Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
TRY OUR
DOUBLE

FILET-0-FISH "™*oven’*

HIGH
LOW

CLOUDY,

{Y\

92F
81F

‘ FSTORMS

Volume: 105 No.221
D5 \
Dy

Marital rane taw
is a numan b.



aly
Ui

Amnesty International
backs Government’s
plans for Seon

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A POWERFUL human
rights group has thrown its
weight behind the governmen-
t’s plan to outlaw marital rape
in the Bahamas.

Amnesty International has
vowed to back the proposed
amendment of the Sexual
Offences Act in order to pro-
tect the rights of every Bahami-
an woman.

A spokesman for the group
told The Tribune: "Amnesty
International would certainly
support that law being passed.

“We view women's rights as
a human right. If there is abuse
in any kind of relationship,
whether it is within a marriage
or with unmarried couples, or
in the case of incest, all of those
are matters that need to be
dealt with properly within the
law.

"On the basic stance of the
law, Amnesty would support
the way it's written to support
persons rights.”

The amendment, introduced
to the House of Assembly by
Minister of State for Social



I
THE SUBJECT has been a source
of heated debate.

Development Loretta Butler-
Turner last month, has sparked
a heated national debate on the
issue.

In Parliament last month,
Mrs Butler-Turner noted that
the current law is outdated
adding that spousal rape had
long been outlawed in many
other countries.

American law recognised
marital rape as a crime in 1976
but it is still a sensitive issue as
many states have lesser penal-
ties for persons convicted of the
offence, compared to acquain-
tance rape or that of a stranger.

SEE page 12

HURRICANE INSURANCE

The Tribune

YOUR PASSPORT TO MISS UNIVERSE



alowe@tribunemedia. net

WAKE UP!

Try our
Big Breakfast Sandwich

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009



PRICE — 75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



Police Constable
is accused of
attacking his
ex-girliriend

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A POLICE Constable who
is alleged to have attacked his
ex-girlfriend was arraigned in
Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Akeem Bonaby, 25, is
charged with causing harm
and making threats of death
to Georgina Silver while at
Hamster Road on Wednes-
day, May 27.

Bonaby, who was arraigned
before Deputy Chief Magis-

SEE page 12

SR eee eeu Tia ea

A

s

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER TS government officials and dine Chinese Ambassador Hu Dingxian look on as construction work
on the new national stadium takes place yesterday. Members of the government toured the facility at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre.
e SEE PAGE TWO AND BUSINESS SECTION

Sports Minister
tight-lipped on = Man gets 3)
reports he will be useer| year sentence

demitting office

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

for murder

A MAN who murdered a
27-year-old member of a
Junkanoo group has been

DESMOND Bannister,
Youth, Sports and Culture
Minister, yesterday declined to
confirm or deny reports that
he will be demitting office, stat-
ing that he “will not comment
on anything relating to
Desmond Bannister.”

There have been rumours in
political circles that there will
soon be a shuffle of Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham’s

SEE page 12

You Can Be Blown

HURRICANE Bill continued on its predicted path
yesterday as it gathered strength over the Atlantic,
churning along with 110mph winds.

While the category two hurricane is still not expected
to affect the Bahamas or the United States, forecasters
said it could cause big problems for Bermuda and the
Canadian maritime provinces.

SEE page 12

Or you can rest easy knowing
that you have excellent insurance
coverage no matter which

way ‘the wind blows.

Nobody does it better. Proud to ve a part of the



jailed for 35 years.

James McKenzie, 25, was
convicted last year of shooting
Kevin Dean. The incident
took place in December 2006
near the old City Market food
store in Market Street where
the One Family Junkanoo
group was practising for the
annual Boxing Day parade.

Mr Dean, who was shot in
the back, died at the scene.

At his trial, McKenzie

SEE page 12

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(RARAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

: ie
if 00 8

Abaca
To Ch Sana Tt Oe?

Ema

cc
Te Ad



MISS UNIVERSE 2009 FASHION SHOW

Congratu Lattows

to the desianers Rachel Tarnquest-Gartia, Basheva Eve,
Sabrina Francis § Brynwda Knowles
Bahama Hand Prints fabric donated fer this avert

Lecaled on Ermest & Mackey Streets * Open Mon-Fri 1lam-dpm, Sat 1lam-zpm
Telephone 242-394-4111 = wew.bahamahandprints.com





NASSAU AND BAHAM

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Miss Universe pageant
tickets still available |

jr

IN an effort to improve tick-
et sales for the Miss Universe
Pageant 2009 to be held this
Sunday at Atlantis, organisers
are offering special group
packages.

The Miss Universe competi-
tion is promising to be one of
the most exciting and glam-
orous events ever to take place
in the Bahamas. Pageant
organisers said yesterday that
there are still lots of tickets
available but that they expect
sales to pick up considerably
over the next several days.

Group packages are now
being offered and patrons can
get one free ticket for every
three tickets purchased for the
final show. The deal was also
offered for the presentation
show held last Sunday at
Atlantis. According to organ-
isers of the show, about 90 per
cent of the tickets were sold,
which is on par with presenta-
tion shows of the past several
years.

Miss Universe organisers,
Ministry of Tourism and
Atlantis officials are all very
pleased with the pageant
events to date. Paula Shugart,
president of the Miss Universe
Organisation, has stated many
times over the past several
weeks that this is one of the
best organised pageants she
has experienced during her
tenure. She lauded the Min-
istry of Tourism and team
Atlantis for their all efforts to
ensure the success of the event.

The Miss Universe finals,
the viewing party and the coro-
nation event will all be held at
Atlantis on Sunday.

All-access tickets for the
viewing party, which will take
place on the Royal Deck are
$145.

SUIT, SHIRT & TIE

Wess

Berard Ad + Mackey 51+ Thompson Blvd

Caves Village
Retail Sales Center



es elk ea
MISS UNIVERSE Dayana Mendoza ;

VIP tickets for final show, }
which will be broadcast live on }
NBC to 150 countries in the ;
world, are $1,000 and include }
entrance to the coronation ball. }

Tickets for sections 3-7 in }
the Imperial Ballroom are}
$750; sections 8-11 are $400; :
sections 11-13 are $250; sec- }
tions 14-20 are $175. :

All-access tickets to the}
coronation ball, to be held in }
Atlantis’ Royal Court, are}
$145. The newly crowned Miss }
Universe and her court will be }
presented in a “highly dramat- :
ic” fashion at the ball. i

THIS morning the 84 contestants }
of the Miss Universe 2009 Com- :
petition attend their final media :
junket. :
Reporters from both local and :
international media outlets will :
have one last chance to speak :
one-on-one with the beauties :
before the final show on Sunday. :

Then tomorrow, Bahamians :
are invited to come out and cheer :
on the beauty queens as they take :
part in a float parade which starts :
from Arawak Cay at 5.30pm. i

The float parade then follows :
along West Bay Street to the }
Wyndham Nassau Resort and }
Crystal Palace Casino on Cable :
Beach, where it is scheduled to :
end at around 7pm. :

ee
EXTERMINATORS
aU eee hays)
Mau) mercer ay |

Our Retail Sales Center facilitates all of your
banking needs including:

¢ Mortgages

e Loans

° Credit Cards
e Drafts and Wire Transfer

e¢ ABM Machines for cash transactions

e Friendly Experienced Staff

e Personalized Banking Experience

over $10,000 in prizes, including
a $2,500 Gift Certificate, iPods and many other fabulous prizes!

New national stadium
is a work in progress

MINISTER OF Sports
Desmond Bannister
presents the Chinese
Ambassador Hu
Dingxian with an
Olympic team track
shirt as Deputy Prime
Minister Brent Symon-
ette and Minister of
Environment Phenton
Neymour look on.
Government offi-
cials toured the new
facility yesterday and
got to see how con-
struction of the new
national stadium is
progressing.
+ SEE BUSINESS SECTION








































Felipé Major/Tribune staff

DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER
Brent Symonette leads yesterday's
tour of the facility.








PROJECT MANAGER Iram Lewis describes an element of
the national stadium construction to government officials
yesterday.

Scott wants to help you be more eco-friendly
with this strong cotton tote bag.

To redeem your
bring in a store receipt for any two of
the products shown to The d’Albenas

Agency, Palmdale and get your tote bag!

tote,

OFFER GOOD WHILE SUPPLIES LAST



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

The best for news . . .

Www. tribune 24 2 .cora



Banker accused
of stealing about
$20,000 from
FINCO

A BANKER accused of
stealing nearly $20,000 from the
Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas Limited by reason of
employment was arraigned in
the Magistrates Court yester-
day.

Raymond Antonio, 48, was
arraigned before Deputy Chief
Magistrate Carolita Bethel,
charged with four counts of
stealing by reason of employ-
ment and eight counts of utter-
ing a forged document.

It is alleged that between
April and July 2007, Antonio
stole a total of $18,800 from the
Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas Limited. Antonio is
also charged with eight counts
of uttering forged documents
including Finance Corporation
of the Bahamas Limited
cheques.

The prosecution yesterday
presented the court with a fiat
signed by attorney Michael
Barnett. The matter could pro-
ceed by way of a preliminary
hearing or Voluntary Bill of
Indictment.

Antonio, who is represented
by attorney Elliot Lockhart,
was not required to enter a plea
to any of the charges. He was
granted bail in the sum of
$10,000 with two sureties. The
case was adjourned to Septem-
ber 1.

COB sees increase

in student numbers



THE College of the
Bahamas has seen a “signifi-
cant” increase in the number
of students enrolled this year
compared to 2008.

COB said yesterday that it
has accepted approximately
1,700 new students for the Fall
2009 semester.

The new students will be
hosted to an orientation session
tomorrow at 9am outside the
Portia Smith Services Centre
located on the main campus,
Oakes Field.

GM confirms Port Lucaya’s pending closure

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net

THE Ministry of Tourism’s
Club Grand Bahama pro-
gramme was “a good idea but a
little too late” to improve the
“orim” conditions facing the
Port Lucaya Resort and Yacht
Club, its general manager said
yesterday as he confirmed the
resort’s pending closure.

However, Glyine Delancy
gave an assurance that all of the
17 full-time and 13 part-time
staff working at the resort will
receive their complete sever-
ance packages from the compa-
ny in the next 24 to 48 hours.

The 16-year-old resort will be
the latest of several Grand
Bahama hotels to close for good
in the face of a worsening out-
look for tourism.

Mr Delancy cited the combi-
nation of a “protracted
decrease” in occupancy levels
and the “aging and declining

condition” of
the property
which called
for a major
investment if
it was to be
improved.
The final
closure will
take place on
August 31,
2009. The
property,
which com-
prises 160 guest rooms but was
only operating 85 rooms, had
earlier this year been selected as
one of the hotels in Grand
Bahama which would be
offered to potential customers
as part of the Ministry of
Tourism’s new all-inclusive pro-
gramme, Club Grand Bahama.
Minister of Tourism Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace said he
envisaged that the programme
would see enhanced interest in
Grand Bahama from tourists
and a greater spread of visitors’

DCO) a mele sts



cash throughout the island’s
economy. But Mr Delancy said
the Club Grand Bahama
scheme came too late to save
the resort, which had “become
too costly to operate at the stan-
dard that meets the expecta-
tions of our guests.”

In his statement, Mr Delancy
commended the resort’s “close-
knit staff” for their “profes-
sional and courteous service
throughout the years, and dur-
ing this challenging time.”

Once severance packages are
disbursed to staff in the next
two days, some will be imme-
diately laid off, while a number
will be maintained to cater to
the needs of some guests who
are still staying at the property,
he added.

Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes said he was informed
of the resort’s pending closure
on Monday by Grand Bahama
Port Authority chairman Ian
Rolle.

However, he confirmed that a

Public schools ‘fall’ open on schedule

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

PUBLIC schools throughout
the country are set to open on
schedule for the fall semester,
director of Education Lionel
Sands said.

"We do not see anything that
will prevent that from happen-
ing,” Mr Sands told The Tribune
yesterday.

In the past, extensive school
repairs during the summer
months have delayed the open-
ing of many public schools, but
Mr Sands does not anticipate a
problem this year.

"We didn't have any exten-
sive repairs because over the
past two years we've been doing
repairs so this year it has been
scaled back because we did not
have as many problems with our

physical plants (schools)," said
Mr Sands. He said crews are
busy with "minimal" jobs like
painting, replacing windows,
repairing bathroom fixtures and
toilets, and upgrading plumbing
and electrical systems.

All public school teachers are
to report to work on August 24,
Mr Sands said, adding that class-
es officially start on August 31.
Meanwhile, students and teach-
ers of the T G Glover primary
school — who have been waiting
more than three years to return
to classrooms after an extensive
repair project was launched —
will have to wait until at least
January 2010 before the school
on Horse Shoe Drive is ready
to accommodate them.

"T G Glover will not be fin-
ished for this September; we
expect that to be completed for
an opening of January 2010,"

said Mr Sands.

Until then, the students and
teachers will continue to use
temporary classrooms which
were built at the Albury Sayle
Primary School on Nassau
Street when T G Glover was
first closed.

In 2002, former Education
Minster Alfred Sears discovered
that students and teachers were
using a building which had been
condemned by structural engi-
neers from the Ministry of
Works. Classes were immedi-
ately suspended at the school
and it was ordered that a new
primary school be built on the
old TG Glover School site.
However, the new Minister of
Education Carl Bethel has
expressed several concerns
about the site, and called it an
unsuitable location for a prima-
ry school.

Andros men arraigned in connection with drug seizure

TWO Andros men charged
in the recent seizure of more
than $44,000 worth of marijua-
na, which was discovered on a
boat docked in the Potter’s Cay
area on Sunday, were arraigned

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION

Business

Weatheree oes

re eeeeece meee saeee File

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

Solid Wade



te Vielzira

ani
To

o

2

in the Magistrate’s Court yes-
terday.

Police found the illegal drugs
on the boat at around 2pm
while acting on a tip.

Neil Duncombe, 28, of Small
Hope, Andros, and Roswell
Jones, 24, of Fresh Creek,
Andros, were arraigned before

Police probe into
Nassau Village
food store fire

POLICE are investigating
the cause of a fire that caused
extensive damage to a Nassau
Village food store.

At around 4.30am a fire
broke out at the Food Max
Supermarket which is located
on the ground level of a two-
storey concrete structure on
Taylor Street.

Three fire units and their
crews removed the front secu-
rity door of the store to gain
access and to extinguish the fire
inside the secured building. The
interior of the building received
extensive smoke and water
damage.

The cause of the blaze is
under investigation.

Worig’s Phere) if ii

i 5
(242/570 a

0, Pele cums yell e sire

| i
4 Ps || ra



Deputy Chief Magistrate Car-
olita Bethel in Court 8, Bank
Lane, on the charge of posses-
sion of marijuana with intent
to supply. Duncombe, who is
represented by attorney Tama-
ra Taylor, and Jones, who is
represented by attorney Ian
Cargill, both pleaded not guilty
to the drug charge.

The men were each granted
bail in the sum of $30,000 with
two sureties. The accused were
ordered to report to the Fresh
Creek Police Station every
Monday, Wednesday and Sat-
urday before 6pm. The case
was adjourned to September 1.

SE BE ses
AL La
axa O TO)

Ue
822-2197

"BACK TO SCHOOL UN

SALE‘

10% OFF All Plaids,Stripes & Trigger
LARGEST STOCK IN THE BAHAMAS

CRS 6: 91010] ac eee
CR @lOE: lie Re en Ate (21) seen
£2110) 10\61(0)() ee
Os) 0 | eee
© |[o|e 2 eee
¢ RM Bailey, Carmichael ....

“private sector entity” — thought
to be Ross University — is in
negotiations with a view to leas-
ing the property. If this takes
place, six employees could be
rehired, meaning the loss of
only seven jobs at the property,
said the minister. It was only
last week that Mr Foulkes,
responding to a Central Bank

of the Bahamas report which
suggested that further lay-offs
in the tourism sector are expect-
ed “in the summer months”,
said he was not aware of any
impending job losses.

Yesterday Mr Foulkes said:
“Things come up every day and
we have to monitor it on a dai-
ly basis.”



CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

THe Miner THO eH Reson ATION 4 CLAANTHO Byes, oa THR ke & Free!
Nasa0"s Oey PROTESPOMAL, CORTE Soo Cann & Uso snr Care §esrits,

* Carpe. Uphokiery, Sine aad Mahle Cheating &
Hestorahion Spectakst

« Peochon Cleaning Sypaens nomwes Deepa Heerey
Sail, Racteria, Creasc,'Woierrarks aad Quire from
Canpeting & Furinre, nevoring them un like mee
i fraction of replacement creat
Carpet, Sofa's, Loweecats, Choirs, Dining Chaim, Cons.
fours, Groat, Ties, Marble & Soone
Pemian. Wool & Sik Carpet Cleasing Specialist

Marble Polshing, Revoniion & Care
* Word Ploor Bewtenation

Authorised Stone Tech Professional Contactar
CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 o 323-1594

OWLY WE CAN 00 IT BMAATS
We CAA ed 9 ae rece one * Win kere ong
* pen ie eral ido

L RMSE OF PPE

SYSTEM can)

Look Qood
Feel Great

in one of our
Suits from

Jack Victor!!
Large

selection

of belts,

ties,

shirts,

shoes &

socks.

MORLEY
For %

MEN

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6
Bayparl Building, Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 * Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com






RSS sea!
$10.00
wb 3.99
web 5,99
$10.50
ub 7.50

® Cotton Twill 60" Colour Fast

No Iron Solid Colours .....





Belting in all sizes * Shirt Buttons * Skirt Hooks & Eyes

Ov ENTIRE

OoFF STOCK
Backp acks —

ronman, a Fila, Bodyglove

Pan Fiajit re ae a, 4

2 EU EL

KP
or oon Me acer
cs Se nh

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

This law must be passed

THIS WEEK a friend reminded us of an
article the late editor/publisher of this news-
paper wrote many years ago about this coun-
try’s social hypocrisy and double standards.
To illustrate his point Sir Etienne recorded
a “reading out” ceremony performed in an
Out Island church to have a young lady,
who had become pregnant, removed from
the flock. She was not married.

What made this “reading out”, or expul-
sion, unique was the open rumour in the
small settlement that the pastor performing
the “reading out” ceremony was the father of
the child.

In those days pregnancy outside of mar-
riage was a monumental disgrace. For an
unfortunate woman, not only would she be
excommunicated from her church, but she
would have to hide herself from society. She
moved around like a leper, an embarrass-
ment to herself and her family.

We recall interviewing an elderly lady
about 40 years ago who described her youth
and the social taboos of her era against
unwed mothers. Of course, there were no
raised eyebrows, or tut-tutting when the man
who had fathered the child abandoned his
obligations and skipped off looking for even
greener pastures. In old age he would sit
back, puff out his chest and boast of his
many children — both “insides” and “out-
sides.”

This was a situation demanded by men
and docilely accepted by women. Many of
our readers have heard a Bahamian woman
tell another: “Chile, if he aint beat you, he
aint love you!” There are some women today
who accept this as a perfectly normal situa-
tion.

Was it this attitude of man’s rightful dom-
inance that led so many women to follow
their PLP leaders to the polls in 2002 to vote
against the Ingraham government’s refer-
endum offering them the same rights as their
male counterparts to confer nationality on
their children and foreign spouses? Their
rejection of equality was a disgraceful per-
formance. That referendum contributed to
the defeat of the Ingraham government a
few months later.

One letter writer to The Tribune, con-
demning the amendment to the Sexual
Offences Act that would make it an offence
for a husband to rape his wife, claimed that
such an amendment would destroy the foun-
dation of marriage in this country. The man
is the head of the home “as Christ is the
head of the church”, the writer reminded
Bahamians. What the Bible said was that a
man — not an animal — was the head of the
home. This amendment would strengthen

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LUCKSON VERSANNES
of BAHAMAS AVENUE, THE GROVE, P.O. Box 8843,
is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 12'*day of August, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box N-

NASSAU, BAHAMAS,

7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Wa

HOME & BUSINESS 4 ZONES ALARM
SPECIAL $299.00 INSTALLED

HOME/BUSINESSES
1 Panel & L.ED Keypad
2 Motion Detectors
2 Door Contacts
1 Siren
1 Transformer
4 Amp Stand-By Battery
| Wemco Decal

“tl Go Cs Votn
Cri

2 HOURS MONITORING,

the foundation of marriage because it would
remove an animal from the bedchamber and
keep him out until he discovered his Chris-
tian manhood. Our letter writer then point-
ed to Prime Minister Ingraham as the leader
of the nation to emphasise the point that
there can be only one leader. However, what
he failed to point out was that Mr Ingra-
ham can only head the nation with the con-
sent of the majority of the Bahamian people.
So also, under this proposed amendment a
man can only exercise his conjugal rights
with the consent of his wife.

The problem with many of our preachers
is that they dwell too much in the old testa-
ment, and with an angry God. Much of
today’s Middle East problems — suspicion
and hatred between Jews and Arabs — can
be traced back to Old Testament history.

Jesus’ teachings in the New Testament
portrayed a God of compassion, of love,
much forgiveness — the good shepherd who
goes in search of the one lost sheep. Jesus
leaves his disciples with a final command-
ment — “Love one another ... as I have
loved you, so you must love one another.”

A man who would force himself on his
wife against her will is not a man who loves
his wife. To him she is property ... property
for his sole pleasure; property that he can
abuse at will.

In the New Testament there is great
respect for women. They are not chattels in
Jesus’ eyes, rather helpmates in his mission
of salvation.

Let’s turn to the parable of the woman
caught in adultery. In the Old Testament —
the law of Moses — she would have been
stoned to death. To test Jesus the Pharisees
wanted to know how he would deal with
her. Jesus quietly bent over and with his fin-
ger wrote in the sand. Then he straightened
up looked each hypocrite in the eye and
said: “Whichever one of you who has com-
mitted no sin may throw the first stone at
her.” He then bent down and continued
writing— probably the sins of each one of
them. Quietly, one by one, these arrogant
men melted into the shadows. If the Bahami-
an pastor who had performed the “reading
out” ceremony against the unmarried young
girl who was carrying his child had been
there, he probably would have been the first
to turn tail and run from his shame.

No there are two types of men. This pro-
posed amendment that would introduce rape
into the marriage chamber are for men who
don’t belong there because they do not know
the duties or responsibilities of a husband.

This amendment has to be passed into
law — and the sooner the better.



THE TRIBUNE



Youth operating
from ‘Paradise
Lost’ perspective

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THANK you for allowing a
space for the specific purpose
of addressing some of our
young men and now even
women in The Bahamas. It
appears to me that a lot of
youth are now operating from
a “Paradise Lost” perspective
and are currently choosing
not to seize their birthright.

As I drive around beauti-
ful Nassau, I am reminded of
all the beauty, abundance and
opportunity that some of my
brothers have chosen not to
see, or perhaps see it and not
understand their purpose in
this life. OK, I hear all your
cries of social alienation —
Man the Babylon and dem
politicians just keep on hold-
ing me back! Enough already!
For most who are seemingly
“suffering” or “doing bad”
have simply chosen to be in
the place where you are. You
have made crime a functional
equivalent to work and your
behaviour is no longer per-
ceived as deviant by your
peers. In fact, people in your
neighbourhood even glorify
your pitiful state, either out
of fear of you or because they
are simply ignorant of what
is normal and good behav-
iour.

You have chosen to with-
draw from the political
process and are now in a per-
petual stage of disenchant-
ment, cynicism and alienation
— your choice!

You have chosen not to
respect the authority of fami-
ly, school, police and commu-
nity involvement — your
choice!

You have chosen to be
involved in the narcotics
trade, which you believe
offers the true currency of
social mobility and inclusion
in the society — your choice!

You have chosen to
become lesbians and homo-
sexuals and sell your bodies
for material things — read
Leviticus 18:22 — your
choice!

You have chosen to pick up
a gun rather than a pen or
book, hate your brother
rather than love him — your
choice!

You have chosen to get a
girl pregnant and then not
take care of your children —
again, your choice!

So now I declare you for-
given. It is time for you to rise
and shine and participate in
our government and civil soci-
ety and be the youth, men and
women that God intended.
Nobody says that it will be

NOTICE

to attend.

There will be an important meeting for
all parents of St. Francis and Joesph
School on Wednesday August 19th 2009
at 6:00pm at Xaviers Lower School
Auditorium. Please make a special effort

HELP
WANTED

An Established Medical Facility

seeks to fill the following position:

REGISTERED

SERVICE & RESPONSE,
ACCESS CONTROL

PHYSICIAN

General / Family Practice (Full-time)

Kindly submit application to:

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



easy, however choose now to
be obedient and principled in
your thoughts, words and
deeds — for by a man’s deeds
he will be known!

Most of you are so loved,
so gifted, however you are
constantly running away from
what you know to be true and
have embarked upon a
Jezebel spirit allowing and
permitting any actions in your
midst.

You greet your brothers
with respect in the bar rooms,
on the domino table and in
the clubs, however you sel-
dom tell your mother or
father that you love and
respect them.

You seldom hug and kiss
your children and still have
all the expectations to be
loved and respected. You
must remember that love
does not equal compromise
with truth or obedience.

You are in paradise, how-
ever you do not see the truth.
You have been disillusioned
by fake hip-hop artists, gangs-

ta lyrics, the boys rolling on
the “chromes”, the girls in the
revealing and seductive dress-
es, purely designed to remove
your eyes from the ultimate
prize. Strength comes in the
recognition of your true pur-
pose, after all you were creat-
ed in the image and likeness
of God.

I beg you to Rise and Shine
and give God the glory. I beg
you to realise your potential
and express love, rather than
hate. There may be times
when you would have to,
either temporarily or perma-
nently, remove yourself from
those persons who are not
doing the right thing.

Today, make it a point to
examine your life, look
around for positive role mod-
els, ask them how they did it,
copy and reproduce.

Tell someone that you love
them and then demonstrate
your love that is within each
of you.

Rise and Shine, my youth
— the future is in your hands!

FRANKLYN “DOOM”
MUNROE

Nassau,

August, 2009.

Clean, green and pristine, but
then there is poor grade diesel

EDITOR, The Tribune.

1 AM a big fan of clean, green and pristine, but frankly it
is an affront by our government.

We have people cleaning up our beaches and roadways
but we do not supply adequate, closed garbage bins and we
charge people to dump and the dump, encouraging them to

dump in vacant lots instead.

The biggest insult though is the importation of unclean

(poor grade) diesel fuel.

This morning I could hardly see where I was driving as the
big truck in front of me spewed out so much exhaust fumes
that it caused a fog for miles. Disgusting!

I have it from business owners that they have to use
engine cleaner constantly in their diesel vehicles to keep
them functioning due to the poor grade of diesel we import.

This diesel fuel is the same stuff that powers all those
Jitneys (still) polluting up Bay Street and beyond making it
revolting for locals and tourists alike.

We are a country only a few feet about sea level and yet
we seem to think the eventual sea rise due to over polluting

will not affect us.
We need to act now.

We are committing suicide by not protecting our envi-

ronment.

Write to your local MP and demand he looks into this
unclean fuel debacle or build another floor on your house
*cause in the future this island will be like Venice!

S APPLETON
Nassau,
August, 2009.

BIMINI BAY

RESORT ANT MARI A

fg

P.O. Box CR-55050
Nassau, Bahamas
or
Via email to: a_1_phyneeded@live.com

DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESCUCESAND
of Pp oeobiiniboyresor.com 0

La | Ad |i





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009, PAGE 5





LOCAL NEWS

www. tribune 2 4 2 .c



Man says he has
found section
from the space
shuttle Challenger

AN AMERICAN visiting
the Bahamas has discovered
what he believes is a section
of metal from the nose of
the space shuttle Chal-
lenger.

Jim Tull, who was on his
boat when he discovered
the fragment, said that he
wants to use the piece of
debris as a "teaching tool,”
the Tampa Examiner
reported.

The Virginia native has
announced plans to take the }
segment around and show it }
to people. ;

However, he may have a
serious fight on his hands.

NASA has cautioned Mr
Tull that it is illegal to keep
any part of the shuttle which }
is still property of the space
agency.

But Mr Tull said that he
is now waiting for a letter
from NASA and is hoping
that some sort of arrange-
ment can be made.

Challenger broke apart
just 73 seconds after the
launch of its tenth mission
on January 28, 1986. The
space craft was destroyed
when an O-ring seal on its
right solid rocket booster
failed. The O-rings failed to
seal due to a variety of fac-
tors, including unusually
cold temperatures. Seven
astronauts died in the disas-
ter. ;

When Challenger explod- }
ed its debris dropped into :
the Atlantic Ocean and :
NASA scrambled to recover }
the pieces of the shuttle. :

Today, the space agency
makes every effort to keep
any parts belonging to its
space craft off auction sites
such as eBay.

It is a violation of federal
law to remove any material
belonging to a NASA space
craft.

~ Claims of payment prob ems
in government youth initiative

But students told they have ‘nothing to worry about’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

YOUNGSTERS who
claim they haven’t been paid
after taking part in the gov-
ernment’s summer youth
initiatives have been told
they have “nothing to worry
about.”

A number of students
took part in the Ministry of
Youth Sports and Culture’s
summer internship pro-
gramme, which saw them
placed with various private
businesses across the coun-
try.

Wages

But some claim they faced
problems getting paid on
time and it is has now been
weeks since they were sup-
posed to receive their final
$125 a week wages.

One told The Tribune
how he is fed up that after
all of his hard work, he has
been left without the funds
he was relying on as he
heads back to school.

But yesterday youth min-
ister Desmond Bannister
said there could be “any
number of reasons” why stu-

DESMOND BANNISTER



dents have not yet been paid
for which the Ministry
would not be to blame.

“Tf they’re placed with
business for an internship,
the business sends in
paysheets to the Ministry
(before cheques are dis-
bursed).

“Sometimes business may
be late, or sometimes young
people were supposed to be
there have not been there
and so the business has to
check up on that,” said the
minister.

New anti-drug plan ‘must
be more comprehensive’

THE Bahamas’ next national anti-drug

However, he assured
them that if they do all that
is required of them, students
who participated in any of
the ministry’s summer pro-
grammes will be paid “by
the end of the week.”

“There’s absolutely no
problem whatsoever.

“We have had the biggest
ever summer progrmme
that we’ve ever had, some
would say the most success-
ful that we’ve ever had and
I understand that there’s a
small number of young peo-
ple who may not have been
paid the week that they fin-
ished, and that’s quite nor-
mal.”

Experience

The Ministry of Youth
Sports and Culture’s Sum-
mer youth programmes
encompasses a wide variety
of programmes in which
young people are able to
engage to gain extra experi-
ence and a source of
income.

Mr Bannister said stu-
dents are paid “according
to their qualifications” and
delays on their part in bring-
ing in the certificates to be
registered can contribute to

setbacks in the timeliness of
payments.

Meanwhile, bureaucratic
requirements which see the
Ministry of Youth Sports
and Culture send off to the
Ministry of Finance to have
student’s cheques prepared,
before having them sent
back to the Ministry of

Youth for disbursement,
can contribute to delays.
Mr Bannister claimed that
under the former PLP
administration some stu-
dents who took part in the
government’s summer pro-
grammes were not paid
“until October” of the year
in which they participated.

UOC MRT EDS TIT TTT)

A WALLET and passport belonging to Nicole Runestien
were lost in the Fox Hill area during the Fox Hill Day fes-
tival. Anyone finding the items are asked to contact The Tri-
bune or deliver the items to the appropriate authorities.

RUSSELL’S WAREHOUSE
CLOSING SALE

Rivet Rite Shelving, Gondolas, Glass Shelves,
2 & 4 Arm Display Racks, Gridwall, Slatwall,
Slotted Standards, and Hardware.
Asst. Fixtures and Fittings,
Men’s Coverall’s $5.00, S/S & L/S Whie Shirts $1-$5,
Blank ID Cards, 16” Stand Fans, Blank CD’s, Blk School
Shoes, Men’s Jeans sz. 46-50, $15, AND MORE,

Location: Madeira Shopping Center
Behind Mystical Gym - Entrance to Aquinas -
First left - First stairs on left.

Hours: Mon. to Thurs. 11am to 5pm Contact: 465-8648



plan should be “more comprehensive and
balanced” and should aim to tackle supply,
demand and trafficking, a top National
Security official said.

Permanent Secretary Missouri Sherman-
Peter said the issue of narcotics must be
addressed on a number of levels, including
law enforcement, public health, criminal
justice, and social and economic develop-
ment.

Addressing the opening session of the
training workshop for the Bahamas nation-
al anti-drug plan 2010-2014, Mrs Sherman-
Peter said the scheme should also take into
account the crime and violence created by
drug trafficking, including arms trafficking.

She said it should also focus on law
enforcement on land and sea _ to disrupt
trans-national criminal networks every-
where.

The Workshop is being held over three
days and is being facilitated by Inter-Amer-
ican Drug Abuse Control Commission
(CICAD) and The Bahamas’ National Anti-
Drug Secretariat (NADS).

“The illicit drug phenomenon is destruc-
tive, complex and challenging,” Mrs. Sher-
man-Peter said.

“It is driven primarily by ruthless drug
trafficking networks consumed by greed
and unmoved by the deadly consequences
that their illicit business inflict on people,
communities and on developed and devel-
oping countries alike.

“The illicit drug phenomenon is multi-
faceted in nature and that successful counter
measures require action on multiple fronts,



NATIONAL SECURITY Permanent Secretary,
Mrs Missouri Sherman-Peter.

by multiple stakeholders.”

Mrs Sherman-Peter said the structuring of
national drug control initiatives into com-
prehensive national anti-drug plans will
allow The Bahamas, and regional countries,
to provide “well-established” responses to
the challenges they face.

An effective drug plan should incorpo-
rate the full range of initiatives and activities
countries are taking, or must take, to “res-
olutely confront the illicit drug trade,” she
added.

AN EQUIPMENT fault at
BEC’s Windsor Field sub-sta-
tion caused a power outage in
the north-western part of the

Share your news

Public Consultations on

(1) Draft Consultation Procedure Guidelines
(2) Preliminary Determination on the Cost of
Capital for Designated SMP Operators

The Utilities Regulation & Competition Authority (URCA) is pleased to invite
comments from members of the public and interested parties on its
consultation documents released on 19 August 2009.

The Consultation on the “Draft Consultation Procedure Guidelines” seeks
feedback on the form of carrying out consultations, handling of confidential
information, and instances where the procedure may need to be different.
Interested parties can give comments by the 1* September 2009

The Consultation on “Preliminary Determinatian on the Cost of Capital for
Designated SMP Operators” addresses the proposed approach to calculating the
allowable rate of return for operators designated with Significant Market Power
(SMP) and presents proposed findings, estimates and a Preliminary
Determination. Interested parties can give comments by the ist October J009,

Copies of the consultation documents can be obtained from the URCA office in

island on Monday morning.

The electricity supply for
most of the area was restored
by llam, with the remaining
customers fully restored by 3pm
through alternative circuits. The
areas affected included
Westridge North and South,
Delaporte, Sandyport, Tropi-
cal Gardens and Love Beach.

BEC yesterday apologised
for any inconveniences caused
and said it is working “tireless-
ly” to repair the faulty equip-
ment.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



New Providence

downloaded

frarn the

URCA website at

Wi urcabohomas. bs and comments emailed ta infag@urcabahames, bs.

TAKE PART IN THE NEW REGULATORY REGIME. YOUR OPINIONS COUNT.

UTILITIES REGULATION & COMPETITION AUTHORITT

15 AEE

P.O. Bo A-S 800 F

Bahan |
wivw.urcabahamas.bs



T 2d. diddas

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Patrick Hanna/BIS

Defence Force summer camp sees
‘significant increase’ in participants

By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION SERVICES

THE almost two-fold
increase in the number of
children participating in the
Royal Bahamas Defence
Force Summer Youth Pro-
gramme “‘is a clear indication
that it must continue for
many years to come,” Nation-
al Security Minister Tommy
Turnquest said.

Initially intended as a “safe
and fun, learning environ-
ment” for children of the offi-
cers and marines of the
Defence Force during the
summer break, the pro-
gramme was expanded to
include children from the
wider community.

It ended last weekend at
HMBS Coral Harbour Base
with a series of performances
that included an arts and craft
display, wind instrument
recital, drama presentation,
choir performance and dance.

The programme was
launched in the summer of
2008 with 250 children rang-
ing in ages from five to 16
years. A year later, 400 chil-



MINISTER of National Security Tommy Turnquest is pictured with par-

ticipants in the second annual Royal Bahamas Defence Force Summer
Youth Programme which ended on August 14.

dren participated.

“The Royal Bahamas
Defence Force’s Summer
Youth Programme is unique
in that it exposes our young

people to the natural, indige-
nous environment that we are
blessed to have in the
Bahamas,” Mr Turnquest
said.

“The Force has designated
quite a significant number of
its resources — human, finan-
cial and material — to its over-
all success.

“The instructors are per-
sons of impeccable character
and integrity and have shown
an interest in teaching, and
for them, I am grateful.”

The programme was hosted
over six weeks with the activ-
ities intended to strengthen
participants’ physical, mental
and educational develop-
ment.

Guest speakers were
brought in to lead discussions

on a range of issues from
drug awareness to peer pres-
sure and gang violence.

Participants were also
treated to field trips to the
Ardastra Gardens and Zoo
and Pirates of Nassau, which
camp organisers said “helped
them garner knowledge of
the Bahamas.”

“We must truly congratu-
late the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force for its deter-
mined efforts to guide and
mould our young people
through quality time, care
and instruction,” Mr Turn-
quest said.







THE SECOND annual Royal
Bahamas Defence Force
Summer Youth Programme
ended with a series of per-
formances including the
plaiting of the Maypole.

He said he was “particular-
ly pleased” with the display
of Bahamian arts and craft
that were produced by the
participants.

“The quality of their work
exudes the commitment and
effort that was put forth,” Mr
Turnquest said. “I am
encouraged by their efforts
and abilities in all facets of
the programme.”



PROSPECTUS

June, 2009.

3:00p.m. on 27th August, 2009.

amounts so refunded.

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

ISSUE OF B$150,000, 000.00

Issued under The Bahamas Registered Stock Act, and authorized by Resolutions of the House of Assembly, 17th



Rate of Interest

1/8 % Above Prime Rate
9/64% Above Prime Rate
5/32% Above Prime Rate
11/64%_ Above Prime Rate
3/16% Above Prime Rate
13/64% Above Prime Rate
7132% Above Prime Rate
15/64% Above Prime Rate
1/4% Above Prime Rate

INTEREST

The date of this Prospectus is August, 2009

Bahamas Registered Stock 2028 20,000,000.00 100.00
Bahamas Registered Stock 2029 20,000,000.00 100.00

Bahamas Registered Stock 2031 15,000,000.00 100.00

Bahamas Registered Stock 2030 15,000,000.00 100.00

Bahamas Registered Stock 2035 10,000,000.00 100.00

Bahamas Registered Stock 2032 20,000,000.00 100.00

Bahamas Registered Stock 2036 10,000,000.00 100.00

Bahamas Registered Stock 2033 20,000,000.00 100.00
Bahamas Registered Stock 2034 20,000,000.00 100.00
000.

po 150,000,000.00T

CHARGE UPON CONSOLIDATED FUND
The principal monies and interest represented by the Stock are charged upon and payable out of the Consolidated
Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

The Stock shall be repaid on 27th August, in the year appearing in the name of the Stock.

The Stock will bear interest from 27th August, 2009, at the rate shown against the name of the Stock as the percent
per annum over the Prime Rate (i.e. the prime commercial interest rate from time to time fixed by the Clearing banks
carrying on business in the Island of New Providence in The Bahamas. If there shall be any difference between them,
then that which is fixed by Royal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half-yearly commencing on 27th February,
2010 and thereafter on 27th August and 27th February in every year until the Stock is repaid.

No interest will be paid on

Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 19th August, 2009 and will
close at 3:00pm on 25th August, 2009. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 26th August, 2009 and will cease at

If the total subscriptions exceed the sum of B$150,000,000.00 (Nominal) partial allotment will be made to
subscribers, and a proportionate refund will be made as soon as possible after allotment.

kGO tOsuRSFbF

BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2028, 2029, 2030, 2031, 2032, 2033, 3034, 3035, AND 3036

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK. 2028, 2029, 2030, 2031, 2032, 2033, 2034, 2035 AND 2036

hDtODhhIpJALOaTgODCLN
ArrLIpAkIDC Cd
ALLDkBgCk Cd2

fAkg

ce“d kGO pOnSFbm obnl dE kGO obGb bR

120D200d*0C&8:
CbRRbv1 obGb bR

TuF

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas invites applications for Bahamas Registered Stock
totalling B$150,000,000.00. The Stock will be available in a range of maturity dates; the earliest being repayable in
2028 and the latest in 2036. The total amount of Stock offered, the rate of interest and the issue price are given below :-

Issue Price
Name of Stock Amount B$
B$

000°**50000A ,dwO0rFu OO0tbS@bGb bROtOsuRSOFOY TSdcl 646B$
00*:85000A,dwO0rFu O0tbSO obGb bROtOsuRSOFOY TSdcl 646B$
09*7650000A,dwO0rFu OOtbS@bGb bROtOsuRSOFOY TSdcl 647B$
7 8500A,dwO0rFu O0tbSO obGb bROtOsuRSOFOY TSdcl 647B$
0007°: 500A ,dwO0rFu OOtbSOobGb bROtOsuRSOFOY TSdcl 647B$
”7T85000A,dwO0drFu O0tbSO obGb bROtOsuRSOFOY TSdcl 647B$
0*7650000A,dwO0rFu OOtbSO obGb bROtOsuRSOFOY TSdcl 647B$
9: 85000A,dwO0rFu O0tbSO obGb bROtOsuRSOFOY TSdcl 647B$
000°**850000A,dwO0rFu OO0tbSé>Gb bROtOsuRSOFOY TSdcl 647B$

bnY vnYOFSbIO Sd becOeS bny mORR b dvnS xGioGnimpdSSOY Sd O“vR2

J*.O OncemdRO 03

Jn SGO OwOnS dE SGO Evmm b dvnS dE TSdcl/R$ beemuOY EdF b,dwO uR“bFO ndS bmmdSSOY Sd
O*vR1 J*xO FOPVORS SGbS SGO Rv FOEvnYbRnO Sdemu@Y EdF SGO Edmmdxuns TSdel

rANBgCkT JC gMpgTT Dh 03941444244 MUST og BAfg (JA tgALkIBg itDTT TgkkLgBgCk

J“.O0 GOFO,y beemy EdF SGO Edmmdxuns b dvrfSbdbRotOsuRSOFOY TSdel

JnROFS ,Omdx SGO b dvnS beemuOY Edl
unQanuSR0dE003”44

un eby OnS EdF SGO TSdcl beEdkR0Y

5 obGb bR tOsuRSOFOY TSdcl

TNTkgB /tkiT$ kItDail ALL pDBBgtpJAL oAC)T gMperk hJCpD2

rANBgCkT Dh 03941444244 Dt LgTT pAC og BAfg (JA tgAL kJBg itDTT TgkkLgBgCk

TNTkgB Dt oN oAC) ftAhk rANAoLg kD kIg pgCktAL oAC

rtANBgCkT Dh 0391444244 Dt LgTT pAC og BAfg (JA tgAL kJ Bg itDTT TgkkLgBgCk

TNTkgB1 oN oAC) ftAhk rANAoLg kD kIg pgCktAL oAC) D



pAT

03

) Dh kIg oAIABAT

hkIg oAIABAT Dt oN

tDDLffdSAso DspHtHpdt
6531DAO3EOFGBA2

The Stock will be issued by the Registrar (The Central Bank of The Bahamas). Applications will eEdGnwEy tGmnwRSEp

be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 19th August, 2009 and TGUIBgC
R KWaaNU B VRE AiEigR Vaa. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 26th August, 2009
and will cease at 3:00p.m. on 27th August, 2009. All envelopes enclosing applications should be Ywxp*Gn* gS JJ***(BLeNI*LPuuPht *FRwRp*kspR sfEMEoE MGFF wnd RGRJpF GD wny,)
labelled “Application For Bahamas Government Registered Stocks’.

GRg The Stock will be in units of B$100.00.



ANNIGRGBg Applications must be for B$100.00 or a multiple of that sum. AddEpFF (NoECoEWRGouF pRe, FsoSJd rGIp hprGFRpEpd AddEpFFpF )
ANNIGRGBrBPUg Applications for the Stock should be made to the Registrar on the form attached to the
Prospectus and may be obtained from the Registrar offices in Nassau and Freeport, The Treasury
Department (Marlborough Street & Navy Lion Road, Nassau), applications may also be
downloaded from the Central Bank of the Bahamas website at www.centralbankbahamas.com or
any of the following banks:

f, e, Boa



Bank of The Bahamas International

First Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited

Commonwealth Bank Limited

Royal Bank Of Canada

Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited (formally British American Bank(1993) Limited)
Citibank, N.A.

upJpCsonp* YoEF,*(i) (b)

85 10SOFO3HKB3BF3,BFO3COFGBAG3 CCWL3 G3UBTAH3GI$GMFT$OFG43HSO3 NNTHTBA \
3$O03RTVOA3$0 WBK52

Se SO Oe hr

eEdGnwEy tGmwRSEpF

DMLHefMS
YwxpF Gn gSJJ
Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts as at June 30, 2009 show the Public Debt of The Bahamas to be

B$3,524,214,000.*
And.eh



hpfsdfdSsffdfAdefcDfdeHSsf
The following information is extracted from the unaudited accounts of the Government of The Commonwealth of AddEpFE
The Bahamas.

FY2006/2007p** FY2007/2008p** FY2008/2009p** upJpCsonp YoF,(i)__

BS BS BS
Approved Budget Approved Budget

Revenue 1,338,172,000 1,424, 108,000 1,569,329,000 T.bp spEpmy EpOSpFR FpxG wnnSwJ GnRpEpFRRt¢ mp CwGd

Recurrent Expenditure (excluding

Repayment of Public Debt) Bwnv Ywxp

1,285,692,000 1,344,028,000 1,484, 150,000

Capital Development Bwnv BEwnes

Expenditure (excluding loans
contributions and advances
to public corporations)

166,225,000 AccosSnR YSxmpE.

176,778,000 188,718,000
** Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts.
* — The Public Debt amount is inclusive of The Public Corporations contingent liability which as at June 30, 2009

totalled B$440,013,000.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM











THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

Be the first to be intormed

www.tribune24? .conm—<<

The

a

ae i ii

— oF uJ ne
1 ¥
= pas a



By LLONELLA GILBERT

THE committee charged with
implementing the government’s
Training and Empowerment Pro-
gramme to help displaced workers is
currently evaluating interviewed
applicants who want to acquire new
administrative and vocational skills.

More than 300 of the 800 inter-
viewed start classes in September at
the College of the Bahamas (COB)
and the Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute (BTV])

“(The global economic) crisis
impacted everyone,” said chairman
of the implementation advisory com-
mittee and president of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce Khaalis
Rolle.

The courses being offered are
geared towards training unemployed
persons in needed skills — masonry,
basic carpentry, landscaping, heavy

equipment operating,
housing, accounting,
diesel mechanics, nail
techniques, computer
applications, and straw
and shell craft.

“The initial thought for
the programme was to
address some of the social
fall-out that was created
by the high levels of |
unemployment in the
hotel and tourism sector,"
Mr Rolle said.

Those interviewed
ranged from persons with
no qualifications and very
little experience to persons with
Master’s degrees.

The ages ranged from 18 to over
60 years.

The courses will take place over a
10 to 15-week period. Registration
begins the last week in August and

KHAALIS ROLLE



classes start the second
week in September.

The government plans
to continue the training
exercises for a year to
give others the opportu-
nity to upgrade their
skills.

Many persons interest-
ed in the programme
showed up after the
deadline. But they will
still have a chance to take
the course, Mr Rolle
— | said.

While the government
would like 1,000 persons
to receive training at the same time,
“institutional class restraints” limit
the number of spaces available, he
added.

The course structure will be
designed as an “intro to” course and
persons wanting further certification

rd is d eh 2
Committee evaluating applicants
for govt’s training programme

can continue on their own.

At the end of the course, trainees
will be placed in an apprenticeship
programme in various businesses.

"Hopefully, at the conclusion of
the apprenticeship period the busi-
nesses will hire the trainees or the
trainees will create their own busi-
nesses,” Mr Rolle said.

He said it may be better for per-
sons to train in vocational areas.

“T think that is the beginning phas-
es of you actually starting your own
business with a specialised skill,” he
said.

"Plumbing is a very specialised
skill and you have to go into a certi-
fication process and having that ver-
sus a certificate in accounting, your
probability of success in starting a
business is greater.”

The implementation advisory com-
mittee will evaluate the programme
every two weeks.

Robotics camp could be the
future for young Bahamians

YOUNG Bahamians
interested in the science
and technology of robotics
could put the country on
the map with their cre-
ations, a physicist said.

Jurgen Riedel, founder of
the Science Institute and a
lecturer at COB, and his
team recently celebrated
the successful conclusion of
the nation’s second annual
Robotics Camp.

While many youngsters
flocked to movie theatres
this summer to watch their
favourite robots in films like
‘Transformers’ or got
awestruck by the spy equip-
ment of ‘G.I. Joe’ and ‘G-
Force’, a small group of
Bahamian youth found
themselves learning the
tools that could very well
lead to careers in creating
such technologies at the
Robotics Camp.

The camp is the brain-
child of physicist Mr Riedel.

Having had such a major
success with his children’s
camp, Mr Riedel is also
considering hosting a semi-
nar in the near future for
educators and profession-
als.

“Robotics is one of the
fastest developing and most
prestigious areas in science
and technology and lots of
creative young Bahamians
could very well put this
country in the map with
their creations,” he said.
“Robots are everywhere —
exploring the deepest
canyons in the ocean, new
frontiers of neighbouring
planets and even as artifi-
cial limbs to amputees. By
putting on this camp annu-

ally, we are fostering these
creative minds while teach-
ing them to develop interest
in science and technology
which will in turn benefit
their country and perhaps
even mankind.”

Mr Riedel, his wife Kim
and a team of COB mathe-
matics and physics students
spent three weeks at the
College’s School of Hospi-
tality teaching young robot-
ics enthusiasts to turn famil-
iar Lego blocks into work-
ing robots.

“This year we focused on
combining the fields of
design, engineering and sci-
ence in the form of small
projects,” Mr Riedel said.

Students

“For the first part of the
camp students had the
opportunity to build small
machines. Later they
applied various principles
to design, construct and
programme small yet
sophisticated robots.”

Participants learnt the
principles of design, how to
apply mathematics and log-
ic to solve problems, what
gears are and how to use
them, how to build struc-
tures and frames and the
essentials of motion.

They were also taught to
understand propulsion and
force aS well as basic
dynamics of programming
and control.

“Camp-goers also learnt
the importance of team
playing by working in small
groups and discussing
design and theory with oth-
ers,” Mr Riedel said. “With-

A YOUNGSTER uses technology to create a working robot.

in the groups they relied on
their peers to work through
difficult situations, learned
to recover from failures and
enjoyed their successes as
a whole.”

Mr Riedel said there are
tremendous opportunities
in the Bahamas to develop
science and technology as
it relates to robotics.

He has also provided
scholarships to a few stu-
dents to attend the camp as
well as offered some classes
through the government’s
Urban Renewal pro-
gramme.



US church leaders
urge Ohama to ent
Cuba embargo

HAVANA

A DELEGATION of
USS. Roman Catholic Church
leaders urged Barack Oba-
ma’s administration Tuesday
to seize what they called a
rare political opportunity to
lift the 47-year-old economic
embargo against Cuba’s com-
munist government, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

Bishop Thomas Wenski of
Orlando, Florida, said the
U.S. church welcomed a
recent move by Washington
to relax travel restrictions on
Cuban Americans with fam-
ily in Cuba as well on the
remittances they can send to
those families. But he said
there is much more to be
done.

Wenski said at a news con-
ference that the U.S. church
hopes “both sides listen to
their better angels” and
move to normalize ties.

The U.S. church long has
urged an end to the embargo,
imposed by Washington in
1962 to weaken Cuba’s com-
munist government. Oppo-
nents argue that easing or
lifting the sanctions will only
sustain a government that
doesn’t tolerate dissent.

Cardinal Sean O’Malley of
Boston said Obama’s elec-
tion presents a rare oppor-
tunity to bridge an “immense
psychological distance” that
has marred relations and end
an economic policy the
church says punishes Cuban
citizens.

“There were other oppor-
tunities that were lost,” Wen-
ski said. “And it’s important
we do not lose the opportu-
nity this time.”

Wenski, O’Malley and
Auxiliary Bishop Oscar Can-
tu of San Antonio, Texas,
met on Monday with Cuban
Cardinal Jaime Ortega and
diplomats at the U.S. Inter-
ests Section, which serves as
an informal U.S. government
mission.

They planned to meet with
Ricardo Alarcon, head of
Cuba’s parliament, later
Tuesday.

Wenski said the delegation
came away from the Inter-
ests Section meeting with the
impression that U.S. policy
toward Cuba is under review
and that “their approach
seems to be piece by piece.”

He urged a quicker pace
after “50 years of lack of con-
fidence on both sides.”

“That’s a lot of history to
overcome,” Wenski added.
“We would hope that both
sides listen to their better
angels.”

The delegation is also in
Cuba to check on church-
funded hurricane recovery
projects.

























SENTRA

Thé B-16 Sentra is built on Nissan's ‘CG plaiform and offers a standard 2.0-liter
4-cylinder angine, fuel-elficiant Nissan Xironi¢ GCYT™ (Continuously Variable
Trangmission) and rasponsive handling. The Sentra is also available with a
range of unexzpected amenilies = ranging Irom the luxury of leather-appointed
seating to the convanianca of Nissan's Intelligani Kay kayless entry system.

S E N TRA SH0R Tine way you reves vost

OM THE SPOT AARICING WITH
ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED fence
#280 Well! Rood Thompson Bled. « Oakes Flabd
PO) Bow Madd i. 242 326.6977" f. 242.926.6315
i (2a) 42 | eae ® sanping@coralwave.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

INSUAANCD AM APL AUC TH
ADWANTVGE IRE LIELG ROE
BRORENS & AGENTS LTD.

ROBOTICS CAMP participants test out machines they've built





PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Proposal to redevelop
the old Elbow Cay Club

By LARRY SMITH

Despite the economic
downturn, a new fight is
brewing over development
in the out islands — this
time the battleground is
Hope Town — one of the
most successful family
island communities.
Tough Call visited Abaco
over the weekend to take
a closer look at a contro-
versial proposal to rede-
velop the old Elbow Cay
Club.

HOPE TOWN, Abaco
— Skimming over the
shallow Sea of Abaco
past the familiar striped
lighthouse that marks the
best-known harbour in
the Bahamas, we arrive
at a small cove backed by
a handful of low-rise
buildings.

The shoreline is punc-
tuated by a crumbling
wooden pier.

Here, tucked away out
of sight of the settlement,
are the remains of New
Hope Lodge — a camp
for recovering alcoholics
founded by American
Ruth Kenyon-Lundegren
on nine acres of undevel-
oped land back in the
1950s.

Ruth has now left the
Bahamas, but in her time
she had a big impact on
the little community of
Hope Town.

New Hope was even-
tually sold to a Danish-
Canadian investor named
Robert Maltarp, while
Ruth went on to buy the
former commissioner's
residence in the settle-

ment, adding a three-
storey wing to create the
Harbour Lodge.

Later, she operated the
nearby Abaco Inn (then
called the Fin and Ton-
ic). Both are 20-room
boutique hotels.

In the meantime, Mal-
tarp had acquired 10
more acres and turned
New Hope into the
Elbow Cay Club, which
operated rather unsuc-
cessfully as a typical out
island inn throughout the
60s and 70s.

It later became a room-
ing house for locals,
eventually descending to
its present status as a
Haitian ghetto — proba-
bly the only "resort" for
immigrants in the coun-
try.

Elbow Cay is five
miles long and half a mile
wide, and the tiny settle-
ment of Hope Town
retains immense rustic
appeal.

An ever-widening
patchwork of roads and
upscale subdivisions radi-
ates from the picturesque
settlement harbour.

And the island is home
to high-flying lawyers,
politicians, architects and
corporate bigwigs.

Abaconians refer to the
place as "Hollywood".

There are some 400
permanent residents



together with perhaps 500
second home families
who come and go, as well
aS an uncertain number
of Haitians.

And although Abaco
may have suffered less
from the recession than
the rest of the Bahamas,
because of its large sec-
ond home economy,
Hope Town has suffered
least.

Despite a drop in prop-
erty sales, rentals, and
construction starts, it
remains one of the most
desirable pieces of real
estate in the country.

It is well known that
most of Hope Town's
Bahamian families can
trace their roots back toa
single Loyalist widow
from South Carolina
named Wyannie Malone,
who arrived here in the

1780s following the
American War of Inde-
pendence.

And ironically, most of
the group who are plan-
ning a $25 million rede-
velopment of the derelict
Elbow Cay Club are also
from South Carolina.

They include three
contractors from the
Charleston area — Philip
Smith, who builds high-
end custom homes; Vic-
tor Apat, who specialis-
es in historical restora-
tion; and Hank Hofford,

CAUGHT YOU
LOOKING!

eT

a rae



With the contemporary look and responsive ride of a crossover the Equinox offers
more rear-seat legroom than any SUV, plus a five-star frontal and side-impact
crash rating from the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

FEATURES:

* 785 hp 24 V6 engine

* 5-speed automatic transmission
* 4-wheel anti-lock dist brakes
*16-in, cast aluminum wheels

* Remote keyless entry system

* Air conditionine

+ Dual-stage driver and front passenger

air bags with Passenger Sensing System
+ 5-passenger seatina
* Flat-folding front passenger seatback
* Power windows, programmable door

locks and exterior minors

* CO player with auxiliary audio Input jack

Ck

‘ Aare eee
financieg ond inmraere

Ont
Dib peeth 4, 000-akt Gectery rari.

StU TD



as

Shirley Street + 302-0130 + Fax: 323-7272

[nfo@nasaumotorcom * www.chevroletbahamas.cam

Tae

bea ae



“Hundreds of leading
citizens and second home
owners have petitioned to
stop the development in its
present form — a campaign
that is led by former realtor
Chester Thompson, Hope
Town's 88-year-old patriarch;
and Clay Wilhoyte, a
naturalised Bahamian who
owns the popular Harbour's
Edge restaurant.”

a big land developer. The
front man for the group
is a trial lawyer named
Mark Mason who has a
home on Elbow Cay. The
remaining partner is
Bahamian realtor Greg
Graham.

When Robert Maltarp
put his 19-acre property
on the market in 2004,
Kerry Sullivan of Dami-
anos Sotheby's Realty
was the listing agent.

The Charleston group
put the property under
contract in January 2008,
but the sale is subject to
government approval of
the development.

"Mason and Greg Gra-
ham met through a mutu-
al friend and realized
they had a common inter-
est so the developers
offered him a partner-
ship.

“It was a great chance
for him to get in with an
experienced team and
people who have the cap-
ital to implement a plan
that, in my opinion, is the
best use of the land."

But her opinion is not
widely shared.

A groundswell of local
opposition has devel-
oped, creating much ill
feeling in this small,
close-knit community.

Hundreds of leading
citizens and second home
owners have petitioned to
stop the development in
its present form — a cam-
paign that is led by for-
mer realtor Chester
Thompson, Hope Town's
88-year-old patriarch;
and Clay Wilhoyte, a nat-
uralised Bahamian who
owns the popular Har-
bour's Edge restaurant.

Their objections relate
to the scale and charac-
ter of the development.
The plans call for over
100 structures on 19
acres.

This includes a dozen
homesites, 88 townhous-
es, a 24-room hotel/con-
ference centre and six
staff apartments, in addi-
tion to common facilities.
Based on a three-person
occupancy per unit anda
total staff of 100 the den-
sity could be as high as
27 per acre, critics say.

"Such high density will
have a major impact on
infrastructure such as
roads, power supply,
refuse removal, fire pro-
tection, health services,
etc." according to one let-
ter to the town council.
"Furthermore, it will rep-
resent the first step in an
undesirable '‘Floridariza-
tion’ of this beautiful
island."

The harshest criticism
is reserved for the mas-
sive marina that is being
proposed. It will occupy
over seven acres of the
Queen's bottom (as the
seabed is known locally),
with a rubble breakwater
jutting out well over 500
feet into the Sea of Aba-
co. It will be designed to
accommodate up to 150
boats as big as 43 feet,
with lifts, a ferry dock
and fuel pumps.



"This marina will be a
permanent blight on one
of the most attractive
areas in the Abacos," one
letter-writer said.

"We believe that this
destructive conversion of
public property into pri-
vate, for-profit use, with
its attendant, unfortunate
environmental effects,
should not be permitted."

According to Linda
Cole, of the Wyannie
Malone Museum, there is
no need for such a mari-
na when existing facilities
are under-utilised.

"I for one do not wish
to see another Miami
Beach shoreline...If the
developers are not pre-
pared to scale back, then
let them move to the
mainland. (People) come
to Hope Town for what
we offer, not (what) they
can get in Treasure Cay,
Freeport and Nassau."

One local developer I
spoke to pointed out that
different islands have dif-
ferent characteristics and
should be branded differ-
ently.

"There is no one-size
fits all solution. And the
average occupancy for
out island hotels and
marinas is 50 per cent, so
I don't know why anyone
would want to build a
marina of that size at
Hope Town."

But the Charleston
group says that with or
without their project
Elbow Cay will continue
to grow, more houses will
be built and more boaters
will need dockage. They
say their development
will be based on demand,
with a 10-15 year build-
out that will not overbur-
den the island or its infra-
structure.

"The project will pro-
vide good jobs to local
residents and their chil-
dren well into the future.
If it took 10 years to
build out, the project
would add 10-12 units to
the island per year,"
Mason said.

"In fact, the master
planning of the project
will provide for con-
trolled growth of the
island in an area where
there will be existing
roads, wastewater treat-
ment and other infra-
structure to handle the
growth."

Critics argue that
Mason is a clever lawyer
who sees an opportunity
to profit from an exclu-
sive, high-demand prod-
uct by catering to a
broader customer base.
The question is whether
this will change the very
dynamics that created the
demand in the first place.
"IT have always been an
advocate of low density
in Hope Town," Chester
Thompson told me. "The
island is a gem where
people can step back in
time and enjoy peace and
quiet. It would be bloody
tragic if this goes
through.”

His comment goes to
the core of a heated argu-

ment over putting big
projects in small commu-
nities. Bimini Bay and
Exuma's Four Seasons
Resort are prime exam-
ples of inappropriate
development, critics say.
It is a model that dates
back to the early years of
the 20th century, and
most examples in the out
islands have failed —
often leaving derelict
buildings and environ-
mental havoc in their
wake.

Treasure Cay on the
main island of Abaco is
a notable exception to
this rule, although it has
taken many years to
achieve stability. It began
in 1957 when Chester
Thompson's late brother,
Leonard, leased 930 acres
of crown land to develop
the resort with American
investors. It opened with
its own airport and mari-
na in 1963 and now fea-
tures 93 rental units, a
commercial centre, golf
course and adjoining res-
idential estates.

Hope Towners don't
want another Treasure
Cay or Boat Harbour on
their island.

But the real elephant in
the room is the Haitian
community that now
occupies the Elbow Cay
Club.

Estimates of the Hait-
ian population range as
high as 600, and most live
at the club.

This mini version of the
Mud is even served by a
Haitian freighter, which
brings in people and
takes away discarded
items and goods of uncer-
tain provenance.

According to Mason,
the club's Haitian ten-
ants, whether they are
legal or not, will be treat-
ed humanely: "Prior to
completion of the pur-
chase, these tenants will
be given proper legal
notice to vacate by the
current owner and the
developers will insist that
the current owner also
help with their reloca-
tion." But no-one can say
why the Haitians are here
in such numbers in the
first place.

In the end, it is in
everyone's interest to
compromise. As former
MP Robert Sweeting told
me over breakfast:
"We've got to find a mid-
dle ground on these
developments. Some peo-
ple who came here 30 or
40 years ago think they
should be the last ones to
come in and do anything.
On the other hand, Hope
Town doesn't really need
this, whereas more
investment is needed on
the mainland."

Following an acrimo-
nious town meeting
recently, the developers
have withdrawn their
application for local plan-
ning approval.

But this was submitted
only as a courtesy in the
first place. All foreign
investment proposals
must be approved by the
National Economic
Council in the first
instance, and then local
councils are asked for
their input.

Perhaps the develop-
ers will use this opportu-
nity to make their pro-
posal more palatable to
the residents of Hope
Town. As Harbour's
Edge proprietor Clay
Wilhoyte put it: "Mr.
Mason has the opportu-
nity to do something
wonderful with this prop-
erty. He should listen to
the suggestions that the
community and others
are giving him."

What do you think?
Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit
www.bahamapundit.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009, PAGE 9



‘Superman’ soars for
fourth in the world

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany —
Leevan “Superman” Sands’
bid for the Bahamas’ first
medal at the IAAP’s 12th
World Championships in Ath-
letics was denied when Cuban
Alexis Copello moved from
fifth on his sixth and final
jump to clinch the bronze last
night at the Olympic Stadium.

Sands, the bronze medallist
in the Olympic Games last
year in Beijing, China, could
taste another medal when he
soared to his second season’s
best leap of 17.32 metres (56-
feet, 10-inches) to trail gold
medallist Phillip Idowu of
Great Britain (17.73 or 58-2)
and silver medallist Nelson
Evora of Portugal (17.55 or
57.7).

But he knew that with two
Cubans still left to jump in the
final round, none of the medal
positions were safe. Sure
enough, it was the medal
Sands was eyeing that was in
jeopardy as Copello's leap of
17.36 (56-11 1/2) spoiled the
show.

"IT really wanted the
medal," said Sands, who came
into the mixed zone where he
was interviewed by the media.
Clinging to his son Leevan III
for some comfort, he said: "I
came so close, but I didn't get
it."

In what had been anticipat-
ed as a birthday party, having
turned 26 on Sunday when he
qualified for the final, Sands
said he will still cherish his
performance here despite not
getting the medal.

He will hold onto the rank-
ing as the fourth best jumper
in the world, one year after
he claimed his first Olympic
medal.

"You know when you want
something so bad and you
really don't get it,” he stated.
"That's how I feel right now.
But I want the Bahamian peo-
ple to know that I went out
there and I gave it my best



LEEVAN SANDS makes an attempt in the final of the triple jump during the World Athletics Championships
in Berlin on Tuesday, August 18, 2009...

shot. It was like a Mike Tyson
fight. We threw a lot of blows,
but in the end, I just fell
short."

Idowu, last year's silver

medallist in Beijing, popped
the gold medal leap of 17.73
or 58-2 for the world's leading
mark on his third attempt as
he surpassed Evora.

Evora, the Olympic cham-
pion, set the stage for what
had promised to be a dramat-
ic showdown when he opened
up with a 57-6 1/2. He

responded to Idowu's leap
with his best of 57-7 on his
last jump.

But after Copello, who
turned 24 on August 12,
stepped it up for the bronze
medal spot, Sands could only
produce 55-9 that kept in
fourth.

"T really wanted this one,
but to finish in fourth ain't
that bad," Sands said. "That
just showed how tough the
competition was out there
tonight. But despite not get-
ting the medal, I still feel
proud of myself."

Copello, speaking through
one of the Cuban interpreters
in the mixed zone, said he was
sorry he passed Sands on the
final jump, but he had a lot
riding on him and his compa-
triot Arnie David Girat, who
finished fifth, to win another
medal for Cuba.

During the fourth round,
Sands was passed by China's
Li Yanxi with his best of 17.23
(56-6 1/2) for the third spot.
But he responded with his
season's best to regain third.
Only this time when Copello
passed him in the sixth, Sands
didn't have the stamina to pull
through with another big
jump.

With his wife Danielle join-
ing him here, Sands said he
will take a couple days to
relax and enjoy the sights of
Berlin. His family will leave
on August 20, but Sands said
he will stay until the end to
cheer on the rest of his team-
mates.

After that, he said he will
return home and start prepar-
ing for a less hectic year that
won't have any major compe-
tition except the Common-
wealth Games that won't be
held until October.

Although he fell short of
another medal, Sands can at
least relish in the fact that he
won the bronze at the 9th
Worlds in Paris Saint-Denis,
France, in 2003 and at the
17th Commonwealth Games
in Manchester, England, in
2002.

ey

FTE
Schedule
TACIT

BERLIN, Germany —
Here’s a look at the sched-
ule for the Bahamians

competing over

the

remainder of the I[AAF’s
12th World Champi-
onships in Athletics:

TODAY

Men’s high jump
qualifying rounds

Trevor Barry, 12th of 15
jumpers in Group A start-
ing at 5:10 am ET

Donald Thomas, 7th of
16 jumpers in Group B
starting at 5:10 am ET

Men’s 110 hurdles

Shamar Sands, lane 4 in

heat 5 at 6:35 am ET

Men’s 400 semifinal

Ramon Miller, lane 5,
heat 1 at 12:15 pm ET

Chris Brown, lane 3,
heat 3 at 12:29 pm ET

Women’s 200
preliminaries
Ferguson-
McKenzie, lane 5, heat 4
at 2:03 pm ET

Sheniqua Ferguson, lane
5, heat 6 at 2:15 pm ET

Debbie

THURSDAY

Men’s 110 hurdles

semifinal
Shamar Sands, starting
at 12:15 pm ET

Women’s 200 semifinal
Ferguson-
McKenzie and Sheniqua
Ferguson, starting at 1:50

Debbie

pm ET

Men’s 110 hurdles final
Shamar Sands, starting
at 2:55 pm ET

FRIDAY

Men’s high jump final

Donald Thomas and
Trevor Barry, starting at
1:15 pm ET

Women’s 200 final

Debbie

Ferguson-
McKenzie and

Sheniqua Ferguson,
starting at 3 pm ET

Men’s 400 final

Chris Brown
Ramon Miller,

starting at 3:20 pm

and

SATURDAY

Women’s 4 x 100 relay
heats @ 12:10 pm ET

Men’s 4 x 400 relay heats
@ 12:55 pm ET

Women’s 4 x 100 relay
final @ 2 pm ET

Women’s 4 x 400 relay
heats @ 2:15 pm ET

SUNDAY

Women’s 4 x 400 relay
final @ 11:50 am ET

Men's 4 x 400 relay final
@ 12:15 pm ET



TEAM BAHAMAS assistant manager Julie Wilson can be seen with Leevan Sands and

SANDS (left) can be seen with Alexis Copello of Cuba, who beat him for the bronze his son, Leevan Ill...



‘Fireman’: ‘They caused me to work hard..:

4




FROM page 11

"That's real good for us. He ran
very well,” Brown said. "This is his
first time in the big event and he
went out there and ran a personal
best. It’s good that he’s going to
make it back. He just has to come
out tomorrow and bring it again.”

In today's semifinal at 12:35 pm
ET, Brown will run out of lane
three in the last of the three heats.
He will be trailing Tabarie Henry of
the British Virgin Islands, who had
the second fastest qualifying time of
45.14 to win heat seven and Aus-
tralian John Steefensen in lane five.

The first three of each heat (Q)
plus the three fastest times (q) will
qualify for the final that is slated
for Friday at 3:20 pm ET.

"I'm just taking it round by
round," said Brown, who wasn't
concerned about his qualifying time.
"I'm hoping to get out there, exe-
cute and run a fast race so that I
can get a good lane for the final
and see how it goes.”

While all the attention is on the
American showdown between
Wariner and Olympic champion
LaShawn Merritt, Brown said he's
looking forward to just going out
there and crashing the party.

As for the relays, which will start
with the qualifying round on Sat-
urday before the final concludes
the championships on Sunday,
Brown said they are looking very
good and as long as everybody stays
healthy, they should win another
medal.

-——

MICHAEL MATHIEU (centre) crossed the line sixth in heat three in 46.41, but was later disqualified for stepping on the line...
(TOP RIGHT) - Chris Brown (right) competes in the preliminary rounds of the 400m yesterday...



PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Bolt through

to 200 semis

By RAF CASERT
AP Sports Writer

BERLIN (AP) — Looking for his
second gold medal of the world cham-
pionships, Usain Bolt jogged across the
line Tuesday to advance to the semifi-
nals of the 200 meters.

Two days after setting a world record
of 9.58 seconds to win the 100, the
Olympic 200 champion ran a good curve
and coasted through the final straight to
finish in 20.41 seconds, a full 1.11 sec-
onds behind his world record.

In the absence of injured defending
champion Tyson Gay, Bolt is the over-
whelming favourite for gold. He said
he would try to get a second world
record at the championships, too.

“Tl be running hard,” Bolt said.

The Jamaican set a record of 19.30
seconds at the Beijing Olympics, wide-
ly considered one of the toughest to
beat in the sport.

“Tm just trying to get through the
rounds. That’s my aim,” Bolt said. “?’m
trying to do it round by round like last
year. Then I'll go to the finals and just
execute.”




Celebrating and showboating after
winning the 100 on Sunday, he was short
on antics this time.

Blame it on fatigue since he had to be
in the stadium early Tuesday for the
first heat.

“Tm feeling a little tired, but noth-
ing a good night’s rest won’t cure,” Bolt
said after his sixth race in four days.

Jamaican teammate Steve Mullings
had the best qualifying time, winning
his heat in 20.23.

Shawn Crawford was third in 20.37,
with American teammate Wallace
Spearmon also easily advancing.

The US team needs to change some-
thing quick to challenge the Jamaicans
for sprint supremacy at the champi-
onships. They lost 5-0 in Olympic titles
at the Beijing Games and are already 2-
0 behind after the 100s. The specter of
another rout is looming ever larger,
especially with Gay out for the 200 and
doubtful for the relays.

The final for the 200 is set for Thurs-
day. Bolt is also favoured to lead
Jamaica to a sprint relay gold on Satur-
day to equal his feat of three golds at the
Olympics.

NATHANIEL McKINNEY (far right) competes in the 200m yesterday...

[>

Save BIG Right Now!

2009 FORD MUSTANG

4.0L Automatic - LOADED 4 &

3 years or 36,000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside assistant, 3 years rust protections
warranty and licensed and inspected up to birthday.

NOW THAT'S REALLY A $3] |(@SDeal

FRIENDLY MOTORS CO, LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 » FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com

a,
<=
eI
oC
=
=
=
o
s
=





USAIN BOLT gestures prior to a 200m 2nd round heat during the World
Championships in Berlin Tuesday, August 18, 2009...

McKinney places

fourth in heat

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany —
Nathaniel McKinney’s step
down from the 400 to the
200m didn’t pay off for him
at all during the IAAF’s
12th World Championships
in Athletics.

On the same day yester-
day at the Olympic Stadium
when the preliminaries of
the 400 was contested, McK-
inney’s bid at the 200 didn't
last long as he could only
run 21.26 seconds for fourth
place in his heat.

While only the first three
in each heat and the next
five fastest times advanced
to the second round during
the evening session, he fin-
ished 42nd out of a field of
60 competitors.

The event took place two
days after the stunning
world record performance
by Jamaican Usain Bolt,
who is also doubling up for
another sweep of the sprints
as he did at the Olympic
Games last year.

McKinney, who hasn’t
competed since May 9 in
Athens, Georgia, where he
qualified for the Worlds
with a personal best of
20.67, said his first race was
a blowout.

"Tt was just something to
play,” said McKinney, who
noted that he hasn’t given
up running the 400 as yet.
"It was cool.”

After getting out toa
quick start with the pack,
McKinney came off the final
bend in lane three in con-
tention but he wasn't able to
stay with the field on the
straight-away. The race was
eventually won by Marion
Davonish of Great Britain in
20.92.

"The 200 is a combination
of speed and endurance,” he
pointed out. "I tried to stay
in it, but my body was kind
of cold and I didn't have it.
Maybe if I had a few more

Finishes 42nd
out of 60
runners

races, I would have been
sharper. It would have been
just like a normal run."

But McKinney added that
the 200 is not a normal run
for him and he now knows
how legitimate sprinters
feel. But he intends to work
a little more on his speed
because he definitely has the
endurance as a result of run-
ning the one-lap races.

Now that his individual
pursuits are over, McKinney
said he will remain in the
Games Village and train in
case the coaching staff calls
upon him to run on the 4x
400 relay team in the prelim-
inaries on Saturday.

The team is now minus
Andretti Bain, who left
Berlin yesterday and headed
back home via the United
States after he suffered a
recurring injury at the train-
ing camp, forcing him to
shut down the rest of his
season.

It was the same fate as
Grand Bahamian Andrae
Williams, who shut it down
just before the BAAA offi-
cially named the team prior
to leaving town for the train-
ing camp in Berlin.

Bain is the second athlete
to have left the Games Vil-
lage. The first was sprinter
Derrick Atkins, who depart-
ed on Sunday after he failed
to advance out of the first
round of the men's 100 on
Saturday.

McKinney, who has ran
on the men's 4x 400 relay
team at both the Olympics
and Worlds, is expected to
join Chris Brown, Ramon
Miller, Michael Mathieu,
Avard Moncur and Latoy
Williams in the pool for the
4x 4 relay.



NATHANIEL McKINNEY leaves the track after the race...





Jamaicans
Cleared of
loping eligible
lo compete

BERLIN (AP) — The five
Jamaican runners provision-
ally cleared of doping are eli-
gible to run at the world
championships, leaving a final
decision to the Jamaican fed-
eration.

IAAF secretary general
Pierre Weiss says Jamaica’s
Anti-Doping Commission will
not rule on their fate until
after the championships end
Sunday. That means they can
compete at worlds.

The five — Yohan Blake,
Sheri-Ann Brooks, Allodin
Fothergill, Lansford Spence
and Marvin Anderson —
could run in the relays, where
Jamaica is a medal favorite.

Weiss said the IAAF did
not have the power to sus-
pend the athletes without a
ruling from JADCO.

But he added if they’re
found guilty of doping, they’d
be stripped of any medals
won at worlds.

SANYA RICHARDS (left) is
hugged by Jamaica's silver
medal winner Shericka Williams
after Richards won gold in the
400m final yesterday

(AP Photo: David J Phillip)

Richards

wins 400
with world
leading time

By RAF CASERT
AP Sports Writer

BERLIN (AP) — Sanya
Richards shook off years of
disappointment with her first
major title in the 400 meters,
pumping her fist after crossing
the line at the world champi-
onships.

Her main rival, Olympic
champion Christine Ohu-
ruogu of Britain, was back in
fifth. And for Shericka
Williams of Jamaica, it was
silver again.

With a time of 49.00 sec-
onds, Richards also set the
fastest mark of the year. She
was 0.32 seconds faster than
Williams. Antonina
Krivoshapka of Russia took
bronze.

In the shadows of the Usain
Bolt vs. Tyson Gay show-
down, this duel was nearly as
good.

From Lane 3, Richards
always had a good look at
Ohuruogu’s Lane 7 and she
caught up with her over the
first 300 meters. Then she
only had to focus on the fin-
ishing line.

In Beijing last year,
Richards faltered over the last
50 meters and Ohuruogu
won. Not so this year.

The American crossed the
line with her arms raised in
celebration, showing utter dis-
belief that so many failures
finally ended in victory.

With a grin on her face, she
danced a little number for
screaming fans. It also was
great news for the struggling
U.S. team, which had been
unable to keep Jamaica from
celebrating in the sprint
events.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays







p — f

PAGE 11



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19,





2009




PAGE 9 ® Schedule of events for IAAF Worlds...





By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — Claiming
that hardly anybody is taking him
seriously, NAIA 400 metres cham-
pion Ramon Miller said he's going
to go out and make believers of
everybody in his initial appearance
at the IAAF's 12th World Champi-
onships in Athletics.

Yesterday morning in the pre-
liminaries of the 400 metres, Miller
did just that as he powered to the
fastest qualifying time in the fifth
of seven heats in a personal best
time of 45.00 seconds.

"First of all, I have to thank the
Lord because without him in my
life, I wouldn't be here," said Miller,
who joined Chris “Fireman” Brown
as the only two Bahamians to
advance to the semifinal today at
the Olympic Stadium.

"Today, I just went out and did
what I had to do. I've been training
since last October and now this is
my reward at the Berlin Games. At
home, everybody have me as the
underdog, saying that this is a little
chunk. But I’m blocking all of that
out and I will just continue to per-
form here."

The 22-year-old BAAA national
runner-up who came into the cham-
pionships with both a PR and sea-
sonal best of 45.35 posted when he
won the NAIA title for the second
consecutive year, said he's just
delighted to be competing at his
best on the biggest stage in track
and field in the world.

"I'm just going to go out there
and execute my race to the fullest,"
he said. "That's all I have to do.
This is where it counts. This is the
big games, so I want to go out there
and qualify for the final. I feel I can
do it."

By virtue of his fast qualifying
time, Miller has drawn lane five in

‘Superman’
soars for
fourth in

the world...
See page 9




ia hy

aac



RAMON MILLER (far right) and United States’ Gil Roberts compete in a 400m heat during the World Athletics Championships in Berlin yesterday...

the first of three semifinals today
at 12:15 pm ET. He will be sand-
wiched between defending cham-
pion Jeremy Wariner of the United
States in lane four and David Gillick

of Ireland in six.

Brown, the 30-year-old national
champion, has drawn lane three in
the last of the three heats at 12:29
pm ET. He will have to contend

with John Steffensen of Australia,
who is in lane five and Jamaican
Ricardo Chambers in lane seven.
Michael Mathieu, the other
Bahamian competing in the field of

53 competitors, had ran 46.41 for
sixth place in the second heat, but
the 25-year-old Grand Bahamian
was disqualified for stepping on the
line.

Michael Sohn/AP



COVERAGE

y¥OUR CONNECTION-TO THE WORLD

‘Fireman’: ‘They caused
me to work hard...’

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — Every time he
lines up in the preliminary rounds, Chris
“Fireman” Brown says his competitors
make him work a little harder than he
expected.

There was no difference yesterday as
he competed out of the third of seven
heats in the preliminary rounds of the
men's 400 metres at the [AAF's 12th
World Championships in Athletics. He
had to hold off the field down the stretch
to stop the clock in 45.53 seconds.

Running out of lane two, Brown made
the stagger up early and was ahead on
the back stretch. But coming off the final
curve, he had to contain with Great
Britain's Michael Bingham (45.54) and
Australia's Joel Milburn (45.56), who
both chased him right through the finish
line.

"T just have to give the Lord praise

TH

BERLIN

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

’m lovin’ it

¢ Chris Brown heads to semis
e Mathieu finishes sixth in heat but
disqualified for stepping on line

and credit," Brown said. "I was hoping
that I didn't have to work so hard, but I
just didn't execute the way I wanted to.
They caused me to work hard. But [just
want to thank the Lord for the victory.

"Being in lane two, you have to work.
Lane two is not one of my favourites.
Nor do I like lane seven or eight. But
any lane at the Worlds is better than no
lane at all."

His time was listed as the 11th fastest,
just ahead of defending champion Jere-
my Wariner of the United States, who
won heat six in 45.54.

Brown, a fourth place finisher in the
last two Worlds in Osaka, Japan (2007)

and Helsinki, Finland (2005), as well as
the Olympic Games (last year in Bei-
jing, China), had to give up the Bahami-
an spotlight yesterday to team-mate
Ramon Miller.

Brown, who turns 31 on October 15,
watched as 22-year-old Miller surged to
the top of the qualifying charts with a
personal best of 45.00, easily winning
heat five. Both of their performances
came after 25-year-old Grand Bahamian
Michael Mathieu crossed the line sixth in
heat three in 46.41, but was later dis-
qualified for stepping on the line.

SEE page 9





PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Bannister
FROM page one

Cabinet ministers, with Mr
Bannister stepping down
from his post as Minister to
return full time to his pve
law practice and current
Attorney General Michael
Barnett possibly filling the

shoes of departing Chief Jus-

tice Sir Burton Hall.

This would leave open two

vacancies in the Cabinet.

Both Mr Bannister and Mr
Barnett have remained tight- :
lipped on the claims since }

they surfaced last week.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, who would also ;
be in a position to confirm }

or deny the speculation,

returned to Nassau yester- }
day from vacation, but was :
to leave for Atlanta this }
afternoon for the opening of }

a consular office there.

On Sunday a political }
insider told The Tribune: “I }
think Mr Bannister has been }
wanting to get out for quite }
some time. I think he’s been }
pleading that his practice has }
been suffering and so he just }
needs to get back in the pri- ;
vate sector — and he said }
(previously) that he only :
wanted to stay around for }
two years and I think he }

wants to go.”

Sentence
FROM page one

denied killing Mr Dean, a

resident of Quakoo Street,
claiming it was his cousin,

alleged hit man Samuel
Mouche McKenzie who }

fired the fatal shot.

Supreme Court Justice }
Stephen Isaacs sentenced }
James McKenzie to 35 years }

in prison.

McKenzie was repre- }
sented by attorney Richard
Bootle. Deputy Director of }
Public Prosecutions Cheryl }
Grant-Bethel was the pros- }
ecutor. The prosecution had }
sought the death penalty for }
McKenzie or 60 years }

imprisonment.

LOCAL NEWS

Bahamians employed on
Nassau Harbour project

By KATHRYN CAMPBELL

NINETY-FIVE Bahamians are
presently employed in the Nassau
Harbour Port Improvement Pro-
ject on jobs including welding,
equipment operation, technical
support, and administration, gov-
ernment project engineer Robert
Garraway Said.

The harbour project is being car-
ried out to accommodate the new
mega Genesis Class cruise ships —
one of which, the “Oasis of the
Seas”, is expected in Nassau in
December on its maiden voyage.

Public Works and Transport
Minister Neko Grant said the har-
bour project, among others, is “in
keeping with the government’s
medium term response to the
financial crisis.

“In light of this global economic
downturn it was decided by the
government that the projects
should be implemented with a dual
intent.

“They are designed to provide
employment for Bahamians while
simultaneously upgrading infra-
structure in preparation for the
future economic upturn,” he said.

On April 2, the government and
Boskalis International, a Nether-
lands based dredging company,
signed a $4.2 million contract to
dredge 1.9 million cubic yards of
material from Nassau Harbour.

The work also includes the con-
struction of three mooring dolphins
at Prince George Wharf and the
1,000 feet extension of the west-
ern end of Arawak Cay using the
dredged material and sheet piles.

The remainder of the dredged
material will be stockpiled on
Arawak Cay to be used in future
government projects.

Dredging work officially began
on the weekend.

¥% The d’Albenas Agency Ltd.

Madeira St., Palmdale
Nassau, BAHAMAS
Tel: 242-322-1441



The power you’ve always trusted.
Kills flying and crawling insects
with a long lasting effect.

A FAMILY COMPANY





ABOVE: BAHAMIAN work-
ers at Arawak Cay are pic-
tured welding pipes being
used to dredge the har-
bour.

LEFT: BAHAMIAN workers
are installing steel sheet
piles on the 1,000-foot
Arawak Cay extension, a
part of the Nassau Harbour
Port Improvement Project.

Letisha Henderson/BIS

Marital rape law

FROM page one

The present law in the
Bahamas defines rape as an act
of any person not under 14
years of age having sex with
another person who is not his
spouse without the consent of
that other person; without con-
sent that had been extorted by
threats or fear of bodily harm;
with consent obtained by
impersonating the spouse of the
other person; or with consent
obtained by false and fraudu-
lent representations as to the
nature and quality of the act.

The proposed amendment
would omit the words "who is
not his spouse" in essence mak-
ing it illegal for any person to
have sex with another without
consent — regardless if they
are married or not.

Under the current law, rape
can only occur in a marriage if
the couple is legally separated.

Some local religious leaders
have argued that a man cannot
rape his wife claiming the Bible
dictates that a wife must physi-
cally submit to her husband.

Controversial pastor Cedric
Moss has vocally opposed the
legislation claiming the amend-
ment would create a "society
of rapists." Citing the "word of
God", Mr Moss argued that
rape cannot be committed in
marriage because the couple
gave each other authority over
the other's body and agreed to
open-ended sexual consent in
the marriage contract.

He argued that including
spouses as potential rapists
would contradict the sacrament
of marriage.

"But can it be right to bring
married people under such a
law designed for unmarried
people? No, and a thousand
times, no! It is not right and it
can never be right to bring all
married couples under this def-
inition of rape whereby
moment by moment consent is
required for every stage of
every act of sexual intercourse.

"Each day you will be a
potential rapist in your own
home if you initiate sex with
your wife without her consent,"
he told the Rotary Club of
West Nassau earlier this month.

Other opponents believe the
proposed change will devastate
marriages and families in this
country and say more discus-
sion is needed before the
amendment is signed into law.

Women's rights advocates
hit back saying rape is rape and
that a wife should have the
right to tell her husband "No"
to sex in order to defend herself
from an abusive or promiscuous
husband.

In its 2008 Human Rights
Reports on the Bahamas, the
United Nations noted that
while rape is considered illegal
in this country the current law
does not address spousal rape.

"Violence against women
continued to be a serious, wide-
spread problem. The law pro-
hibits domestic violence, and
the government generally
enforced the law. However,
domestic violence laws do not
provide penalties separate from
other crimes of assault and bat-
tery and do not

effectively criminalize sexual
violence within a marriage,”
said the report.

The report said that the
RBPF dealt with 114 reported
rapes last year, a decrease from
136 in 2007.

¢ SEE EDITORIAL ON
PAGE FOUR

Hurricane
FROM page one

The US National Hurricane
Centre, in its update at 5pm
yesterday, said Bill was
approaching major hurricane
status with the centre of the
storm located about 635 miles
east of the Leeward Islands.

Bill was moving toward the
west-northwest at near
lomph, and this motion was
expected to continue last
night, followed by a turn
toward the north-west today.
On this track, it will pass well
to the north-east of the
Bahamas on Friday and Sat-
urday.

The storm’s maximum sus-
tained winds were at 110mph
with higher gusts last night.

Police Constable

FROM page one

trate Carolita Bethel in Court
8, Bank Lane, opted to have
the case heard in Magistrate’s
Court. He pleaded not guilty
to the charges.

The prosecution raised no
objection to bail which was
granted in the sum of $7,500.

Bonaby, of Zion Boule-
vard, was ordered not to have
any contact with the com-
plainant. He was also told to
report to the East Street
South police station every
Saturday before 6pm.

The case was adjourned to
Monday, August 24, and
transferred to Court 11, Nas-
sau Street.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM









By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he company that

proposed to sup-

ply the Bahamas

Electricity Corpo-

ration (BEC) with

liquefied natural gas (LNG) has
sold the lease to its proposed
terminal site to a Bahamian-
incorporated company, Tribune
Business can reveal, although
it has not completely aban-
doned its plans for this nation.
AES Corporation’s decision
to sell the lease to its proposed
LNG terminal site on Ocean
Cay, a man-made island near
Bimini, was yesterday said by
sources familiar with the situa-
tion to have been a move
designed to minimise the con-
siderable costs it had already

THE TRIBUNE

sine

WEDNESDAY,



AUGUST

19,



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

LNG supplier sells
project lease rights

* But deal does not mean AES has
walked away from Bahamas
* Agreement has re-lease option if
government gives approval, with
Bahamian buyer planning to
re-start aragonite mining

incurred in what has been, to
date, a fruitless eight-year wait
for successive Bahamian gov-
ernments to approve its pro-
ject.

However, Tribune Business
can reveal that although the
Ocean Cay lease has been sold,
AES has not completely
walked away from the Bahamas
and its proposed Ocean

Express project. It is under-
stood that the deal includes an
option for the US energy giant
to re-lease part of Ocean Cay
should the Government finally
give approval for the project.
“AES has spent a tremen-
dous amount of money in trying
to conduct an LNG project on
Ocean Cay,” one source, who
requested anonymity, said yes-

terday. “They have disposed of
the rights to the island, Ocean
Cay. They decided to sell the
lease to the island to a company
which has agreed that, if the
Government gives permission
for the project, AES will re-
lease a portion of it.”

The lease sale was said by
sources to have been completed
within the last several months,
with the buyer being a Bahami-
an-incorporated company ben-
eficially owned by a Bahamian
citizen.

Tribune Business under-
stands that the buyer is
Bahamian investor Tony
Myers. Sources said he was
planning to team up with for-
eign investors to form a com-
pany that will re-start aragonite

SEE page 6B

Contractors work for 10 per cent less profit

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN contractors are taking cuts
in profit and overhead of up to 10 per cent
just to ensure they secure work in a slump-
ing economy, the Bahamian Contractors
Association’s (BCA) president said yes-
terday, describing the industry as being in a
“buyers market” favouring consumers.

Stephen Wrinkle, who heads his own
construction business, Wrinkle Develop-
ment, said that while the Government’s
various capital works projects were set to
“pick up the slack” for what was a slug-
gish industry, private sector projects also

Corporation ‘to
be in arrears’ for
2009 remainder

needed to rebound in number for a full
revival to take place.

“The contractors are taking the work at
less mark-up to keep the business going,”
Mr Wrinkle told Tribune Business. “Con-
tractors are taking the work for less profit
and less overhead.

“Just in the bid work we’ve seen, it could
be 10 per cent. But if you’re building a
$300,000 house, that’s $300,000.”

Mr Wrinkle described the commercial
construction market, which constitutes pro-
jects such as new office buildings, as “very
slow, with little going on”.

However, there was still activity in the
private homeowners market, with persons

who had already purchased lots and
obtained financing exploiting the weak con-
struction market and reduced building
materials prices to make progress in devel-
oping their own homes.

The BCA president added: “While gen-
erally speaking the market is very soft,
there are isolated cases of success, and peo-
ple are taking what they can get until things
improve. Right now, it’s a buyers market.
Most of the large contractors have a pro-
ject, but very few have multiple projects....

“Government work is picking up a lot
of slack and is holding the industry togeth-

SEE page 6B

ROYAL B FIDELITY

Lela nel

RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Water & Sewerage
Corporation “expects to be in
arrears” on payments to its
major, BISX-listed reverse
osmosis supplier for the
remainder of 2009, Tribune
Business can confirm, despite
making an $8.7 million payment
on the outstanding balance dur-
ing this year’s second quarter.

Consolidated Water, in its
latest 10-Q filing with the Secu-
rities & Exchange Commission
(SEC), said this payment had
reduced the Government-
owned Corporation’s debt to it
to $4.7 million as at end-June
2009, although it continued to
warn investors that its Bahami-

















The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

Water & Sewerage still
owing $4.7m to BISX-listed
Consolidated Water, main
reverse osmosis supplier,
despite $8.7m payment

an subsidiary faced liquidity
issues as a result of payment
issues.

Acknowledging that it had
“experienced significant delays
in the receipt of payments” on
the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration’s since early 2008, Con-
solidated Water said it had held
its last meeting on the issue
with government and Corpora-

SEE page 6B

Cable profits
flat in 09’ Q2

By CHESTER ROABRDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

CABLE BAHAMAS net
income for the 2009 half-year
increased 15.35 per cent to
$14.89 million, compared to
$12.904 million the previous
year, although the second quar-
ter was almost flat at $7.438
million.

Despite total year-to-date
revenues reaching $42 million
in the 2009 second quarter, a 4
per cent increase compared to

SEE page 6B

er la
r

er

ONLY

ROYAL FIDELITY

De ema

PTA ee me eg
NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com

PROJECT MANAGER Iram Lewis (second right) shows Minister
Phenton Neymour how deep the foundations had to be dug.
Photo by Felipé Major/Tribune Staff

Stadium’s $12-$18m
construction boost

By CHESTER ROABRDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE ERECTION of the Bahamas National Stadium will
pump $12 to $18 million into Bahamian construction mate-
rials suppliers, a Chinese project manager said yesterday,
while the overall cost of the project has grown since it broke
ground.

Yiging Sun, the technical manager for the stadium project,
said some minor changes have been made to the stadium
plans which could raise the cost of building the facility.

“With the development of
SEE page 6B

time maybe we will have a lit-



Where do you want to be? > ®inounecueueus

We can get you there!

eek
Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

BARBADOS
St. Michael: 246.435.1955

royalfidelity.com

| Comprehensive Pension Plans

[ Learn more at royalfidelity.com |

ROYAL FIDELITY

AEM old



ey SALE

MEAD Block & White Crayola Crayons Student Proj

200 page
‘(Composition (Books

9541400.

Sto

Beal

ons al
95 9."
35.939

in TODAY and LOOK for the
BOSS Target for MORE great DEALS!

ect Boards Washable Markers

Tel: 394-5656
Me] e all Piel Chel Gget sat
www.bossbahamas.com



PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

THE TRBUNE





Airline industry could nosedive on fee rises

AT 11:41am on June 26,
2009, the operators of 23
Bahamas-based private airline
companies received an e-mail
from the Bahamas Civil Avia-
tion Department that threw
them into a collective tailspin,
or at least a ground loop. They
were told that the new fee reg-
ulations gazetted in May 2005
would now come into effect
on August 1, 2009, but that
“official notification will be
forwarded to you within the
coming week”.

Nothing happened.

Then, at 12:54pm on July 3,
they received a similar e-mail
to say that the effective date
was changed to September 10,
2009, again with notification
to follow within a week.

No notification was
received, leaving uncertainty.

The new fees covered by the
2005 regulations could, if
enforced as written, drive a
dagger into the heart of al pri-
vately-owned airline compa-
nies in the Bahamas. This
would include not only the
larger ones providing sched-
uled service throughout the
country, such as Sky Bahamas,
Western Air, Southern Air,
Cat Island Air and Pineapple
Air, but also the smaller ones
providing charter flights.

I recently spent a couple of
hours with Captain Randy
Butler, chief executive and
principal owner of Sky
Bahamas, so he could explain
to me the background of these




fees and their impact on his
business. We met in his office
on Blake Road, lined with
diplomas he received for the
various courses given by
IATA, the International Air
Transport Association. Holder
of a US airline transport pilot
certificate, Captain Butler has
seen both sides of the coin.
Until last year he served as
Aviation Safety Inspector for
the Bahamas, a top job in civ-
il aviation. Last summer, with
a few friends, he bought the
ailing Sky Bahamas and began
to turn it around, heading for
break-even at present. “I knew
all about the technical side,”
he told me. “I’m still learning
the business side.” He’s helped
by a full-time chief financial
officer.

The new fee structure was
officially enacted in 2005 by
regulations under The Avia-
tion Act, radically revising the
previous 1985 schedule. But
these regulations were never
brought into force. Section 11
of the regulations requires
advance discussion with the
industry. It demands “consul-
tation with airport users before
significant changes in the
charging system or level of
charges”. But, since no con-
sultation was ever held, the
new fees were held in
abeyance — until the recent
communications announcing
their abrupt enforcement,
again without consultation.

Captain Butler handed me a

by Richard Coulson



copy of the 2005 document, so
I could peruse the many pages
of technical verbiage and rate
schedules. To a layman, they
look baffling in their com-
plexity. Existing fees are not
simply increased, but whole
new categories - never charged
before - are created. It seems
every possible activity now
carries a fee — registration of
aircraft and the company itself,
landing fees at Bahamian air-
ports, pilot licensing fees, bag-
gage handling and inspection
fees, passenger fees, security
fees —on and on. Captain But-
ler and his financial staff are
now engaged in calculations
to determine precisely how
these new charges will affect
their operating costs. He is cer-
tain that fare increases will be
inevitable, raising, for exam-
ple, the present $160 round-
trip rare to Georgetown, Exu-
ma.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu. bs

LATE REGISTRATION

Late Registration for Fall 2009 is scheduled for
August 25-26, 2009 from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
in the Records Department, ground floor, Portia
Smith Student Services Centre.


























ENTER 10 WIN! |





















_ ONE WINNER EVERY WEEK!
Don't miss out on your chance of a - 6
stainless steel gas grills and large ice chest.


















HOW TO PARTICIPATE:

1. BUY any TWO panticipating® Kraft or Nabiseo
prodects betwoen July 16 amd August 27, 2009,
2 Visit official Kraft Grillin’ and Chillin’ display at

all participating stores.

4, Fillowt official entry form and attach original

QrOcery store receipt.

4, DEPOSIT entry form im entry hoses located at
participating stores; The d'Albenas Agency Ltd
in Palmdabe or Parity Bakery om Market &

MicPhenon Streets.

5. Entries must be received by August 27, 2009

To qualify, you must answer the skill question:
Who Sells The Cheesiest: Mac & Cheese?

* OSCAR MAYER Hat Daays any variety

= ERAN Singles any variety

* UU BBQ Sauces Hoo ov Larger, any variety
= ERAN Mayo Wor er larger, any variety

Combest ends August 27, 2009

© RAPT Mae & Chasse 725 09

= RAGS) Bitz Crackers (har. apy variety

Ciwtrituted in the Batam by

# The dAlbenas Agency Lte.
Palmdale, 322-1441

* OED Chocolate Sandwith Cookies 1Bae, any vacety
= OUPS AO Cbonolate Chip Cookies tor, ary variety

(PURITY)
t RY)
Morte 6 Schaerer Bin

302-3000

Lmplosces of The 7 Mesa: Ageac and Media Enterprise: or tein imei te Paraiies are mot eligible bo eater the anes,

KRAFT Grillin’ & Chillin’

Name:
Address:

Phone:
Who sells “The Cheesiest”. Mac & Cheese?

Operating costs are already
substantial. Sky Bahamas flies
three 33-seater Saab 340s, and
a back-up 19-seater
Beechcraft, all of which
require meticulous servicing
at the company’s Nassau
hangar, where the mainte-
nance staff pay runs up to
$55,000 per annum. They fly
scheduled service to Freeport,
Georgetown, Marsh Harbour,
Bimini, and, recently, Cat
Island — over 12 flights daily.
On-demand charters are also
flown to Florida and Cap Hai-
tien, Haiti. To provide unin-
terrupted service, Captain But-
ler hires 15 licensed pilots,
whose pay ranges from
$35,000 to $55,000 depending
on experience; all but one are
Bahamian. When to these
expenses are added fuel, office
and counter staff, insurance,
etc., one appreciates that the
company is already operating
on a tight margin.

Competition is an ever-pre-
sent factor. On his principal
routes, Captain Butler faces
the Government-owned carri-
er Bahamasair, as well as the
private Western Air, based in
Andros with a slightly larger
fleet, because of their frequent
flights to that island and
Freeport. Of course, Bahama-
sair alone could not possibly
satisfy the demand from all the
destinations. To Georgetown,
for example, SkyBahamas
operates its three daily round-
trips at an average capacity
factor of about 75 per cent,
flying head-to-head against its
two competitors.

Captain Butler is fortunate
that the current recession, so
problematic for US airlines,
has not substantially affected
Bahamian inter-island traffic,
since most of the travellers are
Bahamian citizens, not visit-
ing tourists. His company is
well known for not squeezing
the last dollar out of the traffic.
They offer free trips for first-
time students, and often waive
fares for indigent passengers
travelling for hospital service.
Once, when unfortunately
delayed five hours on a return
to Nassau, the passengers
including this writer were met
by a SkyBahamas agent who
immediately gave us free
round-trip tickets good for 90
days — a nicety I have never
seen Bahamasair offer.

The new fee charges
technically will apply to
Bahamasair’s domestic flights
equally with the private com-
panies. But from his long
experience in Civil Aviation,
Captain Butler is well aware
that the Government carrier
is given considerable leeway
in making prompt payment,
while the private firms must
pay with a bank cashier’s
cheque on the due date or suf-
fer penalties and sanctions.
Together with the foreign air-
lines, our national flag carrier
enjoys another advantage: it
can import accessories, parts
and instruments exempt from
the Customs duties paid by its
privately-owned competitors.
The fear is that Bahamasair
will simply be able to absorb
the fee increases into its large,

ROYAL FIDELITY

WC acme 4

RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

We are growing!
Royal Fidelity invites applications for the position of:

- Vice President, Corporate Finance -

Reporting directly to the President, the successful
applicant will be responsible for:

Management and development of Corporate

Finance business in Bahamas
Monitoring and oversight of investment
management activities in both Bahamas and

Barbados markets

Business development across all business lines
Public speaking engagements

Requirements:

Bachelors or equivalent degree in finance
A minimum of 15 years experience in an
investment bank, preferably with international

experience

Strong interpersonal, oral and written
communications skills

Proven ability to innovate and develop

new product and services

Willingness and ability to travel frequently
around the Caribbean

Excellent marketing and communications skills

HUMAN RESOURCES
Re: VP, Corporate Finance

PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE
August 28", 2009 to:

51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau

ABSOLUTELY NO
PHONE CALLS

F: 328.1108
careers@fidelitybahamas.com

existing Government-sub-
sidised losses, while the more
tightly run investor-owned
companies will have to raise
fares to stay alive, putting
them at a competitive disad-
vantage.

Captain Butler asks what
the vastly increased fees are
to be used for? The minister
has spoken in vague general
terms about financing
improved services and airport
facilities, particularly in the
Family Islands. There is sup-
posed to be an overall “plan”
under the current Air Trans-
port Improvement Pro-
gramme, being funded by the
Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB). Apparently, the
Bahamas is at risk of losing its
essential Category I Classifi-
cation under the Federal Avi-
ation Agency’s Safety Pro-
gramme. But he has never
seen a copy of this plan or had
an explanation of its contents.
To the contrary, he believes
the Government could actu-
ally save money by downgrad-
ing some of the 18 port-of-
entry airports (with full
inbound Customs and Immi-
gration and facilities). He
questions why Treasure Cay,
just 40 miles from Marsh Har-
bour, needs this status, and
why Andros and Eleuthera
each need three of these
expensive terminals. The
downgraded airports could still
be used for domestic flights
from Nassau. He points out
that travellers to many inter-
national resorts think nothing
of an hour or more drive to
their destination. And Captain
Butler questions whether the
new fee regime would comply
with the Policies on Airport
and Air Navigation Charges
created by ICAO, the Inter-
national Civil Aviation Organ-
isation.

Finally, he asks, why does
Government not take over
control of our own air space
from the Flight Information
Region administered by the
US FAA? Under the present
arrangement every flight over
our own territory, even to and
from local airports, is never-
theless billed a fixed fee
payable to the US Govern-
ment, totaling about $1,700
per month for SkyBahamas.
If we assumed jurisdiction
over our air space, as have oth-
er Caribbean nations, not only
could we collect over-flight
fees from many foreign air-
lines, but Bahamians could be
taught new employment skills
in running the programme.

Most of Captain Butler’s
views are shared by Rex Rolle,
owner and chief executive of
Western Airlines. In a tele-
phone call to him at his com-
pany’s operations base in San
Andros, he confirmed his con-
cerns over the proposed new
fee structure. A pretty loose
trade association featuring all
the private airline companies is
now being tightened up to car-
ry out intensive negotiations
with experts at Civil Aviation
to alleviate the harsh effects
of regulations hastily written
back in 2005, before the due
date of September 10.

It would certainly be unfor-
tunate if private-sector entre-
preneurs in the airline busi-
ness, providing an essential
service with unquestioned
safety and marketing records,
were driven to the wall so that
the Government carrier, with
its bloated financial structure,
be allowed to survive. This
may not be the stated purpose
of the new fee regulations, but
it might be their actual effect.



< NAT

ANCE

The National Insurance Board

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas





Request for Contractors Pre-Qualification

The National Insurance Board (NIB) is seeking to pre-qualify contractors to bid on
works to complete the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre - Robert Smith Child ¢» Adolescents
and Special Education Unit, Fox Hill, Nassau, Bahamas; the project is a joint venture of
NIB and The Bahamas Government. Contractors must be in compliance with the
National Insurance Act (social security programme), and in good standing with the
relevant Government agencies.

Pre-qualification documents may be collected from the Security Booth at NIB’s
Clifford Darling Complex, Blue Hill Road, from August 14 to August 21, 2009.

Pre-Qualification documents should be signed, sealed and dropped in the pre-
qualification box at the Security Booth, Clifford Darling Complex on or before
12:00 Noon on August 21, 2009.









THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009, PAGE 3B





Scotiabank
settles $45m
resort suit

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SCOTIABANK (Bahamas)
and the developers of a $250
million Bahamian-based
resort development now in
receivership have agreed to
end their eight-month long
legal battle in the Florida
courts, Tribune Business can
reveal.

The Bahamian bank and
Chub Cay Club principals,
Walter McCrory and Bob
Moss, on Friday filed in the
US district court for southern
Florida a motion to “volun-
tarily dismiss” the action Sco-
tiabank (Bahamas) initiated
on December 23, 2008. It now
only awaits the agreement and
sign-off by US district judge,
William Zloch.

The Stipulation of Volun-
tary Dismissal without Preju-
dice, which has been obtained
by Tribune Business, states
that both sides “voluntarily
stipulate and agree to dismiss
this action, together with all
of their respective claims,
causes of action, counterclaims
and defences, without preju-
dice”.

Scotiabank (Bahamas) had
initiated the legal proceedings
in a bid to call in an alleged $4
million loan guarantee made
by Messrs McCrory and Moss,
plus their late partner Kaye
Pearson, after the trio default-
ed on repayments to the bank
over a $45 million loan it
granted to finance Chub Cay’s
construction.

The bank, in its lawsuit,
alleged that the trio had guar-
anteed the “financing for the
development of vacation resi-
dences, a marina, a clubhouse
and related improvements for
more than 800 acres on Chub
Cay in the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas”.

Scotiabank (Bahamas)
alleged that the trio owed
$44.010 million in unpaid prin-
cipal on the July 28, 2006,
loan, plus interest, cost and
expenses, including attorneys’
fees.

The bank also alleged that
the three developer principals
had guaranteed that construc-
tion work on Chub Cay would
be completed by December
31, 2007, a deadline that had
been missed. Some $38.6 mil-
lion worth of work, Scotia-
bank (Bahamas) claimed,
needed to be done to bring
the project to completion.

The bank subsequently
secured the appointment of
Baker Tilly Gomez accoun-
tant and partner, Craig A.
‘Tony’ Gomez, as Chub Cay’s

receiver. As previously
revealed by Tribune Business,
Mr Gomez is now seeking to
sell the resort development to
recover what is due to Scotia-
bank (Bahamas), and is
understood to have been close
to appointing George Dami-
anos, of Damianos Sotheby’s
International Realty, as the
realtor who will market the
resort.

Mr Gomez was yesterday
said to be out office until next
week when Tribune Business
called seeking comment. How-
ever, it is presumably the like-
lihood that Scotiabank
(Bahamas) will recover most
of what it is owed via the sale,
plus difficulties in obtaining
this sum from the principals,
that has prompted the lawsuit
settlement. For their part,
Messrs McCrory and Moss
had previously denied the alle-
gations made against them by
Scotiabank (Bahamas).

They argued that while they
had provided a $4 million
guarantee for the loan agree-
ment with the Bahamian
bank, they had fulfilled this
by pledging a $4 million stand-
by letter of credit to Scotia-
bank. The duo alleged that
Scotiabank (Bahamas) had
already “been paid to the full
extent of what it can recover
under the” guarantee through

accessing the pledged stand-
by letter of credit.

While admitting that they
were guarantors and “that all
payments called for by the
agreement have not been
made”, Messrs McCrory and
Moss denied they were liable
for the $4 million guarantee.

They further alleged that
their obligations were limited
to this guarantee, and denied
that a guarantee to complete
the Chub Cay project had
been part of the terms.

Chub Cay, which was
unveiled with much fanfare as
the so-called ‘anchor project’
for the Berry Islands and
North Andros just five years
ago, is a prime example of just
how bad a toll the global eco-
nomic downturn, and espe-
cially the freezing of
credit/debt markets, has exact-
ed on foreign direct invest-
ment projects that the
Bahamas was counting on to
generate jobs and economic
growth.

Numerous other projects,
including the Ritz-Carlton
Rose Island, Royal Island,
Ginn sur mer and Rum Cay
Resort Marina, have all been
impacted to some degree by
the immense difficulty —if not
impossibility — of obtaining
debt financing at reasonable
cost and terms.

OSMAN
“pl Ch Vaan rnin

41R Cameras

One (1) 4 Ch Stand Alone DVR
(Digital Video Recorder)
500 ft of Co-Ax & Power Cable
Power Supply & Accessories



LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.
“Eattage Lat With Private Beach

FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!
Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million

Web Listing # 8377

Mario A. Carey, CRS, CIPS, CLHMS

Tel:242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013
info@mariocareyrealty.com
www.marioca reyrea

NOTICE

.com

As

Mario Carey Realty
Dt'svabaut you... Let's talk.

Nally
ea"

a

‘Yc?

~ TO ALL EMPLOYERS AND SELF-EMPLOYED
PERSONS ON THE ELEUTHERA MAINLAND -

All Employers and Self-Employed Persons on the Eleuthera mainland, who recerved

C-11 Form norices from the Nattonal Insurance Board, are kindly asked to visit the

Compliance Officer ar the North Eleuthera Local Office, in Lower Bogue, on

Wednesday, August 19, 21019, herween che hours of 9/00 a.m. and 541K) p.m.

The Compliance Officer will also be available in Governor's Harbour, ar the

Governor's Harbour Local Office on Thursday, August ;

21, 2009, from 9-0) a.m, to 3:00 pom,

A), 2009, and Friday, August

For your convenience, vou may visit the Officer at anvone of the Local Offices on the

respective dates and times stated



Gear Shareholders,

Overall sales for the 3 quarter this year are down over 37% for the same period last year
( $2,134k versus $3,396k | The Home Centre, Freeport sales for this 3° quarter are down
over 31% (31.713K wersus $2,502k) and the concrete plant sales are down almost 33% (
542 1k versus $895k)

The net boss for this quarter is $198k on total sales of $2. 134k, however, this is almost the

same amount we lost in the 3” quarter last year but on significantly higher sales of
33,390k

Although we lost SIORK for the quarter it is pleasing to report that despite the Home
Centre sales being down over 31% for the same quarter last year we did in fact report net
income, before depreciation and interest of $95k this quarter compared bo a 528K net loss
for the same quarter last year. This shows that despite the downward trend in sales
revenues, due to lack of inventory, our cost cutting measures and the staff redundancies
are making ao difference in reducing our losses ard returning tice profitabality

However, as we forecasted several months ago, without any cash infusion into the

company to purchase more inventory, our sales revenues al the Home Centre will
d

continue to decrease as is evident in our 3" quarter results

Gur concrete sales for the quarter were £421k, which resulted in a net loss aller
depreciation and interest of $198k, compared te a net logs for the same period last year of
572k

Despite the drop in sales in the concrete division in the 2” gir we should see better results
in the 4" quarter a3 we will have the benefit of the additional revenues created by the sale
af concrete blocks in the last two weeks of August

We are confident, expecially from the initial response of vanous contractors wilh regard
to the excellent quality of the blocks, that our concrete division will see increases im
revenues going forward, which means that we will start off our new fiscal year on
September 1, 2009 in a better position than last September.

We continue to explore all avenues to find new capatal in order to purchase the inventory
needed to increase our sales at the Home Centre, which wall in turn create profitability
now that we have reduced our expenses considerably.

Thank you

Yours ancerely,

Ray Simpeon

Chief Exeeutive Officer
July 31, 2009

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consobdated Statement of Operahone
Three montha aided May 31, 2009 with comparative information for 2004

(Expressed in Batianiian dotars)

3 months ended 3 months ended
31-May-0a 311 -Palary 08

Sales 2,134, 189
Cost of sales. 1542 676
‘Gross prot #01505

4,396,260
2577 Bos
BiB dee

Payal costs. 351,971 493,222
Redundaecy caits 0 a
‘Other operating costs 127 069 217,503
Hent expense 37,800 102,200
Achertting expense Vt 14e 13,391
Litiities expense ao 545 1,860

So2 60k Bid, Pre

Income loss) before interest, tas:

deprecation and amortaaion (101 080) (36,471)

Depo. and amor. expense (54,604) (Gh tir}
(2.407) (35.912)
Net financing incomeljexpense)

(708,401)

Nat inornel oes) (197, 100)

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consobdated Statement of Operahons
Nine months ended May 31, 2009 with comparative information far 2008

(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

8 months ended
21-May-06

4 months ended
34-May-08

Teas 5,787,767
‘Cost of sakes. 6246401
‘roe profi 1.951 J6e

10,635 254
7 BS 7 66
20 2

Payroll costs
Redundancy cons
‘Other operating costs

1,360,804 1,512,280
185,000 a
522,926 643,129

Rent expense 226,800 736 263

Agwarising axpanse 28, Tee oT ori

Utiities expense 241129 275,734

2,565,647 2,046, 360k





Income!loss) belore interest, taxes

deprecation and amorimation (834 207) (BS 585)

Depn. and amort. expense (161 461) (20d, 387)

Net financing income(expense (124,227) (108, 62a)

Net income! oes) (039,990) (379,750)

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consolidated Balance Shaat
As at May 34, 2009

May 31, 2006 August 1 2008

{Lireauchibecd) {audited}
Ageete

Cash 10, es
Accaurits eeheble, net 515,598
Invesiones 1064, 017
Inventiones of soare parts and supples 115,576
Deposits ard prepaid expenses 67,264

468,230
BOF 007
Ler h abe
a2.o70
67,142
Total current agcete

1773, 043 2477 o15

Fined assets dd 5G 4.195, T24

Total assets 6,118,386 6,563 620

Liabilities and Bharobolders" Equiny

Rank averd rae 1,821,097 1,841,457
Acoount payaihe and accrued egqoenses. 3,585,357 3,025,007
\ertanty Prowsion 5,000 6,000)
Cunanl portion of kang tare debt To. 645 183,857
5 Sat 139

Total current lasted ties 5068S 45

Lang term debt S708

Sharcholders' equity
Share Capra
Contributed surplus
Appeaisal excess
Retained earnings
Cunnant eamings

a7 0
5.774, B68
1,433,867

(3.766 ,558)
(930,005)

Total equity SaT2en 1467 259
Tota! lisbilries and shareholders’ equity $ 6,716,356 6,560) 60

47, Ces
5,774, Bes
1,423,257

(5,788, S58)







PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



10 RACTOR

er, but at the end of the day it’s
a symphony orchestra, and we
need all the instruments playing
in tune together.”

Among the Government
works projects moving forward
were the $409.5 million Lynden
Pindling International Airport
(LPIA) redevelopment, Mr
Wrinkle telling Tribune Busi-
ness that the general contractor,
a combination of Canadian firm
Ledcor and Bahamian compa-
ny Wooslee Dominion, were
“mobilising and getting ready
to start physical work”. Else-
where, the Straw Market was
in the pre-qualification phase.

Meanwhile, Mr Wrinkle said
the BCA was awaiting final
approval from the Inter-Amer-
ican Development Bank (IDB)
for the proposed $225,000 pro-
ject to strengthen the Bahamian
construction industry.

He added that the BCA
council had met with the IDB’s
Bahamian office several weeks
ago to review the proposed pro-
ject grant, which was subse-
quently sent off for final
approval by the bank’s head
office. Preliminary approval
had already been given by the
Bahamian government.

“Tt is our understanding that
we’ve met all the criteria, the
requirements required by the
grant, and we’ve had every indi-
cation from the IDB locally that
final approval will be forth-
coming,” Mr Wrinkle told Tri-
bune Business.

the same period in fiscal 2008,
the BISX-listed company only
enjoyed a modxest increase
upon the previous year’s $7.365
million net income.

For the second quarter, total
revenues were $21 million, up
3.2 per cent from the same peri-
od last year. Cable television
continued to be the highest rev-
enue earner, with $11.1 million.
Internet netted $6.5 million in
overall revenues, and Data $3.4
million. Last quarter, the com-
pany saw its largest year-over-
year revenue growth in its con-
solidated product offerings.

Cable Bahamas said its rev-
enue growth has continued to
be in line with its expectations
and "was complemented by the
careful management of operat-
ing expenses”. It was able to
lower operating total operating
expenses by 1 per cent to $9.5
million.




Corporation ‘to be in arrears

for 2009 remainder

FROM page 1B

tion representatives on May 1, 2009.

The company, whose Bahamian Depos-
itory Receipts (BDRs) are listed on the
Bahamas International Securities Exchange
(BISX), said it had again received reassur-
ances that the payment “delinquency” was
related to “operating issues” within the
Water & Sewerage Corporation.

Given that there was no dispute between
the parties, and that the Government had
pledged the outstanding amount would be
paid in full, Consolidated Water said it had
made no provision for, or written down,
the sums owed.

Consolidated Water said in its SEC filing:
“During the three months ended June 30,
2009, Consolidated Water-Bahamas
received $8.7 million in payments on its
receivables from the Water & Sewerage
Corporation, and Consolidated Water-
Bahamas’ accounts receivable from the
Water & Sewerage Corporation were
approximately $4.7 million as of June 30,
2009.

“We believe that the accounts receiv-
able from the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration are fully collectible and therefore
have not provided any allowance for pos-
sible non-payment of these receivables as of
June 30, 2009.

“However, we have been informed by
these representatives that the Water &
Sewerage Corporation expects to continue
to be in arrears on its payments to Consol-
idated Water-Bahamas for the remainder

of 2009.”

As a result, Consolidated Water warned
investors: “Consolidated Water-Bahamas
derives substantially all of its revenues from
its contract with the Water & Sewerage
Corporation, and is dependent upon time-
ly collection of its accounts receivable to
fund its operations. If the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation does not improve the
timeliness and/or increase the amounts of
its payments to Consolidated Water-
Bahamas, this subsidiary may not have suf-
ficient liquidity to adequately fund its oper-
ations.

“If this occurs, Consolidated Water-
Bahamas may be required to decrease the
amount of water it supplies the Water &
Sewerage Corporation to the minimum
required amount under the contract or, if
liquidity problems become too severe, cease
its production of water altogether. Such
developments could have a material
adverse effect on our results of operation
and financial position.”

Consolidated Water’s results again high-
light the increasing financial weakness of
the Water & Sewerage Corporation, and
the burden it imposes on Bahamian tax-
payers. The Corporation will still be in
arrears on its reverse osmosis supply pay-
ments despite having received an additional
$11 million in taxpayer funding during the
2008-2009 Budget year that brought its
total subsidy to $30 million.

And the financial drain that is currently
the Water & Sewerage Corporation was
again highlighted by the fact that, without
a government subsidy, it would have

incurred a $24 million loss during its 2007
financial year.

Elsewhere, Consolidated Water said its
Bahamian subsidiary had cancelled a
$500,000 revolving credit facility with Roy-
al Bank of Canada. No amounts had been
due under the facility, which was secured by
the Bahamian company’s assets and would
have incurred interest levied at Bahamian
Prime plus 1.5 per cent.

Consolidated Water said that it would
replace the Royal Bank working capital
facility with “another facility with another
bank in August 2009”.

On the operational front, Consolidated
Water said its Bahamian operations were
generating “higher gross profits”.

“The higher gross profits for our
Bahamas operations reflect improved oper-
ating efficiencies for both our Windsor and
Blue Hills operations located in Nassau,
New Providence,” the company said in its
SEC filing.

“We constructed and commissioned new
feed water wells, and replaced the reverse
osmosis membranes on two of four of our
production trains at our Windsor plant
effective September 2008, and replaced the
reverse osmosis membranes on our other
two production trains at the Windsor plant
during the current quarter.

“These capital expenditures have
improved the energy efficiency of the
Windsor plant. In addition, last year we
implemented an improved feed water pre-
treatment regime at our Blue Hills plant in
Nassau, which has reduced electrical pow-
er consumption at that plant.”

LNG supplier sells project lease rights

FROM page 1B

9 TADIUM,
from 1B

mining on Ocean Cay, a man-
made island originally devel-
oped for such a purpose.

AES has spent at least $65
million in trying to win
approval for the project, only
to incur ever-increasing frus-
tration at the failure of both the
Christie and Ingraham admin-
istrations to give final approval,
despite meeting all the Gov-
ernment’s requirements -
chiefly completing a positive
Environmental Impact Assess-
ment (EIA) and Environmen-

NOTICE





NOTICE

is hereby given that

JOHNNY JOSEPH

P.O. BOX GT-2752 , YELLOW ELDER is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 12 day of August, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE ANGE NOEL of
#137 FAWCETT LANE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
12th day of AUGUST, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SAMANTHA LOUISE
COX KEMP, P.O. BOX N-10767,# 3 HALLS ROAD and
POMPANO COURT, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12‘ day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRANCLIN JOSEPH
of PODOLEO STREET, P.O. Box N-1482, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 19 day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KEVIN KIRAN SURUJLAL
of PARADISE ISLAN DRIVE, P.O. Box N-9841,
PARADISE ISLAND, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 19" day of August, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O.
Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.











tal Management Plan (EMP).

When contacted yesterday
by Tribune Business about
AES’s sale of the Ocean Cay
lease, Phenton Neymour, min-
ister of state for the environ-
ment, replied: “I haven’t
received that information.”

The Government’s failure to
thus far approve an LNG pro-
ject, especially the AES devel-
opment, located some seven
miles from the nearest inhabit-
ed island, is somewhat mysti-
fying, given that all require-
ments have been met and the
Treasury’s desperate need for
revenue.

The AES project had
promised to generate around
$1 billion in revenues for the

Government during the first 25
years of operations, via a com-
bination of annual business
licence fees, sea bed lease fees
and a throughput fee linked to
the Henry Hub natural gas
index.

When the price of LNG
pumped to Florida by AES
exceeded this benchmark, the
Bahamas would gain a per-
centage of the additional rev-
enues - a figure that could have
hit $40-$50 million in 2005.

AES had also proposed to
supply BEC with LNG from
Ocean Cay, something its then-
project manager said could save
the Government-owned Cor-
poration between $1.4 billion
to $4 billion - $80 million to

EXECUTIVE HOME FOR RENT

4-BEDROOM, 4 1/2-BATHROOM EXECUTIVE HOME
ON LYFORD CAY GOLF COURSE

$210 million per annum - in fuel
costs over a 15-year period.

Aaron Samson said that AES
was effectively offering the
Government two options -
approving the original LNG
terminal and pipeline that
would service Florida only, or
giving the go-ahead for that
project and the pipeline to New
Providence.

Yet Tribune Business under-
stands that the Government’s
concerns over the AES pro-
posal relate to long-term LNG
prices, and whether they would
increase at the same rate - and
reach the same level - as oil
prices as global demand
increased. Such a development
would negate any advantages
from switching BEC to LNG.

AES and its attorneys have
been pushing for a government
decision on whether to make
the approval in principle that
was granted to its project back
in 2001 a full, approval that
would allow it to proceed.



tle change. We are paying high-
er than according to the plan,”
said Mr Sun. Much of the mate-
rials and manpower, though, is
being sourced from China.

During a tour of the new
facility, Chinese and Bahami-
an contractors, along with the
Chinese Ambassador to the
Bahamas, showed off its m ain
features to several government
ministers, including Deputy
Prime Minister Brent Symon-
ette and Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture, Desmond
Bannister.

The ministers were shown
innovations in Chinese con-
struction and tests that verify
the fortitude of construction
materials, including steel rebar
with welded joints stronger
than the moulded rebar itself,
and concrete block made with
Bahamian-supplied concrete,
which stood up to pressures
twice its limit.

Mr Symonette relished the
fact that the concrete which
made up the block tested by
Chinese workers was Bahami-
an-made.

Mr Bannister said construc-
tion of the new Stadium will
bring international competi-
tions, currently not able to be
held in the Bahamas, to this
nation. He said it will be the
best facility in the region.

“We are extremely pleased
with the partnership with the
Chinese government, who have
proved they are very good
friends and have made a won-
derful contribution to the devel-
opment of our national stadi-
um. We're looking forward to
continuing this very wonderful
partnership we have with the
government of China,” he said.

“The ambassador has been
a very good friend, and has
been extremely helpful in
everything that we have been
doing.”

Mr Symonette said 75 per
cent of the pylons, which will
be buried more than 40 feet
into the bedrock at the site and
support the foundation for the
stadium, are in place. The sta-
dium will require 620 of those
pylons.

Much of the equipment used
in the construction thus far has
been acquired from Bahamian
companies, according to Mr
Sun.

“We have built relationships
with local small companies. The
blocks and sand are provided
by a local company, and much
of the equipment on the site is
proved by a local company,”
he said.

“Many materials are deliv-
ered from China here, so it
helps the local shipping com-
panies.”

Mr Bannister said the Chi-
nese investment in the Bahami-
an economy was huge, espe-
cially in securing equipment
and supplies for the stadium.

For Immediate Occupancy

This beautiful axecutive residence is located on
a half-acre lot overlooking the Lyford Cay Golf course.

Eighteen-foot high ceilings, eight-foot high French doors,
marble floors, casement windows and an open plan
provide a panoramic view of the Lyford Cay Golf Course
from all living areas,

This modern executive home in Nassau’s most prestigious
community is available for immediate occupancy.

For information call 327-8536.
Serious inquiries only.

POSITIONS
AVAILABLE

A leading wholesale distributor

providing perishables & food
products throughout the Bahamas
for over 25 years has the following
positions available:

DIESEL MECHANIC
CUSTODIAN

Only qualified persons need apply

Please submit all résumés by fax to
(242) 394-0282 or call (242) 677-6700
for further information

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009
IN THE SUPREME COURT COMcom/00100

COMMERCIAL DIVISION

IN THE MATTER OF CLICO ENTERPRISES LIMITED
(In Liquidation |

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT, 1992

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Petition for the
Winding-up of the above-named Company having its
registered office at Serville & Company, No. 13 East
Ave, Centerville in the City of Nassau, was on the 12°
August, 2009 presented to the Court by Craig A. (Tony)
Gomez, the Official Liquidator of Clica Bahamas Limited
and the Petitioner herein, AND that the Company be
wound up pursuant to Section 187 (d) of The Companies
Act, 1992 Chapter 308, Statute Law of The Bahamas
2000 Revised Edition,

AND that the Petition is directed to be heard (in open
Court) before Justice Cheryl Albury, a Justice of the
Supreme Court, in the City of Nassau on Tuesday the
8" day of September, A.D. 2009 at 10:00 a.m. in the
forenoon at the Supreme Court Annex, 3° Floor, British
American Bank Building, Marlborough St., Nassau,
Bahamas and any Creditor or contributory of the said
Company desirous to support or oppose the making of
an Order on the said Petition may appear at the time
of the hearing in person or by his Counsel for that
purpose; and a copy of the Petition will be furnished
by the undersigned to any Creditor or Contributory of
the Company fraquiring such copy on payment of the
prescribed charge for the same.

Callanders & Co.
Chambers
One Millars Court
Attorney for the Petitioner

NOTE: Any person who intends to appear on the
hearing of the said Petition must serve or send by post
to the above-named, notice in writing of his intention
toda so. The notice must stale the name and address
of the person, or, if a firm, the name and address of
the firm and must be signed by the person or firm or
his or their attorney (if any) and must be signed or if
posted, must be sent by post in sufficient time to reach
the above named not later than 4:00 o'clock in the
afternoon on Monday the 7" day of September, A.D.
2009.



st









ORLANDO





























-eOnrAgep Mostly cloudy with Mainly clear with a Mostly sunny with a Sunshine with a t-storm Partly sunny, a t-storm Some sun with a The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
a beste: roe Pas thundersionts frinderstorn thunderstorm in spots. ? meh t-storm possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
@ ™ . High: 90° High: 90° High: 89° High: 90°
r ee High: 92° Low: 81° Low: 80° Low: 79° Low: 80° Low: 80° see ET
TAMPA i AccuWeather RealFeel
High: 92° F/33°C Le . & High __Ht(ft.) Low __Ht(ft.
Low: 78° F/26°C i] r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 7:22am. 3.0 1:15am. 0.0
aa @ “ 2 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 750p.m. 3.4 1:24pm. -0.2
' Se \ a 8:41pm. 3.3 2:20pm. -0.2
) ae a Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Friday 06am. 33 250am. 02
i r 4 SS ABACO Temperature 9:29 p.m. 3.2 3:13 p.m. -0.2
i ; 7 : \ High: 91° F/33° C 7 rea a aeasiues ce Saturday | a.m. | 7 a
i. , co SF ee E26°C Normal high... gorrsz¢
7 F oe ‘ Normal low 76° F/24° C
4 fe! @ WEST PALM BEACH earns Last year's WIgh ..ccccsscssssuseesiene or Fsc | ONT T(IIY
4 ill High: 89° F/32° C Last year's lOW oe eee 77° F/25° C
q : Low: 79° F/26° C . Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:46 a.m. Moonrise..... 5:45 a.m.
a ra e L< = As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..ccccccccccscsssssseeeeeeeeen trace ‘Sumset....... 7-41 p.m. Moonset..... 7:09 p.m.
Teall : FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT 7 Year to date ade: New First Full Last
High: 86° F/30° C @ High: 88° F/31° C Normal year to date oo... 28.62" : anc _
Low: 81°F/27°C —— Low: 77° F/25° C o re J:
Z-. AccuWeather.com os Gio ee
a @ < Forecasts and graphics provided by : a: ay
eg MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Aug. 20 Aug.27 Sep.4 = Sep. 11
ia High: 88° F/31°C High: 95° F/35° C
ORK Low: 81°F/27°C NASSAU ee ee
ar Low: 81° F/27°C
cy eo @ Be iz
KEY WEST i So —_CATISLAND
High: 89° F/32°C High: 90°F/32° C
Low: 82°F/28°G nye Low: 76° F/24°C
2 Sh
= Oo
op GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR
aX High: 91°F/33°C High: 92° F/33°C
o f Low: 79° F/26° C Low:77° F/25°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | ,
highs and tonights's lows. ) ae High: 94° F/34°C
a Low: 76° F/24°C
LONGISLAND
Low: 77° F/25°C
Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday i MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 92° F/33° C
F/C FIC F/C FC FC FIC FC FC FC FC Fie FC me Low: 74° F/23°C
Albuquerque 93/33 65/18 s 92/33 65/18 $s Indianapolis 86/30 72/22 t 83/28 65/18 t Philadelphia 90/32 74/23 t 90/32 74/23 t
Anchorage 66/18 50/10 s 71/21 5110 $s Jacksonville 90/32 74/23 t 89/31 74/23 t Phoenix 110/43 85/29 s 110/43 85/29 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 92/33 71/21 t 89/31 72/22 t KansasCity 86/30 66/18 t 78/25 60/15 pc Pittsburgh 82/27 68/20 t 84/28 68/20 t RAGGEDISLAND Tigh:94°F/34"c
Atlantic City 87/30 73/22 t 80/31 73/22 t Las Vegas 106/41 77/25 s 107/41 81/27 s Portland, OR 98/36 64/17 s 93/33 59/15 s High: 93° F/34° C Low: 77° F/25°C
Baltimore 90/32 70/21 t 92/33 72/22 t Little Rock 92/33 74/23 t 89/31 68/20 t Raleigh-Durham 94/34 73/22 pc 95/35 72/22 pc Low: 74°F/23°C i
Boston 90/32 70/21 t 85/29 71/21 t Los Angeles 80/26 64/117 pc 80/26 64/17 pc St. Louis 90/32 74/23 t 84/28 62/16 t .
Buffalo 80/26 64/117 pce 85/29 69/20 t Louisville 87/30 75/23 t 87/30 70/21 t Salt Lake City 88/31 62/16 s 94/34 66/18 s GREAT INAGUA
Charleston, SC 90/32 74/23 pc 92/83 75/23 pc Memphis 90/32 75/23 t 91/32 69/20 t San Antonio 100/37 78/25 s 98/36 77/25 $s High: 95° F/35° C
Chicago 77/25 67/9 t 79/26 62/16 t Miami 88/31 81/27 t 92/33 80/26 t San Diego 73/22 66/18 pce 74/23 66/18 pc Low. 76°F/24°C
Cleveland 84/28 70/21 t 87/30 71/21 t Minneapolis 74/23 59/15 t 67/19 59/15 sh San Francisco 78/25 58/14 pce 75/23 58/14 pc y
Dallas 98/36 80/26 s 98/36 72/22 t Nashville 87/30 72/22 t 88/31 72/22 t Seattle 88/31 62/16 s 86/30 56/13 s
Denver 83/28 49/9 s 79/26 52/11 $s New Orleans 90/32 78/25 t 90/32 77/25 t Tallahassee 92/33 74/23 t 91/32 75/23 t
Detroit 83/28 68/20 c 81/27 68/20 t New York 88/31 75/23 t 89/31 78/25 t Tampa 92/33 78/25 t 91/32 78/25 t
Honolulu 89/31 77/25 s 89/31 76/24 ¢ Oklahoma City 97/86 74/23 s 92/33 66/18 t Tucson 102/38 77/25 s 102/38 76/24 t
Houston 94/34 77/25 t 96/35 77/25 t Orlando 90/32 77/25 t 91/32 76/24 t Washington, DC 92/33 75/23 t 93/33 76/24 t

AY rr aN

asia,
| =| ojo
\. HIGH EXT.

HIGH

o|1|2

LOW

3|4[5

MODERATE











a i



fy, LEILA Isiiith:








Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
90/32
79/26
86/30
92/33
60/15
90/32
86/30
83/28
84/28
81/27
87/30
77/25
87/30
68/20
84/28
86/30
58/14
98/36
88/31
73/22
91/32
83/28
86/30
70/21
68/20
87/30
87/30
78/25
90/32
66/18
91/32
94/34
86/30
86/30
59/15
90/32
69/20
82/27
99/37
88/31
77/25
102/38
81/27
64/17
84/28
79/26
91/32
66/18
91/32
79/26
80/26
105/40
91/32
91/32
55/12
88/31
54/12
91/32
71/21
90/32
66/18
70/21
93/33
86/30
80/26
95/35
76/24
83/28
72/22
70/21

Til

Today

Low
F/C
77/25
68/20
52/11
73/22
43/8
79/26
79/26
69/20
66/18
78/25
60/15
63/17
76/24
43/8
70/21
59/15
47/8
74/23
81/27
43/8
77/25
72/22
68/20
55/12
54/12
66/18
58/14
59/15
73/22
48/8
81/27
74/23
71/21
61/16
31/0
79/26
58/14
63/17
66/18
79/26
54/12
75/23
63/17
50/10




aoe Ge) Gee =

wn
——

7 eae ao was ma pa

zawUoUgTSo ON
o Be oO —

Yo TDN NS
}o }

oO

a? ee eS aS a

wn
—

54/12 s
56/13 ¢

79/26
54/12
68/20
53/11
73/22
81/27
72/22
79/26

36/2
70/21

34/1
75/23
58/14
75/23
52/11

46/7
80/26
71/21
64/17
75/23
63/17
64/17
54/12
56/13

noe
=

+ Gy Bae moe co ie
=——

=z3
oo a

wn
—

nannnoDoo7eaq7nn
can <>

+

High
F/C
90/32
78/25
85/29
90/32
59/15
91/32
86/30
83/28
93/33
82/27
88/31
86/30
87/30
66/18
88/31
87/30
62/16
99/37
88/31
77/25
90/32
82/27
83/28
76/24
64/17
91/32
87/30
75/23
91/32
68/20
91/32
101/38
84/28
86/30
61/16
88/31
71/21
75/23
97/36
87/30
76/24
102/38
79/26
61/16
89/31
80/26
92/33
63/17
82/27
85/29
83/28
103/39
90/32
88/31
65/18
89/31
61/16
86/30
73/22
88/31
72/22
74/23
91/32
83/28
78/25
88/31
75/23
86/30
75/23
68/20

Thursday

Low
F/C
79/26
55/12
52/11
72/22
46/7
79/26
77/25
68/20
69/20
77/25
61/16
64/17
76/24
47/8
55/12
57/13
43/6
73/22
81/27
52/11
73/22
74/23
65/18
66/18
50/10
63/17
62/16
59/15
73/22
52/11
81/27
77/25
65/18
64/17
39/3
80/26
58/14
55/12
63/17
78/25
53/11
75/23
68/20
48/8
58/14
55/12
80/26
52/11
55/12
60/15
69/20
82/27
68/20
80/26
36/2
74/23
34/1
75/23
53/11
65/18
57/13
43/6
78/25
73/22
63/17
63/17
60/15
66/18
53/11
55/12

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MAarINE FORECAST

WwW

t
pce
s
s
s
pe
pe
s

oo he
a

wn
of

oO

my > fee + ee) ee ee ee eo eo eo Pe
—

ee

O Bao CaO pas 2a° ea @

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace






SUS AS Re i




WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 85° F
Thursday: — ENE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 85° F
FREEPORT Today: ESE at 9-18 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 85° F
Thursday: — ENE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 85° F
ABACO Today: ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 84° F
Thursday: ENE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 84° F



Seattleju

"76/53"

|Kansas)
86/66

Showers
T-storms
Rain







Fronts
= Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and os
Bk.) Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm tit fitnifite
[v_=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Meaguali-
10s| ts [0s /| 10s 20s [Osi] 40s sts 60s 70s sos [G0s//ii0eii0)



~ You Can Be Blown
Away By A Hurricane
Or you._can rest easy knowing
that Youhave excellent insurance

coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

- Wew Providence / Grand Bahama J Abaco Eleuthera ff Exuma
To: (242) 394-5555 ff Tat: nas

Wy



PAGE 8C, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

TASTE

THE TRIBUNE









AMOUNG a list of homemade breads and pies,
Coco’s Café also serves up an original mango bread.

Adding a
CWwIst to
the ordina



By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

Nestled in the heart of Bernard
Road is the new Coco Palm Café
and takeaway featuring the best
in Bahamian dishes fused with Ital-
ian flavours and spices.

Featuring a top notch selection of dishes
rarely found in Nassau, this eatery gives the
right bite for the buck, exposing patrons to
foods only available at upscale restaurants.

Chef Paul Coakley who operates Coco’s,
explained that after living in New Jersey, and
working at the famous Borgata Hotel Casino
and Spa for a year, he thought Bahamians
would enjoy his delicious creations.

The restaurant has a diverse menu ranging

a reel i

The Tribune

we
ALREADY creating a buzz, the restaurant which has only been open
for two weeks has drawn in hungry patrons from East to West all
eager for a taste of one of Coco’s many Italian Bahamian dishes.

from traditional fish, chicken, or burger
snacks, to orginal dishes like Mango wings
with Cajun rice, coconut curry chicken, and
jLeeuiem OLE Mes Kem NCO UU AUC-VOLnen OIA iA

Chef Coakley said the penne pasta which
has already proven to be an overnight success,
can only be described as “sexy and fresh.”

ToUmvlemy ICOM BNlcCom-TcemNNCOULDOY IRC U INR Lert
Pat WII Comrv ee mRe ORG sg ARO leur TNCeme- Vee
rots.

Its sauce he said is actually prepared
overnight, and can take up to eight hours to
get just the right taste, and taste like “noth-
ing he has seen or eaten.”

ayes s also the Shrimp ‘n’ Sausage (Dia-
blo) in spicy tomato sauce. onnts Italian
sausage, rich tomato sauce, and spices, this
dish has already been dubbed the ‘money
maker’ for the establishment.

Chef Coakley said: “We also have an
eclectic approach to Bahamian food, these

(Lancy





include our Rasberry Snapper, the mango
barbecue wings, and bench-marked curry
abt oer

“T travel often, so what I do is select cur-
ry spices from different parts of the world
and I actually blend them with Bahamian
flavours, so it’s a different style of curry
that cannot be found anywhere in the coun-
naan

If their diverse lunch and dinner delights
aren't enough to get your stomach east
for a taste, as eatery also offers freshly
baked breads daily. Helping to up the ante
of the breads, Chef Coakley said he also
adds local fruits that help give the treats a

28-year-old Paul Coakley along with his
mother own and operate Coco Palm Café
Specialising in Bahamian and Italian dishes.

BAKED Chicken with Fettuccini
and homemade garlic bread.










one of a kind signature.

Chef Coakley explained: “I have a
coconut mango bread, which is very nice
and clean flavoured, we also do garlic
breads, foccacia bread, and french bread, all
baked and sold right here.”

This chef said he hopes his approach to
food and mixing flavours will add to the
already diverse local cuisine. With many
Bahamians familiar with the flavours of
mangos, oranges, rasberries, and grapes, he
said introducing a new twist to the way the
fruits are eaten will only help to remind
people of why fruits in general are consid-
ered a gift from above.










THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009, PAGE 9C



eS



The Tribune






By ALEX MISSICK





DOONGALIK Studios Art Gallery in Marina Village at
Paradise Island recently hosted an enthusiastic crowd of
art patrons at the official opening of their ‘SAVE THE TUR-
TLES’ Art Exhibition showcasing the art works of 26 local
artists concerned with the plight of this endangered
species across the globe and in the Bahamas.

o oa a 4 os - =
_ = =

KIM ARANHA (right) and Jane Mather of the Bahamas Sea
Turtles Conservation Group making Opening statements.



District 9

By JASON DONALD

STARRING: Sharlto Copley,
Jason Cope, Nathalie Boltt

IN THE summer onslaught of
increasingly expensive and vacuous
blockbusters, a jaded cinema-going
public can be forgiven for wanting to
back the dark horse.

Anticipation for District 9 has been
building steadily - despite it being
director Neill Blomkamp’s first fea-
ture and having a no-star cast — thanks
to a fantastic trailer and intelligent
online marketing campaign.

But while the hype may have helped
its first week takings, I can’t help but
think the raised expectations may
leave many disappointed.

The film is set 20 years after a lum-



bering alien spaceship became strand-
ed over South Africa. The malnour-
ished insect-like refugees onboard
(cruelly referred to as “prawns” by an
embittered human race) are taken
down to Earth - literally and figura-
tively - and restricted to a horrendous
shanty town area called District 9.

But with tensions growing between
the local population and their new
neighbours, the private company in
charge of the area is forced to relocate
the aliens to a new camp.

The first half of the film takes the
form of a fictional documentary with
faux news footage and interviews with
officials and members of the public.
This nicely illustrates how the incred-
ible event of an alien arrival quickly
became a depressingly mundane
source of violence and misery.

=o

The gallery invited artists to present a
piece of work that would not only pay
homage to this magnificent animal but
also promote awareness of the impor-
tance of its conservation and protection.
Judging by the continuous accolades
from the audience that evening, including
two of the Miss Universe Contestants,
Miss Jamaica and Miss Zimbabwe who
visited earlier in the day, the submis-
sions certainly surpassed expectations.

The proposed ban on the killing of
turtles in The Bahamas, scheduled to be
passed in April, has still not happened in
spite of countless promises to the
Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation
Group which consists of the Bahamas
Humane Society, Advocates for Animal
Rights, Animals Require Kindness, The
Humane Society of Grand Bahama, Re-
Earth, The Bahamas National Trust,
Underwater Explorer’s Society Dolphin
Experience, Grand Bahama Nature
Tours, Earth Care Grand Bahama and
The Nature Conservancy.

President of the Group, Mrs Kim
Aranha said because turtles are a very
necessary part of marine life, the entire
underwater ecosystem will suffer great-
ly without it.

“Tt is our duty as custodians of this
planet to nurture and care for these care-
takers of the sea. It is so exciting and
heartening to look at this amazing exhi-

ey Mat
owners Jack-
SOU Ue Mae UiN
Burnside
SELIG]
amongst
some of the
many striking
NOL CMOlar le

bition with so many remarkable pieces
lovingly created by a huge cross section
of Bahamian artists, each and every one
dedicated to the preservation and pro-
tection of the Sea Turtle. Please take
away with you the memory of the
majesty of these splendid sea creatures
and spread the word... please help us
protect turtles from extinction,” Mrs
Aranha said.

The Exhibition includes originals by
Amos Ferguson, bronze sculptures,
paintings, encaustic wax artworks, pho-
tographs, ceramics, painting on silk, a
coloured pencil drawing, handmade
paper art, a turtle necklace, and even
edible cookies boldly declaring “Eat
Cookies, Not Turtles.” The artists and
the gallery have also agreed that ten
per cent of the sales from this show
will be donated to the Bahamas Sea
Turtles Conservation Group to assist
with their educational efforts. The
Exhibition will remain on display until
Sunday August 30.

¢ To learn more about this initiative, visit
the Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation’s
website at
http://saveourseaturtles.com/introduc-
tion. html

or by telephoning the Gallery at (242)
363-1313.

ARTIST Susan Roberts stands next to her beautiful piece.

rt _ a : i

THIS movie still released by Sony Pictures shows, left to right, Sharlto Copley, Mand-
la Gaduka and Kenneth Nkosi in “District 9.”



=
oO
ad
a
<—
(i
ou
st
i)
o
—
=
=
&
a
=
=
a
“an







i IT’S just a few short weeks until
? summer comes to an end so
i why not make the best of the
i time left, give a little, party a lot,
: and make this that summer
: you'll never forget.

? 1. This weekend a new beauty
i queen will be crowned in Par-
? adise with the selection of the
i 2009 Miss Universe during the
i 58th pageant which takes place
? Sunday evening at 9pm in the
? Imperial Ballroom of the
? AtlantisResort. Tickets for the
i gala event are still available. In
: an attempt to sell the final seats,
? organisiers recently announced
i special discounts- group pack-
? ages are now being offered and
i patrons can get one free ticket
? for every three tickets purchased
i for the final show.

All-access tickets for the

i viewing party, which will take
i place on the Royal Deck are

$145,
VIP tickets for final show,

i which will be broadcast live on
? NBC to 150 countries in the
? world, are $1,000 and include
? entrance to the coronation ball.

Tickets for sections 3-7 in the

i Imperial Ballroom are $750; sec-
? tions 8-11 are $400; sections
? 11-13 are $250; sections 14-20
i are $175.

All-access tickets to the coro-

i nation ball, to be held in Atlantis’
? Royal Court, are $145. The new-
i ly crowned Miss Universe and
? her court will be presented ina
i a dramatic” fashion at the
? ball.

The finale will be aired lived

? on NBC and ZNS.

To get a final glimpse of the

i girls ahead of Sunday’s pageant,
: be sure to check out the con-
? testants during the motorcade
? tomorrow from Arawak Cay to
i Crystal Palace beginning at
: 5.30pm

i 2. The Big Give Organisation - a
i new local charity - is launching
i one of its first fundraisers called
? A Haute Summer Night. The
i event is set to take place this
? Saturday at the Hub Art Center
? on Bay Street. It will highlight
: an attractive selection of local
? artists along with signature
i cocktails culminating with a
i “crazy” mix of reggae, dance
? hall, pop, hip hop, and techno
? from one of Nassau’s hottest
i DJ’s. It’s all going down at 9pm
: until. The entrance fee is $20.
? Proceeds will assist the Claridge
i Primary School.

? 3.The Bahamas International
: Film Festival is busy this week,
? starting with its summer film
i series. BIFF presents the movie
i Hush Your Mouth at the Galleria
: Cinemas at JFK today. This 2007
? Drama/Thriller directed by Tom
? Tyrwhitt, highlights the death of
? a young man who died for what
: he believed, however his death
? is ironically tagged to one of his
i best friends. The story which
i takes place in one of London’s
i least desirable quarters, devel-
? ops as the dead teen’s family
? searches for the killer with a
i major twist. The movie is show-
i se tonight at 8pm at a cost of
? $5.

i 4. On Saturday, experience the
i best that Spanish culture has to
? offer. BIFF has organised the
? best in Spanish food, music,
i wines, and entertainment- show-
? casing professional flamenco
; dancers, and music by Yulee B.
? Taking place at The Balmoral
? Club, this Spanish night starts at
i 7.30 pm with tickets now priced
? at $75, but get yours early
: because the prices will go up.

i 5. The new EA Modeling and
: talent Agency is having its offi-
? cial launch party at Da Balcony
i nightclub opposite the British
? Colonial Hilton this Friday start-
: ing at 8pm. The event will show
? off the agency’s best models
? both male and female while
? entertaining patrons with the
: best in cocktails and music.
i Priced at $10, the event promis-
i es to be the highlight of the
i summer. All models, entertain-
i ers, socialites, and others are
? invited to come out and see
? what the Bahamas really has to
i offer when it comes to top notch
? models.



PAGE 10C, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ARTS





BOOKREVIEW n

Frank Bruni dissects

his food obsession

AP Drama Writer

“BORN ROUND: The
Secret History of a Full-Time
Eater” (The Penguin Press,
354 pages, $25.95), by Frank
Bruni: Obsessive relation-
ships are often the meat and
potatoes of autobiography.

But for Frank Bruni, meat
and potatoes ARE the obses-
sion. Along with a never-end-
ing parade of other goodies,
from French haute cuisine in
all its flavorsome complexity
to more basic foodstuff, such
as the elongated, chocolate-
coated wafers of a KitKat
bar, described in reverential,
almost spiritual terms.

“My life-defining relation-
ship ... wasn’t with a parent, a
sibling, a teacher, a mate. It
was with my stomach,” he
proclaims in “Born Round:
The Secret History of a Full-
Time Eater.” And it’s this
contentious relationship that
Bruni, for five years the chief

restaurant critic for The New
York Times, chronicles with
startling, intimate directness.
It’s a thoughtful tale, unspar-
ing in Bruni’s analysis of him-
self, but hugely entertaining
in his almost “Rocky”-like
determination to make things
right after countless slip-ups.

These struggles are depict-
ed alongside a loving portrait
of an Italian-American fami-
ly (the most affecting part of
the book), a family that in
many ways served as an
enabler for this favorite, full-
figured son to devour every-
thing in sight.

There are wonderful snap-
shots of his mother and his
paternal grandmother, both
excellent cooks and ardent
champions of the philosophy
“more is better,” particularly
in the kitchen. But then the
entire Bruni clan is defined
by meals served and con-
sumed.

Bruni’s ravenous appetite,

of course, had consequences:
a constant battle with weight
that grew more fierce as he
grew older and his seemingly
futile attempts to reach what
he describes as “the won-
drous Xanadu of the willful-
ly emaciated.”

Purging. Pills. Spurts of
intense exercising, particu-
larly after the openly gay
Bruni started dating. Noth-
ing seemed to work for very
long. The only thing that
remained constant was his
appetite — as he went from
college to a career in jour-
nalism and eventually a job
at the Times. It was an
appetite that was put to an
extreme test when Bruni was
given the high-stress assign-
ment of covering George W.
Bush’s presidential cam-
paign.

His weight and waist bal-
looned, as did his unhappi-
ness. Finally after his Wash-
ington stint, Bruni began a

serious, consistent exercise
program tempered by por-
tion moderation. “Less is
more” became his new
mantra.

Bruni, 44, is a nimble,
observant writer. What
makes his restaurant reviews
so entertaining — often a lot
more enjoyable than many
of the establishments he cri-
tiques — is a combination of
his love of eating coupled
with a sharp journalistic eye.

Bruni’s enthusiasm for eat-
ing borders on adoration, and
he knows how to turn readers
into true believers when it
comes to praising a restau-
rant. Or warn them when
things aren’t up to snuff.

Yet “Born Round” is
more than just amusing, gos-
sipy anecdotes for serious
foodies, although the tidbits
Bruni supplies should satisfy
them, particularly descrip-
tions of his extensive plan-
ning to dine unrecognized.





Pood ey
Yanina Manolova/AP Photo

FRANK BRUNI, former New York Times food critic, holds a copy
of his book "Born Round" in New York, Friday, Aug. 14, 2009.





















THIS is an undated portrait of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. What killed Mozart so suddenly in
1791? A report in Tuesday's Annals of Internal Medicine, a medical journal published in Philadel-
phia, suggests it might have been something far more common: a strep infection.







What killed

Mozart?

Study suggests strep infection



PHILADELPHIA

or more than two centuries, the

music of Wolfgang Amadeus

Mozart has endured — as has
the speculation about what led to his
sudden death at age 35 on Dec. 5,
1771,

Was the wunderkind composer poisoned by a jeal-
ous rival? Did he have an intestinal parasite from an
undercooked pork chop? Could he have accidentally
poisoned himself with mercury used to treat an alleged
bout of syphilis?

A report in Tuesday’s Annals of Internal Medicine
suggests the exalted Austrian composer might have
succumbed to something far more commonplace: a
streptococcal infection — possibly strep throat — that
led to kidney failure.

The researchers looked at death records in Vienna
during the months surrounding Mozart’s death —
November and December 1791 and January 1792, and
compared causes of death with the previous and fol-
lowing years.

“We saw that at the time of Mozart’s death there
was a minor epidemic in deaths involving edema
(swelling), which also happened to be the hallmark of
Mozart’s final disease,” said Dr. Richard Zegers of the
University of Amsterdam, one of the study’s authors.

There was a spike in swelling-related deaths among
younger men in Vienna at the time of Mozart’s death
compared to the other years studied, suggesting a
minor epidemic of streptococcal disease, Zegers said.

The cause of death recorded in Vienna’s official
death register was “fever and rash,” though even in
Mozart’s time those were recognized to be merely
symptoms and not an actual disease.

His surviving letters and creative output suggest that
he was feeling well in the months before his death and
was not suffering from any chronic ailment. Many
accounts note that he fell ill not long before he died —
suffering from swelling so severe, his sister-in-law
recalled three decades later, that the composer was
unable to turn in bed.

Others who reported to have been witnesses to
Mozczart’s final days also described swelling, as well as
back pain, malaise and rash — all symptoms that indi-
cate Mozart may have died of kidney disease brought
on by a strep infection.

“It’s not definitive, but it’s certainly food for
thought,” said Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious dis-
ease expert at Vanderbilt University Medical Center
who was not involved in the study.

He said it was not unreasonable to presume that
Mozart died from strep complications, based on the
information presented, but he pointed out that the
authors had scant data to go on.

“Serious streptococcal infections were much more
common than they are now and, indeed, they had very
serious complications,” he said. “This is sure to set off
many discussions going forward.”



Michael Jackson to be buried on his birthday

LOS ANGELES

THE KING of Pop will be
buried on what would have been
his 51st birthday, a spokesman
for Michael Jackson’s family said
Tuesday, according to the Asso-
ciated Press.

Jackson will be buried at a pri-
vate ceremony at Forest Lawn-
Glendale on Aug. 29, spokesman
Ken Sunshine said in a state-
ment. Guests will be limited to
family and close friends, Sun-
shine said.

“The Jackson family once
again wishes to express its grati-
tude to Michael’s fans around the
world for their support during
these difficult times,” the state-
ment said.

Details about the ceremony and
the whereabouts of Jackson’s
body have been tightly guarded.
The announcement came a day
after the New York Daily News
reported comments by Jackson’s
father, Joe Jackson, that his son
would be buried on what would
have been his birthday.

Sunshine said Jackson will be
buried on the Holly Terrace at the
cemetery’s Great Mausoleum. The
cemetery’s Web site describes the
mausoleum as featuring replicas
of works by Michelangelo. It also
features a Stained glass recreation
of Leonardo da Vinci’s “The Last
Supper.”

The cemetery is located in the
city of Glendale, which is about 8
miles north of downtown Los
Angeles. It is a different loca-
tion from the Hollywood Hills
cemetery where Jackson’s family
was seen gathering days after his
death on June 25.

Forest Lawn spokesman Bill
Martin said the cemetery does
not comment on private funeral
services or on steps that might
be taken to handle fans who try
to show up for the burial.

“We’ve handled high-profile
services in the past,” Martin said.

He said the cemetery is on pri-
vate property, and measures will
be taken to discourage “loiter-
ing” on the day of Jackson’s ser-
vice.



Rick Bowmer/AP Photo

THIS July 7, 2009 file photo shows the Jackson family motorcade arriving at the
Forest Lawn Memorial Parks and Mortuaries in Los Angeles, prior to the memori-
al service for Michael Jackson. More than six weeks after Michael Jackson died,
his body has yet to be buried.

- "Big Brother

11" to address
Chima's
expulsion

LOS ANGELES

WHY exactly was Chima
Simone kicked out?

Tuesday's "Big Brother
11" episode promised to
address why producers
removed the 33-year-old
freelance journalist from

i the CBS reality series,

i which isolates 13 contes-

i tants inside a makeshift
two-story house and moni-
tors their every move with
dozens of cameras, accord-
ing to the Associated Press.

"You will see why, basi-
cally, our back was up
against the wall and we had
to expel her from the
game," show host Julie
Chen said Monday on CBS'
"The Early Show," which
she co-hosts. "You will see
her behavior that led up to
the expulsion. Then, you
can decide."

CBS released a statement
Saturday that said Simone,
from West Hollywood,
Calif., was evicted by the
producers for violating the
rules. The network also said
Simone will not be part of

i the show's seven-person

i jury, which selects the

? $500,000 grand prize win-
ner.

Sunday's episode showed
how Simone was aggravat-

i ed because her ally, body-

i builder Jessie Godderz, was
spontaneously nominated

i for eviction Thursday

i because of the "coup d'e-
tat,” a power secretly voted
on by viewers that was used
to overthrow Simone's
nominations.

i Fans have questioned

i whether Simone was boot-

: ed or quit. Chatter from the
remaining seven house-
guests suggest she wanted
out of the house. On Fri-
day, Simone was seen on

i the show's live Internet

i video feeds throwing her

? microphone into the back-

? yard whirlpool spa.

i "She still didn't have to
leave after that. She just
didn't want to be here,"
contestant Natalie Martinez
said on Monday's "Big
Brother After Dark," an
uncensored and unedited
live Showtime 2 broadcast
of what's happening inside
the house each night.

Since entering the house

i last month, Simone has

i been one of the season's
most outspoken house-
guests. When she was nom-
inated for eviction during
the first week, CBS cen-
sored her live last-plea
speech, which referred to
derogatory terms used by
her competitor.

Producers have evicted
two contestants on previ-

i ous "Big Brother" editions.

i Justin Sebik was kicked off

i the second season when he
placed a knife to the throat
of a fellow houseguest.
Scott Weintraub was
removed from the fourth
season after throwing fur-
niture.








WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

ANOTHER of Richard Hokemeir’s collection,
the perfect island sunset on the beach.









ALTHOUGH they no
longer litter the
Long Wharf har-
bour, this picture is
of a Haitian sloop.

Save the
turtles
show

see page nine



of

1S

rl

Adding a twist

to the ordinary
See page eight

eae



Pe ~

&

The Tribune SECTION B e



By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THESE days its seems the craft of photog-
raphy, particularly taking images that cap-
ture raw emotion is quickly becoming a
thing of the past.

With high-tech cameras and photoshopping capabilities
making it easier to compensate for what photographers have
not been taught, today’s world is filled with overnight pho-
tographers with no real training.

However one veteran has remained true to his passion,
and now 40 years after capturing his first image as a profes-
sional photographer, Richard Hokemeir has decided to put
his work on display.

Mr Hokemeir is set to open his newest photo exhibition
titled Richard’s Photographic Art Appreciation Weekend
at the Poop Deck this Saturday from noon until 8pm.

The exhibition will feature more than 500 images taken
during his long career and will also include many images
from his recent collection.

Mr Hokemeir has worked in many fields including the
Armed Forces, the media, and has also done missionary
work.

He explained that he takes a unique approach to art and
photography, and has a knack for seeking the beauty beyond
what most others see.

He said that he has such a love of nature that it is not
unusual for him to photograph something like a regular hibis-
cus ten to 20 times, because “the closer you look at the
image, the more likely you are to see the true essence of
that picture.”

Mr Hokemeir also incorporates the use of specific canvas-
es that help bring out the truest form of the images he cap-
tures.

These include a unique type of paper made from sugarcane,
bamboo, Torchon, and cotton all imported from countries
around the globe.

Mr Hokemeir said three years ago, he came out of retire-
ment after spending less than a year at home. For him, life is
about exploring, discovering the uncharted territory, and
experiencing something new.

“Tn this exhibition you can expect to see photography in a
different way, and different papers from around the world.

“We print in 10 colours and not in 4, between the papers,
the colours, and the ink, it takes photography into a whole
new dimension, and we don’t photoshop.”

He said sitting at home made him feel older than he was,
and added that he is more excited than ever about starting this
new chapter of his life with his exhibition.



Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EKZ3EGMWC_EESRAX INGEST_TIME 2012-01-27T19:41:58Z PACKAGE UF00084249_01384
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


TRY OUR
DOUBLE

FILET-0-FISH "™*oven’*

HIGH
LOW

CLOUDY,

{Y\

92F
81F

‘ FSTORMS

Volume: 105 No.221
D5 \
Dy

Marital rane taw
is a numan b.



aly
Ui

Amnesty International
backs Government’s
plans for Seon

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A POWERFUL human
rights group has thrown its
weight behind the governmen-
t’s plan to outlaw marital rape
in the Bahamas.

Amnesty International has
vowed to back the proposed
amendment of the Sexual
Offences Act in order to pro-
tect the rights of every Bahami-
an woman.

A spokesman for the group
told The Tribune: "Amnesty
International would certainly
support that law being passed.

“We view women's rights as
a human right. If there is abuse
in any kind of relationship,
whether it is within a marriage
or with unmarried couples, or
in the case of incest, all of those
are matters that need to be
dealt with properly within the
law.

"On the basic stance of the
law, Amnesty would support
the way it's written to support
persons rights.”

The amendment, introduced
to the House of Assembly by
Minister of State for Social



I
THE SUBJECT has been a source
of heated debate.

Development Loretta Butler-
Turner last month, has sparked
a heated national debate on the
issue.

In Parliament last month,
Mrs Butler-Turner noted that
the current law is outdated
adding that spousal rape had
long been outlawed in many
other countries.

American law recognised
marital rape as a crime in 1976
but it is still a sensitive issue as
many states have lesser penal-
ties for persons convicted of the
offence, compared to acquain-
tance rape or that of a stranger.

SEE page 12

HURRICANE INSURANCE

The Tribune

YOUR PASSPORT TO MISS UNIVERSE



alowe@tribunemedia. net

WAKE UP!

Try our
Big Breakfast Sandwich

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009



PRICE — 75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



Police Constable
is accused of
attacking his
ex-girliriend

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A POLICE Constable who
is alleged to have attacked his
ex-girlfriend was arraigned in
Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Akeem Bonaby, 25, is
charged with causing harm
and making threats of death
to Georgina Silver while at
Hamster Road on Wednes-
day, May 27.

Bonaby, who was arraigned
before Deputy Chief Magis-

SEE page 12

SR eee eeu Tia ea

A

s

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER TS government officials and dine Chinese Ambassador Hu Dingxian look on as construction work
on the new national stadium takes place yesterday. Members of the government toured the facility at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre.
e SEE PAGE TWO AND BUSINESS SECTION

Sports Minister
tight-lipped on = Man gets 3)
reports he will be useer| year sentence

demitting office

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

for murder

A MAN who murdered a
27-year-old member of a
Junkanoo group has been

DESMOND Bannister,
Youth, Sports and Culture
Minister, yesterday declined to
confirm or deny reports that
he will be demitting office, stat-
ing that he “will not comment
on anything relating to
Desmond Bannister.”

There have been rumours in
political circles that there will
soon be a shuffle of Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham’s

SEE page 12

You Can Be Blown

HURRICANE Bill continued on its predicted path
yesterday as it gathered strength over the Atlantic,
churning along with 110mph winds.

While the category two hurricane is still not expected
to affect the Bahamas or the United States, forecasters
said it could cause big problems for Bermuda and the
Canadian maritime provinces.

SEE page 12

Or you can rest easy knowing
that you have excellent insurance
coverage no matter which

way ‘the wind blows.

Nobody does it better. Proud to ve a part of the



jailed for 35 years.

James McKenzie, 25, was
convicted last year of shooting
Kevin Dean. The incident
took place in December 2006
near the old City Market food
store in Market Street where
the One Family Junkanoo
group was practising for the
annual Boxing Day parade.

Mr Dean, who was shot in
the back, died at the scene.

At his trial, McKenzie

SEE page 12

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(RARAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

: ie
if 00 8

Abaca
To Ch Sana Tt Oe?

Ema

cc
Te Ad



MISS UNIVERSE 2009 FASHION SHOW

Congratu Lattows

to the desianers Rachel Tarnquest-Gartia, Basheva Eve,
Sabrina Francis § Brynwda Knowles
Bahama Hand Prints fabric donated fer this avert

Lecaled on Ermest & Mackey Streets * Open Mon-Fri 1lam-dpm, Sat 1lam-zpm
Telephone 242-394-4111 = wew.bahamahandprints.com





NASSAU AND BAHAM

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Miss Universe pageant
tickets still available |

jr

IN an effort to improve tick-
et sales for the Miss Universe
Pageant 2009 to be held this
Sunday at Atlantis, organisers
are offering special group
packages.

The Miss Universe competi-
tion is promising to be one of
the most exciting and glam-
orous events ever to take place
in the Bahamas. Pageant
organisers said yesterday that
there are still lots of tickets
available but that they expect
sales to pick up considerably
over the next several days.

Group packages are now
being offered and patrons can
get one free ticket for every
three tickets purchased for the
final show. The deal was also
offered for the presentation
show held last Sunday at
Atlantis. According to organ-
isers of the show, about 90 per
cent of the tickets were sold,
which is on par with presenta-
tion shows of the past several
years.

Miss Universe organisers,
Ministry of Tourism and
Atlantis officials are all very
pleased with the pageant
events to date. Paula Shugart,
president of the Miss Universe
Organisation, has stated many
times over the past several
weeks that this is one of the
best organised pageants she
has experienced during her
tenure. She lauded the Min-
istry of Tourism and team
Atlantis for their all efforts to
ensure the success of the event.

The Miss Universe finals,
the viewing party and the coro-
nation event will all be held at
Atlantis on Sunday.

All-access tickets for the
viewing party, which will take
place on the Royal Deck are
$145.

SUIT, SHIRT & TIE

Wess

Berard Ad + Mackey 51+ Thompson Blvd

Caves Village
Retail Sales Center



es elk ea
MISS UNIVERSE Dayana Mendoza ;

VIP tickets for final show, }
which will be broadcast live on }
NBC to 150 countries in the ;
world, are $1,000 and include }
entrance to the coronation ball. }

Tickets for sections 3-7 in }
the Imperial Ballroom are}
$750; sections 8-11 are $400; :
sections 11-13 are $250; sec- }
tions 14-20 are $175. :

All-access tickets to the}
coronation ball, to be held in }
Atlantis’ Royal Court, are}
$145. The newly crowned Miss }
Universe and her court will be }
presented in a “highly dramat- :
ic” fashion at the ball. i

THIS morning the 84 contestants }
of the Miss Universe 2009 Com- :
petition attend their final media :
junket. :
Reporters from both local and :
international media outlets will :
have one last chance to speak :
one-on-one with the beauties :
before the final show on Sunday. :

Then tomorrow, Bahamians :
are invited to come out and cheer :
on the beauty queens as they take :
part in a float parade which starts :
from Arawak Cay at 5.30pm. i

The float parade then follows :
along West Bay Street to the }
Wyndham Nassau Resort and }
Crystal Palace Casino on Cable :
Beach, where it is scheduled to :
end at around 7pm. :

ee
EXTERMINATORS
aU eee hays)
Mau) mercer ay |

Our Retail Sales Center facilitates all of your
banking needs including:

¢ Mortgages

e Loans

° Credit Cards
e Drafts and Wire Transfer

e¢ ABM Machines for cash transactions

e Friendly Experienced Staff

e Personalized Banking Experience

over $10,000 in prizes, including
a $2,500 Gift Certificate, iPods and many other fabulous prizes!

New national stadium
is a work in progress

MINISTER OF Sports
Desmond Bannister
presents the Chinese
Ambassador Hu
Dingxian with an
Olympic team track
shirt as Deputy Prime
Minister Brent Symon-
ette and Minister of
Environment Phenton
Neymour look on.
Government offi-
cials toured the new
facility yesterday and
got to see how con-
struction of the new
national stadium is
progressing.
+ SEE BUSINESS SECTION








































Felipé Major/Tribune staff

DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER
Brent Symonette leads yesterday's
tour of the facility.








PROJECT MANAGER Iram Lewis describes an element of
the national stadium construction to government officials
yesterday.

Scott wants to help you be more eco-friendly
with this strong cotton tote bag.

To redeem your
bring in a store receipt for any two of
the products shown to The d’Albenas

Agency, Palmdale and get your tote bag!

tote,

OFFER GOOD WHILE SUPPLIES LAST



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

The best for news . . .

Www. tribune 24 2 .cora



Banker accused
of stealing about
$20,000 from
FINCO

A BANKER accused of
stealing nearly $20,000 from the
Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas Limited by reason of
employment was arraigned in
the Magistrates Court yester-
day.

Raymond Antonio, 48, was
arraigned before Deputy Chief
Magistrate Carolita Bethel,
charged with four counts of
stealing by reason of employ-
ment and eight counts of utter-
ing a forged document.

It is alleged that between
April and July 2007, Antonio
stole a total of $18,800 from the
Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas Limited. Antonio is
also charged with eight counts
of uttering forged documents
including Finance Corporation
of the Bahamas Limited
cheques.

The prosecution yesterday
presented the court with a fiat
signed by attorney Michael
Barnett. The matter could pro-
ceed by way of a preliminary
hearing or Voluntary Bill of
Indictment.

Antonio, who is represented
by attorney Elliot Lockhart,
was not required to enter a plea
to any of the charges. He was
granted bail in the sum of
$10,000 with two sureties. The
case was adjourned to Septem-
ber 1.

COB sees increase

in student numbers



THE College of the
Bahamas has seen a “signifi-
cant” increase in the number
of students enrolled this year
compared to 2008.

COB said yesterday that it
has accepted approximately
1,700 new students for the Fall
2009 semester.

The new students will be
hosted to an orientation session
tomorrow at 9am outside the
Portia Smith Services Centre
located on the main campus,
Oakes Field.

GM confirms Port Lucaya’s pending closure

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia. net

THE Ministry of Tourism’s
Club Grand Bahama pro-
gramme was “a good idea but a
little too late” to improve the
“orim” conditions facing the
Port Lucaya Resort and Yacht
Club, its general manager said
yesterday as he confirmed the
resort’s pending closure.

However, Glyine Delancy
gave an assurance that all of the
17 full-time and 13 part-time
staff working at the resort will
receive their complete sever-
ance packages from the compa-
ny in the next 24 to 48 hours.

The 16-year-old resort will be
the latest of several Grand
Bahama hotels to close for good
in the face of a worsening out-
look for tourism.

Mr Delancy cited the combi-
nation of a “protracted
decrease” in occupancy levels
and the “aging and declining

condition” of
the property
which called
for a major
investment if
it was to be
improved.
The final
closure will
take place on
August 31,
2009. The
property,
which com-
prises 160 guest rooms but was
only operating 85 rooms, had
earlier this year been selected as
one of the hotels in Grand
Bahama which would be
offered to potential customers
as part of the Ministry of
Tourism’s new all-inclusive pro-
gramme, Club Grand Bahama.
Minister of Tourism Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace said he
envisaged that the programme
would see enhanced interest in
Grand Bahama from tourists
and a greater spread of visitors’

DCO) a mele sts



cash throughout the island’s
economy. But Mr Delancy said
the Club Grand Bahama
scheme came too late to save
the resort, which had “become
too costly to operate at the stan-
dard that meets the expecta-
tions of our guests.”

In his statement, Mr Delancy
commended the resort’s “close-
knit staff” for their “profes-
sional and courteous service
throughout the years, and dur-
ing this challenging time.”

Once severance packages are
disbursed to staff in the next
two days, some will be imme-
diately laid off, while a number
will be maintained to cater to
the needs of some guests who
are still staying at the property,
he added.

Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes said he was informed
of the resort’s pending closure
on Monday by Grand Bahama
Port Authority chairman Ian
Rolle.

However, he confirmed that a

Public schools ‘fall’ open on schedule

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

PUBLIC schools throughout
the country are set to open on
schedule for the fall semester,
director of Education Lionel
Sands said.

"We do not see anything that
will prevent that from happen-
ing,” Mr Sands told The Tribune
yesterday.

In the past, extensive school
repairs during the summer
months have delayed the open-
ing of many public schools, but
Mr Sands does not anticipate a
problem this year.

"We didn't have any exten-
sive repairs because over the
past two years we've been doing
repairs so this year it has been
scaled back because we did not
have as many problems with our

physical plants (schools)," said
Mr Sands. He said crews are
busy with "minimal" jobs like
painting, replacing windows,
repairing bathroom fixtures and
toilets, and upgrading plumbing
and electrical systems.

All public school teachers are
to report to work on August 24,
Mr Sands said, adding that class-
es officially start on August 31.
Meanwhile, students and teach-
ers of the T G Glover primary
school — who have been waiting
more than three years to return
to classrooms after an extensive
repair project was launched —
will have to wait until at least
January 2010 before the school
on Horse Shoe Drive is ready
to accommodate them.

"T G Glover will not be fin-
ished for this September; we
expect that to be completed for
an opening of January 2010,"

said Mr Sands.

Until then, the students and
teachers will continue to use
temporary classrooms which
were built at the Albury Sayle
Primary School on Nassau
Street when T G Glover was
first closed.

In 2002, former Education
Minster Alfred Sears discovered
that students and teachers were
using a building which had been
condemned by structural engi-
neers from the Ministry of
Works. Classes were immedi-
ately suspended at the school
and it was ordered that a new
primary school be built on the
old TG Glover School site.
However, the new Minister of
Education Carl Bethel has
expressed several concerns
about the site, and called it an
unsuitable location for a prima-
ry school.

Andros men arraigned in connection with drug seizure

TWO Andros men charged
in the recent seizure of more
than $44,000 worth of marijua-
na, which was discovered on a
boat docked in the Potter’s Cay
area on Sunday, were arraigned

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION

Business

Weatheree oes

re eeeeece meee saeee File

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

Solid Wade



te Vielzira

ani
To

o

2

in the Magistrate’s Court yes-
terday.

Police found the illegal drugs
on the boat at around 2pm
while acting on a tip.

Neil Duncombe, 28, of Small
Hope, Andros, and Roswell
Jones, 24, of Fresh Creek,
Andros, were arraigned before

Police probe into
Nassau Village
food store fire

POLICE are investigating
the cause of a fire that caused
extensive damage to a Nassau
Village food store.

At around 4.30am a fire
broke out at the Food Max
Supermarket which is located
on the ground level of a two-
storey concrete structure on
Taylor Street.

Three fire units and their
crews removed the front secu-
rity door of the store to gain
access and to extinguish the fire
inside the secured building. The
interior of the building received
extensive smoke and water
damage.

The cause of the blaze is
under investigation.

Worig’s Phere) if ii

i 5
(242/570 a

0, Pele cums yell e sire

| i
4 Ps || ra



Deputy Chief Magistrate Car-
olita Bethel in Court 8, Bank
Lane, on the charge of posses-
sion of marijuana with intent
to supply. Duncombe, who is
represented by attorney Tama-
ra Taylor, and Jones, who is
represented by attorney Ian
Cargill, both pleaded not guilty
to the drug charge.

The men were each granted
bail in the sum of $30,000 with
two sureties. The accused were
ordered to report to the Fresh
Creek Police Station every
Monday, Wednesday and Sat-
urday before 6pm. The case
was adjourned to September 1.

SE BE ses
AL La
axa O TO)

Ue
822-2197

"BACK TO SCHOOL UN

SALE‘

10% OFF All Plaids,Stripes & Trigger
LARGEST STOCK IN THE BAHAMAS

CRS 6: 91010] ac eee
CR @lOE: lie Re en Ate (21) seen
£2110) 10\61(0)() ee
Os) 0 | eee
© |[o|e 2 eee
¢ RM Bailey, Carmichael ....

“private sector entity” — thought
to be Ross University — is in
negotiations with a view to leas-
ing the property. If this takes
place, six employees could be
rehired, meaning the loss of
only seven jobs at the property,
said the minister. It was only
last week that Mr Foulkes,
responding to a Central Bank

of the Bahamas report which
suggested that further lay-offs
in the tourism sector are expect-
ed “in the summer months”,
said he was not aware of any
impending job losses.

Yesterday Mr Foulkes said:
“Things come up every day and
we have to monitor it on a dai-
ly basis.”



CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

THe Miner THO eH Reson ATION 4 CLAANTHO Byes, oa THR ke & Free!
Nasa0"s Oey PROTESPOMAL, CORTE Soo Cann & Uso snr Care §esrits,

* Carpe. Uphokiery, Sine aad Mahle Cheating &
Hestorahion Spectakst

« Peochon Cleaning Sypaens nomwes Deepa Heerey
Sail, Racteria, Creasc,'Woierrarks aad Quire from
Canpeting & Furinre, nevoring them un like mee
i fraction of replacement creat
Carpet, Sofa's, Loweecats, Choirs, Dining Chaim, Cons.
fours, Groat, Ties, Marble & Soone
Pemian. Wool & Sik Carpet Cleasing Specialist

Marble Polshing, Revoniion & Care
* Word Ploor Bewtenation

Authorised Stone Tech Professional Contactar
CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 o 323-1594

OWLY WE CAN 00 IT BMAATS
We CAA ed 9 ae rece one * Win kere ong
* pen ie eral ido

L RMSE OF PPE

SYSTEM can)

Look Qood
Feel Great

in one of our
Suits from

Jack Victor!!
Large

selection

of belts,

ties,

shirts,

shoes &

socks.

MORLEY
For %

MEN

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6
Bayparl Building, Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 * Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com






RSS sea!
$10.00
wb 3.99
web 5,99
$10.50
ub 7.50

® Cotton Twill 60" Colour Fast

No Iron Solid Colours .....





Belting in all sizes * Shirt Buttons * Skirt Hooks & Eyes

Ov ENTIRE

OoFF STOCK
Backp acks —

ronman, a Fila, Bodyglove

Pan Fiajit re ae a, 4

2 EU EL

KP
or oon Me acer
cs Se nh

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

This law must be passed

THIS WEEK a friend reminded us of an
article the late editor/publisher of this news-
paper wrote many years ago about this coun-
try’s social hypocrisy and double standards.
To illustrate his point Sir Etienne recorded
a “reading out” ceremony performed in an
Out Island church to have a young lady,
who had become pregnant, removed from
the flock. She was not married.

What made this “reading out”, or expul-
sion, unique was the open rumour in the
small settlement that the pastor performing
the “reading out” ceremony was the father of
the child.

In those days pregnancy outside of mar-
riage was a monumental disgrace. For an
unfortunate woman, not only would she be
excommunicated from her church, but she
would have to hide herself from society. She
moved around like a leper, an embarrass-
ment to herself and her family.

We recall interviewing an elderly lady
about 40 years ago who described her youth
and the social taboos of her era against
unwed mothers. Of course, there were no
raised eyebrows, or tut-tutting when the man
who had fathered the child abandoned his
obligations and skipped off looking for even
greener pastures. In old age he would sit
back, puff out his chest and boast of his
many children — both “insides” and “out-
sides.”

This was a situation demanded by men
and docilely accepted by women. Many of
our readers have heard a Bahamian woman
tell another: “Chile, if he aint beat you, he
aint love you!” There are some women today
who accept this as a perfectly normal situa-
tion.

Was it this attitude of man’s rightful dom-
inance that led so many women to follow
their PLP leaders to the polls in 2002 to vote
against the Ingraham government’s refer-
endum offering them the same rights as their
male counterparts to confer nationality on
their children and foreign spouses? Their
rejection of equality was a disgraceful per-
formance. That referendum contributed to
the defeat of the Ingraham government a
few months later.

One letter writer to The Tribune, con-
demning the amendment to the Sexual
Offences Act that would make it an offence
for a husband to rape his wife, claimed that
such an amendment would destroy the foun-
dation of marriage in this country. The man
is the head of the home “as Christ is the
head of the church”, the writer reminded
Bahamians. What the Bible said was that a
man — not an animal — was the head of the
home. This amendment would strengthen

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LUCKSON VERSANNES
of BAHAMAS AVENUE, THE GROVE, P.O. Box 8843,
is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 12'*day of August, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box N-

NASSAU, BAHAMAS,

7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Wa

HOME & BUSINESS 4 ZONES ALARM
SPECIAL $299.00 INSTALLED

HOME/BUSINESSES
1 Panel & L.ED Keypad
2 Motion Detectors
2 Door Contacts
1 Siren
1 Transformer
4 Amp Stand-By Battery
| Wemco Decal

“tl Go Cs Votn
Cri

2 HOURS MONITORING,

the foundation of marriage because it would
remove an animal from the bedchamber and
keep him out until he discovered his Chris-
tian manhood. Our letter writer then point-
ed to Prime Minister Ingraham as the leader
of the nation to emphasise the point that
there can be only one leader. However, what
he failed to point out was that Mr Ingra-
ham can only head the nation with the con-
sent of the majority of the Bahamian people.
So also, under this proposed amendment a
man can only exercise his conjugal rights
with the consent of his wife.

The problem with many of our preachers
is that they dwell too much in the old testa-
ment, and with an angry God. Much of
today’s Middle East problems — suspicion
and hatred between Jews and Arabs — can
be traced back to Old Testament history.

Jesus’ teachings in the New Testament
portrayed a God of compassion, of love,
much forgiveness — the good shepherd who
goes in search of the one lost sheep. Jesus
leaves his disciples with a final command-
ment — “Love one another ... as I have
loved you, so you must love one another.”

A man who would force himself on his
wife against her will is not a man who loves
his wife. To him she is property ... property
for his sole pleasure; property that he can
abuse at will.

In the New Testament there is great
respect for women. They are not chattels in
Jesus’ eyes, rather helpmates in his mission
of salvation.

Let’s turn to the parable of the woman
caught in adultery. In the Old Testament —
the law of Moses — she would have been
stoned to death. To test Jesus the Pharisees
wanted to know how he would deal with
her. Jesus quietly bent over and with his fin-
ger wrote in the sand. Then he straightened
up looked each hypocrite in the eye and
said: “Whichever one of you who has com-
mitted no sin may throw the first stone at
her.” He then bent down and continued
writing— probably the sins of each one of
them. Quietly, one by one, these arrogant
men melted into the shadows. If the Bahami-
an pastor who had performed the “reading
out” ceremony against the unmarried young
girl who was carrying his child had been
there, he probably would have been the first
to turn tail and run from his shame.

No there are two types of men. This pro-
posed amendment that would introduce rape
into the marriage chamber are for men who
don’t belong there because they do not know
the duties or responsibilities of a husband.

This amendment has to be passed into
law — and the sooner the better.



THE TRIBUNE



Youth operating
from ‘Paradise
Lost’ perspective

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THANK you for allowing a
space for the specific purpose
of addressing some of our
young men and now even
women in The Bahamas. It
appears to me that a lot of
youth are now operating from
a “Paradise Lost” perspective
and are currently choosing
not to seize their birthright.

As I drive around beauti-
ful Nassau, I am reminded of
all the beauty, abundance and
opportunity that some of my
brothers have chosen not to
see, or perhaps see it and not
understand their purpose in
this life. OK, I hear all your
cries of social alienation —
Man the Babylon and dem
politicians just keep on hold-
ing me back! Enough already!
For most who are seemingly
“suffering” or “doing bad”
have simply chosen to be in
the place where you are. You
have made crime a functional
equivalent to work and your
behaviour is no longer per-
ceived as deviant by your
peers. In fact, people in your
neighbourhood even glorify
your pitiful state, either out
of fear of you or because they
are simply ignorant of what
is normal and good behav-
iour.

You have chosen to with-
draw from the political
process and are now in a per-
petual stage of disenchant-
ment, cynicism and alienation
— your choice!

You have chosen not to
respect the authority of fami-
ly, school, police and commu-
nity involvement — your
choice!

You have chosen to be
involved in the narcotics
trade, which you believe
offers the true currency of
social mobility and inclusion
in the society — your choice!

You have chosen to
become lesbians and homo-
sexuals and sell your bodies
for material things — read
Leviticus 18:22 — your
choice!

You have chosen to pick up
a gun rather than a pen or
book, hate your brother
rather than love him — your
choice!

You have chosen to get a
girl pregnant and then not
take care of your children —
again, your choice!

So now I declare you for-
given. It is time for you to rise
and shine and participate in
our government and civil soci-
ety and be the youth, men and
women that God intended.
Nobody says that it will be

NOTICE

to attend.

There will be an important meeting for
all parents of St. Francis and Joesph
School on Wednesday August 19th 2009
at 6:00pm at Xaviers Lower School
Auditorium. Please make a special effort

HELP
WANTED

An Established Medical Facility

seeks to fill the following position:

REGISTERED

SERVICE & RESPONSE,
ACCESS CONTROL

PHYSICIAN

General / Family Practice (Full-time)

Kindly submit application to:

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



easy, however choose now to
be obedient and principled in
your thoughts, words and
deeds — for by a man’s deeds
he will be known!

Most of you are so loved,
so gifted, however you are
constantly running away from
what you know to be true and
have embarked upon a
Jezebel spirit allowing and
permitting any actions in your
midst.

You greet your brothers
with respect in the bar rooms,
on the domino table and in
the clubs, however you sel-
dom tell your mother or
father that you love and
respect them.

You seldom hug and kiss
your children and still have
all the expectations to be
loved and respected. You
must remember that love
does not equal compromise
with truth or obedience.

You are in paradise, how-
ever you do not see the truth.
You have been disillusioned
by fake hip-hop artists, gangs-

ta lyrics, the boys rolling on
the “chromes”, the girls in the
revealing and seductive dress-
es, purely designed to remove
your eyes from the ultimate
prize. Strength comes in the
recognition of your true pur-
pose, after all you were creat-
ed in the image and likeness
of God.

I beg you to Rise and Shine
and give God the glory. I beg
you to realise your potential
and express love, rather than
hate. There may be times
when you would have to,
either temporarily or perma-
nently, remove yourself from
those persons who are not
doing the right thing.

Today, make it a point to
examine your life, look
around for positive role mod-
els, ask them how they did it,
copy and reproduce.

Tell someone that you love
them and then demonstrate
your love that is within each
of you.

Rise and Shine, my youth
— the future is in your hands!

FRANKLYN “DOOM”
MUNROE

Nassau,

August, 2009.

Clean, green and pristine, but
then there is poor grade diesel

EDITOR, The Tribune.

1 AM a big fan of clean, green and pristine, but frankly it
is an affront by our government.

We have people cleaning up our beaches and roadways
but we do not supply adequate, closed garbage bins and we
charge people to dump and the dump, encouraging them to

dump in vacant lots instead.

The biggest insult though is the importation of unclean

(poor grade) diesel fuel.

This morning I could hardly see where I was driving as the
big truck in front of me spewed out so much exhaust fumes
that it caused a fog for miles. Disgusting!

I have it from business owners that they have to use
engine cleaner constantly in their diesel vehicles to keep
them functioning due to the poor grade of diesel we import.

This diesel fuel is the same stuff that powers all those
Jitneys (still) polluting up Bay Street and beyond making it
revolting for locals and tourists alike.

We are a country only a few feet about sea level and yet
we seem to think the eventual sea rise due to over polluting

will not affect us.
We need to act now.

We are committing suicide by not protecting our envi-

ronment.

Write to your local MP and demand he looks into this
unclean fuel debacle or build another floor on your house
*cause in the future this island will be like Venice!

S APPLETON
Nassau,
August, 2009.

BIMINI BAY

RESORT ANT MARI A

fg

P.O. Box CR-55050
Nassau, Bahamas
or
Via email to: a_1_phyneeded@live.com

DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESCUCESAND
of Pp oeobiiniboyresor.com 0

La | Ad |i


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009, PAGE 5





LOCAL NEWS

www. tribune 2 4 2 .c



Man says he has
found section
from the space
shuttle Challenger

AN AMERICAN visiting
the Bahamas has discovered
what he believes is a section
of metal from the nose of
the space shuttle Chal-
lenger.

Jim Tull, who was on his
boat when he discovered
the fragment, said that he
wants to use the piece of
debris as a "teaching tool,”
the Tampa Examiner
reported.

The Virginia native has
announced plans to take the }
segment around and show it }
to people. ;

However, he may have a
serious fight on his hands.

NASA has cautioned Mr
Tull that it is illegal to keep
any part of the shuttle which }
is still property of the space
agency.

But Mr Tull said that he
is now waiting for a letter
from NASA and is hoping
that some sort of arrange-
ment can be made.

Challenger broke apart
just 73 seconds after the
launch of its tenth mission
on January 28, 1986. The
space craft was destroyed
when an O-ring seal on its
right solid rocket booster
failed. The O-rings failed to
seal due to a variety of fac-
tors, including unusually
cold temperatures. Seven
astronauts died in the disas-
ter. ;

When Challenger explod- }
ed its debris dropped into :
the Atlantic Ocean and :
NASA scrambled to recover }
the pieces of the shuttle. :

Today, the space agency
makes every effort to keep
any parts belonging to its
space craft off auction sites
such as eBay.

It is a violation of federal
law to remove any material
belonging to a NASA space
craft.

~ Claims of payment prob ems
in government youth initiative

But students told they have ‘nothing to worry about’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

YOUNGSTERS who
claim they haven’t been paid
after taking part in the gov-
ernment’s summer youth
initiatives have been told
they have “nothing to worry
about.”

A number of students
took part in the Ministry of
Youth Sports and Culture’s
summer internship pro-
gramme, which saw them
placed with various private
businesses across the coun-
try.

Wages

But some claim they faced
problems getting paid on
time and it is has now been
weeks since they were sup-
posed to receive their final
$125 a week wages.

One told The Tribune
how he is fed up that after
all of his hard work, he has
been left without the funds
he was relying on as he
heads back to school.

But yesterday youth min-
ister Desmond Bannister
said there could be “any
number of reasons” why stu-

DESMOND BANNISTER



dents have not yet been paid
for which the Ministry
would not be to blame.

“Tf they’re placed with
business for an internship,
the business sends in
paysheets to the Ministry
(before cheques are dis-
bursed).

“Sometimes business may
be late, or sometimes young
people were supposed to be
there have not been there
and so the business has to
check up on that,” said the
minister.

New anti-drug plan ‘must
be more comprehensive’

THE Bahamas’ next national anti-drug

However, he assured
them that if they do all that
is required of them, students
who participated in any of
the ministry’s summer pro-
grammes will be paid “by
the end of the week.”

“There’s absolutely no
problem whatsoever.

“We have had the biggest
ever summer progrmme
that we’ve ever had, some
would say the most success-
ful that we’ve ever had and
I understand that there’s a
small number of young peo-
ple who may not have been
paid the week that they fin-
ished, and that’s quite nor-
mal.”

Experience

The Ministry of Youth
Sports and Culture’s Sum-
mer youth programmes
encompasses a wide variety
of programmes in which
young people are able to
engage to gain extra experi-
ence and a source of
income.

Mr Bannister said stu-
dents are paid “according
to their qualifications” and
delays on their part in bring-
ing in the certificates to be
registered can contribute to

setbacks in the timeliness of
payments.

Meanwhile, bureaucratic
requirements which see the
Ministry of Youth Sports
and Culture send off to the
Ministry of Finance to have
student’s cheques prepared,
before having them sent
back to the Ministry of

Youth for disbursement,
can contribute to delays.
Mr Bannister claimed that
under the former PLP
administration some stu-
dents who took part in the
government’s summer pro-
grammes were not paid
“until October” of the year
in which they participated.

UOC MRT EDS TIT TTT)

A WALLET and passport belonging to Nicole Runestien
were lost in the Fox Hill area during the Fox Hill Day fes-
tival. Anyone finding the items are asked to contact The Tri-
bune or deliver the items to the appropriate authorities.

RUSSELL’S WAREHOUSE
CLOSING SALE

Rivet Rite Shelving, Gondolas, Glass Shelves,
2 & 4 Arm Display Racks, Gridwall, Slatwall,
Slotted Standards, and Hardware.
Asst. Fixtures and Fittings,
Men’s Coverall’s $5.00, S/S & L/S Whie Shirts $1-$5,
Blank ID Cards, 16” Stand Fans, Blank CD’s, Blk School
Shoes, Men’s Jeans sz. 46-50, $15, AND MORE,

Location: Madeira Shopping Center
Behind Mystical Gym - Entrance to Aquinas -
First left - First stairs on left.

Hours: Mon. to Thurs. 11am to 5pm Contact: 465-8648



plan should be “more comprehensive and
balanced” and should aim to tackle supply,
demand and trafficking, a top National
Security official said.

Permanent Secretary Missouri Sherman-
Peter said the issue of narcotics must be
addressed on a number of levels, including
law enforcement, public health, criminal
justice, and social and economic develop-
ment.

Addressing the opening session of the
training workshop for the Bahamas nation-
al anti-drug plan 2010-2014, Mrs Sherman-
Peter said the scheme should also take into
account the crime and violence created by
drug trafficking, including arms trafficking.

She said it should also focus on law
enforcement on land and sea _ to disrupt
trans-national criminal networks every-
where.

The Workshop is being held over three
days and is being facilitated by Inter-Amer-
ican Drug Abuse Control Commission
(CICAD) and The Bahamas’ National Anti-
Drug Secretariat (NADS).

“The illicit drug phenomenon is destruc-
tive, complex and challenging,” Mrs. Sher-
man-Peter said.

“It is driven primarily by ruthless drug
trafficking networks consumed by greed
and unmoved by the deadly consequences
that their illicit business inflict on people,
communities and on developed and devel-
oping countries alike.

“The illicit drug phenomenon is multi-
faceted in nature and that successful counter
measures require action on multiple fronts,



NATIONAL SECURITY Permanent Secretary,
Mrs Missouri Sherman-Peter.

by multiple stakeholders.”

Mrs Sherman-Peter said the structuring of
national drug control initiatives into com-
prehensive national anti-drug plans will
allow The Bahamas, and regional countries,
to provide “well-established” responses to
the challenges they face.

An effective drug plan should incorpo-
rate the full range of initiatives and activities
countries are taking, or must take, to “res-
olutely confront the illicit drug trade,” she
added.

AN EQUIPMENT fault at
BEC’s Windsor Field sub-sta-
tion caused a power outage in
the north-western part of the

Share your news

Public Consultations on

(1) Draft Consultation Procedure Guidelines
(2) Preliminary Determination on the Cost of
Capital for Designated SMP Operators

The Utilities Regulation & Competition Authority (URCA) is pleased to invite
comments from members of the public and interested parties on its
consultation documents released on 19 August 2009.

The Consultation on the “Draft Consultation Procedure Guidelines” seeks
feedback on the form of carrying out consultations, handling of confidential
information, and instances where the procedure may need to be different.
Interested parties can give comments by the 1* September 2009

The Consultation on “Preliminary Determinatian on the Cost of Capital for
Designated SMP Operators” addresses the proposed approach to calculating the
allowable rate of return for operators designated with Significant Market Power
(SMP) and presents proposed findings, estimates and a Preliminary
Determination. Interested parties can give comments by the ist October J009,

Copies of the consultation documents can be obtained from the URCA office in

island on Monday morning.

The electricity supply for
most of the area was restored
by llam, with the remaining
customers fully restored by 3pm
through alternative circuits. The
areas affected included
Westridge North and South,
Delaporte, Sandyport, Tropi-
cal Gardens and Love Beach.

BEC yesterday apologised
for any inconveniences caused
and said it is working “tireless-
ly” to repair the faulty equip-
ment.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



New Providence

downloaded

frarn the

URCA website at

Wi urcabohomas. bs and comments emailed ta infag@urcabahames, bs.

TAKE PART IN THE NEW REGULATORY REGIME. YOUR OPINIONS COUNT.

UTILITIES REGULATION & COMPETITION AUTHORITT

15 AEE

P.O. Bo A-S 800 F

Bahan |
wivw.urcabahamas.bs



T 2d. diddas

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Patrick Hanna/BIS

Defence Force summer camp sees
‘significant increase’ in participants

By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION SERVICES

THE almost two-fold
increase in the number of
children participating in the
Royal Bahamas Defence
Force Summer Youth Pro-
gramme “‘is a clear indication
that it must continue for
many years to come,” Nation-
al Security Minister Tommy
Turnquest said.

Initially intended as a “safe
and fun, learning environ-
ment” for children of the offi-
cers and marines of the
Defence Force during the
summer break, the pro-
gramme was expanded to
include children from the
wider community.

It ended last weekend at
HMBS Coral Harbour Base
with a series of performances
that included an arts and craft
display, wind instrument
recital, drama presentation,
choir performance and dance.

The programme was
launched in the summer of
2008 with 250 children rang-
ing in ages from five to 16
years. A year later, 400 chil-



MINISTER of National Security Tommy Turnquest is pictured with par-

ticipants in the second annual Royal Bahamas Defence Force Summer
Youth Programme which ended on August 14.

dren participated.

“The Royal Bahamas
Defence Force’s Summer
Youth Programme is unique
in that it exposes our young

people to the natural, indige-
nous environment that we are
blessed to have in the
Bahamas,” Mr Turnquest
said.

“The Force has designated
quite a significant number of
its resources — human, finan-
cial and material — to its over-
all success.

“The instructors are per-
sons of impeccable character
and integrity and have shown
an interest in teaching, and
for them, I am grateful.”

The programme was hosted
over six weeks with the activ-
ities intended to strengthen
participants’ physical, mental
and educational develop-
ment.

Guest speakers were
brought in to lead discussions

on a range of issues from
drug awareness to peer pres-
sure and gang violence.

Participants were also
treated to field trips to the
Ardastra Gardens and Zoo
and Pirates of Nassau, which
camp organisers said “helped
them garner knowledge of
the Bahamas.”

“We must truly congratu-
late the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force for its deter-
mined efforts to guide and
mould our young people
through quality time, care
and instruction,” Mr Turn-
quest said.







THE SECOND annual Royal
Bahamas Defence Force
Summer Youth Programme
ended with a series of per-
formances including the
plaiting of the Maypole.

He said he was “particular-
ly pleased” with the display
of Bahamian arts and craft
that were produced by the
participants.

“The quality of their work
exudes the commitment and
effort that was put forth,” Mr
Turnquest said. “I am
encouraged by their efforts
and abilities in all facets of
the programme.”



PROSPECTUS

June, 2009.

3:00p.m. on 27th August, 2009.

amounts so refunded.

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

ISSUE OF B$150,000, 000.00

Issued under The Bahamas Registered Stock Act, and authorized by Resolutions of the House of Assembly, 17th



Rate of Interest

1/8 % Above Prime Rate
9/64% Above Prime Rate
5/32% Above Prime Rate
11/64%_ Above Prime Rate
3/16% Above Prime Rate
13/64% Above Prime Rate
7132% Above Prime Rate
15/64% Above Prime Rate
1/4% Above Prime Rate

INTEREST

The date of this Prospectus is August, 2009

Bahamas Registered Stock 2028 20,000,000.00 100.00
Bahamas Registered Stock 2029 20,000,000.00 100.00

Bahamas Registered Stock 2031 15,000,000.00 100.00

Bahamas Registered Stock 2030 15,000,000.00 100.00

Bahamas Registered Stock 2035 10,000,000.00 100.00

Bahamas Registered Stock 2032 20,000,000.00 100.00

Bahamas Registered Stock 2036 10,000,000.00 100.00

Bahamas Registered Stock 2033 20,000,000.00 100.00
Bahamas Registered Stock 2034 20,000,000.00 100.00
000.

po 150,000,000.00T

CHARGE UPON CONSOLIDATED FUND
The principal monies and interest represented by the Stock are charged upon and payable out of the Consolidated
Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

The Stock shall be repaid on 27th August, in the year appearing in the name of the Stock.

The Stock will bear interest from 27th August, 2009, at the rate shown against the name of the Stock as the percent
per annum over the Prime Rate (i.e. the prime commercial interest rate from time to time fixed by the Clearing banks
carrying on business in the Island of New Providence in The Bahamas. If there shall be any difference between them,
then that which is fixed by Royal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half-yearly commencing on 27th February,
2010 and thereafter on 27th August and 27th February in every year until the Stock is repaid.

No interest will be paid on

Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 19th August, 2009 and will
close at 3:00pm on 25th August, 2009. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 26th August, 2009 and will cease at

If the total subscriptions exceed the sum of B$150,000,000.00 (Nominal) partial allotment will be made to
subscribers, and a proportionate refund will be made as soon as possible after allotment.

kGO tOsuRSFbF

BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2028, 2029, 2030, 2031, 2032, 2033, 3034, 3035, AND 3036

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK. 2028, 2029, 2030, 2031, 2032, 2033, 2034, 2035 AND 2036

hDtODhhIpJALOaTgODCLN
ArrLIpAkIDC Cd
ALLDkBgCk Cd2

fAkg

ce“d kGO pOnSFbm obnl dE kGO obGb bR

120D200d*0C&8:
CbRRbv1 obGb bR

TuF

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas invites applications for Bahamas Registered Stock
totalling B$150,000,000.00. The Stock will be available in a range of maturity dates; the earliest being repayable in
2028 and the latest in 2036. The total amount of Stock offered, the rate of interest and the issue price are given below :-

Issue Price
Name of Stock Amount B$
B$

000°**50000A ,dwO0rFu OO0tbS@bGb bROtOsuRSOFOY TSdcl 646B$
00*:85000A,dwO0rFu O0tbSO obGb bROtOsuRSOFOY TSdcl 646B$
09*7650000A,dwO0rFu OOtbS@bGb bROtOsuRSOFOY TSdcl 647B$
7 8500A,dwO0rFu O0tbSO obGb bROtOsuRSOFOY TSdcl 647B$
0007°: 500A ,dwO0rFu OOtbSOobGb bROtOsuRSOFOY TSdcl 647B$
”7T85000A,dwO0drFu O0tbSO obGb bROtOsuRSOFOY TSdcl 647B$
0*7650000A,dwO0rFu OOtbSO obGb bROtOsuRSOFOY TSdcl 647B$
9: 85000A,dwO0rFu O0tbSO obGb bROtOsuRSOFOY TSdcl 647B$
000°**850000A,dwO0rFu OO0tbSé>Gb bROtOsuRSOFOY TSdcl 647B$

bnY vnYOFSbIO Sd becOeS bny mORR b dvnS xGioGnimpdSSOY Sd O“vR2

J*.O OncemdRO 03

Jn SGO OwOnS dE SGO Evmm b dvnS dE TSdcl/R$ beemuOY EdF b,dwO uR“bFO ndS bmmdSSOY Sd
O*vR1 J*xO FOPVORS SGbS SGO Rv FOEvnYbRnO Sdemu@Y EdF SGO Edmmdxuns TSdel

rANBgCkT JC gMpgTT Dh 03941444244 MUST og BAfg (JA tgALkIBg itDTT TgkkLgBgCk

J“.O0 GOFO,y beemy EdF SGO Edmmdxuns b dvrfSbdbRotOsuRSOFOY TSdel

JnROFS ,Omdx SGO b dvnS beemuOY Edl
unQanuSR0dE003”44

un eby OnS EdF SGO TSdcl beEdkR0Y

5 obGb bR tOsuRSOFOY TSdcl

TNTkgB /tkiT$ kItDail ALL pDBBgtpJAL oAC)T gMperk hJCpD2

rANBgCkT Dh 03941444244 Dt LgTT pAC og BAfg (JA tgAL kJBg itDTT TgkkLgBgCk

TNTkgB Dt oN oAC) ftAhk rANAoLg kD kIg pgCktAL oAC

rtANBgCkT Dh 0391444244 Dt LgTT pAC og BAfg (JA tgAL kJ Bg itDTT TgkkLgBgCk

TNTkgB1 oN oAC) ftAhk rANAoLg kD kIg pgCktAL oAC) D



pAT

03

) Dh kIg oAIABAT

hkIg oAIABAT Dt oN

tDDLffdSAso DspHtHpdt
6531DAO3EOFGBA2

The Stock will be issued by the Registrar (The Central Bank of The Bahamas). Applications will eEdGnwEy tGmnwRSEp

be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 19th August, 2009 and TGUIBgC
R KWaaNU B VRE AiEigR Vaa. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 26th August, 2009
and will cease at 3:00p.m. on 27th August, 2009. All envelopes enclosing applications should be Ywxp*Gn* gS JJ***(BLeNI*LPuuPht *FRwRp*kspR sfEMEoE MGFF wnd RGRJpF GD wny,)
labelled “Application For Bahamas Government Registered Stocks’.

GRg The Stock will be in units of B$100.00.



ANNIGRGBg Applications must be for B$100.00 or a multiple of that sum. AddEpFF (NoECoEWRGouF pRe, FsoSJd rGIp hprGFRpEpd AddEpFFpF )
ANNIGRGBrBPUg Applications for the Stock should be made to the Registrar on the form attached to the
Prospectus and may be obtained from the Registrar offices in Nassau and Freeport, The Treasury
Department (Marlborough Street & Navy Lion Road, Nassau), applications may also be
downloaded from the Central Bank of the Bahamas website at www.centralbankbahamas.com or
any of the following banks:

f, e, Boa



Bank of The Bahamas International

First Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited

Commonwealth Bank Limited

Royal Bank Of Canada

Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited (formally British American Bank(1993) Limited)
Citibank, N.A.

upJpCsonp* YoEF,*(i) (b)

85 10SOFO3HKB3BF3,BFO3COFGBAG3 CCWL3 G3UBTAH3GI$GMFT$OFG43HSO3 NNTHTBA \
3$O03RTVOA3$0 WBK52

Se SO Oe hr

eEdGnwEy tGmwRSEpF

DMLHefMS
YwxpF Gn gSJJ
Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts as at June 30, 2009 show the Public Debt of The Bahamas to be

B$3,524,214,000.*
And.eh



hpfsdfdSsffdfAdefcDfdeHSsf
The following information is extracted from the unaudited accounts of the Government of The Commonwealth of AddEpFE
The Bahamas.

FY2006/2007p** FY2007/2008p** FY2008/2009p** upJpCsonp YoF,(i)__

BS BS BS
Approved Budget Approved Budget

Revenue 1,338,172,000 1,424, 108,000 1,569,329,000 T.bp spEpmy EpOSpFR FpxG wnnSwJ GnRpEpFRRt¢ mp CwGd

Recurrent Expenditure (excluding

Repayment of Public Debt) Bwnv Ywxp

1,285,692,000 1,344,028,000 1,484, 150,000

Capital Development Bwnv BEwnes

Expenditure (excluding loans
contributions and advances
to public corporations)

166,225,000 AccosSnR YSxmpE.

176,778,000 188,718,000
** Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts.
* — The Public Debt amount is inclusive of The Public Corporations contingent liability which as at June 30, 2009

totalled B$440,013,000.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM








THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

Be the first to be intormed

www.tribune24? .conm—<<

The

a

ae i ii

— oF uJ ne
1 ¥
= pas a



By LLONELLA GILBERT

THE committee charged with
implementing the government’s
Training and Empowerment Pro-
gramme to help displaced workers is
currently evaluating interviewed
applicants who want to acquire new
administrative and vocational skills.

More than 300 of the 800 inter-
viewed start classes in September at
the College of the Bahamas (COB)
and the Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute (BTV])

“(The global economic) crisis
impacted everyone,” said chairman
of the implementation advisory com-
mittee and president of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce Khaalis
Rolle.

The courses being offered are
geared towards training unemployed
persons in needed skills — masonry,
basic carpentry, landscaping, heavy

equipment operating,
housing, accounting,
diesel mechanics, nail
techniques, computer
applications, and straw
and shell craft.

“The initial thought for
the programme was to
address some of the social
fall-out that was created
by the high levels of |
unemployment in the
hotel and tourism sector,"
Mr Rolle said.

Those interviewed
ranged from persons with
no qualifications and very
little experience to persons with
Master’s degrees.

The ages ranged from 18 to over
60 years.

The courses will take place over a
10 to 15-week period. Registration
begins the last week in August and

KHAALIS ROLLE



classes start the second
week in September.

The government plans
to continue the training
exercises for a year to
give others the opportu-
nity to upgrade their
skills.

Many persons interest-
ed in the programme
showed up after the
deadline. But they will
still have a chance to take
the course, Mr Rolle
— | said.

While the government
would like 1,000 persons
to receive training at the same time,
“institutional class restraints” limit
the number of spaces available, he
added.

The course structure will be
designed as an “intro to” course and
persons wanting further certification

rd is d eh 2
Committee evaluating applicants
for govt’s training programme

can continue on their own.

At the end of the course, trainees
will be placed in an apprenticeship
programme in various businesses.

"Hopefully, at the conclusion of
the apprenticeship period the busi-
nesses will hire the trainees or the
trainees will create their own busi-
nesses,” Mr Rolle said.

He said it may be better for per-
sons to train in vocational areas.

“T think that is the beginning phas-
es of you actually starting your own
business with a specialised skill,” he
said.

"Plumbing is a very specialised
skill and you have to go into a certi-
fication process and having that ver-
sus a certificate in accounting, your
probability of success in starting a
business is greater.”

The implementation advisory com-
mittee will evaluate the programme
every two weeks.

Robotics camp could be the
future for young Bahamians

YOUNG Bahamians
interested in the science
and technology of robotics
could put the country on
the map with their cre-
ations, a physicist said.

Jurgen Riedel, founder of
the Science Institute and a
lecturer at COB, and his
team recently celebrated
the successful conclusion of
the nation’s second annual
Robotics Camp.

While many youngsters
flocked to movie theatres
this summer to watch their
favourite robots in films like
‘Transformers’ or got
awestruck by the spy equip-
ment of ‘G.I. Joe’ and ‘G-
Force’, a small group of
Bahamian youth found
themselves learning the
tools that could very well
lead to careers in creating
such technologies at the
Robotics Camp.

The camp is the brain-
child of physicist Mr Riedel.

Having had such a major
success with his children’s
camp, Mr Riedel is also
considering hosting a semi-
nar in the near future for
educators and profession-
als.

“Robotics is one of the
fastest developing and most
prestigious areas in science
and technology and lots of
creative young Bahamians
could very well put this
country in the map with
their creations,” he said.
“Robots are everywhere —
exploring the deepest
canyons in the ocean, new
frontiers of neighbouring
planets and even as artifi-
cial limbs to amputees. By
putting on this camp annu-

ally, we are fostering these
creative minds while teach-
ing them to develop interest
in science and technology
which will in turn benefit
their country and perhaps
even mankind.”

Mr Riedel, his wife Kim
and a team of COB mathe-
matics and physics students
spent three weeks at the
College’s School of Hospi-
tality teaching young robot-
ics enthusiasts to turn famil-
iar Lego blocks into work-
ing robots.

“This year we focused on
combining the fields of
design, engineering and sci-
ence in the form of small
projects,” Mr Riedel said.

Students

“For the first part of the
camp students had the
opportunity to build small
machines. Later they
applied various principles
to design, construct and
programme small yet
sophisticated robots.”

Participants learnt the
principles of design, how to
apply mathematics and log-
ic to solve problems, what
gears are and how to use
them, how to build struc-
tures and frames and the
essentials of motion.

They were also taught to
understand propulsion and
force aS well as basic
dynamics of programming
and control.

“Camp-goers also learnt
the importance of team
playing by working in small
groups and discussing
design and theory with oth-
ers,” Mr Riedel said. “With-

A YOUNGSTER uses technology to create a working robot.

in the groups they relied on
their peers to work through
difficult situations, learned
to recover from failures and
enjoyed their successes as
a whole.”

Mr Riedel said there are
tremendous opportunities
in the Bahamas to develop
science and technology as
it relates to robotics.

He has also provided
scholarships to a few stu-
dents to attend the camp as
well as offered some classes
through the government’s
Urban Renewal pro-
gramme.



US church leaders
urge Ohama to ent
Cuba embargo

HAVANA

A DELEGATION of
USS. Roman Catholic Church
leaders urged Barack Oba-
ma’s administration Tuesday
to seize what they called a
rare political opportunity to
lift the 47-year-old economic
embargo against Cuba’s com-
munist government, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

Bishop Thomas Wenski of
Orlando, Florida, said the
U.S. church welcomed a
recent move by Washington
to relax travel restrictions on
Cuban Americans with fam-
ily in Cuba as well on the
remittances they can send to
those families. But he said
there is much more to be
done.

Wenski said at a news con-
ference that the U.S. church
hopes “both sides listen to
their better angels” and
move to normalize ties.

The U.S. church long has
urged an end to the embargo,
imposed by Washington in
1962 to weaken Cuba’s com-
munist government. Oppo-
nents argue that easing or
lifting the sanctions will only
sustain a government that
doesn’t tolerate dissent.

Cardinal Sean O’Malley of
Boston said Obama’s elec-
tion presents a rare oppor-
tunity to bridge an “immense
psychological distance” that
has marred relations and end
an economic policy the
church says punishes Cuban
citizens.

“There were other oppor-
tunities that were lost,” Wen-
ski said. “And it’s important
we do not lose the opportu-
nity this time.”

Wenski, O’Malley and
Auxiliary Bishop Oscar Can-
tu of San Antonio, Texas,
met on Monday with Cuban
Cardinal Jaime Ortega and
diplomats at the U.S. Inter-
ests Section, which serves as
an informal U.S. government
mission.

They planned to meet with
Ricardo Alarcon, head of
Cuba’s parliament, later
Tuesday.

Wenski said the delegation
came away from the Inter-
ests Section meeting with the
impression that U.S. policy
toward Cuba is under review
and that “their approach
seems to be piece by piece.”

He urged a quicker pace
after “50 years of lack of con-
fidence on both sides.”

“That’s a lot of history to
overcome,” Wenski added.
“We would hope that both
sides listen to their better
angels.”

The delegation is also in
Cuba to check on church-
funded hurricane recovery
projects.

























SENTRA

Thé B-16 Sentra is built on Nissan's ‘CG plaiform and offers a standard 2.0-liter
4-cylinder angine, fuel-elficiant Nissan Xironi¢ GCYT™ (Continuously Variable
Trangmission) and rasponsive handling. The Sentra is also available with a
range of unexzpected amenilies = ranging Irom the luxury of leather-appointed
seating to the convanianca of Nissan's Intelligani Kay kayless entry system.

S E N TRA SH0R Tine way you reves vost

OM THE SPOT AARICING WITH
ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED fence
#280 Well! Rood Thompson Bled. « Oakes Flabd
PO) Bow Madd i. 242 326.6977" f. 242.926.6315
i (2a) 42 | eae ® sanping@coralwave.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

INSUAANCD AM APL AUC TH
ADWANTVGE IRE LIELG ROE
BRORENS & AGENTS LTD.

ROBOTICS CAMP participants test out machines they've built


PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Proposal to redevelop
the old Elbow Cay Club

By LARRY SMITH

Despite the economic
downturn, a new fight is
brewing over development
in the out islands — this
time the battleground is
Hope Town — one of the
most successful family
island communities.
Tough Call visited Abaco
over the weekend to take
a closer look at a contro-
versial proposal to rede-
velop the old Elbow Cay
Club.

HOPE TOWN, Abaco
— Skimming over the
shallow Sea of Abaco
past the familiar striped
lighthouse that marks the
best-known harbour in
the Bahamas, we arrive
at a small cove backed by
a handful of low-rise
buildings.

The shoreline is punc-
tuated by a crumbling
wooden pier.

Here, tucked away out
of sight of the settlement,
are the remains of New
Hope Lodge — a camp
for recovering alcoholics
founded by American
Ruth Kenyon-Lundegren
on nine acres of undevel-
oped land back in the
1950s.

Ruth has now left the
Bahamas, but in her time
she had a big impact on
the little community of
Hope Town.

New Hope was even-
tually sold to a Danish-
Canadian investor named
Robert Maltarp, while
Ruth went on to buy the
former commissioner's
residence in the settle-

ment, adding a three-
storey wing to create the
Harbour Lodge.

Later, she operated the
nearby Abaco Inn (then
called the Fin and Ton-
ic). Both are 20-room
boutique hotels.

In the meantime, Mal-
tarp had acquired 10
more acres and turned
New Hope into the
Elbow Cay Club, which
operated rather unsuc-
cessfully as a typical out
island inn throughout the
60s and 70s.

It later became a room-
ing house for locals,
eventually descending to
its present status as a
Haitian ghetto — proba-
bly the only "resort" for
immigrants in the coun-
try.

Elbow Cay is five
miles long and half a mile
wide, and the tiny settle-
ment of Hope Town
retains immense rustic
appeal.

An ever-widening
patchwork of roads and
upscale subdivisions radi-
ates from the picturesque
settlement harbour.

And the island is home
to high-flying lawyers,
politicians, architects and
corporate bigwigs.

Abaconians refer to the
place as "Hollywood".

There are some 400
permanent residents



together with perhaps 500
second home families
who come and go, as well
aS an uncertain number
of Haitians.

And although Abaco
may have suffered less
from the recession than
the rest of the Bahamas,
because of its large sec-
ond home economy,
Hope Town has suffered
least.

Despite a drop in prop-
erty sales, rentals, and
construction starts, it
remains one of the most
desirable pieces of real
estate in the country.

It is well known that
most of Hope Town's
Bahamian families can
trace their roots back toa
single Loyalist widow
from South Carolina
named Wyannie Malone,
who arrived here in the

1780s following the
American War of Inde-
pendence.

And ironically, most of
the group who are plan-
ning a $25 million rede-
velopment of the derelict
Elbow Cay Club are also
from South Carolina.

They include three
contractors from the
Charleston area — Philip
Smith, who builds high-
end custom homes; Vic-
tor Apat, who specialis-
es in historical restora-
tion; and Hank Hofford,

CAUGHT YOU
LOOKING!

eT

a rae



With the contemporary look and responsive ride of a crossover the Equinox offers
more rear-seat legroom than any SUV, plus a five-star frontal and side-impact
crash rating from the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

FEATURES:

* 785 hp 24 V6 engine

* 5-speed automatic transmission
* 4-wheel anti-lock dist brakes
*16-in, cast aluminum wheels

* Remote keyless entry system

* Air conditionine

+ Dual-stage driver and front passenger

air bags with Passenger Sensing System
+ 5-passenger seatina
* Flat-folding front passenger seatback
* Power windows, programmable door

locks and exterior minors

* CO player with auxiliary audio Input jack

Ck

‘ Aare eee
financieg ond inmraere

Ont
Dib peeth 4, 000-akt Gectery rari.

StU TD



as

Shirley Street + 302-0130 + Fax: 323-7272

[nfo@nasaumotorcom * www.chevroletbahamas.cam

Tae

bea ae



“Hundreds of leading
citizens and second home
owners have petitioned to
stop the development in its
present form — a campaign
that is led by former realtor
Chester Thompson, Hope
Town's 88-year-old patriarch;
and Clay Wilhoyte, a
naturalised Bahamian who
owns the popular Harbour's
Edge restaurant.”

a big land developer. The
front man for the group
is a trial lawyer named
Mark Mason who has a
home on Elbow Cay. The
remaining partner is
Bahamian realtor Greg
Graham.

When Robert Maltarp
put his 19-acre property
on the market in 2004,
Kerry Sullivan of Dami-
anos Sotheby's Realty
was the listing agent.

The Charleston group
put the property under
contract in January 2008,
but the sale is subject to
government approval of
the development.

"Mason and Greg Gra-
ham met through a mutu-
al friend and realized
they had a common inter-
est so the developers
offered him a partner-
ship.

“It was a great chance
for him to get in with an
experienced team and
people who have the cap-
ital to implement a plan
that, in my opinion, is the
best use of the land."

But her opinion is not
widely shared.

A groundswell of local
opposition has devel-
oped, creating much ill
feeling in this small,
close-knit community.

Hundreds of leading
citizens and second home
owners have petitioned to
stop the development in
its present form — a cam-
paign that is led by for-
mer realtor Chester
Thompson, Hope Town's
88-year-old patriarch;
and Clay Wilhoyte, a nat-
uralised Bahamian who
owns the popular Har-
bour's Edge restaurant.

Their objections relate
to the scale and charac-
ter of the development.
The plans call for over
100 structures on 19
acres.

This includes a dozen
homesites, 88 townhous-
es, a 24-room hotel/con-
ference centre and six
staff apartments, in addi-
tion to common facilities.
Based on a three-person
occupancy per unit anda
total staff of 100 the den-
sity could be as high as
27 per acre, critics say.

"Such high density will
have a major impact on
infrastructure such as
roads, power supply,
refuse removal, fire pro-
tection, health services,
etc." according to one let-
ter to the town council.
"Furthermore, it will rep-
resent the first step in an
undesirable '‘Floridariza-
tion’ of this beautiful
island."

The harshest criticism
is reserved for the mas-
sive marina that is being
proposed. It will occupy
over seven acres of the
Queen's bottom (as the
seabed is known locally),
with a rubble breakwater
jutting out well over 500
feet into the Sea of Aba-
co. It will be designed to
accommodate up to 150
boats as big as 43 feet,
with lifts, a ferry dock
and fuel pumps.



"This marina will be a
permanent blight on one
of the most attractive
areas in the Abacos," one
letter-writer said.

"We believe that this
destructive conversion of
public property into pri-
vate, for-profit use, with
its attendant, unfortunate
environmental effects,
should not be permitted."

According to Linda
Cole, of the Wyannie
Malone Museum, there is
no need for such a mari-
na when existing facilities
are under-utilised.

"I for one do not wish
to see another Miami
Beach shoreline...If the
developers are not pre-
pared to scale back, then
let them move to the
mainland. (People) come
to Hope Town for what
we offer, not (what) they
can get in Treasure Cay,
Freeport and Nassau."

One local developer I
spoke to pointed out that
different islands have dif-
ferent characteristics and
should be branded differ-
ently.

"There is no one-size
fits all solution. And the
average occupancy for
out island hotels and
marinas is 50 per cent, so
I don't know why anyone
would want to build a
marina of that size at
Hope Town."

But the Charleston
group says that with or
without their project
Elbow Cay will continue
to grow, more houses will
be built and more boaters
will need dockage. They
say their development
will be based on demand,
with a 10-15 year build-
out that will not overbur-
den the island or its infra-
structure.

"The project will pro-
vide good jobs to local
residents and their chil-
dren well into the future.
If it took 10 years to
build out, the project
would add 10-12 units to
the island per year,"
Mason said.

"In fact, the master
planning of the project
will provide for con-
trolled growth of the
island in an area where
there will be existing
roads, wastewater treat-
ment and other infra-
structure to handle the
growth."

Critics argue that
Mason is a clever lawyer
who sees an opportunity
to profit from an exclu-
sive, high-demand prod-
uct by catering to a
broader customer base.
The question is whether
this will change the very
dynamics that created the
demand in the first place.
"IT have always been an
advocate of low density
in Hope Town," Chester
Thompson told me. "The
island is a gem where
people can step back in
time and enjoy peace and
quiet. It would be bloody
tragic if this goes
through.”

His comment goes to
the core of a heated argu-

ment over putting big
projects in small commu-
nities. Bimini Bay and
Exuma's Four Seasons
Resort are prime exam-
ples of inappropriate
development, critics say.
It is a model that dates
back to the early years of
the 20th century, and
most examples in the out
islands have failed —
often leaving derelict
buildings and environ-
mental havoc in their
wake.

Treasure Cay on the
main island of Abaco is
a notable exception to
this rule, although it has
taken many years to
achieve stability. It began
in 1957 when Chester
Thompson's late brother,
Leonard, leased 930 acres
of crown land to develop
the resort with American
investors. It opened with
its own airport and mari-
na in 1963 and now fea-
tures 93 rental units, a
commercial centre, golf
course and adjoining res-
idential estates.

Hope Towners don't
want another Treasure
Cay or Boat Harbour on
their island.

But the real elephant in
the room is the Haitian
community that now
occupies the Elbow Cay
Club.

Estimates of the Hait-
ian population range as
high as 600, and most live
at the club.

This mini version of the
Mud is even served by a
Haitian freighter, which
brings in people and
takes away discarded
items and goods of uncer-
tain provenance.

According to Mason,
the club's Haitian ten-
ants, whether they are
legal or not, will be treat-
ed humanely: "Prior to
completion of the pur-
chase, these tenants will
be given proper legal
notice to vacate by the
current owner and the
developers will insist that
the current owner also
help with their reloca-
tion." But no-one can say
why the Haitians are here
in such numbers in the
first place.

In the end, it is in
everyone's interest to
compromise. As former
MP Robert Sweeting told
me over breakfast:
"We've got to find a mid-
dle ground on these
developments. Some peo-
ple who came here 30 or
40 years ago think they
should be the last ones to
come in and do anything.
On the other hand, Hope
Town doesn't really need
this, whereas more
investment is needed on
the mainland."

Following an acrimo-
nious town meeting
recently, the developers
have withdrawn their
application for local plan-
ning approval.

But this was submitted
only as a courtesy in the
first place. All foreign
investment proposals
must be approved by the
National Economic
Council in the first
instance, and then local
councils are asked for
their input.

Perhaps the develop-
ers will use this opportu-
nity to make their pro-
posal more palatable to
the residents of Hope
Town. As Harbour's
Edge proprietor Clay
Wilhoyte put it: "Mr.
Mason has the opportu-
nity to do something
wonderful with this prop-
erty. He should listen to
the suggestions that the
community and others
are giving him."

What do you think?
Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit
www.bahamapundit.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009, PAGE 9



‘Superman’ soars for
fourth in the world

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany —
Leevan “Superman” Sands’
bid for the Bahamas’ first
medal at the IAAP’s 12th
World Championships in Ath-
letics was denied when Cuban
Alexis Copello moved from
fifth on his sixth and final
jump to clinch the bronze last
night at the Olympic Stadium.

Sands, the bronze medallist
in the Olympic Games last
year in Beijing, China, could
taste another medal when he
soared to his second season’s
best leap of 17.32 metres (56-
feet, 10-inches) to trail gold
medallist Phillip Idowu of
Great Britain (17.73 or 58-2)
and silver medallist Nelson
Evora of Portugal (17.55 or
57.7).

But he knew that with two
Cubans still left to jump in the
final round, none of the medal
positions were safe. Sure
enough, it was the medal
Sands was eyeing that was in
jeopardy as Copello's leap of
17.36 (56-11 1/2) spoiled the
show.

"IT really wanted the
medal," said Sands, who came
into the mixed zone where he
was interviewed by the media.
Clinging to his son Leevan III
for some comfort, he said: "I
came so close, but I didn't get
it."

In what had been anticipat-
ed as a birthday party, having
turned 26 on Sunday when he
qualified for the final, Sands
said he will still cherish his
performance here despite not
getting the medal.

He will hold onto the rank-
ing as the fourth best jumper
in the world, one year after
he claimed his first Olympic
medal.

"You know when you want
something so bad and you
really don't get it,” he stated.
"That's how I feel right now.
But I want the Bahamian peo-
ple to know that I went out
there and I gave it my best



LEEVAN SANDS makes an attempt in the final of the triple jump during the World Athletics Championships
in Berlin on Tuesday, August 18, 2009...

shot. It was like a Mike Tyson
fight. We threw a lot of blows,
but in the end, I just fell
short."

Idowu, last year's silver

medallist in Beijing, popped
the gold medal leap of 17.73
or 58-2 for the world's leading
mark on his third attempt as
he surpassed Evora.

Evora, the Olympic cham-
pion, set the stage for what
had promised to be a dramat-
ic showdown when he opened
up with a 57-6 1/2. He

responded to Idowu's leap
with his best of 57-7 on his
last jump.

But after Copello, who
turned 24 on August 12,
stepped it up for the bronze
medal spot, Sands could only
produce 55-9 that kept in
fourth.

"T really wanted this one,
but to finish in fourth ain't
that bad," Sands said. "That
just showed how tough the
competition was out there
tonight. But despite not get-
ting the medal, I still feel
proud of myself."

Copello, speaking through
one of the Cuban interpreters
in the mixed zone, said he was
sorry he passed Sands on the
final jump, but he had a lot
riding on him and his compa-
triot Arnie David Girat, who
finished fifth, to win another
medal for Cuba.

During the fourth round,
Sands was passed by China's
Li Yanxi with his best of 17.23
(56-6 1/2) for the third spot.
But he responded with his
season's best to regain third.
Only this time when Copello
passed him in the sixth, Sands
didn't have the stamina to pull
through with another big
jump.

With his wife Danielle join-
ing him here, Sands said he
will take a couple days to
relax and enjoy the sights of
Berlin. His family will leave
on August 20, but Sands said
he will stay until the end to
cheer on the rest of his team-
mates.

After that, he said he will
return home and start prepar-
ing for a less hectic year that
won't have any major compe-
tition except the Common-
wealth Games that won't be
held until October.

Although he fell short of
another medal, Sands can at
least relish in the fact that he
won the bronze at the 9th
Worlds in Paris Saint-Denis,
France, in 2003 and at the
17th Commonwealth Games
in Manchester, England, in
2002.

ey

FTE
Schedule
TACIT

BERLIN, Germany —
Here’s a look at the sched-
ule for the Bahamians

competing over

the

remainder of the I[AAF’s
12th World Champi-
onships in Athletics:

TODAY

Men’s high jump
qualifying rounds

Trevor Barry, 12th of 15
jumpers in Group A start-
ing at 5:10 am ET

Donald Thomas, 7th of
16 jumpers in Group B
starting at 5:10 am ET

Men’s 110 hurdles

Shamar Sands, lane 4 in

heat 5 at 6:35 am ET

Men’s 400 semifinal

Ramon Miller, lane 5,
heat 1 at 12:15 pm ET

Chris Brown, lane 3,
heat 3 at 12:29 pm ET

Women’s 200
preliminaries
Ferguson-
McKenzie, lane 5, heat 4
at 2:03 pm ET

Sheniqua Ferguson, lane
5, heat 6 at 2:15 pm ET

Debbie

THURSDAY

Men’s 110 hurdles

semifinal
Shamar Sands, starting
at 12:15 pm ET

Women’s 200 semifinal
Ferguson-
McKenzie and Sheniqua
Ferguson, starting at 1:50

Debbie

pm ET

Men’s 110 hurdles final
Shamar Sands, starting
at 2:55 pm ET

FRIDAY

Men’s high jump final

Donald Thomas and
Trevor Barry, starting at
1:15 pm ET

Women’s 200 final

Debbie

Ferguson-
McKenzie and

Sheniqua Ferguson,
starting at 3 pm ET

Men’s 400 final

Chris Brown
Ramon Miller,

starting at 3:20 pm

and

SATURDAY

Women’s 4 x 100 relay
heats @ 12:10 pm ET

Men’s 4 x 400 relay heats
@ 12:55 pm ET

Women’s 4 x 100 relay
final @ 2 pm ET

Women’s 4 x 400 relay
heats @ 2:15 pm ET

SUNDAY

Women’s 4 x 400 relay
final @ 11:50 am ET

Men's 4 x 400 relay final
@ 12:15 pm ET



TEAM BAHAMAS assistant manager Julie Wilson can be seen with Leevan Sands and

SANDS (left) can be seen with Alexis Copello of Cuba, who beat him for the bronze his son, Leevan Ill...



‘Fireman’: ‘They caused me to work hard..:

4




FROM page 11

"That's real good for us. He ran
very well,” Brown said. "This is his
first time in the big event and he
went out there and ran a personal
best. It’s good that he’s going to
make it back. He just has to come
out tomorrow and bring it again.”

In today's semifinal at 12:35 pm
ET, Brown will run out of lane
three in the last of the three heats.
He will be trailing Tabarie Henry of
the British Virgin Islands, who had
the second fastest qualifying time of
45.14 to win heat seven and Aus-
tralian John Steefensen in lane five.

The first three of each heat (Q)
plus the three fastest times (q) will
qualify for the final that is slated
for Friday at 3:20 pm ET.

"I'm just taking it round by
round," said Brown, who wasn't
concerned about his qualifying time.
"I'm hoping to get out there, exe-
cute and run a fast race so that I
can get a good lane for the final
and see how it goes.”

While all the attention is on the
American showdown between
Wariner and Olympic champion
LaShawn Merritt, Brown said he's
looking forward to just going out
there and crashing the party.

As for the relays, which will start
with the qualifying round on Sat-
urday before the final concludes
the championships on Sunday,
Brown said they are looking very
good and as long as everybody stays
healthy, they should win another
medal.

-——

MICHAEL MATHIEU (centre) crossed the line sixth in heat three in 46.41, but was later disqualified for stepping on the line...
(TOP RIGHT) - Chris Brown (right) competes in the preliminary rounds of the 400m yesterday...
PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Bolt through

to 200 semis

By RAF CASERT
AP Sports Writer

BERLIN (AP) — Looking for his
second gold medal of the world cham-
pionships, Usain Bolt jogged across the
line Tuesday to advance to the semifi-
nals of the 200 meters.

Two days after setting a world record
of 9.58 seconds to win the 100, the
Olympic 200 champion ran a good curve
and coasted through the final straight to
finish in 20.41 seconds, a full 1.11 sec-
onds behind his world record.

In the absence of injured defending
champion Tyson Gay, Bolt is the over-
whelming favourite for gold. He said
he would try to get a second world
record at the championships, too.

“Tl be running hard,” Bolt said.

The Jamaican set a record of 19.30
seconds at the Beijing Olympics, wide-
ly considered one of the toughest to
beat in the sport.

“Tm just trying to get through the
rounds. That’s my aim,” Bolt said. “?’m
trying to do it round by round like last
year. Then I'll go to the finals and just
execute.”




Celebrating and showboating after
winning the 100 on Sunday, he was short
on antics this time.

Blame it on fatigue since he had to be
in the stadium early Tuesday for the
first heat.

“Tm feeling a little tired, but noth-
ing a good night’s rest won’t cure,” Bolt
said after his sixth race in four days.

Jamaican teammate Steve Mullings
had the best qualifying time, winning
his heat in 20.23.

Shawn Crawford was third in 20.37,
with American teammate Wallace
Spearmon also easily advancing.

The US team needs to change some-
thing quick to challenge the Jamaicans
for sprint supremacy at the champi-
onships. They lost 5-0 in Olympic titles
at the Beijing Games and are already 2-
0 behind after the 100s. The specter of
another rout is looming ever larger,
especially with Gay out for the 200 and
doubtful for the relays.

The final for the 200 is set for Thurs-
day. Bolt is also favoured to lead
Jamaica to a sprint relay gold on Satur-
day to equal his feat of three golds at the
Olympics.

NATHANIEL McKINNEY (far right) competes in the 200m yesterday...

[>

Save BIG Right Now!

2009 FORD MUSTANG

4.0L Automatic - LOADED 4 &

3 years or 36,000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside assistant, 3 years rust protections
warranty and licensed and inspected up to birthday.

NOW THAT'S REALLY A $3] |(@SDeal

FRIENDLY MOTORS CO, LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 » FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com

a,
<=
eI
oC
=
=
=
o
s
=





USAIN BOLT gestures prior to a 200m 2nd round heat during the World
Championships in Berlin Tuesday, August 18, 2009...

McKinney places

fourth in heat

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany —
Nathaniel McKinney’s step
down from the 400 to the
200m didn’t pay off for him
at all during the IAAF’s
12th World Championships
in Athletics.

On the same day yester-
day at the Olympic Stadium
when the preliminaries of
the 400 was contested, McK-
inney’s bid at the 200 didn't
last long as he could only
run 21.26 seconds for fourth
place in his heat.

While only the first three
in each heat and the next
five fastest times advanced
to the second round during
the evening session, he fin-
ished 42nd out of a field of
60 competitors.

The event took place two
days after the stunning
world record performance
by Jamaican Usain Bolt,
who is also doubling up for
another sweep of the sprints
as he did at the Olympic
Games last year.

McKinney, who hasn’t
competed since May 9 in
Athens, Georgia, where he
qualified for the Worlds
with a personal best of
20.67, said his first race was
a blowout.

"Tt was just something to
play,” said McKinney, who
noted that he hasn’t given
up running the 400 as yet.
"It was cool.”

After getting out toa
quick start with the pack,
McKinney came off the final
bend in lane three in con-
tention but he wasn't able to
stay with the field on the
straight-away. The race was
eventually won by Marion
Davonish of Great Britain in
20.92.

"The 200 is a combination
of speed and endurance,” he
pointed out. "I tried to stay
in it, but my body was kind
of cold and I didn't have it.
Maybe if I had a few more

Finishes 42nd
out of 60
runners

races, I would have been
sharper. It would have been
just like a normal run."

But McKinney added that
the 200 is not a normal run
for him and he now knows
how legitimate sprinters
feel. But he intends to work
a little more on his speed
because he definitely has the
endurance as a result of run-
ning the one-lap races.

Now that his individual
pursuits are over, McKinney
said he will remain in the
Games Village and train in
case the coaching staff calls
upon him to run on the 4x
400 relay team in the prelim-
inaries on Saturday.

The team is now minus
Andretti Bain, who left
Berlin yesterday and headed
back home via the United
States after he suffered a
recurring injury at the train-
ing camp, forcing him to
shut down the rest of his
season.

It was the same fate as
Grand Bahamian Andrae
Williams, who shut it down
just before the BAAA offi-
cially named the team prior
to leaving town for the train-
ing camp in Berlin.

Bain is the second athlete
to have left the Games Vil-
lage. The first was sprinter
Derrick Atkins, who depart-
ed on Sunday after he failed
to advance out of the first
round of the men's 100 on
Saturday.

McKinney, who has ran
on the men's 4x 400 relay
team at both the Olympics
and Worlds, is expected to
join Chris Brown, Ramon
Miller, Michael Mathieu,
Avard Moncur and Latoy
Williams in the pool for the
4x 4 relay.



NATHANIEL McKINNEY leaves the track after the race...





Jamaicans
Cleared of
loping eligible
lo compete

BERLIN (AP) — The five
Jamaican runners provision-
ally cleared of doping are eli-
gible to run at the world
championships, leaving a final
decision to the Jamaican fed-
eration.

IAAF secretary general
Pierre Weiss says Jamaica’s
Anti-Doping Commission will
not rule on their fate until
after the championships end
Sunday. That means they can
compete at worlds.

The five — Yohan Blake,
Sheri-Ann Brooks, Allodin
Fothergill, Lansford Spence
and Marvin Anderson —
could run in the relays, where
Jamaica is a medal favorite.

Weiss said the IAAF did
not have the power to sus-
pend the athletes without a
ruling from JADCO.

But he added if they’re
found guilty of doping, they’d
be stripped of any medals
won at worlds.

SANYA RICHARDS (left) is
hugged by Jamaica's silver
medal winner Shericka Williams
after Richards won gold in the
400m final yesterday

(AP Photo: David J Phillip)

Richards

wins 400
with world
leading time

By RAF CASERT
AP Sports Writer

BERLIN (AP) — Sanya
Richards shook off years of
disappointment with her first
major title in the 400 meters,
pumping her fist after crossing
the line at the world champi-
onships.

Her main rival, Olympic
champion Christine Ohu-
ruogu of Britain, was back in
fifth. And for Shericka
Williams of Jamaica, it was
silver again.

With a time of 49.00 sec-
onds, Richards also set the
fastest mark of the year. She
was 0.32 seconds faster than
Williams. Antonina
Krivoshapka of Russia took
bronze.

In the shadows of the Usain
Bolt vs. Tyson Gay show-
down, this duel was nearly as
good.

From Lane 3, Richards
always had a good look at
Ohuruogu’s Lane 7 and she
caught up with her over the
first 300 meters. Then she
only had to focus on the fin-
ishing line.

In Beijing last year,
Richards faltered over the last
50 meters and Ohuruogu
won. Not so this year.

The American crossed the
line with her arms raised in
celebration, showing utter dis-
belief that so many failures
finally ended in victory.

With a grin on her face, she
danced a little number for
screaming fans. It also was
great news for the struggling
U.S. team, which had been
unable to keep Jamaica from
celebrating in the sprint
events.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays




p — f

PAGE 11



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19,





2009




PAGE 9 ® Schedule of events for IAAF Worlds...





By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — Claiming
that hardly anybody is taking him
seriously, NAIA 400 metres cham-
pion Ramon Miller said he's going
to go out and make believers of
everybody in his initial appearance
at the IAAF's 12th World Champi-
onships in Athletics.

Yesterday morning in the pre-
liminaries of the 400 metres, Miller
did just that as he powered to the
fastest qualifying time in the fifth
of seven heats in a personal best
time of 45.00 seconds.

"First of all, I have to thank the
Lord because without him in my
life, I wouldn't be here," said Miller,
who joined Chris “Fireman” Brown
as the only two Bahamians to
advance to the semifinal today at
the Olympic Stadium.

"Today, I just went out and did
what I had to do. I've been training
since last October and now this is
my reward at the Berlin Games. At
home, everybody have me as the
underdog, saying that this is a little
chunk. But I’m blocking all of that
out and I will just continue to per-
form here."

The 22-year-old BAAA national
runner-up who came into the cham-
pionships with both a PR and sea-
sonal best of 45.35 posted when he
won the NAIA title for the second
consecutive year, said he's just
delighted to be competing at his
best on the biggest stage in track
and field in the world.

"I'm just going to go out there
and execute my race to the fullest,"
he said. "That's all I have to do.
This is where it counts. This is the
big games, so I want to go out there
and qualify for the final. I feel I can
do it."

By virtue of his fast qualifying
time, Miller has drawn lane five in

‘Superman’
soars for
fourth in

the world...
See page 9




ia hy

aac



RAMON MILLER (far right) and United States’ Gil Roberts compete in a 400m heat during the World Athletics Championships in Berlin yesterday...

the first of three semifinals today
at 12:15 pm ET. He will be sand-
wiched between defending cham-
pion Jeremy Wariner of the United
States in lane four and David Gillick

of Ireland in six.

Brown, the 30-year-old national
champion, has drawn lane three in
the last of the three heats at 12:29
pm ET. He will have to contend

with John Steffensen of Australia,
who is in lane five and Jamaican
Ricardo Chambers in lane seven.
Michael Mathieu, the other
Bahamian competing in the field of

53 competitors, had ran 46.41 for
sixth place in the second heat, but
the 25-year-old Grand Bahamian
was disqualified for stepping on the
line.

Michael Sohn/AP



COVERAGE

y¥OUR CONNECTION-TO THE WORLD

‘Fireman’: ‘They caused
me to work hard...’

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — Every time he
lines up in the preliminary rounds, Chris
“Fireman” Brown says his competitors
make him work a little harder than he
expected.

There was no difference yesterday as
he competed out of the third of seven
heats in the preliminary rounds of the
men's 400 metres at the [AAF's 12th
World Championships in Athletics. He
had to hold off the field down the stretch
to stop the clock in 45.53 seconds.

Running out of lane two, Brown made
the stagger up early and was ahead on
the back stretch. But coming off the final
curve, he had to contain with Great
Britain's Michael Bingham (45.54) and
Australia's Joel Milburn (45.56), who
both chased him right through the finish
line.

"T just have to give the Lord praise

TH

BERLIN

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

’m lovin’ it

¢ Chris Brown heads to semis
e Mathieu finishes sixth in heat but
disqualified for stepping on line

and credit," Brown said. "I was hoping
that I didn't have to work so hard, but I
just didn't execute the way I wanted to.
They caused me to work hard. But [just
want to thank the Lord for the victory.

"Being in lane two, you have to work.
Lane two is not one of my favourites.
Nor do I like lane seven or eight. But
any lane at the Worlds is better than no
lane at all."

His time was listed as the 11th fastest,
just ahead of defending champion Jere-
my Wariner of the United States, who
won heat six in 45.54.

Brown, a fourth place finisher in the
last two Worlds in Osaka, Japan (2007)

and Helsinki, Finland (2005), as well as
the Olympic Games (last year in Bei-
jing, China), had to give up the Bahami-
an spotlight yesterday to team-mate
Ramon Miller.

Brown, who turns 31 on October 15,
watched as 22-year-old Miller surged to
the top of the qualifying charts with a
personal best of 45.00, easily winning
heat five. Both of their performances
came after 25-year-old Grand Bahamian
Michael Mathieu crossed the line sixth in
heat three in 46.41, but was later dis-
qualified for stepping on the line.

SEE page 9


PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Bannister
FROM page one

Cabinet ministers, with Mr
Bannister stepping down
from his post as Minister to
return full time to his pve
law practice and current
Attorney General Michael
Barnett possibly filling the

shoes of departing Chief Jus-

tice Sir Burton Hall.

This would leave open two

vacancies in the Cabinet.

Both Mr Bannister and Mr
Barnett have remained tight- :
lipped on the claims since }

they surfaced last week.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, who would also ;
be in a position to confirm }

or deny the speculation,

returned to Nassau yester- }
day from vacation, but was :
to leave for Atlanta this }
afternoon for the opening of }

a consular office there.

On Sunday a political }
insider told The Tribune: “I }
think Mr Bannister has been }
wanting to get out for quite }
some time. I think he’s been }
pleading that his practice has }
been suffering and so he just }
needs to get back in the pri- ;
vate sector — and he said }
(previously) that he only :
wanted to stay around for }
two years and I think he }

wants to go.”

Sentence
FROM page one

denied killing Mr Dean, a

resident of Quakoo Street,
claiming it was his cousin,

alleged hit man Samuel
Mouche McKenzie who }

fired the fatal shot.

Supreme Court Justice }
Stephen Isaacs sentenced }
James McKenzie to 35 years }

in prison.

McKenzie was repre- }
sented by attorney Richard
Bootle. Deputy Director of }
Public Prosecutions Cheryl }
Grant-Bethel was the pros- }
ecutor. The prosecution had }
sought the death penalty for }
McKenzie or 60 years }

imprisonment.

LOCAL NEWS

Bahamians employed on
Nassau Harbour project

By KATHRYN CAMPBELL

NINETY-FIVE Bahamians are
presently employed in the Nassau
Harbour Port Improvement Pro-
ject on jobs including welding,
equipment operation, technical
support, and administration, gov-
ernment project engineer Robert
Garraway Said.

The harbour project is being car-
ried out to accommodate the new
mega Genesis Class cruise ships —
one of which, the “Oasis of the
Seas”, is expected in Nassau in
December on its maiden voyage.

Public Works and Transport
Minister Neko Grant said the har-
bour project, among others, is “in
keeping with the government’s
medium term response to the
financial crisis.

“In light of this global economic
downturn it was decided by the
government that the projects
should be implemented with a dual
intent.

“They are designed to provide
employment for Bahamians while
simultaneously upgrading infra-
structure in preparation for the
future economic upturn,” he said.

On April 2, the government and
Boskalis International, a Nether-
lands based dredging company,
signed a $4.2 million contract to
dredge 1.9 million cubic yards of
material from Nassau Harbour.

The work also includes the con-
struction of three mooring dolphins
at Prince George Wharf and the
1,000 feet extension of the west-
ern end of Arawak Cay using the
dredged material and sheet piles.

The remainder of the dredged
material will be stockpiled on
Arawak Cay to be used in future
government projects.

Dredging work officially began
on the weekend.

¥% The d’Albenas Agency Ltd.

Madeira St., Palmdale
Nassau, BAHAMAS
Tel: 242-322-1441



The power you’ve always trusted.
Kills flying and crawling insects
with a long lasting effect.

A FAMILY COMPANY





ABOVE: BAHAMIAN work-
ers at Arawak Cay are pic-
tured welding pipes being
used to dredge the har-
bour.

LEFT: BAHAMIAN workers
are installing steel sheet
piles on the 1,000-foot
Arawak Cay extension, a
part of the Nassau Harbour
Port Improvement Project.

Letisha Henderson/BIS

Marital rape law

FROM page one

The present law in the
Bahamas defines rape as an act
of any person not under 14
years of age having sex with
another person who is not his
spouse without the consent of
that other person; without con-
sent that had been extorted by
threats or fear of bodily harm;
with consent obtained by
impersonating the spouse of the
other person; or with consent
obtained by false and fraudu-
lent representations as to the
nature and quality of the act.

The proposed amendment
would omit the words "who is
not his spouse" in essence mak-
ing it illegal for any person to
have sex with another without
consent — regardless if they
are married or not.

Under the current law, rape
can only occur in a marriage if
the couple is legally separated.

Some local religious leaders
have argued that a man cannot
rape his wife claiming the Bible
dictates that a wife must physi-
cally submit to her husband.

Controversial pastor Cedric
Moss has vocally opposed the
legislation claiming the amend-
ment would create a "society
of rapists." Citing the "word of
God", Mr Moss argued that
rape cannot be committed in
marriage because the couple
gave each other authority over
the other's body and agreed to
open-ended sexual consent in
the marriage contract.

He argued that including
spouses as potential rapists
would contradict the sacrament
of marriage.

"But can it be right to bring
married people under such a
law designed for unmarried
people? No, and a thousand
times, no! It is not right and it
can never be right to bring all
married couples under this def-
inition of rape whereby
moment by moment consent is
required for every stage of
every act of sexual intercourse.

"Each day you will be a
potential rapist in your own
home if you initiate sex with
your wife without her consent,"
he told the Rotary Club of
West Nassau earlier this month.

Other opponents believe the
proposed change will devastate
marriages and families in this
country and say more discus-
sion is needed before the
amendment is signed into law.

Women's rights advocates
hit back saying rape is rape and
that a wife should have the
right to tell her husband "No"
to sex in order to defend herself
from an abusive or promiscuous
husband.

In its 2008 Human Rights
Reports on the Bahamas, the
United Nations noted that
while rape is considered illegal
in this country the current law
does not address spousal rape.

"Violence against women
continued to be a serious, wide-
spread problem. The law pro-
hibits domestic violence, and
the government generally
enforced the law. However,
domestic violence laws do not
provide penalties separate from
other crimes of assault and bat-
tery and do not

effectively criminalize sexual
violence within a marriage,”
said the report.

The report said that the
RBPF dealt with 114 reported
rapes last year, a decrease from
136 in 2007.

¢ SEE EDITORIAL ON
PAGE FOUR

Hurricane
FROM page one

The US National Hurricane
Centre, in its update at 5pm
yesterday, said Bill was
approaching major hurricane
status with the centre of the
storm located about 635 miles
east of the Leeward Islands.

Bill was moving toward the
west-northwest at near
lomph, and this motion was
expected to continue last
night, followed by a turn
toward the north-west today.
On this track, it will pass well
to the north-east of the
Bahamas on Friday and Sat-
urday.

The storm’s maximum sus-
tained winds were at 110mph
with higher gusts last night.

Police Constable

FROM page one

trate Carolita Bethel in Court
8, Bank Lane, opted to have
the case heard in Magistrate’s
Court. He pleaded not guilty
to the charges.

The prosecution raised no
objection to bail which was
granted in the sum of $7,500.

Bonaby, of Zion Boule-
vard, was ordered not to have
any contact with the com-
plainant. He was also told to
report to the East Street
South police station every
Saturday before 6pm.

The case was adjourned to
Monday, August 24, and
transferred to Court 11, Nas-
sau Street.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM






By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he company that

proposed to sup-

ply the Bahamas

Electricity Corpo-

ration (BEC) with

liquefied natural gas (LNG) has
sold the lease to its proposed
terminal site to a Bahamian-
incorporated company, Tribune
Business can reveal, although
it has not completely aban-
doned its plans for this nation.
AES Corporation’s decision
to sell the lease to its proposed
LNG terminal site on Ocean
Cay, a man-made island near
Bimini, was yesterday said by
sources familiar with the situa-
tion to have been a move
designed to minimise the con-
siderable costs it had already

THE TRIBUNE

sine

WEDNESDAY,



AUGUST

19,



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

LNG supplier sells
project lease rights

* But deal does not mean AES has
walked away from Bahamas
* Agreement has re-lease option if
government gives approval, with
Bahamian buyer planning to
re-start aragonite mining

incurred in what has been, to
date, a fruitless eight-year wait
for successive Bahamian gov-
ernments to approve its pro-
ject.

However, Tribune Business
can reveal that although the
Ocean Cay lease has been sold,
AES has not completely
walked away from the Bahamas
and its proposed Ocean

Express project. It is under-
stood that the deal includes an
option for the US energy giant
to re-lease part of Ocean Cay
should the Government finally
give approval for the project.
“AES has spent a tremen-
dous amount of money in trying
to conduct an LNG project on
Ocean Cay,” one source, who
requested anonymity, said yes-

terday. “They have disposed of
the rights to the island, Ocean
Cay. They decided to sell the
lease to the island to a company
which has agreed that, if the
Government gives permission
for the project, AES will re-
lease a portion of it.”

The lease sale was said by
sources to have been completed
within the last several months,
with the buyer being a Bahami-
an-incorporated company ben-
eficially owned by a Bahamian
citizen.

Tribune Business under-
stands that the buyer is
Bahamian investor Tony
Myers. Sources said he was
planning to team up with for-
eign investors to form a com-
pany that will re-start aragonite

SEE page 6B

Contractors work for 10 per cent less profit

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN contractors are taking cuts
in profit and overhead of up to 10 per cent
just to ensure they secure work in a slump-
ing economy, the Bahamian Contractors
Association’s (BCA) president said yes-
terday, describing the industry as being in a
“buyers market” favouring consumers.

Stephen Wrinkle, who heads his own
construction business, Wrinkle Develop-
ment, said that while the Government’s
various capital works projects were set to
“pick up the slack” for what was a slug-
gish industry, private sector projects also

Corporation ‘to
be in arrears’ for
2009 remainder

needed to rebound in number for a full
revival to take place.

“The contractors are taking the work at
less mark-up to keep the business going,”
Mr Wrinkle told Tribune Business. “Con-
tractors are taking the work for less profit
and less overhead.

“Just in the bid work we’ve seen, it could
be 10 per cent. But if you’re building a
$300,000 house, that’s $300,000.”

Mr Wrinkle described the commercial
construction market, which constitutes pro-
jects such as new office buildings, as “very
slow, with little going on”.

However, there was still activity in the
private homeowners market, with persons

who had already purchased lots and
obtained financing exploiting the weak con-
struction market and reduced building
materials prices to make progress in devel-
oping their own homes.

The BCA president added: “While gen-
erally speaking the market is very soft,
there are isolated cases of success, and peo-
ple are taking what they can get until things
improve. Right now, it’s a buyers market.
Most of the large contractors have a pro-
ject, but very few have multiple projects....

“Government work is picking up a lot
of slack and is holding the industry togeth-

SEE page 6B

ROYAL B FIDELITY

Lela nel

RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Water & Sewerage
Corporation “expects to be in
arrears” on payments to its
major, BISX-listed reverse
osmosis supplier for the
remainder of 2009, Tribune
Business can confirm, despite
making an $8.7 million payment
on the outstanding balance dur-
ing this year’s second quarter.

Consolidated Water, in its
latest 10-Q filing with the Secu-
rities & Exchange Commission
(SEC), said this payment had
reduced the Government-
owned Corporation’s debt to it
to $4.7 million as at end-June
2009, although it continued to
warn investors that its Bahami-

















The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

Water & Sewerage still
owing $4.7m to BISX-listed
Consolidated Water, main
reverse osmosis supplier,
despite $8.7m payment

an subsidiary faced liquidity
issues as a result of payment
issues.

Acknowledging that it had
“experienced significant delays
in the receipt of payments” on
the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration’s since early 2008, Con-
solidated Water said it had held
its last meeting on the issue
with government and Corpora-

SEE page 6B

Cable profits
flat in 09’ Q2

By CHESTER ROABRDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

CABLE BAHAMAS net
income for the 2009 half-year
increased 15.35 per cent to
$14.89 million, compared to
$12.904 million the previous
year, although the second quar-
ter was almost flat at $7.438
million.

Despite total year-to-date
revenues reaching $42 million
in the 2009 second quarter, a 4
per cent increase compared to

SEE page 6B

er la
r

er

ONLY

ROYAL FIDELITY

De ema

PTA ee me eg
NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com

PROJECT MANAGER Iram Lewis (second right) shows Minister
Phenton Neymour how deep the foundations had to be dug.
Photo by Felipé Major/Tribune Staff

Stadium’s $12-$18m
construction boost

By CHESTER ROABRDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE ERECTION of the Bahamas National Stadium will
pump $12 to $18 million into Bahamian construction mate-
rials suppliers, a Chinese project manager said yesterday,
while the overall cost of the project has grown since it broke
ground.

Yiging Sun, the technical manager for the stadium project,
said some minor changes have been made to the stadium
plans which could raise the cost of building the facility.

“With the development of
SEE page 6B

time maybe we will have a lit-



Where do you want to be? > ®inounecueueus

We can get you there!

eek
Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

BARBADOS
St. Michael: 246.435.1955

royalfidelity.com

| Comprehensive Pension Plans

[ Learn more at royalfidelity.com |

ROYAL FIDELITY

AEM old



ey SALE

MEAD Block & White Crayola Crayons Student Proj

200 page
‘(Composition (Books

9541400.

Sto

Beal

ons al
95 9."
35.939

in TODAY and LOOK for the
BOSS Target for MORE great DEALS!

ect Boards Washable Markers

Tel: 394-5656
Me] e all Piel Chel Gget sat
www.bossbahamas.com
PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

THE TRBUNE





Airline industry could nosedive on fee rises

AT 11:41am on June 26,
2009, the operators of 23
Bahamas-based private airline
companies received an e-mail
from the Bahamas Civil Avia-
tion Department that threw
them into a collective tailspin,
or at least a ground loop. They
were told that the new fee reg-
ulations gazetted in May 2005
would now come into effect
on August 1, 2009, but that
“official notification will be
forwarded to you within the
coming week”.

Nothing happened.

Then, at 12:54pm on July 3,
they received a similar e-mail
to say that the effective date
was changed to September 10,
2009, again with notification
to follow within a week.

No notification was
received, leaving uncertainty.

The new fees covered by the
2005 regulations could, if
enforced as written, drive a
dagger into the heart of al pri-
vately-owned airline compa-
nies in the Bahamas. This
would include not only the
larger ones providing sched-
uled service throughout the
country, such as Sky Bahamas,
Western Air, Southern Air,
Cat Island Air and Pineapple
Air, but also the smaller ones
providing charter flights.

I recently spent a couple of
hours with Captain Randy
Butler, chief executive and
principal owner of Sky
Bahamas, so he could explain
to me the background of these




fees and their impact on his
business. We met in his office
on Blake Road, lined with
diplomas he received for the
various courses given by
IATA, the International Air
Transport Association. Holder
of a US airline transport pilot
certificate, Captain Butler has
seen both sides of the coin.
Until last year he served as
Aviation Safety Inspector for
the Bahamas, a top job in civ-
il aviation. Last summer, with
a few friends, he bought the
ailing Sky Bahamas and began
to turn it around, heading for
break-even at present. “I knew
all about the technical side,”
he told me. “I’m still learning
the business side.” He’s helped
by a full-time chief financial
officer.

The new fee structure was
officially enacted in 2005 by
regulations under The Avia-
tion Act, radically revising the
previous 1985 schedule. But
these regulations were never
brought into force. Section 11
of the regulations requires
advance discussion with the
industry. It demands “consul-
tation with airport users before
significant changes in the
charging system or level of
charges”. But, since no con-
sultation was ever held, the
new fees were held in
abeyance — until the recent
communications announcing
their abrupt enforcement,
again without consultation.

Captain Butler handed me a

by Richard Coulson



copy of the 2005 document, so
I could peruse the many pages
of technical verbiage and rate
schedules. To a layman, they
look baffling in their com-
plexity. Existing fees are not
simply increased, but whole
new categories - never charged
before - are created. It seems
every possible activity now
carries a fee — registration of
aircraft and the company itself,
landing fees at Bahamian air-
ports, pilot licensing fees, bag-
gage handling and inspection
fees, passenger fees, security
fees —on and on. Captain But-
ler and his financial staff are
now engaged in calculations
to determine precisely how
these new charges will affect
their operating costs. He is cer-
tain that fare increases will be
inevitable, raising, for exam-
ple, the present $160 round-
trip rare to Georgetown, Exu-
ma.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu. bs

LATE REGISTRATION

Late Registration for Fall 2009 is scheduled for
August 25-26, 2009 from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
in the Records Department, ground floor, Portia
Smith Student Services Centre.


























ENTER 10 WIN! |





















_ ONE WINNER EVERY WEEK!
Don't miss out on your chance of a - 6
stainless steel gas grills and large ice chest.


















HOW TO PARTICIPATE:

1. BUY any TWO panticipating® Kraft or Nabiseo
prodects betwoen July 16 amd August 27, 2009,
2 Visit official Kraft Grillin’ and Chillin’ display at

all participating stores.

4, Fillowt official entry form and attach original

QrOcery store receipt.

4, DEPOSIT entry form im entry hoses located at
participating stores; The d'Albenas Agency Ltd
in Palmdabe or Parity Bakery om Market &

MicPhenon Streets.

5. Entries must be received by August 27, 2009

To qualify, you must answer the skill question:
Who Sells The Cheesiest: Mac & Cheese?

* OSCAR MAYER Hat Daays any variety

= ERAN Singles any variety

* UU BBQ Sauces Hoo ov Larger, any variety
= ERAN Mayo Wor er larger, any variety

Combest ends August 27, 2009

© RAPT Mae & Chasse 725 09

= RAGS) Bitz Crackers (har. apy variety

Ciwtrituted in the Batam by

# The dAlbenas Agency Lte.
Palmdale, 322-1441

* OED Chocolate Sandwith Cookies 1Bae, any vacety
= OUPS AO Cbonolate Chip Cookies tor, ary variety

(PURITY)
t RY)
Morte 6 Schaerer Bin

302-3000

Lmplosces of The 7 Mesa: Ageac and Media Enterprise: or tein imei te Paraiies are mot eligible bo eater the anes,

KRAFT Grillin’ & Chillin’

Name:
Address:

Phone:
Who sells “The Cheesiest”. Mac & Cheese?

Operating costs are already
substantial. Sky Bahamas flies
three 33-seater Saab 340s, and
a back-up 19-seater
Beechcraft, all of which
require meticulous servicing
at the company’s Nassau
hangar, where the mainte-
nance staff pay runs up to
$55,000 per annum. They fly
scheduled service to Freeport,
Georgetown, Marsh Harbour,
Bimini, and, recently, Cat
Island — over 12 flights daily.
On-demand charters are also
flown to Florida and Cap Hai-
tien, Haiti. To provide unin-
terrupted service, Captain But-
ler hires 15 licensed pilots,
whose pay ranges from
$35,000 to $55,000 depending
on experience; all but one are
Bahamian. When to these
expenses are added fuel, office
and counter staff, insurance,
etc., one appreciates that the
company is already operating
on a tight margin.

Competition is an ever-pre-
sent factor. On his principal
routes, Captain Butler faces
the Government-owned carri-
er Bahamasair, as well as the
private Western Air, based in
Andros with a slightly larger
fleet, because of their frequent
flights to that island and
Freeport. Of course, Bahama-
sair alone could not possibly
satisfy the demand from all the
destinations. To Georgetown,
for example, SkyBahamas
operates its three daily round-
trips at an average capacity
factor of about 75 per cent,
flying head-to-head against its
two competitors.

Captain Butler is fortunate
that the current recession, so
problematic for US airlines,
has not substantially affected
Bahamian inter-island traffic,
since most of the travellers are
Bahamian citizens, not visit-
ing tourists. His company is
well known for not squeezing
the last dollar out of the traffic.
They offer free trips for first-
time students, and often waive
fares for indigent passengers
travelling for hospital service.
Once, when unfortunately
delayed five hours on a return
to Nassau, the passengers
including this writer were met
by a SkyBahamas agent who
immediately gave us free
round-trip tickets good for 90
days — a nicety I have never
seen Bahamasair offer.

The new fee charges
technically will apply to
Bahamasair’s domestic flights
equally with the private com-
panies. But from his long
experience in Civil Aviation,
Captain Butler is well aware
that the Government carrier
is given considerable leeway
in making prompt payment,
while the private firms must
pay with a bank cashier’s
cheque on the due date or suf-
fer penalties and sanctions.
Together with the foreign air-
lines, our national flag carrier
enjoys another advantage: it
can import accessories, parts
and instruments exempt from
the Customs duties paid by its
privately-owned competitors.
The fear is that Bahamasair
will simply be able to absorb
the fee increases into its large,

ROYAL FIDELITY

WC acme 4

RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company

We are growing!
Royal Fidelity invites applications for the position of:

- Vice President, Corporate Finance -

Reporting directly to the President, the successful
applicant will be responsible for:

Management and development of Corporate

Finance business in Bahamas
Monitoring and oversight of investment
management activities in both Bahamas and

Barbados markets

Business development across all business lines
Public speaking engagements

Requirements:

Bachelors or equivalent degree in finance
A minimum of 15 years experience in an
investment bank, preferably with international

experience

Strong interpersonal, oral and written
communications skills

Proven ability to innovate and develop

new product and services

Willingness and ability to travel frequently
around the Caribbean

Excellent marketing and communications skills

HUMAN RESOURCES
Re: VP, Corporate Finance

PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE
August 28", 2009 to:

51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau

ABSOLUTELY NO
PHONE CALLS

F: 328.1108
careers@fidelitybahamas.com

existing Government-sub-
sidised losses, while the more
tightly run investor-owned
companies will have to raise
fares to stay alive, putting
them at a competitive disad-
vantage.

Captain Butler asks what
the vastly increased fees are
to be used for? The minister
has spoken in vague general
terms about financing
improved services and airport
facilities, particularly in the
Family Islands. There is sup-
posed to be an overall “plan”
under the current Air Trans-
port Improvement Pro-
gramme, being funded by the
Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB). Apparently, the
Bahamas is at risk of losing its
essential Category I Classifi-
cation under the Federal Avi-
ation Agency’s Safety Pro-
gramme. But he has never
seen a copy of this plan or had
an explanation of its contents.
To the contrary, he believes
the Government could actu-
ally save money by downgrad-
ing some of the 18 port-of-
entry airports (with full
inbound Customs and Immi-
gration and facilities). He
questions why Treasure Cay,
just 40 miles from Marsh Har-
bour, needs this status, and
why Andros and Eleuthera
each need three of these
expensive terminals. The
downgraded airports could still
be used for domestic flights
from Nassau. He points out
that travellers to many inter-
national resorts think nothing
of an hour or more drive to
their destination. And Captain
Butler questions whether the
new fee regime would comply
with the Policies on Airport
and Air Navigation Charges
created by ICAO, the Inter-
national Civil Aviation Organ-
isation.

Finally, he asks, why does
Government not take over
control of our own air space
from the Flight Information
Region administered by the
US FAA? Under the present
arrangement every flight over
our own territory, even to and
from local airports, is never-
theless billed a fixed fee
payable to the US Govern-
ment, totaling about $1,700
per month for SkyBahamas.
If we assumed jurisdiction
over our air space, as have oth-
er Caribbean nations, not only
could we collect over-flight
fees from many foreign air-
lines, but Bahamians could be
taught new employment skills
in running the programme.

Most of Captain Butler’s
views are shared by Rex Rolle,
owner and chief executive of
Western Airlines. In a tele-
phone call to him at his com-
pany’s operations base in San
Andros, he confirmed his con-
cerns over the proposed new
fee structure. A pretty loose
trade association featuring all
the private airline companies is
now being tightened up to car-
ry out intensive negotiations
with experts at Civil Aviation
to alleviate the harsh effects
of regulations hastily written
back in 2005, before the due
date of September 10.

It would certainly be unfor-
tunate if private-sector entre-
preneurs in the airline busi-
ness, providing an essential
service with unquestioned
safety and marketing records,
were driven to the wall so that
the Government carrier, with
its bloated financial structure,
be allowed to survive. This
may not be the stated purpose
of the new fee regulations, but
it might be their actual effect.



< NAT

ANCE

The National Insurance Board

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas





Request for Contractors Pre-Qualification

The National Insurance Board (NIB) is seeking to pre-qualify contractors to bid on
works to complete the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre - Robert Smith Child ¢» Adolescents
and Special Education Unit, Fox Hill, Nassau, Bahamas; the project is a joint venture of
NIB and The Bahamas Government. Contractors must be in compliance with the
National Insurance Act (social security programme), and in good standing with the
relevant Government agencies.

Pre-qualification documents may be collected from the Security Booth at NIB’s
Clifford Darling Complex, Blue Hill Road, from August 14 to August 21, 2009.

Pre-Qualification documents should be signed, sealed and dropped in the pre-
qualification box at the Security Booth, Clifford Darling Complex on or before
12:00 Noon on August 21, 2009.






THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009, PAGE 3B





Scotiabank
settles $45m
resort suit

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SCOTIABANK (Bahamas)
and the developers of a $250
million Bahamian-based
resort development now in
receivership have agreed to
end their eight-month long
legal battle in the Florida
courts, Tribune Business can
reveal.

The Bahamian bank and
Chub Cay Club principals,
Walter McCrory and Bob
Moss, on Friday filed in the
US district court for southern
Florida a motion to “volun-
tarily dismiss” the action Sco-
tiabank (Bahamas) initiated
on December 23, 2008. It now
only awaits the agreement and
sign-off by US district judge,
William Zloch.

The Stipulation of Volun-
tary Dismissal without Preju-
dice, which has been obtained
by Tribune Business, states
that both sides “voluntarily
stipulate and agree to dismiss
this action, together with all
of their respective claims,
causes of action, counterclaims
and defences, without preju-
dice”.

Scotiabank (Bahamas) had
initiated the legal proceedings
in a bid to call in an alleged $4
million loan guarantee made
by Messrs McCrory and Moss,
plus their late partner Kaye
Pearson, after the trio default-
ed on repayments to the bank
over a $45 million loan it
granted to finance Chub Cay’s
construction.

The bank, in its lawsuit,
alleged that the trio had guar-
anteed the “financing for the
development of vacation resi-
dences, a marina, a clubhouse
and related improvements for
more than 800 acres on Chub
Cay in the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas”.

Scotiabank (Bahamas)
alleged that the trio owed
$44.010 million in unpaid prin-
cipal on the July 28, 2006,
loan, plus interest, cost and
expenses, including attorneys’
fees.

The bank also alleged that
the three developer principals
had guaranteed that construc-
tion work on Chub Cay would
be completed by December
31, 2007, a deadline that had
been missed. Some $38.6 mil-
lion worth of work, Scotia-
bank (Bahamas) claimed,
needed to be done to bring
the project to completion.

The bank subsequently
secured the appointment of
Baker Tilly Gomez accoun-
tant and partner, Craig A.
‘Tony’ Gomez, as Chub Cay’s

receiver. As previously
revealed by Tribune Business,
Mr Gomez is now seeking to
sell the resort development to
recover what is due to Scotia-
bank (Bahamas), and is
understood to have been close
to appointing George Dami-
anos, of Damianos Sotheby’s
International Realty, as the
realtor who will market the
resort.

Mr Gomez was yesterday
said to be out office until next
week when Tribune Business
called seeking comment. How-
ever, it is presumably the like-
lihood that Scotiabank
(Bahamas) will recover most
of what it is owed via the sale,
plus difficulties in obtaining
this sum from the principals,
that has prompted the lawsuit
settlement. For their part,
Messrs McCrory and Moss
had previously denied the alle-
gations made against them by
Scotiabank (Bahamas).

They argued that while they
had provided a $4 million
guarantee for the loan agree-
ment with the Bahamian
bank, they had fulfilled this
by pledging a $4 million stand-
by letter of credit to Scotia-
bank. The duo alleged that
Scotiabank (Bahamas) had
already “been paid to the full
extent of what it can recover
under the” guarantee through

accessing the pledged stand-
by letter of credit.

While admitting that they
were guarantors and “that all
payments called for by the
agreement have not been
made”, Messrs McCrory and
Moss denied they were liable
for the $4 million guarantee.

They further alleged that
their obligations were limited
to this guarantee, and denied
that a guarantee to complete
the Chub Cay project had
been part of the terms.

Chub Cay, which was
unveiled with much fanfare as
the so-called ‘anchor project’
for the Berry Islands and
North Andros just five years
ago, is a prime example of just
how bad a toll the global eco-
nomic downturn, and espe-
cially the freezing of
credit/debt markets, has exact-
ed on foreign direct invest-
ment projects that the
Bahamas was counting on to
generate jobs and economic
growth.

Numerous other projects,
including the Ritz-Carlton
Rose Island, Royal Island,
Ginn sur mer and Rum Cay
Resort Marina, have all been
impacted to some degree by
the immense difficulty —if not
impossibility — of obtaining
debt financing at reasonable
cost and terms.

OSMAN
“pl Ch Vaan rnin

41R Cameras

One (1) 4 Ch Stand Alone DVR
(Digital Video Recorder)
500 ft of Co-Ax & Power Cable
Power Supply & Accessories



LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.
“Eattage Lat With Private Beach

FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!
Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million

Web Listing # 8377

Mario A. Carey, CRS, CIPS, CLHMS

Tel:242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013
info@mariocareyrealty.com
www.marioca reyrea

NOTICE

.com

As

Mario Carey Realty
Dt'svabaut you... Let's talk.

Nally
ea"

a

‘Yc?

~ TO ALL EMPLOYERS AND SELF-EMPLOYED
PERSONS ON THE ELEUTHERA MAINLAND -

All Employers and Self-Employed Persons on the Eleuthera mainland, who recerved

C-11 Form norices from the Nattonal Insurance Board, are kindly asked to visit the

Compliance Officer ar the North Eleuthera Local Office, in Lower Bogue, on

Wednesday, August 19, 21019, herween che hours of 9/00 a.m. and 541K) p.m.

The Compliance Officer will also be available in Governor's Harbour, ar the

Governor's Harbour Local Office on Thursday, August ;

21, 2009, from 9-0) a.m, to 3:00 pom,

A), 2009, and Friday, August

For your convenience, vou may visit the Officer at anvone of the Local Offices on the

respective dates and times stated



Gear Shareholders,

Overall sales for the 3 quarter this year are down over 37% for the same period last year
( $2,134k versus $3,396k | The Home Centre, Freeport sales for this 3° quarter are down
over 31% (31.713K wersus $2,502k) and the concrete plant sales are down almost 33% (
542 1k versus $895k)

The net boss for this quarter is $198k on total sales of $2. 134k, however, this is almost the

same amount we lost in the 3” quarter last year but on significantly higher sales of
33,390k

Although we lost SIORK for the quarter it is pleasing to report that despite the Home
Centre sales being down over 31% for the same quarter last year we did in fact report net
income, before depreciation and interest of $95k this quarter compared bo a 528K net loss
for the same quarter last year. This shows that despite the downward trend in sales
revenues, due to lack of inventory, our cost cutting measures and the staff redundancies
are making ao difference in reducing our losses ard returning tice profitabality

However, as we forecasted several months ago, without any cash infusion into the

company to purchase more inventory, our sales revenues al the Home Centre will
d

continue to decrease as is evident in our 3" quarter results

Gur concrete sales for the quarter were £421k, which resulted in a net loss aller
depreciation and interest of $198k, compared te a net logs for the same period last year of
572k

Despite the drop in sales in the concrete division in the 2” gir we should see better results
in the 4" quarter a3 we will have the benefit of the additional revenues created by the sale
af concrete blocks in the last two weeks of August

We are confident, expecially from the initial response of vanous contractors wilh regard
to the excellent quality of the blocks, that our concrete division will see increases im
revenues going forward, which means that we will start off our new fiscal year on
September 1, 2009 in a better position than last September.

We continue to explore all avenues to find new capatal in order to purchase the inventory
needed to increase our sales at the Home Centre, which wall in turn create profitability
now that we have reduced our expenses considerably.

Thank you

Yours ancerely,

Ray Simpeon

Chief Exeeutive Officer
July 31, 2009

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consobdated Statement of Operahone
Three montha aided May 31, 2009 with comparative information for 2004

(Expressed in Batianiian dotars)

3 months ended 3 months ended
31-May-0a 311 -Palary 08

Sales 2,134, 189
Cost of sales. 1542 676
‘Gross prot #01505

4,396,260
2577 Bos
BiB dee

Payal costs. 351,971 493,222
Redundaecy caits 0 a
‘Other operating costs 127 069 217,503
Hent expense 37,800 102,200
Achertting expense Vt 14e 13,391
Litiities expense ao 545 1,860

So2 60k Bid, Pre

Income loss) before interest, tas:

deprecation and amortaaion (101 080) (36,471)

Depo. and amor. expense (54,604) (Gh tir}
(2.407) (35.912)
Net financing incomeljexpense)

(708,401)

Nat inornel oes) (197, 100)

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consobdated Statement of Operahons
Nine months ended May 31, 2009 with comparative information far 2008

(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

8 months ended
21-May-06

4 months ended
34-May-08

Teas 5,787,767
‘Cost of sakes. 6246401
‘roe profi 1.951 J6e

10,635 254
7 BS 7 66
20 2

Payroll costs
Redundancy cons
‘Other operating costs

1,360,804 1,512,280
185,000 a
522,926 643,129

Rent expense 226,800 736 263

Agwarising axpanse 28, Tee oT ori

Utiities expense 241129 275,734

2,565,647 2,046, 360k





Income!loss) belore interest, taxes

deprecation and amorimation (834 207) (BS 585)

Depn. and amort. expense (161 461) (20d, 387)

Net financing income(expense (124,227) (108, 62a)

Net income! oes) (039,990) (379,750)

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consolidated Balance Shaat
As at May 34, 2009

May 31, 2006 August 1 2008

{Lireauchibecd) {audited}
Ageete

Cash 10, es
Accaurits eeheble, net 515,598
Invesiones 1064, 017
Inventiones of soare parts and supples 115,576
Deposits ard prepaid expenses 67,264

468,230
BOF 007
Ler h abe
a2.o70
67,142
Total current agcete

1773, 043 2477 o15

Fined assets dd 5G 4.195, T24

Total assets 6,118,386 6,563 620

Liabilities and Bharobolders" Equiny

Rank averd rae 1,821,097 1,841,457
Acoount payaihe and accrued egqoenses. 3,585,357 3,025,007
\ertanty Prowsion 5,000 6,000)
Cunanl portion of kang tare debt To. 645 183,857
5 Sat 139

Total current lasted ties 5068S 45

Lang term debt S708

Sharcholders' equity
Share Capra
Contributed surplus
Appeaisal excess
Retained earnings
Cunnant eamings

a7 0
5.774, B68
1,433,867

(3.766 ,558)
(930,005)

Total equity SaT2en 1467 259
Tota! lisbilries and shareholders’ equity $ 6,716,356 6,560) 60

47, Ces
5,774, Bes
1,423,257

(5,788, S58)




PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



10 RACTOR

er, but at the end of the day it’s
a symphony orchestra, and we
need all the instruments playing
in tune together.”

Among the Government
works projects moving forward
were the $409.5 million Lynden
Pindling International Airport
(LPIA) redevelopment, Mr
Wrinkle telling Tribune Busi-
ness that the general contractor,
a combination of Canadian firm
Ledcor and Bahamian compa-
ny Wooslee Dominion, were
“mobilising and getting ready
to start physical work”. Else-
where, the Straw Market was
in the pre-qualification phase.

Meanwhile, Mr Wrinkle said
the BCA was awaiting final
approval from the Inter-Amer-
ican Development Bank (IDB)
for the proposed $225,000 pro-
ject to strengthen the Bahamian
construction industry.

He added that the BCA
council had met with the IDB’s
Bahamian office several weeks
ago to review the proposed pro-
ject grant, which was subse-
quently sent off for final
approval by the bank’s head
office. Preliminary approval
had already been given by the
Bahamian government.

“Tt is our understanding that
we’ve met all the criteria, the
requirements required by the
grant, and we’ve had every indi-
cation from the IDB locally that
final approval will be forth-
coming,” Mr Wrinkle told Tri-
bune Business.

the same period in fiscal 2008,
the BISX-listed company only
enjoyed a modxest increase
upon the previous year’s $7.365
million net income.

For the second quarter, total
revenues were $21 million, up
3.2 per cent from the same peri-
od last year. Cable television
continued to be the highest rev-
enue earner, with $11.1 million.
Internet netted $6.5 million in
overall revenues, and Data $3.4
million. Last quarter, the com-
pany saw its largest year-over-
year revenue growth in its con-
solidated product offerings.

Cable Bahamas said its rev-
enue growth has continued to
be in line with its expectations
and "was complemented by the
careful management of operat-
ing expenses”. It was able to
lower operating total operating
expenses by 1 per cent to $9.5
million.




Corporation ‘to be in arrears

for 2009 remainder

FROM page 1B

tion representatives on May 1, 2009.

The company, whose Bahamian Depos-
itory Receipts (BDRs) are listed on the
Bahamas International Securities Exchange
(BISX), said it had again received reassur-
ances that the payment “delinquency” was
related to “operating issues” within the
Water & Sewerage Corporation.

Given that there was no dispute between
the parties, and that the Government had
pledged the outstanding amount would be
paid in full, Consolidated Water said it had
made no provision for, or written down,
the sums owed.

Consolidated Water said in its SEC filing:
“During the three months ended June 30,
2009, Consolidated Water-Bahamas
received $8.7 million in payments on its
receivables from the Water & Sewerage
Corporation, and Consolidated Water-
Bahamas’ accounts receivable from the
Water & Sewerage Corporation were
approximately $4.7 million as of June 30,
2009.

“We believe that the accounts receiv-
able from the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration are fully collectible and therefore
have not provided any allowance for pos-
sible non-payment of these receivables as of
June 30, 2009.

“However, we have been informed by
these representatives that the Water &
Sewerage Corporation expects to continue
to be in arrears on its payments to Consol-
idated Water-Bahamas for the remainder

of 2009.”

As a result, Consolidated Water warned
investors: “Consolidated Water-Bahamas
derives substantially all of its revenues from
its contract with the Water & Sewerage
Corporation, and is dependent upon time-
ly collection of its accounts receivable to
fund its operations. If the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation does not improve the
timeliness and/or increase the amounts of
its payments to Consolidated Water-
Bahamas, this subsidiary may not have suf-
ficient liquidity to adequately fund its oper-
ations.

“If this occurs, Consolidated Water-
Bahamas may be required to decrease the
amount of water it supplies the Water &
Sewerage Corporation to the minimum
required amount under the contract or, if
liquidity problems become too severe, cease
its production of water altogether. Such
developments could have a material
adverse effect on our results of operation
and financial position.”

Consolidated Water’s results again high-
light the increasing financial weakness of
the Water & Sewerage Corporation, and
the burden it imposes on Bahamian tax-
payers. The Corporation will still be in
arrears on its reverse osmosis supply pay-
ments despite having received an additional
$11 million in taxpayer funding during the
2008-2009 Budget year that brought its
total subsidy to $30 million.

And the financial drain that is currently
the Water & Sewerage Corporation was
again highlighted by the fact that, without
a government subsidy, it would have

incurred a $24 million loss during its 2007
financial year.

Elsewhere, Consolidated Water said its
Bahamian subsidiary had cancelled a
$500,000 revolving credit facility with Roy-
al Bank of Canada. No amounts had been
due under the facility, which was secured by
the Bahamian company’s assets and would
have incurred interest levied at Bahamian
Prime plus 1.5 per cent.

Consolidated Water said that it would
replace the Royal Bank working capital
facility with “another facility with another
bank in August 2009”.

On the operational front, Consolidated
Water said its Bahamian operations were
generating “higher gross profits”.

“The higher gross profits for our
Bahamas operations reflect improved oper-
ating efficiencies for both our Windsor and
Blue Hills operations located in Nassau,
New Providence,” the company said in its
SEC filing.

“We constructed and commissioned new
feed water wells, and replaced the reverse
osmosis membranes on two of four of our
production trains at our Windsor plant
effective September 2008, and replaced the
reverse osmosis membranes on our other
two production trains at the Windsor plant
during the current quarter.

“These capital expenditures have
improved the energy efficiency of the
Windsor plant. In addition, last year we
implemented an improved feed water pre-
treatment regime at our Blue Hills plant in
Nassau, which has reduced electrical pow-
er consumption at that plant.”

LNG supplier sells project lease rights

FROM page 1B

9 TADIUM,
from 1B

mining on Ocean Cay, a man-
made island originally devel-
oped for such a purpose.

AES has spent at least $65
million in trying to win
approval for the project, only
to incur ever-increasing frus-
tration at the failure of both the
Christie and Ingraham admin-
istrations to give final approval,
despite meeting all the Gov-
ernment’s requirements -
chiefly completing a positive
Environmental Impact Assess-
ment (EIA) and Environmen-

NOTICE





NOTICE

is hereby given that

JOHNNY JOSEPH

P.O. BOX GT-2752 , YELLOW ELDER is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 12 day of August, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE ANGE NOEL of
#137 FAWCETT LANE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
12th day of AUGUST, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SAMANTHA LOUISE
COX KEMP, P.O. BOX N-10767,# 3 HALLS ROAD and
POMPANO COURT, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12‘ day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRANCLIN JOSEPH
of PODOLEO STREET, P.O. Box N-1482, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 19 day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KEVIN KIRAN SURUJLAL
of PARADISE ISLAN DRIVE, P.O. Box N-9841,
PARADISE ISLAND, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 19" day of August, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O.
Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.











tal Management Plan (EMP).

When contacted yesterday
by Tribune Business about
AES’s sale of the Ocean Cay
lease, Phenton Neymour, min-
ister of state for the environ-
ment, replied: “I haven’t
received that information.”

The Government’s failure to
thus far approve an LNG pro-
ject, especially the AES devel-
opment, located some seven
miles from the nearest inhabit-
ed island, is somewhat mysti-
fying, given that all require-
ments have been met and the
Treasury’s desperate need for
revenue.

The AES project had
promised to generate around
$1 billion in revenues for the

Government during the first 25
years of operations, via a com-
bination of annual business
licence fees, sea bed lease fees
and a throughput fee linked to
the Henry Hub natural gas
index.

When the price of LNG
pumped to Florida by AES
exceeded this benchmark, the
Bahamas would gain a per-
centage of the additional rev-
enues - a figure that could have
hit $40-$50 million in 2005.

AES had also proposed to
supply BEC with LNG from
Ocean Cay, something its then-
project manager said could save
the Government-owned Cor-
poration between $1.4 billion
to $4 billion - $80 million to

EXECUTIVE HOME FOR RENT

4-BEDROOM, 4 1/2-BATHROOM EXECUTIVE HOME
ON LYFORD CAY GOLF COURSE

$210 million per annum - in fuel
costs over a 15-year period.

Aaron Samson said that AES
was effectively offering the
Government two options -
approving the original LNG
terminal and pipeline that
would service Florida only, or
giving the go-ahead for that
project and the pipeline to New
Providence.

Yet Tribune Business under-
stands that the Government’s
concerns over the AES pro-
posal relate to long-term LNG
prices, and whether they would
increase at the same rate - and
reach the same level - as oil
prices as global demand
increased. Such a development
would negate any advantages
from switching BEC to LNG.

AES and its attorneys have
been pushing for a government
decision on whether to make
the approval in principle that
was granted to its project back
in 2001 a full, approval that
would allow it to proceed.



tle change. We are paying high-
er than according to the plan,”
said Mr Sun. Much of the mate-
rials and manpower, though, is
being sourced from China.

During a tour of the new
facility, Chinese and Bahami-
an contractors, along with the
Chinese Ambassador to the
Bahamas, showed off its m ain
features to several government
ministers, including Deputy
Prime Minister Brent Symon-
ette and Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture, Desmond
Bannister.

The ministers were shown
innovations in Chinese con-
struction and tests that verify
the fortitude of construction
materials, including steel rebar
with welded joints stronger
than the moulded rebar itself,
and concrete block made with
Bahamian-supplied concrete,
which stood up to pressures
twice its limit.

Mr Symonette relished the
fact that the concrete which
made up the block tested by
Chinese workers was Bahami-
an-made.

Mr Bannister said construc-
tion of the new Stadium will
bring international competi-
tions, currently not able to be
held in the Bahamas, to this
nation. He said it will be the
best facility in the region.

“We are extremely pleased
with the partnership with the
Chinese government, who have
proved they are very good
friends and have made a won-
derful contribution to the devel-
opment of our national stadi-
um. We're looking forward to
continuing this very wonderful
partnership we have with the
government of China,” he said.

“The ambassador has been
a very good friend, and has
been extremely helpful in
everything that we have been
doing.”

Mr Symonette said 75 per
cent of the pylons, which will
be buried more than 40 feet
into the bedrock at the site and
support the foundation for the
stadium, are in place. The sta-
dium will require 620 of those
pylons.

Much of the equipment used
in the construction thus far has
been acquired from Bahamian
companies, according to Mr
Sun.

“We have built relationships
with local small companies. The
blocks and sand are provided
by a local company, and much
of the equipment on the site is
proved by a local company,”
he said.

“Many materials are deliv-
ered from China here, so it
helps the local shipping com-
panies.”

Mr Bannister said the Chi-
nese investment in the Bahami-
an economy was huge, espe-
cially in securing equipment
and supplies for the stadium.

For Immediate Occupancy

This beautiful axecutive residence is located on
a half-acre lot overlooking the Lyford Cay Golf course.

Eighteen-foot high ceilings, eight-foot high French doors,
marble floors, casement windows and an open plan
provide a panoramic view of the Lyford Cay Golf Course
from all living areas,

This modern executive home in Nassau’s most prestigious
community is available for immediate occupancy.

For information call 327-8536.
Serious inquiries only.

POSITIONS
AVAILABLE

A leading wholesale distributor

providing perishables & food
products throughout the Bahamas
for over 25 years has the following
positions available:

DIESEL MECHANIC
CUSTODIAN

Only qualified persons need apply

Please submit all résumés by fax to
(242) 394-0282 or call (242) 677-6700
for further information

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009
IN THE SUPREME COURT COMcom/00100

COMMERCIAL DIVISION

IN THE MATTER OF CLICO ENTERPRISES LIMITED
(In Liquidation |

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT, 1992

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Petition for the
Winding-up of the above-named Company having its
registered office at Serville & Company, No. 13 East
Ave, Centerville in the City of Nassau, was on the 12°
August, 2009 presented to the Court by Craig A. (Tony)
Gomez, the Official Liquidator of Clica Bahamas Limited
and the Petitioner herein, AND that the Company be
wound up pursuant to Section 187 (d) of The Companies
Act, 1992 Chapter 308, Statute Law of The Bahamas
2000 Revised Edition,

AND that the Petition is directed to be heard (in open
Court) before Justice Cheryl Albury, a Justice of the
Supreme Court, in the City of Nassau on Tuesday the
8" day of September, A.D. 2009 at 10:00 a.m. in the
forenoon at the Supreme Court Annex, 3° Floor, British
American Bank Building, Marlborough St., Nassau,
Bahamas and any Creditor or contributory of the said
Company desirous to support or oppose the making of
an Order on the said Petition may appear at the time
of the hearing in person or by his Counsel for that
purpose; and a copy of the Petition will be furnished
by the undersigned to any Creditor or Contributory of
the Company fraquiring such copy on payment of the
prescribed charge for the same.

Callanders & Co.
Chambers
One Millars Court
Attorney for the Petitioner

NOTE: Any person who intends to appear on the
hearing of the said Petition must serve or send by post
to the above-named, notice in writing of his intention
toda so. The notice must stale the name and address
of the person, or, if a firm, the name and address of
the firm and must be signed by the person or firm or
his or their attorney (if any) and must be signed or if
posted, must be sent by post in sufficient time to reach
the above named not later than 4:00 o'clock in the
afternoon on Monday the 7" day of September, A.D.
2009.
st









ORLANDO





























-eOnrAgep Mostly cloudy with Mainly clear with a Mostly sunny with a Sunshine with a t-storm Partly sunny, a t-storm Some sun with a The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
a beste: roe Pas thundersionts frinderstorn thunderstorm in spots. ? meh t-storm possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
@ ™ . High: 90° High: 90° High: 89° High: 90°
r ee High: 92° Low: 81° Low: 80° Low: 79° Low: 80° Low: 80° see ET
TAMPA i AccuWeather RealFeel
High: 92° F/33°C Le . & High __Ht(ft.) Low __Ht(ft.
Low: 78° F/26°C i] r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 7:22am. 3.0 1:15am. 0.0
aa @ “ 2 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 750p.m. 3.4 1:24pm. -0.2
' Se \ a 8:41pm. 3.3 2:20pm. -0.2
) ae a Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Friday 06am. 33 250am. 02
i r 4 SS ABACO Temperature 9:29 p.m. 3.2 3:13 p.m. -0.2
i ; 7 : \ High: 91° F/33° C 7 rea a aeasiues ce Saturday | a.m. | 7 a
i. , co SF ee E26°C Normal high... gorrsz¢
7 F oe ‘ Normal low 76° F/24° C
4 fe! @ WEST PALM BEACH earns Last year's WIgh ..ccccsscssssuseesiene or Fsc | ONT T(IIY
4 ill High: 89° F/32° C Last year's lOW oe eee 77° F/25° C
q : Low: 79° F/26° C . Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:46 a.m. Moonrise..... 5:45 a.m.
a ra e L< = As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..ccccccccccscsssssseeeeeeeeen trace ‘Sumset....... 7-41 p.m. Moonset..... 7:09 p.m.
Teall : FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT 7 Year to date ade: New First Full Last
High: 86° F/30° C @ High: 88° F/31° C Normal year to date oo... 28.62" : anc _
Low: 81°F/27°C —— Low: 77° F/25° C o re J:
Z-. AccuWeather.com os Gio ee
a @ < Forecasts and graphics provided by : a: ay
eg MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Aug. 20 Aug.27 Sep.4 = Sep. 11
ia High: 88° F/31°C High: 95° F/35° C
ORK Low: 81°F/27°C NASSAU ee ee
ar Low: 81° F/27°C
cy eo @ Be iz
KEY WEST i So —_CATISLAND
High: 89° F/32°C High: 90°F/32° C
Low: 82°F/28°G nye Low: 76° F/24°C
2 Sh
= Oo
op GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR
aX High: 91°F/33°C High: 92° F/33°C
o f Low: 79° F/26° C Low:77° F/25°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | ,
highs and tonights's lows. ) ae High: 94° F/34°C
a Low: 76° F/24°C
LONGISLAND
Low: 77° F/25°C
Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday i MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 92° F/33° C
F/C FIC F/C FC FC FIC FC FC FC FC Fie FC me Low: 74° F/23°C
Albuquerque 93/33 65/18 s 92/33 65/18 $s Indianapolis 86/30 72/22 t 83/28 65/18 t Philadelphia 90/32 74/23 t 90/32 74/23 t
Anchorage 66/18 50/10 s 71/21 5110 $s Jacksonville 90/32 74/23 t 89/31 74/23 t Phoenix 110/43 85/29 s 110/43 85/29 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 92/33 71/21 t 89/31 72/22 t KansasCity 86/30 66/18 t 78/25 60/15 pc Pittsburgh 82/27 68/20 t 84/28 68/20 t RAGGEDISLAND Tigh:94°F/34"c
Atlantic City 87/30 73/22 t 80/31 73/22 t Las Vegas 106/41 77/25 s 107/41 81/27 s Portland, OR 98/36 64/17 s 93/33 59/15 s High: 93° F/34° C Low: 77° F/25°C
Baltimore 90/32 70/21 t 92/33 72/22 t Little Rock 92/33 74/23 t 89/31 68/20 t Raleigh-Durham 94/34 73/22 pc 95/35 72/22 pc Low: 74°F/23°C i
Boston 90/32 70/21 t 85/29 71/21 t Los Angeles 80/26 64/117 pc 80/26 64/17 pc St. Louis 90/32 74/23 t 84/28 62/16 t .
Buffalo 80/26 64/117 pce 85/29 69/20 t Louisville 87/30 75/23 t 87/30 70/21 t Salt Lake City 88/31 62/16 s 94/34 66/18 s GREAT INAGUA
Charleston, SC 90/32 74/23 pc 92/83 75/23 pc Memphis 90/32 75/23 t 91/32 69/20 t San Antonio 100/37 78/25 s 98/36 77/25 $s High: 95° F/35° C
Chicago 77/25 67/9 t 79/26 62/16 t Miami 88/31 81/27 t 92/33 80/26 t San Diego 73/22 66/18 pce 74/23 66/18 pc Low. 76°F/24°C
Cleveland 84/28 70/21 t 87/30 71/21 t Minneapolis 74/23 59/15 t 67/19 59/15 sh San Francisco 78/25 58/14 pce 75/23 58/14 pc y
Dallas 98/36 80/26 s 98/36 72/22 t Nashville 87/30 72/22 t 88/31 72/22 t Seattle 88/31 62/16 s 86/30 56/13 s
Denver 83/28 49/9 s 79/26 52/11 $s New Orleans 90/32 78/25 t 90/32 77/25 t Tallahassee 92/33 74/23 t 91/32 75/23 t
Detroit 83/28 68/20 c 81/27 68/20 t New York 88/31 75/23 t 89/31 78/25 t Tampa 92/33 78/25 t 91/32 78/25 t
Honolulu 89/31 77/25 s 89/31 76/24 ¢ Oklahoma City 97/86 74/23 s 92/33 66/18 t Tucson 102/38 77/25 s 102/38 76/24 t
Houston 94/34 77/25 t 96/35 77/25 t Orlando 90/32 77/25 t 91/32 76/24 t Washington, DC 92/33 75/23 t 93/33 76/24 t

AY rr aN

asia,
| =| ojo
\. HIGH EXT.

HIGH

o|1|2

LOW

3|4[5

MODERATE











a i



fy, LEILA Isiiith:








Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
90/32
79/26
86/30
92/33
60/15
90/32
86/30
83/28
84/28
81/27
87/30
77/25
87/30
68/20
84/28
86/30
58/14
98/36
88/31
73/22
91/32
83/28
86/30
70/21
68/20
87/30
87/30
78/25
90/32
66/18
91/32
94/34
86/30
86/30
59/15
90/32
69/20
82/27
99/37
88/31
77/25
102/38
81/27
64/17
84/28
79/26
91/32
66/18
91/32
79/26
80/26
105/40
91/32
91/32
55/12
88/31
54/12
91/32
71/21
90/32
66/18
70/21
93/33
86/30
80/26
95/35
76/24
83/28
72/22
70/21

Til

Today

Low
F/C
77/25
68/20
52/11
73/22
43/8
79/26
79/26
69/20
66/18
78/25
60/15
63/17
76/24
43/8
70/21
59/15
47/8
74/23
81/27
43/8
77/25
72/22
68/20
55/12
54/12
66/18
58/14
59/15
73/22
48/8
81/27
74/23
71/21
61/16
31/0
79/26
58/14
63/17
66/18
79/26
54/12
75/23
63/17
50/10




aoe Ge) Gee =

wn
——

7 eae ao was ma pa

zawUoUgTSo ON
o Be oO —

Yo TDN NS
}o }

oO

a? ee eS aS a

wn
—

54/12 s
56/13 ¢

79/26
54/12
68/20
53/11
73/22
81/27
72/22
79/26

36/2
70/21

34/1
75/23
58/14
75/23
52/11

46/7
80/26
71/21
64/17
75/23
63/17
64/17
54/12
56/13

noe
=

+ Gy Bae moe co ie
=——

=z3
oo a

wn
—

nannnoDoo7eaq7nn
can <>

+

High
F/C
90/32
78/25
85/29
90/32
59/15
91/32
86/30
83/28
93/33
82/27
88/31
86/30
87/30
66/18
88/31
87/30
62/16
99/37
88/31
77/25
90/32
82/27
83/28
76/24
64/17
91/32
87/30
75/23
91/32
68/20
91/32
101/38
84/28
86/30
61/16
88/31
71/21
75/23
97/36
87/30
76/24
102/38
79/26
61/16
89/31
80/26
92/33
63/17
82/27
85/29
83/28
103/39
90/32
88/31
65/18
89/31
61/16
86/30
73/22
88/31
72/22
74/23
91/32
83/28
78/25
88/31
75/23
86/30
75/23
68/20

Thursday

Low
F/C
79/26
55/12
52/11
72/22
46/7
79/26
77/25
68/20
69/20
77/25
61/16
64/17
76/24
47/8
55/12
57/13
43/6
73/22
81/27
52/11
73/22
74/23
65/18
66/18
50/10
63/17
62/16
59/15
73/22
52/11
81/27
77/25
65/18
64/17
39/3
80/26
58/14
55/12
63/17
78/25
53/11
75/23
68/20
48/8
58/14
55/12
80/26
52/11
55/12
60/15
69/20
82/27
68/20
80/26
36/2
74/23
34/1
75/23
53/11
65/18
57/13
43/6
78/25
73/22
63/17
63/17
60/15
66/18
53/11
55/12

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MAarINE FORECAST

WwW

t
pce
s
s
s
pe
pe
s

oo he
a

wn
of

oO

my > fee + ee) ee ee ee eo eo eo Pe
—

ee

O Bao CaO pas 2a° ea @

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace






SUS AS Re i




WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 85° F
Thursday: — ENE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 85° F
FREEPORT Today: ESE at 9-18 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 85° F
Thursday: — ENE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 85° F
ABACO Today: ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 84° F
Thursday: ENE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 84° F



Seattleju

"76/53"

|Kansas)
86/66

Showers
T-storms
Rain







Fronts
= Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and os
Bk.) Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm tit fitnifite
[v_=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Meaguali-
10s| ts [0s /| 10s 20s [Osi] 40s sts 60s 70s sos [G0s//ii0eii0)



~ You Can Be Blown
Away By A Hurricane
Or you._can rest easy knowing
that Youhave excellent insurance

coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

- Wew Providence / Grand Bahama J Abaco Eleuthera ff Exuma
To: (242) 394-5555 ff Tat: nas

Wy
PAGE 8C, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

TASTE

THE TRIBUNE









AMOUNG a list of homemade breads and pies,
Coco’s Café also serves up an original mango bread.

Adding a
CWwIst to
the ordina



By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

Nestled in the heart of Bernard
Road is the new Coco Palm Café
and takeaway featuring the best
in Bahamian dishes fused with Ital-
ian flavours and spices.

Featuring a top notch selection of dishes
rarely found in Nassau, this eatery gives the
right bite for the buck, exposing patrons to
foods only available at upscale restaurants.

Chef Paul Coakley who operates Coco’s,
explained that after living in New Jersey, and
working at the famous Borgata Hotel Casino
and Spa for a year, he thought Bahamians
would enjoy his delicious creations.

The restaurant has a diverse menu ranging

a reel i

The Tribune

we
ALREADY creating a buzz, the restaurant which has only been open
for two weeks has drawn in hungry patrons from East to West all
eager for a taste of one of Coco’s many Italian Bahamian dishes.

from traditional fish, chicken, or burger
snacks, to orginal dishes like Mango wings
with Cajun rice, coconut curry chicken, and
jLeeuiem OLE Mes Kem NCO UU AUC-VOLnen OIA iA

Chef Coakley said the penne pasta which
has already proven to be an overnight success,
can only be described as “sexy and fresh.”

ToUmvlemy ICOM BNlcCom-TcemNNCOULDOY IRC U INR Lert
Pat WII Comrv ee mRe ORG sg ARO leur TNCeme- Vee
rots.

Its sauce he said is actually prepared
overnight, and can take up to eight hours to
get just the right taste, and taste like “noth-
ing he has seen or eaten.”

ayes s also the Shrimp ‘n’ Sausage (Dia-
blo) in spicy tomato sauce. onnts Italian
sausage, rich tomato sauce, and spices, this
dish has already been dubbed the ‘money
maker’ for the establishment.

Chef Coakley said: “We also have an
eclectic approach to Bahamian food, these

(Lancy





include our Rasberry Snapper, the mango
barbecue wings, and bench-marked curry
abt oer

“T travel often, so what I do is select cur-
ry spices from different parts of the world
and I actually blend them with Bahamian
flavours, so it’s a different style of curry
that cannot be found anywhere in the coun-
naan

If their diverse lunch and dinner delights
aren't enough to get your stomach east
for a taste, as eatery also offers freshly
baked breads daily. Helping to up the ante
of the breads, Chef Coakley said he also
adds local fruits that help give the treats a

28-year-old Paul Coakley along with his
mother own and operate Coco Palm Café
Specialising in Bahamian and Italian dishes.

BAKED Chicken with Fettuccini
and homemade garlic bread.










one of a kind signature.

Chef Coakley explained: “I have a
coconut mango bread, which is very nice
and clean flavoured, we also do garlic
breads, foccacia bread, and french bread, all
baked and sold right here.”

This chef said he hopes his approach to
food and mixing flavours will add to the
already diverse local cuisine. With many
Bahamians familiar with the flavours of
mangos, oranges, rasberries, and grapes, he
said introducing a new twist to the way the
fruits are eaten will only help to remind
people of why fruits in general are consid-
ered a gift from above.







THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009, PAGE 9C



eS



The Tribune






By ALEX MISSICK





DOONGALIK Studios Art Gallery in Marina Village at
Paradise Island recently hosted an enthusiastic crowd of
art patrons at the official opening of their ‘SAVE THE TUR-
TLES’ Art Exhibition showcasing the art works of 26 local
artists concerned with the plight of this endangered
species across the globe and in the Bahamas.

o oa a 4 os - =
_ = =

KIM ARANHA (right) and Jane Mather of the Bahamas Sea
Turtles Conservation Group making Opening statements.



District 9

By JASON DONALD

STARRING: Sharlto Copley,
Jason Cope, Nathalie Boltt

IN THE summer onslaught of
increasingly expensive and vacuous
blockbusters, a jaded cinema-going
public can be forgiven for wanting to
back the dark horse.

Anticipation for District 9 has been
building steadily - despite it being
director Neill Blomkamp’s first fea-
ture and having a no-star cast — thanks
to a fantastic trailer and intelligent
online marketing campaign.

But while the hype may have helped
its first week takings, I can’t help but
think the raised expectations may
leave many disappointed.

The film is set 20 years after a lum-



bering alien spaceship became strand-
ed over South Africa. The malnour-
ished insect-like refugees onboard
(cruelly referred to as “prawns” by an
embittered human race) are taken
down to Earth - literally and figura-
tively - and restricted to a horrendous
shanty town area called District 9.

But with tensions growing between
the local population and their new
neighbours, the private company in
charge of the area is forced to relocate
the aliens to a new camp.

The first half of the film takes the
form of a fictional documentary with
faux news footage and interviews with
officials and members of the public.
This nicely illustrates how the incred-
ible event of an alien arrival quickly
became a depressingly mundane
source of violence and misery.

=o

The gallery invited artists to present a
piece of work that would not only pay
homage to this magnificent animal but
also promote awareness of the impor-
tance of its conservation and protection.
Judging by the continuous accolades
from the audience that evening, including
two of the Miss Universe Contestants,
Miss Jamaica and Miss Zimbabwe who
visited earlier in the day, the submis-
sions certainly surpassed expectations.

The proposed ban on the killing of
turtles in The Bahamas, scheduled to be
passed in April, has still not happened in
spite of countless promises to the
Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation
Group which consists of the Bahamas
Humane Society, Advocates for Animal
Rights, Animals Require Kindness, The
Humane Society of Grand Bahama, Re-
Earth, The Bahamas National Trust,
Underwater Explorer’s Society Dolphin
Experience, Grand Bahama Nature
Tours, Earth Care Grand Bahama and
The Nature Conservancy.

President of the Group, Mrs Kim
Aranha said because turtles are a very
necessary part of marine life, the entire
underwater ecosystem will suffer great-
ly without it.

“Tt is our duty as custodians of this
planet to nurture and care for these care-
takers of the sea. It is so exciting and
heartening to look at this amazing exhi-

ey Mat
owners Jack-
SOU Ue Mae UiN
Burnside
SELIG]
amongst
some of the
many striking
NOL CMOlar le

bition with so many remarkable pieces
lovingly created by a huge cross section
of Bahamian artists, each and every one
dedicated to the preservation and pro-
tection of the Sea Turtle. Please take
away with you the memory of the
majesty of these splendid sea creatures
and spread the word... please help us
protect turtles from extinction,” Mrs
Aranha said.

The Exhibition includes originals by
Amos Ferguson, bronze sculptures,
paintings, encaustic wax artworks, pho-
tographs, ceramics, painting on silk, a
coloured pencil drawing, handmade
paper art, a turtle necklace, and even
edible cookies boldly declaring “Eat
Cookies, Not Turtles.” The artists and
the gallery have also agreed that ten
per cent of the sales from this show
will be donated to the Bahamas Sea
Turtles Conservation Group to assist
with their educational efforts. The
Exhibition will remain on display until
Sunday August 30.

¢ To learn more about this initiative, visit
the Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation’s
website at
http://saveourseaturtles.com/introduc-
tion. html

or by telephoning the Gallery at (242)
363-1313.

ARTIST Susan Roberts stands next to her beautiful piece.

rt _ a : i

THIS movie still released by Sony Pictures shows, left to right, Sharlto Copley, Mand-
la Gaduka and Kenneth Nkosi in “District 9.”



=
oO
ad
a
<—
(i
ou
st
i)
o
—
=
=
&
a
=
=
a
“an







i IT’S just a few short weeks until
? summer comes to an end so
i why not make the best of the
i time left, give a little, party a lot,
: and make this that summer
: you'll never forget.

? 1. This weekend a new beauty
i queen will be crowned in Par-
? adise with the selection of the
i 2009 Miss Universe during the
i 58th pageant which takes place
? Sunday evening at 9pm in the
? Imperial Ballroom of the
? AtlantisResort. Tickets for the
i gala event are still available. In
: an attempt to sell the final seats,
? organisiers recently announced
i special discounts- group pack-
? ages are now being offered and
i patrons can get one free ticket
? for every three tickets purchased
i for the final show.

All-access tickets for the

i viewing party, which will take
i place on the Royal Deck are

$145,
VIP tickets for final show,

i which will be broadcast live on
? NBC to 150 countries in the
? world, are $1,000 and include
? entrance to the coronation ball.

Tickets for sections 3-7 in the

i Imperial Ballroom are $750; sec-
? tions 8-11 are $400; sections
? 11-13 are $250; sections 14-20
i are $175.

All-access tickets to the coro-

i nation ball, to be held in Atlantis’
? Royal Court, are $145. The new-
i ly crowned Miss Universe and
? her court will be presented ina
i a dramatic” fashion at the
? ball.

The finale will be aired lived

? on NBC and ZNS.

To get a final glimpse of the

i girls ahead of Sunday’s pageant,
: be sure to check out the con-
? testants during the motorcade
? tomorrow from Arawak Cay to
i Crystal Palace beginning at
: 5.30pm

i 2. The Big Give Organisation - a
i new local charity - is launching
i one of its first fundraisers called
? A Haute Summer Night. The
i event is set to take place this
? Saturday at the Hub Art Center
? on Bay Street. It will highlight
: an attractive selection of local
? artists along with signature
i cocktails culminating with a
i “crazy” mix of reggae, dance
? hall, pop, hip hop, and techno
? from one of Nassau’s hottest
i DJ’s. It’s all going down at 9pm
: until. The entrance fee is $20.
? Proceeds will assist the Claridge
i Primary School.

? 3.The Bahamas International
: Film Festival is busy this week,
? starting with its summer film
i series. BIFF presents the movie
i Hush Your Mouth at the Galleria
: Cinemas at JFK today. This 2007
? Drama/Thriller directed by Tom
? Tyrwhitt, highlights the death of
? a young man who died for what
: he believed, however his death
? is ironically tagged to one of his
i best friends. The story which
i takes place in one of London’s
i least desirable quarters, devel-
? ops as the dead teen’s family
? searches for the killer with a
i major twist. The movie is show-
i se tonight at 8pm at a cost of
? $5.

i 4. On Saturday, experience the
i best that Spanish culture has to
? offer. BIFF has organised the
? best in Spanish food, music,
i wines, and entertainment- show-
? casing professional flamenco
; dancers, and music by Yulee B.
? Taking place at The Balmoral
? Club, this Spanish night starts at
i 7.30 pm with tickets now priced
? at $75, but get yours early
: because the prices will go up.

i 5. The new EA Modeling and
: talent Agency is having its offi-
? cial launch party at Da Balcony
i nightclub opposite the British
? Colonial Hilton this Friday start-
: ing at 8pm. The event will show
? off the agency’s best models
? both male and female while
? entertaining patrons with the
: best in cocktails and music.
i Priced at $10, the event promis-
i es to be the highlight of the
i summer. All models, entertain-
i ers, socialites, and others are
? invited to come out and see
? what the Bahamas really has to
i offer when it comes to top notch
? models.
PAGE 10C, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ARTS





BOOKREVIEW n

Frank Bruni dissects

his food obsession

AP Drama Writer

“BORN ROUND: The
Secret History of a Full-Time
Eater” (The Penguin Press,
354 pages, $25.95), by Frank
Bruni: Obsessive relation-
ships are often the meat and
potatoes of autobiography.

But for Frank Bruni, meat
and potatoes ARE the obses-
sion. Along with a never-end-
ing parade of other goodies,
from French haute cuisine in
all its flavorsome complexity
to more basic foodstuff, such
as the elongated, chocolate-
coated wafers of a KitKat
bar, described in reverential,
almost spiritual terms.

“My life-defining relation-
ship ... wasn’t with a parent, a
sibling, a teacher, a mate. It
was with my stomach,” he
proclaims in “Born Round:
The Secret History of a Full-
Time Eater.” And it’s this
contentious relationship that
Bruni, for five years the chief

restaurant critic for The New
York Times, chronicles with
startling, intimate directness.
It’s a thoughtful tale, unspar-
ing in Bruni’s analysis of him-
self, but hugely entertaining
in his almost “Rocky”-like
determination to make things
right after countless slip-ups.

These struggles are depict-
ed alongside a loving portrait
of an Italian-American fami-
ly (the most affecting part of
the book), a family that in
many ways served as an
enabler for this favorite, full-
figured son to devour every-
thing in sight.

There are wonderful snap-
shots of his mother and his
paternal grandmother, both
excellent cooks and ardent
champions of the philosophy
“more is better,” particularly
in the kitchen. But then the
entire Bruni clan is defined
by meals served and con-
sumed.

Bruni’s ravenous appetite,

of course, had consequences:
a constant battle with weight
that grew more fierce as he
grew older and his seemingly
futile attempts to reach what
he describes as “the won-
drous Xanadu of the willful-
ly emaciated.”

Purging. Pills. Spurts of
intense exercising, particu-
larly after the openly gay
Bruni started dating. Noth-
ing seemed to work for very
long. The only thing that
remained constant was his
appetite — as he went from
college to a career in jour-
nalism and eventually a job
at the Times. It was an
appetite that was put to an
extreme test when Bruni was
given the high-stress assign-
ment of covering George W.
Bush’s presidential cam-
paign.

His weight and waist bal-
looned, as did his unhappi-
ness. Finally after his Wash-
ington stint, Bruni began a

serious, consistent exercise
program tempered by por-
tion moderation. “Less is
more” became his new
mantra.

Bruni, 44, is a nimble,
observant writer. What
makes his restaurant reviews
so entertaining — often a lot
more enjoyable than many
of the establishments he cri-
tiques — is a combination of
his love of eating coupled
with a sharp journalistic eye.

Bruni’s enthusiasm for eat-
ing borders on adoration, and
he knows how to turn readers
into true believers when it
comes to praising a restau-
rant. Or warn them when
things aren’t up to snuff.

Yet “Born Round” is
more than just amusing, gos-
sipy anecdotes for serious
foodies, although the tidbits
Bruni supplies should satisfy
them, particularly descrip-
tions of his extensive plan-
ning to dine unrecognized.





Pood ey
Yanina Manolova/AP Photo

FRANK BRUNI, former New York Times food critic, holds a copy
of his book "Born Round" in New York, Friday, Aug. 14, 2009.





















THIS is an undated portrait of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. What killed Mozart so suddenly in
1791? A report in Tuesday's Annals of Internal Medicine, a medical journal published in Philadel-
phia, suggests it might have been something far more common: a strep infection.







What killed

Mozart?

Study suggests strep infection



PHILADELPHIA

or more than two centuries, the

music of Wolfgang Amadeus

Mozart has endured — as has
the speculation about what led to his
sudden death at age 35 on Dec. 5,
1771,

Was the wunderkind composer poisoned by a jeal-
ous rival? Did he have an intestinal parasite from an
undercooked pork chop? Could he have accidentally
poisoned himself with mercury used to treat an alleged
bout of syphilis?

A report in Tuesday’s Annals of Internal Medicine
suggests the exalted Austrian composer might have
succumbed to something far more commonplace: a
streptococcal infection — possibly strep throat — that
led to kidney failure.

The researchers looked at death records in Vienna
during the months surrounding Mozart’s death —
November and December 1791 and January 1792, and
compared causes of death with the previous and fol-
lowing years.

“We saw that at the time of Mozart’s death there
was a minor epidemic in deaths involving edema
(swelling), which also happened to be the hallmark of
Mozart’s final disease,” said Dr. Richard Zegers of the
University of Amsterdam, one of the study’s authors.

There was a spike in swelling-related deaths among
younger men in Vienna at the time of Mozart’s death
compared to the other years studied, suggesting a
minor epidemic of streptococcal disease, Zegers said.

The cause of death recorded in Vienna’s official
death register was “fever and rash,” though even in
Mozart’s time those were recognized to be merely
symptoms and not an actual disease.

His surviving letters and creative output suggest that
he was feeling well in the months before his death and
was not suffering from any chronic ailment. Many
accounts note that he fell ill not long before he died —
suffering from swelling so severe, his sister-in-law
recalled three decades later, that the composer was
unable to turn in bed.

Others who reported to have been witnesses to
Mozczart’s final days also described swelling, as well as
back pain, malaise and rash — all symptoms that indi-
cate Mozart may have died of kidney disease brought
on by a strep infection.

“It’s not definitive, but it’s certainly food for
thought,” said Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious dis-
ease expert at Vanderbilt University Medical Center
who was not involved in the study.

He said it was not unreasonable to presume that
Mozart died from strep complications, based on the
information presented, but he pointed out that the
authors had scant data to go on.

“Serious streptococcal infections were much more
common than they are now and, indeed, they had very
serious complications,” he said. “This is sure to set off
many discussions going forward.”



Michael Jackson to be buried on his birthday

LOS ANGELES

THE KING of Pop will be
buried on what would have been
his 51st birthday, a spokesman
for Michael Jackson’s family said
Tuesday, according to the Asso-
ciated Press.

Jackson will be buried at a pri-
vate ceremony at Forest Lawn-
Glendale on Aug. 29, spokesman
Ken Sunshine said in a state-
ment. Guests will be limited to
family and close friends, Sun-
shine said.

“The Jackson family once
again wishes to express its grati-
tude to Michael’s fans around the
world for their support during
these difficult times,” the state-
ment said.

Details about the ceremony and
the whereabouts of Jackson’s
body have been tightly guarded.
The announcement came a day
after the New York Daily News
reported comments by Jackson’s
father, Joe Jackson, that his son
would be buried on what would
have been his birthday.

Sunshine said Jackson will be
buried on the Holly Terrace at the
cemetery’s Great Mausoleum. The
cemetery’s Web site describes the
mausoleum as featuring replicas
of works by Michelangelo. It also
features a Stained glass recreation
of Leonardo da Vinci’s “The Last
Supper.”

The cemetery is located in the
city of Glendale, which is about 8
miles north of downtown Los
Angeles. It is a different loca-
tion from the Hollywood Hills
cemetery where Jackson’s family
was seen gathering days after his
death on June 25.

Forest Lawn spokesman Bill
Martin said the cemetery does
not comment on private funeral
services or on steps that might
be taken to handle fans who try
to show up for the burial.

“We’ve handled high-profile
services in the past,” Martin said.

He said the cemetery is on pri-
vate property, and measures will
be taken to discourage “loiter-
ing” on the day of Jackson’s ser-
vice.



Rick Bowmer/AP Photo

THIS July 7, 2009 file photo shows the Jackson family motorcade arriving at the
Forest Lawn Memorial Parks and Mortuaries in Los Angeles, prior to the memori-
al service for Michael Jackson. More than six weeks after Michael Jackson died,
his body has yet to be buried.

- "Big Brother

11" to address
Chima's
expulsion

LOS ANGELES

WHY exactly was Chima
Simone kicked out?

Tuesday's "Big Brother
11" episode promised to
address why producers
removed the 33-year-old
freelance journalist from

i the CBS reality series,

i which isolates 13 contes-

i tants inside a makeshift
two-story house and moni-
tors their every move with
dozens of cameras, accord-
ing to the Associated Press.

"You will see why, basi-
cally, our back was up
against the wall and we had
to expel her from the
game," show host Julie
Chen said Monday on CBS'
"The Early Show," which
she co-hosts. "You will see
her behavior that led up to
the expulsion. Then, you
can decide."

CBS released a statement
Saturday that said Simone,
from West Hollywood,
Calif., was evicted by the
producers for violating the
rules. The network also said
Simone will not be part of

i the show's seven-person

i jury, which selects the

? $500,000 grand prize win-
ner.

Sunday's episode showed
how Simone was aggravat-

i ed because her ally, body-

i builder Jessie Godderz, was
spontaneously nominated

i for eviction Thursday

i because of the "coup d'e-
tat,” a power secretly voted
on by viewers that was used
to overthrow Simone's
nominations.

i Fans have questioned

i whether Simone was boot-

: ed or quit. Chatter from the
remaining seven house-
guests suggest she wanted
out of the house. On Fri-
day, Simone was seen on

i the show's live Internet

i video feeds throwing her

? microphone into the back-

? yard whirlpool spa.

i "She still didn't have to
leave after that. She just
didn't want to be here,"
contestant Natalie Martinez
said on Monday's "Big
Brother After Dark," an
uncensored and unedited
live Showtime 2 broadcast
of what's happening inside
the house each night.

Since entering the house

i last month, Simone has

i been one of the season's
most outspoken house-
guests. When she was nom-
inated for eviction during
the first week, CBS cen-
sored her live last-plea
speech, which referred to
derogatory terms used by
her competitor.

Producers have evicted
two contestants on previ-

i ous "Big Brother" editions.

i Justin Sebik was kicked off

i the second season when he
placed a knife to the throat
of a fellow houseguest.
Scott Weintraub was
removed from the fourth
season after throwing fur-
niture.





WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009

ANOTHER of Richard Hokemeir’s collection,
the perfect island sunset on the beach.









ALTHOUGH they no
longer litter the
Long Wharf har-
bour, this picture is
of a Haitian sloop.

Save the
turtles
show

see page nine



of

1S

rl

Adding a twist

to the ordinary
See page eight

eae



Pe ~

&

The Tribune SECTION B e



By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THESE days its seems the craft of photog-
raphy, particularly taking images that cap-
ture raw emotion is quickly becoming a
thing of the past.

With high-tech cameras and photoshopping capabilities
making it easier to compensate for what photographers have
not been taught, today’s world is filled with overnight pho-
tographers with no real training.

However one veteran has remained true to his passion,
and now 40 years after capturing his first image as a profes-
sional photographer, Richard Hokemeir has decided to put
his work on display.

Mr Hokemeir is set to open his newest photo exhibition
titled Richard’s Photographic Art Appreciation Weekend
at the Poop Deck this Saturday from noon until 8pm.

The exhibition will feature more than 500 images taken
during his long career and will also include many images
from his recent collection.

Mr Hokemeir has worked in many fields including the
Armed Forces, the media, and has also done missionary
work.

He explained that he takes a unique approach to art and
photography, and has a knack for seeking the beauty beyond
what most others see.

He said that he has such a love of nature that it is not
unusual for him to photograph something like a regular hibis-
cus ten to 20 times, because “the closer you look at the
image, the more likely you are to see the true essence of
that picture.”

Mr Hokemeir also incorporates the use of specific canvas-
es that help bring out the truest form of the images he cap-
tures.

These include a unique type of paper made from sugarcane,
bamboo, Torchon, and cotton all imported from countries
around the globe.

Mr Hokemeir said three years ago, he came out of retire-
ment after spending less than a year at home. For him, life is
about exploring, discovering the uncharted territory, and
experiencing something new.

“Tn this exhibition you can expect to see photography in a
different way, and different papers from around the world.

“We print in 10 colours and not in 4, between the papers,
the colours, and the ink, it takes photography into a whole
new dimension, and we don’t photoshop.”

He said sitting at home made him feel older than he was,
and added that he is more excited than ever about starting this
new chapter of his life with his exhibition.






PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Marital rape law ‘is a human right’ C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.221WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER CLOUDY, T-STORMS HIGH 92F LOW 81F By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A POWERFULhuman rights group has thrown its w eight behind the governmen t’s plan to outlaw marital rape in the Bahamas. Amnesty International has vowed to back the proposed amendment of the Sexual Offences Act in order to pro-t ect the rights of every Bahamian woman. A spokesman for the group told The Tribune : "Amnesty I nternational would certainly support that law being passed. We view women's rights as a human right. If there is abuse in any kind of relationship, whether it is within a marriage or with unmarried couples, or in the case of incest, all of those are matters that need to be dealt with properly within the law. "On the basic stance of the law, Amnesty would support the way it's written to support persons rights." The amendment, introduced to the House of Assembly by Minister of State for Social D evelopment Loretta ButlerTurner last month, has sparked a heated national debate on the issue. I n Parliament last month, Mrs Butler-Turner noted that the current law is outdated adding that spousal rape had long been outlawed in many other countries. American law recognised marital rape as a crime in 1976 but it is still a sensitive issue as many states have lesser penal ties for persons convicted of the offence, compared to acquaintance rape or that of a stranger. Amnesty International backs Government’s plans for legislation The Tribune YOUR PASSPORT TO MISS UNIVERSE B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com Try our Big Breakfast Sandwich B AHAMASNATIONALSTADIUMUNDERCONSTRUCTION A MAN who murdered a 27-year-old member of a Junkanoo group has been jailed for 35 years. James McKenzie, 25, was convicted last year of shooting Kevin Dean. The incident took place in December 2006 near the old City Market food store in Market Street where the One Family Junkanoo group was practising for the annual Boxing Day parade. Mr Dean, who was shot in the back, died at the scene. At his trial, McKenzie Man gets 35 year sentence for murder By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter n mckenzie@tribunemedia.net A POLICE Constable who is alleged to have attacked his e x-girlfriend was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Akeem Bonaby, 25, is charged with causing harm and making threats of deatht o Georgina Silver while at H amster Road on Wednesday, May 27. Bonaby, who was arraigned before Deputy Chief Magis Police Constable is accused of attacking his ex-girlfriend SEE page 12 SEE page 12 SEE page 12 n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net DESMOND Bannister, Youth, Sports and Culture Minister, yesterday declined to confirm or deny reports that he will be demitting office, stat ing that he “will not comment on anything relating to Desmond Bannister.” There have been rumours in political circles that there will soon be a shuffle of Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham’s DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER Brent Symonette, government officials and the Chinese Ambassador Hu Dingxian look on as construction work on the new national stadium takes place yesterday. Members of the government toured the facility at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre. SEE PAGE TWO ANDBUSINESSSECTION F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Sports Minister tight-lipped on reports he will be demitting office SEE page 12 HURRICANE Bill continued on its predicted path yesterday as it gathered strength over the Atlantic, churning along with 110mph winds. While the category two hurricane is still not expected to affect the Bahamas or the United States, forecasters said it could cause big problems for Bermuda and the Canadian maritime provinces. HURRICANEBILL GATHERSSTRENGTHINATLANTIC SEE page 12 Nassau I N S I D E SPECIALSUPPLEMENTINSIDETODAY ‘Law could create society of rapists’ NASSAUANDBAHAMAISLANDSLEADINGNEWSPAPER C M Y K C M Y KVolume: 105 No.212SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHERSUNNY WITH T -STORMHIGH 89F L OW 81F I N S I D E C ontroversial pastor speaks out against marital rape legislationThe TribuneY OUR PASSPORT TO MISS UNIVERSE BAHAMASEDITIONTRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISHw ww.tribune242.com M ISS UNIVERSE 2008 Dayana Mendoza, of Venezuela, walks the red carpet in Rawson Square yesterday. Miss Mendoza will crown her s uccessor from 84 contestants on August 23. SEE PAGE TWO AND OUR SPECIAL MISS UNIVERSE SUPPLEMENT INSIDE FOR MORE ON THE PAGEANT. M ISS UNIVERSE 2009PAGEANT SPECIAL INSIDEE IGHTPAGESOFFULLCOLOUREXCLUSIVEPHOTOS E I G H T F A N T A S T I C P A G E S O F E X C L U S I V E I N T E R V I E W S A N D P I C T U R ES A T U R D A YA U G U S T 8 , 2 0 0 9 By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net THE controversial pastor opposed to legislation which would outlaw marital rape now claims the amendment could create a “society of rapists”. The proposed amendment to the Sexual Offences and Domestic Violence Act presented in Parliament by Minister of Social Services Loretta Butler-Turner last month undermines the institution of marriage and could harm families, Kingdom Life Church pastor Cedric Moss claims. Quoting Biblical text to cite the “Word of God” Mr Moss argued rape cannot be committed in marriage as the couple give each other authority over the other’s body and agree to openended sexual consent in the marriage vows. By including spouses as potential rapists the law contradicts the sacrament of marriage, the pastor argued. He told the Rotary Club of West Nassau: “It makes sense to have such a law to govern sexual intercourse between two persons who are not married to each other because, unlike married people, they have no contract that implies open-ended sexual consent; therefore specific moment by moment consent is required between them. “But can it be right to bring married people under such a law designed for unmarried people? No, and a thousand times no! It is not right, and it can never be right to bring all married couples under this definition of rape whereby moment by moment consent is required for every stage of every act of sexual intercourse. “Each day you will be a potential rapist in your own home if you initiate sex with your wife without her consent.”SEE page 12MISSUNIVERSEONTHEREDCARPET By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net ASPUBLICoutcry mounts over the Government's handling of information sharing regarding several new public work projects, observers say it's too early to tell if the issue will cost the Free National Movement the next election race. In recent weeks the controversy over the Government's proposed relocation of the container port from Bay Street to Arawak Cay;t he construction of Corridor 18 under the Road Improvement Project; along with the subsequent dredging of Nassau Harbour and extensiono f the man-made island have boiled to a fever pitch. Emotions ran high at Thursday's town meeting about the port relocation and its related projects, where angry attendees blasted the Government for not allowing sufficient public discourse before going ahead. Despite the heat, political observers told The Tribune that public fury now may have little weight when ballots are cast during the next election. Former Chamber of Commerce president Dionisio D'Auguilar said: "The man's (Prime Miniser Hubert Ingraham) made a decision. If you don't agree with him vote him out of office, but a lot of people just vote on who has the best rally, and 2012 is three years away." Mr D'Auguilar said it is too soon to say if the port issue will be a deal breaker for the FNM in the next election. PLP MP for Fox Hill Fred Mitchell said elections are won on how the debate is framed at the time. He said it’s impossible to predict the next election too heavily on “what exists in mid-term" while adding that the port issue was a subset of blunders he claims theoo early to tell’ if container p ort relocation will cost FNM next electionS EE page 12THE House of Assembly’s S elect Committee on Crown L and matters held its first m eeting yesterday with the MP for Fox Hill Fred Mitchell voted in as chairman of the group. R epresenting the Governm ent’s side, FNM MP for Golden Isles Charles Maynard was elected as the deputy c hairman. A ddressing the media shortl y following their brief meeting, the committee said they hoped their work would be for the betterment oft he Bahamian people and not end up as m ere recommendations “collecting dust on a shelf”. A ccording to the committ ee’s chairman, an announcem ent will be made in the coming week for people who wish to make submissions to thec ommittee to write in to the c lerk of the House of Assembly. In addition, he said notices will be circulated with every a dministrator on the Family I slands so that persons t hroughout the archipelago can be informed of the committee’s proceedings and make contributions wheren ecessary.By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net MOULD infestation in the Eye Ward of Princess Margaret Hospital is causing nurses to fall ill with respiratory illness, according to Bahamas Nurses Union president Cleola Hamilton. The nurses representative has expressed “huge” concern over the problem which was investigated by the Environmental Health Department last year. A number of recommendations to get rid of the mould growing on the walls and ceilings of the ward were put forward by the department to the Public Hospitals Authority (PHA Health to ensure the health and safety of staff and patients. But Ms Hamilton maintains nurses are still suffering from the effects as hospital bosses have failed to alleviate the mould infestation. She claims new tiles were simply placed over the old ones, and the thriving mould is now growing through and putting the health of around a dozen staff at risk.MP Mitchell voted chairman of Crown Land Select CommitteeUnion president claims nurses alling ill’ due to mould at PMHSEE page 12 SEE page 12 F red Mitchell T im Clarke /Tribune staff THESUBJECT has been a source of heated debate.

PAGE 2

IN an effort to improve ticket sales for the Miss Universe P ageant 2009 to be held this Sunday at Atlantis, organisers are offering special group packages. The Miss Universe competition is promising to be one of the most exciting and glamorous events ever to take placein the Bahamas. Pageant o rganisers said yesterday that there are still lots of tickets available but that they expect sales to pick up considerably over the next several days. Group packages are now being offered and patrons can get one free ticket for every three tickets purchased for the f inal show. The deal was also offered for the presentation show held last Sunday at Atlantis. According to organisers of the show, about 90 per cent of the tickets were sold, which is on par with presentation shows of the past several years. M iss Universe organisers, Ministry of Tourism and Atlantis officials are all very pleased with the pageant events to date. Paula Shugart, president of the Miss Universe Organisation, has stated many times over the past several weeks that this is one of the best organised pageants she has experienced during her tenure. She lauded the Ministry of Tourism and team Atlantis for their all efforts to ensure the success of the event. The Miss Universe finals, the viewing party and the coronation event will all be held at Atlantis on Sunday. All-access tickets for the viewing party, which will take place on the Royal Deck are $145. VIP tickets for final show, which will be broadcast live on NBC to 150 countries in the world, are $1,000 and include entrance to the coronation ball. Tickets for sections 3-7 in the Imperial Ballroom are $750; sections 8-11 are $400; sections 11-13 are $250; sections 14-20 are $175. All-access tickets to the coronation ball, to be held in Atlantis’ Royal Court, are $145. The newly crowned Miss Universe and her court will be presented in a “highly dramatic” fashion at the ball. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Miss Universe pageant tickets still available THIS morning the 84 contestants of the Miss Universe 2009 Competition attend their final media junket. Reporters from both local and international media outlets will have one last chance to speak one-on-one with the beauties before the final show on Sunday. Then tomorrow, Bahamians are invited to come out and cheer on the beauty queens as they take part in a float parade which starts from Arawak Cay at 5.30pm. The float parade then follows along West Bay Street to the Wyndham Nassau Resort and Crystal Palace Casino on Cable Beach, where it is scheduled to end at around 7pm. MISSUNIVERSESCHEDULE MISSUNIVERSE Dayana Mendoza New national stadium is a work in progress MINISTEROF Sports Desmond Bannister presents the Chinese A mbassadorHu Dingxian with an Olympic team track shirt as Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette and Minister of Environment Phenton Neymour look on. Government offic ials toured the new facility yesterday and got to see how construction of the new national stadium is progressing. SEEBUSINESSSECTION F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f DEPUTYPRIMEMINISTER Brent Symonette leads yesterday’s t our of the facility. P ROJECT MANAGER I ram Lewis describes an element of t he national stadium construction to government officials yesterday.

PAGE 3

By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE Ministry of Tourism’s Club Grand Bahama programme was “a good idea but a little too late” to improve the “grim” conditions facing the Port Lucaya Resort and Yacht Club, its general manager said yesterday as he confirmed the r esort’s pending closure. However, Glyine Delancy gave an assurance that all of the 17 full-time and 13 part-time s taff working at the resort will receive their complete severance packages from the company in the next 24 to 48 hours. The 16-year-old resort will be the latest of several Grand Bahama hotels to close for good in the face of a worsening outlook for tourism. Mr Delancy cited the combination of a “protracted d ecrease” in occupancy levels a nd the “aging and declining condition” of the property which called for a major investment if it was to be improved. The final c losure will take place on A ugust 31, 2009. The property, which comprises 160 guest rooms but was only operating 85 rooms, had earlier this year been selected as one of the hotels in Grand Bahama which would be offered to potential customers a s part of the Ministry of Tourism’s new all-inclusive programme, Club Grand Bahama. Minister of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace said he envisaged that the programme would see enhanced interest in Grand Bahama from tourists a nd a greater spread of visitors’ cash throughout the island’s economy. But Mr Delancy said the Club Grand Bahama scheme came too late to save the resort, which had “become too costly to operate at the standard that meets the expectations of our guests.” I n his statement, Mr Delancy commended the resort’s “closek nit staff” for their “professional and courteous service throughout the years, and during this challenging time.” Once severance packages are disbursed to staff in the next two days, some will be immediately laid off, while a number will be maintained to cater to the needs of some guests who a re still staying at the property, he added. Labour Minister Dion Foulkes said he was informed of the resort’s pending closure on Monday by Grand Bahama Port Authority chairman Ian Rolle. H owever, he confirmed that a “private sector entity” – thought to be Ross University – is in negotiations with a view to leasing the property. If this takes place, six employees could be rehired, meaning the loss of only seven jobs at the property, said the minister. It was only l ast week that Mr Foulkes, responding to a Central Bank of the Bahamas report which suggested that further lay-offs in the tourism sector are expected “in the summer months”, said he was not aware of any impending job losses. Yesterday Mr Foulkes said: “Things come up every day and w e have to monitor it on a daily basis.” By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net PUBLIC schools throughout the country are set to open on schedule for the fall semester, director of Education Lionel Sands said. "We do not see anything that will prevent that from happening," Mr Sands told The Tribuney esterday. I n the past, extensive school r epairs during the summer months have delayed the opening of many public schools, but Mr Sands does not anticipate a problem this year. "We didn't have any extensive repairs because over the past two years we've been doing repairs so this year it has been scaled back because we did not have as many problems with our physical plants (schools Mr Sands. He said crews are busy with "minimal" jobs like painting, replacing windows, r epairing bathroom fixtures and toilets, and upgrading plumbing a nd electrical systems. All public school teachers are to report to work on August 24, M r Sands said, adding that classes officially start on August 31.M eanwhile, students and teache rs of the T G Glover primary s chool – who have been waiting more than three years to return to classrooms after an extensive repair project was launched – will have to wait until at least January 2010 before the school on Horse Shoe Drive is ready to accommodate them. "T G Glover will not be finished for this September; we expect that to be completed for an opening of January 2010," said Mr Sands. Until then, the students and teachers will continue to use temporary classrooms which w ere built at the Albury Sayle Primary School on Nassau S treet when T G Glover was first closed. In 2002, former Education M inster Alfred Sears discovered that students and teachers wereu sing a building which had been c ondemned by structural engi n eers from the Ministry of Works. Classes were immediately suspended at the school and it was ordered that a new primary school be built on the old TG Glover School site. However, the new Minister of Education Carl Bethel has expressed several concerns about the site, and called it an unsuitable location for a primary school. T WO Andros men charged in the recent seizure of more t han $44,000 worth of marijua na, which was discovered on a b oat docked in the Potter’s Cay area on Sunday, were arraigned i n the Magistrate’s Court yesterday. P olice found the illegal drugs on the boat at around 2pm w hile acting on a tip. Neil Duncombe, 28, of Small Hope, Andros, and Roswell Jones, 24, of Fresh Creek, Andros, were arraigned before D eputy Chief Magistrate Carolita Bethel in Court 8, Bank L ane, on the charge of posses sion of marijuana with intent t o supply. Duncombe, who is represented by attorney Tama ra Taylor, and Jones, who is represented by attorney Ian Cargill, both pleaded not guilty t o the drug charge. The men were each granted b ail in the sum of $30,000 with two sureties. The accused wereo rdered to report to the Fresh Creek Police Station every M onday, Wednesday and Sat urday before 6pm. The casew as adjourned to September 1. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $4,210 $4,210 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $4,410 $4,410Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank M M e e d d i i t t e e r r r r a a n n e e a a n n M M e e d d i i t t e e r r r r a a n n e e a a n n INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News.......................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,12 Editorial/Letters........................................P4 Sports.............................................P9,10,11 BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION Business.........................................P1,2,3,6 Advts.....................................................P4,5 Comics.....................................................P7T aste.....................................................P8,9 Arts....................................................P10,12 Weather...................................................P11 CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES USA TODA Y MAIN SECTION 12 P AGES TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A BANKER accused of stealing nearly $20,000 from theF inance Corporation of the Bahamas Limited by reason of employment was arraigned in the Magistrates Court yesterd ay. Raymond Antonio, 48, was arraigned before Deputy Chief Magistrate Carolita Bethel, charged with four counts ofs tealing by reason of employment and eight counts of uttering a forged document. It is alleged that between A pril and July 2007, Antonio s tole a total of $18,800 from the F inance Corporation of the B ahamas Limited. Antonio is a lso charged with eight counts of uttering forged documents i ncluding Finance Corporation of the Bahamas Limited c heques. The prosecution yesterday p resented the court with a fiat signed by attorney Michael B arnett. The matter could proceed by way of a preliminary hearing or Voluntary Bill of Indictment. Antonio, who is represented b y attorney Elliot Lockhart, was not required to enter a pleat o any of the charges. He was granted bail in the sum of $10,000 with two sureties. The case was adjourned to September 1. Banker accused of stealing about $20,000 from FINCO THE College of the B ahamas has seen a “significant” increase in the number o f students enrolled this year compared to 2008. C OB said yesterday that it has accepted approximately 1,700 new students for the Fall 2009 semester. The new students will be h osted to an orientation session tomorrow at 9am outside the P ortia Smith Services Centre located on the main campus,O akes Field. COB sees increase in student numbers POLICE are investigating t he cause of a fire that caused extensive damage to a Nassau V illage food store. At around 4.30am a fire broke out at the Food Max Supermarket which is located on the ground level of a twostorey concrete structure on Taylor Street. Three fire units and their crews removed the front security door of the store to gain access and to extinguish the fire inside the secured building. The interior of the building received extensive smoke and water damage. The cause of the blaze is under investigation. P P o o l l i i c c e e p p r r o o b b e e i i n n t t o o N N a a s s s s a a u u V V i i l l l l a a g g e e f f o o o o d d s s t t o o r r e e f f i i r r e e Andros men arraigned in connection with drug seizure Public schools ‘fall’ open on schedule GM confirms Port Lucays pending closure Dion Foulkes

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. THANKyou for allowing a space for the specific purpose of addressing some of our young men and now evenw omen in The Bahamas. It appears to me that a lot of youth are now operating froma “Paradise Lost” perspective and are currently choosing not to seize their birthright. A s I drive around beautiful Nassau, I am reminded of a ll the beauty, abundance and o pportunity that some of my brothers have chosen not to see, or perhaps see it and not u nderstand their purpose in t his life. OK, I hear all your cries of social alienation M an the Babylon and dem p oliticians just keep on holding me back! Enough already! For most who are seemingly suffering” or “doing bad” h ave simply chosen to be in the place where you are. You have made crime a functionale quivalent to work and your behaviour is no longer perceived as deviant by yourp eers. In fact, people in your n eighbourhood even glorify y our pitiful state, either out of fear of you or because they a re simply ignorant of what is normal and good behaviour. Y ou have chosen to withdraw from the political process and are now in a per p etual stage of disenchant ment, cynicism and alienation your choice! You have chosen not to r espect the authority of fami ly, school, police and community involvement your c hoice! You have chosen to be involved in the narcoticst rade, which you believe offers the true currency of social mobility and inclusion in the society your choice! Y ou have chosen to become lesbians and homo sexuals and sell your bodiesf or material things read Leviticus 18:22 your choice! You have chosen to pick up a gun rather than a pen or book, hate your brother rather than love him yourc hoice! You have chosen to get a girl pregnant and then not take care of your children a gain, your choice! So now I declare you forgiven. It is time for you to rise and shine and participate in our government and civil society and be the youth, men and women that God intended. Nobody says that it will be easy, however choose now to be obedient and principled iny our thoughts, words and d eeds for by a man’s deeds he will be known! Most of you are so loved, so gifted, however you are constantly running away fromw hat you know to be true and have embarked upon a Jezebel spirit allowing and p ermitting any actions in your m idst. You greet your brothers with respect in the bar rooms, on the domino table and in the clubs, however you seldom tell your mother orf ather that you love and respect them. You seldom hug and kiss your children and still have all the expectations to be loved and respected. You m ust remember that love d oes not equal compromise with truth or obedience. You are in paradise, howe ver you do not see the truth. You have been disillusioned by fake hip-hop artists, gangsta lyrics, the boys rolling on the “chromes”, the girls in the revealing and seductive dresses, purely designed to remove your eyes from the ultimate prize. Strength comes in ther ecognition of your true purpose, after all you were created in the image and likeness of God. I beg you to Rise and Shine and give God the glory. I begy ou to realise your potential and express love, rather than h ate. There may be times w hen you would have to, either temporarily or permanently, remove yourself from t hose persons who are not d oing the right thing. Today, make it a point to e xamine your life, look a round for positive role models, ask them how they did it, copy and reproduce. T ell someone that you love t hem and then demonstrate your love that is within each of you. R ise and Shine, my youth the future is in your hands! F RANKLYN “DOOM” M UNROE Nassau, A ugust, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P AGE 4, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., ( Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt . P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising A dvertising Manager (242 WEBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm THIS WEEK a friend reminded us of an article the late editor/publisher of this newsp aper wrote many years ago about this country’s social hypocrisy and double standards. To illustrate his point Sir Etienne recordeda “reading out” ceremony performed in an Out Island church to have a young lady, who had become pregnant, removed from the flock. She was not married. What made this “reading out”, or expul sion, unique was the open rumour in the s mall settlement that the pastor performing the “reading out” ceremony was the father of the child. In those days pregnancy outside of marriage was a monumental disgrace. For an unfortunate woman, not only would she be excommunicated from her church, but she would have to hide herself from society. She moved around like a leper, an embarrassm ent to herself and her family. We recall interviewing an elderly lady about 40 years ago who described her youth and the social taboos of her era against unwed mothers. Of course, there were no raised eyebrows, or tut-tutting when the man who had fathered the child abandoned his obligations and skipped off looking for even greener pastures. In old age he would sitb ack, puff out his chest and boast of his many children both “insides” and “outsides.” This was a situation demanded by men and docilely accepted by women. Many ofour readers have heard a Bahamian woman tell another: “Chile, if he aint beat you, he aint love you!” There are some women today who accept this as a perfectly normal situa-t ion. Was it this attitude of man’s rightful dom inance that led so many women to follow their PLP leaders to the polls in 2002 to vote against the Ingraham government’s referendum offering them the same rights as their male counterparts to confer nationality on their children and foreign spouses? Their rejection of equality was a disgraceful per f ormance. That referendum contributed to the defeat of the Ingraham government a few months later. One letter writer to The Tribune, condemning the amendment to the Sexual Offences Act that would make it an offence for a husband to rape his wife, claimed that such an amendment would destroy the foundation of marriage in this country. The man is the head of the home “as Christ is the head of the church”, the writer reminded B ahamians. What the Bible said was that a man not an animal was the head of the home. This amendment would strengthen the foundation of marriage because it would remove an animal from the bedchamber and k eep him out until he discovered his Christian manhood. Our letter writer then pointed to Prime Minister Ingraham as the leader of the nation to emphasise the point that there can be only one leader. However, what he failed to point out was that Mr Ingraham can only head the nation with the consent of the majority of the Bahamian people. So also, under this proposed amendment a m an can only exercise his conjugal rights with the consent of his wife. The problem with many of our preachers is that they dwell too much in the old testament, and with an angry God. Much of today’s Middle East problems suspicion and hatred between Jews and Arabs can be traced back to Old Testament history. Jesus’ teachings in the New Testament p ortrayed a God of compassion, of love, much forgiveness the good shepherd who goes in search of the one lost sheep. Jesus leaves his disciples with a final commandment “Love one another as I have loved you, so you must love one another.” A man who would force himself on his wife against her will is not a man who loves his wife. To him she is property propertyf or his sole pleasure; property that he can abuse at will. In the New Testament there is great respect for women. They are not chattels in Jesus’ eyes, rather helpmates in his mission of salvation. Let’s turn to the parable of the woman caught in adultery. In the Old Testament the law of Moses she would have beens toned to death. To test Jesus the Pharisees wanted to know how he would deal with her. Jesus quietly bent over and with his finger wrote in the sand. Then he straightened up looked each hypocrite in the eye and said: “Whichever one of you who has committed no sin may throw the first stone at her.” He then bent down and continued writing probably the sins of each one of t hem. Quietly, one by one, these arrogant men melted into the shadows. If the Bahami an pastor who had performed the “reading out” ceremony against the unmarried young girl who was carrying his child had been there, he probably would have been the first to turn tail and run from his shame. No there are two types of men. This proposed amendment that would introduce rape into the marriage chamber are for men who don’t belong there because they do not know t he duties or responsibilities of a husband. This amendment has to be passed into law and the sooner the better. Youth operating from ‘Paradise Lost’ perspective LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net This law must be passed 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW /8&.6219(56$11(6 RI%$+$0$6$7+(*529(3%R[ 1$66$8%$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHU UHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQ QDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDW DQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQ QDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQ DQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKW GD\VIURPWKH W K GD\RI$XJXVW WRWKH0LQLVWHU UHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ 127,&( 5(*,67(5(' 3+<6,&,$1 +(/3 NOTICEThere will be an important meeting for all parents of St. Francis and Joesph School on Wednesday August 19th 2009 at 6:00pm at Xaviers Lower School Auditorium. Please make a special effort to attend. EDITOR, The Tribune. I AM a big fan of clean, green and pristine, but frankly it is an affront by our government. We have people cleaning up our beaches and roadways but we do not supply adequate, closed garbage bins and wec harge people to dump and the dump, encouraging them to d ump in vacant lots instead. The biggest insult though is the importation of unclean (poor grade This morning I could hardly see where I was driving as the big truck in front of me spewed out so much exhaust fumes that it caused a fog for miles. Disgusting! I have it from business owners that they have to use e ngine cleaner constantly in their diesel vehicles to keep them functioning due to the poor grade of diesel we import. This diesel fuel is the same stuff that powers all those Jitneys (still r evolting for locals and tourists alike. We are a country only a few feet about sea level and yet we seem to think the eventual sea rise due to over polluting will not affect us. W e need to act now. W e are committing suicide by not protecting our envi ronment. Write to your local MP and demand he looks into this unclean fuel debacle or build another floor on your house ’cause in the future this island will be like Venice! S APPLETON Nassau, August, 2009. Clean, green and pristine, but then there is poor grade diesel

PAGE 5

B y ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net Y OUNGSTERS who claim they haven’t been paid after taking part in the gov ernment’s summer youth initiatives have been told they have “nothing to worry about.” A number of students t ook part in the Ministry of Y outh Sports and Culture’s s ummer internship prog ramme, which saw them p laced with various private businesses across the country. Wages But some claim they faced p roblems getting paid on time and it is has now been w eeks since they were supposed to receive their final $125 a week wages. O ne told T he Tribune h ow he is fed up that after all of his hard work, he has been left without the fundsh e was relying on as he h eads back to school. But yesterday youth minister Desmond Bannister said there could be “anyn umber of reasons” why stu dents have not yet been paid for which the Ministry w ould not be to blame. If they’re placed with b usiness for an internship, the business sends in paysheets to the Ministry( before cheques are disbursed). “Sometimes business may b e late, or sometimes young p eople were supposed to be there have not been there and so the business has to check up on that,” said them inister. H owever, he assured them that if they do all thati s required of them, students w ho participated in any of the ministry’s summer programmes will be paid “by the end of the week.” “There’s absolutely no problem whatsoever. “We have had the biggest e ver summer progrmme t hat we’ve ever had, some would say the most successf ul that we’ve ever had and I understand that there’s a s mall number of young people who may not have been paid the week that they finished, and that’s quite normal.” Experience The Ministry of Youth S ports and Culture’s Summ er youth programmes encompasses a wide variety o f programmes in which y oung people are able to engage to gain extra experience and a source of income. M r Bannister said stu d ents are paid “according to their qualifications” andd elays on their part in bring i ng in the certificates to be registered can contribute to s etbacks in the timeliness of payments. M eanwhile, bureaucratic r equirements which see the Ministry of Youth Sports and Culture send off to the Ministry of Finance to have student’s cheques prepared, before having them sent back to the Ministry of Y outh for disbursement, can contribute to delays. M r Bannister claimed that u nder the former PLP administration some students who took part in the government’s summer programmes were not paid “until October” of the year in which they participated. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009, PAGE 5 RUSSELL’S WAREHOUSE CLOSING SALERivet Rite Shelving, Gondolas, Glass Shelves, 2 & 4 Arm Display Racks, Gridwall, Slatwall, S lotted Standards, and Hardware. A sst. Fixtures and Fittings, M en’s Coverall’s $5.00, S/S & L/S Whie Shirts $1-$5, Blank ID Cards, 16” Stand Fans, Blank CD’s, Blk School S hoes, Men’s Jeans sz. 46-50, $15, AND MORE. L ocation: Madeira Shopping Center Behind Mystical Gym Entrance to Aquinas F irst left First stairs on left. H ours: Mon. to Thurs. 11am to 5pm Contact: 465-8648 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Claims of payment problems in government youth initiative AN AMERICAN visiting the Bahamas has discovered what he believes is a section of metal from the nose of the space shuttle Challenger. Jim Tull, who was on his boat when he discovered the fragment, said that he wants to use the piece of debris as a "teaching tool,” the Tampa Examiner reported. The Virginia native has announced plans to take the segment around and show it to people. However, he may have a serious fight on his hands. NASA has cautioned Mr Tull that it is illegal to keep any part of the shuttle which is still property of the space agency. But Mr Tull said that he is now waiting for a letter from NASA and is hoping that some sort of arrangement can be made. Challenger broke apart just 73 seconds after the launch of its tenth missionon January 28, 1986. The space craft was destroyedwhen an O-ring seal on its right solid rocket booster failed. The O-rings failed to seal due to a variety of fac tors, including unusually cold temperatures. Seven astronauts died in the disaster. When Challenger explod ed its debris dropped into the Atlantic Ocean and NASA scrambled to recover the pieces of the shuttle. Today, the space agency makes every effort to keep any parts belonging to its space craft off auction sites such as eBay. It is a violation of federal law to remove any material belonging to a NASA space craft. Man says he has found section from the space shuttle Challenger AN EQUIPMENTfault at BEC’s Windsor Field sub-sta tion caused a power outage in the north-western part of the island on Monday morning. The electricity supply for most of the area was restored by 11am, with the remaining customers fully restored by 3pm through alternative circuits. The areas affected included Westridge North and South, Delaporte, Sandyport, Tropical Gardens and Love Beach. BEC yesterday apologised for any inconveniences caused and said it is working “tireless ly” to repair the faulty equip ment. BEC equipment fault causes outage THE Bahamas’ next national anti-drug plan should be “more comprehensive and balanced” and should aim to tackle supply, demand and trafficking, a top National Security official said. Permanent Secretary Missouri ShermanP eter said the issue of narcotics must be addressed on a number of levels, including law enforcement, public health, criminal justice, and social and economic development. Addressing the opening session of the training workshop for the Bahamas national anti-drug plan 2010-2014, Mrs ShermanPeter said the scheme should also take into account the crime and violence created by drug trafficking, including arms trafficking. She said it should also focus on law enforcement on land and sea to disrupt trans-national criminal networks everywhere. The Workshop is being held over three days and is being facilitated by Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD Drug Secretariat (NADS “The illicit drug phenomenon is destruc tive, complex and challenging,” Mrs. Sherman-Peter said. “It is driven primarily by ruthless drug trafficking networks consumed by greed and unmoved by the deadly consequences that their illicit business inflict on people, communities and on developed and developing countries alike. “The illicit drug phenomenon is multifaceted in nature and that successful counter measures require action on multiple fronts, by multiple stakeholders.” Mrs Sherman-Peter said the structuring of national drug control initiatives into comprehensive national anti-drug plans will allow The Bahamas, and regional countries, to provide “well-established” responses to the challenges they face. An effective drug plan should incorporate the full range of initiatives and activities countries are taking, or must take, to “res olutely confront the illicit drug trade,” she added. New anti-drug plan ‘must be more comprehensive’ NATIONAL SECURITY Permanent Secretary, Mrs Missouri Sherman-Peter. Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. A WALLET and passport belonging to Nicole Runestien were lost in the Fox Hill area during the Fox Hill Day fest ival. Anyone finding the items are asked to contact T he Trib une o r deliver the items to the appropriate authorities. Wallet and passport found But students told they have ‘nothing to worry about’ DESMONDBANNISTER

PAGE 6

By BAHAMAS INFORMATION SERVICES THEalmosttwo-fold i ncrease in the number of children participating in the Royal Bahamas Defence Force Summer Youth Programme “is a clear indication that it must continue for many years to come,” National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest said. I nitially intended as a “safe and fun, learning environment” for children of the officers and marines of the Defence Force during the summer break, the programme was expanded to include children from the wider community. I t ended last weekend at HMBS Coral Harbour Base with a series of performances that included an arts and craft display, wind instrument recital, drama presentation, choir performance and dance. The programme was launched in the summer of 2 008 with 250 children ranging in ages from five to 16 years. A year later, 400 children participated. “The Royal Bahamas Defence Force’s Summer Youth Programme is unique in that it exposes our young people to the natural, indigenous environment that we are blessed to have in the Bahamas,” Mr Turnquest said. “The Force has designated quite a significant number of its resources – human, financial and material – to its overall success. “The instructors are persons of impeccable character and integrity and have shown an interest in teaching, and for them, I am grateful.” The programme was hosted over six weeks with the activities intended to strengthen participants’ physical, mental and educational development. Guest speakers were brought in to lead discussions on a range of issues from drug awareness to peer pressure and gang violence. Participants were also treated to field trips to the Ardastra Gardens and Zoo and Pirates of Nassau, which camp organisers said “helped them garner knowledge of the Bahamas.” “We must truly congratulate the Royal Bahamas Defence Force for its determined efforts to guide and mould our young people through quality time, care and instruction,” Mr Turnquest said. He said he was “particularly pleased” with the display of Bahamian arts and craft that were produced by the participants. “The quality of their work exudes the commitment and effort that was put forth,” Mr Turnquest said. “I am encouraged by their efforts and abilities in all facets of the programme.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE P ROSPECTUSTHE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2028, 2029, 2030, 2031, 2032, 2033, 3034, 3035, AND 3036 ISSUE OF B$150,000, 000.00 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Defence Force summer camp sees ‘significant increase’ in participants T HE SECOND a nnual Royal B ahamas Defence Force Summer Youth Programme ended with a series of performances including the plaiting of the Maypole. MINISTER of National Security Tommy Turnquest is pictured with participants in the second annual Royal Bahamas Defence Force Summer Y outh Programme which ended on August 14. Patrick Hanna /BIS

PAGE 7

YOUNG Bahamians interested in the sciencea nd technology of robotics could put the country onthe map with their cre a tions, a physicist said. Jrgen Riedel, founder of the Science Institute and a lecturer at COB, and hist eam recently celebrated t he successful conclusion of the nation’s second annual Robotics Camp. While many youngsters flocked to movie theatres this summer to watch their favourite robots in films like ‘Transformers’ or got awestruck by the spy equip ment of ‘G.I. Joe’ and ‘G-F orce’, a small group of B ahamian youth found themselves learning the tools that could very well lead to careers in creatings uch technologies at the Robotics Camp. The camp is the brain child of physicist Mr Riedel. Having had such a major success with his children’s camp, Mr Riedel is also considering hosting a semi-nar in the near future for educators and professionals. “Robotics is one of the fastest developing and most prestigious areas in science and technology and lots of creative young Bahamians could very well put this country in the map with their creations,” he said. “Robots are everywhere – exploring the deepest canyons in the ocean, new frontiers of neighbouring planets and even as artificial limbs to amputees. By putting on this camp annu ally, we are fostering these creative minds while teach i ng them to develop interest in science and technology which will in turn benefitt heir country and perhaps even mankind.” Mr Riedel, his wife Kim and a team of COB mathe m atics and physics students s pent three weeks at the College’s School of Hospitality teaching young robotics enthusiasts to turn famil iar Lego blocks into work ing robots. “This year we focused on combining the fields of design, engineering and sci ence in the form of smallp rojects,” Mr Riedel said. Students For the first part of the camp students had the opportunity to build small machines. Later they applied various principles to design, construct and programme small yet sophisticated robots.” Participants learnt the principles of design, how to apply mathematics and logic to solve problems, what gears are and how to use them, how to build struc tures and frames and the essentials of motion. They were also taught to understand propulsion and force as well as basic dynamics of programming and control. “Camp-goers also learnt the importance of team playing by working in small groups and discussing design and theory with others,” Mr Riedel said. “Within the groups they relied on their peers to work through difficult situations, learned to recover from failures and enjoyed their successes as a whole.” Mr Riedel said there are tremendous opportunities in the Bahamas to develop science and technology as it relates to robotics. He has also provided scholarships to a few students to attend the camp as well as offered some classes through the government’s Urban Renewal pro gramme. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By LLONELLA GILBERT THE committee charged with i mplementing the government’s T raining and Empowerment Programme to help displaced workers is currently evaluating intervieweda pplicants who want to acquire new administrative and vocational skills. More than 300 of the 800 interviewed start classes in September at t he College of the Bahamas (COB a nd the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI (The global economic i mpacted everyone," said chairman o f the implementation advisory comm ittee and president of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce Khaalis R olle. T he courses being offered are g eared towards training unemployed persons in needed skills masonry, basic carpentry, landscaping, heavy equipment operating, housing, accounting, diesel mechanics, nail t echniques, computer a pplications, and straw and shell craft. “The initial thought for t he programme was to address some of the social fall-out that was created by the high levels of u nemployment in the h otel and tourism sector," Mr Rolle said. T hose interviewed r anged from persons with n o qualifications and very l ittle experience to persons with Master’s degrees. T he ages ranged from 18 to over 6 0 years. T he courses will take place over a 10 to 15-week period. Registration begins the last week in August and classes start the second week in September. The government plans t o continue the training e xercises for a year to give others the opportunity to upgrade theirs kills. Many persons interested in the programme showed up after the d eadline. But they will s till have a chance to take the course, Mr Rolle s aid. W hile the government w ould like 1,000 persons t o receive training at the same time, “institutional class restraints” limit t he number of spaces available, he a dded. T he course structure will be designed as an “intro to” course and persons wanting further certification can continue on their own. At the end of the course, trainees will be placed in an apprenticeship p rogramme in various businesses. " Hopefully, at the conclusion of the apprenticeship period the businesses will hire the trainees or thet rainees will create their own businesses,” Mr Rolle said. He said it may be better for persons to train in vocational areas. I think that is the beginning phase s of you actually starting your own business with a specialised skill," he s aid. " Plumbing is a very specialised s kill and you have to go into a certif ication process and having that versus a certificate in accounting, your p robability of success in starting a b usiness is greater.” T he implementation advisory committee will evaluate the programme every two weeks. Committee evaluating applicants for govt’s training programme Robotics camp could be the future for young Bahamians A YOUNGSTER uses technology to create a working robot. ROBOTICS CAMP participants test out machines they've built. HAVANA A DELEGATIONof U.S. Roman Catholic Church leaders urged Barack Obama’s administration Tuesday to seize what they called a rare political opportunity to lift the 47-year-old economic embargo against Cuba’s communist government, according to Associated Press. Bishop Thomas Wenski of Orlando, Florida, said the U.S. church welcomed a recent move by Washington to relax travel restrictions on Cuban Americans with family in Cuba as well on the remittances they can send to those families. But he said there is much more to be done. W enski said at a news conference that the U.S. church hopes “both sides listen to their better angels” and move to normalize ties. The U.S. church long has urged an end to the embargo, imposed by Washington in 1962 to weaken Cuba’s communist government. Opponents argue that easing or lifting the sanctions will only sustain a government that doesn’t tolerate dissent. Cardinal Sean O’Malley of Boston said Obama’s election presents a rare oppor tunity to bridge an “immense psychological distance” that has marred relations and end an economic policy the church says punishes Cuban citizens. “There were other oppor tunities that were lost,” Wenski said. “And it’s important we do not lose the opportu nity this time.” Wenski, O’Malley and Auxiliary Bishop Oscar Cantu of San Antonio, Texas, met on Monday with Cuban Cardinal Jaime Ortega and diplomats at the U.S. Inter ests Section, which serves as an informal U.S. government mission. They planned to meet with Ricardo Alarcon, head of Cuba’s parliament, later Tuesday. Wenski said the delegation came away from the Interests Section meeting with the impression that U.S. policy toward Cuba is under review and that “their approach seems to be piece by piece.” He urged a quicker pace after years of lack of confidence on both sides.” “That’s a lot of history to overcome,” Wenski added. “We would hope that both sides listen to their better angels.” The delegation is also in Cuba to check on churchfunded hurricane recovery projects. US church leaders u rge Obama to end Cuba embargo K HAALIS ROLLE

PAGE 8

By LARRYSMITH Despite the economic downturn, a new fight is brewing over developmenti n the out islands this time the battleground is Hope Town one of the most successful family island communities. Tough Call visited Abacoo ver the weekend to take a closer look at a controversial proposal to redevelop the old Elbow Cay C lub. HOPE TOWN, Abaco Skimming over the shallow Sea of Abaco p ast the familiar striped l ighthouse that marks the best-known harbour in t he Bahamas, we arrive at a small cove backed by a handful of low-rise buildings. The shoreline is punctuated by a crumbling wooden pier. H ere, tucked away out o f sight of the settlement, are the remains of New H ope Lodge a camp f or recovering alcoholics f ounded by American Ruth Kenyon-Lundgren on nine acres of undevel o ped land back in the 1950s. Ruth has now left the Bahamas, but in her time she had a big impact on the little community of Hope Town. New Hope was even t ually sold to a DanishCanadian investor named Robert Maltarp, whileR uth went on to buy the former commissioner's residence in the settle m ent, adding a threestorey wing to create the Harbour Lodge. L ater, she operated the n earby Abaco Inn (then called the Fin and Toni c). Both are 20-room b outique hotels. I n the meantime, Maltarp had acquired 10m ore acres and turned N ew Hope into the Elbow Cay Club, which operated rather unsuccessfully as a typical out island inn throughout the 60s and 70s. It later became a roomi ng house for locals, e ventually descending to i ts present status as a H aitian ghetto probab ly the only "resort" for i mmigrants in the country. Elbow Cay is five miles long and half a mile wide, and the tiny settlement of Hope Town retains immense rustic a ppeal. An ever-widening patchwork of roads and u pscale subdivisions radia tes from the picturesque s ettlement harbour. And the island is home to high-flying lawyers,p oliticians, architects and corporate bigwigs. Abaconians refer to the place as "Hollywood". T here are some 400 permanent residents t ogether with perhaps 500 second home families who come and go, as well a s an uncertain number o f Haitians. And although Abaco m ay have suffered less f rom the recession than t he rest of the Bahamas, because of its large sec-o nd home economy, H ope Town has suffered least. Despite a drop in property sales, rentals, and construction starts, it remains one of the most desirable pieces of real e state in the country. I t is well known that m ost of Hope Town's B ahamian families can t race their roots back to a s ingle Loyalist widow from South Carolina named Wyannie Malone, who arrived here in the 1780s following the American War of Inde pendence. A nd ironically, most of the group who are plan ning a $25 million rede-v elopment of the derelict E lbow Cay Club are also f rom South Carolina. They include three contractors from theC harleston area Philip Smith, who builds highend custom homes; Victor Apat, who specialis e s in historical restora tion; and Hank Hofford, a big land developer. The front man for the group i s a trial lawyer named M ark Mason who has a h ome on Elbow Cay. The remaining partner is Bahamian realtor GregG raham. When Robert Maltarp put his 19-acre property on the market in 2004, Kerry Sullivan of Damianos Sotheby's Realty was the listing agent. T he Charleston group p ut the property under contract in January 2008, b ut the sale is subject to g overnment approval of the development. "Mason and Greg Graham met through a mutu a l friend and realized they had a common interest so the developers offered him a partner-s hip. “It was a great chance for him to get in with an experienced team andp eople who have the cap ital to implement a plan that, in my opinion, is the best use of the land." B ut her opinion is not widely shared. A groundswell of local opposition has developed, creating much ill feeling in this small, close-knit community. H undreds of leading c itizens and second home owners have petitioned to stop the development in its present form a campaign that is led by former realtor Chester Thompson, Hope Town's 88-year-old patriarch; and Clay Wilhoyte, a naturalised Bahamian who owns the popular Har bour's Edge restaurant. Their objections relate to the scale and charac ter of the development. The plans call for over 100 structures on 19 acres. This includes a dozen homesites, 88 townhous es, a 24-room hotel/conference centre and six staff apartments, in addi tion to common facilities. Based on a three-person occupancy per unit and a total staff of 100 the density could be as high as 27 per acre, critics say. "Such high density will have a major impact on infrastructure such as roads, power supply, refuse removal, fire pro tection, health services, etc." according to one letter to the town council. "Furthermore, it will represent the first step in an undesirable 'Floridariza tion' of this beautiful island." The harshest criticism is reserved for the mas sive marina that is being proposed. It will occupy over seven acres of the Queen's bottom (as the seabed is known locally), with a rubble breakwater jutting out well over 500 feet into the Sea of Abaco. It will be designed to accommodate up to 150 boats as big as 43 feet, with lifts, a ferry dock and fuel pumps. "This marina will be a permanent blight on one o f the most attractive a reas in the Abacos," one l etter-writer said. "We believe that this destructive conversion ofp ublic property into private, for-profit use, with its attendant, unfortunate environmental effects, should not be permitted." According to Linda Cole, of the Wyannie M alone Museum, there is n o need for such a marina when existing facilities a re under-utilised. " I for one do not wish to see another Miami Beach shoreline...If the developers are not pre p ared to scale back, then let them move to the mainland. (People to Hope Town for whatw e offer, not (what can get in Treasure Cay, Freeport and Nassau." One local developer I s poke to pointed out that different islands have dif ferent characteristics and should be branded differ-e ntly. "There is no one-size fits all solution. And the average occupancy for out island hotels and marinas is 50 per cent, soI don't know why anyone w ould want to build a m arina of that size at Hope Town." But the Charleston group says that with or without their project Elbow Cay will continue to grow, more houses will be built and more boaters will need dockage. They say their development will be based on demand, with a 10-15 year buildout that will not overbur den the island or its infra structure. "The project will provide good jobs to local residents and their children well into the future. If it took 10 years to build out, the project would add 10-12 units to the island per year," Mason said. "In fact, the master planning of the project will provide for controlled growth of the island in an area where there will be existing roads, wastewater treatment and other infrastructure to handle the growth." Critics argue that Mason is a clever lawyer who sees an opportunity to profit from an exclusive, high-demand product by catering to a broader customer base. The question is whether this will change the very dynamics that created the demand in the first place. "I have always been an advocate of low density in Hope Town," Chester Thompson told me. "The island is a gem where people can step back in time and enjoy peace and quiet. It would be bloody tragic if this goes through.” His comment goes to the core of a heated argument over putting big projects in small communities. Bimini Bay and Exuma's Four Seasons Resort are prime exam-p les of inappropriate development, critics say. It is a model that dates back to the early years of the 20th century, and most examples in the outi slands have failed often leaving derelict buildings and environmental havoc in their w ake. Treasure Cay on the main island of Abaco is a notable exception to this rule, although it has t aken many years to a chieve stability. It began in 1957 when Chester T hompson's late brother, Leonard, leased 930 acres of crown land to develop the resort with American investors. It opened with its own airport and marina in 1963 and now feat ures 93 rental units, a c ommercial centre, golf course and adjoining resi dential estates. H ope Towners don't w ant another Treasure Cay or Boat Harbour on their island. B ut the real elephant in the room is the Haitian community that now occupies the Elbow Cay Club. Estimates of the Hait ian population range as high as 600, and most livea t the club. This mini version of the Mud is even served by aH aitian freighter, which brings in people and takes away discarded items and goods of uncer-t ain provenance. A ccording to Mason, the club's Haitian ten ants, whether they are legal or not, will be treated humanely: "Prior to completion of the pur chase, these tenants will b e given proper legal n otice to vacate by the current owner and the developers will insist that the current owner also help with their relocation." But no-one can say why the Haitians are here in such numbers in the first place. In the end, it is in everyone's interest to compromise. As former MP Robert Sweeting told me over breakfast: "We've got to find a mid dle ground on these developments. Some people who came here 30 or 40 years ago think they should be the last ones to come in and do anything. On the other hand, Hope Town doesn't really need this, whereas more investment is needed on the mainland." Following an acrimo nious town meeting recently, the developers have withdrawn their application for local planning approval. But this was submitted only as a courtesy in the first place. All foreign investment proposals must be approved by the National Economic Council in the first instance, and then local councils are asked for their input. Perhaps the developers will use this opportunity to make their proposal more palatable to the residents of Hope Town. As Harbour's Edge proprietor Clay Wilhoyte put it: "Mr. Mason has the opportunity to do something wonderful with this prop erty. He should listen to the suggestions that the community and others are giving him." What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Proposal to redevelop the old Elbow Cay Club TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM H H u u n n d d r r e e d d s s o o f f l l e e a a d d i i n n g g c c i i t t i i z z e e n n s s a a n n d d s s e e c c o o n n d d h h o o m m e e o o w w n n e e r r s s h h a a v v e e p p e e t t i i t t i i o o n n e e d d t t o o s s t t o o p p t t h h e e d d e e v v e e l l o o p p m m e e n n t t i i n n i i t t s s p p r r e e s s e e n n t t f f o o r r m m a a c c a a m m p p a a i i g g n n t t h h a a t t i i s s l l e e d d b b y y f f o o r r m m e e r r r r e e a a l l t t o o r r C C h h e e s s t t e e r r T T h h o o m m p p s s o o n n , , H H o o p p e e T T o o w w n n ' ' s s 8 8 8 8 y y e e a a r r o o l l d d p p a a t t r r i i a a r r c c h h ; ; a a n n d d C C l l a a y y W W i i l l h h o o y y t t e e , , a a n n a a t t u u r r a a l l i i s s e e d d B B a a h h a a m m i i a a n n w w h h o o o o w w n n s s t t h h e e p p o o p p u u l l a a r r H H a a r r b b o o u u r r ' ' s s E E d d g g e e r r e e s s t t a a u u r r a a n n t t . .

PAGE 9

C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009, PAGE 9 BERLIN, Germany Here’s a look at the schedule for the Bahamians competing over the remainder of the IAAF’s 12th World Championships in Athletics: T T O O D D A A Y Y Men’s high jump qualifying rounds Trevor Barry, 12th of 15 jumpers in Group A starting at 5:10 am ET Donald Thomas, 7th of 16 jumpers in Group B starting at 5:10 am ET Men’s 110 hurdles Shamar Sands, lane 4 in heat 5 at 6:35 am ET Men’s 400 semifinal Ramon Miller, lane 5, heat 1 at 12:15 pm ET Chris Brown, lane 3, heat 3 at 12:29 pm ET Women’s 200 preliminaries Debbie FergusonMcKenzie, lane 5, heat 4 at 2:03 pm ET Sheniqua Ferguson, lane 5, heat 6 at 2:15 pm ET T T H H U U R R S S D D A A Y Y Men’s 110 hurdles semifinal Shamar Sands, starting at 12:15 pm ET Women’s 200 semifinal Debbie FergusonMcKenzie and Sheniqua Ferguson, starting at 1:50 pm ET M en’s 110 hurdles final Shamar Sands, starting at 2:55 pm ET F F R R I I D D A A Y Y Men’s high jump final Donald Thomas and T revor Barry, starting at 1 :15 pm ET Women’s 200 final Debbie FergusonMcKenzie and Sheniqua Ferguson, starting at 3 pm ET Men’s 400 final Chris Brown and Ramon Miller, starting at 3:20 pm S S A A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y Women’s 4 x 100 relay heats @ 12:10 pm ET Men’s 4 x 400 relay heats @ 12:55 pm ET Women’s 4 x 100 relay final @ 2 pm ET Women’s 4 x 400 relay heats @ 2:15 pm ET S S U U N N D D A A Y Y Women’s 4 x 400 relay final @ 11:50 am ET Men's 4 x 400 relay final @ 12:15 pm ET IAAF World Champs: Schedule of events By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net BERLIN, Germany Leevan “Superman” Sands’ bid for the Bahamas’ first medal at the IAAF’s 12th World Championships in Athletics was denied when Cuban Alexis Copello moved from fifth on his sixth and final jump to clinch the bronze last night at the Olympic Stadium. Sands, the bronze medallist in the Olympic Games last year in Beijing, China, could taste another medal when he s oared to his second season’s b est leap of 17.32 metres (56f eet, 10-inches) to trail gold medallist Phillip Idowu of Great Britain (17.73 or 58-2 and silver medallist Nelson Evora of Portugal (17.55 or 57.7). But he knew that with two Cubans still left to jump in the final round, none of the medal positions were safe. Sure enough, it was the medal Sands was eyeing that was in jeopardy as Copello's leap of 17.36 (56-11 1/2 show. "I really wanted the medal," said Sands, who came into the mixed zone where he was interviewed by the media. Clinging to his son Leevan III for some comfort, he said: "I came so close, but I didn't geti t." I n what had been anticipat ed as a birthday party, having turned 26 on Sunday when he qualified for the final, Sands said he will still cherish his performance here despite not getting the medal. He will hold onto the ranking as the fourth best jumper in the world, one year after he claimed his first Olympic medal. "You know when you want something so bad and you really don't get it," he stated. "That's how I feel right now.B ut I want the Bahamian people to know that I went out there and I gave it my best shot. It was like a Mike Tyson fight. We threw a lot of blows, but in the end, I just fell short." I dowu, last year's silver medallist in Beijing, popped the gold medal leap of 17.73 or 58-2 for the world's leading mark on his third attempt ash e surpassed Evora. Evora, the Olympic champion, set the stage for what had promised to be a dramat ic showdown when he opened u p with a 57-6 1/2. He responded to Idowu's leap w ith his best of 57-7 on his l ast jump. B ut after Copello, who turned 24 on August 12, stepped it up for the bronze medal spot, Sands could only produce 55-9 that kept in fourth. "I really wanted this one, but to finish in fourth ain't that bad," Sands said. "That just showed how tough the competition was out there tonight. But despite not getting the medal, I still feel proud of myself." Copello, speaking through one of the Cuban interpreters in the mixed zone, said he was sorry he passed Sands on the final jump, but he had a lot riding on him and his compatriot Arnie David Girat, who finished fifth, to win another medal for Cuba. During the fourth round, Sands was passed by China's Li Yanxi with his best of 17.23 (56-6 1/2 But he responded with his season's best to regain third. Only this time when Copello passed him in the sixth, Sands didn't have the stamina to pull through with another big jump. W ith his wife Danielle joini ng him here, Sands said he w ill take a couple days to relax and enjoy the sights of Berlin. His family will leave on August 20, but Sands said he will stay until the end to cheer on the rest of his teammates. A fter that, he said he will return home and start preparing for a less hectic year that won't have any major competition except the Commonwealth Games that won't be held until October. Although he fell short of another medal, Sands can at least relish in the fact that he won the bronze at the 9th Worlds in Paris Saint-Denis, France, in 2003 and at the 17th Commonwealth Games in Manchester, England, in2002. ‘Superman’ soars for fourth in the world LEEVAN SANDS makes an attempt in the final of the triple jump during the World Athletics Championships i n Berlin on Tuesday, August 18, 2009... SANDS (left TEAM BAHAMAS assistant manager Julie Wilson can be seen with Leevan Sands and his son, Leevan III... M a t t D u n h a m / A P "That's real good for us. He ran very well," Brown said. "This is his first time in the big event and he went out there and ran a personal best. It's good that he's going to make it back. He just has to come out tomorrow and bring it again." In today's semifinal at 12:35 pm ET, Brown will run out of lane three in the last of the three heats. He will be trailing Tabarie Henry of the British Virgin Islands, who had the second fastest qualifying time of 45.14 to win heat seven and Australian John Steefensen in lane five. The first three of each heat (Q plus the three fastest times (q qualify for the final that is slated for Friday at 3:20 pm ET. "I'm just taking it round by round," said Brown, who wasn't concerned about his qualifying time. "I'm hoping to get out there, execute and run a fast race so that I can get a good lane for the final and see how it goes." While all the attention is on the American showdown between Wariner and Olympic champion LaShawn Merritt, Brown said he's looking forward to just going out there and crashing the party. As for the relays, which will start with the qualifying round on Saturday before the final concludes the championships on Sunday, Brown said they are looking very good and as long as everybody stays healthy, they should win another medal. ireman’: ‘They caused me to work hard... F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 MICHAEL MATHIEU (centre (TOP RIGHT Chris Brown (right

PAGE 10

By RAF CASERT AP Sports Writer BERLIN (AP off years of disappointment with her first major title in the 400 meters, pumping her fist after crossing the line at the world championships. Her main rival, Olympic champion ChrisRichards wins 400 with world leading time BERLIN (AP Jamaican runners provisionally cleared of doping are eligible to run at the world championships, leaving a final decision to the Jamaican federation. IAAF secretary general Pierre Weiss says Jamaica’s Anti-Doping Commission will not rule on their fate until after the championships end Sunday. That means they can compete at worlds. The five Yohan Blake, Sheri-Ann Brooks, Allodin Fothergill, Lansford Spence and Marvin Anderson c ould run in the relays, where J amaica is a medal favorite. W eiss said the IAAF did not have the power to suspend the athletes without a ruling from JADCO. But he added if they’re found guilty of doping, they’d be stripped of any medals won at worlds. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Jamaicans cleared of doping eligible to compete Bolt through to 200 semis By RAF CASERT AP Sports Writer BERLIN (AP second gold medal of the world championships, Usain Bolt jogged across the line Tuesday to advance to the semifinals of the 200 meters. Two days after setting a world record of 9.58 seconds to win the 100, the Olympic 200 champion ran a good curve and coasted through the final straight to finish in 20.41 seconds, a full 1.11 seconds behind his world record. In the absence of injured defending champion Tyson Gay, Bolt is the overwhelming favourite for gold. He said he would try to get a second world record at the championships, too. “I’ll be running hard,” Bolt said. The Jamaican set a record of 19.30 seconds at the Beijing Olympics, widely considered one of the toughest to beat in the sport. “I’m just trying to get through the rounds. That’s my aim,” Bolt said. “I’m trying to do it round by round like last year. Then I’ll go to the finals and just execute.” Celebrating and showboating after winning the 100 on Sunday, he was short on antics this time. Blame it on fatigue since he had to be in the stadium early Tuesday for the first heat. “I’m feeling a little tired, but nothing a good night’s rest won’t cure,” Bolt said after his sixth race in four days. Jamaican teammate Steve Mullings had the best qualifying time, winning his heat in 20.23. Shawn Crawford was third in 20.37, with American teammate Wallace Spearmon also easily advancing. The US team needs to change something quick to challenge the Jamaicans for sprint supremacy at the championships. They lost 5-0 in Olympic titles at the Beijing Games and are already 2-0 behind after the 100s. The specter of another rout is looming ever larger, especially with Gay out for the 200 and doubtful for the relays. The final for the 200 is set for Thursday. Bolt is also favoured to lead Jamaica to a sprint relay gold on Saturday to equal his feat of three golds at the Olympics. M a t t D u n h a m / A P USAIN BOLT gestures prior to a 200m 2nd round heat during the World Championships in Berlin Tuesday, August 18, 2009... By RAF CASERT AP Sports Writer BERLIN (AP Richards shook off years of disappointment with her first major title in the 400 meters, pumping her fist after crossing the line at the world champi onships. Her main rival, Olympic champion Christine Ohu ruogu of Britain, was back in fifth. And for Shericka Williams of Jamaica, it was silver again. With a time of 49.00 seconds, Richards also set the fastest mark of the year. She was 0.32 seconds faster than Williams. Antonina Krivoshapka of Russia took bronze. In the shadows of the Usain Bolt vs. Tyson Gay showdown, this duel was nearly as good. From Lane 3, Richards always had a good look at Ohuruogu’s Lane 7 and she caught up with her over the first 300 meters. Then she only had to focus on the finishing line. In Beijing last year, Richards faltered over the last 50 meters and Ohuruogu won. Not so this year. The American crossed the line with her arms raised in celebration, showing utter disbelief that so many failures finally ended in victory. With a grin on her face, she danced a little number for screaming fans. It also was great news for the struggling U.S. team, which had been unable to keep Jamaica from celebrating in the sprint events. Richar ds wins 400 with world leading time SANYA RICHARDS (left hugged by Jamaica's silver medal winner Shericka Williams after Richards won gold in the 4 00m final yesterday (AP Photo: David J Phillip I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net BERLIN, Germany Nathaniel McKinney’s step down from the 400 to the 200m didn’t pay off for him at all during the IAAF’s 12th World Championships in Athletics. On the same day yesterday at the Olympic Stadium when the preliminaries of the 400 was contested, McKinney’s bid at the 200 didn't last long as he could only run 21.26 seconds for fourth place in his heat. While only the first three in each heat and the next five fastest times advanced to the second round during the evening session, he finished 42nd out of a field of 60 competitors. The event took place two days after the stunning world record performance by Jamaican Usain Bolt, who is also doubling up for another sweep of the sprints as he did at the Olympic Games last year. McKinney, who hasn’t competed since May 9 in Athens, Georgia, where he qualified for the Worlds with a personal best of 20.67, said his first race was a blowout. "It was just something to play," said McKinney, who noted that he hasn’t given up running the 400 as yet. "It was cool.” After getting out to a quick start with the pack, McKinney came off the final bend in lane three in contention but he wasn't able to stay with the field on the straight-away. The race was eventually won by Marion Davonish of Great Britain in 20.92. "The 200 is a combination of speed and endurance," he pointed out. "I tried to stay in it, but my body was kind of cold and I didn't have it. Maybe if I had a few more races, I would have been sharper. It would have been just like a normal run." But McKinney added that the 200 is not a normal run for him and he now knows how legitimate sprinters feel. But he intends to work a little more on his speed because he definitely has the endurance as a result of running the one-lap races. Now that his individual pursuits are over, McKinney said he will remain in the Games Village and train in case the coaching staff calls upon him to run on the 4 x 400 relay team in the prelim inaries on Saturday. The team is now minus Andretti Bain, who left Berlin yesterday and headed back home via the United States after he suffered a recurring injury at the training camp, forcing him to shut down the rest of his season. It was the same fate as Grand Bahamian Andrae Williams, who shut it down just before the BAAA offi cially named the team prior to leaving town for the training camp in Berlin. Bain is the second athlete to have left the Games Village. The first was sprinter Derrick Atkins, who departed on Sunday after he failed to advance out of the first round of the men's 100 on Saturday. McKinney, who has ran on the men's 4 x 400 relay team at both the Olympics and Worlds, is expected to join Chris Brown, Ramon Miller, Michael Mathieu, Avard Moncur and Latoy Williams in the pool for the 4 x 4 relay. McKinney places fourth in heat Finishes 42nd out of 60 runners NATHANIEL McKINNEY (far right competes in the 200m yesterday... NATHANIEL McKINNEY leaves the track after the race...

PAGE 11

By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net BERLIN, Germany Claiming that hardly anybody is taking him seriously, NAIA 400 metres champion Ramon Miller said he's going to go out and make believers of everybody in his initial appearance at the IAAF's 12th World Championships in Athletics. Yesterday morning in the pre liminaries of the 400 metres, Miller did just that as he powered to the fastest qualifying time in the fifthof seven heats in a personal best time of 45.00 seconds. "First of all, I have to thank the Lord because without him in my life, I wouldn't be here," said Miller, who joined Chris “Fireman” Brown as the only two Bahamians to advance to the semifinal today at the Olympic Stadium. "Today, I just went out and did what I had to do. I've been training since last October and now this ismy reward at the Berlin Games. At home, everybody have me as the underdog, saying that this is a little chunk. But I'm blocking all of that out and I will just continue to perform here." The 22-year-old BAAA national runner-up who came into the championships with both a PR and seasonal best of 45.35 posted when hewon the NAIA title for the second consecutive year, said he's just delighted to be competing at his best on the biggest stage in track and field in the world. "I'm just going to go out there and execute my race to the fullest,"he said. "That's all I have to do. This is where it counts. This is the big games, so I want to go out there and qualify for the final. I feel I cando it." By virtue of his fast qualifying time, Miller has drawn lane five in the first of three semifinals today at 12:15 pm ET. He will be sandwiched between defending cham pion Jeremy Wariner of the United States in lane four and David Gillick of Ireland in six. Brown, the 30-year-old national champion, has drawn lane three in the last of the three heats at 12:29 pm ET. He will have to contend with John Steffensen of Australia, who is in lane five and Jamaican Ricardo Chambers in lane seven. Michael Mathieu, the other Bahamian competing in the field of 53 competitors, had ran 46.41 for sixth place in the second heat, but the 25-year-old Grand Bahamian was disqualified for stepping on the line. By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net BERLIN, Germany Every time he lines up in the preliminary rounds, Chris “Fireman” Brown says his competitors make him work a little harder than he expected. There was no difference yesterday as he competed out of the third of seven heats in the preliminary rounds of the men's 400 metres at the IAAF's 12th World Championships in Athletics. He had to hold off the field down the stretch to stop the clock in 45.53 seconds. Running out of lane two, Brown made the stagger up early and was ahead on the back stretch. But coming off the final curve, he had to contain with Great Britain's Michael Bingham (45.54 Australia's Joel Milburn (45.56 both chased him right through the finish line. "I just have to give the Lord praise and credit," Brown said. "I was hoping that I didn't have to work so hard, but I just didn't execute the way I wanted to. They caused me to work hard. But I just want to thank the Lord for the victory. "Being in lane two, you have to work. Lane two is not one of my favourites. Nor do I like lane seven or eight. But any lane at the Worlds is better than no lane at all." His time was listed as the 11th fastest, just ahead of defending champion Jere my Wariner of the United States, who won heat six in 45.54. Brown, a fourth place finisher in the last two Worlds in Osaka, Japan (2007 and Helsinki, Finland (2005 the Olympic Games (last year in Beijing, China), had to give up the Bahami an spotlight yesterday to team-mate Ramon Miller. Brown, who turns 31 on October 15, watched as 22-year-old Miller surged to the top of the qualifying charts with a personal best of 45.00, easily winning heat five. Both of their performances came after 25-year-old Grand Bahamian Michael Mathieu crossed the line sixth in heat three in 46.41, but was later disqualified for stepping on the line. C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 9 Schedule of events for IAAF Worlds... ‘Superman’ soars for fourth in the world... See page 9 ‘Fir eman’: ‘They caused me to work hard...’ Chris Brown heads to semis Mathieu finishes sixth in heat but disqualif ied for stepping on line CHRIS BROWN can be seen after a 400m first round heat... M i c h a e l S o h n / A P S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 Miller clocks personal best RAMON MILLER (far right Twenty two-year-old has legs set on qualifying for 400m final TRIBUNECOVERAGEOFTHE IAAF W ORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS BERLIN 2009 BROUGHTTOYOUBY

PAGE 12

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM The present law in the Bahamas defines rape as an act of any person not under 14 years of age having sex with another person who is not his spouse without the consent of that other person; without con sent that had been extorted by threats or fear of bodily harm; with consent obtained by impersonating the spouse of the other person; or with consent obtained by false and fraudulent representations as to the nature and quality of the act. The proposed amendment would omit the words "who is not his spouse" in essence mak ing it illegal for any person to have sex with another without consent regardless if they are married or not. Under the current law, rape can only occur in a marriage if the couple is legally separated. Some local religious leaders have argued that a man cannot rape his wife claiming the Bible dictates that a wife must physi cally submit to her husband. Controversial pastor Cedric Moss has vocally opposed the legislation claiming the amendment would create a "society of rapists." Citing the "word of God", Mr Moss argued that rape cannot be committed in marriage because the couple gave each other authority over the other's body and agreed to open-ended sexual consent in the marriage contract. He argued that including spouses as potential rapists would contradict the sacrament of marriage. "But can it be right to bring married people under such a law designed for unmarried people? No, and a thousand times, no! It is not right and it can never be right to bring all married couples under this definition of rape whereby moment by moment consent is required for every stage of every act of sexual intercourse. "Each day you will be a potential rapist in your own home if you initiate sex with your wife without her consent," he told the Rotary Club of West Nassau earlier this month. Other opponents believe the proposed change will devastate marriages and families in this country and say more discussion is needed before the amendment is signed into law. Women's rights advocates hit back saying rape is rape and that a wife should have the right to tell her husband "No" to sex in order to defend herself from an abusive or promiscuous husband. In its 2008 Human Rights Reports on the Bahamas, the U nited Nations noted that while rape is considered illegal in this country the current law does not address spousal rape. "Violence against women continued to be a serious, widespread problem. The law prohibits domestic violence, and the government generally enforced the law. However, domestic violence laws do not provide penalties separate from other crimes of assault and bat tery and do not effectively criminalize sexual violence within a marriage," said the report. The report said that the RBPF dealt with 114 reported rapes last year, a decrease from 136 in 2007. SEE EDITORIAL ON PAGEFOUR C abinet ministers, with Mr B annister stepping down f rom his post as Minister to return full time to his private law practice and current Attorney General Michael Barnett possibly filling thes hoes of departing Chief Just ice Sir Burton Hall. This would leave open two vacancies in the Cabinet. Both Mr Bannister and Mr Barnett have remained tightlipped on the claims since they surfaced last week. P rime Minister Hubert Ingraham, who would also be in a position to confirm or deny the speculation, returned to Nassau yesterday from vacation, but was to leave for Atlanta this a fternoon for the opening of a consular office there. On Sunday a political insider told The Tribune : think Mr Bannister has been w anting to get out for quite some time. I think he’s been pleading that his practice has b een suffering and so he just n eeds to get back in the private sector and he said ( previously) that he only w anted to stay around for two years and I think he wants to go.” The US National Hurricane Centre, in its update at 5pm yesterday, said Bill was approaching major hurricane status with the centre of the storm located about 635 miles east of the Leeward Islands. Bill was moving toward the west-northwest at near 16mph, and this motion was expected to continue last night, followed by a turn toward the north-west today. On this track, it will pass well to the north-east of the Bahamas on Friday and Saturday. The storm’s maximum sustained winds were at 110mph with higher gusts last night. trate Carolita Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane, opted to have the case heard in Magistrate’s Court. He pleaded not guilty to the charges. The prosecution raised no objection to bail which was granted in the sum of $7,500. Bonaby, of Zion Boule vard, was ordered not to have any contact with the complainant. He was also told to report to the East Street South police station every Saturday before 6pm. The case was adjourned to Monday, August 24, and transferred to Court 11, Nassau Street. denied killing Mr Dean, a resident of Quakoo Street, c laiming it was his cousin, a lleged hit man Samuel Mouche McKenzie who fired the fatal shot. S upreme Court Justice Stephen Isaacs sentenced James McKenzie to 35 yearsi n prison. M cKenzie was represented by attorney Richard B ootle. Deputy Director of P ublic Prosecutions Cheryl Grant-Bethel was the pros ecutor. The prosecution had s ought the death penalty for McKenzie or 60 years imprisonment. Marital rape law FROM page one B yKATHRYN CAMPBELL NINETY-FIVE Bahamians are presently employed in the Nassau Harbour Port Improvement Project on jobs including welding, equipment operation, technical support, and administration, government project engineer Robert Garraway said. The harbour project is being carried out to accommodate the new mega Genesis Class cruise ships one of which, the “Oasis of the Seas”, is expected in Nassau in December on its maiden voyage. Public Works and Transport M inister Neko Grant said the harbour project, among others, is “in keeping with the government’s m edium term response to the financial crisis. In light of this global economic downturn it was decided by theg overnment that the projects s hould be implemented with a dual intent. “They are designed to provide employment for Bahamians while simultaneously upgrading infrastructure in preparation for the future economic upturn,” he said. O n April 2, the government and B oskalis International, a Netherlands based dredging company, s igned a $4.2 million contract to d redge 1.9 million cubic yards of m aterial from Nassau Harbour. The work also includes the construction of three mooring dolphins at Prince George Wharf and the 1,000 feet extension of the western end of Arawak Cay using the dredged material and sheet piles. T he remainder of the dredged material will be stockpiled on Arawak Cay to be used in future government projects. D redging work officially began on the weekend. Bahamians employed on Nassau Harbour project A BOVE: B AHAMIAN workers at Arawak Cay are pictured welding pipes beingu sed to dredge the harbour. L EFT: B AHAMIAN workers a re installing steel sheet piles on the 1,000-foot A rawak Cay extension, a part of the Nassau Harbour Port Improvement Project. L e t i s h a H e n d e r s o n / B I S F ROM page one Sentence Bannister FROM page one FROM page one Police Constable FROM page one Hurricane

PAGE 13

By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor T he company that proposed to supp ly the Bahamas E lectricity Corporation (BEC liquefied natural gas (LNG sold the lease to its proposed terminal site to a Bahamiani ncorporated company, Tribune Business can reveal, although it has not completely abandoned its plans for this nation. AES Corporation’s decision t o sell the lease to its proposed LNG terminal site on OceanC ay, a man-made island near Bimini, was yesterday said by s ources familiar with the situation to have been a move designed to minimise the considerable costs it had already incurred in what has been, to date, a fruitless eight-year wait for successive Bahamian governments to approve its pro-j ect. However, Tribune Business c an reveal that although the Ocean Cay lease has been sold, A ES has not completely walked away from the Bahamas and its proposed Ocean Express project. It is understood that the deal includes an option for the US energy giant to re-lease part of Ocean Cays hould the Government finally give approval for the project. AES has spent a tremen dous amount of money in trying t o conduct an LNG project on Ocean Cay,” one source, who requested anonymity, said yesterday. “They have disposed of the rights to the island, Ocean Cay. They decided to sell the l ease to the island to a company which has agreed that, if the Government gives permission for the project, AES will release a portion of it.” T he lease sale was said by sources to have been completed within the last several months,w ith the buyer being a Bahamian-incorporated company ben-e ficially owned by a Bahamian citizen. T ribune Business unders tands that the buyer is Bahamian investor Tony M yers. Sources said he was planning to team up with for e ign investors to form a company that will re-start aragonite By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Water & Sewerage Corporation “expects to be ina rrears” on payments to its major, BISX-listed reverse o smosis supplier for the remainder of 2009, Tribune Business can confirm, despite making an $8.7 million payment on the outstanding balance during this year’s second quarter. Consolidated Water, in its latest 10-Q filing with the Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC reduced the Governmentowned Corporation’s debt to it to $4.7 million as at end-June 2009, although it continued to warn investors that its Bahamian subsidiary faced liquidity issues as a result of payment issues. Acknowledging that it had “experienced significant delays in the receipt of payments” on the Water & Sewerage Corporation’s since early 2008, Con solidated Water said it had held its last meeting on the issue with government and Corpora C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report. $3.96 $3.87 $4.05 Corporation ‘to be in arr ears’ for 2009 remainder By CHESTER ROABRDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net T HE ERECTION of the Bahamas National Stadium will pump $12 to $18 million into Bahamian construction mate-r ials suppliers, a Chinese project manager said yesterday, while the overall cost of the project has grown since it broke g round. Yiqing Sun, the technical manager for the stadium project, said some minor changes have been made to the stadium plans which could raise the cost of building the facility. “With the development of t ime maybe we will have a litStadium’s $12-$18m constr uction boost B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMIAN contractors are taking cuts in profit and overhead of up to 10 per cent just to ensure they secure work in a slump ing economy, the Bahamian Contractors A ssociation’s (BCA terday, describing the industry as being in a buyers market” favouring consumers. Stephen Wrinkle, who heads his own c onstruction business, Wrinkle Develop ment, said that while the Government’s various capital works projects were set to “pick up the slack” for what was a slug gish industry, private sector projects also n eeded to rebound in number for a full revival to take place. The contractors are taking the work at less mark-up to keep the business going,” Mr Wrinkle told Tribune Business. “Contractors are taking the work for less profit and less overhead. Just in the bid work we’ve seen, it could be 10 per cent. But if you’re building a$ 300,000 house, that’s $300,000.” Mr Wrinkle described the commercial c onstruction market, which constitutes pro jects such as new office buildings, as “very slow, with little going on”. However, there was still activity in the private homeowners market, with persons w ho had already purchased lots and obtained financing exploiting the weak con s truction market and reduced building materials prices to make progress in developing their own homes. The BCA president added: “While generally speaking the market is very soft, t here are isolated cases of success, and people are taking what they can get until thingsi mprove. Right now, it’s a buyers market. Most of the large contractors have a pro j ect, but very few have multiple projects.... “Government work is picking up a lot of slack and is holding the industry togethContractors work for 10 per cent less profit Water & Sewerage still owing $4.7m to BISX-listed Consolidated Water, main reverse osmosis supplier, despite $8.7m payment LNG supplier sells project lease rights S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B PROJECT MANAGER Iram Lewis (second right P henton Neymour how deep the foundations had to be dug. Photo by Felip Major/Tribune Staff By CHESTER ROABRDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net CABLE BAHAMAS net income for the 2009 half-year increased 15.35 per cent to $14.89 million, compared to $12.904 million the previous year, although the second quarter was almost flat at $7.438 million. Despite total year-to-date revenues reaching $42 million in the 2009 second quarter, a 4 per cent increase compared to Cable profits flat in 09’ Q2 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B * But deal does not mean AES has walked away from Bahamas * Agreement has re-lease option if government gives approval, with Bahamian buyer planning to re-start aragonite mining

PAGE 14

A T 11:41am on June 26, 2009, the operators of 23B ahamas-based private airline companies received an e-mail from the Bahamas Civil Avia-t ion Department that threw them into a collective tailspin, or at least a ground loop. They were told that the new fee regulations gazetted in May 2005w ould now come into effect on August 1, 2009, but that “official notification will be f orwarded to you within the coming week”. Nothing happened. Then, at 12:54pm on July 3, they received a similar e-mail t o say that the effective date was changed to September 10, 2009, again with notification to follow within a week. No notification was r eceived, leaving uncertainty. The new fees covered by the 2005 regulations could, ife nforced as written, drive a dagger into the heart of al priv ately-owned airline compan ies in the Bahamas. This would include not only the larger ones providing sched-u led service throughout the c ountry, such as Sky Bahamas, Western Air, Southern Air, Cat Island Air and Pineapple Air, but also the smaller ones providing charter flights. I recently spent a couple of hours with Captain Randy Butler, chief executive and principal owner of SkyB ahamas, so he could explain to me the background of these f ees and their impact on his business. We met in his officeo n Blake Road, lined with diplomas he received for the various courses given byI ATA, the International Air Transport Association. Holder of a US airline transport pilot certificate, Captain Butler has seen both sides of the coin.U ntil last year he served as Aviation Safety Inspector for the Bahamas, a top job in civ-i l aviation. Last summer, with a few friends, he bought the ailing Sky Bahamas and began to turn it around, heading for break-even at present. “I knewa ll about the technical side,” he told me. “I’m still learning the business side.” He’s helped by a full-time chief financial officer. T he new fee structure was officially enacted in 2005 by regulations under The Avia-t ion Act, radically revising the previous 1985 schedule. But t hese regulations were never b rought into force. Section 11 of the regulations requires advance discussion with thei ndustry. It demands “consult ation with airport users before significant changes in the charging system or level of charges”. But, since no con sultation was ever held, the n ew fees were held in abeyance – until the recent communications announcing their abrupt enforcement,a gain without consultation. Captain Butler handed me a copy of the 2005 document, so I could peruse the many pages o f technical verbiage and rate schedules. To a layman, they look baffling in their comp lexity. Existing fees are not simply increased, but whole new categories never charged before are created. It seems every possible activity now carries a fee – registration ofa ircraft and the company itself, landing fees at Bahamian air-p orts, pilot licensing fees, baggage handling and inspectionf ees, passenger fees, security fees – on and on. Captain Butler and his financial staff are now engaged in calculations to determine precisely how these new charges will affect their operating costs. He is cer-t ain that fare increases will be inevitable, raising, for example, the present $160 roundtrip rare to Georgetown, Exu-m a. O perating costs are already substantial. Sky Bahamas fliest hree 33-seater Saab 340s, and a back-up 19-seater Beechcraft, all of whichr equire meticulous servicing at the company’s Nassau hangar, where the maintenance staff pay runs up to $55,000 per annum. They flys cheduled service to Freeport, Georgetown, Marsh Harbour, Bimini, and, recently, CatI sland – over 12 flights daily. On-demand charters are also flown to Florida and Cap Haitien, Haiti. To provide uninterrupted service, Captain But-l er hires 15 licensed pilots, whose pay ranges from $35,000 to $55,000 depending on experience; all but one are Bahamian. When to thesee xpenses are added fuel, office and counter staff, insurance, etc., one appreciates that thec ompany is already operating on a tight margin. C ompetition is an ever-pres ent factor. On his principal routes, Captain Butler faces the Government-owned carri-e r Bahamasair, as well as the p rivate Western Air, based in Andros with a slightly larger fleet, because of their frequent flights to that island and Freeport. Of course, Bahama s air alone could not possibly satisfy the demand from all the destinations. To Georgetown, for example, SkyBahamaso perates its three daily roundtrips at an average capacity factor of about 75 per cent, flying head-to-head against itst wo competitors. C aptain Butler is fortunate that the current recession, sop roblematic for US airlines, has not substantially affected Bahamian inter-island traffic,s ince most of the travellers are Bahamian citizens, not visiting tourists. His company is well known for not squeezing the last dollar out of the traffic.T hey offer free trips for firsttime students, and often waive fares for indigent passengerst ravelling for hospital service. Once, when unfortunately delayed five hours on a return to Nassau, the passengers including this writer were metb y a SkyBahamas agent who immediately gave us free round-trip tickets good for 90 days – a nicety I have never seen Bahamasair offer. T he new fee charges technically will apply to Bahamasair’s domestic flightse qually with the private companies. But from his long e xperience in Civil Aviation, C aptain Butler is well aware that the Government carrier is given considerable leewayi n making prompt payment, w hile the private firms must pay with a bank cashier’s cheque on the due date or suf fer penalties and sanctions. Together with the foreign air l ines, our national flag carrier enjoys another advantage: it can import accessories, parts and instruments exempt fromt he Customs duties paid by its privately-owned competitors. The fear is that Bahamasair will simply be able to absorbt he fee increases into its large, e xisting Government-subsidised losses, while the moret ightly run investor-owned companies will have to raise fares to stay alive, puttingt hem at a competitive disadvantage. Captain Butler asks what the vastly increased fees are to be used for? The ministerh as spoken in vague general terms about financing improved services and airportf acilities, particularly in the Family Islands. There is supposed to be an overall “plan” under the current Air Transport Improvement Pro-g ramme, being funded by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB Bahamas is at risk of losing its essential Category I Classifi-c ation under the Federal Aviation Agency’s Safety Programme. But he has nevers een a copy of this plan or had an explanation of its contents. T o the contrary, he believes t he Government could actually save money by downgrading some of the 18 port-of-e ntry airports (with full i nbound Customs and Immigration and facilities). He questions why Treasure Cay, just 40 miles from Marsh Har bour, needs this status, and w hy Andros and Eleuthera each need three of these expensive terminals. The downgraded airports could stillb e used for domestic flights from Nassau. He points out that travellers to many inter national resorts think nothing o f an hour or more drive to their destination. And Captain Butler questions whether the new fee regime would complyw ith the Policies on Airport a nd Air Navigation Charges created by ICAO, the Inter national Civil Aviation Organ isation. F inally, he asks, why does Government not take over control of our own air space from the Flight InformationR egion administered by the US FAA? Under the present arrangement every flight over our own territory, even to and f rom local airports, is never theless billed a fixed fee payable to the US Govern m ent, totaling about $1,700 p er month for SkyBahamas. I f we assumed jurisdiction over our air space, as have other Caribbean nations, not only could we collect over-flight f ees from many foreign airlines, but Bahamians could be taught new employment skills in running the programme. M ost of Captain Butler’s views are shared by Rex Rolle, owner and chief executive of W estern Airlines. In a tele p hone call to him at his company’s operations base in San Andros, he confirmed his concerns over the proposed new fee structure. A pretty loose trade association featuring all the private airline companies is now being tightened up to car ry out intensive negotiations with experts at Civil Aviation to alleviate the harsh effects of regulations hastily written back in 2005, before the due date of September 10. It would certainly be unfortunate if private-sector entrepreneurs in the airline business, providing an essential service with unquestioned safety and marketing records, were driven to the wall so that the Government carrier, with its bloated financial structure, be allowed to survive. This may not be the stated purpose of the new fee regulations, but it might be their actual effect. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009 THE TRBUNE The National Insurance Board The National Insurance Board The National Insurance Board The National Insurance Board The National Insurance Boardof the Commonwealth of The Bahamas The National Insurance Board (NIB works to complete the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre Robert Smith Child & Adolescents and Special Education Unit , Fox Hill, Nassau, Bahamas; the project is a joint venture of NIB and The Bahamas Government. Contractors must be in compliance with the National Insurance Act (social security programme relevant Government agencies. Pre-qualification documents may be collected from the Security Booth at NIB’s Clifford Darling Complex, Blue Hill Road, from August 14 to August 21, 2009. Pre-Qualification documents should be signed, sealed and dropped in the prequalification box at the Security Booth, Clifford Darling Complex on or before 12:00 Noon on August 21, 2009. Request for Contractors Pre-Qualification Airline industry could nosedive on fee rises by Richard Coulson

PAGE 15

By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor SCOTIABANK (Bahamas and the developers of a $250m illion Bahamian-based r esort development now in receivership have agreed to end their eight-month long legal battle in the Florida courts, Tribune Business can reveal. The Bahamian bank and Chub Cay Club principals, Walter McCrory and BobM oss, on Friday filed in the U S district court for southern Florida a motion to “voluntarily dismiss” the action Scotiabank (Bahamason December 23, 2008. It now only awaits the agreement and s ign-off by US district judge, William Zloch. The Stipulation of Voluntary Dismissal without Prejudice, which has been obtained by Tribune Business, statest hat both sides “voluntarily stipulate and agree to dismiss this action, together with all of their respective claims, causes of action, counterclaims and defences, without prejudice”. S cotiabank (Bahamas initiated the legal proceedings i n a bid to call in an alleged $4 million loan guarantee madeb y Messrs McCrory and Moss, plus their late partner Kaye Pearson, after the trio defaulted on repayments to the bank over a $45 million loan it granted to finance Chub Cay’sc onstruction. The bank, in its lawsuit, alleged that the trio had guaranteed the “financing for the development of vacation residences, a marina, a clubhouseand related improvements for more than 800 acres on Chub C ay in the Commonwealth of t he Bahamas”. Scotiabank (Bahamas alleged that the trio owed $44.010 million in unpaid principal on the July 28, 2006, loan, plus interest, cost and expenses, including attorneys’ f ees. The bank also alleged that the three developer principals had guaranteed that construction work on Chub Cay would be completed by December 3 1, 2007, a deadline that had b een missed. Some $38.6 mil lion worth of work, Scotiabank (Bahamas needed to be done to bring the project to completion. The bank subsequently secured the appointment of Baker Tilly Gomez accountant and partner, Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez, as Chub Cay’s receiver. As previously revealed by Tribune Business, Mr Gomez is now seeking tos ell the resort development to r ecover what is due to Scotiab ank (Bahamas understood to have been close to appointing George Damianos, of Damianos Sotheby’s International Realty, as the realtor who will market the resort. Mr Gomez was yesterday said to be out office until next week when Tribune Businessc alled seeking comment. However, it is presumably the likelihood that Scotiabank (Bahamas of what it is owed via the sale, plus difficulties in obtaining this sum from the principals, that has prompted the lawsuit settlement. For their part,M essrs McCrory and Moss h ad previously denied the allegations made against them by Scotiabank (Bahamas They argued that while they had provided a $4 million guarantee for the loan agree-m ent with the Bahamian bank, they had fulfilled this by pledging a $4 million standby letter of credit to Scotiabank. The duo alleged that S cotiabank (Bahamas already “been paid to the full extent of what it can recover u nder the” guarantee through accessing the pledged standby letter of credit. While admitting that they w ere guarantors and “that all p ayments called for by the a greement have not been made”, Messrs McCrory and Moss denied they were liable for the $4 million guarantee. They further alleged that their obligations were limited to this guarantee, and denied that a guarantee to complete the Chub Cay project had been part of the terms. C hub Cay, which was unveiled with much fanfare as the so-called ‘anchor project’ for the Berry Islands and North Andros just five years ago, is a prime example of just how bad a toll the global economic downturn, and especially the freezing ofc redit/debt markets, has exacte d on foreign direct investment projects that the Bahamas was counting on to generate jobs and economic growth. Numerous other projects, i ncluding the Ritz-Carlton Rose Island, Royal Island, Ginn sur mer and Rum Cay Resort Marina, have all been impacted to some degree by t he immense difficulty – if not impossibility – of obtaining debt financing at reasonable c ost and terms. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009, PAGE 3B btrt tfr f r!%* '!$()))!*&*#tffn""bnff !$ %#&!*&*# !%** Scotiabank settles $45m resort suit

PAGE 16

mining on Ocean Cay, a manm ade island originally developed for such a purpose. A ES has spent at least $65 million in trying to win approval for the project, only to incur ever-increasing frustration at the failure of both the C hristie and Ingraham administrations to give final approval,d espite meeting all the Government’s requirements c hiefly completing a positive Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA t al Management Plan (EMP When contacted yesterday b y Tribune Business about AES’s sale of the Ocean Cay l ease, Phenton Neymour, min ister of state for the environment, replied: “I haven’t received that information.” The Government’s failure to t hus far approve an LNG project, especially the AES devel o pment, located some seven miles from the nearest inhabit e d island, is somewhat mysti fying, given that all require ments have been met and the Treasury’s desperate need for revenue. T he AES project had promised to generate around $ 1 billion in revenues for the G overnment during the first 25 years of operations, via a com b ination of annual business licence fees, sea bed lease fees a nd a throughput fee linked to the Henry Hub natural gas index. When the price of LNG pumped to Florida by AES e xceeded this benchmark, the Bahamas would gain a per c entage of the additional revenues a figure that could have h it $40-$50 million in 2005. AES had also proposed to supply BEC with LNG from Ocean Cay, something its thenproject manager said could save t he Government-owned Corporation between $1.4 billion t o $4 billion $80 million to $ 210 million per annum in fuel costs over a 15-year period. A aron Samson said that AES was effectively offering the G overnment two options approving the original LNG terminal and pipeline that would service Florida only, or giving the go-ahead for that p roject and the pipeline to New Providence. Y et Tribune Business understands that the Government’s c oncerns over the AES pro posal relate to long-term LNG prices, and whether they would increase at the same rate and reach the same level as oil p rices as global demand increased. Such a development w ould negate any advantages from switching BEC to LNG. A ES and its attorneys have been pushing for a government decision on whether to make the approval in principle that was granted to its project back i n 2001 a full, approval that would allow it to proceed. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE NOTICE is hereby giventhat JOHNNYJOSEPH P.O. BOX GT-2752 , YELLOW ELDER is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and t hat any person who knows any reason why registration/ n aturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE NOTICE is hereby given that SAMANTHALOUISE COX KEMP, P.O. BOX N-10767,# 3 HALLS ROAD and POMPANO COURT , is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas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leading wholesale distributor providing perishables & food products throughout the Bahamas for over 25 years has the following positions available:DIESEL MECHANIC CUSTODIANOnly qualied persons need applyPlease submit all rsums by fax to (242242 for further information the same period in fiscal 2008, t he BISX-listed company only enjoyed a modxest increase upon the previous year’s $7.365 million net income. For the second quarter, total r evenues were $21 million, up 3.2 per cent from the same peri-o d last year. Cable television continued to be the highest revenue earner, with $11.1 million. Internet netted $6.5 million in overall revenues, and Data $3.4 m illion. Last quarter, the company saw its largest year-over-y ear revenue growth in its consolidated product offerings. C able Bahamas said its rev enue growth has continued to be in line with its expectations and "was complemented by the careful management of operati ng expenses”. It was able to lower operating total operatinge xpenses by 1 per cent to $9.5 million. Corporation ‘to be in arrears’ for 2009 remainder tion representatives on May 1, 2009. The company, whose Bahamian Depository Receipts (BDRs B ahamas International Securities Exchange (BISX ances that the payment “delinquency” was related to “operating issues” within the Water & Sewerage Corporation. Given that there was no dispute between the parties, and that the Government had pledged the outstanding amount would be paid in full, Consolidated Water said it had m ade no provision for, or written down, the sums owed. Consolidated Water said in its SEC filing: “During the three months ended June 30, 2009, Consolidated Water-Bahamas received $8.7 million in payments on its receivables from the Water & Sewerage Corporation, and Consolidated WaterBahamas’ accounts receivable from the W ater & Sewerage Corporation were approximately $4.7 million as of June 30, 2009. “We believe that the accounts receiv able from the Water & Sewerage Corpor ation are fully collectible and therefore have not provided any allowance for pos sible non-payment of these receivables as of June 30, 2009. “However, we have been informed by t hese representatives that the Water & Sewerage Corporation expects to continuet o be in arrears on its payments to Consol idated Water-Bahamas for the remainder o f 2009.” As a result, Consolidated Water warned investors: “Consolidated Water-Bahamas derives substantially all of its revenues from its contract with the Water & SewerageC orporation, and is dependent upon timely collection of its accounts receivable to fund its operations.If the Water & Sewerage Corporation does not improve the t imeliness and/or increase the amounts of its payments to Consolidated WaterBahamas, this subsidiary may not have sufficient liquidity to adequately fund its operations. If this occurs, Consolidated WaterBahamas may be required to decrease the amount of water it supplies the Water & Sewerage Corporation to the minimum r equired amount under the contract or, if liquidity problems become too severe, cease its production of water altogether. Such developments could have a material adverse effect on our results of operationa nd financial position.” Consolidated Water’s results again highlight the increasing financial weakness of the Water & Sewerage Corporation, and t he burden it imposes on Bahamian taxpayers. The Corporation will still be in a rrears on its reverse osmosis supply paym ents despite having received an additional $ 11 million in taxpayer funding during the 2008-2009 Budget year that brought its t otal subsidy to $30 million. And the financial drain that is currently t he Water & Sewerage Corporation was again highlighted by the fact that, withouta government subsidy, it would have i ncurred a $24 million loss during its 2007 financial year. Elsewhere, Consolidated Water said its Bahamian subsidiary had cancelled a $500,000 revolving credit facility with Roy-a l Bank of Canada. No amounts had been due under the facility, which was secured by the Bahamian company’s assets and would have incurred interest levied at Bahamian P rime plus 1.5 per cent. Consolidated Water said that it would replace the Royal Bank working capital facility with “another facility with another bank in August 2009”. O n the operational front, Consolidated Water said its Bahamian operations were generating “higher gross profits”. “The higher gross profits for our B ahamas operations reflect improved operating efficiencies for both our Windsor and Blue Hills operations located in Nassau, New Providence,” the company said in its SEC filing. We constructed and commissioned new feed water wells, and replaced the reverse osmosis membranes on two of four of our production trains at our Windsor plant e ffective September 2008, and replaced the reverse osmosis membranes on our other t wo production trains at the Windsor plant d uring the current quarter. These capital expenditures have improved the energy efficiency of the W indsor plant. In addition, last year we implemented an improved feed water pre t reatment regime at our Blue Hills plant in Nassau, which has reduced electrical pow-e r consumption at that plant.” er, but at the end of the day it’s a symphony orchestra, and we need all the instruments playing in tune together.” A mong the Government works projects moving forward were the $409.5 million Lynden Pindling International Airport ( LPIA) redevelopment, Mr Wrinkle telling Tribune Business that the general contractor, a combination of Canadian firm Ledcor and Bahamian compa-n y Wooslee Dominion, were “mobilising and getting ready to start physical work”. Elsewhere, the Straw Market was i n the pre-qualification phase. Meanwhile, Mr Wrinkle said the BCA was awaiting final approval from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDBf or the proposed $225,000 project to strengthen the Bahamian construction industry. He added that the BCA c ouncil had met with the IDB’s Bahamian office several weeks ago to review the proposed project grant, which was subsequently sent off for finala pproval by the bank’s head office. Preliminary approval had already been given by the Bahamian government. It is our understanding that we’ve met all the criteria, the requirements required by the g rant, and we’ve had every indic ation from the IDB locally that final approval will be forthc oming,” Mr Wrinkle told Tribune Business. LNG supplier sells project lease rights tle change. We are paying higher than according to the plan,”s aid Mr Sun. Much of the materials and manpower, though, is being sourced from China. During a tour of the new f acility, Chinese and Bahamian contractors, along with the Chinese Ambassador to the Bahamas, showed off its m ain features to several governmentm inisters, including Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette and Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture, Desmond B annister. The ministers were shown innovations in Chinese construction and tests that verify the fortitude of constructionm aterials, including steel rebar with welded joints stronger than the moulded rebar itself, and concrete block made with B ahamian-supplied concrete, which stood up to pressures twice its limit. Mr Symonette relished the fact that the concrete whichm ade up the block tested by Chinese workers was Bahamian-made. Mr Bannister said construct ion of the new Stadium will bring international competitions, currently not able to be held in the Bahamas, to this n ation. He said it will be the best facility in the region. We are extremely pleased with the partnership with the C hinese government, who have proved they are very goodf riends and have made a won derful contribution to the develo pment of our national stadium. We're looking forward to continuing this very wonderful partnership we have with the government of China,” he said. The ambassador has been a very good friend, and hasb een extremely helpful in everything that we have been doing.” Mr Symonette said 75 per cent of the pylons, which will b e buried more than 40 feet into the bedrock at the site ands upport the foundation for the stadium, are in place. The sta d ium will require 620 of those pylons. Much of the equipment used in the construction thus far has been acquired from Bahamian c ompanies, according to Mr Sun. We have built relationships with local small companies. The b locks and sand are provided by a local company, and much of the equipment on the site is proved by a local company,” he said. Many materials are delivered from China here, so it h elps the local shipping com panies.” M r Bannister said the Chinese investment in the Bahami an economy was huge, especially in securing equipment and supplies for the stadium. C C A A B B L L E E , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B C C O O N N T T R R A A C C T T O O R R S S S S T T A A D D I I U U M M , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

PAGE 17

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 77F/25C Low: 78F/26C Low: 79F/26C Low: 81F/27C Low: 81 F/27 C Low: 82F/28C Low: 81 F/27 C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 90F/32C High: 92F/33C High: 89 F/32 C High: 86 F/30 C High: 88F/31C High: 89 F/32C High: 92F/33C Low: 79F/26C High: 91F/33C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 95F/35C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 74F/23C High: 93 F/34 C Low: 79F/26C High: 91 F/33 Low: 76F/24C High: 90F/32C Low: 77 F/25C High: 92F/33C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 94F/34C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 92F/33C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 92F/33C Low: 76F/24C High: 95 F/35 C Low: 76F/24C High: 94F/34C High: 88 F/31 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19 TH , 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Mostly cloudy with thunderstorms. Mainly clear with a thunderstorm. Mostly sunny with a thunderstorm. Sunshine with a t-storm in spots. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 92 Low: 81 High: 90 High: 90 High: 89 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Some sun with a t-storm possible. High: 90 Low: 80 Low: 79 Low: 80 AccuWeather RealFeel 111F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 89F 105-84F 99-87F 101-88F 101-85F Low: 80 TODAYTONIGHTTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................91F/33C Low ....................................................82F/28C Normal high ......................................89F/32C Normal low ........................................76F/24C Last year's high .................................. 91 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 77 F/25C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................trace Year to date ................................................22.35" Normal year to date ....................................28.62" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU New First Full Last Aug. 20 Aug. 27Sep. 4Sep. 11 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:46 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:41 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 5:45 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 7:09 p.m. Today Thursday Friday Saturday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 7:22 a.m.3.01:15 a.m.0.0 7:50 p.m.3.41:24 p.m.-0.2 8:15 a.m.3.22:04 a.m.-0.2 8:41 p.m.3.32:20 p.m.-0.2 9:06 a.m.3.32:50 a.m.-0.2 9:29 p.m.3.23:13 p.m.-0.2 9:55 a.m.3.43:36 a.m.-0.2 10:16 p.m.3.14:05 p.m.-0.1 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco90/3277/25t90/3279/26t Amsterdam79/2668/20s78/2555/12pc Ankara, Turkey86/3052/11s85/2952/11s Athens92/3373/22s90/3272/22s Auckland60/1548/8r59/1546/7s Bangkok90/3279/26sh91/3279/26pc Barbados86/3079/26pc86/3077/25pc Barcelona83/2869/20s83/2868/20s Beijing84/2866/18r93/3369/20pc Beirut81/2778/25s82/2777/25s Belgrade87/3060/15s88/3161/16s Berlin77/2563/17pc86/3064/17s Bermuda87/3076/24s87/3076/24s Bogota68/2048/8c66/1847/8sh Brussels84/2870/21s88/3155/12pc Budapest86/3059/15s87/3057/13s Buenos Aires58/1447/8c62/1643/6pc Cairo98/3674/23s99/3773/22s Calcutta88/3181/27sh88/3181/27t Calgary73/2248/8s77/2552/11s Cancun91/3277/25pc90/3273/22pc Caracas83/2872/22t82/2774/23t Casablanca86/3068/20pc83/2865/18s Copenhagen70/2155/12pc76/2466/18s Dublin68/2054/12r64/1750/10sh Frankfurt87/3066/18s91/3263/17pc Geneva 87/30 58/14 s 87/3062/16s Halifax 78/25 59/15 pc 75/23 59/15 s Havana 90/32 73/22 t 91/32 73/22 s Helsinki 66/18 48/8pc68/2052/11pc Hong Kong 91/32 81/27 s 91/32 81/27s Islamabad 94/34 74/23 t 101/38 77/25 s Istanbul86/3071/21s84/2865/18s Jerusalem 86/30 61/16s86/3064/17s Johannesburg 59/1531/0s61/1639/3s Kingston 90/3279/26pc88/3180/26sh Lima69/2058/14s71/2158/14s London82/2763/17pc75/2355/12r Madrid99/3766/18s97/3663/17s Manila88/3179/26t87/3078/25s Mexico City77/2554/12t76/2453/11t Monterrey102/3875/23s102/3875/23t Montreal81/2763/17s79/2668/20t Moscow64/1750/10sh61/1648/8sh Munich84/2854/12s89/3158/14s Nairobi79/2656/13c80/2655/12sh New Delhi 91/3279/26t92/3380/26c Oslo66/1854/12sh63/1752/11c Paris91/3268/20s82/2755/12pc Prague 79/26 53/11 s 85/29 60/15 s Rio de Janeiro80/2673/22c83/2869/20pc Riyadh105/4081/27s103/3982/27s Rome 91/32 72/22 s 90/32 68/20 s St. Thomas91/3279/26sh88/3180/26sh San Juan55/1236/2sh65/1836/2s San Salvador 88/31 70/21 t 89/31 74/23 t Santiago 54/1234/1sh61/1634/1s Santo Domingo91/3275/23pc86/3075/23sh Sao Paulo 71/21 58/14 r 73/22 53/11c Seoul90/3275/23sh88/3165/18r Stockholm 66/18 52/11 s 72/22 57/13 pc Sydney 70/21 46/7 s74/2343/6s Taipei93/3380/26s91/3278/25s T okyo 86/30 71/21 pc 83/28 73/22 pc T oronto 80/2664/17pc78/2563/17t Trinidad95/3575/23s88/3163/17c V ancouver 76/24 63/17 s 75/2360/15s Vienna 83/2864/17s86/3066/18s W arsaw 72/22 54/12 s 75/23 53/11 s Winnipeg 70/21 56/13 t 68/2055/12c H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:ESE at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet5-7 Miles85F Thursday:ENE at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet5-7 Miles85F Today:ESE at 9-18 Knots1-3 Feet5-7 Miles85F Thursday:ENE at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet5-7 Miles85F Today:ESE at 8-16 Knots1-2 Feet5-7 Miles84F Thursday:ENE at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet5-7 Miles84F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque93/3365/18s92/3365/18s Anchorage66/1850/10s71/2151/10s Atlanta92/3371/21t89/3172/22t Atlantic City87/3073/22t89/3173/22t Baltimore90/3270/21t92/3372/22t Boston90/3270/21t85/2971/21t Buffalo80/2664/17pc85/2969/20t Charleston, SC90/3274/23pc92/3375/23pc Chicago77/2567/19t79/2662/16t Cleveland84/2870/21t87/3071/21t Dallas98/3680/26s98/3672/22t Denver83/2849/9s79/2652/11s Detroit83/2868/20c81/2768/20t Honolulu89/3177/25s89/3176/24s Houston94/3477/25t96/3577/25t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday TodayThursdayTodayThursday Indianapolis86/3072/22t83/2865/18t Jacksonville90/3274/23t89/3174/23t Kansas City86/3066/18t78/2560/15pc Las Vegas106/4177/25s107/4181/27s Little Rock92/3374/23t89/3168/20t Los Angeles80/2664/17pc80/2664/17pc Louisville87/3075/23t87/3070/21t Memphis90/3275/23t91/3269/20t Miami88/3181/27t92/3380/26t Minneapolis74/2359/15t67/1959/15sh Nashville87/3072/22t88/3172/22t New Orleans90/3278/25t90/3277/25t New York88/3175/23t89/3178/25t Oklahoma City97/3674/23s92/3366/18t Orlando90/3277/25t91/3276/24t Philadelphia90/3274/23t90/3274/23t Phoenix 110/43 85/29 s 110/4385/29s Pittsburgh82/2768/20t84/2868/20t Portland, OR 98/3664/17s93/3359/15s Raleigh-Durham 94/34 73/22 pc 95/35 72/22 pc St. Louis90/3274/23t84/2862/16t Salt Lake City 88/31 62/16 s 94/3466/18s San Antonio 100/37 78/25 s 98/36 77/25 s San Diego73/2266/18pc74/2366/18pc San Francisco 78/25 58/14 pc 75/2358/14pc Seattle88/3162/16s86/3056/13s T allahassee 92/3374/23t91/3275/23t T ampa 92/33 78/25 t 91/32 78/25t Tucson102/3877/25s102/3876/24t W ashington, DC 92/33 75/23t93/3376/24t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day . Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

PAGE 18

C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 8C, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE T h e T r i b u n e By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net Nestled in the heart of Bernard Road is the new Coco Palm Caf and t ak ea way featuring the best in Bahamian dishes fused wit h Italian flavours and spices. Featuring a top notch selection of dishes rarely found in Nassau, this eatery gives the right bite for the buck, exposing patrons to foods only available at upscale restaurants. Chef Paul Coakley who operates Coco’s, explained that after living in New Jersey, and working at the famous Borgata Hotel Casino and Spa for a year, he thought Bahamians would enjoy his delicious creations. The restaurant has a diverse menu ranging from traditional fish, chicken, or burger snacks, to orginal dishes like Mango wings with Cajun rice, coconut curry chicken, and penne pasta direct from Atlantic City. Chef Coakley said the penne pasta which has already proven to be an overnight success, can only be described as “sexy and fresh.” In it he said there are mouth watering veggies like garden fresh celery, onions, and carrots. Its sauce he said is actually prepared overnight, and can take up to eight hours to get just the right taste, and taste like “nothing he has seen or eaten.” There’s also the Shrimp ‘n’ Sausage (Diablo) in spicy tomato sauce. Using Italian sausage, rich tomato sauce, and spices, this dish has already been dubbed the ‘money maker’ for the establishment. Chef Coakley said: “We also have an eclectic approach to Bahamian food, these Adding a twist to the ordinary include our Rasberry Snapper, the mango barbecue wings, and bench-marked curry dishes. “I travel often, so what I do is select cur ry spices from different parts of the world and I actually blend them with Bahamian flavours, so it’s a different style of curry that cannot be found anywhere in the country.” If their diverse lunch and dinner delights aren’t enough to get your stomach begging for a taste, the eatery also offers freshly baked breads daily. Helping to up the ante of the breads, Chef Coakley said he also adds local fruits that help give the treats a one of a kind signature. Chef Coakley explained: “I have a coconut mango bread, which is very nice and clean flavoured, we also do garlic breads, foccacia bread, and french bread, all baked and sold right here.” This chef said he hopes his approach to food and mixing flavours will add to the already diverse local cuisine. With many Bahamians familiar with the flavours of mangos, oranges, rasberries, and grapes, he said introducing a new twist to the way the fruits are eaten will only help to remind people of why fruits in general are considered a gift from above. AMOUNG a list of homemade breads and pies, Coco’s Caf also serves up an original mango bread. ALREADY creating a buzz, the restaurant which has only been open for two weeks has drawn in hungry patrons from East to West all eager for a taste of one of Coco’s many Italian Bahamian dishes. BAKED Chicken with Fettuccini and homemade garlic bread. 28 -year-old Paul Coakley along with his mother own and operate Coco Palm Caf specialising in Bahamian and Italian dishes.

PAGE 19

C M Y K C M Y K TASTE THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009, PAGE 9C T h e T r i b u n e IT’S just a few short weeks until summer comes to an end so why not make the best of the t ime left, give a little, party a lot, and make this that summer you’ll never forget. 1. This weekend a new beauty q ueen will be crowned in Paradise with the selection of the 2009 Miss Universe during the 58th pageant which takes place Sunday evening at 9pm in theI mperial Ballroom of the AtlantisResort. Tickets for theg ala event are still available. In an attempt to sell the final seats, o rganisiers recently announced special discountsgroup pack ages are now being offered and patrons can get one free ticket for every three tickets purchasedf or the final show. All-access tickets for the v iewing party, which will take place on the Royal Deck are $ 145. VIP tickets for final show, which will be broadcast live on NBC to 150 countries in the world, are $1,000 and include e ntrance to the coronation ball. Tickets for sections 3-7 in the I mperial Ballroom are $750; sec tions 8-11 are $400; sections1 1-13 are $250; sections 14-20 are $175. A ll-access tickets to the coro nation ball, to be held in Atlantis’ Royal Court, are $145. The newly crowned Miss Universe and her court will be presented in a highly dramatic” fashion at the ball. T he finale will be aired lived on NBC and ZNS. T o get a final glimpse of the girls ahead of Sunday’s pageant, be sure to check out the contestants during the motorcade tomorrow from Arawak Cay to C rystal Palace beginning at 5.30pm 2. The Big Give Organisation a n ew local charity is launching one of its first fundraisers called A Haute Summer Night. The event is set to take place this Saturday at the Hub Art Centero n Bay Street. It will highlight an attractive selection of local a rtists along with signature cocktails culminating with a “crazy” mix of reggae, dance hall, pop, hip hop, and techno from one of Nassau’s hottest DJ’s. It’s all going down at 9pm until. The entrance fee is $20. Proceeds will assist the Claridge Primary School. 3. The Bahamas International Film Festival is busy this week, starting with its summer film series. BIFF presents the movie Hush Your Mouth at the Galleria Cinemas at JFK today. This 2007 Drama/Thriller directed by Tom Tyrwhitt, highlights the death of a young man who died for what he believed, however his death is ironically tagged to one of his best friends. The story which takes place in one of London’s least desirable quarters, develops as the dead teen’s family searches for the killer with a major twist. The movie is showing tonight at 8pm at a cost of $5. 4. On Saturday, experience the best that Spanish culture has to offer. BIFF has organised the best in Spanish food, music, wines, and entertainmentshowcasing professional flamenco dancers, and music by Yulee B. Taking place at The Balmoral Club, this Spanish night starts at 7.30 pm with tickets now priced at $75, but get yours early because the prices will go up. 5. The new EA Modeling and talent Agency is having its official launch party at Da Balcony nightclub opposite the British Colonial Hilton this Friday starting at 8pm. The event will show off the agency’s best models both male and female while entertaining patrons with the best in cocktails and music. Priced at $10, the event promis es to be the highlight of the summer. All models, entertainers, socialites, and others are invited to come out and see what the Bahamas really has to offer when it comes to top notch models. things 2 DO By JASON DONALD STARRING: Sharlto Copley, Jason Cope, Nathalie Boltt IN THE summer onslaught of increasingly expensive and vacuous blockbusters, a jaded cinema-going public can be forgiven for wanting to back the dark horse. Anticipation for District 9 has been building steadily despite it being director Neill Blomkamp’s first feature and having a no-star cast – thanks to a fantastic trailer and intelligent online marketing campaign. But while the hype may have helped its first week takings, I can’t help but think the raised expectations may leave many disappointed. The film is set 20 years after a lum bering alien spaceship became stranded over South Africa. The malnourished insect-like refugees onboard (cruelly referred to as “prawns” by an embittered human race) are taken down to Earth literally and figuratively and restricted to a horrendous shanty town area called District 9. But with tensions growing between the local population and their new neighbours, the private company in charge of the area is forced to relocate the aliens to a new camp. The first half of the film takes the form of a fictional documentary with faux news footage and interviews with officials and members of the public. This nicely illustrates how the incredible event of an alien arrival quickly became a depressingly mundane source of violence and misery. District 9 THIS movie still released by Sony Pictures shows, left to right, Sharlto Copley, Mand la Gaduka and Kenneth Nkosi in “District 9.” S o n y P i c t u r e s / A P P h o t o REVIEW MOVIE By ALEX MISSICK DOONGALIK Studios Art Gallery in Marina Village at P ar a dise Island r ecently hosted an enthusiastic crowd of a rt patrons at the official opening of their ‘SAVE THE TURTLES’ Ar t Exhibition sho w casing t he art works of 26 local ar tists concer ned wit h t he plight of t his endanger ed species across the globe and in the Bahamas. Save the TUR TLES art show T he gallery invited artists to present a piece of work that would not only pay homage to this magnificent animal but also promote awareness of the importance of its conservation and protection. Judging by the continuous accolades from the audience that evening, including two of the Miss Universe Contestants, Miss Jamaica and Miss Zimbabwe who v isited earlier in the day, the submis sions certainly surpassed expectations. The proposed ban on the killing of turtles in The Bahamas, scheduled to be passed in April, has still not happened in spite of countless promises to the Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation Group which consists of the Bahamas Humane Society, Advocates for Animal Rights, Animals Require Kindness, TheH umane Society of Grand Bahama, ReEarth, The Bahamas National Trust, Underwater Explorer’s Society Dolphin Experience, Grand Bahama Nature Tours, Earth Care Grand Bahama and The Nature Conservancy. President of the Group, Mrs Kim Aranha said because turtles are a very necessary part of marine life, the entire underwater ecosystem will suffer great ly without it. It is our duty as custodians of this planet to nurture and care for these care t akers of the sea. It is so exciting and heartening to look at this amazing exhib ition with so many remarkable pieces lovingly created by a huge cross section of Bahamian artists, each and every one dedicated to the preservation and protection of the Sea Turtle. Please take away with you the memory of the majesty of these splendid sea creatures and spread the word please help us protect turtles from extinction,” Mrs A ranha said. The Exhibition includes originals by Amos Ferguson, bronze sculptures, paintings, encaustic wax artworks, photographs, ceramics, painting on silk, a coloured pencil drawing, handmade paper art, a turtle necklace, and even edible cookies boldly declaring “Eat Cookies, Not Turtles.” The artists and the gallery have also agreed that tenp er cent of the sales from this show will be donated to the Bahamas Sea Turtles Conservation Group to assist with their educational efforts. The Exhibition will remain on display until Sunday August 30. To learn more about this initiative, visit the Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation’s website at http://saveourseaturtles.com/introduction.htmlo r by telephoning the Gallery at (242 363-1313. GALLERY owners Jackson and Pam Burnside stand amongst some of the many striking works of art. KIM ARANHA (right Turtles Conservation Group making Opening statements. ARTIST Susan Roberts stands next to her beautiful piece.

PAGE 20

THIS is an undated portrait of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. What killed Mozart so suddenly in 1791? A report in Tuesday's Annals of Internal Medicine, a medical journal published in Philadelphia, suggests it might have been something far more common: a strep infection. C M Y K C M Y K ARTS PAGE 10C, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE LOS ANGELES WHY exactly was Chima Simone kicked out? Tuesday's "Big Brother 11" episode promised to address why producers removed the 33-year-old freelance journalist from the CBS reality series, which isolates 13 contestants inside a makeshift two-story house and monitors their every move with dozens of cameras, accord ing to the Associated Press . "You will see why, basically, our back was up against the wall and we had to expel her from the game," show host Julie Chen said Monday on CBS' "The Early Show," which she co-hosts. "You will see her behavior that led up to the expulsion. Then, you can decide." CBS released a statement Saturday that said Simone, from West Hollywood, Calif., was evicted by the producers for violating the rules. The network also said Simone will not be part of the show's seven-person jury, which selects the $500,000 grand prize win ner. Sunday's episode showed how Simone was aggravat ed because her ally, bodybuilder Jessie Godderz, was spontaneously nominated for eviction Thursday because of the "coup d'etat," a power secretly voted on by viewers that was used to overthrow Simone's nominations. Fans have questioned whether Simone was booted or quit. Chatter from the remaining seven houseguests suggest she wanted out of the house. On Fri day, Simone was seen on the show's live Internet video feeds throwing her microphone into the backyard whirlpool spa. "She still didn't have to leave after that. She just didn't want to be here," contestant Natalie Martinez said on Monday's "Big Brother After Dark," an uncensored and unedited live Showtime 2 broadcast of what's happening inside the house each night. Since entering the house last month, Simone has been one of the season's most outspoken houseguests. When she was nominated for eviction during the first week, CBS censored her live last-plea speech, which referred to derogatory terms used by her competitor. Producers have evicted two contestants on previous "Big Brother" editions. Justin Sebik was kicked off the second season when he placed a knife to the throat of a fellow houseguest. Scott Weintraub was removed from the fourth season after throwing fur niture. 'Big Brother 11' to address Chima's expulsion LOS ANGELES THE KINGof Pop will be buried on what would have been his 51st birthday, a spokesman for Michael Jackson’s family said Tuesday, according to the Associated Press . Jackson will be buried at a private ceremony at Forest LawnGlendale on Aug. 29, spokesman Ken Sunshine said in a statement. Guests will be limited to family and close friends, Sunshine said. “The Jackson family once again wishes to express its gratitude to Michael’s fans around the world for their support during these difficult times,” the statement said. Details about the ceremony and the whereabouts of Jackson’s body have been tightly guarded. The announcement came a day after the New York Daily News reported comments by Jackson’s father, Joe Jackson, that his son would be buried on what would have been his birthday. Sunshine said Jackson will be buried on the Holly Terrace at the cemetery’s Great Mausoleum. The cemetery’s Web site describes the mausoleum as featuring replicas of works by Michelangelo. It also features a stained glass recreation of Leonardo da Vinci’s “The Last Supper.” The cemetery is located in the city of Glendale, which is about 8 miles north of downtown Los Angeles. It is a different location from the Hollywood Hills cemetery where Jackson’s family was seen gathering days after his death on June 25. Forest Lawn spokesman Bill Martin said the cemetery does not comment on private funeral services or on steps that might be taken to handle fans who try to show up for the burial. “We’ve handled high-profile services in the past,” Martin said. He said the cemetery is on private property, and measures will be taken to discourage “loitering” on the day of Jackson’s service. Michael Jackson to be buried on his birthday THIS July 7, 2009 file photo shows the Jackson family motorcade arriving at the Forest Lawn Memorial Parks and Mortuaries in Los Angeles, prior to the memorial service for Michael Jackson. More than six weeks after Michael Jackson died, his body has yet to be buried. REVIEW BOOK Rick Bowmer/ AP Photo PHILADELPHIA F or more than two centuries, the m usic of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozar t has endured as has t he speculation about what led to his sudden deat h at age 35 on Dec. 5, 1 7 9 1 . Was the wunderkind composer poisoned by a jealous rival? Did he have an intestinal parasite from anu ndercooked pork chop? Could he have accidentally poisoned himself with mercury used to treat an alleged b out of syphilis? A report in Tuesday’s Annals of Internal Medicine suggests the exalted Austrian composer might haves uccumbed to something far more commonplace: a streptococcal infection possibly strep throat that led to kidney failure. The researchers looked at death records in Vienna during the months surrounding Mozart’s death N ovember and December 1791 and January 1792, and compared causes of death with the previous and fol lowing years. “We saw that at the time of Mozart’s death there was a minor epidemic in deaths involving edema( swelling), which also happened to be the hallmark of Mozart’s final disease,” said Dr. Richard Zegers of the University of Amsterdam, one of the study’s authors. There was a spike in swelling-related deaths among younger men in Vienna at the time of Mozart’s deathc ompared to the other years studied, suggesting a minor epidemic of streptococcal disease, Zegers said. The cause of death recorded in Vienna’s official d eath register was “fever and rash,” though even in Mozart’s time those were recognized to be merely symptoms and not an actual disease. H is surviving letters and creative output suggest that he was feeling well in the months before his death and was not suffering from any chronic ailment. Many accounts note that he fell ill not long before he died suffering from swelling so severe, his sister-in-law recalled three decades later, that the composer was unable to turn in bed. Others who reported to have been witnesses to Mozart’s final days also described swelling, as well as back pain, malaise and rash all symptoms that indicate Mozart may have died of kidney disease brought on by a strep infection. “It’s not definitive, but it’s certainly food for thought,” said Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious dis ease expert at Vanderbilt University Medical Center who was not involved in the study. He said it was not unreasonable to presume that Mozart died from strep complications, based on the information presented, but he pointed out that the authors had scant data to go on. “Serious streptococcal infections were much more common than they are now and, indeed, they had very serious complications,” he said. “This is sure to set off many discussions going forward.” What killed Mozart? Study suggests strep infection AP Drama Writer “BORN ROUND:The Secret History of a Full-Time Eater” (The Penguin Press, 354 pages, $25.95), by Frank Bruni: Obsessive relationships are often the meat and potatoes of autobiography. But for Frank Bruni, meat and potatoes ARE the obsession. Along with a never-ending parade of other goodies, from French haute cuisine in all its flavorsome complexity to more basic foodstuff, such as the elongated, chocolatecoated wafers of a KitKat bar, described in reverential, almost spiritual terms. “My life-defining relationship ... wasn’t with a parent, a s ibling, a teacher, a mate. It w as with my stomach,” he proclaims in “Born Round: The Secret History of a FullTime Eater.” And it’s this contentious relationship that Bruni, for five years the chief restaurant critic for The New York Times, chronicles with startling, intimate directness. It’s a thoughtful tale, unsparing in Bruni’s analysis of himself, but hugely entertaining in his almost “Rocky”-like determination to make things right after countless slip-ups. These struggles are depicted alongside a loving portrait of an Italian-American family (the most affecting part of the book), a family that in many ways served as an enabler for this favorite, fullfigured son to devour everything in sight. There are wonderful snapshots of his mother and his paternal grandmother, both excellent cooks and ardent champions of the philosophy “more is better,” particularly in the kitchen. But then the entire Bruni clan is defined by meals served and consumed. Bruni’s ravenous appetite, of course, had consequences: a constant battle with weight that grew more fierce as he grew older and his seemingly futile attempts to reach what he describes as “the wondrous Xanadu of the willfully emaciated.” Purging. Pills. Spurts of intense exercising, particularly after the openly gay Bruni started dating. Nothing seemed to work for very long. The only thing that remained constant was his appetite as he went from college to a career in journalism and eventually a job at the Times. It was an appetite that was put to an extreme test when Bruni was given the high-stress assignment of covering George W. Bush’s presidential campaign. His weight and waist ballooned, as did his unhappiness. Finally after his Washington stint, Bruni began a serious, consistent exercise program tempered by portion moderation. “Less is more” became his new mantra. Bruni, 44, is a nimble, observant writer. What makes his restaurant reviews so entertaining often a lot more enjoyable than many of the establishments he critiques is a combination of his love of eating coupled with a sharp journalistic eye. Bruni’s enthusiasm for eating borders on adoration, and he knows how to turn readers into true believers when it comes to praising a restaurant. Or warn them when things aren’t up to snuff. Yet “Born Round” is more than just amusing, gossipy anecdotes for serious foodies, although the tidbits Bruni supplies should satisfy them, particularly descriptions of his extensive planning to dine unrecognized. Frank Bruni dissects his food obsession FRANK BRUNI, former New York Times food critic, holds a copy of his book "Born Round" in New York, Friday, Aug. 14, 2009. Yanina Manolova/ AP Photo

PAGE 21

C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune SECTIONB I N S I D E Save the turtles show See page nine WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2009 Adding a twist to the ordinary See page eight By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net THESE days its seems the craft of photography, particularly taking images that captur e r a w emo tion is q uic kl y becoming a t hing of t he past. Pictures words WORTH A THOUSAND With high-tech cameras and photoshopping capabilities making it easier to compensate for what photographers have not been taught, today’s world is filled with overnight photographers with no real training. However one veteran has remained true to his passion, and now 40 years after capturing his first image as a profes sional photographer, Richard Hokemeir has decided to put his work on display. Mr Hokemeir is set to open his newest photo exhibition titled Richard’s Photographic Art Appreciation Weekend at the Poop Deck this Saturday from noon until 8pm. The exhibition will feature more than 500 images taken during his long career and will also include many images from his recent collection. Mr Hokemeir has worked in many fields including the Armed Forces, the media, and has also done missionary work. He explained that he takes a unique approach to art and photography, and has a knack for seeking the beauty beyond what most others see. He said that he has such a love of nature that it is not unusual for him to photograph something like a regular hibiscus ten to 20 times, because “the closer you look at the image, the more likely you are to see the true essence of that picture.” Mr Hokemeir also incorporates the use of specific canvases that help bring out the truest form of the images he cap tures. These include a unique type of paper made from sugarcane, bamboo, Torchon, and cotton all imported from countries around the globe. Mr Hokemeir said three years ago, he came out of retirement after spending less than a year at home. For him, life is about exploring, discovering the uncharted territory, and experiencing something new. “In this exhibition you can expect to see photography in a different way, and different papers from around the world. “We print in 10 colours and not in 4, between the papers, the colours, and the ink, it takes photography into a whole new dimension, and we don’t photoshop.” He said sitting at home made him feel older than he was, and added that he is more excited than ever about starting this new chapter of his life with his exhibition. ALTHOUGH they no longer litter the Long Wharf har bour, this picture is of a Haitian sloop. ANOTHER of Richard Hokemeir’s collection, the perfect island sunset on the beach.