Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 105 No.216



CLASSIFIEDS TRADER CL






The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009



aR

Suilied Hy police

But commissioner denies
information was leaked

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE bereaved family of
slain teen Brenton Smith
accused members of the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force of
leaking "misinformation" in
order to "sully" his character
and muddy the circumstances
surrounding the young man’s
death.

These accusations were
strongly denied by Commis-
sioner of Police Reginald Fer-
guson.

The claim was made by the
family's attorney, Damian
Gomez, at a press conference
held yesterday to refute alle-
gations that appeared in a
recent tabloid article.

"What they are attempting
to do is to create the impres-
sion that the late Brenton
Smith was a criminal and
(you) need not be concerned
with how he came to his
death.

"Even he had been a crim-
inal, which we say he wasn't,
he was unarmed. No form of
walkie-talkie or other form of
communication was found on
him — there's absolutely no
basis for believing that he had
(anything) to do with the rob-

bery whatsoever," said Mr
Gomez at a press conference
at Gibson and Co yesterday.

",. Public confidence in the
police force is not engendered
by the sullying of victims,” he
added.

But the commissioner said
the argument had no factual
basis.

"Why should we leak infor-
mation like that? (The RBPF)
made an official statement on
the death of the boy and it
was widely published in the
media. There is no way we
are connected to that rumour
or whatever was reported (in
the tabloid) and we have
nothing to do with that state-
ment,” he said during a brief
interview yesterday.

He offered no further com-
ment.

Mr Gomez also questioned
the RBPF's firearm training
procedures. He claimed that
the “unarmed” teen was shot
at "nearly point blank range”
as he cut through a popular
shortcut which leads to the
nearby City Market food
store on Village Road.

He also dispelled early
reports of a cross-fire between
police and suspected armed

SEE page 10

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Felipé Major/Tribune staff

MISS BAHAMAS Kiara Sherman takes to the catwalk last night at a Designer Fashion Show held at
The Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort. The contestants are gearing up for the pageant itself on Sunday,
¢ SEE PAGE TWO

August 23rd at the Atlantis Resort.

Petition launched

move to Arawak Cay

OPPONENTS of Government’s planned
removal of container shipping facilities to
Arawak Cay have launched a petition
against the project which they hope will
attract “at least” 10,000 signatures in two
weeks.

PLP Senator Jerome Fitzgerald and PLP
National Deputy Chairman Kenred Dorsett,
who formed the Committee to Protect and
Preserve the Bahamas for Future Genera-
tions to advocate against the move, plan to
present the petition to the Prime Minister.

They announced their intention during
their third press conference in a week called
to agitate for a stop the plan to relocate the
port to Arawak Cay. They say there is a
need for greater “transparency” on behalf of
government about the “secretive” port
move.

Following a rowdy town meeting, the
Committee said the petition will provide an
opportunity for frustrated Bahamians to

J. Scott Applewhite/AP



PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA presents the 2009
Presidential Medal of Freedom to Sidney Poitier.

Sidney Poitier honoured
by President Obama

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

CAT Island native and Hollywood super-
star Sidney Poitier was one of 16 outstanding
individuals awarded the United States of
America’s highest civilian honour by Presi-
dent Barack Obama yesterday.

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Jury hears

shooting of

student was
like ‘wild
wild west’

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

THE trial of a man charged
with the murder of aC R
Walker high school student
who was gunned down on a
bus stop in the downtown
area last January, opened in
the Supreme Court yesterday.

Jamal Penn, 20, is charged
with the January 7, 2008
shooting death of Deangelo
Cargill Fowler, 18. Penn is
represented by lawyer Mur-
rio Ducille. Yoland Rolle and
Jillian Williams are prosecut-
ing the case. Fowler was shot
in broad daylight as he stood
at a bus stop on Bay and
Frederick Streets.

In her opening address yes-
terday, Mrs Rolle told the
jury that the shooting, which
she compared to something
out of a “wild wild west
movie,” took place between
3.30 and 3.40 pm on January,
2008 while Fowler stood with
a group of children at a bus
stop. Mrs Rolle told the court
that Penn was identified as
the gunmen who opened fire
in broad daylight, hitting
Cargill.

SEE page nine
Depression could
become the first
named storm

of the season

THE tropical depression,
which could affect the
Bahamas by early next week,
was on the cusp of becoming
the first named storm of the
season last night.

At press time last night the
National Hurricane Centre
(NHC) in Miami was report-
ing that the depression
remained just under tropical
storm strength.

Forecast models at this time
have the system moving
towards the northwest. The
predicted trajectory has the
depression passing the
Bahamas on Monday or
Tuesday.

While it is still too early to
tell how strong the system will
be when it gets here or if the
Bahamas will be directly in
its path, local meteorologists
said they are keeping a very
close eye on it.

In its Spm update last night,
the NHC reported that the
tropical depression was locat-
ed about 710 miles west of the
southernmost Cape Verde
Islands.

SEE page nine



PAGE 2, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

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The international beauty
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The HIV/AIDS Founda-
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Bahamians are invited to
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The event starts at 6.30pm
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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



St Kitts-Nevis ‘Botched’

PM condemns
murder of
Soles-Armony

PRIME Minister of St Kitts
and Nevis Dr Denzil Douglas
yesterday condemned the
murder of TaGia Soles-Armo-
ny and offered condolences to
her family who continue to
grieve over the young moth-
er's senseless killing.

“For the
longest
while vic-
tims of gun
crimes have
tended to
be male
and these
deaths have
troubled us
very, very
deeply. In recent times, how-
ever, we have all been partic-
ularly shaken by the loss of
two young females,” said Dr
Douglas during his weekly St
Kitts radio show on Tuesday.

He was referring to Ms
Soles-Armony’s murder and
that of St Kitts resident Stan-
cia Lake, 14, who was report-
edly shot in the head on
August 8 while at a friend’s
home. “Some things most
inhumane are affecting much
of the world, and on behalf of
my Cabinet and on behalf of
the entire country, I wish to
once again express condo-
lences to every family includ-
ing those of these two young
women who have been vic-
tims of these sickening acts of
brutality,” he said.Ms Soles-
Armony, 29, was shot in her
car around 8pm on August 7
while outside her mother's
house in Sea Breeze. Cradling
her three-month-old infant in
her arms she tried to escape
her attacker and rear-ended a
parked car and crashed into
two other parked vehicles.
The infant, whose face was
covered in his mother's blood,
was unharmed but Ms Soles-
Armony was dead when
police arrived at the scene.

Witnesses said they saw a
slim, dark male — about 5'9"
tall — flee the scene on foot.

Local police continue to hit
a brick wall in their investiga-
tions and have yet to establish
a motive for the brutal crime.
Investigators have not recov-
ered a murder weapon, nor do
they have any suspects in cus-
tody, said head of the Central
Detective Unit Supt Elsworth
Moss. Various possible
motives for the shooting have
been posed — including an
attempted robbery gone
wrong or a case of mistaken
identity. But neither police
nor the victim's family know
why the mother-of-two was
killed, said Mr Moss.

Her death sparked a call for
government to hang violent
offenders in an attempt to
stem the rising murder count.

The country’s last public
hanging took place in 2000.

The twin island nation of
St Kitts/Nevis — which has a
population of less than 40,000
— is battling its own recent
upsurge in violent crimes; the
country carried out its first
execution in ten years in 2008
in the wake of these offences.

Dr Douglas, who is also
that country’s Minister of
National Security, stressed
that whether committed in St
Kitts/Nevis or abroad, violent
behaviour “must be con-
demned.”

“The taking of any life by
any human being is one of the
most unnatural and deeply
troubling occurrences that any
society anywhere ever has to
confront. Whether the victim
is old, young or middle-aged,
the horror for the rest of the
community is always real.”

Ms Soles-Armony lived in
St Kitts with her husband and
two children. She had recently
arrived in Nassau to visit her
family.

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seeks cash settlement

A MOTHER-OF-FOUR left
incapacitated by a "botched"
routine surgery is seeking a cash
settlement from government.

According to a writ filed in
the Supreme Court on July 28,
Vernita Adderley is asking for
damages for injuries, loss, and
expenses accrued as a result of
an "incorrectly performed sur-
gical procedure" and negligence
at Princess Margaret Hospital.

In addition to general dam-
ages, Mrs Adderley, 39, is seek-
ing special damages, interest,
loss of earnings, future loss of
earnings, future medical expens-
es and costs.

Mrs Adderley, of Gayle
Street, Nassau, underwent
surgery in July, 2008 at PMH
to have her ovarian tubes tied
— a procedure that prevents
pregnancies.

However she claims her life
was ruined after she checked
into the hospital for the 20-
minute surgical procedure.

She told The Tribune last
year how she underwent gen-
eral anaesthetic and was col-
lected from hospital by her
brother the same day.

“EXCRUCIATING PAIN’: The aftermath of the surgery.

But when she got home, she
began complaining of pains in
her abdomen. She returned to
the hospital the next day "in
excruciating pain" and was
admitted onto the gynaecologi-
cal ward.

Doctors decided they had to
perform more surgery to
remove toxins from her
abdomen after realising her
bowel had been punctured dur-
ing the first procedure.

For nearly two weeks, the
former barmaid lay in a coma
while her husband Clay and
children feared the worst.

Although she recovered, last

Campaign
Koma Iy
HET E

breathe
oi (ey

FOLLOWING on from their successful drive
to raise money for much needed dialysis units
for the Princess Margaret Hospital last year, a
group of local companies is launching a cam-
paign to help tackle another critical health care

issue.

The “Breathe Easy” campaign aims to raise
$300,000 for four ventilators and six incubators for
PMH’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

The organisers include Tribune Media, the
Builder’s Mall, Tile King, Doctors Hospital, The
Rotary Club of East Nassau and Bahamas Real-
ty. Michele Rassin, director of operations for
Doctors Hospital, explained that the new equip-
ment is sorely needed — particularly the ventila-
tors, as all but one currently in use at the hospital



year she claimed she was left a
virtual old woman — with
chronic pains in her feet and an
unsightly 18-inch scar on her
abdomen — because, she
claims, of the botched surgery.
In December she told The
Tribune her stomach had
swollen to the point where she
looked eight months pregnant.
Doctors said she developed a
hernia and needed further
surgery to correct it.
Because of his wife's condition,
Mr Adderley — a 45-year-old
maintenance worker — was
forced to stop work to care for
his youngest child.

PICTURED LEFT TO RIGHT: Terneille (TaDa),

Michele Rassin, Mark Roberts, Technician, Dr
Steve Lochan.



are models which have been discontinued by the
manufacturers, making part replacement and
maintenance virtually impossible.

The incubators will be crucial in keeping pre-
mature or otherwise challenged newborns alive,

while the ventilators will be used to care for

patients in both the adult and neonatal intensive
care units. At a press conference held yesterday
to announce the campaign, the organisers said
they are hoping to raise the funds in about a
month and are appealing to corporate sponsors,
local companies, individuals and anonymous
donors. Anyone interested in helping with the
effort was asked to contact Mark Roberts or The
Tribune, and make cheques payable to the
Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation.

Only one union option now for Sandals staff

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

SANDALS — employees
scheduled to vote for a union
today will have only one option
after the Bahamas Hotel Cater-
ing and Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWVU) backed out of the
race.

The union had been up
against the Bahamas Hotel
Maintenance and Allied Work-
ers Union (BHMAWU) in a
battle to represent hundreds of
Sandals workers for around
three years while all attempts to
hold the poll failed. A Supreme
Court injunction granted by
Justice Jon Isaacs on Monday
suspended the polls scheduled
for today, but that injunction
was overturned by Justice
Neville Adderley on Tuesday.

The injunction had been
granted to BHMAWU former
president Shavon Bethel, but
was overturned when current
president Lynden Taylor, rep-

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resented by Obie Ferguson,
proved Mr Bethel had resigned
from the union in July 2006.

Justice Adderley had ruled
in July that the poll should be
held before August 14 after
attempts had fallen flat over
the last three years.

But it appears the long battle
for representation ended yes-
terday when BHCAWU vice-
president Kirk Wilson
announced the union would be
pulling out of the race.

He said: “We believe that in
order for trade unions to be as
effective as they need to be in
this day and time, we must take
positive steps towards unifying
our movement on a basis of
mutual respect and common
objectives. “A fundamental
part of this approach is co-exist-
ing while maintaining our
respective identities.

“Our union has decided to
put this strategy in motion in
relation to Sandals. We have
informed the Minister of
Labour the BHCAWU will not

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contest a poll to become the
bargaining agent for Sandals.
As such we ask for our name to
be removed from the ballot.”

Minister of Labour Dion
Foulkes was not available to
confirm BHCAWU’s with-
drawal from the polls before
The Tribune went to press.

BHMAWU president Mr
Taylor said: “We will still go
ahead with the voting unless we
hear otherwise from the min-
ister, but we may not need to
have a vote at all.

“Everyone is ecstatic, the
staff have heard the news and
we are happy this thing has
come to a close.”

The poll is scheduled to take
place at the Gaming Board
office in West Bay Street from
9am to Spm today. All employ-
ees of Sandals Royal Bahami-
an, including those who have
been made redundant, are
invited to attend, pending con-
firmation from the Minister of
Labour that BHCAWU have
been removed from the ballot.








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PAGE X, XXXDAY, XXXMONTH XxX, 1998

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Criminals flourish when crimes kept quiet

RECENTLY a member of the public com-
mented in the press on the number of police
officers appearing before the bar of the court
on various charges.

From the context of the comment it was
unclear whether the criticism was against the
officers who had put themselves in such a
compromising position, or whether it was
being suggested that to save the public repu-
tation of the force the charges should be sup-
pressed.

It is always unfortunate when an officer of
the law disgraces a trusted position and an
honoured uniform, but it should also give
the public confidence that the force is head-
ed by a Commissioner who administers jus-
tice evenly. Commissioner Ferguson is a law
officer who will give his full support to his
honest officers, but will pull the rug from
under those whose behaviour compromises
his team and undermines their efforts. This is
as it should be.

In yesterday’s Tribune a former Crime
Stoppers advocate expressed her disap-
pointment in the Force. She accused officers
of denying residents their basic right to safe-
ty by failing to warn them of certain crimes
being committed in their neighbourhood.

She accused the police of being tight-lipped
over rapes and attempted rapes on the east-
ern end of New Providence — no specific
area was pinpointed. She maintained that
women had a right to know so that they could
protect themselves. Without that knowledge
they were being made a vulnerable target
for a predator.

We know that many police officers are
torn between not wanting to cause alarm in a
community, and those who feel that the pub-
lic should be informed but are faced with
the pleas of victims who don’t want anyone to
know of their embarrassment. We know that
the victim of the man who recently invaded
her home and eventually made her drive him
to an ATM machine to withdraw money in
return for not raping her, did not want her
humiliation made public. The police respect-
ed her wishes and kept it from the press.
However, when The Tribune learned of the
case, for the sake of all those women who
might be the next victim, our reporters
tracked it down and we published. The vic-
tim’s identity was respected, but the crime
was not. Instead of having only the eyes of
the police focusing on this criminal, the eyes
of a nation will now be hunting him.

We believe that victims could do much
to help track their attackers, if only they
would talk to the press. The Tribune can
assure them that their identity will always
be protected. We are only interested in the
facts of the crime and putting a spotlight on
the criminal. Criminals flourish when they
can keep their crimes secret — secrecy

enables them to quickly move on to the next
victim. This must be stopped — and it can
only be stopped if the first victim sends out a
warning signal so that there won’t be a sec-
ond or third victim. It is almost a civic duty to
help protect one’s fellow man.

This week we were told a story of the expe-
rience of one family. This story will illustrate
why so many are losing confidence in the
police and the courts.

A certain resident’s daughter-in-law,
despite the many family warnings, would go
for her daily run on Cable Beach’s median
strip. One day as she got into her car to
return home, a man jumped her and tried to
pull her from behind the driver’s wheel. She
pulled away and drove off. He followed in his
car and cornered her. She ran into a person-
*s yard, banged on the door, but got no
answer. The man grabbed her, threw her to
the ground. There was a desperate struggle.
Holding onto her car keys, she banged them
as hard as she could on his head and again
managed to get away. Once more he gave
chase. A Good Samaritan in a passing car
saw what was happening and stopped to help.
Her assailant got into his car and took off.
The Good Samaritan drove behind him, fol-
lowed by a police car that happened on the
scene. The attacker crashed his car and was
arrested. The case went to court, followed
by several adjournments. To this day no one
knows if this man was convicted or if he is
one of those rapists walking the streets on
remand.

About a year later the same resident’s
son was riding his scooter on Dowdeswell
Street when he came upon two men fighting.
A shot rang out and one of the men tried to
run from the scene. Instead he ran into the
son’s oncoming scooter. The son quickly
called the police on his cell phone. The gun-
man was caught. He was facing a murder
charge because, the second man was dead.

The police asked the son to go to the sta-
tion to identify the man, which he did. Some-
time later the police asked the son to return
to Central Station in connection with the
case. As he sat waiting for a police officer he
saw the accused murderer and two police
officers walking down the stairs and into the
corridor. The three of them were laughing
and joking together.

Disgusted, the son got up and left Central
station. If this was the name of the game, he
wanted nothing to do with it.

As the law says — justice must not only be
done, it must be seen to be done. Law officers
and an accused in warm embrace is certainly
not justice being seen to be done.

It might be a small incident, but these
small incidents, like dripping water on a cor-
roding stone, soon erodes public confidence.



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PLP hates
progress

Arawak Cay is all about progress

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In a time when progressive
minded governments all over
the world are feverishly doing
whatever it takes to make its
citizenry more comfortable, the
citizens of any nation expect
the custodians to do what is in
their best interest. They should
always make the necessary and
timely adjustments to make life
better for all and not any spe-
cial interest groups. Period!

If the people stand to suffer
in any way and the pros do not
outweigh the cons then we all
should march on city hall. But
on the other hand if anyone or
group try to hinder or prevent
the progress of the project, then
we all should collectively con-
demn them and expose them
for what they really are. We are
behaving just like hogs, when
we have so much and want
more, some day we would have
to regurgitate and embarrass
ourselves. Swimming in vomit
seems to be the fluid of choice
for some.

The amazing thing about the
uncontrollable hollering by the
PLP about Arawak Cay, while
operating under their modus
operandi, proves that even
though they know that all
Bahamians believe that the par-
ty as it is today is still steeped in
corruption, they would still
gamble with the sensible
Bahamian people. Bahamians
look at what they are doing
with a tremendous deal of sus-
pect. We shall not be fooled. “I
know dem long time, dem peo-
ple is mine.”

I listen to the propaganda
spewed from the PLP about the
container port moving to
Arawak Cay. I even tried to
dissect their message to see if
there was a thread of truth,
common sense, or benefit in
what they said. I intentionally
took this long before I weighed
in so as to allow the rat to come
completely out of the hole
before I dropped the sledge
hammer on its head.

Now the PLP are telling its
few followers especially some
who cannot spell rat if it kills
them, that there is a sinister

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



plan to move the container ter-
minal to Arawak Cay. But the
fact of the matter is that sever-
al high ranking PLP, who have
had carte blanche, already have
businesses on Arawak Cay and
if the terminal is moved it
would affect their business. This
whole thing is personal; it has
absolutely nothing to do with
the followers who are just
pawns in a big game.

Arawak Cay is a container
terminal now, it has always
been one. FNM, PLP, NAD
and others have been collect-
ing their shipment from the cay
for donkey years. Large 40ft
containers are seen leaving the
cay on a daily basis for years.

Present and past politicians
are reaping “big bucks” from
Arawak every day getting as
much as $180 for every con-
tainer that leaves the cay. So
everything that is shipped to
Arawak Cay, someone gets that
money. Imagine that!

Also a high PLP official has
had a sand contract benefitting
from all of the sand that is sold
on Arawak Cay, and has been
doing so forever and a day. This
is just the tip of the iceberg.
The plot thickens. All of this is
done on land leased to them by
the government. So therefore
they have probably become
millionaires by benefitting from
our Crown land. You, the blind
followers, get nothing and they
go “laughing, all the way to the
bank.”

See how foolish we are to lis-
ten to people who have their
own special interest and hid-
den agenda in Arawak Cay.
They tell you about various
impact studies and reports, but
they do not tell you that they
are making plenty money, right
now, doing the same thing that
they do not want the govern-
ment to do.

Arawak Cay has been in
existence forever. The cay has
become the most unsightly eye-
sore as a first impression on

entry to the Bahamas for far
too long. The dilapidated build-
ing has embarrassed us too
much. It is time it is replaced
with something else.

The Pindling government did
nothing to clean up Arawak,
the first Ingraham Government
did not include it in its list of
priorities at the time. The
Christie government must have
seen the degradation and
ignored the deterioration, and
now the Ingraham government
sees the wisdom and is killing
two birds with one rock, clean-
ing up Bay Street and Arawak
Cay, by moving all of the heavy
activity from Bay Street and
shifting it to Arawak Cay while
not only making it easier on the
eye but creating a better first
impression when the cruise
ships come to our shores.

Bahamians must be careful
while following the “Pied Piper
of Hamlin.” They are being
controlled by their own special
interest. They have been licking
their chops long time and see
the possibility of their “golden
goose” being taken away, that’s
the special interest, their spe-
cial interest.

Did anyone notice that a for-
mer politician who spoke on
this groups behalf “broke off
running” when the public was
apprised of his extreme profits
on Arawak Cay?

“Never mind the noise in the
market, only mind the price of
the fish.”

As we speak, Arawak is
going to be transformed and we
all would be proud of it. I can-
not forget the noise created
when the FNM government
was transforming Goodman’s
Bay. They cried holy hell. Look
at Goodman’s Bay today, the
same place that the PLP had
already given to Baha Mar is
the mother of all deals.

The only thing that the PLP
is sure of is that anything that
looks like progress, especially
if it is not happening on their
watch, they oppose to, nothing
more and nothing less.

IVOINE W INGRAHAM
Nassau,
July, 2009.

We need to change our attitude towards trees

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Casuarina trees on Saunders Beach all 66
of them will be cut down to put light polls, is
this true? Who gives who the right to do this to

our environment?

human population are not indigenous to the
Bahamas does this mean that they have to leave?

ment.

Tearing up all the trees on the other side for a

parking lot, what will happen to the shade are we
going to have to spend more money to replant
trees that will take 50 years to grow. The Casua-
rina trees on Saunders have been there longer
than I have been alive, those that say they are not
indigenous to the Bahamas, well half of the

Founder &

(BIFF)
Nassau,

August, 2009.

The attitude because trees are in your way
you have to cut it down mentally has to stop,
work around mother nature and the environ-

LESLIE VANDERPOOL

Executive Director

Sirst Baptist Church

289 Market St. South = P.O. Box H-7984 * Nassau, Bahamas

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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS



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ARSON AND POLICE investigators survey the damage to the St Joseph school located on Boyd Road
yesterday. A number of offices on the ground floor of the building were damaged by the fire which
police believe was deliberately set.

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POLICE are searching for an arsonist
who set fire to the St Joseph’s Catholic
School on Boyd Road sometime before 5am
yesterday.

According to Asst Sup Walter Evans, Fire
Services personnel arrived at the school
within three minutes of receiving a report
about the fire.

Arriving at the scene, they discovered that
the flames were confined to an office on
the ground floor of the two-storey concrete
building.

After removing a metal gate to gain access
to the area, the blaze was extinguished in

short order.

However, the office area for the school’s
principal, bursar and secretary was com-
pletely destroyed and other rooms on the
ground level received substantial smoke
damage.

“Further school damage resulted to the
technology and library area where culprits
entered a window and removed computer
items and searched the library.

“The technology/library building is locat-
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area is located,” Mr Evans said.

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Lane yesterday.

It is alleged that on
Wednesday, July 29, 2009,
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vent Judy Simmons, a wit-
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attending court. Prosecutors
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witness in an armed robbery
case involving Pickstock’s
son, 22- year-old Quendo
Pickstock, and 23-year-old
Vanshuver Adderley.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Neurosurgeon who worked his way out of ghetto to speak at conference

A story to inspire young men

His life story
should serve
to motivate
all of us to
dream and be
determined
to overcome
every obsta-
cle. Yes, his
life reminds
us that ‘yes
we can!

CEO Network president

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



AN INSPIRATIONAL medical pro-
fessor who worked his way out of the
ghetto to become a globally acclaimed
neurosurgeon will speak at the 13th
annual CEO Network conference to
inspire young men in the Bahamas.

Dr Ben Carson worked on the first
separation of Siamese twins joined at
the back of the head in 1987, as well as
the first completely successful separa-
tion of type-two vertical Siamese twins in
1997.

He is currently a professor of neuro-
surgery, oncology, plastic surgery and
pediatrics at the John Hopkins School of
Medicine.

The CEO Network and partners have
arranged for him to come to the
Bahamas to give a positive outlook and
inspiration to young people over-

DO et ol



whelmed by the disturbing trends of
murder and violent crime in the country.

CEO of GEMS 105.9 FM Deborah
Bartlett, the founder and president of
the CEO network president, said the
conference will address the emascula-
tion of men in the Bahamas, and take
steps towards “economic emancipation.”

“There are disturbing trends that are

undermining the beauty of our country
like cold-blooded murder, the rising cas-
es of rape, the high tolerance of
immorality and corruption, and the
apparent comfort with denying produc-
tive and qualified citizens with oppor-
tunities.

“The weapons of choice that are
emasculating men and debilitating
women are dominating the headlines
and negatively influencing our environ-
ment,” she said.

Ms Bartlett and CEO partners includ-
ing the Delta Phi Pi Fraternity, the
Bahamas Christian Council, as well as
medical councils and unions, hope the
conference, and Dr Carson in particular,
will help empower Bahamians to suc-
ceed.

The CEO network president said: “Dr
Carson had a childhood dream of
becoming a physician. Growing up in a
single parent home with dire poverty,
poor grades, a horrible temper and low

self-esteem appeared to preclude the
realisation of that dream until his moth-
er, with only a third grade education,
challenged her sons to strive for excel-
lence.

“His life story should serve to moti-
vate all of us to dream and be deter-
mined to overcome every obstacle. Yes,
his life reminds us that ‘yes we can!’”

In addition to keynote speaker Dr
Carson, US Senator Kent Williams and
CEO of Giles Enterprises Terry Giles
will deliver speeches at the conference,
and Minister of Health Dr Hubert Min-
nis will make remarks.

The conference at the British Colonial
Hilton will open at 7pm on Friday,
August 27, and continue on August 28,
which is the anniversary of Martin
Luther King’s ‘I have a dream’ speech at
the Lincoln Memorial in 1963.

Highlights of the conference will be
televised on 64 network affiliates includ-
ing FOX, CBS, NBC and MY9.

City Market’s
stamp of success





BAHAMAS Supermarkets
Limited, which operates 11 City
Market stores in New Provi-
dence and Grand Bahama,
launched their new community
fundraising initiative last
month.

City Market customers now
have a chance to give back to

New stamp programme fundraising
initiative successfully launched

various charities linked to the
company’s smart shopper sav-
ings stamp programme with the
donation of their stamps.

In each of the City Market
stores there is a fundraising
stand that holds 12 stamp
sheets. Each sheet is assigned to
a non-profit organisation, char-

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ity or group. One sheet holds
200 stamps and a filled sheet is
worth $10.

At the end of each quarter, a
cheque representing the total
amount of sheets accumulated
will be presented to the chari-
ties or organisations that are
part of the programme. In the
first week of the programme
approximately $4,000 in stamps
were donated.

The “community board” as
it is called, has been in the City
Market stores since June and
customers have reacted
favourably to it.

“Tourists who do not usually
use their stamps like the idea
of making a donation to a wor-
thy cause,” the company said.

“Kids also like to get
involved and learn about giv-
ing back.”

Said marketing director Aza-
leta Ishmael-Newry: “When my

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FIRST AID

AZALETA Ishmael-Newry, marketing director (front row, centre) and Peter Goudie, human
resources director (back row, right) of the Bahamas Supermarkets Limited (BSL).

Back row from left to right are: Madeline Froning and Major Oral Morris, Salvation Army; John
Philpott, Scouts Association; Caryl Lashley, AIDS Foundation; Brendon Watson, Red Cross;
Pheafrisia Strachan, Nicolette Archer and Crystal Fountain, Girl Guides; Earle Bethell, Bahamas Can-
cer Society, and Peter Goudie, BSL. Front row from left to right are: Natasha Wright and Lynn
Gape, Bahamas National Trust; Azaleta Ishmael-Newry, BSL and R E Barnes, Heart Foundation.

daughters, who are eight anda
half and three and a half years
old, are shopping with me they
can’t wait to get the stamps at
the end of my sale and run over
to the board and paste them
on.”

“We welcome everyone’s
participation in this worthy
cause,” said Peter Goudie,
human resources director for
Bahamas Supermarkets.

“And this project is an
important cause where the
company and the community
can help make a positive dif-
ference.”

The eight charities that were
chosen for this year’s pro-
gramme include the AIDS
Foundation; Bahamas Girl
Guides Association; Sir Victor
Sassoon Heart Foundation;
Bahamas National Trust;

Bahamas Red Cross; Cancer
Society of the Bahamas, Salva-
tion Army and the Scout Asso-
ciation of the Bahamas.

The other four groups or
charities are chosen by a City
Market store and the aim is to
choose ones that are located in
their community.

“Partnerships like these help
the local community and
Bahamas Supermarkets has
been doing so for the past 40
years,” the company said.

At a press conference that
was held in July at the Nassau
headquarters of Bahamas
Supermarkets, each spokesper-
son for the eight main charities
talked about their organisation.
They all agreed with Earle
Bethell, president of the
Bahamas Cancer Society who
said that in “these tough eco-

nomic times, every penny
counts.”

Major Oral Morris of the Sal-
vation Army said that they
have seen more and more per-
sons seeking help and “the
assistance from Bahamas
Supermarkets will certainly
help the Salvation Army.”

The Bahamas Red Cross said
that they would use the funds
for their ‘Meals on Wheels’ pro-
gramme; the Bahamas Nation-
al Trust, for educational pro-
grammes; the Scouts Associa-
tion of the Bahamas and the
Bahamas Girl Guide Associa-
tion will use the money towards
various projects as will the
AIDS Foundation.

Roy Barnes of the Sir Vic-
tor Heart Foundation said the
funds will help their children’s
heart programme.



Still Young At Heart...













HAPPY 60th BIRTHDAY
PAPI

Love, Kaitlyn, Evan and Jenna



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS



Bahamian named

'Best Personality’

























lan Edwards

BAHAMAS Ambassador C A Smith and Bahamian Jasmine
Adderley who won the ‘Best Personality’ award in the third
annual Miss Caribbean Metro USA 2009 Beauty Pageant.

JASMINE Nastassia Adderley represented the
Bahamas in the third annual Miss Caribbean Metro USA
2009 Beauty Pageant held in Washington, DC, last week-
end.

Entering her first competition, Miss Adderley took the
"Best Personality’ award and was named the second run-
ner-up overall. The competition included 11 contestants.

Ms Adderley only had three weeks to prepare herself
for the challenge. Observers said she presented herself
"professionally, with elegance and confidence."

Future Stars Production, the production company
behind the pageant, said the competition sought to pro-
mote "a proud awareness of each contestant’s talent and
vibrant culture.”

“The aim is to bring Caribbean cultures together. We
will work hard to build this pageant for many years to
come as we seek to make an impact on the lives of our
Caribbean ladies in the community, whereby they too can
make a lasting impact on other girls,” a Future Stars
spokesman said.

“We believe that every young lady has an inner beauty
and that beauty will ultimately bring to light their purpose
in this life. To that end, we encourage each lady in the
competition to be in tune with, not just her outer beauty,
but inner beauty as well.”

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Happy ending for men
and boy missing at sea



PASTOR David Brennen gives thanks for the men’s safe return from © FAMILY members and friends express their relief as the welcome back
sea. the men who were missing since Sunday.

FOUR men and a 13-year-old boy missing at sea were rescued
by a submarine and have been safely returned to their families.

Relatives of the men contacted the Defence Force operations
room early Monday morning with an emergency call.

They said the men had gone on a fishing trip around Andros on
Saturday and had not returned as expected on Sunday at 3pm.
Police officials in Fresh Creek and Mangrove Cay in Andros as well
as BASRA officials were alerted. The RBDF also directed sever-
al of its vessels to assist in the search for the missing 27-foot speed
boat.

Information received by the police control room indicated that a
capsised vessel, the Hammerhead II, had been spotted by an
AUTEC helicopter off the southwestern coast of New Providence,
just a few miles away from the Coral Harbour base.

An AUTEC submarine surfaced and rescued the men from the
waters where they were found floating, all in good health, with the
exception of one man who had an arm injury.

Defence Force vessel P-121 was dispatched to the area and brought
the men and the boy to the Coral Harbour base shortly before noon
on Tuesday where they were greeted by relieved family mem-
bers and friends. Their damaged vessel was also towed into the cap-
ital by Defence Force vessel P-43.

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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

Recognised as an
“ambassador and actor”
who “advanced the
nation’s dialogue on race
and respect” 82-year-old
Poitier was presented the
Presidential Medal of Free-
dom during an afternoon
ceremony at the White
House.




Sidney Poitier honoured by President Obama

As the first black man to
win an Academy Award
for Best Actor, he and 15
other individuals —
including theoretical physi-
cist Stephen Hawking,
South African archbishop
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Supreme Court, retired
Justice Sandra Day O’Con-
nor — were described by
President Obama as
“agents of change.”

Introducing Poitier as he
rose from his seat, a White
House spokesperson not-
ed how, having “risen from
the tomato farms of the
Bahamas, his talent led him
to Broadway, Hollywood
and global acclaim.”

“In front of black and
white audiences struggling
to right the nation’s moral
compass, Sidney Poitier
brought us the common
tragedy of racism, the
inspiring possibility of rec-
onciliation, and the simple
joys of everyday life.

“Ultimately, the man
would mirror the charac-
ter, and both would
advance the nation’s dia-
logue on race and respect,”
said the official.

President Obama said:
“These extraordinary men
and women, these agents
of change, remind us that
excellence is not beyond
our abilities, that hope lies
around the corner and that
justice can still be won in
the forgotten corners of
this world.”

Born in 1927 in Miami,
Florida, Sidney Poitier
grew up in Cat Island as
the last of seven children
before moving to Nassau

with his family, led by his
tomato farmer father, at
age 11.

It was in the capital that
he first encountered cine-
ma.

At the age of 16, Poitier
moved to New York and
found a job as a dishwash-
er.

Soon after, he began
working as a janitor for the
American Negro Theatre
in exchange for acting
lessons.

Despite a lack of formal
training, Poitier went on to
become an acclaimed actor
recognised for a long list
of “firsts.”

He was the first black
actor to become a hero to
both black and white audi-
ences, to win a prestigious
international film award
(Venice Film Festival,
Something of Value, 1957),
to be nominated for a Best
Actor Academy Award
(The Defiant Ones, 1958),
to star as a romantic lead
(Paris Blues, 1961), to win
the Oscar (Lilies of the
Fields, 1963), to become
the number one box office
star in the country (1968),
and to insist on a film crew
that was at least 50 per cent
African-American (The
Lost Man, 1969).

The Cat Islander also
starred in the first main-
stream movies to condone
interracial marriages and

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AFTER PRESENTING him with the 2009 Presidential Medal of Free-
dom, President Barack Obama is hugged by Sidney Poitier, the
Bahamian actor known for breaking racial barriers and the first
black man to win an Academy Award as best actor, at the White
House in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2009. (AP)

permit a mixed couple to
hug and kiss (Guess Who’s
Coming to Dinner, 1967)
and to attack apartheid
(The Wilby Conspiracy,
1975).

In addition to Poitier and
those mentioned above, the
complete list of those hon-
oured by the President yes-
terday include: civil rights
advocate the Rev. Joseph
Lowery; healthcare reform
champion, Senator Edward
Kennedy; native American
world war II hero and his-
torian, Joe Medicine Crow-
High Bird; breast cancer
activist Nancy Goodman
Brinker; tennis champion
and gender equality activist
Billie Jean King; quarter-
back turned Republican
vice presidential nominee,
Jack Kemp; gay rights pio-
neer Harvey Milk; actress

Chita Rivera; former Pres-
ident of Ireland Mary
Robinson; cancer scientist
Janet Davison Rowley;
economist and microcredit
pioneer Muhammad Yunus
and doctor to the homeless,
Pedro Jose Greer Jr.

“These outstanding men
and women represent an
incredible diversity of back-
grounds,” Obama said.

“Yet they share one
overarching trait: Each has
been an agent of change.
Each saw an imperfect
world and set about
improving it, often over-
coming great obstacles
along the way.

“Their relentless devo-
tion to breaking down bar-
riers and lifting up their fel-
low citizens sets a standard
to which we all should
strive,” he added.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS



Shooting of student was
like ‘the wild wild west’

FROM page one

Brandon Russell, 18, who was the first
witness to testify yesterday, told the court
that he was standing about five feet away
from Fowler when the shooting took
place. Russell, who was also a student
at C R Walker at the time, said he was
standing at the bus stop on Bay and Fred-
erick Streets with a group of friends when
he saw a car with two men inside drive up
to them. Russell said that both men had
on Oakley shades and the passenger who
had a chromed tipped handgun opened
fire. Russell admitted that initially he
told police that he could not identify the
two men in the car because they were

wearing shades. Russell told the court
that two weeks later, however, during
an identification parade at the Central
Detective Unit, he identified the
assailant. Russell told the court that he
was able to do so because a friend of his
at school, who had not been at the scene
of the shooting, had shown him a pic-
ture of the suspected gunman in a local
newspaper.

Corporal 474 Keith Turnquest, who
was attached to the Criminal Records
office at the time of the incident, testified
yesterday that when he arrived at the
scene, he and a team of police officers
already had portions of Bay and Freder-
ick Streets already cordoned off. He told

one on Frederick Street, south of Bay
Street and the other on the sidewalk.
The bullets, he said, were 30 feet, four
inches apart. Corporal Turnquest told
the court that he also observed blood-
stains in front of the island shop. Corpo-
ral Turnquest said that he photographed
the scene. The photos were submitted
in evidence yesterday.

Corp Turnquest also testified that on
January 10, 2008, he visited the Rand
Morgue of the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital and observed the body of a dark
male in the dissecting room. Corporal
Turnquest said that he observed a num-
ber of injuries to the front upper region
of his body and the left back section.

the court that he saw two fired bullets,

The trial continues today.

Petition launched against |
container port move

FROM page one

“voice their displeasure in a
controlled fashion.”

“We want to make sure
that Bahamians get an oppor-
tunity to voice their objections
in sufficiently large numbers
that the government will listen
and respond,” said Mr
Fitzgerald.

Among a variety of criti-
cisms of the project — the
potential for it to kill business
at the fish fry, devalue nearby
properties and increase traffic
congestion — the Committee
has repeatedly alleged that
the extension of Arawak Cay
with fill from the dredging of
Nassau Harbour will have the
knock-on effect of “destroy-
ing” the popular recreation
area of Saunders Beach.

However, Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux has
responded that this claim is
false and “alarmist.”

Fill was to be used to
extend Arawak Cay whether
the port was relocated or not,
he stated, and a scientific






| gli sone



School Bags
Geometry Sets ,
Lunch Kits

Jerome Fitzgerald



study available on the BEST
Commission’s website proves
that any impact on the beach
is “unlikely” or mitigable. He
has denied any secrecy on
behalf of Government and
criticised an independent
study that placed Arawak Cay
sixth out of seven potential
sites for the port for using an
allegedly “strange and non-
statistical” methodology.

Meanwhile, though a move
to the southwest for the port
would have a price tag of
“around $400 million”, Dr
Deveaux has stated that an
Arawak Cay port is estimated
to cost a more affordable $80
million.

The site provides the bene-
fit of “already being a major
port” and an “industrial site
for over 40 years”, of not
requiring another cut into
New Providence and still
allowing “ample opportunity
for increased economic activ-
ity at the down home Fish
Fry,” said Dr Deveaux.

But Mr Fitzgerald has
rejected Dr Deveaux’s asser-
tions and called for Govern-
ment to show more evidence
to substantiate its “rush” to
place the port at Arawak
Cay.

Yesterday Mr Fitzgerald
said the Committee is “inten-
sifying its efforts, not only to
get answers to these ques-
tions but to give Government
another opportunity to come
clean with the Bahamian peo-
ple on the full implications of

6 composition books

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the development at Arawak
Cay.”

The Senator charged that
as the Save Saunders Beach
group on social networking
site Facebook already has
1,941 members it will not be
hard to get “a minimum” of
10,00 signatures added to the
petition during the Commit-
tee’s two week “nationwide
drive.”

“This is a defining moment
in our generation and we are
inviting Bahamians to draw
a line in the sand and say to
the government ‘no more,
enough is enough.’

“We would expect (the
Prime Minister) and the gov-
ernment to hear those con-
cerns, stop this project and
allow the Bahamian people
an opportunity to understand
why the government is mov-
ing ahead with this and if they
are not so satisfied that this
project be stopped forth-
with.”

The petition is being posted
on Savesaundersbeach.org
and the Save Saunders Beach
facebook page.

FROM page one

The system was moving
towards the west at a speed
of almost 14mph with maxi-
mum sustained winds of
35mph.

Should the depression
develop into a tropical storm
it would be named Ana —
the first named storm of the
2009 Atlantic hurricane sea-
son.

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



1

a

LOCAL NEWS



Slain teen’s name
‘sullied by police’

FROM page one

robbers and claimed only
one officer was in the area
when Brenton was shot.
"There was a police jeep
that passed Brenton Smith
almost 300 feet away from
where he came to be shot.

he was turning his body to
get into the property. . .The
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police officer shouted
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shot him.

"He was unarmed, he
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He walked that distance, as died," Mr Gomez said,

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flanked by emotional mem-
bers of the Smith family.

This information was
gleaned through his firm's
independent investigation
into the shooting, Mr Gomez
said.

",..More care ought to be
taken by police when dis-
charging a firearm at a per-
son. . .One has to wonder
about the training of police
officers," he said.

The "traumatised" family
wants an expedited coro-
ner's inquest into the youth's
death. They also want the
officer in question to be
removed from active duty
pending the outcome of the
inquest and will fight for
criminal charges to be filed
against anyone found culpa-
ble of Brenton's death.

They also have plans to
file a civil suit against the
relevant agencies.

The 2008 graduate of St
Augustine's College — who
family described as an ambi-
tious teen — was shot
around 8 pm on July, 9 and
died a short time later.

Officers were on the look-
out for two armed robbers
who held up the food store a
short time before Brenton
was killed.

Police have acknowledged
that a ballistics report
revealed the teen was shot
by a police service weapon.

They said the case was
turned over to the Coroner's
Court, however, a date for
the matter has not been
scheduled.

Last week a tabloid
reported that the teen was
on bail for charges stemming
from an alleged stabbing
incident. Brenton was not
convicted of any charges and
his family maintains his
innocence.

A website has been set up
in his honour: www.bren-
tonhectorsmith.com and a
special service will be held
in the parking lot of City
Market on Village Road
tonight.

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THE TRIBUNE

spor

PAGE 11



THURSDAY, AUGUST 13,

ts

£2 © Stubbs’ opinion on IAAF World Championships...



Fireman misses out
On training camp

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — Although
he missed the week-long training
camp, Chris “Fireman” Brown said
it won't take away from his prepa-
rations for the IAAF's 12th World
Championships in Athletics.

Brown, 30, arrived here yester-
day just as the team moved from
their training camp and into the
Games Village. He's here in suffi-
cient time to get acclimatized
before the championships begin on
Saturday and the first round of the
men’s 400 metres is held Tuesday.

"My preparation has been going
pretty good. I feel pretty good and
I'm healthy,” said Brown during
an exclusive interview with The
Tribune at Frankfurt Airport as he
waited to board the flight to Berlin
yesterday. "I'm just waiting for my
race to start."

Despite the fact that the coach-
ing staff had expected him to
report to the training camp, Brown
said his absence should not take
away from the task ahead of him.

"T don't think it will play a factor
with me because I'm trying to get
an individual spot on the podium,"
said Brown, who has fallen short in
the past three championships he
competed in.

"Through the grace of the good
Lord, I have already been there a
few times, so after every disap-
poimtment there is a blessing and
this year, I’m really focused. But
my main objective is to get through
the first round...each round will
take care of itself. All of my team-
mates are there, but I know when I
get in (the Games Village), I will
rise their spirits because they know
that I will be there to encourage
them to just go out there and per-
form."

This is Brown's second appear-
ance on the new blue mondo sur-
face at the Olympic Stadium. He

But doesn’t ‘think it will play a factor’

TRIBUNE

EXCLUSIVE



opened his season with a victory
there and he's hoping to duplicate
that feat next week Friday when
the final of the 400 is staged. The
preliminaries, however, will begin
on Tuesday with the semifinal
Thursday.

"The Lord is in charge right now.
With him being in charge, anything
is possible,” he said. "So I'm just
going to put my trust in him like
I've been doing my whole career
and do the rest. I could plan all
day, but I realize that he is in
charge. I can only go out there and
do my best.”

Over the years, nobody has giv-
en their all as Brown has done, but
yet still he has not been able to
stand tall on the victory podium to
collect an individual medal in the
World Outdoors or the Olympic
Games.

Last year in Beying, China, he
came so close that he could smell it
until American David Neville dove
across the finish line to nip him out
of the bronze.

"T've learnt a lot from the expe-
rience,” said Brown about joining
the top echelon on the podium.
"Not winning a medal has kept me
humble, it has kept me in the game
for a long time. Experience is the
best teacher and every year, I get
better and better and my coach
continues to take the time out to
work with me so that I can get bet-
ter. So with the experience that
I've gained, I think that will make
the difference."

Having ran a season's best of
44.73 seconds, just shy of his



CHRIS BROWN has arrived in Berlin, Germany, just as the team moved from their
training camp and into the Games Village...

national record of 44.40, Brown
said it has showed what he has
been doing in practice and that was
one of the main reasons why he
wanted to stay home a little longer
than to come up so early for the
training camp.

"T don't mind coming in now, a
week before and getting the job
done," he said. "My training has
been going awesome and we just
have to see how all of the hard
work will pay off as I get adjusted
to the environment."

While he's confident of winning
a medal, Brown said he knows he
will have to go through Americans
Jeremy Wariner, the reigning two-
time defending champion and
LaShawn Merritt, the Olympic
champion.

"This is 2009, but you have to
expect the unexpected,” he said.
"We have our eyes on the two

American guys, but at the end of
the day, the race is wide open. For
me, there are eight guys who will
be going for it and so anybody can
win that gold, silver or bronze. I
just have to keep my eyes open,
run a smart race and stay focused.”

As for the relay where the
Bahamas is considered a sure bet
to medal, Brown said as long as all
of the guys come out and do their
part, they should end up with
another medal.

"We're strong enough that we
can really go out there and do
some damage,” Brown said. "We
just have to put our faith in the
Lord and allow him to take us
through."

Having arrived safely in Berlin,
Brown said he's eager to get settled
in at the Games Village and start
his process towards a trip to the
medal stand - twice - next week.



Legacy
meeting on

weekend...
See page 14

BFA donates
to COB

IN an effort to continue to develop
and promote football in the Bahamas,
the Bahamas Football Association
(BFA) has donated teaching materi-
al and equipment to the College of
the Bahamas (COB) to assist with its
new initiative to develop a Sports and
Wellness Institute.

The college launched the Sports
and Wellness Institute in June, 2009,
with a mission to offer training and
development for professionals
involved in the various sporting dis-
ciplines in the country, and also to
serve as a vehicle to assist in the cer-
tification of coaches, trainers, referees
and administrators of the sporting
federation.

The premise is to offer certifica-
tion courses in the various sporting
disciplines in all facets of the game —
coaches, referees, administrators and
medicine.

Additionally, courses and seminars
on nutrition and first aid will be
included as offerings of the institute.

COB has already convened meet-
ings of an advisory board made up
of representatives from the various
sporting bodies in the country, includ-
ing representatives of the Ministry of
Education and Ministry of Sports to
establish the framework under which
this institute will function.

“The idea to establish an accredit-
ed course programme is something
that we are keenly interested in,” said
BFA general secretary Lionel Haven.

“And so the opportunity to con-
tribute to this was something that we
jumped at. FIFA has a wonderful
assortment of courses for coaches,
referees, administrators and sports
medicine under its Futuro III course
programmes, and we felt that mater-
ial from these courses would be very
beneficial to the college in their exer-
cise.

“Also, given the fact that we have
local persons who have completed
the FIFA course programmes and
can serve as instructors for coaching,
refereeing and administration is
something that we are pleased to
offer in addition to the material pre-
sented.

“The presentation of course mate-
rial for administration, coaching, ref-
ereeing and the supply of balls are
made by us here, but on behalf of
FIFA, who supplied the material and
equipment to us for presentation to
the college. We are pleased with the
relationship that we have with the
institute and will continue to work
hand in hand with them on this and
other initiatives.”







PAGE 12, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS



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‘High expectations’ for
Team Bahamas at IAAF
World Championships

STUBBS

BERLIN, Germany — In
two days, the International
Amateur Athletic Federa-
tion’s 12th World Champi-
onships in Athletics is sched-
uled to get underway. And I
have high expectations for the
Bahamas’ 24-member team.

I have pegged in two with
the possibility of three indi-
vidual medals to go along with
one in the relay and at least
three other appearances in the
final over the nine days of
competition on the Olympic
Stadium that once graced the
legendary Jesse Owens.

However, there has been
significant improvements to
the track, including a new
blue mondo surface that was
laid down earlier this year.

All of the athletes have now
arrived in Berlin with Chris
“Fireman” Brown being the
last. We actually came in on
the same flight from Frank-
furt into Berlin yesterday
morning. Brown’s trip was
direct from Atlanta, Georgia,
while I made a stop over in
Charlotte from the Bahamas.

From all indications, Brown
seemed quite ready and con-
fident that he can finally get
on the podium and win the
individual medal that has
eluded him since he started
competing in the men's 400m
back in 2001 in Edmonton,
Canada, where he was fourth
in his first round heat and
failed to advance any further.

That same year, Avard
Moncur became the first
Bahamian to win the men's
one-lapper, clocking a stun-
ning 44.64 seconds that stood
then as the new national
record.

From Edmonton to Paris,
France, in 2003, Brown
moved up a notch advancing
to the semifinal, joining Mon-
cur, who relinquished his
crown to American Tyree
Washington as he too grace-
fully bowed out.

The next two biannual

Harbour
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OPINION
_ 3

championships would be the
emergence of American Jere-
my Wariner, who dominated
the scene until he lost his
Olympic title to his compatri-
ot LaShawn Merritt last year
in Beijing, China.

In each of the successive
Worlds in Helsinki, Finland,
in 2005 and Osaka, Japan, in
2007, Brown fell just shy of
winning a medal, finishing
fourth. He was also the first
man out of a trip on the medal
stand after an American run-
ner dove across the finish line
in Beijing to sneak through
for the bronze at the
Olympics.

Based on the way he has
been running this year, Brown
certainly is considered a
medal contender for the
Bahamas. He's one of the
three individual medallists I
have pegged on my list, along
with the men's 4 x 400 relay
team.

There's no doubt that the
focus will be the two-headed
American monster called the
Wariner-Merritt show. But if
Brown plays his cards right,
he could be the spoiler just as
Derrick Atkins was at the last
Worlds in Osaka when he
powered past Jamaican Asafa
Powell for the silver behind
American Tyson Gay.

This time around, I believe
that both Atkins and Donald
Thomas, who stunned the
world in Osaka when he
soared to the gold in the
men's high jump, will have an
outside chance of returning
to the podium simply because
of the fact that neither of
them have been performing
up to par this year.

But any one of them could
turn things around and make
it to the final.

I like Olympic bronze
medallist Leevan “Superman”
Sands as another medallist for
the Bahamas. Like Brown, I
think he's overdue for a real
big money payday and this
could turn out to be his time

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to shine again.

Last, but not least, if Chan-
dra Sturrup can get out in her
usually quick start and main-
tain her form throughout the
straight away race, we could
look for the veteran sprinter
to be in the mix in the wom-
en's 100.

She's been a two-time
medallist, having won the
bronze consecutively in
Edmonton and Paris, four
years after Sevatheda Fynes
inked her name in the record
books as the first Bahamian
to achieve the feat with her
bronze in Athens, Greece, in
1997.

However, I strongly believe
that with more concentration
on the half-lapper, Debbie
Ferguson-McKenzie could
win her second Worlds medal.
She did it back in Edmonton
in 2001 when she won the
gold and nine years later, she's
still running in tip-top shape.

This could possibly be the
final appearance for both
Sturrup and Ferguson-
McKenzie and so I have a
feeling that they are both
going to go all out for a shot
at being one of the three final
competitors standing tall in
the female sprints.

Both have withstood the
test of time and are definitely
going to have to turn back the
hands of time in their quest
to win another medal.

This year, for the first time,
we have a female team
entered in the 4 x 400 relay,
but it’s a pity that both
Pauline Davis-Thompson, the
400 silver medallist in Goten-
burg, Sweden, in 1995 and
Tonique Williams-Darling,
the gold medallist in Helsinki
in 2005, have both retired.

Christine Amertil is the
most seasoned member of the
team, but I think her experi-
ence alone will not be suffi-
cient for the team to medal.
There is a good possibility
that they could end up in the
final, thus paving the way for
a brighter future as they look
ahead to the 13th Worlds.

As for the women's 4 x 100,
it's good that they are finally
back after falling short of
returning to prominence in
Helsinki when Timicka
Clarke, Sturrup, Fynes and
Phillippa Arnett-Willie failed
to make the final, four years
after the Golden Girls of
Fynes, Sturrup, Davis-
Thompson and Ferguson-
McKenzie struck for gold in
Athens.

The men's 4x 4 relay team
is a sure bet for the final
medal. It just depends on who
runs and in what order and
this could determine the
colour they could be wearing
around their necks at the con-
clusion of these champi-
onships set for August 23.

The majority of the mem-
bers have had their share of
setbacks this year, but they
seemed to have weathered the
storm.

Now it's up to them to go
out there and try to keep the
most successful streak of win-
ning a medal over all the oth-
er countries since the team of
Avard Moncur, Brown, Troy
McIntosh and Timothy
Munnings snatched the gold
in Edmonton.

With different combina-
tions each year, the Bahamas’
men have won a bronze in
Paris and silver back-to-back
in Helsinki and Osaka, the lat-
ter two behind the United
States, who will definitely be
their main target again this
year.

So three or four medals
would not be that bad for us
as we try to match or surpass
what we achieved two years
ago in Osaka.

On top of all of that, ath-
letes are competing for some
hefty cash incentives for their
performances, including
$60,000 for first place, $30,000
for second, $20,000 for third,
$15,000 for fourth, $10,000 for
fifth, $6,000 for sixth, $5,000
for seventh and $4,000 for
eighth place.

The relay teams will split
$80,000 for first, $40,000 for
second, $20,000 for third,
$16,000 for fourth, $12,000 for
fifth, $8,000 for sixth, $6,000
for seventh and $4,000 for
eighth.

In total, the IAAF will be
distributing a total of
$7,336,000 and so you just
know the Bahamians will be
vying for their share.



PAGE 14, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009



SPORTS

THE TRIBUNE



Olympic Stadium ready and waiting for World Championships



THE GENERAL VIEW of the Olympic Stadium in Berlin, Germany. The IAAF Track and Field World Championships 2009 take place at the Olympic
Stadium in Berlin August 15-23, 2009. In the foerground, the top of the Olympic flame from the Berlin 1936 Olympic games is seen.

(AP Photo: Gero Breloer)

T&T and El Salvador meet in
must-win World Cup qualifier

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Trinidad (AP) —
Trinidad and Tobago and El Salvador
were scheduled to meet in a must-win
World Cup qualifier for both countries at
Hasely Crawford Stadium yesterday.

They are the bottom sides in the six-
team finals of CONCACAF qualifying
with just one win between them in 10
games.

Only the top three automatically qual-
ify and the fourth goes to a playoff. El
Salvador had 5 points, one behind Mex-
ico. Trinidad had 2 points and no wins.

Both sides desperately needed a win to
stay in contention with five rounds left.
Trinidad made its World Cup finals

debut three years ago, while El Salvador
hasn't appeared since 1982.

"We know what we have to do and
we will go ahead in the best possible way
in trying to achieve the result in this
game,” Trinidad coach Russell Latapy
said on Tuesday.

"We know we must win the game and
that’s all we're thinking about at the
moment,” added English-born Soca War-
riors midfielder Chris Birchall.

Birchall was alluding to February's
opening fixture in the finals in which
Trinidad let a 2-0 lead slip late into a 2-2
draw.

Before the weekend, English Premier

League stars Bobby Zamora and Jlloyd
Samuel had been expected to join the
Soca Warriors for the first time. Howev-
er, Fulham striker Zamora was injured
playing for his club and Bolton Wander-
ers defender Samuel failed to collect his
passport in time.

Aside from February's 2-2 draw, there
have been four matches between the
sides in the last two years, which ended
with two wins for Trinidad, one for Los
Cuscatlecos and one draw.

El Salvador went into the game on the
back of a 2-1 friendly loss against Colom-
bia, which for coach Carlos De los Cobos
was an encouraging result.

erie Kam ner NO

this weekend

Coaches to meet today

THE Annual General
Meeting of Legacy Base-
ball/Softball Association is
scheduled to be held 10am
August 15 at the YMCA
meeting room.

Steve Burrows, presi-
dent of the youth organi-
sation, is inviting all Lega-
cy coaches, players and
parents to attend.

Also, a special coaches
meeting is slated for 6pm
today at the YMCA. “All
league coaches and offi-
cials are urged to be in
attendance to address mat-
ters of concern before the
AGM.”

“In addition to deter-
mining the officers to lead
the body over the next
year, the organisation will
address plans for the 2010
season and the period
leading up to the start of
the next season,” said Bur-
rows.

Included on the agenda
will be discussions on an
early start to the season
with a four-week develop-
ment camp for first time
players only of all ages to
be headed by Greg
Christie.

“This is tentatively
scheduled to begin in late
September 2009, and will
be followed by a winter
league series in October-
November to prepare
players for the upcoming
season.

“Additionally a Special
Coaches Symposium is
being planned to address
coaching concerns and
introduce interested per-
sons to the PONY League
and local rules and regu-
lations that govern Legacy
Baseball and Softball.

“Discussions will also be
held on efforts to attract
the Bahamas Baseball
Federation’s Champi-

onships to Grand Bahama
in 2010, and towards this
end the AGM will learn of
plans to improve the fields
at the YMCA in time for
next season.

According to a written
statement, Legacy enjoyed
a fruitful season that cul-
minated with a successful
campaign in the Bahamas
Baseball Federation’s
National Championships
resulting in another cham-
pionship, and the naming
of Legacy players to the
Bahamas national teams
that traveled this summer.

“We would want to add
to the experiences avail-
able to the players in our
league, including addition-
al trips for more of those
players not making our
All-star teams to the
nationals. To achieve this
we need the support of our
parents and all concerned
with youth development,”
said Burrows.

With improvements to
the fields, the executive
will also be recommend-
ing the relocation of girls’
softball development
leagues to the YMCA,
thus bringing both divi-
sions of Legacy to one
location.



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THE TRIBUNE



THUR Sa AY

isine

AUGUST



SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Ministry of Ed. to pursue
$30m in outstanding loans



By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

he Ministry of Educa-

tion will begin to

aggressively pursue

$30million outstanding

from the now defunct
Educational Guaranteed Loan Pro-
gramme next month, according to
the Minister of Education.

Carl Bethel told Tribune Business
the programme could be reinstated if
loan receipts show that the $60.8mil-
lion debt held by the government
can be reduced and sustained.

Hotels report significant
declines in activity during

Students who
had applied for
the loan this year
were enraged
when the pro-
gramme was sus-
pended almost
without warning.

President of
the Bahamas
Chamber of
Commerce,
Khaalis Rolle,
told this paper yesterday that would
have preferred to see a road project
scrapped before and educational
loan project.

BETHEL



"This wasn't the best decision,
they should consider the fact that
there are still people that are respon-
sible and would not abuse the sys-
tem," said Mr Rolle.

"A blanket suspension policy was-
n't the best decision.

"What you are you saying? Are
we going to forego educating our
people?"

Mr Bethel said those applicants
who had applied for the loans this
year, were given various grants that
do not have to pay back. However,
112 of the 175 grants of $10,000 are
for one year only.

Four merit scholars were given

awarded $25,000 for four years, ten
academic scholars $10,000 for four
years, and ten technical scholars
$10,000 for four years.

The government's grant program
allows for up to $1million awarded.

Now, according to Mr Bethel, the
ministry will have to consider a
method for collecting the outstand-
ing money, with the Bank of the
Bahamas "not well structured to help
students" restructure their loans.

However, Mr Bethel said: "The
cabinet has authorized the ministry
to pursue aggressive methodologies
to collect tax payer money.”

Mr Rolle contends that he gov-

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ernment should pursue defaulted
loan portfolios aggressively, but not
at he expensive of money for educa-
tion.

He suggested garnishing the wages
of those who do owe the govern-
ment or putting some other system in
place to increase the rate of repay-
ment.

"I'm quite sure there are a number
of them working. Use whatever
method is available," said Mr Rolle.

"We're making a critical mistake -
what's done has already been done -
develop a plan to correct it.

"Don't penalize the good ones for
the bad ones."

Miss Universe gives Harbour Island an economic boost

first six months of ‘09

DESPITE aggressive pro-
motional efforts by industry
and the Ministry of Tourism
and Aviation to stimulate vis-
itor arrivals, hotels reported
significant declines in busi-
ness activity during the first
six months of the year,
according to the Bahamas
Hotel Association's 2009 Mid-
Year Economic Review and
Tourism Outlook Survey con-
ducted last month.

As a result, there is a level
of cautious optimism by some
hoteliers that a turnaround
may begin to occur in 2010.

“Business remains guard-
ed. Until such time that the
recession ends and consumer
confidence begins to return,
we will continue to feel the
impact,” cautioned Bahamas
Hotel Association President
Robert Sands in commenting
on the survey results. Ninety-
per cent of the hotels partici-
pating in the survey reported
a decline in sales and room
occupancy during the first six
months of 2009.

More than three out of four
hoteliers (77 per cent) antici-
pate that revenue will be

down for the remaining six
months of the year.

“The combination of low-
er occupancy rates and lower
room rates is creating a very
difficult situation for many
hotels. While there is some
improvement in the outlook
for 2010, we anticipate we will
continue to be vulnerable”
said Mr Sands.

When asked their outlook
for 2010, 30 percent report a
negative outlook, 53 per cent
a fair outlook and 17 per cent
a positive outlook.

According to the survey,
most hoteliers have respond-
ed to the recession's pressures
and have taken a proactive
stance to reduce costs and
maximize revenue. Ninety per
cent of the hotels report hav-
ing made adjustments to
reduce their labour costs.
Eighty-Seven per cent have
reduced their average daily
room rate, with two-thirds
putting in place ‘value-added’
marketing programs. Two-
thirds (67 per cent) of the
hoteliers also have put in

SEE page 2B

Report offers bleak outlook



for Caribbean hotel industry

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP)

— A new report offers a

bleak outlook for the Caribbean hotel industry.

PKF Hospitality Research says the region’s hotels had an
average drop in profits of 16 per cent in 2008 and there will be
"further profit deterioration” this year.

The report finds steep discounts and special offers have not
offset a four per cent decline in visitors to the tourism-depen-

dent area.

The report published Monday also predicts that about 50
planned hotel projects will likely be delayed because develop-
ers are struggling to get financing. It noted a number of hotels

have been forced to close.

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By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

HARBOUR Island and
Eleuthera received their share
of the outlay trailing the Miss
Universe pageant contestants
Tuesday, with the island's
chief administrator lauding
the economic boost and
invaluable exposure the peo-
ple and place received.

Brenda Colebrooke said
the Miss Universe pageant
was a huge deal for all the
island's residents who came
together to prepare the island
for the arrival of about a
quarter of the pageant's dele-
gation.

Scores of people rode over
on the water taxis from North
Eleuthera, including Miss uni-
verse contestants and hun-
dreds more rented golf carts
form local vendors.

One Vendor alone claimed
to have rented 75 golf carts
on Tuesday alone at $40 per
cart.

He said it was the most
rental requests he has
received outside of Harbour
Island's regatta which attracts
hundreds of people from Nas-
sau and other Family Islands.

"The Miss Universe

Finally, a credit card that's

pageant coming to Harbour
Island is a big deal for the
people of Harbour island and
you can tell in the magnitude
of the preparations,” said Ms
Colebrooke.

“Tt kind of lifted everyone’s
spirit in this economically
depressed time.

“When you think about all
of the sweat and hard work
that went into it, it (the expe-
rience) is invaluable.

“They (Brilanders) knew
for a fact that Harbour Island
would never get publicity like
this again so they have gone
all out to take advantage of
it to the fullest extent and we
are hoping and praying and
looking for a positive out-
come to increase our tourism
income."

Bahamas Ferries also
hoped to capitalize on the
Miss Universe pageant by
chartering a special trip to the
island that would have taken
only an hour and a half.

However, according to Vin-
cent-Vanerpool Wallace time
constraints prevented the con-
tingent form going aboard the
Bohengy two.

Chief marketing officer of
Bahamas Ferries, Kaalis
Rolle, said the Bohengy
would have picked the con-

good for your health and

saves you money with

discounted rates.

testant up at a Paradise Island
Dock and sailed them direct
to Harbour island scything
one hour off of the trip, which
typically stops in Spanish
Wells.

Despite the more than two
hour trip Tuesday Bahamas
Ferries pulled into Harbour
Island 15 minutes before the
delegation arrived and
returned to Nassau as they
drove over the bridge to Par-
adise Island.

“Bahamas Ferries brings a
unique part of what the
Bahamas has to offer,” said
Mr Rolle.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said the trip would have been
a great opportunity to pro-
mote the expansion of ferry
services between islands.

“The original plan obvi-
ously would have given them
a magnificent schedule,” he
said.

“In order to get a full feel
for the Bahamas we far rather
would have had them go on
the Bohengy.”

Ms Colebrooke said she is
convinced that many people
came to Harbour Island only
to experience the magic of the
pageant.

According to her, during
the Miss Universe event at



the Coral Sands resort, which
included lunch, all of the
rooms were fully booked.
“Yes there are people that
come to Harbour Island
around this time, but I think
there is an increase in the
numbers because of this par-
ticular event,” she said. There

were people who said ‘we just
want to see it, we just want
to be a part of it.

299

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Straight to the point: Wants and want nots

Straight to the point.

HERE ARE SOME
WANT NOTS:

Today, Tomorrow Next Week -
Are Neither Here Nor There

Customers and clients today don’t
care how big you are or how old you
are, sure they want to deal with
somebody with a good reputation,
but more importantly at this moment
they only care about what is rele-
vant and how you can meet their
needs today, now.

Constant Contact

You can call a million times (not
suggested), e-mail daily (not recom-
mended) and you can phone hourly
(no way). The bottom line is the cus-

tomer will move/act when they are
ready.

Surprise

Price is not the determining factor;
as a matter of fact it is the least
determining factor in making a deci-
sion. Hhhhmmm.

Loyalty - Ha Ha

I don’t think loyalty exists like it
use to. I have proven this with part-
nerships and co- sponsoring. What
matters is what you can do for me
now.

How Great You Are

Nope they don’t remember that
either, what they remember is when
you could not service or deliver as
promised...

Promotional

Marketing



HERE ARE SOME WANTS:

What Do They Care About?

How much do you know about
them or their company? Do you
research, have information on their
company, their products etc.

Comfort and Assurance
They want security and assurance.
Can you, have you provided and

delivered on time in the past. They
would rather pay more and be
assured they get what they want
when they want it or need it.

Reputation

What and who, have you provided
for before? Delivering a year later
on something won’t get you far...

What are They Buying?

It’s not just a product, its assur-
ance and comfort customers are buy-
ing. No one likes to buy feeling
uncomfortable, or not positively
knowing. If you can demonstrate
this, then do it. They want to get the
most value for their money and see
returns.

All of these marketing strategies

are certain to keep your business on
top during these challenging eco-
nomic times. Have a productive and
profitable week! Remember,
“THOSE WHO MARKET WILL
MAKE IT.”

Scott Farrington is President of
SunTee EmbroidMe, a promotional
and marketing company specializ-
ing in promotional products. Estab-
lished over 27 years ago SunTee
EmbroidMe has assisted local busi-
nesses from various industries from
tourism, banking and telecommu-
nications in marketing themselves.
Readers can contact Mr. Farrington
at SunTee EmbroidMe on East
Shirley Street, by e-mail at
scott@sun-tee.com or by telephone
at 242-393-3104.

Hotels report significant declines in activity during first six months of ‘09

FROM page 1B

place energy efficiency mea-
sures including timers, low
wattage lighting, solar water
heaters, staff-led practical
energy conservation measures
and a range of other initia-
tives.

“Member properties are
paying strict attention to key
factors including product
improvement and marketing.
Several hotels reported hav-
ing the highest levels of cus-
tomer satisfaction on record.

We are encouraged by the
fact that many of our people
have responded. Our indus-
try is packed with exceptional
people with the professional-
ism and commitment to pro-
viding stellar service. All
hands need to be on deck in
this regard, as our reputation
can help pull us out of this
sooner than later. Word of
mouth is the best form of
marketing,” added the BHA
President.

The survey respondents
also pointed to several key
concerns which affect the via-
bility of their business. These

include the continued need
for lower airfares, additional
airlift to some of our islands,
high operating costs and
reduced cash flow. The Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation,
working with the private sec-
tor Promotion Board part-
ners, has had some success in
reducing airfares and attract-
ing additional airlift and
efforts are ongoing.

Applauded

Mr Sands applauded efforts
to bring about the Miss Uni-
verse Pageant.

“Industry has been pleased
to partner with the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation to help
make it possible for The
Bahamas to host the Miss
Universe pageant. This is a
long-term investment in our
destination as the real value
of the pageant is the incredi-
ble international press and
exposure we will receive for
months and years to come.
The immediate impact will
not be as significant as the
long-term impact,” he stated.

“We are encouraged by the
Government’s approach to
improving our product both

*, MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT JC
; NOTICE
CORRIDOR 18
SAUNDERS BEACH AREA
ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION

JOSE CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES S.A. has been contracted for the Completion of the New
providence Road Improvement
Project - International Package.

Cc

* 10 Ten (10) Casuarinas Trees willbe removed and replaced along Saunders Beach (Corridor 18)

* There will also be a permanent closure of the access to Vista Marina from West Bay Street effective August
23, 2009. Motorist are advised to use the following alternatives routes:
Grove Avenue through Coral Drive.

There will be delays along the vicinity due to the one-way traffic flow system. Local diversions will be
sign posted in due course and further information will be provided on the local media.

Tel: 242-322-8341 /242-322-2610

August 3rd - October 30th, 2009

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for our current visitors as well
as for the future. The beauti-
fication program is making a
significant difference in the
appearance of New Provi-
dence. Investments are being
made to improve our roads
and airports, led by the major
work being done at Lynden
Pindling International Air-
port. The downtown Nassau
improvements are beginning
to take shape. These are all
responsible initiatives tied to
our future which demonstrate
the maturity of our destina-
tion,” added Mr Sands.

The BHA mid-year eco-

nomic review and outlook
survey was conducted during
the first week of July, 2009.
The survey is undertaken to
assist BHA and public and
private sector stakeholders
with businesses and the econ-
omy. Recommendations are
also solicited to provide direc-
tion to BHA in planning its
program priorities and activi-
ties. The findings are based
upon responses from 30 hotels
representing a cross-section
of large and small hotels from
Nassau-Paradise Island,
Grand Bahama and the Out
Islands.

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Qualities:
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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 3B





Fed likely to leave rates
at lows to aid recovery

By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Signs are growing that an eco-
nomic recovery may finally
be taking shape, but with dan-
gers still lurking, Federal
Reserve policymakers are all
but certain to leave a key
interest rate at record lows to
make sure any nascent turn-
around gains traction.

Fed Chairman Ben
Bernanke and his colleagues
resumed a two-day meeting
Wednesday morning, where
they will take fresh stock of
the nation’s economic and
financial conditions. So far,
barometers suggest the worst
recession since World War IT
is ending, and that the U.S.
economy has started to grow
again — or will soon.

With the economy turning
a corner, the Fed also will
weigh whether consumer
lending programmes intended
to ease the recession and stem
the financial crisis should be
extended.

"I think the Fed will show a
bit more confidence in the
staying power of the coming
economic recovery and indi-
cate that everything is on
track," said Mark Zandi, chief
economist at Moody's Econ-
omy.com.

Still, the Fed has warned
that recoveries after financial
crises tend to be slow. And
dangers remain.

While unemployment
dipped to 9.4 per cent in July,
the Fed says it’s likely to top
10 per cent this year because
companies won't be in a rush
to hire. That could restrain
the recovery if it crimps
spending by already-cautious
consumers.

Another risk comes from
the troubled commercial real
market where defaults on
loans are rising. That's a strain
on banks holding such loans.
The increasing risk is making
lenders ever-more stingy
about handing out new com-
mercial real-estate loans or
refinancing existing ones.

"That's one of the things
(Fed policymakers) might
want to single out that keeps
them worried," said Michael
Feroli, economist at JPMor-
gan Economics.

Against that backdrop, the



FEDERAL RESERVE CHAIRMAN Ben Bernanke attends a hearing on
regulatory reform before the House Financial Services Committee on
Capitol Hill in Washington...

Fed is widely expected to hold
a key bank lending rate at a
record low near zero at the
meeting's conclusion on
Wednesday afternoon. The
central bank also is expected
to renew a pledge to hold that
rate there for an "extended
period.” It has leeway to do
this because the Fed believes
inflation will stay low for a
while.

Economists predict the Fed
will leave its target range for
its banking lending rate
between zero and 0.25 per
cent through the rest of this
year. The rationale: super-low
lending will spur Americans
to spend more, which would
support the economy.

If the Fed holds its key rate
steady, that means commer-
cial banks’ prime lending rate,
used to peg rates on home
equity loans, certain credit
cards and other consumer
loans, will stay around 3.25
per cent, the lowest in
decades.

There have been signs the
economy is on the mend.

Factory activity is improv-
ing. Home sales are starting
to pick up, although much of
the activity involves people
snapping up bargain-priced
foreclosed properties. Com-
panies are cutting far fewer
workers.

Some financial stresses also
are easing, but lending is not
flowing normally and finan-
cial markets aren't back to full
throttle.

(AP Photo: J Scott Applewhite)

Many analysts believe the
economy — which logged a
mild contraction in the sec-
ond quarter after a dizzying
free-fall in the prior six
months — is growing now.
That makes it more likely the
Fed will consider whether
some rescue programmes
should continue, but any deci-
sions might not come at this
week's meeting.

One such programme,
aimed at driving down inter-
est rates on mortgages and
other consumer debt, involves
buying US Treasurys. The
central bank is on track to buy
$300 billion worth of Trea-
sury bonds by late Septem-
ber; it has bought $253 billion
so far.

Some economists think the
Fed will let the programme
expire. They say it's not clear
whether the programme low-
ered rates. And, there's been
concern that the programme
makes the Fed look like it is
printing money to pay for
Uncle Sam's exploding bud-
get deficits.

Meanwhile, the Term
Asset-Backed Securities Loan
Facility is intended to spark
lending to consumers and
small businesses. It got off to
a slow start in March and is
slated to shut down at the end
of December.

Despite the TALF, many
people are having trouble get-
ting loans, analysts say. More
recently, the programme was
expanded to provide relief to

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the commercial real-estate
market.

The Fed isn't expected to
launch any new revival efforts
or change another existing
programme that aims to push
down mortgage rates.

In that venture, the Fed is
on track to buy $1.25 trillion
worth of securities issued by
mortgage finance companies
Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac
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The central bank's recent
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For information call 327-8536.
SIEM Cem e
























































Rt. Hon. Hubert A. Ingraham

PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, the Police Reserve is an extended arm of the Royal Bahamas Police
Force whose objectives are to assist the Force in the maintenance of law and order, the
preservation of peace, the protection of life and property, detection of crime, the
apprehension of offenders and the enforcement of all laws;

AND WHEREAS, while Reserve Police Officers do not serve the Force
on a fulltime basis, they nonetheless exercise and enjoy the same powers, authority,
advantages and immunities as do their fullttme counterparts, and are liable to the
same duties, responsibilities and discipline while on duty;

AND WHEREAS, in commemoration of the 44th Anniversary of the
establishment of The Royal Bahamas Police Reservists, the Reserve Force has organized
a month of activities to celebrate and promote greater public awareness of the role and
work of the organization in the maintenance of law and order and the preservation of peace;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Minister of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim Ist August - 31st August, 2009, as

“THE ROYAL BAHAMAS POLICE RESERVE MONTH”.

IN WITNESS WHEREOK, | have
hereunto set my Hand and
Seal this 23rd day of July, 2009

Wasel Fiaden

HUBERT A. INGRAHAM
PRIME MINISTER

LifeChoices

If you could secure $300,000 family protection for the
price of a daily coffee, with no medical required, would
you do it? Would you invest in $300,000 family financial
security, if it included a free and confidential financial
review with a professional adviser? We're hoping the
answer Is yes, because you could have this cover, for a
little less caffeine, from just $9 per week*. You'll certainly

sleep a little easier!

*rates vary, applies to male age 30

=

ATLANTIC
MEDICAL

ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO. LTD.
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, P.O. Box $S-5915, Nassau Tel. 356-5433

x

CALL 356-LIFE

or visit www.cgigroup.bm

Colonial Group International is

A COLONIAL GROUP
rated A-(Excellent) by AM Best.

mi INTERNATIONAL A member of Colonial Group International: Insurance, Health, Pensions, Life





PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Asia stocks down on China
data doubts, Wall Street

By ELAINE
KURTENBACH
AP Business Writer

SHANGHAI (AP) —
Asian markets tumbled
Wednesday with Chinese
shares falling nearly five per
cent on renewed jitters over
the economic outlook after

Wall Street suffered its
biggest loss in five weeks.
European markets were
mixed.

Analysts said the sell-off,
particularly in China, was
partly a correction of Tues-
day’s rally when markets
overreacted to data showing
Beijing’s massive stimulus



Legal Notice



NOTICE





NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:




(a) DESTREZZA OVERSEAS LIMITED is in dissolution under the provi-



sions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.




(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on August 12, 2009 when



its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar Gen-

eral.




(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace

spending was adding momen-
tum to the world’s third-
biggest economy. After sift-
ing the slew of figures,
investors decided the signs of
improving growth weren’t as
impressive as hoped for.

“The momentum of the
economic recovery is not very
good, because it’s not as fast
as expected,” said Huang
Xiangbin, an analyst for Cin-
da Securities in Beijing. “Not
so much private investment
is following the government
investment.”

US stock markets fell Tues-
day as the Federal Reserve
started a two-day policy meet-
ing that may provide a fresh
assessment of how the world’s
largest economy is faring. The
US central bank is expected
to hold interest rates steady
at near zero when it ends its

“The momentum of the economic
recovery is not very good, because it’s
not as fast as expected. Not so much

private investment is following the
government investment.”

— Huang Xiangbin, analyst for Cinda Securities in Beijing



meeting Wednesday.

European shares were
mixed in early trading, with
Britain’s FTSE 100 slipping
0.2 per cent while Germany’s
DAX index gained 0.4 per
cent and France’s CAC-40
edged up 0.1 per cent.






West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are required

ACE ACADEMY



on or before the 14th day of September, 2009 to send their names and address-



es and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or,

Academics, Creativity, Excellence



in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution





made before such debts are proved.

August 13, 2009

Offering K2, K3, K4 and K5 Programs




LAKEISHA COLLIE

REGISTER NOW




LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

Class Sizes Are Limited!











islandsky’

Ninth Terrace, East Centreville
Tel: 552-8706
Mondy - Friday « 7:30 am - 6:00 pm
$235 per month
Includes Daily Hot Lunch



WATER MAKING MACHINES
















Atmospheric
Water

Generator
Generates PURE drinking
water from humidity in
the air.

Regular price

NOTICE

DR. JAMIL ANGELO MINNIS

Announces the

opening of his

Asia’s biggest benchmark,
Tokyo’s Nikkei 225 stock
average, retreated from a 10-
month high, losing 150.46
points, or 1.4 per cent, to close
at 10,435.00. A stronger yen
hurt exporters’ shares.

Fnancial stocks came under
pressure after influential
banking analyst Richard Bove
of Rochdale Securities wrote
in a research note that bank
earnings won’t improve in the
second half of this year and
that many companies will post
losses.

“His report came in just as
investors were looking for
leads to sell shares,” said
Masatoshi Sato, market ana-
lyst at Mizuho Investors Secu-
rities Co. in Tokyo.

Hong Kong’s Hang Seng
Index fell 638.97, or three per
cent, to 20,435.24 on heavy
selling of shares in big main-
land Chinese companies and
weakness in mainland-traded
shares.

Shanghai’s Composite
Index tumbled 4.7 per cent to
3,112.72, with financial and
steel companies like Baoshan
Iron & Steel and China Life
Insurance leading the decline.

Figures released Tuesday
in China showed improve-
ment in trade, retail sales and
industrial production, adding
to spreading signs of a global
recovery. But some said the
gains were not as big as hoped
for, and corporate profits
remain relatively weak.

Australia’s benchmark
S&P/ASX 200 index edged up

helped by stronger bank
shares.

Elsewhere, shares fell in
South Korea, Taiwan and the
Philippines.

In the US Tuesday,
investors dumped financial
shares, shifting to safer havens
like consumer staples compa-
nies and government debt.
The Dow Jones industrial
average fell 96.50, or one per
cent, to 9,241.45. The broader
S&P 500 index fell 12.75, or
1.3 per cent, to 994.35. It was
the biggest drop for both the
Dow and the S&P 500 index
since July 7.

US stock index futures
turned lower, with Dow
futures down 12 points, or 0.1
per cent, to 9,204.

Oil prices hovered above
$69 a barrel after the U.S. and
OPEC said global crude con-
sumption will slump this year
as economies struggle to
emerge from recession.
Benchmark crude for Sep-
tember delivery was down 26
cents to $69.19 a barrel by
midday in Singapore in elec-
tronic trading on the New
York Mercantile Exchange.

In currency dealings, the
dollar fell to 95.57 yen in
Tokyo late Wednesday from
95.94 yen in New York late
Tuesday. The euro fell to
$1.4126 from $1.4145.

e Associated Press
Researcher Bonnie Cao in
Beijing and Associated Press
Writer Shino Yuasa in Tokyo

Practice in Obstetrics & Gynecology at
Oxford Medical Centre, 4th Terrace East
off Collins Avenue, Centreville on 4th
August, 2009
















$2,495.00
Cash Price
$2,295.00

Now Available At

TAYLOR
INDUSTRIES

SHIRLEY STREET « TEL: 322-8941
OPEN: MON - FRI 7:30 am - 4:30 pm
SAT 8:00 am - 12 noon

0.3 per cent to 4,343.10,

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, AMBIROSE VALENTINO
BROWN_of KILDEER DRIVE, P.O. BOX N-4346,
Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change the name to AMBROSE
VALENTINO ARMBRISTER. [f there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this
notice.

contributed to this report

Telephone: (242) 328-2566/7
Fax: (242) 325-2249

Eo

cr A L
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
WEDNESDAY, 12 AUGUST 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,565.41| CHG 0.17 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -146.95 | YTD % -8.58
FINDEX: CLOSE 784.27 | YTD -6.06% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

We Accept
VISA, MASTERCARD,
SUN CARD & DISCOVER



FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

COLON!

ROYAL SFIDELITY

Money at Work

RAYGIAN REPROGRAPHICS
Tel: 327-8640, 437-8687
West Bay Street, Cable Beach

PUBLIC NOTICE

“ TL

Please be advised _ that
Mr. Raphael Noel “Ray”Adams
is no longer associated with
Raygian Reprographics and has
Bahamas Waste :
Fidelity Bank : : ; : no involvement whatsoever
Cable Bahamas 7 ‘i
pdine adie with the company. He is
Commonwealth Bank (S1) therefore NOT Authorized
Consolidated Water BDRs :
Doctor's Hospital : . : : : . to transact any business
whatsoever on behalf of the
company.

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Previous Close Today's Close Change

Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.39 10.39 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Security Symbol Last Sale Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 : 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 < Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C} + FBB13 100.00 . 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4005
2.9047
1.4830
3.1031
12.9801
101.6693
96.7398
1.0000
9.2765
1.0622
1.0243

5.13
1.00
0.30
5.49

5.13
1.00
0.30
5.49

The Management

0.00

ases)
Interest Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

NOTICE |

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (4) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that: -

1000.00
52wk-Low EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $ P/E
0.300 N/M
0.480 N/M
0.000 256.6

Symbol Yield
Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

52wk-Low
1.3320
2.8952
1.4059

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
77-Aug-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
3.1031 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
12.3289 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0775 _ Fidelity International Investment Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund

(a) LAPINKULTA LTD. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 20th day of July, A.D., 2009 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308

1.0000 _ FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0585 30-Jun-09 East Bay St.
MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid § - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS § - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value CB. Strategy Ltd.
DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful =
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100. LIQUIDATOR

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007



TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 5B



Q2 home sales
erow in 39 states

By ALAN ZIBEL
AP Real Estate Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
United States home sales
grew in the second quarter in
39 states, another sign that
the ailing housing market is
finally coming to life.

Total quarterly sales rose
3.8 per cent to a seasonally
adjusted annual rate of 4.76
million, from 4.58 million in
the first quarter, but were still
about three per cent below a
year ago, the National Asso-
ciation of Realtors said
Wednesday.

Sales posted quarterly gains
of 20 per cent or more in Ida-
ho, Hawaii, New York, Wis-
consin and Nebraska. But
Alaska, Wyoming, California,
Colorado and Michigan
dropped by at least six per
cent.

Prices, however, were still
down from a year ago in 129
out of 155 metropolitan areas
the group tracks. The median
sales price in the quarter was
$174,100, almost 16 per cent
below a year ago.

The biggest drop, of nearly

Home sales up
Pending home sales rose 6.7
percent higher than in June 2008
Pending U.S. home sales index

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53 per cent, was in Fort
Myers, Florida. Prices also fell
35 per cent or more in
Phoenix, Riverside, Califor-
nia and Las Vegas. The
biggest price gain, of nearly
31 per cent, was in Daven-
port, Iowa, followed by Cum-
berland, Md., at nearly 22 per
cent.

Nationwide, foreclosures
and distressed sales made up
more than a third of all sales
in the second quarter.

CHART SHOWS seasonally
adjusted annual rate of pend-
ing US home sales...

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS

The Securities Commission of The Bahamas, a statutory agency responsible
for the oversight, supervision and regulation of the Investment Funds,
Securities and Capital Markets in or from The Bahamas, as well as
the supervision of Financial and Corporate Service Providers, invites
applications from qualified Bahamians for the following position:

Administrative Assistant IV:

Primary Responsibilities:
Overseeing Departmental Filing System
Scheduling meetings and preparing agendas
Recording all correspondence for the department
Drafting & Acknowledging correspondence

Assist with the recording of incoming mail for SCB and maintenance of data

Researching background material
Assist with the preparation of Board Meetings

Assisting with the Secretarial and Administrative duties and functions of
Investigations Officer, Deputy Legal Counsel and Legal Officers
Provide back up for Administrative Assistant to the Legal Counsel

Special Projects
Overseeing Follow Ups

Qualifications and Experience:
2+ years experience in similar field.

5 BGCSE’s at grade C level or better, including Mathematics and English.
Working knowledge of the Securities Industry and the relevant legislation is a

plus..

Competencies:
¢ Excellent oral and written communication skills

* Proficient in computer skills (Microsoft Office applications, particularly Word)

A competitive salary and benefits are being offered. To apply, please provide a

resume to the attention of:

MANAGER —- CORPORATE AFFAIRS

SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS

P. O. BOX N-8347
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Fax: 356-7530

E-Mail: info@scb.gov.bs

Applications should be submitted no later than August 19th, 2009.



Another sign ailing housing
market finally coming to life



(AP Photo: Paul Sakuma)

Many economists now say
that the worst of the housing
recession is over, though fore-
closures are expected to rise
over the next year.

Lawrence Yun, the trade
group’s chief economist,
called the sales increase “a
hopeful sign for the econo-

ord

my.

NOTICE

GLOBAL TECHNOLOGY INTERNATIONAL
SERVICES LIMITED

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 138 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 24" day of July, 2009.

Amit Singhania
Liquidator
of
GLOBAL TECHNOLOGY INTERNATIONAL
SERVICES LIMITED

ENERGY SAVING
CONSULTANTS

Cut Your El aay”
Up To 4U~/o
Pp 7 Oo
* Energy Saving Capacitors for
Motors, A/C, Pumps etc.

* Fridgi-tech oil additive to increase A/C
efficiency

* Tankless Water Heaters
*Compact Fluorescent Bulbs

For more information or survey
Email: energysavingsconsultants @ hotmail.com

Contact 326-6121 a eee Meth



pm POs,

eta
“ %

‘gl bry gal

PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
ADVERTISEMENT

VACANCY

TWO (2) VACANCIES FOR
EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN (EMT) BASIC

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post
Emergency Medical Technician - Basic, Corporate Office, Public Hospitals
Authority.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications: -

A minimum of two (2) subjects at the B.G.C.S.E level at grade “C’ or above,
or equivalent (including Math, English, Science); Good oral, writing and
reading skills; Certification as an Emergency Medical Technician, Basic with
three years relevant experience; Must be able to communicate and interact
with members of the public and other public safety and health professionals
during times of extreme stress, while maintaining composure.

LICENSES CERTIFICATIONS
Obtains certification equivalent to US National Registry EMT-Basic.

2.Maintains certification in Basic Life Support (BLS); Pre-hospital Trauma
Life Support (PHTLS); American Heart Association (AHA) and Cardio
Pulmonary Recitation (CPR) for the Professional Rescuer.

Registered and licensed with the Health Professions Council (Bahamas).

JOB SUMMARY

Responsible for providing timely pre hospital care to patients who require
emergency medical assistance; Secure scene and maintains safety.

DUTIES:
Responds immediately to emergency calls.
Secures the scene of an emergency situation and maintains safety.

Performs basic life support and other medical assistance until the
patient arrives at the hospital.

Completes required reports related to patient care and provides
electronic, verbal and written report to medical staff.

Communicates with hospitals and dispatch center using various radio /
telephone equipments.

tage that all emergency equipment are in the ambulance at all
imes.

¢ Prepares and submits an inventory of supplies at the end of each shift.

Letters of Application, resume, documentary evidence of qualifications
and three (3) references should be submitted, no later than Friday, 21*
August 2009, to the Human Resources Director, Public Hospitals Authority,
P.O. Box N-8200 or Corporate Office Building ‘B’, 3 & West Terraces,

Centreville.





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 7B

PEOPLE apply for jobs at a job fair in Mexico City. Thousands came to the fair looking for up to 12,000
advertised jobs, organised by Mexico City's Labour Secretary. The Treasury reported the country has lost
596,200 jobs since June 2008, a 4.1 per cent decline as of June of this year...

(AP Photo: Eduardo Verdugo)

Mexico: Falling oil could
ereatly worsen recession

MEXICO CITY (AP) —
Mexico's finance secretary is
warning that falling oil pro-
duction and prices may push
the already cash-strapped
nation into its worst econom-
ic recession in 30 years.

Mexico's state-owned oil
company Pemex currently
pumps about 2.6 million bar-
rels a day, down from about
2.8 billion a day last year,
Finance Secretary Agustin
Carstens told a Senate com-
mittee Tuesday. Carstens said
he expects output to slide to
about 2.5 million barrels a day
next year.

Mexico is the third-largest

oil supplier to the United
States but its reserves are dry-
ing up, and Petroleos Mexi-
canos has been slow to
explore deep-water deposits.

Even with the declines in
output, oil revenues funded
40 per cent of Mexico's bud-
get last year. The government
protected oil income this year
by hedging prices at $70 a bar-
rel. But those guarantees
aren't in place for 2010,
Carstens said. He forecast
2010 export prices of $53 a
barrel.

Carstens said the combined
drop in revenues and produc-
tion will force Mexico's econ-

omy to lag behind an antici-
pated global economic recov-
ery in 2010.

Mexico sends 80 per cent
of its exports to the United
States and has been hard-hit
by the slowdown in the US
economy. It also has seen a
huge plunge in the amount of
money Mexican migrants in
the United States send home.

The central bank says
remittances — Mexico's sec-
ond-largest source of foreign
income after oil exports —
plummeted nearly 18 per cent
in the second quarter of 2009
compared to the same period
last year.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

NOTICE

The College of The Bahamas wishes to advise all students who have
not received a response to their applications from the Admissions
Office to check on their status for the Fall 2009 semester at the

Portia Smith Building,

2nd floor on the main Oakes Field Campus

August 12 - 14, 2009

between the hours of 9:00 a.m. — 3: (4) p.m.

The public is advised that The College of The Bahamas will be closed
for one day on Monday 17th August, 209, as all employees will be
taking part in the annual seminar,

The College will resume normal business hours on
Tuesday, 18th August, 2009.

GE Mechanical Room
Air Conditioner

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Rosetta & Montgomery Streets
322-2188/9

JONES & CO

You'll wonder how you ever got along without it.





PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





European, US markets up
despite Asian declines

By PAN PYLAS

AP Business Writer

LONDON (AP) — Euro-
pean and US stock markets
rose Wednesday ahead of a
key policy statement from the

US Federal Reserve —
despite jitters earlier in Asia.

The FTSE 100 index of
leading British shares closed
up 45.42 points, or one per
cent, at 4,716.76 while Ger-
many's DAX rose 64.28

WAN TED

MEDICAL SALES
REPRESENTATIVE

The medical rep will be responsible for
promoting international pharmaceutical brands
to the healthcare community in The Bahamas.

Skills & Educational Requirements

/ Bachelor’s degree in medical sciences, allied
health, or business administration

/ Effective communication and presentation

abilities

/ Effective time management, planning, and

organizing skills

Proficiency in a variety of computer applications
/ Self-motivated team player
Previous experience in pharmaceutical detailing

would be an asset

Candidates should possess a reliable motor
vehicle, be willing to travel to the family islands,
the U.S., and other foreign countries.

Please send application letter and résumé by
August 21, 2009 to:

MEDICAL REP
P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas
or Fax: 393-0440

We thank all applicants for their interest; however,
only short-listed candidates will be contacted.

Discover BT'VI
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Thursday, August 13th, 2009

EC R@RRTEND scllt

7:00 - 9:00pm

BTVI Technical Ni

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points, or 1.2 per cent, at
5,350.09. The CAC-40 in
France was 51.06 points, or
1.5 per cent, higher at
3,507.24.

On Wall Street, the Dow
Jones industrial average was
up 127.41 points, or 1.4 per
cent, at 9,368.86 around mid-
day New York time while the
broader Standard & Poor's
500 index rose 13.07 points,
or 1.3 per cent, to 1,007.42.

The gains in Europe and



TPT Per

the US came despite big loss-
es in Asia, where investors
were spooked by Tuesday's
losses on Wall Street. Chinese
shares were the worst hit after
the Dow and the S&P fell by
their biggest amounts in
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Analysts said it was impor-
tant to keep things in per-
spective, especially as trading
volumes are particularly light
at the moment — low vol-
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volatility.

"It's important to remem-
ber that the Dow is up over 40
per cent in five months so it’s
only natural to have pullbacks
but if we are to see the index
break through the 10,000 bar-
rier, there needs to be more
signs of economic recovery,”
said Ian Horsley, a financial
trader at Spreadex.

Signs of recovery in the
world's largest economy
emerged with the news that
the US trade deficit edged up
slightly in June as imports
rose for the first time in 11
months — a sign that con-
sumers are getting more con-
fident again.

The state of US retailing is
under the microscope this
week. As well as official gov-
ernment retail sales data,
investors will have earnings
from the likes of Wal-Mart
Stores Inc., Nordstrom Inc.
and JC Penney Corp.

Department store chain
Macy's Inc. kicked off the
retailing results season with
better than expected second-
quarter earnings after a big
cost-cutting exercise — help-
ing the stock to rally three per
cent.

Investors are fully aware
that without the support of
the US consumer, which
accounts for around 70 per
cent of the US economy and
20 per cent of the global econ-
omy, any recovery will soon
fizzle out.

Attention later will be on
the Fed's policy statement
when it concludes its two-day
meeting later.

It is widely expected that
the US central bank will hold
interest rates steady at near
zero when it ends its meeting.
However, investors will be
looking to see if the Fed
sounds a note of cautious
optimism in its accompanying
statement and whether it has
plans to expand its asset-pur-

NOTICE

INVITATION TO BID

chasing programme now that
funds are running dry.

Hopes that the US econo-
my will recover sooner than
anticipated from its deepest
recession since World War 2
has helped stocks around the
world rally hard over the last
month or so, sending major
indexes to 2009 highs. Stocks
usually rally around six
months before actual recov-
ery emerges in the official
data.

With recent gains so siz-
able, analysts said profit-tak-
ing could resume during the
US session.

"Stock markets look frag-
ile and some further pullback
could continue in the near
term,” said Neil Mackinnon,
chief economist at ECU
Group.

Earlier in Asia, Tokyo's
Nikkei 225 stock average,
retreated from a 10-month
high, losing 150.46 points, or
1.4 per cent, to close at
10,435.00.

Hong Kong's Hang Seng
Index fell 638.97, or three per
cent, to 20,435.24 on heavy
selling of shares in big main-
land Chinese companies and
weakness in mainland-traded
shares, while Shanghai's main
composite index tumbled 4.7
per cent to 3,112.72.

Australia's benchmark
S&P/ASX 200 index edged up
0.3 per cent to 4,343.10, but
shares fell in South Korea,
Taiwan and the Philippines.

Oil prices bounced back
after an unexpected fallin US
stocks. Benchmark crude for
September delivery was up
$1.28 to $70.73 a barrel in
electronic trading on the New
York Mercantile Exchange.

The dollar was up 0.3 per
cent at 96.19 yen while the
rose 0.6 per cent to $1.4228.

¢ AP Business Writer Elaine
Kurtenbach in Shanghai con-
tributed to this report

GREEN TURTLE CAY WATER DISTRIBUTION IMPROVEMENTS — PHASE 2

1. The Water & Sewerage Corporation invites bids from suitably qualified contractors for

the = construction

of the

Green

Turtle Cay

Water Distribution

Improvements/Extensians. The Scope of Works include the provision of all labour.
equipment, matenals and other necessary services required for the:-

TRANSMISSION/DISTRIBUTION MAINS

Supply and Installation of approximately 20,000 linear feet of 6-inch, PVC pipe,
6,500 linear feet of 4-lnch PVC pipe, 5000 linear feet of 2-inch PVC water mains,
and 300 no. %-inch Service Laterals and 5 no. 71-inch service laterals, along with
all associated valves and appurtenances.

Bids from potential contractors must be accompanied by comprehensive details from the
Qualification Questionnaire out-lining:

a} Expenence on similar projects
b} Personnel to be assigned (including their experience on similar projects)
c) Financial capacity to execute the works

The Contractor's qualifications and bid price will be evaluated for award of Contract.

Bidding detuments and drawings wil be available on request beginning Tuesday, 18”
August 2008,from lhe Engineering & Planning Department of ihe Waler & Sewerage
Corporation for a nominal fee of $100.00 per set. The Pre-Bid Meeting is scheduled for
Tuesday, 25" August 2009 at 10: a.m. at the site.

Completed documents must be relumed to the address below, no later than 4:00 p.m, on
Friday 11° September 2009

General Manager

Water & Sewerage Corporation

a7 Thompson Blvd.
P.O, Box N-3905
Nassau, Bahamas

Attn: Engineering & Planning Division

Telephone: (242) 302-5512
Facsimile: (242) 302-5538





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 9B



On the Money: Should you hire help to land a job?

By CANDICE CHOI
AP Personal
Finance Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Fred
Alm wants a full-time job. So
much so that he paid a profes-
sional $200 to make his
résumé sparkle.

"T figured it would be worth
it, even just to see what hap-
pens,” said Alm, a 52-year-old
resident of Troy, N.Y. who
teaches business classes part
time at a community college.

It's only been a week since
Alm got his new resume, but
he thinks the investment will
pay off. It now starts with a
“personal profile" that brings
together his mixed back-
ground as a teacher and mar-
keting professional. Then it
dives into his key skills so hir-
ing managers can see why he's
right for the job.

Whether the changes will
make a difference is still to be
seen. Unable to turn teaching
into full-time work for the past
several years, Alm decided to
explore other opportunities.
The timing isn't in his favor.

Despite some glimmers of
improvement, the job market
remains crowded with an
unemployment rate of 9.4 per
cent. That figure rises to 16.3
per cent if you include those
who've given up looking or
settled for part-time work.

Given the competition, Alm
isn't the only one looking for
an edge. You may also wonder
if a resume writer, job coach or
other career services profes-
sional can improve your
chances.

Here's the rundown on what
you need to know.

PICKING A

PROFESSIONAL

The career services indus-
try is not regulated; anyone
can sport the title of "job
coach" or "resume writer."
Professional organizations and
schools offer numerous cer-
tificates, but you can go cross-
eyed trying to figure out what
the various acronyms mean.

For instance, the Interna-
tional Coach Federation, the



LISA VAN CLEEF, a human resources manager at Tommy Hilfiger,
meets with job seekers at the WWD Fashion Career Expo in New York.
(AP Photo: Diane Bondareff)

National Resume Writers
Association and the Career
Management Alliance each
offers its own credentials. It's
also possible you'll find a per-
fectly capable professional
with no certifications but plen-
ty of experience.

"People should hire coaches
or resume writers whose work
they've seen and with whom
they feel trust or a rapport,"
said Liz Sumner, executive
director of Career Manage-
ment Alliance, a trade group
of about 400 career service
professionals based in Peter-
borough, N.H.

If you're more comfortable
working with an established
business, many recruiting firms
now offer career services too.
One time-tested way to finda
trusted professional is to ask
friends and family for refer-
rals.

Whatever route you choose,
ask for work samples and a
free consultation before fork-
ing over any money. A con-
sultation might take about 15
minutes and should give you a
sense of what to expect from
the arrangement.

Finally, get the deal in writ-
ing. Spell out the services to
be provided, and by when.
This ensures you and the per-
son you hire are on the same

page.
HOW IT WORKS

Resume Writing: Given the
sea of information online, it's

natural to wonder what exact-
ly you're paying for when hir-
ing a resume writer or career
coach.

With resumes, it's not just
a matter of having a proof-
reader check your grammar or
fill in a template with your
details. The process generally
starts with an extensive inter-
view that lasts about an hour
or longer and covers topics
including past jobs, your work
style and career goals. The line
of questioning is meant to
uncover accomplishments you
might not have considered sig-
nificant.

"Once my candidates start
talking to me, I'm always
amazed that they don't give
themselves credit for all
they've done," said Alison
Rosenblum, owner of Hudson
River Career Resources in
Albany, N.Y.

The writer should then com-
pose a resume highlighting
your most compelling traits.

You should get a draft
resume about a week after the
interview, with an option to
suggest changes for no extra
charge.

Coaching: Hiring a full-ser-
vice career coach usually
involves a much deeper com-
mitment. It generally covers
all aspects of the job search,
including prepping for an
interview and tips on net-

working.

In addition to the one-on-
one sessions, you might get
takeaway assignments to
ensure you're staying active in
the job hunt. Sessions can take
place over the phone or in per-
son.

If you don't need — or can't
afford — that level of guid-
ance, career coaches often
offer a la carte help too. For
instance, you might just want
help polishing your online pro-
file.

Of course, most people
aren't hiring career coaches
just for technical tips. For
many, the benefit of a coach is
having someone to keep them
motivated and on track.

"Coaches can hold you
accountable to achieve your
goal," said Amy Richardson, a
spokeswoman for the Interna-
tional Coach Federation, a
trade group based in Lexing-
ton, Ky.

Objective feedback from a
professional could also shed
light on why you're not get-
ting calls back.

WHAT YOU'LL PAY

Prices can vary greatly. Flat
fees are more common for
specific tasks, such as resume
writing or creating a Web
page. The Career Manage-
ment Alliance estimates that a
resume for a midlevel profes-
sional can cost $400 or more,
but it's likely you'll be able to
find something much cheap-
er. Check with local job place-
ment firms to get a read on
going rates.

For broader career guid-
ance, you'll likely be charged
by the hour.

The International Coach
Federation says you can
expect to pay an average of
$160 an hour, with coaches
often recommending a set
number of weekly or monthly
sessions. Coaches might offer
discounts for small group ses-
sions or a package of services.

For instance, career coach

LEGAL NOTICE

Jan Melnik charges between
$850 and $1,200 for an execu-
tive-level resume, cover letter
and action plan that spans
eight weeks. Clients can pay
extra for help with specific
items, such as writing e-mails
or cold calling potential
employers. The additional ser-
vices range from $300 to $500,
said Melnik, who's based in
Durham, Conn.

It's unlikely you'll recover
any money if you're unhappy
with the resume writer or
career coach you hire. You can
file a complaint with the Fed-
eral Trade Commission or
your state consumer agency,
but there's no guarantee your
case will be investigated.

THE ALTERNATIVES
There are ways to get per-
sonalized career advice on a



budget.

College career fairs are usu-
ally open to alumni and any-
one in the community sur-
rounding the campus, said
Melnik. These fairs typically
have onsite career coaches or
resume writers who give free
one-on-one sessions.

Many career coaches also
do pro bono work; Melnik
suggests checking with public
libraries, nonprofit groups and
community centers for free
career workshops.

Another place to look is
your state unemployment
offices. The level of services
varies depending on where
you live, but most centers offer
interview training or resume
reviews.

e Have a personal finance
question? Send it to your-
money(at)ap.org

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)












LION OIL TOOLS LTD.

In Voluntary liquidation





“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
LION OIL TOOLS LTD. is in Dissolution.”







The date of commencement of dissolution is the 10th day





of August, 2009.

Mayo Secretaries Limited
Akara Building, 24 De Castro Street
Wickhams Cay I, Road Town
Tortola, BVI
Liquidator




















NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF JOHN A. ROBINS (also known as ALPHONSO JOHN






Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

LANDE ESTATES LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 of the International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, LANDE ESTATES LIMITED, has been
dissolved and struck off the Register according to the
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
on the 17th day of July, 2009.

CI Accountancy Limited
Boatside Business Centre
Warden
Northumberland
NE46 4SH
Liquidator

Employment Opportunity

FINANCIAL MANAGER

VWe seek to employ a talented, innovative, leader with a passion
te succeed and the capacity be initiane progress.

Job Requirements & Experience

Bachelor's Degree in Accounting or an equivalent from a
recognized tertiary level Institution.

Minimune of 3 years practical experience ina similar robe,

Exporicnoe in Management Report ng ina com«ercial
enterprise, with Oracle database manageneant system,

Demenstrated abilicy to manage, motivate and develop a
team and affoctively work with staff,

Extensive experionce using automated accounting systems
such as Quickbools and Peachtree

Demonstrated ability in managing projects.

Well adjusted to working for organizations with 24/7
operations.

Procticall/Specialist Skills include
Technical and practical skills in financial accounting.
Skills in forecasting, budpeting and analyses of variances.
Strong customer focus (internal and external).

Strong communication and interpersonal akille oo effectively
translate ideas.

Strong reasoning and interprection skilk.
Dervanstraced abilicy to research inmewative solucions.
Strong computer and Microsoft Office skills,

The oversight of (A) payrall processing and reporting, (Bi
customer balling and: (C) account recenciliations

Managing year end audits.

APPLY VIA EMAIL BEFORE August 14, 2007 TO;
executivefinditeemail.com

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
PLATINUM STAR GROUP LTD. is in dissolution. Mrs, Al-
rena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at Win-
terbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names addresses and par-
ticulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the
27th August, 2009.

Road Traffic Department
Road Safety Competition

{ {
i'm lovin’ it

‘Whoene: he est place to cross the road"
Helove crosammg Lhe road hat dhould yea do

What do the folle ning oul gi qu peat!

NAME:
ADMEESS:
4k:

TELEPHONE:



ROBINS) late of Yamacraw Beach Drive in the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.
Notice is hereby given that all persons having any claim or de-
mand against the above Estate are required to send their names,
addresses and particulars of the same certified in writing to the un-
dersigned on or before the 10th day of September, A.D., 2009 and
if required, to prove such debts or claims, or default be excluded
from any distribution; after the above date the assets will be distrib-
uted having regard only to the proved debts or claims of which the
Executrices shall have had notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons indebted to the said
Estate are requested to make full settlement on or before the 27th
day of August, A.D., 2009.



SYDBRI LEGAL SERVICES
Naomi House
No.19, 9th Terrace & West Court
P.O. Box EE-15075
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Executrices

Ee SS oe

Bahamas Supermarkets Limited operates a leading
supermarket chain in The Bahamas. As a market leader,
the Company prides itself on delivering premier service
throwgh its City Market supermarkets, having a strong
commitment to its customers, associates and community.

An opportunity for Management Trainees. (Future
Leaders) exists in New Providence to join this market
leader.

Reporting to the Head of Retail Operations, the
successful applicants will;

Be sell-motivated and highly energetic

Have effective supervisory skills

Be highly flexible and mobile and prepared to work
evenings, weekends and holidays

Have a clean police record, drivers license, good
character references and be physically fit

Have completed high school with a minimum of 3
BGCSE

Have good communication (verbal and written)
and interpersonal skills

Be numerate and analytical with the ability te
derive information from financial reports

Be a strong problem solver

Have the ability te multi task

Solid functional computer skills with working
knowledge of Microsoft applications

Previous experience in Retail Management is an
mSSel,

Salary and benefits will be commensurate with
experience and qualifications,

lf you have what it takes to succeed in this challenging
role, forward your resume and cover letter to:
* Human Resources Director
Balharnias Supermarkets Limited
East-West Highway + P.O. Box MN 3738+ Nassau, Bahamas
OF email to; humanresources@bahamassupermarkets.com
Ne teleniene inquiries please

City Mark /

~ io





New F fi

1. Waseart bot #147 (10,55 79q.

ft)-Munnings Dr & Roy

Weat Ln Southem Heights

Sub (Appraised Value

$90,000.00)

Lot #59 (2,500sq. fL) whee
1, 104s. f. Blk #35 hee #o-4-
Lincoln Bled (Appraised
Value $57,790.00)

3. Lat (803 100°) whailding
1,91 2sq, f.-Deveaux St
(Appraised Valoc
$189, 000,00)

4. Lots #29 & #30, (50x 100"),
Blk #47 whuilding |,140sq,
ft-Matthew St, Nassau
Village (Appraised Value
$145,000.00)

Andros

4. Beach front lot 9,000eq. Ft
wibilding 2,100sq. ft.
Pinders Mangrove Cay
Andros (Appraised Valoc
$200,000.00)

6 Lot 434453, f. widuplex
1,1 745q, f.-Fresh Creek
Andros (Appraised Valoc
$94,640.00)

Grand Bahama

7, Lot #20(17,150sq. ft.)
whee 2,00leg. ft. Blire,
Sec #2-Sea Gull Dr,
Bahama Reef Yacht &
Country Clah Sub Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $290,000.00)

8. Vacant lot #39, Blk #9
(14,3975q. ft) Yorkshire
Dr, Bohamia West Replat
(Grand Bahama
(Appraised Valoc
$25,000.00)

4 Vacant Lot #8 Blk #12 Lina
#3 (11 ,250sq. ft }-+Henny
Ave Derby Sub Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $65,000,00)

10, Lot #43 B (100'x150")
building-Melson Rd
Pomciana Gardens Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Valoe $96,000.00)

LL, Lot#7 (30's a")
aysixplex 2-storey
apartment building &
Church 3,400sq, ft.-Martin
Town, Kings Sub Bight Mile
Rock Cirand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$211,200.00)

Pot
'

SUV(s)




9%) Ford Explorer :

2003 Dodge Carnvan
I free Tne s



107 Deora boke Ascii Meck:
Chong Trek



L3E? Ford LOD Bon Trek



Et (ha) Rabole Vaaeal wel LE



SE (0e84) Tasco Murine Wessel
Gee Dreams) eam 20°, Depth 5"
Commins fngine

1"

12.

14.

) BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK

Cable Beach, West Bay Street,
P.0.Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas
Tels(242) 327-5780/327-5793-6
Fax:(242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www.bahamasdevelopmentbank.com

Properties

Lot #10 room botel
5,00Gsq. fi. on 4.99 acres of
beach fromt-High Rock
Cirand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$1,100,000,00)

- Vacant bot #13, Blk #59,

Unit #3 (22,752sq, #45"
on canal front-Dagenham
Circle & Ingrave Dr
Emerald Bay Swb Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $110,000.00)
Lot #15, Blk #15 Linit 4
(90°%125"}-Derby Sub
Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$23,000.10)
Vacant lt #25, Blk Als
(17, 866eq. f. HOetwater La
Shannoa Country Club Sob
Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$34,000.00)
Lot #2 (20,000eq, fi.)
wihullding complex &
Laandromet—-Queess
Highway Holmes Rock
Commenage Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$178,600.00)

A

Lot 825 (17, 7535q, fi.)
whee 800sg, fL-47 Queen
Elizabeth Dr Marsh
Harbour Abaco
(Appraised Value
$212,750.00)

Vacant bot #6 (2 eres Fon
Town Abaco (Appraised
Value $50,000.00)

Lot #3] (15,0005q, ff.)
wihuilding—Murpay Town
Abaco (Appraised
Value $102,420.00)
Portion of lot #89 (15,000,
ft. )-Front St kurpby Town
Abaco (Appraised
Walue $29,250.00)

Lin #55 (6,9008q, fh)
wbuilding-Murphy Town
Abaco (Appraised
Value $82,075.10)

Let #45 (60°s 160") wild
room mote! 300089. if.
Sandy Paint Abaco

Assets
Vehicles

Car(s)





1987 Double Asda Mack
thang Trerk

D000 Chercioes Tandon Double Ashe Tralr



(1974) Saacred Veswal
1 Cvimris Cuiboerd angine 3140 1P Vomahe fatbeard angina

Other Vises — Photos Not Availahly
© BO? Coste Shor! Hull Weseel (Mise oristy)

a Dndge Stratus

Trucks



S82 Doub Agh Mack Trak
Head

Â¥

(Appraised Vabwe
$485,700.00)

23. Lot 87,1 2isg. Fe wid
oomlapes & | storage
building totaling 4,18Gsq. fiL-
Sand Banks Treasure Cay
Abeco (Appraised
Value $880,208.10)

24, Vacant portion of lot #7
(50's 110° + Weal James
Cistem Eleuthera
(Appraised Value
$18,000.00)

23, Vasant 3 acres of lad
situmed Colebrook Street
Dmore Tan | Harter
Island) Eleuthera

Cat Island

26. Vacant 65 acres of land:
Arther's Town, Cat [sland

27. LotwilZ mom motel 1.9
eeres—Arthur's Town Ca
Island (Appraised Value
$630,000.00)

Exum

23. Vacant lot 88 (64 20g. fi.)
Moss Town Exuma
(Appraised Value
$110,188.00)

29. Lot (30,40Misq. ft.) v0 small
hotel 4,826. A, fi
exclusive beach-Forbes Hill
Exuma (Appraised
Vaboe $1,400, 000,00)

30. Vacant lot #95 (30'n 122")
Commodore Rd Elizabeth
Harbour Fst Exuma
(Appraised Value
$45,000.00)

FL. Lit A134 (75'S ") aba
storey budding Geange
Town, Fxuma (Appin ised
Value $468,000.00)



2001 Kia Pregia Van




TIO Ford Ranger Truck

=" =
. =e oe
LeS® Ford LEGG Grill Teck

ie



fh) Piberglam 3 pons

ancl (Hall Cinle)



D2 (1eap Spanish Wels Marine
HLS 10F Mercury Dechoard angie

© 122" Sitale Serew Soeel Hull (1960) MY Lisa J I,
vessel has anew engine regaining installation, And

can be view at Brediord Marine, Grand Boheme
6041992) Defender Vessel (Qrocen Washti)

The public is invited bo submit Seabed bide marked “Tender” to Baharas Development! Bank, P.O. Box M-3094,
Micxsill, Hakan: ablention Financial Contreller, fazed bide will not be accepted or telephone 327-5700 for
additional iaformation. Please mate that all bids om the alwerenctioned propertics aad assets sheowald be received
by or ow August 19, 200%. The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right (0 reject any or all offers. All assets

ore sold as is.

PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



UBS AG offices are shown in New York. The United States and Swiss governments have agreed on most
major disputes in the US effort Friday, July 31, 2009, to get names of thousands of wealthy Americans who
are suspected of evading taxes by hiding billions in assets with Swiss banking giant UBS AG.

(AP Photo: Mark Lennihan)

US, Swiss cement
deal on secret UBS

ban

By JESSICA GRESKO
Associated Press Writer

MIAMI (AP) — The Unit-
ed States government and
Swiss banking giant UBS AG
have reached an agreement
in a case seeking names of
some 52,000 suspected Amer-
ican tax evaders with billions
in secret Swiss accounts, but
details may remain under
wraps until next week, offi-
cials said.

Lawyers for the govern-
ment and UBS told a federal
judge in a brief conference
call they had initialed a deal
after a delay last week to set-
tle undisclosed details.

The Internal Revenue Ser-
vice, which initiated the case
against UBS earlier this year,
said in a statement the deal
“protects the United States
government’s interests.” But
the two-sentence statement
from IRS Commissioner
Doug Shulman added only
that more details will be
released when the Swiss gov-
ernment signs the agreement
as early as next week.

UBS and the Swiss govern-
ment also welcomed the news
and said no terms would be
disclosed until it is signed.
Swiss Justice Minister Eve-
line Widmer-Schlumpf said
the agreement “is in the inter-



UNITED STATES Federal Judge
Alan Gold is seen in this 1999
photo. Judge Gold is presiding
over the IRS vs UBS and Switzer-
land at US Federal Courthouse
in Miami, Fla. A telephone con-
ference between all parties will
resume in Miami Friday August
7, 2009.

(AP Photo)

ests of both states.”

The IRS earlier this year
asked US District Judge Alan
S Gold in Miami to force
Zurich-based UBS to turn
over names of some 52,000

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A well established Hospitality Company is seeking to hire a
creative, detail-oriented, energetic and flexible individual for

the position of:

MARKETING COORDINATOR

RESPONSIBILITIES

Include but are not limited to the following:
* Assist with, analyze and enhance marketing methods and

company products.

* Create, coordinate and implement new marketing and sales

initiatives.

¢ Assist with all online marketing efforts and company

websites.

¢ Work with industry partners on joint marketing efforts.
+ Liaise with company’s advertising and online marketing

partners

« Write press release, assist with company guest
communication and work with the media.
« Manage and maintain a customer database.

* Organize and coordinate large group events and promotions.
* Help create additional revenue opportunities.

EXPERIENCE/SKIELS

« A degree in Marketing, Communications, Public Relations

or Advertising.

In-depth knowledge of all facet of marketing.

Assertive, creative, energetic sales driven individual with
a proven track record of generating new ideas and sales.
Excellent organizational and interpersonal skills
Excellent written, verbal and public speaking skills.
Strong PR and networking skills.

Salary commensurate with experience

Excellent Benefits Package

Apply in writing to:

The Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box SS-6257
Nassau, The Bahamas
Or fax to 363-4437



k accounts

American clients believed to
be hiding nearly $15 billion
in assets in secret accounts.

UBS and the Swiss govern-
ment had resisted, arguing
that to do so would violate
Swiss banking confidentiality
laws that date back centuries.

The Swiss and US govern-
ments announced at the end
of July they had agreed in
principle on major issues but
released no details. They had
hoped to present a final deal
at a hearing August 7, but
resolving their differences has
taken longer.

At the latest hearing
Wednesday, the judge asked
Stuart Gibson, the lead Jus-
tice Department lawyer in the
case, whether an agreement
had been reached.

“The answer is ‘yes,’ your
honor,” Gibson answered.
“The parties have initialed
agreements. It will take a little
time for the agreements to be
signed in final form.”

An attorney for UBS,
Eugene Stearns, thanked the
judge for allowing the case to
be brought to what he called a
“successful conclusion.”

The phone conference last-
ed less than three minutes.

UBS paid a $780 million
penalty earlier this year and
turned over names of about
300 American clients in a
deferred prosecution agree-
ment with the Justice Depart-
ment. In that case, UBS
admitted helping US citizens
evade taxes, which experts say
is not a violation of Swiss
bank secrecy laws.

So far, three UBS cus-
tomers whose names were
divulged under the prior
agreement have pleaded
guilty to tax charges in feder-
al court. Hundreds of others
holders of secret accounts at
UBS and other Swiss banks
have voluntarily come for-
ward to the IRS under an
amnesty programme that
requires payment of taxes and
penalties but generally does
not include the threat of
prison.

That amnesty programme
ends September 23.

New York-listed shares in
UBS were trading 3.5 per cent
higher at $15.22.

¢ Associated Press Writer
Frank Jordans in Geneva con-
tributed to this story

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST






US A Se ee CD

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST





il











TAY rst NG





























































f 3 [ Vv Today Friday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
f | os a High = Low W High Low W NASSAU Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 85° F
a -— oe, - Mi o| 1 |2 3|4 [5|6 18 | oft FC FIC FC FC Friday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 85° F
>a f ls | Acapulco 93/33 77/25 pe 93/33 79/26 pc FREEPORT Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 86° F
af : Sn i LOW MODERATE | HIGH V. HIGH Amsterdam 70/21 54/12 ¢ 68/20 52/11 5 Friday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 86° F
cE ORLANDO iN Ankara, Turkey 86/30 54/12 s 88/31 54/12 Ss ABACO ‘Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 84° F
High:90°F32°C = Mostly sunny, a stray Mainly clear, a stray Variably cloudy, a Windy with t-storms Partly sunny, a Partly sunny, a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 88/31 72/22 s 90/32 73/22 s Friday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 84°F
o Cade F/23°C i -~ t-storm: breezy. t-storm; breezy. t-storm: breezy. possible. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 60/15 50/10 sh 62/16 52/11 +
; oat ist ° ° ° ° Bangkok 89/31 79/26 t 91/382 78/25 t
ies @ he High: ga° Low: 81° oe . ae . oe i oe ee T N Barbados 88/31 77/25 t 86/30 77/25 s
TAMPA Ly | IDES FOR NASSAU Barcelona 81/27 70/21 s 82/27 67/19 s iy ae:
J pet ee a : UCM a Ua . Beijing 99/37 68/20 s 97/36 70/21 s
High: 91” F/33°C I ; a | 94 91 F 104 84 E = ST 86 F _ 100 -90° F High Ht.(ft.) — Low Beirut 82/27 76/24 s 82/97 78/95 s
Low: 77° F/25°C ry - The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 12:59am. 24 7:02am. 0.3 Belgrad 89/31 67/19 91/32 66/18
a @ “ : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 1:35pm. 29 8:07p.m. 0.6 an e 79/29 54/12 7 74/21 55/12 ao
a or Aumanac eee
sa = 39pm. 29 9:14p.m. 0. Bogota 66/18 45/7 sh 67/19 43/6 + illings
) ei r Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday 30dam. 23 906am. 03 Brussels 70/21 54/12 r 70/21 55/12 pc “zis
i 7 e ABACO Temperature 3:48 p.m. 3.0 10:22p.m. 0.5 Budapest 85/29 57/13 sh 82/27 55/12 pc
F i pe Z e a / High: 90° F/32° C High SinanGbdech Sheen UadeaebahRee ddeesnehereeddeeeh aan 93" F/34” C Sunday 414am. 24 10:14am. 02 — Aires aE — sh or arr c
- e ‘all q _ Low: 78° F/26°C Low sett tease etnees 81" F27" C 456p.m. 3.1 11:25pm. 0.3 alro s s 86/69
5 my i-- Normal high .... 89° F/32° C ——————————————ESSSsSS Calcutta 93/33 85/29 + 90/32 83/28 t
od . et) Normal low . 76° F/24° C Calgary 60/15 44/6 t 5412 43/6 t
4 = Si @ WEST PALM BEACH ra Last year's DIQH oo. eeseeeseeesseesseeesseeeeeees 95° F/35° C SUN Ay Ty ity Cancun 91/32 75/23 5 93/33 74/23 pc
’ aie High: 88° F/31°C ae Last year $ low Gieelaeat eens 79° F/26° C ; Caracas 80/26 69/20 t 81/27 72/22 t
— Low: 79° F/26° C i. hy Precipitation _ tees oh a.m. Lay bees (30 en? Casablanca 89/31 68/20 s 89/31 72/22 s
-! ; As of 2 p.m. yesterday occ 0.00" unsel....... “70 p.m. Moonset... .. OU P.M. Copenhagen 70/21 53/11 68/20 55/12 pc
© 3 FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT 3% Yearto date... or i |S ae Dublin S68 oS/2 pe GAT SAAT
High: 90° F/32° C @ High: 88° F/31°C Normal year to date 0... eect 27.38" - : Frankfurt 72/22 52/11 sh 79/26 57/13 pc
Low: 79° F/26°C — Low: 76° F/24° C ae Geneva 79/26 58/14 s 81/27 57/13 s
a AccuWeather.com 4 Halifax 73/22 58/14 pc 73/22 59/15 pc
; @ a am Forecasts and graphics provided by 5 ; Havana 93/33 72/22 t 91/382 72/22 pc Showers a
; - MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Aug.13 Aug. 20 Aug. 27 Helsinki 72/22 54/12 pc 70/21 50/10 sh T-storms
a High: 90° F/32°C -LEUTRER/ Hong Kong 90/32 82/27 t 90/32 82/27 t [270 Rain a
i, oe NASSAU High: 91° F/33° C Islamabad 110/43 85/29 s 109/42 85/29 s [= Flurries - Cold ——.
F Hi h: 89° F/32°C Low: 79° F/26° C Istanbul 83/28 69/20 s 86/30 72/22 5 Pe] *] Snow Shown are noon positions of weather systems and sin nits
Igh: precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
ae Low: 81° F/27°C — eel a alas § —— a. 8 [e_¥] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Menge
is r : ohannesburg s pe
KEY WEST cA a 'e cto Slat 7a sh sat 72s (W156 RN 10 ER ans S676 NN
High: 90° F/32°C i pen Lima 73/22 59/15 s 72/22 57/13 s
; igh:
an. Low: 76°F24"C Madi 25/35. 68120 po «S182. GBI pu
< Manila 85/29 78/25 + 87/30 78/25 t
i ; by Mexico City 79/26 54/12 t 75/23 55/12 t ape A ora
— an OM Monterrey 102/38 75/23 s 102/38 75/23 s t
ee GREAT EXUMA A SAN SALVADOR Montreal 82/27 64/17 s 84/28 66/18 s
all High: 89° F/32° C High: 90° F/32°C Moscow 73/22 54/12 c 68/20 50/0 r
Low: 79° F/26°C Lew: 78°F/26°C Munich 73/22 57/13. sh 73/22 58/14 t ‘
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ieee : , Nea rr ora aa pC OAS an pe ?
highs and tonights's lows. : - . ew Delhi pe pe f
4 g ihe 1° Fa —— & Oslo eis soo e = ert saz I You sant B Blown
ee - HY Paris 77/25 59/15 pc 81/27 59/15 pc ‘
Prague 77/25 54/12 pe 75/23 58/14 + Ay ied ies
LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 74/23 65/18 s 77/25 67/19 s way ul I Li ane
High: 91° F/33° C Riyadh 103/39 79/26 pc 105/40 79/26 s
Fs fe er 8B: Nod Gan rest cary knowing
Today Friday Today Friday Today Friday : t. Thomas i #26 t /32 79/26 s that oO have excellent insurance
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W ae High: 89° F/32° C San Juan 68/20 39/3 pc 83/28 45/7 ¢ x <
Fic F/C Fic FIC Fic F/C Fic FIC Fc FC Fic FIC Low: 77° F/25° C ee eas ee ! Sa B72 coverage no matter which
Albuquerque 86/30 64/17 t 81/27 63/17 t — Indianapolis 86/30 63/17 s 87/30 66/18 s Philadelphia 83/28 70/21 t 85/29 72/22 t antiago c r ‘ :
Anchorage 65/18 53/11 c 64/17 5341 1 Jacksonville 90/32 74/23 t 88/31 74/23 t Phoenix 100/37 82/27 t 101/38 84/28 t croonED SANA ACKLINS aaa oa ya ci ee Ane r way he wind blows.
Atlanta 96/30 70/21 t 85/29 70/21 t Kansas City 92/33 6618 s 92/33 70/21 s Pittsburgh 84/28 62/16 pc 86/30 64/17 s RAGGEDISLAND — High:92°F/33° ao Paulo 8 8 ;
Atlantic City 82/27 67/19 t 83/28 66/18 t LasVegas 105/40 78/25 s 102/38 79/26 pc Portland, OR 73/22 55/12 sh 75/23 55/12 s cee Low: 79° F/26°C a avae eas a ame oes : Nobody does it better
Baltimore 81/27 67419 t 85/29 66/18 t Little Rock 92/33 65/18 s 94/34 68/20 s Raleigh-Durham 82/27 68/20 t 85/29 69/20 t Low: 74° F/23°C ae curr eagrrrs . Ae. ae , br 2
Boston 73/22 64/417 pc 80/26 67/19 s LosAngeles 84/28 64/17 pc 82/27 62/16 pc St Louis 88/31 68/20 s 93/33 71/21 s ° in. oneare ROMER EE =r ee er
Buffalo 84/28 62/16 s 85/29 65/18 s Louisville 88/31 67/19 s 91/32 69/20 s Salt Lake City 93/383 67/119 pce 90/82 63/17 pc GREAT INAGUA Tula 91/32 82/27 pc 96/30 75/23 c
Charleston, SC 86/30 73/22 t 87/30 73/22 t Memphis 92/33 70/21 s 93/33 74/23 pc SanAntonio 100/37 76/24 t 95/35 76/24 pc ache? FG ran nis aU DaLECSEARG SOTERA INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Chicago 86/30 62/16 s 88/31 65/18 s Miami 90/32 80/26 t 89/31 79/26 t San Diego 77/25 68/20 pce 75/23 66/18 pc Low 77°F25°C Trinidad 91/32 68/20 5 94/34 66/18 s
Cleveland 82/27 61/16 s 87/30 66/18 s Minneapolis 88/31 70/21 s 93/33 72/22 s San Francisco 69/20 56/13 pe 70/21 55/12 pe ‘ Taare 67/19 55/12 c 69/20 56/13 pc a LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 97/36 76/24 pc 96/35 77/25 pc — Nashville 90/32 68/20 s 92/33 69/20 pc Seattle 68/20 5311 c 71/21 5412 pe viene 78/95 64/17 sh 79/96 65/18 t :
Denver 95/35 59/15 t 84/28 57/13 t New Orleans 93/33 76/24 t 93/33 75/23 t Tallahassee 88/31 72/22 t 88/31 72/22 t alli. New Providence f Grand Exum
i Warsaw 70/21 50/10 sh 70/21 52/11 pe
ee ae te ee ee ee ee — vn coh Se oe ate Uf eas! magne) ete on mee wat
onolulu c s ahoma Ci s pc ucson :
Houston 97/36 74/23 t 97/36 74/23 t Orlando 90/32 74/23 t 91/32 74/23 t Washington, DC 88/31 70/21 t 86/30 71/21 t Te eh ee a ie



PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





A GAS STATION attendant (not seen)
pumps gas in Portland, Oregon. Oil prices
rose Wednesday as the government
reported that Americans were regaining
their appetite for imported goods and a
European energy watchdog said demand
for crude this year may not be as weak as
once thought.

(AP Photo: Rick Bowmer)



Oil rises as US imports jump

By CHRIS KAHN
AP Energy Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Oil prices rose
Wednesday as the government report-
ed that Americans were regaining their
appetite for imported goods and a Euro-
pean energy watchdog said demand for
crude this year may not be as weak as
once thought.

Benchmark crude for September deliv-
ery climbed $1.38 to $70.82 a barrel on
the New York Mercantile Exchange. In
London, Brent prices added 80 cents to
$73.26 a barrel on the ICE Futures
exchange.

Prices jumped in morning trading after
the government said the U.S. trade deficit
increased slightly in June. The Com-
merce Department reported that imports
rose for the first time in 11 months —
another indication that the recession may
be fading.

The reports from both sides of the
Atlantic were enough to offset news that
crude supplies continue to grow.

The U.S. Energy Information Admin-
istration said oil placed into storage rose
for the third straight week.

Gas prices are certainly much lower
than they were last year, but the bulging

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ore

getline a

supplies of crude haven't resulted steadi-
ly decreasing gas prices.

Refiners continue to cut back on pro-
duction, which has kept gasoline prices
relatively stable for the past month or
so.
U.S. pump prices added two-tenths of
a penny overnight to a new national aver-
age of $2.645 a gallon (70 cents a liter). A
gallon of regular unleaded is still $1.154
(31 cents) cheaper than the same time
last year.

While prices have risen slowly for three
weeks, prices at the pump are about
where they were at the end of June.

Given the economy in the U.S. and
Europe, prices might have fallen further
if not for China.

Earlier in the day, the International
Energy Agency said Chinese energy con-
sumption would push the overall global
crude demand higher despite continued
weakness in Europe and North America.

How China does during the global eco-
nomic downturn has effected energy
prices for the rest of the globe. The coun-
try imported a record 4.6 million barrels
of fuel a day last month.

It is that purchasing power that helped
change the forecast for the Paris-based
TEA, which added 70,000 barrels a day to

its 2010 forecast of global oil demand.
The new prediction of 85.3 million bar-
rels a day is a 1.6 percent increase over
this year. The IEA also increased its 2009
forecast by 190,000 barrels a day to 83.9
million barrels a day, but noted this is
still 2.7 percent lower than 2008.

Both OPEC and the U.S. Energy
Department's Energy Information
Administration were more downbeat.
The EJA on Tuesday said global crude
demand will likely fall by 1.71 million
barrels this year, more than its previous
forecast of a drop of 1.56 million bar-
rels.

And the Organization of Petroleum
Exporting Countries said it expects con-
sumption to slide by 1.65 million barrels
a day this year, before rising next year.

In other Nymex trading, gasoline for
September delivery added less than a
penny to $2.045 a gallon and heating oil
gave up less than a penny to $1.9099 a
gallon. Natural gas for September deliv-
ery also lost less than a penny to fetch
$3.532 per 1,000 cubic feet.

¢ Associated Press writers George Jahn
in Vienna, Alex Kennedy in Singapore
and Emma Vandore in Paris contributed
to this report

‘Chili Loaded Fries

»Whocan Resist?

elicious
SNACK DUOS



Ringing
phones:
a Sign

of small
business
recovery

By JOYCE M
ROSENBERG
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — At
one small company, the
phone is ringing more often,
while another is getting busi-
ness again from retailers who
canceled orders last year. And
at an inn, reservations are
coming in for the busy sea-
son.

These are some of the signs
of a turnaround that small
businesses are starting to see.
As economic reports look
brighter and the stock mar-
ket rebounds, some owners
are finding that customers and
clients are willing to do busi-
ness again.

At Juniper Hill Inn in
Windsor, Vt., “people are
starting to call in daily,” own-
er Robert Dean said.

The 16-room inn was busy
at the end of last year, but
Dean was also getting fewer
advance bookings. His cus-
tomers generally weren’t
affected by the economy, but
they were uncertain and
therefore thinking, “we need
to hold back a bit.”

They’re still cautious. Octo-
ber is the busiest time of the
year for innkeepers in Ver-
mont and normally Juniper
Hill Inn is 85 per cent booked
by early August. This year, it
was 40 per cent booked.

But, Dean said, last week
he booked three rooms for
October in one day.

He attributed the change
to better news about the
economy and the stock mar-
ket. But he’s still seeing cau-
tion — people don’t want to
book for the fall unless
they’re convinced the foliage
is going to be worth seeing.
So they’re making their reser-
vations much closer to the
time that they’re planning to
spend in Vermont.

Some business owners peg
the first signs of recovery to
events, like the election and
inauguration of President
Barack Obama. For a turn-
around to become more wide-
spread, and more certain,
problem areas in the economy
like unemployment and con-
sumer spending, will also have
to show signs of recovery.

Laura McHolm, co-founder
of NorthStar Moving Corp.,
a Chatsworth, Calif.-based
company, said “the phone
pretty much started ringing
after November,” when Oba-
ma was elected.

“People felt like something
was getting done” to help the
economy, she said.

McHolm described those
callers as “early shoppers”
who were looking for infor-
mation. Business picked up
for real along with home sales
in the spring and summer, and
McHolm said the second
weekend in August was
“gangbusters.”

“We are definitely better
than we were last summer,”

she said.

NorthStar, along with other
movers, suffered as the hous-
ing slump persisted. The com-
pany handles moves that orig-
inate in California, and
McHolm said that although
its more upscale business was
solid, it lost business as mid-
dle-class homeowners post-
poned home purchases and
stayed put.

Other firms are doing a lit-
tle better because their cus-
tomers, after more than a year
of cutting back, are ready to
take on more work.

Agnes Huff’s public rela-
tions firm started feeling the
effects of the recession in the
middle of 2008.

“Tt started with one client
saying (they) didn’t have the
money to continue with PR,”
said Huff, president of Los
Angeles-based Agnes Huff
Communications Group. It
also got harder to replace
clients who left.

Business was down
between 30 per cent and 35
per cent. “They weren’t even
inquiring,” Huff said.

The first signs of a change
came six to eight weeks ago,
when several prospects called
to inquire about working with
Huff’s company, and one
became a client. Another
company was very interested,
but ultimately decided to
work with a different kind of
agency. It was a close call, but
gave Huff’s cautious optimism
a boost.

“We’re hoping to see a
pickup toward the end of the
year, when their budgets are
being formulated,” she said,
referring to prospective
clients.

At some small businesses
that have struggled through
the recession, the signs of a
rebound, while still very early,
are reassuringly strong.

Robbie Adrian, an organic
baby blanket maker, was
launched in July 2007 and had
an incredible run, co-owner
Susan Doris said. Then, when
the credit crisis began in Sep-
tember 2008 and the stock
market began crashing, retail-
ers stopped ordering and sales
dropped off between 40 per
cent and 50 per cent from a
year earlier.

The company kept its Inter-
net business running, but
Doris and her partner, Rob-
bie Mahlman, both took on
other work to pay the bills.
Before last September, the
company was getting 70 per
cent of its business from
retailers and 30 per cent
online; after the financial cri-
sis began, that split became
20 per cent and 80 per cent.

But in the past few weeks,
retailers have been calling,
and business in August is up
300 per cent from July.

“We’re seeing orders com-
ing in at a rate we haven’t
seen in six months,” Doris
said. “We’re just seeing the
beginning of life again.”



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RELIGION



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PG 24 ® Thursday, August 13, 2009

RELIGION

The Tribune



Why don't you
share your faith?

By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

THERE can be numerous reasons
why many persons refuse to share
their faith in God. Some may see it
as the pastor’s job or they may have
a fear of being rejected as many of
the Jehovah’s Witnesses are during
their walk abouts in the community.

However, would not being sure of your sal-
vation because of a mistake or “backslide”,

keep you from sharing your faith?

According to biblicalproportians.com, I
Corinthians 9:22 states: "To the weak became I
as weak, that I might gain the weak: I am made
all things to all men, that I might by all means
SSM Comes tt ol

With this text in mind, we wonder why so
many Christians today keep to themselves, if
scripture tells us to become as others are to
share the word of God-not practice their
lifestyle, but make yourself available to them
and some down to their level of understanding.

Pastor Trent Davis of Golden Gates
Outreach Ministries, said there are a number
of reasons why people do not share their faith.

"IT think one of the main reasons they don’t is
because they are in fear of being called a hyp-

ocrite. Some people don’t live the kind of life
that would lend them to sharing their faith. It
is kind of difficult to share your faith at work
when two days before they heard you curse
someone out or you were mean to other peo-
ple so sometimes that is a deterrent,” Mr Davis
Syeute

Mr Davis said sometimes it is the person's
own personal lifestyle that is a deterrent to
them sharing their faith.

“They realise who they are and what they
are saying do not match up. I find that most
Christians dont realise that God gives opportu-
nities to share their faith with common day
people everywhere they go. It begins with a
charismatic personality. There are little win-
dows and doors that are constantly being
opened up. For example when someone says
hi, how are you-that is a window,” Mr Davis
Sota

Mr Davis said as Christians, we have to use
the windows and doors open to us and even
create windows by engaging people.

“Not in a hostile manner, but sometimes
even with a sense of humour or some kind of
compliment. Often times it’s that we are not
seeing and taking advantage of the windows of
opportunities God gives us to share our faith.”

;
i

7
|

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Pw

Tourism seeks year-round
fourists in religious market

THE MINISTRY of Tourism is tak-
ing aggressive measures to receive a
chunk of the Religious Tourism niche
market, an 18 billion dollar industry;
which has the potential of providing
The Bahamas with year-round visitors.
Linville Johnson from The Ministry of
Tourism’s Deputy Director, Religious
Group Market, recently stated that his
department is working along with some
20 denominations to increase the num-
ber of visitors who attend religious
events in The Bahamas annually.

Mr Johnson was speaking to the
press at the first annual Kingdom
Seminar hosted by international author

and consultant Dr Myles Munroe at
The Diplomat Centre Wednesday
night. The winter season is the peak
period for visitors, but Mr Johnson
emphasised the need for year round
visitors.

“We have hundreds of visitors who
come to The Bahamas annually solely
for religious events. It’s an 18 billion
dollar global market that is large and is
growing. We want to be at the cutting
edge of this market so that we can get
our fair share and statistics show that
we are one of the destinations of choice
for these religious groups,” said Mr
Johnson.



Tourism’s religious market is target-
ing large church groups by giving them
the best deals possible from MOTs
website www.bahamas.com/worship.
Other activities include marketing and
advertising through specialty religious
magazines and public relations activi-
ties at seminars and conferences.
Research by MOT show that the local
religious tourism market is comprised
of 54 per cent female, ages 18-24 and
45-54, with household income from
$25,000 -75,000, 57 per cent stay an
average of 6 nights in hotels, account-
ing for approximately 3,057 visitors and
18,201 room nights in 2007/08.

Mr Johnson, “For example, Dr
Myles Munroe’s annual conferences for
youth, Christians and international
leaders have been drawing a large seg-
ment of that market for us. Florida is
our biggest market. What we want to
do now is partner with other denomi-
nations during their events to increase
the numbers through hotel bookings.”

Dr Munroe’s 3-day Kingdom semi-



PASTORS greet
MOT Deputy
Director - left to
right: Dr Rick
Kendall of South
East Florida, Dr
Richard Pinder, Dr
Myles Munroe, MOT
Deputy Director
Religious Group,
Linville Johnson and
Dr Pepe Ramnath of
Mirimar Florida.

nar attracted delegates from more than
30 countries including The United
States, Indonesia, Malaysia, The
United Kingdom and other parts of
Europe.

“It’s great when I can do what I love
which is teaching and at the same time
be a part of tourism in this country.

This is a time when people every-
where are cutting back, but this event
has not been impacted by the recession.
Really this seminar is a response to a
demand for the past ten years. When I
travel people always ask me, ‘When are
you going to have a seminar in The
Bahamas?’ So this is different from the
conferences, but it still attracts
Christians from around the world,”
said Dr Munroe.

The Ministry of Tourism and The
Wyndham Nassau Resort is providing a
welcome reception and tour of
Paradise Island and Cable Beach
Hotels to international pastors from Dr
Munroe’s Kingdom Seminar through-
out the week.



The Tribune

RELIGION

Disciplined attitude

By BISHOP VG CLARKE

GOD is more interested in our atti-
tude than he isin our ability. If He can
find in us the proper attitude, He cer-
tainly can make us able. When Jesus
called His disciples; He placed priority
on attitude rather than ability. “And
He saith unto them, Follow me, and I
will make you fishers of men”
(Matthew 4:19). He was looking for
an attitude of submission to his leader-
ship. With their submission he could
develop their abilities for soul-winning
and ministry to the church.

Saul, the king of Israel, had no expe-
rience in ruling a nation. He had no
cabinet or political advisors to assist
him in forming a government. How
was he able to form and lead a govern-
ment?

@r

FEARLESS

“And Saul also went home to
Gibeah; and there went with him a
band of men, whose hearts God had
touched” (I Sam. 10:26). These were
men with a disciplined and committed
attitude. When Saul's attitude
changed from self-controlled to self-
centeredness and self-indulgence, he
was rejected by the Lord and
dethroned as king in a violent act of
self-destruction (I Sam. 31:3, 4).

A disciplined attitude is necessary
for prayers to be answered and to have
God's peace. A disciplined attitude is
necessary for effective witness
(Ephesians 4:17-24). The believers in
Christ are to have a different attitude
than unbelievers. Believers are
responsible for their attitude.
Attitude is the source of actions.

An improper attitude will condemn

us, regardless of our actions. An atti-
tude of hatred and bitterness makes
one a murderer, even if no physical
harm is done to the person. Sin begins
as an attitude. A person is tempted, a
receptive attitude develops toward the
temptation, and sin is conceived in the
heart. Actions follow attitude towards
the forbidden and wrong thing.
Gideon's army was reduced from
thirty-two thousand to three hundred
(Judges 7:17). Twenty-two thousand
were rejected because of an attitude
of fear. Ninety-seven hundred were
sent home because they drank water
with a careless attitude of self-cen-
teredness without watchfulness and
caution. God took three hundred
men with an attitude of self-discipline
and commitment and delivered Israel.





Love me - Say that you love me

What good will it be for a man if he gains
the whole world, yet forfeits his soul?"
Matthew 16:26 (NIV)

AS I type, I'm listening to 90's pop
group, The Cardigans; and although
cardigans, once again, find them-
selves on the cool lists of leading fash-
ion magazines; ten to twelve years
ago-they were very trendy-right
around the same time,

The Cardigans premiered their hit
song, 'Lovefool’, from whose lyrics I
title this article. It was and still is, a
catchy tongue in cheek song about
longing for anothers love-a favourite
I'm sure in many persons CD and
MP3 collections.

The topic of this article is in rela-
tion to the subject matter of that song
and the many songs

like it; highlighting a persons
intense desire to be accepted. So I
begin by asking this question. Why do
we care about what other's think of
us?

Some might say because we want
to be loved and regarded. That's
understandable and I can't find much
wrong with it, however if in going
about attaining these two universal
human desires, we constantly change
our persons-a problem arises. As a
young adult, I'm very aware that a
considerable amount of my genera-
tion, would find it foreign, indeed
impossible, to cease in caring about
what others think of them.

After all, it's hard work to create a
seemingly larger than life persona
from scratch, or urgently polish a



family title for one's advantage.
Although one has to wonder, if others
finding you, is really, more important
than you finding yourself? However
individuals continue to seek fulfill-
ment in all the wrong places.

For example, via their well crafted
personality; that gets them what they
want, takes them where they want to
be, and with whom they want to be
with- that is, until they wake up and
realise it's not what they really want
in the first place. In recent years, with
the constant evolving technology,
persons have become more and more
crazed for attention, and look to get it
in the most peculiar of ways.

I won't elaborate on some of things
I have seen and heard on the world
wide web, but I will say, I'm left to
wonder why after over a year of leav-
ing a popular social site, they seem to
disallow a person to completely
remove '‘face'. Why persons would
want to be reduced to electronic per-
sonalities is beyond me.

Then there are those who cling to
that same personality in the flesh; so
completely consumed with the exter-
nal world, that their most minute
recognition is cause for consistent
and amusing, red carpet like
entrances. The problem with taking

the realm we really ought to dwell.
But no, the majority of the time, it

enough to those who go into severe
level red panic, upon discovering that
so and so doesn't like them.
Thankfully, there are many young
persons who genuinely, do-not-care,
what others think of them.
Shakespeare

was absolutely on point with his
famous quote, 'To thine own self be
true.' To those young people who are
believers in Christ, and who truly,
don't care what the world thinks of
them- additionally understanding
that the most important and lasting

impression that matters is that which }
: seven-member church in the tiny

we make upon God.

To all of you, I say cheers! God }

knows our heart, our brain, and He }
i Jakes

knows who we are behind the

makeup, cologne, glitter and gadg- }

P ee ce i that nonetheless complement each
: other, with the Pentecostal-honed
mind and soul, and to love our neigh- acu BE ie Parmer binds

This is why we breathe. In closing; eat oe tele oe ie ant

remember, love starts with the first Inauguration Day this year and is

i frequently mentioned as one of the
? prospective heirs to Billy Graham's
? title as America's Pastor. He eschews
i an active role in speaking out on
i issues like abortion and same-sex
? marriage, though, warning churches
? not to become better known for pol-
? itics than for prayer.

ets. He knows our core. We are to
love our Lord God with all our heart,

bours as ourselves.

honest look in the mirror.

Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian
writer and poet, currently residing in
Nassau, Bahamas. Comments related to
the article can be sent to
fearless247@gmail.com



Thursday, August 13, 2009 ® PG 25

Bishop VG Clarke

Ko) RELIGION BRIEFS

: Jakes counsels patience
_ IM economic ‘sorrows'

one's personality so seriously, is the CHARLESTON, W.Va.

fact that all the reality is not there. If ;
we were to remove the person, you’re }

left with something that falls short of E Hills’ of cavitieo Belo: Inoiaas Di
: Jakes looks back from his position as
seems as if the cardboard city is good | ODS ee a ee

: preachers and remembers his own
? hard
i Associated Press.

AS the economy continues to
grind away at jobs, homes and life-

times, according to _ the

T.D. Jakes — known international-

: ly by those first two initials, or sim-
BE ? ply as "bishop"
William } 30,000-member Dallas megachurch
? The Potter's House — began his life
and ministry in West Virginia's
? Kanawha Valley. As a young hus-
? band and father, he lost his job when
? the
: closed, and found himself slipping
? out of the middle class, working for
? years at hard jobs for low pay.

to the people at his

local Union Carbide plant

Eventually, though, he turned a
town of Montgomery into the vast
territories known today as TLD.

Ministries and TDJ
Enterprises — discrete kingdoms

the empower-and-entertain

Jakes, 52, preached a sermon on



PG 26 ® Thursday, August 13, 2009

RELI

ION

The Tribune



What’s going on?

On May 20, 1971, Marvin Gaye
through Motown released one of the
most important, passionate record to
come out of soul music- “What's Going
On”.

To this day the lyrics are just as rele-
vant or maybe even more relevant.

Every week one can look in the obit-
uary sections of our daily papers or lis-
ten to the news via radio or television
and the sobering / reality question
would be “What's Going On?”

We're too small of a nation to be
experiencing the kinds of drama that
we're seeing today. I truly believe that
if we don't put petty politics and reli-
gion aside; and come together as one
people unto God (Yahweh) there
would be much more weeping and
gnashing of teeth through the length
and breath of this beautiful Bahamas.

Think about this! How far advanced
in technology, industrial development,
agriculture, medicine, etc; could we
have been as a nation, if we were more
focused on love and building one
another rather than tearing down each
other?

Mr Prime Minister and Mr Leader of
the Opposition this foolishness has to
stop. The political football game that
you are playing with this nation must
stop immediately; for our children's
children future is at stake.

Therefore I will never be silent until
this nation turns around and heads in
its God ordained direction. We've
allowed the enemy to sow seeds of divi-
sion within this nation which is rapidly
producing divisive / destructive fruits in
every sector of our society. This divi-
sion is so bad that Bahamians are
always in the divided political mode;




PASTOR
ALLEN

everything that many of them do see in
this country, is ignorantly seen through
the eyes of politics.

Meanwhile the family and family val-
ues are methodically being disintegrat-
ed as laws are being enacted by educat-
ed, spiritually blind dummies of limited
understanding. The concept of being
our brother's keeper and loving our
neighbours as ourselves seems to be a
thing of the past in the Bahamas.

Churches no longer preach and teach
this aspect of kingdom living; every
now and then a remark of loving one
another may be made from today’s pul-
pits by religious leaders en-route to a
prosperity centered message.

Is anybody taking note or does any-
body care of the fact that our streets
and communities are becoming like
Iraq and Afghanistan?

How could we accept with such non-
chalant spirit, the news of someone
being gunned down in our neighbor-
hoods and treat it as just another
event? How many more mothers and
wives have to bury their sons, husbands
and fathers before this nation unites
and say “enough is enough?”

Listen to how Marvin Gaye puts it in
this song, and see if there is any resem-
blance of what we're facing today:

Mother, mother

There's too many of you crying
Brother, brother, brother

There's far too many of you dying
You know we've got to find a way
To bring some loving’ here today

Father, father

We don't need to escalate

You see, war is not the answer
For only love can conquer hate
You know we've got to find a way
To bring some lovin' here today

Every stanza of this song ends with
“You know we've got to find a way, to
bring some lovin here today”

As a religious nation that's faced
with a barrage problems due to our
lack of true love for one another;
here's the only way in which we can
bring about true love today. Watch
this! John.14: 6. Jesus saith unto him,
I am the way, the truth, and the life:
no man cometh unto the Father, but
by me.

This word way in the Greek is:
hodos, hod-os' which literally means
1) a road, 2) an act, and 3) a mode or
means of journeying.

Again, one need not be a rocket sci-
entist or a college graduate to deter-
mine that as a nation we're heading in
the wrong direction. Being the reli-
gious nation that we are, I'm fully
aware that you're well acquainted
with the scripture; Prov.14: 12.

There is a way which seemeth right
unto a man, but the end thereof are
the ways of death.

This word way in the Hebrew is:
derek, deh'-rek; which also has sever-
al meanings as follows: 1) a road, 2) a
course of life or mode of action, and

3) a conversation or custom.

Bahamas, it's time for us to stop
playing politics and playing church.

By now it should be quite evident
to all that politics and religion has got-
ten us nowhere as a nation. Both of
these systems are designed to profit
its leaders at the expense of it’s fol-
lowers.

At the end of the day it is always the
politically / religious minded grass-
roots that are left out in the cold cry-
ing and demonstrating about the
fruits which was produced by the
roots of their passion (Politics &
Religion).

Here's the last two stanzas of the
song “What's Going On?” as every-
body is crying out and demonstrating
either against their unions, the gov-
ernment, insurance company or some
kind of religion.

Picket lines and picket signs
Don't punish me with brutality
Talk to me, so you can see
Oh, what's going on

Fathers, fathers, everybody thinks

we're wrong

Oh, but who are they to judge us
Simply because our hair is long

Oh, you know we've got to find a way
To bring some understanding here today

e What's going on in our country? Here's
the answer! We're in desperate need of a
spiritual check-up, from our neck-up;
that's both religiously and politically.

For questions or comments contact us via
E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or Ph.1-
242-441-2021.

Deacon Neil G Nairn to be ordained

WHEN Deacon Neil Geron Nairn
makes his vows this Friday evening dur-
ing his ordination to the priesthood, he
will be fulfilling a prophecy and a
prayer made years ago. The ordination
service will take place August 14, The
Eve of The Feast of The Assumption of
The Blessed Virgin Mary, at Christ
Church Cathedral, at 7 pm. The chief
celebrant will be Reverend Laish Z
Boyd, Sr., Bishop of The Diocese of The
Bahamas and The Turks & Caicos
Islands.

Named after Canon Neil Roach, for-
mer Rector of Holy Cross Anglican
Church, Deacon Nairn recounted that
before he was born, Canon Roach, then
“Father Roach, “told his mother, the
late Leo M Coleby Nairn, while she
was pregnant, that she would have a
son, and that she should name him Neil.
He also told her that her son would

become a priest.

Mrs Nairn shared this story with
young Neil years later, after she
observed his commitment to serving as
an acolyte at St. Gregory's Church.
Meanwhile, at the tender age of nine,
while attending an Evensong service at
St Barnabas Anglican Church, Neil was
so inspired that he prayed for God to
make him a priest.

During the ordination Deacon Nairn
will be examined by the Bishop, and
repeat the vows that he made on
August 8, 2008, when he was ordained
to the Diaconate. He will commit to
being diligent in the reading and study-
ing of the Holy Scriptures, to minister-
ing the word of God and the sacra-
ments, and to accepting the discipline of
the Church, to obey the bishop and
other ministers set over him in the Lord,
and to being a faithful pastor to all

whom he is called to serve

Since July 1, 2008, Deacon Neil Nairn
has been serving at St Agnes Church,
Grants Town, New Providence, and
says that the past year was very enjoy-
able and passed quickly largely due to
the warm welcome that he received
from the loving and generous congrega-
tion, and the support of the rector, I
Ranfurly Brown, the assistant priest,
Rev'd. Bernard Been and other Clergy.

In his role as assistant curate, he has
responsibility for the communications,
mental and physical wellness, sports
and culture, and youth ministries. His
other duties include reading the Gospel,
preaching, visiting the sick and shut-in,
and assisting in the overall development
of the Parish.

Deacon Nairn said that while he has
enjoyed all aspects of the ministry, he
has a passion for young people, and a

desire to see more of them develop a
personal relationship with God. In this
regard, he is looking forward to hosting
a two-day youth discovery later this
year.

Deacon Nairn is a 2008 graduate of
Codrington College with a Licentiate
degree in Theology and a Diploma in
Pastoral Studies. Prior to entering
Codrington, he was employed as an
insurance agent for 22 years. He is
married to Judyann Seymour Nairn,
and the couple has three children,
Marco, Garonique and Ramon, one
grandson, Marco, Jr and daughter-in-
law, Keisha.

Reverend Fr Neil G Nairn will cele-
brate his first masses on Sunday, August
16, at St Agnes Anglican Church,
Baillou Hill Road, at 7 am, and on
Monday, August 17, at St Gregory, the
Great, Carmichael Road, at 7pm.



The Tribune
(CS) MEDITATION

RELIGION

Getting over it

THERE are times when we wonder
how long it is going to take for us to
move from being hurt or angry about an
incident in the past. It may be at the
point that it seems to have become an
obsession that pre-occupies our mind
when we are not busy.

Here are some considerations for
finding your peace again.
1. Do | need to talk about this to someone
who can help, empathise, or just sympa-
thise?
2. Do | need to learn how to pray more
effectively to leave this with the Lord?
3. Do | need to confront the individual if
this is possible and appropriate?
4. Do | need to remind myself of the ways
that | have hurt others and needed to be
forgiven?
5. Do | need to sever all ties at least for the

@r THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS

— ” le

REV. AN GELA

~ ” 30OSF ELD

7. PALACIOUS _

time being?

6. Do | need to ‘get a life’ and not expect
others to make me happy?

7. Do | need to help someone in a worse
situation to gain perspective about my
own?

8. Do | need to read a book, attend a semi-
nar or otherwise educate myself on the
topic?

9. Do | need to join or create a support
group for persons in a similar situation?
10. Do | need to learn from this and work

for prevention and cure in the society?

11. Do | need to write my story if only as a
journal entry?

12. Do | need to decide to forgive the per-
son and move on?

13. Do | need to report the matter to the
police?

14. Do | need to consider it a battle scar in
the spiritual warfare or the struggles of life?
15. Do | need to trust that the justice of
God’s plan will deal with it for me?

16. Do | need to count my blessings and
focus on what is positive about my past?
17. Do | need to write a play or a song to
express my feelings and empower others?
18. Do | need to consider if | am going to
use it to strengthen or weaken my charac-
ter?

19. Do | need to examine my conscience
to see if | am more to blame?

20. Do | need to be spreading the Good

Methodists in Grand Bahama

METHODISM began in Grand
Bahama unofficially during the 1950's
when Methodists from the Turks and
Caicos Islands arrived in the island to
work with the Owens Illinois Lumber
Company cutting down the pine trees
which abound in the island for lumber
and shipping to Georgia for paper pulp.
The centre for the operation was located
at Pine Ridge.

Since the majority of the people work-
ing on the operation were church-orient-
ed, a community church was built for
worship. Among these were large num-
bers of Methodists. After some years the
operation moved to Abaco and Andros.

In 1959, a small Methodist Society was
formed and the disused Pine Ridge
Lumber Camp Church, two miles from
Freeport, was made available for servic-
es. Services began officially in March of
that year by the Rev WT. Makepeace,
then Chairman of the Bahamas District.
An English Methodist local preacher,



/ JIM
a LAWLOR



David Martin, arrived in Freeport soon
afterwards to work and preach.

ST. DAVID’S, SEAGRAPE

Mr Martin began work among the
Methodists, who by this time had been
relocated to Seagrape where families
were each given a plot of land. By this
time the Society had grown from eight
to twenty-two (June, 1959). Services
were held in the Lodge Hall, but by
1960 the members had built their own
church. This is the present St David's
Methodist Church. The first resident
minister was the Rev David Coombs of
Britain. The following ministers served

Share your new

The Tribune wants to hear from people

who are making news in their

neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are

raising funds for a good cause,
campaigning for improvements in th¢
area or have won an award. j
If so, call us on 322-1986 and share you

story.



the church: The Revs Bruce B Swapp,
Donald Urwin, James T. Seymour,
Leroy Saunders, John Bilverstone and
Acelius Isaac.

The church has grown from those
early days and now has a membership
of 1Oa, with a resident lay pastor;
Hilgrove Hamilton.

ST. ANDREW’S HAWKSBILL

St Andrew's Methodist Church was
built in 1967. The building of a church
in that area became necessary when the
community of Freeport, which was fast
developing, began to expand and many
Methodists took up residence in that
community.

At that time the Rev Donald Mason
from Britain pastored the Methodist
society in the Freeport area and the
then Anglican priest, now Bishop of
the Diocese, pastored the Anglicans of
Hawksbill. An agreement was made by
both communions that Anglicans and
Methodists would use the Methodist
church building at different times for
worship services.

A very happy relationship existed
between St Andrew's Methodist and
the Church of the Transfiguration.
After a few years that relationship
ceased to exist and the Anglicans built
a church at Pinder's Point, the Church
of the Good Shepherd.

ST. PAUL’S, FREEPORT

When development began in
Freeport the Methodist Church, having
begun in Pine Ridge, and then in

Thursday, August 13, 2009 ® PG 27

News about Jesus Christ and God’s love?
21. Do | need to consider this being perse-
cuted for Jesus’ sake and sharing in his
suffering?

Our personal relationship with Our
Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ, will
assist us in discerning what to do. Our
God is able to heal all hurts, forgive all
sins, and give insight and understanding.
Considering that these are just some of
the options to be considered, you can
see why we need the Lord to save us,
and the Holy Spirit to guide us.

Be encouraged. Greater is He that is
within us than he that is against us. The
Enemy wants to discourage and ulti-
mately destroy us. Let us stand our
ground, be strong and of good courage,
doing what we know to be right and
pleasing in God’s sight.



PART 40

Seagrape, felt that it ought to minister
to the needs of its Methodists that were
flocking to Freeport to live and work.

In 1965, the Methodist Church of the
Bahamas District was asked by the Port
Authority to take over the manage-
ment of the then Freeport Primary
School. This offer was accepted, and
the buildings were deeded to the
Methodist Synod. With this agreement
the history of the then St Paul's
Primary School (now St. Paul's
College) and the Methodist Church of
Freeport began.

CHURCH SERVICES IN

SCHOOL CLASSROOM

In these early years before the pres-
ent St Paul's Church was built, mem-
bers met for church services in one of
the classrooms of the school.

In 1968, the present St Paul's
Methodist Church was completed by
the Rev Donald Mason, but was begun
about 1965 by the Rev Godfrey S
Johns.

The building was dedicated on
December 14, 1968 by the Rev Hugh B
Sherlock, then President of the
Conference of the Methodist Church of
the Caribbean and the Americas. St
Paul's, however, celebrates its anniver-
sary on the Sunday nearest to October
25 as a reminder that the first
Methodist Church on Grand Bahama
was dedicated on October 25, 1959 at
Pine Ridge Lumber Camp by the late
Rev William T. Makepeace.

The following are the ministers who
followed Rev Godfrey Johns: Revs
Donald Mason, Eric St C Clarke, John
Bilverstone, Edwin L. Taylor and
Henley B. Perry.



PG 28 ® Thursday, August 13, 2009

ION The Tribune





esi Faz E

4f-

4

PICTURED are kids from the New Life Kingdom Outreach Ministries after completing a clean-up project on the Engleston Community Park.

Changing 100 lives in

eight weeks

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE concept of Christian summer
camps commonly includes elements
like daily scripture readings, discus-
sions on parables from the Bible, and
various activities to help youngsters
develop better relationships with God.

However one local church decided to
up the ante this year by introducing
campers to chess, which for them is a
new medium to harness their abilities,
and in the end had one mission in mind,
to change 100 lives.

Calieel Rashad Amahad , youth
director and camp co-ordinator for
New Life Kingdom Outreach
Ministries, said over the past eight
weeks the camp has played host to
about 60 children from the Englerston
community.

He explained: “During the camp the
kids learned about basic Bible princi-
ples, arts and crafts, chess, ways on

serving the elderly, building pride for
their community, and basically one on
one counselling on life situations and
ways of identifying and avoiding social
ills.”

He said as the overall mission for the
camp was to bring change to 100 young
people within the community, the camp
has made it to the half way mark and
will continue until the mission is
accomplished.

“We baptised close to 50 kids during
the final week of the camp, however we
hope to complete the second part of our
goal through various community proj-
ects which include the new basketball
team, the afterschool mentoring pro-
gramme, and the chess team,” he said.

Through these initiatives, Mr
Amahad said he along with other
church members will take that oppor-
tunity to minister to the youngsters and
will leave the rest to God.

The camp ran from June 15 to
August 14, and was open to kids
between the ages of 7 to 18.



MANY kids from the New Life Kingdom Outreach Ministries summer camp were intro-
duced to the game of chess for the first time, and organisers say they hope it teaches
them discipline and good decision making skills.



Full Text
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SOF
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~ MOSTLY
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Volume: 105 No.216



CLASSIFIEDS TRADER CL






The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009



aR

Suilied Hy police

But commissioner denies
information was leaked

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE bereaved family of
slain teen Brenton Smith
accused members of the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force of
leaking "misinformation" in
order to "sully" his character
and muddy the circumstances
surrounding the young man’s
death.

These accusations were
strongly denied by Commis-
sioner of Police Reginald Fer-
guson.

The claim was made by the
family's attorney, Damian
Gomez, at a press conference
held yesterday to refute alle-
gations that appeared in a
recent tabloid article.

"What they are attempting
to do is to create the impres-
sion that the late Brenton
Smith was a criminal and
(you) need not be concerned
with how he came to his
death.

"Even he had been a crim-
inal, which we say he wasn't,
he was unarmed. No form of
walkie-talkie or other form of
communication was found on
him — there's absolutely no
basis for believing that he had
(anything) to do with the rob-

bery whatsoever," said Mr
Gomez at a press conference
at Gibson and Co yesterday.

",. Public confidence in the
police force is not engendered
by the sullying of victims,” he
added.

But the commissioner said
the argument had no factual
basis.

"Why should we leak infor-
mation like that? (The RBPF)
made an official statement on
the death of the boy and it
was widely published in the
media. There is no way we
are connected to that rumour
or whatever was reported (in
the tabloid) and we have
nothing to do with that state-
ment,” he said during a brief
interview yesterday.

He offered no further com-
ment.

Mr Gomez also questioned
the RBPF's firearm training
procedures. He claimed that
the “unarmed” teen was shot
at "nearly point blank range”
as he cut through a popular
shortcut which leads to the
nearby City Market food
store on Village Road.

He also dispelled early
reports of a cross-fire between
police and suspected armed

SEE page 10

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Felipé Major/Tribune staff

MISS BAHAMAS Kiara Sherman takes to the catwalk last night at a Designer Fashion Show held at
The Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort. The contestants are gearing up for the pageant itself on Sunday,
¢ SEE PAGE TWO

August 23rd at the Atlantis Resort.

Petition launched

move to Arawak Cay

OPPONENTS of Government’s planned
removal of container shipping facilities to
Arawak Cay have launched a petition
against the project which they hope will
attract “at least” 10,000 signatures in two
weeks.

PLP Senator Jerome Fitzgerald and PLP
National Deputy Chairman Kenred Dorsett,
who formed the Committee to Protect and
Preserve the Bahamas for Future Genera-
tions to advocate against the move, plan to
present the petition to the Prime Minister.

They announced their intention during
their third press conference in a week called
to agitate for a stop the plan to relocate the
port to Arawak Cay. They say there is a
need for greater “transparency” on behalf of
government about the “secretive” port
move.

Following a rowdy town meeting, the
Committee said the petition will provide an
opportunity for frustrated Bahamians to

J. Scott Applewhite/AP



PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA presents the 2009
Presidential Medal of Freedom to Sidney Poitier.

Sidney Poitier honoured
by President Obama

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

CAT Island native and Hollywood super-
star Sidney Poitier was one of 16 outstanding
individuals awarded the United States of
America’s highest civilian honour by Presi-
dent Barack Obama yesterday.

SEE page eight SEE page nine

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Jury hears

shooting of

student was
like ‘wild
wild west’

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

THE trial of a man charged
with the murder of aC R
Walker high school student
who was gunned down on a
bus stop in the downtown
area last January, opened in
the Supreme Court yesterday.

Jamal Penn, 20, is charged
with the January 7, 2008
shooting death of Deangelo
Cargill Fowler, 18. Penn is
represented by lawyer Mur-
rio Ducille. Yoland Rolle and
Jillian Williams are prosecut-
ing the case. Fowler was shot
in broad daylight as he stood
at a bus stop on Bay and
Frederick Streets.

In her opening address yes-
terday, Mrs Rolle told the
jury that the shooting, which
she compared to something
out of a “wild wild west
movie,” took place between
3.30 and 3.40 pm on January,
2008 while Fowler stood with
a group of children at a bus
stop. Mrs Rolle told the court
that Penn was identified as
the gunmen who opened fire
in broad daylight, hitting
Cargill.

SEE page nine
Depression could
become the first
named storm

of the season

THE tropical depression,
which could affect the
Bahamas by early next week,
was on the cusp of becoming
the first named storm of the
season last night.

At press time last night the
National Hurricane Centre
(NHC) in Miami was report-
ing that the depression
remained just under tropical
storm strength.

Forecast models at this time
have the system moving
towards the northwest. The
predicted trajectory has the
depression passing the
Bahamas on Monday or
Tuesday.

While it is still too early to
tell how strong the system will
be when it gets here or if the
Bahamas will be directly in
its path, local meteorologists
said they are keeping a very
close eye on it.

In its Spm update last night,
the NHC reported that the
tropical depression was locat-
ed about 710 miles west of the
southernmost Cape Verde
Islands.

SEE page nine
PAGE 2, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

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THE Miss Universe 2009
contestants will take part in
the State Gift Auction Din-
ner for a good cause tonight.

The international beauty
queens are asked to bring a
cultural gift from their coun-
try to present to the host, the
Bahamas.

The HIV/AIDS Founda-
tion will be the beneficiary of
the auction of these items.
Bahamians are invited to
come dine with the beauties
at the Sheraton Nassau Beach
Hotel.

The event starts at 6.30pm
and general admission is $150.

Companies can reserve cor-

i porate tables for $2,000 and
im there are also banner pack-
ages available for $5,000.

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The public & also advised that all overdue payments should be made
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Office on Blue Kill and Tucker Roads, the Mall at Marathon or the Malin Post

Office on East Hill Street. Payments can also be made on SATURDAYS at

Our Retail Sales Center facilitates all of your

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



St Kitts-Nevis ‘Botched’

PM condemns
murder of
Soles-Armony

PRIME Minister of St Kitts
and Nevis Dr Denzil Douglas
yesterday condemned the
murder of TaGia Soles-Armo-
ny and offered condolences to
her family who continue to
grieve over the young moth-
er's senseless killing.

“For the
longest
while vic-
tims of gun
crimes have
tended to
be male
and these
deaths have
troubled us
very, very
deeply. In recent times, how-
ever, we have all been partic-
ularly shaken by the loss of
two young females,” said Dr
Douglas during his weekly St
Kitts radio show on Tuesday.

He was referring to Ms
Soles-Armony’s murder and
that of St Kitts resident Stan-
cia Lake, 14, who was report-
edly shot in the head on
August 8 while at a friend’s
home. “Some things most
inhumane are affecting much
of the world, and on behalf of
my Cabinet and on behalf of
the entire country, I wish to
once again express condo-
lences to every family includ-
ing those of these two young
women who have been vic-
tims of these sickening acts of
brutality,” he said.Ms Soles-
Armony, 29, was shot in her
car around 8pm on August 7
while outside her mother's
house in Sea Breeze. Cradling
her three-month-old infant in
her arms she tried to escape
her attacker and rear-ended a
parked car and crashed into
two other parked vehicles.
The infant, whose face was
covered in his mother's blood,
was unharmed but Ms Soles-
Armony was dead when
police arrived at the scene.

Witnesses said they saw a
slim, dark male — about 5'9"
tall — flee the scene on foot.

Local police continue to hit
a brick wall in their investiga-
tions and have yet to establish
a motive for the brutal crime.
Investigators have not recov-
ered a murder weapon, nor do
they have any suspects in cus-
tody, said head of the Central
Detective Unit Supt Elsworth
Moss. Various possible
motives for the shooting have
been posed — including an
attempted robbery gone
wrong or a case of mistaken
identity. But neither police
nor the victim's family know
why the mother-of-two was
killed, said Mr Moss.

Her death sparked a call for
government to hang violent
offenders in an attempt to
stem the rising murder count.

The country’s last public
hanging took place in 2000.

The twin island nation of
St Kitts/Nevis — which has a
population of less than 40,000
— is battling its own recent
upsurge in violent crimes; the
country carried out its first
execution in ten years in 2008
in the wake of these offences.

Dr Douglas, who is also
that country’s Minister of
National Security, stressed
that whether committed in St
Kitts/Nevis or abroad, violent
behaviour “must be con-
demned.”

“The taking of any life by
any human being is one of the
most unnatural and deeply
troubling occurrences that any
society anywhere ever has to
confront. Whether the victim
is old, young or middle-aged,
the horror for the rest of the
community is always real.”

Ms Soles-Armony lived in
St Kitts with her husband and
two children. She had recently
arrived in Nassau to visit her
family.

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seeks cash settlement

A MOTHER-OF-FOUR left
incapacitated by a "botched"
routine surgery is seeking a cash
settlement from government.

According to a writ filed in
the Supreme Court on July 28,
Vernita Adderley is asking for
damages for injuries, loss, and
expenses accrued as a result of
an "incorrectly performed sur-
gical procedure" and negligence
at Princess Margaret Hospital.

In addition to general dam-
ages, Mrs Adderley, 39, is seek-
ing special damages, interest,
loss of earnings, future loss of
earnings, future medical expens-
es and costs.

Mrs Adderley, of Gayle
Street, Nassau, underwent
surgery in July, 2008 at PMH
to have her ovarian tubes tied
— a procedure that prevents
pregnancies.

However she claims her life
was ruined after she checked
into the hospital for the 20-
minute surgical procedure.

She told The Tribune last
year how she underwent gen-
eral anaesthetic and was col-
lected from hospital by her
brother the same day.

“EXCRUCIATING PAIN’: The aftermath of the surgery.

But when she got home, she
began complaining of pains in
her abdomen. She returned to
the hospital the next day "in
excruciating pain" and was
admitted onto the gynaecologi-
cal ward.

Doctors decided they had to
perform more surgery to
remove toxins from her
abdomen after realising her
bowel had been punctured dur-
ing the first procedure.

For nearly two weeks, the
former barmaid lay in a coma
while her husband Clay and
children feared the worst.

Although she recovered, last

Campaign
Koma Iy
HET E

breathe
oi (ey

FOLLOWING on from their successful drive
to raise money for much needed dialysis units
for the Princess Margaret Hospital last year, a
group of local companies is launching a cam-
paign to help tackle another critical health care

issue.

The “Breathe Easy” campaign aims to raise
$300,000 for four ventilators and six incubators for
PMH’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

The organisers include Tribune Media, the
Builder’s Mall, Tile King, Doctors Hospital, The
Rotary Club of East Nassau and Bahamas Real-
ty. Michele Rassin, director of operations for
Doctors Hospital, explained that the new equip-
ment is sorely needed — particularly the ventila-
tors, as all but one currently in use at the hospital



year she claimed she was left a
virtual old woman — with
chronic pains in her feet and an
unsightly 18-inch scar on her
abdomen — because, she
claims, of the botched surgery.
In December she told The
Tribune her stomach had
swollen to the point where she
looked eight months pregnant.
Doctors said she developed a
hernia and needed further
surgery to correct it.
Because of his wife's condition,
Mr Adderley — a 45-year-old
maintenance worker — was
forced to stop work to care for
his youngest child.

PICTURED LEFT TO RIGHT: Terneille (TaDa),

Michele Rassin, Mark Roberts, Technician, Dr
Steve Lochan.



are models which have been discontinued by the
manufacturers, making part replacement and
maintenance virtually impossible.

The incubators will be crucial in keeping pre-
mature or otherwise challenged newborns alive,

while the ventilators will be used to care for

patients in both the adult and neonatal intensive
care units. At a press conference held yesterday
to announce the campaign, the organisers said
they are hoping to raise the funds in about a
month and are appealing to corporate sponsors,
local companies, individuals and anonymous
donors. Anyone interested in helping with the
effort was asked to contact Mark Roberts or The
Tribune, and make cheques payable to the
Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation.

Only one union option now for Sandals staff

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

SANDALS — employees
scheduled to vote for a union
today will have only one option
after the Bahamas Hotel Cater-
ing and Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWVU) backed out of the
race.

The union had been up
against the Bahamas Hotel
Maintenance and Allied Work-
ers Union (BHMAWU) in a
battle to represent hundreds of
Sandals workers for around
three years while all attempts to
hold the poll failed. A Supreme
Court injunction granted by
Justice Jon Isaacs on Monday
suspended the polls scheduled
for today, but that injunction
was overturned by Justice
Neville Adderley on Tuesday.

The injunction had been
granted to BHMAWU former
president Shavon Bethel, but
was overturned when current
president Lynden Taylor, rep-

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resented by Obie Ferguson,
proved Mr Bethel had resigned
from the union in July 2006.

Justice Adderley had ruled
in July that the poll should be
held before August 14 after
attempts had fallen flat over
the last three years.

But it appears the long battle
for representation ended yes-
terday when BHCAWU vice-
president Kirk Wilson
announced the union would be
pulling out of the race.

He said: “We believe that in
order for trade unions to be as
effective as they need to be in
this day and time, we must take
positive steps towards unifying
our movement on a basis of
mutual respect and common
objectives. “A fundamental
part of this approach is co-exist-
ing while maintaining our
respective identities.

“Our union has decided to
put this strategy in motion in
relation to Sandals. We have
informed the Minister of
Labour the BHCAWU will not

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contest a poll to become the
bargaining agent for Sandals.
As such we ask for our name to
be removed from the ballot.”

Minister of Labour Dion
Foulkes was not available to
confirm BHCAWU’s with-
drawal from the polls before
The Tribune went to press.

BHMAWU president Mr
Taylor said: “We will still go
ahead with the voting unless we
hear otherwise from the min-
ister, but we may not need to
have a vote at all.

“Everyone is ecstatic, the
staff have heard the news and
we are happy this thing has
come to a close.”

The poll is scheduled to take
place at the Gaming Board
office in West Bay Street from
9am to Spm today. All employ-
ees of Sandals Royal Bahami-
an, including those who have
been made redundant, are
invited to attend, pending con-
firmation from the Minister of
Labour that BHCAWU have
been removed from the ballot.








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380-FLIX


PAGE X, XXXDAY, XXXMONTH XxX, 1998

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Criminals flourish when crimes kept quiet

RECENTLY a member of the public com-
mented in the press on the number of police
officers appearing before the bar of the court
on various charges.

From the context of the comment it was
unclear whether the criticism was against the
officers who had put themselves in such a
compromising position, or whether it was
being suggested that to save the public repu-
tation of the force the charges should be sup-
pressed.

It is always unfortunate when an officer of
the law disgraces a trusted position and an
honoured uniform, but it should also give
the public confidence that the force is head-
ed by a Commissioner who administers jus-
tice evenly. Commissioner Ferguson is a law
officer who will give his full support to his
honest officers, but will pull the rug from
under those whose behaviour compromises
his team and undermines their efforts. This is
as it should be.

In yesterday’s Tribune a former Crime
Stoppers advocate expressed her disap-
pointment in the Force. She accused officers
of denying residents their basic right to safe-
ty by failing to warn them of certain crimes
being committed in their neighbourhood.

She accused the police of being tight-lipped
over rapes and attempted rapes on the east-
ern end of New Providence — no specific
area was pinpointed. She maintained that
women had a right to know so that they could
protect themselves. Without that knowledge
they were being made a vulnerable target
for a predator.

We know that many police officers are
torn between not wanting to cause alarm in a
community, and those who feel that the pub-
lic should be informed but are faced with
the pleas of victims who don’t want anyone to
know of their embarrassment. We know that
the victim of the man who recently invaded
her home and eventually made her drive him
to an ATM machine to withdraw money in
return for not raping her, did not want her
humiliation made public. The police respect-
ed her wishes and kept it from the press.
However, when The Tribune learned of the
case, for the sake of all those women who
might be the next victim, our reporters
tracked it down and we published. The vic-
tim’s identity was respected, but the crime
was not. Instead of having only the eyes of
the police focusing on this criminal, the eyes
of a nation will now be hunting him.

We believe that victims could do much
to help track their attackers, if only they
would talk to the press. The Tribune can
assure them that their identity will always
be protected. We are only interested in the
facts of the crime and putting a spotlight on
the criminal. Criminals flourish when they
can keep their crimes secret — secrecy

enables them to quickly move on to the next
victim. This must be stopped — and it can
only be stopped if the first victim sends out a
warning signal so that there won’t be a sec-
ond or third victim. It is almost a civic duty to
help protect one’s fellow man.

This week we were told a story of the expe-
rience of one family. This story will illustrate
why so many are losing confidence in the
police and the courts.

A certain resident’s daughter-in-law,
despite the many family warnings, would go
for her daily run on Cable Beach’s median
strip. One day as she got into her car to
return home, a man jumped her and tried to
pull her from behind the driver’s wheel. She
pulled away and drove off. He followed in his
car and cornered her. She ran into a person-
*s yard, banged on the door, but got no
answer. The man grabbed her, threw her to
the ground. There was a desperate struggle.
Holding onto her car keys, she banged them
as hard as she could on his head and again
managed to get away. Once more he gave
chase. A Good Samaritan in a passing car
saw what was happening and stopped to help.
Her assailant got into his car and took off.
The Good Samaritan drove behind him, fol-
lowed by a police car that happened on the
scene. The attacker crashed his car and was
arrested. The case went to court, followed
by several adjournments. To this day no one
knows if this man was convicted or if he is
one of those rapists walking the streets on
remand.

About a year later the same resident’s
son was riding his scooter on Dowdeswell
Street when he came upon two men fighting.
A shot rang out and one of the men tried to
run from the scene. Instead he ran into the
son’s oncoming scooter. The son quickly
called the police on his cell phone. The gun-
man was caught. He was facing a murder
charge because, the second man was dead.

The police asked the son to go to the sta-
tion to identify the man, which he did. Some-
time later the police asked the son to return
to Central Station in connection with the
case. As he sat waiting for a police officer he
saw the accused murderer and two police
officers walking down the stairs and into the
corridor. The three of them were laughing
and joking together.

Disgusted, the son got up and left Central
station. If this was the name of the game, he
wanted nothing to do with it.

As the law says — justice must not only be
done, it must be seen to be done. Law officers
and an accused in warm embrace is certainly
not justice being seen to be done.

It might be a small incident, but these
small incidents, like dripping water on a cor-
roding stone, soon erodes public confidence.



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PLP hates
progress

Arawak Cay is all about progress

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In a time when progressive
minded governments all over
the world are feverishly doing
whatever it takes to make its
citizenry more comfortable, the
citizens of any nation expect
the custodians to do what is in
their best interest. They should
always make the necessary and
timely adjustments to make life
better for all and not any spe-
cial interest groups. Period!

If the people stand to suffer
in any way and the pros do not
outweigh the cons then we all
should march on city hall. But
on the other hand if anyone or
group try to hinder or prevent
the progress of the project, then
we all should collectively con-
demn them and expose them
for what they really are. We are
behaving just like hogs, when
we have so much and want
more, some day we would have
to regurgitate and embarrass
ourselves. Swimming in vomit
seems to be the fluid of choice
for some.

The amazing thing about the
uncontrollable hollering by the
PLP about Arawak Cay, while
operating under their modus
operandi, proves that even
though they know that all
Bahamians believe that the par-
ty as it is today is still steeped in
corruption, they would still
gamble with the sensible
Bahamian people. Bahamians
look at what they are doing
with a tremendous deal of sus-
pect. We shall not be fooled. “I
know dem long time, dem peo-
ple is mine.”

I listen to the propaganda
spewed from the PLP about the
container port moving to
Arawak Cay. I even tried to
dissect their message to see if
there was a thread of truth,
common sense, or benefit in
what they said. I intentionally
took this long before I weighed
in so as to allow the rat to come
completely out of the hole
before I dropped the sledge
hammer on its head.

Now the PLP are telling its
few followers especially some
who cannot spell rat if it kills
them, that there is a sinister

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



plan to move the container ter-
minal to Arawak Cay. But the
fact of the matter is that sever-
al high ranking PLP, who have
had carte blanche, already have
businesses on Arawak Cay and
if the terminal is moved it
would affect their business. This
whole thing is personal; it has
absolutely nothing to do with
the followers who are just
pawns in a big game.

Arawak Cay is a container
terminal now, it has always
been one. FNM, PLP, NAD
and others have been collect-
ing their shipment from the cay
for donkey years. Large 40ft
containers are seen leaving the
cay on a daily basis for years.

Present and past politicians
are reaping “big bucks” from
Arawak every day getting as
much as $180 for every con-
tainer that leaves the cay. So
everything that is shipped to
Arawak Cay, someone gets that
money. Imagine that!

Also a high PLP official has
had a sand contract benefitting
from all of the sand that is sold
on Arawak Cay, and has been
doing so forever and a day. This
is just the tip of the iceberg.
The plot thickens. All of this is
done on land leased to them by
the government. So therefore
they have probably become
millionaires by benefitting from
our Crown land. You, the blind
followers, get nothing and they
go “laughing, all the way to the
bank.”

See how foolish we are to lis-
ten to people who have their
own special interest and hid-
den agenda in Arawak Cay.
They tell you about various
impact studies and reports, but
they do not tell you that they
are making plenty money, right
now, doing the same thing that
they do not want the govern-
ment to do.

Arawak Cay has been in
existence forever. The cay has
become the most unsightly eye-
sore as a first impression on

entry to the Bahamas for far
too long. The dilapidated build-
ing has embarrassed us too
much. It is time it is replaced
with something else.

The Pindling government did
nothing to clean up Arawak,
the first Ingraham Government
did not include it in its list of
priorities at the time. The
Christie government must have
seen the degradation and
ignored the deterioration, and
now the Ingraham government
sees the wisdom and is killing
two birds with one rock, clean-
ing up Bay Street and Arawak
Cay, by moving all of the heavy
activity from Bay Street and
shifting it to Arawak Cay while
not only making it easier on the
eye but creating a better first
impression when the cruise
ships come to our shores.

Bahamians must be careful
while following the “Pied Piper
of Hamlin.” They are being
controlled by their own special
interest. They have been licking
their chops long time and see
the possibility of their “golden
goose” being taken away, that’s
the special interest, their spe-
cial interest.

Did anyone notice that a for-
mer politician who spoke on
this groups behalf “broke off
running” when the public was
apprised of his extreme profits
on Arawak Cay?

“Never mind the noise in the
market, only mind the price of
the fish.”

As we speak, Arawak is
going to be transformed and we
all would be proud of it. I can-
not forget the noise created
when the FNM government
was transforming Goodman’s
Bay. They cried holy hell. Look
at Goodman’s Bay today, the
same place that the PLP had
already given to Baha Mar is
the mother of all deals.

The only thing that the PLP
is sure of is that anything that
looks like progress, especially
if it is not happening on their
watch, they oppose to, nothing
more and nothing less.

IVOINE W INGRAHAM
Nassau,
July, 2009.

We need to change our attitude towards trees

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Casuarina trees on Saunders Beach all 66
of them will be cut down to put light polls, is
this true? Who gives who the right to do this to

our environment?

human population are not indigenous to the
Bahamas does this mean that they have to leave?

ment.

Tearing up all the trees on the other side for a

parking lot, what will happen to the shade are we
going to have to spend more money to replant
trees that will take 50 years to grow. The Casua-
rina trees on Saunders have been there longer
than I have been alive, those that say they are not
indigenous to the Bahamas, well half of the

Founder &

(BIFF)
Nassau,

August, 2009.

The attitude because trees are in your way
you have to cut it down mentally has to stop,
work around mother nature and the environ-

LESLIE VANDERPOOL

Executive Director

Sirst Baptist Church

289 Market St. South = P.O. Box H-7984 * Nassau, Bahamas

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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS



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ARSON AND POLICE investigators survey the damage to the St Joseph school located on Boyd Road
yesterday. A number of offices on the ground floor of the building were damaged by the fire which
police believe was deliberately set.

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POLICE are searching for an arsonist
who set fire to the St Joseph’s Catholic
School on Boyd Road sometime before 5am
yesterday.

According to Asst Sup Walter Evans, Fire
Services personnel arrived at the school
within three minutes of receiving a report
about the fire.

Arriving at the scene, they discovered that
the flames were confined to an office on
the ground floor of the two-storey concrete
building.

After removing a metal gate to gain access
to the area, the blaze was extinguished in

short order.

However, the office area for the school’s
principal, bursar and secretary was com-
pletely destroyed and other rooms on the
ground level received substantial smoke
damage.

“Further school damage resulted to the
technology and library area where culprits
entered a window and removed computer
items and searched the library.

“The technology/library building is locat-
ed adjacent to the where the fire incident
area is located,” Mr Evans said.

Investigations continue.







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armed robbery trial was
arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Ansel Pickstock pleaded
not guilty to the charge at
his arraignment before Mag-
istrate Janeen Weech-
Gomez in Court 1, Bank
Lane yesterday.

It is alleged that on
Wednesday, July 29, 2009,
Pickstock attempted to pre-
vent Judy Simmons, a wit-
ness before the courts, from
attending court. Prosecutors
said that Simmons is a key
witness in an armed robbery
case involving Pickstock’s
son, 22- year-old Quendo
Pickstock, and 23-year-old
Vanshuver Adderley.

The two men are accused

of the July 26 armed rob-
bery of Porky’s Gas Station
in Bamboo Town. Pickstock
was granted $2,000 bail. The
case was adjourned to
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THE TRIBUNE



Neurosurgeon who worked his way out of ghetto to speak at conference

A story to inspire young men

His life story
should serve
to motivate
all of us to
dream and be
determined
to overcome
every obsta-
cle. Yes, his
life reminds
us that ‘yes
we can!

CEO Network president

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



AN INSPIRATIONAL medical pro-
fessor who worked his way out of the
ghetto to become a globally acclaimed
neurosurgeon will speak at the 13th
annual CEO Network conference to
inspire young men in the Bahamas.

Dr Ben Carson worked on the first
separation of Siamese twins joined at
the back of the head in 1987, as well as
the first completely successful separa-
tion of type-two vertical Siamese twins in
1997.

He is currently a professor of neuro-
surgery, oncology, plastic surgery and
pediatrics at the John Hopkins School of
Medicine.

The CEO Network and partners have
arranged for him to come to the
Bahamas to give a positive outlook and
inspiration to young people over-

DO et ol



whelmed by the disturbing trends of
murder and violent crime in the country.

CEO of GEMS 105.9 FM Deborah
Bartlett, the founder and president of
the CEO network president, said the
conference will address the emascula-
tion of men in the Bahamas, and take
steps towards “economic emancipation.”

“There are disturbing trends that are

undermining the beauty of our country
like cold-blooded murder, the rising cas-
es of rape, the high tolerance of
immorality and corruption, and the
apparent comfort with denying produc-
tive and qualified citizens with oppor-
tunities.

“The weapons of choice that are
emasculating men and debilitating
women are dominating the headlines
and negatively influencing our environ-
ment,” she said.

Ms Bartlett and CEO partners includ-
ing the Delta Phi Pi Fraternity, the
Bahamas Christian Council, as well as
medical councils and unions, hope the
conference, and Dr Carson in particular,
will help empower Bahamians to suc-
ceed.

The CEO network president said: “Dr
Carson had a childhood dream of
becoming a physician. Growing up in a
single parent home with dire poverty,
poor grades, a horrible temper and low

self-esteem appeared to preclude the
realisation of that dream until his moth-
er, with only a third grade education,
challenged her sons to strive for excel-
lence.

“His life story should serve to moti-
vate all of us to dream and be deter-
mined to overcome every obstacle. Yes,
his life reminds us that ‘yes we can!’”

In addition to keynote speaker Dr
Carson, US Senator Kent Williams and
CEO of Giles Enterprises Terry Giles
will deliver speeches at the conference,
and Minister of Health Dr Hubert Min-
nis will make remarks.

The conference at the British Colonial
Hilton will open at 7pm on Friday,
August 27, and continue on August 28,
which is the anniversary of Martin
Luther King’s ‘I have a dream’ speech at
the Lincoln Memorial in 1963.

Highlights of the conference will be
televised on 64 network affiliates includ-
ing FOX, CBS, NBC and MY9.

City Market’s
stamp of success





BAHAMAS Supermarkets
Limited, which operates 11 City
Market stores in New Provi-
dence and Grand Bahama,
launched their new community
fundraising initiative last
month.

City Market customers now
have a chance to give back to

New stamp programme fundraising
initiative successfully launched

various charities linked to the
company’s smart shopper sav-
ings stamp programme with the
donation of their stamps.

In each of the City Market
stores there is a fundraising
stand that holds 12 stamp
sheets. Each sheet is assigned to
a non-profit organisation, char-

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ity or group. One sheet holds
200 stamps and a filled sheet is
worth $10.

At the end of each quarter, a
cheque representing the total
amount of sheets accumulated
will be presented to the chari-
ties or organisations that are
part of the programme. In the
first week of the programme
approximately $4,000 in stamps
were donated.

The “community board” as
it is called, has been in the City
Market stores since June and
customers have reacted
favourably to it.

“Tourists who do not usually
use their stamps like the idea
of making a donation to a wor-
thy cause,” the company said.

“Kids also like to get
involved and learn about giv-
ing back.”

Said marketing director Aza-
leta Ishmael-Newry: “When my

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FIRST AID

AZALETA Ishmael-Newry, marketing director (front row, centre) and Peter Goudie, human
resources director (back row, right) of the Bahamas Supermarkets Limited (BSL).

Back row from left to right are: Madeline Froning and Major Oral Morris, Salvation Army; John
Philpott, Scouts Association; Caryl Lashley, AIDS Foundation; Brendon Watson, Red Cross;
Pheafrisia Strachan, Nicolette Archer and Crystal Fountain, Girl Guides; Earle Bethell, Bahamas Can-
cer Society, and Peter Goudie, BSL. Front row from left to right are: Natasha Wright and Lynn
Gape, Bahamas National Trust; Azaleta Ishmael-Newry, BSL and R E Barnes, Heart Foundation.

daughters, who are eight anda
half and three and a half years
old, are shopping with me they
can’t wait to get the stamps at
the end of my sale and run over
to the board and paste them
on.”

“We welcome everyone’s
participation in this worthy
cause,” said Peter Goudie,
human resources director for
Bahamas Supermarkets.

“And this project is an
important cause where the
company and the community
can help make a positive dif-
ference.”

The eight charities that were
chosen for this year’s pro-
gramme include the AIDS
Foundation; Bahamas Girl
Guides Association; Sir Victor
Sassoon Heart Foundation;
Bahamas National Trust;

Bahamas Red Cross; Cancer
Society of the Bahamas, Salva-
tion Army and the Scout Asso-
ciation of the Bahamas.

The other four groups or
charities are chosen by a City
Market store and the aim is to
choose ones that are located in
their community.

“Partnerships like these help
the local community and
Bahamas Supermarkets has
been doing so for the past 40
years,” the company said.

At a press conference that
was held in July at the Nassau
headquarters of Bahamas
Supermarkets, each spokesper-
son for the eight main charities
talked about their organisation.
They all agreed with Earle
Bethell, president of the
Bahamas Cancer Society who
said that in “these tough eco-

nomic times, every penny
counts.”

Major Oral Morris of the Sal-
vation Army said that they
have seen more and more per-
sons seeking help and “the
assistance from Bahamas
Supermarkets will certainly
help the Salvation Army.”

The Bahamas Red Cross said
that they would use the funds
for their ‘Meals on Wheels’ pro-
gramme; the Bahamas Nation-
al Trust, for educational pro-
grammes; the Scouts Associa-
tion of the Bahamas and the
Bahamas Girl Guide Associa-
tion will use the money towards
various projects as will the
AIDS Foundation.

Roy Barnes of the Sir Vic-
tor Heart Foundation said the
funds will help their children’s
heart programme.



Still Young At Heart...













HAPPY 60th BIRTHDAY
PAPI

Love, Kaitlyn, Evan and Jenna
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS



Bahamian named

'Best Personality’

























lan Edwards

BAHAMAS Ambassador C A Smith and Bahamian Jasmine
Adderley who won the ‘Best Personality’ award in the third
annual Miss Caribbean Metro USA 2009 Beauty Pageant.

JASMINE Nastassia Adderley represented the
Bahamas in the third annual Miss Caribbean Metro USA
2009 Beauty Pageant held in Washington, DC, last week-
end.

Entering her first competition, Miss Adderley took the
"Best Personality’ award and was named the second run-
ner-up overall. The competition included 11 contestants.

Ms Adderley only had three weeks to prepare herself
for the challenge. Observers said she presented herself
"professionally, with elegance and confidence."

Future Stars Production, the production company
behind the pageant, said the competition sought to pro-
mote "a proud awareness of each contestant’s talent and
vibrant culture.”

“The aim is to bring Caribbean cultures together. We
will work hard to build this pageant for many years to
come as we seek to make an impact on the lives of our
Caribbean ladies in the community, whereby they too can
make a lasting impact on other girls,” a Future Stars
spokesman said.

“We believe that every young lady has an inner beauty
and that beauty will ultimately bring to light their purpose
in this life. To that end, we encourage each lady in the
competition to be in tune with, not just her outer beauty,
but inner beauty as well.”

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Happy ending for men
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PASTOR David Brennen gives thanks for the men’s safe return from © FAMILY members and friends express their relief as the welcome back
sea. the men who were missing since Sunday.

FOUR men and a 13-year-old boy missing at sea were rescued
by a submarine and have been safely returned to their families.

Relatives of the men contacted the Defence Force operations
room early Monday morning with an emergency call.

They said the men had gone on a fishing trip around Andros on
Saturday and had not returned as expected on Sunday at 3pm.
Police officials in Fresh Creek and Mangrove Cay in Andros as well
as BASRA officials were alerted. The RBDF also directed sever-
al of its vessels to assist in the search for the missing 27-foot speed
boat.

Information received by the police control room indicated that a
capsised vessel, the Hammerhead II, had been spotted by an
AUTEC helicopter off the southwestern coast of New Providence,
just a few miles away from the Coral Harbour base.

An AUTEC submarine surfaced and rescued the men from the
waters where they were found floating, all in good health, with the
exception of one man who had an arm injury.

Defence Force vessel P-121 was dispatched to the area and brought
the men and the boy to the Coral Harbour base shortly before noon
on Tuesday where they were greeted by relieved family mem-
bers and friends. Their damaged vessel was also towed into the cap-
ital by Defence Force vessel P-43.

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

Recognised as an
“ambassador and actor”
who “advanced the
nation’s dialogue on race
and respect” 82-year-old
Poitier was presented the
Presidential Medal of Free-
dom during an afternoon
ceremony at the White
House.




Sidney Poitier honoured by President Obama

As the first black man to
win an Academy Award
for Best Actor, he and 15
other individuals —
including theoretical physi-
cist Stephen Hawking,
South African archbishop
and Nobel laureate
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Supreme Court, retired
Justice Sandra Day O’Con-
nor — were described by
President Obama as
“agents of change.”

Introducing Poitier as he
rose from his seat, a White
House spokesperson not-
ed how, having “risen from
the tomato farms of the
Bahamas, his talent led him
to Broadway, Hollywood
and global acclaim.”

“In front of black and
white audiences struggling
to right the nation’s moral
compass, Sidney Poitier
brought us the common
tragedy of racism, the
inspiring possibility of rec-
onciliation, and the simple
joys of everyday life.

“Ultimately, the man
would mirror the charac-
ter, and both would
advance the nation’s dia-
logue on race and respect,”
said the official.

President Obama said:
“These extraordinary men
and women, these agents
of change, remind us that
excellence is not beyond
our abilities, that hope lies
around the corner and that
justice can still be won in
the forgotten corners of
this world.”

Born in 1927 in Miami,
Florida, Sidney Poitier
grew up in Cat Island as
the last of seven children
before moving to Nassau

with his family, led by his
tomato farmer father, at
age 11.

It was in the capital that
he first encountered cine-
ma.

At the age of 16, Poitier
moved to New York and
found a job as a dishwash-
er.

Soon after, he began
working as a janitor for the
American Negro Theatre
in exchange for acting
lessons.

Despite a lack of formal
training, Poitier went on to
become an acclaimed actor
recognised for a long list
of “firsts.”

He was the first black
actor to become a hero to
both black and white audi-
ences, to win a prestigious
international film award
(Venice Film Festival,
Something of Value, 1957),
to be nominated for a Best
Actor Academy Award
(The Defiant Ones, 1958),
to star as a romantic lead
(Paris Blues, 1961), to win
the Oscar (Lilies of the
Fields, 1963), to become
the number one box office
star in the country (1968),
and to insist on a film crew
that was at least 50 per cent
African-American (The
Lost Man, 1969).

The Cat Islander also
starred in the first main-
stream movies to condone
interracial marriages and

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AFTER PRESENTING him with the 2009 Presidential Medal of Free-
dom, President Barack Obama is hugged by Sidney Poitier, the
Bahamian actor known for breaking racial barriers and the first
black man to win an Academy Award as best actor, at the White
House in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2009. (AP)

permit a mixed couple to
hug and kiss (Guess Who’s
Coming to Dinner, 1967)
and to attack apartheid
(The Wilby Conspiracy,
1975).

In addition to Poitier and
those mentioned above, the
complete list of those hon-
oured by the President yes-
terday include: civil rights
advocate the Rev. Joseph
Lowery; healthcare reform
champion, Senator Edward
Kennedy; native American
world war II hero and his-
torian, Joe Medicine Crow-
High Bird; breast cancer
activist Nancy Goodman
Brinker; tennis champion
and gender equality activist
Billie Jean King; quarter-
back turned Republican
vice presidential nominee,
Jack Kemp; gay rights pio-
neer Harvey Milk; actress

Chita Rivera; former Pres-
ident of Ireland Mary
Robinson; cancer scientist
Janet Davison Rowley;
economist and microcredit
pioneer Muhammad Yunus
and doctor to the homeless,
Pedro Jose Greer Jr.

“These outstanding men
and women represent an
incredible diversity of back-
grounds,” Obama said.

“Yet they share one
overarching trait: Each has
been an agent of change.
Each saw an imperfect
world and set about
improving it, often over-
coming great obstacles
along the way.

“Their relentless devo-
tion to breaking down bar-
riers and lifting up their fel-
low citizens sets a standard
to which we all should
strive,” he added.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS



Shooting of student was
like ‘the wild wild west’

FROM page one

Brandon Russell, 18, who was the first
witness to testify yesterday, told the court
that he was standing about five feet away
from Fowler when the shooting took
place. Russell, who was also a student
at C R Walker at the time, said he was
standing at the bus stop on Bay and Fred-
erick Streets with a group of friends when
he saw a car with two men inside drive up
to them. Russell said that both men had
on Oakley shades and the passenger who
had a chromed tipped handgun opened
fire. Russell admitted that initially he
told police that he could not identify the
two men in the car because they were

wearing shades. Russell told the court
that two weeks later, however, during
an identification parade at the Central
Detective Unit, he identified the
assailant. Russell told the court that he
was able to do so because a friend of his
at school, who had not been at the scene
of the shooting, had shown him a pic-
ture of the suspected gunman in a local
newspaper.

Corporal 474 Keith Turnquest, who
was attached to the Criminal Records
office at the time of the incident, testified
yesterday that when he arrived at the
scene, he and a team of police officers
already had portions of Bay and Freder-
ick Streets already cordoned off. He told

one on Frederick Street, south of Bay
Street and the other on the sidewalk.
The bullets, he said, were 30 feet, four
inches apart. Corporal Turnquest told
the court that he also observed blood-
stains in front of the island shop. Corpo-
ral Turnquest said that he photographed
the scene. The photos were submitted
in evidence yesterday.

Corp Turnquest also testified that on
January 10, 2008, he visited the Rand
Morgue of the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital and observed the body of a dark
male in the dissecting room. Corporal
Turnquest said that he observed a num-
ber of injuries to the front upper region
of his body and the left back section.

the court that he saw two fired bullets,

The trial continues today.

Petition launched against |
container port move

FROM page one

“voice their displeasure in a
controlled fashion.”

“We want to make sure
that Bahamians get an oppor-
tunity to voice their objections
in sufficiently large numbers
that the government will listen
and respond,” said Mr
Fitzgerald.

Among a variety of criti-
cisms of the project — the
potential for it to kill business
at the fish fry, devalue nearby
properties and increase traffic
congestion — the Committee
has repeatedly alleged that
the extension of Arawak Cay
with fill from the dredging of
Nassau Harbour will have the
knock-on effect of “destroy-
ing” the popular recreation
area of Saunders Beach.

However, Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux has
responded that this claim is
false and “alarmist.”

Fill was to be used to
extend Arawak Cay whether
the port was relocated or not,
he stated, and a scientific






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study available on the BEST
Commission’s website proves
that any impact on the beach
is “unlikely” or mitigable. He
has denied any secrecy on
behalf of Government and
criticised an independent
study that placed Arawak Cay
sixth out of seven potential
sites for the port for using an
allegedly “strange and non-
statistical” methodology.

Meanwhile, though a move
to the southwest for the port
would have a price tag of
“around $400 million”, Dr
Deveaux has stated that an
Arawak Cay port is estimated
to cost a more affordable $80
million.

The site provides the bene-
fit of “already being a major
port” and an “industrial site
for over 40 years”, of not
requiring another cut into
New Providence and still
allowing “ample opportunity
for increased economic activ-
ity at the down home Fish
Fry,” said Dr Deveaux.

But Mr Fitzgerald has
rejected Dr Deveaux’s asser-
tions and called for Govern-
ment to show more evidence
to substantiate its “rush” to
place the port at Arawak
Cay.

Yesterday Mr Fitzgerald
said the Committee is “inten-
sifying its efforts, not only to
get answers to these ques-
tions but to give Government
another opportunity to come
clean with the Bahamian peo-
ple on the full implications of

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the development at Arawak
Cay.”

The Senator charged that
as the Save Saunders Beach
group on social networking
site Facebook already has
1,941 members it will not be
hard to get “a minimum” of
10,00 signatures added to the
petition during the Commit-
tee’s two week “nationwide
drive.”

“This is a defining moment
in our generation and we are
inviting Bahamians to draw
a line in the sand and say to
the government ‘no more,
enough is enough.’

“We would expect (the
Prime Minister) and the gov-
ernment to hear those con-
cerns, stop this project and
allow the Bahamian people
an opportunity to understand
why the government is mov-
ing ahead with this and if they
are not so satisfied that this
project be stopped forth-
with.”

The petition is being posted
on Savesaundersbeach.org
and the Save Saunders Beach
facebook page.

FROM page one

The system was moving
towards the west at a speed
of almost 14mph with maxi-
mum sustained winds of
35mph.

Should the depression
develop into a tropical storm
it would be named Ana —
the first named storm of the
2009 Atlantic hurricane sea-
son.

e To keep up to date on

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where readers will find the
latest weather forecast,
weather maps, news from
the hurricane centre and an
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mentary.

a ct Tad De a

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THE TRIBUNE



1

a

LOCAL NEWS



Slain teen’s name
‘sullied by police’

FROM page one

robbers and claimed only
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This information was
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",..More care ought to be
taken by police when dis-
charging a firearm at a per-
son. . .One has to wonder
about the training of police
officers," he said.

The "traumatised" family
wants an expedited coro-
ner's inquest into the youth's
death. They also want the
officer in question to be
removed from active duty
pending the outcome of the
inquest and will fight for
criminal charges to be filed
against anyone found culpa-
ble of Brenton's death.

They also have plans to
file a civil suit against the
relevant agencies.

The 2008 graduate of St
Augustine's College — who
family described as an ambi-
tious teen — was shot
around 8 pm on July, 9 and
died a short time later.

Officers were on the look-
out for two armed robbers
who held up the food store a
short time before Brenton
was killed.

Police have acknowledged
that a ballistics report
revealed the teen was shot
by a police service weapon.

They said the case was
turned over to the Coroner's
Court, however, a date for
the matter has not been
scheduled.

Last week a tabloid
reported that the teen was
on bail for charges stemming
from an alleged stabbing
incident. Brenton was not
convicted of any charges and
his family maintains his
innocence.

A website has been set up
in his honour: www.bren-
tonhectorsmith.com and a
special service will be held
in the parking lot of City
Market on Village Road
tonight.

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THE TRIBUNE

spor

PAGE 11



THURSDAY, AUGUST 13,

ts

£2 © Stubbs’ opinion on IAAF World Championships...



Fireman misses out
On training camp

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

BERLIN, Germany — Although
he missed the week-long training
camp, Chris “Fireman” Brown said
it won't take away from his prepa-
rations for the IAAF's 12th World
Championships in Athletics.

Brown, 30, arrived here yester-
day just as the team moved from
their training camp and into the
Games Village. He's here in suffi-
cient time to get acclimatized
before the championships begin on
Saturday and the first round of the
men’s 400 metres is held Tuesday.

"My preparation has been going
pretty good. I feel pretty good and
I'm healthy,” said Brown during
an exclusive interview with The
Tribune at Frankfurt Airport as he
waited to board the flight to Berlin
yesterday. "I'm just waiting for my
race to start."

Despite the fact that the coach-
ing staff had expected him to
report to the training camp, Brown
said his absence should not take
away from the task ahead of him.

"T don't think it will play a factor
with me because I'm trying to get
an individual spot on the podium,"
said Brown, who has fallen short in
the past three championships he
competed in.

"Through the grace of the good
Lord, I have already been there a
few times, so after every disap-
poimtment there is a blessing and
this year, I’m really focused. But
my main objective is to get through
the first round...each round will
take care of itself. All of my team-
mates are there, but I know when I
get in (the Games Village), I will
rise their spirits because they know
that I will be there to encourage
them to just go out there and per-
form."

This is Brown's second appear-
ance on the new blue mondo sur-
face at the Olympic Stadium. He

But doesn’t ‘think it will play a factor’

TRIBUNE

EXCLUSIVE



opened his season with a victory
there and he's hoping to duplicate
that feat next week Friday when
the final of the 400 is staged. The
preliminaries, however, will begin
on Tuesday with the semifinal
Thursday.

"The Lord is in charge right now.
With him being in charge, anything
is possible,” he said. "So I'm just
going to put my trust in him like
I've been doing my whole career
and do the rest. I could plan all
day, but I realize that he is in
charge. I can only go out there and
do my best.”

Over the years, nobody has giv-
en their all as Brown has done, but
yet still he has not been able to
stand tall on the victory podium to
collect an individual medal in the
World Outdoors or the Olympic
Games.

Last year in Beying, China, he
came so close that he could smell it
until American David Neville dove
across the finish line to nip him out
of the bronze.

"T've learnt a lot from the expe-
rience,” said Brown about joining
the top echelon on the podium.
"Not winning a medal has kept me
humble, it has kept me in the game
for a long time. Experience is the
best teacher and every year, I get
better and better and my coach
continues to take the time out to
work with me so that I can get bet-
ter. So with the experience that
I've gained, I think that will make
the difference."

Having ran a season's best of
44.73 seconds, just shy of his



CHRIS BROWN has arrived in Berlin, Germany, just as the team moved from their
training camp and into the Games Village...

national record of 44.40, Brown
said it has showed what he has
been doing in practice and that was
one of the main reasons why he
wanted to stay home a little longer
than to come up so early for the
training camp.

"T don't mind coming in now, a
week before and getting the job
done," he said. "My training has
been going awesome and we just
have to see how all of the hard
work will pay off as I get adjusted
to the environment."

While he's confident of winning
a medal, Brown said he knows he
will have to go through Americans
Jeremy Wariner, the reigning two-
time defending champion and
LaShawn Merritt, the Olympic
champion.

"This is 2009, but you have to
expect the unexpected,” he said.
"We have our eyes on the two

American guys, but at the end of
the day, the race is wide open. For
me, there are eight guys who will
be going for it and so anybody can
win that gold, silver or bronze. I
just have to keep my eyes open,
run a smart race and stay focused.”

As for the relay where the
Bahamas is considered a sure bet
to medal, Brown said as long as all
of the guys come out and do their
part, they should end up with
another medal.

"We're strong enough that we
can really go out there and do
some damage,” Brown said. "We
just have to put our faith in the
Lord and allow him to take us
through."

Having arrived safely in Berlin,
Brown said he's eager to get settled
in at the Games Village and start
his process towards a trip to the
medal stand - twice - next week.



Legacy
meeting on

weekend...
See page 14

BFA donates
to COB

IN an effort to continue to develop
and promote football in the Bahamas,
the Bahamas Football Association
(BFA) has donated teaching materi-
al and equipment to the College of
the Bahamas (COB) to assist with its
new initiative to develop a Sports and
Wellness Institute.

The college launched the Sports
and Wellness Institute in June, 2009,
with a mission to offer training and
development for professionals
involved in the various sporting dis-
ciplines in the country, and also to
serve as a vehicle to assist in the cer-
tification of coaches, trainers, referees
and administrators of the sporting
federation.

The premise is to offer certifica-
tion courses in the various sporting
disciplines in all facets of the game —
coaches, referees, administrators and
medicine.

Additionally, courses and seminars
on nutrition and first aid will be
included as offerings of the institute.

COB has already convened meet-
ings of an advisory board made up
of representatives from the various
sporting bodies in the country, includ-
ing representatives of the Ministry of
Education and Ministry of Sports to
establish the framework under which
this institute will function.

“The idea to establish an accredit-
ed course programme is something
that we are keenly interested in,” said
BFA general secretary Lionel Haven.

“And so the opportunity to con-
tribute to this was something that we
jumped at. FIFA has a wonderful
assortment of courses for coaches,
referees, administrators and sports
medicine under its Futuro III course
programmes, and we felt that mater-
ial from these courses would be very
beneficial to the college in their exer-
cise.

“Also, given the fact that we have
local persons who have completed
the FIFA course programmes and
can serve as instructors for coaching,
refereeing and administration is
something that we are pleased to
offer in addition to the material pre-
sented.

“The presentation of course mate-
rial for administration, coaching, ref-
ereeing and the supply of balls are
made by us here, but on behalf of
FIFA, who supplied the material and
equipment to us for presentation to
the college. We are pleased with the
relationship that we have with the
institute and will continue to work
hand in hand with them on this and
other initiatives.”




PAGE 12, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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‘High expectations’ for
Team Bahamas at IAAF
World Championships

STUBBS

BERLIN, Germany — In
two days, the International
Amateur Athletic Federa-
tion’s 12th World Champi-
onships in Athletics is sched-
uled to get underway. And I
have high expectations for the
Bahamas’ 24-member team.

I have pegged in two with
the possibility of three indi-
vidual medals to go along with
one in the relay and at least
three other appearances in the
final over the nine days of
competition on the Olympic
Stadium that once graced the
legendary Jesse Owens.

However, there has been
significant improvements to
the track, including a new
blue mondo surface that was
laid down earlier this year.

All of the athletes have now
arrived in Berlin with Chris
“Fireman” Brown being the
last. We actually came in on
the same flight from Frank-
furt into Berlin yesterday
morning. Brown’s trip was
direct from Atlanta, Georgia,
while I made a stop over in
Charlotte from the Bahamas.

From all indications, Brown
seemed quite ready and con-
fident that he can finally get
on the podium and win the
individual medal that has
eluded him since he started
competing in the men's 400m
back in 2001 in Edmonton,
Canada, where he was fourth
in his first round heat and
failed to advance any further.

That same year, Avard
Moncur became the first
Bahamian to win the men's
one-lapper, clocking a stun-
ning 44.64 seconds that stood
then as the new national
record.

From Edmonton to Paris,
France, in 2003, Brown
moved up a notch advancing
to the semifinal, joining Mon-
cur, who relinquished his
crown to American Tyree
Washington as he too grace-
fully bowed out.

The next two biannual

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championships would be the
emergence of American Jere-
my Wariner, who dominated
the scene until he lost his
Olympic title to his compatri-
ot LaShawn Merritt last year
in Beijing, China.

In each of the successive
Worlds in Helsinki, Finland,
in 2005 and Osaka, Japan, in
2007, Brown fell just shy of
winning a medal, finishing
fourth. He was also the first
man out of a trip on the medal
stand after an American run-
ner dove across the finish line
in Beijing to sneak through
for the bronze at the
Olympics.

Based on the way he has
been running this year, Brown
certainly is considered a
medal contender for the
Bahamas. He's one of the
three individual medallists I
have pegged on my list, along
with the men's 4 x 400 relay
team.

There's no doubt that the
focus will be the two-headed
American monster called the
Wariner-Merritt show. But if
Brown plays his cards right,
he could be the spoiler just as
Derrick Atkins was at the last
Worlds in Osaka when he
powered past Jamaican Asafa
Powell for the silver behind
American Tyson Gay.

This time around, I believe
that both Atkins and Donald
Thomas, who stunned the
world in Osaka when he
soared to the gold in the
men's high jump, will have an
outside chance of returning
to the podium simply because
of the fact that neither of
them have been performing
up to par this year.

But any one of them could
turn things around and make
it to the final.

I like Olympic bronze
medallist Leevan “Superman”
Sands as another medallist for
the Bahamas. Like Brown, I
think he's overdue for a real
big money payday and this
could turn out to be his time

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to shine again.

Last, but not least, if Chan-
dra Sturrup can get out in her
usually quick start and main-
tain her form throughout the
straight away race, we could
look for the veteran sprinter
to be in the mix in the wom-
en's 100.

She's been a two-time
medallist, having won the
bronze consecutively in
Edmonton and Paris, four
years after Sevatheda Fynes
inked her name in the record
books as the first Bahamian
to achieve the feat with her
bronze in Athens, Greece, in
1997.

However, I strongly believe
that with more concentration
on the half-lapper, Debbie
Ferguson-McKenzie could
win her second Worlds medal.
She did it back in Edmonton
in 2001 when she won the
gold and nine years later, she's
still running in tip-top shape.

This could possibly be the
final appearance for both
Sturrup and Ferguson-
McKenzie and so I have a
feeling that they are both
going to go all out for a shot
at being one of the three final
competitors standing tall in
the female sprints.

Both have withstood the
test of time and are definitely
going to have to turn back the
hands of time in their quest
to win another medal.

This year, for the first time,
we have a female team
entered in the 4 x 400 relay,
but it’s a pity that both
Pauline Davis-Thompson, the
400 silver medallist in Goten-
burg, Sweden, in 1995 and
Tonique Williams-Darling,
the gold medallist in Helsinki
in 2005, have both retired.

Christine Amertil is the
most seasoned member of the
team, but I think her experi-
ence alone will not be suffi-
cient for the team to medal.
There is a good possibility
that they could end up in the
final, thus paving the way for
a brighter future as they look
ahead to the 13th Worlds.

As for the women's 4 x 100,
it's good that they are finally
back after falling short of
returning to prominence in
Helsinki when Timicka
Clarke, Sturrup, Fynes and
Phillippa Arnett-Willie failed
to make the final, four years
after the Golden Girls of
Fynes, Sturrup, Davis-
Thompson and Ferguson-
McKenzie struck for gold in
Athens.

The men's 4x 4 relay team
is a sure bet for the final
medal. It just depends on who
runs and in what order and
this could determine the
colour they could be wearing
around their necks at the con-
clusion of these champi-
onships set for August 23.

The majority of the mem-
bers have had their share of
setbacks this year, but they
seemed to have weathered the
storm.

Now it's up to them to go
out there and try to keep the
most successful streak of win-
ning a medal over all the oth-
er countries since the team of
Avard Moncur, Brown, Troy
McIntosh and Timothy
Munnings snatched the gold
in Edmonton.

With different combina-
tions each year, the Bahamas’
men have won a bronze in
Paris and silver back-to-back
in Helsinki and Osaka, the lat-
ter two behind the United
States, who will definitely be
their main target again this
year.

So three or four medals
would not be that bad for us
as we try to match or surpass
what we achieved two years
ago in Osaka.

On top of all of that, ath-
letes are competing for some
hefty cash incentives for their
performances, including
$60,000 for first place, $30,000
for second, $20,000 for third,
$15,000 for fourth, $10,000 for
fifth, $6,000 for sixth, $5,000
for seventh and $4,000 for
eighth place.

The relay teams will split
$80,000 for first, $40,000 for
second, $20,000 for third,
$16,000 for fourth, $12,000 for
fifth, $8,000 for sixth, $6,000
for seventh and $4,000 for
eighth.

In total, the IAAF will be
distributing a total of
$7,336,000 and so you just
know the Bahamians will be
vying for their share.
PAGE 14, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009



SPORTS

THE TRIBUNE



Olympic Stadium ready and waiting for World Championships



THE GENERAL VIEW of the Olympic Stadium in Berlin, Germany. The IAAF Track and Field World Championships 2009 take place at the Olympic
Stadium in Berlin August 15-23, 2009. In the foerground, the top of the Olympic flame from the Berlin 1936 Olympic games is seen.

(AP Photo: Gero Breloer)

T&T and El Salvador meet in
must-win World Cup qualifier

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Trinidad (AP) —
Trinidad and Tobago and El Salvador
were scheduled to meet in a must-win
World Cup qualifier for both countries at
Hasely Crawford Stadium yesterday.

They are the bottom sides in the six-
team finals of CONCACAF qualifying
with just one win between them in 10
games.

Only the top three automatically qual-
ify and the fourth goes to a playoff. El
Salvador had 5 points, one behind Mex-
ico. Trinidad had 2 points and no wins.

Both sides desperately needed a win to
stay in contention with five rounds left.
Trinidad made its World Cup finals

debut three years ago, while El Salvador
hasn't appeared since 1982.

"We know what we have to do and
we will go ahead in the best possible way
in trying to achieve the result in this
game,” Trinidad coach Russell Latapy
said on Tuesday.

"We know we must win the game and
that’s all we're thinking about at the
moment,” added English-born Soca War-
riors midfielder Chris Birchall.

Birchall was alluding to February's
opening fixture in the finals in which
Trinidad let a 2-0 lead slip late into a 2-2
draw.

Before the weekend, English Premier

League stars Bobby Zamora and Jlloyd
Samuel had been expected to join the
Soca Warriors for the first time. Howev-
er, Fulham striker Zamora was injured
playing for his club and Bolton Wander-
ers defender Samuel failed to collect his
passport in time.

Aside from February's 2-2 draw, there
have been four matches between the
sides in the last two years, which ended
with two wins for Trinidad, one for Los
Cuscatlecos and one draw.

El Salvador went into the game on the
back of a 2-1 friendly loss against Colom-
bia, which for coach Carlos De los Cobos
was an encouraging result.

erie Kam ner NO

this weekend

Coaches to meet today

THE Annual General
Meeting of Legacy Base-
ball/Softball Association is
scheduled to be held 10am
August 15 at the YMCA
meeting room.

Steve Burrows, presi-
dent of the youth organi-
sation, is inviting all Lega-
cy coaches, players and
parents to attend.

Also, a special coaches
meeting is slated for 6pm
today at the YMCA. “All
league coaches and offi-
cials are urged to be in
attendance to address mat-
ters of concern before the
AGM.”

“In addition to deter-
mining the officers to lead
the body over the next
year, the organisation will
address plans for the 2010
season and the period
leading up to the start of
the next season,” said Bur-
rows.

Included on the agenda
will be discussions on an
early start to the season
with a four-week develop-
ment camp for first time
players only of all ages to
be headed by Greg
Christie.

“This is tentatively
scheduled to begin in late
September 2009, and will
be followed by a winter
league series in October-
November to prepare
players for the upcoming
season.

“Additionally a Special
Coaches Symposium is
being planned to address
coaching concerns and
introduce interested per-
sons to the PONY League
and local rules and regu-
lations that govern Legacy
Baseball and Softball.

“Discussions will also be
held on efforts to attract
the Bahamas Baseball
Federation’s Champi-

onships to Grand Bahama
in 2010, and towards this
end the AGM will learn of
plans to improve the fields
at the YMCA in time for
next season.

According to a written
statement, Legacy enjoyed
a fruitful season that cul-
minated with a successful
campaign in the Bahamas
Baseball Federation’s
National Championships
resulting in another cham-
pionship, and the naming
of Legacy players to the
Bahamas national teams
that traveled this summer.

“We would want to add
to the experiences avail-
able to the players in our
league, including addition-
al trips for more of those
players not making our
All-star teams to the
nationals. To achieve this
we need the support of our
parents and all concerned
with youth development,”
said Burrows.

With improvements to
the fields, the executive
will also be recommend-
ing the relocation of girls’
softball development
leagues to the YMCA,
thus bringing both divi-
sions of Legacy to one
location.



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AUGUST



SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Ministry of Ed. to pursue
$30m in outstanding loans



By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

he Ministry of Educa-

tion will begin to

aggressively pursue

$30million outstanding

from the now defunct
Educational Guaranteed Loan Pro-
gramme next month, according to
the Minister of Education.

Carl Bethel told Tribune Business
the programme could be reinstated if
loan receipts show that the $60.8mil-
lion debt held by the government
can be reduced and sustained.

Hotels report significant
declines in activity during

Students who
had applied for
the loan this year
were enraged
when the pro-
gramme was sus-
pended almost
without warning.

President of
the Bahamas
Chamber of
Commerce,
Khaalis Rolle,
told this paper yesterday that would
have preferred to see a road project
scrapped before and educational
loan project.

BETHEL



"This wasn't the best decision,
they should consider the fact that
there are still people that are respon-
sible and would not abuse the sys-
tem," said Mr Rolle.

"A blanket suspension policy was-
n't the best decision.

"What you are you saying? Are
we going to forego educating our
people?"

Mr Bethel said those applicants
who had applied for the loans this
year, were given various grants that
do not have to pay back. However,
112 of the 175 grants of $10,000 are
for one year only.

Four merit scholars were given

awarded $25,000 for four years, ten
academic scholars $10,000 for four
years, and ten technical scholars
$10,000 for four years.

The government's grant program
allows for up to $1million awarded.

Now, according to Mr Bethel, the
ministry will have to consider a
method for collecting the outstand-
ing money, with the Bank of the
Bahamas "not well structured to help
students" restructure their loans.

However, Mr Bethel said: "The
cabinet has authorized the ministry
to pursue aggressive methodologies
to collect tax payer money.”

Mr Rolle contends that he gov-

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ernment should pursue defaulted
loan portfolios aggressively, but not
at he expensive of money for educa-
tion.

He suggested garnishing the wages
of those who do owe the govern-
ment or putting some other system in
place to increase the rate of repay-
ment.

"I'm quite sure there are a number
of them working. Use whatever
method is available," said Mr Rolle.

"We're making a critical mistake -
what's done has already been done -
develop a plan to correct it.

"Don't penalize the good ones for
the bad ones."

Miss Universe gives Harbour Island an economic boost

first six months of ‘09

DESPITE aggressive pro-
motional efforts by industry
and the Ministry of Tourism
and Aviation to stimulate vis-
itor arrivals, hotels reported
significant declines in busi-
ness activity during the first
six months of the year,
according to the Bahamas
Hotel Association's 2009 Mid-
Year Economic Review and
Tourism Outlook Survey con-
ducted last month.

As a result, there is a level
of cautious optimism by some
hoteliers that a turnaround
may begin to occur in 2010.

“Business remains guard-
ed. Until such time that the
recession ends and consumer
confidence begins to return,
we will continue to feel the
impact,” cautioned Bahamas
Hotel Association President
Robert Sands in commenting
on the survey results. Ninety-
per cent of the hotels partici-
pating in the survey reported
a decline in sales and room
occupancy during the first six
months of 2009.

More than three out of four
hoteliers (77 per cent) antici-
pate that revenue will be

down for the remaining six
months of the year.

“The combination of low-
er occupancy rates and lower
room rates is creating a very
difficult situation for many
hotels. While there is some
improvement in the outlook
for 2010, we anticipate we will
continue to be vulnerable”
said Mr Sands.

When asked their outlook
for 2010, 30 percent report a
negative outlook, 53 per cent
a fair outlook and 17 per cent
a positive outlook.

According to the survey,
most hoteliers have respond-
ed to the recession's pressures
and have taken a proactive
stance to reduce costs and
maximize revenue. Ninety per
cent of the hotels report hav-
ing made adjustments to
reduce their labour costs.
Eighty-Seven per cent have
reduced their average daily
room rate, with two-thirds
putting in place ‘value-added’
marketing programs. Two-
thirds (67 per cent) of the
hoteliers also have put in

SEE page 2B

Report offers bleak outlook



for Caribbean hotel industry

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP)

— A new report offers a

bleak outlook for the Caribbean hotel industry.

PKF Hospitality Research says the region’s hotels had an
average drop in profits of 16 per cent in 2008 and there will be
"further profit deterioration” this year.

The report finds steep discounts and special offers have not
offset a four per cent decline in visitors to the tourism-depen-

dent area.

The report published Monday also predicts that about 50
planned hotel projects will likely be delayed because develop-
ers are struggling to get financing. It noted a number of hotels

have been forced to close.

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By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

HARBOUR Island and
Eleuthera received their share
of the outlay trailing the Miss
Universe pageant contestants
Tuesday, with the island's
chief administrator lauding
the economic boost and
invaluable exposure the peo-
ple and place received.

Brenda Colebrooke said
the Miss Universe pageant
was a huge deal for all the
island's residents who came
together to prepare the island
for the arrival of about a
quarter of the pageant's dele-
gation.

Scores of people rode over
on the water taxis from North
Eleuthera, including Miss uni-
verse contestants and hun-
dreds more rented golf carts
form local vendors.

One Vendor alone claimed
to have rented 75 golf carts
on Tuesday alone at $40 per
cart.

He said it was the most
rental requests he has
received outside of Harbour
Island's regatta which attracts
hundreds of people from Nas-
sau and other Family Islands.

"The Miss Universe

Finally, a credit card that's

pageant coming to Harbour
Island is a big deal for the
people of Harbour island and
you can tell in the magnitude
of the preparations,” said Ms
Colebrooke.

“Tt kind of lifted everyone’s
spirit in this economically
depressed time.

“When you think about all
of the sweat and hard work
that went into it, it (the expe-
rience) is invaluable.

“They (Brilanders) knew
for a fact that Harbour Island
would never get publicity like
this again so they have gone
all out to take advantage of
it to the fullest extent and we
are hoping and praying and
looking for a positive out-
come to increase our tourism
income."

Bahamas Ferries also
hoped to capitalize on the
Miss Universe pageant by
chartering a special trip to the
island that would have taken
only an hour and a half.

However, according to Vin-
cent-Vanerpool Wallace time
constraints prevented the con-
tingent form going aboard the
Bohengy two.

Chief marketing officer of
Bahamas Ferries, Kaalis
Rolle, said the Bohengy
would have picked the con-

good for your health and

saves you money with

discounted rates.

testant up at a Paradise Island
Dock and sailed them direct
to Harbour island scything
one hour off of the trip, which
typically stops in Spanish
Wells.

Despite the more than two
hour trip Tuesday Bahamas
Ferries pulled into Harbour
Island 15 minutes before the
delegation arrived and
returned to Nassau as they
drove over the bridge to Par-
adise Island.

“Bahamas Ferries brings a
unique part of what the
Bahamas has to offer,” said
Mr Rolle.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said the trip would have been
a great opportunity to pro-
mote the expansion of ferry
services between islands.

“The original plan obvi-
ously would have given them
a magnificent schedule,” he
said.

“In order to get a full feel
for the Bahamas we far rather
would have had them go on
the Bohengy.”

Ms Colebrooke said she is
convinced that many people
came to Harbour Island only
to experience the magic of the
pageant.

According to her, during
the Miss Universe event at



the Coral Sands resort, which
included lunch, all of the
rooms were fully booked.
“Yes there are people that
come to Harbour Island
around this time, but I think
there is an increase in the
numbers because of this par-
ticular event,” she said. There

were people who said ‘we just
want to see it, we just want
to be a part of it.

299

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Straight to the point: Wants and want nots

Straight to the point.

HERE ARE SOME
WANT NOTS:

Today, Tomorrow Next Week -
Are Neither Here Nor There

Customers and clients today don’t
care how big you are or how old you
are, sure they want to deal with
somebody with a good reputation,
but more importantly at this moment
they only care about what is rele-
vant and how you can meet their
needs today, now.

Constant Contact

You can call a million times (not
suggested), e-mail daily (not recom-
mended) and you can phone hourly
(no way). The bottom line is the cus-

tomer will move/act when they are
ready.

Surprise

Price is not the determining factor;
as a matter of fact it is the least
determining factor in making a deci-
sion. Hhhhmmm.

Loyalty - Ha Ha

I don’t think loyalty exists like it
use to. I have proven this with part-
nerships and co- sponsoring. What
matters is what you can do for me
now.

How Great You Are

Nope they don’t remember that
either, what they remember is when
you could not service or deliver as
promised...

Promotional

Marketing



HERE ARE SOME WANTS:

What Do They Care About?

How much do you know about
them or their company? Do you
research, have information on their
company, their products etc.

Comfort and Assurance
They want security and assurance.
Can you, have you provided and

delivered on time in the past. They
would rather pay more and be
assured they get what they want
when they want it or need it.

Reputation

What and who, have you provided
for before? Delivering a year later
on something won’t get you far...

What are They Buying?

It’s not just a product, its assur-
ance and comfort customers are buy-
ing. No one likes to buy feeling
uncomfortable, or not positively
knowing. If you can demonstrate
this, then do it. They want to get the
most value for their money and see
returns.

All of these marketing strategies

are certain to keep your business on
top during these challenging eco-
nomic times. Have a productive and
profitable week! Remember,
“THOSE WHO MARKET WILL
MAKE IT.”

Scott Farrington is President of
SunTee EmbroidMe, a promotional
and marketing company specializ-
ing in promotional products. Estab-
lished over 27 years ago SunTee
EmbroidMe has assisted local busi-
nesses from various industries from
tourism, banking and telecommu-
nications in marketing themselves.
Readers can contact Mr. Farrington
at SunTee EmbroidMe on East
Shirley Street, by e-mail at
scott@sun-tee.com or by telephone
at 242-393-3104.

Hotels report significant declines in activity during first six months of ‘09

FROM page 1B

place energy efficiency mea-
sures including timers, low
wattage lighting, solar water
heaters, staff-led practical
energy conservation measures
and a range of other initia-
tives.

“Member properties are
paying strict attention to key
factors including product
improvement and marketing.
Several hotels reported hav-
ing the highest levels of cus-
tomer satisfaction on record.

We are encouraged by the
fact that many of our people
have responded. Our indus-
try is packed with exceptional
people with the professional-
ism and commitment to pro-
viding stellar service. All
hands need to be on deck in
this regard, as our reputation
can help pull us out of this
sooner than later. Word of
mouth is the best form of
marketing,” added the BHA
President.

The survey respondents
also pointed to several key
concerns which affect the via-
bility of their business. These

include the continued need
for lower airfares, additional
airlift to some of our islands,
high operating costs and
reduced cash flow. The Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation,
working with the private sec-
tor Promotion Board part-
ners, has had some success in
reducing airfares and attract-
ing additional airlift and
efforts are ongoing.

Applauded

Mr Sands applauded efforts
to bring about the Miss Uni-
verse Pageant.

“Industry has been pleased
to partner with the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation to help
make it possible for The
Bahamas to host the Miss
Universe pageant. This is a
long-term investment in our
destination as the real value
of the pageant is the incredi-
ble international press and
exposure we will receive for
months and years to come.
The immediate impact will
not be as significant as the
long-term impact,” he stated.

“We are encouraged by the
Government’s approach to
improving our product both

*, MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT JC
; NOTICE
CORRIDOR 18
SAUNDERS BEACH AREA
ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION

JOSE CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES S.A. has been contracted for the Completion of the New
providence Road Improvement
Project - International Package.

Cc

* 10 Ten (10) Casuarinas Trees willbe removed and replaced along Saunders Beach (Corridor 18)

* There will also be a permanent closure of the access to Vista Marina from West Bay Street effective August
23, 2009. Motorist are advised to use the following alternatives routes:
Grove Avenue through Coral Drive.

There will be delays along the vicinity due to the one-way traffic flow system. Local diversions will be
sign posted in due course and further information will be provided on the local media.

Tel: 242-322-8341 /242-322-2610

August 3rd - October 30th, 2009

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for our current visitors as well
as for the future. The beauti-
fication program is making a
significant difference in the
appearance of New Provi-
dence. Investments are being
made to improve our roads
and airports, led by the major
work being done at Lynden
Pindling International Air-
port. The downtown Nassau
improvements are beginning
to take shape. These are all
responsible initiatives tied to
our future which demonstrate
the maturity of our destina-
tion,” added Mr Sands.

The BHA mid-year eco-

nomic review and outlook
survey was conducted during
the first week of July, 2009.
The survey is undertaken to
assist BHA and public and
private sector stakeholders
with businesses and the econ-
omy. Recommendations are
also solicited to provide direc-
tion to BHA in planning its
program priorities and activi-
ties. The findings are based
upon responses from 30 hotels
representing a cross-section
of large and small hotels from
Nassau-Paradise Island,
Grand Bahama and the Out
Islands.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 3B





Fed likely to leave rates
at lows to aid recovery

By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Signs are growing that an eco-
nomic recovery may finally
be taking shape, but with dan-
gers still lurking, Federal
Reserve policymakers are all
but certain to leave a key
interest rate at record lows to
make sure any nascent turn-
around gains traction.

Fed Chairman Ben
Bernanke and his colleagues
resumed a two-day meeting
Wednesday morning, where
they will take fresh stock of
the nation’s economic and
financial conditions. So far,
barometers suggest the worst
recession since World War IT
is ending, and that the U.S.
economy has started to grow
again — or will soon.

With the economy turning
a corner, the Fed also will
weigh whether consumer
lending programmes intended
to ease the recession and stem
the financial crisis should be
extended.

"I think the Fed will show a
bit more confidence in the
staying power of the coming
economic recovery and indi-
cate that everything is on
track," said Mark Zandi, chief
economist at Moody's Econ-
omy.com.

Still, the Fed has warned
that recoveries after financial
crises tend to be slow. And
dangers remain.

While unemployment
dipped to 9.4 per cent in July,
the Fed says it’s likely to top
10 per cent this year because
companies won't be in a rush
to hire. That could restrain
the recovery if it crimps
spending by already-cautious
consumers.

Another risk comes from
the troubled commercial real
market where defaults on
loans are rising. That's a strain
on banks holding such loans.
The increasing risk is making
lenders ever-more stingy
about handing out new com-
mercial real-estate loans or
refinancing existing ones.

"That's one of the things
(Fed policymakers) might
want to single out that keeps
them worried," said Michael
Feroli, economist at JPMor-
gan Economics.

Against that backdrop, the



FEDERAL RESERVE CHAIRMAN Ben Bernanke attends a hearing on
regulatory reform before the House Financial Services Committee on
Capitol Hill in Washington...

Fed is widely expected to hold
a key bank lending rate at a
record low near zero at the
meeting's conclusion on
Wednesday afternoon. The
central bank also is expected
to renew a pledge to hold that
rate there for an "extended
period.” It has leeway to do
this because the Fed believes
inflation will stay low for a
while.

Economists predict the Fed
will leave its target range for
its banking lending rate
between zero and 0.25 per
cent through the rest of this
year. The rationale: super-low
lending will spur Americans
to spend more, which would
support the economy.

If the Fed holds its key rate
steady, that means commer-
cial banks’ prime lending rate,
used to peg rates on home
equity loans, certain credit
cards and other consumer
loans, will stay around 3.25
per cent, the lowest in
decades.

There have been signs the
economy is on the mend.

Factory activity is improv-
ing. Home sales are starting
to pick up, although much of
the activity involves people
snapping up bargain-priced
foreclosed properties. Com-
panies are cutting far fewer
workers.

Some financial stresses also
are easing, but lending is not
flowing normally and finan-
cial markets aren't back to full
throttle.

(AP Photo: J Scott Applewhite)

Many analysts believe the
economy — which logged a
mild contraction in the sec-
ond quarter after a dizzying
free-fall in the prior six
months — is growing now.
That makes it more likely the
Fed will consider whether
some rescue programmes
should continue, but any deci-
sions might not come at this
week's meeting.

One such programme,
aimed at driving down inter-
est rates on mortgages and
other consumer debt, involves
buying US Treasurys. The
central bank is on track to buy
$300 billion worth of Trea-
sury bonds by late Septem-
ber; it has bought $253 billion
so far.

Some economists think the
Fed will let the programme
expire. They say it's not clear
whether the programme low-
ered rates. And, there's been
concern that the programme
makes the Fed look like it is
printing money to pay for
Uncle Sam's exploding bud-
get deficits.

Meanwhile, the Term
Asset-Backed Securities Loan
Facility is intended to spark
lending to consumers and
small businesses. It got off to
a slow start in March and is
slated to shut down at the end
of December.

Despite the TALF, many
people are having trouble get-
ting loans, analysts say. More
recently, the programme was
expanded to provide relief to

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SIEM Cem e
























































Rt. Hon. Hubert A. Ingraham

PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, the Police Reserve is an extended arm of the Royal Bahamas Police
Force whose objectives are to assist the Force in the maintenance of law and order, the
preservation of peace, the protection of life and property, detection of crime, the
apprehension of offenders and the enforcement of all laws;

AND WHEREAS, while Reserve Police Officers do not serve the Force
on a fulltime basis, they nonetheless exercise and enjoy the same powers, authority,
advantages and immunities as do their fullttme counterparts, and are liable to the
same duties, responsibilities and discipline while on duty;

AND WHEREAS, in commemoration of the 44th Anniversary of the
establishment of The Royal Bahamas Police Reservists, the Reserve Force has organized
a month of activities to celebrate and promote greater public awareness of the role and
work of the organization in the maintenance of law and order and the preservation of peace;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Minister of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim Ist August - 31st August, 2009, as

“THE ROYAL BAHAMAS POLICE RESERVE MONTH”.

IN WITNESS WHEREOK, | have
hereunto set my Hand and
Seal this 23rd day of July, 2009

Wasel Fiaden

HUBERT A. INGRAHAM
PRIME MINISTER

LifeChoices

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mi INTERNATIONAL A member of Colonial Group International: Insurance, Health, Pensions, Life


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Asia stocks down on China
data doubts, Wall Street

By ELAINE
KURTENBACH
AP Business Writer

SHANGHAI (AP) —
Asian markets tumbled
Wednesday with Chinese
shares falling nearly five per
cent on renewed jitters over
the economic outlook after

Wall Street suffered its
biggest loss in five weeks.
European markets were
mixed.

Analysts said the sell-off,
particularly in China, was
partly a correction of Tues-
day’s rally when markets
overreacted to data showing
Beijing’s massive stimulus



Legal Notice



NOTICE





NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:




(a) DESTREZZA OVERSEAS LIMITED is in dissolution under the provi-



sions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.




(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on August 12, 2009 when



its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar Gen-

eral.




(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace

spending was adding momen-
tum to the world’s third-
biggest economy. After sift-
ing the slew of figures,
investors decided the signs of
improving growth weren’t as
impressive as hoped for.

“The momentum of the
economic recovery is not very
good, because it’s not as fast
as expected,” said Huang
Xiangbin, an analyst for Cin-
da Securities in Beijing. “Not
so much private investment
is following the government
investment.”

US stock markets fell Tues-
day as the Federal Reserve
started a two-day policy meet-
ing that may provide a fresh
assessment of how the world’s
largest economy is faring. The
US central bank is expected
to hold interest rates steady
at near zero when it ends its

“The momentum of the economic
recovery is not very good, because it’s
not as fast as expected. Not so much

private investment is following the
government investment.”

— Huang Xiangbin, analyst for Cinda Securities in Beijing



meeting Wednesday.

European shares were
mixed in early trading, with
Britain’s FTSE 100 slipping
0.2 per cent while Germany’s
DAX index gained 0.4 per
cent and France’s CAC-40
edged up 0.1 per cent.






West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are required

ACE ACADEMY



on or before the 14th day of September, 2009 to send their names and address-



es and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or,

Academics, Creativity, Excellence



in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution





made before such debts are proved.

August 13, 2009

Offering K2, K3, K4 and K5 Programs




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Asia’s biggest benchmark,
Tokyo’s Nikkei 225 stock
average, retreated from a 10-
month high, losing 150.46
points, or 1.4 per cent, to close
at 10,435.00. A stronger yen
hurt exporters’ shares.

Fnancial stocks came under
pressure after influential
banking analyst Richard Bove
of Rochdale Securities wrote
in a research note that bank
earnings won’t improve in the
second half of this year and
that many companies will post
losses.

“His report came in just as
investors were looking for
leads to sell shares,” said
Masatoshi Sato, market ana-
lyst at Mizuho Investors Secu-
rities Co. in Tokyo.

Hong Kong’s Hang Seng
Index fell 638.97, or three per
cent, to 20,435.24 on heavy
selling of shares in big main-
land Chinese companies and
weakness in mainland-traded
shares.

Shanghai’s Composite
Index tumbled 4.7 per cent to
3,112.72, with financial and
steel companies like Baoshan
Iron & Steel and China Life
Insurance leading the decline.

Figures released Tuesday
in China showed improve-
ment in trade, retail sales and
industrial production, adding
to spreading signs of a global
recovery. But some said the
gains were not as big as hoped
for, and corporate profits
remain relatively weak.

Australia’s benchmark
S&P/ASX 200 index edged up

helped by stronger bank
shares.

Elsewhere, shares fell in
South Korea, Taiwan and the
Philippines.

In the US Tuesday,
investors dumped financial
shares, shifting to safer havens
like consumer staples compa-
nies and government debt.
The Dow Jones industrial
average fell 96.50, or one per
cent, to 9,241.45. The broader
S&P 500 index fell 12.75, or
1.3 per cent, to 994.35. It was
the biggest drop for both the
Dow and the S&P 500 index
since July 7.

US stock index futures
turned lower, with Dow
futures down 12 points, or 0.1
per cent, to 9,204.

Oil prices hovered above
$69 a barrel after the U.S. and
OPEC said global crude con-
sumption will slump this year
as economies struggle to
emerge from recession.
Benchmark crude for Sep-
tember delivery was down 26
cents to $69.19 a barrel by
midday in Singapore in elec-
tronic trading on the New
York Mercantile Exchange.

In currency dealings, the
dollar fell to 95.57 yen in
Tokyo late Wednesday from
95.94 yen in New York late
Tuesday. The euro fell to
$1.4126 from $1.4145.

e Associated Press
Researcher Bonnie Cao in
Beijing and Associated Press
Writer Shino Yuasa in Tokyo

Practice in Obstetrics & Gynecology at
Oxford Medical Centre, 4th Terrace East
off Collins Avenue, Centreville on 4th
August, 2009
















$2,495.00
Cash Price
$2,295.00

Now Available At

TAYLOR
INDUSTRIES

SHIRLEY STREET « TEL: 322-8941
OPEN: MON - FRI 7:30 am - 4:30 pm
SAT 8:00 am - 12 noon

0.3 per cent to 4,343.10,

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, AMBIROSE VALENTINO
BROWN_of KILDEER DRIVE, P.O. BOX N-4346,
Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change the name to AMBROSE
VALENTINO ARMBRISTER. [f there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this
notice.

contributed to this report

Telephone: (242) 328-2566/7
Fax: (242) 325-2249

Eo

cr A L
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
WEDNESDAY, 12 AUGUST 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,565.41| CHG 0.17 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -146.95 | YTD % -8.58
FINDEX: CLOSE 784.27 | YTD -6.06% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

We Accept
VISA, MASTERCARD,
SUN CARD & DISCOVER



FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

COLON!

ROYAL SFIDELITY

Money at Work

RAYGIAN REPROGRAPHICS
Tel: 327-8640, 437-8687
West Bay Street, Cable Beach

PUBLIC NOTICE

“ TL

Please be advised _ that
Mr. Raphael Noel “Ray”Adams
is no longer associated with
Raygian Reprographics and has
Bahamas Waste :
Fidelity Bank : : ; : no involvement whatsoever
Cable Bahamas 7 ‘i
pdine adie with the company. He is
Commonwealth Bank (S1) therefore NOT Authorized
Consolidated Water BDRs :
Doctor's Hospital : . : : : . to transact any business
whatsoever on behalf of the
company.

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Previous Close Today's Close Change

Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.39 10.39 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Security Symbol Last Sale Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 : 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 < Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C} + FBB13 100.00 . 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4005
2.9047
1.4830
3.1031
12.9801
101.6693
96.7398
1.0000
9.2765
1.0622
1.0243

5.13
1.00
0.30
5.49

5.13
1.00
0.30
5.49

The Management

0.00

ases)
Interest Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

NOTICE |

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (4) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that: -

1000.00
52wk-Low EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $ P/E
0.300 N/M
0.480 N/M
0.000 256.6

Symbol Yield
Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

52wk-Low
1.3320
2.8952
1.4059

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
77-Aug-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
3.1031 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
12.3289 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
9.0775 _ Fidelity International Investment Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund

(a) LAPINKULTA LTD. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 20th day of July, A.D., 2009 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308

1.0000 _ FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0585 30-Jun-09 East Bay St.
MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid § - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS § - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value CB. Strategy Ltd.
DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful =
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100. LIQUIDATOR

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007



TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 5B



Q2 home sales
erow in 39 states

By ALAN ZIBEL
AP Real Estate Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
United States home sales
grew in the second quarter in
39 states, another sign that
the ailing housing market is
finally coming to life.

Total quarterly sales rose
3.8 per cent to a seasonally
adjusted annual rate of 4.76
million, from 4.58 million in
the first quarter, but were still
about three per cent below a
year ago, the National Asso-
ciation of Realtors said
Wednesday.

Sales posted quarterly gains
of 20 per cent or more in Ida-
ho, Hawaii, New York, Wis-
consin and Nebraska. But
Alaska, Wyoming, California,
Colorado and Michigan
dropped by at least six per
cent.

Prices, however, were still
down from a year ago in 129
out of 155 metropolitan areas
the group tracks. The median
sales price in the quarter was
$174,100, almost 16 per cent
below a year ago.

The biggest drop, of nearly

Home sales up
Pending home sales rose 6.7
percent higher than in June 2008
Pending U.S. home sales index

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THE HALAS



53 per cent, was in Fort
Myers, Florida. Prices also fell
35 per cent or more in
Phoenix, Riverside, Califor-
nia and Las Vegas. The
biggest price gain, of nearly
31 per cent, was in Daven-
port, Iowa, followed by Cum-
berland, Md., at nearly 22 per
cent.

Nationwide, foreclosures
and distressed sales made up
more than a third of all sales
in the second quarter.

CHART SHOWS seasonally
adjusted annual rate of pend-
ing US home sales...

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS

The Securities Commission of The Bahamas, a statutory agency responsible
for the oversight, supervision and regulation of the Investment Funds,
Securities and Capital Markets in or from The Bahamas, as well as
the supervision of Financial and Corporate Service Providers, invites
applications from qualified Bahamians for the following position:

Administrative Assistant IV:

Primary Responsibilities:
Overseeing Departmental Filing System
Scheduling meetings and preparing agendas
Recording all correspondence for the department
Drafting & Acknowledging correspondence

Assist with the recording of incoming mail for SCB and maintenance of data

Researching background material
Assist with the preparation of Board Meetings

Assisting with the Secretarial and Administrative duties and functions of
Investigations Officer, Deputy Legal Counsel and Legal Officers
Provide back up for Administrative Assistant to the Legal Counsel

Special Projects
Overseeing Follow Ups

Qualifications and Experience:
2+ years experience in similar field.

5 BGCSE’s at grade C level or better, including Mathematics and English.
Working knowledge of the Securities Industry and the relevant legislation is a

plus..

Competencies:
¢ Excellent oral and written communication skills

* Proficient in computer skills (Microsoft Office applications, particularly Word)

A competitive salary and benefits are being offered. To apply, please provide a

resume to the attention of:

MANAGER —- CORPORATE AFFAIRS

SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS

P. O. BOX N-8347
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Fax: 356-7530

E-Mail: info@scb.gov.bs

Applications should be submitted no later than August 19th, 2009.



Another sign ailing housing
market finally coming to life



(AP Photo: Paul Sakuma)

Many economists now say
that the worst of the housing
recession is over, though fore-
closures are expected to rise
over the next year.

Lawrence Yun, the trade
group’s chief economist,
called the sales increase “a
hopeful sign for the econo-

ord

my.

NOTICE

GLOBAL TECHNOLOGY INTERNATIONAL
SERVICES LIMITED

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 138 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 24" day of July, 2009.

Amit Singhania
Liquidator
of
GLOBAL TECHNOLOGY INTERNATIONAL
SERVICES LIMITED

ENERGY SAVING
CONSULTANTS

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For more information or survey
Email: energysavingsconsultants @ hotmail.com

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PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
ADVERTISEMENT

VACANCY

TWO (2) VACANCIES FOR
EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN (EMT) BASIC

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post
Emergency Medical Technician - Basic, Corporate Office, Public Hospitals
Authority.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications: -

A minimum of two (2) subjects at the B.G.C.S.E level at grade “C’ or above,
or equivalent (including Math, English, Science); Good oral, writing and
reading skills; Certification as an Emergency Medical Technician, Basic with
three years relevant experience; Must be able to communicate and interact
with members of the public and other public safety and health professionals
during times of extreme stress, while maintaining composure.

LICENSES CERTIFICATIONS
Obtains certification equivalent to US National Registry EMT-Basic.

2.Maintains certification in Basic Life Support (BLS); Pre-hospital Trauma
Life Support (PHTLS); American Heart Association (AHA) and Cardio
Pulmonary Recitation (CPR) for the Professional Rescuer.

Registered and licensed with the Health Professions Council (Bahamas).

JOB SUMMARY

Responsible for providing timely pre hospital care to patients who require
emergency medical assistance; Secure scene and maintains safety.

DUTIES:
Responds immediately to emergency calls.
Secures the scene of an emergency situation and maintains safety.

Performs basic life support and other medical assistance until the
patient arrives at the hospital.

Completes required reports related to patient care and provides
electronic, verbal and written report to medical staff.

Communicates with hospitals and dispatch center using various radio /
telephone equipments.

tage that all emergency equipment are in the ambulance at all
imes.

¢ Prepares and submits an inventory of supplies at the end of each shift.

Letters of Application, resume, documentary evidence of qualifications
and three (3) references should be submitted, no later than Friday, 21*
August 2009, to the Human Resources Director, Public Hospitals Authority,
P.O. Box N-8200 or Corporate Office Building ‘B’, 3 & West Terraces,

Centreville.


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 7B

PEOPLE apply for jobs at a job fair in Mexico City. Thousands came to the fair looking for up to 12,000
advertised jobs, organised by Mexico City's Labour Secretary. The Treasury reported the country has lost
596,200 jobs since June 2008, a 4.1 per cent decline as of June of this year...

(AP Photo: Eduardo Verdugo)

Mexico: Falling oil could
ereatly worsen recession

MEXICO CITY (AP) —
Mexico's finance secretary is
warning that falling oil pro-
duction and prices may push
the already cash-strapped
nation into its worst econom-
ic recession in 30 years.

Mexico's state-owned oil
company Pemex currently
pumps about 2.6 million bar-
rels a day, down from about
2.8 billion a day last year,
Finance Secretary Agustin
Carstens told a Senate com-
mittee Tuesday. Carstens said
he expects output to slide to
about 2.5 million barrels a day
next year.

Mexico is the third-largest

oil supplier to the United
States but its reserves are dry-
ing up, and Petroleos Mexi-
canos has been slow to
explore deep-water deposits.

Even with the declines in
output, oil revenues funded
40 per cent of Mexico's bud-
get last year. The government
protected oil income this year
by hedging prices at $70 a bar-
rel. But those guarantees
aren't in place for 2010,
Carstens said. He forecast
2010 export prices of $53 a
barrel.

Carstens said the combined
drop in revenues and produc-
tion will force Mexico's econ-

omy to lag behind an antici-
pated global economic recov-
ery in 2010.

Mexico sends 80 per cent
of its exports to the United
States and has been hard-hit
by the slowdown in the US
economy. It also has seen a
huge plunge in the amount of
money Mexican migrants in
the United States send home.

The central bank says
remittances — Mexico's sec-
ond-largest source of foreign
income after oil exports —
plummeted nearly 18 per cent
in the second quarter of 2009
compared to the same period
last year.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

NOTICE

The College of The Bahamas wishes to advise all students who have
not received a response to their applications from the Admissions
Office to check on their status for the Fall 2009 semester at the

Portia Smith Building,

2nd floor on the main Oakes Field Campus

August 12 - 14, 2009

between the hours of 9:00 a.m. — 3: (4) p.m.

The public is advised that The College of The Bahamas will be closed
for one day on Monday 17th August, 209, as all employees will be
taking part in the annual seminar,

The College will resume normal business hours on
Tuesday, 18th August, 2009.

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PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





European, US markets up
despite Asian declines

By PAN PYLAS

AP Business Writer

LONDON (AP) — Euro-
pean and US stock markets
rose Wednesday ahead of a
key policy statement from the

US Federal Reserve —
despite jitters earlier in Asia.

The FTSE 100 index of
leading British shares closed
up 45.42 points, or one per
cent, at 4,716.76 while Ger-
many's DAX rose 64.28

WAN TED

MEDICAL SALES
REPRESENTATIVE

The medical rep will be responsible for
promoting international pharmaceutical brands
to the healthcare community in The Bahamas.

Skills & Educational Requirements

/ Bachelor’s degree in medical sciences, allied
health, or business administration

/ Effective communication and presentation

abilities

/ Effective time management, planning, and

organizing skills

Proficiency in a variety of computer applications
/ Self-motivated team player
Previous experience in pharmaceutical detailing

would be an asset

Candidates should possess a reliable motor
vehicle, be willing to travel to the family islands,
the U.S., and other foreign countries.

Please send application letter and résumé by
August 21, 2009 to:

MEDICAL REP
P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas
or Fax: 393-0440

We thank all applicants for their interest; however,
only short-listed candidates will be contacted.

Discover BT'VI
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points, or 1.2 per cent, at
5,350.09. The CAC-40 in
France was 51.06 points, or
1.5 per cent, higher at
3,507.24.

On Wall Street, the Dow
Jones industrial average was
up 127.41 points, or 1.4 per
cent, at 9,368.86 around mid-
day New York time while the
broader Standard & Poor's
500 index rose 13.07 points,
or 1.3 per cent, to 1,007.42.

The gains in Europe and



TPT Per

the US came despite big loss-
es in Asia, where investors
were spooked by Tuesday's
losses on Wall Street. Chinese
shares were the worst hit after
the Dow and the S&P fell by
their biggest amounts in
weeks.

Analysts said it was impor-
tant to keep things in per-
spective, especially as trading
volumes are particularly light
at the moment — low vol-
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volatility.

"It's important to remem-
ber that the Dow is up over 40
per cent in five months so it’s
only natural to have pullbacks
but if we are to see the index
break through the 10,000 bar-
rier, there needs to be more
signs of economic recovery,”
said Ian Horsley, a financial
trader at Spreadex.

Signs of recovery in the
world's largest economy
emerged with the news that
the US trade deficit edged up
slightly in June as imports
rose for the first time in 11
months — a sign that con-
sumers are getting more con-
fident again.

The state of US retailing is
under the microscope this
week. As well as official gov-
ernment retail sales data,
investors will have earnings
from the likes of Wal-Mart
Stores Inc., Nordstrom Inc.
and JC Penney Corp.

Department store chain
Macy's Inc. kicked off the
retailing results season with
better than expected second-
quarter earnings after a big
cost-cutting exercise — help-
ing the stock to rally three per
cent.

Investors are fully aware
that without the support of
the US consumer, which
accounts for around 70 per
cent of the US economy and
20 per cent of the global econ-
omy, any recovery will soon
fizzle out.

Attention later will be on
the Fed's policy statement
when it concludes its two-day
meeting later.

It is widely expected that
the US central bank will hold
interest rates steady at near
zero when it ends its meeting.
However, investors will be
looking to see if the Fed
sounds a note of cautious
optimism in its accompanying
statement and whether it has
plans to expand its asset-pur-

NOTICE

INVITATION TO BID

chasing programme now that
funds are running dry.

Hopes that the US econo-
my will recover sooner than
anticipated from its deepest
recession since World War 2
has helped stocks around the
world rally hard over the last
month or so, sending major
indexes to 2009 highs. Stocks
usually rally around six
months before actual recov-
ery emerges in the official
data.

With recent gains so siz-
able, analysts said profit-tak-
ing could resume during the
US session.

"Stock markets look frag-
ile and some further pullback
could continue in the near
term,” said Neil Mackinnon,
chief economist at ECU
Group.

Earlier in Asia, Tokyo's
Nikkei 225 stock average,
retreated from a 10-month
high, losing 150.46 points, or
1.4 per cent, to close at
10,435.00.

Hong Kong's Hang Seng
Index fell 638.97, or three per
cent, to 20,435.24 on heavy
selling of shares in big main-
land Chinese companies and
weakness in mainland-traded
shares, while Shanghai's main
composite index tumbled 4.7
per cent to 3,112.72.

Australia's benchmark
S&P/ASX 200 index edged up
0.3 per cent to 4,343.10, but
shares fell in South Korea,
Taiwan and the Philippines.

Oil prices bounced back
after an unexpected fallin US
stocks. Benchmark crude for
September delivery was up
$1.28 to $70.73 a barrel in
electronic trading on the New
York Mercantile Exchange.

The dollar was up 0.3 per
cent at 96.19 yen while the
rose 0.6 per cent to $1.4228.

¢ AP Business Writer Elaine
Kurtenbach in Shanghai con-
tributed to this report

GREEN TURTLE CAY WATER DISTRIBUTION IMPROVEMENTS — PHASE 2

1. The Water & Sewerage Corporation invites bids from suitably qualified contractors for

the = construction

of the

Green

Turtle Cay

Water Distribution

Improvements/Extensians. The Scope of Works include the provision of all labour.
equipment, matenals and other necessary services required for the:-

TRANSMISSION/DISTRIBUTION MAINS

Supply and Installation of approximately 20,000 linear feet of 6-inch, PVC pipe,
6,500 linear feet of 4-lnch PVC pipe, 5000 linear feet of 2-inch PVC water mains,
and 300 no. %-inch Service Laterals and 5 no. 71-inch service laterals, along with
all associated valves and appurtenances.

Bids from potential contractors must be accompanied by comprehensive details from the
Qualification Questionnaire out-lining:

a} Expenence on similar projects
b} Personnel to be assigned (including their experience on similar projects)
c) Financial capacity to execute the works

The Contractor's qualifications and bid price will be evaluated for award of Contract.

Bidding detuments and drawings wil be available on request beginning Tuesday, 18”
August 2008,from lhe Engineering & Planning Department of ihe Waler & Sewerage
Corporation for a nominal fee of $100.00 per set. The Pre-Bid Meeting is scheduled for
Tuesday, 25" August 2009 at 10: a.m. at the site.

Completed documents must be relumed to the address below, no later than 4:00 p.m, on
Friday 11° September 2009

General Manager

Water & Sewerage Corporation

a7 Thompson Blvd.
P.O, Box N-3905
Nassau, Bahamas

Attn: Engineering & Planning Division

Telephone: (242) 302-5512
Facsimile: (242) 302-5538


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 9B



On the Money: Should you hire help to land a job?

By CANDICE CHOI
AP Personal
Finance Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Fred
Alm wants a full-time job. So
much so that he paid a profes-
sional $200 to make his
résumé sparkle.

"T figured it would be worth
it, even just to see what hap-
pens,” said Alm, a 52-year-old
resident of Troy, N.Y. who
teaches business classes part
time at a community college.

It's only been a week since
Alm got his new resume, but
he thinks the investment will
pay off. It now starts with a
“personal profile" that brings
together his mixed back-
ground as a teacher and mar-
keting professional. Then it
dives into his key skills so hir-
ing managers can see why he's
right for the job.

Whether the changes will
make a difference is still to be
seen. Unable to turn teaching
into full-time work for the past
several years, Alm decided to
explore other opportunities.
The timing isn't in his favor.

Despite some glimmers of
improvement, the job market
remains crowded with an
unemployment rate of 9.4 per
cent. That figure rises to 16.3
per cent if you include those
who've given up looking or
settled for part-time work.

Given the competition, Alm
isn't the only one looking for
an edge. You may also wonder
if a resume writer, job coach or
other career services profes-
sional can improve your
chances.

Here's the rundown on what
you need to know.

PICKING A

PROFESSIONAL

The career services indus-
try is not regulated; anyone
can sport the title of "job
coach" or "resume writer."
Professional organizations and
schools offer numerous cer-
tificates, but you can go cross-
eyed trying to figure out what
the various acronyms mean.

For instance, the Interna-
tional Coach Federation, the



LISA VAN CLEEF, a human resources manager at Tommy Hilfiger,
meets with job seekers at the WWD Fashion Career Expo in New York.
(AP Photo: Diane Bondareff)

National Resume Writers
Association and the Career
Management Alliance each
offers its own credentials. It's
also possible you'll find a per-
fectly capable professional
with no certifications but plen-
ty of experience.

"People should hire coaches
or resume writers whose work
they've seen and with whom
they feel trust or a rapport,"
said Liz Sumner, executive
director of Career Manage-
ment Alliance, a trade group
of about 400 career service
professionals based in Peter-
borough, N.H.

If you're more comfortable
working with an established
business, many recruiting firms
now offer career services too.
One time-tested way to finda
trusted professional is to ask
friends and family for refer-
rals.

Whatever route you choose,
ask for work samples and a
free consultation before fork-
ing over any money. A con-
sultation might take about 15
minutes and should give you a
sense of what to expect from
the arrangement.

Finally, get the deal in writ-
ing. Spell out the services to
be provided, and by when.
This ensures you and the per-
son you hire are on the same

page.
HOW IT WORKS

Resume Writing: Given the
sea of information online, it's

natural to wonder what exact-
ly you're paying for when hir-
ing a resume writer or career
coach.

With resumes, it's not just
a matter of having a proof-
reader check your grammar or
fill in a template with your
details. The process generally
starts with an extensive inter-
view that lasts about an hour
or longer and covers topics
including past jobs, your work
style and career goals. The line
of questioning is meant to
uncover accomplishments you
might not have considered sig-
nificant.

"Once my candidates start
talking to me, I'm always
amazed that they don't give
themselves credit for all
they've done," said Alison
Rosenblum, owner of Hudson
River Career Resources in
Albany, N.Y.

The writer should then com-
pose a resume highlighting
your most compelling traits.

You should get a draft
resume about a week after the
interview, with an option to
suggest changes for no extra
charge.

Coaching: Hiring a full-ser-
vice career coach usually
involves a much deeper com-
mitment. It generally covers
all aspects of the job search,
including prepping for an
interview and tips on net-

working.

In addition to the one-on-
one sessions, you might get
takeaway assignments to
ensure you're staying active in
the job hunt. Sessions can take
place over the phone or in per-
son.

If you don't need — or can't
afford — that level of guid-
ance, career coaches often
offer a la carte help too. For
instance, you might just want
help polishing your online pro-
file.

Of course, most people
aren't hiring career coaches
just for technical tips. For
many, the benefit of a coach is
having someone to keep them
motivated and on track.

"Coaches can hold you
accountable to achieve your
goal," said Amy Richardson, a
spokeswoman for the Interna-
tional Coach Federation, a
trade group based in Lexing-
ton, Ky.

Objective feedback from a
professional could also shed
light on why you're not get-
ting calls back.

WHAT YOU'LL PAY

Prices can vary greatly. Flat
fees are more common for
specific tasks, such as resume
writing or creating a Web
page. The Career Manage-
ment Alliance estimates that a
resume for a midlevel profes-
sional can cost $400 or more,
but it's likely you'll be able to
find something much cheap-
er. Check with local job place-
ment firms to get a read on
going rates.

For broader career guid-
ance, you'll likely be charged
by the hour.

The International Coach
Federation says you can
expect to pay an average of
$160 an hour, with coaches
often recommending a set
number of weekly or monthly
sessions. Coaches might offer
discounts for small group ses-
sions or a package of services.

For instance, career coach

LEGAL NOTICE

Jan Melnik charges between
$850 and $1,200 for an execu-
tive-level resume, cover letter
and action plan that spans
eight weeks. Clients can pay
extra for help with specific
items, such as writing e-mails
or cold calling potential
employers. The additional ser-
vices range from $300 to $500,
said Melnik, who's based in
Durham, Conn.

It's unlikely you'll recover
any money if you're unhappy
with the resume writer or
career coach you hire. You can
file a complaint with the Fed-
eral Trade Commission or
your state consumer agency,
but there's no guarantee your
case will be investigated.

THE ALTERNATIVES
There are ways to get per-
sonalized career advice on a



budget.

College career fairs are usu-
ally open to alumni and any-
one in the community sur-
rounding the campus, said
Melnik. These fairs typically
have onsite career coaches or
resume writers who give free
one-on-one sessions.

Many career coaches also
do pro bono work; Melnik
suggests checking with public
libraries, nonprofit groups and
community centers for free
career workshops.

Another place to look is
your state unemployment
offices. The level of services
varies depending on where
you live, but most centers offer
interview training or resume
reviews.

e Have a personal finance
question? Send it to your-
money(at)ap.org

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)












LION OIL TOOLS LTD.

In Voluntary liquidation





“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
LION OIL TOOLS LTD. is in Dissolution.”







The date of commencement of dissolution is the 10th day





of August, 2009.

Mayo Secretaries Limited
Akara Building, 24 De Castro Street
Wickhams Cay I, Road Town
Tortola, BVI
Liquidator




















NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF JOHN A. ROBINS (also known as ALPHONSO JOHN






Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

LANDE ESTATES LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 of the International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, LANDE ESTATES LIMITED, has been
dissolved and struck off the Register according to the
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
on the 17th day of July, 2009.

CI Accountancy Limited
Boatside Business Centre
Warden
Northumberland
NE46 4SH
Liquidator

Employment Opportunity

FINANCIAL MANAGER

VWe seek to employ a talented, innovative, leader with a passion
te succeed and the capacity be initiane progress.

Job Requirements & Experience

Bachelor's Degree in Accounting or an equivalent from a
recognized tertiary level Institution.

Minimune of 3 years practical experience ina similar robe,

Exporicnoe in Management Report ng ina com«ercial
enterprise, with Oracle database manageneant system,

Demenstrated abilicy to manage, motivate and develop a
team and affoctively work with staff,

Extensive experionce using automated accounting systems
such as Quickbools and Peachtree

Demonstrated ability in managing projects.

Well adjusted to working for organizations with 24/7
operations.

Procticall/Specialist Skills include
Technical and practical skills in financial accounting.
Skills in forecasting, budpeting and analyses of variances.
Strong customer focus (internal and external).

Strong communication and interpersonal akille oo effectively
translate ideas.

Strong reasoning and interprection skilk.
Dervanstraced abilicy to research inmewative solucions.
Strong computer and Microsoft Office skills,

The oversight of (A) payrall processing and reporting, (Bi
customer balling and: (C) account recenciliations

Managing year end audits.

APPLY VIA EMAIL BEFORE August 14, 2007 TO;
executivefinditeemail.com

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
PLATINUM STAR GROUP LTD. is in dissolution. Mrs, Al-
rena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at Win-
terbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names addresses and par-
ticulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the
27th August, 2009.

Road Traffic Department
Road Safety Competition

{ {
i'm lovin’ it

‘Whoene: he est place to cross the road"
Helove crosammg Lhe road hat dhould yea do

What do the folle ning oul gi qu peat!

NAME:
ADMEESS:
4k:

TELEPHONE:



ROBINS) late of Yamacraw Beach Drive in the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.
Notice is hereby given that all persons having any claim or de-
mand against the above Estate are required to send their names,
addresses and particulars of the same certified in writing to the un-
dersigned on or before the 10th day of September, A.D., 2009 and
if required, to prove such debts or claims, or default be excluded
from any distribution; after the above date the assets will be distrib-
uted having regard only to the proved debts or claims of which the
Executrices shall have had notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons indebted to the said
Estate are requested to make full settlement on or before the 27th
day of August, A.D., 2009.



SYDBRI LEGAL SERVICES
Naomi House
No.19, 9th Terrace & West Court
P.O. Box EE-15075
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Executrices

Ee SS oe

Bahamas Supermarkets Limited operates a leading
supermarket chain in The Bahamas. As a market leader,
the Company prides itself on delivering premier service
throwgh its City Market supermarkets, having a strong
commitment to its customers, associates and community.

An opportunity for Management Trainees. (Future
Leaders) exists in New Providence to join this market
leader.

Reporting to the Head of Retail Operations, the
successful applicants will;

Be sell-motivated and highly energetic

Have effective supervisory skills

Be highly flexible and mobile and prepared to work
evenings, weekends and holidays

Have a clean police record, drivers license, good
character references and be physically fit

Have completed high school with a minimum of 3
BGCSE

Have good communication (verbal and written)
and interpersonal skills

Be numerate and analytical with the ability te
derive information from financial reports

Be a strong problem solver

Have the ability te multi task

Solid functional computer skills with working
knowledge of Microsoft applications

Previous experience in Retail Management is an
mSSel,

Salary and benefits will be commensurate with
experience and qualifications,

lf you have what it takes to succeed in this challenging
role, forward your resume and cover letter to:
* Human Resources Director
Balharnias Supermarkets Limited
East-West Highway + P.O. Box MN 3738+ Nassau, Bahamas
OF email to; humanresources@bahamassupermarkets.com
Ne teleniene inquiries please

City Mark /

~ io


New F fi

1. Waseart bot #147 (10,55 79q.

ft)-Munnings Dr & Roy

Weat Ln Southem Heights

Sub (Appraised Value

$90,000.00)

Lot #59 (2,500sq. fL) whee
1, 104s. f. Blk #35 hee #o-4-
Lincoln Bled (Appraised
Value $57,790.00)

3. Lat (803 100°) whailding
1,91 2sq, f.-Deveaux St
(Appraised Valoc
$189, 000,00)

4. Lots #29 & #30, (50x 100"),
Blk #47 whuilding |,140sq,
ft-Matthew St, Nassau
Village (Appraised Value
$145,000.00)

Andros

4. Beach front lot 9,000eq. Ft
wibilding 2,100sq. ft.
Pinders Mangrove Cay
Andros (Appraised Valoc
$200,000.00)

6 Lot 434453, f. widuplex
1,1 745q, f.-Fresh Creek
Andros (Appraised Valoc
$94,640.00)

Grand Bahama

7, Lot #20(17,150sq. ft.)
whee 2,00leg. ft. Blire,
Sec #2-Sea Gull Dr,
Bahama Reef Yacht &
Country Clah Sub Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $290,000.00)

8. Vacant lot #39, Blk #9
(14,3975q. ft) Yorkshire
Dr, Bohamia West Replat
(Grand Bahama
(Appraised Valoc
$25,000.00)

4 Vacant Lot #8 Blk #12 Lina
#3 (11 ,250sq. ft }-+Henny
Ave Derby Sub Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $65,000,00)

10, Lot #43 B (100'x150")
building-Melson Rd
Pomciana Gardens Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Valoe $96,000.00)

LL, Lot#7 (30's a")
aysixplex 2-storey
apartment building &
Church 3,400sq, ft.-Martin
Town, Kings Sub Bight Mile
Rock Cirand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$211,200.00)

Pot
'

SUV(s)




9%) Ford Explorer :

2003 Dodge Carnvan
I free Tne s



107 Deora boke Ascii Meck:
Chong Trek



L3E? Ford LOD Bon Trek



Et (ha) Rabole Vaaeal wel LE



SE (0e84) Tasco Murine Wessel
Gee Dreams) eam 20°, Depth 5"
Commins fngine

1"

12.

14.

) BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK

Cable Beach, West Bay Street,
P.0.Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas
Tels(242) 327-5780/327-5793-6
Fax:(242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www.bahamasdevelopmentbank.com

Properties

Lot #10 room botel
5,00Gsq. fi. on 4.99 acres of
beach fromt-High Rock
Cirand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$1,100,000,00)

- Vacant bot #13, Blk #59,

Unit #3 (22,752sq, #45"
on canal front-Dagenham
Circle & Ingrave Dr
Emerald Bay Swb Grand
Bahama (Appraised
Value $110,000.00)
Lot #15, Blk #15 Linit 4
(90°%125"}-Derby Sub
Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$23,000.10)
Vacant lt #25, Blk Als
(17, 866eq. f. HOetwater La
Shannoa Country Club Sob
Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$34,000.00)
Lot #2 (20,000eq, fi.)
wihullding complex &
Laandromet—-Queess
Highway Holmes Rock
Commenage Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
$178,600.00)

A

Lot 825 (17, 7535q, fi.)
whee 800sg, fL-47 Queen
Elizabeth Dr Marsh
Harbour Abaco
(Appraised Value
$212,750.00)

Vacant bot #6 (2 eres Fon
Town Abaco (Appraised
Value $50,000.00)

Lot #3] (15,0005q, ff.)
wihuilding—Murpay Town
Abaco (Appraised
Value $102,420.00)
Portion of lot #89 (15,000,
ft. )-Front St kurpby Town
Abaco (Appraised
Walue $29,250.00)

Lin #55 (6,9008q, fh)
wbuilding-Murphy Town
Abaco (Appraised
Value $82,075.10)

Let #45 (60°s 160") wild
room mote! 300089. if.
Sandy Paint Abaco

Assets
Vehicles

Car(s)





1987 Double Asda Mack
thang Trerk

D000 Chercioes Tandon Double Ashe Tralr



(1974) Saacred Veswal
1 Cvimris Cuiboerd angine 3140 1P Vomahe fatbeard angina

Other Vises — Photos Not Availahly
© BO? Coste Shor! Hull Weseel (Mise oristy)

a Dndge Stratus

Trucks



S82 Doub Agh Mack Trak
Head

Â¥

(Appraised Vabwe
$485,700.00)

23. Lot 87,1 2isg. Fe wid
oomlapes & | storage
building totaling 4,18Gsq. fiL-
Sand Banks Treasure Cay
Abeco (Appraised
Value $880,208.10)

24, Vacant portion of lot #7
(50's 110° + Weal James
Cistem Eleuthera
(Appraised Value
$18,000.00)

23, Vasant 3 acres of lad
situmed Colebrook Street
Dmore Tan | Harter
Island) Eleuthera

Cat Island

26. Vacant 65 acres of land:
Arther's Town, Cat [sland

27. LotwilZ mom motel 1.9
eeres—Arthur's Town Ca
Island (Appraised Value
$630,000.00)

Exum

23. Vacant lot 88 (64 20g. fi.)
Moss Town Exuma
(Appraised Value
$110,188.00)

29. Lot (30,40Misq. ft.) v0 small
hotel 4,826. A, fi
exclusive beach-Forbes Hill
Exuma (Appraised
Vaboe $1,400, 000,00)

30. Vacant lot #95 (30'n 122")
Commodore Rd Elizabeth
Harbour Fst Exuma
(Appraised Value
$45,000.00)

FL. Lit A134 (75'S ") aba
storey budding Geange
Town, Fxuma (Appin ised
Value $468,000.00)



2001 Kia Pregia Van




TIO Ford Ranger Truck

=" =
. =e oe
LeS® Ford LEGG Grill Teck

ie



fh) Piberglam 3 pons

ancl (Hall Cinle)



D2 (1eap Spanish Wels Marine
HLS 10F Mercury Dechoard angie

© 122" Sitale Serew Soeel Hull (1960) MY Lisa J I,
vessel has anew engine regaining installation, And

can be view at Brediord Marine, Grand Boheme
6041992) Defender Vessel (Qrocen Washti)

The public is invited bo submit Seabed bide marked “Tender” to Baharas Development! Bank, P.O. Box M-3094,
Micxsill, Hakan: ablention Financial Contreller, fazed bide will not be accepted or telephone 327-5700 for
additional iaformation. Please mate that all bids om the alwerenctioned propertics aad assets sheowald be received
by or ow August 19, 200%. The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right (0 reject any or all offers. All assets

ore sold as is.

PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



UBS AG offices are shown in New York. The United States and Swiss governments have agreed on most
major disputes in the US effort Friday, July 31, 2009, to get names of thousands of wealthy Americans who
are suspected of evading taxes by hiding billions in assets with Swiss banking giant UBS AG.

(AP Photo: Mark Lennihan)

US, Swiss cement
deal on secret UBS

ban

By JESSICA GRESKO
Associated Press Writer

MIAMI (AP) — The Unit-
ed States government and
Swiss banking giant UBS AG
have reached an agreement
in a case seeking names of
some 52,000 suspected Amer-
ican tax evaders with billions
in secret Swiss accounts, but
details may remain under
wraps until next week, offi-
cials said.

Lawyers for the govern-
ment and UBS told a federal
judge in a brief conference
call they had initialed a deal
after a delay last week to set-
tle undisclosed details.

The Internal Revenue Ser-
vice, which initiated the case
against UBS earlier this year,
said in a statement the deal
“protects the United States
government’s interests.” But
the two-sentence statement
from IRS Commissioner
Doug Shulman added only
that more details will be
released when the Swiss gov-
ernment signs the agreement
as early as next week.

UBS and the Swiss govern-
ment also welcomed the news
and said no terms would be
disclosed until it is signed.
Swiss Justice Minister Eve-
line Widmer-Schlumpf said
the agreement “is in the inter-



UNITED STATES Federal Judge
Alan Gold is seen in this 1999
photo. Judge Gold is presiding
over the IRS vs UBS and Switzer-
land at US Federal Courthouse
in Miami, Fla. A telephone con-
ference between all parties will
resume in Miami Friday August
7, 2009.

(AP Photo)

ests of both states.”

The IRS earlier this year
asked US District Judge Alan
S Gold in Miami to force
Zurich-based UBS to turn
over names of some 52,000

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A well established Hospitality Company is seeking to hire a
creative, detail-oriented, energetic and flexible individual for

the position of:

MARKETING COORDINATOR

RESPONSIBILITIES

Include but are not limited to the following:
* Assist with, analyze and enhance marketing methods and

company products.

* Create, coordinate and implement new marketing and sales

initiatives.

¢ Assist with all online marketing efforts and company

websites.

¢ Work with industry partners on joint marketing efforts.
+ Liaise with company’s advertising and online marketing

partners

« Write press release, assist with company guest
communication and work with the media.
« Manage and maintain a customer database.

* Organize and coordinate large group events and promotions.
* Help create additional revenue opportunities.

EXPERIENCE/SKIELS

« A degree in Marketing, Communications, Public Relations

or Advertising.

In-depth knowledge of all facet of marketing.

Assertive, creative, energetic sales driven individual with
a proven track record of generating new ideas and sales.
Excellent organizational and interpersonal skills
Excellent written, verbal and public speaking skills.
Strong PR and networking skills.

Salary commensurate with experience

Excellent Benefits Package

Apply in writing to:

The Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box SS-6257
Nassau, The Bahamas
Or fax to 363-4437



k accounts

American clients believed to
be hiding nearly $15 billion
in assets in secret accounts.

UBS and the Swiss govern-
ment had resisted, arguing
that to do so would violate
Swiss banking confidentiality
laws that date back centuries.

The Swiss and US govern-
ments announced at the end
of July they had agreed in
principle on major issues but
released no details. They had
hoped to present a final deal
at a hearing August 7, but
resolving their differences has
taken longer.

At the latest hearing
Wednesday, the judge asked
Stuart Gibson, the lead Jus-
tice Department lawyer in the
case, whether an agreement
had been reached.

“The answer is ‘yes,’ your
honor,” Gibson answered.
“The parties have initialed
agreements. It will take a little
time for the agreements to be
signed in final form.”

An attorney for UBS,
Eugene Stearns, thanked the
judge for allowing the case to
be brought to what he called a
“successful conclusion.”

The phone conference last-
ed less than three minutes.

UBS paid a $780 million
penalty earlier this year and
turned over names of about
300 American clients in a
deferred prosecution agree-
ment with the Justice Depart-
ment. In that case, UBS
admitted helping US citizens
evade taxes, which experts say
is not a violation of Swiss
bank secrecy laws.

So far, three UBS cus-
tomers whose names were
divulged under the prior
agreement have pleaded
guilty to tax charges in feder-
al court. Hundreds of others
holders of secret accounts at
UBS and other Swiss banks
have voluntarily come for-
ward to the IRS under an
amnesty programme that
requires payment of taxes and
penalties but generally does
not include the threat of
prison.

That amnesty programme
ends September 23.

New York-listed shares in
UBS were trading 3.5 per cent
higher at $15.22.

¢ Associated Press Writer
Frank Jordans in Geneva con-
tributed to this story

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST






US A Se ee CD

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST





il











TAY rst NG





























































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ies @ he High: ga° Low: 81° oe . ae . oe i oe ee T N Barbados 88/31 77/25 t 86/30 77/25 s
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a @ “ : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 1:35pm. 29 8:07p.m. 0.6 an e 79/29 54/12 7 74/21 55/12 ao
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PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





A GAS STATION attendant (not seen)
pumps gas in Portland, Oregon. Oil prices
rose Wednesday as the government
reported that Americans were regaining
their appetite for imported goods and a
European energy watchdog said demand
for crude this year may not be as weak as
once thought.

(AP Photo: Rick Bowmer)



Oil rises as US imports jump

By CHRIS KAHN
AP Energy Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Oil prices rose
Wednesday as the government report-
ed that Americans were regaining their
appetite for imported goods and a Euro-
pean energy watchdog said demand for
crude this year may not be as weak as
once thought.

Benchmark crude for September deliv-
ery climbed $1.38 to $70.82 a barrel on
the New York Mercantile Exchange. In
London, Brent prices added 80 cents to
$73.26 a barrel on the ICE Futures
exchange.

Prices jumped in morning trading after
the government said the U.S. trade deficit
increased slightly in June. The Com-
merce Department reported that imports
rose for the first time in 11 months —
another indication that the recession may
be fading.

The reports from both sides of the
Atlantic were enough to offset news that
crude supplies continue to grow.

The U.S. Energy Information Admin-
istration said oil placed into storage rose
for the third straight week.

Gas prices are certainly much lower
than they were last year, but the bulging

Loatied Fries

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ore

getline a

supplies of crude haven't resulted steadi-
ly decreasing gas prices.

Refiners continue to cut back on pro-
duction, which has kept gasoline prices
relatively stable for the past month or
so.
U.S. pump prices added two-tenths of
a penny overnight to a new national aver-
age of $2.645 a gallon (70 cents a liter). A
gallon of regular unleaded is still $1.154
(31 cents) cheaper than the same time
last year.

While prices have risen slowly for three
weeks, prices at the pump are about
where they were at the end of June.

Given the economy in the U.S. and
Europe, prices might have fallen further
if not for China.

Earlier in the day, the International
Energy Agency said Chinese energy con-
sumption would push the overall global
crude demand higher despite continued
weakness in Europe and North America.

How China does during the global eco-
nomic downturn has effected energy
prices for the rest of the globe. The coun-
try imported a record 4.6 million barrels
of fuel a day last month.

It is that purchasing power that helped
change the forecast for the Paris-based
TEA, which added 70,000 barrels a day to

its 2010 forecast of global oil demand.
The new prediction of 85.3 million bar-
rels a day is a 1.6 percent increase over
this year. The IEA also increased its 2009
forecast by 190,000 barrels a day to 83.9
million barrels a day, but noted this is
still 2.7 percent lower than 2008.

Both OPEC and the U.S. Energy
Department's Energy Information
Administration were more downbeat.
The EJA on Tuesday said global crude
demand will likely fall by 1.71 million
barrels this year, more than its previous
forecast of a drop of 1.56 million bar-
rels.

And the Organization of Petroleum
Exporting Countries said it expects con-
sumption to slide by 1.65 million barrels
a day this year, before rising next year.

In other Nymex trading, gasoline for
September delivery added less than a
penny to $2.045 a gallon and heating oil
gave up less than a penny to $1.9099 a
gallon. Natural gas for September deliv-
ery also lost less than a penny to fetch
$3.532 per 1,000 cubic feet.

¢ Associated Press writers George Jahn
in Vienna, Alex Kennedy in Singapore
and Emma Vandore in Paris contributed
to this report

‘Chili Loaded Fries

»Whocan Resist?

elicious
SNACK DUOS



Ringing
phones:
a Sign

of small
business
recovery

By JOYCE M
ROSENBERG
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — At
one small company, the
phone is ringing more often,
while another is getting busi-
ness again from retailers who
canceled orders last year. And
at an inn, reservations are
coming in for the busy sea-
son.

These are some of the signs
of a turnaround that small
businesses are starting to see.
As economic reports look
brighter and the stock mar-
ket rebounds, some owners
are finding that customers and
clients are willing to do busi-
ness again.

At Juniper Hill Inn in
Windsor, Vt., “people are
starting to call in daily,” own-
er Robert Dean said.

The 16-room inn was busy
at the end of last year, but
Dean was also getting fewer
advance bookings. His cus-
tomers generally weren’t
affected by the economy, but
they were uncertain and
therefore thinking, “we need
to hold back a bit.”

They’re still cautious. Octo-
ber is the busiest time of the
year for innkeepers in Ver-
mont and normally Juniper
Hill Inn is 85 per cent booked
by early August. This year, it
was 40 per cent booked.

But, Dean said, last week
he booked three rooms for
October in one day.

He attributed the change
to better news about the
economy and the stock mar-
ket. But he’s still seeing cau-
tion — people don’t want to
book for the fall unless
they’re convinced the foliage
is going to be worth seeing.
So they’re making their reser-
vations much closer to the
time that they’re planning to
spend in Vermont.

Some business owners peg
the first signs of recovery to
events, like the election and
inauguration of President
Barack Obama. For a turn-
around to become more wide-
spread, and more certain,
problem areas in the economy
like unemployment and con-
sumer spending, will also have
to show signs of recovery.

Laura McHolm, co-founder
of NorthStar Moving Corp.,
a Chatsworth, Calif.-based
company, said “the phone
pretty much started ringing
after November,” when Oba-
ma was elected.

“People felt like something
was getting done” to help the
economy, she said.

McHolm described those
callers as “early shoppers”
who were looking for infor-
mation. Business picked up
for real along with home sales
in the spring and summer, and
McHolm said the second
weekend in August was
“gangbusters.”

“We are definitely better
than we were last summer,”

she said.

NorthStar, along with other
movers, suffered as the hous-
ing slump persisted. The com-
pany handles moves that orig-
inate in California, and
McHolm said that although
its more upscale business was
solid, it lost business as mid-
dle-class homeowners post-
poned home purchases and
stayed put.

Other firms are doing a lit-
tle better because their cus-
tomers, after more than a year
of cutting back, are ready to
take on more work.

Agnes Huff’s public rela-
tions firm started feeling the
effects of the recession in the
middle of 2008.

“Tt started with one client
saying (they) didn’t have the
money to continue with PR,”
said Huff, president of Los
Angeles-based Agnes Huff
Communications Group. It
also got harder to replace
clients who left.

Business was down
between 30 per cent and 35
per cent. “They weren’t even
inquiring,” Huff said.

The first signs of a change
came six to eight weeks ago,
when several prospects called
to inquire about working with
Huff’s company, and one
became a client. Another
company was very interested,
but ultimately decided to
work with a different kind of
agency. It was a close call, but
gave Huff’s cautious optimism
a boost.

“We’re hoping to see a
pickup toward the end of the
year, when their budgets are
being formulated,” she said,
referring to prospective
clients.

At some small businesses
that have struggled through
the recession, the signs of a
rebound, while still very early,
are reassuringly strong.

Robbie Adrian, an organic
baby blanket maker, was
launched in July 2007 and had
an incredible run, co-owner
Susan Doris said. Then, when
the credit crisis began in Sep-
tember 2008 and the stock
market began crashing, retail-
ers stopped ordering and sales
dropped off between 40 per
cent and 50 per cent from a
year earlier.

The company kept its Inter-
net business running, but
Doris and her partner, Rob-
bie Mahlman, both took on
other work to pay the bills.
Before last September, the
company was getting 70 per
cent of its business from
retailers and 30 per cent
online; after the financial cri-
sis began, that split became
20 per cent and 80 per cent.

But in the past few weeks,
retailers have been calling,
and business in August is up
300 per cent from July.

“We’re seeing orders com-
ing in at a rate we haven’t
seen in six months,” Doris
said. “We’re just seeing the
beginning of life again.”
The Trib une oe"
ORIN AES
RELIGION



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PG 24 ® Thursday, August 13, 2009

RELIGION

The Tribune



Why don't you
share your faith?

By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

THERE can be numerous reasons
why many persons refuse to share
their faith in God. Some may see it
as the pastor’s job or they may have
a fear of being rejected as many of
the Jehovah’s Witnesses are during
their walk abouts in the community.

However, would not being sure of your sal-
vation because of a mistake or “backslide”,

keep you from sharing your faith?

According to biblicalproportians.com, I
Corinthians 9:22 states: "To the weak became I
as weak, that I might gain the weak: I am made
all things to all men, that I might by all means
SSM Comes tt ol

With this text in mind, we wonder why so
many Christians today keep to themselves, if
scripture tells us to become as others are to
share the word of God-not practice their
lifestyle, but make yourself available to them
and some down to their level of understanding.

Pastor Trent Davis of Golden Gates
Outreach Ministries, said there are a number
of reasons why people do not share their faith.

"IT think one of the main reasons they don’t is
because they are in fear of being called a hyp-

ocrite. Some people don’t live the kind of life
that would lend them to sharing their faith. It
is kind of difficult to share your faith at work
when two days before they heard you curse
someone out or you were mean to other peo-
ple so sometimes that is a deterrent,” Mr Davis
Syeute

Mr Davis said sometimes it is the person's
own personal lifestyle that is a deterrent to
them sharing their faith.

“They realise who they are and what they
are saying do not match up. I find that most
Christians dont realise that God gives opportu-
nities to share their faith with common day
people everywhere they go. It begins with a
charismatic personality. There are little win-
dows and doors that are constantly being
opened up. For example when someone says
hi, how are you-that is a window,” Mr Davis
Sota

Mr Davis said as Christians, we have to use
the windows and doors open to us and even
create windows by engaging people.

“Not in a hostile manner, but sometimes
even with a sense of humour or some kind of
compliment. Often times it’s that we are not
seeing and taking advantage of the windows of
opportunities God gives us to share our faith.”

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Tourism seeks year-round
fourists in religious market

THE MINISTRY of Tourism is tak-
ing aggressive measures to receive a
chunk of the Religious Tourism niche
market, an 18 billion dollar industry;
which has the potential of providing
The Bahamas with year-round visitors.
Linville Johnson from The Ministry of
Tourism’s Deputy Director, Religious
Group Market, recently stated that his
department is working along with some
20 denominations to increase the num-
ber of visitors who attend religious
events in The Bahamas annually.

Mr Johnson was speaking to the
press at the first annual Kingdom
Seminar hosted by international author

and consultant Dr Myles Munroe at
The Diplomat Centre Wednesday
night. The winter season is the peak
period for visitors, but Mr Johnson
emphasised the need for year round
visitors.

“We have hundreds of visitors who
come to The Bahamas annually solely
for religious events. It’s an 18 billion
dollar global market that is large and is
growing. We want to be at the cutting
edge of this market so that we can get
our fair share and statistics show that
we are one of the destinations of choice
for these religious groups,” said Mr
Johnson.



Tourism’s religious market is target-
ing large church groups by giving them
the best deals possible from MOTs
website www.bahamas.com/worship.
Other activities include marketing and
advertising through specialty religious
magazines and public relations activi-
ties at seminars and conferences.
Research by MOT show that the local
religious tourism market is comprised
of 54 per cent female, ages 18-24 and
45-54, with household income from
$25,000 -75,000, 57 per cent stay an
average of 6 nights in hotels, account-
ing for approximately 3,057 visitors and
18,201 room nights in 2007/08.

Mr Johnson, “For example, Dr
Myles Munroe’s annual conferences for
youth, Christians and international
leaders have been drawing a large seg-
ment of that market for us. Florida is
our biggest market. What we want to
do now is partner with other denomi-
nations during their events to increase
the numbers through hotel bookings.”

Dr Munroe’s 3-day Kingdom semi-



PASTORS greet
MOT Deputy
Director - left to
right: Dr Rick
Kendall of South
East Florida, Dr
Richard Pinder, Dr
Myles Munroe, MOT
Deputy Director
Religious Group,
Linville Johnson and
Dr Pepe Ramnath of
Mirimar Florida.

nar attracted delegates from more than
30 countries including The United
States, Indonesia, Malaysia, The
United Kingdom and other parts of
Europe.

“It’s great when I can do what I love
which is teaching and at the same time
be a part of tourism in this country.

This is a time when people every-
where are cutting back, but this event
has not been impacted by the recession.
Really this seminar is a response to a
demand for the past ten years. When I
travel people always ask me, ‘When are
you going to have a seminar in The
Bahamas?’ So this is different from the
conferences, but it still attracts
Christians from around the world,”
said Dr Munroe.

The Ministry of Tourism and The
Wyndham Nassau Resort is providing a
welcome reception and tour of
Paradise Island and Cable Beach
Hotels to international pastors from Dr
Munroe’s Kingdom Seminar through-
out the week.
The Tribune

RELIGION

Disciplined attitude

By BISHOP VG CLARKE

GOD is more interested in our atti-
tude than he isin our ability. If He can
find in us the proper attitude, He cer-
tainly can make us able. When Jesus
called His disciples; He placed priority
on attitude rather than ability. “And
He saith unto them, Follow me, and I
will make you fishers of men”
(Matthew 4:19). He was looking for
an attitude of submission to his leader-
ship. With their submission he could
develop their abilities for soul-winning
and ministry to the church.

Saul, the king of Israel, had no expe-
rience in ruling a nation. He had no
cabinet or political advisors to assist
him in forming a government. How
was he able to form and lead a govern-
ment?

@r

FEARLESS

“And Saul also went home to
Gibeah; and there went with him a
band of men, whose hearts God had
touched” (I Sam. 10:26). These were
men with a disciplined and committed
attitude. When Saul's attitude
changed from self-controlled to self-
centeredness and self-indulgence, he
was rejected by the Lord and
dethroned as king in a violent act of
self-destruction (I Sam. 31:3, 4).

A disciplined attitude is necessary
for prayers to be answered and to have
God's peace. A disciplined attitude is
necessary for effective witness
(Ephesians 4:17-24). The believers in
Christ are to have a different attitude
than unbelievers. Believers are
responsible for their attitude.
Attitude is the source of actions.

An improper attitude will condemn

us, regardless of our actions. An atti-
tude of hatred and bitterness makes
one a murderer, even if no physical
harm is done to the person. Sin begins
as an attitude. A person is tempted, a
receptive attitude develops toward the
temptation, and sin is conceived in the
heart. Actions follow attitude towards
the forbidden and wrong thing.
Gideon's army was reduced from
thirty-two thousand to three hundred
(Judges 7:17). Twenty-two thousand
were rejected because of an attitude
of fear. Ninety-seven hundred were
sent home because they drank water
with a careless attitude of self-cen-
teredness without watchfulness and
caution. God took three hundred
men with an attitude of self-discipline
and commitment and delivered Israel.





Love me - Say that you love me

What good will it be for a man if he gains
the whole world, yet forfeits his soul?"
Matthew 16:26 (NIV)

AS I type, I'm listening to 90's pop
group, The Cardigans; and although
cardigans, once again, find them-
selves on the cool lists of leading fash-
ion magazines; ten to twelve years
ago-they were very trendy-right
around the same time,

The Cardigans premiered their hit
song, 'Lovefool’, from whose lyrics I
title this article. It was and still is, a
catchy tongue in cheek song about
longing for anothers love-a favourite
I'm sure in many persons CD and
MP3 collections.

The topic of this article is in rela-
tion to the subject matter of that song
and the many songs

like it; highlighting a persons
intense desire to be accepted. So I
begin by asking this question. Why do
we care about what other's think of
us?

Some might say because we want
to be loved and regarded. That's
understandable and I can't find much
wrong with it, however if in going
about attaining these two universal
human desires, we constantly change
our persons-a problem arises. As a
young adult, I'm very aware that a
considerable amount of my genera-
tion, would find it foreign, indeed
impossible, to cease in caring about
what others think of them.

After all, it's hard work to create a
seemingly larger than life persona
from scratch, or urgently polish a



family title for one's advantage.
Although one has to wonder, if others
finding you, is really, more important
than you finding yourself? However
individuals continue to seek fulfill-
ment in all the wrong places.

For example, via their well crafted
personality; that gets them what they
want, takes them where they want to
be, and with whom they want to be
with- that is, until they wake up and
realise it's not what they really want
in the first place. In recent years, with
the constant evolving technology,
persons have become more and more
crazed for attention, and look to get it
in the most peculiar of ways.

I won't elaborate on some of things
I have seen and heard on the world
wide web, but I will say, I'm left to
wonder why after over a year of leav-
ing a popular social site, they seem to
disallow a person to completely
remove '‘face'. Why persons would
want to be reduced to electronic per-
sonalities is beyond me.

Then there are those who cling to
that same personality in the flesh; so
completely consumed with the exter-
nal world, that their most minute
recognition is cause for consistent
and amusing, red carpet like
entrances. The problem with taking

the realm we really ought to dwell.
But no, the majority of the time, it

enough to those who go into severe
level red panic, upon discovering that
so and so doesn't like them.
Thankfully, there are many young
persons who genuinely, do-not-care,
what others think of them.
Shakespeare

was absolutely on point with his
famous quote, 'To thine own self be
true.' To those young people who are
believers in Christ, and who truly,
don't care what the world thinks of
them- additionally understanding
that the most important and lasting

impression that matters is that which }
: seven-member church in the tiny

we make upon God.

To all of you, I say cheers! God }

knows our heart, our brain, and He }
i Jakes

knows who we are behind the

makeup, cologne, glitter and gadg- }

P ee ce i that nonetheless complement each
: other, with the Pentecostal-honed
mind and soul, and to love our neigh- acu BE ie Parmer binds

This is why we breathe. In closing; eat oe tele oe ie ant

remember, love starts with the first Inauguration Day this year and is

i frequently mentioned as one of the
? prospective heirs to Billy Graham's
? title as America's Pastor. He eschews
i an active role in speaking out on
i issues like abortion and same-sex
? marriage, though, warning churches
? not to become better known for pol-
? itics than for prayer.

ets. He knows our core. We are to
love our Lord God with all our heart,

bours as ourselves.

honest look in the mirror.

Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian
writer and poet, currently residing in
Nassau, Bahamas. Comments related to
the article can be sent to
fearless247@gmail.com



Thursday, August 13, 2009 ® PG 25

Bishop VG Clarke

Ko) RELIGION BRIEFS

: Jakes counsels patience
_ IM economic ‘sorrows'

one's personality so seriously, is the CHARLESTON, W.Va.

fact that all the reality is not there. If ;
we were to remove the person, you’re }

left with something that falls short of E Hills’ of cavitieo Belo: Inoiaas Di
: Jakes looks back from his position as
seems as if the cardboard city is good | ODS ee a ee

: preachers and remembers his own
? hard
i Associated Press.

AS the economy continues to
grind away at jobs, homes and life-

times, according to _ the

T.D. Jakes — known international-

: ly by those first two initials, or sim-
BE ? ply as "bishop"
William } 30,000-member Dallas megachurch
? The Potter's House — began his life
and ministry in West Virginia's
? Kanawha Valley. As a young hus-
? band and father, he lost his job when
? the
: closed, and found himself slipping
? out of the middle class, working for
? years at hard jobs for low pay.

to the people at his

local Union Carbide plant

Eventually, though, he turned a
town of Montgomery into the vast
territories known today as TLD.

Ministries and TDJ
Enterprises — discrete kingdoms

the empower-and-entertain

Jakes, 52, preached a sermon on
PG 26 ® Thursday, August 13, 2009

RELI

ION

The Tribune



What’s going on?

On May 20, 1971, Marvin Gaye
through Motown released one of the
most important, passionate record to
come out of soul music- “What's Going
On”.

To this day the lyrics are just as rele-
vant or maybe even more relevant.

Every week one can look in the obit-
uary sections of our daily papers or lis-
ten to the news via radio or television
and the sobering / reality question
would be “What's Going On?”

We're too small of a nation to be
experiencing the kinds of drama that
we're seeing today. I truly believe that
if we don't put petty politics and reli-
gion aside; and come together as one
people unto God (Yahweh) there
would be much more weeping and
gnashing of teeth through the length
and breath of this beautiful Bahamas.

Think about this! How far advanced
in technology, industrial development,
agriculture, medicine, etc; could we
have been as a nation, if we were more
focused on love and building one
another rather than tearing down each
other?

Mr Prime Minister and Mr Leader of
the Opposition this foolishness has to
stop. The political football game that
you are playing with this nation must
stop immediately; for our children's
children future is at stake.

Therefore I will never be silent until
this nation turns around and heads in
its God ordained direction. We've
allowed the enemy to sow seeds of divi-
sion within this nation which is rapidly
producing divisive / destructive fruits in
every sector of our society. This divi-
sion is so bad that Bahamians are
always in the divided political mode;




PASTOR
ALLEN

everything that many of them do see in
this country, is ignorantly seen through
the eyes of politics.

Meanwhile the family and family val-
ues are methodically being disintegrat-
ed as laws are being enacted by educat-
ed, spiritually blind dummies of limited
understanding. The concept of being
our brother's keeper and loving our
neighbours as ourselves seems to be a
thing of the past in the Bahamas.

Churches no longer preach and teach
this aspect of kingdom living; every
now and then a remark of loving one
another may be made from today’s pul-
pits by religious leaders en-route to a
prosperity centered message.

Is anybody taking note or does any-
body care of the fact that our streets
and communities are becoming like
Iraq and Afghanistan?

How could we accept with such non-
chalant spirit, the news of someone
being gunned down in our neighbor-
hoods and treat it as just another
event? How many more mothers and
wives have to bury their sons, husbands
and fathers before this nation unites
and say “enough is enough?”

Listen to how Marvin Gaye puts it in
this song, and see if there is any resem-
blance of what we're facing today:

Mother, mother

There's too many of you crying
Brother, brother, brother

There's far too many of you dying
You know we've got to find a way
To bring some loving’ here today

Father, father

We don't need to escalate

You see, war is not the answer
For only love can conquer hate
You know we've got to find a way
To bring some lovin' here today

Every stanza of this song ends with
“You know we've got to find a way, to
bring some lovin here today”

As a religious nation that's faced
with a barrage problems due to our
lack of true love for one another;
here's the only way in which we can
bring about true love today. Watch
this! John.14: 6. Jesus saith unto him,
I am the way, the truth, and the life:
no man cometh unto the Father, but
by me.

This word way in the Greek is:
hodos, hod-os' which literally means
1) a road, 2) an act, and 3) a mode or
means of journeying.

Again, one need not be a rocket sci-
entist or a college graduate to deter-
mine that as a nation we're heading in
the wrong direction. Being the reli-
gious nation that we are, I'm fully
aware that you're well acquainted
with the scripture; Prov.14: 12.

There is a way which seemeth right
unto a man, but the end thereof are
the ways of death.

This word way in the Hebrew is:
derek, deh'-rek; which also has sever-
al meanings as follows: 1) a road, 2) a
course of life or mode of action, and

3) a conversation or custom.

Bahamas, it's time for us to stop
playing politics and playing church.

By now it should be quite evident
to all that politics and religion has got-
ten us nowhere as a nation. Both of
these systems are designed to profit
its leaders at the expense of it’s fol-
lowers.

At the end of the day it is always the
politically / religious minded grass-
roots that are left out in the cold cry-
ing and demonstrating about the
fruits which was produced by the
roots of their passion (Politics &
Religion).

Here's the last two stanzas of the
song “What's Going On?” as every-
body is crying out and demonstrating
either against their unions, the gov-
ernment, insurance company or some
kind of religion.

Picket lines and picket signs
Don't punish me with brutality
Talk to me, so you can see
Oh, what's going on

Fathers, fathers, everybody thinks

we're wrong

Oh, but who are they to judge us
Simply because our hair is long

Oh, you know we've got to find a way
To bring some understanding here today

e What's going on in our country? Here's
the answer! We're in desperate need of a
spiritual check-up, from our neck-up;
that's both religiously and politically.

For questions or comments contact us via
E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or Ph.1-
242-441-2021.

Deacon Neil G Nairn to be ordained

WHEN Deacon Neil Geron Nairn
makes his vows this Friday evening dur-
ing his ordination to the priesthood, he
will be fulfilling a prophecy and a
prayer made years ago. The ordination
service will take place August 14, The
Eve of The Feast of The Assumption of
The Blessed Virgin Mary, at Christ
Church Cathedral, at 7 pm. The chief
celebrant will be Reverend Laish Z
Boyd, Sr., Bishop of The Diocese of The
Bahamas and The Turks & Caicos
Islands.

Named after Canon Neil Roach, for-
mer Rector of Holy Cross Anglican
Church, Deacon Nairn recounted that
before he was born, Canon Roach, then
“Father Roach, “told his mother, the
late Leo M Coleby Nairn, while she
was pregnant, that she would have a
son, and that she should name him Neil.
He also told her that her son would

become a priest.

Mrs Nairn shared this story with
young Neil years later, after she
observed his commitment to serving as
an acolyte at St. Gregory's Church.
Meanwhile, at the tender age of nine,
while attending an Evensong service at
St Barnabas Anglican Church, Neil was
so inspired that he prayed for God to
make him a priest.

During the ordination Deacon Nairn
will be examined by the Bishop, and
repeat the vows that he made on
August 8, 2008, when he was ordained
to the Diaconate. He will commit to
being diligent in the reading and study-
ing of the Holy Scriptures, to minister-
ing the word of God and the sacra-
ments, and to accepting the discipline of
the Church, to obey the bishop and
other ministers set over him in the Lord,
and to being a faithful pastor to all

whom he is called to serve

Since July 1, 2008, Deacon Neil Nairn
has been serving at St Agnes Church,
Grants Town, New Providence, and
says that the past year was very enjoy-
able and passed quickly largely due to
the warm welcome that he received
from the loving and generous congrega-
tion, and the support of the rector, I
Ranfurly Brown, the assistant priest,
Rev'd. Bernard Been and other Clergy.

In his role as assistant curate, he has
responsibility for the communications,
mental and physical wellness, sports
and culture, and youth ministries. His
other duties include reading the Gospel,
preaching, visiting the sick and shut-in,
and assisting in the overall development
of the Parish.

Deacon Nairn said that while he has
enjoyed all aspects of the ministry, he
has a passion for young people, and a

desire to see more of them develop a
personal relationship with God. In this
regard, he is looking forward to hosting
a two-day youth discovery later this
year.

Deacon Nairn is a 2008 graduate of
Codrington College with a Licentiate
degree in Theology and a Diploma in
Pastoral Studies. Prior to entering
Codrington, he was employed as an
insurance agent for 22 years. He is
married to Judyann Seymour Nairn,
and the couple has three children,
Marco, Garonique and Ramon, one
grandson, Marco, Jr and daughter-in-
law, Keisha.

Reverend Fr Neil G Nairn will cele-
brate his first masses on Sunday, August
16, at St Agnes Anglican Church,
Baillou Hill Road, at 7 am, and on
Monday, August 17, at St Gregory, the
Great, Carmichael Road, at 7pm.
The Tribune
(CS) MEDITATION

RELIGION

Getting over it

THERE are times when we wonder
how long it is going to take for us to
move from being hurt or angry about an
incident in the past. It may be at the
point that it seems to have become an
obsession that pre-occupies our mind
when we are not busy.

Here are some considerations for
finding your peace again.
1. Do | need to talk about this to someone
who can help, empathise, or just sympa-
thise?
2. Do | need to learn how to pray more
effectively to leave this with the Lord?
3. Do | need to confront the individual if
this is possible and appropriate?
4. Do | need to remind myself of the ways
that | have hurt others and needed to be
forgiven?
5. Do | need to sever all ties at least for the

@r THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS

— ” le

REV. AN GELA

~ ” 30OSF ELD

7. PALACIOUS _

time being?

6. Do | need to ‘get a life’ and not expect
others to make me happy?

7. Do | need to help someone in a worse
situation to gain perspective about my
own?

8. Do | need to read a book, attend a semi-
nar or otherwise educate myself on the
topic?

9. Do | need to join or create a support
group for persons in a similar situation?
10. Do | need to learn from this and work

for prevention and cure in the society?

11. Do | need to write my story if only as a
journal entry?

12. Do | need to decide to forgive the per-
son and move on?

13. Do | need to report the matter to the
police?

14. Do | need to consider it a battle scar in
the spiritual warfare or the struggles of life?
15. Do | need to trust that the justice of
God’s plan will deal with it for me?

16. Do | need to count my blessings and
focus on what is positive about my past?
17. Do | need to write a play or a song to
express my feelings and empower others?
18. Do | need to consider if | am going to
use it to strengthen or weaken my charac-
ter?

19. Do | need to examine my conscience
to see if | am more to blame?

20. Do | need to be spreading the Good

Methodists in Grand Bahama

METHODISM began in Grand
Bahama unofficially during the 1950's
when Methodists from the Turks and
Caicos Islands arrived in the island to
work with the Owens Illinois Lumber
Company cutting down the pine trees
which abound in the island for lumber
and shipping to Georgia for paper pulp.
The centre for the operation was located
at Pine Ridge.

Since the majority of the people work-
ing on the operation were church-orient-
ed, a community church was built for
worship. Among these were large num-
bers of Methodists. After some years the
operation moved to Abaco and Andros.

In 1959, a small Methodist Society was
formed and the disused Pine Ridge
Lumber Camp Church, two miles from
Freeport, was made available for servic-
es. Services began officially in March of
that year by the Rev WT. Makepeace,
then Chairman of the Bahamas District.
An English Methodist local preacher,



/ JIM
a LAWLOR



David Martin, arrived in Freeport soon
afterwards to work and preach.

ST. DAVID’S, SEAGRAPE

Mr Martin began work among the
Methodists, who by this time had been
relocated to Seagrape where families
were each given a plot of land. By this
time the Society had grown from eight
to twenty-two (June, 1959). Services
were held in the Lodge Hall, but by
1960 the members had built their own
church. This is the present St David's
Methodist Church. The first resident
minister was the Rev David Coombs of
Britain. The following ministers served

Share your new

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who are making news in their

neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are

raising funds for a good cause,
campaigning for improvements in th¢
area or have won an award. j
If so, call us on 322-1986 and share you

story.



the church: The Revs Bruce B Swapp,
Donald Urwin, James T. Seymour,
Leroy Saunders, John Bilverstone and
Acelius Isaac.

The church has grown from those
early days and now has a membership
of 1Oa, with a resident lay pastor;
Hilgrove Hamilton.

ST. ANDREW’S HAWKSBILL

St Andrew's Methodist Church was
built in 1967. The building of a church
in that area became necessary when the
community of Freeport, which was fast
developing, began to expand and many
Methodists took up residence in that
community.

At that time the Rev Donald Mason
from Britain pastored the Methodist
society in the Freeport area and the
then Anglican priest, now Bishop of
the Diocese, pastored the Anglicans of
Hawksbill. An agreement was made by
both communions that Anglicans and
Methodists would use the Methodist
church building at different times for
worship services.

A very happy relationship existed
between St Andrew's Methodist and
the Church of the Transfiguration.
After a few years that relationship
ceased to exist and the Anglicans built
a church at Pinder's Point, the Church
of the Good Shepherd.

ST. PAUL’S, FREEPORT

When development began in
Freeport the Methodist Church, having
begun in Pine Ridge, and then in

Thursday, August 13, 2009 ® PG 27

News about Jesus Christ and God’s love?
21. Do | need to consider this being perse-
cuted for Jesus’ sake and sharing in his
suffering?

Our personal relationship with Our
Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ, will
assist us in discerning what to do. Our
God is able to heal all hurts, forgive all
sins, and give insight and understanding.
Considering that these are just some of
the options to be considered, you can
see why we need the Lord to save us,
and the Holy Spirit to guide us.

Be encouraged. Greater is He that is
within us than he that is against us. The
Enemy wants to discourage and ulti-
mately destroy us. Let us stand our
ground, be strong and of good courage,
doing what we know to be right and
pleasing in God’s sight.



PART 40

Seagrape, felt that it ought to minister
to the needs of its Methodists that were
flocking to Freeport to live and work.

In 1965, the Methodist Church of the
Bahamas District was asked by the Port
Authority to take over the manage-
ment of the then Freeport Primary
School. This offer was accepted, and
the buildings were deeded to the
Methodist Synod. With this agreement
the history of the then St Paul's
Primary School (now St. Paul's
College) and the Methodist Church of
Freeport began.

CHURCH SERVICES IN

SCHOOL CLASSROOM

In these early years before the pres-
ent St Paul's Church was built, mem-
bers met for church services in one of
the classrooms of the school.

In 1968, the present St Paul's
Methodist Church was completed by
the Rev Donald Mason, but was begun
about 1965 by the Rev Godfrey S
Johns.

The building was dedicated on
December 14, 1968 by the Rev Hugh B
Sherlock, then President of the
Conference of the Methodist Church of
the Caribbean and the Americas. St
Paul's, however, celebrates its anniver-
sary on the Sunday nearest to October
25 as a reminder that the first
Methodist Church on Grand Bahama
was dedicated on October 25, 1959 at
Pine Ridge Lumber Camp by the late
Rev William T. Makepeace.

The following are the ministers who
followed Rev Godfrey Johns: Revs
Donald Mason, Eric St C Clarke, John
Bilverstone, Edwin L. Taylor and
Henley B. Perry.
PG 28 ® Thursday, August 13, 2009

ION The Tribune





esi Faz E

4f-

4

PICTURED are kids from the New Life Kingdom Outreach Ministries after completing a clean-up project on the Engleston Community Park.

Changing 100 lives in

eight weeks

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE concept of Christian summer
camps commonly includes elements
like daily scripture readings, discus-
sions on parables from the Bible, and
various activities to help youngsters
develop better relationships with God.

However one local church decided to
up the ante this year by introducing
campers to chess, which for them is a
new medium to harness their abilities,
and in the end had one mission in mind,
to change 100 lives.

Calieel Rashad Amahad , youth
director and camp co-ordinator for
New Life Kingdom Outreach
Ministries, said over the past eight
weeks the camp has played host to
about 60 children from the Englerston
community.

He explained: “During the camp the
kids learned about basic Bible princi-
ples, arts and crafts, chess, ways on

serving the elderly, building pride for
their community, and basically one on
one counselling on life situations and
ways of identifying and avoiding social
ills.”

He said as the overall mission for the
camp was to bring change to 100 young
people within the community, the camp
has made it to the half way mark and
will continue until the mission is
accomplished.

“We baptised close to 50 kids during
the final week of the camp, however we
hope to complete the second part of our
goal through various community proj-
ects which include the new basketball
team, the afterschool mentoring pro-
gramme, and the chess team,” he said.

Through these initiatives, Mr
Amahad said he along with other
church members will take that oppor-
tunity to minister to the youngsters and
will leave the rest to God.

The camp ran from June 15 to
August 14, and was open to kids
between the ages of 7 to 18.



MANY kids from the New Life Kingdom Outreach Ministries summer camp were intro-
duced to the game of chess for the first time, and organisers say they hope it teaches
them discipline and good decision making skills.




PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.216THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER MOSTLY SUNNY HIGH 89F LOW 81F By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE bereaved family of slain teen Brenton Smith accused members of the Royal Bahamas Police Force of leaking "misinformation" in order to "sully" his character and muddy the circumstances surrounding the young man’s death. These accusations were strongly denied by Commis sioner of Police Reginald Ferguson. The claim was made by the family's attorney, Damian Gomez, at a press conference held yesterday to refute allegations that appeared in a recent tabloid article. "What they are attempting to do is to create the impression that the late Brenton Smith was a criminal and (you with how he came to his death. "Even he had been a criminal, which we say he wasn't, he was unarmed. No form of walkie-talkie or other form of communication was found on him there's absolutely no basis for believing that he had (anything bery whatsoever," said Mr Gomez at a press conference at Gibson and Co yesterday. ". . .Public confidence in the police force is not engendered by the sullying of victims," he added. But the commissioner said the argument had no factual basis. "Why should we leak infor mation like that? (The RBPF made an official statement on the death of the boy and it was widely published in the media. There is no way we are connected to that rumour or whatever was reported (in the tabloid) and we have nothing to do with that statement," he said during a brief interview yesterday. He offered no further comment. Mr Gomez also questioned the RBPF's firearm training procedures. He claimed that the "unarmed" teen was shot at "nearly point blank range" as he cut through a popular shortcut which leads to the nearby City Market food store on Village Road. He also dispelled early reports of a cross-fire between police and suspected armed But commissioner denies information was leaked The Tribune YOUR PASSPORT TO MISS UNIVERSE B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com I N S I D E CLASSIFIEDSTRADER CLASSIFIEDSTRADER CLASSIFIEDSTRADER I N S I D E OBITUARIES and RELIGION I NTODAY’STRIBUNE JOBSAND HELPWANTED L L O O A A D D S S O O F F CARS! CARS! CARS! By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net THE trial of a man charged with the murder of a C R Walker high school student who was gunned down on a bus stop in the downtown area last January, opened in the Supreme Court yesterday. Jamal Penn, 20, is charged with the January 7, 2008 shooting death of Deangelo Cargill Fowler, 18. Penn is represented by lawyer Murrio Ducille. Yoland Rolle and Jillian Williams are prosecut ing the case. Fowler was shot in broad daylight as he stood at a bus stop on Bay andF rederick Streets. In her opening address yes terday, Mrs Rolle told the jury that the shooting, which she compared to something out of a “wild wild west movie,” took place between3 .30 and 3.40 pm on January, 2 008 while Fowler stood with a group of children at a bus stop. Mrs Rolle told the court that Penn was identified as the gunmen who opened fire in broad daylight, hitting Cargill. Slain teen’s name ‘sullied by police’ Jury hears shooting of student was like ‘wild wild west’ THE tropical depression, which could affect the Bahamas by early next week, was on the cusp of becoming the first named storm of the season last night. At press time last night the National Hurricane Centre (NHC ing that the depression remained just under tropical storm strength. Forecast models at this time have the system moving towards the northwest. The predicted trajectory has the depression passing the Bahamas on Monday or Tuesday. While it is still too early to tell how strong the system will be when it gets here or if the Bahamas will be directly in its path, local meteorologists said they are keeping a very close eye on it. In its 5pm update last night, the NHC reported that the tropical depression was located about 710 miles west of the southernmost Cape Verde Islands. SEE page nine SEE page nine Depression could become the first named storm of the season By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net CAT Island native and Hollywood superstar Sidney Poitier was one of 16 outstanding individuals awarded the United States of America’s highest civilian honour by President Barack Obama yesterday. OPPONENTS of Government’s planned removal of container shipping facilities to Arawak Cay have launched a petition against the project which they hope will attract “at least” 10,000 signatures in two weeks. PLP Senator Jerome Fitzgerald and PLP National Deputy Chairman Kenred Dorsett, who formed the Committee to Protect and Preserve the Bahamas for Future Genera tions to advocate against the move, plan to present the petition to the Prime Minister. They announced their intention during their third press conference in a week called to agitate for a stop the plan to relocate the port to Arawak Cay. They say there is a need for greater “transparency” on behalf of government about the “secretive” port move. Following a rowdy town meeting, the Committee said the petition will provide an opportunity for frustrated Bahamians to Petition launched against container port move to Arawak Cay SEE page nine Sidney Poitier honoured by President Obama PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA presents the 2009 Presidential Medal of Freedom to Sidney Poitier. J . S c o t t A p p l e w h i t e / A P SEE page eight MISSBAHAMASLIGHTSUPTHECATWALK MISSBAHAMAS Kiara Sherman takes to the catwalk last night at a Designer Fashion Show held at The Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort. The contestants are gearing up for the pageant itself on Sunday, August 23rd at the Atlantis Resort. SEE PAGE TWO F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page 10

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Sweet Treat.59GETADONUTFORJUSTWhen you buy a Medium or Large Coee or Tea (at regular price)LIMITEDTIMEOFFERAVAILABLEATDOWNTOWNNASSAULOCATIONONLY NOW OPEN DOWNTOWNOPPOSITETHEBRITISHCOLONIALHILTONONVENIENTLOCATIONSA THEAIRPORTTOSERVEYOU THE Miss Universe 2009 contestants will take part in the State Gift Auction Dinner for a good cause tonight. The international beauty queens are asked to bring a cultural gift from their country to present to the host, the Bahamas. The HIV/AIDS Foundation will be the beneficiary of the auction of these items. Bahamians are invited to come dine with the beauties at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Hotel. The event starts at 6.30pm and general admission is $150. Companies can reserve corporate tables for $2,000 and there are also banner packages available for $5,000. Schedule for Miss Universe contestants MISSBAHAMAS Kiara Sherman

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 3 RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS PHONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 A MOTHER-OF-FOUR left incapacitated by a "botched" r outine surgery is seeking a cash settlement from government. According to a writ filed in the Supreme Court on July 28, Vernita Adderley is asking ford amages for injuries, loss, and expenses accrued as a result of an "incorrectly performed surgical procedure" and negligence a t Princess Margaret Hospital. In addition to general damages, Mrs Adderley, 39, is seeking special damages, interest, loss of earnings, future loss ofe arnings, future medical expenses and costs. Mrs Adderley, of Gayle Street, Nassau, underwent s urgery in July, 2008 at PMH to have her ovarian tubes tied a procedure that prevents pregnancies. However she claims her life w as ruined after she checked into the hospital for the 20minute surgical procedure. She told The Tribune last y ear how she underwent gene ral anaesthetic and was coll ected from hospital by her b rother the same day. But when she got home, she began complaining of pains in her abdomen. She returned to t he hospital the next day "in excruciating pain" and was admitted onto the gynaecological ward. D octors decided they had to p erform more surgery to remove toxins from her abdomen after realising her bowel had been punctured duri ng the first procedure. For nearly two weeks, the former barmaid lay in a coma while her husband Clay and children feared the worst. A lthough she recovered, last year she claimed she was left a virtual old woman with chronic pains in her feet and an u nsightly 18-inch scar on her abdomen because, she claims, of the botched surgery. In December she told The T ribune h er stomach had s wollen to the point where she looked eight months pregnant. Doctors said she developed a hernia and needed further s urgery to correct it. Because of his wife's condition, Mr Adderley – a 45-year-old maintenance worker was forced to stop work to care forh is youngest child. ‘Botched’ surgery mother seeks cash settlement FOLLOWING on from their successful drive t o raise money for much needed dialysis units for the Princess Margaret Hospital last year, a group of local companies is launching a campaign to help tackle another critical health care issue. T he “Breathe Easy” campaign aims to raise $300,000 for four ventilators and six incubators for P MH’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The organisers include Tribune Media, the B uilder’s Mall, Tile King, Doctors Hospital, The Rotary Club of East Nassau and Bahamas Real ty. Michele Rassin, director of operations for Doctors Hospital, explained that the new equip ment is sorely needed – particularly the ventila t ors, as all but one currently in use at the hospital are models which have been discontinued by the m anufacturers, making part replacement and maintenance virtually impossible. The incubators will be crucial in keeping premature or otherwise challenged newborns alive, while the ventilators will be used to care for p atients in both the adult and neonatal intensive care units. At a press conference held yesterday t o announce the campaign, the organisers said they are hoping to raise the funds in about a m onth and are appealing to corporate sponsors, local companies, individuals and anonymous donors. Anyone interested in helping with the effort was asked to contact Mark Roberts or The Tribune, and make cheques payable to the P rincess Margaret Hospital Foundation. Campaign to help Bahamians breathe easier P RIME Minister of St Kitts and Nevis Dr Denzil Douglas yesterday condemned the murder of TaGia Soles-Armon y and offered condolences to her family who continue to grieve over the young mother's senseless killing. “For the longest while victims of gun crimes have t ended to be male and these deaths have troubled us very, very deeply. In recent times, however, we have all been particularly shaken by the loss of t wo young females," said Dr Douglas during his weekly St Kitts radio show on Tuesday. He was referring to Ms Soles-Armony’s murder and that of St Kitts resident Stanc ia Lake, 14, who was reportedly shot in the head on A ugust 8 while at a friend’s home. “Some things most i nhumane are affecting much of the world, and on behalf ofm y Cabinet and on behalf of t he entire country, I wish to once again express condo-l ences to every family including those of these two young w omen who have been victims of these sickening acts of b rutality,” he said.Ms SolesArmony, 29, was shot in herc ar around 8pm on August 7 while outside her mother's house in Sea Breeze. Cradling her three-month-old infant in her arms she tried to escape h er attacker and rear-ended a parked car and crashed into t wo other parked vehicles. The infant, whose face was c overed in his mother's blood, was unharmed but Ms SolesArmony was dead when police arrived at the scene. Witnesses said they saw a s lim, dark male about 5'9" tall flee the scene on foot. L ocal police continue to hit a brick wall in their investiga t ions and have yet to establish a motive for the brutal crime. Investigators have not recovered a murder weapon, nor do they have any suspects in cus t ody, said head of the Central Detective Unit Supt Elsworth M oss. Various possible motives for the shooting have b een posed including an attempted robbery gone wrong or a case of mistaken identity. But neither police nor the victim's family know w hy the mother-of-two was killed, said Mr Moss. H er death sparked a call for government to hang violent o ffenders in an attempt to stem the rising murder count. The country's last public hanging took place in 2000. The twin island nation of St Kitts/Nevis which has a population of less than 40,000 is battling its own recent upsurge in violent crimes; the country carried out its first execution in ten years in 2008 in the wake of these offences. Dr Douglas, who is also that country’s Minister of National Security, stressed that whether committed in St Kitts/Nevis or abroad, violent behaviour “must be condemned.” “The taking of any life by any human being is one of the most unnatural and deeply troubling occurrences that any society anywhere ever has to confront. Whether the victim is old, young or middle-aged, the horror for the rest of the community is always real.” Ms Soles-Armony lived in St Kitts with her husband and two children. She had recently arrived in Nassau to visit her family. St Kitts-Nevis PM condemns murder of Soles-Armony Tagia Soles-Armony PICTURED LEFT TO RIGHT: Terneille (TaDa M ichele Rassin, Mark Roberts, Technician, Dr Steve Lochan. By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net SANDALS employees scheduled to vote for a union today will have only one option after the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union (BHCAWU race. The union had been up against the Bahamas Hotel Maintenance and Allied Workers Union (BHMAWU battle to represent hundreds of Sandals workers for around three years while all attempts to hold the poll failed. A Supreme Court injunction granted by Justice Jon Isaacs on Monday suspended the polls scheduled for today, but that injunction was overturned by Justice Neville Adderley on Tuesday. The injunction had been granted to BHMAWU former president Shavon Bethel, but was overturned when current president Lynden Taylor, rep resented by Obie Ferguson, proved Mr Bethel had resigned from the union in July 2006. Justice Adderley had ruled in July that the poll should be h eld before August 14 after attempts had fallen flat over the last three years. But it appears the long battle for representation ended yesterday when BHCAWU vicepresident Kirk Wilsona nnounced the union would be pulling out of the race. H e said: “We believe that in order for trade unions to be as e ffective as they need to be in this day and time, we must take positive steps towards unifying our movement on a basis of mutual respect and common objectives. “A fundamental part of this approach is co-exist ing while maintaining our respective identities. “Our union has decided to put this strategy in motion in relation to Sandals. We have informed the Minister of Labour the BHCAWU will not contest a poll to become the bargaining agent for Sandals. As such we ask for our name to be removed from the ballot.” Minister of Labour Dion F oulkes was not available to confirm BHCAWU’s with drawal from the polls before The Tribune went to press. BHMAWU president Mr Taylor said: “We will still go ahead with the voting unless weh ear otherwise from the minister, but we may not need to h ave a vote at all. “Everyone is ecstatic, the s taff have heard the news and we are happy this thing has come to a close.” The poll is scheduled to take place at the Gaming Board office in West Bay Street from 9am to 5pm today. All employ ees of Sandals Royal Bahamian, including those who have been made redundant, are invited to attend, pending con firmation from the Minister of Labour that BHCAWU have been removed from the ballot. Only one union option now for Sandals staf f ‘EXCRUCIATING PAIN’: The aftermath of the surgery.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. In a time when progressive minded governments all over the world are feverishly doing whatever it takes to make its citizenry more comfortable, the citizens of any nation expect the custodians to do what is in their best interest. They should always make the necessary and timely adjustments to make life better for all and not any special interest groups. Period! If the people stand to suffer in any way and the pros do not outweigh the cons then we all should march on city hall.But on the other hand if anyone or group try to hinder or prevent the progress of the project, then we all should collectively condemn them and expose them for what they really are. We are behaving just like hogs, when we have so much and want more, some day we would have to regurgitate and embarrass ourselves. Swimming in vomit seems to be the fluid of choice f or some. The amazing thing about the uncontrollable hollering by the P LP about Arawak Cay, while operating under their moduso perandi, proves that even though they know that allB ahamians believe that the part y as it is today is still steeped in c orruption, they would still g amble with the sensible B ahamian people. B ahamians l ook at what they are doing w ith a tremendous deal of suspect. We shall not be fooled. “I k now dem long time, dem peo ple is mine.” I listen to the propaganda spewed from the PLP about the container port moving to Arawak Cay. I even tried tod issect their message to see if there was a thread of truth, common sense, or benefit in what they said. I intentionally took this long before I weighed in so as to allow the rat to come completely out of the hole before I dropped the sledge hammer on its head. Now the PLP are telling its few followers especially some who cannot spell rat if it kills them, that there is a sinister p lan to move the container terminal to Arawak Cay. But the fact of the matter is that several high ranking PLP, who have had carte blanche, already have b usinesses on Arawak Cay and if the terminal is moved it would affect their business.This whole thing is personal; it hasa bsolutely nothing to do with the followers who are just pawns in a big game. Arawak Cay is a container terminal now, it has always been one. FNM, PLP, NADa nd others have been collecting their shipment from the cayf or donkey years. Large 40ft containers are seen leaving the c ay on a daily basis for years. Present and past politicians are reaping “big bucks” from Arawak every day getting as much as $180 for every con-t ainer that leaves the cay. So everything that is shipped to Arawak Cay, someone gets that money.Imagine that! A lso a high PLP official has had a sand contract benefitting from all of the sand that is sold on Arawak Cay, and has been doing so forever and a day. T his i s just the tip of the iceberg. The plot thickens. All of this is d one on land leased to them by the government. So therefore t hey have probably become millionaires by benefitting from our Crown land. You, the blind followers, get nothing and they go “laughing, all the way to the bank.” See how foolish we are to lis ten to people who have their own special interest and hid d en agenda in Arawak Cay. They tell you about various impact studies and reports, but they do not tell you that they are making plenty money, right now, doing the same thing that they do not want the govern ment to do. Arawak Cay has been in e xistence forever. The cay has become the most unsightly eye sore as a first impression on entry to the Bahamas for far too long.The dilapidated building has embarrassed us too much.It is time it is replaced with something else. The Pindling government did nothing to clean up Arawak, the first Ingraham Government did not include it in its list of priorities at the time. The Christie government must have seen the degradation and ignored the deterioration, and now the Ingraham government sees the wisdom and is killing two birds with one rock, cleaning up Bay Street and Arawak Cay, by moving all of the heavy activity from Bay Street and shifting it to Arawak Cay while not only making it easier on the eye but creating a better first impression when the cruise ships come to our shores. Bahamians must be careful while following the “Pied Piper of Hamlin.”They are being controlled by their own special interest. They have been licking their chops long time and see t he possibility of their “golden goose” being taken away, that’s the special interest, their spec ial interest. Did anyone notice that a for m er politician who spoke on this groups behalf “broke offr unning” when the public was a pprised of his extreme profits o n Arawak Cay? Never mind the noise in the m arket, only mind the price of t he fish.” A s we speak, Arawak is going to be transformed and we a ll would be proud of it. I can not forget the noise created when the FNM government was transforming Goodman’s Bay. They cried holy hell. Look at Goodman’s Bay today, thes ame place that the PLP had already given to Baha Mar is the mother of all deals. The only thing that the PLP is sure of is that anything that looks like progress, especially if it is not happening on their watch, they oppose to, nothing more and nothing less. IVOINE W INGRAHAM Nassau, July, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE X, XXXDAY, XXXMONTH XX, 1998 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm RECENTLY a member of the public comm ented in the press on the number of police officers appearing before the bar of the court on various charges. From the context of the comment it was u nclear whether the criticism was against the o fficers who had put themselves in such a compromising position, or whether it was being suggested that to save the public reput ation of the force the charges should be supp ressed. I t is always unfortunate when an officer of the law disgraces a trusted position and an honoured uniform, but it should also give the public confidence that the force is heade d by a Commissioner who administers justice evenly. Commissioner Ferguson is a law officer who will give his full support to his honest officers, but will pull the rug from u nder those whose behaviour compromises h is team and undermines their efforts. This is as it should be. In yesterday’s Tribune a former Crime Stoppers advocate expressed her disapp ointment in the Force. She accused officers of denying residents their basic right to safety by failing to warn them of certain crimes being committed in their neighbourhood. She accused the police of being tight-lipped o ver rapes and attempted rapes on the easte rn end of New Providence no specific area was pinpointed. She maintained that women had a right to know so that they could protect themselves. Without that knowledge t hey were being made a vulnerable target for a predator. We know that many police officers are torn between not wanting to cause alarm in a community, and those who feel that the pub lic should be informed but are faced with t he pleas of victims who don’t want anyone to know of their embarrassment. We know that the victim of the man who recently invaded her home and eventually made her drive him t o an ATM machine to withdraw money in return for not raping her, did not want her humiliation made public. The police respect ed her wishes and kept it from the press. However, when The Tribune learned of the case, for the sake of all those women who might be the next victim, our reporters tracked it down and we published. The victim’s identity was respected, but the crime was not. Instead of having only the eyes of the police focusing on this criminal, the eyes of a nation will now be hunting him. We believe that victims could do much to help track their attackers, if only they would talk to the press. The Tribune can assure them that their identity will always be protected. We are only interested in the facts of the crime and putting a spotlight on the criminal. Criminals flourish when they can keep their crimes secret secrecy enables them to quickly move on to the next v ictim. This must be stopped and it can only be stopped if the first victim sends out aw arning signal so that there won’t be a second or third victim. It is almost a civic duty to help protect one’s fellow man. T his week we were told a story of the experience of one family. This story will illustratew hy so many are losing confidence in the p olice and the courts. A certain resident’s daughter-in-law, d espite the many family warnings, would go for her daily run on Cable Beach’s median strip. One day as she got into her car to return home, a man jumped her and tried top ull her from behind the driver’s wheel. She pulled away and drove off. He followed in his car and cornered her. She ran into a person- ’s yard, banged on the door, but got no answer. The man grabbed her, threw her to the ground. There was a desperate struggle.H olding onto her car keys, she banged them a s hard as she could on his head and again m anaged to get away. Once more he gave chase. A Good Samaritan in a passing car saw what was happening and stopped to help. Her assailant got into his car and took off. The Good Samaritan drove behind him, fol lowed by a police car that happened on the scene. The attacker crashed his car and was arrested. The case went to court, followed by several adjournments. To this day no one knows if this man was convicted or if he is one of those rapists walking the streets on remand. A bout a year later the same resident’s s on was riding his scooter on Dowdeswell S treet when he came upon two men fighting. A shot rang out and one of the men tried to run from the scene. Instead he ran into the son’s oncoming scooter. The son quickly called the police on his cell phone. The gunman was caught. He was facing a murder charge because, the second man was dead. The police asked the son to go to the sta tion to identify the man, which he did. Some time later the police asked the son to return to Central Station in connection with the case. As he sat waiting for a police officer he s aw the accused murderer and two police o fficers walking down the stairs and into the c orridor. The three of them were laughing and joking together. D isgusted, the son got up and left Central station. If this was the name of the game, he wanted nothing to do with it. As the law says justice must not only be done, it must be seen to be done. Law officers and an accused in warm embrace is certainly not justice being seen to be done. It might be a small incident, but these small incidents, like dripping water on a corroding stone, soon erodes public confidence. LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Criminals flourish when crimes kept quiet Arawak Cay is all about progress EDITOR, The Tribune. T he Casuarina trees on Saunders Beach all 66 of them will be cut down to put light polls, is this true? Who gives who the right to do this to our environment? T earing up all the trees on the other side for a parking lot, what will happen to the shade are we g oing to have to spend more money to replant trees that will take 50 years to grow. The Casuarina trees on Saunders have been there longer than I have been alive, those that say they are not indigenous to the Bahamas, well half of the human population are not indigenous to the Bahamas does this mean that they have to leave? T he attitude because trees are in your way you have to cut it down mentally has to stop, work around mother nature and the environ ment. LESLIE VANDERPOOL F ounder & Executive Director (BIFF Nassau, August, 2009. PLPhates progress W e need to change our attitude towards trees

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A 51-YEAR-OLD m an accused of attempting to p revent a witness from giv ing evidence during an armed robbery trial was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday. A nsel Pickstock pleaded not guilty to the charge at his arraignment before Magistrate Janeen WeechGomez in Court 1, Bank Lane yesterday. It is alleged that on Wednesday, July 29, 2009,P ickstock attempted to pre vent Judy Simmons, a wit ness before the courts, from attending court. Prosecutors said that Simmons is a keyw itness in an armed robbery case involving Pickstock’s son, 22year-old Quendo Pickstock, and 23-year-old Vanshuver Adderley. The two men are accused of the July 26 armed rob bery of Porky’s Gas Station i n Bamboo Town. Pickstock was granted $2,000 bail. The case was adjourned to August 28. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 5 POLICE are searching for an arsonist w ho set fire to the St Joseph’s Catholic School on Boyd Road sometime before 5am yesterday. According to Asst Sup Walter Evans, Fire Services personnel arrived at the schoolw ithin three minutes of receiving a report about the fire. Arriving at the scene, they discovered that t he flames were confined to an office on the ground floor of the two-storey concrete b uilding. After removing a metal gate to gain access to the area, the blaze was extinguished in short order. H owever, the office area for the school’s principal, bursar and secretary was completely destroyed and other rooms on the ground level received substantial smoke damage. Further school damage resulted to the technology and library area where culprits entered a window and removed computeri tems and searched the library. “The technology/library building is locate d adjacent to the where the fire incident area is located,” Mr Evans said. Investigations continue. Arsonist sets fire to St Joseph’s Catholic School Man, 51, accused of attempting to prevent witness giving evidence A RSON AND POLICE i nvestigators survey the damage to the St Joseph school located on Boyd Road yesterday. A number of offices on the ground floor of the building were damaged by the fire which p olice believe was deliberately set. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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BAHAMAS Supermarkets L imited, which operates 11 City Market stores in New Providence and Grand Bahama, launched their new community fundraising initiative lastm onth. City Market customers now h ave a chance to give back to various charities linked to the c ompany’s smart shopper savings stamp programme with the donation of their stamps. In each of the City Market stores there is a fundraisings tand that holds 12 stamp sheets. Each sheet is assigned toa non-profit organisation, charity or group. One sheet holds 2 00 stamps and a filled sheet is worth $10. At the end of each quarter, a cheque representing the total amount of sheets accumulated will be presented to the chari ties or organisations that are p art of the programme. In the first week of the programme a pproximately $4,000 in stamps were donated. T he “community board” as it is called, has been in the City M arket stores since June and customers have reacted favourably to it. “Tourists who do not usually use their stamps like the ideao f making a donation to a worthy cause,” the company said. Kids also like to get involved and learn about giving back.” Said marketing director Azaleta Ishmael-Newry: “When my daughters, who are eight and a half and three and a half years old, are shopping with me they can’t wait to get the stamps at t he end of my sale and run over to the board and paste them o n.” “We welcome everyone’s p articipation in this worthy cause,” said Peter Goudie, h uman resources director for Bahamas Supermarkets. “And this project is an important cause where the company and the community c an help make a positive dif ference.” T he eight charities that were chosen for this year’s prog ramme include the AIDS Foundation; Bahamas Girl Guides Association; Sir Victor Sassoon Heart Foundation; Bahamas National Trust; Bahamas Red Cross; Cancer Society of the Bahamas, Salvation Army and the Scout Association of the Bahamas. T he other four groups or charities are chosen by a City M arket store and the aim is to choose ones that are located in t heir community. “Partnerships like these help t he local community and Bahamas Supermarkets has been doing so for the past 40 years,” the company said. At a press conference that w as held in July at the Nassau headquarters of BahamasS upermarkets, each spokesperson for the eight main charities t alked about their organisation. They all agreed with Earle Bethell, president of the Bahamas Cancer Society who said that in “these tough economic times, every penny counts.” Major Oral Morris of the Salvation Army said that they h ave seen more and more persons seeking help and “the a ssistance from Bahamas Supermarkets will certainly h elp the Salvation Army.” The Bahamas Red Cross said t hat they would use the funds for their ‘Meals on Wheels’ programme; the Bahamas Nation al Trust, for educational pro grammes; the Scouts Associat ion of the Bahamas and the Bahamas Girl Guide Associa t ion will use the money towards various projects as will the A IDS Foundation. Roy Barnes of the Sir Vic tor Heart Foundation said the funds will help their children’s heart programme. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE City Market’s stamp of success By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net AN INSPIRATIONAL medical professor who worked his way out of theg hetto to become a globally acclaimed neurosurgeon will speak at the 13th annual CEO Network conference to inspire young men in the Bahamas. D r Ben Carson worked on the first separation of Siamese twins joined at the back of the head in 1987, as well as the first completely successful separation of type-two vertical Siamese twins in 1997. He is currently a professor of neurosurgery, oncology, plastic surgery and pediatrics at the John Hopkins School of M edicine. The CEO Network and partners have arranged for him to come to the Bahamas to give a positive outlook and inspiration to young people overwhelmed by the disturbing trends of murder and violent crime in the country. CEO of GEMS 105.9 FM Deborah Bartlett, the founder and president of the CEO network president, said the conference will address the emasculation of men in the Bahamas, and take steps towards “economic emancipation.” “There are disturbing trends that are undermining the beauty of our country like cold-blooded murder, the rising cases of rape, the high tolerance of immorality and corruption, and the apparent comfort with denying productive and qualified citizens with opportunities. “The weapons of choice that are emasculating men and debilitating women are dominating the headlines and negatively influencing our environment,” she said. M s Bartlett and CEO partners including the Delta Phi Pi Fraternity, theB ahamas Christian Council, as well as medical councils and unions, hope the conference, and Dr Carson in particular, will help empower Bahamians to suc-c eed. The CEO network president said: “Dr Carson had a childhood dream of becoming a physician. Growing up in a single parent home with dire poverty, poor grades, a horrible temper and low self-esteem appeared to preclude the realisation of that dream until his mother, with only a third grade education, challenged her sons to strive for excellence. “His life story should serve to motivate all of us to dream and be determined to overcome every obstacle. Yes, his life reminds us that ‘yes we can!’” In addition to keynote speaker Dr Carson, US Senator Kent Williams and CEO of Giles Enterprises Terry Gilesw ill deliver speeches at the conference, and Minister of Health Dr Hubert Min-n is will make remarks. The conference at the British Colonial Hilton will open at 7pm on Friday, August 27, and continue on August 28,w hich is the anniversary of Martin Luther King’s ‘I have a dream’ speech at the Lincoln Memorial in 1963. Highlights of the conference will be televised on 64 network affiliates including FOX, CBS, NBC and MY9. A story to inspire young men AZALETA Ishmael-Newry, marketing director (front row, centre resources director (back row, rightBSL Back row from left to right are: Madeline Froning and Major Oral Morris, Salvation Army; John Philpott, Scouts Association; Caryl Lashley, AIDS Foundation; Brendon Watson, Red Cross; Pheafrisia Strachan, Nicolette Archer and Crystal Fountain, Girl Guides; Earle Bethell, Bahamas Cancer Society, and Peter Goudie, BSL. Front row from left to right are: Natasha Wright and Lynn Gape, Bahamas National Trust; Azaleta Ishmael-Newry, BSL and R E Barnes, Heart Foundation. New stamp programme fundraising initiative successfully launched His life story should servet o motivate all of us to dream and be determined to overcome every obstacle. Yes, his life reminds us that ‘yes we can!’ Neurosurgeon who worked his way out of ghetto to speak at conference C EO Network president DEBORAH BARTLETT

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 7 )25$/( JASMINE Nastassia Adderley represented the Bahamas in the third annual Miss Caribbean Metro USA 2009 Beauty Pageant held in Washington, DC, last weekend. Entering her first competition, Miss Adderley took the 'Best Personality' award and was named the second runner-up overall. The competition included 11 contestants. M s Adderley only had three weeks to prepare herself for the challenge. Observers said she presented herself " professionally, with elegance and confidence." Future Stars Production, the production company behind the pageant, said the competition sought to promote "a proud awareness of each contestant’s talent and vibrant culture.” “The aim is to bring Caribbean cultures together. We will work hard to build this pageant for many years to come as we seek to make an impact on the lives of our Caribbean ladies in the community, whereby they too can make a lasting impact on other girls,” a Future Stars spokesman said. “We believe that every young lady has an inner beauty and that beauty will ultimately bring to light their purpose in this life. To that end, we encourage each lady in the competition to be in tune with, not just her outer beauty, but inner beauty as well.” Bahamian named 'Best Personality' FOUR men and a 13-year-old boy missing at sea were rescued by a submarine and have been safely returned to their families. Relatives of the men contacted the Defence Force operations r oom early Monday morning with an emergency call. They said the men had gone on a fishing trip around Andros on Saturday and had not returned as expected on Sunday at 3pm. Police officials in Fresh Creek and Mangrove Cay in Andros as well a s BASRA officials were alerted. The RBDF also directed severa l of its vessels to assist in the search for the missing 27-foot speed b oat. I nformation received by the police control room indicated that a c apsised vessel, the Hammerhead II, had been spotted by an AUTEC helicopter off the southwestern coast of New Providence, j ust a few miles away from the Coral Harbour base. An AUTEC submarine surfaced and rescued the men from the w aters where they were found floating, all in good health, with the exception of one man who had an arm injury. Defence Force vessel P-121 was dispatched to the area and brought t he men and the boy to the Coral Harbour base shortly before noon o n Tuesday where they were greeted by relieved family memb ers and friends. Their damaged vessel was also towed into the capital by Defence Force vessel P-43. Happy ending for men and boy missing at sea FAMILY members and friends express their relief as the welcome back the men who were missing since Sunday. PASTOR David Brennen gives thanks for the men’s safe return from sea. BAHAMAS Ambassador C A Smith and Bahamian Jasmine Adderley who won the 'Best Personality' award in the third annual Miss Caribbean Metro USA 2009 Beauty Pageant. I a n E d w a r d s

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Recognised as an ambassador and actor” w ho “advanced the n ation’s dialogue on race and respect” 82-year-old Poitier was presented the Presidential Medal of Freedom during an afternoon ceremony at the White House. A s the first black man to win an Academy Award for Best Actor, he and 15 other individuals including theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking, South African archbishop a nd Nobel laureate Desmond Tutu, first w oman on the U.S. Supreme Court, retired Justice Sandra Day O’Connor were described by President Obama as “agents of change.” Introducing Poitier as he r ose from his seat, a White House spokesperson noted how, having “risen from the tomato farms of the Bahamas, his talent led him to Broadway, Hollywood a nd global acclaim.” In front of black and w hite audiences struggling to right the nation’s moral compass, Sidney Poitier brought us the common tragedy of racism, the inspiring possibility of rec-o nciliation, and the simple joys of everyday life. “Ultimately, the man w ould mirror the character, and both would advance the nation’s dialogue on race and respect,” s aid the official. President Obama said: “These extraordinary men a nd women, these agents o f change, remind us that e xcellence is not beyond our abilities, that hope liesa round the corner and that j ustice can still be won in the forgotten corners of this world.” Born in 1927 in Miami, Florida, Sidney Poitier grew up in Cat Island as the last of seven children b efore moving to Nassau w ith his family, led by his tomato farmer father, at age 11. It was in the capital that he first encountered cinema. At the age of 16, Poitier m oved to New York and found a job as a dishwasher. Soon after, he began working as a janitor for the American Negro Theatre i n exchange for acting l essons. D espite a lack of formal training, Poitier went on to become an acclaimed actor recognised for a long list of “firsts.” He was the first black a ctor to become a hero to both black and white audiences, to win a prestigiousi nternational film award (Venice Film Festival, Something of Value, 1957), to be nominated for a Best A ctor Academy Award (The Defiant Ones, 1958 to star as a romantic lead ( Paris Blues, 1961), to win t he Oscar (Lilies of the F ields, 1963), to become the number one box offices tar in the country (1968 a nd to insist on a film crew that was at least 50 per cent African-American (The Lost Man, 1969). The Cat Islander also starred in the first main stream movies to condonei nterracial marriages and permit a mixed couple to h ug and kiss (Guess Who’s C oming to Dinner, 1967) and to attack apartheid ( The Wilby Conspiracy, 1 975). I n addition to Poitier and those mentioned above, the complete list of those hon o ured by the President yesterday include: civil rights advocate the Rev. Joseph Lowery; healthcare reform champion, Senator Edward Kennedy; native American world war II hero and his t orian, Joe Medicine CrowH igh Bird; breast cancer activist Nancy Goodman Brinker; tennis championa nd gender equality activist Billie Jean King; quarterback turned Republican vice presidential nominee,J ack Kemp; gay rights pion eer Harvey Milk; actress Chita Rivera; former Presi dent of Ireland Mary R obinson; cancer scientist Janet Davison Rowley; e conomist and microcredit p ioneer Muhammad Yunus a nd doctor to the homeless, Pedro Jose Greer Jr. “These outstanding men a nd women represent an incredible diversity of backgrounds,” Obama said. “Yet they share one overarching trait: Each has been an agent of change. Each saw an imperfectw orld and set about i mproving it, often overcoming great obstacles along the way. Their relentless devo tion to breaking down barriers and lifting up their fel low citizens sets a standard t o which we all should s trive,” he added. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE FROM page one Sidney Poitier honoured by President Obama AFTER PRESENTING him with the 2009 Presidential Medal of Freedom, President Barack Obama is hugged by Sidney Poitier, the Bahamian actor known for breaking racial barriers and the firstb lack man to win an Academy Award as best actor, at the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2009. (AP

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 9 TWO YEAR DEGREEL A W D E G R E E L L BInstitute of Business and Commerce Tel 324-4625Registration is now in progress at IBC for the University of London Law Degree at an affordable tuition.Students wishing to sit the May/June 2010 Examinations are advised to meet the 15th August, 2009 Application deadline. For further details call: voice their displeasure in a controlled fashion.” “We want to make sure that Bahamians get an opportunity to voice their objections i n sufficiently large numbers that the government will listen a nd respond,” said Mr F itzgerald. Among a variety of criticisms of the project the potential for it to kill business a t the fish fry, devalue nearby properties and increase traffic congestion the Committeeh as repeatedly alleged that the extension of Arawak Cay with fill from the dredging of N assau Harbour will have the knock-on effect of “destroy ing” the popular recreation a rea of Saunders Beach. H owever, Environment Minister Earl Deveaux has responded that this claim isf alse and “alarmist.” Fill was to be used to extend Arawak Cay whether t he port was relocated or not, he stated, and a scientific s tudy available on the BEST Commission’s website proves that any impact on the beach i s “unlikely” or mitigable. He has denied any secrecy on behalf of Government andc riticised an independent s tudy that placed Arawak Cay sixth out of seven potential sites for the port for using ana llegedly “strange and nonstatistical” methodology. Meanwhile, though a move to the southwest for the port would have a price tag of “around $400 million”, Dr D eveaux has stated that an A rawak Cay port is estimated to cost a more affordable $80 million. T he site provides the benefit of “already being a major port” and an “industrial site f or over 40 years”, of not r equiring another cut into N ew Providence and still allowing “ample opportunity f or increased economic activity at the down home Fish Fry,” said Dr Deveaux. B ut Mr Fitzgerald has r ejected Dr Deveaux’s assertions and called for Govern m ent to show more evidence to substantiate its “rush” to place the port at Arawak Cay. Y esterday Mr Fitzgerald said the Committee is “intensifying its efforts, not only to g et answers to these questions but to give Government another opportunity to come clean with the Bahamian peo p le on the full implications of the development at Arawak Cay.” The Senator charged that as the Save Saunders Beach g roup on social networking s ite Facebook already has 1,941 members it will not be hard to get “a minimum” of1 0,00 signatures added to the petition during the Committee’s two week “nationwide d rive.” This is a defining moment i n our generation and we are inviting Bahamians to draw a line in the sand and say to the government ‘no more, enough is enough.’ We would expect (the P rime Minister) and the government to hear those con c erns, stop this project and allow the Bahamian people an opportunity to understand why the government is mov-i ng ahead with this and if they are not so satisfied that this project be stopped forth w ith.” The petition is being posted on Savesaundersbeach.org and the Save Saunders Beach f acebook page. The system was moving towards the west at a speed of almost 14mph with maximum sustained winds of 35mph. Should the depression d evelop into a tropical storm it would be named Ana the first named storm of the 2009 Atlantic hurricane season. To keep up to date on t he tropical depression until the next edition of The Tribune, check with weather on The Tribune’s website www.tribune242.com where readers will find thel atest weather forecast, w eather maps, news from the hurricane centre and an Accu Weather video commentary. FROM page one Depression Shooting of student was like ‘the wild wild west’ Brandon Russell, 18, who was the first w itness to testify yesterday, told the court that he was standing about five feet away from Fowler when the shooting took place. Russell, who was also a student at C R Walker at the time, said he was standing at the bus stop on Bay and Frederick Streets with a group of friends whenh e saw a car with two men inside drive up to them. Russell said that both men had on Oakley shades and the passenger who had a chromed tipped handgun opened fire. Russell admitted that initially he told police that he could not identify the two men in the car because they were wearing shades. Russell told the court t hat two weeks later, however, during a n identification parade at the Central Detective Unit, he identified the assailant. Russell told the court that he was able to do so because a friend of his at school, who had not been at the scene of the shooting, had shown him a pict ure of the suspected gunman in a local n ewspaper. Corporal 474 Keith Turnquest, who was attached to the Criminal Records office at the time of the incident, testified yesterday that when he arrived at thes cene, he and a team of police officers a lready had portions of Bay and Frederi ck Streets already cordoned off. He told the court that he saw two fired bullets, one on Frederick Street, south of Bay S treet and the other on the sidewalk. T he bullets, he said, were 30 feet, four inches apart. Corporal Turnquest told the court that he also observed bloodstains in front of the island shop. Corporal Turnquest said that he photographed the scene. The photos were submitted i n evidence yesterday. C orp Turnquest also testified that on January 10, 2008, he visited the Rand Morgue of the Princess Margaret Hospital and observed the body of a dark male in the dissecting room. CorporalT urnquest said that he observed a numb er of injuries to the front upper region o f his body and the left back section. The trial continues today. FROM page one Petition launched against container port move FROM page one J erome Fitzgerald

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robbers and claimed only one officer was in the areaw hen Brenton was shot. " There was a police jeep t hat passed Brenton Smith almost 300 feet away from where he came to be shot. He walked that distance, as he was turning his body to get into the property. . .The supermarket property. A police officer shouted' Freeze' and immediately shot him. "He was unarmed, he stumbled backwards, he fell, and ten minutes later he d ied," Mr Gomez said, flanked by emotional members of the Smith family. This information was gleaned through his firm'si ndependent investigation into the shooting, Mr Gomez said. ". . .More care ought to be taken by police when disc harging a firearm at a person. . .One has to wonder a bout the training of police officers," he said. The "traumatised" family wants an expedited coroner's inquest into the youth's death. They also want the officer in question to be removed from active duty pending the outcome of the inquest and will fight for criminal charges to be fileda gainst anyone found culpab le of Brenton's death. T hey also have plans to f ile a civil suit against the r elevant agencies. The 2008 graduate of St Augustine's College who f amily described as an ambit ious teen was shot around 8 pm on July, 9 and d ied a short time later. Officers were on the lookout for two armed robbers who held up the food store a short time before Brenton w as killed. Police have acknowledged t hat a ballistics report r evealed the teen was shot by a police service weapon. They said the case was turned over to the Coroner's C ourt, however, a date for t he matter has not been scheduled. L ast week a tabloid reported that the teen was o n bail for charges stemming f rom an alleged stabbing incident. Brenton was not convicted of any charges andh is family maintains his innocence. A website has been set up in his honour: www.bren t onhectorsmith.com and a special service will be held in the parking lot of City M arket on Village Road tonight. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Miss Universe Pageant Event Schedule:MISS UNIVERSE PRESENTATIONSunday, August 16th, 8:00pm Imperial Ballroom, Atlantis, Paradise IslandWatch all of the contestants compete in the Swimsuit and Evening Gown competitions to secure their spot in the Final Show.Tickets: General $50, Deluxe $100, Preferred $125, Gold $175 VIP $250 (includes dinner at select restaurant)MISS UNIVERSE FINAL SHOWSunday, August 23rd, 9:00pmImperial Ballroom, Atlantis, Paradise IslandBe there live to witness the crowning of the new 2009 Miss Universe!Tickets: General $175, Deluxe $250, Preferred $400, Gold $750 VIP $1000 (includes admission to Coronation Ball with open bar and gourmet buffet)CORONATION BALLSunday, August 23rd, 11:30pmThe Royal Deck, Atlantis, Paradise IslandCelebrate with the new Miss Universe and her fellow contestants and enjoy great music, a gourmet buffet and an open bar!Tickets: $145 For tickets and information call the Atlantis Box Ofce at 363-6601 Witness the crowning of the 2009 Miss Universe on giant multiple screens. Enjoy an open bar and a sumptuous a lfresco buffet. This royal fete will culminate with the prestigious Coronation Ball at 11:30pm where you can mingle with the newly crowned Miss Universe and her fellow contestants! Celebrate an experience that will never happen again!Tickets: $185THE VIEWING PARTYTHE 2009 MISS UNIVERSE PAGEANTSunday, August 23rd, 8:00pm The Royal Deck, Atlantis, Paradise Island Only forty-eight nautical miles east of Miami, Florida, situated on the North end of North Bimini, Bahamas Bimini Bay Resort & Marina complex rests on over 740 acres of pristine Bahamian beaches. Long known as a paradise for anglers and divers alike, Bimini Bay Resort offers a plethora of options for the most discriminating traveller. Bimini Bay Management Ltd. owns and operates Bimini Bay Resort & Marina.B imini Bay Resort & Marina seeks to hire a professional i ndividual for the following position:D Requirements: /LFHQVHG%RDW&DSWDLQ (LJKWWR7ZHOYH\HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQ0DULQD
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C M Y K C M Y K THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 12 Stubbs’ opinion on IAAF World Championships... IN an effort to continue to develop and promote football in the Bahamas, the Bahamas Football Association (BFA al and equipment to the College of the Bahamas (COB new initiative to develop a Sports and Wellness Institute. The college launched the Sports and Wellness Institute in June, 2009, with a mission to offer training and development for professionals involved in the various sporting disciplines in the country, and also to serve as a vehicle to assist in the certification of coaches, trainers, referees and administrators of the sporting federation. The premise is to offer certification courses in the various sporting disciplines in all facets of the game – coaches, referees, administrators and medicine. Additionally, courses and seminars on nutrition and first aid will be included as offerings of the institute. COB has already convened meetings of an advisory board made up of representatives from the various sporting bodies in the country, including representatives of the Ministry of Education and Ministry of Sports to establish the framework under which this institute will function. “The idea to establish an accredited course programme is something that we are keenly interested in,” said BFA general secretary Lionel Haven. “And so the opportunity to contribute to this was something that we jumped at. FIFA has a wonderful assortment of courses for coaches, referees, administrators and sports medicine under its Futuro III course programmes, and we felt that mater ial from these courses would be very beneficial to the college in their exercise. “Also, given the fact that we have local persons who have completed the FIFA course programmes and can serve as instructors for coaching, refereeing and administration iss omething that we are pleased to offer in addition to the material pre sented. “The presentation of course mate rial for administration, coaching, refereeing and the supply of balls are made by us here, but on behalf ofF IFA, who supplied the material and equipment to us for presentation to the college. We are pleased with the relationship that we have with the institute and will continue to work hand in hand with them on this and other initiatives.” BFA donates to COB By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net BERLIN, Germany Although he missed the week-long training camp, Chris “Fireman” Brown said it won't take away from his preparations for the IAAF's 12th World Championships in Athletics. Brown, 30, arrived here yesterday just as the team moved from their training camp and into the Games Village. He's here in sufficient time to get acclimatized before the championships begin on Saturday and the first round of the men's 400 metres is held Tuesday. "My preparation has been going pretty good. I feel pretty good andI'm healthy," said Brown during an exclusive interview with The Tribune at Frankfurt Airport as he waited to board the flight to Berlin yesterday. "I'm just waiting for my race to start." Despite the fact that the coaching staff had expected him to report to the training camp, Brown said his absence should not take away from the task ahead of him. "I don't think it will play a factor with me because I'm trying to get a n individual spot on the podium," said Brown, who has fallen short in the past three championships he competed in. "Through the grace of the good Lord, I have already been there a few times, so after every disap pointment there is a blessing and this year, I'm really focused. But my main objective is to get through the first round...each round will take care of itself. All of my teammates are there, but I know when I get in (the Games Village rise their spirits because they know that I will be there to encourage them to just go out there and per form." This is Brown's second appearance on the new blue mondo sur face at the Olympic Stadium. He opened his season with a victory there and he's hoping to duplicate that feat next week Friday when the final of the 400 is staged. The preliminaries, however, will begin on Tuesday with the semifinal Thursday. "The Lord is in charge right now. With him being in charge, anything is possible," he said. "So I'm just going to put my trust in him like I've been doing my whole career and do the rest. I could plan all day, but I realize that he is in charge. I can only go out there and do my best." Over the years, nobody has giv en their all as Brown has done, but yet still he has not been able to stand tall on the victory podium to collect an individual medal in the World Outdoors or the Olympic Games. Last year in Beijing, China, he came so close that he could smell it until American David Neville dove across the finish line to nip him out of the bronze. "I've learnt a lot from the expe rience," said Brown about joining the top echelon on the podium. "Not winning a medal has kept me humble, it has kept me in the game for a long time. Experience is the best teacher and every year, I get better and better and my coach continues to take the time out to work with me so that I can get better. So with the experience that I've gained, I think that will make the difference." Having ran a season's best of 44.73 seconds, just shy of his national record of 44.40, Brown said it has showed what he has been doing in practice and that was one of the main reasons why he wanted to stay home a little longer than to come up so early for the training camp. "I don't mind coming in now, a week before and getting the job done," he said. "My training has been going awesome and we just have to see how all of the hard work will pay off as I get adjusted to the environment." While he's confident of winning a medal, Brown said he knows he will have to go through Americans Jeremy Wariner, the reigning twotime defending champion and LaShawn Merritt, the Olympic champion. "This is 2009, but you have to expect the unexpected," he said. "We have our eyes on the two American guys, but at the end of the day, the race is wide open. For me, there are eight guys who will be going for it and so anybody can win that gold, silver or bronze. I just have to keep my eyes open, run a smart race and stay focused." As for the relay where the Bahamas is considered a sure bet to medal, Brown said as long as all of the guys come out and do their part, they should end up with another medal. "We're strong enough that we can really go out there and do some damage," Brown said. "We just have to put our faith in the Lord and allow him to take us through." Having arrived safely in Berlin, Brown said he's eager to get settled in at the Games Village and start his process towards a trip to the medal stand twice next week. ‘Fireman’ misses out on training camp TRIBUNE E XCLUSIV E But doesn’t ‘think it will play a factor’ CHRIS BROWN has arrived in Berlin, Germany, just as the team moved from their training camp and into the Games Village... Legacy m eeting on weekend... See page 14

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Only forty-eight nautical miles east of Miami, Florida, situated on the North end of North Bimini, Bahamas Bimini Bay Resort & Marina complex rests on over 740 acres of pristine Bahamian b eaches. Long known as a paradise for anglers and divers alike, Bimini Bay Resort offers a plethora of options for the most discriminating traveller. Bimini Bay Management Ltd. owns and operates Bimini Bay Resort & Marina. %LPLQL%D\HVRUWtDULQDVHHNVWRKLUHTXDOLHGSURIHVVLRQDOV for the following positions:IT MANAGERResponsible for the ongoing maintenance and operation for all of the Information T echnology implemented within the assigned Hotel. The position is responsible for the daily operation, support, and security of the technology and data that support and enable the business operation. 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Ensure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in implementing, achieving and maintaining the resorts goals and objectives. :HRIIHUDQH[FHOOHQWEHQHWVSDFNDJHDQGFRPSHWLWLYHFRPSHQVDWLRQ)RUIXOO consideration, all interested applicants should forward a copy of their resum to the attention of a tjobs@biminibayresort.com o r fax to (242 BERLIN, Germany In two days, the International Amateur Athletic Federation’s 12th World Championships in Athletics is scheduled to get underway. And I have high expectations for the Bahamas’ 24-member team. I have pegged in two with the possibility of three indiv idual medals to go along with one in the relay and at least three other appearances in the final over the nine days of competition on the Olympic Stadium that once graced the legendary Jesse Owens. However, there has been significant improvements to the track, including a new blue mondo surface that was laid down earlier this year. All of the athletes have now arrived in Berlin with Chris “Fireman” Brown being the last. We actually came in on t he same flight from Frankfurt into Berlin yesterday morning. Brown’s trip was direct from Atlanta, Georgia, while I made a stop over in Charlotte from the Bahamas. From all indications, Brown seemed quite ready and confident that he can finally get on the podium and win the individual medal that has eluded him since he started competing in the men's 400m back in 2001 in Edmonton, Canada, where he was fourth in his first round heat and failed to advance any further. That same year, Avard Moncur became the first Bahamian to win the men's one-lapper, clocking a stunning 44.64 seconds that stood then as the new national record. From Edmonton to Paris, France, in 2003, Brown moved up a notch advancing to the semifinal, joining Mon cur, who relinquished his crown to American Tyree Washington as he too gracefully bowed out. The next two biannual championships would be the emergence of American Jeremy Wariner, who dominated the scene until he lost his Olympic title to his compatri ot LaShawn Merritt last year in Beijing, China. In each of the successive Worlds in Helsinki, Finland, in 2005 and Osaka, Japan, in 2007, Brown fell just shy of winning a medal, finishing fourth. He was also the first man out of a trip on the medal stand after an American runner dove across the finish line in Beijing to sneak through for the bronze at the Olympics. Based on the way he has been running this year, Brown certainly is considered a medal contender for the Bahamas. He's one of the three individual medallists I have pegged on my list, along with the men's 4 x 400 relay team. There's no doubt that the focus will be the two-headed American monster called theW ariner-Merritt show. But if Brown plays his cards right, he could be the spoiler just as Derrick Atkins was at the last Worlds in Osaka when he powered past Jamaican Asafa Powell for the silver behind American Tyson Gay. This time around, I believe that both Atkins and Donald Thomas, who stunned the world in Osaka when he soared to the gold in the men's high jump, will have an outside chance of returning to the podium simply because of the fact that neither of them have been performing up to par this year. But any one of them could turn things around and make it to the final. I like Olympic bronze medallist Leevan “Superman” Sands as another medallist for the Bahamas. Like Brown, I think he's overdue for a real big money payday and this could turn out to be his time to shine again. Last, but not least, if Chandra Sturrup can get out in her usually quick start and maintain her form throughout the straight away race, we could look for the veteran sprinter to be in the mix in the women's 100. She's been a two-time m edallist, having won the bronze consecutively in Edmonton and Paris, four years after Sevatheda Fynes inked her name in the record books as the first Bahamian to achieve the feat with her bronze in Athens, Greece, in 1997. However, I strongly believe that with more concentration on the half-lapper, Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie could win her second Worlds medal. She did it back in Edmonton in 2001 when she won the g old and nine years later, she's still running in tip-top shape. This could possibly be the final appearance for both Sturrup and FergusonMcKenzie and so I have a feeling that they are both going to go all out for a shot at being one of the three final competitors standing tall in the female sprints. Both have withstood the test of time and are definitely going to have to turn back the hands of time in their quest to win another medal. This year, for the first time, we have a female team entered in the 4 x 400 relay, but it's a pity that both Pauline Davis-Thompson, the 400 silver medallist in Gotenburg, Sweden, in 1995 and Tonique Williams-Darling, the gold medallist in Helsinki in 2005, have both retired. Christine Amertil is the most seasoned member of the team, but I think her experience alone will not be sufficient for the team to medal. There is a good possibility that they could end up in the final, thus paving the way for a brighter future as they look ahead to the 13th Worlds. As for the women's 4 x 100, it's good that they are finally back after falling short of returning to prominence in Helsinki when Timicka Clarke, Sturrup, Fynes and Phillippa Arnett-Willie failed to make the final, four years after the Golden Girls of Fynes, Sturrup, DavisThompson and FergusonMcKenzie struck for gold in Athens. The men's 4 x 4 relay team is a sure bet for the final medal. It just depends on who runs and in what order and this could determine the colour they could be wearing around their necks at the con clusion of these championships set for August 23. The majority of the members have had their share of setbacks this year, but they seemed to have weathered the storm. Now it's up to them to go out there and try to keep the most successful streak of winning a medal over all the other countries since the team of Avard Moncur, Brown, Troy McIntosh and Timothy Munnings snatched the gold in Edmonton. With different combinations each year, the Bahamas’ men have won a bronze in Paris and silver back-to-back in Helsinki and Osaka, the latter two behind the United States, who will definitely be their main target again this year. So three or four medals would not be that bad for us as we try to match or surpass what we achieved two years ago in Osaka. On top of all of that, ath letes are competing for some hefty cash incentives for their performances, including $60,000 for first place, $30,000 for second, $20,000 for third, $15,000 for fourth, $10,000 for fifth, $6,000 for sixth, $5,000 for seventh and $4,000 for eighth place. The relay teams will split $80,000 for first, $40,000 for second, $20,000 for third, $16,000 for fourth, $12,000 for fifth, $8,000 for sixth, $6,000 for seventh and $4,000 for eighth. In total, the IAAF will be distributing a total of $7,336,000 and so you just know the Bahamians will be vying for their share. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ‘High expectations’ for Team Bahamas at IAAF World Championships OPINION STUBBS Harbour Bay Extra 5% off for Privilege Cards & Corporate Partners Sale on Selected items Up to 50.% Off

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THE Annual General Meeting of Legacy Baseball/Softball Association is scheduled to be held 10am August 15 at the YMCA meeting room. Steve Burrows, president of the youth organisation, is inviting all Legacy coaches, players and parents to attend. Also, a special coaches meeting is slated for 6pm today at the YMCA. “All league coaches and officials are urged to be in attendance to address matt ers of concern before the A GM.” In addition to determ ining the officers to lead the body over the next year, the organisation will address plans for the 2010 season and the period leading up to the start of the next season,” said Burrows. Included on the agenda will be discussions on an early start to the season with a four-week develop-m ent camp for first time players only of all ages to be headed by Greg Christie. “This is tentatively scheduled to begin in late September 2009, and will be followed by a winter league series in OctoberNovember to prepare players for the upcoming season. “Additionally a Special Coaches Symposium is being planned to address coaching concerns and introduce interested per sons to the PONY League and local rules and regulations that govern Legacy Baseball and Softball. “Discussions will also be held on efforts to attract the Bahamas Baseball Federation’s Champio nships to Grand Bahama i n 2010, and towards this end the AGM will learn of plans to improve the fields at the YMCA in time for next season. According to a written statement, Legacy enjoyed a fruitful season that culminated with a successful campaign in the Bahamas Baseball Federation’s National Championships resulting in another championship, and the naming of Legacy players to the Bahamas national teams that traveled this summer. “We would want to add to the experiences available to the players in our league, including additional trips for more of those players not making our All-star teams to the nationals. To achieve this we need the support of our parents and all concerned with youth development,” said Burrows. With improvements to the fields, the executive will also be recommending the relocation of girls’ softball development leagues to the YMCA, thus bringing both divi sions of Legacy to one location. Legacy meeting this weekend Coaches to meet today PORT-OF-SPAIN, Trinidad (AP Trinidad and Tobago and El Salvador were scheduled to meet in a must-win World Cup qualifier for both countries at Hasely Crawford Stadium yesterday. They are the bottom sides in the sixteam finals of CONCACAF qualifying with just one win between them in 10 games. Only the top three automatically qual ify and the fourth goes to a playoff. El Salvador had 5 points, one behind Mexico. Trinidad had 2 points and no wins. Both sides desperately needed a win to stay in contention with five rounds left. Trinidad made its World Cup finals debut three years ago, while El Salvador hasn't appeared since 1982. "We know what we have to do and we will go ahead in the best possible way in trying to achieve the result in this game," Trinidad coach Russell Latapy said on Tuesday. "We know we must win the game and that's all we're thinking about at the moment," added English-born Soca War riors midfielder Chris Birchall. Birchall was alluding to February's opening fixture in the finals in which Trinidad let a 2-0 lead slip late into a 2-2 draw. Before the weekend, English Premier League stars Bobby Zamora and Jlloyd Samuel had been expected to join the Soca Warriors for the first time. However, Fulham striker Zamora was injured playing for his club and Bolton Wanderers defender Samuel failed to collect his passport in time. Aside from February's 2-2 draw, there have been four matches between the sides in the last two years, which ended with two wins for Trinidad, one for Los Cuscatlecos and one draw. El Salvador went into the game on the back of a 2-1 friendly loss against Colombia, which for coach Carlos De los Cobos was an encouraging result. T&T and El Salvador meet in must-win World Cup qualifier THE GENERAL VIEW of the Olympic Stadium in Berlin, Germany. The IAAF Track and Field World Championships 2009 take place at the Olympic Stadium in Berlin August 15-23, 2009. In the foerground, the top of the Olympic flame from the Berlin 1936 Olympic games is seen. (AP Photo: Gero Breloer Olympic Stadium ready and waiting for World Championships

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By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net HARBOUR Island and Eleuthera received their share of the outlay trailing the Miss Universe pageant contestants Tuesday, with the island's chief administrator lauding the economic boost and invaluable exposure the people and place received. Brenda Colebrooke said the Miss Universe pageant was a huge deal for all the island's residents who came together to prepare the island for the arrival of about a quarter of the pageant's dele gation. Scores of people rode over o n the water taxis from North E leuthera, including Miss uni verse contestants and hundreds more rented golf carts form local vendors. One Vendor alone claimed to have rented 75 golf carts on Tuesday alone at $40 perc art. He said it was the most rental requests he has received outside of Harbour Island's regatta which attracts hundreds of people from Nas sau and other Family Islands. "The Miss Universe pageant coming to Harbour Island is a big deal for the people of Harbour island and you can tell in the magnitude of the preparations," said Ms Colebrooke. “It kind of lifted everyone’s spirit in this economically depressed time. “When you think about all of the sweat and hard work that went into it, it (the experience) is invaluable. “They (Brilanders for a fact that Harbour Island would never get publicity like this again so they have gone all out to take advantage of it to the fullest extent and we are hoping and praying and looking for a positive outcome to increase our tourism income." Bahamas Ferries also hoped to capitalize on the Miss Universe pageant by chartering a special trip to the island that would have taken only an hour and a half. However, according to Vincent-Vanerpool Wallace time constraints prevented the contingent form going aboard the Bohengy two. Chief marketing officer of Bahamas Ferries, Kaalis Rolle, said the Bohengy would have picked the contestant up at a Paradise Island Dock and sailed them direct to Harbour island scything one hour off of the trip, which typically stops in Spanish Wells. Despite the more than two hour trip Tuesday Bahamas Ferries pulled into Harbour Island 15 minutes before the delegation arrived and returned to Nassau as they drove over the bridge to Paradise Island. “Bahamas Ferries brings a unique part of what the Bahamas has to offer,” said Mr Rolle. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said the trip would have beena great opportunity to promote the expansion of ferry services between islands. “The original plan obviously would have given thema magnificent schedule,” he said. “In order to get a full feel for the Bahamas we far rather would have had them go on the Bohengy.” Ms Colebrooke said she is convinced that many people came to Harbour Island only to experience the magic of the pageant. According to her, during the Miss Universe event at the Coral Sands resort, which included lunch, all of the rooms were fully booked. “Yes there are people that come to Harbour Island around this time, but I think there is an increase in the numbers because of this particular event,” she said. There were people who said ‘we just want to see it, we just want to be a part of it.’” C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.96 $3.90 $4.10 By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net T he Ministry of Education will begin to aggressively pursue $30million outstanding from the now defunct Educational Guaranteed Loan Programme next month, according to the Minister of Education. Carl Bethel told Tribune Business the programme could be reinstated if loan receipts show that the $60.8million debt held by the government can be reduced and sustained. Students who had applied for the loan this year were enraged when the programme was suspended almost without warning. President of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce, Khaalis Rolle, told this paper yesterday that would have preferred to see a road project scrapped before and educational loan project. "This wasn't the best decision, they should consider the fact that there are still people that are responsible and would not abuse the system," said Mr Rolle. "A blanket suspension policy wasn't the best decision. "What you are you saying? Are we going to forego educating our people?" Mr Bethel said those applicants who had applied for the loans this year, were given various grants that do not have to pay back. However, 112 of the 175 grants of $10,000 are for one year only. Four merit scholars were given awarded $25,000 for four years, ten academic scholars $10,000 for four years, and ten technical scholars $10,000 for four years. The government's grant program allows for up to $1million awarded. Now, according to Mr Bethel, the ministry will have to consider a method for collecting the outstanding money, with the Bank of the Bahamas "not well structured to help students" restructure their loans. However, Mr Bethel said: "The cabinet has authorized the ministry to pursue aggressive methodologies to collect tax payer money." Mr Rolle contends that he government should pursue defaulted loan portfolios aggressively, but not at he expensive of money for education. He suggested garnishing the wages of those who do owe the government or putting some other system in place to increase the rate of repayment. "I'm quite sure there are a number of them working. Use whatever method is available," said Mr Rolle. "We're making a critical mistake what's done has already been done develop a plan to correct it. "Don't penalize the good ones for the bad ones." Ministry of Ed. to pursue $30m in outstanding loans Miss Universe gives Harbour Island an economic boost D ESPITE aggressive promotional efforts by industry and the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation to stimulate visitor arrivals, hotels reported significant declines in busi ness activity during the first s ix months of the year, according to the Bahamas Hotel Association's 2009 MidYear Economic Review and Tourism Outlook Survey con ducted last month. As a result, there is a level of cautious optimism by some hoteliers that a turnaround may begin to occur in 2010. “Business remains guard ed. Until such time that the recession ends and consumer confidence begins to return, we will continue to feel the impact,” cautioned Bahamas Hotel Association President Robert Sands in commenting on the survey results. Ninetyper cent of the hotels participating in the survey reported a decline in sales and room occupancy during the first six months of 2009. More than three out of four hoteliers (77 per cent pate that revenue will be d own for the remaining six months of the year. “The combination of low er occupancy rates and lower room rates is creating a very difficult situation for many hotels. While there is some i mprovement in the outlook for 2010, we anticipate we will continue to be vulnerable” said Mr Sands. When asked their outlook for 2010, 30 percent report a negative outlook, 53 per cent a fair outlook and 17 per cent a positive outlook. According to the survey, most hoteliers have respond ed to the recession's pressures and have taken a proactive stance to reduce costs and maximize revenue. Ninety per cent of the hotels report having made adjustments to reduce their labour costs. Eighty-Seven per cent have reduced their average daily room rate, with two-thirds putting in place 'value-added' marketing programs. Twothirds (67 per cent hoteliers also have put in BETHEL SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP bleak outlook for the Caribbean hotel industry. PKF Hospitality Research says the region’s hotels had an average drop in profits of 16 per cent in 2008 and there will be "further profit deterioration" this year. The report finds steep discounts and special offers have not offset a four per cent decline in visitors to the tourism-dependent area. The report published Monday also predicts that about 50 planned hotel projects will likely be delayed because develop ers are struggling to get financing. It noted a number of hotels have been forced to close. Report offers bleak outlook for Caribbean hotel industry Hotels report significant declines in activity during first six months of S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B

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S traight to the point. H H E E R R E E A A R R E E S S O O M M E E W W A A N N T T N N O O T T S S : : Today, Tomorrow Next Week – Are Neither Here Nor There Customers and clients today don’t care how big you are or how old you are, sure they want to deal with somebody with a good reputation, but more importantly at this moment they only care about what is relevant and how you can meet their needs today, now. C C o o n n s s t t a a n n t t C C o o n n t t a a c c t t You can call a million times (not suggested), e-mail daily (not recommended) and you can phone hourly (no way t omer will move/act when they are r eady. S S u u r r p p r r i i s s e e Price is not the determining factor; as a matter of fact it is the least determining factor in making a decision. Hhhhmmm. L L o o y y a a l l t t y y H H a a H H a a I don’t think loyalty exists like it use to. I have proven this with partnerships and cosponsoring. What matters is what you can do for me now. H H o o w w G G r r e e a a t t Y Y o o u u A A r r e e Nope they don’t remember that either, what they remember is when you could not service or deliver as promised... H H E E R R E E A A R R E E S S O O M M E E W W A A N N T T S S : : W hat Do They Care About? How much do you know about them or their company? Do you research, have information on their company, their products etc. C C o o m m f f o o r r t t a a n n d d A A s s s s u u r r a a n n c c e e They want security and assurance. Can you, have you provided and d elivered on time in the past.They w ould rather pay more and be a ssured they get what they want when they want it or need it. R R e e p p u u t t a a t t i i o o n n What and who, have you provided for before? Delivering a year later on something won’t get you far... W W h h a a t t a a r r e e T T h h e e y y B B u u y y i i n n g g ? ? It’s not just a product, its assurance and comfort customers are buying. No one likes to buy feeling uncomfortable, or not positively knowing. If you can demonstrate this, then do it. They want to get the most value for their money and see returns. All of these marketing strategies a re certain to keep your business on t op during these challenging econ omic times.Have a productive and profitable week! Remember, “THOSE WHO MARKET WILL MAKE IT.” S S c c o o t t t t F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n i i s s P P r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t o o f f S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e , , a a p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l a a n n d d m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g c c o o m m p p a a n n y y s s p p e e c c i i a a l l i i z z i i n n g g i i n n p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l p p r r o o d d u u c c t t s s . . E E s s t t a a b b l l i i s s h h e e d d o o v v e e r r 2 2 7 7 y y e e a a r r s s a a g g o o S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e h h a a s s a a s s s s i i s s t t e e d d l l o o c c a a l l b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s e e s s f f r r o o m m v v a a r r i i o o u u s s i i n n d d u u s s t t r r i i e e s s f f r r o o m m t t o o u u r r i i s s m m , , b b a a n n k k i i n n g g a a n n d d t t e e l l e e c c o o m m m m u u n n i i c c a a t t i i o o n n s s i i n n m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g t t h h e e m m s s e e l l v v e e s s . . R R e e a a d d e e r r s s c c a a n n c c o o n n t t a a c c t t M M r r . . F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n a a t t S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e o o n n E E a a s s t t S S h h i i r r l l e e y y S S t t r r e e e e t t , , b b y y e e m m a a i i l l a a t t s s c c o o t t t t @ @ s s u u n n t t e e e e . . c c o o m m o o r r b b y y t t e e l l e e p p h h o o n n e e a a t t 2 2 4 4 2 2 3 3 9 9 3 3 3 3 1 1 0 0 4 4 . . C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Certified Service at a bush mechanic!s price !!! In these economic times, We are here to support your engine!M&E will do the job for you with Caterpillar certified technicians, Caterpillar original parts and will guarantee the jobs!!! Call us323 5701 (Nassau) 352 5081 (Freeport) Discount applies for truck engines Valid until September 30, 2009Other offers available include: Engine oil analysis Electronic diagnostic Fuel tank cleaning Valve and Injectors adjustment Get a full truck engine service starting at $550 including oil, oil filter, fuel filter and labour. Call us today to schedule your servicing needs. Straight to the point: Wants and want nots P romotional Marketing by Scott Farrington place energy efficiency measures including timers, low wattage lighting, solar water heaters, staff-led practical energy conservation measures and a range of other initiatives. “Member properties are paying strict attention to key factors including product improvement and marketing. Several hotels reported having the highest levels of customer satisfaction on record. We are encouraged by the fact that many of our people have responded. Our industry is packed with exceptional people with the professionalism and commitment to providing stellar service. All hands need to be on deck in this regard, as our reputation can help pull us out of this sooner than later. Word of mouth is the best form of marketing,” added the BHA President. The survey respondents also pointed to several key concerns which affect the viability of their business. These include the continued need for lower airfares, additional airlift to some of our islands, high operating costs and reduced cash flow. The Ministry of Tourism and Aviation, working with the private sector Promotion Board partners, has had some success in reducing airfares and attracting additional airlift and efforts are ongoing. Applauded Mr Sands applauded efforts to bring about the Miss Universe Pageant. “Industry has been pleased to partner with the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation to help make it possible for The Bahamas to host the Miss Universe pageant. This is a long-term investment in our destination as the real value of the pageant is the incredible international press and exposure we will receive for months and years to come. The immediate impact will not be as significant as the long-term impact,” he stated. “We are encouraged by the Government’s approach to improving our product both for our current visitors as well as for the future. The beautification program is making a significant difference in the appearance of New Providence. Investments are being made to improve our roads and airports, led by the major work being done at Lynden Pindling International Airport. The downtown Nassau improvements are beginning to take shape. These are all responsible initiatives tied to our future which demonstrate the maturity of our destination,” added Mr Sands. The BHA mid-year economic review and outlook survey was conducted during the first week of July, 2009. The survey is undertaken to assist BHA and public and private sector stakeholders with businesses and the economy. Recommendations are also solicited to provide direction to BHA in planning its program priorities and activities. The findings are based upon responses from 30 hotels representing a cross-section of large and small hotels from Nassau-Paradise Island, Grand Bahama and the Out Islands. Hotels report significant declines in activity during first six months of ASSOCIATE ATTORNEYNEEDEDExperience in Litigation, Conveyancing and Commercial Law. Background in Natural Science preferred but not required. Apply by email only.atty.at.law09@gmail.com F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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By JEANNINE AVERSA AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON (AP Signs are growing that an economic recovery may finally be taking shape, but with dangers still lurking, Federal Reserve policymakers are all but certain to leave a key interest rate at record lows to make sure any nascent turnaround gains traction. Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke and his colleagues resumed a two-day meeting Wednesday morning, where they will take fresh stock of the nation's economic and financial conditions. So far, barometers suggest the worst recession since World War II i s ending, and that the U.S. economy has started to grow again or will soon. With the economy turning a corner, the Fed also will weigh whether consumer lending programmes intended to ease the recession and stem the financial crisis should be extended. "I think the Fed will show a bit more confidence in the staying power of the coming economic recovery and indi cate that everything is on track," said Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody's Economy.com. Still, the Fed has warned that recoveries after financialcrises tend to be slow. And dangers remain. While unemployment dipped to 9.4 per cent in July, the Fed says it's likely to top10 per cent this year because companies won't be in a rush to hire. That could restrain the recovery if it crimps spending by already-cautious consumers. Another risk comes from the troubled commercial real market where defaults on loans are rising. That's a strainon banks holding such loans. The increasing risk is making lenders ever-more stingy about handing out new commercial real-estate loans or refinancing existing ones. "That's one of the things (Fed policymakerswant to single out that keeps them worried," said Michael Feroli, economist at JPMorgan Economics. Against that backdrop, the Fed is widely expected to hold a key bank lending rate at a record low near zero at the meeting's conclusion on W ednesday afternoon. The c entral bank also is expected t o renew a pledge to hold that rate there for an "extended period." It has leeway to do this because the Fed believes inflation will stay low for a while. Economists predict the Fed will leave its target range for its banking lending rate between zero and 0.25 per cent through the rest of this year. The rationale: super-low lending will spur Americans to spend more, which would support the economy. If the Fed holds its key rate steady, that means commercial banks' prime lending rate, used to peg rates on home equity loans, certain credit cards and other consumer loans, will stay around 3.25 per cent, the lowest in decades. There have been signs the economy is on the mend. Factory activity is improving. Home sales are starting to pick up, although much of the activity involves people snapping up bargain-priced foreclosed properties. Com panies are cutting far fewer workers. Some financial stresses also are easing, but lending is not flowing normally and finan cial markets aren't back to full throttle. Many analysts believe the economy which logged a mild contraction in the second quarter after a dizzying f ree-fall in the prior six m onths is growing now. T hat makes it more likely the Fed will consider whether some rescue programmes should continue, but any decisions might not come at this week's meeting. One such programme, aimed at driving down interest rates on mortgages and other consumer debt, involves buying US Treasurys. The central bank is on track to buy $300 billion worth of Treasury bonds by late Septem ber; it has bought $253 billion so far. Some economists think the Fed will let the programme expire. They say it's not clear whether the programme low ered rates. And, there's been concern that the programme makes the Fed look like it is printing money to pay for Uncle Sam's exploding budget deficits. Meanwhile, the Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility is intended to spark lending to consumers and small businesses. It got off toa slow start in March and is slated to shut down at the end of December. Despite the TALF, many people are having trouble getting loans, analysts say. More recently, the programme was expanded to provide relief to t he commercial real-estate m arket. T he Fed isn't expected to launch any new revival efforts or change another existing programme that aims to push down mortgage rates. In that venture, the Fed is on track to buy $1.25 trillion worth of securities issued by mortgage finance companies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac by the end of the year. The central bank's recent purchases have totaled about $ 542.8 billion. 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Colonial Group International is rated A-(Excellentby AM Best. btrt tfr f r!%* '!$()))!*&*#tffn""bnff !$ %#&!*&*# !%** IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my Hand and Seal this 23rd day of July, 2009 HUBERTA. INGRAHAM PRIME MINISTER Rt. Hon. Hubert A. Ingraham PROCLAMATION WHEREAS, the Police Reserve is an extended arm of the Royal Bahamas Police F orce whose objectives are to assist the Force in the maintenance of law and order, the preservation of peace, the protection of life and property, detection of crime, the apprehension of offenders and the enforcement of all laws; AND WHEREAS , while Reserve Police Ofcers do not serve the Force o n a fulltime basis, they nonetheless exercise and enjoy the same powers, authority, a dvantages and immunities as do their fulltime counterparts, and are liable to the same duties, responsibilities and discipline while on duty; AND WHEREAS, in commemoration of the 44th Anniversary of the establishment of The Royal Bahamas Police Reservists, the Reserve Force has organized a month of activities to celebrate and promote greater public awareness of the role and work of the organization in the maintenance of law and order and the preservation of peace; NOW, THEREFORE, I, Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Minister of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim 1st August 31st August, 2009, as “THE ROYAL BAHAMAS POLICE RESERVE MONTH”. Fed likely to leave rates at lows to aid recovery FEDERAL RESERVE CHAIRMAN Ben Bernanke attends a hearing on regulatory reform before the House Financial Services Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington... (AP Photo: J Scott Applewhite

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By ELAINE KURTENBACH AP Business Writer SHANGHAI (AP Asian markets tumbled Wednesday with Chinese shares falling nearly five per cent on renewed jitters over the economic outlook after Wall Street suffered its biggest loss in five weeks. European markets were mixed. Analysts said the sell-off, particularly in China, was partly a correction of Tuesday’s rally when markets overreacted to data showing Beijing’s massive stimulus spending was adding momentum to the world’s thirdbiggest economy. After sifting the slew of figures, investors decided the signs of improving growth weren’t as impressive as hoped for. “The momentum of the economic recovery is not very good, because it’s not as fast as expected,” said Huang Xiangbin, an analyst for Cinda Securities in Beijing. “Not so much private investment is following the government investment.” US stock markets fell Tuesday as the Federal Reserve started a two-day policy meeting that may provide a fresh assessment of how the world’s largest economy is faring. The US central bank is expected to hold interest rates steady at near zero when it ends its meeting Wednesday. European shares were mixed in early trading, with Britain’s FTSE 100 slipping 0.2 per cent while Germany’s DAX index gained 0.4 per c ent and France’s CAC-40 e dged up 0.1 per cent. Asia’s biggest benchmark, Tokyo’s Nikkei 225 stock average, retreated from a 10month high, losing 150.46 points, or 1.4 per cent, to close at 10,435.00. A stronger yen h urt exporters’ shares. F nancial stocks came under pressure after influential banking analyst Richard Bove of Rochdale Securities wrote in a research note that bank earnings won’t improve in the second half of this year and that many companies will post losses. “His report came in just as investors were looking for leads to sell shares,” said Masatoshi Sato, market anal yst at Mizuho Investors Securities Co. in Tokyo. H ong Kong’s Hang Seng Index fell 638.97, or three per cent, to 20,435.24 on heavy selling of shares in big mainland Chinese companies and weakness in mainland-traded shares. Shanghai’s Composite Index tumbled 4.7 per cent to 3,112.72, with financial and steel companies like Baoshan Iron & Steel and China Life Insurance leading the decline. Figures released Tuesday in China showed improve ment in trade, retail sales and industrial production, adding to spreading signs of a global recovery. But some said the gains were not as big as hoped for, and corporate profits remain relatively weak. Australia’s benchmark S&P/ASX 200 index edged up 0.3 per cent to 4,343.10, helped by stronger bank shares. Elsewhere, shares fell in South Korea, Taiwan and the Philippines. In the US Tuesday, i nvestors dumped financial s hares, shifting to safer havens like consumer staples companies and government debt. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 96.50, or one per cent, to 9,241.45. The broader S&P 500 index fell 12.75, or 1.3 per cent, to 994.35. It was the biggest drop for both the Dow and the S&P 500 index since July 7. US stock index futures turned lower, with Dow f utures down 12 points, or 0.1 per cent, to 9,204. O il prices hovered above $69 a barrel after the U.S. and OPEC said global crude con sumption will slump this year as economies struggle to emerge from recession. Benchmark crude for September delivery was down 26 cents to $69.19 a barrel by midday in Singapore in elec tronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. In currency dealings, the dollar fell to 95.57 yen in Tokyo late Wednesday from 95.94 yen in New York late Tuesday. The euro fell to $1.4126 from $1.4145. Associated Press Researcher Bonnie Cao in Beijing and Associated Press Writer Shino Yuasa in Tokyo contributed to this report $FDGHPLFV&UHDWLYLW\FHOOHQFH 5(*,67(5:& ODVVL]HV$UH/LPLWHG1 LQWKHUUDFH(DVW&HQWUHYLOOH 7 0RQG\)ULGD ,QFOXGHV'DLO\+RW/XQFK C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.811.28Abaco Markets1.341.340.000.1270.00010.60.00% 1 1.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9 .306.25Bank of Bahamas6.256.250.000.2440.26025.64.16% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2 .372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3511.350.001.4060.2508.12.20% 2.882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.765.760.000.4190.36013.76.25% 3 .851.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.833.990.160.1110.05235.91.30% 2 .851.32Doctor's Hospital1.951.950.000.2400.0808.14.10% 8 .206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 1 2.5010.00Finco10.6310.630.000.3220.52033.04.89% 11.7110.30FirstCaribbean Bank10.3010.300.000.7940.35013.03.40% 5.534.95Focol (S)5.135.130.000.3320.15015.52.92% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.50ICD Utilities5.495.490.000.4070.50013.59.11% 12.0010.39J. S. Johnson10.3910.390.000.9520.64010.96.16% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100000 100000 FidelitBkNote13(SeriC)+ FBB13 10000 000 WEDNESDAY, 12 AUGUST 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,565.41| CHG 0.17 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -146.95 | YTD % -8.58BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7 % Prime + 1.75% 7% BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: 30May2013 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 InterestFINDEX: CLOSE 784.27 | YTD -6.06% | 2008 -12.31% 1000 . 00 1000 . 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 . 00 0 . 00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.40051.3320CFAL Bond Fund1.40053.485.15 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.9047-1.20-3.66 1.48301.4059CFAL Money Market Fund1.48303.445.44 3.60903.1031Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1031-8.35-13.82 12.980112.3289Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.98012.875.79 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.47339.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.27652.00-2.98 1.06221.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.06222.566.22 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0243-0.842.43 1.05851.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05852.045.85 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-May-09 Prime + 1.75% 7% 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 NAV Date 30-Jun-09Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds 30 May 2013 29 May 2015TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Jul-09 30-Jun-09 31-Dec-07 30-Jun-09 31-Jul-09 7-Aug-09 30-Jun-09MARKET TERMS RAYGIAN REPROGRAPHICS Tel: 327-8640, 437-8687 West Bay Street, Cable BeachPUBLIC NOTICEPlease be advised that Mr. Raphael Noel “Ray”Adams is no longer associated with Raygian Reprographics and has no involvement whatsoever with the company. He is therefore NOTAuthorized to transact any business whatsoever on behalf of the company.The Management NOTICE DR. JAMILANGELO MINNIS Announces the opening of his Practice in Obstetrics & Gynecology at Oxford Medical Centre, 4th Terrace East off Collins Avenue, Centreville on 4th August, 2009Telephone: (242 Fax: (242 The Public is hereby advised that I, AMBROSE VALENTINO BROWN of KILDEER DRIVE, P.O. BOX N-4346, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change the name to AMBROSE VALENTINO ARMBRISTER. If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Ofcer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30date of publication of this notice. PUBLIC NOTICE INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL L egal NoticeN OTICENOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:(a DESTREZZAOVERSEAS LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000. (bThe Dissolution of said Company commenced on August 12, 2009 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar General. (cThe Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas. (dAll persons having Claims against the above-named Company are required on or before the 14th day of September, 2009 to send their names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benet of any distribution made before such debts are proved. August 13, 2009 LAKEISHA COLLIE LIQUIDATOR OFTHE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY “The momentum of the economic recovery is not very good, because it’s not as fast as expected. Not so much private investment is following the government investment. Huang Xiangbin, analyst for Cinda Securities in Beijing Asia stocks down on China data doubts, Wall Street

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By ALAN ZIBEL AP Real Estate Writer WASHINGTON (AP United States home sales grew in the second quarter in 39 states, another sign that the ailing housing market is finally coming to life. Total quarterly sales rose 3.8 per cent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.76 million, from 4.58 million in the first quarter, but were still about three per cent below a year ago, the National Association of Realtors said Wednesday. Sales posted quarterly gains of 20 per cent or more in Idaho, Hawaii, New York, Wisc onsin and Nebraska. But A laska, Wyoming, California, Colorado and Michigan dropped by at least six per cent. Prices, however, were still down from a year ago in 129 out of 155 metropolitan areas the group tracks. The median sales price in the quarter was $174,100, almost 16 per cent below a year ago. The biggest drop, of nearly 53 per cent, was in Fort Myers, Florida. Prices also fell35 per cent or more in Phoenix, Riverside, California and Las Vegas. The biggest price gain, of nearly 31 per cent, was in Daven port, Iowa, followed by Cumberland, Md., at nearly 22 per cent. Nationwide, foreclosures and distressed sales made up more than a third of all sales in the second quarter. Many economists now say that the worst of the housing recession is over, though foreclosures are expected to rise over the next year. Lawrence Yun, the trade group’s chief economist, called the sales increase “a hopeful sign for the economy.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 5B $&$1&,(6 (0(5*(1&<(',&$/(&+1,&,$1(07f%$6,& $SSOLFDWLRQVDUHLQYLWHGIURPVXLWDEO\TXDOLHGLQGLYLGXDOVIRUWKHSRVW (PHUJHQF\0HGLFDO7HFKQLFLDQ%DVLF&RUSRUDWH3XEOLF+RVSLWDOV $XWKRULW\ $SSOLFDQWVPXVWSRVVHVVWKHIROORZLQJTXDOLFDWLRQV $PLQLPXPRIWZRVXEMHFWVDWWKHOHYHODWJUDGHRUDERYH RUHTXLYDOHQWLQFOXGLQJ0DWK(QJOLVK6FLHQFHf*RRGRUDOZULWLQJDQG UHDGLQJVNLOOV&HUWLFDWLRQDVDQ(PHUJHQF\0HGLFDO7HFKQLFLDQ%DVLFZLWK WKUHH\HDUVUHOHYDQWH[SHULHQFH0XVWEHDEOHWRFRPPXQLFDWHDQGLQWHUDFW ZLWKPHPEHUVRIWKHSXEOLFDQGRWKHUSXEOLFVDIHW\DQGKHDOWKSURIHVVLRQDOV GXULQJWLPHVRIH[WUHPHVWUHVVZKLOHPDLQWDLQLQJFRPSRVXUH /,&(16(6&(57,),&$7,216 2EWDLQVFHUWLFDWLRQHTXLYDOHQWWRDWLRQDOHJLVWU\(07%DVLF DLQWDLQVFHUWLFDWLRQLQ%DVLF/LIH6XSSRUW3UHKRVSLWDO7UDXPD /LIH6XSSRUW$PHULFDQ+HDUW$VVRFLDWLRQDQG&DUGLR 3XOPRQDU\HFLWDWLRQ&35fIRUWKHURIHVVLRQDOHVFXHU 5HJLVWHUHGDQGOLFHQVHGZLWKWKH+HDOWKURIHVVLRQV&RXQFLO%DKDPDVf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t :HVW7HUUDFHV &HQWUHYLOOH 7KH6HFXULWLHV&RPPLVVLRQRI7KH%DKDPDVVWDWXWRU\DJHQF\UHVSRQVLEOH IRUWKHRYHUVLJKWVXSHUYLVLRQDQGUHJXODWLRQRIWKH,QYHVWPHQW)XQGV 6HFXULWLHVDQG&DSLWDO0DUNHWVLQRUIURP7KH%DKDPDVDVZHOODV WKHVXSHUYLVLRQRI)LQDQFLDODQG&RUSRUDWH6HUYLFH3URYLGHUVLQYLWHV DSSOLFDWLRQVIURPTXDOLHG%DKDPLDQVIRUWKHIROORZLQJSRVLWLRQ % 2YHUVHHLQJ'HSDUWPHQWDO)LOLQJ\VWHP % 6FKHGXOLQJPHHWLQJVDQGSUHSDULQJDJHQGDV % 5HFRUGLQJDOOFRUUHVSRQGHQFHIRUWKHGHSDUWPHQW % 'UDIWLQJt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f $FRPSHWLWLYHVDODU\DQGEHQHWVDUHEHLQJRIIHUHG7DSSO\SOHDVHSURYLGH UHVXPHWRWKHDWWHQWLRQRI $SSOLFDWLRQVVKRXOGEHVXEPLWWHGQRODWHUWKDQ 127,&( */2%$/7(&+12/2*<,17(51$7,21$/ 6(59,&(6/,0,7(' 3XUVXDQWWRWKH3URYLVLRQVRI6HFWLRQRIWKH , QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FWQRWLFH LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG&RPSDQ\KDV EHHQGLVVROYHGDQGVWUXFNRIWKH5HJLVWHUSXUVXDQW W R D &HUWLFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHGWKH5HJLVWUDU *HQHUDORQWKHWKGD\RI-XO\ $PLWLQJKDQLD /LTXLGDWRU RI */2%$/7(&+12/2*<,17(51$7,21$/ 6(59,&(6/,0,7(' Q2 home sales grow in 39 states Another sign ailing housing market finally coming to life A PENDING HOME SALE i n Palo Alto, Calif. is shown. (AP Photo: Paul Sakuma CHART SHOWS seasonally adjusted annual rate of pending US home sales...

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 7B GE Mechanical Room Style+ #ASV10#ASQ12A#ASQ14A You’ll wonder how you ever got along without it. MEXICO CITY (AP Mexico's finance secretary is warning that falling oil production and prices may push the already cash-strapped nation into its worst economic recession in 30 years. Mexico's state-owned oil company Pemex currently pumps about 2.6 million barrels a day, down from about 2.8 billion a day last year, Finance Secretary Agustin Carstens told a Senate committee Tuesday. Carstens said he expects output to slide to about 2.5 million barrels a day next year. Mexico is the third-largest oil supplier to the United States but its reserves are drying up, and Petroleos Mexicanos has been slow to explore deep-water deposits. Even with the declines in output, oil revenues funded 40 per cent of Mexico's budget last year. The government protected oil income this year by hedging prices at $70 a barrel. But those guarantees aren't in place for 2010, Carstens said. He forecast 2010 export prices of $53 a barrel. Carstens said the combined drop in revenues and produc tion will force Mexico's econ omy to lag behind an anticipated global economic recovery in 2010. Mexico sends 80 per cent of its exports to the United States and has been hard-hit by the slowdown in the US economy. It also has seen a huge plunge in the amount of money Mexican migrants in the United States send home. The central bank says remittances Mexico's second-largest source of foreign income after oil exports plummeted nearly 18 per cent in the second quarter of 2009 compared to the same period last year. Mexico: Falling oil could greatly worsen recession PEOPLE apply for jobs at a job fair in Mexico City. Thousands came to the fair looking for up to 12,000 advertised jobs, organised by Mexico City's Labour Secretary. The Treasury reported the country has lost 596,200 jobs since June 2008, a 4.1 per cent decline as of June of this year... (AP Photo: Eduardo Verdugo

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By PAN PYLAS AP Business Writer LONDON (AP pean and US stock markets rose Wednesday ahead of a key policy statement from the U S Federal Reserve despite jitters earlier in Asia. The FTSE 100 index of leading British shares closed up 45.42 points, or one per cent, at 4,716.76 while Germany's DAX rose 64.28 p oints, or 1.2 per cent, at 5,350.09. The CAC-40 in France was 51.06 points, or1.5 per cent, higher at 3,507.24. On Wall Street, the Dow Jones industrial average was up 127.41 points, or 1.4 per cent, at 9,368.86 around midday New York time while the broader Standard & Poor's 500 index rose 13.07 points, or 1.3 per cent, to 1,007.42. T he gains in Europe and t he US came despite big losses in Asia, where investors were spooked by Tuesday's losses on Wall Street. Chinese shares were the worst hit after the Dow and the S&P fell by their biggest amounts in weeks. Analysts said it was important to keep things in perspective, especially as trading volumes are particularly light at the moment low volu mes often lead to greater v olatility. "It's important to remember that the Dow is up over 40 per cent in five months so it's only natural to have pullbacks but if we are to see the index break through the 10,000 barrier, there needs to be more signs of economic recovery," said Ian Horsley, a financial trader at Spreadex. Signs of recovery in the world's largest economy e merged with the news that the US trade deficit edged up slightly in June as imports rose for the first time in 11 months a sign that consumers are getting more confident again. The state of US retailing is under the microscope this week. As well as official government retail sales data, investors will have earnings from the likes of Wal-Mart Stores Inc., Nordstrom Inc. and JC Penney Corp. Department store chain Macy's Inc. kicked off the retailing results season with b etter than expected secondq uarter earnings after a big c ost-cutting exercise helping the stock to rally three per cent. Investors are fully aware that without the support of the US consumer, which accounts for around 70 per cent of the US economy and 20 per cent of the global economy, any recovery will soon fizzle out. Attention later will be on the Fed's policy statement when it concludes its two-day meeting later. It is widely expected that the US central bank will hold interest rates steady at near zero when it ends its meeting. However, investors will be looking to see if the Fed sounds a note of cautious optimism in its accompanying statement and whether it has plans to expand its asset-pur c hasing programme now that funds are running dry. Hopes that the US economy will recover sooner than anticipated from its deepest recession since World War 2 has helped stocks around the world rally hard over the last month or so, sending major indexes to 2009 highs. Stocks usually rally around six months before actual recovery emerges in the official d ata. With recent gains so sizable, analysts said profit-taking could resume during the US session. "Stock markets look fragile and some further pullback could continue in the near term," said Neil Mackinnon, chief economist at ECU Group. Earlier in Asia, Tokyo's Nikkei 225 stock average, retreated from a 10-month high, losing 150.46 points, or 1.4 per cent, to close at 10,435.00. Hong Kong's Hang Seng I ndex fell 638.97, or three per c ent, to 20,435.24 on heavy s elling of shares in big mainland Chinese companies and weakness in mainland-traded shares, while Shanghai's main composite index tumbled 4.7 per cent to 3,112.72. Australia's benchmark S&P/ASX 200 index edged up 0.3 per cent to 4,343.10, but shares fell in South Korea, Taiwan and the Philippines. Oil prices bounced back after an unexpected fall in US stocks. Benchmark crude for September delivery was up $1.28 to $70.73 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The dollar was up 0.3 per cent at 96.19 yen while the rose 0.6 per cent to $1.4228. AP Business Writer Elaine Kurtenbach in Shanghai contributed to this report C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE European, US markets up despite Asian declines

PAGE 21

By CANDICE CHOI AP Personal Finance Writer NEW YORK (AP Alm wants a full-time job. So much so that he paid a professional $200 to make his rsum sparkle. "I figured it would be worth it, even just to see what happens," said Alm, a 52-year-old resident of Troy, N.Y. who teaches business classes part time at a community college. It's only been a week since Alm got his new resume, but he thinks the investment will p ay off. It now starts with a "personal profile" that brings together his mixed background as a teacher and marketing professional. Then it dives into his key skills so hiring managers can see why he's right for the job. Whether the changes will make a difference is still to be seen. Unable to turn teaching into full-time work for the past several years, Alm decided toe xplore other opportunities. The timing isn't in his favor. Despite some glimmers of improvement, the job market remains crowded with an unemployment rate of 9.4 per cent. That figure rises to 16.3 p er cent if you include those who've given up looking or settled for part-time work. Given the competition, Alm i sn't the only one looking for an edge. You may also wonder if a resume writer, job coach or other career services professional can improve your chances. Here's the rundown on what you need to know. P P I I C C K K I I N N G G A A P P R R O O F F E E S S S S I I O O N N A A L L The career services indus try is not regulated; anyone can sport the title of "job coach" or "resume writer." Professional organizations and schools offer numerous certificates, but you can go crosseyed trying to figure out what t he various acronyms mean. For instance, the Interna tional Coach Federation, the National Resume Writers Association and the Career Management Alliance each offers its own credentials. It's also possible you'll find a perfectly capable professional with no certifications but plenty of experience. " People should hire coaches or resume writers whose work they've seen and with whomt hey feel trust or a rapport," said Liz Sumner, executive director of Career Management Alliance, a trade group of about 400 career service professionals based in Peterborough, N.H. I f you're more comfortable w orking with an established business, many recruiting firms n ow offer career services too. One time-tested way to find a trusted professional is to ask friends and family for referrals. W hatever route you choose, ask for work samples and a free consultation before forking over any money. A consultation might take about 15 minutes and should give you a sense of what to expect from the arrangement. Finally, get the deal in writing. Spell out the services to be provided, and by when. This ensures you and the person you hire are on the same page. H H O O W W I I T T W W O O R R K K S S Resume Writing: Given the s ea of information online, it's natural to wonder what exactly you're paying for when hiring a resume writer or career coach. With resumes, it's not just a matter of having a proofreader check your grammar or fill in a template with yourd etails. The process generally starts with an extensive interview that lasts about an houro r longer and covers topics including past jobs, your work style and career goals. The line of questioning is meant to uncover accomplishments you might not have considered significant. " Once my candidates start t alking to me, I'm always amazed that they don't give t hemselves credit for all they've done," said Alison Rosenblum, owner of Hudson River Career Resources in Albany, N.Y. T he writer should then compose a resume highlighting your most compelling traits. You should get a draft resume about a week after the interview, with an option to suggest changes for no extra charge. Coaching: Hiring a full-service career coach usually involves a much deeper commitment. It generally covers all aspects of the job search, including prepping for an interview and tips on networking. In addition to the one-ono ne sessions, you might get takeaway assignments to ensure you're staying active in the job hunt. Sessions can takep lace over the phone or in person. If you don't need or can't afford that level of guidance, career coaches often offer a la carte help too. For instance, you might just want help polishing your online profile. Of course, most people aren't hiring career coaches just for technical tips. For many, the benefit of a coach is having someone to keep them motivated and on track. "Coaches can hold you accountable to achieve yourg oal," said Amy Richardson, a spokeswoman for the International Coach Federation, a trade group based in Lexington, Ky. Objective feedback from a professional could also shedl ight on why you're not getting calls back. W W H H A A T T Y Y O O U U ' ' L L L L P P A A Y Y Prices can vary greatly. Flat fees are more common for specific tasks, such as resume writing or creating a Web page. The Career Management Alliance estimates that a resume for a midlevel profes-s ional can cost $400 or more, but it's likely you'll be able to find something much cheaper. Check with local job placement firms to get a read on going rates. For broader career guida nce, you'll likely be charged by the hour. The International Coach Federation says you can expect to pay an average of $160 an hour, with coaches often recommending a set number of weekly or monthly sessions. Coaches might offer discounts for small group ses sions or a package of services. For instance, career coach Jan Melnik charges between $850 and $1,200 for an execut ive-level resume, cover letter and action plan that spans eight weeks. Clients can pay extra for help with specifici tems, such as writing e-mails or cold calling potential employers. The additional services range from $300 to $500, said Melnik, who's based in Durham, Conn. It's unlikely you'll recover any money if you're unhappy with the resume writer or career coach you hire. You can file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission or your state consumer agency, but there's no guarantee your case will be investigated. T T H H E E A A L L T T E E R R N N A A T T I I V V E E S S T here are ways to get personalized career advice on a budget. College career fairs are usua lly open to alumni and anyone in the community surrounding the campus, said Melnik. These fairs typicallyh ave onsite career coaches or resume writers who give free one-on-one sessions. Many career coaches also do pro bono work; Melnik suggests checking with public libraries, nonprofit groups and community centers for free career workshops. Another place to look is your state unemployment offices. The level of services varies depending on where you live, but most centers offer interview training or resume reviews. Have a personal finance q uestion? Send it to yourmoney(at C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009, PAGE 9B NOTICEIN THE ESTATE OF JOHN A. ROBINS (also known as ALPHONSO JOHN ROBINS) late of Yamacraw Beach Drive in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, d eceased. Notice is hereby given that all persons having any claim or demand against the above Estate are required to send their names, addresses and particulars of the same certied in writing to the undersigned on or before the 10th day of September, A.D., 2009 and i f required, to prove such debts or claims, or default be excluded from any distribution; after the above date the assets will be distributed having regard only to the proved debts or claims of which the Executrices shall have had notice. And Notice is hereby given that all persons indebted to the said E state are requested to make full settlement on or before the 27th day of August, A.D., 2009.SYDBRI LEGAL SERVICES Naomi House No.19, 9th Terrace & West Court P.O. Box EE-15075 Nassau, Bahamas Attorneys for the Executrices LEGAL NOTICENOTICEI NTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT(No.45 of 2000 In Voluntary LiquidationNotice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4 of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000P LATINUM STAR GROUPLTD. is in dissolution. Mrs. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named company are required to send their names addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the 27th August, 2009. Legal NoticeINTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT(No.45 of 2000LANDE ESTATES LIMITEDN otice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 of the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000, LANDE ESTATESLIMITED , has been dissolved and struck off the Register according to the Certicate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General on the 17th day of July, 2009. CI Accountancy Limited Boatside Business Centre Warden Northumberland NE46 4SH Liquidator NOTICE Legal NoticeINTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT(No.45 of 2000LION OILTOOLS LTD.I n Voluntary liquidation “Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4 of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000L ION OILTOOLS LTD. is in Dissolution.”The date of commencement of dissolution is the 10th day of August, 2009. Mayo Secretaries Limited Akara Building, 24 De Castro Street Wickhams Cay I, Road Town T ortola, BVI Liquidator NOTICE On the Money: Should you hire help to land a job? LISA VAN CLEEF , a human resources manager at Tommy Hilfiger, meets with job seekers at the WWD Fashion Career Expo in New York. (AP Photo: Diane Bondareff

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B y JESSICA GRESKO Associated Press Writer MIAMI (AP ed States government and Swiss banking giant UBS AGh ave reached an agreement in a case seeking names of some 52,000 suspected Amer ican tax evaders with billions in secret Swiss accounts, but details may remain under wraps until next week, officials said. L awyers for the government and UBS told a federal judge in a brief conference call they had initialed a deal after a delay last week to settle undisclosed details. The Internal Revenue Ser vice, which initiated the case against UBS earlier this year, said in a statement the deal “protects the United States government’s interests.” But the two-sentence statement from IRS Commissioner Doug Shulman added only that more details will be released when the Swiss gov ernment signs the agreement as early as next week. UBS and the Swiss govern ment also welcomed the news and said no terms would be disclosed until it is signed. Swiss Justice Minister Eveline Widmer-Schlumpf said the agreement “is in the interests of both states.” The IRS earlier this year asked US District Judge Alan S Gold in Miami to force Zurich-based UBS to turn over names of some 52,000 American clients believed to be hiding nearly $15 billion in assets in secret accounts. UBS and the Swiss government had resisted, arguing that to do so would violate Swiss banking confidentiality laws that date back centuries. The Swiss and US govern ments announced at the end of July they had agreed in principle on major issues but released no details. They had hoped to present a final dealat a hearing August 7, but resolving their differences has taken longer. At the latest hearing Wednesday, the judge asked Stuart Gibson, the lead Justice Department lawyer in the case, whether an agreement had been reached. “The answer is ‘yes,’ your honor,” Gibson answered. “The parties have initialeda greements. It will take a little time for the agreements to be signed in final form.” An attorney for UBS, Eugene Stearns, thanked the judge for allowing the case to be brought to what he called a successful conclusion.” The phone conference last ed less than three minutes. UBS paid a $780 million penalty earlier this year and turned over names of about 300 American clients in a d eferred prosecution agreement with the Justice Depart ment. In that case, UBS admitted helping US citizens evade taxes, which experts say is not a violation of Swiss bank secrecy laws. So far, three UBS customers whose names were divulged under the prior agreement have pleaded guilty to tax charges in feder al court. Hundreds of others holders of secret accounts at UBS and other Swiss banks have voluntarily come forward to the IRS under an amnesty programme that requires payment of taxes and penalties but generally does not include the threat of prison. That amnesty programme ends September 23. New York-listed shares in UBS were trading 3.5 per cent higher at $15.22. Associated Press Writer Frank Jordans in Geneva con tributed to this story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–.,//6 $ GHJUHHLQDUNHWLQJ&RPPXQLFDWLRQVXEOLFHODWLRQV RU $GYHUWLVLQJ ,QGHSWKNQRZOHGJHRIDOOIDFHWRIPDUNHWLQJ $VVHUWLYHFUHDWLYHHQHUJHWLFVDOHVGULYHQLQGLYLGXDOZLWK D SURYHQWUDFNUHFRUGRIJHQHUDWLQJQHZLGHDVDQGVDOHV ([FHOOHQWRUJDQL]DWLRQDODQGLQWHUSHUVRQDOVNLOOV ([FHOOHQWZULWWHQYHUEDODQGSXEOLFVSHDNLQJVNLOOV 6WURQJDQGQHWZRUNLQJVNLOOV 6DODU\FRPPHQVXUDWHZLWKH[SHULHQFH([FHOOHQW%HQHWVDFNDJH$SSO\LQZULWLQJWR 7KH+XPDQHVRXUFHVDQDJHU 3 1DVVDX7KH%DKDPDV 2U UNITED STATES Federal Judge Alan Gold is seen in this 1999 photo. Judge Gold is presiding over the IRS vs UBS and Switzerland at US Federal Courthouse in Miami, Fla. A telephone con ference between all parties will resume in Miami Friday August 7, 2009. (AP Photo US, Swiss cement deal on secret UBS bank accounts U BS AG o ffices are shown in New York. The United States and Swiss governments have agreed on most major disputes in the US effort Friday, July 31, 2009, to get names of thousands of wealthy Americans who are suspected of evading taxes by hiding billions in assets with Swiss banking giant UBS AG. (AP Photo: Mark Lennihan Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y .

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 74F/23C Low: 77F/25C Low: 79F/26C Low: 79F/26C Low: 80 F/27 C Low: 81F/27C Low: 81 F/27 C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 90F/32C High: 91F/33C High: 88 F/31 C High: 90 F/32 C High: 90F/32C High: 90 F/32C High: 89F/32C Low: 78F/26C High: 90F/32C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 91F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 74F/23C High: 90 F/32 C Low: 79F/26C High: 89 F/32 Low: 76F/24C High: 89F/32C Low: 78 F/26C High: 90F/32C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 92F/33C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 91F/33C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 89F/32C Low: 77F/25C High: 92 F/33 C Low: 76F/24C High: 91F/33C High: 88 F/31 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 13 TH , 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Mostly sunny, a stray t-storm; breezy. Mainly clear, a stray t-storm; breezy. Variably cloudy, a t-storm; breezy. Windy with t-storms possible. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 89 Low: 81 High: 90 High: 91 High: 89 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 90 Low: 83 Low: 81 Low: 81 AccuWeather RealFeel 96F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 89F 94-91F 104-84F 97-86F 100-90F Low: 81 TODAYTONIGHTFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................93F/34C Low ....................................................81F/27C Normal high ......................................89F/32C Normal low ........................................76F/24C Last year's high .................................. 95 F/35C Last year's low .................................. 79 F/26C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ................................................21.61" Normal year to date ....................................27.38" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Last New First Full Aug. 13 Aug. 20Aug. 27Sep. 4 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:43 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:46 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . . . . none Moonset . . . . . 1:30 p.m. Today Friday Saturday Sunday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 12:59 a.m.2.47:02 a.m.0.3 1:35 p.m.2.98:07 p.m.0.6 1:57 a.m.2.38:00 a.m.0.3 2:39 p.m.2.99:14 p.m.0.5 3:04 a.m.2.39:06 a.m.0.3 3:48 p.m.3.010:22 p.m.0.5 4:14 a.m.2.410:14 a.m.0.2 4:56 p.m.3.111:25 p.m.0.3 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco93/3377/25pc93/3379/26pc Amsterdam70/2154/12c68/2052/11r Ankara, Turkey86/3054/12s88/3154/12s Athens88/3172/22s90/3273/22s Auckland60/1550/10sh62/1652/11r Bangkok89/3179/26t91/3278/25t Barbados88/3177/25t86/3077/25s Barcelona81/2770/21s82/2767/19s Beijing99/3768/20s97/3670/21s Beirut82/2776/24s82/2778/25s Belgrade89/3167/19s91/3266/18pc Berlin72/2254/12pc71/2155/12c Bermuda86/3079/26s87/3078/25pc Bogota66/1845/7sh67/1943/6r Brussels70/2154/12r70/2155/12pc Budapest85/2957/13sh82/2755/12pc Buenos Aires61/1657/13sh70/2155/12c Cairo97/3672/22s98/3676/24s Calcutta93/3385/29r90/3283/28t Calgary60/1544/6t54/1243/6t Cancun91/3275/23s93/3374/23pc Caracas80/2669/20t81/2772/22t Casablanca89/3168/20s89/3172/22s Copenhagen70/2153/11r68/2055/12pc Dublin66/1855/12pc64/1754/12r Frankfurt72/2252/11sh79/2657/13pc Geneva 79/26 58/14 s 81/2757/13s Halifax 73/22 58/14 pc 73/22 59/15 pc Havana 93/33 72/22 t 91/32 72/22 pc Helsinki 72/22 54/12pc70/2150/10sh Hong Kong 90/32 82/27 t 90/32 82/27t Islamabad 110/43 85/29 s 109/42 85/29 s Istanbul83/2869/20s86/3072/22s Jerusalem 84/28 61/16s83/2864/17s Johannesburg 66/1839/3s64/1742/5pc Kingston 89/3179/26sh89/3178/25r Lima73/2259/15s72/2257/13s London72/2257/13pc75/2359/15pc Madrid95/3568/20pc91/3266/18pc Manila85/2978/25r87/3078/25t Mexico City79/2654/12t75/2355/12t Monterrey102/3875/23s102/3875/23s Montreal82/2764/17s84/2866/18s Moscow73/2254/12c68/2050/10r Munich73/2257/13sh73/2258/14t Nairobi82/2755/12pc81/2754/12pc New Delhi 99/3784/28pc97/3682/27pc Oslo66/1850/10c67/1954/12s Paris77/2559/15pc81/2759/15pc Prague 77/25 54/12 pc 75/23 58/14 r Rio de Janeiro74/2365/18s77/2567/19s Riyadh103/3979/26pc105/4079/26s Rome 86/30 68/20 s 88/31 68/20 s St. Thomas89/3180/26t90/3279/26sh San Juan68/2039/3pc83/2845/7c San Salvador 90/32 70/21 t 89/31 74/23 t Santiago 61/1645/7c52/1137/2r Santo Domingo88/3174/23t86/3073/22r Sao Paulo 74/23 57/13 s 75/23 59/15s Seoul90/3268/20s90/3268/20s Stockholm 70/21 54/12 sh 66/18 50/10 r Sydney 66/18 46/7 s68/2048/8s Taipei91/3280/26sh93/3380/26sh T okyo 91/32 82/27 pc 86/30 75/23 c T oronto 83/2863/17s82/2763/17s Trinidad91/3268/20s94/3466/18s V ancouver 67/19 55/12 c 69/2056/13pc Vienna 78/2564/17sh79/2665/18t W arsaw 70/21 50/10 sh 70/21 52/11 pc Winnipeg 84/28 64/17 pc 86/3066/18t H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles85F Friday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles85F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles86F Friday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles86F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles84F Friday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles84F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque86/3064/17t81/2763/17t Anchorage65/1853/11c64/1753/11r Atlanta86/3070/21t85/2970/21t Atlantic City82/2767/19t83/2866/18t Baltimore81/2767/19t85/2966/18t Boston73/2264/17pc80/2667/19s Buffalo84/2862/16s85/2965/18s Charleston, SC86/3073/22t87/3073/22t Chicago86/3062/16s88/3165/18s Cleveland82/2761/16s87/3066/18s Dallas97/3676/24pc96/3577/25pc Denver95/3559/15t84/2857/13t Detroit84/2865/18s88/3167/19s Honolulu87/3076/24c89/3176/24s Houston97/3674/23t97/3674/23t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday TodayFridayTodayFriday Indianapolis86/3063/17s87/3066/18s Jacksonville90/3274/23t88/3174/23t Kansas City92/3366/18s92/3370/21s Las Vegas105/4078/25s102/3879/26pc Little Rock92/3365/18s94/3468/20s Los Angeles84/2864/17pc82/2762/16pc Louisville88/3167/19s91/3269/20s Memphis92/3370/21s93/3374/23pc Miami90/3280/26t89/3179/26t Minneapolis88/3170/21s93/3372/22s Nashville90/3268/20s92/3369/20pc New Orleans93/3376/24t93/3375/23t New York77/2568/20t84/2873/22t Oklahoma City96/3568/20s95/3571/21pc Orlando90/3274/23t91/3274/23t Philadelphia83/2870/21t85/2972/22t Phoenix 100/37 82/27 t 101/3884/28t Pittsburgh84/2862/16pc86/3064/17s Portland, OR 73/2255/12sh75/2355/12s Raleigh-Durham 82/27 68/20 t 85/29 69/20 t St. Louis88/3168/20s93/3371/21s Salt Lake City 93/33 67/19 pc 90/3263/17pc San Antonio 100/37 76/24 t 95/35 76/24 pc San Diego77/2568/20pc75/2366/18pc San Francisco 69/20 56/13 pc 70/2155/12pc Seattle68/2053/11c71/2154/12pc T allahassee 88/3172/22t88/3172/22t T ampa 91/32 77/25 t 91/32 76/24t Tucson89/3172/22t95/3575/23t W ashington, DC 88/31 70/21t86/3071/21t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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Ringing phones: a sign of small business recovery By JOYCE M ROSENBERG AP Business Writer NEW YORK (AP one small company, the phone is ringing more often, while another is getting business again from retailers who canceled orders last year. And at an inn, reservations are coming in for the busy season. These are some of the signs of a turnaround that small businesses are starting to see. As economic reports look brighter and the stock mar ket rebounds, some owners are finding that customers and clients are willing to do business again. At Juniper Hill Inn in Windsor, Vt., “people are starting to call in daily,” owner Robert Dean said. The 16-room inn was busy at the end of last year, but Dean was also getting fewer advance bookings. His cus tomers generally weren’t affected by the economy, but they were uncertain and therefore thinking, “we need to hold back a bit.” They’re still cautious. Octo ber is the busiest time of the year for innkeepers in Ver mont and normally Juniper Hill Inn is 85 per cent booked by early August. This year, it was 40 per cent booked. But, Dean said, last week he booked three rooms for October in one day. H e attributed the change t o better news about the economy and the stock market. But he’s still seeing caution people don’t want to book for the fall unless they’re convinced the foliage i s going to be worth seeing. S o they’re making their reser vations much closer to the time that they’re planning to spend in Vermont. Some business owners peg the first signs of recovery to events, like the election and inauguration of President Barack Obama. For a turn around to become more wide spread, and more certain, problem areas in the economy like unemployment and consumer spending, will also have to show signs of recovery. Laura McHolm, co-founder of NorthStar Moving Corp., a Chatsworth, Calif.-based company, said “the phone pretty much started ringing after November,” when Obama was elected. “People felt like something was getting done” to help the economy, she said. McHolm described those callers as “early shoppers” who were looking for infor mation. Business picked up for real along with home sales in the spring and summer, and McHolm said the second weekend in August was “gangbusters.” “We are definitely better than we were last summer,” she said. NorthStar, along with other movers, suffered as the housing slump persisted. The company handles moves that originate in California, and McHolm said that although its more upscale business was solid, it lost business as middle-class homeowners postponed home purchases and stayed put. O ther firms are doing a litt le better because their customers, after more than a year of cutting back, are ready to take on more work. Agnes Huff’s public rela tions firm started feeling the effects of the recession in the middle of 2008. “It started with one client saying (they money to continue with PR,” said Huff, president of Los Angeles-based Agnes Huff Communications Group. It also got harder to replace clients who left. Business was down between 30 per cent and 35 per cent. “They weren’t even inquiring,” Huff said. The first signs of a change came six to eight weeks ago, when several prospects called to inquire about working with Huff’s company, and one became a client. Another company was very interested, but ultimately decided to work with a different kind of agency. It was a close call, but gave Huff’s cautious optimism a boost. “We’re hoping to see a pickup toward the end of the year, when their budgets are being formulated,” she said, referring to prospective clients. At some small businesses that have struggled through the recession, the signs of a rebound, while still very early, are reassuringly strong. Robbie Adrian, an organic baby blanket maker, was launched in July 2007 and had an incredible run, co-owner Susan Doris said. Then, when the credit crisis began in September 2008 and the stock market began crashing, retailers stopped ordering and sales dropped off between 40 per cent and 50 per cent from a year earlier. The company kept its Inter net business running, but Doris and her partner, Robbie Mahlman, both took on other work to pay the bills. Before last September, the company was getting 70 per cent of its business from retailers and 30 per cent online; after the financial cri sis began, that split became 20 per cent and 80 per cent. But in the past few weeks, retailers have been calling, and business in August is up 300 per cent from July. “We’re seeing orders com ing in at a rate we haven’t seen in six months,” Doris said. “We’re just seeing the beginning of life again.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By CHRIS KAHN AP Energy Writer NEW YORK (APprices rose Wednesday as the government report e d that Americans were regaining their appetite for imported goods and a European energy watchdog said demand for crude this year may not be as weak as once thought. Benchmark crude for September deliv ery climbed $1.38 to $70.82 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. In London, Brent prices added 80 cents to $73.26 a barrel on the ICE Futures exchange. Prices jumped in morning trading after the government said the U.S. trade deficit increased slightly in June. The Commerce Department reported that imports rose for the first time in 11 months another indication that the recession may be fading. The reports from both sides of the Atlantic were enough to offset news that crude supplies continue to grow. The U.S. Energy Information Administration said oil placed into storage rose for the third straight week. Gas prices are certainly much lower than they were last year, but the bulging supplies of crude haven't resulted steadi ly decreasing gas prices. Refiners continue to cut back on production, which has kept gasoline prices relatively stable for the past month or so. U.S. pump prices added two-tenths of a penny overnight to a new national average of $2.645 a gallon (70 cents a liter gallon of regular unleaded is still $1.154 (31 cents last year. While prices have risen slowly for three weeks, prices at the pump are about where they were at the end of June. Given the economy in the U.S. and Europe, prices might have fallen furtheri f not for China. Earlier in the day, the International Energy Agency said Chinese energy consumption would push the overall global crude demand higher despite continued weakness in Europe and North America. How China does during the global eco n omic downturn has effected energy prices for the rest of the globe. The coun try imported a record 4.6 million barrels of fuel a day last month. It is that purchasing power that helped change the forecast for the Paris-based IEA, which added 70,000 barrels a day to its 2010 forecast of global oil demand. The new prediction of 85.3 million barrels a day is a 1.6 percent increase over this year. The IEA also increased its 2009 forecast by 190,000 barrels a day to 83.9 million barrels a day, but noted this is still 2.7 percent lower than 2008. Both OPEC and the U.S. Energy Department's Energy Information Administration were more downbeat. The EIA on Tuesday said global crude demand will likely fall by 1.71 million barrels this year, more than its previous forecast of a drop of 1.56 million barrels. And the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries said it expects con-s umption to slide by 1.65 million barrels a day this year, before rising next year. In other Nymex trading, gasoline for September delivery added less than a penny to $2.045 a gallon and heating oil gave up less than a penny to $1.9099 a gallon. Natural gas for September deliv e ry also lost less than a penny to fetch $3.532 per 1,000 cubic feet. Associated Press writers George Jahn in Vienna, Alex Kennedy in Singapore and Emma Vandore in Paris contributed to this report Oil rises as US imports jump A GAS STATION attendant (not seen pumps gas in Portland, Oregon. Oilpricesr ose Wednesday as the government reported that Americans were regaining their appetite for imported goods and a European energy watchdog said demand for crude this year may not be as weak as once thought. (AP Photo: Rick Bowmer T o adver tise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today!

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The Tribune The T ribune M y V o i c e , M y N e w s p a p e r ! Thursday, August 13th, 2009

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RELIGIOUS NEWS, STORIES AND CHURCH EVENTS Pg. 23The Tribune THURSDAY August 13, 2009

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The Tribune PG 24 Thursday, August 13, 2009 RELIGION By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net THERE can be numerous reasons why many persons refuse to share their faith in God. Some may see it as the pastor’s job or they may have a fear of being rejected as many of the Jehovah’s Witnesses are during their walk abouts in the community. However, would not being sure of your salvation because of a mistake or “backslide”, k eep you from sharing your faith? According to biblicalproportians.com, I Corinthians 9:22 states: "To the weak became I as weak, that I might gain the weak: I am made all things to all men, that I might by all means save some." With this text in mind, we wonder why so many Christians today keep to themselves, if scriptur e tells us to become as others are to share the word of God-not practice their lifestyle, but make yourself available to them and some down to their level of understanding. Pastor Trent Davis of Golden Gates Outreach Ministries, said there are a number of reasons why people do not share their faith. "I think one of the main reasons they don’t is because they ar e in fear of being called a hypo crite. Some people don’t live the kind of life that would lend them to sharing their faith. It is kind of difficult to share your faith at work when two days before they heard you curse someone out or you were mean to other people so sometimes that is a deterrent,” Mr Davis said. M r Davis said sometimes it is the person's own personal lifestyle that is a deterrent to them sharing their faith. They realise who they are and what they are saying do not match up. I find that most Christians dont realise that God gives opportunities to share their faith with common day people everywhere they go. It begins with a charismatic personality. There are little windows and doors that are constantly beingo pened up. For example when someone says hi, how are you-that is a window,” Mr Davis said. M r Davis said as Christians, we have to use t he windows and doors open to us and even create windows by engaging people. “Not in a hostile manner, but sometimes even with a sense of humour or some kind of compliment. Often times it’s that we are not seeing and taking advantage of the windows of opportunities God gives us to share our faith.” Why don’t you share your faith? THE MINISTRYof Tourism is taking aggressive measures to receive a chunk of the Religious T ourism niche market, an 18 billion dollar industr y; which has the potential of providing The Bahamas with year -round visitors. Linville Johnson fr om The Ministr y of T ourism’s Deputy Director, Religious Group Market, recently stated that his department is working along with some 20 denominations to incr ease the num ber of visitors who attend r eligious events in The Bahamas annually. Mr Johnson was speaking to the pr ess at the first annual Kingdom Seminar hosted by international author and consultant Dr Myles Munroe at The Diplomat Centre Wednesday night. The winter season is the peak period for visitors, but Mr Johnson emphasised the need for year round visitors. e have hundr eds of visitors who come to The Bahamas annually solely for religious events. It’s an 18 billion dollar global market that is large and is gr owing. W e want to be at the cutting edge of this market so that we can get our fair share and statistics show that we ar e one of the destinations of choice for these r eligious groups,” said Mr Johnson. Tourism’s religious market is targeting large church groups by giving them the best deals possible fr om MOT’ s website www .bahamas.com/worship. Other activities include marketing and advertising through specialty religious magazines and public relations activities at seminars and confer ences. Research by MOT show that the local religious tourism market is comprised of 54 per cent female, ages 18-24 and 45-54, with household income fr om $25,000 -75,000, 57 per cent stay an average of 6 nights in hotels, accounting for appr oximately 3,057 visitors and 18,201 room nights in 2007/08. Mr Johnson, “For example, Dr Myles Munroe’s annual conferences for youth, Christians and inter national leaders have been drawing a large segment of that market for us. Florida is our biggest market. What we want to do now is par tner with other denomi nations during their events to increase the numbers thr ough hotel bookings.” Dr Munr oe’ s 3-day Kingdom seminar attracted delegates from more than 30 countries including The United States, Indonesia, Malaysia, The United Kingdom and other par ts of Europe. s great when I can do what I love which is teaching and at the same time be a par t of tourism in this countr y. This is a time when people everywhere are cutting back, but this event has not been impacted by the recession. Really this seminar is a r esponse to a demand for the past ten years. When I travel people always ask me, ‘When are you going to have a seminar in The Bahamas?’ So this is different from the confer ences, but it still attracts Christians from around the world,” said Dr Munr oe. The Ministry of Tourism and The W yndham Nassau Resor t is providing a welcome reception and tour of Paradise Island and Cable Beach Hotels to international pastors from Dr Munr oe’ s Kingdom Seminar throughout the week. T our ism seeks year-round t our ists in religious market P ASTORS greet MOT Deputy Director left to right: Dr Rick Kendall of South East Florida, Dr Richard Pinder , Dr Myles Munroe, MOT Deputy Director Religious Group, Linville Johnson and Dr Pepe Ramnath of Mirimar Florida.

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What good will it be for a man if he gains the whole world, yet for feits his soul?" Matthew 16:26 (NIV AS I type, I'm listening to 90's pop group, The Cardigans; and although cardigans, once again, find themselves on the cool lists of leading fash ion magazines; ten to twelve years ago-they were very trendy-right around the same time, The Cardigans premiered their hit song, 'Lovefool', from whose lyrics I title this article. It was and still is, a catchy tongue in cheek song about longing for anothers love-a favourite I'm sur e in many persons CD and MP3 collections. The topic of this article is in relation to the subject matter of that song and the many songs like it; highlighting a persons intense desir e to be accepted. So I begin by asking this question. Why do we care about what other's think of us? Some might say because we want to be loved and regarded. That's understandable and I can't find much wrong with it, however if in going about attaining these two universal human desires, we constantly change our persons-a problem arises. As a young adult, I'm very aware that a considerable amount of my genera tion, would find it for eign, indeed impossible, to cease in caring about what others think of them. After all, it's har d work to cr eate a seemingly larger than life persona fr om scratch, or urgently polish a family title for one's advantage. Although one has to wonder, if others finding you, is really, more important than you finding yourself? However individuals continue to seek fulfill ment in all the wr ong places. For example, via their well crafted personality; that gets them what they want, takes them wher e they want to be, and with whom they want to be withthat is, until they wake up and realise it's not what they really want in the first place. In r ecent years, with the constant evolving technology , persons have become more and more crazed for attention, and look to get it in the most peculiar of ways. I won't elaborate on some of things I have seen and heard on the world wide web, but I will say , I'm left to wonder why after over a year of leav ing a popular social site, they seem to disallow a person to completelyr emove 'face'. Why persons would want to be r educed to electr onic per sonalities is beyond me. Then there are those who cling to that same personality in the flesh; so completely consumed with the external world, that their most minuter ecognition is cause for consistent and amusing, red carpet like entrances. The pr oblem with taking one's personality so seriously , is the fact that all the r eality is not there. If we were to remove the person, you’re left with something that falls short of the r ealm we really ought to dwell. But no, the majority of the time, it seems as if the cardboard city is good enough to those who go into severe level r ed panic, upon discovering that so and so doesn't like them. Thankfully, there are many young persons who genuinely, do-not-care, what others think of them. William Shakespeare was absolutely on point with his famous quote, 'To thine own self be tr ue.' T o those young people who are believers in Christ, and who truly, don't car e what the world thinks of themadditionally understanding that the most important and lasting impression that matters is that which we make upon God. To all of you, I say cheers! God knows our heart, our brain, and He knows who we are behind the makeup, cologne, glitter and gadg ets. He knows our core. We are to love our Lor d God with all our hear t, mind and soul, and to love our neighbours as ourselves. This is why we breathe. In closing; r emember , love star ts with the first honest look in the mirror. Toni Elizabeth Styles is a Bahamian writer and poet, currently residing in Nassau, Bahamas. Comments related to the article can be sent to fearless247@gmail.com FEARLESS The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, August 13, 2009 PG25 By BISHOP VG CLARKE G ODis more interested in our attitude than he is in our ability. If He can find in us the proper attitude, He cer-t ainly can make us able. When Jesus c alled His disciples; He placed priority on attitude rather than ability. “And He saith unto them, Follow me, and Iw ill make you fishers of men” (Matthew 4:19 an attitude of submission to his leaders hip. W ith their submission he could develop their abilities for soul-winning and ministry to the church. Saul, the king of Israel, had no exper ience in ruling a nation. He had no cabinet or political advisors to assist him in forming a government. How was he able to form and lead a government? And Saul also went home to Gibeah; and there went with him a band of men, whose hearts God hadt ouched” (I Sam. 10:26 men with a disciplined and committed attitude. When Saul's attitude c hanged from self-controlled to selfcenteredness and self-indulgence, he was rejected by the Lord and dethroned as king in a violent act of s elf-destruction (I Sam. 31:3, 4 A disciplined attitude is necessary for prayers to be answered and to haveG od's peace. A disciplined attitude is necessary for effective witness (Ephesians 4:17-24 Christ are to have a different attitude than unbelievers. Believers are responsible for their attitude. Attitude is the source of actions. An improper attitude will condemn u s, regardless of our actions. An attitude of hatred and bitterness makes one a murderer, even if no physical harm is done to the person. Sin begins as an attitude. A person is tempted, a receptive attitude develops toward the t emptation, and sin is conceived in the h eart. Actions follow attitude towards the forbidden and wrong thing. Gideon's army was reduced from thirty-two thousand to three hundred (Judges 7:17wenty-two thousand were rejected because of an attitude of fear. Ninety-seven hundred were sent home because they drank water with a careless attitude of self-centeredness without watchfulness and caution. God took three hundred men with an attitude of self-discipline and commitment and delivered Israel. Disciplined attitude Bishop VG Clarke Love me Say that you love me T ONI STYLES CHARLEST ON,W.Va. AS the economy continues to grind away at jobs, homes and lifetimes' of savings, Bishop Thomas D. Jakes looks back from his position as one of America's most successful pr eachers and r emembers his own hard times, according to the Associated Press . T.D. Jakes known internationally by those first two initials, or sim ply as "bishop" to the people at his 30,000-member Dallas megachurch The Potter's House began his life and ministr y in W est V ir ginia's Kanawha V alley. As a young husband and father, he lost his job when the local Union Carbide plant closed, and found himself slipping out of the middle class, working for years at hard jobs for low pay. Eventually, though, he turned a seven-member chur ch in the tiny town of Montgomer y into the vast ter ritories known today as T.D. Jakes Ministries and TDJ Enterprises discr ete kingdoms that nonetheless complement each other , with the Pentecostal-honed Christianity of the former blending with the empower -and-enter tain entrepreneurship of the latter. Jakes, 52, pr eached a ser mon on Inauguration Day this year and is fr equently mentioned as one of the pr ospective heirs to Billy Graham's title as America's Pastor. He eschews an active r ole in speaking out on issues like abortion and same-sex marriage, though, warning churches not to become better known for politics than for prayer . Jakes counsels patience in economic 'sorrows' RELIGION BRIEFS

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O n May 20, 1971, Marvin Gaye through Motown released one of the most important, passionate record to c ome out of soul music- “What's Going On”. To this day the lyrics are just as relevant or maybe even more relevant. E very week one can look in the obituary sections of our daily papers or listen to the news via radio or television and the sobering / reality question would be “What's Going On?” We're too small of a nation to be experiencing the kinds of drama that w e're seeing today. I truly believe that if we don't put petty politics and religion aside; and come together as one people unto God (Yahweh) there would be much more weeping and gnashing of teeth through the length and breath of this beautiful Bahamas. Think about this! How far advanced in technology, industrial development, agriculture, medicine, etc; could we have been as a nation, if we were more focused on love and building one another rather than tearing down each other? Mr Prime Minister and Mr Leader of the Opposition this foolishness has to stop. The political football game that you are playing with this nation must stop immediately; for our children's children future is at stake. Therefore I will never be silent until this nation tur ns around and heads in its God or dained direction. We've allowed the enemy to sow seeds of division within this nation which is rapidly pr oducing divisive / destr uctive fr uits in ever y sector of our society. This division is so bad that Bahamians are always in the divided political mode; e verything that many of them do see in this country, is ignorantly seen through the eyes of politics. Meanwhile the family and family values are methodically being disintegrated as laws are being enacted by educated, spiritually blind dummies of limited understanding. The concept of being our brother's keeper and loving our neighbours as ourselves seems to be a thing of the past in the Bahamas. Churches no longer preach and teach this aspect of kingdom living; everynow and then a remark of loving one another may be made from today's pulpits by religious leaders en-route to a prosperity centered message. Is anybody taking note or does anybody car e of the fact that our streets and communities ar e becoming like Iraq and Afghanistan? How could we accept with such non chalant spirit, the news of someone being gunned down in our neighbor hoods and tr eat it as just another event? How many more mothers and wives have to bury their sons, husbands and fathers befor e this nation unites and say “enough is enough?” Listen to how Mar vin Gaye puts it in this song, and see if there is any resemblance of what we're facing today: Mother, mother There's too many of you crying Brother, brother, brotherT here's far too many of you dying You know we've got to find a way To bring some loving' here today Father, father W e don't need to escalate You see, war is not the answerF or only love can conquer hate You know we've got to find a way To bring some lovin' here today Every stanza of this song ends with You know we've got to find a way, to bring some lovin here today” As a religious nation that's faced with a barrage problems due to our lack of true love for one another; here's the only way in which we can bring about true love today. Watch this! John.14: 6. Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me. This word way in the Greek is: hodos, hod-os' which literally means 1) a road, 2) an act, and 3) a mode or means of jour neying. Again, one need not be a rocket scientist or a college graduate to deter mine that as a nation we're heading in the wrong direction. Being the religious nation that we are, I'm fully aware that you're well acquainted with the scriptur e; Prov.14: 12. Ther e is a way which seemeth right unto a man, but the end thereof are the ways of death. This wor d way in the Hebr ew is: der ek, deh'-rek; which also has several meanings as follows: 1) a road, 2) a course of life or mode of action, and 3 ) a conversation or custom. Bahamas, it's time for us to stop playing politics and playing church. B y now it should be quite evident to all that politics and religion has gotten us nowhere as a nation. Both of these systems are designed to profit i ts leaders at the expense of it's followers. At the end of the day it is always the politically / religious minded grassr o ots that are left out in the cold crying and demonstrating about the fruits which was produced by the r oots of their passion (Politics & Religion). Here's the last two stanzas of the song “What's Going On?” as everybody is crying out and demonstrating either against their unions, the government, insurance company or some kind of religion. Picket lines and picket signs Don't punish me with brutality Talk to me, so you can see Oh, what's going on Fathers, fathers, everybody thinks we're wrong Oh, but who are they to judge us Simply because our hair is long Oh, you know we've got to find a way To bring some understanding here today What's going on in our country? Here's the answer! W e're in desperate need of a spiritual check-up, from our neck-up; that's both religiously and politically. For questions or comments contact us via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or Ph.1242-441-2021. The Tribune PG 26 Thursday, August 13, 2009 RELIGION What’s going on? PASTOR MATTHEW ALLEN WHEN Deacon Neil Geron Nairn makes his vows this Friday evening dur ing his ordination to the priesthood, he will be fulfilling a prophecy and a prayer made years ago. The ordination ser vice will take place August 14, The Eve of The Feast of The Assumption of The Blessed Virgin Mary, at Christ Chur ch Cathedral, at 7 pm. The chief celebrant will be Rever end Laish Z Boyd, Sr ., Bishop of The Diocese of The Bahamas and The Turks & Caicos Islands. Named after Canon Neil Roach, for mer Rector of Holy Cr oss Anglican Church, Deacon Nairn recounted that before he was born, Canon Roach, then “Father Roach, “told his mother, the late Leo M Coleby Nair n, while she was pr egnant, that she would have a son, and that she should name him Neil. He also told her that her son would become a priest. Mrs Nair n shar ed this story with young Neil years later, after she observed his commitment to serving as an acolyte at St. Gregory's Church. Meanwhile, at the tender age of nine, while attending an Evensong ser vice at St Barnabas Anglican Church, Neil was so inspir ed that he prayed for God to make him a priest. During the or dination Deacon Nairn will be examined by the Bishop, and repeat the vows that he made on August 8, 2008, when he was or dained to the Diaconate. He will commit to being diligent in the reading and studying of the Holy Scriptures, to ministering the word of God and the sacraments, and to accepting the discipline of the Chur ch, to obey the bishop and other ministers set over him in the Lor d, and to being a faithful pastor to all whom he is called to serve Since July 1, 2008, Deacon Neil Nair n has been serving at St Agnes Church, Grants Town, New Providence, and says that the past year was very enjoyable and passed quickly lar gely due to the war m welcome that he received from the loving and generous congregation, and the suppor t of the rector, I Ranfurly Br own, the assistant priest, Rev'd. Ber nard Been and other Clergy. In his role as assistant curate, he has responsibility for the communications, mental and physical wellness, spor ts and cultur e, and youth ministries. His other duties include reading the Gospel, preaching, visiting the sick and shut-in, and assisting in the overall development of the Parish. Deacon Nair n said that while he has enjoyed all aspects of the ministr y, he has a passion for young people, and a desire to see more of them develop a personal r elationship with God. In this regard, he is looking forward to hosting a two-day youth discovery later this year. Deacon Nair n is a 2008 graduate of Codrington College with a Licentiate degree in Theology and a Diploma in Pastoral Studies. Prior to entering Codrington, he was employed as an insurance agent for 22 years. He is married to Judyann Seymour Nairn, and the couple has three children, Mar co, Gar onique and Ramon, one grandson, Mar co, Jr and daughter -inlaw, Keisha. Reverend Fr Neil G Nairn will celebrate his first masses on Sunday, August 16, at St Agnes Anglican Chur ch, Baillou Hill Road, at 7 am, and on Monday , August 17, at St Gregory, the Gr eat, Carmichael Road, at 7pm. Deacon Neil G Nairn to be ordained

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METHODISMbegan in Grand Bahama unof ficially during the 1950's when Methodists fr om the T urks and Caicos Islands arrived in the island to work with the Owens Illinois Lumber Company cutting down the pine tr ees which abound in the island for lumber and shipping to Geor gia for paper pulp. The centre for the operation was located at Pine Ridge. Since the majority of the people working on the operation wer e chur ch-oriented, a community church was built for worship. Among these were large numbers of Methodists. After some years the operation moved to Abaco and Andros. In 1959, a small Methodist Society was formed and the disused Pine Ridge Lumber Camp Chur ch, two miles from Freeport, was made available for services. Ser vices began officially in March of that year by the Rev W.T. Makepeace, then Chair man of the Bahamas District. An English Methodist local preacher, David Mar tin, ar rived in Freeport soon afterwards to work and preach. ST. DAVID’S, SEAGRAPE Mr Mar tin began work among the Methodists, who by this time had been relocated to Seagrape where families were each given a plot of land. By this time the Society had gr own fr om eight to twenty-two (June, 1959 vices were held in the Lodge Hall, but by 1960 the members had built their own church. This is the present St David's Methodist Chur ch. The first r esident minister was the Rev David Coombs of Britain. The following ministers served the church: The Revs Bruce B Swapp, Donald Ur win, James T. Seymour, Ler oy Saunders, John Bilverstone and Acelius Isaac. The church has grown from those early days and now has a membership of lOa, with a resident lay pastor; Hilgr ove Hamilton. S T . ANDREW’S HAWK SBILL St Andr ew's Methodist Church was built in 1967. The building of a church in that ar ea became necessar y when the community of Freeport, which was fast developing, began to expand and many Methodists took up residence in that community. At that time the Rev Donald Mason fr om Britain pastor ed the Methodist society in the Fr eeport area and the then Anglican priest, now Bishop of the Diocese, pastor ed the Anglicans of Hawksbill. An agreement was made by both communions that Anglicans and Methodists would use the Methodist church building at different times for worship services. A ver y happy r elationship existed between St Andrew's Methodist and the Church of the Transfiguration. After a few years that r elationship ceased to exist and the Anglicans builta chur ch at Pinder's Point, the Church of the Good Shepherd. ST. PAUL’S, FREEPORT When development began in Fr eepor t the Methodist Church, having begun in Pine Ridge, and then in Seagrape, felt that it ought to minister to the needs of its Methodists that wer e flocking to Freeport to live and work. In 1965, the Methodist Chur ch of the Bahamas District was asked by the Port Authority to take over the management of the then Freeport Primary School. This of fer was accepted, and the buildings wer e deeded to the Methodist Synod. With this agreement the history of the then St Paul's Primary School (now St. Paul's College) and the Methodist Chur ch of Freeport began. CHURCH SERVICES IN SCHOOL CLASSROOM In these early years befor e the pr es ent St Paul's Church was built, members met for church services in one of the classr ooms of the school. In 1968, the present St Paul's Methodist Church was completed by the Rev Donald Mason, but was begun about 1965 by the Rev Godfr ey S Johns. The building was dedicated on December 14, 1968 by the Rev Hugh B Sherlock, then Pr esident of the Confer ence of the Methodist Church of the Caribbean and the Americas. St Paul's, however , celebrates its anniver sar y on the Sunday near est to October 25 as a reminder that the first Methodist Church on Grand Bahama was dedicated on October 25, 1959 at Pine Ridge Lumber Camp by the late Rev William T. Makepeace. The following are the ministers who followed Rev Godfr ey Johns: Revs Donald Mason, Eric St C Clarke, John Bilverstone, Edwin L. T aylor and Henley B. Per ry. MEDITATION T HERE are times when we wonder how long it is going to take for us to move from being hurt or angry about ani ncident in the past. It may be at the point that it seems to have become an obsession that pre-occupies our mind when we are not busy. Here are some considerations for f inding your peace again. 1. Do I need to talk about this to someone who can help, empathise, or just sympat hise? 2. Do I need to learn how to pray more effectively to leave this with the Lord? 3. Do I need to confront the individual if this is possible and appropriate? 4. Do I need to remind myself of the ways that I have hurt others and needed to be forgiven? 5. Do I need to sever all ties at least for the time being? 6. Do I need to ‘get a life’ and not expect others to make me happy? 7. Do I need to help someone in a worse situation to gain perspective about my own? 8. Do I need to read a book, attend a seminar or otherwise educate myself on the topic? 9. Do I need to join or create a support group for persons in a similar situation? 10. Do I need to learn from this and work for prevention and cure in the society? 11. Do I need to write my story if only as a j ournal entry? 12. Do I need to decide to forgive the person and move on? 1 3. D o I need to report the matter to the police? 14. Do I need to consider it a battle scar in the spiritual warfare or the struggles of life? 1 5. D o I need to trust that the justice of God’s plan will deal with it for me? 16. Do I need to count my blessings and f ocus on what is positive about my past? 17. Do I need to write a play or a song to express my feelings and empower others? 18. Do I need to consider if I am going to use it to strengthen or weaken my character? 19. Do I need to examine my conscience to see if I am more to blame? 20. Do I need to be spreading the Good News about Jesus Christ and God’s love? 21. Do I need to consider this being persec uted for Jesus’ sake and sharing in his suffering? Our personal relationship with Our Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ, will assist us in discerning what to do. Our God is able to heal all hurts, forgive alls ins, and give insight and understanding. Considering that these are just some of the options to be consider ed, you can see why we need the Lord to save us, and the Holy Spirit to guide us. Be encouraged. Greater is He that is within us than he that is against us. The Enemy wants to discourage and ultimately destroy us. Let us stand our ground, be strong and of good courage, doing what we know to be right and pleasing in God’s sight. The Tribune RELIGION T hursday, August 13, 2009 PG27 Getting over it REV.ANGELA C BOSFIELD PALACIOUS Methodists in Grand Bahama JIM LAWLOR THE HISTOR Y OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS P P A A R R T T 4 4 0 0 Share your news The T ribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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The Tribune PG 28 Thursday, August 13, 2009 RELIGION By LLO YD ALLEN T rib une Features Repor ter lallen@tribunemedia.net THE concept of Christian summer camps commonly includes elements like daily scripture readings, discussions on parables fr om the Bible, and various activities to help youngsters develop better r elationships with God. However one local church decided to up the ante this year by intr oducing campers to chess, which for them is a new medium to harness their abilities, and in the end had one mission in mind, to change 100 lives. Calieel Rashad Amahad , youth director and camp co-ordinator for New Life Kingdom Outr each Ministries, said over the past eight weeks the camp has played host to about 60 children from the Englerston community. He explained: “During the camp the kids learned about basic Bible principles, arts and crafts, chess, ways on serving the elderly, building pride for their community, and basically one on one counselling on life situations and ways of identifying and avoiding social ills.” He said as the overall mission for the camp was to bring change to 100 young people within the community , the camp has made it to the half way mark and will continue until the mission is accomplished. e baptised close to 50 kids during the final week of the camp, however we hope to complete the second part of our goal thr ough various community projects which include the new basketball team, the afterschool mentoring pr o gramme, and the chess team,” he said. Thr ough these initiatives, Mr Amahad said he along with other chur ch members will take that oppor tunity to minister to the youngsters and will leave the r est to God. The camp ran from June 15 to August 14, and was open to kids between the ages of 7 to 18. Changing 100 liv es in eight weeks PICTURED are kids from the New Life Kingdom Outreach Ministries after completing a clean-up project on the Engleston Community Park. MANY kids from the New Life Kingdom Outreach Ministries summer camp were introduced to the game of chess for the first time, and organisers say they hope it teaches them discipline and good decision making skills.


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