Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
m Lhe Tribune

=USA TODAY.

SOF
SOF

BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com

CLOUDS &
TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009

7 SUN, FSTORM
: CARS FOR SALE,
TT

HIGH
LOW



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

aS

te Sa



OG MSc: Sto
BAHAMAS BIGGEST :

an charged vt wit
Slaying of mother



Claims of friction
between upper
level police
officers denied

Commissioner
hits back
at ‘rumours’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Commissioner of
Police yesterday denied that
there is friction between offi-
cers in the upper level of the

{ 5 force that might be compro-
-year-O In court ss mising its focus on solving

5 crimes.
By NATARIO It is alleged that on |= — are
McKENZIE Friday, August 7, S enw h ae ff
Tribune Staff Dorsette intentionally = pte pence 1-
Reporter caused the death of = cers at t 7 pes see
nmckenzie@ TaGia Soles-Armony = missioner level and above

—

tribunemedia.net

A 25-YEAR-OLD
man, charged in the
brutal slaying of a
mother of two, was
arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday.

Police have charged
Valentino Hanna Dorsette,
alias “Ballistic” of Sesame
Street, with the murder of
Tagia Soles-Armony, 29.
Dorsette appeared before
Deputy Chief Magistrate Car-
olita Bethel in Court 8, Bank
Lane on the charges of murder
and possession of a firearm with
intent to endanger the life of
another.

DEMERS ose On)



and was in possession of
a 9mm pistol with intent
to endanger the life of
her son Zen Armony.

According to reports,
Soles-Armony was shot
outside her mother’s
home in Sea Breeze as
she sat in her car breast
feeding her three-month-old
son.

Injured and with her son in
her arms, TaGia reportedly
tried to escape her attacker,
only to rear-end a parked car
and hit two other parked vehi-
cles nearby before coming to a
stop.

SEE page eight

Trial of MP’s police
officer son resumes

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The trial of Police officer Vaughn Pratt, who is
accused of having sexual intercourse with two minors, resumed
Monday in the Freeport Magistrate’s Court.

Lawyer Murrio Ducille made a no case submission on behalf of
Sergeant Pratt — the son of St Cecilia MP Cynthia Pratt — in
Court 3 before Deputy Chief Magistrate Helen Jones.

Pratt is charged with two counts of having sexual intercourse
with two minors, aged 14 and 15, on May 6, 2007.

The summary trial began in November, 2007. Valeria Pyfrom and

SEE page eight

The Taste

eo] #

Tuesdays!!

BiG

ef @ medium,
45) Glo oli



Vee) |fe Mele) mel mite lope

fe’ fener. col
* dele Lane |

Teenager charged
with manslaughter
over stabbing death

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A 18-YEAR-OLD man was
arraigned in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday on a manslaughter
charge over the stabbing death
of a man in Fox Hill last Thurs-
day night.

Police have charged Bradley
Miller Jr with causing the death
of Marvin Macintosh by means
of unlawful harm. Miller was
arraigned before Deputy Chief
Magistrate Carolita Bethel in
Court 8, Bank Lane yesterday.
Miller’s left eye appeared to be

SEE page eight

‘September a
August 2009



= A

|

| Pl
2PM Fa

I

eran



il

Fused }

i =



ABOVE: Kachi Armony, the husband of murder
victim Tagia Soles-Armony, carries their eldest
son Chelan as he leaves the court room yesterday.

LEFT: Valentino Hanna-Dorsette, 25, arrives at
court yesterday to be charged with murder



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS,

a



IF THE projected path of
Hurricane Bill holds true, the
Bahamas could escape with-
out experiencing even so
much as a rain shower, mete-
orologists said yesterday.

While Hurricane Bill — the
first hurricane of the 2009

Atlantic season — strength-
ened significantly yesterday,
packing 90mph winds, fore-
casters did not expect the
storm to directly impact the
Bahamas.

SEE page eight



GET READY FOR

voy

* Debt consolidation with built-in savings

¢ Lower monthly payments
© Debt reduction



are at odds with one another,
even fighting with each other
over their phones being wire-
tapped, are “spinning on stu-
pidness.”

A police insider with
many years on the force has
alleged that the “top floor”
of the police force has been
“divided” and “overcome by
politics.”

Division grew in recent
months with Deputy Com-
missioner Ellison Greenslade
and Assistant Commission-
er Quinn McCartney becom-
ing upset over the apparent
authorisation of their phones
being wiretapped — a con-
cern reported in a local
tabloid but also repeated by
reliable sources.

The alleged wiretapping
was first raised in the public
domain by PLP Senator
Allyson Maynard Gibson,
who suggested in the Senate
in July that the alleged intru-
sions and apparent “infight-
ing in the force” were less-
ening its capacity to “protect
our streets.”

Mrs Maynard Gibson yes-
terday said that neither the
Minister of National Securi-

SEE page eight

Ministry of
Works staff

stage protest

MINISTRY of Works
employees yesterday staged
a demonstration protesting
what they claim are long over-
due promotions.

Their action marks the sec-
ond time in under five months
that the employees, who do
electrical maintenance work,
have demonstrated to have
their voices heard.

At the end of April this
year, Bahamas Public Service
Union (BPSU) president
John Pinder said he would
work with Works Minister
Neko Grant to discuss criteria

SEE page eight

BACK 76 SCHOOL

With the Fidelity Bank DebtSAVER LOAN

2

Nassau: 356.7764 Freeport: 352.6676/7 Marsh Harbour: 367.3135 FID DELITY

Robin Hood extended banking hours: Mon - Fri 9:30 am - 7pm Sat 9am - 5pm



NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS? LEADING NEWSPAPER

30% ANNIVERSARY





PAGE 2, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009





Colinalmperial.

medical emergencies
don't study economics

.. they don't know the word “recession either.

That's why you need to maintain your insurance coverage
with Colinalmperial even when the economy is weak - to
make sure hard times don't get harder just because you
fall ill or fall down on your luck.

Stay confident. Stay connected.

confidence for life

www.colinaimperial.com

COMMONWE

THE TRIBUNE

Miss Universe contestants

compete for the final 15




THE 84 contestants of the
Miss Universe 2009 pageant
put their best foot forward on
Sunday night for the prelimi-
nary swimsuit and evening
gown competitions.

The preview presentation
held in Atlantis’ Imperial
Ballroom helped the judges
reduce the number of contes-
tants to just 15 finalists.

These lucky few will not be
named until the final show
this on Sunday.

MISS Bahamas Kiara
Sherman (left) walks the
runway in the evening
gown segment of the
2009 Miss Universe Pre-
liminary Competition.

Tim Aylen/AP Photo

MISS UNIVERSE
14 1 E

FOLLOWING the
iM eee CaM ES
the past two weeks,
preparations for the final
show of the 58th annual
Miss Universe 2009
Competition on Sunday
now moves into high
gear for the 84 contes-
tants.

Tomorrow, the beauty
TU CURIS Ty
final media junket where
AMAT case
by reporters from
around the world.

The contestants will
also put their best foot
forward in an on-stage
rehearsal for the big
night which will be
broadcast live on NBC at
BI

UC Cee

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd

ALTH BANK

Announces the opening of its

Prince Charles Drive Branch
August 31, 2009

Introducing

SATURDAY
BEGINNING SEPTEMBER 5, 2009 - IOAM TO 1PM

COMMONWEALTH

LP



fee oe

SyAN 4 ORCC meee eri) etwas (eo



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Newspaper vendor who claime

the police beat him is charged

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A DISABLED Rawson Square news-
paper vendor who alleged he was beaten by
police last Friday was yesterday charged
with disorderly behaviour, resisting arrest
and refusing to give his name when request-
ed to do so by a police officer.

Berthram Thurston, 44, now has to go to
court at 10am on Wednesday, August 26 to
be arraigned on the charges.

Mr Thurston told The Tribune yester-
day that the charges were brought against
him after officers came to his stall yesterday
morning and told him to come to the
Tourism Police Station on Bay Street to
“discuss” the altercation between him and
officers next to his stall last Friday.

Mr Thurston said that when he got to
the station, he was informed that he was
under arrest and was to be charged with the
alleged offences.

Attempts by this newspaper to reach
Sergeant Dwight Smith of the Tourism
Police Station to confirm these reports were
unsuccessful, as he was repeatedly said to
be unavailable.

Another officer refused to comment on
the matter.

The charges come after Mr Thurston
alleged in Saturday’s Tribune that an officer
whom he had previously reported as having
made threats of death against him, parked
a patrol car next to the vendor’s stall on
Rawson Square shortly after 6am on Fri-
day.

. i, y
A i, “4
om | i,
1 hh
h

Maha uRccitelmntice

A
Aa

After allegedly pulling the vendor out
of his car and onto the ground, Mr
Thurston claimed the officer then made
calls to two other officers and the three
proceeded to kick and punch him.

Responding to the allegations that day,
Sgt Smith of the Tourism Station, asserted
that police often have a problem with Mr
Thurston — who needs crutches to walk due
to severe spinal injuries — as he refuses to
park his car elsewhere as he offloads papers
for his stall.

Sgt Smith acknowledged being informed
that officers had told Mr Thurston to move
his car on the morning of the alleged beat-
ing but stated that as far as he was aware



officers “acted in good faith”, leaving the
vendor in peace once he refused to move
the vehicle, but pledging to get a warrant
for his arrest.

However, The Tribune has seen a video
taken by Mr Thurston during the incident
which suggests that he was at the very least
roughly manhandled by officers.

Following the publication of the story
outlining Mr Thurston’s allegations and
Sgt Smith’s response on The Tribune’s web-
site, tribune242.com, readers and customers
of Mr Thurston expressed outrage.

“Vanessa” said: “I know this gentlemen.
He is as he says — quiet. I often observe
his family assisting him with the business. I
sometimes chat with both of them when I
purchase the paper. Now this is pure fool-
ishness.

“Why should he park his vehicle very
far and struggle with the papers to get them
to the stall?

“There is no one there at 6am other than
them and a few people scattered here and
there. It does not take much time for him to
unload and then place the car around the
corner. The police need to discontinue
meddling with people and get on with the
business of solving and preventing crime.”

“Simon” said that if true, the incident is
“outrageous.”

“The police force needs to be overhauled
and officers re-trained. I do understand
their aggression at times because they want
to send a message to the criminals but not
all Bahamians deserve to be treated like
crap,” he said.

Man, juvenile accused
of setting fire to schoo

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A 25-YEAR-OLD man
and a juvenile accused of
intentionally setting a fire at
the St Francis and St Joseph
Catholic Primary School last
Wednesday appeared in
Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

A security guard was sen-
tenced to 18 months in jail
after admitting that he
accepted a number of items
stolen from the school. Dean-
gelo Armbrister, 24, of Infant
View Road and a 16-year-old
of Pitt Road have been
charged with arson. It is
alleged that on August 12,
the two intentionally caused

DEANGELO ARMBRISTER (left) was
ing and stealing; James Thompson (right) was charged with shop



4

i %

charged with arson, shop break-



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

KIRKLAND WOODSIDE, was
charged with receiving.



mour to 18 months in prison.
Armbrister and the 16-
year-old were both granted

St Francis and St Joseph Pri-
mary School to be set on fire.
It was the second time that
the school had been set
ablaze. The first fire took
place just before the school
closed for the summer break.
That blaze also damaged sev-
eral classrooms. The school
accommodates 450 students
ranging from pre-kinder-
garten to grade six.

The accused, who
appeared before Magistrate
Derrence Rolle in Court 5,
Bank Lane, were not
required to enter a plea to
the arson charge.

Armbrister, the 16-year-old
boy, a 17-year-old girl, and
James Thompson, 20, of
Sesame Street were
arraigned together on the
charges of shop-breaking
and stealing. It is alleged that
the accused broke into the St
Francis and St Joseph School
and stole six IBM complete
computer sets, each valued
at $650, a 19-inch Haier tele-

breaking and stealing.

vision valued at $350, a DVD
player valued at $150, two
scanners valued at $230 each,
a computer desk valued at
$300, a Dell laptop valued at
$680 and a $180 vacuum
cleaner. The accused all opt-
ed to have the cases heard in
Magistrate’s Court and plead-
ed not guilty to the charges.

Kirkland Woodside, 23,
and Steven Seymour, 25,
were both arraigned on
receiving charges. Woodside
pleaded not guilty to the
charge, however Seymour
who initially pleaded not
guilty to the charge changed
his plea to guilty. The other
accused were escorted out of
the courtroom as the prose-
cutor presented the court
with the evidence in relation
to Seymour.

According to the prosecu-
tor, Sergeant Godfrey Bren-
nen, police acting on infor-
mation, conducted a search
of Seymour’s residence last

Police expect to bring charges
in connection with jitney crash

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

POLICE expect to “soon” bring charges in connection with
a frightening jitney crash that saw passengers leaping from
the bus’ windows in fear for their lives.

Chief Superintendent Glenn Miller said that police are
“reviewing the matter with the intent to look at possible charges

being brought pretty soon.”

The bus driver, who it had been claimed fled the scene fol-
lowing the July 24 incident, has been questioned and released

pending further inquiries.

One of the questions that is still to be answered is whether the
incident was caused by the jitney losing its brakes, suffering
some other mechanical failure, or if something else was to

blame.

Two people were sent to hospital after the jitney careened out
of control down Cumberland Street at around 8 o’clock on
the Friday morning in question, coming to a stop feet from the
water’s edge outside Senor Frog’s bar and restaurant.

Eyewitnesses reported seeing passengers leap from the win-
dows of the vehicle, apparently in fear that they might have end-

ed up in the harbour.

Yesterday Chief Superintendent Miller, officer in charge of
Central Police station, said that police “got an account” of the
incident from the bus driver and also several passengers.

He said that “in some instances” passenger accounts coin-
cided with that of the driver, while in others, they were “a lit-

tle off.”

week where several of the
items stolen from the school
were found. Seymour is
accused of receiving a 19-inch
television, a central process-
ing unit and a DVD player
all the property of the school.
Seymour told the court that
Armbrister had told him to
hold the items for him. Sey-
mour, who told the court that
he works as a security guard,
said that he simply “wasn’t
thinking,” at the time. Mag-
istrate Rolle sentenced Sey-

bail in the sum of $20,000
with one surety.

Thompson and the 17-
year-old girl were each grant-
ed $7,500 bail with one sure-
ty. Woodside was granted
bail in the sum of $5,000. The
case was adjourned to
November 9.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
ee La a
AO)
Tropical Exterminators
322-2157










q Dredging of Nassau

Harbour underway

THE controversial dredging of Nassau Harbour began yes-
terday morning, Project Manager of Boskalis International
Frans Thomassen told the media yesterday.

The dredging will allow the harbour to accept the world’s
largest cruise ships — the Genesis Class vessels.

The Netherlands-based Boskalis was awarded the $44 million
dredging contract.

Approximately 1.9 million cubic yards of rock is expected to
be dredged from Nassau Harbour during the project while three
mooring dolphins will be constructed at the Prince George
Wharf, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham outlined earlier in the

ear.
: The man-made island of Arawak Cay will be extended by
1,000 feet in length on the western end using the dredged mate-
rial along with steel sheet piles, Mr Ingraham also said.

The dredging is slated for completion in November.

30% OFF
large
Selection
y
Beautiful
Designer
“Cuening
Gowns! !

[

a
a
A, BoB ssa

Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family

Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
* Fax: 326-9953

Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2

Lyford Cay (Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay)
Tel: 362-5235

e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com
www.colesofnassau.com * P.O. Box N-121




9



CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

THE Mier THO eH Resor ATION && CLRASTHO Eves, oa THE kik & Free!
Nasa" Oey PROFESIONAL, CORTE 590s Cappo & UeeoL str Care §rsries

* Carper. Uphokiery, Sine aad Matte Cheating &
Hesiorahien Spectabsi

® Poche Cleaning Sysens nomowes Deep a Hoerey
Soil, Racteria, Creasc,Woiermarks aad aire from
Canpeting & Fominire, renoring them uo like mee
aio fraction of replacment coral.

Carpet, Sofa's, Lowrecats, Chiara, Dining Chas, Cars,
Bours, Groat, Ties, Martie & ‘Soom

* Poran Wool & Sik Caper Cleasing Speciale
* Marble Polshing, Revoniion & Care

* Wood Flour Bewteration

Authorised StoneTech Profeisiogal Contractor

CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS

PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594
OWL WE CAN D0 IT MAT?

leew proc AR EATER 20H He TomenecTyen. coe * wma eRe ong
* pen Sera o_o

UUW LOCAL a oe

PROCHEM SYSTEM tan)

FOR ALL YOUR DECORATING as

“Lowest Prices On The Island”

STORE HOURS:
Monday - Saturday
8:30am - 5:30pm

BILLY’S DREAM
STILL ALIVE

FREE DELIVERY ANY WHERE IN NASSAU AND TO THE MAIL BOAT

¢ E-Z CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE

Donald’s Furniture
And Appliance Centre

SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322-1731 OR 322-3875





PAGE 4, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Shouting shouldn’t trump facts

WHEREVER you stand right now on the
dispute over health care reform, surely you
can agree that we’re not witnessing a dis-
play of the idealized vision of democracy
we were bequeathed by our Founding
Fathers.

Shouting down elected officials trying to
conduct issue-focused forums is not behav-
iour we learned in elementary school civics
lessons. Name-calling and intentional dis-
tortion of facts are antithetical to the debate
that ought to frame public decision-making.

What we are experiencing, in fact, is the
result of what John Sexton, one of America’s
most brilliant educators, described a few
years ago as the decline of civil discourse in
American society.

“We have created a coliseum culture that
reduces discourse to gladiatorial combat,”
Sexton, the New York University president,
wrote in 2005. “Viewpoints are caricatured in
their most absolute form, with moderated,
nuanced, or mixed positions given little or no
voice. Propositions incapable of simple
explanation in catchy, easily labelled phras-
es are ignored.”

This week I sat with Sexton in his office
overlooking Washington Square Park in
Manhattan. Mementos, photographs and
citations from his admirable career sur-
rounded us, but Sexton pointed to the award
he most cherishes, from years ago, recog-
nizing him as the country’s top high school
debate coach.

It may be that Sexton’s notion that victo-
ry should go to those who best marshal facts
is a quaint one, outmoded by media that
appeal viscerally in ways that outstrip mere
words.

There’s ample evidence, even in the news-
room of the Albany (N.Y.) Times Union
where I serve as editor, that truth is hard to
swallow when it conflicts with our own pre-
dispositions.

For example: Two weeks ago, we pub-
lished a Q&A on the health care reform
debate prepared by a senior reporter in our
Washington bureau. It was a helpful primer
that we hoped would be useful as Congress
began its August recess with the health care
issue unresolved.

But about a dozen people called to com-
plain that the article wasn’t true. They didn’t
like its assertion that the pending legisla-
tion does not “mean socialized medicine”
(in fact, it relies on the private insurance
sector) and that it would not “encourage
euthanasia of senior citizens.” Never mind

POG ian ene
:

This
ee Ee

We Can Help You
See the Light!

SDMO Generators

Oe ee RR eR oe wet
Our factory trained techmiclans will facilitate generator installation
be a ee Rss edie] fete es

p
—

that every independent analysis of the leg-
islation supports that reading of the bill.

As we have reported, there is a provision
— likely to disappear now, given the uproar
it has generated — that would authorize
Medicare to cover counselling about end-
of-life care if a patient wishes.

President George H.W. Bush in 1992
signed into law a requirement that hospi-
tals help people with such “advanced direc-
tives” if they didn’t already have them in
place. That didn’t cause a firestorm. Why
now?

Perhaps we were less vulnerable in those
days to what Sexton calls “discourse by slo-
gan.” If so — that is, if we are growing less
capable of dealing with complex issues, and
more susceptible to persuasion that ignores
what is factual — then perhaps we need
more than ever a dose of the very medicine
that led me to John Sexton’s office. I had
sought him out for advice on the effort to
encourage the teaching of news literacy in
classrooms.

It’s not that we need to teach young peo-
ple to read the newspaper. More important
is for citizens to learn how to navigate the
blizzard of information constantly swirling
around us — to critically assess the news
they consume so they can decipher what can
be verified from what is merely asserted.
We need smarter news users.

News literacy can help students distin-
guish between propaganda, advertising, pub-
lic relations and reporting. A literate news
consumer won’t necessarily make a news-
paper editor’s life easier, because there are
plenty of flaws in the product we create, the
result of relying upon human beings to do
the hard work of journalism. But someone
aware of the values and skills underlying
good journalism can better sort valid infor-
mation from the mere mediocre, and truth
from distortion — tasks fundamental to
active citizenship.

Walter Lippmann wrote in 1920: “There
can be no liberty for a community which
lacks the information by which to detect
lies.”

Honest reporting can carry us beyond slo-
gans and reinforce civil discourse. It isn’t
always popular, but its ultimate goal is noth-
ing less than defence of liberty. In that pur-
suit, we’ll gladly put up with some angry
phone calls.

(This article was written by Rex Smith —
c.2009 Albany Times Union).



How can these
actions g0
unchallenged?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

LAST YEAR, I wrote a
detailed account of an inci-
dent which I reported to the
senior immigration officer
at the airport upon my
arrival in Nassau. He
demonstrated to me that he
did not care about white
Americans coming into the
Bahamas illegally to obtain
high paying jobs. His prima-
ry concern was the catching
of Jamaicans and other poor
Caribbean people.

Well how about this one?
On the Cubana flight to
Havana just a week ago,
there was a fellow who was
quite verbose about his
tenure in the Bahamas. He
had no problem lacing his
comments to his fellow
Americans about the
Bahamas with four letter
words which could be heard
by all. He gave the fellow
an education on how he is
able to beat the system in
the Bahamas. This fellow
was almost unbelievable. He

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



stated that he is a property
manager in the Bahamas for
absentee home owners who
regularly send their clients
down to the Bahamas rent-
ing their houses to vacation-
ing Americans most of the
year. Currently, his portfolio
is full. He stated that he has
become an expert in the
field due to the numerous
inquiries he and his group
get from Americans who
buy houses in the Bahamas.
He said that he employs
only Haitians with proper
documentation so he won’t
become afoul of the law,
especially now that there
seems to be a crazy immi-
gration minister in place.

He stated that he had
been in construction in New
York prior to coming to the
Bahamas nine years ago.

It is truly mind-boggling

how these actions are
allowed to go unchallenged.
What would happen if he
were black? I venture that
he would at least be invisible
and not bragging in public
about his exploits and his
ability to get rich in the
Bahamas at the expense of
dumb Bahamians.

Unfortunately, I am not
in a position to point out the
individual as I volunteered
to do in the earlier case. It is
my firm conviction that the
immigration department
should conduct a survey
with regard to these bogus
property managers residing
in the country who are living
the life of Riley whilst pay-
ing no taxes. Surely there
must be legitimate real
estate firms and enterpris-
ing Bahamians with the abil-
ity to sit a house.

“Daybreak foul crow,
Ting a ling a ling.”

GEORGE A CAPRON
Nassau,
August 10, 2009.

66 casuarinas at
Saunder’s Beach

EDITOR, The Tribune.

RECENTLY, I heard of
the Bahamas Million Tree
Organisation — surely an
anomaly, in a country
where plans are currently
in place to destroy 66 ven-
erable trees, which have
been part of the Nassau
scene for longer than I can
remember; and I was born
here many years ago.

A portion of the west-
ern shoreline, specifically
the area near Orange Hill,
has already been re-land-
scaped, to our detriment.
It is mundane and unex-
citing and, what is more,
the new plantings obscure
the sea-view.

Take a drive past Saun-
der's Beach, however!
What a difference!

This public beach, much
closer to town and acces-
sible to all, is Nassau at its
finest and the view, to
which we are all accus-

BACK TO SCHOOL AND
T’INGS TOUGH ?

GET A FREE FRAME

ith the purchase of Lenses

IMPERIAL/@PTICAL

tomed, is unique and spec-
tacular — because of the
wonderful old casuarinas.

Where did the ridicu-
lous idea, to get rid of
these trees, come from?
And, why isn't anyone
speaking out against it?

In fact, it's shocking
that the Minister of
Tourism, and his staff, do
not recognize this asset
and have not spoken out,
loudly and clearly, about
the plant desecration — a
foolish, tragic, almost
criminal and, definitely,
unnecessary act.

Keats wrote “A thing
of beauty is a joy forever.”
How come no-one in the

so-called business of
tourism has enough of a
sense of esthetics to
appreciate the value and
beauty of these 66 trees,
which have lent grace and
splendour to this stretch
of beach for nigh on 100
years, and are now sched-
uled to go under the axe?
There is a modern quo-
tation, which I think is also
a propos, “If it ain't break,
don't fix it!” Please stop
the lunacy. Please leave
our fine, old trees alone.

Barbara
Ovsianico-Koulikowsky
Nassau,

August 1, 2009

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

SLO FO eT te. ELE

xerox @) COPY CENTER
DELIVERS

BUSINESS HOURS:

Monday - Friday
8:20am - 5:00pm

AASSAL:
Collins Ave. & 7th Terrace

Co. (Nassau) Ltd
IMPERIAL OPTICAL

CALL 322-2089 |; ROSETTA STREET AND
OR 393-5959 :: THE MALLAT-MARATHON

@R)

FOR MORE INFO::

= Bobcat
Bt hamas

Vervaiiie © Productivity © Belivblilty

ONLY ON XEROX MACHINES AT
Bahamas Business Solutions Ltd,

‘Criveford St. Chik Feld
Tel: 333-5171 Faas a32-696%

SALE APPLIES TO SELECTED FRAMES. SALE ENDS AUGUST 31, 2009.





THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009, PAGE 5



Man fights for
life after being
shot over $10

A MAN is in hospital
fighting for his life after
being shot over $10.

The victim, a 21-year-old
resident of Poinciana

Avenue, was walking in the :

area of Ragged Island
Street around 11pm on
Sunday when he was
approached by two men in
a small white car, police
reported.

One of the men in the
car asked the 21 year old
for money before shooting
him in the stomach and
right leg. The robbers got
away with $10. The victim
was taken to hospital
where he is in serious con-
dition and an intensive
investigation into the inci-
dent has been launched.

DRUGS

Police are also investi-
gating the discovery of
$44,000 worth of marijuana
found in the possession of
two m/v Sea Link passen-
gers.

Acting on information
received just after 2pm on
Sunday, officers of the
Drug Enforcement Unit
(DEV) spotted two men
fitting given descriptions at
Potter’s Cay Dock.

The suspects had just
arrived on the m/v Sea
Link from Andros.

They had two boxes that
were searched and found

to contain 44lbs of marijua-

na. The 24 year old and 28
year old, residents of Fresh

Creek and Small Hope Bay

respectively, were arrested
and are in police custody.

FIREARM

Police also have in their
custody three men who are
being questioned in con-
nection with the seizure of
an illegal firearm and
ammunition.

Fox Hill Police Station
officers were patrolling the
Springfield Road area just
before 11pm on Sunday
when they stopped a dark
Nissan Sentra with three
male occupants. The vehi-
cle was being “driven reck-
lessly,” police said.

A search of the vehicle
was carried out and police
found a 20 gauge semi-
automatic shotgun with
two shotgun shells. The
occupants of the car, a 23-
year-old Malcolm Road
man, a 19-year-old Dignity
Gardens man and an Eliza-
beth Estates juvenile, were
taken into custody.

CORRECTION

In an article printed on
August 17 entitled ‘Four
Hour Power Cut In New
Providence’, it was reported
that officials at BEC failed
to issue a public notice to
explain the reason for the
power outage over the
weekend.

However, a notice was e-
mailed to the newsroom at
9.30pm on Friday.

ALL LocATIons

IMARATHON MALL, TOWN CENTER MALL,

ALL SALES FINAL

No refund. Na exchange. No return

PLP slams Britain over
Turks and Caicos move

THE PLP yesterday severe-
ly criticised Britain’s decision
to suspend the democratic
organs of the government of
the Turks and Caicos Islands,
calling the move “deeply dis-
appointing.”

Through its foreign affairs
spokesperson, Fox Hill MP
Fred Mitchell, the party said it
is especially disturbed that the
right to trial by jury is also
suspended.

“The position of our party
is that the British ought to
have found another way to
deal with the issues of alleged
corruption in the Turks and
Caicos. This position is well
within the public policy on
this matter by CARICOM, of
which we the Bahamas are a
member,” Mr Mitchell said.

On Saturday, Britain offi-
cially suspended the govern-
ment of the Turks and Caicos
Islands, imposing direct rule
following allegations of “sys-
tematic corruption and/or
serious dishonesty” in the
country.

This is the second time in
23 years that the British have
used the same method to
solve issues relating to gover-
nance in the Turks and Caicos
Islands.

Mr Mitchell said that this
says something about the lack
of effectiveness of the meth-



“The position of our party is
that the British ought to have
found another way to deal with
the issues of alleged corruption
in the Turks and Caicos.”



Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell

ods employed by the British
and a failure of their admin-
istration of the territory.

“We reiterate that Britain
as the colonial power in the
Turks and Caicos Islands has
the responsibility not only for
the economic development
and well-being of the territo-
ry, but also its political devel-
opment.

Failure

“The need to impose direct
rule and suspend the elected
government of the Turks and
Caicos Islands speaks not only
to the failure of the internal
mechanisms of governance
but also to failures on the part
of the colonial power,” he
said.

Mr Mitchell said that
Britain as the colonial power

cannot by this action absolve
itself of the responsibility for
the corruption that they allege
took place.

Further, the Fox Hill MP
said that examples of other
public policy instruments
available to deal effectively
with this matter are there for
all to see.

“Even in Britain itself
which recently saw a crisis in
governance as a result of cor-
ruption it did not result in the
suspension of their democra-
cy, but rather a realignment of
the institutions to reflect the
demands of the public for
openness, transparency and
accountability,” he said.

Mr Mitchell said the PLP
is reiterating its call for an all-
party conference in the Turks
and Caicos Islands to ensure
that this suspension of the

organs of democracy in that

National Youth Council speaks
out over student loan suspension

THE suspension of its guaranteed loan pro-
gramme has shown that education is not a pri-
ority for the government, the Bahamas Nation-
al Youth Council (BNYC) said.

The BNYC yesterday called for a systematic
plan for the reinstatement of Education Guar-
anteed Loan Programme.

“In the face of today’s gloomy economy,
increasing investments in the human capital,
especially through education, should be a pri-
ority for countries seeking to increase both
economic growth and human welfare.

“The Bahamas must recognise that invest-
ment in the human capital recognises that
human beings are as important, if not more
important, than physical capital such as build-
ings or roads in creating wealth and generating
successful economy,” the BNYC said in a state-
ment.

The youth council said that at this point
political finger-pointing will simply not do,
“nationally, we must focus on development
not grandstanding.”

The BNYC particularly expressed concern
about how many great minds are being lost
because of the country’s failed education
accounting system.

“We must ensure the best education for
our young people. However, this will not hap-
pen if we undermine education as a priority by
cutting funding for schools, classrooms, and
students.

“Are we a part of a Bahamian nightmare
where gone are the days when middle income
families could dream of sending their children

a5?

to schools of higher learning? Where gone are
the dreams of struggling lower class workers
who once thought they could afford to give
their children a brighter future than they ever
had?

“Where only children of wealthy parents
can afford to attend college,” the BNYC said.

The tragedy is, the youth council said, that
some of the Bahamas’ brightest minds are get-
ting left behind. The organisation accused the
Ministry of Education of leaving 300 students
hanging with college tuition costs that are
beyond the reach of most families.

“If we do not give greater emphasis to edu-
cation as a priority in the current environment
we will be forced to tackle equally serious and
no less urgent development challenges —
reduce prospects for economic growth as a
result of more young people sliding through
the cracks, and turning to lives of crime and
self-destruction,” the BNYC said.

“We challenge our leaders and guardians to
ensure the right to higher educational oppor-
tunity for the Bahamas’ most vulnerable pop-
ulation — the nation’s young people. This is
the challenge before us today. The Education
Guaranteed Loan Programme’s $100 million
fund has been depleted as a result of gross
delinquency of managers and recipients.

“Our contemporaries must bear their share
of responsibility. We can scarce afford to con-
tinue this way with loan recipients not replen-
ishing the funds that afforded them an educa-
tion and shrink the education dollar for other
young people.”



country are for a limited peri-
od of time and less than the
two years envisaged.

It should also be ensured
that democracy is restored to
legitimately elected represen-
tatives of the people of the
Turks and Caicos Islands, he
said.

“Trial by jury must be
restored. The people of the
Turks and Caicos Islands are
part of the world community
and as such are entitled to the
same standards of democra-
cy, transparency and account-
ability in public life.”

ied lB
ss

eA IE
PHONE: 322-2157



el int HH
POT

LOCAL fishermen
were puzzled when they
were unable to identify
an unusual fish caught

at a depth of 1,500 feet
behind Paradise Island.

Its strange appear-
ance prompted fishing
partners Lee Chong
and Venelasco Newball
to forward photos of
the fish to the Universi-
ty of Miami, in the hope
that experts there might
be able to put a name
to the unusual speci-
men.

The five feet long,
slender fish has an
unusual head and razor
sharp teeth that extend
from its mouth into its
stomach.

On the same day they
made this catch, the
fishing duo landed a 70-
pound Warsaw grouper.



EEO




4" 51,39
Cesspit - 00

328-8754

Bntish Colonial Hilton Hixtel
Marlborough St, Shop #1

Clearance SALE
Everything Must Go
Everything for $20
Free parking at the Hilton

We offer Stringing Services, Repairs, Knotting,
Wiring, Driling and Tha Snack Fix System and
The Mystery Clasps

Pearls and Bread Strands Wholesale and Retail
O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Teal: 242-323-1865

Email; gems-pearsi@hotmail,com

vas making clases starts
=i

Sep



amber sign up now

The Poop Deck

- East Bay Street -

We look forward to once again serving you,
our valued customers.

ROSETTA STREET, EAST STREET SOUTH)

SHOE

Nassau Yacht Haven - East Bay Street

For reservations call:

(242) 393-8175

Exiudes NET items

OoEPort

* of equal or less value.





PAGE 6, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009

Upcoming census aims to

determine crime trends



By LINDSAY THOMPSON

DETERMINING crime
trends is one of the new aims of
the upcoming census of popu-
lation and housing.

The Census Office of the
Department of Statistics will
conduct a pre-census test from
August 17 to August 30 on
New Providence and Grand
Bahama.

The exercise is an integral
part of the census of popula-
tion and housing, which offi-
cially takes place in May 2010.

And in order to effectively
administer the census ques-
tionnaire to the public, the
Department has trained six new
enumerators.

They are Christopher Hamil-
ton, Valeska Johnson, Rosalie
Darling-McKenzie, Renbert
Mortimer, Roy Smith and Keva
Storr.

They were sworn in and
administered the oath of secre-
cy by Rev Terrance Morrison in
a ceremony at the Department
of Statistics on August 14.

The main focus of the exer-
cise is to test the questionnaire

Kris Ingraham/BIS



THE DEPARTMENT of Statistics conducts a census pre-test beginning
August 17 in New Providence and Grand Bahama. Pictured from left are
Christopher Hamilton, Valeska Johnson, Rosalie Darling-McKenzie, Ren-
bert Mortimer, Roy Smith and Keva Storr. And from right are Kim Saun-
ders, census office trainer; Susan Black, and Coralee Mackey, chief cen-

sus officer.

for Census 2010 in terms of rel-
evancy as it relates to the ques-
tions, average length of time it
takes to complete the ques-
tionnaire, and weaknesses in
the questions, instructions or
the design of the questionnaire,
among other things, Kim Saun-

ders, census office trainer, said.

Enumerators with official
identification will visit house-
holds in New Providence and
Grand Bahama in order to col-
lect information on households
and individuals, she said.

The census pre-test requires

that the public provide infor-
mation on housing character-
istics such as type of dwelling,
year it was built, source of util-
ities; and population charac-
teristics, which include infor-
mation on age, sex, marital sta-
tus, health, education, and
income.

“The data generated from
the pre-test will be held in
strictest confidence," said Ms
Saunders. "All persons are
urged to cooperate in this very
important national exercise."

A population census is con-
ducted every 10 years. The last
was in 2000 at a cost of $3 mil-
lion. An estimated $5 million
has been earmarked for Cen-
sus 2010. The Bahamas popu-
lation is said to be about
350,000.

A new component to the
questionnaire is a section on
crime, to determine trends and
possible solutions to the prob-
lem, Ms Saunders said.

When the pre-test is com-
pleted, the Department of Sta-
tistics will determine how to
better fashion the question-
naire.

THE TRIBUNE

FNM observes 17th anniversary
of the 1992 first election victory

SENATOR Johnley Fer-
guson, FNM chairman, has
called on party members and
supporters to come together
tomorrow to celebrate and
commemorate the party’s
first general election victo-
ry— August 19, 1992.

Seventeen years ago, after
the FNM had unsuccessfully
contested a total of four gen-
eral elections since the par-
ty’s establishment in 1972,
the party, under leader
Hubert Alexander Ingraham,
finally achieved a crushing
victory over the Progressive
Liberal Party.

Before that the PLP, under
the leadership of the late Sir
Lynden Pindling, had won six
consecutive elections and had
been the government of The
Bahamas for almost 26 years.

Tomorrow, following tra-
dition over the past 17 years,
in New Providence the party
will observe the anniversary
at a special religious service
at the First Holiness Church
of God in Bamboo Town,
where the pastor is Bishop
Edward Missick.

The sermon will be
preached by Overseer Bish-
op Gregory Minnis, senior
pastor at New Jerusalem
Kingdom Ministries Interna-
tional, and the service will

begin at 7.30pm.

The service will be attend-
ed by the party’s leadership,
cabinet ministers, parlia-
mentarians, Party Officers,
Meritorious Council Mem-
bers, Central Council mem-
bers, officers and members
of the FNM Women’s Asso-
ciation and The Torchbear-
ers Association, and other
party members and support-
ers.

“Each year since 1992,
whether the party was in gov-
ernment or in opposition,
members of the Free Nation-
al Movement family have
gathered for praise and wor-
ship to mark the anniversary
of that great day of deliver-
ance,” said Senator Fergu-
son.

“We do so as an outward
declaration and indication
that we in the FNM continue
to believe in the intercession
of Almighty God, that it was
He who interceded in the
national affairs of The
Bahamas in August 1992
when he caused the hearts of
the Bahamian people to turn
to the FNM for deliverance.”

This Wednesday, FNM
Constituency Associations in
all the Family Islands will
similarly be observing the
anniversary.





PROSPECTUS

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2028, 2029, 2030, 2031, 2032, 2033, 3034, 3035, AND 3036
ISSUE OF B$150,000, 000.00

Issued under The Bahamas Registered Stock Act, and authorized by Resolutions of the House of Assembly, 17th PiC OdECeBcCBP dp P£C odecdBhCALPf dp PEC MAfAcAD __ = ;
MAfAcAD eCOEDPCeCN DPdos HiaG HiHVRG HiviG HiuSG HiuHG HiuuG HiuTG HiuIR/

June, 2009.

Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 19th August, 2009 and will
close at 3:00pm on 25th August, 2009. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 26th August, 2009 and will cease at

3:00p.m. on 27th August, 2009.

If the total subscriptions exceed the sum of B$150,000,000.00 (Nominal) partial allotment will be made to

subscribers, and a proportionate refund will be made as soon as possible after allotment.

amounts so refunded.

The date of this Prospectus is . 2009

No interest will be paid on

IHP uPtvSIG G



iru2riiaDayA2bkR2reAp
yhhAaDylare eN
yAArloRel eN5



gylR

BON IHP DPcIG ) dcm Ns IHPdH/S

h52r52dN.2e4
eSSw3dH/S

kvG

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas invites applications for Bahamas Registered Stock

totalling B$150,000,000.00. The Stock will be available in a range of maturity dates; the earliest being repayable in

2028 and the latest in 2033. The total amount of Stock offered, the rate of interest and the issue price are given below :-

Rate of Interest

Name of Stock

Issue Price
Amount BS
B$

a60P HPGP$n ff)n sNG IHP sN))N(vet /Nwel NE/ S uPtvSIPGPC kINBm

acSPGI $P)N( THP /Nwel ff)vPC2sNG
ve2bevIS2Ns2d7:88

222:692222y$NxP2hGv/P2u IPd H/S uPtvSIPGPC2kINBm2;8;2 MtR

2269222y$NxP2hGw/P2u IP
26;92222y$NxP2hGw/P2u IP
::69 y$NxP hGv/P u IP

2226:922y$NxP2hGw/P2u IP

dH/S uPtvSIPGPC2kINBm2;8;2 MtR
dH/S uPtvSIPGPC2kINBm2;882 MtR

dH/S uPtvSIPGPC2kINBm2;8:2 MtR

dH/S uPtvSIPGPC2kINBm2;8;2 MtR

PT 150,000,000.00T

:69222y$NxP2hGv/P2u IP dH/S uPtvSIPGPC2kINBm2;82 MtR

26;92222y$NxP2hGv/P2u IP dH/S uPtvSIPGPC2kINBm2;82 MtR
:69222y$NxP2hGv/P2u IP dH/S uPtvSIPGPC2kINBm2;82 MtR
222:692222y$NxP2hGv/P2u IPd H/S uPtvSIPGPC2kINBm2;82 MtR

The Stock shall be repaid on 27th August, in the year appearing in the name of the Stock. cC weCPGI mP IN BBPfl cn )PSS /Nwel (HvBH $8 ))NIIPC IN /P6wS5

a60P PcB)NSP d7 ve fn/PcI sNG IHP kKINBm ff8dMG52

INTEREST
ac IHP PxPcI Ns IHP sw)) /NweI Ns kINBm%S1 ff)vPC sNG $NxP vS6 GP cNI ))NIIPC IN
The Stock will bear interest from 27th August, 2009, at the rate shown against the name of the Stock as the percent /P6wS3 a6(P GPFwPSI IH I IHP Sw/ GPsweC $)P ENMPGi)vPC sNG IHP sN))N(vet kINBm
per annum over the Prime Rate (i.e. the prime commercial interest rate from time to time fixed by the Clearing banks
carrying on business in the Island of New Providence in The Bahamas. If there shall be any difference between them,
then that which is fixed by Royal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half-yearly commencing on 27th February,

2010 and thereafter on 27th August and 27th February in every year until the Stock is repaid.

9 dH/S uPtvSIPGPC kINBm d?7

hypoRelk ae RzDRkk ri d783888588 erDP dR oygR ,ay uRyAlaoR Turkk kRIIARoRel
kpklRo %ulTk1 JurbTJ yAA DrooRuDayA dye-k RzDRhl iaeDr5

hypoRelk ri d783888588 ru ARkk Dye dR oygR ,ay uRyA laoR Turkk kRIIARoRel

kpklRo ru dp dye- guyil hypydAR Ir JR DReluyA dye - ri IIR dyJyoyk
hypoRelk ri d73888588 ru ARkk Dye dR oygR ,ay uRyA laoR Turkk kRIIARoRel

kpklRo3 dp dye- guyil hypydAR Ir JR DReluyA dye- r ilJR dyJyoyk ru dp
DykJ

CHARGE UPON CONSOLIDATED FUND
The principal monies and interest represented by the Stock are charged upon and payable out of the Consolidated
Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

TKrrLFoFpUAiC rif.aTafpT

aGGID NE THNMXif TudBl xTmm f TttvfN n uif SfRTtuhbh kif efcuhbm obcl dg kif obib)bt-0 yDDmTBbuTdet xT)
f hfBfTwfN/ n kif obclTcR rfDbhu)feu fRTccTcR bu 72/b) de/3ui/yvRvtu$ 522/ocN/ Wu _MNG
H 482200$ Nec 35Ht AIhIGH1 3226mmdBbuTdet xTmm Bd))fcBf bu 72/b0)0 de/5;ui/yvRvtu$ 522
bceN/xTmm Bfbtf bu 722D0)0 de/Sui/yvRvtu$ 5220 ymm fewfmdDft fcBmdtTcR bDDmTBbuTdet
mb fmmfN 6yDDmTBbuTde Gdh obib)bt Hdwfhe)fcu S(RTtufhfN TudBlt:0

1. (One Person)
Ordinary Signature

Name in Full (BLOCK LETTERS, state whether Mr., Mrs., or Miss and titles if any.)

KcuHG kif ludBl xTmm f Tc/vcTut dg 013220220

AOQOuM,HuNcG yDDmTBbuTdct vtu f gdh 01322022/dh b )vmuTMibfidty)0/
Address (Corporations etc. should give Registered Addresses )

AOO uM.HuNcORNS$GmTBbuTdct gdh uif IudBl tidvmN/ f )bNf ud/fBuhbh de uif gdh) buubBifN ud uif
FhdtDfBuvt bcN )bn f dubTcfN ghd) uif SfRTtuhbh dggTBft Tc pbttbv bcN GhffDdhu$ kif khfbts
rfDbhu)fcu ,zbhm dhdvRi/ Iuhffu 4 pbwn ATdc/ SdbN$_ pttbv-§ bDDmTBbuTdct )bn bmtd
NdxcmdbNfN/ ghd) uif efcuhbm obcl dg uif obib)bt xf tTuf buxxx0Bfcuhbm bel bib)btOBd) dh
ben dg uif gdmmdxTcR belt

P.O. Box





30/ obel/dg/kif/obib)bt/JcufhcbuTdcbm

50/ GThtu/ebhT fbe/JcufhcbuTdcbm/obcl/,obib)bAT)TufN

TOI GTcbcBf/edhDdhbuTdc/dg/obib )bt/AT)TufN

80 ed))dexfbmui obcl AT)TufN

90 Sdnbm/obcl/Pg/ebcbNb

30/ IBduTb bel/,obib)bt-/AT)TufN

0 GTNfmTun obel ,obib)bt- AT)TufN ,gdh)bmmn ohTWHT Bbc obcl,37-/AT)TufN-
0 eTuT bel$ pOy0

Telephone Nos._(H) (W)

2. (Where two or more persons apply as joint subscribers, the additional names and addresses should
be given below.)

Ordinary Signatures
rKdLae PFdU

Names in Full
FhdwTtTdcbm ftuT)buft ghd) uif vcbvNTufN bBBdveutiycf 72$ 522/tidx uif Fv mTB rf u dg kif obib )btud f ener

017$958$538$2220,/
And/OR
SLFipoFpU iF. FpKF ApP FBrFpPaUKiF

kif gdmmdxTcR Tegdh)buTde Tt f(uhbBufN ghd) uviNEbfN/bB Bdvcut dg uif Hdwfhe)fcu dg kif ed))dcexfbmui/dg
kif obib)bt0

Address,



GC522;%522D../ GC522%522D../ GC522%522D../

HHHHIo1 ol ol
yDDhdwfN/ovNRfu yDDhdwfN/ovNRfu

3$858$32$222/ 3$9;$75$222/

Telephone Nos.(H)



Sfwfevf 3$77$35$222/ I/We hereby request semi annual interest to be paid to:

SfB vhhfcu/s(DfcNTuvhf/,f(BmvNTcR

SfDbn)fcu dg Fv mTB rf u- 3$59$;5$222/ 3$788$25$222/ 3$88$392$222/ Bank Name.

ebDTubm rfwfmdD)fcu Bank Branch,

s(DfcNTuvhf ,f(BmvNTcR mdbct

BdcuhT vuTdct bcN/bNwhbcBft

ud/Dv mTB BdhDdhbuTdct- 33;$559$222/ 3;$$222/ 3$3$222/ Account Number
FhdwTtTdcbm ftuT)buft ghd) uif vcbyNTufN bRBw)

JHikiffFv mTBrf u/b)dveu/TVT cBmvtT wf/dg/kiffimTB edhDdhbuTdct BdcuTcRfcu mTb TmTun si¥@i72422/

udubmmfN/o1882$237$2220











THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009, PAGE 7



Online readers have their

say on marital rape law

ON www.tribune242.com, we
asked our readers if they think
the proposed legislation out-
lawing marital rape should be
passed. Of the 150 persons who
responded, 61 voted no and 89
yes. Here are some of the com-
ments left by those participat-
ing in the poll:

KHALILA:

This is such a frustrating and
unbelievably stupid debate. I
cannot even believe in the 21st
century, with all the strides
towards progress this country
has made and all the female
empowerment, we are even
TALKING about it.

I would like to pose a ques-
tion to all those archaic, sexist
people who oppose it — what if it
were your daughter? Your
mother? Your sister? Your
friend? Your aunt? And she had
absolutely no recourse under
the law to have her husband
punished for the heinous crime
of abusing her body, for treating
her like an object. Certainly, she
could leave him, but as for his
punishment? Should he not be
held accountable for his
demeaning actions?

Of course there will be abus-
es, as there are with any law.
But whether or not there are or
will be should not determine
whether we pass the amend-
ment. The only question that
matters is — is it right that a man
have irrefutable rights to a wom-
an's body when she says ‘I do’?

Iam APPALLED that this
is even being discussed and even
more disgusted by the women
who oppose it. Hello ladies, if
you rape your husband (how-
ever impossible that may seem)
under the current law, he can
persecute you. WHY WOULD
YOU NOT WANT EQUAL
RIGHTS? And maybe the law
doesn't even pertain to you and
never will, I hope it doesn't, but
what about those women who
it does apply to? Who repeat-
edly get raped by their hus-
bands? Stop being so narrow-
minded and selfish!

BERNARD FERGUSON:

The rights of a woman should
be respected, this is not the
troglodyte era, women have
enough emotional stress, and do
not need the added frustration

of an uncaring unemotional hus-
band. Further, who elected min-
isters to govern our country?

OPUS31-FH:

Here’s a question to those
who pose that this law supports
women in the Bahamas, who
apparently do not have all the
rights they need to confront rape
under our current archaic laws:
What evidence can a man pro-
duce to prove that in a case
when he did not wish to have
sex with his wife, she coerced
him against his wishes? If rape is
sexual activity without the con-
sent of one party, how does a
husband prove that in court,
particularly if there are no bruis-
es?

CONCHY JOE:

If a woman is forced to have
sex by her husband she can
divorce him. If he beats her she
can report him for the abuse.
Why would a woman stay in a
relationship with a "husband"
who does such things? GET A
DIVORCE! If she reports him
for rape then the marriage is
over anyway. Believe me, there
will be abuse of this law! Eg -A
man and his wife of several
years are having financial prob-
lems.

The man continues to have
sexual urges for his wife but she
refuses has advances. This con-
tinues until the man gives into
temptation and has sex outside
the marriage. When the wife dis-
covers his affair she decides to
fix him good (Hell hath no fury
like a woman scorned). She has
sex with him then promptly goes
to the police to report him for
rape.

A medical examination
reveals he had sex with her so
off to court they go. Once in
court, it is his word against hers!
When the details come out
about his infidelity the court will
most likely side with her and
homeboy spends the rest of his
days in Fox Hell prison, while
the wife enjoys all the man
owns.

Shoot, a woman could have
an affair with a sweetheart, have
sex with her husband then
report his behind for rape to get
his backside locked up. Tell me,
just how does a man prove that
the sex he had with his wife was
consensual? This thing has the

potential of creating more prob-
lems than it solves. In the final
analysis, it will be his word
against her’s.

The marriage will end. And
the lawyers will have lots more
income to collect. While the
courts will be further burdened
with more cases they can't get
to. [say no, no a thousand times
NO!

MARRIED LADY:

If a man has to rape his wife,
then something is wrong in the
marriage all together. I voted
no because I am a married
woman and if there comes a
time that my husband would
have to force me to sleep with
him I would not call that rape. I
think that this type of act within
a marriage should be worked
out with a marriage counsellor,
not court, to see why this has
happened.

Passing a law like this would
be stupid and inhumane. Find
another solution, not jail time.
Lastly there are thousands of
women out there that are raped
by strangers everyday and get
away with it. First of all, put
more emphasis on these cases
and find these attackers first
before targeting married cou-
ples that have a past and future
together. Allow them to seek
counselling first and then move
forward if there is reason to.

CRAIG NIXON:

There should never be laws
that uphold or condone abuse
toward anyone ... the act of rape
not only suggests intercourse but
also suggests some form of force
or violence toward another ...
When a marriage has deterio-
rated toward the point of this
form of violence, then its time to
seek counselling and possibly
separation.

E ALBURY:

Surely people can understand
that this law is to protect
women. If a marriage is at the
point that a man has to violent-
ly have sex with his wife, then
the marriage is far beyond the
point of love. I cannot under-
stand anyone in position in a
church thinking that this was
God's plan for a woman. The
Bible says that a husband should
lay down his life for her, clearly

not what his intention is if he
rapes her.

RAM66:

Legally there is no such ani-
mal as "marital rape" however
we know that rape, being
defined as (my definition) sexu-
al intercourse without consent,
occurs in marriage. I feel that
the law should be modified to
have these cases tried, as Sena-
tor Gibson has suggested, in a
family court and that "marital
rape" should be defined as "the
act of sexual intercourse (pene-
tration) without consent
between a married man and
woman".

DARINIQUE:

I voted no because I feel as if
the charge for "rape" within a
marriage should be called anoth-
er name and addressed in anoth-
er way. To me, it opens the door
of making marriage just a com-
modity and on the same page
as a civil union. I believe rape is
wrong, whether it happens to a
single person or within a mar-
riage. However, by changing
such a law, you are setting the
pathway for destruction of the
home and society. More divorce,
more broken homes, and less
family life. Government should
consider exactly why they are
making these amendments; to
please the United Nations, or
for the goodwill of the people

SCRIBE:

This debate really isn't about
a man's rights to force his wife to
have sex, but about what's
becoming more and more clear
— the fact that Bahamian women
are second class citizens in their
own country. As for the argu-
ment that such a law would
enable women to falsely accuse
their husbands of rape out of
spite, well the same could hap-
pen regardless of marital status,
so are these people saying we
should do away with rape laws
altogether? It's times like this
that I really fear for our coun-
try's future.

The new www.tribune242.com
poll question is: Which Minis-
ter would you most like to see
shuffled out of Cabinet? Please
log on and join the debate!



git

Ne ee

SI a ae! TS

The Tribune

Cabinet set
for shuffle?

RCNA I

THE OTHER
HALF IS

5% off

New Arrivals

Harbour Bay

+ Extra 15% Off

For Teachers & School staff

On New Arrivals

VISIT US ON THEWEB @ aebahamas.com







THE VIEWING PARTY =— goatee
= | PSs:

THE 2009 MISS UNIVERSE PAGEANT Sees ES LHE! :
Sunday, August 23rd, 8:00pm a OSes: :

4%") The Royal Deck, Atlantis, Paradise Island ~ | Sek! :
£ — Seer F
Witness the crowning of the 2009 Miss Universe on : | = =e = :
giant multiple screens. Enjoy an open bar and a sumptuous — =

alfresco buffet. This royal fete will culminate with the
prestigious Coronation Ball at 11:30pm where you can
mingle with the newly crowned Miss Universe and her fellow
contestants! Celebrate an experience that will never happen again!

Tickets: $185

Miss Universe Pageant Event Schedule:

MISS UNIVERSE FINAL SHOW
Sunday, August 23rd, 9:00pm

Imperial Ballroom, Atlantis, Paradise Island

Buy 3
Tickets, get
1 free!

Be there live to witness the crowning of the
new 2009 Miss Universe!

Tickets: General $175, Deluxe $250, Preferred $400, Gold $750
VIP $1000 (includes admission to Coronation Ball with open bar and gourmet buffet)

aes

CORONATION BALL LOPRQDILA

Sunday, August 23rd, 11:30pm
The Royal Deck, Atlantis, Paradise Island

Gel calc MUMIA NALA SOM ORIN lit)
and her fellow contestants and enjoy
great music, a gourmet buffet and

an open bar!

Tickets: $145
NEW COROLLA. WEM STYLE
{ BRAKE CONTAOL, oo

ee a

Te eth
For tickets and information call ;

the Atlantis Box Office at 363-6601

AAALALSES
ee ee i a te] ee

FEEPORPAMCE, COMPORT ARD GQUALITE.

EXECUTIVE Auto Mall, Shirley Street copp. St. Matthew's Church]
b , (4 | Open Mon to Fri Sam - 3:30pm =
MOTORS LTD | 5. 39721760" Cy
Tel; 397-1700 ee?

E-mail: execmotonabate! net. bs ae

AUTHORISED TOVOTA DEALER | Parts and service guarantecd —s

Aalladle ie Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales [Freeport ® Queene Hiv 392-6120 « Anais Wiotor Mad, Don Mackay Bid 367-2018





PAGE 8, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

At the moment, Hurricane
Bill is projected to pass the
islands on the northeast on Fri-
day and Saturday, heading
directly for Bermuda.

Chief meteorology officer
Basil Dean told The Tribune
that we may even be so fortu-
nate as not to get any of the rain
the storm is carrying.

However, he warned that
while it definitely looks like the
Bahamas will make a lucky
escape, weather systems are
subject to change and forecast-
ers continue to monitor Hurri-
cane Bill closely.

At press time last night,
weather experts were predict-
ing that Bill will develop into a
major hurricane by tomorrow.

In its Spm update, the Miami-

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

Hurricane

based National Hurricane Cen-
tre reported that Bill was locat-
ed about 975 miles east of the
Lesser Antilles. The hurricane
was moving towards the west-
northwest at about l6mph.
Maximum sustained winds were
at 90mph with higher gusts.

Meanwhile, the disorganised
Tropical Depression Ana is
expected to bring some rain and
even thunderstorms to the
Bahamas within the next 12 to
24 hours.

The system was expected to
begin affecting the southeast-
ern Bahamas late last night.

Islands in the central
Bahamas could also experience
some of the system’s effects
within the next day or two.

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, 8... The Bahamas

Teenager charged

FROM page one

blood shot and he had a bandage over a wound
on his left cheek.

The victim in the case, Macintosh, 31, was
reportedly stabbed multiple times outside his
home in Obediah Avenue, off Springfield Road,
when a confrontation with a neighbour escalated
into violence sometime before 9 pm last Thurs-
day. He had reportedly been outside his home
with a 19-year-old girl when he got into an argu-
ment with a woman neighbour and four men
pulled up in a green Ford Ranger truck and got
involved in the argument. The 19-year-old girl
was injured and Macintosh was stabbed several
times before he ran into the house and collapsed.
He was pronounced dead when emergency med-
ical personnel arrived at the scene.

Miller, who is represented by lawyer Carmen
Brown, was not required to enter a plea to the
manslaughter charge. Brown told the court that
her client had a doctor’s appointment scheduled
for Monday, but was unable to see the doctor
because he was in police custody. Magistrate
Bethel ordered that Miller be taken to the doctor
to be treated for his wounds. Miller was remand-
ed in custody and is expected to appear in Court
11, Nassau Street, on Monday for a bail hearing.

Ministry of Works
FROM page one

for promotions and adjustments to
the career paths of the electrical
department workers.

Yesterday, Mr Pinder said the min-
istry claims to have now established a
task force to look into the issue, and
the union expects to meet with them
on Wednesday.

He said he also anticipates that “in
short order” six people from the
department who were identified for
promotions following the April
protest should see those recommen-
dations executed.

Mr Pinder said the issue has been
“brewing” for about three years.

“That’s why they’re so irate. Every
time they’re close to closing they
switch Permanent Secretary or some-
thing like that,” he added.

About 15 Ministry of Works
employees participated in the demon-
stration on Thompson Boulevard yes-
terday.

Man charged

FROM page one

Family and friends believe that
Soles-Armony — who had just
returned home from St Kitts
where she lived with her husband
— may have been a victim of mis-
taken identity or the target of an
armed robbery gone wrong.
Dorsette, who is represented
by attorney Krysta Smith, was not
required to enter a plea to the
murder and gun possession
charges. Ms Smith requested that
her client be taken to hospital
because he had been “bringing
up” blood. Magistrate Bethel said
that arrangements would be
made for Dorsette to be seen by a
doctor at Her Majesty’s Prison.
Dorsette was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison yesterday. The
case has been transferred to
Court 11, Nassau Street and
adjourned to August 24, which is
when a date will be set for the
start of a preliminary inquiry.

DEATH NOTICE

MRS. JULIA
EMILY (EMMIE)
PINDER

Mrs. J. E. Emmie Pinder,
fs | aged 93, passed away at
* 9% her home in Nassau, The

) Bahamas on Sunday, 16th

August, 2009,

A funeral service will be held for Mrs. Pinder
at Ebenezer Methodist Church, East Shirley
Street, Nassau on Friday, 21st August, 2009 at
3:30 p.m.

Mrs. Pinder was pre deceased by her husband
Baron N. Pinder and her son, Keith Pinder and
is survived by her daughter, Janet Pinder and
her son, Godfrey Pinder and many other relatives
and friends.

Instead of flowers, donations may be made to
Ebenezer Methodist Church Soup Kitchen,
P.0.Box 55 6145, Nassau or the Cancer Society
of The Bahamas, PO.Box 58 6539, Nassau.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited,
2? Palmdale Avenue, Nassau, The Bahamas.



FROM page one

ty nor the Attorney General had
denied that the wiretapping
occurred and that the “Bahami-
an people will have to make up
their own minds whether it hap-
pened.”

“It’s a very serious matter,”
she said.

Yesterday The Tribune’s
source said anger was directed
at the Commissioner by senior
officers over the alleged wire-
tapping, as “the only person who
would know who and why that
was authorised and for how
long.”

“It’s created extreme friction,”
said the insider.

He reiterated the Senator’s
suggestion that the situation is
not conducive to the force ful-
filling its mandate.

“It’s not why you have so
much crime, but it’s why police
may not be as effective as they
can be to deal with the crime
problem. It’s not that we don’t
have the expertise on the force,”
he said.

But Mr Ferguson denied this
claim and said that tabloid
reports and information reach-
ing this newspaper that all may
not be well in the force may be
spread by people looking to push
a particular “agenda.”

He added: “In so far as specu-
lating as to what is happening in
the RBPF, I don’t see anything
wrong with it. People want to
speculate about who wants to be
Commissioner next in this beau-

SUPERVISOROF FINANCE

A leading Bahamian company, is seeking applicatioufseraisor of Finance

JOB OBJECTIVE:

with investors and regulatory agencies.

ORGANIZATIONAL POSITION :
Reports to th®irectorof Finance.

PRINCIPAL DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES :

Core responsibilities include
Assisting in managittige financial affairs of the company
Supervise key components offthancedepartment



To provide financial leadership for the company by managing the financial resources, supervisir{
the certain key aspects of the camfsaaccounting function and maintaining appropriate relations

Ensure accurate and timely interim and annual financial reporting in accordance with

International Accounting Standards
Assist in the annual budget exercise

Assist irthe training and development of line accounting staff

Coordinate the annual audit process
Assist in managing cashflow and treasury functions
Any other related duties as considered necessary

REQUIREMENTS & PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES :

Candidates must meet thédwing criteria:

Bachelor's Degree or higher in accounting or related financial field
Professional accounting designation recognized by The Bahamas Institute of Chartered

Accountants

Minimum of seven years experience in accounting, finance and budgeting.
Leadership, management and direct supervision experience is required. Previous
direct experience in planning and executing all aspects of financial accounting and

budgetary functions

Bahamian citizen

Accounting software experience

Proficient in the usaf the Microsoft range of applications
Strong technical and managerial skills

Excellent writing, communication, analytical and reasoning skills

Excellent organizational and time management skills

Team Player with the ability to add value and strengtitteam and team goals

Honest, hardworking and ability to meet deadlines

The position offers an attractive salary and benefits package, reflecting the successful
applicant's experience and qualifications, including a pension plan, medical, life, dental
and vision coverage.

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumés including referencedumpiste3t

2009to: Email: finsupervisor@ gmail.com



Friction claims

tiful democracy. They should
have a right to do that and that
should not threaten anybody, but
I don’t know anything about any
conflict,” he said.

Mr Ferguson said that noth-
ing “exists at this time” which
interferes with the police’s abili-
ty to carry out its mandate.

“We've got to be focused on
trying to deal with the crime sit-
uation. We cannot allow any-
thing to deal with or interfere
with that.”

Sources claim discontent in the
upper echelons of the force was
stirred when Mr Ferguson
objected to being sent to head
the police college under the for-
mer PLP administration, as sev-
eral former assistant commis-
sioners have been, prior to retire-
ment.

When the FNM won the gen-
eral election in May 2007, veter-
an officer Mr Ferguson — the
brother of FNM senator John-

ley Ferguson — was instead
made acting Commissioner,
before being confirmed as Com-
missioner.

Disgruntlement and political
controversy burgeoned as Mr
Ferguson was promoted around
the same time that a number of
other senior officers and Assis-
tant Commissioners who had
reached the mandatory age of
retirement — as Mr Ferguson
also has — were pushed to
accept retirement packages by
the present government that
expressed its intention to
“restructure” the top heavy
force.

Two other younger officers —
Marvin Dames, now Senior
Assistant Commissioner in
charge of Grand Bahama, and
Ellison Greenslade, now Deputy
Commissioner — were sent to
Canada by the present govern-
ment for training that was
expected to be a prelude to one
of the pair taking over the reins
of the force.

But upon their return, Mr Fer-

guson remained.

A police insider told The Tri-
bune that since being appointed
police chief he has taken the lead
in several key investigations of
a potentially political nature —
such as the investigation into
alleged corruption at the Min-
istry of Housing.

Such responsibilities are
believed to form a part of the
decision to keep Mr Ferguson at
the helm of the force for the time
being. Nonetheless, sources claim
factions have developed in the
force in support of various indi-
viduals taking over from Mr Fer-
guson and police “politics” is
becoming a distraction.

“You have Mr Greenslade
and his supporters, the Commis-
sioner and Quinn McCartney
and Dames. It’s a divided police
force, all of them have their fac-
tions who want to see them at
the top.”

The Tribune’s source said
there is a broad base of support
for Ellison Greenslade taking
over the force.

FROM page one

Lorna Longley-Rolle of the Attorney General’s
Office are prosecuting the case. The prosecu-
tion closed its case on June 23.

According to the particulars, it is alleged that
Pratt got the girls drunk and had sex with them in
his bedroom at home. The girls were put in the
care of him and his wife, who was off the island at
the time of the alleged incident.

In his submission, Mr Ducille said that the
prosecution had failed to establish a prima facie
case against his client.

He stated that it is easy for someone to make
a complaint of a sexual nature where in the cir-
cumstance it is their word against the accused.

Mr Ducille noted that there were some dis-
crepancies in the evidence given by the two girls
concerning the alleged incident.

He also noted that the doctor’s report indi-
cated that there was no sign of bruising on the
vagina of the 14 year old. While there was some
bruising on the vagina and rectum of the 15 year
old, he said there was no evidence to suggest
how she sustained those injuries.

Mr Ducille said the girls were out. Mr Pratt let
them in the house and went back to his room.
“When he woke up, he saw them (the girls) in the
bed,” he said.

“The prosecution must satisfy a prima facie
case against Mr Pratt. As it stands...there is noth-
ing...to go before you which can convince you of
the allegations made against Mr Pratt.

“T implore the court to rule that the prosecu-
tion has failed to establish a prima facie case,”
said Mr Ducille.

Mts Pyfrom insisted that the offence of unlaw-
ful sexual intercourse was committed by Mr Pratt.

She told the court that doctors examined the

K2700/K3000

1V/4TON 21/2 TON

2.7 DIESEL STO
AIR CONDITION
POWER STEERING
FOLO-DOOWWN SIDES
RADIO/ CASSETTE

ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED

Thompson Bled, « Oakes Field
t, 242.326.6377 f, 242.326.6315
6. Sanping@ocoralwave.com

#74 Wut Rory
PO. Boor MAA
1 (PAP) Wadd? £43) 90-8238

Trial of MP’s son

girls at the hospital on May 6, 2007.

She said the doctor reported that the 14 year
old had already taken a bath and changed her
clothing. Her genital exam was normal, but doc-
tors noted that the complainant was emotional
and wanted to cry.

She noted that doctors reported that the 15
year old had redness to the rectum, anus and
vagina.

Mrs Pyfrom said that on May 4, Mrs Pratt had
collected the girls from the Home and left the
island with her son.

She said the girls told a social worker that
Pratt got them drunk. He is accused of giving
each girl five rounds of drinks — one was given
Vodka and cranberry juice and the other was
given Vodka and orange juice.

He is alleged to have bought them more drinks
at a local bar and took them to the Bowling
Alley. He gave the girls some money and left
them at the Bowling Alley.

Mrs Pyfrom said the girls returned to Pratt’s
home around 11pm. Pratt opened the door and
went to his room.

She said Pratt allegedly invited the girls to
sleep with him in his room. The girls alleged that
Pratt touched their breasts and vagina with his
hands and had sex with them.

Pratt was arrested on May 7.

She noted that the evidence of unlawful sex
was Satisfied by the prosecution. She also noted
that when Pratt’s wife left the jurisdiction, the
girls should have been returned to the Home.

Magistrate Helen Jones adjourned the case to
November 24 when she will deliver her ruling
in the matter.

KID

KIA MOTORS

The Power to Surprise -

3.0 DIESEL STO
AIR CONDITION
POWER STEERING
POWER WINDOWS
FOLO-DOWN SIDES
RADIO/CASSETTE

ON THE SPOT AM ANOING WITH
COMMOMWEALTH BANK

INSUAANCE AVAILABLE WITH
ADVANTAGE INSURANCE
BROKERS & AGENTS LD.





TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



Stubbs’ third place flex earns
him spot in Mr Olympia ’09

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

AFTER six years on the pro-
fessional bodybuilding scene, fea-
tures in various international pub-
lications and endorsements, the
Bahamas’ premiere bodybuilder
reached the pinnacle of the sport
with a qualification to its most
prestigious show.

With a third place finish this
weekend at the Europa Super
Show in Dallas, Texas, Joel
Stubbs earned a berth to the 2009
Mr. Olympia contest, scheduled
for September 24-27 in Las
Vegas, Nevada.

Stubbs finished third in the
field of 15 behind Dennis James
and Bill Wilmore.

Stubbs earned his pro card in
2003 after dominating the ama-
teur ranks with a convincing win
at the Central American and
Caribbean games and has since
been one of the most well known
names in the sport.

He made his pro debut in 2005
and was shortly thereafter fea-
tured in “Flex” magazine as one
of the “Best Backs in the History
of the Bodybuilding.”

He became the first Bahamian
to qualify for the event, the con-
clusion of the International Fed-
eration of Bodybuilders (IFBB)
circuit since 1965.

“Tt feels good to be the first
Bahamian to reach the Olympia
stage. It was a dream come true
for me. After the dream you have
to put a strategy and plan in place
to make it possible and to make it
happen. The only word I can pos-
sibly use to describe what I feel
right now is just happy," he said,
"Knowing I made it, it brought
some tears to my eyes as I
thought back to where I started

from in the amateur ranks, to the
knee surgeries, to the possibility
of being sidelined for good. I
eventually was able to dust myself
off and get back into the game."

With his 6'3" 325 pound frame,
Stubbs has garnered much atten-
tion in bodybuilding circles, and
expectations for his potential have
continued to increase since the
feature in Flex magazine.

"From then on I have always
been told that if I could get the
legs to match the upper body that
makes me symmetrically bal-
anced that I would be a force to
be reckoned with on the world
stage and possible that I could be
crowned Mr. Olympia one day. I
just had the mindset to push on
and it was all motivation from
there on," Stubbs said.

Stubbs was thankful for an
opportunity to create a storybook
ending for his season after an
untimely food poisoning incident
nearly derailed the 2009 cam-
paign.

"Thad many days where I was
forced to overcome obstacles. I
had food poisoning about a
month and half away from this
last show and it really placed
things in jeopardy. I was think-
ing about sitting it down and not
competing at all this year because
it really took a toll on my body,"
he said, "What turned it around
for me was speaking to my people
back home that I train with
Albert Rahming, Joey Rolle,
Charles Johnson. They kept me
grounded, kept me motivated.
They continued to push me and
reassured me that I had come too
far to let anything keep me from
getting there. So we decided to
come up with a new plan, a new
strategy to get my act together."

Tt was Stubbs’ second show in
as many weeks after a 12th place

JOEL STUBBS has earned a berth to the 2009 Mr Olympia...

finish at another IFBB event in
Tampa Florida.

"My body rebounded and I
was able to compete in Tampa
and I placed 12th. It was disap-
pointing but I said to myself I
would stick with my regimen and
tighten things up for the show in
Dallas, which I was able to do. I
came into this show with a much
tighter, drier physique and I guess
the judges were impressed with
what they saw," he said, "I was in
second place after the prejudg-
ing and people at the event were
saying I had a really good chance
to win the show. That did won-

ders for my confidence and I
knew a chance at Olympia was
at stake so I continued to perse-
vere."

The 41-year-old IFBB Pro said
that while he has a limited
amount of time to complete his
career goals, he remains opti-
mistic about his Olympia oppor-
tunity.

"From here on in know I am
going to increase my intensity. I
know my age and the expected
amount of time I have left in the
sport so I figure within another
two to three years I would have to
make a major statement before I

call it a day on my career. From
here until that time I am going
to take my game to yet another
level all to make the Bahamas
proud," he said, "I think I can be
one of the top five finishers or
even be crowned Mr Olympia.
My game plan is at another level
and its just crazy what I am about
to get myself into in terms of my
workouts but I realise it is do or
die now at this stage in my career.
I want to encourage any younger
athletes whether its bodybuilding
or any other sport they choose,
the only way you are going to get
to achieve that success is to create



a plan and work toward executing
that plan. It takes dedication,
focus preparation."

According to the event's web-
site, Mr. Olympia is the title
awarded to the winner of the pro-
fessional section of Joe Weider's
Olympia Weekend and doing so
is considered the highest acco-
lade in the sport.

Past Olympia winners include
Arnold Schwarzenegger (six),
Ronnie Coleman (eight), Lee
Haney (eight) and Dorian Yates
(six).

Dexter Jackson is the reigning
champion.

Murray defeats Del Potro to win Rogers Cup

MONTREAL (AP) — Andy
Murray took the court to face Juan
Martin Del Potro knowing no mat-
ter what the result of the Rogers
Cup final, he would be soon be
ranked No. 2 in the world.

Not satisfied having reached that
goal, Murray withstood his tough-
est test of the tournament and
defeated Juan Martin Del Potro 6-7
(4), 7-6 (3), 6-1 Sunday.

"T love winning tournaments, it's
great, and every player will tell you
the same thing,” Murray said.

"But it's tough because I've never
been to No. 2 in the world before, so
that's new to me. I've won a couple
of Masters Series (events) now, and
it still feels great. But getting to No.
2, maybe because it's something dif-
ferent it means a little bit more."

The 22-year-old from Scotland
was assured before the final of
leapfrogging Rafael Nadal into the
second spot when the ATP Tour
rankings are released Monday. The
victory gave Murray an additional
400 ranking points to get him to
9,250 compared to 11,040 for world
No. 1 Roger Federer and 8,665 for
Nadal.

The third-seeded Murray matched
his career best from last season with
his fifth tournament win of the year
and improved his record to 11-4
against top-10 players this season.

He took time off to train in Flori-
da after a bitterly disappointing loss
to Andy Roddick in the semifinal
at Wimbledon, and Murray couldn't
have drawn up a better return to
the court.

"It's a perfect way to come back,”
he said. "It goes one of two ways.

‘Golden girls’ Debbie and Chandra miss 100m medal glory



ANDY MURRAY returns the ball to Argentina's Juan Martin Del Potro during the final of the Rogers Cup tournament Sunday...

Losing to Roddick, there's no shame
in that to start with. I could have
gone away and become a worse
player and not work on anything,
or go and practice harder and
become better so the same thing
doesn't happen the next time
around.”

Del Potro, from Argentina, was
looking for his second straight tour-
nament victory after winning in

Washington, a week earlier. He
squandered an opportunity to jump
past Andy Roddick into fifth in the
world rankings.

The match turned when Del Potro
called for the trainer to work on a
sore shoulder while up 6-5 in the
second set. After the medical time-
out, Murray held serve at love and
won the tiebreaker.

Del Potro said he still hasn't

(AP Photo: Graham Hughes)

reached the point where he can con-
sider himself to be in the same class
as Murray, Nadal or Federer.

"I need to work hard to be like
them,” Del Potro said. "I can play
against them, but I need to improve
my game a lot if I want to be top-
four, or top-two or No. 1."

Del Potro left the court for sever-
al minutes following that second set
and was clearly not the same player

upon his return, falling behind 4-0 in
the third set. Del Potro did break
Murray to get it to 4-1, but called
for the trainer again before Murray
broke Del Potro to go up 5-1 and
then serve out the match.

Del Potro said a combination of
that nagging shoulder injury, the
physical strain of playing nine
matches in 13 days and the stifling
heat Sunday in Montreal was too
much for him to overcome physi-
cally.

"I was so tired (in the third set),"
he said. "I had my chances in the
second set tiebreak, but I didn't take
them."

After needing 2 hours, 17 minutes
to play the first two sets, Murray
needed only 25 minutes to win the
decisive third set.

"Before the match I felt like I was
probably going to be physically
stronger,” Murray said. "He was
obviously tired (in the third set) and
I made a lot of returns which I had-
n't really been doing. His serve
slowed down a little bit and I made
more returns. I served well at the
beginning of the third set to make
sure I stayed ahead, and that was
the only difference."

The tightly contested match under
hot, muggy conditions pleased the
sellout crowd of 11,490 at Uniprix
Stadium, bringing the total atten-
dance for the event to 200,077. That
broke the attendance record for a
one-week ATP event of 185,252 set
here in 2007.

Murray didn't drop a set in the
tournament — his first since Wim-
bledon — until Del Potro won the
first set Sunday in a tiebreak.

FROM page 12

personally wasn't as best as I
wanted it to be," she said.
"However, I tried to come
back at the end, but I wasn't
good enough. I was good
enough for sixth place with
11.05, so I'm happy with my
time."

As for Fraser's winning per-
formance, Ferguson-McKen-
zie said the 22-year-old
Jamaican national champion
made it look so easy.

"It was any women's race,
but Shelly-Ann proved that
she was the best woman out
there tonight," Ferguson-
McKenzie said.

Sturrup, in securing her
berth into the final with a
third place finish in the sec-
ond semis in 11.01, admitted
that once Fraser got out, there
was no catching her anymore.

"I was trying to get my
mechanics back again, but it
wasn't coming quick enough,”
she said.

Running from the outside
in lane seven, Sturrup said she

didn't see how fast Fraser had
zoomed ahead of everybody
until it was too late.

But the elder stateswoman
of the field at 36 said she felt
like she was 25 chasing down
the younger women.

"T feel good, but I'm disap-
pointed. I should have ran
under 11 seconds tonight and
I had a great opportunity to
do it,” she insisted. "I really
wanted to medal, but it just
wasn't my night to do it.”

When asked about the
Jamaicans, who have now tak-
en over from the Americans,
Sturrup simply stated: "They
ran a hell of a race. All of
them got out well. They did a
good job.”

Now that her individual
duties are done, Sturrup said
she will take a well deserved
rest and then get ready for
the relays as the Bahamas
team also attempts to get
back to the final for the first
time since the Golden Girls
dominated at the Worlds in
1999 and the Olympics in
2000.

"When we ran in London,
we did pretty well without any
practice, so I think we have a
fair chance,” she projected.

As for Ferguson-McKen-
zie, she will be back on
Wednesday for the start of
the women's 200 with Sheni-
qua 'Q' Ferguson before she
can think about the relays.

"The 100 for me is always
fun, but the 200 is business,"
said Ferguson-McKenzie, a
finalist of the 8th Worlds in
Edmonton, Canada, where
she came back to win the sil-
ver in the 200, but was ele-
vated to the gold after the dis-
qualification of American
champion Marion Jones.

"I'm glad that we only have
three rounds now, so I just
have to go back to basics
because it's a longer race. So I
have to relax, get my start
back, work on my curve and
then my finish. One round at
a time."

Reminiscent of when the
Golden Girls triumphed, Fer-
guson-McKenzie said the
Bahamas had four women

who were running extremely
well and it came down to their
baton execution in the relay.

She noted that if the
Jamaicans, who had four
entrants in the 100 final, can
get the baton around, they
have the capability not just of
winning the gold, but possi-
bly breaking the world record.

"You have the four fastest
women on paper, so it all
boils down to passing the
stick," she declared.

Not counting out the
Bahamas’ chances of being in
the mix for another medal,
Ferguson-McKenzie said it’s
going to be fun again for her
and Sturrup.

"We both made it to the
final and we had Q, who ran
in the second round, so we're
just going to go out there and
see what happens," she insist-
ed.

The preliminaries of the
relay won't be held until Fri-
day, but Ferguson-McKenzie
will probably skip it because
of the 200 final the night
before.

= =

Registration for the 2009-2010 Swim
Year will take place at Queen 4 College
Fool on Saturday, 29th August, 2009 trom
9:00am to 11:00am.

ALL SWIM GROUPS MUST REGISTER

(1) LEARN TO SWIM FOR CHILDREN
(2) COMPETITIVE SWIMMERS

—~ ‘Registration forms available
ae on the website:
In addition, see our website for start dates,
prices and full swim schedules:
www. barracudaswimming.org







PAGE 10, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009



SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



‘I know I could compete
with these guys...’

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — On
Monday, the Olympic Stadi-
um was still buzzing a day
after the scorching world
record breaking performance
by Jamaican Usain Bolt in the
men's 100 metres.

Although Bolt owned the
previous record of 9.69 sec-
onds set as one of his three
marks at last year's Olympic
Games in Beijing, China, the
9:58 he recorded was unheard
off until the clock stopped and
he literally dominated the
field and obliterated the much
anticipated match-up with
2007 champion and former
world record holder Tyson
Gay, who had to settle for the
silver with an American
record of 9.71.

While he didn't get a
chance to go all the way and
compete in his historic final
in his coming out party,
Bahamian national runner-up
Adrian Griffith was among
those in the stands watching
Bolt put on the spectacular
show.

"Boy, that was a great one.
I'm really glad that I saw it in
person and not on television,"
said Griffith yesterday as he
watched veteran female
sprinters Chandra Sturrup
and Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie storm their way
into an historic all-regional
final.

"This is just telling me that
next year, I really have to step
it up. 10.2s just won't cut it.”

Griffith, one of two
Bahamians competing in the
event, survived through the
quarter-final on Saturday's
opening day as he finished
with a world ranking of 28
with a best time of 10.28.

Derrick Atkins, the 2007
silver medallist in Osaka,
Japan, behind Gay, surpris-

ingly didn't advance out of
the first round after he fin-
ished fifth in his heat in 10.44.
He left the Games Village on
Sunday and didn't stay behind
to watch the amazing century
finale.

For Griffith, who has never
had the chance to run against
Bolt or his compatriot Asafa
Powell, who had to settle for
the bronze in a season's best
of 9.84, said what he has dis-
covered is that the competi-
tion is 80 per cent mental and
20 per cent physical.

"T know I could compete
with these guys," said Grif-
fith, who ran in the same heat
with Gay in the quarters.
"This is the World Champi-
onships and if you come here
and you're not ready, you're
not going to compete well."

One of the things that
shocked Griffith was when he
watched Bolt in the training
area.

"He hardly did anything to
get ready,” Griffith said. "I
was there doing just about
everything and he just took a
couple of strides, stretched
and he was ready to compete.
I really couldn't believe it.
That really opened up my
eyes."

With a little more financial
support from the Govern-
ment and the general public,
Griffith said he could really
get used to being on the inter-
national stage with all the big
stars in the future because
there are times when he real-
ly needs the funds to take care
of his body and it’s not avail-
able.

Right now, he's enjoying
the experience of training on
the same track with Gay in
Clermont, Florida. And
before the championships got
started, he got the chance to
go through some block work-
outs with the former world
champion.

For the first time, he lined

Sprinter Adrian Griffith
reflects on his performance

a,
<=
<=
=
oS
“an
Oo
o
=
2
=



ADRIAN GRIFFITH competes in a 100m first round heat during the World Athletics Championships in Berlin

on Saturday, August 15, 2009...

up in the same race to com-
pete against Gay when they
ran in the quarters. While
Gay went on to post the sec-
ond fastest qualifying time of
9.98, Griffith did 10.28 to
make his exit.

"It showed that I'm not

Save BIG Right Now!
2008 FORD FOCUS SEL

2.0L Automatic - LOADED

Great Deals
On All Models

2008 FORD TAURUS SEL

—.

3.5L Automatic
Leather Interior - LOADED

Available

3 years or 36,000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside assistant, 3 years rust protections
warranty and licensed and inspected up to birthday.

NOW THAT'S REALWY AL 3[ |(@3Deal
FRIENDLY MOTORS CO, LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ¢ TEL.: 356-7100 « FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com



really scared of any of them,”
said Griffith, who just fell shy
of his personal best of 10.27
that he ran in Clemont on
June 7 to qualify for the
Worlds. "I just have to be
ready."

Griffith, who turns 25 on

November 11, said he will
take the rest of the time here
to enjoy the atmosphere and
then get ready for the 13th
IAAF World Indoor Cham-
pionships scheduled to be
held March 12-14 in Doha,
Qatar.

Anthony
sues former
business
manager

By ARNIE STAPLETON
AP Sports Writer

DENVER (AP) — Carmelo Anthony is suing his former
business manager, alleging he misappropriated more than $2
million of the Denver Nuggets star’s assets.

The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Sacramento,
Calif., on Monday, alleges that Anthony’s former business
manager, Larry W. Harmon, and employees of Larry Har-
mon & Associates P.A., breached their fiduciary duties by
transferring $1.75 million of Anthony’s money without his
knowledge or consent to a company formed by Harmon,

most of it in 2008.

Another $265,500 was discovered to have been invested in
third parties without Anthony’s knowledge or consent
between 2005 and 2008, according to the lawsuit, which seeks
recovery of the approximately $2 million, plus punitive dam-

ages.

“Tintend to aggressively represent Carmelo Anthony,” his
Beverly Hills-based attorney, Robert W. Hirsh, told The
Associated Press. “The evidence which I have reviewed
strongly suggests that Carmelo Anthony’s former business
manager plundered his assets. It is reprehensible that profes-
sional athletes are so often victimized.”

Lawsuit

Reached at his office in Roseville, Calif., Harmon said he

was unaware of the lawsuit.

He declined to comment on the allegations in the lawsuit
or on his dealings with Anthony. “I guess [ll just wait and

see what he alleges,”

Harmon said.

The discrepancies were discovered after Anthony ended
his business relationship with Harmon and hired a new man-
ager to manage his assets earlier this year, according to the
lawsuit. That new financial management firm, Gelfand, Ren-
nert & Feldman, discovered the financial discrepancies.

The lawsuit alleges that significant documents were miss-
ing when Harmon transferred Anthony’s records to his new

business manager.

“Further, portions of the books and records are miscoded
in a deliberate attempt to hide moneys converted by defen-

dants,”

according to the lawsuit.

The lawsuit also contends that Harmon and the other
defendants failed to produce any documents requested by
Anthony’s lawyer to explain the transfers of Anthony’s mon-

ey that are in question.

Anthony was the third selection in the 2003 NBA draft
after leading Syracuse to the national title as a freshman.
Last year, he led the Nuggets to their best season in 24 years
after helping the U.S. team win the gold medal at the Beijing

Olympics.

Anthony is entering the fourth year of a five-year, $80 mil-
lion contract extension he signed in 2006.

a gly
FE
SHI ITTT
of events

BERLIN, Germany —
Here's a look at the sched-
ule for our athletes com-
peting over the remainder
of the IAAF's 12th World
Championships in Athlet-
ics:

TODAY

Men's 200m
preliminary rounds
Nathaniel McKinney -
lane 3 in 4th of 9 heats
at 4:23 am ET

(First 3 of each heat,
plus 5 fastest times

qualify)

Men's 400m
preliminary rounds
Michael Mathieu - lane
7 in 2nd of 7 heats

at 5:12 am ET

Chris Brown - lane 2
in 3rd of 7 heats at
5:19 am ET

Ramon Miller - lane 4
in 5th of 7 heats

at 5:33 am ET.

(First 3 of each heat (Q)
plus the three fastest
times (q) qualify)

Men's triple jump final
Leevan Sands - 5th of
12 competitors, starting
at 12:05 pm ET

Men's 200 quarterfinal
Nathaniel McKinney,
lane and heat
undecided, starting

at 12:55 pm ET

WEDNESDAY
Men's high jump
qualifying rounds
Donald Thomas and
Trevor Barry, starting
at 5:10 am ET

Men's 110 hurdles
Shamar Sands, starting
at 5:35 am ET

Men's 400 semifinal
Michael Mathieu, Chris
Brown and Ramon
Miller, starting

at 12:15 pm ET

Men's 200 semifinal
Nathaniel McKinney,
starting at 1:25 pm ET

Women's 200
preliminaries

Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie and Sheniqua
Ferguson, starting

at 1:45 pm ET

THURSDAY

Men's 110 hurdles
semifinal

Shamar Sands,

starting at 12:15 pm ET

Women's 200 semifinal
Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie and Sheniqua
Ferguson, starting

at 1:50 pm ET

Men's 200 final
Nathaniel McKinney,
starting at 2:35 pm ET

Men's 110 hurdles final
Shamar Sands, starting
at 2:55 pm ET

FRIDAY

Men's high jump final
Donald Thomas

and Trevor Barry,
starting at 1:15 pm ET

Women's 200 final
Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie and
Sheniqua Ferguson,
starting at 3 pm ET

Men's 400 final
Michael Mathieu, Chris
Brown and Ramon
Miller, starting

at 3:20 pm

SATURDAY
Women's 4 x 100
relay heats

12:10 pm ET

Men's 4 x 400 relay heats
12:55 pm ET

Women's 4 x 100
relay final
2pm ET

Women's 4 x 400
relay heats
2:15 pm ET

SUNDAY
Women's 4 x 400
relay final

11:50 am ET

Men's 4 x 400
relay final
12:15 pm ET





THE TRIBUNE

MARK KNOWLES












Sp

PAGE



ts

UESDAY, AUGUST 18,

2009

BAHAMIAN tennis ace Mark
Knowles and his doubles partner
Mahesh Bhupathi, of India, were on
top form this weekend at the Mon-
treal Masters in Canada where they
won another championship.

Competing in the doubles cham-
pionship of the ATP World Tour
Rogers Cup on Sunday, the dynam-
ic duo faced off with No.7 seeds Max
Mirnyi, of Belarus, and Andy Ram,



of Israel.
Knowles and Bhupathi, the No.3
seeds, defeated Mirnyi and Ram 6-4,

6-3.
Doubles

In the doubles semifinals on Sat-
urday, Mirnyi and Ram were able
to knock out identical twin broth-
ers, the No.1 seeds, Bob and Mike

Adrian Griffith
reflects on his
performance...

See page 10

Rogers Cup victory for
Knowles, Bhupathi

Bryan of the United States, 7-6 (5),
6-2.

On the other side of the draw,
Knowles and Bhupathi defeated
No.2 seeds Canadian Daniel Nestor
(Knowles’ former doubles partner)
and Nenad Zimonjic, of Serbia, 5-7,
6-2, and a 10-4 tiebreak to advance
to the championship.

Knowles could not be reached for
comment up to press time last night.

Anja Niedringhaus/AP

JAMAICA’S Shelley-Ann Fraser (center) dips across the finish line to beat compatriot Kerron Stewart (left) and win the gold medal in the final of the 100m at the World Athletics Championships in
Berlin, Germany, Monday, August 17, 2009. At right is Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie of the Bahamas, who placed sixth. Chandra Sturrup (not seen) came seventh...

‘Golden girls’ Debbie and Chandra
miss out on 100m medal glory

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — This time, Deb-
bie Ferguson-McKenzie nor Chandra Stur-
rup had the speed to go with the Jamaicans
and Americans and had to settle for sixth
and seventh in the historic regional wom-
en's 100m final last night at the [AAF's
12th World Championships in Athletics.

Running a world leading time of 10.73
seconds, Shelly-Ann Fraser coasted to the
gold as she did at the Olympic Games last

year in Beijing, China, and was joined by
Kerron Stewart, whose personal best of
10.75 earned her the silver with American
Carmelita Jeter settling for the bronze in
10.90.

It was almost identical to the men's cen-
tury the night before when Jamaican Usain
Bolt sped to another world record, dethron-
ing American Tyson Gay who got silver
and Jamaican Asafa Powell picked up his
second consecutive bronze.

For Ferguson-McKenzie and Sturrup, it
was redemption time as they both found
the fountain of youth in clinching their

spots in the elite eight after failing to
advance out of the semifinal at the last
Worlds in Osaka, Japan.

Trying to defy the odds of the 10 years
plus age difference between them and the
rest of the field, Ferguson-McKenzie, 33,
got the better of the duo with sixth place,
while Sturrup, 37, was seventh. Both were
timed in 11.05.

"This was probably my best 100 metres
since the Commonwealth Games," said
Ferguson-McKenzie, who booked her spot
in the final with a fourth place in 11.03 in
the first of the two semifinals held earlier in

the day. "Time-wise. It's amazing. 11.03 in
the semis and 11.05 in the final.

“Normally I would be going backwards
with 11.1s and 11.2s. So I'm feeling like a
sprinter again and I'm happy about that."

Ferguson-McKenzie, the double nation-
al sprint champion, admitted that she tried
to focus on her start running out of lane
two. But once she noticed that Fraser had
a jump-start on everybody in lane three, she
just tried to go after her.

"T tried to stay in my zone, but my start

SEE page 9

IBUNE COVERAGE THE

|AAFWORLDCHAMPIONSHIPSBERLIN2009

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

pe. (V\

’m lovin’ it

YOUR CONNECTIOC O THE WORLD







THE TRIBUNE

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net



TUESDAY,

AUGUST

uSiIness

168 fe 22060°9



ROYAL FIDELITY

Ue
RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company
NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com

New road ‘will have a big impact’
on Vista Marina property values

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

esidents of Vista Marina
Ri have their properties
drastically devalued when
a new road is pushed through only
feet from the affluent subdivision,
according to the Bahamas Real
Estate Association president. The
subdivision will also permanently
lose its main access road.
William Wong told Tribune Busi-
ness that the residents of Vista Mari-
na will have their investments














SHOWN (I-r) are William B Sands, president & CEO of Commonwealth
Bank, Denise Turnquest, vice president of credit risk, Minister of
Education Carl Bethel, T B Donaldson, chairman of Commonwealth
Bank, vice president of operations Mavis Burrows and the Director of

Education Lionel Sands...

destroyed overnight.

According to him, the addition of
a busy road will cause the house
values in that area to plummet.

“Tf you have these 40-foot con-
tainers passing back and forth it will
have a big impact on the properties
and on their values,” said Mr Wong.

In his opinion what government
is doing is “criminal,” but, he said,
residents in the area waited too long
to protest the road, which is part of
the New Providence road improve-
ment project.

Government gazetted the notice
yesterday that work would begin on

the removal of Vista Marina’s main
access road from West Bay Street
on August 23 and that there will be
the removal of 10 Casuarina trees
from Saunders Beach.

“There will be long delays along
the vicinity due to the one-way traf-
fic flow system. Local diversions will
be sign posted in due course and fur-
ther information will be provided
on the local media,” said the notice.

Mr Wong said government owes
the residents of Vista Marina some
manner of compensation for the
intrusion the road will have on their
properties.

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

A pre-school was forced to move
its perimeter wall back several feet
to accommodate changes in the
road. Under the law government has
the right under eminent domain to
annex private property for public
use.

The residents’ biggest concern is
the noise pollution that will be
caused by large trucks using the road
to access the new Arawak Cay con-
tainer port from the south.

One resident of Highland Park,
who spoke on condition of anonymi-
ty, said even now as work is being
done the noise of the equipment is

WITH weeks to go until
thousands of school children
fill school yards, hallways and
classrooms, Commonwealth
Bank repeated its role as edu-
cation’s guardian angel, pre-
senting the Ministry of Edu-
cation with 10,000 backpacks.
The all-Bahamian bank’s
donation will give some
10,000 students a tangible
boost, sending them back to
school with backpacks packed
with school supplies and pro-

viding their teachers and
classrooms with tools from
projectors to laptops.

This is the third year the
leading bank donated back-
packs filled with a variety of
items, including rulers, com-
position books, pencils and
pens to the Ministry of Edu-
cation for distribution among
students entering grades 1-12
in New Providence and the

SEE page 2B

FOR SALE BY SEALED BID
SANDYPORT #4746 Newly built 3 bed 3.5 bath family home, private dock and white
sandy canal-beach. Landscaped and attractively finished with granite counter-tops.
Large open living/dining room offers great canal views and is the perfect space for
entertaining. The master suite features a spacious balcony, walk in closet and ensuite

master bath.

Closing date for sealed bids:

September 30, 2009.

For viewing & bid package, contact Lana Rademaker
Lana.Rademaker@SothebysRealty.com c 242.457.0406

Damianos

Sothebys

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Member of
SIRbahamas.com | t 242.322.2305 | £242322.2033 | the Bohamas MLS



RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company

Where do want to be?

unbearable. “When I woke up I
could feel the ground shaking from
that tractor,” said the resident. “And
it’s like this all morning.”

Residents of Highland Park said
they were not made aware publicly
about the road work being done only
yards from their properties.

“There should have been a lot
more consultation,” said Mr Wong.
“Either they are not aware of it or
the government didn’t do a good job
in consultation.”

According to him, a friend recent-
ly completed two townhouses at a
cost of $1 million, but with the addi-
tion of the road he suggested the
property would lose a fair amount of
value.

“Tf she was aware of it she proba-
bly would not have spent so much
money,” he said. “There should have
been years of consultation.”

Deputy Prime Minister Brent
Symonette told The Tribune recent-
ly that the new thoroughfare was
not connected in any way to the relo-
cation of the container port. How-
ever, the new road is an integral part
of all the blueprints the government
has brought to the public for the
complete redevelopment of that
area, which includes the extension
of Arawak Cay.

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report

College Degree



can get you there!

Education Investment Accounts

Learn more at royalfidelity.com

BAHAMAS
Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

FV: P:\eloh
St. Michael: 246.435.1955

royalfidelity.com

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

eel 4





PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Cuba cuts internationa
rates to $1 per minute

HAVANA (AP) — Cuba says it's
reducing international calling rates for
residents with land lines to $1 a minute.

Cuba's telecommunications monop-
oly, Etecsa, says the discount applies to
all international calls through Decem-
ber 15. Details of the promotion
appeared on its Web site and were
confirmed Monday by a company rep-
resentative who did not provide his
name.

Residential calls from Cuba had cost
$2.45 a minute to the United States
and Canada, $3.45 to Central America
and $5.85 to Europe. Most Cubans
don't have Internet access and cannot
afford cell phones or computers.

Despite the cuts,
international dialing
remains a costly
proposition for
most Cubans whose
average state wages
are $20 a month

Despite the cuts, international dial-
ing remains a costly proposition for
most Cubans whose average state
wages are $20 a month.

News of the offer hadn't been pub-
lished by state media as of Monday.
Etecsa said details about the plan will
appear on residents’ telephone bills.
Residents wanting to call abroad must
first request activation of internation-
al calling service, the company said.

No reason was given for the dis-
count. But Cuba is dealing with a
severe economic crisis that has affect-
ed islanders and prompted the gov-
ernment to announce spending cuts
for education and health care, two pil-

lars of its communist system.

Three hurricanes last year caused
more than $10 billion in damage. The
global recession has cut export earn-
ings and caused budget deficits to soar,
leaving Cuba short of cash. The gov-
ernment’s most recent forecast puts
2009 economic growth at 1.7 per cent,
compared to a 6 percent forecast made
in December.

Etecsa said it will announce new
international rates for cell phone users
but provided no details. The govern-
ment made private service available
to all islanders in 2008. Cell phones
previously were restricted to foreigners
and Cubans with key state jobs.

Bank donates school supplies to Ministry of Education

FROM page 1B

Family Islands. The bank also
donated laptops and LCD
projectors — and for the third
consecutive year, the Ministry
of Education thanked the all-
Bahamian bank and applaud-
ed its effort.

“On behalf of the Govern-
ment of The Bahamas, the
Ministry of Education, the
Department of Education and
the students and teachers of
The Bahamas, I would like to
express the most profound
















NOTICE

There will be an important meeting for
all parents of St. Francis and Joesph
School on Wednesday August 19th 2009
at 6:00pm at Xaviers Lower School
Auditorium. Please make a special effort
romano a(en

GN-89T

GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT
PORT DEPARTMENT

NOTICE
INVITATION FOR TENDERS

The Government of The Bahamas is inviting tenders for the sale of Government Tug
*“TURBOT", as is where is docked at Prince George Dock, Nassau, Bahamas.

DESCRIPTION OF VESSEL

fear Built:
Type:
Type of Hull:
Length:
Draft:
Engines:

Lost

Stan Tug 2600)

Steel

#5 Feet

|? Feet

2 Caterpillar Engines - Model 399
lo Cylinders (each)

1125 H.P. (each)

Full Load RPM 1225

(4) Fuel Tanks @ 3750 Gallons per tank
(2) 371 G.M.

Fuel Capacity:
Generators:

Interested persons may view and inspect the vessel docked at Prince George Dock,
Nassau, Bahamas by contacting:

The Port Department

Prince George Dock

Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone No.: (242) 356-5639

Between the hours of 9:00) acm. - 3:00 pom.
Monday through Friday

Tenders are to be submitted in triplicate (3) in sealed envelope (3) marked “Tender for
the purchase of Government Tug “TURBOT” addressed to:

The Chairman

Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

Cecil ¥. Wallace Whitfield Building
Cable Beach

BO. Box N-3017

Nassau, Bahamas

No later than 4:30 p.m. on Friday, 28th August, 2009. Tenders will be opened at 10:00
am. on Tuesday, Ist September, 2004 at the office of the Tenders Board, Ministry of
Finance.

THE GOVERNMENT RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL
TENDERS.

ume aig

gratitude to Commonwealth
Bank, the nation’s premier
bank,” Education Minister
Carl Bethel said during the
presentation at the bank’s
newest branch, a full service-
banking facility on Prince
Charles Drive that will open
August 31.

“Once again Common-
wealth Bank demonstrated
the kind of visionary corpo-
rate leadership we encourage
and hope that others would
follow.”

Calling it a “sterling dona-
tion” that will assist students
and teachers, the Education
Minister said the laptops can
make a huge difference in a
child’s attention.

“Children love computers
and if we can make a com-
puter more than a glorified
toy, more than a glorified way
to communicate, if we can
make it a tool that provides a
way to gain instruction, it can
be one of most powerful tools
in the arsenal of education
materials,” he said.

According to Common-
wealth Bank Chairman T.B.
Donaldson, CBE, the annual
contribution to education
reflects the bank’s commit-
ment to youth development.

“Commonwealth Bank, the
education bank, is all about
creating a firm learning foun-
dation for our country’s
youth,” said Donaldson, “and
was the driving force behind
formalized certification for
Bahamians in banking.”

“Commonwealth Bank’s
investment and commitment
to education has been long-
standing and broad-based.
We are proud to know that

through our endeavours we
have made an impact on the
lives of students from kinder-
garten through Grade 12 and
onto undergraduate studies
at the college level,” noted
Mr Donaldson, referring to
the bank’s separate COB
scholarship programme.
“Over the past three years,
our back-to-school pro-
gramme has donated nearly
three quarters of a million
dollars in school supplies and
the latest in technological
teaching tools.”

Packages

Those packages — the
school supplies and teaching
tools — will be distributed to
38 schools in 17 islands from
Grand Bahama and Abaco in
the north to Acklins in the
south as well as going to chil-
dren’s homes and the Depart-
ment of Social Services.

“Tt is our hope that the stu-
dents benefiting from this
substantial donation will take
full advantage of the educa-
tional opportunities provided
to them so that this donation
translates into a sound invest-
ment in our nation’s future,”
said Mr. Donaldson.

Commonwealth Bank is
The Bahamas’ most widely-
held public company with
some 7,000 shareholders, 10
branches in New Providence,
Grand Bahama and Abaco
and more than $1.3 billion in
assets. The company’s corpo-
rate giving, with emphasis on
youth development and edu-
cation, also includes a num-
ber of annual college schol-
arships.

coe

Mr. Peter Matthews

IMPORTANT NOTICE

Please be advised that Mr.

Peter

Matthews is mo longer employed
by Construction Services Group.
As a result, he is NOT authorized to

conduct any business
company s behalf.

Management

on the



Major Atlantic
Storms fail to
Stir energy
prices

By JOHN PORRETTO
AP Energy Writer

HOUSTON (AP) — The
season's first Atlantic hurri-
cane and two other storms
have done nothing to spur a
rise in energy prices, largely
because supplies are high and
demand low, but oil compa-
nies are keeping close watch
on their offshore operations
in the Gulf of Mexico.

After a quiet start to the
2009 hurricane season, three
storms whipped up in recent
days, though none appears to
pose a threat to the US Gullf's
massive energy complex.

Crude prices fell to new
lows for the month Monday,
dropping to around $65 a bar-
rel, and natural gas prices
slumped to new lows as well.

Pump prices have changed
little in the past week. On
average, a gallon of regular
unleaded was selling for
$2.641 on Monday, according
to auto club AAA, Wright
Express and the Oil Price
Information Service. That's
less than a penny lower than
average price a week ago.

The apparent indifference
to storms in the Atlantic
stands in stark contrast to last
year, when oil prices ticked
higher as tropical depressions
formed.

Several factors are
involved, the biggest of which
is a recession that's crushed
energy demand at home and
abroad. US crude inventories
rose again last week and are
nearly 20 per cent above year-
ago levels. Natural-gas sup-
plies also are bloated.

The US Gulf accounts for
about one-quarter of domes-
tic oil output, but the nation’s
reliance on the region for nat-
ural gas has lessened in the
past few years as producers
tap into massive reserves
onshore.

Gulf gas production
accounts for about 12 per cent
of total US output, according
to the Energy Information
Administration, down from
roughly 20 per cent only four
years ago.

So even a significant storm
could have little or no impact
on natural gas and even crude
prices, said trader and analyst
Stephen Schork. He noted
natural-gas prices failed to
jump even when hurricanes
Gustav and Ike raked the
region a year ago.

"And let's not forget we're
still in the midst of a pretty
severe economic downturn,"
Schork said.

Ike and Gustav shut down
Gulf production for several
weeks in late August and Sep-
tember, and shuttered several
refineries. That led to gaso-
line shortages and price spikes
above $4 a gallon throughout
the Southeast.

But the storms caused far
less damage than Katrina and
Rita in 2005, a one-two punch
that destroyed 108 production
platforms, damaged hundreds
of others and shut down pro-
duction for months, in some
cases.

For now, major producers
in the Gulf such as Royal
Dutch Shell PLC, Chevron
Corp. and BP PLC say they're
monitoring the systems but
are operating normally.

Hurricane Bill picked up
strength in the open Atlantic
Monday on a path toward
Bermuda, while what was left
of Tropical Storm Claudette
brought rain to the Florida
Panhandle and southern
Alabama. Elsewhere, Tropi-
cal Depression Ana was mov-
ing quickly across the north-
eastern Caribbean Sea. It was
expected to reach the coast
of the Dominican Republic
later Monday.





THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009, PAGE 3B



Stocks plunge as investors
worry about consumers

By IEVA M AUGSTUMS
and TIM PARADIS
AP Business Writers

NEW YORK (AP) —
Investors’ rising fears about
consumer spending are turn-
ing stocks into a risky invest-
ment again.

Stocks plunged and Trea-
sury prices soared Monday
morning as investors around
the world feared that con-
sumers are too anxious to lift
the economy into recovery.
The losses on stock exchanges
extended the heavy selling
that began Friday with a dis-
appointing reading on con-
sumer confidence. And bond

investors, once again search-
ing for a safe investment,
bought heavily into Treasurys.

The Dow Jones industrials
were down more than 180
points, while overseas, the
Shanghai stock market fell
almost six per cent and the
major indexes in Europe fell
more than 1.5 per cent.

Stocks fell across all indus-
tries as investors worried that
consumers’ reluctance to
spend will hurt corporate
earnings. Many companies
second-quarter results were
boosted by cost-cutting, not
higher sales, and the fear is
that without a pickup in sales,
earnings will fall.

goja.

Ont"

41R Cameras
One (1) 4 Ch Stand Alone DVR
(Digital Video Recorder)
500 ft of Co-Ax & Power Cable
Power Supply & Accessories

7
J



While other parts of the
economy, including housing
and manufacturing, are show-
ing signs of progress, the
country cannot have a strong
recovery unless consumers
are spending more freely.
Their spending accounts for
more than two-thirds of eco-
nomic growth.

Traders

Traders got more bad news
about the consumer Monday
when home improvement
retailer Lowe’s Cos. said poor
weather and cautious con-
sumer spending caused sales
to fall 19 per cent in the sec-
ond quarter. Lowe’s missed
analysts’ forecasts.

Investors will be nervous as
they wait for more retailers
to report second-quarter earn-
ings this week. Last week, the
nation’s largest retailer, Wal-
Mart Stores Inc., said its most
important sales figure, those
from stores open at least a
year, fell during the April-
June period.

Joe Saluzzi, co-head of
equity trading at Themis
Trading LLC, said the mar-
ket had risen too far and that
the selling was warranted.

“The economics obviously
don’t support where we’ve
been,” he said.

In midmorning trading, the
Dow fell 181.98, or two per
cent, to 9,134.28. The broader
Standard & Poor’s 500 index
fell 22.56, or 2.3 per cent, to
981.53, while Nasdaq com-
posite index fell 46.20, or 2.3
per cent, to 1,939.32.

About 2,700 stocks fell
while only 180 rose on the
New York Stock Exchange,
where volume came to 228.4
million shares.

The Chicago Board
Options Exchange’s Volatili-
ty Index, also known as the
market’s fear index, surged

O THE WORLD

ULM ansee TON Te eg ALN
ara er OO SRL EU ears arcu!

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Lia. (BIC) is
pleased fo invite Tenders to provide the Company with

Motor Insurance coverage.

Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender Specifi-

cation from the Security's Desk located in the Administra.

live building on John F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours
of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

The deadline for submission of fenders is on or before
Friday, August 21st, 2009. Tenders should be sealed and
marked “TENDER FOR MOTOR INSURANCE” and should be
delivered to the attention of the "Mr. |. Kirk Griffin, Acting

President and CEQ,”

BIC reserves the right fo reject any or all Tenders,

wwwbtcbahamas.com

16.5 per cent Monday. The
VIX rose four to 28.28. It is
down 30 per cent in 2009 and
its historical average is 18 to
20. It hit a record 89.5 in
October at the height of the
financial crisis.

Meanwhile, the yield on the
benchmark 10-year Treasury
note, which moves opposite
its price, fell to 3.50 per cent
from 3.57 per cent late Fri-
day.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average fell 3.1 per cent
as investors weren’t satisfied
by news that the country had
emerged from recession in the
second quarter. In afternoon
trading, Britain’s FTSE 100
fell 1.8 per cent, Germany’s
DAX index fell 1.9 per cent,
and France’s CAC-40 fell 2.3
per cent.

Oil prices also extended
their losses, reflecting the
growing concerns about a
weak economy that will cur-
tail demand for energy. A
barrel of crude oil fell $1.82 to
$65.69 a barrel on the New
York Mercantile Exchange.

Among companies report-
ing results Monday, Lowe’s





shares fell $2.11, or 9.2 per
cent, to $20.72.

The dollar rose against oth-
er major currencies, while

gold prices fell.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies fell 16.24,
or 2.9 per cent, to 547.66.

Legal Notice

Notice
ALGOGENETIC
GLOBAL FUND LTD.

VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000 the Dissolution of ALGOGENETIC GLOBAL
FUND LTD. has been completed, a Certificate of Dis-
solution has been issued and the Company has therefore
been struck off the Register of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was 17th July

LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.









FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!
Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million















Mario A. Carey, CRS, CIPS, CLHMS

Tel: 242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013
info@mariocareyrealty.com
www.marioca reyrea

Web Listing # 8377

As

Mario Carey Realty

com Dts abaut yaw... Let's talk.

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

TENDER FOR SCHOOL / FACILITY
SECURITY SERVICES

1.The Ministry of Education invites sealed bids from eligible qualified
firms for the provision of security services at the following schools/facility

in New Providence:

| No. | ScHooL/FaciiTy _—| ‘ESTIMATEDCOsT__|
[2 | AF. Adderley Junior High | $96,000.00 |
[3 | __C.H. Reeves Junior High | $96,000.00 |
[4 | _H.0.Nash Junior High | $96,000.00 |
[5 | __LW.Young Junior igh | $95,00000 +
[6 | ©. Sweeting Serior High | $89,00000 |
[8 | _C.R. Waker Senior High | $95,000.00 |
[9 |v. Bethel Senior High | $96,000.00 |

Learning Resources Section | $92,000.00

. Assessment of bids will be conducted by the Tenders Board utilizing established

procedures.

. Interested eligible qualified firms may receive Tender Documents from the Security
Headquarters located Claridge Road beginning Monday 17th August, 2009 between the
hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

. No firm/company will be eligible to be awarded more than one contract.

. All bids must be accompanied by copies of a valid Business Licence, and evidence of
payment of National Insurance.

. Bids must be enclosed in a plain sealed envelope bearing no identification of the bidder,
and must be clearly marked across the top “Bid for Security Services (Name of School)

- MOR”.

. All bids must be delivered to the Office of the Financial Secretary, Cecil Wallace-
Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, Bahamas, no later than 5.00 p.m. on Monday, 24th

August, 2009.

. Bids will be opened at 10.30 a.m. on Tuesday, 25th August, 2009 at the Ministry of
Finance, Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, Bahamas. Tenderers or their
designated representative are invited to attend the openings.

. The Ministry of Education reserves the right to reject any or all bid submissions.



Signed:
Elma I. Garraway (Mrs.)
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Education



PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS



Fed extends consumer lending
programme through March































































EXECUTIVE HOME FOR RENT

4-BEDROOM, 4 1/2-BATHROOM EXECUTIVE HOME
ON LYFORD CAY GOLF COURSE

For Immediate Occupancy

This beautiful executive residence is located on
a half-acre lot overlooking the Lyford Cay Golf course.

Eighteen-foot high ceilings, eight-foot high French doors,
marble floors, casement windows and an open plan
provide a panoramic view of the Lyford Cay Golf Course
from all living areas.

This modern executive home in Nassau’s most prestigious
community is available for immediate occupancy.

For information call 327-8536.
Tits De



NOTICE
DR. JAMIL ANGELO MINNIS

Announces the opening of his
Practice in Obstetrics & Gynecology at
Oxford Medical Centre, 4th Terrace East
off Collins Avenue, Centreville on 4th
August, 2009

Telephone: (242) 328-2566/7
Fax: (242) 325-2249

HELP
WANTED

An Established Medical Facility

seeks to fill the following position:

REGISTERED
PHYSICIAN

General / Family Practice (Full-time)
Kindly submit application to:

P.O. Box CR-55050
Nassau, Bahamas
or
Via email to: a_1_phyneeded@live.com

WEMCO g 2 W EAC

6 ied

HOME & BUSINESS 4 ZONES ALARM
SPECIAL $299.00 INSTALLED
HOME/BUSINESSES |
1 Panel & LED Keypad
2 Motion Detertors
2 Door Contacts
1 Siren
| Transformer
4 Amp Sland-By Battery
] Wemco Decal

Less tha adel acy for CC-TINTERCON
GUARD SERVICE, K9UN

By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
The Federal Reserve has
extended the length of a pro-
gramme intended to spur
lending to consumers and
small businesses at lower
rates, but the central bank
said it had no plans to expand
the types of loans being
made.

The Fed said Monday it
was extending its Term Asset-
Backed Securities Loan Facil-
ity through March 31 for most
of the types of loans it makes.
The programme was sched-
uled to end on December 31.

The TALF started in
March and figures promi-
nently in efforts by the Fed
and the Obama administra-
tion to ease credit, stabilize
the financial system and help
end the recession. Under the
programme, investors use the
funds to buy securities backed
by auto and student loans,
credit cards, business equip-
ment and loans guaranteed

by the Small Business Admin-
istration.

Commercial mortgage-
backed securities, which were
added to TALF in mid-June,
were extended through June
30 because issuing new secu-
rities in that area "can take a
significant amount of time to
arrange,” according to a joint
news release from the Fed
and the Treasury Depart-
ment.

The commercial real estate
portion of the TALF is
designed to boost the avail-
ability of such loans, help pre-
vent defaults and facilitate the
sale of distressed properties.
Delinquency rates on com-
mercial loans have doubled
in the past year as more com-
panies downsize and retailers
close their doors, the Fed has
said.

Economists said any help
there is critical because of the
rising defaults. Small and
regional banks face the great-
est risk of severe losses from
commercial real estate loans.
Federal regulators on Friday

announced the biggest bank
failure this year, the collapse
of Montgomery, Ala.-based
real estate lender Colonial
BancGroup Inc.

"The larger banks are sta-
bilizing because they went
through the stress tests, but
many smaller banks are still
in deep trouble,” said Mark
Zandi, chief economist at
Moody's Economy.com.

The TALF, he said, also
has experienced only limited
success in its major goal of
jump-starting loans to sup-
port the market for securities
backed by consumer credit
cards, auto loans and small
business loans — the huge
market known as the shadow
banking system.

"If these markets are not
working, then credit does not
flow freely to US households
and businesses," Zandi said.

The programme got off to a
lethargic start, hobbled by
rule changes, investor worries
about financial privacy and
fears that participants might
become ensnared in an anti-

Ore Estate |

SUMO ULC MLL UC UU Leet aU |

Everywhere The Buyers Are!

Sorat ee

Tel: 502 2356

S2wk-Hi — 52wk-Low

Abaco Markets

6.25
0.63
3.15
2.14

Benchmark

Fidelity Bank

: Cable Bahamas
2.74 Colina Holdings
5.50
1.27
1.32
6.60
10.00
10.30
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.49
10.39
10.00

Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)}

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

52wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

0.20 RND Holdings

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

2.8952
1.4059
3.1031
12.3289
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close

Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV §$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings

- 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Securit y

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Bahamas Waste

Commonwealth Bank (81)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES -

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

ROYAL B FIDELITY

Money at Work



EÂ¥

CcFAL

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 17 AUGUST 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,562.90] CHG 0.34 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD -149.46 | YTD % -8.73
FINDEX: CLOSE 783.13 | YTD -6.20% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

1.34

6.25
0.63
3.15
2.37

2.74
5.71
3.64
1.95
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.13
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.39
10.00

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Previous Close Today's Close

(Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Last Sale

Change Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.07
0.05
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

1.34

6.25
0.63
3.15
2.37

2.74
5.71
3.71
2.00
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.13
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.39
10.00

Change Daily Vol.
100.00
100.00
100.00

100.00

0.00

0.00

EPS $

-0.877

0.00 7%
Prime + 1.75%
0.00 7%
Prime + 1.75%

- Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31,59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3860 2.40 4.75
2.9047 -1.20 -3.66
14817 3.35 5.38
3.1031 -8.35 -13.82
12.9801 2.87 5.79
101.6693 1.10 1.67
96.7398 0.35 4.18
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.2765 2.00 -2.98
1.0622 2.56 6.22
1.0243 -0.84 2.43
1.0585 2.04 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

Weekly Vol.

Div $

EPS $
-0.041

bailout backlash from the
public and Congress.

The TALF has the poten-
tial to generate up to $1 tril-
lion in lending for households
and businesses, according to
the government. Spurring
such lending is vital to turning
around the economy but as
of August 12, the amount of
loans outstanding in the
TALF stood at just $29.6 bil-
lion.

The Fed and Treasury on
Monday said they were pre-
pared to reconsider the deci-
sion not to expand TALF
lending to more areas if finan-
cial or economic develop-
ments merit such action.
However, the government
believes the financial system
is beginning to stabilize after
being hit last fall by the worst
financial crisis since the Great
Depression.

"Conditions in financial
markets have improved con-
siderably in recent months,”
the Fed and Treasury said in
their statement. "Nonethe-
less, the markets for asset-
backed securities backed by
consumer and business loans
and for commercial mort-
gage-backed securities are
still impaired and seem likely
to remain so for some time."

The Fed last week deliv-
ered a vote of confidence in
the economy, saying the
downturn appeared to be
"leveling out.” Fed officials
also said they would slow the
pace of a programme to buy
$300 billion worth of Trea-
sury securities, an effort
aimed at keeping mortgage
rates affordable. The central
bank said it planned to shut
down the programme at the
end of October.

Monday's announcement
was another signal the Fed
wants financial markets to
know it is closely monitoring
its emergency credit pro-
grammes to ensure they do
not generate unwanted infla-
tion once the economy begins
to grow again, economists
said.

"This action reflects the
Fed's view that the economy
is stabilizing but it is far from
a durable recovery,” said Sal
Guatieri, an economist at
BMO Capital Markets.

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE ze SERYICES

Za

Cry LON TAL

Div $ P/E
10.6
11.1
25.6
N/M

0.078 40.4

0.055 : 43.1

1.406 : 8.1

0.249 11.0

0.419 13.6

0.111 : 33.4

0.240 ; 8.3

0.420 15.7

0.322 33.0

0.794 13.0

0.332 15.5

0.000 F N/M

0.035 : 8.6

0.407 13.5

0.952 10.9

0.180 55.6

0.127
0.992
0.244

ases)

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E
N/M
N/M

256.6

Yield
2.05%
7.80%
0.00%|

0.000
0.001

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

0.00%
0.00%
Yield % NAV Date
30-Jun-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

mths

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525



PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune



i

UATE
ARIJUANA

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

IT’S known as Ganja, Herb,

weed, and more than 200 other
names around the globe, marijua-
na is reported as one of the most

COLT AUT tome erm mL

Caribbean among teens.

According to the World Health Organisa-
tion, next to alcohol, marijuana is one of the
most commonly used drug by minors in the

Caribbean.

Mostly taken for psychoactive purposes,
marijuana is said to enhance emotional
responses and create a temporary feeling of
euphoria, but is also known to cause hallucina-
tions apart from other risks.

For many users, marijuana is smoked, but it
can also be taken in liquid form.

Taking a relatively short time to take effect,
THEM MU eRe quae CMON seek Aan ten
can include: dizziness, an inability to control
laughter, a feeling of invincibility, or extreme

fatigue.

With several public and private projects
already introduced to inform people on the
effects associated with the drug, one local doc-
tor is convinced that the community still needs

more information about the plant.

Dr Nisha Armbrister, a doctor of traditional
Chinese Medicine at The Holistic Family
Medicine Center explained that apart from
the pros and cons of marijuana consumption,
marijuana use should be limited to cancer
OL TACesOLSe

Dr Armbrister said: “Marijuana use should
only be used for terminal patients, such as
those with cancer, to induce appetite or help
stimulate energy.

“For many terminal cancer patients,
chemotherapy is a usual means of ridding the
body of cancer. However a common side-
effect is the loss of appetite.

“To build their bodies back up, marijuana
may be an option, but with consuming it
everyday, it can eventually become addictive,
and that is not good either.”

She said some of the long term effects of
marijuana use include hallucinations, short or
long term psychosis, and even depression.

Dr Armbrister said she supports the use of
hemp - a product related to the marijuana
plant group, but seen as a less potent form
with fewer side effects. Given the number of
Bahamians affected by chronic diseases she
said the use of hemp seeds is an even better
option than the raw marijuana.

Overall, she said minors who are introduced
to the drug are far more at risk to addiction
and should seek counseling if they’ve started
using it.

SAS alae



Know
your
zones

i RATHER than relying
: on fragrance, packaging,
i or word of mouth when

: selecting a cleanser or

i moisturiser, what if you

? could choose based upon
i facts about your very

: own skin condition? Face
i Mapping®, Dermalogi-

i ca's unique skin analysis
i available at authorised

i skin treatment centers,

? salons, and spas world-

i wide, provides insight

: into your skin's past and
i present, and allows the

i subsequent prescription
: of a targeted home care

? regimen for a healthy

i skin future.

i Developed by The

i International Dermal

? Institute for Dermalogi-

i ca, Face Mapping® takes
? no more than five to ten
i minutes, is free, and

i eliminates the guesswork
i when selecting products

: for results on your skin.

i Rather than analysing
i: the skin in general terms,
i; a Dermalogica Profes-

: sional Skin Therapist

i uses Face Mapping® to

i divide the facial land-

i scape into fourteen

: zones. Each zone is thor-
i oughly examined inch-

? by-inch through touch

i and sight, and findings

: are notated on a pre-

? scription sheet.

i This prescription sheet
i serves as a customised

: visual guide for you, out-
? lining on an actual facial
? landscape illustration

: where conditions includ-
i ing congestion, break-

? outs, dehydration, and/or
i hyperpigmentation are

? present.

i Face Mapping® main-
i tains an accurate record

? of your skin, which pro-

? vides you and your Der-

i malogica Professional

? Skin Therapist an objec-
i tive view into the results
i of any professional prod-
uct recommendation.



I UNDERWENT surgery about
four years ago, although described as
a simple procedure, this called for
anesthesia. Anything involving anes-
thesia to me isn't so simple. On the
other hand, my husband seemed
somewhat nervous, this being evi-
dent by his serious facial expression
and quietness before I underwent
the procedure.

I was trying to engage him in con-
versation and was overwhelmed with
laughter, finding everything humor-
ous including the doctor's surgery
cap and gown. I realised as nervous
as I was, dwelling on negativity was-
n't going to make the situation any
better, so I chose laughter. There-
fore, I was able to recover from the
surgery with good results.

“Laughter is the best medicine.”
How often have you heard that?
Well it turns out that those sayings
are actually true. Norman Cousins
can attest to that, when he was sick
with a brain tumor, he left the hos-
pital and checked into a hotel room,
where he availed himself of several
humorous books and videos by the
Marx Brothers and the Three
Stooges. In a matter of minutes he
made his discovery. What was it?

Br VaeeN/
| MORTIMER:
iano daNv4|:

iy



of good hearty laughter resulted in
two hours of good sleep without
pain.

It is true that optimists live longer
than pessimists. Research has proven
that people with a better sense of
humour live longer and healthier
lives. The positive results of laughter
and humour is evident when we are
under stress.

Unlike animals, we are the only
known species programmed to
laugh. So, why not embrace it. It is
said that the average adult laughs
approximately 17 times a day. There
is a difference between humour and
laughter. Laughter is the physiolog-
ical response to humour. Research
has proven that 100-200 laughs are
equivalent to ten minutes of jogging.
Let us examine the many health ben-

efits of laughter.

Health Benefits of Humour and

Laughter

¢ Reduces stress, by lowering lev-
els of stress hormones and increas-

ing levels of endorphins.
e Improves cognitive ability.
e Enhances immune system

e Relaxes the body

e An inexpensive anti-aging treat-
ment, it increase blood supply to
your face, enhancing your com-

plexion.
e A natural pain killer

e Increases productivity

e May reduce the risk of heart dis-

case

“When we laugh, natural killer




immune system) and B-cells (which
make disease fighting antibodies).
It also lowers blood pressure, laugh-
ter increases oxygen in the blood,
which also encourages healing.” 'Sci-
ence of Laughter” Discovery Health
Website.

A study conducted at the Univer-
sity of Maryland Medical Center
indicated that a rich sense of humor
may help protect you against a heart
attack. Distressing emotions, such
as depression, anger anxiety and
stress are all connected to heart dis-
ease. The ability to laugh lightens
the physical effects of distressing
emotions.

Laughter and the skin

Do you have lines around your
mouth, and lines around your eyes?
Although describes as signs of aging,
they are also known as laughing
lines. These lines are usually the
result of laughing. Are you going to
cease laughing to avoid developing
laughing lines? Of course not, such
lines are not always a reflection of
poor habits, but a reflection of who
you really are and how you deal with
life challenges, in most cases it is the
result of happiness. However, laugh-

cells which destroy tumors and virus-
es increase, along with Gamma-
interferon (a disease fighting pro-
tein), T-cells Gmportant for our

ing lines can be prevented by wear-
ing sun protection, drinking at least
8 glasses of water and not smoking.
A good skin care routine is also vital.

What can you do to increase your
humour and laughter?



e Look for something funny in
every day life

e Associate with those who are
positive and love to laugh

¢ Read humorous books and watch
funny movies

e Avoid feeding your minds with
negativity, things that are sad and
depressing

Remember to use your discretion
when using humor and laughter. It
is more appropriate to use in an
environment conducive to humor,
like a party and not a funeral. Use
humour to laugh at situations and
not to degrade a person's charac-
ter. Humour and laughter is a nat-
ural treatment for aging. Don't for-
get to cry less, get angry less and to
laugh more.

¢ Kenya Mortimer-McKenzie is an
Esthetician/Anti-Aging Skin Care Spe-
cialist. Interested persons can contact
her at Baha-Retreat Anti-Aging Spa
East Bay Street, East of Lucianos
323-6711 or 323-615

www. baharetreat.com

Email: info@baharetreat.com



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009, PAGE 9B





@x
SEX AND THE NET:

LOVING RELATIONSHIPS



Female Empowerment

MANY in our society would be sur-
prised if they truly knew how the
world of female sexuality is changing
because of the Internet. We have
grown up believing that men are more
technologically competent and fla-
grant in their sexual dialogue. The
role of pornography, for the benefit of
men, is not new and has been well
documented in many cultures and for
many centuries.

Society expects women to behave in
a certain way and conform to expec-
tations. But what are you to do if you
do not fall into the 'norm' or you do
in most areas but not all? If you live in
a society that does not let you openly
satisfy your enquiring mind, then
where and to whom are you to turn?

Today, we are all expected and told
to have healthy lifestyles but who
determines what is healthy? Surely
healthy means a tranquil mind, body
and soul that in turn bring peace and
joy to the whole of our life. To have
any one of those integral parts of our
nature out of step brings a restlessness
and often unhappiness that is not eas-
ily dismissed.

Knowing all of this it is not surpris-
ing that the number of women who
are using the Internet, for sexual
information and satisfaction, is equal

@r

GREEN SCENE





BVAWANGe |e



to men.

In reality, women have become just
as technologically capable as men and
have quickly learnt how to steer clear
of undesirable or degrading sites.
Most of us are used to ducking and
diving from objectionable advances
in real life, so translating that online
becomes even easier. To get rid of
someone or something is just a click
away. Real life is rarely that easy.

When we consider the vast num-
ber of sex related sites we quickly
realise that it is not our gender that
determines if we consider a site to be
‘woman friendly’ or ‘sexist’ but our
perception of our gender.

We may be more drawn to home
pages that have pastel flowery images,
and romantic poetry then feel com-
fortable seeking information. For oth-
ers, exploring more masculine and

Favourite palms

IN A word association exercise the
response to ‘tropical’ will almost always
include ‘palm trees.’ Palms have always
been a feature of Bahamian gardens
and I notice their use is increasing rather
than diminishing.

The coconut palm (Cocos nucifera) is
the best-known palm in the world and is
the most diversely useful, providing both
food and shelter. In The Bahamas we
tend to take its beauty for granted but it
is a stunning tree when mature.

The problem with coconut trees is
they grow so tall they become a danger
to buildings during a hurricane. This is
especially true when the standard build-
ing lot is only 10,000 square feet. Home-
owners who want the beauty of the
coconut palm without its dangers are
opting for smaller cultivars such as
Malaysian Dwarf. These are not as strik-
ing as our regular Jamaican Tall coconut
palms but provide a compromise.

Many more homeowners are going
even more downscale and are using
Manila palms (Veitchia merrillii). Also
called Christmas palms, these never pre-
sent a problem with electric lines and
are handsome with recurved leaves and
straight stems. With the Manila palm
we lose the food aspect but do have
bunches of pretty green and red inedible
nuts hanging down over the Christmas
period.

Some people seem to be overdoing
the number of Manila palms they use in
their garden. After writing this I
checked my own garden: eleven, includ-
ing a grouping of three, a grouping of
two, and six individual plants. I have
seen smaller garden with fifty Manila
palms.

Manila palms are easily grown from
seed. Wait until the nuts drop and then
bury them a scant one-inch deep in
sandy soil. Once they have rooted they
can be transplanted to their permanent
site. Grouping the palms in twos and
threes gives the landscaping a little more
body, especially when the palms are
used for lawn centerpieces. Allow six
inches between the juvenile palms when

grouping.

One larger palm that has become
very popular in Abaco is the Alexander
palm Archontophoenix alexandre), a
beauty with a shapely grey trunk and
green crownshaft and lovely feathery
fronds. The Alexander palm needs its
own space with no competition to be
most visually effective. This palm comes
to us from eastern Australia and is
amongst the loveliest of all palms.

There are a number of palms that are
called fishtail because of the shape of
the leaves on the fronds. The Caryota
Mitis is one most grown in The Bahamas
and technically it could grow to 30 feet
but rarely exceeds 15 feet. Unlike the
other palms discussed in this

article, the fishtail palm has multiple
stems and produces a bushy growth.
Most multi-stemmed palms are shade
lovers but the fishtail palm can take a
good deal of sun. It produces best when
provided with some shade.

After the fishtail palm flowers it los-
es the stem with flower growth, but this
is replaced by new stems from the main
growth.

A true gem of a palm is the bottle
palm (Hyophorbe lagenicaulis) that
comes from the Mascarene Islands in
the Indian Ocean but is no longer found
there. The bottle palm is somewhat
unprepossessing when juvenile as the
trunk is not distended. All this changes
in maturity when the trunk becomes
Falstaffian, positively pot-bellied, raffish
and rotund.

The bottle palm has a short but attrac-
tive crownshaft and the short fronds are
so recurved they almost double back
on themselves. They are often seen in
groupings of two and three but, of
course, need at least two feet between
them. A single specimen makes an
attractive lawn centerpiece. The maxi-
mum height of a bottle palm is about ten
feet.

A selection of palms in the garden
produces a tropical ambience that few
other plants can provide.

e j.hardy@coralwave.com

more sexually graphic venues allows
areas of femininity that would nor-
mally be frowned upon. The anonymi-
ty or pseudo anonymity that can be
achieved via the Internet allows us to
avoid society's labeling and judging
of behaviour.

A fine example of this can be seen
when well-known ‘porn stars’ estab-
lish their own web sites, gain control
over their own careers, and in turn
empower themselves.

In previous weeks, we have dis-
cussed persons who are susceptible
to the lure and compulsive nature of
online sexual activity. Many present
preexisting sexual problems and
undeveloped coping skills to name a
few. In the past, men have presented
more addictive natures, but that is
changing because of the Internet.
Female compulsive online sexual
behavior is, in fact, on par with men.

Because most of the online com-
munication is text based the impor-
tance of the written word become
even more significant. Relationships
are established quickly and accelerate
at lightning speed. The excitement
of becoming whom ever we want
becomes fuel for our imagination and
acts like an amphetamine.

Without a doubt, this can become a

problem when cyber world collides }
with real world. However, in therapy,
we know there are clear benefits for
those who have difficulties relating, :
flirting or who have low self-esteem. }
Chat rooms can be used for 'practice }
relationships’ and, when the time is }
right, it can then be translated into }

the real world.

The way that we communicate has }
changed radically over the last twen- }
ty years in ways that we could never
have imagined. What will the next }
twenty bring? It is important to edu- }
cate persons to understand the perils }
and in turn help to establish more }
positive web sites. The Internet is }
here to stay so we need to take }
advantage and grow with it. If we }
want our role as women to improve }
then we need to play our part in our }

own reinvention.

eMargaret Bain is an Individual and

Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a
Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical :

Sex Therapist. Call for an appointment-
Relate Bahamas at 364- 7230, or email
relatebahamas@yahoo.com
orwww.relatebahamas. blogspot.com.
She is also available for speaking
engagements.



By Gardener Jack



The foliage of fish tail palms is
feathery and adds texture to
individual plantings.

Fe i

- Bottle palms are attractive and
compact and will never endanger
electric lines.







Moms-to-
he stay fit

JACKSON, Miss.

MAUD PRICE, 23, is not
using pregnancy as an
excuse to prop up her feet
and pack on the pounds,
according to the Associated
Press.

Exercise remains a part of
her routine, just as it was
before she became pregnant.

Price has been a part of
the Moms N Motion water
aerobics class at The Club
at St. Dominic's Hospital
since May.

"T felt like it would help
me out with my labor, and it
would probably help me
with my legs and it has," said
Price of Jackson, who is 38
weeks along. "At first, I was
having a lot of leg cramps."

She also walks the indoor
track before the biweekly
classes.

Walking and swimming
are ideal aerobic exercises
for healthy pregnant women,
and experts recommend 30
minutes a day.

A report in this month's
issue of the Journal of the
American Academy of
Orthopaedic Surgeons urges
physicians to recommend
such exercises to pregnant
patients, even if they have
not exercised prior to preg-
nancy.

Data show a pregnant
woman's body can compen-
sate for the changes with no
harm to the fetus during
low- to moderate-intensity
exercise, according to Capt.
Marlene DeMaio, a physi-
cian and research director
of the Naval Medical Cen-
ter in Portsmouth, Va., and
author of the study.

The findings contradict
what some physicians rec-
ommended in the past.

As recently as the 1990s,
there was concern exercise
could be detrimental to a
pregnant woman and her
fetus.

These days the benefits of
exercising while pregnant
are better understood, but
in the grand scheme of pre-
natal care, are sometimes
overlooked. "Honestly, most
patients aren't getting
advised on it unless they are
asking questions,” said Dr.
Emily Johnson, an obstetri-
cian/ gynecologist with Jack-
son Healthcare for Women.

Johnson touts some of the
benefits: keeping weight gain
at an optimal 25-35 pounds;
keeping the heart in good
shape and preparing the
body for the strenuous activ-
ity of labor. Exercise is par-
ticularly beneficial to obese
patients and those who
develop gestational diabetes.
Exercise helps with medi-
cine for the latter, Johnson
said.

Registered nurse Loretta
Buckley has taught the
water aerobics class off and
on for 20 years. Exercising
while pregnant, she says,
keeps the muscles tight in
the legs and abdomen.

"It gives you an enthusi-
asm to keep on doing. Peo-
ple who exercise when
they're pregnant, they are
different people. They want
a healthy baby, and they
want to be healthy them-
selves. And, I'm seeing more
and more of it now," Buck-
ley said.

Over the years, women
have told her they sleep bet-
ter because of the class,
which is the case with one
current participant.

Cristina Lazzari, 32, of
Byram began water aerobics
in her fifth month of preg-
nancy, but didn't attend reg-
ularly until insomnia set in.

"I was having lack of ener-
gy. The little exercise I do
now is really helping me out,
especially with insomnia.
Maybe because I get more
tired physically,” said Laz-
zari, whose baby is due Sept.
9. She also takes a prenatal
yoga class.

Retta Boyd is a registered
nurse and one of the mater-
nal newborn educators at St.
Dominic's. One of her duties
is to give women guidelines
on the do's and don'ts of
exercising while pregnant.

"We always encourage
our patients to do exercise
but not (strenuous) after
they become pregnant.
Don't start hard aerobic
exercise. Continue what you
have been doing prior to get-
ting pregnant," Boyd said.
In her opinion, water aero-
bics is better than other
exercises because "you're
not pounding your body
against concrete (as with jog-
ging). Something you can do
rain or shine."



PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009

r:

MISS Montenegro Anja Jovanovic

walks on the runway,during the

Brennan Linsley/Swimsuit Photos

Ml

swimsuit event of the 2009 Miss
Universe Preliminary Competition...

FROM left: Miss Peru Karen Schwarz, Miss Philippines Bianca Manalo, Miss Poland Angelika Jakubowska, and Miss Puerto Rico Mayra
Matos Perez stand together during the swimsuit event.

- ut q - J
SS Venezuela Stefania Fernandez poses on the runway in the MISS Japan Emiri Miyasaka poses on the runway in the evening

evening gown segment. gown segment.

Tim Aylen/Evening Gown Photos

MISS India Ekta Chowdhry, left, bows as she introduces herself, as Miss Indonesia Zivanna Letisha Siregar, right, looks on, during the
opening event.

THE TRIBUNE

By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

THE 84 contestants of the 2009 Miss Universe Pageant
took to the stage Sunday night in a dazzling display of
both physical fitness and glamour as they participated in
the swimsuit and evening gown preliminary competitions
which will help to reduce the number of hopefuls to a
mere 15 for next weck’s main event.

In less than six hours, the staff of Atlantis transformed
the Imperial Ballroom into a stage and runway fit for a
queen and enough seating to accommodate the hundreds
who came out to show support for their favourite country.

Hosts for the evening were the reigning Miss Universe
Dayana Mendoza and local radio personality Ed Fields
who gave snippets of information about each contestant
as they came on Stage first in swimsuit and then evening
gown.

Between the two events, entertainment was provided
by London based recording artist Anthony Wright.

The evening gown competition was the highlight of the
evening as the ladies gracefully made their way down the
catwalk to the oohs and aahs of the crowd.

Jeweled tones seemed to be the order of the evening
with many of the contestants wearing rich blues, purples
and greens. Other popular choices included silver and
gold sparkling creations (as in the gold dress worn by
Miss Bahamas Kiara Sherman), vibrant red and Grecian
styled gowns in white and silver.

MISS USA Kristen Dalton walks during the swimsuit event of the
2009 Miss Universe Preliminary Competition...

MISS Puerto Rico Mayra Matos Perez walks during the swimsuit
event of the 2009 Miss Universe Preliminary Competition...





THE TRIBUNE



THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST

TAMPA
High: 93° F/34° C

Low: 76° F/24°C

ORLANDO |
High: 90° F/32°C
Low: 77° F/25°C

KEY WEST
High: 90° F/32°C
Low: 81°F/27°C



Clouds and sun, a
t-storm; breezy.

H ig h: 89°
AccuWeather RealFeel

103° F

@ WEST PALM BEACH
High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 80° F/27°C

FT. LAUDERDALE

High:88°F/31°C

Low: 80° F/27°C

>

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

@
MIAMI
High: 89° F/32°C

Low: 80° F/27°C

<



Mostly cloudy, a

ON

Cloudy with showers

Mostly sunny, a

Wednesday

Today

High Low W High

Fie FC F/C
Albuquerque 88/31 63/17 t 90/32
Anchorage 63/17 52/41 ¢ 66/18
Atlanta 90/32 71/21 t 90/32
Atlantic City 90/32 72/22 s 90/32
Baltimore 92/33 70/21 s 90/32
Boston 94/34 72/22 s 90/32
Buffalo 82/27 67/9 t 80/26
Charleston, SC 90/32 73/22 p 91/32
Chicago 81/27 58/14 t 85/29
Cleveland 86/30 69/20 t 82/27
Dallas 99/37 79/26 s 98/36
Denver 80/26 54/12 t 85/29
Detroit 85/29 65/18 t 83/28
Honolulu 89/31 74/23 p 89/31
Houston 93/33 77/25 t 94/34

Low

F/C
65/18
50/10
73/22
71/21
70/21
68/20
61/16
74/23
67/19
68/20
78/25
52/11
68/20
77/25
77/25

Ww

FN ON Dee OD teeter t ON

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando

High
F/C
84/28
88/31
86/30
103/39
94/34
78/25
86/30
88/31
89/31
78/25
84/28
88/31
94/34
96/35
90/32

couple of t-storms. and t-storms. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. shower. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
High: 89° High: 90° High: 90° High: 89°
Low: 80° Low: 77° Low: 76° Low: 75° Low: 75° see RE
ae
107°-82° F 105°-79° F 96°-81° F 96°-84° F High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht. (ft.
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 6:24am. 2.7 12:22am. 0.1
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 657 p.m. 3.3 12:25 p.m. -0.1
Wednesd Zd2am. 3.0 1:15am. 0.0
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thursda S45am. 32 204am. 3
ABACO Temperature, ¥ 8:41pm. 33 2:20pm. -02
, IGM sess sasedvsssesstacetsonaesecsiectared saccbanes 91° F/33° C , 7 ; :
High: 91° F/33°C oes Frid 9:06am. 33 2:50am. -0.2
7a? F/2G°C Low nagenranensaieen 80° F/27° C rday 9:29pm. 3.2 3:13pm. -0.2
a - Normal high .... 89° F/32° C see eee
ee Normal low 76° F/24° C
a Last year's Nigh oo... 91° F/33° C SUN AND itn
3 Last year's LOW o.ccceeceseteeeeeeeee 75° F/24° C
>a Precipitation ||} | ||| Sunrise...... 6:45 a.m. Moonrise. .... 4:35 a.m.
an As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....cccsccsssessscsseeesseseeeee 0.13" ‘Sunset... ... 7-42 p.m. Moonset. .... 6:24 p.m.
FREEPORT 7 Year to date wa 22, New First Full Last
High: 89° F/32° C Normal year to date 0... cecececcseeceneee 28.42" aa = a
Low: 78° F/26° C 4
, Lt
AccuWeather.com ‘ioe’
Forecasts and graphics provided by ii aay
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 i . E
NASSAU High: 91° F/33°C
High: 89° F/32°C Low: 80 F/27 C
a Low: 80° F/27°C
cs - tz
<< “Sg CATISLAND
High: 87° F/31°C
Low: 77° F/25°C
— en ©
Z, GREAT EXUMA a SAN SALVADOR
all, i High: 90° F/32° C 5 ah: ON? 0
Low:81°F/27°C High: 90° F/32° C
ANDROS ow: 81°F/ Low: 78° F/26° C
High: 91° F/33°C ae
Low: 80° F/27°C : in a
a
LONGISLAND
High: 88° F/31° C
Low: 78° F/26° C
Wednesday Today Wednesday a MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W Fic FC FC FC FIC FIC e Low: 75° F/24° C
89/31 70/21 t Philadelphia 93/33 74/23 s 88/31 72/22 t
92/33 74/23 t Phoenix 108/42 32/27 pce 107/41 82/27 s CRO eo
84/28 63/17 t Pittsburgh 84/28 66/18 t 82/27 66/18 t RAGGED ISLAND igh: , ,
105/40 79/26 s Portland,OR 94/34 6216 s 99/37 64/17 cee Low:77° F/25°C
92/33 74/23 t Raleigh-Durham 93/33 71/21 t 94/34 73/22 t Low: 77°F/25°C in %
80/26 64/17 pc St. Louis 87/30 71/21 t 86/30 72/22 t .
90/32 73/22 t Salt Lake City 84/28 57/13 s 88/31 62/16 s ww
92/33 75/23 t San Antonio 99/37 76/24 pc 100/87 78/25 s ipa pines
91/32 79/26 t San Diego 73/22 65/18 pc 75/23 66/18 pc Low. 77°F25°C
79/26 61/16 t San Francisco 76/24 58/14 5s 78/25 58/14 s i
89/31 72/22 t Seattle 85/29 60/15 s 91/32 60/15 s
92/33 78/25 t Tallahassee 95/35 74/23 pe 93/83 74/23 t = *
90/32 73/22 t Tampa 93/33 76/24 t 92/33 78/25 t
96/35 72/22 s Tucson 100/37 74/23 s 99/37 74/23 pc Vw
92/33 77/25 t Washington, DC 94/34 75/23 s 91/32 75/23 t

Today

Low

F/C
68/20
73/22
68/20
73/22
73/22
62/16
72/22
75/23
80/26
61/16
71/21
78/25
75/23
74/23
77/25

Ww

mm

Mostly sunny, a

— allt —
a
— i

Some sun with a brief



Tanne cri






o|1|2

LOW



MODERATE

3|4|5|







HIGH | V.HIGH

ay.
{8| eho
: EXT.

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the

ii

oe LTS



Today Wednesday
High Low W High Low W
F/C F/C F/C F/C

Acapulco 90/32 75/23 c 88/31 79/26 t
Amsterdam 76/24 61/16 s 79/26 68/20 s
Ankara, Turkey 87/30 54/12 s 86/30 51/10 s
Athens 90/32 75/23 s 92/33 75/23 s
Auckland 59/15 50/10 c 60/15 48/8 sh
Bangkok 90/32 77/25 r 91/32 79/26 sh
Barbados 87/30 78/25 pc 86/30 79/26 pc
Barcelona 84/28 68/20 s 83/28 69/20 s
Beijing 84/28 73/22 pc 86/30 70/21 c
Beirut 81/27 79/26 s 81/27 78/25 s
Belgrade 94/34 68/20 s 90/32 60/15 s
Berlin 75/23 57/13 s 79/26 64/17 s
Bermuda 87/30 75/23 sh 86/30 75/23 sh
Bogota 67/19 46/7 sh 68/20 46/7 t
Brussels 81/27 61/16 s 84/28 68/20 s
Budapest 92/33 62/16 s 88/31 57/13 s
Buenos Aires 57/13 47/8 pc 56/13 43/6 c
Cairo 97/36 77/25 s 98/36 74/23 s
Calcutta 91/32 83/28 sh 91/32 34/28 sh
Calgary 72/22 48/8 pc 72/22 50/10 pc
Cancun 91/32 75/23 pc 92/33 75/23 pc
Caracas 82/27 71/21 t 83/28 72/22 t
Casablanca 83/28 71/21 s 86/30 72/22 s
Copenhagen 72/22 53/11 pe 71/21 58/14 pe
Dublin 66/18 59/15 r 68/20 55/12 +
Frankfurt 84/28 57/13 s 87/30 69/20 s
Geneva 86/30 61/16 s 87/30 61/16 s
Halifax 80/26 61/16 s 77/25 59/15 pc
Havana 91/32 72/22 t 90/32 74/23 +
Helsinki 63/17 48/8 r 68/20 48/8 s
Hong Kong 90/32 81/27 pc 93/33 31/27 s
Islamabad 91/32 75/23 t 99/37 77/25 s
Istanbul 86/30 70/21 s 86/30 71/21 s
Jerusalem 85/29 64/17 s 88/31 64/17 s
Johannesburg 62/16 44/6 s 6116 37/2 ¢
Kingston 89/31 77/25 pc 90/32 79/26 r
Lima 70/21 56/13 s 69/20 58/14 s
London 79/26 59/15 s 83/28 63/17 s
Madrid 99/37 61/16 s 97/36 61/16 s
Manila 86/30 79/26 r 87/30 79/26 t
Mexico City 77/25 55/12 t 74/23 55/12 t
Monterrey 100/37 73/22 s 100/37 73/22 s
Montreal 86/30 70/21 t 81/27 63/17 pc
Moscow 73/22 57/13 t 6417 48/8 r
Munich 83/28 55/12 t 88/31 58/14 s
Nairobi 75/23 56/13 sh 78/25 56/13 c
New Delhi 90/32 77/25 t 91/32 79/26 t
Oslo 68/20 48/8 s 68/20 55/12 pc
Paris 88/31 64/17 s 93/33 67/19 pc
Prague 79/26 52/11 s 81/27 57/13 s
Rio de Janeiro 84/28 73/22 s 83/28 71/21 sh
Riyadh 104/40 80/26 s 105/40 81/27 s
Rome 91/32 70/21 s 91/32 70/21 s
St. Thomas 90/32 81/27 pc 91/32 79/26 sh
San Juan 65/18 36/2 ¢ 64/17 36/2 pc
San Salvador 86/30 70/21 t 86/30 74/23 t
Santiago 50/10 41/4 © 54/12 32/0 sh
Santo Domingo 88/31 75/23 t 88/31 75/23 sh
Sao Paulo 76/24 63/17 t 71/21 58/14 +
Seoul 86/30 73/22 sh 86/30 74/23 sh
Stockholm 6417 48/8 +r 68/20 50/10 s
Sydney 70/21 48/8 s 72/22 =48/8 s
Taipei 91/32 79/26 t 92/33 80/26 t
Tokyo 84/28 75/23 c 84/28 73/22 c
Toronto 80/26 61/16 t 77/25 61/16 pc
Trinidad 93/33 70/21 pc 95/35 + 75/23 s
Vancouver 77/25 62/16 s 82/27 63/17 s
Vienna 86/30 63/17 s 84/28 64/17 s
Warsaw 77/25 52/11 -s 72/22 54/12 pc
Winnipeg 67/19 52/11 pc 69/20 56/13 c

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace

TUESDAY, AUGUST 18TH, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

MARINE FORECAST





WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 1-3 Miles 86° F
Wednesday: SE at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 1-3 Miles 86° F
FREEPORT Today: E at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 1-3 Miles 85° F
Wednesday: SE at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 1-3 Miles 85° F
ABACO Today: E at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 1-3 Miles 84° F
Wednesday: SE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 1-3 Miles 84° F



Ue Gy

ti ° “Charlotte

r Nashville~ : Cape Hatteras
Columbia
és Atlanta e 8 AM Sat
MYT Beach

Mont
pnigemety 8 PM Fri

Mobile A

~ BERMUDA

Savannah
packsonville
Jallahassee}.

=
Me

¢ Daytona Beach

\ \ 6 PM Thur |
\ ’
x Tampa, 2) <8 PM Thur | PM Thur

Orlando Freeport

Turks &
Caicos Islands

<8 AM Tue
‘ 8 PM Mon VIRGIN ISLANDS
a (US & UK)
ne 2 Binion, ‘._ Antigua
Seniagg = <0 Ao
Deming
ANA ° DOMINICA
SAINT LUCIA o
° a
(GRENADA BARBADOS

afte
ie. Cu
Santiago dé
= Cuba * *

CAYMAN
ISLANDS o>
i, ingston

aa, ag
——~~Cozumel
°

o Si San Salvador

im.

Managua
Limon

Na

85

Aruba curaca
iene
way

10

5
ke

HURRICANE INSURANCE

ou
tee

Or you can rest easy

Gan, Bs Blown
UIrTLicane

knowing

that yo -have excellent i surance

rage no matter w
as he wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURAMCE BROKERS & AGENTS
' ee | af
Bak (282) B50-3500 ff Ted: (242) 7K ff Tet: (242) 30-2800 ff Tet (22) 336-2308





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009



By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

HE month of August has become

the official month of love for one

local couple who won the ultimate
wedding experience and got to
exchange their vows on live television.

On August 7, 26-year-old Tamika Burrows came before
her friends, coworkers, and family, to express her love for
her new husband 24-year-old Antonio Storr on the first
ever Bahamas At Sunrise ‘Dream Wedding Experience.’

The live show teamed up with several companies to offer
the couple the ultimate dream wedding, providing every-
thing from the location dress, and cake to the rings, and
reception. The only catch was that the couple had to allow
viewers to make the specific selections for the wedding in
the weeks leading up to the event.

When the big day came, both Antonio and Tamika
seemed anxious but excited that their three year courtship
was finally coming to an end.

It was a scene out of the perfect love story - a beautiful
garden wedding at the rear of the British Colonial Hilton,
with yachts passing in the beautiful early morning harbour,
birds singing their morning melodies, and guests dressed in
bright pastels.

Tamika wore an original Apryl Jasmine dress decorated
with lace and white beading.

Just minutes before her walk down the aisle , Tamika
told Tribune Features what the big day truly meant to her.

“What’s running through my head is what I’m going to
say when I reach the altar. I know that I’m going to say yes,
but I’m also thinking what I will say after that, but ?m
good, I’m excited, ’'m happy.”

Tamika who is employed with Batelco, was supported by
dozens of coworkers including the company’s CEO Kirk
i F \ Griffin, VP of Legal Regulations and Interconnection
qi : F i Felicity Johnson, and company Chairman Julian Francis.

Thy, ri =F = i At approximately 7.45am on August 7, the couple was
— i - i | \ Pir 3 announced as husband and wife, and shared their very first



? ‘ fe i i kiss ever
"45 ! Te S. A , fF - Go Following the festivities, the newlyweds headed to Abaco
r “Se hy where they stayed at the Green Turtle Cay Club for four
Ts days and three nights.
. According to the shows Producer Dwight Strachan, the
“aa Dream Wedding Experience was a first, and was well
. received by the public.

“T think everything went pretty much as planned, know-
ing that we were making history where a live Bahamian
wedding was being televised throughout the country, it was

— the most exciting part of the event for us.

“Also being there for this couple who P’ve come to know
over the past few weeks, was an amazing experience, you
could tell that they were so much in love, and we are simply
elated that we were able to be a part of that.”

Sponsors for the event included; The British Colonial
Hilton, Gigi the artist, Modern Men Boutique, Bahama
Fantasies, Jewels by the Sea, Renee Brown, Template,
Vivienne Lockhart, Vows, Donald Knowles, and Sky
Bahamas.

fag “ame fl
7 psa }

map| Zona

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway e 394-1759





Full Text


m Lhe Tribune

=USA TODAY.

SOF
SOF

BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com

CLOUDS &
TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009

7 SUN, FSTORM
: CARS FOR SALE,
TT

HIGH
LOW



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

aS

te Sa



OG MSc: Sto
BAHAMAS BIGGEST :

an charged vt wit
Slaying of mother



Claims of friction
between upper
level police
officers denied

Commissioner
hits back
at ‘rumours’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Commissioner of
Police yesterday denied that
there is friction between offi-
cers in the upper level of the

{ 5 force that might be compro-
-year-O In court ss mising its focus on solving

5 crimes.
By NATARIO It is alleged that on |= — are
McKENZIE Friday, August 7, S enw h ae ff
Tribune Staff Dorsette intentionally = pte pence 1-
Reporter caused the death of = cers at t 7 pes see
nmckenzie@ TaGia Soles-Armony = missioner level and above

—

tribunemedia.net

A 25-YEAR-OLD
man, charged in the
brutal slaying of a
mother of two, was
arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday.

Police have charged
Valentino Hanna Dorsette,
alias “Ballistic” of Sesame
Street, with the murder of
Tagia Soles-Armony, 29.
Dorsette appeared before
Deputy Chief Magistrate Car-
olita Bethel in Court 8, Bank
Lane on the charges of murder
and possession of a firearm with
intent to endanger the life of
another.

DEMERS ose On)



and was in possession of
a 9mm pistol with intent
to endanger the life of
her son Zen Armony.

According to reports,
Soles-Armony was shot
outside her mother’s
home in Sea Breeze as
she sat in her car breast
feeding her three-month-old
son.

Injured and with her son in
her arms, TaGia reportedly
tried to escape her attacker,
only to rear-end a parked car
and hit two other parked vehi-
cles nearby before coming to a
stop.

SEE page eight

Trial of MP’s police
officer son resumes

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The trial of Police officer Vaughn Pratt, who is
accused of having sexual intercourse with two minors, resumed
Monday in the Freeport Magistrate’s Court.

Lawyer Murrio Ducille made a no case submission on behalf of
Sergeant Pratt — the son of St Cecilia MP Cynthia Pratt — in
Court 3 before Deputy Chief Magistrate Helen Jones.

Pratt is charged with two counts of having sexual intercourse
with two minors, aged 14 and 15, on May 6, 2007.

The summary trial began in November, 2007. Valeria Pyfrom and

SEE page eight

The Taste

eo] #

Tuesdays!!

BiG

ef @ medium,
45) Glo oli



Vee) |fe Mele) mel mite lope

fe’ fener. col
* dele Lane |

Teenager charged
with manslaughter
over stabbing death

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A 18-YEAR-OLD man was
arraigned in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday on a manslaughter
charge over the stabbing death
of a man in Fox Hill last Thurs-
day night.

Police have charged Bradley
Miller Jr with causing the death
of Marvin Macintosh by means
of unlawful harm. Miller was
arraigned before Deputy Chief
Magistrate Carolita Bethel in
Court 8, Bank Lane yesterday.
Miller’s left eye appeared to be

SEE page eight

‘September a
August 2009



= A

|

| Pl
2PM Fa

I

eran



il

Fused }

i =



ABOVE: Kachi Armony, the husband of murder
victim Tagia Soles-Armony, carries their eldest
son Chelan as he leaves the court room yesterday.

LEFT: Valentino Hanna-Dorsette, 25, arrives at
court yesterday to be charged with murder



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS,

a



IF THE projected path of
Hurricane Bill holds true, the
Bahamas could escape with-
out experiencing even so
much as a rain shower, mete-
orologists said yesterday.

While Hurricane Bill — the
first hurricane of the 2009

Atlantic season — strength-
ened significantly yesterday,
packing 90mph winds, fore-
casters did not expect the
storm to directly impact the
Bahamas.

SEE page eight



GET READY FOR

voy

* Debt consolidation with built-in savings

¢ Lower monthly payments
© Debt reduction



are at odds with one another,
even fighting with each other
over their phones being wire-
tapped, are “spinning on stu-
pidness.”

A police insider with
many years on the force has
alleged that the “top floor”
of the police force has been
“divided” and “overcome by
politics.”

Division grew in recent
months with Deputy Com-
missioner Ellison Greenslade
and Assistant Commission-
er Quinn McCartney becom-
ing upset over the apparent
authorisation of their phones
being wiretapped — a con-
cern reported in a local
tabloid but also repeated by
reliable sources.

The alleged wiretapping
was first raised in the public
domain by PLP Senator
Allyson Maynard Gibson,
who suggested in the Senate
in July that the alleged intru-
sions and apparent “infight-
ing in the force” were less-
ening its capacity to “protect
our streets.”

Mrs Maynard Gibson yes-
terday said that neither the
Minister of National Securi-

SEE page eight

Ministry of
Works staff

stage protest

MINISTRY of Works
employees yesterday staged
a demonstration protesting
what they claim are long over-
due promotions.

Their action marks the sec-
ond time in under five months
that the employees, who do
electrical maintenance work,
have demonstrated to have
their voices heard.

At the end of April this
year, Bahamas Public Service
Union (BPSU) president
John Pinder said he would
work with Works Minister
Neko Grant to discuss criteria

SEE page eight

BACK 76 SCHOOL

With the Fidelity Bank DebtSAVER LOAN

2

Nassau: 356.7764 Freeport: 352.6676/7 Marsh Harbour: 367.3135 FID DELITY

Robin Hood extended banking hours: Mon - Fri 9:30 am - 7pm Sat 9am - 5pm



NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS? LEADING NEWSPAPER

30% ANNIVERSARY


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009





Colinalmperial.

medical emergencies
don't study economics

.. they don't know the word “recession either.

That's why you need to maintain your insurance coverage
with Colinalmperial even when the economy is weak - to
make sure hard times don't get harder just because you
fall ill or fall down on your luck.

Stay confident. Stay connected.

confidence for life

www.colinaimperial.com

COMMONWE

THE TRIBUNE

Miss Universe contestants

compete for the final 15




THE 84 contestants of the
Miss Universe 2009 pageant
put their best foot forward on
Sunday night for the prelimi-
nary swimsuit and evening
gown competitions.

The preview presentation
held in Atlantis’ Imperial
Ballroom helped the judges
reduce the number of contes-
tants to just 15 finalists.

These lucky few will not be
named until the final show
this on Sunday.

MISS Bahamas Kiara
Sherman (left) walks the
runway in the evening
gown segment of the
2009 Miss Universe Pre-
liminary Competition.

Tim Aylen/AP Photo

MISS UNIVERSE
14 1 E

FOLLOWING the
iM eee CaM ES
the past two weeks,
preparations for the final
show of the 58th annual
Miss Universe 2009
Competition on Sunday
now moves into high
gear for the 84 contes-
tants.

Tomorrow, the beauty
TU CURIS Ty
final media junket where
AMAT case
by reporters from
around the world.

The contestants will
also put their best foot
forward in an on-stage
rehearsal for the big
night which will be
broadcast live on NBC at
BI

UC Cee

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd

ALTH BANK

Announces the opening of its

Prince Charles Drive Branch
August 31, 2009

Introducing

SATURDAY
BEGINNING SEPTEMBER 5, 2009 - IOAM TO 1PM

COMMONWEALTH

LP



fee oe

SyAN 4 ORCC meee eri) etwas (eo
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Newspaper vendor who claime

the police beat him is charged

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A DISABLED Rawson Square news-
paper vendor who alleged he was beaten by
police last Friday was yesterday charged
with disorderly behaviour, resisting arrest
and refusing to give his name when request-
ed to do so by a police officer.

Berthram Thurston, 44, now has to go to
court at 10am on Wednesday, August 26 to
be arraigned on the charges.

Mr Thurston told The Tribune yester-
day that the charges were brought against
him after officers came to his stall yesterday
morning and told him to come to the
Tourism Police Station on Bay Street to
“discuss” the altercation between him and
officers next to his stall last Friday.

Mr Thurston said that when he got to
the station, he was informed that he was
under arrest and was to be charged with the
alleged offences.

Attempts by this newspaper to reach
Sergeant Dwight Smith of the Tourism
Police Station to confirm these reports were
unsuccessful, as he was repeatedly said to
be unavailable.

Another officer refused to comment on
the matter.

The charges come after Mr Thurston
alleged in Saturday’s Tribune that an officer
whom he had previously reported as having
made threats of death against him, parked
a patrol car next to the vendor’s stall on
Rawson Square shortly after 6am on Fri-
day.

. i, y
A i, “4
om | i,
1 hh
h

Maha uRccitelmntice

A
Aa

After allegedly pulling the vendor out
of his car and onto the ground, Mr
Thurston claimed the officer then made
calls to two other officers and the three
proceeded to kick and punch him.

Responding to the allegations that day,
Sgt Smith of the Tourism Station, asserted
that police often have a problem with Mr
Thurston — who needs crutches to walk due
to severe spinal injuries — as he refuses to
park his car elsewhere as he offloads papers
for his stall.

Sgt Smith acknowledged being informed
that officers had told Mr Thurston to move
his car on the morning of the alleged beat-
ing but stated that as far as he was aware



officers “acted in good faith”, leaving the
vendor in peace once he refused to move
the vehicle, but pledging to get a warrant
for his arrest.

However, The Tribune has seen a video
taken by Mr Thurston during the incident
which suggests that he was at the very least
roughly manhandled by officers.

Following the publication of the story
outlining Mr Thurston’s allegations and
Sgt Smith’s response on The Tribune’s web-
site, tribune242.com, readers and customers
of Mr Thurston expressed outrage.

“Vanessa” said: “I know this gentlemen.
He is as he says — quiet. I often observe
his family assisting him with the business. I
sometimes chat with both of them when I
purchase the paper. Now this is pure fool-
ishness.

“Why should he park his vehicle very
far and struggle with the papers to get them
to the stall?

“There is no one there at 6am other than
them and a few people scattered here and
there. It does not take much time for him to
unload and then place the car around the
corner. The police need to discontinue
meddling with people and get on with the
business of solving and preventing crime.”

“Simon” said that if true, the incident is
“outrageous.”

“The police force needs to be overhauled
and officers re-trained. I do understand
their aggression at times because they want
to send a message to the criminals but not
all Bahamians deserve to be treated like
crap,” he said.

Man, juvenile accused
of setting fire to schoo

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A 25-YEAR-OLD man
and a juvenile accused of
intentionally setting a fire at
the St Francis and St Joseph
Catholic Primary School last
Wednesday appeared in
Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

A security guard was sen-
tenced to 18 months in jail
after admitting that he
accepted a number of items
stolen from the school. Dean-
gelo Armbrister, 24, of Infant
View Road and a 16-year-old
of Pitt Road have been
charged with arson. It is
alleged that on August 12,
the two intentionally caused

DEANGELO ARMBRISTER (left) was
ing and stealing; James Thompson (right) was charged with shop



4

i %

charged with arson, shop break-



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

KIRKLAND WOODSIDE, was
charged with receiving.



mour to 18 months in prison.
Armbrister and the 16-
year-old were both granted

St Francis and St Joseph Pri-
mary School to be set on fire.
It was the second time that
the school had been set
ablaze. The first fire took
place just before the school
closed for the summer break.
That blaze also damaged sev-
eral classrooms. The school
accommodates 450 students
ranging from pre-kinder-
garten to grade six.

The accused, who
appeared before Magistrate
Derrence Rolle in Court 5,
Bank Lane, were not
required to enter a plea to
the arson charge.

Armbrister, the 16-year-old
boy, a 17-year-old girl, and
James Thompson, 20, of
Sesame Street were
arraigned together on the
charges of shop-breaking
and stealing. It is alleged that
the accused broke into the St
Francis and St Joseph School
and stole six IBM complete
computer sets, each valued
at $650, a 19-inch Haier tele-

breaking and stealing.

vision valued at $350, a DVD
player valued at $150, two
scanners valued at $230 each,
a computer desk valued at
$300, a Dell laptop valued at
$680 and a $180 vacuum
cleaner. The accused all opt-
ed to have the cases heard in
Magistrate’s Court and plead-
ed not guilty to the charges.

Kirkland Woodside, 23,
and Steven Seymour, 25,
were both arraigned on
receiving charges. Woodside
pleaded not guilty to the
charge, however Seymour
who initially pleaded not
guilty to the charge changed
his plea to guilty. The other
accused were escorted out of
the courtroom as the prose-
cutor presented the court
with the evidence in relation
to Seymour.

According to the prosecu-
tor, Sergeant Godfrey Bren-
nen, police acting on infor-
mation, conducted a search
of Seymour’s residence last

Police expect to bring charges
in connection with jitney crash

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

POLICE expect to “soon” bring charges in connection with
a frightening jitney crash that saw passengers leaping from
the bus’ windows in fear for their lives.

Chief Superintendent Glenn Miller said that police are
“reviewing the matter with the intent to look at possible charges

being brought pretty soon.”

The bus driver, who it had been claimed fled the scene fol-
lowing the July 24 incident, has been questioned and released

pending further inquiries.

One of the questions that is still to be answered is whether the
incident was caused by the jitney losing its brakes, suffering
some other mechanical failure, or if something else was to

blame.

Two people were sent to hospital after the jitney careened out
of control down Cumberland Street at around 8 o’clock on
the Friday morning in question, coming to a stop feet from the
water’s edge outside Senor Frog’s bar and restaurant.

Eyewitnesses reported seeing passengers leap from the win-
dows of the vehicle, apparently in fear that they might have end-

ed up in the harbour.

Yesterday Chief Superintendent Miller, officer in charge of
Central Police station, said that police “got an account” of the
incident from the bus driver and also several passengers.

He said that “in some instances” passenger accounts coin-
cided with that of the driver, while in others, they were “a lit-

tle off.”

week where several of the
items stolen from the school
were found. Seymour is
accused of receiving a 19-inch
television, a central process-
ing unit and a DVD player
all the property of the school.
Seymour told the court that
Armbrister had told him to
hold the items for him. Sey-
mour, who told the court that
he works as a security guard,
said that he simply “wasn’t
thinking,” at the time. Mag-
istrate Rolle sentenced Sey-

bail in the sum of $20,000
with one surety.

Thompson and the 17-
year-old girl were each grant-
ed $7,500 bail with one sure-
ty. Woodside was granted
bail in the sum of $5,000. The
case was adjourned to
November 9.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
ee La a
AO)
Tropical Exterminators
322-2157










q Dredging of Nassau

Harbour underway

THE controversial dredging of Nassau Harbour began yes-
terday morning, Project Manager of Boskalis International
Frans Thomassen told the media yesterday.

The dredging will allow the harbour to accept the world’s
largest cruise ships — the Genesis Class vessels.

The Netherlands-based Boskalis was awarded the $44 million
dredging contract.

Approximately 1.9 million cubic yards of rock is expected to
be dredged from Nassau Harbour during the project while three
mooring dolphins will be constructed at the Prince George
Wharf, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham outlined earlier in the

ear.
: The man-made island of Arawak Cay will be extended by
1,000 feet in length on the western end using the dredged mate-
rial along with steel sheet piles, Mr Ingraham also said.

The dredging is slated for completion in November.

30% OFF
large
Selection
y
Beautiful
Designer
“Cuening
Gowns! !

[

a
a
A, BoB ssa

Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family

Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
* Fax: 326-9953

Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2

Lyford Cay (Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay)
Tel: 362-5235

e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com
www.colesofnassau.com * P.O. Box N-121




9



CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

THE Mier THO eH Resor ATION && CLRASTHO Eves, oa THE kik & Free!
Nasa" Oey PROFESIONAL, CORTE 590s Cappo & UeeoL str Care §rsries

* Carper. Uphokiery, Sine aad Matte Cheating &
Hesiorahien Spectabsi

® Poche Cleaning Sysens nomowes Deep a Hoerey
Soil, Racteria, Creasc,Woiermarks aad aire from
Canpeting & Fominire, renoring them uo like mee
aio fraction of replacment coral.

Carpet, Sofa's, Lowrecats, Chiara, Dining Chas, Cars,
Bours, Groat, Ties, Martie & ‘Soom

* Poran Wool & Sik Caper Cleasing Speciale
* Marble Polshing, Revoniion & Care

* Wood Flour Bewteration

Authorised StoneTech Profeisiogal Contractor

CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS

PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594
OWL WE CAN D0 IT MAT?

leew proc AR EATER 20H He TomenecTyen. coe * wma eRe ong
* pen Sera o_o

UUW LOCAL a oe

PROCHEM SYSTEM tan)

FOR ALL YOUR DECORATING as

“Lowest Prices On The Island”

STORE HOURS:
Monday - Saturday
8:30am - 5:30pm

BILLY’S DREAM
STILL ALIVE

FREE DELIVERY ANY WHERE IN NASSAU AND TO THE MAIL BOAT

¢ E-Z CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE

Donald’s Furniture
And Appliance Centre

SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322-1731 OR 322-3875


PAGE 4, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Shouting shouldn’t trump facts

WHEREVER you stand right now on the
dispute over health care reform, surely you
can agree that we’re not witnessing a dis-
play of the idealized vision of democracy
we were bequeathed by our Founding
Fathers.

Shouting down elected officials trying to
conduct issue-focused forums is not behav-
iour we learned in elementary school civics
lessons. Name-calling and intentional dis-
tortion of facts are antithetical to the debate
that ought to frame public decision-making.

What we are experiencing, in fact, is the
result of what John Sexton, one of America’s
most brilliant educators, described a few
years ago as the decline of civil discourse in
American society.

“We have created a coliseum culture that
reduces discourse to gladiatorial combat,”
Sexton, the New York University president,
wrote in 2005. “Viewpoints are caricatured in
their most absolute form, with moderated,
nuanced, or mixed positions given little or no
voice. Propositions incapable of simple
explanation in catchy, easily labelled phras-
es are ignored.”

This week I sat with Sexton in his office
overlooking Washington Square Park in
Manhattan. Mementos, photographs and
citations from his admirable career sur-
rounded us, but Sexton pointed to the award
he most cherishes, from years ago, recog-
nizing him as the country’s top high school
debate coach.

It may be that Sexton’s notion that victo-
ry should go to those who best marshal facts
is a quaint one, outmoded by media that
appeal viscerally in ways that outstrip mere
words.

There’s ample evidence, even in the news-
room of the Albany (N.Y.) Times Union
where I serve as editor, that truth is hard to
swallow when it conflicts with our own pre-
dispositions.

For example: Two weeks ago, we pub-
lished a Q&A on the health care reform
debate prepared by a senior reporter in our
Washington bureau. It was a helpful primer
that we hoped would be useful as Congress
began its August recess with the health care
issue unresolved.

But about a dozen people called to com-
plain that the article wasn’t true. They didn’t
like its assertion that the pending legisla-
tion does not “mean socialized medicine”
(in fact, it relies on the private insurance
sector) and that it would not “encourage
euthanasia of senior citizens.” Never mind

POG ian ene
:

This
ee Ee

We Can Help You
See the Light!

SDMO Generators

Oe ee RR eR oe wet
Our factory trained techmiclans will facilitate generator installation
be a ee Rss edie] fete es

p
—

that every independent analysis of the leg-
islation supports that reading of the bill.

As we have reported, there is a provision
— likely to disappear now, given the uproar
it has generated — that would authorize
Medicare to cover counselling about end-
of-life care if a patient wishes.

President George H.W. Bush in 1992
signed into law a requirement that hospi-
tals help people with such “advanced direc-
tives” if they didn’t already have them in
place. That didn’t cause a firestorm. Why
now?

Perhaps we were less vulnerable in those
days to what Sexton calls “discourse by slo-
gan.” If so — that is, if we are growing less
capable of dealing with complex issues, and
more susceptible to persuasion that ignores
what is factual — then perhaps we need
more than ever a dose of the very medicine
that led me to John Sexton’s office. I had
sought him out for advice on the effort to
encourage the teaching of news literacy in
classrooms.

It’s not that we need to teach young peo-
ple to read the newspaper. More important
is for citizens to learn how to navigate the
blizzard of information constantly swirling
around us — to critically assess the news
they consume so they can decipher what can
be verified from what is merely asserted.
We need smarter news users.

News literacy can help students distin-
guish between propaganda, advertising, pub-
lic relations and reporting. A literate news
consumer won’t necessarily make a news-
paper editor’s life easier, because there are
plenty of flaws in the product we create, the
result of relying upon human beings to do
the hard work of journalism. But someone
aware of the values and skills underlying
good journalism can better sort valid infor-
mation from the mere mediocre, and truth
from distortion — tasks fundamental to
active citizenship.

Walter Lippmann wrote in 1920: “There
can be no liberty for a community which
lacks the information by which to detect
lies.”

Honest reporting can carry us beyond slo-
gans and reinforce civil discourse. It isn’t
always popular, but its ultimate goal is noth-
ing less than defence of liberty. In that pur-
suit, we’ll gladly put up with some angry
phone calls.

(This article was written by Rex Smith —
c.2009 Albany Times Union).



How can these
actions g0
unchallenged?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

LAST YEAR, I wrote a
detailed account of an inci-
dent which I reported to the
senior immigration officer
at the airport upon my
arrival in Nassau. He
demonstrated to me that he
did not care about white
Americans coming into the
Bahamas illegally to obtain
high paying jobs. His prima-
ry concern was the catching
of Jamaicans and other poor
Caribbean people.

Well how about this one?
On the Cubana flight to
Havana just a week ago,
there was a fellow who was
quite verbose about his
tenure in the Bahamas. He
had no problem lacing his
comments to his fellow
Americans about the
Bahamas with four letter
words which could be heard
by all. He gave the fellow
an education on how he is
able to beat the system in
the Bahamas. This fellow
was almost unbelievable. He

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



stated that he is a property
manager in the Bahamas for
absentee home owners who
regularly send their clients
down to the Bahamas rent-
ing their houses to vacation-
ing Americans most of the
year. Currently, his portfolio
is full. He stated that he has
become an expert in the
field due to the numerous
inquiries he and his group
get from Americans who
buy houses in the Bahamas.
He said that he employs
only Haitians with proper
documentation so he won’t
become afoul of the law,
especially now that there
seems to be a crazy immi-
gration minister in place.

He stated that he had
been in construction in New
York prior to coming to the
Bahamas nine years ago.

It is truly mind-boggling

how these actions are
allowed to go unchallenged.
What would happen if he
were black? I venture that
he would at least be invisible
and not bragging in public
about his exploits and his
ability to get rich in the
Bahamas at the expense of
dumb Bahamians.

Unfortunately, I am not
in a position to point out the
individual as I volunteered
to do in the earlier case. It is
my firm conviction that the
immigration department
should conduct a survey
with regard to these bogus
property managers residing
in the country who are living
the life of Riley whilst pay-
ing no taxes. Surely there
must be legitimate real
estate firms and enterpris-
ing Bahamians with the abil-
ity to sit a house.

“Daybreak foul crow,
Ting a ling a ling.”

GEORGE A CAPRON
Nassau,
August 10, 2009.

66 casuarinas at
Saunder’s Beach

EDITOR, The Tribune.

RECENTLY, I heard of
the Bahamas Million Tree
Organisation — surely an
anomaly, in a country
where plans are currently
in place to destroy 66 ven-
erable trees, which have
been part of the Nassau
scene for longer than I can
remember; and I was born
here many years ago.

A portion of the west-
ern shoreline, specifically
the area near Orange Hill,
has already been re-land-
scaped, to our detriment.
It is mundane and unex-
citing and, what is more,
the new plantings obscure
the sea-view.

Take a drive past Saun-
der's Beach, however!
What a difference!

This public beach, much
closer to town and acces-
sible to all, is Nassau at its
finest and the view, to
which we are all accus-

BACK TO SCHOOL AND
T’INGS TOUGH ?

GET A FREE FRAME

ith the purchase of Lenses

IMPERIAL/@PTICAL

tomed, is unique and spec-
tacular — because of the
wonderful old casuarinas.

Where did the ridicu-
lous idea, to get rid of
these trees, come from?
And, why isn't anyone
speaking out against it?

In fact, it's shocking
that the Minister of
Tourism, and his staff, do
not recognize this asset
and have not spoken out,
loudly and clearly, about
the plant desecration — a
foolish, tragic, almost
criminal and, definitely,
unnecessary act.

Keats wrote “A thing
of beauty is a joy forever.”
How come no-one in the

so-called business of
tourism has enough of a
sense of esthetics to
appreciate the value and
beauty of these 66 trees,
which have lent grace and
splendour to this stretch
of beach for nigh on 100
years, and are now sched-
uled to go under the axe?
There is a modern quo-
tation, which I think is also
a propos, “If it ain't break,
don't fix it!” Please stop
the lunacy. Please leave
our fine, old trees alone.

Barbara
Ovsianico-Koulikowsky
Nassau,

August 1, 2009

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

SLO FO eT te. ELE

xerox @) COPY CENTER
DELIVERS

BUSINESS HOURS:

Monday - Friday
8:20am - 5:00pm

AASSAL:
Collins Ave. & 7th Terrace

Co. (Nassau) Ltd
IMPERIAL OPTICAL

CALL 322-2089 |; ROSETTA STREET AND
OR 393-5959 :: THE MALLAT-MARATHON

@R)

FOR MORE INFO::

= Bobcat
Bt hamas

Vervaiiie © Productivity © Belivblilty

ONLY ON XEROX MACHINES AT
Bahamas Business Solutions Ltd,

‘Criveford St. Chik Feld
Tel: 333-5171 Faas a32-696%

SALE APPLIES TO SELECTED FRAMES. SALE ENDS AUGUST 31, 2009.


THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009, PAGE 5



Man fights for
life after being
shot over $10

A MAN is in hospital
fighting for his life after
being shot over $10.

The victim, a 21-year-old
resident of Poinciana

Avenue, was walking in the :

area of Ragged Island
Street around 11pm on
Sunday when he was
approached by two men in
a small white car, police
reported.

One of the men in the
car asked the 21 year old
for money before shooting
him in the stomach and
right leg. The robbers got
away with $10. The victim
was taken to hospital
where he is in serious con-
dition and an intensive
investigation into the inci-
dent has been launched.

DRUGS

Police are also investi-
gating the discovery of
$44,000 worth of marijuana
found in the possession of
two m/v Sea Link passen-
gers.

Acting on information
received just after 2pm on
Sunday, officers of the
Drug Enforcement Unit
(DEV) spotted two men
fitting given descriptions at
Potter’s Cay Dock.

The suspects had just
arrived on the m/v Sea
Link from Andros.

They had two boxes that
were searched and found

to contain 44lbs of marijua-

na. The 24 year old and 28
year old, residents of Fresh

Creek and Small Hope Bay

respectively, were arrested
and are in police custody.

FIREARM

Police also have in their
custody three men who are
being questioned in con-
nection with the seizure of
an illegal firearm and
ammunition.

Fox Hill Police Station
officers were patrolling the
Springfield Road area just
before 11pm on Sunday
when they stopped a dark
Nissan Sentra with three
male occupants. The vehi-
cle was being “driven reck-
lessly,” police said.

A search of the vehicle
was carried out and police
found a 20 gauge semi-
automatic shotgun with
two shotgun shells. The
occupants of the car, a 23-
year-old Malcolm Road
man, a 19-year-old Dignity
Gardens man and an Eliza-
beth Estates juvenile, were
taken into custody.

CORRECTION

In an article printed on
August 17 entitled ‘Four
Hour Power Cut In New
Providence’, it was reported
that officials at BEC failed
to issue a public notice to
explain the reason for the
power outage over the
weekend.

However, a notice was e-
mailed to the newsroom at
9.30pm on Friday.

ALL LocATIons

IMARATHON MALL, TOWN CENTER MALL,

ALL SALES FINAL

No refund. Na exchange. No return

PLP slams Britain over
Turks and Caicos move

THE PLP yesterday severe-
ly criticised Britain’s decision
to suspend the democratic
organs of the government of
the Turks and Caicos Islands,
calling the move “deeply dis-
appointing.”

Through its foreign affairs
spokesperson, Fox Hill MP
Fred Mitchell, the party said it
is especially disturbed that the
right to trial by jury is also
suspended.

“The position of our party
is that the British ought to
have found another way to
deal with the issues of alleged
corruption in the Turks and
Caicos. This position is well
within the public policy on
this matter by CARICOM, of
which we the Bahamas are a
member,” Mr Mitchell said.

On Saturday, Britain offi-
cially suspended the govern-
ment of the Turks and Caicos
Islands, imposing direct rule
following allegations of “sys-
tematic corruption and/or
serious dishonesty” in the
country.

This is the second time in
23 years that the British have
used the same method to
solve issues relating to gover-
nance in the Turks and Caicos
Islands.

Mr Mitchell said that this
says something about the lack
of effectiveness of the meth-



“The position of our party is
that the British ought to have
found another way to deal with
the issues of alleged corruption
in the Turks and Caicos.”



Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell

ods employed by the British
and a failure of their admin-
istration of the territory.

“We reiterate that Britain
as the colonial power in the
Turks and Caicos Islands has
the responsibility not only for
the economic development
and well-being of the territo-
ry, but also its political devel-
opment.

Failure

“The need to impose direct
rule and suspend the elected
government of the Turks and
Caicos Islands speaks not only
to the failure of the internal
mechanisms of governance
but also to failures on the part
of the colonial power,” he
said.

Mr Mitchell said that
Britain as the colonial power

cannot by this action absolve
itself of the responsibility for
the corruption that they allege
took place.

Further, the Fox Hill MP
said that examples of other
public policy instruments
available to deal effectively
with this matter are there for
all to see.

“Even in Britain itself
which recently saw a crisis in
governance as a result of cor-
ruption it did not result in the
suspension of their democra-
cy, but rather a realignment of
the institutions to reflect the
demands of the public for
openness, transparency and
accountability,” he said.

Mr Mitchell said the PLP
is reiterating its call for an all-
party conference in the Turks
and Caicos Islands to ensure
that this suspension of the

organs of democracy in that

National Youth Council speaks
out over student loan suspension

THE suspension of its guaranteed loan pro-
gramme has shown that education is not a pri-
ority for the government, the Bahamas Nation-
al Youth Council (BNYC) said.

The BNYC yesterday called for a systematic
plan for the reinstatement of Education Guar-
anteed Loan Programme.

“In the face of today’s gloomy economy,
increasing investments in the human capital,
especially through education, should be a pri-
ority for countries seeking to increase both
economic growth and human welfare.

“The Bahamas must recognise that invest-
ment in the human capital recognises that
human beings are as important, if not more
important, than physical capital such as build-
ings or roads in creating wealth and generating
successful economy,” the BNYC said in a state-
ment.

The youth council said that at this point
political finger-pointing will simply not do,
“nationally, we must focus on development
not grandstanding.”

The BNYC particularly expressed concern
about how many great minds are being lost
because of the country’s failed education
accounting system.

“We must ensure the best education for
our young people. However, this will not hap-
pen if we undermine education as a priority by
cutting funding for schools, classrooms, and
students.

“Are we a part of a Bahamian nightmare
where gone are the days when middle income
families could dream of sending their children

a5?

to schools of higher learning? Where gone are
the dreams of struggling lower class workers
who once thought they could afford to give
their children a brighter future than they ever
had?

“Where only children of wealthy parents
can afford to attend college,” the BNYC said.

The tragedy is, the youth council said, that
some of the Bahamas’ brightest minds are get-
ting left behind. The organisation accused the
Ministry of Education of leaving 300 students
hanging with college tuition costs that are
beyond the reach of most families.

“If we do not give greater emphasis to edu-
cation as a priority in the current environment
we will be forced to tackle equally serious and
no less urgent development challenges —
reduce prospects for economic growth as a
result of more young people sliding through
the cracks, and turning to lives of crime and
self-destruction,” the BNYC said.

“We challenge our leaders and guardians to
ensure the right to higher educational oppor-
tunity for the Bahamas’ most vulnerable pop-
ulation — the nation’s young people. This is
the challenge before us today. The Education
Guaranteed Loan Programme’s $100 million
fund has been depleted as a result of gross
delinquency of managers and recipients.

“Our contemporaries must bear their share
of responsibility. We can scarce afford to con-
tinue this way with loan recipients not replen-
ishing the funds that afforded them an educa-
tion and shrink the education dollar for other
young people.”



country are for a limited peri-
od of time and less than the
two years envisaged.

It should also be ensured
that democracy is restored to
legitimately elected represen-
tatives of the people of the
Turks and Caicos Islands, he
said.

“Trial by jury must be
restored. The people of the
Turks and Caicos Islands are
part of the world community
and as such are entitled to the
same standards of democra-
cy, transparency and account-
ability in public life.”

ied lB
ss

eA IE
PHONE: 322-2157



el int HH
POT

LOCAL fishermen
were puzzled when they
were unable to identify
an unusual fish caught

at a depth of 1,500 feet
behind Paradise Island.

Its strange appear-
ance prompted fishing
partners Lee Chong
and Venelasco Newball
to forward photos of
the fish to the Universi-
ty of Miami, in the hope
that experts there might
be able to put a name
to the unusual speci-
men.

The five feet long,
slender fish has an
unusual head and razor
sharp teeth that extend
from its mouth into its
stomach.

On the same day they
made this catch, the
fishing duo landed a 70-
pound Warsaw grouper.



EEO




4" 51,39
Cesspit - 00

328-8754

Bntish Colonial Hilton Hixtel
Marlborough St, Shop #1

Clearance SALE
Everything Must Go
Everything for $20
Free parking at the Hilton

We offer Stringing Services, Repairs, Knotting,
Wiring, Driling and Tha Snack Fix System and
The Mystery Clasps

Pearls and Bread Strands Wholesale and Retail
O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Teal: 242-323-1865

Email; gems-pearsi@hotmail,com

vas making clases starts
=i

Sep



amber sign up now

The Poop Deck

- East Bay Street -

We look forward to once again serving you,
our valued customers.

ROSETTA STREET, EAST STREET SOUTH)

SHOE

Nassau Yacht Haven - East Bay Street

For reservations call:

(242) 393-8175

Exiudes NET items

OoEPort

* of equal or less value.


PAGE 6, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009

Upcoming census aims to

determine crime trends



By LINDSAY THOMPSON

DETERMINING crime
trends is one of the new aims of
the upcoming census of popu-
lation and housing.

The Census Office of the
Department of Statistics will
conduct a pre-census test from
August 17 to August 30 on
New Providence and Grand
Bahama.

The exercise is an integral
part of the census of popula-
tion and housing, which offi-
cially takes place in May 2010.

And in order to effectively
administer the census ques-
tionnaire to the public, the
Department has trained six new
enumerators.

They are Christopher Hamil-
ton, Valeska Johnson, Rosalie
Darling-McKenzie, Renbert
Mortimer, Roy Smith and Keva
Storr.

They were sworn in and
administered the oath of secre-
cy by Rev Terrance Morrison in
a ceremony at the Department
of Statistics on August 14.

The main focus of the exer-
cise is to test the questionnaire

Kris Ingraham/BIS



THE DEPARTMENT of Statistics conducts a census pre-test beginning
August 17 in New Providence and Grand Bahama. Pictured from left are
Christopher Hamilton, Valeska Johnson, Rosalie Darling-McKenzie, Ren-
bert Mortimer, Roy Smith and Keva Storr. And from right are Kim Saun-
ders, census office trainer; Susan Black, and Coralee Mackey, chief cen-

sus officer.

for Census 2010 in terms of rel-
evancy as it relates to the ques-
tions, average length of time it
takes to complete the ques-
tionnaire, and weaknesses in
the questions, instructions or
the design of the questionnaire,
among other things, Kim Saun-

ders, census office trainer, said.

Enumerators with official
identification will visit house-
holds in New Providence and
Grand Bahama in order to col-
lect information on households
and individuals, she said.

The census pre-test requires

that the public provide infor-
mation on housing character-
istics such as type of dwelling,
year it was built, source of util-
ities; and population charac-
teristics, which include infor-
mation on age, sex, marital sta-
tus, health, education, and
income.

“The data generated from
the pre-test will be held in
strictest confidence," said Ms
Saunders. "All persons are
urged to cooperate in this very
important national exercise."

A population census is con-
ducted every 10 years. The last
was in 2000 at a cost of $3 mil-
lion. An estimated $5 million
has been earmarked for Cen-
sus 2010. The Bahamas popu-
lation is said to be about
350,000.

A new component to the
questionnaire is a section on
crime, to determine trends and
possible solutions to the prob-
lem, Ms Saunders said.

When the pre-test is com-
pleted, the Department of Sta-
tistics will determine how to
better fashion the question-
naire.

THE TRIBUNE

FNM observes 17th anniversary
of the 1992 first election victory

SENATOR Johnley Fer-
guson, FNM chairman, has
called on party members and
supporters to come together
tomorrow to celebrate and
commemorate the party’s
first general election victo-
ry— August 19, 1992.

Seventeen years ago, after
the FNM had unsuccessfully
contested a total of four gen-
eral elections since the par-
ty’s establishment in 1972,
the party, under leader
Hubert Alexander Ingraham,
finally achieved a crushing
victory over the Progressive
Liberal Party.

Before that the PLP, under
the leadership of the late Sir
Lynden Pindling, had won six
consecutive elections and had
been the government of The
Bahamas for almost 26 years.

Tomorrow, following tra-
dition over the past 17 years,
in New Providence the party
will observe the anniversary
at a special religious service
at the First Holiness Church
of God in Bamboo Town,
where the pastor is Bishop
Edward Missick.

The sermon will be
preached by Overseer Bish-
op Gregory Minnis, senior
pastor at New Jerusalem
Kingdom Ministries Interna-
tional, and the service will

begin at 7.30pm.

The service will be attend-
ed by the party’s leadership,
cabinet ministers, parlia-
mentarians, Party Officers,
Meritorious Council Mem-
bers, Central Council mem-
bers, officers and members
of the FNM Women’s Asso-
ciation and The Torchbear-
ers Association, and other
party members and support-
ers.

“Each year since 1992,
whether the party was in gov-
ernment or in opposition,
members of the Free Nation-
al Movement family have
gathered for praise and wor-
ship to mark the anniversary
of that great day of deliver-
ance,” said Senator Fergu-
son.

“We do so as an outward
declaration and indication
that we in the FNM continue
to believe in the intercession
of Almighty God, that it was
He who interceded in the
national affairs of The
Bahamas in August 1992
when he caused the hearts of
the Bahamian people to turn
to the FNM for deliverance.”

This Wednesday, FNM
Constituency Associations in
all the Family Islands will
similarly be observing the
anniversary.





PROSPECTUS

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2028, 2029, 2030, 2031, 2032, 2033, 3034, 3035, AND 3036
ISSUE OF B$150,000, 000.00

Issued under The Bahamas Registered Stock Act, and authorized by Resolutions of the House of Assembly, 17th PiC OdECeBcCBP dp P£C odecdBhCALPf dp PEC MAfAcAD __ = ;
MAfAcAD eCOEDPCeCN DPdos HiaG HiHVRG HiviG HiuSG HiuHG HiuuG HiuTG HiuIR/

June, 2009.

Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 19th August, 2009 and will
close at 3:00pm on 25th August, 2009. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 26th August, 2009 and will cease at

3:00p.m. on 27th August, 2009.

If the total subscriptions exceed the sum of B$150,000,000.00 (Nominal) partial allotment will be made to

subscribers, and a proportionate refund will be made as soon as possible after allotment.

amounts so refunded.

The date of this Prospectus is . 2009

No interest will be paid on

IHP uPtvSIG G



iru2riiaDayA2bkR2reAp
yhhAaDylare eN
yAArloRel eN5



gylR

BON IHP DPcIG ) dcm Ns IHPdH/S

h52r52dN.2e4
eSSw3dH/S

kvG

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas invites applications for Bahamas Registered Stock

totalling B$150,000,000.00. The Stock will be available in a range of maturity dates; the earliest being repayable in

2028 and the latest in 2033. The total amount of Stock offered, the rate of interest and the issue price are given below :-

Rate of Interest

Name of Stock

Issue Price
Amount BS
B$

a60P HPGP$n ff)n sNG IHP sN))N(vet /Nwel NE/ S uPtvSIPGPC kINBm

acSPGI $P)N( THP /Nwel ff)vPC2sNG
ve2bevIS2Ns2d7:88

222:692222y$NxP2hGv/P2u IPd H/S uPtvSIPGPC2kINBm2;8;2 MtR

2269222y$NxP2hGw/P2u IP
26;92222y$NxP2hGw/P2u IP
::69 y$NxP hGv/P u IP

2226:922y$NxP2hGw/P2u IP

dH/S uPtvSIPGPC2kINBm2;8;2 MtR
dH/S uPtvSIPGPC2kINBm2;882 MtR

dH/S uPtvSIPGPC2kINBm2;8:2 MtR

dH/S uPtvSIPGPC2kINBm2;8;2 MtR

PT 150,000,000.00T

:69222y$NxP2hGv/P2u IP dH/S uPtvSIPGPC2kINBm2;82 MtR

26;92222y$NxP2hGv/P2u IP dH/S uPtvSIPGPC2kINBm2;82 MtR
:69222y$NxP2hGv/P2u IP dH/S uPtvSIPGPC2kINBm2;82 MtR
222:692222y$NxP2hGv/P2u IPd H/S uPtvSIPGPC2kINBm2;82 MtR

The Stock shall be repaid on 27th August, in the year appearing in the name of the Stock. cC weCPGI mP IN BBPfl cn )PSS /Nwel (HvBH $8 ))NIIPC IN /P6wS5

a60P PcB)NSP d7 ve fn/PcI sNG IHP kKINBm ff8dMG52

INTEREST
ac IHP PxPcI Ns IHP sw)) /NweI Ns kINBm%S1 ff)vPC sNG $NxP vS6 GP cNI ))NIIPC IN
The Stock will bear interest from 27th August, 2009, at the rate shown against the name of the Stock as the percent /P6wS3 a6(P GPFwPSI IH I IHP Sw/ GPsweC $)P ENMPGi)vPC sNG IHP sN))N(vet kINBm
per annum over the Prime Rate (i.e. the prime commercial interest rate from time to time fixed by the Clearing banks
carrying on business in the Island of New Providence in The Bahamas. If there shall be any difference between them,
then that which is fixed by Royal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half-yearly commencing on 27th February,

2010 and thereafter on 27th August and 27th February in every year until the Stock is repaid.

9 dH/S uPtvSIPGPC kINBm d?7

hypoRelk ae RzDRkk ri d783888588 erDP dR oygR ,ay uRyAlaoR Turkk kRIIARoRel
kpklRo %ulTk1 JurbTJ yAA DrooRuDayA dye-k RzDRhl iaeDr5

hypoRelk ri d783888588 ru ARkk Dye dR oygR ,ay uRyA laoR Turkk kRIIARoRel

kpklRo ru dp dye- guyil hypydAR Ir JR DReluyA dye - ri IIR dyJyoyk
hypoRelk ri d73888588 ru ARkk Dye dR oygR ,ay uRyA laoR Turkk kRIIARoRel

kpklRo3 dp dye- guyil hypydAR Ir JR DReluyA dye- r ilJR dyJyoyk ru dp
DykJ

CHARGE UPON CONSOLIDATED FUND
The principal monies and interest represented by the Stock are charged upon and payable out of the Consolidated
Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

TKrrLFoFpUAiC rif.aTafpT

aGGID NE THNMXif TudBl xTmm f TttvfN n uif SfRTtuhbh kif efcuhbm obcl dg kif obib)bt-0 yDDmTBbuTdet xT)
f hfBfTwfN/ n kif obclTcR rfDbhu)feu fRTccTcR bu 72/b) de/3ui/yvRvtu$ 522/ocN/ Wu _MNG
H 482200$ Nec 35Ht AIhIGH1 3226mmdBbuTdet xTmm Bd))fcBf bu 72/b0)0 de/5;ui/yvRvtu$ 522
bceN/xTmm Bfbtf bu 722D0)0 de/Sui/yvRvtu$ 5220 ymm fewfmdDft fcBmdtTcR bDDmTBbuTdet
mb fmmfN 6yDDmTBbuTde Gdh obib)bt Hdwfhe)fcu S(RTtufhfN TudBlt:0

1. (One Person)
Ordinary Signature

Name in Full (BLOCK LETTERS, state whether Mr., Mrs., or Miss and titles if any.)

KcuHG kif ludBl xTmm f Tc/vcTut dg 013220220

AOQOuM,HuNcG yDDmTBbuTdct vtu f gdh 01322022/dh b )vmuTMibfidty)0/
Address (Corporations etc. should give Registered Addresses )

AOO uM.HuNcORNS$GmTBbuTdct gdh uif IudBl tidvmN/ f )bNf ud/fBuhbh de uif gdh) buubBifN ud uif
FhdtDfBuvt bcN )bn f dubTcfN ghd) uif SfRTtuhbh dggTBft Tc pbttbv bcN GhffDdhu$ kif khfbts
rfDbhu)fcu ,zbhm dhdvRi/ Iuhffu 4 pbwn ATdc/ SdbN$_ pttbv-§ bDDmTBbuTdct )bn bmtd
NdxcmdbNfN/ ghd) uif efcuhbm obcl dg uif obib)bt xf tTuf buxxx0Bfcuhbm bel bib)btOBd) dh
ben dg uif gdmmdxTcR belt

P.O. Box





30/ obel/dg/kif/obib)bt/JcufhcbuTdcbm

50/ GThtu/ebhT fbe/JcufhcbuTdcbm/obcl/,obib)bAT)TufN

TOI GTcbcBf/edhDdhbuTdc/dg/obib )bt/AT)TufN

80 ed))dexfbmui obcl AT)TufN

90 Sdnbm/obcl/Pg/ebcbNb

30/ IBduTb bel/,obib)bt-/AT)TufN

0 GTNfmTun obel ,obib)bt- AT)TufN ,gdh)bmmn ohTWHT Bbc obcl,37-/AT)TufN-
0 eTuT bel$ pOy0

Telephone Nos._(H) (W)

2. (Where two or more persons apply as joint subscribers, the additional names and addresses should
be given below.)

Ordinary Signatures
rKdLae PFdU

Names in Full
FhdwTtTdcbm ftuT)buft ghd) uif vcbvNTufN bBBdveutiycf 72$ 522/tidx uif Fv mTB rf u dg kif obib )btud f ener

017$958$538$2220,/
And/OR
SLFipoFpU iF. FpKF ApP FBrFpPaUKiF

kif gdmmdxTcR Tegdh)buTde Tt f(uhbBufN ghd) uviNEbfN/bB Bdvcut dg uif Hdwfhe)fcu dg kif ed))dcexfbmui/dg
kif obib)bt0

Address,



GC522;%522D../ GC522%522D../ GC522%522D../

HHHHIo1 ol ol
yDDhdwfN/ovNRfu yDDhdwfN/ovNRfu

3$858$32$222/ 3$9;$75$222/

Telephone Nos.(H)



Sfwfevf 3$77$35$222/ I/We hereby request semi annual interest to be paid to:

SfB vhhfcu/s(DfcNTuvhf/,f(BmvNTcR

SfDbn)fcu dg Fv mTB rf u- 3$59$;5$222/ 3$788$25$222/ 3$88$392$222/ Bank Name.

ebDTubm rfwfmdD)fcu Bank Branch,

s(DfcNTuvhf ,f(BmvNTcR mdbct

BdcuhT vuTdct bcN/bNwhbcBft

ud/Dv mTB BdhDdhbuTdct- 33;$559$222/ 3;$$222/ 3$3$222/ Account Number
FhdwTtTdcbm ftuT)buft ghd) uif vcbyNTufN bRBw)

JHikiffFv mTBrf u/b)dveu/TVT cBmvtT wf/dg/kiffimTB edhDdhbuTdct BdcuTcRfcu mTb TmTun si¥@i72422/

udubmmfN/o1882$237$2220








THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009, PAGE 7



Online readers have their

say on marital rape law

ON www.tribune242.com, we
asked our readers if they think
the proposed legislation out-
lawing marital rape should be
passed. Of the 150 persons who
responded, 61 voted no and 89
yes. Here are some of the com-
ments left by those participat-
ing in the poll:

KHALILA:

This is such a frustrating and
unbelievably stupid debate. I
cannot even believe in the 21st
century, with all the strides
towards progress this country
has made and all the female
empowerment, we are even
TALKING about it.

I would like to pose a ques-
tion to all those archaic, sexist
people who oppose it — what if it
were your daughter? Your
mother? Your sister? Your
friend? Your aunt? And she had
absolutely no recourse under
the law to have her husband
punished for the heinous crime
of abusing her body, for treating
her like an object. Certainly, she
could leave him, but as for his
punishment? Should he not be
held accountable for his
demeaning actions?

Of course there will be abus-
es, as there are with any law.
But whether or not there are or
will be should not determine
whether we pass the amend-
ment. The only question that
matters is — is it right that a man
have irrefutable rights to a wom-
an's body when she says ‘I do’?

Iam APPALLED that this
is even being discussed and even
more disgusted by the women
who oppose it. Hello ladies, if
you rape your husband (how-
ever impossible that may seem)
under the current law, he can
persecute you. WHY WOULD
YOU NOT WANT EQUAL
RIGHTS? And maybe the law
doesn't even pertain to you and
never will, I hope it doesn't, but
what about those women who
it does apply to? Who repeat-
edly get raped by their hus-
bands? Stop being so narrow-
minded and selfish!

BERNARD FERGUSON:

The rights of a woman should
be respected, this is not the
troglodyte era, women have
enough emotional stress, and do
not need the added frustration

of an uncaring unemotional hus-
band. Further, who elected min-
isters to govern our country?

OPUS31-FH:

Here’s a question to those
who pose that this law supports
women in the Bahamas, who
apparently do not have all the
rights they need to confront rape
under our current archaic laws:
What evidence can a man pro-
duce to prove that in a case
when he did not wish to have
sex with his wife, she coerced
him against his wishes? If rape is
sexual activity without the con-
sent of one party, how does a
husband prove that in court,
particularly if there are no bruis-
es?

CONCHY JOE:

If a woman is forced to have
sex by her husband she can
divorce him. If he beats her she
can report him for the abuse.
Why would a woman stay in a
relationship with a "husband"
who does such things? GET A
DIVORCE! If she reports him
for rape then the marriage is
over anyway. Believe me, there
will be abuse of this law! Eg -A
man and his wife of several
years are having financial prob-
lems.

The man continues to have
sexual urges for his wife but she
refuses has advances. This con-
tinues until the man gives into
temptation and has sex outside
the marriage. When the wife dis-
covers his affair she decides to
fix him good (Hell hath no fury
like a woman scorned). She has
sex with him then promptly goes
to the police to report him for
rape.

A medical examination
reveals he had sex with her so
off to court they go. Once in
court, it is his word against hers!
When the details come out
about his infidelity the court will
most likely side with her and
homeboy spends the rest of his
days in Fox Hell prison, while
the wife enjoys all the man
owns.

Shoot, a woman could have
an affair with a sweetheart, have
sex with her husband then
report his behind for rape to get
his backside locked up. Tell me,
just how does a man prove that
the sex he had with his wife was
consensual? This thing has the

potential of creating more prob-
lems than it solves. In the final
analysis, it will be his word
against her’s.

The marriage will end. And
the lawyers will have lots more
income to collect. While the
courts will be further burdened
with more cases they can't get
to. [say no, no a thousand times
NO!

MARRIED LADY:

If a man has to rape his wife,
then something is wrong in the
marriage all together. I voted
no because I am a married
woman and if there comes a
time that my husband would
have to force me to sleep with
him I would not call that rape. I
think that this type of act within
a marriage should be worked
out with a marriage counsellor,
not court, to see why this has
happened.

Passing a law like this would
be stupid and inhumane. Find
another solution, not jail time.
Lastly there are thousands of
women out there that are raped
by strangers everyday and get
away with it. First of all, put
more emphasis on these cases
and find these attackers first
before targeting married cou-
ples that have a past and future
together. Allow them to seek
counselling first and then move
forward if there is reason to.

CRAIG NIXON:

There should never be laws
that uphold or condone abuse
toward anyone ... the act of rape
not only suggests intercourse but
also suggests some form of force
or violence toward another ...
When a marriage has deterio-
rated toward the point of this
form of violence, then its time to
seek counselling and possibly
separation.

E ALBURY:

Surely people can understand
that this law is to protect
women. If a marriage is at the
point that a man has to violent-
ly have sex with his wife, then
the marriage is far beyond the
point of love. I cannot under-
stand anyone in position in a
church thinking that this was
God's plan for a woman. The
Bible says that a husband should
lay down his life for her, clearly

not what his intention is if he
rapes her.

RAM66:

Legally there is no such ani-
mal as "marital rape" however
we know that rape, being
defined as (my definition) sexu-
al intercourse without consent,
occurs in marriage. I feel that
the law should be modified to
have these cases tried, as Sena-
tor Gibson has suggested, in a
family court and that "marital
rape" should be defined as "the
act of sexual intercourse (pene-
tration) without consent
between a married man and
woman".

DARINIQUE:

I voted no because I feel as if
the charge for "rape" within a
marriage should be called anoth-
er name and addressed in anoth-
er way. To me, it opens the door
of making marriage just a com-
modity and on the same page
as a civil union. I believe rape is
wrong, whether it happens to a
single person or within a mar-
riage. However, by changing
such a law, you are setting the
pathway for destruction of the
home and society. More divorce,
more broken homes, and less
family life. Government should
consider exactly why they are
making these amendments; to
please the United Nations, or
for the goodwill of the people

SCRIBE:

This debate really isn't about
a man's rights to force his wife to
have sex, but about what's
becoming more and more clear
— the fact that Bahamian women
are second class citizens in their
own country. As for the argu-
ment that such a law would
enable women to falsely accuse
their husbands of rape out of
spite, well the same could hap-
pen regardless of marital status,
so are these people saying we
should do away with rape laws
altogether? It's times like this
that I really fear for our coun-
try's future.

The new www.tribune242.com
poll question is: Which Minis-
ter would you most like to see
shuffled out of Cabinet? Please
log on and join the debate!



git

Ne ee

SI a ae! TS

The Tribune

Cabinet set
for shuffle?

RCNA I

THE OTHER
HALF IS

5% off

New Arrivals

Harbour Bay

+ Extra 15% Off

For Teachers & School staff

On New Arrivals

VISIT US ON THEWEB @ aebahamas.com







THE VIEWING PARTY =— goatee
= | PSs:

THE 2009 MISS UNIVERSE PAGEANT Sees ES LHE! :
Sunday, August 23rd, 8:00pm a OSes: :

4%") The Royal Deck, Atlantis, Paradise Island ~ | Sek! :
£ — Seer F
Witness the crowning of the 2009 Miss Universe on : | = =e = :
giant multiple screens. Enjoy an open bar and a sumptuous — =

alfresco buffet. This royal fete will culminate with the
prestigious Coronation Ball at 11:30pm where you can
mingle with the newly crowned Miss Universe and her fellow
contestants! Celebrate an experience that will never happen again!

Tickets: $185

Miss Universe Pageant Event Schedule:

MISS UNIVERSE FINAL SHOW
Sunday, August 23rd, 9:00pm

Imperial Ballroom, Atlantis, Paradise Island

Buy 3
Tickets, get
1 free!

Be there live to witness the crowning of the
new 2009 Miss Universe!

Tickets: General $175, Deluxe $250, Preferred $400, Gold $750
VIP $1000 (includes admission to Coronation Ball with open bar and gourmet buffet)

aes

CORONATION BALL LOPRQDILA

Sunday, August 23rd, 11:30pm
The Royal Deck, Atlantis, Paradise Island

Gel calc MUMIA NALA SOM ORIN lit)
and her fellow contestants and enjoy
great music, a gourmet buffet and

an open bar!

Tickets: $145
NEW COROLLA. WEM STYLE
{ BRAKE CONTAOL, oo

ee a

Te eth
For tickets and information call ;

the Atlantis Box Office at 363-6601

AAALALSES
ee ee i a te] ee

FEEPORPAMCE, COMPORT ARD GQUALITE.

EXECUTIVE Auto Mall, Shirley Street copp. St. Matthew's Church]
b , (4 | Open Mon to Fri Sam - 3:30pm =
MOTORS LTD | 5. 39721760" Cy
Tel; 397-1700 ee?

E-mail: execmotonabate! net. bs ae

AUTHORISED TOVOTA DEALER | Parts and service guarantecd —s

Aalladle ie Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales [Freeport ® Queene Hiv 392-6120 « Anais Wiotor Mad, Don Mackay Bid 367-2018


PAGE 8, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

At the moment, Hurricane
Bill is projected to pass the
islands on the northeast on Fri-
day and Saturday, heading
directly for Bermuda.

Chief meteorology officer
Basil Dean told The Tribune
that we may even be so fortu-
nate as not to get any of the rain
the storm is carrying.

However, he warned that
while it definitely looks like the
Bahamas will make a lucky
escape, weather systems are
subject to change and forecast-
ers continue to monitor Hurri-
cane Bill closely.

At press time last night,
weather experts were predict-
ing that Bill will develop into a
major hurricane by tomorrow.

In its Spm update, the Miami-

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

Hurricane

based National Hurricane Cen-
tre reported that Bill was locat-
ed about 975 miles east of the
Lesser Antilles. The hurricane
was moving towards the west-
northwest at about l6mph.
Maximum sustained winds were
at 90mph with higher gusts.

Meanwhile, the disorganised
Tropical Depression Ana is
expected to bring some rain and
even thunderstorms to the
Bahamas within the next 12 to
24 hours.

The system was expected to
begin affecting the southeast-
ern Bahamas late last night.

Islands in the central
Bahamas could also experience
some of the system’s effects
within the next day or two.

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, 8... The Bahamas

Teenager charged

FROM page one

blood shot and he had a bandage over a wound
on his left cheek.

The victim in the case, Macintosh, 31, was
reportedly stabbed multiple times outside his
home in Obediah Avenue, off Springfield Road,
when a confrontation with a neighbour escalated
into violence sometime before 9 pm last Thurs-
day. He had reportedly been outside his home
with a 19-year-old girl when he got into an argu-
ment with a woman neighbour and four men
pulled up in a green Ford Ranger truck and got
involved in the argument. The 19-year-old girl
was injured and Macintosh was stabbed several
times before he ran into the house and collapsed.
He was pronounced dead when emergency med-
ical personnel arrived at the scene.

Miller, who is represented by lawyer Carmen
Brown, was not required to enter a plea to the
manslaughter charge. Brown told the court that
her client had a doctor’s appointment scheduled
for Monday, but was unable to see the doctor
because he was in police custody. Magistrate
Bethel ordered that Miller be taken to the doctor
to be treated for his wounds. Miller was remand-
ed in custody and is expected to appear in Court
11, Nassau Street, on Monday for a bail hearing.

Ministry of Works
FROM page one

for promotions and adjustments to
the career paths of the electrical
department workers.

Yesterday, Mr Pinder said the min-
istry claims to have now established a
task force to look into the issue, and
the union expects to meet with them
on Wednesday.

He said he also anticipates that “in
short order” six people from the
department who were identified for
promotions following the April
protest should see those recommen-
dations executed.

Mr Pinder said the issue has been
“brewing” for about three years.

“That’s why they’re so irate. Every
time they’re close to closing they
switch Permanent Secretary or some-
thing like that,” he added.

About 15 Ministry of Works
employees participated in the demon-
stration on Thompson Boulevard yes-
terday.

Man charged

FROM page one

Family and friends believe that
Soles-Armony — who had just
returned home from St Kitts
where she lived with her husband
— may have been a victim of mis-
taken identity or the target of an
armed robbery gone wrong.
Dorsette, who is represented
by attorney Krysta Smith, was not
required to enter a plea to the
murder and gun possession
charges. Ms Smith requested that
her client be taken to hospital
because he had been “bringing
up” blood. Magistrate Bethel said
that arrangements would be
made for Dorsette to be seen by a
doctor at Her Majesty’s Prison.
Dorsette was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison yesterday. The
case has been transferred to
Court 11, Nassau Street and
adjourned to August 24, which is
when a date will be set for the
start of a preliminary inquiry.

DEATH NOTICE

MRS. JULIA
EMILY (EMMIE)
PINDER

Mrs. J. E. Emmie Pinder,
fs | aged 93, passed away at
* 9% her home in Nassau, The

) Bahamas on Sunday, 16th

August, 2009,

A funeral service will be held for Mrs. Pinder
at Ebenezer Methodist Church, East Shirley
Street, Nassau on Friday, 21st August, 2009 at
3:30 p.m.

Mrs. Pinder was pre deceased by her husband
Baron N. Pinder and her son, Keith Pinder and
is survived by her daughter, Janet Pinder and
her son, Godfrey Pinder and many other relatives
and friends.

Instead of flowers, donations may be made to
Ebenezer Methodist Church Soup Kitchen,
P.0.Box 55 6145, Nassau or the Cancer Society
of The Bahamas, PO.Box 58 6539, Nassau.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited,
2? Palmdale Avenue, Nassau, The Bahamas.



FROM page one

ty nor the Attorney General had
denied that the wiretapping
occurred and that the “Bahami-
an people will have to make up
their own minds whether it hap-
pened.”

“It’s a very serious matter,”
she said.

Yesterday The Tribune’s
source said anger was directed
at the Commissioner by senior
officers over the alleged wire-
tapping, as “the only person who
would know who and why that
was authorised and for how
long.”

“It’s created extreme friction,”
said the insider.

He reiterated the Senator’s
suggestion that the situation is
not conducive to the force ful-
filling its mandate.

“It’s not why you have so
much crime, but it’s why police
may not be as effective as they
can be to deal with the crime
problem. It’s not that we don’t
have the expertise on the force,”
he said.

But Mr Ferguson denied this
claim and said that tabloid
reports and information reach-
ing this newspaper that all may
not be well in the force may be
spread by people looking to push
a particular “agenda.”

He added: “In so far as specu-
lating as to what is happening in
the RBPF, I don’t see anything
wrong with it. People want to
speculate about who wants to be
Commissioner next in this beau-

SUPERVISOROF FINANCE

A leading Bahamian company, is seeking applicatioufseraisor of Finance

JOB OBJECTIVE:

with investors and regulatory agencies.

ORGANIZATIONAL POSITION :
Reports to th®irectorof Finance.

PRINCIPAL DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES :

Core responsibilities include
Assisting in managittige financial affairs of the company
Supervise key components offthancedepartment



To provide financial leadership for the company by managing the financial resources, supervisir{
the certain key aspects of the camfsaaccounting function and maintaining appropriate relations

Ensure accurate and timely interim and annual financial reporting in accordance with

International Accounting Standards
Assist in the annual budget exercise

Assist irthe training and development of line accounting staff

Coordinate the annual audit process
Assist in managing cashflow and treasury functions
Any other related duties as considered necessary

REQUIREMENTS & PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES :

Candidates must meet thédwing criteria:

Bachelor's Degree or higher in accounting or related financial field
Professional accounting designation recognized by The Bahamas Institute of Chartered

Accountants

Minimum of seven years experience in accounting, finance and budgeting.
Leadership, management and direct supervision experience is required. Previous
direct experience in planning and executing all aspects of financial accounting and

budgetary functions

Bahamian citizen

Accounting software experience

Proficient in the usaf the Microsoft range of applications
Strong technical and managerial skills

Excellent writing, communication, analytical and reasoning skills

Excellent organizational and time management skills

Team Player with the ability to add value and strengtitteam and team goals

Honest, hardworking and ability to meet deadlines

The position offers an attractive salary and benefits package, reflecting the successful
applicant's experience and qualifications, including a pension plan, medical, life, dental
and vision coverage.

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumés including referencedumpiste3t

2009to: Email: finsupervisor@ gmail.com



Friction claims

tiful democracy. They should
have a right to do that and that
should not threaten anybody, but
I don’t know anything about any
conflict,” he said.

Mr Ferguson said that noth-
ing “exists at this time” which
interferes with the police’s abili-
ty to carry out its mandate.

“We've got to be focused on
trying to deal with the crime sit-
uation. We cannot allow any-
thing to deal with or interfere
with that.”

Sources claim discontent in the
upper echelons of the force was
stirred when Mr Ferguson
objected to being sent to head
the police college under the for-
mer PLP administration, as sev-
eral former assistant commis-
sioners have been, prior to retire-
ment.

When the FNM won the gen-
eral election in May 2007, veter-
an officer Mr Ferguson — the
brother of FNM senator John-

ley Ferguson — was instead
made acting Commissioner,
before being confirmed as Com-
missioner.

Disgruntlement and political
controversy burgeoned as Mr
Ferguson was promoted around
the same time that a number of
other senior officers and Assis-
tant Commissioners who had
reached the mandatory age of
retirement — as Mr Ferguson
also has — were pushed to
accept retirement packages by
the present government that
expressed its intention to
“restructure” the top heavy
force.

Two other younger officers —
Marvin Dames, now Senior
Assistant Commissioner in
charge of Grand Bahama, and
Ellison Greenslade, now Deputy
Commissioner — were sent to
Canada by the present govern-
ment for training that was
expected to be a prelude to one
of the pair taking over the reins
of the force.

But upon their return, Mr Fer-

guson remained.

A police insider told The Tri-
bune that since being appointed
police chief he has taken the lead
in several key investigations of
a potentially political nature —
such as the investigation into
alleged corruption at the Min-
istry of Housing.

Such responsibilities are
believed to form a part of the
decision to keep Mr Ferguson at
the helm of the force for the time
being. Nonetheless, sources claim
factions have developed in the
force in support of various indi-
viduals taking over from Mr Fer-
guson and police “politics” is
becoming a distraction.

“You have Mr Greenslade
and his supporters, the Commis-
sioner and Quinn McCartney
and Dames. It’s a divided police
force, all of them have their fac-
tions who want to see them at
the top.”

The Tribune’s source said
there is a broad base of support
for Ellison Greenslade taking
over the force.

FROM page one

Lorna Longley-Rolle of the Attorney General’s
Office are prosecuting the case. The prosecu-
tion closed its case on June 23.

According to the particulars, it is alleged that
Pratt got the girls drunk and had sex with them in
his bedroom at home. The girls were put in the
care of him and his wife, who was off the island at
the time of the alleged incident.

In his submission, Mr Ducille said that the
prosecution had failed to establish a prima facie
case against his client.

He stated that it is easy for someone to make
a complaint of a sexual nature where in the cir-
cumstance it is their word against the accused.

Mr Ducille noted that there were some dis-
crepancies in the evidence given by the two girls
concerning the alleged incident.

He also noted that the doctor’s report indi-
cated that there was no sign of bruising on the
vagina of the 14 year old. While there was some
bruising on the vagina and rectum of the 15 year
old, he said there was no evidence to suggest
how she sustained those injuries.

Mr Ducille said the girls were out. Mr Pratt let
them in the house and went back to his room.
“When he woke up, he saw them (the girls) in the
bed,” he said.

“The prosecution must satisfy a prima facie
case against Mr Pratt. As it stands...there is noth-
ing...to go before you which can convince you of
the allegations made against Mr Pratt.

“T implore the court to rule that the prosecu-
tion has failed to establish a prima facie case,”
said Mr Ducille.

Mts Pyfrom insisted that the offence of unlaw-
ful sexual intercourse was committed by Mr Pratt.

She told the court that doctors examined the

K2700/K3000

1V/4TON 21/2 TON

2.7 DIESEL STO
AIR CONDITION
POWER STEERING
FOLO-DOOWWN SIDES
RADIO/ CASSETTE

ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED

Thompson Bled, « Oakes Field
t, 242.326.6377 f, 242.326.6315
6. Sanping@ocoralwave.com

#74 Wut Rory
PO. Boor MAA
1 (PAP) Wadd? £43) 90-8238

Trial of MP’s son

girls at the hospital on May 6, 2007.

She said the doctor reported that the 14 year
old had already taken a bath and changed her
clothing. Her genital exam was normal, but doc-
tors noted that the complainant was emotional
and wanted to cry.

She noted that doctors reported that the 15
year old had redness to the rectum, anus and
vagina.

Mrs Pyfrom said that on May 4, Mrs Pratt had
collected the girls from the Home and left the
island with her son.

She said the girls told a social worker that
Pratt got them drunk. He is accused of giving
each girl five rounds of drinks — one was given
Vodka and cranberry juice and the other was
given Vodka and orange juice.

He is alleged to have bought them more drinks
at a local bar and took them to the Bowling
Alley. He gave the girls some money and left
them at the Bowling Alley.

Mrs Pyfrom said the girls returned to Pratt’s
home around 11pm. Pratt opened the door and
went to his room.

She said Pratt allegedly invited the girls to
sleep with him in his room. The girls alleged that
Pratt touched their breasts and vagina with his
hands and had sex with them.

Pratt was arrested on May 7.

She noted that the evidence of unlawful sex
was Satisfied by the prosecution. She also noted
that when Pratt’s wife left the jurisdiction, the
girls should have been returned to the Home.

Magistrate Helen Jones adjourned the case to
November 24 when she will deliver her ruling
in the matter.

KID

KIA MOTORS

The Power to Surprise -

3.0 DIESEL STO
AIR CONDITION
POWER STEERING
POWER WINDOWS
FOLO-DOWN SIDES
RADIO/CASSETTE

ON THE SPOT AM ANOING WITH
COMMOMWEALTH BANK

INSUAANCE AVAILABLE WITH
ADVANTAGE INSURANCE
BROKERS & AGENTS LD.


TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



Stubbs’ third place flex earns
him spot in Mr Olympia ’09

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

AFTER six years on the pro-
fessional bodybuilding scene, fea-
tures in various international pub-
lications and endorsements, the
Bahamas’ premiere bodybuilder
reached the pinnacle of the sport
with a qualification to its most
prestigious show.

With a third place finish this
weekend at the Europa Super
Show in Dallas, Texas, Joel
Stubbs earned a berth to the 2009
Mr. Olympia contest, scheduled
for September 24-27 in Las
Vegas, Nevada.

Stubbs finished third in the
field of 15 behind Dennis James
and Bill Wilmore.

Stubbs earned his pro card in
2003 after dominating the ama-
teur ranks with a convincing win
at the Central American and
Caribbean games and has since
been one of the most well known
names in the sport.

He made his pro debut in 2005
and was shortly thereafter fea-
tured in “Flex” magazine as one
of the “Best Backs in the History
of the Bodybuilding.”

He became the first Bahamian
to qualify for the event, the con-
clusion of the International Fed-
eration of Bodybuilders (IFBB)
circuit since 1965.

“Tt feels good to be the first
Bahamian to reach the Olympia
stage. It was a dream come true
for me. After the dream you have
to put a strategy and plan in place
to make it possible and to make it
happen. The only word I can pos-
sibly use to describe what I feel
right now is just happy," he said,
"Knowing I made it, it brought
some tears to my eyes as I
thought back to where I started

from in the amateur ranks, to the
knee surgeries, to the possibility
of being sidelined for good. I
eventually was able to dust myself
off and get back into the game."

With his 6'3" 325 pound frame,
Stubbs has garnered much atten-
tion in bodybuilding circles, and
expectations for his potential have
continued to increase since the
feature in Flex magazine.

"From then on I have always
been told that if I could get the
legs to match the upper body that
makes me symmetrically bal-
anced that I would be a force to
be reckoned with on the world
stage and possible that I could be
crowned Mr. Olympia one day. I
just had the mindset to push on
and it was all motivation from
there on," Stubbs said.

Stubbs was thankful for an
opportunity to create a storybook
ending for his season after an
untimely food poisoning incident
nearly derailed the 2009 cam-
paign.

"Thad many days where I was
forced to overcome obstacles. I
had food poisoning about a
month and half away from this
last show and it really placed
things in jeopardy. I was think-
ing about sitting it down and not
competing at all this year because
it really took a toll on my body,"
he said, "What turned it around
for me was speaking to my people
back home that I train with
Albert Rahming, Joey Rolle,
Charles Johnson. They kept me
grounded, kept me motivated.
They continued to push me and
reassured me that I had come too
far to let anything keep me from
getting there. So we decided to
come up with a new plan, a new
strategy to get my act together."

Tt was Stubbs’ second show in
as many weeks after a 12th place

JOEL STUBBS has earned a berth to the 2009 Mr Olympia...

finish at another IFBB event in
Tampa Florida.

"My body rebounded and I
was able to compete in Tampa
and I placed 12th. It was disap-
pointing but I said to myself I
would stick with my regimen and
tighten things up for the show in
Dallas, which I was able to do. I
came into this show with a much
tighter, drier physique and I guess
the judges were impressed with
what they saw," he said, "I was in
second place after the prejudg-
ing and people at the event were
saying I had a really good chance
to win the show. That did won-

ders for my confidence and I
knew a chance at Olympia was
at stake so I continued to perse-
vere."

The 41-year-old IFBB Pro said
that while he has a limited
amount of time to complete his
career goals, he remains opti-
mistic about his Olympia oppor-
tunity.

"From here on in know I am
going to increase my intensity. I
know my age and the expected
amount of time I have left in the
sport so I figure within another
two to three years I would have to
make a major statement before I

call it a day on my career. From
here until that time I am going
to take my game to yet another
level all to make the Bahamas
proud," he said, "I think I can be
one of the top five finishers or
even be crowned Mr Olympia.
My game plan is at another level
and its just crazy what I am about
to get myself into in terms of my
workouts but I realise it is do or
die now at this stage in my career.
I want to encourage any younger
athletes whether its bodybuilding
or any other sport they choose,
the only way you are going to get
to achieve that success is to create



a plan and work toward executing
that plan. It takes dedication,
focus preparation."

According to the event's web-
site, Mr. Olympia is the title
awarded to the winner of the pro-
fessional section of Joe Weider's
Olympia Weekend and doing so
is considered the highest acco-
lade in the sport.

Past Olympia winners include
Arnold Schwarzenegger (six),
Ronnie Coleman (eight), Lee
Haney (eight) and Dorian Yates
(six).

Dexter Jackson is the reigning
champion.

Murray defeats Del Potro to win Rogers Cup

MONTREAL (AP) — Andy
Murray took the court to face Juan
Martin Del Potro knowing no mat-
ter what the result of the Rogers
Cup final, he would be soon be
ranked No. 2 in the world.

Not satisfied having reached that
goal, Murray withstood his tough-
est test of the tournament and
defeated Juan Martin Del Potro 6-7
(4), 7-6 (3), 6-1 Sunday.

"T love winning tournaments, it's
great, and every player will tell you
the same thing,” Murray said.

"But it's tough because I've never
been to No. 2 in the world before, so
that's new to me. I've won a couple
of Masters Series (events) now, and
it still feels great. But getting to No.
2, maybe because it's something dif-
ferent it means a little bit more."

The 22-year-old from Scotland
was assured before the final of
leapfrogging Rafael Nadal into the
second spot when the ATP Tour
rankings are released Monday. The
victory gave Murray an additional
400 ranking points to get him to
9,250 compared to 11,040 for world
No. 1 Roger Federer and 8,665 for
Nadal.

The third-seeded Murray matched
his career best from last season with
his fifth tournament win of the year
and improved his record to 11-4
against top-10 players this season.

He took time off to train in Flori-
da after a bitterly disappointing loss
to Andy Roddick in the semifinal
at Wimbledon, and Murray couldn't
have drawn up a better return to
the court.

"It's a perfect way to come back,”
he said. "It goes one of two ways.

‘Golden girls’ Debbie and Chandra miss 100m medal glory



ANDY MURRAY returns the ball to Argentina's Juan Martin Del Potro during the final of the Rogers Cup tournament Sunday...

Losing to Roddick, there's no shame
in that to start with. I could have
gone away and become a worse
player and not work on anything,
or go and practice harder and
become better so the same thing
doesn't happen the next time
around.”

Del Potro, from Argentina, was
looking for his second straight tour-
nament victory after winning in

Washington, a week earlier. He
squandered an opportunity to jump
past Andy Roddick into fifth in the
world rankings.

The match turned when Del Potro
called for the trainer to work on a
sore shoulder while up 6-5 in the
second set. After the medical time-
out, Murray held serve at love and
won the tiebreaker.

Del Potro said he still hasn't

(AP Photo: Graham Hughes)

reached the point where he can con-
sider himself to be in the same class
as Murray, Nadal or Federer.

"I need to work hard to be like
them,” Del Potro said. "I can play
against them, but I need to improve
my game a lot if I want to be top-
four, or top-two or No. 1."

Del Potro left the court for sever-
al minutes following that second set
and was clearly not the same player

upon his return, falling behind 4-0 in
the third set. Del Potro did break
Murray to get it to 4-1, but called
for the trainer again before Murray
broke Del Potro to go up 5-1 and
then serve out the match.

Del Potro said a combination of
that nagging shoulder injury, the
physical strain of playing nine
matches in 13 days and the stifling
heat Sunday in Montreal was too
much for him to overcome physi-
cally.

"I was so tired (in the third set),"
he said. "I had my chances in the
second set tiebreak, but I didn't take
them."

After needing 2 hours, 17 minutes
to play the first two sets, Murray
needed only 25 minutes to win the
decisive third set.

"Before the match I felt like I was
probably going to be physically
stronger,” Murray said. "He was
obviously tired (in the third set) and
I made a lot of returns which I had-
n't really been doing. His serve
slowed down a little bit and I made
more returns. I served well at the
beginning of the third set to make
sure I stayed ahead, and that was
the only difference."

The tightly contested match under
hot, muggy conditions pleased the
sellout crowd of 11,490 at Uniprix
Stadium, bringing the total atten-
dance for the event to 200,077. That
broke the attendance record for a
one-week ATP event of 185,252 set
here in 2007.

Murray didn't drop a set in the
tournament — his first since Wim-
bledon — until Del Potro won the
first set Sunday in a tiebreak.

FROM page 12

personally wasn't as best as I
wanted it to be," she said.
"However, I tried to come
back at the end, but I wasn't
good enough. I was good
enough for sixth place with
11.05, so I'm happy with my
time."

As for Fraser's winning per-
formance, Ferguson-McKen-
zie said the 22-year-old
Jamaican national champion
made it look so easy.

"It was any women's race,
but Shelly-Ann proved that
she was the best woman out
there tonight," Ferguson-
McKenzie said.

Sturrup, in securing her
berth into the final with a
third place finish in the sec-
ond semis in 11.01, admitted
that once Fraser got out, there
was no catching her anymore.

"I was trying to get my
mechanics back again, but it
wasn't coming quick enough,”
she said.

Running from the outside
in lane seven, Sturrup said she

didn't see how fast Fraser had
zoomed ahead of everybody
until it was too late.

But the elder stateswoman
of the field at 36 said she felt
like she was 25 chasing down
the younger women.

"T feel good, but I'm disap-
pointed. I should have ran
under 11 seconds tonight and
I had a great opportunity to
do it,” she insisted. "I really
wanted to medal, but it just
wasn't my night to do it.”

When asked about the
Jamaicans, who have now tak-
en over from the Americans,
Sturrup simply stated: "They
ran a hell of a race. All of
them got out well. They did a
good job.”

Now that her individual
duties are done, Sturrup said
she will take a well deserved
rest and then get ready for
the relays as the Bahamas
team also attempts to get
back to the final for the first
time since the Golden Girls
dominated at the Worlds in
1999 and the Olympics in
2000.

"When we ran in London,
we did pretty well without any
practice, so I think we have a
fair chance,” she projected.

As for Ferguson-McKen-
zie, she will be back on
Wednesday for the start of
the women's 200 with Sheni-
qua 'Q' Ferguson before she
can think about the relays.

"The 100 for me is always
fun, but the 200 is business,"
said Ferguson-McKenzie, a
finalist of the 8th Worlds in
Edmonton, Canada, where
she came back to win the sil-
ver in the 200, but was ele-
vated to the gold after the dis-
qualification of American
champion Marion Jones.

"I'm glad that we only have
three rounds now, so I just
have to go back to basics
because it's a longer race. So I
have to relax, get my start
back, work on my curve and
then my finish. One round at
a time."

Reminiscent of when the
Golden Girls triumphed, Fer-
guson-McKenzie said the
Bahamas had four women

who were running extremely
well and it came down to their
baton execution in the relay.

She noted that if the
Jamaicans, who had four
entrants in the 100 final, can
get the baton around, they
have the capability not just of
winning the gold, but possi-
bly breaking the world record.

"You have the four fastest
women on paper, so it all
boils down to passing the
stick," she declared.

Not counting out the
Bahamas’ chances of being in
the mix for another medal,
Ferguson-McKenzie said it’s
going to be fun again for her
and Sturrup.

"We both made it to the
final and we had Q, who ran
in the second round, so we're
just going to go out there and
see what happens," she insist-
ed.

The preliminaries of the
relay won't be held until Fri-
day, but Ferguson-McKenzie
will probably skip it because
of the 200 final the night
before.

= =

Registration for the 2009-2010 Swim
Year will take place at Queen 4 College
Fool on Saturday, 29th August, 2009 trom
9:00am to 11:00am.

ALL SWIM GROUPS MUST REGISTER

(1) LEARN TO SWIM FOR CHILDREN
(2) COMPETITIVE SWIMMERS

—~ ‘Registration forms available
ae on the website:
In addition, see our website for start dates,
prices and full swim schedules:
www. barracudaswimming.org




PAGE 10, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009



SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



‘I know I could compete
with these guys...’

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — On
Monday, the Olympic Stadi-
um was still buzzing a day
after the scorching world
record breaking performance
by Jamaican Usain Bolt in the
men's 100 metres.

Although Bolt owned the
previous record of 9.69 sec-
onds set as one of his three
marks at last year's Olympic
Games in Beijing, China, the
9:58 he recorded was unheard
off until the clock stopped and
he literally dominated the
field and obliterated the much
anticipated match-up with
2007 champion and former
world record holder Tyson
Gay, who had to settle for the
silver with an American
record of 9.71.

While he didn't get a
chance to go all the way and
compete in his historic final
in his coming out party,
Bahamian national runner-up
Adrian Griffith was among
those in the stands watching
Bolt put on the spectacular
show.

"Boy, that was a great one.
I'm really glad that I saw it in
person and not on television,"
said Griffith yesterday as he
watched veteran female
sprinters Chandra Sturrup
and Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie storm their way
into an historic all-regional
final.

"This is just telling me that
next year, I really have to step
it up. 10.2s just won't cut it.”

Griffith, one of two
Bahamians competing in the
event, survived through the
quarter-final on Saturday's
opening day as he finished
with a world ranking of 28
with a best time of 10.28.

Derrick Atkins, the 2007
silver medallist in Osaka,
Japan, behind Gay, surpris-

ingly didn't advance out of
the first round after he fin-
ished fifth in his heat in 10.44.
He left the Games Village on
Sunday and didn't stay behind
to watch the amazing century
finale.

For Griffith, who has never
had the chance to run against
Bolt or his compatriot Asafa
Powell, who had to settle for
the bronze in a season's best
of 9.84, said what he has dis-
covered is that the competi-
tion is 80 per cent mental and
20 per cent physical.

"T know I could compete
with these guys," said Grif-
fith, who ran in the same heat
with Gay in the quarters.
"This is the World Champi-
onships and if you come here
and you're not ready, you're
not going to compete well."

One of the things that
shocked Griffith was when he
watched Bolt in the training
area.

"He hardly did anything to
get ready,” Griffith said. "I
was there doing just about
everything and he just took a
couple of strides, stretched
and he was ready to compete.
I really couldn't believe it.
That really opened up my
eyes."

With a little more financial
support from the Govern-
ment and the general public,
Griffith said he could really
get used to being on the inter-
national stage with all the big
stars in the future because
there are times when he real-
ly needs the funds to take care
of his body and it’s not avail-
able.

Right now, he's enjoying
the experience of training on
the same track with Gay in
Clermont, Florida. And
before the championships got
started, he got the chance to
go through some block work-
outs with the former world
champion.

For the first time, he lined

Sprinter Adrian Griffith
reflects on his performance

a,
<=
<=
=
oS
“an
Oo
o
=
2
=



ADRIAN GRIFFITH competes in a 100m first round heat during the World Athletics Championships in Berlin

on Saturday, August 15, 2009...

up in the same race to com-
pete against Gay when they
ran in the quarters. While
Gay went on to post the sec-
ond fastest qualifying time of
9.98, Griffith did 10.28 to
make his exit.

"It showed that I'm not

Save BIG Right Now!
2008 FORD FOCUS SEL

2.0L Automatic - LOADED

Great Deals
On All Models

2008 FORD TAURUS SEL

—.

3.5L Automatic
Leather Interior - LOADED

Available

3 years or 36,000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside assistant, 3 years rust protections
warranty and licensed and inspected up to birthday.

NOW THAT'S REALWY AL 3[ |(@3Deal
FRIENDLY MOTORS CO, LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ¢ TEL.: 356-7100 « FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com



really scared of any of them,”
said Griffith, who just fell shy
of his personal best of 10.27
that he ran in Clemont on
June 7 to qualify for the
Worlds. "I just have to be
ready."

Griffith, who turns 25 on

November 11, said he will
take the rest of the time here
to enjoy the atmosphere and
then get ready for the 13th
IAAF World Indoor Cham-
pionships scheduled to be
held March 12-14 in Doha,
Qatar.

Anthony
sues former
business
manager

By ARNIE STAPLETON
AP Sports Writer

DENVER (AP) — Carmelo Anthony is suing his former
business manager, alleging he misappropriated more than $2
million of the Denver Nuggets star’s assets.

The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Sacramento,
Calif., on Monday, alleges that Anthony’s former business
manager, Larry W. Harmon, and employees of Larry Har-
mon & Associates P.A., breached their fiduciary duties by
transferring $1.75 million of Anthony’s money without his
knowledge or consent to a company formed by Harmon,

most of it in 2008.

Another $265,500 was discovered to have been invested in
third parties without Anthony’s knowledge or consent
between 2005 and 2008, according to the lawsuit, which seeks
recovery of the approximately $2 million, plus punitive dam-

ages.

“Tintend to aggressively represent Carmelo Anthony,” his
Beverly Hills-based attorney, Robert W. Hirsh, told The
Associated Press. “The evidence which I have reviewed
strongly suggests that Carmelo Anthony’s former business
manager plundered his assets. It is reprehensible that profes-
sional athletes are so often victimized.”

Lawsuit

Reached at his office in Roseville, Calif., Harmon said he

was unaware of the lawsuit.

He declined to comment on the allegations in the lawsuit
or on his dealings with Anthony. “I guess [ll just wait and

see what he alleges,”

Harmon said.

The discrepancies were discovered after Anthony ended
his business relationship with Harmon and hired a new man-
ager to manage his assets earlier this year, according to the
lawsuit. That new financial management firm, Gelfand, Ren-
nert & Feldman, discovered the financial discrepancies.

The lawsuit alleges that significant documents were miss-
ing when Harmon transferred Anthony’s records to his new

business manager.

“Further, portions of the books and records are miscoded
in a deliberate attempt to hide moneys converted by defen-

dants,”

according to the lawsuit.

The lawsuit also contends that Harmon and the other
defendants failed to produce any documents requested by
Anthony’s lawyer to explain the transfers of Anthony’s mon-

ey that are in question.

Anthony was the third selection in the 2003 NBA draft
after leading Syracuse to the national title as a freshman.
Last year, he led the Nuggets to their best season in 24 years
after helping the U.S. team win the gold medal at the Beijing

Olympics.

Anthony is entering the fourth year of a five-year, $80 mil-
lion contract extension he signed in 2006.

a gly
FE
SHI ITTT
of events

BERLIN, Germany —
Here's a look at the sched-
ule for our athletes com-
peting over the remainder
of the IAAF's 12th World
Championships in Athlet-
ics:

TODAY

Men's 200m
preliminary rounds
Nathaniel McKinney -
lane 3 in 4th of 9 heats
at 4:23 am ET

(First 3 of each heat,
plus 5 fastest times

qualify)

Men's 400m
preliminary rounds
Michael Mathieu - lane
7 in 2nd of 7 heats

at 5:12 am ET

Chris Brown - lane 2
in 3rd of 7 heats at
5:19 am ET

Ramon Miller - lane 4
in 5th of 7 heats

at 5:33 am ET.

(First 3 of each heat (Q)
plus the three fastest
times (q) qualify)

Men's triple jump final
Leevan Sands - 5th of
12 competitors, starting
at 12:05 pm ET

Men's 200 quarterfinal
Nathaniel McKinney,
lane and heat
undecided, starting

at 12:55 pm ET

WEDNESDAY
Men's high jump
qualifying rounds
Donald Thomas and
Trevor Barry, starting
at 5:10 am ET

Men's 110 hurdles
Shamar Sands, starting
at 5:35 am ET

Men's 400 semifinal
Michael Mathieu, Chris
Brown and Ramon
Miller, starting

at 12:15 pm ET

Men's 200 semifinal
Nathaniel McKinney,
starting at 1:25 pm ET

Women's 200
preliminaries

Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie and Sheniqua
Ferguson, starting

at 1:45 pm ET

THURSDAY

Men's 110 hurdles
semifinal

Shamar Sands,

starting at 12:15 pm ET

Women's 200 semifinal
Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie and Sheniqua
Ferguson, starting

at 1:50 pm ET

Men's 200 final
Nathaniel McKinney,
starting at 2:35 pm ET

Men's 110 hurdles final
Shamar Sands, starting
at 2:55 pm ET

FRIDAY

Men's high jump final
Donald Thomas

and Trevor Barry,
starting at 1:15 pm ET

Women's 200 final
Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie and
Sheniqua Ferguson,
starting at 3 pm ET

Men's 400 final
Michael Mathieu, Chris
Brown and Ramon
Miller, starting

at 3:20 pm

SATURDAY
Women's 4 x 100
relay heats

12:10 pm ET

Men's 4 x 400 relay heats
12:55 pm ET

Women's 4 x 100
relay final
2pm ET

Women's 4 x 400
relay heats
2:15 pm ET

SUNDAY
Women's 4 x 400
relay final

11:50 am ET

Men's 4 x 400
relay final
12:15 pm ET


THE TRIBUNE

MARK KNOWLES












Sp

PAGE



ts

UESDAY, AUGUST 18,

2009

BAHAMIAN tennis ace Mark
Knowles and his doubles partner
Mahesh Bhupathi, of India, were on
top form this weekend at the Mon-
treal Masters in Canada where they
won another championship.

Competing in the doubles cham-
pionship of the ATP World Tour
Rogers Cup on Sunday, the dynam-
ic duo faced off with No.7 seeds Max
Mirnyi, of Belarus, and Andy Ram,



of Israel.
Knowles and Bhupathi, the No.3
seeds, defeated Mirnyi and Ram 6-4,

6-3.
Doubles

In the doubles semifinals on Sat-
urday, Mirnyi and Ram were able
to knock out identical twin broth-
ers, the No.1 seeds, Bob and Mike

Adrian Griffith
reflects on his
performance...

See page 10

Rogers Cup victory for
Knowles, Bhupathi

Bryan of the United States, 7-6 (5),
6-2.

On the other side of the draw,
Knowles and Bhupathi defeated
No.2 seeds Canadian Daniel Nestor
(Knowles’ former doubles partner)
and Nenad Zimonjic, of Serbia, 5-7,
6-2, and a 10-4 tiebreak to advance
to the championship.

Knowles could not be reached for
comment up to press time last night.

Anja Niedringhaus/AP

JAMAICA’S Shelley-Ann Fraser (center) dips across the finish line to beat compatriot Kerron Stewart (left) and win the gold medal in the final of the 100m at the World Athletics Championships in
Berlin, Germany, Monday, August 17, 2009. At right is Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie of the Bahamas, who placed sixth. Chandra Sturrup (not seen) came seventh...

‘Golden girls’ Debbie and Chandra
miss out on 100m medal glory

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — This time, Deb-
bie Ferguson-McKenzie nor Chandra Stur-
rup had the speed to go with the Jamaicans
and Americans and had to settle for sixth
and seventh in the historic regional wom-
en's 100m final last night at the [AAF's
12th World Championships in Athletics.

Running a world leading time of 10.73
seconds, Shelly-Ann Fraser coasted to the
gold as she did at the Olympic Games last

year in Beijing, China, and was joined by
Kerron Stewart, whose personal best of
10.75 earned her the silver with American
Carmelita Jeter settling for the bronze in
10.90.

It was almost identical to the men's cen-
tury the night before when Jamaican Usain
Bolt sped to another world record, dethron-
ing American Tyson Gay who got silver
and Jamaican Asafa Powell picked up his
second consecutive bronze.

For Ferguson-McKenzie and Sturrup, it
was redemption time as they both found
the fountain of youth in clinching their

spots in the elite eight after failing to
advance out of the semifinal at the last
Worlds in Osaka, Japan.

Trying to defy the odds of the 10 years
plus age difference between them and the
rest of the field, Ferguson-McKenzie, 33,
got the better of the duo with sixth place,
while Sturrup, 37, was seventh. Both were
timed in 11.05.

"This was probably my best 100 metres
since the Commonwealth Games," said
Ferguson-McKenzie, who booked her spot
in the final with a fourth place in 11.03 in
the first of the two semifinals held earlier in

the day. "Time-wise. It's amazing. 11.03 in
the semis and 11.05 in the final.

“Normally I would be going backwards
with 11.1s and 11.2s. So I'm feeling like a
sprinter again and I'm happy about that."

Ferguson-McKenzie, the double nation-
al sprint champion, admitted that she tried
to focus on her start running out of lane
two. But once she noticed that Fraser had
a jump-start on everybody in lane three, she
just tried to go after her.

"T tried to stay in my zone, but my start

SEE page 9

IBUNE COVERAGE THE

|AAFWORLDCHAMPIONSHIPSBERLIN2009

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

pe. (V\

’m lovin’ it

YOUR CONNECTIOC O THE WORLD




THE TRIBUNE

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net



TUESDAY,

AUGUST

uSiIness

168 fe 22060°9



ROYAL FIDELITY

Ue
RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company
NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com

New road ‘will have a big impact’
on Vista Marina property values

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

esidents of Vista Marina
Ri have their properties
drastically devalued when
a new road is pushed through only
feet from the affluent subdivision,
according to the Bahamas Real
Estate Association president. The
subdivision will also permanently
lose its main access road.
William Wong told Tribune Busi-
ness that the residents of Vista Mari-
na will have their investments














SHOWN (I-r) are William B Sands, president & CEO of Commonwealth
Bank, Denise Turnquest, vice president of credit risk, Minister of
Education Carl Bethel, T B Donaldson, chairman of Commonwealth
Bank, vice president of operations Mavis Burrows and the Director of

Education Lionel Sands...

destroyed overnight.

According to him, the addition of
a busy road will cause the house
values in that area to plummet.

“Tf you have these 40-foot con-
tainers passing back and forth it will
have a big impact on the properties
and on their values,” said Mr Wong.

In his opinion what government
is doing is “criminal,” but, he said,
residents in the area waited too long
to protest the road, which is part of
the New Providence road improve-
ment project.

Government gazetted the notice
yesterday that work would begin on

the removal of Vista Marina’s main
access road from West Bay Street
on August 23 and that there will be
the removal of 10 Casuarina trees
from Saunders Beach.

“There will be long delays along
the vicinity due to the one-way traf-
fic flow system. Local diversions will
be sign posted in due course and fur-
ther information will be provided
on the local media,” said the notice.

Mr Wong said government owes
the residents of Vista Marina some
manner of compensation for the
intrusion the road will have on their
properties.

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

A pre-school was forced to move
its perimeter wall back several feet
to accommodate changes in the
road. Under the law government has
the right under eminent domain to
annex private property for public
use.

The residents’ biggest concern is
the noise pollution that will be
caused by large trucks using the road
to access the new Arawak Cay con-
tainer port from the south.

One resident of Highland Park,
who spoke on condition of anonymi-
ty, said even now as work is being
done the noise of the equipment is

WITH weeks to go until
thousands of school children
fill school yards, hallways and
classrooms, Commonwealth
Bank repeated its role as edu-
cation’s guardian angel, pre-
senting the Ministry of Edu-
cation with 10,000 backpacks.
The all-Bahamian bank’s
donation will give some
10,000 students a tangible
boost, sending them back to
school with backpacks packed
with school supplies and pro-

viding their teachers and
classrooms with tools from
projectors to laptops.

This is the third year the
leading bank donated back-
packs filled with a variety of
items, including rulers, com-
position books, pencils and
pens to the Ministry of Edu-
cation for distribution among
students entering grades 1-12
in New Providence and the

SEE page 2B

FOR SALE BY SEALED BID
SANDYPORT #4746 Newly built 3 bed 3.5 bath family home, private dock and white
sandy canal-beach. Landscaped and attractively finished with granite counter-tops.
Large open living/dining room offers great canal views and is the perfect space for
entertaining. The master suite features a spacious balcony, walk in closet and ensuite

master bath.

Closing date for sealed bids:

September 30, 2009.

For viewing & bid package, contact Lana Rademaker
Lana.Rademaker@SothebysRealty.com c 242.457.0406

Damianos

Sothebys

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Member of
SIRbahamas.com | t 242.322.2305 | £242322.2033 | the Bohamas MLS



RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company

Where do want to be?

unbearable. “When I woke up I
could feel the ground shaking from
that tractor,” said the resident. “And
it’s like this all morning.”

Residents of Highland Park said
they were not made aware publicly
about the road work being done only
yards from their properties.

“There should have been a lot
more consultation,” said Mr Wong.
“Either they are not aware of it or
the government didn’t do a good job
in consultation.”

According to him, a friend recent-
ly completed two townhouses at a
cost of $1 million, but with the addi-
tion of the road he suggested the
property would lose a fair amount of
value.

“Tf she was aware of it she proba-
bly would not have spent so much
money,” he said. “There should have
been years of consultation.”

Deputy Prime Minister Brent
Symonette told The Tribune recent-
ly that the new thoroughfare was
not connected in any way to the relo-
cation of the container port. How-
ever, the new road is an integral part
of all the blueprints the government
has brought to the public for the
complete redevelopment of that
area, which includes the extension
of Arawak Cay.

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report

College Degree



can get you there!

Education Investment Accounts

Learn more at royalfidelity.com

BAHAMAS
Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

FV: P:\eloh
St. Michael: 246.435.1955

royalfidelity.com

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

eel 4


PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Cuba cuts internationa
rates to $1 per minute

HAVANA (AP) — Cuba says it's
reducing international calling rates for
residents with land lines to $1 a minute.

Cuba's telecommunications monop-
oly, Etecsa, says the discount applies to
all international calls through Decem-
ber 15. Details of the promotion
appeared on its Web site and were
confirmed Monday by a company rep-
resentative who did not provide his
name.

Residential calls from Cuba had cost
$2.45 a minute to the United States
and Canada, $3.45 to Central America
and $5.85 to Europe. Most Cubans
don't have Internet access and cannot
afford cell phones or computers.

Despite the cuts,
international dialing
remains a costly
proposition for
most Cubans whose
average state wages
are $20 a month

Despite the cuts, international dial-
ing remains a costly proposition for
most Cubans whose average state
wages are $20 a month.

News of the offer hadn't been pub-
lished by state media as of Monday.
Etecsa said details about the plan will
appear on residents’ telephone bills.
Residents wanting to call abroad must
first request activation of internation-
al calling service, the company said.

No reason was given for the dis-
count. But Cuba is dealing with a
severe economic crisis that has affect-
ed islanders and prompted the gov-
ernment to announce spending cuts
for education and health care, two pil-

lars of its communist system.

Three hurricanes last year caused
more than $10 billion in damage. The
global recession has cut export earn-
ings and caused budget deficits to soar,
leaving Cuba short of cash. The gov-
ernment’s most recent forecast puts
2009 economic growth at 1.7 per cent,
compared to a 6 percent forecast made
in December.

Etecsa said it will announce new
international rates for cell phone users
but provided no details. The govern-
ment made private service available
to all islanders in 2008. Cell phones
previously were restricted to foreigners
and Cubans with key state jobs.

Bank donates school supplies to Ministry of Education

FROM page 1B

Family Islands. The bank also
donated laptops and LCD
projectors — and for the third
consecutive year, the Ministry
of Education thanked the all-
Bahamian bank and applaud-
ed its effort.

“On behalf of the Govern-
ment of The Bahamas, the
Ministry of Education, the
Department of Education and
the students and teachers of
The Bahamas, I would like to
express the most profound
















NOTICE

There will be an important meeting for
all parents of St. Francis and Joesph
School on Wednesday August 19th 2009
at 6:00pm at Xaviers Lower School
Auditorium. Please make a special effort
romano a(en

GN-89T

GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT
PORT DEPARTMENT

NOTICE
INVITATION FOR TENDERS

The Government of The Bahamas is inviting tenders for the sale of Government Tug
*“TURBOT", as is where is docked at Prince George Dock, Nassau, Bahamas.

DESCRIPTION OF VESSEL

fear Built:
Type:
Type of Hull:
Length:
Draft:
Engines:

Lost

Stan Tug 2600)

Steel

#5 Feet

|? Feet

2 Caterpillar Engines - Model 399
lo Cylinders (each)

1125 H.P. (each)

Full Load RPM 1225

(4) Fuel Tanks @ 3750 Gallons per tank
(2) 371 G.M.

Fuel Capacity:
Generators:

Interested persons may view and inspect the vessel docked at Prince George Dock,
Nassau, Bahamas by contacting:

The Port Department

Prince George Dock

Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone No.: (242) 356-5639

Between the hours of 9:00) acm. - 3:00 pom.
Monday through Friday

Tenders are to be submitted in triplicate (3) in sealed envelope (3) marked “Tender for
the purchase of Government Tug “TURBOT” addressed to:

The Chairman

Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

Cecil ¥. Wallace Whitfield Building
Cable Beach

BO. Box N-3017

Nassau, Bahamas

No later than 4:30 p.m. on Friday, 28th August, 2009. Tenders will be opened at 10:00
am. on Tuesday, Ist September, 2004 at the office of the Tenders Board, Ministry of
Finance.

THE GOVERNMENT RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL
TENDERS.

ume aig

gratitude to Commonwealth
Bank, the nation’s premier
bank,” Education Minister
Carl Bethel said during the
presentation at the bank’s
newest branch, a full service-
banking facility on Prince
Charles Drive that will open
August 31.

“Once again Common-
wealth Bank demonstrated
the kind of visionary corpo-
rate leadership we encourage
and hope that others would
follow.”

Calling it a “sterling dona-
tion” that will assist students
and teachers, the Education
Minister said the laptops can
make a huge difference in a
child’s attention.

“Children love computers
and if we can make a com-
puter more than a glorified
toy, more than a glorified way
to communicate, if we can
make it a tool that provides a
way to gain instruction, it can
be one of most powerful tools
in the arsenal of education
materials,” he said.

According to Common-
wealth Bank Chairman T.B.
Donaldson, CBE, the annual
contribution to education
reflects the bank’s commit-
ment to youth development.

“Commonwealth Bank, the
education bank, is all about
creating a firm learning foun-
dation for our country’s
youth,” said Donaldson, “and
was the driving force behind
formalized certification for
Bahamians in banking.”

“Commonwealth Bank’s
investment and commitment
to education has been long-
standing and broad-based.
We are proud to know that

through our endeavours we
have made an impact on the
lives of students from kinder-
garten through Grade 12 and
onto undergraduate studies
at the college level,” noted
Mr Donaldson, referring to
the bank’s separate COB
scholarship programme.
“Over the past three years,
our back-to-school pro-
gramme has donated nearly
three quarters of a million
dollars in school supplies and
the latest in technological
teaching tools.”

Packages

Those packages — the
school supplies and teaching
tools — will be distributed to
38 schools in 17 islands from
Grand Bahama and Abaco in
the north to Acklins in the
south as well as going to chil-
dren’s homes and the Depart-
ment of Social Services.

“Tt is our hope that the stu-
dents benefiting from this
substantial donation will take
full advantage of the educa-
tional opportunities provided
to them so that this donation
translates into a sound invest-
ment in our nation’s future,”
said Mr. Donaldson.

Commonwealth Bank is
The Bahamas’ most widely-
held public company with
some 7,000 shareholders, 10
branches in New Providence,
Grand Bahama and Abaco
and more than $1.3 billion in
assets. The company’s corpo-
rate giving, with emphasis on
youth development and edu-
cation, also includes a num-
ber of annual college schol-
arships.

coe

Mr. Peter Matthews

IMPORTANT NOTICE

Please be advised that Mr.

Peter

Matthews is mo longer employed
by Construction Services Group.
As a result, he is NOT authorized to

conduct any business
company s behalf.

Management

on the



Major Atlantic
Storms fail to
Stir energy
prices

By JOHN PORRETTO
AP Energy Writer

HOUSTON (AP) — The
season's first Atlantic hurri-
cane and two other storms
have done nothing to spur a
rise in energy prices, largely
because supplies are high and
demand low, but oil compa-
nies are keeping close watch
on their offshore operations
in the Gulf of Mexico.

After a quiet start to the
2009 hurricane season, three
storms whipped up in recent
days, though none appears to
pose a threat to the US Gullf's
massive energy complex.

Crude prices fell to new
lows for the month Monday,
dropping to around $65 a bar-
rel, and natural gas prices
slumped to new lows as well.

Pump prices have changed
little in the past week. On
average, a gallon of regular
unleaded was selling for
$2.641 on Monday, according
to auto club AAA, Wright
Express and the Oil Price
Information Service. That's
less than a penny lower than
average price a week ago.

The apparent indifference
to storms in the Atlantic
stands in stark contrast to last
year, when oil prices ticked
higher as tropical depressions
formed.

Several factors are
involved, the biggest of which
is a recession that's crushed
energy demand at home and
abroad. US crude inventories
rose again last week and are
nearly 20 per cent above year-
ago levels. Natural-gas sup-
plies also are bloated.

The US Gulf accounts for
about one-quarter of domes-
tic oil output, but the nation’s
reliance on the region for nat-
ural gas has lessened in the
past few years as producers
tap into massive reserves
onshore.

Gulf gas production
accounts for about 12 per cent
of total US output, according
to the Energy Information
Administration, down from
roughly 20 per cent only four
years ago.

So even a significant storm
could have little or no impact
on natural gas and even crude
prices, said trader and analyst
Stephen Schork. He noted
natural-gas prices failed to
jump even when hurricanes
Gustav and Ike raked the
region a year ago.

"And let's not forget we're
still in the midst of a pretty
severe economic downturn,"
Schork said.

Ike and Gustav shut down
Gulf production for several
weeks in late August and Sep-
tember, and shuttered several
refineries. That led to gaso-
line shortages and price spikes
above $4 a gallon throughout
the Southeast.

But the storms caused far
less damage than Katrina and
Rita in 2005, a one-two punch
that destroyed 108 production
platforms, damaged hundreds
of others and shut down pro-
duction for months, in some
cases.

For now, major producers
in the Gulf such as Royal
Dutch Shell PLC, Chevron
Corp. and BP PLC say they're
monitoring the systems but
are operating normally.

Hurricane Bill picked up
strength in the open Atlantic
Monday on a path toward
Bermuda, while what was left
of Tropical Storm Claudette
brought rain to the Florida
Panhandle and southern
Alabama. Elsewhere, Tropi-
cal Depression Ana was mov-
ing quickly across the north-
eastern Caribbean Sea. It was
expected to reach the coast
of the Dominican Republic
later Monday.


THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009, PAGE 3B



Stocks plunge as investors
worry about consumers

By IEVA M AUGSTUMS
and TIM PARADIS
AP Business Writers

NEW YORK (AP) —
Investors’ rising fears about
consumer spending are turn-
ing stocks into a risky invest-
ment again.

Stocks plunged and Trea-
sury prices soared Monday
morning as investors around
the world feared that con-
sumers are too anxious to lift
the economy into recovery.
The losses on stock exchanges
extended the heavy selling
that began Friday with a dis-
appointing reading on con-
sumer confidence. And bond

investors, once again search-
ing for a safe investment,
bought heavily into Treasurys.

The Dow Jones industrials
were down more than 180
points, while overseas, the
Shanghai stock market fell
almost six per cent and the
major indexes in Europe fell
more than 1.5 per cent.

Stocks fell across all indus-
tries as investors worried that
consumers’ reluctance to
spend will hurt corporate
earnings. Many companies
second-quarter results were
boosted by cost-cutting, not
higher sales, and the fear is
that without a pickup in sales,
earnings will fall.

goja.

Ont"

41R Cameras
One (1) 4 Ch Stand Alone DVR
(Digital Video Recorder)
500 ft of Co-Ax & Power Cable
Power Supply & Accessories

7
J



While other parts of the
economy, including housing
and manufacturing, are show-
ing signs of progress, the
country cannot have a strong
recovery unless consumers
are spending more freely.
Their spending accounts for
more than two-thirds of eco-
nomic growth.

Traders

Traders got more bad news
about the consumer Monday
when home improvement
retailer Lowe’s Cos. said poor
weather and cautious con-
sumer spending caused sales
to fall 19 per cent in the sec-
ond quarter. Lowe’s missed
analysts’ forecasts.

Investors will be nervous as
they wait for more retailers
to report second-quarter earn-
ings this week. Last week, the
nation’s largest retailer, Wal-
Mart Stores Inc., said its most
important sales figure, those
from stores open at least a
year, fell during the April-
June period.

Joe Saluzzi, co-head of
equity trading at Themis
Trading LLC, said the mar-
ket had risen too far and that
the selling was warranted.

“The economics obviously
don’t support where we’ve
been,” he said.

In midmorning trading, the
Dow fell 181.98, or two per
cent, to 9,134.28. The broader
Standard & Poor’s 500 index
fell 22.56, or 2.3 per cent, to
981.53, while Nasdaq com-
posite index fell 46.20, or 2.3
per cent, to 1,939.32.

About 2,700 stocks fell
while only 180 rose on the
New York Stock Exchange,
where volume came to 228.4
million shares.

The Chicago Board
Options Exchange’s Volatili-
ty Index, also known as the
market’s fear index, surged

O THE WORLD

ULM ansee TON Te eg ALN
ara er OO SRL EU ears arcu!

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Lia. (BIC) is
pleased fo invite Tenders to provide the Company with

Motor Insurance coverage.

Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender Specifi-

cation from the Security's Desk located in the Administra.

live building on John F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours
of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

The deadline for submission of fenders is on or before
Friday, August 21st, 2009. Tenders should be sealed and
marked “TENDER FOR MOTOR INSURANCE” and should be
delivered to the attention of the "Mr. |. Kirk Griffin, Acting

President and CEQ,”

BIC reserves the right fo reject any or all Tenders,

wwwbtcbahamas.com

16.5 per cent Monday. The
VIX rose four to 28.28. It is
down 30 per cent in 2009 and
its historical average is 18 to
20. It hit a record 89.5 in
October at the height of the
financial crisis.

Meanwhile, the yield on the
benchmark 10-year Treasury
note, which moves opposite
its price, fell to 3.50 per cent
from 3.57 per cent late Fri-
day.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average fell 3.1 per cent
as investors weren’t satisfied
by news that the country had
emerged from recession in the
second quarter. In afternoon
trading, Britain’s FTSE 100
fell 1.8 per cent, Germany’s
DAX index fell 1.9 per cent,
and France’s CAC-40 fell 2.3
per cent.

Oil prices also extended
their losses, reflecting the
growing concerns about a
weak economy that will cur-
tail demand for energy. A
barrel of crude oil fell $1.82 to
$65.69 a barrel on the New
York Mercantile Exchange.

Among companies report-
ing results Monday, Lowe’s





shares fell $2.11, or 9.2 per
cent, to $20.72.

The dollar rose against oth-
er major currencies, while

gold prices fell.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies fell 16.24,
or 2.9 per cent, to 547.66.

Legal Notice

Notice
ALGOGENETIC
GLOBAL FUND LTD.

VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000 the Dissolution of ALGOGENETIC GLOBAL
FUND LTD. has been completed, a Certificate of Dis-
solution has been issued and the Company has therefore
been struck off the Register of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was 17th July

LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.









FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!
Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million















Mario A. Carey, CRS, CIPS, CLHMS

Tel: 242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013
info@mariocareyrealty.com
www.marioca reyrea

Web Listing # 8377

As

Mario Carey Realty

com Dts abaut yaw... Let's talk.

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

TENDER FOR SCHOOL / FACILITY
SECURITY SERVICES

1.The Ministry of Education invites sealed bids from eligible qualified
firms for the provision of security services at the following schools/facility

in New Providence:

| No. | ScHooL/FaciiTy _—| ‘ESTIMATEDCOsT__|
[2 | AF. Adderley Junior High | $96,000.00 |
[3 | __C.H. Reeves Junior High | $96,000.00 |
[4 | _H.0.Nash Junior High | $96,000.00 |
[5 | __LW.Young Junior igh | $95,00000 +
[6 | ©. Sweeting Serior High | $89,00000 |
[8 | _C.R. Waker Senior High | $95,000.00 |
[9 |v. Bethel Senior High | $96,000.00 |

Learning Resources Section | $92,000.00

. Assessment of bids will be conducted by the Tenders Board utilizing established

procedures.

. Interested eligible qualified firms may receive Tender Documents from the Security
Headquarters located Claridge Road beginning Monday 17th August, 2009 between the
hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

. No firm/company will be eligible to be awarded more than one contract.

. All bids must be accompanied by copies of a valid Business Licence, and evidence of
payment of National Insurance.

. Bids must be enclosed in a plain sealed envelope bearing no identification of the bidder,
and must be clearly marked across the top “Bid for Security Services (Name of School)

- MOR”.

. All bids must be delivered to the Office of the Financial Secretary, Cecil Wallace-
Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, Bahamas, no later than 5.00 p.m. on Monday, 24th

August, 2009.

. Bids will be opened at 10.30 a.m. on Tuesday, 25th August, 2009 at the Ministry of
Finance, Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, Bahamas. Tenderers or their
designated representative are invited to attend the openings.

. The Ministry of Education reserves the right to reject any or all bid submissions.



Signed:
Elma I. Garraway (Mrs.)
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Education
PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS



Fed extends consumer lending
programme through March































































EXECUTIVE HOME FOR RENT

4-BEDROOM, 4 1/2-BATHROOM EXECUTIVE HOME
ON LYFORD CAY GOLF COURSE

For Immediate Occupancy

This beautiful executive residence is located on
a half-acre lot overlooking the Lyford Cay Golf course.

Eighteen-foot high ceilings, eight-foot high French doors,
marble floors, casement windows and an open plan
provide a panoramic view of the Lyford Cay Golf Course
from all living areas.

This modern executive home in Nassau’s most prestigious
community is available for immediate occupancy.

For information call 327-8536.
Tits De



NOTICE
DR. JAMIL ANGELO MINNIS

Announces the opening of his
Practice in Obstetrics & Gynecology at
Oxford Medical Centre, 4th Terrace East
off Collins Avenue, Centreville on 4th
August, 2009

Telephone: (242) 328-2566/7
Fax: (242) 325-2249

HELP
WANTED

An Established Medical Facility

seeks to fill the following position:

REGISTERED
PHYSICIAN

General / Family Practice (Full-time)
Kindly submit application to:

P.O. Box CR-55050
Nassau, Bahamas
or
Via email to: a_1_phyneeded@live.com

WEMCO g 2 W EAC

6 ied

HOME & BUSINESS 4 ZONES ALARM
SPECIAL $299.00 INSTALLED
HOME/BUSINESSES |
1 Panel & LED Keypad
2 Motion Detertors
2 Door Contacts
1 Siren
| Transformer
4 Amp Sland-By Battery
] Wemco Decal

Less tha adel acy for CC-TINTERCON
GUARD SERVICE, K9UN

By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
The Federal Reserve has
extended the length of a pro-
gramme intended to spur
lending to consumers and
small businesses at lower
rates, but the central bank
said it had no plans to expand
the types of loans being
made.

The Fed said Monday it
was extending its Term Asset-
Backed Securities Loan Facil-
ity through March 31 for most
of the types of loans it makes.
The programme was sched-
uled to end on December 31.

The TALF started in
March and figures promi-
nently in efforts by the Fed
and the Obama administra-
tion to ease credit, stabilize
the financial system and help
end the recession. Under the
programme, investors use the
funds to buy securities backed
by auto and student loans,
credit cards, business equip-
ment and loans guaranteed

by the Small Business Admin-
istration.

Commercial mortgage-
backed securities, which were
added to TALF in mid-June,
were extended through June
30 because issuing new secu-
rities in that area "can take a
significant amount of time to
arrange,” according to a joint
news release from the Fed
and the Treasury Depart-
ment.

The commercial real estate
portion of the TALF is
designed to boost the avail-
ability of such loans, help pre-
vent defaults and facilitate the
sale of distressed properties.
Delinquency rates on com-
mercial loans have doubled
in the past year as more com-
panies downsize and retailers
close their doors, the Fed has
said.

Economists said any help
there is critical because of the
rising defaults. Small and
regional banks face the great-
est risk of severe losses from
commercial real estate loans.
Federal regulators on Friday

announced the biggest bank
failure this year, the collapse
of Montgomery, Ala.-based
real estate lender Colonial
BancGroup Inc.

"The larger banks are sta-
bilizing because they went
through the stress tests, but
many smaller banks are still
in deep trouble,” said Mark
Zandi, chief economist at
Moody's Economy.com.

The TALF, he said, also
has experienced only limited
success in its major goal of
jump-starting loans to sup-
port the market for securities
backed by consumer credit
cards, auto loans and small
business loans — the huge
market known as the shadow
banking system.

"If these markets are not
working, then credit does not
flow freely to US households
and businesses," Zandi said.

The programme got off to a
lethargic start, hobbled by
rule changes, investor worries
about financial privacy and
fears that participants might
become ensnared in an anti-

Ore Estate |

SUMO ULC MLL UC UU Leet aU |

Everywhere The Buyers Are!

Sorat ee

Tel: 502 2356

S2wk-Hi — 52wk-Low

Abaco Markets

6.25
0.63
3.15
2.14

Benchmark

Fidelity Bank

: Cable Bahamas
2.74 Colina Holdings
5.50
1.27
1.32
6.60
10.00
10.30
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.49
10.39
10.00

Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)}

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

52wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

0.20 RND Holdings

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

2.8952
1.4059
3.1031
12.3289
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close

Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV §$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings

- 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Securit y

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Bahamas Waste

Commonwealth Bank (81)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES -

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

ROYAL B FIDELITY

Money at Work



EÂ¥

CcFAL

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 17 AUGUST 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,562.90] CHG 0.34 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD -149.46 | YTD % -8.73
FINDEX: CLOSE 783.13 | YTD -6.20% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

1.34

6.25
0.63
3.15
2.37

2.74
5.71
3.64
1.95
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.13
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.39
10.00

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Previous Close Today's Close

(Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Last Sale

Change Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.07
0.05
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

1.34

6.25
0.63
3.15
2.37

2.74
5.71
3.71
2.00
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.13
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.39
10.00

Change Daily Vol.
100.00
100.00
100.00

100.00

0.00

0.00

EPS $

-0.877

0.00 7%
Prime + 1.75%
0.00 7%
Prime + 1.75%

- Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31,59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3860 2.40 4.75
2.9047 -1.20 -3.66
14817 3.35 5.38
3.1031 -8.35 -13.82
12.9801 2.87 5.79
101.6693 1.10 1.67
96.7398 0.35 4.18
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.2765 2.00 -2.98
1.0622 2.56 6.22
1.0243 -0.84 2.43
1.0585 2.04 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

Weekly Vol.

Div $

EPS $
-0.041

bailout backlash from the
public and Congress.

The TALF has the poten-
tial to generate up to $1 tril-
lion in lending for households
and businesses, according to
the government. Spurring
such lending is vital to turning
around the economy but as
of August 12, the amount of
loans outstanding in the
TALF stood at just $29.6 bil-
lion.

The Fed and Treasury on
Monday said they were pre-
pared to reconsider the deci-
sion not to expand TALF
lending to more areas if finan-
cial or economic develop-
ments merit such action.
However, the government
believes the financial system
is beginning to stabilize after
being hit last fall by the worst
financial crisis since the Great
Depression.

"Conditions in financial
markets have improved con-
siderably in recent months,”
the Fed and Treasury said in
their statement. "Nonethe-
less, the markets for asset-
backed securities backed by
consumer and business loans
and for commercial mort-
gage-backed securities are
still impaired and seem likely
to remain so for some time."

The Fed last week deliv-
ered a vote of confidence in
the economy, saying the
downturn appeared to be
"leveling out.” Fed officials
also said they would slow the
pace of a programme to buy
$300 billion worth of Trea-
sury securities, an effort
aimed at keeping mortgage
rates affordable. The central
bank said it planned to shut
down the programme at the
end of October.

Monday's announcement
was another signal the Fed
wants financial markets to
know it is closely monitoring
its emergency credit pro-
grammes to ensure they do
not generate unwanted infla-
tion once the economy begins
to grow again, economists
said.

"This action reflects the
Fed's view that the economy
is stabilizing but it is far from
a durable recovery,” said Sal
Guatieri, an economist at
BMO Capital Markets.

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE ze SERYICES

Za

Cry LON TAL

Div $ P/E
10.6
11.1
25.6
N/M

0.078 40.4

0.055 : 43.1

1.406 : 8.1

0.249 11.0

0.419 13.6

0.111 : 33.4

0.240 ; 8.3

0.420 15.7

0.322 33.0

0.794 13.0

0.332 15.5

0.000 F N/M

0.035 : 8.6

0.407 13.5

0.952 10.9

0.180 55.6

0.127
0.992
0.244

ases)

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E
N/M
N/M

256.6

Yield
2.05%
7.80%
0.00%|

0.000
0.001

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

0.00%
0.00%
Yield % NAV Date
30-Jun-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

mths

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525
PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune



i

UATE
ARIJUANA

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

IT’S known as Ganja, Herb,

weed, and more than 200 other
names around the globe, marijua-
na is reported as one of the most

COLT AUT tome erm mL

Caribbean among teens.

According to the World Health Organisa-
tion, next to alcohol, marijuana is one of the
most commonly used drug by minors in the

Caribbean.

Mostly taken for psychoactive purposes,
marijuana is said to enhance emotional
responses and create a temporary feeling of
euphoria, but is also known to cause hallucina-
tions apart from other risks.

For many users, marijuana is smoked, but it
can also be taken in liquid form.

Taking a relatively short time to take effect,
THEM MU eRe quae CMON seek Aan ten
can include: dizziness, an inability to control
laughter, a feeling of invincibility, or extreme

fatigue.

With several public and private projects
already introduced to inform people on the
effects associated with the drug, one local doc-
tor is convinced that the community still needs

more information about the plant.

Dr Nisha Armbrister, a doctor of traditional
Chinese Medicine at The Holistic Family
Medicine Center explained that apart from
the pros and cons of marijuana consumption,
marijuana use should be limited to cancer
OL TACesOLSe

Dr Armbrister said: “Marijuana use should
only be used for terminal patients, such as
those with cancer, to induce appetite or help
stimulate energy.

“For many terminal cancer patients,
chemotherapy is a usual means of ridding the
body of cancer. However a common side-
effect is the loss of appetite.

“To build their bodies back up, marijuana
may be an option, but with consuming it
everyday, it can eventually become addictive,
and that is not good either.”

She said some of the long term effects of
marijuana use include hallucinations, short or
long term psychosis, and even depression.

Dr Armbrister said she supports the use of
hemp - a product related to the marijuana
plant group, but seen as a less potent form
with fewer side effects. Given the number of
Bahamians affected by chronic diseases she
said the use of hemp seeds is an even better
option than the raw marijuana.

Overall, she said minors who are introduced
to the drug are far more at risk to addiction
and should seek counseling if they’ve started
using it.

SAS alae



Know
your
zones

i RATHER than relying
: on fragrance, packaging,
i or word of mouth when

: selecting a cleanser or

i moisturiser, what if you

? could choose based upon
i facts about your very

: own skin condition? Face
i Mapping®, Dermalogi-

i ca's unique skin analysis
i available at authorised

i skin treatment centers,

? salons, and spas world-

i wide, provides insight

: into your skin's past and
i present, and allows the

i subsequent prescription
: of a targeted home care

? regimen for a healthy

i skin future.

i Developed by The

i International Dermal

? Institute for Dermalogi-

i ca, Face Mapping® takes
? no more than five to ten
i minutes, is free, and

i eliminates the guesswork
i when selecting products

: for results on your skin.

i Rather than analysing
i: the skin in general terms,
i; a Dermalogica Profes-

: sional Skin Therapist

i uses Face Mapping® to

i divide the facial land-

i scape into fourteen

: zones. Each zone is thor-
i oughly examined inch-

? by-inch through touch

i and sight, and findings

: are notated on a pre-

? scription sheet.

i This prescription sheet
i serves as a customised

: visual guide for you, out-
? lining on an actual facial
? landscape illustration

: where conditions includ-
i ing congestion, break-

? outs, dehydration, and/or
i hyperpigmentation are

? present.

i Face Mapping® main-
i tains an accurate record

? of your skin, which pro-

? vides you and your Der-

i malogica Professional

? Skin Therapist an objec-
i tive view into the results
i of any professional prod-
uct recommendation.



I UNDERWENT surgery about
four years ago, although described as
a simple procedure, this called for
anesthesia. Anything involving anes-
thesia to me isn't so simple. On the
other hand, my husband seemed
somewhat nervous, this being evi-
dent by his serious facial expression
and quietness before I underwent
the procedure.

I was trying to engage him in con-
versation and was overwhelmed with
laughter, finding everything humor-
ous including the doctor's surgery
cap and gown. I realised as nervous
as I was, dwelling on negativity was-
n't going to make the situation any
better, so I chose laughter. There-
fore, I was able to recover from the
surgery with good results.

“Laughter is the best medicine.”
How often have you heard that?
Well it turns out that those sayings
are actually true. Norman Cousins
can attest to that, when he was sick
with a brain tumor, he left the hos-
pital and checked into a hotel room,
where he availed himself of several
humorous books and videos by the
Marx Brothers and the Three
Stooges. In a matter of minutes he
made his discovery. What was it?

Br VaeeN/
| MORTIMER:
iano daNv4|:

iy



of good hearty laughter resulted in
two hours of good sleep without
pain.

It is true that optimists live longer
than pessimists. Research has proven
that people with a better sense of
humour live longer and healthier
lives. The positive results of laughter
and humour is evident when we are
under stress.

Unlike animals, we are the only
known species programmed to
laugh. So, why not embrace it. It is
said that the average adult laughs
approximately 17 times a day. There
is a difference between humour and
laughter. Laughter is the physiolog-
ical response to humour. Research
has proven that 100-200 laughs are
equivalent to ten minutes of jogging.
Let us examine the many health ben-

efits of laughter.

Health Benefits of Humour and

Laughter

¢ Reduces stress, by lowering lev-
els of stress hormones and increas-

ing levels of endorphins.
e Improves cognitive ability.
e Enhances immune system

e Relaxes the body

e An inexpensive anti-aging treat-
ment, it increase blood supply to
your face, enhancing your com-

plexion.
e A natural pain killer

e Increases productivity

e May reduce the risk of heart dis-

case

“When we laugh, natural killer




immune system) and B-cells (which
make disease fighting antibodies).
It also lowers blood pressure, laugh-
ter increases oxygen in the blood,
which also encourages healing.” 'Sci-
ence of Laughter” Discovery Health
Website.

A study conducted at the Univer-
sity of Maryland Medical Center
indicated that a rich sense of humor
may help protect you against a heart
attack. Distressing emotions, such
as depression, anger anxiety and
stress are all connected to heart dis-
ease. The ability to laugh lightens
the physical effects of distressing
emotions.

Laughter and the skin

Do you have lines around your
mouth, and lines around your eyes?
Although describes as signs of aging,
they are also known as laughing
lines. These lines are usually the
result of laughing. Are you going to
cease laughing to avoid developing
laughing lines? Of course not, such
lines are not always a reflection of
poor habits, but a reflection of who
you really are and how you deal with
life challenges, in most cases it is the
result of happiness. However, laugh-

cells which destroy tumors and virus-
es increase, along with Gamma-
interferon (a disease fighting pro-
tein), T-cells Gmportant for our

ing lines can be prevented by wear-
ing sun protection, drinking at least
8 glasses of water and not smoking.
A good skin care routine is also vital.

What can you do to increase your
humour and laughter?



e Look for something funny in
every day life

e Associate with those who are
positive and love to laugh

¢ Read humorous books and watch
funny movies

e Avoid feeding your minds with
negativity, things that are sad and
depressing

Remember to use your discretion
when using humor and laughter. It
is more appropriate to use in an
environment conducive to humor,
like a party and not a funeral. Use
humour to laugh at situations and
not to degrade a person's charac-
ter. Humour and laughter is a nat-
ural treatment for aging. Don't for-
get to cry less, get angry less and to
laugh more.

¢ Kenya Mortimer-McKenzie is an
Esthetician/Anti-Aging Skin Care Spe-
cialist. Interested persons can contact
her at Baha-Retreat Anti-Aging Spa
East Bay Street, East of Lucianos
323-6711 or 323-615

www. baharetreat.com

Email: info@baharetreat.com
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009, PAGE 9B





@x
SEX AND THE NET:

LOVING RELATIONSHIPS



Female Empowerment

MANY in our society would be sur-
prised if they truly knew how the
world of female sexuality is changing
because of the Internet. We have
grown up believing that men are more
technologically competent and fla-
grant in their sexual dialogue. The
role of pornography, for the benefit of
men, is not new and has been well
documented in many cultures and for
many centuries.

Society expects women to behave in
a certain way and conform to expec-
tations. But what are you to do if you
do not fall into the 'norm' or you do
in most areas but not all? If you live in
a society that does not let you openly
satisfy your enquiring mind, then
where and to whom are you to turn?

Today, we are all expected and told
to have healthy lifestyles but who
determines what is healthy? Surely
healthy means a tranquil mind, body
and soul that in turn bring peace and
joy to the whole of our life. To have
any one of those integral parts of our
nature out of step brings a restlessness
and often unhappiness that is not eas-
ily dismissed.

Knowing all of this it is not surpris-
ing that the number of women who
are using the Internet, for sexual
information and satisfaction, is equal

@r

GREEN SCENE





BVAWANGe |e



to men.

In reality, women have become just
as technologically capable as men and
have quickly learnt how to steer clear
of undesirable or degrading sites.
Most of us are used to ducking and
diving from objectionable advances
in real life, so translating that online
becomes even easier. To get rid of
someone or something is just a click
away. Real life is rarely that easy.

When we consider the vast num-
ber of sex related sites we quickly
realise that it is not our gender that
determines if we consider a site to be
‘woman friendly’ or ‘sexist’ but our
perception of our gender.

We may be more drawn to home
pages that have pastel flowery images,
and romantic poetry then feel com-
fortable seeking information. For oth-
ers, exploring more masculine and

Favourite palms

IN A word association exercise the
response to ‘tropical’ will almost always
include ‘palm trees.’ Palms have always
been a feature of Bahamian gardens
and I notice their use is increasing rather
than diminishing.

The coconut palm (Cocos nucifera) is
the best-known palm in the world and is
the most diversely useful, providing both
food and shelter. In The Bahamas we
tend to take its beauty for granted but it
is a stunning tree when mature.

The problem with coconut trees is
they grow so tall they become a danger
to buildings during a hurricane. This is
especially true when the standard build-
ing lot is only 10,000 square feet. Home-
owners who want the beauty of the
coconut palm without its dangers are
opting for smaller cultivars such as
Malaysian Dwarf. These are not as strik-
ing as our regular Jamaican Tall coconut
palms but provide a compromise.

Many more homeowners are going
even more downscale and are using
Manila palms (Veitchia merrillii). Also
called Christmas palms, these never pre-
sent a problem with electric lines and
are handsome with recurved leaves and
straight stems. With the Manila palm
we lose the food aspect but do have
bunches of pretty green and red inedible
nuts hanging down over the Christmas
period.

Some people seem to be overdoing
the number of Manila palms they use in
their garden. After writing this I
checked my own garden: eleven, includ-
ing a grouping of three, a grouping of
two, and six individual plants. I have
seen smaller garden with fifty Manila
palms.

Manila palms are easily grown from
seed. Wait until the nuts drop and then
bury them a scant one-inch deep in
sandy soil. Once they have rooted they
can be transplanted to their permanent
site. Grouping the palms in twos and
threes gives the landscaping a little more
body, especially when the palms are
used for lawn centerpieces. Allow six
inches between the juvenile palms when

grouping.

One larger palm that has become
very popular in Abaco is the Alexander
palm Archontophoenix alexandre), a
beauty with a shapely grey trunk and
green crownshaft and lovely feathery
fronds. The Alexander palm needs its
own space with no competition to be
most visually effective. This palm comes
to us from eastern Australia and is
amongst the loveliest of all palms.

There are a number of palms that are
called fishtail because of the shape of
the leaves on the fronds. The Caryota
Mitis is one most grown in The Bahamas
and technically it could grow to 30 feet
but rarely exceeds 15 feet. Unlike the
other palms discussed in this

article, the fishtail palm has multiple
stems and produces a bushy growth.
Most multi-stemmed palms are shade
lovers but the fishtail palm can take a
good deal of sun. It produces best when
provided with some shade.

After the fishtail palm flowers it los-
es the stem with flower growth, but this
is replaced by new stems from the main
growth.

A true gem of a palm is the bottle
palm (Hyophorbe lagenicaulis) that
comes from the Mascarene Islands in
the Indian Ocean but is no longer found
there. The bottle palm is somewhat
unprepossessing when juvenile as the
trunk is not distended. All this changes
in maturity when the trunk becomes
Falstaffian, positively pot-bellied, raffish
and rotund.

The bottle palm has a short but attrac-
tive crownshaft and the short fronds are
so recurved they almost double back
on themselves. They are often seen in
groupings of two and three but, of
course, need at least two feet between
them. A single specimen makes an
attractive lawn centerpiece. The maxi-
mum height of a bottle palm is about ten
feet.

A selection of palms in the garden
produces a tropical ambience that few
other plants can provide.

e j.hardy@coralwave.com

more sexually graphic venues allows
areas of femininity that would nor-
mally be frowned upon. The anonymi-
ty or pseudo anonymity that can be
achieved via the Internet allows us to
avoid society's labeling and judging
of behaviour.

A fine example of this can be seen
when well-known ‘porn stars’ estab-
lish their own web sites, gain control
over their own careers, and in turn
empower themselves.

In previous weeks, we have dis-
cussed persons who are susceptible
to the lure and compulsive nature of
online sexual activity. Many present
preexisting sexual problems and
undeveloped coping skills to name a
few. In the past, men have presented
more addictive natures, but that is
changing because of the Internet.
Female compulsive online sexual
behavior is, in fact, on par with men.

Because most of the online com-
munication is text based the impor-
tance of the written word become
even more significant. Relationships
are established quickly and accelerate
at lightning speed. The excitement
of becoming whom ever we want
becomes fuel for our imagination and
acts like an amphetamine.

Without a doubt, this can become a

problem when cyber world collides }
with real world. However, in therapy,
we know there are clear benefits for
those who have difficulties relating, :
flirting or who have low self-esteem. }
Chat rooms can be used for 'practice }
relationships’ and, when the time is }
right, it can then be translated into }

the real world.

The way that we communicate has }
changed radically over the last twen- }
ty years in ways that we could never
have imagined. What will the next }
twenty bring? It is important to edu- }
cate persons to understand the perils }
and in turn help to establish more }
positive web sites. The Internet is }
here to stay so we need to take }
advantage and grow with it. If we }
want our role as women to improve }
then we need to play our part in our }

own reinvention.

eMargaret Bain is an Individual and

Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a
Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical :

Sex Therapist. Call for an appointment-
Relate Bahamas at 364- 7230, or email
relatebahamas@yahoo.com
orwww.relatebahamas. blogspot.com.
She is also available for speaking
engagements.



By Gardener Jack



The foliage of fish tail palms is
feathery and adds texture to
individual plantings.

Fe i

- Bottle palms are attractive and
compact and will never endanger
electric lines.







Moms-to-
he stay fit

JACKSON, Miss.

MAUD PRICE, 23, is not
using pregnancy as an
excuse to prop up her feet
and pack on the pounds,
according to the Associated
Press.

Exercise remains a part of
her routine, just as it was
before she became pregnant.

Price has been a part of
the Moms N Motion water
aerobics class at The Club
at St. Dominic's Hospital
since May.

"T felt like it would help
me out with my labor, and it
would probably help me
with my legs and it has," said
Price of Jackson, who is 38
weeks along. "At first, I was
having a lot of leg cramps."

She also walks the indoor
track before the biweekly
classes.

Walking and swimming
are ideal aerobic exercises
for healthy pregnant women,
and experts recommend 30
minutes a day.

A report in this month's
issue of the Journal of the
American Academy of
Orthopaedic Surgeons urges
physicians to recommend
such exercises to pregnant
patients, even if they have
not exercised prior to preg-
nancy.

Data show a pregnant
woman's body can compen-
sate for the changes with no
harm to the fetus during
low- to moderate-intensity
exercise, according to Capt.
Marlene DeMaio, a physi-
cian and research director
of the Naval Medical Cen-
ter in Portsmouth, Va., and
author of the study.

The findings contradict
what some physicians rec-
ommended in the past.

As recently as the 1990s,
there was concern exercise
could be detrimental to a
pregnant woman and her
fetus.

These days the benefits of
exercising while pregnant
are better understood, but
in the grand scheme of pre-
natal care, are sometimes
overlooked. "Honestly, most
patients aren't getting
advised on it unless they are
asking questions,” said Dr.
Emily Johnson, an obstetri-
cian/ gynecologist with Jack-
son Healthcare for Women.

Johnson touts some of the
benefits: keeping weight gain
at an optimal 25-35 pounds;
keeping the heart in good
shape and preparing the
body for the strenuous activ-
ity of labor. Exercise is par-
ticularly beneficial to obese
patients and those who
develop gestational diabetes.
Exercise helps with medi-
cine for the latter, Johnson
said.

Registered nurse Loretta
Buckley has taught the
water aerobics class off and
on for 20 years. Exercising
while pregnant, she says,
keeps the muscles tight in
the legs and abdomen.

"It gives you an enthusi-
asm to keep on doing. Peo-
ple who exercise when
they're pregnant, they are
different people. They want
a healthy baby, and they
want to be healthy them-
selves. And, I'm seeing more
and more of it now," Buck-
ley said.

Over the years, women
have told her they sleep bet-
ter because of the class,
which is the case with one
current participant.

Cristina Lazzari, 32, of
Byram began water aerobics
in her fifth month of preg-
nancy, but didn't attend reg-
ularly until insomnia set in.

"I was having lack of ener-
gy. The little exercise I do
now is really helping me out,
especially with insomnia.
Maybe because I get more
tired physically,” said Laz-
zari, whose baby is due Sept.
9. She also takes a prenatal
yoga class.

Retta Boyd is a registered
nurse and one of the mater-
nal newborn educators at St.
Dominic's. One of her duties
is to give women guidelines
on the do's and don'ts of
exercising while pregnant.

"We always encourage
our patients to do exercise
but not (strenuous) after
they become pregnant.
Don't start hard aerobic
exercise. Continue what you
have been doing prior to get-
ting pregnant," Boyd said.
In her opinion, water aero-
bics is better than other
exercises because "you're
not pounding your body
against concrete (as with jog-
ging). Something you can do
rain or shine."
PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009

r:

MISS Montenegro Anja Jovanovic

walks on the runway,during the

Brennan Linsley/Swimsuit Photos

Ml

swimsuit event of the 2009 Miss
Universe Preliminary Competition...

FROM left: Miss Peru Karen Schwarz, Miss Philippines Bianca Manalo, Miss Poland Angelika Jakubowska, and Miss Puerto Rico Mayra
Matos Perez stand together during the swimsuit event.

- ut q - J
SS Venezuela Stefania Fernandez poses on the runway in the MISS Japan Emiri Miyasaka poses on the runway in the evening

evening gown segment. gown segment.

Tim Aylen/Evening Gown Photos

MISS India Ekta Chowdhry, left, bows as she introduces herself, as Miss Indonesia Zivanna Letisha Siregar, right, looks on, during the
opening event.

THE TRIBUNE

By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

THE 84 contestants of the 2009 Miss Universe Pageant
took to the stage Sunday night in a dazzling display of
both physical fitness and glamour as they participated in
the swimsuit and evening gown preliminary competitions
which will help to reduce the number of hopefuls to a
mere 15 for next weck’s main event.

In less than six hours, the staff of Atlantis transformed
the Imperial Ballroom into a stage and runway fit for a
queen and enough seating to accommodate the hundreds
who came out to show support for their favourite country.

Hosts for the evening were the reigning Miss Universe
Dayana Mendoza and local radio personality Ed Fields
who gave snippets of information about each contestant
as they came on Stage first in swimsuit and then evening
gown.

Between the two events, entertainment was provided
by London based recording artist Anthony Wright.

The evening gown competition was the highlight of the
evening as the ladies gracefully made their way down the
catwalk to the oohs and aahs of the crowd.

Jeweled tones seemed to be the order of the evening
with many of the contestants wearing rich blues, purples
and greens. Other popular choices included silver and
gold sparkling creations (as in the gold dress worn by
Miss Bahamas Kiara Sherman), vibrant red and Grecian
styled gowns in white and silver.

MISS USA Kristen Dalton walks during the swimsuit event of the
2009 Miss Universe Preliminary Competition...

MISS Puerto Rico Mayra Matos Perez walks during the swimsuit
event of the 2009 Miss Universe Preliminary Competition...


THE TRIBUNE



THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST

TAMPA
High: 93° F/34° C

Low: 76° F/24°C

ORLANDO |
High: 90° F/32°C
Low: 77° F/25°C

KEY WEST
High: 90° F/32°C
Low: 81°F/27°C



Clouds and sun, a
t-storm; breezy.

H ig h: 89°
AccuWeather RealFeel

103° F

@ WEST PALM BEACH
High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 80° F/27°C

FT. LAUDERDALE

High:88°F/31°C

Low: 80° F/27°C

>

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

@
MIAMI
High: 89° F/32°C

Low: 80° F/27°C

<



Mostly cloudy, a

ON

Cloudy with showers

Mostly sunny, a

Wednesday

Today

High Low W High

Fie FC F/C
Albuquerque 88/31 63/17 t 90/32
Anchorage 63/17 52/41 ¢ 66/18
Atlanta 90/32 71/21 t 90/32
Atlantic City 90/32 72/22 s 90/32
Baltimore 92/33 70/21 s 90/32
Boston 94/34 72/22 s 90/32
Buffalo 82/27 67/9 t 80/26
Charleston, SC 90/32 73/22 p 91/32
Chicago 81/27 58/14 t 85/29
Cleveland 86/30 69/20 t 82/27
Dallas 99/37 79/26 s 98/36
Denver 80/26 54/12 t 85/29
Detroit 85/29 65/18 t 83/28
Honolulu 89/31 74/23 p 89/31
Houston 93/33 77/25 t 94/34

Low

F/C
65/18
50/10
73/22
71/21
70/21
68/20
61/16
74/23
67/19
68/20
78/25
52/11
68/20
77/25
77/25

Ww

FN ON Dee OD teeter t ON

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando

High
F/C
84/28
88/31
86/30
103/39
94/34
78/25
86/30
88/31
89/31
78/25
84/28
88/31
94/34
96/35
90/32

couple of t-storms. and t-storms. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. shower. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
High: 89° High: 90° High: 90° High: 89°
Low: 80° Low: 77° Low: 76° Low: 75° Low: 75° see RE
ae
107°-82° F 105°-79° F 96°-81° F 96°-84° F High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht. (ft.
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 6:24am. 2.7 12:22am. 0.1
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 657 p.m. 3.3 12:25 p.m. -0.1
Wednesd Zd2am. 3.0 1:15am. 0.0
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thursda S45am. 32 204am. 3
ABACO Temperature, ¥ 8:41pm. 33 2:20pm. -02
, IGM sess sasedvsssesstacetsonaesecsiectared saccbanes 91° F/33° C , 7 ; :
High: 91° F/33°C oes Frid 9:06am. 33 2:50am. -0.2
7a? F/2G°C Low nagenranensaieen 80° F/27° C rday 9:29pm. 3.2 3:13pm. -0.2
a - Normal high .... 89° F/32° C see eee
ee Normal low 76° F/24° C
a Last year's Nigh oo... 91° F/33° C SUN AND itn
3 Last year's LOW o.ccceeceseteeeeeeeee 75° F/24° C
>a Precipitation ||} | ||| Sunrise...... 6:45 a.m. Moonrise. .... 4:35 a.m.
an As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....cccsccsssessscsseeesseseeeee 0.13" ‘Sunset... ... 7-42 p.m. Moonset. .... 6:24 p.m.
FREEPORT 7 Year to date wa 22, New First Full Last
High: 89° F/32° C Normal year to date 0... cecececcseeceneee 28.42" aa = a
Low: 78° F/26° C 4
, Lt
AccuWeather.com ‘ioe’
Forecasts and graphics provided by ii aay
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 i . E
NASSAU High: 91° F/33°C
High: 89° F/32°C Low: 80 F/27 C
a Low: 80° F/27°C
cs - tz
<< “Sg CATISLAND
High: 87° F/31°C
Low: 77° F/25°C
— en ©
Z, GREAT EXUMA a SAN SALVADOR
all, i High: 90° F/32° C 5 ah: ON? 0
Low:81°F/27°C High: 90° F/32° C
ANDROS ow: 81°F/ Low: 78° F/26° C
High: 91° F/33°C ae
Low: 80° F/27°C : in a
a
LONGISLAND
High: 88° F/31° C
Low: 78° F/26° C
Wednesday Today Wednesday a MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W Fic FC FC FC FIC FIC e Low: 75° F/24° C
89/31 70/21 t Philadelphia 93/33 74/23 s 88/31 72/22 t
92/33 74/23 t Phoenix 108/42 32/27 pce 107/41 82/27 s CRO eo
84/28 63/17 t Pittsburgh 84/28 66/18 t 82/27 66/18 t RAGGED ISLAND igh: , ,
105/40 79/26 s Portland,OR 94/34 6216 s 99/37 64/17 cee Low:77° F/25°C
92/33 74/23 t Raleigh-Durham 93/33 71/21 t 94/34 73/22 t Low: 77°F/25°C in %
80/26 64/17 pc St. Louis 87/30 71/21 t 86/30 72/22 t .
90/32 73/22 t Salt Lake City 84/28 57/13 s 88/31 62/16 s ww
92/33 75/23 t San Antonio 99/37 76/24 pc 100/87 78/25 s ipa pines
91/32 79/26 t San Diego 73/22 65/18 pc 75/23 66/18 pc Low. 77°F25°C
79/26 61/16 t San Francisco 76/24 58/14 5s 78/25 58/14 s i
89/31 72/22 t Seattle 85/29 60/15 s 91/32 60/15 s
92/33 78/25 t Tallahassee 95/35 74/23 pe 93/83 74/23 t = *
90/32 73/22 t Tampa 93/33 76/24 t 92/33 78/25 t
96/35 72/22 s Tucson 100/37 74/23 s 99/37 74/23 pc Vw
92/33 77/25 t Washington, DC 94/34 75/23 s 91/32 75/23 t

Today

Low

F/C
68/20
73/22
68/20
73/22
73/22
62/16
72/22
75/23
80/26
61/16
71/21
78/25
75/23
74/23
77/25

Ww

mm

Mostly sunny, a

— allt —
a
— i

Some sun with a brief



Tanne cri






o|1|2

LOW



MODERATE

3|4|5|







HIGH | V.HIGH

ay.
{8| eho
: EXT.

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the

ii

oe LTS



Today Wednesday
High Low W High Low W
F/C F/C F/C F/C

Acapulco 90/32 75/23 c 88/31 79/26 t
Amsterdam 76/24 61/16 s 79/26 68/20 s
Ankara, Turkey 87/30 54/12 s 86/30 51/10 s
Athens 90/32 75/23 s 92/33 75/23 s
Auckland 59/15 50/10 c 60/15 48/8 sh
Bangkok 90/32 77/25 r 91/32 79/26 sh
Barbados 87/30 78/25 pc 86/30 79/26 pc
Barcelona 84/28 68/20 s 83/28 69/20 s
Beijing 84/28 73/22 pc 86/30 70/21 c
Beirut 81/27 79/26 s 81/27 78/25 s
Belgrade 94/34 68/20 s 90/32 60/15 s
Berlin 75/23 57/13 s 79/26 64/17 s
Bermuda 87/30 75/23 sh 86/30 75/23 sh
Bogota 67/19 46/7 sh 68/20 46/7 t
Brussels 81/27 61/16 s 84/28 68/20 s
Budapest 92/33 62/16 s 88/31 57/13 s
Buenos Aires 57/13 47/8 pc 56/13 43/6 c
Cairo 97/36 77/25 s 98/36 74/23 s
Calcutta 91/32 83/28 sh 91/32 34/28 sh
Calgary 72/22 48/8 pc 72/22 50/10 pc
Cancun 91/32 75/23 pc 92/33 75/23 pc
Caracas 82/27 71/21 t 83/28 72/22 t
Casablanca 83/28 71/21 s 86/30 72/22 s
Copenhagen 72/22 53/11 pe 71/21 58/14 pe
Dublin 66/18 59/15 r 68/20 55/12 +
Frankfurt 84/28 57/13 s 87/30 69/20 s
Geneva 86/30 61/16 s 87/30 61/16 s
Halifax 80/26 61/16 s 77/25 59/15 pc
Havana 91/32 72/22 t 90/32 74/23 +
Helsinki 63/17 48/8 r 68/20 48/8 s
Hong Kong 90/32 81/27 pc 93/33 31/27 s
Islamabad 91/32 75/23 t 99/37 77/25 s
Istanbul 86/30 70/21 s 86/30 71/21 s
Jerusalem 85/29 64/17 s 88/31 64/17 s
Johannesburg 62/16 44/6 s 6116 37/2 ¢
Kingston 89/31 77/25 pc 90/32 79/26 r
Lima 70/21 56/13 s 69/20 58/14 s
London 79/26 59/15 s 83/28 63/17 s
Madrid 99/37 61/16 s 97/36 61/16 s
Manila 86/30 79/26 r 87/30 79/26 t
Mexico City 77/25 55/12 t 74/23 55/12 t
Monterrey 100/37 73/22 s 100/37 73/22 s
Montreal 86/30 70/21 t 81/27 63/17 pc
Moscow 73/22 57/13 t 6417 48/8 r
Munich 83/28 55/12 t 88/31 58/14 s
Nairobi 75/23 56/13 sh 78/25 56/13 c
New Delhi 90/32 77/25 t 91/32 79/26 t
Oslo 68/20 48/8 s 68/20 55/12 pc
Paris 88/31 64/17 s 93/33 67/19 pc
Prague 79/26 52/11 s 81/27 57/13 s
Rio de Janeiro 84/28 73/22 s 83/28 71/21 sh
Riyadh 104/40 80/26 s 105/40 81/27 s
Rome 91/32 70/21 s 91/32 70/21 s
St. Thomas 90/32 81/27 pc 91/32 79/26 sh
San Juan 65/18 36/2 ¢ 64/17 36/2 pc
San Salvador 86/30 70/21 t 86/30 74/23 t
Santiago 50/10 41/4 © 54/12 32/0 sh
Santo Domingo 88/31 75/23 t 88/31 75/23 sh
Sao Paulo 76/24 63/17 t 71/21 58/14 +
Seoul 86/30 73/22 sh 86/30 74/23 sh
Stockholm 6417 48/8 +r 68/20 50/10 s
Sydney 70/21 48/8 s 72/22 =48/8 s
Taipei 91/32 79/26 t 92/33 80/26 t
Tokyo 84/28 75/23 c 84/28 73/22 c
Toronto 80/26 61/16 t 77/25 61/16 pc
Trinidad 93/33 70/21 pc 95/35 + 75/23 s
Vancouver 77/25 62/16 s 82/27 63/17 s
Vienna 86/30 63/17 s 84/28 64/17 s
Warsaw 77/25 52/11 -s 72/22 54/12 pc
Winnipeg 67/19 52/11 pc 69/20 56/13 c

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace

TUESDAY, AUGUST 18TH, 2009, PAGE 11B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

MARINE FORECAST





WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 1-3 Miles 86° F
Wednesday: SE at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 1-3 Miles 86° F
FREEPORT Today: E at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 1-3 Miles 85° F
Wednesday: SE at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 1-3 Miles 85° F
ABACO Today: E at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 1-3 Miles 84° F
Wednesday: SE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 1-3 Miles 84° F



Ue Gy

ti ° “Charlotte

r Nashville~ : Cape Hatteras
Columbia
és Atlanta e 8 AM Sat
MYT Beach

Mont
pnigemety 8 PM Fri

Mobile A

~ BERMUDA

Savannah
packsonville
Jallahassee}.

=
Me

¢ Daytona Beach

\ \ 6 PM Thur |
\ ’
x Tampa, 2) <8 PM Thur | PM Thur

Orlando Freeport

Turks &
Caicos Islands

<8 AM Tue
‘ 8 PM Mon VIRGIN ISLANDS
a (US & UK)
ne 2 Binion, ‘._ Antigua
Seniagg = <0 Ao
Deming
ANA ° DOMINICA
SAINT LUCIA o
° a
(GRENADA BARBADOS

afte
ie. Cu
Santiago dé
= Cuba * *

CAYMAN
ISLANDS o>
i, ingston

aa, ag
——~~Cozumel
°

o Si San Salvador

im.

Managua
Limon

Na

85

Aruba curaca
iene
way

10

5
ke

HURRICANE INSURANCE

ou
tee

Or you can rest easy

Gan, Bs Blown
UIrTLicane

knowing

that yo -have excellent i surance

rage no matter w
as he wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURAMCE BROKERS & AGENTS
' ee | af
Bak (282) B50-3500 ff Ted: (242) 7K ff Tet: (242) 30-2800 ff Tet (22) 336-2308


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009



By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

HE month of August has become

the official month of love for one

local couple who won the ultimate
wedding experience and got to
exchange their vows on live television.

On August 7, 26-year-old Tamika Burrows came before
her friends, coworkers, and family, to express her love for
her new husband 24-year-old Antonio Storr on the first
ever Bahamas At Sunrise ‘Dream Wedding Experience.’

The live show teamed up with several companies to offer
the couple the ultimate dream wedding, providing every-
thing from the location dress, and cake to the rings, and
reception. The only catch was that the couple had to allow
viewers to make the specific selections for the wedding in
the weeks leading up to the event.

When the big day came, both Antonio and Tamika
seemed anxious but excited that their three year courtship
was finally coming to an end.

It was a scene out of the perfect love story - a beautiful
garden wedding at the rear of the British Colonial Hilton,
with yachts passing in the beautiful early morning harbour,
birds singing their morning melodies, and guests dressed in
bright pastels.

Tamika wore an original Apryl Jasmine dress decorated
with lace and white beading.

Just minutes before her walk down the aisle , Tamika
told Tribune Features what the big day truly meant to her.

“What’s running through my head is what I’m going to
say when I reach the altar. I know that I’m going to say yes,
but I’m also thinking what I will say after that, but ?m
good, I’m excited, ’'m happy.”

Tamika who is employed with Batelco, was supported by
dozens of coworkers including the company’s CEO Kirk
i F \ Griffin, VP of Legal Regulations and Interconnection
qi : F i Felicity Johnson, and company Chairman Julian Francis.

Thy, ri =F = i At approximately 7.45am on August 7, the couple was
— i - i | \ Pir 3 announced as husband and wife, and shared their very first



? ‘ fe i i kiss ever
"45 ! Te S. A , fF - Go Following the festivities, the newlyweds headed to Abaco
r “Se hy where they stayed at the Green Turtle Cay Club for four
Ts days and three nights.
. According to the shows Producer Dwight Strachan, the
“aa Dream Wedding Experience was a first, and was well
. received by the public.

“T think everything went pretty much as planned, know-
ing that we were making history where a live Bahamian
wedding was being televised throughout the country, it was

— the most exciting part of the event for us.

“Also being there for this couple who P’ve come to know
over the past few weeks, was an amazing experience, you
could tell that they were so much in love, and we are simply
elated that we were able to be a part of that.”

Sponsors for the event included; The British Colonial
Hilton, Gigi the artist, Modern Men Boutique, Bahama
Fantasies, Jewels by the Sea, Renee Brown, Template,
Vivienne Lockhart, Vows, Donald Knowles, and Sky
Bahamas.

fag “ame fl
7 psa }

map| Zona

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway e 394-1759





xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EF6Y1R0QP_YFAQO0 INGEST_TIME 2012-01-27T22:13:58Z PACKAGE UF00084249_01383
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.220TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER CLOUDS & SUN, T-STORM HIGH 89F LOW 80F S P O R T S SEEPAGE TWELVE 100m final drama F E A T U R E S SEEWOMANSECTION Dream wedding The Tribune YOUR PASSPORT TO MISS UNIVERSE BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR HASH BROWNS 2 FOR $1.15 www.tribune242.com /77,:616/ )VaWVM' Robin Hoodextended banking hours: Mon-Fri9:30am-7pmSat9am-5pm BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Man charged with slaying of mother 25-year -old in court LEFT: Valentino Hanna-Dorsette, 25, arrives at court yesterday to be charged with murder ABOVE: Kachi Armony, the husband of murder victim Tagia Soles-Armony, carries their eldest son Chelan as he leaves the court room yesterday. B y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@ tribunemedia.net A 25-YEAR-OLD man, charged in theb rutal slaying of a mother of two, was arraigned in Magis trate’s Court yesterday. Police have charged Valentino Hanna Dorsette, alias “Ballistic” of Sesame Street, with the murder of Tagia Soles-Armony, 29. D orsette appeared before Deputy Chief Magistrate Carolita Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane on the charges of murder and possession of a firearm with intent to endanger the life of another. It is alleged that on Friday, August 7, Dorsette intentionally caused the death of TaGia Soles-Armony and was in possession of a 9mm pistol with intent to endanger the life of her son Zen Armony. According to reports, Soles-Armony was shot outside her mother’s home in Sea Breeze as she sat in her car breast feeding her three-month-old son. Injured and with her son in her arms, TaGia reportedly tried to escape her attacker, only to rear-end a parked car and hit two other parked vehicles nearby before coming to a stop. By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE Commissioner of Police yesterday denied that there is friction between officers in the upper level of the force that might be compro mising its focus on solvingc rimes. Commissioner Reginald Ferguson said that “rumours” that certain officers at the Assistant Commissioner level and above are at odds with one another, even fighting with each other over their phones being wire t apped, are “spinning on stupidness.” A police insider with many years on the force has alleged that the “top floor” of the police force has been “divided” and “overcome by politics.” Division grew in recent m onths with Deputy Commissioner Ellison Greenslade and Assistant Commissioner Quinn McCartney becoming upset over the apparent authorisation of their phones being wiretapped a concern reported in a local tabloid but also repeated by r eliable sources. The alleged wiretapping was first raised in the public domain by PLP Senator Allyson Maynard Gibson, who suggested in the Senate in July that the alleged intrusions and apparent “infighting in the force” were less ening its capacity to “protect our streets.” Mrs Maynard Gibson yes terday said that neither the Minister of National SecuriClaims of friction between upper level police officers denied Commissioner hits back at ‘rumours’ SEE page eight By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – The trial of Police officer Vaughn Pratt, who is accused of having sexual intercourse with two minors, resumed Monday in the Freeport Magistrate’s Court. Lawyer Murrio Ducille made a no case submission on behalf of Sergeant Pratt the son of St Cecilia MP Cynthia Pratt – in Court 3 before Deputy Chief Magistrate Helen Jones. Pratt is charged with two counts of having sexual intercourse with two minors, aged 14 and 15, on May 6, 2007. The summary trial began in November, 2007. Valeria Pyfrom and T rial of MP’ s police officer son resumes SEE page eight SEE page eight By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A 18-YEAR-OLD man was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday on a manslaughter charge over the stabbing death of a man in Fox Hill last Thursday night. Police have charged Bradley Miller Jr with causing the death of Marvin Macintosh by means of unlawful harm. Miller was arraigned before Deputy Chief Magistrate Carolita Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane yesterday. Miller’s left eye appeared to be Teenager charged with manslaughter over stabbing death SEE page eight MINISTRY of Works employees yesterday staged a demonstration protesting what they claim are long overdue promotions. Their action marks the second time in under five months that the employees, who do electrical maintenance work, have demonstrated to have their voices heard. At the end of April this year, Bahamas Public Service Union (BPSU John Pinder said he would work with Works Minister Neko Grant to discuss criteria Ministry of Works staff stage protest SEE page eight IF THE projected path of Hurricane Bill holds true, the Bahamas could escape without experiencing even so much as a rain shower, meteorologists said yesterday. While Hurricane Bill the first hurricane of the 2009 Atlantic season strengthened significantly yesterday, packing 90mph winds, forecasters did not expect the storm to directly impact the Bahamas. SEE page eight HURRICANE BILL MAY NOW MISS THE BAHAMAS Nassau T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f Tagia Soles-Armony

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE FOLLOWING the flurry of activities during t he past two weeks, p reparations for the final show of the 58th annual M iss Universe 2009 Competition on Sunday n ow moves into high g ear for the 84 contest ants. T omorrow, the beauty q ueens will attend their final media junket where they will be interviewed by reporters from around the world. The contestants will a lso put their best foot f orward in an on-stage r ehearsal for the big n ight which will be b roadcast live on NBC at 9pm. MISS UNIVERSE SCHEDULE THE 84 contestants of the Miss Universe 2009 pageant put their best foot forward onS unday night for the preliminary swimsuit and evening gown competitions. The preview presentation held in Atlantis’ Imperial Ballroom helped the judges reduce the number of contes-t ants to just 15 finalists. These lucky few will not be named until the final showt his on Sunday. Miss Universe contestants compete for the final 15 M ISS B ahamas Kiara Sherman (left w alks the r unway in the evening g own segment of the 2009 Miss Universe Prel iminary Competition. MISS Israel Julia Dyment, right, smiles after introducing h erself, as Miss Ireland Diana Donnelly looks on, during the opening event of the 2009 Miss Universe Preliminary Competi-t ion, at Atlantis, Paradise Island, Bahamas, Sunday,A ug. 16, 2009. B rennan Linsley/ A P Photo T i m A y l e n / A P P h o t o

PAGE 3

By NATARIO McKENZIE T ribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A 25-YEAR-OLDman and a juvenile accused of i ntentionally setting a fire at the St Francis and St Joseph Catholic Primary School last Wednesday appeared in Magistrate’s Court yesterday. A security guard was sentenced to 18 months in jail after admitting that hea ccepted a number of items stolen from the school. Dean g elo Armbrister, 24, of Infant View Road and a 16-year-old of Pitt Road have beenc harged with arson. It is alleged that on August 12, the two intentionally caused St Francis and St Joseph Primary School to be set on fire.I t was the second time that the school had been set ablaze. The first fire took place just before the school closed for the summer break.T hat blaze also damaged sev eral classrooms. The school accommodates 450 students ranging from pre-kinder garten to grade six. The accused, who appeared before Magistrate Derrence Rolle in Court 5, Bank Lane, were not required to enter a plea to the arson charge. Armbrister, the 16-year-old boy, a 17-year-old girl, and James Thompson, 20, of Sesame Street were arraigned together on the charges of shop-breaking and stealing. It is alleged that the accused broke into the St Francis and St Joseph School and stole six IBM complete computer sets, each valued at $650, a 19-inch Haier telev ision valued at $350, a DVD player valued at $150, two scanners valued at $230 each,a computer desk valued at $300, a Dell laptop valued at$ 680 and a $180 vacuum cleaner. The accused all opted to have the cases heard in Magistrate’s Court and pleaded not guilty to the charges. Kirkland Woodside, 23, and Steven Seymour, 25, were both arraigned on receiving charges. Woodside pleaded not guilty to the charge, however Seymour who initially pleaded not guilty to the charge changed his plea to guilty. The other accused were escorted out of the courtroom as the prose cutor presented the court with the evidence in relation to Seymour. According to the prosecutor, Sergeant Godfrey Brennen, police acting on infor mation, conducted a search of Seymour’s residence last w eek where several of the items stolen from the school were found. Seymour is accused of receiving a 19-inch television, a central process-i ng unit and a DVD player all the property of the school. Seymour told the court that Armbrister had told him to hold the items for him. Seymour, who told the court that he works as a security guard, said that he simply “wasn’t thinking,” at the time. Magistrate Rolle sentenced Sey mour to 18 months in prison. A rmbrister and the 16year-old were both granted bail in the sum of $20,000 with one surety. Thompson and the 17y ear-old girl were each grant ed $7,500 bail with one sure t y. Woodside was granted bail in the sum of $5,000. The case was adjourned to November 9. By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A DISABLEDRawson Square newspaper vendor who alleged he was beaten by police last Friday was yesterday charged w ith disorderly behaviour, resisting arrest and refusing to give his name when requested to do so by a police officer. Berthram Thurston, 44, now has to go to court at 10am on Wednesday, August 26 to be arraigned on the charges. Mr Thurston told The Tribune yesterday that the charges were brought against him after officers came to his stall yesterday m orning and told him to come to the Tourism Police Station on Bay Street to “discuss” the altercation between him and officers next to his stall last Friday. Mr Thurston said that when he got to the station, he was informed that he was under arrest and was to be charged with the alleged offences. Attempts by this newspaper to reach S ergeant Dwight Smith of the Tourism Police Station to confirm these reports were unsuccessful, as he was repeatedly said to be unavailable. Another officer refused to comment on t he matter. The charges come after Mr Thurston alleged in Saturday’s Tribune that an officer whom he had previously reported as havingm ade threats of death against him, parked a patrol car next to the vendor’s stall on Rawson Square shortly after 6am on Frid ay. After allegedly pulling the vendor out of his car and onto the ground, Mr Thurston claimed the officer then madec alls to two other officers and the three proceeded to kick and punch him. Responding to the allegations that day, Sgt Smith of the Tourism Station, asserted that police often have a problem with Mr T hurston – who needs crutches to walk due to severe spinal injuries – as he refuses to park his car elsewhere as he offloads papers for his stall. Sgt Smith acknowledged being informed t hat officers had told Mr Thurston to move his car on the morning of the alleged beat-i ng but stated that as far as he was aware o fficers “acted in good faith”, leaving the vendor in peace once he refused to move the vehicle, but pledging to get a warrant for his arrest. H owever, T he Tribune h as seen a video t aken by Mr Thurston during the incident which suggests that he was at the very least roughly manhandled by officers. Following the publication of the story o utlining Mr Thurston’s allegations and Sgt Smith’s response on The Tribune’s website, tribune242.com, readers and customers of Mr Thurston expressed outrage. Vanessa” said: “I know this gentlemen. H e is as he says – quiet. I often observe his family assisting him with the business. I sometimes chat with both of them when I purchase the paper. Now this is pure fool-i shness. “Why should he park his vehicle very far and struggle with the papers to get them to the stall? There is no one there at 6am other than t hem and a few people scattered here and there. It does not take much time for him to unload and then place the car around the corner. The police need to discontinuem eddling with people and get on with the business of solving and preventing crime.” “Simon” said that if true, the incident is “outrageous.” “The police force needs to be overhauled and officers re-trained. I do understandt heir aggression at times because they want to send a message to the criminals but nota ll Bahamians deserve to be treated like crap,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009, PAGE 3 Newspaper vendor who claimed the police beat him is charged By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net POLICE expect to “soon” bring charges in connection with a frightening jitney crash that saw passengers leaping from the bus’ windows in fear for their lives. Chief Superintendent Glenn Miller said that police are “reviewing the matter with the intent to look at possible charges being brought pretty soon.” The bus driver, who it had been claimed fled the scene fol lowing the July 24 incident, has been questioned and released pending further inquiries. One of the questions that is still to be answered is whether the incident was caused by the jitney losing its brakes, suffering some other mechanical failure, or if something else was to blame. Two people were sent to hospital after the jitney careened out of control down Cumberland Street at around 8 o’clock on the Friday morning in question, coming to a stop feet from the water’s edge outside Senor Frog’s bar and restaurant. Eyewitnesses reported seeing passengers leap from the windows of the vehicle, apparently in fear that they might have ended up in the harbour. Yesterday Chief Superintendent Miller, officer in charge of Central Police station, said that police “got an account” of the incident from the bus driver and also several passengers. He said that “in some instances” passenger accounts coin cided with that of the driver, while in others, they were “a lit tle off.” Police expect to bring char ges in connection with jitney crash THE controversial dredging of Nassau Harbour began yest erday morning, Project Manager of Boskalis International Frans Thomassen told the media yesterday. The dredging will allow the harbour to accept the world’s largest cruise ships the Genesis Class vessels. The Netherlands-based Boskalis was awarded the $44 million d redging contract. Approximately 1.9 million cubic yards of rock is expected to be dredged from Nassau Harbour during the project while three mooring dolphins will be constructed at the Prince George W harf, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham outlined earlier in the year. The man-made island of Arawak Cay will be extended by 1,000 feet in length on the western end using the dredged material along with steel sheet piles, Mr Ingraham also said. T he dredging is slated for completion in November. Dredging of Nassau Harbour underway Man, juvenile accused of setting fire to school DEANGELO ARMBRISTER (left i ng and stealing; James Thompson (right breaking and stealing. KIRKLAND WOODSIDE , was charged with receiving. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f NEWS VENDOR Berthram Thurston

PAGE 4

E DITOR, The Tribune. RECENTLY, I heard of the Bahamas Million Tree Organisation surely an a nomaly, in a country where plans are currently in place to destroy 66 ven e rable trees, which have been part of the Nassau scene for longer than I can remember; and I was bornh ere many years ago. A portion of the west ern shoreline, specifically the area near Orange Hill, has already been re-landscaped, to our detriment. It is mundane and unexc iting and, what is more, t he new plantings obscure t he sea-view. Take a drive past Saunder's Beach, however! What a difference! This public beach, much closer to town and accessible to all, is Nassau at its finest and the view, to which we are all accust omed, is unique and spect acular because of the wonderful old casuarinas. Where did the ridiculous idea, to get rid oft hese trees, come from? And, why isn't anyone speaking out against it? I n fact, it's shocking that the Minister of Tourism, and his staff, do not recognize this asseta nd have not spoken out, l oudly and clearly, about the plant desecration a foolish, tragic, almost criminal and, definitely, unnecessary act. Keats wrote “ A thing o f beauty is a joy forever. H ow come no-one in the s o-called business of t ourism has enough of a sense of sthetics to appreciate the value and beauty of these 66 trees,w hich have lent grace and splendour to this stretch of beach for nigh on 100y ears, and are now sched uled to go under the axe? There is a modern quotation, which I think is also propos , “If it ain't break, d on't fix it!” Please stop the lunacy. Please leave our fine, old trees alone. Barbara Ovsianico-Koulikowsky N assau, A ugust 1, 2009 E DITOR, The Tribune. LAST YEAR, I wrote a detailed account of an incid ent which I reported to the s enior immigration officer at the airport upon my a rrival in Nassau. He d emonstrated to me that he d id not care about white Americans coming into the Bahamas illegally to obtainh igh paying jobs. His primary concern was the catching of Jamaicans and other poor Caribbean people. W ell how about this one? On the Cubana flight to Havana just a week ago, t here was a fellow who was q uite verbose about his t enure in the Bahamas. He had no problem lacing hisc omments to his fellow A mericans about the Bahamas with four letter words which could be heard by all. He gave the fellow an education on how he is able to beat the system in the Bahamas. This fellow w as almost unbelievable. He s tated that he is a property manager in the Bahamas fora bsentee home owners who r egularly send their clients down to the Bahamas renting their houses to vacationing Americans most of the year. Currently, his portfolio is full. He stated that he has become an expert in the f ield due to the numerous i nquiries he and his group g et from Americans who b uy houses in the Bahamas. H e said that he employs o nly Haitians with proper documentation so he won’t become afoul of the law, especially now that there seems to be a crazy immigration minister in place. He stated that he had b een in construction in New York prior to coming to the Bahamas nine years ago. I t is truly mind-boggling h ow these actions are allowed to go unchallenged. What would happen if he were black? I venture that h e would at least be invisible a nd not bragging in public about his exploits and his a bility to get rich in the B ahamas at the expense of d umb Bahamians. Unfortunately, I am not in a position to point out thei ndividual as I volunteered to do in the earlier case. It is my firm conviction that the immigration department s hould conduct a survey with regard to these bogus property managers residing i n the country who are living t he life of Riley whilst pay i ng no taxes. Surely there must be legitimate reale state firms and enterprisi ng Bahamians with the ability to sit a house. “Daybreak foul crow, Ting a ling a ling.” GEORGE A CAPRON Nassau, A ugust 10, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P AGE 4, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., ( Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt . P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising A dvertising Manager (242 Circulation Department (242 WEBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WHEREVER you stand right now on the dispute over health care reform, surely you can agree that we’re not witnessing a display of the idealized vision of democracy we were bequeathed by our Founding Fathers. Shouting down elected officials trying to conduct issue-focused forums is not behaviour we learned in elementary school civics lessons. Name-calling and intentional distortion of facts are antithetical to the debate that ought to frame public decision-making. What we are experiencing, in fact, is the result of what John Sexton, one of America’s most brilliant educators, described a few years ago as the decline of civil discourse in American society. “We have created a coliseum culture that reduces discourse to gladiatorial combat,” Sexton, the New York University president, wrote in 2005. “Viewpoints are caricatured in their most absolute form, with moderated, nuanced, or mixed positions given little or no voice. Propositions incapable of simple explanation in catchy, easily labelled phras es are ignored.” This week I sat with Sexton in his office overlooking Washington Square Park in Manhattan. Mementos, photographs and citations from his admirable career sur rounded us, but Sexton pointed to the award he most cherishes, from years ago, recog nizing him as the country’s top high school debate coach. It may be that Sexton’s notion that victo ry should go to those who best marshal facts is a quaint one, outmoded by media that appeal viscerally in ways that outstrip mere words. There’s ample evidence, even in the newsroom of the Albany (N.Y. where I serve as editor, that truth is hard to swallow when it conflicts with our own pre dispositions. For example: Two weeks ago, we published a Q&A on the health care reform debate prepared by a senior reporter in our Washington bureau. It was a helpful primer that we hoped would be useful as Congress began its August recess with the health care issue unresolved. But about a dozen people called to com plain that the article wasn’t true. They didn’t like its assertion that the pending legisla tion does not “mean socialized medicine” (in fact, it relies on the private insurance sector) and that it would not “encourage euthanasia of senior citizens.” Never mind that every independent analysis of the legislation supports that reading of the bill. As we have reported, there is a provision likely to disappear now, given the uproar it has generated that would authorize Medicare to cover counselling about endof-life care if a patient wishes. President George H.W. Bush in 1992 signed into law a requirement that hospitals help people with such “advanced directives” if they didn’t already have them in place. That didn’t cause a firestorm. Why now? Perhaps we were less vulnerable in those days to what Sexton calls “discourse by slogan.” If so that is, if we are growing less capable of dealing with complex issues, and more susceptible to persuasion that ignores what is factual then perhaps we need more than ever a dose of the very medicine that led me to John Sexton’s office. I had sought him out for advice on the effort to encourage the teaching of news literacy in classrooms. It’s not that we need to teach young peo ple to read the newspaper. More important is for citizens to learn how to navigate the blizzard of information constantly swirling around us to critically assess the news they consume so they can decipher what can be verified from what is merely asserted. We need smarter news users. News literacy can help students distin guish between propaganda, advertising, public relations and reporting. A literate news consumer won’t necessarily make a newspaper editor’s life easier, because there are plenty of flaws in the product we create, the result of relying upon human beings to do the hard work of journalism. But someone aware of the values and skills underlying good journalism can better sort valid information from the mere mediocre, and truth from distortion tasks fundamental to active citizenship. Walter Lippmann wrote in 1920: “There can be no liberty for a community which lacks the information by which to detect lies.” Honest reporting can carry us beyond slogans and reinforce civil discourse. It isn’t always popular, but its ultimate goal is noth ing less than defence of liberty. In that pursuit, we’ll gladly put up with some angry phone calls. (This article was written by Rex Smith c.2009 Albany Times Union). How can these actions go unchallenged? LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Shouting shouldn’t trump facts ::IMPERIALOPTICAL ::ROSETTASTREETAND ::THEMALL-AT-MARATHON FORMOREINFO CALL 322 OR 393GET A FREE FRAMEwith the purchase of LensesBACK TO SCHOOLAND T’INGSTOUGH ? SALEAPPLIESTOSELECTEDFRAMES.SALEENDSAUGUST31,2009. 66 casuarinas at Saunder’s Beach Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

PAGE 5

THEPLPyesterday severel y criticised Britain’s decision to suspend the democratic o rgans of the government of the Turks and Caicos Islands, calling the move “deeply disappointing.” Through its foreign affairs s pokesperson, Fox Hill MP F red Mitchell, the party said it is especially disturbed that the right to trial by jury is also suspended. “The position of our party is that the British ought toh ave found another way to d eal with the issues of alleged c orruption in the Turks and Caicos. This position is well within the public policy on this matter by CARICOM, of which we the Bahamas are a member,” Mr Mitchell said. On Saturday, Britain offic ially suspended the government of the Turks and Caicos Islands, imposing direct rule following allegations of “systematic corruption and/or s erious dishonesty” in the c ountry. T his is the second time in 23 years that the British have used the same method tos olve issues relating to governance in the Turks and CaicosI slands. M r Mitchell said that this s ays something about the lack of effectiveness of the methods employed by the British a nd a failure of their administration of the territory. We reiterate that Britain a s the colonial power in the Turks and Caicos Islands has the responsibility not only fort he economic development and well-being of the territor y, but also its political develo pment. Failure The need to impose direct rule and suspend the elected government of the Turks and Caicos Islands speaks not only t o the failure of the internal mechanisms of governance b ut also to failures on the part of the colonial power,” he said. Mr Mitchell said that Britain as the colonial power cannot by this action absolve i tself of the responsibility for the corruption that they allege t ook place. F urther, the Fox Hill MP said that examples of other public policy instrumentsa vailable to deal effectively with this matter are there for a ll to see. Even in Britain itself w hich recently saw a crisis in g overnance as a result of corruption it did not result in the suspension of their democracy, but rather a realignment of the institutions to reflect thed emands of the public for openness, transparency and a ccountability,” he said. Mr Mitchell said the PLP is reiterating its call for an allparty conference in the Turks a nd Caicos Islands to ensure t hat this suspension of the organs of democracy in that country are for a limited perio d of time and less than the two years envisaged. It should also be ensured that democracy is restored to legitimately elected represent atives of the people of the Turks and Caicos Islands, he said. Trial by jury must be restored. The people of the Turks and Caicos Islands are p art of the world community a nd as such are entitled to the s ame standards of democracy, transparency and accounta bility in public life.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009, PAGE 5 7KHRRS'HFN (DVW%D\WUHHW 1RZHRSHQHG:HORRNIRUZDUGWRRQFHDJDLQVHUYLQJ\RX RXU YDOXHGFXVWRPHUV 1DVVDX
PAGE 6

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE PROSPECTUSTHE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2028, 2029, 2030, 2031, 2032, 2033, 3034, 3035, AND 3036 ISSUE OF B$150,000, 000.00 By LINDSAY THOMPSON DETERMINING crime trends is one of the new aims of the upcoming census of population and housing. The Census Office of the Department of Statistics will c onduct a pre-census test from August 17 to August 30 on New Providence and Grand Bahama. The exercise is an integral part of the census of population and housing, which officially takes place in May 2010. And in order to effectively a dminister the census questionnaire to the public, the Department has trained six new enumerators. They are Christopher Hamilton, Valeska Johnson, Rosalie Darling-McKenzie, Renbert Mortimer, Roy Smith and Keva Storr. T hey were sworn in and administered the oath of secrecy by Rev Terrance Morrison in a ceremony at the Department of Statistics on August 14. The main focus of the exercise is to test the questionnaire for Census 2010 in terms of relevancy as it relates to the questions, average length of time it takes to complete the questionnaire, and weaknesses in the questions, instructions or the design of the questionnaire, among other things, Kim Saunders, census office trainer, said. Enumerators with official identification will visit households in New Providence and Grand Bahama in order to col lect information on households and individuals, she said. The census pre-test requires that the public provide information on housing characteristics such as type of dwelling, year it was built, source of utilities; and population characteristics, which include information on age, sex, marital status, health, education, and i ncome. “The data generated from the pre-test will be held in strictest confidence," said Ms Saunders. "All persons are urged to cooperate in this very important national exercise." A population census is conducted every 10 years. The last w as in 2000 at a cost of $3 million. An estimated $5 million has been earmarked for Census 2010. The Bahamas population is said to be about 350,000. A new component to the questionnaire is a section on crime, to determine trends and p ossible solutions to the problem, Ms Saunders said. When the pre-test is completed, the Department of Sta tistics will determine how to better fashion the questionnaire. Upcoming census aims to determine crime trends THE DEPARTMENT of Statistics conducts a census pre-test beginning August 17 in New Providence and Grand Bahama. Pictured from left are Christopher Hamilton, Valeska Johnson, Rosalie Darling-McKenzie, Renbert Mortimer, Roy Smith and Keva Storr. And from right are Kim Saunders, census office trainer; Susan Black, and Coralee Mackey, chief census officer. Kris Ingraham /BIS SENATOR Johnley Ferguson, FNM chairman, has called on party members and supporters to come together tomorrow to celebrate and commemorate the party’s first general election victory August 19, 1992. Seventeen years ago, after the FNM had unsuccessfully contested a total of four general elections since the party’s establishment in 1972, the party, under leader Hubert Alexander Ingraham, finally achieved a crushing victory over the Progressive Liberal Party. Before that the PLP, under the leadership of the late Sir Lynden Pindling, had won six consecutive elections and had been the government of The Bahamas for almost 26 years. Tomorrow, following tradition over the past 17 years, in New Providence the party will observe the anniversary at a special religious service at the First Holiness Church of God in Bamboo Town, where the pastor is Bishop Edward Missick. The sermon will be preached by Overseer Bishop Gregory Minnis, senior pastor at New Jerusalem Kingdom Ministries International, and the service will begin at 7.30pm. The service will be attended by the party’s leadership, cabinet ministers, parliamentarians, Party Officers, Meritorious Council Members, Central Council members, officers and members of the FNM Women’s Association and The Torchbearers Association, and other party members and supporters. “Each year since 1992, whether the party was in government or in opposition, members of the Free National Movement family have gathered for praise and worship to mark the anniversary of that great day of deliverance,” said Senator Ferguson. “We do so as an outward declaration and indication that we in the FNM continue to believe in the intercession of Almighty God, that it was He who interceded in the national affairs of The Bahamas in August 1992 when he caused the hearts of the Bahamian people to turn to the FNM for deliverance.” This Wednesday, FNM Constituency Associations in all the Family Islands will similarly be observing the anniversary. FNM observes 17th anniversary of the 1992 first election victory

PAGE 7

ON www.tribune242.com, we asked our readers if they think the proposed legislation outlawing marital rape should be p assed. Of the 150 persons who responded, 61 voted no and 89 yes. Here are some of the comments left by those participating in the poll: KHALILA : This is such a frustrating and u nbelievably stupid debate. I cannot even believe in the 21st century, with all the strides towards progress this country has made and all the female empowerment, we are even TALKING about it. I would like to pose a question to all those archaic, sexist p eople who oppose it – what if it were your daughter? Your mother? Your sister? Your friend? Your aunt? And she had absolutely no recourse under the law to have her husband punished for the heinous crime of abusing her body, for treating her like an object. Certainly, she could leave him, but as for hisp unishment? Should he not be held accountable for his demeaning actions? Of course there will be abuses, as there are with any law. But whether or not there are or will be should not determine whether we pass the amendment. The only question that m atters is – is it right that a man have irrefutable rights to a woman's body when she says ‘I do’? I am APPALLED that this is even being discussed and even more disgusted by the women who oppose it. Hello ladies, if you rape your husband (how ever impossible that may seem) under the current law, he can persecute you. WHY WOULD YOU NOT WANT EQUAL RIGHTS? And maybe the law doesn't even pertain to you and never will, I hope it doesn't, but what about those women who it does apply to? Who repeat edly get raped by their hus bands? Stop being so narrowminded and selfish! BERNARD FERGUSON: The rights of a woman should be respected, this is not the troglodyte era, women have enough emotional stress, and do not need the added frustration of an uncaring unemotional husband. Further, who elected ministers to govern our country? O PUS31-FH: Here’s a question to those who pose that this law supports women in the Bahamas, who apparently do not have all the rights they need to confront rape under our current archaic laws: What evidence can a man produce to prove that in a case w hen he did not wish to have sex with his wife, she coerced him against his wishes? If rape is sexual activity without the consent of one party, how does a husband prove that in court, particularly if there are no bruises? C ONCHY JOE: If a woman is forced to have sex by her husband she can divorce him. If he beats her she can report him for the abuse. Why would a woman stay in a relationship with a "husband" who does such things? GET A DIVORCE! If she reports him for rape then the marriage iso ver anyway. Believe me, there will be abuse of this law! Eg – A man and his wife of several years are having financial problems. The man continues to have sexual urges for his wife but she refuses has advances. This continues until the man gives into t emptation and has sex outside the marriage. When the wife discovers his affair she decides to fix him good (Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned). She has sex with him then promptly goes to the police to report him for rape. A medical examination reveals he had sex with her so off to court they go. Once in court, it is his word against hers! When the details come out about his infidelity the court will most likely side with her and homeboy spends the rest of his days in Fox Hell prison, while the wife enjoys all the man owns. Shoot, a woman could have an affair with a sweetheart, have sex with her husband then report his behind for rape to get his backside locked up. Tell me, just how does a man prove that the sex he had with his wife was consensual? This thing has the potential of creating more problems than it solves. In the final analysis, it will be his word against her’s. T he marriage will end. And the lawyers will have lots more income to collect. While the courts will be further burdened with more cases they can't get to. I say no, no a thousand times NO! MARRIED LADY: I f a man has to rape his wife, then something is wrong in the marriage all together. I voted no because I am a married woman and if there comes a time that my husband would have to force me to sleep with him I would not call that rape. I think that this type of act within a marriage should be worked out with a marriage counsellor, not court, to see why this has happened. Passing a law like this would be stupid and inhumane. Find another solution, not jail time. Lastly there are thousands of women out there that are raped by strangers everyday and geta way with it. First of all, put more emphasis on these cases and find these attackers first before targeting married couples that have a past and future together. Allow them to seek counselling first and then move forward if there is reason to. C RAIG NIXON: There should never be laws that uphold or condone abuse toward anyone ... the act of rape not only suggests intercourse but also suggests some form of force or violence toward another ... When a marriage has deterio rated toward the point of this form of violence, then its time to seek counselling and possibly separation. E ALBURY: Surely people can understand that this law is to protect women. If a marriage is at the point that a man has to violent ly have sex with his wife, then the marriage is far beyond the point of love. I cannot understand anyone in position in a church thinking that this was God's plan for a woman. The Bible says that a husband should lay down his life for her, clearly not what his intention is if he rapes her. RAM66: L egally there is no such animal as "marital rape" howeverwe know that rape, being defined as (my definition al intercourse without consent, occurs in marriage. I feel that the law should be modified to have these cases tried, as Senator Gibson has suggested, in a f amily court and that "marital rape" should be defined as "the act of sexual intercourse (penetration) without consent between a married man and woman". DARINIQUE: I voted no because I feel as if t he charge for "rape" within a marriage should be called another name and addressed in anoth er way. To me, it opens the door of making marriage just a commodity and on the same page as a civil union. I believe rape is wrong, whether it happens to a single person or within a marriage. However, by changings uch a law, you are setting the pathway for destruction of the home and society. More divorce, more broken homes, and less family life. Government should consider exactly why they are making these amendments; to please the United Nations, or for the goodwill of the people SCRIBE: This debate really isn't about a man's rights to force his wife to have sex, but about what's becoming more and more clear the fact that Bahamian women are second class citizens in their own country. As for the argument that such a law would enable women to falsely accuse their husbands of rape out of spite, well the same could happen regardless of marital status, so are these people saying we should do away with rape laws altogether? It's times like this that I really fear for our coun try's future. The new www.tribune242.com poll question is: Which Minister would you most like to see shuffled out of Cabinet? Please log on and join the debate! C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009, PAGE 7 Miss Universe Pageant Event Schedule: MISS UNIVERSE FINAL SHOWSunday, August 23rd, 9:00pm Imperial Ballroom, Atlantis, Paradise IslandBe there live to witness the crowning of the new 2009 Miss Universe!Tickets: General $175, Deluxe $250, Preferred $400, Gold $750 VIP $1000 (includes admission to Coronation Ball with open bar and gourmet buffet)CORONATION BALLSunday, August 23rd, 11:30pmThe Royal Deck, Atlantis, Paradise IslandCelebrate with the new Miss Universe and her fellow contestants and enjoy great music, a gourmet buffet and an open bar!Tickets: $145 For tickets and information call the Atlantis Box Ofce at 363-6601 Witness the crowning of the 2009 Miss Universe on giant multiple screens. Enjoy an open bar and a sumptuous a lfresco buffet. This royal fete will culminate with the prestigious Coronation Ball at 11:30pm where you can mingle with the newly crowned Miss Universe and her fellow contestants! Celebrate an experience that will never happen again!Tickets: $185THE VIEWING PARTYTHE 2009 MISS UNIVERSE PAGEANTSunday, August 23rd, 8:00pm The Royal Deck, Atlantis, Paradise Island Buy 3 Tickets, get 1 free! Is cutting the store in half HALF IS 50% off THE OTHER HALF IS 15% 15% off off New ArrivalsHarbour Bay VISIT US ON THEWEB @ aebahamas.com + Extra 15% Off ForTeachers & School staff On New Arrivals Online readers have their say on marital rape law THE POLL was conducted on the new website: www.tribune242.com

PAGE 8

ty nor the Attorney General had denied that the wiretapping occurred and that the “Bahamian people will have to make up their own minds whether it happened.” “It’s a very serious matter,” she said. Yesterday The Tribune’s source said anger was directed at the Commissioner by senior officers over the alleged wiretapping, as “the only person who would know who and why that was authorised and for how long.” “It’s created extreme friction,” said the insider. He reiterated the Senator’s suggestion that the situation is not conducive to the force fulfilling its mandate. “It’s not why you have so much crime, but it’s why police may not be as effective as they can be to deal with the crime problem. It’s not that we don’t have the expertise on the force,” he said. But Mr Ferguson denied this claim and said that tabloid reports and information reach ing this newspaper that all may not be well in the force may be spread by people looking to pusha particular “agenda.” He added: “In so far as specu lating as to what is happening in the RBPF, I don’t see anything wrong with it. People want to speculate about who wants to be Commissioner next in this beautiful democracy. They should have a right to do that and that should not threaten anybody, butI don’t know anything about any conflict,” he said. Mr Ferguson said that nothing “exists at this time” which interferes with the police’s ability to carry out its mandate. “We’ve got to be focused on trying to deal with the crime situation. We cannot allow anything to deal with or interfere with that.” Sources claim discontent in the upper echelons of the force was stirred when Mr Ferguson objected to being sent to head the police college under the former PLP administration, as several former assistant commissioners have been, prior to retirement. When the FNM won the general election in May 2007, veteran officer Mr Ferguson the brother of FNM senator Johnley Ferguson was instead made acting Commissioner, before being confirmed as Commissioner. Disgruntlement and political controversy burgeoned as Mr Ferguson was promoted around t he same time that a number of other senior officers and Assistant Commissioners who had reached the mandatory age of retirement as Mr Ferguson also has were pushed to accept retirement packages by the present government that expressed its intention to “restructure” the top heavy force. Two other younger officers Marvin Dames, now Senior Assistant Commissioner in charge of Grand Bahama, and Ellison Greenslade, now Deputy Commissioner were sent to Canada by the present government for training that was expected to be a prelude to one of the pair taking over the reins of the force. But upon their return, Mr Ferguson remained. A police insider told The Tribune that since being appointed police chief he has taken the lead in several key investigations of a potentially political nature such as the investigation into a lleged corruption at the Ministry of Housing. Such responsibilities are believed to form a part of the decision to keep Mr Ferguson at the helm of the force for the time being. Nonetheless, sources claim factions have developed in the force in support of various individuals taking over from Mr Ferguson and police “politics” is becoming a distraction. “You have Mr Greenslade and his supporters, the Commissioner and Quinn McCartney and Dames. It’s a divided police force, all of them have their factions who want to see them at the top.” The Tribune’s source said there is a broad base of support for Ellison Greenslade taking over the force. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE SUPERVISOROFFINANCEA leading Bahamian company, is seeking applications for a Supervisor of Finance JOB OBJECTIVE: To provide financial leadership for the company by managing the financial resources, supervising the certain key aspects of the compa ny’s accounting function and maintaining appropriate relations with investors and regulatory agencies. ORGANIZATIONAL POSITION: Reports to the Director of Finance. PRINCIPAL DUTIES &RESPONSIBILITIES: Core responsibilities include : Assisting in managing the financial affairs of the company Supervise key components of the finance department Ensure accurate and timely interim and annual financial reporting in accordance with International Accounting Standards Assist in the annual budget exercise Assist in the training and development of line accounting staff Coordinate the annual audit process Assist in managing cashflow and treasury functions Any other related duties as considered necessary REQUIREMENTS &PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES: Candidates must meet the fol l owing criteria: Bachelor’s Degree or higher in accounting or related financial field Professional accounting designation recognized by The Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants Minimum of seven years experience in accounting, finance and budgeting. Leadership, management and direct supervision experience is required. Previous direct experience in planning and executing all aspects of financial accounting and budgetary functions Bahamian citizen Accounting software experience Proficient in the use of the Microsoft range of applications Strong technical and managerial skills Excellent writing, communication, analytical and reasoning skills Excellent organizational and time management skills Team Player with the ability to add value and strength to t h e team and team goals Honest, hardworking and ability to meet deadlines The position offers an attractive salary and benefits package, reflecting the successful applicant’s experience and qualifications, including a pension plan, medical, life, dental and vision coverage. Qualified individuals should submit complete resums including references before August 31st2009 to:Email:finsupervisor@gmail.com Family and friends believe that Soles-Armony who had just returned home from St Kitts where she lived with her husband may have been a victim of mistaken identity or the target of an armed robbery gone wrong. Dorsette, who is represented by attorney Krysta Smith, was not required to enter a plea to the murder and gun possession charges. Ms Smith requested that her client be taken to hospital because he had been “bringing up” blood. Magistrate Bethel said that arrangements would be made for Dorsette to be seen by a doctor at Her Majesty’s Prison. Dorsette was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison yesterday. The case has been transferred to Court 11, Nassau Street and adjourned to August 24, which is when a date will be set for the start of a preliminary inquiry. L orna Longley-Rolle of the Attorney General’s Office are prosecuting the case. The prosecu tion closed its case on June 23. According to the particulars, it is alleged that Pratt got the girls drunk and had sex with them in his bedroom at home. The girls were put in the care of him and his wife, who was off the island at the time of the alleged incident. In his submission, Mr Ducille said that the p rosecution had failed to establish a p rima facie case against his client. He stated that it is easy for someone to make a complaint of a sexual nature where in the circumstance it is their word against the accused. Mr Ducille noted that there were some discrepancies in the evidence given by the two girls concerning the alleged incident. He also noted that the doctor’s report indic ated that there was no sign of bruising on the vagina of the 14 year old. While there was some bruising on the vagina and rectum of the 15 year old, he said there was no evidence to suggest how she sustained those injuries. Mr Ducille said the girls were out. Mr Pratt let them in the house and went back to his room. “When he woke up, he saw them (the girls bed,” he said. The prosecution must satisfy a p rima facie case against Mr Pratt. As it standsthere is noth ingto go before you which can convince you of the allegations made against Mr Pratt. “I implore the court to rule that the prosecu tion has failed to establish a prima facie case,” said Mr Ducille. Mrs Pyfrom insisted that the offence of unlawful sexual intercourse was committed by Mr Pratt. She told the court that doctors examined the girls at the hospital on May 6, 2007. She said the doctor reported that the 14 year old had already taken a bath and changed her clothing. Her genital exam was normal, but doc tors noted that the complainant was emotional and wanted to cry. She noted that doctors reported that the 15 year old had redness to the rectum, anus and vagina. Mrs Pyfrom said that on May 4, Mrs Pratt had collected the girls from the Home and left the island with her son. She said the girls told a social worker that Pratt got them drunk. He is accused of giving each girl five rounds of drinks – one was given Vodka and cranberry juice and the other was given Vodka and orange juice. He is alleged to have bought them more drinks a t a local bar and took them to the Bowling Alley. He gave the girls some money and left them at the Bowling Alley. Mrs Pyfrom said the girls returned to Pratt’s home around 11pm. Pratt opened the door and went to his room. She said Pratt allegedly invited the girls to sleep with him in his room. The girls alleged that Pratt touched their breasts and vagina with his hands and had sex with them. Pratt was arrested on May 7. She noted that the evidence of unlawful sex was satisfied by the prosecution. She also noted that when Pratt’s wife left the jurisdiction, the girls should have been returned to the Home. Magistrate Helen Jones adjourned the case to November 24 when she will deliver her ruling in the matter. blood shot and he had a bandage over a wound on his left cheek. The victim in the case, Macintosh, 31, was reportedly stabbed multiple times outside his home in Obediah Avenue, off Springfield Road, when a confrontation with a neighbour escalated into violence sometime before 9 pm last Thursday. He had reportedly been outside his home with a 19-year-old girl when he got into an argument with a woman neighbour and four men pulled up in a green Ford Ranger truck and got involved in the argument. The 19-year-old girl was injured and Macintosh was stabbed several times before he ran into the house and collapsed. He was pronounced dead when emergency medical personnel arrived at the scene. Miller, who is represented by lawyer Carmen Brown, was not required to enter a plea to the manslaughter charge. Brown told the court that her client had a doctor’s appointment scheduled for Monday, but was unable to see the doctor because he was in police custody. Magistrate Bethel ordered that Miller be taken to the doctor to be treated for his wounds. Miller was remanded in custody and is expected to appear in Court 11, Nassau Street, on Monday for a bail hearing. At the moment, Hurricane B ill is projected to pass the islands on the northeast on Friday and Saturday, heading directly for Bermuda. Chief meteorology officer Basil Dean told The Tribune that we may even be so fortunate as not to get any of the rain the storm is carrying. H owever, he warned that while it definitely looks like the Bahamas will make a lucky escape, weather systems are subject to change and forecasters continue to monitor Hurricane Bill closely. At press time last night, weather experts were predicti ng that Bill will develop into a major hurricane by tomorrow. In its 5pm update, the Miamibased National Hurricane Centre reported that Bill was located about 975 miles east of the Lesser Antilles. The hurricane was moving towards the westnorthwest at about 16mph. Maximum sustained winds were at 90mph with higher gusts. Meanwhile, the disorganised Tropical Depression Ana is expected to bring some rain and even thunderstorms to the Bahamas within the next 12 to 24 hours. The system was expected to begin affecting the southeastern Bahamas late last night. Islands in the central Bahamas could also experience some of the system’s effects within the next day or two. for promotions and adjustments to t he career paths of the electrical department workers. Yesterday, Mr Pinder said the ministry claims to have now established a task force to look into the issue, and the union expects to meet with themo n Wednesday. H e said he also anticipates that “in short order” six people from the department who were identified for promotions following the April protest should see those recommendations executed. M r Pinder said the issue has been brewing” for about three years. “That’s why they’re so irate. Every time they’re close to closing they switch Permanent Secretary or something like that,” he added. About 15 Ministry of Works e mployees participated in the demonstration on Thompson Boulevard yesterday. FROM page one Trial of MP’s son Friction claims FROM page one FROM page one Hurricane Teenager charged F ROM page one Ministry of Works F ROM page one Man charged FROM page one

PAGE 9

M ONTREAL (AP Murray took the court to face Juan Martin Del Potro knowing no mat ter what the result of the Rogers Cup final, he would be soon be ranked No. 2 in the world. Not satisfied having reached that goal, Murray withstood his tough est test of the tournament and defeated Juan Martin Del Potro 6-7 (43 "I love winning tournaments, it's great, and every player will tell you the same thing," Murray said. "But it's tough because I've never been to No. 2 in the world before, so that's new to me. I've won a coupleof Masters Series (events it still feels great. But getting to No.2 , maybe because it's something different it means a little bit more." The 22-year-old from Scotland w as assured before the final of leapfrogging Rafael Nadal into the second spot when the ATP Tour rankings are released Monday. The victory gave Murray an additional 400 ranking points to get him to 9,250 compared to 11,040 for world No. 1 Roger Federer and 8,665 for Nadal. The third-seeded Murray matched his career best from last season with his fifth tournament win of the year and improved his record to 11-4 against top-10 players this season. He took time off to train in Florida after a bitterly disappointing loss to Andy Roddick in the semifinal at Wimbledon, and Murray couldn't have drawn up a better return to the court. "It's a perfect way to come back," he said. "It goes one of two ways. Losing to Roddick, there's no shame in that to start with. I could have gone away and become a worse player and not work on anything,or go and practice harder and become better so the same thing doesn't happen the next time around." Del Potro, from Argentina, was looking for his second straight tour nament victory after winning in Washington, a week earlier. He squandered an opportunity to jump past Andy Roddick into fifth in the world rankings. The match turned when Del Potro called for the trainer to work on a sore shoulder while up 6-5 in the second set. After the medical time out, Murray held serve at love and won the tiebreaker. Del Potro said he still hasn't reached the point where he can consider himself to be in the same class as Murray, Nadal or Federer. "I need to work hard to be like them," Del Potro said. "I can play against them, but I need to improve my game a lot if I want to be topfour, or top-two or No. 1." Del Potro left the court for several minutes following that second set and was clearly not the same player u pon his return, falling behind 4-0 in the third set. Del Potro did break Murray to get it to 4-1, but called for the trainer again before Murray broke Del Potro to go up 5-1 and then serve out the match. Del Potro said a combination of that nagging shoulder injury, the physical strain of playing nine matches in 13 days and the stifling heat Sunday in Montreal was too much for him to overcome physi cally. "I was so tired (in the third set he said. "I had my chances in the second set tiebreak, but I didn't take them." After needing 2 hours, 17 minutes to play the first two sets, Murrayn eeded only 25 minutes to win the decisive third set. "Before the match I felt like I was p robably going to be physically stronger," Murray said. "He was obviously tired (in the third set I made a lot of returns which I hadn't really been doing. His serve slowed down a little bit and I made more returns. I served well at the beginning of the third set to make sure I stayed ahead, and that was the only difference." The tightly contested match under hot, muggy conditions pleased the sellout crowd of 11,490 at Uniprix Stadium, bringing the total attendance for the event to 200,077. That broke the attendance record for a one-week ATP event of 185,252 set here in 2007. Murray didn't drop a set in the tournament his first since Wimbledon until Del Potro won the first set Sunday in a tiebreak. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009, PAGE 9 Murray defeats Del Potro to win Rogers Cup Stubbs’ third place flex earns him spot in Mr Olympia ANDY MURRAY returns the ball to Argentina's Juan Martin Del Potro during the final of the Rogers Cup tournament Sunday... (AP Photo: Graham Hughes personally wasn't as best as I wanted it to be," she said. "However, I tried to come back at the end, but I wasn't good enough. I was good enough for sixth place with 11.05, so I'm happy with my time." As for Fraser's winning per formance, Ferguson-McKenzie said the 22-year-old Jamaican national champion made it look so easy. "It was any women's race, but Shelly-Ann proved that she was the best woman out there tonight," FergusonMcKenzie said. Sturrup, in securing her berth into the final with a third place finish in the sec ond semis in 11.01, admitted that once Fraser got out, there was no catching her anymore. "I was trying to get my mechanics back again, but it wasn't coming quick enough," she said. Running from the outside in lane seven, Sturrup said she didn't see how fast Fraser had zoomed ahead of everybody until it was too late. But the elder stateswoman of the field at 36 said she felt like she was 25 chasing down the younger women. "I feel good, but I'm disappointed. I should have ran under 11 seconds tonight and I had a great opportunity to do it," she insisted. "I really wanted to medal, but it just wasn't my night to do it." When asked about the Jamaicans, who have now taken over from the Americans, Sturrup simply stated: "They ran a hell of a race. All of them got out well. They did a good job." Now that her individual duties are done, Sturrup said she will take a well deserved rest and then get ready for the relays as the Bahamas team also attempts to get back to the final for the first time since the Golden Girls dominated at the Worlds in 1999 and the Olympics in 2000. "When we ran in London, we did pretty well without any practice, so I think we have a fair chance," she projected. As for Ferguson-McKen zie, she will be back on Wednesday for the start of the women's 200 with Sheniqua 'Q' Ferguson before she can think about the relays. "The 100 for me is always fun, but the 200 is business," said Ferguson-McKenzie, a finalist of the 8th Worlds in Edmonton, Canada, where she came back to win the silver in the 200, but was elevated to the gold after the dis qualification of American champion Marion Jones. "I'm glad that we only have three rounds now, so I just have to go back to basics because it's a longer race. So I have to relax, get my start back, work on my curve and then my finish. One round at a time." Reminiscent of when the Golden Girls triumphed, Fer guson-McKenzie said the Bahamas had four women who were running extremely well and it came down to their baton execution in the relay. She noted that if the Jamaicans, who had four entrants in the 100 final, can get the baton around, they have the capability not just of winning the gold, but possi bly breaking the world record. "You have the four fastest women on paper, so it all boils down to passing the stick," she declared. Not counting out the Bahamas' chances of being in the mix for another medal, Ferguson-McKenzie said it's going to be fun again for her and Sturrup. "We both made it to the final and we had Q, who ran in the second round, so we're just going to go out there and see what happens," she insisted. The preliminaries of the relay won't be held until Friday, but Ferguson-McKenzie will probably skip it because of the 200 final the night before. ‘Golden girls’ Debbie and Chandra miss 100m medal glory F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 2 2 By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net AFTERsix years on the professional bodybuilding scene, feat ures in various international publications and endorsements, the Bahamas’ premiere bodybuilder reached the pinnacle of the sport with a qualification to its most prestigious show. With a third place finish this weekend at the Europa Super Show in Dallas, Texas, Joel S tubbs earned a berth to the 2009 Mr. Olympia contest, scheduled for September 24-27 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Stubbs finished third in the field of 15 behind Dennis James and Bill Wilmore. Stubbs earned his pro card in 2003 after dominating the amat eur ranks with a convincing win at the Central American and Caribbean games and has since been one of the most well known n ames in the sport. H e made his pro debut in 2005 a nd was shortly thereafter featured in “Flex” magazine as one o f the “Best Backs in the History of the Bodybuilding.” H e became the first Bahamian to qualify for the event, the con-c lusion of the International Fed eration of Bodybuilders (IFBB c ircuit since 1965. It feels good to be the first Bahamian to reach the Olympia s tage. It was a dream come true for me. After the dream you have t o put a strategy and plan in place to make it possible and to make ith appen. The only word I can pos sibly use to describe what I feel right now is just happy," he said, "Knowing I made it, it brought some tears to my eyes as I t hought back to where I started from in the amateur ranks, to the knee surgeries, to the possibility of being sidelined for good. I e ventually was able to dust myself o ff and get back into the game." With his 6'3" 325 pound frame, Stubbs has garnered much attention in bodybuilding circles, ande xpectations for his potential have continued to increase since the feature in Flex magazine. "From then on I have always b een told that if I could get the l egs to match the upper body that makes me symmetrically balanced that I would be a force to be reckoned with on the worlds tage and possible that I could be crowned Mr. Olympia one day. I just had the mindset to push on and it was all motivation from t here on," Stubbs said. S tubbs was thankful for an opportunity to create a storybook ending for his season after an untimely food poisoning incidentn early derailed the 2009 campaign. "I had many days where I was forced to overcome obstacles. I had food poisoning about a month and half away from thisl ast show and it really placed things in jeopardy. I was think-i ng about sitting it down and not competing at all this year because i t really took a toll on my body," he said, "What turned it around for me was speaking to my people back home that I train with Albert Rahming, Joey Rolle,C harles Johnson. They kept me grounded, kept me motivated.T hey continued to push me and reassured me that I had come too f ar to let anything keep me from getting there. So we decided to come up with a new plan, a new strategy to get my act together." It was Stubbs' second show in a s many weeks after a 12th place f inish at another IFBB event in Tampa Florida. " My body rebounded and I was able to compete in Tampa a nd I placed 12th. It was disappointing but I said to myself Iw ould stick with my regimen and tighten things up for the show in D allas, which I was able to do. I came into this show with a much tighter, drier physique and I guess the judges were impressed with what they saw," he said, "I was ins econd place after the prejudging and people at the event were s aying I had a really good chance to win the show. That did wond ers for my confidence and I knew a chance at Olympia was a t stake so I continued to persevere." T he 41-year-old IFBB Pro said that while he has a limiteda mount of time to complete his career goals, he remains optim istic about his Olympia opportunity. "From here on in know I am going to increase my intensity. I know my age and the expecteda mount of time I have left in the sport so I figure within another t wo to three years I would have to make a major statement before I c all it a day on my career. From here until that time I am going t o take my game to yet another level all to make the Bahamas p roud," he said, "I think I can be one of the top five finishers ore ven be crowned Mr Olympia. My game plan is at another level a nd its just crazy what I am about to get myself into in terms of my workouts but I realise it is do or die now at this stage in my career. I want to encourage any youngera thletes whether its bodybuilding or any other sport they choose, t he only way you are going to get to achieve that success is to create a plan and work toward executing that plan. It takes dedication, f ocus preparation." According to the event's web s ite, Mr. Olympia is the title awarded to the winner of the pro-f essional section of Joe Weider's Olympia Weekend and doing so i s considered the highest accolade in the sport. Past Olympia winners include Arnold Schwarzenegger (six Ronnie Coleman (eightH aney (eight (six D exter Jackson is the reigning champion. JOEL STUBBS has earned a berth to the 2009 Mr Olympia...

PAGE 10

By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net BERLIN, Germany On M onday, the Olympic Stadiu m was still buzzing a day after the scorching world record breaking performanceby Jamaican Usain Bolt in the men's 100 metres. Although Bolt owned the previous record of 9.69 seconds set as one of his three marks at last year's Olympic Games in Beijing, China, the 9:58 he recorded was unheard off until the clock stopped and he literally dominated the field and obliterated the much anticipated match-up with 2007 champion and former world record holder Tyson Gay, who had to settle for the silver with an American record of 9.71. While he didn't get a chance to go all the way and compete in his historic final in his coming out party, Bahamian national runner-up Adrian Griffith was among those in the stands watching Bolt put on the spectacular show. "Boy, that was a great one. I'm really glad that I saw it in person and not on television," said Griffith yesterday as he watched veteran female sprinters Chandra Sturrup and Debbie FergusonMcKenzie storm their way into an historic all-regional final. "This is just telling me that n ext year, I really have to step it up. 10.2s just won't cut it." Griffith, one of two Bahamians competing in the event, survived through the quarter-final on Saturday's opening day as he finishedw ith a world ranking of 28 w ith a best time of 10.28. Derrick Atkins, the 2007 silver medallist in Osaka, Japan, behind Gay, surpris ingly didn't advance out of the first round after he finished fifth in his heat in 10.44. He left the Games Village on Sunday and didn't stay behind to watch the amazing century finale. For Griffith, who has never had the chance to run against Bolt or his compatriot Asafa Powell, who had to settle for the bronze in a season's best of 9.84, said what he has discovered is that the competition is 80 per cent mental and 20 per cent physical. "I know I could compete with these guys," said Griffith, who ran in the same heat with Gay in the quarters. "This is the World Championships and if you come here and you're not ready, you're not going to compete well." One of the things that shocked Griffith was when he watched Bolt in the training area. "He hardly did anything to get ready," Griffith said. "I was there doing just about everything and he just took a couple of strides, stretched and he was ready to compete. I really couldn't believe it. That really opened up my eyes." With a little more financial support from the Government and the general public, Griffith said he could really get used to being on the international stage with all the big stars in the future because there are times when he really needs the funds to take care of his body and it's not available. Right now, he's enjoying the experience of training on the same track with Gay in Clermont, Florida. And before the championships got started, he got the chance to go through some block work outs with the former world champion. For the first time, he lined up in the same race to com pete against Gay when they ran in the quarters. While Gay went on to post the second fastest qualifying time of 9.98, Griffith did 10.28 to make his exit. "It showed that I'm not really scared of any of them," said Griffith, who just fell shy of his personal best of 10.27 that he ran in Clemont on June 7 to qualify for the Worlds. "I just have to be ready." Griffith, who turns 25 on November 11, said he will take the rest of the time here to enjoy the atmosphere and then get ready for the 13th IAAF World Indoor Championships scheduled to be held March 12-14 in Doha, Qatar. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS BERLIN, Germany Here's a look at the schedule for our athletes competing over the remainder of the IAAF's 12th World Championships in Athletics: T T O O D D A A Y Y Men's 200m preliminary rounds Nathaniel McKinney lane 3 in 4th of 9 heats at 4:23 am ET (First 3 of each heat, plus 5 fastest times qualify) Men's 400m p reliminary rounds M ichael Mathieu lane 7 in 2nd of 7 heats at 5:12 am ET Chris Brown lane 2 in 3rd of 7 heats at 5:19 am ET Ramon Miller lane 4 in 5th of 7 heats at 5:33 am ET. (First 3 of each heat (Q) plus the three fastest times (q) qualify) Men's triple jump final Leevan Sands 5th of 12 competitors, starting at 12:05 pm ET Men's 200 quarterfinal Nathaniel McKinney, lane and heat undecided, starting at 12:55 pm ET W W E E D D N N E E S S D D A A Y Y Men's high jump qualifying rounds Donald Thomas and Trevor Barry, starting at 5:10 am ET Men's 110 hurdles Shamar Sands, starting at 5:35 am ET Men's 400 semifinal Michael Mathieu, Chris Brown and Ramon Miller, starting at 12:15 pm ET Men's 200 semifinal Nathaniel McKinney, starting at 1:25 pm ET Women's 200 preliminaries Debbie FergusonMcKenzie and Sheniqua Ferguson, starting at 1:45 pm ET T T H H U U R R S S D D A A Y Y M en's 110 hurdles semifinal S hamar Sands, starting at 12:15 pm ET Women's 200 semifinal Debbie FergusonMcKenzie and Sheniqua Ferguson, starting at 1:50 pm ET Men's 200 final Nathaniel McKinney, starting at 2:35 pm ET Men's 110 hurdles final Shamar Sands, starting at 2:55 pm ET F F R R I I D D A A Y Y Men's high jump final Donald Thomas and Trevor Barry, starting at 1:15 pm ET Women's 200 final Debbie FergusonMcKenzie and Sheniqua Ferguson, starting at 3 pm ET Men's 400 final Michael Mathieu, Chris Brown and Ramon Miller, starting at 3:20 pm S S A A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y Women's 4 x 100 relay heats 12:10 pm ET Men's 4 x 400 relay heats 12:55 pm ET Women's 4 x 100 relay final 2 pm ET Women's 4 x 400 relay heats 2:15 pm ET S S U U N N D D A A Y Y Women's 4 x 400 relay final 11:50 am ET Men's 4 x 400 relay final 12:15 pm ET IAAF World Champs: Schedule of events ‘I know I could compete with these guys...’ Sprinter Adrian Griffith reflects on his performance ADRIAN GRIFFITH competes in a 100m first round heat during the World Athletics Championships in Berlin on Saturday, August 15, 2009... M i c h a e l S o h n / A P By ARNIE STAPLETON AP Sports Writer DENVER (AP business manager, alleging he misappropriated more than $2 million of the Denver Nuggets star’s assets. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Sacramento, Calif., on Monday, alleges that Anthony’s former business manager, Larry W. Harmon, and employees of Larry Har mon & Associates P.A., breached their fiduciary duties by transferring $1.75 million of Anthony’s money without his knowledge or consent to a company formed by Harmon, most of it in 2008. Another $265,500 was discovered to have been invested in third parties without Anthony’s knowledge or consent between 2005 and 2008, according to the lawsuit, which seeks recovery of the approximately $2 million, plus punitive damages. “I intend to aggressively represent Carmelo Anthony,” his Beverly Hills-based attorney, Robert W. Hirsh, told The Associated Press. “The evidence which I have reviewed strongly suggests that Carmelo Anthony’s former business manager plundered his assets. It is reprehensible that professional athletes are so often victimized.” Lawsuit Reached at his office in Roseville, Calif., Harmon said he was unaware of the lawsuit. He declined to comment on the allegations in the lawsuit or on his dealings with Anthony. “I guess I’ll just wait and see what he alleges,” Harmon said. The discrepancies were discovered after Anthony ended his business relationship with Harmon and hired a new manager to manage his assets earlier this year, according to the lawsuit. That new financial management firm, Gelfand, Ren nert & Feldman, discovered the financial discrepancies. The lawsuit alleges that significant documents were miss ing when Harmon transferred Anthony’s records to his new business manager. “Further, portions of the books and records are miscoded in a deliberate attempt to hide moneys converted by defen dants,” according to the lawsuit. The lawsuit also contends that Harmon and the other defendants failed to produce any documents requested by Anthony’s lawyer to explain the transfers of Anthony’s money that are in question. Anthony was the third selection in the 2003 NBA draft after leading Syracuse to the national title as a freshman. Last year, he led the Nuggets to their best season in 24 years after helping the U.S. team win the gold medal at the Beijing Olympics. Anthony is entering the fourth year of a five-year, $80 million contract extension he signed in 2006. Anthon y sues former business mana g er

PAGE 11

C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 12 PAGE 9 Stubbs earns spot in Mr Olympia ... BAHAMIAN tennis ace Mark Knowles and his doubles partner Mahesh Bhupathi, of India, were on top form this weekend at the Montreal Masters in Canada where they w on another championship. Competing in the doubles champ ionship of the ATP World Tour R ogers Cup on Sunday, the dynamic duo faced off with No.7 seeds Max M irnyi, of Belarus, and Andy Ram, of Israel. Knowles and Bhupathi, the No.3 seeds, defeated Mirnyi and Ram 6-4, 6-3. Doubles I n the doubles semifinals on Sat u rday, Mirnyi and Ram were able to knock out identical twin brothe rs, the No.1 seeds, Bob and Mike Bryan of the United States, 7-6 (5 6-2. On the other side of the draw, Knowles and Bhupathi defeated No.2 seeds Canadian Daniel Nestor ( Knowles’ former doubles partner) and Nenad Zimonjic, of Serbia, 5-7, 6 -2, and a 10-4 tiebreak to advance t o the championship. Knowles could not be reached for c omment up to press time last night. Rogers Cup victory for Knowles, Bhupathi M ARK KNOWLES M AHESH BHUPATHI JAMAICA’S Shelley-Ann Fraser (centerleft B erlin, Germany, Monday, August 17, 2009. At right is Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie of the Bahamas, who placed sixth. Chandra Sturrup (not seen TRIBUNE COVERAGEOFTHE IAAF WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS BERLIN 2009 BROUGHTTOYOUBY A n j a N i e d r i n g h a u s / A P Adrian Griffith reflects on his performance... See page 10 By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net BERLIN, Germany This time, Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie nor Chandra Sturrup had the speed to go with the Jamaicans and Americans and had to settle for sixth and seventh in the historic regional women's 100m final last night at the IAAF's 12th World Championships in Athletics. Running a world leading time of 10.73 seconds, Shelly-Ann Fraser coasted to the gold as she did at the Olympic Games last year in Beijing, China, and was joined by Kerron Stewart, whose personal best of 10.75 earned her the silver with American Carmelita Jeter settling for the bronze in 10.90. It was almost identical to the men's cen tury the night before when Jamaican Usain Bolt sped to another world record, dethroning American Tyson Gay who got silver and Jamaican Asafa Powell picked up his second consecutive bronze. For Ferguson-McKenzie and Sturrup, it was redemption time as they both found the fountain of youth in clinching their spots in the elite eight after failing to advance out of the semifinal at the last Worlds in Osaka, Japan. Trying to defy the odds of the 10 years plus age difference between them and the rest of the field, Ferguson-McKenzie, 33, got the better of the duo with sixth place, while Sturrup, 37, was seventh. Both were timed in 11.05. "This was probably my best 100 metres since the Commonwealth Games," said Ferguson-McKenzie, who booked her spot in the final with a fourth place in 11.03 in the first of the two semifinals held earlier in the day. "Time-wise. It's amazing. 11.03 in the semis and 11.05 in the final. “Normally I would be going backwards with 11.1s and 11.2s. So I'm feeling like a sprinter again and I'm happy about that." Ferguson-McKenzie, the double nation al sprint champion, admitted that she tried to focus on her start running out of lane two. But once she noticed that Fraser hada jump-start on everybody in lane three, she just tried to go after her. "I tried to stay in my zone, but my start ‘Golden girls’ Debbie and Chandra miss out on 100m medal glor y S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9

PAGE 12

SHOWN (l-r Bank, Denise Turnquest, vice president of credit risk, Minister of Education Carl Bethel, T B Donaldson, chairman of Commonwealth Bank, vice president of operations Mavis Burrows and the Director of Education Lionel Sands... By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net R esidents of Vista Marina will have their properties drastically devalued when a new road is pushed through only feet from the affluent subdivision, according to the Bahamas Real Estate Association president. The subdivision will also permanently lose its main access road. William Wong told Tribune Business that the residents of Vista Marina will have their investments destroyed overnight. According to him, the addition of a busy road will cause the house values in that area to plummet. “If you have these 40-foot cont ainers passing back and forth it will h ave a big impact on the properties a nd on their values,” said Mr Wong. In his opinion what government is doing is “criminal,” but, he said, residents in the area waited too long to protest the road, which is part of the New Providence road improvement project. Government gazetted the notice yesterday that work would begin on the removal of Vista Marina’s main access road from West Bay Street on August 23 and that there will be the removal of 10 Casuarina trees from Saunders Beach. There will be long delays along t he vicinity due to the one-way traff ic flow system. Local diversions will be sign posted in due course and further information will be provided on the local media,” said the notice. Mr Wong said government owes the residents of Vista Marina some manner of compensation for the intrusion the road will have on their properties. A pre-school was forced to move its perimeter wall back several feet to accommodate changes in the road. Under the law government has the right under eminent domain to a nnex private property for public u se. T he residents’ biggest concern is the noise pollution that will be caused by large trucks using the road to access the new Arawak Cay container port from the south. One resident of Highland Park, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said even now as work is being done the noise of the equipment is unbearable. “When I woke up I could feel the ground shaking from that tractor,” said the resident. “And it’s like this all morning.” Residents of Highland Park said t hey were not made aware publicly a bout the road work being done only y ards from their properties. “There should have been a lot more consultation,” said Mr Wong. “Either they are not aware of it or the government didn’t do a good job in consultation.” According to him, a friend recently completed two townhouses at a cost of $1 million, but with the addition of the road he suggested the property would lose a fair amount of value. “If she was aware of it she probab ly would not have spent so much m oney,” he said. “There should have been years of consultation.” Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette told The Tribune recently that the new thoroughfare was not connected in any way to the relo cation of the container port. However, the new road is an integral part of all the blueprints the government has brought to the public for the complete redevelopment of that area, which includes the extension of Arawak Cay. WITH weeks to go until thousands of school children fill school yards, hallways and classrooms, Commonwealth Bank repeated its role as education’s guardian angel, presenting the Ministry of Edu cation with 10,000 backpacks. The all-Bahamian bank’s donation will give some 10,000 students a tangible boost, sending them back to school with backpacks packed with school supplies and providing their teachers and classrooms with tools from projectors to laptops. This is the third year the leading bank donated backpacks filled with a variety of items, including rulers, com position books, pencils and pens to the Ministry of Edu cation for distribution among students entering grades 1-12 in New Providence and the C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a t hird party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for e rrors and/or omission from the daily report. $3.96 $3.87 $4.05 " tf %&"bn&$"%" !&!"$&!%""" !%!!"! ""!"# !#!&%" " ),/'+%"#$,./#)#" '"#-0#* #.,.1'#2'+% '"-%#!,+0!0#*#. #*#.0&# 303!,*! Bank donates school supplies to Ministry of Education New road ‘will have a big impact’ on Vista Marina property values S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B

PAGE 13

HAVANA (AP reducing international calling rates for residents with land lines to $1 a minute. C uba's telecommunications monopo ly, Etecsa, says the discount applies to all international calls through December 15. Details of the promotion appeared on its Web site and were confirmed Monday by a company representative who did not provide his name. Residential calls from Cuba had cost $2.45 a minute to the United States and Canada, $3.45 to Central Americaand $5.85 to Europe. Most Cubans don't have Internet access and cannot afford cell phones or computers. Despite the cuts, international dialing remains a costly proposition for most Cubans whose average statew ages are $20 a month. N ews of the offer hadn't been published by state media as of Monday. Etecsa said details about the plan will appear on residents' telephone bills. Residents wanting to call abroad must first request activation of international calling service, the company said. No reason was given for the discount. But Cuba is dealing with a severe economic crisis that has affected islanders and prompted the government to announce spending cuts for education and health care, two pillars of its communist system. Three hurricanes last year caused more than $10 billion in damage. Theg lobal recession has cut export earni ngs and caused budget deficits to soar, leaving Cuba short of cash. The government's most recent forecast puts 2009 economic growth at 1.7 per cent, compared to a 6 percent forecast made in December. Etecsa said it will announce new international rates for cell phone users but provided no details. The government made private service available to all islanders in 2008. Cell phones previously were restricted to foreigners and Cubans with key state jobs. Family Islands. The bank also donated laptops and LCD projectors – and for the third consecutive year, the Ministry of Education thanked the allBahamian bank and applauded its effort. “On behalf of the Government of The Bahamas, the Ministry of Education, the Department of Education and the students and teachers of The Bahamas, I would like to express the most profound gratitude to Commonwealth Bank, the nation’s premier bank,” Education Minister Carl Bethel said during the presentation at the bank’s newest branch, a full servicebanking facility on Prince Charles Drive that will open August 31. “Once again Commonwealth Bank demonstrated the kind of visionary corporate leadership we encourage and hope that others would follow.” Calling it a “sterling donation” that will assist students and teachers, the Education Minister said the laptops can make a huge difference in a child’s attention. “Children love computers and if we can make a computer more than a glorified toy, more than a glorified way to communicate, if we can make it a tool that provides a way to gain instruction, it can be one of most powerful tools in the arsenal of education materials,” he said. According to Commonwealth Bank Chairman T.B. Donaldson, CBE, the annual contribution to education reflects the bank’s commitment to youth development. Commonwealth Bank, the education bank, is all about creating a firm learning foundation for our country’s youth,” said Donaldson, “and was the driving force behind formalized certification forB ahamians in banking.” “Commonwealth Bank’s investment and commitment to education has been longstanding and broad-based. We are proud to know that through our endeavours we have made an impact on the lives of students from kindergarten through Grade 12 and onto undergraduate studies at the college level,” noted Mr Donaldson, referring to the bank’s separate COB scholarship programme. “Over the past three years, our back-to-school programme has donated nearly three quarters of a million dollars in school supplies and the latest in technological teaching tools.” Packages Those packages – the school supplies and teaching tools – will be distributed to 38 schools in 17 islands from Grand Bahama and Abaco in the north to Acklins in the south as well as going to chil dren’s homes and the Department of Social Services. “It is our hope that the stu dents benefiting from this substantial donation will take full advantage of the educational opportunities provided to them so that this donation translates into a sound invest ment in our nation’s future,” said Mr. Donaldson. C ommonwealth Bank is The Bahamas’ most widelyheld public company with some 7,000 shareholders, 10 branches in New Providence, Grand Bahama and Abaco and more than $1.3 billion ina ssets. The company’s corpo rate giving, with emphasis on youth development and edu cation, also includes a number of annual college scholarships. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE NOTICEThere will be an important meeting for all parents of St. Francis and Joesph School on Wednesday August 19th 2009 at 6:00pm at Xaviers Lower School Auditorium. Please make a special effort to attend. By JOHN PORRETTO AP Energy Writer HOUSTON (AP season's first Atlantic hurricane and two other storms have done nothing to spur a rise in energy prices, largely because supplies are high and demand low, but oil companies are keeping close watch on their offshore operations in the Gulf of Mexico. After a quiet start to the 2009 hurricane season, three storms whipped up in recent days, though none appears to pose a threat to the US Gulf's massive energy complex. Crude prices fell to new lows for the month Monday, dropping to around $65 a barrel, and natural gas prices slumped to new lows as well. Pump prices have changed little in the past week. On average, a gallon of regular unleaded was selling for $2.641 on Monday, according to auto club AAA, Wright Express and the Oil Price Information Service. That's less than a penny lower than average price a week ago. The apparent indifference to storms in the Atlantic stands in stark contrast to last year, when oil prices ticked higher as tropical depressions formed. Several factors are involved, the biggest of which is a recession that's crushed energy demand at home and abroad. US crude inventories rose again last week and are nearly 20 per cent above yearago levels. Natural-gas supplies also are bloated. The US Gulf accounts for about one-quarter of domestic oil output, but the nation's reliance on the region for natural gas has lessened in the past few years as producers tap into massive reserves onshore. Gulf gas production accounts for about 12 per cent of total US output, according to the Energy Information Administration, down from roughly 20 per cent only four years ago. So even a significant storm could have little or no impact on natural gas and even crude prices, said trader and analyst Stephen Schork. He noted natural-gas prices failed toj ump even when hurricanes Gustav and Ike raked the region a year ago. "And let's not forget we're still in the midst of a pretty severe economic downturn," Schork said. Ike and Gustav shut down Gulf production for several weeks in late August and Sep tember, and shuttered several refineries. That led to gaso line shortages and price spikes above $4 a gallon throughout the Southeast. But the storms caused far less damage than Katrina and Rita in 2005, a one-two punch that destroyed 108 production platforms, damaged hundreds of others and shut down pro duction for months, in some cases. For now, major producers in the Gulf such as Royal Dutch Shell PLC, Chevron Corp. and BP PLC say they're monitoring the systems but are operating normally. Hurricane Bill picked up strength in the open Atlantic Monday on a path toward Bermuda, while what was left of Tropical Storm Claudette brought rain to the Florida Panhandle and southern Alabama. Elsewhere, Tropi cal Depression Ana was moving quickly across the north eastern Caribbean Sea. It was expected to reach the coast of the Dominican Republic later Monday. Major Atlantic storms fail to stir energy prices Bank donates school supplies to Ministry of Education F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Cuba cuts international rates to $1 per minute Despite the cuts, international dialing remains a costly proposition for most Cubans whose average state wages are $20 a month

PAGE 14

By IEVA M AUGSTUMS and TIM PARADIS AP Business Writers NEW YORK (AP Investors’ rising fears about consumer spending are turning stocks into a risky investment again. Stocks plunged and Treasury prices soared Monday morning as investors around the world feared that consumers are too anxious to lift the economy into recovery. The losses on stock exchanges extended the heavy selling that began Friday with a disappointing reading on consumer confidence. And bond investors, once again searching for a safe investment, bought heavily into Treasurys. The Dow Jones industrials were down more than 180 points, while overseas, the Shanghai stock market fell almost six per cent and the major indexes in Europe fell more than 1.5 per cent. Stocks fell across all industries as investors worried that consumers’ reluctance to spend will hurt corporate earnings. Many companies second-quarter results were boosted by cost-cutting, not higher sales, and the fear is that without a pickup in sales, earnings will fall. While other parts of the economy, including housing and manufacturing, are showing signs of progress, the country cannot have a strong recovery unless consumers are spending more freely. Their spending accounts for more than two-thirds of economic growth. Traders Traders got more bad news about the consumer Monday when home improvement retailer Lowe’s Cos. said poor weather and cautious consumer spending caused sales to fall 19 per cent in the second quarter. Lowe’s missed analysts’ forecasts. Investors will be nervous as they wait for more retailerst o report second-quarter earnings this week. Last week, the nation’s largest retailer, WalMart Stores Inc., said its most important sales figure, those from stores open at least a year, fell during the AprilJune period. Joe Saluzzi, co-head of equity trading at Themis Trading LLC, said the market had risen too far and that the selling was warranted. The economics obviously d on’t support where we’ve b een,” he said. In midmorning trading, the Dow fell 181.98, or two per cent, to 9,134.28. The broader Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell 22.56, or 2.3 per cent, to 981.53, while Nasdaq com posite index fell 46.20, or 2.3 per cent, to 1,939.32. About 2,700 stocks fell while only 180 rose on the New York Stock Exchange, where volume came to 228.4 million shares. The Chicago Board Options Exchange’s Volatili ty Index, also known as the market’s fear index, surged 16.5 per cent Monday. The VIX rose four to 28.28. It is down 30 per cent in 2009 and its historical average is 18 to 20. It hit a record 89.5 in October at the height of the financial crisis. Meanwhile, the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves opposite its price, fell to 3.50 per cent from 3.57 per cent late Friday. Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei stock average fell 3.1 per cent as investors weren’t satisfied by news that the country had emerged from recession in the second quarter. In afternoon trading, Britain’s FTSE 100 fell 1.8 per cent, Germany’s DAX index fell 1.9 per cent, and France’s CAC-40 fell 2.3 per cent. O il prices also extended their losses, reflecting the growing concerns about a weak economy that will curtail demand for energy. A barrel of crude oil fell $1.82 to $65.69 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Among companies reporting results Monday, Lowe’s shares fell $2.11, or 9.2 per cent, to $20.72. The dollar rose against other major currencies, while gold prices fell. The Russell 2000 index of smaller companies fell 16.24, or 2.9 per cent, to 547.66. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009, PAGE 3B btrt tfr f r!%* '!$()))!*&*#tffn""bnff ! $ %#&!*&*# !%** L egal NoticeNoticeALGOGENETIC GLOBAL FUND LTD.V OLUNTARILY LIQUIDATEDNotice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 1 37 (8International Business Companies Act 2 000 the Dissolution of ALGOGENETIC GLOBAL FUND LTD s olution has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register of Companies. T he Date of the Completion of dissolution was 17th July 2009. Stocks plunge as investors worry about consumers

PAGE 15

By MARTIN CRUTSINGER AP Economics Writer W ASHINGTON (AP T he Federal Reserve has extended the length of a programme intended to spur lending to consumers ands mall businesses at lower r ates, but the central bank said it had no plans to expand the types of loans being made. The Fed said Monday it w as extending its Term AssetBacked Securities Loan Facility through March 31 for most of the types of loans it makes.T he programme was scheduled to end on December 31. The TALF started in March and figures prominently in efforts by the Fed and the Obama administra-t ion to ease credit, stabilize t he financial system and help e nd the recession. Under the programme, investors use the f unds to buy securities backed by auto and student loans, credit cards, business equipment and loans guaranteed by the Small Business Administration. C ommercial mortgagebacked securities, which were added to TALF in mid-June, were extended through June 30 because issuing new secur ities in that area "can take a s ignificant amount of time to arrange," according to a joint news release from the Fed and the Treasury Depart-m ent. T he commercial real estate portion of the TALF is designed to boost the availability of such loans, help pre-v ent defaults and facilitate the sale of distressed properties. Delinquency rates on com-m ercial loans have doubled in the past year as more companies downsize and retailers close their doors, the Fed has said. Economists said any help there is critical because of the rising defaults. Small andr egional banks face the greatest risk of severe losses from c ommercial real estate loans. F ederal regulators on Friday announced the biggest bank failure this year, the collapseo f Montgomery, Ala.-based real estate lender Colonial BancGroup Inc. "The larger banks are stabilizing because they went t hrough the stress tests, but m any smaller banks are still in deep trouble," said Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody's Economy.com. T he TALF, he said, also h as experienced only limited success in its major goal of jump-starting loans to support the market for securitiesb acked by consumer credit cards, auto loans and small business loans the hugem arket known as the shadow banking system. "If these markets are not working, then credit does not flow freely to US households and businesses," Zandi said. The programme got off to a lethargic start, hobbled byr ule changes, investor worries about financial privacy and f ears that participants might b ecome ensnared in an antibailout backlash from the public and Congress. T he TALF has the potential to generate up to $1 trillion in lending for households and businesses, according to the government. Spurring s uch lending is vital to turning a round the economy but as of August 12, the amount of loans outstanding in the TALF stood at just $29.6 bil-l ion. T he Fed and Treasury on Monday said they were prepared to reconsider the decision not to expand TALFl ending to more areas if financial or economic develop ments merit such action. H owever, the government believes the financial system is beginning to stabilize after being hit last fall by the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression. "Conditions in financial markets have improved con s iderably in recent months," the Fed and Treasury said in t heir statement. "Nonethel ess, the markets for assetbacked securities backed by consumer and business loans and for commercial mortgage-backed securities are s till impaired and seem likely to remain so for some time." T he Fed last week delivered a vote of confidence in the economy, saying the d ownturn appeared to be " leveling out." Fed officials a lso said they would slow the p ace of a programme to buy $300 billion worth of Trea sury securities, an effort aimed at keeping mortgage rates affordable. The central bank said it planned to shut down the programme at the end of October. M onday's announcement was another signal the Fed wants financial markets tok now it is closely monitoring its emergency credit pro grammes to ensure they don ot generate unwanted infla tion once the economy beginst o grow again, economists said. "This action reflects the F ed's view that the economy is stabilizing but it is far from a durable recovery," said Sal G uatieri, an economist at BMO Capital Markets. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y P revious CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1 .811.28Abaco Markets1.341.340.000.1270.00010.60.00% 1 1.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.306.25Bank of Bahamas6.256.250.000.2440.26025.64.16% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00%3 .493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 1 4.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3511.350.001.4060.2508.12.20% 2 .882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7 .505.50Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.715.710.000.4190.36013.66.30% 3.851.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.643.710.070.1110.05233.41.40% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital1.952.000.052,5000.2400.0808.34.00% 8.206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.5010.00Finco10.6310.630.000.3220.52033.04.89% 1 1.7110.30FirstCaribbean Bank10.3010.300.000.7940.35013.03.40% 5.534.95Focol (S)5.135.130.000.3320.15015.52.92% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.49ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.0010.39J. S. Johnson10.3910.390.000.9520.64010.96.16% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100000 100000 FidelitBkNote13(SeriC)+ FBB13 10000 000 M ONDAY, 17 AUGUST 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,562.90| CHG 0.34 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD -149.46 | YTD % -8.73BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7 % Prime + 1.75% 7% BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: 30May2013 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 InterestF INDEX: CLOSE 783.13 | YTD -6.20% | 2008 -12.31% 1000 . 00 1000 . 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 . 00 0 . 00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.38601.3231CFAL Bond Fund1.38602.404.75 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.9047-1.20-3.66 1.48171.4059CFAL Money Market Fund1.48173.355.38 3.60903.1031Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1031-8.35-13.82 12.980112.3289Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.98012.875.79 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.47339.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.27652.00-2.98 1.06221.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.06222.566.22 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0243-0.842.43 1.05851.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05852.045.85 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-May-09 Prime + 1.75% 7% 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 NAV Date 30-Jun-09Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds 30 May 2013 29 May 2015TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 31-Dec-07 30-Jun-09 31-Jul-09 31-Jul-09 30-Jun-09MARKET TERMS NOTICE DR. JAMILANGELO MINNIS Announces the opening of his Practice in Obstetrics & Gynecology at Oxford Medical Centre, 4th Terrace East off Collins Avenue, Centreville on 4th August, 2009Telephone: (242 Fax: (242 5(*,67(5(' 3+<6,&,$1 +(/3 Fed extends consumer lending programme through March

PAGE 16

I UNDERWENTsurgery about four years ago, although described as a simple procedure, this called for anesthesia. Anything involving anes thesia to me isn't so simple. On the other hand, my husband seemed somewhat nervous, this being evident by his serious facial expression and quietness before I underwent the procedure. I was trying to engage him in con versation and was overwhelmed with laughter, finding everything humor-ous including the doctor's surgery cap and gown. I realised as nervous as I was, dwelling on negativity wasn't going to make the situation any better, so I chose laughter. Therefore, I was able to recover from the surgery with good results. “Laughter is the best medicine.” How often have you heard that? Well it turns out that those sayings are actually true. Norman Cousins can attest to that, when he was sick with a brain tumor, he left the hos pital and checked into a hotel room, where he availed himself of several humorous books and videos by the Marx Brothers and the Three Stooges. In a matter of minutes hemade his discovery. What was it? He discovered that just ten minutes of good hearty laughter resulted in two hours of good sleep without pain. It is true that optimists live longer than pessimists. Research has proven that people with a better sense of humour live longer and healthier lives. The positive results of laughter and humour is evident when we are under stress. Unlike animals, we are the only known species programmed to laugh. So, why not embrace it. It is said that the average adult laughs approximately 17 times a day. There is a difference between humour and laughter. Laughter is the physiological response to humour. Research has proven that 100-200 laughs are equivalent to ten minutes of jogging. Let us examine the many health benefits of laughter. Health Benefits of Humour and Laughter Reduces stress, by lowering levels of stress hormones and increasing levels of endorphins. Improves cognitive ability. Enhances immune system Relaxes the body An inexpensive anti-aging treatment, it increase blood supply to your face, enhancing your com plexion. A natural pain killer Increases productivity May reduce the risk of heart dis ease “When we laugh, natural killer cells which destroy tumors and virus es increase, along with Gammainterferon (a disease fighting protein), T-cells (important for our immune system) and B-cells (which make disease fighting antibodies). It also lowers blood pressure, laugh ter increases oxygen in the blood, which also encourages healing.” 'Sci ence of Laughter” Discovery Health Website. A study conducted at the University of Maryland Medical Center indicated that a rich sense of humor may help protect you against a heart attack. Distressing emotions, such as depression, anger anxiety and stress are all connected to heart dis ease. The ability to laugh lightens the physical effects of distressing emotions. Laughter and the skin Do you have lines around your mouth, and lines around your eyes? Although describes as signs of aging, they are also known as laughing lines. These lines are usually the result of laughing. Are you going to cease laughing to avoid developing laughing lines? Of course not, such lines are not always a reflection of poor habits, but a reflection of who you really are and how you deal with life challenges, in most cases it is the result of happiness. However, laughing lines can be prevented by wear ing sun protection, drinking at least8 glasses of water and not smoking. A good skin care routine is also vital. What can you do to increase your humour and laughter? Look for something funny in every day life Associate with those who are positive and love to laugh Read humorous books and watch funny movies Avoid feeding your minds with negativity, things that are sad and depressing Remember to use your discretion when using humor and laughter. It is more appropriate to use in an environment conducive to humor, like a party and not a funeral. Use humour to laugh at situations and not to degrade a person's character. Humour and laughter is a natural treatment for aging. Don't forget to cry less, get angry less and to laugh more. Kenya Mortimer-McKenzie is an Esthetician/Anti-Aging Skin Care Spe cialist. Interested persons can contact her at Baha-Retreat Anti-Aging Spa East Bay Street, East of Lucianos 323-6711 or 323-615 www.baharetreat.com Email: info@baharetreat.com health C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE BODYANDMIND T h e T r i b u n e Laughter! The best anti-aging treatment BY KENYA MORTIMERMCKENZIE Know your zones RATHER than relying o n fragrance, packaging, or word of mouth when selecting a cleanser orm oisturiser, what if you could choose based upon f acts about your very own skin condition? Face Mapping, Dermalogi-c a's unique skin analysis available at authorised s kin treatment centers, salons, and spas worldwide, provides insighti nto your skin's past and present, and allows the subsequent prescription o f a targeted home care regimen for a healthy skin future. Developed by The International DermalI nstitute for Dermalogi ca, Face Mapping takes no more than five to tenm inutes, is free, and eliminates the guesswork w hen selecting products for results on your skin. Rather than analysing t he skin in general terms, a Dermalogica Profes sional Skin Therapist uses Face Mapping to divide the facial land-s cape into fourteen zones. Each zone is thor oughly examined inchby-inch through touch and sight, and findings are notated on a prescription sheet. This prescription sheet serves as a customised visual guide for you, out lining on an actual facial landscape illustration where conditions includ ing congestion, breakouts, dehydration, and/or hyperpigmentation are present. Face Mapping maintains an accurate record of your skin, which provides you and your Dermalogica Professional Skin Therapist an objective view into the results of any professional product recommendation. By SARAH BEEK By LLOYD ALLEN T ribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net IT’S known as Ganja, Herb, weed, and more than 200 other names around the globe, marijuana is reported as one of the most c ommonly used drugs in the C ar ibbean among t eens. According to the World Health Organisation, next to alcohol, marijuana is one of the most commonly used drug by minors in the Caribbean. Mostly taken for psychoactive purposes, marijuana is said to enhance emotional responses and create a temporary feeling of euphoria, but is also known to cause hallucina t ions apart from other risks. For many users, marijuana is smoked, but it can also be taken in liquid form. Taking a relatively short time to take effect, many users experience diverse effects which can include: dizziness, an inability to control laughter, a feeling of invincibility, or extremef atigue. W ith several public and private projects already introduced to inform people on the effects associated with the drug, one local doctor is convinced that the community still needs more information about the plant. Dr Nisha Armbrister, a doctor of traditional Chinese Medicine at The Holistic Family Medicine Center explained that apart from the pros and cons of marijuana consumption, marijuana use should be limited to cancer patients. Dr Armbrister said: “Marijuana use should only be used for terminal patients, such as those with cancer, to induce appetite or help stimulate energy. “For many terminal cancer patients, chemotherapy is a usual means of ridding the body of cancer. However a common sideeffect is the loss of appetite. “To build their bodies back up, marijuana may be an option, but with consuming it everyday, it can eventually become addictive, and that is not good either.” She said some of the long term effects of marijuana use include hallucinations, short or long term psychosis, and even depression. Dr Armbrister said she supports the use of hemp a product related to the marijuana plant group, but seen as a less potent form with fewer side effects. Given the number ofB ahamians affected by chronic diseases she said the use of hemp seeds is an even better option than the raw marijuana. Overall, she said minors who are introduced to the drug are far more at risk to addiction and should seek counseling if they’ve started using it. IS SMOKING MARIJUANA REALLY BAD FOR YOU?

PAGE 17

G REEN SCENE By Gardener Jack MANY in our society would be surprised if they truly knew how the world of female sexuality is changing because of the Internet. We have grown up believing that men are more technologically competent and flagrant in their sexual dialogue. The role of pornography, for the benefit of men, is not new and has been well documented in many cultures and for many centuries. Society expects women to behave in a certain way and conform to expectations. But what are you to do if you do not fall into the 'norm' or you do in most areas but not all? If you live ina society that does not let you openly satisfy your enquiring mind, then where and to whom are you to turn? Today, we are all expected and told to have healthy lifestyles but who determines what is healthy? Surely healthy means a tranquil mind, body and soul that in turn bring peace and joy to the whole of our life. To haveany one of those integral parts of our nature out of step brings a restlessness and often unhappiness that is not easily dismissed. Knowing all of this it is not surprising that the number of women who are using the Internet, for sexual information and satisfaction, is equal to men. In reality, women have become just as technologically capable as men and have quickly learnt how to steer clear o f undesirable or degrading sites. Most of us are used to ducking and diving from objectionable advances in real life, so translating that online becomes even easier. To get rid of someone or something is just a click away. Real life is rarely that easy. When we consider the vast number of sex related sites we quickly realise that it is not our gender that determines if we consider a site to be 'woman friendly' or 'sexist' but our perception of our gender. We may be more drawn to home pages that have pastel flowery images, and romantic poetry then feel comfortable seeking information. For others, exploring more masculine and more sexually graphic venues allows areas of femininity that would normally be frowned upon. The anonymity or pseudo anonymity that can be achieved via the Internet allows us to avoid society's labeling and judging of behaviour. A fine example of this can be seen when well-known 'porn stars' establish their own web sites, gain control over their own careers, and in turn empower themselves. In previous weeks, we have discussed persons who are susceptible to the lure and compulsive nature of online sexual activity. Many present preexisting sexual problems and undeveloped coping skills to name a few. In the past, men have presented more addictive natures, but that is changing because of the Internet. Female compulsive online sexual behavior is, in fact, on par with men. Because most of the online communication is text based the importance of the written word become even more significant. Relationships are established quickly and accelerate at lightning speed. The excitement of becoming whom ever we want becomes fuel for our imagination and acts like an amphetamine. Without a doubt, this can become a problem when cyber world collides with real world. However, in therapy, we know there are clear benefits for those who have difficulties relating, flirting or who have low self-esteem. Chat rooms can be used for 'practice relationships' and, when the time is right, it can then be translated into the real world. The way that we communicate has changed radically over the last twenty years in ways that we could never have imagined. What will the next twenty bring? It is important to educate persons to understand the perils and in turn help to establish more positive web sites. The Internet is here to stay so we need to take advantage and grow with it. If we want our role as women to improve then we need to play our part in our own reinvention. Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist. Call for an appointmentRelate Bahamas at 3647230, oremail relatebahamas@yahoo.com orwww.relatebahamas.blogspot.com. She is also available for speaking engagements. LOVING RELATIONSHIPS C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009, PAGE 9B S EX AND THE NET: Female Empowerment By MAGGIE BAIN Favourite palms IN A word association exercise the response to ‘tropical’ will almost always include ‘palm trees.’ Palms have always been a feature of Bahamian gardens and I notice their use is increasing rather than diminishing. The coconut palm (Cocos nucifera the best-known palm in the world and is the most diversely useful, providing both food and shelter. In The Bahamas we tend to take its beauty for granted but it is a stunning tree when mature. The problem with coconut trees is they grow so tall they become a danger to buildings during a hurricane. This is especially true when the standard build ing lot is only 10,000 square feet. Home owners who want the beauty of the coconut palm without its dangers are opting for smaller cultivars such as Malaysian Dwarf. These are not as striking as our regular Jamaican Tall coconut palms but provide a compromise. Many more homeowners are going even more downscale and are using Manila palms (Veitchia merrillii called Christmas palms, these never present a problem with electric lines and are handsome with recurved leaves and straight stems. With the Manila palm we lose the food aspect but do have bunches of pretty green and red inedible nuts hanging down over the Christmas period. Some people seem to be overdoing the number of Manila palms they use in their garden. After writing this I checked my own garden: eleven, including a grouping of three, a grouping of two, and six individual plants. I have seen smaller garden with fifty Manila palms. Manila palms are easily grown from seed. Wait until the nuts drop and then bury them a scant one-inch deep in sandy soil. Once they have rooted they can be transplanted to their permanent site. Grouping the palms in twos and threes gives the landscaping a little more body, especially when the palms are used for lawn centerpieces. Allow six inches between the juvenile palms when grouping. One larger palm that has become very popular in Abaco is the Alexander palm Archontophoenix alexandre), a beauty with a shapely grey trunk and green crownshaft and lovely feathery fronds. The Alexander palm needs its own space with no competition to be most visually effective. This palm comes to us from eastern Australia and is amongst the loveliest of all palms. There are a number of palms that are called fishtail because of the shape of the leaves on the fronds. The Caryota mitis is one most grown in The Bahamas and technically it could grow to 30 feet but rarely exceeds 15 feet. Unlike the other palms discussed in this article, the fishtail palm has multiple stems and produces a bushy growth. Most multi-stemmed palms are shade lovers but the fishtail palm can take a good deal of sun. It produces best when provided with some shade. After the fishtail palm flowers it loses the stem with flower growth, but this is replaced by new stems from the main growth. A true gem of a palm is the bottle palm (Hyophorbe lagenicaulis comes from the Mascarene Islands in the Indian Ocean but is no longer found there. The bottle palm is somewhat unprepossessing when juvenile as the trunk is not distended. All this changes in maturity when the trunk becomes Falstaffian, positively pot-bellied, raffish and rotund. The bottle palm has a short but attractive crownshaft and the short fronds are so recurved they almost double back on themselves. They are often seen in groupings of two and three but, of course, need at least two feet between them. A single specimen makes an attractive lawn centerpiece. The maxi mum height of a bottle palm is about ten feet. A selection of palms in the garden produces a tropical ambience that few other plants can provide. j.hardy@coralwave.com Bottle palms are attractive and compact and will never endanger electric lines. The foliage of fish tail palms is f eathery and adds texture to i ndividual plantings. JACKSON, Miss. MAUD PRICE, 23, is not using pregnancy as an excuse to prop up her feet and pack on the pounds, according to the Associated Press . Exercise remains a part of her routine, just as it was before she became pregnant. Price has been a part of the Moms N Motion water aerobics class at The Club at St. Dominic's Hospital since May. "I felt like it would help me out with my labor, and it would probably help me with my legs and it has," said Price of Jackson, who is 38 weeks along. "At first, I was having a lot of leg cramps." She also walks the indoor track before the biweekly classes. Walking and swimming are ideal aerobic exercises for healthy pregnant women, and experts recommend 30 minutes a day. A report in this month's issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons urges physicians to recommend such exercises to pregnant patients, even if they have not exercised prior to pregnancy. Data show a pregnant woman's body can compensate for the changes with no harm to the fetus during lowto moderate-intensity exercise, according to Capt. Marlene DeMaio, a physician and research director of the Naval Medical Center in Portsmouth, Va., and author of the study. The findings contradict what some physicians recommended in the past. As recently as the 1990s, there was concern exercise could be detrimental to a pregnant woman and her fetus. These days the benefits of exercising while pregnant are better understood, but in the grand scheme of prenatal care, are sometimes overlooked. "Honestly, mostp atients aren't getting advised on it unless they are asking questions," said Dr. Emily Johnson, an obstetri cian/ gynecologist with Jackson Healthcare for Women. Johnson touts some of the b enefits: keeping weight gain a t an optimal 25-35 pounds; keeping the heart in good shape and preparing the body for the strenuous activ ity of labor. Exercise is par ticularly beneficial to obese patients and those who develop gestational diabetes. Exercise helps with medicine for the latter, Johnson said. Registered nurse Loretta Buckley has taught the water aerobics class off and on for 20 years. Exercising while pregnant, she says, keeps the muscles tight in the legs and abdomen. "It gives you an enthusi asm to keep on doing. Peo ple who exercise when they're pregnant, they are different people. They want a healthy baby, and they want to be healthy themselves. And, I'm seeing more and more of it now," Buckley said. Over the years, women have told her they sleep better because of the class, which is the case with one current participant. Cristina Lazzari, 32, of Byram began water aerobics in her fifth month of pregnancy, but didn't attend reg ularly until insomnia set in. "I was having lack of energy. The little exercise I do now is really helping me out, especially with insomnia. Maybe because I get more tired physically," said Laz zari, whose baby is due Sept. 9. She also takes a prenatal yoga class. Retta Boyd is a registered nurse and one of the maternal newborn educators at St. Dominic's. One of her duties is to give women guidelines on the do's and don'ts of exercising while pregnant. "We always encourage our patients to do exercise but not (strenuous they become pregnant. Don't start hard aerobic exercise. Continue what you have been doing prior to getting pregnant," Boyd said. In her opinion, water aerobics is better than other exercises because "you're not pounding your body against concrete (as with jogging). Something you can do rain or shine." Moms-tobe stay fit

PAGE 18

C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE MISS Puerto Rico Mayra Matos Perez walks during the swimsuit event of the 2009 Miss Universe Preliminary Competition... MISS Montenegro Anja Jovanovic walks on the runway during the swimsuit event of the 2009 Miss Universe Preliminary Competition... FROM left: Miss Peru Karen Schwarz, Miss Philippines Bianca Manalo, Miss Poland Angelika Jakubowska, and Miss Puerto Rico Mayra Matos Perez stand together during the swimsuit event. MISS Venezuela Stefania Fernandez poses on the runway in the evening gown segment. MISS Japan Emiri Miyasaka poses on the runway in the evening gown segment. MISS India Ekta Chowdhry, left, bows as she introduces herself, as Miss Indonesia Zivanna Letisha Siregar, right, looks on, during the opening event. MISS USA Kristen Dalton walks during the swimsuit event of the 2009 Miss Universe Preliminary Competition... on the catwalk... By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL T ribune Features Editor THE 84contestants of the 2009 Miss Universe Pageant t ook to the stage Sunday night in a dazzling display of both physical fitness and glamour as they participated in t he swimsuit and evening gown preliminary competitions which will help to reduce the number of hopefuls to a mere 15 for next week’s main event. I n less than six hours, the staff of Atlantis transformed the Imperial Ballroom into a stage and runway fit for a q ueen and enough seating to accommodate the hundreds who came out to show support for their favourite country. Hosts for the evening were the reigning Miss Universe D ayana Mendoza and local radio personality Ed Fields who gave snippets of information about each contestant as they came on stage first in swimsuit and then evening gown. Between the two events, entertainment was provided b y London based recording artist Anthony Wright. The evening gown competition was the highlight of the evening as the ladies gracefully made their way down the catwalk to the oohs and aahs of the crowd. Jeweled tones seemed to be the order of the evening w ith many of the contestants wearing rich blues, purples and greens. Other popular choices included silver and gold sparkling creations ( as in the gold dress worn byM iss Bahamas Kiara Sherman), vibrant red and Grecian styled gowns in white and silver. T i m A y l e n / E v e n i n g G o w n P h o t o s B r e n n a n L i n s l e y / S w i m s u i t P h o t o s

PAGE 19

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 77F/25C Low: 76F/24C Low: 80F/27C Low: 80F/27C Low: 80 F/27 C Low: 81F/27C Low: 80 F/27 C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 90F/32C High: 93F/34C High: 88 F/31 C High: 88 F/31 C High: 89F/32C High: 90 F/32C High: 89F/32C Low: 79F/26C High: 91F/33C Low: 80 F/27 C High: 91F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 77F/25C High: 89 F/32 C Low: 81F/27C High: 90 F/32 Low: 77F/25C High: 87F/31C Low: 78 F/26C High: 90F/32C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 91F/33C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 88F/31C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 90F/32C Low: 77F/25C High: 91 F/33 C Low: 80F/27C High: 91F/33C High: 89 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 18 TH , 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Clouds and sun, a t-storm; breezy. Mostly cloudy, a couple of t-storms. Cloudy with showers and t-storms. Mostly sunny, a t-storm possible. Mostly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 89 Low: 80 High: 89 High: 90 High: 90 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Some sun with a brief shower. High: 89 Low: 77 Low: 76 Low: 75 AccuWeather RealFeel 103F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 80F 107-82F 105-79F 96-81F 96-84F Low: 75 TODAYTONIGHTWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................91F/33C Low ....................................................80F/27C Normal high ......................................89F/32C Normal low ........................................76F/24C Last year's high .................................. 91 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 75 F/24C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.13" Year to date ................................................22.35" Normal year to date ....................................28.42" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU New First Full Last Aug. 20 Aug. 27Sep. 4Sep. 11 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:45 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:42 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 4:35 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 6:24 p.m. Today Wednesday Thursday Friday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 6:24 a.m.2.712:22 a.m.0.1 6:57 p.m.3.312:25 p.m.-0.1 7:22 a.m.3.01:15 a.m.0.0 7:50 p.m.3.41:24 p.m.-0.2 8:15 a.m.3.22:04 a.m.-0.2 8:41 p.m.3.32:20 p.m.-0.2 9:06 a.m.3.32:50 a.m.-0.2 9:29 p.m.3.23:13 p.m.-0.2 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco90/3275/23c88/3179/26t Amsterdam76/2461/16s79/2668/20s Ankara, Turkey87/3054/12s86/3051/10s Athens90/3275/23s92/3375/23s Auckland59/1550/10c60/1548/8sh Bangkok90/3277/25r91/3279/26sh Barbados87/3078/25pc86/3079/26pc Barcelona84/2868/20s83/2869/20s Beijing84/2873/22pc86/3070/21c Beirut81/2779/26s81/2778/25s Belgrade94/3468/20s90/3260/15s Berlin75/2357/13s79/2664/17s Bermuda87/3075/23sh86/3075/23sh Bogota67/1946/7sh68/2046/7t Brussels81/2761/16s84/2868/20s Budapest92/3362/16s88/3157/13s Buenos Aires57/1347/8pc56/1343/6c Cairo97/3677/25s98/3674/23s Calcutta91/3283/28sh91/3284/28sh Calgary72/2248/8pc72/2250/10pc Cancun91/3275/23pc92/3375/23pc Caracas82/2771/21t83/2872/22t Casablanca83/2871/21s86/3072/22s Copenhagen72/2253/11pc71/2158/14pc Dublin66/1859/15r68/2055/12r Frankfurt84/2857/13s87/3069/20s Geneva 86/30 61/16 s 87/3061/16s Halifax 80/26 61/16 s 77/25 59/15 pc Havana 91/32 72/22 t 90/32 74/23 r Helsinki 63/17 48/8r68/2048/8s Hong Kong 90/32 81/27 pc 93/33 81/27s Islamabad 91/32 75/23 t 99/37 77/25 s Istanbul86/3070/21s86/3071/21s Jerusalem 85/29 64/17s88/3164/17s Johannesburg 62/1644/6s61/1637/2c Kingston 89/3177/25pc90/3279/26r Lima70/2156/13s69/2058/14s London79/2659/15s83/2863/17s Madrid99/3761/16s97/3661/16s Manila86/3079/26r87/3079/26t Mexico City77/2555/12t74/2355/12t Monterrey100/3773/22s100/3773/22s Montreal86/3070/21t81/2763/17pc Moscow73/2257/13t64/1748/8r Munich83/2855/12t88/3158/14s Nairobi75/2356/13sh78/2556/13c New Delhi 90/3277/25t91/3279/26t Oslo68/2048/8s68/2055/12pc Paris88/3164/17s93/3367/19pc Prague 79/26 52/11 s 81/27 57/13 s Rio de Janeiro84/2873/22s83/2871/21sh Riyadh104/4080/26s105/4081/27s Rome 91/32 70/21 s 91/32 70/21 s St. Thomas90/3281/27pc91/3279/26sh San Juan65/1836/2c64/1736/2pc San Salvador 86/30 70/21 t 86/30 74/23 t Santiago 50/1041/5r54/1232/0sh Santo Domingo88/3175/23t88/3175/23sh Sao Paulo 76/24 63/17 t 71/21 58/14r Seoul86/3073/22sh86/3074/23sh Stockholm 64/17 48/8 r 68/20 50/10 s Sydney 70/21 48/8 s72/2248/8s Taipei91/3279/26t92/3380/26t T okyo 84/28 75/23 c 84/28 73/22 c T oronto 80/2661/16t77/2561/16pc Trinidad93/3370/21pc95/3575/23s V ancouver 77/25 62/16 s 82/2763/17s Vienna 86/3063/17s84/2864/17s W arsaw 77/25 52/11 s 72/22 54/12 pc Winnipeg 67/19 52/11 pc 69/2056/13c H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace F ORECAST P ATH M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 10-20 Knots1-3 Feet1-3 Miles86F Wednesday:SE at 10-20 Knots1-3 Feet1-3 Miles86F Today:E at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet1-3 Miles85F Wednesday:SE at 10-20 Knots3-5 Feet1-3 Miles85F Today:E at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet1-3 Miles84F Wednesday:SE at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet1-3 Miles84F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque88/3163/17t90/3265/18s Anchorage63/1752/11c66/1850/10c Atlanta90/3271/21t90/3273/22t Atlantic City90/3272/22s90/3271/21t Baltimore92/3370/21s90/3270/21t Boston94/3472/22s90/3268/20t Buffalo82/2767/19t80/2661/16t Charleston, SC90/3273/22pc91/3274/23pc Chicago81/2758/14t85/2967/19t Cleveland86/3069/20t82/2768/20t Dallas99/3779/26s98/3678/25s Denver80/2654/12t85/2952/11s Detroit85/2965/18t83/2868/20c Honolulu89/3174/23pc89/3177/25s Houston93/3377/25t94/3477/25t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday TodayWednesdayTodayWednesday Indianapolis84/2868/20t89/3170/21t Jacksonville88/3173/22t92/3374/23t Kansas City86/3068/20t84/2863/17t Las Vegas103/3973/22s105/4079/26s Little Rock94/3473/22t92/3374/23t Los Angeles78/2562/16pc80/2664/17pc Louisville86/3072/22t90/3273/22t Memphis88/3175/23t92/3375/23t Miami89/3180/26t91/3279/26t Minneapolis78/2561/16pc79/2661/16t Nashville84/2871/21t89/3172/22t New Orleans88/3178/25t92/3378/25t New York94/3475/23s90/3273/22t Oklahoma City96/3574/23t96/3572/22s Orlando90/3277/25t92/3377/25t Philadelphia93/3374/23s88/3172/22t Phoenix 108/42 82/27 pc 107/4182/27s Pittsburgh84/2866/18t82/2766/18t Portland, OR 94/3462/16s99/3764/17s Raleigh-Durham 93/33 71/21 t 94/34 73/22 t St. Louis87/3071/21t86/3072/22t Salt Lake City 84/28 57/13 s 88/3162/16s San Antonio 99/37 76/24 pc 100/37 78/25 s San Diego73/2265/18pc75/2366/18pc San Francisco 76/24 58/14 s 78/2558/14s Seattle85/2960/15s91/3260/15s T allahassee 95/3574/23pc93/3374/23t T ampa 93/33 76/24 t 92/33 78/25t Tucson100/3774/23s99/3774/23pc W ashington, DC 94/34 75/23s91/3275/23t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. AccuW eather .com

PAGE 20

C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONB HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009 B y LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net T H E month of August has become the official month of love for onel ocal couple who won the ultimate wedding experience and got to e xchange their vows on live television. On August 7, 26-year-old Tamika Burrows came before her friends, coworkers, and family, to express her love for her new husband 24-year-old Antonio Storr on the first ever Bahamas At Sunrise ‘Dream Wedding Experience.’ The live show teamed up with several companies to offer the couple the ultimate dream wedding, providing everything from the location dress, and cake to the rings, and reception. The only catch was that the couple had to allow viewers to make the specific selections for the wedding in the weeks leading up to the event. When the big day came, both Antonio and Tamika seemed anxious but excited that their three year courtship was finally coming to an end. It was a scene out of the perfect love story a beautiful garden wedding at the rear of the British Colonial Hilton, w ith yachts passing in the beautiful early morning harbour, b irds singing their morning melodies, and guests dressed in b right pastels. Tamika wore an original Apryl Jasmine dress decorated with lace and white beading. Just minutes before her walk down the aisle , Tamika told Tribune Features what the big day truly meant to her. “What’s running through my head is what I’m going to say when I reach the altar. I know that I’m going to say yes, but I’m also thinking what I will say after that, but I’m good, I’m excited, I’m happy.” Tamika who is employed with Batelco, was supported by dozens of coworkers including the company’s CEO Kirk Griffin, VP of Legal Regulations and Interconnection Felicity Johnson, and company Chairman Julian Francis. At approximately 7.45am on August 7, the couple was announced as husband and wife, and shared their very first kiss ever. Following the festivities, the newlyweds headed to Abaco where they stayed at the Green Turtle Cay Club for four days and three nights. According to the shows Producer Dwight Strachan, the Dream Wedding Experience was a first, and was well received by the public. “I think everything went pretty much as planned, knowing that we were making history where a live Bahamian wedding was being televised throughout the country, it was the most exciting part of the event for us. “Also being there for this couple who I’ve come to know over the past few weeks, was an amazing experience, you could tell that they were so much in love, and we are simply elated that we were able to be a part of that.” Sponsors for the event included; The British Colonial Hilton, Gigi the artist, Modern Men Boutique, Bahama Fantasies, Jewels by the Sea, Renee Brown, Template, Vivienne Lockhart, Vows, Donald Knowles, and Sky Bahamas. The new Mr and Mrs Antonio Storr (center pose along with the bridal party.