Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
TRY OUR
DOUBLE
FILET-0- FISH Pitt bovine it

HIGH
LOW

S8F
70F

SUNNY with

t “ey STORMS

Volume: 105 No.224



Mother of
three gunned
down at work

@ By NATARIO MCKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A MOTHER of three was brutally gunned down yesterday
when armed robbers attacked her workplace just yards away
from a local church.

Although police have not officially released the identity of the
victim, family members told the Tribune yesterday she is 34-
year-old Wendy Bullard.

She is the 53rd person to be murdered this year.

According to police, sales clerk Ms Bullard was shot in the
face when two masked men held up the 21st Century Steel
Welding Limited off Royal Palm Street, just several yards
south of St George’s Anglican Church.

According to police press liaison officer Walter Evans, the
victim was in the front area while a woman co-worker was in the
back with a male customer when the incident occurred.

ASP Evans said: “The other female employee and the male
customer were in the back area when they heard sounds of

SEE page 9

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009

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The Tribune

YOUR PASSPORT TO MISS UNIVERSE



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Colleagues of Wendy “
Bullard grieve after she
was shot during an
attempted armed rob-
bery yesterday.

(Pic: Tim Clarke/Tri-
bune Staff)

Debbie medals again

@ By BRENT STUBBS

Tribune Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — Eight years
after winning her first individual medal

at the [AAF's 8th
World Champi-
onships in Athlet-
ics in Edmonton,
Canada in 2001,
Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie (pic-

tured right) was back on the podium
as the Bahamas flag was raised for the
first time on day seven at the Olympic
Stadium.

This time, she was awarded with the

SEE page 9





NASSAU AND BAHAMWI/

ISLANDS) LEADING NEWSPAPER






ee

Lawyers
object to
Barnett

as Chief
Justice

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Bar
Association has lodged a
formal complaint against
the Prime Minister’s deci-
sion to appoint one of his
Cabinet ministers to the
country’s top judicial post.

Ruth Bowe Darville,
president of the associa-
tion, and Alfred Sears,
MP and former Attorney
General, claim the move
by Prime Minister Ingra-
ham to appoint Attorney
General Michael Barnett
as Chief Justice highlights
a need for constitutional
reform as it relates to how
judicial appointments are
made.

Mr Barnett is due to
resign his post as Attor-
ney General today, before
being sworn in as Chief
Justice on Monday at
liam. He served as Attor-
ney General since July
2008, and was a senior
partner at the law firm
Graham, Thompson and
Co prior to that. He ran
unsuccessfully to be the
FNM Member of Parlia-
ment for Fort Charlotte
in the May 2007 election.

While some local
lawyers have expressed
their satisfaction at the
selection of a Chief Jus-
tice who may be better
placed to address the
“frustrations” of local
attorneys as Chief Justice,
having worked in the pri-
vate sector as an attorney
before becoming Attor-
ney General, Ms Bowe

SEE page 9

Airport
bomb
scare

A BOMB scare cleared the
domestic and international
terminal of Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

Officials at the Nassau Air-
port Development company
received a call about the
threat shortly afternoon yes-
terday.

Security personnel made a
sweep of the area and found it
to be free of any explosive
device. Passengers were
allowed to return soon after.

While there were some
flight delays, operations
returned to normal later in
the afternoon.

Officials at NAD were
unwilling to give details as to
what specific target the threat
was directed at or who
received the initial call. How-
ever, police maintained a
presence at the airport late
into the evening.



PAGE 2, SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



COB apologises
KO MOTI TIC KI eS

THE College of the
Bahamas yesterday apolo-
gised for any inconvenience
caused by the temporary
failure of its online registra-
tion system.

More than 900 new stu-
dents registered for courses
at COB in New Providence
on Thursday, 18 per cent of
whom utilised the institu-
tion’s online registration sys-
tem IQ.Web, COB Regis-
trar Dr Danny Davis said.

The College has accepted
more than 1,700 new stu-
dents for the Fall 2009
semester, approximately 10
per cent more than the num-
ber accepted last year.
Around 1,200 of those stu-
dents were expected to actu-
ally register.

Online registration began
at 12.01am on Thursday with
the first student registering
at 12.53am. But there were
challenges and the system
slowed considerably.

“The system slowed last
night to an unacceptable lev-
el at which point some stu-
dents were unable to register
online as per our original
plan and our instructions to

them. Students who were
unsuccessful at registering
online came in and we man-
ually registered them,” said
Dr Davis.

The Registrar’s depart-
ment went to manual regis-
tration of students at sever-
al processing points across
the Oakes Field Campus,
including the records depart-
ment at the Portia Smith
Student Services Centre.

The students who regis-
tered on Thursday represent
approximately 76 per cent
of the total number of stu-
dents expected for the Fall
2009 semester.

It is believed that the
increase in new students
accepted for enrolment at
the College is the result of
the prevailing economic
environment and the sus-
pension of the government’s
Guaranteed Educational
Loan scheme.

“We have added addi-
tional course sections to
accommodate the increase
and we will continue to
monitor the situation so that
we can make adjustments as
necessary,” Dr Davis said.



MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News
Editorial/Letters

Weathers.

ee nee cetera eee es Fale

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

MISS UNIVERSE TABLOID 8 PAGES

USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGES



“¥? PICTET

1805

PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

ACCOUNTING OFFICER

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:-
-CPA, CA or equivalent

-At least five (5) years experience (minimum 3 years with an audit firm).

-Banking experience

-Strong communication skills.
-Well organised with structured and methodical work approach.
-Dynamic and proactive with a positive attitude.
-High level of computer literacy and office skills with a strong ability to prepare
Microsoft PowerPoint presentations.
-Strong analytical skills with the ability to solve issues efficiently.
-Ability to work independently and take initiatives.

-Flexibility to respond to the reprioritisation of tasks.

DUTIES INCLUDE:-

85% occupancy
boost to Atlantis
from Pageant

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

ROOM occupancies at Atlantis will
be around the 85 per cent mark this
weekend with the Miss Universe Pageant
one day away, according to Atlantis Gen-
eral Manager and CEO.

With ticket sales so far at 76 per cent,
George Markantonis told Tribune Busi-
ness he expects the Imperial Ballroom,
where the new Miss Universe will be
crowned, to be almost filled to capacity
when the pageant is aired live tomorrow
night.

According to him, ticket sales typical-
ly increase in the last three days before a

concert or large event.

It was feared that ticket sales would
not do well as initial reports, aired inter-
nationally, suggested that people were
not buying seats for the event.

However, Mr Markantonis confirmed
that more people will be checking into
the Atlantis today and are expected to
purchase tickets.

"Reaction has been positive,” he said.

According to him, the oval shaped
imperial ballroom will take on a rectan-
gular figure for the Miss Universe
pageant in order to make filming the seg-
ment easier for the crew of the broad-
casting station with exclusive rights to
NBC.

Mr Markantonis said the technology
set up in the ballroom will be extremely

complicated, with peripherals set up
around the room to facilitate world-wide
television coverage.

The resort hosted the FIFA Congress
in June, which brought a large contin-
gent of the most important men of the
world's most popular sport, soccer.

According to Mr Markantonis, the
FIFA Congress was an excellent "prac-
tice run" for the Miss Universe pageant.

Miss Universe held its preliminary
competition last Sunday where the top 15
girls who will vie for the crown tomorrow
were selected. It is not yet known who
the front runners are.

eSEE OUR MISS UNIVERSE
PULLOUT FOR EXCLUSIVE
INTERVIEWS AND PICTURES



Bahamian pleads guilty
over cocaine smuggling

A BAHAMIAN man and
another defendant who were
caught by an undercover
operation have pleaded guilty
to conspiracy to import near-
ly 300 kilos of cocaine into
the United States.

The defendants, Bahamian
Mark Pinder and American
Parson Exana, who were
involved in a cocaine smug-
gling ring face a minimum
sentence of 10 years to life in
prison and a fine of $4,000.

On May, 25 Immigration
and Customs Enforcement

- Preparation of the Bank’s financial statements for internal and external reporting

purposes.

- Preparation of all regulatory reports in compliance with mandated format and
deadlines (e.g. The Central Bank and The Securities Commission).

- Production of professional presentations in line with corporate image.

- Development and preparation of internal statistical reports for senior management.

- Preparation of various client financial statements and other types of customized

reports.

- Assisting with the preparation of supporting schedules and coordination of statutory

audits.

- Responsibility for the administration and booking of accounting activity concerning
licensed banking subsidiaries.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED.
Please deliver Resume and two (2) references BY HAND
NO LATER THAN SEPTEMBER 4, 2009 to:-

The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
West Bay Street and Blake Road
Nassau, Bahamas

Offices in

Lausanne, Geneva, Zurich, Luxembourg, London, Montreal, Nassau, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong
Kong, Frankfurt, Florence, Milan, Madrid, ‘Paris, Rome, Turin



(ICE) Special Agents con-
ducted an undercover opera-
tion and received approxi-
mately 297 kilograms of
cocaine from Pinder in a ves-
sel-to-vessel transfer on the
high seas, according to the US
Attorney's Office.

The drugs were later taken
to Palm Beach County.

The next day, law enforce-
ment conducted a "controlled
delivery" of the cocaine to
both defendants in Jupiter,
Florida and arrested the pair.

Court documents revealed

re

that Pinder and an informant
have conducted many smug-
gling operations together over
the past seven years.

In an interview with police,
Pinder told officers that he
got the cocaine from a man
identified as "Talio", in the
Bahamas who transported the
drugs to him through a man
identified as "Abner."

Pinder told police that he
put the drugs on a boat in the
Bahamas and admitted that
he and "Abner" were present
on the boat at around 4 am

——

on May 25 when the cocaine
was transferred to a boat
manned by undercover spe-
cial agents, court papers state.

Pinder pleaded guilty
before US Judge Donald
Middlebrooks on August, 12.
Exana entered the same plea
on August 18.

Pinder is scheduled for sen-
tencing on October 29 while
Exana is expected to learn his
fate on November 5, accord-
ing to the Southern District
of Florida's US Attorney's
Office.

= = [as
BONNY Bentizen, LEED-AP, director of University Sustainability Business Practices at the Global
Institute of Sustainability at the Arizona State University spoke during the College of the Bahamas’
seminar ‘Greening The Academy: Accepting The Challenge Of Environmental Stewardship’. (BIS photo:
IAEA a=) gL 01 eS0) 0)



COB’s recycling plan
gets Ministry backing

By Gena Gibbs

THE Ministry of the Envi-
ronment has endorsed the
College of the Bahamas’ recy-
cling campaign.

Minister Earl Deveaux said
he hoped the programme
“attracts a critical mass” of
support.

He was addressing the fac-
ulty and staff of COB during
their seminar under the theme
‘Greening The Academy:
Accepting The Challenge Of
Environmental Stewardship”
at Bahamas Faith Ministries
last week.

He said government is com-
mitted to protecting the envi-
ronment and spoke of mea-
sures taken to do so.

Environmental legislation
is being updated to endorse
initiatives like those offered
by COB.

“We are passing legislation
directly to the Town Planning
and Subdivision Act tabled in
parliament,” said Mr
Deveaux. “We welcome your
comments.

“Many of the issues to do
with protecting the environ-
ment, waste disposal, envi-
ronmental impact assessments
and requirements, reservation
of public open space, and the
need for transparency in plan-
ning subdivisions, roads, and
developments are all in this
new Act.

“Tt repeals most of the Con-
servation of the Physical
Landscape Act, the existing
Town Planning, Private
Roads and Subdivisions Act,
and incorporates The Out
Island Dilapidated Buildings
Act,” the minister said.

The proposed Forestry Act
intended to conserve, protect,
and manage the forest estate
and “ensure the national por-
tion of our land is held pri-
marily for wetlands and the
ecosystems in the pine forest
and coppice forests” has been
completed, he said.

“The bio-diversity of the
Bahamas is located in our
forests, and mahogany,
lignum vitae, and horseflesh
trees are endangered and

need protection,” said Mr
Deveaux.

“They feed white crown
pigeons, crabs, and other
wildlife and protect the
ecosystems.”

Minister Deveaux said
environmental employment
opportunities will open up
when the law is passed.

“College of the Bahamas’
School of Sustainability gives
the Bahamas an opportunity
to tackle core issues of how
we manage our environment,
how we populate our institu-
tions, where we create oppor-
tunities for young people, and
where we find answers.”

“These notions of environ-
mental awareness should be
fundamental to our beliefs,”
he added

The nation’s future, its
security and the health of the
people, he said, is based on
how the country resolves the
issues of climate change and
sea level rises.

“Not what other countries
do, but what we do,” said Mr
Deveaux.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



PLP hopeful:
Jobless total
veto mien
official data

PLP leadership hopeful
Paul Moss told The Tri-
bune yesterday that he
believes the unemploy-
ment figures are much
higher than reported by
the Department of Statis-
tics.

According to the
Department’s latest sur-
vey, the unemployment
rate in New Providence
increased from 8.7 per
cent in May last year and
12.1 per cent in February
2009 to 14 per cent in
May.

In Grand Bahama, the
unemployment rate has
increased drastically —
from nine per cent last
year to 14.6 per cent in
February 2009 and a mas-
sive 17.4 per cent in May.

“I am surprised that the
figures for Grand Bahama
seem to be so low having
gone to Grand Bahama
myself, I believe that it is
much higher than that. I
also believe that the rate
in New Providence is high
as well because people
from Grand Bahama
came here looking for jobs
and there are no jobs
here,” Mr Moss said.

There are almost 10,000
more people without jobs
this year than last year,
according to the Depart-
ment of Statistics which
released the results of its
annual labour force sur-
vey on Thursday.

With 9,540 additional
people unemployed it
means that out of a poten-
tial labour force of
184,020, there are 26,215
people without work in
the Bahamas.

The overall unemploy-
ment rate, which also
takes into consideration
the Family Islands, grew
from 8.7 per cent to 14.2
per cent in a year.

Director of Statistics
Kalsie Dorsett said this
places the unemployment
rate at its highest level
since the early 1990s.

This was despite the fig-
ures not taking into con-
sideration major job loss-
es since the survey was
conducted in May, for
example the 500 people
left unemployed by the
closure of the Emerald
Bay Resort in Exuma.

Nonetheless, the news
will not come as a great
surprise to many
observers.

It corresponds with pre-
dictions from various
agencies and individuals,
including the Central
Bank of the Bahamas and
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham that unemploy-
ment would further rise
throughout the year in the
face of decreased tourism
arrivals and a downturn in
foreign direct investment
which has hurt the con-
struction sector in partic-
ular.

In New Providence, one
quarter of all people who
are unemployed left their
Jobs in the last 12 months.

However, Mr Moss
believes the unemploy-
ment problem could be
remedied by government
focusing on creating and
expanding on “light indus-
tries” in the Bahamas.

“Industries like agricul-
ture can allow Bahamians
to have both jobs and
ownership of land. To
grow what is sustainable
and what is in our hotels
and in our homes will
keep money inside the
country,” he said.

Mr Moss said, however,
that government’s deci-
sion to sign on to various
international trade agree-
ments has brought the via-
bility of a local agriculture
industry into question.

“If we have farmers
growing tomatoes for
example and do away with
Customs duty then there is
a chance that tomatoes
coming into the country
will be cheaper than those
grown here. Some may
say that’s fine because we
will have access to cheap-
er food, but what we
would be doing is keeping
people employed abroad
while they remain unem-
ployed here,” he said.



Resort staff fear for
future employment

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

STAFF at the soon-to-close
Riu Paradise Island hotel
have expressed their fears for
the future after they claim
they were told not all of them
will be called back to work
when the resort re-opens.

Some also claim it has not
been made clear what they
will be paid — if anything —
while the hotel is closed for
renovations for three months
as of this weekend.

One employee, who wished

to remain anonymous, said:
“We understand why they are
closing the hotel but of course
it’s like a stab in the back. We
have approached our superi-
ors and we’re not getting any
response.

“Management has a list of
people they are not going to
call back but that’s not been
dealt with yet. The only peo-
ple who know are the man-
agers. We, the employees,
have not been told.”

The RIU is closing as it
undergoes a $25 million
makeover, upgrading its 379
guestrooms. The resort will
reopen on November 26 as

Claim some will not be called
back when PI resort re-opens,
and uncertain over pay during
three-month renovation closure

the RIU Palace Paradise
Island.

Yesterday, Minister of
Tourism Vincent Vanderpool
Wallace said the closure of
the resort will reduce the
options for tourists looking
for the type of holiday in Nas-
sau where they can know in
advance what it is going to

cost them.

However, he added that
there are “alternative prop-
erties” that such holidaymak-
ers can go to.

Mr Vanderpool Wallace
said the Riu had been doing
“fairly well” in terms of occu-
pancy up to now, but added
that it had been hit by the clo-

sure of a Canadian tour oper-
ator which had brought a lot
of business to the property.

He denied reports on ZNS
that the closure was conse-
quent to the Ministry receiv-
ing an abundance of com-
plaints about conditions at the
hotel.

“That’s not something that
we would single them out
for,” he said.

However, he explained that
if a hotel is to carry out reno-
vations, September and Octo-
ber — traditionally slow
months for tourist arrivals —
are best suited for such activ-

ity.





PM identifies investment
‘potential’ of Atlanta link

THERE is a “tremendous potential” for the Bahamas to
expand on major trade and investment opportunities as it
endeavours to develop a close and rewarding relationship with
the city of Atlanta, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said.

Speaking at the opening of the new consulate office in
Atlanta, Georgia, on Thursday, Mr Ingraham said that the
city is the corporate headquarters for the largest number of For-
tune 500 and Fortune 1,000 companies in the southeastern
US.

Gregory Pridgeon, chief of staff to the city’s Mayor Shirley
Franklin, said that the Bahamas and Atlanta are well suited to
be partners and he, too, spoke of mutually beneficial relation-
ships.

He welcomed the Bahamas to the diplomatic fraternity
established in Atlanta.

Mr Ingraham said: “I am very pleased to join you to mark the
official opening of our first Bahamian career Consulate General
in Atlanta, the capital city of Georgia and a major business, cul-
tural and education centre for the southeastern United States.”

“T take this opportunity to say that though tourism is today
and is likely to remain into the future our principal business, we
are also home to one of the deepest harbours in our region, one
of the most modern, efficient container transshipment ports and
a major ship care and repair facility capable of working on
the largest ocean-going vessels afloat today.”

“And so, opportunities for expanded trade and investment
with this consular jurisdiction are ripe for exploration,” he
said.

The prime minister took to the airwaves and cyberspace
about the potential of the new office. During an interview
with two Atlanta reporters — one for Atlanta Business and
the other for the online publication Global Atlanta — Mr Ingra-
ham noted that the new office would also facilitate efforts to
improve relations between Atlanta area businesses and the
Bahamas.

“(This office will) raise the Bahamas’ profile in this area of
the United States,” Mr Ingraham told the reporters.

Locating the office in Atlanta will, the prime minister said,
provide better opportunities for US businesses to have access
to information about either investing or doing business in the
Bahamas, and at the same time provide better access for
Bahamian businesses to the southeastern US market.

“The demand in the southeastern United States for the
Bahamas is great,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said he sees opportunities and potential for
increased trade, citing in particular the services available at the
transshipment facility in Grand Bahama.

Probe into traffic
accident continues

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

Both vehicles were exten-
sively damaged. The drivers
were treated for their injuries
at the Rand Memorial Hos-
pital and later discharged.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
said that police are renewing
their plea to the motoring
public to obey the speed lim-
it and pay attention to traffic
signs.

Investigations are continu-
ing into a traffic accident that
occurred at the intersection
of East Sunrise Highway and
Balao Road.

According to reports, the
accident occurred around
9.50pm on Wednesday involv-
ing a 1996 GMC Truck owned
and driven by Michael
Pritchard, 45, of Freeport, and
a 2004 white Nissan Maxima
driven by Kishana Wilch-
combe, 20, of Freeport.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

ey
ba ALT]

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham and his delegation were
received by Governor Sonny Purdue of Georgia on Thursday. Mr
Ingraham exchanged gifts with Governor Purdue during a courtesy

Galleria Cinemas |

The Mall-at-Marathon
BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 10:00 AM DAILY

EFFECTIVE AUGUST 21ST, 2009
NEW | 1:05
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BANDSLAM 1:10
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Gil. JOE

A PERFECT GETAWAY
ALIEN IN THE ATTIC
THE ORPHAN



























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The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the following
position:

PLUMBER

The Plumber repairs and installs various plumbing systems, fixture,
pumps, piping and related equipment.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

* Completion of secondary school diploma.
¢ Four years of journeyman level in plumbing.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

* Must be skilled in plumbing maintenance.

¢ Must have a valid Bahamian driver’s license and the ability to drive
passenger vehicles, forklift, stake body and pickup trucks with manual
transmission.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation
package including performance-based incentives, medical and
dental insurance, life insurance, pension and opportunities for
training and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are
eligible for employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms can be found on the Embassy’s website
nassau.usembassy.gov under Key Embassy Links and employment
opportunities. Completed applications should be returned to
the Embassy via email to fernanderra@state.gov or faxed to
(242)328-8251, addressed to the Human Resources Office no later
than Thursday August 27th, 2009.



PAGE 4, SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

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Afghan vote shows Taliban still potent

WASHINGTON — The violence-
scarred elections in Afghanistan provided
a stage for the Taliban to show war-weary
Americans and Afghans that it has
rebounded and can strike — even after
eight years of war.

For President Barack Obama's poli-
cies, the timing couldn't be worse.

With memories of the Sept. 11 terrorist
attacks dimming, Americans are tiring of
the conflict. New polling shows a majori-
ty — 51 per cent — of those surveyed
now believe the war is not worth the fight,
an increase of 6 percentage points in a
month.

Obama's answer to the mounting scep-
ticism is to say that, in a way, the war has
just begun. The final push to wipe out
America's Taliban and al-Qaida enemies
is not eight years old but really got started
when he took office and ordered 17,000
more troops into Afghanistan.

In short order, he also installed a new
commander and persuaded Pakistan to
join the U.S. in what on Thursday he
called a pincer movement to squeeze the
enemy astride the common border.

Obama's ability to recast the public
debate at home — to get people to look
past the cost and the deadly violence there
— may matter more in the long run than
who won or lost the Afghan presidency.

Obama has not wavered from his cam-
paign pledge to take the fight to the Tal-
iban and their al-Qaida allies in
Afghanistan and Pakistan. He argues that
the true danger to Americans lies in the
towering peaks and vast deserts of those
countries. The Bush administration, he
asserts, wasted precious time, treasure
and blood in Iraq.

Before then, he argues, problems in
both countries were allowed to fester. As
a result, the Taliban retook huge swaths of
Afghanistan, and al-Qaida was comfort-
ably ensconced on the Pakistan side of
the mountainous border.

"We've got to make sure that we are
really focused on finishing the job in
Afghanistan. But it's going to take some
time,” the president said on a talk-radio
programme Thursday. He gave a nod to
the election, saying it "appears to be suc-
cessful" despite the "Taliban's efforts to
disrupt it." Initial reports show 26
Afghans were killed in Taliban attacks on
Election Day.

The Bush administration used earlier
elections in Afghanistan and Iraq as evi-

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(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427

(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, AUGUST 23RD, 2009

7:00 a.m. Pastor Henry Whyte/Bro. Franklyn Bethel
11:00 a.m. Sis. Tezel Anderson/Sis. Katherine Rose
7:00 p.m. Sis. Nathalie Thompson/Board of Music Ministry

dence of success of its war policies. This
White House isn't getting that boost.

The White House has been particular-
ly reticent to talk about the Afghan vote,
where the turnout appears to have been
significantly lower than in the first-ever
direct election of a president there in 2004.
The administration is deeply aware of the
country's long history of bloody uprisings
against past leaders who were seen as
place men for foreign powers.

While Obama took office having pub-
licly expressed disappointment in Presi-
dent Hamid Karzai over his ineffective-
ness and a background noise of corruption
surrounding his administration, he has not
spoken of a preference for Thursday's
outcome.

Karzai's strongest challenger is his for-
mer foreign minister, Abdullah Abdul-
lah, who may show well when the votes
are counted because of heavier turnout
in the ethnically Tajik northern part of
the country. The turnout was spotty in
the Pashtun south where Karzai has major
support. If neither Karzai, Abdullah nor
any of the other 34 candidates wins 50
per cent in the first round, there will be a
runoff. Final results of the Thursday vote
will not be known until Sept. 3.

Regardless of the Afghan vote or the
diminishing support for the war back
home, a White House strategy review is
due out in mid-September, and Gen. Stan-
ley McChrystal, the U.S. commander in
Afghanistan, is widely expected to press
for a significant further increase in forces
for his new counter-insurgency campaign.

Just three years ago the U.S. had about
20,000 forces in the country. Today, it has
triple that, on its way to 68,000 by year's
end when all of the 17,000 newly deployed
are in place.

A Washington Post-ABC News poll this
week showed, however, that only 24 per
cent of Americans support that move,
with 45 per cent saying the force should be
decreased.

The domestic political course for Oba-
ma's overall Afghan strategy and for a
further troop increase, thus, is growing
ever more difficult to navigate.

And in a sparkling bit of political irony,
backing for the war remains strongest
among Republicans and conservatives
who support the conflict by 70 per cent
and 58 per cent, respectively.

(This article was written by Steven R
Hurst, Associated Press writer).



Men being
stripped of
masculinity

EDITOR, The Tribune.

After perusing the newspa-
per over the past several days
the debate on the rape law
caught my attention. Is the
government really serious
about this? What are the sta-
tistics of women claiming to
be raped on a yearly basis in
the Bahamas by their spouse?
Is this yet another attempt to
feminize the Bahamian male
so we can become more “sen-
sitive” to our wife’s needs or
should I say wants? What
happens if the wife is a little
frisky (a rare occasion for
many of us husbands, and
devoted husbands by the way)
and the husband is not quite
as “energetic” as the
wife...can the husband file
rape charges? What happens
if a married couple actually
has a good time on the very
rare occasional night only to
wake up into an argument,
and the wife files a rape
charge in the heat of the
moment?

Our entire society has yet
gone to the extreme (and far

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



left extreme) I might add. I
can only advise all of the hus-
bands out there to contact
their relevant attorneys to
draft waiver or disclaimer
forms and to have a stack of
them on the night stand in the
bedroom only to be execut-
ed (signed) by your spouse in
case a moment of passion
overwhelms you or your
spouse. At what point does
consent come into play? In
the beginning, halfway
through or better yet at the
very end?

I can just see what we mar-
ital couples are going to trans-
form into over the next sev-
eral years:

Can I hold the car door
open for you honey?

Consent;

Can I hold your hand?

Consent;

Can I take you out to din-
ner?

Consent;

Can I buy you a car?

Consent;

Can I kiss you?

Consent;

Can we bath together?

Consent;

Can [...?

Consent

How ridiculous are we
going to get? At what point
does it stop? I don’t know
how many relationships the
average married male has had
(prior to marriage of course)
but the whole one relation-
ship that I’ve had didn’t quite
materialise as in the afore-
mentioned. Any form of mas-
culinity is slowly being
stripped from the Bahamian
male under the guise of over
sensitivity, tolerance so we
can get in touch with our feel-
ings.

Get you waivers/disclaimers
ready gentlemen, because I
can see where this is going!

CHRISTOPHER
ARMALY
Nassau,

July, 2009.

PLP must elect leader with
best winning shot in 2012

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow me a little
space in your valuable publi-
cation to express a few
thoughts on the upcoming
Progressive Liberal Party’s
convention in a few month’s
time.

It appears that this conven-
tion is shaping up to be a most
interesting one as the various
combatants for positions of
leadership in the party pre-
sent themselves in full battle
gear. All of this is healthy for
the PLP and a clear demon-
stration that democracy is
alive and well in the party.

Cat Island MP Philip
“Brave” Davis has thrown his
hat into the ring for the posi-
tion of deputy leader. What
does he bring to the table? A
solid parliamentary career,
years in the trenches in the
PLP and a keen and insightful
mind. Former Tourism Min-
ister Obie Wilchcombe will
also declare soon for the same
position. He brings actual
Cabinet experience, a solid
background as an MP, a stint
as party chairman, and a keen
and insightful mind. Good
luck to both men and to any
other contestant for the
deputy leadership.

Now a keen political
observer recently posed a
very insightful and intriguing

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Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

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COME TO WORSHIP. LEAVE TO SERVE



question, being, whether the
detractors in the PLP are
capable, at this convention,
of dispossessing party leader
Perry Christie of his crown?

“Despite Christie’s best
efforts, there are those in his
organisation, and a few even
close to his bosom who are
attempting to take Perry
Christie’s party away from
him,” the observer noted.

A spot-on observation, no
doubt, but I have a gut feeling
that when the smoke clears
and the dust settles at this
convention, Perry Gladstone
Christie will emerge as leader
smelling like a rose. I predict
—and I don’t practice the art
of divination — that Christie
will emerge victorious with
barely a scratch.

Why do I say that? The first
thing to observe is that to date
there has not been one single
PLP Member of the House of
Assembly or the Senate who
has stepped forward publicly
to declare that he or she will
run for party leader.

That, in my view, is signifi-
cant because whoever chal-
lenges as leader should at
least have a seat in parlia-
ment, so as to be in a position
to direct the opposition’s
attacks on the government,
and to articulate the party’s
policies and programmes at
that level.

It would be very awkward,
and a step backwards, if the
PLP elected a leader who is
not in the Senate or the
House of Assembly, and can-
not even take part in debates
at a national level. Such a
thing has happened in our
politics in the past, but with
disastrous results.

Secondly, any credible chal-
lenger to Mr Christie would
need to have national appeal,
not merely capable of bring-
ing together the various fac-
tions in the PLP. The leader
must be capable of appealing
to supporters of the other par-
ty in order to win enough
seats to form the next gov-
ernment.

Third, any credible candi-
date should at least have a
track record with the Bahami-
an people. The Rt Hon
Hubert Ingraham had a track
record, a very long and illus-
trious one, and national
appeal before he became
opposition leader and, even-
tually, prime minister. The
same can be said of Mr
Christie.

It is critical that the leader
put in place, and articulate, a
winning strategy in the run up
to the next general elections.
That strategy may very well
mean change within the party,
but to what extent is change
needed is the critical question.
Any change at this late stage,
with the elections barely two
years away, should be very

carefully considered by PLPs.

Does a new leader, largely
unknown to the PLP and the
country, have enough time to
build a bond of trust and con-
fidence between himself and
the public before the next
general election? I think not.

There are those in the PLP
who have sprung up like “top-
sy” who are now crying for
Mr Christie’s head. But they
have spectacularly failed to
unveil any credible plan to
take the PLP, and indeed, the
country forward.

What is their battle cry?
They say that because they
are relatively young, have col-
lege degrees, wear Armani
suits, silk ties and alligator
skin shoes, that they are
God’s gift to the PLP. Now,
they do have something to
offer. But they must learn to
follow before they can lead.
They must wait their turn.
Remember, to everything
there is a season and a time to
every purpose under heaven.

In my view, and I cannot
tell the PLP what it should
do, but the delegates at the
convention in October must
elect a leader who can give
the PLP the best chance of
winning the next government.
They should bear in mind that
the last general elections was
a nail-biter and that the PLP
lost by less than five seats.

If the PLP does not mind
spending another 10 years in
opposition then it should elect
maybe Paul Moss or Jerome
Fitzgerald as leader. Ten
years is enough time for them
to learn the role of Opposi-
tion leader.

It would also give the
Bahamian people a better
opportunity to observe these
two men on the job, and to
decide whether or not they
are fit candidates for prime
minister one day in the future.

But if the PLP wishes to
win the next general election,
then my humble view is that
they should go with Perry
Christie, despite all his faults
and weaknesses, as he will
give the party the best shot at
winning.

He is known as an honest,
very capable leader, despite
his soft heart at times. But
being overly loyal and soft
hearted towards one’s friends,
and even one’s political ene-
mies, does not mean weak-
ness. If the PLP wanted to
change its leader, it should
have done so right after the
last general elections. In my
view, changing the leader at
this late stage would blow the
PLP off course, and send it
directly into the iceberg like
the Titanic in 1912.

MARK
ROLLE-SYMONETTE
Nassau,

August, 2009.



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



"My vexation was so
yucked up when I read that
in 2007 there were 5,177
live births and 3,167 were
from unwed mothers. That
means three out of five
females making children

ain't married! What the

unmarried young women

needs is to get a good coun-

selling session in church

from their

pastor

where they

can learn

to live lives

as good as oO A
Feat ale

tors and

have nice

cars and

fancy

homes."

Repen-

tant sin-

ner, Nas-

sau.

"IT vex
because
while dri-
ving down
Shirley
Street yes-
terday my
car was
attacked by stones/pebbles
from the operator of one of
those weed eaters. These
operators seem to like
weeding the stones and not
the grass, maybe there is no
grass there?

"When I got home I
noticed that the windshield
had a crack in it and it’s
now about a foot long and
will have to be replaced,
some $500 plus. Thanks
Ministry of Works! When
others found out about that
at the office, many had sim-
ilar stories of rocks hitting

)

Ak)
pane ta

their pas- ar

them from the big sit down
mowers on the larger
streets. Someone could get
hurt or even killed!"

- Concerned Citizen,
Nassau.

"I vex that someone in
government decided to do
some road work on East-
ern Road, where so many
people
travel
every day
and night,
and big
and bold
on a Mon-
day morn-
ing they
had one
poor man
out there
laying
down tar
or some-
thing and
the road
was all
patch up.

"There
was no
sign to say
‘road work
ahead',
and the
road was
wide open. I almost buss
my car up driving down that
road and ‘most knock that
worker down. He so fool he
was all up in the middle of
the road in his orange jack-
et. These government peo-
ple need to do better - and
days later the road still ain’
finish. They mussie ga’ pay
for my busted tyre.”

- Mad Motorist, Nassau.

Are you vex? Send com-
plaints to whyyouvex@tri-
bunemedia.net or fax to
328-239.



ENM< to celebrate
first election win

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Free
National Movement and its
supporters on Grand Bahama
will commemorate the party’s
first victory at the polls on
August 19, with a church ser-
vice tomorrow.

Senator David Thompson,
chairman of the FNM’s
Grand Bahama council, said
the anniversary of the FNM’s
victory marks “that great day
of deliverance when Bahami-
ans demonstrated political
judgment and maturity with
the peaceful removal of a
regime whose rule spanned a
quarter century and embraced
the FNM message of deliver-
ance.”

He said party members and
supporters will gather at 9am
at the New Hope Methodist
Church for praise and wor-
ship with Rev Christopher
Neilly.

The party’s leadership,
Cabinet ministers, parlia-
mentarians, party officers,
meritorious council members,
central council members, offi-
cers and members of the
FNM Women’s Association
and the Torchbearers Asso-
ciation and other party mem-
bers are expected to attend.

Mr Thompson said Elec-
tion Day 1992 was a historical
triumph for the people of the
Bahamas.

He said the PLP under the
late Sir Lynden Pindling had
won six consecutive general
elections and had been the
government of the Bahamas
for almost 26 years when the
FNM under party leader
Hubert Ingraham finally
achieved a crushing victory
over the PLP on August 19,
1992.

The FNM won its second
consecutive term in March
2007. In May 2002, the party
lost, but rebounded in May
2007 and won the general
elections for a third time.

“This year as we observe
and celebrate the 1992 victory
we will also be praying to the
Almighty God for the nation’s
speedy and complete recoy-
ery from the current econom-
ic recession which has brought
great hardship on so many
Bahamians,” said Mr Thomp-
son.

He said the FNM MPs will
host back-to-school give-away
jamborees for students
returning to school in each
constituency on Saturday,
August 29.

Marco City MP Zhivargo
Laing hosted a back-to-school
jam on Thursday at the Moon
McPhee Park. Back-to-school
jams will be held next Satur-
day between 2pm-4pm by
Lucaya MP Neko Grant at
the Sunset Land Community
Park; at YMCA by Pineridge
MP Kwasi Thompson, and at
the Basil Neymour Park by
High Rock MP Kenneth Rus-
sell.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, TAITIN CLEVETTE
HANNA of BELDOCK AVENUE, BELAIR ESTATES,
P.O. BOX EE-17845, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, intend to
change the name to TATUM CLEVETTE HANNA. |
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-
742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date
of publication of this notice.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
PAULINE A.

The Public is hereby advised that |,
NEYMOUR of WESTRIDGE ESTATES, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, intend to change the name to PAULINE
A. ZONICLE. If there are any objections to this change of
name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later
than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

BACK by popular demand,
The Tribune announces the
return of its Saturday feature,
“Pet of the Week.”

Each week, one abandoned
cat or dog being cared for by
the dedicated staff at the
Bahamas Humane Society
(BHS) will be featured with
information on how to adopt
a pet of your own.

Now is the perfect time for
the relaunch, BHS staff say, as
the summer months are the
most demanding at the shel-
ter. Animals are either aban-
doned or surrendered, at an
alarming rate — dropped off
by owners unable or unwilling
to care for them anymore,
often due to travel plans.

“To make matters worse,
cats begin to breed in the
spring and by summer
unwanted or found kittens
come in by the dozens,” one
staffer explained. “Mean-
while, adoption rates — espe-
cially among adult dogs and
cats — are extremely low,
again in all likelihood due to
vacation schedules.

“Consequently, the
Humane Society is now over-
whelmed with adult dogs and
cats. Roughly 20 dogs and
over 30 cats are waiting to be
adopted into new, loving
homes. Many are youthful
and all are friendly and full
of character. Sadly, we are
fast approaching full capacity
and if the adoption rate does
not pick up some difficult
decisions will have to be
made. Please help us save as
many lives as possible. The
animals urgently need your
support. Come in and adopt
right now.”

To commemorate the
relaunch, today we publish a
bumper edition of Pet of the
Week. Pictures are above

CHLOE

This five-year-old pit-
bull/chow mix is a true sweet-
heart. Her former owners
regretted having to give her
up, but had to relocate for
career reasons. Chloe is great
with children and loves long
walks, a combination that has
earned her the status of the
Humane Society's summer
camp favourite. However, she
is particular with regards to
the canine company that she
keeps and would do best in a
home where she is the only
four-legged family member.
Unfortunately, this lovely lady
has been at the Humane Soci-
ety for over three months.
Her long stay is probably due
to the fact that she suffers
from a few health concerns
which, while maintainable,
necessitate that she finds the
perfect new family willing to
dedicate a little extra care.
Considering the current state

ies
ett} AD] |

of surrender inundation, slow
adoption rates and the result-
ing space constraints, Chloe's
situation is all the more dire.
She is desperately longing for
the essential security and
companionship that can only
be provided by a loving fami-
ly. By giving Chloe a new
home you can save her life.

GOLDIE

Goldie is a nine-year-old
top of the line Rottweiler.
This girl is sugar-sweet and
has a beautifully mild tem-
perament. Sadly, after having
been used for breeding her
whole life, she has now been
surrendered to the Humane
Society by her owners. She
has tested positive for a low
degree of Ehrlichia, a tick-
borne disease that can easily
be maintained with antibi-
otics. Please help fill the rest
of her life with the love and
happiness that she most cer-
tainly deserves.

SHARKY

This healthy and fun-loving
young man has spunk! He is
about eight months old and
is very handsome with his
unusual long brindle coat. His
wonderful smile reveals his
modestly purple-spotted
tongue that can only belong
to a chow mix. He loves to
walk, run and play, and would
probably make a great beach
companion. Extremely affec-
tionate on the one hand, on
the other he is also quite vocal
and would make a great pro-
tector.

VISCO

What to say about Visco?
He is a Burmese/ Persian mix
and a veteran at the Humane
Society. He is a wise and inde-
pendent soul that, having
approximately nine years of
experience at this thing called
life behind him, knows how
to get by with minimal effort
and attention.

Nonetheless, like every oth-
er cat, he loves to cuddle and
be stroked whenever possi-
ble. He does unfortunately
suffer from a minor skin aller-
gy that the BHS staff are
working on fixing and should
be as good as new in no time.
Please think about taking Vis-
co into your home. Space in
the Cattery is a serious con-
cern and it is time that Visco
moved on so that other cats
can be saved.

ieee
Sasa Ue

SEU UE
PHONE: 322-2157



ei
SLAG



JACKSON

Play, play, play! Jackson is
a young cat who, quite natu-
rally, loves to have fun. Be it
with a piece of string, a pen or
your t-shirt,

Jackson will keep both him-
self and you well entertained.
He is an extremely loving boy
who would do well with other
cats and children. Come in




and meet him for yourself.

KITTENS

We have many playful kit-
tens in all shapes, colours and
sizes. They have been de-
wormed and have begun their
vaccination series. It is now
up to you to come in and take
one (or more) home!

Animal cruelty:
Man is charged


























@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A man
was charged with animal
cruelty in the Freeport
Magistrate’s Court on
Thursday. He was accused
of abusing a mixed Dober-

mann he adopted from the

Humane Society of Grand

Bahama.

Wenito Bootle, 27, was
charged before Deputy
Chief Magistrate Helen

Jones in Court 3.

It is alleged that between

February 9 and July 15,
Bottle abused and mal-
treated a domesticated ani-
mal known as Meka.

According to reports, the
Humane Society had
received a report of a starv-
ing dog that had collapsed
in a yard. Field service offi-
cers were dispatched to the
location, where they dis-
covered a female mix. The
female dog was very weak
and had to be put to sleep
when she became unre-
sponsive.

Bootle pleaded not guilty
to the charge of animal cru-
elty. The case was
adjourned to December 15
for trial.



ASSEMBLIES OF 600]

Adult Education
Worship Service
Spanish Service








































Comejoinjusfas we come together, and
worship}the]Lord in Spirit and in Truth
OPPORTUNITIES FOR
WORSHIP AND MINISTRY

SUNDAY SERVICES

Motning Worship Service
Sunday School for all ages ...

8.30 a.m.
9,45 a.m.
9,45 a.m.
11.00 a.m.

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, AUGUST 23RD, 2009.

11:30 AM Speaker

ELDER BRENTFORD ISAACS

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. « Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. « Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
* Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MICHELINE VOLTAIRE of
MOORSE LANE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 22"? day of August, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-
7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



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PAGE 6, SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





Summit to aid
Grand Bahama

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



infrastructure and unlimit-
ed potential for growth.

“Freeport by design is
already established as the
industry capital in the
Bahamas,” he said. “It is the
ideal landscape for the
vision of what this first
National Empowerment
Summit will propose.”

He said that the topics to
be addressed include “the
role of the Preamble; the
church and intercession for
the Bahamas; opportunity
for business in Grand
Bahama; the possibility of
entrepreneurship in the
Bahamas; the need for
Bahamians to take owner-
ship in the Bahamas; trans-
formation in the market-
place; small business in the
Bahamas; the appeal for jus-
tice in the modern Bahamas,
and global justice.”

The summit will have two
sessions; the day session is
from 8.30am to 4pm, and
the evening session contin-
ues at 7pm at the Our
Lucaya Convention Centre.

Speakers will include Dr
Myles Munroe; Bishop Neil
Ellis; president of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority Ian
Rolle; attorney Daryl Jones
of Global Justice; Bishop
Simeon Hall; businessmen
Rey Hayward Cooper, Win-
ston Pinnock, Mark Turn-
quest and Dr Kenneth
Rodgers.

AS the people of Freeport
continue to suffer job losses,
several of the country’s
national leaders are expect-
ed in Grand Bahama next
month to help forge a way
forward for the island’s
struggling populace.

Business and civic leaders
are expected to attend the
first National Empower-
ment Summit at Our Lucaya
Resort on September 1. The
goals of the one-day forum,
hosted by the Bahamas
Christian Council (BCC),
are “to empower Bahami-
ans everywhere, to stimu-
late industry partners, to
generate jobs and to boost
the local economy.”

The recent lay-offs at two
hotel properties on Grand
Bahama have resulted in the
loss of over a 100 jobs this
year.

BCC president Rev
Patrick Paul said: “There is
a need for empowering each
other for industry, a need
for justice in a nation, and
the need for intercession in
the nation’s national devel-
opment.”

Rev Paul said Freeport
was chosen as the venue for
the summit because of its

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS IN THE
SUPREME COURT 2004
Common Law and Equity Division CLE/qui/00946

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot
of land containing 11,897 square feet situated on the
Eastern Side of Lincoln Boulevard approximately 500
feet south of Homestead Avenue and on the Western
Side of Washington Street in the Subdivision called
and known as Englerston in the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF THOMAS A. MINNS

NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of Thomas A. Minns of the Englerston
Constituency in the Eastern District of the said Island of
New Providence in respect to:

ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land situated about
500 feet south of Homestead Avenue, on the Eastern
side of Lincoln Boulevard and on the Western Side of
Washington Street in the subdivision called and known
as Englerston in the Islands of New Providence one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
which said piece parcel or tract of land is bounded on the
West by a road named Lincoln Boulevard and running
thereon one hundred and two and twelve Hundredths feet
(112.12) and bounded on the North by property believed
to be owned by the Church of God In Christ and running
thereon One hundredth and Four and Sixteen hundredths
feet (104.16) and bounded on the -East by a road named
Washington Street and running thereon One Hundred
and Three and Ninety-six hundredths feet (103.96) and
bounded on the South by property believed to be owned
partially by Adderley’s Upholstery and partially by one
Joan Hanna and running together thereon One Hundred
and Thirty and Fifty nine hundredths feet (130.59) which
said piece parcel or tract of land has such position shape
boundaries marks and dimensions as shown delinated
on the Plan filed herein and which is thereon coloured
Pink. Thomas A. Minns claims to be the equitable and
beneficial owner in possession of the parcel of land
hereinbefore described and such ownership as aforesaid
arises by virtue of a possessory title to the said land. The
Petitioner has made application to the Supreme Court of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of
the Quieting Titles Act, 1959, to have his title to the said
land investigated.

Copies of the filed Plan may be inspected during normal
working hours at:
1. The Registry of the Supreme Court,
Ansbacher House, East Street, Nassau,
Bahamas; and

2. The Law Chambers of Floyd C. Watkins &
Co. situated at St Alban’s Drive (East) Nassau,
Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that any person having dower
or right of dower or any adverse claim or a claim not
recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 3rd day
of October, 2009, file in the Supreme Court and serve
on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of such
claim in the prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit to
be filed therewith. Failure by any such person to file and
serve a statement of such claim on or before the 3rd day

Power company
‘bleeding’ clients

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Grand
Bahama Power Company has
come under fire for “bleed-
ing” citizens and businesses
with the high cost of electric-
ity, which continues to go
unregulated by government.

Local community activists
Joseph Darville, Troy Gar-
vey, and Rev Glenroy Bethel
on Thursday expressed anger
at the Power Company for its
“insensitivity” toward con-
sumers during these hard eco-
nomic times.

They were also shocked by
the silence of local politicians
here on the island in address-
ing the matter.

“Grand Bahama is fortu-
nate enough to have a host of
representatives in Parliament,
including FNM’s and PLP’s.
However, to date not one has
spoken out in any manner to
address the plight of the poor
people on this island,” said
Mr Darville.

Mr Darville said that there
have been widespread com-
plaints from residents and
businesses concerning the
astronomical cost of electrici-
ty, as well as the numerous
disconnections which have
been taking place in recent
weeks.

He noted that some poor
residents are receiving pow-
er bills as high as $600, and
others are being disconnected
for outstanding bills as low as
$60.

“We need to know why a
single mother, living in a trail-
er house with one young
child, without air-condition-
ing or electric stove, has been
burdened with a monthly
power bill of over $600,” he
asked.

“We want to know why
upon some disconnections
now, individuals have to come
up with a $500 deposit in
order to continue to have ser-
vice. What happens to these
funds? Are they invested and
the individuals can benefit
from interests and divi-
dends?” Mr Darville asked.

According to Mr Darville,
some large companies have
taken steps to reduce their
electricity cost by generating
their own power.

He reported that one com-
pany has been able to cut its
cost by 2/3 so that it can pay
its staff. He believes that as a
result the Power Company
maybe levying additional
charges on regular citizenry
in order to compensate the
loss in revenue.

The Power Company has a
monopoly to supply power on
Grand Bahama. However, it
is not being regulated by the
Public Utilities Commission,

which is mandated by gov-
ernment to regulate the cost
of utilities in the Bahamas.

Mr Darville stressed that
there must be some establish-
ment of regulations to govern
the Power Company, which
unilaterally increases rates as
it sees fit.

Concerns were also raised
over the arbitrary disconnec-
tion of power to households
that are financially chal-
lenged.

Mr Darville thinks that the
company should have a com-
passionate agency that pro-
vides some special considera-
tion to the poor, sick, and dis-
abled on the island.

“We understand that the
power company has to make
money: we also realise that
there are individuals who do
not live up to their responsi-
bility and contract to pay bills
on time. However, there are
numerous instances where
some households have
absolutely no way to deal with
all the financial demands in
order to survive with dignity
today on this island,” he said.

He noted that residents
have endured poor, unreliable
service with numerous black-
outs and brown-outs with not
even an apology by the com-
pany.

Troy Garvey said that the
high fees for fuel surcharge
and the 21 days allotted for
payment of bills are unac-

ceptable.

He stated that residents are
entitled to know how the
rates are determined and how
they are being charged. He
believes that 21 days is insuf-
ficient time for payment of
bills.

“Some people are paid
monthly and can’t pay their
bills within 21 days. We think
the actions of the power com-
pany are unacceptable — espe-
cially at a time when many
people are hurting and not
working on this island,” he
said.

Rev Glenroy Bethel said
that bills are being estimated
due to the shortage of meter
readers on the island. Resi-
dents should be charged
according to what is on their
meters, he said.

Mr Garvey said they expect
to meet with Minister of State
Zhivargo Laing on Thursday
concerning the power situa-
tion on Grand Bahama.

He said they are consider-
ing calling a boycott or hold-
ing petition drive against the
Power Company.

“We call on our govern-
ment officials and parliament
to immediately respond to
this yet another crisis brought
upon the people of Grand
Bahama; it is a power keg
ready to be ignited and will
only take an errant spark
from the Power company to
set it off,” said Mr Darville.



‘True friend to animals’ mourned

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

Dr Bater was

Dr Bater pursued many opportunities

Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT —- The community of
Grand Bahama this week mourned the
passing of well-known veterinarian Dr
Alan Bater, who died suddenly at his
residence on Monday, August 17, at the
age of 62.

Dr Bater, a native of Great Britain,
was the owner of the Freeport Animal
Clinic on Queen’s Highway for many
years.

Tip Burrows, of the Humane Society
of Grand Bahama, said Dr Bater was a
great supporter of the Humane Society.

“He was a true friend to animals and
for many years he was a supporter of the
Humane Society’s spay and neuter pro-
ject, and we are very sad to learn of his
sudden passing.

“Dr Bater was the epitome of what a
veterinarian should be; he always put
animals first. The animals here have lost
a true friend,” Mrs Burrows said.

Kirk Antoni described the veterinari-
an as a “brilliant man.”

He said Dr Bater loved people, the-
atre, singing, and cooking for friends.

He said that his friend loved all animals
and had even served as a mammal con-
sultant for some films that were shot in
the Bahamas.

Mr Antoni noted that Dr Bater was
very knowledgeable and also cared for
dolphins at the Dolphins Experience here
on Grand Bahama.

considered one
of the best ani-
mal care experts
on the island.
He was the first
to be called on
to conduct an
autopsy into the
death of a whale
that beached
itself off Grand

Bahama.

Mr Antoni i
said Dr Bater a eit
Bahamas.

“He first

came to the Bahamas in 1972, and the
only other place that he has worked oth-
er than England was in Uganda, Africa,”
Mr Antoni.

In 1968, Dr Bater was graduated with
a Bachelor of Science degree from the
University of London with first class hon-
ours. He then went on to the Royal Vet-
erinary College (RVC) in London where
he received the First Tompson Prize.

In 1970, he became the scientific coor-
dinator for the RVC East African
Research Team in Uganda. He received
his B Vet Medical degree with Distinc-
tion in Veterinary Surgery and the Cen-
tenary second prize from the Royal Vet-
erinary College.

Dr Bater came to Freeport in 1972 and
began serving as an associate then part-
ner and later principal in the Freeport
Animal Clinic until a few weeks ago.

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in the veterinary field. He served as an
Adjunct Clinical Professor at the Uni-
versity of Florida and as guest lecturer for
CIBA GEIGY Corporation at 30 loca-
tions throughout the US and Caribbean.

He continued his work with marine
mammals and was a consultant to
“Marine Floor Aquarium” in Nassau.
He was involved with numerous marine
mammal strandings in northern and cen-
tral Bahamas including whales, dolphins,
seals and manatees.

As consultant to “Dolphin Experi-
ence” in Freeport he became responsible
for supervision of all matters pertaining
to the health of 16 captive Atlantic Bot-
tle Nosed Dolphins, including breeding.
Later he served as executive director of
the Bahamas Marine Mammal Conser-
vation Institute.

Dr Bater collaborated with many oth-
er facilities including Sea World, the US
Navy, Miami Seaquarium, Reina Aven-
tura (Mexico City), and served as vet-
erinary supervisor for research projects
for the Dolphin Experience.

As principal field investigator he col-
laborated with NMPS pathologists in the
mass strandings of whales resulting from
US Navy sonar activity.

In 2003, the Jamaican government
appointed Dr Bater consultant for cap-
tive dolphins to the National Environ-
ment Protection Agency. He cherished
all animals and loved his work.

Friends of Dr Bater plan to hold a
small gathering in honour of him at the
Freeport Rugby Club on Settler’s Way.

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Floyd C. Watkins & CO.,
Attorneys for the Petitioner.

FEES - Trt Adie ose Sock beter. breed, ft =





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Religious tourism holds firm

By SHENIQUE MILLER

AT a time when tourism
numbers are down and many
have cancelled their annual
vacation plans, it appears that
one group remains resilient
in the face of the global reces-
sion and are booking in
droves trips to the Bahamas.
These are the religious con-
ference goers.

Religious conferences and
conventions in the Bahamas
seem to have a magnetic pull
on believers.

The latest of these events
was the Kingdom Training
Seminar at Bahamas Faith
Ministries International held
from August 5 to 9.

The four-day event drew
more than 150 delegates from
numerous states throughout
North America and countries
in Africa, Europe and South
America.

The conference was also
broadcast through a live web-
cast and people from around
the world were able to tune in
to the event.

One woman who flew in
from Maryland said she trav-

PROSPECTUS

Issued under The Bahamas Registered Stock Act, and authorized by Resolutions of the House of Assembly, 17th

June, 2009.

elled to the conference with
her family and used her time
away from the seminar to
experience the Bahamas for
the very first time.

She said she and her family
flew to Nassau one week
before the start of the seminar
and visited the beaches, the
Straw Market, and other his-
toric sites around the capital.

“Because God is our source
and once we can understand
what he has made available
to us, then what happens in
the world won't affect us,” she
said.

Another guest to the con-
ference, Angela Ramnath
from Florida, said she has fol-
lowed Pastor Myles Munroe
for quite some time. Both she
and her husband have attend-
ed conferences in the past
with Dr Munroe, and were
once again in the Bahamas to
listen to him and the other
speakers.

“It makes up for every-
thing, for the economy, lost
investments, no matter what it
is, this conference makes up
for everything so you can’t
miss out on that,” she said.

DR Myles Munroe
Ue Meee

The Kingdom Seminar
brought together pastors,
bishops and church leaders.
One of those in attendance
was Dr Paul Gaechring of
Greenville, South Carolinaa.

Dr Gaehring is part of one
of the largest church groups in
the US, Redemption World
Ministries.

His church has an interna-
tional network of 1,300 fol-

lowers, some involved in
churches across the United
States and in 35 countries
around the world.

Mr Gaehring said: “Both
me and my wife came down
to this conference, and we feel
like this is one of the most
important things that we can
do with time and money and
we intend to not only receive
it for ourselves but teach it to

our members. It's an invest-
ment that will be multiplied
many times over.”

Faith Tourism is an esti-
mated $10 billion dollar a year
industry.

It's comprised primarily of
North Americans.

The Ministry of Tourism
has also introduced a division
with the sole purpose of tap-
ping into the lucrative indus-

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2028, 2029, 2030, 2031, 2032, 2033, 3034, 3035, AND 3036
ISSUE OF B$150,000, 000.00

Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 19th August, 2009 and will
close at 3:00pm on 25th August, 2009. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 26th August, 2009 and will cease at

3:00p.m. on 27th August, 2009.

If the total subscriptions exceed the sum of B$150,000,000.00 (Nominal) partial allotment will be made to

subscribers, and a proportionate refund will be made as soon as possible after allotment.

amounts so refunded.



The date of this Prospectus is August, 2009

No interest will be paid on

The Registrar



try by partnering with local
churches to bring as many as
possible of those visitors to
the Bahamas.

According to the US
Office of Travel and Tourism
Industries, Americans travel-
ling overseas for religious or
pilgrimage purposes has
increased from 491,000 trav-
ellers in 2002 to 633,000 in
2005.

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK _ 2028, 2029 , 2030, 2031, 2032, 2033, 2034, 2035 AND 2036

FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
APPLICATION No
ALLOTMENT No.

DATE:

c/o The Central Bank of The Bahamas

P. O. Box N-4868
Nassau, Bahamas

Sir:

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas invites applications for Bahamas Registered Stock

totalling B$150,000,000.00. The Stock will be available in a range of maturity dates; the earliest being repayable in

2028 and the latest in 2036. The total amount of Stock offered, the rate of interest and the issue price are given below :-



Rate of Interest

Name of Stock

Issue Price
Amount B$
BS



Above Prime Rate

Above Prime Rate

5/32% Above Prime Rate
11/64% Above Prime Rate
3/16% Above Prime Rate

Bahamas Registered Stock 2028

Bahamas Registered Stock 2029 20,000,000.00
Bahamas Registered Stock 2030 15,000,000.00
Bahamas Registered Stock 2031 15,000,000.00

Bahamas Registered Stock 2032

20,000,000.00 100.00



13/64% Above Prime Rate
7/32% Above Prime Rate
15/64% Above Prime Rate
1/4% Above Prime Rate



Bahamas Registered Stock 2033

20,000,000.00
g 20,000,000.00
Bahamas Registered Stock 2034 20,000,000.00

Bahamas Registered Stock 2035 10,000,000.00
Bahamas Registered Stock 2036 10,000,000.00



150,000,000.00



The Stock shall be repaid on 27th August, in the year appearing in the name of the Stock.

INTEREST

The Stock will bear interest from 27th August, 2009, at the rate shown against the name of the Stock as the percent
per annum over the Prime Rate (i.e. the prime commercial interest rate from time to time fixed by the Clearing banks

18%

9/64% Above Prime Rate

5/32%

11/64% Above Prime Rate
3/16% Above Prime Rate
13/64% Above Prime Rate

1132%

15/64% Above Prime Rate

1/4%

Above Prime Rate

Above Prime Rate

Above Prime Rate

Above Prime Rate

I/We hereby apply for the following amount of Bahamas Registered Stock:

Insert below the amount applied for

in Units of B$100

Bahamas Registered Stock 2028
Bahamas Registered Stock 2029
Bahamas Registered Stock 2030
Bahamas Registered Stock 2031
Bahamas Registered Stock 2032
Bahamas Registered Stock 2033
Bahamas Registered Stock 2034
Bahamas Registered Stock 2035
Bahamas Registered Stock 2036

and undertake to accept any less amount which may be allotted to me/us.

I/We enclose BS

B$
B$
B$
B$
B$
B$
B$
B$
B$

in payment for the Stock applied for.

In the event of the full amount of Stock(s) applied for above is/are not allotted to

carrying on business in the Island of New Providence in The Bahamas. If there shall be any difference between them,
then that which is fixed by Royal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half-yearly commencing on 27th February,
2010 and thereafter on 27th August and 27th February in every year until the Stock is repaid.

CHARGE UPON CONSOLIDATED FUND

The principal monies and interest represented by the Stock are charged upon and payable out of the Consolidated

Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

%

Bahamas Registered Stock

me/us, I/we request that the sum refundable to me/us be applied for the following Stock:

BS

PAYMENTS IN EXCESS OF B$50,000.00 MUST BE MADE VIA REALTIME GROSS SETTLEMENT
SYSTEM (RTGS) THROUGH ALL COMMERCIAL BANKS EXCEPT FINCO.

PAYMENTS OF B$50,000.00 OR LESS CAN BE MADE VIA REAL TIME GROSS SETTLEMENT
SYSTEM OR BY BANK DRAFT PAYABLE TO THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS

PAYMENTS OF B$5,000.00 OR LESS CAN BE MADE VIA REAL TIME GROSS SETTLEMENT

SYSTEM, BY BANK DRAFT PAYABLE TO THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS OR BY

CASH

SUPPLEMENTARY PROVISIONS
Issue of Stock The Stock will be issued by the Registrar (The Central Bank of The Bahamas). Applications will
be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 19th August, 2009 and will close
at 3:00 pm on 25th August, 2009. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 26th August, 2009
and will cease at 3:00p.m. on 27th August, 2009. All envelopes enclosing applications should be
labelled “Application For Bahamas Government Registered Stocks”.

Units The Stock will be in units of B$100.00.

Applications must be for B$100.00 or a multiple of that sum.

Applications

Application Forms Applications for the Stock should be made to the Registrar on the form attached to the
Prospectus and may be obtained from the Registrar offices in Nassau and Freeport, The Treasury
Department (Marlborough Street & Navy Lion Road, Nassau), applications may also be
downloaded from the Central Bank of the Bahamas website at www.centralbankbahamas.com or
any of the following banks:

Bank of The Bahamas International

First Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited

Commonwealth Bank Limited

Royal Bank Of Canada

Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited (formally British American Bank(1993) Limited)
Citibank, N.A.

SEN Or ee Se

PUBLIC DEBT

Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts as at June 30, 2009 show the Public Debt of The Bahamas to be
B$3,524,214,000.*

GOVERNMENT REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE

The following information is extracted from the unaudited accounts of the Government of The Commonwealth of
The Bahamas.

FY2006/2007p** FY2007/2008p** FY2008/2009p**
B$ BS BS
Approved Budget Approved Budget
Revenue 1,338,172,000 1,424,108,000 1,569,329,000
Recurrent Expenditure (excluding

Repayment of Public Debt) 1,285,692,000 1,344,028,000 1,484,150,000

Capital Development
Expenditure (excluding loans
contributions and advances
to public corporations) 166,225,000 176,778,000 188,718,000

** Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts.

* — The Public Debt amount is inclusive of The Public Corporations contingent liability which as at June 30, 2009

totalled B$440,013,000.

1. (One Person)
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Name in Full

(BLOCK LETTERS, state whether Mr., Mrs., or Miss and titles if any.)



Address (Corporations etc. should give Registered Addresses )

P. O. Box





Telephone Nos. (H)

(W)



2. (Where two or more persons apply as joint subscribers, the additional names and addresses should

be given below.)

Ordinary Signatures



Names in Full



And/OR



Address



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I/We hereby request semi annual interest to be paid to:

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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

WAVE YOUR FLAG - A proud Debbie rer.
guson-McKenzie celebrates her bronze medal in
the 200m at the World Athletics Championships.

Pic: Associated Press

bronze after battling back on
the home stretch in 22.35 sec-
onds to trail three-time world
champion Allyson Felix of the
United States in 22.02, and
Olympic champion Veronica
Campbell from Jamaica in
22.35.

* AS

"I'm very thankful, I'm very
blessed to walk away with any
medal period," said Ferguson-
McKenzie, who hoped to add
another one tomorrow when
she runs in the women's 4 x
100 relay.

"There's always the hint of

Sia ~

a little disappointment as far
as the time. I wanted to runa
national record and a PB
(personal best), but the sea-
son isn't over yet, so I'm
thankful. I'm blessed."

The night was a special one
for 33-year-old Ferguson-

Shock at slaying

FROM page one

“It probably wasn’t much and it surely was

some movement in the front.

“They observed two men, one of whom had
a handgun. Shortly after a gunshot was heard
and the female employee who was in the front
was injured to the face.”

ASP Evans said Ms Bullard was rushed to
hospital where she died sometime later.

The two robbers escaped with a undeter-
mined amount of cash. They are described as
being slim, tall, dark men.

Last night shocked staff at 21st Century
Steel Welding Limited paid tribune to Ms
Bullard.

Owner Edward Smith said: “She was one of
the nicest employees I ever had.

‘She was a very good worker, working here
for about four or five years.”

Mr Smith said he was not sure how much
money was taken but said it was the first time
his business has been robbed.

not worth her life,” he said.

Mr Smith questioned the motive for the bru-
tal murder, saying: ‘It could have just been an
idiot who didn’t know the value of life.”

A cousin of Ms Bullard, who asked to
remain anonymous, said: ‘She had a beautiful
personality. She knew the Lord and she would
always express love and kindness to everyone
she met,”

Police are asking for the public’s assistance
in solving this latest murder.

Police say that this latest incident is the
country’s 53rd homicide for the year.

Two weeks ago, 29-year-old mother of two
TaGia Soles-Armony was shot and killed out-
side her grandmother’s home in Sea Breeze as
she sat in her car breast-feeding her three-
month-old son.

Mrs Soles-Armony had just returned home
from St Kitts where she lived with her hus-
band. Valentino Hanna Dorsette has been

FROM page one

Darville said the appointment
of a government politician as
Chief Justice will diminish the
integrity of the judiciary.

Mr Barnett would be the
first Attorney General since
independence to become
Chief Justice. Under earlier
colonial administration and
later in the period of internal
self governance prior to July
1973, two men — Sir Gordon
Bryce and Sir Ormond Drim-
mie Malcolm both rose from
being Attorney General to
Chief Justice. Sir Ormond
(1839-1912) was also Speaker
of the House of Assembly.

Noting that there are also
precedents in the Caribbean
and the Commonwealth for
Cabinet ministers being
appointed Chief Justice, Ms
Bowe Darville suggested this
is little consolation for the
Bar.

“At the moment such an
appointment seems to be an
intrustion by executive (in the
form of Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham) on the
independence of the judicia-
ry,” she said, proposing that
the principle of the separa-
tion of powers — which is
based on the need for each
branch of government to be
independent so as to main-
tain checks and balances on
the powers of other branches
— could be compromised.

The Bahamas Bar Associa-
tion President stressed that
the BBA was not consulted
by Mr Ingraham on the issue
of who should replace former
Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall,
and while this is fine accord-
ing to the constitution as set
out, it would be “good and
wholesome for society” if a
Bahamian Prime Minister
engaged in some discussion

charged with her murder.

Bar lodges formal complaint
over Chief Justice selection

with civil society before deter-
mining such critical appoint-
ments — as is the case in the
United States.

“He doesn’t have to take
our advice, but just to consult
would be a good thing. The
appointment of a Chief Jus-
tice is a very, very serious
thing,” she said, adding that
The Bahamas Bar is consult-
ed on lesser matters.

The association’s complaint
was forwarded to the Prime
Minister yesterday, immedi-
ately following confirmation
of rumours circulating for
weeks that Mr Barnett is to
become Chief Justice. No
reaction has yet been issued in
response, said Ms Bowe
Darville. Mr Ingraham is out
of the country on official busi-
ness.

Ms Bowe Darville and Mr
Sears said it is time the con-
stitution is reformed to
include a legal requirement
that the Prime Minister must
consult with more than just
the leader of the Opposition
on who should be a judge, and
Chief Justice in particular.

They said there should be
greater transparency in the
process, so that people can
know in advance who is being
considered, what their merits
or demerits may be, and offer
their opinion on the matter.

Without such wider debate
on the appointment the pow-
er of a Prime Minister
becomes almost absolute, as
the head of the legislature and
the person who has the final
say in who heads the judicia-
ry, suggested Mr Sears.

He said the issue is not one
that should be “trivialised” by
making it political.

“This is beyond PLP or
FNM. At this stage in our
national development it is
time we improve the system.

It’s an imperfect system but
each generation ought to try
to make it better.

“T think it’s time that we
ensure the respect for the law
and to strengthen the inde-
pendence of the judiciary and
general respect for the gov-
ernance process in The
Bahamas by putting ourselves
in line with democratic prac-
tice of most countries in
democratic world,” said the
former Attorney General.

“As we saw in the US
recently with madam Justice
(Sonia) Sotomayor, the Pres-
ident (Barack Obama) made
the nomination, but you had a
hearing by a coordinate
branch of government.
There’s a more bipartisan
approach and also a process
which involves civil society.”

Under the constitution as
presently formed, the Prime
Minister must consult with the
Leader of the Opposition —
in this case Perry Christie —
on who should be the Chief
Justice.

However, The Tribune
understands that even Mr
Christie, as the one person
who was formally consulted,
was opposed to Mr Barnett
becoming Chief Justice, pri-
marily on the basis that he is a
political figure.

Yesterday Mr Christie said
he would not comment on the
content of his discussions with
the Prime Minister on the
Chief Justice post, stating only
that he “made his position
very clear” to Mr Ingraham
on the matter at the time and
adding that he found the fact
that he should select a mem-
ber of his own Cabinet “inter-
esting.”

A message left for Mr Bar-
nett was not returned up to
press time.

=

McKenzie, albeit the race had
to be delayed by almost an
hour because of the pouring
rain that brought some thun-
der and lightning. She was
presented with her medal
from her long-time 30-year-
old idol, mentor and former
team-mate Pauline Davis-
Thompson.

"For her to present it, being
one of my role models was
very special,” said Ferguson-
McKenzie, who only wished
that she could have hugged
her mother, Elka Ferguson,
who was somewhere in the
stadium watching. "I was very
honoured."

Likewise, Davis-Thompson,
who holds the distinction of
being the first woman to win
an individual medal at the 5th
championships in Gothen-
burg, Sweden, in the 400, said
she was as emotional as Fer-
guson-McKenzie, whom she

teamed up with to win the
gold in the women's 4 x 100
metre relay in Seville, Spain,
in 1999 before they duplicated
the feat at the Olympic
Games in 2000 in Sydney,
Australia.

"IT was so overcome and so
happy to be able to be able
to give Debbie her medal,”
said Davis-Thompson, who
now serves as an IAAF coun-
cil member in her retirement
years. "I've been her idol for
so many years and she's been
my idol too.

"T was just always so proud
of her. I've been hard on her
too, but she knows that it was
tough love. She knew I always
cared about her and wanted
the best for her. I cannot
believe that I’m here in this
moment, in this time, in this
setting giving Debbie Fergu-
son-McKenzie her medal.
How awesome is that."



Minister of State for Youth,
Sports and Culture Charles
Maynard, who watched the
historic performance before
he returned home today, said
it was another experience that
he will cherish for the rest of
his life.

"T got a chance to meet the
team today and I told them
that the Bahamas was already
proud of them and we were
really looking forward to the
next few days because we
knew that our chance for a
medal was coming,” said Mr
Maynard, who greeted Fer-
guson-McKenzie as she com-
pleted her victory lap.

"T think tonight, Debbie's
experience and her poise paid
off as she was able to bring
us our first medal at these
games. We expected another
one from Chris Brown, but
we are just as proud about his
fifth place finish."

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ideas for life



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 10, SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS





LaSHAWN MERRITT of the United States (right) races to win gold in the 400m final ahead of his compatriot Jeremy Wariner (left) who took the silver, and Chris Brown of the Bahamas who placed 5th during
the World Athletics Championships in Berlin yesterday...

Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown

places fifth in 40

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — This
was definitely supposed to be
the year that Chris “Fireman”
Brown broke the fourth place
jinx that has haunted him for
the past two World Champi-
onships.

After giving it a gutsy per-
formance over the first 380
metres at the Olympic Stadi-
um, Brown didn't have any-
thing left in the tank and he
slowly dropped from third to
fifth place.

His time of 45.47 seconds
on a cold and chilly night last
night as a result of the down
pour of rain, lightning and
thunder that delayed the race
for more than a hour, was
reminiscent of how disap-
pointed he was in his perfor-
mance.

"T felt pretty good,” said a
dejected Brown, who for the
very first time, was very slow
in delivering his speech. "I'm
disappointed.”

He could only watch as
LaShawn Merritt add the
world title to the Olympic
gold that he achieved last year
in Beijing, China, as he
stopped the clock in a world
leading time of 44.06 for a 1-2
American sweep with former
champion and compatriot
Jeremy Wariner taking the sil-
ver in a season's best of 44.60.

Trinidad & Tobago's Ren-

IAAF Worlds
Schedule

BERLIN, Germany
IHere’s a look at the schedule
for the Bahamians competing
lover the remainder of the
TAAF’s 12th World Champi-
oJeeUlo wre AUsel leis less

Bahamas, lane 3, heat 1
at 12:10 pm ET

Men’s 4 x 400 relay heats
Bahamas, lane 3, heat 2
at 12:55 pm ET

Women’s 4 x 100 relay fina
@2pm ET

Women’s 4 x 400 relay heats
Bahamas, lane 2, heat 1
at 2:15 pm ET

SUNDAY
A oy rblet ew @CLU Uma eN able
@ 11:50am ET

Men’s 4 x 400 relay final
@ 12:15 pm ET



0 final



CHRIS BROWN (centre) can be seen competing with LaShawn Merritt (second right) and Jeremy Wariner (left) of the US, and Renny Quow
(right), of Trinidad & Tobago in the in 400m final...

ny Quow, who had the next
best time behind Merritt com-
ing into the championships,
posted a 45.02 to clinch the
twin Caribbean island's sec-
ond medal of the biannual
championships.
"ITmean...I really don't
know. I just felt tight coming
back home and that's not
me," said Brown, who started

to lose his momentum 50
metres out from the finish line
and didn't have anything left
to close out the golden oppor-
tunity to give the Bahamas
what was anticipated as a
double dose of celebrations.
With the change in weather
due to the rain, Brown said it
played a factor, but not to the
extend that he still couldn't

pull off the medal spot on the
dais to follow after Debbie
Ferguson-McKenzie clinched
her hardware in the women's
200 about half a hour earlier.
"Boy, I really ain't have
much words this time," he
said, trying to console him-
self. "I really went out there,
but it just didn't happen."
Brown, 30, said he will now

(AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

have to regroup and get
focused so he can come back
on Sunday and help the
Bahamas to continue their
tradition of winning a medal
in the 4x 400 relay.

But he admitted that it's
going to take him so time to
get over the fact that another
opportunity to medal slip
right away from him.

England
lakes control
of deciding
Ashes Test

ENGLAND took con-
trol of the deciding Ashes
Test after closing day two
at The Oval 230 ahead of
Australia at 58-3.

After England added
only 25 to their overnight
307-8, Australia were 73-0
before Stuart Broad pro-
duced a stunning spell of 4-
8 in 21 balls.

Broad finished with 5-37
and spinner Graeme
Swann joined in with 4-38
as Australia were skittled
for 160.

England, who need to
win to regain the Ashes,
lost some wickets but
Andrew Strauss was unde-
feated on 32.

If England were deemed
to have wasted a good posi-
tion on day one, Australia's
collapse was far more dra-
matic as the tourists failed
to press home their advan-
tage.

The first wicket of the
Australia innings went
down at 2.40pm and by
5.19pm it was all over, and
that included 20 minutes
for the tea interval.

England are crying out
for a new hero given the
impending retirement of
Andrew Flintoff and may
well have found one in 23-
year-old Broad, who many
thought would be dropped
after taking only seven
wickets for 345 runs in the
first three matches of the
series.



ALLYSON FELIX (left) crosses the line to win the gold medal in the final of the 200m ahead of Jamaica’s Veronica Campbell-Brown (2nd left) who took the silver medal and
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie of the Bahamas, who got the bronze...

(AP Photo: Michael Sohn)

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THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, AUGUST 22np, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MARINE FORECAST








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me ORLANDO x Ankara, Turkey 82/27 48/8 s 79/26 46/7 S = ABACO ‘Today: ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 84° F
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a @ _ : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 10:16 p.m. 3.1 4:05p.m. -0.1 ean 72/22 54/12 po 73/22 57/13 :
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Baltimore 84/28 6719 t 84/28 64/17 ¢t Little Rock 87/30 6116 s 88/31 6216 s Raleigh-Durham 88/31 67/19 t 87/30 64/17 pe Low: 75° F/24°C “an ee Fear ear 7 Ts Soft —
Boston 82/27 67/19 c 81/27 67/19 c Los Angeles 86/30 66/18 t 84/28 6447 pc St. Louis 78/25 59/15 s 82/27 61/16 s . a ae aaa Se EET
Buffalo 76/24 58/14 t 71/21 59/15 t Louisville 80/26 59/15 t 79/26 60/15 s Salt Lake City 96/35 71/21 s 89/31 6246 t GREAT INAGUA ~ te Te 90/32 77/95 36/30 71/21 pc
Charleston,SC 90/32 71/21 t 91/32 70/21 s Memphis 84/28 63/17 s 85/29 65/18 s San Antonio 100/37 76/24 s 99/37 76/24 s High: 92°F/33°C TaEaRIG 7403 BANE t 73/99 58/14 t INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Chicago 70/21 55/12 po 74/23 56/13 s Miami 90/32 79/26 t 91/32 79/26 t San Diego 75/23 68/20 t 75/23 67/19 pec Low. 76°F/24°C Trinidad 88/31 68/20 pc 93/33 70/21 pc ee me aieren ret aoe
Cleveland 74/23 57/13 t 70/21 57/13 pe Minneapolis 74/23 55/12 s 82/27 62/16 s San Francisco 70/21 57/13 pe 68/20 57/13 pc 7 aOR 69/20 53/11 s 68/20 53/11 pc ee a TRANCE BROCK ENTS
Dallas 95/35 74/23 s 95/35 76/24 s Nashville 84/28 60/15 pc 82/27 60/15 s Seattle 72 3 ST AS Viennn 7/99 56/13 t 77/98 B73 s ? Men Providence ee uf enn fe Em
Denver 95/35 59/15 s 92/33 60/15 pc New Orleans 90/32 73/22 pce 89/81 72/22 s Tallahassee 90/32 67/19 t 92/33 66/18 s
Detroit 73/22 55/12 t 75/23 59/15 pc — New York 95/29 73/22 t 84/28 71/21 t Tampa 91/32 77/25 t 91/32 78/25 t an Ting “RE ee a oom! eer Tel: (242) S6T-A2D4 Tet (242) 332-2862 fF Te (2) SRD
Honolulu 89/31 76/24 s 89/31 76/24 s Oklahoma City 90/32 6146 s 92/33 67/419 s Tucson 90/32 74/23 t 91/32 74/23 t — ;
Houston 98/36 75/23 t 95/35 74/23 s Orlando 90/32 74/23 t 90/32 75/23 t Washington, DC 82/27 69/20 t 84/28 67/19 t Ne eh i ee





THE TRIBUNE

S
cal bk

SATURDAY, AUGUST 22,

PAGE 12

OF








ts

2009




4GE 10 * IAAF World Championships schedule...

Devwle picks Up FOZ

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — She
wanted to at least run a per-
sonal best and lower her
national record. But “golden
girl” Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie was happy to settle
with the bronze medal in the
women’s 200 metres at the
IAAP’s 12th World Champi-
onships in Athletics.

Not a particularly fast race
with American Allyson Felix
carting off the prestigious title
for the third consecutive bian-
nual championships in 22.02
seconds, Ferguson-McKen-
zie’s time of 22.41 was good
enough to raise the Bahamian
flag as she followed Olympic
champion and her new train-
ing partner Veronica Camp-
bell-Brown of Jamaica, who
got the silver in 22.35.

"It feels great. At one point,
I came out here really wanting
to win, but coming off the
curve, I didn't run that strong
so I know I had to execute,”
said Ferguson-McKenzie, who
redeemed herself after a sixth-
place finish in the 100 on
Monday night.

"T didn't give up. I'm happy
with the bronze. I tried to go
for the gold, but it is what it
is."

Caught in a rain delay that
postponed the race for more
than an hour at the Olympic
Stadium, Ferguson-McKenzie
said at one point while warm-
ing up they got wet, but she
knew that the frustration
would soon be over when she
won a medal - any colour.

"I'm just glad that it's
over," said Ferguson-McKen-
zie, who finally got back on
the podium for her first indi-
vidual medal after she got the
gold in Edmonton, Canada,
1 2005 after American Mari-
on Jones was disqualified for
testing positive for a banned
substance.



%

=e

2

"Tt was just wonderful. My
goal was for us to hear the



DEBBIE and Pauline Davis-Thompson (left) share a special moment...

SUIT, SHIRT & TIE

109

Them

Roriard Rd - Hockey 54 - Thompaaa Blvd



national anthem, but I'm glad
that I got the bronze. It's bet-
ter than not getting any
medal."

The bronze tied the
Bahamas with Estonia,
France, Mexico and Romania
for the 29th spot. And when
adding the fifth place finish
by Chris “Fireman” Brown in
the 400 in the final event of
the night, the Bahamas is now
tied with Australia for 14th
on the placing table.

COVERAGE

Chris Brown
places fifth in
400 final...

See page 10



_ DEBBIE FERGUSON-McKENZIE



GOLD MEDAL WINNER Allyson Felix of the US is flanked by silver medal winner Veronica Campbell-Brown,
left, of Jamaica and bronze medal winner Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie of Bahamas after the ceremony for
the 200m final...

For Ferguson-McKenzie,
the 33-year-old who along
with veteran Chandra Stur-
rup were able to hold their
own against their younger
opponents, said she's looking
forward to the Bahamas
adding at least one or two
more medals in the relays this
weekend.

Coming in to the champi-
onships, Ferguson-McKenzie
had the second fastest time in
the world of 22.23 she did in

BERLIN

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

Â¥OUR CONNECTION-TO THE WORLD



T

Stockholm, Sweden, on July
31 behind Felix, who won
with the world's leading mark
of 21.88.
Ferguson-McKenzie also
had the third fastest time of
22.24, which was the fastest
qualifying time in the first
round here in Berlin.
Campbell-Brown sat in
fourth with 22.29, also post-
ed here, but in the semifinal
and Lee had the fifth best of
22.30 from her preliminaries

HE

(T

a? saat ta
’m lovin’ it
TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

(AP Photo: Markus Schreiber)

here as well, which equaled
out the predictions of who
were going to be the medal
contenders.

Ferguson-McKenzie, how-
ever, said her own projection
was a little off at the end of
the race.

But she's just glad to have
been back on the podium, this
time receiving her medal from
her own long-time idol, men-
tor and former team-mate
Pauline Davis-Thompson.




proudly raises our national flag
after winning the bronze in the
200m during the World Athletics




~ Championships in Berlin Friday,

August 21, 2009...

(AP Photo: Anja
Niedringhaus)

Victory for
Knowles,
Bhupathi

BAHAMIAN tennis ace
Mark Knowles and his Indian
partner, Mahesh Bhupathi, are
on a roll in a United States
Open series event being held
in Cincinnati, Ohio.

In a doubles quarterfinals
Friday at the ATP World Tour
Western & Southern Financial
Group Masters, the fourth-
seeded duo defeated Michael
Llodra and Jo-Wilfried Tsonga
of France, 7-6 (6), 6-3.

Also yesterday in the quar-
terfinals, Knowles’ former
partner, Daniel Nestor of
Canada, and Nenad Zimonjic
of Serbia, the No. 2 seeds, got
the victory against No.6 seeded
Mariusz Fyrstenberg and
Marcin Matkowski of Poland,
7-6 (8), 6-7 (8), 10-4 tiebreak.

In the other quarters,
Lukasz Kubot of Poland and
Oliver Marach of Austria, the
No.8 seeds, defeated David
Ferrer and Tommy Robredo
of Spain, 7-6 (2), 6-1.



Full Text
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TRY OUR
DOUBLE
FILET-0- FISH Pitt bovine it

HIGH
LOW

S8F
70F

SUNNY with

t “ey STORMS

Volume: 105 No.224



Mother of
three gunned
down at work

@ By NATARIO MCKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A MOTHER of three was brutally gunned down yesterday
when armed robbers attacked her workplace just yards away
from a local church.

Although police have not officially released the identity of the
victim, family members told the Tribune yesterday she is 34-
year-old Wendy Bullard.

She is the 53rd person to be murdered this year.

According to police, sales clerk Ms Bullard was shot in the
face when two masked men held up the 21st Century Steel
Welding Limited off Royal Palm Street, just several yards
south of St George’s Anglican Church.

According to police press liaison officer Walter Evans, the
victim was in the front area while a woman co-worker was in the
back with a male customer when the incident occurred.

ASP Evans said: “The other female employee and the male
customer were in the back area when they heard sounds of

SEE page 9

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009

fOU WANT TO BF

MISS TVs JUDGE?

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The Tribune

YOUR PASSPORT TO MISS UNIVERSE



’mlovin’ it

Iced Coffee,
Now in 4 Flavors,

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

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Colleagues of Wendy “
Bullard grieve after she
was shot during an
attempted armed rob-
bery yesterday.

(Pic: Tim Clarke/Tri-
bune Staff)

Debbie medals again

@ By BRENT STUBBS

Tribune Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — Eight years
after winning her first individual medal

at the [AAF's 8th
World Champi-
onships in Athlet-
ics in Edmonton,
Canada in 2001,
Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie (pic-

tured right) was back on the podium
as the Bahamas flag was raised for the
first time on day seven at the Olympic
Stadium.

This time, she was awarded with the

SEE page 9





NASSAU AND BAHAMWI/

ISLANDS) LEADING NEWSPAPER






ee

Lawyers
object to
Barnett

as Chief
Justice

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Bar
Association has lodged a
formal complaint against
the Prime Minister’s deci-
sion to appoint one of his
Cabinet ministers to the
country’s top judicial post.

Ruth Bowe Darville,
president of the associa-
tion, and Alfred Sears,
MP and former Attorney
General, claim the move
by Prime Minister Ingra-
ham to appoint Attorney
General Michael Barnett
as Chief Justice highlights
a need for constitutional
reform as it relates to how
judicial appointments are
made.

Mr Barnett is due to
resign his post as Attor-
ney General today, before
being sworn in as Chief
Justice on Monday at
liam. He served as Attor-
ney General since July
2008, and was a senior
partner at the law firm
Graham, Thompson and
Co prior to that. He ran
unsuccessfully to be the
FNM Member of Parlia-
ment for Fort Charlotte
in the May 2007 election.

While some local
lawyers have expressed
their satisfaction at the
selection of a Chief Jus-
tice who may be better
placed to address the
“frustrations” of local
attorneys as Chief Justice,
having worked in the pri-
vate sector as an attorney
before becoming Attor-
ney General, Ms Bowe

SEE page 9

Airport
bomb
scare

A BOMB scare cleared the
domestic and international
terminal of Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

Officials at the Nassau Air-
port Development company
received a call about the
threat shortly afternoon yes-
terday.

Security personnel made a
sweep of the area and found it
to be free of any explosive
device. Passengers were
allowed to return soon after.

While there were some
flight delays, operations
returned to normal later in
the afternoon.

Officials at NAD were
unwilling to give details as to
what specific target the threat
was directed at or who
received the initial call. How-
ever, police maintained a
presence at the airport late
into the evening.
PAGE 2, SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



COB apologises
KO MOTI TIC KI eS

THE College of the
Bahamas yesterday apolo-
gised for any inconvenience
caused by the temporary
failure of its online registra-
tion system.

More than 900 new stu-
dents registered for courses
at COB in New Providence
on Thursday, 18 per cent of
whom utilised the institu-
tion’s online registration sys-
tem IQ.Web, COB Regis-
trar Dr Danny Davis said.

The College has accepted
more than 1,700 new stu-
dents for the Fall 2009
semester, approximately 10
per cent more than the num-
ber accepted last year.
Around 1,200 of those stu-
dents were expected to actu-
ally register.

Online registration began
at 12.01am on Thursday with
the first student registering
at 12.53am. But there were
challenges and the system
slowed considerably.

“The system slowed last
night to an unacceptable lev-
el at which point some stu-
dents were unable to register
online as per our original
plan and our instructions to

them. Students who were
unsuccessful at registering
online came in and we man-
ually registered them,” said
Dr Davis.

The Registrar’s depart-
ment went to manual regis-
tration of students at sever-
al processing points across
the Oakes Field Campus,
including the records depart-
ment at the Portia Smith
Student Services Centre.

The students who regis-
tered on Thursday represent
approximately 76 per cent
of the total number of stu-
dents expected for the Fall
2009 semester.

It is believed that the
increase in new students
accepted for enrolment at
the College is the result of
the prevailing economic
environment and the sus-
pension of the government’s
Guaranteed Educational
Loan scheme.

“We have added addi-
tional course sections to
accommodate the increase
and we will continue to
monitor the situation so that
we can make adjustments as
necessary,” Dr Davis said.



MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News
Editorial/Letters

Weathers.

ee nee cetera eee es Fale

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

MISS UNIVERSE TABLOID 8 PAGES

USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGES



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Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

ACCOUNTING OFFICER

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:-
-CPA, CA or equivalent

-At least five (5) years experience (minimum 3 years with an audit firm).

-Banking experience

-Strong communication skills.
-Well organised with structured and methodical work approach.
-Dynamic and proactive with a positive attitude.
-High level of computer literacy and office skills with a strong ability to prepare
Microsoft PowerPoint presentations.
-Strong analytical skills with the ability to solve issues efficiently.
-Ability to work independently and take initiatives.

-Flexibility to respond to the reprioritisation of tasks.

DUTIES INCLUDE:-

85% occupancy
boost to Atlantis
from Pageant

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

ROOM occupancies at Atlantis will
be around the 85 per cent mark this
weekend with the Miss Universe Pageant
one day away, according to Atlantis Gen-
eral Manager and CEO.

With ticket sales so far at 76 per cent,
George Markantonis told Tribune Busi-
ness he expects the Imperial Ballroom,
where the new Miss Universe will be
crowned, to be almost filled to capacity
when the pageant is aired live tomorrow
night.

According to him, ticket sales typical-
ly increase in the last three days before a

concert or large event.

It was feared that ticket sales would
not do well as initial reports, aired inter-
nationally, suggested that people were
not buying seats for the event.

However, Mr Markantonis confirmed
that more people will be checking into
the Atlantis today and are expected to
purchase tickets.

"Reaction has been positive,” he said.

According to him, the oval shaped
imperial ballroom will take on a rectan-
gular figure for the Miss Universe
pageant in order to make filming the seg-
ment easier for the crew of the broad-
casting station with exclusive rights to
NBC.

Mr Markantonis said the technology
set up in the ballroom will be extremely

complicated, with peripherals set up
around the room to facilitate world-wide
television coverage.

The resort hosted the FIFA Congress
in June, which brought a large contin-
gent of the most important men of the
world's most popular sport, soccer.

According to Mr Markantonis, the
FIFA Congress was an excellent "prac-
tice run" for the Miss Universe pageant.

Miss Universe held its preliminary
competition last Sunday where the top 15
girls who will vie for the crown tomorrow
were selected. It is not yet known who
the front runners are.

eSEE OUR MISS UNIVERSE
PULLOUT FOR EXCLUSIVE
INTERVIEWS AND PICTURES



Bahamian pleads guilty
over cocaine smuggling

A BAHAMIAN man and
another defendant who were
caught by an undercover
operation have pleaded guilty
to conspiracy to import near-
ly 300 kilos of cocaine into
the United States.

The defendants, Bahamian
Mark Pinder and American
Parson Exana, who were
involved in a cocaine smug-
gling ring face a minimum
sentence of 10 years to life in
prison and a fine of $4,000.

On May, 25 Immigration
and Customs Enforcement

- Preparation of the Bank’s financial statements for internal and external reporting

purposes.

- Preparation of all regulatory reports in compliance with mandated format and
deadlines (e.g. The Central Bank and The Securities Commission).

- Production of professional presentations in line with corporate image.

- Development and preparation of internal statistical reports for senior management.

- Preparation of various client financial statements and other types of customized

reports.

- Assisting with the preparation of supporting schedules and coordination of statutory

audits.

- Responsibility for the administration and booking of accounting activity concerning
licensed banking subsidiaries.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED.
Please deliver Resume and two (2) references BY HAND
NO LATER THAN SEPTEMBER 4, 2009 to:-

The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
West Bay Street and Blake Road
Nassau, Bahamas

Offices in

Lausanne, Geneva, Zurich, Luxembourg, London, Montreal, Nassau, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong
Kong, Frankfurt, Florence, Milan, Madrid, ‘Paris, Rome, Turin



(ICE) Special Agents con-
ducted an undercover opera-
tion and received approxi-
mately 297 kilograms of
cocaine from Pinder in a ves-
sel-to-vessel transfer on the
high seas, according to the US
Attorney's Office.

The drugs were later taken
to Palm Beach County.

The next day, law enforce-
ment conducted a "controlled
delivery" of the cocaine to
both defendants in Jupiter,
Florida and arrested the pair.

Court documents revealed

re

that Pinder and an informant
have conducted many smug-
gling operations together over
the past seven years.

In an interview with police,
Pinder told officers that he
got the cocaine from a man
identified as "Talio", in the
Bahamas who transported the
drugs to him through a man
identified as "Abner."

Pinder told police that he
put the drugs on a boat in the
Bahamas and admitted that
he and "Abner" were present
on the boat at around 4 am

——

on May 25 when the cocaine
was transferred to a boat
manned by undercover spe-
cial agents, court papers state.

Pinder pleaded guilty
before US Judge Donald
Middlebrooks on August, 12.
Exana entered the same plea
on August 18.

Pinder is scheduled for sen-
tencing on October 29 while
Exana is expected to learn his
fate on November 5, accord-
ing to the Southern District
of Florida's US Attorney's
Office.

= = [as
BONNY Bentizen, LEED-AP, director of University Sustainability Business Practices at the Global
Institute of Sustainability at the Arizona State University spoke during the College of the Bahamas’
seminar ‘Greening The Academy: Accepting The Challenge Of Environmental Stewardship’. (BIS photo:
IAEA a=) gL 01 eS0) 0)



COB’s recycling plan
gets Ministry backing

By Gena Gibbs

THE Ministry of the Envi-
ronment has endorsed the
College of the Bahamas’ recy-
cling campaign.

Minister Earl Deveaux said
he hoped the programme
“attracts a critical mass” of
support.

He was addressing the fac-
ulty and staff of COB during
their seminar under the theme
‘Greening The Academy:
Accepting The Challenge Of
Environmental Stewardship”
at Bahamas Faith Ministries
last week.

He said government is com-
mitted to protecting the envi-
ronment and spoke of mea-
sures taken to do so.

Environmental legislation
is being updated to endorse
initiatives like those offered
by COB.

“We are passing legislation
directly to the Town Planning
and Subdivision Act tabled in
parliament,” said Mr
Deveaux. “We welcome your
comments.

“Many of the issues to do
with protecting the environ-
ment, waste disposal, envi-
ronmental impact assessments
and requirements, reservation
of public open space, and the
need for transparency in plan-
ning subdivisions, roads, and
developments are all in this
new Act.

“Tt repeals most of the Con-
servation of the Physical
Landscape Act, the existing
Town Planning, Private
Roads and Subdivisions Act,
and incorporates The Out
Island Dilapidated Buildings
Act,” the minister said.

The proposed Forestry Act
intended to conserve, protect,
and manage the forest estate
and “ensure the national por-
tion of our land is held pri-
marily for wetlands and the
ecosystems in the pine forest
and coppice forests” has been
completed, he said.

“The bio-diversity of the
Bahamas is located in our
forests, and mahogany,
lignum vitae, and horseflesh
trees are endangered and

need protection,” said Mr
Deveaux.

“They feed white crown
pigeons, crabs, and other
wildlife and protect the
ecosystems.”

Minister Deveaux said
environmental employment
opportunities will open up
when the law is passed.

“College of the Bahamas’
School of Sustainability gives
the Bahamas an opportunity
to tackle core issues of how
we manage our environment,
how we populate our institu-
tions, where we create oppor-
tunities for young people, and
where we find answers.”

“These notions of environ-
mental awareness should be
fundamental to our beliefs,”
he added

The nation’s future, its
security and the health of the
people, he said, is based on
how the country resolves the
issues of climate change and
sea level rises.

“Not what other countries
do, but what we do,” said Mr
Deveaux.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



PLP hopeful:
Jobless total
veto mien
official data

PLP leadership hopeful
Paul Moss told The Tri-
bune yesterday that he
believes the unemploy-
ment figures are much
higher than reported by
the Department of Statis-
tics.

According to the
Department’s latest sur-
vey, the unemployment
rate in New Providence
increased from 8.7 per
cent in May last year and
12.1 per cent in February
2009 to 14 per cent in
May.

In Grand Bahama, the
unemployment rate has
increased drastically —
from nine per cent last
year to 14.6 per cent in
February 2009 and a mas-
sive 17.4 per cent in May.

“I am surprised that the
figures for Grand Bahama
seem to be so low having
gone to Grand Bahama
myself, I believe that it is
much higher than that. I
also believe that the rate
in New Providence is high
as well because people
from Grand Bahama
came here looking for jobs
and there are no jobs
here,” Mr Moss said.

There are almost 10,000
more people without jobs
this year than last year,
according to the Depart-
ment of Statistics which
released the results of its
annual labour force sur-
vey on Thursday.

With 9,540 additional
people unemployed it
means that out of a poten-
tial labour force of
184,020, there are 26,215
people without work in
the Bahamas.

The overall unemploy-
ment rate, which also
takes into consideration
the Family Islands, grew
from 8.7 per cent to 14.2
per cent in a year.

Director of Statistics
Kalsie Dorsett said this
places the unemployment
rate at its highest level
since the early 1990s.

This was despite the fig-
ures not taking into con-
sideration major job loss-
es since the survey was
conducted in May, for
example the 500 people
left unemployed by the
closure of the Emerald
Bay Resort in Exuma.

Nonetheless, the news
will not come as a great
surprise to many
observers.

It corresponds with pre-
dictions from various
agencies and individuals,
including the Central
Bank of the Bahamas and
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham that unemploy-
ment would further rise
throughout the year in the
face of decreased tourism
arrivals and a downturn in
foreign direct investment
which has hurt the con-
struction sector in partic-
ular.

In New Providence, one
quarter of all people who
are unemployed left their
Jobs in the last 12 months.

However, Mr Moss
believes the unemploy-
ment problem could be
remedied by government
focusing on creating and
expanding on “light indus-
tries” in the Bahamas.

“Industries like agricul-
ture can allow Bahamians
to have both jobs and
ownership of land. To
grow what is sustainable
and what is in our hotels
and in our homes will
keep money inside the
country,” he said.

Mr Moss said, however,
that government’s deci-
sion to sign on to various
international trade agree-
ments has brought the via-
bility of a local agriculture
industry into question.

“If we have farmers
growing tomatoes for
example and do away with
Customs duty then there is
a chance that tomatoes
coming into the country
will be cheaper than those
grown here. Some may
say that’s fine because we
will have access to cheap-
er food, but what we
would be doing is keeping
people employed abroad
while they remain unem-
ployed here,” he said.



Resort staff fear for
future employment

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

STAFF at the soon-to-close
Riu Paradise Island hotel
have expressed their fears for
the future after they claim
they were told not all of them
will be called back to work
when the resort re-opens.

Some also claim it has not
been made clear what they
will be paid — if anything —
while the hotel is closed for
renovations for three months
as of this weekend.

One employee, who wished

to remain anonymous, said:
“We understand why they are
closing the hotel but of course
it’s like a stab in the back. We
have approached our superi-
ors and we’re not getting any
response.

“Management has a list of
people they are not going to
call back but that’s not been
dealt with yet. The only peo-
ple who know are the man-
agers. We, the employees,
have not been told.”

The RIU is closing as it
undergoes a $25 million
makeover, upgrading its 379
guestrooms. The resort will
reopen on November 26 as

Claim some will not be called
back when PI resort re-opens,
and uncertain over pay during
three-month renovation closure

the RIU Palace Paradise
Island.

Yesterday, Minister of
Tourism Vincent Vanderpool
Wallace said the closure of
the resort will reduce the
options for tourists looking
for the type of holiday in Nas-
sau where they can know in
advance what it is going to

cost them.

However, he added that
there are “alternative prop-
erties” that such holidaymak-
ers can go to.

Mr Vanderpool Wallace
said the Riu had been doing
“fairly well” in terms of occu-
pancy up to now, but added
that it had been hit by the clo-

sure of a Canadian tour oper-
ator which had brought a lot
of business to the property.

He denied reports on ZNS
that the closure was conse-
quent to the Ministry receiv-
ing an abundance of com-
plaints about conditions at the
hotel.

“That’s not something that
we would single them out
for,” he said.

However, he explained that
if a hotel is to carry out reno-
vations, September and Octo-
ber — traditionally slow
months for tourist arrivals —
are best suited for such activ-

ity.





PM identifies investment
‘potential’ of Atlanta link

THERE is a “tremendous potential” for the Bahamas to
expand on major trade and investment opportunities as it
endeavours to develop a close and rewarding relationship with
the city of Atlanta, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said.

Speaking at the opening of the new consulate office in
Atlanta, Georgia, on Thursday, Mr Ingraham said that the
city is the corporate headquarters for the largest number of For-
tune 500 and Fortune 1,000 companies in the southeastern
US.

Gregory Pridgeon, chief of staff to the city’s Mayor Shirley
Franklin, said that the Bahamas and Atlanta are well suited to
be partners and he, too, spoke of mutually beneficial relation-
ships.

He welcomed the Bahamas to the diplomatic fraternity
established in Atlanta.

Mr Ingraham said: “I am very pleased to join you to mark the
official opening of our first Bahamian career Consulate General
in Atlanta, the capital city of Georgia and a major business, cul-
tural and education centre for the southeastern United States.”

“T take this opportunity to say that though tourism is today
and is likely to remain into the future our principal business, we
are also home to one of the deepest harbours in our region, one
of the most modern, efficient container transshipment ports and
a major ship care and repair facility capable of working on
the largest ocean-going vessels afloat today.”

“And so, opportunities for expanded trade and investment
with this consular jurisdiction are ripe for exploration,” he
said.

The prime minister took to the airwaves and cyberspace
about the potential of the new office. During an interview
with two Atlanta reporters — one for Atlanta Business and
the other for the online publication Global Atlanta — Mr Ingra-
ham noted that the new office would also facilitate efforts to
improve relations between Atlanta area businesses and the
Bahamas.

“(This office will) raise the Bahamas’ profile in this area of
the United States,” Mr Ingraham told the reporters.

Locating the office in Atlanta will, the prime minister said,
provide better opportunities for US businesses to have access
to information about either investing or doing business in the
Bahamas, and at the same time provide better access for
Bahamian businesses to the southeastern US market.

“The demand in the southeastern United States for the
Bahamas is great,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said he sees opportunities and potential for
increased trade, citing in particular the services available at the
transshipment facility in Grand Bahama.

Probe into traffic
accident continues

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

Both vehicles were exten-
sively damaged. The drivers
were treated for their injuries
at the Rand Memorial Hos-
pital and later discharged.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
said that police are renewing
their plea to the motoring
public to obey the speed lim-
it and pay attention to traffic
signs.

Investigations are continu-
ing into a traffic accident that
occurred at the intersection
of East Sunrise Highway and
Balao Road.

According to reports, the
accident occurred around
9.50pm on Wednesday involv-
ing a 1996 GMC Truck owned
and driven by Michael
Pritchard, 45, of Freeport, and
a 2004 white Nissan Maxima
driven by Kishana Wilch-
combe, 20, of Freeport.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
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PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham and his delegation were
received by Governor Sonny Purdue of Georgia on Thursday. Mr
Ingraham exchanged gifts with Governor Purdue during a courtesy

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The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the following
position:

PLUMBER

The Plumber repairs and installs various plumbing systems, fixture,
pumps, piping and related equipment.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

* Completion of secondary school diploma.
¢ Four years of journeyman level in plumbing.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

* Must be skilled in plumbing maintenance.

¢ Must have a valid Bahamian driver’s license and the ability to drive
passenger vehicles, forklift, stake body and pickup trucks with manual
transmission.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation
package including performance-based incentives, medical and
dental insurance, life insurance, pension and opportunities for
training and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are
eligible for employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms can be found on the Embassy’s website
nassau.usembassy.gov under Key Embassy Links and employment
opportunities. Completed applications should be returned to
the Embassy via email to fernanderra@state.gov or faxed to
(242)328-8251, addressed to the Human Resources Office no later
than Thursday August 27th, 2009.
PAGE 4, SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Afghan vote shows Taliban still potent

WASHINGTON — The violence-
scarred elections in Afghanistan provided
a stage for the Taliban to show war-weary
Americans and Afghans that it has
rebounded and can strike — even after
eight years of war.

For President Barack Obama's poli-
cies, the timing couldn't be worse.

With memories of the Sept. 11 terrorist
attacks dimming, Americans are tiring of
the conflict. New polling shows a majori-
ty — 51 per cent — of those surveyed
now believe the war is not worth the fight,
an increase of 6 percentage points in a
month.

Obama's answer to the mounting scep-
ticism is to say that, in a way, the war has
just begun. The final push to wipe out
America's Taliban and al-Qaida enemies
is not eight years old but really got started
when he took office and ordered 17,000
more troops into Afghanistan.

In short order, he also installed a new
commander and persuaded Pakistan to
join the U.S. in what on Thursday he
called a pincer movement to squeeze the
enemy astride the common border.

Obama's ability to recast the public
debate at home — to get people to look
past the cost and the deadly violence there
— may matter more in the long run than
who won or lost the Afghan presidency.

Obama has not wavered from his cam-
paign pledge to take the fight to the Tal-
iban and their al-Qaida allies in
Afghanistan and Pakistan. He argues that
the true danger to Americans lies in the
towering peaks and vast deserts of those
countries. The Bush administration, he
asserts, wasted precious time, treasure
and blood in Iraq.

Before then, he argues, problems in
both countries were allowed to fester. As
a result, the Taliban retook huge swaths of
Afghanistan, and al-Qaida was comfort-
ably ensconced on the Pakistan side of
the mountainous border.

"We've got to make sure that we are
really focused on finishing the job in
Afghanistan. But it's going to take some
time,” the president said on a talk-radio
programme Thursday. He gave a nod to
the election, saying it "appears to be suc-
cessful" despite the "Taliban's efforts to
disrupt it." Initial reports show 26
Afghans were killed in Taliban attacks on
Election Day.

The Bush administration used earlier
elections in Afghanistan and Iraq as evi-

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(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427

(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, AUGUST 23RD, 2009

7:00 a.m. Pastor Henry Whyte/Bro. Franklyn Bethel
11:00 a.m. Sis. Tezel Anderson/Sis. Katherine Rose
7:00 p.m. Sis. Nathalie Thompson/Board of Music Ministry

dence of success of its war policies. This
White House isn't getting that boost.

The White House has been particular-
ly reticent to talk about the Afghan vote,
where the turnout appears to have been
significantly lower than in the first-ever
direct election of a president there in 2004.
The administration is deeply aware of the
country's long history of bloody uprisings
against past leaders who were seen as
place men for foreign powers.

While Obama took office having pub-
licly expressed disappointment in Presi-
dent Hamid Karzai over his ineffective-
ness and a background noise of corruption
surrounding his administration, he has not
spoken of a preference for Thursday's
outcome.

Karzai's strongest challenger is his for-
mer foreign minister, Abdullah Abdul-
lah, who may show well when the votes
are counted because of heavier turnout
in the ethnically Tajik northern part of
the country. The turnout was spotty in
the Pashtun south where Karzai has major
support. If neither Karzai, Abdullah nor
any of the other 34 candidates wins 50
per cent in the first round, there will be a
runoff. Final results of the Thursday vote
will not be known until Sept. 3.

Regardless of the Afghan vote or the
diminishing support for the war back
home, a White House strategy review is
due out in mid-September, and Gen. Stan-
ley McChrystal, the U.S. commander in
Afghanistan, is widely expected to press
for a significant further increase in forces
for his new counter-insurgency campaign.

Just three years ago the U.S. had about
20,000 forces in the country. Today, it has
triple that, on its way to 68,000 by year's
end when all of the 17,000 newly deployed
are in place.

A Washington Post-ABC News poll this
week showed, however, that only 24 per
cent of Americans support that move,
with 45 per cent saying the force should be
decreased.

The domestic political course for Oba-
ma's overall Afghan strategy and for a
further troop increase, thus, is growing
ever more difficult to navigate.

And in a sparkling bit of political irony,
backing for the war remains strongest
among Republicans and conservatives
who support the conflict by 70 per cent
and 58 per cent, respectively.

(This article was written by Steven R
Hurst, Associated Press writer).



Men being
stripped of
masculinity

EDITOR, The Tribune.

After perusing the newspa-
per over the past several days
the debate on the rape law
caught my attention. Is the
government really serious
about this? What are the sta-
tistics of women claiming to
be raped on a yearly basis in
the Bahamas by their spouse?
Is this yet another attempt to
feminize the Bahamian male
so we can become more “sen-
sitive” to our wife’s needs or
should I say wants? What
happens if the wife is a little
frisky (a rare occasion for
many of us husbands, and
devoted husbands by the way)
and the husband is not quite
as “energetic” as the
wife...can the husband file
rape charges? What happens
if a married couple actually
has a good time on the very
rare occasional night only to
wake up into an argument,
and the wife files a rape
charge in the heat of the
moment?

Our entire society has yet
gone to the extreme (and far

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



left extreme) I might add. I
can only advise all of the hus-
bands out there to contact
their relevant attorneys to
draft waiver or disclaimer
forms and to have a stack of
them on the night stand in the
bedroom only to be execut-
ed (signed) by your spouse in
case a moment of passion
overwhelms you or your
spouse. At what point does
consent come into play? In
the beginning, halfway
through or better yet at the
very end?

I can just see what we mar-
ital couples are going to trans-
form into over the next sev-
eral years:

Can I hold the car door
open for you honey?

Consent;

Can I hold your hand?

Consent;

Can I take you out to din-
ner?

Consent;

Can I buy you a car?

Consent;

Can I kiss you?

Consent;

Can we bath together?

Consent;

Can [...?

Consent

How ridiculous are we
going to get? At what point
does it stop? I don’t know
how many relationships the
average married male has had
(prior to marriage of course)
but the whole one relation-
ship that I’ve had didn’t quite
materialise as in the afore-
mentioned. Any form of mas-
culinity is slowly being
stripped from the Bahamian
male under the guise of over
sensitivity, tolerance so we
can get in touch with our feel-
ings.

Get you waivers/disclaimers
ready gentlemen, because I
can see where this is going!

CHRISTOPHER
ARMALY
Nassau,

July, 2009.

PLP must elect leader with
best winning shot in 2012

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow me a little
space in your valuable publi-
cation to express a few
thoughts on the upcoming
Progressive Liberal Party’s
convention in a few month’s
time.

It appears that this conven-
tion is shaping up to be a most
interesting one as the various
combatants for positions of
leadership in the party pre-
sent themselves in full battle
gear. All of this is healthy for
the PLP and a clear demon-
stration that democracy is
alive and well in the party.

Cat Island MP Philip
“Brave” Davis has thrown his
hat into the ring for the posi-
tion of deputy leader. What
does he bring to the table? A
solid parliamentary career,
years in the trenches in the
PLP and a keen and insightful
mind. Former Tourism Min-
ister Obie Wilchcombe will
also declare soon for the same
position. He brings actual
Cabinet experience, a solid
background as an MP, a stint
as party chairman, and a keen
and insightful mind. Good
luck to both men and to any
other contestant for the
deputy leadership.

Now a keen political
observer recently posed a
very insightful and intriguing

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question, being, whether the
detractors in the PLP are
capable, at this convention,
of dispossessing party leader
Perry Christie of his crown?

“Despite Christie’s best
efforts, there are those in his
organisation, and a few even
close to his bosom who are
attempting to take Perry
Christie’s party away from
him,” the observer noted.

A spot-on observation, no
doubt, but I have a gut feeling
that when the smoke clears
and the dust settles at this
convention, Perry Gladstone
Christie will emerge as leader
smelling like a rose. I predict
—and I don’t practice the art
of divination — that Christie
will emerge victorious with
barely a scratch.

Why do I say that? The first
thing to observe is that to date
there has not been one single
PLP Member of the House of
Assembly or the Senate who
has stepped forward publicly
to declare that he or she will
run for party leader.

That, in my view, is signifi-
cant because whoever chal-
lenges as leader should at
least have a seat in parlia-
ment, so as to be in a position
to direct the opposition’s
attacks on the government,
and to articulate the party’s
policies and programmes at
that level.

It would be very awkward,
and a step backwards, if the
PLP elected a leader who is
not in the Senate or the
House of Assembly, and can-
not even take part in debates
at a national level. Such a
thing has happened in our
politics in the past, but with
disastrous results.

Secondly, any credible chal-
lenger to Mr Christie would
need to have national appeal,
not merely capable of bring-
ing together the various fac-
tions in the PLP. The leader
must be capable of appealing
to supporters of the other par-
ty in order to win enough
seats to form the next gov-
ernment.

Third, any credible candi-
date should at least have a
track record with the Bahami-
an people. The Rt Hon
Hubert Ingraham had a track
record, a very long and illus-
trious one, and national
appeal before he became
opposition leader and, even-
tually, prime minister. The
same can be said of Mr
Christie.

It is critical that the leader
put in place, and articulate, a
winning strategy in the run up
to the next general elections.
That strategy may very well
mean change within the party,
but to what extent is change
needed is the critical question.
Any change at this late stage,
with the elections barely two
years away, should be very

carefully considered by PLPs.

Does a new leader, largely
unknown to the PLP and the
country, have enough time to
build a bond of trust and con-
fidence between himself and
the public before the next
general election? I think not.

There are those in the PLP
who have sprung up like “top-
sy” who are now crying for
Mr Christie’s head. But they
have spectacularly failed to
unveil any credible plan to
take the PLP, and indeed, the
country forward.

What is their battle cry?
They say that because they
are relatively young, have col-
lege degrees, wear Armani
suits, silk ties and alligator
skin shoes, that they are
God’s gift to the PLP. Now,
they do have something to
offer. But they must learn to
follow before they can lead.
They must wait their turn.
Remember, to everything
there is a season and a time to
every purpose under heaven.

In my view, and I cannot
tell the PLP what it should
do, but the delegates at the
convention in October must
elect a leader who can give
the PLP the best chance of
winning the next government.
They should bear in mind that
the last general elections was
a nail-biter and that the PLP
lost by less than five seats.

If the PLP does not mind
spending another 10 years in
opposition then it should elect
maybe Paul Moss or Jerome
Fitzgerald as leader. Ten
years is enough time for them
to learn the role of Opposi-
tion leader.

It would also give the
Bahamian people a better
opportunity to observe these
two men on the job, and to
decide whether or not they
are fit candidates for prime
minister one day in the future.

But if the PLP wishes to
win the next general election,
then my humble view is that
they should go with Perry
Christie, despite all his faults
and weaknesses, as he will
give the party the best shot at
winning.

He is known as an honest,
very capable leader, despite
his soft heart at times. But
being overly loyal and soft
hearted towards one’s friends,
and even one’s political ene-
mies, does not mean weak-
ness. If the PLP wanted to
change its leader, it should
have done so right after the
last general elections. In my
view, changing the leader at
this late stage would blow the
PLP off course, and send it
directly into the iceberg like
the Titanic in 1912.

MARK
ROLLE-SYMONETTE
Nassau,

August, 2009.
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



"My vexation was so
yucked up when I read that
in 2007 there were 5,177
live births and 3,167 were
from unwed mothers. That
means three out of five
females making children

ain't married! What the

unmarried young women

needs is to get a good coun-

selling session in church

from their

pastor

where they

can learn

to live lives

as good as oO A
Feat ale

tors and

have nice

cars and

fancy

homes."

Repen-

tant sin-

ner, Nas-

sau.

"IT vex
because
while dri-
ving down
Shirley
Street yes-
terday my
car was
attacked by stones/pebbles
from the operator of one of
those weed eaters. These
operators seem to like
weeding the stones and not
the grass, maybe there is no
grass there?

"When I got home I
noticed that the windshield
had a crack in it and it’s
now about a foot long and
will have to be replaced,
some $500 plus. Thanks
Ministry of Works! When
others found out about that
at the office, many had sim-
ilar stories of rocks hitting

)

Ak)
pane ta

their pas- ar

them from the big sit down
mowers on the larger
streets. Someone could get
hurt or even killed!"

- Concerned Citizen,
Nassau.

"I vex that someone in
government decided to do
some road work on East-
ern Road, where so many
people
travel
every day
and night,
and big
and bold
on a Mon-
day morn-
ing they
had one
poor man
out there
laying
down tar
or some-
thing and
the road
was all
patch up.

"There
was no
sign to say
‘road work
ahead',
and the
road was
wide open. I almost buss
my car up driving down that
road and ‘most knock that
worker down. He so fool he
was all up in the middle of
the road in his orange jack-
et. These government peo-
ple need to do better - and
days later the road still ain’
finish. They mussie ga’ pay
for my busted tyre.”

- Mad Motorist, Nassau.

Are you vex? Send com-
plaints to whyyouvex@tri-
bunemedia.net or fax to
328-239.



ENM< to celebrate
first election win

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Free
National Movement and its
supporters on Grand Bahama
will commemorate the party’s
first victory at the polls on
August 19, with a church ser-
vice tomorrow.

Senator David Thompson,
chairman of the FNM’s
Grand Bahama council, said
the anniversary of the FNM’s
victory marks “that great day
of deliverance when Bahami-
ans demonstrated political
judgment and maturity with
the peaceful removal of a
regime whose rule spanned a
quarter century and embraced
the FNM message of deliver-
ance.”

He said party members and
supporters will gather at 9am
at the New Hope Methodist
Church for praise and wor-
ship with Rev Christopher
Neilly.

The party’s leadership,
Cabinet ministers, parlia-
mentarians, party officers,
meritorious council members,
central council members, offi-
cers and members of the
FNM Women’s Association
and the Torchbearers Asso-
ciation and other party mem-
bers are expected to attend.

Mr Thompson said Elec-
tion Day 1992 was a historical
triumph for the people of the
Bahamas.

He said the PLP under the
late Sir Lynden Pindling had
won six consecutive general
elections and had been the
government of the Bahamas
for almost 26 years when the
FNM under party leader
Hubert Ingraham finally
achieved a crushing victory
over the PLP on August 19,
1992.

The FNM won its second
consecutive term in March
2007. In May 2002, the party
lost, but rebounded in May
2007 and won the general
elections for a third time.

“This year as we observe
and celebrate the 1992 victory
we will also be praying to the
Almighty God for the nation’s
speedy and complete recoy-
ery from the current econom-
ic recession which has brought
great hardship on so many
Bahamians,” said Mr Thomp-
son.

He said the FNM MPs will
host back-to-school give-away
jamborees for students
returning to school in each
constituency on Saturday,
August 29.

Marco City MP Zhivargo
Laing hosted a back-to-school
jam on Thursday at the Moon
McPhee Park. Back-to-school
jams will be held next Satur-
day between 2pm-4pm by
Lucaya MP Neko Grant at
the Sunset Land Community
Park; at YMCA by Pineridge
MP Kwasi Thompson, and at
the Basil Neymour Park by
High Rock MP Kenneth Rus-
sell.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, TAITIN CLEVETTE
HANNA of BELDOCK AVENUE, BELAIR ESTATES,
P.O. BOX EE-17845, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, intend to
change the name to TATUM CLEVETTE HANNA. |
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-
742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date
of publication of this notice.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
PAULINE A.

The Public is hereby advised that |,
NEYMOUR of WESTRIDGE ESTATES, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, intend to change the name to PAULINE
A. ZONICLE. If there are any objections to this change of
name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later
than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

BACK by popular demand,
The Tribune announces the
return of its Saturday feature,
“Pet of the Week.”

Each week, one abandoned
cat or dog being cared for by
the dedicated staff at the
Bahamas Humane Society
(BHS) will be featured with
information on how to adopt
a pet of your own.

Now is the perfect time for
the relaunch, BHS staff say, as
the summer months are the
most demanding at the shel-
ter. Animals are either aban-
doned or surrendered, at an
alarming rate — dropped off
by owners unable or unwilling
to care for them anymore,
often due to travel plans.

“To make matters worse,
cats begin to breed in the
spring and by summer
unwanted or found kittens
come in by the dozens,” one
staffer explained. “Mean-
while, adoption rates — espe-
cially among adult dogs and
cats — are extremely low,
again in all likelihood due to
vacation schedules.

“Consequently, the
Humane Society is now over-
whelmed with adult dogs and
cats. Roughly 20 dogs and
over 30 cats are waiting to be
adopted into new, loving
homes. Many are youthful
and all are friendly and full
of character. Sadly, we are
fast approaching full capacity
and if the adoption rate does
not pick up some difficult
decisions will have to be
made. Please help us save as
many lives as possible. The
animals urgently need your
support. Come in and adopt
right now.”

To commemorate the
relaunch, today we publish a
bumper edition of Pet of the
Week. Pictures are above

CHLOE

This five-year-old pit-
bull/chow mix is a true sweet-
heart. Her former owners
regretted having to give her
up, but had to relocate for
career reasons. Chloe is great
with children and loves long
walks, a combination that has
earned her the status of the
Humane Society's summer
camp favourite. However, she
is particular with regards to
the canine company that she
keeps and would do best in a
home where she is the only
four-legged family member.
Unfortunately, this lovely lady
has been at the Humane Soci-
ety for over three months.
Her long stay is probably due
to the fact that she suffers
from a few health concerns
which, while maintainable,
necessitate that she finds the
perfect new family willing to
dedicate a little extra care.
Considering the current state

ies
ett} AD] |

of surrender inundation, slow
adoption rates and the result-
ing space constraints, Chloe's
situation is all the more dire.
She is desperately longing for
the essential security and
companionship that can only
be provided by a loving fami-
ly. By giving Chloe a new
home you can save her life.

GOLDIE

Goldie is a nine-year-old
top of the line Rottweiler.
This girl is sugar-sweet and
has a beautifully mild tem-
perament. Sadly, after having
been used for breeding her
whole life, she has now been
surrendered to the Humane
Society by her owners. She
has tested positive for a low
degree of Ehrlichia, a tick-
borne disease that can easily
be maintained with antibi-
otics. Please help fill the rest
of her life with the love and
happiness that she most cer-
tainly deserves.

SHARKY

This healthy and fun-loving
young man has spunk! He is
about eight months old and
is very handsome with his
unusual long brindle coat. His
wonderful smile reveals his
modestly purple-spotted
tongue that can only belong
to a chow mix. He loves to
walk, run and play, and would
probably make a great beach
companion. Extremely affec-
tionate on the one hand, on
the other he is also quite vocal
and would make a great pro-
tector.

VISCO

What to say about Visco?
He is a Burmese/ Persian mix
and a veteran at the Humane
Society. He is a wise and inde-
pendent soul that, having
approximately nine years of
experience at this thing called
life behind him, knows how
to get by with minimal effort
and attention.

Nonetheless, like every oth-
er cat, he loves to cuddle and
be stroked whenever possi-
ble. He does unfortunately
suffer from a minor skin aller-
gy that the BHS staff are
working on fixing and should
be as good as new in no time.
Please think about taking Vis-
co into your home. Space in
the Cattery is a serious con-
cern and it is time that Visco
moved on so that other cats
can be saved.

ieee
Sasa Ue

SEU UE
PHONE: 322-2157



ei
SLAG



JACKSON

Play, play, play! Jackson is
a young cat who, quite natu-
rally, loves to have fun. Be it
with a piece of string, a pen or
your t-shirt,

Jackson will keep both him-
self and you well entertained.
He is an extremely loving boy
who would do well with other
cats and children. Come in




and meet him for yourself.

KITTENS

We have many playful kit-
tens in all shapes, colours and
sizes. They have been de-
wormed and have begun their
vaccination series. It is now
up to you to come in and take
one (or more) home!

Animal cruelty:
Man is charged


























@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A man
was charged with animal
cruelty in the Freeport
Magistrate’s Court on
Thursday. He was accused
of abusing a mixed Dober-

mann he adopted from the

Humane Society of Grand

Bahama.

Wenito Bootle, 27, was
charged before Deputy
Chief Magistrate Helen

Jones in Court 3.

It is alleged that between

February 9 and July 15,
Bottle abused and mal-
treated a domesticated ani-
mal known as Meka.

According to reports, the
Humane Society had
received a report of a starv-
ing dog that had collapsed
in a yard. Field service offi-
cers were dispatched to the
location, where they dis-
covered a female mix. The
female dog was very weak
and had to be put to sleep
when she became unre-
sponsive.

Bootle pleaded not guilty
to the charge of animal cru-
elty. The case was
adjourned to December 15
for trial.



ASSEMBLIES OF 600]

Adult Education
Worship Service
Spanish Service








































Comejoinjusfas we come together, and
worship}the]Lord in Spirit and in Truth
OPPORTUNITIES FOR
WORSHIP AND MINISTRY

SUNDAY SERVICES

Motning Worship Service
Sunday School for all ages ...

8.30 a.m.
9,45 a.m.
9,45 a.m.
11.00 a.m.

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, AUGUST 23RD, 2009.

11:30 AM Speaker

ELDER BRENTFORD ISAACS

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. « Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. « Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
* Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MICHELINE VOLTAIRE of
MOORSE LANE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 22"? day of August, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-
7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



Evening Worship Service 6.30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

Selective Bible Teaching
Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-16 yrs,
Missionettes (Girls Club) 4-16 yrs.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministry Meeting

RADIO MINISTRY
Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS 1 - TEMPLE TIME

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

OTIC INC UMC eCR st
Tel: 322-8304, Fax: 322-4793. P.0. Box: N-1566
Email: evtemple@batelnet.bs Web: www.evangelistictemple.org







TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6, SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





Summit to aid
Grand Bahama

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



infrastructure and unlimit-
ed potential for growth.

“Freeport by design is
already established as the
industry capital in the
Bahamas,” he said. “It is the
ideal landscape for the
vision of what this first
National Empowerment
Summit will propose.”

He said that the topics to
be addressed include “the
role of the Preamble; the
church and intercession for
the Bahamas; opportunity
for business in Grand
Bahama; the possibility of
entrepreneurship in the
Bahamas; the need for
Bahamians to take owner-
ship in the Bahamas; trans-
formation in the market-
place; small business in the
Bahamas; the appeal for jus-
tice in the modern Bahamas,
and global justice.”

The summit will have two
sessions; the day session is
from 8.30am to 4pm, and
the evening session contin-
ues at 7pm at the Our
Lucaya Convention Centre.

Speakers will include Dr
Myles Munroe; Bishop Neil
Ellis; president of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority Ian
Rolle; attorney Daryl Jones
of Global Justice; Bishop
Simeon Hall; businessmen
Rey Hayward Cooper, Win-
ston Pinnock, Mark Turn-
quest and Dr Kenneth
Rodgers.

AS the people of Freeport
continue to suffer job losses,
several of the country’s
national leaders are expect-
ed in Grand Bahama next
month to help forge a way
forward for the island’s
struggling populace.

Business and civic leaders
are expected to attend the
first National Empower-
ment Summit at Our Lucaya
Resort on September 1. The
goals of the one-day forum,
hosted by the Bahamas
Christian Council (BCC),
are “to empower Bahami-
ans everywhere, to stimu-
late industry partners, to
generate jobs and to boost
the local economy.”

The recent lay-offs at two
hotel properties on Grand
Bahama have resulted in the
loss of over a 100 jobs this
year.

BCC president Rev
Patrick Paul said: “There is
a need for empowering each
other for industry, a need
for justice in a nation, and
the need for intercession in
the nation’s national devel-
opment.”

Rev Paul said Freeport
was chosen as the venue for
the summit because of its

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS IN THE
SUPREME COURT 2004
Common Law and Equity Division CLE/qui/00946

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot
of land containing 11,897 square feet situated on the
Eastern Side of Lincoln Boulevard approximately 500
feet south of Homestead Avenue and on the Western
Side of Washington Street in the Subdivision called
and known as Englerston in the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF THOMAS A. MINNS

NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of Thomas A. Minns of the Englerston
Constituency in the Eastern District of the said Island of
New Providence in respect to:

ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land situated about
500 feet south of Homestead Avenue, on the Eastern
side of Lincoln Boulevard and on the Western Side of
Washington Street in the subdivision called and known
as Englerston in the Islands of New Providence one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
which said piece parcel or tract of land is bounded on the
West by a road named Lincoln Boulevard and running
thereon one hundred and two and twelve Hundredths feet
(112.12) and bounded on the North by property believed
to be owned by the Church of God In Christ and running
thereon One hundredth and Four and Sixteen hundredths
feet (104.16) and bounded on the -East by a road named
Washington Street and running thereon One Hundred
and Three and Ninety-six hundredths feet (103.96) and
bounded on the South by property believed to be owned
partially by Adderley’s Upholstery and partially by one
Joan Hanna and running together thereon One Hundred
and Thirty and Fifty nine hundredths feet (130.59) which
said piece parcel or tract of land has such position shape
boundaries marks and dimensions as shown delinated
on the Plan filed herein and which is thereon coloured
Pink. Thomas A. Minns claims to be the equitable and
beneficial owner in possession of the parcel of land
hereinbefore described and such ownership as aforesaid
arises by virtue of a possessory title to the said land. The
Petitioner has made application to the Supreme Court of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of
the Quieting Titles Act, 1959, to have his title to the said
land investigated.

Copies of the filed Plan may be inspected during normal
working hours at:
1. The Registry of the Supreme Court,
Ansbacher House, East Street, Nassau,
Bahamas; and

2. The Law Chambers of Floyd C. Watkins &
Co. situated at St Alban’s Drive (East) Nassau,
Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that any person having dower
or right of dower or any adverse claim or a claim not
recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 3rd day
of October, 2009, file in the Supreme Court and serve
on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of such
claim in the prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit to
be filed therewith. Failure by any such person to file and
serve a statement of such claim on or before the 3rd day

Power company
‘bleeding’ clients

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Grand
Bahama Power Company has
come under fire for “bleed-
ing” citizens and businesses
with the high cost of electric-
ity, which continues to go
unregulated by government.

Local community activists
Joseph Darville, Troy Gar-
vey, and Rev Glenroy Bethel
on Thursday expressed anger
at the Power Company for its
“insensitivity” toward con-
sumers during these hard eco-
nomic times.

They were also shocked by
the silence of local politicians
here on the island in address-
ing the matter.

“Grand Bahama is fortu-
nate enough to have a host of
representatives in Parliament,
including FNM’s and PLP’s.
However, to date not one has
spoken out in any manner to
address the plight of the poor
people on this island,” said
Mr Darville.

Mr Darville said that there
have been widespread com-
plaints from residents and
businesses concerning the
astronomical cost of electrici-
ty, as well as the numerous
disconnections which have
been taking place in recent
weeks.

He noted that some poor
residents are receiving pow-
er bills as high as $600, and
others are being disconnected
for outstanding bills as low as
$60.

“We need to know why a
single mother, living in a trail-
er house with one young
child, without air-condition-
ing or electric stove, has been
burdened with a monthly
power bill of over $600,” he
asked.

“We want to know why
upon some disconnections
now, individuals have to come
up with a $500 deposit in
order to continue to have ser-
vice. What happens to these
funds? Are they invested and
the individuals can benefit
from interests and divi-
dends?” Mr Darville asked.

According to Mr Darville,
some large companies have
taken steps to reduce their
electricity cost by generating
their own power.

He reported that one com-
pany has been able to cut its
cost by 2/3 so that it can pay
its staff. He believes that as a
result the Power Company
maybe levying additional
charges on regular citizenry
in order to compensate the
loss in revenue.

The Power Company has a
monopoly to supply power on
Grand Bahama. However, it
is not being regulated by the
Public Utilities Commission,

which is mandated by gov-
ernment to regulate the cost
of utilities in the Bahamas.

Mr Darville stressed that
there must be some establish-
ment of regulations to govern
the Power Company, which
unilaterally increases rates as
it sees fit.

Concerns were also raised
over the arbitrary disconnec-
tion of power to households
that are financially chal-
lenged.

Mr Darville thinks that the
company should have a com-
passionate agency that pro-
vides some special considera-
tion to the poor, sick, and dis-
abled on the island.

“We understand that the
power company has to make
money: we also realise that
there are individuals who do
not live up to their responsi-
bility and contract to pay bills
on time. However, there are
numerous instances where
some households have
absolutely no way to deal with
all the financial demands in
order to survive with dignity
today on this island,” he said.

He noted that residents
have endured poor, unreliable
service with numerous black-
outs and brown-outs with not
even an apology by the com-
pany.

Troy Garvey said that the
high fees for fuel surcharge
and the 21 days allotted for
payment of bills are unac-

ceptable.

He stated that residents are
entitled to know how the
rates are determined and how
they are being charged. He
believes that 21 days is insuf-
ficient time for payment of
bills.

“Some people are paid
monthly and can’t pay their
bills within 21 days. We think
the actions of the power com-
pany are unacceptable — espe-
cially at a time when many
people are hurting and not
working on this island,” he
said.

Rev Glenroy Bethel said
that bills are being estimated
due to the shortage of meter
readers on the island. Resi-
dents should be charged
according to what is on their
meters, he said.

Mr Garvey said they expect
to meet with Minister of State
Zhivargo Laing on Thursday
concerning the power situa-
tion on Grand Bahama.

He said they are consider-
ing calling a boycott or hold-
ing petition drive against the
Power Company.

“We call on our govern-
ment officials and parliament
to immediately respond to
this yet another crisis brought
upon the people of Grand
Bahama; it is a power keg
ready to be ignited and will
only take an errant spark
from the Power company to
set it off,” said Mr Darville.



‘True friend to animals’ mourned

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

Dr Bater was

Dr Bater pursued many opportunities

Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT —- The community of
Grand Bahama this week mourned the
passing of well-known veterinarian Dr
Alan Bater, who died suddenly at his
residence on Monday, August 17, at the
age of 62.

Dr Bater, a native of Great Britain,
was the owner of the Freeport Animal
Clinic on Queen’s Highway for many
years.

Tip Burrows, of the Humane Society
of Grand Bahama, said Dr Bater was a
great supporter of the Humane Society.

“He was a true friend to animals and
for many years he was a supporter of the
Humane Society’s spay and neuter pro-
ject, and we are very sad to learn of his
sudden passing.

“Dr Bater was the epitome of what a
veterinarian should be; he always put
animals first. The animals here have lost
a true friend,” Mrs Burrows said.

Kirk Antoni described the veterinari-
an as a “brilliant man.”

He said Dr Bater loved people, the-
atre, singing, and cooking for friends.

He said that his friend loved all animals
and had even served as a mammal con-
sultant for some films that were shot in
the Bahamas.

Mr Antoni noted that Dr Bater was
very knowledgeable and also cared for
dolphins at the Dolphins Experience here
on Grand Bahama.

considered one
of the best ani-
mal care experts
on the island.
He was the first
to be called on
to conduct an
autopsy into the
death of a whale
that beached
itself off Grand

Bahama.

Mr Antoni i
said Dr Bater a eit
Bahamas.

“He first

came to the Bahamas in 1972, and the
only other place that he has worked oth-
er than England was in Uganda, Africa,”
Mr Antoni.

In 1968, Dr Bater was graduated with
a Bachelor of Science degree from the
University of London with first class hon-
ours. He then went on to the Royal Vet-
erinary College (RVC) in London where
he received the First Tompson Prize.

In 1970, he became the scientific coor-
dinator for the RVC East African
Research Team in Uganda. He received
his B Vet Medical degree with Distinc-
tion in Veterinary Surgery and the Cen-
tenary second prize from the Royal Vet-
erinary College.

Dr Bater came to Freeport in 1972 and
began serving as an associate then part-
ner and later principal in the Freeport
Animal Clinic until a few weeks ago.

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in the veterinary field. He served as an
Adjunct Clinical Professor at the Uni-
versity of Florida and as guest lecturer for
CIBA GEIGY Corporation at 30 loca-
tions throughout the US and Caribbean.

He continued his work with marine
mammals and was a consultant to
“Marine Floor Aquarium” in Nassau.
He was involved with numerous marine
mammal strandings in northern and cen-
tral Bahamas including whales, dolphins,
seals and manatees.

As consultant to “Dolphin Experi-
ence” in Freeport he became responsible
for supervision of all matters pertaining
to the health of 16 captive Atlantic Bot-
tle Nosed Dolphins, including breeding.
Later he served as executive director of
the Bahamas Marine Mammal Conser-
vation Institute.

Dr Bater collaborated with many oth-
er facilities including Sea World, the US
Navy, Miami Seaquarium, Reina Aven-
tura (Mexico City), and served as vet-
erinary supervisor for research projects
for the Dolphin Experience.

As principal field investigator he col-
laborated with NMPS pathologists in the
mass strandings of whales resulting from
US Navy sonar activity.

In 2003, the Jamaican government
appointed Dr Bater consultant for cap-
tive dolphins to the National Environ-
ment Protection Agency. He cherished
all animals and loved his work.

Friends of Dr Bater plan to hold a
small gathering in honour of him at the
Freeport Rugby Club on Settler’s Way.

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Floyd C. Watkins & CO.,
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FEES - Trt Adie ose Sock beter. breed, ft =


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Religious tourism holds firm

By SHENIQUE MILLER

AT a time when tourism
numbers are down and many
have cancelled their annual
vacation plans, it appears that
one group remains resilient
in the face of the global reces-
sion and are booking in
droves trips to the Bahamas.
These are the religious con-
ference goers.

Religious conferences and
conventions in the Bahamas
seem to have a magnetic pull
on believers.

The latest of these events
was the Kingdom Training
Seminar at Bahamas Faith
Ministries International held
from August 5 to 9.

The four-day event drew
more than 150 delegates from
numerous states throughout
North America and countries
in Africa, Europe and South
America.

The conference was also
broadcast through a live web-
cast and people from around
the world were able to tune in
to the event.

One woman who flew in
from Maryland said she trav-

PROSPECTUS

Issued under The Bahamas Registered Stock Act, and authorized by Resolutions of the House of Assembly, 17th

June, 2009.

elled to the conference with
her family and used her time
away from the seminar to
experience the Bahamas for
the very first time.

She said she and her family
flew to Nassau one week
before the start of the seminar
and visited the beaches, the
Straw Market, and other his-
toric sites around the capital.

“Because God is our source
and once we can understand
what he has made available
to us, then what happens in
the world won't affect us,” she
said.

Another guest to the con-
ference, Angela Ramnath
from Florida, said she has fol-
lowed Pastor Myles Munroe
for quite some time. Both she
and her husband have attend-
ed conferences in the past
with Dr Munroe, and were
once again in the Bahamas to
listen to him and the other
speakers.

“It makes up for every-
thing, for the economy, lost
investments, no matter what it
is, this conference makes up
for everything so you can’t
miss out on that,” she said.

DR Myles Munroe
Ue Meee

The Kingdom Seminar
brought together pastors,
bishops and church leaders.
One of those in attendance
was Dr Paul Gaechring of
Greenville, South Carolinaa.

Dr Gaehring is part of one
of the largest church groups in
the US, Redemption World
Ministries.

His church has an interna-
tional network of 1,300 fol-

lowers, some involved in
churches across the United
States and in 35 countries
around the world.

Mr Gaehring said: “Both
me and my wife came down
to this conference, and we feel
like this is one of the most
important things that we can
do with time and money and
we intend to not only receive
it for ourselves but teach it to

our members. It's an invest-
ment that will be multiplied
many times over.”

Faith Tourism is an esti-
mated $10 billion dollar a year
industry.

It's comprised primarily of
North Americans.

The Ministry of Tourism
has also introduced a division
with the sole purpose of tap-
ping into the lucrative indus-

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2028, 2029, 2030, 2031, 2032, 2033, 3034, 3035, AND 3036
ISSUE OF B$150,000, 000.00

Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 19th August, 2009 and will
close at 3:00pm on 25th August, 2009. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 26th August, 2009 and will cease at

3:00p.m. on 27th August, 2009.

If the total subscriptions exceed the sum of B$150,000,000.00 (Nominal) partial allotment will be made to

subscribers, and a proportionate refund will be made as soon as possible after allotment.

amounts so refunded.



The date of this Prospectus is August, 2009

No interest will be paid on

The Registrar



try by partnering with local
churches to bring as many as
possible of those visitors to
the Bahamas.

According to the US
Office of Travel and Tourism
Industries, Americans travel-
ling overseas for religious or
pilgrimage purposes has
increased from 491,000 trav-
ellers in 2002 to 633,000 in
2005.

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK _ 2028, 2029 , 2030, 2031, 2032, 2033, 2034, 2035 AND 2036

FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
APPLICATION No
ALLOTMENT No.

DATE:

c/o The Central Bank of The Bahamas

P. O. Box N-4868
Nassau, Bahamas

Sir:

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas invites applications for Bahamas Registered Stock

totalling B$150,000,000.00. The Stock will be available in a range of maturity dates; the earliest being repayable in

2028 and the latest in 2036. The total amount of Stock offered, the rate of interest and the issue price are given below :-



Rate of Interest

Name of Stock

Issue Price
Amount B$
BS



Above Prime Rate

Above Prime Rate

5/32% Above Prime Rate
11/64% Above Prime Rate
3/16% Above Prime Rate

Bahamas Registered Stock 2028

Bahamas Registered Stock 2029 20,000,000.00
Bahamas Registered Stock 2030 15,000,000.00
Bahamas Registered Stock 2031 15,000,000.00

Bahamas Registered Stock 2032

20,000,000.00 100.00



13/64% Above Prime Rate
7/32% Above Prime Rate
15/64% Above Prime Rate
1/4% Above Prime Rate



Bahamas Registered Stock 2033

20,000,000.00
g 20,000,000.00
Bahamas Registered Stock 2034 20,000,000.00

Bahamas Registered Stock 2035 10,000,000.00
Bahamas Registered Stock 2036 10,000,000.00



150,000,000.00



The Stock shall be repaid on 27th August, in the year appearing in the name of the Stock.

INTEREST

The Stock will bear interest from 27th August, 2009, at the rate shown against the name of the Stock as the percent
per annum over the Prime Rate (i.e. the prime commercial interest rate from time to time fixed by the Clearing banks

18%

9/64% Above Prime Rate

5/32%

11/64% Above Prime Rate
3/16% Above Prime Rate
13/64% Above Prime Rate

1132%

15/64% Above Prime Rate

1/4%

Above Prime Rate

Above Prime Rate

Above Prime Rate

Above Prime Rate

I/We hereby apply for the following amount of Bahamas Registered Stock:

Insert below the amount applied for

in Units of B$100

Bahamas Registered Stock 2028
Bahamas Registered Stock 2029
Bahamas Registered Stock 2030
Bahamas Registered Stock 2031
Bahamas Registered Stock 2032
Bahamas Registered Stock 2033
Bahamas Registered Stock 2034
Bahamas Registered Stock 2035
Bahamas Registered Stock 2036

and undertake to accept any less amount which may be allotted to me/us.

I/We enclose BS

B$
B$
B$
B$
B$
B$
B$
B$
B$

in payment for the Stock applied for.

In the event of the full amount of Stock(s) applied for above is/are not allotted to

carrying on business in the Island of New Providence in The Bahamas. If there shall be any difference between them,
then that which is fixed by Royal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half-yearly commencing on 27th February,
2010 and thereafter on 27th August and 27th February in every year until the Stock is repaid.

CHARGE UPON CONSOLIDATED FUND

The principal monies and interest represented by the Stock are charged upon and payable out of the Consolidated

Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

%

Bahamas Registered Stock

me/us, I/we request that the sum refundable to me/us be applied for the following Stock:

BS

PAYMENTS IN EXCESS OF B$50,000.00 MUST BE MADE VIA REALTIME GROSS SETTLEMENT
SYSTEM (RTGS) THROUGH ALL COMMERCIAL BANKS EXCEPT FINCO.

PAYMENTS OF B$50,000.00 OR LESS CAN BE MADE VIA REAL TIME GROSS SETTLEMENT
SYSTEM OR BY BANK DRAFT PAYABLE TO THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS

PAYMENTS OF B$5,000.00 OR LESS CAN BE MADE VIA REAL TIME GROSS SETTLEMENT

SYSTEM, BY BANK DRAFT PAYABLE TO THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS OR BY

CASH

SUPPLEMENTARY PROVISIONS
Issue of Stock The Stock will be issued by the Registrar (The Central Bank of The Bahamas). Applications will
be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 19th August, 2009 and will close
at 3:00 pm on 25th August, 2009. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 26th August, 2009
and will cease at 3:00p.m. on 27th August, 2009. All envelopes enclosing applications should be
labelled “Application For Bahamas Government Registered Stocks”.

Units The Stock will be in units of B$100.00.

Applications must be for B$100.00 or a multiple of that sum.

Applications

Application Forms Applications for the Stock should be made to the Registrar on the form attached to the
Prospectus and may be obtained from the Registrar offices in Nassau and Freeport, The Treasury
Department (Marlborough Street & Navy Lion Road, Nassau), applications may also be
downloaded from the Central Bank of the Bahamas website at www.centralbankbahamas.com or
any of the following banks:

Bank of The Bahamas International

First Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited

Commonwealth Bank Limited

Royal Bank Of Canada

Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited (formally British American Bank(1993) Limited)
Citibank, N.A.

SEN Or ee Se

PUBLIC DEBT

Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts as at June 30, 2009 show the Public Debt of The Bahamas to be
B$3,524,214,000.*

GOVERNMENT REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE

The following information is extracted from the unaudited accounts of the Government of The Commonwealth of
The Bahamas.

FY2006/2007p** FY2007/2008p** FY2008/2009p**
B$ BS BS
Approved Budget Approved Budget
Revenue 1,338,172,000 1,424,108,000 1,569,329,000
Recurrent Expenditure (excluding

Repayment of Public Debt) 1,285,692,000 1,344,028,000 1,484,150,000

Capital Development
Expenditure (excluding loans
contributions and advances
to public corporations) 166,225,000 176,778,000 188,718,000

** Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts.

* — The Public Debt amount is inclusive of The Public Corporations contingent liability which as at June 30, 2009

totalled B$440,013,000.

1. (One Person)
Ordinary Signature



Name in Full

(BLOCK LETTERS, state whether Mr., Mrs., or Miss and titles if any.)



Address (Corporations etc. should give Registered Addresses )

P. O. Box





Telephone Nos. (H)

(W)



2. (Where two or more persons apply as joint subscribers, the additional names and addresses should

be given below.)

Ordinary Signatures



Names in Full



And/OR



Address



Telephone Nos.(H)



I/We hereby request semi annual interest to be paid to:

Bank Name



Bank Branch



Account Number




THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

WAVE YOUR FLAG - A proud Debbie rer.
guson-McKenzie celebrates her bronze medal in
the 200m at the World Athletics Championships.

Pic: Associated Press

bronze after battling back on
the home stretch in 22.35 sec-
onds to trail three-time world
champion Allyson Felix of the
United States in 22.02, and
Olympic champion Veronica
Campbell from Jamaica in
22.35.

* AS

"I'm very thankful, I'm very
blessed to walk away with any
medal period," said Ferguson-
McKenzie, who hoped to add
another one tomorrow when
she runs in the women's 4 x
100 relay.

"There's always the hint of

Sia ~

a little disappointment as far
as the time. I wanted to runa
national record and a PB
(personal best), but the sea-
son isn't over yet, so I'm
thankful. I'm blessed."

The night was a special one
for 33-year-old Ferguson-

Shock at slaying

FROM page one

“It probably wasn’t much and it surely was

some movement in the front.

“They observed two men, one of whom had
a handgun. Shortly after a gunshot was heard
and the female employee who was in the front
was injured to the face.”

ASP Evans said Ms Bullard was rushed to
hospital where she died sometime later.

The two robbers escaped with a undeter-
mined amount of cash. They are described as
being slim, tall, dark men.

Last night shocked staff at 21st Century
Steel Welding Limited paid tribune to Ms
Bullard.

Owner Edward Smith said: “She was one of
the nicest employees I ever had.

‘She was a very good worker, working here
for about four or five years.”

Mr Smith said he was not sure how much
money was taken but said it was the first time
his business has been robbed.

not worth her life,” he said.

Mr Smith questioned the motive for the bru-
tal murder, saying: ‘It could have just been an
idiot who didn’t know the value of life.”

A cousin of Ms Bullard, who asked to
remain anonymous, said: ‘She had a beautiful
personality. She knew the Lord and she would
always express love and kindness to everyone
she met,”

Police are asking for the public’s assistance
in solving this latest murder.

Police say that this latest incident is the
country’s 53rd homicide for the year.

Two weeks ago, 29-year-old mother of two
TaGia Soles-Armony was shot and killed out-
side her grandmother’s home in Sea Breeze as
she sat in her car breast-feeding her three-
month-old son.

Mrs Soles-Armony had just returned home
from St Kitts where she lived with her hus-
band. Valentino Hanna Dorsette has been

FROM page one

Darville said the appointment
of a government politician as
Chief Justice will diminish the
integrity of the judiciary.

Mr Barnett would be the
first Attorney General since
independence to become
Chief Justice. Under earlier
colonial administration and
later in the period of internal
self governance prior to July
1973, two men — Sir Gordon
Bryce and Sir Ormond Drim-
mie Malcolm both rose from
being Attorney General to
Chief Justice. Sir Ormond
(1839-1912) was also Speaker
of the House of Assembly.

Noting that there are also
precedents in the Caribbean
and the Commonwealth for
Cabinet ministers being
appointed Chief Justice, Ms
Bowe Darville suggested this
is little consolation for the
Bar.

“At the moment such an
appointment seems to be an
intrustion by executive (in the
form of Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham) on the
independence of the judicia-
ry,” she said, proposing that
the principle of the separa-
tion of powers — which is
based on the need for each
branch of government to be
independent so as to main-
tain checks and balances on
the powers of other branches
— could be compromised.

The Bahamas Bar Associa-
tion President stressed that
the BBA was not consulted
by Mr Ingraham on the issue
of who should replace former
Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall,
and while this is fine accord-
ing to the constitution as set
out, it would be “good and
wholesome for society” if a
Bahamian Prime Minister
engaged in some discussion

charged with her murder.

Bar lodges formal complaint
over Chief Justice selection

with civil society before deter-
mining such critical appoint-
ments — as is the case in the
United States.

“He doesn’t have to take
our advice, but just to consult
would be a good thing. The
appointment of a Chief Jus-
tice is a very, very serious
thing,” she said, adding that
The Bahamas Bar is consult-
ed on lesser matters.

The association’s complaint
was forwarded to the Prime
Minister yesterday, immedi-
ately following confirmation
of rumours circulating for
weeks that Mr Barnett is to
become Chief Justice. No
reaction has yet been issued in
response, said Ms Bowe
Darville. Mr Ingraham is out
of the country on official busi-
ness.

Ms Bowe Darville and Mr
Sears said it is time the con-
stitution is reformed to
include a legal requirement
that the Prime Minister must
consult with more than just
the leader of the Opposition
on who should be a judge, and
Chief Justice in particular.

They said there should be
greater transparency in the
process, so that people can
know in advance who is being
considered, what their merits
or demerits may be, and offer
their opinion on the matter.

Without such wider debate
on the appointment the pow-
er of a Prime Minister
becomes almost absolute, as
the head of the legislature and
the person who has the final
say in who heads the judicia-
ry, suggested Mr Sears.

He said the issue is not one
that should be “trivialised” by
making it political.

“This is beyond PLP or
FNM. At this stage in our
national development it is
time we improve the system.

It’s an imperfect system but
each generation ought to try
to make it better.

“T think it’s time that we
ensure the respect for the law
and to strengthen the inde-
pendence of the judiciary and
general respect for the gov-
ernance process in The
Bahamas by putting ourselves
in line with democratic prac-
tice of most countries in
democratic world,” said the
former Attorney General.

“As we saw in the US
recently with madam Justice
(Sonia) Sotomayor, the Pres-
ident (Barack Obama) made
the nomination, but you had a
hearing by a coordinate
branch of government.
There’s a more bipartisan
approach and also a process
which involves civil society.”

Under the constitution as
presently formed, the Prime
Minister must consult with the
Leader of the Opposition —
in this case Perry Christie —
on who should be the Chief
Justice.

However, The Tribune
understands that even Mr
Christie, as the one person
who was formally consulted,
was opposed to Mr Barnett
becoming Chief Justice, pri-
marily on the basis that he is a
political figure.

Yesterday Mr Christie said
he would not comment on the
content of his discussions with
the Prime Minister on the
Chief Justice post, stating only
that he “made his position
very clear” to Mr Ingraham
on the matter at the time and
adding that he found the fact
that he should select a mem-
ber of his own Cabinet “inter-
esting.”

A message left for Mr Bar-
nett was not returned up to
press time.

=

McKenzie, albeit the race had
to be delayed by almost an
hour because of the pouring
rain that brought some thun-
der and lightning. She was
presented with her medal
from her long-time 30-year-
old idol, mentor and former
team-mate Pauline Davis-
Thompson.

"For her to present it, being
one of my role models was
very special,” said Ferguson-
McKenzie, who only wished
that she could have hugged
her mother, Elka Ferguson,
who was somewhere in the
stadium watching. "I was very
honoured."

Likewise, Davis-Thompson,
who holds the distinction of
being the first woman to win
an individual medal at the 5th
championships in Gothen-
burg, Sweden, in the 400, said
she was as emotional as Fer-
guson-McKenzie, whom she

teamed up with to win the
gold in the women's 4 x 100
metre relay in Seville, Spain,
in 1999 before they duplicated
the feat at the Olympic
Games in 2000 in Sydney,
Australia.

"IT was so overcome and so
happy to be able to be able
to give Debbie her medal,”
said Davis-Thompson, who
now serves as an IAAF coun-
cil member in her retirement
years. "I've been her idol for
so many years and she's been
my idol too.

"T was just always so proud
of her. I've been hard on her
too, but she knows that it was
tough love. She knew I always
cared about her and wanted
the best for her. I cannot
believe that I’m here in this
moment, in this time, in this
setting giving Debbie Fergu-
son-McKenzie her medal.
How awesome is that."



Minister of State for Youth,
Sports and Culture Charles
Maynard, who watched the
historic performance before
he returned home today, said
it was another experience that
he will cherish for the rest of
his life.

"T got a chance to meet the
team today and I told them
that the Bahamas was already
proud of them and we were
really looking forward to the
next few days because we
knew that our chance for a
medal was coming,” said Mr
Maynard, who greeted Fer-
guson-McKenzie as she com-
pleted her victory lap.

"T think tonight, Debbie's
experience and her poise paid
off as she was able to bring
us our first medal at these
games. We expected another
one from Chris Brown, but
we are just as proud about his
fifth place finish."

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ideas for life



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 10, SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS





LaSHAWN MERRITT of the United States (right) races to win gold in the 400m final ahead of his compatriot Jeremy Wariner (left) who took the silver, and Chris Brown of the Bahamas who placed 5th during
the World Athletics Championships in Berlin yesterday...

Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown

places fifth in 40

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — This
was definitely supposed to be
the year that Chris “Fireman”
Brown broke the fourth place
jinx that has haunted him for
the past two World Champi-
onships.

After giving it a gutsy per-
formance over the first 380
metres at the Olympic Stadi-
um, Brown didn't have any-
thing left in the tank and he
slowly dropped from third to
fifth place.

His time of 45.47 seconds
on a cold and chilly night last
night as a result of the down
pour of rain, lightning and
thunder that delayed the race
for more than a hour, was
reminiscent of how disap-
pointed he was in his perfor-
mance.

"T felt pretty good,” said a
dejected Brown, who for the
very first time, was very slow
in delivering his speech. "I'm
disappointed.”

He could only watch as
LaShawn Merritt add the
world title to the Olympic
gold that he achieved last year
in Beijing, China, as he
stopped the clock in a world
leading time of 44.06 for a 1-2
American sweep with former
champion and compatriot
Jeremy Wariner taking the sil-
ver in a season's best of 44.60.

Trinidad & Tobago's Ren-

IAAF Worlds
Schedule

BERLIN, Germany
IHere’s a look at the schedule
for the Bahamians competing
lover the remainder of the
TAAF’s 12th World Champi-
oJeeUlo wre AUsel leis less

Bahamas, lane 3, heat 1
at 12:10 pm ET

Men’s 4 x 400 relay heats
Bahamas, lane 3, heat 2
at 12:55 pm ET

Women’s 4 x 100 relay fina
@2pm ET

Women’s 4 x 400 relay heats
Bahamas, lane 2, heat 1
at 2:15 pm ET

SUNDAY
A oy rblet ew @CLU Uma eN able
@ 11:50am ET

Men’s 4 x 400 relay final
@ 12:15 pm ET



0 final



CHRIS BROWN (centre) can be seen competing with LaShawn Merritt (second right) and Jeremy Wariner (left) of the US, and Renny Quow
(right), of Trinidad & Tobago in the in 400m final...

ny Quow, who had the next
best time behind Merritt com-
ing into the championships,
posted a 45.02 to clinch the
twin Caribbean island's sec-
ond medal of the biannual
championships.
"ITmean...I really don't
know. I just felt tight coming
back home and that's not
me," said Brown, who started

to lose his momentum 50
metres out from the finish line
and didn't have anything left
to close out the golden oppor-
tunity to give the Bahamas
what was anticipated as a
double dose of celebrations.
With the change in weather
due to the rain, Brown said it
played a factor, but not to the
extend that he still couldn't

pull off the medal spot on the
dais to follow after Debbie
Ferguson-McKenzie clinched
her hardware in the women's
200 about half a hour earlier.
"Boy, I really ain't have
much words this time," he
said, trying to console him-
self. "I really went out there,
but it just didn't happen."
Brown, 30, said he will now

(AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

have to regroup and get
focused so he can come back
on Sunday and help the
Bahamas to continue their
tradition of winning a medal
in the 4x 400 relay.

But he admitted that it's
going to take him so time to
get over the fact that another
opportunity to medal slip
right away from him.

England
lakes control
of deciding
Ashes Test

ENGLAND took con-
trol of the deciding Ashes
Test after closing day two
at The Oval 230 ahead of
Australia at 58-3.

After England added
only 25 to their overnight
307-8, Australia were 73-0
before Stuart Broad pro-
duced a stunning spell of 4-
8 in 21 balls.

Broad finished with 5-37
and spinner Graeme
Swann joined in with 4-38
as Australia were skittled
for 160.

England, who need to
win to regain the Ashes,
lost some wickets but
Andrew Strauss was unde-
feated on 32.

If England were deemed
to have wasted a good posi-
tion on day one, Australia's
collapse was far more dra-
matic as the tourists failed
to press home their advan-
tage.

The first wicket of the
Australia innings went
down at 2.40pm and by
5.19pm it was all over, and
that included 20 minutes
for the tea interval.

England are crying out
for a new hero given the
impending retirement of
Andrew Flintoff and may
well have found one in 23-
year-old Broad, who many
thought would be dropped
after taking only seven
wickets for 345 runs in the
first three matches of the
series.



ALLYSON FELIX (left) crosses the line to win the gold medal in the final of the 200m ahead of Jamaica’s Veronica Campbell-Brown (2nd left) who took the silver medal and
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie of the Bahamas, who got the bronze...

(AP Photo: Michael Sohn)

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THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, AUGUST 22np, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MARINE FORECAST








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Low: 77° F/25°C ryt ys TET Sa Me Tce of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 9:55am. 3.4 3:36am. -0.2 Belgrade 93/33 61/16 s 80/26 58/14 pc
a @ _ : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 10:16 p.m. 3.1 4:05p.m. -0.1 ean 72/22 54/12 po 73/22 57/13 :
7 —— CUT ne Sunday 043am. 33° 42Tam. 04 Bermuda 84/28 76/24 86/30 78/25 pc
Ae a 11:03pm. 29 4:56pm. 0.0 Bogota 68/20 46/7 c 66/18 47/8 c
, ei é Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Monday tis2am. 32 5:05am. 00 Brussels 74/23 54/12 s 79/26 57/13 pc :
| —— ABACO Temperature 11:50pm. 27 5:47pm. 02 Budapest 86/30 59/15 t 84/28 54/12 pc Minnespolis
; -. High: 92° F/33°C FIOM: ese etoe tree eet tee 90° F/32° C T223pm. 31 55lam. 04 Buenos Aires 61/16 46/7 ¢ 63/17 45/7 s
/ ‘a 1 ae TS DON ec neces epee: ety Oe SB Aipm: 04 Cairo 102/38 76/24 s 99/37 75/23 s
a Cr Low: 78° F/26°C Normal hgh - 80° ae OE Calcutta 91/32 85/29 sh 92/33 83/28 t
s ae ormal low : EP Calga 73/22 46/7 s 66/18 44/6 pc
A ofa _ thet @ WEST PALM BEACH i Last year's Wigh oo... 92° F/33° C SUN ay Ty ify emai 91/32 75/23 pc 92/33 75/23 Ee
4 ed High: 89° F/32° C — Last year's lOW oo. eeeeeeeeeeeeeeee 83° F/28° C " " Caracas 81/27 72/22 t 82/27 72/22 t
——- Low: 77° F/25° C toa Precipitation a aes ae as Lay ae al te Casablanca 91/32 69/20 s 91/32 66/18 s
- As of 2 p.m. yesterday .....ccccccccccccceeceeenee trace = DHMNSEL. ss 00 P.M. Moonset... ... “v4 p.m. Copenhagen 68/20 51/10 sh 68/20 56/13 s
© FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT fp at Verode 8. First Full iad New Dublin 64/17 54/12 sh 63/17 50/10 r
' High: 90° F/32° C @ High: 90° F/32° C Normal year to date .......c.ccsesscssesscseeeeeeeeee 29.25" 7 7 - Frankfurt 75/23 52/11 po 79/26 55/12 5
Low: 78° F/26°C | Low: 76° F/24° C i ie Geneva 76/24 52/11 pe 82/27 57/13 s
7, AccuWeather.com out Halifax 75/23 60/15 s 63/17 59/15 +
fs @ a Forecasts and graphics provided by a : os Havana 90/32 72/22 s 89/31 73/22 sh Showers ee.
MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Aug. 27 Sep. 4 Sep.11 Sep. 18 ‘Helsinki 66/18 50/10 s 66/18 50/10 pc T-storms
i ~~ High: 90° F/32° C : y 7 Hong Kong 93/33 82/27 pc 91/32 30/26 s Rain Fronts
all IL Low: 79° F/26° C NASSAU ig: 31 oe Islamabad Ua Cs Lea [x4 Plumes Shown are noon positions of weather systems and nies
High: 88° F/31° C Low: 78° F/26° C Istanbul 82/27 65/18 s 83/28 66/18 s Bk.) Snow precipitation. Terpertie bands are highs for the day. Warm iii
=a Low: 80° F/27°C Jerusalem 88/31 64/17 s 85/29 62/16 s [v_¥] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary engi
xg , ————— Johannesburg 65/18 41/5 s 65/18 44/6 s
KEY WEST cA a c Sein kgs gat e025 sh 7310/26 sn | 106 | GN 10s GR ati RN 7
High: 89° F/32°C i | ah. OOO ° Lima 70/21 57/13 s 71/21 56/13 s
Low: 81°F/27°C — High: 88° F/31°C London 73/22 57/13 pc 77/25 59/15 pe
¢ @ i. Low: 75° F/24°C Madrid 99/37 66/18 s 99/37 64/17 s
i Manila 88/31 79/26 t 87/30 77/25 +
ee is , Mexico City 77/2 57/13 t 77/25 55/12 t
_ ) Monterrey 102/38 75/23 pc 104/40 75/23 s
GREAT EXUMA ae SAN SALVADOR Montreal 79/26 66/18 t 75/23 57/13 t is C x R| er | ‘ » 2 o Nea » Cc &
High: 89° F/32° C High: 91° F/33°C Moscow 72/22 54/12 pc 73/22 50/10 pe
Low: 77° F/25° C Low: 76°F/24°C Munich 73/22 45/7 c 77/25 45/7 s
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS : Nairobi 80/26 S2/11 c 80/26 53/11 pe
highs and tonights's lows. High: 92° F/33°C —— . New Delhi 97/36 82/27 pc 97/36 82/27 pc
Low: 76° F/24° C i. pa cf Oslo 67/19 50/10 sh 6317 50/10 s B Bl
ia. a Paris 75/23 55/12 pe 81/27 61/16 s an c Own
LONGISLAND Prague 74/23 49/9 c 73/22 47/8 pc st ta cs A H r . ic n e
Rio de Janeiro 69/20 63/17 sh 72/22 66/18 c
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High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W ae High: 91° F/33°C San Juan 72/22 39/3 s 76/24 42/5 s that yo ave excellent i insurance
Fc FIC Fc FIC Fc FIC Fc FIC FC FIC FC FIC Low: 74° F/23°C San Salvador 88/31 70/21 pe 89/31 73/22 sh coverare no matter which
Albuquerque 92/33 6749 s 89/31 66/18 pc Indianapolis 76/24 54/12 t 76/24 56413 s Philadelphia 84/28 70/21 t 86/30 68/20 t CROOKED ISLAND ACKLINS Santiago 61/16 41/5 c 64/17 45/7 ¢ wav the wind blows
Anchorage 65/18 52/11 pce 62/16 49/9 c Jacksonville 90/32 70/21 t 90/32 72/22 s Phoenix 98/36 82/27 t 95/35 81/27 1 AND / sami Domiida SER EES CRE eS y .
Atlanta 86/30 64/17 pc 83/28 64/17 s Kansas City 82/27 56/13 s 84/28 62/16 s Pittsburgh 75/23 58/14 t 79/22 56/13 t RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:93°F/34"c oe ae mE a arr re , :
Atlantic City 86/30 67/19 c 86/30 64/17 t Las Vegas 93/33 72/22 t 95/35 79/26 pc Portland, OR 78/25 53/41 s 76/24 54/12 s High: 91° F/33° C Low: 76° F/24°C Srakal aes SOO 7001 Bots Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 84/28 6719 t 84/28 64/17 ¢t Little Rock 87/30 6116 s 88/31 6216 s Raleigh-Durham 88/31 67/19 t 87/30 64/17 pe Low: 75° F/24°C “an ee Fear ear 7 Ts Soft —
Boston 82/27 67/19 c 81/27 67/19 c Los Angeles 86/30 66/18 t 84/28 6447 pc St. Louis 78/25 59/15 s 82/27 61/16 s . a ae aaa Se EET
Buffalo 76/24 58/14 t 71/21 59/15 t Louisville 80/26 59/15 t 79/26 60/15 s Salt Lake City 96/35 71/21 s 89/31 6246 t GREAT INAGUA ~ te Te 90/32 77/95 36/30 71/21 pc
Charleston,SC 90/32 71/21 t 91/32 70/21 s Memphis 84/28 63/17 s 85/29 65/18 s San Antonio 100/37 76/24 s 99/37 76/24 s High: 92°F/33°C TaEaRIG 7403 BANE t 73/99 58/14 t INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Chicago 70/21 55/12 po 74/23 56/13 s Miami 90/32 79/26 t 91/32 79/26 t San Diego 75/23 68/20 t 75/23 67/19 pec Low. 76°F/24°C Trinidad 88/31 68/20 pc 93/33 70/21 pc ee me aieren ret aoe
Cleveland 74/23 57/13 t 70/21 57/13 pe Minneapolis 74/23 55/12 s 82/27 62/16 s San Francisco 70/21 57/13 pe 68/20 57/13 pc 7 aOR 69/20 53/11 s 68/20 53/11 pc ee a TRANCE BROCK ENTS
Dallas 95/35 74/23 s 95/35 76/24 s Nashville 84/28 60/15 pc 82/27 60/15 s Seattle 72 3 ST AS Viennn 7/99 56/13 t 77/98 B73 s ? Men Providence ee uf enn fe Em
Denver 95/35 59/15 s 92/33 60/15 pc New Orleans 90/32 73/22 pce 89/81 72/22 s Tallahassee 90/32 67/19 t 92/33 66/18 s
Detroit 73/22 55/12 t 75/23 59/15 pc — New York 95/29 73/22 t 84/28 71/21 t Tampa 91/32 77/25 t 91/32 78/25 t an Ting “RE ee a oom! eer Tel: (242) S6T-A2D4 Tet (242) 332-2862 fF Te (2) SRD
Honolulu 89/31 76/24 s 89/31 76/24 s Oklahoma City 90/32 6146 s 92/33 67/419 s Tucson 90/32 74/23 t 91/32 74/23 t — ;
Houston 98/36 75/23 t 95/35 74/23 s Orlando 90/32 74/23 t 90/32 75/23 t Washington, DC 82/27 69/20 t 84/28 67/19 t Ne eh i ee


THE TRIBUNE

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SATURDAY, AUGUST 22,

PAGE 12

OF








ts

2009




4GE 10 * IAAF World Championships schedule...

Devwle picks Up FOZ

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — She
wanted to at least run a per-
sonal best and lower her
national record. But “golden
girl” Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie was happy to settle
with the bronze medal in the
women’s 200 metres at the
IAAP’s 12th World Champi-
onships in Athletics.

Not a particularly fast race
with American Allyson Felix
carting off the prestigious title
for the third consecutive bian-
nual championships in 22.02
seconds, Ferguson-McKen-
zie’s time of 22.41 was good
enough to raise the Bahamian
flag as she followed Olympic
champion and her new train-
ing partner Veronica Camp-
bell-Brown of Jamaica, who
got the silver in 22.35.

"It feels great. At one point,
I came out here really wanting
to win, but coming off the
curve, I didn't run that strong
so I know I had to execute,”
said Ferguson-McKenzie, who
redeemed herself after a sixth-
place finish in the 100 on
Monday night.

"T didn't give up. I'm happy
with the bronze. I tried to go
for the gold, but it is what it
is."

Caught in a rain delay that
postponed the race for more
than an hour at the Olympic
Stadium, Ferguson-McKenzie
said at one point while warm-
ing up they got wet, but she
knew that the frustration
would soon be over when she
won a medal - any colour.

"I'm just glad that it's
over," said Ferguson-McKen-
zie, who finally got back on
the podium for her first indi-
vidual medal after she got the
gold in Edmonton, Canada,
1 2005 after American Mari-
on Jones was disqualified for
testing positive for a banned
substance.



%

=e

2

"Tt was just wonderful. My
goal was for us to hear the



DEBBIE and Pauline Davis-Thompson (left) share a special moment...

SUIT, SHIRT & TIE

109

Them

Roriard Rd - Hockey 54 - Thompaaa Blvd



national anthem, but I'm glad
that I got the bronze. It's bet-
ter than not getting any
medal."

The bronze tied the
Bahamas with Estonia,
France, Mexico and Romania
for the 29th spot. And when
adding the fifth place finish
by Chris “Fireman” Brown in
the 400 in the final event of
the night, the Bahamas is now
tied with Australia for 14th
on the placing table.

COVERAGE

Chris Brown
places fifth in
400 final...

See page 10



_ DEBBIE FERGUSON-McKENZIE



GOLD MEDAL WINNER Allyson Felix of the US is flanked by silver medal winner Veronica Campbell-Brown,
left, of Jamaica and bronze medal winner Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie of Bahamas after the ceremony for
the 200m final...

For Ferguson-McKenzie,
the 33-year-old who along
with veteran Chandra Stur-
rup were able to hold their
own against their younger
opponents, said she's looking
forward to the Bahamas
adding at least one or two
more medals in the relays this
weekend.

Coming in to the champi-
onships, Ferguson-McKenzie
had the second fastest time in
the world of 22.23 she did in

BERLIN

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

Â¥OUR CONNECTION-TO THE WORLD



T

Stockholm, Sweden, on July
31 behind Felix, who won
with the world's leading mark
of 21.88.
Ferguson-McKenzie also
had the third fastest time of
22.24, which was the fastest
qualifying time in the first
round here in Berlin.
Campbell-Brown sat in
fourth with 22.29, also post-
ed here, but in the semifinal
and Lee had the fifth best of
22.30 from her preliminaries

HE

(T

a? saat ta
’m lovin’ it
TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

(AP Photo: Markus Schreiber)

here as well, which equaled
out the predictions of who
were going to be the medal
contenders.

Ferguson-McKenzie, how-
ever, said her own projection
was a little off at the end of
the race.

But she's just glad to have
been back on the podium, this
time receiving her medal from
her own long-time idol, men-
tor and former team-mate
Pauline Davis-Thompson.




proudly raises our national flag
after winning the bronze in the
200m during the World Athletics




~ Championships in Berlin Friday,

August 21, 2009...

(AP Photo: Anja
Niedringhaus)

Victory for
Knowles,
Bhupathi

BAHAMIAN tennis ace
Mark Knowles and his Indian
partner, Mahesh Bhupathi, are
on a roll in a United States
Open series event being held
in Cincinnati, Ohio.

In a doubles quarterfinals
Friday at the ATP World Tour
Western & Southern Financial
Group Masters, the fourth-
seeded duo defeated Michael
Llodra and Jo-Wilfried Tsonga
of France, 7-6 (6), 6-3.

Also yesterday in the quar-
terfinals, Knowles’ former
partner, Daniel Nestor of
Canada, and Nenad Zimonjic
of Serbia, the No. 2 seeds, got
the victory against No.6 seeded
Mariusz Fyrstenberg and
Marcin Matkowski of Poland,
7-6 (8), 6-7 (8), 10-4 tiebreak.

In the other quarters,
Lukasz Kubot of Poland and
Oliver Marach of Austria, the
No.8 seeds, defeated David
Ferrer and Tommy Robredo
of Spain, 7-6 (2), 6-1.




PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.224SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY with STORMS HIGH 88F LOW 70F Mother of three gunned down at work The Tribune YOUR PASSPORT TO MISS UNIVERSE B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com T ears for murder victim no.53 A MOTHER of three was brutally gunned down yesterday when armed robbers attacked her workplace just yards away from a local church. Although police have not officially released the identity of the victim, family members told the Tribune yesterday she is 34year-old Wendy Bullard. She is the 53rd person to be murdered this year. According to police, sales clerk Ms Bullard was shot in the face when two masked men held up the 21st Century Steel Welding Limited off Royal Palm Street, just several yards south of St George’s Anglican Church. According to police press liaison officer Walter Evans, the victim was in the front area while a woman co-worker was in the back with a male customer when the incident occurred. ASP Evans said: “The other female employee and the male customer were in the back area when they heard sounds of n By NATARIO MCKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A BOMB scare cleared the domestic and international terminal of Lynden Pindling International Airport. Officials at the Nassau Airport Development company received a call about the threat shortly afternoon yes terday. Security personnel made a sweep of the area and found it to be free of any explosive device. Passengers were allowed to return soon after. While there were some flight delays, operations returned to normal later in the afternoon. Officials at NAD were unwilling to give details as to what specific target the threat was directed at or who received the initial call. However, police maintained a presence at the airport late into the evening. Airport bomb scare THE Bahamas Bar Association has lodged a formal complaint against the Prime Minister’s deci sion to appoint one of his Cabinet ministers to the country’s top judicial post. Ruth Bowe Darville, president of the association, and Alfred Sears, MP and former Attorney General, claim the move by Prime Minister Ingra ham to appoint Attorney General Michael Barnett as Chief Justice highlights a need for constitutional reform as it relates to how judicial appointments are made. Mr Barnett is due to resign his post as Attorney General today, before being sworn in as Chief Justice on Monday at 11am. He served as Attor ney General since July 2008, and was a senior partner at the law firm Graham, Thompson and Co prior to that. He ran unsuccessfully to be the FNM Member of Parliament for Fort Charlotte in the May 2007 election. While some local lawyers have expressed their satisfaction at the selection of a Chief Justice who may be better placed to address the “frustrations” of local attorneys as Chief Justice, having worked in the private sector as an attorney before becoming Attorney General, Ms Bowe Lawyers object to Barnett as Chief Justice SEE page 9 n By ALISONLOWE T ribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net SEE page 9 Colleagues of Wendy Bullard grieve after she was shot during an attempted armed rob bery yesterday. (Pic: Tim Clarke/Tribune Staff) BERLIN, Germany Eight years after winning her first individual medal at the IAAF's 8th World Championships in Athlet ics in Edmonton, Canada in 2001, Debbie FergusonMcKenzie (pictured right) was back on the podium as the Bahamas flag was raised for the first time on day seven at the Olympic Stadium. This time, she was awarded with the Debbie medals again n By BRENTSTUBBS Tribune Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net SEE page 9

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News............................P1,2,3,5,6,7,9 Editorial/Letters........................................P4 Comics.....................................................P8 Sports................................................P10,12 Weather....................................................P11 CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES MISS UNIVERSE TABLOID 8 PAGES USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGES ROOM occupancies at Atlantis will be around the 85 per cent mark this weekend with the Miss Universe Pageant one day away, according to Atlantis Gene ral Manager and CEO. W ith ticket sales so far at 76 per cent, George Markantonis told Tribune Business he expects the Imperial Ballroom, where the new Miss Universe will be crowned, to be almost filled to capacity when the pageant is aired live tomorrow night. According to him, ticket sales typically increase in the last three days before a concert or large event. It was feared that ticket sales would not do well as initial reports, aired internationally, suggested that people were not buying seats for the event. However, Mr Markantonis confirmed that more people will be checking into the Atlantis today and are expected to purchase tickets. "Reaction has been positive," he said. According to him, the oval shaped i mperial ballroom will take on a rectang ular figure for the Miss Universe p ageant in order to make filming the segment easier for the crew of the broadcasting station with exclusive rights to NBC. Mr Markantonis said the technology set up in the ballroom will be extremely complicated, with peripherals set up around the room to facilitate world-wide television coverage. The resort hosted the FIFA Congress in June, which brought a large contingent of the most important men of the world's most popular sport, soccer. According to Mr Markantonis, the FIFA Congress was an excellent "practice run" for the Miss Universe pageant. Miss Universe held its preliminary c ompetition last Sunday where the top 15 g irls who will vie for the crown tomorrow w ere selected. It is not yet known who the front runners are. SEE OURMISSUNIVERSE P ULLOUTFOREXCLUSIVE INTERVIEWSANDPICTURES 85% occupancy boost to Atlantis from Pageant n By CHESTER ROBARDS Tribune Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net A BAHAMIAN man and another defendant who were caught by an undercover operation have pleaded guilty to conspiracy to import nearly 300 kilos of cocaine into the United States. The defendants, Bahamian Mark Pinder and American Parson Exana, who were involved in a cocaine smuggling ring face a minimum sentence of 10 years to life in prison and a fine of $4,000. On May, 25 Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE ducted an undercover operation and received approxi mately 297 kilograms of cocaine from Pinder in a vessel-to-vessel transfer on the high seas, according to the US Attorney's Office. The drugs were later taken to Palm Beach County. The next day, law enforcement conducted a "controlled delivery" of the cocaine to both defendants in Jupiter, Florida and arrested the pair. Court documents revealed that Pinder and an informant have conducted many smuggling operations together over the past seven years. In an interview with police, Pinder told officers that he got the cocaine from a man identified as "Talio", in the Bahamas who transported the drugs to him through a man identified as "Abner." Pinder told police that he put the drugs on a boat in the Bahamas and admitted that he and "Abner" were present on the boat at around 4 am on May 25 when the cocaine was transferred to a boat manned by undercover spe cial agents, court papers state. Pinder pleaded guilty before US Judge Donald Middlebrooks on August, 12. Exana entered the same plea on August 18. Pinder is scheduled for sentencing on October 29 while Exana is expected to learn his fate on November 5, accord ing to the Southern District of Florida's US Attorney's Office. Bahamian pleads guilty over cocaine smuggling THE College of the Bahamas yesterday apologised for any inconvenience caused by the temporary failure of its online registra-t ion system. More than 900 new students registered for courses at COB in New Providence on Thursday, 18 per cent of whom utilised the institution’s online registration system IQ.Web, COB Regis-t rar Dr Danny Davis said. The College has accepted more than 1,700 new students for the Fall 2009 semester, approximately 10 per cent more than the number accepted last year. Around 1,200 of those stu-d ents were expected to actually register. Online registration began at 12.01am on Thursday with the first student registering a t 12.53am. But there were challenges and the system slowed considerably. “The system slowed last night to an unacceptable level at which point some students were unable to register online as per our original plan and our instructions to them. Students who were unsuccessful at registering online came in and we manually registered them,” said Dr Davis. T he Registrar’s department went to manual registration of students at several processing points across the Oakes Field Campus, including the records department at the Portia Smith Student Services Centre. T he students who registered on Thursday represent approximately 76 per cent of the total number of students expected for the Fall 2009 semester. It is believed that the increase in new studentsa ccepted for enrolment at the College is the result of the prevailing economic environment and the suspension of the government’s G uaranteed Educational Loan scheme. “We have added additional course sections to accommodate the increase and we will continue to monitor the situation so that we can make adjustments as necessary,” Dr Davis said. By Gena Gibbs THE Ministry of the Environment has endorsed the College of the Bahamas’ recy cling campaign. Minister Earl Deveaux said he hoped the programme “attracts a critical mass” of support. He was addressing the fac ulty and staff of COB during their seminar under the theme ‘Greening The Academy: Accepting The Challenge Of Environmental Stewardship” at Bahamas Faith Ministries last week. He said government is committed to protecting the envi ronment and spoke of measures taken to do so. Environmental legislation is being updated to endorse initiatives like those offered by COB. “We are passing legislation directly to the Town Planning and Subdivision Act tabled in parliament,” said Mr Deveaux. “We welcome your comments. “Many of the issues to do with protecting the environ ment, waste disposal, environmental impact assessments and requirements, reservation of public open space, and the need for transparency in plan ning subdivisions, roads, and developments are all in this new Act. “It repeals most of the Con servation of the Physical Landscape Act, the existing Town Planning, Private Roads and Subdivisions Act, and incorporates The Out Island Dilapidated Buildings Act,” the minister said. The proposed Forestry Act intended to conserve, protect, and manage the forest estate and “ensure the national portion of our land is held pri marily for wetlands and the ecosystems in the pine forest and coppice forests” has been completed, he said. “The bio-diversity of the Bahamas is located in our forests, and mahogany, lignum vitae, and horseflesh trees are endangered and need protection,” said Mr Deveaux. “They feed white crown pigeons, crabs, and other wildlife and protect the ecosystems.” Minister Deveaux said environmental employment opportunities will open up when the law is passed. “College of the Bahamas’ School of Sustainability gives the Bahamas an opportunity to tackle core issues of how we manage our environment, how we populate our institutions, where we create opportunities for young people, and where we find answers.” “These notions of environ mental awareness should be fundamental to our beliefs,” he added The nation’s future, its security and the health of the people, he said, is based on how the country resolves the issues of climate change and sea level rises. “Not what other countries do, but what we do,” said Mr Deveaux. COB’s r ecycling plan gets Ministry backing BONNY Bentizen, LEED-AP, director of University Sustainability Business Practices at the Global Institute of Sustainability at the Arizona State University spoke during the College of the Bahamas’ seminar ‘Greening The Academy: Accepting The Challenge Of Environmental Stewardship’. (BIS photo: Letisha Henderson) COBapologises for online woes

PAGE 3

Investigations are continuing into a traffic accident that occurred at the intersection of East Sunrise Highway and Balao Road. According to reports, the accident occurred around 9.50pm on Wednesday involv ing a 1996 GMC Truck owned and driven by Michael Pritchard, 45, of Freeport, anda 2004 white Nissan Maxima driven by Kishana Wilchcombe, 20, of Freeport. Both vehicles were extensively damaged. The drivers were treated for their injuries at the Rand Memorial Hospital and later discharged. Asst Supt Loretta Mackey said that police are renewing their plea to the motoring public to obey the speed limit and pay attention to traffic signs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esort staff fear for future employment STAFF at the soon-to-close Riu Paradise Island hotel have expressed their fears for the future after they claim they were told not all of them will be called back to work when the resort re-opens. Some also claim it has not been made clear what they will be paid if anything w hile the hotel is closed for r enovations for three months as of this weekend. One employee, who wished to remain anonymous, said: “We understand why they are closing the hotel but of course it’s like a stab in the back. We have approached our superiors and we’re not getting any response. “Management has a list of people they are not going to call back but that’s not been dealt with yet. The only people who know are the managers. We, the employees, have not been told.” The RIU is closing as it undergoes a $25 million makeover, upgrading its 379 g uestrooms. The resort will r eopen on November 26 as the RIU Palace Paradise Island. Yesterday, Minister of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool Wallace said the closure of the resort will reduce the options for tourists looking for the type of holiday in Nass au where they can know in a dvance what it is going to cost them. However, he added that there are “alternative properties” that such holidaymakers can go to. Mr Vanderpool Wallace said the Riu had been doing “fairly well” in terms of occup ancy up to now, but added t hat it had been hit by the closure of a Canadian tour operator which had brought a lot of business to the property. He denied reports on ZNS that the closure was consequent to the Ministry receiving an abundance of complaints about conditions at the hotel. “That’s not something that we would single them out for,” he said. However, he explained that if a hotel is to carry out renovations, September and October traditionally slow months for tourist arrivals a re best suited for such activi ty. n By ALISONLOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net Claim some will not be called b ack when PIresort re-opens, a nd uncertain over pay during three-month renovation closure THERE is a “tremendous potential” for the Bahamas to expand on major trade and investment opportunities as it endeavours to develop a close and rewarding relationship with the city of Atlanta, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said. Speaking at the opening of the new consulate office in Atlanta, Georgia, on Thursday, Mr Ingraham said that the city is the corporate headquarters for the largest number of Fortune 500 and Fortune 1,000 companies in the southeastern US. Gregory Pridgeon, chief of staff to the city’s Mayor Shirley Franklin, said that the Bahamas and Atlanta are well suited to be partners and he, too, spoke of mutually beneficial relationships. He welcomed the Bahamas to the diplomatic fraternity established in Atlanta. Mr Ingraham said: “I am very pleased to join you to mark the official opening of our first Bahamian career Consulate General in Atlanta, the capital city of Georgia and a major business, cultural and education centre for the southeastern United States.” “I take this opportunity to say that though tourism is today and is likely to remain into the future our principal business, we are also home to one of the deepest harbours in our region, one of the most modern, efficient container transshipment ports and a major ship care and repair facility capable of working on the largest ocean-going vessels afloat today.” “And so, opportunities for expanded trade and investment with this consular jurisdiction are ripe for exploration,” he said. The prime minister took to the airwaves and cyberspace about the potential of the new office. During an interview with two Atlanta reporters – one for Atlanta Business and the other for the online publication Global Atlanta – Mr Ingra ham noted that the new office would also facilitate efforts to improve relations between Atlanta area businesses and the Bahamas. “(This office will the United States,” Mr Ingraham told the reporters. Locating the office in Atlanta will, the prime minister said, provide better opportunities for US businesses to have access to information about either investing or doing business in the Bahamas, and at the same time provide better access for Bahamian businesses to the southeastern US market. “The demand in the southeastern United States for the Bahamas is great,” he said. Mr Ingraham said he sees opportunities and potential for increased trade, citing in particular the services available at the transshipment facility in Grand Bahama. PM identifies investment ‘potential’ of Atlanta link PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham and his delegation were received by Governor Sonny Purdue of Georgia on Thursday. Mr Ingraham exchanged gifts with Governor Purdue during a courtesy call. PLP leadership hopeful Paul Moss told The Tribune yesterday that he believes the unemployment figures are much higher than reported by the Department of Statistics. According to the Department’s latest survey, the unemployment rate in New Providence increased from 8.7 per cent in May last year and 12.1 per cent in February 2009 to 14 per cent in May. In Grand Bahama, the unemployment rate has increased drastically from nine per cent last year to 14.6 per cent in February 2009 and a massive 17.4 per cent in May. “I am surprised that the f igures for Grand Bahama seem to be so low having gone to Grand Bahama myself, I believe that it is much higher than that. I also believe that the rate in New Providence is high as well because people from Grand Bahama came here looking for jobs and there are no jobs here,” Mr Moss said. There are almost 10,000 more people without jobs this year than last year, according to the Department of Statistics which released the results of its annual labour force survey on Thursday. With 9,540 additional people unemployed it means that out of a poten tial labour force of 184,020, there are 26,215 people without work in the Bahamas. The overall unemployment rate, which also takes into consideration the Family Islands, grew from 8.7 per cent to 14.2 per cent in a year. Director of Statistics Kalsie Dorsett said this places the unemployment rate at its highest level since the early 1990s. This was despite the fig ures not taking into cons ideration major job losses since the survey was conducted in May, for example the 500 people left unemployed by the closure of the Emerald Bay Resort in Exuma. Nonetheless, the news will not come as a great surprise to many observers. It corresponds with pre dictions from various agencies and individuals, including the Central Bank of the Bahamas and Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham that unemployment would further rise throughout the year in the face of decreased tourism arrivals and a downturn in foreign direct investment which has hurt the construction sector in particular. In New Providence, one quarter of all people who are unemployed left their jobs in the last 12 months. However, Mr Moss believes the unemploy ment problem could be remedied by government focusing on creating and expanding on “light indus tries” in the Bahamas. “Industries like agricul ture can allow Bahamians to have both jobs and ownership of land. To grow what is sustainable and what is in our hotels and in our homes will keep money inside the country,” he said. Mr Moss said, however, that government’s deci sion to sign on to various international trade agreements has brought the viability of a local agriculture industry into question. “If we have farmers growing tomatoes for example and do away with Customs duty then there is a chance that tomatoes coming into the country will be cheaper than those grown here. Some may say that’s fine because we will have access to cheap er food, but what we would be doing is keeping people employed abroad while they remain unemployed here,” he said. PLP hopeful: Jobless total higher than official data Pr obe into traffic accident continues n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

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EDITOR, The Tribune. Please allow me a little space in your valuable publication to express a few thoughts on the upcoming Progressive Liberal Party’s convention in a few month’s time. It appears that this conven tion is shaping up to be a most interesting one as the various combatants for positions of leadership in the party pre sent themselves in full battle gear. All of this is healthy for the PLP and a clear demonstration that democracy is alive and well in the party. Cat Island MP Philip Brave” Davis has thrown his hat into the ring for the posi tion of deputy leader. What does he bring to the table? A solid parliamentary career, years in the trenches in the PLP and a keen and insightful mind. Former Tourism Min ister Obie Wilchcombe will also declare soon for the same position. He brings actual Cabinet experience, a solid background as an MP, a stint as party chairman, and a keen and insightful mind. Good luck to both men and to any other contestant for the deputy leadership. Now a keen political observer recently posed a very insightful and intriguing question, being, whether the detractors in the PLP are capable, at this convention, of dispossessing party leader Perry Christie of his crown? “Despite Christie’s best efforts, there are those in his organisation, and a few even close to his bosom who are attempting to take Perry Christie’s party away from him,” the observer noted. A spot-on observation, no doubt, but I have a gut feeling that when the smoke clears and the dust settles at this convention, Perry Gladstone Christie will emerge as leader smelling like a rose. I predict and I don’t practice the art o f divination that Christie will emerge victorious with barely a scratch. Why do I say that? The first thing to observe is that to date there has not been one single PLP Member of the House of Assembly or the Senate who has stepped forward publicly to declare that he or she will run for party leader. That, in my view, is signifi cant because whoever chal lenges as leader should at least have a seat in parliament, so as to be in a position to direct the opposition’s attacks on the government, and to articulate the party’s policies and programmes at that level. It would be very awkward, and a step backwards, if the PLP elected a leader who is not in the Senate or the House of Assembly, and cannot even take part in debates at a national level. Such a thing has happened in our politics in the past, but with disastrous results. Secondly, any credible challenger to Mr Christie would need to have national appeal, not merely capable of bringing together the various fac tions in the PLP. The leader must be capable of appealing to supporters of the other par ty in order to win enough seats to form the next government. Third, any credible candi date should at least have a track record with the Bahami an people. The Rt Hon Hubert Ingraham had a track record, a very long and illus trious one, and national appeal before he became opposition leader and, even tually, prime minister. The same can be said of Mr Christie. It is critical that the leader put in place, and articulate, a winning strategy in the run up to the next general elections. That strategy may very well mean change within the party, but to what extent is change needed is the critical question. Any change at this late stage, with the elections barely two years away, should be very carefully considered by PLPs. Does a new leader, largely unknown to the PLP and the country, have enough time to build a bond of trust and con fidence between himself and the public before the next general election? I think not. There are those in the PLP who have sprung up like “top sy” who are now crying for Mr Christie’s head. But they have spectacularly failed to unveil any credible plan to take the PLP, and indeed, the country forward. What is their battle cry? They say that because they are relatively young, have college degrees, wear Armani s uits, silk ties and alligator skin shoes, that they are God’s gift to the PLP. Now, they do have something to offer. But they must learn to follow before they can lead. They must wait their turn. Remember, to everything there is a season and a time to every purpose under heaven. In my view, and I cannot tell the PLP what it should do, but the delegates at the convention in October must elect a leader who can give the PLP the best chance of winning the next government. They should bear in mind that the last general elections was a nail-biter and that the PLP lost by less than five seats. If the PLP does not mind spending another 10 years in opposition then it should elect maybe Paul Moss or Jerome Fitzgerald as leader. Ten years is enough time for them to learn the role of Opposi tion leader. It would also give the Bahamian people a better opportunity to observe these two men on the job, and to decide whether or not they are fit candidates for prime minister one day in the future. But if the PLP wishes to win the next general election, then my humble view is that they should go with Perry Christie, despite all his faults and weaknesses, as he will give the party the best shot at winning. He is known as an honest, very capable leader, despite his soft heart at times. But being overly loyal and soft hearted towards one’s friends, and even one’s political enemies, does not mean weak ness. If the PLP wanted to change its leader, it should have done so right after the last general elections. In my view, changing the leader at this late stage would blow the PLP off course, and send it directly into the iceberg like the Titanic in 1912. MARK ROLLE-SYMONETTE Nassau, August, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. A fter perusing the newspaper over the past several days the debate on the rape law caught my attention. Is the government really serious about this? What are the statistics of women claiming to be raped on a yearly basis in the Bahamas by their spouse? Is this yet another attempt to feminize the Bahamian male so we can become more “sensitive” to our wife’s needs or should I say wants? What happens if the wife is a little frisky (a rare occasion for many of us husbands, and devoted husbands by the way) and the husband is not quite as “energetic” as the wifecan the husband file rape charges? What happens if a married couple actually has a good time on the very rare occasional night only to wake up into an argument, and the wife files a rape charge in the heat of the moment? Our entire society has yet gone to the extreme (and far left extreme) I might add. I can only advise all of the husbands out there to contact their relevant attorneys to draft waiver or disclaimer forms and to have a stack of them on the night stand in the bedroom only to be executed (signed case a moment of passion overwhelms you or your spouse. At what point does consent come into play? In the beginning, halfway through or better yet at the very end? I can just see what we marital couples are going to transform into over the next several years: Can I hold the car door open for you honey? Consent; Can I hold your hand? Consent; Can I take you out to dinner? Consent; Can I buy you a car? C onsent; Can I kiss you? Consent; Can we bath together? Consent; Can I? Consent How ridiculous are we going to get? At what point does it stop? I don’t know how many relationships the average married male has had (prior to marriage of course but the whole one relationship that I’ve had didn’t quite materialise as in the aforementioned. Any form of masculinity is slowly being stripped from the Bahamian male under the guise of over sensitivity, tolerance so we can get in touch with our feelings. Get you waivers/disclaimers ready gentlemen, because I can see where this is going! CHRISTOPHER ARMALY Nassau, July, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WASHINGTON The violencescarred elections in Afghanistan provided a stage for the Taliban to show war-weary Americans and Afghans that it has rebounded and can strike even after eight years of war. For President Barack Obama's policies, the timing couldn't be worse. With memories of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks dimming, Americans are tiring of the conflict. New polling shows a majority 51 per cent of those surveyed now believe the war is not worth the fight, an increase of 6 percentage points in a month. Obama's answer to the mounting scepticism is to say that, in a way, the war has just begun. The final push to wipe out America's Taliban and al-Qaida enemies is not eight years old but really got started when he took office and ordered 17,000 more troops into Afghanistan. In short order, he also installed a new commander and persuaded Pakistan to join the U.S. in what on Thursday he called a pincer movement to squeeze the enemy astride the common border. Obama's ability to recast the public debate at home to get people to look past the cost and the deadly violence there may matter more in the long run than who won or lost the Afghan presidency. Obama has not wavered from his campaign pledge to take the fight to the Tal iban and their al-Qaida allies in Afghanistan and Pakistan. He argues that the true danger to Americans lies in the towering peaks and vast deserts of those countries. The Bush administration, he asserts, wasted precious time, treasure and blood in Iraq. Before then, he argues, problems in both countries were allowed to fester. Asa result, the Taliban retook huge swaths of Afghanistan, and al-Qaida was comfortably ensconced on the Pakistan side oft he mountainous border. "We've got to make sure that we are really focused on finishing the job in Afghanistan. But it's going to take some time," the president said on a talk-radio programme Thursday. He gave a nod to the election, saying it "appears to be suc cessful" despite the "Taliban's efforts to disrupt it." Initial reports show 26 Afghans were killed in Taliban attacks on Election Day. The Bush administration used earlier elections in Afghanistan and Iraq as evidence of success of its war policies. This White House isn't getting that boost. The White House has been particularly reticent to talk about the Afghan vote, where the turnout appears to have been significantly lower than in the first-ever direct election of a president there in 2004. The administration is deeply aware of the country's long history of bloody uprisings against past leaders who were seen as place men for foreign powers. While Obama took office having publicly expressed disappointment in Presi dent Hamid Karzai over his ineffective ness and a background noise of corruption surrounding his administration, he has not spoken of a preference for Thursday's outcome. Karzai's strongest challenger is his for mer foreign minister, Abdullah Abdullah, who may show well when the votes are counted because of heavier turnout in the ethnically Tajik northern part of the country. The turnout was spotty in the Pashtun south where Karzai has major support. If neither Karzai, Abdullah nor any of the other 34 candidates wins 50 per cent in the first round, there will be a runoff. Final results of the Thursday vote will not be known until Sept. 3. Regardless of the Afghan vote or the diminishing support for the war back home, a White House strategy review is due out in mid-September, and Gen. Stan ley McChrystal, the U.S. commander in Afghanistan, is widely expected to press for a significant further increase in forces for his new counter-insurgency campaign. Just three years ago the U.S. had about 20,000 forces in the country. Today, it has triple that, on its way to 68,000 by year's end when all of the 17,000 newly deployed are in place. A Washington Post-ABC News poll this week showed, however, that only 24 per cent of Americans support that move,w ith 45 per cent saying the force should be decreased. The domestic political course for Obama's overall Afghan strategy and for a further troop increase, thus, is growing ever more difficult to navigate. And in a sparkling bit of political irony, backing for the war remains strongest among Republicans and conservatives who support the conflict by 70 per cent and 58 per cent, respectively. (This article was written by Steven R Hurst, Associated Press writer). Men being stripped of masculinity LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Afghan vote shows Taliban still potent PLP must elect leader with best winning shot in 2012

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BACK by popular demand, The Tribune announces the return of its Saturday feature, “Pet of the Week.” Each week, one abandoned cat or dog being cared for by the dedicated staff at the Bahamas Humane Society (BHS information on how to adopt a pet of your own. Now is the perfect time for the relaunch, BHS staff say, as the summer months are the most demanding at the shelter. Animals are either abandoned or surrendered, at an alarming rate – dropped off by owners unable or unwilling to care for them anymore, often due to travel plans. “To make matters worse, cats begin to breed in the spring and by summer unwanted or found kittens come in by the dozens,” one staffer explained. “Meanwhile, adoption rates – especially among adult dogs and cats – are extremely low, again in all likelihood due to vacation schedules. “Consequently, the Humane Society is now over whelmed with adult dogs and cats. Roughly 20 dogs and over 30 cats are waiting to be adopted into new, loving homes. Many are youthful and all are friendly and full of character. Sadly, we are fast approaching full capacity and if the adoption rate does not pick up some difficult decisions will have to be made. Please help us save as many lives as possible. The animals urgently need your support. Come in and adopt right now.” To commemorate the relaunch, today we publish a bumper edition of Pet of the Week. Pictures are above CHLOE This five-year-old pitbull/chow mix is a true sweetheart. Her former owners regretted having to give her up, but had to relocate for career reasons. Chloe is great with children and loves long walks, a combination that has earned her the status of the Humane Society's summer camp favourite. However, she is particular with regards to the canine company that she keeps and would do best in a home where she is the only four-legged family member. Unfortunately, this lovely lady has been at the Humane Society for over three months. Her long stay is probably due to the fact that she suffers from a few health concerns which, while maintainable, necessitate that she finds the perfect new family willing to dedicate a little extra care. Considering the current state of surrender inundation, slow adoption rates and the resulting space constraints, Chloe's situation is all the more dire. She is desperately longing for the essential security and companionship that can only be provided by a loving family. By giving Chloe a new home you can save her life. G G O O L L D D I I E E Goldie is a nine-year-old top of the line Rottweiler. This girl is sugar-sweet and has a beautifully mild temperament. Sadly, after having been used for breeding her whole life, she has now been surrendered to the Humane Society by her owners. She has tested positive for a low degree of Ehrlichia, a tickborne disease that can easily be maintained with antibi otics. Please help fill the rest of her life with the love and happiness that she most certainly deserves. S S H H A A R R K K Y Y This healthy and fun-loving young man has spunk! He is about eight months old and is very handsome with his unusual long brindle coat. His wonderful smile reveals his modestly purple-spotted tongue that can only belong to a chow mix. He loves to walk, run and play, and would probably make a great beach companion. Extremely affec tionate on the one hand, on the other he is also quite vocal and would make a great protector. V V I I S S C C O O What to say about Visco? He is a Burmese/ Persian mix and a veteran at the Humane Society. He is a wise and independent soul that, having approximately nine years of experience at this thing called life behind him, knows how to get by with minimal effort and attention. Nonetheless, like every other cat, he loves to cuddle and be stroked whenever possible. He does unfortunately suffer from a minor skin aller gy that the BHS staff are working on fixing and should be as good as new in no time. Please think about taking Visco into your home. Space in the Cattery is a serious concern and it is time that Visco moved on so that other cats can be saved. J J A A C C K K S S O O N N Play, play, play! Jackson is a young cat who, quite naturally, loves to have fun. Be it with a piece of string, a pen or your t-shirt, Jackson will keep both himself and you well entertained. He is an extremely loving boy who would do well with other cats and children. Come in and meet him for yourself. K K I I T T T T E E N N S S We have many playful kittens in all shapes, colours and sizes. They have been dewormed and have begun their vaccination series. It is now up to you to come in and take one (or more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y vexation was so yucked up when I read that in 2007 there were 5,177 live births and 3,167 were from unwed mothers. That means three out of five females making children ain't married! What the unmarried young women needs is to get a good counselling session in church from their pastor where they can learn to live lives as good as their pastors and have nice cars and fancy homes." Repentant sinner, Nassau. "I vex because while driving down Shirley Street yesterday my car was attacked by stones/pebbles from the operator of one of those weed eaters. These operators seem to like weeding the stones and not the grass, maybe there is no grass there? "When I got home I noticed that the windshield had a crack in it and it’s now about a foot long and will have to be replaced, some $500 plus. Thanks Ministry of Works! When others found out about that at the office, many had similar stories of rocks hitting them from the big sit down mowers on the larger streets. Someone could get hurt or even killed!" Concerned Citizen, Nassau. "I vex that someone in government decided to do some road work on Eastern Road, where so many people travel every day and night, and big and bold on a Monday morning they had one poor man out there laying down tar or something and the road w as all patch up. "There was no sign to say 'road work ahead', and the road was wide open. I almost buss my car up driving down that road and 'most knock that worker down. He so fool he was all up in the middle of the road in his orange jacket. These government people need to do better and days later the road still ain’ finish. They mussie ga' pay for my busted tyre." Mad Motorist, Nassau. Are you vex? Send complaints to whyyouvex@tri bunemedia.net or fax to 328-239. Why you Vex? FREEPORT – The Free N ational Movement and its supporters on Grand Bahama will commemorate the party’s first victory at the polls on August 19, with a church service tomorrow. Senator David Thompson, c hairman of the FNM’s Grand Bahama council, said the anniversary of the FNM’s victory marks “that great day of deliverance when Bahamians demonstrated political judgment and maturity with t he peaceful removal of a regime whose rule spanned a quarter century and embraced the FNM message of deliverance.” He said party members and supporters will gather at 9am at the New Hope Methodist Church for praise and wor ship with Rev Christopher Neilly. The party’s leadership, Cabinet ministers, parliamentarians, party officers, meritorious council members, central council members, officers and members of the FNM Women’s Association and the Torchbearers Association and other party mem bers are expected to attend. Mr Thompson said Election Day 1992 was a historical triumph for the people of the Bahamas. He said the PLP under the late Sir Lynden Pindling had won six consecutive general elections and had been the government of the Bahamas for almost 26 years when the FNM under party leader Hubert Ingraham finally achieved a crushing victory over the PLP on August 19, 1992. The FNM won its second consecutive term in March 2007. In May 2002, the party lost, but rebounded in May 2007 and won the general elections for a third time. “This year as we observe and celebrate the 1992 victory we will also be praying to the Almighty God for the nation’s speedy and complete recovery from the current economic recession which has brought great hardship on so many Bahamians,” said Mr Thompson. He said the FNM MPs will host back-to-school give-away jamborees for students returning to school in each constituency on Saturday, August 29. Marco City MP Zhivargo Laing hosted a back-to-school jam on Thursday at the Moon McPhee Park. Back-to-school jams will be held next Satur day between 2pm-4pm by Lucaya MP Neko Grant at the Sunset Land Community Park; at YMCA by Pineridge MP Kwasi Thompson, and at the Basil Neymour Park by High Rock MP Kenneth Rus sell. FNM to celebrate first election win n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net CHLOE . GOLDIE SHARKY VISCO Set for a pet? FREEPORT – A man was charged with animal cruelty in the FreeportM agistrate’s Court on Thursday. He was accused of abusing a mixed Dober mann he adopted from the Humane Society of Grand Bahama. Wenito Bootle, 27, was c harged before Deputy C hief Magistrate Helen Jones in Court 3. It is alleged that between February 9 and July 15, Bottle abused and maltreated a domesticated ani mal known as Meka. According to reports, the Humane Society had received a report of a starv ing dog that had collapsed in a yard. Field service officers were dispatched to the location, where they discovered a female mix. The female dog was very weak and had to be put to sleep when she became unre sponsive. Bootle pleaded not guilty to the charge of animal cruelty. The case was adjourned to December 15 for trial. Animal cruelty: Man is charged n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune FreeportR eporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM C OMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS IN THE S UPREME COURT2004 C ommon Law and Equity Division CLE/qui/00946 IN THE MATTER OF ALLTHATpiece parcel or lot o f land containing 11,897 square feet situated on the Eastern Side of Lincoln Boulevard approximately 500 feet south of Homestead Avenue and on the Western S ide of Washington Street in the Subdivision called and known as Englerston in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the C ommonwealth of The Bahamas. AND IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT 1959 AND IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF THOMAS A. MINNSNOTICE OF PETITION T he Petition of Thomas A. Minns of the Englerston Constituency in the Eastern District of the said Island of New Providence in respect to: ALLTHATpiece parcel or tract of land situated about 500 feet south of Homestead Avenue, on the Eastern side of Lincoln Boulevard and on the Western Side of Washington Street in the subdivision called and known as Englerston in the Islands of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, which said piece parcel or tract of land is bounded on the West by a road named Lincoln Boulevard and running thereon one hundred and two and twelve Hundredths feet (112.12) and bounded on the North by property believed to be owned by the Church of God In Christ and running thereon One hundredth and Four and Sixteen hundredths feet (104.16and bounded on the -East by a road named Washington Street and running thereon One Hundred and Three and Ninety-six hundredths feet (103.96and bounded on the South by property believed to be owned partially by Adderley’s Upholstery and partially by one Joan Hanna and running together thereon One Hundred and Thirty and Fifty nine hundredths feet (130.59 said piece parcel or tract of land has such position shape boundaries marks and dimensions as shown delinated Pink. Thomas A. Minns claims to be the equitable and hereinbefore described and such ownership as aforesaid arises by virtue of a possessory title to the said land. The Petitioner has made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959, to have his title to the said land investigated. working hours at: 1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher House, East Street, Nassau, Bahamas; and 2. The Law Chambers of Floyd C. Watkins & Co. situated at St Alban’s Drive (East Bahamas. Notice is hereby given that any person having dower or right of dower or any adverse claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 3rd day on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of such serve a statement of such claim on or before the 3rd day of October, 2009, will operate as a bar to such claim. Floyd C. Watkins & CO., Attorneys for the Petitioner. AS the people of Freeport continue to suffer job losses, several of the country’s national leaders are expected in Grand Bahama next month to help forge a way forward for the island’s struggling populace. Business and civic leaders are expected to attend the first National Empowerment Summit at Our Lucaya Resort on September 1. The goals of the one-day forum, hosted by the Bahamas Christian Council (BCC are “to empower Bahami-ans everywhere, to stimulate industry partners, to generate jobs and to boost the local economy.” The recent lay-offs at two h otel properties on Grand B ahama have resulted in the loss of over a 100 jobs this year. B CC president Rev Patrick Paul said: “There is a need for empowering each other for industry, a needf or justice in a nation, and the need for intercession in the nation’s national development.” Rev Paul said Freeport was chosen as the venue for the summit because of its infrastructure and unlimited potential for growth. “Freeport by design is already established as the industry capital in the B ahamas,” he said. “It is the ideal landscape for the vision of what this first National Empowerment S ummit will propose.” He said that the topics to be addressed include “the role of the Preamble; thec hurch and intercession for the Bahamas; opportunity for business in Grand Bahama; the possibility of entrepreneurship in the Bahamas; the need for Bahamians to take ownership in the Bahamas; transformation in the marketplace; small business in the Bahamas; the appeal for justice in the modern Bahamas, and global justice.” The summit will have two sessions; the day session is from 8.30am to 4pm, and t he evening session continues at 7pm at the Our Lucaya Convention Centre. Speakers will include Dr M yles Munroe; Bishop Neil Ellis; president of the Grand Bahama Port Authority Ian Rolle; attorney Daryl Jones o f Global Justice; Bishop Simeon Hall; businessmen Rev Hayward Cooper, Winston Pinnock, Mark Turn q uest and Dr Kenneth Rodgers. n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net Summit to aid Grand Bahama FREEPORT The Grand Bahama Power Company has come under fire for “bleeding” citizens and businesses with the high cost of electricity, which continues to go unregulated by government. Local community activists Joseph Darville, Troy Garvey, and Rev Glenroy Bethel on Thursday expressed anger at the Power Company for its “insensitivity” toward consumers during these hard economic times. They were also shocked by the silence of local politicians here on the island in addressing the matter. “Grand Bahama is fortu nate enough to have a host of representatives in Parliament, including FNM’s and PLP’s. However, to date not one has spoken out in any manner to address the plight of the poor people on this island,” said Mr Darville. Mr Darville said that there have been widespread complaints from residents and businesses concerning the astronomical cost of electricit y, as well as the numerous d isconnections which have b een taking place in recent weeks. He noted that some poor residents are receiving power bills as high as $600, and others are being disconnected for outstanding bills as low as $60. “We need to know why a single mother, living in a trailer house with one young child, without air-conditioning or electric stove, has been burdened with a monthly power bill of over $600,” he asked. “We want to know why upon some disconnections now, individuals have to come up with a $500 deposit in order to continue to have serv ice. What happens to these f unds? Are they invested and t he individuals can benefit from interests and dividends?” Mr Darville asked. According to Mr Darville, some large companies have taken steps to reduce their electricity cost by generating their own power. He reported that one company has been able to cut its cost by 2/3 so that it can pay its staff. He believes that as a result the Power Company m aybe levying additional charges on regular citizenry in order to compensate the loss in revenue. The Power Company has a monopoly to supply power on Grand Bahama. However, it is not being regulated by the Public Utilities Commission, which is mandated by government to regulate the cost of utilities in the Bahamas. Mr Darville stressed that there must be some establishment of regulations to govern the Power Company, which unilaterally increases rates as it sees fit. Concerns were also raised over the arbitrary disconnection of power to households that are financially challenged. Mr Darville thinks that the company should have a compassionate agency that provides some special consideration to the poor, sick, and disa bled on the island. We understand that the p ower company has to make money: we also realise that there are individuals who do not live up to their responsibility and contract to pay bills on time. However, there are numerous instances where some households have absolutely no way to deal with all the financial demands in order to survive with dignity today on this island,” he said. He noted that residents h ave endured poor, unreliable service with numerous blackouts and brown-outs with not even an apology by the company. Troy Garvey said that the high fees for fuel surcharge and the 21 days allotted for payment of bills are unac ceptable. He stated that residents are entitled to know how the rates are determined and how they are being charged. He believes that 21 days is insufficient time for payment of bills. “Some people are paid monthly and can’t pay their bills within 21 days. We think the actions of the power company are unacceptable – especially at a time when many people are hurting and not working on this island,” he said. Rev Glenroy Bethel said that bills are being estimated d ue to the shortage of meter r eaders on the island. Resid ents should be charged according to what is on their meters, he said. Mr Garvey said they expect to meet with Minister of State Zhivargo Laing on Thursday concerning the power situation on Grand Bahama. He said they are considering calling a boycott or holding petition drive against the Power Company. “We call on our governm ent officials and parliament to immediately respond to this yet another crisis brought upon the people of Grand Bahama; it is a power keg ready to be ignited and will only take an errant spark from the Power company to set it off,” said Mr Darville. n By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net Power company ‘bleeding’ clients FREEPORT – The community of Grand Bahama this week mourned the passing of well-known veterinarian Dr Alan Bater, who died suddenly at his residence on Monday, August 17, at the age of 62. Dr Bater, a native of Great Britain, was the owner of the Freeport Animal Clinic on Queen’s Highway for many years. Tip Burrows, of the Humane Society of Grand Bahama, said Dr Bater was a great supporter of the Humane Society. “He was a true friend to animals and for many years he was a supporter of the Humane Society’s spay and neuter project, and we are very sad to learn of his sudden passing. “Dr Bater was the epitome of what a veterinarian should be; he always put animals first. The animals here have lost a true friend,” Mrs Burrows said. Kirk Antoni described the veterinarian as a “brilliant man.” He said Dr Bater loved people, the atre, singing, and cooking for friends. He said that his friend loved all animals and had even served as a mammal con sultant for some films that were shot in the Bahamas. Mr Antoni noted that Dr Bater was very knowledgeable and also cared for dolphins at the Dolphins Experience here on Grand Bahama. Dr Bater was considered one of the best animal care experts on the island. He was the first to be called on to conduct an autopsy into the death of a whale that beached itself off Grand Bahama. Mr Antoni said Dr Bater loved the Bahamas. “He first came to the Bahamas in 1972, and the only other place that he has worked other than England was in Uganda, Africa,” Mr Antoni. In 1968, Dr Bater was graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of London with first class honours. He then went on to the Royal Vet erinary College (RVC he received the First Tompson Prize. In 1970, he became the scientific coordinator for the RVC East African Research Team in Uganda. He received his B Vet Medical degree with Distinction in Veterinary Surgery and the Cen tenary second prize from the Royal Vet erinary College. Dr Bater came to Freeport in 1972 and began serving as an associate then partner and later principal in the Freeport Animal Clinic until a few weeks ago. Dr Bater pursued many opportunities in the veterinary field. He served as an Adjunct Clinical Professor at the University of Florida and as guest lecturer for CIBA GEIGY Corporation at 30 locations throughout the US and Caribbean. He continued his work with marine mammals and was a consultant to “Marine Floor Aquarium” in Nassau. He was involved with numerous marine mammal strandings in northern and central Bahamas including whales, dolphins, seals and manatees. As consultant to “Dolphin Experience” in Freeport he became responsible for supervision of all matters pertaining to the health of 16 captive Atlantic Bottle Nosed Dolphins, including breeding. Later he served as executive director of the Bahamas Marine Mammal Conservation Institute. Dr Bater collaborated with many other facilities including Sea World, the US Navy, Miami Seaquarium, Reina Aventura (Mexico City erinary supervisor for research projects for the Dolphin Experience. As principal field investigator he collaborated with NMPS pathologists in the mass strandings of whales resulting from US Navy sonar activity. In 2003, the Jamaican government appointed Dr Bater consultant for cap tive dolphins to the National Environ ment Protection Agency. He cherished all animals and loved his work. Friends of Dr Bater plan to hold a small gathering in honour of him at the Freeport Rugby Club on Settler’s Way. rue friend to animals’ mourned n By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net DR Alan Bater

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By SHENIQUE MILLER AT a time when tourism numbers are down and many have cancelled their annual vacation plans, it appears that one group remains resilient in the face of the global recession and are booking in droves trips to the Bahamas. These are the religious conference goers. Religious conferences and conventions in the Bahamas seem to have a magnetic pull on believers. The latest of these events was the Kingdom Training Seminar at Bahamas Faith Ministries International held from August 5 to 9. The four-day event drew more than 150 delegates from numerous states throughout North America and countries in Africa, Europe and South America. T he conference was also broadcast through a live webcast and people from around the world were able to tune in to the event. One woman who flew in from Maryland said she travelled to the conference with her family and used her time away from the seminar to experience the Bahamas for the very first time. She said she and her family flew to Nassau one week before the start of the seminar and visited the beaches, the Straw Market, and other historic sites around the capital. “Because God is our source and once we can understand what he has made available to us, then what happens in the world won't affect us,” she said. Another guest to the conference, Angela Ramnath from Florida, said she has followed Pastor Myles Munroe for quite some time. Both she and her husband have attended conferences in the past with Dr Munroe, and were once again in the Bahamas to listen to him and the other s peakers. “It makes up for everything, for the economy, lost investments, no matter what it is, this conference makes up for everything so you can’t miss out on that,” she said. The Kingdom Seminar brought together pastors, bishops and church leaders. One of those in attendance was Dr Paul Gaehring of Greenville, South Carolinaa. Dr Gaehring is part of one of the largest church groups in the US, Redemption World Ministries. His church has an international network of 1,300 followers, some involved in churches across the United States and in 35 countries around the world. Mr Gaehring said: “Both me and my wife came down to this conference, and we feel like this is one of the most important things that we can do with time and money and we intend to not only receive it for ourselves but teach it to our members. It's an investment that will be multiplied many times over.” Faith Tourism is an estimated $10 billion dollar a year industry. It's comprised primarily of North Americans. The Ministry of Tourism has also introduced a division with the sole purpose of tapping into the lucrative industry by partnering with local churches to bring as many as possible of those visitors to the Bahamas. According to the US Office of Travel and Tourism Industries, Americans travelling overseas for religious or pilgrimage purposes has increased from 491,000 travellers in 2002 to 633,000 in 2005. Religious tourism holds firm DR Myles Munroe shared his kingdom teachings with dozens of community pastors, administrators and leaders at the recent Kingdom Training Conference held at Bahamas Faith Ministries. The event drew more than 150 religious tourists.

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bronze after battling back on the home stretch in 22.35 seconds to trail three-time world champion Allyson Felix of the United States in 22.02, and Olympic champion Veronica Campbell from Jamaica in 22.35. "I'm very thankful, I'm very blessed to walk away with any medal period," said FergusonMcKenzie, who hoped to add another one tomorrow when she runs in the women's 4 x 100 relay. "There's always the hint of a little disappointment as far as the time. I wanted to run a national record and a PB (personal best son isn't over yet, so I'm thankful. I'm blessed." The night was a special one for 33-year-old FergusonMcKenzie, albeit the race had to be delayed by almost an hour because of the pouring rain that brought some thunder and lightning. She was presented with her medal from her long-time 30-yearold idol, mentor and former team-mate Pauline DavisT hompson. " For her to present it, being o ne of my role models was very special," said FergusonMcKenzie, who only wished that she could have hugged her mother, Elka Ferguson, who was somewhere in the stadium watching. "I was very honoured." Likewise, Davis-Thompson, who holds the distinction of being the first woman to win an individual medal at the 5th championships in Gothen burg, Sweden, in the 400, said she was as emotional as Ferguson-McKenzie, whom she teamed up with to win the gold in the women's 4 x 100 metre relay in Seville, Spain, in 1999 before they duplicated the feat at the Olympic Games in 2000 in Sydney, Australia. "I was so overcome and so happy to be able to be able t o give Debbie her medal," s aid Davis-Thompson, who n ow serves as an IAAF council member in her retirement years. "I've been her idol for so many years and she's been my idol too. "I was just always so proud of her. I've been hard on her too, but she knows that it was tough love. She knew I always cared about her and wanted the best for her. I cannot believe that I'm here in this moment, in this time, in this setting giving Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie her medal. How awesome is that." Minister of State for Youth, Sports and Culture Charles Maynard, who watched the historic performance before he returned home today, said it was another experience that he will cherish for the rest of his life. "I got a chance to meet the t eam today and I told them t hat the Bahamas was already p roud of them and we were really looking forward to the next few days because we knew that our chance for a medal was coming," said Mr Maynard, who greeted Ferguson-McKenzie as she com pleted her victory lap. "I think tonight, Debbie's experience and her poise paid off as she was able to bring us our first medal at these games. We expected another one from Chris Brown, but we are just as proud about his fifth place finish." C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM some movement in the front. “They observed two men, one of whom had a handgun. Shortly after a gunshot was heard and the female employee who was in the frontwas injured to the face.” ASP Evans said Ms Bullard was rushed to hospital where she died sometime later. The two robbers escaped with a undeter mined amount of cash. They are described as being slim, tall, dark men. Last night shocked staff at 21st Century Steel Welding Limited paid tribune to MsBullard. Owner Edward Smith said: “She was one of the nicest employees I ever had. “She was a very good worker, working here for about four or five years.” Mr Smith said he was not sure how much money was taken but said it was the first time his business has been robbed. “It probably wasn’t much and it surely was n ot worth her life,” he said. Mr Smith questioned the motive for the brutal murder, saying: “It could have just been an idiot who didn’t know the value of life.” A cousin of Ms Bullard, who asked to remain anonymous, said: “She had a beautiful personality. She knew the Lord and she woulda lways express love and kindness to everyone s he met,” Police are asking for the public’s assistance in solving this latest murder. Police say that this latest incident is the country’s 53rd homicide for the year. Two weeks ago, 29-year-old mother of two TaGia Soles-Armony was shot and killed out side her grandmother’s home in Sea Breeze as she sat in her car breast-feeding her threemonth-old son. Mrs Soles-Armony had just returned home from St Kitts where she lived with her husband. Valentino Hanna Dorsette has been charged with her murder. Darville said the appointment of a government politician as Chief Justice will diminish the integrity of the judiciary. Mr Barnett would be the first Attorney General since independence to become Chief Justice. Under earlier colonial administration and later in the period of internal self governance prior to July 1973, two men Sir Gordon Bryce and Sir Ormond Drimmie Malcolm both rose from being Attorney General to Chief Justice. Sir Ormond (1839-1912 of the House of Assembly. Noting that there are also precedents in the Caribbean and the Commonwealth for Cabinet ministers being appointed Chief Justice, Ms Bowe Darville suggested this is little consolation for the Bar. “At the moment such an appointment seems to be an intrustion by executive (in the form of Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham) on the independence of the judicia ry,” she said, proposing that the principle of the separation of powers which is based on the need for each branch of government to be independent so as to maintain checks and balances on the powers of other branches could be compromised. The Bahamas Bar Association President stressed that the BBA was not consultedby Mr Ingraham on the issue of who should replace former Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall, and while this is fine accord ing to the constitution as set out, it would be “good and wholesome for society” if a Bahamian Prime Minister engaged in some discussion with civil society before deter mining such critical appointments as is the case in the United States. “He doesn’t have to take our advice, but just to consult would be a good thing. The appointment of a Chief Jus tice is a very, very serious thing,” she said, adding that The Bahamas Bar is consulted on lesser matters. The association’s complaint was forwarded to the Prime Minister yesterday, immedi ately following confirmation of rumours circulating for weeks that Mr Barnett is to become Chief Justice. No reaction has yet been issued in response, said Ms Bowe Darville. Mr Ingraham is out of the country on official business. Ms Bowe Darville and Mr Sears said it is time the constitution is reformed to include a legal requirement that the Prime Minister must consult with more than just the leader of the Opposition on who should be a judge, and Chief Justice in particular. They said there should be greater transparency in the process, so that people can know in advance who is being considered, what their merits or demerits may be, and offer their opinion on the matter. Without such wider debate on the appointment the pow er of a Prime Minister becomes almost absolute, as the head of the legislature and the person who has the final say in who heads the judiciary, suggested Mr Sears. He said the issue is not one that should be “trivialised” by making it political. “This is beyond PLP or FNM. At this stage in our national development it is time we improve the system. It’s an imperfect system but each generation ought to try to make it better. “I think it’s time that we ensure the respect for the law and to strengthen the independence of the judiciary and general respect for the governance process in The Bahamas by putting ourselves in line with democratic practice of most countries in democratic world,” said the former Attorney General. “As we saw in the US recently with madam Justice (Sonia ident (Barack Obama the nomination, but you had a hearing by a coordinate branch of government. There’s a more bipartisan approach and also a process which involves civil society.” Under the constitution as presently formed, the Prime Minister must consult with the Leader of the Opposition in this case Perry Christie on who should be the Chief Justice. However, The Tribune understands that even Mr Christie, as the one person who was formally consulted, was opposed to Mr Barnett becoming Chief Justice, pri marily on the basis that he is a political figure. Yesterday Mr Christie said he would not comment on the content of his discussions with the Prime Minister on the Chief Justice post, stating only that he “made his position very clear” to Mr Ingraham on the matter at the time and adding that he found the fact that he should select a member of his own Cabinet “interesting.” A message left for Mr Bar nett was not returned up to press time. FROM page one Bar lodges formal complaint over Chief Justice selection FROM page one Shock at slaying FROM page one W AVEYOURFLAGA proud Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie celebrates her bronze medal in the 200m at the World Athletics Championships. Pic: Associated Press

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England takes control of deciding Ashes T est C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net BERLIN, Germany This was definitely supposed to be the year that Chris “Fireman” Brown broke the fourth place jinx that has haunted him for the past two World Champi-o nships. After giving it a gutsy performance over the first 380 metres at the Olympic Stadi um, Brown didn't have anything left in the tank and he slowly dropped from third tof ifth place. H is time of 45.47 seconds on a cold and chilly night last night as a result of the down pour of rain, lightning and thunder that delayed the race for more than a hour, was r eminiscent of how disappointed he was in his performance. "I felt pretty good," said a dejected Brown, who for the very first time, was very slow in delivering his speech. "I'm disappointed." He could only watch as LaShawn Merritt add the world title to the Olympic gold that he achieved last yearin Beijing, China, as he stopped the clock in a world leading time of 44.06 for a 1-2 American sweep with former champion and compatriot Jeremy Wariner taking the silver in a season's best of 44.60. Trinidad & Tobago's Renny Quow, who had the next best time behind Merritt coming into the championships, posted a 45.02 to clinch the twin Caribbean island's sec ond medal of the biannual championships. "I mean . . . I really don't know. I just felt tight coming back home and that's not me," said Brown, who started to lose his momentum 50 metres out from the finish line and didn't have anything left to close out the golden opportunity to give the Bahamas what was anticipated as a double dose of celebrations. With the change in weather due to the rain, Brown said it played a factor, but not to the extend that he still couldn't pull off the medal spot on the dais to follow after Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie clinched her hardware in the women's 200 about half a hour earlier. "Boy, I really ain't have much words this time," he said, trying to console himself. "I really went out there, but it just didn't happen." Brown, 30, said he will now have to regroup and get focused so he can come back on Sunday and help the Bahamas to continue their tradition of winning a medal in the 4 x 400 relay. But he admitted that it's going to take him so time to get over the fact that another opportunity to medal slip right away from him. Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown places fifth in 400 final ENGLAND took con trol of the deciding Ashes T est after closing day two at The Oval 230 ahead of Australia at 58-3. After England added only 25 to their overnight 307-8, Australia were 73-0 before Stuart Broad produced a stunning spell of 48 in 21 balls. Broad finished with 5-37 and spinner Graeme Swann joined in with 4-38 as Australia were skittled for 160. England, who need to win to regain the Ashes, lost some wickets but Andrew Strauss was unde feated on 32. If England were deemed to have wasted a good position on day one, Australia's collapse was far more dramatic as the tourists failed to press home their advan tage. The first wicket of the Australia innings went down at 2.40pm and by 5.19pm it was all over, and that included 20 minutes for the tea interval. England are crying out for a new hero given the impending retirement of Andrew Flintoff and may well have found one in 23year-old Broad, who many thought would be dropped after taking only seven wickets for 345 runs in the first three matches of the series. LaSHAWN MERRITT of the United States (rightleft the World Athletics Championships in Berlin yesterday... CHRIS BROWN (centresecond rightleft (right (AP Photo/Michael Sohn M a r k u s S c h r e i b e r / A P IAAF Worlds Schedule BERLIN, Germany Here’s a look at the schedule for the Bahamians competing over the remainder of the IAAF’s 12th World Championships in Athletics: T T O O D D A A Y Y Women’s 4 x 100 relay heats Bahamas, lane 3, heat 1 at 12:10 pm ET Men’s 4 x 400 relay heats Bahamas, lane 3, heat 2 at 12:55 pm ET Women’s 4 x 100 relay final @ 2 pm ET Women’s 4 x 400 relay heats Bahamas, lane 2, heat 1 at 2:15 pm ET S S U U N N D D A A Y Y Women’s 4 x 400 relay final @ 11:50 am ET Men’s 4 x 400 relay final @ 12:15 pm ET ‘Golden girl’ Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie picks up the bronze ALLYSON FELIX (left2nd left Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie of the Bahamas, who got the bronze... (AP Photo: Michael Sohn

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 74F/23C Low: 77F/25C Low: 77F/25C Low: 78F/26C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 81F/27C Low: 80 F/27 C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 90F/32C High: 91F/33C High: 89 F/32 C High: 90 F/32 C High: 90F/32C High: 89 F/32C High: 88F/31C Low: 78F/26C High: 92F/33C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 91F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 75F/24C High: 91 F/33 C Low: 77F/25C High: 89 F/32 Low: 75F/24C High: 88F/31C Low: 76 F/24C High: 91F/33C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 93F/34C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 91F/33C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 91F/33C Low: 76F/24C High: 92 F/33 C Low: 76F/24C High: 92F/33C High: 90 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, AUGUST 22 ND , 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. Partly cloudy.Times of sun and clouds and a stray t-storm. Sunshine with a t-storm possible. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 88 Low: 80 High: 91 High: 90 High: 90 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Clouds and sun, a t-storm possible. High: 89 Low: 80 Low: 82 Low: 81 AccuWeather RealFeel 112F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 86F 108-87F 105-87F 100-83F 98-82F Low: 79 TODAYTONIGHTSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................90F/32C Low ....................................................81F/27C Normal high ......................................89F/32C Normal low ........................................76F/24C Last year's high .................................. 92 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 83 F/28C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................trace Year to date ................................................23.82" Normal year to date ....................................29.25" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU First Full Last New Aug. 27 Sep. 4Sep. 11Sep. 18 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:47 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:38 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 9:01 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 9:04 p.m. Today Sunday Monday Tuesday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 9:55 a.m.3.43:36 a.m.-0.2 10:16 p.m.3.14:05 p.m.-0.1 10:43 a.m.3.34:21 a.m.-0.1 11:03 p.m.2.94:56 p.m.0.0 11:32 a.m.3.25:05 a.m.0.0 11:50 p.m.2.75:47 p.m.0.2 12:23 p.m.3.15:51 a.m.0.1 -----6:41 p.m.0.4 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco90/3277/25t91/3279/26pc Amsterdam68/2054/12s72/2258/14pc Ankara, Turkey82/2748/8s79/2646/7s Athens88/3172/22s86/3070/21s Auckland61/1649/9sh60/1550/10c Bangkok91/3278/25sh90/3278/25pc Barbados87/3078/25sh87/3077/25pc Barcelona83/2869/20s79/2666/18s Beijing93/3364/17s84/2865/18pc Beirut82/2778/25s80/2678/25s Belgrade93/3361/16s80/2658/14pc Berlin72/2254/12pc73/2257/13s Bermuda84/2876/24r86/3078/25pc Bogota68/2046/7c66/1847/8c Brussels74/2354/12s79/2657/13pc Budapest86/3059/15t84/2854/12pc Buenos Aires61/1646/7c63/1745/7s Cairo102/3876/24s99/3775/23s Calcutta91/3285/29sh92/3383/28t Calgary73/2246/7s66/1844/6pc Cancun91/3275/23pc92/3375/23pc Caracas81/2772/22t82/2772/22t Casablanca91/3269/20s91/3266/18s Copenhagen68/2051/10sh68/2056/13s Dublin64/1754/12sh63/1750/10r Frankfurt75/2352/11pc79/2655/12s Geneva 76/24 52/11 pc 82/2757/13s Halifax 75/23 60/15 s 63/17 59/15 r Havana 90/32 72/22 s 89/31 73/22 sh Helsinki 66/18 50/10s66/1850/10pc Hong Kong 93/33 82/27 pc 91/32 80/26s Islamabad 100/37 77/25 t 102/38 80/26 s Istanbul82/2765/18s83/2866/18s Jerusalem 88/31 64/17s85/2962/16s Johannesburg 65/1841/5s65/1844/6s Kingston 88/3180/26sh88/3180/26sh Lima70/2157/13s71/2156/13s London73/2257/13pc77/2559/15pc Madrid99/3766/18s99/3764/17s Manila88/3179/26t87/3077/25r Mexico City77/2557/13t77/2555/12t Monterrey102/3875/23pc104/4075/23s Montreal79/2666/18t75/2357/13t Moscow72/2254/12pc73/2250/10pc Munich73/2245/7c77/2545/7s Nairobi80/2652/11c80/2653/11pc New Delhi 97/3682/27pc97/3682/27pc Oslo67/1950/10sh63/1750/10s Paris75/2355/12pc81/2761/16s Prague 74/23 49/9 c 73/22 47/8 pc Rio de Janeiro69/2063/17sh72/2266/18c Riyadh106/4180/26s104/4083/28pc Rome 90/32 70/21 s 88/31 68/20 s St. Thomas89/3179/26sh89/3180/26sh San Juan72/2239/3s76/2442/5s San Salvador 88/31 70/21 pc 89/31 73/22 sh Santiago 61/1641/5c64/1745/7c Santo Domingo90/3274/23sh85/2973/22sh Sao Paulo 61/16 57/13 c 67/19 58/14r Seoul82/2768/20pc82/2761/16s Stockholm 66/18 50/10 r 70/21 52/11 pc Sydney 68/20 52/11 pc77/2552/11c Taipei93/3378/25pc90/3278/25sh T okyo 90/32 77/25 pc 86/30 71/21 pc T oronto 74/2361/16t73/2258/14t Trinidad88/3168/20pc93/3370/21pc V ancouver 69/20 53/11 s 68/2053/11pc Vienna 72/2256/13t77/2557/13s W arsaw 73/22 54/12 sh 72/22 50/10 s Winnipeg 74/23 56/13 s 80/2662/16pc H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySunday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:ESE at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet5-7 Miles85F Sunday:ENE at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet5-7 Miles85F Today:ESE at 9-18 Knots1-3 Feet5-7 Miles85F Sunday:ENE at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet5-7 Miles85F Today:ESE at 8-16 Knots1-2 Feet5-7 Miles84F Sunday:ENE at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet5-7 Miles84F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque92/3367/19s89/3166/18pc Anchorage65/1852/11pc62/1649/9c Atlanta86/3064/17pc83/2864/17s Atlantic City86/3067/19c86/3064/17t Baltimore84/2867/19t84/2864/17t Boston82/2767/19c81/2767/19c Buffalo76/2458/14t71/2159/15t Charleston, SC90/3271/21t91/3270/21s Chicago70/2155/12pc74/2356/13s Cleveland74/2357/13t70/2157/13pc Dallas95/3574/23s95/3576/24s Denver95/3559/15s92/3360/15pc Detroit73/2255/12t75/2359/15pc Honolulu89/3176/24s89/3176/24s Houston98/3675/23t95/3574/23s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySunday TodaySundayTodaySunday Indianapolis76/2454/12t76/2456/13s Jacksonville90/3270/21t90/3272/22s Kansas City82/2756/13s84/2862/16s Las Vegas93/3372/22t95/3579/26pc Little Rock87/3061/16s88/3162/16s Los Angeles86/3066/18t84/2864/17pc Louisville80/2659/15t79/2660/15s Memphis84/2863/17s85/2965/18s Miami90/3279/26t91/3279/26t Minneapolis74/2355/12s82/2762/16s Nashville84/2860/15pc82/2760/15s New Orleans90/3273/22pc89/3172/22s New York85/2973/22t84/2871/21t Oklahoma City90/3261/16s92/3367/19s Orlando90/3274/23t90/3275/23t Philadelphia84/2870/21t86/3068/20t Phoenix 98/36 82/27 t 95/3581/27t Pittsburgh75/2358/14t73/2256/13t Portland, OR 78/2553/11s76/2454/12s Raleigh-Durham 88/31 67/19 t 87/30 64/17 pc St. Louis78/2559/15s82/2761/16s Salt Lake City 96/35 71/21 s 89/3162/16t San Antonio 100/37 76/24 s 99/37 76/24 s San Diego75/2368/20t75/2367/19pc San Francisco 70/21 57/13 pc 68/2057/13pc Seattle71/2153/11s71/2152/11s T allahassee 90/3267/19t92/3366/18s T ampa 91/32 77/25 t 91/32 78/25t Tucson90/3274/23t91/3274/23t W ashington, DC 82/27 69/20t84/2867/19t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day . Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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Victory for Knowles, Bhupathi Debbie picks up bronze By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net BERLIN, Germany She wanted to at least run a personal best and lower her national record. But “golden girl” Debbie FergusonMcKenzie was happy to settle with the bronze medal in the women’s 200 metres at the IAAF’s 12th World Championships in Athletics. Not a particularly fast race with American Allyson Felix carting off the prestigious title for the third consecutive biannual championships in 22.02 seconds, Ferguson-McKenzie’s time of 22.41 was good enough to raise the Bahamian flag as she followed Olympic champion and her new training partner Veronica Campbell-Brown of Jamaica, who got the silver in 22.35. "It feels great. At one point, I came out here really wanting to win, but coming off the curve, I didn't run that strong so I know I had to execute," said Ferguson-McKenzie, who redeemed herself after a sixthplace finish in the 100 on Monday night. "I didn't give up. I'm happy with the bronze. I tried to go for the gold, but it is what it is." Caught in a rain delay that postponed the race for more than an hour at the Olympic Stadium, Ferguson-McKenzie said at one point while warming up they got wet, but she knew that the frustration would soon be over when she won a medal any colour. "I'm just glad that it's over," said Ferguson-McKen zie, who finally got back on the podium for her first individual medal after she got the gold in Edmonton, Canada, in 2005 after American Marion Jones was disqualified for testing positive for a banned substance. "It was just wonderful. My goal was for us to hear the national anthem, but I'm glad that I got the bronze. It's better than not getting any medal." The bronze tied the Bahamas with Estonia, France, Mexico and Romania for the 29th spot. And when adding the fifth place finish by Chris “Fireman” Brown in the 400 in the final event of the night, the Bahamas is now tied with Australia for 14th on the placing table. For Ferguson-McKenzie, the 33-year-old who along with veteran Chandra Stur rup were able to hold their own against their younger opponents, said she's looking forward to the Bahamas adding at least one or two more medals in the relays this weekend. Coming in to the championships, Ferguson-McKenzie had the second fastest time in the world of 22.23 she did in Stockholm, Sweden, on July 31 behind Felix, who won with the world's leading mark of 21.88. Ferguson-McKenzie also had the third fastest time of 22.24, which was the fastest qualifying time in the first round here in Berlin. Campbell-Brown sat in fourth with 22.29, also posted here, but in the semifinal and Lee had the fifth best of 22.30 from her preliminaries here as well, which equaled out the predictions of who were going to be the medal contenders. Ferguson-McKenzie, how ever, said her own projection was a little off at the end of the race. But she's just glad to have been back on the podium, this time receiving her medal from her own long-time idol, men tor and former team-mate Pauline Davis-Thompson. C M Y K C M Y K SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 12 PAGE 10 IAAF World Championships schedule... TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM TRIBUNECOVERAGEOFTHE IAAF WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS BERLIN 2009 BROUGHTTOYOUBY Chris Brown places fifth in 400 final... S ee page 10 BAHAMIAN tennis ace Mark Knowles and his Indian partner, Mahesh Bhupathi, are on a roll in a United States Open series event being held in Cincinnati, Ohio. In a doubles quarterfinals Friday at the ATP World Tour Western & Southern Financial Group Masters, the fourthseeded duo defeated Michael Llodra and Jo-Wilfried Tsonga of France, 7-6 (6 Also yesterday in the quarterfinals, Knowles’ former partner, Daniel Nestor of Canada, and Nenad Zimonjic of Serbia, the No. 2 seeds, got the victory against No.6 seeded Mariusz Fyrstenberg and Marcin Matkowski of Poland, 7-6 (88 In the other quarters, Lukasz Kubot of Poland and Oliver Marach of Austria, the No.8 seeds, defeated David Ferrer and Tommy Robredo of Spain, 7-6 (2 DEBBIE FERGUSON-McKENZIE proudly raises our national flag after winning the bronze in the 2 00m during the World Athletics Championships in Berlin Friday, August 21, 2009... (AP Photo: Anja Niedringhaus) GOLD MEDAL WINNER Allyson Felix of the US is flanked by silver medal winner Veronica Campbell-Brown, left, of Jamaica and bronze medal winner Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie of Bahamas after the ceremony for the 200m final... (AP Photo: Markus Schreiber DEBBIE and Pauline Davis-Thompson (left