Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
Pim blowin’ it

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Volume: 105 No.217

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By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

A TEACHER was taken
into custody for questioning
yesterday in connection with
the alleged molestation of a 12-
year-old girl at Jack Hayward
High School.

Asst Supt Emrick Seymour
confirmed that a male teacher
was taken into custody by
police in connection with com-

a3

90F
83F

CLOUDY WITH



plaints of alleged molestation
of a student.

The teacher is now the fourth
teacher in the public school sys-
tem here on Grand Bahama
accused of child molestation.

The Tribune contacted the
Ministry of Education in
Freeport to find out the status
of the teacher, however,
Hezekiah Dean, School Super-
intendent, was out of office on

SEE page eight

Doctors suspected of penning ‘fake
Sick notes’ for nurses may face action

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

EIGHT medical doctors, some of whom are
suspected of penning “in excess of 50 fake”
sick notes for protesting nurses, may now be
subject to disciplinary action from the Bahamas
Medical Council and/or legal action from Gov-
ernment, The Tribune has confirmed.

Health Minister Dr Hubert Minnis said gov-
ernment has forwarded information it has gath-
ered with respect to the “eight or nine” physi-
cians along with “several medical centres” that

SEE page eight

Dr Hubert Minnis

\y 3



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009

Ss
a

OMS pf
BAHAMAS BIGGEST

leacier bi N.:
GHG SEX fIrobe

Fourth school
official to face
abuse allegations

event.



ata

MISS PANAMA Diana Broce was
announced last night as the winner of
the Miss Universe national costume



BAHAMAS TRACK NEWS

©USA TODAY.



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Man and woman
quizzed over
mother’s killing

By TANEKA THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A MAN and a woman were being quizzed by police
last night in connection with the brutal killing of moth-
er-of-two TaGia Soles-Armony.

The pair were detained by murder squad officers on
Wednesday and are being questioned at the Central
Detective Unit on Thompson Boulevard.

Police press officer Assistant Superintendant Wal-

SEE page seven

eS NOTA eS eU



Miss Panama is pictured (right) at
the Sheraton Nassau Beach Hotel last
night, where the Miss Universe con-
testants attended the State Gift Auc-
tion Dinner.

Pictured above is Miss Panama in
her costume on stage at the Rain-
forest Theatre at the Wyndham
Resort during Monday’s national cos-

tume event.



Claim that police let illegal
Haitian go after being bribed

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A HAITIAN living in the
Bahamas illegally was
allegedy picked up by police
in the Carmichael Road area,
but let go after the police-
man accepted a bribe,
according to a source.

The man was with another
Haitian when they were
stopped by police at around
10pm on Tuesday. Police let
one of the men go when they
saw he had the necessary
paperwork allowing him to
live and work in the country
legally.

But when they saw that
the second man did not have

any papers he was taken in
the police car and offered his
freedom in exchange for a
bribe.

A source told The Tribune
how the man arranged for
someone to pay the bribe,
and asked them to meet him

SEE page seven



Former officer whose
girlfriend was raped
criticises the police

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A FORMER police officer
whose girlfriend was raped in
her home suspects she was
attacked by a serial rapist and
has criticised police for not warn-
ing vulnerable women.

Police have launched an inves-
tigation after a trend of at least
two rapes and two attempted
rapes in eastern New Providence
since March.

But senior officers have said
little to warn the public about
the possibility of a serial rapist
who attacks women at home
alone between 3am and 6am.

The 36-year-old girlfriend of
the former police officer was
alone at her home in Yellow
Elder, off the East West High-
way in central New Providence,
when two intruders broke in at
around 3am on Sunday.

The men burst into her room
as she was sleeping and threat-
ened her with a knife, her

SEE page seven

Pastor hits back
at claims over
Crown land deal

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

GOLDEN Gates Assembly’s
pastor denied claims he profited
from an underhand land deal that
reports suggest could have netted
him substantial sums of money
when the Crown land, granted by
government, was later turned into
a “low cost” housing sub-division.

Speaking with The Tribune yes-
terday following its series of exclu-
sive articles on Crown land, Bish-
op Ross Davis said he could not
do any subdivision by himself as
government’s approval was
required.

“The government gave us per-
mission, the church agreed to use
the land we bought from the gov-
ernment and so it ended there.

SEE page seven

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS? LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009



LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



MISS UNIVERSE

SHOVW HIGHLIGHTS BAHAMIAN
DESIGNS AND FABRICS



PHOTOS FEL

VIBRANT colours, exquis-
ite prints and beauty took
centre stage at the Miss Uni-
verse 2009 Bahamian Design-
er Fabric Fashion Show held
Wednesday night at the Sher-
aton Nassau Beach Resort.

All 84 contestants got to
show off gorgeous creations
by three of the country’s most





PE MAJOR/TRIBUN





renowned designers on a
world class runway in front
of hundreds of local and
international guests.
Designers Basheva Eve of
La Maison de Besh, Sabrina
Francis of Se’B Fashion
Designing and Rachel Turn-
quest-Garcia of Rachel’s
Boutique took the organic



E STAFF

100 per cent uniquely
Bahamian fabrics —
Androsia, a batik fabric made
through a dye and wax
process, and Bahama Hand-
prints, a hand-printed fabric
produced through the tradi-
tional silk-screening tech-
nique — and used them to
create one-of-a-kind pieces.














MISS MEXICO Karla Carrillo

























ABOVE LEFT: Miss Colombia
Michelle Rouillard.
4 io ih. ABOVE RIGHT: Miss Costa
Rica Jessica Umana

THIS morning the 84
beauties of the Miss
Universe 2009 competi-
tion get a chance to
show off their best pos-
es when they gather for
the traditional swimsuit
photo shoot at Atlantis,
Paradise Island.

The shoot will take
place in the lobby of the
Royal Towers at 6am.

Later tonight the con-
testants will be able to
unwind during the VIP
party at Cain Pool, The
Cove, Atlantis.

Cee

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd

Congratulations

to an intelligent , young lady

¢ SEE PAGE 13

MISS PANAMA Diana Broce MISS EGYPT Elham Wagdi



For passing all (6) of her B,.C’s and for
achieving the Sand Dollar and Fonders
Award from Deep Creek (Eleuthera)
Middle School. Also for being accepted to
Garrison Forest Schoal in Baltimore
Marviand. We are praying for vou and
we know God will continuously bless
and protect you.

MISS CANADA Mariana Valente

els

q | gS me -_
KSFinger
3 r meet

, TROPICAL
G> ickin ue ss
” oon Peta
, 1 ea

We-Love Youwfromu Your parenty
Leroy and Curlene Taylor,
Founily and Friends





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



oe |
eyeing new
‘impressive’
weather system

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter

alowe @tribunemedia.net

STORMY activity
over Hispaniola yes-
terday was expected to
bring wind and rain to
New Providence by
late this afternoon or
early Saturday, accord-
ing to meteorologists.

Meanwhile, a mid-
Atlantic weather sys-
tem which forecasters
had been eyeing weak-
ened from a tropical
depression to a tropi-
cal wave, but in its
wake an “impressive”
new weather system
looks set to strengthen
into a tropical depres-
sion shortly.

That makes three
systems brewing in the

Atlantic for forecasters
to watch. By next week }

there may be three
named Atlantic basin
systems - Ana, Bill and
Claudette, according
to the United States
based AccuWeather.
Both the mid-
Atlantic wave and the
system following
behind it are projected
to head in the general
direction of the
Bahamas over the next
couple of days,
although it is too early
to say whether they
will affect us directly.
The front-running
system which was over
Hispaniola and the
Eastern Caribbean sea
yesterday brought
clouds to the south
eastern Bahamas dur-
ing the afternoon, and
was set to bring rain
and winds of around
15mph to 25mph in the
evening, ahead of its
anticipated impact on
the central and north-
ern Bahamas today.
Chief Meteorologist

Basil Dean said that by

later today and into
Saturday, the central
and northern Bahamas
is expected to get rain
and winds of between
15mph and 20mph.

Mr Dean added that
the most recent weath-
er system to come off
the West African coast
“looks impressive and
could possibly form
into something, but
will take a little
while.”

The system was
located around 250
miles south of the
Cape Verde Islands
yesterday afternoon.

“Tt just came off the
coast today. Once over
warm water things
could start to develop
quite rapidly once
upper level conditions
are favourable,” he
said.

American —
(rowns on
diving trip

AN AMERICAN
drowned while on a diving
trip with his father near
Abaco, police said.

Eric Searcy, a 28-year-
old resident of Florida
was on a 24-foot vessel on
a diving trip near Scotland
Cay, Abaco around
6.30pm on Wednesday.

According to police,
Eric went into the water
and was not seen again.

His father dove into the
water and found his son in
a "motionless state,” press
liaison officer Chief Supt
Walter Evans said.

"The victim was
retrieved and attempts
were made to administer
CPR to no avail. Eric was
taken to the local clinic
where he was pronounced
dead.”

Police suspect that the
victim drowned. Howev-
er, an autopsy will be per-
formed to confirm the
exact cause of death.

- Officer accused of raping
teen still being questioned

POLICE yesterday were
still questioning an officer
who is accused of raping a 15-
year-old girl while in custody
at the Central Police station
earlier this week.

According to officer-in-
charge of the Central Police
Station Glenn Miller, the
alleged victim had been
turned over to the station by
relatives who "rendered her
uncontrollable.”

She was slated to be trans-
ferred to the Williemae Pratt
Centre for Girls, but while in
custody on Tuesday night she
was allegedly sexually assault-

ed by an officer at the Central
Police Station, police said.

Chief Supt Miller said once
the complaint was filed at his
station, the case was imme-
diately turned over to the
Central Detective Unit
(CDU).

"The allegations that the
teen was sexually assaulted
were made at Central
through my inspector and we
immediately alerted the Cen-
tral Detective Unit," he told
The Tribune yesterday.

The officer was taken into
custody early Wednesday and
up to press time last night was

still being questioned at
CDU.

Officials yesterday said a
decision would be made
today on whether the officer
would be charged or released
from custody.

Allegations

Police would not comment
when asked if there was phys-
ical evidence to support the
sexual assault allegations.

"The officer is still here
being questioned.

“At this (point) investiga-
tions are still continuing.

“T don't know where the
investigation is going to take
us at this stage - if there is
evidence (to support the alle-
gation) the recommendation
will be sent to have him
charged," head of the CDU
Supt Elsworth Moss said.

The teenager is currently
in protective custody, Mr
Moss added.

Whether or not the officer
will be suspended from duty
will depend on the outcome
of the police investigation.

"He is in custody, the
investigation is ongoing, and
we haven't arrived at any out-

come as yet.

“We have to see what the
investigation will reveal, there
will be a lot of decisions, we
have to get there,” Commis-
sioner of Police Reginald Fer-
guson told The Tribune.

Shift

According to police,
between three to six officers
are usually present at a police
station during a normal shift.

However, police yesterday
could not say how many offi-
cers were at the station when

the alleged offence occurred.

Mother of premature bally hacks ‘Breathe Easy’ campaign

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A NEW mother whose son was
born three months early has pledged
her support for the ‘Breathe Easy’
campaign to provide Princess Mar-
garet Hospital’s Neonatal Intensive
Care Unit with new ventilator
machines.

Lori Burrows, 22, of Exuma, gave
birth to her son Loren on July 13,
only 25 weeks after conception, and
he is currently being kept alive on a
state-of-the-art Puritan Bennett ven-
tilator system — the kind Breathe
Easy wants to raise $300,000 to pur-
chase.

At first the tiny baby was placed
on one of the standard ventilators
used at Princess Margaret Hospital,
but when the out-dated machine failed
to produce enough pressure to pump
oxygen to his tiny lungs he was trans-
ferred to the new ventilator currently
on loan to the hospital.

In his short life, young Loren has
suffered from a stroke, blood infec-
tion, chest infection, excess fluid in
his lungs, and he has an open heart
valve which may need an operation.

He is not able to breathe on his
own.

As well as supplying sufficient oxy-
gen, the more sensitive ventilator has
an alarm function to alert nurses if



DR CARLOS THOMAS with baby Loren on the Puritan Bennett 840 ventilator
system in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Princess Margaret Hospital.

the infant has complications.

A nurse in the Neonatal Intensive
Care Unit said the equipment is vital
to care for the premature babies com-
monly born at PMH.

Ms Burrows said: “The doctors and
nurses explained how (my son) need-
ed it because the others aren’t up to
the standard he needs, and since he
has gone on it he has got much better.

“T am very grateful because if he
didn’t have it he wouldn’t be at the
level he is at now.

“He is not able to breathe on his

KEVIN FERGUSON presents a cheque of $5,000 to Princess Margaret Hospital communications officer

Thelma Rolle as part of the effort to raise $300,000 for new ventilator machines.

Tile King donates
$5,000 to campaign

own, but he is active. He moves
around and looks around, he’s alert,
and he’s perfect to me. My baby is
going to be just fine, he is just taking
his own time.”

Ms Burrows started going into ear-
ly labour on June 29 and was rushed
to Nassau where she received stitches
to stave off a premature birth.

But determined young Loren was
born two weeks later, nearly three
months before his due date, and the
day his mother had intended to return
home to Exuma.

TILE King Enterprises has
kicked off the Breathe Easy
Bahamas fund raising campaign
with a $5,000 donation made in
the name of the late Jesseken
Ferguson.

The campaign was launched
Wednesday to raise $300,000
for ventilators for the Princess
Margaret Hospital.

The donation will go
towards state-of-the-art venti-
lators for adults in the Oncolo-
gy Ward and babies in the
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
who require assisted breathing.

The Builder’s Mall, Tile
King, Doctor’s Hospital, The
Tribune Media, The Rotary
Club of East Nassau and
Bahamas Realty are also
behind the drive to raise
$300,000.

Presenting the cheque on
behalf of the Ferguson family
yesterday was his brother Kevin
Ferguson. Nickita Prescod

eee me Be
Iba eT aL
fea OU)

Pe ete
322-2157



(right) represented Tile King
at the presentation. Thelma
Rolle accepted the cheque on
behalf of the Princess Margaret
Hospital Foundation.

“This cheque,” said Ms
Rolle, “will go a long way
towards the purchase of life-

giving ventilating machines for
the Oncology Ward of the
Princess Margaret Hospital.

“We also accept this gener-
ous donation in the name of
Jesse and thank the family and
extend our prayers to them,”
she said.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Sports

BUSINESS SECTION

E hee 0,0, Goole

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

She is now staying with family in
Nassau and spending every day at her
son’s side. As she celebrated his 31st-
day birthday yesterday, she counted
her blessings.

The young mother said: “The doc-
tors and nurses have all been absolute-
ly wonderful to me, they take very
good care of him, and if there’s a
problem they will let me know, but
they won’t kill your hopes. I have seen
babies go down and they come run-
ning and if they lose a baby they feel
it.

“T am so grateful for this ventilator
because if Loren didn’t have it he
might not be here today. Some babies
are born at 23 or 24 weeks, and they
would absolutely not survive on those
old ventilators, they would need this
from birth.

“Every day a new baby comes in
premature, and it’s about time our
healthcare system got on par with
everybody else,” she said.

The Breathe Easy campaign has
been organised by Builder’s Mall,
Tile King, Tribune Media, Doctor’s
Hospital, The Rotary Club of East
Nassau, and Bahamas Realty, who
have already committed $20,000 to
the project.

To make a donation, please con-
tact The Tribune or Mark Roberts at
FYP on Wulff Road. Cheques should
be made payable to the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital Foundation.



EFFECTIVE AUGUST 14TH, 2009

STRICT 8





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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Senator should recall his PLP plan

WE FIND Senator Jerome Fitzgerald’s
comment most amusing that if Government
were to go ahead with the transfer of Bay
Street’s port to Arawak Cay it would deval-
ue all nearby properties.

The Senator is probably too young to
remember that it was his own party after it
became the government in 1967 that suc-
ceeded in destroying the value of this whole
area well into exclusive Cable Beach. That
was 42 years ago. So what’s the good senator
bleating about now?

Shortly after it came to power the PLP
had its own plans to move the port terminal
from Bay Street to what is now Arawak Cay.

You know when one lives long enough,
life can really be amusing — especially to see
a Johnny-come-lately tripping over his own
history.

Kelly Island — now Arawak Cay — rose
from the sea with the fill dredged from Nas-
sau’s harbour early in 1966. The Kelly Island
project was started under the UBP admin-
istration when the Maritime Minister was
the late Trevor Kelly — the man after whom
the island was named.

That year the UBP was rushing to have 25
acres of the eastern end of Kelly Island com-
pleted so that construction could be started
on a first class hotel by November 1, 1966.
Holiday Inn was to be the first of several
hotels planned for the island.

However, in September Hurricane Faith
threatened to slow the project when sand
dredged up started to slip back into the sea
from the impact of the high waves washing
over the island.

By that time only 500 feet of the 3,000-foot
western breakwater had been completed.

Early the next year the PLP by a narrow
margin removed the UBP from the seat of
government. Kelly Island was caught in lim-
bo.

After spending what seemed an inter-
minably long time squabbling among them-
selves as to who was to get a ministerial post
before they could form a functioning gov-
ernment, the PLP eventually settled down to
look at the job at hand.

Of course, at that time in our history any-
thing to do with the UBP was the “kiss of
death” and had to go.

And so the name Kelly Island was the
first name earmarked for removal. A school
competition was held for the renaming of
the island, and Arawak Cay was the name
that won the competition.

The situation then got racial. The
landowners in the Cable Beach area who
would be directly affected by the future use
of Kelly Island became concerned.

When a two-storey cargo terminal started
to be erected on the eastern end of the island
— the area earmarked for the Holiday Inn
— residents were convinced that a black
government was deliberately trying to deval-
ue their properties. It is true that the area

Quality Auto Sales
PRE-OWNED CARS & TRUCKS

Trade-ins on

around what was by then Arawak Cay quick-
ly lost its charm and several property owners
quietly moved out.

It was announced at the time that the
terminal, which would take nine months to
build, would provide office space upstairs
and cargo storage facilities on the ground
floor.

It was reported that the surplus cargo
from Prince George Dock would be stored at
Arawak Cay and that the Customs Depart-
ment would be transferred to office space
upstairs. Already Prince George had started
to move to Arawak and a new port was in
the making.

But there was a lot of dithering as though
no one quite knew what to do once the mon-
strous steel shed was completed. It was
uncertain whether the PLP government
would proceed with its plans to transfer all
freight activity to Arawak Cay. In those
days there was no talk of environment
impact assessment studies — the PLP just
put down pilings wherever and whenever
the spirit moved them.

Former Communications Minister Arthur
Foulkes — now Sir Arthur — had advocat-
ed a separation of freight and passenger
activity at Prince George to alleviate the
congestion at the dockside and on Bay
Street.

At the time Mr Foulkes pointed out that
there were several considerations motivating
the decision to move the terminal to Arawak
Cay.

He anticipated that with the harbour com-
pleted, there would be a great increase in
freight activity requiring additional sheds
and facilities for containerized cargo and a
roll-on roll-off service.

Adding to this was the problem created by
an increasing number of tourists landing
directly in Nassau from cruise ships at the
pier.

Today the argument for transfer from Bay
Street to Arawak has not changed.

In the end the customs shed remained a
crumbling eyesore, and quietly a shipping
port grew up at Arawak Cay. Other than
let it crumble into disrepair, the PLP gov-
ernment did nothing more constructive with
the cay.

Today Senator Fitzgerald also complains
that the transfer of the port to Arawak Cay
will kill Arawak’s fish fry business. Quite
the contrary.

These small business persons should be
delighted — any busy port will bring an
increase in business.

As for the argument about Saunders
Beach, we think the removal of the scenic
casuarina trees from the area will do more
harm to the beauty of Saunders Beach than
the port being transferred to Arawak Cay.

Quite frankly, Senator Fitzgerald, we
think you are creating a lot of hot air from
atop a shaky wicket.



Education
debate: the
first step to

improvement

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It's delightful to read all
the talk about our education-
al woes and I applaud Mr.
Carl Bethel, Minister of Edu-
cation for at least openly dis-
cussing the dismal exam
results of our children.

That's a giant first step for a
politician in my not so humble
opinion, and just might start
paving the way for the edu-
cation department and teach-
ers to realise their responsi-
bility in this process.

Back in 1999, I was taken
to task for advocating vouch-
ers and privatisation of our
school system by statists and
teachers alike, who, in spite
of the evidence of decades
before them, they continue to
believe that the government
can move the educational sys-
tem in the right direction.

The same applies to some-
one calling himself "Simon"
who recently wrote in his col-
umn in The Nassau Guardian
that:

"..too many parents shun
their basic obligations to
review homework, turn off the
television and fill their homes
with books rather than digital
games, resulting in lacklustre
graduation rates and scores of
school-leavers who are basi-
cally illiterate and innumer-
ate."

This is a cop out. We know
this has been the case for
twenty-five years or more
now, as a result of our single
parent homes, and the edu-
cational system has not adapt-
ed.

A sad commentary for the
body responsible for provid-
ing education for the vast

letters@triobunemedia.net



majority of Bahamian chil-
dren. I'm no behavioural sci-
entist, but maybe if a genera-
tion or two get the education
they deserve they might be
better at parenting?

"Simon" goes on to say:

"Meanwhile, those bedaz-
zled by the type of school
vouchers debated in the U.S.
may wish to draw their star-
spangled gaze home, recog-
nizing how their fervent
desires, sustained by succes-
sive governments, are closer
than imagined."

"Grant-in-aid is our tax
dollars subsidizing our chil-
dren’s education in non-state
schools, a practice prohibited
in the U.S. school system.
Another name for grant-in-
aid: vouchers!"

I must admit to being
bedazzled by the prospect of
vouchers, because the status
quo is dealing our children a
lousy hand.

But to suggest that grant-
in-aid is a voucher pro-
gramme is simply misleading.

IT am not aware of current
numbers, but if my failing
memory serves me well, sev-
eral years back, private
schools received something
like $250,000 per annum from
the Government in grant-in-
aid. This is hardly a voucher
system.

As I'm sure "Simon"
knows, a voucher system, in
simple terms, is where the
government determines the
cost per student in the state

system, and gives parents a
cheque payable to the school
of their choice so their chil-
dren might receive a better
education if their neighbour-
hood school is failing them.

This might mean that par-
ents who choose to accept the
voucher will have to pay a lit-
tle more out of pocket to send
their child to a private school,
because they know that suc-
cess comes from sacrifice.

"Simon", confirming his
statist views, also points to the
"needs of smaller island com-
munities in our far-flung arch-
tpelago,” as if local leadership
in our family islands are inca-
pable of ensuring children
receive a sound education. It
happened before government
took the educational system
over, and it can happen again.

If the private sector were
providing educational services
like the state run system, peo-
ple would be screaming from
the roof tops about the need
to pass a law to ensure the
private system is made
accountable. So why do we
not hear the same cry from
"Simon" and his comrades in
the case of our government
run schools?

Keep the information com-
ing Mr. Bethel, the first step
to improvement is admitting
you have a problem.

Besides, I think you know
that future generations of
Bahamians deserve better.

Yours in Liberty,

RICK LOWE
www.weblogbahamas.com
August 12, 2009.

Miss Bahamas deserves our 100 per cent support

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I agree with Miss Bahamas’ family. Ever
since winning the Miss Bahamas pageant in
May, she has been subjected to the cruelest
form of ridicule and attack that I can remem-
ber in Bahamian pageant history.

This is truly very sad. The nasty attacks
made against her online by rumours, lies, innu-
endoes and photographs in so many of the
forums have been nothing short of disgraceful;
we should be ashamed as a nation.

And to think that it would even continue
while the Miss Universe pageant is actually

going on here in our country.

or the National Miss Universe franchise hold-
er. I think anyone with any common sense

any event.

body.

cent.

would know that while she is a contestant in
the Miss Universe pageant, she does not
choose whether, where and when she goes to

Yes she deserves our support 100 per cent
but it seems like in our country we just can’t
seem to get over the problem of only “Mr or
Mrs so-and-so’s” children deserve to be any-

My family supports Miss Sherman 100 per

Another ghetto family that has succeeded.

I must admit that I was also surprised that

your newspaper would carry a story com-
plaining about her not being at the airport
without even trying to get a statement from her

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Baliamas ant
Egypt seek ties
in education
and technology

By LINDSAY THOMPSON :

THE Bahamas wants
closer ties in education, the
arts, and technology with
the Arab Republic of
Egypt, Governor-General
Arthur Hanna said.

He expressed that desire
as he accepted Letters of
Credence from Tarek
Elwassimy, Non-Resident
Ambassador of the Arab
Republic of Egypt, during a
ceremony at Government
House yesterday.

“Egypt and the Bahamas
have indeed shared close
and cordial relations in
membership in major inter-
national organisations,
including those devoted to
maximising the sovereignty
of developing countries
such as the Non-Aligned
Movement and the Group
of 77 and China,” the Gov-
ernor General said.

“The Bahamas looks for-
ward to continued excellent
relations with Egypt in
these global fora, and bilat-
erally,” he added.

In this regard, the
Bahamas hopes that recip-
rocal support will be con-
firmed for the international
candidatures to which both
countries aspire: The Eco-
nomic and Social Council of
the United Nations, the
International Maritime
Organisation, and the Unit-
ed Nations Educational,
Scientific and Cultural
Organisation.

He recalled the “unique
contribution” of Egypt to
civilisation.

Ambassador Elwassimy,
45, said he was pleased to
have been appointed by
President Mohamed Hosny
Mubarak as Ambassador to
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.

“Both countries have
deep-rooted significant ties
and an outstanding political
coordination,” he said.

A SHOOT-OUT during Fox Hill
Day has left police searching for a
number of persons who could be

linked to gangs engaged in a turf

battle in the Elizabeth Estates, Fox

Hill and Step Street areas.

According to reports reaching
The Tribune, a massive brawl erupt-
ed on Tuesday night near the Fox
Hill roundabout. An eyewitness,
who wished to remain anonymous,
said that as she was driving by the

heard.

area in her car she watched as per-
sons began to fight, and before long
the sound of gunshots could be

Giving chase to these hooligans,
police officers returned fire and
even blocked the roads for a short
time, making the flight of individu-

als who were caught in the cross
fire a near impossibility.

Speeding away, the eyewitness
said that she felt lucky to escape
the area with her life.

While there was no report of this
incident from the police, Commis-
sioner Reginald Ferguson con-

Fox Hill Day shootout could be
linked to possible gang battle

Shots fired after massive brawl

firmed that there was in fact a
shoot-out, noting that thankfully no
one was injured during the whole
ordeal.

He could not confirm if the vio-
lence was connected to any gang or
turf warfare, but said police are con-
tinuing to investigate the matter.

Witnesses testify in student murder case

Court hears of

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

TESTIMONY in the tri-
al of a man charged with
the January 2008 murder
of aC R Walker student
continued yesterday with
another eyewitness giving
his account of the incident.

Jamal Penn, 21, is
charged in the January 7,
2008 shooting death of
Deangelo Cargill Fowler,
18. Penn is being repre-
sented by attorney Murrio
Ducille. Yoland Rolle and
Jilian Williams are prose-
cuting the case.

Fowler was shot in broad
daylight as he stood on a
bus stop on Bay and Fred-
erick Streets.

Taking to the stand yes-
terday, a witness, whose
name is being withheld
because he is a juvenile,
recalled that he had been
standing under a canopy on
the western side of Fred-
erick Street along with sev-
eral of his friends when he
noticed a car playing load
music.

He told the court that
the car stopped at the traf-
fic light on Bay Street.

The witness said that at
that time he was not able
to see the persons in the
car, but got a better look
for about 30 seconds to a
minute when the green
Honda slowly turned south
onto Frederick Street.

The two persons in the
car were laughing, he said.

The witness told the
court that the car had
already passed him when
the person in the front pas-
senger seat stuck his head
out of the window with a
gun in his hand and fired
two shots.

The witness testified that
he was able to see the gun-
man’s face at this point.

He also said that on Jan-
uary 21 he went to the
Central Detective Unit

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their beloved Toy Mal-
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Father-of-two Patrick
Murray said his seven-
year-old daughter Say-
lor has been devastated
by the loss of the dog
she was given around
four years ago.

Little Bear ran off in
the Ruby Avenue area
on Cable Beach in Feb-
ruary, and Mr Murray
now believes the valu-
able dog was taken.

He said: “My daugh-
ter got her when she
was a puppy and kept
her by her side all day
and night. She would
not go to sleep without
Little Bear in her arms.

“It was a sad day
when Little Bear left. I
feel that someone has
her. But my daughter's
heart is broken. She still
draws pictures of her
and talks about her
often.

“She took her every-
where with her. She
wouldn't even leave the
country unless Little
Bear could go. It was a
very sad day when Little
Bear left.”

Pictures of Little Bear
were posted in the
Cable Beach area and a
$500 reward has been
posted for her safe
return.

Anyone with any
information about Lit-
tle Bear should call Mr
Murray on 327-3063 or










































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To submit informa-
tion anonymously call
Crime Stoppers on 328-
TIPS (8477).









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gun fired from car

(CDU) where he waited
for five hours before an
identification parade was
conducted. Penn’s attorney
Mr Ducille suggested to
the witness that he had
come to court to embellish
his story as he went along.
The witness denied this

suggestion.
Another witness, Detec-
tive Sergeant Reno

Armaly, told the court yes-
terday that around 1.40pm
on Sunday, January 20, he
and two other officers on
mobile patrol, acting on
information, went to a
house on St Croix Street
off Carmichael Road.

There, he said, they
observed a heavily tinted
Chevrolet Lumina car with
no license plates attached.
Detective Sergeant Armaly
told the court that he iden-
tified himself as a police
officer and moments later
the passenger door of car
opened.

He said a man wearing a
black jacket, black shirt

and blue jeans got out of
the car with his hands in
the air. Detective Sergeant
Armaly told the court that
he showed the man a war-
rant and told him that he
was suspected of the mur-
der of Deangelo Fowler.

According to the officer,
the man replied, “I am not
Jamal Penn, my name is
Tony Smith.”

Detective Sergeant
Armaly said that the man,
who he identified in court
as murder accused Jamal
Penn, was arrested and tak-
en to the Carmichael Road
Police Station and then to
CDU.

During cross-examina-
tion, Detective Sergeant
Armaly said that he found
nothing unlawful on the
accused and that there had

been another individual in
car who was not wanted by
police.

Inspector Cedric Bullard
told the court that shortly
after 2pm on January 21 he
conducted an identification
parade at CDU.

He said that he gave
Penn a consent form which
the accused read and
signed before the identifi-
cation parade was held.
Inspector Bullard said that
Penn had a lawyer present
at the time.

During cross-examina-
tion he testified that Bran-
don Russell was the first to
attend the identification
parade. Penn was among
nine other men in the line-
up, he said.

The trial continues today
at 10 am.

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Healthcare Centre ‘will lead
rimary care

Fidel Castro
marks 83rd
birthday =

with essay

HAVANA

THE FOUNDER of a}
New York-based church }
group that opposes the U.S. }
embargo of Cuba said Thurs- }
day that former Cuban Pres- }
ident Fidel Castro looked }
strong and animated during }
a July 31 meeting, according }
to Associated Press. }

The Rev. Lucius Walker :
Jr. of Pastors for Peace told }
The Associated Press he met }
for several hours with Castro ;
at a Havana-area home while }
he was in Cuba to organize a }
humanitarian aid shipment. }
Pastors for Peace posted two }
photos of the meeting on its }
Web site to coincide with }
Castro’s 83rd birthday Thurs- }
day. :
“He looked good, like he }
had gained weight, was sharp }
and articulate. I hadn’t seen }
him for three or four years,” }
Walker said by telephone }
from New York. “He showed }
tremendous signs of recovery }
from a very serious illness.” ;

Castro ceded power to his }
brother, Raul, after he fell ill :
three years ago and has not }
been seen in public since. He }
stepped down as president in }
February 2008. :

Walker said he also met }
with Raul Castro on July 26 }
outside Havana and that the }
president mentioned “that }
conversation, in the nature of }
dialogue, between US. and :
Cuban representatives is }
under way.” Raul Castro did- }
n’t offer details, Walker said. i

Ea

S

RPA et EL

Cesspit - 5600





to’ expansion of p

By MATT MAURA
Bahamas Information
Services

JOHNSON BAY — The
re-opening of the Miriam
Green Community Health-
care Centre in South Andros
will lead to the expansion of
primary healthcare services to
residents, Minister of Health
Dr Hubert Minnis said on
Wednesday.

He said this will be accom-
plished through the provision
of dental, X-ray, emergency
treatment and maternal ser-
vices.

X-ray services will be avail-
able when the machine arrives
within the next week.

Dr Minnis said the dental
chair has been repaired and
that those services will also
begin “shortly.”

Among dignitaries present
were Picewell Forbes, Mem-
ber of Parliament for South
Andros, and officials of the
Ministry of Health, the
Department of Public Health,
and the National Insurance
Board.

The centre is named in hon-
our of Miriam Green, a mid-
wife and grandmother whose
contributions to the delivery
of maternal and child health-
care services, particularly in
the area of midwifery, are leg-
endary in the South Andros
community.

Dr Minnis said the re-open-
ing of the centre is also a part
of the government’s objective
to ensure equitable access to
quality healthcare services for
all residents of the Bahamas.

Built in 1991 under a grant
from the National Insurance
Board, the facility has faced
numerous challenges since its
construction.

At one point it was even
closed which resulted in the
relocation of the services
offered there to other facili-
ties.

The Health Minister
assured South Andros resi-
dents that the healthcare cen-

LEFT: Vera Cleare, nursing
officer Il and clinic supervisor
of the Miriam Green Commu-
nity Healthcare Centre (left)
takes Minister of Health Dr
Hubert Minnis (right) and offi-
cials on a tour of the renovat-
ed and re-opened centre in
South Andros. It was named
in honour of midwife Mrs
Miriam Green (second left).
Her husband Euthal is pic-
tured, third left. Algernon
Cargill, director of the Nation-
al Insurance Board is also
shown.

tre will be fully utilised in their
best interests.

“Despite the (previous)
challenges, we celebrate the
achievements made and
launch the re-opening of this
facility which will facilitate the
achievement of a key goal of
the Ministry of Health and the
Department of Public Health,
which is the availability of
quality, primary healthcare
services for all residents of the
Bahamas,” he said.

Dr Minnis said the re-open-
ing of the centre is “evidence”
of the Ministry of Health and
the Department of Public
Health’s commitment to
improving quality primary
healthcare services through-
out the country.

For 30 years, the Ministry
of Health and the Department
of Public Health have imple-
mented the recommended
strategy of primary and public
healthcare as mandated by the
World Health Organisation
(WHO) to ensure equitable
access to essential healthcare
services for all persons.

Some of those services, Dr
Minnis said, are geared
towards promotion, preven-
tion and education.

“Our goal is to ensure that
this community and others
like it throughout the
Bahamas receive the best pri-
mary healthcare they possibly

MINISTER OF HEALTH Dr Hubert Minnis (at podium)
addresses residents of Johnson Bay, South Andros, during
the re-opening ceremonies of the Miriam Green Communi-
ty Healthcare Centre on Wednesday.

can,” Dr Minnis said. centres.”



made annually to healthcare

“That includes access to
healthcare services of the
standard that is received by
persons living in New Provi-
dence and the other major

Dr Minnis said statistics
compiled by his ministry
showed that over the past five
years up to 10,000 visits,
approximately, have been

facilities in Andros.

The re-opening of the cen-
tre will help to facilitate even
greater care to residents in
this regard, he said.

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r gl otal :
sa A Bs E

eit oe

THE GOVERNMENT of the People’s Republic of China awarded four Bahamians full scholarships to pursue
tertiary level education in China. Pictured from left are Jonathan Pratt, biological engineering; Acting
Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette; Courtney Dames, finance; Joelle Miller, Chi-
nese language and culture; Chinese Ambassador to the Bahamas Hu Dingxian; and Carlton Wright II, com-
munication engineering.

Four Bahamians awarded
Chinese scholarships

By LINDSAY THOMPSON

THE People’s Republic of China awarded
four Bahamian students with full scholarships
to pursue tertiary level education at various
institutions in China over the next four years.

Acting Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign
Affairs Brent Symonette congratulated the stu-
dents during a ceremony at the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs on Wednesday.

“These young people are an inspiration, choos-
ing as they have, to study in a country vastly
different from their own, and to learn another
language,” Mr Symonette said.

The scholarship recipients are Courtney
Dames, finance; Joelle Miller, Chinese language
and culture; Jonathan Pratt, biological engi-
neering; and Carlton Wright II, communication
engineering. This brings the number of Bahami-
ans who have benefitted from the Chinese schol-
arship programme to 23.

Based on their qualifications and field of study,
they were chosen from seven applicants reviewed
by a pre-selection committee comprising staff
of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

The names of the applicants were then for-
warded to the Embassy of the People’s Repub-
lic of China in Nassau for approval.

The Bahamas and the People’s Republic of
China established diplomatic relations in May
1997.

Since then, Bahamian students have pursued
higher education at the Bachelor’s and Master’s
levels in a range of disciplines from manufac-
turing and design of clothing and apparel to
medicine, astrophysics/astronomy, international



business management, marketing, Chinese cul-
ture, language and architecture.

“These young Bahamians have been able to
do so with scholarships awarded by the govern-
ment of the People’s Republic of China, through
the China Scholarship Council,” Mr Symonette
said.

“Some of the earlier recipients have complet-
ed their studies and are contributing to the
growth and development of the Bahamas.”

He urged the students to be “good ambas-
sadors” for the Bahamas while in China and to
take full advantage of the opportunity to learn
and become fluent in the language of the fastest
growing economy in the world.

“We look forward to welcoming you back to
the Bahamas at the conclusion of your studies,”
he told students.

“We are confident that you will be well pre-
pared to play your necessary role in the further
development of our country.”

Mr Symonette also expressed appreciation to
the government of China for the technical assis-
tance and cooperation extended to the Bahamas
over the past 12 years.

Ambassador of the People’s Republic of Chi-
na Hu Dingxian said that it was a great pleasure
to be a part of the 2009/10 annual awards to
four Bahamian students.

He advised the students to enrich themselves
with the new knowledge and skills they will
obtain during their studies.

On behalf of the students, Courtney Dames,
who pursues studies in finance, said they look
forward to the challenge to enhance their edu-
cation and learn a new language.



THe TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

Because, you know I don’t operate the
church. We have a board and we have a
lawyer and so everything was done above
board. Nothing was done by myself.”

Bishop Davis said he had no idea of the
value of the land when it was initially pur-
chased in 2007, or whether or not there was
any increase from the initial price given the
fact that the purpose for the property had
changed from an altruistic one to a com-
mercial enterprise.

In fact, Bishop Davis said, he does not
know where Prime Minister Ingraham got
the idea that the property was going to be
used for an old folk’s home, noting that the
ministry already has an old folk’s home next
to the church.

“They have that story all mixed up and I
would prefer you to talk to the church lawyer
instead of talking to me,” he said.

However, when The Tribune contacted
the church’s attorney, Anjanette Pyfrom,
she said she had not as yet been authorised
by the Bishop to speak on the church’s
behalf. Therefore, she said, she could not
answer any questions or speak on any issues
relating to the church’s subdivision at this
time.

Bishop Davis continued: “The church has
a lawyer and I think you need to talk to her
or talk to the former Prime Minister.”

According to documents, the 3.75 acres
of Crown land near Fire Trail Road, granted
by government to the church for $2,500, was,
in a later agreement, to be administered by
Arawak Homes. An irrevocable power of
attorney, dated June 4, 2007, was signed on
June 21, 2007 in the chambers of Sharon
Wilson and Co, by Bishop Roston Davis
with the “authority of two thirds of the mem-
bership of Golden Gates Assembly and
World Outreach Ministries.” The subdivi-
sion is known as Ross Davis Estates.

Golden Gates Assembly and World Out-

Pastor hits back

reach Ministries “for good and valuable con-
sideration” appointed Arawak Homes Lim-
ited “to be its lawful attorney for the purpose
of exercising all the following powers...”
Included in those powers the land was to be
subdivided into a residential community,
with roadways, paths and lots “in such size
and dimensions as Arawak Homes deems
fit.”

Arawak Homes was also to acquire the
necessary government permits and approvals,
and to construct single family homes on all of
the lots. Arawak was to enter into an agree-
ment for sale with purchasers and to receive
the money for the lots. It was also to insure
against any risk or liability that could affect
the lots. The power of attorney, said the
agreement, was “irrevocable.”

It declared that every
“receipt, release, con-
veyance, instrument and
assurance” done by
Arawak Homes were to
be treated as if done by
Golden Gates Assembly.

During a debate in the
House of Assembly on
July 20, Prime Minister
Ingraham tabled a num-
ber of documents outlin-
ing the disposition of pub- JAI Snaiueleln
licly held Crown lands
over the past few decades. Speaking specifi-
cally on land that was issued to various
churches, Mr Ingraham paused and digressed
from his prepared text noting how “inter-
esting” the case surrounding the Golden
Gates Assembly church was.

“Now Golden Gates is an interesting one
because I approved for Golden Gates to
build an old folks home. The conveyance
was signed by my predecessor in office (Per-
ry Christie). The land was sold and a housing



subdivision is on it, named after the rev-
erend,” Mr Ingraham said.

Bishop Davis said he is not bothered by
the Prime Minister’s comments. Neither, he
said, is he inclined to respond to rumours
that he was able to pocket nearly $1 million
through this land transaction.

“T have no comment on that,” he said.

“You are in the Bahamas, you are a
Bahamian, you know how these things go,
right? You know how the newspapers and
people do it. I have the Lord’s work to do, I
don’t have time to fool with these people. I
have to pray, and I have a thousand and one
things to do.

“If you come to my office now people are
out there waiting, saying ‘Bishop can you
help me.’ That is my goal. Not to try to
answer these things, because already the for-
mer Prime Minister has already said what he
had to say. You know how government goes.
No one could do a subdivision without gov-
ernment approval,” he said.

In an earlier interview, former Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie confirmed that it was he
who signed off on the variation to the origi-
nal Crown land grant issued to the Golden
Gates Assembly church that created a hous-
ing subdivision instead of the intended old
folks or community home.

Claiming that there was the overriding
concern at the time in the country for low
cost housing, Mr Christie said he made this
decision only after meeting with the leaders
of the church who all confirmed their support
on the change to the original grant.

“At the time I did it I knew it was a varia-
tion and I signed off on it as a variation
because at the time I was dealing with the
fact that this was going to create home own-
ership and that is in fact exactly what hap-
pened,” he said.

Mr Christie added that he effected a sec-
ond variation to a church application in
respect of Bishop Simeon Hall which, he
said, is expected to produce some housing
development as well.

_ Claim that police let
illegal Haitian go
after being bribed

FROM page one

at the Golden Gates Shopping Centre on the corner of
Baillou Hill Road and Carmichael Road to accept pay-
ment.

But police became concerned that they might be set up
and arranged to meet the man at the Bamboo Shack in
Carmichael Road instead.

One of the officers, a reserve police officer, asked to be
dropped off in order to avoid the illegal transaction, while the
second cop met the man at the Bamboo Shack to accept the
bribe, according to the source.

He said: “The police are now resorting to all sorts of
criminality and something has to be wrong for that to hap-
pen to that Haitian man.

“T want the Police Commissioner to investigate this behav-
iour and stop corruption in the force.”

Commissioner of Police Reginald Ferguson did not return
calls from The Tribune before press time last night.

Ya

|
| itat et On

Is cutting the store in half
HALFIS THE OTHER

FROM page one

boyfriend said.

One of the men then held the
knife to her throat and put on a
condom to rape her while the
other stood guard.

Her boyfriend said she did not
scream for help because she was
afraid she would be killed.

After he raped her the man
forced her to wash and get rid of
the evidence.

He and his accomplice then
raided the house for valuable
goods and stole around $1,000
in cash, as well as jewellery and
other items, before making their
escape.

The woman called police and
went to the hospital for exami-
nation, crying, bruised and com-
plaining of stomach pains.

And now she is concerned the

Former officer

have been five rapes or attempt-
ed rapes in eastern New Provi-
dence over the last month which
followed a trend as the rapist
forced his victims to wash after-
wards, took bed sheets and oth-
er evidence away with him, and
on occasions he at least attempt-
ed to use a condom.

Assistant Commissioner of
Police Raymond Gibson did not
expand on details when ques-
tioned by The Tribune, and con-
firmed only two rapes and two
attempted rapes in eastern New
Providence in the five months
since March.

Former Crime Stoppers advo-
cate Lucia Broughton slammed
police for not informing the pub-
lic about the attacks and warning

police should warn the public by
informing them about crime.

As the 36-year-old raped on
Sunday morning recovers from
the attack, her boyfriend said he
is angry she had not been
warned.

He said: “T get the feeling he
has to be a serial rapist. If a man
can stand up in front of you and
use protection, and make her
bathe after he finished, in case
they check, he has to be some-
one who has done it before; a
one-time rapist isn’t going to
think about it like that.

“The police should warn peo-
ple. There are a lot of young girls
around, and we might hear
about a couple of rapes, but we
have not been told about all of
the people who have been raped.

“The police are supposed to
protect us, that’s what they’re

men will get away with the crime
and strike again.
A source in the police force

FROM page one

ter Evans: "We have two persons being ques-
tioned by police, a man and a woman."

Mrs Soles-Armony was shot outside her
mother's home in the Sea Breeze area around
8pm last Friday as she sat in a car breast-feed-
ing her three-month-old son.

According to a family friend, the 29-year-old
had just returned to her mother’s house with
her two younger sisters and two young sons
after a day at the mall.

With her sisters and eldest son at her moth-
er's front door, TaGia stayed behind to feed
her son when a gunman approached her vehi-
cle and shot her.

Residents heard her scream: "No! No! No!
Don't do that!"

Injured, and with her son in her arms, TaGia
tried desperately to escape her attacker only to
rear-end a parked car and hit two other parked
vehicles nearby before coming to a stop.

A passenger in the rear-ended car reportedly

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Her stand was echoed in a poll ing people about these rapes and
on The Tribune website where

told The Tribune this week there 111 of 113 respondents said

tell them to stay on their guard.”
The former police officer said

Man and woman quizzed

rescued the infant, whose face was said to be
covered in his mother's blood. But when police
arrived on scene TaGia was already dead.

Nearby residents believe the gunman, who
had reportedly approached the car after the
crashes, was scared off by people who had
come to inspect the commotion.

Family and friends believe TaGia — who
had just returned home from St Kitts where
she lived with her husband — may have been a
victim of mistaken identity or the target of an
armed robbery gone wrong.

Investigators have not yet established a
motive for the killing but are probing several
possible scenarios.

"We hear a lot of things and we are looking
at all the information we are getting to see if
there is any evidence to substantiate those,”
head of the Central Detective Unit Superin-
tendent Elsworth Moss told The Tribune yes-
terday.

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he wanted to speak out to warn
others about the risk of attack
as police chiefs stay quiet.

He advises women to take
whatever precautions they can
to make their homes safe, by
installing alarm systems, or bars
on doors and windows, to pre-
vent break-ins.

He said: “I worked for the
police and I know if you have
got a confrontation like that, you
can’t just scream for help
because you have to be careful
or they will kill you.

“We have to protect our-
selves, however we can, to pre-
vent people from breaking into
our homes. We have to be care-
ful.”

Calls to Police Commission-
er Reginald Ferguson, Assistant
Commissioner Raymond Gib-
son and Chief Superintendent
in charge of the Criminal Detec-
tive Unit Elsworth Moss did not
return calls from The Tribune
before press time yesterday.

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Teacher held in Bahamian children fighting

child sex probe |

FROM page one

vacation.

Local community activist
Troy Garvey, founder of
TOUCH (Trusting On Unit-
ing Children’s Hearts), com-
mended the young victim for
coming forth.

“Tt is sad to know that every
day it seems like the victims of
sexual molestation are getting
younger and younger — our
children are not safe at school
or in the church,” he told The
Tribune after learning of the
allegations being made against
the teacher.

“The arrest is indeed an
eye-opener that persons are
now coming forth...and we
would like to commend the
children of this country who
are stepping forth to expose
these alleged child predators,”
he said.

Mr Garvey said that young
victims are reluctant to come
forward out of fear.

Allegations of child
molestation on Grand
Bahama first broke in Janu-
ary at the Eight Mile Rock
High School.

Three teachers — two men
and one woman — have since
been removed from the school
over complaints of alleged
molestation and sexual mis-
conduct.

Mr Garvey, EMRHS PTA
president, criticised the Min-
istry of Education for its
“poor” handling of investiga-

tions into complaints against
former teacher Andre Birbal,
the first of three Eight Mile
Rock teachers accused of
molestation at Eight Mile
Rock High.

Birbal, 46, fled the country
in February after police
launched investigations into
complaints made by two for-
mer male students who
claimed Birbal molested them.

Police issued a warrant of
arrest for Birbal with Inter-
pol, in March, for questioning
into unnatural sexual inter-
course. He was arrested by US
authorities on May 3 on a traf-
fic violation in New York.

The Attorney General has
submitted all relevant docu-
ments requesting the extradi-
tion of Birbal, who is a native
of Trinidad.

Mr Garvey commended the
police for the work they are
doing in the community, espe-
cially as it relates to child
molestation matters.

“There are people out there
preying on our children in the
schools and TOUCH will con-
tinue to work feverishly in the
community of Grand Bahama
and the Bahamas to make
sure the students are safe,”

Mr Garvey stressed that the
government needs to vet all
teachers, and not just new
teachers that are coming into
the public school system.

“We have to do a thorough
job because our children are
being destroyed and taken
advantage of,” he said.

illness visit New York camp

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia. net

FREEPORT - Four Bahami-
an children diagnosed with life-
threatening illnesses travelled to
New York this summer to attend
Camp Good Days, a camp for
children battling terminal illnesses.

Grand Bahama resident Tan-
ternika Johnson, Vance Poitier of
Abaco, and Willinda Theodor and
Alijah Lubin of New Providence,
were among the 160 campers that
spent two weeks in Branchport,
New York.

The camp is free to children
from all over the world who are
diagnosed with illnesses, such as
cancer. Camp Good Days was
founded by Gary Mervis in 1979
when his daughter, Teddi, was
diagnosed with a malignant brain
tumour.

The vision for the camp grew
and became a summer camp
where children battling childhood
cancer could come together to
share goods days — away from hos-
pitals and treatment regimes.

Dorothy Goldsmith accompa-
nied Johnson, 17, and Poitier, 14,
who both suffer from Sickle Cell
Anaemia.

She said that she was first intro-
duced to the camp, in 2007, by
longtime US visitor Joe Kohler,
who is now the official Regional
Director of Camp Good Days for
the Bahamas.

Mrs Goldsmith said the camp



FOUNDERS OF Camp Good Days Wendy Mervis, left, and her husband
Gary Mervis, (far right) is seen with a group from The Bahamas. Also
seen from left are Joe Kohler, Regional Director of Camp Good Days in
the Bahamas; Vance Poitier of Abaco, Tanternika Johnson of Grand
Bahama, Cora Pratt, the mother of Alihan Lubin and Willinda Theodor,
of New Providence, and Dorothy Goldsmith of Grand Bahama.

caters to children between ages 7-
18 from all over the world.

“Children with life-threatening
illnesses lose a lot of their child-
hood; they miss out on vacations
and lose time away from school
because of treatments, and the
camp allows them to meet other
people with similar illness and
share joyful experiences togeth-
er,” she said.

The camp celebrated its 30th
anniversary this year. Mrs Gold-
smith hopes to assist other young-
sters suffering from illnesses in
Grand Bahama to attend the next
year’s camp, in 2010.

Although the camp is free, she
noted that sponsors are needed to
pay for the cost of airfare for the

children.

She thanked businessman
Mario Donato, Princess Taylor,
manager of Municipal Motors Ltd,
and Terry Goldsmith of Docagold
Trading Company for sponsoring
the two campers from Grand
Bahama and Abaco.

She stated that the campers are
exposed to all sorts of activities,
including arts and crafts, archery,
basketball, cookie baking, com-
puter games, fishing, mini-golf,
music, nature tours, rope courses,
sailing, scuba, swimming and
woodwork.

They are also taken on off-
camp field trips to major league
soccer games, shopping at Wal-
mart and Factory Outlets near

Syracuse, and visit the Science
Centre in Ithaca, NY.

Campers Johnson and Poitier
said they enjoyed their stay at
Camp Good Days.

“Tt was a great to meet people
from other countries who have the
same disease as me and it was
wonderful to meet the volunteers
and counsellors,” said Miss John-
son.

Vance Poitier said this trip was
his second to the camp. “It was a
nice experience for a second time
meeting other children like me
from other countries,” he said.

Poitier was the recipient of the
“Best Counsellor in Training”
award for being the most helpful
all around camper.

“We were really pleased that
Vance was selected best all around
camper. At 14, he is an ambas-
sador for the Bahamas; he is some-
thing special for us in the northern
Bahamas, and we expect both
campers to go and tell people of
their experiences,” said Mrs Gold-
smith.

Johnson and Poitier thanked
the sponsors by presenting them
with Camp Good Days Recipe
books.

Mr Donato was very pleased to
assist youngsters on Grand
Bahama. “I have been a support-
er of the YMCA for many
years..., and I wanted to do what
I can because the youth are the
future of the Bahamas,” he said.

Ms Taylor said Municipal was
pleased to be a sponsor.

FROM page one

it suspects of falsifying sick notes to
the BMC and the Attorney General’s
Office for further action.

Hundreds of nurses staged a mass
sick-out in June, disrupting health ser-
vices throughout the country, after the
Bahamas Nurses Union stated its dis-
pleasure with government postponing
its anticipated health insurance cov-
erage.

BNU President Cleola Hamilton
maintained that the action was no
strike and all of the nurses were gen-
uinely ill, with sick notes to prove it.

Yesterday Dr Minnis said that the
government is concerned about some
doctors who “would’ve written in
excess of 50 notes,” as well as others
who supplied in the region of 20 or 30
for various nurses.

Doctors

In one case government has reason
to believe that a doctor faxed a sick
note to a nurse in Grand Bahama,
making it all the more obvious that
he/she could not have examined the
nurse in question for any signs of ill
health.

For a doctor to knowingly write a
sick note for a person who is well
enough to go to work may be an “eth-
ical issue” for which they could face
penalties, noted the minister, himself a
physician.

“We compiled all the information
and sent it to the Attorney General’s
Office so they can deal with it appro-
priately. The Medical Council also has
regulations to deal with those mat-
ters,” said Dr Minnis.

As for exactly what action govern-
ment could take against doctors who
are suspected of having assisted
protesting nurses by providing fake
slips, Dr Minnis said that is up to the
Attorney General’s Office to review
and determine.

However, he suggested that by push-
ing the issue Government could also
be striking a blow for the private sec-
tor, who have long complained to the
Medical Association of the Bahamas,
of which Dr Minnis is a former Presi-
dent, that they are concerned about
the possibility that there are local doc-
tors who falsify sick notes for healthy
workers.

Complaints forwarded to the Med-
ical Council are investigated by a Com-
plaints Committee formed of three
members of the council.

Under the Medical Act (1974),
which governs the profession, a doctor

The Committee for the Privatisation of BTC

PUBLIC NOTICE

Draft Electronic

can be struck off the register or other-
wise disciplined if they engage in “seri-
ous professional misconduct.”

Under Section 2(E) of the Act, such
conduct includes: “Knowingly giving a
certificate with respect to birth, death,
state of health, vaccination or disin-
fection or with respect to any matter
relating to life, health or accidents
which the medical practitioner knows
or ought to know is untrue, misleading
or otherwise improper.”

Possible penalties for those found
guilty of misconduct include removal
of their name from the Register, there-
by ending their ability to practice med-
icine; suspension of registration for a
period not exceeding one year; pay-
ment of a penalty not exceeding one
thousand dollars; payment of costs as
the committee may consider a reason-
able contribution towards “the cost
incurred in connection with those pro-

ceedings.”

The Tribune attempted to reach the
Chairman of the Medical Council, Dr
Duane Sands, for comment yesterday,
however, he was said to be unavail-
able.

The move by government to bring
to account doctors who may have
assisted nurses seeking to skip work
comes a week after Public Hospital
Authority Herbert Brown revealed
that nurses who exceeded their allotted
sick days, or whose sick notes were
found not to be valid, would face pay
cuts this month.

“When we lose a member of staff
who is scheduled to work we may have
to bring somebody in to fill the
shift...and then we are required to give
them double-pay so it can be very cost-
ly,” Mr Brown said.

Government and the nurses have
yet to resolve the insurance row.

The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the
following position:

Communications
Sector Policy

[he Committee for the Privatisation of BIC is pleased, on behalf of

STOREKEEPER

The Storekeeper is responsible for the direction of the overall expendable
and non-expendable personal property and supply program for the US
Embassy and associated agencies, along with the supervision of three

warehousemen.

ihe Government of The Commonwealth of The Baharnas, fa

publish the draft Fectronic Communications Sector Policy.

The Séctor Policy seats out the Government's
communications sector for the next three years by:

the electronic

* outlining the new regulate

electronic

§ planned policy for

ry structure under which the
communications sector will operate:

* Completion of secondary school diploma.
* Three years of progressively responsible experience in warehousing

and inventory control or a related field.
* Two years of supervisory experience.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

* setting out the Government's objectives and policy
framework for further liberalisation: and

* setting regulatory pronties for the new regulator to

implement.

The policies ore embodied in the new legislation recently passed

by Parliament as follows:
«the Camrnunications Act 2009 (“Comms Act”):
* the Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority Act 2009
[“URCA Act’); and
*the Utilities Appeal Tibunal 2009 ("UAT Act").

Copies of fhe Sector Policy will be included os inserted supple-

Must have a professional knowledge of the field of
warehousing and inventory control

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

* Must be able to operate standard industry off-the-shelf computer
programs for property management and inventory control. Also, must
be able to use the latest version of Microsoft Office Suite of programs.

and automatic transmission.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

* Must be able to operate delivery, pickup and forklift with both manual

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation
package including performance-based incentives, medical and dental
insurance, life insurance, pension and opportunities for training and

ments in The Tribune (August 13, 2009) and The Nassau Guardian

fAugust 14, 2009). Copies may ako be downloaded from the
Government's website of www.bohamas.gov.bs or the privatisa-
tion website at www. bfeprivatisation.com or obtained fram the
offices of the Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority.
Comments may be emailed to Info@bteprivatisation.com.

Application forms
nassau.usembassy.gov. under Key Embassy Links and employment

opportunities.
the Embassy via email to

development.

Completed applications

can be found on_ the

should be
fernanderra@state.gov or faxed to

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible
for employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Embassy’s website

returned to

(242)328-8251, addressed to the Human Resources Office no later than
Monday, August 17th, 2009.





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS

Bain out with injured hamstring

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

ONE of the country's premier
quartermilers has opted to shut
down his 2009 season and with-
draw from the IAAF World Cham-
pionships in Athletics due to a per-
sistent season-long injury.

Andretti "The Bahamian
Dream" Bain will be forced to
forego his World Championship
debut due to the reaggravation of a
hamstring injury suffered last Mon-
day at the training camp for team
Bahamas in Berlin, Germany.

Bain first injured the hamstring
shortly before the 2009 season
began in April leading to a series
of disappointing performances.

His personal best for the season
was a time of 46.02s, June 27th run
in New Providence.

"I decided to withdraw from
these games because I got tired

Starting list of events
set to be released

running injured this year and just
wanted to get healthy for next sea-
son without adding anymore dam-
age,” Bain said. "It was a situation
where it was reaggravated. Initial-
ly I pulled it in April this year,
three days before my first meet.
So basically, all year I was com-
peting with an injured hamstring."

Although disappointed with the
outcome of the season and ulti-
mately missing out on the bi-annu-
al meet, the main event on the cal-
endar for the international gov-
erning body of track and field, Bain
said he looks forward to rebound-
ing in 2010.

"This meet was the reason why I
competed all year injured. I
worked extremely hard all season
and did not want the injury to hin-
der what I was on target to achieve.
but after this reaggrevation at
training camp this week, I just fig-
ured God had other things planned
and so the decision suddenly
became an easy one," he said. "I

am ready to start off season train-
ing now. But I will allow my leg to
fully heal before doing so. 2009
was a disappointing season due to
the constant injury, but 2010 will be
great."

Following a 2008 season where
Bain and other members of the
4x400 relay team captured Olympic
silver in Beijing, the team will be
forced to attempt a similar feat at
this year’s World Championships
without the services of two of its
key members, Bain and Andrae
Williams, also sidelined with an
injury.

Despite the setback, Bain said
he has confidence in the remain-
ing members of the team to carry
on the rich recent history of
Bahamian 4x400m squads.

"The others members of the
4x400 remain in high spirits
because this year we are extreme-
ly loaded with talent and so they
will still be able to achieve great
things with or without me,” he said.

Latoy Williams and Nathaniel
are expected to be possible
replacements for the vacant slots
left open by the injuries to Bain
and Williams.

Bain, the NCAA 2008 Indoor
and Outdoor champion during his
senior season at Oral Roberts Uni-
versity, who has enjoyed a virtual-
ly injury-free career thus far said
his first major setback has taught
him several valuable lessons
applicable to life on and off the
track.

"T think this has definitely made
me hungrier. I have learned and
matured a lot. I am a better per-
son, and athlete because of it," he
said. "The injury, it was a reality
check. That is why I am constant-
ly thanking God that I was able to
complete my Master's Degree in
Business, because one injury can
end season, and in some cases a
career. But I'm trusting 2010 will
be a great year for the “Bahamian
Dream".

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany: The
starting list for the events of
the IAAF's 12th World
Championships in Athletics
was not scheduled to be
released until late last night
following the final technical
committee meeting.

But there are a total of 202
countries and 2,101 athletes
registered with the Bahamas’
24-member delegation com-
peting in 4 different events.

Managed by Ralph McKin-
ney, the team is hoping to add
to the 16 total medals, inclu-
sive of seven gold, four silver,
five bronze and the five fourth
and fifth, two sixth and three
seventh and eighth place fin-
ishes posted since the incep-
tion of the biannual champi-
onships in 1976 in Malmo.

The Bahamas, though the
Bahamas didn't win its first
medals until Gotenburg, Swe-
den in 1995 when Troy Kemp
secured the gold in the high
jump and Pauline Davis-
Thompson got the silver in the
women's 400 metres in a 30-
minute span.

The Bahamas is coming off
one of its finest championships
in Osaka, Japan in 2007 when
Donald Thomas soared to the
top of the world in the men's
high jump, Derrick Atkins
sped to a stunning silver
medal upset in the men's 100
and the 4 x 400 relay team was

just as brilliant with their silver
medal feat.

This year, the IAAF have
a couple of out athletes men-
tioned in their previews of the
championships here.

In the women’s 100, they
have indicated that the sprint
duo of Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie and Chandra Stur-
rup have also rolled back the
years to rediscover some out-
standing form this year.

Ferguson-McKenzie, 33,
blitzed to her quickest time
for six years — an impressive
10.97 posting in Monaco. Stur-
rup, 36, the two-time World
championship 100 bronze
medallist, recorded 10.99 in
Rome for third, her fastest
time for four years to suggest
that the pair represent the
chief threat to the US-
Jamaican duopoly.

In the 200, Ferguson-
McKenzie, the 2001 World
champion, who made her
World Championship debut
in Seville 10 years ago, could
provide the stiffest challenge
to American Allyson Felix
and Jamaican Veronica
Campbell-Brown.

With Ferguson-McKenzie
and Sturrup running sub-11
second 100m times this sea-
son, the Bahamas could pose a
threat to get back on the podi-
um since the Golden Girls
won the 2000 Olympic title in
Sydney, Australia.

On the men's side, as the
defending World high jump
champion, the IAAF is won-

dering if Thomas can get back
to his old form of 2007 in Osa-
ka.

And Atkins has had a low-
key season, having only ran a
best of 10.17 in April, so there
too is some concern by the
IAAF as to whether or not he
will peak at the right time
here.

The Americans have a total
of four competitors entered
in the men's 400 and the pro-
jection is that the quartet will
finish in that order.

Chris 'Bay' Brown, who has
been knocking on the door
with consecutive four place
finishes in the past two
World's as well as the
Olympic last year, is consid-
ered to be the outside threat.

Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands,
the Olympic bronze medallist,
is considered to be a
Caribbean threat along with

Three week BFA development
programme comes to a close

THE popular and presti-
gious Bahamas Football
Association National Acade-
my concluded a successful
three week programme, July
24, 2009 at the BFA National
Centre for Football Develop-
ment in New Providence.

One hundred and twenty-
one selected young Bahamian
soccer players participated in
the Academy which included
seven different age groups
and representatives of three
different islands.

Again with a major focus
on the development of the
individual player, the Nation-
al Academy convened spe-
cially selected players for par-
ticipation at U-9, U-11, U-13
and U-16 for boys and U-11,
U-13 and U -16 for girls. The
camp lasted for three weeks
with sessions conducted Mon-
day to Friday commencing at
9:15 am and concluding at
3:00 pm daily. The National
Academy convened a cadre
of coaches trained to improve
the players’ skill and decision
making. Intensive sessions on
technique and personality
were conducted to bring out
the very best in each partici-
pant. Sessions on the team
building and Laws of the
Game were also done on a
regular basis to help the play-
ers overall development, with
this year also seeing attention
being given to the mental
aptitude of the players.

The Academy ended, as it
always does, with comments
from the Academy Director
and Coaches, as well as from
BFA personnel. Academy
Director Daria Adderley
thanked all of the participants

for their efforts and encour-
aged them to continue to
work hard as they return to
their respective clubs and
school programmes. She then
invited the group coaches to
present the certificates to all
of the participants.

Each coach also presented
special awards to “Best Per-
former” and “Most
Improved” in each of the age
divisions, with the following
persons receiving the awards:
U-9 Best Performer: Phieron
Wilson (Dynamos FC, Garvin
Tynes Primary)

MOST IMPROVED: Travis Hunt
(Bears FC, Queens College)

U-11 BOYS BEST PERFORMER:
Marcellus Wilkinson (United FC,
St. Cecilia School)

MOST IMPROVED: Troy Hunt
(Bears FC, Queens College)
U-11 Girls Best Performer: Taj
Dorsett (Cavalier FC, St. Francis
and Joseph)

MOST IMPROVED: Sierra Don-
aldson (Cavalier FC, Queens Col-
lege).

U-13 BOYS BEST PERFORMER:
lan Winder (Cavalier FC, Queens
College)

MOST IMPROVED: D’andre
Lightbourne

U-13 GIRLS BEST PERFORMER:
Lindsay Seymour (United FC, St.
Anne’s School)

MOST IMPROVED: Faythe Miller
(Cavalier FC, Queens College)

U-16 BOYS BEST PERFORMER:

Duane Beneby (Bears FC, Prince
William High School)

MOST IMPROVED: Raymourn
Sturrup (Baha Juniors FC, St.
Andrews School)

U-16 GIRLS BEST PERFORMER:
Shelby Carbin (Cavalier FC,
Queens College)

MOST IMPROVED: Giovanna
Ferguson (Bears FC, Temple
Christian)

BFA General Secretary
Lionel Haven congratulated
all of the participants on their
selection and participation
and also extended congratu-
lations to the coaches for
their hard work.

He admonished the chil-
dren to continue to work
hard, and further to take the
lessons learned with them
back to their respective club
and school teams. Haven fur-
ther advised the group that
the BFA were concluding
arrangements to bring in a
Development Officer whose
task will be to focus on youth
development. His task will be
to review the current youth
development programmes
including the Regional and
National Academies, and
make adjustments to these to
improve them.

As a result, he advised
all of the participants to
expect changes in the pro-
gramme that will make it
harder, but will result in them
becoming better players as a
result, and thus, to continue
to work hard so that they will
be the beneficiaries of these
changes.

Randy Lewis of Grenada in
the men's triple jump.

As for the relay, the predic-
tion is that the United States
will once again dominate, but
watch for the Bahamas to
climb back on the podium
after obtaining a medal at

each of the last four World
Championships (three silver
and one bronze).

Whatever the projections
are, the Bahamian team is
poised and ready to compete
when the championships get
started on Saturday.





ATHLETES test the running set
up inside the Olympic stadium
prior to World Athletics Cham-
pionships in Berlin on Thurs-
day, Aug. 13, 2009.

Anja Niedringhaus/AP Photo



BIMINI BAY

RESORT AND MARINA

Only forty-eight nautical miles east of Miami, Florida, situated on the North end of North Bimini,

Bahamas - Bimini Bay Resort & Marina complex rests on over 740 acres of pristine Bahamian

beaches. Long known as a paradise for anglers and divers alike, Bimini Bay Resort offers a

plethora of options for the most discriminating traveller. Bimini Bay Management Ltd. owns and
operates Bimini Bay Resort & Marina.

al - A 7” : o P .
oe thn) nine

+.

Bimini Bay Resort & Marina seeks to hire qualified professionals
for the following positions:

IT MANAGER

Responsible for the ongoing maintenance and operation for all of the Information
Technology implemented within the assigned Hotel. The position is responsible for the
daily operation, support, and security of the technology and data that support and
enable the business operation.

Desired Requirements Of Proficiency:

Work experience in the Resort Industry
Bachelor degree/diploma in related field.
Call Account Jazz

Phone Switch Nortel

Micros

PMS - Opera

FOOD AND BEVERAGE DIRECTOR

Oversee the function of all food and beverage outlets to ensure excellent customer
service and maximize revenue and profits. Develop, implement and maintain quality
standards for outlets, including supervision and direction of service staff. Ensure
excellent customer service. Work with the individual outlet managers concerning food
and beverage quality, service, cleanliness, merchandizing and promotions.

e Proven success in the management of multiple restaurant outlets and functions

* Minimum of 5 years overseas work experience

* Minimum of 5 years resort management experience

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER

Major areas of responsibility/ management include, but are not limited to, employment,
wage and salary administration, benefits, training, employee/labor relations,
organizational development and payroll. Work closely with Human Resources Director
in implementing, achieving and maintaining the resorts goals and objectives.

We offer an excellent benefits package and competitive compensation. For full
consideration, all interested applicants should forward a copy of their resumé to the

attention of DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING
at jobs@biminibayresort.com or fax to (242) 347.2312.



PAGE 10, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

IAAF WORLD \ / \

BERLIN 2009 in tovin'it

ATHLETE





YOUR CONNECTIONe®TO THE WORLD



a

TIMICKA CLARKE

DATE OF BIRTH: November 9, 1980.
AGE: 27-years-old.

SCHOOL: St. John’s College/
Auburn University.

EVENT(S): 100 metres.

BEST PERFORMANCE(S): 11.26
seconds.

HOBBIES: Bowling, traveling, reading
and watching movies.

EXPECTATIONS: To represent the
Bahamas well.

PARENTS: Timothy and Sybliene Clarke.

S)

DATE OF BIRTH: July 1, 1984.
AGE: 24-years-old.

HIGH SCHOOL: Freeport High (Grand

Bahama). Auburn University.

EVENT(S): High jump.

BEST PERFORMANCE(S): 2.35
metres.

HOBBIES: Basketball, watching movies

and collecting diamonds and jewels.

PARENTS: Paula Thomas.

AVARD MONCUR

DATE OF BIRTH: November 2, 1978.
AGE: 30-years-old.

SCHOOL: SC McPherson Secondary High.
Auburn University.

EVENT(S): 400 metres.

BEST PERFORMANCE(S): 44.45

seconds.
HOBBIES: Surfing the Internet.

EXPECTATIONS: To make my presence
felt for the Bahamas.

Fs,

an (i Pate pli ~ =_—

CHRISTINE AMERTIL

DATE OF BIRTH: August 18, 1979.
AGE: 29-years-old.
SCHOOL: RM Bailey Secondary High.

| Southeastern Louisiana University.

EVENT(S): 200 and 400 metres.

BEST PERFORMANCE(S):

200 - 22.58 metres. 400 - 50.09 seconds.

HOBBIES: Traveling, reading and
sporting activities.

EXPECTATIONS: To represent the

Bahamas as best as | can.

PARENTS: Celavie Henry.

CHANDRA STURRUP

DATE OF BIRTH: September 12, 1971.
AGE: 37-years-old.

SCHOOL: RM Bailey High/
Norfolk State University.

EVENT(S): 100 metres/4 x 100 relay.

| BEST PERFORMANCE(S): 10.84

seconds.

HOBBIES: Traveling, interior decorating,
coaching and learning new things.

EXPECTATIONS: To see the relay team
get back on the medal stand.

DEBBIE FERGUSON-MCKENZIE

DATE OF BIRTH: Janary 16, 1976.
AGE: 33 years-old.

SCHOOL: CC Sweeting and St. Andrew's
High School. The University of Georgia.

EVENT(S): 100/200 metres.

BEST PERFORMANCE(S):
100 - 10.91 seconds. 200 - 22.19 seconds.

HOBBIES: Reading, traveling, meeting
people and track and field.

| EXPECTATIONS: To make the Bahamas |

a shining example.
PARENTS: Elka Ferguson.





THE TRIBUNE



SECTION

§



homas to carry the
flag for the Bahamas

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany: When the offi-
cial opening ceremonies for the JAAF's
12th World Championships are held
here on Saturday at the Olympic Sta-
dium, reigning men's high jump cham-
pion Donald Thomas will carry the flag
for the Bahamas.

Although others were considered,
Thomas was the unanimous choice to
lead the 24-member team during the
march pass by virtue of having won
the men's high jump title at the last
championships in Osaka, Japan in 2007.

According to team manager Ralph
McKinney, the decision was one that all
of the athletes accepted without any
reservation at the team meeting held
yesterday morning.

Thomas, 25, will be one of two com-
petitors representing the Bahamas
when the preliminaries of the high
jump take place on Wednesday,
August 19. He will be joined by Trevor
Barry, 26. The final is set for Friday.

Thomas, a former collegiate basket-
ball standout from Grand Bahama,
became just the second Bahamian male
athlete to win a gold medal at the bian-
nual championships. The first was Troy
Kemp, who did it in Gotenburg, Swe-
den in 1995 in the high jump as well.

Prior to the opening ceremonies, the
first set of athletes to compete for the
Bahamas will be Derrick Atkins, Adri-
an Griffith and Christine Amertil. The
trio will run in the morning session
with the ceremonies to kick off the
evening session.

Atkins, the 25-year-old silver medal-
list from Osaka, along with Griffith,
will run in the century. Amertil, who
turns 30 on Tuesday, will compete in
the women's 400.

The second round of the men's cen-

High jumper
was unanimous
choice for duty

tury will follow opening ceremonies.

With just one day left before the
start of the championships, press liai-
son officer Julie Wilson and chaperon,
said all of the athletes have arrived
safely in Berlin and have settled down
and are ready to compete.

"We were able to go through a suc-
cessful practice today with the indi-
vidual competitors fine toning their
performances and the relay team
members working out together,” she
said. "Everything went well.

We were pleased with what we saw.

"Except for one or two little nag-
ging problems, all of the athletes are
in good shape and they are just wait-
ing for the competition to start. We
had our team meeting with them and
everybody was really positive about
what was discussed. So we feel they
are all ready to compete.”

The team is expected to go through
some light workouts and stretches
today before the championship open
up on Saturday.

The women's 100 preliminaries
will be contested on day two on Sun-
day's morning session with the vet-
eran do of Chandra Sturrup, who
will be 37 on September 12 and Deb-
bie Ferguson-McKenzie, 33, along
with Timicka Clarke, who turns 29
on November 9.

That will be followed by the men's
triple qualifying round for Olympic
bronze medallist Leevan ‘Superman’
Sands, who will celebrate his 27th
birthday on the same day, and the
semifinal and final of the men's 100.



SVORM FRAME

A

A
S | S
he
FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009

WINDOWS

Donald Thomas



Hurricane’ Shutters



BAIN OUT
WITH
HAMSTRING

INJURY
PG9

SPORTS

mri

General Meeting

_ for Legacy Basetiall/
_ Softhall scheduled
_ for Saturday



The Annual General

i Meeting of Legacy Base-
: ball/ Softball Association
i will be held this Saturday,
: August 15, 2009 at 10:00 am

at the YMCA meeting

; room, and Steve Burrows,
i President of the youth
i organisation is inviting all
i Legacy Coaches, players

and parents to be in atten-
dance for this gathering.

Henne to be busy
during preseason

FOOTBALL
DAVIE, Fla.

Associated Press

TRAFFIC can get heavy
around the Miami Dolphins

i complex, which is an annoy-

ance for Chad Henne as he

: comes and goes at training
: camp. “I’m not a road
i rager,” the Dolphins’ backup

quarterback says. “But ’m

i not a very patient person.”
i Henne also has someone in
i his way at work, where he’s
? stuck behind last year’s NFL

Comeback Player of the

Year, Chad Pennington.
i Henne threw only 12 passes
: in his rookie season last year,

and barring a calamity at
quarterback, he’ll ride the

bench again in 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE







Bacardi
KORE MII
sale to

TENNYSON WELLS

BACARDI has con-
firmed it will sell its Nas-
sau-based production facil-
ity in New Providence and
properties at Clifton Pier
to The Source River Limit-
ed headed by former FNM
minister Tennyson Wells.
The deal could be closed
by the end of September.

Tribune Business learned
some time ago that Source
River was interested in the
Bacardi property; however,
were keeping tight-lipped
on the deal.

In a release issued yes-
terday by Source River, it
is revealed that the compa-
ny is comprised of
Bahamian investors
“including several former
Bacardi employees” and
could close the deal with
Bacardi by the end of the
month and turn the ex-rum
facility into a water pro-
duction facility.

“The Source River Lim-
ited is led by well-known
businessman Tennyson
Wells and is comprised of
nearly 40 Bahamian
investors. The Source Riv-
er Limited plans to pro-
duce and bottle distilled
water,” the release said.

“Bacardi & Company
Limited today announced
it has signed a contract to
sell its Nassau-based pro-
duction facility in New
Providence and properties
at Clifton Pier to The
Source River Limited , a
Nassau-based investment
company, and expects to
close on the deal by Sep-
tember 30, 2009.

“Bacardi products cur-
rently for sale in The
Bahamas in retail stores,
restaurants, bars, clubs and
at The BACARDI Store
will continue to be avail-
able at these locations. The
Bacardi portfolio includes:
BACARDI rum and BAC-
ARDI Flavoured rums,
GREY GOOSE vodka,
BOMBAY SAPPHIRE
gin, DEWAR’S Blended
Scotch whisky,
CAZADORES tequila,
MARTINI vermouth and
asti and other leading
brands. BACARDI contin-
ues to be Bahamians’
favourite rum.”







FRIDAY,

isine

AUGUST

SS

14, 2009



SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

INSURANCE COMEANY LIMITED



Moses Plaza renovation ‘could
be done by the end of year’

WB 35,000 square foot plaza to bea Ml Plan to make use of waterfront

‘catalyst for development in area’

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tripunemedia.net

HE RENOVATION of

the Moses Plaza could be

done by the end of the

year, according to the
developments chief officer.

If all goes to plan, they will be the

first of the waterfront properties

between East and Armstrong Streets to

be revitalized as a part of the govern-
ment and private sector’s plan to rein-
vent downtown Nassau’s tourism prod-
uct.

Charles Klonaris told Tribune Busi-
ness that the ‘very expensive’ project
will be a first-class development and
will make use of the waterfront with
the addition of a marina.

Mr Klonaris asserts that the 35,000
square foot plaza will be a catalyst for
development in the area.

“East of East Street is really run

with the addition of a marina

down and it needs some injection,” he
said. “Without a doubt this develop-
ment will bring back that side of Bay
Street.”

He said the new Moses Plaza will
incorporate the finest accessories,
including designer lighting, railings
and tiling.

“It’s really going to showcase what
the Bahamas really should be and how

SEE page 2B

66

East of East
Street is
really run
down and it
needs some
injection.

99

Charles
Klonaris

SE OTe E WSU a aT

Grand
opening of |
new Dunkin

Donuts

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE NEW Dunkin
Donuts location could be a
‘great landmark’ for the
revitalization of downtown
Nassau, the Minister of
Tourism and Aviation said
yesterday during the store’s
grand opening.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said the Myers group’s
investment in reintroducing
Dunkin Donuts to the Nas-
sau could be a catalyst for
other investors to move into
downtown who have been
waiting out a soft economy.

“These kinds of things
happen one space at a time,”
said Mr Vanderpool-Wal-
lace.

Confidence

“When the rest of the
world is sitting down wait-
ing and saying ‘Iet’s see
what’s going to happen to
the economy’ I think it’s the
kind of confidence that
speaks to what people here
are talking about.”

According to him, the
donut and coffee shop is the
kind of facility that lures
cruise ship passengers to the
downtown area and sets the
Bahamas’ cruise ship port
apart from others.

“By far, nobody comes
close to downtown Nassau,
the biggest single cruise port
anywhere,” he said.

“We get two million cruise
passengers coming into this
space every single year.

“And there is no doubt
whatsoever that in order to
get these people off the ship
into downtown Nassau you
must have the attractions in
place.”

SEE page 2B

JOB FAIR

THE Bahamas Ecom-
merce Company and

allied partners is hosting
a job fair on Friday,
August 21, 2009, at the
Kendal GL Isaac Gym
from 9am to 5pm.

a
i awit

| DUNKIN
DONUTS
GRAND
OPENING:
Pictured left to
right are Jon
Luther, George
Myers, Vincent
Vanderpool-
Wallace and
Nigel Travis.

Ashley
Henderson

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Moses Plaza renovation ‘could =r

be done by end of the year’

FROM page 1B

we really win back the harbour side
and how we look at how developments
should be,” said Mr Klonaris.

In a recent town hall meeting the
Minister of Environment said the
development of the waterfront
between East and Armstrong streets
will be government development but
will have private/public ownership with
shared equity in the properties.

Construction of the promenade,
which could begin some time next year,
will be another phase of the public/pri-
vate initiative to reinvent the down-
town Nassau around the cruise ship
port.

However, it is thought that this can-
not begin in full force until the con-

tainer port is moved from the down-
town area after which many of the
building between East and Armstrong
streets will become vacant.

Mr Klonaris said several of the own-
ers of these buildings have expressed
their commitment to develop theses
properties as quickly as possible when
they become available so as to not
stunt the redevelopment of downtown.

“They are waiting to see what will
happen,” he said. “They may be hesi-
tant right now but jumping the gun will
benefit them.”

He said the government incentives
and legislation combined should offer
some more incentive for owners to
begin to develop their properties in
earnest.

“With what we’re doing and the

reclamation of the waterfront it’s going
to energise everybody,” said Mr
Klonaris. “When you see it come
together it’s going to really energise
this whole city.”

According to him, there are also
plans to implement a dedicated ferry
terminal which can transport visitors
and locals to Paradise Island and Cable
Beach.

“To do it right form the start really
helps with the success,” he said.

“To the left of us is the publication
building and we look at it as being a
really important public space.

“Water transportation will mean a
lot Paradise Island and to Nassau and
turning Woodes Rodgers into a water
taxi terminal, once implemented, the
area will revive itself.”

Grand opening of new Dunkin Donuts

FROM page 1B

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
added that in Nassau, more
people spend more time off
the cruise ship than in any
other destination. He assert-

ed that there needs to be
much more attractive facili-
tates like the Dunkin
Donuts location to attract
more people.

Nigel Travis, CEO of
Dunkin brands, said the

As a privately-owned, mid-sized Bahamian
Company and the authorized Caterpillar
dealer in the Bahamas; M&E Ltd. is presently
seeking Certified Caterpillar Technicians
with Mechanical and Electrical experiences,
along with proof of academic and practical
expertise. These candidates should be
professionals who thrive on the challenge of
developing outstanding customer relations
and service excellence.

Send complete resume with education and
work experience to M & E Limited, P. 0. Box
N-3238, Nassau Bahamas, Attention: Office

Administrator, or email me@me-ltd.com .

Only persons being interviewed for this
position will be contacted.

MANAGEMENT TRAINEES / FUTURE LEADERS

Bahamas Supermarkets Limited operates a leading
supermarket chain in The Bahamas, As a market leader,
the Company prides itself on delivering premier service
throwgh its City Market supermarkets, having a strong
commitment to its customers, associates and community.

An opportunity for Management Trainees. (Future
Leaders) exists in New Providence to join this market
leader.

Reporting to the Head of Retail Operations, the
successful applicants wall;

1 Be self-motivated and highly energetic
Have effective supervisory skills

1 Be highly flexible and mobile and prepared to work
evenings, weekends and holulays

| Have aclean police record, drivers license, ood
character references and be physically fit
Have completed high school with a minimum of 3
BGCSE
Have good communication (verbal and written)
and interpersonal skills
Be numerate and analytical with the ability to
derive information from financial reports
Be a strong problem solver
Have the ability te multi task

1 Solid functional computer skills with working
knowledge of Micrasoft applications

| Previews experience in Retail Management is an
maSe1,

Salary and benefits will be commensurate with
experience and qualifications,

lf you have what it takes to succeed in this challenging
role, forward your resume and cover letter to:
~ Humain Resources Director
Bahamas Supermarkets Limited
East-West Highway + P.O. Box M3738 * Nassau, Bahamas
Or email to: humanresources®bahamassupermarkets.com
No tleniene inguiries please

City Market

company is excited to have
the Dunkin brand back in
the Bahamas and back into
the same space it was in
when it burned to the
ground several years ago.

Intrigued

He also said he under-
stands the role the building
plays in the revitalisation of
the city and is “intrigued
with the revitalisation of
downtown.”

“Sounds like an excellent
plan and we are really
pleased to play an important
part in it. This location as I
understand is very central
to that revitalisation,” said

Mr Travis. “So we hope this
is going to give a boost to
the economy of downtown
and stimulate more people
investing in downtown and
as a result of that, encourage
more and more tourist’s to
come down to Nassau.”

He lauded the work that
CEO of the Myers group,
George Myers has done to
reintegrate the Dunkin
Donuts into downtown, as
a new donut shop, Mr
Donuts, popped up in its
stead.

“America runs on Dunkin
and as you can see around
this restaurant certainly the
Bahamas runs on Dunkin as
well.”

weieDLTD W aac

HOME & BUSINESS 420NES ALARM
SPECIAL $299.00 INSTALLED

HOME/BUSINESSES .
1 Panel & LED Keypad
2 Motion Detectors
2 Door Contacts
1 Siren
1 Transformer
4 Amp Stard-By Battery
1 Wenco Decal

[es ha dear aay fr

Criminal nf

2 HOURS MONITORING,
SERVICE & RESPONBE,
ACCESS CONTROL
CCTV INTERCOM
GUARD SERVICE , Ko

625 0 per month

P.O, Bux CBI 444, 232 Anstem House,

IN THE ESTATE OF ELIZABETH BROOKS
late of #83 Alexander Boulevard in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence,

Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that all

persons having any claim or demand against
the said estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the undersigned
on or before the 26th day of August, A.D.
2009, after which date the Administrator will
proceed to distribute the estate having regard
only to the claims of which he shall have

had notice.

AND notice is hereby given that all
persons indebted to the estate are required
to make full settlement on or before the date
hereinabove mentioned.

Dated the 12th day of August, A.D. 2009

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Attorneys for the Administrator
9 Rusty Bethel Drive
Nassau, Bahamas































on strong
auction demand

STEPHEN BERNARD,
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK

Treasury prices rose Thursday after investors were reas-
sured by the strong demand at the government's latest
bond auction.

The demand for Treasurys sent yields sharply lower as the
government wrapped up a record $75 billion in debt sales
this week by auctioning off $15 billion in 30-year bonds. The
price of the already issued 30-year bond rose 1 24/32 to 96
31/32, and its yield, which moves in an opposite direction
from its price, fell to 4.43 percent from 4.54 percent late
Wednesday.

The price of the benchmark 10-year note rose 29/32 to 100
4/32, driving its yield down to 3.61 percent from 3.72 percent.

Investors had already bid Treasurys higher ahead of the
auction after the government reported weak July retail
sales and an unexpected increase in workers filing for job-
less claims for the first time.

The Commerce Department said retail sales fell 0.1 per-
cent in July, significantly worse than the 0.7 percent increase
that analysts forecast. And the Labor Department report
said the number of newly laid-off workers filing claims for
unemployment benefits rose unexpectedly to a seasonally
adjusted 558,000, from 554,000 the previous week. Ana-
lysts were expecting new claims to drop to 545,000.

Those two weaker-than-expected reports had bond
investors questioning whether an economic recovery might
take longer than expected to occur. The stock market, how-
ever, shook off the reports and focused instead on the Fed-
eral Reserve's more upbeat comments on the economy on
Wednesday. Major stock indicators finished moderately
higher Thursday.

The gains in Treasurys after the auction were due in part
to relief among investors that there were plenty of buyers for
the longest term bonds issued by the government.

"There would be a lot of angst if it didn't go well,” said
William Larkin, a fixed income portfolio manager at Cabot
Money Management.

If demand for Treasurys falls sharply, the government
would have to raise the interest it pays, which could drive up
borrowing costs. That would likely lead to higher interest
rates charged on mortgages and other consumer loans, and
potentially put a drag on an economic recovery.

The 30-year auction's bid-to-cover ratio, a measure of
demand, was 2.54 percent, up from 2.36 percent at a similar
auction in July. There was lackluster demand Wednesday at
an auction of $23 billion in 10-year notes as investors were
hesitant to jump into the bond market before the Fed's
interest rate decision and economic statement. The Fed
left interest rates unchanged, and said in its statement that
the economy was "leveling out," a more positive view than
in the past. The central bank also said Wednesday it would
slow its buying of government debt in the coming weeks in
order to hit its target of purchasing $300 billion in Treasurys
by the end of October. The Fed has committed to buying
Treasurys this year to help offset the staggering amount of
debt being raised to fund the government's stimulus pro-
grams. As the Fed exits the market, investors are concerned
there will be too much supply and not enough buyers.

"One still has to be concerned about who will buy all
this debt,” said Matt Hastings, portfolio manager of the
Schwab Premier Income Fund. Hastings estimated there
could be as much as $2 trillion in Treasurys auctioned over
the next year.

In other trading, the two-year note rose 4/32 to 99 26/32
and its yield fell to 1.10 percent from 1.16 percent.

The yield on the three-month T-bill dipped to 0.16 percent
from 0.17 percent. Its discount rate was 0.17 percent.

The cost of borrowing between banks fell. The British
Bankers’ Association said the rate on three-month loans in
dollars — the London Interbank Offered Rate, or Libor —
was unchanged at 0.45 percent.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MELVINA LAVERN DAVIS
of SPRINGFIELD ROAD, P.O. Box CB-12397, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14 day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MANIO JULES of PRINCE
CHARLES DRIVE, P.O. BOX N-10847, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 7'* day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.















British Colonial Hilton Hatel
Marlborough St., Shop #1

Clearance SALE
Everything is $20
We offer Stringing Services, Repairs, Knotting,

Wiring, Driling and The Snack Fix System and
The Mystery Clasps

Pearls and Beads Strands Wholesale and Retail
P.O.Box EE-15827
Nessau, Bahamas
Tal: 242-323-1865
Email: gems-pearns@hotmail.com

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eptember sign up now



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009, PAGE 3B



College
UIs

elm Kets
textbooks
to students

STAMFORD, Connecticut _



A college textbook publisher
said Thursday it would become
the first to rent titles directly
to students, another option for
students fed up with spending
$100 or more to buy books they
have little use for after a semes-
ter, according to Associated
Press.

Stamford, Conn.-based Cen-
gage Learning said its rentals
would cost 40 percent to 70 per-
cent less than the suggested
retail price. Several hundred
titles will be available starting in
December, with more to follow
next July. Students can already
rent textbooks, usually second
hand, through Web sites such as
Chegg.com and
Bookrenter.com, but publish-
ers are largely cut out of that
market.

The publishers say a major
reason their prices sometimes
reach three figures is that the
initial sale is their only chance
to collect revenue.

By renting directly to stu-
dents, Cengage could collect
revenue several times on each
printed copy.

Students renting a book
would get immediate access to
an electronic version of the first
chapter, and then be shipped
the book, the company said. At
the end of the rental term, stu-
dents can return the books or
purchase them.

The announcement comes as
the industry tries to adjust to
modern technologies that have
upended what students and
teachers expect from supple-
mentary classroom materials
and also the traditional models
for selling and delivering them.

Among other experiments, a
group that manages several
hundred college bookstores is
currently running a trial rental
program. Meanwhile, Ama-
zon.com Ine. is aiming the new,
bigger version of its Kindle
electronic reading device at the
college market, with six uni-
versities running Kindle pilots
this fall.

Cengage said it would launch
a gateway site called Cengage-
Brain.com where students can
rent textbooks, on top of cur-
rent options offered through its
ichapters.com site to buy print-
ed textbooks, electronic text-
books, individual e-chapters
and audio books.

WALL STREET

Stocks manage to extend
gains to second day in row

SARA LEPRO,
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK

Focused on an economic
recovery, investors shook off
disappointing news and kept
Wall Street's summer rally
going.

Investors sent stocks higher
for a second day in a row
Thursday, giving all the major
indexes a moderate boost and
adding to the gains that fol-
lowed upbeat comments from
the Federal Reserve a day ear-
lier.

Financial, technology and
energy companies were among
the big winners, while stocks in
defensive, or relatively safer,
industries like health care fell.
Retailers declined after a
worse-than-expected report on
retail sales.

Meanwhile, Treasury prices
rose after the government had a
successful auction of 30-year
bonds. The Treasury Depart-
ment issued a total of $75 bil-
lion of debt this week as part of
its ongoing efforts to fund the
government's stimulus pro-
grams, and investors were
relieved that the market was
able to absorb such a huge sup-
ply.

Analysts said Wall Street's
showing Thursday was a sign
of the market's resilience in
light of economic reports that
suggested the recovery could
be slowed by a weak consumer.
Investors seemed to look past

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that AKINS A.Y. LINTON PRATT
of SPITFIRE ROAD, P.O. Box N-10536, NASSAU,

BAHAMAS,

is applying to the Minister responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14‘ day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



the latest news and focus on the
Fed's more upbeat assessment
of the economy. Stocks soared
Wednesday after the Fed said
the economy was "leveling
out,” not just slowing its
decline.

"You're not seeing people
giving up on this economy,"
said Keith Springer, president
of Capital Financial Advisory
Services.

Among the day's reports, the
Commerce Department said
retail sales fell 0.1 percent in
July, significantly worse than
the 0.7 percent increase econo-
mists expected. Retail sales are
considered a strong indicator
of economic recovery because
consumer spending accounts
for more than two-thirds of all
economic activity.

A weekly report on unem-
ployment also came in worse
than projected. The Labor
Department said the number
of newly laid-off workers filing
claims for unemployment ben-
efits rose unexpectedly to a sea-
sonally adjusted 558,000, from
554,000 the previous week.
Analysts were expecting new
claims to drop to 545,000.

The Dow Jones industrial
average rose 36.58, or 0.4 per-
cent, to 9,398.19 after rising 120
Wednesday in response to the
Fed's statement.

The Standard & Poor's 500
index rose 6.92, or 0.7 percent,
to 1,012.73, while the Nasdaq
composite index rose 10.63, or
0.5 percent, to 2,009.35.

Advancing stocks outpaced
losers by 2 to 1 on the New
York Stock Exchange, where
volume came to a very light
777.32 million shares.

In other trading, the Russell
2000 index of smaller compa-
nies rose 3.02, or 0.5 percent,
to 575.19.

Financial stocks led the day's
gains, buoyed by news that the
hedge fund run by John Paul-
son bought about 168 million
shares of Bank of America
Corp. Paulson foresaw the dis-
tress in subprime mortgages
and reaped billions by betting

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A, member of Colonial Group International Ineurance, Health. Pensions, Life





against the related securities,
so his purchases of Bank of
America stock are seen as a
vote of confidence in the bank's
future.

"He gives a lot of credibility
because he certainly saw the
danger on the credit side,” said
Anton Schutz, portfolio man-
ager of Burnham Financial
Industries Fund and Burnham
Financial Services Fund.

Bank of America rose $1.07,
or 6.7 percent, to $17. Regional
banks also rose significantly
after tumbling earlier in the
week on downbeat comments
from an analyst that raised
doubts about some banks’ abil-
ity to improve their earnings in
the second half of the year.

Texas Instruments Inc. rose
66 cents, or 2.8 percent, to
$24.54 after an analyst upgrad-
ed the stock. That helped lift
other technology stocks.

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. rose
$1.37, or 2.7 percent, to $51.88
after the world's largest retailer
reported better-than-expected
second quarter earnings. Wal-
Mart also raised the low end of
its profit guidance, saying it
expects shoppers to continue
to be attracted by its low-priced
items.

Other retail stocks were
mixed following the govern-
ment's weak sales report.
Macy's Inc. slipped 25 cents to
$16.15, while Best Buy Co. rose
51 cents to $37.01.

Investors have sent stocks
soaring the past few weeks as
improving corporate profits and
signs of life in the troubled
housing industry gave the mar-
ket hope that the economy is
healing. The Fed's comments
Wednesday affirmed for
investors that their recent bets
had been warranted.

Still, with the news flow
tapering and trading light amid
the summer slowdown on Wall
Street, analysts warn it might
be difficult to keep the mar-
ket's momentum going.

The S&P 500 index has risen
15.2 percent in little more than
a month and 49.7 percent since
it fell to a 12-year low in early
March. Treasurys rose higher
after the successful auction of
30-year bonds. The yield on the
benchmark 10-year Treasury
note, which moves opposite its
price, fell to 3.61 percent from
3.72 percent late Wednesday.

The dollar fell against the
euro and the British pound,
while gold and other metal
prices rose.

Light, sweet crude rose 36
cents to settle at $70.52 a barrel
on the New York Mercantile
Exchange.

TRADERS WORK on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Fri-
day, Aug. 7, 2009 in New York. Major stock indexes barreled higher
by more than 1 percent Friday after the government said the nation's
unemployment rate unexpectedly fell in July for the first time in 15
months and that employers cut fewer jobs. Bond prices fell, driving
yields higher as investors left the safety of Treasurys.

(AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

NOTICE
COVAL INVESTMENT LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows

fa) COVAL INVESTMENT LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000

The dissolution of the sald company camoenced on the
17th August, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registerad by the Registrar General.

a cS

The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse

Trust Limited, Aue de Lausanne 17 bas, Geneva.

Dated thes 141h day of August, A. DB. 2008

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE
DARKFLOW LIMITED

HOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

fa} ODARKFLOW LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
Intemational Business Companies Act 2000

The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the Sth July, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
Submitted to and registered by the Registrar General
The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse
Trust Limiled, Aue de Lausanne 17 bes, Geneva.

Dated this 141h day of August, A.D. 2008

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE
INVESTPAR CORPORATION

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows

(a) =INVESTPAR CORPORATION is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
Intetnational Business Companies Act 2000

The dissolution af the sald company commenced on the
5th August, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated
Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BV

Dabed thes 14h day of August, A. 0. 2008

Verdura Associated Ltd.
Liquidator



The National Insurance Board

of the Commonwealth of The

Bahamas

Request for Contractors Pre-Qualification

The National Insurance Board (NIB) is seeking to pre-qualify contractors to bid on works
to complete the Sandon: Renahiiitation Centre - Robert Smite Chia and dowescent and
Special Education Unit, Pox Hill, Nassau, Bahamas, the project is a joint venture of NIB and
the Bahamas Government, Contractors must be in compliance with the National Insurance

Act (social security programme). and in good standing with the

AEENCIES.

relevant Chovernment

Pre qualification decumerts rin be collected fram the Security Booth at NIB‘s Clifford
Darling Complex, Blue Hill Road, from August 14 to August 21, 2009,

Pre-Qualified documents should be signed, sealed and dropped in the pre-qualification
box at the Security Boath, Clifferd Dat ling Complex ono before 12:00 Near ALE USE LL.
200g





PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Court freezes Colonial assets in response to BofA suit

IEVA M. AUGSTUMS,
AP Business Writer
CHARLOTTE, N.C.

A federal court froze $1 bil-
lion of troubled Colonial Banc-
group Inc.'s assets Thursday in
response to a suit filed by Bank
of America Corp.

Bank of America Corp. sued
Colonial for more than $1 bil-
lion in cash and loans, and
asked the court to prevent

Colonial from selling or other-
wise disposing of the assets.
Bank of America said the
U.S. District Court for the
Southern District of Florida, in
response to a complaint filed
Wednesday, granted a tempo-
rary restraining order freezing
the $1 billion held by Mont-
gomery, Ala.-based Colonial.
Court officials could not
immediately be reached to con-
firm the order was granted.

Bank of America had asked
the court to prevent Colonial
from selling proceeds it
received from Freddie Mac in
exchange for mortgage and oth-
er loans, and which were owned
by Ocala Funding LLC, court
documents show.

Charlotte, N.C.-based Bank
of America, which was the col-
lateral agent for the Ocala
Funding loans, sought an emer-
gency injunctive relief in the

complaint. According to court
documents, Colonial held the
proceeds as a custodian, agent
and bailee through bailee let-
ters. But when the bailee let-
ters were terminated, Colonial
refused to return them to Bank
of America, the U.S. banking
giant alleged.

"The emergency relief is nec-
essary because Colonial
appears to be on the verge of
collapsing as a going concern

















NOTICE

NADOLIN LTD,
NOTICE lS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) WNADOLIN LTD. is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisians of Section 137 (4) of the linternatlonal
Business Compares Act 2000.

The dissolution of the sald company commenced on the
6th August, 2009 when ihe Ariches of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro. Associated
Lid., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, Bv'l

Dated thes 14h day of August, A. DB. 2009

Verduro Associated Lid.
Liquidator

E550 NIGERIA (DEEPWATER AREA THREE) LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
Intemational Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company
has been dissolved and struck off the Register
pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by Tha
Registrar General on the 21st day of July, A.D., 2009

Dated the 11th day of August 4.0., 2009.

Gary Johnsen

Liquidater of

E550 NIGERIA (DEEPWATER AREA THREE) LIMITED

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCTION QATAR LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
has been dissolved and struck off the Register
pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The
Registrar General on the 30th day of July, A.0., 2009

Dated the 11th day of August, A.D., 2009.

NOTICE
NORTHAM HOLDINGS LTD.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) NORTHAM HOLDINGS LTD. is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000,

The dissolution of the sald company commenced an the
Sth August, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Assomated
Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BV'l

Dabed hes 14h day of August, A. D. 2008

Verduro Associated Lid.
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN as follkees:

a} PALACAS INTERNATIONAL OVERSEAS S.A, is in dissolution under
the provisions of the Imemational Boamess Conmpanees Act 20MM,

bi The Ditenlition of aid Company commaioed on August 13, 2K) when
it Adtiches of Dissolution were submitted and nepistered by the Registrar
eneral.

ce} The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisin Collie of 2nd Termce

Weal, Centreville, Mecca, Reahaaties

di All persone having Claims against the above-named Company are required
an of before the 14th daw of September, 20M) oo send their names and address
26 ml particulars of their debe: on claims to the Leqaideor of the company cr,
in detault theren!, they my be exciaded from the henetiq of any distrilaaion
made befor: such debts are provend

August 14, 2ieee
LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ARDVE-SAMED COMPANY

EXXONMOBIL UNITED ARAB EMIRATES (NORTH) LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
Intemational Business Companies Act 2000, motice
is hereby givan that thea above-named Company
has been dissolved and struck off the Register
pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The
Regisirar General on te 30th day of July, A.0., 2009

Dated the 17th day of August, 4.D., 2009.

and has reportedly been the
subject of a criminal investiga-
tion for alleged accounting
irregularities," the complaint
said.

Representatives from both
Bank of America and Colonial
declined to comment on the
lawsuit.

Shares of Bank of America
gained $1.07 cents, or 6.7 per-
cent, to $17.00 in trading Thurs-
day, while Colonial shares fell 5
cents, or 9.6 percent, to 47
cents.

The lawsuit could push Colo-
nial into further financial trou-
ble.

On Tuesday, Colonial said it
has advised the Securities and
Exchange Commission it will
not be able to file a second-
quarter financial report because
of alleged accounting irregu-
larities now being investigated.

The Alabama Banking
Department also confirmed
Tuesday that its board held a

private meeting with Colonial
officials on Monday.

Colonial said last week it was
under a criminal investigation
by the Justice Department over
the alleged accounting irregu-
larities at its mortgage ware-
house lending unit in Orlando,
Fla. It was announced earlier
that Colonial was the subject
of a Securities and Exchange
Commission investigation relat-
ed to its bid for federal bailout
funds and its accounting for
loan loss reserves.

Colonial, which previously
reported roughly $26 billion in
assets, has 335 branches in
Florida, Alabama, Georgia,
Texas and Nevada.

The battered bank has been
hurt the credit crisis, as rising
foreclosures in its Florida con-
struction-loan portfolio contin-
ue to strain its balance sheet.

If Colonial fails, it would be
the largest bank failure this
year.

NOTICE

RIDUNA LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

RIDUNA LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under

the provisions of Section 737 (4) of the international
Business Compares Act 2000.

The dissolution of the sald company commenced an the
Sth August, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Assonmated
Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BV'l

Dabed thes 14h day of August, A. DB. 2008

Verduro Associated Lid.
Liquidator

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
Intemational Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company
has bean dissoved and struck off the Register
pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The
Registrar General on the 20th day of July AD., 2009.

Dated the 1ith day of Auguat, A.0., 2008,

Carol G. Gray
Liquidator af

EXXONMOBIL TERMINAL INVESTMENTS LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

NEWFIELD 4USTRALIA INC. is in dessolution under
ihe provigions Of the Intemational Business Companies
Act 2000

The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
4th day of August,2009 when its Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by ihe Registrar
General.

Carol G. Gray

Liquidator of

EXXONMOBIL UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
(NORTH) LIMITED

Carol G, Gray

Liquidater of

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
QATAR LIMITED

3 = FG CAPITAL MARKETS.
ROYALS FIDELITY Oe
Money at Work

COLON A LL

The Liquidator of the sad Company is Susan G. Riggs
of a A. Sam Houston Parkway E., Houston, Texas
F060,

“THURSDAY, 13 AUGUST 2
BIS= ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1.46291) (OHS -2-5 | CHE 40.5 | FTO -1448 | YTO % -6&.73
FIDE: CLOSE 78428 | YD -6.06% | 200 -12.51%.
| TELEPHON
: Z 7 S$ os ne “_ HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY
— MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.

Attomeys for the above-named Company

Dated the 11th day of August, 200).

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NOTICE

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BEE USTED DEST SECURITIES - (fends trade on ao Percentage Pricing bases)
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NEWFIELD AUSTRALIA INC.

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Creditors having debts or claims against
the above-named Company are required to send
particulars thereof to the undersigned cio P.O. Box
N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 15th day of
RAL ies Preferred Eure - : sions September, 4.D., 2009.In default thereof they will be

: excluded from the benefit of any distribution made by

CRAL Globe Bonar the Liquidator
Dated the 11th day of August, A.D., 2009.

44.25 Deterses Superrartet
6.00 Caitheen Cromings (Poet)
Off AWS Hoidinge

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Susan G. Riggs
Liquidator
363 N. Sam Houston Parkway E.
Houston, Texas T7060





THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

FRIDAY, AUGUST 14TH, 2009, PAGE 7B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

MARINE FORECAST
WINDS

iil



5-Day FORECAST

UV rr NY )





Today Saturday WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.





































f cu a = = v High Low W High Low W NASSAU Today: Eat 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 85°F
a ~ fy cae ue 7; at ee : 0| 1|2 3|4|5\6 4 8|9|1 D Fe FIC Fe FC Saturday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 85° F
oe f all all, ! ll | = Acapulco 93/33 79/26 pc 92/33 76/24 t FREEPORT Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 86° F
ht — Low J woderaTE | HicH |v. HIGH eM at aie pe ee ae s Saturday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 86° F
ORLANDO S . nkara, Turkey s S WBACO Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 84°F
High:92°F33°C Partly sunny with a Partly cloudy; an Some sun with a Clouds and sun; Partly sunny, a Clouds, some sun; The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 91/32 73/22 s 90/32 73/22 s Saturday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 84° F
o Low: 74°F/23°C ~ i -~ t-storm; breezy. early t-storm. t-storm in spots. t-storms possible. t-storm possible. t-storms possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 66/18 54/12 + 60/15 53/11 sh
a ee High: 91° High: 89° High: 90° High: a | 7 raat 26/80 77/28 po «878077128 s.
c ae ‘ High: 88° Low: 83° Low: 81° Low: 81° Low: 81° Low: 80° IDES FOR NASSA iy Vth.
TAMPA fie EOC oi BL ee eRe TET
High: 91° F/33°C : = 96°-87° F 99°-89° F 101°-84° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low Rant TRETIERS eT eee
Low: 76° F/24°C atk 7 The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index tat comes = effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 1:57am. 23 8:00am. 0.3 Belgrade 91/32 66/18 c 39/31 67/19 s
ae @ - : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 2:339p.m. 29 9:14pm. 05 Berlin 70/21 57/13 pc 78/25 64/17 pc
“7 a CU ne Saturday 204am. 23° 9:06am. 03 Bermuda 86/30 77/25 s 87/30 78/25 s
7 As 3:48 p.m. 3.0 10:22 p.m. 0.5 Bogota 65/18 43/6 c 67/19 47/8 pc
3 oe r Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Sunday Widam. 24 10:14am. 02 Brussels 75/23 58/14 pc 84/28 62/16 s
/ - ABACO Temperature 456p.m. 3.1 11:25pm. 03 Budapest 78/25 60/15 c 88/31 62/16 pc
F, os Pad ih: @Q° 0 Hig Whi, ? , A, ’ ae ne LOW voce gz°F/2g°¢ Monday = 32 a ee Cairo 96/35 76/24 s 97/36 74/23 s
a Cy ow: 79° F/: Normal high ..... gor rg2c I atoutta 92/33 85/29 r 89/31 82/27 t
* Py Normal low 76° F/24° C Calgary 60/15 44/6 c 5512 43/6 pc
; ofa Whe: @ WEST PALM BEACH i Last year's high nesses 94° F/34° C Sun AND Moon Cancun 91/32 75/23 pe 93/33 76/24 pc
: a High: 88° F/31°C ae Last year's low iene aulaeat eres 79° F/26° C Caracas 77/25 68/20 t 82/27 72/22 t
— Low: 80° F/27°C Ve, - Precipitation _ ies ore a.m. ee Casablanca 91/32 74/23 s 92/33 77/25 s
>a i As of 2 p.m. yesterday 0.0.0 0.06" unsel....... ‘40 p.m. Moonset. .... 09 P.M. ~~ Copenhagen 68/20 55/12 pc 68/20 64/17 r
© : FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT ae Year to date 2. New First Full as Dublin 66/18 54/12 + 66/18 54/12 sh
High: 88° F/31° C @ High: 89° F/32° C Normal year to date... cesses 27.59" a 7 os Frankfurt 77/25 60/15 pc 93/28 64/17 s
Low: 80° F/27°C — Low: 77° F/25° C F ie Geneva 79/26 57/13 s 5/29 58/14 s
a AccuWeather.com cao a Halifax 78/25 62/416 s 79/26 61/16 pc
"i @ 4 a Forecasts and graphics provided by oe ‘aj Havana 91/32 73/22 t 90/32 74/23 t ENN Showers Miami
; : MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Aug. 20 Aug. 27 Sep. 4 Sep. 11 Helsinki 70/21 52/11 pc 64/417 54/12 sh T-storms
"- High: 88° F/31° C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 90/32 82/27 t 90/32 82/27 pc Rain Pasaie
i Low:79°F/26°C NASSAU High: 90° F/32° C Islamabad 109/42 85/29 s 107/41 84/28 s L*,_¥ Flurries . Cold ——=—w
F High: 88° F/31°C Low: 78° F/26° C Istanbul 86/30 72/22 s 86/30 71/21 s Pe] Snow Sih eg aa er gal Warm fi
99° Eape Jerusalem 83/28 64/17 s 83/28 63/17 s [ve] De al aut eetrcaed
=a Low: 83° F/28° C — TETOSUUS Bait? AMIS s 6719 45/7 pc Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary dagen
a > -
KEY WEST & , - i. Kingston 86/30 75/23 t 89/31 79/26 + 10s| Os 0s) 10s 20s {B0s\) 40s |50s 60s 70s 80s /G0s)/UUSN/ii0e)
High: 88° F/31°C i CAT ISLAND Lima 73/22 57/13 s 71/21 57/13 s
Low: 81°F/27°C High: 90° F/32° C London 75/23 59/15 pc 75/23 61/16 s
: di A, Low: 75° F/24°C Madrid 93/33 66/18 s 93/33 68/20 s
£ Manila 87/30 78/25 r 87/30 78/25 t
i we Mexico City 79/26 55/12 t 79/26 53/11 t be be f" ra
7 GaREXUA ~fe Monterrey 102/38 73/22 s 102/38 75/23 s
— ° Montreal 88/31 66/18 s 86/30 68/20 s
all High: 88° F/31° C ae Moscow 66/18 54/12 r 64/17 52/11 sh
Low: 80° F/27°C Lew: 76°F/24°C Munich 73/22 56/13 ¢ 85/29 54/12 s I.
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's eer : hoe one a pe oa Sane pe rz
highs and tonights's lows. : <> : ew Delhi G G
ow:77° 2 > a J fl slo 5 s 5 5 pe “
: , Li F/25°C oO Osl 65/18 49/9 6/13 52/11 :
a i HY Paris 81/27 62/16 pc 90/32 GING s a
Prague 74/23 53/11 ¢ 80/26 58/14 pc AW 7
LONGISLAND Rio de Janeiro 77/25 67/19 s 80/26 68/20 s way ul r I ane
ee cree oH ‘peo e820 s ‘S70. G70 & t ki
a
Low: 76° F/24°C Rome 86/30 68/20 s 87/30 67/19 s You ay rest €asy nowing
Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday ‘ MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 90/32 79/26 pc 90/32 79/26 sh Pac. 23 have TE; insurance
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W ae High: 92° F/33° C San Juan 82/27 45/7 pe 79/26 A0/A c coverave no matter which
Fe F/C Fe F/C Fe F/C Fe | F/C Fic FIC Fe FIC Low: 74° F/23°C San Salvador 88/31 70/21 pc 88/31 74/23 t , &
Albuquerque 87/30 66/18 t 89/31 64/17 pc Indianapolis 87/30 66/18 s 89/31 68/20 s Philadelphia 85/29 70/21 t 88/31 72/22 t CROOKED ISLAND ACKLINS Santiago oe aS way the wind blows.
Anchorage 6216 53/11 c 66/18 5512 1 Jacksonville 90/32 72/22 t 90/32 74/23 t Phoenix 104/40 84/28 t 104/40 81/27 s Hath 90/4 aa aul i cme t oie aan s
Atlanta 90/32 70/21 t 86/30 71/21 ¢ Kansas City 90/32 70/21 s 90/32 71/21 pc Pittsburgh 86/30 6216 s 88/31 64/17 s RAGGEDISLAND — Uligh:94°F/3a" a0 Paulo s s pm
Atlantic City 81/27 66/18 t 96/30 68/20 t LasVegas 102/38 76/24 pc 99/37 74/23 s Portland,OR 72/22 5512 s 75/23 55/12 s coe Low: 76° F/24°C : a van cams $ cae ea $ Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 85/29 66/18 t 89/31 68/20 t Little Rock 92/33 68/20 s 93/33 70/21 s Raleigh-Durham 87/30 69/20 t 88/31 69/20 t Low: 74° F/23°C ¢ ~ sen _ ore ere ey BOAO 7
Boston 80/26 6719 s 87/30 70/21 s Los Angeles 82/27 62/16 pc 78/25 6246 pc St. Louis 92/33 71/21 s 93/33 73/22 s . all, a ae aTPRERURE = eaST EA er
Buffalo 95/29 65/18 s 85/29 65/18 s Louisville 90/32 69/20 s 91/32 72/22 s Salt Lake City 90/32 63/17 pe 76/24 51/10 pc GREATINAGUA Tala 90/32 73/29 : 84/98 72/22 INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Charleston, SC 87/30 73/22 t 87/30 74/23 t Memphis 93/33 71/21 s 92/33 74/23 s San Antonio 100/37 76/24 pc 100/37 75/23 s High: 92° F/23°C Taal aojo7 MGA 7s 9djo8 GANT
Chicago 88/31 63/17 s 90/32 67/19 s Miami 88/31 79/26 t 90/32 80/26 t San Diego 75/23 66/18 peo 72/22 64/17 pc g one 6 a ee, a INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
. Low: 76° F/24° C Trinidad 91/32 70/21 s 91/32 73/22 pc
Cleveland 87/30 62/16 $s 89/31 66/18 s Minneapolis 90/32 72/22 s 88/31 68/20 pc San Francisco 70/21 55/12 pe 73/22 56/13 s Vemneamveai 6719 56/13 pc 70/21 57/13 pc
Dallas 98/36 75/23 pc 96/35 77/25 s Nashville 92/33 69/20 pc 89/31 71/21 pc Seattle 6719 54/12 po 71/21 54/12 pc —s Vienna 76/24 62/16 sh 84/28 67/19 pc - New Providence f Grand Ba Eleuthera Exuma
Denver 98/31 59/15 t 89/31 52/11 ¢t New Orleans 92/33 75/23 t 92/33 76/24 t Tallahassee 90/32 72/22 t 90/82 74/23 t >a WS 70/21 52/11 po 73/22 60/15 po Tat (242) 24-5555 ma herrea Ted: (242) 332-2962 ff Te (282) 396-2304
Detroit 88/31 6719 s 90/32 6719 s New York 82/27 71/21 t 90/32 74/23 pce Tampa 91/32 76/24 t 90/32 78/25 t -_, a
Honolul 89/31 76/24 89/31 76/24 Oklahoma City 95/35 73/22 95/35 72/22 T 95/35 78/25 t 99/37 75/23 s ales te ee
onoliulu S pe anoma Ul pe pe ucson S -
Houston 97/36 74/23 t 95/35 76/24 pc Orlando 92/33 74/23 t 92/33 76/24 t Washington, DC 86/30 69/20 t 99/31 73/22 t Ge he ie ce



PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



Banks reduce emergency borrowing from Fed

CHRISTOPHER S.
RUGABER,

AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON

Banks trimmed their borrowing
from the Federal Reserve's emer-
gency lending facility over the past
week, and cut back their use of oth-
er programs designed to ease the
financial crisis.

The reductions indicate that banks |

are having an easier time obtaining
credit and don't have to rely mostly
on the Fed for short-term loans.

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben
Bernanke and his colleagues on
Wednesday said "financial markets
have improved further in recent
weeks" and the economy "is leveling
out,” a more upbeat assessment than
they gave after their previous meet-
ing in June.

In a report issued Thursday, the
Fed said commercial banks averaged
$33.9 billion in daily borrowing over
the week that ended Wednesday.
That was down from $35.1 billion in
the week ended Aug. 5.

The identities of the financial insti-
tutions are not released. They pay
just 0.50 percent in interest for the
emergency loans.

The weekly lending report also
showed the Fed's net holdings of
"commercial paper" averaged $60
billion, a decrease of $4.7 billion
from the previous week. That's an
encouraging sign that investors’
appetite for such help from the Fed
has eased.

Commercial paper is the crucial
short-term debt that companies use
to pay everyday expenses, which the



IN THIS JULY 21, 2009 file photo, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke delivers a report on the country's economic

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite



and financial health before the House Financial Services Committee, on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Fed began buying under the first-
of-its-kind program on Oct. 27, a
time of intensified credit problems.

At its peak in late January, the
Fed held almost $350 billion of com-
mercial paper. It has said that about
$1.3 trillion would qualify.

Nassau Airport

Development Company

The report also showed the Fed
made little change to its purchases of
mortgage-backed securities guaran-
teed by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac
and Ginnie Mae.

They averaged $542.8 billion over
the past week, nearly unchanged

from the previous week. The goal
of the program, which started on
Jan. 5, is to drive down mortgage
rates and help the housing market.
The Fed has pledged to purchase
up to $1.25 trillion of the securities,
along with $200 billion of debt issued

by Fannie and Freddie. Mortgage
rates rose this week.

Rates on 30-year home loans aver-
aged 5.29 percent, up from 5.22 per-
cent last week, Freddie Mac report-
ed Thursday. Still, the 30-year fixed-
rate mortgage averaged 6.52 percent
a year ago.

Investment houses in March 2008
were given similar emergency-loan
privileges as commercial banks after
a run on Bear Stearns pushed what
was America's fifth-largest invest-
ment bank to the brink of bank-
ruptcy and into a takeover by
JPMorgan Chase & Co.

But investment firms didn't draw
any loans from the Fed for the 13th
straight week.

The last time they drew any mon-
ey — just $482 million — was in the
week that ended May 13.

Critics worry the Fed's actions
have put billions of taxpayers’ dollars
at risk. Some of the assets the Fed
took on last year when it bailed out
Bear Stearns and insurer American
International Group Inc. have
dipped in value.

The report also said that credit
provided to AIG averaged $41.2 bil-
lion for the week ending Wednes-
day, down from $41.6 billion last
week.

The central bank's balance sheet
stands at about $1.99 trillion, up
from nearly $1.98 trillion last week.
The balance sheet has more than
doubled since September, reflecting
the Fed's many unconventional
efforts — various programs to lend
or buy debt — to mend the financial
system and lift the country out of
recession.

REQUEST FOR
PROPOSAL

Nassau Airport Development Company Limited (NAD) is seeking a
Proponent (individual, consortium or joint venture that includes an

experienced restaurant operator) to finance, design, develop, operate
and manage a 4500 sq. ft. (approximate) sit down restaurant and bar
in the new U.S. Departures Terminal currently under construction at
the Lynden Pindling International Airport. This restaurant will be a

world-class facility with a diverse menu, excellent customer service,
high volume and turnover with a true sense of place.

Mandatory qualifications

|. Proponents must be Bahamian and incorporated in The Bahamas.
il. Proponents must have operated a similar restaurant facility
within the last three (3) years.

NAD's goals and objectives are to:

(a) achieve a high standard of excellence and customer service:

(b) offer a mix of concepts that will enhance the image of the Lynden
Pindling International Airport as a world class airport;

(c) offer food & beverage choices to passengers at reasonable

prices;

(d) offer a mix of local, regional and national and international
brand-name companies;

(e} develop and design food & beverage facilities that complement
the qualities of the new terminal while recognizing the distinctive

SIT DOWN RESTAURANT & BAR
New U.S. Departures Terminal at LPIA

Interested parties may pick-up the Request for Proposal package at
NAD’s offices at the reception desk on the second floor

Domestic/International Terminal at Lynden Pindling International Airport

between the hours of 9:00am and 4:00pm, from August 12th to 24th,

spirit, character and ‘sense of place’ of the Bahamas; and

(f|_ optimize revenue to NAD.

2009. A mandatory pre-proposal briefing will be held in the Arawak
Lounge at the Airport on Wednesday, August 26th at 10:00am.





Full Text



PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.217FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER CLOUDYWITH T-STORM HIGH 90F LOW 83F T O M O R R O W INTOMORROW’STRIBUNE S P O R T S BAHAMASTRACKNEWS Latest from Berlin By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net A TEACHER was taken into custody for questioning yesterday in connection with the alleged molestation of a 12year-old girl at Jack Hayward High School. Asst Supt Emrick Seymour confirmed that a male teacher was taken into custody by police in connection with complaints of alleged molestation of a student. The teacher is now the fourth teacher in the public school system here on Grand Bahama accused of child molestation. The Tribune contacted the Ministry of Education in Freeport to find out the status of the teacher, however, Hezekiah Dean, School Superintendent, was out of office on The Tribune YOUR PASSPORT TO MISS UNIVERSE BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com Teacher held in child sex pr obe MISSUNIVERSE BEACHPARTY SPECIALPULLOUT BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Fourth school of ficial to face a buse allegations SEE page eight By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net EIGHT medical doctors, some of whom are suspected of penning “in excess of 50 fake” sick notes for protesting nurses, may now be subject to disciplinary action from the Bahamas Medical Council and/or legal action from Government, The Tribune has confirmed. Health Minister Dr Hubert Minnis said government has forwarded information it has gath ered with respect to the “eight or nine” physi cians along with “several medical centres” that Doctors suspected of penning ‘fake sick notes’ for nurses may face action SEE page eight MISSPANAMAWINS‘BESTCOSTUME’ MISS PANAMA Diana Broce was announced last night as the winner of the Miss Universe national costume event. Miss Panama is pictured (right the Sheraton Nassau Beach Hotel last night, where the Miss Universe con testants attended the State Gift Auction Dinner. Pictured above is Miss Panama in her costume on stage at the Rainforest Theatre at the Wyndham Resort during Monday’s national costume event. T i m A y l e n F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Man and woman quizzed over mother’s killing B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A MAN and a woman were being quizzed by police last night in connection with the brutal killing of moth-e r-of-two TaGia Soles-Armony. T he pair were detained by murder squad officers on Wednesday and are being questioned at the Central Detective Unit on Thompson Boulevard. Police press officer Assistant Superintendant WalS EE page seven By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A FORMER police officer whose girlfriend was raped in her home suspects she was attacked by a serial rapist and has criticised police for not warn ing vulnerable women. Police have launched an inves tigation after a trend of at least t wo rapes and two attempted rapes in eastern New Providence since March. But senior officers have said little to warn the public about the possibility of a serial rapist who attacks women at home alone between 3am and 6am. The 36-year-old girlfriend of t he former police officer was alone at her home in Yellow Elder, off the East West Highway in central New Providence, when two intruders broke in at around 3am on Sunday. The men burst into her room as she was sleeping and threat ened her with a knife, her For mer of ficer whose girlfriend was raped criticises the police SEE page seven By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net GOLDEN Gates Assembly’s pastor denied claims he profited from an underhand land deal that reports suggest could have netted him substantial sums of money when the Crown land, granted by government, was later turned into a “low cost” housing sub-division. Speaking with The Tribune yes terday following its series of exclu sive articles on Crown land, Bish op Ross Davis said he could not do any subdivision by himself as government’s approval was required. “The government gave us permission, the church agreed to use the land we bought from the gov ernment and so it ended there. Pastor hits back at claims over Crown land deal SEE page seven By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A HAITIAN living in the Bahamas illegally was allegedy picked up by police in the Carmichael Road area, but let go after the police man accepted a bribe, according to a source. The man was with another Haitian when they were stopped by police at around 10pm on Tuesday. Police let one of the men go when they saw he had the necessary paperwork allowing him to live and work in the country legally. But when they saw that the second man did not have any papers he was taken in the police car and offered his freedom in exchange for a bribe. A source told The Tribune how the man arranged for someone to pay the bribe, and asked them to meet him Claim that police let illegal Haitian go after being bribed SEE page seven Dr Hubert Minnis

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THIS morning the 84 b eauties of the Miss U niverse 2009 competi tion get a chance to show off their best poses when they gather for the traditional swimsuit photo shoot at Atlantis, Paradise Island. The shoot will take place in the lobby of the Royal Towers at 6am. Later tonight the con testants will be able to unwind during the VIP party at Cain Pool, The Cove, Atlantis. SEE PAGE 13 SCHEDULE OF MISSUNIVERSE CONTESTANTS MISS UNIVERSE SHOW HIGHLIGHTS BAHAMIAN DESIGNS AND FABRICS VIBRANT colours, exquisite prints and beauty took centre stage at the Miss Universe 2009 Bahamian Designer Fabric Fashion Show heldW ednesday night at the Shera ton Nassau Beach Resort. A ll 84 contestants got to show off gorgeous creations by three of the country’s most renowned designers on a world class runway in front of hundreds of local and international guests. Designers Basheva Eve of L a Maison de Besh, Sabrina F rancis of Se’B Fashion D esigning and Rachel Turnquest-Garcia of Rachel’s Boutique took the organic 100 per cent uniquely Bahamian fabrics Androsia, a batik fabric made through a dye and wax process, and Bahama Hand-p rints, a hand-printed fabric p roduced through the tradit ional silk-screening technique and used them to create one-of-a-kind pieces. A BOVE LEFT: M iss Colombia Michelle Rouillard. A BOVE RIGHT: M iss Costa Rica Jessica Umana M ISSINDIA E kta Chowdhry MISSMEXICO Karla Carrillo MISSEGYPT Elham Wagdi MISSPANAMA Diana Broce MISSCANADA Mariana Valente PHOTOS FELIPEMAJOR /TRIBUNESTAFF

PAGE 3

TILE King Enterprises has kicked off the Breathe Easy Bahamas fund raising campaign with a $5,000 donation made in the name of the late Jesseken Ferguson. The campaign was launched Wednesday to raise $300,000 for ventilators for the Princess Margaret Hospital. The donation will go towards state-of-the-art ventilators for adults in the Oncolo gy Ward and babies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit who require assisted breathing. The Builder’s Mall, Tile King, Doctor’s Hospital, The Tribune Media, The Rotary Club of East Nassau and Bahamas Realty are also behind the drive to raise $300,000. Presenting the cheque on behalf of the Ferguson family yesterday was his brother Kevin Ferguson. Nickita Prescod (right at the presentation. Thelma Rolle accepted the cheque on behalf of the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation. “This cheque,” said Ms Rolle, “will go a long way towards the purchase of lifegiving ventilating machines for the Oncology Ward of the Princess Margaret Hospital. “We also accept this gener ous donation in the name of Jesse and thank the family and extend our prayers to them,” she said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009, PAGE 3 INDEX MAIN/SPOR TS SECTION Local News.......................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,12 Editorial/Letters...........................................P4 Advt .........................................................P11 Sports ..................................................P8,9.10 BUSINESS SECTION Business.....................................P1,2,3,4,5,8 Comics .....................................................P6 Weather ....................................................P7 CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES USA TODA Y MAIN SECTION 12 P AGES POLICE yesterday were still questioning an officerw ho is accused of raping a 15y ear-old girl while in custody at the Central Police station earlier this week. According to officer-incharge of the Central Police S tation Glenn Miller, the alleged victim had been t urned over to the station by relatives who "rendered her uncontrollable.” She was slated to be transferred to the Williemae PrattC entre for Girls, but while in custody on Tuesday night she was allegedly sexually assaulted by an officer at the Central Police Station, police said. C hief Supt Miller said once t he complaint was filed at his station, the case was immediately turned over to the Central Detective Unit (CDU " The allegations that the teen was sexually assaulted w ere made at Central through my inspector and we immediately alerted the Central Detective Unit," he told The Tribune yesterday. T he officer was taken into custody early Wednesday and up to press time last night was still being questioned at CDU. O fficials yesterday said a d ecision would be made today on whether the officer would be charged or released from custody. Allegations P olice would not comment when asked if there was physi cal evidence to support the sexual assault allegations. "The officer is still here being questioned. “At this (point tions are still continuing. “I don't know where the investigation is going to takeu s at this stage if there is e vidence (to support the allegation) the recommendation will be sent to have him charged," head of the CDU Supt Elsworth Moss said. T he teenager is currently in protective custody, Mr M oss added. Whether or not the officer will be suspended from duty will depend on the outcome of the police investigation. " He is in custody, the investigation is ongoing, and we haven't arrived at any outcome as yet. “We have to see what the i nvestigation will reveal, there w ill be a lot of decisions, we have to get there," Commissioner of Police Reginald Ferguson told The Tribune. Shift A ccording to police, between three to six officers a re usually present at a police station during a normal shift. However, police yesterday could not say how many officers were at the station when the alleged offence occurred. Officer accused of raping teen still being questioned By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net A NEW mother whose son was born three months early has pledgedh er support for the ‘Breathe Easy’ c ampaign to provide Princess Margaret Hospital’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with new ventilator machines. Lori Burrows, 22, of Exuma, gave birth to her son Loren on July 13, only 25 weeks after conception, and h e is currently being kept alive on a s tate-of-the-art Puritan Bennett ven tilator system the kind BreatheE asy wants to raise $300,000 to purc hase. A t first the tiny baby was placed on one of the standard ventilators used at Princess Margaret Hospital,b ut when the out-dated machine failed to produce enough pressure to pump oxygen to his tiny lungs he was trans-f erred to the new ventilator currently on loan to the hospital. In his short life, young Loren has suffered from a stroke, blood infec t ion, chest infection, excess fluid in h is lungs, and he has an open heart valve which may need an operation. He is not able to breathe on his own. As well as supplying sufficient oxy gen, the more sensitive ventilator has an alarm function to alert nurses if t he infant has complications. A nurse in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit said the equipment is vitalt o care for the premature babies com monly born at PMH. Ms Burrows said: “The doctors and nurses explained how (my son e d it because the others aren’t up to the standard he needs, and since he has gone on it he has got much better. “I am very grateful because if he d idn’t have it he wouldn’t be at the level he is at now. “He is not able to breathe on his o wn, but he is active. He moves around and looks around, he’s alert, and he’s perfect to me. My baby isg oing to be just fine, he is just taking his own time.” Ms Burrows started going into ear ly labour on June 29 and was rushedt o Nassau where she received stitches to stave off a premature birth. But determined young Loren was born two weeks later, nearly threem onths before his due date, and the day his mother had intended to return home to Exuma. S he is now staying with family in N assau and spending every day at her son’s side. As she celebrated his 31stday birthday yesterday, she counted her blessings. The young mother said: “The doctors and nurses have all been absolutely wonderful to me, they take very g ood care of him, and if there’s a p roblem they will let me know, but they won’t kill your hopes. I have seen b abies go down and they come runn ing and if they lose a baby they feel i t. “I am so grateful for this ventilator because if Loren didn’t have it hem ight not be here today. Some babies are born at 23 or 24 weeks, and they would absolutely not survive on those old ventilators, they would need this from birth. “Every day a new baby comes in premature, and it’s about time our healthcare system got on par withe verybody else,” she said. The Breathe Easy campaign has been organised by Builder’s Mall,T ile King, Tribune Media, Doctor’s Hospital, The Rotary Club of East Nassau, and Bahamas Realty, who have already committed $20,000 tot he project. T o make a donation, please con tact The Tribune or Mark Roberts at FYP on Wulff Road. Cheques shouldb e made payable to the Princess Mar garet Hospital Foundation. Mother of premature baby backs ‘Breathe Easy’ campaign DR CARLOS THOMAS with baby Loren on the Puritan Bennett 840 ventilator system in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Princess Margaret Hospital. By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net S TORMY activity o ver Hispaniola yesterday was expected to bring wind and rain to New Providence by late this afternoon or early Saturday, according to meteorologists. Meanwhile, a midAtlantic weather syst em which forecasters h ad been eyeing weakened from a tropical depression to a tropi-cal wave, but in its wake an “impressive” new weather system looks set to strengthen i nto a tropical depress ion shortly. That makes three s ystems brewing in the A tlantic for forecasters to watch. By next week there may be three named Atlantic basin systems Ana, Bill and Claudette, according t o the United States b ased AccuWeather. Both the midA tlantic wave and the s ystem following b ehind it are projected to head in the general direction of theB ahamas over the next couple of days, although it is too early to say whether they will affect us directly. The front-running system which was over Hispaniola and theE astern Caribbean sea y esterday brought clouds to the southe astern Bahamas dur i ng the afternoon, and was set to bring rain and winds of around 15mph to 25mph in thee vening, ahead of its anticipated impact on the central and north ern Bahamas today. Chief Meteorologist Basil Dean said that by later today and intoS aturday, the central a nd northern Bahamas is expected to get rain and winds of between 15mph and 20mph. M r Dean added that the most recent weath-er system to come off the West African coast “looks impressive and could possibly form into something, but will take a little while.” The system was located around 250 miles south of the Cape Verde Islands yesterday afternoon. “It just came off the coast today. Once over warm water things could start to develop quite rapidly once upper level conditions are favourable,” he said. Meteorologists eyeing new ‘impressive’ weather system AN AMERICAN drowned while on a diving trip with his father near Abaco, police said. Eric Searcy, a 28-yearold resident of Florida was on a 24-foot vessel on a diving trip near Scotland Cay, Abaco around 6.30pm on Wednesday. According to police, Eric went into the water and was not seen again. His father dove into the water and found his son in a "motionless state,” press liaison officer Chief Supt Walter Evans said. "The victim was retrieved and attempts were made to administer CPR to no avail. Eric was taken to the local clinic where he was pronounced dead.” Police suspect that the victim drowned. Howev er, an autopsy will be per formed to confirm the exact cause of death. American dr owns on diving trip KEVIN FERGUSON presents a cheque of $5,000 to Princess Margaret Hospital communications officer Thelma Rolle as part of the effort to raise $300,000 for new ventilator machines. Tile King donates $5,000 to campaign

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EDITOR, The Tribune . It's delightful to read all the talk about our educational woes and I applaud Mr. Carl Bethel, Minister of Education for at least openly discussing the dismal exam results of our children. That's a giant first step for a politician in my not so humble opinion, and just might start paving the way for the education department and teachers to realise their responsibility in this process. Back in 1999, I was taken to task for advocating vouchers and privatisation of our s chool system by statists and teachers alike, who, in spite of the evidence of decades before them, they continue to believe that the government can move the educational system in the right direction. The same applies to someone calling himself "Simon" who recently wrote in his column in The Nassau Guardian that: "...too many parents shun their basic obligations to review homework, turn off the television and fill their homes with books rather than digital games, resulting in lacklustre g raduation rates and scores of school-leavers who are basically illiterate and innumerate." This is a cop out. We know this has been the case for twenty-five years or more now, as a result of our single parent homes, and the edu cational system has not adapted. A sad commentary for the body responsible for providing education for the vast majority of Bahamian child ren. I'm no behavioural scientist, but maybe if a generation or two get the education t hey deserve they might be better at parenting? "Simon" goes on to say: "Meanwhile, those bedazzled by the type of school vouchers debated in the U.S. may wish to draw their starspangled gaze home, recognizing how their fervent desires, sustained by succes-s ive governments, are closer than imagined." "Grant-in-aid is our tax dollars subsidizing our children’s education in non-state schools, a practice prohibited in the U.S. school system. Another name for grant-inaid: vouchers!" I must admit to being bedazzled by the prospect of vouchers, because the status quo is dealing our children a lousy hand. B ut to suggest that grantin-aid is a voucher programme is simply misleading. I am not aware of current numbers, but if my failingm emory serves me well, sev eral years back, private schools received something like $250,000 per annum from the Government in grant-inaid. This is hardly a voucher system. As I'm sure "Simon" k nows, a voucher system, in simple terms, is where the government determines the cost per student in the state system, and gives parents a cheque payable to the school of their choice so their children might receive a better education if their neighbourhood school is failing them. This might mean that parents who choose to accept the v oucher will have to pay a little more out of pocket to send their child to a private school, because they know that success comes from sacrifice. "Simon", confirming his statist views, also points to the "needs of smaller island communities in our far-flung archipelago," as if local leadership in our family islands are incapable of ensuring children receive a sound education. It happened before government took the educational system over, and it can happen again. If the private sector were providing educational services like the state run system, people would be screaming from the roof tops about the need to pass a law to ensure the private system is made accountable. So why do we not hear the same cry from "Simon" and his comrades int he case of our government run schools? Keep the information com ing Mr. Bethel, the first step t o improvement is admitting you have a problem. Besides, I think you know that future generations of Bahamians deserve better. Yours in Liberty, RICK LOWE www.weblogbahamas.com August 12, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WE FIND Senator Jerome Fitzgerald’s comment most amusing that if Government w ere to go ahead with the transfer of Bay Street’s port to Arawak Cay it would devalu e all nearby properties. The Senator is probably too young to r emember that it was his own party after it became the government in 1967 that succeeded in destroying the value of this wholea rea well into exclusive Cable Beach. That w as 42 years ago. So what’s the good senator b leating about now? S hortly after it came to power the PLP had its own plans to move the port terminal from Bay Street to what is now Arawak Cay. Y ou know when one lives long enough, life can really be amusing especially to see a Johnny-come-lately tripping over his own h istory. Kelly Island now Arawak Cay rose f rom the sea with the fill dredged from Nas sau’s harbour early in 1966. The Kelly Island project was started under the UBP admin i stration when the Maritime Minister was the late Trevor Kelly the man after whom the island was named. T hat year the UBP was rushing to have 25 acres of the eastern end of Kelly Island completed so that construction could be startedo n a first class hotel by November 1, 1966. Holiday Inn was to be the first of several h otels planned for the island. However, in September Hurricane Faith threatened to slow the project when sand dredged up started to slip back into the sea from the impact of the high waves washing over the island. B y that time only 500 feet of the 3,000-foot western breakwater had been completed. Early the next year the PLP by a narrow m argin removed the UBP from the seat of government. Kelly Island was caught in limbo. After spending what seemed an interminably long time squabbling among them s elves as to who was to get a ministerial post before they could form a functioning government, the PLP eventually settled down to l ook at the job at hand. Of course, at that time in our history any thing to do with the UBP was the “kiss of d eath” and had to go. And so the name Kelly Island was the first name earmarked for removal. A schoolc ompetition was held for the renaming of the island, and Arawak Cay was the name that won the competition. The situation then got racial. The landowners in the Cable Beach area who w ould be directly affected by the future use o f Kelly Island became concerned. When a two-storey cargo terminal started t o be erected on the eastern end of the island the area earmarked for the Holiday Inn residents were convinced that a black government was deliberately trying to devalue their properties. It is true that the area around what was by then Arawak Cay quickly lost its charm and several property owners q uietly moved out. It was announced at the time that the t erminal, which would take nine months to build, would provide office space upstairs a nd cargo storage facilities on the ground floor. It was reported that the surplus cargo f rom Prince George Dock would be stored at A rawak Cay and that the Customs Departm ent would be transferred to office space u pstairs. Already Prince George had started to move to Arawak and a new port was in the making. B ut there was a lot of dithering as though no one quite knew what to do once the mons trous steel shed was completed. It was u ncertain whether the PLP government would proceed with its plans to transfer all f reight activity to Arawak Cay. In those days there was no talk of environment impact assessment studies the PLP justp ut down pilings wherever and whenever the spirit moved them. Former Communications Minister Arthur F oulkes now Sir Arthur had advocated a separation of freight and passenger activity at Prince George to alleviate thec ongestion at the dockside and on Bay Street. A t the time Mr Foulkes pointed out that there were several considerations motivating the decision to move the terminal to Arawak Cay. He anticipated that with the harbour completed, there would be a great increase inf reight activity requiring additional sheds and facilities for containerized cargo and a roll-on roll-off service. A dding to this was the problem created by an increasing number of tourists landing directly in Nassau from cruise ships at the pier. Today the argument for transfer from Bay S treet to Arawak has not changed. In the end the customs shed remained a crumbling eyesore, and quietly a shipping p ort grew up at Arawak Cay. Other than let it crumble into disrepair, the PLP gov ernment did nothing more constructive with t he cay. Today Senator Fitzgerald also complains that the transfer of the port to Arawak Cayw ill kill Arawak’s fish fry business. Quite the contrary. These small business persons should be delighted any busy port will bring an increase in business. A s for the argument about Saunders B each, we think the removal of the scenic casuarina trees from the area will do more h arm to the beauty of Saunders Beach than the port being transferred to Arawak Cay. Quite frankly, Senator Fitzgerald, we think you are creating a lot of hot air from atop a shaky wicket. Education debate: the first step to improvement LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Senator should recall his PLP plan ::IMPERIALOPTICAL ::ROSETTASTREETAND ::THEMALL-AT-MARATHON FORMOREINFO CALL 322 OR 393GET A FREE FRAMEwith the purchase of LensesBACK TO SCHOOLAND T’INGSTOUGH ? SALEAPPLIESTOSELECTEDFRAMES.SALEENDSAUGUST31,2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. I agree with Miss Bahamas’ family. Ever since winning the Miss Bahamas pageant in May, she has been subjected to the cruelest form of ridicule and attack that I can remember in Bahamian pageant history. This is truly very sad. The nasty attacks made against her online by rumours, lies, innuendoes and photographs in so many of the forums have been nothing short of disgraceful; we should be ashamed as a nation. And to think that it would even continue while the Miss Universe pageant is actually going on here in our country. I must admit that I was also surprised that your newspaper would carry a story complaining about her not being at the airport without even trying to get a statement from her or the National Miss Universe franchise holder. I think anyone with any common sense would know that while she is a contestant in the Miss Universe pageant, she does not choose whether, where and when she goes to any event. Yes she deserves our support 100 per cent but it seems like in our country we just can’t seem to get over the problem of only “Mr or Mrs so-and-so’s” children deserve to be anybody. My family supports Miss Sherman 100 per cent. Another ghetto family that has succeeded. GHETTO FAMILY Nassau, August 9, 2009 Miss Bahamas deser ves our 100 per cent suppor t

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By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net TESTIMONY in the tria l of a man charged with the January 2008 murder of a C R Walker studentc ontinued yesterday with another eyewitness giving h is account of the incident. Jamal Penn, 21, is charged in the January 7, 2 008 shooting death of Deangelo Cargill Fowler, 1 8. Penn is being represented by attorney Murrio Ducille. Yoland Rolle and J ilian Williams are prosecuting the case. F owler was shot in broad daylight as he stood on a bus stop on Bay and Fred-e rick Streets. Taking to the stand yest erday, a witness, whose name is being withheld b ecause he is a juvenile, recalled that he had beens tanding under a canopy on the western side of Fred erick Street along with sev e ral of his friends when he n oticed a car playing load music. H e told the court that the car stopped at the traffic light on Bay Street. T he witness said that at that time he was not able t o see the persons in the car, but got a better look for about 30 seconds to am inute when the green Honda slowly turned south o nto Frederick Street. The two persons in the car were laughing, he said. T he witness told the c ourt that the car had a lready passed him when the person in the front passenger seat stuck his head out of the window with a gun in his hand and fired two shots. T he witness testified that he was able to see the gunman’s face at this point. He also said that on Jan u ary 21 he went to the C entral Detective Unit ( CDU) where he waited for five hours before an identification parade was c onducted. Penn’s attorney Mr Ducille suggested to t he witness that he had come to court to embellish his story as he went along.T he witness denied this suggestion. A nother witness, Detective Sergeant Reno Armaly, told the court yest erday that around 1.40pm o n Sunday, January 20, he a nd two other officers on mobile patrol, acting on information, went to a house on St Croix Street off Carmichael Road. There, he said, they o bserved a heavily tinted Chevrolet Lumina car with no license plates attached. Detective Sergeant Armalyt old the court that he ident ified himself as a police officer and moments later the passenger door of caro pened. He said a man wearing a black jacket, black shirt and blue jeans got out of the car with his hands in t he air. Detective Sergeant A rmaly told the court that h e showed the man a warrant and told him that hew as suspected of the mur d er of Deangelo Fowler. A ccording to the officer, t he man replied, “I am not Jamal Penn, my name is Tony Smith.” D etective Sergeant Armaly said that the man, who he identified in court as murder accused Jamal Penn, was arrested and taken to the Carmichael Road Police Station and then to C DU. D uring cross-examina t ion, Detective Sergeant Armaly said that he foundn othing unlawful on the a ccused and that there had been another individual in car who was not wanted by p olice. I nspector Cedric Bullard t old the court that shortly after 2pm on January 21 hec onducted an identification p arade at CDU. H e said that he gave P enn a consent form which the accused read and signed before the identifi c ation parade was held. Inspector Bullard said that Penn had a lawyer present at the time. During cross-examination he testified that Bran don Russell was the first toa ttend the identification p arade. Penn was among n ine other men in the lineup, he said. T he trial continues today a t 10 am. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009, PAGE 5 Only forty-eight nautical miles east of Miami, Florida, situated on the North end of North Bimini, Bahamas Bimini Bay Resort & Marina complex rests on over 740 acres of pristine Bahamian beaches. Long known as a paradise for anglers and divers alike, Bimini Bay Resort offers a plethora of options for the most discriminating traveller. Bimini Bay Management Ltd. owns and operates Bimini Bay Resort & Marina.Bimini Bay Resort & Marina seeks to hire a professional individual for the following position: Requirements: /LFHQVHG%RDW&DSWDLQ (LJKWWR7ZHOYH\HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQ0DULQD
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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE B y MATT MAURA B ahamas Information Services JOHNSON BAY The re-opening of the Miriam Green Community Healthcare Centre in South Androsw ill lead to the expansion of primary healthcare services to residents, Minister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis said on Wednesday. H e said this will be accomp lished through the provision o f dental, X-ray, emergency treatment and maternal services. X-ray services will be available when the machine arrives within the next week. Dr Minnis said the dental chair has been repaired and that those services will also b egin “shortly.” A mong dignitaries present w ere Picewell Forbes, Member of Parliament for South Andros, and officials of the M inistry of Health, the Department of Public Health, and the National InsuranceB oard. T he centre is named in honour of Miriam Green, a midwife and grandmother whose contributions to the delivery of maternal and child healthcare services, particularly int he area of midwifery, are legendary in the South Andros community. Dr Minnis said the re-opening of the centre is also a part of the government’s objective t o ensure equitable access to q uality healthcare services for all residents of the Bahamas. Built in 1991 under a grant f rom the National Insurance Board, the facility has faced numerous challenges since its construction. A t one point it was even closed which resulted in the relocation of the services o ffered there to other facilities. The Health Minister assured South Andros resi d ents that the healthcare cen tre will be fully utilised in their b est interests. “Despite the (previous challenges, we celebrate the achievements made and l aunch the re-opening of this f acility which will facilitate the achievement of a key goal of the Ministry of Health and the Department of Public Health, which is the availability of quality, primary healthcare s ervices for all residents of the B ahamas,” he said. Dr Minnis said the re-opening of the centre is “evidence”o f the Ministry of Health and the Department of Public Health’s commitment to i mproving quality primary h ealthcare services througho ut the country. For 30 years, the Ministry o f Health and the Department of Public Health have implemented the recommendeds trategy of primary and public h ealthcare as mandated by the World Health Organisation ( WHO) to ensure equitable access to essential healthcare services for all persons. Some of those services, Dr M innis said, are geared towards promotion, prevention and education. Our goal is to ensure that this community and others like it throughout the Bahamas receive the best pri m ary healthcare they possibly c an,” Dr Minnis said. “That includes access to healthcare services of the standard that is received byp ersons living in New Providence and the other major c entres.” Dr Minnis said statistics compiled by his ministry showed that over the past fivey ears up to 10,000 visits, approximately, have been m ade annually to healthcare facilities in Andros. The re-opening of the cen tre will help to facilitate even g reater care to residents in this regard, he said. Healthcare Centre ‘will lead to’ expansion of primary care By LINDSAY THOMPSON THE People’s Republic of China awarded four Bahamian students with full scholarships to pursue tertiary level education at various institutions in China over the next four years. Acting Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette congratulated the students during a ceremony at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs on Wednesday. “These young people are an inspiration, choosing as they have, to study in a country vastly different from their own, and to learn another language,” Mr Symonette said. The scholarship recipients are Courtney Dames, finance; Joelle Miller, Chinese language and culture; Jonathan Pratt, biological engineering; and Carlton Wright II, communication engineering. This brings the number of Bahami ans who have benefitted from the Chinese scholarship programme to 23. Based on their qualifications and field of study, they were chosen from seven applicants reviewed by a pre-selection committee comprising staff of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The names of the applicants were then forwarded to the Embassy of the People’s Repub lic of China in Nassau for approval. The Bahamas and the People’s Republic of China established diplomatic relations in May 1997. Since then, Bahamian students have pursued higher education at the Bachelor’s and Master’s levels in a range of disciplines from manufacturing and design of clothing and apparel to medicine, astrophysics/astronomy, international business management, marketing, Chinese culture, language and architecture. “These young Bahamians have been able to do so with scholarships awarded by the govern ment of the People’s Republic of China, through the China Scholarship Council,” Mr Symonette said. “Some of the earlier recipients have completed their studies and are contributing to the growth and development of the Bahamas.” He urged the students to be “good ambassadors” for the Bahamas while in China and to take full advantage of the opportunity to learn and become fluent in the language of the fastest growing economy in the world. “We look forward to welcoming you back to the Bahamas at the conclusion of your studies,” he told students. “We are confident that you will be well pre pared to play your necessary role in the further development of our country.” Mr Symonette also expressed appreciation to the government of China for the technical assistance and cooperation extended to the Bahamas over the past 12 years. Ambassador of the People’s Republic of China Hu Dingxian said that it was a great pleasure to be a part of the 2009/10 annual awards to four Bahamian students. He advised the students to enrich themselves with the new knowledge and skills they will obtain during their studies. On behalf of the students, Courtney Dames, who pursues studies in finance, said they look forward to the challenge to enhance their education and learn a new language. LEFT: Vera Cleare, nursing officer II and clinic supervisor of the Miriam Green Community Healthcare Centre (left t akes Minister of Health Dr H ubert Minnis (right c ials on a tour of the renovated and re-opened centre in South Andros. It was named in honour of midwife Mrs Miriam Green (second left Her husband Euthal is pictured, third left. Algernon C argill, director of the Nationa l Insurance Board is also s hown. M INISTER OF HEALTH D r Hubert Minnis (at podium a ddresses residents of Johnson Bay, South Andros, during t he re-opening ceremonies of the Miriam Green Communit y Healthcare Centre on Wednesday. Four Bahamians awarded Chinese scholarships THE GOVERNMENT of the People’s Republic of China awarded four Bahamians full scholarships to pursue tertiary level education in China. Pictured from left are Jonathan Pratt, biological engineering; Acting Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette; Courtney Dames, finance; Joelle Miller, Chi nese language and culture; Chinese Ambassador to the Bahamas Hu Dingxian; and Carlton Wright II, communication engineering. H AVANA THE FOUNDERof a New York-based church group that opposes the U.S. embargo of Cuba said Thursday that former Cuban President Fidel Castro looked strong and animated during a July 31 meeting, a ccording to Associated Press. The Rev. Lucius Walker Jr. of Pastors for Peace toldThe Associated Press he met for several hours with Castro at a Havana-area home while he was in Cuba to organize a humanitarian aid shipment. P astors for Peace posted two photos of the meeting on its Web site to coincide with Castro’s 83rd birthday Thursday. “He looked good, like he had gained weight, was sharp and articulate. I hadn’t seen him for three or four years,” Walker said by telephone from New York. “He showed tremendous signs of recovery from a very serious illness.” Castro ceded power to his brother, Raul, after he fell ill three years ago and has not been seen in public since. He stepped down as president in February 2008. Walker said he also met with Raul Castro on July 26 outside Havana and that the president mentioned “that conversation, in the nature of dialogue, between U.S. and Cuban representatives is under way.” Raul Castro didn’t offer details, Walker said. Fidel Castro marks 83rd birthday with essay

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boyfriend said. One of the men then held the knife to her throat and put on a condom to rape her while the other stood guard. Her boyfriend said she did not scream for help because she was afraid she would be killed. After he raped her the man forced her to wash and get rid of the evidence. He and his accomplice then raided the house for valuable goods and stole around $1,000 in cash, as well as jewellery and other items, before making their escape. The woman called police and w ent to the hospital for examination, crying, bruised and complaining of stomach pains. And now she is concerned the men will get away with the crime and strike again. A source in the police force told The Tribune this week there have been five rapes or attempted rapes in eastern New Providence over the last month which followed a trend as the rapist forced his victims to wash afterwards, took bed sheets and other evidence away with him, and on occasions he at least attempted to use a condom. Assistant Commissioner of Police Raymond Gibson did not expand on details when questioned by The Tribune , and confirmed only two rapes and two attempted rapes in eastern New Providence in the five months since March. Former Crime Stoppers advo cate Lucia Broughton slammed police for not informing the public about the attacks and warning vulnerable women to be vigilant. Her stand was echoed in a poll on The Tribune website where 111 of 113 respondents said police should warn the public by informing them about crime. As the 36-year-old raped on Sunday morning recovers from the attack, her boyfriend said he is angry she had not been warned. He said: “I get the feeling he has to be a serial rapist. If a man can stand up in front of you and use protection, and make her bathe after he finished, in case they check, he has to be someone who has done it before; a one-time rapist isn’t going to think about it like that. “The police should warn peo ple. There are a lot of young girls around, and we might hear about a couple of rapes, but we have not been told about all of the people who have been raped. “The police are supposed to protect us, that’s what they’re there for. They should be warning people about these rapes and tell them to stay on their guard.” The former police officer said he wanted to speak out to warn others about the risk of attack as police chiefs stay quiet. He advises women to take whatever precautions they can to make their homes safe, by installing alarm systems, or bars on doors and windows, to prevent break-ins. He said: “I worked for the police and I know if you have got a confrontation like that, you can’t just scream for help because you have to be careful or they will kill you. “We have to protect ourselves, however we can, to pre vent people from breaking into our homes. We have to be care ful.” Calls to Police Commissioner Reginald Ferguson, Assistant Commissioner Raymond Gib son and Chief Superintendent in charge of the Criminal Detective Unit Elsworth Moss did not return calls from The Tribune before press time yesterday. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009, PAGE 7 77+(%/,& :HZLVKWRDGYLVHWKDWDOORXURIFHV LQFOXGLQJDVVDX)UHHSRUW$EDFR t([XPDZLOOEH FORVHGRQ )ULGD\ $XJXVW WK IRURXUFRPSDQ\ $QQXDO)XQ'D\ :HDSRORJLVHIRUDQ\ LQFRQYLHQHQFHFDXVHG a t the Golden Gates Shopping Centre on the corner of Baillou Hill Road and Carmichael Road to accept payment. But police became concerned that they might be set up and arranged to meet the man at the Bamboo Shack in Carmichael Road instead. One of the officers, a reserve police officer, asked to be d ropped off in order to avoid the illegal transaction, while the s econd cop met the man at the Bamboo Shack to accept the bribe, according to the source. He said: “The police are now resorting to all sorts of criminality and something has to be wrong for that to happen to that Haitian man. I want the Police Commissioner to investigate this behavi our and stop corruption in the force.” C ommissioner of Police Reginald Ferguson did not return calls from The Tribune before press time last night. ter Evans: "We have two persons being quest ioned by police, a man and a woman." Mrs Soles-Armony was shot outside her mother's home in the Sea Breeze area around 8pm last Friday as she sat in a car breast-feed ing her three-month-old son. According to a family friend, the 29-year-old had just returned to her mother's house with h er two younger sisters and two young sons after a day at the mall. With her sisters and eldest son at her mothe r's front door, TaGia stayed behind to feed her son when a gunman approached her vehi cle and shot her. R esidents heard her scream: "No! No! No! Don't do that!" Injured, and with her son in her arms, TaGia tried desperately to escape her attacker only to rear-end a parked car and hit two other parked vehicles nearby before coming to a stop. A passenger in the rear-ended car reportedly rescued the infant, whose face was said to be c overed in his mother's blood. But when police a rrived on scene TaGia was already dead. Nearby residents believe the gunman, who had reportedly approached the car after the c rashes, was scared off by people who had come to inspect the commotion. Family and friends believe TaGia – who h ad just returned home from St Kitts where she lived with her husband – may have been a victim of mistaken identity or the target of ana rmed robbery gone wrong. Investigators have not yet established a motive for the killing but are probing several possible scenarios. "We hear a lot of things and we are looking at all the information we are getting to see if there is any evidence to substantiate those," head of the Central Detective Unit Superin tendent Elsworth Moss told The Tribune yesterday. Because, you know I don’t operate the church. We have a board and we have a lawyer and so everything was done above board. Nothing was done by myself.” Bishop Davis said he had no idea of the value of the land when it was initially purchased in 2007, or whether or not there was any increase from the initial price given the fact that the purpose for the property had changed from an altruistic one to a commercial enterprise. In fact, Bishop Davis said, he does not know where Prime Minister Ingraham got the idea that the property was going to be used for an old folk’s home, noting that the ministry already has an old folk’s home next to the church. “They have that story all mixed up and I would prefer you to talk to the church lawyer instead of talking to me,” he said. However, when The Tribune contacted the church’s attorney, Anjanette Pyfrom, she said she had not as yet been authorised by the Bishop to speak on the church’s behalf. Therefore, she said, she could not answer any questions or speak on any issues relating to the church’s subdivision at this time. Bishop Davis continued: “The church has a lawyer and I think you need to talk to her or talk to the former Prime Minister.” According to documents, the 3.75 acres of Crown land near Fire Trail Road, granted by government to the church for $2,500, was, in a later agreement, to be administered by Arawak Homes. An irrevocable power of attorney, dated June 4, 2007, was signed on June 21, 2007 in the chambers of Sharon Wilson and Co, by Bishop Roston Davis with the “authority of two thirds of the membership of Golden Gates Assembly and World Outreach Ministries.” The subdivision is known as Ross Davis Estates. Golden Gates Assembly and World Outreach Ministries “for good and valuable consideration” appointed Arawak Homes Limited “to be its lawful attorney for the purpose of exercising all the following powers” Included in those powers the land was to be subdivided into a residential community, with roadways, paths and lots “in such size and dimensions as Arawak Homes deems fit.” Arawak Homes was also to acquire the necessary government permits and approvals, and to construct single family homes on all of the lots. Arawak was to enter into an agreement for sale with purchasers and to receive the money for the lots. It was also to insure against any risk or liability that could affect the lots. The power of attorney, said the agreement, was “irrevocable.” It declared that every “receipt, release, conveyance, instrument and assurance” done by Arawak Homes were to be treated as if done by Golden Gates Assembly. During a debate in the House of Assembly on July 20, Prime Minister Ingraham tabled a number of documents outlining the disposition of pub licly held Crown lands over the past few decades. Speaking specifically on land that was issued to various churches, Mr Ingraham paused and digressed from his prepared text noting how “interesting” the case surrounding the Golden Gates Assembly church was. “Now Golden Gates is an interesting one because I approved for Golden Gates tob uild an old folks home. The conveyance was signed by my predecessor in office (Perr y Christie). The land was sold and a housing subdivision is on it, named after the reverend,” Mr Ingraham said. Bishop Davis said he is not bothered by the Prime Minister’s comments. Neither, he said, is he inclined to respond to rumours that he was able to pocket nearly $1 million through this land transaction. “I have no comment on that,” he said. “You are in the Bahamas, you are a Bahamian, you know how these things go, right? You know how the newspapers and people do it. I have the Lord’s work to do, I don’t have time to fool with these people. I have to pray, and I have a thousand and one things to do. “If you come to my office now people are out there waiting, saying ‘Bishop can you help me.’ That is my goal. Not to try to answer these things, because already the former Prime Minister has already said what he had to say. You know how government goes. No one could do a subdivision without government approval,” he said. In an earlier interview, former Prime Minister Perry Christie confirmed that it was he who signed off on the variation to the original Crown land grant issued to the Golden Gates Assembly church that created a housing subdivision instead of the intended old folks or community home. Claiming that there was the overriding concern at the time in the country for low cost housing, Mr Christie said he made this decision only after meeting with the leaders of the church who all confirmed their support on the change to the original grant. “At the time I did it I knew it was a variation and I signed off on it as a variation because at the time I was dealing with the fact that this was going to create home ownership and that is in fact exactly what happened,” he said. Mr Christie added that he effected a sec ond variation to a church application in respect of Bishop Simeon Hall which, he said, is expected to produce some housing development as well. Pastor hits back FROM page one FROM page one Man and woman quizzed F ROM page one Former officer Hubert Ingraham Claim that police let illegal Haitian go after being bribed FROM page one

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vacation. Local community activist Troy Garvey, founder of TOUCH (Trusting On Uniting Children’s Hearts), commended the young victim for coming forth. “It is sad to know that every day it seems like the victims of sexual molestation are getting younger and younger our children are not safe at school or in the church,” he told The Tribune after learning of the allegations being made against the teacher. “The arrest is indeed an eye-opener that persons are now coming forthand we would like to commend the children of this country who are stepping forth to expose these alleged child predators,” he said. Mr Garvey said that young victims are reluctant to come forward out of fear. Allegations of child molestation on Grand Bahama first broke in January at the Eight Mile Rock High School. Three teachers – two men and one woman have since been removed from the school over complaints of alleged molestation and sexual mis conduct. Mr Garvey, EMRHS PTA president, criticised the Ministry of Education for its “poor” handling of investigations into complaints against former teacher Andre Birbal, the first of three Eight Mile Rock teachers accused of molestation at Eight Mile Rock High. Birbal, 46, fled the country in February after police launched investigations into complaints made by two former male students who claimed Birbal molested them. Police issued a warrant of arrest for Birbal with Interpol, in March, for questioning into unnatural sexual intercourse. He was arrested by US authorities on May 3 on a traffic violation in New York. The Attorney General has submitted all relevant documents requesting the extradition of Birbal, who is a native of Trinidad. Mr Garvey commended the police for the work they are doing in the community, especially as it relates to child molestation matters. “There are people out there preying on our children in the schools and TOUCH will continue to work feverishly in the community of Grand Bahama and the Bahamas to make sure the students are safe,” Mr Garvey stressed that the government needs to vet all teachers, and not just new teachers that are coming into the public school system. “We have to do a thorough job because our children are being destroyed and taken advantage of,” he said. it suspects of falsifying sick notes to the BMC and the Attorney General’s Office for further action. Hundreds of nurses staged a mass sick-out in June, disrupting health ser vices throughout the country, after the Bahamas Nurses Union stated its displeasure with government postponing its anticipated health insurance coverage. BNU President Cleola Hamilton maintained that the action was no strike and all of the nurses were genuinely ill, with sick notes to prove it. Yesterday Dr Minnis said that the government is concerned about some doctors who “would’ve written in excess of 50 notes,” as well as others who supplied in the region of 20 or 30 for various nurses. I n one case government has reason to believe that a doctor faxed a sick note to a nurse in Grand Bahama, making it all the more obvious that he/she could not have examined the nurse in question for any signs of ill health. For a doctor to knowingly write a sick note for a person who is well enough to go to work may be an “ethical issue” for which they could face penalties, noted the minister, himself a physician. “We compiled all the information and sent it to the Attorney General’s Office so they can deal with it appro priately. The Medical Council also has regulations to deal with those matters,” said Dr Minnis. As for exactly what action government could take against doctors who are suspected of having assisted protesting nurses by providing fake slips, Dr Minnis said that is up to the Attorney General’s Office to review a nd determine. However, he suggested that by pushing the issue Government could also be striking a blow for the private sector, who have long complained to the Medical Association of the Bahamas, of which Dr Minnis is a former Presi dent, that they are concerned about the possibility that there are local doc-t ors who falsify sick notes for healthy workers. Complaints forwarded to the Medical Council are investigated by a Com plaints Committee formed of three members of the council. Under the Medical Act (1974 which governs the profession, a doctor can be struck off the register or otherwise disciplined if they engage in “serious professional misconduct.” Under Section 2(E conduct includes: “Knowingly giving a certificate with respect to birth, death, s tate of health, vaccination or disin fection or with respect to any matter relating to life, health or accidents which the medical practitioner knows or ought to know is untrue, misleading or otherwise improper.” Possible penalties for those found guilty of misconduct include removal of their name from the Register, there-b y ending their ability to practice medicine; suspension of registration for a period not exceeding one year; payment of a penalty not exceeding one thousand dollars; payment of costs as the committee may consider a reason able contribution towards “the cost incurred in connection with those pro ceedings.” The Tribune attempted to reach the Chairman of the Medical Council, Dr Duane Sands, for comment yesterday, however, he was said to be unavailable. T he move by government to bring to account doctors who may have assisted nurses seeking to skip work comes a week after Public Hospital Authority Herbert Brown revealed that nurses who exceeded their allotted sick days, or whose sick notes were found not to be valid, would face pay cuts this month. When we lose a member of staff who is scheduled to work we may have to bring somebody in to fill the shift...and then we are required to give them double-pay so it can be very cost ly,” Mr Brown said. Government and the nurses have yet to resolve the insurance row. By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Four Bahamian children diagnosed with lifethreatening illnesses travelled to New York this summer to attend Camp Good Days, a camp for children battling terminal illnesses. Grand Bahama resident Tanternika Johnson, Vance Poitier of Abaco, and Willinda Theodor and Alijah Lubin of New Providence, were among the 160 campers that spent two weeks in Branchport, New York. The camp is free to children from all over the world who are diagnosed with illnesses, such as cancer. Camp Good Days was founded by Gary Mervis in 1979 when his daughter, Teddi, was diagnosed with a malignant brain tumour. The vision for the camp grew and became a summer camp where children battling childhood cancer could come together to share goods days – away from hospitals and treatment regimes. Dorothy Goldsmith accompan ied Johnson, 17, and Poitier, 14, who both suffer from Sickle Cell A naemia. She said that she was first introduced to the camp, in 2007, by longtime US visitor Joe Kohler, who is now the official Regional Director of Camp Good Days for the Bahamas. M rs Goldsmith said the camp caters to children between ages 71 8 from all over the world. “Children with life-threatening illnesses lose a lot of their childhood; they miss out on vacations and lose time away from school because of treatments, and the camp allows them to meet other people with similar illness and share joyful experiences together,” she said. T he camp celebrated its 30th anniversary this year. Mrs Goldsmith hopes to assist other youngsters suffering from illnesses in Grand Bahama to attend the next year’s camp, in 2010. Although the camp is free, she noted that sponsors are needed to pay for the cost of airfare for the children. S he thanked businessman Mario Donato, Princess Taylor, manager of Municipal Motors Ltd, and Terry Goldsmith of Docagold Trading Company for sponsoring the two campers from Grand Bahama and Abaco. She stated that the campers are exposed to all sorts of activities, including arts and crafts, archery, b asketball, cookie baking, com puter games, fishing, mini-golf, music, nature tours, rope courses, sailing, scuba, swimming and woodwork. They are also taken on offcamp field trips to major league soccer games, shopping at Walmart and Factory Outlets near Syracuse, and visit the Science Centre in Ithaca, NY. Campers Johnson and Poitier said they enjoyed their stay at Camp Good Days. “It was a great to meet people from other countries who have the same disease as me and it was wonderful to meet the volunteers and counsellors,” said Miss Johnson. Vance Poitier said this trip was his second to the camp. “It was a nice experience for a second time meeting other children like me from other countries,” he said. Poitier was the recipient of the “Best Counsellor in Training” award for being the most helpful all around camper. “We were really pleased that Vance was selected best all around camper. At 14, he is an ambassador for the Bahamas; he is some thing special for us in the northern Bahamas, and we expect both campers to go and tell people of their experiences,” said Mrs Goldsmith. Johnson and Poitier thanked the sponsors by presenting them with Camp Good Days Recipe books. Mr Donato was very pleased to assist youngsters on Grand Bahama. “I have been a supporter of the YMCA for many years, and I wanted to do whatI can because the youth are the future of the Bahamas,” he said. Ms Taylor said Municipal was pleased to be a sponsor. Bahamian children fighting illness visit New York camp FOUNDERS OF Camp Good Days Wendy Mervis, left, and her husband Gary Mervis, (far right seen from left are Joe Kohler, Regional Director of Camp Good Days in the Bahamas; Vance Poitier of Abaco, Tanternika Johnson of Grand Bahama, Cora Pratt, the mother of Alihan Lubin and Willinda Theodor, of New Providence, and Dorothy Goldsmith of Grand Bahama. Teacher held in child sex probe F ROM page one FROM page one Doctors

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By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net BERLIN, Germany: The starting list for the events of the IAAF's 12th WorldC hampionships in Athletics was not scheduled to be released until late last night following the final technical committee meeting. But there are a total of 202 c ountries and 2,101 athletes r egistered with the Bahamas' 24-member delegation com peting in 4 different events. M anaged by Ralph McKin ney, the team is hoping to add to the 16 total medals, inclu s ive of seven gold, four silver, five bronze and the five fourth and fifth, two sixth and threes eventh and eighth place fini shes posted since the inception of the biannual champi onships in 1976 in Malmo. T he Bahamas, though the Bahamas didn't win its first medals until Gotenburg, Swe den in 1995 when Troy Kemp secured the gold in the high jump and Pauline DavisThompson got the silver in the w omen's 400 metres in a 30minute span. The Bahamas is coming off o ne of its finest championships in Osaka, Japan in 2007 when Donald Thomas soared to the top of the world in the men's h igh jump, Derrick Atkins sped to a stunning silver medal upset in the men's 100a nd the 4 x 400 relay team was j ust as brilliant with their silver medal feat. This year, the IAAF have a couple of out athletes ment ioned in their previews of the c hampionships here. In the women's 100, they have indicated that the sprint duo of Debbie FergusonMcKenzie and Chandra Stur r up have also rolled back the years to rediscover some outstanding form this year. Ferguson-McKenzie, 33, blitzed to her quickest time for six years – an impressive 1 0.97 posting in Monaco. Sturrup, 36, the two-time World championship 100 bronze medallist, recorded 10.99 inR ome for third, her fastest time for four years to suggest that the pair represent the c hief threat to the USJamaican duopoly. In the 200, FergusonM cKenzie, the 2001 World c hampion, who made her World Championship debut in Seville 10 years ago, couldp rovide the stiffest challenge to American Allyson Felix and Jamaican VeronicaC ampbell-Brown. With Ferguson-McKenzie and Sturrup running sub-11 second 100m times this sea s on, the Bahamas could pose a threat to get back on the podi um since the Golden Girls w on the 2000 Olympic title in Sydney, Australia. On the men's side, as the defending World high jumpc hampion, the IAAF is won dering if Thomas can get back t o his old form of 2007 in Osak a. And Atkins has had a lowkey season, having only ran ab est of 10.17 in April, so there too is some concern by the IAAF as to whether or not he w ill peak at the right time here. The Americans have a total of four competitors entered i n the men's 400 and the pro jection is that the quartet will finish in that order. C hris 'Bay' Brown, who has been knocking on the door with consecutive four placef inishes in the past two World's as well as the Olympic last year, is consid-e red to be the outside threat. Leevan 'Superman' Sands, the Olympic bronze medallist, is considered to be aC aribbean threat along with Randy Lewis of Grenada in t he men's triple jump. A s for the relay, the predic tion is that the United States will once again dominate, butw atch for the Bahamas to climb back on the podium after obtaining a medal at each of the last four World C hampionships (three silver a nd one bronze). Whatever the projections are, the Bahamian team isp oised and ready to compete when the championships get started on Saturday. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009, PAGE 9 Only forty-eight nautical miles east of Miami, Florida, situated on the North end of North Bimini, B ahamas Bimini Bay Resort & Marina complex rests on over 740 acres of pristine Bahamian beaches. Long known as a paradise for anglers and divers alike, Bimini Bay Resort offers a plethora of options for the most discriminating traveller. Bimini Bay Management Ltd. owns and o perates Bimini Bay Resort & Marina. %LPLQL%D\HVRUWtDULQDVHHNVWRKLUHTXDOLHGSURIHVVLRQDOV for the following positions:IT MANAGERResponsible for the ongoing maintenance and operation for all of the Information Technology implemented within the assigned Hotel. The position is responsible for the daily operation, support, and security of the technology and data that support and enable the business operation. 'HVLUHGHTXLUHPHQWVIURFLHQF\ :RUNH[SHULHQFHLQWKHHVRUW,QGXVWU\ %DFKHORUGHJUHHGLSORPDLQUHODWHGHOG &DOO$FFRXQW-D]] 3KRQHZLWFKRUWHO 0LFURV 306SHUDFOOD AND BEVERAGE DIRECTOROversee the function of all food and beverage outlets to ensure excellent customer VHUYLFHDQGPD[LPL]HUHYHQXHDQGSU'HYHORSLPSOHPHQWDQGPDLQWDLQTXDOLW\ standards for outlets, including supervision and direction of service staff. Ensure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in implementing, achieving and maintaining the resorts goals and objectives. :HRIIHUDQH[FHOOHQWEHQHWVSDFNDJHDQGFRPSHWLWLYHFRPSHQVDWLRQ)RUIXOO consideration, all interested applicants should forward a copy of their resum to the attention of atjobs@biminibayresort.com or fax to (242 By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net ONE of the country's premier q uartermilers has opted to shut down his 2009 season and withdraw from the IAAF World Championships in Athletics due to a persistent season-long injury. Andretti "The Bahamian Dream" Bain will be forced tof orego his World Championship debut due to the reaggravation of a hamstring injury suffered last Monday at the training camp for team Bahamas in Berlin, Germany. Bain first injured the hamstring s hortly before the 2009 season b egan in April leading to a series of disappointing performances. His personal best for the season was a time of 46.02s, June 27th runin New Providence. "I decided to withdraw from these games because I got tired r unning injured this year and just w anted to get healthy for next season without adding anymore damage," Bain said. "It was a situation where it was reaggravated. Initially I pulled it in April this year,t hree days before my first meet. S o basically, all year I was comp eting with an injured hamstring." Although disappointed with the outcome of the season and ultimately missing out on the bi-annual meet, the main event on the cal-e ndar for the international gove rning body of track and field, Bain s aid he looks forward to rebounding in 2010. "This meet was the reason why I competed all year injured. I worked extremely hard all seasona nd did not want the injury to hind er what I was on target to achieve. but after this reaggrevation at training camp this week, I just figured God had other things planned a nd so the decision suddenly b ecame an easy one," he said. "I a m ready to start off season traini ng now. But I will allow my leg to fully heal before doing so. 2009 was a disappointing season due to the constant injury, but 2010 will be great." F ollowing a 2008 season where B ain and other members of the 4 x400 relay team captured Olympic silver in Beijing, the team will be forced to attempt a similar feat at this year's World Championships without the services of two of itsk ey members, Bain and Andrae W illiams, also sidelined with an i njury. Despite the setback, Bain said he has confidence in the remaining members of the team to carry on the rich recent history ofB ahamian 4x400m squads. " The others members of the 4x400 remain in high spirits because this year we are extremely loaded with talent and so they w ill still be able to achieve great t hings with or without me," he said. L atoy Williams and Nathaniel a re expected to be possible replacements for the vacant slots left open by the injuries to Bain and Williams. Bain, the NCAA 2008 Indoor a nd Outdoor champion during his s enior season at Oral Roberts Univ ersity, who has enjoyed a virtually injury-free career thus far said his first major setback has taught him several valuable lessons applicable to life on and off thet rack. " I think this has definitely made m e hungrier. I have learned and matured a lot. I am a better person, and athlete because of it," he said. "The injury, it was a reality check. That is why I am constant-l y thanking God that I was able to c omplete my Master's Degree in Business, because one injury can end season, and in some cases a career. But I'm trusting 2010 will b e a great year for the “Bahamian D ream". A ndretti Bain THE popular and prestigious Bahamas Football Association National Academy concluded a successful three week programme, July 24, 2009 at the BFA National Centre for Football Develop ment in New Providence. One hundred and twentyone selected young Bahamian soccer players participated inthe Academy which included seven different age groups and representatives of three different islands. Again with a major focus on the development of the individual player, the Nation-al Academy convened specially selected players for par ticipation at U-9, U-11, U-13 and U-16 for boys and U-11, U-13 and U -16 for girls. The camp lasted for three weekswith sessions conducted Mon day to Friday commencing at 9:15 am and concluding at 3:00 pm daily. The National Academy convened a cadre of coaches trained to improve the players’ skill and decision making. Intensive sessions on technique and personality were conducted to bring out the very best in each partici pant. Sessions on the team building and Laws of the Game were also done on a regular basis to help the players overall development, with this year also seeing attention being given to the mental aptitude of the players. The Academy ended, as it always does, with comments from the Academy Directorand Coaches, as well as from BFA personnel. Academy Director Daria Adderley thanked all of the participants for their efforts and encour aged them to continue to work hard as they return to their respective clubs and school programmes. She then invited the group coaches to present the certificates to all of the participants. Each coach also presented special awards to “Best Performer” and “Most Improved” in each of the age divisions, with the following persons receiving the awards: U-9 Best Performer: Phieron Wilson (Dynamos FC, Garvin Tynes Primary) MOST IMPROVED: Travis Hunt (Bears FC, Queens College U-11 BOYS BEST PERFORMER: Marcellus Wilkinson (United FC, St. Cecilia School) MOST IMPROVED: Troy Hunt (Bears FC, Queens College U-11 Girls Best Performer: Taj Dorsett (Cavalier FC, St. Francis and Joseph) MOST IMPROVED: Sierra Donaldson (Cavalier FC, Queens Col lege). U-13 BOYS BEST PERFORMER: Ian Winder (Cavalier FC, Queens College) MOST IMPROVED: D’andre Lightbourne U-13 GIRLS BEST PERFORMER: Lindsay Seymour (United FC, St. Anne’s School) MOST IMPROVED: Faythe Miller (Cavalier FC, Queens College U-16 BOYS BEST PERFORMER: Duane Beneby (Bears FC, Prince William High School) MOST IMPROVED: Raymourn Sturrup (Baha Juniors FC, St. Andrews School) U-16 GIRLS BEST PERFORMER: Shelby Carbin (Cavalier FC, Queens College) MOST IMPROVED: Giovanna Ferguson (Bears FC, Temple Christian) BFA General Secretary Lionel Haven congratulated all of the participants on their selection and participation and also extended congratulations to the coaches for their hard work. He admonished the chil dren to continue to work hard, and further to take the lessons learned with them back to their respective club and school teams. Haven further advised the group that the BFA were concluding arrangements to bring in a Development Officer whose task will be to focus on youth development. His task will be to review the current youth development programmes including the Regional and National Academies, and make adjustments to these to improve them. As a result, he advised all of the participants to expect changes in the programme that will make it harder, but will result in them becoming better players as a result, and thus, to continue to work hard so that they will be the beneficiaries of these changes. Three week BFA development programme comes to a close Starting list of events set to be released Bain out with injured hamstring ATHLETES test the running set up inside the Olympic stadiump rior to World Athletics Championships in Berlin on Thursday, Aug. 13, 2009. Anja Niedringhaus/ AP Photo

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C M Y K C M Y K P AGE 10, FRIDAY, AUGUST14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE DATE OF BIRTH: November 9, 1980. AGE: 2 7-y ear s-old. SCHOOL: St. John’s College/ A ubur n U niv ersity. EVENT(S 1 00 metr es. BES T PERFORMANCE(S 1 1.26 seconds. HOBBIES: Bo wling, traveling, reading and watching movies. EXPECT ATIONS: T o r epresent the Bahamas well. P ARENTS: T imothy and Sybliene Clarke. TIMICKA CLARKE D ATE OF BIR TH: Jul y 1 , 1984. AGE: 24-years-old. HIGH SC HOOL: F r eeport High (Grand Bahama). A uburn University. EVENT(S High jump. BEST PERFORMANCE(S 2.35 metres. HOBBIES: Bask etball, w atching movies and collecting diamonds and jewels. PARENTS: Paula Thomas. DONALD THOMAS DATE OF BIRTH: August 18, 1979. AGE: 29-years-old. SCHOOL: RM Bailey Secondary High. Southeas t ern Louisiana University. EVENT(S 200 and 400 metres. BES T PERF ORMANCE(S 200 22.58 metres. 400 50.09 seconds. HOBBIES: Traveling, reading and spor ting activities. EXPECT ATIONS: T o represent the Bahamas as bes t as I can. PARENTS: Celavie Henry. CHRISTINE AMER TIL DATE OF BIRTH: Janary 16, 1976. AGE: 33 years-old. SCHOOL: CC Sweeting and St. Andrew’s High Sc hool. The U niversity of Georgia. EVENT(S 100/200 metres. BES T PERF ORMANCE(S 100 10.91 seconds. 200 22.19 seconds. HOBBIES: Reading, traveling, meeting people and tr ac k and f ield. EXPECT ATIONS: T o make the Bahamas a shining e xample. PARENTS: Elka Ferguson. DEBBIE FERGUSON-MCKENZIE DATE OF BIRTH: November 2, 1978. AGE: 30-years-old. SCHOOL: SC McPherson Secondary High. A uburn University. EVENT(S 400 metres. BES T PERFORMANCE(S 4 4.45 seconds. HOBBIES: Surfing the Internet. EXPECTATIONS: To make my presence felt for the Bahamas. A V ARD MONCUR D ATE OF BIR TH: Sep t ember 12, 1971. AGE: 37-years-old. SCHOOL: RM Bailey High/ N orfolk State University. EVENT(S 1 00 metres/4 x 100 relay. BES T PERF ORMANCE(S 1 0.8 4 seconds. HOBBIES: T r aveling, interior decorating, coaching and learning new things. EXPECTATIONS: To see the relay team get back on the medal stand. CHANDRA STURRUP ATHLETE PROFILES IAAFWORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS BERLIN 2009

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C M Y K C M Y K FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009 THETRIBUNE SECTIONA INSIDE Local sports news SPORTS IN BRIEF WINDOW FACTORY WAREHOUSE First Storm Of The Season Sale!!! Hurricane Shutters 15% OFF $//’'(5/$&(%()25($8*867 All Windows 15% OFF $//’'(5/$&(%()25($8*867 Window & Shutter Factory Warehouse Shirley Street Telephone: 364-1916/7 Email: STORMFRAMEWINDOWS2@HOTMAIL.COM BY: BEAT THE STORM Shirley Street B y BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net B ERLIN, Germany: When the official opening ceremonies for the IAAF's 12th World Championships are heldh ere on Saturday at the Olympic Stad ium, reigning men's high jump champ ion Donald Thomas will carry the flag f or the Bahamas. A lthough others were considered, T homas was the unanimous choice to l ead the 24-member team during the m arch pass by virtue of having won the men's high jump title at the last championships in Osaka, Japan in 2007. According to team manager Ralph McKinney, the decision was one that allof the athletes accepted without any r eservation at the team meeting held y esterday morning. T homas, 25, will be one of two comp etitors representing the Bahamas w hen the preliminaries of the high j ump take place on Wednesday, A ugust 19. He will be joined by Trevor B arry, 26. The final is set for Friday. Thomas, a former collegiate basketb all standout from Grand Bahama, b ecame just the second Bahamian male athlete to win a gold medal at the bian nual championships. The first was Troy K emp, who did it in Gotenburg, Sweden in 1995 in the high jump as well. Prior to the opening ceremonies, the first set of athletes to compete for theB ahamas will be Derrick Atkins, Adria n Griffith and Christine Amertil. The t rio will run in the morning session w ith the ceremonies to kick off the e vening session. A tkins, the 25-year-old silver medall ist from Osaka, along with Griffith, w ill run in the century. Amertil, who t urns 30 on Tuesday, will compete in the women's 400. The second round of the men's cen t ury will follow opening ceremonies. W ith just one day left before the s tart of the championships, press liais on officer Julie Wilson and chaperon, said all of the athletes have arrived safely in Berlin and have settled down and are ready to compete. "We were able to go through a successful practice today with the indi-v idual competitors fine toning their p erformances and the relay team m embers working out together," she s aid. "Everything went well. W e were pleased with what we saw. " Except for one or two little nagging problems, all of the athletes are in good shape and they are just waiting for the competition to start. We had our team meeting with them and everybody was really positive aboutw hat was discussed. So we feel they a re all ready to compete." T he team is expected to go through s ome light workouts and stretches t oday before the championship open u p on Saturday. T he women's 100 preliminaries w ill be contested on day two on Sund ay's morning session with the vet eran do of Chandra Sturrup, who will be 37 on September 12 and Debb ie Ferguson-McKenzie, 33, along with Timicka Clarke, who turns 29o n November 9. That will be followed by the men's triple qualifying round for Olympic bronze medallist Leevan 'Superman' S ands, who will celebrate his 27th birthday on the same day, and the s emifinal and final of the men's 100. Thomas to carry the flag for the Bahamas The Annual General M eeting of Legacy Baseball/ Softball Association will be held this Saturday, A ugust 15, 2009 at 10:00 am a t the YMCA meeting room, and Steve Burrows, President of the youth organisation is inviting all Legacy Coaches, players and parents to be in atten d ance for this gathering. General Meeting for Legacy Baseball/ Softball scheduled for Saturday F OOTBALL DAVIE, Fla.A ssociated Press TRAFFICcan get heavy a round the Miami Dolphins complex, which is an annoyance for Chad Henne as he comes and goes at training camp. “I’m not a road rager,” the Dolphins’ backupq uarterback says. “But I’m not a very patient person.” Henne also has someone in his way at work, where he’s stuck behind last year’s NFL Comeback Player of the Year, Chad Pennington. Henne threw only 12 passes in his rookie season last year, and barring a calamity at quarterback, he’ll ride the bench again in 2009. Henne to be busy during preseason High jumper was unanimous choice for duty Donald Thomas BAIN OUT WITH HAMSTRING INJURY PG 9

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C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009 THETRIBUNE $3.96 $3.87 $4.10 By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net T HE RENOVATION of t he Moses Plaza could be done by the end of the y ear, according to the developments chief officer. If all goes to plan, they will be the f irst of the waterfront properties between East and Armstrong Streets to be revitalized as a part of the government and private sector’s plan to reinv ent downtown Nassau’s tourism product. C harles Klonaris told T ribune Business that the ‘very expensive’ project will be a first-class development andw ill make use of the waterfront with the addition of a marina. Mr Klonaris asserts that the 35,000 square foot plaza will be a catalyst for development in the area. East of East Street is really run down and it needs some injection,” he said. “Without a doubt this developm ent will bring back that side of Bay Street.” H e said the new Moses Plaza will incorporate the finest accessories, including designer lighting, railingsa nd tiling. “It’s really going to showcase what the Bahamas really should be and how Moses Plaza renovation ‘could be done by the end of year’ DUNKIN DONUTS GRAND OPENING: Pictured left to right are Jon Luther, George Myers, Vincent VanderpoolWallace and Nigel Travis. By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE NEW Dunkin D onuts location could be a ‘great landmark’ for the r evitalization of downtown Nassau, the Minister of Tourism and Aviation saidy esterday during the store’s grand opening. Vincent Vanderpool-Wal lace said the Myers group’s investment in reintroducing Dunkin Donuts to the Nas sau could be a catalyst for other investors to move into downtown who have been waiting out a soft economy. “These kinds of things happen one space at a time,” said Mr Vanderpool-Wallace. Confidence “When the rest of the world is sitting down waiting and saying ‘let’s see what’s going to happen to the economy’ I think it’s the kind of confidence that speaks to what people here are talking about.” According to him, the donut and coffee shop is the kind of facility that lures cruise ship passengers to the downtown area and sets the Bahamas’ cruise ship port apart from others. “By far, nobody comes close to downtown Nassau, the biggest single cruise port anywhere,” he said. “We get two million cruise passengers coming into this space every single year. “And there is no doubt whatsoever that in order to get these people off the ship into downtown Nassau you must have the attractions in place.” A ‘GREAT LANDMARK’ FOR NASSAU RENEWAL BACARDI has conf irmed it will sell its Nassau-based production facility in New Providence andp roperties at Clifton Pier to The Source River Limited headed by former FNMm inister Tennyson Wells. The deal could be closed b y the end of September. Tribune Business learned some time ago that SourceR iver was interested in the Bacardi property; however, w ere keeping tight-lipped on the deal. In a release issued yest erday by Source River, it is revealed that the compa ny is comprised of Bahamian investors “including several formerB acardi employees” and could close the deal with Bacardi by the end of the month and turn the ex-rum facility into a water pro-d uction facility. “The Source River Lim ited is led by well-known businessman Tennyson Wells and is comprised of nearly 40 Bahamian i nvestors. The Source River Limited plans to produce and bottle distilled water,” the release said. “Bacardi & Company Limited today announced it has signed a contract to sell its Nassau-based production facility in New Providence and properties at Clifton Pier to The Source River Limited , a Nassau-based investment company, and expects to close on the deal by September 30, 2009. “Bacardi products currently for sale in The Bahamas in retail stores, restaurants, bars, clubs and at The BACARDI Store will continue to be available at these locations. The Bacardi portfolio includes: BACARDI rum and BACARDI Flavoured rums, GREY GOOSE vodka, BOMBAY SAPPHIRE gin, DEWAR’S Blended Scotch whisky, CAZADORES tequila, MARTINI vermouth and asti and other leading brands. BACARDI continues to be Bahamians’ favourite rum.” Bacardi confirms sale to Source River 35,000 square foot plaza to be a ‘catalyst for development in area’ Plan to make use of waterfront with the addition of a marina East of East Street is really run down and it needs some injection. Charles Klonaris SEE page 2B TENNYSON WELLS Photos: Ashley Henderson Grand opening of new Dunkin Donuts THE Bahamas Ecom merce Company and allied partners is hosting a job fair on Friday, August 21, 2009, at the Kendal GL Isaac Gym from 9am to 5pm. JOB FAIR SEE page 2B

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M r Vanderpool-Wallace added that in Nassau, more p eople spend more time off the cruise ship than in any other destination. He asserted that there needs to be much more attractive facili-t ates like the Dunkin Donuts location to attract m ore people. Nigel Travis, CEO of Dunkin brands, said the company is excited to have the Dunkin brand back int he Bahamas and back into the same space it was in w hen it burned to the ground several years ago. Intrigued He also said he understands the role the buildingp lays in the revitalisation of the city and is “intrigued w ith the revitalisation of downtown.” Sounds like an excellent plan and we are really pleased to play an importantp art in it. This location as I understand is very central t o that revitalisation,” said Mr Travis. “So we hope this is going to give a boost tot he economy of downtown and stimulate more people i nvesting in downtown and as a result of that, encourage more and more tourist’s toc ome down to Nassau.” He lauded the work that CEO of the Myers group, George Myers has done to reintegrate the DunkinD onuts into downtown, as a new donut shop, Mr Donuts, popped up in itss tead. “America runs on Dunkin a nd as you can see around this restaurant certainly the Bahamas runs on Dunkin asw ell.”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late of #83 Alexander Boulevard in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence, Bahamas, deceased.NOTICENOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or demand against the said estate are required to send the same duly certied in writing to the undersigned on or before the 26th day of August, A.D. 2009, after which date the Administrator will proceed to distribute the estate having regard only to the claims of which he shall have had notice. AND notice is hereby given that all persons indebted to the estate are required to make full settlement on or before the date hereinabove mentioned. Dated the 12th day of August, A.D. 2009 CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO. Attorneys for the Administrator 9 Rusty Bethel Drive Nassau, Bahamas 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW 0(/9,1$/$9(51'$9,6 RI635,1*),(/'52$'3%R[1$66$8 %$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU 1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQ DVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKR NQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOG QRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQW RIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH WK GD\RI $XJXVW WRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\ DQG&LWL]HQVKLS 127,&( S TEPHEN BERNARD, A P Business Writer N EW YORK Treasury prices rose Thursday after investors were reassured by the strong demand at the government's latest bond auction. The demand for Treasurys sent yields sharply lower as the government wrapped up a record $75 billion in debt sales this week by auctioning off $15 billion in 30-year bonds. The price of the already issued 30-year bond rose 1 24/32 to 96 31/32, and its yield, which moves in an opposite direction from its price, fell to 4.43 percent from 4.54 percent late Wednesday. The price of the benchmark 10-year note rose 29/32 to 100 4 /32, driving its yield down to 3.61 percent from 3.72 percent. I nvestors had already bid Treasurys higher ahead of the a uction after the government reported weak July retail sales and an unexpected increase in workers filing for jobless claims for the first time. The Commerce Department said retail sales fell 0.1 percent in July, significantly worse than the 0.7 percent increase that analysts forecast. And the Labor Department report said the number of newly laid-off workers filing claims for unemployment benefits rose unexpectedly to a seasonally adjusted 558,000, from 554,000 the previous week. Analysts were expecting new claims to drop to 545,000. Those two weaker-than-expected reports had bond investors questioning whether an economic recovery might take longer than expected to occur. The stock market, however, shook off the reports and focused instead on the Federal Reserve's more upbeat comments on the economy on Wednesday. Major stock indicators finished moderately higher Thursday. The gains in Treasurys after the auction were due in part t o relief among investors that there were plenty of buyers for the longest term bonds issued by the government. "There would be a lot of angst if it didn't go well," said William Larkin, a fixed income portfolio manager at Cabot Money Management. If demand for Treasurys falls sharply, the government w ould have to raise the interest it pays, which could drive up b orrowing costs. That would likely lead to higher interest rates charged on mortgages and other consumer loans, and potentially put a drag on an economic recovery. The 30-year auction's bid-to-cover ratio, a measure of demand, was 2.54 percent, up from 2.36 percent at a similar auction in July. There was lackluster demand Wednesday at an auction of $23 billion in 10-year notes as investors wereh esitant to jump into the bond market before the Fed's interest rate decision and economic statement. The Fed left interest rates unchanged, and said in its statement that the economy was "leveling out," a more positive view than in the past. The central bank also said Wednesday it would slow its buying of government debt in the coming weeks in order to hit its target of purchasing $300 billion in Treasurys by the end of October. The Fed has committed to buying Treasurys this year to help offset the staggering amount of debt being raised to fund the government's stimulus pro grams. As the Fed exits the market, investors are concerned there will be too much supply and not enough buyers. "One still has to be concerned about who will buy all this debt," said Matt Hastings, portfolio manager of the Schwab Premier Income Fund. Hastings estimated there could be as much as $2 trillion in Treasurys auctioned over the next year. In other trading, the two-year note rose 4/32 to 99 26/32 and its yield fell to 1.10 percent from 1.16 percent. The yield on the three-month T-bill dipped to 0.16 percent from 0.17 percent. Its discount rate was 0.17 percent. The cost of borrowing between banks fell. The British Bankers' Association said the rate on three-month loans in dollars the London Interbank Offered Rate, or Libor was unchanged at 0.45 percent. Treasurys rise on strong auction demand Moses Plaza renovation ‘could be done by end of the year’ we really win back the harbour side a nd how we look at how developments should be,” said Mr Klonaris. In a recent town hall meeting the Minister of Environment said the development of the waterfrontb etween East and Armstrong streets will be government development but will have private/public ownership with shared equity in the properties. Construction of the promenade, which could begin some time next year,w ill be another phase of the public/private initiative to reinvent the downtown Nassau around the cruise shipp ort. However, it is thought that this cann ot begin in full force until the cont ainer port is moved from the downtown area after which many of the building between East and Armstrong streets will become vacant. Mr Klonaris said several of the owne rs of these buildings have expressed their commitment to develop theses properties as quickly as possible when they become available so as to not stunt the redevelopment of downtown. They are waiting to see what will happen,” he said. “They may be hesitant right now but jumping the gun will benefit them.” H e said the government incentives and legislation combined should offer s ome more incentive for owners to begin to develop their properties in earnest. With what we’re doing and the r eclamation of the waterfront it’s going to energise everybody,” said Mr Klonaris. “When you see it come together it’s going to really energise this whole city.” A ccording to him, there are also plans to implement a dedicated ferry terminal which can transport visitors and locals to Paradise Island and Cable Beach. To do it right form the start really helps with the success,” he said. “To the left of us is the publication building and we look at it as being ar eally important public space. “Water transportation will mean a l ot Paradise Island and to Nassau and turning Woodes Rodgers into a water taxi terminal, once implemented, thea rea will revive itself.” F ROM page 1B Grand opening of new Dunkin Donuts F ROM page 1B

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SARA LEPRO, A P Business Writer NEW YORK Focused on an economic r ecovery, investors shook off disappointing news and kept W all Street's summer rally g oing. Investors sent stocks higher f or a second day in a row Thursday, giving all the major i ndexes a moderate boost and adding to the gains that fol-l owed upbeat comments from the Federal Reserve a day earlier. Financial, technology and energy companies were among t he big winners, while stocks in defensive, or relatively safer, i ndustries like health care fell. Retailers declined after a w orse-than-expected report on retail sales. Meanwhile, Treasury prices rose after the government had a successful auction of 30-year bonds. The Treasury Depart ment issued a total of $75 bill ion of debt this week as part of its ongoing efforts to fund theg overnment's stimulus programs, and investors were r elieved that the market was able to absorb such a huge supply. Analysts said Wall Street's showing Thursday was a sign o f the market's resilience in light of economic reports thats uggested the recovery could be slowed by a weak consumer. I nvestors seemed to look past the latest news and focus on the F ed's more upbeat assessment of the economy. Stocks soaredW ednesday after the Fed said the economy was "leveling o ut," not just slowing its decline. "You're not seeing people giving up on this economy," said Keith Springer, presidento f Capital Financial Advisory Services. A mong the day's reports, the Commerce Department said r etail sales fell 0.1 percent in July, significantly worse than the 0.7 percent increase economists expected. Retail sales are considered a strong indicator o f economic recovery because consumer spending accounts f or more than two-thirds of all economic activity. A weekly report on unemployment also came in worse than projected. The Labor Department said the number of newly laid-off workers filing claims for unemployment ben efits rose unexpectedly to a seas onally adjusted 558,000, from 554,000 the previous week.A nalysts were expecting new claims to drop to 545,000. T he Dow Jones industrial average rose 36.58, or 0.4 percent, to 9,398.19 after rising 120 Wednesday in response to the Fed's statement. T he Standard & Poor's 500 index rose 6.92, or 0.7 percent,t o 1,012.73, while the Nasdaq composite index rose 10.63, or 0 .5 percent, to 2,009.35. Advancing stocks outpaced losers by 2 to 1 on the New York Stock Exchange, where volume came to a very light 7 77.32 million shares. In other trading, the Russell 2 000 index of smaller companies rose 3.02, or 0.5 percent, to 575.19. Financial stocks led the day's gains, buoyed by news that theh edge fund run by John Paulson bought about 168 million s hares of Bank of America Corp. Paulson foresaw the distress in subprime mortgages and reaped billions by betting against the related securities, s o his purchases of Bank of America stock are seen as av ote of confidence in the bank's future. " He gives a lot of credibility because he certainly saw the danger on the credit side," said Anton Schutz, portfolio manager of Burnham FinancialI ndustries Fund and Burnham Financial Services Fund. B ank of America rose $1.07, or 6.7 percent, to $17. Regional b anks also rose significantly after tumbling earlier in the week on downbeat comments from an analyst that raised doubts about some banks' abil i ty to improve their earnings in the second half of the year. T exas Instruments Inc. rose 66 cents, or 2.8 percent, to $ 24.54 after an analyst upgraded the stock. That helped lift other technology stocks. Wal-Mart Stores Inc. rose $1.37, or 2.7 percent, to $51.88 after the world's largest retailer reported better-than-expected s econd quarter earnings. WalMart also raised the low end ofi ts profit guidance, saying it expects shoppers to continue t o be attracted by its low-priced items. Other retail stocks were mixed following the government's weak sales report. M acy's Inc. slipped 25 cents to $16.15, while Best Buy Co. rose5 1 cents to $37.01. Investors have sent stocks s oaring the past few weeks as improving corporate profits and signs of life in the troubled housing industry gave the mar ket hope that the economy is h ealing. The Fed's comments Wednesday affirmed for i nvestors that their recent bets had been warranted. Still, with the news flow tapering and trading light amid the summer slowdown on WallS treet, analysts warn it might be difficult to keep the mark et's momentum going. The S&P 500 index has risen 15.2 percent in little more than a month and 49.7 percent since it fell to a 12-year low in early March. Treasurys rose higher after the successful auction of 30-year bonds. The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves opposite its price, fell to 3.61 percent from 3.72 percent late Wednesday. The dollar fell against the euro and the British pound, while gold and other metal prices rose. Light, sweet crude rose 36 cents to settle at $70.52 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009, PAGE 3B btrt tfr f r!%* '!$()))!*&*#tffn""bnff !$ %#&!*&*# !%** 1 27,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW $ .,16$
PAGE 15

IEVA M. AUGSTUMS, AP Business WriterC HARLOTTE, N.C. A federal court froze $1 billion of troubled Colonial Bancg roup Inc.'s assets Thursday in r esponse to a suit filed by Bank of America Corp. Bank of America Corp. sued Colonial for more than $1 bill ion in cash and loans, and asked the court to prevent C olonial from selling or otherwise disposing of the assets. Bank of America said the U.S. District Court for theS outhern District of Florida, in response to a complaint filed Wednesday, granted a temporary restraining order freezing the $1 billion held by Montg omery, Ala.-based Colonial. Court officials could not immediately be reached to confirm the order was granted. B ank of America had asked the court to prevent Colonial from selling proceeds it received from Freddie Mac ine xchange for mortgage and other loans, and which were owned by Ocala Funding LLC, court documents show. Charlotte, N.C.-based Bank o f America, which was the collateral agent for the Ocala Funding loans, sought an emergency injunctive relief in the c omplaint. According to court documents, Colonial held the proceeds as a custodian, agent and bailee through bailee let-t ers. But when the bailee letters were terminated, Colonial refused to return them to Bank of America, the U.S. banking giant alleged. " The emergency relief is necessary because Colonial appears to be on the verge of collapsing as a going concern a nd has reportedly been the subject of a criminal investigation for alleged accounting irregularities," the complaints aid. Representatives from both Bank of America and Colonial declined to comment on the lawsuit. S hares of Bank of America gained $1.07 cents, or 6.7 percent, to $17.00 in trading Thursday, while Colonial shares fell 5c ents, or 9.6 percent, to 47 cents. The lawsuit could push Colonial into further financial trouble. O n Tuesday, Colonial said it has advised the Securities and Exchange Commission it will not be able to file a second-q uarter financial report because of alleged accounting irregularities now being investigated. The Alabama Banking Department also confirmed T uesday that its board held a p rivate meeting with Colonial officials on Monday. Colonial said last week it was under a criminal investigationb y the Justice Department over the alleged accounting irregularities at its mortgage warehouse lending unit in Orlando, Fla. It was announced earlier t hat Colonial was the subject of a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation related to its bid for federal bailoutf unds and its accounting for loan loss reserves. Colonial, which previously reported roughly $26 billion in assets, has 335 branches in F lorida, Alabama, Georgia, Texas and Nevada. The battered bank has been hurt the credit crisis, as risingf oreclosures in its Florida construction-loan portfolio continue to strain its balance sheet. If Colonial fails, it would be the largest bank failure this y ear. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Court freezes Colonial assets in response to BofA suit

PAGE 16

C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER, AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON Banks trimmed their borrowing from the Federal Reserve's emergency lending facility over the past week, and cut back their use of oth-er programs designed to ease the financial crisis. The reductions indicate that banks are having an easier time obtaining credit and don't have to rely mostly on the Fed for short-term loans. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke and his colleagues on Wednesday said "financial markets have improved further in recent weeks" and the economy "is leveling out," a more upbeat assessment than they gave after their previous meeting in June. I n a report issued Thursday, the Fed said commercial banks averaged $33.9 billion in daily borrowing over the week that ended Wednesday. That was down from $35.1 billion in the week ended Aug. 5. The identities of the financial instit utions are not released. They pay just 0.50 percent in interest for the emergency loans. The weekly lending report also showed the Fed's net holdings of "commercial paper" averaged $60 billion, a decrease of $4.7 billion from the previous week. That's an encouraging sign that investors'a ppetite for such help from the Fed has eased. Commercial paper is the crucial short-term debt that companies use to pay everyday expenses, which the Fed began buying under the firstof-its-kind program on Oct. 27, a time of intensified credit problems. At its peak in late January, the Fed held almost $350 billion of commercial paper. It has said that about $1.3 trillion would qualify. The report also showed the Fed made little change to its purchases of mortgage-backed securities guaranteed by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and Ginnie Mae. They averaged $542.8 billion over the past week, nearly unchanged from the previous week. The goal of the program, which started on Jan. 5, is to drive down mortgage rates and help the housing market. The Fed has pledged to purchase up to $1.25 trillion of the securities, along with $200 billion of debt issued by Fannie and Freddie. Mortgage rates rose this week. Rates on 30-year home loans averaged 5.29 percent, up from 5.22 percent last week, Freddie Mac reported Thursday. Still, the 30-year fixedrate mortgage averaged 6.52 percent a year ago. Investment houses in March 2008 were given similar emergency-loan privileges as commercial banks after a run on Bear Stearns pushed what was America's fifth-largest investment bank to the brink of bankruptcy and into a takeover by JPMorgan Chase & Co. But investment firms didn't draw any loans from the Fed for the 13th straight week. The last time they drew any money just $482 million was in the week that ended May 13. Critics worry the Fed's actions have put billions of taxpayers' dollars at risk. Some of the assets the Fed took on last year when it bailed out Bear Stearns and insurer American International Group Inc. have dipped in value. The report also said that credit provided to AIG averaged $41.2 billion for the week ending Wednesday, down from $41.6 billion last week. The central bank's balance sheet stands at about $1.99 trillion, up from nearly $1.98 trillion last week. The balance sheet has more than doubled since September, reflecting the Fed's many unconventional efforts various programs to lend or buy debt to mend the financials ystem and lift the country out of recession. IN THIS JULY 21, 2009 file photo, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke delivers a report on the country's economic and financial health before the House Financial Services Committee, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Banks reduce emergency borrowing from Fed A P P h o t o / J . S c o t t A p p l e w h i t e

PAGE 17

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 74F/23C Low: 76F/24C Low: 80F/27C Low: 80F/27C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 81F/27C Low: 83 F/28 C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 92F/33C High: 91F/33C High: 88 F/31 C High: 88 F/31 C High: 88F/31C High: 88 F/31C High: 88F/31C Low: 79F/26C High: 89F/32C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 90F/32C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 74F/23C High: 89 F/32 C Low: 80F/27C High: 88 F/31 Low: 75F/24C High: 90F/32C Low: 76 F/24C High: 92F/33C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 94F/34C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 92F/33C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 92F/33C Low: 76F/24C High: 92 F/33 C Low: 77F/25C High: 91F/33C High: 89 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, AUGUST 14 TH , 2009, PAGE 7B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny with a t-storm; breezy. Partly cloudy; an early t-storm. Some sun with a t-storm in spots. Clouds and sun; t-storms possible. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 88 Low: 83 High: 91 High: 89 High: 90 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Clouds, some sun; t-storms possible. High: 89 Low: 81 Low: 81 Low: 81 AccuWeather RealFeel 98F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 90F 107-85F 96-87F 99-89F 101-84F Low: 80 TODAYTONIGHTSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................93F/34C Low ....................................................82F/28C Normal high ......................................89F/32C Normal low ........................................76F/24C Last year's high .................................. 94 F/34C Last year's low .................................. 79 F/26C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.06" Year to date ................................................21.67" Normal year to date ....................................27.59" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU New First Full Last Aug. 20 Aug. 27Sep. 4Sep. 11 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:43 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:45 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 12:23 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 2:33 p.m. Today Saturday Sunday Monday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 1:57 a.m.2.38:00 a.m.0.3 2:39 p.m.2.99:14 p.m.0.5 3:04 a.m.2.39:06 a.m.0.3 3:48 p.m.3.010:22 p.m.0.5 4:14 a.m.2.410:14 a.m.0.2 4:56 p.m.3.111:25 p.m.0.3 5:22 a.m.2.511:22 a.m.0.1 5:59 p.m.3.2----W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco93/3379/26pc92/3376/24t Amsterdam72/2262/16pc73/2262/16s Ankara, Turkey86/3051/10s89/3152/11s Athens91/3273/22s90/3273/22s Auckland66/1854/12r60/1553/11sh Bangkok91/3278/25t91/3278/25sh Barbados86/3077/25pc87/3077/25s Barcelona84/2867/19s83/2866/18s Beijing97/3675/23s93/3375/23pc Beirut82/2778/25s81/2779/26s Belgrade91/3266/18c89/3167/19s Berlin70/2157/13pc78/2564/17pc Bermuda86/3077/25s87/3078/25s Bogota65/1843/6c67/1947/8pc Brussels75/2358/14pc84/2862/16s Budapest78/2560/15c88/3162/16pc Buenos Aires70/2157/13c73/2250/10t Cairo96/3576/24s97/3674/23s Calcutta92/3385/29r89/3182/27t Calgary60/1544/6c55/1243/6pc Cancun91/3275/23pc93/3376/24pc Caracas77/2568/20t82/2772/22t Casablanca91/3274/23s92/3377/25s Copenhagen68/2055/12pc68/2064/17r Dublin66/1854/12r66/1854/12sh Frankfurt77/2560/15pc83/2864/17s Geneva 79/26 57/13 s 85/2958/14s Halifax 78/25 62/16 s 79/26 61/16 pc Havana 91/32 73/22 t 90/32 74/23 t Helsinki 70/21 52/11pc64/1754/12sh Hong Kong 90/32 82/27 t 90/32 82/27pc Islamabad 109/42 85/29 s 107/41 84/28 s Istanbul86/3072/22s86/3071/21s Jerusalem 83/28 64/17s83/2863/17s Johannesburg 64/1744/6s67/1945/7pc Kingston 86/3075/23t89/3179/26r Lima73/2257/13s71/2157/13s London75/2359/15pc75/2361/16s Madrid93/3366/18s93/3368/20s Manila87/3078/25r87/3078/25t Mexico City79/2655/12t79/2653/11t Monterrey102/3873/22s102/3875/23s Montreal88/3166/18s86/3068/20s Moscow66/1854/12r64/1752/11sh Munich73/2256/13r85/2954/12s Nairobi81/2754/12pc81/2754/12pc New Delhi 97/3682/27c93/3379/26c Oslo65/1849/9s56/1352/11pc Paris81/2762/16pc90/3261/16s Prague 74/23 53/11 c 80/26 58/14 pc Rio de Janeiro77/2567/19s80/2668/20s Riyadh103/3975/23s104/4078/25s Rome 86/30 68/20 s 87/30 67/19 s St. Thomas90/3279/26pc90/3279/26sh San Juan82/2745/7pc79/2640/4c San Salvador 88/31 70/21 pc 88/31 74/23 t Santiago 57/1341/5r48/834/1r Santo Domingo90/3273/22t87/3074/23s Sao Paulo 75/23 59/15 s 77/25 61/16s Seoul91/3268/20s91/3268/20s Stockholm 63/17 52/11 r 70/21 54/12 s Sydney 70/21 50/10 s72/2250/10s Taipei91/3280/26pc93/3381/27sh T okyo 90/32 73/22 c 84/28 72/22 s T oronto 82/2764/17s84/2864/17s Trinidad91/3270/21s91/3273/22pc V ancouver 67/19 56/13 pc 70/2157/13pc Vienna 76/2462/16sh84/2867/19pc W arsaw 70/21 52/11 pc 73/22 60/15 pc Winnipeg 74/23 65/18 t 80/2665/18t H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySaturday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles85F Saturday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles85F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles86F Saturday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles86F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles84F Saturday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles84F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque87/3066/18t89/3164/17pc Anchorage62/1653/11c66/1855/12r Atlanta90/3270/21t86/3071/21t Atlantic City81/2766/18t86/3068/20t Baltimore85/2966/18t89/3168/20t Boston80/2667/19s87/3070/21s Buffalo85/2965/18s85/2965/18s Charleston, SC87/3073/22t87/3074/23t Chicago88/3163/17s90/3267/19s Cleveland87/3062/16s89/3166/18s Dallas98/3675/23pc96/3577/25s Denver88/3159/15t89/3152/11t Detroit88/3167/19s90/3267/19s Honolulu89/3176/24s89/3176/24pc Houston97/3674/23t95/3576/24pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySaturday TodaySaturdayTodaySaturday Indianapolis87/3066/18s89/3168/20s Jacksonville90/3272/22t90/3274/23t Kansas City90/3270/21s90/3271/21pc Las Vegas102/3876/24pc99/3774/23s Little Rock92/3368/20s93/3370/21s Los Angeles82/2762/16pc78/2562/16pc Louisville90/3269/20s91/3272/22s Memphis93/3371/21s92/3374/23s Miami88/3179/26t90/3280/26t Minneapolis90/3272/22s88/3168/20pc Nashville92/3369/20pc89/3171/21pc New Orleans92/3375/23t92/3376/24t New York82/2771/21t90/3274/23pc Oklahoma City95/3573/22pc95/3572/22pc Orlando92/3374/23t92/3376/24t Philadelphia85/2970/21t88/3172/22t Phoenix 104/40 84/28 t 104/4081/27s Pittsburgh86/3062/16s88/3164/17s Portland, OR 72/2255/12s75/2355/12s Raleigh-Durham 87/30 69/20 t 88/31 69/20 t St. Louis92/3371/21s93/3373/22s Salt Lake City 90/32 63/17 pc 76/2451/10pc San Antonio 100/37 76/24 pc 100/37 75/23 s San Diego75/2366/18pc72/2264/17pc San Francisco 70/21 55/12 pc 73/2256/13s Seattle67/1954/12pc71/2154/12pc T allahassee 90/3272/22t90/3274/23t T ampa 91/32 76/24 t 90/32 78/25t Tucson95/3578/25t99/3775/23s W ashington, DC 86/30 69/20t89/3173/22t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com


Pim blowin’ it

HIGH
LOW

oe TSTORM

Volume: 105 No.217

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By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

A TEACHER was taken
into custody for questioning
yesterday in connection with
the alleged molestation of a 12-
year-old girl at Jack Hayward
High School.

Asst Supt Emrick Seymour
confirmed that a male teacher
was taken into custody by
police in connection with com-

a3

90F
83F

CLOUDY WITH



plaints of alleged molestation
of a student.

The teacher is now the fourth
teacher in the public school sys-
tem here on Grand Bahama
accused of child molestation.

The Tribune contacted the
Ministry of Education in
Freeport to find out the status
of the teacher, however,
Hezekiah Dean, School Super-
intendent, was out of office on

SEE page eight

Doctors suspected of penning ‘fake
Sick notes’ for nurses may face action

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

EIGHT medical doctors, some of whom are
suspected of penning “in excess of 50 fake”
sick notes for protesting nurses, may now be
subject to disciplinary action from the Bahamas
Medical Council and/or legal action from Gov-
ernment, The Tribune has confirmed.

Health Minister Dr Hubert Minnis said gov-
ernment has forwarded information it has gath-
ered with respect to the “eight or nine” physi-
cians along with “several medical centres” that

SEE page eight

Dr Hubert Minnis

\y 3



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009

Ss
a

OMS pf
BAHAMAS BIGGEST

leacier bi N.:
GHG SEX fIrobe

Fourth school
official to face
abuse allegations

event.



ata

MISS PANAMA Diana Broce was
announced last night as the winner of
the Miss Universe national costume



BAHAMAS TRACK NEWS

©USA TODAY.



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Man and woman
quizzed over
mother’s killing

By TANEKA THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A MAN and a woman were being quizzed by police
last night in connection with the brutal killing of moth-
er-of-two TaGia Soles-Armony.

The pair were detained by murder squad officers on
Wednesday and are being questioned at the Central
Detective Unit on Thompson Boulevard.

Police press officer Assistant Superintendant Wal-

SEE page seven

eS NOTA eS eU



Miss Panama is pictured (right) at
the Sheraton Nassau Beach Hotel last
night, where the Miss Universe con-
testants attended the State Gift Auc-
tion Dinner.

Pictured above is Miss Panama in
her costume on stage at the Rain-
forest Theatre at the Wyndham
Resort during Monday’s national cos-

tume event.



Claim that police let illegal
Haitian go after being bribed

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A HAITIAN living in the
Bahamas illegally was
allegedy picked up by police
in the Carmichael Road area,
but let go after the police-
man accepted a bribe,
according to a source.

The man was with another
Haitian when they were
stopped by police at around
10pm on Tuesday. Police let
one of the men go when they
saw he had the necessary
paperwork allowing him to
live and work in the country
legally.

But when they saw that
the second man did not have

any papers he was taken in
the police car and offered his
freedom in exchange for a
bribe.

A source told The Tribune
how the man arranged for
someone to pay the bribe,
and asked them to meet him

SEE page seven



Former officer whose
girlfriend was raped
criticises the police

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A FORMER police officer
whose girlfriend was raped in
her home suspects she was
attacked by a serial rapist and
has criticised police for not warn-
ing vulnerable women.

Police have launched an inves-
tigation after a trend of at least
two rapes and two attempted
rapes in eastern New Providence
since March.

But senior officers have said
little to warn the public about
the possibility of a serial rapist
who attacks women at home
alone between 3am and 6am.

The 36-year-old girlfriend of
the former police officer was
alone at her home in Yellow
Elder, off the East West High-
way in central New Providence,
when two intruders broke in at
around 3am on Sunday.

The men burst into her room
as she was sleeping and threat-
ened her with a knife, her

SEE page seven

Pastor hits back
at claims over
Crown land deal

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

GOLDEN Gates Assembly’s
pastor denied claims he profited
from an underhand land deal that
reports suggest could have netted
him substantial sums of money
when the Crown land, granted by
government, was later turned into
a “low cost” housing sub-division.

Speaking with The Tribune yes-
terday following its series of exclu-
sive articles on Crown land, Bish-
op Ross Davis said he could not
do any subdivision by himself as
government’s approval was
required.

“The government gave us per-
mission, the church agreed to use
the land we bought from the gov-
ernment and so it ended there.

SEE page seven

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS? LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009



LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



MISS UNIVERSE

SHOVW HIGHLIGHTS BAHAMIAN
DESIGNS AND FABRICS



PHOTOS FEL

VIBRANT colours, exquis-
ite prints and beauty took
centre stage at the Miss Uni-
verse 2009 Bahamian Design-
er Fabric Fashion Show held
Wednesday night at the Sher-
aton Nassau Beach Resort.

All 84 contestants got to
show off gorgeous creations
by three of the country’s most





PE MAJOR/TRIBUN





renowned designers on a
world class runway in front
of hundreds of local and
international guests.
Designers Basheva Eve of
La Maison de Besh, Sabrina
Francis of Se’B Fashion
Designing and Rachel Turn-
quest-Garcia of Rachel’s
Boutique took the organic



E STAFF

100 per cent uniquely
Bahamian fabrics —
Androsia, a batik fabric made
through a dye and wax
process, and Bahama Hand-
prints, a hand-printed fabric
produced through the tradi-
tional silk-screening tech-
nique — and used them to
create one-of-a-kind pieces.














MISS MEXICO Karla Carrillo

























ABOVE LEFT: Miss Colombia
Michelle Rouillard.
4 io ih. ABOVE RIGHT: Miss Costa
Rica Jessica Umana

THIS morning the 84
beauties of the Miss
Universe 2009 competi-
tion get a chance to
show off their best pos-
es when they gather for
the traditional swimsuit
photo shoot at Atlantis,
Paradise Island.

The shoot will take
place in the lobby of the
Royal Towers at 6am.

Later tonight the con-
testants will be able to
unwind during the VIP
party at Cain Pool, The
Cove, Atlantis.

Cee

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd

Congratulations

to an intelligent , young lady

¢ SEE PAGE 13

MISS PANAMA Diana Broce MISS EGYPT Elham Wagdi



For passing all (6) of her B,.C’s and for
achieving the Sand Dollar and Fonders
Award from Deep Creek (Eleuthera)
Middle School. Also for being accepted to
Garrison Forest Schoal in Baltimore
Marviand. We are praying for vou and
we know God will continuously bless
and protect you.

MISS CANADA Mariana Valente

els

q | gS me -_
KSFinger
3 r meet

, TROPICAL
G> ickin ue ss
” oon Peta
, 1 ea

We-Love Youwfromu Your parenty
Leroy and Curlene Taylor,
Founily and Friends


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



oe |
eyeing new
‘impressive’
weather system

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter

alowe @tribunemedia.net

STORMY activity
over Hispaniola yes-
terday was expected to
bring wind and rain to
New Providence by
late this afternoon or
early Saturday, accord-
ing to meteorologists.

Meanwhile, a mid-
Atlantic weather sys-
tem which forecasters
had been eyeing weak-
ened from a tropical
depression to a tropi-
cal wave, but in its
wake an “impressive”
new weather system
looks set to strengthen
into a tropical depres-
sion shortly.

That makes three
systems brewing in the

Atlantic for forecasters
to watch. By next week }

there may be three
named Atlantic basin
systems - Ana, Bill and
Claudette, according
to the United States
based AccuWeather.
Both the mid-
Atlantic wave and the
system following
behind it are projected
to head in the general
direction of the
Bahamas over the next
couple of days,
although it is too early
to say whether they
will affect us directly.
The front-running
system which was over
Hispaniola and the
Eastern Caribbean sea
yesterday brought
clouds to the south
eastern Bahamas dur-
ing the afternoon, and
was set to bring rain
and winds of around
15mph to 25mph in the
evening, ahead of its
anticipated impact on
the central and north-
ern Bahamas today.
Chief Meteorologist

Basil Dean said that by

later today and into
Saturday, the central
and northern Bahamas
is expected to get rain
and winds of between
15mph and 20mph.

Mr Dean added that
the most recent weath-
er system to come off
the West African coast
“looks impressive and
could possibly form
into something, but
will take a little
while.”

The system was
located around 250
miles south of the
Cape Verde Islands
yesterday afternoon.

“Tt just came off the
coast today. Once over
warm water things
could start to develop
quite rapidly once
upper level conditions
are favourable,” he
said.

American —
(rowns on
diving trip

AN AMERICAN
drowned while on a diving
trip with his father near
Abaco, police said.

Eric Searcy, a 28-year-
old resident of Florida
was on a 24-foot vessel on
a diving trip near Scotland
Cay, Abaco around
6.30pm on Wednesday.

According to police,
Eric went into the water
and was not seen again.

His father dove into the
water and found his son in
a "motionless state,” press
liaison officer Chief Supt
Walter Evans said.

"The victim was
retrieved and attempts
were made to administer
CPR to no avail. Eric was
taken to the local clinic
where he was pronounced
dead.”

Police suspect that the
victim drowned. Howev-
er, an autopsy will be per-
formed to confirm the
exact cause of death.

- Officer accused of raping
teen still being questioned

POLICE yesterday were
still questioning an officer
who is accused of raping a 15-
year-old girl while in custody
at the Central Police station
earlier this week.

According to officer-in-
charge of the Central Police
Station Glenn Miller, the
alleged victim had been
turned over to the station by
relatives who "rendered her
uncontrollable.”

She was slated to be trans-
ferred to the Williemae Pratt
Centre for Girls, but while in
custody on Tuesday night she
was allegedly sexually assault-

ed by an officer at the Central
Police Station, police said.

Chief Supt Miller said once
the complaint was filed at his
station, the case was imme-
diately turned over to the
Central Detective Unit
(CDU).

"The allegations that the
teen was sexually assaulted
were made at Central
through my inspector and we
immediately alerted the Cen-
tral Detective Unit," he told
The Tribune yesterday.

The officer was taken into
custody early Wednesday and
up to press time last night was

still being questioned at
CDU.

Officials yesterday said a
decision would be made
today on whether the officer
would be charged or released
from custody.

Allegations

Police would not comment
when asked if there was phys-
ical evidence to support the
sexual assault allegations.

"The officer is still here
being questioned.

“At this (point) investiga-
tions are still continuing.

“T don't know where the
investigation is going to take
us at this stage - if there is
evidence (to support the alle-
gation) the recommendation
will be sent to have him
charged," head of the CDU
Supt Elsworth Moss said.

The teenager is currently
in protective custody, Mr
Moss added.

Whether or not the officer
will be suspended from duty
will depend on the outcome
of the police investigation.

"He is in custody, the
investigation is ongoing, and
we haven't arrived at any out-

come as yet.

“We have to see what the
investigation will reveal, there
will be a lot of decisions, we
have to get there,” Commis-
sioner of Police Reginald Fer-
guson told The Tribune.

Shift

According to police,
between three to six officers
are usually present at a police
station during a normal shift.

However, police yesterday
could not say how many offi-
cers were at the station when

the alleged offence occurred.

Mother of premature bally hacks ‘Breathe Easy’ campaign

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A NEW mother whose son was
born three months early has pledged
her support for the ‘Breathe Easy’
campaign to provide Princess Mar-
garet Hospital’s Neonatal Intensive
Care Unit with new ventilator
machines.

Lori Burrows, 22, of Exuma, gave
birth to her son Loren on July 13,
only 25 weeks after conception, and
he is currently being kept alive on a
state-of-the-art Puritan Bennett ven-
tilator system — the kind Breathe
Easy wants to raise $300,000 to pur-
chase.

At first the tiny baby was placed
on one of the standard ventilators
used at Princess Margaret Hospital,
but when the out-dated machine failed
to produce enough pressure to pump
oxygen to his tiny lungs he was trans-
ferred to the new ventilator currently
on loan to the hospital.

In his short life, young Loren has
suffered from a stroke, blood infec-
tion, chest infection, excess fluid in
his lungs, and he has an open heart
valve which may need an operation.

He is not able to breathe on his
own.

As well as supplying sufficient oxy-
gen, the more sensitive ventilator has
an alarm function to alert nurses if



DR CARLOS THOMAS with baby Loren on the Puritan Bennett 840 ventilator
system in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Princess Margaret Hospital.

the infant has complications.

A nurse in the Neonatal Intensive
Care Unit said the equipment is vital
to care for the premature babies com-
monly born at PMH.

Ms Burrows said: “The doctors and
nurses explained how (my son) need-
ed it because the others aren’t up to
the standard he needs, and since he
has gone on it he has got much better.

“T am very grateful because if he
didn’t have it he wouldn’t be at the
level he is at now.

“He is not able to breathe on his

KEVIN FERGUSON presents a cheque of $5,000 to Princess Margaret Hospital communications officer

Thelma Rolle as part of the effort to raise $300,000 for new ventilator machines.

Tile King donates
$5,000 to campaign

own, but he is active. He moves
around and looks around, he’s alert,
and he’s perfect to me. My baby is
going to be just fine, he is just taking
his own time.”

Ms Burrows started going into ear-
ly labour on June 29 and was rushed
to Nassau where she received stitches
to stave off a premature birth.

But determined young Loren was
born two weeks later, nearly three
months before his due date, and the
day his mother had intended to return
home to Exuma.

TILE King Enterprises has
kicked off the Breathe Easy
Bahamas fund raising campaign
with a $5,000 donation made in
the name of the late Jesseken
Ferguson.

The campaign was launched
Wednesday to raise $300,000
for ventilators for the Princess
Margaret Hospital.

The donation will go
towards state-of-the-art venti-
lators for adults in the Oncolo-
gy Ward and babies in the
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
who require assisted breathing.

The Builder’s Mall, Tile
King, Doctor’s Hospital, The
Tribune Media, The Rotary
Club of East Nassau and
Bahamas Realty are also
behind the drive to raise
$300,000.

Presenting the cheque on
behalf of the Ferguson family
yesterday was his brother Kevin
Ferguson. Nickita Prescod

eee me Be
Iba eT aL
fea OU)

Pe ete
322-2157



(right) represented Tile King
at the presentation. Thelma
Rolle accepted the cheque on
behalf of the Princess Margaret
Hospital Foundation.

“This cheque,” said Ms
Rolle, “will go a long way
towards the purchase of life-

giving ventilating machines for
the Oncology Ward of the
Princess Margaret Hospital.

“We also accept this gener-
ous donation in the name of
Jesse and thank the family and
extend our prayers to them,”
she said.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Sports

BUSINESS SECTION

E hee 0,0, Goole

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

She is now staying with family in
Nassau and spending every day at her
son’s side. As she celebrated his 31st-
day birthday yesterday, she counted
her blessings.

The young mother said: “The doc-
tors and nurses have all been absolute-
ly wonderful to me, they take very
good care of him, and if there’s a
problem they will let me know, but
they won’t kill your hopes. I have seen
babies go down and they come run-
ning and if they lose a baby they feel
it.

“T am so grateful for this ventilator
because if Loren didn’t have it he
might not be here today. Some babies
are born at 23 or 24 weeks, and they
would absolutely not survive on those
old ventilators, they would need this
from birth.

“Every day a new baby comes in
premature, and it’s about time our
healthcare system got on par with
everybody else,” she said.

The Breathe Easy campaign has
been organised by Builder’s Mall,
Tile King, Tribune Media, Doctor’s
Hospital, The Rotary Club of East
Nassau, and Bahamas Realty, who
have already committed $20,000 to
the project.

To make a donation, please con-
tact The Tribune or Mark Roberts at
FYP on Wulff Road. Cheques should
be made payable to the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital Foundation.



EFFECTIVE AUGUST 14TH, 2009

STRICT 8





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380-FLIX


PAGE 4, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Senator should recall his PLP plan

WE FIND Senator Jerome Fitzgerald’s
comment most amusing that if Government
were to go ahead with the transfer of Bay
Street’s port to Arawak Cay it would deval-
ue all nearby properties.

The Senator is probably too young to
remember that it was his own party after it
became the government in 1967 that suc-
ceeded in destroying the value of this whole
area well into exclusive Cable Beach. That
was 42 years ago. So what’s the good senator
bleating about now?

Shortly after it came to power the PLP
had its own plans to move the port terminal
from Bay Street to what is now Arawak Cay.

You know when one lives long enough,
life can really be amusing — especially to see
a Johnny-come-lately tripping over his own
history.

Kelly Island — now Arawak Cay — rose
from the sea with the fill dredged from Nas-
sau’s harbour early in 1966. The Kelly Island
project was started under the UBP admin-
istration when the Maritime Minister was
the late Trevor Kelly — the man after whom
the island was named.

That year the UBP was rushing to have 25
acres of the eastern end of Kelly Island com-
pleted so that construction could be started
on a first class hotel by November 1, 1966.
Holiday Inn was to be the first of several
hotels planned for the island.

However, in September Hurricane Faith
threatened to slow the project when sand
dredged up started to slip back into the sea
from the impact of the high waves washing
over the island.

By that time only 500 feet of the 3,000-foot
western breakwater had been completed.

Early the next year the PLP by a narrow
margin removed the UBP from the seat of
government. Kelly Island was caught in lim-
bo.

After spending what seemed an inter-
minably long time squabbling among them-
selves as to who was to get a ministerial post
before they could form a functioning gov-
ernment, the PLP eventually settled down to
look at the job at hand.

Of course, at that time in our history any-
thing to do with the UBP was the “kiss of
death” and had to go.

And so the name Kelly Island was the
first name earmarked for removal. A school
competition was held for the renaming of
the island, and Arawak Cay was the name
that won the competition.

The situation then got racial. The
landowners in the Cable Beach area who
would be directly affected by the future use
of Kelly Island became concerned.

When a two-storey cargo terminal started
to be erected on the eastern end of the island
— the area earmarked for the Holiday Inn
— residents were convinced that a black
government was deliberately trying to deval-
ue their properties. It is true that the area

Quality Auto Sales
PRE-OWNED CARS & TRUCKS

Trade-ins on

around what was by then Arawak Cay quick-
ly lost its charm and several property owners
quietly moved out.

It was announced at the time that the
terminal, which would take nine months to
build, would provide office space upstairs
and cargo storage facilities on the ground
floor.

It was reported that the surplus cargo
from Prince George Dock would be stored at
Arawak Cay and that the Customs Depart-
ment would be transferred to office space
upstairs. Already Prince George had started
to move to Arawak and a new port was in
the making.

But there was a lot of dithering as though
no one quite knew what to do once the mon-
strous steel shed was completed. It was
uncertain whether the PLP government
would proceed with its plans to transfer all
freight activity to Arawak Cay. In those
days there was no talk of environment
impact assessment studies — the PLP just
put down pilings wherever and whenever
the spirit moved them.

Former Communications Minister Arthur
Foulkes — now Sir Arthur — had advocat-
ed a separation of freight and passenger
activity at Prince George to alleviate the
congestion at the dockside and on Bay
Street.

At the time Mr Foulkes pointed out that
there were several considerations motivating
the decision to move the terminal to Arawak
Cay.

He anticipated that with the harbour com-
pleted, there would be a great increase in
freight activity requiring additional sheds
and facilities for containerized cargo and a
roll-on roll-off service.

Adding to this was the problem created by
an increasing number of tourists landing
directly in Nassau from cruise ships at the
pier.

Today the argument for transfer from Bay
Street to Arawak has not changed.

In the end the customs shed remained a
crumbling eyesore, and quietly a shipping
port grew up at Arawak Cay. Other than
let it crumble into disrepair, the PLP gov-
ernment did nothing more constructive with
the cay.

Today Senator Fitzgerald also complains
that the transfer of the port to Arawak Cay
will kill Arawak’s fish fry business. Quite
the contrary.

These small business persons should be
delighted — any busy port will bring an
increase in business.

As for the argument about Saunders
Beach, we think the removal of the scenic
casuarina trees from the area will do more
harm to the beauty of Saunders Beach than
the port being transferred to Arawak Cay.

Quite frankly, Senator Fitzgerald, we
think you are creating a lot of hot air from
atop a shaky wicket.



Education
debate: the
first step to

improvement

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It's delightful to read all
the talk about our education-
al woes and I applaud Mr.
Carl Bethel, Minister of Edu-
cation for at least openly dis-
cussing the dismal exam
results of our children.

That's a giant first step for a
politician in my not so humble
opinion, and just might start
paving the way for the edu-
cation department and teach-
ers to realise their responsi-
bility in this process.

Back in 1999, I was taken
to task for advocating vouch-
ers and privatisation of our
school system by statists and
teachers alike, who, in spite
of the evidence of decades
before them, they continue to
believe that the government
can move the educational sys-
tem in the right direction.

The same applies to some-
one calling himself "Simon"
who recently wrote in his col-
umn in The Nassau Guardian
that:

"..too many parents shun
their basic obligations to
review homework, turn off the
television and fill their homes
with books rather than digital
games, resulting in lacklustre
graduation rates and scores of
school-leavers who are basi-
cally illiterate and innumer-
ate."

This is a cop out. We know
this has been the case for
twenty-five years or more
now, as a result of our single
parent homes, and the edu-
cational system has not adapt-
ed.

A sad commentary for the
body responsible for provid-
ing education for the vast

letters@triobunemedia.net



majority of Bahamian chil-
dren. I'm no behavioural sci-
entist, but maybe if a genera-
tion or two get the education
they deserve they might be
better at parenting?

"Simon" goes on to say:

"Meanwhile, those bedaz-
zled by the type of school
vouchers debated in the U.S.
may wish to draw their star-
spangled gaze home, recog-
nizing how their fervent
desires, sustained by succes-
sive governments, are closer
than imagined."

"Grant-in-aid is our tax
dollars subsidizing our chil-
dren’s education in non-state
schools, a practice prohibited
in the U.S. school system.
Another name for grant-in-
aid: vouchers!"

I must admit to being
bedazzled by the prospect of
vouchers, because the status
quo is dealing our children a
lousy hand.

But to suggest that grant-
in-aid is a voucher pro-
gramme is simply misleading.

IT am not aware of current
numbers, but if my failing
memory serves me well, sev-
eral years back, private
schools received something
like $250,000 per annum from
the Government in grant-in-
aid. This is hardly a voucher
system.

As I'm sure "Simon"
knows, a voucher system, in
simple terms, is where the
government determines the
cost per student in the state

system, and gives parents a
cheque payable to the school
of their choice so their chil-
dren might receive a better
education if their neighbour-
hood school is failing them.

This might mean that par-
ents who choose to accept the
voucher will have to pay a lit-
tle more out of pocket to send
their child to a private school,
because they know that suc-
cess comes from sacrifice.

"Simon", confirming his
statist views, also points to the
"needs of smaller island com-
munities in our far-flung arch-
tpelago,” as if local leadership
in our family islands are inca-
pable of ensuring children
receive a sound education. It
happened before government
took the educational system
over, and it can happen again.

If the private sector were
providing educational services
like the state run system, peo-
ple would be screaming from
the roof tops about the need
to pass a law to ensure the
private system is made
accountable. So why do we
not hear the same cry from
"Simon" and his comrades in
the case of our government
run schools?

Keep the information com-
ing Mr. Bethel, the first step
to improvement is admitting
you have a problem.

Besides, I think you know
that future generations of
Bahamians deserve better.

Yours in Liberty,

RICK LOWE
www.weblogbahamas.com
August 12, 2009.

Miss Bahamas deserves our 100 per cent support

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I agree with Miss Bahamas’ family. Ever
since winning the Miss Bahamas pageant in
May, she has been subjected to the cruelest
form of ridicule and attack that I can remem-
ber in Bahamian pageant history.

This is truly very sad. The nasty attacks
made against her online by rumours, lies, innu-
endoes and photographs in so many of the
forums have been nothing short of disgraceful;
we should be ashamed as a nation.

And to think that it would even continue
while the Miss Universe pageant is actually

going on here in our country.

or the National Miss Universe franchise hold-
er. I think anyone with any common sense

any event.

body.

cent.

would know that while she is a contestant in
the Miss Universe pageant, she does not
choose whether, where and when she goes to

Yes she deserves our support 100 per cent
but it seems like in our country we just can’t
seem to get over the problem of only “Mr or
Mrs so-and-so’s” children deserve to be any-

My family supports Miss Sherman 100 per

Another ghetto family that has succeeded.

I must admit that I was also surprised that

your newspaper would carry a story com-
plaining about her not being at the airport
without even trying to get a statement from her

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Baliamas ant
Egypt seek ties
in education
and technology

By LINDSAY THOMPSON :

THE Bahamas wants
closer ties in education, the
arts, and technology with
the Arab Republic of
Egypt, Governor-General
Arthur Hanna said.

He expressed that desire
as he accepted Letters of
Credence from Tarek
Elwassimy, Non-Resident
Ambassador of the Arab
Republic of Egypt, during a
ceremony at Government
House yesterday.

“Egypt and the Bahamas
have indeed shared close
and cordial relations in
membership in major inter-
national organisations,
including those devoted to
maximising the sovereignty
of developing countries
such as the Non-Aligned
Movement and the Group
of 77 and China,” the Gov-
ernor General said.

“The Bahamas looks for-
ward to continued excellent
relations with Egypt in
these global fora, and bilat-
erally,” he added.

In this regard, the
Bahamas hopes that recip-
rocal support will be con-
firmed for the international
candidatures to which both
countries aspire: The Eco-
nomic and Social Council of
the United Nations, the
International Maritime
Organisation, and the Unit-
ed Nations Educational,
Scientific and Cultural
Organisation.

He recalled the “unique
contribution” of Egypt to
civilisation.

Ambassador Elwassimy,
45, said he was pleased to
have been appointed by
President Mohamed Hosny
Mubarak as Ambassador to
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.

“Both countries have
deep-rooted significant ties
and an outstanding political
coordination,” he said.

A SHOOT-OUT during Fox Hill
Day has left police searching for a
number of persons who could be

linked to gangs engaged in a turf

battle in the Elizabeth Estates, Fox

Hill and Step Street areas.

According to reports reaching
The Tribune, a massive brawl erupt-
ed on Tuesday night near the Fox
Hill roundabout. An eyewitness,
who wished to remain anonymous,
said that as she was driving by the

heard.

area in her car she watched as per-
sons began to fight, and before long
the sound of gunshots could be

Giving chase to these hooligans,
police officers returned fire and
even blocked the roads for a short
time, making the flight of individu-

als who were caught in the cross
fire a near impossibility.

Speeding away, the eyewitness
said that she felt lucky to escape
the area with her life.

While there was no report of this
incident from the police, Commis-
sioner Reginald Ferguson con-

Fox Hill Day shootout could be
linked to possible gang battle

Shots fired after massive brawl

firmed that there was in fact a
shoot-out, noting that thankfully no
one was injured during the whole
ordeal.

He could not confirm if the vio-
lence was connected to any gang or
turf warfare, but said police are con-
tinuing to investigate the matter.

Witnesses testify in student murder case

Court hears of

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

TESTIMONY in the tri-
al of a man charged with
the January 2008 murder
of aC R Walker student
continued yesterday with
another eyewitness giving
his account of the incident.

Jamal Penn, 21, is
charged in the January 7,
2008 shooting death of
Deangelo Cargill Fowler,
18. Penn is being repre-
sented by attorney Murrio
Ducille. Yoland Rolle and
Jilian Williams are prose-
cuting the case.

Fowler was shot in broad
daylight as he stood on a
bus stop on Bay and Fred-
erick Streets.

Taking to the stand yes-
terday, a witness, whose
name is being withheld
because he is a juvenile,
recalled that he had been
standing under a canopy on
the western side of Fred-
erick Street along with sev-
eral of his friends when he
noticed a car playing load
music.

He told the court that
the car stopped at the traf-
fic light on Bay Street.

The witness said that at
that time he was not able
to see the persons in the
car, but got a better look
for about 30 seconds to a
minute when the green
Honda slowly turned south
onto Frederick Street.

The two persons in the
car were laughing, he said.

The witness told the
court that the car had
already passed him when
the person in the front pas-
senger seat stuck his head
out of the window with a
gun in his hand and fired
two shots.

The witness testified that
he was able to see the gun-
man’s face at this point.

He also said that on Jan-
uary 21 he went to the
Central Detective Unit

PMMA DL Uta ROMS S LL Cm DOLE

4 >











A FAMILY has been
| left broken-hearted by
the disappearance of
their beloved Toy Mal-
tese ‘Little Bear’.

Father-of-two Patrick
Murray said his seven-
year-old daughter Say-
lor has been devastated
by the loss of the dog
she was given around
four years ago.

Little Bear ran off in
the Ruby Avenue area
on Cable Beach in Feb-
ruary, and Mr Murray
now believes the valu-
able dog was taken.

He said: “My daugh-
ter got her when she
was a puppy and kept
her by her side all day
and night. She would
not go to sleep without
Little Bear in her arms.

“It was a sad day
when Little Bear left. I
feel that someone has
her. But my daughter's
heart is broken. She still
draws pictures of her
and talks about her
often.

“She took her every-
where with her. She
wouldn't even leave the
country unless Little
Bear could go. It was a
very sad day when Little
Bear left.”

Pictures of Little Bear
were posted in the
Cable Beach area and a
$500 reward has been
posted for her safe
return.

Anyone with any
information about Lit-
tle Bear should call Mr
Murray on 327-3063 or










































mail.com

To submit informa-
tion anonymously call
Crime Stoppers on 328-
TIPS (8477).









e-mail westvilla@hot-




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gun fired from car

(CDU) where he waited
for five hours before an
identification parade was
conducted. Penn’s attorney
Mr Ducille suggested to
the witness that he had
come to court to embellish
his story as he went along.
The witness denied this

suggestion.
Another witness, Detec-
tive Sergeant Reno

Armaly, told the court yes-
terday that around 1.40pm
on Sunday, January 20, he
and two other officers on
mobile patrol, acting on
information, went to a
house on St Croix Street
off Carmichael Road.

There, he said, they
observed a heavily tinted
Chevrolet Lumina car with
no license plates attached.
Detective Sergeant Armaly
told the court that he iden-
tified himself as a police
officer and moments later
the passenger door of car
opened.

He said a man wearing a
black jacket, black shirt

and blue jeans got out of
the car with his hands in
the air. Detective Sergeant
Armaly told the court that
he showed the man a war-
rant and told him that he
was suspected of the mur-
der of Deangelo Fowler.

According to the officer,
the man replied, “I am not
Jamal Penn, my name is
Tony Smith.”

Detective Sergeant
Armaly said that the man,
who he identified in court
as murder accused Jamal
Penn, was arrested and tak-
en to the Carmichael Road
Police Station and then to
CDU.

During cross-examina-
tion, Detective Sergeant
Armaly said that he found
nothing unlawful on the
accused and that there had

been another individual in
car who was not wanted by
police.

Inspector Cedric Bullard
told the court that shortly
after 2pm on January 21 he
conducted an identification
parade at CDU.

He said that he gave
Penn a consent form which
the accused read and
signed before the identifi-
cation parade was held.
Inspector Bullard said that
Penn had a lawyer present
at the time.

During cross-examina-
tion he testified that Bran-
don Russell was the first to
attend the identification
parade. Penn was among
nine other men in the line-
up, he said.

The trial continues today
at 10 am.

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Healthcare Centre ‘will lead
rimary care

Fidel Castro
marks 83rd
birthday =

with essay

HAVANA

THE FOUNDER of a}
New York-based church }
group that opposes the U.S. }
embargo of Cuba said Thurs- }
day that former Cuban Pres- }
ident Fidel Castro looked }
strong and animated during }
a July 31 meeting, according }
to Associated Press. }

The Rev. Lucius Walker :
Jr. of Pastors for Peace told }
The Associated Press he met }
for several hours with Castro ;
at a Havana-area home while }
he was in Cuba to organize a }
humanitarian aid shipment. }
Pastors for Peace posted two }
photos of the meeting on its }
Web site to coincide with }
Castro’s 83rd birthday Thurs- }
day. :
“He looked good, like he }
had gained weight, was sharp }
and articulate. I hadn’t seen }
him for three or four years,” }
Walker said by telephone }
from New York. “He showed }
tremendous signs of recovery }
from a very serious illness.” ;

Castro ceded power to his }
brother, Raul, after he fell ill :
three years ago and has not }
been seen in public since. He }
stepped down as president in }
February 2008. :

Walker said he also met }
with Raul Castro on July 26 }
outside Havana and that the }
president mentioned “that }
conversation, in the nature of }
dialogue, between US. and :
Cuban representatives is }
under way.” Raul Castro did- }
n’t offer details, Walker said. i

Ea

S

RPA et EL

Cesspit - 5600





to’ expansion of p

By MATT MAURA
Bahamas Information
Services

JOHNSON BAY — The
re-opening of the Miriam
Green Community Health-
care Centre in South Andros
will lead to the expansion of
primary healthcare services to
residents, Minister of Health
Dr Hubert Minnis said on
Wednesday.

He said this will be accom-
plished through the provision
of dental, X-ray, emergency
treatment and maternal ser-
vices.

X-ray services will be avail-
able when the machine arrives
within the next week.

Dr Minnis said the dental
chair has been repaired and
that those services will also
begin “shortly.”

Among dignitaries present
were Picewell Forbes, Mem-
ber of Parliament for South
Andros, and officials of the
Ministry of Health, the
Department of Public Health,
and the National Insurance
Board.

The centre is named in hon-
our of Miriam Green, a mid-
wife and grandmother whose
contributions to the delivery
of maternal and child health-
care services, particularly in
the area of midwifery, are leg-
endary in the South Andros
community.

Dr Minnis said the re-open-
ing of the centre is also a part
of the government’s objective
to ensure equitable access to
quality healthcare services for
all residents of the Bahamas.

Built in 1991 under a grant
from the National Insurance
Board, the facility has faced
numerous challenges since its
construction.

At one point it was even
closed which resulted in the
relocation of the services
offered there to other facili-
ties.

The Health Minister
assured South Andros resi-
dents that the healthcare cen-

LEFT: Vera Cleare, nursing
officer Il and clinic supervisor
of the Miriam Green Commu-
nity Healthcare Centre (left)
takes Minister of Health Dr
Hubert Minnis (right) and offi-
cials on a tour of the renovat-
ed and re-opened centre in
South Andros. It was named
in honour of midwife Mrs
Miriam Green (second left).
Her husband Euthal is pic-
tured, third left. Algernon
Cargill, director of the Nation-
al Insurance Board is also
shown.

tre will be fully utilised in their
best interests.

“Despite the (previous)
challenges, we celebrate the
achievements made and
launch the re-opening of this
facility which will facilitate the
achievement of a key goal of
the Ministry of Health and the
Department of Public Health,
which is the availability of
quality, primary healthcare
services for all residents of the
Bahamas,” he said.

Dr Minnis said the re-open-
ing of the centre is “evidence”
of the Ministry of Health and
the Department of Public
Health’s commitment to
improving quality primary
healthcare services through-
out the country.

For 30 years, the Ministry
of Health and the Department
of Public Health have imple-
mented the recommended
strategy of primary and public
healthcare as mandated by the
World Health Organisation
(WHO) to ensure equitable
access to essential healthcare
services for all persons.

Some of those services, Dr
Minnis said, are geared
towards promotion, preven-
tion and education.

“Our goal is to ensure that
this community and others
like it throughout the
Bahamas receive the best pri-
mary healthcare they possibly

MINISTER OF HEALTH Dr Hubert Minnis (at podium)
addresses residents of Johnson Bay, South Andros, during
the re-opening ceremonies of the Miriam Green Communi-
ty Healthcare Centre on Wednesday.

can,” Dr Minnis said. centres.”



made annually to healthcare

“That includes access to
healthcare services of the
standard that is received by
persons living in New Provi-
dence and the other major

Dr Minnis said statistics
compiled by his ministry
showed that over the past five
years up to 10,000 visits,
approximately, have been

facilities in Andros.

The re-opening of the cen-
tre will help to facilitate even
greater care to residents in
this regard, he said.

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THE GOVERNMENT of the People’s Republic of China awarded four Bahamians full scholarships to pursue
tertiary level education in China. Pictured from left are Jonathan Pratt, biological engineering; Acting
Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette; Courtney Dames, finance; Joelle Miller, Chi-
nese language and culture; Chinese Ambassador to the Bahamas Hu Dingxian; and Carlton Wright II, com-
munication engineering.

Four Bahamians awarded
Chinese scholarships

By LINDSAY THOMPSON

THE People’s Republic of China awarded
four Bahamian students with full scholarships
to pursue tertiary level education at various
institutions in China over the next four years.

Acting Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign
Affairs Brent Symonette congratulated the stu-
dents during a ceremony at the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs on Wednesday.

“These young people are an inspiration, choos-
ing as they have, to study in a country vastly
different from their own, and to learn another
language,” Mr Symonette said.

The scholarship recipients are Courtney
Dames, finance; Joelle Miller, Chinese language
and culture; Jonathan Pratt, biological engi-
neering; and Carlton Wright II, communication
engineering. This brings the number of Bahami-
ans who have benefitted from the Chinese schol-
arship programme to 23.

Based on their qualifications and field of study,
they were chosen from seven applicants reviewed
by a pre-selection committee comprising staff
of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

The names of the applicants were then for-
warded to the Embassy of the People’s Repub-
lic of China in Nassau for approval.

The Bahamas and the People’s Republic of
China established diplomatic relations in May
1997.

Since then, Bahamian students have pursued
higher education at the Bachelor’s and Master’s
levels in a range of disciplines from manufac-
turing and design of clothing and apparel to
medicine, astrophysics/astronomy, international



business management, marketing, Chinese cul-
ture, language and architecture.

“These young Bahamians have been able to
do so with scholarships awarded by the govern-
ment of the People’s Republic of China, through
the China Scholarship Council,” Mr Symonette
said.

“Some of the earlier recipients have complet-
ed their studies and are contributing to the
growth and development of the Bahamas.”

He urged the students to be “good ambas-
sadors” for the Bahamas while in China and to
take full advantage of the opportunity to learn
and become fluent in the language of the fastest
growing economy in the world.

“We look forward to welcoming you back to
the Bahamas at the conclusion of your studies,”
he told students.

“We are confident that you will be well pre-
pared to play your necessary role in the further
development of our country.”

Mr Symonette also expressed appreciation to
the government of China for the technical assis-
tance and cooperation extended to the Bahamas
over the past 12 years.

Ambassador of the People’s Republic of Chi-
na Hu Dingxian said that it was a great pleasure
to be a part of the 2009/10 annual awards to
four Bahamian students.

He advised the students to enrich themselves
with the new knowledge and skills they will
obtain during their studies.

On behalf of the students, Courtney Dames,
who pursues studies in finance, said they look
forward to the challenge to enhance their edu-
cation and learn a new language.
THe TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

Because, you know I don’t operate the
church. We have a board and we have a
lawyer and so everything was done above
board. Nothing was done by myself.”

Bishop Davis said he had no idea of the
value of the land when it was initially pur-
chased in 2007, or whether or not there was
any increase from the initial price given the
fact that the purpose for the property had
changed from an altruistic one to a com-
mercial enterprise.

In fact, Bishop Davis said, he does not
know where Prime Minister Ingraham got
the idea that the property was going to be
used for an old folk’s home, noting that the
ministry already has an old folk’s home next
to the church.

“They have that story all mixed up and I
would prefer you to talk to the church lawyer
instead of talking to me,” he said.

However, when The Tribune contacted
the church’s attorney, Anjanette Pyfrom,
she said she had not as yet been authorised
by the Bishop to speak on the church’s
behalf. Therefore, she said, she could not
answer any questions or speak on any issues
relating to the church’s subdivision at this
time.

Bishop Davis continued: “The church has
a lawyer and I think you need to talk to her
or talk to the former Prime Minister.”

According to documents, the 3.75 acres
of Crown land near Fire Trail Road, granted
by government to the church for $2,500, was,
in a later agreement, to be administered by
Arawak Homes. An irrevocable power of
attorney, dated June 4, 2007, was signed on
June 21, 2007 in the chambers of Sharon
Wilson and Co, by Bishop Roston Davis
with the “authority of two thirds of the mem-
bership of Golden Gates Assembly and
World Outreach Ministries.” The subdivi-
sion is known as Ross Davis Estates.

Golden Gates Assembly and World Out-

Pastor hits back

reach Ministries “for good and valuable con-
sideration” appointed Arawak Homes Lim-
ited “to be its lawful attorney for the purpose
of exercising all the following powers...”
Included in those powers the land was to be
subdivided into a residential community,
with roadways, paths and lots “in such size
and dimensions as Arawak Homes deems
fit.”

Arawak Homes was also to acquire the
necessary government permits and approvals,
and to construct single family homes on all of
the lots. Arawak was to enter into an agree-
ment for sale with purchasers and to receive
the money for the lots. It was also to insure
against any risk or liability that could affect
the lots. The power of attorney, said the
agreement, was “irrevocable.”

It declared that every
“receipt, release, con-
veyance, instrument and
assurance” done by
Arawak Homes were to
be treated as if done by
Golden Gates Assembly.

During a debate in the
House of Assembly on
July 20, Prime Minister
Ingraham tabled a num-
ber of documents outlin-
ing the disposition of pub- JAI Snaiueleln
licly held Crown lands
over the past few decades. Speaking specifi-
cally on land that was issued to various
churches, Mr Ingraham paused and digressed
from his prepared text noting how “inter-
esting” the case surrounding the Golden
Gates Assembly church was.

“Now Golden Gates is an interesting one
because I approved for Golden Gates to
build an old folks home. The conveyance
was signed by my predecessor in office (Per-
ry Christie). The land was sold and a housing



subdivision is on it, named after the rev-
erend,” Mr Ingraham said.

Bishop Davis said he is not bothered by
the Prime Minister’s comments. Neither, he
said, is he inclined to respond to rumours
that he was able to pocket nearly $1 million
through this land transaction.

“T have no comment on that,” he said.

“You are in the Bahamas, you are a
Bahamian, you know how these things go,
right? You know how the newspapers and
people do it. I have the Lord’s work to do, I
don’t have time to fool with these people. I
have to pray, and I have a thousand and one
things to do.

“If you come to my office now people are
out there waiting, saying ‘Bishop can you
help me.’ That is my goal. Not to try to
answer these things, because already the for-
mer Prime Minister has already said what he
had to say. You know how government goes.
No one could do a subdivision without gov-
ernment approval,” he said.

In an earlier interview, former Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie confirmed that it was he
who signed off on the variation to the origi-
nal Crown land grant issued to the Golden
Gates Assembly church that created a hous-
ing subdivision instead of the intended old
folks or community home.

Claiming that there was the overriding
concern at the time in the country for low
cost housing, Mr Christie said he made this
decision only after meeting with the leaders
of the church who all confirmed their support
on the change to the original grant.

“At the time I did it I knew it was a varia-
tion and I signed off on it as a variation
because at the time I was dealing with the
fact that this was going to create home own-
ership and that is in fact exactly what hap-
pened,” he said.

Mr Christie added that he effected a sec-
ond variation to a church application in
respect of Bishop Simeon Hall which, he
said, is expected to produce some housing
development as well.

_ Claim that police let
illegal Haitian go
after being bribed

FROM page one

at the Golden Gates Shopping Centre on the corner of
Baillou Hill Road and Carmichael Road to accept pay-
ment.

But police became concerned that they might be set up
and arranged to meet the man at the Bamboo Shack in
Carmichael Road instead.

One of the officers, a reserve police officer, asked to be
dropped off in order to avoid the illegal transaction, while the
second cop met the man at the Bamboo Shack to accept the
bribe, according to the source.

He said: “The police are now resorting to all sorts of
criminality and something has to be wrong for that to hap-
pen to that Haitian man.

“T want the Police Commissioner to investigate this behav-
iour and stop corruption in the force.”

Commissioner of Police Reginald Ferguson did not return
calls from The Tribune before press time last night.

Ya

|
| itat et On

Is cutting the store in half
HALFIS THE OTHER

FROM page one

boyfriend said.

One of the men then held the
knife to her throat and put on a
condom to rape her while the
other stood guard.

Her boyfriend said she did not
scream for help because she was
afraid she would be killed.

After he raped her the man
forced her to wash and get rid of
the evidence.

He and his accomplice then
raided the house for valuable
goods and stole around $1,000
in cash, as well as jewellery and
other items, before making their
escape.

The woman called police and
went to the hospital for exami-
nation, crying, bruised and com-
plaining of stomach pains.

And now she is concerned the

Former officer

have been five rapes or attempt-
ed rapes in eastern New Provi-
dence over the last month which
followed a trend as the rapist
forced his victims to wash after-
wards, took bed sheets and oth-
er evidence away with him, and
on occasions he at least attempt-
ed to use a condom.

Assistant Commissioner of
Police Raymond Gibson did not
expand on details when ques-
tioned by The Tribune, and con-
firmed only two rapes and two
attempted rapes in eastern New
Providence in the five months
since March.

Former Crime Stoppers advo-
cate Lucia Broughton slammed
police for not informing the pub-
lic about the attacks and warning

police should warn the public by
informing them about crime.

As the 36-year-old raped on
Sunday morning recovers from
the attack, her boyfriend said he
is angry she had not been
warned.

He said: “T get the feeling he
has to be a serial rapist. If a man
can stand up in front of you and
use protection, and make her
bathe after he finished, in case
they check, he has to be some-
one who has done it before; a
one-time rapist isn’t going to
think about it like that.

“The police should warn peo-
ple. There are a lot of young girls
around, and we might hear
about a couple of rapes, but we
have not been told about all of
the people who have been raped.

“The police are supposed to
protect us, that’s what they’re

men will get away with the crime
and strike again.
A source in the police force

FROM page one

ter Evans: "We have two persons being ques-
tioned by police, a man and a woman."

Mrs Soles-Armony was shot outside her
mother's home in the Sea Breeze area around
8pm last Friday as she sat in a car breast-feed-
ing her three-month-old son.

According to a family friend, the 29-year-old
had just returned to her mother’s house with
her two younger sisters and two young sons
after a day at the mall.

With her sisters and eldest son at her moth-
er's front door, TaGia stayed behind to feed
her son when a gunman approached her vehi-
cle and shot her.

Residents heard her scream: "No! No! No!
Don't do that!"

Injured, and with her son in her arms, TaGia
tried desperately to escape her attacker only to
rear-end a parked car and hit two other parked
vehicles nearby before coming to a stop.

A passenger in the rear-ended car reportedly

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vulnerable women to be vigilant. there for. They should be warn-
Her stand was echoed in a poll ing people about these rapes and
on The Tribune website where

told The Tribune this week there 111 of 113 respondents said

tell them to stay on their guard.”
The former police officer said

Man and woman quizzed

rescued the infant, whose face was said to be
covered in his mother's blood. But when police
arrived on scene TaGia was already dead.

Nearby residents believe the gunman, who
had reportedly approached the car after the
crashes, was scared off by people who had
come to inspect the commotion.

Family and friends believe TaGia — who
had just returned home from St Kitts where
she lived with her husband — may have been a
victim of mistaken identity or the target of an
armed robbery gone wrong.

Investigators have not yet established a
motive for the killing but are probing several
possible scenarios.

"We hear a lot of things and we are looking
at all the information we are getting to see if
there is any evidence to substantiate those,”
head of the Central Detective Unit Superin-
tendent Elsworth Moss told The Tribune yes-
terday.

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he wanted to speak out to warn
others about the risk of attack
as police chiefs stay quiet.

He advises women to take
whatever precautions they can
to make their homes safe, by
installing alarm systems, or bars
on doors and windows, to pre-
vent break-ins.

He said: “I worked for the
police and I know if you have
got a confrontation like that, you
can’t just scream for help
because you have to be careful
or they will kill you.

“We have to protect our-
selves, however we can, to pre-
vent people from breaking into
our homes. We have to be care-
ful.”

Calls to Police Commission-
er Reginald Ferguson, Assistant
Commissioner Raymond Gib-
son and Chief Superintendent
in charge of the Criminal Detec-
tive Unit Elsworth Moss did not
return calls from The Tribune
before press time yesterday.

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Teacher held in Bahamian children fighting

child sex probe |

FROM page one

vacation.

Local community activist
Troy Garvey, founder of
TOUCH (Trusting On Unit-
ing Children’s Hearts), com-
mended the young victim for
coming forth.

“Tt is sad to know that every
day it seems like the victims of
sexual molestation are getting
younger and younger — our
children are not safe at school
or in the church,” he told The
Tribune after learning of the
allegations being made against
the teacher.

“The arrest is indeed an
eye-opener that persons are
now coming forth...and we
would like to commend the
children of this country who
are stepping forth to expose
these alleged child predators,”
he said.

Mr Garvey said that young
victims are reluctant to come
forward out of fear.

Allegations of child
molestation on Grand
Bahama first broke in Janu-
ary at the Eight Mile Rock
High School.

Three teachers — two men
and one woman — have since
been removed from the school
over complaints of alleged
molestation and sexual mis-
conduct.

Mr Garvey, EMRHS PTA
president, criticised the Min-
istry of Education for its
“poor” handling of investiga-

tions into complaints against
former teacher Andre Birbal,
the first of three Eight Mile
Rock teachers accused of
molestation at Eight Mile
Rock High.

Birbal, 46, fled the country
in February after police
launched investigations into
complaints made by two for-
mer male students who
claimed Birbal molested them.

Police issued a warrant of
arrest for Birbal with Inter-
pol, in March, for questioning
into unnatural sexual inter-
course. He was arrested by US
authorities on May 3 on a traf-
fic violation in New York.

The Attorney General has
submitted all relevant docu-
ments requesting the extradi-
tion of Birbal, who is a native
of Trinidad.

Mr Garvey commended the
police for the work they are
doing in the community, espe-
cially as it relates to child
molestation matters.

“There are people out there
preying on our children in the
schools and TOUCH will con-
tinue to work feverishly in the
community of Grand Bahama
and the Bahamas to make
sure the students are safe,”

Mr Garvey stressed that the
government needs to vet all
teachers, and not just new
teachers that are coming into
the public school system.

“We have to do a thorough
job because our children are
being destroyed and taken
advantage of,” he said.

illness visit New York camp

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia. net

FREEPORT - Four Bahami-
an children diagnosed with life-
threatening illnesses travelled to
New York this summer to attend
Camp Good Days, a camp for
children battling terminal illnesses.

Grand Bahama resident Tan-
ternika Johnson, Vance Poitier of
Abaco, and Willinda Theodor and
Alijah Lubin of New Providence,
were among the 160 campers that
spent two weeks in Branchport,
New York.

The camp is free to children
from all over the world who are
diagnosed with illnesses, such as
cancer. Camp Good Days was
founded by Gary Mervis in 1979
when his daughter, Teddi, was
diagnosed with a malignant brain
tumour.

The vision for the camp grew
and became a summer camp
where children battling childhood
cancer could come together to
share goods days — away from hos-
pitals and treatment regimes.

Dorothy Goldsmith accompa-
nied Johnson, 17, and Poitier, 14,
who both suffer from Sickle Cell
Anaemia.

She said that she was first intro-
duced to the camp, in 2007, by
longtime US visitor Joe Kohler,
who is now the official Regional
Director of Camp Good Days for
the Bahamas.

Mrs Goldsmith said the camp



FOUNDERS OF Camp Good Days Wendy Mervis, left, and her husband
Gary Mervis, (far right) is seen with a group from The Bahamas. Also
seen from left are Joe Kohler, Regional Director of Camp Good Days in
the Bahamas; Vance Poitier of Abaco, Tanternika Johnson of Grand
Bahama, Cora Pratt, the mother of Alihan Lubin and Willinda Theodor,
of New Providence, and Dorothy Goldsmith of Grand Bahama.

caters to children between ages 7-
18 from all over the world.

“Children with life-threatening
illnesses lose a lot of their child-
hood; they miss out on vacations
and lose time away from school
because of treatments, and the
camp allows them to meet other
people with similar illness and
share joyful experiences togeth-
er,” she said.

The camp celebrated its 30th
anniversary this year. Mrs Gold-
smith hopes to assist other young-
sters suffering from illnesses in
Grand Bahama to attend the next
year’s camp, in 2010.

Although the camp is free, she
noted that sponsors are needed to
pay for the cost of airfare for the

children.

She thanked businessman
Mario Donato, Princess Taylor,
manager of Municipal Motors Ltd,
and Terry Goldsmith of Docagold
Trading Company for sponsoring
the two campers from Grand
Bahama and Abaco.

She stated that the campers are
exposed to all sorts of activities,
including arts and crafts, archery,
basketball, cookie baking, com-
puter games, fishing, mini-golf,
music, nature tours, rope courses,
sailing, scuba, swimming and
woodwork.

They are also taken on off-
camp field trips to major league
soccer games, shopping at Wal-
mart and Factory Outlets near

Syracuse, and visit the Science
Centre in Ithaca, NY.

Campers Johnson and Poitier
said they enjoyed their stay at
Camp Good Days.

“Tt was a great to meet people
from other countries who have the
same disease as me and it was
wonderful to meet the volunteers
and counsellors,” said Miss John-
son.

Vance Poitier said this trip was
his second to the camp. “It was a
nice experience for a second time
meeting other children like me
from other countries,” he said.

Poitier was the recipient of the
“Best Counsellor in Training”
award for being the most helpful
all around camper.

“We were really pleased that
Vance was selected best all around
camper. At 14, he is an ambas-
sador for the Bahamas; he is some-
thing special for us in the northern
Bahamas, and we expect both
campers to go and tell people of
their experiences,” said Mrs Gold-
smith.

Johnson and Poitier thanked
the sponsors by presenting them
with Camp Good Days Recipe
books.

Mr Donato was very pleased to
assist youngsters on Grand
Bahama. “I have been a support-
er of the YMCA for many
years..., and I wanted to do what
I can because the youth are the
future of the Bahamas,” he said.

Ms Taylor said Municipal was
pleased to be a sponsor.

FROM page one

it suspects of falsifying sick notes to
the BMC and the Attorney General’s
Office for further action.

Hundreds of nurses staged a mass
sick-out in June, disrupting health ser-
vices throughout the country, after the
Bahamas Nurses Union stated its dis-
pleasure with government postponing
its anticipated health insurance cov-
erage.

BNU President Cleola Hamilton
maintained that the action was no
strike and all of the nurses were gen-
uinely ill, with sick notes to prove it.

Yesterday Dr Minnis said that the
government is concerned about some
doctors who “would’ve written in
excess of 50 notes,” as well as others
who supplied in the region of 20 or 30
for various nurses.

Doctors

In one case government has reason
to believe that a doctor faxed a sick
note to a nurse in Grand Bahama,
making it all the more obvious that
he/she could not have examined the
nurse in question for any signs of ill
health.

For a doctor to knowingly write a
sick note for a person who is well
enough to go to work may be an “eth-
ical issue” for which they could face
penalties, noted the minister, himself a
physician.

“We compiled all the information
and sent it to the Attorney General’s
Office so they can deal with it appro-
priately. The Medical Council also has
regulations to deal with those mat-
ters,” said Dr Minnis.

As for exactly what action govern-
ment could take against doctors who
are suspected of having assisted
protesting nurses by providing fake
slips, Dr Minnis said that is up to the
Attorney General’s Office to review
and determine.

However, he suggested that by push-
ing the issue Government could also
be striking a blow for the private sec-
tor, who have long complained to the
Medical Association of the Bahamas,
of which Dr Minnis is a former Presi-
dent, that they are concerned about
the possibility that there are local doc-
tors who falsify sick notes for healthy
workers.

Complaints forwarded to the Med-
ical Council are investigated by a Com-
plaints Committee formed of three
members of the council.

Under the Medical Act (1974),
which governs the profession, a doctor

The Committee for the Privatisation of BTC

PUBLIC NOTICE

Draft Electronic

can be struck off the register or other-
wise disciplined if they engage in “seri-
ous professional misconduct.”

Under Section 2(E) of the Act, such
conduct includes: “Knowingly giving a
certificate with respect to birth, death,
state of health, vaccination or disin-
fection or with respect to any matter
relating to life, health or accidents
which the medical practitioner knows
or ought to know is untrue, misleading
or otherwise improper.”

Possible penalties for those found
guilty of misconduct include removal
of their name from the Register, there-
by ending their ability to practice med-
icine; suspension of registration for a
period not exceeding one year; pay-
ment of a penalty not exceeding one
thousand dollars; payment of costs as
the committee may consider a reason-
able contribution towards “the cost
incurred in connection with those pro-

ceedings.”

The Tribune attempted to reach the
Chairman of the Medical Council, Dr
Duane Sands, for comment yesterday,
however, he was said to be unavail-
able.

The move by government to bring
to account doctors who may have
assisted nurses seeking to skip work
comes a week after Public Hospital
Authority Herbert Brown revealed
that nurses who exceeded their allotted
sick days, or whose sick notes were
found not to be valid, would face pay
cuts this month.

“When we lose a member of staff
who is scheduled to work we may have
to bring somebody in to fill the
shift...and then we are required to give
them double-pay so it can be very cost-
ly,” Mr Brown said.

Government and the nurses have
yet to resolve the insurance row.

The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the
following position:

Communications
Sector Policy

[he Committee for the Privatisation of BIC is pleased, on behalf of

STOREKEEPER

The Storekeeper is responsible for the direction of the overall expendable
and non-expendable personal property and supply program for the US
Embassy and associated agencies, along with the supervision of three

warehousemen.

ihe Government of The Commonwealth of The Baharnas, fa

publish the draft Fectronic Communications Sector Policy.

The Séctor Policy seats out the Government's
communications sector for the next three years by:

the electronic

* outlining the new regulate

electronic

§ planned policy for

ry structure under which the
communications sector will operate:

* Completion of secondary school diploma.
* Three years of progressively responsible experience in warehousing

and inventory control or a related field.
* Two years of supervisory experience.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

* setting out the Government's objectives and policy
framework for further liberalisation: and

* setting regulatory pronties for the new regulator to

implement.

The policies ore embodied in the new legislation recently passed

by Parliament as follows:
«the Camrnunications Act 2009 (“Comms Act”):
* the Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority Act 2009
[“URCA Act’); and
*the Utilities Appeal Tibunal 2009 ("UAT Act").

Copies of fhe Sector Policy will be included os inserted supple-

Must have a professional knowledge of the field of
warehousing and inventory control

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

* Must be able to operate standard industry off-the-shelf computer
programs for property management and inventory control. Also, must
be able to use the latest version of Microsoft Office Suite of programs.

and automatic transmission.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

* Must be able to operate delivery, pickup and forklift with both manual

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation
package including performance-based incentives, medical and dental
insurance, life insurance, pension and opportunities for training and

ments in The Tribune (August 13, 2009) and The Nassau Guardian

fAugust 14, 2009). Copies may ako be downloaded from the
Government's website of www.bohamas.gov.bs or the privatisa-
tion website at www. bfeprivatisation.com or obtained fram the
offices of the Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority.
Comments may be emailed to Info@bteprivatisation.com.

Application forms
nassau.usembassy.gov. under Key Embassy Links and employment

opportunities.
the Embassy via email to

development.

Completed applications

can be found on_ the

should be
fernanderra@state.gov or faxed to

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible
for employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Embassy’s website

returned to

(242)328-8251, addressed to the Human Resources Office no later than
Monday, August 17th, 2009.


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS

Bain out with injured hamstring

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

ONE of the country's premier
quartermilers has opted to shut
down his 2009 season and with-
draw from the IAAF World Cham-
pionships in Athletics due to a per-
sistent season-long injury.

Andretti "The Bahamian
Dream" Bain will be forced to
forego his World Championship
debut due to the reaggravation of a
hamstring injury suffered last Mon-
day at the training camp for team
Bahamas in Berlin, Germany.

Bain first injured the hamstring
shortly before the 2009 season
began in April leading to a series
of disappointing performances.

His personal best for the season
was a time of 46.02s, June 27th run
in New Providence.

"I decided to withdraw from
these games because I got tired

Starting list of events
set to be released

running injured this year and just
wanted to get healthy for next sea-
son without adding anymore dam-
age,” Bain said. "It was a situation
where it was reaggravated. Initial-
ly I pulled it in April this year,
three days before my first meet.
So basically, all year I was com-
peting with an injured hamstring."

Although disappointed with the
outcome of the season and ulti-
mately missing out on the bi-annu-
al meet, the main event on the cal-
endar for the international gov-
erning body of track and field, Bain
said he looks forward to rebound-
ing in 2010.

"This meet was the reason why I
competed all year injured. I
worked extremely hard all season
and did not want the injury to hin-
der what I was on target to achieve.
but after this reaggrevation at
training camp this week, I just fig-
ured God had other things planned
and so the decision suddenly
became an easy one," he said. "I

am ready to start off season train-
ing now. But I will allow my leg to
fully heal before doing so. 2009
was a disappointing season due to
the constant injury, but 2010 will be
great."

Following a 2008 season where
Bain and other members of the
4x400 relay team captured Olympic
silver in Beijing, the team will be
forced to attempt a similar feat at
this year’s World Championships
without the services of two of its
key members, Bain and Andrae
Williams, also sidelined with an
injury.

Despite the setback, Bain said
he has confidence in the remain-
ing members of the team to carry
on the rich recent history of
Bahamian 4x400m squads.

"The others members of the
4x400 remain in high spirits
because this year we are extreme-
ly loaded with talent and so they
will still be able to achieve great
things with or without me,” he said.

Latoy Williams and Nathaniel
are expected to be possible
replacements for the vacant slots
left open by the injuries to Bain
and Williams.

Bain, the NCAA 2008 Indoor
and Outdoor champion during his
senior season at Oral Roberts Uni-
versity, who has enjoyed a virtual-
ly injury-free career thus far said
his first major setback has taught
him several valuable lessons
applicable to life on and off the
track.

"T think this has definitely made
me hungrier. I have learned and
matured a lot. I am a better per-
son, and athlete because of it," he
said. "The injury, it was a reality
check. That is why I am constant-
ly thanking God that I was able to
complete my Master's Degree in
Business, because one injury can
end season, and in some cases a
career. But I'm trusting 2010 will
be a great year for the “Bahamian
Dream".

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany: The
starting list for the events of
the IAAF's 12th World
Championships in Athletics
was not scheduled to be
released until late last night
following the final technical
committee meeting.

But there are a total of 202
countries and 2,101 athletes
registered with the Bahamas’
24-member delegation com-
peting in 4 different events.

Managed by Ralph McKin-
ney, the team is hoping to add
to the 16 total medals, inclu-
sive of seven gold, four silver,
five bronze and the five fourth
and fifth, two sixth and three
seventh and eighth place fin-
ishes posted since the incep-
tion of the biannual champi-
onships in 1976 in Malmo.

The Bahamas, though the
Bahamas didn't win its first
medals until Gotenburg, Swe-
den in 1995 when Troy Kemp
secured the gold in the high
jump and Pauline Davis-
Thompson got the silver in the
women's 400 metres in a 30-
minute span.

The Bahamas is coming off
one of its finest championships
in Osaka, Japan in 2007 when
Donald Thomas soared to the
top of the world in the men's
high jump, Derrick Atkins
sped to a stunning silver
medal upset in the men's 100
and the 4 x 400 relay team was

just as brilliant with their silver
medal feat.

This year, the IAAF have
a couple of out athletes men-
tioned in their previews of the
championships here.

In the women’s 100, they
have indicated that the sprint
duo of Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie and Chandra Stur-
rup have also rolled back the
years to rediscover some out-
standing form this year.

Ferguson-McKenzie, 33,
blitzed to her quickest time
for six years — an impressive
10.97 posting in Monaco. Stur-
rup, 36, the two-time World
championship 100 bronze
medallist, recorded 10.99 in
Rome for third, her fastest
time for four years to suggest
that the pair represent the
chief threat to the US-
Jamaican duopoly.

In the 200, Ferguson-
McKenzie, the 2001 World
champion, who made her
World Championship debut
in Seville 10 years ago, could
provide the stiffest challenge
to American Allyson Felix
and Jamaican Veronica
Campbell-Brown.

With Ferguson-McKenzie
and Sturrup running sub-11
second 100m times this sea-
son, the Bahamas could pose a
threat to get back on the podi-
um since the Golden Girls
won the 2000 Olympic title in
Sydney, Australia.

On the men's side, as the
defending World high jump
champion, the IAAF is won-

dering if Thomas can get back
to his old form of 2007 in Osa-
ka.

And Atkins has had a low-
key season, having only ran a
best of 10.17 in April, so there
too is some concern by the
IAAF as to whether or not he
will peak at the right time
here.

The Americans have a total
of four competitors entered
in the men's 400 and the pro-
jection is that the quartet will
finish in that order.

Chris 'Bay' Brown, who has
been knocking on the door
with consecutive four place
finishes in the past two
World's as well as the
Olympic last year, is consid-
ered to be the outside threat.

Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands,
the Olympic bronze medallist,
is considered to be a
Caribbean threat along with

Three week BFA development
programme comes to a close

THE popular and presti-
gious Bahamas Football
Association National Acade-
my concluded a successful
three week programme, July
24, 2009 at the BFA National
Centre for Football Develop-
ment in New Providence.

One hundred and twenty-
one selected young Bahamian
soccer players participated in
the Academy which included
seven different age groups
and representatives of three
different islands.

Again with a major focus
on the development of the
individual player, the Nation-
al Academy convened spe-
cially selected players for par-
ticipation at U-9, U-11, U-13
and U-16 for boys and U-11,
U-13 and U -16 for girls. The
camp lasted for three weeks
with sessions conducted Mon-
day to Friday commencing at
9:15 am and concluding at
3:00 pm daily. The National
Academy convened a cadre
of coaches trained to improve
the players’ skill and decision
making. Intensive sessions on
technique and personality
were conducted to bring out
the very best in each partici-
pant. Sessions on the team
building and Laws of the
Game were also done on a
regular basis to help the play-
ers overall development, with
this year also seeing attention
being given to the mental
aptitude of the players.

The Academy ended, as it
always does, with comments
from the Academy Director
and Coaches, as well as from
BFA personnel. Academy
Director Daria Adderley
thanked all of the participants

for their efforts and encour-
aged them to continue to
work hard as they return to
their respective clubs and
school programmes. She then
invited the group coaches to
present the certificates to all
of the participants.

Each coach also presented
special awards to “Best Per-
former” and “Most
Improved” in each of the age
divisions, with the following
persons receiving the awards:
U-9 Best Performer: Phieron
Wilson (Dynamos FC, Garvin
Tynes Primary)

MOST IMPROVED: Travis Hunt
(Bears FC, Queens College)

U-11 BOYS BEST PERFORMER:
Marcellus Wilkinson (United FC,
St. Cecilia School)

MOST IMPROVED: Troy Hunt
(Bears FC, Queens College)
U-11 Girls Best Performer: Taj
Dorsett (Cavalier FC, St. Francis
and Joseph)

MOST IMPROVED: Sierra Don-
aldson (Cavalier FC, Queens Col-
lege).

U-13 BOYS BEST PERFORMER:
lan Winder (Cavalier FC, Queens
College)

MOST IMPROVED: D’andre
Lightbourne

U-13 GIRLS BEST PERFORMER:
Lindsay Seymour (United FC, St.
Anne’s School)

MOST IMPROVED: Faythe Miller
(Cavalier FC, Queens College)

U-16 BOYS BEST PERFORMER:

Duane Beneby (Bears FC, Prince
William High School)

MOST IMPROVED: Raymourn
Sturrup (Baha Juniors FC, St.
Andrews School)

U-16 GIRLS BEST PERFORMER:
Shelby Carbin (Cavalier FC,
Queens College)

MOST IMPROVED: Giovanna
Ferguson (Bears FC, Temple
Christian)

BFA General Secretary
Lionel Haven congratulated
all of the participants on their
selection and participation
and also extended congratu-
lations to the coaches for
their hard work.

He admonished the chil-
dren to continue to work
hard, and further to take the
lessons learned with them
back to their respective club
and school teams. Haven fur-
ther advised the group that
the BFA were concluding
arrangements to bring in a
Development Officer whose
task will be to focus on youth
development. His task will be
to review the current youth
development programmes
including the Regional and
National Academies, and
make adjustments to these to
improve them.

As a result, he advised
all of the participants to
expect changes in the pro-
gramme that will make it
harder, but will result in them
becoming better players as a
result, and thus, to continue
to work hard so that they will
be the beneficiaries of these
changes.

Randy Lewis of Grenada in
the men's triple jump.

As for the relay, the predic-
tion is that the United States
will once again dominate, but
watch for the Bahamas to
climb back on the podium
after obtaining a medal at

each of the last four World
Championships (three silver
and one bronze).

Whatever the projections
are, the Bahamian team is
poised and ready to compete
when the championships get
started on Saturday.





ATHLETES test the running set
up inside the Olympic stadium
prior to World Athletics Cham-
pionships in Berlin on Thurs-
day, Aug. 13, 2009.

Anja Niedringhaus/AP Photo



BIMINI BAY

RESORT AND MARINA

Only forty-eight nautical miles east of Miami, Florida, situated on the North end of North Bimini,

Bahamas - Bimini Bay Resort & Marina complex rests on over 740 acres of pristine Bahamian

beaches. Long known as a paradise for anglers and divers alike, Bimini Bay Resort offers a

plethora of options for the most discriminating traveller. Bimini Bay Management Ltd. owns and
operates Bimini Bay Resort & Marina.

al - A 7” : o P .
oe thn) nine

+.

Bimini Bay Resort & Marina seeks to hire qualified professionals
for the following positions:

IT MANAGER

Responsible for the ongoing maintenance and operation for all of the Information
Technology implemented within the assigned Hotel. The position is responsible for the
daily operation, support, and security of the technology and data that support and
enable the business operation.

Desired Requirements Of Proficiency:

Work experience in the Resort Industry
Bachelor degree/diploma in related field.
Call Account Jazz

Phone Switch Nortel

Micros

PMS - Opera

FOOD AND BEVERAGE DIRECTOR

Oversee the function of all food and beverage outlets to ensure excellent customer
service and maximize revenue and profits. Develop, implement and maintain quality
standards for outlets, including supervision and direction of service staff. Ensure
excellent customer service. Work with the individual outlet managers concerning food
and beverage quality, service, cleanliness, merchandizing and promotions.

e Proven success in the management of multiple restaurant outlets and functions

* Minimum of 5 years overseas work experience

* Minimum of 5 years resort management experience

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER

Major areas of responsibility/ management include, but are not limited to, employment,
wage and salary administration, benefits, training, employee/labor relations,
organizational development and payroll. Work closely with Human Resources Director
in implementing, achieving and maintaining the resorts goals and objectives.

We offer an excellent benefits package and competitive compensation. For full
consideration, all interested applicants should forward a copy of their resumé to the

attention of DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING
at jobs@biminibayresort.com or fax to (242) 347.2312.
PAGE 10, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

IAAF WORLD \ / \

BERLIN 2009 in tovin'it

ATHLETE





YOUR CONNECTIONe®TO THE WORLD



a

TIMICKA CLARKE

DATE OF BIRTH: November 9, 1980.
AGE: 27-years-old.

SCHOOL: St. John’s College/
Auburn University.

EVENT(S): 100 metres.

BEST PERFORMANCE(S): 11.26
seconds.

HOBBIES: Bowling, traveling, reading
and watching movies.

EXPECTATIONS: To represent the
Bahamas well.

PARENTS: Timothy and Sybliene Clarke.

S)

DATE OF BIRTH: July 1, 1984.
AGE: 24-years-old.

HIGH SCHOOL: Freeport High (Grand

Bahama). Auburn University.

EVENT(S): High jump.

BEST PERFORMANCE(S): 2.35
metres.

HOBBIES: Basketball, watching movies

and collecting diamonds and jewels.

PARENTS: Paula Thomas.

AVARD MONCUR

DATE OF BIRTH: November 2, 1978.
AGE: 30-years-old.

SCHOOL: SC McPherson Secondary High.
Auburn University.

EVENT(S): 400 metres.

BEST PERFORMANCE(S): 44.45

seconds.
HOBBIES: Surfing the Internet.

EXPECTATIONS: To make my presence
felt for the Bahamas.

Fs,

an (i Pate pli ~ =_—

CHRISTINE AMERTIL

DATE OF BIRTH: August 18, 1979.
AGE: 29-years-old.
SCHOOL: RM Bailey Secondary High.

| Southeastern Louisiana University.

EVENT(S): 200 and 400 metres.

BEST PERFORMANCE(S):

200 - 22.58 metres. 400 - 50.09 seconds.

HOBBIES: Traveling, reading and
sporting activities.

EXPECTATIONS: To represent the

Bahamas as best as | can.

PARENTS: Celavie Henry.

CHANDRA STURRUP

DATE OF BIRTH: September 12, 1971.
AGE: 37-years-old.

SCHOOL: RM Bailey High/
Norfolk State University.

EVENT(S): 100 metres/4 x 100 relay.

| BEST PERFORMANCE(S): 10.84

seconds.

HOBBIES: Traveling, interior decorating,
coaching and learning new things.

EXPECTATIONS: To see the relay team
get back on the medal stand.

DEBBIE FERGUSON-MCKENZIE

DATE OF BIRTH: Janary 16, 1976.
AGE: 33 years-old.

SCHOOL: CC Sweeting and St. Andrew's
High School. The University of Georgia.

EVENT(S): 100/200 metres.

BEST PERFORMANCE(S):
100 - 10.91 seconds. 200 - 22.19 seconds.

HOBBIES: Reading, traveling, meeting
people and track and field.

| EXPECTATIONS: To make the Bahamas |

a shining example.
PARENTS: Elka Ferguson.


THE TRIBUNE



SECTION

§



homas to carry the
flag for the Bahamas

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany: When the offi-
cial opening ceremonies for the JAAF's
12th World Championships are held
here on Saturday at the Olympic Sta-
dium, reigning men's high jump cham-
pion Donald Thomas will carry the flag
for the Bahamas.

Although others were considered,
Thomas was the unanimous choice to
lead the 24-member team during the
march pass by virtue of having won
the men's high jump title at the last
championships in Osaka, Japan in 2007.

According to team manager Ralph
McKinney, the decision was one that all
of the athletes accepted without any
reservation at the team meeting held
yesterday morning.

Thomas, 25, will be one of two com-
petitors representing the Bahamas
when the preliminaries of the high
jump take place on Wednesday,
August 19. He will be joined by Trevor
Barry, 26. The final is set for Friday.

Thomas, a former collegiate basket-
ball standout from Grand Bahama,
became just the second Bahamian male
athlete to win a gold medal at the bian-
nual championships. The first was Troy
Kemp, who did it in Gotenburg, Swe-
den in 1995 in the high jump as well.

Prior to the opening ceremonies, the
first set of athletes to compete for the
Bahamas will be Derrick Atkins, Adri-
an Griffith and Christine Amertil. The
trio will run in the morning session
with the ceremonies to kick off the
evening session.

Atkins, the 25-year-old silver medal-
list from Osaka, along with Griffith,
will run in the century. Amertil, who
turns 30 on Tuesday, will compete in
the women's 400.

The second round of the men's cen-

High jumper
was unanimous
choice for duty

tury will follow opening ceremonies.

With just one day left before the
start of the championships, press liai-
son officer Julie Wilson and chaperon,
said all of the athletes have arrived
safely in Berlin and have settled down
and are ready to compete.

"We were able to go through a suc-
cessful practice today with the indi-
vidual competitors fine toning their
performances and the relay team
members working out together,” she
said. "Everything went well.

We were pleased with what we saw.

"Except for one or two little nag-
ging problems, all of the athletes are
in good shape and they are just wait-
ing for the competition to start. We
had our team meeting with them and
everybody was really positive about
what was discussed. So we feel they
are all ready to compete.”

The team is expected to go through
some light workouts and stretches
today before the championship open
up on Saturday.

The women's 100 preliminaries
will be contested on day two on Sun-
day's morning session with the vet-
eran do of Chandra Sturrup, who
will be 37 on September 12 and Deb-
bie Ferguson-McKenzie, 33, along
with Timicka Clarke, who turns 29
on November 9.

That will be followed by the men's
triple qualifying round for Olympic
bronze medallist Leevan ‘Superman’
Sands, who will celebrate his 27th
birthday on the same day, and the
semifinal and final of the men's 100.



SVORM FRAME

A

A
S | S
he
FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009

WINDOWS

Donald Thomas



Hurricane’ Shutters



BAIN OUT
WITH
HAMSTRING

INJURY
PG9

SPORTS

mri

General Meeting

_ for Legacy Basetiall/
_ Softhall scheduled
_ for Saturday



The Annual General

i Meeting of Legacy Base-
: ball/ Softball Association
i will be held this Saturday,
: August 15, 2009 at 10:00 am

at the YMCA meeting

; room, and Steve Burrows,
i President of the youth
i organisation is inviting all
i Legacy Coaches, players

and parents to be in atten-
dance for this gathering.

Henne to be busy
during preseason

FOOTBALL
DAVIE, Fla.

Associated Press

TRAFFIC can get heavy
around the Miami Dolphins

i complex, which is an annoy-

ance for Chad Henne as he

: comes and goes at training
: camp. “I’m not a road
i rager,” the Dolphins’ backup

quarterback says. “But ’m

i not a very patient person.”
i Henne also has someone in
i his way at work, where he’s
? stuck behind last year’s NFL

Comeback Player of the

Year, Chad Pennington.
i Henne threw only 12 passes
: in his rookie season last year,

and barring a calamity at
quarterback, he’ll ride the

bench again in 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE







Bacardi
KORE MII
sale to

TENNYSON WELLS

BACARDI has con-
firmed it will sell its Nas-
sau-based production facil-
ity in New Providence and
properties at Clifton Pier
to The Source River Limit-
ed headed by former FNM
minister Tennyson Wells.
The deal could be closed
by the end of September.

Tribune Business learned
some time ago that Source
River was interested in the
Bacardi property; however,
were keeping tight-lipped
on the deal.

In a release issued yes-
terday by Source River, it
is revealed that the compa-
ny is comprised of
Bahamian investors
“including several former
Bacardi employees” and
could close the deal with
Bacardi by the end of the
month and turn the ex-rum
facility into a water pro-
duction facility.

“The Source River Lim-
ited is led by well-known
businessman Tennyson
Wells and is comprised of
nearly 40 Bahamian
investors. The Source Riv-
er Limited plans to pro-
duce and bottle distilled
water,” the release said.

“Bacardi & Company
Limited today announced
it has signed a contract to
sell its Nassau-based pro-
duction facility in New
Providence and properties
at Clifton Pier to The
Source River Limited , a
Nassau-based investment
company, and expects to
close on the deal by Sep-
tember 30, 2009.

“Bacardi products cur-
rently for sale in The
Bahamas in retail stores,
restaurants, bars, clubs and
at The BACARDI Store
will continue to be avail-
able at these locations. The
Bacardi portfolio includes:
BACARDI rum and BAC-
ARDI Flavoured rums,
GREY GOOSE vodka,
BOMBAY SAPPHIRE
gin, DEWAR’S Blended
Scotch whisky,
CAZADORES tequila,
MARTINI vermouth and
asti and other leading
brands. BACARDI contin-
ues to be Bahamians’
favourite rum.”







FRIDAY,

isine

AUGUST

SS

14, 2009



SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

INSURANCE COMEANY LIMITED



Moses Plaza renovation ‘could
be done by the end of year’

WB 35,000 square foot plaza to bea Ml Plan to make use of waterfront

‘catalyst for development in area’

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tripunemedia.net

HE RENOVATION of

the Moses Plaza could be

done by the end of the

year, according to the
developments chief officer.

If all goes to plan, they will be the

first of the waterfront properties

between East and Armstrong Streets to

be revitalized as a part of the govern-
ment and private sector’s plan to rein-
vent downtown Nassau’s tourism prod-
uct.

Charles Klonaris told Tribune Busi-
ness that the ‘very expensive’ project
will be a first-class development and
will make use of the waterfront with
the addition of a marina.

Mr Klonaris asserts that the 35,000
square foot plaza will be a catalyst for
development in the area.

“East of East Street is really run

with the addition of a marina

down and it needs some injection,” he
said. “Without a doubt this develop-
ment will bring back that side of Bay
Street.”

He said the new Moses Plaza will
incorporate the finest accessories,
including designer lighting, railings
and tiling.

“It’s really going to showcase what
the Bahamas really should be and how

SEE page 2B

66

East of East
Street is
really run
down and it
needs some
injection.

99

Charles
Klonaris

SE OTe E WSU a aT

Grand
opening of |
new Dunkin

Donuts

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE NEW Dunkin
Donuts location could be a
‘great landmark’ for the
revitalization of downtown
Nassau, the Minister of
Tourism and Aviation said
yesterday during the store’s
grand opening.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said the Myers group’s
investment in reintroducing
Dunkin Donuts to the Nas-
sau could be a catalyst for
other investors to move into
downtown who have been
waiting out a soft economy.

“These kinds of things
happen one space at a time,”
said Mr Vanderpool-Wal-
lace.

Confidence

“When the rest of the
world is sitting down wait-
ing and saying ‘Iet’s see
what’s going to happen to
the economy’ I think it’s the
kind of confidence that
speaks to what people here
are talking about.”

According to him, the
donut and coffee shop is the
kind of facility that lures
cruise ship passengers to the
downtown area and sets the
Bahamas’ cruise ship port
apart from others.

“By far, nobody comes
close to downtown Nassau,
the biggest single cruise port
anywhere,” he said.

“We get two million cruise
passengers coming into this
space every single year.

“And there is no doubt
whatsoever that in order to
get these people off the ship
into downtown Nassau you
must have the attractions in
place.”

SEE page 2B

JOB FAIR

THE Bahamas Ecom-
merce Company and

allied partners is hosting
a job fair on Friday,
August 21, 2009, at the
Kendal GL Isaac Gym
from 9am to 5pm.

a
i awit

| DUNKIN
DONUTS
GRAND
OPENING:
Pictured left to
right are Jon
Luther, George
Myers, Vincent
Vanderpool-
Wallace and
Nigel Travis.

Ashley
Henderson

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Moses Plaza renovation ‘could =r

be done by end of the year’

FROM page 1B

we really win back the harbour side
and how we look at how developments
should be,” said Mr Klonaris.

In a recent town hall meeting the
Minister of Environment said the
development of the waterfront
between East and Armstrong streets
will be government development but
will have private/public ownership with
shared equity in the properties.

Construction of the promenade,
which could begin some time next year,
will be another phase of the public/pri-
vate initiative to reinvent the down-
town Nassau around the cruise ship
port.

However, it is thought that this can-
not begin in full force until the con-

tainer port is moved from the down-
town area after which many of the
building between East and Armstrong
streets will become vacant.

Mr Klonaris said several of the own-
ers of these buildings have expressed
their commitment to develop theses
properties as quickly as possible when
they become available so as to not
stunt the redevelopment of downtown.

“They are waiting to see what will
happen,” he said. “They may be hesi-
tant right now but jumping the gun will
benefit them.”

He said the government incentives
and legislation combined should offer
some more incentive for owners to
begin to develop their properties in
earnest.

“With what we’re doing and the

reclamation of the waterfront it’s going
to energise everybody,” said Mr
Klonaris. “When you see it come
together it’s going to really energise
this whole city.”

According to him, there are also
plans to implement a dedicated ferry
terminal which can transport visitors
and locals to Paradise Island and Cable
Beach.

“To do it right form the start really
helps with the success,” he said.

“To the left of us is the publication
building and we look at it as being a
really important public space.

“Water transportation will mean a
lot Paradise Island and to Nassau and
turning Woodes Rodgers into a water
taxi terminal, once implemented, the
area will revive itself.”

Grand opening of new Dunkin Donuts

FROM page 1B

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
added that in Nassau, more
people spend more time off
the cruise ship than in any
other destination. He assert-

ed that there needs to be
much more attractive facili-
tates like the Dunkin
Donuts location to attract
more people.

Nigel Travis, CEO of
Dunkin brands, said the

As a privately-owned, mid-sized Bahamian
Company and the authorized Caterpillar
dealer in the Bahamas; M&E Ltd. is presently
seeking Certified Caterpillar Technicians
with Mechanical and Electrical experiences,
along with proof of academic and practical
expertise. These candidates should be
professionals who thrive on the challenge of
developing outstanding customer relations
and service excellence.

Send complete resume with education and
work experience to M & E Limited, P. 0. Box
N-3238, Nassau Bahamas, Attention: Office

Administrator, or email me@me-ltd.com .

Only persons being interviewed for this
position will be contacted.

MANAGEMENT TRAINEES / FUTURE LEADERS

Bahamas Supermarkets Limited operates a leading
supermarket chain in The Bahamas, As a market leader,
the Company prides itself on delivering premier service
throwgh its City Market supermarkets, having a strong
commitment to its customers, associates and community.

An opportunity for Management Trainees. (Future
Leaders) exists in New Providence to join this market
leader.

Reporting to the Head of Retail Operations, the
successful applicants wall;

1 Be self-motivated and highly energetic
Have effective supervisory skills

1 Be highly flexible and mobile and prepared to work
evenings, weekends and holulays

| Have aclean police record, drivers license, ood
character references and be physically fit
Have completed high school with a minimum of 3
BGCSE
Have good communication (verbal and written)
and interpersonal skills
Be numerate and analytical with the ability to
derive information from financial reports
Be a strong problem solver
Have the ability te multi task

1 Solid functional computer skills with working
knowledge of Micrasoft applications

| Previews experience in Retail Management is an
maSe1,

Salary and benefits will be commensurate with
experience and qualifications,

lf you have what it takes to succeed in this challenging
role, forward your resume and cover letter to:
~ Humain Resources Director
Bahamas Supermarkets Limited
East-West Highway + P.O. Box M3738 * Nassau, Bahamas
Or email to: humanresources®bahamassupermarkets.com
No tleniene inguiries please

City Market

company is excited to have
the Dunkin brand back in
the Bahamas and back into
the same space it was in
when it burned to the
ground several years ago.

Intrigued

He also said he under-
stands the role the building
plays in the revitalisation of
the city and is “intrigued
with the revitalisation of
downtown.”

“Sounds like an excellent
plan and we are really
pleased to play an important
part in it. This location as I
understand is very central
to that revitalisation,” said

Mr Travis. “So we hope this
is going to give a boost to
the economy of downtown
and stimulate more people
investing in downtown and
as a result of that, encourage
more and more tourist’s to
come down to Nassau.”

He lauded the work that
CEO of the Myers group,
George Myers has done to
reintegrate the Dunkin
Donuts into downtown, as
a new donut shop, Mr
Donuts, popped up in its
stead.

“America runs on Dunkin
and as you can see around
this restaurant certainly the
Bahamas runs on Dunkin as
well.”

weieDLTD W aac

HOME & BUSINESS 420NES ALARM
SPECIAL $299.00 INSTALLED

HOME/BUSINESSES .
1 Panel & LED Keypad
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IN THE ESTATE OF ELIZABETH BROOKS
late of #83 Alexander Boulevard in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence,

Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that all

persons having any claim or demand against
the said estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the undersigned
on or before the 26th day of August, A.D.
2009, after which date the Administrator will
proceed to distribute the estate having regard
only to the claims of which he shall have

had notice.

AND notice is hereby given that all
persons indebted to the estate are required
to make full settlement on or before the date
hereinabove mentioned.

Dated the 12th day of August, A.D. 2009

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Attorneys for the Administrator
9 Rusty Bethel Drive
Nassau, Bahamas































on strong
auction demand

STEPHEN BERNARD,
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK

Treasury prices rose Thursday after investors were reas-
sured by the strong demand at the government's latest
bond auction.

The demand for Treasurys sent yields sharply lower as the
government wrapped up a record $75 billion in debt sales
this week by auctioning off $15 billion in 30-year bonds. The
price of the already issued 30-year bond rose 1 24/32 to 96
31/32, and its yield, which moves in an opposite direction
from its price, fell to 4.43 percent from 4.54 percent late
Wednesday.

The price of the benchmark 10-year note rose 29/32 to 100
4/32, driving its yield down to 3.61 percent from 3.72 percent.

Investors had already bid Treasurys higher ahead of the
auction after the government reported weak July retail
sales and an unexpected increase in workers filing for job-
less claims for the first time.

The Commerce Department said retail sales fell 0.1 per-
cent in July, significantly worse than the 0.7 percent increase
that analysts forecast. And the Labor Department report
said the number of newly laid-off workers filing claims for
unemployment benefits rose unexpectedly to a seasonally
adjusted 558,000, from 554,000 the previous week. Ana-
lysts were expecting new claims to drop to 545,000.

Those two weaker-than-expected reports had bond
investors questioning whether an economic recovery might
take longer than expected to occur. The stock market, how-
ever, shook off the reports and focused instead on the Fed-
eral Reserve's more upbeat comments on the economy on
Wednesday. Major stock indicators finished moderately
higher Thursday.

The gains in Treasurys after the auction were due in part
to relief among investors that there were plenty of buyers for
the longest term bonds issued by the government.

"There would be a lot of angst if it didn't go well,” said
William Larkin, a fixed income portfolio manager at Cabot
Money Management.

If demand for Treasurys falls sharply, the government
would have to raise the interest it pays, which could drive up
borrowing costs. That would likely lead to higher interest
rates charged on mortgages and other consumer loans, and
potentially put a drag on an economic recovery.

The 30-year auction's bid-to-cover ratio, a measure of
demand, was 2.54 percent, up from 2.36 percent at a similar
auction in July. There was lackluster demand Wednesday at
an auction of $23 billion in 10-year notes as investors were
hesitant to jump into the bond market before the Fed's
interest rate decision and economic statement. The Fed
left interest rates unchanged, and said in its statement that
the economy was "leveling out," a more positive view than
in the past. The central bank also said Wednesday it would
slow its buying of government debt in the coming weeks in
order to hit its target of purchasing $300 billion in Treasurys
by the end of October. The Fed has committed to buying
Treasurys this year to help offset the staggering amount of
debt being raised to fund the government's stimulus pro-
grams. As the Fed exits the market, investors are concerned
there will be too much supply and not enough buyers.

"One still has to be concerned about who will buy all
this debt,” said Matt Hastings, portfolio manager of the
Schwab Premier Income Fund. Hastings estimated there
could be as much as $2 trillion in Treasurys auctioned over
the next year.

In other trading, the two-year note rose 4/32 to 99 26/32
and its yield fell to 1.10 percent from 1.16 percent.

The yield on the three-month T-bill dipped to 0.16 percent
from 0.17 percent. Its discount rate was 0.17 percent.

The cost of borrowing between banks fell. The British
Bankers’ Association said the rate on three-month loans in
dollars — the London Interbank Offered Rate, or Libor —
was unchanged at 0.45 percent.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MELVINA LAVERN DAVIS
of SPRINGFIELD ROAD, P.O. Box CB-12397, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14 day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MANIO JULES of PRINCE
CHARLES DRIVE, P.O. BOX N-10847, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 7'* day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.















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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009, PAGE 3B



College
UIs

elm Kets
textbooks
to students

STAMFORD, Connecticut _



A college textbook publisher
said Thursday it would become
the first to rent titles directly
to students, another option for
students fed up with spending
$100 or more to buy books they
have little use for after a semes-
ter, according to Associated
Press.

Stamford, Conn.-based Cen-
gage Learning said its rentals
would cost 40 percent to 70 per-
cent less than the suggested
retail price. Several hundred
titles will be available starting in
December, with more to follow
next July. Students can already
rent textbooks, usually second
hand, through Web sites such as
Chegg.com and
Bookrenter.com, but publish-
ers are largely cut out of that
market.

The publishers say a major
reason their prices sometimes
reach three figures is that the
initial sale is their only chance
to collect revenue.

By renting directly to stu-
dents, Cengage could collect
revenue several times on each
printed copy.

Students renting a book
would get immediate access to
an electronic version of the first
chapter, and then be shipped
the book, the company said. At
the end of the rental term, stu-
dents can return the books or
purchase them.

The announcement comes as
the industry tries to adjust to
modern technologies that have
upended what students and
teachers expect from supple-
mentary classroom materials
and also the traditional models
for selling and delivering them.

Among other experiments, a
group that manages several
hundred college bookstores is
currently running a trial rental
program. Meanwhile, Ama-
zon.com Ine. is aiming the new,
bigger version of its Kindle
electronic reading device at the
college market, with six uni-
versities running Kindle pilots
this fall.

Cengage said it would launch
a gateway site called Cengage-
Brain.com where students can
rent textbooks, on top of cur-
rent options offered through its
ichapters.com site to buy print-
ed textbooks, electronic text-
books, individual e-chapters
and audio books.

WALL STREET

Stocks manage to extend
gains to second day in row

SARA LEPRO,
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK

Focused on an economic
recovery, investors shook off
disappointing news and kept
Wall Street's summer rally
going.

Investors sent stocks higher
for a second day in a row
Thursday, giving all the major
indexes a moderate boost and
adding to the gains that fol-
lowed upbeat comments from
the Federal Reserve a day ear-
lier.

Financial, technology and
energy companies were among
the big winners, while stocks in
defensive, or relatively safer,
industries like health care fell.
Retailers declined after a
worse-than-expected report on
retail sales.

Meanwhile, Treasury prices
rose after the government had a
successful auction of 30-year
bonds. The Treasury Depart-
ment issued a total of $75 bil-
lion of debt this week as part of
its ongoing efforts to fund the
government's stimulus pro-
grams, and investors were
relieved that the market was
able to absorb such a huge sup-
ply.

Analysts said Wall Street's
showing Thursday was a sign
of the market's resilience in
light of economic reports that
suggested the recovery could
be slowed by a weak consumer.
Investors seemed to look past

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that AKINS A.Y. LINTON PRATT
of SPITFIRE ROAD, P.O. Box N-10536, NASSAU,

BAHAMAS,

is applying to the Minister responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14‘ day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



the latest news and focus on the
Fed's more upbeat assessment
of the economy. Stocks soared
Wednesday after the Fed said
the economy was "leveling
out,” not just slowing its
decline.

"You're not seeing people
giving up on this economy,"
said Keith Springer, president
of Capital Financial Advisory
Services.

Among the day's reports, the
Commerce Department said
retail sales fell 0.1 percent in
July, significantly worse than
the 0.7 percent increase econo-
mists expected. Retail sales are
considered a strong indicator
of economic recovery because
consumer spending accounts
for more than two-thirds of all
economic activity.

A weekly report on unem-
ployment also came in worse
than projected. The Labor
Department said the number
of newly laid-off workers filing
claims for unemployment ben-
efits rose unexpectedly to a sea-
sonally adjusted 558,000, from
554,000 the previous week.
Analysts were expecting new
claims to drop to 545,000.

The Dow Jones industrial
average rose 36.58, or 0.4 per-
cent, to 9,398.19 after rising 120
Wednesday in response to the
Fed's statement.

The Standard & Poor's 500
index rose 6.92, or 0.7 percent,
to 1,012.73, while the Nasdaq
composite index rose 10.63, or
0.5 percent, to 2,009.35.

Advancing stocks outpaced
losers by 2 to 1 on the New
York Stock Exchange, where
volume came to a very light
777.32 million shares.

In other trading, the Russell
2000 index of smaller compa-
nies rose 3.02, or 0.5 percent,
to 575.19.

Financial stocks led the day's
gains, buoyed by news that the
hedge fund run by John Paul-
son bought about 168 million
shares of Bank of America
Corp. Paulson foresaw the dis-
tress in subprime mortgages
and reaped billions by betting

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Tel. 956-5433 weerw-cgigrouplom

A, member of Colonial Group International Ineurance, Health. Pensions, Life





against the related securities,
so his purchases of Bank of
America stock are seen as a
vote of confidence in the bank's
future.

"He gives a lot of credibility
because he certainly saw the
danger on the credit side,” said
Anton Schutz, portfolio man-
ager of Burnham Financial
Industries Fund and Burnham
Financial Services Fund.

Bank of America rose $1.07,
or 6.7 percent, to $17. Regional
banks also rose significantly
after tumbling earlier in the
week on downbeat comments
from an analyst that raised
doubts about some banks’ abil-
ity to improve their earnings in
the second half of the year.

Texas Instruments Inc. rose
66 cents, or 2.8 percent, to
$24.54 after an analyst upgrad-
ed the stock. That helped lift
other technology stocks.

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. rose
$1.37, or 2.7 percent, to $51.88
after the world's largest retailer
reported better-than-expected
second quarter earnings. Wal-
Mart also raised the low end of
its profit guidance, saying it
expects shoppers to continue
to be attracted by its low-priced
items.

Other retail stocks were
mixed following the govern-
ment's weak sales report.
Macy's Inc. slipped 25 cents to
$16.15, while Best Buy Co. rose
51 cents to $37.01.

Investors have sent stocks
soaring the past few weeks as
improving corporate profits and
signs of life in the troubled
housing industry gave the mar-
ket hope that the economy is
healing. The Fed's comments
Wednesday affirmed for
investors that their recent bets
had been warranted.

Still, with the news flow
tapering and trading light amid
the summer slowdown on Wall
Street, analysts warn it might
be difficult to keep the mar-
ket's momentum going.

The S&P 500 index has risen
15.2 percent in little more than
a month and 49.7 percent since
it fell to a 12-year low in early
March. Treasurys rose higher
after the successful auction of
30-year bonds. The yield on the
benchmark 10-year Treasury
note, which moves opposite its
price, fell to 3.61 percent from
3.72 percent late Wednesday.

The dollar fell against the
euro and the British pound,
while gold and other metal
prices rose.

Light, sweet crude rose 36
cents to settle at $70.52 a barrel
on the New York Mercantile
Exchange.

TRADERS WORK on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Fri-
day, Aug. 7, 2009 in New York. Major stock indexes barreled higher
by more than 1 percent Friday after the government said the nation's
unemployment rate unexpectedly fell in July for the first time in 15
months and that employers cut fewer jobs. Bond prices fell, driving
yields higher as investors left the safety of Treasurys.

(AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

NOTICE
COVAL INVESTMENT LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows

fa) COVAL INVESTMENT LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000

The dissolution of the sald company camoenced on the
17th August, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registerad by the Registrar General.

a cS

The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse

Trust Limited, Aue de Lausanne 17 bas, Geneva.

Dated thes 141h day of August, A. DB. 2008

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE
DARKFLOW LIMITED

HOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

fa} ODARKFLOW LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
Intemational Business Companies Act 2000

The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the Sth July, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
Submitted to and registered by the Registrar General
The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse
Trust Limiled, Aue de Lausanne 17 bes, Geneva.

Dated this 141h day of August, A.D. 2008

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

NOTICE
INVESTPAR CORPORATION

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows

(a) =INVESTPAR CORPORATION is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
Intetnational Business Companies Act 2000

The dissolution af the sald company commenced on the
5th August, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated
Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BV

Dabed thes 14h day of August, A. 0. 2008

Verdura Associated Ltd.
Liquidator



The National Insurance Board

of the Commonwealth of The

Bahamas

Request for Contractors Pre-Qualification

The National Insurance Board (NIB) is seeking to pre-qualify contractors to bid on works
to complete the Sandon: Renahiiitation Centre - Robert Smite Chia and dowescent and
Special Education Unit, Pox Hill, Nassau, Bahamas, the project is a joint venture of NIB and
the Bahamas Government, Contractors must be in compliance with the National Insurance

Act (social security programme). and in good standing with the

AEENCIES.

relevant Chovernment

Pre qualification decumerts rin be collected fram the Security Booth at NIB‘s Clifford
Darling Complex, Blue Hill Road, from August 14 to August 21, 2009,

Pre-Qualified documents should be signed, sealed and dropped in the pre-qualification
box at the Security Boath, Clifferd Dat ling Complex ono before 12:00 Near ALE USE LL.
200g


PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Court freezes Colonial assets in response to BofA suit

IEVA M. AUGSTUMS,
AP Business Writer
CHARLOTTE, N.C.

A federal court froze $1 bil-
lion of troubled Colonial Banc-
group Inc.'s assets Thursday in
response to a suit filed by Bank
of America Corp.

Bank of America Corp. sued
Colonial for more than $1 bil-
lion in cash and loans, and
asked the court to prevent

Colonial from selling or other-
wise disposing of the assets.
Bank of America said the
U.S. District Court for the
Southern District of Florida, in
response to a complaint filed
Wednesday, granted a tempo-
rary restraining order freezing
the $1 billion held by Mont-
gomery, Ala.-based Colonial.
Court officials could not
immediately be reached to con-
firm the order was granted.

Bank of America had asked
the court to prevent Colonial
from selling proceeds it
received from Freddie Mac in
exchange for mortgage and oth-
er loans, and which were owned
by Ocala Funding LLC, court
documents show.

Charlotte, N.C.-based Bank
of America, which was the col-
lateral agent for the Ocala
Funding loans, sought an emer-
gency injunctive relief in the

complaint. According to court
documents, Colonial held the
proceeds as a custodian, agent
and bailee through bailee let-
ters. But when the bailee let-
ters were terminated, Colonial
refused to return them to Bank
of America, the U.S. banking
giant alleged.

"The emergency relief is nec-
essary because Colonial
appears to be on the verge of
collapsing as a going concern

















NOTICE

NADOLIN LTD,
NOTICE lS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) WNADOLIN LTD. is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisians of Section 137 (4) of the linternatlonal
Business Compares Act 2000.

The dissolution of the sald company commenced on the
6th August, 2009 when ihe Ariches of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro. Associated
Lid., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, Bv'l

Dated thes 14h day of August, A. DB. 2009

Verduro Associated Lid.
Liquidator

E550 NIGERIA (DEEPWATER AREA THREE) LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
Intemational Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company
has been dissolved and struck off the Register
pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by Tha
Registrar General on the 21st day of July, A.D., 2009

Dated the 11th day of August 4.0., 2009.

Gary Johnsen

Liquidater of

E550 NIGERIA (DEEPWATER AREA THREE) LIMITED

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCTION QATAR LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
has been dissolved and struck off the Register
pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The
Registrar General on the 30th day of July, A.0., 2009

Dated the 11th day of August, A.D., 2009.

NOTICE
NORTHAM HOLDINGS LTD.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) NORTHAM HOLDINGS LTD. is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000,

The dissolution of the sald company commenced an the
Sth August, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Assomated
Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BV'l

Dabed hes 14h day of August, A. D. 2008

Verduro Associated Lid.
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN as follkees:

a} PALACAS INTERNATIONAL OVERSEAS S.A, is in dissolution under
the provisions of the Imemational Boamess Conmpanees Act 20MM,

bi The Ditenlition of aid Company commaioed on August 13, 2K) when
it Adtiches of Dissolution were submitted and nepistered by the Registrar
eneral.

ce} The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisin Collie of 2nd Termce

Weal, Centreville, Mecca, Reahaaties

di All persone having Claims against the above-named Company are required
an of before the 14th daw of September, 20M) oo send their names and address
26 ml particulars of their debe: on claims to the Leqaideor of the company cr,
in detault theren!, they my be exciaded from the henetiq of any distrilaaion
made befor: such debts are provend

August 14, 2ieee
LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ARDVE-SAMED COMPANY

EXXONMOBIL UNITED ARAB EMIRATES (NORTH) LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
Intemational Business Companies Act 2000, motice
is hereby givan that thea above-named Company
has been dissolved and struck off the Register
pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The
Regisirar General on te 30th day of July, A.0., 2009

Dated the 17th day of August, 4.D., 2009.

and has reportedly been the
subject of a criminal investiga-
tion for alleged accounting
irregularities," the complaint
said.

Representatives from both
Bank of America and Colonial
declined to comment on the
lawsuit.

Shares of Bank of America
gained $1.07 cents, or 6.7 per-
cent, to $17.00 in trading Thurs-
day, while Colonial shares fell 5
cents, or 9.6 percent, to 47
cents.

The lawsuit could push Colo-
nial into further financial trou-
ble.

On Tuesday, Colonial said it
has advised the Securities and
Exchange Commission it will
not be able to file a second-
quarter financial report because
of alleged accounting irregu-
larities now being investigated.

The Alabama Banking
Department also confirmed
Tuesday that its board held a

private meeting with Colonial
officials on Monday.

Colonial said last week it was
under a criminal investigation
by the Justice Department over
the alleged accounting irregu-
larities at its mortgage ware-
house lending unit in Orlando,
Fla. It was announced earlier
that Colonial was the subject
of a Securities and Exchange
Commission investigation relat-
ed to its bid for federal bailout
funds and its accounting for
loan loss reserves.

Colonial, which previously
reported roughly $26 billion in
assets, has 335 branches in
Florida, Alabama, Georgia,
Texas and Nevada.

The battered bank has been
hurt the credit crisis, as rising
foreclosures in its Florida con-
struction-loan portfolio contin-
ue to strain its balance sheet.

If Colonial fails, it would be
the largest bank failure this
year.

NOTICE

RIDUNA LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

RIDUNA LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under

the provisions of Section 737 (4) of the international
Business Compares Act 2000.

The dissolution of the sald company commenced an the
Sth August, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Assonmated
Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BV'l

Dabed thes 14h day of August, A. DB. 2008

Verduro Associated Lid.
Liquidator

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
Intemational Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company
has bean dissoved and struck off the Register
pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by The
Registrar General on the 20th day of July AD., 2009.

Dated the 1ith day of Auguat, A.0., 2008,

Carol G. Gray
Liquidator af

EXXONMOBIL TERMINAL INVESTMENTS LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

NEWFIELD 4USTRALIA INC. is in dessolution under
ihe provigions Of the Intemational Business Companies
Act 2000

The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
4th day of August,2009 when its Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by ihe Registrar
General.

Carol G. Gray

Liquidator of

EXXONMOBIL UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
(NORTH) LIMITED

Carol G, Gray

Liquidater of

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
QATAR LIMITED

3 = FG CAPITAL MARKETS.
ROYALS FIDELITY Oe
Money at Work

COLON A LL

The Liquidator of the sad Company is Susan G. Riggs
of a A. Sam Houston Parkway E., Houston, Texas
F060,

“THURSDAY, 13 AUGUST 2
BIS= ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1.46291) (OHS -2-5 | CHE 40.5 | FTO -1448 | YTO % -6&.73
FIDE: CLOSE 78428 | YD -6.06% | 200 -12.51%.
| TELEPHON
: Z 7 S$ os ne “_ HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY
— MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.

Attomeys for the above-named Company

Dated the 11th day of August, 200).

1h0
oa

NOTICE

1ST
ao

BEE USTED DEST SECURITIES - (fends trade on ao Percentage Pricing bases)
= Os Wal

NEWFIELD AUSTRALIA INC.

Picedty Bane Ricker 2 (erie Bo +
Pisedty Ban Woke 1 (ere Cy +
Picetitty Teck Hodes 145 (ere Of +

Creditors having debts or claims against
the above-named Company are required to send
particulars thereof to the undersigned cio P.O. Box
N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 15th day of
RAL ies Preferred Eure - : sions September, 4.D., 2009.In default thereof they will be

: excluded from the benefit of any distribution made by

CRAL Globe Bonar the Liquidator
Dated the 11th day of August, A.D., 2009.

44.25 Deterses Superrartet
6.00 Caitheen Cromings (Poet)
Off AWS Hoidinge

SUNOCO AD
ESRB HDI REE

CRAL Gch! Bord Furc
CPAL Gicbhal Dqaty Pound
CRA. High Grade Bord Fur

nu
r

ie § - Gye pace of Codie aed Pedi

nk: © - Genii patow of Coie mend Biche

Kae Pie. lot eee ees Bee te pee
ee ee

PS 6 - 4 corepressor! serge cer shee bor ie ee dt ee
RS — led eed She

art - Mee eee

PRES — Soe Pcp Geer Sect ireiem. Jere 1 PH =

Susan G. Riggs
Liquidator
363 N. Sam Houston Parkway E.
Houston, Texas T7060


THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT

FRIDAY, AUGUST 14TH, 2009, PAGE 7B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

MARINE FORECAST
WINDS

iil



5-Day FORECAST

UV rr NY )





Today Saturday WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.





































f cu a = = v High Low W High Low W NASSAU Today: Eat 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 85°F
a ~ fy cae ue 7; at ee : 0| 1|2 3|4|5\6 4 8|9|1 D Fe FIC Fe FC Saturday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 85° F
oe f all all, ! ll | = Acapulco 93/33 79/26 pc 92/33 76/24 t FREEPORT Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 86° F
ht — Low J woderaTE | HicH |v. HIGH eM at aie pe ee ae s Saturday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 86° F
ORLANDO S . nkara, Turkey s S WBACO Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 84°F
High:92°F33°C Partly sunny with a Partly cloudy; an Some sun with a Clouds and sun; Partly sunny, a Clouds, some sun; The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 91/32 73/22 s 90/32 73/22 s Saturday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 84° F
o Low: 74°F/23°C ~ i -~ t-storm; breezy. early t-storm. t-storm in spots. t-storms possible. t-storm possible. t-storms possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 66/18 54/12 + 60/15 53/11 sh
a ee High: 91° High: 89° High: 90° High: a | 7 raat 26/80 77/28 po «878077128 s.
c ae ‘ High: 88° Low: 83° Low: 81° Low: 81° Low: 81° Low: 80° IDES FOR NASSA iy Vth.
TAMPA fie EOC oi BL ee eRe TET
High: 91° F/33°C : = 96°-87° F 99°-89° F 101°-84° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low Rant TRETIERS eT eee
Low: 76° F/24°C atk 7 The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index tat comes = effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 1:57am. 23 8:00am. 0.3 Belgrade 91/32 66/18 c 39/31 67/19 s
ae @ - : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 2:339p.m. 29 9:14pm. 05 Berlin 70/21 57/13 pc 78/25 64/17 pc
“7 a CU ne Saturday 204am. 23° 9:06am. 03 Bermuda 86/30 77/25 s 87/30 78/25 s
7 As 3:48 p.m. 3.0 10:22 p.m. 0.5 Bogota 65/18 43/6 c 67/19 47/8 pc
3 oe r Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Sunday Widam. 24 10:14am. 02 Brussels 75/23 58/14 pc 84/28 62/16 s
/ - ABACO Temperature 456p.m. 3.1 11:25pm. 03 Budapest 78/25 60/15 c 88/31 62/16 pc
F, os Pad ih: @Q° 0 Hig Whi, ? , A, ’ ae ne LOW voce gz°F/2g°¢ Monday = 32 a ee Cairo 96/35 76/24 s 97/36 74/23 s
a Cy ow: 79° F/: Normal high ..... gor rg2c I atoutta 92/33 85/29 r 89/31 82/27 t
* Py Normal low 76° F/24° C Calgary 60/15 44/6 c 5512 43/6 pc
; ofa Whe: @ WEST PALM BEACH i Last year's high nesses 94° F/34° C Sun AND Moon Cancun 91/32 75/23 pe 93/33 76/24 pc
: a High: 88° F/31°C ae Last year's low iene aulaeat eres 79° F/26° C Caracas 77/25 68/20 t 82/27 72/22 t
— Low: 80° F/27°C Ve, - Precipitation _ ies ore a.m. ee Casablanca 91/32 74/23 s 92/33 77/25 s
>a i As of 2 p.m. yesterday 0.0.0 0.06" unsel....... ‘40 p.m. Moonset. .... 09 P.M. ~~ Copenhagen 68/20 55/12 pc 68/20 64/17 r
© : FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT ae Year to date 2. New First Full as Dublin 66/18 54/12 + 66/18 54/12 sh
High: 88° F/31° C @ High: 89° F/32° C Normal year to date... cesses 27.59" a 7 os Frankfurt 77/25 60/15 pc 93/28 64/17 s
Low: 80° F/27°C — Low: 77° F/25° C F ie Geneva 79/26 57/13 s 5/29 58/14 s
a AccuWeather.com cao a Halifax 78/25 62/416 s 79/26 61/16 pc
"i @ 4 a Forecasts and graphics provided by oe ‘aj Havana 91/32 73/22 t 90/32 74/23 t ENN Showers Miami
; : MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Aug. 20 Aug. 27 Sep. 4 Sep. 11 Helsinki 70/21 52/11 pc 64/417 54/12 sh T-storms
"- High: 88° F/31° C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 90/32 82/27 t 90/32 82/27 pc Rain Pasaie
i Low:79°F/26°C NASSAU High: 90° F/32° C Islamabad 109/42 85/29 s 107/41 84/28 s L*,_¥ Flurries . Cold ——=—w
F High: 88° F/31°C Low: 78° F/26° C Istanbul 86/30 72/22 s 86/30 71/21 s Pe] Snow Sih eg aa er gal Warm fi
99° Eape Jerusalem 83/28 64/17 s 83/28 63/17 s [ve] De al aut eetrcaed
=a Low: 83° F/28° C — TETOSUUS Bait? AMIS s 6719 45/7 pc Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary dagen
a > -
KEY WEST & , - i. Kingston 86/30 75/23 t 89/31 79/26 + 10s| Os 0s) 10s 20s {B0s\) 40s |50s 60s 70s 80s /G0s)/UUSN/ii0e)
High: 88° F/31°C i CAT ISLAND Lima 73/22 57/13 s 71/21 57/13 s
Low: 81°F/27°C High: 90° F/32° C London 75/23 59/15 pc 75/23 61/16 s
: di A, Low: 75° F/24°C Madrid 93/33 66/18 s 93/33 68/20 s
£ Manila 87/30 78/25 r 87/30 78/25 t
i we Mexico City 79/26 55/12 t 79/26 53/11 t be be f" ra
7 GaREXUA ~fe Monterrey 102/38 73/22 s 102/38 75/23 s
— ° Montreal 88/31 66/18 s 86/30 68/20 s
all High: 88° F/31° C ae Moscow 66/18 54/12 r 64/17 52/11 sh
Low: 80° F/27°C Lew: 76°F/24°C Munich 73/22 56/13 ¢ 85/29 54/12 s I.
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's eer : hoe one a pe oa Sane pe rz
highs and tonights's lows. : <> : ew Delhi G G
ow:77° 2 > a J fl slo 5 s 5 5 pe “
: , Li F/25°C oO Osl 65/18 49/9 6/13 52/11 :
a i HY Paris 81/27 62/16 pc 90/32 GING s a
Prague 74/23 53/11 ¢ 80/26 58/14 pc AW 7
LONGISLAND Rio de Janeiro 77/25 67/19 s 80/26 68/20 s way ul r I ane
ee cree oH ‘peo e820 s ‘S70. G70 & t ki
a
Low: 76° F/24°C Rome 86/30 68/20 s 87/30 67/19 s You ay rest €asy nowing
Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday ‘ MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 90/32 79/26 pc 90/32 79/26 sh Pac. 23 have TE; insurance
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W ae High: 92° F/33° C San Juan 82/27 45/7 pe 79/26 A0/A c coverave no matter which
Fe F/C Fe F/C Fe F/C Fe | F/C Fic FIC Fe FIC Low: 74° F/23°C San Salvador 88/31 70/21 pc 88/31 74/23 t , &
Albuquerque 87/30 66/18 t 89/31 64/17 pc Indianapolis 87/30 66/18 s 89/31 68/20 s Philadelphia 85/29 70/21 t 88/31 72/22 t CROOKED ISLAND ACKLINS Santiago oe aS way the wind blows.
Anchorage 6216 53/11 c 66/18 5512 1 Jacksonville 90/32 72/22 t 90/32 74/23 t Phoenix 104/40 84/28 t 104/40 81/27 s Hath 90/4 aa aul i cme t oie aan s
Atlanta 90/32 70/21 t 86/30 71/21 ¢ Kansas City 90/32 70/21 s 90/32 71/21 pc Pittsburgh 86/30 6216 s 88/31 64/17 s RAGGEDISLAND — Uligh:94°F/3a" a0 Paulo s s pm
Atlantic City 81/27 66/18 t 96/30 68/20 t LasVegas 102/38 76/24 pc 99/37 74/23 s Portland,OR 72/22 5512 s 75/23 55/12 s coe Low: 76° F/24°C : a van cams $ cae ea $ Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 85/29 66/18 t 89/31 68/20 t Little Rock 92/33 68/20 s 93/33 70/21 s Raleigh-Durham 87/30 69/20 t 88/31 69/20 t Low: 74° F/23°C ¢ ~ sen _ ore ere ey BOAO 7
Boston 80/26 6719 s 87/30 70/21 s Los Angeles 82/27 62/16 pc 78/25 6246 pc St. Louis 92/33 71/21 s 93/33 73/22 s . all, a ae aTPRERURE = eaST EA er
Buffalo 95/29 65/18 s 85/29 65/18 s Louisville 90/32 69/20 s 91/32 72/22 s Salt Lake City 90/32 63/17 pe 76/24 51/10 pc GREATINAGUA Tala 90/32 73/29 : 84/98 72/22 INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Charleston, SC 87/30 73/22 t 87/30 74/23 t Memphis 93/33 71/21 s 92/33 74/23 s San Antonio 100/37 76/24 pc 100/37 75/23 s High: 92° F/23°C Taal aojo7 MGA 7s 9djo8 GANT
Chicago 88/31 63/17 s 90/32 67/19 s Miami 88/31 79/26 t 90/32 80/26 t San Diego 75/23 66/18 peo 72/22 64/17 pc g one 6 a ee, a INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
. Low: 76° F/24° C Trinidad 91/32 70/21 s 91/32 73/22 pc
Cleveland 87/30 62/16 $s 89/31 66/18 s Minneapolis 90/32 72/22 s 88/31 68/20 pc San Francisco 70/21 55/12 pe 73/22 56/13 s Vemneamveai 6719 56/13 pc 70/21 57/13 pc
Dallas 98/36 75/23 pc 96/35 77/25 s Nashville 92/33 69/20 pc 89/31 71/21 pc Seattle 6719 54/12 po 71/21 54/12 pc —s Vienna 76/24 62/16 sh 84/28 67/19 pc - New Providence f Grand Ba Eleuthera Exuma
Denver 98/31 59/15 t 89/31 52/11 ¢t New Orleans 92/33 75/23 t 92/33 76/24 t Tallahassee 90/32 72/22 t 90/82 74/23 t >a WS 70/21 52/11 po 73/22 60/15 po Tat (242) 24-5555 ma herrea Ted: (242) 332-2962 ff Te (282) 396-2304
Detroit 88/31 6719 s 90/32 6719 s New York 82/27 71/21 t 90/32 74/23 pce Tampa 91/32 76/24 t 90/32 78/25 t -_, a
Honolul 89/31 76/24 89/31 76/24 Oklahoma City 95/35 73/22 95/35 72/22 T 95/35 78/25 t 99/37 75/23 s ales te ee
onoliulu S pe anoma Ul pe pe ucson S -
Houston 97/36 74/23 t 95/35 76/24 pc Orlando 92/33 74/23 t 92/33 76/24 t Washington, DC 86/30 69/20 t 99/31 73/22 t Ge he ie ce
PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



Banks reduce emergency borrowing from Fed

CHRISTOPHER S.
RUGABER,

AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON

Banks trimmed their borrowing
from the Federal Reserve's emer-
gency lending facility over the past
week, and cut back their use of oth-
er programs designed to ease the
financial crisis.

The reductions indicate that banks |

are having an easier time obtaining
credit and don't have to rely mostly
on the Fed for short-term loans.

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben
Bernanke and his colleagues on
Wednesday said "financial markets
have improved further in recent
weeks" and the economy "is leveling
out,” a more upbeat assessment than
they gave after their previous meet-
ing in June.

In a report issued Thursday, the
Fed said commercial banks averaged
$33.9 billion in daily borrowing over
the week that ended Wednesday.
That was down from $35.1 billion in
the week ended Aug. 5.

The identities of the financial insti-
tutions are not released. They pay
just 0.50 percent in interest for the
emergency loans.

The weekly lending report also
showed the Fed's net holdings of
"commercial paper" averaged $60
billion, a decrease of $4.7 billion
from the previous week. That's an
encouraging sign that investors’
appetite for such help from the Fed
has eased.

Commercial paper is the crucial
short-term debt that companies use
to pay everyday expenses, which the



IN THIS JULY 21, 2009 file photo, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke delivers a report on the country's economic

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite



and financial health before the House Financial Services Committee, on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Fed began buying under the first-
of-its-kind program on Oct. 27, a
time of intensified credit problems.

At its peak in late January, the
Fed held almost $350 billion of com-
mercial paper. It has said that about
$1.3 trillion would qualify.

Nassau Airport

Development Company

The report also showed the Fed
made little change to its purchases of
mortgage-backed securities guaran-
teed by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac
and Ginnie Mae.

They averaged $542.8 billion over
the past week, nearly unchanged

from the previous week. The goal
of the program, which started on
Jan. 5, is to drive down mortgage
rates and help the housing market.
The Fed has pledged to purchase
up to $1.25 trillion of the securities,
along with $200 billion of debt issued

by Fannie and Freddie. Mortgage
rates rose this week.

Rates on 30-year home loans aver-
aged 5.29 percent, up from 5.22 per-
cent last week, Freddie Mac report-
ed Thursday. Still, the 30-year fixed-
rate mortgage averaged 6.52 percent
a year ago.

Investment houses in March 2008
were given similar emergency-loan
privileges as commercial banks after
a run on Bear Stearns pushed what
was America's fifth-largest invest-
ment bank to the brink of bank-
ruptcy and into a takeover by
JPMorgan Chase & Co.

But investment firms didn't draw
any loans from the Fed for the 13th
straight week.

The last time they drew any mon-
ey — just $482 million — was in the
week that ended May 13.

Critics worry the Fed's actions
have put billions of taxpayers’ dollars
at risk. Some of the assets the Fed
took on last year when it bailed out
Bear Stearns and insurer American
International Group Inc. have
dipped in value.

The report also said that credit
provided to AIG averaged $41.2 bil-
lion for the week ending Wednes-
day, down from $41.6 billion last
week.

The central bank's balance sheet
stands at about $1.99 trillion, up
from nearly $1.98 trillion last week.
The balance sheet has more than
doubled since September, reflecting
the Fed's many unconventional
efforts — various programs to lend
or buy debt — to mend the financial
system and lift the country out of
recession.

REQUEST FOR
PROPOSAL

Nassau Airport Development Company Limited (NAD) is seeking a
Proponent (individual, consortium or joint venture that includes an

experienced restaurant operator) to finance, design, develop, operate
and manage a 4500 sq. ft. (approximate) sit down restaurant and bar
in the new U.S. Departures Terminal currently under construction at
the Lynden Pindling International Airport. This restaurant will be a

world-class facility with a diverse menu, excellent customer service,
high volume and turnover with a true sense of place.

Mandatory qualifications

|. Proponents must be Bahamian and incorporated in The Bahamas.
il. Proponents must have operated a similar restaurant facility
within the last three (3) years.

NAD's goals and objectives are to:

(a) achieve a high standard of excellence and customer service:

(b) offer a mix of concepts that will enhance the image of the Lynden
Pindling International Airport as a world class airport;

(c) offer food & beverage choices to passengers at reasonable

prices;

(d) offer a mix of local, regional and national and international
brand-name companies;

(e} develop and design food & beverage facilities that complement
the qualities of the new terminal while recognizing the distinctive

SIT DOWN RESTAURANT & BAR
New U.S. Departures Terminal at LPIA

Interested parties may pick-up the Request for Proposal package at
NAD’s offices at the reception desk on the second floor

Domestic/International Terminal at Lynden Pindling International Airport

between the hours of 9:00am and 4:00pm, from August 12th to 24th,

spirit, character and ‘sense of place’ of the Bahamas; and

(f|_ optimize revenue to NAD.

2009. A mandatory pre-proposal briefing will be held in the Arawak
Lounge at the Airport on Wednesday, August 26th at 10:00am.





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