Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 103 No.226

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=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009





CARS FOR SALE,
at
ey:

BAHAMAS BIGGEST



ES

Fury over free
furniture the

Items destined for the
under-privileged are
reportedly ‘hijacked’

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

PANDEMONIUM broke
out at RM Bailey High
School and RIU Hotel yes-
terday after some delivery
men reportedly made off with
furniture and other household
items that were destined for
the country’s under-privi-
leged.

Hundreds of persons
queued outside of the hotel
and the school yesterday wait-

ing for their chance to get a
pick at desks, television sets,
mattresses and other house-
hold items that were given to
the poor in a generous ges-
ture by the operators of RIU
Hotel in a Social Services co-
lead operation.

However, some unscrupu-
lous delivery men reportedly
“hijacked” a number of trucks
loaded with these items and
took them to other locations
where they were either sold

SEE page nine

ir 7
Pal ray gelia medium
IFTOppingIpizzcka os olutENA



Ve] Mer) ime Mm CUT t ele ts

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff





| SEE PAGE ELEVEN



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



New Chief Justice
won't ‘dignify’ his

By TANEKA
THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

NEWLY appointed
Chief Justice Michael Bar-
nett said he would not
"dignify" critics — who
argue that his political affil-
iation will diminish the
appearance of separation
between the judiciary and
the state — with a
response.

Since government con-
firmed that Mr Barnett
would succeed Sir Burton



critics with response

Hall as the next head of
the judiciary, several mem-
bers of civil society have
found fault with the deci-
sion.

The Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce said the
appointment will weaken
the judiciary and fears the
move will create "far too
great an appearance of a
lack of separation between
the executive and judicial
branches of government.”

Last week the Bahamas
Bar Association (BBA)

SEE page eight



CASUARINA TREES are cut down on Saunder’s Beach yesterday. It is claimed the casuarinas must be cut down because they’re an invasive
species which does not allow any other plants to grow beneath them. But campaigners against the move say there is no justifiable reason

for the trees to be removed.

Miss Universe telecast was ‘a full
return for govt money invested’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

TOURISM Minister Vin-
cent Vanderpool-Wallace
declared yesterday that the
promotional value of Sunday
night’s final Miss Universe
2009 pageant telecast alone
represented a full return on
the money the Government
invested into the three-week-
long event.

“In terms of a turnaround
in investment there’s no
doubt whatsoever that we got
that all back without ques-
tion last night,” he said.

“Tf you do a very simple
calculation of what the cost
would be to do the promo-
tion that was done last night,

in one telecast the money was
back.

“The question now, and
what we have been doing, is
really looking at the follow
up and the follow on of how
we utilise the publicity from
it.”

The total amount spent by
the Government on bringing
the event to the Bahamas is
not known, however $4 mil-
lion was re-allocated towards
it in the Ministry of Tourism’s
mid-year budget.

Other costs were born by
pageant hosts Atlantis, whose
occupancy went up to 85 per
cent during the event, but is
now expected to fall to 50 per
cent this week, and 30 per

SEE page 12

° SEE PAGE TWO

Attorney tight-lipped
over the AG post

By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

THE prominent
attorney who is
pegged to be the
country's next attor-
ney general remained
tight-lipped on
whether or not he has
accepted the post.

However, senior partner of
McKinney Bancroft and
Hughes Brian Moree did not
close the door on the possi-
bility and highlighted the
need for qualified Bahami-
ans to give back to their

GET READY FOR

a ce



nossa

country through
public service.

"In a hypothetical
context, we all need
to contribute to the
building of our
nation and I believe
the administration
of justice is in des-
| perate need of
resources — it needs
more financial
resources, more
human resources,
more technological resources,
it needs to demand a higher
authority with regard to the
allocation of funding (from)
the Ministry of Finance —
and I think that the window

SEE page eight

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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

See

AUGUST 5, 2009 — This
is West Bay Street, near
Orange Hill, but it could be
the middle of the island of
New Providence. Because
the foliage has been allowed
to grow unnecessarily high,



West Bay Street and casuarinas issue

one is deprived of a view of
the beautiful sea. Note the
casuarina tree, one of those
that have been allowed to
grow amongst the “accept-
able” foliage. “My personal
interest,” said Capt Paul

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News
Editorial/Letters
Sports

BUSINESS/WOMAN SECTION

Business
Comics

Weathet...........:0:c00cc0ee

Seo O emt

eeeeceteaprerunevecgreettece P11

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



Aranha of Lyford Cay who
submitted this photo, “is the
threatened removal of 66
casuarina trees and the pos-
sibility that the area will end
up looking like this photo.”

The 66 casuarina trees
were removed from the
foreshore yesterday (see

page 1).

share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



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THE TRIBUNE

MISSUNIVERSERIGHLIGHTS




NEW MISS UNIVERSE Stefania Fernandez of Venezuela poses with members of the Cabinet after win-
ning the pageant last night at Atlantis.



ABOVE: Miss Universe Stefania
Fernandez poses with co-owner
of the pageant Donald Trump
and Miss Universe 2008
Dayana Mendoza

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Two of three who
requested funts
transfer were
hotel union officers:

TWO of the three individu- |
als who signed a letter
requesting the transfer of
almost half a million dollars
from the hotel union’s

account are registered elected :

officers of the union, the
Director of Labour con-
firmed.

This after it was reported in :

another local daily yesterday

that a letter is alleged to have }

been sent to the Bank of the
Bahamas (BOTB) calling for
wire tranfers totalling
$475,000 to be made to two
local law firms and for back-

pay to executive council mem- }

bers.
The request was said to

have been sent to BOTB days

after Nicole Martin was oust-
ed as president of the

Bahamas Hotel Catering and
Allied Workers Union follow-

ing a Supreme Court ruling
nullifying the election that
elevated her.

But the Bank of the
Bahamas is said to have
turned down the request to
transfer the funds “given the
very public bitter dispute”
surrounding the governance
of the union, and requested
that the union “confirm by

resolution” that the three sig- :

natories were authorised to
conduct business on the
union’s behalf.

The earlier article quoted
Labour Director Harcourt
Brown as saying that one of
the three signatories to the
letter, Raymond Wright, is
not a registered officer of the
union, as far as the Depart-

ment of Labour is concerned. }
In the letter, Mr Wright was }

to have received the largest

quantity of funds requested — :

$73,600.
However, Mr Brown yes-

terday noted that the two oth- :

er signatories — Samantha
Gray and Ian Neely, who
were to receive $21,450 and

$30,026 each — both appear to :

be registered elected officers.

He noted however that on the }

department’s record, Ms

Gray’s first name is registered :

as Frances.

The legal fees intended to
be covered by the requested
payout appear to stem from
the legal challenge mounted

by First Vice President of the

union, Kirk Wilson to the
election which brought Ms
Martin to power on May 28,
2009. The letter requests that
$140,000 be transferred from
the union’s account for out-
standing legal fees to Com-
mercial Law Advocates —
whose principal attorney is
Keod Smith — and Obie Fer-
guson and Co.

Secretary General Leo
Douglas maintains that the

lawyers’ fees are the responsi- }

bility of Mr Wilson, “who
hired them”, unless Mr Wil-
son and his team win the
upcoming election, for which

a date is set to be determined }

today.

The Tribune understands
that whether or not these
firms are owed by the union
depends on whether or not
the attorneys were hired
according to the constitution
of the union, with the meeting
in which this took place being
“properly constituted.”

CLARIFICATION

IN FRIDAY 'S Tribune, it
was incorrectly reported
that Kayla Green-Smith,
chief counsel for the Attor-
ney General's Office, said
anyone found making a
false claim of rape could
face life imprisionment
under law.

Speaking at last week's
media information session
on the proposed ammend-
ment to the Sexual Offences
Act, Ms Green-Smith said
that a malicious claim of
rape was an "offence pun-
ishable by law".

She did not say the
offence was punishable by
life imprisonment.

The Tribune apologises
for any inconvenience this
error may have caused.

Man is charged with
-businessman’s murder

By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 22-year-
old man was charged with the
murder of businessman Leslie
Maycock in the Freeport
Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Corderold Kiel Wallace
appeared before Magistrate
Debbye Ferguson in Court
One, where he was arraigned
on charges of armed robbery

and murder.

It is alleged that on July 15,
Wallace being concerned with
another or others robbed
Leslie Maycock Jr of a black
pouch, valued at $100, and
$700 in cash that was con-

tained in the pouch.

It is also alleged that on
July 23, the accused being
concerned with another and
others by means of unlawful
harm, to wit a handgun, inten-
tionally caused the death of

Maycock.

Maycock, 50, a retired
police officer and owner of
the Hawksbill Mini Mart, was
robbed and shot after closing

his convenience store.

He died a week later in hos-

pital of his injuries.

Maycock’s death was the
sixth homicide for the year on

Grand Bahama.

The victim’s wife and two
sons were present in the
courtroom for the arraign-

ment.

Oo
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2
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=
=
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CORDEROLD KIEL WALLACE arrives at court yesterday.

K Brian Hanna represent-
ed Wallace.

When Magistrate Ferguson
asked Wallace where he
resided, he said he lives with
his sister at the Garden
Resort on the Mall.

The accused was not
required to enter a plea to the
charges of murder and armed
robbery.

‘Rigorous’ investigation to he
held into alleged ‘fake’ sick notes

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ALL complaints made by the
Ministry of Health about doc-
tors allegedly writing “fake” sick
notes for nurses will be put
through a “rigorous” investiga-
tion process, the president of the
Bahamas Medical Council said.

Confirming that the BMC
received the complaints about
“a number” of doctors — Health
Minister Hubert Minnis said it
was “eight or nine” physicians
and several medical clinics — Dr
Duane Sands said there is “noth-
ing whimsical or volitional”
about the BMC pursuing the

issue.

His comments come after
Minister Minnis stated that the
Ministry of Health had forward-
ed information on the physicians
and medical centres in question
to the Attorney General’s Office
and the BMC for further action,
after it had reason to suspect that
they had facilitated nurses who
wanted to protest the govern-
ment’s decision to delay their

health insurance coverage.

A large group of nurses were
involved in a prolonged “sick-
out” in response to the decision.

Dr Sands said: “Clearly the
council has a statutory obliga-
tion to follow up and to act on

TS TRC FTI
ST ET

POLICE in South Andros
seized almost a quarter of a
million dollars worth of sus-
pected marijuana over the
weekend.

Press liaison officer Asst
Supt Walter Evans said a tip
led officers from the Kemps
Bay Police Station to Blue
Bush Creek south of Grassy
Creek in South Andros around
6pm last Friday. There, they
found 11 brown taped pack-
ages, seven bags and 52 crocus
sacks containing a substance
they suspect to be marijuana.

The drugs have a local street
value of just under $250,000
and weigh over 2,400 lbs, Mr
Evans said.

Police are continuing to
investigate.



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every single complaint made to
it (formally).

“We are mandated to put it
through a fairly rigorous
process as defined by the Med-
ical Act.

“Tt is submitted to a subcom-
mittee of the BMC —- the Com-
plaints Committee. The Com-
plaints Committee then reviews
the written complaint and
determines whether or not
there is cause to submit it to
the Disciplinary Committee.”

Meanwhile, the doctor who is
accused of misconduct is also
given an opportunity to present
their side of the story, having
reviewed the substance of the
complaint.

Dr Sands said that each com-
plaint made against each physi-
cian by the Ministry of Health
will be dealt with “individual-
ly.”

As for penalties, the Medical
Act states that for forging any
health certificate, such as a sick
note, the sanction could “be as
severe as a fine or being strick-
en from medical register.”

“The committee looks at the
entirety of matter and then
makes a decision as to what
penalty may apply. Previous
infractions might make the
council less likely to look at it
with same degree of leniency,”
added the BMC chief.





A preliminary inquiry will
be held to determine whether
there is sufficient evidence for
him to stand trial in the
Supreme Court.

Magistrate Ferguson denied
Wallace bail and remanded
him to Her Majesty’s Prison
in Fox Hill until February 10,
2010, when a preliminary
inquiry will be held.

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Good English needed to succeed

“SUCCESS in English, success in life” is
the message on a large billboard — written in
both Chinese and English — on the side of a
wall in a small country town off the Li river
in the shadow of the famous Sugarloaf moun-
tains in Guilin, China.

It was a billboard to encourage Chinese
students to study English at the Omedia Lan-
guage College in that province.

Mr Ronnie Lightbourn, who with his wife,
Joan, took a boat tour down China’s Li Riv-
er about four months ago was so impressed
by the message that he took a photograph of
it and forwarded it to us. Here was an Asian
country that fully understood the importance
of speaking not only English, but good Eng-
lish, while in the Bahamas, where English is
the mother tongue, Bahamian children are
yet to recognise its importance. Not only
have many Bahamians failed to master Eng-
lish, but they do not seem to understand the
importance of speaking the language well.

Many years ago, shortly after the PLP
became the government, some bright sparks
got the idea that the Bahamian dialect should
be taught in the schools — both written and
spoken. Fortunately, the majority of our peo-
ple were wise enough to realise that speaking
in the “dis”, “dat”, “dees” and “dose” lingo
would not carry them very far. However, it
would certainly move them very quickly from
the front to the back door. Eventually the
matter was dropped and standard English
continued in the schools.

French has always been recognised as the
language of diplomats, but today English is
the lingua franca of the world. As Carla Pow-
er wrote in Newsweek International’s mag-
azine in March, 2008, India is on the “front
lines of a global revolution in which hun-
dreds of millions of people are learning Eng-
lish, the planet's language for commerce,
technology—and, increasingly, empower-
ment.

“Within a decade, 2 billion people will be
studying English and about half the world—
some 3 billion people—will speak it, accord-
ing to a recent report from the British Coun-
cil.

“From Caracas to Karachi, parents keen
for their children to achieve are forking over
tuition for English-language schools. Chi-
na's English fever— elevated to epidemic
proportions by the country's recent acces-
sion to the World Trade Organization and
the 2008 Olympics—even has its own Man-
darin term, Yingwen re. And governments
from Tunisia to Turkey are pushing Eng-
lish, recognizing that along with computers
and mass migration, the language is the tur-

ST. JOHNS COLLEGE

Orientation for all

bine engine of globalization. As one 12-year-
old self-taught English-speaker from Chi-
na's southwestern Sichuan province says, "If
you can't speak English, it's like you're deaf
and dumb.”

Is that how Bahamian students are to be
classified?

The second report produced by the Coali-
tion for Education Reform, released earlier
this year, revealed that in 2006, 55 per cent of
Bahamian students in public schools failed
the BGCSE English Language examination.
There is an alarming shortage of Bahamians
with the necessary English and mathematics
skills to compete in today’s industries,
framers of the report concluded.

The report was compiled by the Chamber of
Commerce, Employers Confederation,
National Congress of Trade Unions, Hotel
Employers Association and the Nassau
Tourism and Development Board. In other
words leaders of the industry that turns the
engine of this economy.

The shortage of qualified Bahamians with a
command of the English language, the report
said, “is critical to tourism because the skills
of its employees dealing with its clients
directly affects the latter’s view of the
Bahamas.”

Time has not shown any improvement in
these results. If there is no turnaround in
both English and Mathematics, Bahamians
will soon find that they will be pushed to the
sidelines because they are not qualified to
compete, even in their own language in their
own country. Will the day ever come when
foreigners, speaking English better than our
own people, will be called upon to fill essen-
tial positions in this country?

Today, according to the Newsweek report,
non-native English speakers now outnum-
ber native ones by three to one.

David Crystal, English-language expert and
author of “English as a Global Language”
has suggested that there could be a “tri-Eng-
lish world, one in which you could speak a
local English-based dialect at home, a nation-
al variety at work or school, and interna-
tional Standard English to talk to foreigners.”

Bahamian students would be wise to apply
themselves to their studies and master their
language and mathematics. They certainly
have been given every opportunity to pre-
pare themselves to take their place in their
country. If they fail to qualify, they cannot
blame anyone but themselves for becoming
strangers in their own land.

¢ See Mr Ron Lightbourn’s photograph tak-
en in Guilin, China, on page 12.



The marital

rape furore

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The people who are up in
arms over the Government's
proposal to criminalize rape in
marriage remind me very much
of the reactionary politicians in
the Republican Party in the
United States and their lunatic
fringe supporters who are try-
ing to trash President Obama's
health reform initiative.

Some are downright ignorant
and from them you can't expect
much. Some are, unfortunately,
Christian religious leaders who
are intellectual and moral
weaklings living in their own
stone age unaware of the New
Dispensation. But the worst of
the lot are those who know bet-
ter but refuse to play it straight.
Instead they hem and haw and
pander to the Neanderthals for
political advantage. They are
spouting exaggerations and
obfuscations, prevarications
and equivocations. Permit me
to comment on some of them.

1. They say making spousal
rape a crime will put the gov-
ernment in the bedroom, cause
breakdown in the family and
lead to same-sex matriages.

That last piece of asininity
— from a lawyer no less — is so
patently absurd that it boggles
the mind trying to find a ratio-
nal response. It's like telling
your children that drinking
orange juice will lead to drink-
ing rum. The demagogic grand-
standing about the government
in the bedroom is also patently
ridiculous. The law enforce-
ment agencies of the govern-
ment have a duty to go wher-
ever crime is committed: in the
bedroom or in the church
office.

The bedroom cannot be a
sanctuary for criminals, whether
it is a husband raping his wife
or a father raping his daughter.

To condone violence — and
rape is essentially a violent act
— is not protecting the family.
It's creating hell-holes from
which we spawn more violent
offspring in our society.

The wife who cloaks the hus-
band who rapes her because
she is afraid of losing the bread-
winner is complicit in her own
degradation, and if she cloaks
him in the rape of her children
she is just as guilty as he is.

2. They say that the timing
of the Government's anti-rape
bill is bad, that it should be

letters@triobunemedia.net



withdrawn and that more con-
sultation should take place.

This line of obfuscation and
equivocation comes mainly
from the political types who say
they are against all forms of vio-
lence against women. They
even want to flog rapists!

But they want to get political
advantage out of the situation
so they shamelessly pander to
those cavemen who do not —
and after a thousand years of
consultation still will not —
accept that rape can take place
in a marriage, and those mis-
guided women who, like some
slaves of old, do not want to
enjoy full equality and freedom.

The public debate on domes-
tic violence will no doubt go on
for a long time, and it should as
long as this evil persists. But
the issue before us is to do
something about a particular
form of domestic violence —
spousal rape — just as we
enacted laws against other
forms of violence without end-
less consultation.

If ever the timing is right it is
now when we are living in fear
of the gathering storm of crim-
inal violence around us. With-
out hemming and hawing we
need to send a clear, simple and
unequivocal message that our
society does not condone vio-
lence in any form — not in the
streets, not in the schools and
not in the bedroom.

3. They say there are legal
problems, so we should not call
spousal rape by its right name,
that the punishment should be
different and that there should
be safeguards against women
falsely accusing their husbands.

Rape is the act of forcing a
woman to have sex against her
will by force or any form of
coercion. Once those elements
are there it is rape and so it
should be called.

As for providing a different
punishment for spousal rape,
that is not necessary because
the principle of imposing pun-
ishment according to all the cir-
cumstances is already well-
established in our law.

Even in cases of homicide
the punishment can vary con-

siderably according to the cir-
cumstances. That is for the
courts to decide. The same
applies to providing safeguards
for husbands accused of rape.
The suggestion that there are
a lot of vindictive Bahamian
wives just waiting to destroy
their husbands when this law is
passed is utter rubbish. Chances
are that those wives who are
being abused by their cavemen
husbands will, unfortunately,
still be reluctant to report them.
The professional people tell us
that that is exactly what is hap-
pening in the case of too many
women who will not turn their
husbands in for raping their
daughters.

If there are some husbands
who have made the mistake of
choosing vindictive women as
their partners, the law already
provides protection for them.
In the case of a false accusa-
tion it will not be his word
against hers that will decide but
— as in every other allegation
of a crime — the courts will
look at the evidence and make
judgments about credibility.

Furthermore, the law also
makes provision for the pun-
ishment of persons who bring
false charges and make false
statements to the authorities.

4. They say the FNM Gov-
ermmment should remember the
referendum and back off.

When Prime Minister Ingra-
ham and his Government tried
to remove discrimination
against Bahamian women in cit-
izenship matters from our con-
stitution, the PLP supported
him in the House of Assembly
and voted unanimously for the
proposed amendment.

Then when they saw a
chance to make political hay
they turned around and along
with their clerical allies cam-
paigned against it. The result
was that the referendum was
defeated, they won the election
and that discriminatory provi-
sion still remains in our consti-
tution. I do not believe that this
time they will get away with
talking out of both sides of their
mouths. Mr. Ingraham should
put the matter to the vote, let
them show their colours and let
them vote against it.

FOR PROGRESS
Nassau,
August 23, 2009.

Use of casuarinas in Bahamas should be strongly discouraged

trees will smother all growth with their toxic,
needle-like litter, reducing the plant diversity in

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In response to the letters of protest that ran in
Friday's newspaper I feel obliged to put in my two
cents. While the casuarina trees that line Good-
man's Bay and West Bay Street have indeed
stood for decades, the use of casuarinas in any
landscape setting here in the Bahamas should be
strongly discouraged. Casuarina trees are natives
of Australia and the South Pacific region — and
in those areas, they are an important part of the
ecosystem, providing food and shelter to the ani-
mals, birds and insects that they have evolved in
tandem with. In our area, casuarinas are noxious
pests, displacing native plants and animals along

our fragile coastal habitats. These trees are allelo-

pathic, which means that they produce chemi-
cals that prevent any other vegetation from grow-
ing under or near them. A stand of casuarina

FOR SALE BY OWNER

“lah rh "I

f w
a O:

. Four(4)- Unit P aza

ail

East aud Street

“oned for Retail 5

op/Office Use

Sale Opt. 1; Entire Complex - 468K net, ono
Sale Opt. 2: Three-Unit Ownership - $388K net

Serious Inquires Only

Ph.(242) 477-3772(dys.)
(242) 341-4104(eve.)

New

Students Grades K-12 will be

held on Thursday August 27th
2009 at 6:00pm at the school.
All students are to wear full

Uniform.

School will reopen for ALL
new and returning students on
Monday, August 31st 2009 at

8:30am

ja bene aee

Bntish Colonial Hilton Motel
MarIborowch St, Shop tl

Clearance SALE
Everything Must Go

Everything for $20
Free parking at the Hilton

We offer Stringing Services, Repairs, Knotting,
Wiring, Driling and The Snack Fix System and
The Mystery Clasps

Pearls and Bread Strands Wholesale and Retail

P.O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 242-323-1865
Email: gems-peans@hotmail,com

Jewerly making clases starts
Seplember sign up now

Nassau,

August 22, 2008

that area to that one single species of introduced
tree — virtually useless to our native creatures.
Every mature casuarina is capable of producing
tens of thousands of tiny, winged seeds each year,
which may blow or float to distant shores, starting
new casuarina ‘barrens’ and reducing the area
that our wildlife has to live in. While these old
beachside trees do frame the vista nicely, so
would seagrapes, pigeon plums or buccaneer
palms — all native Bahamian trees, providing
livable habitat for the wildlife that colonized
these islands long before we did. Thank you for
allowing me to share my thoughts.

JOHN A. THOMPSON, Jr.,

RUSSELL’S WAREHOUSE
CLOSING SALE

Rivet Rite Shelving, Gondolas, Glass Shelves,

2 &4Arm Display Racks, Gridwall, Slatwall,
Slotted Standards, and Hardware. Asst. Fixtures and Fittings,
Men’s Coverall’s $5.00, S/S & L/S Whie Shirts $1-$5,
Blank CD’s $0.50, Men’s Jeans sz. 46-50, $15,
Blank ID Cards, 16’’ Stand Fans $20.00,

Blk School Shoes, $5.00 & $7.00, AND MORE.

Location: Madeira Shopping Center
Behind Mystical Gym - Entrance to Aquinas -
First left - First stairs on left.

Hours: Mon. to Thurs. 9am to 5pm
Contact: 465-8648

In Memoriam

Samuel F. Clapp

Beloved husband and father
1927 - 2009





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



BEC working
on Family
Islands
problems

THE Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation
(BEC) said yesterday
that it is working dili-
gently to correct all the
problems which led to
multiple power outages
in the Family Islands
over the weekend.

Consumers experi-
enced power interrup-
tions in Harbour
Island, Abaco and
Central Andros.

On Friday at 6.40pm,
a cable at BEC's
Whale Point, North
Eleuthera station fault-
ed, resulting in an
island-wide outage.
The restoration
process began immedi-
ately with the electrici-
ty supply restored at
approximately 10.30pm
that night. The power
was then fully restored
to all Harbour Island
residential consumers
by 3.30pm Saturday
afternoon, BEC said.

On Saturday at
10.45pm, Abaco expe-
rienced an island-wide
power outage. The
faulted panel was iso-
lated and power was
fully restored at
approximately 3am on
Sunday morning.

“We continue to
experience generation
problems at our power
station in Fresh Creek,
Central Andros, which
is still affecting supply
to the area, making it
necessary for the cor-
poration to rotate pow-
er around the commu-
nity. We anticipate that
the unit will be
returned to service by
early Wednesday
morning,” BEC said.

Govt in the dark over staff
situation at the Riu hotel

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT officials
yesterday admitted to being
in the dark about what
arrangement on pay or
future job security manage-
ment at the Riu Paradise
Island hotel have reached
with their staff during their
three month closure.

In the wake of claims by
some hotel workers that they
have not been kept ade-
quately informed by man-
agement about what pay
they will get, if any, during
the renovation period, or
how many of the employees
will be coming back to work
when the property re-opens
in November, Minister of
Tourism Vincent Vander-
pool-Wallace and Director
of Labour Harcourt Brown
both said they are unaware
of the terms of the closure
as far as staff are concerned.

“T don’t know, but I will
ask that question myself. I
haven’t heard about (the
fears expressed by some
employees), but I will speak
to the Minister of Labour,”
said Mr Vanderpool- Wal-
lace.



Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace

Mr Brown said he “doesn’t
have all the specifics” con-
cerning the situation, but
added that he is not aware
of any complaints from staff
that have reached his depart-
ment.

“IT would recommend to
anyone who has queries or
concerns about whether
they’ve gotten what they
were entitled to, to come and
see one of our officers and
we'll see what we can do,”
the Labour Director said.

The RIU hotel will be
closed for the next three

Masked gunmen
rob KFC restaurant

TWO masked gunmen burst into the Kentucky Fried Chick-
en (KFC) restaurant on Prince Charles Drive and robbed the
restaurant of an unknown amount of money.

Police said sometime after 11pm on Sunday, two gun-wield-
ing men smashed through the eatery's glass window and entered

the establishment.

The bandits approached an employee and robbed him of
cash, said press liaison officer Asst Supt Walter Evans. The men
left the area in an unknown direction.

Police investigations are ongoing.

SUPERVISOR OF FINANCE

A leading Bahamian company, is secking applications for a Supervisor of Finance

Jon OBJECTIVE:

To promde financial leadershup for the company by managing the financial resources, supervising
the certain key aspects of the company’s accounting funchon and maintaining appropriare relations

months during the tradition-
ally slow tourism season.

The property is set to
undergo a $25 million
makeover, reopening on
November 26, 2009 as the
Riu Palace Paradise Island.

Its 379 guestrooms will be
upgraded and other new
facilities added.

There have been rumours
that there were an above
average number of com-
plaints about the condition
of the property.

One employee said: “We
understand why they are
closing the hotel but of
course it’s like a stab in the
back. We have approached
our superiors and we’re not
getting any response (about
the pay issue).

“Management has a list of
people they are not going to
call back but that’s not been
dealt with yet. The only peo-
ple who know are the man-
agers. We, the employees,
have not been told,” she
claimed.

The Tribune was unable to
reach Minister of Labour
Dion Foulkes as he is on
leave. Attempts to reach
Acting Minister of Labour
Loretta Butler Turner were
unsuccessful up to press time.

Representatives of RIU
could also not be reached for
comment as both the num-
ber listed locally for the hotel
and a number obtained from
RIU’s headquarters in Spain
for the property are now out
of service.

Ud 718
Sasa
eRe
PHONE: 322-2157
















































Mohs Surgery in Nassau
DR. JOHN STRASSWIMMER, MOHS SURGEON
will be visiting The Skin Centre on Friday
September 25th, 2009. DOr Strasswirnmer
trained at Harvard and Yale and is Board
Certified and a Fellow of the Mohs College.

Mohs Micrographic Surgery is an advanced
treatment process for skin cancer which is
now offered at The Skin Centre. It offers the
highest possible cure rate for many skin
cancers and simultaneously minimizes the
sacrifice of normal tissue. This cutting-edge
treatment requires highly specialized
physicians that serve as surgeon, pathologist
and reconstructive surgeon.

Our visiting Mohs Surgeon has extensive
experience in the Mohs Micrographic
Procedure. The technique is used to remove
the two most common forms of skin cancer:
basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell
carcinoma.

For more information, please contact:

The Skin Centre, Harbour Bay Plaza,
East Bay Street Tel. 393-7546,

with investors and regulatney agencies.

(URGANIZATIONAL POSITION:
Reports bo the Director of Finance

PRINCIPAL DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:

Cone responsailines include:
+ Assisting in managing the linancal alairs of the company
Supervise key components of the finance department
Ensure accurate and timely interim and annual financial reporting in accordance with
International Accomnting Standards
Assist in the antvaal budeet exercise
Assist in the training and development of line accounting staff
Coordinate the annual audit process
Assist in managing cashflow and treasury fonctons
Any other related duties as considered necessary

REQUIREMENTS & PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

Candidates must mect the following ceitesia:

Bacheloc’s Degree oc higher in accounting or related financial field

Professional accounting designation recognized by The Bahamas Insitate of Chartered
Acoouetants

Minimum of seven years experience in accounting, finance and budgeting.
Leadership, management and direct supervision experience is required. Previous
direct experience in planning and executing all aspects of financial accounting and
hudgetary functions



Bahamian citizen

Accounting softaure experience Size: 5-11
Proficient in the ust of the Microsoft range of applications

Strong technical and manaperial skills

Excellent wring, communscation, analyncal and reasoning skalls

Excellent organizational and time management skills

Team Player with the ability eo add value ard streneth to the seam and team poals

Hoeest, hardworking and abiliry to mect deadlines

The position offers an attractive salary and benefits package, reflecting the successful
applicant's experience and qualifications, including a pension plan, medical, life, dental
and vision coverage.

Chulified individuals should submit complete resumes including references before August 31"
2009 to: Exnadl: finsupervisori@email.con

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Rosetta St. - Ph: 325-3336





PAGE 6, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



CANE ital

A TRIBUNE reader has
identified the mysterious fish
caught at an ocean depth of
1,500 feet at the back of Par-
adise Island as a longnose
lancetfish.

Fishing partners Lee Chong
and Velasco Newball forward-
ed pictures of the unusual
marine creature to the Uni-
versity of Miami seeking help
in putting a name to it.

The long slender fish has an
unusual head and razor sharp
teeth that extend from the



mouth into the stomach.

Lancetfish are predators and }

can grow up to 6’6” in length.

Very little is known about
their biology except that they ;
mainly inhabit tropical and }
subtropical waters. During the ;
feeding period adults may :

migrate to the sub-arctic reach-
ing as far north as Greenland,
Iceland and the Bering Sea

There are currently only two i

recognised species, the long-

nose and the shortnose }

lancetfish.

_ Three men hospitalised
after drive-by shootings

TWO separate daylight drive-by shoot-
ings sent three men to hospital over the
weekend — with two of them in serious
condition fighting for their lives.

During a brazen daylight drive-by
shooting on Sunday morning, a young
resident of Milton Street was shot in the
abdomen after being sprayed with bullets
from a passing car.

Police said the 21-year-old was stand-
ing on the side of Milton Street around

11am when a Nissan Maxima with heav-
ily tinted windows pulled up and shot
the victim multiple times.

The victim was rushed to hospital by
private vehicle, police said.

At last report, he remained in serious
condition.

Police are also looking for the gunman
who wounded two men on Saturday
morning.

It was shortly after 9am when two men,

aged 23 and 27, were in the area of Cum-
berbatch Alley when an unknown person
pulled up and fired shots from a car, press
liaison officer Asst Supt Walter Evans.

The two men were taken to hospital for
injuries; the younger of the pair was treat-
ed and discharged but the older man —
who was shot in his abdomen — is in
serious condition.

Police have launched intensive inves-
tigations into both shootings.





Former Secretary to the Cabinet HC Walkine dies

HERBERT Cleveland
Walkine, CMG, CVO, OBE, for-
mer Secretary to the Cabinet
died on Thursday, August 20 at
the University of Miami Hospital
in Florida.

He died of cancer at the age of
79 and is survived by his wife
Pam Walkine and daughters
Angel and Imogene Walkine.

Mr Walkine was born on
November 28, 1929 in Crooked
Island, where he began his public

service career as a monitor at the
local public school.

He won a scholarship to attend
the Government High School in
Nassau. After graduating, he con-
tinued his education at the
Bahamas Teacher’s Training Col-
lege in Nassau and at the Uni-
versity of Manchester.

Mr Walkine had a varied and
well-rounded career in the public
service. He began as a teacher
and then served as a Family

Island commissioner for 10 years,
from 1958 to 1968, when he was
appointed assistant secretary to
the Cabinet Office.

He served as permanent sec-
retary in the Ministry of Labour,
the Ministry of Education, the
Ministry of Works and Utilities,
and the Ministry of National
Security, before he was once
again appointed to the Cabinet
Office in 1986, this time as Sec-
retary to the Cabinet.

HC Walkine



PROSPECTUS
THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2028, 2029, 2030, 2031, 2032, 2033, 3034, 3035, AND 3036
ISSUE OF B$150,000, 000.00

THE FU ERNMED uF wt DLA AAS WAL To DE BA AAS



Issued ercke The Bahamas Reeetered Stock Act. and authorized by Resolutions of the House of Assembly, [7th

June, SLR.

PORK LAAPICTAL USE ONLY
APPLICCAT EUR Pbco
ALLOTMENT Mex

Appliculions wall be recenved by The Banking Department beginning af 9:20 amon 1th August. 2008 and will
chose at a: DOpen on 28h August KM, Al kecations will commence at Sob a.m. ca 20th Auguedt, 2000? amd will ceese af
34K on 270h Aeeet, 2M,

DATE

IP the total setecripeions exceed the sum of BSISM0CKKIAMMLIN) (Momingl) partial alhnient will be mde bo
subscribers, aml a peoportenate refund will be made as soon as possible afler allotenent
amounts st refunded.

Nie interes) well he paid on The Regisirer
efo The Central Bank of The Bahaetace

P.O), Bao, MiibH

— i. iL Ls.) [Sh Masse, Matarres
Sir
The Government of The Commemnwealth of The Bahamas invites applications For Bakes Registered Suwk
totalling BS 150,000 The Stock will be available in a range of maturity diies; the earliest being repayable im bWe hereby apply for the folbowing amount of Bahamas Registered Stock:
SUZH wih che laresr in 2h. The total mount of Sanck offered, the rate of interest amd the ieee prece are give helcrar :-
. Imacrt beckew the amceant applied bor
te eats of BSL
ewe Price
Rate Of laterest Namie of Stock Aunaun ES LSS Albowe Prin Rate Babitiis Registered Stock 228 = =6=BS
[5 Z 4 ; : ,
Hii Abowe Prime Rote Bahamas Registered Stock 229 BS
Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Stock 2023 | MOMMY |_| ‘ ess ehseret
Albee Free Rua Hohamase KHegihered Sinmck MI a 34) Aow? Pome Kate fKabomas Regastered Stock Sao BS
Above Prime Rate Habamas Hepistered Sinck 21M» Li44 Abowe Prime Rate Kakamas Regisicred Siok 201 | BS
Above Prime Rate Habeas Kepitered Stock JU ! a
Above Prime Ratz Pakamas Recistered Siock 22 16% Above Pame Rate Baluimis Registered Stock 292 BS
Above Preme Rate Hatemas Kepitered Stock 229 Laid") Above Prine Rate Bahoims Registered Stock 203 06«-BS
Ahowe Prime Rate Habana Repinered Sock Mit . :
VEN: Above Prime Rate aboamas Resistered Sinck 2k %
¢_ Above Prime Rate Bahamas Rephtered Siok 2003 | __(WANNIOWMIOMP | (oh oe Above Dome Role = Balms Kogeiored Sinck aks =
howe Prime Rate Hohamas Repinered Stock 0 lat Above Prime Rate Hiskomos Registered Stock 25 | BS
| isonet | | 4) Albowe Prin Rate Babciities Kegasicred Stock 2096 «BS



ane) urkicrke jo accep any bess amon whch may he alledice be merous

The Seack seal be repaid on 27

th Aagust,

mn the year appearing in Whe qari of the Steck

ie cali BS in payee Gor the Sock apyllied fow
INTEREST
In the ever cf the full omeunt of Sincki=) applied fer ahowe eetare met olketied in

The Stock will bear interest from 27h August. 2009, at the rate shown against ihe name of the Siock ax ihe percent infin, Wire eequeal that Ue atin rfuneiae to atehlies Be: apeplidl Foor the Rallirming Sacache
per aniiien over the Prime Rate (ie, the pri commercial interest fate frowa bime be time fined bey the Clearing hasis a
curyieg in business im the Island of Sew Prowedence in The Bahamas, 2 then: shall be acy difference bolween them.
them that which is fixed by Rowal Bank of Canada). Imeerest shall be payable half-vearly commencing on 27th February,
210 aiid chereafier on 27h August and 27th February in every year aewil the Sinck is repeaidd



ahaimnas Registoned Snook BS

+ PAYMENTS [6 EXCESS OF AS50008 MIST BE SLADE VLA REALTIME (ROSS SETTLEMEST
STSTEM CR TGG) DHRU ALL OOMMERCIAL HARKS EACEPT FISCU,

eo) PAYMENT! CHP B30 LOR LESS CAN AE MADE VA REAL TIME GROSS SETTLEMENT

SYSTM OF BY DARK GRAD PAY ADL To THE CIN TRAL BANE OF TM BAM AMAS

PAYMENT. OF 935 00.00 Of LESS CAN RE AAD VLA REAL TEM O08 SETTLEMENT

SYSTEM. BY BANK DRAPT PAYABLE TO THE CENTRAL BASIK OF THE BAHASLAS OR BY

CASH

CHARGE UPON COONS CHL IDA TRI FUN
The preecipal monies and interest represential by the Steck ore charged epon and payable out of the Conestidahead *
Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.



SUPPLEMESTARY PROVISIONS
1. (me Person



shine oS) The Steck will be mane! by the: Revisirar (The Central Bank of The Bahamas, Applications wall Ordinary Skanature
be received by The Banking Department begimeing af 923) am om 19th August, 700% and ypllileloge oe
HE Alkealions will Gammence al 9) an. an 2th August, MM
and will cease at 3:00p.m.on 27th Amgust, 2000. All envelopes enclosing applications should be Name in Pall (BLOCK LETTERS, state whether Mir Mrs, or Miss and tres if any.)
lohelked "Vupedicolies: Por Hahomas Goverment Registered Stocks”. .
Units The Stock will be im umats of TS 100001.
Auuificationes Applications most be for BS MAMA) ara multiple of that sum. Address (Corporations etc. should give Registered Addresses 4)

ApMicning Fartie Applications for the Steck shoukl be mene bo the Repishrar ort the Geri altactaed ty the
Prospectes amd may be obtained from the Registrar offices im Masau and Freeport, The Treasary
Deparment (Monborsugh Some A havy Linn Rowe, Mimesaiil,
downkialed front the Cestral Bank af the Bakara chsite al wacw cen
any of the folowing banks:

P.O. Box

EPPA CULO Ady oben be
brilhin

Kaha coat oF




1 fark of The Dahamas Intemational Telephone Mos. (H) (Veh

2 First Caribbean lntertatonal Barak (Baleaitats) Limited

4 Pirice Corporation of Haters Lirmetind

2 oa 2. (Where teeor more persons apply as joint subscribers, the addidional nanves and addresses should
fi Scotiabank (Bahernas) Linlied Of prem besew.)

7 Pidehey Bank (Baharres| Limited (formedly Brite American Haake 104) Lirnted)

a Cite nik NA . Ordinary Signatures

PUBLIC DRHT
Mares i Full
Provisional estimates from the ungedtied accounts ws at June 30, 204M show the Public Debi of The Bahar to be

$5,524,214 00."
1



Address:

The following information is ciracied from the mnaiidined acco of the Goverment of The Commonwealth al
The Bahaenas.
PY SKE p PYaabodp* PY SIRI Teelepiieome: Nes.
KS BS BS
Approawed Budpet Approved Budget



Revemee 1 oo 1.424, 108.00 1 4899 00 lWe hereby neqecs: semi anal incest bo bet peed on:
Recurrent Expenditure (eucheding

Repayment of Public Liebe} 1 285690 000 1.344,028,000 14845000 Bank Mame,
Capital Development Hank Branch

Expedite fexcliding loans

contributions ane) advanecs

to public corporations! 166 75, 178,778 EI (Ek) 000 Account Number

2 Brovisnl cslienatcs (note the inate accounts.
* The Public Debt amount is inclusive of The Public Cc
totalled BS440 400150081.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

sporations contingent Gabilite which as at June 30. 204



THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

a

GOVERNOR General
AD Hanna looks on as
former AG Michael
Barnette takes the oath
as Chief Justice at
Government House
yesterday. Mr Barnett’s
appointement has been
controversial with both
the Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce and Bar
Association question-
ing whether his politi-
cal past will affect his
ability to be impartial.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

Barnett sworn in as Chief Justice

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

REFORM of the country's
judicial system to ensure that
it performs as efficiently as
possible is topmost on the
agenda for the new chief jus-
tice.

"We're going to be address-
ing the whole court environ-
ment and I'm trying to get
reforms in terms of civil pro-
cedure reforms and probate
reforms and things to be able
to help justice (move) as expe-
ditiously and efficiently as we
can," said Michael Barnett,
who was officially sworn in as

Reform of country’s judicial
system ‘topmost on the agenda’

chief justice at Government
House yesterday morning.
But given recent budget
cuts to the Attorney Gener-
al's Office and the judiciary —
coupled with a backlog of
pending cases and a shortage
of judges — Mr Barnett warned
the public that these neces-
sary improvements will not
happen immediately.
"Problems do not occur
overnight and they're not
going to be solved overnight.

rake

yr
D

N

Nassau Airport

Development Company

People must be patient and
while they have a right to
demand that matters be
addressed, it is unreasonable
to expect that problems that
have been created over a peri-
od of time can be resolved
instantaneously,” he told The
Tribune before he took his
oath of office yesterday.

Mr Barnett resigned as the
country's attorney general last
week to succeed former chief
justice Sir Burton Hall, who

Nassau Airport Development Company Limited (NAD) is seeking a
Proponent (individual, consortium or joint venture that includes an
experienced restaurant operator) to finance, design, develop, operate
and manage a 4500 sq. ft. (approximate) sit down restaurant and bar
in the new U.S, Departures Terminal currently under construction at
the Lynden Pindling International Airport. This restaurant will be a
world-class facility with a diverse menu, excellent customer service,
high volume and turnover with a true sense of place.

Mandatory qualifications

|. Proponents must be Bahamian and incorporated in The Bahamas.
ii. Proponents must have operated a similar restaurant facility
within the last three (3) years,

NAD’s goals and objectives are to:

(a) achieve a high standard of excellence and customer service;

(b) offer a mix of concepts that will enhance the image of the Lynden
Pindling International Airport as a world class airport;

(c) offer food & beverage choices to passengers at reasonable

prices;

(d) offer a mix of local, regional and national and international
brand-name companies;

(e) develop and design food & beverage facilities that complement
the qualities of the new terminal while recognizing the distinctive
spirit, character and ‘sense of place’ of the Bahamas: and

(f) optimize revenue to NAD.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

is set to take up a post as a
permanent judge on the Inter-
national Criminal Tribunal for
the former Yugoslavia.

Speaking before a crowd of
well-wishers, several Cabinet
ministers and members of the
legal community at his swear-
ing-in ceremony yesterday, Mr
Barnett noted that the job at
hand comes with an "awe-
some responsibility” that can
only be (performed) "with the
grace of God."

Governor-general Arthur
Hanna commended Mr Bar-
nett as a product of a strong
family with a "tradition of
honesty."

After the ceremony, Sir
Burton Hall reflected on his

10-year tenure as a "fascinat-
ing experience."

Still, he admitted that sev-
eral challenges remained with
respect to the country’s judi-
cial system.

"The challenge in the
Bahamas like everywhere else
is to ensure that the systems
that are put in place work as
best as the resources in the
country allow, to serve the
people.”

Deteriorating court build-
ings, too few judges and an
extensive backlog of cases
which leads to defendants
languishing in the system
for years are common criti-
cisms of the Bahamas judi-
cial system.

“The challenge
in the Bahamas
like everywhere
else is to ensure
that the systems
that are put in
place work as
best as the
resources in
the country
allow, to serve
the people.”



Michael Barnett

REQUEST FOR

PROPOSAL

SIT DOWN RESTAURANT & BAR

New U.S. Departures Terminal at LPIA

Interested parties may pick-up the Request for Proposal package at
NAD's offices at the reception desk on the second floor
Domestic/International Terminal at Lynden Pindling International Airport
between the hours of 8:00am and 4:00pm, from August 12th to 24th,
2009. A mandatory pre-proposal briefing will be held in the Arawak
Lounge at the Airport on Wednesday, August 26th at 10:00am.





PAGE 8, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

Chief Justice won't ‘dignity’ Attorney tight-lipped

his critics with response

FROM page one

lodged a formal complaint
against the prime minister's
decision to appoint Mr Bar-
nett.

When asked to respond to
his detractors, Mr Barnett
said "I've noted what they
(said) and I have no comment
on it.”

When pressed about asser-
tions that his ties with the
FNM could influence his car-
riage as chief justice, he said,
"I'm not even going to digni-
fy that with an answer."

He also stressed that his
political affiliation would not
cloud his administration of

justice.

Mr Barnett resigned as
Attorney General last week
after holding the post since
July, 2008.

He was a senior partner at
the law firm of Graham,
Thompson and Co and had
an unsuccessful bid for the
Fort Charlotte seat on the
FNM's ticket in 2007.

Yesterday, prominent
attorney Brian Moree, who
has reportedly been offered
the job as the new AG,
praised Mr Barnett as a "dis-
tinguished" "impressive"
attorney who will remain
impartial.

"IT think based upon my

Legal Notice

NOTICE

CANDY MOUNTAIN VALLEY LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

VEUVE CREEK LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Bahamas.



Legal Notice

NOTICE

MAULES DESSUS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TINY TIDBIT INVESTMENT LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

personal knowledge of him as
a colleague for over 25 years I
have no doubt that he will
bring energy, competence and
experience and most of all
integrity to the office of chief
justice.

"While I understand the
concerns that some have
expressed about the indepen-
dence of the judiciary — and,
of course, that is a critically
important principle in our
democracy — I am satisfied
that he will discharge his judi-
cial conscience with an impar-
tial role of complete integri-
ty,” he told reporters after Mr
Barnett was sworn in at Gov-
ernment House yesterday.



over the AG post

FROM page one

for fixing these problems is
rapidly closing," Mr Moree
told reporters after a swear-
ing in ceremony for new
Chief Justice Michael Bar-
nett yesterday.

When asked directly if he
had accepted the job Mr
Moree said, "I don't think
that's a matter which I can
comment on at the present
time.”

Mr Barnett, the former
attorney general, resigned
last week to assume the post
of chief justice.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

WALLBURG INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

CANNFIELD RIVERA LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PANTHERSVILLE LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TANO VILLAGE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

For weeks, there has been
wide speculation in the legal
community that Mr Moree
had been tapped by Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
to replace him.

Mr Moree has been vocal
in his criticisms of the state
of the judiciary in the past,
many times calling on gov-
ernment to immediately fix
the judicial system's inability
to resolve commercial dis-
putes in a timely manner.

He reiterated these con-
cerns yesterday: "The
administrative of justice is
critical to everything in this
country — it's critical to our

tourism, it's critical to our
financial services industry,
it's critical to our quality of
life and it is at the moment
confronting very serious
problems," he told the media
outside of Government
House.

Deputy Prime Minister
and Minister of Foreign
Affairs Brent Symonette will
serve as Attorney General
and Minister of Legal Affairs
until a new attorney general
is appointed.

He previously served as
Attorney General under a
previous Ingraham adminis-
tration.



Legal Notice

NOTICE

CEDERCREST PEAK INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TRESMO GARDEN INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

OCTOSTONE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)







Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Legal Notice

NOTICE
VISIONARY INVESTMENTS

OFFSHORE LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)
Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 7th day of August
2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-
7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

This notice replaces the publication of 7 August 2009 in the
Gazette wherein APRIL HARVEST INC. was incorrectly
referref to as being dissolved.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009, PAGE 9



- Fury over free 1.9

furniture ‘theft’

Peru police
seize cocaine |
sewn inside —
live turkeys

LIMA, Peru

PERUVIAN police
expecting to find a ship-

ment of cocaine hiddenin

a crate holding two live
turkeys were surprised to
discover the drug surgi-
cally implanted inside the
birds, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Acting on a tip, officers :
stopped a Turismo Ejecu- :

tivo SRL bus outside the
city of Tarapoto in the

central jungle state of San

Martin, officials said
Monday.

Police were puzzled
when they found the
turkeys in the crate, but
didn’t find the cocaine,
Tarapoto’s anti-drug
police chief, Otero Gon-
zalez, told the Associated
Press. They then noticed
that the two turkeys were
bloated.

“Lifting up the feathers
of the bird, in the chest
area, police detected a
handmade seam,” he
said.

A veterinarian extract-
ed 11 oval-shaped plastic
capsules containing 1.9

kilograms (4.2 pounds) of

cocaine from one turkey
and 17 capsules with 2.9
kilograms (6.4 pounds)
from the other, he said.

Both turkeys survived
the removal.

Police were searching
for whoever sent the
shipment from Juanjui to
Tarapoto, which is on a
smuggling route from
Peru’s east Andean coca-
producing valleys to
northern coastal cities,
where it is sold to Mexi-
can and Colombian traf-
fickers.

Gangs often use human

couriers who swallow
cocaine to sneak it across
borders but it is unusual
to use animals. In 2005,

Colombian police found a

total of 3 kilograms (6.6
pounds) of heroin sewn

into the bellies of six pup-

pies during a raid ona
veterinarian clinic.

FROM page one

or handed out to family
members and friends.

The “left over” products
which made their way to
RM Bailey for distribution
were reported of such a low
caliber that many persons
at the scene described them
as either “damaged, or
unusable” items.

At RM Bailey people
queued in the blistering
heat for hours to get an
opportunity to see some of
the items, only to be frus-
trated by the report that
persons allegedly “connect-
ed” with Social Service
workers were being allowed
to get the “first pick.”

According to an eyewit-
ness, who phoned The Tri-
bune, the crowd broke
down the school’s fence and
overran the police who
were called to keep the sit-
uation under control.

As the caller explained,
the situation quickly turned
into a “free-for-all frenzy”
where persons were mak-
ing off with anything they
could lay their hands on.

Speaking with The Tri-
bune from the RIU Hotel
yesterday, Minister of

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Social Services Loretta But-
ler-Turner said that she was
very disturbed by yester-
day’s events.

And as it pertains to
those persons contracted by
the Ministry to deliver
these items to the school,
Mrs Butler-Turner said that
the police have had some
success already in tracking
down a number of persons
who had cordoned off these
hotel supplies.

“Tam very disappointed
but I do realize now why
hotels do not do this any-
more because it becomes
very difficult to manage.

“When Atlantis changes
their stuff now, they just get
rid of it.

“They just send it to the
dump.

“T thought this was a
good gesture on behalf of
RIU as a corporate citizen.

“Our department thought
it was a good gesture con-
sidering the economic chal-
lenges that everyone is hav-
ing, but the lack of
patience, the lack of peo-
ple cooperating, and just a
few people who decided
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HUNDREDS gathered outside of the Paradise Island hotel yesterday.

us in this situation where
we’re at,” she said.

With this distribution
exercise beginning on Fri-
day of last week, Mrs But-
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Ministry will be winding
down this exercise today.

“Tam right now at this









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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS



Team heads home
FROM page 11

"We could have easily
turned away when they
caught Donald and pinned
him on the ground and beat
him," said Leevan Sands, who
just turned 27 on Tuesday
when he finished fourth in the
men's triple jump final.

"But because he was our
team-mate, we only went over
to ask them why they were
treating him like that. That
was when the Police asked us
to go with them for question-
ing, It was an embarrassing
situation that we found our-
selves in, but we didn't do
anything wrong.”

Shamar Sands, the 24-year-
old who finished as a semifi-
nalist in the 110 hurdles, said
they were sorry for the way
that they treated Thomas, a
training partner of theirs in
Auburn, so they had to go to
his rescue. "If we knew that
we would have been put in
this situation, we could have
just tried away and not assist-
ed him at all," Shamar Sands
said.

"But we just couldn't leave
him there, not the way they
were treating him.”

Thomas, the 25-year-old
who relinquished his title he
won in Osaka, Japan in 2007
when he just missed out mak-
ing the final in the men's high
jump, was unavailable for fur-
ther comments yesterday as
he had already departed for
the airport.

Neither Sands said they
were unaware of any com-
promising situation Thomas
got himself in that may have
led to him being chased and
thrown to the ground by the
bouncers of the nightclub
because they were not in that
close vicinity.

"None of us did anything
wrong,” Leevan Sands insist-
ed. "There was a lot of ath-
letes there who can verify
that. But it’s just unfortunate
that we were taken in for
questioning. But we didn't do
anything wrong, except head
out to the club that night."

BERLIN WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS: THE AFTERMATH

Sturrup gets better with age

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany: Stop the time clock. Rewind it
to about ten years for Chandra Sturrup.

That's how the 37-year-old, soon to be 38 veteran
sprinter looked as she competed at the IAAF's 12th
World Championships in Athletics last week.

Nobody hardly noticed the age difference because
Sturrup was the first to remind all of the reporters who
had interviewed her in the mixed zone where the ath-
letes were stopped for comments once they had com-
pleted their events.

"Why everybody is so concerned about my age,”
she boldly asked when one of the first questions posed
to her from one of the international reporters after
the women's 100 metres final how do she do it at age 37.

Sturrup, who will actually turn 38 on September 12,
abruptly answered: "It's because I feel like I'm 27."

And she looked that way. Although she was sev-
enth in the final in 11.05 seconds on August 17 at the
Olympic Stadium, Sturrup posted a season's best of
10.99 for third at a Golden League meet in Rome,
which had heads turned as she headed into Berlin.

And although she deliberately decided not to talk too
much to the media prior to the final, she said it was all
because she got tired of all the questions about her
age. Age certainly wasn't a factor in the century and it
didn't show up with her blazing speed on the second leg
for the Bahamas women's 4 x 100 relay team that
clinched the silver in a season's best of 42.29 behind
Jamaica to return to the podium at a major champi-
onship for the first time since the 2000 Olympic Games
in Sydney, Australia.

"T just felt good out there,” said Sturrup about her
performance. "I worked really hard to get here and I
was determined to go out there and give it my best
shot and I think I did that.”

She collected an estimated $15,000, inclusive of the
$5,000 for her seventh in the 100 and her share of the



CHANDRA STURRUP. Sheniqua Ferguson and Christine
Amertil celebrate women's 4 x 100 silver medal. Missing
is Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie.

$40,000 as a part of the silver medal relay team. Not bad
for a 37-year-old, who could have easily not pack any
bags to compete at all.

That's where the conversation at the Olympic Sta-
dium after the 4 x 1 performance got a little interesting.

For the first time, Sturrup asked the much antici-
pated question: How long do you intend to continue in
the sport. "I really don't know yet," said Sturrup with
a little hesitating. "I haven't really thought about it
yet. But I know for sure that I will compete next year at
the World Indoors and then I will take it from there."

Known as one of the fastest starters in the world, the
indoors suit Sturrup better than the outdoors because
she will have a 60 metre race to contend with when she
go to Doha, Qatar from March 12014, 2010.

In an international career that got started with a
gold in the 100 and silver in the 200 at the Central
American and Caribbean Junior Championships in
1988, Sturrup's first medal at the World's came at the
1997 Indoor Championships when she got a silver.

She then went on to win the World Indoor's 60 title
in 2001 and got her first World Outdoor Championship
medal with a bronze in 2003. Along the way, she has

dominated at both the Central American and
Caribbean, Pan American and Commonwealth Games.

The only level she has not won an individual medal
is at the Olympic Games where her best showing was
sixth in the 100 in 2000. And that maybe the only item
missing off her resume as she's not certain if, at age 40,
she wants to be competing in London, England in 2012.

Unlike many of her foes, Sturrup find herself in a
very unique position, not just in age.

She's one of the few athletes who are excelling at this
level who is self-trained. And that is not be design, but
really as fate would have it.

After her coach, Jamaican Trevor Graham, whom
she had worked with from 1998 to 2006, ran into some
problems with the law, Sturrup has been training on her
own and that is because she felt she learnt so much from
him that she can do it on her own.

Has it worked? It certainly does when one consider
the fact that her 10.99 has only be topped by six other
athletes so far this year, including Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie, who sits just above her with 10.97.

Sturrup, the single mother of an 18-year-old, Shawn,
left Berlin for Switzerland where she will compete
again on Friday at the Weltklasse Zurich, the fifth of the
six Golden League Grand Prix Meets. The final one is
in Bruxelles at the Memorial Van Damme on Septem-
ber 4. But Sturrup should be competing on August 31
and again on September 9 before she get ready for the
TAAF/VTB Bank World Athletics Final in Thessa-
loniki, Greece from September 12-13.

Going into those pre-World Championships meets,
Sturrup was sitting in second place on the World Tour
list for the 100 with 72 points behind Jamaica's Kerron
Stewart's 100 for first place. The aftermath to Berlin is
where the athletes tend to really show their true colours
as they try to claim the hefty cash prizes available at the
end of tunnel. As she head towards that tunnel, Sturrup
said she will also start looking ahead to what could be
grand finale in 2010. Who knows, she might just stick
around a little longer. It all depends on what happen
after Doha next March.

Debbie Ferguson-
} McKenzie’s coaching

change key factor

GOLD MEDAL WINNER Allyson Felix of the US| is flanked by
silver medal winner Veronica Campbell-Brown, left, of }
Jamaica and bronze medal winner Debbie Ferguson-McKen- :

zie of Bahamas after the ceremony for the Women's 200m
final at the World Athletics Championships in Berlin.














FROM page 11

in their first head-to-head con-
frontation at the Stockholm
Golden League meet on July
31. Felix surged on top of the
charts with 21.88, dropping Fer-
guson-McKenzie to second with
22.23.

At the championships, the
focus of attention was on
Allyson,

Campbell-Brown and
McKenzie and the question was
really would order they would

“Based on the
way I’ve been
running this
year, Iam going
to compete
through 2012 in
London.”



The meet will also serve as
another qualifier for the ath-
letes to accumulate points for
the World Athletics Tour,
which culminates with the
Finals in Thessaloniki, Greece
from September 12-13.

Right now. Ferguson-
McKenzie is sitting in seventh
spot with 55 points. The race is
led by Jamaican World silver
medalists Kerron Stewart with
100 with Bahamian Chandra
Sturrup sitting in second with
72.

Although the 200 is not on































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finish in. Ferguson-McKenzie
had staked her claim to the title
when she ran the fastest quali-
fying time of 22.24 in beating
out Campbell-Brown (22.29) at
the tape in the first heat, while
Felix easily followed winning
the next heat in the fourth
fastest time of 22.44 behind
compatriot Muna Lee, the win-
ner of the last heat in 22.30.

The tide, however, turned in
the final as Felix saved her best
for last as she maintained her
lead from the crack of the gun
in six in 22.02 to put her name
on the two fastest times this
year.

Campbell’-Brown, just
behind her in lave five, got the
silver in 22.35 and Ferguson-
McKenzie, trailing in lane four,
had to settle for the bronze in
22.41.

"You know what, I'm still
satisfied with the bronze," said

Ferguson-McKenzie, who

made up for her sixth place fin-
ish in the 100 final three days
before the preliminaries of the
200. "I really wanted to run a
personal best and set a nation-
al record, but the season isn't
over yet. So hopefully I can get
to do both of them before I'm
done."

Now that the World's are
complete, Ferguson-McKenzie,
who earned about $36,000
(which represents her §20,000
for the bronze, §10,000 for her
split on the relay team and
$6,000 for sixth in the 100), say
she can now concentrate on the
rest of the season and all of the
monies that's to be won head-
ing into the World Athletic
Final next month.

She will rejoin the field in a
rematch of Berlin at the Welk-
lasse Zurich meet on August
28, the fifth of the six race series
in the Golden League on Fri-
day in the 100.

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the schedule for Zurich, Fergu-
son-McKenzie heads that chart
with 55, a seven-point margin
over Virgin Island's LaVerne
Jones-Ferrette.

The Golden League series
will end on September 9 in
Bruxelles at the Memorial Van
Damme. But before that, Fer-
guson-McKenzie is expected to
compete in the Zageb 2009 on
August 31 as well.

As for next year and beyond,
Ferguson-McKenzie assured
the Bahamian public that she's
definitely not done yet.

"Based on the way I've ben
running this year, I am going
to compete through 2012 in
London, England," said Fergu-
son-McKenzie, the site of what
will be her fifth Olympic
Games, dating back to Atlanta,
Georgia in 1996 when she made
her debut.

"T feel that I'm fit and I'm in
a position to continue to run
fast,” she said. "And being in
the new environment that I'm
in, I don't see why I should not
be able to compete in another
Olympic Games."

In three years, Ferguson-
McKenzie should then be con-
sidered the ‘Grandma’ of the
Bahamian track team at age 36,
taking over from Sturrup, who
held that honor in Berlin after
43-year-old javelin thrower
Lavern Eve didn't make the
team. "If Chandra can still run
10.99 at age 36, I don't see why
Ican't run under 11 seconds at
age 36," Ferguson-McKenzie
stressed. "We will just have to
wait and see what happens. But
I want to compete in one more
Olympics.”

Along the way, Ferguson-
McKenzie is still contemplat-
ing whether or not she will run
in the IAAF's 13th World
Indoor Championships in
Doha, Qatar from March 12-
14, 2010. But she's certainly
going to represent the Bahamas
at the Commonwealth Games
in Delhi, India from October
3-14.

As long as she stays healthy,
Ferguson-McKenzie said her
goal is to also contest the
TAAF's 13th World Champi-
onships in Daegu, South Korea
from August 27-September 4.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE PAGE 1






>| TUESDAY, AUGUST 25,

rts

2009



INSIDE ¢ Sturrup gets better with age



WAM RA USI
McKenzie's coaching
CTR MCI

(AP Photo/Michael Sohn)
DEBBIE FERGUSON-MCKENZIE of the Bahamas celebrates
after taking the bronze in the Women's 200m during the
World Athletics Championships in Berlin on Friday, Aug. 21,
2009.

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany: As soon as she had returned home
from the Penn Relays in Philadelphia in April, Debbie
Ferguson-McKenzie packed her bags and left her training
camp in Miami, Florida and headed north to Orlando
where she teamed up with her Jamaican rival Veronica
Campbell-Brown and American Tyson Gay.

It was probably the wisest move that the 33-year-old has
made in her life - and it has rejuvenated her career to the
point that Ferguson-McKenzie has announced that will
will definitely compete through the 2012 Olympic Games
before she finally hang up her sprints.

"I wasn't happy where I was," said Ferguson-McKenzie,
of her previous site where she worked under University of
Miami's coach Amy Beem and American sprinter Lauyrn
Williams. "I just decided after I competed at Penn's that I
had to make the move. I think it was the best decision that
T could make."

Winner of the Bahamas' only individual medal - a
bronze in the 200 metres behind Campbell (silver) and
now three-time champion Allyson Felix of the United
States — is all the reason more to agree with the Bahamian,
who has virtually won a medal at every international meet
she has competed in - the only one to hold such a distinc-
tion.

"When I was offered the opportunity to train with coach
(Lance) Brauman, it was one of a lifetime achievement. I
certainly don't have any regrets. But at the same time, I
want to wish both Lauryn and coach Beem every suc-
cess."

In the short time that Brauman has been able to include
Ferguson-McKenzie into his stable, she was able to return
home and pull off the double sprint victory at the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associations’ National Open Track
and Field Championships in July at the Thomas A. Robin-
son Track and Field Stadium.

In between that time and the World's over the past
nine days, Ferguson-McKenzie has proven to once again be
a dominant force on the international scene. She actually
posted the fastest time in the world in the 200 of 22.32 in a
meet in Rethimno on July 20 until she was beaten by Felix

SEE page 10



BERLIN WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS: THE AFTERMATH



spirits high as
team heads home

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

BERLIN, Germany:

ith the
IAAF's
12th
World
Championships over and
done with, triple jumper Lee-
van ‘Superman’ Sands and
110 metres hurdler Shamar
Sands said they hope to leave
the memories behind as well.

The team left the Games
Village yesterday and while
the two Sands headed onto
their next meets in Europe,
those still in Berlin returned
to the hotel where they stayed
when the Bahamas Associa-
tion of Athletic Associations
hosted the team at a training
camp prior to the start of the
championships.

Team manager Ralph
McKinney confirmed that all
of the athletes were in good
spirits and are just waiting to
get out of Berlin. McKinney is
expected to remain until
everybody leave by today.

As for the two Sands who
were caught up in the melee
that also involved high jumper
Donald Thomas, two Cubans
and an American, McKinney
said Thomas had to re-
arrange his return to the Unit-
ed States, while Leevan Sands
left for Zurch, Switzerland
where he will compete on Fri-
day and Shamar Sands
departed for Astoria where
he will also compete this
weekend.

"Everybody else is in good
spirits," said McKinney, who
noted that sprinters Debbie
Ferguson-McKinney and
Chandra Sturrup both headed
to Zurich to compete, while
Christine Amertil went to
Atlanta and Sasha Rolle
headed to Arkansas.

"Everybody else who is
here either are relaxing in the
hotel or have gone sightseeing
and shopping."

McKinney said it was just
disappointing that the scuffle
that resulted in the three ath-
letes being arrested and
detained for questioning for
11 hours on Sunday put a
damper on the team's tied
22nd position with Japan in
the medal count with two and
their tied 16th spot on the

placing table.
But before they left Berlin,
both Sands adamantly

claimed their innocence and
said they were only escorted
to the Police station for ques-
tioning. Both athletes assured
the Bahamian public that they
neither of them were directly
involved any scuffle.

SEE page 10



but ‘Superman’ Sands and Shamar
Sands hope to leave memories behind



SHAMAR SANDS walks through the tunnel at the
Olympic Stadium after failing to make the final of the
men's 110 metres hurdles.

LEEVAN SANDS makes an attempt in the final of
the triple jump during the World Athletics Cham-
pionships in Berlin on Tuesday, August 18, 2009...

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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Miss Universe telecast was ‘a full {eee

return for govt money invested’

FROM page one

cent next month.

The final pageant, which
involved 83 contestants from
across the globe, was televised
across the world live on NBC and
Telemundo from 9pm to 11pm
Sunday.

Pageant co-owner Donald
Trump revealed on the night that
18 countries had vied to host the
pageant, but the Bahamas got it.

Mr Trump said “the government
can be very proud of themselves”
for the manner in which the coun-
try prepared itself for the event
and hosted the competition. He
said the Bahamas looked “amaz-

”

ing.
Yesterday, Mr Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said the success of the event
“exceeded even our very high
expectations.”
He touted the fact that, besides
massive exposure for the Atlantis





importance
Te
UTE LT

‘SUCCESS in English, suc-
cess in life’ says this billboard
in a country district in Guilin,
China, which encourages Chi-
nese students to study Eng-
lish to succeed in the world.
This photograph was taken
by Mr Ron Lightbourn, who
with his wife, took a boat trip
down the Li River, stopping
off in Guilin for a short tour
during which he spotted this
billboard. Immediately Mr
Lightbourn thought of
Bahamian students failing
their English Language exams
and felt that the global impor-
tance of English should be a
wake up call for them.

¢ SEE EDITORIAL
PAGE 4.











resort, where the pageant was
based, the two-hour event involved
eight minutes of coverage of the
Family Island — including Exu-
ma, Bimini, Abaco and Grand
Bahama — from trips taken there
by the contestants, highlighting the
diversity of The Bahamas.

All of the “intros and outros”
around various segments of the
show were accompanied by the
official logo that appears in all
Bahamas tourism promotions.

“We are already getting emails
and calls from all over to say it was
the best two hours of promotion
for any country ever. At the end of
the day while all the publicity was
quite useful it was the worldwide
audience for the final telecast that
matters,” said the minister.

The Minister suggested that
another area where the event will
benefit The Bahamas going for-
ward is as an example of our
capacity to host major events.

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over $10,000 in prizes, including
a $2,500 Gift Certificate, iPods and many other fabulous prizes!

“We never ever looked at this
as a three week event or a one
night event, it’s something that we
use as a platform to move some
other things forward.

“There are local companies that
put on events for Miss Universe
that are companies that service
groups coming into The Bahamas
that now have a portfolio of capa-
bility that they never had before
and that can also be used.

“We can now put that to any
country or organisation that has
large numbers of people coming
from anywhere else to show what
we can do,” added the minister.

Mr Vanderpool Wallace
explained that the Ministry sought
to cash-in on the “high awareness
and excitement levels” generated
by the exposure of the Bahamas
during the event by running adver-
tisements for Bahamas vacations
right after the telecast.

He said that the Ministry will be

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MISS VENEZUELA Stefania Fernandez, center, steadies her Miss Universe 2009 crown
as she poses with the other contestants at the end of the Miss Universe beauty
pageant in Nassau, Bahamas, Sunday, Aug. 23, 2009.

monitoring more closely where its
future bookings are coming from
to see how the event may have
stimulated more interest from new
markets and to what extent it may
be worth pursuing more aggres-
sive marketing campaigns in dif-



ferent areas.

“We think we will begin to see
bookings right now for all points in
the future so we will continue to
monitor it — not just how much
business but where it’s coming
from,” he said.

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‘ven ld econ 3-8 8271999)




Delegation seeks Zelaya’s return in Hondas visit

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras

FOREIGN ministers from
seven nations launched a direct,
high-profile attempt Monday to
persuade Honduras’ interim
government to restore ousted
President Manuel Zelaya,
according to Associated Press.

The delegation from the
Organization of American
States was the most prominent
group of officials to visit Hon-
duras since Zelaya was arrest-
ed and hustled out of the coun-
try June 28, prompting criticism

from governments around the
world.

“We hope to meet with the
interim government and other
sectors (of Honduran society)
who are able to support all the
points in the San Jose accord,
including the reinstatement of
President Zelaya,” Costa Rican
Foreign Minister Bruno Stagno
told reporters.The foreign min-
isters — from Argentina, Cana-
da, Costa Rica, Jamaica, Mexico,
Panama and the Dominican
Republic — met with Zelaya
supporters in the morning and



they “showed they would sup-
port the accord,” Stagno said.

OAS Secretary-General Jose
Miguel Insulza accompanied the
group.

The OAS is pressuring the
interim government to accept
the San Jose accord, a plan pro-
posed by Costa Rican President
Oscar Arias that would return
Zelaya to power until elections
are held by the end of Noverm-
ber and would grant amnesty
both to Zelaya for any alleged
crimes and to those involved in
the coup.



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Customs chief
hits back over |
corruption
concerns

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia. net

THE COMPTROLLER of }
Customs said yesterday that }
claims of delays and corrup- }
tion stemming from the }
implementation of proper }
clearance procedures for }
courier companies and non- }
perishable goods, which have }
been made by some business }
people, are “gross misrepre- }

sentations”.

Glenn Gomez said the }
processes put in place by the }
Customs Department since }
his appointment have always }
been the right procedures, but :
had not been enforced for }

decades.

Mr Gomez admitted that }
the new process regarding the :
C-13 declaration form had }
become a challenge for couri- }
er companies during its ini- }
tial implementation, but he :
argued that some concerns }
brought to him by a newly }
formed courier association }

were dealt with promptly.

He added that some other }
changes requested by the }
association would have }
required him to negate the }
revisions made to the clear- }

ing of imported goods.

Mr Gomez said the new }
processes were introduced }
because government was los- }
ing millions in revenue due }
to an erroneous procedure }
that he said should not have }

been in place.

“They want a system that is :
illegal to operate,” he said. :
“Tf you’re just upset because }
you can't circumvent the sys- }
tem, I can’t help you with }
that. We are there to collect }
duties not to stymie business- i

”

es.
According to Mr Gomez,

the issue of delays has greatly :
decreased over the months }
since the C-13 clearance pro- }
cedure was reintroduced. }
And he said it was due to the ?
department putting more staff }
in place to expedite the "vast }
of paperwork }

amount"

required to clear items.

SEE page 3B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

THE TRIBUNE

usiness

TU 2s. AY.

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

AUGUST 25,

2009

City Markets shareholders

urged: ‘Take strong action’ BEXZiiver

* Financial consultant recommends ‘vote of no confidence’ in grocery chain’s Board at
next AGM, and generating negative publicity to shame likes of Neal & Massey

* Argues that investors being ‘kept in the dark’ and shares have ‘no market value’
* Claims that protest could help spur improved corporate governance in the Bahamas

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

MINORITY investors in
Bahamas Supermarkets, the pub-
licly traded holding company for
City Markets, have been urged by a
leading Bahamian financial con-
sultant to “take strong action”
whenever the company holds its
next annual general meeting
(AGM), including a ‘no confidence’
vote in the existing Board of Direc-
tors.

Richard Coulson, head of RC
Capital Markets Consultants, in a
message sent to City Markets’ 1500
minority investors, said such action
could help improve corporate gov-
ernance in the Bahamas and show
the company’s Board how upset
shareholders were about the lack of
information on its financial condi-
tion.

Calling on minority investors to

IDB initiative to develop
10-year Water Corp plan

form a steering committee if they
were serious about pushing for a
redress of their grievances, Mr
Coulson’s message, a copy of which
has been obtained by Tribune Busi-
ness, said: “The facts remain that
you shareholders continue to be
kept in the dark by the Board of
Directors, while your shares effec-
tively have no market value and it
will be a long time before you see
any dividends.

“Tt seems only logical to me, as a
financial consultant, that the minor-
ity shareholders should take strong
action at the next AGM, such as
vigorous questioning, voting no
confidence in the present Board,
and proposing a slate of new direc-
tors.”

There is no chance anything pro-
posed by the minority shareholders
in, say, a dissenting Proxy, would be
adopted given that BSL Holdings,

the private equity consortium that
dominates the Board, has a strong
78 per cent majority.

Mr Coulson acknowledged this,
but wrote: “Your formal resolu-
tions would be defeated by major-
ity vote (although you might get
support from several of the major-
ity group), but could lead to nego-
tiated changes, and at least you
would go on record and would
receive wide publicity - which cer-
tainly the dominant foreign share-
holder, Neal & Massey, would wish
to avoid for obvious reasons.

“There might even be political
fall-out from your action. In my
opinion, your motions would have
a salutary effect on corporate gov-
ernance in our entire capital mar-
kets.”

Mr Coulson said this represented

SEE page 5B



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Ernst & Young
defendant in

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ERNST & YOUNG (Bahamas) has been
sued in a class action lawsuit filed in relation to
Bernard Madoff’s giant $64.8 billion Ponzi
fraud, a British Virgin Islands company alleg-
ing that it and its Cayman affiliate received $1
million in fees despite failing to properly audit
an investment fund that had all its assets invest-
ed with the convicted fraudster.

The action, filed on July 17, 2009, in the US
District Court for the southern district of New
York by BVI-domiciled Tradex Global Master
Fund, also named as a defendant Bahamas and
Cayman-based Euro-Dutch Management and
its managing director, Anthony Inder-Rieden,
which acted as fund manager to the Santa Clara
I Fund.

This fund, initially established in the
Bahamas during December 1999 before its
transfer to the Cayman Islands on July 30,
2003, was the entity that Tradex invested its
funds with. In turn, Santa Clara invested its
assets with Cayman-based Harley International,

which then “invested substantially all of its
money” with Mr Madoff.

Ermst & Young (Bahamas) and its Cayman
affiliate was alleged to have acted as Santa
Clara’s auditor, with Tradex claiming that their
unqualified audit opinions never” fairly pre-
sented, in all material respects, the financial
condition or results of the fund”.

SEE page 3B

CLICO chief moves to bar discovery

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

(Bahamas) and himself or
the 75 Florida-based entities
he and his wife allegedly



Apart from Corporation business plan,
consultants hired in $300k project to
devise way to place water regulation in
URCA’s hands and increase prices

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government has
agreed a $300,000 Inter-
American Development
Bank (IDB) loan to update
the legal and regulatory
framework for this nation’s
water industry, a programme
that includes devising a 10-
year business plan for the ail-
ing Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration and increased water
prices.

The Ingraham administra-
tion, in the form of Zhivargo
Laing, minister of state for
finance, signed the agreement
with the IDB on August 5,
2009, agreeing to an initiative
that will involve the IDB
lending $250,000 from its
IDB-Netherlands Water Part-
nership Programme
(INWAP) and the Govern-
ment providing $50,000.

The funds will be used to
contract and hire a consult-
ing firm, an appointment sub-
ject to the Government’s
approval, which will develop a
plan for revamping the
Bahamian water industry’s
legal and regulatory frame-
work.

“The bank [IDB] is cur-
rently financing the prepara-
tion of a Water and Sanita-
tion Strategic Sector Plan,”

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the IDB said in its operational
plan for the initiative.

“This assignment includes
the preparation of a 10-year
Business Plan for the Water
& Sewerage Corporation as
well a tariff request. It has
been determined that the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion Act has not been updated
since 1976, and its provisions
are not adequate in the cur-
rent environment. The cur-
rent legislations need to be
revised in the light of severe
environmental, health, and

SEE page 4B

THE Trinidadian head of
CLICO (Bahamas) has
moved to restrict the docu-
ments the insolvent insurer’s
liquidator can obtain from
his attorneys regarding his
personal financial dealings,
arguing that the original sub-
poena is “overly broad” and
seeks information beyond
what is required for an
orderly wind-up.

Lawrence Duprey, the
man many are blaming for
CLICO (Bahamas) collapse
into insolvency, and his wife,
Sylvia Baldini, on August 19,
2009, filed a Protective
Motion with the US Bank-
ruptcy Court for the south-
ern district of Florida, seek-
ing an Order that would
restrict the documents their
US attorneys, Greenberg

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liquidator Craig A. “Tony’
Gomez.

The hearing on their
motion is due to be heard on
September 3, 2009, as Mr
Duprey seeks to limit dis-
covery only to documents
involving the transfer of
funds between CLICO

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The Trinidadian wants the
court to exempt from dis-
covery “documents regard-
ing transfers to, from, on
behalf of, or for the benefit
of either Duprey or Baldini,
except to the extent that
such transfers involved funds
belonging to CLICO
(Bahamas)”.

He also wants “copies of
management agreements,
shareholders agreements,
operating agreements or
records reflecting ownership
of any entity, except to the
extent that ownership in
such entity is held by” CLI-
CO (Bahamas), along with
papers protected by attor-
ney-client privilege and oth-

SEE page 6B



> Pension Plans

> Mutual Funds

> Stock Brokerage

> Corporate Finance

> Investment Management
> Trusts & Estate Planning

> Personal Pension Plan Accounts

> Education Investment Accounts

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Cleo 4





PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



OO —ooeeaeeUS INES eee
Learning to value tertiary education

By LARRY GIBSON

THE Government has
announced the suspension of
new scholarship loans under
the Educational Scholarship
Loan Programme. The rea-
son for the suspension was cit-
ed as the high default rate on
loans, thus preventing the
‘Fund’ from being self-sus-
taining. While I was not sur-
prised at the high default rate
or the inevitability of the sus-
pension of new loans, I was
very surprised at what, prima
facie, appeared to be extreme-
ly late notice. I thought the
late notice was both unfortu-
nate and unfair to those under






Financial

Focus

By Larry Gibson

the impression that funding
was forthcoming.

We really need to take an
urgent look at our long-term
‘national education policy’, as
I fundamentally believe that
education and training are
key to our long-term eco-
nomic viability as a nation.
We need an integrated and
comprehensive ‘cradle to
grave’ approach to education

NOTICE

MARLIN INVESTMENTS, INC.








In Voluntary Liquidation




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with






Section

Companies Act.

138(4) of the
2000, MARLIN

International Business
INVESTMENTS,

INC. is in dissolution as of August 17, 2009.





James M. Meyer situated at 701 Brickell Avenue, Suite
1400, Miami, Florida is the Liquidator.








LIQUIDATOR








Legal Notice

NOTICE

WHITE COLUMBINE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

HANANI VISTA LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced

on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

LAUNCESTON LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

and training. As I survey the
Bahamas’ educational land-
scape, while I see pockets of
excellence, there are so many
areas where we could do
much better.

HOME GROWN VERSUS
INTERNATIONAL

My good friend Ray
Winder offered his opinion
last week, suggesting that gov-
ernment would have got a
better return on their invest-
ment if the funds for the stu-
dent loan programme had
been injected into the College
of the Bahamas (COB),
instead of the-now $60 mil-
lion-deep loan portfolio.

This approach has been
taken by numerous develop-
ing countries in the past,
where resources are initially
directed towards creating an
academically respected and
competitive national univer-
sity. To our credit, COB is
making great strides in both
spheres and, to the extent that
we can maintain both objec-
tives, I believe Ray’s views
have merit. I also share all his
views about the need for
COB to have the capacity to
educate the majority of stu-
dents seeking a tertiary edu-
cation there.

However, it is not the full
solution. For example, there
are undoubtedly specialised
programmes or areas of study
that COB cannot offer, or
they may not be cost effec-
tive to offer. In such instances,
there must be funding avail-
able for studies abroad. In dis-
ciplines where we have
demonstrated capability and
capacity, we should first con-
sider directing public fund-

ing and scholarship awards to
COB, while still making schol-
arship funding for advanced
degrees and specialised pro-
grammes at institutions
abroad available.

DIVERSITY IN
TRAINING

There is a constituency out
there who would argue that
forcing scholarship students
to COB may not be advisable,
if it means that virtually all
our students would be edu-
cated at COB. I guess that the
point being suggested is that
graduates (and, by extension,
our future workforce) may all
be of a similar leaning or phi-
losophy. For example, if
COB?’s economics department
is ‘monetarist-leaning’, then
most of our graduates may be
monetarist in their views.

In a conversation some
years ago, a physician pointed
out that probably as much as
75 per cent of our doctors are
graduates of a single institu-
tion, the University of the
West Indies (UWI). Is this
good or bad? Should we be
concerned about this? I am
certainly not qualified to offer
an opinion on this particular
issue. What I do know, how-
ever, is that these same doc-
tors go on to many of the best
schools in North America and
Europe for postgraduate stud-
ies and specialisation. Admis-
sions to these programmes are
highly competitive, and our
candidates do extremely well.

CONCLUSION
The stark reality is that
public funding is limited, and
more so, in difficult econom-
ic times. Therefore, policy-

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SOUTHAVEN HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

MEIJI FIRST GROUP CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

RAMAT S.A.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

makers have to make tough
allocation decisions from
among many competing
needs. However, the institu-
tional strengthening and
expansion of COB should be
a national priority.

A by-product of the sus-
pension of new student loans
is the fact that COB will be
taking in some 1,700 fresh-
men students this autumn, the
largest intake in its history.

This is probably several
hundred more students than
COB would have normally
planned for. I trust that COB
was given a ‘heads up’ on this
and was able to ramp up
staffing to accommodate addi-
tional students.

I am also told that COB is
limited to a class size of 25
students through collective
bargaining agreements. While
this is excellent, I am remind-
ed of the fact that most col-
leges and universities run
‘auditorium type’ introducto-
ry courses, where one class
would have one professor and
several research assistants
teaching a single class with
several hundred students at a
time.

POSTSCRIPT -

BEACH ALERT
Every morning at Good-
man’s Bay you can hear a ris-
ing crescendo of complaints
regarding another encroach-
ment on Bahamians rights.
This time, a fence has been
erected in the vicinity of the
old ‘Nassau Beach Hotel’,
which actually extends into
the water. The only way you
can pass this property is to
actually swim around it. This
is a travesty that is wrong and

must be corrected immedi-
ately.

Private property only
extends to the high water
mark.

Further, that property has
received benefits under the
Hotels Encouragement Act,
which expressly provides for
public access to all public
areas. If the fence is erected
for security reasons, then why
can’t it run parallel to the
beach at or above the high
water mark, which the law
calls for.

Finally, I am not sure
whether that land is actually
Crown land in the first
instance. If so, it makes the
Bahamian people the rightful
owner of the land and the
thoroughfare. I call upon
those who erected this fence
to ‘do the right thing’ and cor-
rect your oversight...this isn’t
something that the Govern-
ment needs to get involved
with.

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice President-pensions,
Colonial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance
and is a major shareholder of
Security & General Insurance
Company in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do
not necessarily represent
those of Colonial Group
International or any of its sub-
sidiary and/or affiliated com-
panies. Please direct any
questions or comments to
rigibson@atlantichouse.com.bs

Legal Notice

NOTICE

DELTA HORIZONS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ORCHID GROUP INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

HONOUR OAK CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009, PAGE 3B



I =~) =< ee
FROM page one Customs chief ‘®OMPseeore Ernst & Young defendant

in Madoff lawsuit

According to him, howev-
er, when the new procedure
was introduced in Grand
Bahama it was rife with
“quirks,” and so the use of the
old system was extended to
the end of the year. There are
no plans, though, for a simi-
lar extension in New Provi-
dence.

Mr Gomez said New Provi-
dence -based courier compa-
nies had been given three
extensions before the C-13 was
implemented, and “will have
to wait for Freeport to catch
them up”.

He suggested that the Fam-
ily Islands do not have the
same procedures in place and
customs facilities as New Prov-
idence, and barring any
change to the types of ship-
ments they receive they will
continue to have different pro-
cedures.

“Going forward it is not
practical that every single
thing that we do is going to
work in Exuma (and other
Family Islands),” said Mr
Gomez. “The same law will
apply, but every step in the
process might not apply.”

According to him, the
changes were implemented in
order to lead the Customs
Department to a more feasible
procedural structure, in hopes

hits back

of one day taking the process

paperless by moving online.

Businesses recently lament- :
ed that the changes are }
impacting cash flow and could }
increase the potential for cor- }

ruption.

Tribune Business was told }
that the Bahamas Chamber of }
Commerce had received hun- }
dreds of complaints from }

Bahamian businesses.

Responding to those claims, }
Mr Gomez said he has not had }
any complaints to his office }
from those entities, saying: “If }
they have concerns come and }
speak with me and I'll address }

it ”

is not much that can be done.

However, he said, should :
the behaviour persist, the indi- }

vidual will be caught.

“We are changing the sys- :
tem so there are less avenues }
for corruption, and these }
things will be able to be detect- }

ed much quicker,” he said.

BAHAMAS FIRST
HOLDINGS LIMITED

With regard to the charges }
that delays caused by the new }
procedures could encourage }
corruption, Mr Gomez sug- }
gested that when corrupt- :
minded individuals decide to }
commit illegal offences, there }

Euro-Dutch was alleged to
have been the investment man-
ager for both Santa Clara and
Harley, with Mr Inder-Rieden
and another defendant, Dawn
Davies, sitting on both compa-
nies’ Boards of Directors.

The crux of Tradex’s allega-
tions and complaint is that nei-
ther the Ernst & Young sub-
sidiaries, nor Euro-Dutch and
its executives, spotted that Mr
Madoff was a fraudster running
a Ponzi scheme, despite numer-
ous ‘red flags’ being raised in
public - such as his high returns
year after year being ‘too good
to be true’; Madoff’s unwilling-
ness to subject himself and his
firm to outside scrutiny; his
external auditors being a small
three-man company; and
numerous public media articles
and investment professionals
expressing scepticism.

The lawsuit alleged: “Ernst
& Young was also responsible
for, complicit in and acquies-
cent to the issuance of the false
and misleading statements and
omissions, including those set
forth above, contained in the
fund’s audited annual financial
statements.”

Tradex alleged that Ernst &
Young provided a clean audit
opinion for Santa Clara as
recently as July 4, 2008, repre-
senting that the fund’s finan-

NOTICE TO SHAREHOLDERS

Bahamas First Holdings Limited hereby notifies all its
shareholders that based on the results of the Audited
Financial Statements of the Company for the year ended

cial statements “gave a true and
fair view of the state of affairs
of the company, and of its
results and cash flows”. Santa
Clara is now in liquidation in
the Cayman Islands.

Alleging that the Ernst &
Young affiliates had “breached
[their] duties” to investors in
Santa Clara and Harley, the lat-
ter of which is being sued by

the Madoff bankruptcy trustee,
the lawsuit claimed: “Ernst &
Young ignored multiple red
flags that would have led any
reasonable auditor exercising
professional scepticism to
inquire further to obtain the
requisite level of comfort.”
The lawsuit alleged that the
fair value of Santa Clara’s
financial assets, its total assets

and liabilities, the net asset val-
ue of shares, and investment
income and expenses, were all
incorrectly presented in the
fund’s audited financial state-
ments.

“Ernst & Young reaped sub-
stantial professional fees for
their supposed audit work for
both Santa Clara and Harley,”
the lawsuit alleged. “On infor-
mation and belief, Ernst &
Young was paid substantially
more than $1 million for their
auditing and accounting work
on the Santa Clara and Harley
engagements.”

LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.
“Eattage Lat With Private Beach

FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!

Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million

Web Listing # 8377

Mario A. Carey, CRS, CIPS, CLHMS

Tel: 242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013

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NOTICE

info@mariocareyrealty.com

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AMS

Mario Carey Realty
Dt's abaut yaw... Let's talk.



International Business Companies Act 2000

Fairsands Limited

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Motion is hereby given in

GCampenies «ect 2000 thet Falreemades Limited ts in dissolution

acoordanon with Secthon 138 (4) of tha Imarnnational Business

The date of commencament of dissolution waa the 19th day of Auguat, 2000:

The Liquiddaters are Wir, Juan M4, Lope: eed Mr. Simon JS. Townend, of KPRAG Restroctur ng

Limited, 5" Flaar, Mantagua Sterling Cantra, PO Box N-123, Nassau, Bahamas

41) persons having claims against the above-named Company are required om of before the
21st day of September, 2008 fo send their ners peed addrasgses and marticulars of their

31st December 2008, the Board of Directors has declared

an extraordinary dividend of two cents (2 ¢) per ordinary

share to be paid 31st August 2009, to all shareholders of
record as of 13th August 2009.

debts of clainna te the Liquidatera of tha Company, or in default thereof they may be axcluded
from the benetit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

Gated the 19th day of August, 7009

Juan Wl, Line
Langs eed whoo

Simon JS. Townend
Liquidator

THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD
VACANCY NOTICE

\pplicani M15 afte bevined trom sutalsy plait id pete ms to fill the: position « CASE ALATY AG EMENT/
SENIOR ASSISTANT MANAGER wothin the Qhecupatoanal Health & Safety Urat of the Maricnal
[naumince Board (S0K).

“8 PICTET

1805
PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

JOB SUMMARY Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

This officer wall be responsible for coordinating appropriate coat efficient health care serviees with bes
sige i. enabling os ea eee noeable ei if “ sical uth ao ACCOUNTING OFFICER
firnchonings and oversees the peneral supervishon of the meclcal billing preacess

-CPA, CA or equivalent

«At least five (5) years experience (minimum 3 years with an audit firm).
-Banking experience

-firong communication skills.

-Well organised with structured and methodical work approach

-Dynamic and proactive with a positive attitude.

-High level of computer literacy and office skills with a strong ability to prepare
Microsoft PowerPoint presentations.

-Strong analytical skills with the ability to solve issues efficiently

-Ability to work independently and take initiatives.

-Flexibility to respond to the reprioritisation of tasks,

1, Initiate and factitate communication berwern the healthcare provider and the clasmant bor proactive
intervention in the care of the claimant
Assess the pi sical ani mexliz al sranus of the crinicall ‘jure claimant during le ref} lization oF
while convalescing at borne.

3. Coordinate an acten plain with bealtheare provider, employer and claimant, for the elairnanr’s teturn
toe werk

% Enforce Oot nechuctix a strutepaes andl nosonumerid OPHUrS i Hie Maaapererit of claimant's Care,
\pprove certain services within a specitiod mme period,

Prepare requests for specific medical services to NIEs Medical Officer.

DUTIES INCLUDE:-

- Preparation of the Bank's financial statements for internal and external reporting
purposes,

- Preparation of all regulatory reports in compliance with mandated format and
deadlines (e.g. The Central Bank and The Securities Commission).

- Production of professional presentations in line with corporate image.

- Development and preparation of internal statistical reports for semior management.

: i! : - Preparation of various client financial statements and other types of customized
reports.

- Assisting with the preparation of supporting schedules and coordination of statutory
audits.

- Responsibility for the administration and booking of accounting activity conceming
licensed banking subsidiaries.

. Partapate in unlaanon review process,

4. Provide direction, contre] and leadership oo staff of responsibiliry while moniroting and assessing

Reto mance, conduct, attenmtance and other related Mantes
. Suyyrest systems and procedures 00 facilitate achieving objectives in areas of responsibility,

. Pertorm any other relared duties as may be assigned

. Preterted candidate should hawe a Kachelor’s Degree in Business Ackministration or Management.
. Should have proven oral and wrinten communication skills and abiliry,
3. Knowledgeable in the bw (Benefits & Assistance Regulations) pertaining to Industral Accidents;

+, Know ledovable in health insurance and medical ceed ing! billing peta tices!
ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED.
Please deliver Resume and two (2) references BY HAND
NO LATER THAN SEPTEMBER 4, 2009 to:-

. Effective, interpersonal, commuunicaten and customer service skilk;

Registered Pre shessioral Nurse with well rounded expret cies i meclical Cast Mina ene including,

but acet limited te rehabiltanon, emergency, critical care and health care admanistration;

Ava c Oct nficarion in Cast MALTA CTL and felared dise iplines

The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
West Bay Street and Blake Road
Nassau, Bahamas

lrnet cated PCSOs (Tra apyaly by submirting Ac ample rea application fi Wim, along wath the DOCG ES APY pre ef
of qualifications on or before Friday, September 4, 2009, te the
Deputy Director Vice President
Human Resources and Training
The Savticnal Insurance Beowred
Clifford Darling Complex
FO. Box fy. 7 50%
Nassau, Bahamas

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Offices in
Lawanne, Geneva, Zurich, Loxembourg, London, Montreal, Nassau, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong
Kong, Frankfurt, Florence, Milan, Madrid, ‘Paris, Rome, Turin





PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS ee
IDB initiative to develop

10-year Water Corp plan

Legal Notice

NOTICE

WAN SI XING LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)









































Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., PR O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NANTES MOUNTAIN INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator

FROM page one

financial issues facing the
country the water and sanita-
tion sector.”

The Water & Sewerage
Corporation’s financial woes
are nothing new and, if any-
thing, appear to be getting
worse. Without government
subsidies it would have suf-
fered a $24.107 million net
loss in 2007, the last year for
which financial statements
were available, had it not
been for the receipt of $20
million-plus in taxpayer funds.

Tribune Business recently
revealed that it “expects to be
in arrears” on payments to its
major reverse osmosis suppli-
er, BISX-listed Consolidated
Water, for the remainder of
2009, despite making an $8.7
million payment on the out-
standing balance during this
year’s second quarter.

The IDB said in documents
related to the water sector
regulatory reform programme
that the Bahamas’ increasing
reliance on reverse osmosis
to produce potable drinking
water had increased costs
because this was an expensive
means of water production.

However, for the Water &
Sewerage Corporation, this
cost increase had not been
balanced/offset by a rise in
revenues, as the Corporation
had not increased tariffs since

1993.

The IDB said: “There is the
need to ensure adequate
recovery of costs for opera-
tion, maintenance and
required capital expenditures
to ensure that the Water &
Sewerage Corporation com-
plies with its mandates.

“A review of the financial
situation of the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation confirms
that the operational costs of
the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration over the past 10
years have been increasing as
water production has been
increasing; but the volume of
water sold remained relative-
ly constant and the average
price of water sold has been
decreasing.

“The data also shows
increases in water losses as
production volumes increase.
The margin required to meet
operational expenditure and
capital expenditure of the util-
ity company has therefore
been shrinking over these past
years.

Legal Notice

“Exacerbating the situation,
the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration Act 1976 is outdated
and allocates to Water & Sew-
erage Corporation the con-
flicting roles of a utility ser-
vice provider and a water reg-
ulator. At the same time, the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion lacks financial and oper-
ational autonomy necessary
for an efficient utility.”

Given the “severe environ-
mental, health and financial
issues” facing the Bahamas
when it came to water and
sanitation, the IDB said the
selected consultants would
also make recommendations
for the transfer of regulatory
responsibility from the Water
& Sewerage Corporation to
the newly-formed Utilities
Regulation and Competition
Authority (URCA).

URCA would then regula-
tor all water and sanitation
services providers, and deal
with issues such as sector pric-
ing and quality of service.
Developing a revised tariff
and fee structure for the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion and the industry is also
part of the consultants’ brief.

ject and water industry
reform, the IDB documents
said: “The likelihood of back-
tracking on the need for an
independent economic regu-
lator is low, given the large
annual subsidies that the Gov-
ernment currently provides to
the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration.

“This situation, coupled
with the dire need for pollu-
tion control to ensure sus-
tainable use of groundwater
resources, provide compelling
reasons for the Government
of the Bahamas to adopt a
new Water and Sanitation
Act.”

As for increased water tar-
iffs and prices, the IDB ini-
tiative added: “Regarding the
impact on the lower income
and special groups, the tech-
nical consultancy proposes
that the consulting firm con-
siders cross-subsidies and oth-
er mechanisms to ensure
access to water by low income
groups.

“Also, due consideration
will be given to the social
aspects of water management,
including consultation and
participation, transparency

NOTICE

PANEMA MOUNTAIN CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Assessing the Governmen-
t’s likely attitude to the pro-

and management of potential
conflicts.”




is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.
Legal Notice

NOTICE

LA GLANESTRASS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

mua! Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

BAHAMAS

mit hed

LIMITED

IT MANAGER

Bahamas Supermarkets Limited operates a leading
supermarket chain in The Bahamas. As a market leader,
the Company pnides itself on delivering premier service
through its City Market supermarkets, having a strong
commitment to its customers, associates and community.

An opportunity for an I. T. Manager exists in New
Providence to jom this market _ leader.

Reporting to the CEO, this position involves managing a
staff of tech support personnel who are responsible for the
daily operations of customer service, retail and office
support and network/systems management. Also, the
candidate is responsible for resource planning and
assignments within the group to ensure projects are
delivered on time with a high degree of quality. The ideal
candidate should have 2-3 years of solid measurable
experience in IT Project Management and an excellent
communicator, both oral and written.

QUALIFICATIONS/REQUIREMENTS:

* Prior experience in the role of I. T. Team Leader or
Manager

* Familiarity with change management and the major
aspects of IT governance.

* Excellent analytical ability with strong problem solving
skills

* Works closely with executive management to ensure that
IT projects are aligned with the business and company’s
vision.

* Strong background in managing WAN’s and LAN’s.

* Experience in supporting Microsoft Active Directory
Domains; MCSE certified.

* Excellent communication, negotiation, and organization
skills.

* Microsoft SQL Server and Project Management skills a
definite asset

* Follows the project lifecycle methodology on assigned
projects and tasks

* Defines the Functionality, Usability, Reliability,
Performance, and Supportability requirements of critical
software components

» Analyses, designs, constructs and unit tests of custom
solutions

* Directs the preparation of functional and technical
software specifications that reflect an in-depth
understanding of the business and end-user requirements
while also considering IT standards and technical direction
* Provides functional support for application related issues

Salary and benefits will be commensurate with
experience and qualifications.

If you have what it takes to succeed in this challenging
role, forward your resume and cover letter to:

Human Resources Director
Bahamas Supermarkets Limited
East-West Highway « P. O. Box N 3738 « Nassau, Bahamas
Or e-mail to: humanresources@bahamassupermarkets.com
No telephone inquiries please
Only qualified applicants will be contacted

ty % ra i
City ‘i [ if Ket ! AINAUG2409

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

RBC ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
is presently considering applications for

Manager, Personal

Financial Services
Paradise Island Branch

The successful candidate should possess the following

qualifications:

° a aa - Bachelor's degree in Banking (or a related

eld)

* At least 7 or more years banking experience. Previous
experience in Loan Portfolio Management would be
an asset.

* Must have retail banking experience in lending

Key skills required:

¢ Strong communication skills (both oral and written)
¢ Strong Leadership and Coaching

* Negotiating/Selling skills

* Problem Account Management

* Relationship building and interpersonal skills

¢ Effectively manage risk

* Microsoft Office Proficiency (Word, Excel, Power Point)

Responsibilities include:

¢ Providing overall management by the establishment
and achievement of team sales objectives, and related
activities to achieve a high standard of customer care,
optimal business retention, profitable growth and
productivity
Developing RBC and community relationships to
capitalize on business opportunities
Providing ongoing coaching and development of staff,
ensuring a high level of employee commitment and
capability through focused sales/service management
routines
Growing both the business and personal client
relationship
Balancing the rewards of meeting business objectives
with the risk of loss to the customer, employee and
shareholder by following corporate compliance/
policies to maintain risk exposure and to operate within
the legal framework

A competitive compensation package (base salary &
bonus) commensurate with relevant experience and
qualifications is offered.

Please apply before August 28, 2009 to:

Regional Manager

Human Resources, Caribbean Banking
RBC Royal Bank of Canada

Bahamas Regional Office

PO. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas

Via fax: (242) 322-1367
Via email:bahcayjp@rbc.com

RBC > HELPING YOU SUCCEED

Ne ieee 4
Royal Ban
We me ae

CUCU ea ae OC RC COun Lori SEL WG

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

BRONZEBLOUSSE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

HELP
WANTED

An Established Medical Facility

seeks to fill the following position:

REGISTERED
PHYSICIAN

General / Family Practice (Full-time)

Kindly submit application to:

P.O. Box CR-55050
Nassau, Bahamas

or

Via email to: a_1_phyneeded@live.com



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009, PAGE 5B





FROM page one

his own personal view of the
situation, adding: “It is entire-
ly the decision of you share-
holders whether you wish to
form a steering committee
and take action. If so, I and
Jerry Butler will be glad to
provide professional assis-
tance.”

Tribune Business previ-
ously revealed that Messrs
Coulson and Butler had
already helped to organise
one meeting of minority
investors in Bahamas Super-
markets, during which attor-
ney Damian Gomez took
them through some of the
possible legal remedies and
litigation channels open to
them.

It is unclear when Bahamas
Supermarkets expects to hold
its next AGM, the last one -
for fiscal year 2007 - having
been held in September 2008,
a date some 14-15 months

City Markets shareholders
urged: ‘Take strong action’

after the period end.

The next AGM will be for
its 2008 fiscal year that end-
ed at end-June 2008, mean-
ing that Bahamas Supermar-
kets will have endured a sec-
ond consecutive reporting
period in which its year-end
financial statements are
released after the subsequent
financial year has been com-
pleted, something that has
left the company well out-
side compliance with global
capital markets norms.

Tribune Business under-
stands that Bahamas Super-
markets is hoping to possi-
bly hold its next AGM
towards the end of Septem-

Wiaker's Wap

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position currently available,

General Superintendent, Vertical Construction

Key Responsibilities include:

Â¥ Supervise subcontractors on site for scheduling, quality, and safety.

Y Quantity survey as required.

Â¥ Assist with project close out documentation including monitoring of punch
list corrections, collecting warranty information, and samples.

Â¥ Supervise and monitor staff and staffing levels.

Â¥ Call for inspections and follow up that inspections were performed and

approved.

Â¥ Hold and attend subcontractor meetings and safety meetings.
Y Hold and attend preconstruction meetings with subcontractors for conduct

and contract compliance.

Qualifications

Â¥ Minimum of 20 years in construction administration of high-end residential

and commercial facilities.

Y Excellent computer skills in particular Microsoft Word, Excel, and Project,
Timberline Project Management and Primavera.
Â¥ Excellent written and oral communication skills.

ber, or failing that, in Octo-
ber. This, though, is depen-
dent on completion of the
fiscal year 2008 audit by
external auditors, KPMG,
which, in turn, hinges on the
successful completion of City
Markets’ multi-million dol-
lar refinancing.

Tribune Business revealed
yesterday that 20 per cent of
the new equity capital injec-
tion from the investors that
comprise BSL Holdings had
been received, enabling City
Markets to restart its direct
import programme and pre-
pare for a “relaunch” in the
next six weeks.

Sunil Chatrani, Bahamas

Supermarkets’ chief execu-
tive, expressed optimism that
receipt of the financing
would be the final step
towards completing the long-
outstanding 2008 financial
year audit, and was confident
that the company’s report-
ing/disclosure problems were
now firmly behind it.

He said of the 2008 audit:
“Now that the financing has
come in, the auditors are
reviewing the business plan,
the actual numbers to date
and commitment of the fund-
ing.
“They are dotting the ‘i’s’
and crossing the ‘t’s’ to con-
firm these things are in place,

Hiaker's wWhiap

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position currently available,

Assistant Golf Course Superintendent

Key Requirements include:

Â¥ Must have previous experience on golf course crew.

Â¥ Knowledge of Toro site pro Irrigation system.

Â¥ Be able to follow basic and detailed instructions under the Superintendent.
Â¥ Experience with fertilizer and chemical applications.

Â¥ Knowledge of warm season grasses a plus.

Qualifications

Â¥ Minimum of 2-3 years experience in golf course maintenance.
Â¥ Associate's or Bachelor's degree in Turf Management or related field.
Â¥ Excellent written and oral communication skills

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing and
dynamic organization and must be a self-starter, team player, have a positive
attitude, work af the highest standards of performance, and meet deadlines.

so that they can sign-off on
the audit. We’re hoping that
in the next two to three
weeks this will be complet-
ed.”

There is little doubt,
though, that the minority
investors in Bahamas
Supermarkets have experi-
enced a dramatic destruc-
tion of shareholder value
since BSL Holdings
acquired its majority stake
from Winn-Dixie in summer
2006 for $54 million.

Not only were they effec-
tively sidelined during the
acquisition, no offer was
made to buy them out on
the same terms offered to

Winn-Dixie. Now, Bahamas
Supermarkets is projected,
through management
accounts, to have incurred
a $13.429 million loss for
the 2008 fiscal year.

Apart from Neal &
Massey, the Trinidadian
conglomerate that is BSL
Holdings’ largest share-
holder with a 40 per cent
stake, the Bahamas-based
investors in Bahamas
Supermarkets’ majority
shareholder include the two
hotel industry pension
funds, RoyalFidelity’s pri-
vate equity arm, Milo B
Butler & Sons, and Craig
Symonette.

Hiaker's Wap

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position currently available.

Design Manager

Key Responsibilities

Â¥ Sit on design review committee that ensures design guidelines and

adherence fo project.

Â¥ Assist architect of record with securing necessary building permits.

Â¥ Respond to ASI/RFI questions during building process.

Â¥ List requests and change orders including pricing etc. from owners.

Â¥ Provide field reports and punch lists, and ensuring the contractors
compliance with the plans and technical specifications.

Y Coordinate the design of new facilties.

Qualifications

Â¥ Bachelor's and Master's degree in Architecture from an accredited

university

Â¥ Minimum of 10 years of progressive experience in architecture and interior
design and construction administration of commercial and residential

structures.

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing and

Â¥ Well organized, self motivated, and able to meet demanding deadlines
and handle multiple tasks and projects.

Â¥ Must be able to accurately read plans and work well with all construction
and architectural personnel, engineers and owners.

If you are progressive and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume
to the attention of the Director of HR & Training, hr@bakersbyclub.com or by fax
at 242-367-0613.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”

Hiaker's Wap

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position currently available.

Golf Clubhouse Manager

Key Responsibilities

Start up new golf clubhouse, including all systems and elements for new golf
program

Oversee all Atlantic Clubhouse staff and daily operations of golf, retail, and food
& beverage

Financial accountability for creating forecasts, budgets, as well as compliance
Direct and oversee all aspects of member services for the golf club, including the
sequence of service and amenity programs

Develop and implement service standards for golf operations and associated
Member Services and ensure consistent high levels of all service standards
Conduct quarterly training and departmental reviews

Qualifications

Minimum of Associate degree in Golf Course Management, Business
Administration; Bachelor's degree a plus.

Minimum of § years in Golf Course Management

Previous experience in a hotel or private club preferred.

Experience in opening a golf course clubhouse a plus

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing and dynamic
organization and must be a self-starter, team player, work at the highest standards of
performance, and meet deadlines.

If you are progressive and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume to the
attention of the Director of HR & Training, hr@bakersbyclub.com or by fax at 242-367-
0613.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”

Persons without relevant experience will not be considered.

If you are progressive and prepared fo advance your career, submit your resume
{o the attention of the Director of HR & Training, hr@bakersbyclub.com or by fax
at 242-367-0613.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”

Hiakers dhap

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position currently available.

Assistant Marketing Manager

Key Requirements

Â¥ A demonstrated track record of sales to high net worth clients

Â¥ Extensive experience maintaining strong long term customer relationships
wilh significant add-on/repeat business

Â¥ Astrong existing network with high net worth clients in the U.S.A. , Europe
and The Bahamas

Â¥ Ability to develop and implement marketing campaigns to high net worth
clients

Qualifications

Â¥ Bachelor's degree in Sales, Marketing or related subject; professional
certifications

Â¥ Minimum five (5) years experience in high net worlh real estate
promotions

Â¥ Must be proficient in C2C software, ACT, Power Point, Microsoft Word,
Excel and Asset Manager

Â¥ Must be innovative, demonstrate strong leadership and customer relations
skills

Â¥ Must have excellent written and verbal communication skills

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing and
dynamic organization and must be a self-starter, team player, work af the highest
standards of performance, and meet deadlines.

If you are progressive and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume
to the attention of the Director of HR & Training, hr@bakersbayclub.com or by
fax at 242-367-0613.

dynamic organization and must be a self-starter, team player, work at the highest
standards of performance, and meet deadlines.

If you are progressive and prepared fo advance your career, submit your resume
fo the attention of the Director of HR & Training, hr@bakersbyclub.com or by fax
at 242-367-0613.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”

Hiaker's Wiap

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position currently available.

Executive Chef

Key Responsibilities

Â¥ Ability to skillfully prepare international cuisine

Â¥ Plan, design and cost menus for a variety of outlets

Â¥ Recruit, manage, and train culinary team.

Â¥ Manage the culinary budget and food cost.

Â¥ Maintain an effective inventory and supplies vendor list of local and
international suppliers.

Qualifications

Y Bachelor's degree in Culinary Arts or related subject; professional
certifications

Â¥ Minimum ten (10) years experience at a five-star club, resort or restaurant
with at least three (3) years international or off-shore experience.

Â¥ Previous experience with a start-up property a plus.

Â¥ Must be innovative, demonstrate strong leadership and culinary skills,
must be able to train others and execute ideas and standards.

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing and
dynamic organization and must be a self-starter, team player, work at the highest
standards of performance, and meet deadlines.

If you are progressive and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume
to the attention of the Director of HR & Training, hr@bakersbayclub.com or by
fax at 242-367-0613.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



=
CLICO chief moves to bar discovery

FROM page one

er confidential documents, to
be eliminated from the dis-
covery process, too.

Mr Duprey’s attorneys, in
the protective order motion
filed with the Florida Bank-
ruptcy Court, a copy of which
has been obtained by Tribune
Business, argued: “The [sub-
poena] is overly broad and

purports to require disclosure
of documents of a privileged,
confidential and proprietary
nature, and/or which have no
relationship to [CLICO
(Bahamas)] acts, conduct or
property, or the liabilities and
financial condition of [CLI-
CO (Bahamas)] estate, or to



Legal Notice



NOTICE




TIMBER VALLEY INC.




(In Voluntary Liquidation)






Notice is hereby given that the above-named




Company is in dissolution, which commenced




on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator




is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,













Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.



(Liquidator)




Legal Notice

NOTICE

ROBLE MANAGEMENT LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

KTLA FINES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ROYAL FIDELITY

Mwy at Work

[CLICO (Bahamas)] right to
a discharge.”

They were responding after
Mr Gomez, the Baker Tilly
Gomez accountant and part-
ner, filed a subpoena demand-
ing a host of documents relat-
ed to the business dealings of
75 Florida-based companies
believed to be owned and/or
controlled by Mr Duprey, as
he ramps up efforts to trace
and recover the company’s
assets.

Informed sources have told
Tribune Business that the lig-
uidator intends to “go after
Mr Duprey in a big way” in
his bid to recover assets for
CLICO (Bahamas) Bahamian
creditors, policyholders and
annuity depositors, although
no findings of wrongdoing
have yet been made against
the Trinidadian chairman.

However, Mr Duprey’s
attorneys, in their Protective
Order Motion, argued: “[CLI-
CO Bahamas], apparently the
subject of insolvency pro-
ceedings occurring in the
Bahamas, has commenced
these proceedings as a pro-
fessed means of seeking dis-
covery for use in the Bahami-
an proceedings.

“|The liquidator] has served
its Notice on Greenberg, pur-
porting to require production

of documents which Green-
berg obtained in connection
with its business of providing
legal services and counsel to
various of its clients, including
Duprey and Baldini and com-
panies which they own, have
owned, or in which they exer-
cise or have exercised man-
agement control...”

Mr Duprey’s attorneys,
though, attempting to justify
their demands for a Protec-
tive Order, alleged: “The
[subpoena] does not purport
to limit the scope of the pro-
duction it seeks to documents
related to transfers of funds
in which [CLICO (Bahamas)]
has any ownership interest or
entitlement, or ownership and
management agreements, in
entities in which [CLICO
(Bahamas)] holds an interest.

“Rather, the subpoena pur-
ports to require wholesale dis-
closure of documents relating
to transfers and ownership of
the business activities of all
77 entities and persons with-
out regard to whether the
business activities, transfer or
ownership or management
structures have any relevance
to [CLICO (Bahamas)] insol-
vency proceedings in the
Bahamas.”

It was argued that Mr
Gomez wanted a “limitless

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PASTE MANAGEMENT CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

EURYDICE MOUNTAIN LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

eS *

AL MARKET.
oe a SERVICES

s

crai?ercaMNtdt.«

disclosure of documents”
unrelated to CLICO
(Bahamas), and both Mr
Duprey and his wife were said
to have informed Greenberg
Traurig of their objections to
handing over papers unrelat-
ed to the Bahamian insurer.
Although the documents
do not divulge why Mr
Gomez is seeking all this
information, it is more than
likely that he wants to exam-
ine whether any assets
belonging to CLICO
(Bahamas) and, by extension,
its Bahamian insurance poli-
cyholders, annuity depositors
and other creditors, may have
ended up with Mr Duprey’s
private companies — and been
used to finance his private

business interests.

If this turns out to be the
case, the CLICO (Bahamas)
liquidator will more than
likely go after Mr Duprey
and his companies through
the courts to secure their
return.

This could take months
before a successful outcome
is secured, though, as Mr
Gomez will likely have to
unravel a maze of inter-party
transactions and related par-
ty wheelings and dealings.

There is little doubt,
though, that eyebrows will be
raised by the size of Mr
Duprey’s private business
empire, and why it was nec-
essary to have as many as 75
different companies.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NEWTONVILLE COMPANY LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named



Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TABITA HOLDINGS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

RAPPAHANNOCK INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 24 AUGUST 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,577.56] CHG -0.07| %CHG 0.00 | YTD -134.80 | YTD % -7.87
FINDEX: CLOSE 790.65 | YTD -5.30% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit Previous Close Today's Close Change
1.28 Abaco Markets 1.34 1.34 0.00
e Bahamas Property Fund ’ i 0.00
6.25 Bank of Bahamas 6.25 6.25 0.00
0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00
10.18 Cable Bahamas 11.35 11.35 0.00
2.74 Colina Holdings 2.74 2.74 0.00
5.50 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.00 6.00 0.00
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.78 3.71 -0.07
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.00 2.00 0.00
6.60 Famguard 6.60 6.60 0.00
10.00 Finco 10.63 10.63 0.00
10.30 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.30 10.30 0.00
4.95 Focol (S) 5.13 5.13 0.00
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30 0.00
5.49 ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 0.00
10.39 J. S. Johnson 10.39 10.39 0.00
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series ©) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 3 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
Bahamas Supermarkets tite 8.42 14.00
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
ABDAB 30.13 29.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months

Daily Vol. EPS $
0.127
0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.382

Div $ P/E

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

2,000

0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407 B 13. 5
0.952 : 10.9
0.180 5 55.6
ases)
Interest

Legal Notice

NOTICE

JABREAH VENTURES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

i__ 52wk-Low
1000.00

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

FBB22

52wk-Low Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

Fund Name

CFAL Bond Fund

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund

CFAL Money Market Fund
3.1031 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
12.3870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund

100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund

Div $
1.3320
2.8952
1.4075

2.9047 -1. -3.66
1.4842 i! 5.55
3.1143 - -12.43
13.0484 . 5.84
101.6693 - 1.67
96.7398 -4.18
1.0000 : 0.00
9.3399 = -1.41
1.0622 2.56 6.22
1.0243 -0.84 2.43
1.0585 2.04 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD -last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

31-Jul-09
14-Aug-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
i

“s weighted price for daily volume
hted price for daily volume
day to day
traded today

er-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - me of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Today's Close -
Change - Change
Daily Vol. -
DIV $ - Dividends per
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
KS1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





©



The Tribune

men 6D





ith







The future

In ph

Sical

GN-902

LIN

MINISTRY OF FINANCE
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
FINANCIAL INTELLIGENCE UNIT

This position provides an excellent opportunity for an individual seeking a
meaningful employment with the Financial Intelligence Unit.

The successful candidate would be the Chief Executive Officer of the
Financial Intelligence Unit.

POSITION:
RESPONSIBLE TO:
QUALIFICATIONS:

DIRECTOR
THE MINISTER RESPONSIBLE
The successful applicant must:

* Possess a College Degree

¢ Hold no other office or employment,
whether remunerated or not, without
the prior approval of the Minister

* Not be a Public Officer

¢ Not be a director, officer or servant of,
or have a controlling interest in, any
financial institution

¢ Not be bankrupt

* Be a fit and proper person

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES

¢ Charge of the day-to-day management and operation of the
Financial Intelligence Unit;

* Liaise between the Financial Intelligence Unit and the Minister
responsible the for FIU regarding matters of policy having to do
with the functions of FIU;

¢ Advise the Minister on the work of the Financial Intelligence Unit

and in particular on matters that could affect public policy;

¢ Prepare the Annual Reports of the FIU and submit to the Minister
before June 30th in every year;

¢ Ensure that an Annual Budget is prepared for the FIU and submitted

to the Minister at least two months prior to the commencement of the
financial year; and

¢ Ensure that the accounts of the FIU are audited annually and a copy

of the audit report is submitted to the Minister.



SARRAN Thompson is hooked up to the Arayas machine which sends ion magnum waveforms to

the body to stimulate muscle toning work-outs.

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

IT seems these days practically everyone’s
trying their hand at weight loss either through
diet or by purchasing the hippest work-out
gear in an attempt to whip their body in shape.

Despite the large number of fitness hopefuls,
one expert estimates that more than 50 per
cent of people who begin workout pro-
grammes stop within the first 12 months.

Edwardo Thompson of the International
Sports Therapy and Holistic Spa told Tribune
Health that although most people are con-
cerned about their health and weight, reducing
their body fat percentage (BFP) remains a
major challenge. This has lead him to intro-
ducing a machine which could potentially
change the way exercise is thought of by
Bahamians.

The machine is called the Arasys, and was
first introduced in the United Kingdom in
1992. It was originally designed to encourage
myelinated cell reproduction in patients suf-
fering from Multiple Sclerosis, and has proven
to be effective in reducing the effects of the ill-
ness.

According to Laurent Ambard, the field
marketing director for the Arasys Perfector
company, the initial success of the of the device
paved the way for its introduction in other
areas of health, fitness, and anti-aging treat-
ment.

Mr Ambard was in town last Friday and
conducted a live demonstration of the
machine.

He explained: “Arasys is a device created
and manufactured by the co-inventor of the
first pacemaker, Gerry Pollock.

“The Arasys Ion Magnum waveform is a
composite of 1,000 waveforms which were
researched individually in Pollock's laborato-
ry. This compact square waveform is specifi-
cally designed to mimic brain waves so that the
muscle tissue is made to believe that it is per-
forming a muscle-toning workout. Ion Mag-
num can be placed on almost any muscle group
on the body and if used regularly, combined
with a sensible diet, will fight the flab without
having to hit the gym.

“Results are equivalent to strenuous exercise
and they last just as long. There is no gym
burnout since the Arasys procedure does not

SEE page 10

GN-903

MINISTRY OF NATIONAL SECURITY
ROYAL BAHAMAS POLICE FORCE

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
PUBLIC AUCTION

Friday and Saturday, August 28th and 29th, 2009
Two (2) Days

By Order of
The Commissioner of Police
The Royal Bahamas Police Force
Commonwealth of The Bahamas

1.G. STUBBS WILL SELL

WHAT:

104 assorted used vehicles

LOCATION: Internal Security Division ISD) Compound

Oakes Field

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS & EXPERIENCE: Nassau, Bahamas
The successful candidate is expected to:
1. Be knowledgeable about the financial services sector and the Laws
governing the financial services industry;
. Be experienced in financial investigations;
. Have strong data gathering, analytical and report writing skills; and
. Have strong leadership skills.

10:00 am - Friday - August 28th, 2009

10:00 am - Saturday - August 29th, 2009

All Preview and Inspection both days from 9:00 a.m.
Until Auction time at the site.

* All items Sold Where Is As Is for Cash, Cashier’s
Check or current Bank Guarantee Letter. No
purchase(s) will be released until paid for in full.
Where a deposit is required, the same is non
refundable.

REMUNERATION PACKAGE

* Competitive salary commensurate with experience
¢ Three (3) year contract; renewal
¢ 15% gratuity upon successful completion of contract.

ALL PURCHASES MUST BE COLLECTED AND REMOVED

FROM THE AUCTION SITE WITHIN THREE (3) WORKING
DAYS FROM DATE OF SALE.

Interested persons should submit their application and resume in writing along
with the relevant certificates no later than Friday, 25th September, 2009.

Any and all Notices or amendments by Auctioneer on said Auction
Day whether written or verbal shall supersede this or any subsequent

. . advertisement.
The Financial Secretary

Ministry of Finance

3rd Floor, Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building
Cable Beach

Nassau, Bahamas

For further information contact I.G. Stubbs at 322-2024 or 5 or
Fax: 328-8086 or Email: igstubbs@coralwave.com

1.G. STUBBS
PUBLIC AUCTIONEER

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009, PAGE 9B





(CY LOVING RELATIONSHIPS



Do you believe in soul mates?

USUALLY, when people are dis-
cussing love and romance the topic
of soul mates comes up. When
asked, 'Do you believe in Soul
Mates?’ people usually answer
unequivocally ‘yes!’ It brings out
strong reactions, recounting stories,
both personal and fictional. From
the first moment, we consider having
someone of our very own to love;
this magical and mysterious person
fills our imagination.

When we were young, we were
read fairy tales and a seed was plant-
ed in our young minds. From that
moment, we believe that there is
someone special for each of us. Just
the very idea of meeting the person
who matches, compliments, and
understands our very essence brings
us a sense of comfort and peace. It is
this dream or fantasy that carries us
through dating disappointments. The
image of a person waiting for us,
waiting for our lives to align, and
possibly with a handful of fate
thrown in, is tantalising.

Are we correct in assuming that
our soul mate is our life partner and,
therefore, sexual in nature? Think
back and consider if you have ever



experienced that wonderful bond,
connection, thinking as one mind
with a dear friend, or family mem-
ber. There may have been people
who have only stayed in our lives
for a short time or, in fact, a fleeting
moment. That true and pure spiritual
connection can be found many times
in our lives if we just learn how to
open our minds and hearts to
receive.

How often have we said, 'You
know my spirit really takes to ...'
However, for many of us our own
fears and insecurities hold us back
from opening our arms, embracing
life, loving fully and recognising the
soul mate standing right in front of
us. All too often, we are so preoccu-
pied with judging, criticising and

over analysing that we fail to expe-
rience the moment. Perhaps, it is
healing and loving ourselves that is
needed before the time is right to
allow us to see, let alone, meet our
soul mate.

Ancient civilisations and cultures
have many theories on soul mates. It
is not surprising therefore, that our
own individual views are greatly
influenced by our religious and spir-
itual principles. Values and opinions
fall within the wide spectrum of
beliefs. On one hand, some believe
that the person put on earth for us is
chosen by God and therefore can
not be denied or controlled.

Others, who believe in reincarna-
tion, believe they have met that per-
son in a previous life, hence the deep
sense of knowing them. But one
thing that they all have in common is
the spiritual connection or karma
felt, between the two people. They
possess a deep and natural affinity,
friendship, love, sexual unity and
compatibility. They have the ability
to complete each other in an eternal
bond.

There are many of us who, in fact,
have been fortunate to experience

this type of soul mate, but few even
come close to meeting their ‘twin
flame’. We may joke and call our
partner our ‘better half’, but for
those who have met their twin, this
truly feels like their other half.

The bond is so strong that just
being apart is unbearable for them.
Joining of the flames can be excru-
ciating, as their souls and minds are
so synchronised that parting for any
length of time is painful and they
can even feel physically ill. These
couples often express a type of
telepathy which is quite different
from finishing each others sentences,
as seen with other compatible cou-
ples. Stories of a bereft partner,
dying within a short time from a
‘broken heart’, rings true to the the-
ory. Their half of the flame can not
continue without the other and it
soon extinguishes.

Are we too hasty when we first
meet someone new? Do we write
them off because we do not feel the
‘soul mate connection’? What hap-
pens if we thought we did have it
but after some years think we made
a mistake or lost it? What happens
when one half of the partnership

(Coy GREEN SCENE

\

je ADORSETT Golden with its distinctive red
blush, now part of our Bahamian eS

se

feels it, but not the other?

As relationship and sex thera-
pists, our work involves enhancing
and salvaging all those feelings and
habits that soul mates possess. With-
out a doubt, it is possible to bring
your relationship to a higher spiritual
level by developing all areas of inti-
macy. There are many self-help
books on the subject, but keep in
mind the solid foundation has to be
there for the relationship to soar toa
higher level. To be able to recog-
nise that your relationship is deplet-
ed spiritually and emotionally, would
benefit from an overhaul, takes a lot
of insight and courage. Be brave,
take a deep breath and make the
changes that are required.

¢Margaret Bain is an Individual and
Couples Relationship Therapist. She is
a Registered Nurse and a Certified
Clinical Sex Therapist. Call for an
appointment- Relate Bahamas at 364-
7230, or email
relatebahamas@yahoo.com
orwww.relatebahamas.blogspot.com.
She is also available for speaking
engagements.

By Gardener Jack



IN July of this year I wrote
of an apple tree that was
grown in The Bahamas and
became the source for hun-
dreds of thousands of sub-
tropical apple trees that can
be found in Florida, Texas
and Southern California.

At the end of the article I
asked if any relatives of
Irene Dorsett, the lady who
planted the original Dorsett
Golden, knew of the fate of
the original tree. A few
weeks later I

received a charming call
from Aline G. Mc Laughlin
who provided me with the
following:

“My late grand-uncle,
Logan Dorsett (husband of
Irene Dorsett), was a keen
gardener who enjoyed grow-
ing his plants from seed. His
niece, my mother, shared his
interest so whenever we met
the conversation eventually
turned to gardening. In due
course we learned of the
seeds purchased by Mrs

Dorsett and how they had
very carefully selected the
spot in the garden where he
felt a ‘northern’ apple might
possibly grow. This was shel-
tered from the wind and too
much direct sunlight.

“They chose well because
there was great excitement
among family and friends
when the first shoot
appeared. One of the friends
who was keenly interested
was the late Oris Russell
who was a horticulturist and
in charge of the Government
Experimental Station located
in the Carmichael Road
area. It was Mr Russell who
made the connection for the
Dorsetts to have their tree
registered in Florida.

“When the tree bore its
first crop the Dorsetts gave a
party at their home in Brook-
lyn Avenue, which is a sub-
division just off Village Road.
It was attended by friends,
family and (of course) the
experts from Florida. All

hands gathered around the
tree which was certified by
the people from Florida to
be a true apple tree grown
from seed, as was made evi-
dent by its trunk. Trees that
grow from seed have trunks
that differ in form from those
grown from cuttings. They
also stated it was the first
apple tree to their knowledge
to be grown in a sub-tropical
area. Mrs Dorsett had set out
tables on the patio on which
were plates of apples from
the tree of which all present
partook. The fruit was beau-
tiful, light yellow with splash-
es of red, smooth textured
and of a delicious flavour.
“The tree continued to
beat fruit year after year. I
do not recall in which year
it occurred but the Dorsetts
decided to go for an extend-
ed visit with their daughter
and her family in Alberta,
Canada. As they did not
want to leave their home
empty for a long period they

rented it, but failed to tell
the tenant about the apple
tree.

“The tenants noted that
while the master bedroom
was lovely and comfortable,
one of the windows was not
admitting enough light and
air due to a large, leafy tree
just on the outside of it. They
apparently had never seen
an apple tree. Their decision
to cut it down was based on
the desire to present a pleas-
ant surprise to the Dorsetts

on their return. They made a
very thorough job of it.
Nothing sprouted from
where the tree once flour-
ished and the Dorsetts never
attempted to plant another.”

Thank you, Mrs McLaugh-
lin, for fleshing out the story
of the Dorsett Golden apple
for us. I was so sad to learn
that the original tree was cut
down. Sometimes we are so
careless about our heritage,
even in innocence.

Perhaps the story of this

apple tree will create an
interest in growing more
Dorsett Goldens in The
Bahamas. Your local nurs-
ery should be able to obtain
certified trees. I spoke with
the owner of a large Nassau
nursery recently and he said
he had never heard of
Dorsett Golden apple before
the Tribune article. Now we
know, there’s no excuse.

e j.hardy@coralwave.com





Think on your feet - Teachers!

LAST week our readers were presented
with tips for fitting and selecting children's
footwear and it was very well received. Today,
we continue with our 'Back-to- School’ theme
by focusing on teachers. Teachers are among
the group of people who are on their feet more
than four hours per day, and many teachers
constantly complain of tired, aching feet and
legs, as well as lower back pain.

In today’s fashion conscious world, while it
is important for female teachers to look their
very best by complementing that perfect out-
fit with a cute pair of high heel shoes, or for
male teachers to wear trendy looking shoes, it
is absolutely necessary to note that these mag-
nificent creations often lead to foot pain at
the end of the day.

While this is quite understandable, I would
recommend that you follow these simple tips to
get away with looking your best while feeling
great on your feet:

1. WOMEN, try to choose shoes with a reasonable
heel height of 1.5 to 2 inches. Look for shoes that
provide ample toe room (beware of pointed toe
styles) and contain a back strap or enclosed back.
The same holds true for men with the exception of
heel height.

2. IF YOU are having trouble achieving the appro-
priate fit with shoes you already own, take them to
a local specialty footwear store or Pedorthic facili-
ty. They may be able to modify your shoes to bet-
ter fit your feet.

3. PURCHASE a slim arch support/orthortic that
your shoe can accommodate. Specialty footwear
stores and pedorthic facilities have options that
will fit almost any shoe. Orthortics are especially









designed to reduce discomfort associated by high
heeled shoes and sandals.

In sum, it is important to note that while
high heels are not the best for your feet, you
can take measures to minimize some of the
symptoms associated from wearing high heels,
such as pain in the back of the legs (and long
term, shortening of the calf muscles), ball of
the foot pain, pain under the arch and heel. A
lower heel height, properly fitted and a sup-
portive shoe combined with an accommodative
orthotic/arch supports will put your feet in
balance, and in turn improve the alignment
of the rest of your body. Teachers take steps to
think on your feet pain free and feel great in
the classroom!

e Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board Certified Pedor-
thist, is the proprietor of Foot Solutions, a health
and wellness franchise that focuses on foot care
and proper shoe fit, located in the Sandyport
Plaza, Nassau.

"The views expressed are those of the author and
does not necessarily represent those of Foot
Solutions Incorporated or any of its subsidiary
and/or affiliated companies. Please direct any
questions or comments to nassau@footsolu-
tions.com or 327-FEET (3338).

The sign of great things to come!

Alacta Plus Advanced formulation is the only milk food

for growing children enriched with 34 nutrients,

such as iron, iodine and zinc, as well as DHA, ARA,

and Sialic Acid, which are integral building
blocks for the brain.

They'll go much further in life

Meadjohnson*

Nutritionals



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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Making criticism constructive

CONSTRUCTIVE criticism is
usually hard to give and receive
because the receiver can react nega-
tively to any type of criticism, espe-
cially if they regularly receive criti-
cism that is angry, blaming or con-
descending.

I come across managers, supervi-
sors and employees who avoid giving
any type of criticism for fear of the
conversation going in an undesir-
able direction. So what usually hap-
pens is the target of the criticism is
allowed to get away with inappro-
priate behaviours because the boss is
reluctant to take any type of correc-
tive action.

Then there are managers, super-
visors and employees on the oppo-
site side of the spectrum who tell
the cold, hard truth, with good inten-
tions. Unfortunately, depending on
how cold and hard the truth is, it
can strip away the dignity and
humanity of the receiver and can
lead to an angry or withdrawn
response.

A Model of Constructive Criticism

Managers sometimes use
approaches designed to deliver crit-
icism in a constructive way. There
are writers that suggest the “oreo”
approach where you start the con-
versation with something positive,

The future in physical fitness



then introduce the criticism con-
structively and then you end on a
note that reinforces the employee's
strengths and your intent to provide
support. A key consideration is to
try not to sound rehearsed because
you will be perceived as inauthentic
or phony.

Authenticity

There are people who avoid
telling the whole truth when provid-
ing criticism because there is the
clear and present risk that it can be
held against them by the receiver.
This is because most people don't
want to hear the truth if it isn't
aligned with their perception of the
truth, even when they ask you for
your views.
Curiosity is open, interested and
unbiased. It invites trust, openness
and creativity by:

¢ Posing questions that are not

assumption based

¢ Being open to diversity

¢ Avoiding placing labels on people
and situations

Questioning is an important tool
that is an integral part of curiosity.
A leader should never have all the
answers or advice so you can invite
the person receiving the criticism to
provide their views and alternative
solutions. The best questioners are
skilled at formulating questions that
will help the receiver of criticism
build their confidence and knowl-
edge. Two quick tips for question-
ing in situations where you want crit-
icism to be constructive are to avoid
questions that lead the receiver to
your desired outcome or ones that
cause the receiver to feel interro-
gated.

Timing

When providing anyone with crit-
icism, timing is everything. The first
tip is to avoid telling them the truth
in front of others. This causes you to
appear to be unprofessional and it is
easier for someone to accept criti-
cism if they are not embarrassed.

Secondly, avoid providing criti-
cism if you are in a negative emo-
tional state. Finally, try to avoid
constructively criticising someone if

FROM page eight

require glucose, which is normally utilised dur-
ing physical exercise.”

The machine is about the size of a small
cash register, and is know throughout Europe
as the miracle machine.

With just a few short weeks to go before the
device is officially launched locally, many at the
recent expo were eager to try the machine to
test its true potential.

One of those participants was local radio
personality Saraan Gibson from More 98.7.
Prior to being connected to the machine, her
waist was measured at 35 inches.

She said: “I’m trying to see if Ican get four
inches off from my waist. If this product can do
what they say it can, I will definitely be sold on
it and without fail would be in as often as pos-
sible to continue with it.

“T used to work out a lot in the past, but
staying motivated is difficult, and hopefully
this will get me where I want to be.”

After being connected to the machine, she
was instructed that the procedure would take
about 20 to 25 minutes, and would become
more intense as time passed.

Around ten minutes in, Mrs Gibson said the

device itself was comfortable, but caused major
crunch sensations, enough to bear but unusu-
al because “I was getting the burn as if I was at
the gym, but without the physical fatigue and
sweating.”

Twenty - five minutes later when her waist
was re-measured, her waist had dropped three
quarters of an inch.

Roger Bell, 49 who wanted to reduce facial
wrinkles also tested the machine

After 20 minutes of treatments on his left
side, Mr Bell said there was a marked differ-
ence.

As to the risks involved in using the
machine, Mr Thompson said: “ “The only thing
that we’ve seen thus far is fatigue, and the
reason why is because persons get dehydrated
from the treatment.”

Looking at the benefit of having one week’s
worth of gym training compressed to a single
20 to 40 minute treatment, Mr Thompson said
the Arasys is worth the risk.

The device is FDA approved however
Arasys rep Mr Ambard said just like tradi-
tional exercise and skin care, the procedure
must continue to maintain effectiveness. For
more on this product visit www.arasysper-
fector.com.

they are in arush. They may not
decode your message accurately
because they are in a stressed state
or because they are focused on
something else.

Communication Tips

Respect is very important if you
want your communication to be con-
structive. Avoid labeling people
using words like liar or stupid. Stay
away from shouting and profanity
or using words like never and always.
You can get your message across
effectively without expressing your
negative opinions.

For instance, if an employee tells
you something that sounds like an
untruth, you can say, “I realise you
think that is the case but based on
my investigation I found something
else to be the case. Help me to
understand the gap between what
you are saying and what I found to
be the case.” In this example, you
are not calling the person a liar, you
are inviting them to help you under-
stand the facts because you may
have been provided with misinfor-
mation.

Another communication tip is to
be clear and concise. Managers,
supervisors and employees start out
with good intentions to provide con-
structive criticism but they “chicken

out” and use language that is so
vague and tactful that the real mes-
sage is lost in tactfulness.

The Art of Listening

When providing constructive crit-
icism, you will be more effective if
you are equally adept at listening
objectively to the person receiving
the criticism because you need to
know if they are listening to you.
You can tell if the message is not
being received as constructive if they
are defensive, blaming or giving
excuses.

In closing I would like to leave
you with a quotation from an
unknown author: “Constructive crit-
icism is essential in any arena that
requires creativity, innovation, and
problem-solving. Since leadership
requires all three, leaders need to
be sure they are not only open to
criticism, but that they actively seek
it out. Ask people - direct reports,
peers, customers - to poke holes in
your ideas and approaches. Critique
can be a useful approach to test
ideas.”

¢ Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organiza-
tional Soul, an HR Consulting and
Training Company. For more informa-
tion contact us at info@orgsoul.com.

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Brennan Linsley/AP Photo

MISS Universe 2009 Stefania Fernandez, of Venezuela, stands with Donald Trump after win-
ning the beauty pageant in Nassau, Bahamas, Sunday, Aug. 23, 2009.

The silver lining

By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

WHEN I interviewed 18-
year-old Stefania Fernandez
two weeks ago, she admitted
that it would be difficult for
any girl to fill the shoes of
her countrywoman, the reign-
ing Miss Universe Dayana
Mendoza.

However, the beautiful and
poised young lady said that
she was not letting that phase
her and was determined to
compete in this year’s pageant
on her own terms.

“T know that Dayana has
done a wonderful job, but we
are two different women with
two different ideas.”

Stefania obviously was able
to pass that message on to the
judges on Sunday night and
do what many thought was
impossible — bring the crown
home to Venezuela for two
years straight.

As they walked the red car-
pet, moments before the live
show, the judges told the
media that they were looking
for the “ it factor” — a com-
bination of inner and outer
beauty that would be a real
reflection of the universe.

Judge Heather Kerzner

described it as someone who
“ turns heads” while judge
Andre Leon Talley said he
wanted to see the queen dis-
play a sense of purpose and
confidence that would impact
everyone she came into con-
tact with.

Dean Cain added that the
queen needed to be “beauti-
ful, but connected to the
world, because for the next
year she will be the face and
voice of the world”.

“Tam very proud and final-
ly now we can say Venezuela
has made it,” the excited
queen said as Dayana who
looked equally thrilled trans-
lated for her in a press con-
ference moments after her
win.

And while Bahamians
extend a hearty congratula-
tions to the queen- the jewel
in the crown of the entire
experience has to be the pos-
itive light in which our coun-
try was portrayed.

From the opening scenes-
an aerial fly in to the Atlantis
to the final strains of
Junkanoo as the queen took
her celebratory walk - the
Bahamas looked good, very
good. The beauty of the
country was on full display
from the mangroves in

Andros, the Hermitage on
Cat Island to the Garden of
the Groves in Grand Bahama
in what could only be an
advertising and PR dream
come true for the Ministry of
Tourism.

Nassau/ Paradise Island
even got a billion dollar
stamp of approval from the
Donald himself. Pageant co-
owner Donald Trump told
local media that the country
looked very good and the
government should be very
proud of the preparations
they had made in beating out
the other 18 countries to host
the event seen in 118 coun-
tries around the world.

Everyone I spoke with,
from contestants to Miss Uni-
verse organisers to judges to
my colleagues covering the
event from around the world,
had positive reviews about
the beauty of the country, the
friendliness of the people and
the unique and varied events
taking place.

Yes there may have been
glitches - slow and possibly
overpriced ticket sales, a post-
poned float parade, but all in
all when our moment in the
spot light came we shone and
that in itself is a beautiful
thing.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

SS AS ee dB

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS



fi

A] INDEX NY
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VO PTS ue
Pa % Today Wednesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
f — a a High = Low W High =Low W NASSAU Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 85° F
ot - vy ~~ _ ~~ é ao E 0| 1 |2 3 |4|5 ( 18 | gl10 FC FC F/C F/C Wednesday: NE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 7-15 Miles 85° F
: i | | [ia Acapulco 91/32 77/25 pe 92/33 77/25 pC FREEPORT Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 85° F
~e — a a ce — a Low | MODERATE | HiH | \. HIGH cam a ae pe se ae pe Wednesday: NE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet __7-15 Miles 85° F
ORLANDO nkara, Turkey 54/12 pe 7 50/10 s = ABACO Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 84° F
High:91°F/33°C Partly sunny with a Clouds breaking with a Some sun with a Partly sunny with Partly sunny, a t-storm Partly sunny. The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 86/30 72/22 pc 90/32 70/21 s Wednesday: NE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 7-15 Miles 84° F
7 Low:75°F/24°C Pat thunderstorm. brief shower. t-storm possible. t-storms possible. possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 6417 55/12 1 647 52/11 pc
, aoe =i vay og° val ane ahs Ono tah O4° Bangkok 91/32 77/25 t 91/32 79/26 t Fi
i. Q@ LR saris pau: ee ce ee ae you i. ie 7 i 7 Barbados 8780 7/05 sh 96800705 sh ML) Va
TAMPA 7, . : : : : : a Barcelona 81/27 70/21 c 81/27 70/21 s
Orr i o TU ENT Ta Beijin 77/25 66/18 r 90/32 68/20 5
High: 91° F/33° C ee , i 102° F 113°-87° F 109°-87° F 107°-87° F 111°-85° F High Ht.(ft.) Low _ Ht.(ft. ar 88/31 77/25 s 79/96 76/24 5
Low: 76° F/24°C atk y The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 12:23p.m. 3.1 5:51am. 0.1 Belarade 98/31 64/17 s 95/35 66/18 s
cae @ a : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low forthe day, 6:41 p.m. 0.4 ean 82/27 66/18 pc 77/25 64/16 po (COOLER) vk
- | ee CUT ae Wednesday 1229am. 25 640am. 03 Bermuda 86/30 80/26 t 86/30 80/26 pc : :
4 i. ‘fA — 17pm. 29 737 p.m. 06 Bogota 67/19 45/7 pc 68/20 45/7 t aust)
) “ie ? Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thursday 12am. 23 /a2am. 05 Brussels 72/22 52/11 sh 75/23 59/15 pe
’ ae ABACO Temperature 215pm. 28 8:37pm. 07 Budapest 86/30 59/15 s 90/32 63/17 s
,. i - ary ° HIGH ooeceeeecccecescscsteseseststeseeceeseseeceseees 93° F/34° C : 70am. 22 o30am. 06 Buenos Aires 73/22 55/12 pe 75/23 59/15 pe
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oie f* @ WEST PALM BEACH a Last year's DIQH ooo eeeceeeseeesseesseeesseeeeeees 88° F/3t° C SUN Ay Ty ify Cancun 91/32 73/22 pc 91/32 74/23 pc
: a High: 90° F/32° C =<— Last year's low fener Uieseateeeas 76° F/25° C ; Caracas 81/27 72/22 t 81/27 72/22 5
— Low: 78° F/26° C ¢€ as Precipitation Pl ree a.m. Lae ee p.m. Casablanca 81/27 61/16 s 78/25 65/18 pc
a aa As of 2 p.m. yesterday .....cccsccccecsseceseenes trace unsel....... 20 p.m. Moonset. ...1EUT P.M. — Copenhagen 73/22 63/17 pc 71/21 59/15 pe 88/67
& FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date 23, , Dublin 66/18 54/12 pe 68/20 54/12 sh
k First Full Last New
High: 89° F/32° C @ High: 91° F/33° C Normal year to date 0... eects 29.87" ; oe a Frankfurt 79/26 57/13 t 75/23 55/12 pc
Low: 80° F/27°C — Low: 76° F/24° C Ee ' ue 1 Geneva 83/28 62/16 t 80/26 60/15 pc
a AccuWeather.com oo ae ee Halifax 71/21 B7/13 s 72/22 57/13 po |W] FNNY Showers Miami
; @ a am Foretasis-and wraphies prouded by ° = | Havana 90/32 72/22 t 88/31 73/22 sh [| [SS 3 T-storms 7
, ; MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Aug. 27 Sep. 4 Sep.11 Sep. 18 Helsinki 68/20 50/10 pc 73/22 57/13 pe 3°] Rain ae
"ae High: 90° F/32° C : En Hong Kong 91/32 81/27 t 91/32 82/27 t [*, *| Flurries re Cold ==
Se tower NASSAU High: 91° Fe" lana found 7oz6 s 9087 77725 po UAB! snow SMe reon eters leat a Way mm
High: 90° F/32° C Low: 78° F/26°C Istanbul 82/27 67/19 pc 85/29 69/20 s [==] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary engl
—— Low: 79° F/26°C Jerusalem 83/28 58/14 s 82/27 60/15 s
: _ — aes cis 446 po 682036 s (105 | ts GN 10s (26 BRN ans RE cos 70s SST
KEY WEST , 2 i. CATISLAND Kingston 88/31 80/26 sh 88/31 78/25 t
High: 89° F/32°C i = 5 - Lima 71/21 58/14 s 73/22 59/15 s
Low: 81°F/27°C High: 88° F/31°C London 72/22 55/12 pc 70/21 59/15 +
i - . Low: 75° F/24°C Madrid 88/31 59/15 pc 95/35 66/18 pc
@ 474. Manila 8831 7/25 t 96/30 79/26 t HURR IC AN aes ot a Peay e i.
- ; ’ Mexico City 77/25 = 55/12 t 77/25 54/2 t
or ~= Monterrey 104/40 73/22 s 102/38 73/22 s
ee GREAT EXUMA — SAN SALVADOR Montreal 81/27 66/18 pc 77/25 50/10 pc
cl i High: 91° F/33°C High: 90° F/32°C Moscow 59/15 48/8 sh 63/17 46/7 pc
4 Low: 77° F/25° C Lew: 76°F/24°C Munich 84/28 60/15 s 84/28 61/16 pc , tg ;
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ioc : Noun 7 ae aa pe ee a Pe Yi i B BI
highs and tonights's lows. a : ew Delhi pe ‘
g g ef Low: 76° F/24°C OG i> Oslo 64/17 52/11 sh 68/20 50/10 pe ou an I OW?
; Paris 72/22 55/12 sh 75/23 59/15 pc r f ~
Prague 84/28 641/16 s 93/28 60/15 c Way y A ulmricane
LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 75/23 67/19 c 74/23 67/19 t y
High: 90° F/32°C Riyadh 106/41 91/32 s 109/42 88/31 s ’ .
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Today Wetiiastay Today Wetiasitay Today Wadhestiay MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 88/31 80/26 sh 90/32 80/26 sh that yo have excellent insurance
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 90° F/32° C San Juan 83/28 46/7 pc 87/30 48/8 pc coverace no matter which
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Albuquerque 82/27 62/16 t 86/30 64/117 t Indianapolis 86/30 65/18 s 86/30 65/18 pc Philadelphia 88/31 70/21 s 92/33 70/21 s antago pe pe 4
Anchorage 63/17 49/9 s 61/6 50/10 sh Jacksonville 88/31 73/22 t 90/32 73/22 t Phoenix 103/39 84/28 pc 106/41 84/28 s CRO eo aaa oman ae ae a oa eae - ¥
Atlanta 88/31 67/19 pc 88/381 70/21 s Kansas City 88/31 66/18 s 86/30 66/18 t Pittsburgh 86/30 58/14 s 84/28 62/16 pc RAGGED ISLAND igh: a , ana) a
Atlantic City 83/28 6749 s 85/29 68/20 s Las Vegas 100/37 74/23 s 102/38 77/25 s Portland, OR 75/23 5442 pc 86/30 58/14 pc cae Low: 76° F/24°C eae ence Ean Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 89/31 66/18 s 91/32 67/19 s Little Rock 92/33 65/18 s 91/32 66/18 Raleigh-Durham 91/32 69/20 t 92/33 69/20 t Low:73°F/23°C = % sen = Pea Boston 82/27 70/21 s 89/31 65/18 ¢ Los Angeles 87/30 64/47 pce 87/30 6447 pc St. Louis 89/31 68/20 s 90/32 68/20 pc . on ae 95/35 83/28 - 95/35 81/27 _
Buffalo 82/27 64/17 s 76/24 5542 pce Louisville 88/31 68/20 s 90/32 70/21 pc Salt Lake City 84/28 62/16 t 87/30 64/117 $s GREAT INAGUA “ Tava 92/27 73/29 5 84/28 75/23
Charleston, SC 88/31 71/21 t 91/32 71/21 t Memphis 91/32 70/21 s 92/33 71/21 $s San Antonio 101/88 74/23 s 100/37 74/23 s High: 93° F/34°C aaa 80/26 63/17 Be 79/26 4/12 pe INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Chicago 87/30 64/17 s 76/24 58/14 c Miami 90/32 80/26 t 91/32 79/26 t San Diego 78/25 67/49 pce 80/26 67/19 pc Low. 76°F/24°C Trinidad 90/32 70/21 pe 91/32 70/21 pe : ; : = :
Cleveland 84/28 62/16 s 80/26 6146 pc Minneapolis 82/27 60/15 t 81/27 5844 pc San Francisco 72/22 55/412 pc 73/22 56/13 pc ; amen 68/20 53/11 sh 68/20 55/12 pc (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 98/36 78/25 s 97/36 76/24 s Nashville 92/33 66/18 s 92/33 65/18 s Seattle 71/21 53/11 po 81/27 54/12 pc rane 84/98 65/18 89/97 BE/I8 ru Fleut vy
Denver 83/28 56/13 t 83/28 55/12 t New Orleans 90/32 70/21 s 90/32 72/22 s Tallahassee 91/32 69/20 pce 90/32 71/21 t lie ' Jaa ; ma
; Warsaw 77/25 58/14 s 85/29 61/16 s 2) 950-3500 Tet 47 Te sa-2000 HT 06-294
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Houston 97/36 74/23 t 97/36 74/23 s Orlando 91/32 75/23 t 91/32 75/23 t Washington, DC 90/32 71/21 s 91/82 71/21 s Gh Ce ee







THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009



ENDING THE
SEASON WITH A

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemeida.net

WITH the recent Theodore Elyett’s Miss Teen Bahamas
held as the last official local pageant for the 2009
pageant season, 16-year-old Shamika Rolle won the title

over 21 other contestants.

During the star studded event which
took place on August 9 at the Wynd-
ham Crystal Palace Rainforest The-
ater, Shamika competed as Miss Bimi-
ni giving the judges a fierce perfor-
mance during her jazz routine to Bey-
once’s Sweet Dream, Beautiful Night-
mare.

Speaking with Tribune Features
recently about her preparations and
victory, the teen queen explained that
her coach was a major motivation
leading up to the event.

“My coach who was Carolyn Smith,
inspired me daily and helped me to
formulate my inspirational quotes, per-
fect my walk, and to prepare myself
full-circle leading up to the pageant.

“T also watched past Miss Teen Uni-
verse competitions, some of the Amer-
ican pageants, and I watched Miss
Teen Venezuela from last year.”

Shamika said compared to all of her
preparations, the one thing that she

Shamika said this is only the start for
her. When she gets older she hopes
to pursue a career as an economist
and corporate lawyer. She also hopes
to one day compete for the title of
Miss Universe.

Theodore Sealy, President of Miss
Bahamas World Organisation, said in
this forth year of the event he decided
to change the dynamics of the pageant
in grooming the contestants from a
holistic standpoint.

“This year we had 21 girls, and we
had the theme Twilight Beauties. I
chose that because every year we say
there’s a lot going on in society, a lot of
negative things going on with teens.

“T thought why not highlight these
girls as twilight beauties, ‘light in the
midst of darkness,’ who are setting an
example for others out there.”

Another change for the pageant was
the addition of international judges
including; Bianca Golden from Amer-

“At the end of the day it's not
all about the crown, the girls created
lasting professions, and for our winner
Shamika she is now developing

her platform of teen abstinence.”
THEODORE SEALY

thinks stood out the most was an exot-
ic evening gown walk used mostly by
Venezuelan queens.

“T stumbled a little bit in my dress,
but I got over that, and over all I did
really well.”

She describes herself as determined
and friendly.

According to her mother Cassan-
dra Fortune, Shamika was barely a
toddler when she began showing-off
her passion for pageantry and dance.

She explained: “Ever since the age
of three, Shamika loved the art of
dancing, singing, and ‘priming’ in the
mirror.

“Because of that I saw the need to
enroll her in ballet school, and other
things that would help her to develop
her talents.

“T did that from she was three, and
she has been dancing, modeling, and
doing etiquette classes ever since.”

Shamika who is currently in her
senior year of high school, proves that
she is more than just a pretty face.
According to her mother she has also
succeeded in passing eight BGCSEs
taken last year.

ica’s Next Top Model, Kendrick Kemp
who was Mr Caribbean 2008, Miss
Florida 2009 Anastagia Pierre,
Caribbean pageant coach extraordi-
naire Hector Joaquin Colon Gonzalez,
third runner up to Miss Puerto Rico
2009 Haydil Rivera Escobales, and
local pageant and fashion coach Phyl-
lis Garraway.

Mr Sealy feels this final hurrah for
the 2009 pageant season had to end
with a bang, and said the addition of
the judges and media coverage added
a new level of pageantry for the con-
testants and viewers.

Mr Sealy said: “At the end of the
day it’s not all about the crown, the
girls created lasting professions, and
for our winner Shamika she is now
developing her platform of teen absti-
nence.”

The New Miss Teen Bahamas
World will first represent the country
in the upcoming Miss Teen World to
be held in Houston Texas. She will
also receive gifts from John Bull, a
$2,000 cash prize, and countless oppor-
tunities to represent both the pageant
and her country in the upcoming year.

Grapeade jj

nf
We ice ie

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway * 394-1759





THE New Miss Teen Bahamas World Shamika Rolle said the one
thing that she thinks stood out the most making her the top choice
for the title was an exotic evening gown walk used mostly by
Venezuelan queens.









Full Text
Pim bowin’ it

HIGH
LOW

~3ey TSTORM

Volume: 103 No.226

aU



a Nai

90F
79F

SUNNY WITH

m Lhe Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009





CARS FOR SALE,
at
ey:

BAHAMAS BIGGEST



ES

Fury over free
furniture the

Items destined for the
under-privileged are
reportedly ‘hijacked’

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

PANDEMONIUM broke
out at RM Bailey High
School and RIU Hotel yes-
terday after some delivery
men reportedly made off with
furniture and other household
items that were destined for
the country’s under-privi-
leged.

Hundreds of persons
queued outside of the hotel
and the school yesterday wait-

ing for their chance to get a
pick at desks, television sets,
mattresses and other house-
hold items that were given to
the poor in a generous ges-
ture by the operators of RIU
Hotel in a Social Services co-
lead operation.

However, some unscrupu-
lous delivery men reportedly
“hijacked” a number of trucks
loaded with these items and
took them to other locations
where they were either sold

SEE page nine

ir 7
Pal ray gelia medium
IFTOppingIpizzcka os olutENA



Ve] Mer) ime Mm CUT t ele ts

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff





| SEE PAGE ELEVEN



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



New Chief Justice
won't ‘dignify’ his

By TANEKA
THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

NEWLY appointed
Chief Justice Michael Bar-
nett said he would not
"dignify" critics — who
argue that his political affil-
iation will diminish the
appearance of separation
between the judiciary and
the state — with a
response.

Since government con-
firmed that Mr Barnett
would succeed Sir Burton



critics with response

Hall as the next head of
the judiciary, several mem-
bers of civil society have
found fault with the deci-
sion.

The Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce said the
appointment will weaken
the judiciary and fears the
move will create "far too
great an appearance of a
lack of separation between
the executive and judicial
branches of government.”

Last week the Bahamas
Bar Association (BBA)

SEE page eight



CASUARINA TREES are cut down on Saunder’s Beach yesterday. It is claimed the casuarinas must be cut down because they’re an invasive
species which does not allow any other plants to grow beneath them. But campaigners against the move say there is no justifiable reason

for the trees to be removed.

Miss Universe telecast was ‘a full
return for govt money invested’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

TOURISM Minister Vin-
cent Vanderpool-Wallace
declared yesterday that the
promotional value of Sunday
night’s final Miss Universe
2009 pageant telecast alone
represented a full return on
the money the Government
invested into the three-week-
long event.

“In terms of a turnaround
in investment there’s no
doubt whatsoever that we got
that all back without ques-
tion last night,” he said.

“Tf you do a very simple
calculation of what the cost
would be to do the promo-
tion that was done last night,

in one telecast the money was
back.

“The question now, and
what we have been doing, is
really looking at the follow
up and the follow on of how
we utilise the publicity from
it.”

The total amount spent by
the Government on bringing
the event to the Bahamas is
not known, however $4 mil-
lion was re-allocated towards
it in the Ministry of Tourism’s
mid-year budget.

Other costs were born by
pageant hosts Atlantis, whose
occupancy went up to 85 per
cent during the event, but is
now expected to fall to 50 per
cent this week, and 30 per

SEE page 12

° SEE PAGE TWO

Attorney tight-lipped
over the AG post

By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

THE prominent
attorney who is
pegged to be the
country's next attor-
ney general remained
tight-lipped on
whether or not he has
accepted the post.

However, senior partner of
McKinney Bancroft and
Hughes Brian Moree did not
close the door on the possi-
bility and highlighted the
need for qualified Bahami-
ans to give back to their

GET READY FOR

a ce



nossa

country through
public service.

"In a hypothetical
context, we all need
to contribute to the
building of our
nation and I believe
the administration
of justice is in des-
| perate need of
resources — it needs
more financial
resources, more
human resources,
more technological resources,
it needs to demand a higher
authority with regard to the
allocation of funding (from)
the Ministry of Finance —
and I think that the window

SEE page eight

| BACK TO SCHOOL

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISCANDS7 EEADING NEWSPAPER

ELIT Y

30% ANNIVERSARY
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

See

AUGUST 5, 2009 — This
is West Bay Street, near
Orange Hill, but it could be
the middle of the island of
New Providence. Because
the foliage has been allowed
to grow unnecessarily high,



West Bay Street and casuarinas issue

one is deprived of a view of
the beautiful sea. Note the
casuarina tree, one of those
that have been allowed to
grow amongst the “accept-
able” foliage. “My personal
interest,” said Capt Paul

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News
Editorial/Letters
Sports

BUSINESS/WOMAN SECTION

Business
Comics

Weathet...........:0:c00cc0ee

Seo O emt

eeeeceteaprerunevecgreettece P11

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



Aranha of Lyford Cay who
submitted this photo, “is the
threatened removal of 66
casuarina trees and the pos-
sibility that the area will end
up looking like this photo.”

The 66 casuarina trees
were removed from the
foreshore yesterday (see

page 1).

share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



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... they don't know the word “recession” either.
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it







THE TRIBUNE

MISSUNIVERSERIGHLIGHTS




NEW MISS UNIVERSE Stefania Fernandez of Venezuela poses with members of the Cabinet after win-
ning the pageant last night at Atlantis.



ABOVE: Miss Universe Stefania
Fernandez poses with co-owner
of the pageant Donald Trump
and Miss Universe 2008
Dayana Mendoza

¢ SEE TODAY’S WOMAN
SECTION FOR MORE

Fine Threads

PO a ual |

SUIT, SHIRT & TIE |

NEWBK BBO
DOUBLE

se iy 09 4 ot

peel Yeihig ilo

Incomes etre es ernie) eve eer)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Two of three who
requested funts
transfer were
hotel union officers:

TWO of the three individu- |
als who signed a letter
requesting the transfer of
almost half a million dollars
from the hotel union’s

account are registered elected :

officers of the union, the
Director of Labour con-
firmed.

This after it was reported in :

another local daily yesterday

that a letter is alleged to have }

been sent to the Bank of the
Bahamas (BOTB) calling for
wire tranfers totalling
$475,000 to be made to two
local law firms and for back-

pay to executive council mem- }

bers.
The request was said to

have been sent to BOTB days

after Nicole Martin was oust-
ed as president of the

Bahamas Hotel Catering and
Allied Workers Union follow-

ing a Supreme Court ruling
nullifying the election that
elevated her.

But the Bank of the
Bahamas is said to have
turned down the request to
transfer the funds “given the
very public bitter dispute”
surrounding the governance
of the union, and requested
that the union “confirm by

resolution” that the three sig- :

natories were authorised to
conduct business on the
union’s behalf.

The earlier article quoted
Labour Director Harcourt
Brown as saying that one of
the three signatories to the
letter, Raymond Wright, is
not a registered officer of the
union, as far as the Depart-

ment of Labour is concerned. }
In the letter, Mr Wright was }

to have received the largest

quantity of funds requested — :

$73,600.
However, Mr Brown yes-

terday noted that the two oth- :

er signatories — Samantha
Gray and Ian Neely, who
were to receive $21,450 and

$30,026 each — both appear to :

be registered elected officers.

He noted however that on the }

department’s record, Ms

Gray’s first name is registered :

as Frances.

The legal fees intended to
be covered by the requested
payout appear to stem from
the legal challenge mounted

by First Vice President of the

union, Kirk Wilson to the
election which brought Ms
Martin to power on May 28,
2009. The letter requests that
$140,000 be transferred from
the union’s account for out-
standing legal fees to Com-
mercial Law Advocates —
whose principal attorney is
Keod Smith — and Obie Fer-
guson and Co.

Secretary General Leo
Douglas maintains that the

lawyers’ fees are the responsi- }

bility of Mr Wilson, “who
hired them”, unless Mr Wil-
son and his team win the
upcoming election, for which

a date is set to be determined }

today.

The Tribune understands
that whether or not these
firms are owed by the union
depends on whether or not
the attorneys were hired
according to the constitution
of the union, with the meeting
in which this took place being
“properly constituted.”

CLARIFICATION

IN FRIDAY 'S Tribune, it
was incorrectly reported
that Kayla Green-Smith,
chief counsel for the Attor-
ney General's Office, said
anyone found making a
false claim of rape could
face life imprisionment
under law.

Speaking at last week's
media information session
on the proposed ammend-
ment to the Sexual Offences
Act, Ms Green-Smith said
that a malicious claim of
rape was an "offence pun-
ishable by law".

She did not say the
offence was punishable by
life imprisonment.

The Tribune apologises
for any inconvenience this
error may have caused.

Man is charged with
-businessman’s murder

By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 22-year-
old man was charged with the
murder of businessman Leslie
Maycock in the Freeport
Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Corderold Kiel Wallace
appeared before Magistrate
Debbye Ferguson in Court
One, where he was arraigned
on charges of armed robbery

and murder.

It is alleged that on July 15,
Wallace being concerned with
another or others robbed
Leslie Maycock Jr of a black
pouch, valued at $100, and
$700 in cash that was con-

tained in the pouch.

It is also alleged that on
July 23, the accused being
concerned with another and
others by means of unlawful
harm, to wit a handgun, inten-
tionally caused the death of

Maycock.

Maycock, 50, a retired
police officer and owner of
the Hawksbill Mini Mart, was
robbed and shot after closing

his convenience store.

He died a week later in hos-

pital of his injuries.

Maycock’s death was the
sixth homicide for the year on

Grand Bahama.

The victim’s wife and two
sons were present in the
courtroom for the arraign-

ment.

Oo
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2
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yy
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rt)
=
=
o

CORDEROLD KIEL WALLACE arrives at court yesterday.

K Brian Hanna represent-
ed Wallace.

When Magistrate Ferguson
asked Wallace where he
resided, he said he lives with
his sister at the Garden
Resort on the Mall.

The accused was not
required to enter a plea to the
charges of murder and armed
robbery.

‘Rigorous’ investigation to he
held into alleged ‘fake’ sick notes

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ALL complaints made by the
Ministry of Health about doc-
tors allegedly writing “fake” sick
notes for nurses will be put
through a “rigorous” investiga-
tion process, the president of the
Bahamas Medical Council said.

Confirming that the BMC
received the complaints about
“a number” of doctors — Health
Minister Hubert Minnis said it
was “eight or nine” physicians
and several medical clinics — Dr
Duane Sands said there is “noth-
ing whimsical or volitional”
about the BMC pursuing the

issue.

His comments come after
Minister Minnis stated that the
Ministry of Health had forward-
ed information on the physicians
and medical centres in question
to the Attorney General’s Office
and the BMC for further action,
after it had reason to suspect that
they had facilitated nurses who
wanted to protest the govern-
ment’s decision to delay their

health insurance coverage.

A large group of nurses were
involved in a prolonged “sick-
out” in response to the decision.

Dr Sands said: “Clearly the
council has a statutory obliga-
tion to follow up and to act on

TS TRC FTI
ST ET

POLICE in South Andros
seized almost a quarter of a
million dollars worth of sus-
pected marijuana over the
weekend.

Press liaison officer Asst
Supt Walter Evans said a tip
led officers from the Kemps
Bay Police Station to Blue
Bush Creek south of Grassy
Creek in South Andros around
6pm last Friday. There, they
found 11 brown taped pack-
ages, seven bags and 52 crocus
sacks containing a substance
they suspect to be marijuana.

The drugs have a local street
value of just under $250,000
and weigh over 2,400 lbs, Mr
Evans said.

Police are continuing to
investigate.



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every single complaint made to
it (formally).

“We are mandated to put it
through a fairly rigorous
process as defined by the Med-
ical Act.

“Tt is submitted to a subcom-
mittee of the BMC —- the Com-
plaints Committee. The Com-
plaints Committee then reviews
the written complaint and
determines whether or not
there is cause to submit it to
the Disciplinary Committee.”

Meanwhile, the doctor who is
accused of misconduct is also
given an opportunity to present
their side of the story, having
reviewed the substance of the
complaint.

Dr Sands said that each com-
plaint made against each physi-
cian by the Ministry of Health
will be dealt with “individual-
ly.”

As for penalties, the Medical
Act states that for forging any
health certificate, such as a sick
note, the sanction could “be as
severe as a fine or being strick-
en from medical register.”

“The committee looks at the
entirety of matter and then
makes a decision as to what
penalty may apply. Previous
infractions might make the
council less likely to look at it
with same degree of leniency,”
added the BMC chief.





A preliminary inquiry will
be held to determine whether
there is sufficient evidence for
him to stand trial in the
Supreme Court.

Magistrate Ferguson denied
Wallace bail and remanded
him to Her Majesty’s Prison
in Fox Hill until February 10,
2010, when a preliminary
inquiry will be held.

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Good English needed to succeed

“SUCCESS in English, success in life” is
the message on a large billboard — written in
both Chinese and English — on the side of a
wall in a small country town off the Li river
in the shadow of the famous Sugarloaf moun-
tains in Guilin, China.

It was a billboard to encourage Chinese
students to study English at the Omedia Lan-
guage College in that province.

Mr Ronnie Lightbourn, who with his wife,
Joan, took a boat tour down China’s Li Riv-
er about four months ago was so impressed
by the message that he took a photograph of
it and forwarded it to us. Here was an Asian
country that fully understood the importance
of speaking not only English, but good Eng-
lish, while in the Bahamas, where English is
the mother tongue, Bahamian children are
yet to recognise its importance. Not only
have many Bahamians failed to master Eng-
lish, but they do not seem to understand the
importance of speaking the language well.

Many years ago, shortly after the PLP
became the government, some bright sparks
got the idea that the Bahamian dialect should
be taught in the schools — both written and
spoken. Fortunately, the majority of our peo-
ple were wise enough to realise that speaking
in the “dis”, “dat”, “dees” and “dose” lingo
would not carry them very far. However, it
would certainly move them very quickly from
the front to the back door. Eventually the
matter was dropped and standard English
continued in the schools.

French has always been recognised as the
language of diplomats, but today English is
the lingua franca of the world. As Carla Pow-
er wrote in Newsweek International’s mag-
azine in March, 2008, India is on the “front
lines of a global revolution in which hun-
dreds of millions of people are learning Eng-
lish, the planet's language for commerce,
technology—and, increasingly, empower-
ment.

“Within a decade, 2 billion people will be
studying English and about half the world—
some 3 billion people—will speak it, accord-
ing to a recent report from the British Coun-
cil.

“From Caracas to Karachi, parents keen
for their children to achieve are forking over
tuition for English-language schools. Chi-
na's English fever— elevated to epidemic
proportions by the country's recent acces-
sion to the World Trade Organization and
the 2008 Olympics—even has its own Man-
darin term, Yingwen re. And governments
from Tunisia to Turkey are pushing Eng-
lish, recognizing that along with computers
and mass migration, the language is the tur-

ST. JOHNS COLLEGE

Orientation for all

bine engine of globalization. As one 12-year-
old self-taught English-speaker from Chi-
na's southwestern Sichuan province says, "If
you can't speak English, it's like you're deaf
and dumb.”

Is that how Bahamian students are to be
classified?

The second report produced by the Coali-
tion for Education Reform, released earlier
this year, revealed that in 2006, 55 per cent of
Bahamian students in public schools failed
the BGCSE English Language examination.
There is an alarming shortage of Bahamians
with the necessary English and mathematics
skills to compete in today’s industries,
framers of the report concluded.

The report was compiled by the Chamber of
Commerce, Employers Confederation,
National Congress of Trade Unions, Hotel
Employers Association and the Nassau
Tourism and Development Board. In other
words leaders of the industry that turns the
engine of this economy.

The shortage of qualified Bahamians with a
command of the English language, the report
said, “is critical to tourism because the skills
of its employees dealing with its clients
directly affects the latter’s view of the
Bahamas.”

Time has not shown any improvement in
these results. If there is no turnaround in
both English and Mathematics, Bahamians
will soon find that they will be pushed to the
sidelines because they are not qualified to
compete, even in their own language in their
own country. Will the day ever come when
foreigners, speaking English better than our
own people, will be called upon to fill essen-
tial positions in this country?

Today, according to the Newsweek report,
non-native English speakers now outnum-
ber native ones by three to one.

David Crystal, English-language expert and
author of “English as a Global Language”
has suggested that there could be a “tri-Eng-
lish world, one in which you could speak a
local English-based dialect at home, a nation-
al variety at work or school, and interna-
tional Standard English to talk to foreigners.”

Bahamian students would be wise to apply
themselves to their studies and master their
language and mathematics. They certainly
have been given every opportunity to pre-
pare themselves to take their place in their
country. If they fail to qualify, they cannot
blame anyone but themselves for becoming
strangers in their own land.

¢ See Mr Ron Lightbourn’s photograph tak-
en in Guilin, China, on page 12.



The marital

rape furore

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The people who are up in
arms over the Government's
proposal to criminalize rape in
marriage remind me very much
of the reactionary politicians in
the Republican Party in the
United States and their lunatic
fringe supporters who are try-
ing to trash President Obama's
health reform initiative.

Some are downright ignorant
and from them you can't expect
much. Some are, unfortunately,
Christian religious leaders who
are intellectual and moral
weaklings living in their own
stone age unaware of the New
Dispensation. But the worst of
the lot are those who know bet-
ter but refuse to play it straight.
Instead they hem and haw and
pander to the Neanderthals for
political advantage. They are
spouting exaggerations and
obfuscations, prevarications
and equivocations. Permit me
to comment on some of them.

1. They say making spousal
rape a crime will put the gov-
ernment in the bedroom, cause
breakdown in the family and
lead to same-sex matriages.

That last piece of asininity
— from a lawyer no less — is so
patently absurd that it boggles
the mind trying to find a ratio-
nal response. It's like telling
your children that drinking
orange juice will lead to drink-
ing rum. The demagogic grand-
standing about the government
in the bedroom is also patently
ridiculous. The law enforce-
ment agencies of the govern-
ment have a duty to go wher-
ever crime is committed: in the
bedroom or in the church
office.

The bedroom cannot be a
sanctuary for criminals, whether
it is a husband raping his wife
or a father raping his daughter.

To condone violence — and
rape is essentially a violent act
— is not protecting the family.
It's creating hell-holes from
which we spawn more violent
offspring in our society.

The wife who cloaks the hus-
band who rapes her because
she is afraid of losing the bread-
winner is complicit in her own
degradation, and if she cloaks
him in the rape of her children
she is just as guilty as he is.

2. They say that the timing
of the Government's anti-rape
bill is bad, that it should be

letters@triobunemedia.net



withdrawn and that more con-
sultation should take place.

This line of obfuscation and
equivocation comes mainly
from the political types who say
they are against all forms of vio-
lence against women. They
even want to flog rapists!

But they want to get political
advantage out of the situation
so they shamelessly pander to
those cavemen who do not —
and after a thousand years of
consultation still will not —
accept that rape can take place
in a marriage, and those mis-
guided women who, like some
slaves of old, do not want to
enjoy full equality and freedom.

The public debate on domes-
tic violence will no doubt go on
for a long time, and it should as
long as this evil persists. But
the issue before us is to do
something about a particular
form of domestic violence —
spousal rape — just as we
enacted laws against other
forms of violence without end-
less consultation.

If ever the timing is right it is
now when we are living in fear
of the gathering storm of crim-
inal violence around us. With-
out hemming and hawing we
need to send a clear, simple and
unequivocal message that our
society does not condone vio-
lence in any form — not in the
streets, not in the schools and
not in the bedroom.

3. They say there are legal
problems, so we should not call
spousal rape by its right name,
that the punishment should be
different and that there should
be safeguards against women
falsely accusing their husbands.

Rape is the act of forcing a
woman to have sex against her
will by force or any form of
coercion. Once those elements
are there it is rape and so it
should be called.

As for providing a different
punishment for spousal rape,
that is not necessary because
the principle of imposing pun-
ishment according to all the cir-
cumstances is already well-
established in our law.

Even in cases of homicide
the punishment can vary con-

siderably according to the cir-
cumstances. That is for the
courts to decide. The same
applies to providing safeguards
for husbands accused of rape.
The suggestion that there are
a lot of vindictive Bahamian
wives just waiting to destroy
their husbands when this law is
passed is utter rubbish. Chances
are that those wives who are
being abused by their cavemen
husbands will, unfortunately,
still be reluctant to report them.
The professional people tell us
that that is exactly what is hap-
pening in the case of too many
women who will not turn their
husbands in for raping their
daughters.

If there are some husbands
who have made the mistake of
choosing vindictive women as
their partners, the law already
provides protection for them.
In the case of a false accusa-
tion it will not be his word
against hers that will decide but
— as in every other allegation
of a crime — the courts will
look at the evidence and make
judgments about credibility.

Furthermore, the law also
makes provision for the pun-
ishment of persons who bring
false charges and make false
statements to the authorities.

4. They say the FNM Gov-
ermmment should remember the
referendum and back off.

When Prime Minister Ingra-
ham and his Government tried
to remove discrimination
against Bahamian women in cit-
izenship matters from our con-
stitution, the PLP supported
him in the House of Assembly
and voted unanimously for the
proposed amendment.

Then when they saw a
chance to make political hay
they turned around and along
with their clerical allies cam-
paigned against it. The result
was that the referendum was
defeated, they won the election
and that discriminatory provi-
sion still remains in our consti-
tution. I do not believe that this
time they will get away with
talking out of both sides of their
mouths. Mr. Ingraham should
put the matter to the vote, let
them show their colours and let
them vote against it.

FOR PROGRESS
Nassau,
August 23, 2009.

Use of casuarinas in Bahamas should be strongly discouraged

trees will smother all growth with their toxic,
needle-like litter, reducing the plant diversity in

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In response to the letters of protest that ran in
Friday's newspaper I feel obliged to put in my two
cents. While the casuarina trees that line Good-
man's Bay and West Bay Street have indeed
stood for decades, the use of casuarinas in any
landscape setting here in the Bahamas should be
strongly discouraged. Casuarina trees are natives
of Australia and the South Pacific region — and
in those areas, they are an important part of the
ecosystem, providing food and shelter to the ani-
mals, birds and insects that they have evolved in
tandem with. In our area, casuarinas are noxious
pests, displacing native plants and animals along

our fragile coastal habitats. These trees are allelo-

pathic, which means that they produce chemi-
cals that prevent any other vegetation from grow-
ing under or near them. A stand of casuarina

FOR SALE BY OWNER

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Ph.(242) 477-3772(dys.)
(242) 341-4104(eve.)

New

Students Grades K-12 will be

held on Thursday August 27th
2009 at 6:00pm at the school.
All students are to wear full

Uniform.

School will reopen for ALL
new and returning students on
Monday, August 31st 2009 at

8:30am

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August 22, 2008

that area to that one single species of introduced
tree — virtually useless to our native creatures.
Every mature casuarina is capable of producing
tens of thousands of tiny, winged seeds each year,
which may blow or float to distant shores, starting
new casuarina ‘barrens’ and reducing the area
that our wildlife has to live in. While these old
beachside trees do frame the vista nicely, so
would seagrapes, pigeon plums or buccaneer
palms — all native Bahamian trees, providing
livable habitat for the wildlife that colonized
these islands long before we did. Thank you for
allowing me to share my thoughts.

JOHN A. THOMPSON, Jr.,

RUSSELL’S WAREHOUSE
CLOSING SALE

Rivet Rite Shelving, Gondolas, Glass Shelves,

2 &4Arm Display Racks, Gridwall, Slatwall,
Slotted Standards, and Hardware. Asst. Fixtures and Fittings,
Men’s Coverall’s $5.00, S/S & L/S Whie Shirts $1-$5,
Blank CD’s $0.50, Men’s Jeans sz. 46-50, $15,
Blank ID Cards, 16’’ Stand Fans $20.00,

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Location: Madeira Shopping Center
Behind Mystical Gym - Entrance to Aquinas -
First left - First stairs on left.

Hours: Mon. to Thurs. 9am to 5pm
Contact: 465-8648

In Memoriam

Samuel F. Clapp

Beloved husband and father
1927 - 2009


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



BEC working
on Family
Islands
problems

THE Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation
(BEC) said yesterday
that it is working dili-
gently to correct all the
problems which led to
multiple power outages
in the Family Islands
over the weekend.

Consumers experi-
enced power interrup-
tions in Harbour
Island, Abaco and
Central Andros.

On Friday at 6.40pm,
a cable at BEC's
Whale Point, North
Eleuthera station fault-
ed, resulting in an
island-wide outage.
The restoration
process began immedi-
ately with the electrici-
ty supply restored at
approximately 10.30pm
that night. The power
was then fully restored
to all Harbour Island
residential consumers
by 3.30pm Saturday
afternoon, BEC said.

On Saturday at
10.45pm, Abaco expe-
rienced an island-wide
power outage. The
faulted panel was iso-
lated and power was
fully restored at
approximately 3am on
Sunday morning.

“We continue to
experience generation
problems at our power
station in Fresh Creek,
Central Andros, which
is still affecting supply
to the area, making it
necessary for the cor-
poration to rotate pow-
er around the commu-
nity. We anticipate that
the unit will be
returned to service by
early Wednesday
morning,” BEC said.

Govt in the dark over staff
situation at the Riu hotel

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT officials
yesterday admitted to being
in the dark about what
arrangement on pay or
future job security manage-
ment at the Riu Paradise
Island hotel have reached
with their staff during their
three month closure.

In the wake of claims by
some hotel workers that they
have not been kept ade-
quately informed by man-
agement about what pay
they will get, if any, during
the renovation period, or
how many of the employees
will be coming back to work
when the property re-opens
in November, Minister of
Tourism Vincent Vander-
pool-Wallace and Director
of Labour Harcourt Brown
both said they are unaware
of the terms of the closure
as far as staff are concerned.

“T don’t know, but I will
ask that question myself. I
haven’t heard about (the
fears expressed by some
employees), but I will speak
to the Minister of Labour,”
said Mr Vanderpool- Wal-
lace.



Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace

Mr Brown said he “doesn’t
have all the specifics” con-
cerning the situation, but
added that he is not aware
of any complaints from staff
that have reached his depart-
ment.

“IT would recommend to
anyone who has queries or
concerns about whether
they’ve gotten what they
were entitled to, to come and
see one of our officers and
we'll see what we can do,”
the Labour Director said.

The RIU hotel will be
closed for the next three

Masked gunmen
rob KFC restaurant

TWO masked gunmen burst into the Kentucky Fried Chick-
en (KFC) restaurant on Prince Charles Drive and robbed the
restaurant of an unknown amount of money.

Police said sometime after 11pm on Sunday, two gun-wield-
ing men smashed through the eatery's glass window and entered

the establishment.

The bandits approached an employee and robbed him of
cash, said press liaison officer Asst Supt Walter Evans. The men
left the area in an unknown direction.

Police investigations are ongoing.

SUPERVISOR OF FINANCE

A leading Bahamian company, is secking applications for a Supervisor of Finance

Jon OBJECTIVE:

To promde financial leadershup for the company by managing the financial resources, supervising
the certain key aspects of the company’s accounting funchon and maintaining appropriare relations

months during the tradition-
ally slow tourism season.

The property is set to
undergo a $25 million
makeover, reopening on
November 26, 2009 as the
Riu Palace Paradise Island.

Its 379 guestrooms will be
upgraded and other new
facilities added.

There have been rumours
that there were an above
average number of com-
plaints about the condition
of the property.

One employee said: “We
understand why they are
closing the hotel but of
course it’s like a stab in the
back. We have approached
our superiors and we’re not
getting any response (about
the pay issue).

“Management has a list of
people they are not going to
call back but that’s not been
dealt with yet. The only peo-
ple who know are the man-
agers. We, the employees,
have not been told,” she
claimed.

The Tribune was unable to
reach Minister of Labour
Dion Foulkes as he is on
leave. Attempts to reach
Acting Minister of Labour
Loretta Butler Turner were
unsuccessful up to press time.

Representatives of RIU
could also not be reached for
comment as both the num-
ber listed locally for the hotel
and a number obtained from
RIU’s headquarters in Spain
for the property are now out
of service.

Ud 718
Sasa
eRe
PHONE: 322-2157
















































Mohs Surgery in Nassau
DR. JOHN STRASSWIMMER, MOHS SURGEON
will be visiting The Skin Centre on Friday
September 25th, 2009. DOr Strasswirnmer
trained at Harvard and Yale and is Board
Certified and a Fellow of the Mohs College.

Mohs Micrographic Surgery is an advanced
treatment process for skin cancer which is
now offered at The Skin Centre. It offers the
highest possible cure rate for many skin
cancers and simultaneously minimizes the
sacrifice of normal tissue. This cutting-edge
treatment requires highly specialized
physicians that serve as surgeon, pathologist
and reconstructive surgeon.

Our visiting Mohs Surgeon has extensive
experience in the Mohs Micrographic
Procedure. The technique is used to remove
the two most common forms of skin cancer:
basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell
carcinoma.

For more information, please contact:

The Skin Centre, Harbour Bay Plaza,
East Bay Street Tel. 393-7546,

with investors and regulatney agencies.

(URGANIZATIONAL POSITION:
Reports bo the Director of Finance

PRINCIPAL DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:

Cone responsailines include:
+ Assisting in managing the linancal alairs of the company
Supervise key components of the finance department
Ensure accurate and timely interim and annual financial reporting in accordance with
International Accomnting Standards
Assist in the antvaal budeet exercise
Assist in the training and development of line accounting staff
Coordinate the annual audit process
Assist in managing cashflow and treasury fonctons
Any other related duties as considered necessary

REQUIREMENTS & PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

Candidates must mect the following ceitesia:

Bacheloc’s Degree oc higher in accounting or related financial field

Professional accounting designation recognized by The Bahamas Insitate of Chartered
Acoouetants

Minimum of seven years experience in accounting, finance and budgeting.
Leadership, management and direct supervision experience is required. Previous
direct experience in planning and executing all aspects of financial accounting and
hudgetary functions



Bahamian citizen

Accounting softaure experience Size: 5-11
Proficient in the ust of the Microsoft range of applications

Strong technical and manaperial skills

Excellent wring, communscation, analyncal and reasoning skalls

Excellent organizational and time management skills

Team Player with the ability eo add value ard streneth to the seam and team poals

Hoeest, hardworking and abiliry to mect deadlines

The position offers an attractive salary and benefits package, reflecting the successful
applicant's experience and qualifications, including a pension plan, medical, life, dental
and vision coverage.

Chulified individuals should submit complete resumes including references before August 31"
2009 to: Exnadl: finsupervisori@email.con

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Rosetta St. - Ph: 325-3336


PAGE 6, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



CANE ital

A TRIBUNE reader has
identified the mysterious fish
caught at an ocean depth of
1,500 feet at the back of Par-
adise Island as a longnose
lancetfish.

Fishing partners Lee Chong
and Velasco Newball forward-
ed pictures of the unusual
marine creature to the Uni-
versity of Miami seeking help
in putting a name to it.

The long slender fish has an
unusual head and razor sharp
teeth that extend from the



mouth into the stomach.

Lancetfish are predators and }

can grow up to 6’6” in length.

Very little is known about
their biology except that they ;
mainly inhabit tropical and }
subtropical waters. During the ;
feeding period adults may :

migrate to the sub-arctic reach-
ing as far north as Greenland,
Iceland and the Bering Sea

There are currently only two i

recognised species, the long-

nose and the shortnose }

lancetfish.

_ Three men hospitalised
after drive-by shootings

TWO separate daylight drive-by shoot-
ings sent three men to hospital over the
weekend — with two of them in serious
condition fighting for their lives.

During a brazen daylight drive-by
shooting on Sunday morning, a young
resident of Milton Street was shot in the
abdomen after being sprayed with bullets
from a passing car.

Police said the 21-year-old was stand-
ing on the side of Milton Street around

11am when a Nissan Maxima with heav-
ily tinted windows pulled up and shot
the victim multiple times.

The victim was rushed to hospital by
private vehicle, police said.

At last report, he remained in serious
condition.

Police are also looking for the gunman
who wounded two men on Saturday
morning.

It was shortly after 9am when two men,

aged 23 and 27, were in the area of Cum-
berbatch Alley when an unknown person
pulled up and fired shots from a car, press
liaison officer Asst Supt Walter Evans.

The two men were taken to hospital for
injuries; the younger of the pair was treat-
ed and discharged but the older man —
who was shot in his abdomen — is in
serious condition.

Police have launched intensive inves-
tigations into both shootings.





Former Secretary to the Cabinet HC Walkine dies

HERBERT Cleveland
Walkine, CMG, CVO, OBE, for-
mer Secretary to the Cabinet
died on Thursday, August 20 at
the University of Miami Hospital
in Florida.

He died of cancer at the age of
79 and is survived by his wife
Pam Walkine and daughters
Angel and Imogene Walkine.

Mr Walkine was born on
November 28, 1929 in Crooked
Island, where he began his public

service career as a monitor at the
local public school.

He won a scholarship to attend
the Government High School in
Nassau. After graduating, he con-
tinued his education at the
Bahamas Teacher’s Training Col-
lege in Nassau and at the Uni-
versity of Manchester.

Mr Walkine had a varied and
well-rounded career in the public
service. He began as a teacher
and then served as a Family

Island commissioner for 10 years,
from 1958 to 1968, when he was
appointed assistant secretary to
the Cabinet Office.

He served as permanent sec-
retary in the Ministry of Labour,
the Ministry of Education, the
Ministry of Works and Utilities,
and the Ministry of National
Security, before he was once
again appointed to the Cabinet
Office in 1986, this time as Sec-
retary to the Cabinet.

HC Walkine



PROSPECTUS
THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2028, 2029, 2030, 2031, 2032, 2033, 3034, 3035, AND 3036
ISSUE OF B$150,000, 000.00

THE FU ERNMED uF wt DLA AAS WAL To DE BA AAS



Issued ercke The Bahamas Reeetered Stock Act. and authorized by Resolutions of the House of Assembly, [7th

June, SLR.

PORK LAAPICTAL USE ONLY
APPLICCAT EUR Pbco
ALLOTMENT Mex

Appliculions wall be recenved by The Banking Department beginning af 9:20 amon 1th August. 2008 and will
chose at a: DOpen on 28h August KM, Al kecations will commence at Sob a.m. ca 20th Auguedt, 2000? amd will ceese af
34K on 270h Aeeet, 2M,

DATE

IP the total setecripeions exceed the sum of BSISM0CKKIAMMLIN) (Momingl) partial alhnient will be mde bo
subscribers, aml a peoportenate refund will be made as soon as possible afler allotenent
amounts st refunded.

Nie interes) well he paid on The Regisirer
efo The Central Bank of The Bahaetace

P.O), Bao, MiibH

— i. iL Ls.) [Sh Masse, Matarres
Sir
The Government of The Commemnwealth of The Bahamas invites applications For Bakes Registered Suwk
totalling BS 150,000 The Stock will be available in a range of maturity diies; the earliest being repayable im bWe hereby apply for the folbowing amount of Bahamas Registered Stock:
SUZH wih che laresr in 2h. The total mount of Sanck offered, the rate of interest amd the ieee prece are give helcrar :-
. Imacrt beckew the amceant applied bor
te eats of BSL
ewe Price
Rate Of laterest Namie of Stock Aunaun ES LSS Albowe Prin Rate Babitiis Registered Stock 228 = =6=BS
[5 Z 4 ; : ,
Hii Abowe Prime Rote Bahamas Registered Stock 229 BS
Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Stock 2023 | MOMMY |_| ‘ ess ehseret
Albee Free Rua Hohamase KHegihered Sinmck MI a 34) Aow? Pome Kate fKabomas Regastered Stock Sao BS
Above Prime Rate Habamas Hepistered Sinck 21M» Li44 Abowe Prime Rate Kakamas Regisicred Siok 201 | BS
Above Prime Rate Habeas Kepitered Stock JU ! a
Above Prime Ratz Pakamas Recistered Siock 22 16% Above Pame Rate Baluimis Registered Stock 292 BS
Above Preme Rate Hatemas Kepitered Stock 229 Laid") Above Prine Rate Bahoims Registered Stock 203 06«-BS
Ahowe Prime Rate Habana Repinered Sock Mit . :
VEN: Above Prime Rate aboamas Resistered Sinck 2k %
¢_ Above Prime Rate Bahamas Rephtered Siok 2003 | __(WANNIOWMIOMP | (oh oe Above Dome Role = Balms Kogeiored Sinck aks =
howe Prime Rate Hohamas Repinered Stock 0 lat Above Prime Rate Hiskomos Registered Stock 25 | BS
| isonet | | 4) Albowe Prin Rate Babciities Kegasicred Stock 2096 «BS



ane) urkicrke jo accep any bess amon whch may he alledice be merous

The Seack seal be repaid on 27

th Aagust,

mn the year appearing in Whe qari of the Steck

ie cali BS in payee Gor the Sock apyllied fow
INTEREST
In the ever cf the full omeunt of Sincki=) applied fer ahowe eetare met olketied in

The Stock will bear interest from 27h August. 2009, at the rate shown against ihe name of the Siock ax ihe percent infin, Wire eequeal that Ue atin rfuneiae to atehlies Be: apeplidl Foor the Rallirming Sacache
per aniiien over the Prime Rate (ie, the pri commercial interest fate frowa bime be time fined bey the Clearing hasis a
curyieg in business im the Island of Sew Prowedence in The Bahamas, 2 then: shall be acy difference bolween them.
them that which is fixed by Rowal Bank of Canada). Imeerest shall be payable half-vearly commencing on 27th February,
210 aiid chereafier on 27h August and 27th February in every year aewil the Sinck is repeaidd



ahaimnas Registoned Snook BS

+ PAYMENTS [6 EXCESS OF AS50008 MIST BE SLADE VLA REALTIME (ROSS SETTLEMEST
STSTEM CR TGG) DHRU ALL OOMMERCIAL HARKS EACEPT FISCU,

eo) PAYMENT! CHP B30 LOR LESS CAN AE MADE VA REAL TIME GROSS SETTLEMENT

SYSTM OF BY DARK GRAD PAY ADL To THE CIN TRAL BANE OF TM BAM AMAS

PAYMENT. OF 935 00.00 Of LESS CAN RE AAD VLA REAL TEM O08 SETTLEMENT

SYSTEM. BY BANK DRAPT PAYABLE TO THE CENTRAL BASIK OF THE BAHASLAS OR BY

CASH

CHARGE UPON COONS CHL IDA TRI FUN
The preecipal monies and interest represential by the Steck ore charged epon and payable out of the Conestidahead *
Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.



SUPPLEMESTARY PROVISIONS
1. (me Person



shine oS) The Steck will be mane! by the: Revisirar (The Central Bank of The Bahamas, Applications wall Ordinary Skanature
be received by The Banking Department begimeing af 923) am om 19th August, 700% and ypllileloge oe
HE Alkealions will Gammence al 9) an. an 2th August, MM
and will cease at 3:00p.m.on 27th Amgust, 2000. All envelopes enclosing applications should be Name in Pall (BLOCK LETTERS, state whether Mir Mrs, or Miss and tres if any.)
lohelked "Vupedicolies: Por Hahomas Goverment Registered Stocks”. .
Units The Stock will be im umats of TS 100001.
Auuificationes Applications most be for BS MAMA) ara multiple of that sum. Address (Corporations etc. should give Registered Addresses 4)

ApMicning Fartie Applications for the Steck shoukl be mene bo the Repishrar ort the Geri altactaed ty the
Prospectes amd may be obtained from the Registrar offices im Masau and Freeport, The Treasary
Deparment (Monborsugh Some A havy Linn Rowe, Mimesaiil,
downkialed front the Cestral Bank af the Bakara chsite al wacw cen
any of the folowing banks:

P.O. Box

EPPA CULO Ady oben be
brilhin

Kaha coat oF




1 fark of The Dahamas Intemational Telephone Mos. (H) (Veh

2 First Caribbean lntertatonal Barak (Baleaitats) Limited

4 Pirice Corporation of Haters Lirmetind

2 oa 2. (Where teeor more persons apply as joint subscribers, the addidional nanves and addresses should
fi Scotiabank (Bahernas) Linlied Of prem besew.)

7 Pidehey Bank (Baharres| Limited (formedly Brite American Haake 104) Lirnted)

a Cite nik NA . Ordinary Signatures

PUBLIC DRHT
Mares i Full
Provisional estimates from the ungedtied accounts ws at June 30, 204M show the Public Debi of The Bahar to be

$5,524,214 00."
1



Address:

The following information is ciracied from the mnaiidined acco of the Goverment of The Commonwealth al
The Bahaenas.
PY SKE p PYaabodp* PY SIRI Teelepiieome: Nes.
KS BS BS
Approawed Budpet Approved Budget



Revemee 1 oo 1.424, 108.00 1 4899 00 lWe hereby neqecs: semi anal incest bo bet peed on:
Recurrent Expenditure (eucheding

Repayment of Public Liebe} 1 285690 000 1.344,028,000 14845000 Bank Mame,
Capital Development Hank Branch

Expedite fexcliding loans

contributions ane) advanecs

to public corporations! 166 75, 178,778 EI (Ek) 000 Account Number

2 Brovisnl cslienatcs (note the inate accounts.
* The Public Debt amount is inclusive of The Public Cc
totalled BS440 400150081.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

sporations contingent Gabilite which as at June 30. 204
THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

a

GOVERNOR General
AD Hanna looks on as
former AG Michael
Barnette takes the oath
as Chief Justice at
Government House
yesterday. Mr Barnett’s
appointement has been
controversial with both
the Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce and Bar
Association question-
ing whether his politi-
cal past will affect his
ability to be impartial.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

Barnett sworn in as Chief Justice

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

REFORM of the country's
judicial system to ensure that
it performs as efficiently as
possible is topmost on the
agenda for the new chief jus-
tice.

"We're going to be address-
ing the whole court environ-
ment and I'm trying to get
reforms in terms of civil pro-
cedure reforms and probate
reforms and things to be able
to help justice (move) as expe-
ditiously and efficiently as we
can," said Michael Barnett,
who was officially sworn in as

Reform of country’s judicial
system ‘topmost on the agenda’

chief justice at Government
House yesterday morning.
But given recent budget
cuts to the Attorney Gener-
al's Office and the judiciary —
coupled with a backlog of
pending cases and a shortage
of judges — Mr Barnett warned
the public that these neces-
sary improvements will not
happen immediately.
"Problems do not occur
overnight and they're not
going to be solved overnight.

rake

yr
D

N

Nassau Airport

Development Company

People must be patient and
while they have a right to
demand that matters be
addressed, it is unreasonable
to expect that problems that
have been created over a peri-
od of time can be resolved
instantaneously,” he told The
Tribune before he took his
oath of office yesterday.

Mr Barnett resigned as the
country's attorney general last
week to succeed former chief
justice Sir Burton Hall, who

Nassau Airport Development Company Limited (NAD) is seeking a
Proponent (individual, consortium or joint venture that includes an
experienced restaurant operator) to finance, design, develop, operate
and manage a 4500 sq. ft. (approximate) sit down restaurant and bar
in the new U.S, Departures Terminal currently under construction at
the Lynden Pindling International Airport. This restaurant will be a
world-class facility with a diverse menu, excellent customer service,
high volume and turnover with a true sense of place.

Mandatory qualifications

|. Proponents must be Bahamian and incorporated in The Bahamas.
ii. Proponents must have operated a similar restaurant facility
within the last three (3) years,

NAD’s goals and objectives are to:

(a) achieve a high standard of excellence and customer service;

(b) offer a mix of concepts that will enhance the image of the Lynden
Pindling International Airport as a world class airport;

(c) offer food & beverage choices to passengers at reasonable

prices;

(d) offer a mix of local, regional and national and international
brand-name companies;

(e) develop and design food & beverage facilities that complement
the qualities of the new terminal while recognizing the distinctive
spirit, character and ‘sense of place’ of the Bahamas: and

(f) optimize revenue to NAD.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

is set to take up a post as a
permanent judge on the Inter-
national Criminal Tribunal for
the former Yugoslavia.

Speaking before a crowd of
well-wishers, several Cabinet
ministers and members of the
legal community at his swear-
ing-in ceremony yesterday, Mr
Barnett noted that the job at
hand comes with an "awe-
some responsibility” that can
only be (performed) "with the
grace of God."

Governor-general Arthur
Hanna commended Mr Bar-
nett as a product of a strong
family with a "tradition of
honesty."

After the ceremony, Sir
Burton Hall reflected on his

10-year tenure as a "fascinat-
ing experience."

Still, he admitted that sev-
eral challenges remained with
respect to the country’s judi-
cial system.

"The challenge in the
Bahamas like everywhere else
is to ensure that the systems
that are put in place work as
best as the resources in the
country allow, to serve the
people.”

Deteriorating court build-
ings, too few judges and an
extensive backlog of cases
which leads to defendants
languishing in the system
for years are common criti-
cisms of the Bahamas judi-
cial system.

“The challenge
in the Bahamas
like everywhere
else is to ensure
that the systems
that are put in
place work as
best as the
resources in
the country
allow, to serve
the people.”



Michael Barnett

REQUEST FOR

PROPOSAL

SIT DOWN RESTAURANT & BAR

New U.S. Departures Terminal at LPIA

Interested parties may pick-up the Request for Proposal package at
NAD's offices at the reception desk on the second floor
Domestic/International Terminal at Lynden Pindling International Airport
between the hours of 8:00am and 4:00pm, from August 12th to 24th,
2009. A mandatory pre-proposal briefing will be held in the Arawak
Lounge at the Airport on Wednesday, August 26th at 10:00am.


PAGE 8, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

Chief Justice won't ‘dignity’ Attorney tight-lipped

his critics with response

FROM page one

lodged a formal complaint
against the prime minister's
decision to appoint Mr Bar-
nett.

When asked to respond to
his detractors, Mr Barnett
said "I've noted what they
(said) and I have no comment
on it.”

When pressed about asser-
tions that his ties with the
FNM could influence his car-
riage as chief justice, he said,
"I'm not even going to digni-
fy that with an answer."

He also stressed that his
political affiliation would not
cloud his administration of

justice.

Mr Barnett resigned as
Attorney General last week
after holding the post since
July, 2008.

He was a senior partner at
the law firm of Graham,
Thompson and Co and had
an unsuccessful bid for the
Fort Charlotte seat on the
FNM's ticket in 2007.

Yesterday, prominent
attorney Brian Moree, who
has reportedly been offered
the job as the new AG,
praised Mr Barnett as a "dis-
tinguished" "impressive"
attorney who will remain
impartial.

"IT think based upon my

Legal Notice

NOTICE

CANDY MOUNTAIN VALLEY LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

VEUVE CREEK LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Bahamas.



Legal Notice

NOTICE

MAULES DESSUS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TINY TIDBIT INVESTMENT LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

personal knowledge of him as
a colleague for over 25 years I
have no doubt that he will
bring energy, competence and
experience and most of all
integrity to the office of chief
justice.

"While I understand the
concerns that some have
expressed about the indepen-
dence of the judiciary — and,
of course, that is a critically
important principle in our
democracy — I am satisfied
that he will discharge his judi-
cial conscience with an impar-
tial role of complete integri-
ty,” he told reporters after Mr
Barnett was sworn in at Gov-
ernment House yesterday.



over the AG post

FROM page one

for fixing these problems is
rapidly closing," Mr Moree
told reporters after a swear-
ing in ceremony for new
Chief Justice Michael Bar-
nett yesterday.

When asked directly if he
had accepted the job Mr
Moree said, "I don't think
that's a matter which I can
comment on at the present
time.”

Mr Barnett, the former
attorney general, resigned
last week to assume the post
of chief justice.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

WALLBURG INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

CANNFIELD RIVERA LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PANTHERSVILLE LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TANO VILLAGE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

For weeks, there has been
wide speculation in the legal
community that Mr Moree
had been tapped by Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
to replace him.

Mr Moree has been vocal
in his criticisms of the state
of the judiciary in the past,
many times calling on gov-
ernment to immediately fix
the judicial system's inability
to resolve commercial dis-
putes in a timely manner.

He reiterated these con-
cerns yesterday: "The
administrative of justice is
critical to everything in this
country — it's critical to our

tourism, it's critical to our
financial services industry,
it's critical to our quality of
life and it is at the moment
confronting very serious
problems," he told the media
outside of Government
House.

Deputy Prime Minister
and Minister of Foreign
Affairs Brent Symonette will
serve as Attorney General
and Minister of Legal Affairs
until a new attorney general
is appointed.

He previously served as
Attorney General under a
previous Ingraham adminis-
tration.



Legal Notice

NOTICE

CEDERCREST PEAK INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TRESMO GARDEN INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

OCTOSTONE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)







Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Legal Notice

NOTICE
VISIONARY INVESTMENTS

OFFSHORE LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)
Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 7th day of August
2009. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-
7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

This notice replaces the publication of 7 August 2009 in the
Gazette wherein APRIL HARVEST INC. was incorrectly
referref to as being dissolved.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009, PAGE 9



- Fury over free 1.9

furniture ‘theft’

Peru police
seize cocaine |
sewn inside —
live turkeys

LIMA, Peru

PERUVIAN police
expecting to find a ship-

ment of cocaine hiddenin

a crate holding two live
turkeys were surprised to
discover the drug surgi-
cally implanted inside the
birds, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Acting on a tip, officers :
stopped a Turismo Ejecu- :

tivo SRL bus outside the
city of Tarapoto in the

central jungle state of San

Martin, officials said
Monday.

Police were puzzled
when they found the
turkeys in the crate, but
didn’t find the cocaine,
Tarapoto’s anti-drug
police chief, Otero Gon-
zalez, told the Associated
Press. They then noticed
that the two turkeys were
bloated.

“Lifting up the feathers
of the bird, in the chest
area, police detected a
handmade seam,” he
said.

A veterinarian extract-
ed 11 oval-shaped plastic
capsules containing 1.9

kilograms (4.2 pounds) of

cocaine from one turkey
and 17 capsules with 2.9
kilograms (6.4 pounds)
from the other, he said.

Both turkeys survived
the removal.

Police were searching
for whoever sent the
shipment from Juanjui to
Tarapoto, which is on a
smuggling route from
Peru’s east Andean coca-
producing valleys to
northern coastal cities,
where it is sold to Mexi-
can and Colombian traf-
fickers.

Gangs often use human

couriers who swallow
cocaine to sneak it across
borders but it is unusual
to use animals. In 2005,

Colombian police found a

total of 3 kilograms (6.6
pounds) of heroin sewn

into the bellies of six pup-

pies during a raid ona
veterinarian clinic.

FROM page one

or handed out to family
members and friends.

The “left over” products
which made their way to
RM Bailey for distribution
were reported of such a low
caliber that many persons
at the scene described them
as either “damaged, or
unusable” items.

At RM Bailey people
queued in the blistering
heat for hours to get an
opportunity to see some of
the items, only to be frus-
trated by the report that
persons allegedly “connect-
ed” with Social Service
workers were being allowed
to get the “first pick.”

According to an eyewit-
ness, who phoned The Tri-
bune, the crowd broke
down the school’s fence and
overran the police who
were called to keep the sit-
uation under control.

As the caller explained,
the situation quickly turned
into a “free-for-all frenzy”
where persons were mak-
ing off with anything they
could lay their hands on.

Speaking with The Tri-
bune from the RIU Hotel
yesterday, Minister of

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With this distribution
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“Tam right now at this









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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 10, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS



Team heads home
FROM page 11

"We could have easily
turned away when they
caught Donald and pinned
him on the ground and beat
him," said Leevan Sands, who
just turned 27 on Tuesday
when he finished fourth in the
men's triple jump final.

"But because he was our
team-mate, we only went over
to ask them why they were
treating him like that. That
was when the Police asked us
to go with them for question-
ing, It was an embarrassing
situation that we found our-
selves in, but we didn't do
anything wrong.”

Shamar Sands, the 24-year-
old who finished as a semifi-
nalist in the 110 hurdles, said
they were sorry for the way
that they treated Thomas, a
training partner of theirs in
Auburn, so they had to go to
his rescue. "If we knew that
we would have been put in
this situation, we could have
just tried away and not assist-
ed him at all," Shamar Sands
said.

"But we just couldn't leave
him there, not the way they
were treating him.”

Thomas, the 25-year-old
who relinquished his title he
won in Osaka, Japan in 2007
when he just missed out mak-
ing the final in the men's high
jump, was unavailable for fur-
ther comments yesterday as
he had already departed for
the airport.

Neither Sands said they
were unaware of any com-
promising situation Thomas
got himself in that may have
led to him being chased and
thrown to the ground by the
bouncers of the nightclub
because they were not in that
close vicinity.

"None of us did anything
wrong,” Leevan Sands insist-
ed. "There was a lot of ath-
letes there who can verify
that. But it’s just unfortunate
that we were taken in for
questioning. But we didn't do
anything wrong, except head
out to the club that night."

BERLIN WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS: THE AFTERMATH

Sturrup gets better with age

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany: Stop the time clock. Rewind it
to about ten years for Chandra Sturrup.

That's how the 37-year-old, soon to be 38 veteran
sprinter looked as she competed at the IAAF's 12th
World Championships in Athletics last week.

Nobody hardly noticed the age difference because
Sturrup was the first to remind all of the reporters who
had interviewed her in the mixed zone where the ath-
letes were stopped for comments once they had com-
pleted their events.

"Why everybody is so concerned about my age,”
she boldly asked when one of the first questions posed
to her from one of the international reporters after
the women's 100 metres final how do she do it at age 37.

Sturrup, who will actually turn 38 on September 12,
abruptly answered: "It's because I feel like I'm 27."

And she looked that way. Although she was sev-
enth in the final in 11.05 seconds on August 17 at the
Olympic Stadium, Sturrup posted a season's best of
10.99 for third at a Golden League meet in Rome,
which had heads turned as she headed into Berlin.

And although she deliberately decided not to talk too
much to the media prior to the final, she said it was all
because she got tired of all the questions about her
age. Age certainly wasn't a factor in the century and it
didn't show up with her blazing speed on the second leg
for the Bahamas women's 4 x 100 relay team that
clinched the silver in a season's best of 42.29 behind
Jamaica to return to the podium at a major champi-
onship for the first time since the 2000 Olympic Games
in Sydney, Australia.

"T just felt good out there,” said Sturrup about her
performance. "I worked really hard to get here and I
was determined to go out there and give it my best
shot and I think I did that.”

She collected an estimated $15,000, inclusive of the
$5,000 for her seventh in the 100 and her share of the



CHANDRA STURRUP. Sheniqua Ferguson and Christine
Amertil celebrate women's 4 x 100 silver medal. Missing
is Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie.

$40,000 as a part of the silver medal relay team. Not bad
for a 37-year-old, who could have easily not pack any
bags to compete at all.

That's where the conversation at the Olympic Sta-
dium after the 4 x 1 performance got a little interesting.

For the first time, Sturrup asked the much antici-
pated question: How long do you intend to continue in
the sport. "I really don't know yet," said Sturrup with
a little hesitating. "I haven't really thought about it
yet. But I know for sure that I will compete next year at
the World Indoors and then I will take it from there."

Known as one of the fastest starters in the world, the
indoors suit Sturrup better than the outdoors because
she will have a 60 metre race to contend with when she
go to Doha, Qatar from March 12014, 2010.

In an international career that got started with a
gold in the 100 and silver in the 200 at the Central
American and Caribbean Junior Championships in
1988, Sturrup's first medal at the World's came at the
1997 Indoor Championships when she got a silver.

She then went on to win the World Indoor's 60 title
in 2001 and got her first World Outdoor Championship
medal with a bronze in 2003. Along the way, she has

dominated at both the Central American and
Caribbean, Pan American and Commonwealth Games.

The only level she has not won an individual medal
is at the Olympic Games where her best showing was
sixth in the 100 in 2000. And that maybe the only item
missing off her resume as she's not certain if, at age 40,
she wants to be competing in London, England in 2012.

Unlike many of her foes, Sturrup find herself in a
very unique position, not just in age.

She's one of the few athletes who are excelling at this
level who is self-trained. And that is not be design, but
really as fate would have it.

After her coach, Jamaican Trevor Graham, whom
she had worked with from 1998 to 2006, ran into some
problems with the law, Sturrup has been training on her
own and that is because she felt she learnt so much from
him that she can do it on her own.

Has it worked? It certainly does when one consider
the fact that her 10.99 has only be topped by six other
athletes so far this year, including Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie, who sits just above her with 10.97.

Sturrup, the single mother of an 18-year-old, Shawn,
left Berlin for Switzerland where she will compete
again on Friday at the Weltklasse Zurich, the fifth of the
six Golden League Grand Prix Meets. The final one is
in Bruxelles at the Memorial Van Damme on Septem-
ber 4. But Sturrup should be competing on August 31
and again on September 9 before she get ready for the
TAAF/VTB Bank World Athletics Final in Thessa-
loniki, Greece from September 12-13.

Going into those pre-World Championships meets,
Sturrup was sitting in second place on the World Tour
list for the 100 with 72 points behind Jamaica's Kerron
Stewart's 100 for first place. The aftermath to Berlin is
where the athletes tend to really show their true colours
as they try to claim the hefty cash prizes available at the
end of tunnel. As she head towards that tunnel, Sturrup
said she will also start looking ahead to what could be
grand finale in 2010. Who knows, she might just stick
around a little longer. It all depends on what happen
after Doha next March.

Debbie Ferguson-
} McKenzie’s coaching

change key factor

GOLD MEDAL WINNER Allyson Felix of the US| is flanked by
silver medal winner Veronica Campbell-Brown, left, of }
Jamaica and bronze medal winner Debbie Ferguson-McKen- :

zie of Bahamas after the ceremony for the Women's 200m
final at the World Athletics Championships in Berlin.














FROM page 11

in their first head-to-head con-
frontation at the Stockholm
Golden League meet on July
31. Felix surged on top of the
charts with 21.88, dropping Fer-
guson-McKenzie to second with
22.23.

At the championships, the
focus of attention was on
Allyson,

Campbell-Brown and
McKenzie and the question was
really would order they would

“Based on the
way I’ve been
running this
year, Iam going
to compete
through 2012 in
London.”



The meet will also serve as
another qualifier for the ath-
letes to accumulate points for
the World Athletics Tour,
which culminates with the
Finals in Thessaloniki, Greece
from September 12-13.

Right now. Ferguson-
McKenzie is sitting in seventh
spot with 55 points. The race is
led by Jamaican World silver
medalists Kerron Stewart with
100 with Bahamian Chandra
Sturrup sitting in second with
72.

Although the 200 is not on































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finish in. Ferguson-McKenzie
had staked her claim to the title
when she ran the fastest quali-
fying time of 22.24 in beating
out Campbell-Brown (22.29) at
the tape in the first heat, while
Felix easily followed winning
the next heat in the fourth
fastest time of 22.44 behind
compatriot Muna Lee, the win-
ner of the last heat in 22.30.

The tide, however, turned in
the final as Felix saved her best
for last as she maintained her
lead from the crack of the gun
in six in 22.02 to put her name
on the two fastest times this
year.

Campbell’-Brown, just
behind her in lave five, got the
silver in 22.35 and Ferguson-
McKenzie, trailing in lane four,
had to settle for the bronze in
22.41.

"You know what, I'm still
satisfied with the bronze," said

Ferguson-McKenzie, who

made up for her sixth place fin-
ish in the 100 final three days
before the preliminaries of the
200. "I really wanted to run a
personal best and set a nation-
al record, but the season isn't
over yet. So hopefully I can get
to do both of them before I'm
done."

Now that the World's are
complete, Ferguson-McKenzie,
who earned about $36,000
(which represents her §20,000
for the bronze, §10,000 for her
split on the relay team and
$6,000 for sixth in the 100), say
she can now concentrate on the
rest of the season and all of the
monies that's to be won head-
ing into the World Athletic
Final next month.

She will rejoin the field in a
rematch of Berlin at the Welk-
lasse Zurich meet on August
28, the fifth of the six race series
in the Golden League on Fri-
day in the 100.

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the schedule for Zurich, Fergu-
son-McKenzie heads that chart
with 55, a seven-point margin
over Virgin Island's LaVerne
Jones-Ferrette.

The Golden League series
will end on September 9 in
Bruxelles at the Memorial Van
Damme. But before that, Fer-
guson-McKenzie is expected to
compete in the Zageb 2009 on
August 31 as well.

As for next year and beyond,
Ferguson-McKenzie assured
the Bahamian public that she's
definitely not done yet.

"Based on the way I've ben
running this year, I am going
to compete through 2012 in
London, England," said Fergu-
son-McKenzie, the site of what
will be her fifth Olympic
Games, dating back to Atlanta,
Georgia in 1996 when she made
her debut.

"T feel that I'm fit and I'm in
a position to continue to run
fast,” she said. "And being in
the new environment that I'm
in, I don't see why I should not
be able to compete in another
Olympic Games."

In three years, Ferguson-
McKenzie should then be con-
sidered the ‘Grandma’ of the
Bahamian track team at age 36,
taking over from Sturrup, who
held that honor in Berlin after
43-year-old javelin thrower
Lavern Eve didn't make the
team. "If Chandra can still run
10.99 at age 36, I don't see why
Ican't run under 11 seconds at
age 36," Ferguson-McKenzie
stressed. "We will just have to
wait and see what happens. But
I want to compete in one more
Olympics.”

Along the way, Ferguson-
McKenzie is still contemplat-
ing whether or not she will run
in the IAAF's 13th World
Indoor Championships in
Doha, Qatar from March 12-
14, 2010. But she's certainly
going to represent the Bahamas
at the Commonwealth Games
in Delhi, India from October
3-14.

As long as she stays healthy,
Ferguson-McKenzie said her
goal is to also contest the
TAAF's 13th World Champi-
onships in Daegu, South Korea
from August 27-September 4.

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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 1






>| TUESDAY, AUGUST 25,

rts

2009



INSIDE ¢ Sturrup gets better with age



WAM RA USI
McKenzie's coaching
CTR MCI

(AP Photo/Michael Sohn)
DEBBIE FERGUSON-MCKENZIE of the Bahamas celebrates
after taking the bronze in the Women's 200m during the
World Athletics Championships in Berlin on Friday, Aug. 21,
2009.

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany: As soon as she had returned home
from the Penn Relays in Philadelphia in April, Debbie
Ferguson-McKenzie packed her bags and left her training
camp in Miami, Florida and headed north to Orlando
where she teamed up with her Jamaican rival Veronica
Campbell-Brown and American Tyson Gay.

It was probably the wisest move that the 33-year-old has
made in her life - and it has rejuvenated her career to the
point that Ferguson-McKenzie has announced that will
will definitely compete through the 2012 Olympic Games
before she finally hang up her sprints.

"I wasn't happy where I was," said Ferguson-McKenzie,
of her previous site where she worked under University of
Miami's coach Amy Beem and American sprinter Lauyrn
Williams. "I just decided after I competed at Penn's that I
had to make the move. I think it was the best decision that
T could make."

Winner of the Bahamas' only individual medal - a
bronze in the 200 metres behind Campbell (silver) and
now three-time champion Allyson Felix of the United
States — is all the reason more to agree with the Bahamian,
who has virtually won a medal at every international meet
she has competed in - the only one to hold such a distinc-
tion.

"When I was offered the opportunity to train with coach
(Lance) Brauman, it was one of a lifetime achievement. I
certainly don't have any regrets. But at the same time, I
want to wish both Lauryn and coach Beem every suc-
cess."

In the short time that Brauman has been able to include
Ferguson-McKenzie into his stable, she was able to return
home and pull off the double sprint victory at the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associations’ National Open Track
and Field Championships in July at the Thomas A. Robin-
son Track and Field Stadium.

In between that time and the World's over the past
nine days, Ferguson-McKenzie has proven to once again be
a dominant force on the international scene. She actually
posted the fastest time in the world in the 200 of 22.32 in a
meet in Rethimno on July 20 until she was beaten by Felix

SEE page 10



BERLIN WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS: THE AFTERMATH



spirits high as
team heads home

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

BERLIN, Germany:

ith the
IAAF's
12th
World
Championships over and
done with, triple jumper Lee-
van ‘Superman’ Sands and
110 metres hurdler Shamar
Sands said they hope to leave
the memories behind as well.

The team left the Games
Village yesterday and while
the two Sands headed onto
their next meets in Europe,
those still in Berlin returned
to the hotel where they stayed
when the Bahamas Associa-
tion of Athletic Associations
hosted the team at a training
camp prior to the start of the
championships.

Team manager Ralph
McKinney confirmed that all
of the athletes were in good
spirits and are just waiting to
get out of Berlin. McKinney is
expected to remain until
everybody leave by today.

As for the two Sands who
were caught up in the melee
that also involved high jumper
Donald Thomas, two Cubans
and an American, McKinney
said Thomas had to re-
arrange his return to the Unit-
ed States, while Leevan Sands
left for Zurch, Switzerland
where he will compete on Fri-
day and Shamar Sands
departed for Astoria where
he will also compete this
weekend.

"Everybody else is in good
spirits," said McKinney, who
noted that sprinters Debbie
Ferguson-McKinney and
Chandra Sturrup both headed
to Zurich to compete, while
Christine Amertil went to
Atlanta and Sasha Rolle
headed to Arkansas.

"Everybody else who is
here either are relaxing in the
hotel or have gone sightseeing
and shopping."

McKinney said it was just
disappointing that the scuffle
that resulted in the three ath-
letes being arrested and
detained for questioning for
11 hours on Sunday put a
damper on the team's tied
22nd position with Japan in
the medal count with two and
their tied 16th spot on the

placing table.
But before they left Berlin,
both Sands adamantly

claimed their innocence and
said they were only escorted
to the Police station for ques-
tioning. Both athletes assured
the Bahamian public that they
neither of them were directly
involved any scuffle.

SEE page 10



but ‘Superman’ Sands and Shamar
Sands hope to leave memories behind



SHAMAR SANDS walks through the tunnel at the
Olympic Stadium after failing to make the final of the
men's 110 metres hurdles.

LEEVAN SANDS makes an attempt in the final of
the triple jump during the World Athletics Cham-
pionships in Berlin on Tuesday, August 18, 2009...

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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Miss Universe telecast was ‘a full {eee

return for govt money invested’

FROM page one

cent next month.

The final pageant, which
involved 83 contestants from
across the globe, was televised
across the world live on NBC and
Telemundo from 9pm to 11pm
Sunday.

Pageant co-owner Donald
Trump revealed on the night that
18 countries had vied to host the
pageant, but the Bahamas got it.

Mr Trump said “the government
can be very proud of themselves”
for the manner in which the coun-
try prepared itself for the event
and hosted the competition. He
said the Bahamas looked “amaz-

”

ing.
Yesterday, Mr Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said the success of the event
“exceeded even our very high
expectations.”
He touted the fact that, besides
massive exposure for the Atlantis





importance
Te
UTE LT

‘SUCCESS in English, suc-
cess in life’ says this billboard
in a country district in Guilin,
China, which encourages Chi-
nese students to study Eng-
lish to succeed in the world.
This photograph was taken
by Mr Ron Lightbourn, who
with his wife, took a boat trip
down the Li River, stopping
off in Guilin for a short tour
during which he spotted this
billboard. Immediately Mr
Lightbourn thought of
Bahamian students failing
their English Language exams
and felt that the global impor-
tance of English should be a
wake up call for them.

¢ SEE EDITORIAL
PAGE 4.











resort, where the pageant was
based, the two-hour event involved
eight minutes of coverage of the
Family Island — including Exu-
ma, Bimini, Abaco and Grand
Bahama — from trips taken there
by the contestants, highlighting the
diversity of The Bahamas.

All of the “intros and outros”
around various segments of the
show were accompanied by the
official logo that appears in all
Bahamas tourism promotions.

“We are already getting emails
and calls from all over to say it was
the best two hours of promotion
for any country ever. At the end of
the day while all the publicity was
quite useful it was the worldwide
audience for the final telecast that
matters,” said the minister.

The Minister suggested that
another area where the event will
benefit The Bahamas going for-
ward is as an example of our
capacity to host major events.

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over $10,000 in prizes, including
a $2,500 Gift Certificate, iPods and many other fabulous prizes!

“We never ever looked at this
as a three week event or a one
night event, it’s something that we
use as a platform to move some
other things forward.

“There are local companies that
put on events for Miss Universe
that are companies that service
groups coming into The Bahamas
that now have a portfolio of capa-
bility that they never had before
and that can also be used.

“We can now put that to any
country or organisation that has
large numbers of people coming
from anywhere else to show what
we can do,” added the minister.

Mr Vanderpool Wallace
explained that the Ministry sought
to cash-in on the “high awareness
and excitement levels” generated
by the exposure of the Bahamas
during the event by running adver-
tisements for Bahamas vacations
right after the telecast.

He said that the Ministry will be

: - sinysc



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MISS VENEZUELA Stefania Fernandez, center, steadies her Miss Universe 2009 crown
as she poses with the other contestants at the end of the Miss Universe beauty
pageant in Nassau, Bahamas, Sunday, Aug. 23, 2009.

monitoring more closely where its
future bookings are coming from
to see how the event may have
stimulated more interest from new
markets and to what extent it may
be worth pursuing more aggres-
sive marketing campaigns in dif-



ferent areas.

“We think we will begin to see
bookings right now for all points in
the future so we will continue to
monitor it — not just how much
business but where it’s coming
from,” he said.

al

SBE Ps








mlife

‘ven ld econ 3-8 8271999)




Delegation seeks Zelaya’s return in Hondas visit

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras

FOREIGN ministers from
seven nations launched a direct,
high-profile attempt Monday to
persuade Honduras’ interim
government to restore ousted
President Manuel Zelaya,
according to Associated Press.

The delegation from the
Organization of American
States was the most prominent
group of officials to visit Hon-
duras since Zelaya was arrest-
ed and hustled out of the coun-
try June 28, prompting criticism

from governments around the
world.

“We hope to meet with the
interim government and other
sectors (of Honduran society)
who are able to support all the
points in the San Jose accord,
including the reinstatement of
President Zelaya,” Costa Rican
Foreign Minister Bruno Stagno
told reporters.The foreign min-
isters — from Argentina, Cana-
da, Costa Rica, Jamaica, Mexico,
Panama and the Dominican
Republic — met with Zelaya
supporters in the morning and



they “showed they would sup-
port the accord,” Stagno said.

OAS Secretary-General Jose
Miguel Insulza accompanied the
group.

The OAS is pressuring the
interim government to accept
the San Jose accord, a plan pro-
posed by Costa Rican President
Oscar Arias that would return
Zelaya to power until elections
are held by the end of Noverm-
ber and would grant amnesty
both to Zelaya for any alleged
crimes and to those involved in
the coup.



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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM






Customs chief
hits back over |
corruption
concerns

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia. net

THE COMPTROLLER of }
Customs said yesterday that }
claims of delays and corrup- }
tion stemming from the }
implementation of proper }
clearance procedures for }
courier companies and non- }
perishable goods, which have }
been made by some business }
people, are “gross misrepre- }

sentations”.

Glenn Gomez said the }
processes put in place by the }
Customs Department since }
his appointment have always }
been the right procedures, but :
had not been enforced for }

decades.

Mr Gomez admitted that }
the new process regarding the :
C-13 declaration form had }
become a challenge for couri- }
er companies during its ini- }
tial implementation, but he :
argued that some concerns }
brought to him by a newly }
formed courier association }

were dealt with promptly.

He added that some other }
changes requested by the }
association would have }
required him to negate the }
revisions made to the clear- }

ing of imported goods.

Mr Gomez said the new }
processes were introduced }
because government was los- }
ing millions in revenue due }
to an erroneous procedure }
that he said should not have }

been in place.

“They want a system that is :
illegal to operate,” he said. :
“Tf you’re just upset because }
you can't circumvent the sys- }
tem, I can’t help you with }
that. We are there to collect }
duties not to stymie business- i

”

es.
According to Mr Gomez,

the issue of delays has greatly :
decreased over the months }
since the C-13 clearance pro- }
cedure was reintroduced. }
And he said it was due to the ?
department putting more staff }
in place to expedite the "vast }
of paperwork }

amount"

required to clear items.

SEE page 3B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

THE TRIBUNE

usiness

TU 2s. AY.

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

AUGUST 25,

2009

City Markets shareholders

urged: ‘Take strong action’ BEXZiiver

* Financial consultant recommends ‘vote of no confidence’ in grocery chain’s Board at
next AGM, and generating negative publicity to shame likes of Neal & Massey

* Argues that investors being ‘kept in the dark’ and shares have ‘no market value’
* Claims that protest could help spur improved corporate governance in the Bahamas

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

MINORITY investors in
Bahamas Supermarkets, the pub-
licly traded holding company for
City Markets, have been urged by a
leading Bahamian financial con-
sultant to “take strong action”
whenever the company holds its
next annual general meeting
(AGM), including a ‘no confidence’
vote in the existing Board of Direc-
tors.

Richard Coulson, head of RC
Capital Markets Consultants, in a
message sent to City Markets’ 1500
minority investors, said such action
could help improve corporate gov-
ernance in the Bahamas and show
the company’s Board how upset
shareholders were about the lack of
information on its financial condi-
tion.

Calling on minority investors to

IDB initiative to develop
10-year Water Corp plan

form a steering committee if they
were serious about pushing for a
redress of their grievances, Mr
Coulson’s message, a copy of which
has been obtained by Tribune Busi-
ness, said: “The facts remain that
you shareholders continue to be
kept in the dark by the Board of
Directors, while your shares effec-
tively have no market value and it
will be a long time before you see
any dividends.

“Tt seems only logical to me, as a
financial consultant, that the minor-
ity shareholders should take strong
action at the next AGM, such as
vigorous questioning, voting no
confidence in the present Board,
and proposing a slate of new direc-
tors.”

There is no chance anything pro-
posed by the minority shareholders
in, say, a dissenting Proxy, would be
adopted given that BSL Holdings,

the private equity consortium that
dominates the Board, has a strong
78 per cent majority.

Mr Coulson acknowledged this,
but wrote: “Your formal resolu-
tions would be defeated by major-
ity vote (although you might get
support from several of the major-
ity group), but could lead to nego-
tiated changes, and at least you
would go on record and would
receive wide publicity - which cer-
tainly the dominant foreign share-
holder, Neal & Massey, would wish
to avoid for obvious reasons.

“There might even be political
fall-out from your action. In my
opinion, your motions would have
a salutary effect on corporate gov-
ernance in our entire capital mar-
kets.”

Mr Coulson said this represented

SEE page 5B



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(242) 367-3135

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Ernst & Young
defendant in

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ERNST & YOUNG (Bahamas) has been
sued in a class action lawsuit filed in relation to
Bernard Madoff’s giant $64.8 billion Ponzi
fraud, a British Virgin Islands company alleg-
ing that it and its Cayman affiliate received $1
million in fees despite failing to properly audit
an investment fund that had all its assets invest-
ed with the convicted fraudster.

The action, filed on July 17, 2009, in the US
District Court for the southern district of New
York by BVI-domiciled Tradex Global Master
Fund, also named as a defendant Bahamas and
Cayman-based Euro-Dutch Management and
its managing director, Anthony Inder-Rieden,
which acted as fund manager to the Santa Clara
I Fund.

This fund, initially established in the
Bahamas during December 1999 before its
transfer to the Cayman Islands on July 30,
2003, was the entity that Tradex invested its
funds with. In turn, Santa Clara invested its
assets with Cayman-based Harley International,

which then “invested substantially all of its
money” with Mr Madoff.

Ermst & Young (Bahamas) and its Cayman
affiliate was alleged to have acted as Santa
Clara’s auditor, with Tradex claiming that their
unqualified audit opinions never” fairly pre-
sented, in all material respects, the financial
condition or results of the fund”.

SEE page 3B

CLICO chief moves to bar discovery

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

(Bahamas) and himself or
the 75 Florida-based entities
he and his wife allegedly



Apart from Corporation business plan,
consultants hired in $300k project to
devise way to place water regulation in
URCA’s hands and increase prices

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government has
agreed a $300,000 Inter-
American Development
Bank (IDB) loan to update
the legal and regulatory
framework for this nation’s
water industry, a programme
that includes devising a 10-
year business plan for the ail-
ing Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration and increased water
prices.

The Ingraham administra-
tion, in the form of Zhivargo
Laing, minister of state for
finance, signed the agreement
with the IDB on August 5,
2009, agreeing to an initiative
that will involve the IDB
lending $250,000 from its
IDB-Netherlands Water Part-
nership Programme
(INWAP) and the Govern-
ment providing $50,000.

The funds will be used to
contract and hire a consult-
ing firm, an appointment sub-
ject to the Government’s
approval, which will develop a
plan for revamping the
Bahamian water industry’s
legal and regulatory frame-
work.

“The bank [IDB] is cur-
rently financing the prepara-
tion of a Water and Sanita-
tion Strategic Sector Plan,”

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the IDB said in its operational
plan for the initiative.

“This assignment includes
the preparation of a 10-year
Business Plan for the Water
& Sewerage Corporation as
well a tariff request. It has
been determined that the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion Act has not been updated
since 1976, and its provisions
are not adequate in the cur-
rent environment. The cur-
rent legislations need to be
revised in the light of severe
environmental, health, and

SEE page 4B

THE Trinidadian head of
CLICO (Bahamas) has
moved to restrict the docu-
ments the insolvent insurer’s
liquidator can obtain from
his attorneys regarding his
personal financial dealings,
arguing that the original sub-
poena is “overly broad” and
seeks information beyond
what is required for an
orderly wind-up.

Lawrence Duprey, the
man many are blaming for
CLICO (Bahamas) collapse
into insolvency, and his wife,
Sylvia Baldini, on August 19,
2009, filed a Protective
Motion with the US Bank-
ruptcy Court for the south-
ern district of Florida, seek-
ing an Order that would
restrict the documents their
US attorneys, Greenberg

ROYAL FIDELITY

Leda ae Lm eda 4

RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company

CRAIG GOMEZ

Traurig, must hand over to
liquidator Craig A. “Tony’
Gomez.

The hearing on their
motion is due to be heard on
September 3, 2009, as Mr
Duprey seeks to limit dis-
covery only to documents
involving the transfer of
funds between CLICO

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have an interest in.

The Trinidadian wants the
court to exempt from dis-
covery “documents regard-
ing transfers to, from, on
behalf of, or for the benefit
of either Duprey or Baldini,
except to the extent that
such transfers involved funds
belonging to CLICO
(Bahamas)”.

He also wants “copies of
management agreements,
shareholders agreements,
operating agreements or
records reflecting ownership
of any entity, except to the
extent that ownership in
such entity is held by” CLI-
CO (Bahamas), along with
papers protected by attor-
ney-client privilege and oth-

SEE page 6B



> Pension Plans

> Mutual Funds

> Stock Brokerage

> Corporate Finance

> Investment Management
> Trusts & Estate Planning

> Personal Pension Plan Accounts

> Education Investment Accounts

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Cleo 4


PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



OO —ooeeaeeUS INES eee
Learning to value tertiary education

By LARRY GIBSON

THE Government has
announced the suspension of
new scholarship loans under
the Educational Scholarship
Loan Programme. The rea-
son for the suspension was cit-
ed as the high default rate on
loans, thus preventing the
‘Fund’ from being self-sus-
taining. While I was not sur-
prised at the high default rate
or the inevitability of the sus-
pension of new loans, I was
very surprised at what, prima
facie, appeared to be extreme-
ly late notice. I thought the
late notice was both unfortu-
nate and unfair to those under






Financial

Focus

By Larry Gibson

the impression that funding
was forthcoming.

We really need to take an
urgent look at our long-term
‘national education policy’, as
I fundamentally believe that
education and training are
key to our long-term eco-
nomic viability as a nation.
We need an integrated and
comprehensive ‘cradle to
grave’ approach to education

NOTICE

MARLIN INVESTMENTS, INC.








In Voluntary Liquidation




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with






Section

Companies Act.

138(4) of the
2000, MARLIN

International Business
INVESTMENTS,

INC. is in dissolution as of August 17, 2009.





James M. Meyer situated at 701 Brickell Avenue, Suite
1400, Miami, Florida is the Liquidator.








LIQUIDATOR








Legal Notice

NOTICE

WHITE COLUMBINE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

HANANI VISTA LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced

on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

LAUNCESTON LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

and training. As I survey the
Bahamas’ educational land-
scape, while I see pockets of
excellence, there are so many
areas where we could do
much better.

HOME GROWN VERSUS
INTERNATIONAL

My good friend Ray
Winder offered his opinion
last week, suggesting that gov-
ernment would have got a
better return on their invest-
ment if the funds for the stu-
dent loan programme had
been injected into the College
of the Bahamas (COB),
instead of the-now $60 mil-
lion-deep loan portfolio.

This approach has been
taken by numerous develop-
ing countries in the past,
where resources are initially
directed towards creating an
academically respected and
competitive national univer-
sity. To our credit, COB is
making great strides in both
spheres and, to the extent that
we can maintain both objec-
tives, I believe Ray’s views
have merit. I also share all his
views about the need for
COB to have the capacity to
educate the majority of stu-
dents seeking a tertiary edu-
cation there.

However, it is not the full
solution. For example, there
are undoubtedly specialised
programmes or areas of study
that COB cannot offer, or
they may not be cost effec-
tive to offer. In such instances,
there must be funding avail-
able for studies abroad. In dis-
ciplines where we have
demonstrated capability and
capacity, we should first con-
sider directing public fund-

ing and scholarship awards to
COB, while still making schol-
arship funding for advanced
degrees and specialised pro-
grammes at institutions
abroad available.

DIVERSITY IN
TRAINING

There is a constituency out
there who would argue that
forcing scholarship students
to COB may not be advisable,
if it means that virtually all
our students would be edu-
cated at COB. I guess that the
point being suggested is that
graduates (and, by extension,
our future workforce) may all
be of a similar leaning or phi-
losophy. For example, if
COB?’s economics department
is ‘monetarist-leaning’, then
most of our graduates may be
monetarist in their views.

In a conversation some
years ago, a physician pointed
out that probably as much as
75 per cent of our doctors are
graduates of a single institu-
tion, the University of the
West Indies (UWI). Is this
good or bad? Should we be
concerned about this? I am
certainly not qualified to offer
an opinion on this particular
issue. What I do know, how-
ever, is that these same doc-
tors go on to many of the best
schools in North America and
Europe for postgraduate stud-
ies and specialisation. Admis-
sions to these programmes are
highly competitive, and our
candidates do extremely well.

CONCLUSION
The stark reality is that
public funding is limited, and
more so, in difficult econom-
ic times. Therefore, policy-

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SOUTHAVEN HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

MEIJI FIRST GROUP CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

RAMAT S.A.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

makers have to make tough
allocation decisions from
among many competing
needs. However, the institu-
tional strengthening and
expansion of COB should be
a national priority.

A by-product of the sus-
pension of new student loans
is the fact that COB will be
taking in some 1,700 fresh-
men students this autumn, the
largest intake in its history.

This is probably several
hundred more students than
COB would have normally
planned for. I trust that COB
was given a ‘heads up’ on this
and was able to ramp up
staffing to accommodate addi-
tional students.

I am also told that COB is
limited to a class size of 25
students through collective
bargaining agreements. While
this is excellent, I am remind-
ed of the fact that most col-
leges and universities run
‘auditorium type’ introducto-
ry courses, where one class
would have one professor and
several research assistants
teaching a single class with
several hundred students at a
time.

POSTSCRIPT -

BEACH ALERT
Every morning at Good-
man’s Bay you can hear a ris-
ing crescendo of complaints
regarding another encroach-
ment on Bahamians rights.
This time, a fence has been
erected in the vicinity of the
old ‘Nassau Beach Hotel’,
which actually extends into
the water. The only way you
can pass this property is to
actually swim around it. This
is a travesty that is wrong and

must be corrected immedi-
ately.

Private property only
extends to the high water
mark.

Further, that property has
received benefits under the
Hotels Encouragement Act,
which expressly provides for
public access to all public
areas. If the fence is erected
for security reasons, then why
can’t it run parallel to the
beach at or above the high
water mark, which the law
calls for.

Finally, I am not sure
whether that land is actually
Crown land in the first
instance. If so, it makes the
Bahamian people the rightful
owner of the land and the
thoroughfare. I call upon
those who erected this fence
to ‘do the right thing’ and cor-
rect your oversight...this isn’t
something that the Govern-
ment needs to get involved
with.

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice President-pensions,
Colonial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance
and is a major shareholder of
Security & General Insurance
Company in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do
not necessarily represent
those of Colonial Group
International or any of its sub-
sidiary and/or affiliated com-
panies. Please direct any
questions or comments to
rigibson@atlantichouse.com.bs

Legal Notice

NOTICE

DELTA HORIZONS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ORCHID GROUP INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

HONOUR OAK CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009, PAGE 3B



I =~) =< ee
FROM page one Customs chief ‘®OMPseeore Ernst & Young defendant

in Madoff lawsuit

According to him, howev-
er, when the new procedure
was introduced in Grand
Bahama it was rife with
“quirks,” and so the use of the
old system was extended to
the end of the year. There are
no plans, though, for a simi-
lar extension in New Provi-
dence.

Mr Gomez said New Provi-
dence -based courier compa-
nies had been given three
extensions before the C-13 was
implemented, and “will have
to wait for Freeport to catch
them up”.

He suggested that the Fam-
ily Islands do not have the
same procedures in place and
customs facilities as New Prov-
idence, and barring any
change to the types of ship-
ments they receive they will
continue to have different pro-
cedures.

“Going forward it is not
practical that every single
thing that we do is going to
work in Exuma (and other
Family Islands),” said Mr
Gomez. “The same law will
apply, but every step in the
process might not apply.”

According to him, the
changes were implemented in
order to lead the Customs
Department to a more feasible
procedural structure, in hopes

hits back

of one day taking the process

paperless by moving online.

Businesses recently lament- :
ed that the changes are }
impacting cash flow and could }
increase the potential for cor- }

ruption.

Tribune Business was told }
that the Bahamas Chamber of }
Commerce had received hun- }
dreds of complaints from }

Bahamian businesses.

Responding to those claims, }
Mr Gomez said he has not had }
any complaints to his office }
from those entities, saying: “If }
they have concerns come and }
speak with me and I'll address }

it ”

is not much that can be done.

However, he said, should :
the behaviour persist, the indi- }

vidual will be caught.

“We are changing the sys- :
tem so there are less avenues }
for corruption, and these }
things will be able to be detect- }

ed much quicker,” he said.

BAHAMAS FIRST
HOLDINGS LIMITED

With regard to the charges }
that delays caused by the new }
procedures could encourage }
corruption, Mr Gomez sug- }
gested that when corrupt- :
minded individuals decide to }
commit illegal offences, there }

Euro-Dutch was alleged to
have been the investment man-
ager for both Santa Clara and
Harley, with Mr Inder-Rieden
and another defendant, Dawn
Davies, sitting on both compa-
nies’ Boards of Directors.

The crux of Tradex’s allega-
tions and complaint is that nei-
ther the Ernst & Young sub-
sidiaries, nor Euro-Dutch and
its executives, spotted that Mr
Madoff was a fraudster running
a Ponzi scheme, despite numer-
ous ‘red flags’ being raised in
public - such as his high returns
year after year being ‘too good
to be true’; Madoff’s unwilling-
ness to subject himself and his
firm to outside scrutiny; his
external auditors being a small
three-man company; and
numerous public media articles
and investment professionals
expressing scepticism.

The lawsuit alleged: “Ernst
& Young was also responsible
for, complicit in and acquies-
cent to the issuance of the false
and misleading statements and
omissions, including those set
forth above, contained in the
fund’s audited annual financial
statements.”

Tradex alleged that Ernst &
Young provided a clean audit
opinion for Santa Clara as
recently as July 4, 2008, repre-
senting that the fund’s finan-

NOTICE TO SHAREHOLDERS

Bahamas First Holdings Limited hereby notifies all its
shareholders that based on the results of the Audited
Financial Statements of the Company for the year ended

cial statements “gave a true and
fair view of the state of affairs
of the company, and of its
results and cash flows”. Santa
Clara is now in liquidation in
the Cayman Islands.

Alleging that the Ernst &
Young affiliates had “breached
[their] duties” to investors in
Santa Clara and Harley, the lat-
ter of which is being sued by

the Madoff bankruptcy trustee,
the lawsuit claimed: “Ernst &
Young ignored multiple red
flags that would have led any
reasonable auditor exercising
professional scepticism to
inquire further to obtain the
requisite level of comfort.”
The lawsuit alleged that the
fair value of Santa Clara’s
financial assets, its total assets

and liabilities, the net asset val-
ue of shares, and investment
income and expenses, were all
incorrectly presented in the
fund’s audited financial state-
ments.

“Ernst & Young reaped sub-
stantial professional fees for
their supposed audit work for
both Santa Clara and Harley,”
the lawsuit alleged. “On infor-
mation and belief, Ernst &
Young was paid substantially
more than $1 million for their
auditing and accounting work
on the Santa Clara and Harley
engagements.”

LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.
“Eattage Lat With Private Beach

FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!

Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million

Web Listing # 8377

Mario A. Carey, CRS, CIPS, CLHMS

Tel: 242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013

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NOTICE

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AMS

Mario Carey Realty
Dt's abaut yaw... Let's talk.



International Business Companies Act 2000

Fairsands Limited

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Motion is hereby given in

GCampenies «ect 2000 thet Falreemades Limited ts in dissolution

acoordanon with Secthon 138 (4) of tha Imarnnational Business

The date of commencament of dissolution waa the 19th day of Auguat, 2000:

The Liquiddaters are Wir, Juan M4, Lope: eed Mr. Simon JS. Townend, of KPRAG Restroctur ng

Limited, 5" Flaar, Mantagua Sterling Cantra, PO Box N-123, Nassau, Bahamas

41) persons having claims against the above-named Company are required om of before the
21st day of September, 2008 fo send their ners peed addrasgses and marticulars of their

31st December 2008, the Board of Directors has declared

an extraordinary dividend of two cents (2 ¢) per ordinary

share to be paid 31st August 2009, to all shareholders of
record as of 13th August 2009.

debts of clainna te the Liquidatera of tha Company, or in default thereof they may be axcluded
from the benetit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

Gated the 19th day of August, 7009

Juan Wl, Line
Langs eed whoo

Simon JS. Townend
Liquidator

THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD
VACANCY NOTICE

\pplicani M15 afte bevined trom sutalsy plait id pete ms to fill the: position « CASE ALATY AG EMENT/
SENIOR ASSISTANT MANAGER wothin the Qhecupatoanal Health & Safety Urat of the Maricnal
[naumince Board (S0K).

“8 PICTET

1805
PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

JOB SUMMARY Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

This officer wall be responsible for coordinating appropriate coat efficient health care serviees with bes
sige i. enabling os ea eee noeable ei if “ sical uth ao ACCOUNTING OFFICER
firnchonings and oversees the peneral supervishon of the meclcal billing preacess

-CPA, CA or equivalent

«At least five (5) years experience (minimum 3 years with an audit firm).
-Banking experience

-firong communication skills.

-Well organised with structured and methodical work approach

-Dynamic and proactive with a positive attitude.

-High level of computer literacy and office skills with a strong ability to prepare
Microsoft PowerPoint presentations.

-Strong analytical skills with the ability to solve issues efficiently

-Ability to work independently and take initiatives.

-Flexibility to respond to the reprioritisation of tasks,

1, Initiate and factitate communication berwern the healthcare provider and the clasmant bor proactive
intervention in the care of the claimant
Assess the pi sical ani mexliz al sranus of the crinicall ‘jure claimant during le ref} lization oF
while convalescing at borne.

3. Coordinate an acten plain with bealtheare provider, employer and claimant, for the elairnanr’s teturn
toe werk

% Enforce Oot nechuctix a strutepaes andl nosonumerid OPHUrS i Hie Maaapererit of claimant's Care,
\pprove certain services within a specitiod mme period,

Prepare requests for specific medical services to NIEs Medical Officer.

DUTIES INCLUDE:-

- Preparation of the Bank's financial statements for internal and external reporting
purposes,

- Preparation of all regulatory reports in compliance with mandated format and
deadlines (e.g. The Central Bank and The Securities Commission).

- Production of professional presentations in line with corporate image.

- Development and preparation of internal statistical reports for semior management.

: i! : - Preparation of various client financial statements and other types of customized
reports.

- Assisting with the preparation of supporting schedules and coordination of statutory
audits.

- Responsibility for the administration and booking of accounting activity conceming
licensed banking subsidiaries.

. Partapate in unlaanon review process,

4. Provide direction, contre] and leadership oo staff of responsibiliry while moniroting and assessing

Reto mance, conduct, attenmtance and other related Mantes
. Suyyrest systems and procedures 00 facilitate achieving objectives in areas of responsibility,

. Pertorm any other relared duties as may be assigned

. Preterted candidate should hawe a Kachelor’s Degree in Business Ackministration or Management.
. Should have proven oral and wrinten communication skills and abiliry,
3. Knowledgeable in the bw (Benefits & Assistance Regulations) pertaining to Industral Accidents;

+, Know ledovable in health insurance and medical ceed ing! billing peta tices!
ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED.
Please deliver Resume and two (2) references BY HAND
NO LATER THAN SEPTEMBER 4, 2009 to:-

. Effective, interpersonal, commuunicaten and customer service skilk;

Registered Pre shessioral Nurse with well rounded expret cies i meclical Cast Mina ene including,

but acet limited te rehabiltanon, emergency, critical care and health care admanistration;

Ava c Oct nficarion in Cast MALTA CTL and felared dise iplines

The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
West Bay Street and Blake Road
Nassau, Bahamas

lrnet cated PCSOs (Tra apyaly by submirting Ac ample rea application fi Wim, along wath the DOCG ES APY pre ef
of qualifications on or before Friday, September 4, 2009, te the
Deputy Director Vice President
Human Resources and Training
The Savticnal Insurance Beowred
Clifford Darling Complex
FO. Box fy. 7 50%
Nassau, Bahamas

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Offices in
Lawanne, Geneva, Zurich, Loxembourg, London, Montreal, Nassau, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong
Kong, Frankfurt, Florence, Milan, Madrid, ‘Paris, Rome, Turin


PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS ee
IDB initiative to develop

10-year Water Corp plan

Legal Notice

NOTICE

WAN SI XING LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)









































Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., PR O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NANTES MOUNTAIN INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator

FROM page one

financial issues facing the
country the water and sanita-
tion sector.”

The Water & Sewerage
Corporation’s financial woes
are nothing new and, if any-
thing, appear to be getting
worse. Without government
subsidies it would have suf-
fered a $24.107 million net
loss in 2007, the last year for
which financial statements
were available, had it not
been for the receipt of $20
million-plus in taxpayer funds.

Tribune Business recently
revealed that it “expects to be
in arrears” on payments to its
major reverse osmosis suppli-
er, BISX-listed Consolidated
Water, for the remainder of
2009, despite making an $8.7
million payment on the out-
standing balance during this
year’s second quarter.

The IDB said in documents
related to the water sector
regulatory reform programme
that the Bahamas’ increasing
reliance on reverse osmosis
to produce potable drinking
water had increased costs
because this was an expensive
means of water production.

However, for the Water &
Sewerage Corporation, this
cost increase had not been
balanced/offset by a rise in
revenues, as the Corporation
had not increased tariffs since

1993.

The IDB said: “There is the
need to ensure adequate
recovery of costs for opera-
tion, maintenance and
required capital expenditures
to ensure that the Water &
Sewerage Corporation com-
plies with its mandates.

“A review of the financial
situation of the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation confirms
that the operational costs of
the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration over the past 10
years have been increasing as
water production has been
increasing; but the volume of
water sold remained relative-
ly constant and the average
price of water sold has been
decreasing.

“The data also shows
increases in water losses as
production volumes increase.
The margin required to meet
operational expenditure and
capital expenditure of the util-
ity company has therefore
been shrinking over these past
years.

Legal Notice

“Exacerbating the situation,
the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration Act 1976 is outdated
and allocates to Water & Sew-
erage Corporation the con-
flicting roles of a utility ser-
vice provider and a water reg-
ulator. At the same time, the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion lacks financial and oper-
ational autonomy necessary
for an efficient utility.”

Given the “severe environ-
mental, health and financial
issues” facing the Bahamas
when it came to water and
sanitation, the IDB said the
selected consultants would
also make recommendations
for the transfer of regulatory
responsibility from the Water
& Sewerage Corporation to
the newly-formed Utilities
Regulation and Competition
Authority (URCA).

URCA would then regula-
tor all water and sanitation
services providers, and deal
with issues such as sector pric-
ing and quality of service.
Developing a revised tariff
and fee structure for the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion and the industry is also
part of the consultants’ brief.

ject and water industry
reform, the IDB documents
said: “The likelihood of back-
tracking on the need for an
independent economic regu-
lator is low, given the large
annual subsidies that the Gov-
ernment currently provides to
the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration.

“This situation, coupled
with the dire need for pollu-
tion control to ensure sus-
tainable use of groundwater
resources, provide compelling
reasons for the Government
of the Bahamas to adopt a
new Water and Sanitation
Act.”

As for increased water tar-
iffs and prices, the IDB ini-
tiative added: “Regarding the
impact on the lower income
and special groups, the tech-
nical consultancy proposes
that the consulting firm con-
siders cross-subsidies and oth-
er mechanisms to ensure
access to water by low income
groups.

“Also, due consideration
will be given to the social
aspects of water management,
including consultation and
participation, transparency

NOTICE

PANEMA MOUNTAIN CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Assessing the Governmen-
t’s likely attitude to the pro-

and management of potential
conflicts.”




is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.
Legal Notice

NOTICE

LA GLANESTRASS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

mua! Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

BAHAMAS

mit hed

LIMITED

IT MANAGER

Bahamas Supermarkets Limited operates a leading
supermarket chain in The Bahamas. As a market leader,
the Company pnides itself on delivering premier service
through its City Market supermarkets, having a strong
commitment to its customers, associates and community.

An opportunity for an I. T. Manager exists in New
Providence to jom this market _ leader.

Reporting to the CEO, this position involves managing a
staff of tech support personnel who are responsible for the
daily operations of customer service, retail and office
support and network/systems management. Also, the
candidate is responsible for resource planning and
assignments within the group to ensure projects are
delivered on time with a high degree of quality. The ideal
candidate should have 2-3 years of solid measurable
experience in IT Project Management and an excellent
communicator, both oral and written.

QUALIFICATIONS/REQUIREMENTS:

* Prior experience in the role of I. T. Team Leader or
Manager

* Familiarity with change management and the major
aspects of IT governance.

* Excellent analytical ability with strong problem solving
skills

* Works closely with executive management to ensure that
IT projects are aligned with the business and company’s
vision.

* Strong background in managing WAN’s and LAN’s.

* Experience in supporting Microsoft Active Directory
Domains; MCSE certified.

* Excellent communication, negotiation, and organization
skills.

* Microsoft SQL Server and Project Management skills a
definite asset

* Follows the project lifecycle methodology on assigned
projects and tasks

* Defines the Functionality, Usability, Reliability,
Performance, and Supportability requirements of critical
software components

» Analyses, designs, constructs and unit tests of custom
solutions

* Directs the preparation of functional and technical
software specifications that reflect an in-depth
understanding of the business and end-user requirements
while also considering IT standards and technical direction
* Provides functional support for application related issues

Salary and benefits will be commensurate with
experience and qualifications.

If you have what it takes to succeed in this challenging
role, forward your resume and cover letter to:

Human Resources Director
Bahamas Supermarkets Limited
East-West Highway « P. O. Box N 3738 « Nassau, Bahamas
Or e-mail to: humanresources@bahamassupermarkets.com
No telephone inquiries please
Only qualified applicants will be contacted

ty % ra i
City ‘i [ if Ket ! AINAUG2409

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

RBC ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
is presently considering applications for

Manager, Personal

Financial Services
Paradise Island Branch

The successful candidate should possess the following

qualifications:

° a aa - Bachelor's degree in Banking (or a related

eld)

* At least 7 or more years banking experience. Previous
experience in Loan Portfolio Management would be
an asset.

* Must have retail banking experience in lending

Key skills required:

¢ Strong communication skills (both oral and written)
¢ Strong Leadership and Coaching

* Negotiating/Selling skills

* Problem Account Management

* Relationship building and interpersonal skills

¢ Effectively manage risk

* Microsoft Office Proficiency (Word, Excel, Power Point)

Responsibilities include:

¢ Providing overall management by the establishment
and achievement of team sales objectives, and related
activities to achieve a high standard of customer care,
optimal business retention, profitable growth and
productivity
Developing RBC and community relationships to
capitalize on business opportunities
Providing ongoing coaching and development of staff,
ensuring a high level of employee commitment and
capability through focused sales/service management
routines
Growing both the business and personal client
relationship
Balancing the rewards of meeting business objectives
with the risk of loss to the customer, employee and
shareholder by following corporate compliance/
policies to maintain risk exposure and to operate within
the legal framework

A competitive compensation package (base salary &
bonus) commensurate with relevant experience and
qualifications is offered.

Please apply before August 28, 2009 to:

Regional Manager

Human Resources, Caribbean Banking
RBC Royal Bank of Canada

Bahamas Regional Office

PO. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas

Via fax: (242) 322-1367
Via email:bahcayjp@rbc.com

RBC > HELPING YOU SUCCEED

Ne ieee 4
Royal Ban
We me ae

CUCU ea ae OC RC COun Lori SEL WG

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

BRONZEBLOUSSE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

HELP
WANTED

An Established Medical Facility

seeks to fill the following position:

REGISTERED
PHYSICIAN

General / Family Practice (Full-time)

Kindly submit application to:

P.O. Box CR-55050
Nassau, Bahamas

or

Via email to: a_1_phyneeded@live.com



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009, PAGE 5B





FROM page one

his own personal view of the
situation, adding: “It is entire-
ly the decision of you share-
holders whether you wish to
form a steering committee
and take action. If so, I and
Jerry Butler will be glad to
provide professional assis-
tance.”

Tribune Business previ-
ously revealed that Messrs
Coulson and Butler had
already helped to organise
one meeting of minority
investors in Bahamas Super-
markets, during which attor-
ney Damian Gomez took
them through some of the
possible legal remedies and
litigation channels open to
them.

It is unclear when Bahamas
Supermarkets expects to hold
its next AGM, the last one -
for fiscal year 2007 - having
been held in September 2008,
a date some 14-15 months

City Markets shareholders
urged: ‘Take strong action’

after the period end.

The next AGM will be for
its 2008 fiscal year that end-
ed at end-June 2008, mean-
ing that Bahamas Supermar-
kets will have endured a sec-
ond consecutive reporting
period in which its year-end
financial statements are
released after the subsequent
financial year has been com-
pleted, something that has
left the company well out-
side compliance with global
capital markets norms.

Tribune Business under-
stands that Bahamas Super-
markets is hoping to possi-
bly hold its next AGM
towards the end of Septem-

Wiaker's Wap

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position currently available,

General Superintendent, Vertical Construction

Key Responsibilities include:

Â¥ Supervise subcontractors on site for scheduling, quality, and safety.

Y Quantity survey as required.

Â¥ Assist with project close out documentation including monitoring of punch
list corrections, collecting warranty information, and samples.

Â¥ Supervise and monitor staff and staffing levels.

Â¥ Call for inspections and follow up that inspections were performed and

approved.

Â¥ Hold and attend subcontractor meetings and safety meetings.
Y Hold and attend preconstruction meetings with subcontractors for conduct

and contract compliance.

Qualifications

Â¥ Minimum of 20 years in construction administration of high-end residential

and commercial facilities.

Y Excellent computer skills in particular Microsoft Word, Excel, and Project,
Timberline Project Management and Primavera.
Â¥ Excellent written and oral communication skills.

ber, or failing that, in Octo-
ber. This, though, is depen-
dent on completion of the
fiscal year 2008 audit by
external auditors, KPMG,
which, in turn, hinges on the
successful completion of City
Markets’ multi-million dol-
lar refinancing.

Tribune Business revealed
yesterday that 20 per cent of
the new equity capital injec-
tion from the investors that
comprise BSL Holdings had
been received, enabling City
Markets to restart its direct
import programme and pre-
pare for a “relaunch” in the
next six weeks.

Sunil Chatrani, Bahamas

Supermarkets’ chief execu-
tive, expressed optimism that
receipt of the financing
would be the final step
towards completing the long-
outstanding 2008 financial
year audit, and was confident
that the company’s report-
ing/disclosure problems were
now firmly behind it.

He said of the 2008 audit:
“Now that the financing has
come in, the auditors are
reviewing the business plan,
the actual numbers to date
and commitment of the fund-
ing.
“They are dotting the ‘i’s’
and crossing the ‘t’s’ to con-
firm these things are in place,

Hiaker's wWhiap

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position currently available,

Assistant Golf Course Superintendent

Key Requirements include:

Â¥ Must have previous experience on golf course crew.

Â¥ Knowledge of Toro site pro Irrigation system.

Â¥ Be able to follow basic and detailed instructions under the Superintendent.
Â¥ Experience with fertilizer and chemical applications.

Â¥ Knowledge of warm season grasses a plus.

Qualifications

Â¥ Minimum of 2-3 years experience in golf course maintenance.
Â¥ Associate's or Bachelor's degree in Turf Management or related field.
Â¥ Excellent written and oral communication skills

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing and
dynamic organization and must be a self-starter, team player, have a positive
attitude, work af the highest standards of performance, and meet deadlines.

so that they can sign-off on
the audit. We’re hoping that
in the next two to three
weeks this will be complet-
ed.”

There is little doubt,
though, that the minority
investors in Bahamas
Supermarkets have experi-
enced a dramatic destruc-
tion of shareholder value
since BSL Holdings
acquired its majority stake
from Winn-Dixie in summer
2006 for $54 million.

Not only were they effec-
tively sidelined during the
acquisition, no offer was
made to buy them out on
the same terms offered to

Winn-Dixie. Now, Bahamas
Supermarkets is projected,
through management
accounts, to have incurred
a $13.429 million loss for
the 2008 fiscal year.

Apart from Neal &
Massey, the Trinidadian
conglomerate that is BSL
Holdings’ largest share-
holder with a 40 per cent
stake, the Bahamas-based
investors in Bahamas
Supermarkets’ majority
shareholder include the two
hotel industry pension
funds, RoyalFidelity’s pri-
vate equity arm, Milo B
Butler & Sons, and Craig
Symonette.

Hiaker's Wap

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position currently available.

Design Manager

Key Responsibilities

Â¥ Sit on design review committee that ensures design guidelines and

adherence fo project.

Â¥ Assist architect of record with securing necessary building permits.

Â¥ Respond to ASI/RFI questions during building process.

Â¥ List requests and change orders including pricing etc. from owners.

Â¥ Provide field reports and punch lists, and ensuring the contractors
compliance with the plans and technical specifications.

Y Coordinate the design of new facilties.

Qualifications

Â¥ Bachelor's and Master's degree in Architecture from an accredited

university

Â¥ Minimum of 10 years of progressive experience in architecture and interior
design and construction administration of commercial and residential

structures.

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing and

Â¥ Well organized, self motivated, and able to meet demanding deadlines
and handle multiple tasks and projects.

Â¥ Must be able to accurately read plans and work well with all construction
and architectural personnel, engineers and owners.

If you are progressive and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume
to the attention of the Director of HR & Training, hr@bakersbyclub.com or by fax
at 242-367-0613.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”

Hiaker's Wap

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position currently available.

Golf Clubhouse Manager

Key Responsibilities

Start up new golf clubhouse, including all systems and elements for new golf
program

Oversee all Atlantic Clubhouse staff and daily operations of golf, retail, and food
& beverage

Financial accountability for creating forecasts, budgets, as well as compliance
Direct and oversee all aspects of member services for the golf club, including the
sequence of service and amenity programs

Develop and implement service standards for golf operations and associated
Member Services and ensure consistent high levels of all service standards
Conduct quarterly training and departmental reviews

Qualifications

Minimum of Associate degree in Golf Course Management, Business
Administration; Bachelor's degree a plus.

Minimum of § years in Golf Course Management

Previous experience in a hotel or private club preferred.

Experience in opening a golf course clubhouse a plus

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing and dynamic
organization and must be a self-starter, team player, work at the highest standards of
performance, and meet deadlines.

If you are progressive and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume to the
attention of the Director of HR & Training, hr@bakersbyclub.com or by fax at 242-367-
0613.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”

Persons without relevant experience will not be considered.

If you are progressive and prepared fo advance your career, submit your resume
{o the attention of the Director of HR & Training, hr@bakersbyclub.com or by fax
at 242-367-0613.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”

Hiakers dhap

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position currently available.

Assistant Marketing Manager

Key Requirements

Â¥ A demonstrated track record of sales to high net worth clients

Â¥ Extensive experience maintaining strong long term customer relationships
wilh significant add-on/repeat business

Â¥ Astrong existing network with high net worth clients in the U.S.A. , Europe
and The Bahamas

Â¥ Ability to develop and implement marketing campaigns to high net worth
clients

Qualifications

Â¥ Bachelor's degree in Sales, Marketing or related subject; professional
certifications

Â¥ Minimum five (5) years experience in high net worlh real estate
promotions

Â¥ Must be proficient in C2C software, ACT, Power Point, Microsoft Word,
Excel and Asset Manager

Â¥ Must be innovative, demonstrate strong leadership and customer relations
skills

Â¥ Must have excellent written and verbal communication skills

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing and
dynamic organization and must be a self-starter, team player, work af the highest
standards of performance, and meet deadlines.

If you are progressive and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume
to the attention of the Director of HR & Training, hr@bakersbayclub.com or by
fax at 242-367-0613.

dynamic organization and must be a self-starter, team player, work at the highest
standards of performance, and meet deadlines.

If you are progressive and prepared fo advance your career, submit your resume
fo the attention of the Director of HR & Training, hr@bakersbyclub.com or by fax
at 242-367-0613.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”

Hiaker's Wiap

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position currently available.

Executive Chef

Key Responsibilities

Â¥ Ability to skillfully prepare international cuisine

Â¥ Plan, design and cost menus for a variety of outlets

Â¥ Recruit, manage, and train culinary team.

Â¥ Manage the culinary budget and food cost.

Â¥ Maintain an effective inventory and supplies vendor list of local and
international suppliers.

Qualifications

Y Bachelor's degree in Culinary Arts or related subject; professional
certifications

Â¥ Minimum ten (10) years experience at a five-star club, resort or restaurant
with at least three (3) years international or off-shore experience.

Â¥ Previous experience with a start-up property a plus.

Â¥ Must be innovative, demonstrate strong leadership and culinary skills,
must be able to train others and execute ideas and standards.

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing and
dynamic organization and must be a self-starter, team player, work at the highest
standards of performance, and meet deadlines.

If you are progressive and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume
to the attention of the Director of HR & Training, hr@bakersbayclub.com or by
fax at 242-367-0613.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



=
CLICO chief moves to bar discovery

FROM page one

er confidential documents, to
be eliminated from the dis-
covery process, too.

Mr Duprey’s attorneys, in
the protective order motion
filed with the Florida Bank-
ruptcy Court, a copy of which
has been obtained by Tribune
Business, argued: “The [sub-
poena] is overly broad and

purports to require disclosure
of documents of a privileged,
confidential and proprietary
nature, and/or which have no
relationship to [CLICO
(Bahamas)] acts, conduct or
property, or the liabilities and
financial condition of [CLI-
CO (Bahamas)] estate, or to



Legal Notice



NOTICE




TIMBER VALLEY INC.




(In Voluntary Liquidation)






Notice is hereby given that the above-named




Company is in dissolution, which commenced




on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator




is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,













Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.



(Liquidator)




Legal Notice

NOTICE

ROBLE MANAGEMENT LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

KTLA FINES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ROYAL FIDELITY

Mwy at Work

[CLICO (Bahamas)] right to
a discharge.”

They were responding after
Mr Gomez, the Baker Tilly
Gomez accountant and part-
ner, filed a subpoena demand-
ing a host of documents relat-
ed to the business dealings of
75 Florida-based companies
believed to be owned and/or
controlled by Mr Duprey, as
he ramps up efforts to trace
and recover the company’s
assets.

Informed sources have told
Tribune Business that the lig-
uidator intends to “go after
Mr Duprey in a big way” in
his bid to recover assets for
CLICO (Bahamas) Bahamian
creditors, policyholders and
annuity depositors, although
no findings of wrongdoing
have yet been made against
the Trinidadian chairman.

However, Mr Duprey’s
attorneys, in their Protective
Order Motion, argued: “[CLI-
CO Bahamas], apparently the
subject of insolvency pro-
ceedings occurring in the
Bahamas, has commenced
these proceedings as a pro-
fessed means of seeking dis-
covery for use in the Bahami-
an proceedings.

“|The liquidator] has served
its Notice on Greenberg, pur-
porting to require production

of documents which Green-
berg obtained in connection
with its business of providing
legal services and counsel to
various of its clients, including
Duprey and Baldini and com-
panies which they own, have
owned, or in which they exer-
cise or have exercised man-
agement control...”

Mr Duprey’s attorneys,
though, attempting to justify
their demands for a Protec-
tive Order, alleged: “The
[subpoena] does not purport
to limit the scope of the pro-
duction it seeks to documents
related to transfers of funds
in which [CLICO (Bahamas)]
has any ownership interest or
entitlement, or ownership and
management agreements, in
entities in which [CLICO
(Bahamas)] holds an interest.

“Rather, the subpoena pur-
ports to require wholesale dis-
closure of documents relating
to transfers and ownership of
the business activities of all
77 entities and persons with-
out regard to whether the
business activities, transfer or
ownership or management
structures have any relevance
to [CLICO (Bahamas)] insol-
vency proceedings in the
Bahamas.”

It was argued that Mr
Gomez wanted a “limitless

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PASTE MANAGEMENT CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

EURYDICE MOUNTAIN LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

eS *

AL MARKET.
oe a SERVICES

s

crai?ercaMNtdt.«

disclosure of documents”
unrelated to CLICO
(Bahamas), and both Mr
Duprey and his wife were said
to have informed Greenberg
Traurig of their objections to
handing over papers unrelat-
ed to the Bahamian insurer.
Although the documents
do not divulge why Mr
Gomez is seeking all this
information, it is more than
likely that he wants to exam-
ine whether any assets
belonging to CLICO
(Bahamas) and, by extension,
its Bahamian insurance poli-
cyholders, annuity depositors
and other creditors, may have
ended up with Mr Duprey’s
private companies — and been
used to finance his private

business interests.

If this turns out to be the
case, the CLICO (Bahamas)
liquidator will more than
likely go after Mr Duprey
and his companies through
the courts to secure their
return.

This could take months
before a successful outcome
is secured, though, as Mr
Gomez will likely have to
unravel a maze of inter-party
transactions and related par-
ty wheelings and dealings.

There is little doubt,
though, that eyebrows will be
raised by the size of Mr
Duprey’s private business
empire, and why it was nec-
essary to have as many as 75
different companies.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NEWTONVILLE COMPANY LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named



Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TABITA HOLDINGS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

RAPPAHANNOCK INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 24 AUGUST 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,577.56] CHG -0.07| %CHG 0.00 | YTD -134.80 | YTD % -7.87
FINDEX: CLOSE 790.65 | YTD -5.30% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit Previous Close Today's Close Change
1.28 Abaco Markets 1.34 1.34 0.00
e Bahamas Property Fund ’ i 0.00
6.25 Bank of Bahamas 6.25 6.25 0.00
0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00
10.18 Cable Bahamas 11.35 11.35 0.00
2.74 Colina Holdings 2.74 2.74 0.00
5.50 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.00 6.00 0.00
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.78 3.71 -0.07
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.00 2.00 0.00
6.60 Famguard 6.60 6.60 0.00
10.00 Finco 10.63 10.63 0.00
10.30 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.30 10.30 0.00
4.95 Focol (S) 5.13 5.13 0.00
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30 0.00
5.49 ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 0.00
10.39 J. S. Johnson 10.39 10.39 0.00
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series ©) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 3 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
Bahamas Supermarkets tite 8.42 14.00
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
ABDAB 30.13 29.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months

Daily Vol. EPS $
0.127
0.992
0.244
-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.382

Div $ P/E

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

2,000

0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407 B 13. 5
0.952 : 10.9
0.180 5 55.6
ases)
Interest

Legal Notice

NOTICE

JABREAH VENTURES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

i__ 52wk-Low
1000.00

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

FBB22

52wk-Low Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

Fund Name

CFAL Bond Fund

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund

CFAL Money Market Fund
3.1031 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
12.3870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund

100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund

Div $
1.3320
2.8952
1.4075

2.9047 -1. -3.66
1.4842 i! 5.55
3.1143 - -12.43
13.0484 . 5.84
101.6693 - 1.67
96.7398 -4.18
1.0000 : 0.00
9.3399 = -1.41
1.0622 2.56 6.22
1.0243 -0.84 2.43
1.0585 2.04 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD -last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

31-Jul-09
14-Aug-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
i

“s weighted price for daily volume
hted price for daily volume
day to day
traded today

er-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - me of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Today's Close -
Change - Change
Daily Vol. -
DIV $ - Dividends per
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
KS1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





©



The Tribune

men 6D





ith







The future

In ph

Sical

GN-902

LIN

MINISTRY OF FINANCE
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
FINANCIAL INTELLIGENCE UNIT

This position provides an excellent opportunity for an individual seeking a
meaningful employment with the Financial Intelligence Unit.

The successful candidate would be the Chief Executive Officer of the
Financial Intelligence Unit.

POSITION:
RESPONSIBLE TO:
QUALIFICATIONS:

DIRECTOR
THE MINISTER RESPONSIBLE
The successful applicant must:

* Possess a College Degree

¢ Hold no other office or employment,
whether remunerated or not, without
the prior approval of the Minister

* Not be a Public Officer

¢ Not be a director, officer or servant of,
or have a controlling interest in, any
financial institution

¢ Not be bankrupt

* Be a fit and proper person

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES

¢ Charge of the day-to-day management and operation of the
Financial Intelligence Unit;

* Liaise between the Financial Intelligence Unit and the Minister
responsible the for FIU regarding matters of policy having to do
with the functions of FIU;

¢ Advise the Minister on the work of the Financial Intelligence Unit

and in particular on matters that could affect public policy;

¢ Prepare the Annual Reports of the FIU and submit to the Minister
before June 30th in every year;

¢ Ensure that an Annual Budget is prepared for the FIU and submitted

to the Minister at least two months prior to the commencement of the
financial year; and

¢ Ensure that the accounts of the FIU are audited annually and a copy

of the audit report is submitted to the Minister.



SARRAN Thompson is hooked up to the Arayas machine which sends ion magnum waveforms to

the body to stimulate muscle toning work-outs.

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

IT seems these days practically everyone’s
trying their hand at weight loss either through
diet or by purchasing the hippest work-out
gear in an attempt to whip their body in shape.

Despite the large number of fitness hopefuls,
one expert estimates that more than 50 per
cent of people who begin workout pro-
grammes stop within the first 12 months.

Edwardo Thompson of the International
Sports Therapy and Holistic Spa told Tribune
Health that although most people are con-
cerned about their health and weight, reducing
their body fat percentage (BFP) remains a
major challenge. This has lead him to intro-
ducing a machine which could potentially
change the way exercise is thought of by
Bahamians.

The machine is called the Arasys, and was
first introduced in the United Kingdom in
1992. It was originally designed to encourage
myelinated cell reproduction in patients suf-
fering from Multiple Sclerosis, and has proven
to be effective in reducing the effects of the ill-
ness.

According to Laurent Ambard, the field
marketing director for the Arasys Perfector
company, the initial success of the of the device
paved the way for its introduction in other
areas of health, fitness, and anti-aging treat-
ment.

Mr Ambard was in town last Friday and
conducted a live demonstration of the
machine.

He explained: “Arasys is a device created
and manufactured by the co-inventor of the
first pacemaker, Gerry Pollock.

“The Arasys Ion Magnum waveform is a
composite of 1,000 waveforms which were
researched individually in Pollock's laborato-
ry. This compact square waveform is specifi-
cally designed to mimic brain waves so that the
muscle tissue is made to believe that it is per-
forming a muscle-toning workout. Ion Mag-
num can be placed on almost any muscle group
on the body and if used regularly, combined
with a sensible diet, will fight the flab without
having to hit the gym.

“Results are equivalent to strenuous exercise
and they last just as long. There is no gym
burnout since the Arasys procedure does not

SEE page 10

GN-903

MINISTRY OF NATIONAL SECURITY
ROYAL BAHAMAS POLICE FORCE

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
PUBLIC AUCTION

Friday and Saturday, August 28th and 29th, 2009
Two (2) Days

By Order of
The Commissioner of Police
The Royal Bahamas Police Force
Commonwealth of The Bahamas

1.G. STUBBS WILL SELL

WHAT:

104 assorted used vehicles

LOCATION: Internal Security Division ISD) Compound

Oakes Field

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS & EXPERIENCE: Nassau, Bahamas
The successful candidate is expected to:
1. Be knowledgeable about the financial services sector and the Laws
governing the financial services industry;
. Be experienced in financial investigations;
. Have strong data gathering, analytical and report writing skills; and
. Have strong leadership skills.

10:00 am - Friday - August 28th, 2009

10:00 am - Saturday - August 29th, 2009

All Preview and Inspection both days from 9:00 a.m.
Until Auction time at the site.

* All items Sold Where Is As Is for Cash, Cashier’s
Check or current Bank Guarantee Letter. No
purchase(s) will be released until paid for in full.
Where a deposit is required, the same is non
refundable.

REMUNERATION PACKAGE

* Competitive salary commensurate with experience
¢ Three (3) year contract; renewal
¢ 15% gratuity upon successful completion of contract.

ALL PURCHASES MUST BE COLLECTED AND REMOVED

FROM THE AUCTION SITE WITHIN THREE (3) WORKING
DAYS FROM DATE OF SALE.

Interested persons should submit their application and resume in writing along
with the relevant certificates no later than Friday, 25th September, 2009.

Any and all Notices or amendments by Auctioneer on said Auction
Day whether written or verbal shall supersede this or any subsequent

. . advertisement.
The Financial Secretary

Ministry of Finance

3rd Floor, Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building
Cable Beach

Nassau, Bahamas

For further information contact I.G. Stubbs at 322-2024 or 5 or
Fax: 328-8086 or Email: igstubbs@coralwave.com

1.G. STUBBS
PUBLIC AUCTIONEER

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009, PAGE 9B





(CY LOVING RELATIONSHIPS



Do you believe in soul mates?

USUALLY, when people are dis-
cussing love and romance the topic
of soul mates comes up. When
asked, 'Do you believe in Soul
Mates?’ people usually answer
unequivocally ‘yes!’ It brings out
strong reactions, recounting stories,
both personal and fictional. From
the first moment, we consider having
someone of our very own to love;
this magical and mysterious person
fills our imagination.

When we were young, we were
read fairy tales and a seed was plant-
ed in our young minds. From that
moment, we believe that there is
someone special for each of us. Just
the very idea of meeting the person
who matches, compliments, and
understands our very essence brings
us a sense of comfort and peace. It is
this dream or fantasy that carries us
through dating disappointments. The
image of a person waiting for us,
waiting for our lives to align, and
possibly with a handful of fate
thrown in, is tantalising.

Are we correct in assuming that
our soul mate is our life partner and,
therefore, sexual in nature? Think
back and consider if you have ever



experienced that wonderful bond,
connection, thinking as one mind
with a dear friend, or family mem-
ber. There may have been people
who have only stayed in our lives
for a short time or, in fact, a fleeting
moment. That true and pure spiritual
connection can be found many times
in our lives if we just learn how to
open our minds and hearts to
receive.

How often have we said, 'You
know my spirit really takes to ...'
However, for many of us our own
fears and insecurities hold us back
from opening our arms, embracing
life, loving fully and recognising the
soul mate standing right in front of
us. All too often, we are so preoccu-
pied with judging, criticising and

over analysing that we fail to expe-
rience the moment. Perhaps, it is
healing and loving ourselves that is
needed before the time is right to
allow us to see, let alone, meet our
soul mate.

Ancient civilisations and cultures
have many theories on soul mates. It
is not surprising therefore, that our
own individual views are greatly
influenced by our religious and spir-
itual principles. Values and opinions
fall within the wide spectrum of
beliefs. On one hand, some believe
that the person put on earth for us is
chosen by God and therefore can
not be denied or controlled.

Others, who believe in reincarna-
tion, believe they have met that per-
son in a previous life, hence the deep
sense of knowing them. But one
thing that they all have in common is
the spiritual connection or karma
felt, between the two people. They
possess a deep and natural affinity,
friendship, love, sexual unity and
compatibility. They have the ability
to complete each other in an eternal
bond.

There are many of us who, in fact,
have been fortunate to experience

this type of soul mate, but few even
come close to meeting their ‘twin
flame’. We may joke and call our
partner our ‘better half’, but for
those who have met their twin, this
truly feels like their other half.

The bond is so strong that just
being apart is unbearable for them.
Joining of the flames can be excru-
ciating, as their souls and minds are
so synchronised that parting for any
length of time is painful and they
can even feel physically ill. These
couples often express a type of
telepathy which is quite different
from finishing each others sentences,
as seen with other compatible cou-
ples. Stories of a bereft partner,
dying within a short time from a
‘broken heart’, rings true to the the-
ory. Their half of the flame can not
continue without the other and it
soon extinguishes.

Are we too hasty when we first
meet someone new? Do we write
them off because we do not feel the
‘soul mate connection’? What hap-
pens if we thought we did have it
but after some years think we made
a mistake or lost it? What happens
when one half of the partnership

(Coy GREEN SCENE

\

je ADORSETT Golden with its distinctive red
blush, now part of our Bahamian eS

se

feels it, but not the other?

As relationship and sex thera-
pists, our work involves enhancing
and salvaging all those feelings and
habits that soul mates possess. With-
out a doubt, it is possible to bring
your relationship to a higher spiritual
level by developing all areas of inti-
macy. There are many self-help
books on the subject, but keep in
mind the solid foundation has to be
there for the relationship to soar toa
higher level. To be able to recog-
nise that your relationship is deplet-
ed spiritually and emotionally, would
benefit from an overhaul, takes a lot
of insight and courage. Be brave,
take a deep breath and make the
changes that are required.

¢Margaret Bain is an Individual and
Couples Relationship Therapist. She is
a Registered Nurse and a Certified
Clinical Sex Therapist. Call for an
appointment- Relate Bahamas at 364-
7230, or email
relatebahamas@yahoo.com
orwww.relatebahamas.blogspot.com.
She is also available for speaking
engagements.

By Gardener Jack



IN July of this year I wrote
of an apple tree that was
grown in The Bahamas and
became the source for hun-
dreds of thousands of sub-
tropical apple trees that can
be found in Florida, Texas
and Southern California.

At the end of the article I
asked if any relatives of
Irene Dorsett, the lady who
planted the original Dorsett
Golden, knew of the fate of
the original tree. A few
weeks later I

received a charming call
from Aline G. Mc Laughlin
who provided me with the
following:

“My late grand-uncle,
Logan Dorsett (husband of
Irene Dorsett), was a keen
gardener who enjoyed grow-
ing his plants from seed. His
niece, my mother, shared his
interest so whenever we met
the conversation eventually
turned to gardening. In due
course we learned of the
seeds purchased by Mrs

Dorsett and how they had
very carefully selected the
spot in the garden where he
felt a ‘northern’ apple might
possibly grow. This was shel-
tered from the wind and too
much direct sunlight.

“They chose well because
there was great excitement
among family and friends
when the first shoot
appeared. One of the friends
who was keenly interested
was the late Oris Russell
who was a horticulturist and
in charge of the Government
Experimental Station located
in the Carmichael Road
area. It was Mr Russell who
made the connection for the
Dorsetts to have their tree
registered in Florida.

“When the tree bore its
first crop the Dorsetts gave a
party at their home in Brook-
lyn Avenue, which is a sub-
division just off Village Road.
It was attended by friends,
family and (of course) the
experts from Florida. All

hands gathered around the
tree which was certified by
the people from Florida to
be a true apple tree grown
from seed, as was made evi-
dent by its trunk. Trees that
grow from seed have trunks
that differ in form from those
grown from cuttings. They
also stated it was the first
apple tree to their knowledge
to be grown in a sub-tropical
area. Mrs Dorsett had set out
tables on the patio on which
were plates of apples from
the tree of which all present
partook. The fruit was beau-
tiful, light yellow with splash-
es of red, smooth textured
and of a delicious flavour.
“The tree continued to
beat fruit year after year. I
do not recall in which year
it occurred but the Dorsetts
decided to go for an extend-
ed visit with their daughter
and her family in Alberta,
Canada. As they did not
want to leave their home
empty for a long period they

rented it, but failed to tell
the tenant about the apple
tree.

“The tenants noted that
while the master bedroom
was lovely and comfortable,
one of the windows was not
admitting enough light and
air due to a large, leafy tree
just on the outside of it. They
apparently had never seen
an apple tree. Their decision
to cut it down was based on
the desire to present a pleas-
ant surprise to the Dorsetts

on their return. They made a
very thorough job of it.
Nothing sprouted from
where the tree once flour-
ished and the Dorsetts never
attempted to plant another.”

Thank you, Mrs McLaugh-
lin, for fleshing out the story
of the Dorsett Golden apple
for us. I was so sad to learn
that the original tree was cut
down. Sometimes we are so
careless about our heritage,
even in innocence.

Perhaps the story of this

apple tree will create an
interest in growing more
Dorsett Goldens in The
Bahamas. Your local nurs-
ery should be able to obtain
certified trees. I spoke with
the owner of a large Nassau
nursery recently and he said
he had never heard of
Dorsett Golden apple before
the Tribune article. Now we
know, there’s no excuse.

e j.hardy@coralwave.com





Think on your feet - Teachers!

LAST week our readers were presented
with tips for fitting and selecting children's
footwear and it was very well received. Today,
we continue with our 'Back-to- School’ theme
by focusing on teachers. Teachers are among
the group of people who are on their feet more
than four hours per day, and many teachers
constantly complain of tired, aching feet and
legs, as well as lower back pain.

In today’s fashion conscious world, while it
is important for female teachers to look their
very best by complementing that perfect out-
fit with a cute pair of high heel shoes, or for
male teachers to wear trendy looking shoes, it
is absolutely necessary to note that these mag-
nificent creations often lead to foot pain at
the end of the day.

While this is quite understandable, I would
recommend that you follow these simple tips to
get away with looking your best while feeling
great on your feet:

1. WOMEN, try to choose shoes with a reasonable
heel height of 1.5 to 2 inches. Look for shoes that
provide ample toe room (beware of pointed toe
styles) and contain a back strap or enclosed back.
The same holds true for men with the exception of
heel height.

2. IF YOU are having trouble achieving the appro-
priate fit with shoes you already own, take them to
a local specialty footwear store or Pedorthic facili-
ty. They may be able to modify your shoes to bet-
ter fit your feet.

3. PURCHASE a slim arch support/orthortic that
your shoe can accommodate. Specialty footwear
stores and pedorthic facilities have options that
will fit almost any shoe. Orthortics are especially









designed to reduce discomfort associated by high
heeled shoes and sandals.

In sum, it is important to note that while
high heels are not the best for your feet, you
can take measures to minimize some of the
symptoms associated from wearing high heels,
such as pain in the back of the legs (and long
term, shortening of the calf muscles), ball of
the foot pain, pain under the arch and heel. A
lower heel height, properly fitted and a sup-
portive shoe combined with an accommodative
orthotic/arch supports will put your feet in
balance, and in turn improve the alignment
of the rest of your body. Teachers take steps to
think on your feet pain free and feel great in
the classroom!

e Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board Certified Pedor-
thist, is the proprietor of Foot Solutions, a health
and wellness franchise that focuses on foot care
and proper shoe fit, located in the Sandyport
Plaza, Nassau.

"The views expressed are those of the author and
does not necessarily represent those of Foot
Solutions Incorporated or any of its subsidiary
and/or affiliated companies. Please direct any
questions or comments to nassau@footsolu-
tions.com or 327-FEET (3338).

The sign of great things to come!

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and Sialic Acid, which are integral building
blocks for the brain.

They'll go much further in life

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Nutritionals



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Making criticism constructive

CONSTRUCTIVE criticism is
usually hard to give and receive
because the receiver can react nega-
tively to any type of criticism, espe-
cially if they regularly receive criti-
cism that is angry, blaming or con-
descending.

I come across managers, supervi-
sors and employees who avoid giving
any type of criticism for fear of the
conversation going in an undesir-
able direction. So what usually hap-
pens is the target of the criticism is
allowed to get away with inappro-
priate behaviours because the boss is
reluctant to take any type of correc-
tive action.

Then there are managers, super-
visors and employees on the oppo-
site side of the spectrum who tell
the cold, hard truth, with good inten-
tions. Unfortunately, depending on
how cold and hard the truth is, it
can strip away the dignity and
humanity of the receiver and can
lead to an angry or withdrawn
response.

A Model of Constructive Criticism

Managers sometimes use
approaches designed to deliver crit-
icism in a constructive way. There
are writers that suggest the “oreo”
approach where you start the con-
versation with something positive,

The future in physical fitness



then introduce the criticism con-
structively and then you end on a
note that reinforces the employee's
strengths and your intent to provide
support. A key consideration is to
try not to sound rehearsed because
you will be perceived as inauthentic
or phony.

Authenticity

There are people who avoid
telling the whole truth when provid-
ing criticism because there is the
clear and present risk that it can be
held against them by the receiver.
This is because most people don't
want to hear the truth if it isn't
aligned with their perception of the
truth, even when they ask you for
your views.
Curiosity is open, interested and
unbiased. It invites trust, openness
and creativity by:

¢ Posing questions that are not

assumption based

¢ Being open to diversity

¢ Avoiding placing labels on people
and situations

Questioning is an important tool
that is an integral part of curiosity.
A leader should never have all the
answers or advice so you can invite
the person receiving the criticism to
provide their views and alternative
solutions. The best questioners are
skilled at formulating questions that
will help the receiver of criticism
build their confidence and knowl-
edge. Two quick tips for question-
ing in situations where you want crit-
icism to be constructive are to avoid
questions that lead the receiver to
your desired outcome or ones that
cause the receiver to feel interro-
gated.

Timing

When providing anyone with crit-
icism, timing is everything. The first
tip is to avoid telling them the truth
in front of others. This causes you to
appear to be unprofessional and it is
easier for someone to accept criti-
cism if they are not embarrassed.

Secondly, avoid providing criti-
cism if you are in a negative emo-
tional state. Finally, try to avoid
constructively criticising someone if

FROM page eight

require glucose, which is normally utilised dur-
ing physical exercise.”

The machine is about the size of a small
cash register, and is know throughout Europe
as the miracle machine.

With just a few short weeks to go before the
device is officially launched locally, many at the
recent expo were eager to try the machine to
test its true potential.

One of those participants was local radio
personality Saraan Gibson from More 98.7.
Prior to being connected to the machine, her
waist was measured at 35 inches.

She said: “I’m trying to see if Ican get four
inches off from my waist. If this product can do
what they say it can, I will definitely be sold on
it and without fail would be in as often as pos-
sible to continue with it.

“T used to work out a lot in the past, but
staying motivated is difficult, and hopefully
this will get me where I want to be.”

After being connected to the machine, she
was instructed that the procedure would take
about 20 to 25 minutes, and would become
more intense as time passed.

Around ten minutes in, Mrs Gibson said the

device itself was comfortable, but caused major
crunch sensations, enough to bear but unusu-
al because “I was getting the burn as if I was at
the gym, but without the physical fatigue and
sweating.”

Twenty - five minutes later when her waist
was re-measured, her waist had dropped three
quarters of an inch.

Roger Bell, 49 who wanted to reduce facial
wrinkles also tested the machine

After 20 minutes of treatments on his left
side, Mr Bell said there was a marked differ-
ence.

As to the risks involved in using the
machine, Mr Thompson said: “ “The only thing
that we’ve seen thus far is fatigue, and the
reason why is because persons get dehydrated
from the treatment.”

Looking at the benefit of having one week’s
worth of gym training compressed to a single
20 to 40 minute treatment, Mr Thompson said
the Arasys is worth the risk.

The device is FDA approved however
Arasys rep Mr Ambard said just like tradi-
tional exercise and skin care, the procedure
must continue to maintain effectiveness. For
more on this product visit www.arasysper-
fector.com.

they are in arush. They may not
decode your message accurately
because they are in a stressed state
or because they are focused on
something else.

Communication Tips

Respect is very important if you
want your communication to be con-
structive. Avoid labeling people
using words like liar or stupid. Stay
away from shouting and profanity
or using words like never and always.
You can get your message across
effectively without expressing your
negative opinions.

For instance, if an employee tells
you something that sounds like an
untruth, you can say, “I realise you
think that is the case but based on
my investigation I found something
else to be the case. Help me to
understand the gap between what
you are saying and what I found to
be the case.” In this example, you
are not calling the person a liar, you
are inviting them to help you under-
stand the facts because you may
have been provided with misinfor-
mation.

Another communication tip is to
be clear and concise. Managers,
supervisors and employees start out
with good intentions to provide con-
structive criticism but they “chicken

out” and use language that is so
vague and tactful that the real mes-
sage is lost in tactfulness.

The Art of Listening

When providing constructive crit-
icism, you will be more effective if
you are equally adept at listening
objectively to the person receiving
the criticism because you need to
know if they are listening to you.
You can tell if the message is not
being received as constructive if they
are defensive, blaming or giving
excuses.

In closing I would like to leave
you with a quotation from an
unknown author: “Constructive crit-
icism is essential in any arena that
requires creativity, innovation, and
problem-solving. Since leadership
requires all three, leaders need to
be sure they are not only open to
criticism, but that they actively seek
it out. Ask people - direct reports,
peers, customers - to poke holes in
your ideas and approaches. Critique
can be a useful approach to test
ideas.”

¢ Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organiza-
tional Soul, an HR Consulting and
Training Company. For more informa-
tion contact us at info@orgsoul.com.

MISS UNIVERSE HSCACANTLD. 1

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Brennan Linsley/AP Photo

MISS Universe 2009 Stefania Fernandez, of Venezuela, stands with Donald Trump after win-
ning the beauty pageant in Nassau, Bahamas, Sunday, Aug. 23, 2009.

The silver lining

By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

WHEN I interviewed 18-
year-old Stefania Fernandez
two weeks ago, she admitted
that it would be difficult for
any girl to fill the shoes of
her countrywoman, the reign-
ing Miss Universe Dayana
Mendoza.

However, the beautiful and
poised young lady said that
she was not letting that phase
her and was determined to
compete in this year’s pageant
on her own terms.

“T know that Dayana has
done a wonderful job, but we
are two different women with
two different ideas.”

Stefania obviously was able
to pass that message on to the
judges on Sunday night and
do what many thought was
impossible — bring the crown
home to Venezuela for two
years straight.

As they walked the red car-
pet, moments before the live
show, the judges told the
media that they were looking
for the “ it factor” — a com-
bination of inner and outer
beauty that would be a real
reflection of the universe.

Judge Heather Kerzner

described it as someone who
“ turns heads” while judge
Andre Leon Talley said he
wanted to see the queen dis-
play a sense of purpose and
confidence that would impact
everyone she came into con-
tact with.

Dean Cain added that the
queen needed to be “beauti-
ful, but connected to the
world, because for the next
year she will be the face and
voice of the world”.

“Tam very proud and final-
ly now we can say Venezuela
has made it,” the excited
queen said as Dayana who
looked equally thrilled trans-
lated for her in a press con-
ference moments after her
win.

And while Bahamians
extend a hearty congratula-
tions to the queen- the jewel
in the crown of the entire
experience has to be the pos-
itive light in which our coun-
try was portrayed.

From the opening scenes-
an aerial fly in to the Atlantis
to the final strains of
Junkanoo as the queen took
her celebratory walk - the
Bahamas looked good, very
good. The beauty of the
country was on full display
from the mangroves in

Andros, the Hermitage on
Cat Island to the Garden of
the Groves in Grand Bahama
in what could only be an
advertising and PR dream
come true for the Ministry of
Tourism.

Nassau/ Paradise Island
even got a billion dollar
stamp of approval from the
Donald himself. Pageant co-
owner Donald Trump told
local media that the country
looked very good and the
government should be very
proud of the preparations
they had made in beating out
the other 18 countries to host
the event seen in 118 coun-
tries around the world.

Everyone I spoke with,
from contestants to Miss Uni-
verse organisers to judges to
my colleagues covering the
event from around the world,
had positive reviews about
the beauty of the country, the
friendliness of the people and
the unique and varied events
taking place.

Yes there may have been
glitches - slow and possibly
overpriced ticket sales, a post-
poned float parade, but all in
all when our moment in the
spot light came we shone and
that in itself is a beautiful
thing.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

SS AS ee dB

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS



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A] INDEX NY
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VO PTS ue
Pa % Today Wednesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
f — a a High = Low W High =Low W NASSAU Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 85° F
ot - vy ~~ _ ~~ é ao E 0| 1 |2 3 |4|5 ( 18 | gl10 FC FC F/C F/C Wednesday: NE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 7-15 Miles 85° F
: i | | [ia Acapulco 91/32 77/25 pe 92/33 77/25 pC FREEPORT Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 85° F
~e — a a ce — a Low | MODERATE | HiH | \. HIGH cam a ae pe se ae pe Wednesday: NE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet __7-15 Miles 85° F
ORLANDO nkara, Turkey 54/12 pe 7 50/10 s = ABACO Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-15 Miles 84° F
High:91°F/33°C Partly sunny with a Clouds breaking with a Some sun with a Partly sunny with Partly sunny, a t-storm Partly sunny. The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 86/30 72/22 pc 90/32 70/21 s Wednesday: NE at 10-15 Knots 2-4 Feet 7-15 Miles 84° F
7 Low:75°F/24°C Pat thunderstorm. brief shower. t-storm possible. t-storms possible. possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 6417 55/12 1 647 52/11 pc
, aoe =i vay og° val ane ahs Ono tah O4° Bangkok 91/32 77/25 t 91/32 79/26 t Fi
i. Q@ LR saris pau: ee ce ee ae you i. ie 7 i 7 Barbados 8780 7/05 sh 96800705 sh ML) Va
TAMPA 7, . : : : : : a Barcelona 81/27 70/21 c 81/27 70/21 s
Orr i o TU ENT Ta Beijin 77/25 66/18 r 90/32 68/20 5
High: 91° F/33° C ee , i 102° F 113°-87° F 109°-87° F 107°-87° F 111°-85° F High Ht.(ft.) Low _ Ht.(ft. ar 88/31 77/25 s 79/96 76/24 5
Low: 76° F/24°C atk y The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 12:23p.m. 3.1 5:51am. 0.1 Belarade 98/31 64/17 s 95/35 66/18 s
cae @ a : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low forthe day, 6:41 p.m. 0.4 ean 82/27 66/18 pc 77/25 64/16 po (COOLER) vk
- | ee CUT ae Wednesday 1229am. 25 640am. 03 Bermuda 86/30 80/26 t 86/30 80/26 pc : :
4 i. ‘fA — 17pm. 29 737 p.m. 06 Bogota 67/19 45/7 pc 68/20 45/7 t aust)
) “ie ? Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thursday 12am. 23 /a2am. 05 Brussels 72/22 52/11 sh 75/23 59/15 pe
’ ae ABACO Temperature 215pm. 28 8:37pm. 07 Budapest 86/30 59/15 s 90/32 63/17 s
,. i - ary ° HIGH ooeceeeecccecescscsteseseststeseeceeseseeceseees 93° F/34° C : 70am. 22 o30am. 06 Buenos Aires 73/22 55/12 pe 75/23 59/15 pe
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' ; wy Normal low 76° F/24° C Calgary 76/24 48/8 pc 63/117 44/6 s
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: a High: 90° F/32° C =<— Last year's low fener Uieseateeeas 76° F/25° C ; Caracas 81/27 72/22 t 81/27 72/22 5
— Low: 78° F/26° C ¢€ as Precipitation Pl ree a.m. Lae ee p.m. Casablanca 81/27 61/16 s 78/25 65/18 pc
a aa As of 2 p.m. yesterday .....cccsccccecsseceseenes trace unsel....... 20 p.m. Moonset. ...1EUT P.M. — Copenhagen 73/22 63/17 pc 71/21 59/15 pe 88/67
& FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date 23, , Dublin 66/18 54/12 pe 68/20 54/12 sh
k First Full Last New
High: 89° F/32° C @ High: 91° F/33° C Normal year to date 0... eects 29.87" ; oe a Frankfurt 79/26 57/13 t 75/23 55/12 pc
Low: 80° F/27°C — Low: 76° F/24° C Ee ' ue 1 Geneva 83/28 62/16 t 80/26 60/15 pc
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; @ a am Foretasis-and wraphies prouded by ° = | Havana 90/32 72/22 t 88/31 73/22 sh [| [SS 3 T-storms 7
, ; MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Aug. 27 Sep. 4 Sep.11 Sep. 18 Helsinki 68/20 50/10 pc 73/22 57/13 pe 3°] Rain ae
"ae High: 90° F/32° C : En Hong Kong 91/32 81/27 t 91/32 82/27 t [*, *| Flurries re Cold ==
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High: 90° F/32° C Low: 78° F/26°C Istanbul 82/27 67/19 pc 85/29 69/20 s [==] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary engl
—— Low: 79° F/26°C Jerusalem 83/28 58/14 s 82/27 60/15 s
: _ — aes cis 446 po 682036 s (105 | ts GN 10s (26 BRN ans RE cos 70s SST
KEY WEST , 2 i. CATISLAND Kingston 88/31 80/26 sh 88/31 78/25 t
High: 89° F/32°C i = 5 - Lima 71/21 58/14 s 73/22 59/15 s
Low: 81°F/27°C High: 88° F/31°C London 72/22 55/12 pc 70/21 59/15 +
i - . Low: 75° F/24°C Madrid 88/31 59/15 pc 95/35 66/18 pc
@ 474. Manila 8831 7/25 t 96/30 79/26 t HURR IC AN aes ot a Peay e i.
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or ~= Monterrey 104/40 73/22 s 102/38 73/22 s
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cl i High: 91° F/33°C High: 90° F/32°C Moscow 59/15 48/8 sh 63/17 46/7 pc
4 Low: 77° F/25° C Lew: 76°F/24°C Munich 84/28 60/15 s 84/28 61/16 pc , tg ;
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ioc : Noun 7 ae aa pe ee a Pe Yi i B BI
highs and tonights's lows. a : ew Delhi pe ‘
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; Paris 72/22 55/12 sh 75/23 59/15 pc r f ~
Prague 84/28 641/16 s 93/28 60/15 c Way y A ulmricane
LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 75/23 67/19 c 74/23 67/19 t y
High: 90° F/32°C Riyadh 106/41 91/32 s 109/42 88/31 s ’ .
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Today Wetiiastay Today Wetiasitay Today Wadhestiay MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 88/31 80/26 sh 90/32 80/26 sh that yo have excellent insurance
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 90° F/32° C San Juan 83/28 46/7 pc 87/30 48/8 pc coverace no matter which
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Albuquerque 82/27 62/16 t 86/30 64/117 t Indianapolis 86/30 65/18 s 86/30 65/18 pc Philadelphia 88/31 70/21 s 92/33 70/21 s antago pe pe 4
Anchorage 63/17 49/9 s 61/6 50/10 sh Jacksonville 88/31 73/22 t 90/32 73/22 t Phoenix 103/39 84/28 pc 106/41 84/28 s CRO eo aaa oman ae ae a oa eae - ¥
Atlanta 88/31 67/19 pc 88/381 70/21 s Kansas City 88/31 66/18 s 86/30 66/18 t Pittsburgh 86/30 58/14 s 84/28 62/16 pc RAGGED ISLAND igh: a , ana) a
Atlantic City 83/28 6749 s 85/29 68/20 s Las Vegas 100/37 74/23 s 102/38 77/25 s Portland, OR 75/23 5442 pc 86/30 58/14 pc cae Low: 76° F/24°C eae ence Ean Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 89/31 66/18 s 91/32 67/19 s Little Rock 92/33 65/18 s 91/32 66/18 Raleigh-Durham 91/32 69/20 t 92/33 69/20 t Low:73°F/23°C = % sen = Pea Boston 82/27 70/21 s 89/31 65/18 ¢ Los Angeles 87/30 64/47 pce 87/30 6447 pc St. Louis 89/31 68/20 s 90/32 68/20 pc . on ae 95/35 83/28 - 95/35 81/27 _
Buffalo 82/27 64/17 s 76/24 5542 pce Louisville 88/31 68/20 s 90/32 70/21 pc Salt Lake City 84/28 62/16 t 87/30 64/117 $s GREAT INAGUA “ Tava 92/27 73/29 5 84/28 75/23
Charleston, SC 88/31 71/21 t 91/32 71/21 t Memphis 91/32 70/21 s 92/33 71/21 $s San Antonio 101/88 74/23 s 100/37 74/23 s High: 93° F/34°C aaa 80/26 63/17 Be 79/26 4/12 pe INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Chicago 87/30 64/17 s 76/24 58/14 c Miami 90/32 80/26 t 91/32 79/26 t San Diego 78/25 67/49 pce 80/26 67/19 pc Low. 76°F/24°C Trinidad 90/32 70/21 pe 91/32 70/21 pe : ; : = :
Cleveland 84/28 62/16 s 80/26 6146 pc Minneapolis 82/27 60/15 t 81/27 5844 pc San Francisco 72/22 55/412 pc 73/22 56/13 pc ; amen 68/20 53/11 sh 68/20 55/12 pc (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 98/36 78/25 s 97/36 76/24 s Nashville 92/33 66/18 s 92/33 65/18 s Seattle 71/21 53/11 po 81/27 54/12 pc rane 84/98 65/18 89/97 BE/I8 ru Fleut vy
Denver 83/28 56/13 t 83/28 55/12 t New Orleans 90/32 70/21 s 90/32 72/22 s Tallahassee 91/32 69/20 pce 90/32 71/21 t lie ' Jaa ; ma
; Warsaw 77/25 58/14 s 85/29 61/16 s 2) 950-3500 Tet 47 Te sa-2000 HT 06-294
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Houston 97/36 74/23 t 97/36 74/23 s Orlando 91/32 75/23 t 91/32 75/23 t Washington, DC 90/32 71/21 s 91/82 71/21 s Gh Ce ee




THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009



ENDING THE
SEASON WITH A

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemeida.net

WITH the recent Theodore Elyett’s Miss Teen Bahamas
held as the last official local pageant for the 2009
pageant season, 16-year-old Shamika Rolle won the title

over 21 other contestants.

During the star studded event which
took place on August 9 at the Wynd-
ham Crystal Palace Rainforest The-
ater, Shamika competed as Miss Bimi-
ni giving the judges a fierce perfor-
mance during her jazz routine to Bey-
once’s Sweet Dream, Beautiful Night-
mare.

Speaking with Tribune Features
recently about her preparations and
victory, the teen queen explained that
her coach was a major motivation
leading up to the event.

“My coach who was Carolyn Smith,
inspired me daily and helped me to
formulate my inspirational quotes, per-
fect my walk, and to prepare myself
full-circle leading up to the pageant.

“T also watched past Miss Teen Uni-
verse competitions, some of the Amer-
ican pageants, and I watched Miss
Teen Venezuela from last year.”

Shamika said compared to all of her
preparations, the one thing that she

Shamika said this is only the start for
her. When she gets older she hopes
to pursue a career as an economist
and corporate lawyer. She also hopes
to one day compete for the title of
Miss Universe.

Theodore Sealy, President of Miss
Bahamas World Organisation, said in
this forth year of the event he decided
to change the dynamics of the pageant
in grooming the contestants from a
holistic standpoint.

“This year we had 21 girls, and we
had the theme Twilight Beauties. I
chose that because every year we say
there’s a lot going on in society, a lot of
negative things going on with teens.

“T thought why not highlight these
girls as twilight beauties, ‘light in the
midst of darkness,’ who are setting an
example for others out there.”

Another change for the pageant was
the addition of international judges
including; Bianca Golden from Amer-

“At the end of the day it's not
all about the crown, the girls created
lasting professions, and for our winner
Shamika she is now developing

her platform of teen abstinence.”
THEODORE SEALY

thinks stood out the most was an exot-
ic evening gown walk used mostly by
Venezuelan queens.

“T stumbled a little bit in my dress,
but I got over that, and over all I did
really well.”

She describes herself as determined
and friendly.

According to her mother Cassan-
dra Fortune, Shamika was barely a
toddler when she began showing-off
her passion for pageantry and dance.

She explained: “Ever since the age
of three, Shamika loved the art of
dancing, singing, and ‘priming’ in the
mirror.

“Because of that I saw the need to
enroll her in ballet school, and other
things that would help her to develop
her talents.

“T did that from she was three, and
she has been dancing, modeling, and
doing etiquette classes ever since.”

Shamika who is currently in her
senior year of high school, proves that
she is more than just a pretty face.
According to her mother she has also
succeeded in passing eight BGCSEs
taken last year.

ica’s Next Top Model, Kendrick Kemp
who was Mr Caribbean 2008, Miss
Florida 2009 Anastagia Pierre,
Caribbean pageant coach extraordi-
naire Hector Joaquin Colon Gonzalez,
third runner up to Miss Puerto Rico
2009 Haydil Rivera Escobales, and
local pageant and fashion coach Phyl-
lis Garraway.

Mr Sealy feels this final hurrah for
the 2009 pageant season had to end
with a bang, and said the addition of
the judges and media coverage added
a new level of pageantry for the con-
testants and viewers.

Mr Sealy said: “At the end of the
day it’s not all about the crown, the
girls created lasting professions, and
for our winner Shamika she is now
developing her platform of teen absti-
nence.”

The New Miss Teen Bahamas
World will first represent the country
in the upcoming Miss Teen World to
be held in Houston Texas. She will
also receive gifts from John Bull, a
$2,000 cash prize, and countless oppor-
tunities to represent both the pageant
and her country in the upcoming year.

Grapeade jj

nf
We ice ie

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway * 394-1759





THE New Miss Teen Bahamas World Shamika Rolle said the one
thing that she thinks stood out the most making her the top choice
for the title was an exotic evening gown walk used mostly by
Venezuelan queens.











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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.226TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY WITH T-STORM HIGH 90F LOW 79F F E A T U R E S SEEPAGETWOANDWOMANSECTION S P O R T S New Miss Universe SEEPAGEELEVEN Team heads Home By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net PANDEMONIUM broke out at RM Bailey High School and RIU Hotel yes terday after some delivery men reportedly made off with furniture and other household items that were destined for the country’s under-privileged. Hundreds of persons queued outside of the hotel and the school yesterday waiting for their chance to get a pick at desks, television sets, mattresses and other household items that were given to the poor in a generous gesture by the operators of RIU Hotel in a Social Services colead operation. H owever, some unscrupul ous delivery men reportedly “hijacked” a number of trucks loaded with these items and took them to other locations where they were either sold Items destined for the under-privileged are reportedly ‘hijacked’ The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR HASH BROWNS 2 FOR $1.15 www.tribune242.com Robin Hoodextended banking hours: Mon-Fri9:30am-7pmSat9am-5pm BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Fury over free furniture ‘theft’ HUNDREDS gathered outside of the RIU Hotel yesterday. SEE page nine New Chief Justice won’t ‘dignify’ his critics with response By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net NEWLY appointed Chief Justice Michael Barnett said he would not "dignify" critics who argue that his political affil iation will diminish the appearance of separation between the judiciary and thestatewitha response. Since government confirmed that Mr Barnett would succeed Sir Burton Hall as the next head of the judiciary, several mem bers of civil society havef ound fault with the decis ion. T he Bahamas Chamber of Commerce said the appointment will weaken the judiciary and fears the move will create "far too great an appearance of al ack of separation between t he executive and judicial branches of government." Last week the Bahamas Bar Association (BBA S EE page eight C ASU ARIN AS C OMEDOWN CASUARINA TREES are cut down on Saunder’s Beach yesterday. It is claimed the casuarinas must be cut down because they’re an invasive species which does not allow any other plants to grow beneath them. But campaigners against the move say there is no justifiable reason for the trees to be removed. SEE PAGE TWO T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net TOURISM Minister Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace declared yesterday that the promotional value of Sunday night’s final Miss Universe 2009 pageant telecast alone represented a full return on the money the Government invested into the three-weeklong event. “In terms of a turnaround in investment there’s no doubt whatsoever that we got that all back without ques tion last night,” he said. “If you do a very simple calculation of what the cost would be to do the promotion that was done last night, in one telecast the money was back. “The question now, and what we have been doing, is really looking at the follow up and the follow on of how we utilise the publicity from it.” The total amount spent by the Government on bringing the event to the Bahamas is not known, however $4 million was re-allocated towards it in the Ministry of Tourism’s mid-year budget. Other costs were born by pageant hosts Atlantis, whose occupancy went up to 85 per cent during the event, but is now expected to fall to 50 per cent this week, and 30 per By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net THE prominent attorney who is pegged to be the country's next attorney general remained tight-lipped on whether or not he has accepted the post. However, senior partner of McKinney Bancroft and Hughes Brian Moree did not close the door on the possibility and highlighted the need for qualified Bahami ans to give back to their country through public service. "In a hypothetical context, we all need to contribute to the building of our nation and I believe the administration of justice is in des perate need of resources it needs more financial resources, more human resources, more technological resources, it needs to demand a higher authority with regard to the allocation of funding (from the Ministry of Finance and I think that the window Attorney tight-lipped o ver the AG post Miss Universe telecast was ‘a full return for govt money invested’ BRIAN MOREE SEE page eight SEE page 12

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AUGUST 5, 2009– This is West Bay Street, near Orange Hill, but it could bet he middle of the island of N ew Providence. Because the foliage has been allowed to grow unnecessarily high, one is deprived of a view of the beautiful sea. Note the casuarina tree, one of thoset hat have been allowed to g row amongst the “acceptable” foliage. “My personal interest,” said Capt Paul Aranha of Lyford Cay who submitted this photo, “is the threatened removal of 66c asuarina trees and the poss ibility that the area will end up looking like this photo.” The 66 casuarina trees were removed from the foreshore yesterday (see page 1). C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM INDEX M AIN/SPORTS SECTION L ocal News.........................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,12 Editorial/Letters........................................P4 S ports................................................P10,11 B USINESS/WOMAN SECTION Business....................................P1,2,3,4,5,6 C omics......................................................P7 W oman........................................P8,9,10,12 W e ather . ..................................................P11 C LASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES West Bay Street and casuarinas issue Share your news The T r ibune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won ana war d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y . MISS UNIVERSE HIGHLIGHTS N EW MISS UNIVERSE S tefania Fernandez of Venezuela poses with members of the Cabinet after win ning the pageant last night at Atlantis. A BOVE: M iss Universe Stefania Fernandez poses with co-owner of the pageant Donald Trumpa nd Miss Universe 2008 Dayana Mendoza SEE T ODAY’SWOMAN SECTION FOR MORE

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By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net ALL complaints made by the M inistry of Health about doc tors allegedly writing “fake” sick notes for nurses will be put through a “rigorous” investigation process, the president of the Bahamas Medical Council said. Confirming that the BMC received the complaints about “a number” of doctors – HealthM inister Hubert Minnis said it was “eight or nine” physicians and several medical clinics – Dr Duane Sands said there is “nothing whimsical or volitional” about the BMC pursuing the issue. His comments come after Minister Minnis stated that theM inistry of Health had forwarded information on the physicians and medical centres in question to the Attorney General’s Office and the BMC for further action, after it had reason to suspect that they had facilitated nurses who wanted to protest the government’s decision to delay their h ealth insurance coverage. A large group of nurses were involved in a prolonged “sickout” in response to the decision. Dr Sands said: “Clearly the council has a statutory obligation to follow up and to act on every single complaint made to it (formally “We are mandated to put it through a fairly rigorous process as defined by the Medical Act. “It is submitted to a subcom mittee of the BMC – the Com plaints Committee. The Complaints Committee then reviews the written complaint and determines whether or not there is cause to submit it to the Disciplinary Committee.” Meanwhile, the doctor who is accused of misconduct is also given an opportunity to present their side of the story, having reviewed the substance of the complaint. Dr Sands said that each com plaint made against each physi cian by the Ministry of Health will be dealt with “individually.” As for penalties, the Medical Act states that for forging any health certificate, such as a sick note, the sanction could “be as severe as a fine or being stricken from medical register.” “The committee looks at the entirety of matter and then makes a decision as to what penalty may apply. Previous infractions might make the council less likely to look at it with same degree of leniency,” added the BMC chief. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT A 22-yearold man was charged with the murder of businessman Leslie Maycock in the Freeport Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Corderold Kiel Wallace appeared before Magistrate Debbye Ferguson in CourtO ne, where he was arraigned on charges of armed robbery and murder. It is alleged that on July 15, Wallace being concerned with another or others robbed Leslie Maycock Jr of a blackp ouch, valued at $100, and $700 in cash that was contained in the pouch. It is also alleged that on July 23, the accused being concerned with another and o thers by means of unlawful harm, to wit a handgun, inten t ionally caused the death of M aycock. Maycock, 50, a retired police officer and owner of the Hawksbill Mini Mart, was r obbed and shot after closing h is convenience store. H e died a week later in hosp ital of his injuries. Maycock’s death was the s ixth homicide for the year on G rand Bahama. T he victim’s wife and two s ons were present in the courtroom for the arraignment. K Brian Hanna represented Wallace. W hen Magistrate Ferguson a sked Wallace where he resided, he said he lives with his sister at the Garden Resort on the Mall. The accused was not required to enter a plea to thec harges of murder and armed robbery. A preliminary inquiry will be held to determine whethert here is sufficient evidence for h im to stand trial in the Supreme Court. Magistrate Ferguson denied Wallace bail and remanded him to Her Majesty’s Prison in Fox Hill until February 10,2 010, when a preliminary inquiry will be held. Man is charged with businessman’s murder ‘Rigorous’ investigation to be held into alleged ‘fake’ sick notes TWOof the three individuals who signed a letter requesting the transfer of almost half a million dollars from the hotel union’s account are registered elected officers of the union, the Director of Labour con-f irmed. This after it was reported in another local daily yesterday that a letter is alleged to have been sent to the Bank of the Bahamas (BOTB wire tranfers totalling $475,000 to be made to two local law firms and for backp ay to executive council members. The request was said to have been sent to BOTB days after Nicole Martin was ousted as president of the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union following a Supreme Court ruling n ullifying the election that elevated her. But the Bank of the Bahamas is said to have turned down the request to transfer the funds “given the very public bitter dispute” surrounding the governance o f the union, and requested that the union “confirm by r esolution” that the three signatories were authorised to conduct business on the union’s behalf. The earlier article quoted Labour Director Harcourt Brown as saying that one of t he three signatories to the letter, Raymond Wright, is n ot a registered officer of the union, as far as the Depart ment of Labour is concerned. In the letter, Mr Wright was to have received the largest quantity of funds requested – $73,600. H owever, Mr Brown yesterday noted that the two othe r signatories – Samantha Gray and Ian Neely, who were to receive $21,450 and $30,026 each – both appear to be registered elected officers.He noted however that on the department’s record, Ms Gray’s first name is registered as Frances. The legal fees intended to be covered by the requested payout appear to stem from the legal challenge mounted by First Vice President of the union, Kirk Wilson to the election which brought Ms Martin to power on May 28, 2009. The letter requests that $140,000 be transferred from the union’s account for out standing legal fees to Com mercial Law Advocates – whose principal attorney is Keod Smith – and Obie Ferguson and Co. S ecretary General Leo Douglas maintains that the lawyers’ fees are the responsi bility of Mr Wilson, “who hired them”, unless Mr Wil son and his team win the upcoming election, for which a date is set to be determined today. T he Tribune u nderstands that whether or not these firms are owed by the union depends on whether or not the attorneys were hired according to the constitution of the union, with the meeting in which this took place being “properly constituted.” T wo of three who requested funds transfer were hotel union officers CLARIFICATION IN FRIDAY'S Tribune, it was incorrectly reported that Kayla Green-Smith, chief counsel for the Attorney General's Office, said anyone found making a false claim of rape could face life imprisionment under law. Speaking at last week's media information session on the proposed ammendment to the Sexual Offences Act, Ms Green-Smith said that a malicious claim of rape was an "offence punishable by law". She did not say the offence was punishable by life imprisonment. The Tribune apologises for any inconvenience this error may have caused. POLICE in South Andros seized almost a quarter of a million dollars worth of suspected marijuana over the weekend. Press liaison officer Asst Supt Walter Evans said a tip led officers from the Kemps Bay Police Station to Blue Bush Creek south of Grassy Creek in South Andros around 6pm last Friday. There, they found 11 brown taped packages, seven bags and 52 crocus sacks containing a substance they suspect to be marijuana. The drugs have a local street value of just under $250,000 and weigh over 2,400 lbs, Mr Evans said. Police are continuing to investigate. Suspected marijuana is seized by police C ORDEROLD KIEL WALLACE a rrives at court yesterday.D e r e k C a r r o l l

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EDITOR, The Tribune. T he people who are up in arms over the Government's proposal to criminalize rape in m arriage remind me very much of the reactionary politicians in the Republican Party in the U nited States and their lunatic fringe supporters who are trying to trash President Obama's h ealth reform initiative. Some are downright ignorant and from them you can't expect much. Some are, unfortunately, Christian religious leaders who are intellectual and moral weaklings living in their own stone age unaware of the New Dispensation. But the worst of the lot are those who know bett er but refuse to play it straight. Instead they hem and haw and pander to the Neanderthals for p olitical advantage. They are spouting exaggerations and obfuscations, prevarications a nd equivocations. Permit me to comment on some of them. 1. They say making spousal rape a crime will put the gove rnment in the bedroom, cause breakdown in the family and l ead to same-sex marriages. That last piece of asininity from a lawyer no less is so p atently absurd that it boggles the mind trying to find a rational response. It's like telling your children that drinking orange juice will lead to drinki ng rum. The demagogic grands tanding about the government in the bedroom is also patently r idiculous. The law enforcement agencies of the government have a duty to go where ver crime is committed: in the bedroom or in the church o ffice. The bedroom cannot be a sanctuary for criminals, whether it is a husband raping his wife or a father raping his daughter. To condone violence and r ape is essentially a violent act is not protecting the family. It's creating hell-holes from which we spawn more violent offspring in our society. T he wife who cloaks the husband who rapes her because she is afraid of losing the breadw inner is complicit in her own degradation, and if she cloaks him in the rape of her children she is just as guilty as he is. 2. They say that the timing o f the Government's anti-rape bill is bad, that it should be w ithdrawn and that more consultation should take place . This line of obfuscation and equivocation comes mainly from the political types who say t hey are against all forms of violence against women. They even want to flog rapists! But they want to get political a dvantage out of the situation s o they shamelessly pander to those cavemen who do not and after a thousand years of consultation still will not accept that rape can take place in a marriage, and those misg uided women who, like some slaves of old, do not want to enjoy full equality and freedom. The public debate on domestic violence will no doubt go on for a long time, and it should as long as this evil persists. But the issue before us is to do something about a particularf orm of domestic violence s pousal rape just as we enacted laws against other f orms of violence without endless consultation. If ever the timing is right it is n ow when we are living in fear of the gathering storm of crimi nal violence around us. Witho ut hemming and hawing we need to send a clear, simple and u nequivocal message that our society does not condone violence in any form not in the s treets, not in the schools and not in the bedroom. 3. They say there are legal p roblems, so we should not call spousal rape by its right name, that the punishment should be different and that there should be safeguards against women falsely accusing their husbands . Rape is the act of forcing a woman to have sex against her w ill by force or any form of coercion. Once those elements are there it is rape and so its hould be called. As for providing a different punishment for spousal rape, that is not necessary because the principle of imposing punishment according to all the circumstances is already wellestablished in our law. E ven in cases of homicide the punishment can vary considerably according to the circ umstances. That is for the courts to decide. The same applies to providing safeguards for husbands accused of rape. The suggestion that there area lot of vindictive Bahamian wives just waiting to destroy t heir husbands when this law is passed is utter rubbish. Chances are that those wives who are being abused by their cavemen husbands will, unfortunately, still be reluctant to report them. The professional people tell us that that is exactly what is happening in the case of too many women who will not turn theirh usbands in for raping their daughters. I f there are some husbands who have made the mistake of choosing vindictive women as their partners, the law already provides protection for them.I n the case of a false accusation it will not be his worda gainst hers that will decide but as in every other allegation o f a crime the courts will look at the evidence and make judgments about credibility. Furthermore, the law also makes provision for the pun-i shment of persons who bring f alse charges and make false statements to the authorities. 4 . They say the FNM Government should remember the referendum and back off . When Prime Minister Ingraham and his Government tried to remove discrimination a gainst Bahamian women in citizenship matters from our constitution, the PLP supported him in the House of Assemblya nd voted unanimously for the proposed amendment. Then when they saw a chance to make political hay they turned around and along with their clerical allies camp aigned against it. The result was that the referendum was d efeated, they won the election and that discriminatory provision still remains in our constitution. I do not believe that this time they will get away with t alking out of both sides of their m ouths. Mr. Ingraham should put the matter to the vote, let them show their colours and let them vote against it. FOR PROGRESS N assau, August 23, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 WEBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm SUCCESS in English, success in life” is t he message on a large billboard written in b oth Chinese and English on the side of a wall in a small country town off the Li river i n the shadow of the famous Sugarloaf mountains in Guilin, China. I t was a billboard to encourage Chinese students to study English at the Omedia Lan-g uage College in that province. M r Ronnie Lightbourn, who with his wife, J oan, took a boat tour down China’s Li Rive r about four months ago was so impressed by the message that he took a photograph of i t and forwarded it to us. Here was an Asian country that fully understood the importance o f speaking not only English, but good English, while in the Bahamas, where English ist he mother tongue, Bahamian children are yet to recognise its importance. Not only h ave many Bahamians failed to master Eng lish, but they do not seem to understand the importance of speaking the language well. Many years ago, shortly after the PLP became the government, some bright sparks g ot the idea that the Bahamian dialect should be taught in the schools both written and s poken. Fortunately, the majority of our peo ple were wise enough to realise that speaking i n the “dis”, “dat”, “dees” and “dose” lingo would not carry them very far. However, it would certainly move them very quickly from the front to the back door. Eventually the matter was dropped and standard English c ontinued in the schools. French has always been recognised as the l anguage of diplomats, but today English is the lingua franca of the world. As Carla Powe r wrote in Newsweek International’s mag azine in March, 2008, India is on the “front lines of a global revolution in which hundreds of millions of people are learning English, the planet's language for commerce, t echnologyand, increasingly, empowerment. Within a decade, 2 billion people will be studying English and about half the world s ome 3 billion peoplewill speak it, according to a recent report from the British Council. “From Caracas to Karachi, parents keen for their children to achieve are forking over tuition for English-language schools. Chi na's English fever elevated to epidemic p roportions by the country's recent accession to the World Trade Organization and t he 2008 Olympicseven has its own Mandarin term, Yingwen re . And governments from Tunisia to Turkey are pushing English, recognizing that along with computers and mass migration, the language is the turb ine engine of globalization. As one 12-yearo ld self-taught English-speaker from Chin a's southwestern Sichuan province says, "If you can't speak English, it's like you're deaf a nd dumb." Is that how Bahamian students are to be c lassified? The second report produced by the Coalit ion for Education Reform, released earlier t his year, revealed that in 2006, 55 per cent of B ahamian students in public schools failed t he BGCSE English Language examination. There is an alarming shortage of Bahamians w ith the necessary English and mathematics skills to compete in today’s industries, f ramers of the report concluded. The report was compiled by the Chamber of C ommerce, Employers Confederation, National Congress of Trade Unions, Hotel E mployers Association and the Nassau Tourism and Development Board. In other words leaders of the industry that turns the engine of this economy. The shortage of qualified Bahamians with a c ommand of the English language, the report said, “is critical to tourism because the skills o f its employees dealing with its clients directly affects the latter’s view of the B ahamas.” Time has not shown any improvement in these results. If there is no turnaround in both English and Mathematics, Bahamians will soon find that they will be pushed to the s idelines because they are not qualified to compete, even in their own language in their o wn country. Will the day ever come when foreigners, speaking English better than our o wn people, will be called upon to fill essen tial positions in this country? Today, according to the Newsweek report, non-native English speakers now outnumber native ones by three to one. D avid Crystal, English-language expert and author of “English as a Global Language” h as suggested that there could be a “tri-Eng lish world, one in which you could speak a l ocal English-based dialect at home, a national variety at work or school, and international Standard English to talk to foreigners.” Bahamian students would be wise to apply themselves to their studies and master their language and mathematics. They certainly have been given every opportunity to pre p are themselves to take their place in their country. If they fail to qualify, they cannot b lame anyone but themselves for becoming strangers in their own land. See Mr Ron Lightbourn’s photograph tak en in Guilin, China, on page 12. The marital rape furore LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Good English needed to succeed In MemoriamSamuel F. ClappBeloved husband and father1927 2009 ST. JOHNS COLLEGEOrientation for all New Students Grades K-12 will be held on Thursday August 27th 2009 at 6:00pm at the school. All students are to wear full uniform. School will reopen for ALL new and returning students on Monday, August 31st 2009 at 8:30am RUSSELL’S WAREHOUSE CLOSING SALERivet Rite Shelving, Gondolas, Glass Shelves, 2 & 4 Arm Display Racks, Gridwall, Slatwall, Slotted Standards, and Hardware. Asst. Fixtures and Fittings, Men’s Coverall’s $5.00, S/S & L/S Whie Shirts $1-$5, Blank CD’s $0.50, Men’s Jeans sz. 46-50, $15, Blank ID Cards, 16” Stand Fans $20.00, Blk School Shoes, $5.00 & $7.00, AND MORE. Location: Madeira Shopping Center Behind Mystical Gym Entrance to Aquinas First left First stairs on left. Hours: Mon. to Thurs. 9am to 5pm Contact: 465-8648 EDITOR, The Tribune. In response to the letters of protest that ran in Friday's newspaper I feel obliged to put in my two cents. While the casuarina trees that line Good man's Bay and West Bay Street have indeed stood for decades, the use of casuarinas in any landscape setting here in the Bahamas should be strongly discouraged. Casuarina trees are natives of Australia and the South Pacific region and in those areas, they are an important part of the ecosystem, providing food and shelter to the animals, birds and insects that they have evolved in tandem with. In our area, casuarinas are noxious pests, displacing native plants and animals along our fragile coastal habitats. These trees are allelopathic, which means that they produce chemicals that prevent any other vegetation from grow ing under or near them. A stand of casuarina trees will smother all growth with their toxic, needle-like litter, reducing the plant diversity in that area to that one single species of introduced tree virtually useless to our native creatures. Every mature casuarina is capable of producing tens of thousands of tiny, winged seeds each year, which may blow or float to distant shores, starting new casuarina 'barrens' and reducing the area that our wildlife has to live in. While these old beachside trees do frame the vista nicely, so would seagrapes, pigeon plums or buccaneer palms all native Bahamian trees, providing livable habitat for the wildlife that colonized these islands long before we did. Thank you for allowing me to share my thoughts. JOHN A. THOMPSON, Jr., Nassau, August 22, 2008 Use of casuarinas in Bahamas should be strongly discouraged

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B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net GOVERNMENT officials y esterday admitted to being i n the dark about what arrangement on pay or future job security management at the Riu Paradise Island hotel have reached with their staff during their three month closure. In the wake of claims by some hotel workers that they have not been kept adequately informed by management about what pay they will get, if any, during t he renovation period, or h ow many of the employees w ill be coming back to work w hen the property re-opens i n November, Minister of T ourism Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace and Director o f Labour Harcourt Brown both said they are unawareo f the terms of the closure a s far as staff are concerned. “I don’t know, but I will ask that question myself. I haven’t heard about (the fears expressed by some employees), but I will speak to the Minister of Labour,” s aid Mr VanderpoolWall ace. M r Brown said he “doesn’t h ave all the specifics” concerning the situation, but added that he is not awareo f any complaints from staff that have reached his department. “I would recommend to a nyone who has queries or concerns about whether they’ve gotten what they w ere entitled to, to come and s ee one of our officers and w e’ll see what we can do,” the Labour Director said. T he RIU hotel will be c losed for the next three months during the traditionally slow tourism season. The property is set to undergo a $25 million m akeover, reopening on November 26, 2009 as the Riu Palace Paradise Island. Its 379 guestrooms will be upgraded and other new facilities added. T here have been rumours t hat there were an above a verage number of comp laints about the condition o f the property. O ne employee said: “We u nderstand why they are c losing the hotel but of c ourse it’s like a stab in the back. We have approached our superiors and we’re notg etting any response (about the pay issue). “Management has a list of people they are not going to c all back but that’s not been dealt with yet. The only peo ple who know are the man-a gers. We, the employees, h ave not been told,” she c laimed. The Tribune was unable to r each Minister of Labour D ion Foulkes as he is on leave. Attempts to reach Acting Minister of Labour Loretta Butler Turner were unsuccessful up to press time. Representatives of RIU could also not be reached for c omment as both the numb er listed locally for the hotel and a number obtained from R IU’s headquarters in Spain f or the property are now out o f service. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 127 ,&( THE Bahamas ElectricityCorporation (BEC that it is working dilig ently to correct all the p roblems which led to m ultiple power outages in the Family Islands over the weekend. Consumers experienced power interruptions in Harbour Island, Abaco and Central Andros. On Friday at 6.40pm, a cable at BEC's Whale Point, North Eleuthera station faulted, resulting in an i sland-wide outage. The restoration process began immedia tely with the electricit y supply restored at a pproximately 10.30pm that night. The powerw as then fully restored t o all Harbour Island residential consumers by 3.30pm Saturday afternoon, BEC said. On Saturday at 10.45pm, Abaco expe rienced an island-widep ower outage. The f aulted panel was iso lated and power wasf ully restored at a pproximately 3am on S unday morning. “We continue to experience generationp roblems at our power station in Fresh Creek, Central Andros, which is still affecting supply to the area, making it necessary for the corporation to rotate pow e r around the commun ity. We anticipate that the unit will be returned to service bye arly Wednesday morning,” BEC said. BEC working on Family Islands problems TWO masked gunmen burst into the Kentucky Fried Chicke n (KFC r estaurant of an unknown amount of money. Police said sometime after 11pm on Sunday, two gun-wield ing men smashed through the eatery's glass window and entered t he establishment. The bandits approached an employee and robbed him of cash, said press liaison officer Asst Supt Walter Evans. The men l eft the area in an unknown direction. Police investigations are ongoing. Masked gunmen r ob KFC restaurant Govt in the dark over staff situation at the Riu hotel Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM HERBERTCleveland W alkine, CMG, CVO, OBE, former Secretary to the Cabinet died on Thursday, August 20 at the University of Miami Hospital in Florida. H e died of cancer at the age of 79 and is survived by his wife Pam Walkine and daughters Angel and Imogene Walkine. M r Walkine was born on November 28, 1929 in Crooked Island, where he began his public service career as a monitor at the l ocal public school. He won a scholarship to attend the Government High School in Nassau. After graduating, he continued his education at theB ahamas Teacher’s Training College in Nassau and at the University of Manchester. Mr Walkine had a varied and w ell-rounded career in the public service. He began as a teacher and then served as a Family Island commissioner for 10 years, f rom 1958 to 1968, when he was appointed assistant secretary to the Cabinet Office. He served as permanent secretary in the Ministry of Labour,t he Ministry of Education, the Ministry of Works and Utilities, and the Ministry of National Security, before he was once a gain appointed to the Cabinet Office in 1986, this time as Secretary to the Cabinet. Former Secretary to the Cabinet H C Walkine dies TWO separate daylight drive-by shootings sent three men to hospital over the weekend with two of them in serious condition fighting for their lives. During a brazen daylight drive-by shooting on Sunday morning, a young resident of Milton Street was shot in the abdomen after being sprayed with bullets from a passing car. Police said the 21-year-old was standing on the side of Milton Street around 11am when a Nissan Maxima with heavily tinted windows pulled up and shot the victim multiple times. The victim was rushed to hospital by private vehicle, police said. At last report, he remained in serious condition. Police are also looking for the gunman who wounded two men on Saturday morning. It was shortly after 9am when two men, aged 23 and 27, were in the area of Cumberbatch Alley when an unknown person pulled up and fired shots from a car, press liaison officer Asst Supt Walter Evans. The two men were taken to hospital for injuries; the younger of the pair was treated and discharged but the older man who was shot in his abdomen is in serious condition. Police have launched intensive investigations into both shootings. T T h h r r e e e e m m e e n n h h o o s s p p i i t t a a l l i i s s e e d d a a f f t t e e r r d d r r i i v v e e b b y y s s h h o o o o t t i i n n g g s s A TRIBUNE reader has identified the mysterious fishc aught at an ocean depth of 1,500 feet at the back of Paradise Island as a longnose lancetfish. Fishing partners Lee Chong a nd Velasco Newball forwarded pictures of the unusual marine creature to the University of Miami seeking help in putting a name to it. The long slender fish has an unusual head and razor sharp teeth that extend from the mouth into the stomach. Lancetfish are predators and c an grow up to 6” in length. Very little is known about their biology except that they mainly inhabit tropical and subtropical waters. During the f eeding period adults may migrate to the sub-arctic reaching as far north as Greenland, Iceland and the Bering Sea There are currently only two recognised species, the longnose and the shortnose lancetfish. M YSTERY FISH IDENTIFIED HC Walkine

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net REFORM of the country's judicial system to ensure that it performs as efficiently as possible is topmost on the agenda for the new chief justice. "We're going to be addressing the whole court environment and I'm trying to get reforms in terms of civil procedure reforms and probate reforms and things to be able to help justice (move ditiously and efficiently as we can," said Michael Barnett, who was officially sworn in as chief justice at Government House yesterday morning. But given recent budget cuts to the Attorney General's Office and the judiciary – coupled with a backlog of pending cases and a shortage of judges – Mr Barnett warned the public that these neces sary improvements will not happen immediately. " Problems do not occur overnight and they're not going to be solved overnight. People must be patient and while they have a right to demand that matters be addressed, it is unreasonable to expect that problems that have been created over a peri od of time can be resolved instantaneously," he told The Tribune before he took his oath of office yesterday. Mr Barnett resigned as the country's attorney general last week to succeed former chief justice Sir Burton Hall, who is set to take up a post as a permanent judge on the Inter-n ational Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. Speaking before a crowd of well-wishers, several Cabinet ministers and members of the legal community at his swearing-in ceremony yesterday, Mr Barnett noted that the job at hand comes with an "awesome responsibility" that can only be (performed grace of God." Governor-general Arthur Hanna commended Mr Barnett as a product of a strong family with a "tradition of honesty." After the ceremony, Sir Burton Hall reflected on his 10-year tenure as a "fascinating experience." Still, he admitted that several challenges remained with r espect to the country's judicial system. "The challenge in the Bahamas like everywhere else is to ensure that the systems that are put in place work as best as the resources in thec ountry allow, to serve the p eople.” Deteriorating court buildings, too few judges and an extensive backlog of cases which leads to defendants languishing in the system for years are common criticisms of the Bahamas judicial system. B B a a r r n n e e t t t t s s w w o o r r n n i i n n a a s s C C h h i i e e f f J J u u s s t t i i c c e e GOVERNOR General AD Hanna looks on as former AG Michael Barnette takes the oath as Chief Justice at Government House yesterday. Mr Barnett’s appointement has been controversial with both the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce and Bar Association questioning whether his political past will affect his ability to be impartial. Reform of country’s judicial system ‘topmost on the agenda’ T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f “The challenge in the Bahamasl ike everywhere else is to ensuret hat the systems that are put in place work as best as the resources in the country allow, to serve the people.” M ichael Barnett

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG R Q GD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU L V $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU L $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV lodged a formal complaint a gainst the prime minister's decision to appoint Mr Barnett. When asked to respond to his detractors, Mr Barnetts aid "I've noted what they (said on it." When pressed about assertions that his ties with the FNM could influence his carriage as chief justice, he said, " I'm not even going to dignif y that with an answer." He also stressed that his political affiliation would not cloud his administration of justice. Mr Barnett resigned as Attorney General last week after holding the post since July, 2008. H e was a senior partner at t he law firm of Graham, Thompson and Co and had an unsuccessful bid for the Fort Charlotte seat on the FNM's ticket in 2007. Yesterday, prominent attorney Brian Moree, whoh as reportedly been offered the job as the new AG, praised Mr Barnett as a "distinguished" "impressive" attorney who will remaini mpartial. " I think based upon my personal knowledge of him as a colleague for over 25 years I have no doubt that he will bring energy, competence and experience and most of alli ntegrity to the office of chief j ustice. "While I understand the concerns that some have expressed about the independence of the judiciary and, of course, that is a critically important principle in ourd emocracy I am satisfied that he will discharge his judicial conscience with an impartial role of complete integrity," he told reporters after MrB arnett was sworn in at Gove rnment House yesterday. for fixing these problems is r apidly closing," Mr Moree told reporters after a swear-i ng in ceremony for new Chief Justice Michael Barnett yesterday. When asked directly if he had accepted the job MrM oree said, "I don't think t hat's a matter which I can c omment on at the present time." Mr Barnett, the former attorney general, resigned last week to assume the posto f chief justice. For weeks, there has been wide speculation in the legalc ommunity that Mr Moree h ad been tapped by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham to replace him. Mr Moree has been vocal in his criticisms of the state of the judiciary in the past,m any times calling on gove rnment to immediately fix the judicial system's inability to resolve commercial disputes in a timely manner. He reiterated these concerns yesterday: "Thea dministrative of justice is c ritical to everything in this country it's critical to our tourism, it's critical to our financial services industry,i t's critical to our quality of l ife and it is at the moment confronting very serious problems," he told the media outside of Government House. Deputy Prime Minister a nd Minister of Foreign A ffairs Brent Symonette will serve as Attorney General and Minister of Legal Affairs until a new attorney general is appointed. He previously served as A ttorney General under a p revious Ingraham administration. Chief Justice won’t ‘dignify’ his critics with response F ROM page one Attorney tight-lipped over the AG post F ROM page one

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o r handed out to family members and friends. The “left over” products which made their way to RM Bailey for distribution were reported of such a low caliber that many personsa t the scene described them as either “damaged, or unusable” items. At RM Bailey people queued in the blisteringh eat for hours to get an opportunity to see some of t he items, only to be frustrated by the report that persons allegedly “connected” with Social Service workers were being allowed to get the “first pick.” A ccording to an eyewitn ess, who phoned T he Trib une, t he crowd broke down the school’s fence and overran the police who w ere called to keep the situ ation under control. As the caller explained, t he situation quickly turned into a “free-for-all frenzy” where persons were making off with anything they could lay their hands on. S peaking with The Tribune from the RIU Hotel y esterday, Minister of S ocial Services Loretta Butler-Turner said that she wasv ery disturbed by yesterday’s events. And as it pertains to those persons contracted by the Ministry to delivert hese items to the school, Mrs Butler-Turner said that the police have had some success already in tracking down a number of persons who had cordoned off these hotel supplies. I am very disappointed but I do realize now why hotels do not do this anymore because it becomes very difficult to manage. “When Atlantis changes their stuff now, they just get rid of it. “They just send it to the d ump. “I thought this was a g ood gesture on behalf of R IU as a corporate citizen. “Our department thought i t was a good gesture considering the economic challenges that everyone is having, but the lack of p atience, the lack of peop le cooperating, and just a few people who decided that they want to takea dvantage of a situation as you will always have, places us in this situation where we’re at,” she said. With this distribution exercise beginning on Fri-d ay of last week, Mrs Butl er-Turner said that the M inistry will be winding down this exercise today. “I am right now at this moment, insuring that former employees of RIU who are asking me if they can get some of this stuff, Ih ave given them a number s ystem and I am ensuring t hat they get a few things. “But the distribution for the general public has been at RM Bailey and we haven’t sent anymore stuff there since about 5.30 this afternoon because it justb ecame a little out of hand a nd uncontrollable. And we h ave been using the Police Force but it is just that bad,” she said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM LIMA, Peru PERUVIANpolice expecting to find a shipm ent of cocaine hidden in a crate holding two live turkeys were surprised to discover the drug surgically implanted inside the birds, according to Associated Press. Acting on a tip, officers s topped a Turismo Ejecutivo SRL bus outside the city of Tarapoto in the central jungle state of San Martin, officials saidM onday. Police were puzzled w hen they found the t urkeys in the crate, but didn’t find the cocaine, Tarapoto’s anti-drugp olice chief, Otero Gonzalez, told the Associated Press. They then noticed that the two turkeys were bloated. “Lifting up the feathers of the bird, in the chesta rea, police detected a handmade seam,” he said. A veterinarian extracted 11 oval-shaped plastic capsules containing 1.9 k ilograms (4.2 pounds c ocaine from one turkey and 17 capsules with 2.9 kilograms (6.4 poundsf rom the other, he said. Both turkeys survived the removal. P olice were searching f or whoever sent the shipment from Juanjui to Tarapoto, which is on a s muggling route from Peru’s east Andean cocaproducing valleys to northern coastal cities, w here it is sold to Mexi can and Colombian traffickers. G angs often use human couriers who swallow cocaine to sneak it acrossb orders but it is unusual to use animals. In 2005, Colombian police found a total of 3 kilograms (6.6p ounds) of heroin sewn into the bellies of six pup pies during a raid on av eterinarian clinic. Peru police seize cocaine sewn inside live turkeys HUNDREDS gathered outside of the Paradise Island hotel yesterday. Fury over free furniture ‘theft’ F ROM page one

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Debbie FergusonMcKenzie’s coaching change key factor in their first head-to-head conf rontation at the Stockholm Golden League meet on July 31. Felix surged on top of the charts with 21.88, dropping Fer g uson-McKenzie to second with 22.23. A t the championships, the focus of attention was on A llyson, Campbell-Brown and McKenzie and the question was really would order they would finish in. Ferguson-McKenzie had staked her claim to the title when she ran the fastest qualifying time of 22.24 in beating out Campbell-Brown (22.29 the tape in the first heat, while Felix easily followed winning the next heat in the fourth fastest time of 22.44 behind compatriot Muna Lee, the winner of the last heat in 22.30. The tide, however, turned in the final as Felix saved her best for last as she maintained her lead from the crack of the gun in six in 22.02 to put her name on the two fastest times this year. Campbell-Brown, just behind her in lave five, got the silver in 22.35 and FergusonMcKenzie, trailing in lane four, had to settle for the bronze in 22.41. "You know what, I'm still satisfied with the bronze," said Ferguson-McKenzie, who made up for her sixth place finish in the 100 final three days before the preliminaries of the 200. "I really wanted to run a personal best and set a national record, but the season isn't over yet. So hopefully I can get t o do both of them before I'm done." N ow that the World's are complete, Ferguson-McKenzie, who earned about $36,000 (which represents her ,000 for the bronze, ,000 for her split on the relay team and $6,000 for sixth in the 100), say she can now concentrate on the rest of the season and all of the monies that's to be won head ing into the World Athletic Final next month. She will rejoin the field in a rematch of Berlin at the Welk lasse Zurich meet on August 28, the fifth of the six race series in the Golden League on Friday in the 100. T he meet will also serve as another qualifier for the athletes to accumulate points for the World Athletics Tour, which culminates with the Finals in Thessaloniki, Greece from September 12-13. Right now. FergusonMcKenzie is sitting in seventh spot with 55 points. The race is led by Jamaican World silver medalists Kerron Stewart with 100 with Bahamian Chandra Sturrup sitting in second with 72. Although the 200 is not on the schedule for Zurich, Ferguson-McKenzie heads that chart with 55, a seven-point margin over Virgin Island's LaVerne Jones-Ferrette. The Golden League series will end on September 9 in Bruxelles at the Memorial Van Damme. But before that, Ferguson-McKenzie is expected to compete in the Zageb 2009 on August 31 as well. As for next year and beyond, Ferguson-McKenzie assured the Bahamian public that she's definitely not done yet. "Based on the way I've ben running this year, I am going to compete through 2012 in London, England," said Ferguson-McKenzie, the site of what will be her fifth Olympic Games, dating back to Atlanta, Georgia in 1996 when she made her debut. "I feel that I'm fit and I'm in a position to continue to run fast," she said. "And being in the new environment that I'm in, I don't see why I should not be able to compete in another Olympic Games." In three years, FergusonMcKenzie should then be considered the 'Grandma' of the Bahamian track team at age 36, taking over from Sturrup, who held that honor in Berlin after 43-year-old javelin thrower Lavern Eve didn't make the team. "If Chandra can still run 10.99 at age 36, I don't see why I can't run under 11 seconds at age 36," Ferguson-McKenzie stressed. "We will just have to wait and see what happens. But I want to compete in one more Olympics." Along the way, FergusonMcKenzie is still contemplating whether or not she will run in the IAAF's 13th World Indoor Championships in Doha, Qatar from March 1214, 2010. But she's certainly going to represent the Bahamas at the Commonwealth Games in Delhi, India from October 3-14. As long as she stays healthy, Ferguson-McKenzie said her goal is to also contest the IAAF's 13th World Championships in Daegu, South Korea from August 27-September 4. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM "We could have easily turned away when they caught Donald and pinned him on the ground and beat him," said Leevan Sands, who just turned 27 on Tuesday when he finished fourth in the men's triple jump final. "But because he was our team-mate, we only went over to ask them why they were treating him like that. That was when the Police asked us to go with them for questioning, It was an embarrassing situation that we found ourselves in, but we didn't do anything wrong." Shamar Sands, the 24-yearold who finished as a semifinalist in the 110 hurdles, said they were sorry for the way that they treated Thomas, a training partner of theirs in Auburn, so they had to go to his rescue. "If we knew that we would have been put in this situation, we could have just tried away and not assisted him at all," Shamar Sands said. "But we just couldn't leave him there, not the way they were treating him." Thomas, the 25-year-old who relinquished his title he won in Osaka, Japan in 2007 when he just missed out making the final in the men's high jump, was unavailable for further comments yesterday as he had already departed for the airport. Neither Sands said they were unaware of any compromising situation Thomas got himself in that may have led to him being chased and thrown to the ground by the bouncers of the nightclub because they were not in that close vicinity. "None of us did anything wrong," Leevan Sands insisted. "There was a lot of athletes there who can verify that. But it's just unfortunate that we were taken in for questioning. But we didn't do anything wrong, except head out to the club that night." BERLIN WORLDCHAMPIONSHIPS: THEAFTERMATH Team heads home F ROM page 11 FROM page 11 By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net BERLIN, Germany: Stop the time clock. Rewind it t o about ten years for Chandra Sturrup. That's how the 37-year-old, soon to be 38 veteran sprinter looked as she competed at the IAAF's 12th World Championships in Athletics last week. Nobody hardly noticed the age difference because Sturrup was the first to remind all of the reporters who h ad interviewed her in the mixed zone where the athl etes were stopped for comments once they had completed their events. "Why everybody is so concerned about my age," s he boldly asked when one of the first questions posed to her from one of the international reporters after the women's 100 metres final how do she do it at age 37. S turrup, who will actually turn 38 on September 12, abruptly answered: "It's because I feel like I'm 27." And she looked that way. Although she was seventh in the final in 11.05 seconds on August 17 at the Olympic Stadium, Sturrup posted a season's best of 10.99 for third at a Golden League meet in Rome, which had heads turned as she headed into Berlin. A nd although she deliberately decided not to talk too much to the media prior to the final, she said it was all because she got tired of all the questions about her age. Age certainly wasn't a factor in the century and it d idn't show up with her blazing speed on the second leg for the Bahamas women's 4 x 100 relay team thatc linched the silver in a season's best of 42.29 behind J amaica to return to the podium at a major champio nship for the first time since the 2000 Olympic Games i n Sydney, Australia. " I just felt good out there," said Sturrup about her performance. "I worked really hard to get here and I w as determined to go out there and give it my best shot and I think I did that." She collected an estimated $15,000, inclusive of the $5,000 for her seventh in the 100 and her share of the $40,000 as a part of the silver medal relay team. Not bad for a 37-year-old, who could have easily not pack any bags to compete at all. That's where the conversation at the Olympic Stadium after the 4 x 1 performance got a little interesting. For the first time, Sturrup asked the much anticip ated question: How long do you intend to continue in the sport. "I really don't know yet," said Sturrup with a little hesitating. "I haven't really thought about it yet. But I know for sure that I will compete next year at the World Indoors and then I will take it from there." K nown as one of the fastest starters in the world, the indoors suit Sturrup better than the outdoors because she will have a 60 metre race to contend with when she go to Doha, Qatar from March 12014, 2010. In an international career that got started with a g old in the 100 and silver in the 200 at the Central American and Caribbean Junior Championships in1 988, Sturrup's first medal at the World's came at the 1997 Indoor Championships when she got a silver. S he then went on to win the World Indoor's 60 title in 2001 and got her first World Outdoor Championship medal with a bronze in 2003. Along the way, she has d ominated at both the Central American and Caribbean, Pan American and Commonwealth Games. The only level she has not won an individual medal i s at the Olympic Games where her best showing was sixth in the 100 in 2000. And that maybe the only item m issing off her resume as she's not certain if, at age 40, she wants to be competing in London, England in 2012. Unlike many of her foes, Sturrup find herself in a very unique position, not just in age. She's one of the few athletes who are excelling at this l evel who is self-trained. And that is not be design, but really as fate would have it. After her coach, Jamaican Trevor Graham, whom she had worked with from 1998 to 2006, ran into some problems with the law, Sturrup has been training on hero wn and that is because she felt she learnt so much from him that she can do it on her own. Has it worked? It certainly does when one consider the fact that her 10.99 has only be topped by six other athletes so far this year, including Debbie FergusonM cKenzie, who sits just above her with 10.97. Sturrup, the single mother of an 18-year-old, Shawn, l eft Berlin for Switzerland where she will compete again on Friday at the Weltklasse Zurich, the fifth of the six Golden League Grand Prix Meets. The final one is i n Bruxelles at the Memorial Van Damme on September 4. But Sturrup should be competing on August 31 and again on September 9 before she get ready for theI AAF/VTB Bank World Athletics Final in Thessal oniki, Greece from September 12-13. G oing into those pre-World Championships meets, Sturrup was sitting in second place on the World Tour l ist for the 100 with 72 points behind Jamaica's Kerron S tewart's 100 for first place. The aftermath to Berlin is where the athletes tend to really show their true colours a s they try to claim the hefty cash prizes available at the end of tunnel. As she head towards that tunnel, Sturrup said she will also start looking ahead to what could beg rand finale in 2010. Who knows, she might just stick a round a little longer. It all depends on what happen after Doha next March. Sturrup gets better with age GOLD MEDAL WINNER Allyson Felix of the US is flanked by silver medal winner Veronica Campbell-Brown, left, of Jamaica and bronze medal winner Debbie Ferguson-McKen zie of Bahamas after the ceremony for the Women's 200m final at the World Athletics Championships in Berlin. CHANDRA STURRUP , Sheniqua Ferguson and Christine Amertil celebrate women's 4 x 100 silver medal. Missing is Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie. “Based on the way I’ve been running this year, I am going to compete through 2012 in London.”

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Debbie FergusonMcKenzie's coaching change key factor B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net BERLIN, Germany: As soon as she had returned home from the Penn Relays in Philadelphia in April, Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie packed her bags and left her training camp in Miami, Florida and headed north to Orlando where she teamed up with her Jamaican rival Veronica Campbell-Brown and American Tyson Gay. It was probably the wisest move that the 33-year-old has made in her life and it has rejuvenated her career to the point that Ferguson-McKenzie has announced that will will definitely compete through the 2012 Olympic Games before she finally hang up her sprints. "I wasn't happy where I was," said Ferguson-McKenzie, of her previous site where she worked under University of Miami's coach Amy Beem and American sprinter Lauyrn Williams. "I just decided after I competed at Penn's that I had to make the move. I think it was the best decision that I could make." Winner of the Bahamas' only individual medal – a bronze in the 200 metres behind Campbell (silver now three-time champion Allyson Felix of the United States – is all the reason more to agree with the Bahamian, who has virtually won a medal at every international meet she has competed in the only one to hold such a distinction. "When I was offered the opportunity to train with coach (Lance certainly don't have any regrets. But at the same time, I want to wish both Lauryn and coach Beem every suc cess." In the short time that Brauman has been able to include Ferguson-McKenzie into his stable, she was able to return home and pull off the double sprint victory at the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations' National Open Track and Field Championships in July at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium. In between that time and the World's over the past nine days, Ferguson-McKenzie has proven to once again be a dominant force on the international scene. She actually posted the fastest time in the world in the 200 of 22.32 in a meet in Rethimno on July 20 until she was beaten by Felix C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE Sturrup gets better with age TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM SHAMAR SANDS walks through the tunnel at the Olympic Stadium after failing to make the final of the men's 110 metres hurdles. LEEVAN SANDS makes an attempt in the final of t he triple jump during the World Athletics Championships in Berlin on Tuesday, August 18, 2009... BERLIN WORLDCHAMPIONSHIPS: THEAFTERMATH By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net BERLIN, Germany: W ith the IAAF's 12th World Championships over and done with, triple jumper Leevan 'Superman' Sands and 110 metres hurdler Shamar Sands said they hope to leave the memories behind as well. The team left the Games Village yesterday and while the two Sands headed onto their next meets in Europe, those still in Berlin returned to the hotel where they stayed when the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations hosted the team at a training camp prior to the start of the championships. Team manager Ralph McKinney confirmed that all of the athletes were in good spirits and are just waiting to get out of Berlin. McKinney is expected to remain until everybody leave by today. As for the two Sands who were caught up in the melee that also involved high jumper Donald Thomas, two Cubans and an American, McKinney said Thomas had to rearrange his return to the United States, while Leevan Sands left for Zurch, Switzerland where he will compete on Friday and Shamar Sands departed for Astoria where he will also compete this weekend. "Everybody else is in good spirits," said McKinney, who noted that sprinters Debbie Ferguson-McKinney and Chandra Sturrup both headed to Zurich to compete, while Christine Amertil went to Atlanta and Sasha Rolle headed to Arkansas. "Everybody else who is here either are relaxing in the hotel or have gone sightseeing and shopping." McKinney said it was just disappointing that the scuffle that resulted in the three athletes being arrested and detained for questioning for 11 hours on Sunday put a damper on the team's tied 22nd position with Japan in the medal count with two and their tied 16th spot on the placing table. But before they left Berlin, both Sands adamantly claimed their innocence and said they were only escorted to the Police station for questioning. Both athletes assured the Bahamian public that they neither of them were directly involved any scuffle. Spirits high as team heads home ... but ‘Superman’ Sands and Shamar Sands hope to leave memories behind (AP Photo/Michael Sohn DEBBIE FERGUSON-MCKENZIE of the Bahamas celebrates a fter taking the bronze in the Women's 200m during the World Athletics Championships in Berlin on Friday, Aug. 21, 2009. SEE page 10 SEE page 10

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Cool JettingPURCHASEANYDUNKIN’DONUTS COLDBEVERAGE*ANDENTERTO WINATRIPFORTWOEVERYWEEK FORFOURWEEKSWeek 1: Two Round-trip Flights to Fort Lauderdale & $500 Visa Debit Card Week 2: Two Round-trip Flights to Fort Lauderdale & $500 Visa Debit Card Week 3: Two Round-trip Flights to Orlando & $500 Visa Debit Card Week 4: Two Round-trip Flights to New York & $1,000 Visa Debit CardVisit www.Dunkinbahamas.com for ocial contest rules and regulations. Available at participating Dunkin’ Donuts locations, Nassau. * EXCLUDESALLBOTTLEDBEVERAGES Certain restrictions apply. ENTER To Win Round-trip Flights on Now oering daily jet service to Fort Lauderdale & Orlando from Nassau & your rst bag is free!* Nonstop ights are also available from Nassau to New York & Boston. * Baggage weight and size limits apply. cent next month. The final pageant, which involved 83 contestants from across the globe, was televiseda cross the world live on NBC and Telemundo from 9pm to 11pm Sunday. Pageant co-owner Donald Trump revealed on the night that1 8 countries had vied to host the pageant, but the Bahamas got it. Mr Trump said “the government can be very proud of themselves” for the manner in which the country prepared itself for the eventa nd hosted the competition. He said the Bahamas looked “amazing.” Y esterday, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said the success of the event exceeded even our very high expectations.” He touted the fact that, besides m assive exposure for the Atlantis resort, where the pageant was based, the two-hour event involvede ight minutes of coverage of the Family Island including Exuma, Bimini, Abaco and Grand Bahama from trips taken there by the contestants, highlighting thed iversity of The Bahamas. All of the “intros and outros” around various segments of the show were accompanied by the official logo that appears in allB ahamas tourism promotions. “We are already getting emails and calls from all over to say it was the best two hours of promotionf or any country ever. At the end of the day while all the publicity was quite useful it was the worldwidea udience for the final telecast that matters,” said the minister. T he Minister suggested that another area where the event will benefit The Bahamas going for-w ard is as an example of our capacity to host major events. “We never ever looked at this as a three week event or a onen ight event, it’s something that we use as a platform to move some other things forward. “There are local companies that put on events for Miss Universet hat are companies that service groups coming into The Bahamas that now have a portfolio of capability that they never had before and that can also be used. We can now put that to any country or organisation that has large numbers of people coming from anywhere else to show whatw e can do,” added the minister. Mr Vanderpool Wallace explained that the Ministry soughtt o cash-in on the “high awareness and excitement levels” generated b y the exposure of the Bahamas during the event by running advertisements for Bahamas vacationsr ight after the telecast. He said that the Ministry will be monitoring more closely where its f uture bookings are coming from to see how the event may have stimulated more interest from newm arkets and to what extent it may be worth pursuing more aggress ive marketing campaigns in different areas. We think we will begin to see bookings right now for all points in the future so we will continue tom onitor it not just how much business but where it’s coming f rom,” he said. Miss Universe telecast was ‘a full return for govt money invested’ F ROM page one MISS VENEZUELA Stefania Fernandez, center, steadies her Miss Universe 2009 crown as she poses with the other contestants at the end of the Miss Universe beauty pageant in Nassau, Bahamas, Sunday, Aug. 23, 2009. A n d r e s L e i g h t o n / A P TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras FOREIGN ministers from seven nations launched a direct, h igh-profile attempt Monday to persuade Honduras’ interim government to restore ousted President Manuel Zelaya, according to Associated Press. The delegation from the Organization of American States was the most prominent group of officials to visit Honduras since Zelaya was arrested and hustled out of the country June 28, prompting criticism from governments around the world. “We hope to meet with the interim government and other s ectors (of Honduran society who are able to support all the points in the San Jose accord, including the reinstatement of President Zelaya,” Costa Rican Foreign Minister Bruno Stagno told reporters.The foreign ministers from Argentina, Cana da, Costa Rica, Jamaica, Mexico, Panama and the Dominican Republic met with Zelaya supporters in the morning and they “showed they would support the accord,” Stagno said. OAS Secretary-General Jose Miguel Insulza accompanied the g roup. The OAS is pressuring the interim government to accept the San Jose accord, a plan proposed by Costa Rican President Oscar Arias that would return Zelaya to power until elections are held by the end of Novem ber and would grant amnesty both to Zelaya for any alleged crimes and to those involved in the coup. ‘SUCCESS in English, success in life’ says this billboard in a country district in Guilin, China, which encourages Chinese students to study Eng lish to succeed in the world. This photograph was taken by Mr Ron Lightbourn, who with his wife, took a boat trip down the Li River, stopping off in Guilin for a short tour during which he spotted this billboard. Immediately Mr Lightbourn thought of Bahamian students failing their English Language exams and felt that the global impor tance of English should be a wake up call for them. SEE EDITORIAL PAGE 4. The global importance of the English language Delegation seeks Zelaya’s return in Honduras visit

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B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor MINORITYinvestors in Bahamas Supermarkets, the publicly traded holding company forC ity Markets, have been urged by a leading Bahamian financial consultant to “take strong action” whenever the company holds its next annual general meeting (AGM v ote in the existing Board of Direct ors. Richard Coulson, head of RC Capital Markets Consultants, in am essage sent to City Markets’ 1500 minority investors, said such action could help improve corporate gove rnance in the Bahamas and show t he company’s Board how upset shareholders were about the lack of information on its financial condit ion. Calling on minority investors to f orm a steering committee if they w ere serious about pushing for a redress of their grievances, Mr Coulson’s message, a copy of which has been obtained by Tribune Busin ess, said: “The facts remain that y ou shareholders continue to be k ept in the dark by the Board of Directors, while your shares effec tively have no market value and it w ill be a long time before you see any dividends. “It seems only logical to me, as a f inancial consultant, that the minori ty shareholders should take strong action at the next AGM, such as vigorous questioning, voting no c onfidence in the present Board, and proposing a slate of new directors.” T here is no chance anything proposed by the minority shareholders in, say, a dissenting Proxy, would be adopted given that BSL Holdings, t he private equity consortium that d ominates the Board, has a strong 78 per cent majority. Mr Coulson acknowledged this, but wrote: “Your formal resolut ions would be defeated by majori ty vote (although you might get s upport from several of the majority group), but could lead to nego tiated changes, and at least you w ould go on record and would receive wide publicity which certainly the dominant foreign share-h older, Neal & Massey, would wish t o avoid for obvious reasons. “There might even be political fall-out from your action. In my o pinion, your motions would have a salutary effect on corporate governance in our entire capital mar k ets.” Mr Coulson said this represented By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor THE G overnment has agreed a $300,000 Inter-A merican Development B ank (IDB the legal and regulatory framework for this nation’s water industry, a programme that includes devising a 10year business plan for the ailing Water & Sewerage Cor p oration and increased water prices. The Ingraham administra tion, in the form of Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, signed the agreement with the IDB on August 5, 2009, agreeing to an initiative that will involve the IDB lending $250,000 from its IDB-Netherlands Water Partnership Programme (INWAP ment providing $50,000. The funds will be used to contract and hire a consult ing firm, an appointment subject to the Government’s approval, which will develop a plan for revamping the Bahamian water industry’s legal and regulatory framework. “The bank [IDB] is currently financing the preparation of a Water and Sanitation Strategic Sector Plan,” the IDB said in its operational p lan for the initiative. “This assignment includes the preparation of a 10-yearB usiness Plan for the Water & Sewerage Corporation as well a tariff request. It hasb een determined that the Water & Sewerage Corporation Act has not been updated since 1976, and its provisions are not adequate in the current environment. The current legislations need to be revised in the light of severe environmental, health, and C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.96 $4.27 $4.05 & $%"%'$ t%&!$*%#'$!!&t$!!t&!( !'%(&!&% "!& &!!&!!$%b$%%!'%! * (&"!! brtrrnf IDB initiative to develop 10-year W ater Corp plan A par t from Corporation business plan, consultants hired in $300k project to de vise w a y to place water regulation in URCA s hands and increase prices SEE page 4B City Markets shareholders urged: ‘Take strong action’ SEE page 5B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE T rinidadian head of CLICO (Bahamas moved to restrict the docu m ents the insolvent insurer’s liquidator can obtain from his attorneys regarding his p ersonal financial dealings, arguing that the original subpoena is “overly broad” ands eeks information beyond what is required for an orderly wind-up. Lawrence Duprey, the m an many are blaming for CLICO (Bahamas into insolvency, and his wife,S ylvia Baldini, on August 19, 2009, filed a Protective Motion with the US Bank-r uptcy Court for the south ern district of Florida, seeking an Order that would restrict the documents their US attorneys, Greenberg Traurig, must hand over to liquidator Craig A. ‘Tony’G omez. The hearing on their motion is due to be heard on September 3, 2009, as Mr D uprey seeks to limit discovery only to documents involving the transfer off unds between CLICO (Bahamas the 75 Florida-based entitiesh e and his wife allegedly have an interest in. The Trinidadian wants the court to exempt from dis c overy “documents regard ing transfers to, from, on behalf of, or for the benefit o f either Duprey or Baldini, except to the extent that such transfers involved fundsb elonging to CLICO (Bahamas He also wants “copies of management agreements,s hareholders agreements, operating agreements or records reflecting ownership of any entity, except to the extent that ownership in such entity is held by” CLI C O (Bahamas papers protected by attorney-client privilege and othCLICO chief moves to bar discovery SEE page 6B * Financial consultant recommends ‘vote of no confidence’ in grocery chain’s Board at next AGM, and generating negative publicity to shame likes of Neal & Massey * Argues that investors being ‘kept in the dark’ and shares have ‘no market value’ * Claims that protest could help spur improved corporate governance in the Bahamas C RAIGGOMEZ By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor ERNST & YOUNG (Bahamas sued in a class action lawsuit filed in relation to Bernard Madoff’s giant $64.8 billion Ponzi fraud, a British Virgin Islands company alleging that it and its Cayman affiliate received $1 million in fees despite failing to properly audit an investment fund that had all its assets invested with the convicted fraudster. The action, filed on July 17, 2009, in the US District Court for the southern district of New York by BVI-domiciled Tradex Global Master Fund, also named as a defendant Bahamas and Cayman-based Euro-Dutch Management and i ts managing director, Anthony Inder-Rieden, which acted as fund manager to the Santa Clara I Fund. This fund, initially established in the Bahamas during December 1999 before its transfer to the Cayman Islands on July 30, 2003, was the entity that Tradex invested its funds with. In turn, Santa Clara invested its assets with Cayman-based Harley International, w hich then “invested substantially all of its money” with Mr Madoff. Ernst & Young (Bahamas affiliate was alleged to have acted as Santa Clara’s auditor, with Tradex claiming that their unqualified audit opinions never”fairly pre sented, in all material respects, the financial condition or results of the fund”. Ernst & Young defendant in Madoff lawsuit SEE page 3B By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE COMPTROLLER of Customs said yesterday that claims of delays and corruption stemming from the implementation of proper clearance procedures for courier companies and nonperishable goods, which have been made by some business people, are “gross misrepresentations”. Glenn Gomez said the processes put in place by the Customs Department since his appointment have always been the right procedures, but had not been enforced for decades. Mr Gomez admitted that the new process regarding the C-13 declaration form had become a challenge for courier companies during its initial implementation, but he argued that some concerns brought to him by a newly formed courier association were dealt with promptly. He added that some other changes requested by the association would have required him to negate the revisions made to the clear ing of imported goods. Mr Gomez said the new processes were introduced because government was los ing millions in revenue due to an erroneous proceduret hat he said should not have been in place. “They want a system that is illegal to operate,” he said. “If you’re just upset because you can't circumvent the sys tem, I can’t help you with that. We are there to collect duties not to stymie business-e s.” According to Mr Gomez, the issue of delays has greatly decreased over the months since the C-13 clearance pro cedure was reintroduced. And he said it was due to the department putting more staff in place to expedite the "vast amount" of paperwork required to clear items. Customs chief hits back over corruption concerns SEE page 3B

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B yLARRY GIBSON THEGovernment has announced the suspension ofnew scholarship loans under the Educational ScholarshipL oan Programme. The reason for the suspension was cit-e d as the high default rate on loans, thus preventing the ‘Fund’ from being self-sustaining. While I was not surprised at the high default rateo r the inevitability of the susp ension of new loans, I was v ery surprised at what, prima facie, appeared to be extremely late notice. I thought the late notice was both unfortunate and unfair to those under the impression that funding was forthcoming. We really need to take an urgent look at our long-term national education policy’, as I fundamentally believe that education and training are key to our long-term economic viability as a nation. We need an integrated and comprehensive ‘cradle to g rave’ approach to education a nd training. As I survey the B ahamas’ educational landscape, while I see pockets of excellence, there are so many areas where we could do much better. HOME GROWN VERSUS I NTERNATIONAL My good friend Ray Winder offered his opinion last week, suggesting that government would have got ab etter return on their investm ent if the funds for the stud ent loan programme had been injected into the College of the Bahamas (COB instead of the-now $60 million-deep loan portfolio. T his approach has been t aken by numerous developing countries in the past, where resources are initially directed towards creating an academically respected and competitive national university. To our credit, COB is making great strides in boths pheres and, to the extent that we can maintain both objectives, I believe Ray’s views h ave merit. I also share all his v iews about the need for COB to have the capacity to educate the majority of stud ents seeking a tertiary edu cation there. However, it is not the full s olution. For example, there a re undoubtedly specialised programmes or areas of study that COB cannot offer, or they may not be cost effective to offer. In such instances, there must be funding avail a ble for studies abroad. In disciplines where we have demonstrated capability and capacity, we should first consider directing public fundi ng and scholarship awards to C OB, while still making scholarship funding for advanced degrees and specialised programmes at institutions abroad available. DIVERSITY IN T RAINING There is a constituency out there who would argue that forcing scholarship students to COB may not be advisable,i f it means that virtually all o ur students would be educ ated at COB. I guess that the point being suggested is that graduates (and, by extension, our future workforce) may all be of a similar leaning or phi-l osophy. For example, if C OB’s economics department is ‘monetarist-leaning’, then most of our graduates may be monetarist in their views. In a conversation some years ago, a physician pointed out that probably as much as 75 per cent of our doctors areg raduates of a single institution, the University of the West Indies (UWI g ood or bad? Should we be c oncerned about this? I am certainly not qualified to offer an opinion on this particular i ssue. What I do know, how ever, is that these same doctors go on to many of the bests chools in North America and E urope for postgraduate studies and specialisation. Admissions to these programmes are highly competitive, and our candidates do extremely well. C ONCLUSION The stark reality is that public funding is limited, and more so, in difficult economic times. Therefore, policym akers have to make tough a llocation decisions from among many competing needs. However, the institutional strengthening and expansion of COB should bea national priority. A by-product of the susp ension of new student loans is the fact that COB will be taking in some 1,700 freshmen students this autumn, the largest intake in its history. T his is probably several h undred more students than C OB would have normally planned for. I trust that COB was given a ‘heads up’ on this and was able to ramp up staffing to accommodate addi-t ional students. I am also told that COB is limited to a class size of 25 students through collective bargaining agreements. While this is excellent, I am reminded of the fact that most colleges and universities run ‘auditorium type’ introducto-r y courses, where one class would have one professor and several research assistants t eaching a single class with s everal hundred students at a time. P OSTSCRIPT – BEACH ALERT Every morning at Goodm an’s Bay you can hear a risi ng crescendo of complaints regarding another encroachment on Bahamians rights. This time, a fence has been erected in the vicinity of the old ‘Nassau Beach Hotel’,w hich actually extends into the water. The only way you can pass this property is to actually swim around it. This is a travesty that is wrong and m ust be corrected immedia tely. Private property only extends to the high water mark. Further, that property has r eceived benefits under the Hotels Encouragement Act,w hich expressly provides for public access to all public areas. If the fence is erected for security reasons, then why can’t it run parallel to theb each at or above the high w ater mark, which the law c alls for. Finally, I am not sure whether that land is actually Crown land in the first instance. If so, it makes theB ahamian people the rightful o wner of the land and the thoroughfare. I call upon those who erected this fence to ‘do the right thing’ and correct your oversightthis isn’t something that the Government needs to get involved with. U ntil next week NB: Larry R. Gibson, a C hartered Financial Analyst, i s vice President-pensions, Colonial Pensions Services (Bahamas s ubsidiary of Colonial Group International, which owns Atlantic Medical Insurancea nd is a major shareholder of S ecurity & General Insurance Company in the Bahamas. The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of Colonial GroupI nternational or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated com panies. Please direct any questions or comments to rlgibson@atlantichouse.com.bs C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG R Q GD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU L V $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU L V $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV N OTICE MARLIN INVESTMENTS, INC. In Voluntary Liquidation N otice ishereby given that in accordance with Section 138(4Business Companies Act. 2000, MARLIN INVESTMENTS, INC. is in dissolution as of August 17, 2009. J ames M. Meyer situated at 701 Brickell Avenue, Suite 1400, Miami, Florida is the Liquidator.LIQUIDATOR _ ____________________ P AGE 2B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Learning to value tertiary education Financial Focus By Larry Gibson

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Euro-Dutch was alleged to have been the investment manager for both Santa Clara and Harley, with Mr Inder-Rieden and another defendant, Dawn Davies, sitting on both companies’ Boards of Directors. The crux of Tradex’s allegations and complaint is that neither the Ernst & Young subsidiaries, nor Euro-Dutch and its executives, spotted that Mr Madoff was a fraudster running a Ponzi scheme, despite numerous ‘red flags’ being raised in public such as his high returns year after year being ‘too good to be true’; Madoff’s unwillingness to subject himself and his firm to outside scrutiny; his external auditors being a small three-man company; and numerous public media articles and investment professionals expressing scepticism. The lawsuit alleged: “Ernst & Young was also responsible for, complicit in and acquiescent to the issuance of the false and misleading statements and omissions, including those set forth above, contained in the fund’s audited annual financial statements.” Tradex alleged that Ernst & Young provided a clean audit opinion for Santa Clara as recently as July 4, 2008, representing that the fund’s financial statements “gave a true and fair view of the state of affairs of the company, and of its results and cash flows”. Santa Clara is now in liquidation in the Cayman Islands. Alleging that the Ernst & Young affiliates had “breached [their] duties” to investors in Santa Clara and Harley, the latter of which is being sued by the Madoff bankruptcy trustee, the lawsuit claimed: “Ernst & Young ignored multiple red flags that would have led any reasonable auditor exercising professional scepticism to inquire further to obtain the requisite level of comfort.” The lawsuit alleged that the fair value of Santa Clara’s financial assets, its total assets and liabilities, the net asset value of shares, and investment income and expenses, were all incorrectly presented in the fund’s audited financial statements. “Ernst & Young reaped substantial professional fees for their supposed audit work for both Santa Clara and Harley,” the lawsuit alleged. “On information and belief, Ernst & Young was paid substantially more than $1 million for their auditing and accounting work on the Santa Clara and Harley engagements.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM btrt tfb r f r !%* '!$() ))!*&*#tffn""bnff ! $ %#&!*&*# !%** According to him, however, when the new procedure was introduced in Grand Bahama it was rife with “quirks,” and so the use of the old system was extended to the end of the year. There are no plans, though, for a similar extension in New Providence. Mr Gomez said New Providence -based courier companies had been given three extensions before the C-13 was implemented, and “will have to wait for Freeport to catch them up”. He suggested that the Family Islands do not have the same procedures in place and customs facilities as New Providence, and barring any change to the types of shipments they receive they will continue to have different procedures. “Going forward it is not practical that every single thing that we do is going to work in Exuma (and other Family Islands),” said Mr Gomez. “The same law will apply, but every step in the process might not apply.” According to him, the changes were implemented in order to lead the Customs Department to a more feasible procedural structure, in hopes of one day taking the process paperless by moving online. Businesses recently lamented that the changes are impacting cash flow and could increase the potential for corruption. Tribune Business was told that the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce had received hundreds of complaints from Bahamian businesses. Responding to those claims, Mr Gomez said he has not had any complaints to his office from those entities, saying: “If they have concerns come and speak with me and I’ll address it.” With regard to the charges that delays caused by the new procedures could encourage corruption, Mr Gomez suggested that when corruptminded individuals decide to commit illegal offences, there is not much that can be done. However, he said, should the behaviour persist, the individual will be caught. “We are changing the system so there are less avenues for corruption, and these things will be able to be detected much quicker,” he said. FROM page one Ernst & Young defendant in Madoff lawsuit FROM page one Customs chief hits back

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financial issues facing the country the water and sanitation sector.” The Water & Sewerage Corporation’s financial woes are nothing new and, if any-t hing, appear to be getting w orse. Without government subsidies it would have suffered a $24.107 million net loss in 2007, the last year for which financial statements were available, had it notb een for the receipt of $20 m illion-plus in taxpayer funds. Tribune Business recently revealed that it “expects to be in arrears” on payments to its major reverse osmosis suppli-e r, BISX-listed Consolidated W ater, for the remainder of 2 009, despite making an $8.7 million payment on the outstanding balance during this year’s second quarter. The IDB said in documents r elated to the water sector regulatory reform programme that the Bahamas’ increasing reliance on reverse osmosis to produce potable drinking water had increased costsb ecause this was an expensive means of water production. However, for the Water & S ewerage Corporation, this c ost increase had not been balanced/offset by a rise in revenues, as the Corporation had not increased tariffs since 1993. T he IDB said: “There is the need to ensure adequater ecovery of costs for operation, maintenance and required capital expenditures to ensure that the Water & Sewerage Corporation com-p lies with its mandates. A review of the financial situation of the Water & Sewerage Corporation confirms that the operational costs of the Water & Sewerage Corporation over the past 10 y ears have been increasing as w ater production has been increasing; but the volume of water sold remained relatively constant and the averagep rice of water sold has been d ecreasing. The data also shows increases in water losses as p roduction volumes increase. The margin required to meet operational expenditure andc apital expenditure of the utility company has therefore been shrinking over these pasty ears. “Exacerbating the situation, t he Water & Sewerage Corporation Act 1976 is outdateda nd allocates to Water & Sewerage Corporation the conflicting roles of a utility service provider and a water regulator. At the same time, theW ater & Sewerage Corporat ion lacks financial and operational autonomy necessary for an efficient utility.” Given the “severe environmental, health and financial issues” facing the Bahamas w hen it came to water and s anitation, the IDB said the selected consultants would also make recommendations for the transfer of regulatoryr esponsibility from the Water & Sewerage Corporation to t he newly-formed Utilities Regulation and Competition A uthority (URCA URCA would then regulator all water and sanitations ervices providers, and deal with issues such as sector pric ing and quality of service. D eveloping a revised tariff and fee structure for the Water & Sewerage Corporat ion and the industry is also p art of the consultants’ brief. Assessing the Governmen t’s likely attitude to the project and water industry r eform, the IDB documents said: “The likelihood of back-t racking on the need for an independent economic regulator is low, given the large annual subsidies that the Government currently provides tot he Water & Sewerage Corp oration. “This situation, coupled with the dire need for pollution control to ensure sustainable use of groundwater resources, provide compelling r easons for the Government o f the Bahamas to adopt a new Water and Sanitation Act.” As for increased water tari ffs and prices, the IDB init iative added: “Regarding the i mpact on the lower income and special groups, the techn ical consultancy proposes that the consulting firm considers cross-subsidies and oth-e r mechanisms to ensure access to water by low income groups. Also, due consideration will be given to the social aspects of water management, i ncluding consultation and p articipation, transparency and management of potential conflicts.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 5(*,67(5(' 3+<6,&,$1 +(/3 /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU L V $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG R Q GD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV IT MANAGERB ahamas Supermarkets Limited operates a leading s upermarket chain in The Bahamas. As a market leader, the Company prides itself on delivering premier service through its City Market supermarkets, having a strong c ommitment to its customers, associates and community. An opportunity for an I. T. Manager exists in New P rovidence to join this market leader. Reporting to the CEO, this position involves managing a staff of tech support personnel who are responsible for the daily operations of customer service, retail and office support and network/systems management. Also, the candidate is responsible for resource planning and assignments within the group to ensure projects are delivered on time with a high degree of quality. The ideal candidate should have 2-3 years of solid measurable experience in IT Project Management and an excellent communicator, both oral and written. QUALIFICATIONS/REQUIREMENTS: Manager aspects of IT governance. skills IT projects are aligned with the business and company’s vision. ’s and LAN’s. MCSE certified. skills. SQL Server and Project Management skills a definite asset projects and tasks Performance, and Supportability requirements of critical software components solutions software specifications that reflect an in-depth understanding of the business and end-user requirements while also considering IT standards and technical direction n related issues Salary and benefits will be commensurate with experience and qualifications. If you have what it takes to succeed in this challenging role, forward your resume and cover letter to:Human Resources Director Bahamas Supermarkets Limited No telephone inquiries please Only qualified applicants will be contactedAINAUG2409 /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV FROM page one IDB initiative to develop 10-year Water Corp plan

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Great Guana Cay, Abaco The Bahamas EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY You are invited to apply for the following position currently available. Assistant Marketing Manager Key Requirements A demonstrated track record of sales to high net wort h clients Extensive experience maintaining strong long term customer relationships with significant add on/repeat business A strong existing network with high net worth clients in the U.S.A. , Europe and The Bahamas Ability to d evelop and implement marketi ng campaigns to high net worth clients Qualifications Bachelor’s degree in Sales, Marketing or related subject; professional certifications Minimum five (5 promotions Must be proficient in C 2 C software, ACT, Power Point, Microsoft Word, Excel and Asset Manager Must be innovative, demonstrate strong leadership and customer relations skills Must have excellent written and verbal communication skills The s uccessful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing and dynamic organization and must be a self starter, team player, work at the highest standards of performance, and meet deadlines. If you are progressive and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume to the attention of the Director o f HR & Training , hr@bakersbayclub.com o r by fax at 242 367 0 613 . Great Guana Cay, Abaco The Bahamas EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Y ou are invited to apply for the f ollowing position c urrently available. DesignManager Key Responsibilities Sit on design review committee that ensures design guidelines a nd adherence to project. Assist architect of record with securing necessary building permits. Respond to ASI/RFI questions during building process. List requests and change orders including pricing etc. from owners. Provide field reports and punch lists, a nd ensuring the contractors compliance with the plans and technical specifications. C oordinate the design of new facilities. Qualifications Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Architecture from an accredited university Minimum of 10 years of progressive expe rience in architecture and interior design and construction administration of commercial and residential structures. The s uccessful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing and dynamic organization and must be a self starter, team player, work at the highest standards of performance, and meet deadlines. If you are progressive and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume to the attention of the Director of HR & Training , hr@bakersbyclub. com o r by fax at 242 367 0 613. “Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!” Great Guana Cay, Abaco The Bahamas EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY You are invited to apply for the following position currently available. Executive Chef Key Responsibilities Ability to skillfully prepare international cuisine Plan, desi gn and cost menus for a variety of outlets Recruit, manage, and train culinary team. Manage the culinary budget and food cost. Maintain an effective inventory and supplies vendor list of local and international suppliers. Qualifications Bachelor’s degree i n Culinary Arts or related subject; professional certifications Minimum ten (10 star club, resort or restaurant with at least three (3 shore experience. Previous experience with a start up property a plus. Must be innovative, demonstrate strong leadership and culinary skills, must be able to train others and execute ideas and standards. The s uccessful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing and dynamic organization and must be a self starter, team player, work at the highest standards of performance, and meet deadlines. If you are progressive and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume to the attention of the Director of HR & Training , hr@bakersbayclub.com o r by fax at 242 367 0 613 . “Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!” Great Guana Cay, Abaco The Bahamas EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY You are invited to apply for the following position currently available. Assistant Golf Course Superintendent Key Re quirements include: Must have previous experience on gol f course crew . K nowledge of Toro site pro Irrigation system . Be able to follow basic and detailed instructions under the Superintendent. Experience with fertilizer and chemical applications. Knowledge of warm season grasses a plus. Qualifications Minimum o f 2 3 years experience in golf course maintenance . Associate’s or Bachelor’s degree in Turf Management or related field. Excellent written and oral communication skills. The s uccessful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing and dynamic o rganization and must be a self starter, team player, have a positive attitude, work at the highest standards of performance, and meet deadlines. Persons without relevant experience will not be considered. If you are progressive and prepared to advance yo ur career, submit your resume to the attention of the Director of HR & Training , hr@bakersbyclub.com o r by fax at 242 367 0 613. “Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!” Great Guana Cay, Abaco The Bahamas EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY You are invited to apply for the following position currently available. Golf Clubhouse Manager Key Responsibilities Start up new golf clubhouse, including all systems and elements for new golf program Oversee all Atlantic Clubhouse staff and daily operations of golf, retail, and food & beverage Financial accountability for creating forecasts, budgets, as well as compliance Direct and oversee all aspects of member services for the golf club, including the sequence of service and amenity programs Develop and implement service standards for golf operations and associated Member Services and ensure consistent high levels of all service standards Conduct quarterly training an d departmental reviews Qualifications Minimum of Associate degree in Golf Course Management, Business Administration; Bachelor’s degree a plus. Minimum of 5 years in Golf Course Management Previous experience in a hotel or private club preferred. Experie nce in opening a golf course clubhouse a plus The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing and dynamic organization and must be a self starter, team player, work at the highest standards of performance, and meet deadlines. If y ou are progressive and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume to the attention of the Director of HR & Training, hr@bakersbyclub.com or by fax at 242 367 0613. “Becoming the Employer of Choice in Th e Bahamas!” Great Guana Cay, Abaco The Bahamas EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY You are invited to apply for the following position currently available. General Superintendent, Vertical Construction Key Responsibilities include: Supervise subcontractor s on site for scheduling, quality, and safety. Quantity survey as required . Assist with project close out documentation including monitoring of punch list corrections, collecting warranty information, and samples. S upervise and monitor staff and staffing l e vels. Call for inspections and follow up that inspections were performed and a pproved. Hold and attend subcontractor meetings and safety meetings. H old and attend preconstruction meetings with subcontractors for conduct and contract compliance. Qualificat ions Minimum of 2 0 years in construction administration of high end residential and commercial facilities . Excellent computer skills in particular Microsoft Word, Excel, and Project, Timberline Project Management and Primavera. E xcellent written and oral c ommunication skills. Well organized, self motivated, and able to meet demanding deadlines a nd handle multiple tasks and projects. Must be able to accurately read plans and work well with all construction and architectural personnel, engineers and owners. If you are progressive and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume to the attention of the Director of HR & Training , hr@bakersbyclub.com o r by fax at 242 367 0 613. “Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!” his own personal view of the situation, adding: “It is entirely the decision of you shareholders whether you wish to form a steering committee and take action. If so, I andJ erry Butler will be glad to p rovide professional assistance.” Tribune Business previously revealed that Messrs Coulson and Butler had already helped to organiseo ne meeting of minority i nvestors in Bahamas Supermarkets, during which attorney Damian Gomez took them through some of the possible legal remedies andl itigation channels open to t hem. I t is unclear when Bahamas Supermarkets expects to hold its next AGM, the last one for fiscal year 2007 having been held in September 2008,a date some 14-15 months a fter the period end. The next AGM will be for its 2008 fiscal year that ended at end-June 2008, meaning that Bahamas Supermarkets will have endured a sec-o nd consecutive reporting p eriod in which its year-end financial statements are released after the subsequent financial year has been completed, something that hasl eft the company well outs ide compliance with global c apital markets norms. Tribune Business understands that Bahamas Supermarkets is hoping to possibly hold its next AGMt owards the end of Septemb er, or failing that, in October. This, though, is dependent on completion of the fiscal year 2008 audit by external auditors, KPMG, which, in turn, hinges on thes uccessful completion of City M arkets’ multi-million dollar refinancing. Tribune Business revealed yesterday that 20 per cent of the new equity capital injec-t ion from the investors that c omprise BSL Holdings had b een received, enabling City Markets to restart its direct import programme and prepare for a “relaunch” in the next six weeks. S unil Chatrani, Bahamas S upermarkets’ chief executive, expressed optimism that receipt of the financing would be the final step towards completing the longoutstanding 2008 financialy ear audit, and was confident t hat the company’s reporting/disclosure problems were now firmly behind it. He said of the 2008 audit: “Now that the financing hasc ome in, the auditors are r eviewing the business plan, t he actual numbers to date and commitment of the funding. “They are dotting the ‘i’s’ and crossing the ‘t’s’ to con-f irm these things are in place, s o that they can sign-off on the audit. We’re hoping that in the next two to three weeks this will be completed.” There is little doubt, t hough, that the minority i nvestors in Bahamas Supermarkets have experienced a dramatic destruction of shareholder value since BSL Holdingsa cquired its majority stake f rom Winn-Dixie in summer 2 006 for $54 million. Not only were they effectively sidelined during the acquisition, no offer was made to buy them out ont he same terms offered to W inn-Dixie. Now, Bahamas Supermarkets is projected, through management accounts, to have incurred a $13.429 million loss for the 2008 fiscal year. A part from Neal & M assey, the Trinidadian conglomerate that is BSL Holdings’ largest shareholder with a 40 per cent stake, the Bahamas-basedi nvestors in Bahamas S upermarkets’ majority s hareholder include the two hotel industry pension funds, RoyalFidelity’s private equity arm, Milo B Butler & Sons, and CraigS ymonette. FROM page one City Markets shareholders urged: ‘Take strong action’

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e r confidential documents, to b e eliminated from the discovery process, too. Mr Duprey’s attorneys, in the protective order motion filed with the Florida Bankruptcy Court, a copy of whichh as been obtained by Tribune B usiness, argued: “The [subpoena] is overly broad and purports to require disclosure of documents of a privileged,c onfidential and proprietary nature, and/or which have no relationship to [CLICO (Bahamas property, or the liabilities and financial condition of [CLI-C O (Bahamas [CLICO (Bahamas a discharge.” T hey were responding after Mr Gomez, the Baker Tilly Gomez accountant and partner, filed a subpoena demanding a host of documents related to the business dealings of7 5 Florida-based companies b elieved to be owned and/or controlled by Mr Duprey, as he ramps up efforts to trace and recover the company’s assets. Informed sources have told T ribune Business that the liqu idator intends to “go after Mr Duprey in a big way” in his bid to recover assets for CLICO (Bahamas creditors, policyholders and annuity depositors, althoughn o findings of wrongdoing have yet been made against the Trinidadian chairman. However, Mr Duprey’s attorneys, in their Protective Order Motion, argued: “[CLIC O Bahamas], apparently the subject of insolvency proc eedings occurring in the B ahamas, has commenced these proceedings as a prof essed means of seeking discovery for use in the Bahamian proceedings. “[The liquidator] has served i ts Notice on Greenberg, purp orting to require production of documents which Greenberg obtained in connectionw ith its business of providing legal services and counsel to various of its clients, including Duprey and Baldini and companies which they own, have owned, or in which they exer-c ise or have exercised mana gement control....” Mr Duprey’s attorneys, though, attempting to justify their demands for a Protective Order, alleged: “The [subpoena] does not purportt o limit the scope of the prod uction it seeks to documents related to transfers of funds in which [CLICO (Bahamas has any ownership interest or entitlement, or ownership and management agreements, ine ntities in which [CLICO (Bahamas “Rather, the subpoena purports to require wholesale disclosure of documents relating to transfers and ownership of t he business activities of all 77 entities and persons witho ut regard to whether the b usiness activities, transfer or ownership or management s tructures have any relevance to [CLICO (Bahamas vency proceedings in the Bahamas.” I t was argued that Mr G omez wanted a “limitless disclosure of documents” unrelated to CLICO( Bahamas), and both Mr Duprey and his wife were said to have informed Greenberg Traurig of their objections to handing over papers unrelated to the Bahamian insurer. A lthough the documents d o not divulge why Mr Gomez is seeking all this information, it is more than likely that he wants to examine whether any assets belonging to CLICO( Bahamas) and, by extension, i ts Bahamian insurance policyholders, annuity depositors and other creditors, may have ended up with Mr Duprey’s private companies – and been used to finance his private business interests. If this turns out to be the c ase, the CLICO (Bahamas liquidator will more than likely go after Mr Duprey and his companies through the courts to secure their return. T his could take months b efore a successful outcome is secured, though, as Mr Gomez will likely have to unravel a maze of inter-party transactions and related party wheelings and dealings. T here is little doubt, t hough, that eyebrows will be raised by the size of Mr Duprey’s private business empire, and why it was necessary to have as many as 75 different companies. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.811.28Abaco Markets1.341.340.000.1270.00010.60.00% 11.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.306.25Bank of Bahamas6.256.250.000.2440.26025.64.16% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2 .372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 1 4.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3511.350.001.4060.2508.12.20% 2 .882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S1)6.006.000.002,0000.4190.30014.35.00% 3 .851.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.783.71-0.070.1110.05233.41.40% 2 .851.32Doctor's Hospital2.002.000.000.3820.0805.24.00% 8.206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.5010.00Finco10.6310.630.000.3220.52033.04.89% 11.7110.30FirstCaribbean Bank10.3010.300.000.7940.35013.03.40% 5.534.95Focol (S)5.135.130.000.3320.15015.52.92% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.49ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.0010.39J. S. Johnson10.3910.390.000.9520.64010.96.16% 1 0.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1 000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1 000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.003 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1460 792 BahamasSupermarkets 792 842 1400 2246 0000 N/M 000% MONDAY, 24 AUGUST 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,577.56| CHG -0.07| %CHG 0.00 | YTD -134.80 | YTD % -7.87BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7% P rime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 7%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities30 May 2013 29 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 InterestFINDEX: CLOSE 790.65 | YTD -5.30% | 2008 -12.31% 14 . 60 7 . 92 Bahamas Supermarkets 7 . 92 8 . 42 14 . 00 2 . 246 0 . 000 N/M 0 . 00% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref2.006.254.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.40051.3320CFAL Bond Fund1.40053.485.15 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.9047-1.20-3.66 1.48421.4075CFAL Money Market Fund1.48423.535.55 3.60903.1031Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1143-8.01-12.43 13.048412.3870Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.04843.415.84 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.40759.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.33992.69-1.41 1.06221.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.06222.566.22 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0243-0.842.43 1.05851.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05852.045.85 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-Jul-09 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 NAV Date 30-Jun-09Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual FundsTO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Jul-09 30-Jun-09 31-Dec-07 31-Jul-09 31-Jul-09 14-Aug-09 31-Jul-09MARKET TERMS / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV F ROM page one CLICO chief moves to bar discovery

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 75F/24C Low: 76F/24C Low: 78F/26C Low: 80F/27C Low: 80 F/27 C Low: 81F/27C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 91F/33C High: 91F/33C High: 90 F/32 C High: 89 F/32 C High: 90F/32C High: 89 F/32C High: 90F/32C Low: 79F/26C High: 91F/33C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 91F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 73F/23C High: 91 F/33 C Low: 77F/25C High: 91 F/33 Low: 75F/24C High: 88F/31C Low: 76 F/24C High: 90F/32C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 92F/33C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 90F/32C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 90F/32C Low: 76F/24C High: 93 F/34 C Low: 76F/24C High: 92F/33C High: 91 F/33 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 25 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. Clouds breaking with a brief shower. Some sun with a t-storm possible. Partly sunny with t-storms possible. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 90 Low: 79 High: 89 High: 90 High: 90 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny. High: 91 Low: 79 Low: 79 Low: 79 AccuWeather RealFeel 102F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 89F 113-87F 109-87F 107-87F 111-85F Low: 80 TODAYTONIGHTWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................93F/34C Low ....................................................84F/29C Normal high ......................................89F/32C Normal low ........................................76F/24C Last year's high .................................. 88 F/31C Last year's low .................................. 76 F/25C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................trace Year to date ................................................23.81" Normal year to date ....................................29.87" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU First Full Last New Aug. 27 Sep. 4Sep. 11Sep. 18 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:48 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:36 p.m. Moonrise . . . 12:02 p.m. Moonset . . . . 11:01 p.m. Today Wednesday Thursday Friday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 12:23 p.m.3.15:51 a.m.0.1 -----6:41 p.m.0.4 12:39 a.m.2.56:40 a.m.0.3 1:17 p.m.2.97:37 p.m.0.6 1:32 a.m.2.37:32 a.m.0.5 2:15 p.m.2.88:37 p.m.0.7 2:29 a.m.2.28:30 a.m.0.6 3:17 p.m.2.79:38 p.m.0.8 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco91/3277/25pc92/3377/25pc Amsterdam72/2255/12pc70/2155/12pc Ankara, Turkey84/2854/12pc82/2750/10s Athens86/3072/22pc90/3270/21s Auckland64/1755/12r64/1752/11pc Bangkok91/3277/25t91/3279/26t Barbados87/3077/25sh86/3077/25sh Barcelona81/2770/21c81/2770/21s Beijing77/2566/18r90/3268/20s Beirut88/3177/25s79/2676/24s Belgrade88/3164/17s95/3566/18s Berlin82/2766/18pc77/2561/16pc Bermuda86/3080/26t86/3080/26pc Bogota67/1945/7pc68/2045/7t Brussels72/2252/11sh75/2359/15pc Budapest86/3059/15s90/3263/17s Buenos Aires73/2255/12pc75/2359/15pc Cairo97/3675/23s96/3570/21s Calcutta91/3281/27t95/3581/27t Calgary76/2448/8pc63/1744/6s Cancun91/3273/22pc91/3274/23pc Caracas81/2772/22t81/2772/22s Casablanca81/2761/16s78/2565/18pc Copenhagen73/2263/17pc71/2159/15pc Dublin66/1854/12pc68/2054/12sh Frankfurt79/2657/13t75/2355/12pc Geneva 83/28 62/16 t 80/2660/15pc Halifax 71/21 57/13 s 72/22 57/13 pc Havana 90/32 72/22 t 88/31 73/22 sh Helsinki 68/20 50/10pc73/2257/13pc Hong Kong 91/32 81/27 t 91/32 82/27t Islamabad 104/40 79/26 s 99/37 77/25 pc Istanbul82/2767/19pc85/2969/20s Jerusalem 83/28 58/14s82/2760/15s Johannesburg 61/1644/6pc68/2043/6s Kingston 88/3180/26sh88/3178/25t Lima71/2158/14s73/2259/15s London72/2255/12pc70/2159/15r Madrid88/3159/15pc95/3566/18pc Manila88/3177/25t86/3079/26t Mexico City77/2555/12t77/2554/12t Monterrey104/4073/22s102/3873/22s Montreal81/2766/18pc77/2550/10pc Moscow59/1548/8sh63/1746/7pc Munich84/2860/15s84/2861/16pc Nairobi79/2653/11pc81/2753/11pc New Delhi 93/3381/27pc91/3279/26t Oslo64/1752/11sh68/2050/10pc Paris72/2255/12sh75/2359/15pc Prague 84/28 61/16 s 83/28 60/15 c Rio de Janeiro75/2367/19c74/2367/19t Riyadh106/4191/32s109/4288/31s Rome 86/30 66/18 s 88/31 68/20 s St. Thomas88/3180/26sh90/3280/26sh San Juan83/2846/7pc87/3048/8pc San Salvador 88/31 70/21 pc 86/30 73/22 c Santiago 73/2248/8pc77/2548/8pc Santo Domingo90/3273/22pc87/3074/23sh Sao Paulo 68/20 57/13 t 68/20 58/14t Seoul84/2872/22pc81/2773/22r Stockholm 72/22 54/12 pc 70/21 52/11 r Sydney 68/20 50/10 s70/2148/8s Taipei95/3583/28pc95/3581/27pc T okyo 82/27 73/22 pc 84/28 75/23 s T oronto 80/2663/17pc79/2654/12pc Trinidad90/3270/21pc91/3270/21pc V ancouver 68/20 53/11 sh 68/2055/12pc Vienna 84/2865/18s82/2766/18c W arsaw 77/25 58/14 s 85/29 61/16 s Winnipeg 74/23 49/9 s 75/2357/13s H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-15 Miles85F Wednesday:NE at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet7-15 Miles85F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-15 Miles85F Wednesday:NE at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet7-15 Miles85F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-15 Miles84F Wednesday:NE at 10-15 Knots2-4 Feet7-15 Miles84F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque82/2762/16t86/3064/17t Anchorage63/1749/9s61/1650/10sh Atlanta88/3167/19pc88/3170/21s Atlantic City83/2867/19s85/2968/20s Baltimore89/3166/18s91/3267/19s Boston82/2770/21s89/3165/18s Buffalo82/2764/17s76/2455/12pc Charleston, SC88/3171/21t91/3271/21t Chicago87/3064/17s76/2458/14c Cleveland84/2862/16s80/2661/16pc Dallas98/3678/25s97/3676/24s Denver83/2856/13t83/2855/12t Detroit87/3064/17s78/2558/14c Honolulu89/3176/24s89/3176/24s Houston97/3674/23t97/3674/23s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday TodayWednesdayTodayWednesday Indianapolis86/3065/18s86/3065/18pc Jacksonville88/3173/22t90/3273/22t Kansas City88/3166/18s86/3066/18t Las Vegas100/3774/23s102/3877/25s Little Rock92/3365/18s91/3266/18s Los Angeles87/3064/17pc87/3064/17pc Louisville88/3168/20s90/3270/21pc Memphis91/3270/21s92/3371/21s Miami90/3280/26t91/3279/26t Minneapolis82/2760/15t81/2758/14pc Nashville92/3366/18s92/3365/18s New Orleans90/3270/21s90/3272/22s New York88/3174/23s88/3172/22s Oklahoma City100/3772/22s94/3469/20pc Orlando91/3275/23t91/3275/23t Philadelphia88/3170/21s92/3370/21s Phoenix 103/39 84/28 pc 106/4184/28s Pittsburgh86/3058/14s84/2862/16pc Portland, OR 75/2354/12pc86/3058/14pc Raleigh-Durham 91/32 69/20 t 92/33 69/20 t St. Louis89/3168/20s90/3268/20pc Salt Lake City 84/28 62/16 t 87/3064/17s San Antonio 101/38 74/23 s 100/37 74/23 s San Diego78/2567/19pc80/2667/19pc San Francisco 72/22 55/12 pc 73/2256/13pc Seattle71/2153/11pc81/2754/12pc T allahassee 91/3269/20pc90/3271/21t T ampa 91/32 76/24 t 92/33 77/25t Tucson95/3574/23t96/3575/23s W ashington, DC 90/32 71/21s91/3271/21s UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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B y LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter l allen@tribunemedia.net IT seems these days practically everyone’s trying their hand at weight loss either through diet or by purchasing the hippest work-out gear in an attempt to whip their body in shape. Despite the large number of fitness hopefuls, o ne expert estimates that more than 50 per c ent of people who begin workout programmes stop within the first 12 months. Edwardo Thompson of the International Sports Therapy and Holistic Spa told Tribune Health that although most people are concerned about their health and weight, reducing their body fat percentage (BFPm ajor challenge. This has lead him to intro ducing a machine which could potentially change the way exercise is thought of by Bahamians. The machine is called the Arasys, and was first introduced in the United Kingdom in 1992. It was originally designed to encourage myelinated cell reproduction in patients suffering from Multiple Sclerosis, and has proven to be effective in reducing the effects of the ill ness. According to Laurent Ambard, the field marketing director for the Arasys Perfector company, the initial success of the of the device paved the way for its introduction in othera reas of health, fitness, and anti-aging treatment. Mr Ambard was in town last Friday and conducted a live demonstration of the machine. He explained: “Arasys is a device created and manufactured by the co-inventor of thef irst pacemaker, Gerry Pollock. “The Arasys Ion Magnum waveform is a composite of 1,000 waveforms which were researched individually in Pollock's laboratory. This compact square waveform is specifically designed to mimic brain waves so that the muscle tissue is made to believe that it is per-f orming a muscle-toning workout. Ion Magn um can be placed on almost any muscle group on the body and if used regularly, combined with a sensible diet, will fight the flab without having to hit the gym. “Results are equivalent to strenuous exercise and they last just as long. There is no gym burnout since the Arasys procedure does not C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM MINISTRY OF FINANCE E MPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY FINANCIAL INTELLIGENCE UNITThis position provides an excellent opportunity for an individual seeking a meaningful employment with the Financial Intelligence Unit. Financial Intelligence Unit. POSITION: DIRECTOR RESPONSIBLE TO: THE MINISTER RESPONSIBLE QUALIFICATIONS : The successful applicant must: the prior approval of the Minister KEY RESPONSIBILITIES Financial Intelligence Unit; responsible the for FlU regarding matters of policy having to do with the functions of FlU; and in particular on matters that could affect public policy; before June 30th in every year; to the Minister at least two months prior to the commencement of the of the audit report is submitted to the Minister. KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS & EXPERIENCE: The successful candidate is expected to: REMUNERATION PACKAGE Interested persons should submit their application and resume in writing along Friday, 25th September, 2009. The Financial Secretary Ministry of Finance Cable Beach GN-902 health BODYANDMIND T T h h e e T T r r i i b b u u n n e e The future in physical fitness SARRAN Thompson is hooked up to the Arayas machine which sends ion magnum waveforms to the body to stimulate muscle toning work-outs. SEE page 10

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I NJuly of this year I wrote o f an apple tree that was grown in The Bahamas and became the source for hundreds of thousands of subtropical apple trees that canbe found in Florida, Texas and Southern California. A t the end of the article I asked if any relatives of Irene Dorsett, the lady who planted the original Dorsett Golden, knew of the fate ofthe original tree. A few weeks later I received a charming call from Aline G. Mc Laughlin who provided me with the following: “My late grand-uncle, Logan Dorsett (husband of Irene Dorsett), was a keen gardener who enjoyed grow ing his plants from seed. His niece, my mother, shared his interest so whenever we met the conversation eventually turned to gardening. In due course we learned of the seeds purchased by Mrs D orsett and how they had v ery carefully selected the spot in the garden where he felt a ‘northern’ apple might possibly grow. This was sheltered from the wind and too much direct sunlight. “They chose well because t here was great excitement among family and friends when the first shoot appeared. One of the friends who was keenly interested was the late Oris Russell who was a horticulturist and in charge of the Government Experimental Station located in the Carmichael Road area. It was Mr Russell who made the connection for the Dorsetts to have their tree registered in Florida. “When the tree bore its first crop the Dorsetts gave a party at their home in Brooklyn Avenue, which is a subdivision just off Village Road. It was attended by friends, family and (of course experts from Florida. All h ands gathered around the t ree which was certified by the people from Florida to be a true apple tree grown from seed, as was made evident by its trunk. Trees that grow from seed have trunks that differ in form from thoseg rown from cuttings. They also stated it was the first apple tree to their knowledge to be grown in a sub-tropical area. Mrs Dorsett had set out tables on the patio on which were plates of apples from the tree of which all present partook. The fruit was beautiful, light yellow with splashes of red, smooth textured and of a delicious flavour. “The tree continued to beat fruit year after year. I do not recall in which year it occurred but the Dorsetts decided to go for an extended visit with their daughter and her family in Alberta, Canada. As they did not want to leave their home empty for a long period they r ented it, but failed to tell t he tenant about the apple tree. “The tenants noted that while the master bedroom was lovely and comfortable, one of the windows was not admitting enough light anda ir due to a large, leafy tree just on the outside of it. They apparently had never seen an apple tree. Their decision to cut it down was based on the desire to present a pleas ant surprise to the Dorsetts o n their return. They made a v ery thorough job of it. Nothing sprouted from where the tree once flourished and the Dorsetts never attempted to plant another.” Thank you, Mrs McLaughlin, for fleshing out the storyo f the Dorsett Golden apple for us. I was so sad to learn that the original tree was cut down. Sometimes we are so careless about our heritage, even in innocence. Perhaps the story of this a pple tree will create an i nterest in growing more Dorsett Goldens in The Bahamas. Your local nursery should be able to obtain certified trees. I spoke with the owner of a large Nassau nursery recently and he saidh e had never heard of Dorsett Golden apple before the Tribune article. Now we know, there’s no excuse. j.hardy@coralwave.com LAST week our readers were presented with tips for fitting and selecting children's footwear and it was very well received. Today, we continue with our 'Back-toSchool' theme by focusing on teachers. Teachers are among the group of people who are on their feet more than four hours per day, and many teachers constantly complain of tired, aching feet and legs, as well as lower back pain. In today's fashion conscious world, while it is important for female teachers to look their very best by complementing that perfect outfit with a cute pair of high heel shoes, or for male teachers to wear trendy looking shoes, it is absolutely necessary to note that these magnificent creations often lead to foot pain at the end of the day. While this is quite understandable, I would recommend that you follow these simple tips to get away with looking your best while feeling great on your feet: 1.WOMEN, try to choose shoes with a reasonable heel height of 1.5 to 2 inches. Look for shoes that provide ample toe room (beware of pointed toe styles) and contain a back strap or enclosed back. The same holds true for men with the exception of heel height. 2. IF YOU are having trouble achieving the appropriate fit with shoes you already own, take them to a local specialty footwear store or Pedorthic facility. They may be able to modify your shoes to bet ter fit your feet. 3. PURCHASE a slim arch support/orthortic that your shoe can accommodate. Specialty footwear stores and pedorthic facilities have options that will fit almost any shoe. Orthortics are especially designed to reduce discomfort associated by high heeled shoes and sandals. In sum, it is important to note that while high heels are not the best for your feet, you can take measures to minimize some of the symptoms associated from wearing high heels, such as pain in the back of the legs (and long term, shortening of the calf muscles), ball of the foot pain, pain under the arch and heel. A lower heel height, properly fitted and a supportive shoe combined with an accommodative orthotic/arch supports will put your feet in balance, and in turn improve the alignment of the rest of your body. Teachers take steps to think on your feet pain free and feel great in the classroom! Bernadette D. Gibson , a Board Certified Pedor thist, is the proprietor of Foot Solutions, a health and wellness franchise that focuses on foot care and proper shoe fit, located in the Sandyport Plaza, Nassau. "The views expressed are those of the author and does not necessarily represent those of Foot Solutions Incorporated or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated companies. Please direct any questions or comments to nassau@footsolu tions.com or 327-FEET (3338 USUALLY, when people are discussing love and romance the topic of soul mates comes up. When asked, 'Do you believe in Soul Mates?' people usually answer u nequivocally 'yes!' It brings out s trong reactions, recounting stories, b oth personal and fictional. From the first moment, we consider having someone of our very own to love; this magical and mysterious person fills our imagination. When we were young, we were read fairy tales and a seed was planted in our young minds. From that moment, we believe that there is someone special for each of us. Just the very idea of meeting the person who matches, compliments, and understands our very essence brings u s a sense of comfort and peace. It is t his dream or fantasy that carries us through dating disappointments. The image of a person waiting for us, waiting for our lives to align, and possibly with a handful of fate thrown in, is tantalising. Are we correct in assuming that our soul mate is our life partner and, therefore, sexual in nature? Think back and consider if you have ever experienced that wonderful bond, connection, thinking as one mind with a dear friend, or family member. There may have been people who have only stayed in our lives for a short time or, in fact, a fleeting moment. That true and pure spiritual connection can be found many times in our lives if we just learn how to open our minds and hearts to receive. How often have we said, 'You know my spirit really takes to ' However, for many of us our own fears and insecurities hold us back from opening our arms, embracing life, loving fully and recognising the soul mate standing right in front of us. All too often, we are so preoccu-p ied with judging, criticising and over analysing that we fail to experience the moment. Perhaps, it is healing and loving ourselves that is needed before the time is right to allow us to see, let alone, meet our s oul mate. A ncient civilisations and cultures h ave many theories on soul mates. It is not surprising therefore, that our own individual views are greatly influenced by our religious and spiritual principles. Values and opinions fall within the wide spectrum of beliefs. On one hand, some believe that the person put on earth for us is chosen by God and therefore can not be denied or controlled. Others, who believe in reincarnation, believe they have met that person in a previous life, hence the deep s ense of knowing them. But one t hing that they all have in common is the spiritual connection or karma felt, between the two people. They possess a deep and natural affinity, friendship, love, sexual unity and compatibility. They have the ability to complete each other in an eternal bond. There are many of us who, in fact, have been fortunate to experience this type of soul mate, but few even come close to meeting their 'twin flame'. We may joke and call our partner our 'better half', but for those who have met their twin, this t ruly feels like their other half. T he bond is so strong that just b eing apart is unbearable for them. Joining of the flames can be excruciating, as their souls and minds are so synchronised that parting for any length of time is painful and they can even feel physically ill. These couples often express a type of telepathy which is quite different from finishing each others sentences, as seen with other compatible couples. Stories of a bereft partner, dying within a short time from a 'broken heart', rings true to the theo ry. Their half of the flame can not c ontinue without the other and it soon extinguishes. Are we too hasty when we first meet someone new? Do we write them off because we do not feel the 'soul mate connection'? What happens if we thought we did have it but after some years think we made a mistake or lost it? What happens when one half of the partnership feels it, but not the other? As relationship and sex therapists, our work involves enhancing and salvaging all those feelings and habits that soul mates possess. Witho ut a doubt, it is possible to bring y our relationship to a higher spiritual l evel by developing all areas of intimacy. There are many self-help books on the subject, but keep in mind the solid foundation has to be there for the relationship to soar to a higher level. To be able to recognise that your relationship is depleted spiritually and emotionally, would benefit from an overhaul, takes a lot of insight and courage. Be brave, take a deep breath and make the changes that are required. Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples Relationship Therapist. She isa Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist. Call for an appointmentRelate Bahamas at 3647230, oremail relatebahamas@yahoo.com orwww.relatebahamas.blogspot.com. She is also available for speaking engagements. GREEN SCENE Think on your feet Teachers! L OVING RELATIONSHIPS C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009, PAGE 9B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Do you believe in soul mates? By MAGGIE BAIN By BERNADETTE GIBSON By Gardener Jack A Bahamian apple 2 A DORSETT Golden with its distinctive red blush, now part of our Bahamian heritage.

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CONSTRUCTIVE criticism is usually hard to give and receivebecause the receiver can react negatively to any type of criticism, especially if they regularly receive criticism that is angry, blaming or condescending. I come across managers, supervisors and employees who avoid giving any type of criticism for fear of the conversation going in an undesirable direction. So what usually happens is the target of the criticism is a llowed to get away with inapprop riate behaviours because the boss is reluctant to take any type of corrective action. Then there are managers, supervisors and employees on the opposite side of the spectrum who tell the cold, hard truth, with good intentions. Unfortunately, depending on how cold and hard the truth is, itcan strip away the dignity and humanity of the receiver and can lead to an angry or withdrawn response. A A M M o o d d e e l l o o f f C C o o n n s s t t r r u u c c t t i i v v e e C C r r i i t t i i c c i i s s m m Managers sometimes use approaches designed to deliver criticism in a constructive way. There are writers that suggest the “oreo” approach where you start the conversation with something positive, then introduce the criticism constructively and then you end on a note that reinforces the employee's strengths and your intent to provide support. A key consideration is to try not to sound rehearsed because you will be perceived as inauthentic or phony. A A u u t t h h e e n n t t i i c c i i t t y y There are people who avoid telling the whole truth when providing criticism because there is the clear and present risk that it can be held against them by the receiver. This is because most people don't want to hear the truth if it isn't aligned with their perception of the truth, even when they ask you for your views. C C u u r r i i o o s s i i t t y y is open, interested and unbiased. It invites trust, openness and creativity by: Posing questions that are not assumption based Being open to diversity Avoiding placing labels on people and situations Questioning is an important tool that is an integral part of curiosity. A leader should never have all the answers or advice so you can invite the person receiving the criticism to provide their views and alternative solutions. The best questioners are skilled at formulating questions that will help the receiver of criticism build their confidence and knowledge. Two quick tips for questioning in situations where you want criticism to be constructive are to avoid questions that lead the receiver to your desired outcome or ones that cause the receiver to feel interrogated. T T i i m m i i n n g g When providing anyone with criticism, timing is everything. The first tip is to avoid telling them the truth in front of others. This causes y y o o u u to appear to be unprofessional and it is e asier for someone to accept critic ism if they are not embarrassed. S econdly, avoid providing criticism if you are in a negative emot ional state. Finally, try to avoid constructively criticising someone if they are in a rush. They may not decode your message accurately because they are in a stressed state or because they are focused on something else. C C o o m m m m u u n n i i c c a a t t i i o o n n T T i i p p s s Respect is very important if you want your communication to be constructive. Avoid labeling people using words like liar or stupid. Stay away from shouting and profanity or using words like never and always. Y ou can get your message across e ffectively without expressing your negative opinions. For instance, if an employee tells you something that sounds like an untruth, you can say, “I realise you think that is the case but based on my investigation I found something else to be the case. Help me to understand the gap between what you are saying and what I found to be the case.” In this example, you are not calling the person a liar, you are inviting them to help you understand the facts because you may have been provided with misinformation. Another communication tip is to be clear and concise. Managers, supervisors and employees start out with good intentions to provide constructive criticism but they “chicken out” and use language that is so vague and tactful that the real message is lost in tactfulness. T T h h e e A A r r t t o o f f L L i i s s t t e e n n i i n n g g When providing constructive criticism, you will be more effective if you are equally adept at listening objectively to the person receiving the criticism because you need to know if they are listening to you. You can tell if the message is not being received as constructive if they a re defensive, blaming or giving e xcuses. In closing I would like to leave you with a quotation from an unknown author: “Constructive criticism is essential in any arena that requires creativity, innovation, and problem-solving. Since leadership requires all three, leaders need to be sure they are not only open to criticism, but that they actively seek it out. Ask people direct reports, peers, customers to poke holes in your ideas and approaches. Critique can be a useful approach to test ideas.” Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organizational Soul, an HR Consulting and Training Company. For more information contact us at info@orgsoul.com. C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By YVETTE BETHEL Making criticism constructive By CARA BRENNENBETHEL Tribune Features Editor WHEN I interviewed 18year-old Stefania Fernandez two weeks ago, she admitted that it would be difficult for any girl to fill the shoes of her countrywoman, the reigning Miss Universe Dayana Mendoza. However, the beautiful and poised young lady said that she was not letting that phase her and was determined to compete in this year’s pageant on her own terms. “I know that Dayana has done a wonderful job, but we are two different women with two different ideas.” Stefania obviously was able to pass that message on to the judges on Sunday night and do what many thought was impossible – bring the crown home to Venezuela for two years straight. As they walked the red carpet, moments before the live show, the judges told the media that they were looking for the “ it factor” – a combination of inner and outer beauty that would be a real reflection of the universe. Judge Heather Kerzner described it as someone who “ turns heads” while judge Andre Leon Talley said he wanted to see the queen display a sense of purpose and confidence that would impact everyone she came into contact with. Dean Cain added that the queen needed to be “beautiful, but connected to the world, because for the next year she will be the face and voice of the world”. “I am very proud and finally now we can say Venezuela has made it,” the excited queen said as Dayana who looked equally thrilled trans lated for her in a press con ference moments after her win. And while Bahamians extend a hearty congratulations to the queenthe jewel in the crown of the entire experience has to be the positive light in which our coun try was portrayed. From the opening scenesan aerial fly in to the Atlantis to the final strains of Junkanoo as the queen took her celebratory walk the Bahamas looked good, very good. The beauty of the country was on full display from the mangroves in Andros, the Hermitage on Cat Island to the Garden of the Groves in Grand Bahama in what could only be an advertising and PR dream come true for the Ministry of Tourism. Nassau/ Paradise Island even got a billion dollar stamp of approval from the Donald himself. Pageant coowner Donald Trump told local media that the country looked very good and the government should be very proud of the preparations they had made in beating out the other 18 countries to host the event seen in 118 coun tries around the world. Everyone I spoke with, from contestants to Miss Universe organisers to judges to my colleagues covering the event from around the world, had positive reviews about the beauty of the country, the friendliness of the people and the unique and varied events taking place. Yes there may have been glitches slow and possibly overpriced ticket sales, a postponed float parade, but all in all when our moment in the spot light came we shone and that in itself is a beautiful thing. The silver lining MISS UNIVERSE PAGEANT REVIEW require glucose, which is normally utilised during physical exercise.” The machine is about the size of a small cash register, and is know throughout Europe as the miracle machine. With just a few short weeks to go before the device is officially launched locally, many at the recent expo were eager to try the machine to test its true potential. One of those participants was local radio personality Saraan Gibson from More 98.7. Prior to being connected to the machine, her waist was measured at 35 inches. She said: “I’m trying to see if I can get four inches off from my waist. If this product can do what they say it can, I will definitely be sold on it and without fail would be in as often as pos sible to continue with it. “I used to work out a lot in the past, but staying motivated is difficult, and hopefully this will get me where I want to be.” After being connected to the machine, she was instructed that the procedure would take about 20 to 25 minutes, and would become more intense as time passed. Around ten minutes in, Mrs Gibson said the device itself was comfortable, but caused major crunch sensations, enough to bear but unusu al because “I was getting the burn as if I was at the gym, but without the physical fatigue and sweating.” Twenty five minutes later when her waist was re-measured, her waist had dropped three quarters of an inch. Roger Bell, 49 who wanted to reduce facial wrinkles also tested the machine After 20 minutes of treatments on his left side, Mr Bell said there was a marked difference. As to the risks involved in using the machine, Mr Thompson said: “ “The only thing that we’ve seen thus far is fatigue, and the reason why is because persons get dehydrated from the treatment.” Looking at the benefit of having one week’s worth of gym training compressed to a single 20 to 40 minute treatment, Mr Thompson said the Arasys is worth the risk. The device is FDA approved however Arasys rep Mr Ambard said just like traditional exercise and skin care, the procedure must continue to maintain effectiveness. For more on this product visit www.arasysper fector.com. MISS Universe 2009 Stefania Fernandez, of Venezuela, stands with Donald Trump after winning the beauty pageant in Nassau, Bahamas, Sunday, Aug. 23, 2009. B r e n n a n L i n s l e y / A P P h o t o The future in physical fitness F ROM page eight INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Monda ys

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C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONB HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2009 By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemeida.net WITH the recent Theodore Elyett’s Miss Teen Bahamas held as the last official local pageant for the 2009 pageant season, 1 6 -y ear -old Shamik a R olle w on t he title over 21 other contestants. ENDING THE PAGEANT SEASON WITH A BANG During the star studded event which t ook place on August 9 at the Wyndh am Crystal Palace Rainforest The ater, Shamika competed as Miss Bimini giving the judges a fierce performance during her jazz routine to Bey once’s Sweet Dream, Beautiful Night mare . Speaking with Tribune Features r ecently about her preparations and victory, the teen queen explained that her coach was a major motivation leading up to the event. “My coach who was Carolyn Smith, inspired me daily and helped me to formulate my inspirational quotes, per fect my walk, and to prepare myself full-circle leading up to the pageant. “I also watched past Miss Teen Universe competitions, some of the American pageants, and I watched Miss Teen Venezuela from last year.” Shamika said compared to all of her preparations, the one thing that she thinks stood out the most was an exot ic evening gown walk used mostly by Venezuelan queens. “I stumbled a little bit in my dress, but I got over that, and over all I did really well.” She describes herself as determined and friendly. According to her mother Cassan dra Fortune, Shamika was barely a toddler when she began showing-off her passion for pageantry and dance. She explained: “Ever since the age of three, Shamika loved the art of dancing, singing, and ‘priming’ in the mirror. “Because of that I saw the need to enroll her in ballet school, and other things that would help her to develop her talents. “I did that from she was three, and she has been dancing, modeling, and doing etiquette classes ever since.” Shamika who is currently in her senior year of high school, proves that she is more than just a pretty face. According to her mother she has also succeeded in passing eight BGCSEs taken last year. Shamika said this is only the start for h er. When she gets older she hopes t o pursue a career as an economist and corporate lawyer. She also hopes to one day compete for the title of Miss Universe. Theodore Sealy, President of Miss Bahamas World Organisation, said in this forth year of the event he decidedt o change the dynamics of the pageant in grooming the contestants from a holistic standpoint. “This year we had 21 girls, and we had the theme Twilight Beauties. I chose that because every year we say there’s a lot going on in society, a lot of negative things going on with teens. “I thought why not highlight these girls as twilight beauties, ‘light in the midst of darkness,’ who are setting an example for others out there.” Another change for the pageant was the addition of international judges including; Bianca Golden from Amer ica’s Next Top Model, Kendrick Kemp who was Mr Caribbean 2008, Miss Florida 2009 Anastagia Pierre, Caribbean pageant coach extraordinaire Hector Joaquin Colon Gonzalez, third runner up to Miss Puerto Rico 2009 Haydil Rivera Escobales, and local pageant and fashion coach Phyllis Garraway. Mr Sealy feels this final hurrah for the 2009 pageant season had to end with a bang, and said the addition of the judges and media coverage added a new level of pageantry for the contestants and viewers. Mr Sealy said: “At the end of the day it’s not all about the crown, the girls created lasting professions, and for our winner Shamika she is now developing her platform of teen abstinence.” The New Miss Teen Bahamas World will first represent the country in the upcoming Miss Teen World to be held in Houston Texas. She will also receive gifts from John Bull, a $2,000 cash prize, and countless oppor tunities to represent both the pageant and her country in the upcoming year. At the end of the day it’ s not all about the crown, the girls created lasting professions, and for our winner Shamika she is now developing her platform of teen abstinence. THEODORE SEALY THE New Miss Teen Bahamas World Shamika Rolle said the one thing that she thinks stood out the most making her the top choice for the title was an exotic evening gown walk used mostly by Venezuelan queens.