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital Foundation for the pur-
chase of new state-of-the-art
ventilators.

Mr Austin said he was
“delighted and proud to sup-
port the Breathe Easy Bahamas
Campaign.”

“Mark has been managing
our property (Little Whale
Cay) for 12 years. This fundrais-
ing drive is important to all of
our staff and we are pleased to
support Mark’s philanthropic
endeavours,” he said.

Little Whale Cay is located
32 miles northwest of Nassau
in the Berry Island chain and
was previously the summer and
weekend home of Wallace
Groves, founder of Freeport.





breathing until the infants’ res-
piratory efforts are sufficient.

Presenting a check to the
Princess Margaret Hospital
Foundation, Charles Sealy,
CEO of Doctors Hospital said:
“We continue to recognise and
support the public/private part-
nership in the provision of
healthcare to the Bahamian
Community.

“We were pleased last year
to assist in the acquisition of
dialysis machines for Princess
Margaret Hospital. This year,
our participation in providing
ventilators for the Neo-natal
intensive Care Unit (NICU) at

support of Breathe Easy Campaign e -

only NICU in the country pro-
viding this service for our citi-
zenry.

“We are glad to be in a posi-
tion to assist our public part-
ners with its pressing equipment
needs. Our community deserves
the best. This is the posture that
Doctors Hospital has adopted.
We will continue on our quest
to maintain the same.”

Persons interested in making
a donation towards the cam-
paign should contact The Tri-
bune Media Group or drop off
a check made payable to the
“Princess Margaret Hospital
Foundation, Breathe Easy

PMH is very special as it is the



OLDCASTLE BUILDING PRODUCTS





Oldcastle’
SN Us eae ad cate lee
MOST ele tc) ca)

Sa









share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are making
news in their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising funds
for a good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.

RUSSELL’S WAREHOUSE
CLOSING SALE

Rivet Kite Shelving, Giomlolas, Cilass Shelves.
244 Ann Display Racks, Gridwall, Slarwall,
Stoned Standards. amd Hardware. Asst Fixnures and Fintings,
Men's Coverall’s 33.00, 5/5 & LSS Whie Shirts 31-55,
Blank CD's 30.50), Mens Jeans sz. 46-34), S15.
Blank 1D Cards, 16° Stand Fams S20).000,

BIk Scheol Shoes, S50N) 4 S70), AND MICK E

Campaign”.

TRIBUNE NEWS
EDITOR Paco
Nunez accepts a
donation for the
Breathe Easy
campaign from
Thea Glinton,
office manager at
Olcastle Building
Products
(Caribbean), Ltd.

361-2487
www.anaesfabrics, weebly.com
CARMICHAEL ROAD

* women between 35 and 39 who
accounted for 685 live births — 259
of which were born out of wedlock

¢ women between 40 and 44 who
accounted for 184 live births — 73 of
which were born out of wedlock

There was also a change in statis-
tics for women aged 45 and 49, who
accounted for 10 live births in 2007,
four of which were to unwed moth-
ers.

The shocking statistic which
revealed that young girls between 10
and 14 had six live births, all to single
mothers, did not change. Women
aged 50 and over had no live births

_—

ANAE’S

that year.

The department corrected another
mistake published in its earlier sta-
tistics, where it noted that in 1983
there were only 2,047 live births.

The new data reveals that in that
year, there were 5,252 live births,
3,240 of which were to single moth-
ers.

There was also a change to data
published about live births in 1985.

In that year, there were 5,420 live
births; 3,363 to unwed mothers.

The department's data does not
include live births to widowed or
divorced mothers.





FRONT ROW LEFT TO RIGHT: Michele Rassin, VP of operations, Doctors Hospital; Dr Keva Bethel,
director, Doctors Hospital; Barry Rassin, president, Doctors Hospital; Charles Sealy, CEO, Doctors
Hospital; Dr Gwendolyn McDeigan, director, NICU, Princess Margaret Hospital; Patricia Solomon,
nursing officer, NICU, Princess Margaret Hospital; Analee Richards, acting supervisor, Surgical Area 2,
Princess Margaret Hospital; Thelma Rolle, public relations, Princess Margaret Hospital/PMH Founda-
tion; Mark Roberts, Tile King and “Breathe Easy” chairman.



THE ROTARY CLUB of East Nassau makes a $5,000 donation to the Breathe Easy Campaign. Pictured
(from left) are: Mark Roberts of Tile King; Joanne Smith, first vice president of the Rotary Club of East
Nassau; Michele Rassin, president of the Rotary Club of East Nassau; Sandra Olander, senior nursing
officer for Surgical Area Two at PMH; Paulette Cash, neonatal nurse at the Neontal Unit, PMH; Dr F

Montero Registra, Neonatal Department, PMH.

FABRICS

P.O. Box CR-55541
Telephone:

AF Adderley
Anabel Rodgers
Aquinas
Bahamas Ebaptist
Carton Francis
Carmichael

C1 Gibson
CR Walker
CW Sawyer
Garvin Tynes
(Gerald Cash

Ringaway
Mable Walker
Queen's College
§.C McPherson
Sadie Curtis

St, Augustine's
51, John's
Stapleton
Stephen Billet
TA Thimnpson
Yellow Elder



Location: Madeira Shopping Cencet
Behind Mystical Gann - Entrance to Aquinas -
Furst left - Pirst stairs on bef

Hours: When. to Thors, San to Spe
Comtect: 465-648

Directions: Gomer Opp. BFM, 1st night,
3rd building painted white, upstairs.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Tropical
storm could
form in next
36 hours

FROM page one

If it becomes more organ- }
ised, the system would be }
named “Danny” — the }
Atlantic 2009 season’s fourth }
named storm. :

The NHC was last night }
reporting that an area of dis- }
turbed weather associated }
with a trough of low pres- }
sure interacting with an }
upper-level low is centred }
about 325 miles north-north- }
east of San Juan, Puerto }
Rico. :

The system continued to }
show some signs of organi- }
sation, and upper-level winds }
were forecast to become }
more conducive for devel- }
opment during the next day }
or so as the system moves }
west-northwestward at }
around 20mph, the NHC }
said. i

A hurricane tracker air- }
craft was scheduled to inves- }
tigate the area yesterday }
evening. :

Honduras govt
says it doesn't
fear sanctions

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras

INTERIM President Rober- }
to Micheletti said Tuesday he }
doesn’t fear international sanc- }
tions aimed at restoring Manuel }
Zelaya to the presidency, shrug- ;
ging offa U.S. announcement it
will stop issuing most visas at }
its embassy in Honduras, }
according to Associated Press.

Micheletti acknowledged the }
country will suffer consequences }
for refusing to reinstate Zelaya, }
but he suggested that nothing ;
short of armed intervention
could change the situation. :

“We are not afraid of an }
embargo by anybody,” he said :
after meeting with a delegation }
of foreign ministers from the }
Organization of American }
States pressing for Zelaya’s ;
return. “We have already ana- }
lyzed this and the country can
carry on firmly and calmly with-
out your support and that of
other nations.”

“Nobody is coming here to
impose anything on us, unless
troops come from somewhere
else and force us,” Micheletti
said.

He said he places his trust in
a large voter turnout for the
Nov. 29 presidential election to
pick Zelaya’s successor, a ballot
scheduled before the leader was
ousted June 28 amid suspicions
among his opponents that he
wanted to overturn the consti-
tutional provision limiting Hon-
duran presidents to a single
term. He denies that was his
goal.



Bank stormed in
union cash row

FROM page one

Colebrooke told The Tri-
bune outside of the union's
headquarters at Workers
House.

Mr Colebrooke said he
plans to take legal action
against those union mem-
bers who requested the
transfers.

According to a union
bank statement obtained by
The Tribune, two of the
union's fixed-term deposits,
amounting to $468,317.87,
were dissolved to facilitate
several payments.

The news infuriated
dozens of frustrated
BHCAWU members, as
many questioned the
union's future financial
State.

The group then marched
to the nearby Bank of the
Bahamas location with
picket signs.

They later swelled into
the bank, daring employees
to call the police before
they were escorted outside
by security.

Maria Roberts, an oust-
ed trustee of Nicole Mart-
in's A-Team, explained the
group's frustration: "Where
does that leave hotel work-
ers? And the workers of

this country?

"We never break our fix
deposit to help our mem-
bership but these things can
happen for the people who
are supposed to be protect-
ing us."

According to a newspa-
per report, the requests
were allegedly made by
assistant treasurer Saman-
tha Gray, trustee Ian Neely
and purported assistant sec-
retary general Raymond
Wright days after Nicole
Martin was ousted as the
union's president.

The article said Mr
Wright was to receive
$73,600 of the requested
funds, while Ms Gray and
Mr Neely were to receive
$21,450 and $30,026 respec-
tively.

The transfer also includes
$140,000 in legal fees
intended to cover the chal-
lenge led by BHCAWU
first vice-president Kirk
Wilson, which nullified the
May election that brought
Ms Martin into power.

The earlier article said
$140,000 was requested to
pay Commercial Law
Advocates, whose principal
attorney is Keod Smith, and
$50,000 to Obie Ferguson
and Co.

Another $54,113 was

ANGER AT UNION HEADQUARTERS

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

ANGRY UNION MEMBERS outside of the Hotel Union headquarters last night.

requested for HLB Galanis
Bain chartered accountants’



letter requesting the trans-

Yesterday, Bank of

partner John Bain for out-
standing fees, according to
the report.

Earlier this week, Direc-
tor of Labour Harcourt
Brown confirmed to The
Tribune that two of three
— Ms Gray and Mr Neely
—who reportedly signed a

fer are registered elected
officers of the union.

Godfrey Price, ousted
first vice president under
Nicole Martin's team, said
the union now faces hun-
dreds of thousands of dol-
lars in charges for breaking
their fixed-term deposit
with bank.



Ministry’s ‘greatest swine flu concern’
is the virus becoming more severe

FROM page one

this summer as fears over the deadly
potential of swine flu escalated around
the world.

The country recorded its first cases in
June, 2009, and up until late July had

Man charged

FROM page one

striped shirt. He was not required to
enter a plea in connection with any of the
charges and was denied bail.

According to court dockets, 38-year-
old Johnson intentionally caused the
death of Ms Moss on Saturday, August
22, 2009, by means of unlawful harm.

The attempted suicide and causing
damage charges stem from when he was
in police custody on August 24.

Ms Moss, 33, was stabbed on Canaan
Lane, opposite the Nassau Motor Com-
pany. She died in hospital of her injuries.

jis
:
ae

dealt with 28 confirmed cases.

However, fears of the virus’s poten-
tial to cause death or overwhelm health
facilities subsided as trends proved the
virus was less serious than initially indi-
cated.

“The symptoms of Swine flu and reg-
ular flu are basically the same,” said
Dr Minnis yesterday, in response to
queries about whether the Government
was concerned about the US panel’s
predictions and their potential to
impact the Bahamas.

“With swine flu, everyone was con-
cerned initially, especially since this
was a new type of virus.

“It became pandemic and we were
not sure how the mortality would pan
out.

“We were happy that mortality rates
were not as bad as had been expected
and our concern today is not necessar-
ily the swine flu itself — because the
symptoms were mild in most cases and
the number of deaths was mild — but
our great concern is if the virus were to
change.

“Then we would be dealing with a
new virus again,” he added.

=yee

Dr Minnis said the Ministry will be
“monitoring the population very, very
closely” for any signs of flu-like symp-
toms, and particularly more “aggres-
sive” symptoms.

“That may be an indication that the
virus has changed its genetic compo-
nent and that would be of great con-
cern,” said the health minister.

In July, Dr Minnis stated that Gov-
ernment has “sufficient medication”
to handle an outbreak of the H1IN1
virus.

In the meantime, the Ministry of
Health has advised the public to con-
tinue to follow influenza preventative
measures to ensure the protection of
individuals, families and communities.

“These precautionary measures
include covering your nose and mouth
with a tissue when you cough or sneeze,
disposing of the tissue in the trash after
use, along with frequent hand washing
with soap and water.”

If you are experiencing flu-like symp-
toms, avoid contact with others and
stay away from group settings to
decrease the potential for any infec-
tion to spread.

Bahamas managing direc-
tor Paul McWeeney
stressed the bank acted
"legally and in full accor-
dance with its fiduciary
responsibility in executing
disbursements, following
authorisation by and
instructions from the
union."

Date set for
new hotel
union election

FROM page one

council will be held on
Thursday. September 29.

However, union presi-
dent Roy Colebrooke
told The Tribune yester-
day that a special meet-
ing was scheduled at the
union's headquarters last
night to determine a new
election date and that a
date had not been set.

Highlighting the rift
within the union's execu-
tive team, Mr Wilson
said a date was decided
on August, 3 when the
executive council met
and adopted the
Supreme Court order of
Justice Jon Isaacs, which
nullified the union's May
election.

Mr Wilson added that
the union's Triennial
General Meeting is slat-
ed for September 30 at 9
am.

Concerned citizen speaks
ems} Out Over crime situation

Mr Knowles commended Rev Simeon

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By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A concerned citizen
claims that while crime continues to spiral
out of control, many religious ministers
remain in their “ivory towers” ignoring
the country’s crime situation.

Bahamian Julian Knowles walked into
Tribune’s Freeport office to express his
concern over the recent murders of inno-
cent victims in New Providence and
Grand Bahama.

“We are now at 55 murders in this coun-
try and I think it is high time the citizens
of this country stop blaming politicians
and take this country back.

“We can’t let a handful of hoodlums
take this country over, but right now they
are winning because there are more good
people dying than bad people,” he said.

According to reports, the national mur-
der count for 2009 has exceeded the 43
murders that were recorded during the
same period last August.

Mr Knowles said he was very hurt over
the brutal murders of 29-year-old Tagia
Soles-Armony and 34-year-old Wendy
Bullard in New Providence.

“Those young women were killed sense-
lessly and now five children will grow up
without their mothers,” he said.

Mr Knowles said it is time that religious
ministers get out of their gated commu-
nities and go into the ghettos and turn
young criminals to Christ.

Hall for his efforts. However, he criti-
cised four other prominent religious lead-
ers in the country for their “apparent lack
of concern for crime.”

“There are four leading religious min-
isters — the Bentley driving minister, the
big land developer minister, the Lear jet
flying minister, and the renowned book
author minister — who seem to be too busy
praising themselves and forgetting about
the grassroots in the ghetto,” he said.

Mr Knowles believes that crime could
be significantly reduced if these “men of
the cloth” visit crime-filled communities.

“They need to get out there with politi-
cians and community activist and knock
on doors and do something about what
is happening in this country,” he said.

“You cannot blame the Prime Minister
for the crime situation because he has the
entire country to run and he has appoint-
ed a Minister of National Security,” he
said.

Mr Knowles said that government
should consider hiring anti-violence
Youth Leader Carlos Reid as a consul-
tant.

He believes that Mr Reid could be a
great asset in the war against crime in
New Providence.

Mr Knowles also commended Assistant
Commissioner Marvin Dames for the
work he is doing in Grand Bahama. “He
has made a difference here on Grand
Bahama and many people respect what
he is doing in here,” he said.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009, PAGE 7





TT hint
Ovail Rahnags 9

hie 4 arching Hanal

Office in Atlanta, Georgia.



THE GRAND BAHAMA Youth Choir performed during the opening of the Bahamas Consulate

Atlanta welcomes
the Bahamas’
onsul General

KATHERINE Forbes-Smith, the
Bahamas' Consul General in Atlanta,
Georgia, was welcomed into the ranks of
the city's diplomatic corps during a special
reception marking the grand opening of
her office.

Greg Pridgeon, Chief of Staff to Mayor
Shirley Franklin, said he looks forward
to a strengthened relationship between
the Bahamas and Georgia.

“The more than 500,000 people of
Atlanta say that we are friends, brothers
and sisters,” he said. “We are so proud of
being selected as your new partner.”

Scores of Atlanta business representa-
tives were among the hundreds who gath-
ered to celebrate the consulate opening
last Thursday.

They were entertained by the Royal
Bahamas Police Force Pop Band, the
Royal Bahamas Police Force Marching
Band, and the Grand Bahama Youth
Choir.

Special guests included Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham, Minister of Health Dr

Hubert Minnis, Minister of Labour Sena-
tor Dion Foulkes, Ambassador CA Smith,
Consuls-General Carl Smith and Gladys
Johnson-Sands along with numerous
Bahamians who work and study in
Atlanta.



Bahamians working on Nassau Harbour
dredging project learning new skills

By KATHRYN CAMPBELL

WELDING a three-foot wide pipe in 90-
degree temperatures is not easy, but for Lynden
Whyms it provides an opportunity to expand his
knowledge and ability of a profession he loves.

A welder for more than a decade, Mr Whyms
is among 95 Bahamians putting together the
equipment to dredge 1.9 cubic yards of material
from Nassau Harbour onto Arawak Cay.

“It’s an ongoing learning process,” said Mr
Whyms, employed with sub-contractor American
Bridge. “These guys have skills that are a little
different from what I know.

"But learning from them prepares me not just
for other projects but also for work other than
welding. You don’t have one job description
here. Sometimes you’re welding, pile driving or
rigging with the crane operators.

“The foremen on this project have different
working methods. It all boils down to basically the
same — just different technicalities,” Mr Whyms
said.

Trevor “Moose” Cooper employed with Amer-
ican Bridge as a foreman said the majority of
Bahamians on the project are experienced in
their tasks.

“Each job you go on people do things differ-
ently,” he said. "We’re learning different styles
and techniques of how to do things. We’re getting
the job done and we’re doing a good job.

“Everybody is working together as a team and
we’re trying to keep everyone safe. Conditions
are good and everyone is happy.”

Project manager with contractor Boskalis
International BV Frans Thomassen said: “My
supervisors are reporting that they are very hap-
py to work with the guys.”

“Driving a bulldozer in front of a pipe and see-
ing beyond it requires attention. That is where
our supervisors come in - to get the people
relaxed and help them acquire skills they need for
that. You have to be very confident to sit in a
bulldozer and not to sink it.”

Mr Thomassen said he is satisfied with the
welding work being done by the Bahamian team.

“The welding part is 90 per cent complete. We

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—



TREVOR “MOOSE” COOPER, foreman with sub-
contractor American Bridge, is pictured repairing
a busted pipeline while other Bahamian workers
employed on the Nassau Harbour and Arawak
Cay port projects observe. Welder Lynden
Whyms is shown in far back.

have a very good team of welders whose progress
allowed us to start dredging last weekend. If they
were not progressing we could not start,” he said.

Since the available space on Arawak Cay is
insufficient to accommodate all of the dredged
material, the project also includes the westward
extension of Arawak Cay by approximately 43
acres.

The harbour project is being carried out to
accommodate the new mega Genesis Class Cruise
ships such as the ‘Oasis of the Seas’ which is
expected in Nassau in December on its maiden
voyage.

CONSUL-GENERAL Katherine Forbes-Smith welcomes the observers to the ribbon-cutting
ceremony that marked the official opening of the Consulate-General.

Clifton Heritage Park
receives BTC donation

THE Clifton Heritage
Authority (CHA) has
received a donation of $10,000
from the Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company (BTC)
to help in the restoration of
the slave ruins at the Clifton
Heritage National Park.

CHA’s chairperson Sena-
tor Dr Jacinta Higgs said:
“The donation is a part of our
ongoing efforts to involve cor-
porate citizens in the work of
the park in general, but more

specifically to help preserve
the ruins and provide other
facilities for Bahamians and
visitors alike to enjoy this his-
toric site, the home of three
civilisations.”

On behalf of Clifton’s
board she expressed gratitude
that BTC has joined others in
supporting the work of the
park and is helping in the
preservation of the country’s
rich heritage.

“Other corporate citizens

will be presented with specif-
ic plans as to how they may
contribute to the next phase
in the park’s development
with a specific emphasis on
stabilising and protecting the
ruins, enhancing the visitor
experience and providing
educational materials for
young Bahamians.”

Since its official opening in
April 2009, the Clifton Her-
itage National Park has
received several donations.





ie / i



ABOVE: PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham touched base with
hoteliers, including Andrew
Ingraham (left) and Anthony
Folar of the Latin American
Hoteliers Association, while in
Atlanta, Georgia for the open-
ing of the Bahamas consulate
office.

LEFT: THE Royal Bahamas Police
Force Band was a hit at the open-
ing of the Bahamas’ consulate
office in Atlanta, Georgia.



saturday, August 29, 2009

ONE LUCKY WINNER WILL

WIN A $500
MALL SCHOLARSHIP

TO HELP DEFRAY COSTS OF GOING BACK TO SCHOOL!

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





The great Wilson City
power plant mystery

By LARRY SMITH

During a recent visit to
Abaco, concerns were raised
by environmentalists about
the island's new power plant
at Wilson City, which is now
under construction. Very lit-
tle information on this $105
million project has been
divulged by either the gov-
ernment or BEC, so fears are
being fed by rumours. Tough
Call has reviewed the EIA
for the plant that was com-
pleted in October 2008 by
KES Environmental Services
Inc of Florida and will try to
cut through some of the
obscurity.

THE Environmental
Impact Assessment of
BEC's 48 megawatt power
plant now being built on
Abaco is more interesting
for what it reveals about
BEC's environmental man-
agement practices than for
what it tells us about this
huge project deep in the
pine forest.

Tough Call visited the
power plant site a few days
ago. It lies some 14 miles
south of Marsh Harbour,
five miles east of the Abaco
Highway, and about two
miles from the coastal ruins
of Wilson City, the fabulous
lumber town that operated
for about 10 years in the ear-
ly 1900s.

The site consists of a 25-
acre fenced clearing, with
foundations already laid out
for a tank farm, power-
house, transformer substa-

*

sale dates
August

yyy Ai eA

* except on red tagged and
ae) Mey

tion and office building.
Another 75 acres of forested
land has been assigned to
the site for future expansion,
but not yet cleared.

Access is via the old
tramway that once hauled
logs to the Wilson City
sawmill. This has been
widened from the highway
to the plant for vehicles and
transmission poles, but
before the road gets to Wil-
son City proper, it cuts to
the right, crossing over to
the Bight of Old Robinson,
where a pier and terminal
will be built for tankers to
offload fuel.

Along this road you can
still find bits of iron railroad
ties and fragments of the ter-
ra cotta water pipeline that
once supplied Wilson City.
BEC plans to bury a 12-foot
diameter corrosion-resistant
pipeline under the road and
pump fuel from the dock to
the power plant. New trans-
mission lines also will be
required to supply electrici-
ty to the grid, but EIAs for
these projects are still in
progress.

The plant will enclose
four 12 megawatt generators
supplied by the European
firm Man B&W, which has
supplied engines for BEC
plants on several islands in



the past. A tank farm will
be built within an impervi-
ous area known as a bund.
And a cooling system will
draw water from the under-
ground aquifer and dis-
charge it via a deep injec-
tion well.

Officials say the Wilson
City site was picked because
it is one of the few areas on
the island within reasonable
distance of a coast that can
be approached by a fuel
ship. Expansion of the exist-
ing power plant at Marsh
Harbour would have con-
flicted with the city's devel-
opment. The only other
clear option was Snake Cay,
afew miles south of the city,
where a terminal was built
by Owens-I]linois in the
1950s.

Unfortunately, the entire
coastline around Snake Cay
and Wilson City is a rela-
tively untouched wilderness
of mangroves, tidal crecks
and shallow bights, all con-
nected by a network of blue
holes. In fact, the area is so
ecologically sensitive that
the Bahamas National Trust
and Abaco Friends of the
Environment want to make
it a national park.

And one of the only two
shipping approaches to the
Wilson City fuel terminal

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Mall at Marathon
ACLS anLee Am a ete lis Ree

Tel: Te 393-4002
Fax: (242) 393-4096

Saturday
Sunday closed
Ta ana De srelioe Keel]

9:00am-9:00pm



goes right through the exist-
ing Pelican Cays Land and
Sea Park, an area of great
natural beauty.

So you can see why envi-
ronmentalists are alarmed
about the new power plant,
despite the obvious benefits
it will bring to Abaco's econ-
omy, which suffers through
endless load shedding every
summer. Their concerns are
heightened by the fact that
the plant will run on heavy
fuel oil, like the one at
Clifton that has been such
an environmental disaster
over the years.

In fact, BEC paid scant
attention to such matters
until the mid-1990s, when it
belatedly introduced an
environmental management
policy. According to the
EIA, several third party
audits of that policy over the
years have outlined the cor-
poration's chronic failures.
For example, drains dis-
charged oily water into the
ground for years at Clifton,
resulting in a huge hydro-
carbon plume in the fresh-
water lens and discharges
into the sea from caves
below the cliffs.

als OO) ENT syd i LOLeh



State Utilities Minister
Phenton Neymour admitted
recently that more than a
million gallons of oil had
been recovered from these
caves in recent times, at a
cost of over $1 million so
far.

The EJA also reported
that large areas of the
Clifton plant were covered
in semi-solid oil in 1996 (two
years after the EMP was
introduced) while the Blue
Hills plant did not have an
impervious floor to its bund
enclosure, which "grossly
contaminated" the site.
Chronic problems were also
noted at out island plants,
including “widespread and
undocumented oil dis-
charges, inadequate bund-
ing, no clean-up facilities
and poor drum storage."

The EIA expressed con-
cern over the lack of
resources allocated to BEC's
environmental oversight and
concluded that the corpora-
tion's culture was at fault:
"Clifton has suffered signif-
icant impacts requiring
ongoing assessment and cor-
rective action...Poor han-
dling of materials at Clifton
and Marsh Harbour has
required the need for exten-
sive ground clean up and
plant upgrading to remedy
historical oil pollution prob-
lems."

Added to this history of
gross incompetence is the
risk of a shipping disaster in
pristine waters.

This is not as rare as you
might think.

In 2005, former Transport
Minister Glenys Hanna
Martin reported on several
oil spills around Abaco,
Grand Bahama and New
Providence.

They included the spilling
of over 2,000 gallons of fuel
by BEC at the dock in
Marsh Harbour, several
spills at the Freeport ship
care facility, a wreck off
Xanadu Beach, and the
spilling of tons of lubricant
oil at Clifton during a storm.

But the EIA remains
optimistic that spills like this
will not occur at Wilson
City. Fuel will be transferred
from the tanker via a state-

of-the-art hose system and
pumped to the power plant
through a pipeline with safe-
ty valves installed every 500
feet. And the plant's stor-
age facilities will be built to
international standards with-
in an impervious concrete
bund designed to contain
the catastrophic discharge
of a million-gallon tank.

Clean-up equipment and
supplies also will be based
at the terminal, but the
potential risks should not be
minimised. During a tour of
BEC's Clifton plant last
December, Minister Ney-
mour said, “It is important
that we demonstrate to the
Bahamian people that we
are serious about cleaning
up oil spills and incidents,
and also demonstrate to
BEC and its staff how costly
it is to clean up incidents
after they have occurred."

In addition to the choice
of a conventional power
plant, Abaconians have
complained about the type
of fuel it will use. Oil-fired
electricity generation in the
United States is only a tiny
fraction of total production
because natural gas is a
cheaper and widely avail-
able alternative. And the
costs of pollution controls
and extra maintenance often
outweigh the lower cost of
using fuel oil.

But the EIA says that
renewable energy options
are not yet feasible for Aba-
co on a utility scale — winds
are inconsistent, solar col-
lectors require too much
land, and the island's cur-
rent waste stream cannot
generate enough power to
meet demand.

"This leaves oil-fired gen-
eration as the only reason-
able solution," the EIA said.
"A balance must be found
between meeting the island's
energy needs and environ-
mental responsibility. A no-
development option would
mean more reliance on
small diesel generators,
which are not as clean or
efficient as utility engines.
Doing nothing is not a viable
option."

Critics have pointed to
the air pollution that could
result from the burning of
fuel oil. The Bahamas has
no emissions standards, but
the EIA says that exhaust
from the 106-foot-high
smokestacks at Wilson City
will not exceed US stan-
dards, and BEC will monitor
air quality on a regular basis.

"The plant is unlikely to
contribute significantly, if at
all, to acid rain based on the
use of low sulphur fuel and
engine efficiency. Atmos-
pheric dispersal from the
stacks will be effective."

An incinerator will be
installed at the site to burn
garbage, waste oil and
sludge. Non-burnable items
will be trucked to the landfill
at Snake Cay. And all water
discharges will be moni-
tored.

"Protection of the under-
lying aquifer is of para-
mount importance,” the
EIA said. "In the event of a
discharge, clean-up must
begin immediately in accor-
dance with the environmen-
tal management plan."

The EIA acknowledged
that a fuel or chemical dis-
charge from the power
plant, pipeline or tanker
would be an ecological cata-
strophe.

It says that a strictly
applied environmental man-
agement plan will be essen-
tial to ensure that the plant
operates with the least risk
to the environment.

A Salvadoran construc-
tion company has been sub-
contracted to build the plant
and many Central Ameri-
can workers are already at
the site, with a big influx
expected in the next few
weeks.

The three-storey high gen-
erators will arrive in Novem-
ber and be slowly trucked
from Marsh Harbour to Wil-

son City, entailing the cut-
ting of many power lines
along the way. It is unclear
how many Bahamians will
be employed at the site.

There has also been a
puzzling escalation of the
cost of this project. In 2007
Minister Neymour said the
plant would cost $66 million.
Prime Minister Ingraham
pegged it at $80 million a
year later, and Minister Ney-
mour said $90 million in
June. But in the budget
debate shortly afterward, the
cost was put at $105 million.
A full outline of the project
has never been disclosed,
and no public consultations
have been held on Abaco,
despite frequent requests.

Meanwhile, the existing
25.6 megawatt plant at
Marsh Harbour is barely
keeping up with the demand
from Abaco's 15,000 resi-
dents, 1500 second home
owners, and 100,000 visitors.
Over the past five years
peak energy demand has
risen by 64 per cent, the
EIA said, and planning has
been underway since the
late 1990s to meet this
growth.

But the corporation's
(and by extension, the gov-
ernment's) lack of trans-
parency on this project has
fueled anger and disap-
pointment among environ-
mentalists and other con-
cerned citizens on Abaco,
and this is despite the fact
that BEC's chairman —
Fred Gottlieb — is a popu-
lar Marsh Harbour lawyer.

KEVIN BASDEN



Following Tough Call's
inquiries, we were told that a
town hall meeting is being
planned for mid-September.
Perhaps then Minister Ney-
mour, Chairman Gottlieb
and General Manager Kevin
Basden will be prepared to
respond to the following
questions that they were
unable or unwilling to
answer for this article:

1. What is the reason for
the increase in estimated
costs for this project?

2. What is the actual
signed contract figure?

3. What scope of work
does the contract price cov-
er?

4. Are the engines that
will be installed new or
used?

5. Does Man B&W have
the overall design-build con-
tract?

6. Has Man B&W sub-
contracted the construction
to a Salvadoran firm?

7. How many foreign
workers will be employed at
the site at maximum?

8. Will Bahamian firms
and workers be employed at
the site?

9. When do you expect
power to be delivered by the
plant?

10. Will this be over new
transmission lines?

11. What assurance do we
have that BEC will imple-
ment an effective EMP, giv-
en its past track record?

12. What is your current
assessment of BEC's envi-
ronmental management at
Clifton, Blue Hills, Marsh
Harbour and other family
island sites?

What do you think?
Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit
www.bahamapundit.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009, PAGE 9



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Vick set to make
debut Thursday

PHILADELPHIA
Associated Press

MICHAEL VICK will
make his preseason debut
for the Philadelphia Eagles
on Thursday night.

The three-time Pro Bowl
quarterback hasn’t played
in an NFL game since Dec.
31, 2006 with the Atlanta
Falcons. Vick was released
from federal custody July
20 after serving 18 months
of a 23-month sentence for
his role in running a dog-
fighting operation.

“TI can only go off what
[ve seen in practice and it

SPORTS

INBRIEF

Former Dolphins
DL Turner dies at
AG after stroke
FOOTBALL

LUFKIN, Texas
Associated Press



FORMER Miami Dol-
phins defensive lineman
T.J. Turner has died of
complications from a
stroke. He was 46.

Turner’s death was
confirmed by Tims
Funeral Home in Lufkin.
The Lufkin Daily News
said he died Monday at
a Bryan, Texas, hospital
after a stroke last week.

Turner played seven
seasons for the Dolphins
from 1986-92, compiling
16 sacks in 101 career
games. He played defen-
sive end and nose tack-
le.

He was an All-South-
west Conference player
at Houston before the
Dolphins drafted him in
the third round in 1986.



Tim Donaghy

Ex-ref Donaghy
jailed for federal
rule violation

BASKETBALL
TAMPA, Fla.
Associated Press

DISGRACED former
NBA referee Tim Don-
aghy is back behind bars.

Donaghy was being
held without bond Tues-
day for a federal rule vio-
lation, according to Hills-
borough County jail
records.

A message left Tuesday
at the office of Donaghy’s
attorney was not immedi-
ately returned.

Donaghy was given a
15-month sentence last
year after he said he took
money from a profession-
al gambler in exchange for
inside tips on games —
including games he
worked. He pleaded guilty
to conspiracy to engage in
wire fraud and transmit-
ting betting information
through interstate com-
merce.

Donaghy was moved to
a halfway house this year
after serving part his sen-
tence in a federal prison
camp. He was scheduled
for release in October.





looks like he’s moving
around pretty good,”
Eagles coach Andy Reid
said. “Realistically, it’s
been two years. We'll see
how it works out. We’ll
give him a couple shots in
there and see what he can
do.”

It’s unknown how much
Vick will play against Jack-
sonville. Donovan McNabb
and the rest of the starters
are slated to play three
quarters, and Reid said
Vick won’t play in the
fourth quarter. That means
Vick could spell McNabb
and get reps with the first-

team offense. It’s also like-
ly he could be used in a
variation of the wildcat for-
mation. Reid said he’s not
concerned about showing
off such packages in a pre-
season game.

“Tm just going to take it
play by play and see how
he adjusts to game speed,”
Reid said. “If I think that’s
a problem, I'll probably dis-
continue the reps. If I feel
he’s adjusting OK, Pll con-
tinue to give him an oppor-
tunity here and there.”

Vick is eligible to play
the next two preseason
games, but not in the regu-

lar season. NFL commis-
sioner Roger Goodell said
he would consider Vick for
full reinstatement by no lat-
er than Week 6 (Oct. 18-
19).

“He wants to get in. He’s
set this as a goal, as did
we,” Reid said. “You see
him out there conditioning
after practice. He’s condi-
tioning before practice.
He’s excited to get out
there. ’m sure he'll have a
couple butterflies with it
being a couple years since
he’s been in, but he’s excit-
ed to get back doing what
he does.”



Matt Slocum/AP Photo

IN this Sunday, Aug. 16, 2009, file photo, Philadelphia Eagles
quarterback Michael Vick throws during NFL football practice at
team's practice facility in Philadelphia. Vick will make his pre-
season debut for the Philadelphia Eagles on Thursday night,

Aug. 27, 2009.



David J. Phillip/AP Photo

SOUTH Africa's Caster Semenya celebrates as she crosses the finish line to win the gold medal in the final of the Women's 800m during the World Athletics Champi-
onships in Berlin on Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2009.

south Africans rally for gender controversy runner

Working toge
we can do mo



Themba Hadebe/AP Photo

SOUTH Africa's President Jacob Zuma, right, congratulates athlete Caster Semenya, left, during
their meeting at The Presidential Guest House in Pretoria, South Africa, Tuesday Aug. 25, 2009.
Semenya, who is undergoing gender testing after questions arose about her muscular build and
deep voice, returns home Tuesday to celebrations after her 800-meter win at the world champi-

onships.

Track & Field
JOHANNESBURG
Associated Press

LOOKING shy and awk-
ward under the glare of
media attention, South
African runner Caster
Semenya returned home
Tuesday amid questions
about her gender after her
800-meter win at the world
championships and South
Africa’s president vowed that
he would not permit her gold
medal to be taken away, no
matter what gender tests say.

The president of Athletics
South Africa, Leonard
Chuene, was also defiant and
said he had resigned from his
seat on the IAAF board to
protest the organization’s
treatment of Semenya. She
is not accused of trying to
cheat, but of perhaps
unknowingly having a med-
ical condition that blurs her
gender and gives her an
unfair advantage.

“We are not going to allow
Europeans to describe and
define our children,” he told
a news conference, which
Semenya attended although
she did not address
reporters.

Semenya’s victory in
Berlin came after world ath-
letics officials said they were
conducting gender tests after
questions arose about her
muscular build and deep
voice. South Africans have
embraced her achievement
despite the questions.

Semenya was greeted
warmly at the airport in
Johannesburg by several
thousand singing and danc-
ing fans. A homemade
poster held by a fan at the
airport declared Semenya
“our first lady of sport.”

The 18-year-old, dressed
in her team tracksuit with
her gold medal around her
neck, then was brought to a
stage set up in the parking

lot.

“Hi everybody,” Semenya
told the roaring crowd of
fans. Standing in a row with
the other South African
medalists, she gave a
thumbs-up sign and waved
to people in the crowd. The
smiling teenager also joined
in with the dancing for a
short while before being
embraced by her younger
siblings.

Semenya also was wel-
comed home by her parents
and Winnie Madikizela-
Mandela, the former wife of
the country’s first black pres-
ident Nelson Mandela.

“We are here to tell the
whole world how proud we
are of our little girl,” Madik-
izela-Mandela told the cheer-
ing crowd of fans. “They can
write what they like — we
are proud of her.”

Semenya’s mother Dorcus,
wearing a traditional head-
dress, stood beaming at her
daughter.

“She has lifted our hearts,”
she said. “We feel powerful
because of her.”

On Tuesday, Semenya
spoke very briefly at the
presidential guest house in
Pretoria after South African
President Jacob Zuma gave a
speech celebrating the ath-
letes’ return. Semenya strode
confidently to the podium
and described her last race
and those that led to it.

She said that before her
final 800-meter race, her
coach told her, “’last 200, kill
them. I did what he said, but
I took a lead in the last 400. I
celebrated the last 200. It
was great,” she said with a
smile as her teammates stood
up to applaud.

Zuma said South Africa’s
minister of sport and recre-
ation has written to the
IAAF to express “our disap-
pointment and the manner
in which the body has dealt
with the matter,” he said.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

MTT
IE
Wee

represent

NTT

THE WORLD CUP TEAM:
Pictured from left to right
are Keno Turnquest, Chris

Lewis (Bahamas Profession-

al Golf Association Presi-
dent) and Lemon Gorospe

FROM page 11

played for years on the pro
circuit.

Both golfers will be mak-
ing their third trip to the
World Cup Qualifying
event, and have previously
teammed up in 2007.

Gorospe qualified for the
tournament last year with
BPGA President Chris
Lewis.

Turnquest said his third
tournament qualification

looks to be the most effec-
tive thus far because of the
extended preparation time
the team has headed into
the event.

“It was a very good feel-
ing. I thnk we have a strong
team this year and for one of
the first times we have time
and an opportunity to prac-
tice and fully prepare our-
selves for competition.

“The preparation will be
vital for us .

“In the past we have nev-



er really had time to work
together which if crucial
because it is a team event.
We get to work on our
games together, develop a
team chemistry, work on
how we compliment each
other.

“One person can not win
and it obviously has to be a
team effort so with this time
we have to work together
and work on our weakness-
es I think it will make all the
differences in year’s past.”



AP Photo/Michael Sohn

ALLYSON FELIX of the United States of the United States, right, races to the line on her way winning
the gold medal in the final of the Women’s 200m ahead of Jamaica’s Veronica Campbell-Brown, cen-
ter, who took the silver medal and Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie of the Bahamas, bronze, during the
World Athletics Championships in Berlin on Friday, Aug. 21, 2009.

Athletes turn their attention
lo regular seasons in Europe

FROM page 11

The trio of medallists from Berlin will head
the field, Jamaica’s Shelly-Ann Fraser and
Kerron Stewart and bronze medallist Carmeli-
ta Jeter of the United States.

Eight of the nine women in the field

Bahamians to fight Belurus, Bulgaria
at the Judo World Championships

FROM page 11

beyond.” Dr. Ferguson said, "Lil’ Cynthia
Rahming at 48kg is small. She's also cute, but
she'll ruin your day if you line up in front of
her. I know one of these days she's going to
shock the world. At 15 she a coach's dream."

More importantly though is the systems-
based approach that Dr. Ferguson brings to
coaching. In a matter of month Coach Fergu-
son has help the Bahamas make a dent inter-
nationally in terms of their judo development.
66kg Judo Player and Bahamian World Team
member Wellington Mullings says, "Dr. Fer-
guson expects us to win and requires a high


















[>

level of professionalism. I'm not only learning
about judo, I'm developing as a man and an
adult at the same time. I really didn't know
exactly how important reading, studying and
deliberate practice were until now. I'm really
looking forward to competing at the Worlds."

The Bahamas Judo Federation has focused
first on developing winning attitude then
putting in place the necessary training ele-
ments to bring the confidence to win. This
philospophy runs through the program from
the most entry level to its advanced athletes.

Persons interested in finding out more about
the Bahamas Judo program may contact
Bahamas Judo at 364-6773.

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appeared in last weeks 100m final in Berlin
including Lauryn Williams of the United
States, Kelly-Ann Baptiste of Trinidad and
Tobago, and Aleen Bailey of Jamaica.

Verna Sailer of Germany will round out the
field as the lone member not to make the
Berlin as she was eliminated in the semifinals.

Sturrup, who finished seventh in the World
Championship final is ranked second in World
Athletics Tour standings behind Stewart, while
Feguson-McKenzie, who finished sixth, is the
seventh ranked century runner.

Leevan Sands will make his sixth appearance
on the Euro circuit in 2009 in the triple jump.

Despite a season’s best jump of 17.20m,
Sands finished fourth at the World Champi-
onships behind Nelson Evora of Portugal
(17.44m), Phillips Idowu of Great Britain
(17.32m) and Li Yanxi of China (17.27m).

Evora will defend his gold medal, heading
the field in Zurich.

Other top 10 finishers in Berlin are included
in the field, Arnie Giralt of Cuba (17.15m),
Jadel Gregario of Brazil (17.06m) and Igor
Spasovkhodskiy of Russia (17.02).

Sands is currently ranked third on the World
Athletics Tour Standings list with 40 points,
behind Girat and Idowu.

In the 400m, Chris Brown seeks redemp-
tion for a disappointing fifth place finish in
Berlin.

The 400m field in Zurich will nearly mirror
the final at the World Championships with
fourth place finisher Tabarie Henry of the U.S
Virgin Islands replaced by 400m hurdles gold
medallist, Kerron Clement of the United
States.

In Zurich Brown will be joined by World
Championship medallists Lashawn Merritt



CHRIS ‘FIREMAN’ BROWN in action in Berlin.

TENNIS



NDE Rss

(44.06s), Jeremy Wariner (44.60s) of the Unit-
ed States and Renny Quow of Trinidad and
Tobago (45.02s).

The remainder of the field includes David
Gillick of Ireland, Leslie Djhone of France,
and Micahel Bingham of Great Britain.

Brown is currently the top ranked quarter-
miler after the latest update of the World Ath-
letics Tour Standings with 60 points.

Following Zurich, The Golden League will
have just one meet remaining, its finale Sep-
tember 4th in Brussels, Belgium.

Four athletes remain in contention for the
IAAF’s Golden League $1 Million jackpot
including Stewart in the 100m, Sanya Richards
of the United States in the 400m, and Yelena
Isinbayeva of Russia in the Pole Vault.

Kenenisa Bekele of Ethiopia is the lone
male athlete eligible in the 3000m/3000m.
Athletes are required to win at all six meets in
the series to acquire at least a share of athlet-
ics’ biggest yearly payday, however if no ath-
lete manages to claim six event wins and the $1
Million, then anyone with five victories will
share half the original prize, which is $500,000.



S.Williams No. 2 to Safina in US Open seedings

Defending champion Serena Williams was
seeded No. 2 for the U.S. Open on Tuesday,
behind Dinara Safina, because the tournament
stuck to its policy of strictly following the rank-
ings.

Roger Federer was seeded No. | for the fifth
time at the year’s last Grand Slam tournament.
He is ranked No. 1 and has won the U.S. Open
five years in a row.

Safina is No. 1 in the WTA computer, which
calculates rankings based on performances across
tournaments over the preceding 52 weeks. The
younger sister of former men’s No. 1 Marat Safin
is still seeking her first Grand Slam title. She is 0-
3 in major finals, including a loss to Williams at
the Australian Open in January.

Williams has won three of the past four Grand
Slam singles championships and 11 overall, the
most among active women. She will be seeking
her fourth U.S. Open title.

Tournament director Jim Curley said the U'S.
Tennis Association did discuss the possibility of
moving Williams ahead of Safina.

“The U.S. Open has the prerogative of altering
its seedings; it’s something we have not availed
ourselves of in quite some time,” Curley said in a
telephone interview. “We certainly spoke about
it, but it never got to the point where we were
seriously intending to not follow the rankings.”

Since 1997, the USTA has matched its seedings
to the ATP and WTA rankings.

“The players do earn their rankings over a 12-
mointh period, both at Grand Slams and non-
Grand Slam events. At the end of the day,
whether you’re seeded No. 1 or seeded No. 2 at
the U.S. Open, it really doesn’t matter. You’re
either at the top of the draw or the bottom of the
draw, and the rest of the draw is determined by a
coin toss,” Curley said. “From a competition per-
spective, there really isn’t any difference being
seeded 1 or 2.”

The draw will be announced Thursday, and
the tournament begins Monday.

After the top two women, two-time U.S. Open
champion Venus Williams is No. 3, followed by
Beijing Olympics gold medalist Elena Demen-
tieva and 2008 U.S. Open runner-up Jelena
Jankovic.

Maria Sharapova is No. 29 — barely earning
one of the 32 seedings after rising from No. 49 in
the rankings last week. She won the 2006 US.
Open for one of her three major titles but missed
the tournament last year because of a right shoul-
der injury. The Russian had surgery in October
and a long absence from the tour dropped her
ranking.

Sharapova is among a dozen Grand Slam sin-
gles champions seeded at this year’s U.S. Open.
One major champion in the field but not seeded
is 2005 U.S. Open winner Kim Clijsters, who
recently came out of retirement and received a
wild card from the USTA.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE PAGE 11



sports

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009

Golfing duo earn right
to represent country

by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

A duo of Bahamian golf pros earned the right to
represent the country at a series of qualifying events
and continue their trek toward the sport’s World
Cup.

Keno Turnquest and Lemon Gorospe emerged
from a field of nine golfers at a qualifying event
hosted by Lyford Cay Golf Club.

Turnquest shot a combined score of 151to lead
the group, while Gorospe shot a 154.

The team will now have more than two months of
prepartion before they head to the Nations Cup -
Omega Mission Hills Qualifier.

The event, hosted September 21-25 at the Cara-
cas Country Club, with spots for the Omega Mission
Hills World Cup on the line.

Turnquest is a former Bahamas Professional
Golfers Association National Champion, and has a
resume which includes being a multi junior nation-
al champion, representing The Bahamas at previous
World Cup event, former member of the Hoer-
man Cup team and playing on the collegiate scene
for five years.

Goropse is also a former junior national cham-
pion, Hoerman Cup team member, former junior
college champion in North Carolina and he has

SEE page 10



u\

RO Cnn

TURAN

’'m lovin’ it

rarewel





| Bertin ...

hello Golden League

Athletes turn their attention to regular seasons in Europe

by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia. net

ollowing a memorable per-
formance at the 12th IAAF
Championships in Athletics
which fluctuated between a
pair of medal winning performances,
heartbreaking disqualifications and an
unfortunate off-the-field incident,
Bahamians athletes continue their regu-
lar seasons on the European circuits.
Several of the countries elite athletes
left the games in Berlin, Germany fol-
lowing the closing ceremonies and turned
immediately toward preparation for the
fifth leg of the IAAF Golden League
series of meets.
The Weltklasse Zurich scheduled for





DEBBIE FERGUSON-MCKENZIE crosses the
finish line to take the silver in the Women's
4x100m relay during the World Athletics
Championships in Berlin on Saturday, Aug.
22, 2009.

August 28th in Zurich, Switzerland will
feature a number of Bahamian athletes
led by medal winners Debbie Ferguson-



McKenzie and Chandra Sturrup.

Ferguson-McKenzie, the Bahamas’
lone individual medal winner at the
World Championships with her bronze
medal in the 200m, will look to continue
the prolific season she has enjoyed thus
far.

With her time of 22.41s, she finished
behind Allyson Felix (22.02s) and Veron-
ica Campell-Brown (22.35s).

Sturrup joined the 200m specialist
alongside Christine Amertil, and Sheni-
qua Ferguson to return the Women’s
400m relay team to prominence with a
silver medal performance.

Both Ferguson-McKenzie and Stur-
rup will contest the 100m in a star stud-
ded lineup in Zurich.

SEE page 10

Bahamians to fight Belurus, Bulgaria
at the Judo World Championships

Bahamian Judo athletes have spent
the past several months preparing for
the Judo world championships and the
hard work appears to be paying off.
Tomorrow Cynthia Rahming, age 15,
and Wellington Mullings, age 20, will
fight Belurus and Bulgaria at the
Senior Judo World Championships.
These are strong Judo countries with a
wrestling style of Judo, exactly what
the Bahamian team has been prepar-
ing against.

Earlier in the month, the Judo
World Cadet Championships in
Budapest Hungary Cynthia Rahming
(-44Kg) and Alex Martinborough (-
66Kg), both 15 years of age, lost in
first round matches respectively to the
Indian Champion and the Greek
Champion. However, the matches
were quite competitive with Cynthia
going almost the distance against the
Indian Champion and Alex getting off

CTI ML Cel gO TT eka

an impressive attacking sequence
against his opponent before being
pinned.

"Judo is a sport in which if you are
outmatched you can lose in seconds.
The fact that these kids lasted and
indeed dominated certain exchanges
against World class competitors is sig-
nificant.” Said Bahamas Judo Presi-
dent D'Arcy Rahming." At this point
we are looking for improvement and
we are pleased with what we see in
the Bahamas Judo Program,” said
Bahamas BOA President Wellington
Miller.

Judo matches are won by throwing
an opponent to his back or pinning
him to his back for 25 seconds. Judo is
rising in popularity in the Bahamas
and has began to gain the respect and
notice of the World body. "We are
working on several levels; delegates,
athletes and coaches,” says Rahming.

"We have made the commitment to
develop a world class program begin-
ning at the grass roots level. That is
why we are recruiting the best in the
world to help move us forward."

The athletes were prepared by 2004
Olympian Dr. Rhadi Ferguson, of
Bahamian descent. After retiring from
active competition in 2005 Dr. Rhadi
Ferguson coached a 2008 Olympian,
completed his dissertation, earned his
doctorate degree, coached various
Mixed Martial Arts Fighters and
gained worldwide respect and recog-
nition due to his constant onslaught
of marketing and creation of visibility
for the sport of judo worldwide
through social media networking.

"We are definitely looking forward
to the 2009 World Championships and

SEE page 10



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM








eee Es

Ministry
sees 50%
website
hit rise

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

THE MINISTRY of
Tourism saw a 50 per cent
spike on hits to its website,
Bahamas.com, during and
after the Miss Universe
Pageant, its director-general
said yesterday, with more
than $1 million invested to
garner just that kind of
response form the interna-
tional community.

Vernice Walkine told Tri-
bune Business that it was
much too early to gauge
exactly what government
spending on the pageant
totalled, but she suspected the
amount to be more than $1
million.

“Tam signing some cheques
now,” she said.

The Government has
scheduled a post-mortem
pageant meeting for mid-Sep-
tember to discuss aggregate
spending on the event.

Ms Walkine lauded the
efforts of the Government to
use Bahamian businesses to
cater to the Miss Universe
delegation, including trans-
port, float building and char-
ter flights.

“You're talking about more
than $1 million spent in the
Bahamas,” she said. “That
was a nice benefit of the host-
ing of this event, to re-circu-
late money within the econo-
m —-

She added that the Ministry
of Tourism was awaiting sta-
tistics on ticket sale numbers
and hotel performance in
order to truly evaluate the
cost-benefit from hosting the
event.

However, Ms Walkine said
that from a publicity perspec-
tive she was extremely
pleased with the quality of the
imagery shown in over 180
countries.

The Miss Universe Pageant
was expected to bring immea-
surable public exposure to the
Bahamas and, according to
Ms Walkine, it has.

“We can’t quantify that,”
she said. “The ladies were
exposed to as much of the
Bahamas as they could. The
media moved with them and
there are a lot of great sto-
ries.”

Bahamas.com received
almost 50 per cent more traf-
fic than normal last Sunday
as the beauty competition was
aired around the world,
according to Miss Walkine,
while Monday morning, just
before 9.30am, it had already
received more than 4,000 hits.
She said Bahamas.com
received almost 15,000 hits on
Sunday night.

“The reports we have got-
ten from people and the spike
on the on the website all point
to us having achieved the pri-

SEE page 4B

Sale Ends
September Sth

THE TRIBUNE

USINESS

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net



WEDNESDAY,

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Cable sees 5-5% Airline fee increases
premium drop

Mi Company expects $40m preference share issue to be
fully subscribed, amid wait for NIB and other investors

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Cable Bahamas has seen sub-
scriber numbers for its premi-
um cable TV services drop by a
net 3-5 per cent for the year-
to-date due to the recession,
Tribune Business was told yes-
terday, with the BISX-listed
company expecting its $40 mil-
lion private placement to be
“fully subscribed”.

Barry Williams, the compa-
ny’s vice-president of finance,
said that despite the slight
decline in subscriber numbers,
something that was not unex-

pected for its more expensive
premium services as consumers
reduce discretionary spending,
Cable Bahamas was “still man-
aging to stay a little ahead of
the game”.

Mr Williams said Cable
Bahamas was “just behind”
expectations on subscriber
churn for 2009-to-date,
although this was “not signifi-
cant”. While the company was
“about 1 per cent” down on
subscriber numbers for its basic
cable TV service, its Internet
client numbers were “a little
above plan year-to-date”.

As for premium cable TV

Bahamas 240% debt-to-
revenue ratio concerns

* International credit rating agency warns key
indicator among highest for similarly rated
countries, with government debt-to-GDP ratio to

hit 47% next year

* Debt-to-revenue indicator will strike 255% in
2010, says Moody's, as former finance minister
warns: ‘We’re not out of the woods yet’

* Recession ‘still playing itself out’ and
spreading beyond tourism, although decline

rate falling

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas has one of
the highest government debt
to revenue ratios, standing
at 240 per cent, among
nations that enjoy the same
strong sovereign credit rat-
ings, a leading Wall Street
agency has warned, some-
thing that was “potentially
troublesome” and “exacer-
bates fiscal spending rigidi-
ties”,

And data produced by
Moody’s, the international
credit rating agency, in a
credit opinion on the
Bahamas issued on August
11, 2009, showed that in the
short-term at least key fis-
cal ratios will get worse, not
better, with the central gov-
ernment debt-to-GDP ratio
forecast to hit almost 47 per
cent at the end of the 2010
fiscal year.

Moody’s statistics again
highlighted the heavy toll
the recession has exacted
from the Bahamas’ public
finances, with the central
government’s debt-to-rev-
enue ratio having increased
from 207.1 per cent in 2008
to 241.5 per cent for fiscal
2009. This ratio is forecast
to further rise to 255 per
cent in fiscal 2010.

“Government debt as a
percentage of revenues has
risen as a consequence of
the current crisis, and at 240
per cent for 2009 is one of
the highest in its peer
group,” Moody’s said of the
Bahamas.

“This condition exacer-
bates fiscal spending rigidi-
ties and is potentially trou-
blesome, given its exposure

SEE page 2B

rd
er
ONLY

services, Mr Williams said: “We
continue to see a challenge with
the premium services. We con-
tinue to see churn down there.
Year-to-date, we’re probably
down in the net 3-5 per cent
range.

“It’s not something we didn’t
expect or anticipate. We’ve
built into our expectations with
respect to this economic situa-
tion, and so far we’ve estimated
it pretty good in terms of what
has happened to subscriber
numbers and revenues. I think
we’ve done a really good job

SEE page 3B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

ROYAL FIDELITY

Leite An LOL

RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

will ‘wreak havoc’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government will “wreak havoc” on the Bahamian
private airline industry if it pushes ahead with the planned
implementation of new fees/regulations that could raise an
operator’s costs by $100,000 per annum, Tribune Busi-
ness was told yesterday, with the sector handed an “impos-
sible” four-day deadline to review a new draft of the
amendments.

Kevin Turnquest, president of the Bahamas Association
of Air Transport Operators, which represents the more-
than 20 private Bahamian airlines and charter companies,
told Tribune Business that the four days they had been giv-
en by the Civil Aviation Department (CAD) to review the
new draft regulations had expired yesterday,

Explaining that the document was 47 pages long, Mr
Turnquest said the Association and its individual members
had “simply not enough time to respond. The deadline to
reply was today. It’s impossible to provide them with an
informed position”.

The CAD and the Government have continued to place
new advertisements stating that the regulations, initially

SEE page 3B



Cable's gearing ratio outside
MUSA LCD TT

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Cable Bahamas current gearing ratio lies just outside the
limits being proposed by the new electronic communica-
tions sector regulator, which is proposing that it and the
Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC) - the two
operators with significant market power (SMP) - be confined
to a range between 10-30 per cent.

The Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority
(URCA), in its consultation on the cost of capital for
Bahamas-based electronic communications operators with
SMP power, said it had calculated Cable Bahamas’ gearing
ratio as being 30.1 per cent at year-end 2008, compared to
40.1 per cent the previous year.

SEE page 4B



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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





These bad habits will make you unsuccesstul

void these

characteris-

tics and stay

successful.
Here are things you should
avoid like a plague and or
Boiled Barracuda.

Rigidity — In sales you can't
succeed with rigid one-way
thinking, or an unwillingness
to adopt new ideas and new
ways of doing things. Every-
thing is changing fast. If you
are too rigid you will not be
able to adapt. Think of it this
way: Your future should nev-
er be behind you.

Unoriginal - Join the aver-
age parade and you will blend
in with all your competition.
Ever wonder why SunTee’s
building on Shirley Street is
painted with bright colours?
Well, that’s so you don’t run



Promotional
Marketing

Dae rea titcoy









into the building with your
car, silly. If we painted the
building a boring colour then
we have failed to differenti-
ate ourselves from our com-
petitors.

Also, remember you are a
walking billboard. You should
have the proper attire on,
with your company logo
affixed. Remember, image is
everything. Look sharp, pro-
fessional, fun etc, whichever
image fits your business.

Oh, and make sure you buy
from SunTee. Ha-ha.

Uncommitted — If you're
serious about selling, you

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ALGOGENETIC ADVISORY LTD.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 ALGOGENETIC AD-
VISORY LTD. is in dissolution.

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 19th
August 2009. David Thain of Amer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.,
Building 2 Caves Village, P.O. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of
ALGOGENETIC ADVISORY LTD. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their address and
particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 19th
September 2009.



BAHAMAS etf

LIMITED

IT MANAGER

Bahamas Supermarkets Limited operates a leading
supermarket chain in The Bahamas. As a market leader,
the Company prides itself on delivering premier service
through its City Market supermarkets, having a strong
commitment to its customers, associates and community.

An opportunity for an I. T. Manager exists in New
Providence to join this market leader.

Reporting to the CEO, this position involves managing a
staff of tech support personnel who are responsible for the
daily operations of customer service, retail and office
support and network/systems management. Also, the
candidate is responsible for resource planning and
assignments within the group to ensure projects are
delivered on time with a high degree of quality. The ideal
candidate should have 2-3 years of solid measurable
experience in IT Project Management and an excellent
communicator, both oral and written.

QUALIFICATIONS/REQUIREMENTS:

* Prior experience in the role of I. T. Team Leader or
Manager

* Familiarity with change management and the major
aspects of IT governance.

* Excellent analytical ability with strong problem solving
skills

* Works closely with executive management to ensure that
IT projects are aligned with the business and company’s
vision.

* Strong background in managing WAN’s and LAN’s.

* Experience in supporting Microsoft Active Directory
Domains; MCSE certified.

* Excellent communication, negotiation, and organization
skills.

* Microsoft SQL Server and Project Management skills a
definite asset

* Follows the project lifecycle methodology on assigned
projects and tasks

* Defines the Functionality, Usability, Reliability,
Performance, and Supportability requirements of critical
software components

* Analyses, designs, constructs and unit tests of custom
solutions

* Directs the preparation of functional and technical
software specifications that reflect an in-depth
understanding of the business and end-user requirements
while also considering IT standards and technical direction
* Provides functional support for application related issues

Salary and benefits will be commensurate with
experience and qualifications.

If you have what it takes to succeed in this challenging
role, forward your resume and cover letter to:

Human Resources Director
Bahamas Supermarkets Limited
East-West Highway « P. O. Box N 3738 « Nassau, Bahamas
Or e-mail to: humanresources@bahamassupermarkets.com
No telephone inquiries please
Only qualified applicants will be contacted

( p WE } (a / Ket :

AINAUG2409



have to be serious and
focused on a steady diet of
self-improvement. Salespeo-
ple have to increase their
knowledge of their customers,
their client’s products and
market knowledge. I know
this is hard, day in and day
out. Just think what will hap-
pen if you don’t do anything.
That’s right, nothing. That
should motivate you.

Unemotional — Ralph Wal-
do Emerson once said: “Noth-
ing great was ever achieved
without enthusiasm.” Spread
your enthusiasm like a
WIRUS (Bahamian for
virus). You have to be excited
about your work and your
products if you expect your
sales prospects and customers
to get excited about these
things. Make sure your cus-
tomers are catching DA
WIRUS.

Unconvincing — You'll
sound unconvincing if you
don't absolutely love the
products you're selling. If you
lack passion and enthusiasm
for your products and ser-
vices, don't expect a long line
of prospects. There are many
ways to find passion in any

product. No passion, no sales.
If you can’t find any passion,
either change products or
careers.

Unhappy — Ever notice
how unhappy people are?
How grumpy they are? When
you're selling, no matter what
is going on in your world,
leave that emotion behind
you when talking with a
client. You can't remove the
pain that you suffer, but you
can remove your pained
expression. Try this before
your next chat with a client.
Say to yourself 10 times real-
ly fast with ENTUSIASM
(Bahamian for enthusiasm):
“Tm a great salesperson”, and
see if you don’t start laugh-
ing yourself to death. Try it
and let me know.

Unmotivated — If you walk
around like a conch on the
ocean floor, that’s the image
you will reflect, (I reach,
when I reach — like the song
says). If you walk around with
a little pep in your step, this
shows you are alive, motivat-
ed and on a mission.

Our clients today want
things yesterday, and there
are times when we turn-

around orders in less than 24
hours. I know there are days
when you feel like something
the cat dragged in, but you
have to slap yourself in the
face and wake up, because the
show stops for no man or
woman.

Unwelcome — So many
salespeople wear out their
welcome. They stay too long
and talk too much. BLAH,
BLAH, BLAH, BLAH. Get
the message? Say less, listen
more, and as soon as you've
achieved your sales call objec-
tives, end the call. Remem-
ber, take the cotton out of
your ears and put it in your
mouth.

You'll accomplish more
and your customer will appre-
ciate you more. If your cus-
tomer has to end the call for
you, you've overstayed your
welcome.

Uninformed — Educate
yourself. Know what’s hap-
pening locally and globally.
At least have little tid bits of
what’s going on. I’m not the
best conversationalist, but I
can hold my own. Today,
technology makes this easy to
do. Also, be informed about

your client. At least go on
their website and read a bit
about them.

To achieve unlimited sell-
ing success you must throw
these out.

All of these marketing
strategies are certain to keep
your business on top during
these challenging economic
times. Have a productive and
profitable week! Remember,
DEM WHO IS MARKET
MUSSE GONE MAKE IT -
“THOSE WHO MARKET
WILL MAKE IT.”

NB: Scott Farrington is
president of SunTee
EmbroidMe, a promotional
and marketing company spe-
cialising in uniforms, embroi-
dery, silkscreen printing and
promotional products.

Established over 27 years,
ago SunTee EmbroidMe has
assisted Bahamian business-
es from various industries in
marketing themselves. Read-
ers can contact Mr Farring-
ton at SunTee EmbroidMe on
East Shirley Street or, by e-
mail at scott@sun-tee.com or
by telephone at 242-393-3104.

Bahamas 240% debt-to-revenue ratio concerns

FROM page 1B

to natural disasters and
external shocks. Suscepti-
bility to event risks that
could suddenly lead to a
multiple-notch adjustment
in the country’s ratings,
however, is judged to be low
relative to the universe of
rated countries.”

That gives the Govern-
ment some breathing space,
as it indicates the A3 and
A1 ratings on its foreign cur-
rency and domestic bonds,
and the Aal rating on its
foreign current debt, are not
in jeopardy of being down-
graded - at least in the short-
term.

However, the Moody’s
data, which is usually drawn

—
AP ed

from the Government’s own
Statistics and those supplied
by the likes of the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund
(IMF), again illustrates the



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REGISTERED
PHYSICIAN

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Kindly submit application to:

P.O. Box CR-55050
Nassau, Bahamas

Via email to: a_1_phyneeded@live.com



depth of the challenge facing
the Ingraham administration
when it comes to getting the
public finances back into
line over the short to medi-
um-term.

To date, the Governmen-
t’s strategy appears to be
one pinning its hopes on a
US economic recovery by
the 2010 first half, prior to
the 2010-2011 Budget com-
munication, which in turn
should feed into the
Bahamas some six months
later and avoid the need for
any drastic spending and civ-
il Service cuts.

Moody’s, perhaps opti-
mistically, projected that this
year’s 4.5 per cent contrac-
tion of the Bahamian econ-
omy would be followed by a
modest 0.5 per cent growth
in 2010.

However, the external
debt to current account
receipts ratio was projected
to increase from 24.9 per
cent in 2009 to 26.7 per cent
next year, with the
Bahamas’ external vulnera-
bility indicator rising from
15.8 in 2008 to 18.7 this year,
then 19.2 in 2010.

Reducing the fiscal deficit
and government debt will be
key factors if the Govern-
ment is to secure an
improved credit rating,
Moody’s warned, adding:
“The ratings are limited by a
narrow economic base,
moderate government finan-
cial strength - constrained
by fiscal inflexibility and
comparatively high govern-
ment debt ratios - and vul-
nerability to external
shocks.....

“Continued and perma-
nent deterioration of the
Government’s debt metrics
may result in a downgrade.”
For the first 11 months of
the 2008-2009 fiscal year, the
Government’s deficit rose
by 74 per cent to $219 mil-
lion, as revenues fell 6.1 per

PRICEVATERHOUSE(COPERS @

POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR
SENIOR ASSOCIATES

PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancies for qualified accountants whose
qualifications make them eligible for membership in the Bahamas Institute of
Chartered Accountants. Prospective candidates should have at least three (3)

recent years
computer literate.

of public accounting and auditing experience and _ be

The positions offer challenging work in the financial services industry and
other areas of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which recognizes
different levels of experience and skill, is designed to reward high performance.
In addition, the Firm provides excellent medical insurance and provident fund

benefits.

Please submit an application letter with your Curriculum Vitae to:

Human Resources Partner

PricewaterhouseCoopers

P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas



cent and spending increased
by 4.5 per cent.

Still, Moody’s praised the
Bahamas for its long tradi-
tion of political stability, rel-
atively low external debt,
high standard of living and
strong tourism and financial
services industries.

Moody’s assessment came
as a former finance minister
told Tribune Business that
the Bahamian economy was
“not out of the woods yet”
despite promising rumblings
coming from the US, as the
recession was still “gradual-
ly eating its way through the
economy”.

James Smith, minister of
state for finance in the for-
mer Christie administration,
said that while the rate of
decline in employment and
the overall economy had
slowed, the recession was
now impacting industries
outside the tourism indus-
try, and the Bahamas as a
result was “still continuing
on a downward spiral”.

“We still have to work this
thing out,” Mr Smith told
Tribune Business. “We are
seeing things produced by
the recession, but there are
structural deficiencies in the
economy that are not pick-
ing up the slack.....

“This thing is still playing
itself out, and forcing the
policymakers to accelerate
programmes they may have
put on the back burner for
infrastructure, new schools.”

He added: “We need to
see what happens beyond
our slow tourism season. If
we have a winter season in
2009 that is better than in
2008, it may be an indica-
tion that things will not get
much worse.”

The global economy,
chiefly the US, determined
the rate of economic growth
enjoyed by the Bahamas,
Mr Smith said, adding that
this nation was “not ina
position to provide an
appropriate stimulus”
because it did not have a
hard currency.

He explained that mone-
tary policy in the Bahamian
context was “almost inef-
fective” in a recession, as the
Government and Central
Bank could not print money
because there was no way
to mop up the excess after-
wards.

“When it does turn-
around, if we do not have a
strong economy, we will
have one that is much more
aware of itself,” Mr Smith
said.

“The people left are work-
ing hard at it, so I could see
some productivity gains,
which is always good for an
economy.”

Consumer demand and
confidence, though, were
continuing to be hit by the
continued slippage in the
tourism figures, coupled
with the short-term and per-
manent closure of various
hotel properties.

This was both raising
unemployment and damp-
ening consumer spending.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009, PAGE 3B



Airline fee increases
will ‘wreak havoc’

FROM page 1B

drawn up in 2005, will come
into effect on September 10,
2009, despite the industry’s con-
tinued objections.

“It'll just wreak havoc on the
industry,” Mr Turnquest told
Tribune Business, when asked
what impact implementation of
the regulations would have.

“We’ve not been able to
determine the total impact yet,
but from a preliminary per-
spective one operator has said
they would have to increase
fees by between 40-60 per cent,
and incur $100,000 in increased
annual operating costs. “It'll
just be devastating for the
industry. You can’t pass on
those increases to the con-
sumer. The whole thing is going
to be a disaster - a complete
disaster. Air transport in the
Bahamas is so essential to get-
ting around. How else are you
going to get around from places
like Rum Cay?”

Mr Turnquest said that from
a preliminary look at the new
draft regulations sent to the
Association last week, it
appeared that the CAD and the
Government had omitted the
obligation to justify the fee
increases/regulations through
providing the industry with the
supporting financial data.

“They’re hellbent on imple-
menting the thing, and it’s going
to lead to obvious difficulties,”
Mr Turnquest told Tribune
Business. “The reason it was
not implemented before was
because of difficulties with the
protocol and the process. This is
much too serious to rush to
judgment on. I think that if we
wait, calmer heads will prevail,
we can reconsider things, and it
will be much better for the
industry in the long-run.”

The Association, in its
August 24, 2009, response to
Patrick Rolle, the CAD’s direc-
tor, also urged the Government
to “reconsider their rush to
judgment in this matter. It has
lain dormant for four years and
there is no reason now to allow
expediency to supersede good
judgment”.

The Association added that it
resented the Government/CAD
giving the impression that the
new regulations were “a done
deal” via their advertising, and
warned that failing to follow
the implementation procedures
could see it mount a legal chal-
lenge. “The CAD/Ministry of
Tourism must be aware that the
failure to follow the procedure
governing the regulations could
result in the entire legitimacy
of the exercise being called into
question, the natural result of
which will be a call by the oper-
ators for judicial review,” the
Association warned, calling for
the proposed regulations to be
scrapped and a new National
Plan for Aviation formed.

It added: “We are not
opposed to fee increases, cog-
nisant that from time to time
the costs of doing business will
rise. [The Association] is not
opposed to modest fee increas-
es in landing and licensing fees
in principal, in accordance with
the provisions of the regulation.

” However the increases and
the new categories of fees are
not in keeping with the spirit
and intent of the regulations,
which make provision for grad-
ual increases. The method and
manner of the imposition of this
regulation is unacceptable.

“Imposing draconian taxes

on the local operators to pay
for development of Family
Island airports is equivalent to
making the motoring public
assume the costs for the new
roadworks in Nassau.

“The regulation seeks to
make local charter companies
and airlines liable for the devel-
opment of Family Island air-
ports, while exempting foreign
airlines and Bahamasair, there-
by providing them with an
unfair advantage in direct con-
travention of Government pol-
icy and the provisions of the
International Civil Aviation
Organisation.”

The Association said that the
Government appeared “not to
have a development plan” for
the Family Island airports the
fee increases were supposed to
finance, and said the rises were
inconsistent with the policy of
reducing airlift and air fare
costs in the Bahamas, as stated
by Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace, minister of tourism.

The Bahamian airline opera-
tors also pointed out that the
increases contrasted sharply
with the Ministry of Tourism’s
lobbying of the UK govern-
ment and Parliament to pre-
vent it increasing ticket tax
imposed on flights to this nation
from the UK.

“The fee increase is incon-
sistent with the Government’s
objective to stimulate travel to
the Bahamas, as evidenced by
the recent decision to provide
incentives to the cruise ships
and to reduce the passenger
tax,” the Association wrote.

“In addition, in some
instances such as Marsh Har-
bour and others, the primary
users are the foreign operators.
These principal users must be
consulted in this exercise and,
in accordance with the reason-
ing of this exercise, if necessary,
must therefore bear propor-
tional costs. The Government
cannot reasonably expect the
local operators to bear the costs
if the primary beneficiaries are
the foreign airlines and
Bahamasair.”

Among the carriers that
needed to be involved, the
Association said, were the likes
of Gulfstream and American
Eagle, the primary user of Fam-

BKG/410.03

ily Island airports. It also urged
the Government to ‘level the
playing field’ between them-
selves and Bahamasair, requir-
ing the national flag carrier to
pay the same fees as them-
selves, with the private airlines
also granted similar import
duties exemptions for aircraft
parts. “Bahamasair cannot con-
tinue being given subsidies to
undermine the air charter and
commuter industry through its
predatory hiring and operating
practices,” the Association
argued. “Bahamasair does not
train pilots. They wait until
charter or commuter operators
recruit and invest thousands of
dollars in the training of a pilot
and, when they reach a certain
proficiency level with the req-
uisite number of hours,
Bahamasair goes on the prowl.

“Bahamasair does not create
or stimulate activity on any
route. They wait until the com-
muter such as Sky, Western or
Southern Air invests in new
equipment and promotion of a
particular destination, then they
come calling with reduced sub-
sidised ticket prices to under-
mine the operator and lure
away customers.”

The Government was also
urged to tackle the problem of
unlicensed hackers, “who
appear to be operating with
impunity in the Bahamas”, unli-
censed and unregulated.

With the CAD not having
the powers under law to
enforce sanctions against
alleged hackers, the Associa-
tion said: “The neglect of Gov-
ernment to take corrective
measures and to give the CAD
authority to address this issue is
long overdue. “The charter
companies and airlines cannot
be expected to continue to pay
fees and adhere to regulations
with a rogue group of local and
Foreign Operators skimming
the profits and compromising
the integrity of the system.”

The Association added that
the Government needed to
implement a Flight Information
Region (FIR) for the Bahamas,
something that would end the
payment of overflight fees to
the US and generate $30-$50
million in per annum revenues
for the Government.

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

Sealed tenders for B$81,100,000.00 of 91-Day Treasury Bills
will be received by the Banking Manager, The Central Bank
of The Bahamas, Frederick Street, Nassau up to 3:00 p.m on
Tuesday, August 28, 2009. Successful tenderers, who will be

advised should take up their bills against payment on Thursday,
September 1, 2009. These bills will be in minimum multiples

of B$100.00.

Tenders are to be on special forms obtainable from the Central
Bank of The Bahamas or Commercial Banks.

Tenders must state the net price percent Gn multiples of one
cent) and should be marked “Tender”. The Central Bank of the
Bahamas reserves the night to reject any or all tenders.



PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS @

POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR
AUDIT MANAGER

PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancy in its Nassau and Freeport Offices for
Audit Managers whose qualifications make the individuals eligible for membership in
the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants. Prospective candidates should
be employed im public accounting and have at
experience at the Assistant Manager/Manager level in managing a portfolio of
diverse client engagements. Candidates are also required to have a high level of

computer literacy.

least

one (1) year of

The position offers challenging work in the financial services industry and
other areas of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which recognizes different

levels

of experience and = skill, is

designed to reward high performance.

In addition, the Firm provides excellent medical insurance and provident fund benefits.

Please submit an application letter with your Curriculum Vitae to:

P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas

Human Resources Partner
“Audit Manager Position
PricewaterhouseCoopers



FROM page 1B

to mitigate that with expense
management. On the revenue
side, we’re basically in line with
what we expected.”

Meanwhile, Mr Williams told
Tribune Business that Cable
Bahamas’ $40 million prefer-
ence share issue, which is now
due to close at end-August
2009, was in good shape.

“It’s going to be closing on
the 31st, next Monday,” he
added. “Because of some cir-
cumstances that some of the
particular investors were hav-
ing, our advisers said it was pru-
dent to extend it for one month.

“It’s gone very well, and it’s
going to be pretty much fully
subscribed.”

The proceeds from the $40
million private placement are
being used to finance the $80
million buyout of Columbus
Communications, Cable
Bahamas’ largest shareholder,
which holds a 30 per cent stake
in the company.

The offering was extended
to give institutional investors
and high-net worths extra time
to decide on whether to partic-
ipate, given that key executives
and decisionmakers were off-
island on vacation during July.

In particular, Tribune Busi-
ness understands through
informed sources that the key
investor for whom the exten-
sion was targeted at is the
National Insurance Board
(NIB) and, by extension, the
Government, which will have
the ultimate say on whether
NIB participates. As the sec-
ond-largest shareholder in
Cable Bahamas behind Colum-
bus, its participation seems like-

Cable premium

ly. Elsewhere, Mr Williams said
that during the 2009 first half
Cable Bahamas had been
“holding expenses back as
much as possible” through a
variety of initiatives.

Its ‘One Tech’ initiative,
which in 2008 had seen a num-
ber of company technicians
trained to perform both cable
TV and Internet work, had
“saved us a lot on the human
resources side” by reducing the
number of personnel Cable
Bahamas needed to send to
solve client problems from one
to two. The electricity manage-
ment system at the company’s
headquarters had reduced ener-
gy costs by turning lights off at
a certain time, and limiting the
air conditioning to certain tem-
peratures at certain hours,
while at weekends Cable
Bahamas was totally closing its
customer service building after
hours - operating solely from
its administration building.

Cable Bahamas was repay-
ing an average $2 million in
debt per quarter, or $8 million
per year, Mr Williams told Tri-
bune Business, with the com-
pany set to launch a ‘Back to
School’ special offering new
subscribers a discount on cer-
tain services.

“Typically, when we get a
new Internet subscriber, if they
sign up for a minimum of a
year, they will be eligible to get
about three months’ of services
free,” Mr Williams explained.

“The marketing guys are
putting together the finishing
touches on a campaign with
respect to that. Obviously,

they’ll be working on a Christ-
mas campaign to repackage
products, provide some dis-
counts, provide some incentives
to make it a little bit more
attractive for customers and
give them some relief in these
times.”

And the Cable Bahamas
executive added: “T think we’ ll
end up with a good year over-
all. We’re anticipating a good
fourth quarter. The fourth
quarter for us has traditionally
been the best quarter of the
year. “Last year, in 2008, when
we started to feel the pinch of
the economic situation and the
hotels started laying-off, we still
ended up with a good fourth
quarter. My view is that our
Bahamian society, when it
comes to Thanksgiving and
Christmas, irrespective of the
economic situation, Bahamians
somehow find a way to have a
great time. That helps us anda
lot of retailers as well.”

Cable Bahamas employs
some 400 persons, including
contract and temporary per-
sonnel, and Mr Williams said
the company had never con-
templated any lay-offs as a
result of the economy.

“All things considered, I
think we’ve done pretty good,”
he said. “It’s a tough environ-
ment out there, but one of the
things we pride ourselves on,
unlike other companies, is that
we've not gone the way of
reducing staff. We’ve main-
tained it, and not by accident.
That will be a very, very last
resort for us, and by really tight-
ly managing expenses we’ve
been able to compensate for
some of the shortfall we’ve
experienced in revenue.”

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wAT
THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD «< - “

VACANCY NOTICE

we

AGE

\pplicati wis ate invited From suuitakyy cptaalifie dl Pre recnes he fill the: prositicen « CASE MANAGEMENT
SENIOR ASSISTANT MANAGER vothin che Qocupatanal Healeh & Satery Unit of che Marina

Tnsumince Board (S18),

JOB SUMMARY

This officer wall be naponsibble for coondinating appropriate eos efficient bealth cate serviecs with best

on] enralsling the chain Ait [es peach thc highest possible level é aif pluysical aid Metal

henchonings and oversees the general supervision ot the medical billing process.

» Initiate and factitate communication berween the healthcare prowider and the clasmant bor proactive

intervention in the care of the chamant.

aness The min sical ane meric 4] sramas cet the crrically mjured clanmannr during he ref? tlizarion of

while convalescing at home.

. Coordinate an acien plin with bealtheare provider, employer and claimane, for the clairnan’s senairn

to work

. Enforce cott-reducien strategies and recommend options in the manapenvent of claimant's care,

\ppr WE Certain services within a specitiod time period,

. Prepare requests for specific medical services to NIE Modieal Officer.

. Parapate in unlaapon review process,

8. Provide direction, conteel and leadership to staff of responsibiliry while monitoting and assessing
Rerrormame, conduct, artenmienece and orher related marrers

. Sunes systems and procedures eo facilitate achieving objectives in areas of responsibility,

. Perform any orher related duties as may be assigned

T

. Pretenred candatate should havea Bachelor's Depres in Business Ackminsctration or Managemen.

. Should have proven oral and weitten commnunicacion skills and abiliry,

1. Knowledgeable in the lew (Benefits & Assistance Regulations) pertaining to Indusmal Accidents;

+, Know ledirealble in health insurance and medical coe ng! billings Practices

. Effective, interpersonal, communication and customer service skilb;

Register ed Pr fessional Nurse with well rounded CAPCiC nS In merical Case Manapenenie including,

bat acet luted te rehabilitanon, emergency, crincal care and health care admanistration;

\draned certification in case managerncnt and tclaced disciplines

APPLICATION

lorerested persons (Teal apply by sa beruicciiing Ac mpl tel application form, along with che HECess Ar pre wat
of qualificanons on or before Friday, September 4, 20809, to the

Deputy Director Vice President
Human Resources and Training
The National Insurance Board
Clifford Darling Complex
PO). Box Dy= 75018
Niassa, Palins.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Cable's gearing ratio outside proposed 30% regulatory limit

FROM page 1B

Both ratios would be out-
side the new limits proposed
by URCA. The regulator cal-
culated Cable Bahamas’ gear-
ing ratio using its audited

financial statements for both
years, which showed a net
debt of $46.861 million along-
side a combined net debt and
total equity of $155.546 mil-
lion in 2008.

For 2007, the figure used in
the calculation were net debt












































NOTICE
MANTICORE INVESTMENT LTD.

NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MANTICORE INVESTMENT LTD. is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
25th August, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro
Associated Lid., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 26" day of August, A. D. 2009



Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE

GLIDER MANAGEMENT LTD.
IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the Inter-
national Business Companies Act 2000 GLIDER MANAGEMENT
LTD. is in dissolution.

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 24th
August 2009. David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.,
Building 2 Caves Village, PRO. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of
GLIDER MANAGEMENT LTD. All persons having claims against
the above-named company are required to send their address and
particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 24th
September 2009.

” :

ng
soo he
1 iy sa

NOTICE
NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) SAO MATEUS LTD. is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 7 July, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro

Associated Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 26" day of August, A. D. 2009



Verduro Associated Lid.
Liquidator

ROYAL FIDELITY

Paoney at Wowk

of $59.177 million and net
debt plus total equity of
$147.471 million. In contrast,
BTC’s 2007 gearing ratio was
0 per cent, since its $135.351
million cash pile exceeded the
$71.536 million in debt on its
books.

Barry Williams, Cable
Bahamas’ vice-president of
finance, told Tribune Busi-
ness he was unable to com-
ment on the regulator’s gear-
ing calculations because he
had yet to read the consulta-
tion document.

He pointed out, though,
that there were various ways
to calculate gearing ratios.

The gearing ratio measures
a company’s financial lever-
age, comparing its level of
debt to shareholder equity,
and showing the extent to
which its operations are fund-
ed by both forms of capital.

URCA, in its consultation
document, said: “BTC’s cur-
rent capital structure may in
large part be explained by the
fact it is currently government
owned.

“However, gearing, like all
other elements of the cost of

capital, must be forward-look-
ing. It is conceivable that, fol-
lowing privatisation, the busi-
ness may become funded
through a greater level of debt
than is currently the case.
URCA has taken this possi-
bility into account when
determining an appropriate
level of gearing for the SMP
operators. Cable’s gearing
over the past two years has
averaged approximately 35
per cent.”

URCA acknowledged that
communications regulators
across the globe had adopted
different approaches towards
gearing, typically imposing
ratios of between 10-50 per
cent. Some regulators, the
Bahamian supervisory body
said, have not seen a need to
regulate this area, on the basis
that companies seeking to
maximise profits took on an
optimal level of borrowing to
minimise capital costs.

Others, though, had adopt-
ed a more interventionist
approach because they felt
companies were prone to bor-
row too much, increasing their
financing and other costs and,

potentially, placing them at
risk of default.

URCA said it was minded
to take the latter option, and
added: “The notion that cor-
porate debt policies are not
solely determined by the tax
advantages of debt is sup-
ported by the observation that
Cable Bahamas has a reason-
ably substantial level of debt.
This suggests to URCA that it
would not be sensible to apply
a notional gearing of 0 per
cent.”

The Bahamian regulator
based its approach on a sam-
ple of 16 global electronic
communications companies
who had a Standard & Poor’s
or Fitch rating of A- or better,
and for whom gearing data
was available.

Almost 70 per cent of these
firms operated with a gearing
ratio of between 0-30 per
cent, something that was
“comfortably within the gear-
ing range allowed by other
regulators recently, 0-50 per
cent”.

As a result, the regulator
concluded: “URCA consid-
ers it unlikely that a gearing

ratio of 0 per cent is optimal
for Bahamian companies.
Therefore, URCA proposes
to apply a gearing range of 10
per cent to 30 per cent, with a
midpoint value of 20 per
cent.”

The Bahamian regulator
said that in assessing the cost
of capital for SMP operators,
they had also taken into
account this nation’s relative-
ly small economy and the
impact its exchange control
regime had on potential
investor decisions.

“The small economy fea-
tures of the Bahamas, as well
as minor Central Bank restric-
tions on the flow of capital in
and out of the country, means
that equity and debt investors
in Bahamian companies may
be more exposed to ‘country
risk’ than investors in larger,
more developed economies,”
URCA said.

“As such, both equity and
debt investors in Bahamian
companies may require a
country risk premium, over
and above the standard mini-
mum risk premium, for the
additional risk they bear.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANTHON GUILLAUME of LEWIS
YARD , EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is
applying tothe Minister responsible tor Nationality and Citizenship,
for registrationmaturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
26th day of AUGUST, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CAROL CUNNINGHAM of
#7 EASTERN CLOSE, P.O. Box FH-14364, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26" day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WISLINE BENJAMIN of
KEMP ROAD, P.O. Box SS-5139, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 26" day of August, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MUELMY MAZARD
of HAMPTON STREET, P.O. Box N-556, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26'" day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

KJ

CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERYICES

Zaa

Clee Fes ST A LL

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 25 AUGUST 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,577.62| CHG 0.06] %CHG 0.00 | YTD -134.74 | YTD % -7.87
FINDEX: CLOSE 790.64 | YTD -5.30% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Securit y
Abaco Markets
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Benchmark
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Fidelity Bank
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Colina Holdings
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Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
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Finco
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Focol (S}
Focol Class B Preference
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ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

10.39
10.00

10.39
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Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol. EPS $

10.39
10.00 zi R 55.6

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13

1000.00
1000.00

1000.00 FBB15

Last Sale

Change Daily Vol. Interest
100.00 0.00 7%

100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
100.00 0.00 7%

Prime + 1.75%

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013

100.00 0.00 29 May 2015

Ministry sees 50%

website hit rise
FROM page 1B

mary objective,” said Ms Walkine. “It was important that in the
final telecast we were able to communicate a multiplicity of
islands and that the island names were put out there. When you
look at the size of the audience it was important that each
islands looks and feels different.”

Ms Walkine said many of the hits to Bahamas.com on Sun-
day originated in European countries such as the UK, Germany
and France, while Monday’s hits came from many Latin Amer-
ican countries, especially Venezuela - home of the outgoing and
incoming Miss Universe.

The Government recently secured airlift from Germany and
France, and has increased the number of flights from the Unit-
ed Kingdom into the Lynden Pindling International Airport.

Ms Walkine said the pageant seemed to have intrigued view-
ers and enticed them to research the Bahamas islands on the
Ministry’s website.

Share your news

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from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRANCLIN JOSEPH
of PODOLEO STREET, P.O. Box N-1482, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 19" day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KEVIN KIRAN SURUJLAL
of PARADISE ISLAN DRIVE, P.O. Box N-9844,
PARADISE ISLAND, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 19" day of August, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O.
Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PROGRESSIVE SERVICE ORIENTED COMPANY
LOOKING FORA FEW GOOD PEOPLE.

PARTS AND SERVICE COORDINATOR

Extensive background in managing an OEM
Heavy Truck Service/ Parts facility a must.
Background in Parts and Service management and
coordination required on a daily basis. Must be able
to effectively administer all facits of business.
Minimum of 10 years experience preferred. Good
people skills a must. Must have prior experience

in parts order and supervising employees. Computer
skills required on a daily basis. Must be self
motivated and work with little or no supervision.

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price

Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.00

Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00

RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00 : 0.000
0.55 z 0.000

Weekly Vol.
0.000
0.480
0.000

ABDAB

RND Holdings 0.45 0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Fund Name NAV Last 12 Months

CFAL Bond Fund 1.4005

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.9047

CFAL Money Market Fund 1.4842

Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.1143

Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.0484

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

Competitive Wages

Div $

We thank all applicants however, only candidates to
be interviewed will be contacted.

101.6693
96.7398
1.0000
9.3399
1.0622
1.0243
1.0585 t 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina
ri

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Please hand deliver your resumes and references to

Bahamas Mack Truck Sales Ltd.
Rock Crusher Road
Nassau, Bahamas

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wWk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

nted price for daily volume
om day to day

Weekly Vol. -
EPS $-Acom|

ding volume of the prior week

y's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnin: gs
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 6/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

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PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
TASTE





The Tribune








THIS bartender said

many locals compare # at
their homemade : - - a
‘Switcha’ to the drink *
their grandmothers f 4
used to make. i



é r f=
By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net
FOR most Bahamians, one of the first signs that you’re
about to enjoy a great meal is when the aroma of the dish 4
catches your attention long before you enter the kitchen. : a
This is certainly true for the recently opened Noni Way . r*
Café. Ft
The gourmet Bahamian restau- other flavourings. oe
rant located in the Coral Harbour The restaurant also offers steak, .
Plaza, features a fine selection of lobster, grouper, garlic mashed
traditional Bahamian dishes along potatoes, sautéed spinach, sautéed
with several popular European style © mushrooms, all of which are pre- 4
entrées. pared with the health of his cus- 2
Stephen St Clair Serrette, the tomers in mind. hs =
owner, explained that beside the Diners can also try the Ortland H *, we
restaurant’s exquisite décor, top Bodie Surf and Turf named after ie
quality waiters, and comfortable the radio talk show who frequents
atmosphere, providing healthy food the establishment at least twice a r ‘
was the inspiration for creating the week.
establishment. There is also the Jay Joh Cracked
“This is a restaurant that empha- Conch named after one of the
sises health, because we cook with restaurant’s chefs who created a
no MSG, we use the extra virgin reputation for top notch cooking
olive oil, coconuts, and our secret during his former emplyment at
ingredient the Noni Juice.” Castaways restaurant some years
Mr St Clair Serrette said the ago.
restaurant features a one of a kind Tribune Taste recently stopped in * "
Noni vinaigrette and a Noni Coolie to sample a few of the delectable \ =
-a beverage made from Tahitian dishes on the menu, including the ws ite a
Noni, with blueberry, grapes and conch and crab cake with Noni



ae

Sar,

iy

_

rf
a?



vinaigrette, the Spicy Curried Beef
Satay, and the guava duff.

At first sight, the conch and crab
cake looked like a colour fiesta with
its bright green garnish on one side,
cucumber, green and red bell pep-
pers, and cabbage salad on the oth-
er end dressed with the vinaigrette.
At the center was the hearty cake
sitting as the star of the dish.

This dish is rather light and
infused with lots of vegetables.
There is a very noticeable fusion of
flavours smoothly bringing together
the crab, conch, veggies, and the
noni.

Toped with a tall glass of home-
made ‘Switcha,’ this dish was the
perfect start to the meal.

Next was the Spicy Curried Beef
Satay.

Prepared by executive Chef Det-
rick Francis who lives by the motto
“People eat with their eyes,” this
dish looked quite pleasing with its
marriage of steak and greens with a
slight simmer, but it also had an
intoxicating scent of curry.

Chef Francis explained: “The cur-
ry Vinaigrette was made from
scratch and the taste is spicy and

tangy flavoured which still has a
slight sweetness from the chutney
used. The beef is center cut sirloin
steak, so it’s the best part of the
steak.”

Chef Francis said even honey is
used to add flavour to the dish. In
the end, it was truly a taste of heav-
en allowing you to enjoy each ele-
ment of its seasoning while being
filled by its content.

The final dish was guava duff.
Made like traditional duff, this dish
was garnished with a diced straw-
berry and a side of whipped cream.

According to one patron, “If
Heaven was made of this exact gua-
va duff, I promise I’ll never sin
again.”

Like the old wedding adage, Noni
Way offers ‘something old, some-
thing new, something borrowed,
and something blue.’

The restaurant is new, some of its
dishes are traditional Bahamian,
others are borrowed from Europe,
and the highlight is the blue bottled
Tahitian Noni Juice.

A perfect spot for breakfast,
lunch, or dinner, the Noni Way Café
is truly the way to go.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009, PAGE 7B





The Tribune



This weekend brings to an
end summer 09’, so why not
end it with a bang and cele-
brate the end of the season as
we welcome in autumn.

4. The Adastra Gardens is
coming to the Marathon Mall
on Friday, well maybe not the
entire zoo, but an awesome
selection of its feathery ten-
ants. Expect to see a number
of exotic animals including
the Moluccan cockatoo which
is indigenous to Eastern
Indonesia and one of the
largest white cockatoos in the
world. There will also be the
Green and Gold Macaw. The
macaw which is considered
the poster image for parrots,
is commonly found in wood-
lands, rainforest environ-
ments, and savannah-like
regions.

There will be additional
information informing kids
and adults about the history
of the birds, their characteris-
tics, and global populations.
This event will be held in the
mall’s center court from noon
until 5pm.

On Saturday at the zoo
grounds, there will be a spe-
cial show to introduce kids to
the other animals at the zoo.
The event will feature various
activities, food, drinks, and
will end with a pep-talk from
the police on back-to-school
safety. Entrance is $8 for
adults and $3 for kids.

2. The Bahamas Interna-
tional Film Festival continues
its film festival series with the
movie Holly. The 2006 poetic
drama directed by Guy Moshe
is set in modern day Cambo-
dia where a Vietnamese girl
called Holly, encounters
Patrick an American resident
who specialises in the sale of
stolen artifacts. The story fol-
lows their strong connection
and her unrelenting efforts to
escape her fate of becoming a
sex slave in the notorious
Cambodian red-light district
of Phnom Pehn. The movie
will be shown on Wednesday
at Galleria JFK at 8pm. Tickets
are $5. The film starts at 8pm.

3. Just in time for back-to-
school, local entertainment
group Make-Em-Listen will
present its first annual Back-
To-School Pep-Rally. The
event takes place at the Town
Centre Mall this Saturday and
will feature a number of local
music icons including |-Rate,
Peter Runks, Broken Mics,
BainTown Boys, Anku Sara,
Death Angel, Professor, and
lots more. There will also be a
special presentation from
Kyran Turnquest - a youth
counselor and motivational
speaker - along with dozens
of give-aways for students
returning to the classroom.
Everyone is invited to this free
community event from noon
until 6pm.

4. Local gospel recording
artist Najie Dunn is gearing
up to release his latest music
project titled Relentless Pur-
suit. Najie is having his offi-
cial aloum release this Friday
at 7.30pm at the Holy Trinity
Activity Center Stapleton Gar-
dens. The artist will perform
several pre-released selec-
tions from the album such as
Inspiration, Pray For You,
They Want Take Life Ft. Mon-
ty G, and Yes Lord. There will
also be special appearances
from Monty G, Ricardo Clark,
i Heights. The event
is $5,

5. The Nahbulunge cloth-
ing line will release its fall
sporting line this Thursday at
Harry’s Haven of Rest on
Queens Street. Featuring the
latest trends in female
sportswear, the company
said its clothing has always
been about defining the
image of beauty for women.
The event starts at 6pm and
promises to be a philan-
thropic extravaganza with
proceeds from the $30 tick-
ets going to the Willie Mae
Pratt School for girls.







On

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

larence Rolle has suc-
cessfully captured the
human spirit in his very
first film-Fresh a riveting
story about overcoming

the challenges of life.

The film, which recently pre-
miered at the Dundas Centre for
the Performing Arts, features an all
Bahamian cast. The plot centers
around Angie ( D’Adra Smith-
Owen) one of 800 plus employees
recently laid-off from the tourism
industry.

As the reality of having no job,
two dependents (her sister Sharon
played by Lakeria Forbes and son
Ram, played by Terran Brown)
sinks in, Angie feels like her luck
has completely run out.

If that isn’t bad enough, her
estranged husband Solomon, played
by Gene Cage is released from
prison and returns to a home far
different than the one he left
behind.

As the story develops, the family
learns to works through their many
problems growing closer through
faith, and an overall commitment
to creating a better life.

Mr Rolle who wrote and directed
the film explained: “The film Fresh
is a theme that I’ve always had in
mind, and to some extent it has
been incorporated in other plays
I’ve done.

“As a society I think we are a bit



materialistic, and we have a need
for instant gratification, and this is
something that I see around every
day, so I thought to also include
that in the film.”

Mr Rolle said with so many per-
sons unemployed and struggling
financially , he hopes Fresh will in
some way reaffirm the benefits of
budgeting and maintaining insur-
ance,

The film was attended by many



CLARENCE ROLLE (RIGHT), Direc-
tor and Writer of Fresh said the
film took about 18 days to shoot.
Also pictured is videographer Craig

i

a
Sy ——- <. a

supporters who also participated in
a brief Q and A session with Mr
Rolle and the cast.

Fresh received rave reviews, with
many audience members saying
never before has a local or interna-
tional movie been successful in
offering a how-to guide toward
financial survival during a reces-
sion.

Now that the film has received its
initial stamp of approval, Mr Rolle

Lenihan, left.



ASCENE from the new Bahamian
movie Fresh. Pictured are actors
D’Adra Smith-Owen and Gene Cage.

said his next goal is to have it shown
in local high schools to help increase
the awareness of the social and eco-
nomic conditions facing many
throughout the community.

Mr Rolle has also written and
directed a number of stage perfor-
mances including The Web Shop
Horror, and Da Rally.

For more information visit Fresh
The Movie on Facebook. The film is
rated A.

INTERNATIONAL BAHAMIAN THEATRE FESTIVAL IS ON ITS WAY!

By KENCOVIA INGRAHAM

SHAKESPEARE in Paradise,
designed to be an annual interna-
tional theatre festival that will place
The Bahamas on a global level, will
soon be making its way to the stage.
Based on similar festivals such as
Scotland's Edinburgh Festival Fringe
and this region's Caribbean Festival
of Arts (CARIFESTA), this event
will take place in Nassau October 5-
12, 2009 at various local venues
including The College of The
Bahamas, the National Art Gallery
of The Bahamas, The Hub, Graycliff
and The Marley Resort.

Although the event is about two
months away, it has already received
positive feedback from individuals
in the Bahamian cultural foreground.
As poet and musician Patrick Rah-
ming has written: "We must commit

resources to create an environment
rich with opportunities to share the
uniqueness of the Bahamas through
the development of attractions.”

With a focus on making this event
the perfect opportunity to help boost
the Bahamian cultural scene as well
as the economy, the week-long
extravaganza will not only increase
the appreciation and awareness of
local and international theatre, but
also provide school visits, workshops,
readings, seminars, student matinees,
and much more to the Bahamian
community.

The festival will feature three
Bahamian productions and three
international productions, all of
which have received critical acclaim
in their hometowns. Plays will be
represented not only from The
Bahamas, but from the United
States, Cayman, and Guyana.

Shakespeare's The Tempest is the

festival's signature work. It was
adapted for a Bahamian audience by
students of The College of The
Bahamas under the guidance of
Nicolette Bethel, and will be co-
directed by Trinidadian native Patti-
Anne Ali, known for her role of
“Soomintra” in The Mystic Masseur,
a Merchant-Ivory Film, and Bahami-
an stage actor and acting coach Craig
Pinder, who has had major roles in
such West End productions as Les
Miserables and Mama Mia Kim
Brockington, known for her recur-
ring TV roles in Guiding Light and
the West Wing, will perform her one-
woman show Zora, about the
African-American folklorist Zora
Neale Hurston. Other productions
include One White One Black from
Cayman, selected shows by Ken
Corsbie, a Guyanese-American per-
former and storyteller, and Track
Road Theatre's productions of Love

in Two Acts and Light.

The Shakespeare in Paradise team
openly welcomes the public to attend
this event. Special invitations are sent
out to students who are passionate
about pursuing theatre as a career
to take full advantage of this one-
week experience.

For more information about this event
visit:
www.shakespeareinparadise.org

For more information about this event
visit:
www.shakespeareinparadise.org
YOU TUBE - Shakespeare In Paradise
Facebook: Bahamian Shakespeare
Facebook Fan Group: Shakespeare In
Paradise

Myspace: www.myspace.com/shake-
speareinparadise

Twitter: www.twitter.com/shake-
speareinparadise

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PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

BAHAMIAN BEACH WEDDING



In an intimate beach
ceremony, Patrick
Rahming married
Sarah Johnson-
Saunders on
Yamacraw Beach on
August 20. The
couple, both Grand
Bahamians, chose to
dress in island wear
for a unique,
authentically
Bahamian wedding.
The couple
exchanged his and
her Bibles to signify
daXcylaxeoyesvennnaentcvels
to God and each
other. The ceremony
VER Ole) we) anetee meni
Bishop Victor A.
Johnson of New
Dimension
Ministries on Joe
Farrington Road.



Homicide ruling, documents

detail death of Jackson

LOS ANGELES

THE Los Angeles County coroner’s
finding that the death of Michael Jack-
son was a homicide could mean crimi-
nal charges for his doctor, who told
investigators he administered a mix of
powerful drugs to treat the pop star’s
insomnia hours before his death,
according to the Associated Press.

The homicide ruling was based on
forensic tests that found the anesthetic
propofol combined with at least two
sedatives to kill Jackson, a law enforce-
ment official told The Associated Press,
speaking on condition of anonymity
because the findings have not been pub-
licly released.

The finding does not necessarily
mean a crime was committed. But it
does help prosecutors if they decide to
file criminal charges against Dr. Conrad
Murray, the Las Vegas cardiologist who
was caring for Jackson when he died
June 25 in a rented Los Angeles man-
sion.

“Tt is an easier prosecution when the
medical examiner calls it a homicide,”
said Dr. Michael Baden, the former
chief medical examiner in New York
City, who is not involved in the Jackson
investigation.

Through his lawyer, Murray has said
he administered nothing that should
have killed Jackson.

Murray told investigators that at the
time of Jackson’s death, he had been
trying to wean the entertainer off
propofol. The doctor said he’d been
treating Jackson for insomnia for about
six weeks with 50 milligrams of the drug
every night via an intravenous drip, a
search warrant affidavit said.

Murray said he feared Jackson was

MUSICREVIEW

becoming addicted to the anesthetic,
which is supposed to be used only in
hospitals and other advanced medical
settings.

Murray told police he was present
when another Las Vegas anesthesiolo-
gist, Dr. David Adams, sedated Jackson
with propofol at an unnamed cosme-
tologist’s office “sometime between
March and April of this year,” accord-
ing to the affidavit.

It was about the time Jackson
requested that Murray become his per-
sonal physician for a European tour,
the affidavit said.

A woman at Adams’ office in Las
Vegas referred calls Tuesday to his
lawyer, Liborius Agwara, who did not
immediately respond to messages seek-
ing comment.

Nevada State Board of Osteopathic
Medicine records show Adams has
been licensed in the state of Nevada
since 2002, and there are no reports of
malpractice and no disciplinary issues
against him. Ongoing investigations are
confidential unless a licensee is named
in a formal administrative complaint.

The affidavit was unsealed in Hous-
ton, where Los Angeles police took
materials from one of Murray’s clinics
last month as part of their manslaughter
investigation. Manslaughter is homi-
cide without malice or premeditation.

The affidavit says Murray told detec-
tives that two days before Jackson’s
death, he had lowered the propofol
dose to 25 milligrams and added the
sedatives lorazepam and midazolam, a
combination that succeeded in helping
the pop star sleep. The next day, Mur-
ray said, he cut off the propofol and
Jackson fell asleep with just the two
sedatives.

Queen Latifah brings back the raps

Queen Latifah,

“PERSONA”



(Flavor Unit Records)

There’s nobody quite like Queen
Latifah, the rough-edged rapper
turned jazz singer and Oscar-nomi-
nated actress. On her new CD, “Per-
sona,” Latifah goes back to the roots
that made her so unique in the first
place.

The album is an enjoyable mix of
singing and rapping, produced by hip-
hop hitmakers Cool & Dre and fea-
turing cameos from the likes of Missy
Elliott, Mary J. Blige, Busta Rhymes
and Marsha Ambrosius. The style
ranges from straight-up hip-hop to
mid-tempo R&B to breathless tech-
no, with a mercifully light sprinkle of
the obligatory Autotune effects.

Latifah has sung on two previous
albums, and her voice is capable, com-
parable to most of the women popu-
lating today’s charts (She’s no Jen-
nifer Hudson, but who is?). Singles

like “Cue the Rain,” “My Couch” and
“With You” are body-moving tales of
the type of hothouse love that blooms
on the dance floor, while “People”
with Mary J. Blige and “The World”
tackle more weighty topics.

Her singing occasionally get sub-
merged beneath Cool & Dre’s dense
instrumentals, and on a few songs it’s
tough to differentiate Latifah from
her guest singers. When she raps,
though, everything changes.

Latifah still has the punch and word-
play of the woman who broke into
entertainment more than 20 years ago
as the rare female rapper who cap-
tured attention with skills instead of
sex. On her new album, you recog-
nize within the first few bars of “The
Light” or “Over the Mountain” that
Latifah is on the mic.

Latifah’s rap voice demands atten-
tion the way her presence does on
screen. That’s not usually the case with
her singing. So big up to Latifah for
continuing to expand her talents —
and for not forgetting where she came
from.



Daniel Gluskoter/AP Photo

AUTHORITIES leave the scene after executing a search warrant at the Red Rock
Canyon Country Club residence of Dr. Conrad Murray, Tuesday, July 28, 2009, in
Las Vegas. Murray is currently under investigation for his alleged role in the

death of pop icon Michael Jackson.



Jaton Johnson/Photo



Chris Brown
sentenced in
Rihanna
assault case

LOS ANGELES

A JUDGE on Tuesday
sentenced Chris Brown to
five years’ probation, six
months’ community labor
for the beating of Rihanna
and ordered the R&B
singer to stay away from
his former girlfriend for
the next five years, accord-
ing to the Associated Press.

Los Angeles Superior
Court Judge Patricia
Schnegg told Brown that
he could be sent to state
prison if he violated any
terms of his sentence,
including an order to stay
100 yards away from
Rihanna unless they’re
attending music industry
events.

A probation report pre-
pared for Tuesday’s sen-
tencing describes two pre-
vious violent incidents.
The first happened about
three months before the
February beating while
the couple was traveling
in Europe; Rihanna
slapped Brown during an
argument, and he shoved
her into a wall. In the sec-
ond instance, Brown
allegedly broke the front
and passenger side win-
dows on a Range Rover
they were driving while
visiting Barbados, Rihan-
na ’s home country. Nei-
ther attack was reported,
the probation report
states.

Brown will serve his
sentence in his home state
— Virginia — and his
community labor will be
overseen by the police
chief in Richmond.

The judge said she
wanted to ensure that
Brown, 20, performs phys-
ical labor instead of com-
munity service, such as
mentoring young people.
He will also undergo a
year of domestic violence
counseling.

Rihanna did not attend
Tuesday’s sentencing.

At one point, Brown,
who was accompanied by
his mother, agreed to the
terms of the sentence before
Schnegg had finished going
through them all.

The hearing had been
planned for Thursday
afternoon, but Brown’s
lawyer, Mark Geragos,
asked to move up the
singer’s sentencing to
Tuesday. A previous
attempt to sentence
Brown was postponed
when Schnegg said she
hadn’t received adequate
assurances that Brown
would perform physical
labor if allowed to serve
probation in Virginia.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26,

2009

Oh so
fresh!

| See page seven



The Noni

i

Way Cafe ’

See page six;



First place finishers in the Adisa Outstanding Children in The Arts competition were presented with grants from
the Minister of Culture Charles Maynard and Adisa founder Patricia Bazard. Pictured from left to; Berlicia Saun-
ders, Quenton Smith, Bernard Farquharson, Adisa Director Patricia Bazard, Culture Minister Charles Maynard,
Benjamin Pinder, Elan Hutchinson, and Adisa programme co-ordinator Persey Francis.

cultivating

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

Five students were recently awarded
scholarship grants after taking part in the
first annual Adisa Outstanding Children in
the Arts programme, for their perfor-
mance and success by Adisa officials and
Culture Minister Charles Maynard.

The initiative which seeks to identify and publicly
acknowledge the successes of students gifted in music,
dance, and drama, has been a long time coming senior
cultural affairs officer and Adisa co-ordinator, Patricia
Bazard said.

“We have so many talented children, those who can
sing, who can dance, who can write, and so first came
the birth of the national children’s choirs.

“However there were all those other children who
couldn’t sing, but who are just as talented and who
also needed a voice with someone speaking for them,

and so the Adisa Foundation was born.”

She said when the applications for the awards were
first issued, the committee never imagined the kind of
response they would receive.

Mrs Bazard said more than 300 forms were returned,
however in the end there could only be one winner in
each category.

During a special awards presentation at the ministry
last Monday, Mr Maynard said the programe was an
important step for culture in the country.

“This whole initiative is driven by the Adisa Foun-
dation and the National Children’s Choir. The awards
programme acknowledges, celebrates, and rewards the
contributions of children to the artistic culture of the
Bahamas,” he said.

The minister said as the access to funding needed to
support these types of initiatives becomes an ever
increasing challenge, it is good to know that Adisa has
been successful in accomplishing its mandate of fos-
tering cultural growth within many of the nation’s
youth.

In music; Berlicia Saunders from Freeport Primary
took first place, Bernard Farquharson from Lyford

Cay won in the junior category, and Benjamin Pinder
from St Andrew’s won in the senior divisiom
In drama; Quenton Smith from North Long Island
High took first place, and Elan Hutchinson from Faith
Temple Christian Academy won in the senior division.
Then in dance open category, Simone Davies from.St
John’s won first place.

We have so
many talented
children, those who
can sing, who can
dance, who can write,
and so first came
the birth of
the national

children’s*choirs.
PATRICIA BAZARD




PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.227WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY WITH T-STORM HIGH 89F LOW 79F F E A T U R E S SEETHEARTSANDENTERTAINMENT SECTION S P O R T S SEEPAGEELEVEN Athletes eye Golden League CHAOS erupted yester d ay as an angry mob s tormed a bank demanding to know how union chiefs were able to withdraw near-l y $500,000 from funds. M embers of Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union burst into the Bank of the Bahamas, on Harrold Road, wanting to know how the cash could be taken out without the consent of its president. Yesterday bank bosses maintained the transactions were legal, adding that due to the "sensitive" dispute surrounding the union's executive team, the transfers w ere only green-lighted after o utside legal consultation. Union president Roy Colebrook, who was rein-s tated to the organisation’s h elm after a recent Supreme Court ruling, claimed he did not know about the transfer until yesterday morning. "It's a sad day because those banks have clear instructions on who are the signatories on any account of the union certainly it's not those individuals who are purporting to sign," Mr Members demand answers after $500k withdrawn The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com B AHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Cultivating culture S tudents awarded Bank stormed in union cash row ANGRY MEMBERS of the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union burst into the Harrold Road location of Bank of the Bahamas in protest yesterday. B y ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A S THEUnited States braces itself for the number of swine flu cases to jump t his fall,the Bahamas’ Ministry of Health said its “greatest concern” is notm ore cases but whether the virus could become more severe. Yesterday, the White House announced that the President’s panel of advis ers on science and technolog y have estimated that half of the US population could become infected with theI nfluenza H1N1 virus this fall or winter as infection rates escalate after a slow down during the late sum mer months. As a result, 1.8 million in the Bahamas main tourism market of North America could be hospitalised and 90,000 could die, claimed the panel. While flu cases always rise during colder winter months, as the flu virus is hardier at such times, those figures are more than double the numbers seen in an average flu season. This is because the H1N1 virus is relatively new and therefore predicted to infect more people as fewer will have had a chance to develop any immunity. Panel expert Marc Lip sitch, of the Harvard School of Public Health, described the figures as “not a predic tion, but a possibility” based on its in-depth analysis. As a tourism dependent nation which welcomes thousands of foreigners to its shores each week, as well as Bahamians returning home from trips abroad, the Bahamas was forced to heighten its vigilance earlier Ministr s ‘gr eatest swine flu concer n’ is virus becoming more severe SEE page six By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net POLICE are investigating the death of a 26-year-old man found hanging in a closet. The body of Stephen Alexander Fernander was f ound at around 11pm on Monday in his apartment on Dominica Way, Golden Gates. A police report revealed he was “hanging in a closet from a rod with a laceration and a belt around his neck.” Police have classified his death as “suspicious” but Chief Superintendent Elsworth Moss, head of the Central Detective Unit, said it is being treated “more as a suicide than anything else” at this stage. Chief Supt Moss said that until an autopsy is conducted, police are unable to say exactly how Mr Fernander died possibly either due to the cut to his body or the hanging. Police declined to speculate as to how long the victim had been dead when he was found. Man found dead hanging in closet A DATE has been set for a new election for the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union, according to its first-vice president. A statement released by Kirk Wilson yesterday said that new elections for officers and members of the executive Date set for new hotel union election FORECASTERS are keeping an eye on a weather system that has a 50 per cent chance of becoming a tropical storm within next 36 hours. The United States’ National Hurricane Centre (NHC the Bahamas to monitor the progress of the system. However, Chief Meteo rology Officer Basil Dean said the Bahamas should only experience some rain and thunderstorm activity late today and early tomorrow due to the system. By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A MAN has been charged with the murder of waitress Schakacan Shonell Moss. Craig Leo Johnson, who is understood to have been in a relationship with Ms Moss, was also charged with attempting suicide while in police custody and causing $200 worth of damage to an airconditioning vent in the Central Detective Unit on Thompson Boulevard. Appearing in magistrate’s court number eight, Johnson, of Faith Avenue, Nassau, was clad in khaki trousers and a Man c har g ed with murder of waitress 38-YEAR-OLD Craig Leo John son heads to court yesterday. SEE page six Tropical storm could form in next 36 hours SEE page six SEE page six SEE page six T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

PAGE 2

By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Executives of the Grand Bahama Shipyard are expected meet with work ers following reports of a pos sible strike at the facility. Carl Gustaf-Rotkirch, chair man and CEO, could not be reached for comment before press time yesterday regarding claims that two union shop stewards were wrongfully dismissed. The Grand Bahama Port Authority Workers’ Union filed a dispute with the Depart ment Labour over the dismissals of Eudencel McPhee and Simeon Richardson. The union is now threatening to take a strike vote if the two workers are not reinstat ed. However, union officials could not be reached for com ment. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News.............................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8 Editorial/Letters........................................P4 Sports...............................................P9,10,11 Advt...................................................... P12 BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION Business..........................................P1,2,3,4 Comics....................................................P5T aste..............................................P6,7,8,10 W eather ....................................................P9 CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES USA TODA Y MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – One of the oldest educational institutions on Grand Bahama is being phased out, but recruitment efforts are being made to keep the doors of the school open. FatherReginald Demeritte, pastor of St Vincent de Paul Church, said that enrolment at the school in Hunters has significantly declined over the last decade. “Unfortunately, for the past 10 years now we have been trying to maintain the school and keep it open,” he told radio listeners on Love 97 Radio on Tuesday. “We pump $350,000 a year to keep that school going andyou can only give so much, so we have decided nowbecause of the economic situation that we could not afford to spend $350,000 for the school, and so we made a decision to phase it out,” he said. The St Vincent de Paul School is operated by the Catholic Board of Education. It has been in existence forover 30 years and was one of the leading private schoolson the island for many years, with an enrolment of more than 800 students from kindergarten to eighth grade. Today, the school caters to less than 100 students in grades two through six. Father Demeritte said this year will mark 120 years of Catholic education in the Bahamas. He noted that the school in Hunters will only remain open if enrolment is significantly improved. “There are some new sub divisions in the area and we want to canvas those com munities and speak with par ents,” he said. “The reality is that we are phasing out, but if we can rebuild enrolment then we will cease (from closing the school),” said Fr Demeritte. He said St Vincent de Paul School is a very good institu tion. “We offer the best education and we have a good record,” he said. Fr Demeritte said they will also launch a major fundrais ing event to raise $120,000 for its Education Fund to assist those needy children who attend St Vincent de Paul and Catholic High School. Educational institution is being phased out ON AUGUST 1 the Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority Act 2009 came into force. In accordance with the Act a new board has been appointed. The composition of the board, which was released yesterday, is as follows: Mr Wayne Aranha has been appointed chairman. Mr Aranha joined PricewaterhouseCoopers in the Bahamas in 1976 and spent 24 years as a partner before his retirement in 2008. He is a member and past president of the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants and a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. He was a director of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of the Caribbean and he is currently a member of the board of the new Insurance Commission of the Bahamas. J Paul Morgan and Katherine Doehler have been appointed non-executive directors. Mr Morgan is an independent adviser on policy and regulatory frameworks in the energy, telecommunications (ICT and water sectors. He has spent his career of 38 years in utilities. He is the former chairman of the Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation, former chairman of the Organisation of Caribbean Utility Regulators, and former chairman for two terms of the Office of Utilities Regulation in Jamaica. He is a past president of the Jamaica Institution of Engineers. Ms Doehler is a communications specialist with 25 years experience working in Canada and internationally in the telecoms, broadcasting and cable TV fields. She is a founding member of the executive committee of the Canadian Network for the Advancement of Research, Industry and Education, a past member of the Canadian Standards Association Standing Committee on Telecommunications, and a past director of the board of the Telecommunications Applications Research Alliance. She is a partner of Syntel Consultancy Inc. Michael Symonette and Usman Saadat have been appointed executive directors. Mr Symonette, Chief Executive Officer, served as executive director of the Public Utilities Commission from October 1, 2008 to July 31, 2009. He was employed with the Bahamas Telecommunications Corporation which later became the Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC 1960-2006. He spent the last 11 years at BTC as president and CEO. He oversaw the establishment of URCA and will act as CEO of URCA during a transition period until a new CEO is appointed in accordance with the URCA Act. Usman Saadat , Director of Policy and Regulation, Mr Saadat has 14 years of global communications experience including five years in economic consulting with UK based National Economic Research Associates (NERA Europe Economics. He served as adviser on major regulatory projects for the European Commission, and led projects for European and Asian national telecommunications regulators including OFTEL in the UK, ODTR in Ireland and OFTA in Hong Kong. Mr Sadaat also spent three years as an economist with the regulatory team in the head office of Cable and Wireless PLC. His most recent responsibility was as chief executive officer of Cable and Wireless St Lucia, prior to which he served as business development director of Cable and Wireless International. Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority Act:new board appointed T RIBUNE r eaders gave their view on the recent appointment of former Attorney General Michael Barnett to the post of Chief Justice in an online poll. Responding to the quest ion “Do you think the a ppointment of Michael B arnett as Chief Justice w as a good move?” posted o n tribune242.com, 50 of t he 79 persons who voted said “no” and 29 said “yes.” Mr Barnett was sworn in a s Chief Justice on Mon d ay at Government House despite some controversy. He resigned his post as A ttorney General last week to take up the top judicial job, having been selected by Prime Minister HubertI ngraham, in consultation with opposition leader Perry Christie. The swearing in came n otwithstanding a formal objection lodged against the selection of Mr Barnettb y the Bahamas Bar Asso c iation last Friday and a statement criticising the move issued by the Bahamas Chamber ofC ommerce over the week end. Both entities suggested t hat because of his well k nown political affiliations and former position as a sit ting cabinet minister it was inappropriate for the prime minister to have offered him the job of chief justice and for Mr Barnett to have accepted it, as it might “compromise the integrity” o f the judiciary to be seen a s an independent branch of government. Somewelcomedthe appointment, however,s tating that Mr Barnett has the experience necessary to be effective in the key role.H e in turn has promised to lead reforms which will help the justice system “move as expeditiously ande fficiently as (it C ommenting on the issue ontribune242.com, “Roger” said: “The selec-t ion of Mr Barnett is a clear i ndication that govern ments of the day in the Banana Republic of the Bahamas just don’t get the difference between servant leadership and arrogance. Somehow, the former seems a trait our leaders are not capable of exhibit ing.” Tribune leaders give views on new Chief Justice in poll MICHAEL BARNETT Shipyard executives set to meet with w or k ers WORK ON THE redevelopment of the Lynden Pindling Airport – projected to be complete in 2011 – is well underway. These cranes are pictured towering over the existing terminal. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f AIRPORTREDEVELOPMENTINFULLSWING

PAGE 3

IT IS understood that the majority of RIU employees will be asked back to work when the Paradise Island hotel reopens in November, but gov ernment said it will investigate pay conditions of the staff dur ing the three-month closure. This according to Acting Minister of Labour Loretta Butler-Turner, who yesterday responded to claims that staff have not been fully informed about what they are to expect in terms of pay during the temporary closure of the property and do not know whether they will all have their jobs back when it reopens as the RIU Palace Paradise Island. “From what I heard from the HR (human resources ment informally, I think most of the workers are going to be re-engaged, but the pay issue hasn’t been fully resolved. The Department of Labour will look into matter,” she said. spoke with some of the staff members yesterday. Obvi ously we are going to try to meet with the principals so we can determine the way forward.” Speaking to The Tribune , RIU employees expressed concerns about their uncertain future. One hotel worker said: “We understand why they are closing the hotel, but of course it’s like a stab in the back. We have approached our superiors and we’re not getting any response (about the pay issue “Management has a list of people they are not going to call back but that’s not been dealt with yet. The only peo ple who know are the managers. We, the employees, have not been told,” she claimed. The RIU hotel will be closed for the next three months during the traditionally off season for tourism. The property is set to undergo a $25 million makeover, reopening on November 26, 2009. Its 379 rooms will be upgraded and new facilities will be added. Mrs Butler-Turner said that renovation efforts are already underway. “The contractors are actual ly on the ground and they’ve already started,” she said. On Monday, chaos erupted at RM Bailey High School and outside the RIU after persons reportedly made off with furniture and other household items from the hotel that the property’s operators had intended to donate to underprivileged people. The giveaway effort by the RIU, led by the Department of Social Services, ended in pandemonium as furniture, television sets and other items were “hijacked” by a few unscrupulous individuals and reportedly sold or given to their family members. Yesterday the giveaway con tinued under much more order ly conditions at the RIU property, as police officers were on hand to monitor the situation. AS THEcontroversy surr ounding the proposed a mendment to the Sexual Offences Act rages, a representative of a large religious denomination has come out in support of the law. T he head of the more than 1 0,000-member strong Seventh-Day Adventists (SDA Church in the Bahamas in a statement yesterday said that he believes the proposed amendment, which wouldo utlaw marital rape, deserves consideration and support,” but added that there should have been more consultation prior to presenting the bill in parliament. Pastor Leonard Johnson, president of the SDA Bahamas Conference, said: I believe that the proposed amendment to the Sexual Offences Act is one thats eeks to protect a spouse by introducing a clause pertain-i ng to rape within marriage a nd deserves consideration a nd support. Essentially, if couples respect each other there is no need to have con-c ern about the proposed amendment. However, when the spirit of selfishness anda nger or hate is at work, p roblems can be expected.” Quoting from Bible passages relevant to the topic – i ncluding First Corinthians 13, First Corinthians 7 and Ephesians 5 Pastor John s on said that these make the a ssumption that Christians operate on a “basis of divine l ove.” However, this is not always the case. “The preceding passages g overn followers of God. So it can be assumed that a wife who operates on the basis ofl ove will not withhold sex u nnecessarily or spitefully. Also one who operates on the basis of love will not force or take advantage of h is spouse. The principle of l ove will inform action and behaviour,” he said. “Also, it must be clear that not everyone operates on the basis of divine love, and hence it is necessary toe nact laws and rules governi ng behaviour. However, that is not to say that Christians are above the law, but as noted it would be hoped that they would not need to be guided by them; for theys hould be operating on the b asis of a higher principle.” Pastor Johnson said that critical to understanding the Bible is the need for what is referred to as hermeneutics, or sound interpretation; allowing the Bible to speak for itself as opposed toi mposing meaning on scripture. “In doing so, consideration i s given to who spoke, the audience, the issues, etc etera. It is also helpful to h ave some knowledge of the l anguage used, whether Hebrew, Aramaic or Greek. Otherwise, we may uset oday’s understanding and impose on scripture, thus forcing it to say what itsw riter never intended,” he s aid. “It is also necessary that one be guided by the Holy S pirit, as it was He who inspired the Bible writers.” Pastor Johnson said that t his would be a good time to r aise the age of sexual consent from 16 to 18 years. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Wong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Tel: (242 Tel: (242 2335 2335 Soft and durable Diversatex Soft and durable DiversatexTM TMcushion is fade and mildew cushion is fade and mildew resistant and is available in resistant and is available in blue, green or terracotta blue, green or terracotta x xChairs Chairsx xTables Tablesx xBenches Benchesx xUmbrellas Umbrellasx xLoungers Loungersx xDrinks Trolleys Drinks Trolleysx xCoffee Tables Coffee Tablesx xEnd Tables End Tablesx xCushions CushionsOutdoor Elegance Outdoor Elegance Proposed marital rape law backed by Seventh Day Adventists representative Major ity of RIU emplo yees ‘will be asked back to wor A CROWD outside of the RIU yesterday for the furniture giveaway. A MORE ORDERL Y FURNITUREGIVEAWAY Tim Clarke /Tribune staff PHILIP “Brave” Davis,d eputy leader candidate for the PLP, hosted a “launch reception” for his candidacy at the Governor’s Ballroom in British Colo-n ial Hilton yesterday evening. Addressing the reception, Mr Davis said the country is “headed in the wrong direction” and “we must change its course.” “I want to make a change!” said the MP for Cat Island, Rum Cay and San Salvador. C alling for a return to “a time when ‘D’ was not an acceptable national grade average” and “when one could sleep at night without having to worry about being robbed or hurt by criminals,” Mr Davis described the PLP as the “vessel to restore the dream” of a better Bahamas. “We PLP’s must always be the sober, thoughtful alternativeand we must promote ideas that offer solutions to problems. “We must ensure that our conversation with the Bahamian people is not simply a celebration of our history but we must use our history to develop and communicate a road map of policies and programmes that assist them in realising their hopes and dreams,” said the MP, who described himself as a “tireless fighter for the rights of Bahamians.” Mr Davis is the first person to publicly announce his campaign to become the next deputy leader of the PLP, after the current holder of the post, St Cecilia MP Cynthia Pratt, announced that she will be standing down. The new deputy leader will be chosen at the party’s convention in October. M P Davis holds ‘launch reception’ PHILIP DAVIS I I b b e e l l i i e e v v e e t t h h a a t t t t h h e e p p r r o o p p o o s s e e d d a a m m e e n n d d m m e e n n t t t t o o t t h h e e S S e e x x u u a a l l O O f f f f e e n n c c e e s s A A c c t t i i s s o o n n e e t t h h a a t t s s e e e e k k s s t t o o p p r r o o t t e e c c t t a a s s p p o o u u s s e e b b y y i i n n t t r r o o d d u u c c i i n n g g a a c c l l a a u u s s e e p p e e r r t t a a i i n n i i n n g g t t o o r r a a p p e e w w i i t t h h i i n n m m a a r r r r i i a a g g e e a a n n d d d d e e s s e e r r v v e e s s c c o o n n s s i i d d e e r r a a t t i i o o n n a a n n d d s s u u p p p p o o r r t t . . Pastor Leonard Johnson, president o f the Seventh-Day Adventists Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your story.

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E DITOR, The Tribune. While I understand that my opinions go directly against yours (as per your August 20th a rticle) I trust you will allow me some space in your paper t o open the eyes of Bahamians to the facts about Casuarinas a nd other invasive species. I wish to put aside all political agendas and dramaticism for simple scientific fact. The documents, regarding the listing of p rotected native and traditional trees, are available for all B ahamians to access at www.bahamas.gov.bs or w ww.best.bs. I recommend all Bahamians read our National InvasiveS pecies Strategy, National Wetlands policy both of which ment ion the impact of invasive species in a Bahamian context. Y our August 20th article mentions Sri Lanka and Viet N am. There are two major flaws in d rawing analogs between their situation and ours. Firstly, Casuarina is native to that region so there was no issue in introduction of an established n ative. Secondly, the fact that something has been done does not automatically make it intel ligent or effective and their actions (Sri Lanka r ecent to be adequately evaluated. I f you need examples, the Casuarinas planted on beache s in Bermuda, to replace Cedars killed by blight in 1940s, are now considered a threat to all ecosystems there. Casuarinas planted in Hawaii a re now threatening ecosystems from the seashore to the mount ain top. In the Bahamas, the Casuarina has entered virtually a ll terrestrial ecosystems and will potentially impact all turtle nesting beaches and shorebirdh abitat within this century. The main fault I have with y our article, however, is the “beauty” of Casuarinas and h ow cutting them down will hurt our tourism industry. B eauty is highly subjective, but can be considered objectively i n terms of novelty and benefit. Casuarinas have invaded much of the world’s tropical coastline so they can be seen virtually anywhere. They do not make S aunder’s beach or the Bahamas special. The benefits Tribune readers tout of shade and the wind in the branches are benefits of all trees, this d oes not make them a special tree. B enefits of wildlife use and edible fruit are much more i mportant. Casuarina is virtu ally useless in this regard. The facts are, Casuarinas destroy marine turtle and sea bird nesting beaches and man g rove habitat that would provide for numerous other fish a nd seafood species (ecosystem services). Ecosystem services g enerate more than $80 through fishing and tourism in the Caribbean annually. I f you are only concerned about what tourists will see a fter the trees are cut, ask your self, “Are we selling the B ahamas?” If we are marketing an “Australian pine” beach as a B ahamian beach we are lost. Cut them down. ANCILLENO O DAVIS M.Sc. Nassau, August, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. Yesterday, I was very saddened to see those wonderful old trees being cut down along Saunders Beach. I was not alone, as my car crawled along the road I witnessed many drivers call out angry comments at the workmen doing the job. I guess I cannot expect much more when in the past we have so willingly and wantonly pulled down wonderful old buildings and homes in the name of progress, only to replace them with ugly, for eign looking monstrosities. I remember very clearly when I was chairman of the fund raising committee for the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas when several very influential people in high places urged us to pull down Villa Doyle and replace it with a modern building because it was easier. Fortunately under the stal wart leadership of the late Vincent d’Aguilar we won that round, and Villa Doyle stands proud, and restored, today. It has been virtually impossible to make, some surprisingly intelligent people, understand that those of us who wished to preserve the 66 Casuarinas trees lining Saunders Beach were not “in love” with casuarinas, nor were we mistakenly trying to preserve all casuarinas trees in the countryjust those 66 trees that have been there for over 80 years and withstood countless storms, sheltered us and our kids from the sun, whispered to us when we held hands with our childhood sweethearts and gazed at the sea whilst full of dreams, and snacked on countless KFC snacks growing up. Is that really that hard to understand, or are people intentionally not getting the message? I worry that the rather hideous rendition of the “pro posed plan”, which is not proposed, but clearly already decided, will be a garbage filled, hot and unattractive stab at an American beach complex. Just from previouse xperience on Arawak Cay and the Fish Fry and the deplorable conditions of the toilets there, imagine how distasteful and filthy the Saunders Beach facilities will be after a few weeks. I find it disturbing that the destruction of these trees took place the day immediately after Miss Universe was over, and the eyes of the world had ceased looking at us.coincidence? I think not! I find it amazing that we cannot pass a law to protect sea turtles, a globally endangered species, without two years of procrastination and apparent “consultation” with every fisherman in the nation, but can cut down trees, re arrange beaches, reroute roads, reclaim land and take people’s land away from them for roads can be done without any forewarning whatsoever. Last point, if casuarinas stop beaches, why is Saunders beach still there after 80 years? and why did the eastern end of Saunders Beach disappear after the building of Kelly Island? And what will the true repercussions be after the extension of Arawak Cay? KIM VICTORIA ARANHA Nassau, August 25, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm FOR TWO hours Sunday night the Bahamas held the world’s attention as 83M iss Universe contestants young women from around the world stepped onto A tlantis’ stage for one of them to be chosen by a panel of international judges as the uni-v erse’s new queen. By 11pm the outgoing M iss Venezuela had crowned another queen a second Miss Venezuela, Stefania Fernandez. This was the first time in the historyo f the pageant that the same country had w on the pageant back-to-back. The Miss Universe show the world’s l argest pageant received the highest TV ratings Sunday night as viewers switched from their regular stations to watch the newM iss Universe crowned in the Bahamas. By having the various events on different islands Abaco, Grand Bahama, Bimini, Harbour Island and Exuma and not justc oncentrated in Nassau, the Tourism Ministry succeeded in delivering its message that a visit to the Bahamas offers many other islands from which to choose. Donald Trump, owner of the Miss Univ erse Organisation, said that 18 countries bid for the honour of hosting the beauty pageant, but the Bahamas got it. “The government,” he said, “can be very proud of t hemselves” for the manner in which the country prepared for the event and hosted the competition. He said the Bahamasl ooked “amazing.” Atlantis also deserves tremendous praise for the enormous part it played as the background anchor for the show. Miss Universe, Miss USA and Miss Teen USA pageants are a Donald J Trump and NBC Universal joint venture. The show wasa ired live from Paradise Island on NBC and Telemundo. T he National Host Planning Company, headed by Owen Bethel, was the pageant coordinator for the activities on the ground and Billy Bush, president George W Bush’s nephew, was the male presenter on stageS unday night. The Bahamas and Atlantis are still getting e xposure on the web, where videos of the various segments of the event are posted a nd will be available for some time all free advertising. However, it is a pity that the Miss Uni verse organisers were not more discriminating in the selection of the night’s enter t ainment. It was third rate, and, of course, 24 hours after the event it provided talk show hosts tremendous chewing fodder. The first show we watched late Monday night was Anderson Cooper’s AC360, which p anned the Miss Universe entertainment. His show was repeated into the wee hours oft he morning. H eidi Montag, the featured performer had hoped to get her big break on the Atlantis stage Sunday night to fulfil a dream of launching herself as a famous pop star. “Miss Universe was the best experience of my life,” she gushed on her arrival back in Los Angeles Monday. “It was a miracle!” I t might have been a miracle for her, but i t certainly wasn’t a miracle for the Bahamas. “I am so excited to perform at Miss Universe for my first ever live performance,”s he told “People” magazine. “This is such a miracle in life and I give thanks to God everyday for this once-in-a-lifetime oppor tunity.” I t was also a once-in-a lifetime opportu nity for the Bahamas, and she spoiled it. A ccording to Anderson Cooper, Heidi M ontag, had found a “fresh new way to embarrass herself.” According to Cooper, Montag stole the M iss Universe show by “her stunning lack of talent.” “I don’t know who she is,” he scoffed, “or who she thinks she is, or where she isf rom, or why she’s famous, she can’t dance, she can’t sing but she can Twitter.” He said she had Twittered to thank God for herb ig break. “I don’t think God had anything to do with it!” he commented to his co-anchor, E rica Hills. “If that’s the best God can do then we’re in trouble!” Hills and Cooper commented on how Montag didn’t even know the words to her n ew song, “Body Language.” This was to be her second release, which she was launching from Atlantis’ stage. B ut instead of singing her new release Cooper and Hills said she lip-synched it all the way through. This was picked up on the w eb and instead of glowing reports about t he Miss Universe show, highlighted was the flop of a star trying to launch her career from the Bahamas. T his is the one segment of the show that we could all have done without. As a matter of fact the audience would have been better o ff if all of the entertainment had been scrubbed. It was a third rate performance thrown into a first class show. It’s a shame that whoever she is, or might one day become, she had to use the Bahamas on its big night to fall flat on her face. A sad sight at Saunders Beach – but should we be surprised? LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Miss Universe showcases the Bahamas For Rente premier choice for serious business”1,550 sq.ft.$5,425.00 p. month incl. CAM fees 1,056 sq.ft.$3,432.00 p. month incl. CAM feesContact Mr. Simon Chappell on 327 1575 or 477-7610Email: simon@cavesheights.comCaves Village Professional Turn Key Office Suites Can’t see the environment for the trees EDITOR, The Tribune. I write in regard to the introduction of laws to further protect Women’s rights. I would like to thank Ms Butler-Turner for her steps in the right direction by bringing this very important piece of legislation to the public’s attention. When it is necessary for us to take these types of measures in order to protect a basis human right it tells something about the kind of young men we are producing in society. A woman’s right to refuse her husband is just that her right when we marry someone it is built upon a loving and trusting relationship. Rape is a very humiliating, embarrassing act that seeks to destroy the other party physically and mentally. Marriage is the opposite it seeks to show society the level of commitment, love, honour and respect. Therefore, all areas that is necessary to protect an individuals choice and right to decide what should happen with his or her body should be taken. Shame on selfish men who use their strength to bring pain and distress. As for our outstanding men in society much respect to you for being just that, a man. A real man would never see the reason behind forcing his spouse to do something she is unwilling to do. LATISHA GILBERT Paralegal Nassau, July 29, 2009. Shame on selfish men who misuse their strength

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM The measuring scales dipped a little lower for the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation’s “Breathe Easy” campaign with a donation from corporate sponsor, Doctors Hospital. Infants born at the Princess Margaret Hospital can now ‘breathe easy’ thanks to the generous $10,000 donation, which will go towards the purchase of urgently needed ventilators and incubators. The campaign aims to raise $300,000 towards this effort. Earmarked for high risk, premature, low birth-weight, or critically ill newborns, the donated ventilators will support breathing until the infants’ respiratory efforts are sufficient. Presenting a check to the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation, Charles Sealy, CEO of Doctors Hospital said: “We continue to recognise and support the public/private part nership in the provision of healthcare to the Bahamian Community. “We were pleased last year to assist in the acquisition of dialysis machines for Princess Margaret Hospital. This year, our participation in providing ventilators for the Neo-natal intensive Care Unit (NICU PMH is very special as it is the only NICU in the country providing this service for our citizenry. “We are glad to be in a position to assist our public partners with its pressing equipment needs. Our community deserves the best. This is the posture that Doctors Hospital has adopted. We will continue on our quest to maintain the same.” Persons interested in making a donation towards the campaign should contact The Tribune Media Group or drop offa check made payable to the “Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation, Breathe Easy Campaign”. THE ROTARY CLUB of East Nassau makes a $5,000 donation to the Breathe Easy Campaign. Pictured (from left Nassau; Michele Rassin, president of the Rotary Club of East Nassau; Sandra Olander, senior nursing officer for Surgical Area Two at PMH; Paulette Cash, neonatal nurse at the Neontal Unit, PMH; Dr F Montero Registra, Neonatal Department, PMH. BAHAMAS REALTY makes a $5,000 donation to the Breathe Easy Campaign. Pictured (from left Mark Roberts of Tile King; Robin Brownrigg, president Bahamas Realty; Larry Roberts, CEO of Bahamas Realty; Sandra Orlander, senior nursing officer of Surgical Area Two at PMH; Paulette Cash, neonatal nurse at the Neontal Unit, PMH; Dr F Montero Registra, Neonatal Department, PMH. THE Department of Statistics r etracted incorrect live birth statistics recently published on its website and released new, corrected data on the subject yesterday. According to the most recent statistics, there were 5,126 live infants born in the Bahamas in 2007 – 3,047 o f which were born to unwed mothe rs – and not 5,177 live births, as origi nally stated by the department. Nearly all of the new statistics for 2007 differed from the data published by the department earlier this month e xcept in two areas, young mothers b etween the ages of 10 and 14 and those whose age was not stated. C hanges were noted to the categories of: young girls between the ages of 15 and 19, who accounted for 604 live births in the respective period, 581 of which were out of wedlock women between 20 and 24 who a ccounted for 1,201 live births – 968 o f which were born out of wedlock women between 25 and 29 who accounted for 1,277 live births – 682 of which were born out of wedlock women between 30 and 34 who a ccounted for 1,141 live births – 466 o f which were born out of wedlock women between 35 and 39 who a ccounted for 685 live births – 259 of which were born out of wedlock women between 40 and 44 who accounted for 184 live births – 73 of which were born out of wedlock There was also a change in statistics for women aged 45 and 49, who a ccounted for 10 live births in 2007, f our of which were to unwed mothe rs. The shocking statistic which revealed that young girls between 10 and 14 had six live births, all to single m others, did not change. Women a ged 50 and over had no live births that year. T he department corrected another mistake published in its earlier statistics, where it noted that in 1983 there were only 2,047 live births. The new data reveals that in that year, there were 5,252 live births, 3,240 of which were to single mothe rs. T here was also a change to data p ublished about live births in 1985. In that year, there were 5,420 live births; 3,363 to unwed mothers. The department's data does not i nclude live births to widowed or d ivorced mothers. Corrected statistics show 3,047 infants were born to unwed mothers in 2007 MANAGER OF LITTLE W HALE CAY M ark Roberts presents a cheque for $1,000 from the family of Mr and Mrs Peter Austin to Thelma Rolle of the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation for the pur chase of new state-of-the-art ventilators. Mr Austin said he was “delighted and proud to support the Breathe Easy Bahamas Campaign.” “Mark has been managing our property (Little Whale Cay) for 12 years. This fundraising drive is important to all of our staff and we are pleased to support Mark’s philanthropic endeavours,” he said. Little Whale Cay is located 32 miles northwest of Nassau in the Berry Island chain and was previously the summer and weekend home of Wallace Groves, founder of Freeport. TRIBUNE NEWS EDITOR Paco Nunez accepts a donation for the Breathe Easy campaign from Thea Glinton, office manager at Olcastle Building Products (Caribbean Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. FRONT ROW LEFT TO RIGHT: Michele Rassin, VP of operations, Doctors Hospital; Dr Keva Bethel, director, Doctors Hospital; Barry Rassin, president, Doctors Hospital; Charles Sealy, CEO, DoctorsH ospital; Dr Gwendolyn McDeigan, director, NICU, Princess Margaret Hospital; Patricia Solomon, nursing officer, NICU, Princess Margaret Hospital; Analee Richards, acting supervisor, Surgical Area 2, Princess Margaret Hospital; Thelma Rolle, public relations, Princess Margaret Hospital/PMH Foundat ion; Mark Roberts, Tile King and “Breathe Easy” chairman. Doctors Hospital makes donation in support of Breathe Easy Campaign BAHAMAS REALTY THE R OT ARYCLUBOFEASTNASSAU LITTLE WHALECAY OLDCASTLE BUILDINGPRODUCTS HAVANA CUBA'SFidel Castro is criticizing President Barack Obama's stepped-up U.S. war in Afghanistan while b acking Obama's effort to provide health care coverage for all Americans, according to Associated Press. The former Cuban president said in an essay published Tuesday that he hasn't the slightest doubt that "the racist right" will do anyt hing to stop Obama from succeeding domestically. Castro's remarks appeared on the Cubadebate Web site, which publishes his frequent essays on global affairs. He formally stepped down as Cuba's president in February 2008 a fter ceding power to his brother Raul. C astro calls US war in Afghanistan a mistake

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – A concerned citizen claims that while crime continues to spiral out of control, many religious ministers remain in their “ivory towers” ignoring the country’s crime situation. Bahamian Julian Knowles walked into Tribune’s Freeport office to express his concern over the recent murders of innocent victims in New Providence and Grand Bahama. “We are now at 55 murders in this country and I think it is high time the citizens of this country stop blaming politicians and take this country back. “We can’t let a handful of hoodlums take this country over, but right now they are winning because there are more good people dying than bad people,” he said. According to reports, the national mur der count for 2009 has exceeded the 43 murders that were recorded during the same period last August. Mr Knowles said he was very hurt over the brutal murders of 29-year-old Tagia Soles-Armony and 34-year-old Wendy Bullard in New Providence. “Those young women were killed senselessly and now five children will grow up without their mothers,” he said. Mr Knowles said it is time that religious ministers get out of their gated commu nities and go into the ghettos and turn young criminals to Christ. Mr Knowles commended Rev Simeon Hall for his efforts. However, he criticised four other prominent religious lead ers in the country for their “apparent lack of concern for crime.” “There are four leading religious min isters – the Bentley driving minister, the big land developer minister, the Lear jet flying minister, and the renowned book author minister – who seem to be too busy praising themselves and forgetting about the grassroots in the ghetto,” he said. Mr Knowles believes that crime could be significantly reduced if these “men of the cloth” visit crime-filled communities. “They need to get out there with politicians and community activist and knock on doors and do something about what is happening in this country,” he said. “You cannot blame the Prime Minister for the crime situation because he has the entire country to run and he has appointed a Minister of National Security,” he said. Mr Knowles said that government should consider hiring anti-violence Youth Leader Carlos Reid as a consul tant. He believes that Mr Reid could be a great asset in the war against crime in New Providence. Mr Knowles also commended Assistant Commissioner Marvin Dames for the work he is doing in Grand Bahama. “He has made a difference here on Grand Bahama and many people respect what he is doing in here,” he said. Concerned citizen speaks out over crime situation C olebrooke told T he Tribune outside of the union's headquarters at Workers House. Mr Colebrooke said he plans to take legal action against those union memb ers who requested the transfers. A ccording to a union bank statement obtained by The Tribune , two of the union's fixed-term deposits, a mounting to $468,317.87, were dissolved to facilitate several payments. T he news infuriated d ozens of frustrated B HCAWU members, as m any questioned the u nion's future financial s tate. The group then marched to the nearby Bank of the Bahamas location with picket signs. They later swelled into the bank, daring employees t o call the police before t hey were escorted outside by security. M aria Roberts, an ouste d trustee of Nicole Mart i n's A-Team, explained the group's frustration: "Where does that leave hotel work e rs? And the workers of this country? "We never break our fix deposit to help our membership but these things can happen for the people who are supposed to be protecting us." According to a newspaper report, the requests were allegedly made by assistant treasurer Samantha Gray, trustee Ian Neely and purported assistant secr etary general Raymond W right days after Nicole Martin was ousted as the u nion's president. T he article said Mr W right was to receive $73,600 of the requestedf unds, while Ms Gray and M r Neely were to receive $21,450 and $30,026 respectively. The transfer also includes $140,000 in legal fees intended to cover the chal lenge led by BHCAWUf irst vice-president Kirk W ilson, which nullified the M ay election that brought M s Martin into power. T he earlier article said $ 140,000 was requested to pay Commercial Law Advocates, whose principal attorney is Keod Smith, and $50,000 to Obie Ferguson and Co. Another $54,113 was r equested for HLB Galanis Bain chartered accountants’ p artner John Bain for outs tanding fees, according to t he report. Earlier this week, Director of Labour HarcourtB rown confirmed to T he Tribune that two of three Ms Gray and Mr Neely who reportedly signed a l etter requesting the transfer are registered elected o fficers of the union. G odfrey Price, ousted f irst vice president under Nicole Martin's team, said the union now faces hun-d reds of thousands of dollars in charges for breaking their fixed-term deposit with bank. Y esterday, Bank of Bahamas managing direct or Paul McWeeney s tressed the bank acted " legally and in full accordance with its fiduciary responsibility in executingd isbursements, following authorisation by and instructions from the union." t his summer as fears over the deadly potential of swine flu escalated around the world. The country recorded its first cases in J une, 2009, and up until late July had dealt with 28 confirmed cases. However, fears of the virus’s poten t ial to cause death or overwhelm health facilities subsided as trends proved the virus was less serious than initially indi c ated. The symptoms of Swine flu and reg ular flu are basically the same,” said Dr Minnis yesterday, in response toq ueries about whether the Government was concerned about the US panel’s predictions and their potential toi mpact the Bahamas. “With swine flu, everyone was concerned initially, especially since this was a new type of virus. It became pandemic and we were not sure how the mortality would pan out. “We were happy that mortality rates were not as bad as had been expected and our concern today is not necessar ily the swine flu itself because the s ymptoms were mild in most cases and the number of deaths was mild but our great concern is if the virus were to change. “Then we would be dealing with a new virus again,” he added. Dr Minnis said the Ministry will be “monitoring the population very, very c losely” for any signs of flu-like symp toms, and particularly more “aggressive” symptoms. That may be an indication that the v irus has changed its genetic compo nent and that would be of great concern,” said the health minister. I n July, Dr Minnis stated that Government has “sufficient medication” to handle an outbreak of the H1N1v irus. In the meantime, the Ministry of Health has advised the public to con tinue to follow influenza preventative m easures to ensure the protection of individuals, families and communities. “These precautionary measures include covering your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, disposing of the tissue in the trash after use, along with frequent hand washingw ith soap and water.” If you are experiencing flu-like symptoms, avoid contact with others and stay away from group settings to decrease the potential for any infec tion to spread. Bank stormed in union cash row FROM page one c ouncil will be held on T hursday. September 29. However, union president Roy Colebrooke told The Tribune yester-d ay that a special meet ing was scheduled at the union's headquarters lastn ight to determine a new election date and that a date had not been set. Highlighting the rift w ithin the union's execu t ive team, Mr Wilson said a date was decided on August, 3 when the executive council meta nd adopted the Supreme Court order of Justice Jon Isaacs, which nullified the union's May election. Mr Wilson added that the union's Triennial General Meeting is slated for September 30 at 9 am. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Date set for new hotel union election FROM page one Ministry’s ‘greatest swine flu concern’ is the virus becoming more severe FROM page one If it becomes more organi sed, the system would be named “Danny” – the Atlantic 2009 season’s fourth named storm. The NHC was last night reporting that an area of disturbed weather associatedw ith a trough of low press ure interacting with an upper-level low is centred about 325 miles north-northeast of San Juan, Puerto Rico. T he system continued to s how some signs of organisation, and upper-level winds w ere forecast to become more conducive for development during the next day or so as the system moves west-northwestward at around 20mph, the NHC said. A hurricane tracker aircraft was scheduled to investigate the area yesterday evening. s triped shirt. He was not required to enter a plea in connection with any of the charges and was denied bail. A ccording to court dockets, 38-yearold Johnson intentionally caused the death of Ms Moss on Saturday, August2 2, 2009, by means of unlawful harm. The attempted suicide and causing damage charges stem from when he was in police custody on August 24. Ms Moss, 33, was stabbed on Canaan Lane, opposite the Nassau Motor Company. She died in hospital of her injuries. Man charged FROM page one Tropical storm could form in next 36 hours FROM page one TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras INTERIMPresident Roberto Micheletti said Tuesday he doesn’t fear international sanctions aimed at restoring Manuel Zelaya to the presidency, shrugging off a U.S. announcement it will stop issuing most visas at its embassy in Honduras, according to Associated Press. Micheletti acknowledged the country will suffer consequences for refusing to reinstate Zelaya, but he suggested that nothing short of armed intervention could change the situation. “We are not afraid of an embargo by anybody,” he said after meeting with a delegation of foreign ministers from the Organization of American States pressing for Zelaya’s return. “We have already analyzed this and the country can carry on firmly and calmly without your support and that of other nations.” “Nobody is coming here to impose anything on us, unless troops come from somewhere else and force us,” Micheletti said. He said he places his trust in a large voter turnout for the N ov. 29 presidential election to pick Zelaya’s successor, a ballot scheduled before the leader was ousted June 28 amid suspicions among his opponents that he wanted to overturn the consti tutional provision limiting Honduran presidents to a single term. He denies that was his goal. Honduras govt says it doesn’t fear sanctions ANGRYUNIONMEMBERS outside of the Hotel Union headquarters last night. A NGERATUNIONHEADQUARTERS

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THE Clifton Heritage Authority (CHA received a donation of $10,000 from the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC to help in the restoration ofthe slave ruins at the Clifton Heritage National Park. CHA’s chairperson Sena tor Dr Jacinta Higgs said: “The donation is a part of our ongoing efforts to involve cor porate citizens in the work of the park in general, but more specifically to help preserve the ruins and provide other facilities for Bahamians and visitors alike to enjoy this historic site, the home of three civilisations.” On behalf of Clifton’s board she expressed gratitude that BTC has joined others in supporting the work of the park and is helping in the preservation of the country’s rich heritage. “Other corporate citizens will be presented with specif ic plans as to how they may contribute to the next phase in the park’s development with a specific emphasis on stabilising and protecting the ruins, enhancing the visitor experience and providing educational materials for young Bahamians.” Since its official opening in April 2009, the Clifton Her itage National Park has received several donations. Clifton Her itage Park r eceiv es BTC donation KATHERINE Forbes-Smith, the B ahamas' Consul General in Atlanta, Georgia, was welcomed into the ranks of the city's diplomatic corps during a special r eception marking the grand opening of her office. G reg Pridgeon, Chief of Staff to Mayor Shirley Franklin, said he looks forwardto a strengthened relationship between t he Bahamas and Georgia. “The more than 500,000 people of Atlanta say that we are friends, brothers and sisters,” he said. “We are so proud of being selected as your new partner.” Scores of Atlanta business representa tives were among the hundreds who gathe red to celebrate the consulate opening l ast Thursday. They were entertained by the Royal Bahamas Police Force Pop Band, theR oyal Bahamas Police Force Marching Band, and the Grand Bahama Youth Choir. Special guests included Prime Minister H ubert Ingraham, Minister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis, Minister of Labour Senat or Dion Foulkes, Ambassador CA Smith, Consuls-General Carl Smith and Gladys Johnson-Sands along with numerous B ahamians who work and study in Atlanta. By KATHRYN CAMPBELL WELDING a three-foot wide pipe in 90degree temperatures is not easy, but for Lynden Whyms it provides an opportunity to expand his knowledge and ability of a profession he loves. A welder for more than a decade, Mr Whyms is among 95 Bahamians putting together the equipment to dredge 1.9 cubic yards of material from Nassau Harbour onto Arawak Cay. “It’s an ongoing learning process,” said Mr Whyms, employed with sub-contractor American Bridge. “These guys have skills that are a little different from what I know. "But learning from them prepares me not just for other projects but also for work other than welding. You don’t have one job description here. Sometimes you’re welding, pile driving or rigging with the crane operators. “The foremen on this project have different working methods. It all boils down to basically the same – just different technicalities,” Mr Whyms said. Trevor “Moose” Cooper employed with Amer ican Bridge as a foreman said the majority of Bahamians on the project are experienced in their tasks. “Each job you go on people do things differently,” he said. "We’re learning different styles and techniques of how to do things. We’re getting the job done and we’re doing a good job. “Everybody is working together as a team and we’re trying to keep everyone safe. Conditions are good and everyone is happy.” Project manager with contractor Boskalis International BV Frans Thomassen said: “My supervisors are reporting that they are very happy to work with the guys.” “Driving a bulldozer in front of a pipe and seeing beyond it requires attention. That is where our supervisors come in to get the people relaxed and help them acquire skills they need for that. You have to be very confident to sit in a bulldozer and not to sink it.” Mr Thomassen said he is satisfied with the welding work being done by the Bahamian team. “The welding part is 90 per cent complete. We have a very good team of welders whose progress allowed us to start dredging last weekend. If they were not progressing we could not start,” he said. Since the available space on Arawak Cay is insufficient to accommodate all of the dredged material, the project also includes the westward extension of Arawak Cay by approximately 43 acres. The harbour project is being carried out to accommodate the new mega Genesis Class Cruise ships such as the ‘Oasis of the Seas’ which is expected in Nassau in December on its maiden voyage. Bahamians working on Nassau Harbour dredging project learning new skills CONSUL-GENERAL Katherine Forbes-Smith welcomes the observers to the ribbon-cutting ceremony that marked the official opening of the Consulate-General. T HE GRAND BAHAMA Y outh Choir performed during the opening of the Bahamas Consulate O ffice in Atlanta, Georgia. Atlanta welcomes the Bahamas’ Consul General A BOVE: P RIME Minister Hubert Ingraham touched base with hoteliers, including Andrew I ngraham (Ieft F olar of the Latin American H oteliers Association, while in Atlanta, Georgia for the openi ng of the Bahamas consulate office. L EFT: T HE Royal Bahamas Police Force Band was a hit at the open ing of the Bahamas' consulate o ffice in Atlanta, Georgia. TREVOR “MOOSE” COOPER , foreman with subcontractor American Bridge, is pictured repairinga busted pipeline while other Bahamian workers employed on the Nassau Harbour and Arawak Cay port projects observe. Welder Lynden Whyms is shown in far back. L e t i s h a H e n d e r s o n / B I S

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By LARRYSMITH During a recent visit to Abaco, concerns were raised b y environmentalists about the island's new power plant at Wilson City, which is now under construction. Very little information on this $105 million project has beend ivulged by either the government or BEC, so fears are being fed by rumours. Tough Call has reviewed the EIA f or the plant that was completed in October 2008 by KES Environmental Services I nc of Florida and will try to cut through some of the o bscurity. THE Environmental I mpact Assessment of BEC's 48 megawatt power plant now being built on Abaco is more interesting for what it reveals about BEC's environmental man agement practices than forw hat it tells us about this h uge project deep in the pine forest. T ough Call v isited the p ower plant site a few days a go. It lies some 14 miles south of Marsh Harbour, five miles east of the Abaco Highway, and about two miles from the coastal ruins of Wilson City, the fabulous lumber town that operated f or about 10 years in the early 1900s. The site consists of a 25a cre fenced clearing, with f oundations already laid out for a tank farm, power house, transformer substation and office building. A nother 75 acres of forested l and has been assigned to t he site for future expansion, but not yet cleared. Access is via the old t ramway that once hauled logs to the Wilson City sawmill. This has been widened from the highway to the plant for vehicles and transmission poles, butb efore the road gets to Wilson City proper, it cuts to t he right, crossing over to the Bight of Old Robinson, w here a pier and terminal w ill be built for tankers to offload fuel. A long this road you can still find bits of iron railroad ties and fragments of the terra cotta water pipeline that once supplied Wilson City.B EC plans to bury a 12-foot diameter corrosion-resistant p ipeline under the road and pump fuel from the dock to the power plant. New transm ission lines also will be required to supply electricit y to the grid, but EIAs for these projects are still in progress. T he plant will enclose four 12 megawatt generatorss upplied by the European f irm Man B&W, which has supplied engines for BEC plants on several islands in the past. A tank farm will b e built within an impervio us area known as a bund. A nd a cooling system will draw water from the underground aquifer and dis-c harge it via a deep injec tion well. Officials say the Wilson City site was picked because it is one of the few areas on the island within reasonabled istance of a coast that can be approached by a fuel s hip. Expansion of the existing power plant at Marsh H arbour would have conf licted with the city's development. The only other c lear option was Snake Cay, a few miles south of the city, where a terminal was built by Owens-Illinois in the 1950s. U nfortunately, the entire coastline around Snake Cay a nd Wilson City is a relatively untouched wilderness of mangroves, tidal creeks a nd shallow bights, all connected by a network of blue h oles. In fact, the area is so ecologically sensitive that the Bahamas National Trust a nd Abaco Friends of the Environment want to makei t a national park. A nd one of the only two shipping approaches to the Wilson City fuel terminal goes right through the existing Pelican Cays Land and Sea Park, an area of great natural beauty. S o you can see why envir onmentalists are alarmed a bout the new power plant, despite the obvious benefits it will bring to Abaco's economy, which suffers through e ndless load shedding every s ummer. Their concerns are h eightened by the fact that t he plant will run on heavy f uel oil, like the one at C lifton that has been such an environmental disaster over the years. In fact, BEC paid scant attention to such matters u ntil the mid-1990s, when it belatedly introduced an e nvironmental management policy. According to the EIA, several third partya udits of that policy over the years have outlined the corp oration's chronic failures. For example, drains discharged oily water into the g round for years at Clifton, resulting in a huge hydroc arbon plume in the freshwater lens and discharges into the sea from caves below the cliffs. State Utilities Minister P henton Neymour admitted recently that more than a million gallons of oil had been recovered from thesec aves in recent times, at a cost of over $1 million so far. The EIA also reported t hat large areas of the Clifton plant were covered in semi-solid oil in 1996 (two y ears after the EMP was i ntroduced) while the Blue Hills plant did not have an impervious floor to its bund enclosure, which "grossly contaminated" the site. Chronic problems were also noted at out island plants, including "widespread and undocumented oil discharges, inadequate bunding, no clean-up facilities and poor drum storage." The EIA expressed con cern over the lack of resources allocated to BEC's environmental oversight and concluded that the corporation's culture was at fault: "Clifton has suffered signif icant impacts requiring ongoing assessment and corrective action...Poor handling of materials at Clifton and Marsh Harbour has required the need for exten sive ground clean up and plant upgrading to remedy historical oil pollution prob lems." Added to this history of gross incompetence is the risk of a shipping disaster in pristine waters. This is not as rare as you might think. In 2005, former Transport Minister Glenys Hanna Martin reported on several oil spills around Abaco, Grand Bahama and New Providence. They included the spilling of over 2,000 gallons of fuel by BEC at the dock in Marsh Harbour, several spills at the Freeport ship care facility, a wreck off Xanadu Beach, and the spilling of tons of lubricant oil at Clifton during a storm. But the EIA remains optimistic that spills like this will not occur at Wilson City. Fuel will be transferred from the tanker via a stateof-the-art hose system and pumped to the power plant through a pipeline with safety valves installed every 500 f eet. And the plant's stora ge facilities will be built to i nternational standards within an impervious concrete bund designed to contain the catastrophic discharge o f a million-gallon tank. C lean-up equipment and s upplies also will be based a t the terminal, but the p otential risks should not be m inimised. During a tour of BEC's Clifton plant last December, Minister Neymour said, "It is important that we demonstrate to the B ahamian people that we are serious about cleaning u p oil spills and incidents, and also demonstrate to BEC and its staff how costlyi t is to clean up incidents after they have occurred." I n addition to the choice of a conventional power plant, Abaconians have c omplained about the type of fuel it will use. Oil-fired e lectricity generation in the United States is only a tiny fraction of total production because natural gas is a cheaper and widely avail-a ble alternative. And the costs of pollution controls a nd extra maintenance often o utweigh the lower cost of using fuel oil. B ut the EIA says that renewable energy options are not yet feasible for Aba co on a utility scale winds a re inconsistent, solar collectors require too much land, and the island's cur r ent waste stream cannot g enerate enough power to meet demand. "This leaves oil-fired generation as the only reason a ble solution," the EIA said. "A balance must be found between meeting the island'se nergy needs and environmental responsibility. A nodevelopment option would mean more reliance ons mall diesel generators, which are not as clean or efficient as utility engines. Doing nothing is not a viable o ption." Critics have pointed to the air pollution that could r esult from the burning of f uel oil. The Bahamas has no emissions standards, but the EIA says that exhaust from the 106-foot-high smokestacks at Wilson City will not exceed US stan dards, and BEC will monitor air quality on a regular basis. "The plant is unlikely to contribute significantly, if at all, to acid rain based on the use of low sulphur fuel and engine efficiency. Atmos pheric dispersal from the stacks will be effective." An incinerator will be installed at the site to burn garbage, waste oil and sludge. Non-burnable items will be trucked to the landfill at Snake Cay. And all water discharges will be monitored. "Protection of the under lying aquifer is of para mount importance," the EIA said. "In the event of a discharge, clean-up must begin immediately in accordance with the environmental management plan." The EIA acknowledged that a fuel or chemical dis charge from the power plant, pipeline or tanker would be an ecological catastrophe. It says that a strictly applied environmental man agement plan will be essen tial to ensure that the plant operates with the least risk to the environment. A Salvadoran construc tion company has been sub contracted to build the plant and many Central American workers are already at the site, with a big influx expected in the next few weeks. The three-storey high gen erators will arrive in November and be slowly trucked from Marsh Harbour to Wil son City, entailing the cutting of many power lines along the way. It is unclear how many Bahamians will b e employed at the site. T here has also been a p uzzling escalation of the cost of this project. In 2007 Minister Neymour said the plant would cost $66 million. P rime Minister Ingraham p egged it at $80 million a y ear later, and Minister Neym our said $90 million in J une. But in the budget d ebate shortly afterward, the cost was put at $105 million.A full outline of the project has never been disclosed, and no public consultations h ave been held on Abaco, despite frequent requests. M eanwhile, the existing 25.6 megawatt plant at Marsh Harbour is barelyk eeping up with the demand from Abaco's 15,000 resid ents, 1500 second home owners, and 100,000 visitors. Over the past five years p eak energy demand has risen by 64 per cent, the E IA said, and planning has been underway since the late 1990s to meet this growth. But the corporation's ( and by extension, the government's) lack of transp arency on this project has f ueled anger and disappointment among environm entalists and other concerned citizens on Abaco, and this is despite the fact that BEC's chairman F red Gottlieb is a popular Marsh Harbour lawyer. F ollowing T ough Call's i nquiries, we were told that a town hall meeting is being planned for mid-September. Perhaps then Minister Ney mour, Chairman Gottlieb and General Manager Kevin Basden will be prepared to respond to the following questions that they were unable or unwilling to answer for this article: 1. What is the reason for the increase in estimated costs for this project? 2. What is the actual signed contract figure? 3. What scope of work does the contract price cov er? 4. Are the engines that will be installed new or used? 5. Does Man B&W have the overall design-build con tract? 6. Has Man B&W subcontracted the construction to a Salvadoran firm? 7. How many foreign workers will be employed at the site at maximum? 8. Will Bahamian firms and workers be employed at the site? 9. When do you expect power to be delivered by the plant? 10. Will this be over new transmission lines? 11. What assurance do we have that BEC will implement an effective EMP, given its past track record? 12. What is your current assessment of BEC's envi ronmental management at Clifton, Blue Hills, Marsh Harbour and other family island sites? What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM The great Wilson City power plant mystery PHENTON NEYMOUR KEVIN BASDEN

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM PHILADELPHIA Associated Press MICHAEL VICKwill make his preseason debut f or the Philadelphia Eagles on Thursday night. The three-time Pro Bowl quarterback hasn’t played in an NFL game since Dec.3 1, 2006 with the Atlanta Falcons. Vick was released from federal custody July 20 after serving 18 monthso f a 23-month sentence for his role in running a dogfighting operation. I can only go off what I’ve seen in practice and it looks like he’s moving a round pretty good,” Eagles coach Andy Reid said. “Realistically, it’s been two years. We’ll see how it works out. We’llg ive him a couple shots in there and see what he can do.” It’s unknown how much Vick will play against Jack-s onville. Donovan McNabb and the rest of the starters are slated to play three quarters, and Reid saidV ick won’t play in the fourth quarter. That means V ick could spell McNabb and get reps with the firstteam offense. It’s also likel y he could be used in a variation of the wildcat formation. Reid said he’s not concerned about showing off such packages in a pre-s eason game. “I’m just going to take it play by play and see how he adjusts to game speed,” Reid said. “If I think that’sa problem, I’ll probably discontinue the reps. If I feel he’s adjusting OK, I’ll continue to give him an oppor-t unity here and there.” Vick is eligible to play t he next two preseason games, but not in the regular season. NFL commiss ioner Roger Goodell said he would consider Vick for full reinstatement by no later than Week 6 (Oct. 1819). He wants to get in. He’s set this as a goal, as did we,” Reid said. “You see him out there conditioning after practice. He’s condi-t ioning before practice. He’s excited to get out there. I’m sure he’ll have a couple butterflies with itb eing a couple years since he’s been in, but he’s excite d to get back doing what he does.” Vick set to make debut Thursday I N t his Sunday, Aug. 16, 2009, file photo, Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Michael Vick throws during NFL football practice at team's practice facility in Philadelphia. Vick will make his pre-s eason debut for the Philadelphia Eagles on Thursday night, Aug. 27, 2009. M a t t S l o c u m / A P P h o t o SPORTS IN BRIEF FOOTBALL L UFKIN, Texas Associated Press FORMER Miami Dolp hins defensive lineman T.J. Turner has died of complications from as troke. He was 46. Turner’s death was confirmed by Tims Funeral Home in Lufkin. The Lufkin Daily News said he died Monday at a Bryan, Texas, hospital after a stroke last week. T urner played seven seasons for the Dolphins from 1986-92, compiling1 6 sacks in 101 career games. He played defen s ive end and nose tack le. He was an All-South w est Conference player at Houston before the Dolphins drafted him in the third round in 1986. Former Dolphins DL Turner dies at 46 after stroke BASKETBALL TAMPA, Fla. Associated Press DISGRACED former NBA referee Tim Donaghy is back behind bars. Donaghy was being held without bond Tuesday for a federal rule violation, according to Hillsborough County jail records. A message left Tuesday at the office of Donaghy’s attorney was not immediately returned. Donaghy was given a 15-month sentence last year after he said he took money from a professional gambler in exchange for inside tips on games including games he worked. He pleaded guilty to conspiracy to engage in wire fraud and transmitting betting information through interstate commerce. Donaghy was moved to a halfway house this year after serving part his sentence in a federal prison camp. He was scheduled for release in October. Ex-ref Donaghy jailed for federal r ule violation Tim Donaghy Track & Field JOHANNESBURG Associated Press LOOKING shy and awkward under the glare of media attention, South African runner Caster Semenya returned home Tuesday amid questions about her gender after her 800-meter win at the world championships and South Africa’s president vowed that he would not permit her gold medal to be taken away, no matter what gender tests say. The president of Athletics South Africa, Leonard Chuene, was also defiant and said he had resigned from his seat on the IAAF board to protest the organization’s treatment of Semenya. She is not accused of trying to cheat, but of perhaps unknowingly having a medical condition that blurs her gender and gives her an unfair advantage. “We are not going to allow Europeans to describe and define our children,” he told a news conference, which Semenya attended although she did not address reporters. Semenya’s victory in Berlin came after world ath letics officials said they were conducting gender tests after questions arose about her muscular build and deep voice. South Africans have embraced her achievement despite the questions. Semenya was greeted warmly at the airport in Johannesburg by several thousand singing and dancing fans. A homemade poster held by a fan at the airport declared Semenya “our first lady of sport.” The 18-year-old, dressed in her team tracksuit with her gold medal around her neck, then was brought to a stage set up in the parking lot. “Hi everybody,” Semenya told the roaring crowd of fans. Standing in a row with the other South African medalists, she gave a thumbs-up sign and waved to people in the crowd. The smiling teenager also joined in with the dancing for a short while before being embraced by her younger siblings. Semenya also was wel comed home by her parents and Winnie MadikizelaMandela, the former wife of the country’s first black president Nelson Mandela. “We are here to tell the whole world how proud we are of our little girl,” Madikizela-Mandela told the cheer ing crowd of fans. “They can write what they like we are proud of her.” Semenya’s mother Dorcus, wearing a traditional headdress, stood beaming at her daughter. “She has lifted our hearts,” she said. “We feel powerful because of her.” On Tuesday, Semenya spoke very briefly at the presidential guest house in Pretoria after South African President Jacob Zuma gave a speech celebrating the athletes’ return. Semenya strode confidently to the podium and described her last race and those that led to it. She said that before her final 800-meter race, her coach told her, “’last 200, kill them. I did what he said, but I took a lead in the last 400. I celebrated the last 200. It was great,” she said with a smile as her teammates stood up to applaud. Zuma said South Africa’s minister of sport and recreation has written to the IAAF to express “our disap pointment and the manner in which the body has dealt with the matter,” he said. South Africans rally for gender contr oversy r unner SOUTH Africa's President Jacob Zuma, right, congratulates athlete Caster Semenya, left, during their meeting at The Presidential Guest House in Pretoria, South Africa, Tuesday Aug. 25, 2009. Semenya, who is undergoing gender testing after questions arose about her muscular build and deep voice, returns home Tuesday to celebrations after her 800-meter win at the world champi onships. S OUTH A frica's Caster Semenya celebrates as she crosses the finish line to win the gold medal in the final of the Women's 800m during the World Athletics Champi onships in Berlin on Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2009. Themba Hadebe/ AP Photo D a v i d J . P h i l l i p / A P P h o t o

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM beyond." Dr. Ferguson said, "Lil' Cynthia Rahming at 48kg is small. She's also cute, but she'll ruin your day if you line up in front ofher. I know one of these days she's going to s hock the world. At 15 she a coach's dream." More importantly though is the systemsbased approach that Dr. Ferguson brings to coaching. In a matter of month Coach Ferguson has help the Bahamas make a dent internationally in terms of their judo development. 66kg Judo Player and Bahamian World Team member Wellington Mullings says, "Dr. Ferguson expects us to win and requires a high level of professionalism. I'm not only learning about judo, I'm developing as a man and ana dult at the same time. I really didn't know e xactly how important reading, studying and deliberate practice were until now. I'm really looking forward to competing at the Worlds." The Bahamas Judo Federation has focused first on developing winning attitude then putting in place the necessary training elements to bring the confidence to win. Thisp hilospophy runs through the program from the most entry level to its advanced athletes. Persons interested in finding out more about the Bahamas Judo program may contact Bahamas Judo at 364-6773. Bahamians to fight Belurus, Bulgaria at the Judo World Championships F ROM page 11 The trio of medallists from Berlin will head the field, Jamaica’s Shelly-Ann Fraser and Kerron Stewart and bronze medallist Carmelita Jeter of the United States. E ight of the nine women in the field appeared in last weeks 100m final in Berlin i ncluding Lauryn Williams of the United States, Kelly-Ann Baptiste of Trinidad and Tobago, and Aleen Bailey of Jamaica. Verna Sailer of Germany will round out the field as the lone member not to make the Berlin as she was eliminated in the semifinals. Sturrup, who finished seventh in the World Championship final is ranked second in World Athletics Tour standings behind Stewart, while Feguson-McKenzie, who finished sixth, is the seventh ranked century runner. Leevan Sands will make his sixth appearance on the Euro circuit in 2009 in the triple jump. Despite a season’s best jump of 17.20m, Sands finished fourth at the World Champi onships behind Nelson Evora of Portugal (17.44m (17.32m17.27m Evora will defend his gold medal, heading the field in Zurich. Other top 10 finishers in Berlin are included in the field, Arnie Giralt of Cuba (17.15m Jadel Gregario of Brazil (17.06m Spasovkhodskiy of Russia (17.02 Sands is currently ranked third on the World Athletics Tour Standings list with 40 points, behind Girat and Idowu. In the 400m, Chris Brown seeks redemp tion for a disappointing fifth place finish in Berlin. The 400m field in Zurich will nearly mirror the final at the World Championships with fourth place finisher Tabarie Henry of the U.S Virgin Islands replaced by 400m hurdles gold medallist, Kerron Clement of the United States. In Zurich Brown will be joined by World Championship medallists Lashawn Merritt (44.06s44.60s ed States and Renny Quow of Trinidad and Tobago (45.02s The remainder of the field includes David Gillick of Ireland, Leslie Djhone of France, and Micahel Bingham of Great Britain. Brown is currently the top ranked quartermiler after the latest update of the World Ath letics Tour Standings with 60 points. Following Zurich, The Golden League will have just one meet remaining, its finale Sep tember 4th in Brussels, Belgium. Four athletes remain in contention for the IAAF’s Golden League $1 Million jackpot including Stewart in the 100m, Sanya Richards of the United States in the 400m, and Yelena Isinbayeva of Russia in the Pole Vault. Kenenisa Bekele of Ethiopia is the lone male athlete eligible in the 3000m/5000m. Athletes are required to win at all six meets in the series to acquire at least a share of athlet ics’ biggest yearly payday, however if no athlete manages to claim six event wins and the $1 Million, then anyone with five victories will share half the original prize, which is $500,000. p layed for years on the pro circuit. B oth golfers will be making their third trip to the World Cup Qualifyinge vent, and have previously teammed up in 2007. G orospe qualified for the tournament last year with BPGA President ChrisL ewis. Turnquest said his third tournament qualification looks to be the most effective thus far because of thee xtended preparation time the team has headed into t he event. “It was a very good feeling. I thnk we have a strongt eam this year and for one of the first times we have time a nd an opportunity to practice and fully prepare ourselves for competition. The preparation will be vital for us . “In the past we have never really had time to work together which if crucialb ecause it is a team event. We get to work on our g ames together, develop a team chemistry, work on how we compliment eacho ther. “One person can not win a nd it obviously has to be a team effort so with this time we have to work togethera nd work on our weaknesses I think it will make all the differences in year’s past.” Golfing duo earn right to represent country THE WORLD CUP TEAM: Pictured from left to right a re Keno Turnquest, Chris Lewis (Bahamas Professiona l Golf Association President) and Lemon Gorospe FROM page 11 Athletes turn their attention to regular seasons in Europe FROM page 11 ALLYSON FELIX of the United States of the United States, right, races to the line on her way winning the gold medal in the final of the Women’s 200m ahead of Jamaica’s Veronica Campbell-Brown, center, who took the silver medal and Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie of the Bahamas, bronze, during the World Athletics Championships in Berlin on Friday, Aug. 21, 2009. A P P h o t o / M i c h a e l S o h n CHANDRA STURRUP CHRIS ‘FIREMAN’ BROWN in action in Berlin. Defending champion Serena Williams was seeded No. 2 for the U.S. Open on Tuesday, behind Dinara Safina, because the tournament stuck to its policy of strictly following the rank ings. Roger Federer was seeded No. 1 for the fifth time at the year’s last Grand Slam tournament. He is ranked No. 1 and has won the U.S. Open five years in a row. Safina is No. 1 in the WTA computer, which calculates rankings based on performances across tournaments over the preceding 52 weeks. The younger sister of former men’s No. 1 Marat Safin is still seeking her first Grand Slam title. She is 03 in major finals, including a loss to Williams at the Australian Open in January. Williams has won three of the past four Grand Slam singles championships and 11 overall, the most among active women. She will be seeking her fourth U.S. Open title. Tournament director Jim Curley said the U.S. Tennis Association did discuss the possibility of moving Williams ahead of Safina. “The U.S. Open has the prerogative of altering its seedings; it’s something we have not availed ourselves of in quite some time,” Curley said in a telephone interview. “We certainly spoke about it, but it never got to the point where we were seriously intending to not follow the rankings.” Since 1997, the USTA has matched its seedings to the ATP and WTA rankings. “The players do earn their rankings over a 12mointh period, both at Grand Slams and nonGrand Slam events. At the end of the day, whether you’re seeded No. 1 or seeded No. 2 at the U.S. Open, it really doesn’t matter. You’re either at the top of the draw or the bottom of the draw, and the rest of the draw is determined by a coin toss,” Curley said. “From a competition per spective, there really isn’t any difference being seeded 1 or 2.” The draw will be announced Thursday, and the tournament begins Monday. After the top two women, two-time U.S. Open champion Venus Williams is No. 3, followed by Beijing Olympics gold medalist Elena Dementieva and 2008 U.S. Open runner-up Jelena Jankovic. Maria Sharapova is No. 29 barely earning one of the 32 seedings after rising from No. 49 in the rankings last week. She won the 2006 U.S. Open for one of her three major titles but missed the tournament last year because of a right shoul der injury. The Russian had surgery in October and a long absence from the tour dropped her ranking. Sharapova is among a dozen Grand Slam singles champions seeded at this year’s U.S. Open. One major champion in the field but not seeded is 2005 U.S. Open winner Kim Clijsters, who recently came out of retirement and received a wild card from the USTA. S.Williams No. 2 to Safina in US Open seedings TENNIS

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Golfing duo earn right to represent country C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE South Africans rally round runner TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Bahamian Judo athletes have spent the past several months preparing for the Judo world championships and the hard work appears to be paying off. Tomorrow Cynthia Rahming, age 15, and Wellington Mullings, age 20, will fight Belurus and Bulgaria at the Senior Judo World Championships. These are strong Judo countries with a wrestling style of Judo, exactly what the Bahamian team has been preparing against. Earlier in the month, the Judo World Cadet Championships in Budapest Hungary Cynthia Rahming (-44Kg) and Alex Martinborough (66Kg), both 15 years of age, lost in first round matches respectively to the Indian Champion and the Greek Champion. However, the matches were quite competitive with Cynthia going almost the distance against the Indian Champion and Alex getting off an impressive attacking sequence against his opponent before being pinned. "Judo is a sport in which if you are outmatched you can lose in seconds. The fact that these kids lasted and indeed dominated certain exchanges against World class competitors is sig nificant." Said Bahamas Judo President D'Arcy Rahming."At this point we are looking for improvement and we are pleased with what we see in the Bahamas Judo Program," said Bahamas BOA President Wellington Miller. Judo matches are won by throwing an opponent to his back or pinning him to his back for 25 seconds. Judo is rising in popularity in the Bahamas and has began to gain the respect and notice of the World body. "We are working on several levels; delegates, athletes and coaches," says Rahming. "We have made the commitment to develop a world class program beginning at the grass roots level. That is why we are recruiting the best in the world to help move us forward." The athletes were prepared by 2004 Olympian Dr. Rhadi Ferguson, of Bahamian descent. After retiring from active competition in 2005 Dr. Rhadi Ferguson coached a 2008 Olympian, completed his dissertation, earned his doctorate degree, coached various Mixed Martial Arts Fighters and gained worldwide respect and recog nition due to his constant onslaught of marketing and creation of visibility for the sport of judo worldwide through social media networking. "We are definitely looking forward to the 2009 World Championships and Cynthia and Wellington Cynthia and Alex Rahming at World Congress Ferguson warms up Mullings by RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net F ollowing a memorable performance at the 12th IAAF Championships in Athletics which fluctuated between a pair of medal winning performances, heartbreaking disqualifications and an unfortunate off-the-field incident, Bahamians athletes continue their regular seasons on the European circuits. Several of the countries elite athletes left the games in Berlin, Germany following the closing ceremonies and turned immediately toward preparation for the fifth leg of the IAAF Golden League series of meets. The Weltklasse Zurich scheduled for August 28th in Zurich, Switzerland will feature a number of Bahamian athletes led by medal winners Debbie FergusonMcKenzie and Chandra Sturrup. Ferguson-McKenzie, the Bahamas’ lone individual medal winner at the World Championships with her bronze medal in the 200m, will look to continue the prolific season she has enjoyed thus far. With her time of 22.41s, she finished b ehind Allyson Felix (22.02s i ca Campell-Brown (22.35s S turrup joined the 200m specialist alongside Christine Amertil, and Sheniqua Ferguson to return the Women’s 400m relay team to prominence with a silver medal performance. Both Ferguson-McKenzie and Sturrup will contest the 100m in a star studded lineup in Zurich. Farewell Berlin ... hello Golden League GETTING READ Y T OTAKEONTHEWORLD Bahamians to fight Belurus, Bulgaria at the Judo W orld Championships Athletes turn their attention to regular seasons in Europe SEE page 10 DEBBIE FERGUSON-MCKENZIE crosses the finish line to take the silver in the Women's 4x100m relay during the World Athletics Championships in Berlin on Saturday, Aug. 22, 2009. SEE page 10 by RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter r dorsett@tribunemedia.net A duo of Bahamian golf pros earned the right to represent the country at a series of qualifying events and continue their trek toward the sport’s WorldC up. Keno Turnquest and Lemon Gorospe emerged f rom a field of nine golfers at a qualifying event hosted by Lyford Cay Golf Club. Turnquest shot a combined score of 151to lead t he group, while Gorospe shot a 154. The team will now have more than two months of prepartion before they head to the Nations Cup -O mega Mission Hills Qualifier. The event, hosted September 21-25 at the Carac as Country Club, with spots for the Omega Mission Hills World Cup on the line. Turnquest is a former Bahamas Professional G olfers Association National Champion, and has a resume which includes being a multi junior nationa l champion, representing The Bahamas at previous World Cup event, former member of the Hoerman Cup team and playing on the collegiate scenef or five years. Goropse is also a former junior national champ ion, Hoerman Cup team member, former junior college champion in North Carolina and he has S EE page 10

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Airline fee increases will ‘wreak havoc’ B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Bahamas has one of the highest government debtt o revenue ratios, standing at 240 per cent, among nations that enjoy the same strong sovereign credit ratings, a leading Wall Streeta gency has warned, something that was “potentially troublesome” and “exacerbates fiscal spending rigidities”. And data produced by Moody’s, the international credit rating agency, in a credit opinion on the Bahamas issued on August 11, 2009, showed that in the short-term at least key fiscal ratios will get worse, not better, with the central government debt-to-GDP ratio forecast to hit almost 47 per cent at the end of the 2010 fiscal year. Moody’s statistics again highlighted the heavy toll the recession has exacted from the Bahamas’ public finances, with the central government’s debt-to-revenue ratio having increased from 207.1 per cent in 2008 to 241.5 per cent for fiscal 2009. This ratio is forecast to further rise to 255 per cent in fiscal 2010. “Government debt as a percentage of revenues has risen as a consequence of the current crisis, and at 240 per cent for 2009 is one of the highest in its peer group,” Moody’s said of the Bahamas. “This condition exacerbates fiscal spending rigidities and is potentially trou blesome, given its exposure C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.27 $4.27 $4.05 Bahamas 240% debt-torevenue ratio concerns * International credit rating agency warns key indicator among highest for similarly rated countries, with government debt-to-GDP ratio to hit 47% next year* Debt-to-revenue indicator will strike 255% in 2010, says Moody’s, as former finance minister warns: ‘We’re not out of the woods yet’* Recession ‘still playing itself out’ and spreading beyond tourism, although decline rate falling SEE page 2B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Cable Bahamas current gearing ratio lies just outside the limits being proposed by the new electronic communica-t ions sector regulator, which is proposing that it and the B ahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC operators with significant market power (SMP to a range between 10-30 per cent. The Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCA Bahamas-based electronic communications operators with SMP power, said it had calculated Cable Bahamas’ gearing ratio as being 30.1 per cent at year-end 2008, compared to 40.1 per cent the previous year. Cable’s gearing ratio outside proposed 30% regulatory limit SEE page 4B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T he Government will “wreak havoc” on the Bahamian private airline industry if it pushes ahead with the planned implementation of new fees/regulations that could raise an operator’s costs by $100,000 per annum, Tribune Business was told yesterday, with the sector handed an “impos-s ible” four-day deadline to review a new draft of the amendments. Kevin Turnquest, president of the Bahamas Association of Air Transport Operators, which represents the moret han 20 private Bahamian airlines and charter companies, told Tribune Business that the four days they had been giv en by the Civil Aviation Department (CAD n ew draft regulations had expired yesterday, Explaining that the document was 47 pages long, Mr T urnquest said the Association and its individual members h ad “simply not enough time to respond. The deadline to r eply was today. It’s impossible to provide them with an i nformed position”. The CAD and the Government have continued to place n ew advertisements stating that the regulations, initially S EE page 3B VERNICE WALKINE By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor Cable Bahamas has seen subscriber numbers for its premiu m cable TV services drop by a net 3-5 per cent for the yearto-date due to the recession, Tribune Business was told yes-t erday, with the BISX-listed company expecting its $40 mil-l ion private placement to be “fully subscribed”. B arry Williams, the company’s vice-president of finance, said that despite the slight decline in subscriber numbers, something that was not unexpected for its more expensive premium services as consumers reduce discretionary spending, Cable Bahamas was “still managing to stay a little ahead of the game”. Mr Williams said Cable B ahamas was “just behind” expectations on subscriberc hurn for 2009-to-date, although this was “not signific ant”. While the company was “about 1 per cent” down on s ubscriber numbers for its basic cable TV service, its Internetc lient numbers were “a little a bove plan year-to-date”. As for premium cable TV services, Mr Williams said: “We continue to see a challenge with the premium services. We continue to see churn down there. Year-to-date, we’re probably down in the net 3-5 per cent range. It’s not something we didn’t expect or anticipate. We’veb uilt into our expectations with respect to this economic situat ion, and so far we’ve estimated it pretty good in terms of what h as happened to subscriber numbers and revenues. I thinkw e’ve done a really good job Cable sees 3-5% premium drop Company expects $40m preference share issue to be fully subscribed, amid wait for NIB and other investors SEE page 3B By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE MINISTRY of Tourism saw a 50 per cent spike on hits to its website, Bahamas.com, during and after the Miss Universe Pageant, its director-general said yesterday, with more than $1 million invested to garner just that kind of response form the international community. Vernice Walkine told Tribune Business that it was much too early to gauge exactly what government spending on the pageant totalled, but she suspected the amount to be more than $1 million. “I am signing some cheques now,” she said. The Government has scheduled a post-mortem pageant meeting for mid-Sep t ember to discuss aggregate spending on the event. Ms Walkine lauded the efforts of the Government to use Bahamian businesses to cater to the Miss Universe delegation, including trans-p ort, float building and chart er flights. “You’re talking about more than $1 million spent in the Bahamas,” she said. “That was a nice benefit of the hosting of this event, to re-circulate money within the econo my.” She added that the Ministry of Tourism was awaiting statistics on ticket sale numbers and hotel performance in order to truly evaluate the cost-benefit from hosting the event. However, Ms Walkine said that from a publicity perspective she was extremely pleased with the quality of the imagery shown in over 180 countries. The Miss Universe Pageant was expected to bring immeasurable public exposure to the Bahamas and, according to Ms Walkine, it has. “We can’t quantify that,” she said. “The ladies were exposed to as much of the Bahamas as they could. The media moved with them and there are a lot of great stories.” Bahamas.com received almost 50 per cent more traffic than normal last Sunday as the beauty competition was aired around the world, according to Miss Walkine, while Monday morning, just before 9.30am, it had already received more than 4,000 hits. She said Bahamas.com received almost 15,000 hits on Sunday night. “The reports we have gotten from people and the spike on the on the website all point to us having achieved the priMinistry sees 50% website hit rise SEE page 4B

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t o natural disasters and external shocks. Susceptibility to event risks thatc ould suddenly lead to a multiple-notch adjustment in the country’s ratings, however, is judged to be lowr elative to the universe of rated countries.” That gives the Governm ent some breathing space, as it indicates the A3 and A 1 ratings on its foreign currency and domestic bonds, and the Aa1 rating on itsf oreign current debt, are not in jeopardy of being downgraded at least in the shortterm. However, the Moody’s d ata, which is usually drawn from the Government’s own s tatistics and those supplied by the likes of the International Monetary Fund( IMF), again illustrates the d epth of the challenge facing the Ingraham administration w hen it comes to getting the public finances back into line over the short to medi-u m-term. To date, the Government ’s strategy appears to be one pinning its hopes on a US economic recovery byt he 2010 first half, prior to the 2010-2011 Budget communication, which in turn should feed into the Bahamas some six monthsl ater and avoid the need for any drastic spending and civil service cuts. M oody’s, perhaps optimistically, projected that this y ear’s 4.5 per cent contraction of the Bahamian economy would be followed by am odest 0.5 per cent growth in 2010. However, the external debt to current account receipts ratio was projectedt o increase from 24.9 per cent in 2009 to 26.7 per cent next year, with the Bahamas’ external vulnerability indicator rising from1 5.8 in 2008 to 18.7 this year, then 19.2 in 2010. Reducing the fiscal deficit and government debt will be key factors if the Govern-m ent is to secure an improved credit rating, Moody’s warned, adding: “The ratings are limited by a narrow economic base, moderate government financial strength constrained by fiscal inflexibility and comparatively high government debt ratios and vulnerability to external shocks..... “Continued and permanent deterioration of the Government’s debt metrics may result in a downgrade.” For the first 11 months of the 2008-2009 fiscal year, the Government’s deficit rose by 74 per cent to $219 million, as revenues fell 6.1 per c ent and spending increased by 4.5 per cent. S till, Moody’s praised the Bahamas for its long tradition of political stability, rel-a tively low external debt, high standard of living and s trong tourism and financial services industries. Moody’s assessment came a s a former finance minister told Tribune Business that the Bahamian economy was “not out of the woods yet” despite promising rumblingsc oming from the US, as the recession was still “gradually eating its way through thee conomy”. James Smith, minister of s tate for finance in the former Christie administration, said that while the rate ofd ecline in employment and the overall economy had slowed, the recession was now impacting industries outside the tourism indus-t ry, and the Bahamas as a result was “still continuing on a downward spiral”. “We still have to work this thing out,” Mr Smith told T ribune Business . “We are seeing things produced by the recession, but there are structural deficiencies in the economy that are not pick-i ng up the slack..... “This thing is still playing itself out, and forcing the policymakers to accelerate programmes they may have put on the back burner for infrastructure, new schools.” He added: “We need to see what happens beyond our slow tourism season. If we have a winter season in 2009 that is better than in 2008, it may be an indication that things will not get much worse.” The global economy, chiefly the US, determined the rate of economic growth enjoyed by the Bahamas, Mr Smith said, adding that this nation was “not in a position to provide an appropriate stimulus” because it did not have a hard currency. He explained that monetary policy in the Bahamian context was “almost ineffective” in a recession, as the Government and Central Bank could not print money because there was no way to mop up the excess afterwards. “When it does turnaround, if we do not have a strong economy, we will have one that is much more aware of itself,” Mr Smith said. “The people left are working hard at it, so I could see some productivity gains, which is always good for an economy.” Consumer demand and confidence, though, were continuing to be hit by the continued slippage in the tourism figures, coupled with the short-term and permanent closure of various hotel properties. This was both raising unemployment and dampening consumer spending. A void these characteristics and stay successful. Here are things you should avoid like a plague and or Boiled Barracuda. Rigidity – In sales you can't succeed with rigid one-way thinking, or an unwillingness to adopt new ideas and new ways of doing things. Everything is changing fast. If you are too rigid you will not be able to adapt. Think of it this way: Your future should never be behind you. Unoriginal Join the average parade and you will blend in with all your competition. Ever wonder why SunTee’s building on Shirley Street is painted with bright colours? Well, that’s so you don’t run into the building with your car, silly. If we painted the building a boring colour then we have failed to differentiate ourselves from our competitors. Also, remember you are a walking billboard. You should have the proper attire on, with your company logo affixed. Remember, image is everything. Look sharp, professional, fun etc, whichever image fits your business. Oh, and make sure you buy from SunTee. Ha-ha. Uncommitted – If you're serious about selling, you have to be serious and focused on a steady diet of self-improvement. Salespeople have to increase their knowledge of their customers, their client’s products and market knowledge. I know this is hard, day in and day out. Just think what will happen if you don’t do anything. That’s right, nothing. That should motivate you. Unemotional – Ralph Waldo Emerson once said: “Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.” Spread your enthusiasm like a WIRUS (Bahamian for virus). You have to be excited about your work and your products if you expect your sales prospects and customers to get excited about these things. Make sure your customers are catching DA WIRUS. Unconvincing – You'll sound unconvincing if you don't absolutely love the products you're selling. If you lack passion and enthusiasm for your products and services, don't expect a long line of prospects. There are many ways to find passion in any product. No passion, no sales. If you can’t find any passion, either change products or careers. Unhappy – Ever notice how unhappy people are? How grumpy they are? When you're selling, no matter what is going on in your world, leave that emotion behind you when talking with a client. You can't remove the pain that you suffer, but you can remove your pained expression. Try this before your next chat with a client. Say to yourself 10 times really fast with ENTUSIASM (Bahamian for enthusiasm “I’m a great salesperson”, and see if you don’t start laughing yourself to death. Try it and let me know. Unmotivated – If you walk around like a conch on the ocean floor, that’s the image you will reflect, (I reach, when I reach – like the song says). If you walk around with a little pep in your step, this shows you are alive, motivated and on a mission. Our clients today want things yesterday, and there are times when we turnaround orders in less than 24 hours. I know there are days when you feel like something the cat dragged in, but you have to slap yourself in the face and wake up, because the show stops for no man or woman. Unwelcome – So many salespeople wear out their welcome. They stay too long and talk too much. BLAH, BLAH, BLAH, BLAH. Get the message? Say less, listen more, and as soon as you've achieved your sales call objectives, end the call. Remember, take the cotton out of your ears and put it in your mouth. You'll accomplish more and your customer will appreciate you more. If your customer has to end the call for you, you've overstayed your welcome. Uninformed – Educate yourself. Know what’s happening locally and globally. At least have little tid bits of what’s going on. I’m not the best conversationalist, but I can hold my own. Today, technology makes this easy to do. Also, be informed about your client. At least go on their website and read a bit about them. To achieve unlimited selling success you must throw these out. All of these marketing strategies are certain to keep your business on top during these challenging economic times. Have a productive and profitable week! Remember, DEM WHO IS MARKET MUSSE GONE MAKE IT - “THOSE WHO MARKET WILL MAKE IT.” NB: Scott Farrington is president of SunTee EmbroidMe, a promotional and marketing company specialising in uniforms, embroidery, silkscreen printing and promotional products. Established over 27 years, ago SunTee EmbroidMe has assisted Bahamian businesses from various industries in marketing themselves. Readers can contact Mr Farring ton at SunTee EmbroidMe on East Shirley Street or, by email at scott@sun-tee.com or by telephone at 242-393-3104. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 5(*,67(5(' 3+<6,&,$1 +(/3 IT MANAGERBahamas Supermarkets Limited operates a leading supermarket chain in The Bahamas. As a market leader, t he Company prides itself on delivering premier service through its City Market supermarkets, having a strong commitment to its customers, associates and community. An opportunity for an I. T. Manager exists in New Providence to join this market leader. Reporting to the CEO, this position involves managing a staff of tech support personnel who are responsible for the daily operations of customer service, retail and office support and network/systems management. Also, the candidate is responsible for resource planning and assignments within the group to ensure projects are delivered on time with a high degree of quality. The ideal candidate should have 2-3 years of solid measurable experience in IT Project Management and an excellent communicator, both oral and written. QUALIFICATIONS/REQUIREMENTS: Manageraspects of IT governance.skillsIT projects are aligned with the business and company’s vision.’s and LAN’s. MCSE certified.skills.SQL Server and Project Management skills a definite assetprojects and tasksPerformance, and Supportability requirements of critical software componentssolutionssoftware specifications that reflect an in-depth understanding of the business and end-user requirements while also considering IT standards and technical direction n related issues Salary and benefits will be commensurate with experience and qualifications. If you have what it takes to succeed in this challenging role, forward your resume and cover letter to:Human Resources Director Bahamas Supermarkets Limited No telephone inquiries please Only qualified applicants will be contactedAINAUG2409 L egal NoticeNOTICEALGOGENETIC ADVISORY LTD.I N VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the I nternational Business Companies Act 2000 ALGOGENETIC ADVISORY LTD. is in dissolution. The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 19th August 2009. David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (BahamasB uilding 2 Caves Village, P.O. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of ALGOGENETIC ADVISORYLTD. All persons having claims a gainst the above-named company are required to send their address and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 19th September 2009. POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR SENIOR ASSOCIATES Human Resources Partner PricewaterhouseCoopers P.O. Box N-3910 Nassau, The Bahamas These bad habits will make you unsuccessful S traight to the point. H EREARESOME W ANTNOTS: T oday, Tomorrow Next Week – A re Neither Here Nor There C ustomers and clients today don’t care how big you are or how old you are, sure they want to deal withs omebody with a good reputation, b ut more importantly at this moment they only care about what is relevant and how you can meet theirn eeds today, now. ConstantContact Y ou can call a million times (not s uggested), e-mail daily (not recomm ended) and you can phone hourly (no way t omer will move/act when they are ready. S urprise P rice is not the determining factor; a s a matter of fact it is the least d etermining factor in making a decis ion. Hhhhmmm. L oyaltyHaHa I don’t think loyalty exists like it use to. I have proven this with partnerships and cosponsoring. What matters is what you can do for men ow. HowGreatYouAre N ope they don’t remember that e ither, what they remember is when y ou could not service or deliver as promised... H EREARESOMEWANTS: W hat Do They Care About? How much do you know about them or their company? Do your esearch, have information on their c ompany, their products etc. C omfortandAssurance T hey want security and assurance. C an you, have you provided and d elivered on time in the past.They would rather pay more and be a ssured they get what they want w hen they want it or need it. R eputation W hat and who, have you provided f or before? Delivering a year later on something won’t get you far... W hatareTheyBuying? It’s not just a product, its assurance and comfort customers are buying. No one likes to buy feelingu ncomfortable, or not positively k nowing. If you can demonstrate this, then do it. They want to get the most value for their money and seer eturns. All of these marketing strategies a re certain to keep your business on top during these challenging econ omic times.Have a productive and p rofitable week! Remember, THOSE WHO MARKET WILL MAKE IT.”S cottFarringtonisPresidentof SunTeeEmbroidMe,apromotional a ndmarketingcompanyspecializi nginpromotionalproducts.Establishedover27yearsagoSunTee EmbroidMehasassistedlocalbusin essesfromvariousindustriesfrom t ourism,bankingandtelecommunicationsinmarketingthemselves. ReaderscancontactMr.Farrington a tSunTeeEmbroidMeonEast S hirleyStreet,bye-mailat scott@sun-tee.comorbytelephone at242-393-3104. C M Y K C M Y KBUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Straight to the point: Wants and want nots Promotional Marketing by Scott Farrington p lace energy efficiency meas ures including timers, low wattage lighting, solar water heaters, staff-led practical e nergy conservation measures a nd a range of other initiatives. “Member properties are p aying strict attention to key f actors including product improvement and marketing. Several hotels reported hav-i ng the highest levels of cust omer satisfaction on record. W e are encouraged by the f act that many of our people have responded. Our industry is packed with exceptionalp eople with the professionalism and commitment to providing stellar service. Allh ands need to be on deck in t his regard, as our reputation can help pull us out of this sooner than later. Word ofm outh is the best form of m arketing,” added the BHA P resident. T he survey respondents also pointed to several key concerns which affect the via-b ility of their business. These include the continued need for lower airfares, additionala irlift to some of our islands, h igh operating costs and reduced cash flow. The Ministry of Tourism and Aviation,w orking with the private sect or Promotion Board partners, has had some success in r educing airfares and attracti ng additional airlift and efforts are ongoing.ApplaudedMr Sands applauded efforts t o bring about the Miss Universe Pageant. Industry has been pleased t o partner with the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation to help make it possible for TheB ahamas to host the Miss Universe pageant. This is a long-term investment in ourd estination as the real value o f the pageant is the incredible international press and exposure we will receive form onths and years to come. T he immediate impact will not be as significant as the long-term impact,” he stated. We are encouraged by the G overnment’s approach to improving our product both f or our current visitors as well a s for the future. The beautification program is making a significant difference in the appearance of New Providence. Investments are beingm ade to improve our roads a nd airports, led by the major work being done at Lynden P indling International Airp ort. The downtown Nassau improvements are beginning to take shape. These are allr esponsible initiatives tied to o ur future which demonstrate the maturity of our destination,” added Mr Sands. T he BHA mid-year economic review and outlook survey was conducted duringt he first week of July, 2009. T he survey is undertaken to assist BHA and public and private sector stakeholdersw ith businesses and the econo my. Recommendations are also solicited to provide direct ion to BHA in planning its program priorities and activit ies. The findings are based u pon responses from 30 hotels representing a cross-section of large and small hotels fromN assau-Paradise Island, G rand Bahama and the Out Islands.Hotels report significant declines in activity during first six months of FROMpage1B Bahamas 240% debt-to-revenue ratio concerns F ROM page 1B JAMES SMITH

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to mitigate that with expense management. On the revenue side, we’re basically in line with what we expected.” Meanwhile, Mr Williams told T ribune Business that Cable Bahamas’ $40 million preference share issue, which is now due to close at end-August 2009, was in good shape. “It’s going to be closing on the 31st, next Monday,” he added. “Because of some circumstances that some of the p articular investors were having, our advisers said it was prudent to extend it for one month. “It’s gone very well, and it’s going to be pretty much fully subscribed.” The proceeds from the $40 million private placement are being used to finance the $80 m illion buyout of Columbus Communications, Cable Bahamas’ largest shareholder, which holds a 30 per cent stake in the company. The offering was extended to give institutional investors and high-net worths extra time to decide on whether to partici pate, given that key executives and decisionmakers were offisland on vacation during July. In particular, Tribune Busi ness understands through informed sources that the key i nvestor for whom the extension was targeted at is the N ational Insurance Board (NIB G overnment, which will have the ultimate say on whetherN IB participates. As the second-largest shareholder in C able Bahamas behind Columbus, its participation seems likely. Elsewhere, Mr Williams said that during the 2009 first half Cable Bahamas had been holding expenses back as much as possible” through a variety of initiatives. Its ‘One Tech’ initiative, w hich in 2008 had seen a numb er of company technicians trained to perform both cable TV and Internet work, had “saved us a lot on the human r esources side” by reducing the number of personnel Cable Bahamas needed to send to solve client problems from one t o two. The electricity managem ent system at the company’s headquarters had reduced energy costs by turning lights off ata certain time, and limiting the a ir conditioning to certain temperatures at certain hours, while at weekends Cable Bahamas was totally closing its c ustomer service building after h ours operating solely from its administration building. Cable Bahamas was repaying an average $2 million in d ebt per quarter, or $8 million per year, Mr Williams told Tribune Business, with the company set to launch a ‘Back toS chool’ special offering new subscribers a discount on certain services. Typically, when we get a n ew Internet subscriber, if they sign up for a minimum of a year, they will be eligible to get about three months’ of services f ree,” Mr Williams explained. “The marketing guys are putting together the finishing touches on a campaign withr espect to that. Obviously, they’ll be working on a Christm as campaign to repackage products, provide some discounts, provide some incentives to make it a little bit more attractive for customers andg ive them some relief in these times.” And the Cable Bahamas executive added: “I think we’ll e nd up with a good year overall. We’re anticipating a good fourth quarter. The fourth quarter for us has traditionally been the best quarter of they ear. “Last year, in 2008, when we started to feel the pinch of the economic situation and the hotels started laying-off, we still e nded up with a good fourth quarter. My view is that our Bahamian society, when it comes to Thanksgiving and Christmas, irrespective of thee conomic situation, Bahamians somehow find a way to have a great time. That helps us and a lot of retailers as well.” C able Bahamas employs some 400 persons, including contract and temporary personnel, and Mr Williams said the company had never con-t emplated any lay-offs as a result of the economy. “All things considered, I think we’ve done pretty good,” h e said. “It’s a tough environment out there, but one of the things we pride ourselves on, unlike other companies, is that w e’ve not gone the way of reducing staff. We’ve maint ained it, and not by accident. That will be a very, very last r esort for us, and by really tightly managing expenses we’veb een able to compensate for some of the shortfall we’ve e xperienced in revenue.” drawn up in 2005, will come i nto effect on September 10, 2009, despite the industry’s continued objections. “It’ll just wreak havoc on the industry,” Mr Turnquest toldT ribune Business, when asked what impact implementation of the regulations would have. “We’ve not been able to d etermine the total impact yet, but from a preliminary perspective one operator has said they would have to increase fees by between 40-60 per cent,a nd incur $100,000 in increased annual operating costs. “It’ll just be devastating for the industry. You can’t pass on t hose increases to the consumer. The whole thing is going to be a disaster a complete disaster. Air transport in the Bahamas is so essential to get-t ing around. How else are you going to get around from places like Rum Cay?” M r Turnquest said that from a preliminary look at the new d raft regulations sent to the Association last week, it a ppeared that the CAD and the Government had omitted the obligation to justify the fee increases/regulations through providing the industry with thes upporting financial data. “They’re hellbent on implem enting the thing, and it’s going to lead to obvious difficulties,” M r Turnquest told Tribune Business. “The reason it was not implemented before was because of difficulties with the protocol and the process. This is m uch too serious to rush to judgment on. I think that if we w ait, calmer heads will prevail, we can reconsider things, and it will be much better for the industry in the long-run.” The Association, in its A ugust 24, 20o9, response to Patrick Rolle, the CAD’s direct or, also urged the Government to “reconsider their rush to j udgment in this matter. It has lain dormant for four years and there is no reason now to allow expediency to supersede good judgment”. T he Association added that it resented the Government/CAD g iving the impression that the new regulations were “a done d eal” via their advertising, and warned that failing to follow the implementation procedures could see it mount a legal challenge. “The CAD/Ministry of Tourism must be aware that the failure to follow the procedure g overning the regulations could result in the entire legitimacyo f the exercise being called into question, the natural result of w hich will be a call by the oper ators for judicial review,” the Association warned, calling for the proposed regulations to be scrapped and a new NationalP lan for Aviation formed. It added: “We are not o pposed to fee increases, cognisant that from time to time t he costs of doing business will rise. [The Association] is not opposed to modest fee increas es in landing and licensing fees in principal, in accordance with the provisions of the regulation. ”However the increases and the new categories of fees are not in keeping with the spirit and intent of the regulations, which make provision for gradual increases. The method and manner of the imposition of this regulation is unacceptable. “Imposing draconian taxes on the local operators to pay f or development of Family Island airports is equivalent to making the motoring public assume the costs for the new roadworks in Nassau. “The regulation seeks to make local charter companies and airlines liable for the development of Family Island airp orts, while exempting foreign airlines and Bahamasair, thereby providing them with an unfair advantage in direct contravention of Government policy and the provisions of the International Civil Aviation Organisation.” The Association said that the G overnment appeared “not to have a development plan” for the Family Island airports the fee increases were supposed to finance, and said the rises were inconsistent with the policy of reducing airlift and air fare costs in the Bahamas, as stated by Vincent Vanderpool-Wall ace, minister of tourism. The Bahamian airline operators also pointed out that the i ncreases contrasted sharply with the Ministry of Tourism’s l obbying of the UK government and Parliament to prevent it increasing ticket tax imposed on flights to this nation from the UK. The fee increase is inconsistent with the Government’so bjective to stimulate travel to the Bahamas, as evidenced by t he recent decision to provide incentives to the cruise ships and to reduce the passenger tax,” the Association wrote. “In addition, in some i nstances such as Marsh Harbour and others, the primary u sers are the foreign operators. These principal users must be consulted in this exercise and, in accordance with the reasoning of this exercise, if necessary, m ust therefore bear proportional costs. The Governmentc annot reasonably expect the local operators to bear the costs i f the primary beneficiaries are the foreign airlines and Bahamasair.” Among the carriers that needed to be involved, the A ssociation said, were the likes of Gulfstream and AmericanE agle, the primary user of Family Island airports. It also urged t he Government to ‘level the playing field’ between themselves and Bahamasair, requiring the national flag carrier to pay the same fees as themselves, with the private airlines also granted similar import duties exemptions for aircraft parts. “Bahamasair cannot cont inue being given subsidies to undermine the air charter and commuter industry through its predatory hiring and operating practices,” the Association argued. “Bahamasair does not train pilots. They wait until charter or commuter operators recruit and invest thousands of d ollars in the training of a pilot and, when they reach a certain proficiency level with the requisite number of hours, Bahamasair goes on the prowl. “Bahamasair does not create or stimulate activity on any route. They wait until the commuter such as Sky, Western or S outhern Air invests in new equipment and promotion of a particular destination, then they c ome calling with reduced sub sidised ticket prices to underm ine the operator and lure away customers.” The Government was also urged to tackle the problem of unlicensed hackers, “whoa ppear to be operating with impunity in the Bahamas”, unli-c ensed and unregulated. With the CAD not having t he powers under law to enforce sanctions against alleged hackers, the Association said: “The neglect of Government to take correctivem easures and to give the CAD authority to address this issue is l ong overdue. “The charter companies and airlines cannot be expected to continue to pay fees and adhere to regulations with a rogue group of local and F oreign Operators skimming the profits and compromisingt he integrity of the system.” The Association added that t he Government needed to implement a Flight Information Region (FIR something that would end the payment of overflight fees to t he US and generate $30-$50 million in per annum revenuesf or the Government. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM btrt tfr f r !%* '!$()))!*&*#tffn""bnff ! $ %#&!*&*# !%** POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR AUDIT MANAGER Human Resources Partner “Audit Manager Position PricewaterhouseCoopers P.O. Box N-3910 Nassau, The Bahamas Airline fee increases will ‘wreak havoc’ FROM page 1B Cable premium F ROM page 1B

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Both ratios would be outside the new limits proposedby URCA. The regulator calculated Cable Bahamas’ gearing ratio using its audited financial statements for both years, which showed a net debt of $46.861 million alongside a combined net debt and total equity of $155.546 million in 2008. For 2007, the figure used in the calculation were net debt of $59.177 million and net debt plus total equity of $147.471 million. In contrast, BTC’s 2007 gearing ratio was 0 per cent, since its $135.351 million cash pile exceeded the $71.536 million in debt on its books. Barry Williams, Cable Bahamas’ vice-president of finance, told Tribune Business he was unable to comment on the regulator’s gearing calculations because he had yet to read the consultation document. He pointed out, though, that there were various ways to calculate gearing ratios. The gearing ratio measures a company’s financial leverage, comparing its level of debt to shareholder equity, and showing the extent to which its operations are funded by both forms of capital. URCA, in its consultation document, said: “BTC’s current capital structure may in large part be explained by the fact it is currently government owned. “However, gearing, like all other elements of the cost of capital, must be forward-looking. It is conceivable that, following privatisation, the business may become funded through a greater level of debt than is currently the case. URCA has taken this possibility into account when determining an appropriate level of gearing for the SMP operators. Cable’s gearing over the past two years has averaged approximately 35 per cent.” URCA acknowledged that communications regulators across the globe had adopted different approaches towards gearing, typically imposing ratios of between 10-50 per cent. Some regulators, the Bahamian supervisory body said, have not seen a need to regulate this area, on the basis that companies seeking to maximise profits took on an optimal level of borrowing to minimise capital costs. Others, though, had adopted a more interventionist approach because they felt companies were prone to borrow too much, increasing their financing and other costs and, potentially, placing them at risk of default. URCA said it was minded to take the latter option, and added: “The notion that corporate debt policies are not solely determined by the tax advantages of debt is supported by the observation that Cable Bahamas has a reasonably substantial level of debt. This suggests to URCA that it would not be sensible to apply a notional gearing of 0 per cent.” The Bahamian regulator based its approach on a sample of 16 global electronic communications companies who had a Standard & Poor’s or Fitch rating of Aor better, and for whom gearing data was available. Almost 70 per cent of these firms operated with a gearing ratio of between 0-30 per cent, something that was “comfortably within the gearing range allowed by other regulators recently, 0-50 per cent”. As a result, the regulator concluded: “URCA considers it unlikely that a gearing ratio of 0 per cent is optimal for Bahamian companies. Therefore, URCA proposes to apply a gearing range of 10 per cent to 30 per cent, with a midpoint value of 20 per cent.” The Bahamian regulator said that in assessing the cost of capital for SMP operators, they had also taken into account this nation’s relatively small economy and the impact its exchange control regime had on potential investor decisions. “The small economy features of the Bahamas, as well as minor Central Bank restrictions on the flow of capital in and out of the country, means that equity and debt investors in Bahamian companies may be more exposed to ‘country risk’ than investors in larger, more developed economies,” URCA said. “As such, both equity and debt investors in Bahamian companies may require a country risk premium, over and above the standard minimum risk premium, for the additional risk they bear.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.811.28Abaco Markets1.341.340.000.1270.00010.60.00% 11.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.306.25Bank of Bahamas6.256.250.000.2440.26025.64.16% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3511.350.002001.4060.2508.12.20% 2.882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S1)6.006.000.002,0000.4190.30014.35.00% 3.851.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.713.770.060.1110.05234.01.38% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital2.002.000.000.3820.0805.24.00% 8.206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.5010.00Finco10.6310.630.000.3220.52033.04.89% 11.7110.30FirstCaribbean Bank10.3010.300.000.7940.35013.03.40% 5.534.95Focol (S)5.135.130.000.3320.15015.52.92%1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0 .450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9 .025.49ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 1 2.0010.39J. S. Johnson10.3910.390.000.9520.64010.96.16% 1 0.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100000 100000 FidelitBkNote13(SeriC)+ FBB13 10000 000 T UESDAY, 25 AUGUST 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,577.62| CHG 0.06| %CHG 0.00 | YTD -134.74 | YTD % -7.87BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7 % Prime + 1.75% 7% BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: 30May2013 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 InterestF INDEX: CLOSE 790.64 | YTD -5.30% | 2008 -12.31% 1000 . 00 1000 . 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 . 00 0 . 00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.607.92Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.00-2.2460.000N/M0.00% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref2.006.254.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.40051.3320CFAL Bond Fund1.40053.485.15 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.9047-1.20-3.66 1.48421.4075CFAL Money Market Fund1.48423.535.55 3.60903.1031Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1143-8.01-12.43 13.048412.3870Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.04843.415.84 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.40759.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.33992.69-1.41 1.06221.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.06222.566.22 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0243-0.842.43 1.05851.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05852.045.85 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-Jul-09 Prime + 1.75% 7% 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 NAV Date 30-Jun-09Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds 30 May 2013 29 May 2015TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Jul-09 30-Jun-09 31-Dec-07 31-Jul-09 31-Jul-09 14-Aug-09 31-Jul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xtensive background in managing an OEM Heavy Truck Service/ Parts facility a must. Background in Parts and Service management and coordination required on a daily basis. Must be able to effectively administer all facits of business. Minimum of 10 years experience preferred. Good people skills a must. Must have prior experience in parts order and supervising employees. Computer skills required on a daily basis. Must be self motivated and work with little or no supervision.Competitive WagesWe thank all applicants however, only candidates to be interviewed will be contacted. Please hand deliver your resumes and references to Bahamas Mack Truck Sales Ltd. Rock Crusher Road Nassau, Bahamas 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW &$52/&811,1*+$0RI ($67(51&/26(3%R[1$66$8 %$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU 1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQ DVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKR NQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOG QRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQW RIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH WK GD\RI $XJXVW WRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\ DQG&LWL]HQVKLS 127,&( Cable’s gearing ratio outside proposed 30% regulatory limit F ROM page 1B Ministry sees 50% website hit rise mary objective,” said Ms Walkine. “It was important that in the final telecast we were able to communicate a multiplicity of islands and that the island names were put out there. When you look at the size of the audience it was important that each islands looks and feels different.” Ms Walkine said many of the hits to Bahamas.com on Sunday originated in European countries such as the UK, Germany and France, while Monday’s hits came from many Latin American countries, especially Venezuela home of the outgoing and incoming Miss Universe. The Government recently secured airlift from Germany and France, and has increased the number of flights from the United Kingdom into the Lynden Pindling International Airport. Ms Walkine said the pageant seemed to have intrigued view ers and enticed them to research the Bahamas islands on the Ministry’s website. FROM page 1B Share your news T he Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their n eighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986

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vinaigrette, the Spicy Curried Beef Satay, and the guava duff. At first sight, the conch and crab cake looked like a colour fiesta with its bright green garnish on one side, cucumber, green and red bell peppers, and cabbage salad on the oth er end dressed with the vinaigrette. At the center was the hearty cake sitting as the star of the dish. This dish is rather light and infused with lots of vegetables. There is a very noticeable fusion of flavours smoothly bringing together the crab, conch, veggies, and the noni. Toped with a tall glass of homemade ‘Switcha,’ this dish was the perfect start to the meal. Next was the Spicy Curried Beef Satay. Prepared by executive Chef Detrick Francis who lives by the motto “People eat with their eyes,” this dish looked quite pleasing with its marriage of steak and greens with a slight simmer, but it also had an intoxicating scent of curry. Chef Francis explained: “The cur ry vinaigrette was made from scratch and the taste is spicy and tangy flavoured which still has a slight sweetness from the chutney used. The beef is center cut sirloin steak, so it’s the best part of the steak.” Chef Francis said even honey is used to add flavour to the dish. In the end, it was truly a taste of heaven allowing you to enjoy each element of its seasoning while being filled by its content. The final dish was guava duff. Made like traditional duff, this dish was garnished with a diced straw berry and a side of whipped cream. According to one patron, “If Heaven was made of this exact guava duff, I promise I’ll never sin again.” Like the old wedding adage, Noni Way offers ‘something old, something new, something borrowed, and something blue.’ The restaurant is new, some of its dishes are traditional Bahamian, others are borrowed from Europe, and the highlight is the blue bottled Tahitian Noni Juice. A perfect spot for breakfast, lunch, or dinner, the Noni Way Caf is truly the way to go. C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM T T h h e e T T r r i i b b u u n n e e By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net FOR most Bahamians, one of the first signs that you’re about to enjoy a great meal is when the aroma of the dish catc hes y our att ention long bef or e you enter the kitchen. This is certainly true for the recently opened Noni Way Caf. THE NONI WAY CAFE The gourmet Bahamian restaurant located in the Coral Harbour Plaza, features a fine selection of traditional Bahamian dishes along with several popular European style entres. Stephen St Clair Serrette, the owner, explained that beside the restaurant’s exquisite dcor, top quality waiters, and comfortable atmosphere, providing healthy food was the inspiration for creating the establishment. “This is a restaurant that emphasises health, because we cook with no MSG, we use the extra virgin olive oil, coconuts, and our secret ingredient the Noni Juice.” Mr St Clair Serrette said the restaurant features a one of a kind Noni vinaigrette and a Noni Coolie a beverage made from Tahitian Noni, with blueberry, grapes and other flavourings. The restaurant also offers steak, lobster, grouper, garlic mashed potatoes, sauted spinach, sauted mushrooms, all of which are prepared with the health of his cus tomers in mind. Diners can also try the Ortland H Bodie Surf and Turf named after the radio talk show who frequents the establishment at least twice a week. There is also the Jay Joh Cracked Conch named after one of the restaurant’s chefs who created a reputation for top notch cooking during his former emplyment at Castaways restaurant some years ago. Tribune Taste recently stopped in to sample a few of the delectable dishes on the menu, including the conch and crab cake with Noni THIS bartender said many locals compare their homemade ‘Switcha’ to the drink their grandmothers used to make. CONCH and Crab Cake with nacho chip. NONI Way’s one of a kind Guava Duff. DINNER is Served; Spicy Curried Beef Satay.

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C M Y K C M Y K TASTE THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009, PAGE 7B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM This weekend brings to an end summer 09’, so why not e nd it with a bang and celeb rate the end of the season as w e welcome in autumn. 1. The Adastra Gardens is coming to the Marathon Mall on Friday, well maybe not the entire zoo, but an awesome selection of its feathery tenants. Expect to see a number of exotic animals including the Moluccan cockatoo which is indigenous to Eastern Indonesia and one of the largest white cockatoos in the world. There will also be the Green and Gold Macaw. The macaw which is considered the poster image for parrots, is commonly found in woodlands, rainforest environments, and savannah-like regions. There will be additional information informing kids and adults about the history of the birds, their characteristics, and global populations. This event will be held in the mall’s center court from noon until 5pm. On Saturday at the zoo grounds, there will be a special show to introduce kids to the other animals at the zoo. The event will feature various activities, food, drinks, and will end with a pep-talk from the police on back-to-school safety. Entrance is $8 for adults and $3 for kids. 2. The Bahamas Interna tional Film Festival continues its film festival series with the movie Holly . The 2006 poetic drama directed by Guy Moshe is set in modern day Cambo dia where a Vietnamese girl called Holly, encounters Patrick an American resident who specialises in the sale of stolen artifacts. The story follows their strong connection and her unrelenting efforts to escape her fate of becoming a sex slave in the notorious Cambodian red-light districtof Phnom Pehn. The movie will be shown on Wednesday at Galleria JFK at 8pm. Tickets are $5. The film starts at 8pm. 3. Just in time for back-toschool, local entertainment group Make-Em-Listen will present its first annual BackTo-School Pep-Rally. The event takes place at the Town Centre Mall this Saturday and will feature a number of local music icons including I-Rate, Peter Runks, Broken Mics, BainTown Boys, Anku Sara, Death Angel, Professor, and lots more. There will also be a special presentation from Kyran Turnquest a youth counselor and motivational speaker along with dozens of give-aways for students returning to the classroom. Everyone is invited to this free community event from noon until 6pm. 4. Local gospel recording artist Najie Dunn is gearing up to release his latest music project titled Relentless Pur suit. Najie is having his official album release this Friday at 7.30pm at the Holy Trinity Activity Center Stapleton Gardens. The artist will perform several pre-released selections from the album such as Inspiration, Pray For You, They Want Take Life Ft. Mon ty G , and Yes Lord . There will also be special appearances from Monty G, Ricardo Clark, and Rubin Heights. The event is $5. 5. The Nahbulunge clothing line will release its fall sporting line this Thursday at Harry’s Haven of Rest on Queens Street. Featuring the latest trends in female sportswear, the company said its clothing has always been about defining the image of beauty for women. The event starts at 6pm and promises to be a philanthropic extravaganza with proceeds from the $30 tickets going to the Willie Mae Pratt School for girls. T T h h e e T T r r i i b b u u n n e e things 2 DO By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net C larence Rolle has successfully captured the human spirit in his very first filmFresh a riveting st or y about o v er coming t he challenges of life. The film, which recently premiered at the Dundas Centre for t he Performing Arts, features an all Bahamian cast. The plot centers around Angie ( D’Adra SmithO wen) one of 800 plus employees r ecently laid-off from the tourism industry. As the reality of having no job, two dependents (her sister Sharon played by Lakeria Forbes and son Ram, played by Terran Brown) sinks in, Angie feels like her luck has completely run out. If that isn’t bad enough, her estranged husband Solomon, played by Gene Cage is released from prison and returns to a home far different than the one he left behind. As the story develops, the family learns to works through their many problems growing closer through faith, and an overall commitment to creating a better life. Mr Rolle who wrote and directed the film explained: “The film Fresh is a theme that I’ve always had in mind, and to some extent it has been incorporated in other plays I’ve done. “As a society I think we are a bit materialistic, and we have a need for instant gratification, and this is something that I see around every day, so I thought to also include that in the film.” Mr Rolle said with so many persons unemployed and struggling financially , he hopes Fresh will in some way reaffirm the benefits of budgeting and maintaining insurance. The film was attended by many supporters who also participated in a brief Q and A session with Mr Rolle and the cast. Fresh received rave reviews, with many audience members saying never before has a local or international movie been successful in offering a how-to guide toward financial survival during a recession. Now that the film has received its initial stamp of approval, Mr Rolle said his next goal is to have it shown in local high schools to help increase the awareness of the social and eco nomic conditions facing many throughout the community. Mr Rolle has also written and directed a number of stage perfor mances including The Web Shop Horror, and Da Rally. For more information visit Fresh The Movie on Facebook. The film is rated A. By KENCOVIA INGRAHAM SHAKESPEAREin Paradise, designed to be an annual international theatre festival that will place The Bahamas on a global level, will soon be making its way to the stage. Based on similar festivals such as Scotland's Edinburgh Festival Fringe and this region's Caribbean Festival of Arts (CARIFESTA will take place in Nassau October 512, 2009 at various local venues including The College of The Bahamas, the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas, The Hub, Graycliff and The Marley Resort. Although the event is about two months away, it has already received positive feedback from individuals in the Bahamian cultural foreground. As poet and musician Patrick Rahming has written: "We must commit resources to create an environment rich with opportunities to share the uniqueness of the Bahamas through the development of attractions.” With a focus on making this event the perfect opportunity to help boost the Bahamian cultural scene as well as the economy, the week-long extravaganza will not only increase the appreciation and awareness of local and international theatre, but also provide school visits, workshops, readings, seminars, student matinees, and much more to the Bahamian community. The festival will feature three Bahamian productions and three international productions, all of which have received critical acclaim in their hometowns. Plays will be represented not only from The Bahamas, but from the United States, Cayman, and Guyana. Shakespeare's The Tempest is the festival's signature work. It was adapted for a Bahamian audience by students of The College of The Bahamas under the guidance of Nicolette Bethel, and will be codirected by Trinidadian native PattiAnne Ali, known for her role of “Soomintra” in The Mystic Masseur, a Merchant-Ivory Film, and Bahamian stage actor and acting coach Craig Pinder, who has had major roles in such West End productions as Les Miserables and Mama Mia Kim Brockington, known for her recurring TV roles in Guiding Light and the West Wing, will perform her onewoman show Zora, about the African-American folklorist Zora Neale Hurston. Other productions include One White One Black from Cayman, selected shows by Ken Corsbie, a Guyanese-American per former and storyteller, and Track Road Theatre's productions of Love in Two Acts and Light. The Shakespeare in Paradise team openly welcomes the public to attend this event. Special invitations are sent out to students who are passionate about pursuing theatre as a career to take full advantage of this oneweek experience. For more information about this event visit: www.shakespeareinparadise.org For more information about this event visit: www.shakespeareinparadise.org YOU TUBE Shakespeare In Paradise Facebook: Bahamian Shakespeare Facebook Fan Group: Shakespeare In Paradise Myspace: www.myspace.com/shake speareinparadise Twitter: www.twitter.com/shake speareinparadise INTERNATIONAL BAHAMIAN THEATRE FESTIVAL IS ON ITS WAY! Oh so fresh! C LARENCE ROLLE (RIGHT D irect or and Writer of Fresh said the film took about 18 days to shoot. Also pictured is videographer Craig Lenihan, left. A SCENE from the new Bahamian movie Fresh. Pictured are actors D’Adra Smith-Owen and Gene Cage.

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C M Y K C M Y K ARTS PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM I n an intimate beach ceremony, Patrick Rahming marriedS arah JohnsonS aunders on Yamacraw Beach on A ugust 20. The c ouple, both Grand Bahamians, chose tod ress in island wear f or a unique, a uthentically Bahamian wedding.T he couple e xchanged his and her Bibles to signify t heir commitment t o God and each other. The ceremony was performed byB ishop Victor A. Johnson of New Dimension M inistries on Joe F arrington Road. Jaton Johnson / Photo B AHAMIAN BEACH WEDDING LOS ANGELES A JUDGE on Tuesday sentenced Chris Brown to five years’ probation, six months’ community labor for the beating of Rihanna and ordered the R&B singer to stay away from his former girlfriend for the next five years, accord ing to the Associated Press . Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Patricia Schnegg told Brown that he could be sent to state prison if he violated any terms of his sentence, including an order to stay 100 yards away from Rihanna unless they’re attending music industry events. A probation report pre pared for Tuesday’s sentencing describes two previous violent incidents. The first happened about three months before the February beating while the couple was traveling in Europe; Rihanna slapped Brown during an argument, and he shoved her into a wall. In the sec ond instance, Brown allegedly broke the front and passenger side windows on a Range Rover they were driving while visiting Barbados, Rihanna ’s home country. Nei ther attack was reported, the probation report states. Brown will serve his sentence in his home state Virginia and his community labor will be overseen by the police chief in Richmond. The judge said she wanted to ensure that Brown, 20, performs physical labor instead of community service, such as mentoring young people. He will also undergo a year of domestic violence counseling. Rihanna did not attend Tuesday’s sentencing. At one point, Brown, who was accompanied by his mother, agreed to the terms of the sentence before Schnegg had finished going through them all. The hearing had been planned for Thursday afternoon, but Brown’s lawyer, Mark Geragos, asked to move up the singer’s sentencing to Tuesday. A previous attempt to sentence Brown was postponed when Schnegg said she hadn’t received adequate assurances that Brown would perform physical labor if allowed to serve probation in Virginia. Chris Brown sentenced in Rihanna assault case Homicide ruling, documents detail death of Jackson LOS ANGELES THE Los Angeles County coroner’s finding that the death of Michael Jackson was a homicide could mean criminal charges for his doctor, who told investigators he administered a mix ofp owerful drugs to treat the pop star’s insomnia hours before his death, a ccording to the Associated Press . The homicide ruling was based on f orensic tests that found the anesthetic propofol combined with at least two sedatives to kill Jackson, a law enforcement official told The Associated Press, speaking on condition of anonymity because the findings have not been publicly released. The finding does not necessarily mean a crime was committed. But it does help prosecutors if they decide to file criminal charges against Dr. Conrad M urray, the Las Vegas cardiologist who was caring for Jackson when he died June 25 in a rented Los Angeles mansion. “It is an easier prosecution when the medical examiner calls it a homicide,” said Dr. Michael Baden, the former chief medical examiner in New York City, who is not involved in the Jackson investigation. Through his lawyer, Murray has said he administered nothing that should have killed Jackson. Murray told investigators that at the time of Jackson’s death, he had been trying to wean the entertainer off propofol. The doctor said he’d been treating Jackson for insomnia for about six weeks with 50 milligrams of the drug every night via an intravenous drip, a search warrant affidavit said. Murray said he feared Jackson was becoming addicted to the anesthetic, which is supposed to be used only in hospitals and other advanced medical settings. Murray told police he was present when another Las Vegas anesthesiologist, Dr. David Adams, sedated Jacksonw ith propofol at an unnamed cosmetologist’s office “sometime between March and April of this year,” accord ing to the affidavit. It was about the time Jackson requested that Murray become his personal physician for a European tour, the affidavit said. A woman at Adams’ office in Las Vegas referred calls Tuesday to his lawyer, Liborius Agwara, who did not immediately respond to messages seeking comment. Nevada State Board of Osteopathic Medicine records show Adams has been licensed in the state of Nevada since 2002, and there are no reports of malpractice and no disciplinary issues against him. Ongoing investigations are confidential unless a licensee is named in a formal administrative complaint. The affidavit was unsealed in Houston, where Los Angeles police took materials from one of Murray’s clinics last month as part of their manslaughter investigation. Manslaughter is homicide without malice or premeditation. The affidavit says Murray told detectives that two days before Jackson’s death, he had lowered the propofol dose to 25 milligrams and added the sedatives lorazepam and midazolam, a combination that succeeded in helping the pop star sleep. The next day, Murray said, he cut off the propofol and Jackson fell asleep with just the two sedatives. AUTHORITIES leave the scene after executing a search warrant at the Red Rock Canyon Country Club residence of Dr. Conrad Murray, Tuesday, July 28, 2009, in Las Vegas. Murray is currently under investigation for his alleged role in the death of pop icon Michael Jackson. Daniel Gluskoter/ AP Photo music REVIEW Queen Latifah, “PERSONA” (Flavor Unit Records There’s nobody quite like Queen Latifah, the rough-edged rapper turned jazz singer and Oscar-nominated actress. On her new CD, “Persona,” Latifah goes back to the roots that made her so unique in the first place. The album is an enjoyable mix of singing and rapping, produced by hiphop hitmakers Cool & Dre and featuring cameos from the likes of Missy Elliott, Mary J. Blige, Busta Rhymes and Marsha Ambrosius. The style ranges from straight-up hip-hop to mid-tempo R&B to breathless techno, with a mercifully light sprinkle of the obligatory Autotune effects. Latifah has sung on two previous albums, and her voice is capable, comparable to most of the women populating today’s charts (She’s no Jennifer Hudson, but who is?). Singles like “Cue the Rain,” “My Couch” and “With You” are body-moving tales of the type of hothouse love that blooms on the dance floor, while “People” with Mary J. Blige and “The World” tackle more weighty topics. Her singing occasionally get submerged beneath Cool & Dre’s dense instrumentals, and on a few songs it’s tough to differentiate Latifah from her guest singers. When she raps, though, everything changes. Latifah still has the punch and wordplay of the woman who broke into entertainment more than 20 years ago as the rare female rapper who captured attention with skills instead of sex. On her new album, you recognize within the first few bars of “The Light” or “Over the Mountain” that Latifah is on the mic. Latifah’s rap voice demands attention the way her presence does on screen. That’s not usually the case with her singing. So big up to Latifah for continuing to expand her talents and for not forgetting where she came from. Queen Latifah brings back the raps

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e cultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating culture ultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating culture tivating culture cultivating culture cultivating culture c ting culture cultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating g culture cultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating ulture cultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating e cultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating culture ultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating culture tivating culture cultivating culture cultivating culture c ting culture cultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating g culture cultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating ulture cultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating e cultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating culture ultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating culture tivating culture cultivating culture cultivating culture c ting culture cultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating g culture cultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating ulture cultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating e cultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating culture ultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating culture tivating culture cultivating culture cultivating culture c ting culture cultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating g culture cultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating ulture cultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating e cultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating culture ultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating culture tivating culture cultivating culture cultivating culture c ting culture cultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating g culture cultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating ulture cultivating culture cultivating culture cultivating f By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net Five students were recently awarded scholarship grants after taking part in the f irst annual A disa Outs t anding Childr en in t he Arts programme , f or their performance and success by Adisa officials and Culture Minister Charles Maynard. The initiative which seeks to identify and publicly acknowledge the successes of students gifted in music, dance, and drama, has been a long time coming senior cultural affairs officer and Adisa co-ordinator, Patricia Bazard said. “We have so many talented children, those who can sing, who can dance, who can write, and so first came the birth of the national children’s choirs. “However there were all those other children who couldn’t sing, but who are just as talented and who also needed a voice with someone speaking for them, and so the Adisa Foundation was born.” She said when the applications for the awards were first issued, the committee never imagined the kind of response they would receive. Mrs Bazard said more than 300 forms were returned, however in the end there could only be one winner in each category. During a special awards presentation at the ministry last Monday, Mr Maynard said the programe was an important step for culture in the country. “This whole initiative is driven by the Adisa Foundation and the National Children’s Choir. The awards programme acknowledges, celebrates, and rewards the contributions of children to the artistic culture of the Bahamas,” he said. The minister said as the access to funding needed to support these types of initiatives becomes an ever increasing challenge, it is good to know that Adisa has been successful in accomplishing its mandate of fostering cultural growth within many of the nation’s youth. In music; Berlicia Saunders from Freeport Primary took first place, Bernard Farquharson from Lyford We have so many talented children, those who can sing, who can dance, who can write, and so first came the birth of the national c hildr en’s c hoirs. cultivating culture Cay won in the junior category, and Benjamin Pinder from St Andrew’s won in the senior division. In drama; Quenton Smith from North Long Island High took first place, and Elan Hutchinson from Faith Temple Christian Academy won in the senior division. Then in dance open category, Simone Davies from St John’s won first place. First place finishers in the Adisa Outstanding Children in The Arts competition were presented with grants from the Minister of Culture Charles Maynard and Adisa founder Patricia Bazard. Pictured from left to; Berlicia Saunders, Quenton Smith, Bernard Farquharson, Adisa Director Patricia Bazard, Culture Minister Charles Maynard, Benjamin Pinder, Elan Hutchinson, and Adisa programme co-ordinator Persey Francis. PATRICIA BAZARD C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune SECTIONB I N S I D E Oh so fresh! See page seven WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2009 The Noni Way Cafe See page six


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