Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
Pim blowin’ it

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m Lhe Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

for shuffle?

Sports Minister
Desmond Bannister
reportedly wants

to leave politics

RUMOURS of an impend-
ing shuffle to the prime min-
ister’s Cabinet swirled in
political circles yesterday.

The shake-up will report-
edly centre around Sports
Minister Desmond Bannister
who, according to a well-
placed source, wants to leave
the political fray to focus on
his law practice.

For weeks it has been spec-
ulated that Attorney General
Michael Barnett will be
appointed as the next chief
justice leaving a void in his
current post. There are also

reports that State Minister for
the Environment Phenton
Neymour will be moved to
another area and assume new
duties.

“T think Mr Bannister has
been wanting to get out for
quite some time. I think he’s
been pleading that his prac-
tice has been suffering and so
he just needs to get back in
the private sector — and he
said (previously) that he only
wanted to stay around for two
years and I think he wants to

SEE page 11

Four hour power cut
in New Providence

A POWER cut affected homes and businesses throughout
New Providence for up to four hours on Friday night when a
Bahamas Electricity Corporation power cable “faulted” in the

Big Pond area.

Minister of State for the Environment Phenton Neymour said
power failed in nearly every New Providence community when
a fault in the voltage transformer of the 33 kilowatt cable

SEE page 11

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ee

MISS BAHAMAS Kiara Sherman poses on stage last night at the
Imperial Ballroom, Atlantis Resort, Paradise Island.

The Miss Universe pageant entered its competitive phase last
night with the swimwear and evening gown events.

Win a fully-loaded
backpack plus a

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Hurricane could
hit the Bahamas
by end of week

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By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

iO} INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
[| (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

A HURRICANE could hit the Bahamas at the end of
the week as Tropical Storm Bill gains strength over the
Atlantic, forecasters warned last night. However, it is still

too early to say for certain.

Although it is still too early to tell whether Bill will be
a threat to the Bahamas, Bahamas Department of Mete-
orology meteorologist Basil Dean told The Tribune
yesterday that the threat will become clear by Wednes-

day.

The strengthening Tropical Storm had maximum sus-
tained winds of 65 mph as it moved west northwest at
around 16 mph last night, and Tropical Storm force
winds extended up to 140 miles outward.

SEE page 11



Young mother believed to have
drowned after falling from cliff

TRAGEDY struck a young
mother who fell off a cliff and is

fale 2”
THE REIGNING Miss Uni-
verse Dayana Mendoza gave
an exclusive interview to The
Tribune at the weekend.

* SEE PAGE TWO for her
views on the pageant and
what she’s made of her vis-
it to the Bahamas.

EYTYeS Wai Loe

believed to have drowned in
rough waters near Clifton Pier,
police said. Just two hours later,
police found the lifeless body
of a man bobbing in the water
at the eastern end of Potter’s
Cay.

Police said Vonique Johnson,
39, and her 18-year-old daugh-
ter took a car ride to the Clifton

SEE page 11

Marriage and family
therapist: govt must
pass marital rape law

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A MARRIAGE and family
therapist of 15 years says gov-
ernment must pass the marital
rape law whether there is con-
sensus for it or not.

Barrington Brennen has
been agitating for the “long
overdue” law “for about 10
years”, he told The Tribune yes-
terday.

He said the debate that has
followed in the wake of its pro-
posal in parliament has, “unfor-

SEE page 11

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

REIGNINGMISSUNIVERSE

DAYANA MENDOZA SPEAKS TO THE TRIBUNE

REIGNING Miss Uni-
verse Dayana Mendoza
admits she is sad she no
longer plays an active role
in the competition, but says
she could not have chosen a
better place to relinquish
her crown than the
Bahamas.

While on the set of an
early morning Miss Uni-
verse calendar shoot on Fri-
day at Atlantis, the former
Miss Venezuela took a few
minutes to give an exclusive
interview to The Tribune, in
which she discussed her
feelings about the pageant,
this year’s contestants and
her plans for the future.

T: How do you feel
watching this year’s contest
from the sidelines?

DM: “It is a bit weird and
a little sad for me some-
times, because I see them
having fun - like Miss
Venezuela (Stefania Fer-
nandez, who succeeded
Miss Mendoza). It is sad to
see them, because it
reminds me of when I was
doing it.”














































THE BAHAMAS
ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

wishes to advise

ALL CONSUMERS

In both New Providence and the Farnily Islands, ta make prompt
payment(s) on oll accounts to avoid interruption of your electricity

Fervice [5].

The public is also odvised that all overdue poyments should be made
Grectly to the Corporation. Those poyments can be mode ot the Head
Office on Blue Hill and Tucker Roods, the Mall at Morathon of the Main Past
Office on East Hill Steet. Payments can ale be made on SATURDAYS aot
the Mall ot Marathen from 8:30 am fe 1 pm. Please make sure to see a
Credit and Collections supervisor once overdve bill & pald to ensue

facennection.

Consumers whose account(s} ore not overdue con olso make
Poyment[s) directhy ta the Corporation or at any Barcloys
Bank, British American Bank, or the Bank of Nova Scotia or

Fince Bankliné or Royal Online.

T: How was your year as
Miss Universe?

DM: “It was great, I had
so much fun. It is really a
beautiful job; you get to rep-
resent Latin women in my
case and women in general,
and learn a lot about the
world.”

T: Which of the contes-
tants has the best chance of
winning in your opinion?

DM: “Well I don’t know. I
haven’t the opportunity to
speak with them really, so I
don’t know if what kind of
personality they have, or if
they project something spe-
cial. They are all pretty, but if
I don’t talk to them, I can-
not really tell if Pd like them
to be winners or not. So I
don’t know.

T: What do you think
about the Bahamas?

DM: “I’m having a great
time. The Bahamas is par-
adise, so for me to give up
the crown here, I’m very
lucky.

T: When you first arrived,
you said, “I’m home”. What
did you mean by that?

DM: “I’ve been here so
many times already that ’'m
used to being here and I
don’t feel a difference. I love
the food, I love the people, I
love the weather, the beach
and the sand and the whole
thing, so I feel so comfort-
able, I don’t want to leave.”

T: What will you take back
with you?

DM: “More than objects.
I’m going to take back mem-
ories. Pll be back, I will defi-
nitely visit again. But not by
myself — with my family.”

T: What is in your future?

DM: “I don’t know what’s
in my future; only God
knows what is in my future,
but what ’'m going to do now
in the near future is go to
New York Film Academy.
I’m going to go to acting
school.

“T think it is a great oppor-
tunity that I can take advan-
tage of thanks to my schol-
arship from the Miss Uni-
verse organisation.”

T: What was your
favourite part of being Miss
Universe?

DM: “Travelling all
around the world for free!”

rE
tt ES)
tee na
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Oln brief.

Police: two men
targeting cars in
Goodman's Bay

TWO men are target-
ing isolated cars parked
in the Goodman’s Bay
area and stealing valu-
ables left behind, police
confirmed.

According to an offi-
cer stationed at the
Cable Beach police sta-
tion, who did not want

to be named, the station

has received several
complaints of items
being stolen from vehi-
cles left parked in the
western parking lot of
Goodman’s Bay beach.

“We've been getting
several reports on that,”
said the officer, who
could not say how many
break-ins were reported
recently or when the
thieves strike.

An e-mail being circu- }

lated over the last few
days warned residents
of the potential danger.
“The driver would
pull very close toa
parked vehicle while his
accomplice (would)
take an object out to
break the glass, then
reverse the car, while
the other (does) the
searching and the steal-
ing,” said the e-mail.
The thieves are tar-
geting cars that seem
vulnerable — with valu-

able items left out in the

open — and are parked
in isolated spots, said
police.

The officer said his
station patrols the area
every day but urged
persons who use that

parking lot to park their

cars in populated areas
and not to leave valu-
ables in their vehicles.




Prooting



Davis calls for govt to end

loan prog

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE prime minister should
immediately end government’s
“insensitive” suspension of the
national education loan guaran-
tee programme — and increase
the cap on educational funding
— to ensure that hundreds of
abandoned students can still pur-
sue tertiary education abroad this
semester.

Deputy leader candidate of
the Progressive Liberal Party
Philip “Brave” Davis argued that
this would allow the hundreds of
students let down by govern-
ment’s “abrupt” decision to
begin their studies as early as this
week.

“A government serious about
its young people would priori-
tize its spending and budget to
ensure that the hundreds of (stu-
dents) affected receive the fund-
ing necessary to pursue their
studies,” said Mr Davis.

He also questioned why gov-
ernment would “squander” the
public’s money on road improve-
ment projects and preparations
for the upcoming Miss Universe
pageant instead of allocating
money to invest in the country’s
educational development.

“What is the point of revital-
ising Bay Street and the down-
town area and creating new
opportunities if we are not devel-
oping the brain power to take
advantage of it?

“T understand that govern-
ment has spent over $10 million
to aid in the hosting of Miss Uni-
verse.

“How can we truly benefit
from the exposure of our islands
when in the same breath we can-
not find a dollar to support and
educate our people,” he asked
at a press conference held at his
law chambers yesterday.

Nearly two weeks ago, Edu-
cation Minister Carl Bethel
shocked many students who
were counting on the loan to

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PHILIP ‘BRAVE’ DAVIS

help finance costly studies
abroad when he announced that
the plan had been suspended due
to a high default rate.

Following the backlash from
frustrated students, Mr Bethel
said his ministry had repeatedly
warned the public that the pro-
gramme's future was uncertain
from the start.

He added that the plan would
remain suspended until it is able
to sustain itself.

In a recent interview with The
Tribune, Mr Bethel explained
that the cap on the loans was
lowered from $20,000 a year to
$10,000 in 2004 while the average
grade point average of 2.5 per
cent was raised to make the pro-
gramme more exclusive in the
face of rising defaulters.

Still government's Guaranteed
Loan Programme accumulated
a $68.05 million deficit because
so many students failed to make
good on their repayment, he said.

Mr Davis argued that govern-
ment should quickly enact more
stringent controls, increased pub-
lic reporting requirements and
regular audits to ensure the plan
is sustained in the long-term.

The MP for Cat Island and
Rum Cay also called on govern-
ment to publish the names of all
defaulters of the educational loan

MSs

programme and publish strin-
gent eligibility so that the plan
will be free of political abuse in
the future.

He also criticised government
for not alerting applicants about
the suspension sooner, so they
could make alternate plans.

“At this late stage, the Col-
lege of the Bahamas and alter-
native financing are not viable
options. These same children,
the victims of broken promises,
now have to find a way not only
to cope. ..But must now find a
job in this challenging market,”
he said.

“Prospective students, who
had their tickets purchased,
resigned from jobs, paid non-
refundable deposits, secured
visas, reserved accommodations
and prepared their lives for a
major change now face grievous
disappointment because govern-
ment broke their promise to
them,” said Mr Davis, flanked
by one disappointed student
whose dreams of studying at a
college abroad were dashed.

In a recent interview, Mr
Bethel defended government’s
decision.

"Sometimes the wheels of gov-
ernment don't operate as quick-
ly as possible and it's unfortu-
nate in this case that the policy



Carjackers steal woman's car

POLICE are searching for armed carjackers who held a
young woman up at gunpoint and stole her car.

Shortly after 2 am yesterday two men driving a gold coloured
Honda pulled up behind a 26-year-old woman who had just
arrived at her home on Sweeting’s Lane.

One of the men got out of the car with a shotgun and
demanded the keys to the victim’s white 2001 Honda Accord

registration No. 209852.

The gunman sped off in the stolen vehicle, however, the

young woman was not harmed.
Police investigations continue.







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decision came as late as it did,
but that's something we can't
control.

"T have spoken several times
about the debts, urging gradu-























ramme suspension

ates to pay because of the
threat it was posing to the via-
bility of the fund,” Mr Bethel
told The Tribune in a recent
interview.

SSE — 14TH, 2009

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, 1998, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Wyndham closes for eight weeks

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Wyndham resort on
Cable Beach will close today
for eight weeks in an effort to
increase cost savings and stave
off further negative repercus-

the temporary closure makes
good business sense.

“This (closure) will also
allow us the opportunity to
maximise financial saving dur-
ing a traditionally slow period
and the traditional height of
the hurricane season,” he said.

The hotel’s phone lines will

Mr Sands said all employees
will be scheduled to return to
work on or about October 7.

But if the tourism industry
continues to worsen, current
staffing levels may be adjust-
ed.

“Our business is like an
accordion and we adjust

demand. . .We assess staffing
levels on a monthly basis —
that’s the nature of our busi-
ness. We have to continue to
ensure that we are financially
viable and staffing demands are
predicated on business levels
period,” he said.

The last guests are set to

STRUCKUM

ET ea Tt
UR em pit

sions from the current tourism
downturn.

Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s
senior vice-president of admin-
istration and external relations,
said the period will be used to
freshen up the property and
ensure it can be a viable com-
petitor when it re-opens on
October, 7.

“There will be some routine
maintenance that will be car-
ried out plus some small capital
items to ensure that the prod-
uct is as fresh as it can be when
the property reopens.

“There won’t be any major
capital works done because
we’ve already invested close to
$30 million (in upgrades) into
the property. But we will
ensure that the property will

ROBERT SANDS

be in the best condition that it
can be,” he told The Tribune
during a brief interview yester-
day.

Over the last few weeks the
resort has had occupancy levels
of around 70 per cent he said,
but added that visitor arrivals
routinely dwindle in Septem-
ber and October.

Factoring in the unpre-
dictable hurricane season,
which is normally more active
later in the year, Mr Sands said



remain open to book future
reservations and the resort’s
operators will continue to
aggressively market the prop-
erty. But Mr Sands said it was
too early to tell how business
will fare come October.

“It’s too soon to say but cer-
tainly when you look at the lev-
els of travel over that period
there will be a time-frame for
which we have to build back
slowly but that will also be
influenced by world economic
conditions and that (hinges on)
whether confidence in North
America improves,” he said.

Meantime Whyndam
employees, who were informed
of the closure last year, will use
the two-month closure as a
vacation period.

Woman criticises Immigration Dept over
refusal to void estranged husband’s permit

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A MOTHER whose Jamaican husband left
her days after she applied for his permanent
residence permit has criticised the Immigration
Department for ignoring her pleas to void the
application.

The 33-year-old of Harbour Island was
enraged when she discovered that the depart-
ment not only ignored her request but granted
her estranged husband’s application in less
than six months.

She married the 27-year-old Jamaican in
2004, and after five years of marriage she sent
off the final application for his permanent res-
idence.

But within days of sending off the final
paperwork in February, her husband left both
his wife and two children in Harbour Island to
move to Nassau.

He has since failed to provide any financial
assistance to his family while his wife is unable
to work as she is their four-year-old daughter’s
full-time care giver, she says.

The Harbour Island woman, who did not
want to be named, told The Tribune how she
contacted the Immigration Department, sent
Immigration officials several letters, and met
with Director of Immigration Jack Thomp-
son, in an effort to revoke his application.

Colors::
ac /

The

Rosetta St.



But she said Mr Thomp-
son appeared to be uncon-
cerned about her plight,
and Minister of Immigra-
tion Branville McCartney
failed to respond to her
request to meet with him.

The mother of five fol-
lowed the department’s
advice by filing for a legal
separation, and sent Immi-
gration officials a copy of
the court summons her hus-
band had received.

Yet the application was granted after he
failed to appear in court in July and the hear-
ing was postponed to mid-September.

The woman said: “I wrote letters on top of
letters and it’s like my pleas don’t even mean
anything. It’s like Immigration doesn’t care.

“T feel as if my husband is the registered
voter and not me. I did everything and now I
get slapped in the face, as he was granted per-
manent residence after I sent every letter I
wrote.

“When I met with the director he told me I
am not the only one in these circumstances,
that he meets people like me every day, but
this is his job; if he can’t take the pressure he
needs to come out the kitchen!”

SEE page 16

BRANVILLE
MCCARTNEY

Ph: 325-3336

PHONE: 327-6464
td a

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Chavez: Venezuela
to strengthen its
ties with allies

CARACAS, Venezuela

PRESIDENT Hugo:
Chavez says Venezuela's }
ties with nations like Rus- }
sia and China have gained }
importance as the U.S. :
moves to expand its mili- }
tary presence in Latin :
America, according to }

Associated Press.

Chavez says there are }
now "much more signifi- :
cant reasons to accelerate }
cooperation plans with :

allied countries."

The USS. is negotiating :
an agreement with Colom- }
bia to use seven bases }
there for anti-drug opera- }
tions. Chavez calls the plan :
a threat to the region, but }
Colombian and USS. offi- }
cials say there is no reason }

for concern.

Chavez said Saturday he }
plans to visit Russia and }
the former Soviet repub- }
lic of Belarus within the }
next month. He added that :
Venezuela hopes to triple :
oil shipments to China }
over the next four years to }

1 million barrels a day.

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Government wants insurance
and fishermen

for farmers

GOVERNMENT wants
the produce of farmers and
fishermen insured in the
event of a hurricane. To
facilitate this, the Food and
Agriculture Organisation
(FAO) of the United
Nations has been designing
a plan for the Bahamas.

Last weekend, Charles
Stutley, risk insurer adviser
with the World Bank met
with farmers and fishermen
at the Gladstone Road Agri-
cultural Centre to apprise
them of the studies done.

Also participating in the
discussions were Director of
Agriculture Simeon Pinder,
and Simon Wilson of the
Ministry of Finance along
with representatives from
Abaco, Exuma, San Sal-
vador, Long Island,
Crooked Island, Grand
Bahama and Andros.

Traditionally government
gave out relief funds, “but
that has a certain affect

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FARMERS AND fishermen discussed product insurance with FAO adviser eee Stutley.

upon the budget,” noted
Agriculture and Marine
Resources Under Secretary
Philip Miller.

“We do not know in any
budget year if or when a
storm is coming and how
much damage it would
cause.”

In 2003, government
asked FAO for technical
assistance in coming up with
an insurance scheme for
crop damage during a storm.

Mr Stutley’s visit is the
third for an FAO represen-
tative on this matter.

“The Government wants
to institute a crop insurance
scheme for farmers and fish-
ermen,” said Mr Miller.
“For full coverage, we are
looking at situations where
farmers and fishermen will
not have to pay a burden-
some premium. The techni-
cians are looking at all the
options.”

A demand survey con-
ducted in 2006 showed that
most farmers were in favour
of insurance.

Letisha Henderson/BIS



FAO RISK insurer adviser Charles Stutley met with fishermen and farmers to discuss insurance.



“Something can be
done,” said Mr Miller. “We
live in a hurricane prone
zone. As the economy
develops, the damage done

in agriculture and fisheries
will also increase.

“Today persons are com-
ing up with big investments
in poultry and green house

farming. The question is
how can we come up with
an insurance that would
indemnify them against
damage.”

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US military denies role in Honduras coup flight

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras

THE U.S. military said Sunday its troops
in Honduras did not know of and played no
role in a flight that took ousted President
Manuel Zelaya to exile during a military coup,
according to Associated Press.

Zelaya says the Honduran military plane
that flew him to Costa Rica on June 28 stopped
to refuel at Soto Cano, a Honduran air base
that is home to 600 U.S. soldiers, sailors and
airmen engaged in counter-narcotics opera-
tions and other missions in Central America.

USS. forces at Soto Cano “were not involved
in the flight that carried President Zelaya to
Costa Rica on June 28,” Southern Command
spokesman Robert Appin said in an e-mail to
The Associated Press. The American troops
“had no knowledge or part in the decisions
made for the plane to land, refuel and take
off.”

Appin said the U.S. troops at Soto Cano
have stopped conducting exercises with the
Honduran military since the coup.

“The U.S. military recognizes that the situ-
ation must be resolved by Hondurans and
their democratic institutions in accordance
with the rule of law,” he said.

The administration of President Barack
Obama has cut off millions of dollars in mili-
tary and development aid to Honduras in
an effort to pressure for Zelaya’s reinstate-
ment.

It has stopped short of imposing trade sanc-
tions that could cripple the Honduran econo-
my, which is highly dependent on exports to
the United States.

Zelaya, a wealthy rancher who aligned him-
self with leftist Venezuelan President Hugo
Chavez during his presidency, has increasing-
ly voiced frustration with Washington for fail-
ing to impose tougher penalties.

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THE TRIBUNE

No Fi;
Commonwealth Conference

By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a
Consultant and former
Caribbean diplomat)

WHEN Commonwealth
Heads of Government
meet in Trinidad in
November, they might
have expected to welcome
back to their councils a
government of Fiji that
had been elected in March.
As it turns out, there will
be no Fiji in Trinidad.

If a contest was held to
choose a country with a
Culture of coup d’états,
the Pacific Island-State
would be a front runner.
There were two coups in
1987, a third in 2000 and a
fourth in December 2006.

Now, come September 1,
the 53-nation Common-
wealth (formerly the
British Commonwealth) is
expected to suspend Fiji
from its membership.

The suspension will
come after almost three
years of trying every diplo-
matic and negotiating
device to convince the mil-
itary government of Com-
modore Frank Bainimara-
ma to restore the country
to democratic rule.

A consistent figure in
the last two coups, Baini-
marama has shown a
remarkable failure to hon-
our commitments he gives
to the international com-
munity.

Fiji is made up of a
group of islands in the
Pacific and has a popula-
tion of 872,000 people con-
sisting of indigenous
Fijians, indigenous Rotu-
mans and Banabans, Indo-
Fijians, Chinese, Euro-
peans (mostly Australians
and New Zealanders) and
people of mixed race.

The 1987 coup and the
abrogation of the 1970
Constitution led to a new
Constitution in 1997 which
contained a social compact
among all the political par-
ties, provided for affirma-
tive action for indigenous
Fijians, gave indigenous
Fijians the majority of
communal seats in the
elected House of Assem-
bly and a near two thirds
majority in the appointed
Senate. It also provided for
shared governance and set-
tled tensions between the
indigenous Fijians and the
Indo-Fijians.

Bainimarama’s 2006
coup had nothing to do
with racial differences in
Fiji and much more to do
with controversies between
him and the then Prime
Minister, Laisinea Qarase,
who was threatening to
arrest Bainimarama and
others for their part in the
coup of 2000.

The Commonwealth has
patiently engaged Fiji since
the 2006 coup. The previ-
ous and current Common-
wealth Secretaries-Gener-
al, Don McKinnon and
Kamalesh Sharma, as well
as the organisation’s
watchdog body — the
Commonwealth Minister-
ial Action Group (CMAG)
— have engaged the mili-
tary regime and other
groups in Fiji to try to
restore democracy.

While the Common-
wealth did suspend Fiji
from the councils of the
Commonwealth after the
2006 coup, it did not sus-
pend it from membership
of the grouping.

Along with the Pacific
Islands Forum (Fiji and its
closest neighbours), the
United Nations and other
bodies, the Common-
wealth has been working
to persuade Bainimarama
to hold elections by March
this year — an undertaking
that he had given. But
March came and went, and
in April the government
abrogated the Constitu-
tion, further entrenched
authoritarian rule, cracked
down on freedom of
speech and assembly, and
undermined the judiciary
and legal system.

iji in

= ¥
f
—- r = ae =

WORLD VIEW.

Bainimarama also
scrapped the paramount
Fijian institution, the pres-
tigious Great Council of
Chiefs which selects the
President and Vice-Presi-
dent. It is widely believed
that he did so because the
Chiefs did not rally to him.
He also prevented the

dominant Methodist
Church from holding its
annual convention

demanding that it must
first be cleansed of politi-
cal clergymen.

Making matters worse,
Bainimarama issued a
“Strategic Framework for
Change,” which he
described as "the only path
to ensuring sustainable and
true democracy, the
removal of communal rep-
resentation and the imple-
mentation of equal suf-
frage based on common
and equal citizenry."
Under this plan, work will

nt

begin on a new Constitu-
tion in 2011 and elections
would not be held until
2014.

CMAG, which had
shown considerable
patience with the Fijian
regime up to that point,
finally decided enough was
enough. Among its nine
members is the Foreign
Minister of St Lucia, Rufus
Bousquet.

Together, the ministers,
meeting on July 31, gave
the Fijian regime until Sep-
tember 1 to “reactivate the
President's Political Dia-
logue Forum process, facil-
itated by the Common-
wealth and the United
Nations.”

The Group said it want-
ed the regime to “state its
firm commitment” to reac-
tivating the political dia-
logue “in writing” to the
Commonwealth Secretary-
General by September 1 or





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“Fiji will be fully suspend-
ed on that date.”

No one is holding their
breath that such a written
commitment will be forth-
coming from Bainimara-
ma.

His government has
already condemned Fiji’s
neighbours in the Pacific
Islands Forum for express-
ing, in early August, “their
deep concern for the peo-
ple of Fiji in the face of
Fiji’s deteriorating econo-
my as a consequence of the
military regime’s actions,
including the undermining

Sa



MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 7

of the private sector and
the negative effect on busi-
ness confidence in the
absence of the rule of
law.”

Seeking any opportuni-
ty to delay the Common-
wealth’s suspension of Fiji
from membership, he dis-
patched a letter on August
5th to the Commonwealth
Secretary-General request-
ing him “to facilitate a del-
egation from the Com-
monwealth to visit Fiji to
enter into direct dialogue
and consultations.”

The invitation can hard-
ly be taken seriously
against the background of
Bainimarama’s actions in
abrogating the constitu-
tion, imposing media con-
trols, restricting freedom
of assembly, and the ongo-
ing erosion of the judicial
and legal system.

It is even less credible in
the context of his complete
abandonment of the Presi-
dent's Political Dialogue
Forum which was promot-
ed by both the UN and the
Commonwealth.

It is clear that Baini-
marama’s invitation is not
in good faith and his game
is to do nothing more than

Trinidad for the

prolong still further a
process that has already
dragged on for almost
three years.

In this connection,
CMAG has no choice but
to suspend Fiji from mem-
bership of the Common-
wealth on September 1.

But, in the Common-
wealth way, that will not
be the end of the matter.
For as Secretary-General
Sharma told the Pacific
Forum meeting, “it will
remain my intent, on
behalf of all Common-
wealth members, to find
ways to remain engaged,
to promote dialogue with
the current government
there, and to promote dia-
logue between all the par-
ties in Fiji who collectively
hold the solution for the
future and without all of
whom a solution cannot be
sustainable”.

Suspension of Fiji after
almost three years of try-
ing to reason with the mil-
itary regime is necessary
punishment now; but
engagement is also neces-
sary to give back to all the
people of Fiji their right to
democracy, constitutional-
ity and the rule of law.

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Ministry must study the
sociology of education

YOUNG MAnN’s VIEW
N |}

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

THIS year, a cross-sec-
tion of students sitting the
national exams have once
again affirmed the infa-
mous and unsatisfactory,
almost predictable D
national average.

Although the disap-
pointing national average
reflects the mean grade of
all the students sitting the

ADRIA

BGCSE/BJC exams, we
must not, and should not,
allow these crummy grades
to cause us to forget to
highlight the good students
and their success stories,

| & s © IN



quality teachers and those
dedicated parents. They
have all earned praisewor-
thy results. Kudos to them!

Education is truly the
great equalizer but, if the

THE COMMITTEE TO PROTECT AND PRESERVE
THE BAHAMAS FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS

id stee) SY

PETITION 2009

“PETITION AGAINST THE RELOCATION OF THE
CONTAINER PORT TO ARAWAK CAY”

This Petition will be delivered to the Prime Minister and The Cabinet of
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas to register the opposition of the
Bahamian public to the relocation of the container port to Arawak Cay,
the extension of Arawak Cay and the resulting environmental and marine
damage to Saunders Beach and the suouading areas. Please print your
name clearly, sign where indicated and date. Thank you.

Please return this form to:

Samana Hill

No. 14 Village Road North

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tel.: 394.1823
Or

Chancery House

No. 21 Dowdeswell Street

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tel.: 356.6108




























saunders

ter
CaC



stakeholders in education
do not have an apprecia-
tion for or a grasp of 20th
century professor Emile
Durkheim’s sociology of
education, we should
expect to produce illiter-
ate and mathematically-
challenged graduates who
can barely take menial jobs
and to see more years of
failing grades.

Addressing the correla-
tion between society and
education, the sociology of
education promotes an
understanding of all levels
of the educational system,
looking at the extent to
which schools/universities
are socializing institutions
as well as the ways these
educational outlets impact
social mobility, social strat-
ification and adult socio-
economic success. The
sociology of education also
examines social stratifica-
tion processes — in and
out of schools — that play
a huge role in education,
for example, the noticeable
impact on the linguistic
skills of students attending
certain schools and from
certain homes in various
sectors of society.

Studying the sociology
of education would allow
the Ministry of Education
and educational stake-
holders to analytically
review how the current
curriculum can/cannot con-
tribute to the creation of
a modern, culturally-sound
society, as well as to better
understand the role of edu-
cation in fostering social
change.

As an educator, I have
discovered that students
possess a wide array of
multiple intelligences and
learning styles that span
the social spectrum,
although I find that many
students have a “bodily-
kinesthetic” learning
approach, which is usually
coupled with another
favoured learning style.

Frankly, many students

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fail the national exams
because they simply can-
not read! This must be cor-
rected from the elemen-
tary level on up to senior
high (even college) with an
increased focus on reading
comprehension in a child’s
formative years.

A new literacy approach
must be taken to improve
students’ abilities to read
and understand content by
also teaching them to
query reading materials.
This outlook would foster
discussion and heighten
students’ understanding of
texts while encouraging
them to make inferences.
Teacher and student dri-
ven queries, student-
teacher collaboration and
the establishment of lesson
goals for understanding —
by teachers — would
undoubtedly form the
framework of a new litera-
cy approach. Taking such
an approach would assist
students in constructing
meaning as learners—in
and out of a classroom.

In the Bahamas, the
readability of content must
be taken into account as it
has a direct affect upon
class cohesion and student
perception. More books
should be developed-
across the subject areas—
to correspond with the dif-
ferent grade levels and
teachers must know the
value of using more grade
appropriate material and
recognise the value of
guided learning, where
teachers build upon con-
structivist theories, inter-
vene and facilitate in
establishing student-driven
activities and probe or
comprehensively respond
to questions.

By now, the Depart-
ment of Education should
have learnt that cramming
too much into a textbook,
hiring unqualified teachers
and continuing to endorse
a flawed curriculum will
only continue to be an

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educational setback—
countrywide!

The AG’s office—

a clerk filing station!

“The AG’s office is dys-
functional and is nothing
more than a clerk filing
station.”

Those were the words
of Rev Glenroy Bethel in
October 2007 when he and
several families of mur-
dered victims on Grand
Bahama spoke out against
the inadequate functioning
of the Attorney General’s
office in Freeport.

At that time, Mr Bethel
asserted that the accused
killers were being released
on bail as a result of the
long delays by the AG’s
office, that there was no
Supreme Court judge to
hear criminal or civil mat-
ters in Freeport, that only
two of the four magis-
trate’s courts were func-
tioning, that there were no
permanent prosecutors sta-
tioned at the AG’s office
in Grand Bahama and that
62 per cent of persons in
prison were still awaiting
dates for criminal matters
to be brought before the
courts.

In the case of the
Bahamas legal system,
many of Mr Bethel’s con-
cerns continue to plague
our society and hinder
those seeking justice.

These days, there is a
need for at least 15 justices
to be appointed to the
Supreme Court to address
the case backlog. In the
1990s, the then govern-
ment brought in several
Australian judges to
reduce the number of cas-
es. While more Bahamians
should accept appoint-
ments to the court, if for-
eign judges must once
again be brought in, then
so be it.

The government must
seek to extend court hours
(night court) and appoint
persons outside of the legal
fraternity to judgeships in
order to ensure the timely
resolution of matters.

Why aren’t murder tri-
als completed within five
years? Why should appeals
take more than 18 months?
Whatever happened to the
case of my friend Chris
Brown, a Certified Public
Accountant, who was
viciously killed and burnt
in early 2006 after he had
taken a fare from the air-
port (he drove a taxi as a
hobby, paying homage to
his father, who was a taxi
driver)?

The entire legal process
for convicted murderers
should be completed with-
in five years, which would
allow for the death penal-
ty. The AG’s office needs
to ensure that cases are
being processed and also
apply a time-frame to each
case.

8” BLOCKS

9

4-51.
Cesspit - 00

328-8754



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS



r

4

Ree
real estate
today

Carmen Massoni

PAUSE FOR
THE PAWS

WITH millions of
dogs and cats as mem-
bers of local families,
there’s a good chance
that you’ve got pets
sharing the home you’re
trying to sell.

Since not everyone
enjoys the company of
animals, there are some
measures you should
consider taking before
prospective buyers come
over for a showing.

Pet odours are the
biggest problem sellers
face, but they can be
easily minimised with
thorough cleaning and
vacuuming, and vigilant
duty with the litter box-
es.

It also makes a good
impression if you pick
up and store toys, bed-
ding, and food and
water bowls while your
home is being shown to
buyers.

If at all possible, take
your dog(s) out with you
when an agent brings
clients, or ask a friend or
family member to keep
your pet(s) during the
initial listing period.

This will help reduce
the stress on your pet at
a time when showings
are usually more fre-
quent.



A

Minister: GB Post Office AC
problem being addressed

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - State Min-
ister for Finance Zhivargo
Laing toured the Post Office
Building here on Friday, and
assured employees that the
air-conditioning problem is
now being addressed by con-
tractors.

Mr Laing, minister of
finance with responsibility
for the Public Service, said
that a new AC unit has final-
ly arrived on the island, and
is in the possession of con-
tractors who are installing it
in one section first which will
provide relief to 50 per cent
of the building.

“Tt is a very large unit and
the plan is to install one part
now which will take a few
weeks,” he said.

Employees and customers
have had to endure unsatis-
factory conditions for more
than a year.

As a result of the heat and
lack of proper ventilation in
the building, a four-hour shift








Vandyke Hepburn/BIS

ZHIVARGO LAING



schedule was implemented
so that workers would not
have to spend the entire day
working in unfavourable
conditions.

Mr Laing explained that
the delay was due to the time
it took to get the unit on the
island.

“Clearly, the heat of the
summer presented a great
challenge and I want to
thank the staff for their

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patience in this situation,” he
said.

Bahamas Public Services
Union (BPSU) area vice
president John Curtis said
the conditions at the Post
Office have been very
unbearable for workers.

He has been agitating for
the past year for a new air
conditioning unit.

Mr Curtis described the
situation as “bordering on
being inhumane.” He noted
that it is a direct violation of
the industrial agreement,
which speaks to proper
working conditions.

“You cannot call this
proper working conditions
when it is 90 degrees on the
outside, but inside here it’s
125 degrees,” he said.

He said that employees
were fed up with the situa-
tion and brought the matter
to the union’s attention.

“We brought it to the
government’s attention and
we brought it to the post-
master general’s attention
and at that point we were
promised that within eight



THE Grand Bahama Port
Authority donated two new
Segways — two-wheeled,
self-balancing electronic
vehicles — to the Royal
Bahamas Police Force.

They were received by
Senior Assistant Commis-
sion of Police Marvin
Dames and will be used to
heighten police presence in
the downtown area.

SENIOR Assistant Commis-
sioner of Police Marvin Dames
and GBPA president lan Rolle
take the vehicles on a test run.

When you think of the average SUV on
the road today, you think of road-
hogging, air-polluting gas guzzlers
that wouldn’t know the meaning of
high precision and fuel efficiency if it
were emblazoned on their windshields.
But there is an alternative. The refined
M-Class from Mercedes-Benz.

weeks or somewhere there-
abouts, that the air condi-
tioning system will be sort-
ed out,” he said.

“They did an investigation
and we found out that the
entire system here needed to
be taken out.”

Mr Curtis said it was at
the time that the union was
able to negotiate with the
government on behalf of the
approximately 30 Post Office
employees to begin four hour
shifts to alleviate their dis-
comfort.

BIMINI BAY

RESORT AND MARINA

Only forty-eight nautical miles east of Miami, Florida, situated on the North end of North
Bimini, Bahamas - Bimini Bay Resort & Marina complex rests on over 740 acres of pristine
Bahamian beaches. Long known as a paradise for anglers and divers alike, Bimini
Bay Resort offers a plethora of options for the most discriminating traveller. Bimini Bay
Management Ltd. owns and operates Bimini Bay Resort & Marina.



Bimini Bay Resort & Marina seeks to hire a professional
individual for the following position:

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

MARINA -

Requirements:
. Licensed Boat Captain

MARKETING

. Eight to Twelve years experience in Marina Yacht
management with "mega yacht" clientele.

. Proven success in the organization and operation of fishing
tournaments, regattas and marina social events

. Proven experience in building out marina facilities

. Proven success in Marketing relating to potential purchase

of slips or berths

. Proven track record in providing training for concierge

service to yachts

. Ability to speak Spanish as a second language

We offer an excellent benefits package and competitive
compensation. For full consideration, all interested applicants
should forward a copy of their resumé to the attention of

DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES

AND TRAINING
at jobs@biminibayresort.com or fax to (242} 347.2312.

The Mercedes M-Class.
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PAGE 10, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Mexico replaces

customs inspectors 2
with agents to fight :

children in the performing arts

MEXICO has replaced all 700 }
of its customs inspectors with }
agents newly trained to fight drug ;
smuggling, according to Associ- }

drug smuggling

MEXICO CITY

ated Press.

The government has sent sol- }
diers to airports and border cross- }
ings across the country to take }
back the guns issued to the }

inspectors.

Tax Administration Service }
spokesman Pedro Canabal says }
the officers were not fired. }
Instead, the agency decided not :
to rehire them when their con- }
tracts expired over the weekend. }
They were replaced with 1,400 }
newly hired agents who have }
undergone months of training }
and background checks to ensure

they have no criminal records.

Canabal spoke Sunday to The i

Associated Press.

Ohama official says
govt insurance plan
hot essential to

health care overhaul

WASHINGTON

BOWING to Republican pres- :
sure and an uneasy public, Pres- }
ident Barack Obama’s adminis- }
tration signaled Sunday it is ready }
to abandon the idea of giving}
Americans the option of govern- }
ment-run insurance as part of a :
new health care system, accord- }

ing to Associated Press.

Facing mounting opposition
to the overhaul, administration }
officials left open the chance for a
compromise with Republicans }
that would include health insur- :
ance cooperatives instead of ai
government-run plan. Such ai
concession probably would
enrage Obama’s liberal support- }
ers but could deliver a much-
needed victory on a top domestic i
priority opposed by GOP law- }

makers.

Officials from both political i
parties reached across the aisle }
in an effort to find compromises }
on proposals they left behind :
when they returned to their dis- }
tricts for an August recess. Oba- }
ma had wanted the government }
to run a health insurance orga- }
nization to help cover the nation’s }
almost 50 million uninsured, but }
didn’t include it as one of his core

principles of reform.

By ERIC ROSE

BAHAMIAN students
from four islands have
received grants from the
Adisa Foundation for their
outstanding achievements
in various fields of the per-
forming Arts.

Minister of State for Cul-
ture in the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture
Charles Maynard joined
Adisa Foundation founder
and director Mrs Patricia
Bazard and acting Direc-
tor of Culture Eddie
Dames in recognising the
young performers on
August 10.

“It makes me feel proud
that there is talent through-
out this country,” Minister
Maynard said.

“Tam quite pleased with
the growth of the cultural
community in terms of its
young people and how they
are expressing themselves.”

The Adisa Foundation,
in conjunction with the
Bahamas National Chil-
dren’s Choir, presented the
first annual Outstanding
Children in the Arts Chil-
dren’s Ball, on April 18.

The awards programme
acknowledges, celebrates
and rewards the contribu-
tions of children to the
artistic culture of The
Bahamas.

The competition is open
to children from pre-school
to high school and prizes
include scholarship grants
for the winners in each cat-
egory.

Adisa is a Ghanaian
word meaning “a child
shall lead them.”

The awards presentation
is a continuation of the
Ministry’s annual E
Clement Bethel National
Arts Festival. Many of the
students nominated and
winning the awards were
in the Festival. Their per-

LOCAL NEWS

Grants presented to outstanding

formances led to their
nominations for the Adisa
award by their schools.

“The grants came from
the Adisa Foundation,”
Minister Maynard said.
“We simply supported
them logistically and
morally.

“We love that kind of
support, when we are able
to help those who want to
do good in the community
without having to find
funding, as funding is
always hard to find.”

Winning in the Music
Category were Freeport
Primary School student
Berlicia Saunders, Lyford
Cay International School
junior high student
Bernard Farquharson and
St Andrews School former
senior Benjamin Pinder.

In the Drama Category,
North Long Island High
School junior Quenton
Smith and Faith Temple
Christian Academy former
senior Elan JoLee
Hutchinson received the
top awards.

St John’s College former
senior Simone Davis, won

BIMINI BAY

RESORT AND MARINA

Only forty-eight nautical miles east of Miami, Florida, situated on the North end of North Bimini,
Bahamas - Bimini Bay Resort & Marina complex rests on over 740 acres of pristine Bahamian
beaches. Long known as a paradise for anglers and divers alike, Bimini Bay Resort offers a
plethora of options for the most discriminating traveller. Bimini Bay Management Ltd. owns and

AREER OPP

Bimini Bay Resort & Marina seeks to hire qualified professionals
for the following positions:



operates Bimini Bay Resort & Marina.

A

IT MANAGER

ORTUNITIES

Responsible for the ongoing maintenance and operation for all of the Information
Technology implemented within the assigned Hotel. The position is responsible for the
daily operation, support, and security of the technology and data that support and
enable the business operation.





MINISTER OF
STATE for Culture
Charles Maynard
presents North
Long Island High
School student
and dramatist
Quenton Smith his
awarded from the
Adisa Foundation
for his outstanding
achievement in the
Performing Arts.
Pictured from left
are Acting Director
of Culture Eddie
Dames, Smith,
Minister Maynard,
and Adisa Founda-
tion founder and
director Patricia
Bazard.

Kristaan Ingraham/BIS

alll

MINISTER OF STATE for Culture Maynard presented Lyford Cay International School student and pianist
Bernard Farquharson one of the grants awarded from the Adisa Foundation for his outstanding achieve-
ment in the Performing Arts. Pictured from left are Acting Director of Culture Eddie Dames, Farquharson,
Minister Maynard, and Adisa Foundation founder and Director Mrs Patricia Bazard.

in the Dance Category.
Senior winners received
a $1,000 grant and juniors
and primary school stu-
dents received $750 and
$500 respectively.
“All of the winners here

are certainly to be con-
gratulated,” Mr Dames
said. “I am particularly
pleased that we can see
winners coming out of the
Family Islands. We can see
that the cultural pro-

grammes are not Nassau-
centric and we have a wide
pool of talent.”

Minister Maynard com-
mended Mrs Bazard’s
“passion an compassion”
for the students.

Princess Margaret Hospital

ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

PUBLIC
NOTICE!

IN AN EFFORT TO IMPROVE OUR PATIENT
SERVICES AT THE PRINCESS MARGARET

HOSPITAL.

WE WILL

UNDERGO

RENOVATIONS TO THE ENTRANCE AND
TRIAGE AREA OF THE ACCIDENT &
EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT.v

WE ASK THAT PERSONS VISITING THE

DEPARTMENT

ENTER THROUGH

THE

PHARMACY DEPARTMENT ENTRANCE AND

CONTINUE ONWARD THROUGH THE
ENTRANCE OF THE ORTHOPEDIC CLINIC.

Desired Requirements Of Proficiency:

Work experience in the Resort Industry
Bachelor degree/diploma in related field.
Call Account Jazz

Phone Switch Nortel

Micros

PMS — Opera

FOOD AND BEVERAGE DIRECTOR

Oversee the function of all food and beverage outlets to ensure excellent customer
service and maximize revenue and profits. Develop, implement and maintain quality
standards for outlets, including supervision and direction of service staff. Ensure
excellent customer service. Work with the individual outlet managers concerning food
and beverage quality, service, cleanliness, merchandizing and promotions.

* Proven success in the management of multiple restaurant outlets and functions

* Minimum of 5 years overseas work experience

* Minimum of 5 years resort management experience

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER

Major areas of responsibility/ management include, but are not limited to, employment,
wage and salary administration, benefits, training, employee/labor relations,
organizational development and payroll. Work closely with Human Resources Director
in implementing, achieving and maintaining the resorts goals and objectives.

MANAGEMENT APOLOGIZES
INCONVENIENCE CAUSED AND ASK THAT

FOR ANY

THE PUBLIC COOPERATE WITH
THIS TIME.

US DURING

SIGNED: MANAGEMENT

We offer an excellent benefits package and competitive compensation. For full
consideration, all interested applicants should forward a copy of their resumé to the

attention of DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING
at jobs@biminibayresort.com or fax to (242) 347.2312.





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 11



Four hour

power cut
inNew
Provitlence

FROM page one

caused the power genera-
tors to trip.

The power went out
across New Providence
from around 7.30pm. Traf-
fic lights stopped working
on Nassau’s main roads
and street lights failed to
turn on as dusk settled into
night and the city fell dark.

Downtown Nassau,
inner city communities,
and neighbourhoods in
eastern New Providence,
Cable Beach, and Paradise
Island were without power
for up to four hours as the
last areas to regain power
did so at around 11.30pm,
Mr Neymour said.

Guests at the Miss Uni-
verse VIP party for
pageant contestants, select
Atlantis visitors and
Bahamians, fell silent when
the lights and music sud-
denly stopped at the pres-
tigious event, and the
crowd fell quiet for a few
moments before the hotel’s
generators kicked in.

Officials at BEC failed
to issue a public notice to
explain the reason for the
power outage over the
weekend, but yesterday Mr
Neymour explained the
reason for the fault.

He said: “There was a
fault in a voltage trans-
former in the Big Pond
area, a 33 kilowatt cable
had faulted and it caused
the generators to trip,
which resulted in a loss of
supply for the majority of
the island at around
7.30pm on Friday.

“They began their reme-
dial procedure to restart
the generator and from
around 8.30pm services
were being put back into
place, and that was not
completed until around
11.30 on Friday night.

“Tt did not affect all of
New Providence, because
I understand there were
some locations where ser-
vices were not lost, but it
was the vast majority of the
island.”

The minister of state
added: “Of course we are
apologetic for this, but it
was a situation where
equipment faulted and we
couldn’t have predicted it.

“All equipment faults at
some time or other, but
this could not have been
foreseen.”

o.

Desmond Eee

LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

go,” said the source.

Meantime, Attorney General Michael
Barnett is expected to step up as the next
chief justice when Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham returns from vacation in the
next week.

According to unconfirmed reports,
senior partner at McKinney, Bancroft and
Hughes Brian Moree is said to be a top
choice for his replacement.

However, one political observer for the
opposition commented that if Mr Ingra-
ham were to select a successor from his
current complement of ministers, either

Education Minister Carl Bethel or For-
eign Affairs Minister Brent Symonette
would be suitable choices.

“T always thought Carl Bethel who had
served as the attorney general before
would get the job again. (The Cabinet
ministers) who’ve been attorney generals
before are (Foreign Affairs Minister)
Brent Symonette and Carl Bethel so it’s an
easy fit for one of them to take it back
again,” the observer, who did not want to
be identified, speculated.

As for the rumours surrounding the pos-
sible reassignment of Mr Neymour’s port-
folio, the junior environment minister said
any move in that direction would be news

Cabinet set for shuffle?

to him.

“The prime minister has not spoken to
me, as of today, on that matter. And so I’m
not aware of that,” he told The Tribune
yesterday.

When asked if he were happy in his post
or if he would welcome a re-assignment,
he said: “I am happy serving as a minister
in the Cabinet of the prime minister — I
serve at his liberty and the reason I’m in
politics is to be of service to the Bahamian
people, so it is not a matter of what I like,
it’s a matter of serving the Bahamian peo-
ple that is most important to me.”

Attempts to reach Mr Bannister for
comment were unsuccessful yesterday.



Hurricane could hit the

FROM page one

Tropical Storm Bill was expected
to strengthen into a category one hur-
ricane by this morning, and as it con-
tinues to move westard it is likely to
build to a category two hurricane by
Wednesday, and a category three
storm by Friday, forecasters predict.

Bill is currently projected to pass
north east of the Bahamas on Friday,
but as the storm is still around 2,000
miles from the Bahamas, Mr Dean
said it is too early to tell whether the
hurricane will be a threat.

The storm is just one of three sur-
rounding the Bahamas this week, as
Tropical Storm Claudette passed into
northwest Florida last night and this
morning, and Tropical Storm Ana

FROM page one

tunately revealed a deep seated
belief that women are still prop-
erty” in the Bahamas.

“In my opinion I don’t think
the government needs a con-
sensus to approve this law,” Mr
Brennen said.

“My view is this — going to
a referendum or trying to get
a consensus is belittling women.

“Saying the law should not
be passed is like saying, ‘Should
we have a law to say a man
shouldn’t kill a woman?’ It
doesn’t make sense.”

Marriage and family
therapist: govt must
pass marital rape law

He objects to the idea that
the law will pave the way for
“vindictive women” to punish
their husbands for unrelated
misdemeanours by accusing
them of rape before the courts.

“Tt is so difficult to prove
rape, even stranger rape, that it
would appear under the cur-
rent law unless there is batter-

edges closer to the Dominican Repub-
lic in the southeast.

Mr Dean said: “Bill is more of a
concern because a sharp northward
curvature would put it parallel to us,
but it is way too early to say.

“Tt is around 1,500 miles east of the
Lesser Antilles now, and that is
around 1,000 miles from us, so by
Wednesday or Thursday we will be in
a much better position to say whether
it will be a threat to the Bahamas.”

The path currently projected for
Bill shows the storm will pass north of
the Bahamas over the Atlantic on Fri-
day, but a change of course could put
the country at risk.

Tropical Storm Bill follows Tropical
Storm Ana, which weakened to a
Tropical Depression as it approached

police said.

According to reports, a
group of nearby workers saw
her fall but could not rescue
her because of the rough seas.

Mr Brennen said he is forced
to ask opponents to the law to
articulate the difference
between a rape of a woman to
whom a man is not married,
and a man raping his wife.

He said: “It’s the same pain
being inflicted. If you argue this
law should not go ahead, you
may as well argue that if a man
kills his wife he should not be
charged with murder.”

The therapist said he has
been shocked by the reaction
to the proposed law, which was
tabled as a Bill before parlia-
ment last month, but has yet to
be debated.

ing the person can’t be charged
with rape,” Mr Brennen said.

The therapist described the
marital rape law issue as one
that requires intelligence, but
is led by emotion.

“It’s going to take a while
to educate the public, but in my
opinion the government does
not need a consensus to
approve this law,” he said.

In many cases, the therapist
said, religious groups are “twist-
ing” scripture to justify a man
forcing sex with his wife.

“They are misusing scrip-
ture. They want to brain wash
those who are ignorant,” he
said.

Hispaniola last night.

Tropical Storm warnings were
issued for the Dominican Republic
last night as Ana was expected to
bring Tropical Storm conditions today
and tomorrow.

Ana’s maximum sustained winds
were around 35 mph last night, with
higher gusts, and was expected to pour
two to four inches of rain over the
Leeward Islands, including Puerto
Rico and the US and British Virgin
Islands, with isolated rainfall of up to
six inches over mountainous terrain.

Ana is moving west at around 23
mph, and a turn west-northwest is
expected today. The Depression was
set to cross the northern Leeward
Islands last night and enter the north-
eastern Caribbean Sea on Monday.

FROM page one Young mother

Pier area on Friday evening.
The pair was reportedly
sightseeing near an old dock
opposite the BEC power sta-
tion around 7 pm when at
some point Ms Johnson
walked over the edge and fell,

the water.

Evans.

Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans said Emergency
Medical Services responded,
along with Royal Bahamas
Defence Force officers who
pulled her lifeless body from

“It is believed that she
drowned; an autopsy is to be
performed to confirm the
cause of death,” said ASP

Bahamas by end of week

Mr Dean said: “Most of the track is
keeping it slightly south of the islands
and fortunately it should be good news
for us if it continues to Hispaniola and
Cuba.”

Meanwhile Tropical Storm
Claudette was due to pass over north-
west Florida and southern Alabama
last night and today, moving north-
west at 14 mph, bringing heavy rains
and sustained winds of 35mph with
higher gusts.

Flash flooding was the biggest fear
for the states as three to five inches of
rain were predicted, with isolated max-
imum amounts of 10 inches.

To follow the progress of the storms
log on to www.nhc.noaa.gov for regu-
lar updates or
www.tribune242.com/weather.












































Around 9 pm Friday, police
received information that the
motionless body of a man was
seen in the water at the east-
ern end of Potters Cay Dock.

The body of 46-year-old
Williams Lane resident Edwin
Smith was retrieved and
responding EMS personnel
pronounced him dead at the
scene.

Police suspect that Mr
Smith drowned, however, an
autopsy will be performed to
confirm his cause of death.

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS

Four young Bahamians qualify for the
International Jr Sunfish Championships

FIFTEEN-year-old Christopher
Sands battled high winds, white caps
in Montagu Bay and 13 determined
competitors to come out on top in
this year’s Junior Sunfish Nationals.

He as well as Donico Brown,
Michael Holowesko and Michael
Gibson who placed 2nd and 3rd and
4th at the end of the two days of
intense racing, not only won brag-
ging rights, but the four coveted
spots at the International Junior
Sunfish Championships being held in
Nassau in October.

“This was a tough win as it was
really windy and there was strong
competition out on the water. It felt
really good though knowing that all
the time I’ve put in the boat paid
off,” said Sands. Having won a berth
in the international competition, he
says he now intends to increase his
training to four times a week.

The youngsters, who ranged in age
from 11 to 18 dealt with choppy seas
and strong winds, which made racing
even more of a challenge. In fact,
organisers anticipated the weather
conditions would have impacted fin-
ish times and even their ability to
remain in the water, but say the
young sailors handled themselves
with impressive strength and ability.

Sands attributes his win in part to
the weather conditions, saying the
race became as much about fitness
and strength as it was about sailing

skills.

“It’s astounding just how far these
kids have come. Their boat handling
and their ability to deal with consis-
tent 18-21 knot winds was really
impressive,” said Chairman of the
race committee Jimmy Lowe, him-
self a veteran sailor, “Based on what
we saw today, I think we can expect
our team to turn in really respectable
performances at the International
championships in October.”

The International Junior Sunfish
Championships will be held in the
Bahamas on October 15-17 when 20
of the world’s top junior sailors are
expected to compete.

Immediately following that, for
the first time since 1995, the
Bahamas Sailing Association and
the Nassau Yacht Club will host the



ABOVE, TOP LEFT — Young Bahamians battled strong winds and rough seas to
compete in the Junior Sunfish Nationals this weekend...

—_— all THERON MAILLIS (left) and Eddie
—_ Williams placed 7th overall in the
—— = Junior Sunfish Nationals...









Photes by Lori Lowe

“5 2009 Sunfish World Championships

a from October 16-24. Earlier this
summer, 15 Bahamians qualified for
that major event and will be among
72 boats competing for the top place.

“It’s quite a major event for the
Bahamas to be hosting both of these
races back to back. We’ve been
lucky that companies like Pictet
Bank & Trust, Nestle and Atlantis
have stepped up to help make this
possible. And the Ministry of
Tourism came forward with a unique
sail design to help promote the
Bahamas,” said Paul Hutton, Regat-
ta Chairman.

The Bahamas has enjoyed much
success over the years in Sunfish sail-
ing, winning the World Champi-
onships five times. Donnie Martin-
borough, the Bahamas’ top finisher
in this year’s Bahamas Nationals, is

BIANCA WAGNER, shown above with teammate Donovan Williamson, was the only a three time Sunfish World Cham-
girl to compete in this weekend’s Junior Sunfish Nationals. The team placed 8th pion, with top place finishes in 1983,

overall.

Ind again in 1988.

GOVERNMEN T NOTICE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

TENDER FOR SCHOOL / FACILITY
SECURITY SERVICES

ee OL a AST

ey eves

. A = SEU

ecu ee sy 4

Sasa Includes COnCE aur es by

3 Siete | es eS ME

ye Prophetic Voices,

*)st Barnabe SU Sel

eT: uc

on Jie, ROS Rnd

Ou ily Peis g

Holy,.C os ee Ministry
af, Dance oii)

SDPNC eye

WLR Ta ery

dmore....

ays

SUE pal Uk

Soe

afl i Li a
sah Wt

For you have been born again, not of perishable seed, but of imperishable,
through the living and enduring word of God.
ges

1.The Ministry of Education invites sealed bids from eligible qualified
firms for the provision of security services at the following schools/facility
in New Providence:

| No. | ScHooL/Facuty _| ESTIMATEDCOST
| 1 ~—si|_~—sThelmaGibson Primary _| $95,000.00 ~—sCd
[2 | _A.F.Adderley Jurior igh | $96,000.00
[3 | 6-H Reeves Junior High —| $96,000.00
[4 | #0. Nash Junior igh |_$96,00000
[5 | LW. Young Junior High | $96,00000
[6 | 6.6. Sweeting Senior Figh | $89,000.00
[8 | _G-R. Waker Senior High | $96,000.00
[3 [6 Bate! Senior High | $96,000.00

| 10 ~~ | Government High $89,000.00
| 11 | RM. Bailey Senior High $89,000.00

= Learning Resources Section | $92,000.00

2. Assessment of bids will be conducted by the Tenders Board utilizing established
procedures.

. Interested eligible qualified firms may receive Tender Documents from the Security
Headquarters located Claridge Road beginning Monday 17th August, 2009 between the
hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

. No firm/company will be eligible to be awarded more than one contract.

. All bids must be accompanied by copies of a valid Business Licence, and evidence of
payment of National Insurance.

. Bids must be enclosed in a plain sealed envelope bearing no identification of the bidder,
and must be clearly marked across the top “Bid for Security Services (Name of School)
- MOE”.

. All bids must be delivered to the Office of the Financial Secretary, Cecil Wallace-
Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, Bahamas, no later than 5.00 p.m. on Monday, 24th
August, 2009.

. Bids will be opened at 10.30 a.m. on Tuesday, 25th August, 2009 at the Ministry of
Finance, Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, Bahamas. Tenderers or their
designated representative are invited to attend the openings.

. The Ministry of Education reserves the right to reject any or all bid submissions.

Signed:
Elma I. Garraway (Mrs.)
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Education





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS





ADRIAN GRIFFITH of the Bahamas and Germany's Tobias Unger compete in the 100m first round heat on Saturday...

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — It
hasn't been the start to the
TAAF's 12th World Champi-
onships in Athletics that the
Bahamian delegation had
anticipated on day one Satur-
day.

But the results on Sunday
helped make the journey
through the next seven days a
little more interesting to look
forward to at the national sta-
dium that legendary Jesse
Owens ruled the men's sprints
at the 1936 Olympic Games.

Derrick Atkins, the 11th
World Championships’ 100
metres silver medallist from
Osaka, Japan, was surprising-
ly ousted from the first round
of the century in the opening
session on Saturday and quar-
ter-miler Christine Amertil
was disqualified for stepping
on the line twice in the first
round of the women's 400.

To add to the problems the
team officials, headed by man-
ager Ralph McKinney, con-
tinue to deal with the issue of
Osbourne 'Ozzie' Moxey not
been included in the men's
long jump after the IAAF
ruled that his victory at the
Central American and
Caribbean Championships
could not be accepted as the
area championship.

Amertil, who will celebrate
her 30th birthday on Tuesday,
was said to have stepped out
of her lane at both around the
200 metres mark. But Amertil
said she would know if she
had stepped on the line and it
was devastating that she was
charged with the DQ.

"Iam saddened by this
decision of course because a
lot of work is put into getting
to this level of competition
and it can be heart wrenching
to go from the joy of moving
on to the next round to being
told you no longer get to go
without any clear or solid indi-
cation as to why," she said.

"Mentally, I was very frus-
trated and upset but I have
other races to run and team-
mates who need me to be at
my best so I am at the stage
where I am refocused on
those races that matter now."

Immediately after the post-
ing of the DQ, McKinney said
he and the Bahamian coach-
ing staff, headed by Tyrone
Burrows, filed an appeal and
they spent more than two
hours trying to get a successful
resolve.

"They allowed us to look
at the video taping, but on the
first occasion, it was not con-
clusive,” McKinney said. "On
the second one, it was also not
conclusive.

"We then went to the jury
complaint and they said they
took the word of the ITO,
who said she was flagged for
touching the lane with her left



(AP Photo: Michael Sohn)

e Atkins ousted from first round of century
¢ Amertil disqualified for stepping on line twice
¢ Moxey not included in long jump as
IAAF rules his victory at CAC Games could
not be accepted as area championship

foot."

McKinney said they had
nothing else to do but to
inform Amertil about the
decision.

The news came right after
Atkins turned in one of the
most disappointing perfor-
mances so far at the champi-
onships.

Battling back from a semi-
final exit at the Olympic
Games in Beijing, China last
year, Atkins could run no
faster than 10.44 seconds for
fifth place in the third of 12
heats.

"That was very very dis-
turbing, most definitely, we
expected Derrick to go
through minimum semifinal,
but if your A game isn't on
you face the consequences,”
McKinney said.

Atkins, the national sprint
champion who has been run-
ning a series of 100 and 200s
this year, finished 43rd overall
out of a field of 92 competi-
tors.

Three other competitors

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with slower times advanced
to the second round by virtue
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their respective heats.

Adrian Griffith, runner-up
at the Nationals, also
advanced after his third place
finish in heat five in 10.37 for
30th overall.

His heat was won by
Antigua's Daniel Bailey in
10.26.

Competing in his first major
competition, Griffith fell shy
of advancing to yesterday's
semifinal with a fifth place in
10.28 in the fourth of five sec-
ond round heat won by
American Tyson Gay in the
second fastest qualifying time
of 9.98.

Griffith was 28th overall out
of a field of 30 competitors.

As for Moxey, McKinney
said they have exhausted all
avenues in trying to appeal
the IAAF's decision not to
accept the national and CAC
champion in the men's long
jump that will be contested

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on Wednesday.

"We've been to 3-4 appeals
to get him in the meet,” McK-
inney said.

"But they are taking the
long jumper from the Domini-
can Republic, who won the
NACAC in 2007."

According to McKinney,
the qualifying period is from
January 2008 to August 1. But
because there was no
NACAC since 2007, they are
using that as the area champi-
onships, as opposed to the
CAC that was held in July in
Cuba.

Despite not being allowed
to compete, McKinney said
Moxey will remain here with
the team.

On day two yesterday,
McKinney reported that they
were quite pleased with the
fact that all three female
sprinters performed as expect-
ed in the first two rounds of
the 100, as well as Olympic
bronze medallist Leevan
‘Superman’ Sands in the
men's triple jump.

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IAAF's 12th World Championships in Athletics...

Bolt shatters
100m world
record

By PAT GRAHAM
AP Sports Writer

BERLIN (AP) — Usain
Bolt crossed the finish line,
saw his record-setting time
on the clock and spread his
arms as if he were soaring
like a bird.

About all this guy can't do
is fly. And by saving his cel-
ebration until after the finish
line this time, he showed
how fast a man really can go
on two feet.

The Jamaican shattered
the world record again Sun-
day, running 100 meters in
9.58 seconds at the world
championships to turn his
much-anticipated race
against Tyson Gay into a
one-man show.

That was 0.11 seconds
faster than the mark he set
last year at the Beijing
Olympics — the biggest
improvement in the 100-
meter record since electron-
ic timing began in 1968.

Gay, his closest rival,
broke the American mark
with his 9.71 performance
and still looked like he was
jogging — finishing a few
big strides behind Bolt in
second place.

Bolt's only competition
these days is the clock.

And when he's really try-
ing, not hot-dogging it over



BOLT celebrates after the race...
(AP Photo: David J Phillip)

the line the way he did in
China, even time itself does-
n't stand a chance.

"T don't run for world
records," said Bolt, who
crossed the line with a slight
breeze at his back.

Yet those records always
seem to find him.

He thinks he can go even
lower.

"T know I said 9.4," Bolt
said, grinning. "You never
know. I'll just keep on work-
ing.”

Last summer at Beijing,
Bolt shut his race down ear-
ly, waving his arms and cele-
brating about 10 meters
before he got to the line.

Some, like Jacques Rogge
of the International Olympic
Committee, viewed it as a
sign of bad sportsmanship.
Most saw it as a welcome
sigh of relief for a sport that
needed some good news
after years of doping and
scandal.
















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PAGE 14, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

SPORTS

‘Superman’ advances
to triple jump final

Vick
say
he cried
in prison

NEW YORK (AP) —
Michael Vick says he
cried in prison because
of the guilt he felt about
being involved in dog-
fighting.

In an interview with
"60 Minutes” that aired
Sunday night, Vick said
the day he walked into
prison he realized "the
magnitude of the deci-
sions that I made.

"And, you know, it's
no way of, you know,
explaining, you know,
the hurt and the guilt
that I felt. And that was
the reason I cried so
many nights. And that
put it all into perspec-
tive," he said.

A three-time Pro Bowl
pick during six seasons
with the Atlanta Falcons,
Vick served 18 months in
federal prison for run-
ning a dogfighting ring
and was reinstated last
month by the NFL after
being out of action since
2006.

He signed with the
Philadelphia Eagles on
Thursday.

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — What's the
best way to celebrate your 28th birth-
day? Just ask Olympic bronze medal-
list Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands.

Competing in the qualifying round
of the men's triple jump yesterday at
the Olympic Stadium, Sands advanced
to Tuesday's final at 12:05 pm ET with
a season's best of 17.20 metres or 56-
feet, 5 1/4-inches.

That placed him second in Group A
and fourth overall in a field of 45 com-
petitors.

"That's my birthday present. I
couldn't really feel it because it was
my birthday,” said Sands, who had to
wait for his third and final attempt to
produce his best mark in the compe-
tition. "I just had to make the final.”

With his wife, Danielle and son,
Leevan III, in the stands along with his
coach Henry Rolle and his agent,
Sands said he got all the motivation
and inspiration he needed yesterday.

As the fourth jumper to compete,
Sands opened with a leap of 17.02 (55-
10 1/4) to put him in second place
behind Phillips Idowu of Great
Britain, who opened with 17.10 (56-1
1/4).

On his second attempt, Sands did
16.84 (55-3) to remain in second, while
Idowu turned in his best mark in the
competition of 17.32 (56-10).

With nobody near him in their
group, Sands then produced his best of
17.20 (56-5 1/4), improving on his pre-
vious season's best of 17.14 (56-2 3/4)
that did at the BAAA Nationals in

fATDI |
Powell



LEEVAN SANDS has advanced to Tuesday's final...
(FILE phote)

THE TRIBUNE

Places second in group, fourth
overall out of 45 competitors

June at the Thomas A. Robinson
Track and Field Stadium.

Finishing third in their group was
Cuban Arnie David Girat with 17.15
(56-3 1/4) on his third and final jump.

"To make the finals with a season's
best, I can't complain about that,” he
said. "I just want to thank God for
allowing me to perform the way I did
today."

He also thanked all the Bahamian
people who supported him, including
the Walnut Street crew in Pinewood
Gardens where he reside when he's
in town with his parents, Leevan and
Elaine Sands.

As for the birthday celebrations,
Sands said he will really enjoy it on
August 18 when he wins his medal.

"I think I can do at least 17.50
because the jump I didn't even fin-
ish,” Sands reflected. "I just stepped
down quick.

"But I think as long as I execute
my phase, I could jump 17.50 or bet-
ter. That should definitely get me a
medal.”

To go along with the Olympic
bronze he won last year, Sands has
also won a bronze at the 17th Com-
monwealth Games in Manchester,
England and the bronze at the 9th
World's in Paris Saint-Denis, France in
2003.



ASAFA POWELL (left) and Derrick Atkins of the Bahamas compete in the 100m first round heat during the World Athletics Championships in Berlin on Saturday...

(AP Photo: Anja Niedringhaus)

‘I don’t know what to Say.

Derrick Atkins reflects on his performance



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — This will be a
performance that Derrick Atkins would
like to quickly erase from his memories,
while Adrian Griffith staked his claim for
future appearances at the World Champi-
onships.

Unable to duplicate the form that pro-
duced the silver medal at the 11th IAAF
World Championships in Athletics in Osa-
ka, Japan last year, Atkins sent shock
waves through the Olympic Stadium when
he failed to advance from the first round of
the men’s 100 on Saturday's opening ses-
sion.

"IT don't know what to say,” said Atkins,
who was simply lost for words after his
time of 10.44 seconds was only good
enough for fifth place as he finished 43rd
out of a field of 92 competitors.

Running out of lane two next to
Jamaican Asafa Powell in lane three,
Atkins got left in the blocks and was nev-
er able to make a dent in the pack ahead of

Adrian Griffith stakes his claim for future
appearances at the World Championships

him. He admitted that while he had Powell
to gauge his race, he was trying to concen-
trate on the whole field.

Powell, who faded to the bronze in Osa-
ka behind Atkins and American champion
Tyson Gay, noted that he was watching
Atkins and after leading for the majority of
the race, he was caught and passed with
about 20 metres left and finished third
again in 10.38.

Martial Mbandjock of France stormed
back to win the heat in 10.28.

While Atkins was experiencing his prob-
lems, Griffith was enjoying his experience.

In heat five, Griffith clocked 10.37 for
third place to qualify in 30th overall. The

heat was won by Antigua's Daniel Bailey
in 10.26.

"Tt was quite cold this morning, so I just
had to get my mind and my body right,” he
said.

When asked if he saw Atkins and his
performance, Griffith said "No, I wasn't
interested in Derrick. I was concerned
about my race. Right now, this is my first
World Championships and I don't have
any time to worry about him.”

Not pressured or intimidated at all about
running with the big stars on the world
stage for the first time, Griffith came back
in the second round or the quarter-finals
and, except for a shaky start, was able to

maintain his composure for fifth in the
fourth of five heats in 10.28, which placed
him 28th out of 34, but not good enough to
make the elite 16.

"T kind of struggled at the beginning and
Thad to turn it up a notch at the end,” he
said. "I just didn't panic. I worked hard to
get back into the race. So I’m happy with
what I did. I was consistent this year."

With so much history in the stadium
going back to the 1932 Olympics when
Jesse Owens dominated the sprints, Grif-
fith said he was just delighted that he got a
chance to display his skills.

"Now I can really look ahead to the
future," he insisted.



THE TRIBUNE PAGE 15

r

Bolt shatters

100m world
record...
See page 15

ts



op FRIDAY, NOVEMBER , 2007



DEBBIE FERGUSON-McKenzie competes in a 100m first round
heat during the World Athletics Championships in Berlin Sunday...

(AP Photo: Anja Niedringhaus)

GOLDEN GIRL CHANDRA STURRUP (left) and Colombia's Yomara
Hinestroza compete in a 2nd round heat yesterday...

Golden Girls’
keen our medal
hopes alive

‘Q’ Ferguson seventh
in heat, 30th overall

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — In
contrast to the way they have
performed all year, veteran
female sprinters Chandra
Sturrup and Debbie Fergu-
son-McKenzie turned back
the hands of time as they both
advanced to the semifinal of
the 100 metres.

Helping to erase the hurtful
early exit of past World
Championships’ 100 silver
medallist Derrick Atkins, the
duo kept the Bahamas’ hopes
alive for a medal in the short
sprints yesterday at the 12th
version of the biannual cham-
pionships at the Olympic Sta-
dium.

Tied with American Lau-
ryn Williams with the sixth
fastest time of 10.06 seconds,
Sturrup secured her berth in
today's elite 16, while Fergu-
son-McKenzie trailed them
with the eighth fastest time of
11.08.

The third Bahamian in the
field, 19-year-old Sheniqua
‘Q' Ferguson was seventh in
her heat in 11.59 for 30th out
of a field of 32. But the
Auburn bound junior was
unable to advance any further.

"Tt felt better," said Sheni-
qua Ferguson as she com-
pared her first round fourth
place of 11.57 that advanced
her with the third of the five
fastest losers. "The first, it was
a little easy, but this round I
really had to run, so I just
went out there and really gave
it all I had."

Ferguson said she wished

I'BUNE

her time would have been
faster, but she hopes to
improve on her performance
when she runs in the prelimi-
naries of the 200 that will start
on Tuesday at 4.05 am ET.

In her first World's appear-
ance after she had her
Olympic debut last year in
Beijing, China, Ferguson will
enter the field with Ferguson-
McKenzie, who is now in her
fourth Worlds.

Listed on her running bib
as just Ferguson, Ferguson-
McKenzie, the national dou-
ble sprint champion said she
was quite pleased with the
way she ran her quarters in
the century yesterday,
although her start could have
been better.

"T still held it together and
came through at the end, so
I'm happy with that," said
Ferguson-McKenzie, who
trailed only to Jamaica, the
top qualifier in 10.92.

As for the semis today, Fer-
guson-McKenzie said there's
no doubt that she's going to
have to run.

"It's going to be tough
because everybody's running,’
she reflected.

"At this point, I think it will
take 11.0s or better, maybe
even 10 point because every-
body is running."

Ferguson-McKenzie, 33,
will be running out of the first
of the two semis today at 1:05
pm ET in lane three, sand-

wiched between Verena

Sailer of Germany in lane
two and Stewart in four. Also
included in her heat is her for-
mer training partner Lauryn
Williams in five and Jamaican
Shelly-Ann Fraser in sixth.

Sturrup, the elder
stateswoman of the field at
age 37, has drawn lane five in
the second heat at 1:13 pm
ET. Her rivals to watch are
Jamaicans Veronica Camp-
bell-Brown in three and
Aleen Bailey in sixth, while
American Carmelita Jeter is
in fourth.

Focused on the task ahead
of her, Sturrup opted not to
give an interview. She indi-
cated that she really wants to
wait until she completes the
final that will be run as
tonight's showcase at 3:35 pm
ET

In yesterday's preliminary
rounds of the 100, Ferguson-
McKenzie competed first of
fourth of nine heats. She eas-
ily won her opener in 11.26 in
the second fastest qualifying
time. Jeter had the fastest
time of 11.22 in winning the
third heat.

Two heats later, Sheniqua
Ferguson was fourth in heat
six in 11.57.

And Sturrup rounded out
the Bahamian participation of
the morning session by also
winning heat eight in 11.28 to
turn in the third fastest quali-
fying time.

COVERAGE



Michael Sohn/AP ‘



JAMAICA’S Veronica Campbell-Brown and Sheniqua Ferguson
(right) compete in a 100m first round heat Sunday...

(AP Photo: Anja Niedringhaus)

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Woman criticises
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refusal to void estranged
husbands permit

FROM page five

The couple’s four-year-old daughter was born prematurely,
and developmental difficulties have rendered her incontinent
and partially paralyzed. Since the child’s father abandoned
the family, her mother has been unable to afford to take her to
scheduled medical check-ups and is surviving on support from
social services, the woman said.

She is angry that the application she put forward has enabled
her estranged husband to now earn around $600 a week, while
he fails to support his Bahamian family at the cost of govern-
ment, she said.

“Tam very grateful to government, but they shouldn’t have
to do that when the children have a young, vibrant, working
father,” she said.

The couple also have a two-year-old daughter, and the Har-
bour Islander has three other children from previous relation-
ships.

Calls to the director of Immigration and Minister of Immi-
gration Branville McCartney were not returned before The
Tribune went to press last night.

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area or have won an
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 19



IN THIS Feb. 26, 2009 photo,

Mexico cartels go from . |

drugs to full-scale matias

CIUDAD HIDALGO, Mexico

SHOPKEEPERS in this pine-covered moun-
tain region easily recite the list of "protection"
fees they pay to La Familia drug cartel to stay in
business: 100 pesos a month for a stall in a street
market, 30,000 pesos for an auto dealership or
construction-supply firm.

First offense for nonpayment: a severe beat-
ing. Those who keep ignoring the fees — or try
to charge their own — may pay with their lives,
according to Associated Press.

"Every day you can see the people they have
beaten up being taken to the IMSS,” said auto
mechanic Jesus Hernandez, motioning to the
government-run hospital a few doors from his
repair shop.

Mexican drug cartels have morphed into full-
scale mafias, running extortion and protection
rackets and trafficking everything from people
to pirated DVDs. As once-lucrative cocaine
profits have fallen and U.S. and Mexican author-
ities crack down on all drug trafficking to the
US., gangs are branching into new ventures —
some easier and more profitable than drugs.

The expansion has major implications as Pres-
ident Felipe Calderon continues his 2?-year-old
drug war, which has killed more than 11,000
people and turned formerly tranquil rural towns
such as Ciudad Hidalgo into major battlefronts.

Organized crime is seeping into Mexican soci-
ety in ways not seen before, making it ever more
difficult to combat. Besides controlling busi-
nesses, cartels provide jobs and social services
where government has failed.

"Today, the traffickers have big companies,
education, careers,” said Congresswoman Yudit
del Rincon of Sinaloa state, which has long been
controlled by the cartel of the same name.
"They're businessman of the year, they even
head up social causes and charitable founda-
tions."

Local officials say they do not have the man-
power to investigate cartel rackets and refer
such cases to the state, which hands them over to
overloaded federal agents because organized
crime is a federal offense. A federal police
report released in April notes that often no one
confronts the cartels, "not the police, because in
many cases there is probably corruption, and
not the public, because they live in terror."

After media reports questioned whether Mex-
ico was becoming a failed state, Calderon insist-
ed to The Associated Press in February that his
country is in the hands of Mexican authorities.

"Even me, as president, I can visit any single
point of the territory,” he said. He has since
sent 5,500 extra military and police officers to
fight drug lords in Michoacan — his home state.

Jailed

But in Ciudad Hidalgo and neighboring
Zitacuaro, mayors have been jailed and charged
with working for La Familia cartel, which con-
trols swaths of central and western Mexico.
Cadillac Escalades and Lincoln Navigators with
low tires and chrome rims patrol the streets of
Zitacuaro, even as trucks of army troops roll
past.

In the Michoacan mountain town of Arteaga,
La Familia boss Servando Gomez Martinez is
revered for giving townspeople money for food,
clothing and even medical care.

"He is a country man just like us, who wears
huaraches," a farmer said of one of Mexico's
most-wanted drug lords, pointing to his own
open-toed leather sandals. He asked that his
name not be used for fear of retaliation.

"It's almost like Chicago, when Al Capone
ruled everything," said a senior U.S. law
enforcement official who was not authorized to
be quoted by name. "They control everything
from the shoeshine boy to the taxi driver."

Mexican cartels gained their dominance in
drug trafficking in the mid-1980s, when U.S.
drug agents and the Colombian government
cracked down on Colombian cartels and drug
routes through the Caribbean. The vast major-
ity of cocaine headed to the US. started going
through Mexico.

In the meantime, trade in pirated and other
smuggled goods in Mexico traditionally was car-
ried out by small gangs centered around extend-
ed families or neighborhood rings.

In the last five to 10 years, Mexican cartels
created domestic drug markets and carved out
local territories, using a quasi-corporate struc-
ture, firepower and gangs of hit men to control
other illicit trades as well. Federal prosecutors
now call them "organized crime syndicates” and
say their tactics — such as charging a "turf tax"
to do business in their territory — mirror the
Italian mafia.

"They adopt a business model as if they were
franchises, except they are characterized by vio-
lence," according to a federal police briefing
report.

In June, soldiers in the northern city of Mon-
terrey caught members of the Zetas cartel pro-

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Radio 152°161411"1

IN THIS Feb. 26, 2009 photo, souvenirs sit for
sale in front of a closed shop with a for rent sign
along the famous Revolucion Avenue in Tijuana,
Mexico. Mexico's drug cartels are becoming true
mafias forcing many businesses in northern bor-
der states to close down.

ducing and distributing pirated DVDs and con-
trolling street vendors with protection fees.

Also in Monterrey, top Gulf cartel lieutenant
Sigifrido Najera Talamantes ran kidnapping
and extortion rings while trafficking migrants
and crude oil stolen from the pipelines of Mex-
ico's state-owned oil company, Pemex, accord-
ing to the army.Najera Talamantes, who was
arrested in March, allegedly charged migrant
smugglers to pass through his territory, took a
cut from street vendors and oversaw trafficking
in stolen goods, said Army Gen. Luis Arturo
Oliver.In Durango state, residents of Cuencame
dug ditches around their town earlier this year to
keep out roving bands of drug hit men kidnap-
ping people at will.

"Even with the ditches, they still came in and
kidnapped five people," said a Cuencame offi-
cial who asked his name not be used for fear of
retaliation.

In late 2008, almost all the betting parlors in
the border state of Tamaulipas closed because of
demands for protection money, according to
Alfonso Perez, the head of the Mexican associ-
ation of betting parlors.

In northern states such as Chihuahua and
Tamaulipas, cartels also are blamed for busi-
nesses closing or burning if they don't pay pro-
tection fees.

Last year, mayors of more than a dozen towns
throughout the state of Mexico received threat-
ening phone calls demanding that $10,000 to
$50,000 be deposited in bank accounts. State
investigators say many of the threats mentioned
links to the Gulf cartel.

Threats

Salvador Vergara, mayor of the resort town of
Ixtapan de la Sal, received threats and was shot
to death in October. State authorities believe
that he didn't pay and refused to allow gangs to
operate in his township.

Families in parts of the central state of Zacate-
cas went without cooking gas for several days in
January, after gangs demanded protection fees
of the gas-delivery trucks, and drivers refused to
make their rounds. Deliveries resumed only
after the state government increased security
patrols on the local roads.

Extortion threats reported to federal police
skyrocketed from about 50 in 2002 to about
50,000 in 2008, according to Public Safety Sec-
retary Genaro Garcia Luna.

Because of the spike, the Mexican govern-
ment this year launched a nationwide anti-extor-
tion program, creating a national database to
track protection rackets and promising to pro-
tect even business owners too scared to file for-
mal complaint.

While the results of the new complaint system
are still meager, the government recently moved
to go after cartel finances.

In April, Congress approved a law allowing
the government to seize properties and money
from suspected drug traffickers and other crim-
inals before they are convicted. In the past, sus-
pects had to be convicted before their property
could be seized, and trials often last years in
Mexico.



people play soccer in the
empty "Gomez Passage"
shopping center where for
rent signs are seen in a tourist
area of Tijuana, Mexico. Mexi-
co's drug cartels are becom-
ing true mafias, branching out
into large-scale extortion and
protection rackets, demand-
ing money from everybody
from junkyard owners to town
mayors and forcing many
businesses in northern border
states to close down.

ee” ESV

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at wew.cob.edu.by

LATE REGISTRATION

Late Registration for Fall 2009 is scheduled for
August 25-26, 2009 from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
in the Records Department, ground floor, Portia
smith Student Services Centre.

SUPERVISOROF FINANCE

A leading Bahamian company, is seeking application&ufearaisor of Finance

JOB OBJECTIVE:

To provide financial leadership for the company by managing the financial resources, supervisir\
the certain key aspects of the campjsaaccounting function and maintaining appropriate relations
with investors and regulatory agencies.

ORGANIZATIONAL POSITION :
Reports to th@irectorof Finance.

PRINCIPAL DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES :

Core responsibilities include
Assisting in managittige financial affairs of the company
Supervise key components offthancedepartment
Ensure accurate and timely interim and annual financial reporting in accordance with
International Accounting Standards
Assist in the annual budget exercise
Assist irthe training and development of line accounting staff
Coordinate the annual audit process
Assist in managing cashflow and treasury functions
Any other related duties as considered necessary

REQUIREMENTS & PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES :

Candidates must meet thédwing criteria:
Bachelor's Degree or higher in accounting or related financial field
Professional accounting designation recognized by The Bahamas Institute of Chartered
Accountants
Minimum of seven years experience in accounting, finance and budgeting.
Leadership, management and direct supervision experience is required. Previous
direct experience in planning and executing all aspects of financial accounting and
budgetary functions
Bahamian citizen
Accounting software experience
Proficient in the usaf the Microsoft range of applications
Strong technical and managerial skills
Excellent writing, communication, analytical and reasoning skills
Excellent organizational and time management skills
Team Player with the ability to add value and strendtm tam and team goals
Honest, hardworking and ability to meet deadlines

The position offers an attractive salary and benefits package, reflecting the successful
applicant's experience and qualifications, including a pension plan, medical, life, dental
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PAGE 24, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Two Russian jets collide,
crash in air show training

Stunt pilot is killed

MOSCOW

TWO Russian air force jets
rehearsing aerobatic maneu-
vers collided Sunday near
Moscow, killing one stunt
pilot and sending one fighter
crashing into nearby vacation
homes, a military official said,
according to Associated Press.

The Su-27 fighters were
part of the elite Russian
Knights flying group prepar-
ing to perform at the MAKS-
2009 air show, the largest and
most important showcase for
Russia’s aerospace industry.

The jets collided near
Zhukovsky airfield, east of
Moscow, where the air show
opens Tuesday.

Air force spokesman Lt.
Col. Vladimir Drik said all
three pilots involved ejected.

He said rescuers recovered
two in satisfactory condition
but the third was killed.

The Kremlin identified the
dead pilot as Col. Igor
Tkachenko, commander of
the Russian Knights.

Experience

The Russian Knights’ Web
site said Tkachenko was 45,
was married with a son and
daughter, and had been an
aerobatics pilot since 1989
with more than 1,500 hours’
experience flying attack air-
craft.

One jet crashed into a row
of houses near the airfield,
setting three ablaze and scat-
tering debris over a wide
area.

The RIA-Novosti news
agency said one woman was

(Chr o 2 fing

Ab

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seriously wounded and up to
four other people on the
ground may have been
injured.

Russian TV footage
showed wreckage from the
other jet lying in an unpopu-
lated field.

The Russian Knights,
formed in 1991, have suffered
tragedy before.

In December 1995, three
of its Su-27 jets crashed into a
Vietnamese mountainside in
rough weather as they were
returning to Russia from an
air show in Malaysia.

Four pilots died.

More generally, Russian
air force jets have suffered a
series of mishaps attributed
to the Soviet-era age and
poor maintenance of

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their airplanes.

Earlier this year, officials
grounded the air force’s
entire fleet of Su-24 swing-
wing attack aircraft after two
crashes in three days.

Two crashes of MiG-29
fighter jets in 2008 led to that
model’s temporary ground-
ing as well.

Dangerous

Subsequent inspections
determined that many were
in dangerous shape, either
through age or ill repair, and
had to be scrapped.

Also Sunday, a Yak-52 sin-
gle-propeller aircraft crashed
in the Kaluga region south of
Moscow.

Russian broadcasters NTV
reported that one of two peo-
ple killed in that crash was
the son of a former Russian
Knights pilot.

<
=
3S
2
—
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hes
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i. a

A BURNING Su-27 jet from the Russian air force elite aerobatic
team Russkiye Vityazi (Russian Knights), dives just seconds after
the aircraft collided with a two-seat Su-27, not seen, not far from
the Zhukovsky airfield, east of Moscow, Sunday, Aug. 16, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE 6

yu



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—

MONDAY,

_
’ —



AUGUST

lige ee 205059

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

ColinaImperial.

Confidence For Life





Winder: Loan
programme was
a mistake from
the beginning

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

A SENIOR partner at
Deloitte and Touche suggest-
ed yesterday that government
would have got a better
return on their investment if
the funds for the student loan
programme had been injected
into the College of the
Bahamas (COB) instead of
the now $60 million deep loan
portfolio.

Ray Winder told Tribune
Business that the govern-
ment’s guaranteed loan pro-
gramme was a mistake from
the beginning.

He contends that the
expansion of COB’s facilities
to accommodate more stu-
dents would have yielded
much more for this country
than the now $30 million debt
the loan programme has left
in its wake.

Mall expands eatery options with Uncle Jim’s

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE TOWN Centre Mall
expanded its eatery options
recently with the addition of
Uncle Jim's, as new business-
es continue to open their
doors in a location that is
quickly trying to recharge
itself.

Craig and Carlos Wells
opened Uncle Jim's Rotis-
serie only three weeks ago
and, according to them, the
response to the restaurant has
been overwhelming.

Maybe due to the fact that
the only other food establish-
ment in the mall is Subway;
however, the lure of the smell
from Uncle Jim's Barbecue
rotisserie chicken is an atten-
tion grabber.

The Wells brothers set up
their rotisserie just in front of
the door to their business.

“People see the rotisserie
and they come in,” said Car-
los Wells. “But they will smell
it first.”

According to him, the
restaurant, which also pre-
pares sandwiches and fea-
tures an all-you-can-eat sal-
ad bar, was envisaged with
the family in mind.

He said he wanted a family

And that number could
increase with the more than
$30 million loan portfolio that
is Not yet in arrears.

“The government made a
great mistake when they start-
ed the programme and did-
n’t put proper procedures and
controls in place,” said Mr
Winder.

“The bigger poimt on this
issue is this was not a proper
investment.

“The best investment for
the government to make
when they made it (decision
to start guaranteed loan pro-
gramme) would have been if
the majority (of the money)
had been put into building
additional capacity at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas.

“T would submit that if you
compare the return on that
investment with the return

SEE page 9B

friendly environment with
good food and a good atmos-
phere.

The lights in Uncle Jim are
kept muted and a flat panel
television embedded in the
wall plays continuous music
videos.

Samples

Samples of the establish-
ment’s conch fritters are set
out for customers to try and a
separate counter serves up
fresh sweet tea and pink
lemonade prepared by hand
by the Wells brothers.

Craig Wells said they hope
to expand the business into
the empty space next door,
but pointed out that the busi-
ness is still young.

According to Carlos, their
vision for the space next door
is of an ultra-modern game
room, stocked with all the lat-
est in gaming equipment.

The brothers began the
restaurant with an initial out-
lay of about $16,000 and hope
to open another location in
the western part of New
Providence in the near future.

Besides just barbecue, the
rotisserie offers a special spicy
chicken and a regular sea-
soned chicken, prepared by
one of three chefs.

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Airlines ‘siightet'
by fee increases

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

overnment is
continuing to
expand airlift

into the Bahamas, with oo
several new American
Eagle flights into the
family islands and a New
Condor service from
Germany, according to
Tourism and Aviation
Minister, while many
small, local airlines feel
slighted by fee increases across the
board that could leave them handi-
capped.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace told
Tribune Business recently that gov-
ernment has been in talks with those
small airline companies that make fre-
quent inter-island trips.

According to him, those small com-

ioe
—

es elicles)



panies are a part of the government’s
plan to increase travel to the family
islands.

However, those airlines may not sur-
vive the tax increases associated with
the construction of a new internation-
al departure terminal.

“The smaller airlines are very much
a part of what we want to develop in
terms of intra-Bahamas travel, but at
the end of the day we had to put flight
systems in place that allow for those
services to be paid for that we are
putting in there,” said Mr Vanderpool-
Wallace.

“And we've been talking to them
(small, local airlines) and we’re pre-
pared to make adjustments that are
reasonable and necessary before it goes
into effect and we are now just collect-
ing all of the information.”

Government recently secured West-
jest service from Canada into Grand
Bahama and have expanded Ameri-
can Eagle services into Abaco, Gov-

ernors Harbour and North Eleuthera.
Service to Exuma is expected to begin
November 19.

“What we’ve been talking to them
about is beginning to work,” said Mr
Vanderpool-Wallace.

“A Condor flight out of Germany is
beginning later this year.”

He said low cost international airlift
to the Bahamas is beginning to gain
traction and he insists the small inter-
island airlines will not be left behind.

According to him, government has
already held one meeting with repre-
sentatives from those companies and
said another meeting has been sched-
uled.

“We’re listening to them, but at the
end of the day, of course, government
can impose taxes very easily, but those
taxes should not be counter produc-
tive and we want to make sure that we
have the kind of dialogue that is nec-
essary to guide us in terms of what to
put in place when it comes to them.”

According to Carlos, the
barbecue chicken has been
the most popular.

“Tm only doing barbecue
today," the chef told Tribune
Business on a recent visit.

The brothers named their
restaurant after an uncle who
operated a restaurant in the
Bronx, New York, where
they worked for several sum-
mers.

Craig contends it’s where
he got the recipe for his spe-
cial barbecue sauce.

On a typical day, accord-
ing to Carlos, the business is
packed with people for lunch
and already Uncle Jim’s has

regulars.

“They said there is no traf-
fic through this mall,” he said.
“Look at the people who are
here.”

About the same time Uncle
Jim opened its doors “Bed,
Bath and the Works” opened
theirs.

Owner, Harrison Toote
said opening the new store
with the way the economy is
was a “leap of faith,” espe-
cially as he did not seek
financing from the banks.

“T guess we'll be in full
swing by the time the econo-
my starts back up,” he said.

This is Mr. Toote’s second

store. He said sales are down
at the Marathon Mall store,
but “it remains profitable.”

The new location offers
bathroom, bedroom, and
kitchen accessories and will
soon have rugs and carpets
for sale.

Mr Toote added that he
would like to offer more of
the accessories used to dec-
orate kitchens in the future,
as the store has great poten-
tial for growth.

According to him, people
like the concept and location
of the new store.

“There is market for this
part of town,” he said.

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The information contained is from a third
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By AUDREY McAVOY
Associated Press Writer

HONOLULU (AP) —
Hawaii became the 50th state
this week in 1959, helping
transform an island economy
dominated by sugar and
pineapple fields into a vaca-
tion paradise.

With statehood, tourists
could come here knowing
they would be protected by
US laws. It also gave investors
more confidence they could
reap returns in the islands.

For locals, statehood meant
electing their own governor
and sending voting represen-

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INTERNATIONAL BUSI

PAGE 2B, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

= "oa @

tatives to Washington, D.C.
for the first time. The
increased democracy led to
pro-labor legislation and a
steady flow of federal dollars
sent Hawaii's way by its Con-
gressional representatives.

"There were these remark-
able spurts of growth in
Hawaii that raised incomes
and standards of living well
beyond what it was prior to
statehood," said Lawrence W.
Boyd, Jr., a labor economist
at the University of Hawaii
at West Oahu.

Just before World War II,
Hawaii produced four per
cent of the world's sugar and
60 per cent of its commercial
pineapple. The leaders of the
five companies who ran the
biggest plantations formed an
oligarchy that dominated
Hawaii politics, as well as the
economy.

Sugar and pineapple began
to quickly decline, however.
Reduced tariffs and higher
labor costs made it cheaper
to grow sugar in Brazil and
Thailand and pineapple in
Ecuador and Costa Rica.

Tourism was already grow-
ing in the 1950s as propeller
planes entered use alongside
ocean liners. But growth
exploded with the introduc-
tion of commercial jet planes
in 1959, a couple months
before statehood. Jets made it
faster, cheaper and easier to
vacation in Hawaii.

No longer were the islands
reserved for celebrities and
elite. Americans, whose
incomes were rising, were
eager to experience an exotic
getaway they had only seen
on TV.

The number of tourists
surged from just 171,000 in
1958 to 2.6 million in 1973.
Hawaii's economy grew an
average of seven per cent per
year during the 15 first years
of statehood.

"It's progress,” said Pat Sai-
ki, who represented Hawaii's
first Congressional district
from 1987 to 1991. "I remem-
ber when the only way we
could travel to the mainland
was on the Matsonia — by
ship."

Economists say social pro-
grams pursued by Hawaii's
newly elected officials pro-
moted prosperity.

Until statehood, Hawaii's
governors were appointed by
the president. The governors
were close to the plantation
owners and didn't directly
represent their concerns and
interests of the broader pop-
ulation. That changed with
statehood.

THE TRIBUNE



NESS



ia

IN THIS February 1, 2006 file photo, visitors pack Waikiki Beach in Honolulu. Hawaii became the 50th state
this week in 1959, helping transform an island economy dominated by sugar and pineapple fields into a
vacation paradise for Americans...

(AP Photo: Lucy Pemoni)

Statehood helped
transform Hawaii
to tourism haven

Gov. John A Burns, the
first governor elected after
statehood, oversaw reforms
to wage and hour laws, unem-
ployment insurance and
workers’ compensation. He
also presided over the expan-
sion of the public school sys-
tem. Under George Ariyoshi,
Burns' successor, the state
began requiring companies to
provide health insurance to
their workers, giving Hawaii
near-universal medical cover-
age. The election of gover-
nors gave unions and their
large membership new politi-
cal clout. Hawaii is now the
second-most unionized state
in the nation behind New
York.

But while tourism has pow-
ered the economy for the past
50 years, islanders have yet
to find a new source of growth
for the next five decades.

In 2007, Hawaii welcomed
a record 7.63 million visitors,
which was nearly one million
more than in 1999.

There's also little public
appetite for building more
hotels to welcome millions
more tourists. In recent years,
activists and residents have
demonstrated against devel-
opers’ plans to expand resorts
in places like Oahu's North
Shore and Maui's Makena
Bay.

"We're floundering,” says
Paul Brewbaker, senior eco-
nomic adviser to the Bank of
Hawai. "We're at an inter-
esting moment in terms of
strategic economic policy. We
have to make a decision: How
are we going to sustain rising
living standards?"

The state offers generous
tax credits to promote invest-
ment in high-technology. It
actively supports aquaculture
farms while global conglom-
erates use Hawaii as a base
to develop seed corn. But
none of these sectors has
come close to replacing
tourism as Hawaii's liveli-
hood.

Prominent businessman
Walter Dods, the former head
of First Hawaiian Bank and
current chairman of Hawai-
ian Telcom, said Hawaii
should rely on aquaculture
and a half-dozen other niche
industries to supplement
tourism.

But welcoming tourists, he
said, is a natural industry for
the islands.

"All the talk of all the mag-
ical things that's going to
replace it — virtually every
one has fallen on its face,"
Dods said. "Tourism is the
financial linchpin of Hawaii."



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 3B



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS



Wall Street sees shoppers
as key to rally’s future

By STEPHEN BERNARD
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — On
Wall Street, the average shop-
per can trump a Federal
Reserve policy maker.

With other parts of the
economy showing signs of
improvement, the question of
when a recovery will occur
and how strong it will be lies
with consumers.

So reports last week show-
ing weaker-than-expected
retail sales and flagging con-
sumer confidence overshad-
owed an upbeat view of the
economy from the Federal
Reserve. The major indexes
ended the week with a loss of
about half a percent, their first
weekly losses in five weeks.

"Anything pointing to the
health of the consumer and
its willingness to spend is
going to be watched closely,”
said Ryan Jacob, president of
Jacob Asset Management in
Los Angeles.

This week, the consumer is
in focus again as a stream of
retailers report second-quar-
ter earnings. Wall Street will
want to know if retail compa-
nies, like businesses in other
industries, made money pri-
marily because of cost-cutting
rather than from improved
revenue or sales.

The nation's biggest retail-
er, Wal-Mart Stores Inc., last
week followed the trend set
by other companies, report-
ing earnings that beat Wall
Street forecasts but also say-
ing that its most important
sales, those from stores open
at least a year, fell during the
quarter. And it's likely that
other retailers still to
announce results will continue
that pattern.

Eventually, investors will
need to see rising sales in
order to become confident
about the economy's ability
to show sustained growth.
Consumer spending accounts
for more than two-thirds of
the nation's economic activity.

"We'll get a very good
range of what retail sales actu-
ally look like" this week, said



SALE SIGNS advertise discounts
at a Hard Tail retailer on the Third
Street Promenade in Santa Mon-
ica, California. Retail sales dis-
appointed in July and the number
of newly laid-off workers filing
claims for unemployment bene-
fits rose unexpectedly last week.
The latest government reports
reinforced concerns about how
quickly consumers will be able to
contribute to a broad economic
recovery.

(AP Photo: Reed Saxon)

Jamie Cox, managing partner
at Harris Financial Group in
Richmond, Va. Cox noted
that retailers from across the
pricing and product spectrum
are reporting results.
Oft-price retailer TIX Cos.
and the high-end Saks Inc.
report results Tuesday, while
apparel retailer Gap Inc. pro-
vides its earnings data on




Thursday. Home improve-
ment retailers Lowe's Cos.
and Home Depot Inc. also
release results this week, as
do Target Corp., BJ's Whole-
sale Club and Barnes &
Noble Inc.

Stock gains were muted
after the Commerce Depart-
ment said Thursday that retail
sales fell 0.1 per cent in July,
significantly worse than the
0.7 per cent increase econo-
mists expected. The news was
bad again Friday, when a new
reading on consumer senti-
ment was much lower than
expected. Major indexes tum-
bled about one per cent that
day.

News of the Reuters/Uni-
versity of Michigan consumer
sentiment survey wiped out
the surge of optimism the
market had after the Federal
Reserve on Wednesday said
the economy was "leveling
out."

Cox said there is a split
between Wall Street and
Main Street over the econo-
my's potential recovery. The
rally that began after the
stock market bottomed out in
early March shows investors
are confident a recovery is
coming in the near future,
while the average American is
a bit more cautious, he said.

Friday's consumer senti-
ment report was a jolt for

traders about exactly how
uncomfortable consumers still
are with their finances and
the state of the economy.

One of the biggest worries
for people is the job market.
Jacob said that while growing
consumer confidence would
be a welcome sign for the
market, “with unemployment
still trending higher, it’s hard
to expect too much progress.”

Harvey Robinson, chief
investment officer at Robin-
son Capital Group in Dayton,
Md., said that because of
questions about the job mar-
Ket, there is still no clear sign
about the timing or strength
of a recovery.

Weekly unemployment
data last week showed an
unexpected rise in the num-
ber of workers filing for job-
less benefits for the first time.
The next report on jobless
claims will come out Thurs-
day.

Though job growth typical
lags behind as the economy
recovers, improving unem-
ployment reports could give
consumers a confidence
boost. Until that happens,
however, markets could be
volatile and the five-month
rally might slow, analysts said.

However, strength in new
housing and manufacturing
data during the week could
provide investors with more

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CORRIDOR 18
SAUNDERS BEACH AREA
ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION

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There will be delays along the vicinity due to the one-way traffic flow system. Local diversions will be
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DAYS THE
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Tuesday

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Cake Decorating | 1

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All fees are incloded in the price quoted above; new students pay a onetime application fee of $40.00, (SON REFUNDABLE)

Application Deadline: August 28, 2009 at 4:00 p.m.
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reasons to bid stocks higher.
The market will get readings
on housing starts and exist-

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regional manufacturing
reports.

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COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
EQUITY SIDE

2008/CLE/Qui/01307

IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
S. G. B. Company Ltd.

AND

IN THE MATTER of all that piece parcels or tract
of land 260 acres more or less situate in the
Settlement of The Bight Long Island one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected during
normal working hours at:-

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Second
Floor, Ansbacher House, East Street, Nassau,
The Bahamas.

The Chambers of Hanna & Co., Second
Floor, Pond Plaza, East Bay and Ernest
Streets, Nassau N.P., The Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that any person having
dower or right to dower or any adverse claim/s not
recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 18th
day of September, A.D., 2009, file in the Registry of the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a statement of such claim in the
prescribed form and verified by an affidavit to be
filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file
and serve a statement of such claim on or before the
aforementioned date will operate as a bar to such claim.

HANNA & CO.

Chambers

3rd Floor, Columbus House,
East & Shirley Streets,
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioner



PAGE 4B, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Some indications RI economy

may be nearing the bottom

By MICHELLE R SMITH
Associated Press Writer

Island (AP) — Sarah Robil-
lard spent this day like many
other days: pushing her four -

PAWTUCKET, Rhode month-old daughter's stroller

Legal Notice

Notice
ALGOGENETIC GLOBAL LTD.

VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000 the Dissolution of ALGOGENETIC GLOBAL
LTD. has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was 17th July
2009.



around town in the drizzling
rain, looking for a job. She's
been out of work for a year,
and her husband, Christo-
pher, has only worked spo-
radically in the last several
months. They're $500 behind
on rent and just talked their
phone company into turning
their service back on after it
got shut off.

"We've had to resort to
public help to get formula for
her," Robillard said of her
sleeping daughter. "I just got
married a month ago. We
can't even afford to get my
new ID. That's $16.50."

The couple, both 19, are
just two among the tens of
thousands of unemployed
Rhode Islanders. The state's
growing unemployment rate
stood at 12.4 per cent in June,
second highest in the country
behind Michigan. Even worse,
economists say that number
is probably 25 per cent or
more if you include people
who have given up looking or
are settling for part-time
work.

There is some positive news
— slowing unemployment,

Back BY Popular Demand
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Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED



Eo

CcFAL*

SECURITIES AS OF:

FRIDAY, 14 AUGUST 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,562.56] CHG -0.35 | %CHG -0.02 | YTD -149.80 | YTD % -8.75
FINDEX: CLOSE 783.14 | YTD -6.20% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit y
Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (81)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)}

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson 10.39
Premier Real Estate 10.00

6.25
0.63
3.15
2.14

6.25
0.63
3.15
2.37

2.74
5.50
1.27
1.32
6.60
10.00
10.30
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.49
10.39
10.00

2.74
5.71
3.97
1.95
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.13
1.00
0.30
5.50

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.33
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

6.25
0.63
3.15
2.37

2.74
5.71
3.64
1.95
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.13
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.39
10.00

EPS $

-0.877



SARAH ROBILLARD of Rhode Island has her job application reviewed by Ground Round manager, Kay,
at the restaurant in Pawtucket...

fewer jobless claims and more
home sales, for example —
that economists say indicates,
if not an end to the state's
recession, the possible begin-
ning of the end. Economists
also caution that unemployed
people like the Robillards
could find themselves scram-
bling for work for quite a
while because the employ-
ment picture is so bleak.

"People are really, really
concerned here about the
state of the economy," said
Marion Orr, a professor at
Brown University, who polled
Rhode Islanders about their
attitudes in May. "We're a
working class state and have
long been a working class
state, so when the economy
goes south, we get hurt really
bad."

Sixty-nine per cent of the
people Orr polled said they
personally knew a friend or
family member who had lost
his job.

Even those who have a sta-
ble job are feeling the dire
economic situation.

Lisa Church, 45, a public
transit operator, says she was
hit with a $1,200 property tax
increase on her modest home
in Pawtucket. Communities
around the state have had to
make cuts or raise taxes
because the state budget dras-
tically cut local aid.

Church said she's saving
more and being more con-
scious of her spending.

"Do I really need it? No, I
don't, so why buy it? I'm
being more practical today,
putting the desires on hold,”
she said.

By many measures, the

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

C:Co LCIN TAL

Div$ P/E
10.6
11.1
25.6
N/M

0.078 40.4

0.055 43.1

1.406 8.1

0.249 11.0

0.419 13.6

0.111 32.8

0.240 8.1

0.420 15.7

0.322 33.0

0.794 13.0

0.332 15.5

0.000 N/M

0.035 8.6

0.407 13.5

0.952 10.9

0.180 55.6

0.127
0.992
0.244

Ocean State's economy is
doing poorly. For example,
bankruptcies are up about
eight per cent in the first six
months of 2009, compared to
the same period a year ago.
The number of people
exhausting their unemploy-
ment benefits, indicating
they've been out of work for a
long time, doubled in June.
The median value of a single-
family home in Rhode Island
fell 23 per cent in the second
quarter from the same peri-
od a year ago, according to
the Rhode Island Association
of Realtors.

However, while foreclo-
sures persist, the rate seems to
be easing, said Edward
Mazze, an economist and for-
mer dean of the School of
Business Administration at
the University of Rhode
Island. Ignoring homes sold
as foreclosures or short-sales,
the median price of a single
family home fell less than 6
percent in the second quar-
ter, the real estate group said.

Paul Leys, president of the
group and a real estate agent
in Newport, said the number
of homes sold is going up
because of low prices, along
with low mortgage interest
rates and the $8,000 tax cred-
it for first-time home buyers.

"It's almost like someone
turned the faucet back on a
month, a month and a half
ago. It's been fun to be busy
again," he said.

While he doesn't see a
return to double-digit home
appreciations anytime soon,
he does think the worst is
over.

"We're beyond the bottom

(AP Photo: Elise Amendola)

of the market," he said.

Economists expect unem-
ployment will continue to
climb, but the pace of new
claims, while still rising, has
slowed.

"We're not adding jobs, but
the elements are starting to
come around," said Leonard
Lardaro, a professor of eco-
nomics at the University of
Rhode Island.

He said one way for the
state's unemployment rate to
go down is for people to move
out of Rhode Island or find
work in neighboring Massa-
chusetts or Connecticut,
which have more jobs in
growth and technology indus-
tries. He said that's bad for
Rhode Island because it cre-
ates a "brain drain” of edu-
cated, highly skilled workers.

Mazze said he expected the
state's unemployment rate to
stay above 10 per cent at least
through the middle of next
year. By the end of 2010, he
said unemployment will prob-
ably still be a persistent prob-
lem, at eight or nine per cent.

Robillard said she'll keep
looking for work. When she’s
lucky enough to find a place
that's accepting applications,
she fills one out there, then
takes one home and brings it
back the next day so she has a
better chance of her name
standing out in the pile. She's
turned philosophical in the
last few months.

"T figure this is a test. This is
a test to see how the human
race goes about taking care
of ourselves," she said. "If
God is testing us, I thank him
for every minute of peace that
he gives me."

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BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31,59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3860 2.40 4.75
2.9047 -1.20 -3.66
1.4817 3.35 5.38
3.1031 -8.35 -13.82
12.9801 2.87 5.79
101.6693 1.10 1.67
96.7398 0.35 -4.18
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.2765 2.00 -2.98
1.0622 2.56 6.22
1.0243 -0.84 243
1.0585 2.04 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

ases)
52wk-Low Interest
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

7%
Prime + 1.75%
7%
Prime + 1.75%

52wk-Low Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

N/M
256.6

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

52wk-Low
1.3231
2.8952
1.4059
3.1031
12.3289
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Div$ Yield % NAV Date
30-Jun-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

QUALIFICATIONS

- BAin Accounting from an accredited University

- International accounting designation (CPA/CA) with minimum of
5 years post qualification experience,

- Advance working knowledge of Excel

- Working knowledge of Microsoft Word

Interested persons should apply on or before
August 29th, 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S11) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Attention: CONTROLLER
DA 81270
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N3207

Nassau, Bahamas

Suitably qualified candidates need only apply.
Salary is commensurate with experience and qualification.





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 5B



$1bn in battery grants may recharge MI talent base

By DAVID N GOODMAN
and JEFF KAROUB
Associated Press Writers

DETROIT (AP) — As a
business professor and for-
mer auto executive in Michi-
gan, Gerald Meyers has seen
his share of former colleagues
and students leave the state.

The state's economy has
been shrinking along with its
struggling auto industry. And
the brain drain is well-docu-
mented as the state struggles
to keep its own college grad-
uates, much less attract
degreed newcomers.

"IT can speak for my stu-
dents, who are predominant-
ly leaving the state," said
Meyers, a University of
Michigan business professor
and former chairman of
American Motors Corp. "It
would be helpful — certainly
in my conversations with
them — if something is going
on that suggests that the
future is brighter here than it
has been."

Meyers and state officials
say a newly announced $1.36
billion mjection into 11 com-
panies and universities in
Michigan might offer some
of the best and brightest a
reason to stay.

Obama administration offi-
cials this month announced
$2.4 billion in federal grants
to develop next-generation
electric vehicles and batter-
ies. Vice President Joe Biden
made the announcement in
Michigan, the single largest
recipient of the grants.

These and other recent fed-

eral grants give the state a
better shot at reversing the
brain drain, veteran U.S. Rep.
John Dingell told University
of Michigan researchers and
administrators.

"We hope we can keep
them home so they can do
those things to move our
economy forward," said Din-
gell, a Dearborn Democrat
who visited the Ann Arbor
campus after the announce-
ment. He has been instru-
mental over decades in steer-
ing research money to the
school.

Stephen Forrest, the uni-
versity's vice president for
research, said the state is rich
in engineering and scientific
talent but has lagged in turn-
ing those skills into new busi-
ness ideas.

"We're very sensitive to the
idea of brain drain," he said.
What has been lacking, he
said, has been the "manage-
ment talent" to put those
ideas to work.

Gov. Jennifer Granholm
said the grants are important
for keeping and developing
tens of thousands of jobs
because they cover every-
thing from early research
through final assembly — giv-
ing many graduates an oppor-
tunity to find in-state jobs in
their fields of study.

"Tf we create a whole value
chain for the battery indus-
try, the opportunities for
those workers are very, very
ripe,” she said.

The University of Michi-
gan, Detroit's Wayne State
University and Michigan

WAT Oy
2 -
=

1
1)

“5 ak)

.
“Wee *

Technological University in
Houghton in the Upper
Peninsula will receive $10.5
million for education and
work-force training pro-
grammes and other purpos-
es.

If things go right, graduates
will be able to walk right into
newly created jobs in the
region, said Wayne State
engineering professor Simon
Ng, director of that universi-
ty's new Alternative Energy
Technology degree pro-
gramme.

"Tt will be perfect timing,"
Ng said. "They will be able
to employ these people when
they graduate."

Meyers says the billion-dol-
lar effort is a great economic
stimulant but can't plug the
brain drain by itself.

"What I hope is that it's an
incentive for more," he said.
"Some big shooters will say,
‘Let's move some capital in
that direction.'"

Michigan has had the
nation's highest annual unem-
ployment rate since 2006 — it
reached 15.2 per cent in June
— and forecasters say it will
climb further before it turns
around. The state never
regained its momentum after
the 2001 recession, and the
bankruptcies this summer of
General Motors Corp. and
Chrysler Group LLC has-
tened the steady stream of
plant closings and layoffs.

Lou Glazer, president of
Michigan Future Inc., a non-
partisan research organisa-
tion in Ann Arbor, said
"quality of place," particular-

The National Insurance Board
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
Request for Contractors Pre-Qualification

The National Insurance Board (NIB) is seeking to pre-qualify contractors to bid on works
to complete the Sendo: Aehobititation Centre - Robert Sinn Child and Aoolescent and
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Pre-qualification documents may be collected fram the Security Booth at NIB‘s Clifford
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Pre-Qualiied documents should be signed, sealed and dropped in the pre-qualification
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20

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website af www.cobeduhy

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& EXTENSION SERVICES

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Fees May Be Paid By Cash, Credit Cand, or Hank Certified Cheque Payable To:
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And Course Mietereals

ly in urban centers, is at least should feel really good."
equal to employment oppor-
tunities as a means of luring
and keeping college gradu-
ates. And making the state's
major cities more attractive
by creating vibrant, "walka-
ble" neighbourhoods and
developing mass transit sys-
tems historically has been
challenging, but some efforts
are under way.

"It's the two together that
end up being the ingredients
that allow you to fundamen-
tally change...the location
decision of talent in general
and young people in particu-
lar," he said.

Still, Glazer said, the boost
for the nascent battery and
hybrid technology market is
the right kind of move on the
economic development side.

"Just in and of itself, it cre-
ates new job opportunities for
talent and the state needs
that," he said. "It's in an
emerging industry, which has
good buzz, which the state
needs. All that stuff is an

absolute plus. "The state

ey

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PAGE 6B, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS



White House appears ready
to drop ‘public option’

By PHILIP ELLIOTT
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Bowing to Republican pres-
sure and an uneasy public,
President Barack Obama's
administration signaled Sun-
day it is ready to abandon the
idea of giving Americans the
option of government-run
insurance as part of a new
health care system.

Facing mounting opposition
to the overhaul, administra-
tion officials left open the
chance for a compromise with
Republicans that would
include health insurance coop-
eratives instead of a govern-
ment-run plan. Such a con-
cession probably would
enrage Obama's liberal sup-
porters but could deliver a
much-needed victory on a top
domestic priority opposed by

As a privately-owned, mid-sized Bahamian
Company and the authorized Caterpillar
dealer in the Bahamas; M&E Ltd. is presently
seeking Certified Caterpillar Technicians
with Mechanical and Electrical experiences,
along with proof of academic and practical
expertise. These candidates should be

professionals who thrive on the challenge of
developing outstanding customer relations

and service excellence.

Send complete resume with education and
work experience to M & E Limited, P. O. Box
N-3238, Nassau Bahamas, Attention: Office

Administrator, or email me@me-ltd.com .

Only

persons being interviewed for this

position will be contacted.



GOP lawmakers.

Officials from both politi-
cal parties reached across the
aisle in an effort to find com-
promises on proposals they
left behind when they
returned to their districts for
an August recess. Obama had
wanted the government to run
a health insurance organiza-
tion to help cover the nation's
almost 50 million uninsured,
but didn't include it as one of
his three core principles of
reform.

Health and Human Services
Secretary Kathleen Sebelius
said that government alterna-
tive to private health insur-
ance is "not the essential ele-
ment" of the administration's
health care overhaul. The
White House would be open
to co-ops, she said, a sign that
Democrats want a compro-
mise so they can declare a vic-
tory.

Under a proposal by Sen.
Kent Conrad, D-N.D., con-
sumer-owned nonprofit coop-
eratives would sell insurance
in competition with private
industry, not unlike the way
electric and agriculture co-ops
operate, especially in rural
states such as his own.

With $3 billion to $4 billion
in initial support from the
government, the co-ops would
operate under a national
structure with state affiliates,
but independent of the gov-
ernment. They would be
required to maintain the type
of financial reserves that pri-
vate companies are required
to keep in case of unexpect-
edly high claims.

"T think there will be a com-
petitor to private insurers,”
Sebelius said. "That's really
the essential part, is you don't
turn over the whole new mar-
ketplace to private insurance
companies and trust them to
do the right thing."

Obama's spokesman

The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invites qualified applicants to apply for the
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checks and tests control instrumentation in its Generation Power Plant.

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Directs instrument technicians when required.

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Analyze and calibrates control systems.

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PRESIDENT Barack Obama listens to a question as he speaks about health care during a town hall
meeting at Central High School in Grand Junction, Colorado...

refused to say a public option
was a make-or-break choice.

"What I am saying is the
bottom line for this for the
president is, what we have to
have is choice and competi-
tion in the insurance market,"
White House press secretary
Robert Gibbs said Sunday.

A day before, Obama
appeared to hedge his bets.

"All I'm saying is, though,
that the public option,
whether we have it or we
don't have it, is not the entire-
ty of health care reform,”
Obama said at a town hall
meeting in Grand Junction,
Colo. "This is just one sliver of
it, one aspect of it.”

Lawmakers have discussed
the co-op model for months
although the Democratic lead-
ership and the White House
have said they prefer a gov-
ernment-run option.

Conrad, chairman of the
Senate Budget Committee,
called the argument for a gov-
ernment-run public plan little
more than a "wasted effort."
He added there are enough
votes in the Senate for a coop-
erative plan.

"It's not government-run
and government-controlled,"
he said. "It's membership-run
and membership-controlled.
But it does provide a non-
profit competitor for the for-
profit insurance companies,
and that's why it has appeal
on both sides."

Sen. Richard Shelby, R-
Ala., said Obama's team is
making a political calculation
and embracing the co-op
alternative as "a step away
from the government
takeover of the health care
system” that the GOP has
pummeled.

"T don't know if it will do
everything people want, but
we ought to look at it. I think
it's a far cry from the original
proposals,” he said.

Republicans say a public
option would have unfair
advantages that would drive
private insurers out of busi-
ness. Critics say co-ops would
not be genuine public options
for health insurance.

Rep. Eddie Bernice John-
son, D-Texas, said it would be
difficult to pass any legisla-
tion through the Democratic-
controlled Congress without
the promised public plan.

"We'll have the same num-
ber of people uninsured," she
said. "If the insurance com-
panies wanted to insure these
people now, they'd be
insured."

Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga.,
said the Democrats’ option
would force individuals from
their private plans to a gov-
ernment-run plan, a claim that
the nonpartisan Congression-
al Budget Office supports.

"There is a way to get folks
insured without having the
government option,” he said.

A shift to a cooperative
plan would certainly give
some cover to fiscally conser-
vative Blue Dog Democrats
who are hardly cheering for
the government-run plan.

"The reality is that it takes
60 percent to get this done in
the Senate. It's probably going
to have to be bipartisan in the
Senate, which I think it should
be," said Rep. Mike Ross, D-
Ark., who added that the pro-
posals still need changes
before he can support them.

Obama, writing in Sunday's
New York Times, said politi-
cal maneuvers should be

(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

excluded from the debate.

"In the coming weeks, the
cynics and the naysayers will
continue to exploit fear and
concerns for political gain,"
he wrote. "But for all the
scare tactics out there, what's
truly scary — truly risky — is
the prospect of doing noth-
ing."

Congress’ proposals, how-
ever, seemed likely to strike
end-of-life counseling ses-
sions. Former Alaska Gov.
Sarah Palin has called the ses-
sion "death panels," a label
that has drawn rebuke from
her fellow Republicans as well
as Democrats.

Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah,
declined to criticize Palin's
comments and said Obama
wants to create a government-
run panel to advise what types
of care would be available to
citizens.

"In all honesty, I don't want
a bunch of nameless, faceless
bureaucrats setting health
care for my aged citizens in
Utah," Hatch said.

Sebelius said the end-of-life
proposal was likely to be
dropped from the final bill.

"We wanted to make sure
doctors were reimbursed for
that very important consulta-
tion if family members chose
to make it, and instead it's
been turned into this scare
tactic and probably will be off
the table," she said.

Sebelius spoke on CNN's
"State of the Union” and
ABC's "This Week." Gibbs
appeared on CBS' "Face the
Nation." Conrad and Shelby
appeared on "Fox News Sun-
day.” Johnson, Price and Ross
spoke with "State of the
Union.” Hatch was inter-
viewed on "This Week."

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at wew.cob.edu.by

STAFF VACANCY

Applications are invited [rom suitably qualified persons for the follow-

ing position:

Chef Instructor, Culinary Arts, The Culinary & Hospitality
Management Institute (CHMI)

The successful candidate will be responsible for teaching a variety of
cooking and culinary courses to future Bahamian chefs; providing
assistance for the planning, development and maintenance of pro-
gramme curriculum; recommending and implementing curriculum
improvements; and must adhere to or exceed guidelines for lectures,
demonstrations, and class projects, as outlined in the approved course
outlines and syllabi. Candidates must have mastered culinary funda-
mentals and possess a passion for cooking and teaching.

Applicants should possess a Bachelor degree in Culinary or Hospitality
Management and at least three of the following professional designa-
tions, C.C.E., CCA, C.E.C, or C.M.C., and National Restaurant
Association (NRA) Sanitation Certification (ServSafe®). Individuals
with a minimum of seven years experience in progressive responsibil-

ities and teaching experience will be considered.

For a detailed job description, visit www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply
5 * Interested candidates should submit

a detailed resume and cover letter of interest no later than Monday,
August 31st , 2009.





THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 7B

School lending practices in question

Some for-profit schools are making loans to students, knowing that
many wont be able to pay them back.

Percent distribution of college loan debt, 2007-'08

None
=<$10,000 10. .000-

2-9 999

30,.000-
39,999

AO) CHOnO+ CHART SHOWS the student

debts in relation to their

Bachelor's degree

34

Associate degree

oo

Certificate

a

Overall

MOTE

SOURCE: Departrnent of E

NMurmbers may

4

14

| 20



ducatlion

Some tips
for taking out
student loans

By The Associated Press

AS credit standards for pri-
vate loans have tightened,
some for-profit, or "propri-
etary,” colleges are now lend-
ing money directly to stu-
dents.

Such borrowing may be
worthwhile, but here are
some tips for protecting your-
self on any student loan from
three experts: Deanne Loonin
of the National Consumer
Law Center, Tim Ranzetta of
Student Lending Analytics,
and Mark Kantrowitz of the
Web site finaid.org.

— Fill out the FAFSA form
for government aid, and
always max out on federal
grants and loans before turn-
ing to other sources. Rates

are lower, and the new
income-based repayment plan
offers protections if you expe-
rience financial difficulties or
choose a lower-paying career.

— Be wary of any lender
that refuses to provide infor-
mation on terms and fees.
Make sure you understand
the repayment requirements,
both for while you're in
school and after.

— If possible, apply with a
creditworthy co-signer to
reduce costs.

— Borrow as little as possi-
ble, no matter how much
somebody is willing to offer
you. Depending on rates and
repayment scheules, every
$100 in loans is likely to cost
around $200 by the time you
repay. However, borrowing is
preferable to forcing yourself

to work so many hours while
in school that you fail to grad-
uate.

— Find a school that won't
set you up for failure. Espe-
cially at for-profit colleges,
ask for data about graduation
rates, job placement rates and
average wages. If you're bor-
rowing more than around
$45,000 for a bachelor's
degree, or $25,000 for an asso-
ciate’s degree, think seriously
about finding a cheaper
school.

— A good rule of thumb:
Don't give yourself more total
loan debt than your expect-
ed gross salary the year after
you graduate. Another: Your
total monthly payment on all
student debt shouldn't exceed
eight per cent to 10 per cent
of your monthly salary.

rs
FOR RENT

Market Street North,
Near Central Bank

Renovated Office Space
900 sq. ft. $1500.00 per month

Warehouse Space
850 sq. ft - 750.00 per month

Warehouse Space
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Office Space (as Is)
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Secured Parking Space
$100.00 per month

Contact Tony Duncombe at

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tonyduncombe1@coralwave.com



degrees earned

20 Bile
sensi
ese I

23

not add up to 100 due to rounding.

NOTICE
CENSUS PRE-TEST

The Census Office of the Department of Statistics will conduct a Pre-Census Test
beginning Monday, August 17 — Sunday, August 30, 2009, in New Providence
and Grand Bahama. The Pre-test is an integral part of the Census of Population
and Housing which takes place in May 2010.

The main focus of this exercise is to test the questionnaire for Census 2010 in
terms of relevancy, as it relates to the census questions, average length of time
it takes to complete the questionnaire, weaknesses in the questions, instructions
or the design of the questionnaire, etc. To this end, enumerators with official
identification will visit households in New Providence and Grand Bahama in
order to collect information on households and individuals. The Census Pre-test
requires that the public provide information on the following:

Housing Characteristics such as type of dwelling, year the dwelling was built,
main source of water supply, number of bedrooms, etc

Population Characteristics which include information on age, sex, marital status,
health, disability, education, income, etc.

The data generated from the Pre-test will be held in strictest confidence.
All persons are urged to co-operate in this very important national exercise.

The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the following
position:

PLUMBER

The Plumber repairs and installs various plumbing systems, fixture,
pumps, piping and related equipment.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

* Completion of secondary school diploma.
* Four years of journeyman level in plumbing.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

¢ Must be skilled in plumbing maintenance.

¢ Must have a valid Bahamian driver’s license and the ability to drive
passenger vehicles, forklift, stake body and pickup trucks with manual
transmission.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation
package including performance-based incentives, medical and
dental insurance, life insurance, pension and opportunities for
training and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are
eligible for employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms can be found on the Embassy’s website
nassau.usembassy.gov under Key Embassy Links and employment

opportunities. Completed applications should be returned to
the Embassy via email to fernanderra@state.gov or faxed to
(242)328-8251, addressed to the Human Resources Office no later
than Thursday August 27th, 2009.





PAGE 8B, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



UK treasury chief: Banks’
bonus pay must be curbed.

LONDON (AP) —
Britain's treasury chief says
the government is ready to
bring in laws to curb the sort
of big bankers’ bonuses that
helped trigger the global
financial crisis.

Alistair Darling said in
comments published Sunday
he was prepared to legislate,
although he did not specify
any ideas for new laws.

"I'm quite clear that some
of the problems we have

today were caused by the fact
that some traders were incen-
tivized to take risks which nei-
ther they nor their bosses ful-
ly understood," Darling was
quoted as telling the Sunday
Times newspaper. "If we need
to change the law and tough-
en things up, we can do that."
Britain's financial services
watchdog has drawn up new
rules on bankers’ pay, but crit-
ics say they are too weak.
The Financial Services

Authority has outlined a code
to stop bankers from getting
bonuses at high multiples of
their salary or bonuses guar-
anteed for more than a year.
Banks that fail to comply
could face higher capital
charges or other punitive
action.

However, the authority
backed away from imposing
some new restrictions on the
structure of bonus payments
and reduced the range of
financial institutions that the

new code will cover. That
retreat followed industry
warnings that the tougher
measures would cripple Lon-
don's position as a financial
center.

Darling said the new code
"is only part of our approach"
to preventing another bank-
ing crisis.

Despite the global push to
reduce the risk-taking associ-
ated with big bonus pay,
reports suggest that bankers’
bonuses are creeping up

regardless.

The London-based Center
for Economic Business and
Research has forecast bonus
payments by banks will hit
four billion pounds ($6.6 bil-
lion) this year, up from 3.3
billion pounds a year ago.

Darling said citizens were
"rightly concerned," particu-
larly given their newfound
status as shareholders in
nationalized banks. Britain
seized Northern Rock and
took major stakes in Lloyds

and the Royal Bank of Scot-
land after they teetered amid
the global credit squeeze.

"Tam not against bonuses
where you are rewarding
good behavior and long-term
growth. That is something you
should encourage,” Darling
was quoted as saying.

But he warned that banks
must not return to “a situa-
tion where firms actively have
a pay system that results in
them being exposed in a way
that led to ruin."

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ANISEED ENTERPRISES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)














Legal Notice

NOTICE
FILDON PTE. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JANCH LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WEALTH FOUNTAIN LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RISTRETTO ENTERPRISES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LUCKY FORTUNE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
TUNLERTON
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LEEKSDALE INVESTMENTS
PTE. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ARKHALA HOLDINGS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ROCKY DIAMOND
PARK LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
BINGEO VENTURES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ASSOCIATE ATTORNEY

NEEDED

Experience in Litigation,
Conveyancing and
Commercial Law.

Background in Natural

Science preferred but not

required.

Apply by email only.
atty.at.law09 @ gmail.com



THE TRIBUNE



FROM page 1B

from COB it would have
been a far better investment
for the people of the
Bahamas.”

Mr Winder said 60 per cent
of the staff at Deloitte and
Touche went through the
College of the Bahamas,
including the firms two
youngest partners.

He added that a resumé,
with the College of the
Bahamas listed as a past insti-
tution, has more credibility
for his company.

“Investment in the College
of the Bahamas should take
priority over the loan sys-
tem,” said Mr Winder. “Gov-
ernment needs to do a post
analysis.”

According to him, it is
more important to ensure
that COB has the capacity to
educate the majority of the
students seeking a tertiary
education there. He said the
government was right to
abandon the guaranteed loan
programme.

Mr Winder contended that
the loan programme would
never be able to support the
majority, but insisted that the
expansion of COB would
increase the educated popu-
lation substantially by giving
the most students a better
chance at enrolling at the col-
lege.

“Precious investment dol-

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 9B
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Winder: Loan
programme was
a mistake from
the beginning

RAY WINDER

lars in COB will yield a far
greater return if capacity is
enlarged,” he said.

Mr Winder said govern-
ment now needs to out-source
the collection of the out-
standing $30 million in order
to reduce government inter-
ference.

“Individuals should not be

NOTICE

INVITATION TO BID



allowed to complain to the
politicians,” he said.

No politician would have
the ability to say “I know this
one and don't go so hard on
him.”

“We are prepared to sup-
port COB and are fully
behind investment at COB,”
he said.

GREEN TURTLE CAY WATER DISTRIBUTION IMPROVEMENTS — PHASE 2

1. The Water & Sewerage Corporation invites bids from suitably qualified contractors for

the = construction

of the

Green

Ture Cay

Water Distribution

Improvements/Extensions. The Scope of Works include the provision of all labour,
equipment, matenals and other necessary services required for the:-

TRANSMISSION/DISTRIBUTION MAINS

Supply and Installation of approximately 20,000 linear feet of 6-inch, PVC pipe,
6,500 linear feet of 4-lnch PVC pipe, 5000 linear feet of 2-inch PVC water mains,
and 300 no. *%-inch Service Laterals and 5 no. 1-inch service laterals, along with
all associated valves and appurtenances.

Bids from potential contractors must be accompanied by comprehensive details from the
Qualification Questionnaire out-lining:

a} Expenence on similar projects
b} Personnel to be assigned (including their experience on similar projects)
¢) Financial capacity to execute the works

The Contractor's qualifications and bid price will be evaluated for award of Contract.

Bidding documents and drawings wil be available on request beginning Tuesday, ia"
August 2009,from the Engineering & Planning Department of the Water & Sewerage
Corporation for a nominal fee of $100.00 per set. The Pre-Bid Meeting is scheduled for
Tuesday, 25" August 2009 at 10: a.m. af the site.

Completed documents must be returned to the address below, no later than 4:00 p.m, on
Friday 11° September 2009

General Manager

Water & Sewerage Corporation

a? Thompson Blvd.
P.O. Box N-3905
Nassau, Bahamas

Attn: Engineering & Planning Division

Telephone: (242) 302-5512
Facsimile: (242) 302-5538





BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West Bay Street,
P.0.Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas
Tels(242) 327-5780/327-5793-6
Fan:(242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www.bahamasdevelopmentbank,com



New Providence

Vacant bot #147 (10,55 7sq.

ft.)-Munnings Dr & Roy

West Lo Southem Heights

Sub (Appraised Value

$90,000.00)

2. Lot #59 (2500s. fL) whee
1, 104s. f. Blk #35 hoe #o-4-
Lincoln Bled (Appraised
Value $57,790.00)

3. Lat (50°x 100°) whuilding
1,91 2sq, f.-Deveaux St
(Appraised Valoc
$189,000.00)

4. Lats #29 2 #30, (50° 100"),
Blk #47 whuilding |,1-4sq.
ft-Matthew St, Nassau
Village (Appraised Value
$145,000.00)

And

§. Beach front loc 9,0eq, Fe.
wibilding 2,100sq. ft.
Pinders Mangrove Cay
Andros (Appraised Valoc
$200,000.00)

6 Lot 43449, f. widuplex
1,1 745q, f.-Fresh Creek
Andros (Appraised Valoc
$94,640.00)

Grand Bahama

7, Lot#20(17,150sq. ft.)
whee 2,0i0eg. fi. Ble,
Sec #2-Sea Gull Dr,
Bahama Reef Yacht &
Country Chah Sub Cirand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $230,000.00)

8. Wacamnt lot #39, Blk #9
(14,3973q. ft) Yorkshine
Dr, Bahamia West Replat
(Grand Bahama
(Appraised Valoc
$25,000.00)

4 Vacant Lot #8 Blk #12 Una
#3 (11,250sq, ft }-+Henny
Ave Derby Sub Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $65,000.00)

10, Lat Wad B(100'x1307)
building-Nelson Rid
Pomciana Gardens Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $96,000.00)

1, Lot#37 (30's 1")
‘aysixplex 2-stoney
apartment building d&
Church 3,400sq. ft.-Martin
Town, Kings Sub Bight Mile
Rock Grand Bahama
(Appraised Vale
$211,200.00)

—

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- Vacant lot #13, Blk #59,

Unit #3 (22,752sq, #145"
an canal front-Dagenham
Circle & Ingrave Dr
Emerald Bay Swh Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $110,000.00)
Lot #15, Blk ADS Linit 4
(90°x125"}-Derby Sub
Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$23,000.00)

. Vacant Wt e25, Blk els

(17, 866eq. 0. -Cetwater La
Shannon Country Club Sob
Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$34,000.00)

, Lot #2 (20/0005. f.)

wi building complex &
Lawndromat—Queens
Highway Holmes Rock
Commenage Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$178,600.00)

A
Lot #25 (17,7445q, f.)
whee 800ag, fL-47 Queen
Elizabeth Dr Marsh
Harbour Abaco
(Appraised Value
$212,750.00)
Vacant lot 86 (2 acres + Fox
Town Abaco (Appraised
Value $50,000.00)

19, Lot #3) (15,0005q, Ft.)

Pat
bo
'



whuikding-Murphy Town
Abaco (Appraised
Value $102,420.00)
Portion of lot 69 (15, (00sq,
ft.)-Front St WMurpby Town
Abaco (Appraised
Value $29,250.00)

. Loe 855 (6,9008q, M1)

wbuilding-Murphy Town
Abaco (Appraised
Value $82,075.10)

Let #45 (60° 160") wild
room motel 3,900aq. ff.
Sandy Paint Abaco

Assets
Vehicles

Car(s)



Wa! Dodee Strate

Trucks








21" (#74) Seacram Viceal
HP Evinrude Chitboard engine 3/140 10F VWamebs atbeard engine

‘iher Viggo! s — Photog Wot Avalos by
© BO" Coston Shae] Hull Wess] (Piss Eoreaty)

1999 Ford F-250 Track

1987 Double Asda Mack
Phenp Tirerk

Hiewal

aire Tandon Dew bela Traber i
1“.

(Appraised Value
$485, 700,00)

. Lot 87,1 2oeg. Fe wil
comages & | storage
building totaling 4,1B6sq. f-
Sand Banks Tressure Cay
Abeco (Appraised
Value $880,208.00)

ha
hed

24, Vacant portion of lot #7
(30's 110" Weal James
Cistem Eleuthera
(Appraised Value
$18,000.00)

25, Veen 3 acres of laced
situmed Colebrook Street
Dmmore Twn | Hoartacar
Island) Eleuthera

Cat Island

26. Vacant 65 acres of land:
Artvar's Town, Cat [sland

27. Lotwit mom motel 1.9
eeres—Arthue’s Town Cat
Islnd (Appraised Value
$630,000.00)

Exum

23. Vacant lot 88 (64, 20sg. fi.)
hogs Town Exuma
(Appraised Value
$110,188.00)

29. Lot (30,50sq. ft.) wo! small
hotel 4,5 20eap. i,
exclusive beach-Forbes Hill
Exuma (Appraised
Value $1,400, 000,00)

30. Vacant lot #05 (30'n 122")
Commadern: Ri Elizabeth
Harbowr Est. Exuma
(Appraised Value
$45,000.00)

S10. Lat A134 (75'S) een
storey building Geange
Town, Fxuma (Appraised
Value $463,000.00)

Vanis)





ZIG Ford Ranger Truck





S88) Mberglam 5 pons

nel (all Gale)



12" (heap Spaniels Marine
wD3 10P Mercury Dechoard eagle

= 122" Sitegle Screw Soeed Hull (1/960) MAY Lisa J I,
vessel has a mew engine requiring Installation, And

oan be view at Bradford Marine, Grand Bahame

60 (1992) Defender Vessel ()oeen. Vashti)

The public ia invited to submit Seabed bide marked “Tender” to Bahar Development Bank, P.O, Box M-3094,
Micxtill, Hakanée: ablention Financial Contreller, fazed bide will not be accepted or telephone 327-5780 for
additional iaformation Please mete that all bids om the alweermenctioned properties aad assets sheowald be received
by orem August 19, 200%. The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers. All assets

ore sold as is.



THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 11B



afl

bags fly free, but charges for a
third checked bag. JetBlue
charges for the second
checked bag.

JetBlue wants more busi-
ness travelers, as does South-
west, which has tried to lure
them with its "Business
Select" option launched two
years ago. Passengers that pay
a premium can go to the front
of the boarding line. Neither
airline offers business or first
class seats.

JetBlue said in July that
although it has not focused
on courting business travel-
ers in the past, it's landing
more of them in New York
and Boston as companies cut
travel budgets.

Because of their cheap
fares and high customer ser-
vice rankings, both airlines
have legions of loyal travel-
ers. Part of that loyalty can
also be traced to fresh mar-
keting that tries to put some
fun in flying. JetBlue's
tongue-in-cheek ads have
urged executives to get off
their private jets and fly Jet-
Blue. In Southwest TV ads,
CEO Gary Kelly told cus-
tomers "It's On" in New
York.

Both airlines are on
YouTube. Blogs and Twitter
are also important parts of
their brands.

Kelleher and Neeleman no
longer run the airlines they
started. Kelleher, 78, stepped
down as chairman last year,
but he is still under contract
until 2013. Neeleman, 49, runs
Azul Airlines in Brazil — a
venture he started after he
was pushed out of JetBlue in
2007 following the company's
bungled response to a North-
east snowstorm, leaving
130,000 passengers stranded
or delayed.

But the airlines they started
still have the low-cost, pas-
senger-savvy traits of their
founders. Both have flown
farther and lasted longer than

IN THIS July 19, 2005 file photo, a JetBlue Airbus flies over a pair of Southwest Airlines’ jets from Bob Hope
Airport in Burbank, Calif., bound for New York's JFK airport. After years of following similar game plans
to lure passengers with fares that are a cut below and customer service that's a cut above, JetBlue and
Southwest are going head-to-head in major Northeast markets...

some of their larger competi-
tors. Platt thinks the big air-
lines may have something to
worry about now in Boston
— and JetBlue will have to
ramp up its game, too.
"Boston has really been a
two-horse town with (two
major carriers dominating ser-
vice there)," he said. "Just the
mere presence (of another
low-cost carrier) is going to
change the landscape."

(AP Photo: Reed Saxon)

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MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

'y







The stories behind the news

SIGHT



‘Real tal’ on marital rape

By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

disturbing window is

opening into the

minds of Bahamians

who oppose the

amendment to the
Sexual Offences Act which would
totally ban marital rape in the
Bahamas.

It appears that men who balk at
the idea believe that it is acceptable
to force themselves on wives unwill-
ing or unable to have sex. It seems
they are willing to abandon the tra-
ditional role of husbands as protec-
tor and provider and don the mantle
of predator.

Women who oppose this amend-
ment either believe that being raped
is an acceptable aspect of married
life, an inevitability, like having to
complain about your husband drop-
ping his shirt onto the bedroom floor
after he comes home from work or
believe that they have no right to
their own feelings as it relates to
their sexual or reproductive life.

This is what it boils down to.
There are no nuances. There are no
shades of grey. There is no room left
for interpretation. The bill seeks to
give married women the same rights
as their single counterparts, the abil-
ity to see their rapist brought to jus-
tice even if he is the man she mar-
ried.

Those who oppose this bill believe
that if he so chooses, a man should
be able to "take sex", by force if
need be, from the "bone of his bone
and flesh of his flesh." I will through-
out this article refer to opponents
of this bill as proponents of marital
rape because like people of my gen-
eration say, "That's real talk."

It's been disheartening listening
to radio shows over the past few
weeks as the debate on this bill con-
tinues. Our men have come across as
brutes and our women steeped in a
victimology that is inexplicable in
this modern age. People have
butchered, misinterpreted and mis-
quoted the Bible to, as they see it,
defend the right of a man to his
wife's body. Even the radio show
hosts, who should know better,
defend would be rapists and postu-
late that the bill is being pushed by a
cabal of vindictive women or a hid-
den homosexual agenda.

I was also disappointed listening to
the recent Senate contribution that
Allyson Maynard Gibson made on
this matter. After listing what she
described as “black and white or
clearly defined areas about which
there is little or no disagreement”
where it would be obvious that a
man has raped his wife, like doping,
drugging, threatening her at gun-
point or beating her to have sex,
etcetera, she suggested that "con-
cerns arise when we are confronted
with the tremendous grey areas that
inevitably exist in the context of a
marriage."

The good senator suggests that
these grey areas may include
whether the wife was really saying
no, whether the husband was forcing
or trying to convince his wife to have
sex. She also asserts that there
should be consideration as to what
was the wife’s motive for making the
allegation of rape against her hus-
band. The amendment, she says,
should also take into consideration
the children and who will support
the family if the husband is sent to
jail.



A MAN SHOULD BE protector, provider, a nurturer, loving and a lover. You cannot love or be loved through force, contempt,

or through violence...

One can only assume Mrs May-
nard-Gibson was playing the role of
devil's advocate because the answers
to these questions are quite direct
and (as I said before) there are no
shades of grey.

First of all we will rightly assume
that in the case of marital rape it
will be the wife making the com-
plaint to the police so regardless of
what the husband thinks, the wife
knows if she was "really saying no."

She also will be painfully aware
of whether she was being "con-
vinced" or "forced" into having sex.
As for the motivation behind the
wife making the allegation in the
first place, as with rape cases involv-
ing people who are not married, it is
up to the courts to make that deter-
mination.

As for the children and who will
support the family if the husband is
sent to jail, surely these are matters
the man should consider before he
commits such a heinous act. These
should not be hindrances to a vic-
tim making a complaint. Rape laws,
which Mrs Maynard-Gibson
marched and fought to see enforced
in this country, exist for the victims
of rape and do not nor should not
include consideration for any other
party.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson is a suc-
cessful, well educated and promi-
nent Bahamian woman. There are
many women in our society would
be happy to be as blessed as she is.

$ SUZUKI

UE ere a en

Grand Vitara features:
Ce Sete emir ed
am RAR a a

Women in her position should take
care not to offer proponents of mar-
ital rape any excuse, which they have
done over this past week, to say "see
even a woman of no less esteem than
Allyson Maynard-Gibson has had
reason to question this amendment."

In the Bahamas marital rape can
only be recognised if the couple is
separated or in the process of getting
a divorce. If they are married and
there has been no separation,
spousal rape cannot occur under
Bahamian law.

One of the more persistent objec-
tions to the proposed amendment is
the idea that removing the ability of
aman to rape his wife would severe-
ly damage the institution of mar-
riage in the Bahamas.

Those stupid enough to make this
argument chose to ignore the fact
that the rape itself is severely dam-
aging to the institution of marriage.

In a "Your Say" published in this
newspaper on Wednesday, August
12, a writer by the name of "E.V"
suggested that the amendment
would destroy the family, because
it would force a man to sweetheart
or look for satisfaction elsewhere.

"When this happens and the
woman files for a divorce on the
grounds that the man was 'sweet-
hearting’, the courts would not con-
sider that it was the woman who ini-
tiated the whole thing by using her
body as a weapon and depriving her
husband of his rights. This same man

The best-value compact

then has to pay alimony and other
expenses. Why? Because he simply
wanted to have sex with the woman
God gave him to have sex with."

This argument is so ignorant,
backward, demonic and ridiculous
that if it were not repeated so many
times and by so many different peo-
ple it would hardly warrant a
response.

If the alternative to raping the
mother of your children is "seeking
satisfaction elsewhere" I hardly see
a problem. But there are more mea-
sured and intelligent solutions. If a
husband is sexually frustrated in his
marriage he can suggest counselling,
or perhaps talk to his wife and ask
her why she no longer seems inter-
ested in having sex. Even a trip to
her personal physician may be in
order.

In any event, in the "Your Say”
E.V. presents himself as one seeking
to preserve manhood. However,
E.V. wasn't man enough to have his
name printed which leads me to
respect his opinion even less.

Former president of the Bar Asso-
ciation, Wayne Munroe while he was
a panelist on Star 106.5’s talk Show
Generation X suggested that the
amendment would be abused by vin-
dictive Bahamian women, who, he
seems to suggest, are widespread
through the country.

Mr Munroe was quoted in anoth-
er daily as saying: “The problem that
this creates is this: All you need is for

there to be dysfunction in a house-
hold and a woman to be upset at a
man — and rape does not require
any trauma — and she calls the
police and says my husband raped
me. You would be arrested and you
would be the subject of domestic
orders. And it will be your word
against hers as to whether she said
‘hoa,

Amendment or no amendment, if
your marriage is so bad that forcing
yourself on your wife is the only way
you can have sex with her, you need
to get a divorce. Also, if your wife is
so vindictive that having sex with
her feels like playing a game of Russ-
ian roulette because you don’t know
when she’ll decide to unjustly accuse
you of rape, you need to get a
divorce.

Nothing is more damaging to the
institution of marriage than two peo-
ple who no longer want to be or who
have no business being together, liv-
ing in a tumultuous household cre-
ating a poisonous environment for
them and their children.

Barrington Brennen, who has
been a marriage and family thera-
pist for the past 15 years has been
agitating for a law like this for over a
decade.

He told The Tribune that unfor-
tunately the response to the pro-
posed amendment is revealing a
deep seated belief that women are
still property.

He pointed out that it is religious
rather than secular people who have
the biggest problem with this amend-
ment. These people Mr Brennen
said, resort to misusing scripture in
order to "brain wash" those who are
ignorant.

He highlighted the case of a
Bahamian woman who, after under-
going a painful surgical procedure
told her husband she was unable to
have sex.

This woman's husband forced
himself on her and through his wife's
pain, pleading and tears completed
the sexual act.

Opposition or support for this act
will not divide homes, but will sepa-
rate real Bahamian men from the
animals they may call brothers,
fathers, uncles, cousins and friends.

I have a very “traditional” view
of manhood which may become
even more “traditional” if I'm lucky
enough to be a father one day.

A man should be protector,
provider, a nurturer, loving and a
lover. You cannot love or be loved
through force, through contempt, or
through violence.

I sincerely hope that the public
debate on this bill is simply just some
social experiment or maybe even a
political distraction and the govern-
ment will have this legislation passed
regardless of the nonsense out there.
They have a moral and humanitari-
an obligation to do so.

If they fail to do this it will cer-
tainly be unforgivable and Bahami-
an women and all true Bahamian
men who love their women should
remind them harshly of their failure
in 2012.

Not passing this bill will mean that
men will be able to be punished for
raping acquaintances, relatives, girl-
friends, prostitutes, strippers and
strangers, but not their wives.

It is funny how these men, and I
use the term in the loosest sense of
the word, believe that a complete
stranger or prostitute should have
more rights than the women they
swore before God to love and cher-
ish until death.

er ;

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Full Text

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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.219MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUN WITH T-STORM HIGH 90F LOW 81F S P O R T S LATESTNEWSONPAGEFIFTEEN Bahamian athletes at World Championships SEEINSIGHTSECTION ‘Real talk’ on the subject of marital rape RUMOURS of an impend ing shuffle to the prime min ister’s Cabinet swirled in p olitical circles yesterday. The shake-up will report edly centre around Sports M inister Desmond Bannister who, according to a wellplaced source, wants to leave the political fray to focus onh is law practice. For weeks it has been speculated that Attorney GeneralM ichael Barnett will be appointed as the next chief justice leaving a void in his current post. There are also reports that State Minister for the Environment Phenton Neymour will be moved toa nother area and assume new duties. “I think Mr Bannister has b een wanting to get out for quite some time. I think he’s been pleading that his practice has been suffering and soh e just needs to get back in the private sector and he said (previouslyw anted to stay around for two years and I think he wants to The Tribune YOUR PASSPORT TO MISS UNIVERSE BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com I N S I G H T B y R U P E R T M I S S I C K J r C h i e f R e p o r t e r r m i s s i c k @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e tAd i s t u r b i n g w i n d o w i s o p e n i n g i n t o t h e m i n d s o f B a h a m i a n s w h o o p p o s e t h e a m e n d m e n t t o t h e S e x u a l O f f e n c e s A c t w h i c h w o u l d t o t a l l y b a n m a r i t a l r a p e i n t h e B a h a m a s . I t a p p e a r s t h a t m e n w h o b a l k a t t h e i d e a b e l i e v e t h a t i t i s a c c e p t a b l e t o f o r c e t h e m s e l v e s o n w i v e s u n w i l l i n g o r u n a b l e t o h a v e s e x . I t s e e m s t h e y a r e w i l l i n g t o a b a n d o n t h e t r a d i t i o n a l r o l e o f h u s b a n d s a s p r o t e c t o r a n d p r o v i d e r a n d d o n t h e m a n t l e o f p r e d a t o r . W o m e n w h o o p p o s e t h i s a m e n d m e n t e i t h e r b e l i e v e t h a t b e i n g r a p e d i s a n a c c e p t a b l e a s p e c t o f m a r r i e d l i f e , a n i n e v i t a b i l i t y , l i k e h a v i n g t o c o m p l a i n a b o u t y o u r h u s b a n d d r o p p i n g h i s s h i r t o n t o t h e b e d r o o m f l o o r a f t e r h e c o m e s h o m e f r o m w o r k o r b e l i e v e t h a t t h e y h a v e n o r i g h t t o t h e i r o w n f e e l i n g s a s i t r e l a t e s t o t h e i r s e x u a l o r r e p r o d u c t i v e l i f e . T h i s i s w h a t i t b o i l s d o w n t o . T h e r e a r e n o n u a n c e s . T h e r e a r e n o s h a d e s o f g r e y . T h e r e i s n o r o o m l e f t f o r i n t e r p r e t a t i o n . T h e b i l l s e e k s t o g i v e m a r r i e d w o m e n t h e s a m e r i g h t s a s t h e i r s i n g l e c o u n t e r p a r t s , t h e a b i l i t y t o s e e t h e i r r a p i s t b r o u g h t t o j u s t i c e e v e n i f h e i s t h e m a n s h e m a r r i e d . T h o s e w h o o p p o s e t h i s b i l l b e l i e v e t h a t i f h e s o c h o o s e s , a m a n s h o u l d b e a b l e t o " t a k e s e x " , b y f o r c e i f n e e d b e , f r o m t h e " b o n e o f h i s b o n e a n d f l e s h o f h i s f l e s h . " I w i l l t h r o u g h o u t t h i s a r t i c l e r e f e r t o o p p o n e n t s o f t h i s b i l l a s p r o p o n e n t s o f m a r i t a l r a p e b e c a u s e l i k e p e o p l e o f m y g e n e r a t i o n s a y , " T h a t ' s r e a l t a l k . " I t ' s b e e n d i s h e a r t e n i n g l i s t e n i n g t o r a d i o s h o w s o v e r t h e p a s t f e w w e e k s a s t h e d e b a t e o n t h i s b i l l c o n t i n u e s . O u r m e n h a v e c o m e a c r o s s a s b r u t e s a n d o u r w o m e n s t e e p e d i n a v i c t i m o l o g y t h a t i s i n e x p l i c a b l e i n t h i s m o d e r n a g e . P e o p l e h a v e b u t c h e r e d , m i s i n t e r p r e t e d a n d m i s q u o t e d t h e B i b l e t o , a s t h e y s e e i t , d e f e n d t h e r i g h t o f a m a n t o h i s w i f e ' s b o d y . E v e n t h e r a d i o s h o w h o s t s , w h o s h o u l d k n o w b e t t e r , d e f e n d w o u l d b e r a p i s t s a n d p o s t u l a t e t h a t t h e b i l l i s b e i n g p u s h e d b y a c a b a l o f v i n d i c t i v e w o m e n o r a h i d d e n h o m o s e x u a l a g e n d a . I w a s a l s o d i s a p p o i n t e d l i s t e n i n g t o t h e r e c e n t S e n a t e c o n t r i b u t i o n t h a t A l l y s o n M a y n a r d G i b s o n m a d e o n t h i s m a t t e r . A f t e r l i s t i n g w h a t s h e d e s c r i b e d a s b l a c k a n d w h i t e o r c l e a r l y d e f i n e d a r e a s a b o u t w h i c h t h e r e i s l i t t l e o r n o d i s a g r e e m e n t w h e r e i t w o u l d b e o b v i o u s t h a t a m a n h a s r a p e d h i s w i f e , l i k e d o p i n g , d r u g g i n g , t h r e a t e n i n g h e r a t g u n p o i n t o r b e a t i n g h e r t o h a v e s e x , e t c e t e r a , s h e s u g g e s t e d t h a t " c o n c e r n s a r i s e w h e n w e a r e c o n f r o n t e d w i t h t h e t r e m e n d o u s g r e y a r e a s t h a t i n e v i t a b l y e x i s t i n t h e c o n t e x t o f a m a r r i a g e . " T h e g o o d s e n a t o r s u g g e s t s t h a t t h e s e g r e y a r e a s m a y i n c l u d e w h e t h e r t h e w i f e w a s r e a l l y s a y i n g n o , w h e t h e r t h e h u s b a n d w a s f o r c i n g o r t r y i n g t o c o n v i n c e h i s w i f e t o h a v e s e x . S h e a l s o a s s e r t s t h a t t h e r e s h o u l d b e c o n s i d e r a t i o n a s t o w h a t w a s t h e w i f e s m o t i v e f o r m a k i n g t h e a l l e g a t i o n o f r a p e a g a i n s t h e r h u s b a n d . T h e a m e n d m e n t , s h e s a y s , s h o u l d a l s o t a k e i n t o c o n s i d e r a t i o n t h e c h i l d r e n a n d w h o w i l l s u p p o r t t h e f a m i l y i f t h e h u s b a n d i s s e n t t o j a i l . O n e c a n o n l y a s s u m e M r s M a y n a r d G i b s o n w a s p l a y i n g t h e r o l e o f d e v i l ' s a d v o c a t e b e c a u s e t h e a n s w e r s t o t h e s e q u e s t i o n s a r e q u i t e d i r e c t a n d ( a s I s a i d b e f o r e ) t h e r e a r e n o s h a d e s o f g r e y . F i r s t o f a l l w e w i l l r i g h t l y a s s u m e t h a t i n t h e c a s e o f m a r i t a l r a p e i t w i l l b e t h e w i f e m a k i n g t h e c o m p l a i n t t o t h e p o l i c e s o r e g a r d l e s s o f w h a t t h e h u s b a n d t h i n k s , t h e w i f e k n o w s i f s h e w a s " r e a l l y s a y i n g n o . " S h e a l s o w i l l b e p a i n f u l l y a w a r e o f w h e t h e r s h e w a s b e i n g " c o n v i n c e d " o r " f o r c e d " i n t o h a v i n g s e x . A s f o r t h e m o t i v a t i o n b e h i n d t h e w i f e m a k i n g t h e a l l e g a t i o n i n t h e f i r s t p l a c e , a s w i t h r a p e c a s e s i n v o l v i n g p e o p l e w h o a r e n o t m a r r i e d , i t i s u p t o t h e c o u r t s t o m a k e t h a t d e t e r m i n a t i o n . A s f o r t h e c h i l d r e n a n d w h o w i l l s u p p o r t t h e f a m i l y i f t h e h u s b a n d i s s e n t t o j a i l , s u r e l y t h e s e a r e m a t t e r s t h e m a n s h o u l d c o n s i d e r b e f o r e h e c o m m i t s s u c h a h e i n o u s a c t . T h e s e s h o u l d n o t b e h i n d r a n c e s t o a v i c t i m m a k i n g a c o m p l a i n t . R a p e l a w s , w h i c h M r s M a y n a r d G i b s o n m a r c h e d a n d f o u g h t t o s e e e n f o r c e d i n t h i s c o u n t r y , e x i s t f o r t h e v i c t i m s o f r a p e a n d d o n o t n o r s h o u l d n o t i n c l u d e c o n s i d e r a t i o n f o r a n y o t h e r p a r t y . M r s M a y n a r d G i b s o n i s a s u c c e s s f u l , w e l l e d u c a t e d a n d p r o m i n e n t B a h a m i a n w o m a n . T h e r e a r e m a n y w o m e n i n o u r s o c i e t y w o u l d b e h a p p y t o b e a s b l e s s e d a s s h e i s . W o m e n i n h e r p o s i t i o n s h o u l d t a k e c a r e n o t t o o f f e r p r o p o n e n t s o f m a r i t a l r a p e a n y e x c u s e , w h i c h t h e y h a v e d o n e o v e r t h i s p a s t w e e k , t o s a y " s e e e v e n a w o m a n o f n o l e s s e s t e e m t h a n A l l y s o n M a y n a r d G i b s o n h a s h a d r e a s o n t o q u e s t i o n t h i s a m e n d m e n t . " I n t h e B a h a m a s m a r i t a l r a p e c a n o n l y b e r e c o g n i s e d i f t h e c o u p l e i s s e p a r a t e d o r i n t h e p r o c e s s o f g e t t i n g a d i v o r c e . I f t h e y a r e m a r r i e d a n d t h e r e h a s b e e n n o s e p a r a t i o n , s p o u s a l r a p e c a n n o t o c c u r u n d e r B a h a m i a n l a w . O n e o f t h e m o r e p e r s i s t e n t o b j e c t i o n s t o t h e p r o p o s e d a m e n d m e n t i s t h e i d e a t h a t r e m o v i n g t h e a b i l i t y o f a m a n t o r a p e h i s w i f e w o u l d s e v e r e l y d a m a g e t h e i n s t i t u t i o n o f m a r r i a g e i n t h e B a h a m a s . T h o s e s t u p i d e n o u g h t o m a k e t h i s a r g u m e n t c h o s e t o i g n o r e t h e f a c t t h a t t h e r a p e i t s e l f i s s e v e r e l y d a m a g i n g t o t h e i n s t i t u t i o n o f m a r r i a g e . I n a " Y o u r S a y " p u b l i s h e d i n t h i s n e w s p a p e r o n W e d n e s d a y , A u g u s t 1 2 , a w r i t e r b y t h e n a m e o f " E . V " s u g g e s t e d t h a t t h e a m e n d m e n t w o u l d d e s t r o y t h e f a m i l y , b e c a u s e i t w o u l d f o r c e a m a n t o s w e e t h e a r t o r l o o k f o r s a t i s f a c t i o n e l s e w h e r e . " W h e n t h i s h a p p e n s a n d t h e w o m a n f i l e s f o r a d i v o r c e o n t h e g r o u n d s t h a t t h e m a n w a s ' s w e e t h e a r t i n g ' , t h e c o u r t s w o u l d n o t c o n s i d e r t h a t i t w a s t h e w o m a n w h o i n i t i a t e d t h e w h o l e t h i n g b y u s i n g h e r b o d y a s a w e a p o n a n d d e p r i v i n g h e r h u s b a n d o f h i s r i g h t s . T h i s s a m e m a n t h e n h a s t o p a y a l i m o n y a n d o t h e r e x p e n s e s . W h y ? B e c a u s e h e s i m p l y w a n t e d t o h a v e s e x w i t h t h e w o m a n G o d g a v e h i m t o h a v e s e x w i t h . " T h i s a r g u m e n t i s s o i g n o r a n t , b a c k w a r d , d e m o n i c a n d r i d i c u l o u s t h a t i f i t w e r e n o t r e p e a t e d s o m a n y t i m e s a n d b y s o m a n y d i f f e r e n t p e o p l e i t w o u l d h a r d l y w a r r a n t a r e s p o n s e . I f t h e a l t e r n a t i v e t o r a p i n g t h e m o t h e r o f y o u r c h i l d r e n i s " s e e k i n g s a t i s f a c t i o n e l s e w h e r e " I h a r d l y s e e a p r o b l e m . B u t t h e r e a r e m o r e m e a s u r e d a n d i n t e l l i g e n t s o l u t i o n s . I f a h u s b a n d i s s e x u a l l y f r u s t r a t e d i n h i s m a r r i a g e h e c a n s u g g e s t c o u n s e l l i n g , o r p e r h a p s t a l k t o h i s w i f e a n d a s k h e r w h y s h e n o l o n g e r s e e m s i n t e r e s t e d i n h a v i n g s e x . E v e n a t r i p t o h e r p e r s o n a l p h y s i c i a n m a y b e i n o r d e r . I n a n y e v e n t , i n t h e " Y o u r S a y " E . V . p r e s e n t s h i m s e l f a s o n e s e e k i n g t o p r e s e r v e m a n h o o d . H o w e v e r , E . V . w a s n ' t m a n e n o u g h t o h a v e h i s n a m e p r i n t e d w h i c h l e a d s m e t o r e s p e c t h i s o p i n i o n e v e n l e s s . F o r m e r p r e s i d e n t o f t h e B a r A s s o c i a t i o n , W a y n e M u n r o e w h i l e h e w a s a p a n e l i s t o n S t a r 1 0 6 . 5 s t a l k S h o w G e n e r a t i o n X s u g g e s t e d t h a t t h e a m e n d m e n t w o u l d b e a b u s e d b y v i n d i c t i v e B a h a m i a n w o m e n , w h o , h e s e e m s t o s u g g e s t , a r e w i d e s p r e a d t h r o u g h t h e c o u n t r y . M r M u n r o e w a s q u o t e d i n a n o t h e r d a i l y a s s a y i n g : T h e p r o b l e m t h a t t h i s c r e a t e s i s t h i s : A l l y o u n e e d i s f o r t h e r e t o b e d y s f u n c t i o n i n a h o u s e h o l d a n d a w o m a n t o b e u p s e t a t a m a n a n d r a p e d o e s n o t r e q u i r e a n y t r a u m a a n d s h e c a l l s t h e p o l i c e a n d s a y s m y h u s b a n d r a p e d m e . Y o u w o u l d b e a r r e s t e d a n d y o u w o u l d b e t h e s u b j e c t o f d o m e s t i c o r d e r s . A n d i t w i l l b e y o u r w o r d a g a i n s t h e r s a s t o w h e t h e r s h e s a i d n o . A m e n d m e n t o r n o a m e n d m e n t , i f y o u r m a r r i a g e i s s o b a d t h a t f o r c i n g y o u r s e l f o n y o u r w i f e i s t h e o n l y w a y y o u c a n h a v e s e x w i t h h e r , y o u n e e d t o g e t a d i v o r c e . A l s o , i f y o u r w i f e i s s o v i n d i c t i v e t h a t h a v i n g s e x w i t h h e r f e e l s l i k e p l a y i n g a g a m e o f R u s s i a n r o u l e t t e b e c a u s e y o u d o n t k n o w w h e n s h e l l d e c i d e t o u n j u s t l y a c c u s e y o u o f r a p e , y o u n e e d t o g e t a d i v o r c e . N o t h i n g i s m o r e d a m a g i n g t o t h e i n s t i t u t i o n o f m a r r i a g e t h a n t w o p e o p l e w h o n o l o n g e r w a n t t o b e o r w h o h a v e n o b u s i n e s s b e i n g t o g e t h e r , l i v i n g i n a t u m u l t u o u s h o u s e h o l d c r e a t i n g a p o i s o n o u s e n v i r o n m e n t f o r t h e m a n d t h e i r c h i l d r e n . B a r r i n g t o n B r e n n e n , w h o h a s b e e n a m a r r i a g e a n d f a m i l y t h e r a p i s t f o r t h e p a s t 1 5 y e a r s h a s b e e n a g i t a t i n g f o r a l a w l i k e t h i s f o r o v e r a d e c a d e . H e t o l d T h e T r i b u n e t h a t u n f o r t u n a t e l y t h e r e s p o n s e t o t h e p r o p o s e d a m e n d m e n t i s r e v e a l i n g a d e e p s e a t e d b e l i e f t h a t w o m e n a r e s t i l l p r o p e r t y . H e p o i n t e d o u t t h a t i t i s r e l i g i o u s r a t h e r t h a n s e c u l a r p e o p l e w h o h a v e t h e b i g g e s t p r o b l e m w i t h t h i s a m e n d m e n t . T h e s e p e o p l e M r B r e n n e n s a i d , r e s o r t t o m i s u s i n g s c r i p t u r e i n o r d e r t o " b r a i n w a s h " t h o s e w h o a r e i g n o r a n t . H e h i g h l i g h t e d t h e c a s e o f a B a h a m i a n w o m a n w h o , a f t e r u n d e r g o i n g a p a i n f u l s u r g i c a l p r o c e d u r e t o l d h e r h u s b a n d s h e w a s u n a b l e t o h a v e s e x . T h i s w o m a n ' s h u s b a n d f o r c e d h i m s e l f o n h e r a n d t h r o u g h h i s w i f e ' s p a i n , p l e a d i n g a n d t e a r s c o m p l e t e d t h e s e x u a l a c t . O p p o s i t i o n o r s u p p o r t f o r t h i s a c t w i l l n o t d i v i d e h o m e s , b u t w i l l s e p a r a t e r e a l B a h a m i a n m e n f r o m t h e a n i m a l s t h e y m a y c a l l b r o t h e r s , f a t h e r s , u n c l e s , c o u s i n s a n d f r i e n d s . I h a v e a v e r y " t r a d i t i o n a l " v i e w o f m a n h o o d w h i c h m a y b e c o m e e v e n m o r e " t r a d i t i o n a l " i f I ' m l u c k y e n o u g h t o b e a f a t h e r o n e d a y . A m a n s h o u l d b e p r o t e c t o r , p r o v i d e r , a n u r t u r e r , l o v i n g a n d a l o v e r . Y o u c a n n o t l o v e o r b e l o v e d t h r o u g h f o r c e , t h r o u g h c o n t e m p t , o r t h r o u g h v i o l e n c e . I s i n c e r e l y h o p e t h a t t h e p u b l i c d e b a t e o n t h i s b i l l i s s i m p l y j u s t s o m e s o c i a l e x p e r i m e n t o r m a y b e e v e n a p o l i t i c a l d i s t r a c t i o n a n d t h e g o v e r n m e n t w i l l h a v e t h i s l e g i s l a t i o n p a s s e d r e g a r d l e s s o f t h e n o n s e n s e o u t t h e r e . T h e y h a v e a m o r a l a n d h u m a n i t a r i a n o b l i g a t i o n t o d o s o . I f t h e y f a i l t o d o t h i s i t w i l l c e r t a i n l y b e u n f o r g i v a b l e a n d B a h a m i a n w o m e n a n d a l l t r u e B a h a m i a n m e n w h o l o v e t h e i r w o m e n s h o u l d r e m i n d t h e m h a r s h l y o f t h e i r f a i l u r e i n 2 0 1 2 . N o t p a s s i n g t h i s b i l l w i l l m e a n t h a t m e n w i l l b e a b l e t o b e p u n i s h e d f o r r a p i n g a c q u a i n t a n c e s , r e l a t i v e s , g i r l f r i e n d s , p r o s t i t u t e s , s t r i p p e r s a n d s t r a n g e r s , b u t n o t t h e i r w i v e s . I t i s f u n n y h o w t h e s e m e n , a n d I u s e t h e t e r m i n t h e l o o s e s t s e n s e o f t h e w o r d , b e l i e v e t h a t a c o m p l e t e s t r a n g e r o r p r o s t i t u t e s h o u l d h a v e m o r e r i g h t s t h a n t h e w o m e n t h e y s w o r e b e f o r e G o d t o l o v e a n d c h e r i s h u n t i l d e a t h . I N S I G H T C M Y K C M Y K T h e T r i b u n e I N S I G H T M O N D A Y , A U G U S T 1 7 , 2 0 0 9T h e s t o r i e s b e h i n d t h e n e w s R e a l t a l k o n m a r i t a l r a p e A M A N S H O U L D B E p r o t e c t o r , p r o v i d e r , a n u r t u r e r , l o v i n g a n d a l o v e r . Y o u c a n n o t l o v e o r b e l o v e d t h r o u g h f o r c e , c o n t e m p t , o r t h r o u g h v i o l e n c e . . . Cabinet set for shuf fle? Sports Minister Desmond Bannisterr epor tedl y wants to lea ve politics Hurricane could hit the Bahamas by end of week N assau MISS UNIVERSEPAGEANTGETSCOMPETITIVE MISSBAHAMAS Kiara Sherman poses on stage last night at the Imperial Ballroom, Atlantis Resort, Paradise Island. The Miss Universe pageant entered its competitive phase last night with the swimwear and evening gown events. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A HURRICANE could hit the Bahamas at the end of the week as Tropical Storm Bill gains strength over the Atlantic, forecasters warned last night. However, it is still too early to say for certain. A lthough it is still too early to tell whether Bill will be a threat to the Bahamas, Bahamas Department of Mete orology meteorologist Basil Dean told The Tribune yesterday that the threat will become clear by Wednesday. The strengthening Tropical Storm had maximum sus t ained winds of 65 mph as it moved west northwest at around 16 mph last night, and Tropical Storm force winds extended up to 140 miles outward. SEE page 11 TRAGEDY struck a young mother who fell off a cliff and is believed to have drowned in rough waters near Clifton Pier, police said. Just two hours later, police found the lifeless body of a man bobbing in the water at the eastern end of Potter’s Cay. Police said Vonique Johnson, 39, and her 18-year-old daugh ter took a car ride to the Clifton Young mother believed to have drowned after falling from cliff By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A MARRIAGE and family therapist of 15 years says gov ernment must pass the marital rape law whether there is con sensus for it or not. Barrington Brennen has been agitating for the “long overdue” law “for about 10 years”, he told The Tribune yesterday. He said the debate that has followed in the wake of its pro posal in parliament has, “unfor SEE page 11 SEE page 11 REIGNING MISS UNIVERSETALKS TOTHETRIBUNE THEREIGNING Miss Universe Dayana Mendoza gave an exclusive interview to The Tribune at the weekend. SEE PAGE TWOfor her views on the pageant and what she’s made of her visit to the Bahamas. Mar riage and family therapist: govt must pass marital rape law SEE page 11 A POWER cut affected homes and businesses throughout New Providence for up to four hours on Friday night when a Bahamas Electricity Corporation power cable “faulted” in the Big Pond area. Minister of State for the Environment Phenton Neymour said power failed in nearly every New Providence community when a fault in the voltage transformer of the 33 kilowatt cable Four hour power cut in New Providence SEE page 11

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REIGNING Miss Universe Dayana Mendoza admits she is sad she no longer plays an active role in the competition, but says she could not have chosen a better place to relinquish her crown than the Bahamas. While on the set of an early morning Miss Universe calendar shoot on Frid ay at Atlantis, the former Miss Venezuela took a few minutes to give an exclusive i nterview to T he Tribune , in w hich she discussed her feelings about the pageant, t his year’s contestants and h er plans for the future. T : How do you feel w atching this year’s contest from the sidelines? DM: “It is a bit weird and a little sad for me sometimes, because I see them having fun – like Miss V enezuela (Stefania Fern andez, who succeeded M iss Mendoza). It is sad to s ee them, because it r eminds me of when I was d oing it.” T: How was your year as Miss Universe? DM: “It was great, I had so much fun. It is really a beautiful job; you get to represent Latin women in my case and women in general, and learn a lot about the world.” T : Which of the contestants has the best chance of winning in your opinion? D M: “Well I don’t know. I haven’t the opportunity to s peak with them really, so I d on’t know if what kind of p ersonality they have, or if they project something spe-c ial. They are all pretty, but if I don’t talk to them, I cannot really tell if I’d like them to be winners or not. So I don’t know. T: What do you think a bout the Bahamas? D M: “I’m having a great t ime. The Bahamas is para dise, so for me to give up t he crown here, I’m very lucky. T: When you first arrived, you said, “I’m home”. What did you mean by that? DM: “I’ve been here so many times already that I’m u sed to being here and I d on’t feel a difference. I love t he food, I love the people, I love the weather, the beach and the sand and the wholet hing, so I feel so comfort able, I don’t want to leave.” T : What will you take back with you? DM: “More than objects. I ’m going to take back memories. I’ll be back, I will definitely visit again. But not bym yself – with my family.” T: What is in your future? DM: “I don’t know what’s in my future; only God knows what is in my future, but what I’m going to do now in the near future is go to New York Film Academy. I ’m going to go to acting s chool. “I think it is a great opportunity that I can take advan tage of thanks to my schol arship from the Miss Universe organisation.” T: What was your favourite part of being Miss Universe? DM: “Travelling all around the world for free!” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE REIGNING MISS UNIVERSE DAYANA MENDOZA SPEAKSTOTHETRIBUNE F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f CHADMARTEL REIGNING Miss Universe Dayana Mendoza MISS UNIVERSE Dayana Mendoza enjoys a photo shoot. THE REIGNING Miss Universe has enjoyed her time in the Bahamas. DAYANA MENDOZA chats while on camera. CHADMARTEL Derek Smith /BIS

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By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE prime minister should immediately end government’s “insensitive” suspension of the national education loan guarantee programme and increase the cap on educational funding to ensure that hundreds of abandoned students can still pursue tertiary education abroad this semester. Deputy leader candidate of the Progressive Liberal Party Philip “Brave” Davis argued that this would allow the hundreds of students let down by government’s “abrupt” decision to begin their studies as early as this week. “A government serious about its young people would prioritize its spending and budget to ensure that the hundreds of (students) affected receive the funding necessary to pursue their studies,” said Mr Davis. He also questioned why government would “squander” the public’s money on road improvement projects and preparations for the upcoming Miss Universe pageant instead of allocating money to invest in the country’s educational development. “What is the point of revitalising Bay Street and the downtown area and creating new opportunities if we are not developing the brain power to take advantage of it? “I understand that government has spent over $10 million to aid in the hosting of Miss Uni verse. “How can we truly benefit from the exposure of our islands when in the same breath we cannot find a dollar to support and educate our people,” he asked at a press conference held at his law chambers yesterday. Nearly two weeks ago, Education Minister Carl Bethel shocked many students who were counting on the loan to help finance costly studies abroad when he announced that the plan had been suspended due to a high default rate. Following the backlash from frustrated students, Mr Bethel said his ministry had repeatedly warned the public that the programme's future was uncertain from the start. He added that the plan would remain suspended until it is able to sustain itself. In a recent interview with The Tribune, Mr Bethel explained that the cap on the loans was lowered from $20,000 a year to $10,000 in 2004 while the average grade point average of 2.5 per cent was raised to make the pro gramme more exclusive in the face of rising defaulters. Still government's Guaranteed Loan Programme accumulateda $68.05 million deficit because so many students failed to make good on their repayment, he said. Mr Davis argued that government should quickly enact more stringent controls, increased pub lic reporting requirements andr egular audits to ensure the plan is sustained in the long-term. The MP for Cat Island and Rum Cay also called on government to publish the names of all defaulters of the educational loan programme and publish stringent eligibility so that the plan will be free of political abuse in the future. He also criticised government for not alerting applicants about the suspension sooner, so they could make alternate plans. “At this late stage, the College of the Bahamas and alternative financing are not viable options. These same children, the victims of broken promises, now have to find a way not only to cope. ..But must now find a job in this challenging market,” he said. “Prospective students, who had their tickets purchased, resigned from jobs, paid nonrefundable deposits, secured visas, reserved accommodations and prepared their lives for a major change now face grievous disappointment because government broke their promise to them,” said Mr Davis, flanked by one disappointed student whose dreams of studying at a college abroad were dashed. In a recent interview, Mr B ethel defended government’s decision. "Sometimes the wheels of government don't operate as quickly as possible and it's unfortu nate in this case that the policy decision came as late as it did, but that's something we can't control. "I have spoken several times about the debts, urging graduates to pay because of the threat it was posing to the viability of the fund," Mr Bethel told The Tribune in a recent interview. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Post Bed 3 pc Queen Post Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $3,950 $3,950 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $4,150 $4,150Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank I I r r i i s s h h C C o o u u n n t t r r y y s s i i d d e e I I r r i i s s h h C C o o u u n n t t r r y y s s i i d d e e Davis calls for govt to end loan programme suspension TWO men are targeting isolated cars parked in the Goodman’s Bay area and stealing valuables left behind, police confirmed. According to an offic er stationed at the C able Beach police stat ion, who did not want to be named, the station has received several complaints of items b eing stolen from vehic les left parked in the w estern parking lot of Goodman’s Bay beach. We’ve been getting s everal reports on that,” said the officer, who could not say how many break-ins were reported recently or when the thieves strike. An e-mail being circul ated over the last few days warned residents of the potential danger. The driver would pull very close to a parked vehicle while his accomplice (would t ake an object out to break the glass, then reverse the car, while t he other (does s earching and the steali ng,” said the e-mail. The thieves are targ eting cars that seem v ulnerable with valuable items left out in the open and are parkedin isolated spots, said police. T he officer said his station patrols the areae very day but urged p ersons who use that parking lot to park their cars in populated areas and not to leave valu a bles in their vehicles. Police:two men targeting cars in Goodman’s Bay In brief POLICE are searching for armed carjackers who held a young woman up at gunpoint and stole her car. S hortly after 2 am yesterday two men driving a gold coloured H onda pulled up behind a 26-year-old woman who had just arrived at her home on Sweeting’s Lane. One of the men got out of the car with a shotgun and d emanded the keys to the victim’s white 2001 Honda Accord registration No. 209852. The gunman sped off in the stolen vehicle, however, the y oung woman was not harmed. Police investigations continue. Carjackers steal woman’ s car PHILIP ‘BRAVE’ DAVIS HUBERT INGRAHAM

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By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE Wyndham resort on Cable Beach will close today for eight weeks in an effort to increase cost savings and stave o ff further negative repercussions from the current tourism downturn. Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s senior vice-president of administration and external relations, said the period will be used to freshen up the property and ensure it can be a viable comp etitor when it re-opens on October, 7. “There will be some routine maintenance that will be carried out plus some small capital items to ensure that the product is as fresh as it can be when the property reopens. “There won’t be any major c apital works done because we’ve already invested close to$30 million (in upgrades the property. But we will ensure that the property will be in the best condition that it can be,” he told The Tribune during a brief interview yesterday. Over the last few weeks the resort has had occupancy levels of around 70 per cent he said, but added that visitor arrivals r outinely dwindle in September and October. Factoring in the unpredictable hurricane season, which is normally more active later in the year, Mr Sands said the temporary closure makes good business sense. “This (closure allow us the opportunity to maximise financial saving during a traditionally slow period and the traditional height of the hurricane season,” he said. The hotel’s phone lines will remain open to book future reservations and the resort’s operators will continue to aggressively market the property. But Mr Sands said it was too early to tell how business will fare come October. “It’s too soon to say but certainly when you look at the levels of travel over that period there will be a time-frame for which we have to build back slowly but that will also be influenced by world economic conditions and that (hinges on whether confidence in North America improves,” he said. Meantime Whyndam employees, who were informed of the closure last year, will use the two-month closure as a vacation period. Mr Sands said all employees will be scheduled to return to work on or about October 7. But if the tourism industry continues to worsen, current staffing levels may be adjusted. “Our business is like an accordion and we adjust staffing levels to meet business demand. . .We assess staffing levels on a monthly basis that’s the nature of our business. We have to continue to ensure that we are financially viable and staffing demands are predicated on business levels period,” he said. The last guests are set to leave the hotel today. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, 1998, PAGE 5 Wyndham closes for eight weeks B y MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A MOTHER whose Jamaican husband left h er days after she applied for his permanent r esidence permit has criticised the Immigration Department for ignoring her pleas to void the application. The 33-year-old of Harbour Island was e nraged when she discovered that the depart m ent not only ignored her request but granted her estranged husband’s application in less t han six months. She married the 27-year-old Jamaican in 2004, and after five years of marriage she sent off the final application for his permanent residence. B ut within days of sending off the final paperwork in February, her husband left both his wife and two children in Harbour Island to m ove to Nassau. He has since failed to provide any financial assistance to his family while his wife is unablet o work as she is their four-year-old daughter’s full-time care giver, she says. The Harbour Island woman, who did not want to be named, told The Tribune how she c ontacted the Immigration Department, sent Immigration officials several letters, and met with Director of Immigration Jack Thomps on, in an effort to revoke his application. But she said Mr Thomps on appeared to be uncon cerned about her plight, a nd Minister of Immigrat ion Branville McCartney f ailed to respond to her r equest to meet with him. The mother of five followed the department’s advice by filing for a legal separation, and sent Immi-g ration officials a copy of the court summons her hus b and had received. Yet the application was granted after he failed to appear in court in July and the hearing was postponed to mid-September. The woman said: “I wrote letters on top of l etters and it’s like my pleas don’t even mean anything. It’s like Immigration doesn’t care. “I feel as if my husband is the registered v oter and not me. I did everything and now I get slapped in the face, as he was granted per manent residence after I sent every letter I w rote. “When I met with the director he told me I am not the only one in these circumstances, that he meets people like me every day, but t his is his job; if he can’t take the pressure he needs to come out the kitchen!” W oman criticises Immigration Dept over refusal to void estranged husband’s permit SEE page 16 BRANVILLE MCCARTNEY ROBERT SANDS

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G OVERNMENT wants t he produce of farmers and fishermen insured in the event of a hurricane. To facilitate this, the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO Nations has been designinga plan for the Bahamas. Last weekend, Charles Stutley, risk insurer adviser with the World Bank met with farmers and fishermen at the Gladstone Road Agri-c ultural Centre to apprise them of the studies done. Also participating in the discussions were Director of A griculture Simeon Pinder, a nd Simon Wilson of the Ministry of Finance along w ith representatives from Abaco, Exuma, San Salv ador, Long Island, Crooked Island, GrandB ahama and Andros. Traditionally government gave out relief funds, “but t hat has a certain affect upon the budget,” noted A griculture and Marine Resources Under Secretary P hilip Miller. “We do not know in any budget year if or when a s torm is coming and how much damage it would c ause.” In 2003, government asked FAO for technicala ssistance in coming up with an insurance scheme for c rop damage during a storm. Mr Stutley’s visit is the third for an FAO represent ative on this matter. “The Government wants t o institute a crop insurance scheme for farmers and fishermen,” said Mr Miller. For full coverage, we are looking at situations where farmers and fishermen willn ot have to pay a burdensome premium. The techni cians are looking at all the options.” A demand survey con d ucted in 2006 showed that most farmers were in favour of insurance. Something can be done,” said Mr Miller. “We live in a hurricane prone zone. As the economyd evelops, the damage done i n agriculture and fisheries will also increase. “Today persons are coming up with big investmentsi n poultry and green house f arming. The question is how can we come up with an insurance that would indemnify them againstd amage.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Vacation in Paradise.Only $69*per person double occupancy.Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only. Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus: Limited-time offer! Reserve today ! B *$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. – Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. – Sat. Maximum four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply. Government wants insurance for farmers and fishermen F ARMERS AND f ishermen discussed product insurance with FAO adviser Charles Stutley. F AO RISK i nsurer adviser Charles Stutley met with fishermen and farmers to discuss insurance. CARACAS, Venezuela PRESIDENTHugo Chavez says Venezuela's ties with nations like Russia and China have gained importance as the U.S. moves to expand its milit ary presence in Latin A merica, a ccording to A ssociated Press. Chavez says there are now "much more significant reasons to accelerate cooperation plans with allied countries." The U.S. is negotiating a n agreement with Colomb ia to use seven bases t here for anti-drug operat ions. Chavez calls the plan a threat to the region, but Colombian and U.S. offi-c ials say there is no reason for concern. Chavez said Saturday he plans to visit Russia and t he former Soviet republ ic of Belarus within the next month. He added that V enezuela hopes to triple oil shipments to China o ver the next four years to 1 million barrels a day. Chavez: Venezuela to strengthen its ties with allies TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras T HEU.S. military said Sunday its troops in Honduras did not know of and played no role in a flight that took ousted PresidentM anuel Zelaya to exile during a military coup, according to Associated Press. Zelaya says the Honduran military plane that flew him to Costa Rica on June 28 stopped to refuel at Soto Cano, a Honduran air base that is home to 600 U.S. soldiers, sailors and airmen engaged in counter-narcotics opera t ions and other missions in Central America. U.S. forces at Soto Cano “were not involved in the flight that carried President Zelaya to Costa Rica on June 28,” Southern Command spokesman Robert Appin said in an e-mail to The Associated Press. The American troops “had no knowledge or part in the decisions made for the plane to land, refuel and take off.” Appin said the U.S. troops at Soto Cano have stopped conducting exercises with theH onduran military since the coup. “The U.S. military recognizes that the situation must be resolved by Hondurans andt heir democratic institutions in accordance with the rule of law,” he said. The administration of President Barack Obama has cut off millions of dollars in military and development aid to Honduras in an effort to pressure for Zelaya’s reinstatement. I t has stopped short of imposing trade sanc tions that could cripple the Honduran economy, which is highly dependent on exports to the United States. Zelaya, a wealthy rancher who aligned himself with leftist Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez during his presidency, has increasingly voiced frustration with Washington for failing to impose tougher penalties. US military denies role in Honduras coup flight L etisha Henderson / BIS

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By SIR RONALD SANDERS (The writer is a Consultant and former Caribbean diplomat) WHEN Commonwealth H eads of Government m eet in Trinidad in N ovember, they might h ave expected to welcome b ack to their councils a g overnment of Fiji that h ad been elected in March. A s it turns out, there will b e no Fiji in Trinidad. If a contest was held to choose a country with a Culture of coup d’tats, the Pacific Island-State would be a front runner. There were two coups in 1 987, a third in 2000 and a fourth in December 2006. Now, come September 1, the 53-nation Common wealth (formerly theB ritish Commonwealth) is e xpected to suspend Fiji from its membership. T he suspension will c ome after almost three y ears of trying every diplomatic and negotiating device to convince the mil itary government of Commodore Frank Bainimarama to restore the country to democratic rule. A consistent figure in the last two coups, Baini marama has shown ar emarkable failure to hono ur commitments he gives to the international com munity. F iji is made up of a group of islands in the Pacific and has a popula tion of 872,000 people con s isting of indigenous Fijians, indigenous Rotu mans and Banabans, IndoFijians, Chinese, Euro-p eans (mostly Australians and New Zealanders) and people of mixed race. T he 1987 coup and the a brogation of the 1970 Constitution led to a new Constitution in 1997 which contained a social compact among all the political par ties, provided for affirma tive action for indigenous Fijians, gave indigenous Fijians the majority of communal seats in the elected House of Assemb ly and a near two thirds m ajority in the appointed Senate. It also provided for shared governance and settled tensions between the indigenous Fijians and the Indo-Fijians. Bainimarama’s 2006 coup had nothing to do with racial differences in Fiji and much more to do with controversies between him and the then Prime Minister, Laisinea Qarase, who was threatening to arrest Bainimarama and others for their part in the coup of 2000. The Commonwealth has patiently engaged Fiji since the 2006 coup. The previ ous and current Commonwealth Secretaries-Gener al, Don McKinnon and Kamalesh Sharma, as well as the organisation’s watchdog body the Commonwealth Minister ial Action Group (CMAG have engaged the mili tary regime and other groups in Fiji to try to restore democracy. While the Commonwealth did suspend Fiji from the councils of the Commonwealth after the 2006 coup, it did not suspend it from membership of the grouping. Along with the Pacific Islands Forum (Fiji and its closest neighbours), the United Nations and other bodies, the Common wealth has been working to persuade Bainimarama to hold elections by March this year – an undertaking that he had given. But March came and went, and in April the government abrogated the Constitution, further entrenched authoritarian rule, cracked down on freedom of speech and assembly, and undermined the judiciary and legal system. B ainimarama also scrapped the paramount F ijian institution, the prestigious Great Council of Chiefs which selects the President and Vice-President. It is widely believed that he did so because the Chiefs did not rally to him. H e also prevented the d ominant Methodist C hurch from holding its a nnual convention d emanding that it must f irst be cleansed of political clergymen. Making matters worse, B ainimarama issued a “Strategic Framework for Change,” which he described as "the only path t o ensuring sustainable and true democracy, the removal of communal repr esentation and the implem entation of equal suf f rage based on common and equal citizenry."U nder this plan, work will b egin on a new Constitution in 2011 and elections w ould not be held until 2014. CMAG, which had shownconsiderable patience with the Fijian regime up to that point, finally decided enough was e nough. Among its nine m embers is the Foreign M inister of St Lucia, Rufus B ousquet. T ogether, the ministers, m eeting on July 31, gave the Fijian regime until September 1 to “reactivate theP resident's Political Dialogue Forum process, facilitated by the Commonwealth and the United N ations.” The Group said it want ed the regime to “state itsf irm commitment” to react ivating the political dia l ogue “in writing” to the Commonwealth Secretary-G eneral by September 1 or Fiji will be fully suspended on that date.” No one is holding their b reath that such a written commitment will be forthc oming from Bainimarama. H is government has already condemned Fiji’s neighbours in the PacificI slands Forum for expressing, in early August, “their d eep concern for the people of Fiji in the face of Fiji’s deteriorating econom y as a consequence of the military regime’s actions, i ncluding the undermining of the private sector and the negative effect on business confidence in the absence of the rule of law.” Seeking any opportunit y to delay the Commonwealth’s suspension of Fiji from membership, he dispatched a letter on August 5th to the Commonwealth Secretary-General requesti ng him “to facilitate a delegation from the Commonwealth to visit Fiji to e nter into direct dialogue a nd consultations.” T he invitation can hardl y be taken seriously a gainst the background of B ainimarama’s actions in abrogating the constitution, imposing media con trols, restricting freedom of assembly, and the ongoing erosion of the judicial and legal system. I t is even less credible in t he context of his complete abandonment of the Presid ent's Political Dialogue F orum which was promote d by both the UN and the Commonwealth. It is clear that Bainim arama’s invitation is not in good faith and his game is to do nothing more than prolong still further a process that has already dragged on for almost three years. In this connection, CMAG has no choice but t o suspend Fiji from membership of the Commonwealth on September 1. But, in the Commonwealth way, that will not be the end of the matter. F or as Secretary-General Sharma told the Pacific Forum meeting, “it will r emain my intent, on b ehalf of all Commonw ealth members, to find w ays to remain engaged, t o promote dialogue with t he current government there, and to promote dialogue between all the par ties in Fiji who collectively hold the solution for the future and without all of whom a solution cannot be s ustainable”. S uspension of Fiji after almost three years of tryi ng to reason with the mili tary regime is necessary p unishment now; but engagement is also necessary to give back to all thep eople of Fiji their right to democracy, constitutionality and the rule of law. C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 7 No Fiji in Trinidad for the Commonwealth Conference WORLDVIEW SIRRONALD SANDERS

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By ADRIAN GIBSON ajbahama@hotmail.com THIS year, a cross-sect ion of students sitting the n ational exams have once a gain affirmed the infamous and unsatisfactory, almost predictable D national average. Although the disapp ointing national average r eflects the mean grade of a ll the students sitting the BGCSE/BJC exams, we must not, and should not, a llow these crummy grades to cause us to forget to highlight the good students a nd their success stories, quality teachers and those dedicated parents. They h ave all earned praiseworthy results. Kudos to them! Education is truly the g reat equalizer but, if the s takeholders in education d o not have an appreciation for or a grasp of 20th c entury professor Emile D urkheim’s sociology of e ducation, we should expect to produce illiterate and mathematicallychallenged graduates who can barely take menial jobs and to see more years of failing grades. A ddressing the correlation between society and education, the sociology of e ducation promotes an u nderstanding of all levels o f the educational system, looking at the extent tow hich schools/universities a re socializing institutions as well as the ways these educational outlets impacts ocial mobility, social strati fication and adult socioeconomic success. The sociology of education also examines social stratifica t ion processes in and out of schools that playa huge role in education, f or example, the noticeable impact on the linguistic skills of students attending certain schools and fromc ertain homes in various s ectors of society. Studying the sociology of education would allowt he Ministry of Education and educational stakeholders to analytically r eview how the current c urriculum can/cannot con t ribute to the creation of a modern, culturally-sound society, as well as to betteru nderstand the role of edu cation in fostering social change. As an educator, I have discovered that students possess a wide array of multiple intelligences and learning styles that span the social spectrum, although I find that many students have a “bodilykinesthetic” learning approach, which is usually coupled with another favoured learning style. Frankly, many students f ail the national exams b ecause they simply cannot read! This must be corr ected from the element ary level on up to senior h igh (even college increased focus on reading comprehension in a child’s formative years. A new literacy approach must be taken to improve students’ abilities to read a nd understand content by also teaching them to query reading materials. T his outlook would foster d iscussion and heighten s tudents’ understanding of texts while encouragingt hem to make inferences. T eacher and student driven queries, studentteacher collaboration andt he establishment of lesson g oals for understanding by teachers would undoubtedly form the framework of a new litera c y approach. Taking such an approach would assist students in constructingm eaning as learnersin and out of a classroom. In the Bahamas, the readability of content mustb e taken into account as it h as a direct affect upon class cohesion and student perception. More bookss hould be developedacross the subject areas to correspond with the dif f erent grade levels and t eachers must know the v alue of using more grade appropriate material and recognise the value ofg uided learning, where teachers build upon con structivist theories, inter vene and facilitate in establishing student-driven activities and probe or comprehensively respond to questions. By now, the Depart ment of Education should have learnt that cramming too much into a textbook, hiring unqualified teachers and continuing to endorsea flawed curriculum will only continue to be an e ducational setback c ountrywide! T he AG’s office a clerk filing station! The AG’s office is dysfunctional and is nothing more than a clerk filing station.” Those were the words of Rev Glenroy Bethel in October 2007 when he and s everal families of murdered victims on Grand Bahama spoke out against t he inadequate functioning o f the Attorney General’s o ffice in Freeport. At that time, Mr Bethel a sserted that the accused k illers were being released on bail as a result of the long delays by the AG’so ffice, that there was no S upreme Court judge to hear criminal or civil matters in Freeport, that only two of the four magis t rate’s courts were functioning, that there were no permanent prosecutors sta t ioned at the AG’s office in Grand Bahama and that 62 per cent of persons in prison were still awaitingd ates for criminal matters t o be brought before the courts. In the case of the B ahamas legal system, many of Mr Bethel’s concerns continue to plague o ur society and hinder t hose seeking justice. T hese days, there is a need for at least 15 justices to be appointed to theS upreme Court to address the case backlog. In the 1990s, the then govern ment brought in several Australian judges to reduce the number of cases. While more Bahamians should accept appoint ments to the court, if for eign judges must once again be brought in, then so be it. The government must seek to extend court hours (night court persons outside of the legal fraternity to judgeships in order to ensure the timely resolution of matters. Why aren’t murder trials completed within five years? Why should appeals take more than 18 months? Whatever happened to the case of my friend Chris Brown, a Certified Public Accountant, who was viciously killed and burnt in early 2006 after he had taken a fare from the air port (he drove a taxi as a hobby, paying homage to his father, who was a taxi driver)? The entire legal process for convicted murderers should be completed within five years, which would allow for the death penal ty. The AG’s office needs to ensure that cases are being processed and also apply a time-frame to each case. C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THE COMMITTEE TO PROTECT AND PRESERVE THE BAHAMAS FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS P RESENTSPETITION 2009 PETITION AGAINST THE RELOCATION OF THE C ONTAINER PORT TO ARAWAK CAThis Petition will be delivered to the Prime Minister and The Cabinet of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas to register the opposition of the Bahamian public to the relocation of the container port to Arawak Cay, the extension of Arawak Cay and the resulting environmental and marine damage to Saunders Beach and the surrounding areas. Please print your name clearly, sign where indicated and date. Thank you. NameSignatureDatePlease return this form to: Samana Hill No. 14 Village Road North Nassau, The Bahamas Tel.: 394.1823 Or Chancery House No. 21 Dowdeswell Street Nassau, The Bahamas Tel.: 356.6108 Ministry must study the sociology of education Y OUNG M AN S V IEW ADRIANGIBSON

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By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – State Minister for Finance Zhivargo Laing toured the Post Office Building here on Friday, and assured employees that the a ir-conditioning problem is n ow being addressed by cont ractors. M r Laing, minister of finance with responsibility for the Public Service, said t hat a new AC unit has finall y arrived on the island, and i s in the possession of cont ractors who are installing it i n one section first which will provide relief to 50 per cent o f the building. “It is a very large unit and the plan is to install one part n ow which will take a few weeks,” he said. E mployees and customers h ave had to endure unsatisf actory conditions for more t han a year. A s a result of the heat and l ack of proper ventilation in the building, a four-hour shift s chedule was implemented so that workers would not h ave to spend the entire day working in unfavourable conditions. Mr Laing explained that the delay was due to the time i t took to get the unit on the i sland. “Clearly, the heat of the s ummer presented a great c hallenge and I want to t hank the staff for their p atience in this situation,” he s aid. Bahamas Public Services Union (BPSU president John Curtis said the conditions at the Post O ffice have been very u nbearable for workers. He has been agitating for the past year for a new air conditioning unit. Mr Curtis described the s ituation as “bordering on b eing inhumane.” He noted that it is a direct violation of the industrial agreement, which speaks to proper working conditions. “You cannot call this proper working conditions w hen it is 90 degrees on the o utside, but inside here it’s 1 25 degrees,” he said. H e said that employees w ere fed up with the situat ion and brought the matter to the union’s attention. “We brought it to the government’s attention and we brought it to the postmaster general’s attention and at that point we were p romised that within eight w eeks or somewhere therea bouts, that the air conditioning system will be sorted out,” he said. “They did an investigation and we found out that the e ntire system here needed to b e taken out.” M r Curtis said it was at t he time that the union was able to negotiate with the government on behalf of the approximately 30 Post Office employees to begin four hour s hifts to alleviate their disc omfort. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 9 The Mercedes M-Class. Beauty, brains and brawn. TYREFLEX STAR MOTORSCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz M-Class at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667When you think of the average SUV on the road today, you think of roadhogging, air-polluting gas guzzlers that wouldnt know the meaning of high precision and fuel efficiency if it were emblazoned on their windshields. But there is an alternative. The refined M-Class from Mercedes-Benz. Withits superior German styling utilising only high-grade materials, its robust engine power delivering exemplary turn-on-a-dime performance whilst still being frugal on fuel and its handling of pot-holed roads and 1.5 ft. flooded streets, the Mercedes-Benz M-Class is clearly the best choice in SUVs. Only forty-eight nautical miles east of Miami, Florida, situated on the North end of North Bimini, Bahamas Bimini Bay Resort & Marina complex rests on over 740 acres of pristine Bahamian beaches. Long known as a paradise for anglers and divers alike, Bimini Bay Resort offers a plethora of options for the most discriminating traveller. Bimini Bay Management Ltd. owns and operates Bimini Bay Resort & Marina.Bimini Bay Resort & Marina seeks to hire a professional i ndividual for the following position: Requirements: /LFHQVHG%RDW&DSWDLQ (LJKWWR7ZHOYH\HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQ0DULQD
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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 38%/,& 12 O nly forty-eight nautical miles east of Miami, Florida, situated on the North end of North Bimini, Bahamas Bimini Bay Resort & Marina complex rests on over 740 acres of pristine Bahamian beaches. Long known as a paradise for anglers and divers alike, Bimini Bay Resort offers a plethora of options for the most discriminating traveller. Bimini Bay Management Ltd. owns and o perates Bimini Bay Resort & Marina. %LPLQL%D\HVRUWtDULQDVHHNVWRKLUHTXDOLHGSURIHVVLRQDOV for the following positions:IT MANAGERResponsible for the ongoing maintenance and operation for all of the Information Technology implemented within the assigned Hotel. The position is responsible for the daily operation, support, and security of the technology and data that support and enable the business operation. 'HVLUHGHTXLUHPHQWVIURFLHQF\ :RUNH[SHULHQFHLQWKHHVRUW,QGXVWU\ %DFKHORUGHJUHHGLSORPDLQUHODWHGHOG &DOO$FFRXQW-D]] 3KRQHZLWFKRUWHO 0LFURV 306SHUDFOOD AND BEVERAGE DIRECTOROversee the function of all food and beverage outlets to ensure excellent customer VHUYLFHDQGPD[LPL]HUHYHQXHDQGSU'HYHORSLPSOHPHQWDQGPDLQWDLQTXDOLW\ standards for outlets, including supervision and direction of service staff. Ensure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in implementing, achieving and maintaining the resorts goals and objectives. :HRIIHUDQH[FHOOHQWEHQHWVSDFNDJHDQGFRPSHWLWLYHFRPSHQVDWLRQ)RUIXOO consideration, all interested applicants should forward a copy of their resum to the attention of atjobs@biminibayresort.com or fax to (242 B y ERIC ROSE BAHAMIANstudents from four islands have received grants from the Adisa Foundation for their outstanding achievements i n various fields of the perf orming Arts. M inister of State for Culture in the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture Charles Maynard joined Adisa Foundation founder a nd director Mrs Patricia B azard and acting Direct or of Culture Eddie D ames in recognising the y oung performers on August 10. “It makes me feel proud that there is talent throughout this country,” Minister M aynard said. “I am quite pleased with t he growth of the cultural community in terms of its young people and how theya re expressing themselves.” The Adisa Foundation, i n conjunction with the Bahamas National Children’s Choir, presented the f irst annual Outstanding Children in the Arts Child ren’s Ball, on April 18. The awards programme acknowledges, celebrates a nd rewards the contributions of children to the a rtistic culture of The Bahamas. The competition is open t o children from pre-school to high school and prizes i nclude scholarship grants for the winners in each cate gory. Adisa is a Ghanaian w ord meaning “a child shall lead them.” The awards presentation i s a continuation of the M inistry’s annual E Clement Bethel National Arts Festival. Many of the students nominated andw inning the awards were in the Festival. Their performances led to their nominations for the Adisa award by their schools. “The grants came from the Adisa Foundation,” Minister Maynard said. We simply supported t hem logistically and m orally. We love that kind of s upport, when we are able t o help those who want to do good in the community without having to find funding, as funding is always hard to find.” Winning in the Music Category were Freeport P rimary School student Berlicia Saunders, Lyford Cay International School j unior high student B ernard Farquharson and St Andrews School former senior Benjamin Pinder. In the Drama Category, N orth Long Island High School junior Quenton Smith and Faith TempleC hristian Academy former s enior Elan JoLee Hutchinson received the top awards. St John’s College former s enior Simone Davis, won in the Dance Category. S enior winners received a $1,000 grant and juniors and primary school stu dents received $750 and $ 500 respectively. “All of the winners here are certainly to be cong ratulated,” Mr Dames s aid. “I am particularly pleased that we can see winners coming out of theF amily Islands. We can see that the cultural pro grammes are not Nassauc entric and we have a wide p ool of talent.” Minister Maynard com mended Mrs Bazard’s passion an compassion” for the students. Grants presented to outstanding children in the performing arts M INISTER OF STATE f or Culture Maynard presented Lyford Cay International School student and pianist Bernard Farquharson one of the grants awarded from the Adisa Foundation for his outstanding achieve m ent in the Performing Arts. Pictured from left are Acting Director of Culture Eddie Dames, Farquharson, Minister Maynard, and Adisa Foundation founder and Director Mrs Patricia Bazard. M INISTER OF S TATE f or Culture C harles Maynard presents North Long Island High School student and dramatist Quenton Smith his awarded from the Adisa Foundation for his outstanding achievement in the Performing Arts. Pictured from left are Acting Directoro f Culture Eddie Dames, Smith, Minister Maynard, and Adisa Foundat ion founder and director Patricia Bazard. K ristaan Ingraham / BIS MEXICO CITY MEXICOhas replaced all 700 of its customs inspectors with agents newly trained to fight drug smuggling, according to Associated Press. The government has sent soldiers to airports and border crossings across the country to take back the guns issued to the inspectors. Tax Administration Service spokesman Pedro Canabal says the officers were not fired. Instead, the agency decided not to rehire them when their contracts expired over the weekend. They were replaced with 1,400 newly hired agents who have undergone months of training and background checks to ensure they have no criminal records. Canabal spoke Sunday to The Associated Press. M exico replaces customs inspectors with agents to fight drug smuggling WASHINGTON BOWING to Republican pressure and an uneasy public, President Barack Obama’s administration signaled Sunday it is ready to abandon the idea of giving Americans the option of government-run insurance as part of a new health care system, according to Associated Press. Facing mounting opposition to the overhaul, administration officials left open the chance for a compromise with Republicans that would include health insurance cooperatives instead of a government-run plan. Such a concession probably would enrage Obama’s liberal supporters but could deliver a muchneeded victory on a top domestic priority opposed by GOP lawmakers. Officials from both political parties reached across the aisle in an effort to find compromises on proposals they left behind when they returned to their dis tricts for an August recess. Oba-ma had wanted the government to run a health insurance orga nization to help cover the nation’s almost 50 million uninsured, but didn’t include it as one of his core principles of reform. Obama official says govt insurance plan not essential to health care overhaul

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 11 7KHRRS'HFN 1RZ 5HRSHQHG:HORRNIRUZDUGWRRQFHDJDLQVHUYLQJ\RX RXUYDOXHGFXVWRPHUV 1DVVDX
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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE FIFTEEN-year-old Christopher Sands battled high winds, white caps in Montagu Bay and 13 determined competitors to come out on top in this year’s Junior Sunfish Nationals. He as well as Donico Brown, Michael Holowesko and Michael Gibson who placed 2nd and 3rd and 4th at the end of the two days of intense racing, not only won bragging rights, but the four coveted spots at the International Junior Sunfish Championships being held in Nassau in October. “This was a tough win as it was really windy and there was strong competition out on the water. It felt really good though knowing that all the time I’ve put in the boat paid off,” said Sands. Having won a berth in the international competition, he says he now intends to increase his training to four times a week. The youngsters, who ranged in age from 11 to 18 dealt with choppy seas and strong winds, which made racingeven more of a challenge. In fact, organisers anticipated the weather conditions would have impacted finish times and even their ability to remain in the water, but say the young sailors handled themselves with impressive strength and ability. Sands attributes his win in part to the weather conditions, saying the race became as much about fitness and strength as it was about sailing skills. “It’s astounding just how far these kids have come. Their boat handling and their ability to deal with consistent 18-21 knot winds was really impressive,” said Chairman of the race committee Jimmy Lowe, himself a veteran sailor, “Based on what we saw today, I think we can expect our team to turn in really respectable p erformances at the International c hampionships in October.” The International Junior Sunfish Championships will be held in the Bahamas on October 15-17 when 20 of the world’s top junior sailors are expected to compete. Immediately following that, for the first time since 1995, the Bahamas Sailing Association and the Nassau Yacht Club will host the 2009 Sunfish World Championships from October 16-24. Earlier this summer, 15 Bahamians qualified for that major event and will be among 72 boats competing for the top place. “It’s quite a major event for the Bahamas to be hosting both of these races back to back. We’ve been lucky that companies like Pictet Bank & Trust, Nestle and Atlantis have stepped up to help make this possible. And the Ministry of Tourism came forward with a unique sail design to help promote the Bahamas,” said Paul Hutton, Regatta Chairman. The Bahamas has enjoyed much success over the years in Sunfish sail ing, winning the World Champi onships five times. Donnie Martinborough, the Bahamas’ top finisher in this year’s Bahamas Nationals, isa three time Sunfish World Champ ion, with top place finishes in 1983, 1nd again in 1988. Four young Bahamians qualify for the International Jr Sunfish Championships BIANCA WAGNER , shown above with teammate Donovan Williamson, was the only girl to compete in this weekend’s Junior Sunfish Nationals. The team placed 8th overall.. THERON MAILLIS (left Williams placed 7th overall in the Junior Sunfish Nationals... Photos by Lori Lowe ABOVE, TOP LEFT Young Bahamians battled strong winds and rough seas to compete in the Junior Sunfish Nationals this weekend...

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B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net BERLIN, Germany It hasn't been the start to the IAAF's 12th World Champi o nships in Athletics that the Bahamian delegation had anticipated on day one Satur-day. But the results on Sunday helped make the journey through the next seven days a little more interesting to look forward to at the national sta dium that legendary Jesse Owens ruled the men's sprints at the 1936 Olympic Games. Derrick Atkins, the 11th World Championships' 100 metres silver medallist from Osaka, Japan, was surprising-l y ousted from the first round o f the century in the opening s ession on Saturday and quarter-miler Christine Amertil was disqualified for steppingon the line twice in the first round of the women's 400. To add to the problems the team officials, headed by manager Ralph McKinney, continue to deal with the issue of Osbourne 'Ozzie' Moxey notbeen included in the men's long jump after the IAAF ruled that his victory at the Central American and Caribbean Championships could not be accepted as the area championship. Amertil, who will celebrate her 30th birthday on Tuesday, was said to have stepped out of her lane at both around the 200 metres mark. But Amertil said she would know if she had stepped on the line and it was devastating that she was charged with the DQ. "I am saddened by this decision of course because a lot of work is put into getting to this level of competition and it can be heart wrenching to go from the joy of moving on to the next round to being told you no longer get to go without any clear or solid indi cation as to why," she said. "Mentally, I was very frustrated and upset but I have other races to run and teammates who need me to be at my best so I am at the stage where I am refocused on those races that matter now." Immediately after the post ing of the DQ, McKinney saidhe and the Bahamian coaching staff, headed by Tyrone Burrows, filed an appeal and they spent more than two hours trying to get a successful resolve. "They allowed us to look at the video taping, but on the first occasion, it was not con clusive," McKinney said. "On the second one, it was also not conclusive. "We then went to the jury complaint and they said they took the word of the ITO, who said she was flagged for touching the lane with her left foot." McKinney said they had nothing else to do but to inform Amertil about the decision. T he news came right after A tkins turned in one of the most disappointing performances so far at the champi onships. Battling back from a semifinal exit at the Olympic Games in Beijing, China last year, Atkins could run no faster than 10.44 seconds for fifth place in the third of 12 heats. "That was very very disturbing, most definitely, we expected Derrick to go through minimum semifinal, but if your A game isn't on you face the consequences," McKinney said. Atkins, the national sprint champion who has been running a series of 100 and 200s this year, finished 43rd overall out of a field of 92 competi tors. Three other competitors with slower times advanced to the second round by virtue of coming in the top three as automatic qualifiers from their respective heats. A drian Griffith, runner-up a t the Nationals, also advanced after his third place finish in heat five in 10.37 for 30th overall. His heat was won by Antigua's Daniel Bailey in10.26. Competing in his first major competition, Griffith fell shy of advancing to yesterday's semifinal with a fifth place in 10.28 in the fourth of five second round heat won by American Tyson Gay in the second fastest qualifying time of 9.98. Griffith was 28th overall out of a field of 30 competitors. As for Moxey, McKinney said they have exhausted all avenues in trying to appeal the IAAF's decision not to accept the national and CAC champion in the men's long jump that will be contested on Wednesday. "We've been to 3-4 appeals to get him in the meet," McKinney said. "But they are taking the l ong jumper from the Domini c an Republic, who won the NACAC in 2007." According to McKinney, the qualifying period is from January 2008 to August 1. But because there was no NACAC since 2007, they are using that as the area championships, as opposed to the CAC that was held in July in Cuba. Despite not being allowed to compete, McKinney said Moxey will remain here with the team. On day two yesterday, McKinney reported that they were quite pleased with the fact that all three female sprinters performed as expected in the first two rounds of the 100, as well as Olympic bronze medallist Leevan 'Superman' Sands in the men's triple jump. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 13 On-the-spot financing and insurance. 24-month/24,000-mile factory warranty. ShirleyStreet W ebsite:www.hondabahamas.comThe2008Accorddramaticstylingcombinedwiththe greatestrangeofadvancedtechnologyinthemodel's 33-yearhistory.Italladdsuptoloweremissions, betterfueleconomy,largercabin,top-ratedsafety, lowmaintenancecostsandhighresalevalue. Special Model-Year Close-out Prices—While They Last! Atkins ousted from first round of century Amertil disqualified for stepping on line twice Moxey not included in long jump as IAAF rules his victory at CAC Games could not be accepted as area championship ADRIAN GRIFFITH of the Bahamas and Germany's Tobias Unger compete in the 100m first round heat on Saturday... (AP Photo: Michael Sohn IAAF's 12th World Championships in Athletics... By PAT GRAHAM AP Sports Writer BERLIN (AP Bolt crossed the finish line, saw his record-setting time o n the clock and spread his a rms as if he were soaring l ike a bird. About all this guy can't do is fly. And by saving his celebration until after the finish line this time, he showed how fast a man really can go on two feet. The Jamaican shattered the world record again Sunday, running 100 meters in 9.58 seconds at the world championships to turn his much-anticipated race against Tyson Gay into a one-man show. That was 0.11 seconds faster than the mark he set last year at the Beijing Olympics the biggest improvement in the 100meter record since electronic timing began in 1968. Gay, his closest rival, broke the American mark with his 9.71 performance and still looked like he was jogging finishing a few big strides behind Bolt in second place. Bolt's only competition these days is the clock. And when he's really try i ng, not hot-dogging it over the line the way he did in China, even time itself doesn 't stand a chance. "I don't run for world records," said Bolt, who crossed the line with a slight breeze at his back. Yet those records always seem to find him. He thinks he can go even lower. "I know I said 9.4," Bolt said, grinning. "You never know. I'll just keep on working." Last summer at Beijing, Bolt shut his race down early, waving his arms and celebrating about 10 meters before he got to the line. Some, like Jacques Rogge of the International Olympic Committee, viewed it as a sign of bad sportsmanship. Most saw it as a welcome sigh of relief for a sport that needed some good news after years of doping and scandal. Bolt shatters 100m world record B OLT c elebrates after the race... (AP Photo: David J Phillip

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By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net BERLIN, Germany What's the best way to celebrate your 28th birthday? Just ask Olympic bronze medallist Leevan 'Superman' Sands. Competing in the qualifying round of the men's triple jump yesterday at the Olympic Stadium, Sands advanced to Tuesday's final at 12:05 pm ET witha season's best of 17.20 metres or 56feet, 5 1/4-inches. That placed him second in Group A and fourth overall in a field of 45 competitors. "That's my birthday present. I couldn't really feel it because it was my birthday," said Sands, who had to wait for his third and final attempt top roduce his best mark in the competition. "I just had to make the final." With his wife, Danielle and son, Leevan III, in the stands along with his coach Henry Rolle and his agent, Sands said he got all the motivation and inspiration he needed yesterday. As the fourth jumper to compete, Sands opened with a leap of 17.02 (5510 1/4) to put him in second place behind Phillips Idowu of Great Britain, who opened with 17.10 (56-1 1/4). O n his second attempt, Sands did 1 6.84 (55-3 Idowu turned in his best mark in the competition of 17.32 (56-10 With nobody near him in their group, Sands then produced his best of 17.20 (56-5 1/4 vious season's best of 17.14 (56-2 3/4 that did at the BAAA Nationals in June at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium. Finishing third in their group was Cuban Arnie David Girat with 17.15 (56-3 1/4 "To make the finals with a season's best, I can't complain about that," he said. "I just want to thank God for allowing me to perform the way I did today." He also thanked all the Bahamian people who supported him, including the Walnut Street crew in Pinewood Gardens where he reside when he's in town with his parents, Leevan and Elaine Sands. As for the birthday celebrations, Sands said he will really enjoy it on August 18 when he wins his medal. "I think I can do at least 17.50 because the jump I didn't even finish," Sands reflected. "I just stepped down quick. "But I think as long as I execute my phase, I could jump 17.50 or bet ter. That should definitely get me a medal." To go along with the Olympic bronze he won last year, Sands has also won a bronze at the 17th Commonwealth Games in Manchester, England and the bronze at the 9th World's in Paris Saint-Denis, France in 2003. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ‘Superman’ advances to triple jump final By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net BERLIN, Germany This will be a performance that Derrick Atkins would like to quickly erase from his memories, while Adrian Griffith staked his claim for future appearances at the World Championships. Unable to duplicate the form that produced the silver medal at the 11th IAAF World Championships in Athletics in Osaka, Japan last year, Atkins sent shock waves through the Olympic Stadium when he failed to advance from the first round of the men's 100 on Saturday's opening ses sion. "I don't know what to say," said Atkins, who was simply lost for words after his time of 10.44 seconds was only good enough for fifth place as he finished 43rd out of a field of 92 competitors. Running out of lane two next to Jamaican Asafa Powell in lane three, Atkins got left in the blocks and was nev er able to make a dent in the pack ahead of him. He admitted that while he had Powell to gauge his race, he was trying to concen trate on the whole field. Powell, who faded to the bronze in Osaka behind Atkins and American champion Tyson Gay, noted that he was watching Atkins and after leading for the majority of the race, he was caught and passed with about 20 metres left and finished third again in 10.38. Martial Mbandjock of France stormed back to win the heat in 10.28. While Atkins was experiencing his problems, Griffith was enjoying his experience. In heat five, Griffith clocked 10.37 for third place to qualify in 30th overall. The heat was won by Antigua's Daniel Bailey in 10.26. "It was quite cold this morning, so I just had to get my mind and my body right," he said. When asked if he saw Atkins and his performance, Griffith said "No, I wasn't interested in Derrick. I was concerned about my race. Right now, this is my first World Championships and I don't have any time to worry about him." Not pressured or intimidated at all about running with the big stars on the world stage for the first time, Griffith came back in the second round or the quarter-finals and, except for a shaky start, was able to maintain his composure for fifth in the fourth of five heats in 10.28, which placed him 28th out of 34, but not good enough to make the elite 16. "I kind of struggled at the beginning and I had to turn it up a notch at the end," he said. "I just didn't panic. I worked hard to get back into the race. So I'm happy with what I did. I was consistent this year." With so much history in the stadium going back to the 1932 Olympics when Jesse Owens dominated the sprints, Griffith said he was just delighted that he got a chance to display his skills. "Now I can really look ahead to the future," he insisted. Places second in group, fourth overall out of 45 competitors ‘I don’t know what to say... Derrick Atkins reflects on his performance Adrian Griffith stakes his claim for future appearances at the W orld Championships ASAFA POWELL (left (AP Photo: Anja Niedringhaus LEEVAN SANDS has advanced to Tuesday's final... (FILE photo NEW YORK (AP Michael Vick says he cried in prison because of the guilt he felt about being involved in dogfighting. In an interview with "60 Minutes" that aired Sunday night, Vick said the day he walked into prison he realized "the magnitude of the decisions that I made. "And, you know, it's no way of, you know, explaining, you know, the hurt and the guilt that I felt. And that was the reason I cried so many nights. And that put it all into perspective," he said. A three-time Pro Bowl pick during six seasons with the Atlanta Falcons, Vick served 18 months in federal prison for running a dogfighting ring and was reinstated last month by the NFL after being out of action since 2006. He signed with the Philadelphia Eagles on Thursday. Vick says he cried in prison

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C M Y K C M Y K FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2007 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 PAGE 12 Bahamians qualify for Int. Jr Sunfish Champs... By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net BERLIN, Germany In contrast to the way they have performed all year, veteran female sprinters Chandra Sturrup and Debbie Fergu son-McKenzie turned back the hands of time as they both advanced to the semifinal ofthe 100 metres. Helping to erase the hurtful early exit of past WorldC hampionships' 100 silver medallist Derrick Atkins, the duo kept the Bahamas’ hopes alive for a medal in the short sprints yesterday at the 12th version of the biannual cham pionships at the Olympic Sta dium. Tied with American Lauryn Williams with the sixth fastest time of 10.06 seconds, Sturrup secured her berth in today's elite 16, while Fergu son-McKenzie trailed them with the eighth fastest time of 11.08. The third Bahamian in the field, 19-year-old Sheniqua 'Q' Ferguson was seventh in her heat in 11.59 for 30th out of a field of 32. But the Auburn bound junior was unable to advance any further. "It felt better," said Sheni qua Ferguson as she com pared her first round fourth place of 11.57 that advanced her with the third of the five fastest losers. "The first, it was a little easy, but this round I really had to run, so I just went out there and really gave it all I had." Ferguson said she wished her time would have been faster, but she hopes toi mprove on her performance when she runs in the preliminaries of the 200 that will starto n Tuesday at 4.05 am ET. In her first World's appearance after she had her Olympic debut last year inB eijing, China, Ferguson will enter the field with FergusonMcKenzie, who is now in her fourth Worlds. Listed on her running bib as just Ferguson, FergusonMcKenzie, the national double sprint champion said she was quite pleased with the way she ran her quarters in the century yesterday, although her start could have been better. "I still held it together and came through at the end, so I'm happy with that," said Ferguson-McKenzie, who trailed only to Jamaica, the top qualifier in 10.92. As for the semis today, Fer guson-McKenzie said there's no doubt that she's going to have to run. "It's going to be tough because everybody's running,' she reflected. "At this point, I think it will take 11.0s or better, maybe even 10 point because every body is running." Ferguson-McKenzie, 33, will be running out of the first of the two semis today at 1:05 pm ET in lane three, sand wiched between Verena Sailer of Germany in lane t wo and Stewart in four. Also included in her heat is her former training partner LaurynW illiams in five and Jamaican Shelly-Ann Fraser in sixth. Sturrup, the elder stateswoman of the field ata ge 37, has drawn lane five in the second heat at 1:13 pm ET. Her rivals to watch are Jamaicans Veronica Campbell-Brown in three and Aleen Bailey in sixth, while American Carmelita Jeter is in fourth. Focused on the task ahead of her, Sturrup opted not to give an interview. She indicated that she really wants to wait until she completes the final that will be run as tonight's showcase at 3:35 pm ET. In yesterday's preliminary rounds of the 100, FergusonMcKenzie competed first of fourth of nine heats. She eas ily won her opener in 11.26 in the second fastest qualifying time. Jeter had the fastest time of 11.22 in winning the third heat. Two heats later, Sheniqua Ferguson was fourth in heat six in 11.57. And Sturrup rounded out the Bahamian participation of the morning session by also winning heat eight in 11.28 to turn in the third fastest qualifying time. ‘Golden Girls’ keep our medal hopes alive B olt shatters 100m world record... S ee page 13 JAMAICA’S Veronica Campbell-Brown and Sheniqua Ferguson ( right) compete in a 100m first round heat Sunday... (AP Photo: Anja Niedringhaus GOLDEN GIRL CHANDRA STURRUP (left H inestroza compete in a 2nd round heat yesterday... erguson seventh in heat, 30th o verall DEBBIE FERGUSON-McKenzie competes in a 100m first round h eat during the World Athletics Championships in Berlin Sunday... ( AP Photo: Anja Niedringhaus) M i c h a e l S o h n / A P TRIBUNE COVERAGEOFTHE IAAF WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS BERLIN 2009 BROUGHTTOYOUBY

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The couple’s four-year-old daughter was born prematurely, a nd developmental difficulties have rendered her incontinent and partially paralyzed. Since the child’s father abandoned the family, her mother has been unable to afford to take her to scheduled medical check-ups and is surviving on support froms ocial services, the woman said. She is angry that the application she put forward has enabled her estranged husband to now earn around $600 a week, while he fails to support his Bahamian family at the cost of govern ment, she said. “I am very grateful to government, but they shouldn’t have t o do that when the children have a young, vibrant, working f ather,” she said. The couple also have a two-year-old daughter, and the Har bour Islander has three other children from previous relations hips. C alls to the director of Immigration and Minister of Immi gration Branville McCartney were not returned before The T ribune w ent to press last night. FROM page five W oman criticises Immigration Dept over refusal to void estranged husbands permit Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. NEW RECRUITS of the Royal Bahamas Police Force spent Saturday morning cleaning the yard of the C hildren’s Emergency Hostel. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f P OLICERECRUITSCLEANUPCHILDREN’S HOSTELYARD

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CIUDAD HIDALGO, Mexico SHOPKEEPERSin this pine-covered mountain region easily recite the list of "protection" fees they pay to La Familia drug cartel to stay in business: 100 pesos a month for a stall in a street market, 30,000 pesos for an auto dealership or construction-supply firm. First offense for nonpayment: a severe beating. Those who keep ignoring the fees or try to charge their own may pay with their lives, according to Associated Press . "Every day you can see the people they have beaten up being taken to the IMSS," said auto mechanic Jesus Hernandez, motioning to the government-run hospital a few doors from his repair shop. Mexican drug cartels have morphed into fullscale mafias, running extortion and protection rackets and trafficking everything from people to pirated DVDs. As once-lucrative cocaine profits have fallen and U.S. and Mexican authorities crack down on all drug trafficking to the U.S., gangs are branching into new ventures some easier and more profitable than drugs. The expansion has major implications as President Felipe Calderon continues his 2?-year-old drug war, which has killed more than 11,000p eople and turned formerly tranquil rural towns such as Ciudad Hidalgo into major battlefronts. Organized crime is seeping into Mexican society in ways not seen before, making it ever more difficult to combat. Besides controlling businesses, cartels provide jobs and social services where government has failed. "Today, the traffickers have big companies, e ducation, careers," said Congresswoman Yudit del Rincon of Sinaloa state, which has long been controlled by the cartel of the same name. "They're businessman of the year, they even head up social causes and charitable foundations." Local officials say they do not have the manpower to investigate cartel rackets and refer such cases to the state, which hands them over to o verloaded federal agents because organized crime is a federal offense. A federal police report released in April notes that often no one confronts the cartels, "not the police, because in many cases there is probably corruption, and not the public, because they live in terror." After media reports questioned whether Mexico was becoming a failed state, Calderon insist-ed to The Associated Press in February that his c ountry is in the hands of Mexican authorities. "Even me, as president, I can visit any single point of the territory," he said. He has since sent 5,500 extra military and police officers to fight drug lords in Michoacan his home state. Jailed But in Ciudad Hidalgo and neighboring Zitacuaro, mayors have been jailed and charged with working for La Familia cartel, which con trols swaths of central and western Mexico. Cadillac Escalades and Lincoln Navigators with low tires and chrome rims patrol the streets of Zitacuaro, even as trucks of army troops roll past. In the Michoacan mountain town of Arteaga, La Familia boss Servando Gomez Martinez is revered for giving townspeople money for food, clothing and even medical care. "He is a country man just like us, who wears huaraches," a farmer said of one of Mexico's most-wanted drug lords, pointing to his own open-toed leather sandals. He asked that his name not be used for fear of retaliation. "It's almost like Chicago, when Al Capone ruled everything," said a senior U.S. law enforcement official who was not authorized to be quoted by name. "They control everything from the shoeshine boy to the taxi driver." Mexican cartels gained their dominance in drug trafficking in the mid-1980s, when U.S. drug agents and the Colombian government cracked down on Colombian cartels and drug routes through the Caribbean. The vast majority of cocaine headed to the U.S. started going through Mexico. In the meantime, trade in pirated and other smuggled goods in Mexico traditionally was carried out by small gangs centered around extended families or neighborhood rings. In the last five to 10 years, Mexican cartels created domestic drug markets and carved out local territories, using a quasi-corporate structure, firepower and gangs of hit men to control other illicit trades as well. Federal prosecutors now call them "organized crime syndicates" and say their tactics such as charging a "turf tax" to do business in their territory mirror the Italian mafia. "They adopt a business model as if they were franchises, except they are characterized by vio lence," according to a federal police briefing report. In June, soldiers in the northern city of Monterrey caught members of the Zetas cartel producing and distributing pirated DVDs and cont rolling street vendors with protection fees. Also in Monterrey, top Gulf cartel lieutenant Sigifrido Najera Talamantes ran kidnapping and extortion rings while trafficking migrants and crude oil stolen from the pipelines of Mexico's state-owned oil company, Pemex, accord ing to the army.Najera Talamantes, who was arrested in March, allegedly charged migrant smugglers to pass through his territory, took a cut from street vendors and oversaw trafficking in stolen goods, said Army Gen. Luis Arturo Oliver.In Durango state, residents of Cuencame dug ditches around their town earlier this year to keep out roving bands of drug hit men kidnapping people at will. "Even with the ditches, they still came in and kidnapped five people," said a Cuencame offi cial who asked his name not be used for fear of retaliation. In late 2008, almost all the betting parlors in the border state of Tamaulipas closed because of demands for protection money, according to Alfonso Perez, the head of the Mexican associ ation of betting parlors. In northern states such as Chihuahua and Tamaulipas, cartels also are blamed for businesses closing or burning if they don't pay pro tection fees. Last year, mayors of more than a dozen towns throughout the state of Mexico received threat ening phone calls demanding that $10,000 to $50,000 be deposited in bank accounts. State investigators say many of the threats mentioned links to the Gulf cartel. Thr eats Salvador Vergara, mayor of the resort town of Ixtapan de la Sal, received threats and was shot to death in October. State authorities believe that he didn't pay and refused to allow gangs to operate in his township. Families in parts of the central state of Zacatecas went without cooking gas for several days in January, after gangs demanded protection fees of the gas-delivery trucks, and drivers refused to make their rounds. Deliveries resumed only after the state government increased security patrols on the local roads. Extortion threats reported to federal police skyrocketed from about 50 in 2002 to about 50,000 in 2008, according to Public Safety Secretary Genaro Garcia Luna. Because of the spike, the Mexican government this year launched a nationwide anti-extortion program, creating a national database to track protection rackets and promising to protect even business owners too scared to file for mal complaint. While the results of the new complaint system are still meager, the government recently moved to go after cartel finances. In April, Congress approved a law allowing the government to seize properties and money from suspected drug traffickers and other crim inals before they are convicted. In the past, suspects had to be convicted before their property could be seized, and trials often last years in Mexico. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 19 5(*,67(5(' 3+<6,&,$1 +(/3 SUPERVISOROFFINANCEA leading Bahamian company, is seeking applications for a Supervisor of Finance JO BOB JECTIVE: T o provide financial leadership for the company by managing the financial resources, supervising the certain key aspects of the compa ny’s accounting function and maintaining appropriate relations w ith investors and regulatory agencies. ORGANIZATIONAL POSITION: R eports to the Director of Finance. PRINCIPAL DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES: Core responsibilities include : Assisting in managing the financial affairs of the company Supervise key components of the finance department Ensure accurate and timely interim and annual financial reporting in accordance with International Accounting Standards Assist in the annual budget exercise Assist in the training and development of line accounting staff Coordinate the annual audit process Assist in managing cashflow and treasury functions Any other related duties as considered necessary REQUIREMENTS &PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES: Candidates must meet the fol lowing criteria: Bachelor’s Degree or higher in accounting or related financial field Professional accounting designation recognized by The Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants Minimum of seven years experience in accounting, finance and budgeting. Leadership, management and direct supervision experience is required. Previous direct experience in planning and executing all aspects of financial accounting and budgetary functions Bahamian citizen Accounting software experience Proficient in the use of the Microsoft range of applications Strong technical and managerial skills Excellent writing, communication, analytical and reasoning skills Excellent organizational and time management skills Team Player with the ability to add value and strength to t h e team and team goals Honest, hardworking and ability to meet deadlines The position offers an attractive salary and benefits package, reflecting the successful applicant’s experience and qualifications, including a pension plan, medical, life, dental and vision coverage. Qualified individuals should submit complete resums including references before August 31st2009 to:Email:finsupervisor@gmail.com Mexico cartels go from drugs to full-scale mafias IN THIS Feb. 26, 2009 photo, people play soccer in the empty "Gomez Passage" shopping center where for rent signs are seen in a tourist area of Tijuana, Mexico. Mexico's drug cartels are becoming true mafias, branching out into large-scale extortion and protection rackets, demanding money from everybody from junkyard owners to town mayors and forcing many businesses in northern border states to close down. G u i l l e r m o A r i a s / A P IN THIS Feb. 26, 2009 photo, souvenirs sit for sale in front of a closed shop with a for rent sign along the famous Revolucion Avenue in Tijuana, Mexico. Mexico's drug cartels are becoming true m afias forcing many businesses in northern bord er states to close down.

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS PAGE 24, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Cool JettingPURCHASEANYDUNKIN’DONUTS COLDBEVERAGEANDENTERTO WINATRIPFORTWOEVERYWEEK FORFOURWEEKSWeek 1: Two Round-trip Flights to Fort Lauderdale & $500 Visa Debit Card Week 2: Two Round-trip Flights to Fort Lauderdale & $500 Visa Debit Card Week 3: Two Round-trip Flights to Orlando & $500 Visa Debit Card Week 4: Two Round-trip Flights to New York & $1,000 Visa Debit CardVisit www.Dunkinbahamas.com for ocial contest rules and regulations. Available at participating Dunkin’ Donuts locations, Nassau. ENTER To Win Round-trip Flights on Now oering daily jet service to Fort Lauderdale & Orlando from Nassau & your rst bag is free!* Nonstop ights are also available from Nassau to New York & Boston.* Baggage weight and size limits apply. MOSCOW TWORussian air force jets r ehearsing aerobatic maneuv ers collided Sunday near M oscow, killing one stunt pilot and sending one fighter crashing into nearby vacation homes, a military official said, according to Associated Press. The Su-27 fighters were p art of the elite Russian Knights flying group prepar-i ng to perform at the MAKS2 009 air show, the largest and most important showcase forR ussia’s aerospace industry. T he jets collided near Zhukovsky airfield, east of Moscow, where the air show opens Tuesday. Air force spokesman Lt. Col. Vladimir Drik said all three pilots involved ejected. H e said rescuers recovered t wo in satisfactory condition b ut the third was killed. The Kremlin identified the dead pilot as Col. Igor Tkachenko, commander of t he Russian Knights. E xperience T he Russian Knights’ Web site said Tkachenko was 45, was married with a son and daughter, and had been an a erobatics pilot since 1989 w ith more than 1,500 hours’ experience flying attack airc raft. O ne jet crashed into a row o f houses near the airfield, setting three ablaze and scat-t ering debris over a wide a rea. The RIA-Novosti news agency said one woman was seriously wounded and up to four other people on the ground may have been i njured. Russian TV footage showed wreckage from the other jet lying in an unpopulated field. The Russian Knights, f ormed in 1991, have suffered tragedy before. In December 1995, three o f its Su-27 jets crashed into a V ietnamese mountainside in r ough weather as they were r eturning to Russia from an a ir show in Malaysia. F our pilots died. More generally, Russian air force jets have suffered a series of mishaps attributed to the Soviet-era age and poor maintenance of their airplanes. Earlier this year, officials grounded the air force’s e ntire fleet of Su-24 swingw ing attack aircraft after two c rashes in three days. Two crashes of MiG-29 fighter jets in 2008 led to that model’s temporary grounding as well. Dangerous S ubsequent inspections d etermined that many were i n dangerous shape, either t hrough age or ill repair, and had to be scrapped. Also Sunday, a Yak-52 single-propeller aircraft crashed in the Kaluga region south of Moscow. Russian broadcasters NTV r eported that one of two people killed in that crash was the son of a former Russian K nights pilot. Two Russian jets collide, crash in air show training A BURNING S u-27 jet from the Russian air force elite aerobatic team Russkiye Vityazi (Russian Knights the aircraft collided with a two-seat Su-27, not seen, not far from the Zhukovsky airfield, east of Moscow, Sunday, Aug. 16, 2009. D m i t r y K a r p o v / A P Stunt pilot is killed

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Airlines ‘slighted’ by fee increases By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net A SENIOR partner at Deloitte and Touche suggested yesterday that government would have got a better return on their investment if t he funds for the student loan programme had been injected into the College of the Bahamas (COB the now $60 million deep loan portfolio. R ay Winder told Tribune Business that the government’s guaranteed loan programme was a mistake from t he beginning. He contends that the expansion of COB’s facilities to accommodate more students would have yielded much more for this country than the now $30 million debt the loan programme has left in its wake. And that number could increase with the more than $30 million loan portfolio that i s not yet in arrears. “The government made a g reat mistake when they started the programme and did n’t put proper procedures and controls in place,” said Mr Winder. “The bigger point on this i ssue is this was not a proper investment. “The best investment for the government to make when they made it (decisiont o start guaranteed loan prog ramme) would have been if the majority (of the money had been put into building additional capacity at the College of the Bahamas. I would submit that if you compare the return on that investment with the return By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE TOWN Centre Mall expanded its eatery options recently with the addition of Uncle Jim's, as new businesses continue to open their d oors in a location that is quickly trying to recharge itself. C raig and Carlos Wells opened Uncle Jim's Rotisserie only three weeks ago and, according to them, the response to the restaurant has been overwhelming. Maybe due to the fact that the only other food establishment in the mall is Subway; however, the lure of the smell from Uncle Jim's Barbecue rotisserie chicken is an attention grabber. The Wells brothers set up their rotisserie just in front of the door to their business. “People see the rotisserie and they come in,” said Carlos Wells. “But they will smell it first.” According to him, the restaurant, which also pre pares sandwiches and fea tures an all-you-can-eat salad bar, was envisaged with the family in mind. He said he wanted a family friendly environment with good food and a good atmos phere. The lights in Uncle Jim are kept muted and a flat panel television embedded in the wall plays continuous music videos. Samples Samples of the establishm ent’s conch fritters are set out for customers to try and a separate counter serves up fresh sweet tea and pink lemonade prepared by hand by the Wells brothers. Craig Wells said they hope to expand the business into the empty space next door, but pointed out that the business is still young. According to Carlos, their vision for the space next door is of an ultra-modern game room, stocked with all the latest in gaming equipment. The brothers began the restaurant with an initial outlay of about $16,000 and hope to open another location in the western part of New Providence in the near future. Besides just barbecue, the rotisserie offers a special spicy chicken and a regular seasoned chicken, prepared by one of three chefs. According to Carlos, the barbecue chicken has been the most popular. “I’m only doing barbecue today," the chef told Tribune Business on a recent visit. The brothers named their restaurant after an uncle who operated a restaurant in the B ronx, New York, where they worked for several summers. C raig contends it’s where he got the recipe for his special barbecue sauce. On a typical day, according to Carlos, the business is packed with people for lunch and already Uncle Jim’s has regulars. “They said there is no traf fic through this mall,” he said. “Look at the people who are here.” About the same time Uncle Jim opened its doors “Bed, Bath and the Works” opened theirs. O wner, Harrison Toote said opening the new store with the way the economy is w as a “leap of faith,” especially as he did not seek financing from the banks. “I guess we’ll be in full swing by the time the economy starts back up,” he said. This is Mr. Toote’s second store. He said sales are down at the Marathon Mall store, but “it remains profitable.” The new location offers bathroom, bedroom, and kitchen accessories and will soon have rugs and carpets for sale. Mr Toote added that he w ould like to offer more of the accessories used to decorate kitchens in the future, a s the store has great potential for growth. According to him, people like the concept and location of the new store. “There is market for this part of town,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be h eld responsible for errors and/or o mission from the daily report. $3.96 $3.87 $4.05 ! ! r r b b ! ! r r '"%%%'" bntn f #$!" !"$# r#$$#$' $ $"% !! "$%$) " %#f$# $# n$ # "$#%#)) bf By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net G overnment is continuing to expand airlift into the Bahamas, with several new American Eagle flights into the family islands and a New Condor service from Germany, according to Tourism and Aviation Minister, while many small, local airlines feel slighted by fee increases across the board that could leave them handicapped. Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace told Tribune Business recently that gov ernment has been in talks with those small airline companies that make frequent inter-island trips. According to him, those small com panies are a part of the government’s plan to increase travel to the family islands. However, those airlines may not survive the tax increases associated with the construction of a new international departure terminal. “The smaller airlines are very much a part of what we want to develop in terms of intra-Bahamas travel, but at the end of the day we had to put flight systems in place that allow for those services to be paid for that we are putting in there,” said Mr VanderpoolWallace. “And we've been talking to them (small, local airlines pared to make adjustments that are reasonable and necessary before it goes into effect and we are now just collecting all of the information.” Government recently secured Westjest service from Canada into Grand Bahama and have expanded Ameri can Eagle services into Abaco, Gov ernors Harbour and North Eleuthera. Service to Exuma is expected to begin November 19. “What we’ve been talking to them about is beginning to work,” said Mr Vanderpool-Wallace. “A Condor flight out of Germany is beginning later this year.” He said low cost international airlift to the Bahamas is beginning to gain traction and he insists the small interisland airlines will not be left behind. According to him, government has already held one meeting with representatives from those companies and said another meeting has been scheduled. “We’re listening to them, but at the end of the day, of course, government can impose taxes very easily, but those taxes should not be counter produc tive and we want to make sure that we have the kind of dialogue that is necessary to guide us in terms of what to put in place when it comes to them.” Mall expands eatery options with Uncle Jim’s Winder: Loan programme was a mistake from the beginning V -Wallace S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 B B

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By AUDREY McAVOY Associated Press Writer HONOLULU (AP Hawaii became the 50th state this week in 1959, helping transform an island economy dominated by sugar and pineapple fields into a vacation paradise. With statehood, tourists could come here knowing they would be protected by US laws. It also gave investors more confidence they could reap returns in the islands. For locals, statehood meant electing their own governor and sending voting representatives to Washington, D.C. for the first time. The increased democracy led to pro-labor legislation and a steady flow of federal dollars sent Hawaii's way by its Congressional representatives. "There were these remarkable spurts of growth in Hawaii that raised incomesa nd standards of living well b eyond what it was prior to statehood," said Lawrence W. Boyd, Jr., a labor economist at the University of Hawaii at West Oahu. Just before World War II, Hawaii produced four perc ent of the world's sugar and 60 per cent of its commercial pineapple. The leaders of the five companies who ran the biggest plantations formed an oligarchy that dominated Hawaii politics, as well as the economy. Sugar and pineapple began to quickly decline, however. Reduced tariffs and higher labor costs made it cheaper to grow sugar in Brazil and Thailand and pineapple in Ecuador and Costa Rica. Tourism was already grow ing in the 1950s as propeller planes entered use alongside ocean liners. But growth exploded with the introduction of commercial jet planes in 1959, a couple months before statehood. Jets made it faster, cheaper and easier to vacation in Hawaii. No longer were the islands reserved for celebrities and elite. Americans, whose incomes were rising, were eager to experience an exotic getaway they had only seen on TV. The number of tourists surged from just 171,000 in 1958 to 2.6 million in 1973. Hawaii's economy grew an average of seven per cent per year during the 15 first years of statehood. "It's progress," said Pat Saiki, who represented Hawaii's first Congressional district from 1987 to 1991. "I remember when the only way we could travel to the mainland was on the Matsonia by ship." Economists say social pro grams pursued by Hawaii's newly elected officials promoted prosperity. Until statehood, Hawaii's governors were appointed by the president. The governors were close to the plantation owners and didn't directly represent their concerns and interests of the broader population. That changed with statehood. Gov. John A Burns, the first governor elected after statehood, oversaw reforms to wage and hour laws, unemployment insurance and workers' compensation. He also presided over the expan sion of the public school system. Under George Ariyoshi, Burns' successor, the stateb egan requiring companies to p rovide health insurance to their workers, giving Hawaii near-universal medical coverage. The election of gover nors gave unions and their large membership new political clout. Hawaii is now thes econd-most unionized state in the nation behind New York. But while tourism has powered the economy for the past 50 years, islanders have yet to find a new source of growth for the next five decades. In 2007, Hawaii welcomed a record 7.63 million visitors, which was nearly one million more than in 1999. There's also little public appetite for building more hotels to welcome millions more tourists. In recent years, activists and residents have demonstrated against developers' plans to expand resorts in places like Oahu's North Shore and Maui's Makena Bay. "We're floundering," says Paul Brewbaker, senior economic adviser to the Bank of Hawaii. "We're at an interesting moment in terms of strategic economic policy. We have to make a decision: How are we going to sustain rising living standards?" The state offers generous tax credits to promote investment in high-technology. It actively supports aquaculture farms while global conglomerates use Hawaii as a base to develop seed corn. But none of these sectors has come close to replacing tourism as Hawaii's livelihood. Prominent businessman Walter Dods, the former head of First Hawaiian Bank and current chairman of Hawai ian Telcom, said Hawaii should rely on aquaculture and a half-dozen other niche industries to supplement tourism. But welcoming tourists, he said, is a natural industry for the islands. "All the talk of all the mag ical things that's going to replace it virtually every one has fallen on its face," Dods said. "Tourism is the financial linchpin of Hawaii." C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE MARINA & SEAFOOD PROCESSING PLANT ALLIGATOR BAY, NORTH LONG ISLANDApprox. 6 acres of Waterfront property with a 152 feet wide canal. Prope rty comprises three buildings: Building A:Seafood Processing Plant include a reception area, an room, a storage room, a laboratory and a processing room, (3 x 30 ft blast freezers, and (1x 15 ft and (1x15 ft holding freezers. Building B:Generator House B uilding C:The Water Plant age capacity. I nterested persons should submit offers to: T he Manager, Credit Risk Management, P. O. Box N-7518, N assau, Bahamas To reach us on or before October 2nd , 2009F or further information, please contact us at 502-0929, 356-1685 or 356-1608DEVELOPMENT FOR SALE Statehood helped transform Hawaii to tour ism haven IN THIS February 1, 2006 file photo, visitors pack Waikiki Beach in Honolulu. Hawaii became the 50th state this week in 1959, helping transform an island economy dominated by sugar and pineapple fields into a vacation paradise for Americans... (AP Photo: Lucy Pemoni

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By STEPHEN BERNARD AP Business Writer NEW YORK (AP Wall Street, the average shopper can trump a Federal Reserve policy maker. With other parts of the economy showing signs of improvement, the question of when a recovery will occur and how strong it will be lies with consumers. So reports last week showing weaker-than-expected retail sales and flagging consumer confidence overshadowed an upbeat view of the e conomy from the Federal R eserve. The major indexes e nded the week with a loss of a bout half a percent, their first w eekly losses in five weeks. " Anything pointing to the health of the consumer and its willingness to spend isg oing to be watched closely," said Ryan Jacob, president of Jacob Asset Management inL os Angeles. This week, the consumer is in focus again as a stream ofr etailers report second-quarter earnings. Wall Street will want to know if retail compa-n ies, like businesses in other industries, made money primarily because of cost-cuttingr ather than from improved revenue or sales. The nation's biggest retailer, Wal-Mart Stores Inc., last week followed the trend set by other companies, reporting earnings that beat Wall Street forecasts but also say ing that its most important sales, those from stores open at least a year, fell during the quarter. And it's likely that other retailers still to announce results will continue that pattern. Eventually, investors will need to see rising sales in order to become confident about the economy's ability to show sustained growth. Consumer spending accounts for more than two-thirds of the nation's economic activity. "We'll get a very good range of what retail sales actu-a lly look like" this week, said Jamie Cox, managing partner at Harris Financial Group in Richmond, Va. Cox noted that retailers from across the pricing and product spectrum are reporting results. Off-price retailer TJX Cos. and the high-end Saks Inc. report results Tuesday, while apparel retailer Gap Inc. provides its earnings data on T hursday. Home improvem ent retailers Lowe's Cos. a nd Home Depot Inc. also r elease results this week, as d o Target Corp., BJ's Wholes ale Club and Barnes & N oble Inc. S tock gains were muted a fter the Commerce Department said Thursday that retails ales fell 0.1 per cent in July, s ignificantly worse than the 0.7 per cent increase econo-m ists expected. The news was b ad again Friday, when a new reading on consumer senti-m ent was much lower than expected. Major indexes tumb led about one per cent that day. News of the Reuters/Univ ersity of Michigan consumer sentiment survey wiped out t he surge of optimism the m arket had after the Federal Reserve on Wednesday said t he economy was "leveling o ut." Cox said there is a split b etween Wall Street and M ain Street over the econom y's potential recovery. The r ally that began after the s tock market bottomed out in e arly March shows investors a re confident a recovery is coming in the near future,w hile the average American is a bit more cautious, he said. Friday's consumer sentim ent report was a jolt for t raders about exactly how u ncomfortable consumers still a re with their finances and t he state of the economy. O ne of the biggest worries f or people is the job market. J acob said that while growing c onsumer confidence would b e a welcome sign for the market, "with unemployments till trending higher, it's hard t o expect too much progress." Harvey Robinson, chief i nvestment officer at Robins on Capital Group in Dayton, Md., said that because ofq uestions about the job market, there is still no clear sign a bout the timing or strength of a recovery. Weekly unemployment d ata last week showed an unexpected rise in the numb er of workers filing for jobl ess benefits for the first time. The next report on jobless c laims will come out Thursd ay. Though job growth typical l ags behind as the economy r ecovers, improving unemp loyment reports could give c onsumers a confidence b oost. Until that happens, h owever, markets could be v olatile and the five-month rally might slow, analysts said. H owever, strength in new h ousing and manufacturing data during the week couldp rovide investors with more r easons to bid stocks higher. T he market will get readings o n housing starts and existi ng home sales as well as two r egional manufacturing r eports. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 3B THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008/CLE/Qui/01307IN THE SUPREME COURT EQUITY SIDE IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 AND IN THE MATTE R of the Petition of S. G. B. Company Ltd. AND IN THE MATTER of all that piece parcels or tract of land 260 acres more or less situate in the Settlement of The Bight Long Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. Copies of the led plan may be inspected during normal working hours at:(aThe Registry of the Supreme Court, Second Floor, Ansbacher House, East Street, Nassau, The Bahamas. (bThe Chambers of Hanna & Co., Second Floor, Pond Plaza, East Bay and Ernest Streets, Nassau N.P., The Bahamas. Notice is hereby given that any person having dower or right to dower or any adverse claim/s not recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 18th day of September, A.D., 2009, le in the Registry of the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of such claim in the prescribed form and veried by an afdavit to be led therewith. Failure of any such person to le and serve a statement of such claim on or before the aforementioned date will operate as a bar to such claim. HANNA & CO. Chambers 3rd Floor, Columbus House, East & Shirley Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas Attorneys for the Petitioner btrt tfr f r!%* '!$()))!*&*# tffn""bnff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–.,//6 $ GHJUHHLQDUNHWLQJ&RPPXQLFDWLRQVXEOLFHODWLRQV RU$GYHUWLVLQJ ,QGHSWKNQRZOHGJHRIDOOIDFHWRIPDUNHWLQJ $VVHUWLYHFUHDWLYHHQHUJHWLFVDOHVGULYHQLQGLYLGXDOZLWK D SURYHQWUDFNUHFRUGRIJHQHUDWLQJQHZLGHDVDQGVDOHV ([FHOOHQWRUJDQL]DWLRQDODQGLQWHUSHUVRQDOVNLOOV ([FHOOHQWZULWWHQYHUEDODQGSXEOLFVSHDNLQJVNLOOV 6WURQJDQGQHWZRUNLQJVNLOOV 6 DODU\FRPPHQVXUDWHZLWKH[SHULHQFH([FHOOHQW%HQHWVDFNDJH$SSO\LQZULWLQJWR 7KH+XPDQHVRXUFHVDQDJHU 3 1 DVVDX7KH%DKDPDV 2U Wall Street sees shoppers as key to rally’s future SALE SIGNS advertise discounts at a Hard Tail retailer on the Third Street Promenade in Santa Mon-i ca, California. Retail sales disappointed in July and the number of newly laid-off workers filing claims for unemployment benef its rose unexpectedly last week. The latest government reports reinforced concerns about how quickly consumers will be able to contribute to a broad economic recovery. (AP Photo: Reed Saxon

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By MICHELLE R SMITH Associated Press Writer PAWTUCKET, Rhode Island (AP lard spent this day like many other days: pushing her four month-old daughter's stroller around town in the drizzling rain, looking for a job. She's been out of work for a year, and her husband, Christopher, has only worked sporadically in the last several months. They're $500 behind on rent and just talked their phone company into turning their service back on after it got shut off. "We've had to resort to public help to get formula for her," Robillard said of her sleeping daughter. "I just got married a month ago. We can't even afford to get my new ID. That's $16.50." The couple, both 19, are just two among the tens of thousands of unemployed Rhode Islanders. The state's growing unemployment rate stood at 12.4 per cent in June, second highest in the country behind Michigan. Even worse, economists say that number is probably 25 per cent or more if you include people who have given up looking or are settling for part-time work. There is some positive news slowing unemployment, fewer jobless claims and more home sales, for example that economists say indicates, if not an end to the state's recession, the possible beginning of the end. Economists also caution that unemployed people like the Robillards could find themselves scrambling for work for quite a while because the employment picture is so bleak. "People are really, really c oncerned here about the s tate of the economy," said M arion Orr, a professor at Brown University, who polled Rhode Islanders about their attitudes in May. "We're a working class state and have long been a working class state, so when the economy goes south, we get hurt really bad." Sixty-nine per cent of the people Orr polled said they personally knew a friend or family member who had lost his job. Even those who have a stable job are feeling the dire economic situation. Lisa Church, 45, a public transit operator, says she was hit with a $1,200 property tax increase on her modest home in Pawtucket. Communities around the state have had to make cuts or raise taxes because the state budget dras tically cut local aid. Church said she's saving more and being more con scious of her spending. "Do I really need it? No, I don't, so why buy it? I'm being more practical today, putting the desires on hold," she said. By many measures, the Ocean State's economy is doing poorly. For example, bankruptcies are up about eight per cent in the first six months of 2009, compared to the same period a year ago. The number of people exhausting their unemployment benefits, indicating they've been out of work for a long time, doubled in June. The median value of a singlefamily home in Rhode Island f ell 23 per cent in the second q uarter from the same perio d a year ago, according to the Rhode Island Association of Realtors. However, while foreclosures persist, the rate seems to be easing, said Edward Mazze, an economist and former dean of the School of Business Administration at the University of Rhode Island. Ignoring homes sold as foreclosures or short-sales, the median price of a single family home fell less than 6 percent in the second quarter, the real estate group said. Paul Leys, president of the group and a real estate agent in Newport, said the number of homes sold is going up because of low prices, along with low mortgage interest rates and the $8,000 tax credit for first-time home buyers. "It's almost like someone turned the faucet back on a month, a month and a half ago. It's been fun to be busy again," he said. While he doesn't see a return to double-digit home appreciations anytime soon, he does think the worst is over. "We're beyond the bottom of the market," he said. Economists expect unemployment will continue to climb, but the pace of new claims, while still rising, has slowed. "We're not adding jobs, but the elements are starting to come around," said Leonard Lardaro, a professor of economics at the University of Rhode Island. He said one way for the s tate's unemployment rate to g o down is for people to move o ut of Rhode Island or find work in neighboring Massachusetts or Connecticut, which have more jobs in growth and technology industries. He said that's bad for Rhode Island because it creates a "brain drain" of educated, highly skilled workers. Mazze said he expected the state's unemployment rate to stay above 10 per cent at least through the middle of next year. By the end of 2010, he said unemployment will probably still be a persistent prob lem, at eight or nine per cent. Robillard said she'll keep looking for work. When she's lucky enough to find a place that's accepting applications, she fills one out there, then takes one home and brings it back the next day so she has a better chance of her name standing out in the pile. She's turned philosophical in the last few months. "I figure this is a test. This is a test to see how the human race goes about taking care of ourselves," she said. "If God is testing us, I thank him for every minute of peace that he gives me." C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1 .811.28Abaco Markets1.341.340.000.1270.00010.60.00% 11.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.306.25Bank of Bahamas6.256.250.000.2440.26025.64.16%0 .890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2 .372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3511.350.001.4060.2508.12.20% 2.882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.715.710.000.4190.36013.66.30% 3.851.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.973.64-0.330.1110.05232.81.43% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital1.951.950.000.2400.0808.14.10% 8.206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.5010.00Finco10.6310.630.000.3220.52033.04.89% 1 1.7110.30FirstCaribbean Bank10.3010.300.000.7940.35013.03.40% 5.534.95Focol (S)5.135.130.000.3320.15015.52.92% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.49ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.0010.39J. S. Johnson10.3910.390.000.9520.64010.96.16% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100000 100000 FidelitBkNote13(SeriC)+ FBB13 10000 000 F INDEX: CLOSE 783.14 | YTD -6.20% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: 30May2013 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 Interest Prime + 1.75% 7% FRIDAY, 14 AUGUST 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,562.56| CHG -0.35 | %CHG -0.02 | YTD -149.80 | YTD % -8.75BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7 % 1000 . 00 1000 . 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 . 00 0 . 00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.38601.3231CFAL Bond Fund1.38602.404.75 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.9047-1.20-3.66 1.48171.4059CFAL Money Market Fund1.48173.355.38 3.60903.1031Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1031-8.35-13.82 12.980112.3289Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.98012.875.79 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.47339.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.27652.00-2.98 1.06221.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.06222.566.22 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0243-0.842.43 1.05851.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05852.045.85 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 31-Dec-07 30-Jun-09 31-Jul-09 31-Jul-09 30-Jun-09MARKET TERMS30-Jun-09Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 31-May-09 Prime + 1.75% 7% 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 NAV Date $FDGHPLFV&UHDWLYLW\FHOOHQFH 5(*,67(5:&ODVVL]HV$UH/LPLWHG1LQWKHUUDFH(DVW&HQWUHYLOOH 7 0RQG\)ULGD ,QFOXGHV'DLO\+RW/XQFK Financial ControllerRequirements & Responsibilities: Lead and motivate accounting staff Experience in the preparation and interpretation of Financial Statements Must be able to develop and maintain an effective system of internal accounting and operational controls in a Hotel environment position Self motivated with strong analytical and problem-solving skills Must be conversant with hotel accounting software, with emphasis in Liaise with external Auditors, third party service providers and relevant Regulatory & Compliance Authorities Timely and accurate preparation, presentation and interpretation of Excellent written and oral communication skills Able to work extended hours, weekends and holidays QUALIFICATIONS BA in Accounting from an accredited University Advance working knowledge of Excel Working knowledge of Microsoft WordInterested persons should apply on or before August 29th, 2009Attention: CONTROLLER DA 81270 c/o The Tribune P.O. Box N3207 Nassau, Bahamas Management Opportunity applicants for the role of Some indications RI economy may be nearing the bottom SARAH ROBILLARD of Rhode Island has her job application reviewed by Ground Round manager, Kay, at the restaurant in Pawtucket... (AP Photo: Elise Amendola

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By DAVID N GOODMAN and JEFF KAROUB Associated Press Writers DETROIT (AP business professor and former auto executive in Michigan, Gerald Meyers has seen his share of former colleagues and students leave the state. The state's economy has been shrinking along with its struggling auto industry. And the brain drain is well-documented as the state struggles to keep its own college graduates, much less attract degreed newcomers. "I can speak for my students, who are predominantly leaving the state," said Meyers, a University of Michigan business professor and former chairman of American Motors Corp. "It would be helpful certainly in my conversations with them if something is goingo n that suggests that the future is brighter here than it has been." M eyers and state officials say a newly announced $1.36 billion injection into 11 com panies and universities in Michigan might offer some of the best and brightest a reason to stay. Obama administration officials this month announced $2.4 billion in federal grants to develop next-generation e lectric vehicles and batteries. Vice President Joe Biden made the announcement in M ichigan, the single largest recipient of the grants. These and other recent federal grants give the state a better shot at reversing the brain drain, veteran U.S. Rep. J ohn Dingell told University of Michigan researchers and administrators. " We hope we can keep them home so they can do those things to move our e conomy forward," said Dingell, a Dearborn Democrat who visited the Ann Arbor campus after the announcement. He has been instrumental over decades in steering research money to the school. Stephen Forrest, the university's vice president for research, said the state is rich in engineering and scientific talent but has lagged in turning those skills into new business ideas. "We're very sensitive to the idea of brain drain," he said. What has been lacking, he said, has been the "management talent" to put those ideas to work. Gov. Jennifer Granholm said the grants are important for keeping and developing tens of thousands of jobs because they cover everything from early research through final assembly giving many graduates an opportunity to find in-state jobs in their fields of study. "If we create a whole value chain for the battery indust ry, the opportunities for those workers are very, very ripe," she said. T he University of Michigan, Detroit's Wayne State University and Michigan Technological University in Houghton in the Upper Peninsula will receive $10.5 m illion for education and work-force training programmes and other purpose s. If things go right, graduates will be able to walk right into n ewly created jobs in the region, said Wayne State engineering professor Simon Ng, director of that university's new Alternative Energy Technology degree programme. "It will be perfect timing," Ng said. "They will be able to employ these people when they graduate." Meyers says the billion-dollar effort is a great economic stimulant but can't plug the brain drain by itself. "What I hope is that it's an incentive for more," he said. "Some big shooters will say, 'Let's move some capital in that direction.'" Michigan has had the nation's highest annual unemployment rate since 2006 it reached 15.2 per cent in June and forecasters say it will climb further before it turns around. The state never regained its momentum after the 2001 recession, and the bankruptcies this summer of General Motors Corp. and Chrysler Group LLC has tened the steady stream ofp lant closings and layoffs. Lou Glazer, president of Michigan Future Inc., a nonp artisan research organisation in Ann Arbor, said "quality of place," particularly in urban centers, is at least equal to employment opportunities as a means of luring a nd keeping college graduates. And making the state's major cities more attractive b y creating vibrant, "walkable" neighbourhoods and developing mass transit syst ems historically has been challenging, but some efforts are under way. "It's the two together that end up being the ingredients that allow you to fundamentally change...the location decision of talent in general and young people in particular," he said. Still, Glazer said, the boost for the nascent battery and hybrid technology market is the right kind of move on the economic development side. "Just in and of itself, it creates new job opportunities for talent and the state needs that," he said. "It's in an emerging industry, which has good buzz, which the state needs. All that stuff is an absolute plus. "The stateshould feel really good." C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 5B $1bn in battery grants may recharge MI talent base

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By PHILIP ELLIOTT Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP Bowing to Republican pressure and an uneasy public, President Barack Obama's administration signaled Sunday it is ready to abandon the idea of giving Americans the option of government-run insurance as part of a new health care system. Facing mounting opposition to the overhaul, administration officials left open the c hance for a compromise with R epublicans that would i nclude health insurance cooperatives instead of a government-run plan. Such a concession probably would enrage Obama's liberal supporters but could deliver a much-needed victory on a top domestic priority opposed by GOP lawmakers. Officials from both political parties reached across the a isle in an effort to find comp romises on proposals they l eft behind when they returned to their districts for an August recess. Obama had wanted the government to run a health insurance organization to help cover the nation's almost 50 million uninsured, but didn't include it as one of his three core principles of reform. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebeliuss aid that government alternative to private health insurance is "not the essential element" of the administration's health care overhaul. The White House would be open to co-ops, she said, a sign that Democrats want a compromise so they can declare a victory. Under a proposal by Sen. Kent Conrad, D-N.D., consumer-owned nonprofit coope ratives would sell insurance i n competition with private i ndustry, not unlike the way electric and agriculture co-ops operate, especially in rural states such as his own. With $3 billion to $4 billion in initial support from the government, the co-ops would operate under a nationals tructure with state affiliates, b ut independent of the government. They would be required to maintain the type of financial reserves that pri vate companies are required to keep in case of unexpectedly high claims. " I think there will be a competitor to private insurers," Sebelius said. "That's really the essential part, is you don't turn over the whole new marketplace to private insurance companies and trust them to do the right thing." Obama's spokesman refused to say a public option w as a make-or-break choice. "What I am saying is the b ottom line for this for the president is, what we have to h ave is choice and competition in the insurance market," White House press secretary Robert Gibbs said Sunday. A day before, Obama appeared to hedge his bets. "All I'm saying is, though, that the public option, whether we have it or we don't have it, is not the entirety of health care reform," Obama said at a town hall meeting in Grand Junction, Colo. "This is just one sliver ofi t, one aspect of it." L awmakers have discussed the co-op model for months although the Democratic leadership and the White House have said they prefer a government-run option. Conrad, chairman of the S enate Budget Committee, c alled the argument for a gov ernment-run public plan little more than a "wasted effort." He added there are enough votes in the Senate for a cooperative plan. "It's not government-run and government-controlled," he said. "It's membership-run and membership-controlled. But it does provide a non profit competitor for the forprofit insurance companies, and that's why it has appeal on both sides." Sen. Richard Shelby, RAla., said Obama's team is making a political calculation and embracing the co-op alternative as "a step away from the government takeover of the health care system" that the GOP has pummeled. "I don't know if it will do e verything people want, but we ought to look at it. I think i t's a far cry from the original proposals," he said. R epublicans say a public option would have unfair advantages that would drive private insurers out of business. Critics say co-ops would not be genuine public options for health insurance. Rep. Eddie Bernice John son, D-Texas, said it would be difficult to pass any legislation through the Democraticcontrolled Congress without the promised public plan. "We'll have the same numb er of people uninsured," she s aid. "If the insurance com panies wanted to insure these people now, they'd be insured." Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga., said the Democrats' option would force individuals fromt heir private plans to a gove rnment-run plan, a claim that the nonpartisan Congression al Budget Office supports. "There is a way to get folks insured without having the government option," he said. A shift to a cooperative plan would certainly give some cover to fiscally conser vative Blue Dog Democrats who are hardly cheering for the government-run plan. "The reality is that it takes 60 percent to get this done in the Senate. It's probably going to have to be bipartisan in the Senate, which I think it should be," said Rep. Mike Ross, DArk., who added that the proposals still need changes before he can support them. Obama, writing in Sunday's New York Times, said political maneuvers should be excluded from the debate. " In the coming weeks, the cynics and the naysayers will c ontinue to exploit fear and concerns for political gain," h e wrote. "But for all the scare tactics out there, what's truly scary truly risky is the prospect of doing nothing." Congress' proposals, however, seemed likely to strike end-of-life counseling ses sions. Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin has called the session "death panels," a label that has drawn rebuke from her fellow Republicans as well as Democrats. S en. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, d eclined to criticize Palin's comments and said Obama wants to create a governmentrun panel to advise what types of care would be available to citizens. "In all honesty, I don't want a bunch of nameless, faceless b ureaucrats setting health care for my aged citizens in Utah," Hatch said. Sebelius said the end-of-life proposal was likely to be dropped from the final bill. "We wanted to make sure doctors were reimbursed for that very important consulta tion if family members chose to make it, and instead it's been turned into this scare tactic and probably will be off the table," she said. Sebelius spoke on CNN's "State of the Union" and ABC's "This Week." Gibbs appeared on CBS' "Face the Nation." Conrad and Shelby appeared on "Fox News Sunday." Johnson, Price and Ross spoke with "State of the Union." Hatch was interviewed on "This Week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hite House appears ready to drop ‘public option’ PRESIDENT Barack Obama listens to a question as he speaks about health care during a town hall m eeting at Central High School in Grand Junction, Colorado... (AP Photo/Alex Brandon

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f 6HFXUHGDUNLQJSDFH &RQWDFW7RQ\'XQFRPEHDW WRQ\GXQFRPEH#FRUDOZDYHFRP CHART SHOWS the student debts in relation to their degrees earned By The Associated Press AS credit standards for private loans have tightened, some for-profit, or "proprietary," colleges are now lending money directly to students. Such borrowing may be worthwhile, but here are some tips for protecting your self on any student loan from three experts: Deanne Loonin of the National Consumer Law Center, Tim Ranzetta of Student Lending Analytics, and Mark Kantrowitz of the Web site finaid.org. Fill out the FAFSA form for government aid, and always max out on federal grants and loans before turning to other sources. Rates are lower, and the new income-based repayment plan offers protections if you experience financial difficulties or choose a lower-paying career. Be wary of any lender that refuses to provide information on terms and fees. Make sure you understand the repayment requirements, both for while you're in school and after. If possible, apply with a creditworthy co-signer to reduce costs. Borrow as little as possible, no matter how much somebody is willing to offer you. Depending on rates and repayment scheules, every $100 in loans is likely to cost around $200 by the time you repay. However, borrowing is preferable to forcing yourself to work so many hours while in school that you fail to graduate. Find a school that won't set you up for failure. Especially at for-profit colleges, ask for data about graduation rates, job placement rates and average wages. If you're borrowing more than around $45,000 for a bachelor's degree, or $25,000 for an asso ciate's degree, think seriously about finding a cheaper school. A good rule of thumb: Don't give yourself more total loan debt than your expected gross salary the year after you graduate. Another: Your total monthly payment on all student debt shouldn't exceed eight per cent to 10 per cent of your monthly salary. Some tips for taking out student loans

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LONDON (AP Britain's treasury chief says the government is ready to bring in laws to curb the sort of big bankers' bonuses that h elped trigger the global f inancial crisis. Alistair Darling said in comments published Sunday he was prepared to legislate, although he did not specify any ideas for new laws. "I'm quite clear that some of the problems we have today were caused by the fact that some traders were incentivized to take risks which neither they nor their bosses fully understood," Darling was q uoted as telling the Sunday T imes newspaper. "If we need to change the law and toughen things up, we can do that." Britain's financial services watchdog has drawn up new rules on bankers' pay, but critics say they are too weak. The Financial Services Authority has outlined a code to stop bankers from getting bonuses at high multiples of their salary or bonuses guaranteed for more than a year. B anks that fail to comply c ould face higher capital charges or other punitive action. However, the authority backed away from imposing some new restrictions on the structure of bonus payments and reduced the range of financial institutions that the new code will cover. That retreat followed industry warnings that the tougher measures would cripple London's position as a financial c enter. D arling said the new code "is only part of our approach" to preventing another banking crisis. Despite the global push to reduce the risk-taking associated with big bonus pay, reports suggest that bankers' bonuses are creeping up regardless. The London-based Center for Economic Business and Research has forecast bonus payments by banks will hit f our billion pounds ($6.6 bill ion) this year, up from 3.3 billion pounds a year ago. Darling said citizens were "rightly concerned," particularly given their newfound status as shareholders in nationalized banks. Britain seized Northern Rock and took major stakes in Lloyds and the Royal Bank of Scotland after they teetered amid the global credit squeeze. "I am not against bonuses where you are rewarding g ood behavior and long-term g rowth. That is something you should encourage," Darling was quoted as saying. But he warned that banks must not return to "a situation where firms actively havea pay system that results in them being exposed in a way that led to ruin." C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGE 8B, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ASSOCIATE ATTORNEYNEEDEDExperience in Litigation, Conveyancing and Commercial Law. Background in Natural Science preferred but not required. Apply by email only.atty.at.law09@gmail.com / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG R GD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU L $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV UK treasury chief: Banks’ bonus pay must be curbed

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 9B Winder: Loan programme was a mistake from the beginning from COB it would have been a far better investment for the people of the B ahamas.” Mr Winder said 60 per cent o f the staff at Deloitte and Touche went through the College of the Bahamas, including the firms two y oungest partners. He added that a resum, w ith the College of the Bahamas listed as a past insti tution, has more credibility for his company. “Investment in the College o f the Bahamas should take p riority over the loan system,” said Mr Winder. “Government needs to do a post analysis.” According to him, it is m ore important to ensure that COB has the capacity to educate the majority of the students seeking a tertiarye ducation there. He said the government was right to a bandon the guaranteed loan programme. M r Winder contended that the loan programme wouldn ever be able to support the majority, but insisted that the e xpansion of COB would increase the educated popul ation substantially by giving the most students a betterc hance at enrolling at the col lege. “Precious investment dol lars in COB will yield a far greater return if capacity is enlarged,” he said. Mr Winder said government now needs to out-source the collection of the outstanding $30 million in ordert o reduce government inter ference. Individuals should not be allowed to complain to the politicians,” he said. No politician would have the ability to say “I know this one and don't go so hard on him.” “We are prepared to supp ort COB and are fully behind investment at COB,” h e said. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B RAY WINDER

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bags fly free, but charges for a third checked bag. JetBlue charges for the second checked bag. JetBlue wants more business travelers, as does Southwest, which has tried to lure them with its "Business Select" option launched two years ago. Passengers that pay a premium can go to the front o f the boarding line. Neither a irline offers business or first class seats. JetBlue said in July that although it has not focused on courting business travelers in the past, it's landing more of them in New York and Boston as companies cut travel budgets. Because of their cheap fares and high customer service rankings, both airlines have legions of loyal travelers. Part of that loyalty can also be traced to fresh marketing that tries to put some fun in flying. JetBlue's tongue-in-cheek ads have urged executives to get off their private jets and fly JetBlue. In Southwest TV ads, CEO Gary Kelly told customers "It's On" in New York. Both airlines are on YouTube. Blogs and Twitter are also important parts of their brands. Kelleher and Neeleman no longer run the airlines they started. Kelleher, 78, stepped down as chairman last year, but he is still under contractu ntil 2013. Neeleman, 49, runs Azul Airlines in Brazil a venture he started after hewas pushed out of JetBlue in 2007 following the company's bungled response to a Northeast snowstorm, leaving1 30,000 passengers stranded or delayed. But the airlines they started still have the low-cost, passenger-savvy traits of their founders. Both have flownfarther and lasted longer than some of their larger competitors. Platt thinks the big airlines may have something to worry about now in Boston and JetBlue will have to ramp up its game, too. "Boston has really been a two-horse town with (two major carriers dominating ser vice there)," he said. "Just the mere presence (of another low-cost carrier) is going to change the landscape." C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 11B and Southwest face off IN THIS July 19, 2005 file photo, a JetBlue Airbus flies over a pair of Southwest Airlines' jets from Bob Hope Airport in Burbank, Calif., bound for New York's JFK airport. After years of following similar game plans to lure passengers with fares that are a cut below and customer service that's a cut above, JetBlue and Southwest are going head-to-head in major Northeast markets... (AP Photo: Reed Saxon

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By RUPERT MISSICK Jr Chief Reporter rmissick@tribunemedia.net A disturbing window is opening into the minds of Bahamians who oppose the amendment to the Sexual Offences Act which would totally ban marital rape in the Bahamas. It appears that men who balk at the idea believe that it is acceptable to force themselves on wives unwilling or unable to have sex. It seems they are willing to abandon the traditional role of husbands as protector and provider and don the mantle of predator. Women who oppose this amendment either believe that being raped is an acceptable aspect of married life, an inevitability, like having to complain about your husband dropping his shirt onto the bedroom floor after he comes home from work or believe that they have no right tot heir own feelings as it relates to t heir sexual or reproductive life. This is what it boils down to. There are no nuances. There are no shades of grey. There is no room left for interpretation. The bill seeks to give married women the same rights as their single counterparts, the abil i ty to see their rapist brought to jus tice even if he is the man she married. Those who oppose this bill believe that if he so chooses, a man should be able to "take sex", by force if need be, from the "bone of his bone and flesh of his flesh." I will through out this article refer to opponents of this bill as proponents of marital rape because like people of my gen eration say, "That's real talk." It's been disheartening listening to radio shows over the past few weeks as the debate on this bill con tinues. Our men have come across as brutes and our women steeped in a victimology that is inexplicable in this modern age. People have butchered, misinterpreted and misquoted the Bible to, as they see it, defend the right of a man to his wife's body. Even the radio show hosts, who should know better, defend would be rapists and postulate that the bill is being pushed by a cabal of vindictive women or a hid den homosexual agenda. I was also disappointed listening to the recent Senate contribution that Allyson Maynard Gibson made on this matter. After listing what she described as “black and white or clearly defined areas about which there is little or no disagreement” where it would be obvious that a man has raped his wife, like doping, drugging, threatening her at gunpoint or beating her to have sex, etcetera, she suggested that "concerns arise when we are confronted with the tremendous grey areas that inevitably exist in the context of a marriage." The good senator suggests that these grey areas may include whether the wife was really saying no, whether the husband was forcing or trying to convince his wife to have sex. She also asserts that there should be consideration as to what was the wife’s motive for making the allegation of rape against her hus band. The amendment, she says, should also take into consideration the children and who will support the family if the husband is sent to jail. One can only assume Mrs May nard-Gibson was playing the role of devil's advocate because the answers to these questions are quite direct and (as I said before shades of grey. First of all we will rightly assume that in the case of marital rape it will be the wife making the complaint to the police so regardless of what the husband thinks, the wife knows if she was "really saying no." She also will be painfully aware of whether she was being "con vinced" or "forced" into having sex. As for the motivation behind the wife making the allegation in the first place, as with rape cases involving people who are not married, it is up to the courts to make that determination. As for the children and who will support the family if the husband is sent to jail, surely these are matters the man should consider before he commits such a heinous act. These should not be hindrances to a victim making a complaint. Rape laws, which Mrs Maynard-Gibson marched and fought to see enforced in this country, exist for the victims of rape and do not nor should not include consideration for any other party. Mrs Maynard-Gibson is a suc cessful, well educated and prominent Bahamian woman. There are many women in our society would be happy to be as blessed as she is. Women in her position should take care not to offer proponents of marital rape any excuse, which they have done over this past week, to say "see even a woman of no less esteem than Allyson Maynard-Gibson has had reason to question this amendment." In the Bahamas marital rape can only be recognised if the couple is separated or in the process of getting a divorce. If they are married and there has been no separation, spousal rape cannot occur under Bahamian law. One of the more persistent objections to the proposed amendment is the idea that removing the ability of a man to rape his wife would severely damage the institution of marriage in the Bahamas. Those stupid enough to make this argument chose to ignore the fact that the rape itself is severely dam aging to the institution of marriage. In a "Your Say" published in this newspaper on Wednesday, August 12, a writer by the name of "E.V" suggested that the amendment would destroy the family, because it would force a man to sweetheart or look for satisfaction elsewhere. "When this happens and the woman files for a divorce on the grounds that the man was 'sweethearting', the courts would not con sider that it was the woman who initiated the whole thing by using her body as a weapon and depriving her husband of his rights. This same man then has to pay alimony and other expenses. Why? Because he simply wanted to have sex with the woman God gave him to have sex with." This argument is so ignorant, backward, demonic and ridiculous that if it were not repeated so many times and by so many different peo ple it would hardly warrant a response. If the alternative to raping the mother of your children is "seeking satisfaction elsewhere" I hardly see a problem. But there are more mea sured and intelligent solutions. If a husband is sexually frustrated in his marriage he can suggest counselling, or perhaps talk to his wife and ask her why she no longer seems interested in having sex. Even a trip to her personal physician may be in order. In any event, in the "Your Say" E.V. presents himself as one seeking to preserve manhood. However, E.V. wasn't man enough to have his name printed which leads me to respect his opinion even less. Former president of the Bar Association, Wayne Munroe while he was a panelist on Star 106.5’s talk Show Generation X suggested that the amendment would be abused by vindictive Bahamian women, who, he seems to suggest, are widespread through the country. Mr Munroe was quoted in another daily as saying: “The problem that this creates is this: All you need is for there to be dysfunction in a household and a woman to be upset at a man and rape does not require any trauma and she calls the police and says my husband raped me. You would be arrested and you would be the subject of domestic orders. And it will be your word against hers as to whether she said Amendment or no amendment, if your marriage is so bad that forcing yourself on your wife is the only way you can have sex with her, you need to get a divorce. Also, if your wife is so vindictive that having sex with her feels like playing a game of Russian roulette because you don’t know when she’ll decide to unjustly accuse you of rape, you need to get a divorce. Nothing is more damaging to the institution of marriage than two people who no longer want to be or who have no business being together, living in a tumultuous household creating a poisonous environment for them and their children. Barrington Brennen, who has been a marriage and family therapist for the past 15 years has been agitating for a law like this for over a decade. He told The Tribune that unfortunately the response to the proposed amendment is revealing a deep seated belief that women are still property. He pointed out that it is religious rather than secular people who have the biggest problem with this amendment. These people Mr Brennen said, resort to misusing scripture in order to "brain wash" those who arei gnorant. He highlighted the case of a Bahamian woman who, after undergoing a painful surgical procedure told her husband she was unable to have sex. This woman's husband forced h imself on her and through his wife's pain, pleading and tears completed the sexual act. Opposition or support for this act will not divide homes, but will separate real Bahamian men from the animals they may call brothers, f athers, uncles, cousins and friends. I have a very "traditional" view of manhood which may become even more "traditional" if I'm lucky enough to be a father one day. A man should be protector, provider, a nurturer, loving and a lover. You cannot love or be loved through force, through contempt, or through violence. I sincerely hope that the public debate on this bill is simply just some social experiment or maybe even a political distraction and the government will have this legislation passed regardless of the nonsense out there. They have a moral and humanitarian obligation to do so. If they fail to do this it will certainly be unforgivable and Bahami an women and all true Bahamian men who love their women should remind them harshly of their failure in 2012. Not passing this bill will mean that men will be able to be punished for raping acquaintances, relatives, girl friends, prostitutes, strippers and strangers, but not their wives. It is funny how these men, and I use the term in the loosest sense of the word, believe that a complete stranger or prostitute should have more rights than the women they swore before God to love and cherish until death. INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009 The stories behind the news ‘Real talk’ on marital rape A MAN SHOULD BE protector, provider, a nurturer, loving and a lover. You cannot love or be loved through force, contempt, or through violence...


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FILES


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=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

for shuffle?

Sports Minister
Desmond Bannister
reportedly wants

to leave politics

RUMOURS of an impend-
ing shuffle to the prime min-
ister’s Cabinet swirled in
political circles yesterday.

The shake-up will report-
edly centre around Sports
Minister Desmond Bannister
who, according to a well-
placed source, wants to leave
the political fray to focus on
his law practice.

For weeks it has been spec-
ulated that Attorney General
Michael Barnett will be
appointed as the next chief
justice leaving a void in his
current post. There are also

reports that State Minister for
the Environment Phenton
Neymour will be moved to
another area and assume new
duties.

“T think Mr Bannister has
been wanting to get out for
quite some time. I think he’s
been pleading that his prac-
tice has been suffering and so
he just needs to get back in
the private sector — and he
said (previously) that he only
wanted to stay around for two
years and I think he wants to

SEE page 11

Four hour power cut
in New Providence

A POWER cut affected homes and businesses throughout
New Providence for up to four hours on Friday night when a
Bahamas Electricity Corporation power cable “faulted” in the

Big Pond area.

Minister of State for the Environment Phenton Neymour said
power failed in nearly every New Providence community when
a fault in the voltage transformer of the 33 kilowatt cable

SEE page 11

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MISS BAHAMAS Kiara Sherman poses on stage last night at the
Imperial Ballroom, Atlantis Resort, Paradise Island.

The Miss Universe pageant entered its competitive phase last
night with the swimwear and evening gown events.

Win a fully-loaded
backpack plus a

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, LATEST NEWS ON PAGE FIFTEEN



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Hurricane could
hit the Bahamas
by end of week

a
By caren ree Laces 1
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By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

iO} INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
[| (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

A HURRICANE could hit the Bahamas at the end of
the week as Tropical Storm Bill gains strength over the
Atlantic, forecasters warned last night. However, it is still

too early to say for certain.

Although it is still too early to tell whether Bill will be
a threat to the Bahamas, Bahamas Department of Mete-
orology meteorologist Basil Dean told The Tribune
yesterday that the threat will become clear by Wednes-

day.

The strengthening Tropical Storm had maximum sus-
tained winds of 65 mph as it moved west northwest at
around 16 mph last night, and Tropical Storm force
winds extended up to 140 miles outward.

SEE page 11



Young mother believed to have
drowned after falling from cliff

TRAGEDY struck a young
mother who fell off a cliff and is

fale 2”
THE REIGNING Miss Uni-
verse Dayana Mendoza gave
an exclusive interview to The
Tribune at the weekend.

* SEE PAGE TWO for her
views on the pageant and
what she’s made of her vis-
it to the Bahamas.

EYTYeS Wai Loe

believed to have drowned in
rough waters near Clifton Pier,
police said. Just two hours later,
police found the lifeless body
of a man bobbing in the water
at the eastern end of Potter’s
Cay.

Police said Vonique Johnson,
39, and her 18-year-old daugh-
ter took a car ride to the Clifton

SEE page 11

Marriage and family
therapist: govt must
pass marital rape law

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A MARRIAGE and family
therapist of 15 years says gov-
ernment must pass the marital
rape law whether there is con-
sensus for it or not.

Barrington Brennen has
been agitating for the “long
overdue” law “for about 10
years”, he told The Tribune yes-
terday.

He said the debate that has
followed in the wake of its pro-
posal in parliament has, “unfor-

SEE page 11

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NASSAU AND BAHAM/?

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER


PAGE 2, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

REIGNINGMISSUNIVERSE

DAYANA MENDOZA SPEAKS TO THE TRIBUNE

REIGNING Miss Uni-
verse Dayana Mendoza
admits she is sad she no
longer plays an active role
in the competition, but says
she could not have chosen a
better place to relinquish
her crown than the
Bahamas.

While on the set of an
early morning Miss Uni-
verse calendar shoot on Fri-
day at Atlantis, the former
Miss Venezuela took a few
minutes to give an exclusive
interview to The Tribune, in
which she discussed her
feelings about the pageant,
this year’s contestants and
her plans for the future.

T: How do you feel
watching this year’s contest
from the sidelines?

DM: “It is a bit weird and
a little sad for me some-
times, because I see them
having fun - like Miss
Venezuela (Stefania Fer-
nandez, who succeeded
Miss Mendoza). It is sad to
see them, because it
reminds me of when I was
doing it.”














































THE BAHAMAS
ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

wishes to advise

ALL CONSUMERS

In both New Providence and the Farnily Islands, ta make prompt
payment(s) on oll accounts to avoid interruption of your electricity

Fervice [5].

The public is also odvised that all overdue poyments should be made
Grectly to the Corporation. Those poyments can be mode ot the Head
Office on Blue Hill and Tucker Roods, the Mall at Morathon of the Main Past
Office on East Hill Steet. Payments can ale be made on SATURDAYS aot
the Mall ot Marathen from 8:30 am fe 1 pm. Please make sure to see a
Credit and Collections supervisor once overdve bill & pald to ensue

facennection.

Consumers whose account(s} ore not overdue con olso make
Poyment[s) directhy ta the Corporation or at any Barcloys
Bank, British American Bank, or the Bank of Nova Scotia or

Fince Bankliné or Royal Online.

T: How was your year as
Miss Universe?

DM: “It was great, I had
so much fun. It is really a
beautiful job; you get to rep-
resent Latin women in my
case and women in general,
and learn a lot about the
world.”

T: Which of the contes-
tants has the best chance of
winning in your opinion?

DM: “Well I don’t know. I
haven’t the opportunity to
speak with them really, so I
don’t know if what kind of
personality they have, or if
they project something spe-
cial. They are all pretty, but if
I don’t talk to them, I can-
not really tell if Pd like them
to be winners or not. So I
don’t know.

T: What do you think
about the Bahamas?

DM: “I’m having a great
time. The Bahamas is par-
adise, so for me to give up
the crown here, I’m very
lucky.

T: When you first arrived,
you said, “I’m home”. What
did you mean by that?

DM: “I’ve been here so
many times already that ’'m
used to being here and I
don’t feel a difference. I love
the food, I love the people, I
love the weather, the beach
and the sand and the whole
thing, so I feel so comfort-
able, I don’t want to leave.”

T: What will you take back
with you?

DM: “More than objects.
I’m going to take back mem-
ories. Pll be back, I will defi-
nitely visit again. But not by
myself — with my family.”

T: What is in your future?

DM: “I don’t know what’s
in my future; only God
knows what is in my future,
but what ’'m going to do now
in the near future is go to
New York Film Academy.
I’m going to go to acting
school.

“T think it is a great oppor-
tunity that I can take advan-
tage of thanks to my schol-
arship from the Miss Uni-
verse organisation.”

T: What was your
favourite part of being Miss
Universe?

DM: “Travelling all
around the world for free!”

rE
tt ES)
tee na
PHONE: 322-2157

SUIT, SHIRT & TIE

WM

Tre Me a see Bt





CHAD MARTEL
MISS UNIVERSE Dayana Mendoza enjoys a photo shoot.

CHAD MARTEL

DAYANA MENDOZA chats while on camera.

Derek Smith/BIS

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Oln brief.

Police: two men
targeting cars in
Goodman's Bay

TWO men are target-
ing isolated cars parked
in the Goodman’s Bay
area and stealing valu-
ables left behind, police
confirmed.

According to an offi-
cer stationed at the
Cable Beach police sta-
tion, who did not want

to be named, the station

has received several
complaints of items
being stolen from vehi-
cles left parked in the
western parking lot of
Goodman’s Bay beach.

“We've been getting
several reports on that,”
said the officer, who
could not say how many
break-ins were reported
recently or when the
thieves strike.

An e-mail being circu- }

lated over the last few
days warned residents
of the potential danger.
“The driver would
pull very close toa
parked vehicle while his
accomplice (would)
take an object out to
break the glass, then
reverse the car, while
the other (does) the
searching and the steal-
ing,” said the e-mail.
The thieves are tar-
geting cars that seem
vulnerable — with valu-

able items left out in the

open — and are parked
in isolated spots, said
police.

The officer said his
station patrols the area
every day but urged
persons who use that

parking lot to park their

cars in populated areas
and not to leave valu-
ables in their vehicles.




Prooting



Davis calls for govt to end

loan prog

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE prime minister should
immediately end government’s
“insensitive” suspension of the
national education loan guaran-
tee programme — and increase
the cap on educational funding
— to ensure that hundreds of
abandoned students can still pur-
sue tertiary education abroad this
semester.

Deputy leader candidate of
the Progressive Liberal Party
Philip “Brave” Davis argued that
this would allow the hundreds of
students let down by govern-
ment’s “abrupt” decision to
begin their studies as early as this
week.

“A government serious about
its young people would priori-
tize its spending and budget to
ensure that the hundreds of (stu-
dents) affected receive the fund-
ing necessary to pursue their
studies,” said Mr Davis.

He also questioned why gov-
ernment would “squander” the
public’s money on road improve-
ment projects and preparations
for the upcoming Miss Universe
pageant instead of allocating
money to invest in the country’s
educational development.

“What is the point of revital-
ising Bay Street and the down-
town area and creating new
opportunities if we are not devel-
oping the brain power to take
advantage of it?

“T understand that govern-
ment has spent over $10 million
to aid in the hosting of Miss Uni-
verse.

“How can we truly benefit
from the exposure of our islands
when in the same breath we can-
not find a dollar to support and
educate our people,” he asked
at a press conference held at his
law chambers yesterday.

Nearly two weeks ago, Edu-
cation Minister Carl Bethel
shocked many students who
were counting on the loan to

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PHILIP ‘BRAVE’ DAVIS

help finance costly studies
abroad when he announced that
the plan had been suspended due
to a high default rate.

Following the backlash from
frustrated students, Mr Bethel
said his ministry had repeatedly
warned the public that the pro-
gramme's future was uncertain
from the start.

He added that the plan would
remain suspended until it is able
to sustain itself.

In a recent interview with The
Tribune, Mr Bethel explained
that the cap on the loans was
lowered from $20,000 a year to
$10,000 in 2004 while the average
grade point average of 2.5 per
cent was raised to make the pro-
gramme more exclusive in the
face of rising defaulters.

Still government's Guaranteed
Loan Programme accumulated
a $68.05 million deficit because
so many students failed to make
good on their repayment, he said.

Mr Davis argued that govern-
ment should quickly enact more
stringent controls, increased pub-
lic reporting requirements and
regular audits to ensure the plan
is sustained in the long-term.

The MP for Cat Island and
Rum Cay also called on govern-
ment to publish the names of all
defaulters of the educational loan

MSs

programme and publish strin-
gent eligibility so that the plan
will be free of political abuse in
the future.

He also criticised government
for not alerting applicants about
the suspension sooner, so they
could make alternate plans.

“At this late stage, the Col-
lege of the Bahamas and alter-
native financing are not viable
options. These same children,
the victims of broken promises,
now have to find a way not only
to cope. ..But must now find a
job in this challenging market,”
he said.

“Prospective students, who
had their tickets purchased,
resigned from jobs, paid non-
refundable deposits, secured
visas, reserved accommodations
and prepared their lives for a
major change now face grievous
disappointment because govern-
ment broke their promise to
them,” said Mr Davis, flanked
by one disappointed student
whose dreams of studying at a
college abroad were dashed.

In a recent interview, Mr
Bethel defended government’s
decision.

"Sometimes the wheels of gov-
ernment don't operate as quick-
ly as possible and it's unfortu-
nate in this case that the policy



Carjackers steal woman's car

POLICE are searching for armed carjackers who held a
young woman up at gunpoint and stole her car.

Shortly after 2 am yesterday two men driving a gold coloured
Honda pulled up behind a 26-year-old woman who had just
arrived at her home on Sweeting’s Lane.

One of the men got out of the car with a shotgun and
demanded the keys to the victim’s white 2001 Honda Accord

registration No. 209852.

The gunman sped off in the stolen vehicle, however, the

young woman was not harmed.
Police investigations continue.







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"T have spoken several times
about the debts, urging gradu-























ramme suspension

ates to pay because of the
threat it was posing to the via-
bility of the fund,” Mr Bethel
told The Tribune in a recent
interview.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, 1998, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Wyndham closes for eight weeks

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Wyndham resort on
Cable Beach will close today
for eight weeks in an effort to
increase cost savings and stave
off further negative repercus-

the temporary closure makes
good business sense.

“This (closure) will also
allow us the opportunity to
maximise financial saving dur-
ing a traditionally slow period
and the traditional height of
the hurricane season,” he said.

The hotel’s phone lines will

Mr Sands said all employees
will be scheduled to return to
work on or about October 7.

But if the tourism industry
continues to worsen, current
staffing levels may be adjust-
ed.

“Our business is like an
accordion and we adjust

demand. . .We assess staffing
levels on a monthly basis —
that’s the nature of our busi-
ness. We have to continue to
ensure that we are financially
viable and staffing demands are
predicated on business levels
period,” he said.

The last guests are set to

STRUCKUM

ET ea Tt
UR em pit

sions from the current tourism
downturn.

Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s
senior vice-president of admin-
istration and external relations,
said the period will be used to
freshen up the property and
ensure it can be a viable com-
petitor when it re-opens on
October, 7.

“There will be some routine
maintenance that will be car-
ried out plus some small capital
items to ensure that the prod-
uct is as fresh as it can be when
the property reopens.

“There won’t be any major
capital works done because
we’ve already invested close to
$30 million (in upgrades) into
the property. But we will
ensure that the property will

ROBERT SANDS

be in the best condition that it
can be,” he told The Tribune
during a brief interview yester-
day.

Over the last few weeks the
resort has had occupancy levels
of around 70 per cent he said,
but added that visitor arrivals
routinely dwindle in Septem-
ber and October.

Factoring in the unpre-
dictable hurricane season,
which is normally more active
later in the year, Mr Sands said



remain open to book future
reservations and the resort’s
operators will continue to
aggressively market the prop-
erty. But Mr Sands said it was
too early to tell how business
will fare come October.

“It’s too soon to say but cer-
tainly when you look at the lev-
els of travel over that period
there will be a time-frame for
which we have to build back
slowly but that will also be
influenced by world economic
conditions and that (hinges on)
whether confidence in North
America improves,” he said.

Meantime Whyndam
employees, who were informed
of the closure last year, will use
the two-month closure as a
vacation period.

Woman criticises Immigration Dept over
refusal to void estranged husband’s permit

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A MOTHER whose Jamaican husband left
her days after she applied for his permanent
residence permit has criticised the Immigration
Department for ignoring her pleas to void the
application.

The 33-year-old of Harbour Island was
enraged when she discovered that the depart-
ment not only ignored her request but granted
her estranged husband’s application in less
than six months.

She married the 27-year-old Jamaican in
2004, and after five years of marriage she sent
off the final application for his permanent res-
idence.

But within days of sending off the final
paperwork in February, her husband left both
his wife and two children in Harbour Island to
move to Nassau.

He has since failed to provide any financial
assistance to his family while his wife is unable
to work as she is their four-year-old daughter’s
full-time care giver, she says.

The Harbour Island woman, who did not
want to be named, told The Tribune how she
contacted the Immigration Department, sent
Immigration officials several letters, and met
with Director of Immigration Jack Thomp-
son, in an effort to revoke his application.

Colors::
ac /

The

Rosetta St.



But she said Mr Thomp-
son appeared to be uncon-
cerned about her plight,
and Minister of Immigra-
tion Branville McCartney
failed to respond to her
request to meet with him.

The mother of five fol-
lowed the department’s
advice by filing for a legal
separation, and sent Immi-
gration officials a copy of
the court summons her hus-
band had received.

Yet the application was granted after he
failed to appear in court in July and the hear-
ing was postponed to mid-September.

The woman said: “I wrote letters on top of
letters and it’s like my pleas don’t even mean
anything. It’s like Immigration doesn’t care.

“T feel as if my husband is the registered
voter and not me. I did everything and now I
get slapped in the face, as he was granted per-
manent residence after I sent every letter I
wrote.

“When I met with the director he told me I
am not the only one in these circumstances,
that he meets people like me every day, but
this is his job; if he can’t take the pressure he
needs to come out the kitchen!”

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Chavez: Venezuela
to strengthen its
ties with allies

CARACAS, Venezuela

PRESIDENT Hugo:
Chavez says Venezuela's }
ties with nations like Rus- }
sia and China have gained }
importance as the U.S. :
moves to expand its mili- }
tary presence in Latin :
America, according to }

Associated Press.

Chavez says there are }
now "much more signifi- :
cant reasons to accelerate }
cooperation plans with :

allied countries."

The USS. is negotiating :
an agreement with Colom- }
bia to use seven bases }
there for anti-drug opera- }
tions. Chavez calls the plan :
a threat to the region, but }
Colombian and USS. offi- }
cials say there is no reason }

for concern.

Chavez said Saturday he }
plans to visit Russia and }
the former Soviet repub- }
lic of Belarus within the }
next month. He added that :
Venezuela hopes to triple :
oil shipments to China }
over the next four years to }

1 million barrels a day.

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Government wants insurance
and fishermen

for farmers

GOVERNMENT wants
the produce of farmers and
fishermen insured in the
event of a hurricane. To
facilitate this, the Food and
Agriculture Organisation
(FAO) of the United
Nations has been designing
a plan for the Bahamas.

Last weekend, Charles
Stutley, risk insurer adviser
with the World Bank met
with farmers and fishermen
at the Gladstone Road Agri-
cultural Centre to apprise
them of the studies done.

Also participating in the
discussions were Director of
Agriculture Simeon Pinder,
and Simon Wilson of the
Ministry of Finance along
with representatives from
Abaco, Exuma, San Sal-
vador, Long Island,
Crooked Island, Grand
Bahama and Andros.

Traditionally government
gave out relief funds, “but
that has a certain affect

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FARMERS AND fishermen discussed product insurance with FAO adviser eee Stutley.

upon the budget,” noted
Agriculture and Marine
Resources Under Secretary
Philip Miller.

“We do not know in any
budget year if or when a
storm is coming and how
much damage it would
cause.”

In 2003, government
asked FAO for technical
assistance in coming up with
an insurance scheme for
crop damage during a storm.

Mr Stutley’s visit is the
third for an FAO represen-
tative on this matter.

“The Government wants
to institute a crop insurance
scheme for farmers and fish-
ermen,” said Mr Miller.
“For full coverage, we are
looking at situations where
farmers and fishermen will
not have to pay a burden-
some premium. The techni-
cians are looking at all the
options.”

A demand survey con-
ducted in 2006 showed that
most farmers were in favour
of insurance.

Letisha Henderson/BIS



FAO RISK insurer adviser Charles Stutley met with fishermen and farmers to discuss insurance.



“Something can be
done,” said Mr Miller. “We
live in a hurricane prone
zone. As the economy
develops, the damage done

in agriculture and fisheries
will also increase.

“Today persons are com-
ing up with big investments
in poultry and green house

farming. The question is
how can we come up with
an insurance that would
indemnify them against
damage.”

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US military denies role in Honduras coup flight

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras

THE U.S. military said Sunday its troops
in Honduras did not know of and played no
role in a flight that took ousted President
Manuel Zelaya to exile during a military coup,
according to Associated Press.

Zelaya says the Honduran military plane
that flew him to Costa Rica on June 28 stopped
to refuel at Soto Cano, a Honduran air base
that is home to 600 U.S. soldiers, sailors and
airmen engaged in counter-narcotics opera-
tions and other missions in Central America.

USS. forces at Soto Cano “were not involved
in the flight that carried President Zelaya to
Costa Rica on June 28,” Southern Command
spokesman Robert Appin said in an e-mail to
The Associated Press. The American troops
“had no knowledge or part in the decisions
made for the plane to land, refuel and take
off.”

Appin said the U.S. troops at Soto Cano
have stopped conducting exercises with the
Honduran military since the coup.

“The U.S. military recognizes that the situ-
ation must be resolved by Hondurans and
their democratic institutions in accordance
with the rule of law,” he said.

The administration of President Barack
Obama has cut off millions of dollars in mili-
tary and development aid to Honduras in
an effort to pressure for Zelaya’s reinstate-
ment.

It has stopped short of imposing trade sanc-
tions that could cripple the Honduran econo-
my, which is highly dependent on exports to
the United States.

Zelaya, a wealthy rancher who aligned him-
self with leftist Venezuelan President Hugo
Chavez during his presidency, has increasing-
ly voiced frustration with Washington for fail-
ing to impose tougher penalties.

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THE TRIBUNE

No Fi;
Commonwealth Conference

By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a
Consultant and former
Caribbean diplomat)

WHEN Commonwealth
Heads of Government
meet in Trinidad in
November, they might
have expected to welcome
back to their councils a
government of Fiji that
had been elected in March.
As it turns out, there will
be no Fiji in Trinidad.

If a contest was held to
choose a country with a
Culture of coup d’états,
the Pacific Island-State
would be a front runner.
There were two coups in
1987, a third in 2000 and a
fourth in December 2006.

Now, come September 1,
the 53-nation Common-
wealth (formerly the
British Commonwealth) is
expected to suspend Fiji
from its membership.

The suspension will
come after almost three
years of trying every diplo-
matic and negotiating
device to convince the mil-
itary government of Com-
modore Frank Bainimara-
ma to restore the country
to democratic rule.

A consistent figure in
the last two coups, Baini-
marama has shown a
remarkable failure to hon-
our commitments he gives
to the international com-
munity.

Fiji is made up of a
group of islands in the
Pacific and has a popula-
tion of 872,000 people con-
sisting of indigenous
Fijians, indigenous Rotu-
mans and Banabans, Indo-
Fijians, Chinese, Euro-
peans (mostly Australians
and New Zealanders) and
people of mixed race.

The 1987 coup and the
abrogation of the 1970
Constitution led to a new
Constitution in 1997 which
contained a social compact
among all the political par-
ties, provided for affirma-
tive action for indigenous
Fijians, gave indigenous
Fijians the majority of
communal seats in the
elected House of Assem-
bly and a near two thirds
majority in the appointed
Senate. It also provided for
shared governance and set-
tled tensions between the
indigenous Fijians and the
Indo-Fijians.

Bainimarama’s 2006
coup had nothing to do
with racial differences in
Fiji and much more to do
with controversies between
him and the then Prime
Minister, Laisinea Qarase,
who was threatening to
arrest Bainimarama and
others for their part in the
coup of 2000.

The Commonwealth has
patiently engaged Fiji since
the 2006 coup. The previ-
ous and current Common-
wealth Secretaries-Gener-
al, Don McKinnon and
Kamalesh Sharma, as well
as the organisation’s
watchdog body — the
Commonwealth Minister-
ial Action Group (CMAG)
— have engaged the mili-
tary regime and other
groups in Fiji to try to
restore democracy.

While the Common-
wealth did suspend Fiji
from the councils of the
Commonwealth after the
2006 coup, it did not sus-
pend it from membership
of the grouping.

Along with the Pacific
Islands Forum (Fiji and its
closest neighbours), the
United Nations and other
bodies, the Common-
wealth has been working
to persuade Bainimarama
to hold elections by March
this year — an undertaking
that he had given. But
March came and went, and
in April the government
abrogated the Constitu-
tion, further entrenched
authoritarian rule, cracked
down on freedom of
speech and assembly, and
undermined the judiciary
and legal system.

iji in

= ¥
f
—- r = ae =

WORLD VIEW.

Bainimarama also
scrapped the paramount
Fijian institution, the pres-
tigious Great Council of
Chiefs which selects the
President and Vice-Presi-
dent. It is widely believed
that he did so because the
Chiefs did not rally to him.
He also prevented the

dominant Methodist
Church from holding its
annual convention

demanding that it must
first be cleansed of politi-
cal clergymen.

Making matters worse,
Bainimarama issued a
“Strategic Framework for
Change,” which he
described as "the only path
to ensuring sustainable and
true democracy, the
removal of communal rep-
resentation and the imple-
mentation of equal suf-
frage based on common
and equal citizenry."
Under this plan, work will

nt

begin on a new Constitu-
tion in 2011 and elections
would not be held until
2014.

CMAG, which had
shown considerable
patience with the Fijian
regime up to that point,
finally decided enough was
enough. Among its nine
members is the Foreign
Minister of St Lucia, Rufus
Bousquet.

Together, the ministers,
meeting on July 31, gave
the Fijian regime until Sep-
tember 1 to “reactivate the
President's Political Dia-
logue Forum process, facil-
itated by the Common-
wealth and the United
Nations.”

The Group said it want-
ed the regime to “state its
firm commitment” to reac-
tivating the political dia-
logue “in writing” to the
Commonwealth Secretary-
General by September 1 or





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“Fiji will be fully suspend-
ed on that date.”

No one is holding their
breath that such a written
commitment will be forth-
coming from Bainimara-
ma.

His government has
already condemned Fiji’s
neighbours in the Pacific
Islands Forum for express-
ing, in early August, “their
deep concern for the peo-
ple of Fiji in the face of
Fiji’s deteriorating econo-
my as a consequence of the
military regime’s actions,
including the undermining

Sa



MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 7

of the private sector and
the negative effect on busi-
ness confidence in the
absence of the rule of
law.”

Seeking any opportuni-
ty to delay the Common-
wealth’s suspension of Fiji
from membership, he dis-
patched a letter on August
5th to the Commonwealth
Secretary-General request-
ing him “to facilitate a del-
egation from the Com-
monwealth to visit Fiji to
enter into direct dialogue
and consultations.”

The invitation can hard-
ly be taken seriously
against the background of
Bainimarama’s actions in
abrogating the constitu-
tion, imposing media con-
trols, restricting freedom
of assembly, and the ongo-
ing erosion of the judicial
and legal system.

It is even less credible in
the context of his complete
abandonment of the Presi-
dent's Political Dialogue
Forum which was promot-
ed by both the UN and the
Commonwealth.

It is clear that Baini-
marama’s invitation is not
in good faith and his game
is to do nothing more than

Trinidad for the

prolong still further a
process that has already
dragged on for almost
three years.

In this connection,
CMAG has no choice but
to suspend Fiji from mem-
bership of the Common-
wealth on September 1.

But, in the Common-
wealth way, that will not
be the end of the matter.
For as Secretary-General
Sharma told the Pacific
Forum meeting, “it will
remain my intent, on
behalf of all Common-
wealth members, to find
ways to remain engaged,
to promote dialogue with
the current government
there, and to promote dia-
logue between all the par-
ties in Fiji who collectively
hold the solution for the
future and without all of
whom a solution cannot be
sustainable”.

Suspension of Fiji after
almost three years of try-
ing to reason with the mil-
itary regime is necessary
punishment now; but
engagement is also neces-
sary to give back to all the
people of Fiji their right to
democracy, constitutional-
ity and the rule of law.

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Ministry must study the
sociology of education

YOUNG MAnN’s VIEW
N |}

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

THIS year, a cross-sec-
tion of students sitting the
national exams have once
again affirmed the infa-
mous and unsatisfactory,
almost predictable D
national average.

Although the disap-
pointing national average
reflects the mean grade of
all the students sitting the

ADRIA

BGCSE/BJC exams, we
must not, and should not,
allow these crummy grades
to cause us to forget to
highlight the good students
and their success stories,

| & s © IN



quality teachers and those
dedicated parents. They
have all earned praisewor-
thy results. Kudos to them!

Education is truly the
great equalizer but, if the

THE COMMITTEE TO PROTECT AND PRESERVE
THE BAHAMAS FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS

id stee) SY

PETITION 2009

“PETITION AGAINST THE RELOCATION OF THE
CONTAINER PORT TO ARAWAK CAY”

This Petition will be delivered to the Prime Minister and The Cabinet of
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas to register the opposition of the
Bahamian public to the relocation of the container port to Arawak Cay,
the extension of Arawak Cay and the resulting environmental and marine
damage to Saunders Beach and the suouading areas. Please print your
name clearly, sign where indicated and date. Thank you.

Please return this form to:

Samana Hill

No. 14 Village Road North

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tel.: 394.1823
Or

Chancery House

No. 21 Dowdeswell Street

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tel.: 356.6108




























saunders

ter
CaC



stakeholders in education
do not have an apprecia-
tion for or a grasp of 20th
century professor Emile
Durkheim’s sociology of
education, we should
expect to produce illiter-
ate and mathematically-
challenged graduates who
can barely take menial jobs
and to see more years of
failing grades.

Addressing the correla-
tion between society and
education, the sociology of
education promotes an
understanding of all levels
of the educational system,
looking at the extent to
which schools/universities
are socializing institutions
as well as the ways these
educational outlets impact
social mobility, social strat-
ification and adult socio-
economic success. The
sociology of education also
examines social stratifica-
tion processes — in and
out of schools — that play
a huge role in education,
for example, the noticeable
impact on the linguistic
skills of students attending
certain schools and from
certain homes in various
sectors of society.

Studying the sociology
of education would allow
the Ministry of Education
and educational stake-
holders to analytically
review how the current
curriculum can/cannot con-
tribute to the creation of
a modern, culturally-sound
society, as well as to better
understand the role of edu-
cation in fostering social
change.

As an educator, I have
discovered that students
possess a wide array of
multiple intelligences and
learning styles that span
the social spectrum,
although I find that many
students have a “bodily-
kinesthetic” learning
approach, which is usually
coupled with another
favoured learning style.

Frankly, many students

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fail the national exams
because they simply can-
not read! This must be cor-
rected from the elemen-
tary level on up to senior
high (even college) with an
increased focus on reading
comprehension in a child’s
formative years.

A new literacy approach
must be taken to improve
students’ abilities to read
and understand content by
also teaching them to
query reading materials.
This outlook would foster
discussion and heighten
students’ understanding of
texts while encouraging
them to make inferences.
Teacher and student dri-
ven queries, student-
teacher collaboration and
the establishment of lesson
goals for understanding —
by teachers — would
undoubtedly form the
framework of a new litera-
cy approach. Taking such
an approach would assist
students in constructing
meaning as learners—in
and out of a classroom.

In the Bahamas, the
readability of content must
be taken into account as it
has a direct affect upon
class cohesion and student
perception. More books
should be developed-
across the subject areas—
to correspond with the dif-
ferent grade levels and
teachers must know the
value of using more grade
appropriate material and
recognise the value of
guided learning, where
teachers build upon con-
structivist theories, inter-
vene and facilitate in
establishing student-driven
activities and probe or
comprehensively respond
to questions.

By now, the Depart-
ment of Education should
have learnt that cramming
too much into a textbook,
hiring unqualified teachers
and continuing to endorse
a flawed curriculum will
only continue to be an

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educational setback—
countrywide!

The AG’s office—

a clerk filing station!

“The AG’s office is dys-
functional and is nothing
more than a clerk filing
station.”

Those were the words
of Rev Glenroy Bethel in
October 2007 when he and
several families of mur-
dered victims on Grand
Bahama spoke out against
the inadequate functioning
of the Attorney General’s
office in Freeport.

At that time, Mr Bethel
asserted that the accused
killers were being released
on bail as a result of the
long delays by the AG’s
office, that there was no
Supreme Court judge to
hear criminal or civil mat-
ters in Freeport, that only
two of the four magis-
trate’s courts were func-
tioning, that there were no
permanent prosecutors sta-
tioned at the AG’s office
in Grand Bahama and that
62 per cent of persons in
prison were still awaiting
dates for criminal matters
to be brought before the
courts.

In the case of the
Bahamas legal system,
many of Mr Bethel’s con-
cerns continue to plague
our society and hinder
those seeking justice.

These days, there is a
need for at least 15 justices
to be appointed to the
Supreme Court to address
the case backlog. In the
1990s, the then govern-
ment brought in several
Australian judges to
reduce the number of cas-
es. While more Bahamians
should accept appoint-
ments to the court, if for-
eign judges must once
again be brought in, then
so be it.

The government must
seek to extend court hours
(night court) and appoint
persons outside of the legal
fraternity to judgeships in
order to ensure the timely
resolution of matters.

Why aren’t murder tri-
als completed within five
years? Why should appeals
take more than 18 months?
Whatever happened to the
case of my friend Chris
Brown, a Certified Public
Accountant, who was
viciously killed and burnt
in early 2006 after he had
taken a fare from the air-
port (he drove a taxi as a
hobby, paying homage to
his father, who was a taxi
driver)?

The entire legal process
for convicted murderers
should be completed with-
in five years, which would
allow for the death penal-
ty. The AG’s office needs
to ensure that cases are
being processed and also
apply a time-frame to each
case.

8” BLOCKS

9

4-51.
Cesspit - 00

328-8754
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS



r

4

Ree
real estate
today

Carmen Massoni

PAUSE FOR
THE PAWS

WITH millions of
dogs and cats as mem-
bers of local families,
there’s a good chance
that you’ve got pets
sharing the home you’re
trying to sell.

Since not everyone
enjoys the company of
animals, there are some
measures you should
consider taking before
prospective buyers come
over for a showing.

Pet odours are the
biggest problem sellers
face, but they can be
easily minimised with
thorough cleaning and
vacuuming, and vigilant
duty with the litter box-
es.

It also makes a good
impression if you pick
up and store toys, bed-
ding, and food and
water bowls while your
home is being shown to
buyers.

If at all possible, take
your dog(s) out with you
when an agent brings
clients, or ask a friend or
family member to keep
your pet(s) during the
initial listing period.

This will help reduce
the stress on your pet at
a time when showings
are usually more fre-
quent.



A

Minister: GB Post Office AC
problem being addressed

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - State Min-
ister for Finance Zhivargo
Laing toured the Post Office
Building here on Friday, and
assured employees that the
air-conditioning problem is
now being addressed by con-
tractors.

Mr Laing, minister of
finance with responsibility
for the Public Service, said
that a new AC unit has final-
ly arrived on the island, and
is in the possession of con-
tractors who are installing it
in one section first which will
provide relief to 50 per cent
of the building.

“Tt is a very large unit and
the plan is to install one part
now which will take a few
weeks,” he said.

Employees and customers
have had to endure unsatis-
factory conditions for more
than a year.

As a result of the heat and
lack of proper ventilation in
the building, a four-hour shift








Vandyke Hepburn/BIS

ZHIVARGO LAING



schedule was implemented
so that workers would not
have to spend the entire day
working in unfavourable
conditions.

Mr Laing explained that
the delay was due to the time
it took to get the unit on the
island.

“Clearly, the heat of the
summer presented a great
challenge and I want to
thank the staff for their

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k.com/ pittonN2ss4

Nassau.

©2009 Hilton Hospitality Inc.

Travel should take you placess

GBPA donates
AST ts

patience in this situation,” he
said.

Bahamas Public Services
Union (BPSU) area vice
president John Curtis said
the conditions at the Post
Office have been very
unbearable for workers.

He has been agitating for
the past year for a new air
conditioning unit.

Mr Curtis described the
situation as “bordering on
being inhumane.” He noted
that it is a direct violation of
the industrial agreement,
which speaks to proper
working conditions.

“You cannot call this
proper working conditions
when it is 90 degrees on the
outside, but inside here it’s
125 degrees,” he said.

He said that employees
were fed up with the situa-
tion and brought the matter
to the union’s attention.

“We brought it to the
government’s attention and
we brought it to the post-
master general’s attention
and at that point we were
promised that within eight



THE Grand Bahama Port
Authority donated two new
Segways — two-wheeled,
self-balancing electronic
vehicles — to the Royal
Bahamas Police Force.

They were received by
Senior Assistant Commis-
sion of Police Marvin
Dames and will be used to
heighten police presence in
the downtown area.

SENIOR Assistant Commis-
sioner of Police Marvin Dames
and GBPA president lan Rolle
take the vehicles on a test run.

When you think of the average SUV on
the road today, you think of road-
hogging, air-polluting gas guzzlers
that wouldn’t know the meaning of
high precision and fuel efficiency if it
were emblazoned on their windshields.
But there is an alternative. The refined
M-Class from Mercedes-Benz.

weeks or somewhere there-
abouts, that the air condi-
tioning system will be sort-
ed out,” he said.

“They did an investigation
and we found out that the
entire system here needed to
be taken out.”

Mr Curtis said it was at
the time that the union was
able to negotiate with the
government on behalf of the
approximately 30 Post Office
employees to begin four hour
shifts to alleviate their dis-
comfort.

BIMINI BAY

RESORT AND MARINA

Only forty-eight nautical miles east of Miami, Florida, situated on the North end of North
Bimini, Bahamas - Bimini Bay Resort & Marina complex rests on over 740 acres of pristine
Bahamian beaches. Long known as a paradise for anglers and divers alike, Bimini
Bay Resort offers a plethora of options for the most discriminating traveller. Bimini Bay
Management Ltd. owns and operates Bimini Bay Resort & Marina.



Bimini Bay Resort & Marina seeks to hire a professional
individual for the following position:

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

MARINA -

Requirements:
. Licensed Boat Captain

MARKETING

. Eight to Twelve years experience in Marina Yacht
management with "mega yacht" clientele.

. Proven success in the organization and operation of fishing
tournaments, regattas and marina social events

. Proven experience in building out marina facilities

. Proven success in Marketing relating to potential purchase

of slips or berths

. Proven track record in providing training for concierge

service to yachts

. Ability to speak Spanish as a second language

We offer an excellent benefits package and competitive
compensation. For full consideration, all interested applicants
should forward a copy of their resumé to the attention of

DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES

AND TRAINING
at jobs@biminibayresort.com or fax to (242} 347.2312.

The Mercedes M-Class.
Beauty, brains and brawn.

With its superior German styling utilising
only high-grade materials, its robust
engine power delivering exemplary
turn-on-a-dime performance whilst still
being frugal on fuel and its handling of
pot-holed roads and 1.5 ft. flooded
streets, the Mercedes-Benz M-Class is
clearly the best choice in SUVs.

4

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Call us today for your new Mercedes-Benz M-Class at 325.4961
Wulff Road, P. 0. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas ¢ Fax: 323.4667
PAGE 10, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Mexico replaces

customs inspectors 2
with agents to fight :

children in the performing arts

MEXICO has replaced all 700 }
of its customs inspectors with }
agents newly trained to fight drug ;
smuggling, according to Associ- }

drug smuggling

MEXICO CITY

ated Press.

The government has sent sol- }
diers to airports and border cross- }
ings across the country to take }
back the guns issued to the }

inspectors.

Tax Administration Service }
spokesman Pedro Canabal says }
the officers were not fired. }
Instead, the agency decided not :
to rehire them when their con- }
tracts expired over the weekend. }
They were replaced with 1,400 }
newly hired agents who have }
undergone months of training }
and background checks to ensure

they have no criminal records.

Canabal spoke Sunday to The i

Associated Press.

Ohama official says
govt insurance plan
hot essential to

health care overhaul

WASHINGTON

BOWING to Republican pres- :
sure and an uneasy public, Pres- }
ident Barack Obama’s adminis- }
tration signaled Sunday it is ready }
to abandon the idea of giving}
Americans the option of govern- }
ment-run insurance as part of a :
new health care system, accord- }

ing to Associated Press.

Facing mounting opposition
to the overhaul, administration }
officials left open the chance for a
compromise with Republicans }
that would include health insur- :
ance cooperatives instead of ai
government-run plan. Such ai
concession probably would
enrage Obama’s liberal support- }
ers but could deliver a much-
needed victory on a top domestic i
priority opposed by GOP law- }

makers.

Officials from both political i
parties reached across the aisle }
in an effort to find compromises }
on proposals they left behind :
when they returned to their dis- }
tricts for an August recess. Oba- }
ma had wanted the government }
to run a health insurance orga- }
nization to help cover the nation’s }
almost 50 million uninsured, but }
didn’t include it as one of his core

principles of reform.

By ERIC ROSE

BAHAMIAN students
from four islands have
received grants from the
Adisa Foundation for their
outstanding achievements
in various fields of the per-
forming Arts.

Minister of State for Cul-
ture in the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture
Charles Maynard joined
Adisa Foundation founder
and director Mrs Patricia
Bazard and acting Direc-
tor of Culture Eddie
Dames in recognising the
young performers on
August 10.

“It makes me feel proud
that there is talent through-
out this country,” Minister
Maynard said.

“Tam quite pleased with
the growth of the cultural
community in terms of its
young people and how they
are expressing themselves.”

The Adisa Foundation,
in conjunction with the
Bahamas National Chil-
dren’s Choir, presented the
first annual Outstanding
Children in the Arts Chil-
dren’s Ball, on April 18.

The awards programme
acknowledges, celebrates
and rewards the contribu-
tions of children to the
artistic culture of The
Bahamas.

The competition is open
to children from pre-school
to high school and prizes
include scholarship grants
for the winners in each cat-
egory.

Adisa is a Ghanaian
word meaning “a child
shall lead them.”

The awards presentation
is a continuation of the
Ministry’s annual E
Clement Bethel National
Arts Festival. Many of the
students nominated and
winning the awards were
in the Festival. Their per-

LOCAL NEWS

Grants presented to outstanding

formances led to their
nominations for the Adisa
award by their schools.

“The grants came from
the Adisa Foundation,”
Minister Maynard said.
“We simply supported
them logistically and
morally.

“We love that kind of
support, when we are able
to help those who want to
do good in the community
without having to find
funding, as funding is
always hard to find.”

Winning in the Music
Category were Freeport
Primary School student
Berlicia Saunders, Lyford
Cay International School
junior high student
Bernard Farquharson and
St Andrews School former
senior Benjamin Pinder.

In the Drama Category,
North Long Island High
School junior Quenton
Smith and Faith Temple
Christian Academy former
senior Elan JoLee
Hutchinson received the
top awards.

St John’s College former
senior Simone Davis, won

BIMINI BAY

RESORT AND MARINA

Only forty-eight nautical miles east of Miami, Florida, situated on the North end of North Bimini,
Bahamas - Bimini Bay Resort & Marina complex rests on over 740 acres of pristine Bahamian
beaches. Long known as a paradise for anglers and divers alike, Bimini Bay Resort offers a
plethora of options for the most discriminating traveller. Bimini Bay Management Ltd. owns and

AREER OPP

Bimini Bay Resort & Marina seeks to hire qualified professionals
for the following positions:



operates Bimini Bay Resort & Marina.

A

IT MANAGER

ORTUNITIES

Responsible for the ongoing maintenance and operation for all of the Information
Technology implemented within the assigned Hotel. The position is responsible for the
daily operation, support, and security of the technology and data that support and
enable the business operation.





MINISTER OF
STATE for Culture
Charles Maynard
presents North
Long Island High
School student
and dramatist
Quenton Smith his
awarded from the
Adisa Foundation
for his outstanding
achievement in the
Performing Arts.
Pictured from left
are Acting Director
of Culture Eddie
Dames, Smith,
Minister Maynard,
and Adisa Founda-
tion founder and
director Patricia
Bazard.

Kristaan Ingraham/BIS

alll

MINISTER OF STATE for Culture Maynard presented Lyford Cay International School student and pianist
Bernard Farquharson one of the grants awarded from the Adisa Foundation for his outstanding achieve-
ment in the Performing Arts. Pictured from left are Acting Director of Culture Eddie Dames, Farquharson,
Minister Maynard, and Adisa Foundation founder and Director Mrs Patricia Bazard.

in the Dance Category.
Senior winners received
a $1,000 grant and juniors
and primary school stu-
dents received $750 and
$500 respectively.
“All of the winners here

are certainly to be con-
gratulated,” Mr Dames
said. “I am particularly
pleased that we can see
winners coming out of the
Family Islands. We can see
that the cultural pro-

grammes are not Nassau-
centric and we have a wide
pool of talent.”

Minister Maynard com-
mended Mrs Bazard’s
“passion an compassion”
for the students.

Princess Margaret Hospital

ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

PUBLIC
NOTICE!

IN AN EFFORT TO IMPROVE OUR PATIENT
SERVICES AT THE PRINCESS MARGARET

HOSPITAL.

WE WILL

UNDERGO

RENOVATIONS TO THE ENTRANCE AND
TRIAGE AREA OF THE ACCIDENT &
EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT.v

WE ASK THAT PERSONS VISITING THE

DEPARTMENT

ENTER THROUGH

THE

PHARMACY DEPARTMENT ENTRANCE AND

CONTINUE ONWARD THROUGH THE
ENTRANCE OF THE ORTHOPEDIC CLINIC.

Desired Requirements Of Proficiency:

Work experience in the Resort Industry
Bachelor degree/diploma in related field.
Call Account Jazz

Phone Switch Nortel

Micros

PMS — Opera

FOOD AND BEVERAGE DIRECTOR

Oversee the function of all food and beverage outlets to ensure excellent customer
service and maximize revenue and profits. Develop, implement and maintain quality
standards for outlets, including supervision and direction of service staff. Ensure
excellent customer service. Work with the individual outlet managers concerning food
and beverage quality, service, cleanliness, merchandizing and promotions.

* Proven success in the management of multiple restaurant outlets and functions

* Minimum of 5 years overseas work experience

* Minimum of 5 years resort management experience

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER

Major areas of responsibility/ management include, but are not limited to, employment,
wage and salary administration, benefits, training, employee/labor relations,
organizational development and payroll. Work closely with Human Resources Director
in implementing, achieving and maintaining the resorts goals and objectives.

MANAGEMENT APOLOGIZES
INCONVENIENCE CAUSED AND ASK THAT

FOR ANY

THE PUBLIC COOPERATE WITH
THIS TIME.

US DURING

SIGNED: MANAGEMENT

We offer an excellent benefits package and competitive compensation. For full
consideration, all interested applicants should forward a copy of their resumé to the

attention of DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING
at jobs@biminibayresort.com or fax to (242) 347.2312.


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 11



Four hour

power cut
inNew
Provitlence

FROM page one

caused the power genera-
tors to trip.

The power went out
across New Providence
from around 7.30pm. Traf-
fic lights stopped working
on Nassau’s main roads
and street lights failed to
turn on as dusk settled into
night and the city fell dark.

Downtown Nassau,
inner city communities,
and neighbourhoods in
eastern New Providence,
Cable Beach, and Paradise
Island were without power
for up to four hours as the
last areas to regain power
did so at around 11.30pm,
Mr Neymour said.

Guests at the Miss Uni-
verse VIP party for
pageant contestants, select
Atlantis visitors and
Bahamians, fell silent when
the lights and music sud-
denly stopped at the pres-
tigious event, and the
crowd fell quiet for a few
moments before the hotel’s
generators kicked in.

Officials at BEC failed
to issue a public notice to
explain the reason for the
power outage over the
weekend, but yesterday Mr
Neymour explained the
reason for the fault.

He said: “There was a
fault in a voltage trans-
former in the Big Pond
area, a 33 kilowatt cable
had faulted and it caused
the generators to trip,
which resulted in a loss of
supply for the majority of
the island at around
7.30pm on Friday.

“They began their reme-
dial procedure to restart
the generator and from
around 8.30pm services
were being put back into
place, and that was not
completed until around
11.30 on Friday night.

“Tt did not affect all of
New Providence, because
I understand there were
some locations where ser-
vices were not lost, but it
was the vast majority of the
island.”

The minister of state
added: “Of course we are
apologetic for this, but it
was a situation where
equipment faulted and we
couldn’t have predicted it.

“All equipment faults at
some time or other, but
this could not have been
foreseen.”

o.

Desmond Eee

LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

go,” said the source.

Meantime, Attorney General Michael
Barnett is expected to step up as the next
chief justice when Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham returns from vacation in the
next week.

According to unconfirmed reports,
senior partner at McKinney, Bancroft and
Hughes Brian Moree is said to be a top
choice for his replacement.

However, one political observer for the
opposition commented that if Mr Ingra-
ham were to select a successor from his
current complement of ministers, either

Education Minister Carl Bethel or For-
eign Affairs Minister Brent Symonette
would be suitable choices.

“T always thought Carl Bethel who had
served as the attorney general before
would get the job again. (The Cabinet
ministers) who’ve been attorney generals
before are (Foreign Affairs Minister)
Brent Symonette and Carl Bethel so it’s an
easy fit for one of them to take it back
again,” the observer, who did not want to
be identified, speculated.

As for the rumours surrounding the pos-
sible reassignment of Mr Neymour’s port-
folio, the junior environment minister said
any move in that direction would be news

Cabinet set for shuffle?

to him.

“The prime minister has not spoken to
me, as of today, on that matter. And so I’m
not aware of that,” he told The Tribune
yesterday.

When asked if he were happy in his post
or if he would welcome a re-assignment,
he said: “I am happy serving as a minister
in the Cabinet of the prime minister — I
serve at his liberty and the reason I’m in
politics is to be of service to the Bahamian
people, so it is not a matter of what I like,
it’s a matter of serving the Bahamian peo-
ple that is most important to me.”

Attempts to reach Mr Bannister for
comment were unsuccessful yesterday.



Hurricane could hit the

FROM page one

Tropical Storm Bill was expected
to strengthen into a category one hur-
ricane by this morning, and as it con-
tinues to move westard it is likely to
build to a category two hurricane by
Wednesday, and a category three
storm by Friday, forecasters predict.

Bill is currently projected to pass
north east of the Bahamas on Friday,
but as the storm is still around 2,000
miles from the Bahamas, Mr Dean
said it is too early to tell whether the
hurricane will be a threat.

The storm is just one of three sur-
rounding the Bahamas this week, as
Tropical Storm Claudette passed into
northwest Florida last night and this
morning, and Tropical Storm Ana

FROM page one

tunately revealed a deep seated
belief that women are still prop-
erty” in the Bahamas.

“In my opinion I don’t think
the government needs a con-
sensus to approve this law,” Mr
Brennen said.

“My view is this — going to
a referendum or trying to get
a consensus is belittling women.

“Saying the law should not
be passed is like saying, ‘Should
we have a law to say a man
shouldn’t kill a woman?’ It
doesn’t make sense.”

Marriage and family
therapist: govt must
pass marital rape law

He objects to the idea that
the law will pave the way for
“vindictive women” to punish
their husbands for unrelated
misdemeanours by accusing
them of rape before the courts.

“Tt is so difficult to prove
rape, even stranger rape, that it
would appear under the cur-
rent law unless there is batter-

edges closer to the Dominican Repub-
lic in the southeast.

Mr Dean said: “Bill is more of a
concern because a sharp northward
curvature would put it parallel to us,
but it is way too early to say.

“Tt is around 1,500 miles east of the
Lesser Antilles now, and that is
around 1,000 miles from us, so by
Wednesday or Thursday we will be in
a much better position to say whether
it will be a threat to the Bahamas.”

The path currently projected for
Bill shows the storm will pass north of
the Bahamas over the Atlantic on Fri-
day, but a change of course could put
the country at risk.

Tropical Storm Bill follows Tropical
Storm Ana, which weakened to a
Tropical Depression as it approached

police said.

According to reports, a
group of nearby workers saw
her fall but could not rescue
her because of the rough seas.

Mr Brennen said he is forced
to ask opponents to the law to
articulate the difference
between a rape of a woman to
whom a man is not married,
and a man raping his wife.

He said: “It’s the same pain
being inflicted. If you argue this
law should not go ahead, you
may as well argue that if a man
kills his wife he should not be
charged with murder.”

The therapist said he has
been shocked by the reaction
to the proposed law, which was
tabled as a Bill before parlia-
ment last month, but has yet to
be debated.

ing the person can’t be charged
with rape,” Mr Brennen said.

The therapist described the
marital rape law issue as one
that requires intelligence, but
is led by emotion.

“It’s going to take a while
to educate the public, but in my
opinion the government does
not need a consensus to
approve this law,” he said.

In many cases, the therapist
said, religious groups are “twist-
ing” scripture to justify a man
forcing sex with his wife.

“They are misusing scrip-
ture. They want to brain wash
those who are ignorant,” he
said.

Hispaniola last night.

Tropical Storm warnings were
issued for the Dominican Republic
last night as Ana was expected to
bring Tropical Storm conditions today
and tomorrow.

Ana’s maximum sustained winds
were around 35 mph last night, with
higher gusts, and was expected to pour
two to four inches of rain over the
Leeward Islands, including Puerto
Rico and the US and British Virgin
Islands, with isolated rainfall of up to
six inches over mountainous terrain.

Ana is moving west at around 23
mph, and a turn west-northwest is
expected today. The Depression was
set to cross the northern Leeward
Islands last night and enter the north-
eastern Caribbean Sea on Monday.

FROM page one Young mother

Pier area on Friday evening.
The pair was reportedly
sightseeing near an old dock
opposite the BEC power sta-
tion around 7 pm when at
some point Ms Johnson
walked over the edge and fell,

the water.

Evans.

Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans said Emergency
Medical Services responded,
along with Royal Bahamas
Defence Force officers who
pulled her lifeless body from

“It is believed that she
drowned; an autopsy is to be
performed to confirm the
cause of death,” said ASP

Bahamas by end of week

Mr Dean said: “Most of the track is
keeping it slightly south of the islands
and fortunately it should be good news
for us if it continues to Hispaniola and
Cuba.”

Meanwhile Tropical Storm
Claudette was due to pass over north-
west Florida and southern Alabama
last night and today, moving north-
west at 14 mph, bringing heavy rains
and sustained winds of 35mph with
higher gusts.

Flash flooding was the biggest fear
for the states as three to five inches of
rain were predicted, with isolated max-
imum amounts of 10 inches.

To follow the progress of the storms
log on to www.nhc.noaa.gov for regu-
lar updates or
www.tribune242.com/weather.












































Around 9 pm Friday, police
received information that the
motionless body of a man was
seen in the water at the east-
ern end of Potters Cay Dock.

The body of 46-year-old
Williams Lane resident Edwin
Smith was retrieved and
responding EMS personnel
pronounced him dead at the
scene.

Police suspect that Mr
Smith drowned, however, an
autopsy will be performed to
confirm his cause of death.

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(242) 393-8175


PAGE 12, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS

Four young Bahamians qualify for the
International Jr Sunfish Championships

FIFTEEN-year-old Christopher
Sands battled high winds, white caps
in Montagu Bay and 13 determined
competitors to come out on top in
this year’s Junior Sunfish Nationals.

He as well as Donico Brown,
Michael Holowesko and Michael
Gibson who placed 2nd and 3rd and
4th at the end of the two days of
intense racing, not only won brag-
ging rights, but the four coveted
spots at the International Junior
Sunfish Championships being held in
Nassau in October.

“This was a tough win as it was
really windy and there was strong
competition out on the water. It felt
really good though knowing that all
the time I’ve put in the boat paid
off,” said Sands. Having won a berth
in the international competition, he
says he now intends to increase his
training to four times a week.

The youngsters, who ranged in age
from 11 to 18 dealt with choppy seas
and strong winds, which made racing
even more of a challenge. In fact,
organisers anticipated the weather
conditions would have impacted fin-
ish times and even their ability to
remain in the water, but say the
young sailors handled themselves
with impressive strength and ability.

Sands attributes his win in part to
the weather conditions, saying the
race became as much about fitness
and strength as it was about sailing

skills.

“It’s astounding just how far these
kids have come. Their boat handling
and their ability to deal with consis-
tent 18-21 knot winds was really
impressive,” said Chairman of the
race committee Jimmy Lowe, him-
self a veteran sailor, “Based on what
we saw today, I think we can expect
our team to turn in really respectable
performances at the International
championships in October.”

The International Junior Sunfish
Championships will be held in the
Bahamas on October 15-17 when 20
of the world’s top junior sailors are
expected to compete.

Immediately following that, for
the first time since 1995, the
Bahamas Sailing Association and
the Nassau Yacht Club will host the



ABOVE, TOP LEFT — Young Bahamians battled strong winds and rough seas to
compete in the Junior Sunfish Nationals this weekend...

—_— all THERON MAILLIS (left) and Eddie
—_ Williams placed 7th overall in the
—— = Junior Sunfish Nationals...









Photes by Lori Lowe

“5 2009 Sunfish World Championships

a from October 16-24. Earlier this
summer, 15 Bahamians qualified for
that major event and will be among
72 boats competing for the top place.

“It’s quite a major event for the
Bahamas to be hosting both of these
races back to back. We’ve been
lucky that companies like Pictet
Bank & Trust, Nestle and Atlantis
have stepped up to help make this
possible. And the Ministry of
Tourism came forward with a unique
sail design to help promote the
Bahamas,” said Paul Hutton, Regat-
ta Chairman.

The Bahamas has enjoyed much
success over the years in Sunfish sail-
ing, winning the World Champi-
onships five times. Donnie Martin-
borough, the Bahamas’ top finisher
in this year’s Bahamas Nationals, is

BIANCA WAGNER, shown above with teammate Donovan Williamson, was the only a three time Sunfish World Cham-
girl to compete in this weekend’s Junior Sunfish Nationals. The team placed 8th pion, with top place finishes in 1983,

overall.

Ind again in 1988.

GOVERNMEN T NOTICE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

TENDER FOR SCHOOL / FACILITY
SECURITY SERVICES

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. A = SEU

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Sasa Includes COnCE aur es by

3 Siete | es eS ME

ye Prophetic Voices,

*)st Barnabe SU Sel

eT: uc

on Jie, ROS Rnd

Ou ily Peis g

Holy,.C os ee Ministry
af, Dance oii)

SDPNC eye

WLR Ta ery

dmore....

ays

SUE pal Uk

Soe

afl i Li a
sah Wt

For you have been born again, not of perishable seed, but of imperishable,
through the living and enduring word of God.
ges

1.The Ministry of Education invites sealed bids from eligible qualified
firms for the provision of security services at the following schools/facility
in New Providence:

| No. | ScHooL/Facuty _| ESTIMATEDCOST
| 1 ~—si|_~—sThelmaGibson Primary _| $95,000.00 ~—sCd
[2 | _A.F.Adderley Jurior igh | $96,000.00
[3 | 6-H Reeves Junior High —| $96,000.00
[4 | #0. Nash Junior igh |_$96,00000
[5 | LW. Young Junior High | $96,00000
[6 | 6.6. Sweeting Senior Figh | $89,000.00
[8 | _G-R. Waker Senior High | $96,000.00
[3 [6 Bate! Senior High | $96,000.00

| 10 ~~ | Government High $89,000.00
| 11 | RM. Bailey Senior High $89,000.00

= Learning Resources Section | $92,000.00

2. Assessment of bids will be conducted by the Tenders Board utilizing established
procedures.

. Interested eligible qualified firms may receive Tender Documents from the Security
Headquarters located Claridge Road beginning Monday 17th August, 2009 between the
hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

. No firm/company will be eligible to be awarded more than one contract.

. All bids must be accompanied by copies of a valid Business Licence, and evidence of
payment of National Insurance.

. Bids must be enclosed in a plain sealed envelope bearing no identification of the bidder,
and must be clearly marked across the top “Bid for Security Services (Name of School)
- MOE”.

. All bids must be delivered to the Office of the Financial Secretary, Cecil Wallace-
Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, Bahamas, no later than 5.00 p.m. on Monday, 24th
August, 2009.

. Bids will be opened at 10.30 a.m. on Tuesday, 25th August, 2009 at the Ministry of
Finance, Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, Bahamas. Tenderers or their
designated representative are invited to attend the openings.

. The Ministry of Education reserves the right to reject any or all bid submissions.

Signed:
Elma I. Garraway (Mrs.)
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Education


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS





ADRIAN GRIFFITH of the Bahamas and Germany's Tobias Unger compete in the 100m first round heat on Saturday...

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — It
hasn't been the start to the
TAAF's 12th World Champi-
onships in Athletics that the
Bahamian delegation had
anticipated on day one Satur-
day.

But the results on Sunday
helped make the journey
through the next seven days a
little more interesting to look
forward to at the national sta-
dium that legendary Jesse
Owens ruled the men's sprints
at the 1936 Olympic Games.

Derrick Atkins, the 11th
World Championships’ 100
metres silver medallist from
Osaka, Japan, was surprising-
ly ousted from the first round
of the century in the opening
session on Saturday and quar-
ter-miler Christine Amertil
was disqualified for stepping
on the line twice in the first
round of the women's 400.

To add to the problems the
team officials, headed by man-
ager Ralph McKinney, con-
tinue to deal with the issue of
Osbourne 'Ozzie' Moxey not
been included in the men's
long jump after the IAAF
ruled that his victory at the
Central American and
Caribbean Championships
could not be accepted as the
area championship.

Amertil, who will celebrate
her 30th birthday on Tuesday,
was said to have stepped out
of her lane at both around the
200 metres mark. But Amertil
said she would know if she
had stepped on the line and it
was devastating that she was
charged with the DQ.

"Iam saddened by this
decision of course because a
lot of work is put into getting
to this level of competition
and it can be heart wrenching
to go from the joy of moving
on to the next round to being
told you no longer get to go
without any clear or solid indi-
cation as to why," she said.

"Mentally, I was very frus-
trated and upset but I have
other races to run and team-
mates who need me to be at
my best so I am at the stage
where I am refocused on
those races that matter now."

Immediately after the post-
ing of the DQ, McKinney said
he and the Bahamian coach-
ing staff, headed by Tyrone
Burrows, filed an appeal and
they spent more than two
hours trying to get a successful
resolve.

"They allowed us to look
at the video taping, but on the
first occasion, it was not con-
clusive,” McKinney said. "On
the second one, it was also not
conclusive.

"We then went to the jury
complaint and they said they
took the word of the ITO,
who said she was flagged for
touching the lane with her left



(AP Photo: Michael Sohn)

e Atkins ousted from first round of century
¢ Amertil disqualified for stepping on line twice
¢ Moxey not included in long jump as
IAAF rules his victory at CAC Games could
not be accepted as area championship

foot."

McKinney said they had
nothing else to do but to
inform Amertil about the
decision.

The news came right after
Atkins turned in one of the
most disappointing perfor-
mances so far at the champi-
onships.

Battling back from a semi-
final exit at the Olympic
Games in Beijing, China last
year, Atkins could run no
faster than 10.44 seconds for
fifth place in the third of 12
heats.

"That was very very dis-
turbing, most definitely, we
expected Derrick to go
through minimum semifinal,
but if your A game isn't on
you face the consequences,”
McKinney said.

Atkins, the national sprint
champion who has been run-
ning a series of 100 and 200s
this year, finished 43rd overall
out of a field of 92 competi-
tors.

Three other competitors

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their respective heats.

Adrian Griffith, runner-up
at the Nationals, also
advanced after his third place
finish in heat five in 10.37 for
30th overall.

His heat was won by
Antigua's Daniel Bailey in
10.26.

Competing in his first major
competition, Griffith fell shy
of advancing to yesterday's
semifinal with a fifth place in
10.28 in the fourth of five sec-
ond round heat won by
American Tyson Gay in the
second fastest qualifying time
of 9.98.

Griffith was 28th overall out
of a field of 30 competitors.

As for Moxey, McKinney
said they have exhausted all
avenues in trying to appeal
the IAAF's decision not to
accept the national and CAC
champion in the men's long
jump that will be contested

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on Wednesday.

"We've been to 3-4 appeals
to get him in the meet,” McK-
inney said.

"But they are taking the
long jumper from the Domini-
can Republic, who won the
NACAC in 2007."

According to McKinney,
the qualifying period is from
January 2008 to August 1. But
because there was no
NACAC since 2007, they are
using that as the area champi-
onships, as opposed to the
CAC that was held in July in
Cuba.

Despite not being allowed
to compete, McKinney said
Moxey will remain here with
the team.

On day two yesterday,
McKinney reported that they
were quite pleased with the
fact that all three female
sprinters performed as expect-
ed in the first two rounds of
the 100, as well as Olympic
bronze medallist Leevan
‘Superman’ Sands in the
men's triple jump.

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IAAF's 12th World Championships in Athletics...

Bolt shatters
100m world
record

By PAT GRAHAM
AP Sports Writer

BERLIN (AP) — Usain
Bolt crossed the finish line,
saw his record-setting time
on the clock and spread his
arms as if he were soaring
like a bird.

About all this guy can't do
is fly. And by saving his cel-
ebration until after the finish
line this time, he showed
how fast a man really can go
on two feet.

The Jamaican shattered
the world record again Sun-
day, running 100 meters in
9.58 seconds at the world
championships to turn his
much-anticipated race
against Tyson Gay into a
one-man show.

That was 0.11 seconds
faster than the mark he set
last year at the Beijing
Olympics — the biggest
improvement in the 100-
meter record since electron-
ic timing began in 1968.

Gay, his closest rival,
broke the American mark
with his 9.71 performance
and still looked like he was
jogging — finishing a few
big strides behind Bolt in
second place.

Bolt's only competition
these days is the clock.

And when he's really try-
ing, not hot-dogging it over



BOLT celebrates after the race...
(AP Photo: David J Phillip)

the line the way he did in
China, even time itself does-
n't stand a chance.

"T don't run for world
records," said Bolt, who
crossed the line with a slight
breeze at his back.

Yet those records always
seem to find him.

He thinks he can go even
lower.

"T know I said 9.4," Bolt
said, grinning. "You never
know. I'll just keep on work-
ing.”

Last summer at Beijing,
Bolt shut his race down ear-
ly, waving his arms and cele-
brating about 10 meters
before he got to the line.

Some, like Jacques Rogge
of the International Olympic
Committee, viewed it as a
sign of bad sportsmanship.
Most saw it as a welcome
sigh of relief for a sport that
needed some good news
after years of doping and
scandal.
















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PAGE 14, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

SPORTS

‘Superman’ advances
to triple jump final

Vick
say
he cried
in prison

NEW YORK (AP) —
Michael Vick says he
cried in prison because
of the guilt he felt about
being involved in dog-
fighting.

In an interview with
"60 Minutes” that aired
Sunday night, Vick said
the day he walked into
prison he realized "the
magnitude of the deci-
sions that I made.

"And, you know, it's
no way of, you know,
explaining, you know,
the hurt and the guilt
that I felt. And that was
the reason I cried so
many nights. And that
put it all into perspec-
tive," he said.

A three-time Pro Bowl
pick during six seasons
with the Atlanta Falcons,
Vick served 18 months in
federal prison for run-
ning a dogfighting ring
and was reinstated last
month by the NFL after
being out of action since
2006.

He signed with the
Philadelphia Eagles on
Thursday.

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — What's the
best way to celebrate your 28th birth-
day? Just ask Olympic bronze medal-
list Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands.

Competing in the qualifying round
of the men's triple jump yesterday at
the Olympic Stadium, Sands advanced
to Tuesday's final at 12:05 pm ET with
a season's best of 17.20 metres or 56-
feet, 5 1/4-inches.

That placed him second in Group A
and fourth overall in a field of 45 com-
petitors.

"That's my birthday present. I
couldn't really feel it because it was
my birthday,” said Sands, who had to
wait for his third and final attempt to
produce his best mark in the compe-
tition. "I just had to make the final.”

With his wife, Danielle and son,
Leevan III, in the stands along with his
coach Henry Rolle and his agent,
Sands said he got all the motivation
and inspiration he needed yesterday.

As the fourth jumper to compete,
Sands opened with a leap of 17.02 (55-
10 1/4) to put him in second place
behind Phillips Idowu of Great
Britain, who opened with 17.10 (56-1
1/4).

On his second attempt, Sands did
16.84 (55-3) to remain in second, while
Idowu turned in his best mark in the
competition of 17.32 (56-10).

With nobody near him in their
group, Sands then produced his best of
17.20 (56-5 1/4), improving on his pre-
vious season's best of 17.14 (56-2 3/4)
that did at the BAAA Nationals in

fATDI |
Powell



LEEVAN SANDS has advanced to Tuesday's final...
(FILE phote)

THE TRIBUNE

Places second in group, fourth
overall out of 45 competitors

June at the Thomas A. Robinson
Track and Field Stadium.

Finishing third in their group was
Cuban Arnie David Girat with 17.15
(56-3 1/4) on his third and final jump.

"To make the finals with a season's
best, I can't complain about that,” he
said. "I just want to thank God for
allowing me to perform the way I did
today."

He also thanked all the Bahamian
people who supported him, including
the Walnut Street crew in Pinewood
Gardens where he reside when he's
in town with his parents, Leevan and
Elaine Sands.

As for the birthday celebrations,
Sands said he will really enjoy it on
August 18 when he wins his medal.

"I think I can do at least 17.50
because the jump I didn't even fin-
ish,” Sands reflected. "I just stepped
down quick.

"But I think as long as I execute
my phase, I could jump 17.50 or bet-
ter. That should definitely get me a
medal.”

To go along with the Olympic
bronze he won last year, Sands has
also won a bronze at the 17th Com-
monwealth Games in Manchester,
England and the bronze at the 9th
World's in Paris Saint-Denis, France in
2003.



ASAFA POWELL (left) and Derrick Atkins of the Bahamas compete in the 100m first round heat during the World Athletics Championships in Berlin on Saturday...

(AP Photo: Anja Niedringhaus)

‘I don’t know what to Say.

Derrick Atkins reflects on his performance



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — This will be a
performance that Derrick Atkins would
like to quickly erase from his memories,
while Adrian Griffith staked his claim for
future appearances at the World Champi-
onships.

Unable to duplicate the form that pro-
duced the silver medal at the 11th IAAF
World Championships in Athletics in Osa-
ka, Japan last year, Atkins sent shock
waves through the Olympic Stadium when
he failed to advance from the first round of
the men’s 100 on Saturday's opening ses-
sion.

"IT don't know what to say,” said Atkins,
who was simply lost for words after his
time of 10.44 seconds was only good
enough for fifth place as he finished 43rd
out of a field of 92 competitors.

Running out of lane two next to
Jamaican Asafa Powell in lane three,
Atkins got left in the blocks and was nev-
er able to make a dent in the pack ahead of

Adrian Griffith stakes his claim for future
appearances at the World Championships

him. He admitted that while he had Powell
to gauge his race, he was trying to concen-
trate on the whole field.

Powell, who faded to the bronze in Osa-
ka behind Atkins and American champion
Tyson Gay, noted that he was watching
Atkins and after leading for the majority of
the race, he was caught and passed with
about 20 metres left and finished third
again in 10.38.

Martial Mbandjock of France stormed
back to win the heat in 10.28.

While Atkins was experiencing his prob-
lems, Griffith was enjoying his experience.

In heat five, Griffith clocked 10.37 for
third place to qualify in 30th overall. The

heat was won by Antigua's Daniel Bailey
in 10.26.

"Tt was quite cold this morning, so I just
had to get my mind and my body right,” he
said.

When asked if he saw Atkins and his
performance, Griffith said "No, I wasn't
interested in Derrick. I was concerned
about my race. Right now, this is my first
World Championships and I don't have
any time to worry about him.”

Not pressured or intimidated at all about
running with the big stars on the world
stage for the first time, Griffith came back
in the second round or the quarter-finals
and, except for a shaky start, was able to

maintain his composure for fifth in the
fourth of five heats in 10.28, which placed
him 28th out of 34, but not good enough to
make the elite 16.

"T kind of struggled at the beginning and
Thad to turn it up a notch at the end,” he
said. "I just didn't panic. I worked hard to
get back into the race. So I’m happy with
what I did. I was consistent this year."

With so much history in the stadium
going back to the 1932 Olympics when
Jesse Owens dominated the sprints, Grif-
fith said he was just delighted that he got a
chance to display his skills.

"Now I can really look ahead to the
future," he insisted.
THE TRIBUNE PAGE 15

r

Bolt shatters

100m world
record...
See page 15

ts



op FRIDAY, NOVEMBER , 2007



DEBBIE FERGUSON-McKenzie competes in a 100m first round
heat during the World Athletics Championships in Berlin Sunday...

(AP Photo: Anja Niedringhaus)

GOLDEN GIRL CHANDRA STURRUP (left) and Colombia's Yomara
Hinestroza compete in a 2nd round heat yesterday...

Golden Girls’
keen our medal
hopes alive

‘Q’ Ferguson seventh
in heat, 30th overall

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — In
contrast to the way they have
performed all year, veteran
female sprinters Chandra
Sturrup and Debbie Fergu-
son-McKenzie turned back
the hands of time as they both
advanced to the semifinal of
the 100 metres.

Helping to erase the hurtful
early exit of past World
Championships’ 100 silver
medallist Derrick Atkins, the
duo kept the Bahamas’ hopes
alive for a medal in the short
sprints yesterday at the 12th
version of the biannual cham-
pionships at the Olympic Sta-
dium.

Tied with American Lau-
ryn Williams with the sixth
fastest time of 10.06 seconds,
Sturrup secured her berth in
today's elite 16, while Fergu-
son-McKenzie trailed them
with the eighth fastest time of
11.08.

The third Bahamian in the
field, 19-year-old Sheniqua
‘Q' Ferguson was seventh in
her heat in 11.59 for 30th out
of a field of 32. But the
Auburn bound junior was
unable to advance any further.

"Tt felt better," said Sheni-
qua Ferguson as she com-
pared her first round fourth
place of 11.57 that advanced
her with the third of the five
fastest losers. "The first, it was
a little easy, but this round I
really had to run, so I just
went out there and really gave
it all I had."

Ferguson said she wished

I'BUNE

her time would have been
faster, but she hopes to
improve on her performance
when she runs in the prelimi-
naries of the 200 that will start
on Tuesday at 4.05 am ET.

In her first World's appear-
ance after she had her
Olympic debut last year in
Beijing, China, Ferguson will
enter the field with Ferguson-
McKenzie, who is now in her
fourth Worlds.

Listed on her running bib
as just Ferguson, Ferguson-
McKenzie, the national dou-
ble sprint champion said she
was quite pleased with the
way she ran her quarters in
the century yesterday,
although her start could have
been better.

"T still held it together and
came through at the end, so
I'm happy with that," said
Ferguson-McKenzie, who
trailed only to Jamaica, the
top qualifier in 10.92.

As for the semis today, Fer-
guson-McKenzie said there's
no doubt that she's going to
have to run.

"It's going to be tough
because everybody's running,’
she reflected.

"At this point, I think it will
take 11.0s or better, maybe
even 10 point because every-
body is running."

Ferguson-McKenzie, 33,
will be running out of the first
of the two semis today at 1:05
pm ET in lane three, sand-

wiched between Verena

Sailer of Germany in lane
two and Stewart in four. Also
included in her heat is her for-
mer training partner Lauryn
Williams in five and Jamaican
Shelly-Ann Fraser in sixth.

Sturrup, the elder
stateswoman of the field at
age 37, has drawn lane five in
the second heat at 1:13 pm
ET. Her rivals to watch are
Jamaicans Veronica Camp-
bell-Brown in three and
Aleen Bailey in sixth, while
American Carmelita Jeter is
in fourth.

Focused on the task ahead
of her, Sturrup opted not to
give an interview. She indi-
cated that she really wants to
wait until she completes the
final that will be run as
tonight's showcase at 3:35 pm
ET

In yesterday's preliminary
rounds of the 100, Ferguson-
McKenzie competed first of
fourth of nine heats. She eas-
ily won her opener in 11.26 in
the second fastest qualifying
time. Jeter had the fastest
time of 11.22 in winning the
third heat.

Two heats later, Sheniqua
Ferguson was fourth in heat
six in 11.57.

And Sturrup rounded out
the Bahamian participation of
the morning session by also
winning heat eight in 11.28 to
turn in the third fastest quali-
fying time.

COVERAGE



Michael Sohn/AP ‘



JAMAICA’S Veronica Campbell-Brown and Sheniqua Ferguson
(right) compete in a 100m first round heat Sunday...

(AP Photo: Anja Niedringhaus)

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Woman criticises
Immigration Dept over
refusal to void estranged
husbands permit

FROM page five

The couple’s four-year-old daughter was born prematurely,
and developmental difficulties have rendered her incontinent
and partially paralyzed. Since the child’s father abandoned
the family, her mother has been unable to afford to take her to
scheduled medical check-ups and is surviving on support from
social services, the woman said.

She is angry that the application she put forward has enabled
her estranged husband to now earn around $600 a week, while
he fails to support his Bahamian family at the cost of govern-
ment, she said.

“Tam very grateful to government, but they shouldn’t have
to do that when the children have a young, vibrant, working
father,” she said.

The couple also have a two-year-old daughter, and the Har-
bour Islander has three other children from previous relation-
ships.

Calls to the director of Immigration and Minister of Immi-
gration Branville McCartney were not returned before The
Tribune went to press last night.

Share your news

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area or have won an
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and share your story.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 19



IN THIS Feb. 26, 2009 photo,

Mexico cartels go from . |

drugs to full-scale matias

CIUDAD HIDALGO, Mexico

SHOPKEEPERS in this pine-covered moun-
tain region easily recite the list of "protection"
fees they pay to La Familia drug cartel to stay in
business: 100 pesos a month for a stall in a street
market, 30,000 pesos for an auto dealership or
construction-supply firm.

First offense for nonpayment: a severe beat-
ing. Those who keep ignoring the fees — or try
to charge their own — may pay with their lives,
according to Associated Press.

"Every day you can see the people they have
beaten up being taken to the IMSS,” said auto
mechanic Jesus Hernandez, motioning to the
government-run hospital a few doors from his
repair shop.

Mexican drug cartels have morphed into full-
scale mafias, running extortion and protection
rackets and trafficking everything from people
to pirated DVDs. As once-lucrative cocaine
profits have fallen and U.S. and Mexican author-
ities crack down on all drug trafficking to the
US., gangs are branching into new ventures —
some easier and more profitable than drugs.

The expansion has major implications as Pres-
ident Felipe Calderon continues his 2?-year-old
drug war, which has killed more than 11,000
people and turned formerly tranquil rural towns
such as Ciudad Hidalgo into major battlefronts.

Organized crime is seeping into Mexican soci-
ety in ways not seen before, making it ever more
difficult to combat. Besides controlling busi-
nesses, cartels provide jobs and social services
where government has failed.

"Today, the traffickers have big companies,
education, careers,” said Congresswoman Yudit
del Rincon of Sinaloa state, which has long been
controlled by the cartel of the same name.
"They're businessman of the year, they even
head up social causes and charitable founda-
tions."

Local officials say they do not have the man-
power to investigate cartel rackets and refer
such cases to the state, which hands them over to
overloaded federal agents because organized
crime is a federal offense. A federal police
report released in April notes that often no one
confronts the cartels, "not the police, because in
many cases there is probably corruption, and
not the public, because they live in terror."

After media reports questioned whether Mex-
ico was becoming a failed state, Calderon insist-
ed to The Associated Press in February that his
country is in the hands of Mexican authorities.

"Even me, as president, I can visit any single
point of the territory,” he said. He has since
sent 5,500 extra military and police officers to
fight drug lords in Michoacan — his home state.

Jailed

But in Ciudad Hidalgo and neighboring
Zitacuaro, mayors have been jailed and charged
with working for La Familia cartel, which con-
trols swaths of central and western Mexico.
Cadillac Escalades and Lincoln Navigators with
low tires and chrome rims patrol the streets of
Zitacuaro, even as trucks of army troops roll
past.

In the Michoacan mountain town of Arteaga,
La Familia boss Servando Gomez Martinez is
revered for giving townspeople money for food,
clothing and even medical care.

"He is a country man just like us, who wears
huaraches," a farmer said of one of Mexico's
most-wanted drug lords, pointing to his own
open-toed leather sandals. He asked that his
name not be used for fear of retaliation.

"It's almost like Chicago, when Al Capone
ruled everything," said a senior U.S. law
enforcement official who was not authorized to
be quoted by name. "They control everything
from the shoeshine boy to the taxi driver."

Mexican cartels gained their dominance in
drug trafficking in the mid-1980s, when U.S.
drug agents and the Colombian government
cracked down on Colombian cartels and drug
routes through the Caribbean. The vast major-
ity of cocaine headed to the US. started going
through Mexico.

In the meantime, trade in pirated and other
smuggled goods in Mexico traditionally was car-
ried out by small gangs centered around extend-
ed families or neighborhood rings.

In the last five to 10 years, Mexican cartels
created domestic drug markets and carved out
local territories, using a quasi-corporate struc-
ture, firepower and gangs of hit men to control
other illicit trades as well. Federal prosecutors
now call them "organized crime syndicates” and
say their tactics — such as charging a "turf tax"
to do business in their territory — mirror the
Italian mafia.

"They adopt a business model as if they were
franchises, except they are characterized by vio-
lence," according to a federal police briefing
report.

In June, soldiers in the northern city of Mon-
terrey caught members of the Zetas cartel pro-

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IN THIS Feb. 26, 2009 photo, souvenirs sit for
sale in front of a closed shop with a for rent sign
along the famous Revolucion Avenue in Tijuana,
Mexico. Mexico's drug cartels are becoming true
mafias forcing many businesses in northern bor-
der states to close down.

ducing and distributing pirated DVDs and con-
trolling street vendors with protection fees.

Also in Monterrey, top Gulf cartel lieutenant
Sigifrido Najera Talamantes ran kidnapping
and extortion rings while trafficking migrants
and crude oil stolen from the pipelines of Mex-
ico's state-owned oil company, Pemex, accord-
ing to the army.Najera Talamantes, who was
arrested in March, allegedly charged migrant
smugglers to pass through his territory, took a
cut from street vendors and oversaw trafficking
in stolen goods, said Army Gen. Luis Arturo
Oliver.In Durango state, residents of Cuencame
dug ditches around their town earlier this year to
keep out roving bands of drug hit men kidnap-
ping people at will.

"Even with the ditches, they still came in and
kidnapped five people," said a Cuencame offi-
cial who asked his name not be used for fear of
retaliation.

In late 2008, almost all the betting parlors in
the border state of Tamaulipas closed because of
demands for protection money, according to
Alfonso Perez, the head of the Mexican associ-
ation of betting parlors.

In northern states such as Chihuahua and
Tamaulipas, cartels also are blamed for busi-
nesses closing or burning if they don't pay pro-
tection fees.

Last year, mayors of more than a dozen towns
throughout the state of Mexico received threat-
ening phone calls demanding that $10,000 to
$50,000 be deposited in bank accounts. State
investigators say many of the threats mentioned
links to the Gulf cartel.

Threats

Salvador Vergara, mayor of the resort town of
Ixtapan de la Sal, received threats and was shot
to death in October. State authorities believe
that he didn't pay and refused to allow gangs to
operate in his township.

Families in parts of the central state of Zacate-
cas went without cooking gas for several days in
January, after gangs demanded protection fees
of the gas-delivery trucks, and drivers refused to
make their rounds. Deliveries resumed only
after the state government increased security
patrols on the local roads.

Extortion threats reported to federal police
skyrocketed from about 50 in 2002 to about
50,000 in 2008, according to Public Safety Sec-
retary Genaro Garcia Luna.

Because of the spike, the Mexican govern-
ment this year launched a nationwide anti-extor-
tion program, creating a national database to
track protection rackets and promising to pro-
tect even business owners too scared to file for-
mal complaint.

While the results of the new complaint system
are still meager, the government recently moved
to go after cartel finances.

In April, Congress approved a law allowing
the government to seize properties and money
from suspected drug traffickers and other crim-
inals before they are convicted. In the past, sus-
pects had to be convicted before their property
could be seized, and trials often last years in
Mexico.



people play soccer in the
empty "Gomez Passage"
shopping center where for
rent signs are seen in a tourist
area of Tijuana, Mexico. Mexi-
co's drug cartels are becom-
ing true mafias, branching out
into large-scale extortion and
protection rackets, demand-
ing money from everybody
from junkyard owners to town
mayors and forcing many
businesses in northern border
states to close down.

ee” ESV

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at wew.cob.edu.by

LATE REGISTRATION

Late Registration for Fall 2009 is scheduled for
August 25-26, 2009 from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
in the Records Department, ground floor, Portia
smith Student Services Centre.

SUPERVISOROF FINANCE

A leading Bahamian company, is seeking application&ufearaisor of Finance

JOB OBJECTIVE:

To provide financial leadership for the company by managing the financial resources, supervisir\
the certain key aspects of the campjsaaccounting function and maintaining appropriate relations
with investors and regulatory agencies.

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Reports to th@irectorof Finance.

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Core responsibilities include
Assisting in managittige financial affairs of the company
Supervise key components offthancedepartment
Ensure accurate and timely interim and annual financial reporting in accordance with
International Accounting Standards
Assist in the annual budget exercise
Assist irthe training and development of line accounting staff
Coordinate the annual audit process
Assist in managing cashflow and treasury functions
Any other related duties as considered necessary

REQUIREMENTS & PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES :

Candidates must meet thédwing criteria:
Bachelor's Degree or higher in accounting or related financial field
Professional accounting designation recognized by The Bahamas Institute of Chartered
Accountants
Minimum of seven years experience in accounting, finance and budgeting.
Leadership, management and direct supervision experience is required. Previous
direct experience in planning and executing all aspects of financial accounting and
budgetary functions
Bahamian citizen
Accounting software experience
Proficient in the usaf the Microsoft range of applications
Strong technical and managerial skills
Excellent writing, communication, analytical and reasoning skills
Excellent organizational and time management skills
Team Player with the ability to add value and strendtm tam and team goals
Honest, hardworking and ability to meet deadlines

The position offers an attractive salary and benefits package, reflecting the successful
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THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Two Russian jets collide,
crash in air show training

Stunt pilot is killed

MOSCOW

TWO Russian air force jets
rehearsing aerobatic maneu-
vers collided Sunday near
Moscow, killing one stunt
pilot and sending one fighter
crashing into nearby vacation
homes, a military official said,
according to Associated Press.

The Su-27 fighters were
part of the elite Russian
Knights flying group prepar-
ing to perform at the MAKS-
2009 air show, the largest and
most important showcase for
Russia’s aerospace industry.

The jets collided near
Zhukovsky airfield, east of
Moscow, where the air show
opens Tuesday.

Air force spokesman Lt.
Col. Vladimir Drik said all
three pilots involved ejected.

He said rescuers recovered
two in satisfactory condition
but the third was killed.

The Kremlin identified the
dead pilot as Col. Igor
Tkachenko, commander of
the Russian Knights.

Experience

The Russian Knights’ Web
site said Tkachenko was 45,
was married with a son and
daughter, and had been an
aerobatics pilot since 1989
with more than 1,500 hours’
experience flying attack air-
craft.

One jet crashed into a row
of houses near the airfield,
setting three ablaze and scat-
tering debris over a wide
area.

The RIA-Novosti news
agency said one woman was

(Chr o 2 fing

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seriously wounded and up to
four other people on the
ground may have been
injured.

Russian TV footage
showed wreckage from the
other jet lying in an unpopu-
lated field.

The Russian Knights,
formed in 1991, have suffered
tragedy before.

In December 1995, three
of its Su-27 jets crashed into a
Vietnamese mountainside in
rough weather as they were
returning to Russia from an
air show in Malaysia.

Four pilots died.

More generally, Russian
air force jets have suffered a
series of mishaps attributed
to the Soviet-era age and
poor maintenance of

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Earlier this year, officials
grounded the air force’s
entire fleet of Su-24 swing-
wing attack aircraft after two
crashes in three days.

Two crashes of MiG-29
fighter jets in 2008 led to that
model’s temporary ground-
ing as well.

Dangerous

Subsequent inspections
determined that many were
in dangerous shape, either
through age or ill repair, and
had to be scrapped.

Also Sunday, a Yak-52 sin-
gle-propeller aircraft crashed
in the Kaluga region south of
Moscow.

Russian broadcasters NTV
reported that one of two peo-
ple killed in that crash was
the son of a former Russian
Knights pilot.

<
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A BURNING Su-27 jet from the Russian air force elite aerobatic
team Russkiye Vityazi (Russian Knights), dives just seconds after
the aircraft collided with a two-seat Su-27, not seen, not far from
the Zhukovsky airfield, east of Moscow, Sunday, Aug. 16, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE 6

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MONDAY,

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AUGUST

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SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

ColinaImperial.

Confidence For Life





Winder: Loan
programme was
a mistake from
the beginning

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

A SENIOR partner at
Deloitte and Touche suggest-
ed yesterday that government
would have got a better
return on their investment if
the funds for the student loan
programme had been injected
into the College of the
Bahamas (COB) instead of
the now $60 million deep loan
portfolio.

Ray Winder told Tribune
Business that the govern-
ment’s guaranteed loan pro-
gramme was a mistake from
the beginning.

He contends that the
expansion of COB’s facilities
to accommodate more stu-
dents would have yielded
much more for this country
than the now $30 million debt
the loan programme has left
in its wake.

Mall expands eatery options with Uncle Jim’s

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE TOWN Centre Mall
expanded its eatery options
recently with the addition of
Uncle Jim's, as new business-
es continue to open their
doors in a location that is
quickly trying to recharge
itself.

Craig and Carlos Wells
opened Uncle Jim's Rotis-
serie only three weeks ago
and, according to them, the
response to the restaurant has
been overwhelming.

Maybe due to the fact that
the only other food establish-
ment in the mall is Subway;
however, the lure of the smell
from Uncle Jim's Barbecue
rotisserie chicken is an atten-
tion grabber.

The Wells brothers set up
their rotisserie just in front of
the door to their business.

“People see the rotisserie
and they come in,” said Car-
los Wells. “But they will smell
it first.”

According to him, the
restaurant, which also pre-
pares sandwiches and fea-
tures an all-you-can-eat sal-
ad bar, was envisaged with
the family in mind.

He said he wanted a family

And that number could
increase with the more than
$30 million loan portfolio that
is Not yet in arrears.

“The government made a
great mistake when they start-
ed the programme and did-
n’t put proper procedures and
controls in place,” said Mr
Winder.

“The bigger poimt on this
issue is this was not a proper
investment.

“The best investment for
the government to make
when they made it (decision
to start guaranteed loan pro-
gramme) would have been if
the majority (of the money)
had been put into building
additional capacity at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas.

“T would submit that if you
compare the return on that
investment with the return

SEE page 9B

friendly environment with
good food and a good atmos-
phere.

The lights in Uncle Jim are
kept muted and a flat panel
television embedded in the
wall plays continuous music
videos.

Samples

Samples of the establish-
ment’s conch fritters are set
out for customers to try and a
separate counter serves up
fresh sweet tea and pink
lemonade prepared by hand
by the Wells brothers.

Craig Wells said they hope
to expand the business into
the empty space next door,
but pointed out that the busi-
ness is still young.

According to Carlos, their
vision for the space next door
is of an ultra-modern game
room, stocked with all the lat-
est in gaming equipment.

The brothers began the
restaurant with an initial out-
lay of about $16,000 and hope
to open another location in
the western part of New
Providence in the near future.

Besides just barbecue, the
rotisserie offers a special spicy
chicken and a regular sea-
soned chicken, prepared by
one of three chefs.

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Airlines ‘siightet'
by fee increases

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

overnment is
continuing to
expand airlift

into the Bahamas, with oo
several new American
Eagle flights into the
family islands and a New
Condor service from
Germany, according to
Tourism and Aviation
Minister, while many
small, local airlines feel
slighted by fee increases across the
board that could leave them handi-
capped.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace told
Tribune Business recently that gov-
ernment has been in talks with those
small airline companies that make fre-
quent inter-island trips.

According to him, those small com-

ioe
—

es elicles)



panies are a part of the government’s
plan to increase travel to the family
islands.

However, those airlines may not sur-
vive the tax increases associated with
the construction of a new internation-
al departure terminal.

“The smaller airlines are very much
a part of what we want to develop in
terms of intra-Bahamas travel, but at
the end of the day we had to put flight
systems in place that allow for those
services to be paid for that we are
putting in there,” said Mr Vanderpool-
Wallace.

“And we've been talking to them
(small, local airlines) and we’re pre-
pared to make adjustments that are
reasonable and necessary before it goes
into effect and we are now just collect-
ing all of the information.”

Government recently secured West-
jest service from Canada into Grand
Bahama and have expanded Ameri-
can Eagle services into Abaco, Gov-

ernors Harbour and North Eleuthera.
Service to Exuma is expected to begin
November 19.

“What we’ve been talking to them
about is beginning to work,” said Mr
Vanderpool-Wallace.

“A Condor flight out of Germany is
beginning later this year.”

He said low cost international airlift
to the Bahamas is beginning to gain
traction and he insists the small inter-
island airlines will not be left behind.

According to him, government has
already held one meeting with repre-
sentatives from those companies and
said another meeting has been sched-
uled.

“We’re listening to them, but at the
end of the day, of course, government
can impose taxes very easily, but those
taxes should not be counter produc-
tive and we want to make sure that we
have the kind of dialogue that is nec-
essary to guide us in terms of what to
put in place when it comes to them.”

According to Carlos, the
barbecue chicken has been
the most popular.

“Tm only doing barbecue
today," the chef told Tribune
Business on a recent visit.

The brothers named their
restaurant after an uncle who
operated a restaurant in the
Bronx, New York, where
they worked for several sum-
mers.

Craig contends it’s where
he got the recipe for his spe-
cial barbecue sauce.

On a typical day, accord-
ing to Carlos, the business is
packed with people for lunch
and already Uncle Jim’s has

regulars.

“They said there is no traf-
fic through this mall,” he said.
“Look at the people who are
here.”

About the same time Uncle
Jim opened its doors “Bed,
Bath and the Works” opened
theirs.

Owner, Harrison Toote
said opening the new store
with the way the economy is
was a “leap of faith,” espe-
cially as he did not seek
financing from the banks.

“T guess we'll be in full
swing by the time the econo-
my starts back up,” he said.

This is Mr. Toote’s second

store. He said sales are down
at the Marathon Mall store,
but “it remains profitable.”

The new location offers
bathroom, bedroom, and
kitchen accessories and will
soon have rugs and carpets
for sale.

Mr Toote added that he
would like to offer more of
the accessories used to dec-
orate kitchens in the future,
as the store has great poten-
tial for growth.

According to him, people
like the concept and location
of the new store.

“There is market for this
part of town,” he said.

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The information contained is from a third
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By AUDREY McAVOY
Associated Press Writer

HONOLULU (AP) —
Hawaii became the 50th state
this week in 1959, helping
transform an island economy
dominated by sugar and
pineapple fields into a vaca-
tion paradise.

With statehood, tourists
could come here knowing
they would be protected by
US laws. It also gave investors
more confidence they could
reap returns in the islands.

For locals, statehood meant
electing their own governor
and sending voting represen-

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INTERNATIONAL BUSI

PAGE 2B, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

= "oa @

tatives to Washington, D.C.
for the first time. The
increased democracy led to
pro-labor legislation and a
steady flow of federal dollars
sent Hawaii's way by its Con-
gressional representatives.

"There were these remark-
able spurts of growth in
Hawaii that raised incomes
and standards of living well
beyond what it was prior to
statehood," said Lawrence W.
Boyd, Jr., a labor economist
at the University of Hawaii
at West Oahu.

Just before World War II,
Hawaii produced four per
cent of the world's sugar and
60 per cent of its commercial
pineapple. The leaders of the
five companies who ran the
biggest plantations formed an
oligarchy that dominated
Hawaii politics, as well as the
economy.

Sugar and pineapple began
to quickly decline, however.
Reduced tariffs and higher
labor costs made it cheaper
to grow sugar in Brazil and
Thailand and pineapple in
Ecuador and Costa Rica.

Tourism was already grow-
ing in the 1950s as propeller
planes entered use alongside
ocean liners. But growth
exploded with the introduc-
tion of commercial jet planes
in 1959, a couple months
before statehood. Jets made it
faster, cheaper and easier to
vacation in Hawaii.

No longer were the islands
reserved for celebrities and
elite. Americans, whose
incomes were rising, were
eager to experience an exotic
getaway they had only seen
on TV.

The number of tourists
surged from just 171,000 in
1958 to 2.6 million in 1973.
Hawaii's economy grew an
average of seven per cent per
year during the 15 first years
of statehood.

"It's progress,” said Pat Sai-
ki, who represented Hawaii's
first Congressional district
from 1987 to 1991. "I remem-
ber when the only way we
could travel to the mainland
was on the Matsonia — by
ship."

Economists say social pro-
grams pursued by Hawaii's
newly elected officials pro-
moted prosperity.

Until statehood, Hawaii's
governors were appointed by
the president. The governors
were close to the plantation
owners and didn't directly
represent their concerns and
interests of the broader pop-
ulation. That changed with
statehood.

THE TRIBUNE



NESS



ia

IN THIS February 1, 2006 file photo, visitors pack Waikiki Beach in Honolulu. Hawaii became the 50th state
this week in 1959, helping transform an island economy dominated by sugar and pineapple fields into a
vacation paradise for Americans...

(AP Photo: Lucy Pemoni)

Statehood helped
transform Hawaii
to tourism haven

Gov. John A Burns, the
first governor elected after
statehood, oversaw reforms
to wage and hour laws, unem-
ployment insurance and
workers’ compensation. He
also presided over the expan-
sion of the public school sys-
tem. Under George Ariyoshi,
Burns' successor, the state
began requiring companies to
provide health insurance to
their workers, giving Hawaii
near-universal medical cover-
age. The election of gover-
nors gave unions and their
large membership new politi-
cal clout. Hawaii is now the
second-most unionized state
in the nation behind New
York.

But while tourism has pow-
ered the economy for the past
50 years, islanders have yet
to find a new source of growth
for the next five decades.

In 2007, Hawaii welcomed
a record 7.63 million visitors,
which was nearly one million
more than in 1999.

There's also little public
appetite for building more
hotels to welcome millions
more tourists. In recent years,
activists and residents have
demonstrated against devel-
opers’ plans to expand resorts
in places like Oahu's North
Shore and Maui's Makena
Bay.

"We're floundering,” says
Paul Brewbaker, senior eco-
nomic adviser to the Bank of
Hawai. "We're at an inter-
esting moment in terms of
strategic economic policy. We
have to make a decision: How
are we going to sustain rising
living standards?"

The state offers generous
tax credits to promote invest-
ment in high-technology. It
actively supports aquaculture
farms while global conglom-
erates use Hawaii as a base
to develop seed corn. But
none of these sectors has
come close to replacing
tourism as Hawaii's liveli-
hood.

Prominent businessman
Walter Dods, the former head
of First Hawaiian Bank and
current chairman of Hawai-
ian Telcom, said Hawaii
should rely on aquaculture
and a half-dozen other niche
industries to supplement
tourism.

But welcoming tourists, he
said, is a natural industry for
the islands.

"All the talk of all the mag-
ical things that's going to
replace it — virtually every
one has fallen on its face,"
Dods said. "Tourism is the
financial linchpin of Hawaii."
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 3B



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS



Wall Street sees shoppers
as key to rally’s future

By STEPHEN BERNARD
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — On
Wall Street, the average shop-
per can trump a Federal
Reserve policy maker.

With other parts of the
economy showing signs of
improvement, the question of
when a recovery will occur
and how strong it will be lies
with consumers.

So reports last week show-
ing weaker-than-expected
retail sales and flagging con-
sumer confidence overshad-
owed an upbeat view of the
economy from the Federal
Reserve. The major indexes
ended the week with a loss of
about half a percent, their first
weekly losses in five weeks.

"Anything pointing to the
health of the consumer and
its willingness to spend is
going to be watched closely,”
said Ryan Jacob, president of
Jacob Asset Management in
Los Angeles.

This week, the consumer is
in focus again as a stream of
retailers report second-quar-
ter earnings. Wall Street will
want to know if retail compa-
nies, like businesses in other
industries, made money pri-
marily because of cost-cutting
rather than from improved
revenue or sales.

The nation's biggest retail-
er, Wal-Mart Stores Inc., last
week followed the trend set
by other companies, report-
ing earnings that beat Wall
Street forecasts but also say-
ing that its most important
sales, those from stores open
at least a year, fell during the
quarter. And it's likely that
other retailers still to
announce results will continue
that pattern.

Eventually, investors will
need to see rising sales in
order to become confident
about the economy's ability
to show sustained growth.
Consumer spending accounts
for more than two-thirds of
the nation's economic activity.

"We'll get a very good
range of what retail sales actu-
ally look like" this week, said



SALE SIGNS advertise discounts
at a Hard Tail retailer on the Third
Street Promenade in Santa Mon-
ica, California. Retail sales dis-
appointed in July and the number
of newly laid-off workers filing
claims for unemployment bene-
fits rose unexpectedly last week.
The latest government reports
reinforced concerns about how
quickly consumers will be able to
contribute to a broad economic
recovery.

(AP Photo: Reed Saxon)

Jamie Cox, managing partner
at Harris Financial Group in
Richmond, Va. Cox noted
that retailers from across the
pricing and product spectrum
are reporting results.
Oft-price retailer TIX Cos.
and the high-end Saks Inc.
report results Tuesday, while
apparel retailer Gap Inc. pro-
vides its earnings data on




Thursday. Home improve-
ment retailers Lowe's Cos.
and Home Depot Inc. also
release results this week, as
do Target Corp., BJ's Whole-
sale Club and Barnes &
Noble Inc.

Stock gains were muted
after the Commerce Depart-
ment said Thursday that retail
sales fell 0.1 per cent in July,
significantly worse than the
0.7 per cent increase econo-
mists expected. The news was
bad again Friday, when a new
reading on consumer senti-
ment was much lower than
expected. Major indexes tum-
bled about one per cent that
day.

News of the Reuters/Uni-
versity of Michigan consumer
sentiment survey wiped out
the surge of optimism the
market had after the Federal
Reserve on Wednesday said
the economy was "leveling
out."

Cox said there is a split
between Wall Street and
Main Street over the econo-
my's potential recovery. The
rally that began after the
stock market bottomed out in
early March shows investors
are confident a recovery is
coming in the near future,
while the average American is
a bit more cautious, he said.

Friday's consumer senti-
ment report was a jolt for

traders about exactly how
uncomfortable consumers still
are with their finances and
the state of the economy.

One of the biggest worries
for people is the job market.
Jacob said that while growing
consumer confidence would
be a welcome sign for the
market, “with unemployment
still trending higher, it’s hard
to expect too much progress.”

Harvey Robinson, chief
investment officer at Robin-
son Capital Group in Dayton,
Md., said that because of
questions about the job mar-
Ket, there is still no clear sign
about the timing or strength
of a recovery.

Weekly unemployment
data last week showed an
unexpected rise in the num-
ber of workers filing for job-
less benefits for the first time.
The next report on jobless
claims will come out Thurs-
day.

Though job growth typical
lags behind as the economy
recovers, improving unem-
ployment reports could give
consumers a confidence
boost. Until that happens,
however, markets could be
volatile and the five-month
rally might slow, analysts said.

However, strength in new
housing and manufacturing
data during the week could
provide investors with more

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CORRIDOR 18
SAUNDERS BEACH AREA
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* 10 Ten (10) Casuarinas Trees willbe removed and replaced along Saunders Beach (Corridor 18)

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23, 2009. Motorist are advised to use the following alternatives routes:
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There will be delays along the vicinity due to the one-way traffic flow system. Local diversions will be
sign posted in due course and further information will be provided on the local media.

Tel: 242-322-8341 /242-322-2610

Email:bahamasneighbors @cartellone.com.ar

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DAYS THE
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All fees are incloded in the price quoted above; new students pay a onetime application fee of $40.00, (SON REFUNDABLE)

Application Deadline: August 28, 2009 at 4:00 p.m.
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reasons to bid stocks higher.
The market will get readings
on housing starts and exist-

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regional manufacturing
reports.

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COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
EQUITY SIDE

2008/CLE/Qui/01307

IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
S. G. B. Company Ltd.

AND

IN THE MATTER of all that piece parcels or tract
of land 260 acres more or less situate in the
Settlement of The Bight Long Island one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected during
normal working hours at:-

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Second
Floor, Ansbacher House, East Street, Nassau,
The Bahamas.

The Chambers of Hanna & Co., Second
Floor, Pond Plaza, East Bay and Ernest
Streets, Nassau N.P., The Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that any person having
dower or right to dower or any adverse claim/s not
recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 18th
day of September, A.D., 2009, file in the Registry of the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a statement of such claim in the
prescribed form and verified by an affidavit to be
filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file
and serve a statement of such claim on or before the
aforementioned date will operate as a bar to such claim.

HANNA & CO.

Chambers

3rd Floor, Columbus House,
East & Shirley Streets,
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioner
PAGE 4B, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Some indications RI economy

may be nearing the bottom

By MICHELLE R SMITH
Associated Press Writer

Island (AP) — Sarah Robil-
lard spent this day like many
other days: pushing her four -

PAWTUCKET, Rhode month-old daughter's stroller

Legal Notice

Notice
ALGOGENETIC GLOBAL LTD.

VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000 the Dissolution of ALGOGENETIC GLOBAL
LTD. has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was 17th July
2009.



around town in the drizzling
rain, looking for a job. She's
been out of work for a year,
and her husband, Christo-
pher, has only worked spo-
radically in the last several
months. They're $500 behind
on rent and just talked their
phone company into turning
their service back on after it
got shut off.

"We've had to resort to
public help to get formula for
her," Robillard said of her
sleeping daughter. "I just got
married a month ago. We
can't even afford to get my
new ID. That's $16.50."

The couple, both 19, are
just two among the tens of
thousands of unemployed
Rhode Islanders. The state's
growing unemployment rate
stood at 12.4 per cent in June,
second highest in the country
behind Michigan. Even worse,
economists say that number
is probably 25 per cent or
more if you include people
who have given up looking or
are settling for part-time
work.

There is some positive news
— slowing unemployment,

Back BY Popular Demand
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ROYAL BFIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED



Eo

CcFAL*

SECURITIES AS OF:

FRIDAY, 14 AUGUST 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,562.56] CHG -0.35 | %CHG -0.02 | YTD -149.80 | YTD % -8.75
FINDEX: CLOSE 783.14 | YTD -6.20% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit y
Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (81)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)}

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson 10.39
Premier Real Estate 10.00

6.25
0.63
3.15
2.14

6.25
0.63
3.15
2.37

2.74
5.50
1.27
1.32
6.60
10.00
10.30
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.49
10.39
10.00

2.74
5.71
3.97
1.95
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.13
1.00
0.30
5.50

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.33
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

6.25
0.63
3.15
2.37

2.74
5.71
3.64
1.95
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.13
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.39
10.00

EPS $

-0.877



SARAH ROBILLARD of Rhode Island has her job application reviewed by Ground Round manager, Kay,
at the restaurant in Pawtucket...

fewer jobless claims and more
home sales, for example —
that economists say indicates,
if not an end to the state's
recession, the possible begin-
ning of the end. Economists
also caution that unemployed
people like the Robillards
could find themselves scram-
bling for work for quite a
while because the employ-
ment picture is so bleak.

"People are really, really
concerned here about the
state of the economy," said
Marion Orr, a professor at
Brown University, who polled
Rhode Islanders about their
attitudes in May. "We're a
working class state and have
long been a working class
state, so when the economy
goes south, we get hurt really
bad."

Sixty-nine per cent of the
people Orr polled said they
personally knew a friend or
family member who had lost
his job.

Even those who have a sta-
ble job are feeling the dire
economic situation.

Lisa Church, 45, a public
transit operator, says she was
hit with a $1,200 property tax
increase on her modest home
in Pawtucket. Communities
around the state have had to
make cuts or raise taxes
because the state budget dras-
tically cut local aid.

Church said she's saving
more and being more con-
scious of her spending.

"Do I really need it? No, I
don't, so why buy it? I'm
being more practical today,
putting the desires on hold,”
she said.

By many measures, the

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

C:Co LCIN TAL

Div$ P/E
10.6
11.1
25.6
N/M

0.078 40.4

0.055 43.1

1.406 8.1

0.249 11.0

0.419 13.6

0.111 32.8

0.240 8.1

0.420 15.7

0.322 33.0

0.794 13.0

0.332 15.5

0.000 N/M

0.035 8.6

0.407 13.5

0.952 10.9

0.180 55.6

0.127
0.992
0.244

Ocean State's economy is
doing poorly. For example,
bankruptcies are up about
eight per cent in the first six
months of 2009, compared to
the same period a year ago.
The number of people
exhausting their unemploy-
ment benefits, indicating
they've been out of work for a
long time, doubled in June.
The median value of a single-
family home in Rhode Island
fell 23 per cent in the second
quarter from the same peri-
od a year ago, according to
the Rhode Island Association
of Realtors.

However, while foreclo-
sures persist, the rate seems to
be easing, said Edward
Mazze, an economist and for-
mer dean of the School of
Business Administration at
the University of Rhode
Island. Ignoring homes sold
as foreclosures or short-sales,
the median price of a single
family home fell less than 6
percent in the second quar-
ter, the real estate group said.

Paul Leys, president of the
group and a real estate agent
in Newport, said the number
of homes sold is going up
because of low prices, along
with low mortgage interest
rates and the $8,000 tax cred-
it for first-time home buyers.

"It's almost like someone
turned the faucet back on a
month, a month and a half
ago. It's been fun to be busy
again," he said.

While he doesn't see a
return to double-digit home
appreciations anytime soon,
he does think the worst is
over.

"We're beyond the bottom

(AP Photo: Elise Amendola)

of the market," he said.

Economists expect unem-
ployment will continue to
climb, but the pace of new
claims, while still rising, has
slowed.

"We're not adding jobs, but
the elements are starting to
come around," said Leonard
Lardaro, a professor of eco-
nomics at the University of
Rhode Island.

He said one way for the
state's unemployment rate to
go down is for people to move
out of Rhode Island or find
work in neighboring Massa-
chusetts or Connecticut,
which have more jobs in
growth and technology indus-
tries. He said that's bad for
Rhode Island because it cre-
ates a "brain drain” of edu-
cated, highly skilled workers.

Mazze said he expected the
state's unemployment rate to
stay above 10 per cent at least
through the middle of next
year. By the end of 2010, he
said unemployment will prob-
ably still be a persistent prob-
lem, at eight or nine per cent.

Robillard said she'll keep
looking for work. When she’s
lucky enough to find a place
that's accepting applications,
she fills one out there, then
takes one home and brings it
back the next day so she has a
better chance of her name
standing out in the pile. She's
turned philosophical in the
last few months.

"T figure this is a test. This is
a test to see how the human
race goes about taking care
of ourselves," she said. "If
God is testing us, I thank him
for every minute of peace that
he gives me."

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BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31,59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3860 2.40 4.75
2.9047 -1.20 -3.66
1.4817 3.35 5.38
3.1031 -8.35 -13.82
12.9801 2.87 5.79
101.6693 1.10 1.67
96.7398 0.35 -4.18
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.2765 2.00 -2.98
1.0622 2.56 6.22
1.0243 -0.84 243
1.0585 2.04 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

ases)
52wk-Low Interest
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

7%
Prime + 1.75%
7%
Prime + 1.75%

52wk-Low Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

N/M
256.6

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

52wk-Low
1.3231
2.8952
1.4059
3.1031
12.3289
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Div$ Yield % NAV Date
30-Jun-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

QUALIFICATIONS

- BAin Accounting from an accredited University

- International accounting designation (CPA/CA) with minimum of
5 years post qualification experience,

- Advance working knowledge of Excel

- Working knowledge of Microsoft Word

Interested persons should apply on or before
August 29th, 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S11) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Attention: CONTROLLER
DA 81270
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N3207

Nassau, Bahamas

Suitably qualified candidates need only apply.
Salary is commensurate with experience and qualification.


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 5B



$1bn in battery grants may recharge MI talent base

By DAVID N GOODMAN
and JEFF KAROUB
Associated Press Writers

DETROIT (AP) — As a
business professor and for-
mer auto executive in Michi-
gan, Gerald Meyers has seen
his share of former colleagues
and students leave the state.

The state's economy has
been shrinking along with its
struggling auto industry. And
the brain drain is well-docu-
mented as the state struggles
to keep its own college grad-
uates, much less attract
degreed newcomers.

"IT can speak for my stu-
dents, who are predominant-
ly leaving the state," said
Meyers, a University of
Michigan business professor
and former chairman of
American Motors Corp. "It
would be helpful — certainly
in my conversations with
them — if something is going
on that suggests that the
future is brighter here than it
has been."

Meyers and state officials
say a newly announced $1.36
billion mjection into 11 com-
panies and universities in
Michigan might offer some
of the best and brightest a
reason to stay.

Obama administration offi-
cials this month announced
$2.4 billion in federal grants
to develop next-generation
electric vehicles and batter-
ies. Vice President Joe Biden
made the announcement in
Michigan, the single largest
recipient of the grants.

These and other recent fed-

eral grants give the state a
better shot at reversing the
brain drain, veteran U.S. Rep.
John Dingell told University
of Michigan researchers and
administrators.

"We hope we can keep
them home so they can do
those things to move our
economy forward," said Din-
gell, a Dearborn Democrat
who visited the Ann Arbor
campus after the announce-
ment. He has been instru-
mental over decades in steer-
ing research money to the
school.

Stephen Forrest, the uni-
versity's vice president for
research, said the state is rich
in engineering and scientific
talent but has lagged in turn-
ing those skills into new busi-
ness ideas.

"We're very sensitive to the
idea of brain drain," he said.
What has been lacking, he
said, has been the "manage-
ment talent" to put those
ideas to work.

Gov. Jennifer Granholm
said the grants are important
for keeping and developing
tens of thousands of jobs
because they cover every-
thing from early research
through final assembly — giv-
ing many graduates an oppor-
tunity to find in-state jobs in
their fields of study.

"Tf we create a whole value
chain for the battery indus-
try, the opportunities for
those workers are very, very
ripe,” she said.

The University of Michi-
gan, Detroit's Wayne State
University and Michigan

WAT Oy
2 -
=

1
1)

“5 ak)

.
“Wee *

Technological University in
Houghton in the Upper
Peninsula will receive $10.5
million for education and
work-force training pro-
grammes and other purpos-
es.

If things go right, graduates
will be able to walk right into
newly created jobs in the
region, said Wayne State
engineering professor Simon
Ng, director of that universi-
ty's new Alternative Energy
Technology degree pro-
gramme.

"Tt will be perfect timing,"
Ng said. "They will be able
to employ these people when
they graduate."

Meyers says the billion-dol-
lar effort is a great economic
stimulant but can't plug the
brain drain by itself.

"What I hope is that it's an
incentive for more," he said.
"Some big shooters will say,
‘Let's move some capital in
that direction.'"

Michigan has had the
nation's highest annual unem-
ployment rate since 2006 — it
reached 15.2 per cent in June
— and forecasters say it will
climb further before it turns
around. The state never
regained its momentum after
the 2001 recession, and the
bankruptcies this summer of
General Motors Corp. and
Chrysler Group LLC has-
tened the steady stream of
plant closings and layoffs.

Lou Glazer, president of
Michigan Future Inc., a non-
partisan research organisa-
tion in Ann Arbor, said
"quality of place," particular-

The National Insurance Board
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
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The National Insurance Board (NIB) is seeking to pre-qualify contractors to bid on works
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Pre-qualification documents may be collected fram the Security Booth at NIB‘s Clifford
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20

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Visit our website af www.cobeduhy

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ly in urban centers, is at least should feel really good."
equal to employment oppor-
tunities as a means of luring
and keeping college gradu-
ates. And making the state's
major cities more attractive
by creating vibrant, "walka-
ble" neighbourhoods and
developing mass transit sys-
tems historically has been
challenging, but some efforts
are under way.

"It's the two together that
end up being the ingredients
that allow you to fundamen-
tally change...the location
decision of talent in general
and young people in particu-
lar," he said.

Still, Glazer said, the boost
for the nascent battery and
hybrid technology market is
the right kind of move on the
economic development side.

"Just in and of itself, it cre-
ates new job opportunities for
talent and the state needs
that," he said. "It's in an
emerging industry, which has
good buzz, which the state
needs. All that stuff is an

absolute plus. "The state

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PAGE 6B, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS



White House appears ready
to drop ‘public option’

By PHILIP ELLIOTT
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Bowing to Republican pres-
sure and an uneasy public,
President Barack Obama's
administration signaled Sun-
day it is ready to abandon the
idea of giving Americans the
option of government-run
insurance as part of a new
health care system.

Facing mounting opposition
to the overhaul, administra-
tion officials left open the
chance for a compromise with
Republicans that would
include health insurance coop-
eratives instead of a govern-
ment-run plan. Such a con-
cession probably would
enrage Obama's liberal sup-
porters but could deliver a
much-needed victory on a top
domestic priority opposed by

As a privately-owned, mid-sized Bahamian
Company and the authorized Caterpillar
dealer in the Bahamas; M&E Ltd. is presently
seeking Certified Caterpillar Technicians
with Mechanical and Electrical experiences,
along with proof of academic and practical
expertise. These candidates should be

professionals who thrive on the challenge of
developing outstanding customer relations

and service excellence.

Send complete resume with education and
work experience to M & E Limited, P. O. Box
N-3238, Nassau Bahamas, Attention: Office

Administrator, or email me@me-ltd.com .

Only

persons being interviewed for this

position will be contacted.



GOP lawmakers.

Officials from both politi-
cal parties reached across the
aisle in an effort to find com-
promises on proposals they
left behind when they
returned to their districts for
an August recess. Obama had
wanted the government to run
a health insurance organiza-
tion to help cover the nation's
almost 50 million uninsured,
but didn't include it as one of
his three core principles of
reform.

Health and Human Services
Secretary Kathleen Sebelius
said that government alterna-
tive to private health insur-
ance is "not the essential ele-
ment" of the administration's
health care overhaul. The
White House would be open
to co-ops, she said, a sign that
Democrats want a compro-
mise so they can declare a vic-
tory.

Under a proposal by Sen.
Kent Conrad, D-N.D., con-
sumer-owned nonprofit coop-
eratives would sell insurance
in competition with private
industry, not unlike the way
electric and agriculture co-ops
operate, especially in rural
states such as his own.

With $3 billion to $4 billion
in initial support from the
government, the co-ops would
operate under a national
structure with state affiliates,
but independent of the gov-
ernment. They would be
required to maintain the type
of financial reserves that pri-
vate companies are required
to keep in case of unexpect-
edly high claims.

"T think there will be a com-
petitor to private insurers,”
Sebelius said. "That's really
the essential part, is you don't
turn over the whole new mar-
ketplace to private insurance
companies and trust them to
do the right thing."

Obama's spokesman

The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invites qualified applicants to apply for the
position of Technician | (Instrument), responsible for conducting calibrations, repairs, routine
checks and tests control instrumentation in its Generation Power Plant.

The successful candidate 15 expected to lead instrument technicians m fault finding,
iroubleshooting and repairs on instrument and control system.

Duties and tasks are as follows:

Directs instrument technicians when required.

Assist with the writing of procedures,

Prepares reports on failures and repairs,

Maintain historical records.

Analyze and calibrates control systems.

Plans jobs and secures necessary tools and equipment.
Calibrates electrome & pneumatic instruments.
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Applicants must also have a minimum of five (5) years power station or equivalent industrial
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PRESIDENT Barack Obama listens to a question as he speaks about health care during a town hall
meeting at Central High School in Grand Junction, Colorado...

refused to say a public option
was a make-or-break choice.

"What I am saying is the
bottom line for this for the
president is, what we have to
have is choice and competi-
tion in the insurance market,"
White House press secretary
Robert Gibbs said Sunday.

A day before, Obama
appeared to hedge his bets.

"All I'm saying is, though,
that the public option,
whether we have it or we
don't have it, is not the entire-
ty of health care reform,”
Obama said at a town hall
meeting in Grand Junction,
Colo. "This is just one sliver of
it, one aspect of it.”

Lawmakers have discussed
the co-op model for months
although the Democratic lead-
ership and the White House
have said they prefer a gov-
ernment-run option.

Conrad, chairman of the
Senate Budget Committee,
called the argument for a gov-
ernment-run public plan little
more than a "wasted effort."
He added there are enough
votes in the Senate for a coop-
erative plan.

"It's not government-run
and government-controlled,"
he said. "It's membership-run
and membership-controlled.
But it does provide a non-
profit competitor for the for-
profit insurance companies,
and that's why it has appeal
on both sides."

Sen. Richard Shelby, R-
Ala., said Obama's team is
making a political calculation
and embracing the co-op
alternative as "a step away
from the government
takeover of the health care
system” that the GOP has
pummeled.

"T don't know if it will do
everything people want, but
we ought to look at it. I think
it's a far cry from the original
proposals,” he said.

Republicans say a public
option would have unfair
advantages that would drive
private insurers out of busi-
ness. Critics say co-ops would
not be genuine public options
for health insurance.

Rep. Eddie Bernice John-
son, D-Texas, said it would be
difficult to pass any legisla-
tion through the Democratic-
controlled Congress without
the promised public plan.

"We'll have the same num-
ber of people uninsured," she
said. "If the insurance com-
panies wanted to insure these
people now, they'd be
insured."

Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga.,
said the Democrats’ option
would force individuals from
their private plans to a gov-
ernment-run plan, a claim that
the nonpartisan Congression-
al Budget Office supports.

"There is a way to get folks
insured without having the
government option,” he said.

A shift to a cooperative
plan would certainly give
some cover to fiscally conser-
vative Blue Dog Democrats
who are hardly cheering for
the government-run plan.

"The reality is that it takes
60 percent to get this done in
the Senate. It's probably going
to have to be bipartisan in the
Senate, which I think it should
be," said Rep. Mike Ross, D-
Ark., who added that the pro-
posals still need changes
before he can support them.

Obama, writing in Sunday's
New York Times, said politi-
cal maneuvers should be

(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

excluded from the debate.

"In the coming weeks, the
cynics and the naysayers will
continue to exploit fear and
concerns for political gain,"
he wrote. "But for all the
scare tactics out there, what's
truly scary — truly risky — is
the prospect of doing noth-
ing."

Congress’ proposals, how-
ever, seemed likely to strike
end-of-life counseling ses-
sions. Former Alaska Gov.
Sarah Palin has called the ses-
sion "death panels," a label
that has drawn rebuke from
her fellow Republicans as well
as Democrats.

Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah,
declined to criticize Palin's
comments and said Obama
wants to create a government-
run panel to advise what types
of care would be available to
citizens.

"In all honesty, I don't want
a bunch of nameless, faceless
bureaucrats setting health
care for my aged citizens in
Utah," Hatch said.

Sebelius said the end-of-life
proposal was likely to be
dropped from the final bill.

"We wanted to make sure
doctors were reimbursed for
that very important consulta-
tion if family members chose
to make it, and instead it's
been turned into this scare
tactic and probably will be off
the table," she said.

Sebelius spoke on CNN's
"State of the Union” and
ABC's "This Week." Gibbs
appeared on CBS' "Face the
Nation." Conrad and Shelby
appeared on "Fox News Sun-
day.” Johnson, Price and Ross
spoke with "State of the
Union.” Hatch was inter-
viewed on "This Week."

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at wew.cob.edu.by

STAFF VACANCY

Applications are invited [rom suitably qualified persons for the follow-

ing position:

Chef Instructor, Culinary Arts, The Culinary & Hospitality
Management Institute (CHMI)

The successful candidate will be responsible for teaching a variety of
cooking and culinary courses to future Bahamian chefs; providing
assistance for the planning, development and maintenance of pro-
gramme curriculum; recommending and implementing curriculum
improvements; and must adhere to or exceed guidelines for lectures,
demonstrations, and class projects, as outlined in the approved course
outlines and syllabi. Candidates must have mastered culinary funda-
mentals and possess a passion for cooking and teaching.

Applicants should possess a Bachelor degree in Culinary or Hospitality
Management and at least three of the following professional designa-
tions, C.C.E., CCA, C.E.C, or C.M.C., and National Restaurant
Association (NRA) Sanitation Certification (ServSafe®). Individuals
with a minimum of seven years experience in progressive responsibil-

ities and teaching experience will be considered.

For a detailed job description, visit www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply
5 * Interested candidates should submit

a detailed resume and cover letter of interest no later than Monday,
August 31st , 2009.


THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 7B

School lending practices in question

Some for-profit schools are making loans to students, knowing that
many wont be able to pay them back.

Percent distribution of college loan debt, 2007-'08

None
=<$10,000 10. .000-

2-9 999

30,.000-
39,999

AO) CHOnO+ CHART SHOWS the student

debts in relation to their

Bachelor's degree

34

Associate degree

oo

Certificate

a

Overall

MOTE

SOURCE: Departrnent of E

NMurmbers may

4

14

| 20



ducatlion

Some tips
for taking out
student loans

By The Associated Press

AS credit standards for pri-
vate loans have tightened,
some for-profit, or "propri-
etary,” colleges are now lend-
ing money directly to stu-
dents.

Such borrowing may be
worthwhile, but here are
some tips for protecting your-
self on any student loan from
three experts: Deanne Loonin
of the National Consumer
Law Center, Tim Ranzetta of
Student Lending Analytics,
and Mark Kantrowitz of the
Web site finaid.org.

— Fill out the FAFSA form
for government aid, and
always max out on federal
grants and loans before turn-
ing to other sources. Rates

are lower, and the new
income-based repayment plan
offers protections if you expe-
rience financial difficulties or
choose a lower-paying career.

— Be wary of any lender
that refuses to provide infor-
mation on terms and fees.
Make sure you understand
the repayment requirements,
both for while you're in
school and after.

— If possible, apply with a
creditworthy co-signer to
reduce costs.

— Borrow as little as possi-
ble, no matter how much
somebody is willing to offer
you. Depending on rates and
repayment scheules, every
$100 in loans is likely to cost
around $200 by the time you
repay. However, borrowing is
preferable to forcing yourself

to work so many hours while
in school that you fail to grad-
uate.

— Find a school that won't
set you up for failure. Espe-
cially at for-profit colleges,
ask for data about graduation
rates, job placement rates and
average wages. If you're bor-
rowing more than around
$45,000 for a bachelor's
degree, or $25,000 for an asso-
ciate’s degree, think seriously
about finding a cheaper
school.

— A good rule of thumb:
Don't give yourself more total
loan debt than your expect-
ed gross salary the year after
you graduate. Another: Your
total monthly payment on all
student debt shouldn't exceed
eight per cent to 10 per cent
of your monthly salary.

rs
FOR RENT

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Near Central Bank

Renovated Office Space
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Warehouse Space
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degrees earned

20 Bile
sensi
ese I

23

not add up to 100 due to rounding.

NOTICE
CENSUS PRE-TEST

The Census Office of the Department of Statistics will conduct a Pre-Census Test
beginning Monday, August 17 — Sunday, August 30, 2009, in New Providence
and Grand Bahama. The Pre-test is an integral part of the Census of Population
and Housing which takes place in May 2010.

The main focus of this exercise is to test the questionnaire for Census 2010 in
terms of relevancy, as it relates to the census questions, average length of time
it takes to complete the questionnaire, weaknesses in the questions, instructions
or the design of the questionnaire, etc. To this end, enumerators with official
identification will visit households in New Providence and Grand Bahama in
order to collect information on households and individuals. The Census Pre-test
requires that the public provide information on the following:

Housing Characteristics such as type of dwelling, year the dwelling was built,
main source of water supply, number of bedrooms, etc

Population Characteristics which include information on age, sex, marital status,
health, disability, education, income, etc.

The data generated from the Pre-test will be held in strictest confidence.
All persons are urged to co-operate in this very important national exercise.

The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the following
position:

PLUMBER

The Plumber repairs and installs various plumbing systems, fixture,
pumps, piping and related equipment.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

* Completion of secondary school diploma.
* Four years of journeyman level in plumbing.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

¢ Must be skilled in plumbing maintenance.

¢ Must have a valid Bahamian driver’s license and the ability to drive
passenger vehicles, forklift, stake body and pickup trucks with manual
transmission.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation
package including performance-based incentives, medical and
dental insurance, life insurance, pension and opportunities for
training and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are
eligible for employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms can be found on the Embassy’s website
nassau.usembassy.gov under Key Embassy Links and employment

opportunities. Completed applications should be returned to
the Embassy via email to fernanderra@state.gov or faxed to
(242)328-8251, addressed to the Human Resources Office no later
than Thursday August 27th, 2009.


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



UK treasury chief: Banks’
bonus pay must be curbed.

LONDON (AP) —
Britain's treasury chief says
the government is ready to
bring in laws to curb the sort
of big bankers’ bonuses that
helped trigger the global
financial crisis.

Alistair Darling said in
comments published Sunday
he was prepared to legislate,
although he did not specify
any ideas for new laws.

"I'm quite clear that some
of the problems we have

today were caused by the fact
that some traders were incen-
tivized to take risks which nei-
ther they nor their bosses ful-
ly understood," Darling was
quoted as telling the Sunday
Times newspaper. "If we need
to change the law and tough-
en things up, we can do that."
Britain's financial services
watchdog has drawn up new
rules on bankers’ pay, but crit-
ics say they are too weak.
The Financial Services

Authority has outlined a code
to stop bankers from getting
bonuses at high multiples of
their salary or bonuses guar-
anteed for more than a year.
Banks that fail to comply
could face higher capital
charges or other punitive
action.

However, the authority
backed away from imposing
some new restrictions on the
structure of bonus payments
and reduced the range of
financial institutions that the

new code will cover. That
retreat followed industry
warnings that the tougher
measures would cripple Lon-
don's position as a financial
center.

Darling said the new code
"is only part of our approach"
to preventing another bank-
ing crisis.

Despite the global push to
reduce the risk-taking associ-
ated with big bonus pay,
reports suggest that bankers’
bonuses are creeping up

regardless.

The London-based Center
for Economic Business and
Research has forecast bonus
payments by banks will hit
four billion pounds ($6.6 bil-
lion) this year, up from 3.3
billion pounds a year ago.

Darling said citizens were
"rightly concerned," particu-
larly given their newfound
status as shareholders in
nationalized banks. Britain
seized Northern Rock and
took major stakes in Lloyds

and the Royal Bank of Scot-
land after they teetered amid
the global credit squeeze.

"Tam not against bonuses
where you are rewarding
good behavior and long-term
growth. That is something you
should encourage,” Darling
was quoted as saying.

But he warned that banks
must not return to “a situa-
tion where firms actively have
a pay system that results in
them being exposed in a way
that led to ruin."

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ANISEED ENTERPRISES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)














Legal Notice

NOTICE
FILDON PTE. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JANCH LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WEALTH FOUNTAIN LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RISTRETTO ENTERPRISES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LUCKY FORTUNE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
TUNLERTON
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LEEKSDALE INVESTMENTS
PTE. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ARKHALA HOLDINGS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ROCKY DIAMOND
PARK LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
BINGEO VENTURES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ASSOCIATE ATTORNEY

NEEDED

Experience in Litigation,
Conveyancing and
Commercial Law.

Background in Natural

Science preferred but not

required.

Apply by email only.
atty.at.law09 @ gmail.com
THE TRIBUNE



FROM page 1B

from COB it would have
been a far better investment
for the people of the
Bahamas.”

Mr Winder said 60 per cent
of the staff at Deloitte and
Touche went through the
College of the Bahamas,
including the firms two
youngest partners.

He added that a resumé,
with the College of the
Bahamas listed as a past insti-
tution, has more credibility
for his company.

“Investment in the College
of the Bahamas should take
priority over the loan sys-
tem,” said Mr Winder. “Gov-
ernment needs to do a post
analysis.”

According to him, it is
more important to ensure
that COB has the capacity to
educate the majority of the
students seeking a tertiary
education there. He said the
government was right to
abandon the guaranteed loan
programme.

Mr Winder contended that
the loan programme would
never be able to support the
majority, but insisted that the
expansion of COB would
increase the educated popu-
lation substantially by giving
the most students a better
chance at enrolling at the col-
lege.

“Precious investment dol-

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 9B
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Winder: Loan
programme was
a mistake from
the beginning

RAY WINDER

lars in COB will yield a far
greater return if capacity is
enlarged,” he said.

Mr Winder said govern-
ment now needs to out-source
the collection of the out-
standing $30 million in order
to reduce government inter-
ference.

“Individuals should not be

NOTICE

INVITATION TO BID



allowed to complain to the
politicians,” he said.

No politician would have
the ability to say “I know this
one and don't go so hard on
him.”

“We are prepared to sup-
port COB and are fully
behind investment at COB,”
he said.

GREEN TURTLE CAY WATER DISTRIBUTION IMPROVEMENTS — PHASE 2

1. The Water & Sewerage Corporation invites bids from suitably qualified contractors for

the = construction

of the

Green

Ture Cay

Water Distribution

Improvements/Extensions. The Scope of Works include the provision of all labour,
equipment, matenals and other necessary services required for the:-

TRANSMISSION/DISTRIBUTION MAINS

Supply and Installation of approximately 20,000 linear feet of 6-inch, PVC pipe,
6,500 linear feet of 4-lnch PVC pipe, 5000 linear feet of 2-inch PVC water mains,
and 300 no. *%-inch Service Laterals and 5 no. 1-inch service laterals, along with
all associated valves and appurtenances.

Bids from potential contractors must be accompanied by comprehensive details from the
Qualification Questionnaire out-lining:

a} Expenence on similar projects
b} Personnel to be assigned (including their experience on similar projects)
¢) Financial capacity to execute the works

The Contractor's qualifications and bid price will be evaluated for award of Contract.

Bidding documents and drawings wil be available on request beginning Tuesday, ia"
August 2009,from the Engineering & Planning Department of the Water & Sewerage
Corporation for a nominal fee of $100.00 per set. The Pre-Bid Meeting is scheduled for
Tuesday, 25" August 2009 at 10: a.m. af the site.

Completed documents must be returned to the address below, no later than 4:00 p.m, on
Friday 11° September 2009

General Manager

Water & Sewerage Corporation

a? Thompson Blvd.
P.O. Box N-3905
Nassau, Bahamas

Attn: Engineering & Planning Division

Telephone: (242) 302-5512
Facsimile: (242) 302-5538





BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West Bay Street,
P.0.Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas
Tels(242) 327-5780/327-5793-6
Fan:(242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www.bahamasdevelopmentbank,com



New Providence

Vacant bot #147 (10,55 7sq.

ft.)-Munnings Dr & Roy

West Lo Southem Heights

Sub (Appraised Value

$90,000.00)

2. Lot #59 (2500s. fL) whee
1, 104s. f. Blk #35 hoe #o-4-
Lincoln Bled (Appraised
Value $57,790.00)

3. Lat (50°x 100°) whuilding
1,91 2sq, f.-Deveaux St
(Appraised Valoc
$189,000.00)

4. Lats #29 2 #30, (50° 100"),
Blk #47 whuilding |,1-4sq.
ft-Matthew St, Nassau
Village (Appraised Value
$145,000.00)

And

§. Beach front loc 9,0eq, Fe.
wibilding 2,100sq. ft.
Pinders Mangrove Cay
Andros (Appraised Valoc
$200,000.00)

6 Lot 43449, f. widuplex
1,1 745q, f.-Fresh Creek
Andros (Appraised Valoc
$94,640.00)

Grand Bahama

7, Lot#20(17,150sq. ft.)
whee 2,0i0eg. fi. Ble,
Sec #2-Sea Gull Dr,
Bahama Reef Yacht &
Country Chah Sub Cirand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $230,000.00)

8. Wacamnt lot #39, Blk #9
(14,3973q. ft) Yorkshine
Dr, Bahamia West Replat
(Grand Bahama
(Appraised Valoc
$25,000.00)

4 Vacant Lot #8 Blk #12 Una
#3 (11,250sq, ft }-+Henny
Ave Derby Sub Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $65,000.00)

10, Lat Wad B(100'x1307)
building-Nelson Rid
Pomciana Gardens Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $96,000.00)

1, Lot#37 (30's 1")
‘aysixplex 2-stoney
apartment building d&
Church 3,400sq. ft.-Martin
Town, Kings Sub Bight Mile
Rock Grand Bahama
(Appraised Vale
$211,200.00)

—

SUV(s)



(06) Ford Explorer





LSE? Ford LEO00 Boom Track



—

Ei (hha) abole Vaseal wel LE



SE" (D8) Dysco Marine Voserl
eee Dreams) Beam 20°, Depth 6"
Commins Engine

14.

. Lotwl) room botel

5,000sq. fi. on 4,99 acres of
beach fromt-High Pook
Cirand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$1,100,000,00)

- Vacant lot #13, Blk #59,

Unit #3 (22,752sq, #145"
an canal front-Dagenham
Circle & Ingrave Dr
Emerald Bay Swh Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $110,000.00)
Lot #15, Blk ADS Linit 4
(90°x125"}-Derby Sub
Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$23,000.00)

. Vacant Wt e25, Blk els

(17, 866eq. 0. -Cetwater La
Shannon Country Club Sob
Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$34,000.00)

, Lot #2 (20/0005. f.)

wi building complex &
Lawndromat—Queens
Highway Holmes Rock
Commenage Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$178,600.00)

A
Lot #25 (17,7445q, f.)
whee 800ag, fL-47 Queen
Elizabeth Dr Marsh
Harbour Abaco
(Appraised Value
$212,750.00)
Vacant lot 86 (2 acres + Fox
Town Abaco (Appraised
Value $50,000.00)

19, Lot #3) (15,0005q, Ft.)

Pat
bo
'



whuikding-Murphy Town
Abaco (Appraised
Value $102,420.00)
Portion of lot 69 (15, (00sq,
ft.)-Front St WMurpby Town
Abaco (Appraised
Value $29,250.00)

. Loe 855 (6,9008q, M1)

wbuilding-Murphy Town
Abaco (Appraised
Value $82,075.10)

Let #45 (60° 160") wild
room motel 3,900aq. ff.
Sandy Paint Abaco

Assets
Vehicles

Car(s)



Wa! Dodee Strate

Trucks








21" (#74) Seacram Viceal
HP Evinrude Chitboard engine 3/140 10F VWamebs atbeard engine

‘iher Viggo! s — Photog Wot Avalos by
© BO" Coston Shae] Hull Wess] (Piss Eoreaty)

1999 Ford F-250 Track

1987 Double Asda Mack
Phenp Tirerk

Hiewal

aire Tandon Dew bela Traber i
1“.

(Appraised Value
$485, 700,00)

. Lot 87,1 2oeg. Fe wil
comages & | storage
building totaling 4,1B6sq. f-
Sand Banks Tressure Cay
Abeco (Appraised
Value $880,208.00)

ha
hed

24, Vacant portion of lot #7
(30's 110" Weal James
Cistem Eleuthera
(Appraised Value
$18,000.00)

25, Veen 3 acres of laced
situmed Colebrook Street
Dmmore Twn | Hoartacar
Island) Eleuthera

Cat Island

26. Vacant 65 acres of land:
Artvar's Town, Cat [sland

27. Lotwit mom motel 1.9
eeres—Arthue’s Town Cat
Islnd (Appraised Value
$630,000.00)

Exum

23. Vacant lot 88 (64, 20sg. fi.)
hogs Town Exuma
(Appraised Value
$110,188.00)

29. Lot (30,50sq. ft.) wo! small
hotel 4,5 20eap. i,
exclusive beach-Forbes Hill
Exuma (Appraised
Value $1,400, 000,00)

30. Vacant lot #05 (30'n 122")
Commadern: Ri Elizabeth
Harbowr Est. Exuma
(Appraised Value
$45,000.00)

S10. Lat A134 (75'S) een
storey building Geange
Town, Fxuma (Appraised
Value $463,000.00)

Vanis)





ZIG Ford Ranger Truck





S88) Mberglam 5 pons

nel (all Gale)



12" (heap Spaniels Marine
wD3 10P Mercury Dechoard eagle

= 122" Sitegle Screw Soeed Hull (1/960) MAY Lisa J I,
vessel has a mew engine requiring Installation, And

oan be view at Bradford Marine, Grand Bahame

60 (1992) Defender Vessel ()oeen. Vashti)

The public ia invited to submit Seabed bide marked “Tender” to Bahar Development Bank, P.O, Box M-3094,
Micxtill, Hakanée: ablention Financial Contreller, fazed bide will not be accepted or telephone 327-5780 for
additional iaformation Please mete that all bids om the alweermenctioned properties aad assets sheowald be received
by orem August 19, 200%. The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers. All assets

ore sold as is.
THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009, PAGE 11B



afl

bags fly free, but charges for a
third checked bag. JetBlue
charges for the second
checked bag.

JetBlue wants more busi-
ness travelers, as does South-
west, which has tried to lure
them with its "Business
Select" option launched two
years ago. Passengers that pay
a premium can go to the front
of the boarding line. Neither
airline offers business or first
class seats.

JetBlue said in July that
although it has not focused
on courting business travel-
ers in the past, it's landing
more of them in New York
and Boston as companies cut
travel budgets.

Because of their cheap
fares and high customer ser-
vice rankings, both airlines
have legions of loyal travel-
ers. Part of that loyalty can
also be traced to fresh mar-
keting that tries to put some
fun in flying. JetBlue's
tongue-in-cheek ads have
urged executives to get off
their private jets and fly Jet-
Blue. In Southwest TV ads,
CEO Gary Kelly told cus-
tomers "It's On" in New
York.

Both airlines are on
YouTube. Blogs and Twitter
are also important parts of
their brands.

Kelleher and Neeleman no
longer run the airlines they
started. Kelleher, 78, stepped
down as chairman last year,
but he is still under contract
until 2013. Neeleman, 49, runs
Azul Airlines in Brazil — a
venture he started after he
was pushed out of JetBlue in
2007 following the company's
bungled response to a North-
east snowstorm, leaving
130,000 passengers stranded
or delayed.

But the airlines they started
still have the low-cost, pas-
senger-savvy traits of their
founders. Both have flown
farther and lasted longer than

IN THIS July 19, 2005 file photo, a JetBlue Airbus flies over a pair of Southwest Airlines’ jets from Bob Hope
Airport in Burbank, Calif., bound for New York's JFK airport. After years of following similar game plans
to lure passengers with fares that are a cut below and customer service that's a cut above, JetBlue and
Southwest are going head-to-head in major Northeast markets...

some of their larger competi-
tors. Platt thinks the big air-
lines may have something to
worry about now in Boston
— and JetBlue will have to
ramp up its game, too.
"Boston has really been a
two-horse town with (two
major carriers dominating ser-
vice there)," he said. "Just the
mere presence (of another
low-cost carrier) is going to
change the landscape."

(AP Photo: Reed Saxon)

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Visit our website at weew.cob,edurbs
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Visit our website at www.cob.edu.ts

STAFF VACANCY

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the follow-
Ing position:

Library Associate Il, who will be responsible for assisting with the
daily operations of The College of The Bahamas Law Library, directing
the activities of library assistants and part-time staff members and assist-
ing with their training and appraisal. This position requires a highly
motivated, tactful, people-fnendly, innovative and detail-oriented pro-
fessional able to deal efficiently with students and faculty of the LL.B
Programme, as well as members of the legal profession and the general
public,

Specific duties and responsibilities include, but are not Inmited to, prepa-
ration of written and oral reports/correspondence, planning and organiz-
ing job activities, overseeing the maintenance of collections and partici-
pation in the development of policies, services and programmes.

Applicants should possess a Bachelor's degree or the equivalent in rele-
vant area OR for a technical/vocational or craft area, satisfactory com-
pletion of a recognized or acceptable programme of training, AND have
at least ten (10) years of experience working in the craft area, OR have
a trained Teacher's Certificate with specialization in the relevant craft
area, PLUS at least six (6) years of teaching experience in that area.

For a detailed job description, visit www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply
Interested candidates should submit a detailed resume and cover letter of
interest no later than Friday, August 28th, 2()9.


MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009

'y







The stories behind the news

SIGHT



‘Real tal’ on marital rape

By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

disturbing window is

opening into the

minds of Bahamians

who oppose the

amendment to the
Sexual Offences Act which would
totally ban marital rape in the
Bahamas.

It appears that men who balk at
the idea believe that it is acceptable
to force themselves on wives unwill-
ing or unable to have sex. It seems
they are willing to abandon the tra-
ditional role of husbands as protec-
tor and provider and don the mantle
of predator.

Women who oppose this amend-
ment either believe that being raped
is an acceptable aspect of married
life, an inevitability, like having to
complain about your husband drop-
ping his shirt onto the bedroom floor
after he comes home from work or
believe that they have no right to
their own feelings as it relates to
their sexual or reproductive life.

This is what it boils down to.
There are no nuances. There are no
shades of grey. There is no room left
for interpretation. The bill seeks to
give married women the same rights
as their single counterparts, the abil-
ity to see their rapist brought to jus-
tice even if he is the man she mar-
ried.

Those who oppose this bill believe
that if he so chooses, a man should
be able to "take sex", by force if
need be, from the "bone of his bone
and flesh of his flesh." I will through-
out this article refer to opponents
of this bill as proponents of marital
rape because like people of my gen-
eration say, "That's real talk."

It's been disheartening listening
to radio shows over the past few
weeks as the debate on this bill con-
tinues. Our men have come across as
brutes and our women steeped in a
victimology that is inexplicable in
this modern age. People have
butchered, misinterpreted and mis-
quoted the Bible to, as they see it,
defend the right of a man to his
wife's body. Even the radio show
hosts, who should know better,
defend would be rapists and postu-
late that the bill is being pushed by a
cabal of vindictive women or a hid-
den homosexual agenda.

I was also disappointed listening to
the recent Senate contribution that
Allyson Maynard Gibson made on
this matter. After listing what she
described as “black and white or
clearly defined areas about which
there is little or no disagreement”
where it would be obvious that a
man has raped his wife, like doping,
drugging, threatening her at gun-
point or beating her to have sex,
etcetera, she suggested that "con-
cerns arise when we are confronted
with the tremendous grey areas that
inevitably exist in the context of a
marriage."

The good senator suggests that
these grey areas may include
whether the wife was really saying
no, whether the husband was forcing
or trying to convince his wife to have
sex. She also asserts that there
should be consideration as to what
was the wife’s motive for making the
allegation of rape against her hus-
band. The amendment, she says,
should also take into consideration
the children and who will support
the family if the husband is sent to
jail.



A MAN SHOULD BE protector, provider, a nurturer, loving and a lover. You cannot love or be loved through force, contempt,

or through violence...

One can only assume Mrs May-
nard-Gibson was playing the role of
devil's advocate because the answers
to these questions are quite direct
and (as I said before) there are no
shades of grey.

First of all we will rightly assume
that in the case of marital rape it
will be the wife making the com-
plaint to the police so regardless of
what the husband thinks, the wife
knows if she was "really saying no."

She also will be painfully aware
of whether she was being "con-
vinced" or "forced" into having sex.
As for the motivation behind the
wife making the allegation in the
first place, as with rape cases involv-
ing people who are not married, it is
up to the courts to make that deter-
mination.

As for the children and who will
support the family if the husband is
sent to jail, surely these are matters
the man should consider before he
commits such a heinous act. These
should not be hindrances to a vic-
tim making a complaint. Rape laws,
which Mrs Maynard-Gibson
marched and fought to see enforced
in this country, exist for the victims
of rape and do not nor should not
include consideration for any other
party.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson is a suc-
cessful, well educated and promi-
nent Bahamian woman. There are
many women in our society would
be happy to be as blessed as she is.

$ SUZUKI

UE ere a en

Grand Vitara features:
Ce Sete emir ed
am RAR a a

Women in her position should take
care not to offer proponents of mar-
ital rape any excuse, which they have
done over this past week, to say "see
even a woman of no less esteem than
Allyson Maynard-Gibson has had
reason to question this amendment."

In the Bahamas marital rape can
only be recognised if the couple is
separated or in the process of getting
a divorce. If they are married and
there has been no separation,
spousal rape cannot occur under
Bahamian law.

One of the more persistent objec-
tions to the proposed amendment is
the idea that removing the ability of
aman to rape his wife would severe-
ly damage the institution of mar-
riage in the Bahamas.

Those stupid enough to make this
argument chose to ignore the fact
that the rape itself is severely dam-
aging to the institution of marriage.

In a "Your Say" published in this
newspaper on Wednesday, August
12, a writer by the name of "E.V"
suggested that the amendment
would destroy the family, because
it would force a man to sweetheart
or look for satisfaction elsewhere.

"When this happens and the
woman files for a divorce on the
grounds that the man was 'sweet-
hearting’, the courts would not con-
sider that it was the woman who ini-
tiated the whole thing by using her
body as a weapon and depriving her
husband of his rights. This same man

The best-value compact

then has to pay alimony and other
expenses. Why? Because he simply
wanted to have sex with the woman
God gave him to have sex with."

This argument is so ignorant,
backward, demonic and ridiculous
that if it were not repeated so many
times and by so many different peo-
ple it would hardly warrant a
response.

If the alternative to raping the
mother of your children is "seeking
satisfaction elsewhere" I hardly see
a problem. But there are more mea-
sured and intelligent solutions. If a
husband is sexually frustrated in his
marriage he can suggest counselling,
or perhaps talk to his wife and ask
her why she no longer seems inter-
ested in having sex. Even a trip to
her personal physician may be in
order.

In any event, in the "Your Say”
E.V. presents himself as one seeking
to preserve manhood. However,
E.V. wasn't man enough to have his
name printed which leads me to
respect his opinion even less.

Former president of the Bar Asso-
ciation, Wayne Munroe while he was
a panelist on Star 106.5’s talk Show
Generation X suggested that the
amendment would be abused by vin-
dictive Bahamian women, who, he
seems to suggest, are widespread
through the country.

Mr Munroe was quoted in anoth-
er daily as saying: “The problem that
this creates is this: All you need is for

there to be dysfunction in a house-
hold and a woman to be upset at a
man — and rape does not require
any trauma — and she calls the
police and says my husband raped
me. You would be arrested and you
would be the subject of domestic
orders. And it will be your word
against hers as to whether she said
‘hoa,

Amendment or no amendment, if
your marriage is so bad that forcing
yourself on your wife is the only way
you can have sex with her, you need
to get a divorce. Also, if your wife is
so vindictive that having sex with
her feels like playing a game of Russ-
ian roulette because you don’t know
when she’ll decide to unjustly accuse
you of rape, you need to get a
divorce.

Nothing is more damaging to the
institution of marriage than two peo-
ple who no longer want to be or who
have no business being together, liv-
ing in a tumultuous household cre-
ating a poisonous environment for
them and their children.

Barrington Brennen, who has
been a marriage and family thera-
pist for the past 15 years has been
agitating for a law like this for over a
decade.

He told The Tribune that unfor-
tunately the response to the pro-
posed amendment is revealing a
deep seated belief that women are
still property.

He pointed out that it is religious
rather than secular people who have
the biggest problem with this amend-
ment. These people Mr Brennen
said, resort to misusing scripture in
order to "brain wash" those who are
ignorant.

He highlighted the case of a
Bahamian woman who, after under-
going a painful surgical procedure
told her husband she was unable to
have sex.

This woman's husband forced
himself on her and through his wife's
pain, pleading and tears completed
the sexual act.

Opposition or support for this act
will not divide homes, but will sepa-
rate real Bahamian men from the
animals they may call brothers,
fathers, uncles, cousins and friends.

I have a very “traditional” view
of manhood which may become
even more “traditional” if I'm lucky
enough to be a father one day.

A man should be protector,
provider, a nurturer, loving and a
lover. You cannot love or be loved
through force, through contempt, or
through violence.

I sincerely hope that the public
debate on this bill is simply just some
social experiment or maybe even a
political distraction and the govern-
ment will have this legislation passed
regardless of the nonsense out there.
They have a moral and humanitari-
an obligation to do so.

If they fail to do this it will cer-
tainly be unforgivable and Bahami-
an women and all true Bahamian
men who love their women should
remind them harshly of their failure
in 2012.

Not passing this bill will mean that
men will be able to be punished for
raping acquaintances, relatives, girl-
friends, prostitutes, strippers and
strangers, but not their wives.

It is funny how these men, and I
use the term in the loosest sense of
the word, believe that a complete
stranger or prostitute should have
more rights than the women they
swore before God to love and cher-
ish until death.

er ;

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#1 ALTO DEALER IM THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 + 325-3079

Witt diet detec at Quality Ate Saleg (Freapeert) Led bor dinder decd a, Quewes Mp, 152-6157
soe Alesis Marte: Mel Dror bea: llery Bbeed eh? 291

* Anti-lock brakes

See Bhar |
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* CD changer
* Alloy wheels

ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING