Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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www.tribune242.com
Volume: 105 No.222 (oR

Mt. Royal Ave.
Tel:326-1875







THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009 PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

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The Deangelo
Fowler murder
trial ends in
a hung jury

Retrial is

birth rate shock

Number of children

born out of wedlock
highest since 1985

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE number of children
born in the Bahamas to single
mothers is the highest it has
been since 1985, according to
the most recent data from the
Department of Statistics.

There were 5,177 live births
in 2007 and more than half of
this number — 3,167 to be
exact — came from unwed
mothers.

The number of live births
to single mothers in this peri-
od jumped from 2,766 in 2006
and 2,706 in 2005. In 1985,
there were 3,380 live births to
unwed mothers — a slight
increase from 3,114 in 1984
and a sharp rise compared to
a mere 35 live births to unwed
mothers in 1983.

Statistics from 2007 also
reveal that single teenage
mothers between 15 to 19
years old had 585 children
born out of wedlock while 19
of the live births in this age
group came from married
teens.

Although young girls
between ages 10 to 14 years
old contributed to less than
one per cent of the total num-
ber of live births in the respec-
tive period, shocking statis-
tics reveal that six babies were
delivered by children in this
age group.

Women between the ages
of 25 to 29 years old had the
highest number of live births
in 2007: 1,282, with 588 of
these births to married
women and 694 to unwed
mothers. Mothers in the age
range of 20 to 24 years old
came in second with 1,204 live
births — 227 of this number
to married women and 977
born to single mothers.

Women between ages 30 to
34 had 1,152 live births in
2007 with 650 children born
to married women and 502 to
single mothers. Mothers
between the ages of 35 to 39
made up 708 of the live births
that year; 407 of these births
were to married women while
301 were to single mothers.

SEE page nine

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TAGIA Soles-Armony, the
mother of two who was shot
dead in front of her parents’
house in Sea Breeze on August
7, was laid to rest yesterday fol-
lowing a funeral service at St
Francis Xavier Cathedral.

The service was well attend-
ed, and in addition to grieving
family members and friends,
many political and community
leaders also paid their respects.
Among those attending the ser-
vice were PLP leader Perry

PALLBEARERS carry the body of Tagia Soles-Armony (inset) from
St Francis Xavier Cathedral yesterday.

Christie and several Cab-
inet ministers.

Her father Gordon
Soles described her as
a loving and protective
mother to her sons, and
someone who was “a
whirlwind of activity
always seeking to make
it better for those around
her.”

In the funeral programme,

SEE page nine

ordered for
Jamal Penn

By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
nmckenzie@
tribunemedia.net

JURORS in the Dean-
gelo Fowler murder trial
were deadlocked over a
verdict yesterday as the
trial ended with a hung
jury.

Senior Justice Anita
Allen ordered a retrial
for Jamal Penn, 21, after
the jury failed to reach a
verdict on the charge of
murder.

The seven women and
five men voted six to six.
A verdict must be unan-
imous for a murder con-
viction, and at least a two
thirds majority for a not
guilty verdict.

Penn is accused of
shooting 18-year-old
Deangelo Cargill Fowler
in the chest as he stood
near a bus stop on Bay
and Frederick streets on
January 7, 2008. Mr
Fowler died in hospital
later that night.

SEE page nine



Man to he arraigned
over the killing of
Bahamian in Horida

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A MAN is to be arraigned
on charges of murder and
robbery in connection with
the killing of Bahamian Kahlil
Holmes in Florida.

Eric Andrew White, 33, of
West Palm Beach, was indict-
ed last Friday. He is now
being held in the Palm Beach
County jail without bail.

Mr Holmes, a father of two,
was found dead and half-
naked in the middle of a
street in West Palm Beach on
July 14. He had been shot up
to six times.

His half-sister, Juliet, said
her brother was only expected
to be in Florida for one day as
he had promised to return to
his ailing father’s side. She
said she did not know the pur-
pose of his trip.

Mr Holmes owned a car

SEE page nine

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS: LEADING NEWSPAPER



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 3





By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A GROUP of FNM ministers
yesterday stood up in defence
of the relocation of the contain-
er shipping facilities to Arawak
Cay, hitting back at criticisms
the site may not be the most suit-
able and was chosen to accomo-
date “special interests”.

Minister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing, denied the gov-
ernment has been “secretive” in
its decision making in relation
to the port, claiming its actions
are ‘transparent’ and ‘account-
able’ according to definitions of
the terms laid out by the United
Nations.

“You may not agree with me
but that does not mean that I
am not transparent or account-
able, it just means you do not
agree with me,” said Mr Laing,
referring to the government’s
critics on the issue.

PLP Senator Jerome Fitzger-
ald has led criticism of the gov-
ernment’s proposed relocation
of container shipping facilities
to Arawak Cay, claiming it has
not been justified in the face of a
study commissioned under the
PLP which found it
unfavourable as a potential site
for the port and may be driven
by private rather than public
interest.

He has questioned the gov-
ernment’s data and claims it is
“rushing” the move for dubious
reasons.

Masked men
hreak into
woman's home

A WOMAN was
asleep in her bed early
yesterday morning when
three masked men, one
of them armed, broke
into her home in Boyd
Subdivision.

The home invasion
occurred shortly after
4am and the woman, 45,
told police that the men
searched her house and
made off with money, a
cellular telephone and
her green 2006 Hyundai
Tuscon.

The men then escaped
in the stolen vehicle. i

An intensive investiga- }
tion hasbeen launched}
into this matter, police
said.

¢ A MAN was appre-
hended by police after i
he was found to be carry- }
ing afirearmconcealed
in a detergent box at the :
Lynden Pindling Interna- :
tional Airport.
The suspect, a 41-year- }
old Farrington Road :
man, was attempting to
travel to Jamaica when
he was held up by police
at 2.30pm on Tuesday.
Amongst the era |
the man had in the box
officers of the Western
Police Station discovered |
a .9mm handgun which
contained eight live
rounds of ammunition.
The man is currently in
police custody.

Miss teverse |
float parade

BAHAMIANS are
invited to come out and
cheer on the beauty
queens as they take part
in a float parade which
starts from Arawak Cay
today at 5.30pm.

The float parade then
follows along West Bay
Street to the Wyndham

LOCAL NEWS

FNM ministers defend
container port move

Yesterday Mr
Laing, like Environ-
ment Minister Earl
Deveaux, suggested a
review of that report
reveals deficiencies in
it as a basis for decid-
ing which site would
be best.

“Tt has a very inter-
esting opening sen-
tence in its executive
summary and that
sentence says essen-
tially that the consul-
tants were directed to
go to Clifton Pier to look at
that.”

“There’s nothing in that
report that has any extensive
evaluation of Arawak Cay or
any other port in this country
other than the Clifton Pier loca-
tion.

“When you read that report,
what struck me as someone who
has done college level reasearch
in this country was how jaun-
diced the report was in a direc-
tion (the consultants) were clear-
ly sent in,” he added.

The study ranked Arawak
Cay sixth out of seven potential
sites for the port.

Mr Laing, Deputy Prime Min-
ister Brent Symonette, Minister
of National Security Tommy
Turnquest and FNM Chairman
Johnley Ferguson were speak-
ing on radio talk show “Issues
of the Day” on Love97fm.

Responding to allegations that
the party is catering to “special
interests” by selecting Arawak

ZHIVARGO LAING



Cay as the site for the
new port, Mr Symon-
ette said everyone is
in agreement that the
container facilities
must be moved out of
Downtown Bay
Street if the centre is
to be revitalised and
charged that Prime
Minister Hubert
Ingraham has spoken
“many times in the
last 15 years” about
developing Arawak
Cay in this regard.

He pointed out that in the
FNM’s Manifesto 2007, the par-
ty said it intended to develop
Arawak Cay “commercially” as
well as “recreationally.”

“T think we’ve dealt with that
issue. Let’s move on,” said Mr
Symonette when Mr Jones first
raised the question of special
interests with him.

The Deputy Prime Minister
has been accused by Mr Fitzger-
ald of “being the mastermind” of
what the senator termed a “con-
spiracy to secretively enrich a
special interest group at great
expense to the public purse.”

But Mr Turnquest defended
the decision as one taken by the
government as a whole “based
on various analyses.”

He added: “Right now
Arawak Cay is very unsightly.
We want to bring it into an
orderly port where you have
your container port, where you
move containers at night, where
you are able to beautify the port

and use Arawak Cay for other
purposes.”

Mr Turnquest claimed the
popular hangout, of which the
FNM is “very proud”, will see a
surge in business when the port
is relocated to the area.

Mr Laing explained that the
government will be moving the
port to Arawak Cay “through a
partnership with the various
owners of the container opera-
tions in the country who are now
to the tune of one third (already)
using Arawak Cay for that pur-
pose”.

Suggesting the port is not
intended to remain there indefi-
nitely, Mr Laing described mov-
ing it from Downtown to
Arawak Cay as the “best interim
solution to any long- term per-
manent relocation of that port”.

“To be able to clear Bay
Street and our central touristic
centre of those containers in the
shortest possible time, Arawak
Cay, which now accomodates
one third of the container move-
ments in this country, represents
the most efficient and effective
way to do that,” he claimed.

Mr Laing noted that “no
environmentalists” have come
forward to suggest that they are
concerned about any environ-
mental impact from the project
to date.

“You have political operatives
saying that, you have people fol-
lowing them saying that, but no
environmentalists are showing
any evidence to say so,” he
added.

New judicial appointments made

ATTORNEY Rhonda Bain
was yesterday appointed a
Supreme Court judge and Jus-
tice Jon Isaacs was named

senior justice.

Governor-General Arthur
Hanna made the appointments
on the advice of the Judicial and

Legal Service Commission.
Justice Isaacs,

on January 27, 1955.

He received his education at
St Anne's High School in New
Providence and at Cornwall
College, Montego Bay, Jamaica,
where he taught for one year before attend-
ing the University of Waterloo, Ontario,
Canada where he received a bachelor of
arts degree in political science with a minor

in history in 1979.

He read law at the University of the West
Indies and was awarded a bachelor of laws

degree in 1982.

Justice Isaacs acquired his professional
qualification at the Norman Manley Law
School and was called to the Bahamas Bar

in 1984.

He was then employed by Office of the
Attorney General, where he served for 13
years as a prosecutor and civil litigator.

Justice Isaacs was promoted to the post of
assistant director of Legal Affairs, a post he
held until his appointment as chief magis-

trate in January, 1997.

He took office as an acting justice of the
Supreme Court in September, 2000 and was
appointed a justice on February 1, 2002.

Justice Isaacs is a fellow of the Com-
monwealth Judicial Education Institute. He
is an Anglican and is married to the for-

who will
become senior justice on Sep-
tember 1, was born in Nassau

RHONDA BAIN



mer Berencia Macaulay.

Rhonda Bain, a member of

the Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Association and the Cuckoos
Rugby Football Club, will
assume office on August 14,
2009.

She was born in Nassau on

April 22, 1952 and in 1974 was
awarded a bachelor of laws
degree by the University of the
West Indies at Cave Hill, Bar-
bados — which also awarded her
a master of laws degree in leg-
islative drafting in 1984.

Having attended the Norman

Manley Law School in Mona,
Jamaica, she received the Legal Education
Certificate of the Council of Legal Educa-
tion of the West Indies in 1976 and was
admitted as an attorney of the Supreme

Court of the Bahamas on October 6, 1976.

She entered the office of the Attorney
General as an assistant counsel in 1976 and

served in those chambers until 1983 when

she entered private practice in the firm of
Christie, Ingraham and Company, where
she remained until 1992.

From 1993 to 1996 she practised at her

own firm, Rhonda P Bain Chambers, with
offices in Nassau and Freeport.

In 1996 she returned to the public ser-
vice as deputy director of Legal Affairs in
the Office of the Attorney General and in
1999 was promoted to director of Legal

Affairs, a position in which she remained

until 2005.

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Ms Bain is the mother of twin boys.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Uae bate
brea ALT







PAGE 4, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Felling the casuarinas is a tragedy

BEFORE air-conditioning there was the
casuarina tree.

Hot afternoons found Bahamians at var-
ious New Providence beaches — Montagu,
Yamacraw, Adelaide, Saunders and Love
— just “chilling out” under the shady
branches of a casuarina tree. Cool seabreezes
wafted through the large tree’s pine needles
to cool the body, and hum the song of the
sea to calm the soul. In those days it was a
delight for children to play in the shade of
the large trees, and a relaxing break at the
end of a hard day for working parents.

It was under the casuarina tree that an
earlier generation lay down their daily bur-
dens.

There already is a generation of Bahami-
ans who never experienced Nassau’s most

beneath it, which is true, but who wants to
grow anything else on a beach?

It is claimed that it was introduced to the
Bahamas in the twenties as a hedge tree that
got out of control and spread. Although this
might be true, we have our doubts as it is a
tree that seems to skirt the periphery of
most of our islands. They must have been
planted on the shoreline for a purpose, and
they must have been a part of these islands
long before the twenties. In his book Hawaii,
John Mitchener claims that casuarinas were
planted along Hawaii’s coastline to protect
that island from salt spray and absorb the
wave energy of a mini-tsunami. However,
because they snap easily they are an unreli-
able wind shield in a typhoon.

In certain areas of the east — Viet Nam

PLP is ‘injecting
partisan politics
into public life’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I AM troubled by the
determination of the PLP to
inject partisan politics into
every aspect of public life.
The habit of that political
party to try to extract polit-
ical advantage from any
matter regardless of its
impact on our country can
only be described as shame-
less; but then they have
proven themselves to be
without shame time and
again and so I suppose I
should not be surprised that
the leopard cannot change
its stripes.

Tam also concerned with
the seeming inability of the
independent press to call the
PLP out on their hypocrisy
and indeed, their dedication
to misleading and misin-
forming the Bahamian peo-
ple on matters of national
importance.

The PLP opposed amend-
ing the Constitution to
acknowledge that men and
women are equal. They
claimed it was too confus-

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



those who they know and
trust.

The PLP have got to stop
looking to find political gain
from the narrow mindedness
of some. Instead, they
should use their position of
influence to enlighten and
make our society better.
Ignorance is not to be
excused and pampered but
fought with knowledge and
insight and enlightenment.
This would be the time for
Allyson Maynard-Gibson to
be speaking out publicly in
support of happy marriages
in which all individuals love
and respect each other and
in which no one secks to
dominate and demand
against the will of the other.

This is the time for Mrs.
Maynard-Gibson to take a
stand in support of all those
loving husbands who cherish
and protect their wives and

who are insulted by any sug-
gestion that a law outlawing
rape in marriage could ever
apply to them or impugn
their character.

The proposed new law
targets abusers. Any effort
to support the allegation
that this law will target lov-
ing husbands is a cruel mis-
representation. Any sugges-
tion that we should delay
providing greater protection
under the law for abused
women in our society is
unconscionable.

It is especially wrong for
anyone in political leader-
ship to coddle or protect
abusers and criminals in any
way and we must all call on
all members of the PLP to
break with their past of
opposing for the sake of
opposing and to support the
timely adoption and entry
into force of the law mak-
ing rape in a marriage a
crime.

LIVINGSTON GRAY
Nassau,
August 18, 2009.

beautiful drive on the western end of the
island. It was a must-drive when we had
guests in town. It was like motoring down the
aisle of a darkened Gothic cathedral as the
large trees bent over and interlocked at the
top. It went on for almost the length of Cable
Beach. It was what John Keats would have
called a “thing of beauty.” According to
Keats “a thing of beauty is a joy for ever: Its
loveliness increases; it will never Pass into
nothingness.”

But our casuarina trees started to pass
into nothingness after the late Frank Christie
took his first trip to the Far East and saw the
magnificent groves of tall, elegant palm trees.
It is true that there is nothing more magnif-
icent than the palm trees of the East, espe-
cially at dusk, paddling across a lagoon to see
thick palm groves silhouetted against a set-
ting sun.

Mr Christie was captivated. He was deter-
mined that he could transplant the East to
the West, specifically to Cable Beach. It was
then that the butchering of our magnificent
casuarinas started. Palm trees — that looked
like dwarfs next to the palms of the Far East
— were planted. They eventually contracted
lethal yellowing and one by one fell by the
wayside. Just as our magnificent translucent
waters could not be taken to the East, the
tree-lined eastern skyline could not be
moved to Cable Beach.

Then came the final rooting up of the
trees to make way for the dual carriageway.
Only scattered stumps remain of our cathe-
dral-like casuarina drive.

It was lawyer Pericles Maillis, who as head
of the Bahamas National Trust, led the
charge to remove all casuarina trees from the
island. They were alien to our islands, he
said. It is true that the tree is an Australian
pine, but it is no more alien to these islands
than each and every one of us who call our-
selves Bahamian. The tree kills everything

































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for example — the casuarina is planted next
to the seashore as a windbreaker for inland
food crops. For the first five to seven years
after planting the roots are pruned on either
side. Here in the Bahamas, the trees have
been allowed to grow like Topsy.

The casuarina tolerates alkali and saline
soils, is drought resistant and will withstand
strong prevailing winds. It is claimed that
they are easily felled during a hurricane, but
those, especially on the western seashore,
have withstood many hurricanes, and are
still standing, while on the Eastern Road we
see many palm trees twisted and broken
after a hurricane.

Although our Bahamian pundits maintain
that casuarina trees do not protect sand
dunes, in Hambantota City, Sri Lanka, that
was the very reason for growing them.

As they grew with much space between
them they did not block the beautiful natural
view of the water, yet provided a barrier to
the salt spray from the sea.

The casuarina shelterbelt became popular
because it was the only undamaged area in
Hambantota City after the devastating 2004
tsunami.

However, more than anything else Sri
Lankans believe that their casuarina shore-
line has improved the aesthetic value of their
beach and has enhanced its touristic value. In
the meantime, Bahamians in their wisdom
are about to destroy 66 of our old trees.
Obviously, they don’t appreciate their beau-
ty along our shoreline, the shade they pro-
vide for those who use the beaches and the
fact that they do not blot from view our
beautiful blue waters. And, accept it or not,
they do give properties inland a certain
amount of protection from salt spray.

To remove the casuarina is to remove an
important feature of the Bahamas. This is a
tragedy about to be executed in the name of
progress.

ing a concept and that
Bahamians needed time to
understand and accept it!
They spent five years in
office but apparently didn't
have time to educate
Bahamians on this impor-
tant issue.

Now they are lukewarm
about making rape in a mar-
riage a crime. Again they
claim that people need to be
consulted and informed on
this before the law is passed.

I was horrified but not
surprised to learn that Sen-
ator Allyson Maynard
thinks that we should not
legislate against marital rape
until we find a better way to
deal with the high incidence
of rape by strangers! This is
a most curious legal concept.

Mrs. Maynard-Gibson, as
a practising attorney, should
know that rape is rape. Rape
by an acquaintance or
indeed by a family member,
is if anything, more trau-
matic because women do
not expect to be attacked by

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Thanks for awards
banquet in my honour

EDITOR, The Tribune.

KINDLY allow me space in your paper to thank the All
Andros and Berry Islands Regatta Committee and the com-
munity of North Andros for hosting an awards banquet in
my honour and honouring me at the 2009 Regatta. Specif-
ically, I wish to thank the following people for making the
events possible: Brian Cleare, Chief Councillor and Chair-
man of the Banquet Committee; Danny Ferguson, Chairman
of the All Andros and Berry Islands Regatta Committee; Ms
Donna Pickstock; Patrick Romer; Ms Shema Woodside;
Ms Darnell Evans; Ms Pennell Wilson; Ms Estella Hunter;
Ms Daisy Bowleg; Ms Michelle Bowleg Ms Vanria Rahming;
Mrs Patricia Woodside; Ms Angela McDonald; Ossie Pin-
tard; Frank Hanna and Dudley Smith for their financial
contributions.

T also wish to thank Edison Key, the Executive Chairman
of The Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation,
Benjamin Rahming, the General Manager BAIC and oth-
er members of the executive management team for their
attendance and support. Also thanks to my good friend
Everett Hart who came all the way from Exuma to speak on
my behalf. I also wish to thank Administrator Dr Huntley
Christie and the Member of Parliament the Hon Vincent
Peet for their support and kind words.

Last, but not least, I wish to thank the good people of
North Andros who came out in the hundreds in support of
me. North Androsians, you really showed me how much you
appreciated all that I have done in a non-partisan way.

I have always maintained that my contribution to North
Andros and The Bahamas is not for plaques, trophies or
awards ... what I do is from the goodness of my heart and the
love I have for this place that I call home.

My late mother always taught her children “it’s better to
give than to receive” because your award will not come
from man, but from God. I strive to live by that dictum.

I wish to reassure North Androsians that I will always be
there for you even until the end of time.

ALPHONSO SMITH
North Andros,
Bahamas

August 18, 2009

first Baptist Church

289 Market St. South » P.O. Bow N-7984 * Nassau, Bahamas
THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK
“God is a safe dwelling place in
Lite’s difficult storms.”

SUNDAY SEAVICES
fan, 00am, 11:18am

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Email resume to
beverley @rightafterthethebell.com





THE TRIBUNE





Govt: violent crime boils

LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 5

UU NOLO AE)

down to individual choices xyes

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT ministers
yesterday hit back at suggestions
that the FNM is "impotent" in
tackling the escalating murder
count and argued that violent
crime boils down to individual
choices that are out of govern-
ment's control.

Speaking as a guest on Love 97
FM's “Issues of the Day”, State
Finance Minister Zhivargo Laing
said that despite the current high
levels of violent crimes and mur-
ders, the Bahamas is an "orderly
society".

"The United Nations still con-
firms that this is one of the most
civil societies in all of the world,
not withstanding, we have our own

set of issues, which we know when
it comes to murder.

"This is an orderly society, order
in a society doesn't happen by acci-
dent," he said, adding that gov-
ernment has invested significant
resources in the Royal Bahamas
Police Force to effectively police
the nation.

He said observers must realise
that much of the crime plaguing
our society boils down to complex
personal choices that are "beyond
the control of government.”

"If you look at the crime (sta-
tistics) and you pick murder as an
example, you would have to say
from year to year the murder rate
has gone up. The question
becomes one of was there anything
in analysing those murders that we
could have done to prevent them.

"If I had two police officers in

the home that somebody broke
into and shot somebody, maybe
that could have been prevented.
But is that practical,” said Mr
Laing.

The FNM and particularly Min-
ister of National Security Tommy
Turnquest have come under heavy
fire as the country grapples with
rising levels of violent crime.

Mr Turnquest conceded that
crime is at an unacceptable level in
the country as he weighed in on
the debate on yesterday’s talk
show.

"I'm the first to admit that 52
murders in eight months of the
year based on any yardstick is far
too high for a society like the
Bahamas.

"The international standards in
terms of homicides are five per
100,000 of population. Assuming a

$1,000 donated to ‘Breathe Easy’ campaign

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

Pantie

' J



FROM LEFT: Vice President of Doctors Hospital Michele Rassin; Director, Doctors Hospital Dr Keva
Bethel; President of Doctors Hospital Barry Rassin; CEO Doctors Hospital Charles Sealy; Director NICU
PMH Dr. Gwendolyn McDeigan; Nursing Officer NICU Patrice Solomon, Nursing Officer NICU Analee
Richards, Thelma Rolle of PMH, Mark Roberts of Tile King.

MANAGER of Little
Whale Cay Mark Roberts pre-
sents a cheque for $1,000 from
the family of Mr and Mrs Peter
Austin to Thelma Rolle of the
Princess Margaret Hospital
Foundation for the purchase
of new state-of-the-art venti-
lators.

Mr Austin said he was
“delighted and proud to sup-
port the Breathe Easy
Bahamas Campaign.”

“Mark has been managing
our property (Little Whale
Cay) for 12 years. This
fundraising drive is important
to all of our staff and we are

pleased to support Mark’s phil-
anthropic endeavours,” he
said.

Little Whale Cay is located
32 miles northwest of Nassau
in the Berry Island chain and
was previously the summer
and weekend home of Wallace
Groves, founder of Freeport.

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population of 350,000 we should have 52 that's far too many for a
country our size," he acknowl-

have no more than 18 homicides a

year. And so in eight months to edged.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

Threat prevents parents of Miss

India from travelling to Bahamas

THE parents of Miss India
Universe Ekta Choudhry
were forced to cancel their
plans to travel to the Bahamas
for the final show of the
pageant due to a threat from
hooligans.

The Times of India report-
ed yesterday that Miss India’s
parents had been very excited
about the trip, but had to can-
cel at the last minute.

A group of hooligans near
the Choudhrys’ home in the
city of Gurgaon have been
terrorising the family and
Ekta’s parents said they are
afraid to leave the country as
MISS INDIA is pictured celebrating India’s 62nd jitienendencs day their house may be attacked
in Nassau recently. in their absence.

Ekta’s mother Rita

RALEE ) Choudhry told the Times in
¢ FACHIONG India that the family had
recently moved to Gurgaon
from Delhi and now regretted
the decision.

has gowns for all those | _, 8 “hessuyshwve no

* *

important occasions.



Derek Smith/MOT




from their holidays

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham and his
wife Deloris returned to Nassau yesterday
morning ending their annual holidays.

The Ingrahams were met at Prince George
Dock By Deputy Prime Minister and Minister
of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette, Minister
of National Security Tommy Turnquest, Cab-
inet Secretary Anita Bernard, and Police
Commissioner, Reginald Ferguson after dis-
embarking the Norwegian Cruise liner, Nor-
wegian Sky.

filed a police complaint in this
matter.

While they will not be able
to attend the final show to be
held at Atlantis this Sunday,
Ekta’s parents said that they

Mackey Street + Telephone: 393-0744 are praying for their daugh-

Monday - Saturday 9:00am - 5:30pm eee



Peter Ramsay/BIS

PROSPECTUS
THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2028, 2029, 2030, 2031, 2032, 2033, 3034, 3035, AND 3036
ISSUE OF B$150,000, 000.00

Issued onder The Bahamas Registered Stock Act. and authomeed by Resolutions of the House of Assembly, | Teh
June, SUH.

THE (A IVE RAMEN T OF CPE CS WAL Te TE BAD AMA
ho oe rer > 1 4 7

Applicaiions will be reoeived by The Banking Depariment beginning af 9:30 amon 1th August. 2008 and will POR OPP ICTAL USE ONLY
chome at 0D pen on 2h August, SHH) Allocations will commence af 94h a.m. om 2th August, 200 and will cee ar APPLICA TELIM Bao
SAM On 27h August, DIMM), ALLOTMENT Mes

DATE

If the total swahecripeions exceed the sum cf HS TMICKKIAKRLIM) (Nominal) portial allotment will be make bo

subscribers, and a proporticmate refund will be made as sn as possible aller allobnent No interes! will he pak on The Regicirer

amounts so refunded. elo The Central Bank of The Bahaetars
P.O, Bao, Bae

Nrescme, Plaharnes

The Government of The Commonweal of The Bahamas invites applications For Rakeintiss Registered Sunk
totalling BSI S00 The Stock will be available in a range of maturity dates; the earliest being repayable in We hereby apply bor the following amount of Bahamas Registered Stock:
SIPS and che laese in 2h. The total amount of Steck offered, the rane of interest amd the lesue piece wre giver etlcrar :-

Sir

Inert beckorw the amkeant apqeied! bor

in eis of BEL

make Proce
Rac of liters Le Albowe Prom Rate Babuitas Registered Stock 228 = =BS
ies 5
eee .

Abecrie * Rabe & Registered Stock 24
Above Prime Rais Dabama= Reprtered Sick MILA /— sano | Ten Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Siock 2 BS
Ondo Albee Prime Bate Dahamas Repistered Stock 2 SES Above Prime Bate Rabamas Registered Stock 2040)
Above: Prime: Rate Habermas Repistered Sinck 2M L1H Abowe Prime Rate Rakamas Registered Steak 3K
Abowe Prime Rate latamas Repinered Stock 2011
Aborne Prime Rate Hohamas Recknered Siock ML es M16 Above Pane Rate Babes Registered Stock 232
bsceve Prime: Bate Bahamas Rephtered Stock 0003 | MCU | ot 34 Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Stock 203
borne Prime: Fale Hahermias Repisered Stock 214 TES) Above Pome Rate fabomas Registered Stock 24
[a Above Prime Rate Hatames Reghered Sick Gs | CL | | 2 BPemaLs Icgastened lnk ot.
Lite Avbowse Prime Blane Hohmas Repinered Siock Mit | LOO | oi | [S445 Alkove Prime Rate Kakomas Registered Stock 25
131 AHL AHLIN) | 4) Alkowe Prin Rate Batriitas Rogisicred Stock 2096

Kl deriake in accep pic cunt which mary he ablated bo metus.
The Saock shall be eepand on 27th August, ethe year appcariog: on the ane of thi: Steck = ee eee
Ie cals 2S in payee Gor the Soock apylled foe
INTEREST
inthe event of ihe full omeunt of Sincki=} applied for abowe estan mo nlkngied in
7 : nnn : . . i " . w “ “fin Be £ : j allere ine Baca
The Stock will bewr interest from 27th August, 2009, at the rate shown against ihe name of the Stock ax ihe percent fevis. Wee request thet the sum refundable to nevis be applied for the Fallivwing Steck
fer anid over the Prime Rote (1c, the print commercial interest rate frown time to tne fied by the Clearing haslcs
curving on business im the Island of Sew Prowdente in The Bahamas, 2 there shall be acy difference boiween them,
then that which is fixed by Rowal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half-yearly commencing on 27th February,
210) aid chereafier on 27h August aml 271h February in every year aedil che Sieck is repaid PAYMENTS [M EXCESS OF BS50000 0 MUST BE SLADE VLA REALTIME ORO88 SETTLEMEST
SYSTEM (RTOS) THROUGH ALL COMMBRCIAL BANKS EXCEPT FINCH,
. a PAYMENTS CHF HSS (L000 10-08 LESS CAN BE MADE VIA REAL TIME GROSS SETTLEMENT
: FLD A TR FL SYSTEM C1 EY DANK DRAPT PAY AIL TO THE CUNTHRAL BANKOOD TH BAM AMAS
The prescipal monies and interest reprcseniod by the Stock ane changed apon and payable out of the Consohidated PAYMENTS CHF B35 00000 OR LESS CAN BE ALADHE VLA REAL Tie OHSS. SETTLEMENT
r . . rs I i APT Vi T = CEN i f ‘ i i
Fund and axsets of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas. — BY BANK DRAPT PAYABLE TO THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS OR BY

% Bohamas Registered Sook BS

SUPPLEMENTARY PROVISIONS
1. (Qe Person
The Steck will be maved by Uke Registrar (The Central Bank of The Baha), Applications wall Ordinary Skanature
be received by The Banking Department begimeing af 9230 am om 19th August, 200% and yell eloge se
2300 pre on 25h Apusd, AMM, Alksculions wll cammence al 9:30 aon. on 26th Agpest,
and will cease at 3:00pm. on 27th Aegust, 2008. All envclopes enclosing applications should be Name in Pall (BLOCK LETTERS. state whether Mr_ Mrs...or Miss and titles if any.’
lobelked "Vupedicotbos or Bahomas Goverment Registered Stocks”. :

Units The Stock will be im umats of TS 100080.

Anpliccutines Applications most be for BS MK) ora multiple of that sum. Address (Corporations etc. should give Registered Addresses }

ApHicating Faris Applicat for the Steck should be mende tothe Regishrar cet the fora attached te the FO. Box
Prospectes amd may be obtained from the Registrar offices im Nassau and Freeport, The Treasary
Deparment (Marlborough Sere: A Ravy Lion Rowl, Nea), appdicuiions may also be
diwikualed front the Ceatral Bank of the Rabanies gichsite al wae cembril hind baleen soon oo

any of the following banks:

Hank of The Hatamas Inmemational Telephone Mos. (H) 1
First Canbbeas lero! Haak (Bales Lanned

binece Corperation of Hatamnas Lirmetid

Connmonvcalth Bank Limited

Hevpal Heank OW Carced

Scotiabask (Bahamas) Lindied

Fiichty Bank {Baharrers) Linnted (formed! y Heit American Hiab 13) Linnted) . .
Chibenk. MA Ordinary Signatuncs

nw ht

2 (Where beoor more persons apply as jolnt subscribers, the additional names and addresses should
he given below.)

— ee oh

ro

PUBLIC DEAT
Maires ia Full

Prowisimnal estimates from the ungediied accounts ws at June 30. 204 show ihe Public Debt of The Bahar to be
$5,524,214 0K."

The tolhaaing intonation is extracted trom the anaidited acco: of the Government of The Commonwealth at Adiress
The Bahwrnas.

PYRKMYXETp AYaanoap* FYSKIRKMpT* Telephone Mes.tH)
He BS KS

Approved Budget Approved Badert .
Bevemme 1 00 1.424, 108,000 148899 000 We hereby reqs: semi anmiial inperest oo fet peed eo:

Recurrent Expenditure (oxcleding :
Repayment of Public Debt) 1 285,600,000 1,344,028,000 1484, 150,000 Hank Name

Capital Development Bank Branch

Expenmdiire fexcliding loans
Contributions and ail aneis
to public carponstions| 166225, 0) 17,778 0K 128718000) Avacounl Number

2 Previsacetal estiertcs [note the unaiital accounts
* The Public Gebt amount is inclusive of The Public Corporations contingent liability which as at June 4, 2009
totalled BS420015 001,





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 7



Readers say who they want shuffled from Cabinet

IN our last poll on www.tri-
bune242.com we asked our
readers: “Which minister would
you most like to see shuffled
out of Cabinet?”

Overall 238 persons partici-
pated. The results of the vot-
ing are as follows:

Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest - 54

Minister of Education
Carl Bethel - 51

“They are all doing a

good job” - 30

Minister of Public Works and
Transport Neko Grant - 30

Minister of Health
Hubert Minnis - 12

Minister of Labour and Social
Development Dion Foulkes - 11

Minister of the Environment
Earl Deveaux - 9

Attorney General Michael
Barnett - 8

Minister of Housing and National
Insurance Kenneth Russell - 8

Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette - 7

Minister of Agriculture
and Marine Resources
Larry Cartwright - 6

Minister of Youth, Sports and
Culture Desmond Bannister - 6

Minister of Tourism
Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace - 6

Here are some of the com-
ments of the website’s readers:

By ‘Concerned Parent?
Title: Out of touch

“Tts sad to see that the grade
point average has not changed.
Mr Bethel doesn't care about
the future of our country, if he
did he would have a vision for
our educational system. Mr
Bethel, it starts from students
entering grade 1, please change
the programme. Also Mr
Bethel, I believed that you
should at least make and effort
to meet with the parents in
Grand Bahama about the
abuse.”

By ‘Tired of criminals’
Title: Security System Sucks
“Come on "leaders" of our
nation....are your minds only
on how much money you're
getting paid? Are you not get-
ting paid to THINK for our
country? We have so many
islands, many of them empty,

A

BUILD A PRISON ON ONE
OF THOSE!!!! Stop letting so
many criminals back into the
decent (populace) of society.
I'm trying everyday to be law-
abiding, yet if I run an amber
light, not even red, amber, the
police wanna pull me over to
ticket me. Murderers are free,
drug dealers are free, and an
innocent person like me getting
charged for something so petty.
Lock those criminals up and I'll
feel better about getting a tick-
et for something small and pet-

ty.”

By Stanley Jackson Sr
Title: Crime Fiasco

“The Bahamas, Bahamians
and everyone else in the coun-
try including visitors are being
held hostage by the criminal
element in our society. Minister
Turnquest should have been
man enough to carry out hang-
ing as capital punishment
according to the laws of the
Bahamas. He cannot effective-
ly handle his mandate, so get
rid of him!!”

By Steff
Title: Copy cats

“The Minister of National
Security is clueless. Moreover,
whatever other Caribbean
countries do, he tries to dupli-
cate. We've heard about moni-
toring system many times for
those criminals on bail, yet he



THE LATEST poll can be found
on tribune242.com.

remains silent and recites..."WE
ARE VERY CONCERN"
with level of this crime and that
crime!! Why are they collect-
ing monthly salaries for such
high level of incompetence?
Overall, we have a bunch of
copy cats as leaders, I am con-
vinced it's endemic.”

By Ginger
Title: Loan mess

“Honestly I am still (bog-
gled) by how long Carl took
(to) deal with the college loans,
how can you wait weeks before
persons go off to college to say
that ‘hey we aint giving ya'll
any money because other peo-

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ple didn’t pay the loans back’,
it’s pretty sad. I would have
thought that one of the main
tasks in education was to deal
with persons who haven’t paid
the government back yet. They
suppose to be on these peoples
back three months after they
got their degrees, and whoever
else signed on the application,
take the money from them, if
you can’t find them, put a very
big advertisement in the news-
papers and on TV listing these
persons names and colleges
they went to, because it’s sad
that other people have to suffer
because others want to be dis-
gusting.”

By Ian
Title: Minister Vanderpool stinks
“T think that he is still in the
old-school mentality and that
doesn’t work in today’s society
anymore. People don't just
want sun, sand and sea. They
want to do activities and learn
the culture. Sitting on a beach
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By K FORBES
Title: Clueless

“Honestly... I think Carl
Bethel is clueless with regard
to the fundamental require-
ments of developing a strong
Educational Curriculum in our
country. I have seen no cre-
ativity in terms of how to fund,
much less develop stimulating
programmes that would help to
reform the youth of our nation
or help to salvage the intellec-
tual remains of student popu-
lation. How could an elected
and supposedly educated mem-
ber of parliament not be furious
about the average BJC/
BGCSE results, or the number
of students able to successfully
pursue a form of higher educa-
tion... And the student loan
programme... how could they
just cease ‘opportunity’... what

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examination of improvement.
That could have been handled
completely different... but when
there is no vision.”

By Scribe
Title: Wutless

“Why don't you have an
option for ‘all of the above'? I
think they're all doing a bad
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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





&
i

GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTR

‘ Harbour Bay Shopping Centre =~":

Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 =X ata

! Automotive General. Manager |

Responsibilities:
; . - Create and organize vehicle sales activities
is seeking a general manager. - Create and organize parts and service
operations
Manage follow-up systems for existing
customers
Cultivate new business
Develop and implement company policies and
programmes
- Train and lead staff in a team environment
- Stay up-to-date in dealership technology

A prominent new car dealership

The ideal candidate must have
wide experience in the
automotive business as well as

good written and oral

Requirements:

- 5+ years of experience in the automotive
industry

- 8+ years experience in automotive manufacture
and corporate experience
Experience with Japanese automotive brands
Strong leadership and management skills
Superior communication and customer service
skills
Account management and budgeting experience
Proficiency in computers

communication skills.

Interested persons should send resumes
with references to:

Automotive GM
P.O. Box N-9240
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for application: Wednesday,
August 26, 2009.

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an open bar!

Tickets: $145

For tickets and information call
the Atlantis Box Office at 363-6601



SENATOR Jerome
Fitzgerald yesterday called
for the resignation of
Environment Minister
Earl Deveaux following
the spillage of dredged
material near Saunder’s
Beach.

The material was
released into the water fol-
lowing an alleged “mis-
take” made by the team
constructing the extension
to Arawak Cay. However,
a Ministry of Environment
statement denied that the
“turbidity plume” com-
plained of was at any time
near Saunders Beach.

Mr Fitzgerald, chairman
of the committee to Pre-
serve and Protect The
Bahamas for Future Gen-
erations, has criticised
government over the
extension, claiming it has

“Sty THE

BED BATH & HOME| Call for minister to LUTE:
resign over dredged
material spillage

the potential to harm the
environment.

Yesterday he said the
spillage, which occurred
on Tuesday and was visi-
ble throughout the waters
off Saunders Beach, “only
confirms and highlights
the grave concern the
Committee and thousands
of Bahamians have raised
with regard to the exten-
sion of Arawak Cay and
its effect on the surround-
ing environment.”

Mr Fitzgerald said: “This
is sufficient evidence that
this project should be
stopped forthwith in order
that the government and
the Bahamian people can
get a better understanding
of the effects this project
will have on our environ-
ment and the impact to the
surrounding areas.”

wor of

Psalms 90:17

LOCATED KEMP ROAD NORTH

REGISTRATION IS NOW IN PROGRESS
FOR THE NEW SCHOOL YEAR 2009-2010

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL: 393-6743
OFFICE HOURS 9:00 A.M. TO 1:00 PM,
WE WELCOME ALL INQUIRIES

‘tattine + Solstiom i

NOTICE

Mohs Surge

in Nassau

DR. JOHN STRASSWIMMER, MOHS SURGEON
will be visiting The Skin Centre on Friday
September 25th, 2009. Dr Strasswimmer
trained at Harvard and Yale and is Board
Certified and a Fellow of the Mohs College.

Mohs Micrographic Surgery is an advanced
treatment process for skin cancer which |s
now offered at The Skin Centre. It offers the
highest possible cure rate for many skin
cancers and simultaneously minimizes the
sacrifice of normal tissue. This cutting-edge

treatment requires

highly specialized

physicians that serve as surgeon, pathologist
and reconstructive Surgeon.

Our visiting Mohs Surgeon has extensive

experience in the

Mohs Micrographic

Procedure. The technique is used to remove
the two most common forms of skin cancer:

basal cell
carcinoma.

carcinoma and squamous cell

For more information. olease contact:

The Skin Centre, Harbour Bay Plaza,
East Bay Street Tel. 393-7546,





UT ST
TAT TTA
Category 4

MIAMI

HURRICANE Bill
howled over the open
Atlantic as a danger-
ous Category 4 storm
Wednesday, and it
could be energized by
warmer waters as it
moves north, according
to Associated Press.

Forecasters said Bill
should begin pushing
large swells toward
Bermuda and parts of
the southeastern U.S.
coast by the weekend,
but it wasn't yet clear
how close the storm
will come to land.

The National Hurri-
cane Center also said
people in the Leeward
Islands should keep an
eye on the storm,
though its core was
expected to pass well
to the northeast of the
chain in the next 24
hours. Fishermen in
Antigua were advised
to dock their boats.

As strong as Bill
already is, it could get
stronger because it's
traveling into warmer
waters in the Atlantic
that could intensify the
storm, said senior hur-
ricane specialist Lixion
Avila.

"The warm ocean is
like the fuel for car,"
Avila said Wednesday.
"Tf you get high octane
gas you get more pow-
er — that's what
warmer water does."

Bill was maintaining
a top wind speed of
135 mph Wednesday,
hours after it became a
Category 4 storm, and
forecasters said it
could get stronger. The
storm's center was
located 335 miles east
of the Leeward Islands
and it was moving
west-northwest near 20
mph.

Islands in the north-
east Caribbean could
see bigger waves from
the storm in the next
day or two.

The most significant
threat could be to
Bermuda, which the
storm could pass in
three or four days,
forecasters said. But it
also could move direct-
ly between Bermuda
and the eastern coast
of the U.S. without
making landfall.

It was too early to
tell if Bill would veer
close to shore over the
weckend or swing
away from the East
Coast of the U.S., but
the five-day forecast
predicted its center
would pass well off-
shore of the North
Carolina- Virginia line
Saturday.

A cold front was
expected to turn Bill to
the northeast, but it
wasn't clear when that
would happen, Blake

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS



Man to he
arraigned
over killing

FROM page one

and scooter rental compa-
ny in Nassau.

According to the Flori-
da State Attorney’s Office,
a second suspect was issued
a warrant on August 13 but
the person’s name is being
withheld at this time.

White is to be arraigned
in front of a judge next
Monday.

Deangelo Fowler murder trial

FROM page one

The defendant has denied
any involvement in the inci-
dent, and told the court dur-
ing an unsworn statement that
he is Tony Smith and not
Jamal Penn.

Outside the courtroom,
Penn’s attorney Murrio
Ducille said: “Our position is
that the prosecution obvious-
ly had difficulty convincing
the jury that this young man is
guilty. At least he has another
shot on a retrial with different
minds to consider it. We can
just wait until the system can
accommodate him for anoth-
er trial.”

Mr Ducille said he will be
making a bail application for
his client who has been in cus-

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tody since January 20 last
year.

The murder trial began
before Senior Justice Allen
last Wednesday. Jilian
Williams and Yolande Rolle
prosecuted the case.

During her nearly hour-
long summation yesterday
morning, Senior Justice Allen
told jurors they were to come
to a decision based on the evi-
dence against Penn. The fact
that another individual was
charged with the murder but
had not stood trial was “irrel-
evant.”

The prosecution relied
heavily on the testimony of a
16-year-old boy who said he
was standing under a canopy
outside the Perfume Bar on

the western side of Frederick
Street when the shooting took
place.

The teenager, who was also
shot, testified he was with
friends when he saw and
heard a green Honda car
playing loud music. He said
the car had stopped at a traf-
fic light and he got a good
look inside when it turned
slowly south onto Frederick
Street.

He told the court how the
passenger in the front seat
stuck his head out of the win-
dow with a gun in his hand
and fired two shots.

According to a firearms
examiner, one of the two fired
rounds found at the scene was
a .38 bullet.

Single mums in birth rate shock

FROM page one

There were 193 live births to women between 40 to 44 with
104 born to married women and 89 to unwed mothers.

Mothers between the ages of 45 to 49 had 10 live births,
with five of that number born to single mothers.

There were no live births born to women over the age of 50.

There were 18 live births to women whose age was not stat-
ed; 10 of these births were to married women while eight came

from single mothers.

The data is available on the Department of Statistics website.

Slain mother of two

FROM page one

the family said TaGia died
three months after giving
birth to her second son Zen,
two weeks after her 29th
birthday and just two days
after arriving in Nassau from
St Kitts.

Two hours before she was
killed she had a telephone
conversation with her hus-
band Kachi Armony in which
she told him she loved him.

TaGia, known by family
and friends as “Lady T”, was
born on July 20, 1980, in
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

She attended Xavier’s Low-
er School and St Andrew’s
High School in the Bahamas,
Havergal College in Ontario,

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Canada, and Dalhousie Uni-
versity in Nova Scotia. She
was graduated with a degree
in commerce and practised as
an accountant in St Kitts
where she lived with her hus-
band, radio host Kachi Armo-
ny.

TaGia is survived by her
husband, Kach, sons Chelan
and Zen Armony, parents
Gordon Soles and Maxine
Soles, sisters Giahna, Paige
and Greer Soles, brother Kurt
Major, grandmothers Doris
Taylor and Rosalie Austin,
and many other relatives and
friends.

Earlier this week, 25-year-
old Valentino Hanna-

Dorsette, alias “Ballistic”, of
Sesame Street, was charged
with her murder.

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009



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LOCAL NEWS

RUSSELIT’S WAREHOUSE
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M&E Limited ay

Machinery & Energy Limited (M & E
Limited), the authorized Caterpillar dealer
in The Bahamas, is looking for Trainee
Technician Candidates 20 to 30 years
old for enrollment in their local Caterpillar
Training Institute.Candidates should be a
graduate of BTVI or an equivalent institution.
Practical experience in repairing diesel
engines and/or electrical equipment is a
plus. Successful candidates will be trained in
M & E’s local training institute by experienced
mechanics and electricians. The training
will be done in Nassau with opportunities
to relocate to M & E’s Freeport or Abaco
branches upon completion.

Please address all resumes to:

The Service Manager
P. O. Box N-3238
Nassau, Bahamas.

Resumes can also be eroepee off
at the receptionist desk at & E’s
main office in Oakes Field. Resumes
must be received no later than Friday,
September 18", 2009. Only persons
being interviewed for this training will
be contacted.

4 hit by tornado?

THE TRIBUNE

We tee

Golden Gates

EYE WITNESSES claimed a tornado caused serious
damage to trees and cars on Barbados Street, Golden
Gates on Tuesday night. Some in the area said they have
never heard anything like it before.

One resident said the air was sucked from his house,
knocking down blinds, curtains and tossing around garden

furniture.
by
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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Thomas, Barry don’t make final jump

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — Not
since the [AAF’s 5th World
Championships in Gothen-

burg, Sweden, did the
Bahamas have two represen-
tatives in the men's high jump
final.

Fourteen years later at the
12th World Championships
yesterday, the Bahamas had

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two competitors competing
for a spot in the final on Fri-
day.

But both defending cham-
pion Donald Thomas and
Trevor Barry failed in their
bid to match the combo of
Troy Kemp and the late Ian
Thompson in Gothenburg.

As fate would have it at the
Gothenburg championship,
Kemp went on to win the
gold and Thompson ended up
11th.

Yesterday at the Olympic
Stadium, Thomas, who
became only the second
Bahamian male athlete to win
a gold medal at the biannual
championships, finished 15th
and Barry was 17th out of a
field of 30 competitors.

Thomas, avenging a defeat
to Barry at the BAAA
Nationals in June, bowed out
at 2.27 metres or 7-feet, 5 1/4-
inches, while Barry's first
appearance at the champi-
onships stopped at 7-4 1.4.

The qualifying height
where eight of the 12 com-
petitors booked their posi-
tions was 7-6 1/2.

"Tt was an all right compe-
tition. I thought I was ready,”
said Thomas, who cleared his
first four heights at 2.10 (6-
10 3/4), 2.15 (7-0 1/2), 2.20 (7-
2 1/2) and 2.24 (7-4 1/4)
before he got his first knock-
down at 2.27 (7-5 1/4) and
didn't clear any attempts at
2.30 (7-6 1/2).

"T felt good out there. I had
a clean sheet up to 7.24. After
that, I developed a cramp. I
tried to rub it out, but I just
couldn't run the way I needed
to when I tried to go for 2.24.
I think if I had cleared it on
my first attempt, I would have
been right up there.”

After watching the field
slowly decrease and his
chances of returning to the
final slip away, Thomas said
the competition was stiff, but
he knew he had the ability to
jump with the field.

"T had some problems this
year, went home, stayed there
for about a month and
worked on some things and I
was ready to come here,” he
said. "I just started to develop
some cramps and that threw

Builders Mall
will be

CLOSED

on Saturday,
August 22nd.
We will re-open at

7:00am on Monday,
August 24th.

We apologize for
any inconvenience
this may cause.

- Management

Builders Mall :

188 Wulff Road, Nassau, Bahamas

Open Mon-Fri 7:00am-4:00pm Saturday 7:00am-3:00pm = {
Tel: (242) 323-3973 or 326-3978 Fax: (242) 322-3937

3

Webs www. builldersmalibahamas.com Email: info@buildersmalibahamas.com



DONALD THOMAS (left) and Trevor Barry can be seen at the IAAF’s
12th World Championships in Berlin, Germany...

me off today.”

Although neither of them
were able to at least duplicate
the feat of Kemp and Thomp-
son in the final, Thomas said
he definitely came here pre-
pared to ink his name among
the last 12.

"T really wanted to defend
my title. Unfortunately I can't
do it anymore," said the 25-
year-old former basketball
player of Grand Bahama. "I
just have to regroup and take
it from there. I don't know
what I will do. I probably will
do one or two more meets
before I'm finished for the
year."

For 26-year-old Barry, who
competed in Group A with
14 other competitors (seven
of whom qualified and two
surpassed the qualifying
mark), he was thrilled about
his performance, even
thought he didn't qualify for
the final.

"It was a good experience. I
know I can beat these guys,”
said Barry, who did a lifetime
best of 2.28 (7-5 3/4) in Nove
Mesto on July 22 to clinch his
appearance here. "I know I

a gl
FTE
SRI AHTTT:
of events

BERLIN, Germany —
Here's a look at the sched-
ule for the Bahamians
competing over the
remainder of the [AAF's
12th World Champi-
onships in Athletics:





































TODAY

Men's 110 hurdles

semifinal

Shamar Sands, lane 1,
heat 3 at 12:38 pm ET

Women's 200 semifinal

Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie, lane 6, heat 1
at 1:50 pm ET

Sheniqua Ferguson, lane
1, heat 2 at 1:56 pm ET

Men's 110 hurdles final
Shamar Sands, starting

can beat these guys. I just at 2:55 pm ET

need a little more competi-
tion."

Unlike Thomas, Barry
passed his opening height of
2.10 (6-10 3/4), but knocked
his first attempt at 2.15 (7-0
1/2) before he came back to
nail it on his second try. He
cleared both 2.20 (7-2 1/2) and
2.24 (7-4 1/4), but couldn't get
over the 2.27 (7-5 1/4) barrier.

"I was a little shaken up
when I got the first knock
down, but I made the adjust-
ment,” said Barry about his
series of jumps. "At 2.20, I
was trying to get in the
rhythm and at 2.24, I was still
trying to get more height.

"T think I had my chances. I
just couldn't get the big jumps
when I needed them. I think I
kind of defeated myself today.
I know that I had the ability
to be in the final. I just didn't
get the job done today."

Barry, who had a chance to
meet and work out briefly
with Kemp (but only heard
about Thompson), said he will
definitely be looking at get-
ting back to the next Worlds
and the Olympic Games.

FRIDAY

Women's 200 final

Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie and Sheniqua
Ferguson, starting at 3 pm
ET

Men's 400 final
Chris Brown, lane five
at 3:20 pm ET

SATURDAY

Women's 4 x 100 relay
heats

12:10 pm ET

Men's 4 x 400 relay heats

12:55 pm ET

Women's 4 x 100 relay
final

2pm ET

Women's 4 x 400 relay
heats

2:15 pm ET

SUNDAY

Women's 4 x 400 relay
final

11:50 am ET

Men's 4 x 400 relay final

12:15 pm ET

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



toa

MOSS

‘Golden girl’ Debbie and ‘Q’ Ferguson qualify for 200 semis

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — Two
days after finishing sixth in the
final of the women's 100
metres, Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie was all business
yesterday as she contested the
preliminary rounds of the 200
at the Olympic Stadium.

She trailed American Mar-
shevet Hooker through the
finish line in second place in
22.71 seconds to qualify with
the third fastest time for
today's semifinal. A well-rest-
ed Hooker, who didn't run in
the century, won the heat in
the fastest time of 22.51.

Meanwhile in the 24th spot,
Sheniqua 'Q' Ferguson tagged
along with Olympic champi-
on Veronica Campbell-Brown
and turned in a season's best
of 23.35 to qualify in the final
spot. Campbell-Brown won
the heat in 23.01 for the 12th
spot.

"It feels good. Basically I
was worried about running



SHENIQUA FERGUSON

and not getting injured,” said
Sheniqua Ferguson, the 19-
year-old Auburn University
bound junior, who is slowly
coming into her own after
making her Worlds debut.

"Basically I just wanted to
go out there and do my best. I
feel happy with the way things
are going. Hopefully in the
next round, I will run even
better."

Ferguson, the champion



DEBBIE FERGUSON-McKENZIE

from the 12th IAAF World
Junior Championships in Byd-
goszca last year, said she’s just
delighted to be competing
against the world's best ath-
letes, especially Campbell-
Brown, whom she ran against
in the second round of the 100
as well.

"T'm just trying to take it all
in,” she said.

Ferguson-McKenzie, now

the training partner of Camp-
bell-Brown in Clearmont,
Florida, said she felt pretty
good after her century,
although her legs felt a little
heavy at the start of the race.

"I'm glad that we didn't
have the rounds this morn-
ing,” said Ferguson-McKen-
zie, who at age 33 could use all
the rest she can get.

"T felt really good. I think
that was one of the easiest
22.7 that I've ran in a while. I
just wanted to run to get in
the top two.

"Twas really running to see
where I was after the 100, so I
was pleased to be in the top
two. So there wasn't really any
concern going into the race or
the way that I ran.”

In today’s semis, Ferguson-
McKenzie will be up first in
lane six just ahead of Camp-
bell-Brown in five and Hook-
er in four at 1:50 pm ET.

Ferguson will follow at 1:56
pm ET in lane one in the sec-
ond heat that will include the
defending Worlds champion
Allyson Felix of the United

‘Fireman’ hot for 400 showdown

FROM page 16

Brown, the 30-year-old
fourth place finisher in the last
two Worlds as well as the
Olympic Games last year in
Beijing, China, said he is confi-
dent that he’s running well

enough to get the monkey off
his back and claim the individ-
ual medal that has eluded him
at one of the two major inter-
national meets.

As for Miller, the 22-year-
old two-time NAIA champion,
Brown said he has been pleased

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to see the runner-up to him at
the BAAA National Champi-
onships perform as well as he
did all season long.

"I'm very proud of him,"
Brown said. "Not just here, but
the way he did throughout the
season. Every meet he ran in
he has improved on his times.
To come here in his first World
Championships and run 44.99
is fantastic for him.”

Miller, whose debut was just
shy of an appearance in the
final, said he made sure that he
wasn't intimidated by all of the
runners around him and that
helped him to get through his
two rounds.

"44.99 what more could I ask
for," he asked? "I came at the
games expecting nothing and I
got rewarded with a 44.99. So
I'm really happy with the per-
formance, even though I'm not
eligible for the final. Hopefully
in years to come, my training
could step up and I can come
out to the Worlds or the
Olympics and step up again.”

For Miller, the experience is
one that he will definitely cher-
ish as he got a chance to run
against Wariner, who was con-
sidered the best quarter-miler
since world record holder
Michael Johnson, until Merritt
burst on the scene last year.

"I know he was in the back
of me, so I just came out to run
my best," said Miller about
competing in lane three with
Wariner trailing him in two. "I
just tried to do my best. But he
was way faster than me.”

As for Miller's place in the
history of the Bahamian ath-

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letics, he joins Brown, the
national record holder at 44.40;
former world champion and
former national record holder
Avard Moncur (44.45); former
NCAA champion Andretti
Bain (44.62); retired former
national record holder Troy
McIntosh (44.73) and Grand
Bahamians Latoy Williams
(44.73) and Andrae Williams
(44.98).

With the relays coming up
on the weekend, Miller will get
a chance to team-up with
Brown, Moncur, Latoy
Williams and Nathaniel McK-
inney. He said he's confident
that the Bahamas can keep its
streak of winning a medal alive
since they started in 1999.

After the championships,
Miller said he will be looking
at whatever opportunity comes
up for a major contract. But in
any event, he intends to con-
tinue in the sport because he
loves the experience he has
gained so far.

States in lane five.

Only the top four finishers
in each heat will advance to
the final on Friday at 3pm ET
just before Chris Brown runs
in the final of the men’s 400m.

"They have the Olympic
champion and the World
champion and every other
champion out here,” said Fer-
guson-McKenzie, the Bahami-
an double sprint champion.
"Every other is out there to
run, so it's going to be a battle,

you just have to come out
fighting if you want to win.”
Not having won a World
title outright, although she was
elevated to the gold after the
suspension of American Mar-
ion Jones at the 8th Worlds
in Edmonton, Canada, in
2001, Ferguson-McKenzie
said she would like nothing
but to hear the national
anthem and see the Bahamian
flag hoisted in the air as she
ascends the podium again.

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009




SHAMAR SANDS (centre) clears the hurdle in the
110 metres event during the World Championships in
Berlin, Germany. He is sandwiched between Hector
Cotto (left) of Puerto Rico and Selim Nurudeen of
Nigeria.

(Photo: Bryan Cummings/The Jamaica Observer)
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Sands advances to semis

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany —
Even though he had a “horri-
ble” start and bumped over
one of the 10 hurdles, Shamar
Sands was still able to
rebound in time to advance
to today’s semifinal of the
men’s 110 metre hurdles at
the IAAF’s 12th World
Championships in Athletics.

In his preliminary rounds
at the Olympic Stadium yes-
terday, Sands finished fifth in
the fifth of seven heats in
13.57 seconds to advance to
the semis on the third fastest
losing time to earn his berth
into the race with 24 com-
petitors left.

"T felt really good about the
race,” said Sands, who clipped
the fifth hurdle during his
heat that was a photo finish
between China’s Wei Ji and

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American Terrance Trammell
in 13.51, followed closely by
Netherlands’ Gregory Sedoc
in 13.54 and Frenchman Dim-
itri Bascou in 13.55.

"T just had a horrible stat,
but once I got going, the mid-
dle of the race felt really
good. So I'm really happy
with the time. Once I get a
better start, I should be all
right."

Tied for 15th with Jamaican
Dwight Thomas in the field
of 46 in the preliminaries,
Sands will run out of lane one
in the last of three heats in
the semis at 12:31 pm ET. The
heat will include Cuban world
record holder and Olympic
champion Dayron Robles in
lane seven and Jamaican
Maurice Wignall in four.

The first two in each heat
plus the two fastest losing
times will qualify for the final
that will be ran two hours lat-
er at 2:55 pm ET.

Improving on his perfor-
mance at the 2007 Worlds in
Osaka, Japan, where he failed
to advance out of the first
round and matching the sec-
ond round appearance at the
Olympic Games last year in
Beijing, China, the 2001
World Youth semifinal said
the goal is to get through one
round at a time.

"T contribute my time and
place all to my start,” said
Sands, reflecting on his per-
formance. "But I'm happy
that I got back into the race. I
just have to improve on the
start.”

With it being day five of the
championships, Sands said he
definitely felt the jitter-bugs
when he stepped out on the
track. But competing first on
the day after his training part-
ner Leevan “Superman”
Sands just missed out on a
medal in the men's triple
jump on Tuesday, Sands said

he was even more encouraged
to go out and run well.

"We help each other
through things because we are
real close," said Sands, who
trains in Auburn under coach
Henry Rolle. "I just told him
that I know he's disappointed,
but he says he has to be
thankful to God.

"And he told me that he
knows I'm ready to go out
there and just show the peo-
ple what he knows I can do.
So I'm just going to go out
there and do what I have to
do. It's going to be hard, but if
I can get my start down
packed, I should be okay.”

However, 24-year-old
Sands admitted that in order
for him to have a successful
showing at the Worlds
tonight, he will have to lower
his national record again,
which he brought down to
13.38 in Ostrava on June 17 in
his final race.

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 20,



2009

For the best sporting action

www. tr une242. COL




toa


snass 12285

Fireman’ hot for 400 chewiewn °



CHRIS BROWN and Tabarie Henry of US Virgin Islands in action...

(AP Photo)

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany —
While everybody ran incredi-
bly fast, Chris “Fireman”
Brown said he just wanted to
do enough to book his spot in
what is anticipated to be one
of the greatest showdowns in
the men's 400 metres final on
Friday night.

On day five of the IAAF's
World Championships in Ath-
letics, Brown had to hold off
Virgin Islands' Tabarie Henry
to win the third and final heat

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COVERAGE

Miller’s personal best
doesn’t put him in final

of the semifinal yesterday at
the Olympic Stadium in 44.95.
Henry clocked 44.97 to also
qualify.

Olympic champion LaShawn
Merritt of the United States
lowered his world leading time
from 44.50 to 44.37 in winning
heat two as he pulled Trinidad
& Tobago's Renny Quow along
in second in a personal best of
44.53.

And two-time World cham-
pion Jeremy Wariner of the
United States did 44.69 in tak-
ing the first heat, leaving
Bahamian Ramon Miller out
of the final eight in the 10th
spot after he dropped his first
round PB of 45.00 to 44.99 or
fifth place to become only the
seventh Bahamian to dip under
the 45-second barrier.

"It was not what the doctor
ordered, or should I say what
the ‘Fireman’ ordered," said
Brown about his race. "My
coach told me to go out there
and get the win. I was just
focusing on the win. I think I
got the first part right, but the
second part was so so.

"But I know I'm pretty
strong enough to go out there
and get on the podium. I didn't
have to run 44 seconds low or
43 high to get back to the final,
even though we have a day's
break. I feel pretty good. I just
have to wait until the day after
tomorrow (Friday)."

When the final is held on Fri-
day at 3:20 pm ET, Brown will





JEREMY WARINER crosses the
line ahead of Ramon Miller of the
Bahamas in a 400m semifinal at
World Athletics Championships in
Berlin on Wednesday... (AP Phato)

run out of lane five, right where
he wants to be in between Mer-
ritt in four and Wariner in six.
Quow, the other threat to a
medal, will be in three.

"You never know what will
happen,” said Brown about the
final. "A lot of the guys haven't
ran their season's best yet. So it
could be anything. It could be
44, it could be 43 or it could be
45. A lot of tension is going into
it. So it will come down to who
goes out and executes. For me
it doesn't matter the time, just
as long as I get on the podium.”

SEE page 13

RAMON MILLER (left) and Wariner come round the curve..

"(AP Photo)

Ce

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd

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advances
to semis...

See page 14




Still wenans
of hope’
for medal

BERLIN,
Germany — We 5
just passed the
mid-way point of
the Internation-
al Amateur Ath-
letic Federa-
tion's 12th ver-
sion of the
World Champi-
onships in Ath-
letics and
although the
Bahamas has not had its flag
raised during a medal presen-
tation in the Olympic Stadium,
there's still plenty of hope left
over the next four days.

The two individual medals
are now left up to the women's
200 metres and the men's 400
after Leevan “Superman”
Sands was just barely beaten
out for the bronze in the men's
triple jump by Cuban Alexis
Copello Tuesday night.

Although we got another
shocker on Wednesday morn-
ing when Donald Thomas did-
n't qualify in his bid to defend
his 2007 high jump title in Osa-
ka, Japan, it just shows the lev-
el of competition that is exhib-
ited here.

If you don't come here hav-
ing performed at a reasonable
level, they shouldn't expect to
be able to turn it on and per-
form at a higher standard.

Everybody else who has
been performing all year long
are taking it to the next level,
which means that if you were
not at a certain standard before
you got here, you wouldn't be
able to contain with those who
have.

Case in point. Many expect-
ed Derrick Atkins to be in the
final of the men's century, but
he didn't even get out of the
first round.

Since winning the silver
behind American Tyson Gay’s
gold medal performance and
Jamaican Asafa Powell’s
bronze in Osaka, Atkins has
not had that type of season to
make him a contender here.

But one has to agree that
nobody anticipated that he
would not have even gotten out
of the first round.

As for Thomas, he too has
not had the type of season that
led to his triumph in Osaka and
it showed in his performance
here as well.

He obviously lacked the
"killer" instinct that his peers
brought to the competition yes-
terday when they needed to dig
deep and pull out that big jump
on their attempts at 7-6 1/4 and
for the most part, they got the
job done to earn their spot in
the final.

Leevan “Superman” Sands
had to stretch for two season’s
best performances to stake his
claim at a shot for a medal in
the men's triple jump on Tues-
day.

The difference was just four
centimetres that separated him
and Copello for the bronze.
Copello just proved that he
wanted it a little more and that
was what separated him from
Sands in the final analysis.

So it's going to be interest-
ing to see how the final days of
the championships unfold. I'm
still looking at the possibility
of two to three medals, which
would be right in our range.

STUBBS



OPINION
= —_





THE TRIBUNE

busine

THURSDAY,

AUGUST 20,

Ss

2009



SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net



Resort buyer
fold to revise
its proposal

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor _

T H E
prospective
purchaser of
the Hotel
Corporation’s |
last resort
property has |—
been asked |
“to revise

as)

some parts of .
their propos- a

al”, the minis-
ter of tourism
and aviation
confirmed yesterday, which
will involve providing the
Government with details
about how the project will be
‘phased in’.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace, in a brief interview with
Tribune Business, confirmed
that Scheck Industries, the
Illinois-based industrial and
real estate developer, had
been asked to revise its pro-
posal and, until these submis-
sions had been received and
approved, its acquisition of
the Andros-based Lighthouse
Yacht Club & Marina would
not be permitted.

SEE page 11B

Es Eleles)

‘Excellent opportunity



$2m manufacturing
plant aids re-training

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

he Canadian custom wood-

work manufacturing com-

pany, KP Manufacturing,

yesterday said it had

opened its $2 million
Bahamas-based production and training
facility, where prisoners and interested
individuals will be trained to make the
same high-end products it sells across
North America.

Kristine Smed, the company’s owner,
said KP Manufacturing (Bahamas) pri-
mary output was top-of-the-line wood
furniture, and its primary purpose is to
trained unskilled individuals in the art
of fine woodworking.

“Tam hoping when they are trained
they will sprout out and start their own
companies,” said Ms Smed. “ In Calgary,
probably 90 per cent of the shops are
started from our shop. Most of the shop
owners have worked, at KP so I'm
assuming in the future everybody would
be trained at KP Bahamas.”

According to her, the shop has already
begun training four inmates from Her
Majesty's Prison Fox Hill, and it plans to
train more in the future.

Those who enroll in KP (Bahamas)
four-year training programme are paid



EMPLOYEES of KP Manufacturing (Bahamas), including inmates of Her Majesty’s Prisons
involved in the company’s training programme, flanking the company’s signature woodworking
figure...

about $700 bi- monthly, while the prisons
are paid for the labour they release to the
firm for the programme.

Those individuals engaged in the train-
ing programme will be responsible for
putting out the same high-end product
manufactured at the company's 60,000
square foot factory in Calgary, in Alber-

ta, Canada, under the tutelage of master
carpenters.

“Tf somebody's got a good job and
doesn't need any help then they are not
our people. I want lifestyle change people
that need an opportunity that nobody

SEE page 8B

Retailer’s sales buck recession



to get house in order’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian construc-
tion industry is hoping the
Contractors Bill will be before
Parliament and passed into
law before year-end, Tribune
Business was told yesterday,
as the economic downturn
represents “an excellent
opportunity for the industry
to get its house in order”.

Stephen Wrinkle, the
Bahamian Contractors Asso-
ciation’s (BCA) president,
said that given the absence
of a licensing/standards
regime that provided a guide
to which contractors were
able to do a specific job, both
the industry and its clients
currently incurred “exhaus-
tive” costs and time dealing
with a paper-intensive appli-
cation/selection process.

To prepare Bahamian con-
tractors for the registration
and licensing regime the Con-
tractors Bill will usher in once
it becomes statute law, Mr
Wrinkle said the BCA
planned to restart its seminar
series in conjunction with the
Ministry of Works and
Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute (BTVI).

“At the moment, the Bill is
with the Attorney General’s

Foul find it all at Palm Cay

Contractors hope
legislation to regulate
industry in place

by year-end

Office, and they are incorpo-
rating the final changes that
the BCA and the Ministry of
Works agreed to,” Mr Wrin-
kle told Tribune Business.
“We’ve basically finished with
the Bill.

“The changes were minor
- just a few minor details.
They had to do with the cate-
gories of contractor. We’ve
agreed basically all the out-
standing issues with the Bill.
We’ve had the full support of
the Ministry of Works in this
effort. They’ve been slow but
supportive.”

Mr Wrinkle added that the
BCA understood the Bill was
now with the Legal Depart-
ment in the Attorney Gener-
al’s Office, and “in the final
stages” there. Once that min-
istry completed its work, the
Bill would be returned to the
Ministry of Works. If Neko
Grant, the minister of works,
was satisfied, he would then

SEE page 10B

ST eho Me Ec Mia fe

* Private member to Governces Club

eek ethan a eee mir La ly)

ei el) Geils

Lots starting cu Scere
et ee ee tele ee ee Cm eo [i

at w

wed

NASSAU # FAHAMAS

AN era
es Pe ee |

ee ee |

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FREEPORT-based
housewares/building materi-
als supplier yesterday attrib-
uted its ability to weather the
recession to “internal opera-
tional efficiencies” and a pos-
itive corporate culture, with
year-to-date sales trending in
line with 2008 and 2007 levels,
and expansion being eyed
“when the time is right”.

Christopher Lowe, opera-
tions manager for Kelly’s
(Freeport), told Tribune Busi-
ness that the company had
“weathered the downturn
quite well” despite all the lay-























offs and ‘doom and gloom’
surrounding it in the Grand
Bahama economy, and it was
continuing to hire to replace
staff who left.

Even though Grand
Bahama’s economy has yet to
emerge from the slump initi-
ated by the Royal Oasis clo-
sure in 2004, something exac-
erbated by the current global
recession, Mr Lowe said sales
at Kelly’s (Freeport) were “all
in all, in par with last year and
the year before”.

While sales year-to-date
had often been up one month,
then down the next, Mr Lowe
saying they were “up and
down in the top 3 per cent”,

he confirmed that overall they
were trending in line with
2007 and 2008 comparatives.

“This speaks to the effi-
ciency of operations, supply
and demand, being in tune
with the customer base and
giving them the prices and
commodities they want,” Mr
Lowe told Tribune Business.

“We’re looking at an
expansion when the time is
right. You plan when you can.
We’re looking at the future
to see what direction we
expand in when the time is
right, and when there is more
stability in the Government

SEE page 4B

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Freeport
Concrete chief
‘confident’ on
Q1 profitability

* Acknowledges possible
fall into negative equity
a ‘concern’, but optimistic
will not happen because
$500,000 for Home Centre
inventory will come through
* Chair and majority
shareholder Babak looking
at guaranteeing some funds

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FREEPORT Concrete’s
chief executive yesterday told
Tribune Business he was
“fairly confident” that the
BISX-listed firm would return
to profitability in the first
quarter of its next financial
year, indicating its chairman
was looking at guaranteeing
the $500,000 in extra financing
required to take its retail arm
into profitability.

Ray Simpson said his major
problem remained getting the
additional $500,000 financing
required to boost inventory
levels, and thus sales, at its

SEE page 12B



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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009

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MEMBERS of the Securities Commission and Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants...

Accountants meet
regulator over Act

ing regulations will have on
its members and Bahamian
accountants in general.

Apart from the ability of
foreign auditors, unlicensed
by BICA, to conduct audit
sign-offs, and the Commis-
sion’s power to appoint audi-
tors without reference to the
licensee concerned, the talks
also focused on extra assur-
ance services that the regula-
tor could impose at licensee
expense.

BICA said, following the
meeting, that it needed to
obtain membership consen-
sus on the issues discussed. A
follow-up meeting will be held
to finalise the consultation
process.

The meeting was attended
by the Commission’s execu-
tive director, Hillary
Deveaux, and his legal team.
Representing BICA was its
committee that had reviewed
the Securities Industry Act
amendments.

Among the BICA officials
present was president Reece
Chipman; Myra Lundy-Mor-
timer, chairperson for legal
reform; Basil Ingraham, chair-
person for small and medium-
sized practices; Sheldon
Cartwright, chairperson for
public relations and BICA’s
website.

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THE TRIBUNE

Schools monitor
enrollment level

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE CATHOLIC Board
of Education is paying close
attention to enrollment num-
bers at Family Island schools
due to the economic down-
turn, its director said yester-
day, but to date few families
have needed to take advan-
tage of instituted payment
programmes.

Claudette Rolle said the
Board was concerned that
Catholic schools on islands
such as Bimini and Eleuthera
could see low enrollment
come next week, when
schools return from summer
holidays.

However, for New Provi-
dence schools, she said enroll-
ment has been flat over the
past two years.

Mrs Rolle said the eco-
nomic downturn did not affect
exit numbers this year, with
the majority of 4,100 students
enrolled in the beginning of
the school year remaining
throughout. And throughout
the year there had been few
defaults on school fee pay-
ments.

“We offered that [payment

plan] last year, but not many
persons took advantage of it,”
said Mrs Rolle. “We were
still, in terms of payment and
responsibility, able to take
care of the responsibilities
financially -we cut out a lot
of field trips.”

She said the schools tried
to give parents savings wher-
ever they could so they could
focus on paying tuition.

Principal of Kingsway
Academy, George Baxter,
provided a similar trend for
enrollment for the new school
year. He said enrollment
numbers have been largely
flat over the past several
years.

And according to him, the
school had not seen signifi-
cant tuition defaults over the
2008-2009 school year.

“T think by and large col-
lections were consistent,” said
Mr Baxter. “People made
payment plans and things
were managed quite well by
our accounts department.”

Many schools told Tribune
Business that the real test of
true enrollment numbers will
be within the first week of the
beginning of the term.

However, most schools
expect those numbers to

remain at levels they have
been in previous years.
“We’re looking forward to
a good year and that all things
will go well,” said principal of
Kingsway’s Elementary
school, Cassandra Smith.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



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and manage a 4500 sq, ft. (approximate} sit down restaurant and bar
in the new U.S, Departures Terminal currently under construction at
the Lynden Pindling International Airport. This restaurant will be a
world-class facility with a diverse menu, excellent customer service,
high volume and turnover with a true sense of place.

Mandatory qualifications

i, Proponents must be Baharnian and incorporated in The Bahamas.
ii. Proponents must have operated a similar restaurant facility
within the last three (3) years.

NAD's goals and objectives are to:

(a) achieve a high standard of excellence and customer service:

(o) offer a mix of concepts that will enhance the image of the Lynden
Pindling International Airport as a world class airport:

(c) offer food & beverage choices to passengers at reasonable

prices;

(d) offer a mix of local, regional and national and international
brand-name companies;

(e) develop and design food & beverage facilities that complement
the qualities of the new terminal while recognizing the distinctive
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THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 3B

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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

TENDER FOR SCHOOL / FACILITY
SECURITY SERVICES

1.The Ministry of Education invites sealed bids from eligible qualified
firms for the provision of security services at the following schools/facility
in New Providence:

-—wo_| SCHOOL / FACILITY ESTIMATED ESTIMATED 6087 _
Thelma Gibson Prima | $95,000.00 | 000.00

A. F. Adderley Junior High $95,000.00

a

[3 |G. Reeves Junior High | $96,000.00 +
[4 | _H.0.Nash Junior High | $96,000.00 |
[5 | LW Young Junior High | $95,00000 +
[6 | _.6. Sweeting Serior High | $89,00000 |
[8 | _C.R, Waker Senior High | $95,00000 |
[9 V. Bethel Senior High | $95,000.00 |

| =§10 ~~ | Government High $89,000.00
| 11 | RLM. Bailey Senior High $89,000.00

ae Learning Resources Section | $92,000.00

2. Assessment of bids will be conducted by the Tenders Board utilizing established
procedures.

. Interested eligible qualified firms may receive Tender Documents from the Security
Headquarters located Claridge Road beginning Monday 17th August, 2009 between the
hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

. No firm/company will be eligible to be awarded more than one contract.

. All bids must be accompanied by copies of a valid Business Licence, and evidence of
payment of National Insurance.

. Bids must be enclosed in a plain sealed envelope bearing no identification of the bidder,
and must be clearly marked across the top “Bid for Security Services (Name of School)
- MOE”.

. All bids must be delivered to the Office of the Financial Secretary, Cecil Wallace-
Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, Bahamas, no later than 5.00 p.m. on Monday, 24th
August, 2009.

. Bids will be opened at 10.30 a.m. on Tuesday, 25th August, 2009 at the Ministry of
Finance, Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, Bahamas. Tenderers or their
designated representative are invited to attend the openings.

. The Ministry of Education reserves the right to reject any or all bid submissions.

Signed:
Elma I. Garraway (Mrs.)
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Education

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THE TRIBUNE



ee =") =
Retailer’s sales buck recession

FROM page 1B

and the Port Authority.”

Mr Lowe added: “I think,
all things considered, we’re
doing quite well. We’re quite
an efficient operation. We’ve
got really good morale among
our staff, and everyone is
working as a team, pulling
together and looking after the
consumer’s interest as well as
the company’s and their own.
There is a recession, but we’re
weathering it quite well.

“Lack of vision and lack of
direction on the part of the
Grand Bahama Port Author-
ity and the Government is
obviously contributing to
Grand Bahama’s dismal state.
But there are success stories
out there, and they need to
be emulated and understood.

“Why are they doing OK
in this recession? Is the com-
pany’s internal structure and
culture a positive one, or is it
a negative one.”

Praising Kelly’s
(Freeport’s) 100-strong work-
force as being among “the

best staff in the Bahamas”,
Mr Lowe added: “We’re not
trimming. We’re still hiring,
replacing good people who
are moving on with more
good people who want an
opportunity to thrive and suc-
ceed in a good business envi-
ronment.

“The customer base trusts
us, the staff trust us, and we
trust them. We are part of this
economy, and are making the
decisions that make a differ-
ence. We have to continue to
put our best foot forward, and
continue to invest in this com-
munity.”

Mr Lowe suggested that
instead of lamenting over a
decline in top-line growth due
to a recession-induced drop-
off in consumer demand,
Bahamian businesses had the
power to withstand the down-
turn by simply focusing on the
internal issues under their
direct control.

Urging “constant self-eval-
uation”, Mr Lowe said:
“There’s no use blaming the
external factors when there is
so much under your direct

control where it concerns
your business. You have to
be constantly self-evaluating.

“The true test of the mettle
of a company is how well it
does in the hard times, not
the good times.”

With staff training and the
development of employee
benefits also critical to work-
force productivity, Mr Lowe
added: “There’s an all-inclu-
siveness so far as management
and staffing - the develop-
ment of trust within a com-
pany or corporate atmosphere
that everyone can embrace
and hold on to, something
that is sorely lacking in other
realms in the Bahamas.”

Meanwhile, Mr Lowe said
there had been “a shift in the
type of product” consumers
were buying as a result of the
recession, with the trend mov-
ing in favour of “essential
renewals and repairs to
homes”, While plumbing and
electrical goods sales had
increased as a result of the
‘fix-ups’ trend, there had also
been a surge in demand for
fishing related hardware.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 7B

Accountants head
attends conference

THE Bahamas Institute of
Chartered Accountants
(BICA) president, Reece
Chipman, attended the World
Council of Credit Unions Con-
ference (WOCCU) that was
held in Barcelona in July 2009.

Mr Chipman, who is also a
Board member of the
Bahamas Public Co-Operative

“redit Union, was present for
ssions that included the
Basel agenda and capital
requirements; risk manage-
ment and Know Your Cus-
tomer (K YC) initiatives; and
accounting standards relating
to small and medium-sized
enterprises.
Mr Chipman is pictured

above with Karl Cordwener,
deputy secretary general of the
Basel Committee on Banking
Supervision, and below with
Jan Engstrom, Board member
of the International Account-
ing Standards Board (IASB)
UK with responsibilities in
Latin America and the
Caribbean.

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LEGAL NOTICE

EBBVALE LIMITED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

a) The above Company is in dissolution under the
provision of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act, 2000

The Dissolution of said Company commenced on the
28th day of August, 2008, when The Court Order was
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said Company is George
Clifford Culmer of BDO Mann Judd, P. O. Box
N-10144, 3rd Floor, Ansbacher House, East Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.

GEORGE CLIFFORD CULMER
Liquidator

eel >

Mr. Peter Matthews

IMPORTANT NOTICE

Please be advised that Mr. Peter
Matthews is no longer employed
by Construction Services Group.
As aresult, he is NOT authorized to
conduct any business on the
company’s behalf.

Management

ROYAL @FIDELITY

CAEL TOLL

Ply Mal ee a oe eel

We are growing!
Royal Fidelity invites applications for the position of:

- Vice President, Corporate Finance -

Reporting directly to the President, the successful
applicant will be responsible for:

Management and development of Corporate
Finance business in Bahamas

Monitoring and oversight of investment
management activities in both Bahamas and
Barbados markets

Business development across all business lines
Public speaking engagements

Requirements:
Bachelors or equivalent degree in finance
A minimum of 15 years experience in an
investment bank, preferably with international
experience
Strong interpersonal, oral and written
communications skills
Proven ability to innovate and develop
new product and services
Willingness and ability to travel frequently
around the Caribbean
Excellent marketing and communications skills

HUMAN RESOURCES

Re: VP, Corporate Finance

51 Frederick Street

P.O, Box N-4853

Nassau

F: 328.1108
careers@fidelitybahamas.com

PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE
August 28", 2009 to:

ABSOLUTELY NO
PHONE CALLS

PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



$2m manufacturing
plant aids re-training

FROM page 1B

gives them,” said Ms Smed.

“It’s not cheap labour we're
looking for. They're not
allowed to swear, not allowed
to fight, not allowed to do
much of anything besides lis-
ten and learn.”

KP (Canada) has produced
fine, finished boardroom
tables and furniture for firms
such as New York Telecom
and Papa John's Pizza, and
created a custom boardroom
table for Metro Goldwyn
Mayer (MGM), complete

lifts out the centre of the table
to reveal a series of television
screens.

Mrs Smed admits that KP's
products are not cheap - the
company uses only hard
woods and custom inlays -
and may not be for the aver-
age home or office.

However, she hopes to tap
the middle of the Bahamian
market as well as the high-
end.

Ms Smed suggested that
raw materials will have to be
imported from Canada in
order to produce the same
quality products being man-

tory, then assembled in the
Bahamas to keep costs low.

According to her, KP
(Canada) has installed furni-
ture in several offices in the
Orange Hill area, and from
its Abundant Life Road loca-
tion here in Nassau is fur-
nishing a house in South
Ocean Estates.

Ms Smed said no other fur-
niture maker in the Bahamas
will have the same finishes as
KP (Bahamas), which she
likened to a glass topped

desk. The company offers
woods such as Maple Burl,
Curly Maple and Walnut.

Ms Smed's father took over
the now 82-year-old Canadian
carpentry business in 1965,
and has trained hundreds of
cabinet makers, sustaining the
dying art of wood craftman-
ship in Calgary.

Ms Smed now hopes to
train a new generation of cab-
inet makers in the Bahamas
and further expand her 15,000
square foot facility.

with a hydraulic system that ufactured in the Calgary fac-

NOTICE

EBBVALE LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, commencing on the 28th day of
August 2008. The Court Order has been duly
registered by the Registrar. The Liquidator is George Clifford
Culmer, C/O BDO Mann Judd, P. O. Box N-10144, 3rd
Floor, Ansbacher House, East Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

All persons having claims against the above named Company
are required on or before the 18th day of September 2009
to send their names and addresses and particulars of their
debts or claims to the Liquidator of the Company or, in de-
fault thereof they may be excluded from the benefit of any
distribution made before such debts are proved.

GEORGE CLIFFORD CULMER

Liquidator

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MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT JC

. NOTICE

CC

CORRIDOR 18

SAUNDERS BEACH AREA
ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION
JOSE CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES S.A. has been contracted for the Completion af the New

providence Road Improvement
Projact - International Package.

* 10 Ten (10) Casuarinas Trees will be removed along Saunders Beach (Corridor 18)
: There will also be a permanent closure of the access to Vista Marina from West Bay Street effactive August
24, 2009. Motorist are advised to use the following alternatives routes:

Grove Avenue through Coral Drive.

There will be delays along the vicinity due to the one-way traffic flow system. Local diversions will be
sign posted in due course and further information will be provided on the local media.

Tal: 242-322-894 142-322-2610

Emiail:bahamasneighbors @cartellonea.com.ar



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Publicisherebyadvised that |, WINDYS DEROSINS
of Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name
to WENDY DEROSIN. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE
VALIANT HEART LIMITED

NOTICES HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) | VALIANT HEART LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 18"

August 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to

and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Ms. Celene Koh of 1 Raffles
Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

Dated this 20" day of August A. D. 2009



Ms. Celene Koh
Liquidator

NOTICE
DR. JAMIL ANGELO MINNIS

Announces the opening of his
Practice in Obstetrics & Gynecology at
Oxford Medical Centre, 4th Terrace East
off Collins Avenue, Centreville on 4th
August, 2009

Telephone: (242) 328-2566/7
Fax: (242) 325-2249

Management Opportunity
A well established company is considering highly qualified
applicants for the role of

Financial Controller

Requirements & Responsibilities:

- Lead and motivate accounting staff

- Experience in the preparation and interpretation of Financial
Statements

- Must be able to develop and maintain an effective system of internal
accounting and operational controls in a Hotel environment

- Must possess five years experience in a supervisory accounting
position

- Self motivated with strong analytical and problem-solving skills

- Must be conversant with hotel accounting software, with emphasis in
areas Food & Beverage, Front Office and Payroll

- Liaise with external Auditors, third party service providers and relevant
Regulatory & Compliance Authorities

- Preparation of budgets

- Timely and accurate preparation, presentation and interpretation of
financial reports

- Excellent written and oral communication skills

- Able to work extended hours, weekends and holidays

QUALIFICATIONS

- BAin Accounting from an accredited University

- International accounting designation (CPA/CA) with minimum of
5 years post qualification experience,

- Advance working knowledge of Excel

- Working knowledge of Microsoft Word

Interested persons should apply on or before
August 29th, 2009

Attention: CONTROLLER
DA 81270
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N3207

Nassau, Bahamas

Suitably qualified candidates need only apply.
Salary is commensurate with experience and qualification.



PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



re
FOR RENT

Market Street North,
Near Central Bank

Renovated Office Space
900 sq. ft. $1500.00 per month

Warehouse Space
850 sq. ft - 750.00 per month

Warehouse Space
420 sq. {$375.00 per month

Office Space (as Is)
1500 sq. ft. $2000.00 per month

Secured Parking Space
$100.00 per month

Contact Tony Duncombe at

326.5121

tonyduncombe1@coralwave.com

The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the following

position:

PLUMBER

The Plumber repairs and installs various plumbing systems, fixture,

pumps, piping and related equipment.
This position 1s open to candidates with the following qualifications:

* Completion of secondary school diploma.
¢ Four years of journeyman level in plumbing.

PERSONALATTRIBUTES:

¢ Must be skilled in plumbing maintenance.

¢ Must have a valid Bahamian driver’s license and the ability to drive
passenger vehicles, forklift, stake body and pickup trucks with manual

transmission.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation
package including performance-based incentives, medical and
dental insurance, life insurance, pension and opportunities for

training and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are

eligible for employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

a Se
‘Excellent opportunity

to get house in order’

FROM page 1B

take the legislation to Cabi-
net.

“We'd like to see this done
by the end of the year,” Mr
Wrinkle told Tribune Busi-
ness. “With the economy in
the doldrums, it’s an excellent
opportunity for us to get our
house in order.”

In the absence of a licens-
ing/categorisation regime that
sorted Bahamian contractors
according to technical com-
petence and the type of job
they had the ability to do,
industry players were
required to complete huge
amounts of paperwork for dif-
ferent contracts they bid on.

The BCA president said
that “every time a project
comes along”, Bahamian con-
tractors not only had to fill
out forms demonstrating their
experience, but also forms for
pre-qualification, their finan-
cial status and bonding
requirements.

This exercise was then
repeated many times over for
different clients, Mr Wrinkle
stating as an example that
Bahamian contractors were

‘oe

F a, ¥ nau . IPE

oe E ise we

Tel: 326-1111 «

Healthy Kids
Back to School

having to fill out similar forms
for Ledcor/Wooslee Domin-
ion, the general contractor for
the Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport (LPIA) rede-
velopment, and the National
Insurance Board (NIB) on
the Sandilands Rehabilitation
Centre project.

The contractor licensing
regime, Mr Wrinkle
explained, would eliminate
the need for much of this
repetitive paperwork and
associated costs, since it
would signal to developers
which companies had the abil-
ity to meet their require-
ments.

“All of this exhaustive
paperwork is repetitive,
because no one knows who is
qualified to do what,” Mr
Wrinkle said........ “But it’s
hard to blame the client,
because they do not know
who is qualified to do it.

“They have to do an
exhaustive process, sorting
through 200-300 applications
for five to six tenders. It costs
a huge amount of resources
at both ends. That’s why we
want to get the Bill in place.”

Mr Wrinkle said the BCA
planned to take its seminar

series from New Providence,
where some 2,000 Level One
contractors were based, to
Grand Bahama, Abaco, Exu-
ma, Eleuthera, Andros and
Long Island in a bid to
enhance the education
process. All this was planned
before Christmas.

“We’re moving to get the
contractor seminars back on
the road,” Mr Wrinkle said,
“and get contractors ready for
registration. They'll be called
for registration and, subse-
quently, licensing.”

The BCA was working with
BTVI and the latter’s outside
consultant, Daytona Beach
College, to develop the edu-
cation curriculum for the con-
struction industry.

“What we are trying to do
is include specific items the
Ministry of Works wants, the
BCA wants and the industry
needs - code compliance and
things like that,” Mr Wrinkle
said.

“The Ministry is cognisant
of the fact we have an oppor-
tunity to offer all contractors
a basic package of education
and information material, so
that everyone would start on
the same page.”

ADVANCED FAMILY a CENTER & MEDISPA

Fax 326-1112

Summer Campaign

Take advantage of the summer break
and get your physical done Today!

This summer belore school &

darts, annual physicals

are one of the most important things on your “To Do List’

Annual Physical for the Kids & You!!
Family Medicine & Skin Care Clinic Mon - Sat 9-6

The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invites qualified applicants to apply for the
position of Technician | (Instrument), responsible for conducting calibrations, repairs, routine
checks and tests contro! instrumentation in its Generation Power Plant.

The successful candidate 1s expected to lead instrument technicians im fault finding,
iroubleshooting and repairs on instrument and control system.

Duties and tasks are as follows:

Directs instrument lechnecnins when required

Assist with the writing of procedures,

Prepares reports on failures and repairs.

Maintain historical records.

Analyze and calibrates control systems.

Plans jobs and secures necessary tools and equipment.
Calibrates electrome & pneumatic mstruments,
Troubleshoot and install instrument and control system problems.
Repairs pneumatic and electronic instruments,
Trains subordinates in instrument repairs.
Capable of working from manufactures blueprints or sketches with limited supervision.
Responsible for safety and training of men working with him.

Perform any other tasks as assigned

Applicants must have a High School Diploma, BGCSE passes of C or better in Math, English
and a Technological Certificate in Electronics or its equivalent from an accredited institution.

Applicants must also has

¢a minimum of five (5) years power station or equivalent industrial

experience or three (3) years ata Technician Il level in the Maintenance Department of an

industrial facility.

Applications with supporting documentation including a clean Police Certificate and proof of
Bahamian citizenship should be sent to:-

Pete h,

Application forms can be found on the Embassy’s website
nassau.usembassy.gov under Key Embassy Links and employment
opportunities. Completed applications should be returned to
the Embassy via email to fernanderra@state.gov or faxed to
(242)328-8251, addressed to the Human Resources Office no later
than Thursday August 27th, 2009.

Ue
Bie e al
ORS ee tite)

GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY

Ppptnny aeiad Aveta) Cader Hegel

Freeport, Grand Bahama





THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 11B

Resort buyer told to revise its proposal



FROM page 1B

“T don’t know about imminent
but, yes, there’s likely to be some
movement on that,” Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace confirmed to Tribune
Business, when contacted about how
close the Government was to
approving the Scheck Industries
acquisition and project.

He added: “We’ve asked them to
revise some parts of their proposal.
They’ve agreed to do that. We’ve
not received those revisions as yet.
Until we’ve seen them and they’ve
been approved, so announcement
will be forthcoming.”

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
explained that Scheck Industries’
plans for the Lighthouse Yacht Club
& Marina, and the surrounding real

estate, would be implemented in sev-
eral phases once it was finally
approved by the Government and
the purchase consummated.

“Their revised proposal is going
to provide is with the phasing, and
from that will come the number of
jobs to be created and the level of
investment involved,” the tourism
minister explained.

“Very obviously, the Lighthouse
Yacht Club & Marina will be
expanded in the first phase. They’re
looking at extending the subdivision
with a housing development, and a
golf course.

“All of this is being guided by an
Environmental Impact Assessment
(EIA) that was completed last
month to give an indication of what
was possible on that site. That was a

very important piece of the puzzle.”

Tribune Business revealed last
month that Scheck Industries was
the front-runner to acquire the
Andros-based resort which, accord-
ing to the company’s website, it plans
to re-name as the Andros Sporting
Club.

Apart from the Lighthouse Yacht
Club & Marina itself, the Hotel Cor-
poration also owns some 7,000-
10,000 acres of land in that part of
Andros. The precise size of its land-
holdings is unclear, though, as the
land needs to be surveyed and the
boundaries established.

Residents of Coakley Town have
been consulted on the Scheck Indus-
tries project, which has been modi-
fied several times to account for the
EIA, which was prepared by the

consulting firm, Black & Veatch.

The project is also said to include
a marina, marina villas and shop-
ping/retail facilities, fishing lodges
and boutique hotels. The Lighthouse
Yacht Club & Marina currently has
about 30 employees, and features a
20-slip marina, beach frontage and a
20-room hotel. Yet the average occu-
pancy at the Fresh Creek property is
only about 35 per cent.

According to the Hotel Corpora-
tion’s 2004 accounts, the appraised
value of the Lighthouse Yacht Club
& Marina’s buildings was pegged at
$2.314 million, with the land valued
at $400,000 and furniture, fixtures
and equipment valued at $528,173.
Yet allowing for depreciation, the
net book value was reduced to
$1.547 million.

TST

For the stories

hehind the news,
ES
Montlays



NOTICE
CENSUS PRE-TEST

The Census Office of the Department of Statistics will conduct a Pre-Census Test
beginning Monday, August 17 — Sunday, August 30, 2009, in New Providence
and Grand Bahama. The Pre-test is an integral part of the Census of Population
and Housing which takes place in May 2010.

The main focus of this exercise is to test the questionnaire for Census 2010 in
terms of relevancy, as it relates to the census questions, average length of time
it takes to complete the questionnaire, weaknesses in the questions, instructions
or the design of the questionnaire, etc. To this end, enumerators with official
identification will visit households in New Providence and Grand Bahama in
order to collect information on households and individuals. The Census Pre-test
requires that the public provide information on the following:

Housing Characteristics such as type of dwelling, year the dwelling was built,
main source of water supply, number of bedrooms, etc

Population Characteristics which include information on age, sex, marital status,
health, disability, education, income, etc.

The data generated from the Pre-test will be held in strictest confidence.
All persons are urged to co-operate in this very important national exercise.

a
2” PICTET
PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

ACCOUNTING OFFICER

MINIMUM REOUIREMENTS:-
“CPA, CA of equivalent
~At least five (5) vears experience (minimum 3 years with an audit firm}
-Banking experience
-Strong communication skills,
«Well organised with structured and methodical work approach.
-Dynamie and proactive with a positive attitude,
«High level of computer literacy and office skills with a strong ability to prepare
Microsoft PowerPoint presentations,
“Strong analytical skills with the ability to solve issues efficiently.
-Ability to work independently and take initiatives,
«Flexibility to respond to the reprioritisation of tasks.

DUTIES INCLUDE:-

- Preparation of the Bank's financial statements for internal and external reporting
purposes,

- Preparation of all regulatory reports in compliance with mandated format and
deadlines (¢.¢. The Central Bank and The Securities Commission).

- Production of professional presentations in line with corporate image.

- Development and preparation of intemal statistical reports for senior management

- Preparation of various client financial statements and other types of customized
reports

- Assisting with the preparation of supporting schedules and coordination of statutory
audits,

- Responsibility for the administration and booking of accounting activity conceming
licensed banking subsidiaries,

ABSOLUTELY SO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED,
Please deliver Resume and two (2) references BY HAND
AO LATER THAS SEPTEMBER 4, 21009 to:-

The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
West Bay Street and Blake Road
Nassau, Bahamas

Offices in
Lawanne, Geneva, Zurich, Luxembourg, London, Montreal, Nassau, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong
Kong, Frankfurt, Florence, Milan, Madrid, ‘Paris, Rome, Turin



£%

Dy

“ane

The National Insurance Board

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

Request for Contractors Pre-Qualification

The Nattonal Insurance Board (NIB) is seeking to pre-qualify contractors to bid on
works to complete the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre - Robert Smith Child & Adolescents
and Special Education Unit, Fox Hill, Nassau, Bahamas; the project 1s a joint venture of
NIB and The Bahamas Government. Contractors must be tn compliance with the
National Insurance Act (soctal security programme), and in good standing with the
relevant Government agencies.

Pre-qualification documents may be collected from the Security Booth at NIB’s
Clifford Darling Complex, Blue Hill Road, from August 14 to August 21, 2009.

Pre-Qualification documents should be signed, sealed and dropped in the pre-
qualification box at the Security Booth, Clifford Darling Complex on or before
12:00 Noon on August 21, 2009.

The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invited qualified applicants to apply
for the position of Human Resources Manager.

The position is responsible for the management of Human Resources and Labour
Relation activities as well as the activities of instructors engaged in training and
developing employees.

The successful candidate will be expected to:

* Develop, implement and modify as necessary, Human Resource procedures
and guidelines.

‘ Negotiate and manage Union Agreements.

* Represent management in the resolution of grievances and labour disputes

* Manage Organizational training and development activities.

* Manage budgets to ensure that training cost do not exceed allocated funds.

* Keep abreast of and as necessary provide advice and guidance to Directors,
Managers and Supervisors on organizational and external procedures and
statutes relative to Human Resources and Industrial Relations.

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

* Bachelor's degree in human Resources or related field with a professional
certification preferred

* Five (5) years Human Resources/Training experience at the supervisory level

: Experiance in union negotiations and management of union agreements

* Must possess proven leadership skills and have a reputation as a honest
and ethical employee

* Must be results oriented with proven ability to perform under pressure of
deadlines.

* Must be confidential in nature, well organized, accurate and attentive to detail.

Applications with supporting documentation including a clean Police Certificate
and proof of Bahamian citizenship should be sent to;

A eh

Te
ie e al

OS ee litite)

GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY

Ppptney iad Aveiad) Cater |

Freeport, Grand Bahama





PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Freeport Concrete chief
‘confident’ on Q1 profitability

FROM page 1B

Home Centre retail outlet, a
development that was essen-
tial to returning Freeport
Concrete to profitability and
avoiding any slippage into
negative equity.

Freeport Concrete’s accu-
mulated deficit stood at
$5.789 million as at May 31,
2009, reflecting the steady
losses the company has

years. These have chipped
away at shareholder equity,
which at that date stood only
at $527,260.

While acknowledging that
the equity position was a con-
cern, Mr Simpson yesterday
told Tribune Business he was
“confident” this would be
avoided.

He was optimistic that the
additional funds to finance
the necessary Home Centre
inventory purchases would be
forthcoming, and this would

incurred over the past several

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOZIE TELFORE of EAST
STREET SOUTH, MALCOLM ROAD, P.O. BOX N-2557,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20‘ day of August, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

help return Freeport Con-






























crete to profitability during
the first quarter of its 2009-
2010 financial year - the three-
month period from August to
November 2009.

“We’ve got a few irons in
the fire. We’ve got a few
things out there,” Mr Simp-
son said of Freeport Con-
crete’s plans to raise the nec-
essary financing. “Today, we
probably might need
$500,000.”

He added that the compa-
ny’s bankers, FirstCaribbean
International Bank
(Bahamas), were likely to
help, while Hannes Babak,
the Grand Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA) chairman
who is also Freeport Con-
crete’s chair and its largest
shareholder, with a 43 per
cent stake, was also explor-

ing how to help.

“My main shareholder
might help out by guarantee-
ing a bit of money,” Mr Simp-
son told Tribune Business, in
a reference to Mr Babak. “I'd
prefer to get a capital injec-
tion, rather than borrowing,
because I want to reduce our
borrowings.”

He admitted, though, that
the recession’s effects meant
retail businesses such as the
Home Centre/Freeport Con-
crete were not currently
viewed as attractive invest-
ments for equity capital, while
being a Freeport-based busi-
ness was “another strike
against us”.

And Mr Simpson acknowl-
edged that until the extra
financing was secured,
Freeport Concrete and the

ASSOCIATE ATTORNEY

NEEDED

Experience in Litigation,
Conveyancing and
Commercial Law.

Background in Natural

Science preferred but not

required.

Home Centre as a business
were “treading water” and in
“survival mode”.

“All the cash generated
from daily sales at the Home
Centre is going back into
building materials [invento-
ry], but we’re missing out on
appliances,” the Freeport
Concrete chief executive said.

He explained that this
meant the company was los-
ing out on potential sales of
high-margin, big ticket items
simply because it did not have
them in stock. For instance,
the Home Centre had supply
arrangements in place with
Panasonic for TVs, and with
brands such as Westinghouse
and Frigidair for other appli-
ances, but it was unable to
purchase stock because these
companies - hit hard by the
recession themselves - were
unable to extend credit and
wanted the Bahamian com-
pany to pay cash upfront.

Freeport Concrete’s finan-
cial position means it is
unable to do this. Mr Simp-
son, pointing to the fact that
gross profit margins were
around 29-30 per cent, said:
“In the day when we were
doing $1 million to $900,000
in sales per month at the
Home Centre, we were los-
ing $50,000-$60,000.

“Now, we’re down to
$500,000 in monthly sales, but
even at this level, while we’re
not losing money we’re just
breaking even. If we were to
get up to $600,000, based on a
29 per cent gross profit mar-

gin, we could make a state-
ment to the bottom line -
$29,000-$30,000 for every
$100,000 we make.”

But despite Freeport Con-
crete’s current predicament,
Mr Simpson told Tribune
Business: “We have a very
good story as far as I’m con-
cerned. We will make it.
We’re trying to get it through
the eye of a needle.

“If we can just get the
banks or find investors will-
ing to put money into the
company, based on what
we’ve done we’re going to be
fine. The key is to get the
inventory into the Home Cen-
tre, and we don’t need a lot of
money. As fast as the trailers
come in, we need more.
Instead of two trailers, we
need five.”

Mr Simpson, though,
acknowledged that Freeport
Concrete’s equity position
was “a concern”. He added:
“We’ve got to start turning a
profit, or we’ll have negative
net worth. I’m fairly confident
that’s [profitability] going to
happen in the first quarter,
because I’m confident we’ll
have some money come
through and the block plant
will provide us with a new
revenue stream.

“The concern is that we’re
basically eating into our equi-
ty, and we’ve got to be prof-
itable in the first quarter. We
will survive. I’m very confi-
dent with where we are at the
Home Centre, and costs are
completely under control.”

Apply by email only.
atty.at.law09 @ gmail.com

HELP
WANTED

An Established Medical Facility

seeks to fill the following position:

5 HOS PITAL

Het Per cf

HELP WANTED

Receptionist / Clinical Assistant

for medical clinic
Hardworking, pleasant, honest lady age 18-25 years.



Education:

fasociale Degree in Business or Management. or ils equivalent.

Please call 393-7586 or 393-7531
Experience:

Prevings collections experemce ot lenst 2 year: experience. Well organize
ane) eR pT

Qualifications:
+ Basic CMtuler skills

Leaderstign akille lineal

wal k

* Lae ! ‘ills Rex m IM THE SUPRERE vicinal Fie we a |

* Eo len writen Atel ord GoOMiKninicalicm skills eee ena a Dirision assests |

+ Ah ty toapply skills Wwith-all lewels of intemal and extemal cushomers | We ———
/ETrH Ef

General / Family Practice (Full-time)

ce With Pore manigement. Aun undersinndang of ineinunce
ubaIn und Pe|UIrPeMments.

ith dap of Sercobker 6.0 BOG and 1th day at tu

y Robes af The Seprey age ara
CMCMMEALTH oF rar nds sanity 2007) CLE i pea! cit

This includes, tits not limited te

* Medical sult WILLIAH THORS Jaci

+ Paments A families .
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* Linical personal Pisintd
ec il sult

aie ani be ia

SIMEY Geome OLIN
* And members of the community

i

Position Summary:

Ta coiators and

Kindly submit application to:

imager reecivables under your postloleo, Ta Wlonibar

selfpay adenissions to the hospital, Fallot on delinquent accounts as

need, Comiminnale well pteral A external cusbomer on a peeular hase
ner, ¢
1PM EE Te enhwnee
Gtomers throughow the Health System, Ain

Loondinapar at Credit am

P.O. Box CR-55050
Nassau, Bahamas
or
Via email to: a_1_phyneeded@live.com

SIDMET GEORGE GLINTOR
Eo. 56 Eoidier Poad
Sasesc, H_P.. Boban

Lise PPO Queries ih an inboriied) ia MUL Ly

Parte pRAle ie per
Cher diites assigied

Supervisor o

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i "WELLER THOMAS a =f vag
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SMD Pat 4
UP ne E|

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 18 AUGUST 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,563.90] CHG 1.00] %CHG 0.06 | YTD -148.46 | YTD %
FINDEX: CLOSE 783.13 | YTD -6.20% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Previous Close _ Today's Close Daily Vol. EPS$ Div $
1.34 1.34 0.00 0.127 1
11.00 11.00 0.00 0.992 : ‘ : Foar tae snare q . ©
6.25 6.25 0.00 0.244
0.63 0.63 0.00 -0.877
3.15 3.15 0.00 0.078
2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055
11.35 11.35 0.00 1.406
2.74 2.74 0.00 0.249
5.71 5.73 0.02 0.419
3.71 3.70 -0.01 0.111
0.382
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180
ases)
Interest

-8.67

Securit
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.39 10.39 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Symbol Last Sale
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13 100.00 0.00
FBB15 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 6.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3860 2.40 4.75
2.9047 -1.20 -3.66
1.4817 3.35 5.38
3.1031 -8.35 -13.82
12.9801 2.87 5.79
101.6693 1.10 1.67
96.7398
1.0000
9.2765
1.0622 2.56
1.0243 -0.84
1.0585 2.04
MARKET TERMS
YIELD -last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Change

2.00
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.13
1.00
0.30
5.50

2.00
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.13
1.00
0.30
5.50

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

7%
Prime + 1.75%
7%
Prime + 1.75%

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

100.00 0.00

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
N/M

256.6

ABDAB
RND Holdings

9.03
261.90

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Div $ NAV Date
30-Jun-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09 Dated 20°" day of Jar

1.3231
2.8952
1.4059
3.1031
12.3289
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

0.35
0.00
2.00

-4.18
0.00
-2.98
6.22
2.43
5.85

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
K'S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

ERLEDIFY CHARERS





THE TRIBUNE





i
ORLANDO
High: 90° F/32° C

Low:76? oe i le

TAMPA } ,
High: 91° F/33° C a | =
Low: 78° F/26° C i -

@ i i

a —

Hi, uw @ WEST PALM BEACH
4 = High: 91° F/33° C .
" Low: 80° ° a
ans ow: 80° F/27°C e
amet FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT >
| mt High:91°F/33°C High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 80° F/27°C a Low: 76° F/24° C
; @ ala
ere MIAMI
Rar High: 92° F/33° C
OR Low: 80°F/27°C NASSAU
uh High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 80° F/27°C
KEY WEST / eX 2
High: 90° F/32°C
Low: 81° F/27°C i ae

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Today Friday

High Low W High Low W

F/C F/C F/C F/C
Albuquerque 90/32 65/18 s 93/33 65/18 $s Indianapolis
Anchorage 69/20 51/10 s 67/19 52/11 pe Jacksonville
Atlanta 86/30 72/22 t 87/30 71/21 t Kansas City
Atlantic City 87/30 73/22 t 88/31 71/21 t Las Vegas
Baltimore 88/31 74/23 t 90/32 72/22 t Little Rock
Boston 85/29 71/21 t 85/29 72/22 t Los Angeles
Buffalo 84/28 69/20 t 80/26 64/17 t Louisville
Charleston,SC 90/32 75/23 pce 90/82 75/23 t Memphis
Chicago 79/26 62/16 t 76/24 60/15 c Miami
Cleveland 86/30 69/20 t 81/27 61/16 t Minneapolis
Dallas 98/36 74/23 t 93/33 71/21 s Nashville
Denver 81/27 52/11 s 88/31 56/13 s New Orleans
Detroit 84/28 66/18 t 77/25 61/6 c New York
Honolulu 89/31 78/25 $s 89/31 76/24 s Oklahoma City
Houston 96/35 77/25 t 97/36 75/23 t Orlando

= Cc









Partly sunny; breezy in Clear to partly cloudy Mostly sunny with a Mostly sunny, a t-storm
the p.m. and breezy. shower in spots. possible.
High: 90° High: 91°
High: 90° Low: 80° Low: 79° Low: 80°
FETE ele
106°-84° F 105°-88° F

The exclusive eau RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

ABACO
High: 92° F/33° C
Low: 77° F/25°C

O



ANDROS f
High: 93° F/34° C
Low: 76° F/24°C

Today Friday Today
High Low W High Low W High Low W
F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C
86/30 65/18 t 79/26 59/15 c Philadelphia 89/31 74/23 t
88/31 74/23 t 92/33 74/23 t Phoenix 110/43 85/29 pc
80/26 60/15 p 81/27 59/15 s Pittsburgh 84/28 68/20 t
107/41 79/26 s 107/41 83/28 s Portland, OR 92/33 59/15 s
92/33 70/21 t 89/31 6417 pc Raleigh-Durham 95/35 72/22 pc
80/26 64/17 p 82/27 647 pc St. Louis 84/28 64/17 t
86/30 70/21 t 84/28 63/117 t Salt Lake City 94/34 66/18 s
88/31 71/21 t 88/31 68/20 pc San Antonio 100/37 77/25
92/33 80/26 t 90/32 80/26 pc San Diego 74/23 66/18 pc
69/20 59/15 r 72/22 5542 pe San Francisco 73/22 58/14 pc
87/30 72/22 t 87/30 65/18 Seattle 84/28 56/13 s
90/32 77/25 t 90/32 76/24 t Tallahassee 91/32 72/22 t
87/30 76/24 t 89/31 75/23 t Tampa 91/32 78/25
92/33 64/7 t 89/31 63/17 $s Tucson 100/37 76/24 pc
90/32 76/24 t 91/32 76/24 t Washington, DC 87/30 76/24 t










e~





AY rn Ny

oY
|3| oot
: EXT.

o|1|2






Some sun with a
t-storm possible.

Sunshine and nice.












LOW

3|4|5|6

MODERATE



High: 90° High: 90°
Low: 80° Low: 82°
ETCH
100°-88° F High
Tod 8:15 a.m.
oe 8:44 p.m.
Frid 9:06 a.m.
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday 955am.
Temperature 10:16 p.m.
MiG Whi, cgssceseseees Sceurreceecncetececs 90° F/32° C 10-43
LOW wn erp SUN
Normal high .... 89° F/32° C a
Normal low 76° F/24° C
Last year's WIQh oo... cecteteeeeeteees 89° F/32° C

Last year's LOW o.cccceeseseteteeeeeeees 73° F/23° C







HIGH

3.2
3.3

3.3
3.2

3.4
3.1

3.3
2.9





\. HIGH

Low

2:04 a.m.
2:20 p.m.
2:50 a.m.
3:13 p.m.
3:36 a.m.
4:05 p.m.
4:21 a.m.
4:56 p.m.

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

a Pe

Ht.(ft.

Ht. (ft.
-0.2
-0.2
-0.2
-0.2
-0.2
-0.1

-0.1
0.0

Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:46 a.m. Moonrise..... 6:52 a.m.
: a om yesterday o...ceecceseccecsessseeesseeee 1.46" Sunset....... 7:40 p.m. Moonset... ... 7:50 p.m.
ear to date 23. ;
Normal year to date oo... cccceeceseeceneeee 28.83" us ist nul i=
AccuWeather.com ae
Forecasts and graphics provided by Sali a
ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Aug. 20 Aug. 27 Sep. 4 Sep. 11
High: 93° F/34° C
Low: 78° F/26° C
CATISLAND
High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 75° F/24°C
GREAT EXUMA i SAN SALVADOR
High: 89° F/32° C High: 92° F/33°C
Low: 78° F/26°C Low: 76° F/24°C
Ce O
LONG ISLAND
High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 77° F/25°C MAYAGUANA
Friday
High Low W =} High: 91° F/33°C
F/G «FC — Low: 74° F/23°C
90/32 74/23 t
TATE NERS CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS
79/26 62/16 t Hight 3S" F/34"C
79/26 60/15 s sie sa ea Low: 77° F/25°C
9} High: 90° F/32° C
/32 71/21 t -79° ° —_—
Low: 73° F/23° C
80/26 63/17 pc
97/36 68/20 s GREAT INAGUA wr
99/37 75/23 t High: 92° F/33°C
74/23 67/19 pc Low. 75°F/24°C
75/23 5844 pc ‘
73/22 56/13 pc pe.
94/34 75/23 t ——-
92/33 77/25 t XK
100/37 77/25 t WK
91/32 75/23 t









Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
90/32
86/30
82/27
90/32
57/13
91/32
86/30
83/28
82/27
82/27
838/31
86/30
86/30
66/18
91/32
86/30
57/13
99/37
88/31
78/25
91/32
82/27
85/29
77/25
64/17
93/33
87/30
79/26
91/32
68/20
91/32
101/38
87/30
86/30
56/12
838/31
71/21
75/23
97/36
86/30
73/22
102/38
81/27
57/13
89/31
80/26
95/35
72/22
91/32
85/29
85/29
106/41
90/32
88/31
61/16
88/31
63/17
90/32
75/23
84/28
70/21
72/22
93/33
86/30
82/27
86/30
78/25
86/30
74/23
68/20

ealil

Today

Low
F/C
76/24
59/15
52/11
72/22
46/7
79/26
77/25
68/20
68/20
77/25
61/16
66/18
76/24
47/8
59/15
59/15
41/5
73/22
81/27
52/11
75/23
74/23
65/18
66/18
50/10
66/18
62/16
60/15
72/22
50/10
82/27
79/26
65/18
64/17
35/1
80/26
58/14
54/12
61/16
79/26
53/11
75/23
68/20
48/8
60/15
55/12
81/27
59/15
59/15
54/12
69/20
82/27
68/20
80/26
36/2
70/21
37/2
75/23
53/11
66/18
55/12
50/10
81/27
75/23
63/17
64/17
60/15
66/18
50/10
55/12

oO

oO

oO

pc
$
sh

=>

s
t
t
s
p
r
s
s
t
pc
p
s
c
s
s
p
c

pc
pc
sh
r
r
pc
s
pc
pc
t

t
S
s
$

sh

High
F/C
88/31
70/21
77/25
90/32
58/14
91/32
86/30
78/25
87/30
81/27
91/32
79/26
84/28
66/18
75/23
88/31
59/15
100/37
90/32
84/28
94/34
82/27
85/29
73/22
63/17
75/23
69/20
73/22
90/32
72/22
91/32
99/37
82/27
87/30
62/16
88/31
70/21
72/22
99/37
87/30
75/23
102/38
81/27
59/15
78/25
78/25
96/35
70/21
77/25
86/30
73/22
105/40
91/32
88/31
70/21
89/31
63/17
88/31
64/17
85/29
73/22
79/26
92/33
86/30
79/26
76/24
73/22
89/31
17/25
71/21

Friday

Low
F/C
76/24
54/12
48/8
70/21
48/8
79/26
77/25
68/20
66/18
76/24
63/17
57/13
76/24
47/8
50/10
61/16
46/7
76/24
84/28
52/11
74/23
73/22
66/18
52/11
50/10
54/12
51/10
59/15
73/22
52/11
81/27
76/24
62/16
63/17
40/4
80/26
58/14
52/11
63/17
78/25
51/10
76/24
68/20
46/7
50/10
54/12
82/27
50/10
52/11
51/10
61/16
79/26
70/21
81/27
37/2
74/23
45/7
74/23
50/10
66/18
SoulZ
46/7
79/26
76/24
59/15
50/10
57/13
68/20
54/12
51/10





INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

pc

pc
pc
sh

pe

Ss

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace

THURSDAY, AUGUST 20th, 2009, PAGE 13B



MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 85° F
Friday: ENE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 85° F
FREEPORT Today: ESE at 9-18 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 85° F
Friday: ENE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 85° F
ABACO Today: ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 84° F
Friday: ENE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 84° F



Miami
92/80

Showers
T-storms
Rain









Fronts
=.) Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and as
BEL Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm ficnfitentie
[v=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mage
10s| 0s (0s) 10s 20s [Osi] 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s (G0s//iO0eiie)
PoP ih me,
»
y
*
CJ
i

Y. Be Blov
Away u€an Hurricane

Or you_can rest easy knowing
that $0 have excellent insurance
coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

(BAMANLAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

| New Providence f Grand

Tiak (242) 34-5555 ff Tet: a a



PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

UBS to hand over 4,450 client names

By STEPHEN
OHLEMACHER
and DEVLIN BARRETT

Associated Press Writers

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Swiss banking giant UBS
AG agreed Wednesday to
turn over to the IRS the
details of 4,450 accounts sus-
pected of holding undeclared
assets by American cus-
tomers, piercing Switzer-
land’s long-standing tradi-
tion of banking secrecy.

IRS Commissioner Doug
Shulman said the accounts
held $18 billion in assets at
one time. Many have since
been closed, he said.

The deal will give the
Internal Revenue Service
thousands of long-sought
account names, Shulman
said, and is expected to pro-
vide even more UBS clients
who voluntarily disclose
their financial details to the







































CATERPILLAR’

TODAY'S WOK, TOMORROW'S WORLD."

agency.

UBS has an estimated
52,000 accounts of U.S. cus-
tomers. The IRS chief said
the 4,450 accounts being
relinquished to the agency
were the ones most suspect-
ed of containing undeclared
assets.

“T believe this agreement
gives us what we wanted —
access to information about
those UBS accountholders
most likely to have been
involved in offshore tax eva-
sion,” Shulman said.

He said that other account
holders appear to be in com-
pliance with U.S. tax laws.

The two sides told a feder-
al judge last week they had
reached a tentative agree-
ment, but the details were
not released until Wednes-
day.

Account holders will be
notified before their names
are released to the IRS. The

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names will first go to the
Swiss Federal Tax Adminis-
tration. Account holders will
then be able to appeal their
release to the IRS before
Switzerland’s Federal
Administrative Court.

The process is expected to
take several months, IRS
officials said.

Shulman said the Swiss

government has assured U.S.

authorities that the release
of the names conforms with
both Swiss banking laws and
the tax treaty signed by both
countries. Shulman said the
IRS reserves the right to
resume its legal fight if any
of the names are withheld.

“This issue is not going
away, and people hiding
assets and income offshore
will find themselves increas-
ingly at risk due to our
efforts in this area,” Shul-
man said.

UBS shares were down 2.1

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ALLIGATOR BAY, NORTH LONG ISLAND

Approx. 6 acres of Waterfront property with a 152 feet wide canal. Prop-
erty comprises three buildings:

Building A: Seafood Processing Plant include a reception area, an
office, three bathrooms, a receiving room, a dressing room, a packing
room, a storage room, a laboratory and a processing room, (3) 10 ft
x 30 ft blast freezers, and (1) 15ft x 15 ft and (1) 10 ft x15 ft holding

freezers.

Building B: Generator House

Building C: The Water Plant consists of a reverse osmosis water
system that converts salt water into drinking water with a 10,000 stor-

age capacity.

Interested persons should submit offers to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management,

P. O. Box N-7518,
Nassau, Bahamas

To reach us on or before October 2nd , 2009

Call us 323 - 5701 (Nassau)

352 - 5081 (Freeport)

M&E Limited



SWISS BANK UBS’ logo on Zurich's Bahnhofstrasse in Switzerland...
(AP Photo: Walter Bieri)

percent at 16.55 Swiss francs
($15.51) on the Zurich
exchange.

The Swiss Bankers Associ-
ation issued a statement in
support of the agreement.

“The out-of-court agree-
ment avoids a prolonged
legal battle that would have
had an uncertain outcome
and UBS can now continue
with its consolidation
process in an atmosphere
free of this legal uncertain-
ty,” the association said.

Swiss Justice Minister
Eveline Widmer-Schlumpf
told a news conference in the
capital of Bern that the deal
lifts the threat of criminal
prosecution against UBS,
which could have endan-
gered the bank’s very exis-
tence and dealt a severe
blow to the Alpine nation’s
economy.

“There was no alternative
to this solution,” she said.

Asked if other Swiss banks
could be targeted for future
prosecution in the United
States, she said: “We don’t
expect this to be the case.”

UBS Chairman Kaspar
Villiger said, “I am confident
that the agreement will allow
the bank to continue moving

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forward to rebuild its reputa-
tion through solid perfor-
mance and client service.”

The case — and other U.S.
efforts to go after interna-
tional tax dodgers — already
has a lot of wealthy Ameri-
cans with offshore accounts
nervously running to their
tax advisers — and the Inter-
nal Revenue Service.

Tax advisers at several
U.S. firms said they are see-
ing many more customers
with undeclared assets seek-
ing information about their
legal options.

The IRS long has had a
policy that certain tax
evaders who come forward
before they are contacted by
the agency usually can avoid
jail time as long as they
agree to pay back taxes,
interest and hefty penalties.
Drug dealers and money
launderers need not apply.
But if the money was earned
legally, tax evaders can usu-
ally avoid criminal prosecu-
tion.

In March, the IRS began a
six-month amnesty program
that sweetened the offer
with reduced penalties for
people with undeclared
assets. Shulman said the
response has been unprece-
dented, though he declined
to say how many people
have applied.

Shulman said UBS cus-
tomers are free to take
advantage of the program as
long as they come forward
before Sept. 23 — and
before the IRS receives their
name from UBS.

“The letter they receive
from the bank will not dis-
qualify them from coming
forward to the IRS under
our voluntary disclosure pro-
gram,” Shulman said. “But
once the Swiss government
sends us the name, all bets
are off.”

Shulman said the IRS
already is using the program
to get information from
account holders about other
banks and financial advisers
who have helped them evade
USS. taxes.

“You can expect us to con-
tinue to be aggressive,” he
said.

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The Trib une oo”
OBIMUARIES
RELIGION



| ~< The Tribune
a OLT | tty Arcee, My Newspaper!

—‘\ en
» \0
707.9

SS hour chaice for ine family:



THURSDAY
August 20, 2009

The Tribune Pg, 31

RELIGIOUS
NEWS,
STORIES
AND
CHURCH
EVENTS





PG 32 ® Thursday, August 20, 2009

The keys to
maximising
stewardship

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

FOR many believers who have made the decision
to set aside their own desires and live for God, one
of the most important decisions is to fulfill purpose.

For some, purpose is defined as
the way we deal with others, the
things we do for others, and our
ability to set aside self while focus-
ing on others. However there are a
chosen few who are called to lead
and facilitate the delivery of the
word of God in the church, and for
those individuals, proper guidance
is still the key to reaching your God
given potential.

Local author Dr Albert Ferguson
in his new book titled Keys To
Releasing The Potential In Church
Workers And Volunteers, explained
that one of the first things a leader
must do when appointing volun-
teers is to evaluate their reasons for
doing so.

Apart from this, Dr Ferguson
explained that the duty of serving
lies in the hands and heart of the
volunteer and not in the leader/pas-
tor.

In an excerpt from the book Dr
Ferguson stated: “When people are
named to work in an area or within
the church setting, ‘appointed’ by a
pastor or ministry leader, the pic-
ture becomes a little more involved.

“Pastors have been heard to say
things like ‘I have appointed/select-
ed you, and put my hand on you
because I heard from God.’ The
implication is that this is now
between you and God, you should
work because God is asking you to
do so.”

He said this spiritual contract is
ultimately a commitment to serve
God in whatever capacity, so if the
volunteer decides to up and quit
their duty, they are not liable to the
church or pastor, rather to God.

In this second installment to his
three part series on stewardship, Dr
Ferguson also examines avenues on
drawing younger volunteers to vari-
ous roles in ministry. He said most

RELIGION The Tribune

Keys To Releasing
WTAE

people tend to become excited by
the prospect of giving of themselves
in church, but the duration of that
period is normally a blur and can
often lead to an unpleasant depar-
ture.

His suggestion to leaders is to
offer short term ‘contracts’ allow-
ing the church to get the most from
that volunteer. He said in the end,
the volunteer may be more dedicat-
ed to doing a good job because
clearer parameters to their duties
now exist. He refers to this as
open-ended appointment.

Throughout the book there is a
subtle association with the opera-
tions of the church and that of a
business or establishment.

He said just as companies use
motivation strategies like appoint-
ing an employee of the month, and
giving rewards to those employees a,
that perform well, the same prac- 7
tice should be present in the church
to encourage those who give of
their time, proving their efforts are
not in vain.

Dr Ferguson said he has used his
experience working in the public
sector along with his desire to see
the church return to its intended
function, to give both leaders and
followers a guide to executing the
will of God.

The book took two years to com-
plete and Dr Ferguson is having
the official book release this
Sunday at the Workers House
Auditorium on Harold Road at
5pm.

With parts one and two of the
series already under his belt, Dr
Farrington said through God’s
guidance he will soon release part
three along with other materials all
to build the kingdom of God, and
in some small way bring change to
the world.



77 hik — -

Z| | thd ow

“When people are
named to work in
an area or within
the church setting,
‘appointed’ by a

pastor or ministry
leader, the picture
becomes a little
more involved.”

Dr Albert Ferguson





The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, August 20, 2009 ® PG 33

(SY MEDITATION

Making uP

MATTHEW 18: 15- 17 has the fol-
lowing advice for persons in the
church who have a difference of opin-
ion or a falling out: 15:"If your broth-
er sins against you,[b] go and show
him his fault, just between the two of
you. If he listens to you, you have
won your brother over.

16: But if he will not listen, take one
or two others along, so that ‘every
matter may be established by the testi-
mony of two or three witnesses.'[c] 17
If he refuses to listen to them, tell it to
the church; and if he refuses to listen
even to the church, treat him as you
would a pagan or a tax collector.”

Let us look at each step very closely
to see how we usually respond.

1. The One on One Approach

"If your brother sins against you,[b]
go and show him his fault, just
between the two of you. If he listens
to you, you have won your brother
over.” This seems simple enough but
we may be reluctant to do so for a
variety of reasons:

: y. ANGELA
. PALACIOUS

i. It may make things worse

ii. We do not wish to be rejected or
insulted

ii.What we say may be misquoted

iv. We are afraid of or intimidated by
the person when alone with him or
her

However the advantages of such an
effort are obvious:

i.The matter is kept private and confi-
dential

ii.Resolution can come immediately
u.The renewed relationship is now
based on openness, honesty and trust

2. Taking Witnesses
Versel6: But if he will not listen,
take one or two others along, so that

A prayer for the nation

By AGNES SAUNDERS

OUR Father who art in Heaven,

Lord we reverence your name, as
we bow in your Holy presence.

We ask in the name of Jesus that
you forgive us of our wrong
doings, and we accept that forgive-
ness right now.

Clean us oh Lord and make us as
pure as gold.

We thank you for being an excel-
lent father to us,

We thank you because you
brought us out of many dangers
and snares.

We thank you for providing for
Us,

We thank you for placing us in
this Bahama land, and we ask that
you touch the hearts and minds of
every Bahamian and others who
reside here that we all would hum-
ble ourselves, pray, seek you, and
turn from our wicked ways.

All so that we can hear from
you, and that you would forgive
our sins and heal our land.

These blessings and favours we
ask in the name of Jesus our
Christ,

Amen.

‘every matter may be established by
the testimony of two or three witness-
es.”

It is hoped that the presence of oth-
ers will help the offender to recognise
the validity of the complaint. Four or
five Christians gathered together to
prayerfully address a matter should
be able to feel the presence of God,
hear the voice of God, and obey the
will of God.

It is wonderful when the issue can
be settled in this way. Sometimes the
presence of others threatens the indi-
vidual who is being confronted and
the person becomes more defensive
and even offensive. Think of a spouse
who tries to have persons come to the
home to settle a conflict only to dis-
cover that it has the opposite effect.
This is when serious decisions have to
be made about the future of such a
relationship.

3. Bringing it to the Body
Verse 17: If he refuses to listen to

them, tell it to the church; and if he
refuses to listen even to the church,
treat him as you would a pagan or a
tax collector.”

It is very rare for us to go to this
length in most of our denominations,
if this means the whole church. More
often than not it will be reported to a
bishop, a special council or some
smaller group of persons with the
authority to act on behalf of the larg-
er body.

The bottom line is that every effort
is to be made to be reconciled. In the
end, however, it has to be left up to
the offender to acknowledge, admit,
confess and repent. We may always
pray for one another and reach out
with godly love, but it is

only by allowing God’s grace to
rule in our hearts that true peace can
be realised.

The question for us to ask ourselves
is: How stubborn, hard-hearted, or
obstinate am I when I am wrong and
need to put things right?

DR. ALBERT S. FERGUSON, J.P.

I Cordially Invite You To The
BOOK LAUNCH & SIGNING CEREMONY
for my new book, titled

Share your
news

The Tribune wants to hear from
people who are making news in

their neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a good
cause, campaigning for
improvements in the area or have
won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.



KEYS TO RELEASING THE POTENTIAL
IN CHURCH WORKERS AND VOLUNTEERS
THIS COMING SUNDAY AT 5:00PM SHARP
WORKERS HOUSE BALLROOM
Tonique Williams Darling Highway
THE EVENT IS FOR ONE HOUR!
PLEASE NOTE THE START TIME OF 5:00PM SHARP! |
I am looking forward to seeing you!
For further information, contact

albertsferguson @ gmail.com or 242-324-3139





PG 34 © Thursday, August 20, 2009

RELIGION

The Tribune

Spiritual to motivational: A nation in peril !

THERE is no doubt that the
Bahamas is under an intense satanic
attack. The enemy is wasting no time in
snuffing out the lives of the male seed
and also a few females along the way.
The real tragedy about this attack is not
the attack its self, but rather the
church's inability to cast out this
destructive spirit, due to its commit-
ment to religions and denominations;
as to a disciplined relationship with
Yahweh through His Son Yeshuwa
Messiah.

This is one of the reasons why that
nowhere in the scriptures can it be
found that Yeshuwa ever refer too or
called His followers Christians. But
rather He always called them disciples
(Discipline One).

It is said that one of the most undis-
ciplined religions in the world is
Christianity. The church today is filled
with fair weather Christians, their com-
mitment to God and his word is based
upon how well things are going in their
lives. This sort of lukewarm religion is
nothing new; for here's what Yeshuwa
said when speaking to the religious
mind-set.

John.8: 31 Then said Jesus to those
Jews which believed on him, If ye con-
tinue in my word, then are ye my disci-
ples indeed. (My disciples not my
Christians / powerless ones).

Satan, knowing of the power and
authority that has been given to the
church (The Organism) by Yeshuwa,
has infiltrated the church through reli-
gion; and has made the same offer to
the leaders as he did to Yeshuwa:
“Matt.4: 8-9: Again, the devil taketh
him up into an exceeding high moun-
tain, and showeth him all the kingdoms
of the world, and the glory of them;




PASTOR
ALLEN

And saith unto him, All these things
will I give thee, if thou wilt fall down
and worship me.

Here's the tragedy; the church lead-
ers have ignorantly accepted Satan's
offer which has resulted in him identi-
fying and calling them religious leaders.
The church / religious organisations
have no power and authority of the
kingdom of darkness.

How can a young mother be gunned
down in the drive way of her home; in
this Christian nation and the so-called
anointed bishops, apostles, doctors of
religion can be so silent?

Here's why and how?

We're an undisciplined nation that's
mixed with the undisciplined religion
of Christianity, the above mentioned
criminal act was conjured up in the
kingdom of darkness which is a spiritu-
al realm; a realm that religion has no
power and authority.

Over the years God had raised up
some men in this country to lead the
way in taking authority over every
unclean / demonic spirit. But for their
name sake, for fame and fortune these
men have traded and aborted their
assignment of being God's authorita-
tive spiritual voice; and have suc-
cumbed to the enemy's subtle plan of
being motivational speakers.

The enemy is no fool; for he knows
that there is power in the name of

HAVE you ever sat down and
thought or written down how your
life will be- only to find out that
those plans were far from what God
has ordained? It is a good joke I'm
sure.

My life hasn't been horrible, it
just didn't turn out the way I
thought that it would. We can have
all the plans we want but if it does-
n't line up with

God's word for our lives, I want to
say that it’s wasted. I don't mean
people who have to set certain
things in order for the day to run
smoothly because even in that there
is only so much you can control.

My thoughts were after that high
school I would go to college and
pursue my interest at that time.
Then after graduation I would get a

Fr



ALLISON
MILLER

good job, find the man of my
dreams and marry him.

We would then have a compro-
mised amount of children, go to
church pay our tithes go home and
live happily ever after. To my sur-
prise none of that happened and
certainly not in that order.

I am a single woman without a
husband and any biological chil-
dren.

I did not go to college although I
did take a number of computer

Yeshuwa Messiah. Therefore whenever
he (the devil) can get a believer to do
or say things without mentioning
Yeshuwa' name, the devil will see to it
that; that believer is rewarded or even
promoted. This act is what I call
“enticement stage one”

Watch this!

Many fortune 500 companies like
Procter and Gamble, IBM, etc; are pay-
ing mega bucks to prominent church
leaders to come and motivate their staff
and leadership; but with these condi-
tions :

Can't talk about or mention the
name Jesus / Yeshuwa Messiah,

Can't talk about the bible.

For the big bucks, many church lead-
ers have compromised whatever Godly
principles they had and denied / dis-
owned Yeshuwa Messiah, and sought
to justify their acts with erroneous spir-
itual quotes and clichés. But to answer
the wisdom of these wise-fools here's
what Yeshuwa says in “Matt.10: 32-33
:Whosoever therefore shall confess me
before men, him will I confess also
before my Father which is in heaven.
But whosoever shall deny me before
men, him will I also deny before my
Father which is in heaven.

Unfortunately today's church leaders
bear no spiritual resemblance of the
New Testament Apostles. For even
under intense pressure and being put in
prison the apostles didn't compro-
mised, but boldly spoke of and in the
name of Yeshuwa.

Acts.5: 40: And to him they agreed:
and when they had called the apostles,
and beaten them, they commanded
that they should not speak in the name
of Jesus, and let them go.

Here's one of our other problems;

courses. I worked at a job that
taught me alot and I am grateful. I
have yet to meet the man who is
right for me.

At a very early age I became a
Christian and it has definitely
changed the course of my life and
what I thought it to be. After a long
time of beingprocessed and still
being processed my desires have
changed. I no longer want to do the
things I wanted to when I left high
school over ten years ago. I want to
do the things that God has made me
to do.

Knowing that only what is done
for Christ will last, that's all that
matters.

Some may think that is old fash-
ion but I know that, that is the best
thing to desire, the will of God.

I never imagined that I would
have such an overwhelming desire
to do what God created me to do.
At first I didn't understand what
that meant or what that was- "the

we've got lots of religious leaders that
know the word of God, but they don't
know the God of the word.

Many of our church leaders are
doing their very best to become like the
America preachers; insomuch that
they're paying their International
Preacher friends / motivational speak-
ers to come in and emotionally moti-
vate their churches.

Most of these events are commonly
called conferences and are tagged with
a registration fee; excluding the cost of
the speakers materials and products of
which is strongly recommended that all
attendees purchase.

As a nation, we're in trouble spiritu-
ally; and I'm just wondering if there is
any other person out there that sees
and understands what's going on?

It's time to get the flesh and the moti-
vational hype out of the pulpits, and
restore holiness, sanctification and the
fear of God back into the church. Then
and only then, would the saints be able
to bind and cast out this demonic spirit
that is wreaking havoc throughout the
Bahamas.

In spite its many challenges, the lack
of bold, uncompromising Godly leader-
ship; the Bahamas’ best days are yet
ahead of her.

For there is a New day on the rise; as
the true spiritual sons 'elohiym, el-o-
heem’'; shall burst forth and manifest
His kingdom here in the Bahamas.

¢ Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen
Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int'l
For questions or comments contact us

via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com
or Ph. 1-242-441-2021

will of God for your life.” I sought
Him out and He told me what that
was.

I have spent most of my life trying
to accomplish that and will spend
the rest of my life doing just that.
Fulfilling the will of God for my life,
nothing else matters. I have not
aced it as yet but I will die trying.

God is good and He has been bet-
ter to us than we have been to our-
selves. The least we can do is ask the
Lord, "What do you want me to do
with my life?" I don't understand
how anyone can live a whole life-
time without any consideration of
the Almighty God. We should not
live our lives as if we made our-
selves- remember, it is in Him that
we live, move and have our very
being. How can we make plans for
our lives without consulting Him?

God is Alpha and Omega, He
knows what course our lives will
take. Can you blame Him if He
laughs at our plans?



The Tribune

Bishop Rolle celebrates
48th pastoral and
Wedding anniversaries

cL aa-

Wilbert and Idell Rolle

IN THE 1940's, a young Wilbert Milton Rolle set two
goals for his life after watching a ‘picture show’ on World
War II - he was going to fight a war and he was going to be
a Christian. By 1953, he accomplished both goals though not
the way he expected.

“T was fishing off Andros singing Silent Night to myself
when I heard the call from the Lord that it was my time to
go to war for Him through ministry,” recalls the now 76 year-
old. “Well, I joined the AME Church in Mastic Point,
Andros and now as Bishop of Living Waters Church of God,
I've been warring for the Kingdom for almost 50 years.”

A week-long celebration of Bishop Rolle's 48th pastoral
anniversary began on Monday and will end on Sunday at his
church. Speakers for the celebration include Pastor Carlos
James Wallace, Apostles of the End Times; Bishop Lindo
Wallace, Church of God Temple of Praise; Rev Dr Vincent
Smith, Universal Village Church; Bishop Shervin Smith,
Good Shepherd Church of God; Pastor Mark Knowles, Holy
Ghost and Fire Deliverance Centre and Apostle Winton
Roberts, Prayer and Deliverance Church.

Among the singers at the event will be Bahamian Idol's
Adrianna Munnings and the award-winning Living Water's
Youth Choir.

The week also coincides with Bishop Rolle’s 48 wedding
anniversary. His life partner Idell, has stood faithfully by his
side helping him enhance his ministry from the time they
started off with just 60 members to now having two church-
es in Andros and one Marshall Road, New Providence
which is in the process of adding on a large worship centre.

In a time when half of all marriages are ending in divorce,

SEE page 36

RELIGION



Thursday, August 20, 2009 ® PG 35

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays

INSIGHT

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PG 36 ® Thursday, August 20, 2009



RELIGION

BISHOPS Drexel Gomez and Laish Boyd place the priest's Stole on Fr Neil Nairn during His Ordination last week.

‘Ordination service was a

NEWLY ordained Anglican priest
Rev’d. Neil Geron Nairn described his
ordination to the priesthood as a “
mountain top experience” and added
that he now he has to go into the val-
ley because there is much work to be
done.

Rev’d. Nairn was ordained last
Friday evening by Rev’d. Laish Boyd,
Bishop of The Bahamas and The
Turks & Caicos Islands, before a large
congregation at Christ Church
Cathedral. The majority of the three
hour service was without electricity,
due to an island-wide blackout.
Around 7.30 pm just as Rev’d. Harry
Ward, Rector of Holy Spirit Anglican

Church, and preacher for the spe-
cial occasion, was about to mount the
pulpit, the lights went out, and so
Rev'd. Nairn took his priestly vows by
candlelight. It is a scenario, he has
grown accustomed to. During his ordi-
nation to the Diaconate on August 8,
2008, there was also an island-wide

blackout.

Reflecting on the service, Rev'd.
Nairn believes that the darkness
allowed the congregation to focus
entirely on the sermon, which had a
message for everyone. In his case,
the darkness allowed him the oppor-
tunity to reflect on the brevity of life
and the fact that within a second your
life can end.

He said that he also used the time to
listen, pray, and reflect.

“T was overwhelmed by the entire
experience: the sermon, when I was
presented to the Bishop, making my
vows, and laying prostrate before the
altar. The entire mood was uplifting
and spirit-filled”, said Father Nairn.

He added that he was very pleased
with the large numbers of persons
who attended the service, including
parishioners of St. Agnes, St.
Gregory’s, family and friends.

Chief Celebrant for the Ordination
was Rev'd. Laish Boyd Sr assisted by

Rev'd. Drexel Gomez. The preacher oe :
was Rev'd. Harry Ward and Litanist | Was tempted to join them, but my wife
was The Venerable James Palacious. }
Deacon of the Mass was Rev’d. }

Bradley Mill dcl ters
fa cy wer, and C€. ergy presen ers solely oni him.”

were

Dr E Etienne Bowleg, I Ranfurly :
Revd. }
Canon Neil Roach, Rev’d. Atma }
Rev’d. Bernard Been and
Lay presen- }
ters included Judy Nairn, Clayton i
Claire }
Wilton ;
Gibson, Marge Stewart, Wellington }
Dorsette, Rosemand Stubbs, Ralph }

Wood, Mary Basden and Karen } the completion of this building,” said

: Bishop Rolle. “I remind the youth

Brown, James Palacious,

Budhu,
Rev’d. Thaddeus Pratt.

Newbold, Lenford Nairn,
Hepburn, Henry Dean,

Nairn.

Special music was provided by ;

Adrian Archer and the combined ;
; themselves because they will be
Rev'd. Nairn will continue to serve ; Tesponsible for taking this ministry to
as Assistant Curate at St Agnes :

Anglican Church, Grants Town, New i blessed with where the Lord has led

i me

choirs of St Agnes and St Gregory’s.

Providence.

The Tribune

Bishop Rolle celebrates

| 48th pastoral and
-Wetlding anniversaries

FROM page 35

Mrs Rolle says that the secret of their
i success is to simply trust in the Lord.

“We had a mind to stand for Christ

i and we didn't allow the things of this
i life to worry us,” she says. “Even when
i the Lord chose to take our only child
i after eight days, we still allowed him to
i make the decisions in our life. As a
i pastor's wife, of course you have chal-
i lenges and you must make sacrifices.
i So many members sometimes come
i with spiritual or emotional needs, you
i have to be there to talk to them and
i minister to them and still be a help-
i mate to a man who happens to be a
i bishop.

“But overall, we've been blessed to

i lend so many people a hand and we've
ieven helped some families from
i Andros by allowing their kids to stay
i with us to attend school in the city.
i? Even adults who were sick, we've
i stepped in to help them on the road to
i recovery by allowing them to stay with
i us. We sacrifice it all for the Lord by
? doing this work.”

The bishop admits to making many

i sacrifices over the years -the first
i being when he decided to leave his job
? as a labourer in the city to go back to
i Andros.

“T was in Nassau, and I worked real-

ly hard with jackhammers all day
i breaking out rocks to make some of
: the beaches around here,” he recalls.

mountain-top experiment’
Says newly ordained priest |

i Freeport which was developing back

“T even worked on the foundation for
what is now the College of The
Bahamas. Back in those days (1960's),
things were springing up but we decid-
ed to go back to Andros. We went
back there and things were rough and
tough and it seemed like there weren't
any jobs and folks were moving to

then and offered quite a bit of jobs. I

was satisfied to stay in Andros and
that's when God made provisions for
us to go full time into ministry and rely

Evidence of how much the ministry
has grown is on the same property of
the New Providence branch of the
church where a roof covers what will
be a two-storey sanctuary to seat
about 500 persons with an attached
youth hall, auditorium, kitchen and 14
bedrooms for when groups visit.

“Tam getting up there but it is my
desire that the Lord allows me to see

who make up the majority of this con-
gregation every Sunday to prepare

the next level. Overall though, I am

2



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“~Se< TSTORM BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com
Volume: 105 No.222 (oR

Mt. Royal Ave.
Tel:326-1875







THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009 PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

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CLASSIFIEDS TRADER CL;

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The Deangelo
Fowler murder
trial ends in
a hung jury

Retrial is

birth rate shock

Number of children

born out of wedlock
highest since 1985

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE number of children
born in the Bahamas to single
mothers is the highest it has
been since 1985, according to
the most recent data from the
Department of Statistics.

There were 5,177 live births
in 2007 and more than half of
this number — 3,167 to be
exact — came from unwed
mothers.

The number of live births
to single mothers in this peri-
od jumped from 2,766 in 2006
and 2,706 in 2005. In 1985,
there were 3,380 live births to
unwed mothers — a slight
increase from 3,114 in 1984
and a sharp rise compared to
a mere 35 live births to unwed
mothers in 1983.

Statistics from 2007 also
reveal that single teenage
mothers between 15 to 19
years old had 585 children
born out of wedlock while 19
of the live births in this age
group came from married
teens.

Although young girls
between ages 10 to 14 years
old contributed to less than
one per cent of the total num-
ber of live births in the respec-
tive period, shocking statis-
tics reveal that six babies were
delivered by children in this
age group.

Women between the ages
of 25 to 29 years old had the
highest number of live births
in 2007: 1,282, with 588 of
these births to married
women and 694 to unwed
mothers. Mothers in the age
range of 20 to 24 years old
came in second with 1,204 live
births — 227 of this number
to married women and 977
born to single mothers.

Women between ages 30 to
34 had 1,152 live births in
2007 with 650 children born
to married women and 502 to
single mothers. Mothers
between the ages of 35 to 39
made up 708 of the live births
that year; 407 of these births
were to married women while
301 were to single mothers.

SEE page nine

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Fragular Fries
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Ir. Twister Combo

1 Snacker Combo

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Major/Tribune staff

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Felip |

TAGIA Soles-Armony, the
mother of two who was shot
dead in front of her parents’
house in Sea Breeze on August
7, was laid to rest yesterday fol-
lowing a funeral service at St
Francis Xavier Cathedral.

The service was well attend-
ed, and in addition to grieving
family members and friends,
many political and community
leaders also paid their respects.
Among those attending the ser-
vice were PLP leader Perry

PALLBEARERS carry the body of Tagia Soles-Armony (inset) from
St Francis Xavier Cathedral yesterday.

Christie and several Cab-
inet ministers.

Her father Gordon
Soles described her as
a loving and protective
mother to her sons, and
someone who was “a
whirlwind of activity
always seeking to make
it better for those around
her.”

In the funeral programme,

SEE page nine

ordered for
Jamal Penn

By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
nmckenzie@
tribunemedia.net

JURORS in the Dean-
gelo Fowler murder trial
were deadlocked over a
verdict yesterday as the
trial ended with a hung
jury.

Senior Justice Anita
Allen ordered a retrial
for Jamal Penn, 21, after
the jury failed to reach a
verdict on the charge of
murder.

The seven women and
five men voted six to six.
A verdict must be unan-
imous for a murder con-
viction, and at least a two
thirds majority for a not
guilty verdict.

Penn is accused of
shooting 18-year-old
Deangelo Cargill Fowler
in the chest as he stood
near a bus stop on Bay
and Frederick streets on
January 7, 2008. Mr
Fowler died in hospital
later that night.

SEE page nine



Man to he arraigned
over the killing of
Bahamian in Horida

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A MAN is to be arraigned
on charges of murder and
robbery in connection with
the killing of Bahamian Kahlil
Holmes in Florida.

Eric Andrew White, 33, of
West Palm Beach, was indict-
ed last Friday. He is now
being held in the Palm Beach
County jail without bail.

Mr Holmes, a father of two,
was found dead and half-
naked in the middle of a
street in West Palm Beach on
July 14. He had been shot up
to six times.

His half-sister, Juliet, said
her brother was only expected
to be in Florida for one day as
he had promised to return to
his ailing father’s side. She
said she did not know the pur-
pose of his trip.

Mr Holmes owned a car

SEE page nine

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS: LEADING NEWSPAPER
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 3





By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A GROUP of FNM ministers
yesterday stood up in defence
of the relocation of the contain-
er shipping facilities to Arawak
Cay, hitting back at criticisms
the site may not be the most suit-
able and was chosen to accomo-
date “special interests”.

Minister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing, denied the gov-
ernment has been “secretive” in
its decision making in relation
to the port, claiming its actions
are ‘transparent’ and ‘account-
able’ according to definitions of
the terms laid out by the United
Nations.

“You may not agree with me
but that does not mean that I
am not transparent or account-
able, it just means you do not
agree with me,” said Mr Laing,
referring to the government’s
critics on the issue.

PLP Senator Jerome Fitzger-
ald has led criticism of the gov-
ernment’s proposed relocation
of container shipping facilities
to Arawak Cay, claiming it has
not been justified in the face of a
study commissioned under the
PLP which found it
unfavourable as a potential site
for the port and may be driven
by private rather than public
interest.

He has questioned the gov-
ernment’s data and claims it is
“rushing” the move for dubious
reasons.

Masked men
hreak into
woman's home

A WOMAN was
asleep in her bed early
yesterday morning when
three masked men, one
of them armed, broke
into her home in Boyd
Subdivision.

The home invasion
occurred shortly after
4am and the woman, 45,
told police that the men
searched her house and
made off with money, a
cellular telephone and
her green 2006 Hyundai
Tuscon.

The men then escaped
in the stolen vehicle. i

An intensive investiga- }
tion hasbeen launched}
into this matter, police
said.

¢ A MAN was appre-
hended by police after i
he was found to be carry- }
ing afirearmconcealed
in a detergent box at the :
Lynden Pindling Interna- :
tional Airport.
The suspect, a 41-year- }
old Farrington Road :
man, was attempting to
travel to Jamaica when
he was held up by police
at 2.30pm on Tuesday.
Amongst the era |
the man had in the box
officers of the Western
Police Station discovered |
a .9mm handgun which
contained eight live
rounds of ammunition.
The man is currently in
police custody.

Miss teverse |
float parade

BAHAMIANS are
invited to come out and
cheer on the beauty
queens as they take part
in a float parade which
starts from Arawak Cay
today at 5.30pm.

The float parade then
follows along West Bay
Street to the Wyndham

LOCAL NEWS

FNM ministers defend
container port move

Yesterday Mr
Laing, like Environ-
ment Minister Earl
Deveaux, suggested a
review of that report
reveals deficiencies in
it as a basis for decid-
ing which site would
be best.

“Tt has a very inter-
esting opening sen-
tence in its executive
summary and that
sentence says essen-
tially that the consul-
tants were directed to
go to Clifton Pier to look at
that.”

“There’s nothing in that
report that has any extensive
evaluation of Arawak Cay or
any other port in this country
other than the Clifton Pier loca-
tion.

“When you read that report,
what struck me as someone who
has done college level reasearch
in this country was how jaun-
diced the report was in a direc-
tion (the consultants) were clear-
ly sent in,” he added.

The study ranked Arawak
Cay sixth out of seven potential
sites for the port.

Mr Laing, Deputy Prime Min-
ister Brent Symonette, Minister
of National Security Tommy
Turnquest and FNM Chairman
Johnley Ferguson were speak-
ing on radio talk show “Issues
of the Day” on Love97fm.

Responding to allegations that
the party is catering to “special
interests” by selecting Arawak

ZHIVARGO LAING



Cay as the site for the
new port, Mr Symon-
ette said everyone is
in agreement that the
container facilities
must be moved out of
Downtown Bay
Street if the centre is
to be revitalised and
charged that Prime
Minister Hubert
Ingraham has spoken
“many times in the
last 15 years” about
developing Arawak
Cay in this regard.

He pointed out that in the
FNM’s Manifesto 2007, the par-
ty said it intended to develop
Arawak Cay “commercially” as
well as “recreationally.”

“T think we’ve dealt with that
issue. Let’s move on,” said Mr
Symonette when Mr Jones first
raised the question of special
interests with him.

The Deputy Prime Minister
has been accused by Mr Fitzger-
ald of “being the mastermind” of
what the senator termed a “con-
spiracy to secretively enrich a
special interest group at great
expense to the public purse.”

But Mr Turnquest defended
the decision as one taken by the
government as a whole “based
on various analyses.”

He added: “Right now
Arawak Cay is very unsightly.
We want to bring it into an
orderly port where you have
your container port, where you
move containers at night, where
you are able to beautify the port

and use Arawak Cay for other
purposes.”

Mr Turnquest claimed the
popular hangout, of which the
FNM is “very proud”, will see a
surge in business when the port
is relocated to the area.

Mr Laing explained that the
government will be moving the
port to Arawak Cay “through a
partnership with the various
owners of the container opera-
tions in the country who are now
to the tune of one third (already)
using Arawak Cay for that pur-
pose”.

Suggesting the port is not
intended to remain there indefi-
nitely, Mr Laing described mov-
ing it from Downtown to
Arawak Cay as the “best interim
solution to any long- term per-
manent relocation of that port”.

“To be able to clear Bay
Street and our central touristic
centre of those containers in the
shortest possible time, Arawak
Cay, which now accomodates
one third of the container move-
ments in this country, represents
the most efficient and effective
way to do that,” he claimed.

Mr Laing noted that “no
environmentalists” have come
forward to suggest that they are
concerned about any environ-
mental impact from the project
to date.

“You have political operatives
saying that, you have people fol-
lowing them saying that, but no
environmentalists are showing
any evidence to say so,” he
added.

New judicial appointments made

ATTORNEY Rhonda Bain
was yesterday appointed a
Supreme Court judge and Jus-
tice Jon Isaacs was named

senior justice.

Governor-General Arthur
Hanna made the appointments
on the advice of the Judicial and

Legal Service Commission.
Justice Isaacs,

on January 27, 1955.

He received his education at
St Anne's High School in New
Providence and at Cornwall
College, Montego Bay, Jamaica,
where he taught for one year before attend-
ing the University of Waterloo, Ontario,
Canada where he received a bachelor of
arts degree in political science with a minor

in history in 1979.

He read law at the University of the West
Indies and was awarded a bachelor of laws

degree in 1982.

Justice Isaacs acquired his professional
qualification at the Norman Manley Law
School and was called to the Bahamas Bar

in 1984.

He was then employed by Office of the
Attorney General, where he served for 13
years as a prosecutor and civil litigator.

Justice Isaacs was promoted to the post of
assistant director of Legal Affairs, a post he
held until his appointment as chief magis-

trate in January, 1997.

He took office as an acting justice of the
Supreme Court in September, 2000 and was
appointed a justice on February 1, 2002.

Justice Isaacs is a fellow of the Com-
monwealth Judicial Education Institute. He
is an Anglican and is married to the for-

who will
become senior justice on Sep-
tember 1, was born in Nassau

RHONDA BAIN



mer Berencia Macaulay.

Rhonda Bain, a member of

the Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Association and the Cuckoos
Rugby Football Club, will
assume office on August 14,
2009.

She was born in Nassau on

April 22, 1952 and in 1974 was
awarded a bachelor of laws
degree by the University of the
West Indies at Cave Hill, Bar-
bados — which also awarded her
a master of laws degree in leg-
islative drafting in 1984.

Having attended the Norman

Manley Law School in Mona,
Jamaica, she received the Legal Education
Certificate of the Council of Legal Educa-
tion of the West Indies in 1976 and was
admitted as an attorney of the Supreme

Court of the Bahamas on October 6, 1976.

She entered the office of the Attorney
General as an assistant counsel in 1976 and

served in those chambers until 1983 when

she entered private practice in the firm of
Christie, Ingraham and Company, where
she remained until 1992.

From 1993 to 1996 she practised at her

own firm, Rhonda P Bain Chambers, with
offices in Nassau and Freeport.

In 1996 she returned to the public ser-
vice as deputy director of Legal Affairs in
the Office of the Attorney General and in
1999 was promoted to director of Legal

Affairs, a position in which she remained

until 2005.

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Uae bate
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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Felling the casuarinas is a tragedy

BEFORE air-conditioning there was the
casuarina tree.

Hot afternoons found Bahamians at var-
ious New Providence beaches — Montagu,
Yamacraw, Adelaide, Saunders and Love
— just “chilling out” under the shady
branches of a casuarina tree. Cool seabreezes
wafted through the large tree’s pine needles
to cool the body, and hum the song of the
sea to calm the soul. In those days it was a
delight for children to play in the shade of
the large trees, and a relaxing break at the
end of a hard day for working parents.

It was under the casuarina tree that an
earlier generation lay down their daily bur-
dens.

There already is a generation of Bahami-
ans who never experienced Nassau’s most

beneath it, which is true, but who wants to
grow anything else on a beach?

It is claimed that it was introduced to the
Bahamas in the twenties as a hedge tree that
got out of control and spread. Although this
might be true, we have our doubts as it is a
tree that seems to skirt the periphery of
most of our islands. They must have been
planted on the shoreline for a purpose, and
they must have been a part of these islands
long before the twenties. In his book Hawaii,
John Mitchener claims that casuarinas were
planted along Hawaii’s coastline to protect
that island from salt spray and absorb the
wave energy of a mini-tsunami. However,
because they snap easily they are an unreli-
able wind shield in a typhoon.

In certain areas of the east — Viet Nam

PLP is ‘injecting
partisan politics
into public life’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I AM troubled by the
determination of the PLP to
inject partisan politics into
every aspect of public life.
The habit of that political
party to try to extract polit-
ical advantage from any
matter regardless of its
impact on our country can
only be described as shame-
less; but then they have
proven themselves to be
without shame time and
again and so I suppose I
should not be surprised that
the leopard cannot change
its stripes.

Tam also concerned with
the seeming inability of the
independent press to call the
PLP out on their hypocrisy
and indeed, their dedication
to misleading and misin-
forming the Bahamian peo-
ple on matters of national
importance.

The PLP opposed amend-
ing the Constitution to
acknowledge that men and
women are equal. They
claimed it was too confus-

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



those who they know and
trust.

The PLP have got to stop
looking to find political gain
from the narrow mindedness
of some. Instead, they
should use their position of
influence to enlighten and
make our society better.
Ignorance is not to be
excused and pampered but
fought with knowledge and
insight and enlightenment.
This would be the time for
Allyson Maynard-Gibson to
be speaking out publicly in
support of happy marriages
in which all individuals love
and respect each other and
in which no one secks to
dominate and demand
against the will of the other.

This is the time for Mrs.
Maynard-Gibson to take a
stand in support of all those
loving husbands who cherish
and protect their wives and

who are insulted by any sug-
gestion that a law outlawing
rape in marriage could ever
apply to them or impugn
their character.

The proposed new law
targets abusers. Any effort
to support the allegation
that this law will target lov-
ing husbands is a cruel mis-
representation. Any sugges-
tion that we should delay
providing greater protection
under the law for abused
women in our society is
unconscionable.

It is especially wrong for
anyone in political leader-
ship to coddle or protect
abusers and criminals in any
way and we must all call on
all members of the PLP to
break with their past of
opposing for the sake of
opposing and to support the
timely adoption and entry
into force of the law mak-
ing rape in a marriage a
crime.

LIVINGSTON GRAY
Nassau,
August 18, 2009.

beautiful drive on the western end of the
island. It was a must-drive when we had
guests in town. It was like motoring down the
aisle of a darkened Gothic cathedral as the
large trees bent over and interlocked at the
top. It went on for almost the length of Cable
Beach. It was what John Keats would have
called a “thing of beauty.” According to
Keats “a thing of beauty is a joy for ever: Its
loveliness increases; it will never Pass into
nothingness.”

But our casuarina trees started to pass
into nothingness after the late Frank Christie
took his first trip to the Far East and saw the
magnificent groves of tall, elegant palm trees.
It is true that there is nothing more magnif-
icent than the palm trees of the East, espe-
cially at dusk, paddling across a lagoon to see
thick palm groves silhouetted against a set-
ting sun.

Mr Christie was captivated. He was deter-
mined that he could transplant the East to
the West, specifically to Cable Beach. It was
then that the butchering of our magnificent
casuarinas started. Palm trees — that looked
like dwarfs next to the palms of the Far East
— were planted. They eventually contracted
lethal yellowing and one by one fell by the
wayside. Just as our magnificent translucent
waters could not be taken to the East, the
tree-lined eastern skyline could not be
moved to Cable Beach.

Then came the final rooting up of the
trees to make way for the dual carriageway.
Only scattered stumps remain of our cathe-
dral-like casuarina drive.

It was lawyer Pericles Maillis, who as head
of the Bahamas National Trust, led the
charge to remove all casuarina trees from the
island. They were alien to our islands, he
said. It is true that the tree is an Australian
pine, but it is no more alien to these islands
than each and every one of us who call our-
selves Bahamian. The tree kills everything

































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for example — the casuarina is planted next
to the seashore as a windbreaker for inland
food crops. For the first five to seven years
after planting the roots are pruned on either
side. Here in the Bahamas, the trees have
been allowed to grow like Topsy.

The casuarina tolerates alkali and saline
soils, is drought resistant and will withstand
strong prevailing winds. It is claimed that
they are easily felled during a hurricane, but
those, especially on the western seashore,
have withstood many hurricanes, and are
still standing, while on the Eastern Road we
see many palm trees twisted and broken
after a hurricane.

Although our Bahamian pundits maintain
that casuarina trees do not protect sand
dunes, in Hambantota City, Sri Lanka, that
was the very reason for growing them.

As they grew with much space between
them they did not block the beautiful natural
view of the water, yet provided a barrier to
the salt spray from the sea.

The casuarina shelterbelt became popular
because it was the only undamaged area in
Hambantota City after the devastating 2004
tsunami.

However, more than anything else Sri
Lankans believe that their casuarina shore-
line has improved the aesthetic value of their
beach and has enhanced its touristic value. In
the meantime, Bahamians in their wisdom
are about to destroy 66 of our old trees.
Obviously, they don’t appreciate their beau-
ty along our shoreline, the shade they pro-
vide for those who use the beaches and the
fact that they do not blot from view our
beautiful blue waters. And, accept it or not,
they do give properties inland a certain
amount of protection from salt spray.

To remove the casuarina is to remove an
important feature of the Bahamas. This is a
tragedy about to be executed in the name of
progress.

ing a concept and that
Bahamians needed time to
understand and accept it!
They spent five years in
office but apparently didn't
have time to educate
Bahamians on this impor-
tant issue.

Now they are lukewarm
about making rape in a mar-
riage a crime. Again they
claim that people need to be
consulted and informed on
this before the law is passed.

I was horrified but not
surprised to learn that Sen-
ator Allyson Maynard
thinks that we should not
legislate against marital rape
until we find a better way to
deal with the high incidence
of rape by strangers! This is
a most curious legal concept.

Mrs. Maynard-Gibson, as
a practising attorney, should
know that rape is rape. Rape
by an acquaintance or
indeed by a family member,
is if anything, more trau-
matic because women do
not expect to be attacked by

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Thanks for awards
banquet in my honour

EDITOR, The Tribune.

KINDLY allow me space in your paper to thank the All
Andros and Berry Islands Regatta Committee and the com-
munity of North Andros for hosting an awards banquet in
my honour and honouring me at the 2009 Regatta. Specif-
ically, I wish to thank the following people for making the
events possible: Brian Cleare, Chief Councillor and Chair-
man of the Banquet Committee; Danny Ferguson, Chairman
of the All Andros and Berry Islands Regatta Committee; Ms
Donna Pickstock; Patrick Romer; Ms Shema Woodside;
Ms Darnell Evans; Ms Pennell Wilson; Ms Estella Hunter;
Ms Daisy Bowleg; Ms Michelle Bowleg Ms Vanria Rahming;
Mrs Patricia Woodside; Ms Angela McDonald; Ossie Pin-
tard; Frank Hanna and Dudley Smith for their financial
contributions.

T also wish to thank Edison Key, the Executive Chairman
of The Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation,
Benjamin Rahming, the General Manager BAIC and oth-
er members of the executive management team for their
attendance and support. Also thanks to my good friend
Everett Hart who came all the way from Exuma to speak on
my behalf. I also wish to thank Administrator Dr Huntley
Christie and the Member of Parliament the Hon Vincent
Peet for their support and kind words.

Last, but not least, I wish to thank the good people of
North Andros who came out in the hundreds in support of
me. North Androsians, you really showed me how much you
appreciated all that I have done in a non-partisan way.

I have always maintained that my contribution to North
Andros and The Bahamas is not for plaques, trophies or
awards ... what I do is from the goodness of my heart and the
love I have for this place that I call home.

My late mother always taught her children “it’s better to
give than to receive” because your award will not come
from man, but from God. I strive to live by that dictum.

I wish to reassure North Androsians that I will always be
there for you even until the end of time.

ALPHONSO SMITH
North Andros,
Bahamas

August 18, 2009

first Baptist Church

289 Market St. South » P.O. Bow N-7984 * Nassau, Bahamas
THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK
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THE TRIBUNE





Govt: violent crime boils

LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 5

UU NOLO AE)

down to individual choices xyes

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT ministers
yesterday hit back at suggestions
that the FNM is "impotent" in
tackling the escalating murder
count and argued that violent
crime boils down to individual
choices that are out of govern-
ment's control.

Speaking as a guest on Love 97
FM's “Issues of the Day”, State
Finance Minister Zhivargo Laing
said that despite the current high
levels of violent crimes and mur-
ders, the Bahamas is an "orderly
society".

"The United Nations still con-
firms that this is one of the most
civil societies in all of the world,
not withstanding, we have our own

set of issues, which we know when
it comes to murder.

"This is an orderly society, order
in a society doesn't happen by acci-
dent," he said, adding that gov-
ernment has invested significant
resources in the Royal Bahamas
Police Force to effectively police
the nation.

He said observers must realise
that much of the crime plaguing
our society boils down to complex
personal choices that are "beyond
the control of government.”

"If you look at the crime (sta-
tistics) and you pick murder as an
example, you would have to say
from year to year the murder rate
has gone up. The question
becomes one of was there anything
in analysing those murders that we
could have done to prevent them.

"If I had two police officers in

the home that somebody broke
into and shot somebody, maybe
that could have been prevented.
But is that practical,” said Mr
Laing.

The FNM and particularly Min-
ister of National Security Tommy
Turnquest have come under heavy
fire as the country grapples with
rising levels of violent crime.

Mr Turnquest conceded that
crime is at an unacceptable level in
the country as he weighed in on
the debate on yesterday’s talk
show.

"I'm the first to admit that 52
murders in eight months of the
year based on any yardstick is far
too high for a society like the
Bahamas.

"The international standards in
terms of homicides are five per
100,000 of population. Assuming a

$1,000 donated to ‘Breathe Easy’ campaign

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

Pantie

' J



FROM LEFT: Vice President of Doctors Hospital Michele Rassin; Director, Doctors Hospital Dr Keva
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Richards, Thelma Rolle of PMH, Mark Roberts of Tile King.

MANAGER of Little
Whale Cay Mark Roberts pre-
sents a cheque for $1,000 from
the family of Mr and Mrs Peter
Austin to Thelma Rolle of the
Princess Margaret Hospital
Foundation for the purchase
of new state-of-the-art venti-
lators.

Mr Austin said he was
“delighted and proud to sup-
port the Breathe Easy
Bahamas Campaign.”

“Mark has been managing
our property (Little Whale
Cay) for 12 years. This
fundraising drive is important
to all of our staff and we are

pleased to support Mark’s phil-
anthropic endeavours,” he
said.

Little Whale Cay is located
32 miles northwest of Nassau
in the Berry Island chain and
was previously the summer
and weekend home of Wallace
Groves, founder of Freeport.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

Threat prevents parents of Miss

India from travelling to Bahamas

THE parents of Miss India
Universe Ekta Choudhry
were forced to cancel their
plans to travel to the Bahamas
for the final show of the
pageant due to a threat from
hooligans.

The Times of India report-
ed yesterday that Miss India’s
parents had been very excited
about the trip, but had to can-
cel at the last minute.

A group of hooligans near
the Choudhrys’ home in the
city of Gurgaon have been
terrorising the family and
Ekta’s parents said they are
afraid to leave the country as
MISS INDIA is pictured celebrating India’s 62nd jitienendencs day their house may be attacked
in Nassau recently. in their absence.

Ekta’s mother Rita

RALEE ) Choudhry told the Times in
¢ FACHIONG India that the family had
recently moved to Gurgaon
from Delhi and now regretted
the decision.

has gowns for all those | _, 8 “hessuyshwve no

* *

important occasions.



Derek Smith/MOT




from their holidays

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham and his
wife Deloris returned to Nassau yesterday
morning ending their annual holidays.

The Ingrahams were met at Prince George
Dock By Deputy Prime Minister and Minister
of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette, Minister
of National Security Tommy Turnquest, Cab-
inet Secretary Anita Bernard, and Police
Commissioner, Reginald Ferguson after dis-
embarking the Norwegian Cruise liner, Nor-
wegian Sky.

filed a police complaint in this
matter.

While they will not be able
to attend the final show to be
held at Atlantis this Sunday,
Ekta’s parents said that they

Mackey Street + Telephone: 393-0744 are praying for their daugh-

Monday - Saturday 9:00am - 5:30pm eee



Peter Ramsay/BIS

PROSPECTUS
THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2028, 2029, 2030, 2031, 2032, 2033, 3034, 3035, AND 3036
ISSUE OF B$150,000, 000.00

Issued onder The Bahamas Registered Stock Act. and authomeed by Resolutions of the House of Assembly, | Teh
June, SUH.

THE (A IVE RAMEN T OF CPE CS WAL Te TE BAD AMA
ho oe rer > 1 4 7

Applicaiions will be reoeived by The Banking Depariment beginning af 9:30 amon 1th August. 2008 and will POR OPP ICTAL USE ONLY
chome at 0D pen on 2h August, SHH) Allocations will commence af 94h a.m. om 2th August, 200 and will cee ar APPLICA TELIM Bao
SAM On 27h August, DIMM), ALLOTMENT Mes

DATE

If the total swahecripeions exceed the sum cf HS TMICKKIAKRLIM) (Nominal) portial allotment will be make bo

subscribers, and a proporticmate refund will be made as sn as possible aller allobnent No interes! will he pak on The Regicirer

amounts so refunded. elo The Central Bank of The Bahaetars
P.O, Bao, Bae

Nrescme, Plaharnes

The Government of The Commonweal of The Bahamas invites applications For Rakeintiss Registered Sunk
totalling BSI S00 The Stock will be available in a range of maturity dates; the earliest being repayable in We hereby apply bor the following amount of Bahamas Registered Stock:
SIPS and che laese in 2h. The total amount of Steck offered, the rane of interest amd the lesue piece wre giver etlcrar :-

Sir

Inert beckorw the amkeant apqeied! bor

in eis of BEL

make Proce
Rac of liters Le Albowe Prom Rate Babuitas Registered Stock 228 = =BS
ies 5
eee .

Abecrie * Rabe & Registered Stock 24
Above Prime Rais Dabama= Reprtered Sick MILA /— sano | Ten Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Siock 2 BS
Ondo Albee Prime Bate Dahamas Repistered Stock 2 SES Above Prime Bate Rabamas Registered Stock 2040)
Above: Prime: Rate Habermas Repistered Sinck 2M L1H Abowe Prime Rate Rakamas Registered Steak 3K
Abowe Prime Rate latamas Repinered Stock 2011
Aborne Prime Rate Hohamas Recknered Siock ML es M16 Above Pane Rate Babes Registered Stock 232
bsceve Prime: Bate Bahamas Rephtered Stock 0003 | MCU | ot 34 Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Stock 203
borne Prime: Fale Hahermias Repisered Stock 214 TES) Above Pome Rate fabomas Registered Stock 24
[a Above Prime Rate Hatames Reghered Sick Gs | CL | | 2 BPemaLs Icgastened lnk ot.
Lite Avbowse Prime Blane Hohmas Repinered Siock Mit | LOO | oi | [S445 Alkove Prime Rate Kakomas Registered Stock 25
131 AHL AHLIN) | 4) Alkowe Prin Rate Batriitas Rogisicred Stock 2096

Kl deriake in accep pic cunt which mary he ablated bo metus.
The Saock shall be eepand on 27th August, ethe year appcariog: on the ane of thi: Steck = ee eee
Ie cals 2S in payee Gor the Soock apylled foe
INTEREST
inthe event of ihe full omeunt of Sincki=} applied for abowe estan mo nlkngied in
7 : nnn : . . i " . w “ “fin Be £ : j allere ine Baca
The Stock will bewr interest from 27th August, 2009, at the rate shown against ihe name of the Stock ax ihe percent fevis. Wee request thet the sum refundable to nevis be applied for the Fallivwing Steck
fer anid over the Prime Rote (1c, the print commercial interest rate frown time to tne fied by the Clearing haslcs
curving on business im the Island of Sew Prowdente in The Bahamas, 2 there shall be acy difference boiween them,
then that which is fixed by Rowal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half-yearly commencing on 27th February,
210) aid chereafier on 27h August aml 271h February in every year aedil che Sieck is repaid PAYMENTS [M EXCESS OF BS50000 0 MUST BE SLADE VLA REALTIME ORO88 SETTLEMEST
SYSTEM (RTOS) THROUGH ALL COMMBRCIAL BANKS EXCEPT FINCH,
. a PAYMENTS CHF HSS (L000 10-08 LESS CAN BE MADE VIA REAL TIME GROSS SETTLEMENT
: FLD A TR FL SYSTEM C1 EY DANK DRAPT PAY AIL TO THE CUNTHRAL BANKOOD TH BAM AMAS
The prescipal monies and interest reprcseniod by the Stock ane changed apon and payable out of the Consohidated PAYMENTS CHF B35 00000 OR LESS CAN BE ALADHE VLA REAL Tie OHSS. SETTLEMENT
r . . rs I i APT Vi T = CEN i f ‘ i i
Fund and axsets of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas. — BY BANK DRAPT PAYABLE TO THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS OR BY

% Bohamas Registered Sook BS

SUPPLEMENTARY PROVISIONS
1. (Qe Person
The Steck will be maved by Uke Registrar (The Central Bank of The Baha), Applications wall Ordinary Skanature
be received by The Banking Department begimeing af 9230 am om 19th August, 200% and yell eloge se
2300 pre on 25h Apusd, AMM, Alksculions wll cammence al 9:30 aon. on 26th Agpest,
and will cease at 3:00pm. on 27th Aegust, 2008. All envclopes enclosing applications should be Name in Pall (BLOCK LETTERS. state whether Mr_ Mrs...or Miss and titles if any.’
lobelked "Vupedicotbos or Bahomas Goverment Registered Stocks”. :

Units The Stock will be im umats of TS 100080.

Anpliccutines Applications most be for BS MK) ora multiple of that sum. Address (Corporations etc. should give Registered Addresses }

ApHicating Faris Applicat for the Steck should be mende tothe Regishrar cet the fora attached te the FO. Box
Prospectes amd may be obtained from the Registrar offices im Nassau and Freeport, The Treasary
Deparment (Marlborough Sere: A Ravy Lion Rowl, Nea), appdicuiions may also be
diwikualed front the Ceatral Bank of the Rabanies gichsite al wae cembril hind baleen soon oo

any of the following banks:

Hank of The Hatamas Inmemational Telephone Mos. (H) 1
First Canbbeas lero! Haak (Bales Lanned

binece Corperation of Hatamnas Lirmetid

Connmonvcalth Bank Limited

Hevpal Heank OW Carced

Scotiabask (Bahamas) Lindied

Fiichty Bank {Baharrers) Linnted (formed! y Heit American Hiab 13) Linnted) . .
Chibenk. MA Ordinary Signatuncs

nw ht

2 (Where beoor more persons apply as jolnt subscribers, the additional names and addresses should
he given below.)

— ee oh

ro

PUBLIC DEAT
Maires ia Full

Prowisimnal estimates from the ungediied accounts ws at June 30. 204 show ihe Public Debt of The Bahar to be
$5,524,214 0K."

The tolhaaing intonation is extracted trom the anaidited acco: of the Government of The Commonwealth at Adiress
The Bahwrnas.

PYRKMYXETp AYaanoap* FYSKIRKMpT* Telephone Mes.tH)
He BS KS

Approved Budget Approved Badert .
Bevemme 1 00 1.424, 108,000 148899 000 We hereby reqs: semi anmiial inperest oo fet peed eo:

Recurrent Expenditure (oxcleding :
Repayment of Public Debt) 1 285,600,000 1,344,028,000 1484, 150,000 Hank Name

Capital Development Bank Branch

Expenmdiire fexcliding loans
Contributions and ail aneis
to public carponstions| 166225, 0) 17,778 0K 128718000) Avacounl Number

2 Previsacetal estiertcs [note the unaiital accounts
* The Public Gebt amount is inclusive of The Public Corporations contingent liability which as at June 4, 2009
totalled BS420015 001,


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 7



Readers say who they want shuffled from Cabinet

IN our last poll on www.tri-
bune242.com we asked our
readers: “Which minister would
you most like to see shuffled
out of Cabinet?”

Overall 238 persons partici-
pated. The results of the vot-
ing are as follows:

Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest - 54

Minister of Education
Carl Bethel - 51

“They are all doing a

good job” - 30

Minister of Public Works and
Transport Neko Grant - 30

Minister of Health
Hubert Minnis - 12

Minister of Labour and Social
Development Dion Foulkes - 11

Minister of the Environment
Earl Deveaux - 9

Attorney General Michael
Barnett - 8

Minister of Housing and National
Insurance Kenneth Russell - 8

Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette - 7

Minister of Agriculture
and Marine Resources
Larry Cartwright - 6

Minister of Youth, Sports and
Culture Desmond Bannister - 6

Minister of Tourism
Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace - 6

Here are some of the com-
ments of the website’s readers:

By ‘Concerned Parent?
Title: Out of touch

“Tts sad to see that the grade
point average has not changed.
Mr Bethel doesn't care about
the future of our country, if he
did he would have a vision for
our educational system. Mr
Bethel, it starts from students
entering grade 1, please change
the programme. Also Mr
Bethel, I believed that you
should at least make and effort
to meet with the parents in
Grand Bahama about the
abuse.”

By ‘Tired of criminals’
Title: Security System Sucks
“Come on "leaders" of our
nation....are your minds only
on how much money you're
getting paid? Are you not get-
ting paid to THINK for our
country? We have so many
islands, many of them empty,

A

BUILD A PRISON ON ONE
OF THOSE!!!! Stop letting so
many criminals back into the
decent (populace) of society.
I'm trying everyday to be law-
abiding, yet if I run an amber
light, not even red, amber, the
police wanna pull me over to
ticket me. Murderers are free,
drug dealers are free, and an
innocent person like me getting
charged for something so petty.
Lock those criminals up and I'll
feel better about getting a tick-
et for something small and pet-

ty.”

By Stanley Jackson Sr
Title: Crime Fiasco

“The Bahamas, Bahamians
and everyone else in the coun-
try including visitors are being
held hostage by the criminal
element in our society. Minister
Turnquest should have been
man enough to carry out hang-
ing as capital punishment
according to the laws of the
Bahamas. He cannot effective-
ly handle his mandate, so get
rid of him!!”

By Steff
Title: Copy cats

“The Minister of National
Security is clueless. Moreover,
whatever other Caribbean
countries do, he tries to dupli-
cate. We've heard about moni-
toring system many times for
those criminals on bail, yet he



THE LATEST poll can be found
on tribune242.com.

remains silent and recites..."WE
ARE VERY CONCERN"
with level of this crime and that
crime!! Why are they collect-
ing monthly salaries for such
high level of incompetence?
Overall, we have a bunch of
copy cats as leaders, I am con-
vinced it's endemic.”

By Ginger
Title: Loan mess

“Honestly I am still (bog-
gled) by how long Carl took
(to) deal with the college loans,
how can you wait weeks before
persons go off to college to say
that ‘hey we aint giving ya'll
any money because other peo-

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ple didn’t pay the loans back’,
it’s pretty sad. I would have
thought that one of the main
tasks in education was to deal
with persons who haven’t paid
the government back yet. They
suppose to be on these peoples
back three months after they
got their degrees, and whoever
else signed on the application,
take the money from them, if
you can’t find them, put a very
big advertisement in the news-
papers and on TV listing these
persons names and colleges
they went to, because it’s sad
that other people have to suffer
because others want to be dis-
gusting.”

By Ian
Title: Minister Vanderpool stinks
“T think that he is still in the
old-school mentality and that
doesn’t work in today’s society
anymore. People don't just
want sun, sand and sea. They
want to do activities and learn
the culture. Sitting on a beach
everyday is boring!! Why not

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create activities or day excur-
sions that are affordable so peo-
ple can see what other (the real
Bahamians) do such as in the
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By K FORBES
Title: Clueless

“Honestly... I think Carl
Bethel is clueless with regard
to the fundamental require-
ments of developing a strong
Educational Curriculum in our
country. I have seen no cre-
ativity in terms of how to fund,
much less develop stimulating
programmes that would help to
reform the youth of our nation
or help to salvage the intellec-
tual remains of student popu-
lation. How could an elected
and supposedly educated mem-
ber of parliament not be furious
about the average BJC/
BGCSE results, or the number
of students able to successfully
pursue a form of higher educa-
tion... And the student loan
programme... how could they
just cease ‘opportunity’... what

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ever happened to 'reform' and
examination of improvement.
That could have been handled
completely different... but when
there is no vision.”

By Scribe
Title: Wutless

“Why don't you have an
option for ‘all of the above'? I
think they're all doing a bad
job!”

Visit www.tribune242.com to
participate in our new poll where
we ask the question “Should Paul
Moss contest Perry Christie for
PLP leadership in October?”

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





&
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GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTR

‘ Harbour Bay Shopping Centre =~":

Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 =X ata

! Automotive General. Manager |

Responsibilities:
; . - Create and organize vehicle sales activities
is seeking a general manager. - Create and organize parts and service
operations
Manage follow-up systems for existing
customers
Cultivate new business
Develop and implement company policies and
programmes
- Train and lead staff in a team environment
- Stay up-to-date in dealership technology

A prominent new car dealership

The ideal candidate must have
wide experience in the
automotive business as well as

good written and oral

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- 5+ years of experience in the automotive
industry

- 8+ years experience in automotive manufacture
and corporate experience
Experience with Japanese automotive brands
Strong leadership and management skills
Superior communication and customer service
skills
Account management and budgeting experience
Proficiency in computers

communication skills.

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P.O. Box N-9240
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for application: Wednesday,
August 26, 2009.

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SENATOR Jerome
Fitzgerald yesterday called
for the resignation of
Environment Minister
Earl Deveaux following
the spillage of dredged
material near Saunder’s
Beach.

The material was
released into the water fol-
lowing an alleged “mis-
take” made by the team
constructing the extension
to Arawak Cay. However,
a Ministry of Environment
statement denied that the
“turbidity plume” com-
plained of was at any time
near Saunders Beach.

Mr Fitzgerald, chairman
of the committee to Pre-
serve and Protect The
Bahamas for Future Gen-
erations, has criticised
government over the
extension, claiming it has

“Sty THE

BED BATH & HOME| Call for minister to LUTE:
resign over dredged
material spillage

the potential to harm the
environment.

Yesterday he said the
spillage, which occurred
on Tuesday and was visi-
ble throughout the waters
off Saunders Beach, “only
confirms and highlights
the grave concern the
Committee and thousands
of Bahamians have raised
with regard to the exten-
sion of Arawak Cay and
its effect on the surround-
ing environment.”

Mr Fitzgerald said: “This
is sufficient evidence that
this project should be
stopped forthwith in order
that the government and
the Bahamian people can
get a better understanding
of the effects this project
will have on our environ-
ment and the impact to the
surrounding areas.”

wor of

Psalms 90:17

LOCATED KEMP ROAD NORTH

REGISTRATION IS NOW IN PROGRESS
FOR THE NEW SCHOOL YEAR 2009-2010

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL: 393-6743
OFFICE HOURS 9:00 A.M. TO 1:00 PM,
WE WELCOME ALL INQUIRIES

‘tattine + Solstiom i

NOTICE

Mohs Surge

in Nassau

DR. JOHN STRASSWIMMER, MOHS SURGEON
will be visiting The Skin Centre on Friday
September 25th, 2009. Dr Strasswimmer
trained at Harvard and Yale and is Board
Certified and a Fellow of the Mohs College.

Mohs Micrographic Surgery is an advanced
treatment process for skin cancer which |s
now offered at The Skin Centre. It offers the
highest possible cure rate for many skin
cancers and simultaneously minimizes the
sacrifice of normal tissue. This cutting-edge

treatment requires

highly specialized

physicians that serve as surgeon, pathologist
and reconstructive Surgeon.

Our visiting Mohs Surgeon has extensive

experience in the

Mohs Micrographic

Procedure. The technique is used to remove
the two most common forms of skin cancer:

basal cell
carcinoma.

carcinoma and squamous cell

For more information. olease contact:

The Skin Centre, Harbour Bay Plaza,
East Bay Street Tel. 393-7546,





UT ST
TAT TTA
Category 4

MIAMI

HURRICANE Bill
howled over the open
Atlantic as a danger-
ous Category 4 storm
Wednesday, and it
could be energized by
warmer waters as it
moves north, according
to Associated Press.

Forecasters said Bill
should begin pushing
large swells toward
Bermuda and parts of
the southeastern U.S.
coast by the weekend,
but it wasn't yet clear
how close the storm
will come to land.

The National Hurri-
cane Center also said
people in the Leeward
Islands should keep an
eye on the storm,
though its core was
expected to pass well
to the northeast of the
chain in the next 24
hours. Fishermen in
Antigua were advised
to dock their boats.

As strong as Bill
already is, it could get
stronger because it's
traveling into warmer
waters in the Atlantic
that could intensify the
storm, said senior hur-
ricane specialist Lixion
Avila.

"The warm ocean is
like the fuel for car,"
Avila said Wednesday.
"Tf you get high octane
gas you get more pow-
er — that's what
warmer water does."

Bill was maintaining
a top wind speed of
135 mph Wednesday,
hours after it became a
Category 4 storm, and
forecasters said it
could get stronger. The
storm's center was
located 335 miles east
of the Leeward Islands
and it was moving
west-northwest near 20
mph.

Islands in the north-
east Caribbean could
see bigger waves from
the storm in the next
day or two.

The most significant
threat could be to
Bermuda, which the
storm could pass in
three or four days,
forecasters said. But it
also could move direct-
ly between Bermuda
and the eastern coast
of the U.S. without
making landfall.

It was too early to
tell if Bill would veer
close to shore over the
weckend or swing
away from the East
Coast of the U.S., but
the five-day forecast
predicted its center
would pass well off-
shore of the North
Carolina- Virginia line
Saturday.

A cold front was
expected to turn Bill to
the northeast, but it
wasn't clear when that
would happen, Blake

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS



Man to he
arraigned
over killing

FROM page one

and scooter rental compa-
ny in Nassau.

According to the Flori-
da State Attorney’s Office,
a second suspect was issued
a warrant on August 13 but
the person’s name is being
withheld at this time.

White is to be arraigned
in front of a judge next
Monday.

Deangelo Fowler murder trial

FROM page one

The defendant has denied
any involvement in the inci-
dent, and told the court dur-
ing an unsworn statement that
he is Tony Smith and not
Jamal Penn.

Outside the courtroom,
Penn’s attorney Murrio
Ducille said: “Our position is
that the prosecution obvious-
ly had difficulty convincing
the jury that this young man is
guilty. At least he has another
shot on a retrial with different
minds to consider it. We can
just wait until the system can
accommodate him for anoth-
er trial.”

Mr Ducille said he will be
making a bail application for
his client who has been in cus-

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The murder trial began
before Senior Justice Allen
last Wednesday. Jilian
Williams and Yolande Rolle
prosecuted the case.

During her nearly hour-
long summation yesterday
morning, Senior Justice Allen
told jurors they were to come
to a decision based on the evi-
dence against Penn. The fact
that another individual was
charged with the murder but
had not stood trial was “irrel-
evant.”

The prosecution relied
heavily on the testimony of a
16-year-old boy who said he
was standing under a canopy
outside the Perfume Bar on

the western side of Frederick
Street when the shooting took
place.

The teenager, who was also
shot, testified he was with
friends when he saw and
heard a green Honda car
playing loud music. He said
the car had stopped at a traf-
fic light and he got a good
look inside when it turned
slowly south onto Frederick
Street.

He told the court how the
passenger in the front seat
stuck his head out of the win-
dow with a gun in his hand
and fired two shots.

According to a firearms
examiner, one of the two fired
rounds found at the scene was
a .38 bullet.

Single mums in birth rate shock

FROM page one

There were 193 live births to women between 40 to 44 with
104 born to married women and 89 to unwed mothers.

Mothers between the ages of 45 to 49 had 10 live births,
with five of that number born to single mothers.

There were no live births born to women over the age of 50.

There were 18 live births to women whose age was not stat-
ed; 10 of these births were to married women while eight came

from single mothers.

The data is available on the Department of Statistics website.

Slain mother of two

FROM page one

the family said TaGia died
three months after giving
birth to her second son Zen,
two weeks after her 29th
birthday and just two days
after arriving in Nassau from
St Kitts.

Two hours before she was
killed she had a telephone
conversation with her hus-
band Kachi Armony in which
she told him she loved him.

TaGia, known by family
and friends as “Lady T”, was
born on July 20, 1980, in
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

She attended Xavier’s Low-
er School and St Andrew’s
High School in the Bahamas,
Havergal College in Ontario,

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Canada, and Dalhousie Uni-
versity in Nova Scotia. She
was graduated with a degree
in commerce and practised as
an accountant in St Kitts
where she lived with her hus-
band, radio host Kachi Armo-
ny.

TaGia is survived by her
husband, Kach, sons Chelan
and Zen Armony, parents
Gordon Soles and Maxine
Soles, sisters Giahna, Paige
and Greer Soles, brother Kurt
Major, grandmothers Doris
Taylor and Rosalie Austin,
and many other relatives and
friends.

Earlier this week, 25-year-
old Valentino Hanna-

Dorsette, alias “Ballistic”, of
Sesame Street, was charged
with her murder.

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009



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at the receptionist desk at & E’s
main office in Oakes Field. Resumes
must be received no later than Friday,
September 18", 2009. Only persons
being interviewed for this training will
be contacted.

4 hit by tornado?

THE TRIBUNE

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Golden Gates

EYE WITNESSES claimed a tornado caused serious
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never heard anything like it before.

One resident said the air was sucked from his house,
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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Thomas, Barry don’t make final jump

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — Not
since the [AAF’s 5th World
Championships in Gothen-

burg, Sweden, did the
Bahamas have two represen-
tatives in the men's high jump
final.

Fourteen years later at the
12th World Championships
yesterday, the Bahamas had

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two competitors competing
for a spot in the final on Fri-
day.

But both defending cham-
pion Donald Thomas and
Trevor Barry failed in their
bid to match the combo of
Troy Kemp and the late Ian
Thompson in Gothenburg.

As fate would have it at the
Gothenburg championship,
Kemp went on to win the
gold and Thompson ended up
11th.

Yesterday at the Olympic
Stadium, Thomas, who
became only the second
Bahamian male athlete to win
a gold medal at the biannual
championships, finished 15th
and Barry was 17th out of a
field of 30 competitors.

Thomas, avenging a defeat
to Barry at the BAAA
Nationals in June, bowed out
at 2.27 metres or 7-feet, 5 1/4-
inches, while Barry's first
appearance at the champi-
onships stopped at 7-4 1.4.

The qualifying height
where eight of the 12 com-
petitors booked their posi-
tions was 7-6 1/2.

"Tt was an all right compe-
tition. I thought I was ready,”
said Thomas, who cleared his
first four heights at 2.10 (6-
10 3/4), 2.15 (7-0 1/2), 2.20 (7-
2 1/2) and 2.24 (7-4 1/4)
before he got his first knock-
down at 2.27 (7-5 1/4) and
didn't clear any attempts at
2.30 (7-6 1/2).

"T felt good out there. I had
a clean sheet up to 7.24. After
that, I developed a cramp. I
tried to rub it out, but I just
couldn't run the way I needed
to when I tried to go for 2.24.
I think if I had cleared it on
my first attempt, I would have
been right up there.”

After watching the field
slowly decrease and his
chances of returning to the
final slip away, Thomas said
the competition was stiff, but
he knew he had the ability to
jump with the field.

"T had some problems this
year, went home, stayed there
for about a month and
worked on some things and I
was ready to come here,” he
said. "I just started to develop
some cramps and that threw

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August 24th.

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DONALD THOMAS (left) and Trevor Barry can be seen at the IAAF’s
12th World Championships in Berlin, Germany...

me off today.”

Although neither of them
were able to at least duplicate
the feat of Kemp and Thomp-
son in the final, Thomas said
he definitely came here pre-
pared to ink his name among
the last 12.

"T really wanted to defend
my title. Unfortunately I can't
do it anymore," said the 25-
year-old former basketball
player of Grand Bahama. "I
just have to regroup and take
it from there. I don't know
what I will do. I probably will
do one or two more meets
before I'm finished for the
year."

For 26-year-old Barry, who
competed in Group A with
14 other competitors (seven
of whom qualified and two
surpassed the qualifying
mark), he was thrilled about
his performance, even
thought he didn't qualify for
the final.

"It was a good experience. I
know I can beat these guys,”
said Barry, who did a lifetime
best of 2.28 (7-5 3/4) in Nove
Mesto on July 22 to clinch his
appearance here. "I know I

a gl
FTE
SRI AHTTT:
of events

BERLIN, Germany —
Here's a look at the sched-
ule for the Bahamians
competing over the
remainder of the [AAF's
12th World Champi-
onships in Athletics:





































TODAY

Men's 110 hurdles

semifinal

Shamar Sands, lane 1,
heat 3 at 12:38 pm ET

Women's 200 semifinal

Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie, lane 6, heat 1
at 1:50 pm ET

Sheniqua Ferguson, lane
1, heat 2 at 1:56 pm ET

Men's 110 hurdles final
Shamar Sands, starting

can beat these guys. I just at 2:55 pm ET

need a little more competi-
tion."

Unlike Thomas, Barry
passed his opening height of
2.10 (6-10 3/4), but knocked
his first attempt at 2.15 (7-0
1/2) before he came back to
nail it on his second try. He
cleared both 2.20 (7-2 1/2) and
2.24 (7-4 1/4), but couldn't get
over the 2.27 (7-5 1/4) barrier.

"I was a little shaken up
when I got the first knock
down, but I made the adjust-
ment,” said Barry about his
series of jumps. "At 2.20, I
was trying to get in the
rhythm and at 2.24, I was still
trying to get more height.

"T think I had my chances. I
just couldn't get the big jumps
when I needed them. I think I
kind of defeated myself today.
I know that I had the ability
to be in the final. I just didn't
get the job done today."

Barry, who had a chance to
meet and work out briefly
with Kemp (but only heard
about Thompson), said he will
definitely be looking at get-
ting back to the next Worlds
and the Olympic Games.

FRIDAY

Women's 200 final

Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie and Sheniqua
Ferguson, starting at 3 pm
ET

Men's 400 final
Chris Brown, lane five
at 3:20 pm ET

SATURDAY

Women's 4 x 100 relay
heats

12:10 pm ET

Men's 4 x 400 relay heats

12:55 pm ET

Women's 4 x 100 relay
final

2pm ET

Women's 4 x 400 relay
heats

2:15 pm ET

SUNDAY

Women's 4 x 400 relay
final

11:50 am ET

Men's 4 x 400 relay final

12:15 pm ET

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



toa

MOSS

‘Golden girl’ Debbie and ‘Q’ Ferguson qualify for 200 semis

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — Two
days after finishing sixth in the
final of the women's 100
metres, Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie was all business
yesterday as she contested the
preliminary rounds of the 200
at the Olympic Stadium.

She trailed American Mar-
shevet Hooker through the
finish line in second place in
22.71 seconds to qualify with
the third fastest time for
today's semifinal. A well-rest-
ed Hooker, who didn't run in
the century, won the heat in
the fastest time of 22.51.

Meanwhile in the 24th spot,
Sheniqua 'Q' Ferguson tagged
along with Olympic champi-
on Veronica Campbell-Brown
and turned in a season's best
of 23.35 to qualify in the final
spot. Campbell-Brown won
the heat in 23.01 for the 12th
spot.

"It feels good. Basically I
was worried about running



SHENIQUA FERGUSON

and not getting injured,” said
Sheniqua Ferguson, the 19-
year-old Auburn University
bound junior, who is slowly
coming into her own after
making her Worlds debut.

"Basically I just wanted to
go out there and do my best. I
feel happy with the way things
are going. Hopefully in the
next round, I will run even
better."

Ferguson, the champion



DEBBIE FERGUSON-McKENZIE

from the 12th IAAF World
Junior Championships in Byd-
goszca last year, said she’s just
delighted to be competing
against the world's best ath-
letes, especially Campbell-
Brown, whom she ran against
in the second round of the 100
as well.

"T'm just trying to take it all
in,” she said.

Ferguson-McKenzie, now

the training partner of Camp-
bell-Brown in Clearmont,
Florida, said she felt pretty
good after her century,
although her legs felt a little
heavy at the start of the race.

"I'm glad that we didn't
have the rounds this morn-
ing,” said Ferguson-McKen-
zie, who at age 33 could use all
the rest she can get.

"T felt really good. I think
that was one of the easiest
22.7 that I've ran in a while. I
just wanted to run to get in
the top two.

"Twas really running to see
where I was after the 100, so I
was pleased to be in the top
two. So there wasn't really any
concern going into the race or
the way that I ran.”

In today’s semis, Ferguson-
McKenzie will be up first in
lane six just ahead of Camp-
bell-Brown in five and Hook-
er in four at 1:50 pm ET.

Ferguson will follow at 1:56
pm ET in lane one in the sec-
ond heat that will include the
defending Worlds champion
Allyson Felix of the United

‘Fireman’ hot for 400 showdown

FROM page 16

Brown, the 30-year-old
fourth place finisher in the last
two Worlds as well as the
Olympic Games last year in
Beijing, China, said he is confi-
dent that he’s running well

enough to get the monkey off
his back and claim the individ-
ual medal that has eluded him
at one of the two major inter-
national meets.

As for Miller, the 22-year-
old two-time NAIA champion,
Brown said he has been pleased

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to see the runner-up to him at
the BAAA National Champi-
onships perform as well as he
did all season long.

"I'm very proud of him,"
Brown said. "Not just here, but
the way he did throughout the
season. Every meet he ran in
he has improved on his times.
To come here in his first World
Championships and run 44.99
is fantastic for him.”

Miller, whose debut was just
shy of an appearance in the
final, said he made sure that he
wasn't intimidated by all of the
runners around him and that
helped him to get through his
two rounds.

"44.99 what more could I ask
for," he asked? "I came at the
games expecting nothing and I
got rewarded with a 44.99. So
I'm really happy with the per-
formance, even though I'm not
eligible for the final. Hopefully
in years to come, my training
could step up and I can come
out to the Worlds or the
Olympics and step up again.”

For Miller, the experience is
one that he will definitely cher-
ish as he got a chance to run
against Wariner, who was con-
sidered the best quarter-miler
since world record holder
Michael Johnson, until Merritt
burst on the scene last year.

"I know he was in the back
of me, so I just came out to run
my best," said Miller about
competing in lane three with
Wariner trailing him in two. "I
just tried to do my best. But he
was way faster than me.”

As for Miller's place in the
history of the Bahamian ath-

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letics, he joins Brown, the
national record holder at 44.40;
former world champion and
former national record holder
Avard Moncur (44.45); former
NCAA champion Andretti
Bain (44.62); retired former
national record holder Troy
McIntosh (44.73) and Grand
Bahamians Latoy Williams
(44.73) and Andrae Williams
(44.98).

With the relays coming up
on the weekend, Miller will get
a chance to team-up with
Brown, Moncur, Latoy
Williams and Nathaniel McK-
inney. He said he's confident
that the Bahamas can keep its
streak of winning a medal alive
since they started in 1999.

After the championships,
Miller said he will be looking
at whatever opportunity comes
up for a major contract. But in
any event, he intends to con-
tinue in the sport because he
loves the experience he has
gained so far.

States in lane five.

Only the top four finishers
in each heat will advance to
the final on Friday at 3pm ET
just before Chris Brown runs
in the final of the men’s 400m.

"They have the Olympic
champion and the World
champion and every other
champion out here,” said Fer-
guson-McKenzie, the Bahami-
an double sprint champion.
"Every other is out there to
run, so it's going to be a battle,

you just have to come out
fighting if you want to win.”
Not having won a World
title outright, although she was
elevated to the gold after the
suspension of American Mar-
ion Jones at the 8th Worlds
in Edmonton, Canada, in
2001, Ferguson-McKenzie
said she would like nothing
but to hear the national
anthem and see the Bahamian
flag hoisted in the air as she
ascends the podium again.

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009




SHAMAR SANDS (centre) clears the hurdle in the
110 metres event during the World Championships in
Berlin, Germany. He is sandwiched between Hector
Cotto (left) of Puerto Rico and Selim Nurudeen of
Nigeria.

(Photo: Bryan Cummings/The Jamaica Observer)
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Sands advances to semis

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany —
Even though he had a “horri-
ble” start and bumped over
one of the 10 hurdles, Shamar
Sands was still able to
rebound in time to advance
to today’s semifinal of the
men’s 110 metre hurdles at
the IAAF’s 12th World
Championships in Athletics.

In his preliminary rounds
at the Olympic Stadium yes-
terday, Sands finished fifth in
the fifth of seven heats in
13.57 seconds to advance to
the semis on the third fastest
losing time to earn his berth
into the race with 24 com-
petitors left.

"T felt really good about the
race,” said Sands, who clipped
the fifth hurdle during his
heat that was a photo finish
between China’s Wei Ji and

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American Terrance Trammell
in 13.51, followed closely by
Netherlands’ Gregory Sedoc
in 13.54 and Frenchman Dim-
itri Bascou in 13.55.

"T just had a horrible stat,
but once I got going, the mid-
dle of the race felt really
good. So I'm really happy
with the time. Once I get a
better start, I should be all
right."

Tied for 15th with Jamaican
Dwight Thomas in the field
of 46 in the preliminaries,
Sands will run out of lane one
in the last of three heats in
the semis at 12:31 pm ET. The
heat will include Cuban world
record holder and Olympic
champion Dayron Robles in
lane seven and Jamaican
Maurice Wignall in four.

The first two in each heat
plus the two fastest losing
times will qualify for the final
that will be ran two hours lat-
er at 2:55 pm ET.

Improving on his perfor-
mance at the 2007 Worlds in
Osaka, Japan, where he failed
to advance out of the first
round and matching the sec-
ond round appearance at the
Olympic Games last year in
Beijing, China, the 2001
World Youth semifinal said
the goal is to get through one
round at a time.

"T contribute my time and
place all to my start,” said
Sands, reflecting on his per-
formance. "But I'm happy
that I got back into the race. I
just have to improve on the
start.”

With it being day five of the
championships, Sands said he
definitely felt the jitter-bugs
when he stepped out on the
track. But competing first on
the day after his training part-
ner Leevan “Superman”
Sands just missed out on a
medal in the men's triple
jump on Tuesday, Sands said

he was even more encouraged
to go out and run well.

"We help each other
through things because we are
real close," said Sands, who
trains in Auburn under coach
Henry Rolle. "I just told him
that I know he's disappointed,
but he says he has to be
thankful to God.

"And he told me that he
knows I'm ready to go out
there and just show the peo-
ple what he knows I can do.
So I'm just going to go out
there and do what I have to
do. It's going to be hard, but if
I can get my start down
packed, I should be okay.”

However, 24-year-old
Sands admitted that in order
for him to have a successful
showing at the Worlds
tonight, he will have to lower
his national record again,
which he brought down to
13.38 in Ostrava on June 17 in
his final race.

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 20,



2009

For the best sporting action

www. tr une242. COL




toa


snass 12285

Fireman’ hot for 400 chewiewn °



CHRIS BROWN and Tabarie Henry of US Virgin Islands in action...

(AP Photo)

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany —
While everybody ran incredi-
bly fast, Chris “Fireman”
Brown said he just wanted to
do enough to book his spot in
what is anticipated to be one
of the greatest showdowns in
the men's 400 metres final on
Friday night.

On day five of the IAAF's
World Championships in Ath-
letics, Brown had to hold off
Virgin Islands' Tabarie Henry
to win the third and final heat

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COVERAGE

Miller’s personal best
doesn’t put him in final

of the semifinal yesterday at
the Olympic Stadium in 44.95.
Henry clocked 44.97 to also
qualify.

Olympic champion LaShawn
Merritt of the United States
lowered his world leading time
from 44.50 to 44.37 in winning
heat two as he pulled Trinidad
& Tobago's Renny Quow along
in second in a personal best of
44.53.

And two-time World cham-
pion Jeremy Wariner of the
United States did 44.69 in tak-
ing the first heat, leaving
Bahamian Ramon Miller out
of the final eight in the 10th
spot after he dropped his first
round PB of 45.00 to 44.99 or
fifth place to become only the
seventh Bahamian to dip under
the 45-second barrier.

"It was not what the doctor
ordered, or should I say what
the ‘Fireman’ ordered," said
Brown about his race. "My
coach told me to go out there
and get the win. I was just
focusing on the win. I think I
got the first part right, but the
second part was so so.

"But I know I'm pretty
strong enough to go out there
and get on the podium. I didn't
have to run 44 seconds low or
43 high to get back to the final,
even though we have a day's
break. I feel pretty good. I just
have to wait until the day after
tomorrow (Friday)."

When the final is held on Fri-
day at 3:20 pm ET, Brown will





JEREMY WARINER crosses the
line ahead of Ramon Miller of the
Bahamas in a 400m semifinal at
World Athletics Championships in
Berlin on Wednesday... (AP Phato)

run out of lane five, right where
he wants to be in between Mer-
ritt in four and Wariner in six.
Quow, the other threat to a
medal, will be in three.

"You never know what will
happen,” said Brown about the
final. "A lot of the guys haven't
ran their season's best yet. So it
could be anything. It could be
44, it could be 43 or it could be
45. A lot of tension is going into
it. So it will come down to who
goes out and executes. For me
it doesn't matter the time, just
as long as I get on the podium.”

SEE page 13

RAMON MILLER (left) and Wariner come round the curve..

"(AP Photo)

Ce

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd

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See page 14




Still wenans
of hope’
for medal

BERLIN,
Germany — We 5
just passed the
mid-way point of
the Internation-
al Amateur Ath-
letic Federa-
tion's 12th ver-
sion of the
World Champi-
onships in Ath-
letics and
although the
Bahamas has not had its flag
raised during a medal presen-
tation in the Olympic Stadium,
there's still plenty of hope left
over the next four days.

The two individual medals
are now left up to the women's
200 metres and the men's 400
after Leevan “Superman”
Sands was just barely beaten
out for the bronze in the men's
triple jump by Cuban Alexis
Copello Tuesday night.

Although we got another
shocker on Wednesday morn-
ing when Donald Thomas did-
n't qualify in his bid to defend
his 2007 high jump title in Osa-
ka, Japan, it just shows the lev-
el of competition that is exhib-
ited here.

If you don't come here hav-
ing performed at a reasonable
level, they shouldn't expect to
be able to turn it on and per-
form at a higher standard.

Everybody else who has
been performing all year long
are taking it to the next level,
which means that if you were
not at a certain standard before
you got here, you wouldn't be
able to contain with those who
have.

Case in point. Many expect-
ed Derrick Atkins to be in the
final of the men's century, but
he didn't even get out of the
first round.

Since winning the silver
behind American Tyson Gay’s
gold medal performance and
Jamaican Asafa Powell’s
bronze in Osaka, Atkins has
not had that type of season to
make him a contender here.

But one has to agree that
nobody anticipated that he
would not have even gotten out
of the first round.

As for Thomas, he too has
not had the type of season that
led to his triumph in Osaka and
it showed in his performance
here as well.

He obviously lacked the
"killer" instinct that his peers
brought to the competition yes-
terday when they needed to dig
deep and pull out that big jump
on their attempts at 7-6 1/4 and
for the most part, they got the
job done to earn their spot in
the final.

Leevan “Superman” Sands
had to stretch for two season’s
best performances to stake his
claim at a shot for a medal in
the men's triple jump on Tues-
day.

The difference was just four
centimetres that separated him
and Copello for the bronze.
Copello just proved that he
wanted it a little more and that
was what separated him from
Sands in the final analysis.

So it's going to be interest-
ing to see how the final days of
the championships unfold. I'm
still looking at the possibility
of two to three medals, which
would be right in our range.

STUBBS



OPINION
= —_


THE TRIBUNE

busine

THURSDAY,

AUGUST 20,

Ss

2009



SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net



Resort buyer
fold to revise
its proposal

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor _

T H E
prospective
purchaser of
the Hotel
Corporation’s |
last resort
property has |—
been asked |
“to revise

as)

some parts of .
their propos- a

al”, the minis-
ter of tourism
and aviation
confirmed yesterday, which
will involve providing the
Government with details
about how the project will be
‘phased in’.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace, in a brief interview with
Tribune Business, confirmed
that Scheck Industries, the
Illinois-based industrial and
real estate developer, had
been asked to revise its pro-
posal and, until these submis-
sions had been received and
approved, its acquisition of
the Andros-based Lighthouse
Yacht Club & Marina would
not be permitted.

SEE page 11B

Es Eleles)

‘Excellent opportunity



$2m manufacturing
plant aids re-training

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

he Canadian custom wood-

work manufacturing com-

pany, KP Manufacturing,

yesterday said it had

opened its $2 million
Bahamas-based production and training
facility, where prisoners and interested
individuals will be trained to make the
same high-end products it sells across
North America.

Kristine Smed, the company’s owner,
said KP Manufacturing (Bahamas) pri-
mary output was top-of-the-line wood
furniture, and its primary purpose is to
trained unskilled individuals in the art
of fine woodworking.

“Tam hoping when they are trained
they will sprout out and start their own
companies,” said Ms Smed. “ In Calgary,
probably 90 per cent of the shops are
started from our shop. Most of the shop
owners have worked, at KP so I'm
assuming in the future everybody would
be trained at KP Bahamas.”

According to her, the shop has already
begun training four inmates from Her
Majesty's Prison Fox Hill, and it plans to
train more in the future.

Those who enroll in KP (Bahamas)
four-year training programme are paid



EMPLOYEES of KP Manufacturing (Bahamas), including inmates of Her Majesty’s Prisons
involved in the company’s training programme, flanking the company’s signature woodworking
figure...

about $700 bi- monthly, while the prisons
are paid for the labour they release to the
firm for the programme.

Those individuals engaged in the train-
ing programme will be responsible for
putting out the same high-end product
manufactured at the company's 60,000
square foot factory in Calgary, in Alber-

ta, Canada, under the tutelage of master
carpenters.

“Tf somebody's got a good job and
doesn't need any help then they are not
our people. I want lifestyle change people
that need an opportunity that nobody

SEE page 8B

Retailer’s sales buck recession



to get house in order’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian construc-
tion industry is hoping the
Contractors Bill will be before
Parliament and passed into
law before year-end, Tribune
Business was told yesterday,
as the economic downturn
represents “an excellent
opportunity for the industry
to get its house in order”.

Stephen Wrinkle, the
Bahamian Contractors Asso-
ciation’s (BCA) president,
said that given the absence
of a licensing/standards
regime that provided a guide
to which contractors were
able to do a specific job, both
the industry and its clients
currently incurred “exhaus-
tive” costs and time dealing
with a paper-intensive appli-
cation/selection process.

To prepare Bahamian con-
tractors for the registration
and licensing regime the Con-
tractors Bill will usher in once
it becomes statute law, Mr
Wrinkle said the BCA
planned to restart its seminar
series in conjunction with the
Ministry of Works and
Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute (BTVI).

“At the moment, the Bill is
with the Attorney General’s

Foul find it all at Palm Cay

Contractors hope
legislation to regulate
industry in place

by year-end

Office, and they are incorpo-
rating the final changes that
the BCA and the Ministry of
Works agreed to,” Mr Wrin-
kle told Tribune Business.
“We’ve basically finished with
the Bill.

“The changes were minor
- just a few minor details.
They had to do with the cate-
gories of contractor. We’ve
agreed basically all the out-
standing issues with the Bill.
We’ve had the full support of
the Ministry of Works in this
effort. They’ve been slow but
supportive.”

Mr Wrinkle added that the
BCA understood the Bill was
now with the Legal Depart-
ment in the Attorney Gener-
al’s Office, and “in the final
stages” there. Once that min-
istry completed its work, the
Bill would be returned to the
Ministry of Works. If Neko
Grant, the minister of works,
was satisfied, he would then

SEE page 10B

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By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FREEPORT-based
housewares/building materi-
als supplier yesterday attrib-
uted its ability to weather the
recession to “internal opera-
tional efficiencies” and a pos-
itive corporate culture, with
year-to-date sales trending in
line with 2008 and 2007 levels,
and expansion being eyed
“when the time is right”.

Christopher Lowe, opera-
tions manager for Kelly’s
(Freeport), told Tribune Busi-
ness that the company had
“weathered the downturn
quite well” despite all the lay-























offs and ‘doom and gloom’
surrounding it in the Grand
Bahama economy, and it was
continuing to hire to replace
staff who left.

Even though Grand
Bahama’s economy has yet to
emerge from the slump initi-
ated by the Royal Oasis clo-
sure in 2004, something exac-
erbated by the current global
recession, Mr Lowe said sales
at Kelly’s (Freeport) were “all
in all, in par with last year and
the year before”.

While sales year-to-date
had often been up one month,
then down the next, Mr Lowe
saying they were “up and
down in the top 3 per cent”,

he confirmed that overall they
were trending in line with
2007 and 2008 comparatives.

“This speaks to the effi-
ciency of operations, supply
and demand, being in tune
with the customer base and
giving them the prices and
commodities they want,” Mr
Lowe told Tribune Business.

“We’re looking at an
expansion when the time is
right. You plan when you can.
We’re looking at the future
to see what direction we
expand in when the time is
right, and when there is more
stability in the Government

SEE page 4B

Money Safe.
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Freeport
Concrete chief
‘confident’ on
Q1 profitability

* Acknowledges possible
fall into negative equity
a ‘concern’, but optimistic
will not happen because
$500,000 for Home Centre
inventory will come through
* Chair and majority
shareholder Babak looking
at guaranteeing some funds

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FREEPORT Concrete’s
chief executive yesterday told
Tribune Business he was
“fairly confident” that the
BISX-listed firm would return
to profitability in the first
quarter of its next financial
year, indicating its chairman
was looking at guaranteeing
the $500,000 in extra financing
required to take its retail arm
into profitability.

Ray Simpson said his major
problem remained getting the
additional $500,000 financing
required to boost inventory
levels, and thus sales, at its

SEE page 12B



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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009

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posed Securities Industry Act
amendments, chiefly the abil-
ity of foreign auditors to sign-
off on licensee audits and the

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The Bahamas Institute of
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mission to assess the impact
the proposed Act amend-
ments and their accompany-

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THE TRIBUNE




MEMBERS of the Securities Commission and Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants...

Accountants meet
regulator over Act

ing regulations will have on
its members and Bahamian
accountants in general.

Apart from the ability of
foreign auditors, unlicensed
by BICA, to conduct audit
sign-offs, and the Commis-
sion’s power to appoint audi-
tors without reference to the
licensee concerned, the talks
also focused on extra assur-
ance services that the regula-
tor could impose at licensee
expense.

BICA said, following the
meeting, that it needed to
obtain membership consen-
sus on the issues discussed. A
follow-up meeting will be held
to finalise the consultation
process.

The meeting was attended
by the Commission’s execu-
tive director, Hillary
Deveaux, and his legal team.
Representing BICA was its
committee that had reviewed
the Securities Industry Act
amendments.

Among the BICA officials
present was president Reece
Chipman; Myra Lundy-Mor-
timer, chairperson for legal
reform; Basil Ingraham, chair-
person for small and medium-
sized practices; Sheldon
Cartwright, chairperson for
public relations and BICA’s
website.

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THE TRIBUNE

Schools monitor
enrollment level

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE CATHOLIC Board
of Education is paying close
attention to enrollment num-
bers at Family Island schools
due to the economic down-
turn, its director said yester-
day, but to date few families
have needed to take advan-
tage of instituted payment
programmes.

Claudette Rolle said the
Board was concerned that
Catholic schools on islands
such as Bimini and Eleuthera
could see low enrollment
come next week, when
schools return from summer
holidays.

However, for New Provi-
dence schools, she said enroll-
ment has been flat over the
past two years.

Mrs Rolle said the eco-
nomic downturn did not affect
exit numbers this year, with
the majority of 4,100 students
enrolled in the beginning of
the school year remaining
throughout. And throughout
the year there had been few
defaults on school fee pay-
ments.

“We offered that [payment

plan] last year, but not many
persons took advantage of it,”
said Mrs Rolle. “We were
still, in terms of payment and
responsibility, able to take
care of the responsibilities
financially -we cut out a lot
of field trips.”

She said the schools tried
to give parents savings wher-
ever they could so they could
focus on paying tuition.

Principal of Kingsway
Academy, George Baxter,
provided a similar trend for
enrollment for the new school
year. He said enrollment
numbers have been largely
flat over the past several
years.

And according to him, the
school had not seen signifi-
cant tuition defaults over the
2008-2009 school year.

“T think by and large col-
lections were consistent,” said
Mr Baxter. “People made
payment plans and things
were managed quite well by
our accounts department.”

Many schools told Tribune
Business that the real test of
true enrollment numbers will
be within the first week of the
beginning of the term.

However, most schools
expect those numbers to

remain at levels they have
been in previous years.
“We’re looking forward to
a good year and that all things
will go well,” said principal of
Kingsway’s Elementary
school, Cassandra Smith.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.
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aN
NAD

Nassau Airport

Development Company

com

Mario Carey Realty

2b's about yaw... Let's tale.

Nassau Airport Development Company Limited (NAD) is seeking a
Proponent (individual, consortium or joint venture that includes an
experienced restaurant operator] to finance, design, develop, operate
and manage a 4500 sq, ft. (approximate} sit down restaurant and bar
in the new U.S, Departures Terminal currently under construction at
the Lynden Pindling International Airport. This restaurant will be a
world-class facility with a diverse menu, excellent customer service,
high volume and turnover with a true sense of place.

Mandatory qualifications

i, Proponents must be Baharnian and incorporated in The Bahamas.
ii. Proponents must have operated a similar restaurant facility
within the last three (3) years.

NAD's goals and objectives are to:

(a) achieve a high standard of excellence and customer service:

(o) offer a mix of concepts that will enhance the image of the Lynden
Pindling International Airport as a world class airport:

(c) offer food & beverage choices to passengers at reasonable

prices;

(d) offer a mix of local, regional and national and international
brand-name companies;

(e) develop and design food & beverage facilities that complement
the qualities of the new terminal while recognizing the distinctive
spirit, character and ‘sense of place’ of the Bahamas; and

(f| optimize revenue to NAD.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 3B

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Interested parties may pick-up the Request for Proposal package at
NAD's offices at the reception desk on the second floor
Domestic/International Terminal at Lynden Pindling International Airport
between the hours of 8:00am and 4:00pm, from August 12th to 24th,
2009. A mandatory pre-proposal briefing will be held in the Arawak
Lounge at the Airport on Wednesday, August 26th at 10:00am.
PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

TENDER FOR SCHOOL / FACILITY
SECURITY SERVICES

1.The Ministry of Education invites sealed bids from eligible qualified
firms for the provision of security services at the following schools/facility
in New Providence:

-—wo_| SCHOOL / FACILITY ESTIMATED ESTIMATED 6087 _
Thelma Gibson Prima | $95,000.00 | 000.00

A. F. Adderley Junior High $95,000.00

a

[3 |G. Reeves Junior High | $96,000.00 +
[4 | _H.0.Nash Junior High | $96,000.00 |
[5 | LW Young Junior High | $95,00000 +
[6 | _.6. Sweeting Serior High | $89,00000 |
[8 | _C.R, Waker Senior High | $95,00000 |
[9 V. Bethel Senior High | $95,000.00 |

| =§10 ~~ | Government High $89,000.00
| 11 | RLM. Bailey Senior High $89,000.00

ae Learning Resources Section | $92,000.00

2. Assessment of bids will be conducted by the Tenders Board utilizing established
procedures.

. Interested eligible qualified firms may receive Tender Documents from the Security
Headquarters located Claridge Road beginning Monday 17th August, 2009 between the
hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

. No firm/company will be eligible to be awarded more than one contract.

. All bids must be accompanied by copies of a valid Business Licence, and evidence of
payment of National Insurance.

. Bids must be enclosed in a plain sealed envelope bearing no identification of the bidder,
and must be clearly marked across the top “Bid for Security Services (Name of School)
- MOE”.

. All bids must be delivered to the Office of the Financial Secretary, Cecil Wallace-
Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, Bahamas, no later than 5.00 p.m. on Monday, 24th
August, 2009.

. Bids will be opened at 10.30 a.m. on Tuesday, 25th August, 2009 at the Ministry of
Finance, Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, Bahamas. Tenderers or their
designated representative are invited to attend the openings.

. The Ministry of Education reserves the right to reject any or all bid submissions.

Signed:
Elma I. Garraway (Mrs.)
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Education

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THE TRIBUNE



ee =") =
Retailer’s sales buck recession

FROM page 1B

and the Port Authority.”

Mr Lowe added: “I think,
all things considered, we’re
doing quite well. We’re quite
an efficient operation. We’ve
got really good morale among
our staff, and everyone is
working as a team, pulling
together and looking after the
consumer’s interest as well as
the company’s and their own.
There is a recession, but we’re
weathering it quite well.

“Lack of vision and lack of
direction on the part of the
Grand Bahama Port Author-
ity and the Government is
obviously contributing to
Grand Bahama’s dismal state.
But there are success stories
out there, and they need to
be emulated and understood.

“Why are they doing OK
in this recession? Is the com-
pany’s internal structure and
culture a positive one, or is it
a negative one.”

Praising Kelly’s
(Freeport’s) 100-strong work-
force as being among “the

best staff in the Bahamas”,
Mr Lowe added: “We’re not
trimming. We’re still hiring,
replacing good people who
are moving on with more
good people who want an
opportunity to thrive and suc-
ceed in a good business envi-
ronment.

“The customer base trusts
us, the staff trust us, and we
trust them. We are part of this
economy, and are making the
decisions that make a differ-
ence. We have to continue to
put our best foot forward, and
continue to invest in this com-
munity.”

Mr Lowe suggested that
instead of lamenting over a
decline in top-line growth due
to a recession-induced drop-
off in consumer demand,
Bahamian businesses had the
power to withstand the down-
turn by simply focusing on the
internal issues under their
direct control.

Urging “constant self-eval-
uation”, Mr Lowe said:
“There’s no use blaming the
external factors when there is
so much under your direct

control where it concerns
your business. You have to
be constantly self-evaluating.

“The true test of the mettle
of a company is how well it
does in the hard times, not
the good times.”

With staff training and the
development of employee
benefits also critical to work-
force productivity, Mr Lowe
added: “There’s an all-inclu-
siveness so far as management
and staffing - the develop-
ment of trust within a com-
pany or corporate atmosphere
that everyone can embrace
and hold on to, something
that is sorely lacking in other
realms in the Bahamas.”

Meanwhile, Mr Lowe said
there had been “a shift in the
type of product” consumers
were buying as a result of the
recession, with the trend mov-
ing in favour of “essential
renewals and repairs to
homes”, While plumbing and
electrical goods sales had
increased as a result of the
‘fix-ups’ trend, there had also
been a surge in demand for
fishing related hardware.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 7B

Accountants head
attends conference

THE Bahamas Institute of
Chartered Accountants
(BICA) president, Reece
Chipman, attended the World
Council of Credit Unions Con-
ference (WOCCU) that was
held in Barcelona in July 2009.

Mr Chipman, who is also a
Board member of the
Bahamas Public Co-Operative

“redit Union, was present for
ssions that included the
Basel agenda and capital
requirements; risk manage-
ment and Know Your Cus-
tomer (K YC) initiatives; and
accounting standards relating
to small and medium-sized
enterprises.
Mr Chipman is pictured

above with Karl Cordwener,
deputy secretary general of the
Basel Committee on Banking
Supervision, and below with
Jan Engstrom, Board member
of the International Account-
ing Standards Board (IASB)
UK with responsibilities in
Latin America and the
Caribbean.

Announcing the practice of:

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Surgical e
Oncologist

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LEGAL NOTICE

EBBVALE LIMITED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

a) The above Company is in dissolution under the
provision of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act, 2000

The Dissolution of said Company commenced on the
28th day of August, 2008, when The Court Order was
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said Company is George
Clifford Culmer of BDO Mann Judd, P. O. Box
N-10144, 3rd Floor, Ansbacher House, East Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.

GEORGE CLIFFORD CULMER
Liquidator

eel >

Mr. Peter Matthews

IMPORTANT NOTICE

Please be advised that Mr. Peter
Matthews is no longer employed
by Construction Services Group.
As aresult, he is NOT authorized to
conduct any business on the
company’s behalf.

Management

ROYAL @FIDELITY

CAEL TOLL

Ply Mal ee a oe eel

We are growing!
Royal Fidelity invites applications for the position of:

- Vice President, Corporate Finance -

Reporting directly to the President, the successful
applicant will be responsible for:

Management and development of Corporate
Finance business in Bahamas

Monitoring and oversight of investment
management activities in both Bahamas and
Barbados markets

Business development across all business lines
Public speaking engagements

Requirements:
Bachelors or equivalent degree in finance
A minimum of 15 years experience in an
investment bank, preferably with international
experience
Strong interpersonal, oral and written
communications skills
Proven ability to innovate and develop
new product and services
Willingness and ability to travel frequently
around the Caribbean
Excellent marketing and communications skills

HUMAN RESOURCES

Re: VP, Corporate Finance

51 Frederick Street

P.O, Box N-4853

Nassau

F: 328.1108
careers@fidelitybahamas.com

PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE
August 28", 2009 to:

ABSOLUTELY NO
PHONE CALLS

PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



$2m manufacturing
plant aids re-training

FROM page 1B

gives them,” said Ms Smed.

“It’s not cheap labour we're
looking for. They're not
allowed to swear, not allowed
to fight, not allowed to do
much of anything besides lis-
ten and learn.”

KP (Canada) has produced
fine, finished boardroom
tables and furniture for firms
such as New York Telecom
and Papa John's Pizza, and
created a custom boardroom
table for Metro Goldwyn
Mayer (MGM), complete

lifts out the centre of the table
to reveal a series of television
screens.

Mrs Smed admits that KP's
products are not cheap - the
company uses only hard
woods and custom inlays -
and may not be for the aver-
age home or office.

However, she hopes to tap
the middle of the Bahamian
market as well as the high-
end.

Ms Smed suggested that
raw materials will have to be
imported from Canada in
order to produce the same
quality products being man-

tory, then assembled in the
Bahamas to keep costs low.

According to her, KP
(Canada) has installed furni-
ture in several offices in the
Orange Hill area, and from
its Abundant Life Road loca-
tion here in Nassau is fur-
nishing a house in South
Ocean Estates.

Ms Smed said no other fur-
niture maker in the Bahamas
will have the same finishes as
KP (Bahamas), which she
likened to a glass topped

desk. The company offers
woods such as Maple Burl,
Curly Maple and Walnut.

Ms Smed's father took over
the now 82-year-old Canadian
carpentry business in 1965,
and has trained hundreds of
cabinet makers, sustaining the
dying art of wood craftman-
ship in Calgary.

Ms Smed now hopes to
train a new generation of cab-
inet makers in the Bahamas
and further expand her 15,000
square foot facility.

with a hydraulic system that ufactured in the Calgary fac-

NOTICE

EBBVALE LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, commencing on the 28th day of
August 2008. The Court Order has been duly
registered by the Registrar. The Liquidator is George Clifford
Culmer, C/O BDO Mann Judd, P. O. Box N-10144, 3rd
Floor, Ansbacher House, East Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

All persons having claims against the above named Company
are required on or before the 18th day of September 2009
to send their names and addresses and particulars of their
debts or claims to the Liquidator of the Company or, in de-
fault thereof they may be excluded from the benefit of any
distribution made before such debts are proved.

GEORGE CLIFFORD CULMER

Liquidator

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*

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NAME
ADDRESS:
Ask:

TELEPHONE:

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MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT JC

. NOTICE

CC

CORRIDOR 18

SAUNDERS BEACH AREA
ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION
JOSE CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES S.A. has been contracted for the Completion af the New

providence Road Improvement
Projact - International Package.

* 10 Ten (10) Casuarinas Trees will be removed along Saunders Beach (Corridor 18)
: There will also be a permanent closure of the access to Vista Marina from West Bay Street effactive August
24, 2009. Motorist are advised to use the following alternatives routes:

Grove Avenue through Coral Drive.

There will be delays along the vicinity due to the one-way traffic flow system. Local diversions will be
sign posted in due course and further information will be provided on the local media.

Tal: 242-322-894 142-322-2610

Emiail:bahamasneighbors @cartellonea.com.ar



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Publicisherebyadvised that |, WINDYS DEROSINS
of Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name
to WENDY DEROSIN. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE
VALIANT HEART LIMITED

NOTICES HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) | VALIANT HEART LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 18"

August 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to

and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Ms. Celene Koh of 1 Raffles
Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

Dated this 20" day of August A. D. 2009



Ms. Celene Koh
Liquidator

NOTICE
DR. JAMIL ANGELO MINNIS

Announces the opening of his
Practice in Obstetrics & Gynecology at
Oxford Medical Centre, 4th Terrace East
off Collins Avenue, Centreville on 4th
August, 2009

Telephone: (242) 328-2566/7
Fax: (242) 325-2249

Management Opportunity
A well established company is considering highly qualified
applicants for the role of

Financial Controller

Requirements & Responsibilities:

- Lead and motivate accounting staff

- Experience in the preparation and interpretation of Financial
Statements

- Must be able to develop and maintain an effective system of internal
accounting and operational controls in a Hotel environment

- Must possess five years experience in a supervisory accounting
position

- Self motivated with strong analytical and problem-solving skills

- Must be conversant with hotel accounting software, with emphasis in
areas Food & Beverage, Front Office and Payroll

- Liaise with external Auditors, third party service providers and relevant
Regulatory & Compliance Authorities

- Preparation of budgets

- Timely and accurate preparation, presentation and interpretation of
financial reports

- Excellent written and oral communication skills

- Able to work extended hours, weekends and holidays

QUALIFICATIONS

- BAin Accounting from an accredited University

- International accounting designation (CPA/CA) with minimum of
5 years post qualification experience,

- Advance working knowledge of Excel

- Working knowledge of Microsoft Word

Interested persons should apply on or before
August 29th, 2009

Attention: CONTROLLER
DA 81270
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N3207

Nassau, Bahamas

Suitably qualified candidates need only apply.
Salary is commensurate with experience and qualification.
PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



re
FOR RENT

Market Street North,
Near Central Bank

Renovated Office Space
900 sq. ft. $1500.00 per month

Warehouse Space
850 sq. ft - 750.00 per month

Warehouse Space
420 sq. {$375.00 per month

Office Space (as Is)
1500 sq. ft. $2000.00 per month

Secured Parking Space
$100.00 per month

Contact Tony Duncombe at

326.5121

tonyduncombe1@coralwave.com

The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the following

position:

PLUMBER

The Plumber repairs and installs various plumbing systems, fixture,

pumps, piping and related equipment.
This position 1s open to candidates with the following qualifications:

* Completion of secondary school diploma.
¢ Four years of journeyman level in plumbing.

PERSONALATTRIBUTES:

¢ Must be skilled in plumbing maintenance.

¢ Must have a valid Bahamian driver’s license and the ability to drive
passenger vehicles, forklift, stake body and pickup trucks with manual

transmission.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation
package including performance-based incentives, medical and
dental insurance, life insurance, pension and opportunities for

training and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are

eligible for employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

a Se
‘Excellent opportunity

to get house in order’

FROM page 1B

take the legislation to Cabi-
net.

“We'd like to see this done
by the end of the year,” Mr
Wrinkle told Tribune Busi-
ness. “With the economy in
the doldrums, it’s an excellent
opportunity for us to get our
house in order.”

In the absence of a licens-
ing/categorisation regime that
sorted Bahamian contractors
according to technical com-
petence and the type of job
they had the ability to do,
industry players were
required to complete huge
amounts of paperwork for dif-
ferent contracts they bid on.

The BCA president said
that “every time a project
comes along”, Bahamian con-
tractors not only had to fill
out forms demonstrating their
experience, but also forms for
pre-qualification, their finan-
cial status and bonding
requirements.

This exercise was then
repeated many times over for
different clients, Mr Wrinkle
stating as an example that
Bahamian contractors were

‘oe

F a, ¥ nau . IPE

oe E ise we

Tel: 326-1111 «

Healthy Kids
Back to School

having to fill out similar forms
for Ledcor/Wooslee Domin-
ion, the general contractor for
the Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport (LPIA) rede-
velopment, and the National
Insurance Board (NIB) on
the Sandilands Rehabilitation
Centre project.

The contractor licensing
regime, Mr Wrinkle
explained, would eliminate
the need for much of this
repetitive paperwork and
associated costs, since it
would signal to developers
which companies had the abil-
ity to meet their require-
ments.

“All of this exhaustive
paperwork is repetitive,
because no one knows who is
qualified to do what,” Mr
Wrinkle said........ “But it’s
hard to blame the client,
because they do not know
who is qualified to do it.

“They have to do an
exhaustive process, sorting
through 200-300 applications
for five to six tenders. It costs
a huge amount of resources
at both ends. That’s why we
want to get the Bill in place.”

Mr Wrinkle said the BCA
planned to take its seminar

series from New Providence,
where some 2,000 Level One
contractors were based, to
Grand Bahama, Abaco, Exu-
ma, Eleuthera, Andros and
Long Island in a bid to
enhance the education
process. All this was planned
before Christmas.

“We’re moving to get the
contractor seminars back on
the road,” Mr Wrinkle said,
“and get contractors ready for
registration. They'll be called
for registration and, subse-
quently, licensing.”

The BCA was working with
BTVI and the latter’s outside
consultant, Daytona Beach
College, to develop the edu-
cation curriculum for the con-
struction industry.

“What we are trying to do
is include specific items the
Ministry of Works wants, the
BCA wants and the industry
needs - code compliance and
things like that,” Mr Wrinkle
said.

“The Ministry is cognisant
of the fact we have an oppor-
tunity to offer all contractors
a basic package of education
and information material, so
that everyone would start on
the same page.”

ADVANCED FAMILY a CENTER & MEDISPA

Fax 326-1112

Summer Campaign

Take advantage of the summer break
and get your physical done Today!

This summer belore school &

darts, annual physicals

are one of the most important things on your “To Do List’

Annual Physical for the Kids & You!!
Family Medicine & Skin Care Clinic Mon - Sat 9-6

The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invites qualified applicants to apply for the
position of Technician | (Instrument), responsible for conducting calibrations, repairs, routine
checks and tests contro! instrumentation in its Generation Power Plant.

The successful candidate 1s expected to lead instrument technicians im fault finding,
iroubleshooting and repairs on instrument and control system.

Duties and tasks are as follows:

Directs instrument lechnecnins when required

Assist with the writing of procedures,

Prepares reports on failures and repairs.

Maintain historical records.

Analyze and calibrates control systems.

Plans jobs and secures necessary tools and equipment.
Calibrates electrome & pneumatic mstruments,
Troubleshoot and install instrument and control system problems.
Repairs pneumatic and electronic instruments,
Trains subordinates in instrument repairs.
Capable of working from manufactures blueprints or sketches with limited supervision.
Responsible for safety and training of men working with him.

Perform any other tasks as assigned

Applicants must have a High School Diploma, BGCSE passes of C or better in Math, English
and a Technological Certificate in Electronics or its equivalent from an accredited institution.

Applicants must also has

¢a minimum of five (5) years power station or equivalent industrial

experience or three (3) years ata Technician Il level in the Maintenance Department of an

industrial facility.

Applications with supporting documentation including a clean Police Certificate and proof of
Bahamian citizenship should be sent to:-

Pete h,

Application forms can be found on the Embassy’s website
nassau.usembassy.gov under Key Embassy Links and employment
opportunities. Completed applications should be returned to
the Embassy via email to fernanderra@state.gov or faxed to
(242)328-8251, addressed to the Human Resources Office no later
than Thursday August 27th, 2009.

Ue
Bie e al
ORS ee tite)

GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY

Ppptnny aeiad Aveta) Cader Hegel

Freeport, Grand Bahama


THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 11B

Resort buyer told to revise its proposal



FROM page 1B

“T don’t know about imminent
but, yes, there’s likely to be some
movement on that,” Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace confirmed to Tribune
Business, when contacted about how
close the Government was to
approving the Scheck Industries
acquisition and project.

He added: “We’ve asked them to
revise some parts of their proposal.
They’ve agreed to do that. We’ve
not received those revisions as yet.
Until we’ve seen them and they’ve
been approved, so announcement
will be forthcoming.”

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
explained that Scheck Industries’
plans for the Lighthouse Yacht Club
& Marina, and the surrounding real

estate, would be implemented in sev-
eral phases once it was finally
approved by the Government and
the purchase consummated.

“Their revised proposal is going
to provide is with the phasing, and
from that will come the number of
jobs to be created and the level of
investment involved,” the tourism
minister explained.

“Very obviously, the Lighthouse
Yacht Club & Marina will be
expanded in the first phase. They’re
looking at extending the subdivision
with a housing development, and a
golf course.

“All of this is being guided by an
Environmental Impact Assessment
(EIA) that was completed last
month to give an indication of what
was possible on that site. That was a

very important piece of the puzzle.”

Tribune Business revealed last
month that Scheck Industries was
the front-runner to acquire the
Andros-based resort which, accord-
ing to the company’s website, it plans
to re-name as the Andros Sporting
Club.

Apart from the Lighthouse Yacht
Club & Marina itself, the Hotel Cor-
poration also owns some 7,000-
10,000 acres of land in that part of
Andros. The precise size of its land-
holdings is unclear, though, as the
land needs to be surveyed and the
boundaries established.

Residents of Coakley Town have
been consulted on the Scheck Indus-
tries project, which has been modi-
fied several times to account for the
EIA, which was prepared by the

consulting firm, Black & Veatch.

The project is also said to include
a marina, marina villas and shop-
ping/retail facilities, fishing lodges
and boutique hotels. The Lighthouse
Yacht Club & Marina currently has
about 30 employees, and features a
20-slip marina, beach frontage and a
20-room hotel. Yet the average occu-
pancy at the Fresh Creek property is
only about 35 per cent.

According to the Hotel Corpora-
tion’s 2004 accounts, the appraised
value of the Lighthouse Yacht Club
& Marina’s buildings was pegged at
$2.314 million, with the land valued
at $400,000 and furniture, fixtures
and equipment valued at $528,173.
Yet allowing for depreciation, the
net book value was reduced to
$1.547 million.

TST

For the stories

hehind the news,
ES
Montlays



NOTICE
CENSUS PRE-TEST

The Census Office of the Department of Statistics will conduct a Pre-Census Test
beginning Monday, August 17 — Sunday, August 30, 2009, in New Providence
and Grand Bahama. The Pre-test is an integral part of the Census of Population
and Housing which takes place in May 2010.

The main focus of this exercise is to test the questionnaire for Census 2010 in
terms of relevancy, as it relates to the census questions, average length of time
it takes to complete the questionnaire, weaknesses in the questions, instructions
or the design of the questionnaire, etc. To this end, enumerators with official
identification will visit households in New Providence and Grand Bahama in
order to collect information on households and individuals. The Census Pre-test
requires that the public provide information on the following:

Housing Characteristics such as type of dwelling, year the dwelling was built,
main source of water supply, number of bedrooms, etc

Population Characteristics which include information on age, sex, marital status,
health, disability, education, income, etc.

The data generated from the Pre-test will be held in strictest confidence.
All persons are urged to co-operate in this very important national exercise.

a
2” PICTET
PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

ACCOUNTING OFFICER

MINIMUM REOUIREMENTS:-
“CPA, CA of equivalent
~At least five (5) vears experience (minimum 3 years with an audit firm}
-Banking experience
-Strong communication skills,
«Well organised with structured and methodical work approach.
-Dynamie and proactive with a positive attitude,
«High level of computer literacy and office skills with a strong ability to prepare
Microsoft PowerPoint presentations,
“Strong analytical skills with the ability to solve issues efficiently.
-Ability to work independently and take initiatives,
«Flexibility to respond to the reprioritisation of tasks.

DUTIES INCLUDE:-

- Preparation of the Bank's financial statements for internal and external reporting
purposes,

- Preparation of all regulatory reports in compliance with mandated format and
deadlines (¢.¢. The Central Bank and The Securities Commission).

- Production of professional presentations in line with corporate image.

- Development and preparation of intemal statistical reports for senior management

- Preparation of various client financial statements and other types of customized
reports

- Assisting with the preparation of supporting schedules and coordination of statutory
audits,

- Responsibility for the administration and booking of accounting activity conceming
licensed banking subsidiaries,

ABSOLUTELY SO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED,
Please deliver Resume and two (2) references BY HAND
AO LATER THAS SEPTEMBER 4, 21009 to:-

The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
West Bay Street and Blake Road
Nassau, Bahamas

Offices in
Lawanne, Geneva, Zurich, Luxembourg, London, Montreal, Nassau, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong
Kong, Frankfurt, Florence, Milan, Madrid, ‘Paris, Rome, Turin



£%

Dy

“ane

The National Insurance Board

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

Request for Contractors Pre-Qualification

The Nattonal Insurance Board (NIB) is seeking to pre-qualify contractors to bid on
works to complete the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre - Robert Smith Child & Adolescents
and Special Education Unit, Fox Hill, Nassau, Bahamas; the project 1s a joint venture of
NIB and The Bahamas Government. Contractors must be tn compliance with the
National Insurance Act (soctal security programme), and in good standing with the
relevant Government agencies.

Pre-qualification documents may be collected from the Security Booth at NIB’s
Clifford Darling Complex, Blue Hill Road, from August 14 to August 21, 2009.

Pre-Qualification documents should be signed, sealed and dropped in the pre-
qualification box at the Security Booth, Clifford Darling Complex on or before
12:00 Noon on August 21, 2009.

The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invited qualified applicants to apply
for the position of Human Resources Manager.

The position is responsible for the management of Human Resources and Labour
Relation activities as well as the activities of instructors engaged in training and
developing employees.

The successful candidate will be expected to:

* Develop, implement and modify as necessary, Human Resource procedures
and guidelines.

‘ Negotiate and manage Union Agreements.

* Represent management in the resolution of grievances and labour disputes

* Manage Organizational training and development activities.

* Manage budgets to ensure that training cost do not exceed allocated funds.

* Keep abreast of and as necessary provide advice and guidance to Directors,
Managers and Supervisors on organizational and external procedures and
statutes relative to Human Resources and Industrial Relations.

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

* Bachelor's degree in human Resources or related field with a professional
certification preferred

* Five (5) years Human Resources/Training experience at the supervisory level

: Experiance in union negotiations and management of union agreements

* Must possess proven leadership skills and have a reputation as a honest
and ethical employee

* Must be results oriented with proven ability to perform under pressure of
deadlines.

* Must be confidential in nature, well organized, accurate and attentive to detail.

Applications with supporting documentation including a clean Police Certificate
and proof of Bahamian citizenship should be sent to;

A eh

Te
ie e al

OS ee litite)

GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY

Ppptney iad Aveiad) Cater |

Freeport, Grand Bahama


PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Freeport Concrete chief
‘confident’ on Q1 profitability

FROM page 1B

Home Centre retail outlet, a
development that was essen-
tial to returning Freeport
Concrete to profitability and
avoiding any slippage into
negative equity.

Freeport Concrete’s accu-
mulated deficit stood at
$5.789 million as at May 31,
2009, reflecting the steady
losses the company has

years. These have chipped
away at shareholder equity,
which at that date stood only
at $527,260.

While acknowledging that
the equity position was a con-
cern, Mr Simpson yesterday
told Tribune Business he was
“confident” this would be
avoided.

He was optimistic that the
additional funds to finance
the necessary Home Centre
inventory purchases would be
forthcoming, and this would

incurred over the past several

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOZIE TELFORE of EAST
STREET SOUTH, MALCOLM ROAD, P.O. BOX N-2557,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20‘ day of August, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

help return Freeport Con-






























crete to profitability during
the first quarter of its 2009-
2010 financial year - the three-
month period from August to
November 2009.

“We’ve got a few irons in
the fire. We’ve got a few
things out there,” Mr Simp-
son said of Freeport Con-
crete’s plans to raise the nec-
essary financing. “Today, we
probably might need
$500,000.”

He added that the compa-
ny’s bankers, FirstCaribbean
International Bank
(Bahamas), were likely to
help, while Hannes Babak,
the Grand Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA) chairman
who is also Freeport Con-
crete’s chair and its largest
shareholder, with a 43 per
cent stake, was also explor-

ing how to help.

“My main shareholder
might help out by guarantee-
ing a bit of money,” Mr Simp-
son told Tribune Business, in
a reference to Mr Babak. “I'd
prefer to get a capital injec-
tion, rather than borrowing,
because I want to reduce our
borrowings.”

He admitted, though, that
the recession’s effects meant
retail businesses such as the
Home Centre/Freeport Con-
crete were not currently
viewed as attractive invest-
ments for equity capital, while
being a Freeport-based busi-
ness was “another strike
against us”.

And Mr Simpson acknowl-
edged that until the extra
financing was secured,
Freeport Concrete and the

ASSOCIATE ATTORNEY

NEEDED

Experience in Litigation,
Conveyancing and
Commercial Law.

Background in Natural

Science preferred but not

required.

Home Centre as a business
were “treading water” and in
“survival mode”.

“All the cash generated
from daily sales at the Home
Centre is going back into
building materials [invento-
ry], but we’re missing out on
appliances,” the Freeport
Concrete chief executive said.

He explained that this
meant the company was los-
ing out on potential sales of
high-margin, big ticket items
simply because it did not have
them in stock. For instance,
the Home Centre had supply
arrangements in place with
Panasonic for TVs, and with
brands such as Westinghouse
and Frigidair for other appli-
ances, but it was unable to
purchase stock because these
companies - hit hard by the
recession themselves - were
unable to extend credit and
wanted the Bahamian com-
pany to pay cash upfront.

Freeport Concrete’s finan-
cial position means it is
unable to do this. Mr Simp-
son, pointing to the fact that
gross profit margins were
around 29-30 per cent, said:
“In the day when we were
doing $1 million to $900,000
in sales per month at the
Home Centre, we were los-
ing $50,000-$60,000.

“Now, we’re down to
$500,000 in monthly sales, but
even at this level, while we’re
not losing money we’re just
breaking even. If we were to
get up to $600,000, based on a
29 per cent gross profit mar-

gin, we could make a state-
ment to the bottom line -
$29,000-$30,000 for every
$100,000 we make.”

But despite Freeport Con-
crete’s current predicament,
Mr Simpson told Tribune
Business: “We have a very
good story as far as I’m con-
cerned. We will make it.
We’re trying to get it through
the eye of a needle.

“If we can just get the
banks or find investors will-
ing to put money into the
company, based on what
we’ve done we’re going to be
fine. The key is to get the
inventory into the Home Cen-
tre, and we don’t need a lot of
money. As fast as the trailers
come in, we need more.
Instead of two trailers, we
need five.”

Mr Simpson, though,
acknowledged that Freeport
Concrete’s equity position
was “a concern”. He added:
“We’ve got to start turning a
profit, or we’ll have negative
net worth. I’m fairly confident
that’s [profitability] going to
happen in the first quarter,
because I’m confident we’ll
have some money come
through and the block plant
will provide us with a new
revenue stream.

“The concern is that we’re
basically eating into our equi-
ty, and we’ve got to be prof-
itable in the first quarter. We
will survive. I’m very confi-
dent with where we are at the
Home Centre, and costs are
completely under control.”

Apply by email only.
atty.at.law09 @ gmail.com

HELP
WANTED

An Established Medical Facility

seeks to fill the following position:

5 HOS PITAL

Het Per cf

HELP WANTED

Receptionist / Clinical Assistant

for medical clinic
Hardworking, pleasant, honest lady age 18-25 years.



Education:

fasociale Degree in Business or Management. or ils equivalent.

Please call 393-7586 or 393-7531
Experience:

Prevings collections experemce ot lenst 2 year: experience. Well organize
ane) eR pT

Qualifications:
+ Basic CMtuler skills

Leaderstign akille lineal

wal k

* Lae ! ‘ills Rex m IM THE SUPRERE vicinal Fie we a |

* Eo len writen Atel ord GoOMiKninicalicm skills eee ena a Dirision assests |

+ Ah ty toapply skills Wwith-all lewels of intemal and extemal cushomers | We ———
/ETrH Ef

General / Family Practice (Full-time)

ce With Pore manigement. Aun undersinndang of ineinunce
ubaIn und Pe|UIrPeMments.

ith dap of Sercobker 6.0 BOG and 1th day at tu

y Robes af The Seprey age ara
CMCMMEALTH oF rar nds sanity 2007) CLE i pea! cit

This includes, tits not limited te

* Medical sult WILLIAH THORS Jaci

+ Paments A families .
i Laint
* Linical personal Pisintd
ec il sult

aie ani be ia

SIMEY Geome OLIN
* And members of the community

i

Position Summary:

Ta coiators and

Kindly submit application to:

imager reecivables under your postloleo, Ta Wlonibar

selfpay adenissions to the hospital, Fallot on delinquent accounts as

need, Comiminnale well pteral A external cusbomer on a peeular hase
ner, ¢
1PM EE Te enhwnee
Gtomers throughow the Health System, Ain

Loondinapar at Credit am

P.O. Box CR-55050
Nassau, Bahamas
or
Via email to: a_1_phyneeded@live.com

SIDMET GEORGE GLINTOR
Eo. 56 Eoidier Poad
Sasesc, H_P.. Boban

Lise PPO Queries ih an inboriied) ia MUL Ly

Parte pRAle ie per
Cher diites assigied

Supervisor o

Al Collections Departmen WE COMED TOO thet

eee mete ei et le eRe ea ge
eae eet
SUT PR tea em a

i "WELLER THOMAS a =f vag
1 Kiobe i Wis in, 5h

SMD Pat 4
UP ne E|

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 18 AUGUST 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,563.90] CHG 1.00] %CHG 0.06 | YTD -148.46 | YTD %
FINDEX: CLOSE 783.13 | YTD -6.20% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Previous Close _ Today's Close Daily Vol. EPS$ Div $
1.34 1.34 0.00 0.127 1
11.00 11.00 0.00 0.992 : ‘ : Foar tae snare q . ©
6.25 6.25 0.00 0.244
0.63 0.63 0.00 -0.877
3.15 3.15 0.00 0.078
2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055
11.35 11.35 0.00 1.406
2.74 2.74 0.00 0.249
5.71 5.73 0.02 0.419
3.71 3.70 -0.01 0.111
0.382
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180
ases)
Interest

-8.67

Securit
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.39 10.39 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Symbol Last Sale
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13 100.00 0.00
FBB15 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 6.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3860 2.40 4.75
2.9047 -1.20 -3.66
1.4817 3.35 5.38
3.1031 -8.35 -13.82
12.9801 2.87 5.79
101.6693 1.10 1.67
96.7398
1.0000
9.2765
1.0622 2.56
1.0243 -0.84
1.0585 2.04
MARKET TERMS
YIELD -last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Change

2.00
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.13
1.00
0.30
5.50

2.00
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.13
1.00
0.30
5.50

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

7%
Prime + 1.75%
7%
Prime + 1.75%

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

100.00 0.00

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
N/M

256.6

ABDAB
RND Holdings

9.03
261.90

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Div $ NAV Date
30-Jun-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09 Dated 20°" day of Jar

1.3231
2.8952
1.4059
3.1031
12.3289
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

0.35
0.00
2.00

-4.18
0.00
-2.98
6.22
2.43
5.85

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
K'S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

ERLEDIFY CHARERS


THE TRIBUNE





i
ORLANDO
High: 90° F/32° C

Low:76? oe i le

TAMPA } ,
High: 91° F/33° C a | =
Low: 78° F/26° C i -

@ i i

a —

Hi, uw @ WEST PALM BEACH
4 = High: 91° F/33° C .
" Low: 80° ° a
ans ow: 80° F/27°C e
amet FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT >
| mt High:91°F/33°C High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 80° F/27°C a Low: 76° F/24° C
; @ ala
ere MIAMI
Rar High: 92° F/33° C
OR Low: 80°F/27°C NASSAU
uh High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 80° F/27°C
KEY WEST / eX 2
High: 90° F/32°C
Low: 81° F/27°C i ae

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Today Friday

High Low W High Low W

F/C F/C F/C F/C
Albuquerque 90/32 65/18 s 93/33 65/18 $s Indianapolis
Anchorage 69/20 51/10 s 67/19 52/11 pe Jacksonville
Atlanta 86/30 72/22 t 87/30 71/21 t Kansas City
Atlantic City 87/30 73/22 t 88/31 71/21 t Las Vegas
Baltimore 88/31 74/23 t 90/32 72/22 t Little Rock
Boston 85/29 71/21 t 85/29 72/22 t Los Angeles
Buffalo 84/28 69/20 t 80/26 64/17 t Louisville
Charleston,SC 90/32 75/23 pce 90/82 75/23 t Memphis
Chicago 79/26 62/16 t 76/24 60/15 c Miami
Cleveland 86/30 69/20 t 81/27 61/16 t Minneapolis
Dallas 98/36 74/23 t 93/33 71/21 s Nashville
Denver 81/27 52/11 s 88/31 56/13 s New Orleans
Detroit 84/28 66/18 t 77/25 61/6 c New York
Honolulu 89/31 78/25 $s 89/31 76/24 s Oklahoma City
Houston 96/35 77/25 t 97/36 75/23 t Orlando

= Cc









Partly sunny; breezy in Clear to partly cloudy Mostly sunny with a Mostly sunny, a t-storm
the p.m. and breezy. shower in spots. possible.
High: 90° High: 91°
High: 90° Low: 80° Low: 79° Low: 80°
FETE ele
106°-84° F 105°-88° F

The exclusive eau RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

ABACO
High: 92° F/33° C
Low: 77° F/25°C

O



ANDROS f
High: 93° F/34° C
Low: 76° F/24°C

Today Friday Today
High Low W High Low W High Low W
F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C
86/30 65/18 t 79/26 59/15 c Philadelphia 89/31 74/23 t
88/31 74/23 t 92/33 74/23 t Phoenix 110/43 85/29 pc
80/26 60/15 p 81/27 59/15 s Pittsburgh 84/28 68/20 t
107/41 79/26 s 107/41 83/28 s Portland, OR 92/33 59/15 s
92/33 70/21 t 89/31 6417 pc Raleigh-Durham 95/35 72/22 pc
80/26 64/17 p 82/27 647 pc St. Louis 84/28 64/17 t
86/30 70/21 t 84/28 63/117 t Salt Lake City 94/34 66/18 s
88/31 71/21 t 88/31 68/20 pc San Antonio 100/37 77/25
92/33 80/26 t 90/32 80/26 pc San Diego 74/23 66/18 pc
69/20 59/15 r 72/22 5542 pe San Francisco 73/22 58/14 pc
87/30 72/22 t 87/30 65/18 Seattle 84/28 56/13 s
90/32 77/25 t 90/32 76/24 t Tallahassee 91/32 72/22 t
87/30 76/24 t 89/31 75/23 t Tampa 91/32 78/25
92/33 64/7 t 89/31 63/17 $s Tucson 100/37 76/24 pc
90/32 76/24 t 91/32 76/24 t Washington, DC 87/30 76/24 t










e~





AY rn Ny

oY
|3| oot
: EXT.

o|1|2






Some sun with a
t-storm possible.

Sunshine and nice.












LOW

3|4|5|6

MODERATE



High: 90° High: 90°
Low: 80° Low: 82°
ETCH
100°-88° F High
Tod 8:15 a.m.
oe 8:44 p.m.
Frid 9:06 a.m.
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday 955am.
Temperature 10:16 p.m.
MiG Whi, cgssceseseees Sceurreceecncetececs 90° F/32° C 10-43
LOW wn erp SUN
Normal high .... 89° F/32° C a
Normal low 76° F/24° C
Last year's WIQh oo... cecteteeeeeteees 89° F/32° C

Last year's LOW o.cccceeseseteteeeeeeees 73° F/23° C







HIGH

3.2
3.3

3.3
3.2

3.4
3.1

3.3
2.9





\. HIGH

Low

2:04 a.m.
2:20 p.m.
2:50 a.m.
3:13 p.m.
3:36 a.m.
4:05 p.m.
4:21 a.m.
4:56 p.m.

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

a Pe

Ht.(ft.

Ht. (ft.
-0.2
-0.2
-0.2
-0.2
-0.2
-0.1

-0.1
0.0

Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:46 a.m. Moonrise..... 6:52 a.m.
: a om yesterday o...ceecceseccecsessseeesseeee 1.46" Sunset....... 7:40 p.m. Moonset... ... 7:50 p.m.
ear to date 23. ;
Normal year to date oo... cccceeceseeceneeee 28.83" us ist nul i=
AccuWeather.com ae
Forecasts and graphics provided by Sali a
ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Aug. 20 Aug. 27 Sep. 4 Sep. 11
High: 93° F/34° C
Low: 78° F/26° C
CATISLAND
High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 75° F/24°C
GREAT EXUMA i SAN SALVADOR
High: 89° F/32° C High: 92° F/33°C
Low: 78° F/26°C Low: 76° F/24°C
Ce O
LONG ISLAND
High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 77° F/25°C MAYAGUANA
Friday
High Low W =} High: 91° F/33°C
F/G «FC — Low: 74° F/23°C
90/32 74/23 t
TATE NERS CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS
79/26 62/16 t Hight 3S" F/34"C
79/26 60/15 s sie sa ea Low: 77° F/25°C
9} High: 90° F/32° C
/32 71/21 t -79° ° —_—
Low: 73° F/23° C
80/26 63/17 pc
97/36 68/20 s GREAT INAGUA wr
99/37 75/23 t High: 92° F/33°C
74/23 67/19 pc Low. 75°F/24°C
75/23 5844 pc ‘
73/22 56/13 pc pe.
94/34 75/23 t ——-
92/33 77/25 t XK
100/37 77/25 t WK
91/32 75/23 t









Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
90/32
86/30
82/27
90/32
57/13
91/32
86/30
83/28
82/27
82/27
838/31
86/30
86/30
66/18
91/32
86/30
57/13
99/37
88/31
78/25
91/32
82/27
85/29
77/25
64/17
93/33
87/30
79/26
91/32
68/20
91/32
101/38
87/30
86/30
56/12
838/31
71/21
75/23
97/36
86/30
73/22
102/38
81/27
57/13
89/31
80/26
95/35
72/22
91/32
85/29
85/29
106/41
90/32
88/31
61/16
88/31
63/17
90/32
75/23
84/28
70/21
72/22
93/33
86/30
82/27
86/30
78/25
86/30
74/23
68/20

ealil

Today

Low
F/C
76/24
59/15
52/11
72/22
46/7
79/26
77/25
68/20
68/20
77/25
61/16
66/18
76/24
47/8
59/15
59/15
41/5
73/22
81/27
52/11
75/23
74/23
65/18
66/18
50/10
66/18
62/16
60/15
72/22
50/10
82/27
79/26
65/18
64/17
35/1
80/26
58/14
54/12
61/16
79/26
53/11
75/23
68/20
48/8
60/15
55/12
81/27
59/15
59/15
54/12
69/20
82/27
68/20
80/26
36/2
70/21
37/2
75/23
53/11
66/18
55/12
50/10
81/27
75/23
63/17
64/17
60/15
66/18
50/10
55/12

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oO

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$
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=>

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t
t
s
p
r
s
s
t
pc
p
s
c
s
s
p
c

pc
pc
sh
r
r
pc
s
pc
pc
t

t
S
s
$

sh

High
F/C
88/31
70/21
77/25
90/32
58/14
91/32
86/30
78/25
87/30
81/27
91/32
79/26
84/28
66/18
75/23
88/31
59/15
100/37
90/32
84/28
94/34
82/27
85/29
73/22
63/17
75/23
69/20
73/22
90/32
72/22
91/32
99/37
82/27
87/30
62/16
88/31
70/21
72/22
99/37
87/30
75/23
102/38
81/27
59/15
78/25
78/25
96/35
70/21
77/25
86/30
73/22
105/40
91/32
88/31
70/21
89/31
63/17
88/31
64/17
85/29
73/22
79/26
92/33
86/30
79/26
76/24
73/22
89/31
17/25
71/21

Friday

Low
F/C
76/24
54/12
48/8
70/21
48/8
79/26
77/25
68/20
66/18
76/24
63/17
57/13
76/24
47/8
50/10
61/16
46/7
76/24
84/28
52/11
74/23
73/22
66/18
52/11
50/10
54/12
51/10
59/15
73/22
52/11
81/27
76/24
62/16
63/17
40/4
80/26
58/14
52/11
63/17
78/25
51/10
76/24
68/20
46/7
50/10
54/12
82/27
50/10
52/11
51/10
61/16
79/26
70/21
81/27
37/2
74/23
45/7
74/23
50/10
66/18
SoulZ
46/7
79/26
76/24
59/15
50/10
57/13
68/20
54/12
51/10





INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

pc

pc
pc
sh

pe

Ss

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace

THURSDAY, AUGUST 20th, 2009, PAGE 13B



MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 85° F
Friday: ENE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 85° F
FREEPORT Today: ESE at 9-18 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 85° F
Friday: ENE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 85° F
ABACO Today: ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 84° F
Friday: ENE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 84° F



Miami
92/80

Showers
T-storms
Rain









Fronts
=.) Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and as
BEL Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm ficnfitentie
[v=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mage
10s| 0s (0s) 10s 20s [Osi] 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s (G0s//iO0eiie)
PoP ih me,
»
y
*
CJ
i

Y. Be Blov
Away u€an Hurricane

Or you_can rest easy knowing
that $0 have excellent insurance
coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

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(BAMANLAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

| New Providence f Grand

Tiak (242) 34-5555 ff Tet: a a
PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

UBS to hand over 4,450 client names

By STEPHEN
OHLEMACHER
and DEVLIN BARRETT

Associated Press Writers

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Swiss banking giant UBS
AG agreed Wednesday to
turn over to the IRS the
details of 4,450 accounts sus-
pected of holding undeclared
assets by American cus-
tomers, piercing Switzer-
land’s long-standing tradi-
tion of banking secrecy.

IRS Commissioner Doug
Shulman said the accounts
held $18 billion in assets at
one time. Many have since
been closed, he said.

The deal will give the
Internal Revenue Service
thousands of long-sought
account names, Shulman
said, and is expected to pro-
vide even more UBS clients
who voluntarily disclose
their financial details to the







































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agency.

UBS has an estimated
52,000 accounts of U.S. cus-
tomers. The IRS chief said
the 4,450 accounts being
relinquished to the agency
were the ones most suspect-
ed of containing undeclared
assets.

“T believe this agreement
gives us what we wanted —
access to information about
those UBS accountholders
most likely to have been
involved in offshore tax eva-
sion,” Shulman said.

He said that other account
holders appear to be in com-
pliance with U.S. tax laws.

The two sides told a feder-
al judge last week they had
reached a tentative agree-
ment, but the details were
not released until Wednes-
day.

Account holders will be
notified before their names
are released to the IRS. The

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names will first go to the
Swiss Federal Tax Adminis-
tration. Account holders will
then be able to appeal their
release to the IRS before
Switzerland’s Federal
Administrative Court.

The process is expected to
take several months, IRS
officials said.

Shulman said the Swiss

government has assured U.S.

authorities that the release
of the names conforms with
both Swiss banking laws and
the tax treaty signed by both
countries. Shulman said the
IRS reserves the right to
resume its legal fight if any
of the names are withheld.

“This issue is not going
away, and people hiding
assets and income offshore
will find themselves increas-
ingly at risk due to our
efforts in this area,” Shul-
man said.

UBS shares were down 2.1

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SWISS BANK UBS’ logo on Zurich's Bahnhofstrasse in Switzerland...
(AP Photo: Walter Bieri)

percent at 16.55 Swiss francs
($15.51) on the Zurich
exchange.

The Swiss Bankers Associ-
ation issued a statement in
support of the agreement.

“The out-of-court agree-
ment avoids a prolonged
legal battle that would have
had an uncertain outcome
and UBS can now continue
with its consolidation
process in an atmosphere
free of this legal uncertain-
ty,” the association said.

Swiss Justice Minister
Eveline Widmer-Schlumpf
told a news conference in the
capital of Bern that the deal
lifts the threat of criminal
prosecution against UBS,
which could have endan-
gered the bank’s very exis-
tence and dealt a severe
blow to the Alpine nation’s
economy.

“There was no alternative
to this solution,” she said.

Asked if other Swiss banks
could be targeted for future
prosecution in the United
States, she said: “We don’t
expect this to be the case.”

UBS Chairman Kaspar
Villiger said, “I am confident
that the agreement will allow
the bank to continue moving

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forward to rebuild its reputa-
tion through solid perfor-
mance and client service.”

The case — and other U.S.
efforts to go after interna-
tional tax dodgers — already
has a lot of wealthy Ameri-
cans with offshore accounts
nervously running to their
tax advisers — and the Inter-
nal Revenue Service.

Tax advisers at several
U.S. firms said they are see-
ing many more customers
with undeclared assets seek-
ing information about their
legal options.

The IRS long has had a
policy that certain tax
evaders who come forward
before they are contacted by
the agency usually can avoid
jail time as long as they
agree to pay back taxes,
interest and hefty penalties.
Drug dealers and money
launderers need not apply.
But if the money was earned
legally, tax evaders can usu-
ally avoid criminal prosecu-
tion.

In March, the IRS began a
six-month amnesty program
that sweetened the offer
with reduced penalties for
people with undeclared
assets. Shulman said the
response has been unprece-
dented, though he declined
to say how many people
have applied.

Shulman said UBS cus-
tomers are free to take
advantage of the program as
long as they come forward
before Sept. 23 — and
before the IRS receives their
name from UBS.

“The letter they receive
from the bank will not dis-
qualify them from coming
forward to the IRS under
our voluntary disclosure pro-
gram,” Shulman said. “But
once the Swiss government
sends us the name, all bets
are off.”

Shulman said the IRS
already is using the program
to get information from
account holders about other
banks and financial advisers
who have helped them evade
USS. taxes.

“You can expect us to con-
tinue to be aggressive,” he
said.

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The Trib une oo”
OBIMUARIES
RELIGION



| ~< The Tribune
a OLT | tty Arcee, My Newspaper!

—‘\ en
» \0
707.9

SS hour chaice for ine family:
THURSDAY
August 20, 2009

The Tribune Pg, 31

RELIGIOUS
NEWS,
STORIES
AND
CHURCH
EVENTS


PG 32 ® Thursday, August 20, 2009

The keys to
maximising
stewardship

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

FOR many believers who have made the decision
to set aside their own desires and live for God, one
of the most important decisions is to fulfill purpose.

For some, purpose is defined as
the way we deal with others, the
things we do for others, and our
ability to set aside self while focus-
ing on others. However there are a
chosen few who are called to lead
and facilitate the delivery of the
word of God in the church, and for
those individuals, proper guidance
is still the key to reaching your God
given potential.

Local author Dr Albert Ferguson
in his new book titled Keys To
Releasing The Potential In Church
Workers And Volunteers, explained
that one of the first things a leader
must do when appointing volun-
teers is to evaluate their reasons for
doing so.

Apart from this, Dr Ferguson
explained that the duty of serving
lies in the hands and heart of the
volunteer and not in the leader/pas-
tor.

In an excerpt from the book Dr
Ferguson stated: “When people are
named to work in an area or within
the church setting, ‘appointed’ by a
pastor or ministry leader, the pic-
ture becomes a little more involved.

“Pastors have been heard to say
things like ‘I have appointed/select-
ed you, and put my hand on you
because I heard from God.’ The
implication is that this is now
between you and God, you should
work because God is asking you to
do so.”

He said this spiritual contract is
ultimately a commitment to serve
God in whatever capacity, so if the
volunteer decides to up and quit
their duty, they are not liable to the
church or pastor, rather to God.

In this second installment to his
three part series on stewardship, Dr
Ferguson also examines avenues on
drawing younger volunteers to vari-
ous roles in ministry. He said most

RELIGION The Tribune

Keys To Releasing
WTAE

people tend to become excited by
the prospect of giving of themselves
in church, but the duration of that
period is normally a blur and can
often lead to an unpleasant depar-
ture.

His suggestion to leaders is to
offer short term ‘contracts’ allow-
ing the church to get the most from
that volunteer. He said in the end,
the volunteer may be more dedicat-
ed to doing a good job because
clearer parameters to their duties
now exist. He refers to this as
open-ended appointment.

Throughout the book there is a
subtle association with the opera-
tions of the church and that of a
business or establishment.

He said just as companies use
motivation strategies like appoint-
ing an employee of the month, and
giving rewards to those employees a,
that perform well, the same prac- 7
tice should be present in the church
to encourage those who give of
their time, proving their efforts are
not in vain.

Dr Ferguson said he has used his
experience working in the public
sector along with his desire to see
the church return to its intended
function, to give both leaders and
followers a guide to executing the
will of God.

The book took two years to com-
plete and Dr Ferguson is having
the official book release this
Sunday at the Workers House
Auditorium on Harold Road at
5pm.

With parts one and two of the
series already under his belt, Dr
Farrington said through God’s
guidance he will soon release part
three along with other materials all
to build the kingdom of God, and
in some small way bring change to
the world.



77 hik — -

Z| | thd ow

“When people are
named to work in
an area or within
the church setting,
‘appointed’ by a

pastor or ministry
leader, the picture
becomes a little
more involved.”

Dr Albert Ferguson


The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, August 20, 2009 ® PG 33

(SY MEDITATION

Making uP

MATTHEW 18: 15- 17 has the fol-
lowing advice for persons in the
church who have a difference of opin-
ion or a falling out: 15:"If your broth-
er sins against you,[b] go and show
him his fault, just between the two of
you. If he listens to you, you have
won your brother over.

16: But if he will not listen, take one
or two others along, so that ‘every
matter may be established by the testi-
mony of two or three witnesses.'[c] 17
If he refuses to listen to them, tell it to
the church; and if he refuses to listen
even to the church, treat him as you
would a pagan or a tax collector.”

Let us look at each step very closely
to see how we usually respond.

1. The One on One Approach

"If your brother sins against you,[b]
go and show him his fault, just
between the two of you. If he listens
to you, you have won your brother
over.” This seems simple enough but
we may be reluctant to do so for a
variety of reasons:

: y. ANGELA
. PALACIOUS

i. It may make things worse

ii. We do not wish to be rejected or
insulted

ii.What we say may be misquoted

iv. We are afraid of or intimidated by
the person when alone with him or
her

However the advantages of such an
effort are obvious:

i.The matter is kept private and confi-
dential

ii.Resolution can come immediately
u.The renewed relationship is now
based on openness, honesty and trust

2. Taking Witnesses
Versel6: But if he will not listen,
take one or two others along, so that

A prayer for the nation

By AGNES SAUNDERS

OUR Father who art in Heaven,

Lord we reverence your name, as
we bow in your Holy presence.

We ask in the name of Jesus that
you forgive us of our wrong
doings, and we accept that forgive-
ness right now.

Clean us oh Lord and make us as
pure as gold.

We thank you for being an excel-
lent father to us,

We thank you because you
brought us out of many dangers
and snares.

We thank you for providing for
Us,

We thank you for placing us in
this Bahama land, and we ask that
you touch the hearts and minds of
every Bahamian and others who
reside here that we all would hum-
ble ourselves, pray, seek you, and
turn from our wicked ways.

All so that we can hear from
you, and that you would forgive
our sins and heal our land.

These blessings and favours we
ask in the name of Jesus our
Christ,

Amen.

‘every matter may be established by
the testimony of two or three witness-
es.”

It is hoped that the presence of oth-
ers will help the offender to recognise
the validity of the complaint. Four or
five Christians gathered together to
prayerfully address a matter should
be able to feel the presence of God,
hear the voice of God, and obey the
will of God.

It is wonderful when the issue can
be settled in this way. Sometimes the
presence of others threatens the indi-
vidual who is being confronted and
the person becomes more defensive
and even offensive. Think of a spouse
who tries to have persons come to the
home to settle a conflict only to dis-
cover that it has the opposite effect.
This is when serious decisions have to
be made about the future of such a
relationship.

3. Bringing it to the Body
Verse 17: If he refuses to listen to

them, tell it to the church; and if he
refuses to listen even to the church,
treat him as you would a pagan or a
tax collector.”

It is very rare for us to go to this
length in most of our denominations,
if this means the whole church. More
often than not it will be reported to a
bishop, a special council or some
smaller group of persons with the
authority to act on behalf of the larg-
er body.

The bottom line is that every effort
is to be made to be reconciled. In the
end, however, it has to be left up to
the offender to acknowledge, admit,
confess and repent. We may always
pray for one another and reach out
with godly love, but it is

only by allowing God’s grace to
rule in our hearts that true peace can
be realised.

The question for us to ask ourselves
is: How stubborn, hard-hearted, or
obstinate am I when I am wrong and
need to put things right?

DR. ALBERT S. FERGUSON, J.P.

I Cordially Invite You To The
BOOK LAUNCH & SIGNING CEREMONY
for my new book, titled

Share your
news

The Tribune wants to hear from
people who are making news in

their neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a good
cause, campaigning for
improvements in the area or have
won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.



KEYS TO RELEASING THE POTENTIAL
IN CHURCH WORKERS AND VOLUNTEERS
THIS COMING SUNDAY AT 5:00PM SHARP
WORKERS HOUSE BALLROOM
Tonique Williams Darling Highway
THE EVENT IS FOR ONE HOUR!
PLEASE NOTE THE START TIME OF 5:00PM SHARP! |
I am looking forward to seeing you!
For further information, contact

albertsferguson @ gmail.com or 242-324-3139


PG 34 © Thursday, August 20, 2009

RELIGION

The Tribune

Spiritual to motivational: A nation in peril !

THERE is no doubt that the
Bahamas is under an intense satanic
attack. The enemy is wasting no time in
snuffing out the lives of the male seed
and also a few females along the way.
The real tragedy about this attack is not
the attack its self, but rather the
church's inability to cast out this
destructive spirit, due to its commit-
ment to religions and denominations;
as to a disciplined relationship with
Yahweh through His Son Yeshuwa
Messiah.

This is one of the reasons why that
nowhere in the scriptures can it be
found that Yeshuwa ever refer too or
called His followers Christians. But
rather He always called them disciples
(Discipline One).

It is said that one of the most undis-
ciplined religions in the world is
Christianity. The church today is filled
with fair weather Christians, their com-
mitment to God and his word is based
upon how well things are going in their
lives. This sort of lukewarm religion is
nothing new; for here's what Yeshuwa
said when speaking to the religious
mind-set.

John.8: 31 Then said Jesus to those
Jews which believed on him, If ye con-
tinue in my word, then are ye my disci-
ples indeed. (My disciples not my
Christians / powerless ones).

Satan, knowing of the power and
authority that has been given to the
church (The Organism) by Yeshuwa,
has infiltrated the church through reli-
gion; and has made the same offer to
the leaders as he did to Yeshuwa:
“Matt.4: 8-9: Again, the devil taketh
him up into an exceeding high moun-
tain, and showeth him all the kingdoms
of the world, and the glory of them;




PASTOR
ALLEN

And saith unto him, All these things
will I give thee, if thou wilt fall down
and worship me.

Here's the tragedy; the church lead-
ers have ignorantly accepted Satan's
offer which has resulted in him identi-
fying and calling them religious leaders.
The church / religious organisations
have no power and authority of the
kingdom of darkness.

How can a young mother be gunned
down in the drive way of her home; in
this Christian nation and the so-called
anointed bishops, apostles, doctors of
religion can be so silent?

Here's why and how?

We're an undisciplined nation that's
mixed with the undisciplined religion
of Christianity, the above mentioned
criminal act was conjured up in the
kingdom of darkness which is a spiritu-
al realm; a realm that religion has no
power and authority.

Over the years God had raised up
some men in this country to lead the
way in taking authority over every
unclean / demonic spirit. But for their
name sake, for fame and fortune these
men have traded and aborted their
assignment of being God's authorita-
tive spiritual voice; and have suc-
cumbed to the enemy's subtle plan of
being motivational speakers.

The enemy is no fool; for he knows
that there is power in the name of

HAVE you ever sat down and
thought or written down how your
life will be- only to find out that
those plans were far from what God
has ordained? It is a good joke I'm
sure.

My life hasn't been horrible, it
just didn't turn out the way I
thought that it would. We can have
all the plans we want but if it does-
n't line up with

God's word for our lives, I want to
say that it’s wasted. I don't mean
people who have to set certain
things in order for the day to run
smoothly because even in that there
is only so much you can control.

My thoughts were after that high
school I would go to college and
pursue my interest at that time.
Then after graduation I would get a

Fr



ALLISON
MILLER

good job, find the man of my
dreams and marry him.

We would then have a compro-
mised amount of children, go to
church pay our tithes go home and
live happily ever after. To my sur-
prise none of that happened and
certainly not in that order.

I am a single woman without a
husband and any biological chil-
dren.

I did not go to college although I
did take a number of computer

Yeshuwa Messiah. Therefore whenever
he (the devil) can get a believer to do
or say things without mentioning
Yeshuwa' name, the devil will see to it
that; that believer is rewarded or even
promoted. This act is what I call
“enticement stage one”

Watch this!

Many fortune 500 companies like
Procter and Gamble, IBM, etc; are pay-
ing mega bucks to prominent church
leaders to come and motivate their staff
and leadership; but with these condi-
tions :

Can't talk about or mention the
name Jesus / Yeshuwa Messiah,

Can't talk about the bible.

For the big bucks, many church lead-
ers have compromised whatever Godly
principles they had and denied / dis-
owned Yeshuwa Messiah, and sought
to justify their acts with erroneous spir-
itual quotes and clichés. But to answer
the wisdom of these wise-fools here's
what Yeshuwa says in “Matt.10: 32-33
:Whosoever therefore shall confess me
before men, him will I confess also
before my Father which is in heaven.
But whosoever shall deny me before
men, him will I also deny before my
Father which is in heaven.

Unfortunately today's church leaders
bear no spiritual resemblance of the
New Testament Apostles. For even
under intense pressure and being put in
prison the apostles didn't compro-
mised, but boldly spoke of and in the
name of Yeshuwa.

Acts.5: 40: And to him they agreed:
and when they had called the apostles,
and beaten them, they commanded
that they should not speak in the name
of Jesus, and let them go.

Here's one of our other problems;

courses. I worked at a job that
taught me alot and I am grateful. I
have yet to meet the man who is
right for me.

At a very early age I became a
Christian and it has definitely
changed the course of my life and
what I thought it to be. After a long
time of beingprocessed and still
being processed my desires have
changed. I no longer want to do the
things I wanted to when I left high
school over ten years ago. I want to
do the things that God has made me
to do.

Knowing that only what is done
for Christ will last, that's all that
matters.

Some may think that is old fash-
ion but I know that, that is the best
thing to desire, the will of God.

I never imagined that I would
have such an overwhelming desire
to do what God created me to do.
At first I didn't understand what
that meant or what that was- "the

we've got lots of religious leaders that
know the word of God, but they don't
know the God of the word.

Many of our church leaders are
doing their very best to become like the
America preachers; insomuch that
they're paying their International
Preacher friends / motivational speak-
ers to come in and emotionally moti-
vate their churches.

Most of these events are commonly
called conferences and are tagged with
a registration fee; excluding the cost of
the speakers materials and products of
which is strongly recommended that all
attendees purchase.

As a nation, we're in trouble spiritu-
ally; and I'm just wondering if there is
any other person out there that sees
and understands what's going on?

It's time to get the flesh and the moti-
vational hype out of the pulpits, and
restore holiness, sanctification and the
fear of God back into the church. Then
and only then, would the saints be able
to bind and cast out this demonic spirit
that is wreaking havoc throughout the
Bahamas.

In spite its many challenges, the lack
of bold, uncompromising Godly leader-
ship; the Bahamas’ best days are yet
ahead of her.

For there is a New day on the rise; as
the true spiritual sons 'elohiym, el-o-
heem’'; shall burst forth and manifest
His kingdom here in the Bahamas.

¢ Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen
Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int'l
For questions or comments contact us

via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com
or Ph. 1-242-441-2021

will of God for your life.” I sought
Him out and He told me what that
was.

I have spent most of my life trying
to accomplish that and will spend
the rest of my life doing just that.
Fulfilling the will of God for my life,
nothing else matters. I have not
aced it as yet but I will die trying.

God is good and He has been bet-
ter to us than we have been to our-
selves. The least we can do is ask the
Lord, "What do you want me to do
with my life?" I don't understand
how anyone can live a whole life-
time without any consideration of
the Almighty God. We should not
live our lives as if we made our-
selves- remember, it is in Him that
we live, move and have our very
being. How can we make plans for
our lives without consulting Him?

God is Alpha and Omega, He
knows what course our lives will
take. Can you blame Him if He
laughs at our plans?
The Tribune

Bishop Rolle celebrates
48th pastoral and
Wedding anniversaries

cL aa-

Wilbert and Idell Rolle

IN THE 1940's, a young Wilbert Milton Rolle set two
goals for his life after watching a ‘picture show’ on World
War II - he was going to fight a war and he was going to be
a Christian. By 1953, he accomplished both goals though not
the way he expected.

“T was fishing off Andros singing Silent Night to myself
when I heard the call from the Lord that it was my time to
go to war for Him through ministry,” recalls the now 76 year-
old. “Well, I joined the AME Church in Mastic Point,
Andros and now as Bishop of Living Waters Church of God,
I've been warring for the Kingdom for almost 50 years.”

A week-long celebration of Bishop Rolle's 48th pastoral
anniversary began on Monday and will end on Sunday at his
church. Speakers for the celebration include Pastor Carlos
James Wallace, Apostles of the End Times; Bishop Lindo
Wallace, Church of God Temple of Praise; Rev Dr Vincent
Smith, Universal Village Church; Bishop Shervin Smith,
Good Shepherd Church of God; Pastor Mark Knowles, Holy
Ghost and Fire Deliverance Centre and Apostle Winton
Roberts, Prayer and Deliverance Church.

Among the singers at the event will be Bahamian Idol's
Adrianna Munnings and the award-winning Living Water's
Youth Choir.

The week also coincides with Bishop Rolle’s 48 wedding
anniversary. His life partner Idell, has stood faithfully by his
side helping him enhance his ministry from the time they
started off with just 60 members to now having two church-
es in Andros and one Marshall Road, New Providence
which is in the process of adding on a large worship centre.

In a time when half of all marriages are ending in divorce,

SEE page 36

RELIGION



Thursday, August 20, 2009 ® PG 35

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays

INSIGHT

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PG 36 ® Thursday, August 20, 2009



RELIGION

BISHOPS Drexel Gomez and Laish Boyd place the priest's Stole on Fr Neil Nairn during His Ordination last week.

‘Ordination service was a

NEWLY ordained Anglican priest
Rev’d. Neil Geron Nairn described his
ordination to the priesthood as a “
mountain top experience” and added
that he now he has to go into the val-
ley because there is much work to be
done.

Rev’d. Nairn was ordained last
Friday evening by Rev’d. Laish Boyd,
Bishop of The Bahamas and The
Turks & Caicos Islands, before a large
congregation at Christ Church
Cathedral. The majority of the three
hour service was without electricity,
due to an island-wide blackout.
Around 7.30 pm just as Rev’d. Harry
Ward, Rector of Holy Spirit Anglican

Church, and preacher for the spe-
cial occasion, was about to mount the
pulpit, the lights went out, and so
Rev'd. Nairn took his priestly vows by
candlelight. It is a scenario, he has
grown accustomed to. During his ordi-
nation to the Diaconate on August 8,
2008, there was also an island-wide

blackout.

Reflecting on the service, Rev'd.
Nairn believes that the darkness
allowed the congregation to focus
entirely on the sermon, which had a
message for everyone. In his case,
the darkness allowed him the oppor-
tunity to reflect on the brevity of life
and the fact that within a second your
life can end.

He said that he also used the time to
listen, pray, and reflect.

“T was overwhelmed by the entire
experience: the sermon, when I was
presented to the Bishop, making my
vows, and laying prostrate before the
altar. The entire mood was uplifting
and spirit-filled”, said Father Nairn.

He added that he was very pleased
with the large numbers of persons
who attended the service, including
parishioners of St. Agnes, St.
Gregory’s, family and friends.

Chief Celebrant for the Ordination
was Rev'd. Laish Boyd Sr assisted by

Rev'd. Drexel Gomez. The preacher oe :
was Rev'd. Harry Ward and Litanist | Was tempted to join them, but my wife
was The Venerable James Palacious. }
Deacon of the Mass was Rev’d. }

Bradley Mill dcl ters
fa cy wer, and C€. ergy presen ers solely oni him.”

were

Dr E Etienne Bowleg, I Ranfurly :
Revd. }
Canon Neil Roach, Rev’d. Atma }
Rev’d. Bernard Been and
Lay presen- }
ters included Judy Nairn, Clayton i
Claire }
Wilton ;
Gibson, Marge Stewart, Wellington }
Dorsette, Rosemand Stubbs, Ralph }

Wood, Mary Basden and Karen } the completion of this building,” said

: Bishop Rolle. “I remind the youth

Brown, James Palacious,

Budhu,
Rev’d. Thaddeus Pratt.

Newbold, Lenford Nairn,
Hepburn, Henry Dean,

Nairn.

Special music was provided by ;

Adrian Archer and the combined ;
; themselves because they will be
Rev'd. Nairn will continue to serve ; Tesponsible for taking this ministry to
as Assistant Curate at St Agnes :

Anglican Church, Grants Town, New i blessed with where the Lord has led

i me

choirs of St Agnes and St Gregory’s.

Providence.

The Tribune

Bishop Rolle celebrates

| 48th pastoral and
-Wetlding anniversaries

FROM page 35

Mrs Rolle says that the secret of their
i success is to simply trust in the Lord.

“We had a mind to stand for Christ

i and we didn't allow the things of this
i life to worry us,” she says. “Even when
i the Lord chose to take our only child
i after eight days, we still allowed him to
i make the decisions in our life. As a
i pastor's wife, of course you have chal-
i lenges and you must make sacrifices.
i So many members sometimes come
i with spiritual or emotional needs, you
i have to be there to talk to them and
i minister to them and still be a help-
i mate to a man who happens to be a
i bishop.

“But overall, we've been blessed to

i lend so many people a hand and we've
ieven helped some families from
i Andros by allowing their kids to stay
i with us to attend school in the city.
i? Even adults who were sick, we've
i stepped in to help them on the road to
i recovery by allowing them to stay with
i us. We sacrifice it all for the Lord by
? doing this work.”

The bishop admits to making many

i sacrifices over the years -the first
i being when he decided to leave his job
? as a labourer in the city to go back to
i Andros.

“T was in Nassau, and I worked real-

ly hard with jackhammers all day
i breaking out rocks to make some of
: the beaches around here,” he recalls.

mountain-top experiment’
Says newly ordained priest |

i Freeport which was developing back

“T even worked on the foundation for
what is now the College of The
Bahamas. Back in those days (1960's),
things were springing up but we decid-
ed to go back to Andros. We went
back there and things were rough and
tough and it seemed like there weren't
any jobs and folks were moving to

then and offered quite a bit of jobs. I

was satisfied to stay in Andros and
that's when God made provisions for
us to go full time into ministry and rely

Evidence of how much the ministry
has grown is on the same property of
the New Providence branch of the
church where a roof covers what will
be a two-storey sanctuary to seat
about 500 persons with an attached
youth hall, auditorium, kitchen and 14
bedrooms for when groups visit.

“Tam getting up there but it is my
desire that the Lord allows me to see

who make up the majority of this con-
gregation every Sunday to prepare

the next level. Overall though, I am

2



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PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.222THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY WITH T-STORM HIGH 90F LOW 80F B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE number of children born in the Bahamas to singlem others is the highest it has b een since 1985, according to the most recent data from the Department of Statistics. T here were 5,177 live births in 2007 and more than half of this number 3,167 to bee xact came from unwed mothers. The number of live births to single mothers in this period jumped from 2,766 in 2006 and 2,706 in 2005. In 1985, there were 3,380 live births to unwed mothers a slight increase from 3,114 in 1984 and a sharp rise compared to a mere 35 live births to unwed mothers in 1983. Statistics from 2007 also reveal that single teenage mothers between 15 to 19 years old had 585 children born out of wedlock while 19 of the live births in this age group came from married teens. A lthough young girls between ages 10 to 14 years old contributed to less thano ne per cent of the total number of live births in the respec tive period, shocking statist ics reveal that six babies were delivered by children in this age group. Women between the ages o f 25 to 29 years old had the highest number of live births in 2007: 1,282, with 588 oft hese births to married women and 694 to unwed mothers. Mothers in the age range of 20 to 24 years old came in second with 1,204 live births 227 of this number to married women and 977 born to single mothers. Women between ages 30 to 34 had 1,152 live births in 2007 with 650 children born to married women and 502 to single mothers. Mothers between the ages of 35 to 39 made up 708 of the live births that year; 407 of these births were to married women while 301 were to single mothers. The Tribune YOUR PASSPORT TO MISS UNIVERSE BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com I N S I D E CLASSIFIEDSTRADER CLASSIFIEDSTRADER CLASSIFIEDSTRADER I N S I D E OBITUARIES and RELIGION INTODAY’STRIBUNE JOBSAND HELPWANTED L L O O A A D D S S O O F F CARS! CARS! CARS! Single mums in birth rate shock Number of children born out of wedlock highest since 1985 SEE page nine TAGIA Soles-Armony, the mother of two who was shot dead in front of her parents’ house in Sea Breeze on August 7, was laid to rest yesterday fol lowing a funeral service at St Francis Xavier Cathedral. The service was well attended, and in addition to grieving family members and friends, many political and community leaders also paid their respects. Among those attending the ser vice were PLP leader Perry Christie and several Cabinet ministers. Her father Gordon Soles described her as a loving and protective mother to her sons, and someone who was “a whirlwind of activity always seeking to make it better for those around her.” In the funeral programme, SLAIN MOTHER OF TWO IS LAID TO REST The Deangelo Fowler murder trial ends in a hung jury By NATARIO McKENZIE T ribune Staff R eporter nmckenzie@ tribunemedia.net JURORS in the Dean gelo Fowler murder trial w ere deadlocked over a verdict yesterday as the trial ended with a hung jury. S enior Justice Anita Allen ordered a retrial for Jamal Penn, 21, after t he jury failed to reach a verdict on the charge of murder. T he seven women and five men voted six to six. A verdict must be unan imous for a murder conv iction, and at least a two thirds majority for a not guilty verdict. P enn is accused of s hooting 18-year-old Deangelo Cargill Fowler in the chest as he stoodn ear a bus stop on Bay and Frederick streets on January 7, 2008. MrF owler died in hospital later that night. SEE page nine Retrial is ordered for Jamal Penn By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A MAN is to be arraigned on charges of murder and robbery in connection with the killing of Bahamian Kahlil Holmes in Florida. Eric Andrew White, 33, of West Palm Beach, was indict ed last Friday. He is now being held in the Palm Beach County jail without bail. Mr Holmes, a father of two, was found dead and halfnaked in the middle of a street in West Palm Beach on July 14. He had been shot up to six times. His half-sister, Juliet, said her brother was only expected to be in Florida for one day as he had promised to return to his ailing father’s side. She said she did not know the pur pose of his trip. Mr Holmes owned a car Man to be ar raigned over the killing of Bahamian in Florida SEE page nine SEE page nine PALLBEARERS carry the body of Tagia Soles-Armony (inset St Francis Xavier Cathedral yesterday. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

PAGE 2

A TTORNEY Rhonda Bain was yesterday appointed a Supreme Court judge and Justice Jon Isaacs was nameds enior justice. Governor-General Arthur Hanna made the appointments on the advice of the Judicial andL egal Service Commission. Justice Isaacs, who will become senior justice on Sep t ember 1, was born in Nassau o n January 27, 1955. He received his education at St Anne's High School in New Providence and at CornwallC ollege, Montego Bay, Jamaica, where he taught for one year before attending the University of Waterloo, Ontario,C anada where he received a bachelor of arts degree in political science with a minor in history in 1979. H e read law at the University of the West I ndies and was awarded a bachelor of laws d egree in 1982. Justice Isaacs acquired his professional qualification at the Norman Manley Law S chool and was called to the Bahamas Bar i n 1984. He was then employed by Office of the Attorney General, where he served for 13 years as a prosecutor and civil litigator. Justice Isaacs was promoted to the post of assistant director of Legal Affairs, a post he held until his appointment as chief magistrate in January, 1997. He took office as an acting justice of the Supreme Court in September, 2000 and was appointed a justice on February 1, 2002. Justice Isaacs is a fellow of the Commonwealth Judicial Education Institute. He is an Anglican and is married to the for m er Berencia Macaulay. Rhonda Bain, a member of the Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association and the CuckoosR ugby Football Club, will assume office on August 14, 2009. She was born in Nassau on A pril 22, 1952 and in 1974 was awarded a bachelor of laws degree by the University of theW est Indies at Cave Hill, Barb ados – which also awarded her a master of laws degree in legislative drafting in 1984. Having attended the Norman M anley Law School in Mona, Jamaica, she received the Legal Education Certificate of the Council of Legal Educa t ion of the West Indies in 1976 and was admitted as an attorney of the Supreme Court of the Bahamas on October 6, 1976. S he entered the office of the Attorney G eneral as an assistant counsel in 1976 and s erved in those chambers until 1983 when she entered private practice in the firm of Christie, Ingraham and Company, where s he remained until 1992. F rom 1993 to 1996 she practised at her own firm, Rhonda P Bain Chambers, with offices in Nassau and Freeport. In 1996 she returned to the public service as deputy director of Legal Affairs in the Office of the Attorney General and in 1999 was promoted to director of Legal Affairs, a position in which she remained until 2005. From 2005 to 2008 Ms Bain worked as vice president, legal, at Baha Mar Resorts Ltd, and then worked in association with IngrahamLaw Chambers. Ms Bain is the mother of twin boys. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A GROUPof FNM ministers yesterday stood up in defenceof the relocation of the container shipping facilities to Arawak Cay, hitting back at criticisms the site may not be the most suitable and was chosen to accomodate “special interests”. Minister of State for Finance Zhivargo Laing, denied the government has been “secretive” inits decision making in relation to the port, claiming its actions are ‘transparent’ and ‘accountable’ according to definitions of the terms laid out by the United Nations. “You may not agree with me but that does not mean that I am not transparent or accountable, it just means you do not agree with me,” said Mr Laing, referring to the government’s critics on the issue. PLP Senator Jerome Fitzgerald has led criticism of the government’s proposed relocation of container shipping facilities to Arawak Cay, claiming it has not been justified in the face of a study commissioned under the PLP which found it unfavourable as a potential site for the port and may be driven by private rather than public interest. He has questioned the government’s data and claims it is “rushing” the move for dubious reasons. Yesterday Mr Laing, like Environm ent Minister Earl Deveaux, suggested a review of that report reveals deficiencies in it as a basis for deciding which site would be best. “It has a very interesting opening sent ence in its executive summary and that sentence says essentially that the consultants were directed to go to Clifton Pier to look at that.” “There’s nothing in that report that has any extensive e valuation of Arawak Cay or any other port in this country other than the Clifton Pier location. “When you read that report, what struck me as someone who has done college level reasearch in this country was how jaun-d iced the report was in a direction (the consultants l y sent in,” he added. The study ranked Arawak Cay sixth out of seven potential sites for the port. Mr Laing, Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette, Minister of National Security TommyT urnquest and FNM Chairman Johnley Ferguson were speaking on radio talk show “Issues of the Day” on Love97fm. Responding to allegations that the party is catering to “special interests” by selecting Arawak Cay as the site for the new port, Mr Symone tte said everyone is in agreement that the container facilities must be moved out of Downtown Bay Street if the centre is to be revitalised and charged that Prime Minister Hubert I ngraham has spoken “many times in the last 15 years” about developing Arawak Cay in this regard. He pointed out that in the FNM’s Manifesto 2007, the party said it intended to develop Arawak Cay “commercially” as w ell as “recreationally.” “I think we’ve dealt with that issue. Let’s move on,” said Mr Symonette when Mr Jones first raised the question of special interests with him. The Deputy Prime Minister has been accused by Mr Fitzger-a ld of “being the mastermind” of what the senator termed a “cons piracy to secretively enrich a special interest group at great expense to the public purse.” But Mr Turnquest defended the decision as one taken by the government as a whole “based on various analyses.” H e added: R ight now Arawak Cay is very unsightly. We want to bring it into an orderly port where you have your container port, where you move containers at night, where you are able to beautify the port and use Arawak Cay for other purposes.” M r Turnquest claimed the popular hangout, of which the FNM is “very proud”, will see a surge in business when the port is relocated to the area. Mr Laing explained that the government will be moving the port to Arawak Cay “through a partnership with the various o wners of the container operations in the country who are now to the tune of one third (already using Arawak Cay for that purpose”. Suggesting the port is not intended to remain there indefinitely, Mr Laing described moving it from Downtown to A rawak Cay as the “best interim solution to any longterm permanent relocation of that port”. “To be able to clear Bay Street and our central touristic centre of those containers in the shortest possible time, Arawak Cay, which now accomodateso ne third of the container movements in this country, represents t he most efficient and effective way to do that,” he claimed. Mr Laing noted that “no environmentalists” have come forward to suggest that they are concerned about any environmental impact from the projectt o date. “You have political operatives saying that, you have people following them saying that, but no environmentalists are showing any evidence to say so,” he added. FNM ministers defend container port move New judicial appointments made A WOMAN was asleep in her bed early yesterday morning whent hree masked men, one of them armed, broke into her home in Boyd Subdivision. T he home invasion occurred shortly after 4am and the woman, 45, told police that the mens earched her house and made off with money, a cellular telephone andh er green 2006 Hyundai T uscon. The men then escaped in the stolen vehicle. An intensive investigation has been launched into this matter, police said. A MAN was appre hended by police after he was found to be carrying a firearm concealed in a detergent box at the Lynden Pindling Interna tional Airport. The suspect, a 41-yearold Farrington Road man, was attempting to travel to Jamaica when he was held up by police at 2.30pm on Tuesday. Amongst the groceries the man had in the box officers of the Western Police Station discovered a .9mm handgun which contained eight live rounds of ammunition. The man is currently in police custody. Masked men break into woman’ s home R HONDA BAIN Miss Universe float parade BAHAMIANSare invited to come out and cheer on the beauty queens as they take part in a float parade which starts from Arawak Cay today at 5.30pm. The float parade then follows along West Bay Street to the Wyndham Nassau Resort and Crys tal Palace Casino on Cable Beach, where it is scheduled to end at around 7pm. ZHIVARGO LAING

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EDITOR, The Tribune. I AMtroubled by the determination of the PLP to inject partisan politics into every aspect of public life. The habit of that political p arty to try to extract politi cal advantage from any m atter regardless of its i mpact on our country can o nly be described as shame l ess; but then they have proven themselves to be without shame time and again and so I suppose I should not be surprised thatt he leopard cannot change i ts stripes. I am also concerned with t he seeming inability of the independent press to call the P LP out on their hypocrisy and indeed, their dedication t o misleading and misinforming the Bahamian people on matters of national i mportance. The PLP opposed amendi ng the Constitution to acknowledge that men and women are equal. Theyc laimed it was too confusing a concept and that B ahamians needed time to understand and accept it! They spent five years in o ffice but apparently didn't h ave time to educate Bahamians on this impor tant issue. N ow they are lukewarm a bout making rape in a mar riage a crime. Again they claim that people need to be consulted and informed ont his before the law is passed. I was horrified but not surprised to learn that Sen-a tor Allyson Maynard thinks that we should not legislate against marital rape until we find a better way tod eal with the high incidence o f rape by strangers! This is a most curious legal concept. Mrs. Maynard-Gibson, as a practising attorney, should know that rape is rape. Rape by an acquaintance or i ndeed by a family member, i s if anything, more trau m atic because women do not expect to be attacked by t hose who they know and trust. T he PLP have got to stop l ooking to find political gain from the narrow mindedness of some. Instead, they should use their position of influence to enlighten and make our society better. Ignorance is not to be e xcused and pampered but f ought with knowledge and i nsight and enlightenment. T his would be the time for A llyson Maynard-Gibson to b e speaking out publicly in support of happy marriages in which all individuals love and respect each other and in which no one seeks to dominate and demand against the will of the other. T his is the time for Mrs. Maynard-Gibson to take a stand in support of all those l oving husbands who cherish a nd protect their wives and who are insulted by any suggestion that a law outlawing rape in marriage could ever apply to them or impugn their character. The proposed new law targets abusers. Any effort t o support the allegation t hat this law will target lov i ng husbands is a cruel misr epresentation. Any suggest ion that we should delay p roviding greater protection under the law for abused women in our society is unconscionable. It is especially wrong for a nyone in political leaders hip to coddle or protect a busers and criminals in any w ay and we must all call on all members of the PLP to b reak with their past of opposing for the sake of o pposing and to support the timely adoption and entry into force of the law maki ng rape in a marriage a crime. LIVINGSTON GRAY Nassau, A ugust 18, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P AGE 4, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., ( Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt . P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising A dvertising Manager (242 WEBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm BEFORE air-conditioning there was the casuarina tree. Hot afternoons found Bahamians at var ious New Providence beaches Montagu, Yamacraw, Adelaide, Saunders and Love just “chilling out” under the shady branches of a casuarina tree. Cool seabreezes wafted through the large tree’s pine needles to cool the body, and hum the song of the sea to calm the soul. In those days it was a delight for children to play in the shade of the large trees, and a relaxing break at the end of a hard day for working parents. It was under the casuarina tree that an earlier generation lay down their daily burdens. There already is a generation of Bahamians who never experienced Nassau’s most beautiful drive on the western end of the island. It was a must-drive when we had guests in town. It was like motoring down the aisle of a darkened Gothic cathedral as the large trees bent over and interlocked at the top. It went on for almost the length of Cable Beach. It was what John Keats would have called a “thing of beauty.” According to Keats “a thing of beauty is a joy for ever: Its loveliness increases; it will never Pass into nothingness.” But our casuarina trees started to pass into nothingness after the late Frank Christie took his first trip to the Far East and saw the magnificent groves of tall, elegant palm trees. It is true that there is nothing more magnificent than the palm trees of the East, espec ially at dusk, paddling across a lagoon to see thick palm groves silhouetted against a setting sun. Mr Christie was captivated. He was determined that he could transplant the East to the West, specifically to Cable Beach. It was then that the butchering of our magnificent casuarinas started. Palm trees that looked like dwarfs next to the palms of the Far East were planted. They eventually contracted lethal yellowing and one by one fell by the wayside. Just as our magnificent translucent waters could not be taken to the East, the tree-lined eastern skyline could not be moved to Cable Beach. Then came the final rooting up of the trees to make way for the dual carriageway. Only scattered stumps remain of our cathe dral-like casuarina drive. It was lawyer Pericles Maillis, who as head of the Bahamas National Trust, led the charge to remove all casuarina trees from the island. They were alien to our islands, he said. It is true that the tree is an Australian pine, but it is no more alien to these islands than each and every one of us who call our selves Bahamian. The tree kills everything beneath it, which is true, but who wants to grow anything else on a beach? It is claimed that it was introduced to the Bahamas in the twenties as a hedge tree that got out of control and spread. Although this might be true, we have our doubts as it is a tree that seems to skirt the periphery of most of our islands. They must have been planted on the shoreline for a purpose, and they must have been a part of these islands long before the twenties. In his book Hawaii , John Mitchener claims that casuarinas were planted along Hawaii’s coastline to protect that island from salt spray and absorb the wave energy of a mini-tsunami. However, because they snap easily they are an unreliable wind shield in a typhoon. In certain areas of the east Viet Nam for example the casuarina is planted next to the seashore as a windbreaker for inland food crops. For the first five to seven years after planting the roots are pruned on either side. Here in the Bahamas, the trees have been allowed to grow like Topsy. The casuarina tolerates alkali and saline soils, is drought resistant and will withstand strong prevailing winds. It is claimed that they are easily felled during a hurricane, but those, especially on the western seashore, have withstood many hurricanes, and are still standing, while on the Eastern Road we see many palm trees twisted and broken after a hurricane. Although our Bahamian pundits maintain that casuarina trees do not protect sand d unes, in Hambantota City, Sri Lanka, that was the very reason for growing them. As they grew with much space between them they did not block the beautiful natural view of the water, yet provided a barrier to the salt spray from the sea. The casuarina shelterbelt became popular because it was the only undamaged area in Hambantota City after the devastating 2004 tsunami. However, more than anything else Sri Lankans believe that their casuarina shoreline has improved the aesthetic value of their beach and has enhanced its touristic value. In the meantime, Bahamians in their wisdom are about to destroy 66 of our old trees. Obviously, they don’t appreciate their beau ty along our shoreline, the shade they pro vide for those who use the beaches and the fact that they do not blot from view our beautiful blue waters. And, accept it or not, they do give properties inland a certain amount of protection from salt spray. To remove the casuarina is to remove an important feature of the Bahamas. This is a tragedy about to be executed in the name of progress. PLP is ‘injecting partisan politics into public life’ LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Felling the casuarinas is a tragedy ::IMPERIALOPTICAL ::ROSETTASTREETAND ::THEMALL-AT-MARATHON FORMOREINFO CALL 322 OR 393GET A FREE FRAMEwith the purchase of LensesBACK TO SCHOOLAND T’INGSTOUGH ? SALEAPPLIESTOSELECTEDFRAMES.SALEENDSAUGUST31,2009. TEACHERSWANTEDPreschool & Primary School Fun, Nurturing Christian Teachers.Email resume to beverley@rightafterthethebell.com EDITOR, The Tribune. KINDLY a llow me space in your paper to thank the All Andros and Berry Islands Regatta Committee and the community of North Andros for hosting an awards banquet inm y honour and honouring me at the 2009 Regatta. Specif ically, I wish to thank the following people for making the events possible: Brian Cleare, Chief Councillor and Chair man of the Banquet Committee; Danny Ferguson, Chairman o f the All Andros and Berry Islands Regatta Committee; Ms Donna Pickstock; Patrick Romer; Ms Shema Woodside; Ms Darnell Evans; Ms Pennell Wilson; Ms Estella Hunter;M s Daisy Bowleg; Ms Michelle Bowleg Ms Vanria Rahming; M rs Patricia Woodside; Ms Angela McDonald; Ossie Pin tard; Frank Hanna and Dudley Smith for their financial contributions. I also wish to thank Edison Key, the Executive Chairman of The Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation, Benjamin Rahming, the General Manager BAIC and oth er members of the executive management team for their attendance and support. Also thanks to my good friend Everett Hart who came all the way from Exuma to speak on my behalf. I also wish to thank Administrator Dr Huntley Christie and the Member of Parliament the Hon Vincent Peet for their support and kind words. Last, but not least, I wish to thank the good people of North Andros who came out in the hundreds in support of me. North Androsians, you really showed me how much you appreciated all that I have done in a non-partisan way. I have always maintained that my contribution to North Andros and The Bahamas is not for plaques, trophies or awards ... what I do is from the goodness of my heart and the love I have for this place that I call home. My late mother always taught her children “it’s better to give than to receive” because your award will not come from man, but from God. I strive to live by that dictum. I wish to reassure North Androsians that I will always be there for you even until the end of time. ALPHONSO SMITH North Andros, Bahamas August 18, 2009 Thanks for awards banquet in my honour

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By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net GOVERNMENT ministers yesterday hit back at suggestions that the FNM is "impotent" in t ackling the escalating murder count and argued that violent crime boils down to individual choices that are out of government's control. Speaking as a guest on Love 97 FM's “Issues of the Day”, State Finance Minister Zhivargo Laing said that despite the current high l evels of violent crimes and murders, the Bahamas is an "orderly society". "The United Nations still confirms that this is one of the most civil societies in all of the world,not withstanding, we have our own set of issues, which we know when it comes to murder. "This is an orderly society, order in a society doesn't happen by accident," he said, adding that government has invested significant resources in the Royal Bahamas Police Force to effectively police the nation. He said observers must realise that much of the crime plaguing our society boils down to complex personal choices that are "beyond the control of government.” "If you look at the crime (statistics) and you pick murder as an example, you would have to say from year to year the murder rate has gone up. The question becomes one of was there anything in analysing those murders that we could have done to prevent them. "If I had two police officers in the home that somebody broke into and shot somebody, maybe that could have been prevented. But is that practical,” said Mr Laing. The FNM and particularly Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest have come under heavy fire as the country grapples with rising levels of violent crime. Mr Turnquest conceded that crime is at an unacceptable level in the country as he weighed in on the debate on yesterday’s talk show. "I'm the first to admit that 52 murders in eight months of the year based on any yardstick is far too high for a society like the Bahamas. "The international standards in terms of homicides are five per 100,000 of population. Assuming a population of 350,000 we should have no more than 18 homicides a year. And so in eight months to have 52 that's far too many for a country our size," he acknowledged. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Govt: violent crime boils down to individual choices MANAGER of Little Whale Cay Mark Roberts pre s ents a cheque for $1,000 from the family of Mr and Mrs Peter Austin to Thelma Rolle of the Princess Margaret HospitalF oundation for the purchase of new state-of-the-art ventilators. Mr Austin said he was “delighted and proud to sup p ort theBreatheEasy Bahamas Campaign.” “Mark has been managing our property (Little WhaleC ay) for 12 years. This fundraising drive is important to all of our staff and we are pleased to support Mark’s phil anthropic endeavours,” he s aid. Little Whale Cay is located 32 miles northwest of Nassau in the Berry Island chain andw as previously the summer and weekend home of Wallace Groves, founder of Freeport. $1,000 donated to ‘Breathe Easy’ campaign T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f F ROM LEFT: V ice President of Doctors Hospital Michele Rassin; Director, Doctors Hospital Dr Keva Bethel; President of Doctors Hospital Barry Rassin; CEO Doctors Hospital Charles Sealy; Director NICU PMH Dr. Gwendolyn McDeigan; Nursing Officer NICU Patrice Solomon, Nursing Officer NICU Analee R ichards, Thelma Rolle of PMH, Mark Roberts of Tile King.

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THE parents of Miss India Universe Ekta Choudhry were forced to cancel their plans to travel to the Bahamas for the final show of the pageant due to a threat from hooligans. The Times of India reported yesterday that Miss India’s parents had been very excited about the trip, but had to cancel at the last minute. A group of hooligans near the Choudhrys’ home in the city of Gurgaon have been terrorising the family and Ekta’s parents said they are afraid to leave the country as their house may be attacked in their absence. Ekta’s mother Rita Choudhry told the Times in India that the family had recently moved to Gurgaon from Delhi and now regretted the decision. The Choudhrys have now filed a police complaint in this matter. While they will not be able to attend the final show to be held at Atlantis this Sunday, Ekta’s parents said that they are praying for their daughter’s success in the competition. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Threat prevents parents of Miss India from travelling to Bahamas PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham and his w ife Deloris returned to Nassau yesterday morning ending their annual holidays. The Ingrahams were met at Prince George Dock By Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette, Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest, Cabinet Secretary Anita Bernard, and Police Commissioner, Reginald Ferguson after dise mbarking the Norwegian Cruise liner, Norwegian Sky. PM and wife return from their holidays M ISS INDIA i s pictured celebrating India’s 62nd Independence day in Nassau recently. D e r e k S m i t h / M O T P e t e r R a m s a y / B I S

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IN our last poll on www.tribune242.com we asked our readers: “Which minister would you most like to see shuffled out of Cabinet?” Overall 238 persons participated. The results of the voting are as follows: Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest 54 Minister of Education Carl Bethel 51 “They are all doing a good job” 30 Minister of Public Works and Transport Neko Grant 30 Minister of Health Hubert Minnis 12 Minister of Labour and Social Development Dion Foulkes 11 Minister of the Environment Earl Deveaux 9 Attorney General Michael Barnett 8 Minister of Housing and National Insurance Kenneth Russell 8 Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette 7 Minister of Agriculture and Marine Resources Larry Cartwright 6 Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister 6 Minister of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace 6 Here are some of the comments of the website’s readers: By‘Concerned Parent’ Title: Out of touch “Its sad to see that the grade point average has not changed. Mr Bethel doesn't care about the future of our country, if hedid he would have a vision for our educational system. Mr Bethel, it starts from students entering grade 1, please change the programme. Also Mr Bethel, I believed that you should at least make and effort to meet with the parents in Grand Bahama about the abuse.” By ‘Tired of criminals’ Title: Security System Sucks “Come on "leaders" of our nation....are your minds only on how much money you're getting paid? Are you not getting paid to THINK for our country? We have so many islands, many of them empty, BUILD A PRISON ON ONE OF THOSE!!!! Stop letting so many criminals back into the decent (populace I'm trying everyday to be lawabiding, yet if I run an amber light, not even red, amber, the police wanna pull me over to ticket me. Murderers are free, drug dealers are free, and an innocent person like me getting charged for something so petty. Lock those criminals up and I'll feel better about getting a ticket for something small and petty.” ByStanley Jackson Sr Title: Crime Fiasco “The Bahamas, Bahamians and everyone else in the country including visitors are being held hostage by the criminal element in our society. Minister Turnquest should have been man enough to carry out hanging as capital punishment according to the laws of the Bahamas. He cannot effectively handle his mandate, so get rid of him!!” BySteff Title: Copy cats “The Minister of National Security is clueless. Moreover, whatever other Caribbean countries do, he tries to dupli cate. We've heard about monitoring system many times for those criminals on bail, yet he remains silent and recites..."WE ARE VERY CONCERN" with level of this crime and that crime!! Why are they collecting monthly salaries for such high level of incompetence? Overall, we have a bunch of copy cats as leaders, I am convinced it's endemic.” ByGinger Title: Loan mess “Honestly I am still (bogg led) by how long Carl took (to how can you wait weeks before persons go off to college to say that ‘hey we aint giving ya'll any money because other people didn’t pay the loans back’, it’s pretty sad. I would have thought that one of the main tasks in education was to deal with persons who haven’t paid the government back yet. They suppose to be on these peoples back three months after they got their degrees, and whoever else signed on the application, take the money from them, if you can’t find them, put a very big advertisement in the newspapers and on TV listing these persons names and colleges they went to, because it’s sad that other people have to suffer because others want to be disgusting.” ByIan Title: Minister Vanderpool stinks “I think that he is still in the old-school mentality and that doesn’t work in today’s society anymore. People don't just want sun, sand and sea. They want to do activities and learn the culture. Sitting on a beach everyday is boring!! Why not create activities or day excursions that are affordable so people can see what other (the real Bahamians) do such as in the Family Islands.” By K FORBES Title: Clueless “Honestly... I think Carl Bethel is clueless with regard to the fundamental requirements of developing a strong Educational Curriculum in our country. I have seen no creativity in terms of how to fund, much less develop stimulating programmes that would help to reform the youth of our nation or help to salvage the intellectual remains of student population. How could an elected and supposedly educated member of parliament not be furious about the average BJC/ BGCSE results, or the number of students able to successfully pursue a form of higher education... And the student loan programme... how could they just cease 'opportunity'... what ever happened to 'reform' and examination of improvement. That could have been handled completely different... but when there is no vision.” ByScribe Title: Wutless “Why don't you have an option for 'all of the above'? I think they're all doing a bad job!” Visit www.tribune242.com to participate in our new poll where we ask the question “Should Paul Moss contest Perry Christie for PLP leadership in October?” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 7 Island specialMidsizeinFlorida aslowas US$45Daily/US$180Weekly w henusingtheupgrade c oupon.F ullsizeinFlorida a slowas US$49D aily/US$205Weekly w henusingtheupgrade coupon.U nlimited Mileage, CDW, F ees, Taxes & Free UpgradeF orreservations,aswellasterms&conditions p leasecontactDestinationsat(786245-0520 o rat1-800-468-3334.Besuretouseratecode RC1 a ndcouponcodeAU2253VLS w henmaking t hereservation.Upgradeisonlyvalidoncompact a ndmidsizecarsonrentalsoftwoormoredays. R atesincludeunlimitedmileageCDW, l ocal/state/airporttaxesandfees.Rates,terms & conditionsaresubjecttochangewithoutnotice. OffervalidthroughSeptember30th2009.alamo.com 2 0 0 9 H i l t o n H o s p i t a l i t y I n c .Forreservations:32233013029000reservations.nassau@hi lton.comfacebook.com/HiltonNassau Relax in our newly renovated rooms for only$99*per nightplus taxes*Valid through September 30, 2009Single occupancy, Friday, Saturday, Sunday nights only ($109 for double occupancy room Bahamian residents only Turn your weekends into aMini Vacationat the British Colonial Hilton Readers say who they want shuffled from Cabinet THE LATEST poll can be found on tribune242.com.

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SENATORJerome Fitzgerald yesterday called for the resignation of Environment Minister Earl Deveaux following the spillage of dredged material near Saunder’s Beach. T he material was released into the water following an alleged “mist ake” made by the team c onstructing the extension to Arawak Cay. However, a Ministry of Environment s tatement denied that the turbidity plume” complained of was at any timen ear Saunders Beach. M r Fitzgerald, chairman of the committee to Preserve and Protect The Bahamas for Future Generations, has criticised government over the extension, claiming it has the potential to harm the environment. Yesterday he said the spillage, which occurred on Tuesday and was visible throughout the waters off Saunders Beach, “only confirms and highlights t he grave concern the Committee and thousands of Bahamians have raised w ith regard to the extens ion of Arawak Cay and its effect on the surroundi ng environment.” M r Fitzgerald said: “This i s sufficient evidence that this project should bes topped forthwith in order t hat the government and the Bahamian people can get a better understanding of the effects this project will have on our environment and the impact to the surrounding areas.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Miss Universe Pageant Event Schedule: MISS UNIVERSE FINAL SHOWSunday, August 23rd, 9:00pm Imperial Ballroom, Atlantis, Paradise IslandBe there live to witness the crowning of the new 2009 Miss Universe!Tickets: General $175, Deluxe $250, Preferred $400, Gold $750 VIP $1000 (includes admission to Coronation Ball with open bar and gourmet buffet)CORONATION BALLSunday, August 23rd, 11:30pmThe Royal Deck, Atlantis, Paradise IslandCelebrate with the new Miss Universe and her fellow contestants and enjoy great music, a gourmet buffet and an open bar!Tickets: $145 For tickets and information call the Atlantis Box Ofce at 363-6601 W itness the crowning of the 2009 Miss Universe on giant multiple screens. Enjoy an open bar and a sumptuous a lfresco buffet. This royal fete will culminate with the prestigious Coronation Ball at 11:30pm where you can mingle with the newly crowned Miss Universe and her fellow contestants! Celebrate an experience that will never happen again!Tickets: $185THE VIEWING PARTYTHE 2009 MISS UNIVERSE PAGEANTSunday, August 23rd, 8:00pm The Royal Deck, Atlantis, Paradise Island Buy 3 Tickets, get 1 free! 127 ,&( TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Call for minister to resign over dredged material spillage M IAMI H URRICANEBill howled over the open Atlantic as a dangerous Category 4 storm Wednesday, and it could be energized by warmer waters as it moves north, according t o Associated Press. F orecasters said Bill should begin pushing large swells towardB ermuda and parts of the southeastern U.S. coast by the weekend, but it wasn't yet clear h ow close the storm will come to land. The National Hurric ane Center also said people in the Leeward I slands should keep an eye on the storm,t hough its core was e xpected to pass well to the northeast of the chain in the next 24 hours. Fishermen in Antigua were advised to dock their boats. As strong as Bill a lready is, it could get s tronger because it's traveling into warmer w aters in the Atlantic t hat could intensify the s torm, said senior hurricane specialist Lixion Avila. "The warm ocean is like the fuel for car," Avila said Wednesday." If you get high octane g as you get more pow er that's what warmer water does." Bill was maintaining a top wind speed of 135 mph Wednesday, hours after it became aC ategory 4 storm, and forecasters said it could get stronger. The storm's center wasl ocated 335 miles east o f the Leeward Islands and it was moving west-northwest near 20 mph. Islands in the north east Caribbean could s ee bigger waves from t he storm in the next d ay or two. The most significant threat could be to Bermuda, which the storm could pass in three or four days, forecasters said. But it also could move directly between Bermuda and the eastern coast of the U.S. without making landfall. It was too early to tell if Bill would veer close to shore over the weekend or swing away from the East Coast of the U.S., but the five-day forecast predicted its center would pass well offshore of the North Carolina-Virginia line Saturday. A cold front was expected to turn Bill to the northeast, but it wasn't clear when that would happen, Blake said. Hurricane Bill looms in Atlantic at Category 4 Share your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y. E ARL DEVEAUX

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 9 Sporty meets sophistication.It all starts the moment you set eyes on the new Mercedes-Benz CLC Sports Coup. Expressive styling and visible dynamism appeal to the heart, the mind and the eye in equal measure. Its distinctive wedge shaped design exudes energy and the desire to be on the move at all times. Its agile sportiness coupled with a high standard of comfort makes this Sports Coup heads and shoulders above the rest. Anyone opting for a CLC buys far more than just a car. You own engineering excellence. Come into Tyreflex Star Motors and test drive a MercedesBenz CLC-Class today.OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT IS FULLY STOCKED WITH EVERY COMPONENT NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT YOUR MERCEDES RUNS TROUBLE FREE. TRAINED TECHNICIANS ON DUTY.TYREFLEX STAR MOTORSCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz CLC-Class at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667 CAREER OPPORTUNITY Reinsurance Consultant We are looking for a Reinsurance Consultant to review the process flows for reinsurance administration and establish process flows for all new business to ensure that procedures are in accordance with provisions of the Company’s reinsurance treaties. Qualifications/Experience/Skills: xBachelors Degree in Computer Science, Finance or related discipline; xIn-depth financial services experience; x5-10 years experience in testing, implementation and assessment of systems; xAbility to identify and recommend solutions to internal control weaknesses within business systems and processes; xExcellent organizational, time management and interpersonal skills; and xProject management or leadership expertise. To apply: Send electronic rsum via email to careers@colinaimperial.com Subject: Reinsurance Consultant or Send rsum to: Human Resources Manager 308 East Bay Street P.O. Box N-4728 Nassau, Bahamas Applications must be received by 10 September 2009. TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM t he family said TaGia died t hree months after giving b irth to her second son Zen, two weeks after her 29th b irthday and just two days after arriving in Nassau from St Kitts. T wo hours before she was killed she had a telephone conversation with her husb and Kachi Armony in which she told him she loved him. TaGia, known by family and friends as “Lady T”, was b orn on July 20, 1980, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She attended Xavier’s Lowe r School and St Andrew’s High School in the Bahamas, Havergal College in Ontario, Canada, and Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia. She w as graduated with a degree i n commerce and practised as an accountant in St Kitts where she lived with her hus-b and, radio host Kachi Armo ny. TaGia is survived by her h usband, Kach, sons Chelan a nd Zen Armony, parents Gordon Soles and Maxine Soles, sisters Giahna, Paigea nd Greer Soles, brother Kurt Major, grandmothers Doris Taylor and Rosalie Austin, a nd many other relatives and friends. Earlier this week, 25-yearo ld Valentino HannaD orsette, alias “Ballistic”, of Sesame Street, was charged with her murder. The defendant has denied any involvement in the incident, and told the court dur-i ng an unsworn statement that he is Tony Smith and notJ amal Penn. Outside the courtroom, Penn’s attorney Murrio Ducille said: “Our position is that the prosecution obvious-l y had difficulty convincing the jury that this young man isg uilty. At least he has another shot on a retrial with different minds to consider it. We can just wait until the system can accommodate him for anoth-e r trial.” Mr Ducille said he will be making a bail application for his client who has been in custody since January 20 last year. The murder trial began before Senior Justice Allenl ast Wednesday. Jilian W illiams and Yolande Rolle prosecuted the case. During her nearly hourlong summation yesterday morning, Senior Justice Allen t old jurors they were to come t o a decision based on the evid ence against Penn. The fact that another individual was charged with the murder but had not stood trial was “irrelevant.” T he prosecution relied heavily on the testimony of a 16-year-old boy who said he was standing under a canopy outside the Perfume Bar on the western side of Frederick Street when the shooting took place. The teenager, who was also s hot, testified he was with f riends when he saw and heard a green Honda car playing loud music. He said the car had stopped at a traffic light and he got a good l ook inside when it turned s lowly south onto Frederick S treet. He told the court how the passenger in the front seat stuck his head out of the window with a gun in his handa nd fired two shots. According to a firearms examiner, one of the two fired rounds found at the scene was a .38 bullet. a nd scooter rental compan y in Nassau. According to the Florida State Attorney’s Office, a second suspect was issued a warrant on August 13 but the person’s name is beingw ithheld at this time. W hite is to be arraigned in front of a judge next Monday. FROM page one Slain mother of two T here were 193 live births to women between 40 to 44 with 1 04 born to married women and 89 to unwed mothers. M others between the ages of 45 to 49 had 10 live births, w ith five of that number born to single mothers. There were no live births born to women over the age of 50. T here were 18 live births to women whose age was not stat e d; 10 of these births were to married women while eight came f rom single mothers. T he data is available on the Department of Statistics website. FROM page one Single mums in birth rate shock Man to be arraignedover killing of Bahamian FROM page one Deangelo Fowler murder trial FROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 0DFKLQHU\(QHUJ\/LPLWHG /LPLWHGfWKHDXWKRUL]HG&DWHUSLOODUGHDOHU LQ7KH%DKDPDVLVORRNLQJIRU 7UDLQHH 7HFKQLFLDQ&DQGLGDWHV WR \HDUV ROGIRUHQUROOPHQWLQWKHLUORFDO&DWHUSLOODU 7UDLQLQJ,QVWLWXWH&DQGLGDWHVVKRXOGEH JUDGXDWHRI%79,RUDQHTXLYDOHQWLQVWLWXWLRQ 3UDFWLFDOH[SHULHQFHLQUHSDLULQJGLHVHO HQJLQHVDQGRUHOHFWULFDOHTXLSPHQWLV SOXV6XFFHVVIXOFDQGLGDWHVZLOOEHWUDLQHGLQ0 t ORFDOWUDLQLQJLQVWLWXWHH[SHULHQFHG PHFKDQLFVDQGHOHFWULFLDQV7KHWUDLQLQJ ZLOOEHGRQHLQ1DVVDXZLWKRSSRUWXQLWLHV WRUHORFDWHWR)UHHSRUWRU$EDFR EUDQFKHVXSRQFRPSOHWLRQ3OHDVHDGGUHVVDOOUHVXPHVWR 7KHHUYLFHDQDJHU 1DVVDX%DKDPDV 5HVXPHVFDQDOVREHGURSSHGRII DWWKHUHFHSWLRQLVWGHVNDW PDLQRIFHLQ2DNHV)LHOG5HVXPHV PXVWEHUHFHLYHGQRODWHUWKDQ)ULGD\ 6HSWHPEHUWK 2QO\SHUVRQV EHLQJLQWHUYLHZHGIRUWKLVWUDLQLQJZLOO EHFRQWDFWHG RUSSELL’S WAREHOUSE C LOSING SALER ivet Rite Shelving, Gondolas, Glass Shelves, 2 & 4 Arm Display Racks, Gridwall, Slatwall, S lotted Standards, and Hardware. Asst. Fixtures and Fittings, M en’s Coverall’s $5.00, S/S & L/S Whie Shirts $1-$5, Blank ID Cards, 16” Stand Fans, Blank CD’s, Blk School S hoes, Men’s Jeans sz. 46-50, $15, AND MORE. L ocation: Madeira Shopping Center Behind Mystical Gym Entrance to Aquinas F irst left First stairs on left. Hours: Mon. to Thurs. 11am to 5pm Contact: 465-8648 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS P AGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM E YE WITNESSES claimed a tornado caused serious d amage to trees and cars on Barbados Street, Golden G ates on Tuesday night. Some in the area said they have n ever heard anything like it before. O ne resident said the air was sucked from his house, k nocking down blinds, curtains and tossing around garden furniture. P h o t o : P h i l i p B r o w n Golden Gates hit by tornado?

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B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net BERLIN, Germany Not s ince the IAAF's 5th World Championships in Gothenburg, Sweden, did the Bahamas have two representatives in the men's high jump final. Fourteen years later at the 12th World Championships yesterday, the Bahamas had two competitors competing for a spot in the final on Friday. But both defending champion Donald Thomas and Trevor Barry failed in their bid to match the combo of Troy Kemp and the late Ian Thompson in Gothenburg. As fate would have it at the Gothenburg championship, Kemp went on to win the gold and Thompson ended up 11th. Yesterday at the Olympic Stadium, Thomas, who became only the second Bahamian male athlete to wina gold medal at the biannual championships, finished 15th and Barry was 17th out of a field of 30 competitors. Thomas, avenging a defeat to Barry at the BAAA Nationals in June, bowed out at 2.27 metres or 7-feet, 5 1/4i nches, while Barry's first a ppearance at the championships stopped at 7-4 1.4. T he qualifying height w here eight of the 12 comp etitors booked their posit ions was 7-6 1/2. " It was an all right compet ition. I thought I was ready," s aid Thomas, who cleared his f irst four heights at 2.10 (61 0 3/4), 2.15 (7-0 1/2), 2.20 (72 1/2) and 2.24 (7-4 1/4) before he got his first knock-d own at 2.27 (7-5 1/4 d idn't clear any attempts at 2.30 (7-6 1/2 " I felt good out there. I had a clean sheet up to 7.24. After that, I developed a cramp. It ried to rub it out, but I just couldn't run the way I needed to when I tried to go for 2.24.I think if I had cleared it on my first attempt, I would have been right up there." After watching the field slowly decrease and his chances of returning to the final slip away, Thomas said the competition was stiff, but he knew he had the ability to jump with the field. "I had some problems this year, went home, stayed there for about a month and worked on some things and I was ready to come here," he said. "I just started to develop some cramps and that threw me off today." Although neither of them w ere able to at least duplicate the feat of Kemp and Thompson in the final, Thomas saidh e definitely came here prepared to ink his name among the last 12. " I really wanted to defend my title. Unfortunately I can't do it anymore," said the 25-y ear-old former basketball player of Grand Bahama. "I j ust have to regroup and take i t from there. I don't know what I will do. I probably will d o one or two more meets b efore I'm finished for the y ear." F or 26-year-old Barry, who c ompeted in Group A with 1 4 other competitors (seven o f whom qualified and two s urpassed the qualifying m ark), he was thrilled about h is performance, even t hought he didn't qualify for the final. " It was a good experience. I k now I can beat these guys," said Barry, who did a lifetime best of 2.28 (7-5 3/4M esto on July 22 to clinch his appearance here. "I know I can beat these guys. I just need a little more competi t ion." Unlike Thomas, Barry passed his opening height of2 .10 (6-10 3/4 his first attempt at 2.15 (7-0 1/2) before he came back ton ail it on his second try. He cleared both 2.20 (7-2 1/2 2.24 (7-4 1/4o ver the 2.27 (7-5 1/4 "I was a little shaken up w hen I got the first knock d own, but I made the adjustment," said Barry about his s eries of jumps. "At 2.20, I w as trying to get in the r hythm and at 2.24, I was still t rying to get more height. " I think I had my chances. I j ust couldn't get the big jumps w hen I needed them. I think I k ind of defeated myself today. I know that I had the ability t o be in the final. I just didn't g et the job done today." Barry, who had a chance to m eet and work out briefly w ith Kemp (but only heard about Thompson), said he will definitely be looking at get t ing back to the next Worlds and the Olympic Games. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS BERLIN, Germany Here's a look at the schedule for the Bahamians competing over the remainder of the IAAF's 12th World Championships in Athletics: T T O O D D A A Y Y Men's 110 hurdles semifinal Shamar Sands, lane 1, heat 3 at 12:38 pm ET Women's 200 semifinal Debbie FergusonMcKenzie, lane 6, heat 1 at 1:50 pm ET Sheniqua Ferguson, lane 1, heat 2 at 1:56 pm ET Men's 110 hurdles final Shamar Sands, starting at 2:55 pm ET F F R R I I D D A A Y Y Women's 200 final D ebbie FergusonM cKenzie and Sheniqua F erguson, starting at 3 pm ET Men's 400 final Chris Brown, lane five at 3:20 pm ET S S A A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y Women's 4 x 100 relay heats 12:10 pm ET Men's 4 x 400 relay heats 12:55 pm ET Women's 4 x 100 relay final 2 pm ET Women's 4 x 400 relay heats 2:15 pm ET S S U U N N D D A A Y Y Women's 4 x 400 relay final 11:50 am ET Men's 4 x 400 relay final 12:15 pm ET IAAF World Champs: Schedule of events Thomas, Barry don’t make final jump DONALD THOMAS (left 12th World Championships in Berlin, Germany...

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Brown, the 30-year-old fourth place finisher in the last two Worlds as well as the O lympic Games last year in Beijing, China, said he is confid ent that he's running well e nough to get the monkey off his back and claim the individ-u al medal that has eluded him at one of the two major international meets. As for Miller, the 22-yearold two-time NAIA champion, B rown said he has been pleased t o see the runner-up to him at the BAAA National Champi-o nships perform as well as he did all season long. "I'm very proud of him," Brown said. "Not just here, but the way he did throughout the s eason. Every meet he ran in he has improved on his times.T o come here in his first World Championships and run 44.99 i s fantastic for him." Miller, whose debut was just shy of an appearance in the final, said he made sure that he wasn't intimidated by all of the r unners around him and that helped him to get through hist wo rounds. "44.99 what more could I ask f or," he asked? "I came at the games expecting nothing and I got rewarded with a 44.99. So I'm really happy with the performance, even though I'm not e ligible for the final. Hopefully in years to come, my training c ould step up and I can come out to the Worlds or the O lympics and step up again." For Miller, the experience is one that he will definitely cherish as he got a chance to run against Wariner, who was cons idered the best quarter-miler since world record holderM ichael Johnson, until Merritt burst on the scene last year. " I know he was in the back of me, so I just came out to run m y best," said Miller about competing in lane three with W ariner trailing him in two. "I just tried to do my best. But he w as way faster than me." As for Miller's place in the history of the Bahamian athl etics, he joins Brown, the national record holder at 44.40;f ormer world champion and former national record holder Avard Moncur (44.45 NCAA champion Andretti Bain (44.62 n ational record holder Troy McIntosh (44.73B ahamians Latoy Williams (44.73 ( 44.98). With the relays coming up on the weekend, Miller will geta chance to team-up with Brown, Moncur, Latoy W illiams and Nathaniel McKinney. He said he's confidentt hat the Bahamas can keep its streak of winning a medal alive s ince they started in 1999. After the championships, Miller said he will be looking at whatever opportunity comes up for a major contract. But in a ny event, he intends to continue in the sport because he l oves the experience he has gained so far. By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net BERLIN, Germany Two days after finishing sixth in the final of the women's 100 metres, Debbie FergusonMcKenzie was all business yesterday as she contested the p reliminary rounds of the 200 a t the Olympic Stadium. She trailed American Marshevet Hooker through the finish line in second place in 2 2.71 seconds to qualify with t he third fastest time for t oday's semifinal. A well-rested Hooker, who didn't run in the century, won the heat in the fastest time of 22.51. Meanwhile in the 24th spot, Sheniqua 'Q' Ferguson taggeda long with Olympic champio n Veronica Campbell-Brown a nd turned in a season's best o f 23.35 to qualify in the final s pot. Campbell-Brown won t he heat in 23.01 for the 12th s pot. "It feels good. Basically I was worried about running and not getting injured," said Sheniqua Ferguson, the 19year-old Auburn University bound junior, who is slowly coming into her own after making her Worlds debut. "Basically I just wanted to go out there and do my best. I feel happy with the way things are going. Hopefully in then ext round, I will run even b etter." F erguson, the champion from the 12th IAAF World Junior Championships in Bydgoszca last year, said she's just delighted to be competing against the world's best athletes, especially CampbellBrown, whom she ran against in the second round of the 100 as well. "I'm just trying to take it all in," she said. F erguson-McKenzie, now the training partner of Campbell-Brown in Clearmont, Florida, said she felt pretty good after her century,a lthough her legs felt a little h eavy at the start of the race. " I'm glad that we didn't h ave the rounds this morni ng," said Ferguson-McKenz ie, who at age 33 could use all t he rest she can get. " I felt really good. I think that was one of the easiest 22.7 that I've ran in a while. I just wanted to run to get in the top two. "I was really running to see where I was after the 100, so Iw as pleased to be in the top t wo. So there wasn't really any concern going into the race or the way that I ran." In today's semis, FergusonMcKenzie will be up first in l ane six just ahead of Campb ell-Brown in five and Hooker in four at 1:50 pm ET. F erguson will follow at 1:56 p m ET in lane one in the second heat that will include the d efending Worlds champion Allyson Felix of the United States in lane five. Only the top four finishers in each heat will advance to the final on Friday at 3pm ETj ust before Chris Brown runs i n the final of the men’s 400m. " They have the Olympic c hampion and the World c hampion and every other c hampion out here," said Ferg uson-McKenzie, the Bahamia n double sprint champion. "Every other is out there to run, so it's going to be a battle, you just have to come out fighting if you want to win." Not having won a World title outright, although she wase levated to the gold after the s uspension of American Mari on Jones at the 8th Worlds i n Edmonton, Canada, in 2 001, Ferguson-McKenzie s aid she would like nothing b ut to hear the national a nthem and see the Bahamian flag hoisted in the air as she ascends the podium again. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 13 ‘Golden girl’ Debbie and ‘Q’ Ferguson qualify for 200 semis SHENIQUA FERGUSON DEBBIE FERGUSON-McKENZIE ‘Fireman’ hot for 400 showdown F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 6 6

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net BERLIN, Germany Even though he had a “horrible” start and bumped over one of the 10 hurdles, Shamar Sands was still able to rebound in time to advance to today’s semifinal of the men’s 110 metre hurdles at the IAAF’s 12th World Championships in Athletics. In his preliminary rounds at the Olympic Stadium yesterday, Sands finished fifth in the fifth of seven heats in 13.57 seconds to advance to the semis on the third fastest losing time to earn his berth into the race with 24 com petitors left. "I felt really good about the race," said Sands, who clippedt he fifth hurdle during his h eat that was a photo finish between China’s Wei Ji and American Terrance Trammell in 13.51, followed closely by Netherlands’ Gregory Sedoc in 13.54 and Frenchman Dimitri Bascou in 13.55. "I just had a horrible stat, but once I got going, the middle of the race felt really good. So I'm really happy with the time. Once I get a better start, I should be all right." Tied for 15th with Jamaican Dwight Thomas in the field of 46 in the preliminaries, Sands will run out of lane one in the last of three heats in the semis at 12:31 pm ET. The heat will include Cuban world record holder and Olympic champion Dayron Robles in lane seven and Jamaican Maurice Wignall in four. The first two in each heat plus the two fastest losing times will qualify for the final that will be ran two hours later at 2:55 pm ET. Improving on his performance at the 2007 Worlds in Osaka, Japan, where he failed to advance out of the first round and matching the second round appearance at the Olympic Games last year in Beijing, China, the 2001 World Youth semifinal said the goal is to get through one round at a time. "I contribute my time and place all to my start," said Sands, reflecting on his per formance. "But I'm happy that I got back into the race. I just have to improve on the start." With it being day five of the championships, Sands said he definitely felt the jitter-bugs when he stepped out on the track. But competing first on the day after his training partner Leevan “Superman” Sands just missed out on a medal in the men's triple jump on Tuesday, Sands said he was even more encouraged to go out and run well. "We help each other through things because we are real close," said Sands, who trains in Auburn under coach Henry Rolle. "I just told him that I know he's disappointed, but he says he has to be thankful to God. "And he told me that he knows I'm ready to go out there and just show the peo ple what he knows I can do. So I'm just going to go out there and do what I have to do. It's going to be hard, but ifI can get my start down packed, I should be okay." However, 24-year-old Sands admitted that in order for him to have a successful showing at the Worlds tonight, he will have to lower his national record again, which he brought down to 13.38 in Ostrava on June 17 in his final race. Sands advances to semis SHAMAR SANDS (centre 110 metres event during the World Championships in Berlin, Germany. He is sandwiched between Hector Cotto (left Nigeria. (Photo: Bryan Cummings/The Jamaica Observer

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‘Still plenty of hope’ for medal By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net BERLIN, Germany While everybody ran incredib ly fast, Chris “Fireman” Brown said he just wanted to d o enough to book his spot in what is anticipated to be one of the greatest showdowns in the men's 400 metres final on Friday night. O n day five of the IAAF's World Championships in Ath-l etics, Brown had to hold off Virgin Islands' Tabarie Henry t o win the third and final heat of the semifinal yesterday at the Olympic Stadium in 44.95. Henry clocked 44.97 to also qualify. O lympic champion LaShawn Merritt of the United Statesl owered his world leading time from 44.50 to 44.37 in winning h eat two as he pulled Trinidad & Tobago's Renny Quow along in second in a personal best of 44.53. And two-time World champ ion Jeremy Wariner of the United States did 44.69 in tak-i ng the first heat, leaving Bahamian Ramon Miller out of the final eight in the 10th spot after he dropped his first round PB of 45.00 to 44.99 or f ifth place to become only the seventh Bahamian to dip under t he 45-second barrier. "It was not what the doctor o rdered, or should I say what the ‘Fireman’ ordered," said Brown about his race. "My coach told me to go out there and get the win. I was just focusing on the win. I think I got the first part right, but the second part was so so. "But I know I'm pretty s trong enough to go out there and get on the podium. I didn't have to run 44 seconds low or 43 high to get back to the final, even though we have a day's break. I feel pretty good. I just have to wait until the day after tomorrow (Friday When the final is held on Frid ay at 3:20 pm ET, Brown will run out of lane five, right where he wants to be in between Merritt in four and Wariner in six. Q uow, the other threat to a medal, will be in three. " You never know what will happen," said Brown about the f inal. "A lot of the guys haven't ran their season's best yet. So it could be anything. It could be 44, it could be 43 or it could be 45. A lot of tension is going into i t. So it will come down to who goes out and executes. For me i t doesn't matter the time, just as long as I get on the podium." BERLIN, G ermany We j ust passed the mid-way point of t he International Amateur Ath-l etic Federa tion's 12th vers ion of the W orld Championships in Athl etics and although the B ahamas has not had its flag raised during a medal presen-t ation in the Olympic Stadium, there's still plenty of hope left o ver the next four days. The two individual medals are now left up to the women's 2 00 metres and the men's 400 after Leevan “Superman”S ands was just barely beaten out for the bronze in the men's t riple jump by Cuban Alexis Copello Tuesday night. Although we got another shocker on Wednesday morning when Donald Thomas didn 't qualify in his bid to defend his 2007 high jump title in Osa k a, Japan, it just shows the level of competition that is exhib i ted here. If you don't come here hav ing performed at a reasonable level, they shouldn't expect to be able to turn it on and per f orm at a higher standard. Everybody else who has b een performing all year long are taking it to the next level, w hich means that if you were not at a certain standard before you got here, you wouldn't be able to contain with those who have. C ase in point. Many expected Derrick Atkins to be in the f inal of the men's century, but he didn't even get out of the f irst round. Since winning the silver b ehind American Tyson Gay’s gold medal performance and Jamaican Asafa Powell’s bronze in Osaka, Atkins hasn ot had that type of season to make him a contender here. But one has to agree that nobody anticipated that he would not have even gotten outo f the first round. As for Thomas, he too has not had the type of season that led to his triumph in Osaka and it showed in his performance here as well. He obviously lacked the "killer" instinct that his peers brought to the competition yesterday when they needed to dig deep and pull out that big jump on their attempts at 7-6 1/4 and for the most part, they got the job done to earn their spot in the final. Leevan “Superman” Sands had to stretch for two season’s best performances to stake his claim at a shot for a medal in the men's triple jump on Tues day. The difference was just four centimetres that separated him and Copello for the bronze. Copello just proved that he wanted it a little more and that was what separated him from Sands in the final analysis. So it's going to be interest ing to see how the final days of the championships unfold. I'm still looking at the possibility of two to three medals, which would be right in our range. C M Y K C M Y K THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 16 P AGE 13 Debbie and Sheniqua qualify for 200 semis...... TRIBUNECOVERAGEOFTHE IAAF WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS BERLIN 2009 BROUGHT TO YOU BY Sands advances to semis... See page 14 ‘Fireman’ hot for 400 showdown OPINION S TUBBS S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 3 3 C HRIS BROWN a nd Tabarie Henry of US Virgin Islands in action... (AP Photo J EREMY WARINER c rosses the l ine ahead of Ramon Miller of the Bahamas in a 400m semifinal at World Athletics Championships in Berlin on Wednesday... (AP Photo RAMON MILLER (left (AP Photo Miller’s personal best doesn’t put him in final

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE prospective purchaser of the Hotel Corporation’s last resort property has b een asked to revise some parts of their proposal”, the minis-ter of tourism and aviation confirmed yesterday, which will involve providing the Government with details about how the project will be ‘phased in’. Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, in a brief interview with Tribune Business, confirmed that Scheck Industries, the Illinois-based industrial and real estate developer, had been asked to revise its proposal and, until these submis-sions had been received and approved, its acquisition of the Andros-based Lighthouse Yacht Club & Marina would not be permitted. C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.96 $3.87 $4.05 B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamian construction industry is hoping the Contractors Bill will be before Parliament and passed intol aw before year-end, Tribune Business was told yesterday,as the economic downturn represents “an excellent opportunity for the industryto get its house in order”. Stephen Wrinkle, the Bahamian Contractors Association’s (BCA said that given the absence of a licensing/standards regime that provided a guide to which contractors were able to do a specific job, both the industry and its clients currently incurred “exhaus tive” costs and time dealing with a paper-intensive appli cation/selection process. To prepare Bahamian contractors for the registration and licensing regime the Contractors Bill will usher in once it becomes statute law, Mr Wrinkle said the BCA planned to restart its seminar series in conjunction with the Ministry of Works and Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI “At the moment, the Bill is with the Attorney General’s Office, and they are incorpo rating the final changes that t he BCA and the Ministry of W orks agreed to,” Mr Wrink le told Tribune Business. “We’ve basically finished with the Bill. “The changes were minor just a few minor details. They had to do with the categories of contractor. We’ve agreed basically all the out standing issues with the Bill. We’ve had the full support of the Ministry of Works in this effort. They’ve been slow but supportive.” Mr Wrinkle added that the BCA understood the Bill was now with the Legal Department in the Attorney Gener al’s Office, and “in the final stages” there. Once that ministry completed its work, the Bill would be returned to the Ministry of Works. If Neko Grant, the minister of works, was satisfied, he would then ‘Excellent opportunity to get house in order’ Contractors hope legislation to regulate industry in place by year -end S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 B B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A FREEPORT-based housewares/building materi als supplier yesterday attrib uted its ability to weather the recession to “internal operational efficiencies” and a positive corporate culture, with year-to-date sales trending in line with 2008 and 2007 levels, and expansion being eyed “when the time is right”. Christopher Lowe, operations manager for Kelly’s (Freeport ness that the company had “weathered the downturn quite well” despite all the layoffs and ‘doom and gloom’ surrounding it in the Grand Bahama economy, and it was continuing to hire to replace staff who left. Even though Grand Bahama’s economy has yet to emerge from the slump initiated by the Royal Oasis closure in 2004, something exacerbated by the current global recession, Mr Lowe said sales at Kelly’s (Freeport in all, in par with last year and the year before”. While sales year-to-date had often been up one month, then down the next, Mr Lowe saying they were “up and down in the top 3 per cent”, he confirmed that overall they were trending in line with 2007 and 2008 comparatives. “This speaks to the effi ciency of operations, supply and demand, being in tune with the customer base and giving them the prices and commodities they want,” Mr Lowe told Tribune Business. “We’re looking at an expansion when the time is right. You plan when you can. We’re looking at the future to see what direction we expand in when the time is right, and when there is more stability in the Government Retailer’s sales buck recession S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 B B Resort buyer told to revise its proposal V-Wallace * Acknowledges possible fall into negative equity a ‘concern’, but optimistic will not happen because $500,000 for Home Centre inventory will come through * Chair and majority shareholder Babak looking at guaranteeing some funds By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor FREEPORT Concrete’s chief executive yesterday told Tribune Business he was “fairly confident” that the BISX-listed firm would return to profitability in the first quarter of its next financial year, indicating its chairman was looking at guaranteeing the $500,000 in extra financing required to take its retail arm into profitability. Ray Simpson said his major problem remained getting the additional $500,000 financing required to boost inventory levels, and thus sales, at its Freeport Concrete chief ‘confident’ on Q1 profitability S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 2 2 B B By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net T he Canadian custom woodwork manufacturing company, KP Manufacturing, yesterday said it had opened its $2 million Bahamas-based production and training facility, where prisoners and interested individuals will be trained to make the same high-end products it sells across North America. Kristine Smed, the company’s owner, said KP Manufacturing (Bahamas mary output was top-of-the-line wood furniture, and its primary purpose is to trained unskilled individuals in the art of fine woodworking. “I am hoping when they are trained they will sprout out and start their own companies,” said Ms Smed. “ In Calgary, probably 90 per cent of the shops are started from our shop. Most of the shop owners have worked, at KP so I'm assuming in the future everybody would be trained at KP Bahamas.” According to her, the shop has already begun training four inmates from Her Majesty's Prison Fox Hill, and it plans to train more in the future. Those who enroll in KP (Bahamas four-year training programme are paid about $700 bimonthly, while the prisons are paid for the labour they release to the firm for the programme. T hose individuals engaged in the traini ng programme will be responsible for putting out the same high-end product manufactured at the company's 60,000 square foot factory in Calgary, in Alber ta, Canada, under the tutelage of master carpenters. “If somebody's got a good job and d oesn't need any help then they are not o ur people. I want lifestyle change people that need an opportunity that nobody $2m manufacturing plant aids re-training E MPLOYEES o f KP Manufacturing (Bahamas involved in the company’s training programme, flanking the company’s signature woodworking figure... S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B

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THE Securities Commission has met with Bahamian accountants to discuss the latter’s concerns over the proposed Securities Industry Act amendments, chiefly the ability of foreign auditors to signoff on licensee audits and the regulator’s power to appoint auditors. The Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants (BICA mission to assess the impact the proposed Act amendments and their accompanying regulations will have on its members and Bahamian accountants in general. Apart from the ability of foreign auditors, unlicensed by BICA, to conduct audit sign-offs, and the Commission’s power to appoint auditors without reference to the licensee concerned, the talks a lso focused on extra assura nce services that the regulat or could impose at licensee expense. BICA said, following the meeting, that it needed to obtain membership consensus on the issues discussed. A follow-up meeting will be held to finalise the consultation process. The meeting was attended by the Commission’s executive director, Hillary Deveaux, and his legal team. Representing BICA was its committee that had reviewed the Securities Industry Act amendments. Among the BICA officials present was president Reece Chipman; Myra Lundy-Mortimer, chairperson for legal reform; Basil Ingraham, chairperson for small and mediumsized practices; Sheldon Cartwright, chairperson for public relations and BICA’s website. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE To advertise in The Tribune , call 502-2371 Accountants meet regulator over Act MEMBERS of the Securities Commission and Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants...

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 3B btrt tfb r f r!%* '!$()))!*&*#tffn""bnff ! $ %#&!*&*# !%** By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE CATHOLIC Board of Education is paying close attention to enrollment numbers at Family Island schools due to the economic downturn, its director said yesterday, but to date few families have needed to take advantage of instituted payment programmes. Claudette Rolle said the Board was concerned that Catholic schools on islands such as Bimini and Eleuthera could see low enrollment c ome next week, when s chools return from summer holidays. However, for New Providence schools, she said enrollment has been flat over the past two years. Mrs Rolle said the economic downturn did not affect exit numbers this year, with the majority of 4,100 students enrolled in the beginning of the school year remaining throughout. And throughout the year there had been few defaults on school fee payments. “We offered that [payment plan] last year, but not many persons took advantage of it,” said Mrs Rolle. “We were still, in terms of payment and responsibility, able to take care of the responsibilities financially -we cut out a lot of field trips.” She said the schools tried to give parents savings wherever they could so they could focus on paying tuition. Principal of Kingsway Academy, George Baxter, provided a similar trend for enrollment for the new school year. He said enrollment numbers have been largely flat over the past several years. And according to him, the school had not seen significant tuition defaults over the 2008-2009 school year. “I think by and large collections were consistent,” said Mr Baxter. “People made p ayment plans and things w ere managed quite well by o ur accounts department.” Many schools told Tribune Business that the real test of true enrollment numbers will be within the first week of the beginning of the term. However, most schools expect those numbers to remain at levels they have been in previous years. “We’re looking forward to a good year and that all things will go well,” said principal of Kingsway’s Elementary school, Cassandra Smith. Schools monitor enrollment level Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a g ood cause, campaigning for improvements in the a rea or have won an a ward. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE EAGLE ELECTRICAL &LIGHTINGTel (242 Fax (242 Email: eaglebahamas@gmail.com END OF SUMMER SALE! 20-50% OFF LIGHTS & FANS L i g h t s F a n s Sale Includes Chandeliers and the Port Authority.” Mr Lowe added: “I think, all things considered, we’re doing quite well. We’re quite an efficient operation. We’ve got really good morale among our staff, and everyone is working as a team, pulling together and looking after the consumer’s interest as well as the company’s and their own. There is a recession, but we’re weathering it quite well. “Lack of vision and lack of direction on the part of the Grand Bahama Port Authority and the Government is obviously contributing to Grand Bahama’s dismal state. But there are success stories out there, and they need to be emulated and understood. “Why are they doing OK in this recession? Is the company’s internal structure and culture a positive one, or is it a negative one.” Praising Kelly’s (Freeport’s force as being among “the best staff in the Bahamas”, Mr Lowe added: “We’re not trimming. We’re still hiring, replacing good people who are moving on with more good people who want an opportunity to thrive and succeed in a good business environment. “The customer base trusts us, the staff trust us, and we trust them. We are part of this e conomy, and are making the d ecisions that make a differe nce. We have to continue to put our best foot forward, and continue to invest in this community.” Mr Lowe suggested that instead of lamenting over a decline in top-line growth due to a recession-induced dropoff in consumer demand, Bahamian businesses had the power to withstand the downturn by simply focusing on the internal issues under their d irect control. U rging “constant self-evaluation”, Mr Lowe said: “There’s no use blaming the external factors when there is so much under your direct control where it concerns your business. You have to be constantly self-evaluating. “The true test of the mettle of a company is how well it does in the hard times, not the good times.” With staff training and the development of employee benefits also critical to workforce productivity, Mr Lowe added: “There’s an all-inclus iveness so far as management a nd staffing the developm ent of trust within a company or corporate atmosphere that everyone can embrace and hold on to, something that is sorely lacking in other realms in the Bahamas.” Meanwhile, Mr Lowe said there had been “a shift in the type of product” consumers were buying as a result of the recession, with the trend moving in favour of “essential renewals and repairs to h omes”. While plumbing and e lectrical goods sales had increased as a result of the ‘fix-ups’ trend, there had also been a surge in demand for fishing related hardware. Retailer’s sales buck recession F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009, PAGE 7B THE Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants (BICA Chipman, attended the World Council of Credit Unions Conference (WOCCU held in Barcelona in July 2009. Mr Chipman, who is also a Board member of the Bahamas Public Co-Operative Credit Union, was present for discussions that included the Basel agenda and capital requirements; risk management and Know Your Customer (KYC accounting standards relating to small and medium-sized enterprises. Mr Chipman is pictured above with Karl Cordwener, deputy secretary general of the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, and below with Jan Engstrom, Board member of the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB UK with responsibilities in Latin America and the Caribbean. Accountants head attends conference

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gives them,” said Ms Smed. “It’s not cheap labour we're looking for. They're not allowed to swear, not allowed to fight, not allowed to do much of anything besides listen and learn.” KP (Canada fine, finished boardroom tables and furniture for firms such as New York Telecom and Papa John's Pizza, and created a custom boardroom table for Metro Goldwyn Mayer (MGM with a hydraulic system that lifts out the centre of the table to reveal a series of television screens. Mrs Smed admits that KP's products are not cheap the company uses only hard woods and custom inlays and may not be for the average home or office. However, she hopes to tap the middle of the Bahamian market as well as the highend. Ms Smed suggested that raw materials will have to be imported from Canada in order to produce the same quality products being manufactured in the Calgary factory, then assembled in the Bahamas to keep costs low. According to her, KP (Canada ture in several offices in the Orange Hill area, and from its Abundant Life Road location here in Nassau is furnishing a house in South Ocean Estates. Ms Smed said no other furniture maker in the Bahamas will have the same finishes as KP (Bahamas likened to a glass topped desk. The company offers woods such as Maple Burl, Curly Maple and Walnut. Ms Smed's father took over the now 82-year-old Canadian carpentry business in 1965, and has trained hundreds of cabinet makers, sustaining the dying art of wood craftmanship in Calgary. Ms Smed now hopes to train a new generation of cabinet makers in the Bahamas and further expand her 15,000 square foot facility. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE NOTICE DR. JAMILANGELO MINNIS Announces the opening of his Practice in Obstetrics & Gynecology at Oxford Medical Centre, 4th Terrace East off Collins Avenue, Centreville on 4th August, 2009Telephone: (242 Fax: (242 Financial ControllerRequirements & Responsibilities: Lead and motivate accounting staff Experience in the preparation and interpretation of Financial Statements Must be able to develop and maintain an effective system of internal accounting and operational controls in a Hotel environment position Self motivated with strong analytical and problem-solving skills Must be conversant with hotel accounting software, with emphasis in Liaise with external Auditors, third party service providers and relevant Regulatory & Compliance Authorities Timely and accurate preparation, presentation and interpretation of Excellent written and oral communication skills Able to work extended hours, weekends and holidays QUALIFICATIONS BA in Accounting from an accredited University Advance working knowledge of Excel Working knowledge of Microsoft WordInterested persons should apply on or before August 29th, 2009Attention: CONTROLLER DA 81270 c/o The Tribune P.O. Box N3207 Nassau, Bahamas Management Opportunity applicants for the role of The Public is hereby advised that I, WINDYS DEROSINS o f Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to WENDYDEROSIN. If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such o bjections to the Chief Passport Oer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30ys after the d ate of publication of this notice. PUBLIC NOTICE INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL LEGAL NOTICE E BBVALE LIMITED N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows: a)The above Company is in dissolution under the provision of Section 137 (4 Business Companies Act, 2000 b)The Dissolution of said Company commenced on the 2 8th day of August, 2008, when The Court Order was submitted to and registered by the Registrar General. c)The Liquidator of the said Company is George C lifford Culmer of BDO Mann Judd, P. O. Box N-10144, 3rd Floor, Ansbacher House, East Street, N assau, Bahamas. GEORGE CLIFFORD CULMER Liquidator N OTICE EBBVALE LIMITED Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, commencing on the 28th day of A ugust 2008. The Court Orderhas been duly r egistered by the Registrar. The Liquidatoris George Clifford C ulmer, C/O BDO Mann Judd, P. O. Box N-10144, 3rd F loor, AnsbacherHouse, East Street, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above named Company a re required on orbefore the 18th day of September2009 t o send theirnames and addresses and particulars of their debts orclaims to the Liquidatorof the Company or, in ded istribution made before such debts are proved. GEORGE CLIFFORD CULMER L iquidator $2m manufacturing plant aids re-training F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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f 6HFXUHGDUNLQJSDFH &RQWDFW7RQ\'XQFRPEHDW WRQ\GXQFRPEH#FRUDOZDYHFRP ‘Excellent opportunity to get house in order’ take the legislation to Cabinet. “We’d like to see this done by the end of the year,” Mr Wrinkle told Tribune Business. “With the economy in the doldrums, it’s an excellent opportunity for us to get our house in order.” In the absence of a licensing/categorisation regime that sorted Bahamian contractors according to technical competence and the type of job they had the ability to do, industry players were required to complete huge amounts of paperwork for different contracts they bid on. The BCA president said that “every time a project comes along”, Bahamian contractors not only had to fill out forms demonstrating their experience, but also forms for pre-qualification, their financial status and bonding requirements. This exercise was then repeated many times over for different clients, Mr Wrinkle stating as an example that Bahamian contractors were having to fill out similar forms for Ledcor/Wooslee Dominion, the general contractor for the Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA velopment, and the National Insurance Board (NIB the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre project. The contractor licensing regime, Mr Wrinkle explained, would eliminate the need for much of this repetitive paperwork and associated costs, since it would signal to developers which companies had the ability to meet their requirements. “All of this exhaustive paperwork is repetitive, because no one knows who is qualified to do what,” Mr Wrinkle said........ “But it’s hard to blame the client, because they do not know who is qualified to do it. “They have to do an exhaustive process, sorting through 200-300 applications for five to six tenders. It costs a huge amount of resources at both ends. That’s why we want to get the Bill in place.” Mr Wrinkle said the BCA planned to take its seminar series from New Providence, where some 2,000 Level One contractors were based, to Grand Bahama, Abaco, Exuma, Eleuthera, Andros and Long Island in a bid to enhance the education process. All this was planned before Christmas. “We’re moving to get the contractor seminars back on the road,” Mr Wrinkle said, “and get contractors ready for registration. They’ll be called for registration and, subsequently, licensing.” The BCA was working with BTVI and the latter’s outside consultant, Daytona Beach College, to develop the education curriculum for the construction industry. “What we are trying to do is include specific items the Ministry of Works wants, the BCA wants and the industry needs code compliance and things like that,” Mr Wrinkle said. “The Ministry is cognisant of the fact we have an opportunity to offer all contractors a basic package of education and information material, so that everyone would start on the same page.” F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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he National Insurance Board The National Insurance Board The National Insurance Board The National Insurance Board The National Insurance Boardof the Commonwealth of The Bahamas The National Insurance Board (NIB works to complete the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre Robert Smith Child & Adolescents and Special Education Unit , Fox Hill, Nassau, Bahamas; the project is a joint venture of NIB and The Bahamas Government. Contractors must be in compliance with the National Insurance Act (social security programme relevant Government agencies. P re-qualification documents may be collected from the Security Booth at NIB’s Clifford Darling Complex, Blue Hill Road, from August 14 to August 21, 2009. Pre-Qualification documents should be signed, sealed and dropped in the prequalification box at the Security Booth, Clifford Darling Complex on or before 12:00 Noon on August 21, 2009. Request for Contractors Pre-Qualification Resort buyer told to revise its proposal “I don’t know about imminent but, yes, there’s likely to be some movement on that,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace confirmed to Tribune Business, when contacted about how close the Government was to approving the Scheck Industries acquisition and project. He added: “We’ve asked them to revise some parts of their proposal. They’ve agreed to do that. We’ve not received those revisions as yet. Until we’ve seen them and they’ve been approved, so announcement will be forthcoming.” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace explained that Scheck Industries’ plans for the Lighthouse Yacht Club & Marina, and the surrounding real estate, would be implemented in several phases once it was finally approved by the Government and the purchase consummated. “Their revised proposal is going to provide is with the phasing, and from that will come the number of jobs to be created and the level of investment involved,” the tourism minister explained. “Very obviously, the Lighthouse Yacht Club & Marina will be expanded in the first phase. They’re looking at extending the subdivision with a housing development, and a golf course. “All of this is being guided by an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA month to give an indication of what was possible on that site. That was a very important piece of the puzzle.” Tribune Business revealed last month that Scheck Industries was the front-runner to acquire the Andros-based resort which, according to the company’s website, it plans to re-name as the Andros Sporting Club. Apart from the Lighthouse Yacht Club & Marina itself, the Hotel Corporation also owns some 7,00010,000 acres of land in that part of Andros. The precise size of its landholdings is unclear, though, as the land needs to be surveyed and the boundaries established. Residents of Coakley Town have been consulted on the Scheck Industries project, which has been modified several times to account for the EIA, which was prepared by the consulting firm, Black & Veatch. The project is also said to include a marina, marina villas and shopping/retail facilities, fishing lodges and boutique hotels. The Lighthouse Yacht Club & Marina currently has about 30 employees, and features a 20-slip marina, beach frontage and a 20-room hotel. Yet the average occupancy at the Fresh Creek property is only about 35 per cent. According to the Hotel Corporation’s 2004 accounts, the appraised value of the Lighthouse Yacht Club & Marina’s buildings was pegged at $2.314 million, with the land valued at $400,000 and furniture, fixtures and equipment valued at $528,173. Yet allowing for depreciation, the net book value was reduced to $1.547 million. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays

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Home Centre retail outlet, a development that was essen-tial to returning Freeport Concrete to profitability and avoiding any slippage into negative equity. Freeport Concrete’s accumulated deficit stood at $5.789 million as at May 31, 2009, reflecting the steady losses the company has incurred over the past several years. These have chipped away at shareholder equity, which at that date stood only at $527,260. While acknowledging that the equity position was a concern, Mr Simpson yesterday told Tribune Business he was “confident” this would be avoided. He was optimistic that the additional funds to finance the necessary Home Centre inventory purchases would be forthcoming, and this would help return Freeport Concrete to profitability during the first quarter of its 20092010 financial year the threemonth period from August to November 2009. “We’ve got a few irons in the fire. We’ve got a few things out there,” Mr Simpson said of Freeport Concrete’s plans to raise the necessary financing. “Today, we probably might need $500,000.” He added that the company’s bankers, FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas help, while Hannes Babak, the Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA who is also Freeport Concrete’s chair and its largest shareholder, with a 43 per cent stake, was also exploring how to help. “My main shareholder might help out by guaranteeing a bit of money,” Mr Simpson told Tribune Business, in a reference to Mr Babak. “I’d prefer to get a capital injection, rather than borrowing, because I want to reduce our borrowings.” He admitted, though, that the recession’s effects meant retail businesses such as the Home Centre/Freeport Concrete were not currently viewed as attractive investments for equity capital, while being a Freeport-based business was “another strike against us”. And Mr Simpson acknowledged that until the extra financing was secured, Freeport Concrete and the Home Centre as a business were “treading water” and in “survival mode”. “All the cash generated from daily sales at the Home Centre is going back into building materials [inventory], but we’re missing out on appliances,” the Freeport Concrete chief executive said. He explained that this meant the company was losing out on potential sales of high-margin, big ticket items simply because it did not have them in stock. For instance, the Home Centre had supply arrangements in place with Panasonic for TVs, and with brands such as Westinghouse and Frigidair for other appliances, but it was unable to purchase stock because these companies hit hard by the recession themselves were unable to extend credit and wanted the Bahamian company to pay cash upfront. F reeport Concrete’s financ ial position means it is u nable to do this. Mr Simpson, pointing to the fact that gross profit margins were around 29-30 per cent, said: “In the day when we were doing $1 million to $900,000 in sales per month at the Home Centre, we were losing $50,000-$60,000. “Now, we’re down to $500,000 in monthly sales, but even at this level, while we’re not losing money we’re just breaking even. If we were to get up to $600,000, based on a 29 per cent gross profit mar gin, we could make a statement to the bottom line $29,000-$30,000 for every $100,000 we make.” But despite Freeport Concrete’s current predicament, Mr Simpson told Tribune Business: “We have a very good story as far as I’m concerned. We will make it. We’re trying to get it through the eye of a needle. “If we can just get the banks or find investors willing to put money into the company, based on what we’ve done we’re going to be fine. The key is to get the inventory into the Home Centre, and we don’t need a lot of money. As fast as the trailers come in, we need more. Instead of two trailers, we need five.” Mr Simpson, though, acknowledged that Freeport Concrete’s equity position was “a concern”. He added: We’ve got to start turning a p rofit, or we’ll have negative n et worth. I’m fairly confident that’s [profitability] going to happen in the first quarter, because I’m confident we’ll have some money come through and the block plant will provide us with a new revenue stream. “The concern is that we’re basically eating into our equity, and we’ve got to be profitable in the first quarter. We will survive. I’m very confi dent with where we are at the Home Centre, and costs are completely under control.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1 .811.28Abaco Markets1.341.340.000.1270.00010.60.00% 11.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.306.25Bank of Bahamas6.256.250.000.2440.26025.64.16% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3511.350.003001.4060.2508.12.20% 2.882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.005,2980.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.715.730.021,5000.4190.36013.76.28% 3.851.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.713.70-0.010.1110.05233.31.41% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital2.002.000.000.3820.0805.24.00%8 .206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.5010.00Finco10.6310.630.000.3220.52033.04.89% 11.7110.30FirstCaribbean Bank10.3010.300.000.7940.35013.03.40% 5.534.95Focol (S)5.135.130.005,2000.3320.15015.52.92% 1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.49ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.0010.39J. S. Johnson10.3910.390.000.9520.64010.96.16% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1460 1425 BahamasSupermarkets 792 842 1460 0041 0300 N/M 205% FINDEX: CLOSE 783.13 | YTD -6.20% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities30 May 2013 29 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 Interest Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 7%TUESDAY, 18 AUGUST 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,563.90| CHG 1.00| %CHG 0.06 | YTD -148.46 | YTD % -8.67BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7 % 14 . 60 14 . 25 Bahamas Supermarkets 7 . 92 8 . 42 14 . 60 0 . 041 0 . 300 N/M 2 . 05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.38601.3231CFAL Bond Fund1.38602.404.75 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.9047-1.20-3.66 1.48171.4059CFAL Money Market Fund1.48173.355.38 3.60903.1031Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1031-8.35-13.82 12.980112.3289Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.98012.875.79 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.47339.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.27652.00-2.98 1.06221.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.06222.566.22 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0243-0.842.43 1.05851.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05852.045.85 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 31-Dec-07 30-Jun-09 31-Jul-09 31-Jul-09 30-Jun-09MARKET TERMS30-Jun-09Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds31-May-09 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 NAV Date ASSOCIATE ATTORNEYNEEDEDExperience in Litigation, Conveyancing and Commercial Law. Background in Natural Science preferred but not required. Apply by email only.atty.at.law09@gmail.com 5(*,67(5(' 3+<6,&,$1 +(/3 NOTICE is hereby given that JOZIE TELFORE of EAST STREET SOUTH, MALCOLM ROAD, P.O. BOX N-2557, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20th day of August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE HELP WANTEDReceptionist / Clinical Assistantfor medical clinicHardworking, pleasant, honest lady age 18-25 years.Please call 393-7586 or 393-7531 Freeport Concrete chief ‘confident’ on Q1 profitability F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 76F/24C Low: 78F/26C Low: 80F/27C Low: 80F/27C Low: 80 F/27 C Low: 81F/27C Low: 80 F/27 C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 90F/32C High: 91F/33C High: 91 F/33 C High: 91 F/33 C High: 92F/33C High: 90 F/32C High: 90F/32C Low: 77F/25C High: 92F/33C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 93F/34C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 73F/23C High: 90 F/32 C Low: 78F/26C High: 89 F/32 Low: 75F/24C High: 90F/32C Low: 76 F/24C High: 92F/33C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 93F/34C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 91F/33C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 91F/33C Low: 75F/24C High: 92 F/33 C Low: 76F/24C High: 93F/34C High: 91 F/33 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 20 TH , 2009, PAGE 13B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny; breezy in the p.m. Clear to partly cloudy and breezy. Mostly sunny with a shower in spots. Mostly sunny, a t-storm possible. Sunshine and nice. High: 90 Low: 80 High: 90 High: 91 High: 90 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Some sun with a t-storm possible. High: 90 Low: 79 Low: 80 Low: 80 AccuWeather RealFeel 109F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 88F 106-84F 105-88F 100-88F 98-88F Low: 82 TODAYTONIGHTFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................90F/32C Low ....................................................73F/23C Normal high ......................................89F/32C Normal low ........................................76F/24C Last year's high .................................. 89 F/32C Last year's low .................................. 73 F/23C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................1.46" Year to date ................................................23.81" Normal year to date ....................................28.83" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU New First Full Last Aug. 20 Aug. 27Sep. 4Sep. 11 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:46 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:40 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 6:52 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 7:50 p.m. Today Friday Saturday Sunday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 8:15 a.m.3.22:04 a.m.-0.2 8:41 p.m.3.32:20 p.m.-0.2 9:06 a.m.3.32:50 a.m.-0.2 9:29 p.m.3.23:13 p.m.-0.2 9:55 a.m.3.43:36 a.m.-0.2 10:16 p.m.3.14:05 p.m.-0.1 10:43 a.m.3.34:21 a.m.-0.1 11:03 p.m.2.94:56 p.m.0.0 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco90/3276/24t88/3176/24t Amsterdam86/3059/15t70/2154/12sh Ankara, Turkey82/2752/11s77/2548/8s Athens90/3272/22s90/3270/21s Auckland57/1346/7c58/1448/8pc Bangkok91/3279/26t91/3279/26pc Barbados86/3077/25pc86/3077/25sh Barcelona83/2868/20s78/2568/20s Beijing82/2768/20pc87/3066/18c Beirut82/2777/25s81/2776/24s Belgrade88/3161/16s91/3263/17s Berlin86/3066/18s79/2657/13t Bermuda86/3076/24pc84/2876/24t Bogota66/1847/8c66/1847/8sh Brussels91/3259/15pc75/2350/10pc Budapest86/3059/15s88/3161/16s Buenos Aires57/1341/5pc59/1546/7pc Cairo99/3773/22s100/3776/24s Calcutta88/3181/27t90/3284/28t Calgary78/2552/11s84/2852/11s Cancun91/3275/23s94/3474/23pc Caracas82/2774/23t82/2773/22t Casablanca85/2965/18s85/2966/18s Copenhagen77/2566/18s73/2252/11t Dublin64/1750/10sh63/1750/10sh Frankfurt93/3366/18pc75/2354/12sh Geneva 87/30 62/16 s 69/2051/10c Halifax 79/26 60/15 pc 73/22 59/15 c Havana 91/32 72/22 pc 90/32 73/22 sh Helsinki 68/20 50/10pc72/2252/11s Hong Kong 91/32 82/27 pc 91/32 81/27s Islamabad 101/38 79/26 s 99/37 76/24 t Istanbul87/3065/18s82/2762/16s Jerusalem 86/30 64/17s87/3063/17s Johannesburg 55/1235/1s62/1640/4s Kingston 88/3180/26pc88/3180/26sh Lima71/2158/14s70/2158/14s London75/2354/12sh72/2252/11sh Madrid97/3661/16s99/3763/17s Manila86/3079/26t87/3078/25sh Mexico City73/2253/11t75/2351/10t Monterrey102/3875/23s102/3876/24pc Montreal81/2768/20pc81/2768/20t Moscow57/1348/8r59/1546/7pc Munich89/3160/15s78/2550/10t Nairobi80/2655/12sh78/2554/12r New Delhi 95/3581/27t96/3582/27pc Oslo72/2259/15pc70/2150/10r Paris91/3259/15pc77/2552/11pc Prague 85/29 54/12 s 86/30 51/10 pc Rio de Janeiro85/2969/20c73/2261/16r Riyadh106/4182/27s105/4079/26s Rome 90/32 68/20 s 91/32 70/21 s St. Thomas88/3180/26pc88/3181/27pc San Juan61/1636/2c70/2137/2s San Salvador 88/31 70/21 pc 89/31 74/23 pc Santiago 63/1737/2pc63/1745/7c Santo Domingo90/3275/23sh88/3174/23sh Sao Paulo 75/23 53/11 r 64/17 50/10r Seoul84/2866/18r85/2966/18pc Stockholm 70/21 55/12 pc 73/22 55/12 pc Sydney 72/22 50/10 s79/2646/7s Taipei93/3381/27pc92/3379/26s T okyo 86/30 75/23 pc 86/30 76/24 sh T oronto 82/2763/17t79/2659/15t Trinidad86/3064/17t76/2450/10c V ancouver 78/25 60/15 s 73/2257/13pc Vienna 86/3066/18s89/3168/20t W arsaw 74/23 50/10 s 77/25 54/12 s Winnipeg 68/20 55/12 sh 71/2151/10s H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:ESE at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet5-7 Miles85F Friday:ENE at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet5-7 Miles85F Today:ESE at 9-18 Knots1-3 Feet5-7 Miles85F Friday:ENE at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet5-7 Miles85F Today:ESE at 8-16 Knots1-2 Feet5-7 Miles84F Friday:ENE at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet5-7 Miles84F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque90/3265/18s93/3365/18s Anchorage69/2051/10s67/1952/11pc Atlanta86/3072/22t87/3071/21t Atlantic City87/3073/22t88/3171/21t Baltimore88/3174/23t90/3272/22t Boston85/2971/21t85/2972/22t Buffalo84/2869/20t80/2664/17t Charleston, SC90/3275/23pc90/3275/23t Chicago79/2662/16t76/2460/15c Cleveland86/3069/20t81/2761/16t Dallas98/3674/23t93/3371/21s Denver81/2752/11s88/3156/13s Detroit84/2866/18t77/2561/16c Honolulu89/3178/25s89/3176/24s Houston96/3577/25t97/3675/23t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday TodayFridayTodayFriday Indianapolis86/3065/18t79/2659/15c Jacksonville88/3174/23t92/3374/23t Kansas City80/2660/15pc81/2759/15s Las Vegas107/4179/26s107/4183/28s Little Rock92/3370/21t89/3164/17pc Los Angeles80/2664/17pc82/2764/17pc Louisville86/3070/21t84/2863/17t Memphis88/3171/21t88/3168/20pc Miami92/3380/26t90/3280/26pc Minneapolis69/2059/15r72/2255/12pc Nashville87/3072/22t87/3065/18t New Orleans90/3277/25t90/3276/24t New York87/3076/24t89/3175/23t Oklahoma City92/3364/17t89/3163/17s Orlando90/3276/24t91/3276/24t Philadelphia89/3174/23t90/3274/23t Phoenix 110/43 85/29 pc 107/4183/28pc Pittsburgh84/2868/20t79/2662/16t Portland, OR 92/3359/15s79/2660/15s Raleigh-Durham 95/35 72/22 pc 91/32 71/21 t St. Louis84/2864/17t80/2663/17pc Salt Lake City 94/34 66/18 s 97/3668/20s San Antonio 100/37 77/25 s 99/37 75/23 t San Diego74/2366/18pc74/2367/19pc San Francisco 73/22 58/14 pc 75/2358/14pc Seattle84/2856/13s73/2256/13pc T allahassee 91/3272/22t94/3475/23t T ampa 91/32 78/25 t 92/33 77/25t Tucson100/3776/24pc100/3777/25t W ashington, DC 87/30 76/24t91/3275/23t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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By STEPHEN OHLEMACHERand DEVLIN BARRETT Associated Press Writers WASHINGTON (AP Swiss banking giant UBS AG agreed Wednesday to turn over to the IRS the details of 4,450 accounts suspected of holding undeclared assets by American customers, piercing Switzerland’s long-standing tradition of banking secrecy. IRS Commissioner Doug Shulman said the accounts held $18 billion in assets at one time. Many have since been closed, he said. The deal will give the Internal Revenue Service thousands of long-sought account names, Shulmansaid, and is expected to provide even more UBS clientswho voluntarily disclose their financial details to the agency. UBS has an estimated 52,000 accounts of U.S. customers. The IRS chief said the 4,450 accounts being relinquished to the agency were the ones most suspected of containing undeclared assets. “I believe this agreement gives us what we wanted access to information about those UBS accountholders most likely to have been involved in offshore tax evasion,” Shulman said. He said that other account holders appear to be in compliance with U.S. tax laws. The two sides told a federal judge last week they had reached a tentative agreement, but the details were not released until Wednesday. Account holders will be notified before their namesa re released to the IRS. The names will first go to the Swiss Federal Tax Administration. Account holders will then be able to appeal their release to the IRS before Switzerland’s Federal Administrative Court. The process is expected to take several months, IRS officials said. Shulman said the Swiss government has assured U.S. authorities that the release of the names conforms with both Swiss banking laws and the tax treaty signed by both countries. Shulman said the IRS reserves the right to resume its legal fight if any of the names are withheld. “This issue is not going away, and people hiding assets and income offshore will find themselves increasingly at risk due to our efforts in this area,” Shulman said. U BS shares were down 2.1 p ercent at 16.55 Swiss francs ($15.51 e xchange. The Swiss Bankers Association issued a statement in support of the agreement. “The out-of-court agreement avoids a prolonged legal battle that would have had an uncertain outcome and UBS can now continue with its consolidation process in an atmospheref ree of this legal uncertaint y,” the association said. S wiss Justice Minister E veline Widmer-Schlumpf t old a news conference in the c apital of Bern that the deal lifts the threat of criminal p rosecution against UBS, w hich could have endan g ered the bank’s very exist ence and dealt a severe b low to the Alpine nation’s economy. “There was no alternative to this solution,” she said. Asked if other Swiss banks could be targeted for future prosecution in the United States, she said: “We don’t expect this to be the case.” UBS Chairman Kaspar Villiger said, “I am confident that the agreement will allow the bank to continue moving forward to rebuild its reputation through solid performance and client service.” The case and other U.S. efforts to go after international tax dodgers already has a lot of wealthy Americans with offshore accounts nervously running to their tax advisers and the Internal Revenue Service. Tax advisers at several U.S. firms said they are seeing many more customers with undeclared assets seeking information about their legal options. The IRS long has had a policy that certain tax evaders who come forward before they are contacted by the agency usually can avoid jail time as long as they agree to pay back taxes, interest and hefty penalties. Drug dealers and money launderers need not apply.B ut if the money was earned l egally, tax evaders can usua lly avoid criminal prosecut ion. I n March, the IRS began a six-month amnesty program that sweetened the offer with reduced penalties for people with undeclared assets. Shulman said the response has been unprecedented, though he declined to say how many people have applied. Shulman said UBS cus tomers are free to take advantage of the program as long as they come forward b efore Sept. 23 and before the IRS receives their name from UBS. The letter they receive f rom the bank will not dis q ualify them from coming f orward to the IRS under o ur voluntary disclosure pro gram,” Shulman said. “But once the Swiss government sends us the name, all bets are off.” S hulman said the IRS already is using the program to get information from account holders about other banks and financial advisers who have helped them evade U.S. taxes. “You can expect us to continue to be aggressive,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Certified Service at a bush mechanic!s price !!! In these economic times, W e are here to support your engine!M&E will do the job for you with Caterpillar certified t echnicians, Caterpillar original parts and will g uarantee the jobs!!! Call us323 5701 (Nassau) 352 5081 (Freeport) Discount applies for truck engines Valid until September 30, 2009Other offers available include: Engine oil analysis E lectronic diagnostic Fuel tank cleaning V alve and Injectors adjustment G et a full truck engine service starting at $550 including oil, oil filter, fuel filter and labour. C all us today to schedule your servicing needs. MARINA & SEAFOOD PROCESSING PLANT ALLIGATOR BAY, NORTH LONG ISLANDApprox. 6 acres of Waterfront property with a 152 feet wide canal. Property comprises three buildings: Building A:Seafood Processing Plant include a reception area, an room, a storage room, a laboratory and a processing room, (3x 30 ft blast freezers, and (1x 15 ft and (110 ft x15 ft holding freezers. Building B:Generator House Building C:The Water Plant age capacity. Interested persons should submit offers to: The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P. O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas To reach us on or before October 2nd , 2009For further information, please contact us at 502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608DEVELOPMENT FOR SALE UBS to hand over 4,450 client names SWISS BANK UBS’ logo on Zurich's Bahnhofstrasse in Switzerland... (AP Photo: Walter Bieri

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The Tribune The T ribune M y V o i c e , M y N e w s p a p e r ! Thursday, August 20th, 2009

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RELIGIOUS NEWS, STORIES AND CHURCH EVENTS The TribunePg. 31 THURSDAY August 20, 2009

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For some, purpose is defined as the way we deal with others, the things we do for others, and our ability to set aside self while focusing on others. However there are a chosen few who are called to lead and facilitate the deliver y of the wor d of God in the chur ch, and for those individuals, proper guidance is still the key to r eaching your God given potential. Local author Dr Alber t Ferguson in his new book titled Keys T o Releasing The Potential In Church Workers And Volunteers , explained that one of the first things a leader must do when appointing volunteers is to evaluate their reasons for doing so. Apart from this, Dr Ferguson explained that the duty of serving lies in the hands and heart of the volunteer and not in the leader/pastor. In an excerpt from the book Dr Ferguson stated: “When people are named to work in an area or within the church setting, ‘appointed’ by a pastor or ministry leader, the picture becomes a little more involved. “Pastors have been heard to say things like ‘I have appointed/selected you, and put my hand on you because I heard from God.’ The implication is that this is now between you and God, you should work because God is asking you to do so.” He said this spiritual contract is ultimately a commitment to ser ve God in whatever capacity , so if the volunteer decides to up and quit their duty , they ar e not liable to the chur ch or pastor , rather to God. In this second installment to his thr ee par t series on stewar dship, Dr Fer guson also examines avenues on drawing younger volunteers to vari ous r oles in ministr y . He said most people tend to become excited by the prospect of giving of themselves in church, but the duration of that period is normally a blur and can often lead to an unpleasant departure. His suggestion to leaders is to of fer shor t ter m ‘contracts’ allow ing the church to get the most from that volunteer . He said in the end, the volunteer may be more dedicated to doing a good job because clear er parameters to their duties now exist. He refers to this as open-ended appointment. Throughout the book there is a subtle association with the operations of the church and that of a business or establishment. He said just as companies use motivation strategies like appointing an employee of the month, and giving rewards to those employees that perform well, the same practice should be present in the church to encourage those who give of their time, proving their efforts are not in vain. Dr Ferguson said he has used his experience working in the public sector along with his desire to see the church return to its intended function, to give both leaders and followers a guide to executing the will of God. The book took two years to complete and Dr Ferguson is having the official book release this Sunday at the W orkers House Auditorium on Har old Road at 5pm. W ith par ts one and two of the series alr eady under his belt, Dr Far rington said thr ough God’ s guidance he will soon r elease par t thr ee along with other materials all to build the kingdom of God, and in some small way bring change to the world. The Tribune P G 32 Thursday, August 20, 2009 RELIGION By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net FOR many believers who have made the decision to set aside their own desires and live for God, one of the most important decisions is to fulfill purpose. The keys to maximising stewardship “When people are named to work in an area or within the church setting, ‘appointed’ by a pastor or ministry leader, the picture becomes a little more involved.” Dr Alber t F er guson

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The Tribune Thursday, August 20, 2009 PG 33 RELIGION MATTHEW 18: 1517 has the following advice for persons in the church who have a difference of opinion or a falling out: 15:"If your brother sins against you,[b] go and show him his fault, just between the two of you. If he listens to you, you havew on your brother over. 16: But if he will not listen, take one o r two others along, so that 'every matter may be established by the testimony of two or three witnesses.'[c] 17 If he refuses to listen to them, tell it to the church; and if he refuses to listen even to the church, treat him as you would a pagan or a tax collector Let us look at each step very closely to see how we usually respond. 1. The One on One Approach "If your brother sins against you,[b] go and show him his fault, just between the two of you. If he listensto you, you have won your brother over .” This seems simple enough but we may be reluctant to do so for a variety of reasons: i. It may make things worse ii. We do not wish to be rejected or insulted iii.What we say may be misquoted iv.We are afraid of or intimidated by the person when alone with him or her However the advantages of such an effort are obvious: i.The matter is kept private and confi dential ii.Resolution can come immediately iii.The r enewed relationship is now based on openness, honesty and tr ust 2. T aking W itnesses Verse16: But if he will not listen, take one or two others along, so that 'every matter may be established by the testimony of two or three witnesses.” It is hoped that the presence of others will help the offender to recognise the validity of the complaint. Four or five Christians gathered together top rayerfully address a matter should be able to feel the presence of God, h ear the voice of God, and obey the will of God. It is wonderful when the issue can be settled in this way. Sometimes the presence of others threatens the individual who is being confronted and the person becomes more defensive and even offensive. Think of a spouse who tries to have persons come to the home to settle a conflict only to discover that it has the opposite effect. This is when serious decisions have to be made about the future of such a relationship. 3. Bringing it to the Body Verse 17: If he refuses to listen to them, tell it to the church; and if he refuses to listen even to the church, treat him as you would a pagan or a tax collector It is very rare for us to go to this length in most of our denominations, if this means the whole church. Moreo ften than not it will be reported to a bishop, a special council or some s maller group of persons with the authority to act on behalf of the larger body. The bottom line is that every effort is to be made to be reconciled. In the end, however, it has to be left up to the offender to acknowledge, admit, confess and repent. We may always pray for one another and reach out with godly love, but it is only by allowing God’s grace to rule in our hearts that true peace can be realised. The question for us to ask ourselves is: How stubbor n, har d-hear ted, or obstinate am I when I am wrong and need to put things right? Making up MEDITATION REV.ANGELA C BOSFIELD PALACIOUS By AGNES SAUNDERS OUR Father who ar t in Heaven, Lord we reverence your name, as we bow in your Holy pr esence. W e ask in the name of Jesus that you forgive us of our wrong doings, and we accept that for give ness right now . Clean us oh Lord and make us as pur e as gold. W e thank you for being an excel lent father to us, W e thank you because you br ought us out of many dangers and snares. We thank you for providing for us, W e thank you for placing us in this Bahama land, and we ask that you touch the hear ts and minds of ever y Bahamian and others who reside here that we all would humble ourselves, pray , seek you, and tur n fr om our wicked ways. All so that we can hear from you, and that you would for give our sins and heal our land. These blessings and favours we ask in the name of Jesus our Christ, Amen. A prayer for the nation Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who ar e making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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HAVEyou ever sat down and thought or written down how your life will beonly to find out that those plans were far from what God has ordained? It is a good joke I'm sure. My life hasn't been horrible, it just didn't turn out the way I thought that it would. We can have all the plans we want but if it doest line up with God's word for our lives, I want to say that it’ s wasted. I don't mean people who have to set cer tain things in or der for the day to r un smoothly because even in that ther e is only so much you can contr ol. My thoughts wer e after that high school I would go to college and pursue my inter est at that time. Then after graduation I would get a good job, find the man of my dr eams and marry him. We would then have a compromised amount of childr en, go to church pay our tithes go home and live happily ever after. To my surprise none of that happened and certainly not in that order. I am a single woman without a husband and any biological chil dren. I did not go to college although I did take a number of computer courses. I worked at a job that taught me alot and I am grateful. I have yet to meet the man who is right for me. At a ver y early age I became a Christian and it has definitely changed the course of my life and what I thought it to be. After a long time of beingprocessed and still being pr ocessed my desir es have changed. I no longer want to do the things I wanted to when I left high school over ten years ago. I want to do the things that God has made me to do. Knowing that only what is done for Christ will last, that's all that matters. Some may think that is old fash ion but I know that, that is the best thing to desire, the will of God. I never imagined that I would have such an overwhelming desire to do what God created me to do. At first I didn't understand what that meant or what that was"the will of God for your life." I sought Him out and He told me what that was. I have spent most of my life tr ying to accomplish that and will spend the rest of my life doing just that. Fulfilling the will of God for my life, nothing else matters. I have not aced it as yet but I will die trying. God is good and He has been bet ter to us than we have been to our selves. The least we can do is ask the Lor d, "What do you want me to do with my life?" I don't understand how anyone can live a whole lifetime without any consideration of the Almighty God. W e should not live our lives as if we made ourselvesr emember , it is in Him that we live, move and have our very being. How can we make plans for our lives without consulting Him? God is Alpha and Omega, He knows what course our lives will take. Can you blame Him if He laughs at our plans? The Tribune P G 34 Thursday, August 20, 2009 RELIGION THERE is no doubt that the Bahamas is under an intense satanic attack. The enemy is wasting no time in snuffing out the lives of the male seed and also a few females along the way. The real tragedy about this attack is not the attack its self, but rather the church's inability to cast out this destructive spirit, due to its commitment to religions and denominations; as to a disciplined relationship with Yahweh through His Son Yeshuwa Messiah. This is one of the reasons why that nowhere in the scriptures can it be found that Yeshuwa ever refer too or called His followers Christians. But rather He always called them disciples (Discipline One It is said that one of the most undisciplined religions in the world is Christianity. The church today is filled with fair weather Christians, their commitment to God and his word is based upon how well things are going in their lives. This sort of lukewarm religion is nothing new; for here's what Yeshuwa said when speaking to the religious mind-set. John.8: 31 Then said Jesus to those Jews which believed on him, If ye continue in my wor d, then ar e ye my disci ples indeed. (My disciples not my Christians / powerless ones). Satan, knowing of the power and authority that has been given to the church (The Organismeshuwa, has infiltrated the church through religion; and has made the same offer to the leaders as he did to Yeshuwa: “Matt.4: 8-9: Again, the devil taketh him up into an exceeding high mountain, and showeth him all the kingdoms of the world, and the glor y of them; And saith unto him, All these things will I give thee, if thou wilt fall down and worship me. Here's the tragedy; the church leaders have ignorantly accepted Satan's offer which has resulted in him identifying and calling them religious leaders. The church / religious organisations have no power and authority of the kingdom of darkness. How can a young mother be gunned down in the drive way of her home; in this Christian nation and the so-called anointed bishops, apostles, doctors of religion can be so silent? Here's why and how? We're an undisciplined nation that's mixed with the undisciplined religion of Christianity, the above mentioned criminal act was conjured up in the kingdom of darkness which is a spiritual r ealm; a r ealm that r eligion has no power and authority. Over the years God had raised up some men in this countr y to lead the way in taking authority over every unclean / demonic spirit. But for their name sake, for fame and fortune these men have traded and aborted their assignment of being God's authoritative spiritual voice; and have succumbed to the enemy's subtle plan of being motivational speakers. The enemy is no fool; for he knows that there is power in the name of Yeshuwa Messiah. Therefore whenever he (the devil or say things without mentioning Yeshuwa' name, the devil will see to it that; that believer is rewarded or even promoted. This act is what I call “enticement stage one” Watch this! Many fortune 500 companies like Procter and Gamble, IBM, etc; are paying mega bucks to prominent church leaders to come and motivate their staff and leadership; but with these conditions : Can't talk about or mention the name Jesus / Yeshuwa Messiah, Can't talk about the bible. For the big bucks, many church leaders have compromised whatever Godly principles they had and denied / disowned Yeshuwa Messiah, and sought to justify their acts with erroneous spiritual quotes and clichs. But to answer the wisdom of these wise-fools here's what Yeshuwa says in “Matt.10: 32-33 :Whosoever therefore shall confess me before men, him will I confess also before my Father which is in heaven. But whosoever shall deny me befor e men, him will I also deny befor e my Father which is in heaven. Unfor tunately today's chur ch leaders bear no spiritual resemblance of the New T estament Apostles. For even under intense pressure and being put in prison the apostles didn't compromised, but boldly spoke of and in the name of Yeshuwa. Acts.5: 40: And to him they agreed: and when they had called the apostles, and beaten them, they commanded that they should not speak in the name of Jesus, and let them go. Her e's one of our other problems; we've got lots of religious leaders that know the word of God, but they don't know the God of the word. Many of our church leaders are doing their very best to become like the America preachers; insomuch that they're paying their International Preacher friends / motivational speakers to come in and emotionally motivate their churches. Most of these events are commonly called conferences and are tagged with a registration fee; excluding the cost of the speakers materials and products of which is strongly recommended that all attendees purchase. As a nation, we're in trouble spiritually; and I'm just wondering if there is any other person out there that sees and understands what's going on? It's time to get the flesh and the motivational hype out of the pulpits, and restore holiness, sanctification and the fear of God back into the church. Then and only then, would the saints be able to bind and cast out this demonic spirit that is wreaking havoc throughout the Bahamas. In spite its many challenges, the lack of bold, uncompr omising Godly leader ship; the Bahamas' best days are yet ahead of her . For there is a New day on the rise; as the tr ue spiritual sons 'elohiym, el-oheem'; shall burst forth and manifest His kingdom here in the Bahamas. Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int'l For questions or comments contact us via E-mail: pastormallen@yahoo.com or Ph. 1-242-441-2021 PASTOR MATTHEW ALLEN Spiritual to motivational: A nation in peril ! Man plans God laughs ALLISON MILLER

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The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, August 20, 2009 PG35 IN THE 1940's, a young W ilber t Milton Rolle set two goals for his life after watching a 'pictur e show' on World War II he was going to fight a war and he was going to be a Christian. By 1953, he accomplished both goals though not the way he expected. “I was fishing off Andros singing Silent Night to myself when I heard the call from the Lord that it was my time to go to war for Him through ministry,” recalls the now 76 yearold. “Well, I joined the AME Church in Mastic Point,Andr os and now as Bishop of Living W aters Chur ch of God, I've been warring for the Kingdom for almost 50 years.” A week-long celebration of Bishop Rolle's 48th pastoral anniversar y began on Monday and will end on Sunday at his chur ch. Speakers for the celebration include Pastor Carlos James Wallace, Apostles of the End Times; Bishop Lindo Wallace, Church of God Temple of Praise; Rev Dr Vincent Smith, Universal Village Church; Bishop Shervin Smith, Good Shepherd Church of God; Pastor Mark Knowles, Holy Ghost and Fir e Deliverance Centr e and Apostle Winton Roberts, Prayer and Deliverance Church. Among the singers at the event will be Bahamian Idol's Adrianna Munnings and the awar d-winning Living W ater's Y outh Choir . The week also coincides with Bishop Rolle's 48 wedding anniversary. His life partner Idell, has stood faithfully by his side helping him enhance his ministry from the time they started off with just 60 members to now having two churches in Andr os and one Marshall Road, New Providence which is in the process of adding on a large worship centre. In a time when half of all marriages are ending in divorce, Bishop Rolle celebrates 48th pastoral and wedding anniversaries SEE page 36 Wilber t and Idell Rolle I I N N S S I I G G H H T T For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays

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The Tribune P G 36 Thursday, August 20, 2009 RELIGION NEWL Y or dained Anglican priest Rev’d. Neil Geron Nairn described his ordination to the priesthood as a “ mountain top experience” and added that he now he has to go into the val ley because there is much work to be done. Rev’d. Nairn was ordained last Friday evening by Rev’d. Laish Boyd, Bishop of The Bahamas and The Turks & Caicos Islands, before a large congregation at Christ Church Cathedral. The majority of the thr ee hour ser vice was without electricity , due to an island-wide blackout. Around 7.30 pm just as Rev’d. Harry Ward, Rector of Holy Spirit Anglican Church, and preacher for the special occasion, was about to mount the pulpit, the lights went out, and so Rev’d. Nairn took his priestly vows by candlelight. It is a scenario, he has gr own accustomed to. During his or dination to the Diaconate on August 8, 2008, ther e was also an island-wide blackout. Reflecting on the service, Rev’d. Nairn believes that the darkness allowed the congr egation to focus entir ely on the ser mon, which had a message for everyone. In his case, the darkness allowed him the opportunity to reflect on the brevity of life and the fact that within a second your life can end. He said that he also used the time to listen, pray, and reflect. “I was over whelmed by the entir e experience: the ser mon, when I was presented to the Bishop, making my vows, and laying prostrate before the altar. The entire mood was uplifting and spirit-filled”, said Father Nairn. He added that he was ver y pleased with the large numbers of persons who attended the service, including parishioners of St. Agnes, St. Gr egor s, family and friends. Chief Celebrant for the Ordination was Rev’d. Laish Boyd Sr assisted by Rev’d. Dr exel Gomez. The pr eacher was Rev’d. Harry Ward and Litanist was The Venerable James Palacious. Deacon of the Mass was Rev’d. Bradley Miller , and cler gy pr esenters were Dr E Etienne Bowleg, I Ranfurly Brown, James Palacious, Rev’d. Canon Neil Roach, Rev’d. Atma Budhu, Rev’d. Ber nar d Been and Rev’d. Thaddeus Pratt. Lay presenters included Judy Nairn, Clayton Newbold, Lenfor d Nair n, Clair e Hepbur n, Henr y Dean, W ilton Gibson, Marge Stewart, Wellington Dorsette, Rosemand Stubbs, Ralph Wood, Mary Basden and Karen Nairn. Special music was pr ovided by Adrian Archer and the combined choirs of St Agnes and St Gregory’s. Rev’d. Nair n will continue to ser ve as Assistant Curate at St Agnes Anglican Church, Grants Town, New Pr ovidence. ‘Ordination service was a mountain-top experiment’ says newly ordained priest BISHOPS Drexel Gomez and Laish Boyd place the priest’s Stole on Fr Neil Nairn during His Ordination last week. Mrs Rolle says that the secret of their success is to simply trust in the Lord. e had a mind to stand for Christ and we didn't allow the things of this life to worry us,” she says. “Even when the Lord chose to take our only child after eight days, we still allowed him to make the decisions in our life. As a pastor's wife, of course you have challenges and you must make sacrifices. So many members sometimes come with spiritual or emotional needs, you have to be there to talk to them and minister to them and still be a helpmate to a man who happens to be a bishop. “But overall, we've been blessed to lend so many people a hand and we've even helped some families from Andros by allowing their kids to stay with us to attend school in the city. Even adults who were sick, we've stepped in to help them on the road to recovery by allowing them to stay with us. We sacrifice it all for the Lord by doing this work.” The bishop admits to making many sacrifices over the years -the first being when he decided to leave his job as a labourer in the city to go back to Andr os. “I was in Nassau, and I worked r eal ly hard with jackhammers all day br eaking out r ocks to make some of the beaches around here,” he recalls. “I even worked on the foundation for what is now the College of The Bahamas. Back in those days (1960's things were springing up but we decided to go back to Andr os. We went back there and things were rough and tough and it seemed like ther e wer en't any jobs and folks wer e moving to Freeport which was developing back then and offered quite a bit of jobs. I was tempted to join them, but my wife was satisfied to stay in Andros and that's when God made pr ovisions for us to go full time into ministry and rely solely on him.” Evidence of how much the ministr y has gr own is on the same pr oper ty of the New Pr ovidence branch of the church where a roof covers what will be a two-storey sanctuary to seat about 500 persons with an attached youth hall, auditorium, kitchen and 14 bedrooms for when groups visit. “I am getting up there but it is my desir e that the Lor d allows me to see the completion of this building,” said Bishop Rolle. “I remind the youth who make up the majority of this con gregation every Sunday to prepare themselves because they will ber esponsible for taking this ministry to the next level. Overall though, I am blessed with where the Lord has led me.” Bishop Rolle celebrates 48th pastoral and wedding anniversaries FROM page 35