Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
Pim blowin’ it

SOF
75F

SUNNY WITH

Volume: 105 No.215

HIGH
LOW

ey

anock rise
rape figures

Senator reveals
alarming statistics

THE number of
rapes and attempted
rapes reported in the
first five months of this
year has already sur-
passed in number all of
the cases in 2008, Sena-
tor Allyson Maynard-
Gibson said.

Revealing the latest
crime statistics at a town
meeting on the Sexual
Offences Amendment
Bill at the St Agnes
Church Parish Hall last night,
the PLP senator in her speaking
notes said that up until June 14,
2009, 69 cases of rapes and
attempted rapes were reported.
In 2008 the police recorded 63

Senator Allyson
Maynard-Gibson

cases, she said.

“In less than six
months we have had
more than the total
number of rapes and
attempted rapes report-
ed for 2008.”

“The United Nations
in its report entitled
‘Crime, Violence, and
Development Trends,
Costs, and Policy
Options in the
Caribbean’, issued in
March 2007 shows that the
Bahamas has the highest rape
rate in Caribbean and compari-
son countries,” she said.

SEE page 12

Police slammed for ‘failing to protect
public from murderers and rapists’

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

POLICE have been slammed for failing to protect the com-
munity from murderers and rapists by a former Crime Stoppers
advocate who is demanding the basic right to public safety.

Lucia Broughton, a mother of three from Camperdown, eastern
New Providence, spoke on the record as she demanded that senior
officers in the Royal Bahamas Police Force be held to account over

SEE page 12

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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12, 2009

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sentenced

Woman is
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ajor/Tribune staff

Felip

MISS UNIVERSE contestants enjoy horseback riding during their visit to Harbour island yesterday.
The contestants were given an enthusiastic welcome by the island’s residents.

Hotel union elections will

be held in next two months

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

HOTEL union elections held in May remain
“null and void” and new elections will be held
within the next two months.

Supreme Court Justice Jon Isaacs yesterday
denied an application by recently ousted Bahamas
Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWVU) president Nicole Martin for the
granting of a stay of the proceedings or execution
of his order pending an appeal.

“It has been a long drawn out process, but it is
now at and end and everyone now without ques-
tion has no doubt on what the position of the

SEE page 12



¢ SEE PAGE TWO

Police still ‘puzzled’
over mother’s murder

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

POLICE are still "puzzled" over the sense-
less murder of mother-of-two Tagia Soles-
Armony, who was shot and killed in her sis-
ter's car while her infant son lay in her arms.

Early reports from family and friends indi-
cate that the murder may have been a case of
mistaken identity or an attempted robbery
gone wrong, but investigators are probing all
possible scenarios that would unearth a
motive.

"We are following several leads, no one is in

SEE page 12



NASSAU AND BAHAM/?

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER



to 10 years

By NATARIO
McKENZIE

Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@
tribunemedia.net

A MOTHER of three,
convicted of manslaugh-
ter for the stabbing death
of her boyfriend, was sen-
tenced to 10 years in
prison yesterday.

Senior Justice Anita
Allen also ordered that
Shimeakima Delores
Pratt attend counselling
for anger management
and family counselling.
Pratt, 30, was convicted
on July 1 of the stabbing
death of her boyfriend of
eight years Gary Carey
Sr. Carey, a 54-year-old
Defence Force Officer,
was found stabbed to
death in Pratt’s Minnis
Subdivision apartment
off Carmichael Road on
Sunday, August 17, 2008.
According to evidence
adduced at the trial, Pratt
had stabbed Carey in the
chest with a rat tail comb
and initially told police
that Carey had collapsed

SEE page 12

Bahamians

who died in

plane crash
are identified

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

POLICE in Jamaica have
identified the two Bahamian
men who died in a fiery plane
crash on that island last week.

According to Sergeant Jubert
Llewellyn of the Jamaican Con-
stabulary Force, the two men
are Preston Rolle, 41, and
Christon Dion Dean, 32. The
men, who police suspect were
part of a drug deal gone wrong,
were found in the charred cock-
pit of a twin-engine plane,
burned beyond recognition.

Officials at the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs and local police
could not confirm the men's
identities.

Reports reaching The Tri-
bune indicate that one of the
men was arrested for plane

SEE page 12

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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Miss Universe
contestants visit
Harbour Island

A GROUP of Miss Universe contestants
travelled to beautiful Harbour Island yes-
terday, where they were greeted with enthu-
siasm by the locals and given the five-star
treatment.

The ladies flew in to North Eleuthera and
were ferried across to the Harbour Island
dock in several small boats, arriving at about
10.30am on what turned out to be a gor-
geous, clear summer day.

What seemed like the entire population of
the island — as well as a good number of
tourists — was on hand to greet the contes-
tants, who were led to a waiting cavalcade of

vehicles by a rousing local junkanoo troupe.

They proceeded to Valentines Resort for
refreshments and then on to the island’s
Haunted House, the grounds of which are
said to be wandered by the soul of an
unnamed woman who appears in a wedding
gown.

The ladies then took in a local art gallery
before hitting Bay Street for some shop-
ping.

They were then treated to an exquisite
lunch by the staff of the Coral Sands, before
spending the rest of the afternoon relaxing
on the world famous pink sand beach.

| Automotive General. Manager |

Responsibilities:

- Create and organize vehicle sales activities
Create and organize parts and service
operations
Manage follow-up systems for existing
customers
Cultivate new business
Develop and implement company policies and
programmes
Train and lead staff in a team environment
Stay up-to-date in dealership technology

A prominent new car dealership

is seeking a general manager.

The ideal candidate must have
wide experience in the
automotive business as well as

good written and oral

Requirements:
5+ years of experience in the automotive
industry
8+ years experience in automotive manufacture
and corporate experience
Experience with Japanese automotive brands
Strong leadership and management skills
Superior communication and customer service
skills
Account management and budgeting experience
Proficiency in computers

communication skills.

Interested persons should send resumes
with references to:

Automotive GM
P.O. Box N-9240
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for application: Wednesday,
August 26, 2009.


















STARS OF STAGE AND SCREAM: Te contestants visit Harbour Rent Haunted House.

MISS ZAMBIA Andella
Chileshe Matthews along with
Miss Turks and Caicos Jewel
Selver are all smiles on their
Harbour Island trip

PHOTOS:
Felipé Major/
Tribune staff

ie a
aU eS
eBay
PHONE: 322-2157

SUIT, SHIRT & TIE

aU

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MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News

Paleeror ooo
Editorial/Letters. ...........cceeccecceeeceeeeecceeeeeeeees P4

Sports oe Crna

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



The best for news

tripune 242 .cc



Second tropical
depression
is monitored

WEATHER experts are
now monitoring a second trop-
ical depression that has formed
in the Atlantic and could devel-
op into a storm system within
the next two days.

As with tropical depression
nine-e which is still hovering
over the Atlantic, forecasters at
the National Hurricane Centre
(NHC) in Miami reported that

this second system is not yet

showing any signs of strength-
ening.

At 5pm yesterday, the cen-
tre of tropical depression two
was located about 400 miles
west of the southernmost Cape
Verde islands.

The depression was moving

toward the west at a speed of

near 12mph.
This general track with a

slight increase in forward speed

is expected over the next couple
of days, the NHC said.
Maximum sustained winds

were near 30mph with higher

gusts.

Search for man
who physically
assaulted woman

POLICE are searching for
aman who physically assault-
ed a woman in the parking
lot of The Tribune yesterday
afternoon.

Sometime after 2pm, a man
of “dark” complexion was
seen arguing with a woman
as they both sat in a black
coloured Ford Sport Trac.

The man was reportedly
demanding that the woman
get out of the driver’s seat.

After a verbal exchange,
he began to repeatedly punch
the woman in her head, eye-
witnesses said.

Attempting to block the
blows, the woman threw her
hands in front of her face
while the man began to pull
on her as he dragged her out
of the truck.

When persons who were
outside of the building began
to approach the pair, the man
flung the woman into the
backseat of the truck and
sped off down Shirley Street.

A police report was imme-
diately filed with officers at
the Central Detective Unit
who up until press time last
night were still actively
searching for the man.

Firearm, live
rounds seizet

POLICE seized an illegal }
firearm and six live rounds of }
ammunition from a man }
apprehended in the Kemp :

Road area.

Officers from the Wulff }
Road station spotted a man }
on the roof of a building as }
they patrolled Strachan's }
Alley, off Kemp Road, short- }

ly before 11pm Monday.

After the man climbed }
down from the roof, police }
searched him and found a }
.380 handgun with six live ;
rounds of ammunition in his ;

possession.

The suspect, a 25-year-old

Tribune website
the hottest in town

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THERE HAS been an aE response to The mt s website.

Visitor calls for clean-up at
PMH after strange odour

A STRANGE odour per-
meating the upper floor of
the main building at
Princess Margaret Hospital
has led one visitor to call for
a clean-up of the facility.

The woman who identi-
fied herself only as Ms
Smith told The Tribune how
the smell of “rotting dead
bodies” wafted through the
corridor near the male sur-
gical ward as she was walk-
ing through to visit a friend
in the hospital on Sunday.

She believes the smell was
coming from the morgue
and called Minister of
Health Dr Hubert Minnis to
investigate the stench which
struck her as unhygienic.

Ms Smith said: “Whatever
it is, I know it’s not healthy.
I don’t know if it’s bodies
rotting in there and the
smell is seeping up, but it
stinks. It smells like rotting
dead bodies, bodies decom-
posing.

“Dr Minnis should get
somebody to check it out
because that’s what he’s
being paid for.”

Ventilation problems in
the PMH morgue was one
of the reasons why staff
walked out of the hospital
on a sick-out last year
demanding overdue haz-
ardous pay owing to unsuit-
able working conditions.

Ms Smith said: “They
need a new hospital, that
place is the pits.”



was blown over from piles
of burning medical waste in
the engineering department
in the back of the hospital
grounds.

She said: “Smell is some-
thing that can come and go
depending on how the
breeze is blowing, and what

Anger over water outages

WATER outages in eastern New Providence had some residents

fuming yesterday.

Area residents said they have been plagued with frequent water
outages with no warnings, rusty water and low to no pressure for

months now.

"I was about to take a cold shower to cool off in this stifling heat
and I couldn't. If this is going to happen Water and Sewerage

should at least let me know.

"It's too hot and sticky for this and I'm tired of it — and it's
always this area. I refuse to believe that this catch them by sur-
prise,” said one angry resident who lives near Yamacraw Beach.

Another resident of the area said he is fed up with the utility

company.

"If I have to pay them for their services then they have to let me
Know (when the water will be off). I don't even need the money
back, I just want them to respect me as a paying customer," he said.

Attempts to secure a comment from the Water and Sewerage



IT’S live and it’s officially the
hottest website in town!

Within hours of the launch of
TRIBUNE242, hundreds of new
visitors had registered, and many
got busy voting in the daily news
poll on the site and commenting
on the hot stories of the day.

In fact, the number of daily hits
jumped by more than 1,000 PER
CENT from Sunday when TRI-
BUNE242 hosted just the PDF
flipbook to Monday when we
launched our full feature website.

“The response so far has been
overwhelming. We knew the
Bahamian public was eager for
The Tribune to launch an inter-
active website, but I think we
were all amazed by the statistics
we saw following day one,” said
TRIBUNE242 online editor Jes-
sica Robertson.

The Tribune set up its website
not only as a means of dissemi-
nating information, but as a way
to generate intelligent conversa-
tions on the issues affecting
Bahamians.

Polls have been set up to allow
each registered user only one vote

might smell like dead bodies
is not necessarily the smell
of dead bodies.
“Normally we do the
fumigation process at the
hospital on evenings and
weekends to avoid traffic of
staff, so it is possible that is
what she was smelling.”

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cav
Telephone: (242) 3642-66545
Bayparl Building, Parliament Street

on a given topic. This ensures that
multiple votes by a single person
can’t skew the results.

The first question asked was
“With the murder toll now reach-
ing 50, does the Government have
the right policies to tackle crime
on our streets?”

By noon yesterday, more than
160 people had cast their votes — a
resounding 83 per cent voted no —
and many had left comments.

Managing Editor John Fleet
hailed the first day of
TRUBUNE242 as a magnificent
success.

He said: “The number of tele-
phone calls and e-mails from read-
ers congratulating us has been
fantastic.

“TRIBUNE242 is the only reli-
able online source for news in the
Bahamas. The interaction which is
already taking place is amazing,
and it’s only Day One

TRIBUNE242 is updated daily
at 2pm. The site will be open
access for a month, after that
readers will be required to take
out a paid subscription to access
all sections.

Beat the Summer heat in a great selection of
Swim trunks, Surfer Shorts, Tees, Polos.

by Vineyard Vines

Telephone: (242) 323-4240 © Fax: (242) 3h-9953
P.O, Box W171, Sassen, WP, Boles
e-mail: infoo?! colesofinassau.com

PMH press officer Thel-

‘ Corporation were unsuccessful yesterday.
ma Rolle said there are cur-

resident of Johnson Alley, is :
: In May, Robert Deal, assistant general manager at the WSC,

currently in police custody.

He could appear in court
on formal charges as early as }

tomorrow.

rently no problems with
ventilation in the morgue
and she expects the stench

admitted that the rationing of water to homes in New Providence
came as the supply of water stored by the corporation sunk to “crit-

ically low levels.”

Drugs worth $160,000 seized on beach

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A large
quantity of illegal drugs with
an estimated street value of
over $160,000 was seized by
police early yesterday morn-
ing at a secluded beach on
Grand Bahama.

Asst Supt Loretta Mack-
ey, police press liaison offi-
cer, reported that sometime
around 6.30am police went to
the north-eastern area of
Williams Town Beach, where
they discovered a drug smug-
gling operation in progress.

According to reports, four
persons onboard a white 25ft
vessel were seen off-loading
a large quantity of drugs from

the boat on to the beach.

ASP Mackey said the cul-
prits fled the area in the boat
when police arrived at the
scene.

Officers recovered 162
pounds of suspected marijua-
na with a street value of
$162,000.

Police also discovered a
black and chrome .380 hand-
gun along with one magazine
consisting of seven .380
rounds of ammunition.

Drug Enforcement Unit
(DEV) officers are continu-
ing their investigation into the
matter.

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PAGE X, XXXDAY, XXXMONTH XxX, 1998

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

More need for monitoring criminals

JOHN Hincliffe, who for many years was
port director in Freeport, told a Welsh news
site recently that he believes the number of
guns on New Providence streets is now
worse than in the eighties when he lived
here.

The eighties — an era notorious not only
for drug peddling, but for gun smuggling
with drive-by shootings the order of the
day. Now, almost 20 years later, history is
repeating itself.

Mr Hincliffe was commenting to the news
media on the shooting death — which he
and many like him believe was a contract
killing — of banker and fellow Welshman,
Hywel Jones, 55. Mr Hincliffe believes that
because of the widespread corruption in the
Bahamas, the Jones case will be difficult of
solution.

The bank executive was walking from
his car to his office on the morning of April
22 when a gunman stepped up and shot him
in the head. So far no one has been arrested.
Jones clung to life for about two weeks with-
out regaining consciousness. He died on
May 8.

Other than having a hunch that there are
more guns in circulation in the Bahamas, a
police officer said there are no current sta-
tistics to support this belief.

With the Bahamas’ open borders and the
US — and its fanatical gun culture that
adversely affects all its neighbours — right
on our doorstep, the police are daily chal-
lenged in their fight to get guns off the
streets. However, the officer said, this year
the force had taken more firearms out of
circulation than ever before.

In April this year the Bahamas Central
Intelligence Bureau (CIB) compiled a list
of all persons released from prison that
month. Of the 205 released, 153 were out on
bail, and 39 were classified as persons who
“should be monitored.”

Eleven persons released on bail were in
prison for murder or attempted murder,
three for unlawful sexual intercourse, three
for rape, and one for assault with intent to
rape. Today most of the crime news that we
report are offences being committed by per-
sons on bail. Some of these accused have
long rap sheets. Most of their alleged
offences are yet to be settled by the courts.

On the April bail sheet was a person
notorious for drug possession, and other
crimes. He was accused, but acquitted of

murder. However, all who know him, and his
criminal record claim he only got off the
murder charge because witnesses were too
terrified to testify against him. Here is a man
acquitted by the courts, but released from
prison with the CIB recommendation that he
“should be monitored.”

Still under discussion by government is
the implementation of electronic monitoring
devices for persons out on bail. Apparently
these devices are to be used only in cases
where an accused has a criminal charge
pending. But what happens to a man, who
the courts have acquitted, public opinion
has convicted, and police don’t trust as being
a safe neighbour? How can the police mon-
itor him without an electronic device being
attached to his leg?

The committee should include such a per-
son in their considerations — acquitted, but
believed guilty. Apparently, even the police
think the public should be protected against
his anti-social behaviour.

Either the rules have to be adjusted to
accommodate this type of person, or a per-
petual charge will have to be kept pending
against him to justify the device around his
leg.

it is really unrealistic to make the police
responsible for such a person without giving
them the tools with which to do the moni-
toring job.

As crime escalates, the police certainly
need Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) in
schools and other critical areas. Such devices
might not only deter the criminal, but if
caught on camera he can be quickly sought
and brought to justice. The electronic device
should now be beyond the talking stage. It is
hoped that it will be a perpetual piece of
jewellery for the convicted rapist, even after
he has served his time.

As crime increases and the community
becomes more tense, talking committees
have to speed up their deliberations and
turn their talk into action.

The monitoring of these devices, once in
place, will put an extra strain on the police
force. Staff will have to be found to monitor
them. There is no point having an ankle
monitor on an accused if there is no one at
the other end paying attention to his activi-
ties. Even though this will put another bur-
den on the police, many of them believe
that something has to be done to assist them
in enforcing the law and preventing crime.



Stench from
Montagu ramp
is unbearable

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thank you for this opportu-
nity to address you this letter.

On Saturday, July 25, I went
to Montagu Beach and the
stink odour was so bad that I
thought the sea water was stink,
so I continued to smell and dis-
covered that the odour was
coming from the Montagu
ramp.

On Saturday, August 1, I
went on Montagu, and low and
behold, passing the ramp there
was the horrible odour.

What kind of nasty people
are we?

Paradise Island is just across
from East Bay Street. Montagu
ramp, East Bay Street is a one
way street, when you come
from over the bridge.

LETTERS

letters@tripbunemedia.net



There is no toilet, so those
nasty people go in the bushes to
relieve themselves, hands not
washed, mingling with fish and
conch for Bahamians to buy
and eat.

I don’t mind the fruit and the
straw vendors, but the fisher-
men must go. Family Guardian
have my condolences.

In the 60’s and 70’s one could
go downtown and buy fish,
mutton and fruits from the
Market, after it burnt down
they moved to Potter’s Cay.
PLP, FNM, you all know very

well that some Bahamians are
unruly, hard-headed and stub-
born.

Mr. Health Minister, Mrs.
M.P., Mr. Tourism Minister,
when I pass the Montagu ramp,
I would love to have my car
glass down and so would the
tourists, also Miss Universe and
my Bahamian brothers and sis-
ters.

Please have these people
moved to Potters Cay, they will
cry that they have mouths to
feed, but they must go.

Now PLP and FNM, if you
all don’t get together and make
those people move, you will be
cut below the knees in 2012.

PATTE LEE,
Nassau,
August 7, 2009

Better laws needed to protect children, animals

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have listened to some of the views on the
proposed amendments to the (rape of spouse) in
the sexual offences and domestic violence act, this
is what our act is now.

15 (1) Any person who has sexual intercourse
with his spouse without the consent of the spouse-

Sexual assault by spouse.

(a) where there is in existence in relation to
them-

(i) a decree nisi of divorce;

(ii) a decree of judicial separation;

(iii) a separation agreement; or

(iv) an order of a court for the person not to
molest or cohabit with his spouse, or any other
order made under Part IJ; or

(b) where the person has notice that a petition
for judicial separation, divorce or nullity of mar-
riage has been presented to a court, is guilty of
the offence of sexual assault by spouse and liable
to imprisonment for a term of fifteen years.

I see nothing wrong with this, we must all
respect each others privacy and if your spouse
says no to you that should mean no.

Here is the problem in which amending this
law cannot help, persons with very low self
esteem, too much pride, worrying about what
others may say or think and putting children’s
vacation/school fees and mortgage in front of
self. If these amendments due become law it
will put burden on the court system and the
Police because the spouses who are being abuse
now, still will not come forward and other spous-
es will use the new law to waste the systems’
time by calling the police and then not appearing
in court.

A spouse needs to say to the other half, if you
violate me then you go or I go, because if it is
done once it will happen again, you must leave

that situation put your trust in God only he can
give you the strength to make it on your own, if
you need to fall into someone arms fall into his
and not your pastor.

What we need in our country is more love and
compassion towards each other, Mahatma Gand-
hi said: “A country is judged by the way it treats
its animals” and that says a lot for The Bahamas
with the high level of cruelty in this nation
towards animals and children, it is no wonder
why we breed the type of adults we have in this
country. Compassion and love for all living things
is taught and expressed in very few homes today.
So let us pass better laws to protect our children
and animals from abuse because this is where
the seed is planted, our children grow up being
abused and seeing animals abused. What do you
think will happen to 75 per cent of them when
they reach adulthood?

I say to the politicians of this country please try
and find a way make the cost of living cheaper so
that parents can spend more time with their chil-
dren. Parents stop trying to keep up with the
Jones’s, take those extra hours and spend with
your children, they do not need the extra games
and clothes, this does not erase the memory of
the only time you said anything was to shout at
them or the only time you touched them was to
hit them.

“T object to violence because when it appears
to do good the good is only temporary, the evil it
does is permanent” — Gandhi.

Show love to your children as God showed
his love to you.

STEPHEN TURNQUEST
Nassau,
August, 2009.

A Chief Justice should be ‘lettered’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Who will be appointed the
next Chief Justice?

Speculation abounds and at
least two newspapers are actu-
ally naming candidates.

My five cents is simple — a
Chief Justice should be a per-
son who is “lettered.”

In other words has been to
an accredited university and has
a degree in Law, so this obvi-

ously eliminates effectively one
of those mentioned.

Current AG Michael Barnett
has certain political aspirations
and I am reasonably sure he
will try again, although this time
around could be more of a chal-
lenge for the FNM than 2007, if
one is to believe current public
opinion polling.

Also there is the speculation
if His Excellency A.D. Hanna

but that is not really a race as it
is a sShoe-in for the obvious
totally acceptable bipartisan
candidate who is well tried.
The rumoured alternative is
absolutely unacceptable to the
majority of Bahamians.

K. MINNIS,
Nassau,
August 10, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009, PAGE 5



Fire in Grand

Bahama is
investigated

GRAND Bahama
police are investigating
the cause of a fire which
almost destroyed an 11-
room home on East Sun-

ASP Loretta Mackey
reported that the Police
Fire Department
responded to a building
fire at approximately
8.55pm.

When firemen went to
Sunrise Highway, near
Ariel Place, they
observed an 11-room sin-
gle stone structure
engulfed in flames.

The fire was extin-
guished. The house,
which owned by a resi-
dent of Freeport, was
extensively damaged.

Spanish tourist
hitten by shark
in Florida

PONCE INLET, Fla.

THE Volusia County
Beach Patrol says a tourist

from Spain has been bitten

by a shark off of Florida’s

Atlantic coast, according to

Associated Press.
Authorities say the man,
26, whose name was not

immediately available, suf-

fered small punctures on
the top and bottom of his

left foot while sitting on his

surfboard Monday
evening.

Beach Patrol spokesman

Scott Petersohn said the
man was treated at the
scene and left. It was not
known if he went to hospi-
tal after that.



Harbour dredging is

By KATHRYN CAMPBELL

DREDGING of Nassau Har-
bour is expected to officially begin
tomorrow and be completed by
November.

Project manager with Boskalis
International BV Frans
Thomassen informed government
officials that the Nassau Harbour
Port Project is on course.

Mr Thomassen last weekend
took a team of officials on a tour
of the Nassau Harbour and
Arawak Cay port projects sites.

They were also shown the Ursa,
the rock cutting self-propelled
dredger to be used to move 1.9
million cubic yards of material
from the harbour.

Voyage

The $44.2 million Nassau Har-
bour Port Improvement Project is
being carried out to accommodate
the new mega Genesis Class cruise
ship ‘Oasis of the Seas’ which is
expected to stop in Nassau during
its maiden voyage in December.

The Ministry of Public Works
and Transport said the dredged
material will be stockpiled on
Arawak Cay for use in future gov-
ernment projects. Some of it will
be used to extend Arawak Cay by
1,000 feet.

The project also includes the
installation of three mooring dol-
phins at Prince George Wharf.

“Tam most pleased having
toured the dredger,” said Minister
Grant.

“T have every confidence that the
project will remain on schedule.



“The dredger has some five
heads (instrument on the dredger
used to cut rock).

“With this sort of preparation
there is no doubt that we will pro-
ceed on schedule.”

Among the officials were Public
Works and Transport Minister
Neko Grant; Environment Minis-
ter Earl Deveaux; permanent sec-
retary at the Ministry of Works
Colin Higgs; permanent secretary
at the Ministry of the Environ-
ment Ronald Thompson; acting
director of Works Gordon Major;
director of the Bahamas Environ-
ment Science and Technology
(BEST) Commission Philip
Weech, and Ministry of Works’
project engineer Robert Gar-
raway.

Derek Smith/BIS

al Arthur Hanna; Ministry of Tourism's Director General Vernice Walkine, and members of the royal

Bahamas Police Force Band.

This year’s Miss Universe pageant ‘best organised’

By BETTY VEDRINE

OFFICIALS of the Miss Uni-
verse organisation are hailing
this year’s pageant as their best
organised event ever and said
they are very pleased with their
partnership with the Bahamas.

“Based on the comments that
we’ve received, they are very
pleased with the way that every-
thing is going,” said Minister of
Tourism and Aviation Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace.

“In fact, the organisers said
this has been the most organ-
ised event they have ever had
and they are crediting it not only
to the ministry but also to the
corporate partners involved in
this venture.”

The Bahamas is hosting the
58th annual Miss Universe com-
petition featuring 84 of the
world's most beautiful women.

It airs live from Atlantis, Par-
adise Island, on August 23 on
NBC and Telemundo.

Paula Shugart, president of
the Miss Universe organisation,
said having the competition in
here epitomises the qualities
that are unique to the Bahamas.

“Paradise,” she said. "There is
no better name for the beauty of
the Bahamas and this island.

“The worldwide telecast will
highlight the warmth, beauty
and hospitality of the islands of
the Bahamas as well as the
world renowned Atlantis
Resort,” Ms Shugart said.

Her organisation, she said,
has had “a wonderful working
relationship” with the Bahamas
and Atlantis for many years.

ABACO

The Committee for The Privatisation of BTC
& The Utilities Regulation & Competition Authority (URCA)

“[’m very excited that this
global event will take this part-
nership to a whole new level,”
she said.

Minister Vanderpool-Wallace
said: “The people of the
Bahamas are proud and excited
at the opportunity to host some
of the most beautiful people in
the universe in some of the most
beautiful islands in the universe.

“This feels like the perfect
match.

“We look forward to show-
casing the hospitality of our peo-
ple, the clarity of our waters, the
vibrancy of our music, dance,
food and spirit.”

The reigning Miss Universe,
Venezuelan, Dayana Mendoza,
has travelled the world as an
advocate for HIV/AIDS educa-
tion, research and legislation.

Contestants will be judged in
three categories; swimsuit,
evening gown and the interview.

The competition will be host-
ed by Billy Bush, co-anchor of
‘Access Hollywood’ and Claudia
Jordan of ‘Celebrity Appren-
tice’ and ‘Deal or no Deal’.

International recording artist
Flo Rida will perform his hits
"Right Round’ and ‘Jump’ dur-
ing the swimsuit segment.

There will also be a perfor-
mances by reality star Heidi
Montag featuring her single
‘Turn ya head’. David Guetta
and Kelly Rowland will sing
their hit single ‘When love takes
over’ during the evening gown
segment.

Donald Trump and Phil
Gurin serve as executive pro-
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set to begin tomorrow

rise Highway on Monday. :

LEFT: Frans Thomassen, project manag-
er with Boskalis International BV, gives
government ministers an overview of
the Ursa dredger to be used in the Nas-
sau Harbour Port Improvement Project.
Pictured from left are Minister of the
Environment Earl Deveaux, Mr
Thomassen and Public Works and
Transport Minister Neko Grant.

BELOW: Public Works and Transport
Minister Neko Grant points to where
one of the three mooring dolphins will
be installed as part of the Nassau Har-
bour Port Improvement Project. Pic-
tured from left are permanent secre-
tary at the Ministry of the Environment
Ronald Thompson; Minister of the
Environment Earl Deveaux; Frans
Thomassen, project manager with
Boskalis International BV and Mr
Grant.



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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Falling grades ‘show lack of
‘progress in education system’

The Progressive Young
Liberals join the debate

Advocates:
Release two
Haitians to

bury daughter

MIAMD

NEARLY three dnaihs! :
after a boat overloaded with }
Haitian migrants capsized off :
South Florida's coast, the body }
of the youngest drowning vic- }
tim lies unclaimed in a}
morgue, according to Associ- }

ated Press.

Advocates in Miami's Lit- }
tle Haiti pressed federal i
authorities Tuesday to release }
the 8-month-old girl's parents }
so they can bury the child they }
lost in the fast-flowing Gulf :
Stream current and to fight
the government's efforts to}

deport them back to Haiti.
The

recovered from the ocean.

The infant remains at the}
Palm Beach County medical :
examiner's office, along with
the bodies of three other i
women who died in the acci- }
dent and have not been iden- }

tified.

north of Miami.

The grief-stricken couple }
from Port-de-Paix, Haiti, are }
plagued with nightmares:
about the baby's drowning }
and need counseling and the }
ability to plan Luana's funeral, }

relatives and advocates said.

"It's very critical for her" to :
see the baby buried, said:
Leonard's cousin, Albert Noel i

of Miami.

Marleine Bastien, executive }
director of Haitian Women of }
Miami, said the Department }
of Homeland Security has not }
responded to the couple's ;
request for humanitarian }
parole, which is occasionally }
granted for pregnant women }
or others with serious medical

conditions.

"As a matter of human
decency, they should have?
been released in order to bury :
their little baby girl, to deal }
with their immigration cases }

and to be with family,”
Bastien said.

Leonard and Augustin have }
been transferred to U.S. Mar- }
shals Service custody, said}
U.S. Immigration and Cus- }
toms Enforcement spokes- }
woman Nicole Navas. Mes- }
sages left at the Marshals Ser- :
vice's Miami and West Palm }
Beach offices were not imme- }

diately returned Tuesday.

Luana could receive a coun- !
ty burial if no one can afford
to bury her, said Tony Mean, }
operations manager for the }
Palm Beach County medical :

examiner's office.

The parents can designate ;
a friend or relative to make }
the necessary arrangements, :

but that has not happened.

The three unidentified }
women will receive county}

burials, Mead said.

The medical examiner's :
office will keep Luana's body }
and says it will wait until the ;

situation is resolved.

body of Luana :
Augustin was among nine}

Chandeline Leonard, 32, }
and Lucsene Augustin, 26, }
have been in U.S. custody :
since May 13 when the boat }
capsized and sank off Boyn- }
ton Beach, some 60 miles }

THE Progressive Young Liberals
(PYL) yesterday chimed in on the
debate raging over the national grade
average, calling on government to
place more attention on specialised
classrooms and teachers who can fur-
ther advance the Bahamas’ education
system.

Noting how the grade average has
fallen from a ‘D+’ to a ‘D’, the PYL
said this once again represents the
lack of progress within the education-
al system to “better equip young peo-
ple for the global world that we live
in.”

“Bahamians would remember that
it was just last year the minister cele-
brated the rise from a ‘D’ to a ‘D+’,
but today we are right where we start-
ed from, poised to try to reclaim the
‘D+’ average instead of advancing fur-
ther toward an ‘A’ and here is why:

“The Ingraham government has
failed to recognise that in order to
create achievers in our system it must
deliver the kinds of upgrades neces-
sary to advance education through-
out the country. Specialised class-
rooms with wireless technology, spe-
cialty trained teachers in core subject
areas such as mathematics and Eng-
lish. And the creation of an environ-
ment in which there is a zero toler-
ance approach to detractors, human or
otherwise in our system to in anyway
hinder the learning process.”

The PYL said that the education
system must also demand greater
responsibility from parents who are
the first instructors of students in this
society.

As the youth wing of the PLP, the
PYL said they found the Ministry of
Education’s 10-year plan rather inter-
esting, and even applauded govern-
ment for its efforts.

However, they added that the prob-
lems facing education have persisted
for “far too long” and need “immedi-
ate attention.”

“The Bahamian student can no
longer be allowed to fail and medioc-
rity can no longer be acceptable.

“For far too long the results of the
BJC and BGCSE have been bandied
about the halls of parliament and in
the press by politicians as a stick to
brow beat one another with for polit-
ical reasons.

“While announcing the results, the
minister said ‘when I am satisfied that
every child in the Bahamas has
achieved their full potential then I will
be satisfied, until then no stone will be
left unturned and no initiative left
untried until we reach that moment.’

“The question is we are now at the
half-way mark of the minister’s term
and what can he say that he has done
substantially to achieve that goal,” the
PYL asked.

Further, the PYL said that the
announcements that government is
suspending its Education Loan Pro-
gramme and that more than 3,000 new
students are being transferred into the
public school system, which is inclusive
of children whose parents can no
longer afford private schools, “paint a
fearful picture of more problems to
come.”

These problems include over-





results are down
from last year’s ‘D+’

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

examinations (BJC) is a ‘D’. In
2008 the national average in the
BGCSE examination was a
‘D+’ and a ‘C-’ in the BJC
examinations.

Economist Ralph Massey,
who has written a Bahamian
public policy essay based on the
2006 national grade average
told The Tribune yesterday that
the fluctuating ‘D’ average is
“deceptive” and does not
reflect a true distribution of
scores in the public and private
school sectors.

p

THE country’s current
national ‘D’ grade average of
students sitting the Bahamas
General Certificate of Sec-
ondary Education examinations
(BGCSE) is a cover up for
problems within the public
school system, it was claimed
yesterday.

During a press conference at
the Ministry of Education yes-

a atl







The national grade
average falls to D

BGCSE examination wa USSU aed as









©

fale Bibs staff
od :










THE TRIBUNE reported on the falling national grade average last week

crowded classrooms, fewer teachers,
lower grades and essentially more fail-
ures, the organisation said.

“So what does that minister intend
to do to achieve his goal of every stu-
dent living up to their potential? When
are we going to realise that education
is the key to solving a lot of the social
ills that we face, and that access to a
good education is a basic human right?
The minister has to know that no
longer can he or his administration
continue to pay lip service to this
major problem.”

“We call on the government to
move with swiftness to make sure that
the youth of the nation are in a posi-
tion to be active contributing citizens
of this country in a positive way and to
be able to compete on the global stage
as will be required of them.

“The PYL calls on the present gov-
ernment to live up to all the promises
made to the young people of the coun-
try during the 2007 election campaign.
We are waiting on the results not the
usual rhetoric, or the usual promises,
but results,” the young politicians said.

Dealing with economic
Crisis is easy, relatively

BECAUSE of the lost
jobs and the resulting
stress on people’s day-to-
day lives, the fallout from
the world economic crisis
is front and centre in the
nation’s consciousness.



JOHN



Issa

VIEW FROM AFAR |



any sustained outrage
about the number of our
young people who receive
poor or failing grades.
There are numerous arti-
cles on matters financial
but few if any about our

There are programmes on
stream to assist the unem-
ployed. There are also cap-
ital projects such as
Albany, the airport and
seaport developments that
will stimulate growth.
The plan for the renew-
al of downtown Nassau is
long overdue and will pro-
duce benefits for decades
to come. When the

economies in the devel-
oped world resume vigor-
ous growth, resort devel-

opments in New Provi-
dence and the Family
Islands will once again
flourish. These are rela-
tively easy happenings that
will pull us out of the pre-
sent slump. That is all well
and good, but it won’t
solve the most serious
threat to the future of The
Bahamas.

The most serious threat
to the Bahamian way of
life is the state of our pub-
lic education establishment















@ ie
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which produces poor
results and does not pre-
pare the majority of our
youth so that they can live
productive and fulfilling
lives. This crisis is not new
and this is not the first
time that this column has
visited the subject. A
recent study has highlight-
ed the crisis and has also
shown what is possible by
pointing to two schools
that have been producing
superior results.

Dealing with this crisis
will make dealing with the
economic crisis look easy,
but we have no choice but
to put this job front and
centre if we are to fulfil
our duty to the next gen-
eration. There has been
passing attention to the
problems with education
in the media but it pales in
comparison to the atten-
tion being given to the
relocation of the port.



Reading most of the media
online I have not noticed

real wealth, the youth of
The Bahamas.

It is worth once again
emphasizing that the coun-
tries that have the best
quality of life and the high-
est standards of living are
not the ones with the most
natural resources but the
ones with the most educat-
ed populations. Let us not
let down our children and
their children.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their

neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.eduby

NOTICE

The College of The Bahamas wishes to advise all students who have
not received a response to their applications from the Admissions
Office to check on their status for the Fall 2009 semester at the

Portia Smith Building,

2nd floor on the main Oakes Field Campus

between the hours of 9:00 a.m.

August 12 = 14, 2009

— 5: 00 p.m.

The public is advised that The College of The Bahamas will be closed
for one day on Monday 17th August, 2009, as all employees will be
taking part in the annual serminar.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



www. tribune 24 2 .co



Marital rape legislation:
Where are my rights?

By EV.

I HAVE decided to speak
up at this time because I am
tired of the government intro-
ducing legislation without
regard to the rights and pro-
tection of the entire populace
and not just one segment of it.

Now it appears that they
want to control the sacred mar-
ital bed which the Lord, the
supreme and greater judge
than all of us, has declared
undefiled. Do you mean to tell
me that we (men) are so smart
that we know what is better
for us than the Creator him-
self? God forbids. What right
has government to control any-
one’s bedroom?

What is next on the agenda,
are they going to then tell me

YOUR SAY

how to run my family?

They could legislate the
most sacred and intimate por-
tion of my relationship with
my wife. This is a private and
personal matter.

I am sure that I speak for
most men in this country when
I say that rape is wrong, it is a
vicious and violent act, and the
punishment should be death.
No one regardless of gender
or status should be forced to
have sex against their will, this
is how I really feel about rape.



The family is the foundation
of any society and what the
government is effectively doing
1s destroying the foundation of
this country. The man is the
head of the home as Christ is
the head of the church. Did
the married members of par-
liament forget what the
preacher read to them from
the word of God when they
stood before God and the
many witnesses when they
were married? Did they take
their vows seriously or was this

ee au NU

RITAGE SECTOR meeting at British Colonial Hilton. From left: Charles

naris, co-chair of Downtown Nassau Partnership; State Minister of Cul-
ture Charles Maynard; Dr Andrew Chin, director of architecture programmes

at FAMU; Dr Keith Simmonds, assistant dean of the College of Arts & Sci-
ences at FAMU; and Dr Keith Tinker, executive director of the Antiquities,

Monuments & Museums Corporation.

A DIGITAL map and three-
dimensional model of Nassau
as well as an electronic database
of historic sites on New Provi-
dence will be created as part of
projects developed with the
assistance of Florida Agricul-
tural and Mechanical Universi-
ty.

Heritage sector representa-
tives met at the British Colonial
Hilton recently to discuss a pro-
posed digital mapping project
for the city of Nassau with offi-
cials from Florida A and M Uni-
versity's School of Architecture.

Participants at the meeting
included representatives from
the College of the Bahamas, the
Downtown Nassau Partnership
and the Antiquties, Monuments
and Museums Corporation, as
well as from several government
agencies and private sector
groups.

Florida Agricultural and
Mechanical University began
life as a training centre for
African-Americans in 1887. It
became a state university in
1953, and today there are more
than 12,000 students on the 420-
acre campus near Tallahassee,
including 58 Bahamians -
many studying architecture.

The university features an
Office of Black Diasporan Cul-
ture whose mission is to foster
tolerance and understanding by
explaining and demonstrating
traditions and folkways that
have their roots in Africa. This
Office sponsors a Bahamian
Junkanoo group (the Rhythm
Rushers) and helps recruit
Caribbean students through a
scholarship programme.

FAMU is also the home to
the respected Black Archives
Research Centre and Museum,
an important national and inter-
national research institution
for African-American stud-
ies. The centre is one of the
largest repositories of African-
American historical and cultur-
al documents.

"We want to provide techni-
cal skills and digital resources
to the AMMC and scholarships
to Bahamian students," accord-
ing to Dr Andrew Chin, director
of architecture programmes at
FAMU. "We are here for feed-
back and discussions."

Among the projects being
developed are the creation of a
digital map and three-dimen-
sional model of the city of Nas-
sau, an electronic database of
historic sites on New Provi-
dence, and digital recreations

of historic buildings that fea-
ture vernacular Bahamian archi-
tecture.

"These projects will be a
source of information for envi-
ronmental impact assessments,
heritage tourism initiatives and
archaeological surveys,” Dr

Chin said. "They will document
traditional architecture that is
in danger of disappearing and
will provide important
resources for planners, tourists
and citizens."

The research and scholarship
partnership being forged
between the AMMC, FAMU
and the College of the Bahamas
will be one of the Corporation's
chief contributions to the rede-
velopment of the city of Nassau,
which is being led by the Down-
town Nassau Partnership.

According to Vaughn
Roberts, managing director of
the DNP, the government has
made strong commitments
towards the revitalisation
of Nassau, including harbour



dredging and reclamation, and
removal of the container port
from the city.

Legislation is also being draft-
ed to create an effective model
of local government for the
downtown area, and laws are
being revised to prevent the
demolition of historic buildings
on purpose or by neglect.

Meanwhile, the AMMC is
working on the restoration of
Centreville House on the for-
mer Collins Estate on Shirley
Street.

The grounds are being devel-
oped into a public park and the
35,000-square-foot building
is expected to become the home
of the National Museum of the
Bahamas.

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just a formality. No institution
created by God or man could
function effectively with two
heads. There can be only one
authoritative figure. Just ask
our Prime Minister who makes
this clear —as inferred by his
statements— as often as he
can. What this proposed legis-
lation is attempting to do is put
the man in an unfavourable
position. Men would now be
afraid to put their foot down
on family issues because when
he goes to bed at night and has
sexual relations with his wife
and if she is a spiteful, conniv-
ing or unscrupulous person,
she could then wake up in the
morning and file a complaint
against her husband just to get
back at him.

Sex between husband and
wife, which God ordained,
then becomes a weapon. The
woman could use her body as a
weapon. If you want this then
you better do this for me or
you better behave in a certain
way. Does the man have the
same right? Absolutely not.
Even though I am not con-
doning such acts. This legisla-
tion if passed would then effec-
tively put the woman in charge
of the home.

Because this weapon is so
powerful this would essential-
ly make the man a puppet in
his own home. It is nothing
short of holding a gun to the
man’s head. That is what I
mean by the woman using her
body as a weapon. After the
man has sex with his wife, what
is there to stop her from telling
him do this or else, do that or
else I will report you. It is not
different from someone hold-



















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ing a gun to my head and
telling me do this or else. It is a
weapon.

If they want to outlaw some-
thing why don’t they outlaw
premarital or un-natural sex,
which does far more harm to a
country than sex between mar-
ried couples? Maybe then we
would have more men thinking
twice and taking responsibili-
ties for their actions rather
than leaving women to raise
children on their own.

If the problem is domestic
violence then deal with that
but the government and the
law has no right to be in a cou-
ple’s bedroom. This is perhaps
the most sacred event in the
lives of husbands and wives
and now the government wants
to threaten it. Many of us got
married so that we could expe-
rience a sexual relationship
with the one we love without
having a guilty conscience. If
this law is passed what incen-
tive is there for many of our
young men to do the right
thing and marry the ones they
love?

T also see this as an excuse to
promote sweethearting
because if his wife decides to
use this weapon against him
then it leaves him with three
choices: 1. Leave her for a
woman who understands the
role of a wife (divorce then
remarry), 2. Find a sweetheart
who is willing to meet his
needs, or 3. Remain in the
home powerless. Which choic-
es do you think he would take?

1. A real man would never
force his wife to have sex — a
real woman would never force
her husband to have sex.

={{e

2. A real man would never
withhold sex from his wife — a
real woman would never with-
hold sex from her husband.

3. His body is not his accord-
ing to the Bible — her body is
not hers according to the Bible.

4. Sex is his obligation — sex
is her obligation.

Last but not least this would
essentially be a double wham-
my against the man. That is, it
would destroy his family,
because it would force him to
sweetheart or look for satis-
faction elsewhere, and when
this happens and the woman
files for a divorce on the
grounds that the man was
sweethearting, the courts
would not consider that it was
the woman who initiated the
whole thing by using her body
as a weapon and depriving her
husband of his rights. This
same man then has to pay
alimony and other expenses,
why because he simply wanted
to have sex with the woman
God gave him to have sex
with.

I urge this entire country to
rise up against this foolishness.
Marriage is the last institution
known to man that he has con-
trol over without the threat of
governmental interference and
now our parliament is threat-
ening to change that. So what
if it is the law in other parts of
the world. Don’t make the
same mistake here?

Many things are laws in
other countries to which we
don’t subscribe, perhaps that
is why those countries are in
the mess they are in.

I challenge anyone who
wants to debate this point.

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



‘If you want a debate, fine — if
you want to lie, get a radio show

By LARRY SMITH

THE headline for this arti-
cle is a recent quote from a
CNN commentator talking
about healthcare reform in
the United States. But it could
just as easily refer to the utter
nonsense circulating about
Arawak Cay in the Bahamas.

The argument in the US
has been fueled by Sarah Pal-
in's charge that President
Obama plans to set up "death
panels" to force euthanasia
on old folks and the disabled.
And at least one Democratic
congressman has received
death threats for his support
of healthcare reform.

Here at home, the conspir-
acy theory marketed by PLP
Senator Jerome Fitzgerald
and his crew of political oper-
atives accuses Deputy Prime
Minister Brent Symonette of
masterminding the white oli-
garchy's plot to secretly enrich
themselves from a port at
Arawak Cay.

In fact, the entire debate
over the multi-million-dollar
road improvements, harbour
dredging, downtown revitali-
sation, future of the shipping
industry, and public disclo-
sure has been hijacked and
reduced to the PLP's racially
divisive 2007 election slogan:
"No turning back".

Tough Call attended a
town meeting at the British
Colonial Hilton last week. It
was designed to discuss the
$100 million roads project, the
$50 million harbour dredging
and $24 million waterfront
reclamation project, and the
projected expansion of the
container port at Arawak
Cay, which is still in limbo.

The meeting was held in
response to increasingly stri-
dent calls for more informa-
tion on these important pro-
jects. Three cabinet ministers
and several top officials made
presentations, and attendance
was no doubt boosted by the
anticipation of political fire-
works.

In fact, it was standing
room only at the Hilton —
which had substituted a small-
er room at the last minute,
according to government offi-
cials. The limited space was
further reduced by stacks of
videotape and projector
equipment from BIS, JCN
and ZNS, and there was even
a cash bar to throw fuel on
the fire.

The ante-room to the
meeting hall was filled with
poster displays and document
handouts. And Ministry of
Works Permanent Secretary
Colin Higgs told participants
they would receive e-mail
responses to questions sub-
mitted in writing, and noted
that DVD's of the presenta-
tion would be available in
short order.

Most of the audience was
content to sit and take in the
presentations by senior offi-
cials from the Ministries of
Works, Tourism and the
Environment. And the more
inquisitive hoped to take part
in the one-hour designated
question-and-answer session
at the end of the presenta-
tions.

But that portion of the
meeting was unfortunately
hijacked by a handful of
politicos and eccentrics who
took up most of the time
making angry sermons, offer-
ing irrelevant comments or
expressing off-the-wall opin-
ions. A small band of heck-
lers jeered the speakers
throughout much of the meet-
ing.

Government officials sat
impassively for the most part,
but at the end, the hecklers
complained bitterly about a
lack of democracy, demand-
ing that more people should

—
NAD

Development Company



be given the opportunity to
ask questions. One woman
sitting behind me sucked her
teeth and remarked porten-
tously, “it ain't gonna be no
silent revolution this time!”

This was a clear reference
to the racially divisive cam-
paign that has been built up
by PLP politicos over the past
several weeks in relation to
the plans to move container
facilities from downtown Nas-
sau to Arawak Cay, where
more than a third of ocean-
going cargo already arrives.

It appears that this plan
has been pushed back some-
what by the government's
requirement for the Arawak
Cay Port Development Com-
pany to produce an environ-
mental impact assessment, an
environmental management
plan and a traffic study before
the port expansion can pro-
ceed. This was contained in a
letter to the developers from
the prime minister, portions
of which were read at the
meeting.

Jimmy Mosko, chairman
of the ACPDC, later told me
the developers were in the
process of arranging these
studies and hoped to start
work on the new port before
the end of the year. This is a
departure from previous
statements, which indicated
the port expansion could pro-
ceed concurrently with the
harbour dredging.

There also appears to be
some divergence between the
government and the develop-
ers over access to the cay. In
other words, will the existing
causeways through the Fish
Fry be used to truck contain-
ers to the inland warehouse
off Gladstone Road, or will a
new causeway or bridge be

Nassau Airport Development Company Limited (NAD) is seeking a
Proponent (individual, consortium or joint venture that includes an
experienced restaurant operator) to finance, design, develop, operate
and manage a 4500 sq. ft. (approximate) sit down restaurant and bar
in the new U.S, Departures Terminal currently under construction at
the Lynden Pindling International Airport. This restaurant will be a
world-class facility with a diverse menu, excellent customer service,
high volume and turnover with a true sense of place.

Mandatory qualifications

|. Proponents must be Bahamian and incorporated in The Bahamas.
il. Proponents must have operated a similar restaurant facility
within the last three (3) years.

NAD’s goals and objectives are to:

(a) achieve a high standard of excellence and customer service;

(b) offer a mix of concepts that will enhance the image of the Lynden
Pindling International Airport as a world class airport;

(c} offer food & beverage choices to passengers at reasonable

prices:

(d) offer a mix of local, regional and national and international
brand-name companies;

(e) develop and design food & beverage facilities that complement
the qualities of the new terminal while recognizing the distinctive
spirit, character and ‘sense of place’ of the Bahamas; and

(| optimize revenue to NAD.



“ There are
already container
facilities at
Arawak Cay and
the new port will
make use of the
existing harbour
channel that has
been dredged
several times over
the past century.”



built to connect to the Saun-
ders Beach/Bethel Avenue
road corridor now under con-
struction?

Despite these gaps — and
the memorandum of under-
standing between the govern-
ment and the developers is
still under negotiation — the
more one learns about the
pros and cons of this project,
the clearer it becomes that
Arawak Cay is the best loca-
tion for a modern shipping
terminal on New Providence
— one that will have a 50-year
lifespan.

There are already contain-
er facilities at Arawak Cay
and the new port will make
use of the existing harbour
channel that has been
dredged several times over
the past century. At 100-plus
acres there is more than
enough land for future expan-
sion; and as an artificial island
the cay can be easily secured.
In addition, the port develop-
ment can piggyback on the
expensive harbour dredging
and road improvements now
underway nearby.

The port will require new
bulkheading on the northern
shore, maintenance dredging
of less than 200,000 cubic
yards of material from the
existing channel, the addition
of two lift cranes onshore, and

some 20 acres of pavement,
plus security fencing occupy-
ing a total land area of about
AQ acres on the existing cay.
Another five acres on the
eastern tip will handle inter-
island ferries, the Mailboat
Company and tour boats.

But there is another angle
to this saga that has not been
discussed. A Canadian mar-
itime consultant concluded in
2007 that the government
should be concerned about
the cost of maritime transport,
"which anecdotal evidence
suggests is today higher than
it would be in a market in
which there was effective
price competition. Govern-
ment participation is impor-
tant to ensure that the new
port...encourages real price
competition among the ship-
ping lines."

According to the consul-
tant — Peter Smith — the
penalty for not moving the
container facilities from
downtown Nassau, apart from
the increasing traffic conges-
tion and conflict with tourism,
would be increasing costs for
the shipping lines, who in the
current non-competitive envi-
ronment would simply pass
these costs on to their cus-
tomers.

And in fact, there is some
indication that one of the rea-
sons for the delay in finalising
a port agreement is a differ-
ence of opinion over the
prospective revenue split
between the government and
the developers. The shippers
want to keep lucrative con-
tainer handling fees for them-
selves while the government
wants all revenue to go into
the same pot and be shared
according to the equity split.

The latest version of the
agreement calls for a 40 per
cent split between the ship-
pers and the government,
with the remaining 20 per
cent offered to the public. But
there has been no discussion
of how this will affect future
access to the Bahamian mar-

ket for possible new entrants
to the shipping industry. The
question of open competition
must be publicly addressed,
and the system of charges for
maritime transport and port
services should be fully trans-
parent.

It is, of course, foolish to
believe that the politicos who
are now manipulating this
debate can ever be satisfied.
But we have no doubt that as
much information as possible
should be put into the public
domain. And in fact, most of
the relevant documents are
already on the BEST Com-
mission website.

As an interesting aside,
one of those documents
describes the origin of the
derelict Customs shed on
Arawak Cay that Bahamians
have complained about for
decades and successive gov-
ernment have simply ignored.

The original plans identi-
fied the building's upper level
as a "passenger hall", and
apparently the prefabricated
building was intended to be
erected on the middle pier at
Prince George Wharf, but was
too wide. So when it arrived
in the 1970s it had to be put
somewhere else.

The Arawak Cay site
meant there was no deep
draft access, so it could not
be used for its intended pur-
pose. For a time it was used as
an office and warehouse for
the Customs Department, but
lack of maintenance created
conditions that led Customs
officers to go on strike.

Eventually, the building
was abandoned and bits and
pieces of Arawak Cay were
leased out for various indus-
trial purposes over the years.
It's time to put this land to
proper use as a modern port
and end the asphyxiation of
downtown Nassau.

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

REQUEST FOR
PROPOSAL

SIT DOWN RESTAURANT & BAR

New U.S. Departures Terminal at LPIA

Interested parties may pick-up the Request for Proposal package at
NAD's offices at the reception desk on the second floor
Domestic/Intemational Terminal at Lynden Pindling International Airport
between the hours of 8:00am and 4:00pm, from August 12th to 24th,
2009. A mandatory pre-proposal briefing will be held in the Arawak
Lounge at the Airport on Wednesday, August 26th at 10:00am.





PAGE 9, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

SPORTS

[AAF WORLD
BERLIN 2009





YOUR CONNECTION@*"TO THE WORLD

im lovin it



ATHLETE

OSBOURNE MOXEY

DATE OF BIRTH: August 27, 1978.

| AGE: 30 years old.

SCHOOL: N/A.

EVENT(S): Men’s long jump.

BEST PERFORMANCE(S): 8.19 metres.

HOBBIES: Watching movies, sailing, reading
and cooking.

EXPECTATIONS: To produce my best performance.
PARENTS: Lesardo and Malvease Moxey.

ADRIAN GRIFFITH

DATE OF BIRTH: November 11, 1984.

AGE: 24-years-old.

SCHOOL: CC Sweeting Sr. and Dickinson State
University.

EVENT(S): 100/200 metres.

BEST PERFORMANCE(S): 10.23 and 21.03
seconds.

HOBBIES: Volleyball, cars, softball, dining.

EXPECTATIONS: To perform to the best of my abil-
ity, make myself, my country, my coach and my family
proud. Make if to the final and run a personal best
time.

PARENTS: Sherry Anne and Adrian Griffith.

rn

RAMON MILLER

DATE OF BIRTH: February 17, 1987.
AGE: 22 years-old.

SCHOOL: CR Walker Secondary High/Dickinson
State University.

EVENT(S): 400 metres/1600 metre relay.
BEST PERFORMANCE(S): 45.35 seconds.
HOBBIES: Junkanoo.

EXPECTATIONS: To make the final and accomplish
a new personal record.

PARENTS: Clarice Knowles.

JERNISE SAUNDERS

DATE OF BIRTH: July 16, 1986.
AGE: 23-years-old.

SCHOOL: CI Gibson Secondary High/Portland State
University.

EVENT(S): 100/200 metres.

BEST PERFORMANCE(S): 11.6 and 23.7
seconds.

HOBBIES: Singing and listening to music.
EXPECTATIONS: To execute.
PARENTS: Ruby and John Saunders.

KATRINA SEYMOUR.

DATE OF BIRTH: January 7, 1993.

AGE: 16-years-old.

SCHOOL: (I Gibson Secondary High.
EVENT(S): 200/400 metees.

BEST PERFORMANCE(S): 54.17 seconds.
HOBBIES: Dancing and swimming.
EXPECTATIONS: To he the best that | can be.
PARENTS: Bernadette Bodie-Miller.

NATHANIEL MCKINNEY

DATE OF BIRTH: January 19, 1982.
AGE: 27-years-old.

SCHOOL: CR Walker Secondary High/St. Augustine's
College North Carolina.

EVENT(S): 200/400 metres.

BEST PERFORMANCE(S): 200 - 20.6 seconds
and 400 - 45.6 seconds.

HOBBIES: Horseback riding and motivational
speaking.

EXPECTATIONS: Always to win.
PARENTS: Sherry Ann Woods and Anthony McKinney.





Tae TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009, PAGE 10



LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

WORLD CUP QUALIFYING

Ballack boosts German hopes

By ROBERT MILLWARD
AP Soccer Writer

The season has barely started and
Michael Ballack already has flattened
an opponent, angered Manchester Unit-
ed manager Alex Ferguson and picked
up a first winner’s medal.

That is good news for Germany as it
resumes its World Cup qualifying cam-
paign Wednesday at Azerbaijan. Its cap-
tain appears to be over a lingering toe
injury and back to his skillful and aggres-
sive best.

Although the Premier League doesn’t
start until Saturday, the Chelsea mid-
fielder has a very competitive game
behind him — he blatantly blocked
defender Patrice Evra before Chelsea’s
second goal in last weekend’s Commu-
nity Shield victory over Manchester
United. Germany (5-0-1) will be trying

to open a four-point advantage over sec-
ond-place Russia (5-1) in Group Four.

“We have to win the game so that we
can defend our good position in the
group,” Germany coach Joachim Loew
said.

Evra arrived a little bruised at
France’s training camp ahead of
Wednesday’s Group Seven qualifier
against the Faeroe Islands in Torshavn.

“Be true to yourselves, be worthy of
the French team shirt. Anything other
than a win would be a catastrophe,”
France coach Raymond Domenech said
in a message to his stars.

France (3-1-1) is eight points behind
first-place Serbia (6-1) but has played
two were games. “If we can’t beat the
Faeroe Islands then we have no right to
be at the World Cup,” French forward
Nicolas Anelka said.

In another of the five European qual-

ifiers Wednesday, Croatia (3-1-2) goes to
Belarus (3-2) with both teams seeming-
ly competing for second in Group Six
behind England (7-0), which would
clinch with a victory at home against
Croatia on Sept. 9.

The nine European group winners
qualify, and the top eight second-place
nations advance to playoffs.

Angered

England’s national team angered
some Premier League managers by
scheduling an exhibition game at the
Netherlands, which already has clinched
first place in Group 9.

Liverpool captain Steven Gerrard
withdrew from the match because of a
slight groin injury. David Beckham has
flown in from the Los Angeles Galaxy,

however, hoping to stretch his national
team appearances to 113, 12 short of
goalkeeper Peter Shilton’s record.

In qualifiers in North and Central
America and the Caribbean, the United
States (3-1-1) seeks its first win at Mex-
ico (2-3), El Salvador (1-2-2) is at
Trinidad and Tobago (0-3-2) and first-
place Costa Rica (4-1) is at Honduras (2-
2-1). The top three nations qualify, and
No. 4 faces South America’s fifth-place
team in a playoff.

Cristiano Ronaldo will miss Portu-
gal’s exhibition against Liechtenstein
because of flu. With his team struggling,
Argentina coach Diego Maradona is in
Moscow to face Guus Hiddink’s Rus-
sia.

In other exhibitions, European cham-
pion Spain is at Macedonia, World Cup
champion Italy at Switzerland and South
American champion Brazil at Estonia.

NSE CRS TTT CI]



AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Paul Chiasson

ANDY MURRAY from Great Britain, reacts during his match against Jeremy Chardy from France, dur-
ing second round of play at the Rogers Cup tennis tournament, Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2009 in Montreal.

Murray won 6-4, 6-2.

US returns
to altitude
of Azteca

By RONALD BLUM
AP Sports Writer

Landon Donovan knows just
how much visitors struggle in
the altitude and pollution of
Azteca Stadium. Like a lot of
US. players, he’s familiar with
the shortness of breath and the
sting of losing there.

“Tf you walk around in Mex-
ico City for a few minutes,
you'll be tired,” the American
forward said. “There’s very real
issues there.”

Winless in Mexico since it
first started playing there in
1937, the U.S. soccer team
returns to 105,000-seat Azteca
on Wednesday when qualify-
ing for next year’s World Cup
resumes.

With some players coming
off European club openers last
weekend and others looking
ahead to the first weekend of
England’s Premier League,
U.S. players weren’t given
much time to acclimatize to the
7,200-foot altitude. Players from
Major League Soccer and
Europe gathered in Miami,
then traveled to Mexico on
Tuesday.

“We have worked for a long
time with different people, dif-
ferent experts, on altitude train-
ing, including many from the
U.S. Olympic Committee,”
U.S. coach Bob Bradley said
Monday. “The research we
have stuck with is one that says
if you don’t have enough time
to acclimatize, which can take
10 days or so, then going in late

is your best bet.”

The USS. is 0-22-1 in Mexi-
co, including 0-18-1 in Mexico
City. The Americans gained a
0-0 tie at Azteca in a 1997 qual-
ifier, playing the final 58 min-
utes short-handed after defend-
er Jeff Agoos was ejected for
elbowing Pavel Pardo in the
neck — after Pardo had hit
Agoos in the back.

In two qualifiers at Azteca
under coach Bruce Arena, the
Americans lost 1-0 in 2001 and
2-1 four years later.

“The sightlines are real diffi-
cult for players,” Arena said.
“The field looks like you’re out
in the country, and then you
start dealing with the heat and
the altitude, and it gets to your
head. And it’s not only your
head — the physiology, it’s dif-
ficult. It’s very difficult. And I
remember games where, you
know, we’ve had oxygen at
halftime.”

Seeking its sixth straight
World Cup appearance, the
USS. is in good shape halfway
through the final round of
North and Central American
and Caribbean qualifying and
likely would advance by win-
ning its two remaining home
games: against El Salvador on
Sept. 5 at Sandy, Utah, and vs.
Costa Rica on Oct. 14 at Wash-
ington, D.C.

Costa Rica is first with 12
points, followed by the United
States (3-1-1) with 10, Hon-
duras (2-2-1) with seven, Mex-
ico (2-3) with six, El Salvador

(1-2-2) with five and Trinidad
and Tobago (0-3-2) with two.
The top three nations qualify,
and the No. 4 team goes to a
playoff against the No. 5 nation
from South America.

Mexico has played just two
home matches and is feeling
intense pressure to win
Wednesday. Even though it’s a
midweek game, Mexico sched-
uled it for a4 p.m. EDT start —
increasing the heat that U.S.
players may find difficult when
combined with the altitude and
pollution.

“We have to take advantage
of all those factors,” Mexican
goalkeeper Guillermo Ochoa
said.

The rivalry has been almost
equally lopsided — the other
way — on USS. soil. Mexico had
been 0-9-2 against the Ameri-
cans in the United States since
March 1999 before winning 5-0
last month in the final of the
CONCACAF Gold Cup at
Giants Stadium. But just one
USS. regular was in the lineup
for that one, and Mexico also
went mostly with backups.

When the teams met in Feb-
ruary in a qualifier at Colum-
bus, Ohio, the United States
won 2-0. But the Americans
have struggled on the road,
tying 2-2 at El Salvador and los-
ing 3-1 in Costa Rica.

“We're confident that we can
play with any team in the
world,” Donovan said. “And
it’s no longer good enough to
hope for a point on the road.”

MONTREAL

Roger Federer, playing for the first time since winning Wim-
bledon, returned to the court with a 7-6 (3), 6-4 win over Canada's
Frederic Niemeyer at the Rogers Cup on Tuesday night, according

to Associated Press.

Federer, who took time off while his wife gave birth to twin girls,
took a set to find his range and then the top-ranked Swiss star put

away the low-ranked Niemeyer.

The 33-year-old Niemeyer, whose ranking has tumbled to 487th,
plans to retire at the end of this season. He had a double-fault in
the first set tiebreaker, and then lost his serve at 3-3 in the second
set and Federer served out the match.

Earlier in the day, Andy Murray — also playing his first match
since Wimbledon — beat France's Jeremy Chardy 6-4, 6-2. Murray
lost to Andy Roddick in the semifinals at Wimbledon, but he was
in control from the start against Chardy.

"I feel better, now I've got through the first one, because you lose
your rhythm a bit,” said the third-seeded Murray. "I didn't really
have more than six or seven days off without playing a match for

a long time.”

Murray is off to the best start of his career with a 46-7 record,
winning four tournaments this year.

Overtake

With Rafael Nadal struggling on sore knees, Murray can over-
take the Spaniard for the No. 2 ranking if he wins the tourna-
ment. Murray also could attain No. 2 if he reaches the final and

Nadal loses in the semifinals.

"I've been asked about it a lot so, it's impossible not to think
about it. But when I'm playing my match, it's the furthest thing
from my mind," Murray said the rankings.

Nadal was to play a doubles match on Tuesday. He's scheduled
to play singles on Wednesday, the first since he lost in the fourth
round of the French Open and withdrew from Wimbledon because

of tendinitis in his knees.

Murray will face the winner of a match between Juan Carlos Fer-
rero of Spain and 13th-seeded Gael Monfils of France. Ferrero
advanced by defeating Lleyton Hewitt 6-1, 64 in a match of former
No. 1 players. The 29-year-old Spaniard improved to 4-6 in career
matches against Hewitt. Ferrero needed to get through two qual-
ifying matches to play in the tournament.

Last year, the 28-year-old Hewitt missed the Rogers Cup because
of hip surgery. Fourth-ranked Novak Djokovic of Serbia trailed 3-
0 in the first set before rallying for a 6-4, 7-6 (6) victory over
Canadian Peter Polansky. In other first round matches, Tommy
Robredo of Spain defeated American Alex Bogomolov 6-4, 6-2,
and Victor Hanescu of Romania beat Jurgen Melzer of Austria 6-
4, 6-3. Qualifier John Isner defeated fellow American Jesse Levine

6-3, 6-4.





EVERTON FC
goalkeeper
Tim Howard
listens to a
question dur-
ing a press
conference in
Park City,
Utah, Mon-
day, July 27,
2009.

AP Photo/George Frey

EVERTON FC GOALIE Tim Howard stops a shot on goal to win the
game in a shootout against MSL All Star's in the second half of the
MLS All Star game in Sandy, Utah, Wednesday, July 29, 2009. Ever-
ton beat the All Stars 6-5 in a shootout.

With a victory, the US.
might put itself in position to
clinch in September, meaning
players wouldn’t have to return
from Europe again in October.
And, these players would
become the first Americans to

win at Azteca. “It would be
special, no question,” goal-
keeper Tim Howard said. “We
know the history. We’re well
aware of it, which makes the
challenge that much more spe-
cial.”

Bahamas
takes first
place at ICC

tournament
FROM page 11

Brown was the team’s top
scorer in each of the match-
es with an aggregate score
of 162 runs.

He netted 31 runs, not
out, in the opener against
Cayman Islands, 44 runs, not
out, in the first match
against Belize and 37 runs
in the second match versus
Cayman. Brown has had a
recent string of stellar
national team performances,
beginning with his play as a
member of the Bahamas’
under 19 team which battled
Canada and the United
States last month.

Bahamas Cricket Associ-
ation representative, Paul
Thompson, said This is the
first time the Bahamas
Cricket Association will be
hosting such an event and
the they have pledged that it
will be hosted properly.

“dt is so important for the
Bahamas and for the local
Cricket community to have
a tournament of this stature
to be hosted here in the
Bahamas. It is something
that has not been really
receiving much attention but
it is a monumental step for
the game and our regional
status,” he said.

The tournament is of a
developmental nature as it
filters under 15 players into
the under 19 program.

“It is amazing what these
young men are achieving
thus far and the perfor-
mance that they had today is
indicative of the work put
through by the development
program” he said, “.”

ICC Americas awarded
the hosting of the tourna-
ment to the Bahamas as the
top affiliate in the Americas
after showing progress with
an under 15, under 19 and
Senior National Team.

Cayman Islands are an
associate country and the
Bahamas and Belize are
affiliates. There are three
tiers in the ICC, test play-
ing countries, of which there
are ten, 35 associates and 59
affiliates. The Bahamas par-
ticipated in the last tourna-
ment in Bermuda in 2007
where it placed last against
associate countries.

This year, because of sev-
eral affiliate countries being
able to produce under 15
teams, ICC Americas has
divided the region into three
divisions, Northern, Central
and Southern.

In the Northern Division
we have Canada, Bermuda
and the United States, all
associate countries.

In the Central Division:
Bahamas, Belize and Cay-
man Islands and in the
Southern: Argentina, Brazil,
Chile and Surinam. As this
is anew format there will be
no progress to the Northern
Division this year but it will
happen in 2011.

24 trophies

FROM page 11

Additional and medal
placement

Shawn ‘Vicious’ Smith

1st place Trophy Men —
Forms/ Kata

1st place Trophy Men
Combined Beginners & Inter-
mediate - Weapons Forms/
Kata

2nd place Trophy Men
Intermediate — Point Fight-
ing/Kumite

2nd place Trophy Men &
Women combined — Self
Defense

Additional 4th place and
medal placement

Quon ‘Quarter’ White

1st place Trophy Men -
Point Fighting/Kumite

Additional 4th place and
medal placement

Romaine ‘BA’ Leslie

3rd place Trophy Men -
Point Fighting/Kumite

1st place Trophy Men
Beginners — Forms/ Kata

Additional medal placement

Sensei Julian Rolle

1st in Advance - Point
Fighting/Kumite

1st in Advance - Forms/
Kata



SECTION

THE TRIBUNE



rt

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12,





2009

For the best sporting action . . .

WWW. * me?4?. C

sports

TRACK AND FIELD

The Baltamas Association of Athletic
Associations mourns loss ot Jerry Wisdom

The BAAA would like to publicly extend
heartfelt condolence to the family of the late
Gerald ‘Jerry’ Wisdom (pictured), who passed
away on Saturday August the 8th.

The Bahamas has lost a great Bahamian and
the sport of track and field

has lost one of its biggest fans, supporters, and
historian.

Jerry is a former Olympian and BAAA execu-
tive member and we know that

with the IAAF Championships just days away,
he would have been keenly

in tune with how The Bahamian athletes were
doing in Berlin, Germany

and right there routing for his beloved
Bahamas with the rest of the

country.

To his family we mourn with you in your loss.
We will keep you in our prayer.

-Kermit Taylor, BAAA Public Relations Offi-
cer

SOCCER

The College of The Bahamas Women's Soccer
Team will host the John Brown University wom-
en's team Saturday August 15th at 6:00 p.m. at
the Thomas Robinson Stadium (TAR).



The Bahamas Cycling Association will host its
National Cycling Time Trial Championships this Sat-
urday, 22nd of August, 2009.

The Senior cyclists will cover 15 miles of western
portion of the island while Juniors, Open Women and
Novices will cover seven miles of western portion of
the island.

Route for Seniors will be as follows:

Start and finish at Mount Pleasant Park in Mount
Pleasant Lyford Cay. Head west along the southwest
road, take left onto South Ocean blvd., left on the new
road (the road that runs along the Albany project,
travel that road to the end or t-junction, turn around at
the t-junction, back along the new road again, take a
let turn onto south ocean blvd. again, travel along
south ocean blvd. passing the brewery, B.E.C, Clifton
Heritage national park in Clifton pier, cyclist will trav-
el on the south west road again taking them back to
the start/finish line at Mt. Pleasant park in Mt. pleas-
ant.

Route for Juniors, Open women, Novice male-
female:

Start at Mt. Pleasant Park, head to south ocean
blvd., take a left onto the south ocean blvd., take
South Ocean blvd., all the way to Clifton Pier, past
Clifton Heritage site, come onto south-west road end-
ing at the start/finish location.

Registration will take place, Wednesday 19th August
at the National Cycling Track 6pm-7:30pm and Friday
21st, August at the Race Site in Mount Pleasant 6pm-
7:20pm



CRICKET




O——-.:

Tht UNDErCATED





by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

historic and overall
impressive perfor-
mance for the
Bahamas in the first
tournament of its kind hosted locally



and sanctioned by cricket’s interna-
tional governing body.

The Bahamas captured first place in
the International Cricket Council
(ICC) Americas Under 15 cricket tour-
nament, capping an undefeated run
with a win over Belize Monday at
Haynes Oval.

The Bahamas in their turn at bat
scored 118 runs for the loss of one

Impressive Bahamas takes first place at
ICC Americas U15 cricket tournament

Team caps winning run with crushing
victory over Belize at Haynes Oval

wicket, while Belize managed just 117
runs. Turan “Geronimo” Brown was
the top scorer for the Bahamas with a
total of 52 runs, not out and Ashmeid
Allie chipped in with 21 runs, not out.

The Bahamas won a total of four
matches defeating both Belize and the
Cayman Islands twice.

SEE page 10

GOLF: NEW SLATE OF OFFICERS ELECTED

THE BAHAMAS
Professional
Golfers Associa-
| tion recently
elected a new
slate of officers.
The picture
shows the
results of the
latest Bahamas
Professional

| Golfers Associa-
| tion election.
From the left is
Chris Lewis
(President),
Keno Turnquest
( Secretary),
Lemon Gorospe
(Vice President),
Tony Robinson,
Marcus Pratt
(Treasurer),
Alex Gibson.

PHOTO:
Keno
Turnquest



ABACO ACADEMY’S OPEN TOURNAMENT
‘Society of Shotokan Stylists’ team win 24 trophies

A team of eight (8) from the ‘Soci-
ety of Shotokan Stylists, participated
in the Abaco Academy’s Open Tour-
nament this weekend, where they
placed & won twenty-four (24) tro-
phies and six (6) medals.

The delegation, headed by Master
Brian Beckford & Sensei Julian
Rolle, consisted of team members
Rudell ‘Rude Awakening’ Capron,
Shawn ‘Vicious’ Smith, Desmond ‘K-
9’ Pinder, Quon ‘Quarter’ White and
Romaine ‘BA’ Leslie and team coor-
dinator Ginea Wilson.

The one (1) day event hosted by
Chief Instructor Sensei Toote of the
Abaco Karate Academy was held in
Marsh Harbour Abaco at the
Methodist Hall. Participants from
Abaco, Nassau and Surinam came
for the annual event. The four (4)
contested divisions were Self
Defense, Weapons, point fighting
and forms.

Rudell ‘Rude Awakening’ Capron
1st place Trophy Men & Women com-
bined - Self defense

1st place Trophy Women - Point
Fighting/Kumite
2nd place in Women - Forms/ Kata

Desmond ‘K-9’ Pinder

1st place Trophy Men - Point Fight-
ing/Kumite

2nd place Trophy Men — Weapons
Forms/ Kata

3rd place Trophy Men — Forms/ Kata

3rd place Trophy Men & Women com-
bined — Self Defense

SEE page 10



PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

Mrs Maynard-Gibson
stressed that all cases of rape
must be condemned and pun-
ished whenever and wherever it
occurs.

She said she is still in favour
of the courts having the pun-
ishment option of flogging in
rape cases.

“In the mid-1980s I joined
Janet Bostwick in organising
‘The March Against Rape’—
then one of the largest marches
ever in the Bahamas. At that
time rape figures varied
between 121 in 1980; 92 in 1981;
83 in 1982; 93 in 1983 and 84 in
1984.

“Rightly so, citizens then
had had enough. We all felt
that rape incidents were far too
many, though less than they are
now. We wanted the punish-
ment of the cat o’ nine tails for
rape. I still feel that it should be
open to the courts to order the
sentence of flogging for rape,”
she said.

Those who passed and
amended the (Sexual Offences)
Bill — which came after a great
deal of lobbying — recognised
that the entire matter was sen-
sitive.”

Mrs Maynard-Gibson also
said that the existing Act recog-
nises and condemmns forced sex-
ual relations with a spouse, and
added that the proposed
amendment, which was intro-
duced in parliament by the
FNM last month, should be
withdrawn pending wide con-
sultation about domestic vio-
lence, including rape in a mar-
riage. And this consultation
should take place outside of the
political arena, she said.



Rape figures

“T believe that in certain cir-
cumstances Bahamians would
without hesitation say that a
man raped his wife: Tying her
up to have sex; breaking into
her mother’s house where she
is staying (they not being legal-
ly separated) to have sex; dop-
ing or drugging her to have sex;
threatening her at gunpoint to
have sex; beating her to have
sex.

“If my premise is correct,
Bahamians today do believe
that a man can rape his wife,”
the senator said.

However, she said, concerns
arise with the issue in the
tremendous grey areas that
inevitably exist in the context of
a matriage.

“Was the wife really saying
‘no’; was the husband forcing
his wife or was he trying to con-
vince his wife; what is the wife’s
motive for making the allega-
tion of rape against her hus-
band; what about the children;
who will support the family,
including emotionally and
financially, if the husband is
sent to jail?” the senator said.

“T believe that there are
many problems with this
amendment, including:

We do not know why it was
brought at this time. What per-
centage of the rape statistics
represents rape in a marriage?
There was no wide consulta-
tion before it was brought. It
was brought in such a manner
as to possibly create a political
football and to cause unneces-
sary strife in marriages and in
society, especially between men
and women.”

FROM page one

corruption and a policy of secrecy.

The lawyer who helped bring Crime
Stoppers to the Bahamas in 1998 said she is
on the brink of publicly denouncing the
charity until police show they are able to
perform their proper function.

And she criticised Assistant Police Com-
missioner Raymond Gibson for remaining
tight-lipped about a series of rapes and
attempted rapes in eastern New Provi-
dence, She said that by hiding the details
police make women more vulnerable.

Mrs Broughton said: “It is wholly unac-
ceptable not to notify the public through
the media. Why do I have to wait to meet a
police officer in the street to tell me to be
careful when I am a woman living in the
east with a 17-year-old daughter? Is it for
the tourists?

“Tf there are three rapes carried out, why
can’t they say ‘be on your guard’? They
want to hold out in the name of the inves-
tigation and leave women exposed and at
risk because it’s a procedure? It’s a dis-
grace.”

She further blamed the force for cor-
ruption which allows brazen criminals to
carry on undeterred and said she has been
driven to denounce the police and Crime
Stoppers until she can see the police “actu-

FROM pageone Police still puzzled

custody, but we're looking at

Police slammed

ally functioning.”

“They can’t keep you safe, and they
don’t even have the decency to warn you
when they are not sure you are safe, so
what is their function?” Mrs Broughton
asked.

“All I ask for is the same simple protec-
tion everyone is entitled to, it’s a basic
human right and if you can’t give me safe-
ty, tell me when I need to take extra care;
when I need to buy my own gun.”

Mrs Broughton left Crime Stoppers in
2001, but spoke out for the charity once
again when Welsh banker Hywell Jones,
55, was shot in the head outside his Bri-
tannia Investment Group office in West
Bay Street on April 22, and died in hospital
on May 8.

However, she has since become incensed
with the handling of the murder investiga-
tion which has so far failed to lead to any
arrests.

Mr Jones’ brother Ilt Jones maintains
his brother had made but one enemy during
his 21 years in the Bahamas, but police
have not yet named any suspects.

Mrs Broughton said: “Tt just incenses me
that all this time has passed by and nothing
has been done.

“Crime begets crime, and if people just
fumble along it will continue. Someone
needs to say something for once and I don’t
know how many murders have to happen,
how many people have to be raped, but
until my children are safe, I will take the
brunt of becoming a target because I put
my name in the paper.”

Police Commissioner Reginald Fergu-
son said: “As long as I have something to
do with this police force and responsibility
for investigating a crime in this country,
wherever evidence exists to move against
someone for criminality I will be doing
that.”

However Mr Ferguson failed to provide
any further details of the two rapes and
two attempted rapes in eastern New Prov-
idence.

He said: “(Mrs Broughton) has a legiti-
mate concern, but we don’t want to create
any unnecessary excitement and I told her
about this thing in the east... Investigators
are saying there is some trend but to say
there’s a serial rapist out there would be
kind of far-fetched at this time.

“T think we want to always be concerned
about what’s happening in our environ-
ment we want to always be on the alert.
And people are being alerted without being
specific, that’s the approach we have always
had. We can’t hide crime, that’s a reality.”

all possibilities. . . (but) this got
all of us puzzled,” admitted the
senior officer, who was not
authorised to comment on the
case.

Police are also looking into
whether the victim was the tar-
get of a contracted hit-man.

"We leave that open until we
determine otherwise," said the
officer.

The nature of the killing also
prompted public concerns that

TOBE NACL TS Se UT















































FROM page one

theft in the past, but Commissioner of Police
Reginald Ferguson could not confirm this yes-

terday.

Meanwhile, autopsies are expected to deter-
mine the official cause of death for two men.
Police do not know if they died from the impact
of the crash or whether they were burned in the

fire.

Investigators in Jamaica are also probing
whether a shoot-out which happened hours
after the crash was connected to the busted

drug deal.

Officials believe the crashed plane, which
was registered in the United States, may have
been stolen from the Bahamas — the same one
stolen from a North Eleuthera airport around 9

am on August 3.

Mr Llewellyn added that two more men,
believed to be the accomplices of the dead

men, were recently arrested in the Bahamas
in connection with the plane theft.
"We've been told that two Bahamians were

taken into custody for being complicit in the
(theft) of the aircraft," he said.

However, senior police officers at home said

they were not aware of any such arrests.
Abner Pinder, administrator of Spanish

Wells, said at the time of the theft from the

North Eleuthera airport, fuel was siphoned

from several other planes.

A police officer is supposed to be stationed at
the site he said, however the culprits were able
to tamper with the aircraft and make good
their escape.

"There's supposed to be a police presence
there. . It’s an international airport and as such
it's supposed to have a 24-hour presence,” he
said yesterday.

Attempts to reach contractor Terry Higgs,

who owned the plane believed to have been
stolen for the drug run, have been unsuccessful.

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ros

the shooter may have been part
of a gang initiation, looking for
arandom kill.

Yesterday another high-
ranking police officer who did
not want to be identified said
there was no evidence to sub-
stantiate this fear.

Reports reaching The Tri-
bune indicate that a cell phone,
believed to be the gunman’s,
was seized at the crime scene
but this was dismissed by a
police officer yesterday.

"We don't know where that
rumour came from, only foren-
sic evidence was recovered,
nothing physical that we know
about," said the first officer.

Meanwhile police are still
appealing to the public to come
forward with information that
could lead to the gunman’s cap-
ture.

"We are trying to have per-
sons who would have seen the

FROM page one

suspect to make that known to
us, who can give us a composite
(sketch)," the police source
added.

The gunman, described as a
slim, dark male about 5'9" is
believed to have fled on foot.

According to a family fried,
Tagia had just pulled up to her
mother's house with her two
younger sisters and young sons
after a day at the mall.

The two girls and Tagia's
eldest son went to knock on
their grandmother's front door
as the victim stayed behind to
breast-feed her three-month-
old son.

At some point, a gunman
approached her and shot her in
the left arm. The bullet report-
edly punctured her lungs or
heart.

In an attempt to escape her
attacker, Tagia sped off only to
rear-end a parked car and crash

TAGIA SOLES-ARMONY



into two other parked cars
before coming to a stop.

The Tribune understands
persons coming to inspect the
commotion scared the gunman
away. When police arrived on
the scene, the victim was
already dead.

Tagia, who was living in St
Kitts with her husband, had just
arrived in Nassau to visit her
family after years of living
abroad to visit her family.

court is,” lawyer Keod Smith told reporters yes-

terday. According to Mr Smith, who is repre-
senting BHCAWU First Vice president Kirk
Wilson and his team, new elections must now
be held within 60 days of Justice Isaacs’ ruling,
which was handed down on July 31.

In the 35-page judgment, Justice Isaacs had
declared that the union’s elections held on May
28 were “null and void.” Mr Wilson and his team
had filed an application to have the process
reviewed; contending that the setting of both the
nomination and election dates circumvented the
union's constitution. Ms Martin, the first woman
president in the unions almost 51-year history,
won the presidency in a landslide victory.

“The court has denied the application made by
Ms Martin to stay the proceedings or the execu-
tion of its order pending an appeal and it has
denied a similar application by the Attorney
General for the Registrar of Trade Unions to
do the same. “It has made it very clear that Ms
Martin and those persons who would have been
elected on her team and any other who would be
preventing the existing executive council from
doing its task, to refrain from doing so,” Mr
Smith said. Mr Smith said that members of the
union’s previous executive council will resume

FROM page one

after taking the male enhance-
ment pill Viagra. Pratt denied
that she had intended to kill
Carey.

their posts.

Martin said.

Mother sentenced

Pratt, who was dressed in a
pink outfit, remained silent
while Senior Justice Allen

IN THE ESTATE OF ELIZABETH BROOKS
late of #83 Alexander Boulevard in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence,

Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons having any claim or demand against
the said estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the undersigned
on or before the 26th day of August, A.D.
2009, after which date the Administrator will

proceed to distribute the estate having regard

only to the claims of which he shall have

had notice.
AND notice is hereby given that all

persons indebted to the estate are required

to make full settlement on or before the date

hereinabove mentioned.

Dated the 12th day of August, A.D. 2009

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Attorneys for the Administrator
9 Rusty Bethel Drive
Nassau, Bahamas



Mr Wilson told reporters, “The law is the law
and that’s all we were doing, following the law
and the outcome as we expected, it is what it is.”

Ms Martin’s attorney Damian Gomez told
the court that decision has no impact on the
notice of appeal filed on behalf of his client.

“We have also been informed that the Attor-
ney General’s Office is in the process of filing an
appeal on behalf of the Registrar, and the appeal
court will eventually have a hearing and we will
abide by whatever decision the Court of Appeal
makes,” he said.

Amidst supporters who periodically chanted,
“No retreat, no surrender,” Ms Martin told
reporters that she was disappointed by the out-
come yesterday, but remains encouraged.

“[’m disappointed, but I am also relieved
that we will have the opportunity to do it the
way Wilson and those want us to do it. We were
not given an election we won an election. The
people are poised and ready to do it again. As we
campaigned before we will campaign even more
so now because this shows how important it is to
have the right people in your organisation,” Ms

handed down her sentence.
Outside the courtroom, Ter-
rence Carey, a brother of the
deceased, told reporters that he
thought Pratt should have had a
lengthier prison sentence.

“T think she should get more
years. The judge said she had to
sleep on it, so I know her mind
was going to change.” Carey
said that his brother was the
closest to their mother who is
also deceased. He said that his
death would have been diffi-
cult for her to handle. “My sis-
ter is taking it very hard
because she really didn’t like it
at all. She doesn’t know why
she only got 10 years,” he said.

Before handing down the
sentence yesterday, Senior Jus-
tice Allen noted that
manslaughter is a serious
offence that carries a maximum
penalty of life imprisonment
although a judge can exercise
her discretion. Senior Justice
Allen said that the sentence
should reflect the position of
the court and noted that homi-
cide is far too prevalent in the
Bahamas. The judge said she
had taken into account all of
the aggravating and mitigating
factors in the case having noted
that the offence took place in a
domestic situation. She also
said that the ill health of the
accused may be a matter for
the prerogative of mercy com-
mittee. The year that Pratt has
spent on remand has been tak-
en into account.

“T was hoping for something
much less bearing in mind all
of the circumstances, it was
about a domestic situation gone
wrong,” Pratt’s attorney
Romona Farquharson told
reporters yesterday. Ms Far-
quharson said she offered her
client words of encouragement
after the sentence was handed
down noting that the proceed-
ings have taken a toll on Pratt
who has been on suicide watch.
Ms Farquharson said she will
have to get instructions from
her client as to whether the sen-
tence will be appealed.





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY,

AUGUST

usiness

2 2 0-0°9

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Central Bank report:
could see turnaroun

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunebusiness.net

ocal financial experts

and a Central Bank

report believe the

Bahamian economy

could see a turnaround
in the beginning months of 2010, as
the US markets bottom-up, save the
housing market which is facing mar-
ginal recovery.

Kenn Kerr of Providence Advi-
sors told Tribune Business the rea-
sonable degree of recovery occur-
ring world wide bodes well for the
Bahamas economy which relies on
tourism as its top dollar earner.

And the monthly 3.6 per cent

increase in hous-
ing starts and com-
pletions in the US
housing market in
2009, according to
the Central Bank's
monthly econom-
ic and financial
developments
report for June, is
a good sign of sta-
ble recovery of
assets. KERR

According to
him, the 'muted recovery’ in the US
is a positive sign for the region,
despite the slow turnaround in the
tourism sector.

He said in the US market, the
recovery has been too slow to quell



the high unemployment figures,
which could be a product of the
leisurely recovering housing mar-
ket.

The collapse of the housing mar-
ket in the US is thought to have been
the catalyst for the global economic
downturn.

Mr Kerr said if the measured
recovery in the US continues then
"you probably wont have deep
recovery.”

Of course, he added, that if travel
outside of US borders increases, the
Bahamas could see a substantial
increase in visitor numbers and con-
sequently an increase in economic
stability vis-a-vis the hospitality sec-
tor in the Bahamas.

"T suspect that by the first or sec-

ond quarter of 2010 there will be
vast improvements in the economy if
the muted recovery keeps advancing
in the US," said Mr Kerr.

According to the Central Bank
report: "Indicators suggest that the
global economy remained moribund
over the first half of the year; how-
ever, in recent months, modest signs
of a flattening in the economic
downturn emerged, buoyed by the
aggressive “stimulus” from mone-
tary and fiscal packages, improved
consumer confidence indicators and
corporate sector cost cutting mea-
sures, which supported stock mar-
ket gains."

The report added that the major-
ity of Bahamian firms indicated they
had to reduced staffing levels within

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Econom
d in 2010

the past six months, with "more
than four-fifths signaling either no
anticipated change or likely further
reductionsin the months ahead."

Furthermore, the Central Bank
asserted that foreclosure filings
surged by nine per cent.

"Buttressed by a surge in credit
to Government, domestic foreign
currency credit expanded by
$113.4million, a reversal from the
$54.6million net repayment recorded
during 2008," the report continued.

"Net claims on the Government
rebounded by $159.5million, from a
$20.3million decrease a year earli-
er, on account of an increase in
short-term advances. In contrast,
claims on the rest of the public sector
fell by $45.4million."

Surveys will be performed by company
contracted to dredge Nassau harbour

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunebusiness.net

TOPOGRAPHICAL and
photographic surveys will be
performed by the company
contracted to carry out the
dredging of Nassau harbour
for the post dredging restora-
tion of the the areas sur-
rounding the excavation sites,
according to the Boskalis'’
Environment Management
Plan (EMP), as vehement dis-
sent to the project persists.

The EMP, drawn up by
dredging company Boskalis
and which will be a constant-
ly amended document, will
follow the environmental
impact mitigation plan.

According to the docu-
ment: "The EMP is also an
umbrella document in which
all other environmental pro-
tection documents are evalu-
ated and communicated."

These documents include
the Environmental spill
response plan, the Environ-
mental Impact Assessment
(EIA) for the Storage and use
of dredged material for Nas-
sau Harbour Port Improve-
ment Project and the EJA for
the Nassau Harbour Port
Improvement Project.

Government ministers have
recently not been clear on cer-
tain guidelines that will have
to be adhered to during the
dredging process and western

























The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report

Sale Ends
September Sth

extension of Arawak Cay.

Members of the governing
party have even been accused
by the opposition of contra-
dicting each other on the
Arawak Cay extension deal,
being obscure on the details
of the movement of the con-
tainer port and not being
forthcoming on information
concerning several other pro-
jects associated with the con-
tainer port movement.

The EMP seeks to shed
light on the environmental
side of the dredging project
and highlight efforts
employed by the dredging
company to secure the safety
of the environment around it.

It is thought that the
Arawak Cay extension, which
was purported by the Minister
of the Environment Earl
Deveaux to be directly related
to the dredging project,
should not be used for relo-
cation of the container port
from downtown Nassau.

Former Minister of Trade
for the PLP, Leslie Miller,
told Tribune Business recent-
ly that every international
body that has come to the
Bahamas to study proposed
sites for the relocation of the
container port have shunned
Arawak Cay as a viable site.

Clifton in the South West
of New Providence was con-
sidered to be a more suitable
site to Arawak Cay. However,
the present government
decided the move to Clifton
would be too costly.

"Where is your study that
states that Arawak Cay is a
superior site to Clifton,” said
Mr Miller.

Former FNM minister Ten-
nyson Wells echoed similar
sentiments saying he was not
convinced that the estimate
to move the container port to
Clifton would have cost what
the government said it would
have.

"As a nationalist and some-
body who would look toward
the country moving forward, I
would not have put the port
on Arawak Cay. I would take
the risk and spend $100 to 150
million," Mr Wells said
recently.

According to him, special
interest groups are pushing
for the port’s relocation to
Arawak Cay which he sug-
gested may be able to be com-

er la
r

er

ee

pleted for half of the cost
quoted, though many figures

Aide

“Where is your study that states that
Arawak Cay is a superior site to Clifton.”

— Leslie Miller

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A representative for the
Committee to Protect and
Preserve the Bahamas for
Future generations said dur-
ing a recent town hall meet-
ing: "They have sought to

and the extension of Arawak
Cay.

“They continue to negoti-
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the night ... deals involving
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Energy prices slumped Tues-
day on a Labour Department
report that suggested con-
sumer spending, a major eco-
nomic driver, may be
depressed for some time as
companies cut back.
Benchmark crude for Sep-
tember delivery fell $1.15 to
settle at $69.45 a barrel on the
New York Mercantile
Exchange. It was the fourth
straight day of declines and
the first time this month that

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the price for crude dipped
below $69.

Oil prices have ended the
week higher for five straight
weeks, a period that coincides
with earnings reports from US
companies. The results
appeared surprisingly healthy,
which gave energy prices a
boost on the belief that the
recession has loosened its
grip.

While that may be true,
data from the Labour Depart-
ment Tuesday again showed
that company profits were in
many cases buoyed by less
spending on employee pay.

The Labour Department
reported that productivity, the
amount of output per hour of
work, rose at an annual rate
of 6.4 per cent in the April-
June quarter. (see story on
page 3B)

In normal economic times
companies might pay more
for workers and increase pro-
duction. Yet companies dur-
ing the recession have instead
frozen hiring and cut hours to
prop up profits.

If workers are not getting

the hours they need, the pull-
back on spending for every-
thing from gasoline to prod-
ucts made from petroleum,
will likely remain depressed.

That has already happened
this year.

The Energy Information
Administration in its short-
term energy outlook Tuesday
said US consumption of liquid
fuels will fall by 4.1 per cent
this year. The falloff in gaso-
line sales has been tempered
somewhat because it's
become so cheap compared
with past years.

Crude prices rose early in
the day on reports from China
that the nation's exports,
retail sales and factory out-
put improved in July, and the
country imported a record 4.6
million barrels of fuel a day
last month.

The market reversed course
when the Labour Department
released its report and oil
prices fell two per cent.

The monthly forecast by
the Organisation of Petrole-
um Exporting Countries also
may have helped pushed

THE TRIBUNE





Energy prices
slump after Labour
Department report

energy prices down. OPEC
— responsible for about a
third of the world's crude pro-
duction — said it expected
demand to fall by 1.65 million
barrels a day this year, com-
pared with last year, before
rising in 2010.

The Federal Reserve on
Tuesday begins a two-day
meeting that could shed more
light on the US economy. An
interest-rate hike is highly
unlikely, but people want to
hear what the Fed will say
about the state of the econo-
my, said Jim Ritterbusch,
president of energy consul-
tancy Ritterbusch and Asso-
ciates.

"By and large, we're just
taking a little of this econom-
ic optimism out of the mar-
ket right now and responding
to the possibility that we're
going to see a more stable
currency environment going
forward," he said.

The falling dollar has
helped push crude prices up
because oil is priced in the US
currency.

The EIA predicted Tues-
day that gas prices will aver-
age around $2.34 per gallon
in 2009.

In other Nymex trading,
gasoline for September deliv-
ery gained 1.38 cents to settle
at $2.9422 a gallon and heat-
ing oil fell 1.59 cents to settle
at $1.9117. Natural gas for
September delivery fell 10
cents to settle at $3.541 per
1,000 cubic feet.

In London, Brent prices fell
$1.04 to settle at $72.46 a bar-
rel on the ICE Futures
exchange.

¢ Associated Press Writers
Alex Kennedy in Singapore,
George Jahn in Vienna, Joe
McDonald in Beijing and
Martin Crutsinger in Wash-
ington contributed to this
report

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2 HOURS MONITORING,
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le Bank of The Bahamas

@inTERN ATION AL INSIGHT
For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

{evs thaw a dollar a day for
i:

424,
AMENDED Sh ra

GOVERNMENT GUARANTEED ADVANCED FO, Bor CHIH, 62 Alsen Hots,

EDUCATION LOAN SCHEME

In collaboration with The Education Guaranteed Fund Loan Program of
the Ministry of Education, Bank of The Bahamas International is pleased
to advise that the cheque disbursement for RETURNING students
in the Loan Program will continue at Holy Trinity Activity
Centre, Stapledon Gardens, Monday, August 10", to Friday,
August 14°, 2009 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. as follows:

__ ———

a
CABLE BAHAMAS

Surnames beginning with

Monday, August 10, 2009
Tuesday, August 11, 2009
Wednesday, August 12, 2009
Thursday, August 13, 2009

Friday, August 14, 2009

PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT

Series Four 8%, Non-Voting Cumulative
Redeemable Convertible Preference
Share Offering

TIME: 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
PLACE: Holy Trinity Activity Centre
Stapledon Gardens

Thursday, August 06, 2009 - NASSAU, BAHAMAS -The Board of
Directors of Cable Bahamas Ltd wishes to announce that the Closing
Date for the Series Four 8%, Non-Voting Cumulative Redeemable
Convertible Preference Share Offering has been extended to

- Returning Students AND Guarantors should be present and must euigust et 52002

bring relevant identification, (valid Passport and National Insurance
Card).

Cable Bahamas Ltd. is majority owned by 2,500 Bahamians and the
Government of the Bahamas. The company’s 280 employees provide:
(1) world-class cable television service on 16 Bahamian islands;
(2) high-speed Internet access services in Grand Bahama, Abaco,
Eleuthera and New Providence; telecommunications services between
the Bahamas and the rest of the world with a 600-kilometer submarine
fiber-optic system owned and operated by Caribbean Crossings Ltd,
a wholly-owned subsidiary; and (4) web-hosting, data center and
disaster recovery services through its wholly-owned subsidiary, Maxil
Communications Ltd. Cable Bahamas’ ordinary shares trade on the
Bahamas International Stock Exchange (Symbol: CAB).

- Cheques will not be released until completion of all required
documentation.

PLEASE NOTE: DISBURSEMENTS MADE AT THE
BANK WILL INCUR A PENALTY FEE!



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009, PAGE 3B





Productivity rises in Q2
while labour costs plunge

By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Productivity surged in the
spring by the largest amount
in almost six years while
labour costs plunged at the
fastest pace in nine years. The
results point to a recession
losing steam, but they do not
bode well for the unemployed
or those forced to work short-
er weeks who were hoping for
more hours.

The Labour Department
said Tuesday that productivi-
ty, the amount of output per
hour of work, rose at an annu-
al rate of 6.4 per cent in the
April-June quarter, while unit
labour costs dropped 5.8 per
cent. Both results were
greater than economists
expected.

Productivity can help boost
living standards because it
means companies can pay
their workers more, with
those wage increases financed
by rising output. However, in
this recession, companies
have been using their pro-
ductivity gains from layoffs
and other cost cuts not to hire
again but to bolster their prof-
its.

The result: Many compa-
nies have been reporting bet-
ter-than-expected second-
quarter earnings despite
falling sales.

Businesses producing more
with fewer employees means
millions of unemployed
Americans likely will continue
to face a dismal job market.
Some analysts also worry that
companies’ aggressive cost-
cutting could make it hard to
mount a sustainable recovery.
That's because a lack of wage
growth and a shortage of jobs
will likely depress consumer

Please
Mr. Raphael Noel “Ray” Adams
is no longer associated with
Raygian Reprographics and has
no
with the company.
therefore
to transact
whatsoever on behalf of the
company.

NOTICE

ESTATE OF JOHN HERBERT BETHELL,
(deceased)

Notice is hereby given pursuant to Section
29 of the Law of Property Act that any person
having a claim against or an interest in the
Estate of John Herbert Bethell, deceased, late
of No. 8 Woodland Road off Skyline Drive in the
Western District of the Island of New Providence
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas and who
died on the 5th July, 2008 is hereby required
to send particulars in writing of his or her claim
or interest to Higgs & Kelly, Attorneys for the
Executors, of P.O. Box N-4818, 384 Bay Street,
Nassau, and to send such particulars not later
than the 25th August, 2009, after which date the
Executors will distribute the Estate among the
persons entitled thereto having regard only to
the claims and interests of which they have had

notice, and will not, as

distributed, be liable to any person of whose
claim they shall not then have had notice.

HIGGS

Attorneys for the Executors



IN THIS June 4, 2009 file photo, people look for jobs at the Los Angeles Mission Career Fair. Productivity surged in the spring by the largest
amount in almost six years while labour costs plunged at the fastest pace in nine years.

spending, which accounts for
about 70 per cent of econom-
ic Output.

Ideally, businesses would
use the current productivity
gains to stabilize their own
financial situations and as the
economy rebounds, resume
hiring to meet the rising
demand, analysts said.

"Hopefully, businesses will
stop the layoffs and start hir-
ing again so that consumers
will have the ability to spend,
but that is a tricky transition,”
said Mark Zandi, chief econ-
omist at Moody's Econo-
my.com.

In a second report, the
Commerce Department said
wholesale inventories

consecutive month, falling 1.7
per cent in June. That was
nearly double the 0.9 per cent
decrease economists had
expected.

But in an encouraging sign,
sales rose 0.4 per cent for a
second straight month. The
first back-to-back increases in
a year boosted hopes that
businesses will begin to ramp
up production to meet rising
demand.

On Wall Street, stocks fell
after the mixed economic
reports and on comments
from analyst Richard Bove of
Rochdale Securities who
wrote in a research note that
bank earnings won't improve
in the second half of this year

gross domestic product.
Economists had expected
productivity to surge in the
second quarter as businesses
continued to lay off workers
and trim the number of hours
being worked by their remain-
ing employees amid the
nation's worst recession since
the end of World War IT.
The second-quarter pro-
ductivity increase reflected
that the number of hours
worked fell much faster than

(AP Photo: Damian Dovarganes)

output dropped.

Total hours worked
dropped at an annual rate of
7.6 per cent, while the output
of non-farm businesses fell at
a 1.7 per cent rate.

The nation's total output of
goods and services, as mea-
sured by the gross domestic
product, fell at an annual rate
of one per cent in the second
quarter. That was a much
slower rate of decline than the
previous two quarters when

the economy shrank at the
fastest pace in more than a
half-century.

Many economists believe
the recession is on the verge
of ending. Should the econo-
my start to grow in the sec-
ond half of this year, some
companies might boost
employment — if demand for
their products showed a sus-
tained increase.

Still, the leaner work force
should help keep productivity
rising in coming quarters
although the gains are not
expected to be as large as the
jump in the spring.

"Before the recession of
2001, productivity typically
fell in recessions because
companies waited too long to
respond to the downturn,”
Ian Shepherdson, chief US
economist at High Frequency
Economics, wrote in a
research note.

Among those reporting sec-
ond-quarter profits due part-
ly to layoffs and other cost
cuts were Internet company
Yahoo Inc., which saw earn-
ings grow eight per cent, and
automaker Ford Motor Co.

The 6.4 per cent jump in
productivity at an annual rate
was the biggest quarterly gain
since a 9.7 per cent surge in
the third quarter of 2003.

The 5.8 per cent decline in
unit labour costs followed a
revised 2.7 per cent dip in the
first quarter and was the
biggest quarterly drop since
a 7.7 per cent decline in the
second quarter of 2000.

LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.
“Eattage Lat With Private Beach



declined for a record 10th — and that many companies will
post losses. The Dow Jones
industrial average lost about
65 points in afternoon trad-
ing and broader indices also
fell.

The 6.4 per cent jump in
productivity followed a 0.3
per cent increase in the first
three months of the year that
was revised downward from
an earlier estimate of a 1.6
per cent gain. The revision
partially reflected the annual
benchmark revisions of eco-
nomic data connected to the

FOR SALE

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Tel: 327-8640, 437-8687
West Bay Street, Cable Beach

PUBLIC NOTICE Web Listing # 8377

Mario A. Carey, CRS, CIPS, CLHMS

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info@mariocareyrealty.com

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Eo

CcFAL"
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 10 AUGUST 2009

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BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3860 2.40 4.75
2.9047 -1.20 -3.66
1.4817 3.35 5.38
3.1031 -8.35 -13.82
12.9801 2.87 5.79
101.6693 1.10 1.67
96.7398 0.35 -4.18
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.2765 2.00 -2.98
1.0622 2.56 6.22
1.0243 -0.84 2.43
1.0585 2.04 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.16
0.37
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

6.25
0.63
3.15
2.14

6.25
0.63
3.15
2.37

6.25
0.63
3.15
2.37

2.74
5.50
1.27
1.32
6.60
10.00
10.30
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.39
10.00

2.74
5.60
3.48
1.82
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.13
1.00
0.30
5.49

2.74
5.76
3.85
1.82
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.13
1.00
0.30
5.49

52wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

7%

7%

52wk-Low

Symbol

14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

52wk-Low
1.3231
2.8952
1.4059
3.1031
12.3289
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Fund Name Div$

CFAL Bond Fund

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund

CFAL Money Market Fund

Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund

Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

Fidelity International Investment Fund

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund

respects the property so FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV §$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings

& KELLY

) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Tel: 242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013

Prime + 1.75%
Prime + 1.75%

EPS $
-0.041

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!
Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million

ATs

Mario Carey Realty
Dt's abaut yaw... Let's talk.



FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

CoO LGONTAL

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,564.59] CHG 8.48 | %CHG 0.54 | YTD -147.77 | YTD % -8.63

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

$ Div$
0.127
0.992
0.244

P/E

-0.877

0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

ases)

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E
N/M
N/M

256.6

Yield

0.000
0.001

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90
Yield % NAV Date
30-Jun-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

mths

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525





PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TORRINGTON
MANAGEMENT LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ROMANZA LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BIALEX VISTA LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WOHLEN LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
APRIL HARVEST LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BUNT IMP. CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
UPWARD LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
OSB INCORPORATION LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ABBI VOLCANY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BIALEX VISTA LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Hybrid efficiency
General Motors Corp. said
Tuesday that its new plug-in
hybrid car, the Volt, should get
triple-digit miles per gallon.

City miles per gallon,
HYBRID VEHICLES
2011 Chevrolet Volt
8
2010 Toyota Prius
me 51

2000 Honda Insight
49

2009 Toyota Prius
De 48

2001 Toyota Prius
De 42

2010 Ford Fusion
a 41

2010 Honda Insight
MS 40

2010 Ford Escape
ae 34

2009 Chevrolet Malibu

WS 26

NOTE: The Vo 1 differant
aditional hybrids. Its

calculated by GM using
AP

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SIX FORTUNES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EMEK INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
STAEL INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009, PAGE 5B



Asian markets inch higher
as China data sifted

By JEREMIAH MARQUEZ
AP Business Writer

HONG KONG (AP) —
Major Asian markets inched
higher Tuesday amid signs
China’s stimulus measures
were helping shield its econ-
omy from the global slump
and as governments issued
cautious outlooks about the
recovery.

Regional markets made
tentative gains as investors
sifted through a rash of data
about China’s economy that
together provided positive
signs for Beijing’s multibil-
lion-dollar effort to restore
stable growth, though still
hinted at weak fundamentals.

While industrial output and
retail sales rose last month in
the world’s third-largest econ-
omy, imports and exports
were still down sharply from

a year earlier amid continuing
weak global demand.

Investors have been count-
ing on China’s homegrown
growth to help other
economies turn around
quicker, but Tuesday’s data
raised concerns such expec-
tations may fall short, said
Peter Lai, investment man-
ager at DBS Vickers in Hong
Kong. That in turn could
weigh on the markets, he
said.

“The upside room is quite
limited right now,” he said.
“The global economy may
have reached a bottom, but
the revival will take some
time, there are just too many
uncertainties.”

Markets across the region
traded in a narrow range.

In a back-and-forth session,
Hong Kong’s Hang Seng was
up 86.34 points, or 0.4 per

cent, at 21,015.86 and Shang-
hai’s benchmark gained 0.3
per cent to 3,258.40.

Japan’s Nikkei 225 stock
average rose 18.54, or 0.2 per
cent, to 10,542.80 as the Bank
of Japan said there were signs
the downturn was bottoming
out but warned about grow-
ing joblessness.

South Korea’s central bank
was similarly cautious, saying
the road to stronger growth
was uncertain because recov-
eries in other major
economies could be delayed.
The benchmark Kospi added
less than 0.1 per cent to
1,576.81.

Australia’s benchmark rose

0.3 per cent and Singapore’s
main index climbed nearly
two per cent after being
closed for a national holiday
Monday. Indexes in Thailand,
Taiwan and New Zealand
were moderately lower.

Wall Street posted moder-
ate losses overnight as
investors took some profits
without any major corporate
or economic news.

The Dow Jones industrial
average fell 32.12, or 0.3 per
cent, to 9,337.95. The Stan-
dard & Poor’s 500 index fell
3.38, or 0.3 per cent, to
1,007.10, while the Nasdaq
composite index fell 8.01, or
0.4 per cent, to 1,992.24.

NOTICE

Wall Street futures

declined modestly with Dow
futures off five points at
9,315.

Oil prices lingered below
$71 a barrel, with benchmark
crude for September delivery





up four cents at $70.64. On
Monday, the contract fell 33
cents,

The dollar fell to 96.63 yen
from 97.09 yen, and the curo
traded lower at $1.4137 com-
pared to $1.4144.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SAMANTHA LOUISE
COX KEMP, P.O. BOX N-10767,# 3 HALLS ROAD and
POMPANO COURT, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12" day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

















NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOHNNY JOSEPH
P.O. BOX GT-2752 , YELLOW ELDER is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 12" day of August, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE ANGE NOEL of
#137 FAWCETT LANE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
12th day of AUGUST, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

TOMCAT PROPERTIES
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICEis Oy that DEJA SIFFRARD of MARSH
HARBOUR, P.O. BOX AB-20554, ABACO, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration’ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 5th day of
AUGUST 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

TOMCAT PROPERTIES (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
N OTIC E IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) TOMCAT PROPERTIES (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
is in dissolution under the provisions of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
7th day of August, 2009 when its Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said Company is Mr. Dayan Bourne
of Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Dated the 10th day of August, 2009.
H & J CORPORATE SERVICES LTD.

Registered Agent
for the above-named Company

Legal Notice

RAMBLING HOLDINGS LTD.
IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 RAMBLING
HOLDINGS LTD. is in dissolution.

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 10th
August 2009. David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.,
Building 2 Caves Village, P O. Box N 3917 is the Liquidator of
RAMBLING HOLDINGS LTD. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
address and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the
10th September 2009.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LUCKSON VERSANNES
of BAHAMAS AVENUE, THE GROVE, P.O. Box 8843,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 12‘ day of August, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-
7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS IN THE
SUPREME COURT 2004
Common Law and Equity Division CLE/qui/00946

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot
of land containing 11,897 square feet situated on the
Eastern Side of Lincoln Boulevard approximately 500
feet south of Homestead Avenue and on the Western
Side of Washington Street in the Subdivision called
and known as Englerston in the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF THOMAS A. MINNS

NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of Thomas A. Minns of the Englerston
Constituency in the Eastern District of the said Island of
New Providence in respect to:

ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land situated about
500 feet south of Homestead Avenue, on the Eastern
side of Lincoln Boulevard and on the Western Side of
Washington Street in the subdivision called and known
as Englerston in the Islands of New Providence one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
which said piece parcel or tract of land is bounded on the
West by a road named Lincoln Boulevard and running
thereon one hundred and two and twelve Hundredths feet
(112.12) and bounded on the North by property believed
to be owned by the Church of God In Christ and running
thereon One hundredth and Four and Sixteen hundredths
feet (104.16) and bounded on the -East by a road named
Washington Street and running thereon One Hundred
and Three and Ninety-six hundredths feet (103.96) and
bounded on the South by property believed to be owned
partially by Adderley’s Upholstery and partially by one
Joan Hanna and running together thereon One Hundred
and Thirty and Fifty nine hundredths feet (130.59) which

said piece parcel or tract of land has such position shape
boundaries marks and dimensions as shown delinated
on the Plan filed herein and which is thereon coloured
Pink. Thomas A. Minns claims to be the equitable and
beneficial owner in possession of the parcel of land
hereinbefore described and such ownership as aforesaid
arises by virtue of a possessory title to the said land. The
Petitioner has made application to the Supreme Court of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of
the Quieting Titles Act, 1959, to have his title to the said
land investigated.

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned
at Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay Street, Nassau,
Bahamas as sole Liquidator on or before the 21st day of August,
2009. In default thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of
any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 10th day of August, 2009.

DAYAN BOURNE
LIQUIDATOR

of
TOMCAT PROPERTIES (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Copies of the filed Plan may be inspected during normal
working hours at:
1. The Registry of the Supreme Court,
Ansbacher House, East Street, Nassau,

Legal Noti
i ae Bahamas; and

NOTICE

2. The Law Chambers of Floyd C. Watkins &
NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

Co. situated at St Alban’s Drive (East) Nassau,

Bahamas.
(a) GYROSCOPE LIMITED (SAC) is in dissolution under the provisions of

the International Business Companies Act 2000. ‘ : F :
Notice is hereby given that any person having dower

or right of dower or any adverse claim or a claim not
recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 3rd day
of October, 2009, file in the Supreme Court and serve
on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of such
claim in the prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit to
be filed therewith. Failure by any such person to file and
serve a statement of such claim on or before the 3rd day
of October, 2009, will operate as a bar to such claim.

41R Cameras
One (1) 4 Ch Stand Alone DVR
(Digital Video Recorder)
500 ft of Co-Ax & Power Cable
Power Supply & Accessories

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on August 11, 2009 when
its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

\
\
§

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are required
on or before the 11th day of September, 2009 to send their names and addresses
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or,
in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made before such debts are proved.

August 12, 2009

> a / Aho ae
( a } et 4 ee j

oe a"

Floyd C. Watkins & CO.,
Attorneys for the Petitioner.

LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY







THE BAHAMAS MARITIME

AUTHORITY
(LONDON OFFICE)

Technical and Compliance Officer
(Inspections & Surveys)

An appointment is available for a marine professional in the
Inspections and Surveys Department, carrying out a wide range of
duties associated with statutory compliance of The Bahamas flagged
fleet of about 1,700 vessels comprising over 51,000,000 GT.

Duties will include
* close oversight of response and management of PSC inspection,
* operation of the BMA inspection programme
* technical advice to owners, managers and Recognised
Organisations,

A logical thinking, safety orientated person is required who must
have a wide knowledge of the International Maritime Conventions
and Codes.

Candidates should have seagoing experience at a senior level or
surveying experience, or as a Naval Architect within an IACS
Classification Society. Suitably experienced candidates from an
alternative professional stream may also be considered. Audit
experience 1s advantageous.

This particular vacancy will be better suited to a holder of an STCW
II/2 certificate. However outstanding candidates who are otherwise
qualified will be considered.

The successful candidate will be required to work in the London
Office of the BMA and should be prepared to undertake occasional
travel on the business of the Authority.

Technical and Compliance Officer
(STCW and Manning)

Applications are invited for the position of Technical & Compliance
Officer in the STCW and Manning Department of the BMA. The
STCW and Manning Section 1s responsible for all aspects related
to the training, certification and approval of seafarers and STCW
courses, and the assessment of the manning provisions, for The
Bahamas flagged fleet.

The successful candidate will be employed at a supervisory level
with duties including:
¢ Representing the Authority at meetings/forum on matters
relating to seafarers training and manning
* Oversight of the BMA processes and development of national
policies relating to seafarers, STCW course approval and safe
manning
* Provision of training and manning guidance/assistance to
Owners, Managers and the Authority’s other stakeholders

Candidates for the post should have a university degree with practical
and theoretical knowledge of STCW Convention/Code and the
international principles on manning of ships. Applicants with other
qualifications gained in the field of maritime training/education or
other relevant experience/expertise will also be considered. Previous
experience in auditing will be advantageous.

Applicants are invited to write, enclosing a copy of their C/V, and
details of their current salary to: Deputy Director, Inspections &
Surveys, The Bahamas Maritime Authority, 120 Old Broad Street,
London EC2N IAR, U K, or by email to tech@bahamasmaritime.c

om.

Closing date for applications 1s 28 August 2009. All applications
will be acknowledged.

PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Nevada casino

winnings down
14% in June

NOTICE

FROND ASSETS LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) FROND ASSETS LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
07" August 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Ms. Celene Koh of
1 Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

Dated this 11" day of August A. D. 2009



Ms. Celene Koh
Liquidator



NOTICE

MAXIMUS PRIME LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MAXIMUS PRIME LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
07" August 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.
The Liquidator of the said company is Ms. Celene Koh of
1 Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

Dated this 11" day of August A. D. 2009



Ms. Celene Koh
Liquidator

NOTICE

MENTOR ANGEL VENTURES LTD.

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) MENTOR ANGEL VENTURES LTD. is in voluntary

dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4)

of the International Business Companies Act 2000.
The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
07" August 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.
The Liquidator of the said company is Ms. Celene Koh of
1 Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

Dated this 11" day of August A. D. 2009



Ms. Celene Koh



By SANDRA CHEREB
Associated Press Writer

CARSON CITY, Nev.
(AP) — Nevada casinos won
almost $820 million from
gamblers in June, down near-
ly 14 per cent compared with
the same month a year ago
and marking the smallest
gaming win reported in the
last five years, state gaming
regulators said Tuesday.

For the fiscal year ended
June 30, the state Gaming
Control Board report said the
total gambling win was $10.8
billion, down almost 14 per
cent from the previous 12-
month period.

June was the 18th straight
month of decline.

Nevada collected $45.8 mil-
lion in taxes based on the
June win, a 13.5 per cent drop
from a year earlier.

"It's a continuation of what
we've seen," said Frank
Streshley, an analyst with the
Gaming Control Board.
"We're seeing less visitors and
they're spending a lot less
than what they had been.”

The number of visitors to
Las Vegas fell 6.3 per cent in
June, marking the sixth
straight month of decline,
according to the Las Vegas
Convention and Visitors
Authority. About 2.98 million
visitors traveled to Las Vegas
in June, compared with near-
ly 3.18 million a year earlier.

The monthly win was down
in every major market in the
state. The Las Vegas Strip
was down almost 15 per cent.
The Reno-Sparks-North
Tahoe area was down more
than seven per cent. It was
the 24th straight month of
declines in Washoe County,
Streshley said.

Elsewhere, declines were
15 per cent at South Lake
Tahoe, 5.6 per cent in down-
town Las Vegas, 11.6 per cent
in Laughlin, and 15.6 per cent
in the Carson Valley area of
Douglas County.

The June win was the
amount left in casino coffers
after gamblers wagered $11
billion in table games and
slots. There were declines in
both types of gambling.

"It's across the board,"
Streshley said.

Slot wagering totaled $9.2
billion, down 10.7 per cent,
while the $1.8 billion wagered
on table games was down 12.7
per cent.

Gaming revenues account
for 30 per cent of state's gen-
eral fund.

Last month, the Nevada
Department of Taxation
reported taxable sales for 11
months of the 2009 fiscal year
fell 11.9 per cent compared
with the prior year, and they
fell 21 per cent in May.

Gov. Jim Gibbons called
the latest casino numbers
"troubling" but said no deci-
sion has been made on
whether he will call state law-
makers into special session to
address the revenue shortfall.

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PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
ENTERTAINMENT

World’s most beautiful women

By Bahamas
Information
Services

ALL 84 of the world’s
most beautiful women
graced the stage of Wyn-
dham Nassau Resort
Rain Forest Theater on
Monday to unveil their
national costumes for the
first time.

As each contestant
took centre stage, a kalei-
doscope of colour illumi-
nated the theatre to the
delight of the crowd who
shouted for their
favourites. Many foreign
residents living in Nassau
came prepared with flags
and dressed in their own
national costumes to
specifically cheer on their
home country. There was
a huge amount of sup-
port for the Latin Amer-
ican and Caribbean coun-
tries in particular. Miss
India and Miss USA also
came out to much local
support.

“This is one of the best
shows I have ever seen
in terms of colour dis-
play, presentation and
quality of the fabrics and
the way the costumes
were made,” said Lisa
Harold, an aspiring fash-
ion designer from New
York.

Contestants wore cos-
tumes depicting the
national symbol from
their respective country.

Leading the way was
Miss Bahamas, Kiara
Sherman, whose golden
costume depicted the
‘Bahamian sunshine.’

“Tt was a very impres-
sive display of costumes,”
said Dwayne Delancy,
photographer with
NuWoman magazine. “I
especially liked the
detailed workings of the
costumes worn by Miss
Czechoslovakia and Miss
Ecuador, Nicaragua and
Panama. Miss Bahamas
was also a very good
depiction.”

Each presentation was
divided into groups of six
with contestants coming
out in alphabetical order.

Actress Claudette
‘Cookie’ Allens and his-
torian and junkanoo
artist Arlene Nash-Fer-
guson were the hostesses.

Judges included Lynn
Holowesko, President of
the Senate; Leslie Van-
derpool, Bahamas Inter-
national Film Festival;
artist John Cox, owner of
Popop Studios; Rochelle
Walker, Solomon’s
Mines; Gershin Major,
CEO, Mail Boxes Etc;
Elaine Pinder, the owner
of La Rose; and Kishlane

SEE next page





THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009, PAGE 11B

SSeS

unveil their national costumes

Photos by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

FROM page 10B

O’Brien, vice president Cititrust.

The winner of the “Best Costume’ award
will be announced tonight during the
Bahamian Designer Fabric Fashion show

scheduled for the Sheraton Nassau Beach
Hotel.

The event went off very smoothly. The
attendance was not as good as it could
have been which may have due to the high
cost of tickets which were eventually
reduced in price in the lead up days.







PAGE 12B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009



ARTS

THE TRIBUNE



Red Bull
has many
forms

By ALEX MISSICK
Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

REDBULL, the popular
energy drink, has for a num-
ber of years, pulled together
great events allowing people
from around the world to
express their creativity and
has now launched its “Red
Bull Art of Can” in the
Bahamas with the final local
competition and exhibition to
be hosted at THE HUB,
located on Bay Street on Sep-
tember 4.

Red Bull Art of Can has
pulled creativity from people
of all ages and stages the
world over producing some
of the most fashionable, imag-
inative and inspired pieces
using from as little as one can
to hundreds. With no restric-
tions, artists can design, cre-
ate, mold, sculpt, photograph,
do anything you like with as
many or as few cans as
desired. There are very few
countries in the world that can
boast the creativity of
Bahamians so Red Bull is
inviting the nation to get busy
and start building.

Arame Strachan, Market-
ing Manager at Bristol Wines
and Spirits, said because the
Art of Can is a global initia-
tive of Red Bull, as a distrib-
utor, Bristol Wines wants to
integrate alot of the pro-
grammes if they are applicible
to the Bahamian market.

“T appealed to them
because I think we have a
great creative market here
because of Junkanoo. I am
partial to Junkanoo and I
know Junkanooers can create
anything out of nothing. We
have alot of local talent here
that don’t really have a forum
to express their creative
works outside of Junkanoo so
I think this is a great initia-
tive for them,” Ms Strachan
said.

Registration is free and
open to Bahamian artists
through August 31. The top
three pieces from this exhibi-
tion will be sent to Jamaica
to compete in the regional
competition. Sculptures,
paintings, digital/graphic
designs and various forms of
mixed media will all be con-
sidered. Judges will review
each piece based on creativity
(overall idea behind the

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piece), conceptual execution
(how well the piece translates
the idea) and construction
(the quality of
production/final presenta-
tion).

“Anyone can enter and
there is no age requirement.
Any piece of art work can be
created out of the cans once it
is inspired by Red Bull and
made with the Red Bull cans
it can be entered. Right now I
think there are about 12
entrants. We have cans avail-
able at the warehouse so peo-
ple can come and get them
from Bristol Wines,” Ms Stra-
chan said.

The lucky first place
Bahamian winner will be
flown all expenses paid with
his/her piece to this final exhi-
bition that will be hosted at
Devon House, Kingston,
Jamaica in October. This
competition promises to fea-
ture the finest pieces from the
Caribbean and will be judged
by the public through the peo-
ple’s choice award, a media
choice award and the coveted
prize being given to the best
piece chosen by a panel of
Caribbean art gurus.

Other Red Bull Art of Can
exhibitions have taken place
in the US in Boston, Atlanta,
Dallas, Minneapolis, Philadel-
phia, Houston and Chicago.
Red Bull Art of Can has a
long international history
which began in Europe in
2000. Since then, exhibits
have been hosted all over the
world including Prague,
Switzerland, London, Dublin,
Dubai, Budapest, Vienna,
Warsaw and Amsterdam.

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Photos by Naphtali Junior

TOP — Miss Jamaica Carolyn Yapp showing off her Red Bull earrings

ABOVE —- Miss Jamaica Universe ‘09 Carolyn Yapp has a great time trying on and admiring
great fashion pieces submitted for Red Bull Art of Can. The pieces, using Red Bull cans in
its creation, including funky earrings and a very edgy and futuristic dress were submitted by
Jamaican jewelry designers Reve Jewelry and on display at the Hilton on Saturday August
1, 2009 at the Miss Universe’ send off to the Bahamas.

Three artists unite to
put on exhibition of
their works at Hilton

that I'm studying the past legends in this project, I feel
that we all need to embrace the past. People like Joseph
Spence, Blind Blake and many others were great locally
and internationally. These men and women paved the
way for us in music, now we need to get back on that
path and value 'us' first instead of rap or reggae or any
other foreign art style. Not to say that these styles of
music aren't good but they are not who we are. So I
guess my inspiration comes from knowing that there
needs to be a consciousness of where we came from,
who we are as Bahamians so that we will know where
we're going,” Mr Wildgoose said.

Mr Wildgoose said during the show, he is expecting a
cultural awakening and an appreciation for who we are
as Bahamians.

“T'm expecting viewers to be inspired not just by art
pieces, but fine art itself and to know that it 1s ‘the quali-
ty of our art that reflects the quality of our society,’” Mr
Wildgoose said.

As for Mr Strachan, his body of work is all paintings
just as his co-exhibitors and is probably the most repre-
sentational of them all. They can be described as figura-
tive in subject matter but his interpretation of the con-
tent he addresses is intermediary of subtle and bold.
According to Mr Petit, Mr Strachan’s work can be seen
as multiplexed as this recent compilation of his is made
up of landscapes, seascapes and portraits.

“His brush strokes are a bit more defined or intense
than that of Bernard’s, but not giving as much of a hard-
ened appearance as that of Matthew’s canvases. Further-
more, the manner in which he addresses his subject mat-
ter demonstrates an artist’s sensitivity towards not totally
adapting the content beyond reasonable recognition,”
Mr Petit said.

Mr Strachan said although this is his fourth show, it is

Ni o } his first with Mr Petit and Mr Wildgoose.
Gas Stove | “T expect that the showing gets the attention it rightful-
white ] ly needs as it draws not only the Bahamian public but
also off island viewers and potential buyers. I also expect
that a major difference can be made with this showing as
it’s to acknowledge the younger talent in this country on
how to explore their gifts,” Mr Strachan said.

Mr Petit hopes that he and his co-exhibitors will begin
to gain more exposure as young up and coming artists.

“T hope that we develop a following from this new
approach we have taken to our work. Ideally we would
want people to walk away feeling that we have brought
something different to the art scene in comparison to
what some of our contemporaries are presenting of late,”
Mr Petit said.

ate tLOre)[
Counter Top

aR eu



By LLOYD ALLEN
Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

WITH all the excitement
surrounding the Miss Uni-
verse pageant added with
everything else that’s hap-
pening in Nassau, it’s impor-
tant to know exactly what’s
happening. This week Things
2 Do is mixing all the right
elements of fun, flare, and
beauty, offering you every-
thing and then some for the
best in entertainment.

1. It’s all glitz and glamour
for the 84 contestants of the
Miss Universe Pageant with
the organisers sparing no
effort in giving the girls the
all Bahamian experience.
Tonight at 7pm, locals
designers will have a rare
opportunity to have the
international beauties model
their designs made from the
local Bahamian fabrics
Androsia and Bahama Hand
Prints. The public is invited
to join the contestants at the
Sheraton’s Nassau Beach
Hotel, Cable Beach. Tickets
are priced at $75 to $125 and
can be purchased from the
Miss Universe events box-
office in the Sheraton’s con-
vention centre lobby.

Following the event is a
Junkanoo rush-out between
the Sheraton and Breezes
hotel starting at 9pm.

2. Continuing with its sixth
annual film festival series,
The Bahamas International
Film Festival is presenting
the flick Pretty Ugly People.
First released in 2008, the
film tells the story of a dying
woman’s last wish of bringing
together her estranged circle
of friends from college to
spend a final weekend
together. As the film unfolds,
the reality that none of the
characters are the way the
were in college comes to light
for Lucy (Missi Pyle), and
they all spend the time
together without any of the
modern conveniences while
tolerating each other. The
film is being shown tonight
at Galleria Cinema JFK at
8pm and tickets are priced at

$5.

3. On Thursday the organ-
isers from the Miss Universe
committee have scheduled a
State Gift Auction and Din-
ner where souvenirs and cul-
tural pieces from the 84
countries represented in the
pageant will be auctioned off
and proceeds given to the
Bahamas’ HIV/AIDS Foun-
dation. The event will take
place at the Sheraton Nas-
sau Beach Hotel at 6.30pm
on Thursday. Tickets are
priced between $150 and
$200 general admission, and
$500 for banner seats. To buy
yours now, visit the Miss
Universe box office in the
Sheraton’s convention cen-
ter lobby or contact the
Bahamas Aids Foundation
at 325.9326/7.

4. It’s all about TGI Fri-
day’s, and throughout the
island there are activities
galore all offering the best in
entertainment to launch the
weekend. On the list are
Market Paradiso on Paradise
Island with an up tempo hap-
py hour from 5pm to 8.
There’s also Van Breugel’s
on Charlotte Street and if
that’s not enough, Green
Parrots on East Bay Street
may be just the place for you.
It’s right on the water’s edge
giving the best in urban and
pop music, a spectacular
décor, and drinks are priced
just right. Either way, enter-
tainment on Friday is all
about unwinding, so go out
and indulge.

5. What is TRI-ART-IC?
It’s a new approach to art,
particularly local art helping
to translate the essence of
Bahamian experiences,
lifestyles, and culture into the
local and international con-
sciousness. This Friday at the
British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, local artists Bernard
Petit, Charlton Strachan, and
Matthew Wildgoose, will pre-
sent several pieces of their
art along with intimate dis-
cussions and light refresh-
ments all to generate more
talk of the TRI-ART-IC ini-
tiative. The event runs from
6pm to 9, and will extend to
an after party at Harry’s
Haven of Rest on George
Street. Access to the event is
free, and all are invited.









THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 121h, 2009, PAGE 13B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MarINE FORECAST











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Detroit 82/27 64/17 s 86/30 65/18 s New York 85/29 70/21 83/28 72/22 pc Tampa 90/32 77/25 t 89/31 75/23 t iS Winriped wee eee en sees | ie xf ea - wpe sane Tek: (22) 336-2304
Honolulu 88/31 75/23 + 89/31 76/24 + Oklahoma City 94/34 70/21 pe 93/33 70/21 s Tucson 96/35 76/24 t 94/34 76/24 t ;
Houston 98/36 76/24 t 94/34 74/23 t Orlando 93/33 75/23 t 92/33 74/23 t Washington, DC 88/31 71/21 t 83/28 72/22 t Ge he ee












Red Bull World's most beautiful

has many women unveil their

forms... .
See page 12B national costumes...

See pages 10 & 11B

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12, 2009

For the very best features . . .



www. tribune 24? .cor-

‘Tri-art-1C’

ratieereore ‘Three artists put on exhibition

amissick@tribunemedia.net

alented artistic
trio, Bernard
Petit, Charlton
Strachan and
Matthew Wild-
goose, have come together
to put on an art exhibition
entitled “Tri-art-ic” featur-
ing their recent works from
August 14-August 15 at the
British Colonial Hilton.

Triartic is adapted from
the word “Triadic” which ts
one of several colour
schemes where three
colours are used that appear
equally spaced from each
other on the colour wheel.

“Given that we are three
young artists that possess
three styles that are equally
distinct from each other we
found the name to be fitting
in describing us and the
body of work,” Mr Petit
said.

Mr Petit said although
this is his sixth group show,
his work in Tri-art-ic can be
described as being the most
subtle and simplistic of the
three. Mr Petit attempts to
create a smoother surface
onto the canvas. Though his
colour palette is arbitrary
from plausible reality, each
painting still reflects some
degree of visual credibility.

“From my body of work I
favor the piece ‘Perspective
View of the Restful Wall.’
Lately, I have found myself
interested in anthropomor-
phising inanimate objects,
making them seem as if they
can experience human situa-
tions of being lonely or even
observers of other objects, - -
for example. This piece MAN WITH CIGAR by Matthew Wildgoose...
shows a pole looking on at
the perspective of the wall
stretching further into the
distance from hun. I felt
that this particular piece
accomplished my attempt to
create these scenarios with
non living objects,” Mr Petit
said.

Mr Wildgoose’s series
which is the boldest of the
three, takes the most cele-
brated Bahamian figures
and exaggerates their fea-
tures into caricature por-
traits. Through his pieces,
there is an artist’s interest to
stretch his subject beyond
what is normally perceived
in reality as natural.

Mr Wildgoose said at this
point, he has completed
eight pieces with hopes to
have twelve at the time of
the show.

“T always had a deep
appreciation for today's
Bahamian music (Goom-
bay) and musicians. Now



RAKE AND SCRAPE by Matthew Wildgoose...

SEE page 12B PERSPECTIVE VIEW of the restful wall... MUSICIAN by Matthew Wildgoose...



Full Text

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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.215WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY WITH T-STORM HIGH 89F LOW 75F S P O R T S SEEPAGEELEVEN Bahamas undefeated F E A T U R E S SEE‘THEARTS’ Trio put on exhibition THE number of rapes and attempted rapes reported in the first five months of this year has already sur passed in number all of the cases in 2008, Senator Allyson MaynardGibson said. Revealing the latest crime statistics at a town meeting on the Sexual Offences Amendment Bill at the St Agnes Church Parish Hall last night, the PLP senator in her speaking n otes said that up until June 14, 2009, 69 cases of rapes and attempted rapes were reported. In 2008 the police recorded 63 cases, she said. “In less than six months we have had more than the total number of rapes and attempted rapes report ed for 2008.” “The United Nations in its report entitled ‘Crime, Violence, and Development Trends, Costs, and Policy Options in the Caribbean’, issued in March 2007 shows that the Bahamas has the highest rape r ate in Caribbean and comparison countries,” she said. Senator r eveals alarming statistics The Tribune YOUR PASSPORT TO MISS UNIVERSE BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com T ry our Big Breakfast Sandwich BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Shock rise in rape figur es MISS UNIVERSE contestants enjoy horseback riding during their visit to Harbour island yesterday. The contestants were given an enthusiastic welcome by the island’s residents. SEEPAGETWO C ONTES T ANTSINHARBOURISLAND F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@ tribunemedia.net AMOTHERof three, convicted of manslaughter for the stabbing death of her boyfriend, was sen tenced to 10 years in prison yesterday. Senior Justice Anita Allen also ordered that Shimeakima Delores Pratt attend counselling for anger management and family counselling. Pratt, 30, was convicted on July 1 of the stabbing death of her boyfriend of eight years Gary Carey Sr. Carey, a 54-year-old Defence Force Officer, was found stabbed to death in Pratt’s Minnis Subdivision apartment off Carmichael Road on Sunday, August 17, 2008. According to evidence adduced at the trial, Pratt had stabbed Carey in the chest with a rat tail comb and initially told police that Carey had collapsed Mother of three is sentenced to10 years Woman is convicted of manslaughter SEE page 12 SEE page 12 By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net POLICE have been slammed for failing to protect the community from murderers and rapists by a former Crime Stoppers advocate who is demanding the basic right to public safety. Lucia Broughton, a mother of three from Camperdown, eastern New Providence, spoke on the record as she demanded that senior officers in the Royal Bahamas Police Force be held to account over Police slammed for ‘failing to protect public from murderers and rapists’ SEE page 12 By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net POLICE in Jamaica have identified the two Bahamian men who died in a fiery plane crash on that island last week. According to Sergeant Jubert Llewellyn of the Jamaican Con stabulary Force, the two men are Preston Rolle, 41, and Christon Dion Dean, 32. The men, who police suspect were part of a drug deal gone wrong, were found in the charred cockpit of a twin-engine plane, burned beyond recognition. Officials at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and local police could not confirm the men's identities. Reports reaching The Tribune indicate that one of the men was arrested for plane Bahamians who died in plane crash are identified SEE page 12 By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net HOTEL union elections held in May remain “null and void” and new elections will be held within the next two months. Supreme Court Justice Jon Isaacs yesterday denied an application by recently ousted Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union (BHCAWU granting of a stay of the proceedings or execution of his order pending an appeal. “It has been a long drawn out process, but it is now at and end and everyone now without ques tion has no doubt on what the position of the By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net POLICE are still "puzzled" over the senseless murder of mother-of-two Tagia SolesArmony, who was shot and killed in her sis ter's car while her infant son lay in her arms. Early reports from family and friends indi cate that the murder may have been a case of mistaken identity or an attempted robbery gone wrong, but investigators are probing all possible scenarios that would unearth a motive. "We are following several leads, no one is in Police still ‘puzzled’ over mother’s murder SEE page 12 Hotel union elections will be held in next two months SEE page 12 Senator Allyson M aynard-Gibson

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE MAIN/SPOR TS SECTION Local News................................P1,2,3,5.6,7,8 Editorial/Letters. ......................................... P4 Sports .............................................. P9,10,11 BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION Business................................P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8 Advt..........................................................P10 Comics........................................................P9 Weather.....................................................P13 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES USA TODA Y MAIN SECTION 12 P AGES A GROUP of Miss Universe contestants travelled to beautiful Harbour Island yesterday, where they were greeted with enthusiasm by the locals and given the five-star treatment. The ladies flew in to North Eleuthera and were ferried across to the Harbour Island dock in several small boats, arriving at about 10.30am on what turned out to be a gorgeous, clear summer day. What seemed like the entire population of t he island – as well as a good number of t ourists – was on hand to greet the contestants, who were led to a waiting cavalcade of vehicles by a rousing local junkanoo troupe. They proceeded to Valentines Resort for refreshments and then on to the island’s Haunted House, the grounds of which are said to be wandered by the soul of an unnamed woman who appears in a wedding gown. The ladies then took in a local art gallery before hitting Bay Street for some shopping. They were then treated to an exquisite l unch by the staff of the Coral Sands, before s pending the rest of the afternoon relaxing on the world famous pink sand beach. Miss Universe contestants visit Harbour Island S TARSOFSTAGEANDSCREAM: T hecontestants visit Harbour Island’s Haunted House. MISS INDONESIA Zivanna Letisha Siregar speaks to youngsters on Harbour Island. MISS ZAMBIA Andella C hileshe Matthews along with M iss Turks and Caicos Jewel Selver are all smiles on their Harbour Island trip Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. PHOTOS: Felip Major/T ribune staf f

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By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – A large quantity of illegal drugs withan estimated street value of over $160,000 was seized by police early yesterday morning at a secluded beach on Grand Bahama. Asst Supt Loretta Mack ey, police press liaison officer, reported that sometime around 6.30am police went to the north-eastern area of Williams Town Beach, where they discovered a drug smuggling operation in progress. According to reports, four persons onboard a white 25ftvessel were seen off-loading a large quantity of drugs from the boat on to the beach. ASP Mackey said the culprits fled the area in the boat when police arrived at the scene. Officers recovered 162 pounds of suspected marijuana with a street value of $162,000. Police also discovered a black and chrome .380 handgun along with one magazine consisting of seven .380 rounds of ammunition. Drug Enforcement Unit (DEU ing their investigation into the matter. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009, PAGE 3 Beat the Summer heat in a great selection of Swim trunks, Surfer Shorts, Tees, Polos.by Vineyard Vines x xChairs Chairsx xTables Tablesx xBenches Benchesx xUmbrellas Umbrellasx xLoungers Loungersx xDrinks Trolleys Drinks Trolleysx xCoffee Tables Coffee Tablesx xEnd Tables End Tablesx xCushions CushionsT T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y T T h h e e J Ja a v v a a G G a a l ll l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Wong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Tel: (242 Tel: (242)326 2335 2335Outdoor Elegance Outdoor Elegance IT’S live and it’s officially the h ottest website in town! W ithin hours of the launch of TRIBUNE242 , hundreds of new visitors had registered, and manyg ot busy voting in the daily news poll on the site and commenting on the hot stories of the day. In fact, the number of daily hits j umped by more than 1 ,000 PER CENT from Sunday when TRI BUNE242 hosted just the PDF f lipbook to Monday when we l aunched our full feature website. The response so far has been overwhelming. We knew theB ahamian public was eager for T he Tribune t o launch an interactive website, but I think we were all amazed by the statistics we saw following day one,” said TRIBUNE242 online editor Jessica Robertson. The Tribune set up its website n ot only as a means of dissemin ating information, but as a way to generate intelligent conversat ions on the issues affecting B ahamians. P olls have been set up to allow each registered user only one vote on a given topic. This ensures that m ultiple votes by a single person c an’t skew the results. The first question asked was “With the murder toll now reachi ng 50, does the Government have the right policies to tackle crime on our streets?” By noon yesterday, more than 1 60 people had cast their votes – a resounding 83 per cent voted no – and many had left comments. M anaging Editor John Fleet h ailedthefirstdayof T RUBUNE242 a s a magnificent success. H e said: “The number of telep hone calls and e-mails from readers congratulating us has been fantastic. TRIBUNE242 is the only reliable online source for news in the Bahamas. The interaction which is already taking place is amazing, a nd it’s only Day One T RIBUNE242 i s updated daily at 2pm. The site will be open a ccess for a month, after that r eaders will be required to take o ut a paid subscription to access all sections. A STRANGE odour permeating the upper floor of the main building at Princess Margaret Hospitalh as led one visitor to call for a clean-up of the facility. The woman who identi f ied herself only as Ms Smith told The Tribune how the smell of “rotting dead bodies” wafted through the c orridor near the male sur gical ward as she was walk ing through to visit a friend in the hospital on Sunday. She believes the smell was coming from the morguea nd called Minister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis to investigate the stench whichs truck her as unhygienic. M s Smith said: “Whatever it is, I know it’s not healthy. I don’t know if it’s bodies r otting in there and the smell is seeping up, but it stinks. It smells like rottingd ead bodies, bodies decomposing. “Dr Minnis should get somebody to check it out because that’s what he’s being paid for.” Ventilation problems in the PMH morgue was one of the reasons why staff walked out of the hospital on a sick-out last year demanding overdue hazardous pay owing to unsuit able working conditions. Ms Smith said: “They need a new hospital, that place is the pits.” PMH press officer Thel ma Rolle said there are cur rently no problems with ventilation in the morgue and she expects the stench was blown over from piles of burning medical waste in t he engineering department in the back of the hospital grounds. S he said: “Smell is some thing that can come and go depending on how theb reeze is blowing, and what might smell like dead bodies is not necessarily the smell o f dead bodies. “Normally we do the fumigation process at theh ospital on evenings and weekends to avoid traffic of staff, so it is possible that isw hat she was smelling.” Visitor calls for clean-up at PMH after str ange odour Drugs worth $160,000 seized on beach POLICE seized an illegal firearm and six live rounds of ammunition from a man apprehended in the Kemp R oad area. Officers from the Wulff Road station spotted a man on the roof of a building as they patrolled Strachan's Alley, off Kemp Road, short-ly before 11pm Monday. After the man climbed down from the roof, police searched him and found a .380 handgun with six live rounds of ammunition in his possession. The suspect, a 25-year-old resident of Johnson Alley, is currently in police custody. He could appear in court on formal charges as early as tomorrow. Firearm, live r ounds seized WATER outages in eastern New Providence had some residents fuming yesterday. Area residents said they have been plagued with frequent water outages with no warnings, rusty water and low to no pressure for months now. "I was about to take a cold shower to cool off in this stifling heat and I couldn't. If this is going to happen Water and Sewerage should at least let me know. "It's too hot and sticky for this and I'm tired of it and it's always this area. I refuse to believe that this catch them by surprise," said one angry resident who lives near Yamacraw Beach. Another resident of the area said he is fed up with the utility company. "If I have to pay them for their services then they have to let me know (when the water will be off back, I just want them to respect me as a paying customer," he said. Attempts to secure a comment from the Water and Sewerage Corporation were unsuccessful yesterday. In May, Robert Deal, assistant general manager at the WSC, admitted that the rationing of water to homes in New Providence came as the supply of water stored by the corporation sunk to “critically low levels.” Anger over water outages WEATHER experts are now monitoring a second tropical depression that has formed in the Atlantic and could develop into a storm system within the next two days. As with tropical depression nine-e which is still hovering over the Atlantic, forecasters at the National Hurricane Centre (NHC this second system is not yet showing any signs of strengthening. At 5pm yesterday, the centre of tropical depression two was located about 400 miles west of the southernmost Cape Verde islands. The depression was moving toward the west at a speed of near 12mph. This general track with a slight increase in forward speedis expected over the next couple of days, the NHC said. Maximum sustained winds were near 30mph with higher gusts. Second tropical depression is monitored POLICE are searching for a man who physically assaulted a woman in the parking lot of The Tribune yesterday afternoon. Sometime after 2pm, a man of “dark” complexion was seen arguing with a woman as they both sat in a black coloured Ford Sport Trac. The man was reportedly demanding that the woman get out of the driver’s seat. After a verbal exchange, he began to repeatedly punch the woman in her head, eye-w itnesses said. Attempting to block the blows, the woman threw her hands in front of her face while the man began to pull on her as he dragged her outof the truck. When persons who were outside of the building begant o approach the pair, the man flung the woman into the backseat of the truck and sped off down Shirley Street. A police report was imme diately filed with officers at the Central Detective Unit who up until press time last night were still actively searching for the man. Search for man who physically assaulted woman Tribune website is the hottest in town THERE HAS been an overwhelming response to The Tribune’s website.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. Thank you for this opportunity to address you this letter. On Saturday, July 25, I went to Montagu Beach and thes tink odour was so bad that I thought the sea water was stink, so I continued to smell and discovered that the odour was coming from the Montagu ramp. On Saturday, August 1, I went on Montagu, and low and behold, passing the ramp therew as the horrible odour. What kind of nasty people are we? Paradise Island is just across from East Bay Street. Montagu r amp, East Bay Street is a one way street, when you come from over the bridge. There is no toilet, so those n asty people go in the bushes to relieve themselves, hands not w ashed, mingling with fish and conch for Bahamians to buy a nd eat. I don’t mind the fruit and the s traw vendors, but the fishermen must go. Family Guardian h ave my condolences. In the 60’s and 70’s one could go downtown and buy fish, mutton and fruits from the M arket, after it burnt down they moved to Potter’s Cay. PLP, FNM, you all know very well that some Bahamians are u nruly, hard-headed and stubborn. Mr. Health Minister, Mrs. M.P., Mr. Tourism Minister, when I pass the Montagu ramp,I would love to have my car glass down and so would the tourists, also Miss Universe and my Bahamian brothers and sisters. Please have these people moved to Potters Cay, they will cry that they have mouths to feed, but they must go. N ow PLP and FNM, if you all don’t get together and make those people move, you will be cut below the knees in 2012. P ATTE LEE, Nassau, August 7, 2009 C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE X, XXXDAY, XXXMONTH XX, 1998 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm JOHN Hincliffe, who for many years was p ort director in Freeport, told a Welsh news site recently that he believes the number ofg uns on New Providence streets is now worse than in the eighties when he lived h ere. The eighties an era notorious not only for drug peddling, but for gun smuggling with drive-by shootings the order of the day. Now, almost 20 years later, history isr epeating itself. Mr Hincliffe was commenting to the news m edia on the shooting death which he and many like him believe was a contract killing of banker and fellow Welshman, Hywel Jones, 55. Mr Hincliffe believes that because of the widespread corruption in the B ahamas, the Jones case will be difficult of solution. T he bank executive was walking from his car to his office on the morning of April 2 2 when a gunman stepped up and shot him in the head. So far no one has been arrested. Jones clung to life for about two weeks without regaining consciousness. He died on May 8. O ther than having a hunch that there are more guns in circulation in the Bahamas, a p olice officer said there are no current sta tistics to support this belief. W ith the Bahamas’ open borders and the US and its fanatical gun culture that adversely affects all its neighbours right on our doorstep, the police are daily challenged in their fight to get guns off the s treets. However, the officer said, this year the force had taken more firearms out of c irculation than ever before. In April this year the Bahamas Central I ntelligence Bureau (CIB of all persons released from prison that month. Of the 205 released, 153 were out on bail, and 39 were classified as persons who “should be monitored.” Eleven persons released on bail were in prison for murder or attempted murder,t hree for unlawful sexual intercourse, three for rape, and one for assault with intent to rape. Today most of the crime news that we report are offences being committed by per-s ons on bail. Some of these accused have long rap sheets. Most of their alleged o ffences are yet to be settled by the courts. On the April bail sheet was a person notorious for drug possession, and other crimes. He was accused, but acquitted of murder. However, all who know him, and his c riminal record claim he only got off the murder charge because witnesses were toot errified to testify against him. Here is a man acquitted by the courts, but released from p rison with the CIB recommendation that he “should be monitored.” Still under discussion by government is the implementation of electronic monitoring devices for persons out on bail. Apparentlyt hese devices are to be used only in cases where an accused has a criminal charge p ending. But what happens to a man, who the courts have acquitted, public opinion has convicted, and police don’t trust as beinga safe neighbour? How can the police monitor him without an electronic device being a ttached to his leg? The committee should include such a per s on in their considerations acquitted, but believed guilty. Apparently, even the police t hink the public should be protected against his anti-social behaviour. Either the rules have to be adjusted to accommodate this type of person, or a perpetual charge will have to be kept pending a gainst him to justify the device around his leg. I t is really unrealistic to make the police responsible for such a person without giving t hem the tools with which to do the monitoring job. As crime escalates, the police certainly need Closed Circuit Television (CCTV schools and other critical areas. Such devices m ight not only deter the criminal, but if caught on camera he can be quickly sought a nd brought to justice. The electronic device should now be beyond the talking stage. It is h oped that it will be a perpetual piece of jewellery for the convicted rapist, even after he has served his time. As crime increases and the community becomes more tense, talking committees have to speed up their deliberations and turn their talk into action. T he monitoring of these devices, once in place, will put an extra strain on the police force. Staff will have to be found to monitor them. There is no point having an anklem onitor on an accused if there is no one at the other end paying attention to his activi t ies. Even though this will put another burden on the police, many of them believe that something has to be done to assist them in enforcing the law and preventing crime. Stench from Montagu ramp is unbear able LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net More need for monitoring criminals ::IMPERIALOPTICAL ::ROSETTASTREETAND ::THEMALL-AT-MARATHON FORMOREINFO CALL 322 OR 393GET A FREE FRAMEwith the purchase of LensesBACK TO SCHOOLAND T’INGSTOUGH ? SALEAPPLIESTOSELECTEDFRAMES.SALEENDSAUGUST31,2009. E DITOR, The Tribune. Who will be appointed the n ext Chief Justice? Speculation abounds and at least two newspapers are actu ally naming candidates. M y five cents is simple a Chief Justice should be a person who is “lettered.” In other words has been to an accredited university and has a degree in Law, so this obvio usly eliminates effectively one of those mentioned. Current AG Michael Barnett h as certain political aspirations and I am reasonably sure he will try again, although this time around could be more of a chall enge for the FNM than 2007, if one is to believe current public opinion polling. Also there is the speculation if His Excellency A.D. Hanna retires who will be appointed, b ut that is not really a race as it is a shoe-in for the obvious totally acceptable bipartisan candidate who is well tried. The rumoured alternative is absolutely unacceptable to the majority of Bahamians. K. MINNIS, Nassau, August 10, 2009. E DITOR, The Tribune. I have listened to some of the views on the p roposed amendments to the (rape of spouse the sexual offences and domestic violence act, this is what our act is now. 1 5 (1 with his spouse without the consent of the spouseSexual assault by spouse. (a t hem(i ( ii) a decree of judicial separation; (iii (iv molest or cohabit with his spouse, or any othero rder made under Part II; or (b for judicial separation, divorce or nullity of mar-r iage has been presented to a court, is guilty of the offence of sexual assault by spouse and liable to imprisonment for a term of fifteen years. I see nothing wrong with this, we must all r espect each others privacy and if your spouse says no to you that should mean no. Here is the problem in which amending this l aw cannot help, persons with very low self esteem, too much pride, worrying about what others may say or think and putting children’sv acation/school fees and mortgage in front of self. If these amendments due become law it will put burden on the court system and theP olice because the spouses who are being abuse now, still will not come forward and other spous es will use the new law to waste the systems’ time by calling the police and then not appearingi n court. A spouse needs to say to the other half, if you violate me then you go or I go, because if it isd one once it will happen again, you must leave t hat situation put your trust in God only he can g ive you the strength to make it on your own, if y ou need to fall into someone arms fall into his a nd not your pastor. What we need in our country is more love and compassion towards each other, Mahatma Gandhi said: “A country is judged by the way it treats its animals” and that says a lot for The Bahamas with the high level of cruelty in this nation towards animals and children, it is no wonder w hy we breed the type of adults we have in this c ountry. Compassion and love for all living things is taught and expressed in very few homes today. S o let us pass better laws to protect our children and animals from abuse because this is where the seed is planted, our children grow up being abused and seeing animals abused. What do you think will happen to 75 per cent of them whent hey reach adulthood? I say to the politicians of this country please try a nd find a way make the cost of living cheaper so that parents can spend more time with their children. Parents stop trying to keep up with the Jones’s, take those extra hours and spend with your children, they do not need the extra games and clothes, this does not erase the memory of the only time you said anything was to shout at them or the only time you touched them was to h it them. “I object to violence because when it appears t o do good the good is only temporary, the evil it does is permanent” Gandhi. Show love to your children as God showed h is love to you. S TEPHEN TURNQUEST Nassau, August, 2009. Better laws needed to protect children, animals A Chief J ustice should be ‘lettered’

PAGE 5

By BETTY VEDRINE OFFICIALS of the Miss Universe organisation are hailing this year’s pageant as their best organised event ever and said they are very pleased with their partnership with the Bahamas. “Based on the comments that we’ve received, they are very pleased with the way that every thing is going,” said Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace. “In fact, the organisers said this has been the most organised event they have ever had and they are crediting it not only to the ministry but also to the corporate partners involved in this venture.” The Bahamas is hosting the 58th annual Miss Universe com petition featuring 84 of the world's most beautiful women. It airs live from Atlantis, Par adise Island, on August 23 on NBC and Telemundo. Paula Shugart, president of the Miss Universe organisation, said having the competition in here epitomises the qualities that are unique to the Bahamas. “Paradise," she said. "There is no better name for the beauty of the Bahamas and this island. “The worldwide telecast will highlight the warmth, beauty and hospitality of the islands of the Bahamas as well as the world renowned Atlantis Resort,” Ms Shugart said. Her organisation, she said, has had “a wonderful working relationship” with the Bahamas and Atlantis for many years. “I’m very excited that this global event will take this partnership to a whole new level,” she said. Minister Vanderpool-Wallace said: “The people of the Bahamas are proud and excited at the opportunity to host some of the most beautiful people in the universe in some of the most beautiful islands in the universe. “This feels like the perfect match. “We look forward to showcasing the hospitality of our people, the clarity of our waters, the vibrancy of our music, dance, food and spirit.” The reigning Miss Universe, Venezuelan, Dayana Mendoza, has travelled the world as an advocate for HIV/AIDS education, research and legislation. Contestants will be judged in three categories; swimsuit, evening gown and the interview. The competition will be hosted by Billy Bush, co-anchor of ‘Access Hollywood’ and Claudia Jordan of ‘Celebrity Appren tice’ and ‘Deal or no Deal’. International recording artist Flo Rida will perform his hits 'Right Round’ and ‘Jump’ during the swimsuit segment. There will also be a performances by reality star Heidi Montag featuring her single ‘Turn ya head'. David Guetta and Kelly Rowland will sing their hit single ‘When love takes over’ during the evening gown segment. Donald Trump and Phil Gurin serve as executive producers. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009, PAGE 5 By KATHRYN CAMPBELL DREDGING of Nassau Harbour is expected to officially begin t omorrow and be completed by N ovember. P roject manager with Boskalis I nternationalBVFrans T homassen informed government o fficials that the Nassau Harbour Port Project is on course. Mr Thomassen last weekend took a team of officials on a tour of the Nassau Harbour and Arawak Cay port projects sites. They were also shown the Ursa, t he rock cutting self-propelled d redger to be used to move 1.9 million cubic yards of material f rom the harbour. Voyage T he $44.2 million Nassau Harbour Port Improvement Project is being carried out to accommodate the new mega Genesis Class cruise ship ‘Oasis of the Seas’ which ise xpected to stop in Nassau during its maiden voyage in December. T he Ministry of Public Works and Transport said the dredged material will be stockpiled on A rawak Cay for use in future gov ernment projects. Some of it will be used to extend Arawak Cay by 1,000 feet. T he project also includes the i nstallation of three mooring dolphins at Prince George Wharf. I am most pleased having t oured the dredger,” said Minister Grant. “I have every confidence that the project will remain on schedule. “The dredger has some five h eads (instrument on the dredger used to cut rock). With this sort of preparation there is no doubt that we will proceed on schedule.” A mong the officials were Public Works and Transport Minister N eko Grant; Environment Minister Earl Deveaux; permanent sec-r etary at the Ministry of Works C olin Higgs; permanent secretary at the Ministry of the Environ-m ent Ronald Thompson; acting d irector of Works Gordon Major; director of the Bahamas Environ ment Science and Technology (BESTW eech, and Ministry of Works’ project engineer Robert Garraway. Harbour dredging is set to begin tomorrow GRAND Bahama police are investigating the cause of a fire which almost destroyed an 11r oom home on East Sunr ise Highway on Monday. ASP Loretta Mackey r eported that the Police F ire Department responded to a building f ire at approximately 8 .55pm. W hen firemen went to Sunrise Highway, near Ariel Place, theyo bserved an 11-room single stone structure engulfed in flames. The fire was exting uished. The house, which owned by a resident of Freeport, wase xtensively damaged. Fire in Grand Bahama is investigated This year’ s Miss Universe pageant ‘best organised’ PONCE INLET, Fla. THEVolusia County B each Patrol says a tourist from Spain has been bitten b y a shark off of Florida’s Atlantic coast, according to Associated Press. Authorities say the man, 26, whose name was not immediately available, suffered small punctures ont he top and bottom of his l eft foot while sitting on his surfboard Monday e vening. Beach Patrol spokesman Scott Petersohn said the man was treated at thes cene and left. It was not known if he went to hospi tal after that. Spanish tourist bitten by shark in Florida LEFT: Frans Thomassen, project manager with Boskalis International BV, gives government ministers an overview of the Ursa dredger to be used in the Nassau Harbour Port Improvement Project.P ictured from left are Minister of the E nvironment Earl Deveaux, Mr T homassen and Public Works and T ransport Minister Neko Grant. CONTESTANTS in the Miss Universe pageant are pictured at Government House with Governor-General Arthur Hanna; Ministry of Tourism's Director General Vernice Walkine, and members of the royal Bahamas Police Force Band. Derek Smith /BIS B ELOW: P ublic Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant points to where o ne of the three mooring dolphins will b e installed as part of the Nassau Harbour Port Improvement Project. Pict ured from left are permanent secret ary at the Ministry of the Environment R onald Thompson; Minister of the E nvironment Earl Deveaux; Frans Thomassen, project manager with B oskalis International BV and Mr Grant.

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BECAUSE of the lost jobs and the resultings tress on people’s day-today lives, the fallout from the world economic crisis is front and centre in then ation’s consciousness. There are programmes on stream to assist the unem ployed. There are also capital projects such as Albany, the airport and seaport developments that w ill stimulate growth. The plan for the renew al of downtown Nassau is long overdue and will produce benefits for decades to come. When the economies in the developed world resume vigorous growth, resort devel opments in New Providence and the Family I slands will once again f lourish. These are rela t ively easy happenings that will pull us out of the present slump. That is all well and good, but it won’t solve the most serious threat to the future of The Bahamas. The most serious threat to the Bahamian way of life is the state of our public education establishment which produces poor results and does not prep are the majority of our y outh so that they can live p roductive and fulfilling lives. This crisis is not new and this is not the first time that this column has visited the subject. A recent study has highlight ed the crisis and has also shown what is possible by pointing to two schools that have been producing superior results. Dealing with this crisis will make dealing with the economic crisis look easy, but we have no choice but to put this job front and centre if we are to fulfil our duty to the next generation. There has been passing attention to the problems with education in the media but it pales in comparison to the attention being given to the relocation of the port. Reading most of the media online I have not noticed any sustained outrage about the number of oury oung people who receive poor or failing grades. There are numerous arti cles on matters financial b ut few if any about our real wealth, the youth of The Bahamas. It is worth once again emphasizing that the countries that have the best quality of life and the highe st standards of living are not the ones with the most natural resources but the ones with the most educated populations. Let us not let down our children and their children. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Dealing with economic cr isis is easy, relatively THE Progressive Young Liberals (PYL debate raging over the national grade average, calling on government to p lace more attention on specialised classrooms and teachers who can furt her advance the Bahamas’ education system. Noting how the grade average has fallen from a ‘D+’ to a ‘D’, the PYL said this once again represents the lack of progress within the educationa l system to “better equip young peop le for the global world that we live i n.” “Bahamians would remember that it was just last year the minister cele-b rated the rise from a ‘D’ to a ‘D+’, but today we are right where we start-e d from, poised to try to reclaim the D+’ average instead of advancing furt her toward an ‘A’ and here is why: “The Ingraham government has failed to recognise that in order to c reate achievers in our system it must deliver the kinds of upgrades necessary to advance education through-o ut the country. Specialised classrooms with wireless technology, specialty trained teachers in core subject areas such as mathematics and English. And the creation of an environm ent in which there is a zero tolerance approach to detractors, human or o therwise in our system to in anyway hinder the learning process.” The PYL said that the education system must also demand greater responsibility from parents who are t he first instructors of students in this society. As the youth wing of the PLP, the PYL said they found the Ministry of Education’s 10-year plan rather interesting, and even applauded governm ent for its efforts. However, they added that the probl ems facing education have persisted for “far too long” and need “immediate attention.” “The Bahamian student can no longer be allowed to fail and mediocrity can no longer be acceptable. For far too long the results of the B JC and BGCSE have been bandied a bout the halls of parliament and in the press by politicians as a stick to brow beat one another with for polit-i cal reasons. “While announcing the results, the m inister said ‘when I am satisfied that e very child in the Bahamas has a chieved their full potential then I will be satisfied, until then no stone will be left unturned and no initiative left u ntried until we reach that moment.’ “The question is we are now at the half-way mark of the minister’s terma nd what can he say that he has done substantially to achieve that goal,” the PYL asked. Further, the PYL said that the announcements that government is s uspending its Education Loan Programme and that more than 3,000 new s tudents are being transferred into the public school system, which is inclusive of children whose parents can no longer afford private schools, “paint a fearful picture of more problems to c ome.” These problems include overcrowded classrooms, fewer teachers, lower grades and essentially more failu res, the organisation said. So what does that minister intend to do to achieve his goal of every student living up to their potential? When a re we going to realise that education is the key to solving a lot of the social ills that we face, and that access to ag ood education is a basic human right? T he minister has to know that no longer can he or his administration continue to pay lip service to this m ajor problem.” “We call on the government to move with swiftness to make sure that t he youth of the nation are in a posit ion to be active contributing citizens of this country in a positive way and to be able to compete on the global stage a s will be required of them. “The PYL calls on the present government to live up to all the promisesm ade to the young people of the count ry during the 2007 election campaign. We are waiting on the results not the usual rhetoric, or the usual promises, b ut results,” the young politicians said. Falling grades ‘show lack of progress in education system’ V IEW FROM A F AR J O HN I S SA By NATARIO McKENZIE T ribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net THE country’s current national ‘D’ grade average of students sitting the Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Education examinations (BGCSE p roblems within the public school system, it was claimed yesterday. During a press conference at t he Ministry of Education yesterday, Education Minister Carl B hat the nationa examinations (BJC 2008 the national average in the B GCSE examination was a ‘D+’ and a ‘C-’ in the BJC examinations. Economist Ralph Massey, who has written a Bahamian public policy essay based on the 2006 national grade average t old TheTribune yesterday that the fluctuating ‘D’ average is “deceptive” and does not reflect a true distribution of scores in the public and private s chool sectors. “In the past it almost seemed like these kinds of fluctuations w BGCSE examination results are down from last year’s ‘D+’O REIGNINGMISSUNIVERSEARRIVES The national grade average falls to ‘D’SF e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f The Progressive Young Liberals join the debate THETRIBUNE reported on the falling national grade average last week MIAMI NEARLYthree months after a boat overloaded with Haitian migrants capsized off South Florida's coast, the body of the youngest drowning vict im lies unclaimed in a morgue, according to Associated Press. Advocates in Miami's Little Haiti pressed federal authorities Tuesday to release the 8-month-old girl's parents so they can bury the child they lost in the fast-flowing Gulf S tream current and to fight the government's efforts to deport them back to Haiti. The body of Luana Augustin was among nine recovered from the ocean. The infant remains at the Palm Beach County medical examiner's office, along with the bodies of three other women who died in the accident and have not been identified. Chandeline Leonard, 32, and Lucsene Augustin, 26, have been in U.S. custody since May 13 when the boat capsized and sank off Boynton Beach, some 60 miles north of Miami. The grief-stricken couple from Port-de-Paix, Haiti, are plagued with nightmares about the baby's drowning and need counseling and the ability to plan Luana's funeral, relatives and advocates said. "It's very critical for her" to see the baby buried, said Leonard's cousin, Albert Noel of Miami. Marleine Bastien, executive director of Haitian Women of Miami, said the Department of Homeland Security has not responded to the couple's request for humanitarian parole, which is occasionally granted for pregnant women or others with serious medical conditions. "As a matter of human decency, they should have been released in order to bury their little baby girl, to deal with their immigration cases and to be with family," Bastien said. Leonard and Augustin have been transferred to U.S. Marshals Service custody, said U.S. Immigration and Cus toms Enforcement spokeswoman Nicole Navas. Mes sages left at the Marshals Service's Miami and West Palm Beach offices were not imme diately returned Tuesday. Luana could receive a county burial if no one can afford to bury her, said Tony Mean, operations manager for the Palm Beach County medical examiner's office. The parents can designate a friend or relative to make the necessary arrangements, but that has not happened. The three unidentified women will receive county burials, Mead said. The medical examiner's office will keep Luana's body and says it will wait until the situation is resolved. Advocates: Release two Haitians to bury daughter Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y.

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By E.V. I HAVE decided to speak up at this time because I am tired of the government introducing legislation without regard to the rights and protection of the entire populace and not just one segment of it. Now it appears that they want to control the sacred marital bed which the Lord, the supreme and greater judge than all of us, has declared undefiled. Do you mean to tellme that we (men that we know what is better for us than the Creator himself? God forbids. What righthas government to control anyone’s bedroom? What is next on the agenda, are they going to then tell me how to run my family? They could legislate the most sacred and intimate portion of my relationship with my wife. This is a private and personal matter. I am sure that I speak for most men in this country when I say that rape is wrong, it is a vicious and violent act, and the punishment should be death. No one regardless of gender or status should be forced to have sex against their will, this is how I really feel about rape. The family is the foundation of any society and what the government is effectively doing is destroying the foundation of this country. The man is the head of the home as Christ is the head of the church. Did the married members of parliament forget what the preacher read to them from the word of God when they stood before God and the many witnesses when they were married? Did they take their vows seriously or was this just a formality. No institution created by God or man could function effectively with two heads. There can be only one authoritative figure. Just ask our Prime Minister who makes this clear as inferred by his statements as often as he can. What this proposed legislation is attempting to do is put the man in an unfavourable position. Men would now be afraid to put their foot down on family issues because when he goes to bed at night and has sexual relations with his wife and if she is a spiteful, conniving or unscrupulous person, she could then wake up in the morning and file a complaint against her husband just to get back at him. Sex between husband and wife, which God ordained, then becomes a weapon. The woman could use her body as a weapon. If you want this then you better do this for me or you better behave in a certain way. Does the man have the same right? Absolutely not. Even though I am not condoning such acts. This legisla tion if passed would then effectively put the woman in charge of the home. Because this weapon is so p owerful this would essentially make the man a puppet in his own home. It is nothing short of holding a gun to the man’s head. That is what I mean by the woman using her body as a weapon. After the man has sex with his wife, what is there to stop her from tellingh im do this or else, do that or else I will report you. It is not different from someone hold ing a gun to my head and telling me do this or else. It is a weapon. If they want to outlaw something why don’t they outlaw premarital or un-natural sex, which does far more harm to a country than sex between married couples? Maybe then we would have more men thinking twice and taking responsibilities for their actions rather than leaving women to raise children on their own. If the problem is domestic violence then deal with that but the government and the law has no right to be in a couple’s bedroom. This is perhaps the most sacred event in the lives of husbands and wives and now the government wants to threaten it. Many of us got married so that we could experience a sexual relationship with the one we love without having a guilty conscience. If this law is passed what incentive is there for many of our young men to do the right thing and marry the ones they love? I also see this as an excuse to promote sweethearting because if his wife decides to use this weapon against him then it leaves him with threec hoices: 1. Leave her for a woman who understands the role of a wife (divorce then remarry), 2. Find a sweetheart who is willing to meet his needs, or 3. Remain in the home powerless. Which choic es do you think he would take? 1. A real man would never f orce his wife to have sex a real woman would never force her husband to have sex. 2. A real man would never withhold sex from his wife a real woman would never withhold sex from her husband. 3. His body is not his according to the Bible her body is not hers according to the Bible. 4. Sex is his obligation sex is her obligation. Last but not least this would essentially be a double whammy against the man. That is, it would destroy his family, because it would force him to sweetheart or look for satis faction elsewhere, and when this happens and the woman files for a divorce on the grounds that the man was sweethearting, the courts would not consider that it was the woman who initiated the whole thing by using her body as a weapon and depriving her husband of his rights. This same man then has to pay alimony and other expenses, why because he simply wanted to have sex with the woman God gave him to have sex with. I urge this entire country to rise up against this foolishness. Marriage is the last institution known to man that he has control over without the threat of governmental interference andn ow our parliament is threatening to change that. So what if it is the law in other parts of the world. Don’t make the same mistake here? Many things are laws in other countries to which we don’t subscribe, perhaps that is why those countries are int he mess they are in. I challenge anyone who wants to debate this point. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009, PAGE 7 Marital rape legislation: Where are my rights? Y OUR S AY A DIGITAL map and threed imensional model of Nassau as well as an electronic database of historic sites on New Provi d ence will be created as part of projects developed with the assistance of Florida Agricul-t ural and Mechanical Universi t y. Heritage sector representatives met at the British Colonial H iltonrecently to discuss a proposed digital mapping project for the city ofNassau with offi-c ials from Florida A and M Uni versity's School of Architecture. Participants at the meeting i ncluded representatives from the College of the Bahamas,the Downtown Nassau Partnership a nd the Antiquties, Monuments andMuseums Corporation, as well as from several government agencies andprivate sector groups. Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University began life as atraining centre for African-Americans in 1887. It became a stateuniversity in 1953, and today there are more than 12,000 students onthe 420acre campus near Tallahassee, including 58 Bahamians manystudying architecture. The university features an Office of Black Diasporan Cul ture whosemission is to foster tolerance and understanding by explaining anddemonstrating traditions and folkways that have their roots in Africa. This Office sponsors a Bahamian Junkanoo group (the Rhythm Rushers) and helps recruit Caribbean students through a scholarship programme. FAMU is also the home to the respected Black Archives Research Centreand Museum, an important national and inter national research institution for African-American stud ies.The centre is one of the largest repositories of AfricanAmericanhistorical and cultural documents. "We want to provide techni cal skills and digital resources to the AMMC and scholarships to Bahamian students," accord ing to Dr Andrew Chin, director of architecture programmes at FAMU. "We are here for feedbackand discussions." Among the projects being developed are the creation of a digital mapand three-dimensional model of the city of Nas sau, an electronic database of historic sites on New Provi dence, and digital recreations of historic buildings that fea ture vernacular Bahamian archi tecture. "These projects will be a source of information for environmental impact assessments, heritage tourism initiatives and archaeologicalsurveys," Dr Chin said. "They will document t raditional architecture t hat is in danger of disappearing and will provide important r esources for planners, tourists and citizens." The research and scholarship p artnership being forged b etween the AMMC, FAMU and the College of the Bahamas will be one of theCorporation's c hief contributions to the redevelopment of the city ofNassau, which is being led by the Down-t own Nassau Partnership. According to Vaughn Roberts, managing director oft he DNP, thegovernment has made strong commitments towards the revitalisation o f Nassau, including harbour dredging and reclamation, and r emoval of the c ontainer port from the city. Legislation is also being draft e d to create an effective model oflocal government for the downtown area, and laws areb eing revised to prevent the d emolition of historic buildings on purpose or by neglect. Meanwhile, the AMMC is w orking on the restoration of Centreville Houseon the former Collins Estate on ShirleyS treet. The grounds are being devel oped into a public park and the 3 5,000-square-foot building isexpected to become the home of the National Museum of the B ahamas. PROJECTSTOGIVENASSAUA NEWDIMENSION HERITAGE SECTOR meeting at British Colonial Hilton. From left: Charles Klonaris, co-chair of Downtown Nassau Partnership; State Minister of Culture Charles Maynard;Dr Andrew Chin,director of architecture programmes at FAMU; Dr Keith Simmonds, assistant dean of the College of Arts & Sciences at FAMU; and Dr Keith Tinker, executive director of the Antiquities, Monuments & Museums Corporation.

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C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By LARRYSMITH T HEheadline for this artic le is a recent quote from a CNN commentator talking about healthcare reform in the United States. But it could just as easily refer to the utter n onsense circulating about Arawak Cay in the Bahamas. The argument in the US has been fueled by Sarah Palin's charge that President Obama plans to set up "deathp anels" to force euthanasia on old folks and the disabled. And at least one Democratic congressman has received death threats for his supporto f healthcare reform. Here at home, the conspira cy theory marketed by PLP S enator Jerome Fitzgerald a nd his crew of political opera tives accuses Deputy Prime M inister Brent Symonette of masterminding the white oligarchy's plot to secretly enrich themselves from a port at Arawak Cay. In fact, the entire debate over the multi-million-dollar road improvements, harbour dredging, downtown revitalis ation, future of the shipping i ndustry, and public disclosure has been hijacked and reduced to the PLP's racially divisive 2007 election slogan: "No turning back". T ough Call a ttended a town meeting at the British Colonial Hilton last week. It w as designed to discuss the $100 million roads project, the $ 50 million harbour dredging a nd $24 million waterfront reclamation project, and the projected expansion of the container port at Arawak C ay, which is still in limbo. The meeting was held in response to increasingly stri-d ent calls for more informa tion on these important projects. Three cabinet ministersa nd several top officials made presentations, and attendance was no doubt boosted by the a nticipation of political fire w orks. In fact, it was standing room only at the Hilton which had substituted a smaller room at the last minute, according to government officials. The limited space wasf urther reduced by stacks of videotape and projector equipment from BIS, JCN and ZNS, and there was evena cash bar to throw fuel on the fire. The ante-room to the meeting hall was filled with p oster displays and document h andouts. And Ministry of Works Permanent Secretary Colin Higgs told participantst hey would receive e-mail responses to questions submitted in writing, and noted t hat DVD's of the presentat ion would be available in short order. Most of the audience was c ontent to sit and take in the presentations by senior officials from the Ministries ofW orks, Tourism and the E nvironment. And the more i nquisitive hoped to take part in the one-hour designated q uestion-and-answer session at the end of the presentations. B ut that portion of the meeting was unfortunately hijacked by a handful of politicos and eccentrics who took up most of the time making angry sermons, offering irrelevant comments or e xpressing off-the-wall opinions. A small band of heck lers jeered the speakers t hroughout much of the meeting. Government officials sat i mpassively for the most part, but at the end, the hecklers complained bitterly about a lack of democracy, demand i ng that more people should be given the opportunity to ask questions. One woman sitting behind me sucked her teeth and remarked portentously, "it ain't gonna be no silent revolution this time!" T his was a clear reference to the racially divisive campaign that has been built up by PLP politicos over the past several weeks in relation to the plans to move container facilities from downtown Nassau to Arawak Cay, where m ore than a third of oceang oing cargo already arrives. It appears that this plan has been pushed back some-w hat by the government's requirement for the Arawak Cay Port Development Comp any to produce an environm ental impact assessment, an environmental management plan and a traffic study beforet he port expansion can proceed. This was contained in a letter to the developers fromt he prime minister, portions o f which were read at the m eeting. Jimmy Mosko, chairman o f the ACPDC, later told me the developers were in the process of arranging theses tudies and hoped to start work on the new port before the end of the year. This is a departure from previous statements, which indicated the port expansion could proceed concurrently with the h arbour dredging. There also appears to be some divergence between theg overnment and the developers over access to the cay. In other words, will the existingc auseways through the Fish Fry be used to truck containers to the inland warehouse off Gladstone Road, or will an ew causeway or bridge be built to connect to the Saund ers Beach/Bethel Avenue r oad corridor now under cons truction? D espite these gaps and the memorandum of understanding between the government and the developers is still under negotiation the m ore one learns about the pros and cons of this project, the clearer it becomes that A rawak Cay is the best location for a modern shipping t erminal on New Providence one that will have a 50-year l ifespan. T here are already containe r facilities at Arawak Cay a nd the new port will make use of the existing harbour channel that has been dredged several times over t he past century. At 100-plus acres there is more than enough land for future expans ion; and as an artificial island t he cay can be easily secured. In addition, the port development can piggyback on the e xpensive harbour dredging a nd road improvements now u nderway nearby. The port will require new b ulkheading on the northern shore, maintenance dredging o f less than 200,000 cubic yards of material from the existing channel, the addition of two lift cranes onshore, and some 20 acres of pavement, p lus security fencing occupyi ng a total land area of about 4 0 acres on the existing cay. Another five acres on the eastern tip will handle interisland ferries, the Mailboat Company and tour boats. B ut there is another angle to this saga that has not been discussed. A Canadian maritime consultant concluded in 2007 that the government should be concerned aboutt he cost of maritime transport, "which anecdotal evidence suggests is today higher than it would be in a market in which there was effectivep rice competition. Government participation is import ant to ensure that the new p ort...encourages real price c ompetition among the shipp ing lines." A ccording to the consultant Peter Smith the penalty for not moving the container facilities from downtown Nassau, apart from the increasing traffic congestion and conflict with tourism, would be increasing costs for the shipping lines, who in the c urrent non-competitive envir onment would simply pass these costs on to their customers. And in fact, there is some indication that one of the rea-s ons for the delay in finalising a port agreement is a difference of opinion over the p rospective revenue split between the government and t he developers. The shippers w ant to keep lucrative container handling fees for them selves while the government wants all revenue to go into t he same pot and be shared according to the equity split. The latest version of the a greement calls for a 40 per cent split between the shippers and the government,w ith the remaining 20 per cent offered to the public. But there has been no discussion o f how this will affect future a ccess to the Bahamian market for possible new entrants to the shipping industry. The question of open competition must be publicly addressed, and the system of charges for maritime transport and port services should be fully transparent. It is, of course, foolish to believe that the politicos who are now manipulating this debate can ever be satisfied. But we have no doubt that as much information as possible should be put into the public domain. And in fact, most of t he relevant documents are already on the BEST Commission website. As an interesting aside, one of those documents describes the origin of thed erelict Customs shed on A rawak Cay that Bahamians h ave complained about for d ecades and successive gove rnment have simply ignored. T he original plans identified the building's upper level as a "passenger hall", and a pparently the prefabricated building was intended to be erected on the middle pier at Prince George Wharf, but was too wide. So when it arrivedi n the 1970s it had to be put s omewhere else. T he Arawak Cay site m eant there was no deep d raft access, so it could not be used for its intended purp ose. For a time it was used as a n office and warehouse for t he Customs Department, but lack of maintenance created conditions that led Customs officers to go on strike. Eventually, the building w as abandoned and bits and p ieces of Arawak Cay were l eased out for various industrial purposes over the years. I t's time to put this land to proper use as a modern porta nd end the asphyxiation of d owntown Nassau. What do you think? S end comments to larry@tribunemedia.netO r visit www.bahamapundit.com ‘If you want a debate, fine – if you want to lie, get a radio show’ T T h h e e r r e e a a r r e e a a l l r r e e a a d d y y c c o o n n t t a a i i n n e e r r f f a a c c i i l l i i t t i i e e s s a a t t A A r r a a w w a a k k C C a a y y a a n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w p p o o r r t t w w i i l l l l m m a a k k e e u u s s e e o o f f t t h h e e e e x x i i s s t t i i n n g g h h a a r r b b o o u u r r c c h h a a n n n n e e l l t t h h a a t t h h a a s s b b e e e e n n d d r r e e d d g g e e d d s s e e v v e e r r a a l l t t i i m m e e s s o o v v e e r r t t h h e e p p a a s s t t c c e e n n t t u u r r y y . .

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 9, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE D ATE OF BIRTH: A ugust 27, 1978. AGE: 30 years old. SCHOOL: N/A. EVENT(S M en’s long jump. BEST PERFORMANCE(S 8.19 metres. HOBBIES: Watching movies, sailing, reading and cooking. EXPECTATIONS: To produce my best performance. P ARENTS: Lesar do and Malvease Moxey. OSBOURNE MOXEY DATE OF BIRTH: November 11, 1984. AGE: 24-years-old. SCHOOL: CC Sweeting Sr. and Dickinson State U niversity. EVENT(S 100/200 metres. BEST PERFORMANCE(S 10.23 and 21.03 seconds. HOBBIES: V olleyball, cars, softball, dining. EXPECTATIONS: To perform to the best of my ability, make myself, my country, my coach and my family pr oud. Make it to the final and run a personal best time. PARENTS: Sherry Anne and Adrian Griffith. ADRIAN GRIFFITH D ATE OF BIRTH: Jul y 16, 1986. AGE: 23-y ear s-old. SC HOOL: CI Gibson Secondar y High/Portland State U niv er sity. EVENT(S 100/200 metres. BES T PERF ORMAN CE(S 1 1 .6 and 23.7 seconds. HOBBIES: Singing and lis t ening to music. EXPECTATIONS: To execute. P ARENT S: R ub y and John Saunder s. JERNISE SAUNDERS DATE OF BIRTH: January 19, 1982. AGE: 2 7-y ears-old. SCHOOL: CR Walker Secondary High/St. Augustine’s College N orth Carolina. EVENT(S 200/400 metres. BES T PERF ORMANCE(S 200 20.6 seconds and 400 45.6 seconds. HOBBIES: Hor seback riding and motivational speaking. EXPECTATIONS: Always to win. P ARENT S: Sher r y Ann Woods and Anthony McKinney. NATHANIEL MCKINNEY D ATE OF BIR T H: F ebr uar y 17, 1987. AGE: 22 years-old. SCHOOL: CR Walker Secondary High/Dickinson S tate University. EVENT(S 400 metres/1600 metre relay. BEST PERFORMANCE(S 45.35 seconds. HOBBIES: Junkanoo. EXPECTATIONS: To make the final and accomplish a ne w per sonal r ecord. PARENTS: Clarice Knowles. RAMON MILLER D ATE OF BIRTH: January 7, 1993. AGE: 1 6-years-old. SC HOOL: CI Gibson Secondar y High. EVENT(S 200/400 met ees. BES T PERF ORMAN CE(S 54. 1 7 seconds. HOBBIES: Dancing and swimming. EXPECT ATIONS: T o be the bes t that I can be. PARENTS: Bernadette Bodie-Miller. KATRINA SEYMOUR ATHLETE PROFILES IAAFWORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS BERLIN 2009

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCALANDINTERNATIONAL SPORTS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009, PAGE 10 Brown was the team’s top scorer in each of the match-e s with an aggregate score o f 162 runs. He netted 31 runs, not out, in the opener against Cayman Islands, 44 runs, not out, in the first matcha gainst Belize and 37 runs in the second match versus Cayman. Brown has had ar ecent string of stellar n ational team performances, beginning with his play as a m ember of the Bahamas’ under 19 team which battled Canada and the UnitedS tates last month. Bahamas Cricket Associa tion representative, Paul Thompson, said This is the first time the BahamasC ricket Association will be hosting such an event and t he they have pledged that it will be hosted properly. “it is so important for the B ahamas and for the local Cricket community to have a tournament of this stature to be hosted here in the Bahamas. It is somethingt hat has not been really receiving much attention but it is a monumental step fort he game and our regional status,” he said. T he tournament is of a developmental nature as it filters under 15 players into the under 19 program. “It is amazing what these y oung men are achieving thus far and the perfor m ance that they had today is indicative of the work put through by the developmentp rogram” he said, “.” ICC Americas awarded the hosting of the tourna ment to the Bahamas as the top affiliate in the Americasa fter showing progress with an under 15, under 19 and Senior National Team. Cayman Islands are an associate country and theB ahamas and Belize are affiliates. There are three tiers in the ICC, test playing countries, of which there are ten, 35 associates and 59a ffiliates. The Bahamas participated in the last tournament in Bermuda in 2007w here it placed last against associate countries. This year, because of several affiliate countries being able to produce under 15 teams, ICC Americas has divided the region into three divisions, Northern, Central and Southern. In the Northern Division we have Canada, Bermuda and the United States, all associate countries. In the Central Division: Bahamas, Belize and Cayman Islands and in the Southern: Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Surinam. As this is a new format there will be no progress to the Northern Division this year but it will happen in 2011. Bahamas takes first place at ICC tournament F ROM page 11 Additional and medal placemen t Shawn ‘Vicious’ Smith 1st place Trophy Men – Forms/ Kata 1st place Trophy Men Combined Beginners & Inter mediate – Weapons Forms/ Kata 2nd place Trophy Men Intermediate – Point Fighting/Kumite 2nd place Trophy Men & Women combined – Self Defense Additional 4th place and medal placement Quon ‘Quarter’ White 1st place Trophy Men – Point Fighting/Kumite Additional 4th place and medal placement Romaine ‘BA’ Leslie 3rd place Trophy Men Point Fighting/Kumite 1st place Trophy Men Beginners – Forms/ Kata Additional medal placement Sensei Julian Rolle 1st in Advance Point Fighting/Kumite 1st in Advance Forms/ Kata 24 trophies FROM page 11 ANDY MURRAY from Great Britain, reacts during his match against Jeremy Chardy from France, during second round of play at the Rogers Cup tennis tournament, Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2009 in Montreal. Murray won 6-4, 6-2. A P P h o t o / T h e C a n a d i a n P r e s s , P a u l C h i a s s o n Federer, Murray win first matches since Wimbledon By RONALD BLUM AP Sports Writer Landon Donovan knows just how much visitors struggle in the altitude and pollution of Azteca Stadium. Like a lot of U.S. players, he’s familiar with the shortness of breath and the sting of losing there. “If you walk around in Mex ico City for a few minutes, you’ll be tired,” the American forward said. “There’s very real issues there.” Winless in Mexico since it first started playing there in 1937, the U.S. soccer team returns to 105,000-seat Azteca on Wednesday when qualifying for next year’s World Cup resumes. With some players coming off European club openers last weekend and others looking ahead to the first weekend of England’s Premier League, U.S. players weren’t given much time to acclimatize to the 7,200-foot altitude. Players from Major League Soccer and Europe gathered in Miami, then traveled to Mexico on Tuesday. “We have worked for a long time with different people, different experts, on altitude train ing, including many from the U.S. Olympic Committee,” U.S. coach Bob Bradley said Monday. “The research we have stuck with is one that says if you don’t have enough time to acclimatize, which can take 10 days or so, then going in late is your best bet.” The U.S. is 0-22-1 in Mexico, including 0-18-1 in Mexico City. The Americans gained a 0-0 tie at Azteca in a 1997 qual ifier, playing the final 58 minutes short-handed after defender Jeff Agoos was ejected for elbowing Pavel Pardo in the neck after Pardo had hit Agoos in the back. In two qualifiers at Azteca under coach Bruce Arena, the Americans lost 1-0 in 2001 and 2-1 four years later. “The sightlines are real diffi cult for players,” Arena said. “The field looks like you’re out in the country, and then you start dealing with the heat and the altitude, and it gets to your head. And it’s not only your head the physiology, it’s difficult. It’s very difficult. And I remember games where, you know, we’ve had oxygen at halftime.” Seeking its sixth straight World Cup appearance, the U.S. is in good shape halfway through the final round of North and Central American and Caribbean qualifying and likely would advance by win ning its two remaining home games: against El Salvador on Sept. 5 at Sandy, Utah, and vs. Costa Rica on Oct. 14 at Washington, D.C. Costa Rica is first with 12 points, followed by the United States (3-1-1 duras (2-2-1 ico (2-3 (1-2-2 and Tobago (0-3-2 The top three nations qualify, and the No. 4 team goes to a playoff against the No. 5 nation from South America. Mexico has played just two home matches and is feeling intense pressure to win Wednesday. Even though it’s a midweek game, Mexico scheduled it for a 4 p.m. EDT start increasing the heat that U.S. players may find difficult when combined with the altitude and pollution. “We have to take advantage of all those factors,” Mexican goalkeeper Guillermo Ochoa said. The rivalry has been almost equally lopsided the other way on U.S. soil. Mexico had been 0-9-2 against the Americans in the United States since March 1999 before winning 5-0 last month in the final of the CONCACAF Gold Cup at Giants Stadium. But just one U.S. regular was in the lineup for that one, and Mexico also went mostly with backups. When the teams met in Feb ruary in a qualifier at Colum bus, Ohio, the United States won 2-0. But the Americans have struggled on the road, tying 2-2 at El Salvador and losing 3-1 in Costa Rica. “We’re confident that we can play with any team in the world,” Donovan said. “And it’s no longer good enough to hope for a point on the road.” With a victory, the U.S. might put itself in position to clinch in September, meaning players wouldn’t have to return from Europe again in October. And, these players would become the first Americans to win at Azteca. “It would be special, no question,” goalkeeper Tim Howard said. “We know the history. We’re well aware of it, which makes the challenge that much more spe cial.” EVERTON FC GOALIE Tim Howard stops a shot on goal to win the game in a shootout against MSL All Star's in the second half of the MLS All Star game in Sandy, Utah, Wednesday, July 29, 2009. Everton beat the All Stars 6-5 in a shootout. US returns to altitude of Azteca A P P h o t o / G e o r g e F r e y EVERTON FC goalkeeper Tim Howard listens to a question during a press conference in Park City, Utah, Mon day, July 27, 2009. MONTREAL Roger Federer, playing for the first time since winning Wim bledon, returned to the court with a 7-6 (3 Frederic Niemeyer at the Rogers Cup on Tuesday night, according to Associated Press . F ederer, who took time off while his wife gave birth to twin girls, took a set to find his range and then the top-ranked Swiss star puta way the low-ranked Niemeyer. The 33-year-old Niemeyer, whose ranking has tumbled to 487th, p lans to retire at the end of this season. He had a double-fault in the first set tiebreaker, and then lost his serve at 3-3 in the second set and Federer served out the match. Earlier in the day, Andy Murray also playing his first match since Wimbledon beat France's Jeremy Chardy 6-4, 6-2. Murrayl ost to Andy Roddick in the semifinals at Wimbledon, but he was in control from the start against Chardy. " I feel better, now I've got through the first one, because you lose your rhythm a bit," said the third-seeded Murray. "I didn't reallyh ave more than six or seven days off without playing a match for a long time." M urray is off to the best start of his career with a 46-7 record, winning four tournaments this year. Overtake With Rafael Nadal struggling on sore knees, Murray can overt ake the Spaniard for the No. 2 ranking if he wins the tournament. Murray also could attain No. 2 if he reaches the final andN adal loses in the semifinals. "I've been asked about it a lot so, it's impossible not to think a bout it. But when I'm playing my match, it's the furthest thing from my mind," Murray said the rankings. Nadal was to play a doubles match on Tuesday. He's scheduled to play singles on Wednesday, the first since he lost in the fourth round of the French Open and withdrew from Wimbledon because o f tendinitis in his knees. Murray will face the winner of a match between Juan Carlos Fer r ero of Spain and 13th-seeded Gael Monfils of France. Ferrero advanced by defeating Lleyton Hewitt 6-1, 6-4 in a match of former N o. 1 players. The 29-year-old Spaniard improved to 4-6 in career matches against Hewitt. Ferrero needed to get through two qual ifying matches to play in the tournament. Last year, the 28-year-old Hewitt missed the Rogers Cup because of hip surgery. Fourth-ranked Novak Djokovic of Serbia trailed 30 in the first set before rallying for a 6-4, 7-6 (6 Canadian Peter Polansky. In other first round matches, Tommy R obredo of Spain defeated American Alex Bogomolov 6-4, 6-2, and Victor Hanescu of Romania beat Jurgen Melzer of Austria 64, 6-3. Qualifier John Isner defeated fellow American Jesse Levine 6-3, 6-4. By ROBERT MILLWARD AP Soccer Writer T he season has barely started and Michael Ballack already has flattened an opponent, angered Manchester United manager Alex Ferguson and picked u p a first winner’s medal. T hat is good news for Germany as it resumes its World Cup qualifying campaign Wednesday at Azerbaijan. Its captain appears to be over a lingering toe i njury and back to his skillful and aggressive best. Although the Premier League doesn’t start until Saturday, the Chelsea midf ielder has a very competitive game behind him he blatantly blocked defender Patrice Evra before Chelsea’s second goal in last weekend’s Commun ity Shield victory over Manchester United. Germany (5-0-1 to open a four-point advantage over second-place Russia (5-1 “We have to win the game so that we can defend our good position in the group,” Germany coach Joachim Loew s aid. Evra arrived a little bruised at France’s training camp ahead of Wednesday’s Group Seven qualifier against the Faeroe Islands in Torshavn. “Be true to yourselves, be worthy of the French team shirt. Anything other than a win would be a catastrophe,” France coach Raymond Domenech said i n a message to his stars. France (3-1-1 first-place Serbia (6-1 two were games. “If we can’t beat the Faeroe Islands then we have no right to be at the World Cup,” French forward Nicolas Anelka said. In another of the five European qualifiers Wednesday, Croatia (3-1-2 Belarus (3-2 ly competing for second in Group Six behind England (7-0 clinch with a victory at home against C roatia on Sept. 9. The nine European group winners qualify, and the top eight second-place nations advance to playoffs. Angered England’s national team angered some Premier League managers by scheduling an exhibition game at the N etherlands, which already has clinched first place in Group 9. Liverpool captain Steven Gerrard withdrew from the match because of a slight groin injury. David Beckham has flown in from the Los Angeles Galaxy, however, hoping to stretch his national team appearances to 113, 12 short of goalkeeper Peter Shilton’s record. In qualifiers in North and Central America and the Caribbean, the United S tates (3-1-1 ico (2-31-2-2 Trinidad and Tobago (0-3-2 place Costa Rica (4-1) is at Honduras (22-1). The top three nations qualify, and No. 4 faces South America’s fifth-place team in a playoff. Cristiano Ronaldo will miss Portugal’s exhibition against Liechtenstein b ecause of flu. With his team struggling, Argentina coach Diego Maradona is in Moscow to face Guus Hiddink’s Russia. In other exhibitions, European champion Spain is at Macedonia, World Cup champion Italy at Switzerland and South American champion Brazil at Estonia. Ballack boosts German hopes WORLDCUP QUALIFYING

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C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12, 2009 THETRIBUNE SECTIONA I NSIDE Ballack boosts German World Cup hopes by RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter r dorsett@tribunemedia.net A historic and overall impressive perfor-m ance for the Bahamas in the first tournament of its kind hosted locally and sanctioned by cricket’s internat ional governing body. The Bahamas captured first place in the International Cricket Council( ICC) Americas Under 15 cricket tournament, capping an undefeated run w ith a win over Belize Monday at Haynes Oval. The Bahamas in their turn at bat s cored 118 runs for the loss of one wicket, while Belize managed just 117 r uns. Turan “Geronimo” Brown was the top scorer for the Bahamas with a total of 52 runs, not out and AshmeidA llie chipped in with 21 runs, not out. The Bahamas won a total of four m atches defeating both Belize and the Cayman Islands twice. THEUNDEFEATED sports NOTES CRICKET Impressive Bahamas takes first place at ICC Americas U15 cricket tournament Team caps winning run with crushing victory over Belize at Haynes Oval THE BAHAMAS Professional Golfers Associa tion recently e lected a new slate of officers. The picture shows the results of the latest Bahamas Professional Golfers Association election. From the left is Chris Lewis (President Keno Turnquest ( Secretary Lemon Gorospe (Vice President Tony Robinson, Marcus Pratt (Treasurer Alex Gibson. PHOTO: Keno Turnquest GOLF: NEWSLATEOF OFFICERSELECTED The Bahamas Cycling Association will host its National Cycling Time Trial Championships this Saturday, 22nd of August, 2009. The Senior cyclists will cover 15 miles of western portion of the island while Juniors, Open Women and Novices will cover seven miles of western portion of the island. Route for Seniors will be as follows: Start and finish at Mount Pleasant Park in Mount Pleasant Lyford Cay. Head west along the southwest road, take left onto South Ocean blvd., left on the new road (the road that runs along the Albany project, travel that road to the end or t-junction, turn around at the t-junction, back along the new road again, take a let turn onto south ocean blvd. again, travel along south ocean blvd. passing the brewery, B.E.C, Clifton Heritage national park in Clifton pier, cyclist will travel on the south west road again taking them back to the start/finish line at Mt. Pleasant park in Mt. pleas ant. Route for Juniors, Open women, Novice malefemale: Start at Mt. Pleasant Park, head to south ocean blvd., take a left onto the south ocean blvd., take South Ocean blvd., all the way to Clifton Pier, past Clifton Heritage site, come onto south-west road end ing at the start/finish location. Registration will take place, Wednesday 19th August at the National Cycling Track 6pm-7:30pm and Friday 21st, August at the Race Site in Mount Pleasant 6pm7:20pm National Cycling Time Trial Championship on August 22 TRACK AND FIELD The Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations mourns loss of Jerry Wisdom The BAAA would like to publicly extend heartfelt condolence to the family of the lateG erald ‘Jerry’ Wisdom (pictured away on Saturday August the 8th. The Bahamas has lost a great Bahamian and the sport of track and field has lost one of its biggest fans, supporters, and h istorian. Jerry is a former Olympian and BAAA executive member and we know that with the IAAF Championships just days away, he would have been keenly in tune with how The Bahamian athletes were doing in Berlin, Germany a nd right there routing for his beloved Bahamas with the rest of the country. To his family we mourn with you in your loss. We will keep you in our prayer. -Kermit Taylor, BAAA Public Relations Officer SOCCER The College of The Bahamas Women's Soccer Team will host the John Brown University wom en's team Saturday August 15th at 6:00 p.m. at the Thomas Robinson Stadium (TAR SEE page 10 A team of eight (8 ety of Shotokan Stylists, participated in the Abaco Academy’s Open Tournament this weekend, where they placed & won twenty-four (24 phies and six (6 The delegation, headed by Master Brian Beckford & Sensei Julian Rolle, consisted of team members Rudell ‘Rude Awakening’ Capron, Shawn ‘Vicious’ Smith, Desmond ‘K9’ Pinder, Quon ‘Quarter’ White and Romaine ‘BA’ Leslie and team coordinator Ginea Wilson. The one (1 Chief Instructor Sensei Toote of the Abaco Karate Academy was held in Marsh Harbour Abaco at the Methodist Hall. Participants from Abaco, Nassau and Surinam came for the annual event. The four (4 contested divisions were Self Defense, Weapons, point fighting and forms. Rudell ‘Rude Awakening’ Capron 1st place Trophy Men & Women combined Self defense 1st place Trophy Women Point Fighting/Kumite 2nd place in Women Forms/ Kata Desmond ‘K-9’ Pinder 1st place Trophy Men Point Fight ing/Kumite 2nd place Trophy Men – Weapons Forms/ Kata 3rd place Trophy Men – Forms/ Kata 3rd place Trophy Men & Women combined – Self Defense ‘Society of Shotokan Stylists’ team win 24 trophies ABACO ACADEMY’S OPEN TOURNAMENT SEE page 10

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after taking the male enhancement pill Viagra. Pratt denied that she had intended to kill Carey. Pratt, who was dressed in a pink outfit, remained silent while Senior Justice Allen handed down her sentence. Outside the courtroom, Terrence Carey, a brother of the deceased, told reporters that he thought Pratt should have had a lengthier prison sentence. “I think she should get more years. The judge said she had to sleep on it, so I know her mind was going to change.” Carey said that his brother was the closest to their mother who is also deceased. He said that his death would have been diffi cult for her to handle. “My sister is taking it very hard because she really didn’t like it at all. She doesn’t know why she only got 10 years,” he said. Before handing down the sentence yesterday, Senior Justice Allen noted that manslaughter is a serious offence that carries a maximum penalty of life imprisonment although a judge can exercise her discretion. Senior Justice Allen said that the sentence should reflect the position of the court and noted that homicide is far too prevalent in the Bahamas. The judge said she had taken into account all of the aggravating and mitigating factors in the case having noted that the offence took place in a domestic situation. She also said that the ill health of the accused may be a matter for the prerogative of mercy committee. The year that Pratt has spent on remand has been tak en into account. “I was hoping for something much less bearing in mind all of the circumstances, it was about a domestic situation gone wrong,” Pratt’s attorney Romona Farquharson told reporters yesterday. Ms Farquharson said she offered her client words of encouragement after the sentence was handed down noting that the proceedings have taken a toll on Pratt who has been on suicide watch. Ms Farquharson said she will have to get instructions from her client as to whether the sen tence will be appealed. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE IN THE ESTATE OF ELIZABETH BROOKS late of #83 Alexander Boulevard in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence, Bahamas, deceased.NOTICENOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or demand against the said estate are required to send the same duly certied in writing to the undersigned on or before the 26th day of August, A.D. 2009, after which date the Administrator will proceed to distribute the estate having regard only to the claims of which he shall have had notice. AND notice is hereby given that all persons indebted to the estate are required to make full settlement on or before the date hereinabove mentioned. Dated the 12th day of August, A.D. 2009 CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO. Attorneys for the Administrator 9 Rusty Bethel Drive Nassau, Bahamas Mrs Maynard-Gibson stressed that all cases of rape must be condemned and punished whenever and wherever it occurs. She said she is still in favour of the courts having the punishment option of flogging in rape cases. “In the mid-1980s I joined Janet Bostwick in organising ‘The March Against Rape’– then one of the largest marches ever in the Bahamas. At that time rape figures varied between 121 in 1980; 92 in 1981; 83 in 1982; 93 in 1983 and 84 in 1984. “Rightly so, citizens then had had enough. We all felt that rape incidents were far too many, though less than they are now. We wanted the punishment of the cat o’ nine tails for rape. I still feel that it should be open to the courts to order the sentence of flogging for rape,” she said. Those who passed and amended the (Sexual Offences Bill which came after a great deal of lobbying recognised that the entire matter was sensitive.” Mrs Maynard-Gibson also said that the existing Act recognises and condemns forced sexual relations with a spouse, and added that the proposed amendment, which was introduced in parliament by theFNM last month, should be withdrawn pending wide consultation about domestic violence, including rape in a marriage. And this consultation should take place outside of the political arena, she said. “I believe that in certain circumstances Bahamians would without hesitation say that a man raped his wife: Tying her up to have sex; breaking into her mother’s house where she is staying (they not being legally separated) to have sex; doping or drugging her to have sex; threatening her at gunpoint to have sex; beating her to have sex. “If my premise is correct, Bahamians today do believe that a man can rape his wife,” the senator said. However, she said, concerns arise with the issue in the tremendous grey areas that inevitably exist in the context ofa marriage. “Was the wife really saying ‘no’; was the husband forcing his wife or was he trying to convince his wife; what is the wife’s motive for making the allegation of rape against her husband; what about the children; who will support the family, including emotionally and financially, if the husband is sent to jail?” the senator said. “I believe that there are many problems with this amendment, including: We do not know why it was brought at this time. What percentage of the rape statistics represents rape in a marriage? There was no wide consultation before it was brought. It was brought in such a manner as to possibly create a political football and to cause unnecessary strife in marriages and in society, especially between men and women.” corruption and a policy of secrecy. The lawyer who helped bring Crime Stoppers to the Bahamas in 1998 said she is o n the brink of publicly denouncing the charity until police show they are able to perform their proper function. And she criticised Assistant Police Commissioner Raymond Gibson for remaining tight-lipped about a series of rapes and attempted rapes in eastern New Providence, She said that by hiding the details police make women more vulnerable. M rs Broughton said: “It is wholly unacceptable not to notify the public through the media. Why do I have to wait to meet a police officer in the street to tell me to be careful when I am a woman living in the east with a 17-year-old daughter? Is it for the tourists? “If there are three rapes carried out, why can’t they say ‘be on your guard’? They w ant to hold out in the name of the investigation and leave women exposed and at risk because it’s a procedure? It’s a disgrace.” She further blamed the force for corruption which allows brazen criminals to carry on undeterred and said she has been driven to denounce the police and Crime Stoppers until she can see the police “actually functioning.” “They can’t keep you safe, and they don’t even have the decency to warn you when they are not sure you are safe, so what is their function?” Mrs Broughton asked. “All I ask for is the same simple protection everyone is entitled to, it’s a basic human right and if you can’t give me safety, tell me when I need to take extra care; when I need to buy my own gun.” Mrs Broughton left Crime Stoppers in 2001, but spoke out for the charity once again when Welsh banker Hywell Jones, 55, was shot in the head outside his Britannia Investment Group office in West Bay Street on April 22, and died in hospital on May 8. However, she has since become incensed with the handling of the murder investigation which has so far failed to lead to any arrests. Mr Jones’ brother Ilt Jones maintains his brother had made but one enemy during his 21 years in the Bahamas, but police have not yet named any suspects. Mrs Broughton said: “It just incenses me that all this time has passed by and nothing has been done. “Crime begets crime, and if people just fumble along it will continue. Someone needs to say something for once and I don’t know how many murders have to happen, how many people have to be raped, but until my children are safe, I will take the brunt of becoming a target because I put my name in the paper.” Police Commissioner Reginald Ferguson said: “As long as I have something to do with this police force and responsibility for investigating a crime in this country, wherever evidence exists to move against someone for criminality I will be doing that.” However Mr Ferguson failed to provide any further details of the two rapes and two attempted rapes in eastern New Providence. He said: “(Mrs Broughton mate concern, but we don’t want to create any unnecessary excitement and I told her about this thing in the east... Investigators are saying there is some trend but to say there’s a serial rapist out there would be kind of far-fetched at this time. “I think we want to always be concerned about what’s happening in our environment we want to always be on the alert. And people are being alerted without being specific, that’s the approach we have always had. We can’t hide crime, that’s a reality.” court is,” lawyer Keod Smith told reporters yesterday. According to Mr Smith, who is repre senting BHCAWU First Vice president Kirk Wilson and his team, new elections must now be held within 60 days of Justice Isaacs’ ruling, which was handed down on July 31. In the 35-page judgment, Justice Isaacs had declared that the union’s elections held on May 28 were “null and void.” Mr Wilson and his team had filed an application to have the process reviewed; contending that the setting of both the nomination and election dates circumvented the union's constitution. Ms Martin, the first woman president in the unions almost 51-year history, won the presidency in a landslide victory. “The court has denied the application made by Ms Martin to stay the proceedings or the execu tion of its order pending an appeal and it has denied a similar application by the Attorney General for the Registrar of Trade Unions to do the same. “It has made it very clear that Ms Martin and those persons who would have been elected on her team and any other who would be preventing the existing executive council from doing its task, to refrain from doing so,” Mr Smith said. Mr Smith said that members of the union’s previous executive council will resume their posts. Mr Wilson told reporters, “The law is the law and that’s all we were doing, following the law and the outcome as we expected, it is what it is.” Ms Martin’s attorney Damian Gomez told the court that decision has no impact on the notice of appeal filed on behalf of his client. “We have also been informed that the Attor ney General’s Office is in the process of filing an appeal on behalf of the Registrar, and the appeal court will eventually have a hearing and we will abide by whatever decision the Court of Appeal makes,” he said. Amidst supporters who periodically chanted, “No retreat, no surrender,” Ms Martin told reporters that she was disappointed by the out come yesterday, but remains encouraged. “I’m disappointed, but I am also relieved that we will have the opportunity to do it the way Wilson and those want us to do it. We were not given an election we won an election. The people are poised and ready to do it again. As we campaigned before we will campaign even more so now because this shows how important it is to have the right people in your organisation,” Ms Martin said. custody, but we're looking at all possibilities. . . (but all of us puzzled," admitted the senior officer, who was not authorised to comment on the case. Police are also looking into whether the victim was the target of a contracted hit-man. "We leave that open until we determine otherwise," said the officer. The nature of the killing also prompted public concerns that the shooter may have been part of a gang initiation, looking fora random kill. Yesterday another highranking police officer who did not want to be identified said there was no evidence to substantiate this fear. Reports reaching The Tribune indicate that a cell phone, believed to be the gunman’s, was seized at the crime scene but this was dismissed by a police officer yesterday. "We don't know where that rumour came from, only forensic evidence was recovered, nothing physical that we know about," said the first officer. Meanwhile police are still appealing to the public to come forward with information that could lead to the gunman’s capture. "We are trying to have persons who would have seen the suspect to make that known to us, who can give us a composite (sketch added. The gunman, described as a slim, dark male about 5'9" is believed to have fled on foot. According to a family fried, Tagia had just pulled up to her mother's house with her two younger sisters and young sons after a day at the mall. The two girls and Tagia's eldest son went to knock on their grandmother's front door as the victim stayed behind to breast-feed her three-monthold son. At some point, a gunman approached her and shot her in the left arm. The bullet reportedly punctured her lungs or heart. In an attempt to escape her attacker, Tagia sped off only to rear-end a parked car and crash into two other parked cars before coming to a stop. The Tribune understands persons coming to inspect the commotion scared the gunman away. When police arrived on the scene, the victim was already dead. Tagia, who was living in St Kitts with her husband, had just arrived in Nassau to visit her family after years of living abroad to visit her family. theft in the past, but Commissioner of Police Reginald Ferguson could not confirm this yes terday. Meanwhile, autopsies are expected to determine the official cause of death for two men. P olice do not know if they died from the impact of the crash or whether they were burned in the fire. Investigators in Jamaica are also probing whether a shoot-out which happened hours after the crash was connected to the busted drug deal. Officials believe the crashed plane, which was registered in the United States, may haveb een stolen from the Bahamas the same one stolen from a North Eleuthera airport around 9 am on August 3. Mr Llewellyn added that two more men, believed to be the accomplices of the dead men, were recently arrested in the Bahamas in connection with the plane theft. "We've been told that two Bahamians were taken into custody for being complicit in the (theft However, senior police officers at home said they were not aware of any such arrests. Abner Pinder, administrator of Spanish Wells, said at the time of the theft from the North Eleuthera airport, fuel was siphoned from several other planes. A police officer is supposed to be stationed at the site he said, however the culprits were able to tamper with the aircraft and make good their escape. "There's supposed to be a police presence there. . .It’s an international airport and as such it's supposed to have a 24-hour presence," he said yesterday. Attempts to reach contractor Terry Higgs, who owned the plane believed to have been stolen for the drug run, have been unsuccessful. FROM page one Rape figures Bahamians who died in plane crash are identified FROM page one FROM page one Police slammed F ROM page one Police still puzzled T AGIA SOLES-ARMONY FROM page one Mother sentenced Hotel union elections F ROM page one

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By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunebusiness.net TOPOGRAPHICAL and photographic surveys will be performed by the company contracted to carry out the dredging of Nassau harbour for the post dredging restoration of the the areas sur r ounding the excavation sites, according to the Boskalis' Environment Management Plan (EMP sent to the project persists. The EMP, drawn up by dredging company Boskalisa nd which will be a constantl y amended document, will follow the environmental impact mitigation plan. According to the document: "The EMP is also an umbrella document in which all other environmental protection documents are evaluated and communicated." These documents include the Environmental spill response plan, the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA of dredged material for Nassau Harbour Port Improvement Project and the EIA for the Nassau Harbour Port Improvement Project. Government ministers have recently not been clear on certain guidelines that will have to be adhered to during the dredging process and western extension of Arawak Cay. Members of the governing party have even been accused by the opposition of contra dicting each other on the Arawak Cay extension deal, being obscure on the details of the movement of the container port and not being forthcoming on information concerning several other projects associated with the con tainer port movement. The EMP seeks to shed light on the environmental side of the dredging project and highlight efforts employed by the dredging company to secure the safety of the environment around it. It is thought that the Arawak Cay extension, which was purported by the Minister of the Environment Earl Deveaux to be directly related to the dredging project, should not be used for relo-c ation of the container port from downtown Nassau. Former Minister of Trade for the PLP, Leslie Miller, told Tribune Business recently that every international body that has come to the Bahamas to study proposed sites for the relocation of the container port have shunned Arawak Cay as a viable site. Clifton in the South West of New Providence was considered to be a more suitable site to Arawak Cay. However, the present government decided the move to Clifton would be too costly. "Where is your study that states that Arawak Cay is a superior site to Clifton," said Mr Miller. Former FNM minister Tennyson Wells echoed similar sentiments saying he was not convinced that the estimate to move the container port to Clifton would have cost what the government said it would have. "As a nationalist and some body who would look toward the country moving forward, I would not have put the port on Arawak Cay. I would take the risk and spend $100 to 150 million," Mr Wells said recently. According to him, special interest groups are pushing for the port’s relocation to Arawak Cay which he suggested may be able to be com pleted for half of the cost quoted, though many figures have been circulated as to the final cost of the move. A representative for the Committee to Protect and Preserve the Bahamas for Future generations said dur ing a recent town hall meeting: "They have sought to withhold information from Parliament and the people regarding the temporary relo cation of the container port and the extension of Arawak Cay. “They continue to negoti ate deals in the darkness of the night deals involving the people’s land at Arawak Cay deals involving the people’s beach and deals involving the people’s mon ey. C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.96 $3.90 $4.10 By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunebusiness.net L o cal financial experts and a Central Bank report believe the Bahamian economy could see a turnaround in the beginning months of 2010, as the US markets bottom-up, save the housing market which is facing marginal recovery. Kenn Kerr of Providence Advisors told Tribune Business the reasonable degree of recovery occurring world wide bodes well for the Bahamas economy which relies on tourism as its top dollar earner. And the monthly 3.6 per cent increase in housing starts and completions in the US housing market in 2009, according to the Central Bank's monthly economic and financial developments report for June, is a good sign of stable recovery of assets. According to him, the 'muted recovery' in the US i s a positive sign for the region, d espite the slow turnaround in the t ourism sector. He said in the US market, the recovery has been too slow to quell the high unemployment figures, which could be a product of the leisurely recovering housing market. The collapse of the housing market in the US is thought to have been the catalyst for the global economic downturn. Mr Kerr said if the measured recovery in the US continues then "you probably wont have deep recovery." Of course, he added, that if travel outside of US borders increases, the Bahamas could see a substantial i ncrease in visitor numbers and cons equently an increase in economic s tability vis-a-vis the hospitality sector in the Bahamas. "I suspect that by the first or second quarter of 2010 there will be vast improvements in the economy if the muted recovery keeps advancing in the US," said Mr Kerr. According to the Central Bank report: "Indicators suggest that the global economy remained moribund over the first half of the year; how ever, in recent months, modest signs of a flattening in the economic downturn emerged, buoyed by the aggressive “stimulus” from monetary and fiscal packages, improved consumer confidence indicators and corporate sector cost cutting meas ures, which supported stock mark et gains." T he report added that the majority of Bahamian firms indicated they had to reduced staffing levels within the past six months, with "more than four-fifths signaling either no anticipated change or likely further reductionsin the months ahead." Furthermore, the Central Bank asserted that foreclosure filings surged by nine per cent. "Buttressed by a surge in credit to Government, domestic foreign currency credit expanded by $113.4million, a reversal from the $54.6million net repayment recorded during 2008," the report continued. "Net claims on the Government rebounded by $159.5million, from a $ 20.3million decrease a year earlie r, on account of an increase in s hort-term advances. In contrast, claims on the rest of the public sector fell by $45.4million." Central Bank report: Economy could see turnaround in 2010 KERR Sur v e ys will be perf or med by company contracted to dredge Nassau harbour “Where is your study that states that Arawak Cay is a superior site to Clifton.” Leslie Miller

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NEW YORK (AP Energy prices slumped Tuesday on a Labour Department report that suggested consumer spending, a major economic driver, may be depressed for some time as companies cut back. Benchmark crude for September delivery fell $1.15 to settle at $69.45 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. It was the fourth straight day of declines and the first time this month that the price for crude dipped below $69. Oil prices have ended the week higher for five straight weeks, a period that coincides with earnings reports from US companies. The results appeared surprisingly healthy, which gave energy prices a boost on the belief that the recession has loosened its grip. While that may be true, data from the Labour Department Tuesday again showed that company profits were in many cases buoyed by less spending on employee pay. The Labour Department reported that productivity, the amount of output per hour of work, rose at an annual rate of 6.4 per cent in the AprilJune quarter. (see story on page 3B) In normal economic times companies might pay more for workers and increase production. Yet companies during the recession have instead frozen hiring and cut hours to prop up profits. If workers are not getting the hours they need, the pullback on spending for everything from gasoline to products made from petroleum, will likely remain depressed. That has already happened this year. The Energy Information Administration in its shortterm energy outlook Tuesday said US consumption of liquid fuels will fall by 4.1 per cent this year. The falloff in gasoline sales has been tempered somewhat because it's become so cheap compared with past years. Crude prices rose early in the day on reports from China that the nation's exports, retail sales and factory output improved in July, and the country imported a record 4.6 million barrels of fuel a day last month. The market reversed course when the Labour Department released its report and oil prices fell two per cent. The monthly forecast by the Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries also may have helped pushed energy prices down. OPEC responsible for about a third of the world's crude production said it expected demand to fall by 1.65 million barrels a day this year, compared with last year, before rising in 2010. The Federal Reserve on Tuesday begins a two-day meeting that could shed more light on the US economy. An interest-rate hike is highly unlikely, but people want to hear what the Fed will say about the state of the economy, said Jim Ritterbusch, president of energy consultancy Ritterbusch and Associates. "By and large, we're just taking a little of this economic optimism out of the market right now and responding to the possibility that we're going to see a more stable currency environment going forward," he said. The falling dollar has helped push crude prices up because oil is priced in the US currency. The EIA predicted Tuesday that gas prices will average around $2.34 per gallon in 2009. In other Nymex trading, gasoline for September delivery gained 1.38 cents to settlea t $2.9422 a gallon and heati ng oil fell 1.59 cents to settle at $1.9117. Natural gas for September delivery fell 10 cents to settle at $3.541 per 1,000 cubic feet. In London, Brent prices fell $1.04 to settle at $72.46 a bar-r el on the ICE Futures exchange. Associated Press Writers Alex Kennedy in Singapore, George Jahn in Vienna, Joe McDonald in Beijing and Martin Crutsinger in Wash ington contributed to this report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f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f &KHTXHVZLOOQRWEHUHOHDVHGXQWLOFRPSOHWLRQRIDOOUHTXLUHG GRFXPHQWDWLRQ 3/($6(856(0(176$'($ %$1.:,//,1&85$(1$/ 3/$&( +ROULQLW\$FWLYLW\&HQWUH 6WDSOHGRQ*DUGHQV Energy prices slump after Labour Department report To advertise in The Tribune just call 502-2371 today! I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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By MARTIN CRUTSINGER AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON (AP Productivity surged in the spring by the largest amount in almost six years while labour costs plunged at the fastest pace in nine years. The results point to a recession losing steam, but they do not bode well for the unemployed or those forced to work shorter weeks who were hoping for more hours. The Labour Department said Tuesday that productivity, the amount of output per hour of work, rose at an annual rate of 6.4 per cent in the April-June quarter, while unit labour costs dropped 5.8 per cent. Both results were greater than economists expected. Productivity can help boost living standards because it m eans companies can pay t heir workers more, with t hose wage increases financed by rising output. However, in this recession, companies have been using their productivity gains from layoffs and other cost cuts not to hire again but to bolster their profits. The result: Many companies have been reporting better-than-expected secondquarter earnings despite falling sales. Businesses producing more with fewer employees means millions of unemployed Americans likely will continue to face a dismal job market.Some analysts also worry that companies' aggressive cost-cutting could make it hard to mount a sustainable recovery. That's because a lack of wage growth and a shortage of jobs will likely depress consumer spending, which accounts for about 70 per cent of economic output. Ideally, businesses would use the current productivityg ains to stabilize their own financial situations and as the economy rebounds, resume hiring to meet the rising demand, analysts said. "Hopefully, businesses will stop the layoffs and start hiring again so that consumers will have the ability to spend, but that is a tricky transition," said Mark Zandi, chief econ omist at Moody's Economy.com. In a second report, the Commerce Department said wholesale inventories declined for a record 10th consecutive month, falling 1.7 per cent in June. That was nearly double the 0.9 per cent decrease economists had expected. B ut in an encouraging sign, sales rose 0.4 per cent for a second straight month. The first back-to-back increases ina year boosted hopes that businesses will begin to ramp up production to meet rising demand. On Wall Street, stocks fell after the mixed economic reports and on comments from analyst Richard Bove of Rochdale Securities who wrote in a research note that bank earnings won't improve in the second half of this year and that many companies will post losses. The Dow Jones industrial average lost about 65 points in afternoon trading and broader indices also fell. The 6.4 per cent jump in productivity followed a 0.3 per cent increase in the first three months of the year that was revised downward from an earlier estimate of a 1.6 per cent gain. The revision partially reflected the annual benchmark revisions of eco nomic data connected to the gross domestic product. Economists had expected productivity to surge in the second quarter as businesses continued to lay off workersa nd trim the number of hours being worked by their remaining employees amid the nation's worst recession since the end of World War II. The second-quarter productivity increase reflected that the number of hours worked fell much faster than output dropped. Total hours worked dropped at an annual rate of 7.6 per cent, while the output of non-farm businesses fell ata 1.7 per cent rate. The nation's total output of goods and services, as measured by the gross domestic product, fell at an annual rate of one per cent in the second quarter. That was a much slower rate of decline than the previous two quarters when the economy shrank at the fastest pace in more than a half-century. Many economists believe the recession is on the verge of ending. Should the economy start to grow in the second half of this year, some companies might boost employment if demand for their products showed a sustained increase. Still, the leaner work force should help keep productivity rising in coming quarters although the gains are not expected to be as large as the jump in the spring. "Before the recession of 2001, productivity typically fell in recessions because companies waited too long to respond to the downturn," Ian Shepherdson, chief US economist at High Frequency Economics, wrote in a research note. Among those reporting second-quarter profits due partly to layoffs and other cost cuts were Internet company Yahoo Inc., which saw earnings grow eight per cent, and automaker Ford Motor Co. The 6.4 per cent jump in productivity at an annual rate was the biggest quarterly gain since a 9.7 per cent surge in the third quarter of 2003. The 5.8 per cent decline in unit labour costs followed a revised 2.7 per cent dip in the first quarter and was theb iggest quarterly drop since a 7.7 per cent decline in the second quarter of 2000. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009, PAGE 3B 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1 .811.28Abaco Markets1.341.340.000.1270.00010.60.00% 11.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.306.25Bank of Bahamas6.256.250.000.2440.26025.64.16%0 .890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2 .372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3511.350.001.4060.2508.12.20% 2.882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.605.760.167,9090.4190.36013.76.25% 3.851.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.483.850.370.1110.05234.71.35% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital1.821.820.000.2400.0807.64.40% 8.206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.5010.00Finco10.6310.630.000.3220.52033.04.89% 1 1.7110.30FirstCaribbean Bank10.3010.300.000.7940.35013.03.40% 5.534.95Focol (S)5.135.130.000.3320.15015.52.92% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.50ICD Utilities5.495.490.000.4070.50013.59.11% 12.0010.39J. S. Johnson10.3910.390.000.9520.64010.96.16% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100000 100000 FidelitBkNote13(SeriC)+ FBB13 10000 000 MONDAY, 10 AUGUST 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,564.59| CHG 8.48 | %CHG 0.54 | YTD -147.77 | YTD % -8.63BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: 30May2013 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 InterestF INDEX: CLOSE 779.58 | YTD -6.62% | 2008 -12.31% 1000 . 00 1000 . 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 . 00 0 . 00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.38601.3231CFAL Bond Fund1.38602.404.75 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.9047-1.20-3.66 1.48171.4059CFAL Money Market Fund1.48173.355.38 3.60903.1031Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1031-8.35-13.82 12.980112.3289Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.98012.875.79 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.47339.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.27652.00-2.98 1.06221.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.06222.566.22 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0243-0.842.43 1.05851.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05852.045.85 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-May-09 Prime + 1.75% 7% 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 NAV Date 30-Jun-09Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds 30 May 2013 29 May 2015TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 31-Dec-07 30-Jun-09 31-Jul-09 31-Jul-09 30-Jun-09MARKET TERMS btrt tfr f r!%* '!$()))!*&*# tffn""bnff !$ %#&!*&*# !%** 1 27,&( R AYGIAN REPROGRAPHICS Tel: 327-8640, 437-8687 West Bay Street, Cable BeachPUBLIC NOTICEPlease be advised that Mr. Raphael Noel “Ray”Adams is no longer associated with R aygian Reprographics and has no involvement whatsoever with the company. He is therefore NOTAuthorized to transact any business whatsoever on behalf of the company.T he Management Productivity rises in Q2 while labour costs plunge IN THIS June 4, 2009 file photo, people look for jobs at the Los Angeles Mission Career Fair. Productivity surged in the spring by the largest a mount in almost six years while labour costs plunged at the fastest pace in nine years. (AP Photo: Damian Dovarganes

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG R Q WKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG R WKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG R WKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG R WKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV

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By JEREMIAH MARQUEZ AP Business Writer HONG KONG (AP Major Asian markets inched higher Tuesday amid signs China’s stimulus measures were helping shield its economy from the global slump and as governments issued cautious outlooks about the recovery. Regional markets made tentative gains as investors sifted through a rash of data about China’s economy thatt ogether provided positive signs for Beijing’s multibillion-dollar effort to restores table growth, though still hinted at weak fundamentals. While industrial output and r etail sales rose last month in the world’s third-largest economy, imports and exports were still down sharply from a year earlier amid continuing weak global demand. Investors have been counting on China’s homegrown growth to help other economies turn around quicker, but Tuesday’s data raised concerns such expectations may fall short, said Peter Lai, investment manager at DBS Vickers in Hong Kong. That in turn could weigh on the markets, he said. “The upside room is quite limited right now,” he said. “The global economy may have reached a bottom, but the revival will take some time, there are just too many uncertainties.” Markets across the region traded in a narrow range. In a back-and-forth session, Hong Kong’s Hang Seng was up 86.34 points, or 0.4 per cent, at 21,015.86 and Shanghai’s benchmark gained 0.3 per cent to 3,258.40. Japan’s Nikkei 225 stock average rose 18.54, or 0.2 per cent, to 10,542.80 as the Bank of Japan said there were signs the downturn was bottoming out but warned about growing joblessness. South Korea’s central bank was similarly cautious, saying the road to stronger growth was uncertain because recoveries in other major economies could be delayed. The benchmark Kospi added less than 0.1 per cent to 1,576.81. Australia’s benchmark rose 0.3 per cent and Singapore’s main index climbed nearly two per cent after being closed for a national holiday Monday. Indexes in Thailand, Taiwan and New Zealand were moderately lower. Wall Street posted moderate losses overnight as investors took some profits without any major corporate or economic news. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 32.12, or 0.3 per cent, to 9,337.95. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell 3.38, or 0.3 per cent, to 1,007.10, while the Nasdaq composite index fell 8.01, or 0.4 per cent, to 1,992.24. Wall Street futures declined modestly with Dow futures off five points at 9,315. Oil prices lingered below $71 a barrel, with benchmark crude for September delivery up four cents at $70.64. On Monday, the contract fell 33 cents. The dollar fell to 96.63 yen from 97.09 yen, and the euro traded lower at $1.4137 compared to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ommon Law and Equity Division CLE/qui/00946 IN THE MATTER OF ALLTHATpiece parcel or lot o f land containing 11,897 square feet situated on the Eastern Side of Lincoln Boulevard approximately 500 feet south of Homestead Avenue and on the Western S ide of Washington Street in the Subdivision called and known as Englerston in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the C ommonwealth of The Bahamas. AND IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT 1959 AND IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF THOMAS A. MINNSNOTICE OF PETITION T he Petition of Thomas A. Minns of the Englerston Constituency in the Eastern District of the said Island of New Providence in respect to: ALLTHATpiece parcel or tract of land situated about 500 feet south of Homestead Avenue, on the Eastern side of Lincoln Boulevard and on the Western Side of Washington Street in the subdivision called and known as Englerston in the Islands of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, which said piece parcel or tract of land is bounded on the West by a road named Lincoln Boulevard and running thereon one hundred and two and twelve Hundredths feet (112.12) and bounded on the North by property believed to be owned by the Church of God In Christ and running thereon One hundredth and Four and Sixteen hundredths feet (104.16and bounded on the -East by a road named Washington Street and running thereon One Hundred and Three and Ninety-six hundredths feet (103.96and bounded on the South by property believed to be owned partially by Adderley’s Upholstery and partially by one Joan Hanna and running together thereon One Hundred and Thirty and Fifty nine hundredths feet (130.59 said piece parcel or tract of land has such position shape boundaries marks and dimensions as shown delinated Pink. Thomas A. Minns claims to be the equitable and hereinbefore described and such ownership as aforesaid arises by virtue of a possessory title to the said land. The Petitioner has made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959, to have his title to the said land investigated. working hours at: 1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher House, East Street, Nassau, Bahamas; and 2. The Law Chambers of Floyd C. Watkins & Co. situated at St Alban’s Drive (East Bahamas. Notice is hereby given that any person having dower or right of dower or any adverse claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 3rd day on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of such serve a statement of such claim on or before the 3rd day of October, 2009, will operate as a bar to such claim. Floyd C. Watkins & CO., Attorneys for the Petitioner. NOTICE is hereby giventhat JOHNNYJOSEPH P .O. BOX GT-2752 , YELLOW ELDER is applying to the M inister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for r egistration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N -7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE NOTICE is hereby given that SAMANTHALOUISE COX KEMP, P.O. BOX N-10767,# 3 HALLS ROAD and P OMPANO COURT , is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who k nows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of A ugust, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE Legal NoticeRAMBLING HOLDINGS LTD.I N VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the I nternational Business Companies Act 2000 RAMBLING HOLDINGS LTD. is in dissolution. The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 10th August 2009. David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas Building 2 Caves Village, P. O. Box N 3917 is the Liquidator of RAMBLING HOLDINGS LTD. All persons having claims against the above-named company are required to send their address and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 10th September 2009. Asian markets inch higher as China data sifted To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in cir culation, just call 502-2371 today!

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By SANDRA CHEREB Associated Press Writer CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP almost $820 million from gamblers in June, down nearly 14 per cent compared with the same month a year agoa nd marking the smallest gaming win reported in the last five years, state gaming regulators said Tuesday. For the fiscal year ended June 30, the state Gaming Control Board report said the total gambling win was $10.8 billion, down almost 14 per cent from the previous 12month period. June was the 18th straight month of decline. Nevada collected $45.8 million in taxes based on the June win, a 13.5 per cent drop from a year earlier. "It's a continuation of what we've seen," said Frank Streshley, an analyst with the Gaming Control Board. "We're seeing less visitors and they're spending a lot less than what they had been." The number of visitors to Las Vegas fell 6.3 per cent in June, marking the sixth straight month of decline, according to the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority. About 2.98 million visitors traveled to Las Vegas in June, compared with nearly 3.18 million a year earlier. The monthly win was down in every major market in the state. The Las Vegas Strip was down almost 15 per cent. The Reno-Sparks-North Tahoe area was down more than seven per cent. It was the 24th straight month of declines in Washoe County, Streshley said. Elsewhere, declines were 15 per cent at South Lake Tahoe, 5.6 per cent in down town Las Vegas, 11.6 per cent in Laughlin, and 15.6 per cent in the Carson Valley area of Douglas County. The June win was the amount left in casino coffers after gamblers wagered $11 billion in table games and slots. There were declines in both types of gambling. "It's across the board," Streshley said. Slot wagering totaled $9.2 billion, down 10.7 per cent, while the $1.8 billion wagered on table games was down 12.7 per cent. Gaming revenues account for 30 per cent of state's general fund. Last month, the Nevada Department of Taxation reported taxable sales for 11 months of the 2009 fiscal year fell 11.9 per cent compared with the prior year, and they fell 21 per cent in May. Gov. Jim Gibbons called the latest casino numbers "troubling" but said no decision has been made on whether he will call state lawmakers into special session to address the revenue shortfall. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 7HFKQLFDODQG&RPSOLDQFHIFHU ,QVSHFWLRQVtXUYH\Vf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f $SSOLFDWLRQVDUHLQYLWHGIRUWKHSRVLWLRQRI7HFKQLFDO&RPSOLDQFH 2IFHULQWKH67&:DQG0DQQLQJ'HSDUWPHQWRIWKH7KH 67&:DQG0DQQLQJ6HFWLRQLVUHVSRQVLEOHIRUDOODVSHFWVUHODWHG WRWKHWUDLQLQJFHUWLFDWLRQDQGDSSURYDORIVHDIDUHUVDQG67&: FRXUVHVDQGWKHDVVHVVPHQWRIWKHPDQQLQJSURYLVLRQVIRU7KH %DKDPDVDJJHGHHW 7KHVXFFHVVIXOFDQGLGDWHZLOOEHHPSOR\HGDWVXSHUYLVRU\OHYHO ZLWKGXWLHVLQFOXGLQJ 5HSUHVHQWLQJWKH$XWKRULW\DWPHHWLQJVIRUXPRQPDWWHUV UHODWLQJWRVHDIDUHUVWUDLQLQJDQGPDQQLQJ 2YHUVLJKWRIWKH%0$SURFHVVHVDQGGHYHORSPHQWRIQDWLRQDO SROLFLHVUHODWLQJWRVHDIDUHUV&:FRXUVHDSSURYDODQGVDIH PDQQLQJ 3URYLVLRQRIWUDLQLQJDQGPDQQLQJJXLGDQFHDVVLVWDQFHWR 2ZQHUVDQDJHUVDQGWKH$XWKRULW\VRWKHUVWDNHKROGHUV &DQGLGDWHVIRUWKHSRVWVKRXOGKDYHXQLYHUVLW\GHJUHHZLWKSUDFWLFDO DQGWKHRUHWLFDONQRZOHGJHRI67&:&RQYHQWLRQ&RGHDQGWKH LQWHUQDWLRQDOSULQFLSOHVRQPDQQLQJRIVKLSV$SSOLFDQWVZLWKRWKHU TXDOLFDWLRQVJDLQHGLQWKHRIPDULWLPHWUDLQLQJHGXFDWLRQRU RWKHUUHOHYDQWH[SHULHQFHH[SHUWLVHZLOODOVREHFRQVLGHUHG3UHYLRXV H[SHULHQFHLQDXGLWLQJZLOOEHDGYDQWDJHRXV $SSOLFDQWVDUHLQYLWHGWRZULWHHQFORVLQJFRS\RIWKHLU&DQG GHWDLOVRIWKHLUFXUUHQWVDODU\'HSXW\'LUHFWRU,QVSHFWLRQV 6XUYH\V7KH%DKDPDV0DULWLPH$XWKRULW\2OG%URDG6WUHHW /RQGRQRUHPDLOWR WHFK#EDKDPDVPDULWLPHF RP &ORVLQJGDWHIRUDSSOLFDWLRQVLV$XJXVW$OODSSOLFDWLRQV ZLOOEHDFNQRZOHGJHG 7 +( % $+$0$6 0 $5,7,0( $ 87+25,7< /21'21)),&(f N O T I C E F ROND ASSETS LIMITEDN O T I C E IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows: (aFROND ASSETS LIMITED is in voluntary d issolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4 o f the International Business Companies Act 2000. T he dissolution of the said company commenced on the 0 7t hA ugust 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General. T he Liquidator of the said company is Ms. Celene Koh of Dated this 11th day of August A. D. 2009_ _______________________________ M s. Celene Koh L iquidator N O T I C E M AXIMUS PRIME LIMITEDN O T I C E IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows: (aMAXIMUS PRIME LIMITED is in voluntary d issolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4 of the International Business Companies Act 2000. T he dissolution of the said company commenced on the 07t hAugust 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General. The Liquidator of the said company is Ms. Celene Koh of Dated this 11th day of August A. D. 2009_________________________________ Ms. Celene Koh L iquidator N O T I C E MENTOR ANGEL VENTURES LTD.N O T I C E IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows: (aMENTOR ANGELVENTURES LTD. is in voluntary dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4 of the International Business Companies Act 2000. The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 07t hAugust 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General. The Liquidator of the said company is Ms. Celene Koh of Dated this 11t hday of August A. D. 2009 ________________________________ Ms. Celene Koh Nevada casino winnings down 14% in June

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C M Y K C M Y K ENTERTAINMENT PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By Bahamas Information Services ALL 84 of the world’s most beautiful women graced the stage of Wyndham Nassau Resort Rain Forest Theater on Monday to unveil their national costumes for the first time. As each contestant took centre stage, a kaleidoscope of colour illuminated the theatre to the delight of the crowd who shouted for their favourites. Many foreign residents living in Nassau came prepared with flags and dressed in their own national costumes to specifically cheer on their home country. There was a huge amount of support for the Latin American and Caribbean countries in particular. Miss India and Miss USA also came out to much local support. “This is one of the best shows I have ever seen in terms of colour dis play, presentation and quality of the fabrics and the way the costumes were made,” said Lisa Harold, an aspiring fashion designer from New York. Contestants wore costumes depicting the national symbol from their respective country. Leading the way was Miss Bahamas, Kiara Sherman, whose golden costume depicted the ‘Bahamian sunshine.’ “It was a very impres sive display of costumes," said Dwayne Delancy, photographer with NuWoman magazine. “I especially liked the detailed workings of the costumes worn by Miss Czechoslovakia and Miss Ecuador, Nicaragua and Panama. Miss Bahamas was also a very good depiction.” Each presentation was divided into groups of six with contestants coming out in alphabetical order. Actress Claudette ‘Cookie’ Allens and his torian and junkanoo artist Arlene Nash-Ferguson were the hostesses. Judges included Lynn Holowesko, President of the Senate; Leslie Van derpool, Bahamas Inter national Film Festival; artist John Cox, owner of Popop Studios; Rochelle Walker, Solomon’s Mines; Gershin Major, CEO, Mail Boxes Etc; E laine Pinder, the owner of La Rose; and Kishlane World’s most beautiful women S S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e

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C M Y K C M Y K ENTERTAINMENT THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009, PAGE 11B unveil their national costumes Photos by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff O’Brien, vice president Cititrust. The winner of the ‘Best Costume’ award will be announced tonight during the Bahamian Designer Fabric Fashion show scheduled for the Sheraton Nassau Beach Hotel. The event went off very smoothly. The attendance was not as good as it could have been which may have due to the high cost of tickets which were eventually reduced in price in the lead up days. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K ARTS PAGE 12B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE By ALEX MISSICK Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net R EDBULL, the popular e nergy drink, has for a numb er of years, pulled together great events allowing people from around the world to express their creativity and has now launched its “Red Bull Art of Can” in the Bahamas with the final local competition and exhibition to be hosted at THE HUB, located on Bay Street on September 4. Red Bull Art of Can has pulled creativity from people of all ages and stages the world over producing some of the most fashionable, imaginative and inspired pieces using from as little as one can to hundreds. With no restrictions, artists can design, create, mold, sculpt, photograph, do anything you like with as many or as few cans as desired.There are very few countries in the world that can boast the creativity of Bahamians so Red Bull is inviting the nation to get busy and start building. Arame Strachan, Market ing Manager at Bristol Wines a nd Spirits, said because the A rt of Can is a global initiative of Red Bull, as a distributor, Bristol Wines wants to integrate alot of the programmes if they are applicible to the Bahamian market. appealed to them b ecause I think we have a g reat creative market here because of Junkanoo. I am partial to Junkanoo and I know Junkanooers can create anything out of nothing. We have alot of local talent here that don’t really have a forum to express their creative works outside of Junkanoo soI think this is a great initia tive for them,” Ms Strachan said. Registration is free and open to Bahamian artists through August 31. The top three pieces from this exhibi tion will be sent to Jamaica to compete in the regional competition. Sculptures, paintings, digital/graphic designs and various forms of mixed media will all be considered. Judges will review each piece based on creativity (overall idea behind the piece), conceptual execution (how well the piece translates the idea) and construction (the quality of production/final presentation). “Anyone can enter and there is no age requirement. Any piece of art work can be c reated out of the cans once it i s inspired by Red Bull and made with the Red Bull cans it can be entered. Right now I think there are about 12 entrants. We have cans avail able at the warehouse so peo ple can come and get them from Bristol Wines,” Ms Strachan said. The lucky first place Bahamian winner will be flown all expenses paid with his/her piece to this final exhibition that will be hosted at Devon House, Kingston, Jamaica in October. This competition promises to feature the finest pieces from the Caribbean and will be judged by the public through the peo ple's choice award, a media choice award and the coveted prize being given to the best piece chosen by a panel of Caribbean art gurus. Other Red Bull Art of Can exhibitions have taken place in the US in Boston, Atlanta, Dallas, Minneapolis, Philadelphia, Houston and Chicago. Red Bull Art of Can has a long international history which began in Europe in 2000. Since then, exhibits have been hosted all over the world including Prague, Switzerland, London, Dublin, Dubai, Budapest, Vienna, Warsaw and Amsterdam. Red Bull has many forms things 2 DO By LLOYD ALLEN Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net WITH all the excitement surrounding the Miss Universe pageant added with everything else that’s happening in Nassau, it’s important to know exactly what’s happening. This week Things 2 Do is mixing all the right elements of fun, flare, and beauty, offering you everything and then some for the best in entertainment. 1. It’s all glitz and glamour for the 84 contestants of the Miss Universe Pageant with the organisers sparing no effort in giving the girls the all Bahamian experience. Tonight at 7pm, locals designers will have a rare opportunity to have the international beauties model their designs made from the local Bahamian fabrics Androsia and Bahama Hand Prints. The public is invited to join the contestants at the Sheraton’s Nassau Beach Hotel, Cable Beach. Tickets are priced at $75 to $125 and can be purchased from the Miss Universe events boxoffice in the Sheraton’s convention centre lobby. Following the event is a Junkanoo rush-out between the Sheraton and Breezes hotel starting at 9pm. 2. Continuing with its sixth annual film festival series, The Bahamas International Film Festival is presenting the flick Pretty Ugly People. First released in 2008, the film tells the story of a dying woman’s last wish of bringing together her estranged circle of friends from college to spend a final weekend together. As the film unfolds, the reality that none of the characters are the way the were in college comes to light for Lucy (Missi Pyle they all spend the time together without any of the modern conveniences while tolerating each other. The film is being shown tonight at Galleria Cinema JFK at 8pm and tickets are priced at $5. 3. On Thursday the organisers from the Miss Universe committee have scheduled a State Gift Auction and Din-n er where souvenirs and cult ural pieces from the 84 countries represented in the pageant will be auctioned off and proceeds given to the Bahamas’ HIV/AIDS Foun dation. The event will takep lace at the Sheraton Nas s au Beach Hotel at 6.30pm on Thursday. Tickets are priced between $150 and $200 general admission, and $500 for banner seats. To buy yours now, visit the Miss Universe box office in the Sheraton’s convention center lobby or contact the Bahamas Aids Foundation at 325.9326/7. 4. It’s all about TGI Friday’s, and throughout the island there are activities galore all offering the best in entertainment to launch the weekend. On the list are Market Paradiso on Paradise Island with an up tempo happy hour from 5pm to 8. There’s also Van Breugel’s on Charlotte Street and if that’s not enough, Green Parrots on East Bay Street may be just the place for you. It’s right on the water’s edge giving the best in urban and pop music, a spectacular dcor, and drinks are priced just right. Either way, entertainment on Friday is all about unwinding, so go out and indulge. 5. What is TRI-ART-IC? It’s a new approach to art, particularly local art helping to translate the essence of Bahamian experiences, lifestyles, and culture into the local and international consciousness. This Friday at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, local artists Bernard Petit, Charlton Strachan, and Matthew Wildgoose, will present several pieces of their art along with intimate dis cussions and light refreshments all to generate more talk of the TRI-ART-IC ini tiative. The event runs from 6pm to 9, and will extend to an after party at Harry’s Haven of Rest on George Street. Access to the event is free, and all are invited. P h o t o s b y N a p h t a l i J u n i o r TOP – Miss Jamaica Carolyn Yapp showing off her Red Bull earrings ABOVE Miss Jamaica Universe Carolyn Yapp has a great time trying on and admiring great fashion pieces submitted for Red Bull Art of Can. The pieces, using Red Bull cans in its creation, including funky earrings and a very edgy and futuristic dress were submitted by Jamaican jewelry designers Reve Jewelry and on display at the Hilton on Saturday August 1, 2009 at the Miss Universe' send off to the Bahamas. ARTIST showing off a flower made from a Red Bull can... that I'm studying the past legends in this project, I feel that we all need to embrace the past. People like Joseph Spence, Blind Blake and many others were great locally and internationally. These men and women paved the way for us in music, now we need to get back on that path and value 'us' first instead of rap or reggae or any other foreign art style. Not to say that these styles of music aren't good but they are not who we are. So I guess my inspiration comes from knowing that there needs to be a consciousness of where we came from, who we are as Bahamians so that we will know where we're going,” Mr Wildgoose said. Mr Wildgoose said during the show, he is expecting a cultural awakening and an appreciation for who we are as Bahamians. “I'm expecting viewers to be inspired not just by art pieces, but fine art itself and to know that it is ‘the quality of our art that reflects the quality of our society,’” Mr Wildgoose said. As for Mr Strachan, his body of work is all paintings just as his co-exhibitors and is probably the most repre sentational of them all. They can be described as figurative in subject matter but his interpretation of the con tent he addresses is intermediary of subtle and bold. According to Mr Petit, Mr Strachan’s work can be seen as multiplexed as this recent compilation of his is made up of landscapes, seascapes and portraits. “His brush strokes are a bit more defined or intense than that of Bernard’s, but not giving as much of a hardened appearance as that of Matthew’s canvases. Further more, the manner in which he addresses his subject matter demonstrates an artist’s sensitivity towards not totally adapting the content beyond reasonable recognition,” Mr Petit said. Mr Strachan said although this is his fourth show, it is his first with Mr Petit and Mr Wildgoose. “I expect that the showing gets the attention it rightfully needs as it draws not only the Bahamian public but also off island viewers and potential buyers. I also expect that a major difference can be made with this showing as it’s to acknowledge the younger talent in this country on how to explore their gifts,” Mr Strachan said. Mr Petit hopes that he and his co-exhibitors will begin to gain more exposure as young up and coming artists. “I hope that we develop a following from this new approach we have taken to our work. Ideally we would want people to walk away feeling that we have brought something different to the art scene in comparison to what some of our contemporaries are presenting of late,” Mr Petit said. Three artists unite to put on exhibition of their works at Hilton

PAGE 22

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 75F/24C Low: 77F/25C Low: 77F/25C Low: 79F/26C Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 80F/27C Low: 75 F/24 C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 93F/34C High: 90F/32C High: 90 F/32 C High: 89 F/32 C High: 90F/32C High: 90 F/32C High: 89F/32C Low: 77F/25C High: 91F/33C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 91F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 71F/22C High: 91 F/33 C Low: 77F/25C High: 91 F/33 Low: 73F/23C High: 87F/31C Low: 75 F/24C High: 90F/32C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 92F/33C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 90F/32C Low: 73 F/23 C High: 91F/33C Low: 76F/24C High: 93 F/34 C Low: 75F/24C High: 91F/33C High: 90 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12 TH , 2009, PAGE 13B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. Partly cloudy with a brief shower. Partly sunny, a t-storm; breezy. Clouds and sun, a t-storm possible. Some sun, t-storms possible; windy. High: 89 Low: 75 High: 89 High: 87 High: 87 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 89 Low: 76 Low: 80 Low: 76 AccuWeather RealFeel 94F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 80F 94-81F 92-82F 92-80F 100-77F Low: 75 TODAYTONIGHTTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................91F/33C Low ....................................................78F/26C Normal high ......................................89F/32C Normal low ........................................76F/24C Last year's high .................................. 91 F/33C Last year's low .................................. 79 F/26C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.79" Year to date ................................................21.61" Normal year to date ....................................27.17" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Last New First Full Aug. 13 Aug. 20Aug. 27Sep. 4 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:43 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:47 p.m. Moonrise . . . 11:37 p.m. Moonset . . . . 12:29 p.m. Today Thursday Friday Saturday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 12:09 a.m.2.46:13 a.m.0.2 12:39 p.m.2.97:05 p.m.0.5 12:59 a.m.2.47:02 a.m.0.3 1:35 p.m.2.98:07 p.m.0.6 1:57 a.m.2.38:00 a.m.0.3 2:39 p.m.2.99:14 p.m.0.5 3:04 a.m.2.39:06 a.m.0.3 3:48 p.m.3.010:22 p.m.0.5 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco95/3579/26s92/3379/26pc Amsterdam70/2157/13r68/2054/12pc Ankara, Turkey81/2750/10s85/2954/12s Athens84/2871/21s86/3072/22s Auckland63/1748/8c60/1554/12r Bangkok90/3279/26r89/3179/26sh Barbados86/3077/25t86/3077/25s Barcelona89/3169/20t81/2770/21s Beijing99/3775/23s100/3773/22s Beirut81/2776/24s82/2776/24s Belgrade85/2961/16s89/3167/19s Berlin72/2254/12r72/2254/12pc Bermuda86/3078/25s86/3078/25s Bogota67/1943/6c66/1845/7sh Brussels77/2559/15pc77/2557/13sh Budapest85/2963/17c82/2759/15pc Buenos Aires68/2053/11s61/1650/10pc Cairo96/3574/23s97/3674/23s Calcutta93/3385/29sh93/3385/29t Calgary66/1846/7pc59/1544/6t Cancun93/3375/23s93/3375/23pc Caracas81/2766/18t82/2773/22t Casablanca89/3169/20s89/3171/21s Copenhagen72/2255/12sh69/2051/10sh Dublin64/1752/11pc63/1754/12pc Frankfurt79/2663/17pc77/2559/15r Geneva 80/26 57/13 s 79/2658/14s Halifax 72/22 59/15 pc 68/20 58/14 c Havana 93/33 72/22 t 90/32 72/22 sh Helsinki 73/22 52/11r70/2150/10sh Hong Kong 88/31 82/27 t 90/32 82/27t Islamabad 109/42 85/29 s 108/42 85/29 s Istanbul83/2867/19s83/2869/20s Jerusalem 86/30 63/17s84/2861/16s Johannesburg 69/2041/5s64/1739/3s Kingston 89/3179/26t89/3179/26sh Lima70/2159/15s73/2258/14s London75/2355/12sh72/2257/13r Madrid91/3264/17pc95/3566/18pc Manila90/3281/27t83/2878/25r Mexico City77/2555/12pc75/2354/12t Monterrey102/3875/23s104/4075/23s Montreal77/2561/16pc82/2764/17s Moscow75/2355/12pc70/2154/12sh Munich78/2558/14pc75/2357/13c Nairobi79/2654/12c82/2755/12pc New Delhi 97/3686/30pc95/3584/28t Oslo67/1952/11sh64/1750/10r Paris82/2761/16pc79/2657/13pc Prague 76/24 58/14 pc 74/23 54/12 c Rio de Janeiro72/2263/17pc74/2365/18s Riyadh103/3980/26s103/3979/26s Rome 88/31 68/20 s 86/30 68/20 s St. Thomas90/3280/26sh89/3180/26sh San Juan83/2844/6pc68/2039/3pc San Salvador 90/32 70/21 t 88/31 74/23 t Santiago 59/1541/5r64/1745/7c Santo Domingo91/3273/22pc86/3074/23r Sao Paulo 67/19 56/13 pc 74/23 57/13s Seoul81/2773/22r89/3168/20s Stockholm 70/21 52/11 pc 72/22 52/11 pc Sydney 66/18 50/10 s68/2049/9s Taipei92/3381/27r92/3380/26t T okyo 84/28 77/25 pc 92/33 82/27 pc T oronto 76/2461/16s81/2763/17s Trinidad88/3161/16s91/3266/18s V ancouver 70/21 56/13 pc 69/2055/12sh Vienna 77/2565/18pc78/2564/17sh W arsaw 72/22 54/12 sh 70/21 50/10 sh Winnipeg 84/28 66/18 s 84/2865/18c H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles85F Thursday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles85F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles86F Thursday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles86F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles84F Thursday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles84F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque92/3366/18pc89/3166/18t Anchorage66/1853/11s65/1853/11c Atlanta86/3070/21t87/3070/21t Atlantic City84/2868/20t84/2867/19t Baltimore88/3166/18t85/2967/19t Boston76/2466/18t73/2264/17pc Buffalo80/2659/15s81/2759/15s Charleston, SC91/3275/23t89/3173/22t Chicago84/2859/15s85/2962/16s Cleveland82/2760/15pc84/2861/16s Dallas96/3574/23t96/3576/24pc Denver95/3559/15pc96/3559/15t Detroit82/2764/17s86/3065/18s Honolulu88/3175/23r89/3176/24r Houston98/3676/24t94/3474/23t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday TodayThursdayTodayThursday Indianapolis86/3062/16pc86/3065/18s Jacksonville92/3373/22t89/3174/23t Kansas City92/3367/19s90/3266/18s Las Vegas105/4079/26s105/4081/27s Little Rock92/3366/18s92/3367/19s Los Angeles86/3066/18pc84/2864/17pc Louisville88/3166/18pc89/3169/20s Memphis92/3371/21s93/3372/22s Miami90/3278/25t90/3278/25t Minneapolis88/3169/20s90/3270/21pc Nashville88/3167/19pc91/3268/20s New Orleans91/3276/24t93/3376/24t New York85/2970/21t83/2872/22pc Oklahoma City94/3470/21pc93/3370/21s Orlando93/3375/23t92/3374/23t Philadelphia86/3070/21t86/3070/21t Phoenix 103/39 83/28 pc 103/3985/29t Pittsburgh82/2760/15pc83/2862/16pc Portland, OR 78/2560/15pc75/2355/12s Raleigh-Durham 86/30 70/21 t 85/29 71/21 t St. Louis87/3066/18s90/3270/21s Salt Lake City 94/34 66/18 s 93/3365/18pc San Antonio 100/37 76/24 t 98/36 76/24 t San Diego77/2569/20pc77/2568/20pc San Francisco 72/22 57/13 pc 69/2055/12pc Seattle73/2255/12c72/2253/11pc T allahassee 90/3273/22t88/3172/22t T ampa 90/32 77/25 t 89/31 75/23t Tucson96/3576/24t94/3476/24t W ashington, DC 88/31 71/21t83/2872/22t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

PAGE 23

C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune SECTIONB I N S I D E Red Bull has many forms... See page 12B WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12, 2009 World’s most beautiful women unveil their national costumes... See pages 10 & 11B B y ALEX MISSICK Features Reporter amissick@tribunemedia.net T alented artistic t rio, Bernard Petit, CharltonS trachan and M atthew Wild goose, have come together to put on an art exhibition entitled “Tri-art-ic” featuring their recent works from August 14-August 15 at theB ritish Colonial Hilton. T riartic is adapted from the word “Triadic” which is o ne of several colour s chemes where three colours are used that appear equally spaced from each other on the colour wheel. Given that we are three y oung artists that possess three styles that are equally d istinct from each other we f ound the name to be fitting in describing us and the body of work,” Mr Petit said. Mr Petit said although this is his sixth group show, his work in Tri-art-ic can be described as being the most subtle and simplistic of the three. Mr Petit attempts to create a smoother surface onto the canvas. Though his colour palette is arbitrary from plausible reality, each painting still reflects some degree of visual credibility. “From my body of work I favor the piece ‘Perspective View of the Restful Wall.’ Lately, I have found myself interested in anthropomorphising inanimate objects, making them seem as if they can experience human situa tions of being lonely or even observers of other objects, for example. This piece shows a pole looking on at the perspective of the wall stretching further into the distance from him. I felt that this particular piece accomplished my attempt to create these scenarios with non living objects,” Mr Petit said. Mr Wildgoose’s series which is the boldest of the three, takes the most celebrated Bahamian figures and exaggerates their fea tures into caricature por traits. Through his pieces, there is an artist’s interest to stretch his subject beyond what is normally perceived in reality as natural. Mr Wildgoose said at this point, he has completed eight pieces with hopes to have twelve at the time of the show. “I always had a deep appreciation for today's Bahamian music (Goombay) and musicians. Now ri-art-ic’ S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 2 2 B B Three artists put on exhibition MAN WITH CIGAR by Matthew Wildgoose... PERSPECTIVE VIEW of the restful wall... MUSICIAN by Matthew Wildgoose... RAKE AND SCRAPE by Matthew Wildgoose...


Pim blowin’ it

SOF
75F

SUNNY WITH

Volume: 105 No.215

HIGH
LOW

ey

anock rise
rape figures

Senator reveals
alarming statistics

THE number of
rapes and attempted
rapes reported in the
first five months of this
year has already sur-
passed in number all of
the cases in 2008, Sena-
tor Allyson Maynard-
Gibson said.

Revealing the latest
crime statistics at a town
meeting on the Sexual
Offences Amendment
Bill at the St Agnes
Church Parish Hall last night,
the PLP senator in her speaking
notes said that up until June 14,
2009, 69 cases of rapes and
attempted rapes were reported.
In 2008 the police recorded 63

Senator Allyson
Maynard-Gibson

cases, she said.

“In less than six
months we have had
more than the total
number of rapes and
attempted rapes report-
ed for 2008.”

“The United Nations
in its report entitled
‘Crime, Violence, and
Development Trends,
Costs, and Policy
Options in the
Caribbean’, issued in
March 2007 shows that the
Bahamas has the highest rape
rate in Caribbean and compari-
son countries,” she said.

SEE page 12

Police slammed for ‘failing to protect
public from murderers and rapists’

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

POLICE have been slammed for failing to protect the com-
munity from murderers and rapists by a former Crime Stoppers
advocate who is demanding the basic right to public safety.

Lucia Broughton, a mother of three from Camperdown, eastern
New Providence, spoke on the record as she demanded that senior
officers in the Royal Bahamas Police Force be held to account over

SEE page 12

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12, 2009

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ajor/Tribune staff

Felip

MISS UNIVERSE contestants enjoy horseback riding during their visit to Harbour island yesterday.
The contestants were given an enthusiastic welcome by the island’s residents.

Hotel union elections will

be held in next two months

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

HOTEL union elections held in May remain
“null and void” and new elections will be held
within the next two months.

Supreme Court Justice Jon Isaacs yesterday
denied an application by recently ousted Bahamas
Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWVU) president Nicole Martin for the
granting of a stay of the proceedings or execution
of his order pending an appeal.

“It has been a long drawn out process, but it is
now at and end and everyone now without ques-
tion has no doubt on what the position of the

SEE page 12



¢ SEE PAGE TWO

Police still ‘puzzled’
over mother’s murder

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

POLICE are still "puzzled" over the sense-
less murder of mother-of-two Tagia Soles-
Armony, who was shot and killed in her sis-
ter's car while her infant son lay in her arms.

Early reports from family and friends indi-
cate that the murder may have been a case of
mistaken identity or an attempted robbery
gone wrong, but investigators are probing all
possible scenarios that would unearth a
motive.

"We are following several leads, no one is in

SEE page 12



NASSAU AND BAHAM/?

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER



to 10 years

By NATARIO
McKENZIE

Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@
tribunemedia.net

A MOTHER of three,
convicted of manslaugh-
ter for the stabbing death
of her boyfriend, was sen-
tenced to 10 years in
prison yesterday.

Senior Justice Anita
Allen also ordered that
Shimeakima Delores
Pratt attend counselling
for anger management
and family counselling.
Pratt, 30, was convicted
on July 1 of the stabbing
death of her boyfriend of
eight years Gary Carey
Sr. Carey, a 54-year-old
Defence Force Officer,
was found stabbed to
death in Pratt’s Minnis
Subdivision apartment
off Carmichael Road on
Sunday, August 17, 2008.
According to evidence
adduced at the trial, Pratt
had stabbed Carey in the
chest with a rat tail comb
and initially told police
that Carey had collapsed

SEE page 12

Bahamians

who died in

plane crash
are identified

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

POLICE in Jamaica have
identified the two Bahamian
men who died in a fiery plane
crash on that island last week.

According to Sergeant Jubert
Llewellyn of the Jamaican Con-
stabulary Force, the two men
are Preston Rolle, 41, and
Christon Dion Dean, 32. The
men, who police suspect were
part of a drug deal gone wrong,
were found in the charred cock-
pit of a twin-engine plane,
burned beyond recognition.

Officials at the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs and local police
could not confirm the men's
identities.

Reports reaching The Tri-
bune indicate that one of the
men was arrested for plane

SEE page 12

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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Miss Universe
contestants visit
Harbour Island

A GROUP of Miss Universe contestants
travelled to beautiful Harbour Island yes-
terday, where they were greeted with enthu-
siasm by the locals and given the five-star
treatment.

The ladies flew in to North Eleuthera and
were ferried across to the Harbour Island
dock in several small boats, arriving at about
10.30am on what turned out to be a gor-
geous, clear summer day.

What seemed like the entire population of
the island — as well as a good number of
tourists — was on hand to greet the contes-
tants, who were led to a waiting cavalcade of

vehicles by a rousing local junkanoo troupe.

They proceeded to Valentines Resort for
refreshments and then on to the island’s
Haunted House, the grounds of which are
said to be wandered by the soul of an
unnamed woman who appears in a wedding
gown.

The ladies then took in a local art gallery
before hitting Bay Street for some shop-
ping.

They were then treated to an exquisite
lunch by the staff of the Coral Sands, before
spending the rest of the afternoon relaxing
on the world famous pink sand beach.

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The ideal candidate must have
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August 26, 2009.


















STARS OF STAGE AND SCREAM: Te contestants visit Harbour Rent Haunted House.

MISS ZAMBIA Andella
Chileshe Matthews along with
Miss Turks and Caicos Jewel
Selver are all smiles on their
Harbour Island trip

PHOTOS:
Felipé Major/
Tribune staff

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MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
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Sports oe Crna

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



The best for news

tripune 242 .cc



Second tropical
depression
is monitored

WEATHER experts are
now monitoring a second trop-
ical depression that has formed
in the Atlantic and could devel-
op into a storm system within
the next two days.

As with tropical depression
nine-e which is still hovering
over the Atlantic, forecasters at
the National Hurricane Centre
(NHC) in Miami reported that

this second system is not yet

showing any signs of strength-
ening.

At 5pm yesterday, the cen-
tre of tropical depression two
was located about 400 miles
west of the southernmost Cape
Verde islands.

The depression was moving

toward the west at a speed of

near 12mph.
This general track with a

slight increase in forward speed

is expected over the next couple
of days, the NHC said.
Maximum sustained winds

were near 30mph with higher

gusts.

Search for man
who physically
assaulted woman

POLICE are searching for
aman who physically assault-
ed a woman in the parking
lot of The Tribune yesterday
afternoon.

Sometime after 2pm, a man
of “dark” complexion was
seen arguing with a woman
as they both sat in a black
coloured Ford Sport Trac.

The man was reportedly
demanding that the woman
get out of the driver’s seat.

After a verbal exchange,
he began to repeatedly punch
the woman in her head, eye-
witnesses said.

Attempting to block the
blows, the woman threw her
hands in front of her face
while the man began to pull
on her as he dragged her out
of the truck.

When persons who were
outside of the building began
to approach the pair, the man
flung the woman into the
backseat of the truck and
sped off down Shirley Street.

A police report was imme-
diately filed with officers at
the Central Detective Unit
who up until press time last
night were still actively
searching for the man.

Firearm, live
rounds seizet

POLICE seized an illegal }
firearm and six live rounds of }
ammunition from a man }
apprehended in the Kemp :

Road area.

Officers from the Wulff }
Road station spotted a man }
on the roof of a building as }
they patrolled Strachan's }
Alley, off Kemp Road, short- }

ly before 11pm Monday.

After the man climbed }
down from the roof, police }
searched him and found a }
.380 handgun with six live ;
rounds of ammunition in his ;

possession.

The suspect, a 25-year-old

Tribune website
the hottest in town

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Visitor calls for clean-up at
PMH after strange odour

A STRANGE odour per-
meating the upper floor of
the main building at
Princess Margaret Hospital
has led one visitor to call for
a clean-up of the facility.

The woman who identi-
fied herself only as Ms
Smith told The Tribune how
the smell of “rotting dead
bodies” wafted through the
corridor near the male sur-
gical ward as she was walk-
ing through to visit a friend
in the hospital on Sunday.

She believes the smell was
coming from the morgue
and called Minister of
Health Dr Hubert Minnis to
investigate the stench which
struck her as unhygienic.

Ms Smith said: “Whatever
it is, I know it’s not healthy.
I don’t know if it’s bodies
rotting in there and the
smell is seeping up, but it
stinks. It smells like rotting
dead bodies, bodies decom-
posing.

“Dr Minnis should get
somebody to check it out
because that’s what he’s
being paid for.”

Ventilation problems in
the PMH morgue was one
of the reasons why staff
walked out of the hospital
on a sick-out last year
demanding overdue haz-
ardous pay owing to unsuit-
able working conditions.

Ms Smith said: “They
need a new hospital, that
place is the pits.”



was blown over from piles
of burning medical waste in
the engineering department
in the back of the hospital
grounds.

She said: “Smell is some-
thing that can come and go
depending on how the
breeze is blowing, and what

Anger over water outages

WATER outages in eastern New Providence had some residents

fuming yesterday.

Area residents said they have been plagued with frequent water
outages with no warnings, rusty water and low to no pressure for

months now.

"I was about to take a cold shower to cool off in this stifling heat
and I couldn't. If this is going to happen Water and Sewerage

should at least let me know.

"It's too hot and sticky for this and I'm tired of it — and it's
always this area. I refuse to believe that this catch them by sur-
prise,” said one angry resident who lives near Yamacraw Beach.

Another resident of the area said he is fed up with the utility

company.

"If I have to pay them for their services then they have to let me
Know (when the water will be off). I don't even need the money
back, I just want them to respect me as a paying customer," he said.

Attempts to secure a comment from the Water and Sewerage



IT’S live and it’s officially the
hottest website in town!

Within hours of the launch of
TRIBUNE242, hundreds of new
visitors had registered, and many
got busy voting in the daily news
poll on the site and commenting
on the hot stories of the day.

In fact, the number of daily hits
jumped by more than 1,000 PER
CENT from Sunday when TRI-
BUNE242 hosted just the PDF
flipbook to Monday when we
launched our full feature website.

“The response so far has been
overwhelming. We knew the
Bahamian public was eager for
The Tribune to launch an inter-
active website, but I think we
were all amazed by the statistics
we saw following day one,” said
TRIBUNE242 online editor Jes-
sica Robertson.

The Tribune set up its website
not only as a means of dissemi-
nating information, but as a way
to generate intelligent conversa-
tions on the issues affecting
Bahamians.

Polls have been set up to allow
each registered user only one vote

might smell like dead bodies
is not necessarily the smell
of dead bodies.
“Normally we do the
fumigation process at the
hospital on evenings and
weekends to avoid traffic of
staff, so it is possible that is
what she was smelling.”

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cav
Telephone: (242) 3642-66545
Bayparl Building, Parliament Street

on a given topic. This ensures that
multiple votes by a single person
can’t skew the results.

The first question asked was
“With the murder toll now reach-
ing 50, does the Government have
the right policies to tackle crime
on our streets?”

By noon yesterday, more than
160 people had cast their votes — a
resounding 83 per cent voted no —
and many had left comments.

Managing Editor John Fleet
hailed the first day of
TRUBUNE242 as a magnificent
success.

He said: “The number of tele-
phone calls and e-mails from read-
ers congratulating us has been
fantastic.

“TRIBUNE242 is the only reli-
able online source for news in the
Bahamas. The interaction which is
already taking place is amazing,
and it’s only Day One

TRIBUNE242 is updated daily
at 2pm. The site will be open
access for a month, after that
readers will be required to take
out a paid subscription to access
all sections.

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PMH press officer Thel-

‘ Corporation were unsuccessful yesterday.
ma Rolle said there are cur-

resident of Johnson Alley, is :
: In May, Robert Deal, assistant general manager at the WSC,

currently in police custody.

He could appear in court
on formal charges as early as }

tomorrow.

rently no problems with
ventilation in the morgue
and she expects the stench

admitted that the rationing of water to homes in New Providence
came as the supply of water stored by the corporation sunk to “crit-

ically low levels.”

Drugs worth $160,000 seized on beach

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A large
quantity of illegal drugs with
an estimated street value of
over $160,000 was seized by
police early yesterday morn-
ing at a secluded beach on
Grand Bahama.

Asst Supt Loretta Mack-
ey, police press liaison offi-
cer, reported that sometime
around 6.30am police went to
the north-eastern area of
Williams Town Beach, where
they discovered a drug smug-
gling operation in progress.

According to reports, four
persons onboard a white 25ft
vessel were seen off-loading
a large quantity of drugs from

the boat on to the beach.

ASP Mackey said the cul-
prits fled the area in the boat
when police arrived at the
scene.

Officers recovered 162
pounds of suspected marijua-
na with a street value of
$162,000.

Police also discovered a
black and chrome .380 hand-
gun along with one magazine
consisting of seven .380
rounds of ammunition.

Drug Enforcement Unit
(DEV) officers are continu-
ing their investigation into the
matter.

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PAGE X, XXXDAY, XXXMONTH XxX, 1998

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

More need for monitoring criminals

JOHN Hincliffe, who for many years was
port director in Freeport, told a Welsh news
site recently that he believes the number of
guns on New Providence streets is now
worse than in the eighties when he lived
here.

The eighties — an era notorious not only
for drug peddling, but for gun smuggling
with drive-by shootings the order of the
day. Now, almost 20 years later, history is
repeating itself.

Mr Hincliffe was commenting to the news
media on the shooting death — which he
and many like him believe was a contract
killing — of banker and fellow Welshman,
Hywel Jones, 55. Mr Hincliffe believes that
because of the widespread corruption in the
Bahamas, the Jones case will be difficult of
solution.

The bank executive was walking from
his car to his office on the morning of April
22 when a gunman stepped up and shot him
in the head. So far no one has been arrested.
Jones clung to life for about two weeks with-
out regaining consciousness. He died on
May 8.

Other than having a hunch that there are
more guns in circulation in the Bahamas, a
police officer said there are no current sta-
tistics to support this belief.

With the Bahamas’ open borders and the
US — and its fanatical gun culture that
adversely affects all its neighbours — right
on our doorstep, the police are daily chal-
lenged in their fight to get guns off the
streets. However, the officer said, this year
the force had taken more firearms out of
circulation than ever before.

In April this year the Bahamas Central
Intelligence Bureau (CIB) compiled a list
of all persons released from prison that
month. Of the 205 released, 153 were out on
bail, and 39 were classified as persons who
“should be monitored.”

Eleven persons released on bail were in
prison for murder or attempted murder,
three for unlawful sexual intercourse, three
for rape, and one for assault with intent to
rape. Today most of the crime news that we
report are offences being committed by per-
sons on bail. Some of these accused have
long rap sheets. Most of their alleged
offences are yet to be settled by the courts.

On the April bail sheet was a person
notorious for drug possession, and other
crimes. He was accused, but acquitted of

murder. However, all who know him, and his
criminal record claim he only got off the
murder charge because witnesses were too
terrified to testify against him. Here is a man
acquitted by the courts, but released from
prison with the CIB recommendation that he
“should be monitored.”

Still under discussion by government is
the implementation of electronic monitoring
devices for persons out on bail. Apparently
these devices are to be used only in cases
where an accused has a criminal charge
pending. But what happens to a man, who
the courts have acquitted, public opinion
has convicted, and police don’t trust as being
a safe neighbour? How can the police mon-
itor him without an electronic device being
attached to his leg?

The committee should include such a per-
son in their considerations — acquitted, but
believed guilty. Apparently, even the police
think the public should be protected against
his anti-social behaviour.

Either the rules have to be adjusted to
accommodate this type of person, or a per-
petual charge will have to be kept pending
against him to justify the device around his
leg.

it is really unrealistic to make the police
responsible for such a person without giving
them the tools with which to do the moni-
toring job.

As crime escalates, the police certainly
need Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) in
schools and other critical areas. Such devices
might not only deter the criminal, but if
caught on camera he can be quickly sought
and brought to justice. The electronic device
should now be beyond the talking stage. It is
hoped that it will be a perpetual piece of
jewellery for the convicted rapist, even after
he has served his time.

As crime increases and the community
becomes more tense, talking committees
have to speed up their deliberations and
turn their talk into action.

The monitoring of these devices, once in
place, will put an extra strain on the police
force. Staff will have to be found to monitor
them. There is no point having an ankle
monitor on an accused if there is no one at
the other end paying attention to his activi-
ties. Even though this will put another bur-
den on the police, many of them believe
that something has to be done to assist them
in enforcing the law and preventing crime.



Stench from
Montagu ramp
is unbearable

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thank you for this opportu-
nity to address you this letter.

On Saturday, July 25, I went
to Montagu Beach and the
stink odour was so bad that I
thought the sea water was stink,
so I continued to smell and dis-
covered that the odour was
coming from the Montagu
ramp.

On Saturday, August 1, I
went on Montagu, and low and
behold, passing the ramp there
was the horrible odour.

What kind of nasty people
are we?

Paradise Island is just across
from East Bay Street. Montagu
ramp, East Bay Street is a one
way street, when you come
from over the bridge.

LETTERS

letters@tripbunemedia.net



There is no toilet, so those
nasty people go in the bushes to
relieve themselves, hands not
washed, mingling with fish and
conch for Bahamians to buy
and eat.

I don’t mind the fruit and the
straw vendors, but the fisher-
men must go. Family Guardian
have my condolences.

In the 60’s and 70’s one could
go downtown and buy fish,
mutton and fruits from the
Market, after it burnt down
they moved to Potter’s Cay.
PLP, FNM, you all know very

well that some Bahamians are
unruly, hard-headed and stub-
born.

Mr. Health Minister, Mrs.
M.P., Mr. Tourism Minister,
when I pass the Montagu ramp,
I would love to have my car
glass down and so would the
tourists, also Miss Universe and
my Bahamian brothers and sis-
ters.

Please have these people
moved to Potters Cay, they will
cry that they have mouths to
feed, but they must go.

Now PLP and FNM, if you
all don’t get together and make
those people move, you will be
cut below the knees in 2012.

PATTE LEE,
Nassau,
August 7, 2009

Better laws needed to protect children, animals

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have listened to some of the views on the
proposed amendments to the (rape of spouse) in
the sexual offences and domestic violence act, this
is what our act is now.

15 (1) Any person who has sexual intercourse
with his spouse without the consent of the spouse-

Sexual assault by spouse.

(a) where there is in existence in relation to
them-

(i) a decree nisi of divorce;

(ii) a decree of judicial separation;

(iii) a separation agreement; or

(iv) an order of a court for the person not to
molest or cohabit with his spouse, or any other
order made under Part IJ; or

(b) where the person has notice that a petition
for judicial separation, divorce or nullity of mar-
riage has been presented to a court, is guilty of
the offence of sexual assault by spouse and liable
to imprisonment for a term of fifteen years.

I see nothing wrong with this, we must all
respect each others privacy and if your spouse
says no to you that should mean no.

Here is the problem in which amending this
law cannot help, persons with very low self
esteem, too much pride, worrying about what
others may say or think and putting children’s
vacation/school fees and mortgage in front of
self. If these amendments due become law it
will put burden on the court system and the
Police because the spouses who are being abuse
now, still will not come forward and other spous-
es will use the new law to waste the systems’
time by calling the police and then not appearing
in court.

A spouse needs to say to the other half, if you
violate me then you go or I go, because if it is
done once it will happen again, you must leave

that situation put your trust in God only he can
give you the strength to make it on your own, if
you need to fall into someone arms fall into his
and not your pastor.

What we need in our country is more love and
compassion towards each other, Mahatma Gand-
hi said: “A country is judged by the way it treats
its animals” and that says a lot for The Bahamas
with the high level of cruelty in this nation
towards animals and children, it is no wonder
why we breed the type of adults we have in this
country. Compassion and love for all living things
is taught and expressed in very few homes today.
So let us pass better laws to protect our children
and animals from abuse because this is where
the seed is planted, our children grow up being
abused and seeing animals abused. What do you
think will happen to 75 per cent of them when
they reach adulthood?

I say to the politicians of this country please try
and find a way make the cost of living cheaper so
that parents can spend more time with their chil-
dren. Parents stop trying to keep up with the
Jones’s, take those extra hours and spend with
your children, they do not need the extra games
and clothes, this does not erase the memory of
the only time you said anything was to shout at
them or the only time you touched them was to
hit them.

“T object to violence because when it appears
to do good the good is only temporary, the evil it
does is permanent” — Gandhi.

Show love to your children as God showed
his love to you.

STEPHEN TURNQUEST
Nassau,
August, 2009.

A Chief Justice should be ‘lettered’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Who will be appointed the
next Chief Justice?

Speculation abounds and at
least two newspapers are actu-
ally naming candidates.

My five cents is simple — a
Chief Justice should be a per-
son who is “lettered.”

In other words has been to
an accredited university and has
a degree in Law, so this obvi-

ously eliminates effectively one
of those mentioned.

Current AG Michael Barnett
has certain political aspirations
and I am reasonably sure he
will try again, although this time
around could be more of a chal-
lenge for the FNM than 2007, if
one is to believe current public
opinion polling.

Also there is the speculation
if His Excellency A.D. Hanna

but that is not really a race as it
is a sShoe-in for the obvious
totally acceptable bipartisan
candidate who is well tried.
The rumoured alternative is
absolutely unacceptable to the
majority of Bahamians.

K. MINNIS,
Nassau,
August 10, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009, PAGE 5



Fire in Grand

Bahama is
investigated

GRAND Bahama
police are investigating
the cause of a fire which
almost destroyed an 11-
room home on East Sun-

ASP Loretta Mackey
reported that the Police
Fire Department
responded to a building
fire at approximately
8.55pm.

When firemen went to
Sunrise Highway, near
Ariel Place, they
observed an 11-room sin-
gle stone structure
engulfed in flames.

The fire was extin-
guished. The house,
which owned by a resi-
dent of Freeport, was
extensively damaged.

Spanish tourist
hitten by shark
in Florida

PONCE INLET, Fla.

THE Volusia County
Beach Patrol says a tourist

from Spain has been bitten

by a shark off of Florida’s

Atlantic coast, according to

Associated Press.
Authorities say the man,
26, whose name was not

immediately available, suf-

fered small punctures on
the top and bottom of his

left foot while sitting on his

surfboard Monday
evening.

Beach Patrol spokesman

Scott Petersohn said the
man was treated at the
scene and left. It was not
known if he went to hospi-
tal after that.



Harbour dredging is

By KATHRYN CAMPBELL

DREDGING of Nassau Har-
bour is expected to officially begin
tomorrow and be completed by
November.

Project manager with Boskalis
International BV Frans
Thomassen informed government
officials that the Nassau Harbour
Port Project is on course.

Mr Thomassen last weekend
took a team of officials on a tour
of the Nassau Harbour and
Arawak Cay port projects sites.

They were also shown the Ursa,
the rock cutting self-propelled
dredger to be used to move 1.9
million cubic yards of material
from the harbour.

Voyage

The $44.2 million Nassau Har-
bour Port Improvement Project is
being carried out to accommodate
the new mega Genesis Class cruise
ship ‘Oasis of the Seas’ which is
expected to stop in Nassau during
its maiden voyage in December.

The Ministry of Public Works
and Transport said the dredged
material will be stockpiled on
Arawak Cay for use in future gov-
ernment projects. Some of it will
be used to extend Arawak Cay by
1,000 feet.

The project also includes the
installation of three mooring dol-
phins at Prince George Wharf.

“Tam most pleased having
toured the dredger,” said Minister
Grant.

“T have every confidence that the
project will remain on schedule.



“The dredger has some five
heads (instrument on the dredger
used to cut rock).

“With this sort of preparation
there is no doubt that we will pro-
ceed on schedule.”

Among the officials were Public
Works and Transport Minister
Neko Grant; Environment Minis-
ter Earl Deveaux; permanent sec-
retary at the Ministry of Works
Colin Higgs; permanent secretary
at the Ministry of the Environ-
ment Ronald Thompson; acting
director of Works Gordon Major;
director of the Bahamas Environ-
ment Science and Technology
(BEST) Commission Philip
Weech, and Ministry of Works’
project engineer Robert Gar-
raway.

Derek Smith/BIS

al Arthur Hanna; Ministry of Tourism's Director General Vernice Walkine, and members of the royal

Bahamas Police Force Band.

This year’s Miss Universe pageant ‘best organised’

By BETTY VEDRINE

OFFICIALS of the Miss Uni-
verse organisation are hailing
this year’s pageant as their best
organised event ever and said
they are very pleased with their
partnership with the Bahamas.

“Based on the comments that
we’ve received, they are very
pleased with the way that every-
thing is going,” said Minister of
Tourism and Aviation Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace.

“In fact, the organisers said
this has been the most organ-
ised event they have ever had
and they are crediting it not only
to the ministry but also to the
corporate partners involved in
this venture.”

The Bahamas is hosting the
58th annual Miss Universe com-
petition featuring 84 of the
world's most beautiful women.

It airs live from Atlantis, Par-
adise Island, on August 23 on
NBC and Telemundo.

Paula Shugart, president of
the Miss Universe organisation,
said having the competition in
here epitomises the qualities
that are unique to the Bahamas.

“Paradise,” she said. "There is
no better name for the beauty of
the Bahamas and this island.

“The worldwide telecast will
highlight the warmth, beauty
and hospitality of the islands of
the Bahamas as well as the
world renowned Atlantis
Resort,” Ms Shugart said.

Her organisation, she said,
has had “a wonderful working
relationship” with the Bahamas
and Atlantis for many years.

ABACO

The Committee for The Privatisation of BTC
& The Utilities Regulation & Competition Authority (URCA)

“[’m very excited that this
global event will take this part-
nership to a whole new level,”
she said.

Minister Vanderpool-Wallace
said: “The people of the
Bahamas are proud and excited
at the opportunity to host some
of the most beautiful people in
the universe in some of the most
beautiful islands in the universe.

“This feels like the perfect
match.

“We look forward to show-
casing the hospitality of our peo-
ple, the clarity of our waters, the
vibrancy of our music, dance,
food and spirit.”

The reigning Miss Universe,
Venezuelan, Dayana Mendoza,
has travelled the world as an
advocate for HIV/AIDS educa-
tion, research and legislation.

Contestants will be judged in
three categories; swimsuit,
evening gown and the interview.

The competition will be host-
ed by Billy Bush, co-anchor of
‘Access Hollywood’ and Claudia
Jordan of ‘Celebrity Appren-
tice’ and ‘Deal or no Deal’.

International recording artist
Flo Rida will perform his hits
"Right Round’ and ‘Jump’ dur-
ing the swimsuit segment.

There will also be a perfor-
mances by reality star Heidi
Montag featuring her single
‘Turn ya head’. David Guetta
and Kelly Rowland will sing
their hit single ‘When love takes
over’ during the evening gown
segment.

Donald Trump and Phil
Gurin serve as executive pro-
ducers.

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set to begin tomorrow

rise Highway on Monday. :

LEFT: Frans Thomassen, project manag-
er with Boskalis International BV, gives
government ministers an overview of
the Ursa dredger to be used in the Nas-
sau Harbour Port Improvement Project.
Pictured from left are Minister of the
Environment Earl Deveaux, Mr
Thomassen and Public Works and
Transport Minister Neko Grant.

BELOW: Public Works and Transport
Minister Neko Grant points to where
one of the three mooring dolphins will
be installed as part of the Nassau Har-
bour Port Improvement Project. Pic-
tured from left are permanent secre-
tary at the Ministry of the Environment
Ronald Thompson; Minister of the
Environment Earl Deveaux; Frans
Thomassen, project manager with
Boskalis International BV and Mr
Grant.



UTILITIES REGULATION & COMPETITION AUTHORITY

invite you to attend a

on Regulatory Reform of
The Bahamas Electronic
Communications Sector





7 p.m. | Friday, August 14, 2009
The Anglican Parish Hall
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Rereshmenis will be served.
PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Falling grades ‘show lack of
‘progress in education system’

The Progressive Young
Liberals join the debate

Advocates:
Release two
Haitians to

bury daughter

MIAMD

NEARLY three dnaihs! :
after a boat overloaded with }
Haitian migrants capsized off :
South Florida's coast, the body }
of the youngest drowning vic- }
tim lies unclaimed in a}
morgue, according to Associ- }

ated Press.

Advocates in Miami's Lit- }
tle Haiti pressed federal i
authorities Tuesday to release }
the 8-month-old girl's parents }
so they can bury the child they }
lost in the fast-flowing Gulf :
Stream current and to fight
the government's efforts to}

deport them back to Haiti.
The

recovered from the ocean.

The infant remains at the}
Palm Beach County medical :
examiner's office, along with
the bodies of three other i
women who died in the acci- }
dent and have not been iden- }

tified.

north of Miami.

The grief-stricken couple }
from Port-de-Paix, Haiti, are }
plagued with nightmares:
about the baby's drowning }
and need counseling and the }
ability to plan Luana's funeral, }

relatives and advocates said.

"It's very critical for her" to :
see the baby buried, said:
Leonard's cousin, Albert Noel i

of Miami.

Marleine Bastien, executive }
director of Haitian Women of }
Miami, said the Department }
of Homeland Security has not }
responded to the couple's ;
request for humanitarian }
parole, which is occasionally }
granted for pregnant women }
or others with serious medical

conditions.

"As a matter of human
decency, they should have?
been released in order to bury :
their little baby girl, to deal }
with their immigration cases }

and to be with family,”
Bastien said.

Leonard and Augustin have }
been transferred to U.S. Mar- }
shals Service custody, said}
U.S. Immigration and Cus- }
toms Enforcement spokes- }
woman Nicole Navas. Mes- }
sages left at the Marshals Ser- :
vice's Miami and West Palm }
Beach offices were not imme- }

diately returned Tuesday.

Luana could receive a coun- !
ty burial if no one can afford
to bury her, said Tony Mean, }
operations manager for the }
Palm Beach County medical :

examiner's office.

The parents can designate ;
a friend or relative to make }
the necessary arrangements, :

but that has not happened.

The three unidentified }
women will receive county}

burials, Mead said.

The medical examiner's :
office will keep Luana's body }
and says it will wait until the ;

situation is resolved.

body of Luana :
Augustin was among nine}

Chandeline Leonard, 32, }
and Lucsene Augustin, 26, }
have been in U.S. custody :
since May 13 when the boat }
capsized and sank off Boyn- }
ton Beach, some 60 miles }

THE Progressive Young Liberals
(PYL) yesterday chimed in on the
debate raging over the national grade
average, calling on government to
place more attention on specialised
classrooms and teachers who can fur-
ther advance the Bahamas’ education
system.

Noting how the grade average has
fallen from a ‘D+’ to a ‘D’, the PYL
said this once again represents the
lack of progress within the education-
al system to “better equip young peo-
ple for the global world that we live
in.”

“Bahamians would remember that
it was just last year the minister cele-
brated the rise from a ‘D’ to a ‘D+’,
but today we are right where we start-
ed from, poised to try to reclaim the
‘D+’ average instead of advancing fur-
ther toward an ‘A’ and here is why:

“The Ingraham government has
failed to recognise that in order to
create achievers in our system it must
deliver the kinds of upgrades neces-
sary to advance education through-
out the country. Specialised class-
rooms with wireless technology, spe-
cialty trained teachers in core subject
areas such as mathematics and Eng-
lish. And the creation of an environ-
ment in which there is a zero toler-
ance approach to detractors, human or
otherwise in our system to in anyway
hinder the learning process.”

The PYL said that the education
system must also demand greater
responsibility from parents who are
the first instructors of students in this
society.

As the youth wing of the PLP, the
PYL said they found the Ministry of
Education’s 10-year plan rather inter-
esting, and even applauded govern-
ment for its efforts.

However, they added that the prob-
lems facing education have persisted
for “far too long” and need “immedi-
ate attention.”

“The Bahamian student can no
longer be allowed to fail and medioc-
rity can no longer be acceptable.

“For far too long the results of the
BJC and BGCSE have been bandied
about the halls of parliament and in
the press by politicians as a stick to
brow beat one another with for polit-
ical reasons.

“While announcing the results, the
minister said ‘when I am satisfied that
every child in the Bahamas has
achieved their full potential then I will
be satisfied, until then no stone will be
left unturned and no initiative left
untried until we reach that moment.’

“The question is we are now at the
half-way mark of the minister’s term
and what can he say that he has done
substantially to achieve that goal,” the
PYL asked.

Further, the PYL said that the
announcements that government is
suspending its Education Loan Pro-
gramme and that more than 3,000 new
students are being transferred into the
public school system, which is inclusive
of children whose parents can no
longer afford private schools, “paint a
fearful picture of more problems to
come.”

These problems include over-





results are down
from last year’s ‘D+’

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

examinations (BJC) is a ‘D’. In
2008 the national average in the
BGCSE examination was a
‘D+’ and a ‘C-’ in the BJC
examinations.

Economist Ralph Massey,
who has written a Bahamian
public policy essay based on the
2006 national grade average
told The Tribune yesterday that
the fluctuating ‘D’ average is
“deceptive” and does not
reflect a true distribution of
scores in the public and private
school sectors.

p

THE country’s current
national ‘D’ grade average of
students sitting the Bahamas
General Certificate of Sec-
ondary Education examinations
(BGCSE) is a cover up for
problems within the public
school system, it was claimed
yesterday.

During a press conference at
the Ministry of Education yes-

a atl







The national grade
average falls to D

BGCSE examination wa USSU aed as









©

fale Bibs staff
od :










THE TRIBUNE reported on the falling national grade average last week

crowded classrooms, fewer teachers,
lower grades and essentially more fail-
ures, the organisation said.

“So what does that minister intend
to do to achieve his goal of every stu-
dent living up to their potential? When
are we going to realise that education
is the key to solving a lot of the social
ills that we face, and that access to a
good education is a basic human right?
The minister has to know that no
longer can he or his administration
continue to pay lip service to this
major problem.”

“We call on the government to
move with swiftness to make sure that
the youth of the nation are in a posi-
tion to be active contributing citizens
of this country in a positive way and to
be able to compete on the global stage
as will be required of them.

“The PYL calls on the present gov-
ernment to live up to all the promises
made to the young people of the coun-
try during the 2007 election campaign.
We are waiting on the results not the
usual rhetoric, or the usual promises,
but results,” the young politicians said.

Dealing with economic
Crisis is easy, relatively

BECAUSE of the lost
jobs and the resulting
stress on people’s day-to-
day lives, the fallout from
the world economic crisis
is front and centre in the
nation’s consciousness.



JOHN



Issa

VIEW FROM AFAR |



any sustained outrage
about the number of our
young people who receive
poor or failing grades.
There are numerous arti-
cles on matters financial
but few if any about our

There are programmes on
stream to assist the unem-
ployed. There are also cap-
ital projects such as
Albany, the airport and
seaport developments that
will stimulate growth.
The plan for the renew-
al of downtown Nassau is
long overdue and will pro-
duce benefits for decades
to come. When the

economies in the devel-
oped world resume vigor-
ous growth, resort devel-

opments in New Provi-
dence and the Family
Islands will once again
flourish. These are rela-
tively easy happenings that
will pull us out of the pre-
sent slump. That is all well
and good, but it won’t
solve the most serious
threat to the future of The
Bahamas.

The most serious threat
to the Bahamian way of
life is the state of our pub-
lic education establishment















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which produces poor
results and does not pre-
pare the majority of our
youth so that they can live
productive and fulfilling
lives. This crisis is not new
and this is not the first
time that this column has
visited the subject. A
recent study has highlight-
ed the crisis and has also
shown what is possible by
pointing to two schools
that have been producing
superior results.

Dealing with this crisis
will make dealing with the
economic crisis look easy,
but we have no choice but
to put this job front and
centre if we are to fulfil
our duty to the next gen-
eration. There has been
passing attention to the
problems with education
in the media but it pales in
comparison to the atten-
tion being given to the
relocation of the port.



Reading most of the media
online I have not noticed

real wealth, the youth of
The Bahamas.

It is worth once again
emphasizing that the coun-
tries that have the best
quality of life and the high-
est standards of living are
not the ones with the most
natural resources but the
ones with the most educat-
ed populations. Let us not
let down our children and
their children.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their

neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.eduby

NOTICE

The College of The Bahamas wishes to advise all students who have
not received a response to their applications from the Admissions
Office to check on their status for the Fall 2009 semester at the

Portia Smith Building,

2nd floor on the main Oakes Field Campus

between the hours of 9:00 a.m.

August 12 = 14, 2009

— 5: 00 p.m.

The public is advised that The College of The Bahamas will be closed
for one day on Monday 17th August, 2009, as all employees will be
taking part in the annual serminar.

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Tuesday, 18th August, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



www. tribune 24 2 .co



Marital rape legislation:
Where are my rights?

By EV.

I HAVE decided to speak
up at this time because I am
tired of the government intro-
ducing legislation without
regard to the rights and pro-
tection of the entire populace
and not just one segment of it.

Now it appears that they
want to control the sacred mar-
ital bed which the Lord, the
supreme and greater judge
than all of us, has declared
undefiled. Do you mean to tell
me that we (men) are so smart
that we know what is better
for us than the Creator him-
self? God forbids. What right
has government to control any-
one’s bedroom?

What is next on the agenda,
are they going to then tell me

YOUR SAY

how to run my family?

They could legislate the
most sacred and intimate por-
tion of my relationship with
my wife. This is a private and
personal matter.

I am sure that I speak for
most men in this country when
I say that rape is wrong, it is a
vicious and violent act, and the
punishment should be death.
No one regardless of gender
or status should be forced to
have sex against their will, this
is how I really feel about rape.



The family is the foundation
of any society and what the
government is effectively doing
1s destroying the foundation of
this country. The man is the
head of the home as Christ is
the head of the church. Did
the married members of par-
liament forget what the
preacher read to them from
the word of God when they
stood before God and the
many witnesses when they
were married? Did they take
their vows seriously or was this

ee au NU

RITAGE SECTOR meeting at British Colonial Hilton. From left: Charles

naris, co-chair of Downtown Nassau Partnership; State Minister of Cul-
ture Charles Maynard; Dr Andrew Chin, director of architecture programmes

at FAMU; Dr Keith Simmonds, assistant dean of the College of Arts & Sci-
ences at FAMU; and Dr Keith Tinker, executive director of the Antiquities,

Monuments & Museums Corporation.

A DIGITAL map and three-
dimensional model of Nassau
as well as an electronic database
of historic sites on New Provi-
dence will be created as part of
projects developed with the
assistance of Florida Agricul-
tural and Mechanical Universi-
ty.

Heritage sector representa-
tives met at the British Colonial
Hilton recently to discuss a pro-
posed digital mapping project
for the city of Nassau with offi-
cials from Florida A and M Uni-
versity's School of Architecture.

Participants at the meeting
included representatives from
the College of the Bahamas, the
Downtown Nassau Partnership
and the Antiquties, Monuments
and Museums Corporation, as
well as from several government
agencies and private sector
groups.

Florida Agricultural and
Mechanical University began
life as a training centre for
African-Americans in 1887. It
became a state university in
1953, and today there are more
than 12,000 students on the 420-
acre campus near Tallahassee,
including 58 Bahamians -
many studying architecture.

The university features an
Office of Black Diasporan Cul-
ture whose mission is to foster
tolerance and understanding by
explaining and demonstrating
traditions and folkways that
have their roots in Africa. This
Office sponsors a Bahamian
Junkanoo group (the Rhythm
Rushers) and helps recruit
Caribbean students through a
scholarship programme.

FAMU is also the home to
the respected Black Archives
Research Centre and Museum,
an important national and inter-
national research institution
for African-American stud-
ies. The centre is one of the
largest repositories of African-
American historical and cultur-
al documents.

"We want to provide techni-
cal skills and digital resources
to the AMMC and scholarships
to Bahamian students," accord-
ing to Dr Andrew Chin, director
of architecture programmes at
FAMU. "We are here for feed-
back and discussions."

Among the projects being
developed are the creation of a
digital map and three-dimen-
sional model of the city of Nas-
sau, an electronic database of
historic sites on New Provi-
dence, and digital recreations

of historic buildings that fea-
ture vernacular Bahamian archi-
tecture.

"These projects will be a
source of information for envi-
ronmental impact assessments,
heritage tourism initiatives and
archaeological surveys,” Dr

Chin said. "They will document
traditional architecture that is
in danger of disappearing and
will provide important
resources for planners, tourists
and citizens."

The research and scholarship
partnership being forged
between the AMMC, FAMU
and the College of the Bahamas
will be one of the Corporation's
chief contributions to the rede-
velopment of the city of Nassau,
which is being led by the Down-
town Nassau Partnership.

According to Vaughn
Roberts, managing director of
the DNP, the government has
made strong commitments
towards the revitalisation
of Nassau, including harbour



dredging and reclamation, and
removal of the container port
from the city.

Legislation is also being draft-
ed to create an effective model
of local government for the
downtown area, and laws are
being revised to prevent the
demolition of historic buildings
on purpose or by neglect.

Meanwhile, the AMMC is
working on the restoration of
Centreville House on the for-
mer Collins Estate on Shirley
Street.

The grounds are being devel-
oped into a public park and the
35,000-square-foot building
is expected to become the home
of the National Museum of the
Bahamas.

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“oe,

just a formality. No institution
created by God or man could
function effectively with two
heads. There can be only one
authoritative figure. Just ask
our Prime Minister who makes
this clear —as inferred by his
statements— as often as he
can. What this proposed legis-
lation is attempting to do is put
the man in an unfavourable
position. Men would now be
afraid to put their foot down
on family issues because when
he goes to bed at night and has
sexual relations with his wife
and if she is a spiteful, conniv-
ing or unscrupulous person,
she could then wake up in the
morning and file a complaint
against her husband just to get
back at him.

Sex between husband and
wife, which God ordained,
then becomes a weapon. The
woman could use her body as a
weapon. If you want this then
you better do this for me or
you better behave in a certain
way. Does the man have the
same right? Absolutely not.
Even though I am not con-
doning such acts. This legisla-
tion if passed would then effec-
tively put the woman in charge
of the home.

Because this weapon is so
powerful this would essential-
ly make the man a puppet in
his own home. It is nothing
short of holding a gun to the
man’s head. That is what I
mean by the woman using her
body as a weapon. After the
man has sex with his wife, what
is there to stop her from telling
him do this or else, do that or
else I will report you. It is not
different from someone hold-



















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ing a gun to my head and
telling me do this or else. It is a
weapon.

If they want to outlaw some-
thing why don’t they outlaw
premarital or un-natural sex,
which does far more harm to a
country than sex between mar-
ried couples? Maybe then we
would have more men thinking
twice and taking responsibili-
ties for their actions rather
than leaving women to raise
children on their own.

If the problem is domestic
violence then deal with that
but the government and the
law has no right to be in a cou-
ple’s bedroom. This is perhaps
the most sacred event in the
lives of husbands and wives
and now the government wants
to threaten it. Many of us got
married so that we could expe-
rience a sexual relationship
with the one we love without
having a guilty conscience. If
this law is passed what incen-
tive is there for many of our
young men to do the right
thing and marry the ones they
love?

T also see this as an excuse to
promote sweethearting
because if his wife decides to
use this weapon against him
then it leaves him with three
choices: 1. Leave her for a
woman who understands the
role of a wife (divorce then
remarry), 2. Find a sweetheart
who is willing to meet his
needs, or 3. Remain in the
home powerless. Which choic-
es do you think he would take?

1. A real man would never
force his wife to have sex — a
real woman would never force
her husband to have sex.

={{e

2. A real man would never
withhold sex from his wife — a
real woman would never with-
hold sex from her husband.

3. His body is not his accord-
ing to the Bible — her body is
not hers according to the Bible.

4. Sex is his obligation — sex
is her obligation.

Last but not least this would
essentially be a double wham-
my against the man. That is, it
would destroy his family,
because it would force him to
sweetheart or look for satis-
faction elsewhere, and when
this happens and the woman
files for a divorce on the
grounds that the man was
sweethearting, the courts
would not consider that it was
the woman who initiated the
whole thing by using her body
as a weapon and depriving her
husband of his rights. This
same man then has to pay
alimony and other expenses,
why because he simply wanted
to have sex with the woman
God gave him to have sex
with.

I urge this entire country to
rise up against this foolishness.
Marriage is the last institution
known to man that he has con-
trol over without the threat of
governmental interference and
now our parliament is threat-
ening to change that. So what
if it is the law in other parts of
the world. Don’t make the
same mistake here?

Many things are laws in
other countries to which we
don’t subscribe, perhaps that
is why those countries are in
the mess they are in.

I challenge anyone who
wants to debate this point.

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



‘If you want a debate, fine — if
you want to lie, get a radio show

By LARRY SMITH

THE headline for this arti-
cle is a recent quote from a
CNN commentator talking
about healthcare reform in
the United States. But it could
just as easily refer to the utter
nonsense circulating about
Arawak Cay in the Bahamas.

The argument in the US
has been fueled by Sarah Pal-
in's charge that President
Obama plans to set up "death
panels" to force euthanasia
on old folks and the disabled.
And at least one Democratic
congressman has received
death threats for his support
of healthcare reform.

Here at home, the conspir-
acy theory marketed by PLP
Senator Jerome Fitzgerald
and his crew of political oper-
atives accuses Deputy Prime
Minister Brent Symonette of
masterminding the white oli-
garchy's plot to secretly enrich
themselves from a port at
Arawak Cay.

In fact, the entire debate
over the multi-million-dollar
road improvements, harbour
dredging, downtown revitali-
sation, future of the shipping
industry, and public disclo-
sure has been hijacked and
reduced to the PLP's racially
divisive 2007 election slogan:
"No turning back".

Tough Call attended a
town meeting at the British
Colonial Hilton last week. It
was designed to discuss the
$100 million roads project, the
$50 million harbour dredging
and $24 million waterfront
reclamation project, and the
projected expansion of the
container port at Arawak
Cay, which is still in limbo.

The meeting was held in
response to increasingly stri-
dent calls for more informa-
tion on these important pro-
jects. Three cabinet ministers
and several top officials made
presentations, and attendance
was no doubt boosted by the
anticipation of political fire-
works.

In fact, it was standing
room only at the Hilton —
which had substituted a small-
er room at the last minute,
according to government offi-
cials. The limited space was
further reduced by stacks of
videotape and projector
equipment from BIS, JCN
and ZNS, and there was even
a cash bar to throw fuel on
the fire.

The ante-room to the
meeting hall was filled with
poster displays and document
handouts. And Ministry of
Works Permanent Secretary
Colin Higgs told participants
they would receive e-mail
responses to questions sub-
mitted in writing, and noted
that DVD's of the presenta-
tion would be available in
short order.

Most of the audience was
content to sit and take in the
presentations by senior offi-
cials from the Ministries of
Works, Tourism and the
Environment. And the more
inquisitive hoped to take part
in the one-hour designated
question-and-answer session
at the end of the presenta-
tions.

But that portion of the
meeting was unfortunately
hijacked by a handful of
politicos and eccentrics who
took up most of the time
making angry sermons, offer-
ing irrelevant comments or
expressing off-the-wall opin-
ions. A small band of heck-
lers jeered the speakers
throughout much of the meet-
ing.

Government officials sat
impassively for the most part,
but at the end, the hecklers
complained bitterly about a
lack of democracy, demand-
ing that more people should

—
NAD

Development Company



be given the opportunity to
ask questions. One woman
sitting behind me sucked her
teeth and remarked porten-
tously, “it ain't gonna be no
silent revolution this time!”

This was a clear reference
to the racially divisive cam-
paign that has been built up
by PLP politicos over the past
several weeks in relation to
the plans to move container
facilities from downtown Nas-
sau to Arawak Cay, where
more than a third of ocean-
going cargo already arrives.

It appears that this plan
has been pushed back some-
what by the government's
requirement for the Arawak
Cay Port Development Com-
pany to produce an environ-
mental impact assessment, an
environmental management
plan and a traffic study before
the port expansion can pro-
ceed. This was contained in a
letter to the developers from
the prime minister, portions
of which were read at the
meeting.

Jimmy Mosko, chairman
of the ACPDC, later told me
the developers were in the
process of arranging these
studies and hoped to start
work on the new port before
the end of the year. This is a
departure from previous
statements, which indicated
the port expansion could pro-
ceed concurrently with the
harbour dredging.

There also appears to be
some divergence between the
government and the develop-
ers over access to the cay. In
other words, will the existing
causeways through the Fish
Fry be used to truck contain-
ers to the inland warehouse
off Gladstone Road, or will a
new causeway or bridge be

Nassau Airport Development Company Limited (NAD) is seeking a
Proponent (individual, consortium or joint venture that includes an
experienced restaurant operator) to finance, design, develop, operate
and manage a 4500 sq. ft. (approximate) sit down restaurant and bar
in the new U.S, Departures Terminal currently under construction at
the Lynden Pindling International Airport. This restaurant will be a
world-class facility with a diverse menu, excellent customer service,
high volume and turnover with a true sense of place.

Mandatory qualifications

|. Proponents must be Bahamian and incorporated in The Bahamas.
il. Proponents must have operated a similar restaurant facility
within the last three (3) years.

NAD’s goals and objectives are to:

(a) achieve a high standard of excellence and customer service;

(b) offer a mix of concepts that will enhance the image of the Lynden
Pindling International Airport as a world class airport;

(c} offer food & beverage choices to passengers at reasonable

prices:

(d) offer a mix of local, regional and national and international
brand-name companies;

(e) develop and design food & beverage facilities that complement
the qualities of the new terminal while recognizing the distinctive
spirit, character and ‘sense of place’ of the Bahamas; and

(| optimize revenue to NAD.



“ There are
already container
facilities at
Arawak Cay and
the new port will
make use of the
existing harbour
channel that has
been dredged
several times over
the past century.”



built to connect to the Saun-
ders Beach/Bethel Avenue
road corridor now under con-
struction?

Despite these gaps — and
the memorandum of under-
standing between the govern-
ment and the developers is
still under negotiation — the
more one learns about the
pros and cons of this project,
the clearer it becomes that
Arawak Cay is the best loca-
tion for a modern shipping
terminal on New Providence
— one that will have a 50-year
lifespan.

There are already contain-
er facilities at Arawak Cay
and the new port will make
use of the existing harbour
channel that has been
dredged several times over
the past century. At 100-plus
acres there is more than
enough land for future expan-
sion; and as an artificial island
the cay can be easily secured.
In addition, the port develop-
ment can piggyback on the
expensive harbour dredging
and road improvements now
underway nearby.

The port will require new
bulkheading on the northern
shore, maintenance dredging
of less than 200,000 cubic
yards of material from the
existing channel, the addition
of two lift cranes onshore, and

some 20 acres of pavement,
plus security fencing occupy-
ing a total land area of about
AQ acres on the existing cay.
Another five acres on the
eastern tip will handle inter-
island ferries, the Mailboat
Company and tour boats.

But there is another angle
to this saga that has not been
discussed. A Canadian mar-
itime consultant concluded in
2007 that the government
should be concerned about
the cost of maritime transport,
"which anecdotal evidence
suggests is today higher than
it would be in a market in
which there was effective
price competition. Govern-
ment participation is impor-
tant to ensure that the new
port...encourages real price
competition among the ship-
ping lines."

According to the consul-
tant — Peter Smith — the
penalty for not moving the
container facilities from
downtown Nassau, apart from
the increasing traffic conges-
tion and conflict with tourism,
would be increasing costs for
the shipping lines, who in the
current non-competitive envi-
ronment would simply pass
these costs on to their cus-
tomers.

And in fact, there is some
indication that one of the rea-
sons for the delay in finalising
a port agreement is a differ-
ence of opinion over the
prospective revenue split
between the government and
the developers. The shippers
want to keep lucrative con-
tainer handling fees for them-
selves while the government
wants all revenue to go into
the same pot and be shared
according to the equity split.

The latest version of the
agreement calls for a 40 per
cent split between the ship-
pers and the government,
with the remaining 20 per
cent offered to the public. But
there has been no discussion
of how this will affect future
access to the Bahamian mar-

ket for possible new entrants
to the shipping industry. The
question of open competition
must be publicly addressed,
and the system of charges for
maritime transport and port
services should be fully trans-
parent.

It is, of course, foolish to
believe that the politicos who
are now manipulating this
debate can ever be satisfied.
But we have no doubt that as
much information as possible
should be put into the public
domain. And in fact, most of
the relevant documents are
already on the BEST Com-
mission website.

As an interesting aside,
one of those documents
describes the origin of the
derelict Customs shed on
Arawak Cay that Bahamians
have complained about for
decades and successive gov-
ernment have simply ignored.

The original plans identi-
fied the building's upper level
as a "passenger hall", and
apparently the prefabricated
building was intended to be
erected on the middle pier at
Prince George Wharf, but was
too wide. So when it arrived
in the 1970s it had to be put
somewhere else.

The Arawak Cay site
meant there was no deep
draft access, so it could not
be used for its intended pur-
pose. For a time it was used as
an office and warehouse for
the Customs Department, but
lack of maintenance created
conditions that led Customs
officers to go on strike.

Eventually, the building
was abandoned and bits and
pieces of Arawak Cay were
leased out for various indus-
trial purposes over the years.
It's time to put this land to
proper use as a modern port
and end the asphyxiation of
downtown Nassau.

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

REQUEST FOR
PROPOSAL

SIT DOWN RESTAURANT & BAR

New U.S. Departures Terminal at LPIA

Interested parties may pick-up the Request for Proposal package at
NAD's offices at the reception desk on the second floor
Domestic/Intemational Terminal at Lynden Pindling International Airport
between the hours of 8:00am and 4:00pm, from August 12th to 24th,
2009. A mandatory pre-proposal briefing will be held in the Arawak
Lounge at the Airport on Wednesday, August 26th at 10:00am.


PAGE 9, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

SPORTS

[AAF WORLD
BERLIN 2009





YOUR CONNECTION@*"TO THE WORLD

im lovin it



ATHLETE

OSBOURNE MOXEY

DATE OF BIRTH: August 27, 1978.

| AGE: 30 years old.

SCHOOL: N/A.

EVENT(S): Men’s long jump.

BEST PERFORMANCE(S): 8.19 metres.

HOBBIES: Watching movies, sailing, reading
and cooking.

EXPECTATIONS: To produce my best performance.
PARENTS: Lesardo and Malvease Moxey.

ADRIAN GRIFFITH

DATE OF BIRTH: November 11, 1984.

AGE: 24-years-old.

SCHOOL: CC Sweeting Sr. and Dickinson State
University.

EVENT(S): 100/200 metres.

BEST PERFORMANCE(S): 10.23 and 21.03
seconds.

HOBBIES: Volleyball, cars, softball, dining.

EXPECTATIONS: To perform to the best of my abil-
ity, make myself, my country, my coach and my family
proud. Make if to the final and run a personal best
time.

PARENTS: Sherry Anne and Adrian Griffith.

rn

RAMON MILLER

DATE OF BIRTH: February 17, 1987.
AGE: 22 years-old.

SCHOOL: CR Walker Secondary High/Dickinson
State University.

EVENT(S): 400 metres/1600 metre relay.
BEST PERFORMANCE(S): 45.35 seconds.
HOBBIES: Junkanoo.

EXPECTATIONS: To make the final and accomplish
a new personal record.

PARENTS: Clarice Knowles.

JERNISE SAUNDERS

DATE OF BIRTH: July 16, 1986.
AGE: 23-years-old.

SCHOOL: CI Gibson Secondary High/Portland State
University.

EVENT(S): 100/200 metres.

BEST PERFORMANCE(S): 11.6 and 23.7
seconds.

HOBBIES: Singing and listening to music.
EXPECTATIONS: To execute.
PARENTS: Ruby and John Saunders.

KATRINA SEYMOUR.

DATE OF BIRTH: January 7, 1993.

AGE: 16-years-old.

SCHOOL: (I Gibson Secondary High.
EVENT(S): 200/400 metees.

BEST PERFORMANCE(S): 54.17 seconds.
HOBBIES: Dancing and swimming.
EXPECTATIONS: To he the best that | can be.
PARENTS: Bernadette Bodie-Miller.

NATHANIEL MCKINNEY

DATE OF BIRTH: January 19, 1982.
AGE: 27-years-old.

SCHOOL: CR Walker Secondary High/St. Augustine's
College North Carolina.

EVENT(S): 200/400 metres.

BEST PERFORMANCE(S): 200 - 20.6 seconds
and 400 - 45.6 seconds.

HOBBIES: Horseback riding and motivational
speaking.

EXPECTATIONS: Always to win.
PARENTS: Sherry Ann Woods and Anthony McKinney.


Tae TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009, PAGE 10



LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

WORLD CUP QUALIFYING

Ballack boosts German hopes

By ROBERT MILLWARD
AP Soccer Writer

The season has barely started and
Michael Ballack already has flattened
an opponent, angered Manchester Unit-
ed manager Alex Ferguson and picked
up a first winner’s medal.

That is good news for Germany as it
resumes its World Cup qualifying cam-
paign Wednesday at Azerbaijan. Its cap-
tain appears to be over a lingering toe
injury and back to his skillful and aggres-
sive best.

Although the Premier League doesn’t
start until Saturday, the Chelsea mid-
fielder has a very competitive game
behind him — he blatantly blocked
defender Patrice Evra before Chelsea’s
second goal in last weekend’s Commu-
nity Shield victory over Manchester
United. Germany (5-0-1) will be trying

to open a four-point advantage over sec-
ond-place Russia (5-1) in Group Four.

“We have to win the game so that we
can defend our good position in the
group,” Germany coach Joachim Loew
said.

Evra arrived a little bruised at
France’s training camp ahead of
Wednesday’s Group Seven qualifier
against the Faeroe Islands in Torshavn.

“Be true to yourselves, be worthy of
the French team shirt. Anything other
than a win would be a catastrophe,”
France coach Raymond Domenech said
in a message to his stars.

France (3-1-1) is eight points behind
first-place Serbia (6-1) but has played
two were games. “If we can’t beat the
Faeroe Islands then we have no right to
be at the World Cup,” French forward
Nicolas Anelka said.

In another of the five European qual-

ifiers Wednesday, Croatia (3-1-2) goes to
Belarus (3-2) with both teams seeming-
ly competing for second in Group Six
behind England (7-0), which would
clinch with a victory at home against
Croatia on Sept. 9.

The nine European group winners
qualify, and the top eight second-place
nations advance to playoffs.

Angered

England’s national team angered
some Premier League managers by
scheduling an exhibition game at the
Netherlands, which already has clinched
first place in Group 9.

Liverpool captain Steven Gerrard
withdrew from the match because of a
slight groin injury. David Beckham has
flown in from the Los Angeles Galaxy,

however, hoping to stretch his national
team appearances to 113, 12 short of
goalkeeper Peter Shilton’s record.

In qualifiers in North and Central
America and the Caribbean, the United
States (3-1-1) seeks its first win at Mex-
ico (2-3), El Salvador (1-2-2) is at
Trinidad and Tobago (0-3-2) and first-
place Costa Rica (4-1) is at Honduras (2-
2-1). The top three nations qualify, and
No. 4 faces South America’s fifth-place
team in a playoff.

Cristiano Ronaldo will miss Portu-
gal’s exhibition against Liechtenstein
because of flu. With his team struggling,
Argentina coach Diego Maradona is in
Moscow to face Guus Hiddink’s Rus-
sia.

In other exhibitions, European cham-
pion Spain is at Macedonia, World Cup
champion Italy at Switzerland and South
American champion Brazil at Estonia.

NSE CRS TTT CI]



AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Paul Chiasson

ANDY MURRAY from Great Britain, reacts during his match against Jeremy Chardy from France, dur-
ing second round of play at the Rogers Cup tennis tournament, Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2009 in Montreal.

Murray won 6-4, 6-2.

US returns
to altitude
of Azteca

By RONALD BLUM
AP Sports Writer

Landon Donovan knows just
how much visitors struggle in
the altitude and pollution of
Azteca Stadium. Like a lot of
US. players, he’s familiar with
the shortness of breath and the
sting of losing there.

“Tf you walk around in Mex-
ico City for a few minutes,
you'll be tired,” the American
forward said. “There’s very real
issues there.”

Winless in Mexico since it
first started playing there in
1937, the U.S. soccer team
returns to 105,000-seat Azteca
on Wednesday when qualify-
ing for next year’s World Cup
resumes.

With some players coming
off European club openers last
weekend and others looking
ahead to the first weekend of
England’s Premier League,
U.S. players weren’t given
much time to acclimatize to the
7,200-foot altitude. Players from
Major League Soccer and
Europe gathered in Miami,
then traveled to Mexico on
Tuesday.

“We have worked for a long
time with different people, dif-
ferent experts, on altitude train-
ing, including many from the
U.S. Olympic Committee,”
U.S. coach Bob Bradley said
Monday. “The research we
have stuck with is one that says
if you don’t have enough time
to acclimatize, which can take
10 days or so, then going in late

is your best bet.”

The USS. is 0-22-1 in Mexi-
co, including 0-18-1 in Mexico
City. The Americans gained a
0-0 tie at Azteca in a 1997 qual-
ifier, playing the final 58 min-
utes short-handed after defend-
er Jeff Agoos was ejected for
elbowing Pavel Pardo in the
neck — after Pardo had hit
Agoos in the back.

In two qualifiers at Azteca
under coach Bruce Arena, the
Americans lost 1-0 in 2001 and
2-1 four years later.

“The sightlines are real diffi-
cult for players,” Arena said.
“The field looks like you’re out
in the country, and then you
start dealing with the heat and
the altitude, and it gets to your
head. And it’s not only your
head — the physiology, it’s dif-
ficult. It’s very difficult. And I
remember games where, you
know, we’ve had oxygen at
halftime.”

Seeking its sixth straight
World Cup appearance, the
USS. is in good shape halfway
through the final round of
North and Central American
and Caribbean qualifying and
likely would advance by win-
ning its two remaining home
games: against El Salvador on
Sept. 5 at Sandy, Utah, and vs.
Costa Rica on Oct. 14 at Wash-
ington, D.C.

Costa Rica is first with 12
points, followed by the United
States (3-1-1) with 10, Hon-
duras (2-2-1) with seven, Mex-
ico (2-3) with six, El Salvador

(1-2-2) with five and Trinidad
and Tobago (0-3-2) with two.
The top three nations qualify,
and the No. 4 team goes to a
playoff against the No. 5 nation
from South America.

Mexico has played just two
home matches and is feeling
intense pressure to win
Wednesday. Even though it’s a
midweek game, Mexico sched-
uled it for a4 p.m. EDT start —
increasing the heat that U.S.
players may find difficult when
combined with the altitude and
pollution.

“We have to take advantage
of all those factors,” Mexican
goalkeeper Guillermo Ochoa
said.

The rivalry has been almost
equally lopsided — the other
way — on USS. soil. Mexico had
been 0-9-2 against the Ameri-
cans in the United States since
March 1999 before winning 5-0
last month in the final of the
CONCACAF Gold Cup at
Giants Stadium. But just one
USS. regular was in the lineup
for that one, and Mexico also
went mostly with backups.

When the teams met in Feb-
ruary in a qualifier at Colum-
bus, Ohio, the United States
won 2-0. But the Americans
have struggled on the road,
tying 2-2 at El Salvador and los-
ing 3-1 in Costa Rica.

“We're confident that we can
play with any team in the
world,” Donovan said. “And
it’s no longer good enough to
hope for a point on the road.”

MONTREAL

Roger Federer, playing for the first time since winning Wim-
bledon, returned to the court with a 7-6 (3), 6-4 win over Canada's
Frederic Niemeyer at the Rogers Cup on Tuesday night, according

to Associated Press.

Federer, who took time off while his wife gave birth to twin girls,
took a set to find his range and then the top-ranked Swiss star put

away the low-ranked Niemeyer.

The 33-year-old Niemeyer, whose ranking has tumbled to 487th,
plans to retire at the end of this season. He had a double-fault in
the first set tiebreaker, and then lost his serve at 3-3 in the second
set and Federer served out the match.

Earlier in the day, Andy Murray — also playing his first match
since Wimbledon — beat France's Jeremy Chardy 6-4, 6-2. Murray
lost to Andy Roddick in the semifinals at Wimbledon, but he was
in control from the start against Chardy.

"I feel better, now I've got through the first one, because you lose
your rhythm a bit,” said the third-seeded Murray. "I didn't really
have more than six or seven days off without playing a match for

a long time.”

Murray is off to the best start of his career with a 46-7 record,
winning four tournaments this year.

Overtake

With Rafael Nadal struggling on sore knees, Murray can over-
take the Spaniard for the No. 2 ranking if he wins the tourna-
ment. Murray also could attain No. 2 if he reaches the final and

Nadal loses in the semifinals.

"I've been asked about it a lot so, it's impossible not to think
about it. But when I'm playing my match, it's the furthest thing
from my mind," Murray said the rankings.

Nadal was to play a doubles match on Tuesday. He's scheduled
to play singles on Wednesday, the first since he lost in the fourth
round of the French Open and withdrew from Wimbledon because

of tendinitis in his knees.

Murray will face the winner of a match between Juan Carlos Fer-
rero of Spain and 13th-seeded Gael Monfils of France. Ferrero
advanced by defeating Lleyton Hewitt 6-1, 64 in a match of former
No. 1 players. The 29-year-old Spaniard improved to 4-6 in career
matches against Hewitt. Ferrero needed to get through two qual-
ifying matches to play in the tournament.

Last year, the 28-year-old Hewitt missed the Rogers Cup because
of hip surgery. Fourth-ranked Novak Djokovic of Serbia trailed 3-
0 in the first set before rallying for a 6-4, 7-6 (6) victory over
Canadian Peter Polansky. In other first round matches, Tommy
Robredo of Spain defeated American Alex Bogomolov 6-4, 6-2,
and Victor Hanescu of Romania beat Jurgen Melzer of Austria 6-
4, 6-3. Qualifier John Isner defeated fellow American Jesse Levine

6-3, 6-4.





EVERTON FC
goalkeeper
Tim Howard
listens to a
question dur-
ing a press
conference in
Park City,
Utah, Mon-
day, July 27,
2009.

AP Photo/George Frey

EVERTON FC GOALIE Tim Howard stops a shot on goal to win the
game in a shootout against MSL All Star's in the second half of the
MLS All Star game in Sandy, Utah, Wednesday, July 29, 2009. Ever-
ton beat the All Stars 6-5 in a shootout.

With a victory, the US.
might put itself in position to
clinch in September, meaning
players wouldn’t have to return
from Europe again in October.
And, these players would
become the first Americans to

win at Azteca. “It would be
special, no question,” goal-
keeper Tim Howard said. “We
know the history. We’re well
aware of it, which makes the
challenge that much more spe-
cial.”

Bahamas
takes first
place at ICC

tournament
FROM page 11

Brown was the team’s top
scorer in each of the match-
es with an aggregate score
of 162 runs.

He netted 31 runs, not
out, in the opener against
Cayman Islands, 44 runs, not
out, in the first match
against Belize and 37 runs
in the second match versus
Cayman. Brown has had a
recent string of stellar
national team performances,
beginning with his play as a
member of the Bahamas’
under 19 team which battled
Canada and the United
States last month.

Bahamas Cricket Associ-
ation representative, Paul
Thompson, said This is the
first time the Bahamas
Cricket Association will be
hosting such an event and
the they have pledged that it
will be hosted properly.

“dt is so important for the
Bahamas and for the local
Cricket community to have
a tournament of this stature
to be hosted here in the
Bahamas. It is something
that has not been really
receiving much attention but
it is a monumental step for
the game and our regional
status,” he said.

The tournament is of a
developmental nature as it
filters under 15 players into
the under 19 program.

“It is amazing what these
young men are achieving
thus far and the perfor-
mance that they had today is
indicative of the work put
through by the development
program” he said, “.”

ICC Americas awarded
the hosting of the tourna-
ment to the Bahamas as the
top affiliate in the Americas
after showing progress with
an under 15, under 19 and
Senior National Team.

Cayman Islands are an
associate country and the
Bahamas and Belize are
affiliates. There are three
tiers in the ICC, test play-
ing countries, of which there
are ten, 35 associates and 59
affiliates. The Bahamas par-
ticipated in the last tourna-
ment in Bermuda in 2007
where it placed last against
associate countries.

This year, because of sev-
eral affiliate countries being
able to produce under 15
teams, ICC Americas has
divided the region into three
divisions, Northern, Central
and Southern.

In the Northern Division
we have Canada, Bermuda
and the United States, all
associate countries.

In the Central Division:
Bahamas, Belize and Cay-
man Islands and in the
Southern: Argentina, Brazil,
Chile and Surinam. As this
is anew format there will be
no progress to the Northern
Division this year but it will
happen in 2011.

24 trophies

FROM page 11

Additional and medal
placement

Shawn ‘Vicious’ Smith

1st place Trophy Men —
Forms/ Kata

1st place Trophy Men
Combined Beginners & Inter-
mediate - Weapons Forms/
Kata

2nd place Trophy Men
Intermediate — Point Fight-
ing/Kumite

2nd place Trophy Men &
Women combined — Self
Defense

Additional 4th place and
medal placement

Quon ‘Quarter’ White

1st place Trophy Men -
Point Fighting/Kumite

Additional 4th place and
medal placement

Romaine ‘BA’ Leslie

3rd place Trophy Men -
Point Fighting/Kumite

1st place Trophy Men
Beginners — Forms/ Kata

Additional medal placement

Sensei Julian Rolle

1st in Advance - Point
Fighting/Kumite

1st in Advance - Forms/
Kata
SECTION

THE TRIBUNE



rt

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12,





2009

For the best sporting action . . .

WWW. * me?4?. C

sports

TRACK AND FIELD

The Baltamas Association of Athletic
Associations mourns loss ot Jerry Wisdom

The BAAA would like to publicly extend
heartfelt condolence to the family of the late
Gerald ‘Jerry’ Wisdom (pictured), who passed
away on Saturday August the 8th.

The Bahamas has lost a great Bahamian and
the sport of track and field

has lost one of its biggest fans, supporters, and
historian.

Jerry is a former Olympian and BAAA execu-
tive member and we know that

with the IAAF Championships just days away,
he would have been keenly

in tune with how The Bahamian athletes were
doing in Berlin, Germany

and right there routing for his beloved
Bahamas with the rest of the

country.

To his family we mourn with you in your loss.
We will keep you in our prayer.

-Kermit Taylor, BAAA Public Relations Offi-
cer

SOCCER

The College of The Bahamas Women's Soccer
Team will host the John Brown University wom-
en's team Saturday August 15th at 6:00 p.m. at
the Thomas Robinson Stadium (TAR).



The Bahamas Cycling Association will host its
National Cycling Time Trial Championships this Sat-
urday, 22nd of August, 2009.

The Senior cyclists will cover 15 miles of western
portion of the island while Juniors, Open Women and
Novices will cover seven miles of western portion of
the island.

Route for Seniors will be as follows:

Start and finish at Mount Pleasant Park in Mount
Pleasant Lyford Cay. Head west along the southwest
road, take left onto South Ocean blvd., left on the new
road (the road that runs along the Albany project,
travel that road to the end or t-junction, turn around at
the t-junction, back along the new road again, take a
let turn onto south ocean blvd. again, travel along
south ocean blvd. passing the brewery, B.E.C, Clifton
Heritage national park in Clifton pier, cyclist will trav-
el on the south west road again taking them back to
the start/finish line at Mt. Pleasant park in Mt. pleas-
ant.

Route for Juniors, Open women, Novice male-
female:

Start at Mt. Pleasant Park, head to south ocean
blvd., take a left onto the south ocean blvd., take
South Ocean blvd., all the way to Clifton Pier, past
Clifton Heritage site, come onto south-west road end-
ing at the start/finish location.

Registration will take place, Wednesday 19th August
at the National Cycling Track 6pm-7:30pm and Friday
21st, August at the Race Site in Mount Pleasant 6pm-
7:20pm



CRICKET




O——-.:

Tht UNDErCATED





by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

historic and overall
impressive perfor-
mance for the
Bahamas in the first
tournament of its kind hosted locally



and sanctioned by cricket’s interna-
tional governing body.

The Bahamas captured first place in
the International Cricket Council
(ICC) Americas Under 15 cricket tour-
nament, capping an undefeated run
with a win over Belize Monday at
Haynes Oval.

The Bahamas in their turn at bat
scored 118 runs for the loss of one

Impressive Bahamas takes first place at
ICC Americas U15 cricket tournament

Team caps winning run with crushing
victory over Belize at Haynes Oval

wicket, while Belize managed just 117
runs. Turan “Geronimo” Brown was
the top scorer for the Bahamas with a
total of 52 runs, not out and Ashmeid
Allie chipped in with 21 runs, not out.

The Bahamas won a total of four
matches defeating both Belize and the
Cayman Islands twice.

SEE page 10

GOLF: NEW SLATE OF OFFICERS ELECTED

THE BAHAMAS
Professional
Golfers Associa-
| tion recently
elected a new
slate of officers.
The picture
shows the
results of the
latest Bahamas
Professional

| Golfers Associa-
| tion election.
From the left is
Chris Lewis
(President),
Keno Turnquest
( Secretary),
Lemon Gorospe
(Vice President),
Tony Robinson,
Marcus Pratt
(Treasurer),
Alex Gibson.

PHOTO:
Keno
Turnquest



ABACO ACADEMY’S OPEN TOURNAMENT
‘Society of Shotokan Stylists’ team win 24 trophies

A team of eight (8) from the ‘Soci-
ety of Shotokan Stylists, participated
in the Abaco Academy’s Open Tour-
nament this weekend, where they
placed & won twenty-four (24) tro-
phies and six (6) medals.

The delegation, headed by Master
Brian Beckford & Sensei Julian
Rolle, consisted of team members
Rudell ‘Rude Awakening’ Capron,
Shawn ‘Vicious’ Smith, Desmond ‘K-
9’ Pinder, Quon ‘Quarter’ White and
Romaine ‘BA’ Leslie and team coor-
dinator Ginea Wilson.

The one (1) day event hosted by
Chief Instructor Sensei Toote of the
Abaco Karate Academy was held in
Marsh Harbour Abaco at the
Methodist Hall. Participants from
Abaco, Nassau and Surinam came
for the annual event. The four (4)
contested divisions were Self
Defense, Weapons, point fighting
and forms.

Rudell ‘Rude Awakening’ Capron
1st place Trophy Men & Women com-
bined - Self defense

1st place Trophy Women - Point
Fighting/Kumite
2nd place in Women - Forms/ Kata

Desmond ‘K-9’ Pinder

1st place Trophy Men - Point Fight-
ing/Kumite

2nd place Trophy Men — Weapons
Forms/ Kata

3rd place Trophy Men — Forms/ Kata

3rd place Trophy Men & Women com-
bined — Self Defense

SEE page 10
PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

Mrs Maynard-Gibson
stressed that all cases of rape
must be condemned and pun-
ished whenever and wherever it
occurs.

She said she is still in favour
of the courts having the pun-
ishment option of flogging in
rape cases.

“In the mid-1980s I joined
Janet Bostwick in organising
‘The March Against Rape’—
then one of the largest marches
ever in the Bahamas. At that
time rape figures varied
between 121 in 1980; 92 in 1981;
83 in 1982; 93 in 1983 and 84 in
1984.

“Rightly so, citizens then
had had enough. We all felt
that rape incidents were far too
many, though less than they are
now. We wanted the punish-
ment of the cat o’ nine tails for
rape. I still feel that it should be
open to the courts to order the
sentence of flogging for rape,”
she said.

Those who passed and
amended the (Sexual Offences)
Bill — which came after a great
deal of lobbying — recognised
that the entire matter was sen-
sitive.”

Mrs Maynard-Gibson also
said that the existing Act recog-
nises and condemmns forced sex-
ual relations with a spouse, and
added that the proposed
amendment, which was intro-
duced in parliament by the
FNM last month, should be
withdrawn pending wide con-
sultation about domestic vio-
lence, including rape in a mar-
riage. And this consultation
should take place outside of the
political arena, she said.



Rape figures

“T believe that in certain cir-
cumstances Bahamians would
without hesitation say that a
man raped his wife: Tying her
up to have sex; breaking into
her mother’s house where she
is staying (they not being legal-
ly separated) to have sex; dop-
ing or drugging her to have sex;
threatening her at gunpoint to
have sex; beating her to have
sex.

“If my premise is correct,
Bahamians today do believe
that a man can rape his wife,”
the senator said.

However, she said, concerns
arise with the issue in the
tremendous grey areas that
inevitably exist in the context of
a matriage.

“Was the wife really saying
‘no’; was the husband forcing
his wife or was he trying to con-
vince his wife; what is the wife’s
motive for making the allega-
tion of rape against her hus-
band; what about the children;
who will support the family,
including emotionally and
financially, if the husband is
sent to jail?” the senator said.

“T believe that there are
many problems with this
amendment, including:

We do not know why it was
brought at this time. What per-
centage of the rape statistics
represents rape in a marriage?
There was no wide consulta-
tion before it was brought. It
was brought in such a manner
as to possibly create a political
football and to cause unneces-
sary strife in marriages and in
society, especially between men
and women.”

FROM page one

corruption and a policy of secrecy.

The lawyer who helped bring Crime
Stoppers to the Bahamas in 1998 said she is
on the brink of publicly denouncing the
charity until police show they are able to
perform their proper function.

And she criticised Assistant Police Com-
missioner Raymond Gibson for remaining
tight-lipped about a series of rapes and
attempted rapes in eastern New Provi-
dence, She said that by hiding the details
police make women more vulnerable.

Mrs Broughton said: “It is wholly unac-
ceptable not to notify the public through
the media. Why do I have to wait to meet a
police officer in the street to tell me to be
careful when I am a woman living in the
east with a 17-year-old daughter? Is it for
the tourists?

“Tf there are three rapes carried out, why
can’t they say ‘be on your guard’? They
want to hold out in the name of the inves-
tigation and leave women exposed and at
risk because it’s a procedure? It’s a dis-
grace.”

She further blamed the force for cor-
ruption which allows brazen criminals to
carry on undeterred and said she has been
driven to denounce the police and Crime
Stoppers until she can see the police “actu-

FROM pageone Police still puzzled

custody, but we're looking at

Police slammed

ally functioning.”

“They can’t keep you safe, and they
don’t even have the decency to warn you
when they are not sure you are safe, so
what is their function?” Mrs Broughton
asked.

“All I ask for is the same simple protec-
tion everyone is entitled to, it’s a basic
human right and if you can’t give me safe-
ty, tell me when I need to take extra care;
when I need to buy my own gun.”

Mrs Broughton left Crime Stoppers in
2001, but spoke out for the charity once
again when Welsh banker Hywell Jones,
55, was shot in the head outside his Bri-
tannia Investment Group office in West
Bay Street on April 22, and died in hospital
on May 8.

However, she has since become incensed
with the handling of the murder investiga-
tion which has so far failed to lead to any
arrests.

Mr Jones’ brother Ilt Jones maintains
his brother had made but one enemy during
his 21 years in the Bahamas, but police
have not yet named any suspects.

Mrs Broughton said: “Tt just incenses me
that all this time has passed by and nothing
has been done.

“Crime begets crime, and if people just
fumble along it will continue. Someone
needs to say something for once and I don’t
know how many murders have to happen,
how many people have to be raped, but
until my children are safe, I will take the
brunt of becoming a target because I put
my name in the paper.”

Police Commissioner Reginald Fergu-
son said: “As long as I have something to
do with this police force and responsibility
for investigating a crime in this country,
wherever evidence exists to move against
someone for criminality I will be doing
that.”

However Mr Ferguson failed to provide
any further details of the two rapes and
two attempted rapes in eastern New Prov-
idence.

He said: “(Mrs Broughton) has a legiti-
mate concern, but we don’t want to create
any unnecessary excitement and I told her
about this thing in the east... Investigators
are saying there is some trend but to say
there’s a serial rapist out there would be
kind of far-fetched at this time.

“T think we want to always be concerned
about what’s happening in our environ-
ment we want to always be on the alert.
And people are being alerted without being
specific, that’s the approach we have always
had. We can’t hide crime, that’s a reality.”

all possibilities. . . (but) this got
all of us puzzled,” admitted the
senior officer, who was not
authorised to comment on the
case.

Police are also looking into
whether the victim was the tar-
get of a contracted hit-man.

"We leave that open until we
determine otherwise," said the
officer.

The nature of the killing also
prompted public concerns that

TOBE NACL TS Se UT















































FROM page one

theft in the past, but Commissioner of Police
Reginald Ferguson could not confirm this yes-

terday.

Meanwhile, autopsies are expected to deter-
mine the official cause of death for two men.
Police do not know if they died from the impact
of the crash or whether they were burned in the

fire.

Investigators in Jamaica are also probing
whether a shoot-out which happened hours
after the crash was connected to the busted

drug deal.

Officials believe the crashed plane, which
was registered in the United States, may have
been stolen from the Bahamas — the same one
stolen from a North Eleuthera airport around 9

am on August 3.

Mr Llewellyn added that two more men,
believed to be the accomplices of the dead

men, were recently arrested in the Bahamas
in connection with the plane theft.
"We've been told that two Bahamians were

taken into custody for being complicit in the
(theft) of the aircraft," he said.

However, senior police officers at home said

they were not aware of any such arrests.
Abner Pinder, administrator of Spanish

Wells, said at the time of the theft from the

North Eleuthera airport, fuel was siphoned

from several other planes.

A police officer is supposed to be stationed at
the site he said, however the culprits were able
to tamper with the aircraft and make good
their escape.

"There's supposed to be a police presence
there. . It’s an international airport and as such
it's supposed to have a 24-hour presence,” he
said yesterday.

Attempts to reach contractor Terry Higgs,

who owned the plane believed to have been
stolen for the drug run, have been unsuccessful.

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the shooter may have been part
of a gang initiation, looking for
arandom kill.

Yesterday another high-
ranking police officer who did
not want to be identified said
there was no evidence to sub-
stantiate this fear.

Reports reaching The Tri-
bune indicate that a cell phone,
believed to be the gunman’s,
was seized at the crime scene
but this was dismissed by a
police officer yesterday.

"We don't know where that
rumour came from, only foren-
sic evidence was recovered,
nothing physical that we know
about," said the first officer.

Meanwhile police are still
appealing to the public to come
forward with information that
could lead to the gunman’s cap-
ture.

"We are trying to have per-
sons who would have seen the

FROM page one

suspect to make that known to
us, who can give us a composite
(sketch)," the police source
added.

The gunman, described as a
slim, dark male about 5'9" is
believed to have fled on foot.

According to a family fried,
Tagia had just pulled up to her
mother's house with her two
younger sisters and young sons
after a day at the mall.

The two girls and Tagia's
eldest son went to knock on
their grandmother's front door
as the victim stayed behind to
breast-feed her three-month-
old son.

At some point, a gunman
approached her and shot her in
the left arm. The bullet report-
edly punctured her lungs or
heart.

In an attempt to escape her
attacker, Tagia sped off only to
rear-end a parked car and crash

TAGIA SOLES-ARMONY



into two other parked cars
before coming to a stop.

The Tribune understands
persons coming to inspect the
commotion scared the gunman
away. When police arrived on
the scene, the victim was
already dead.

Tagia, who was living in St
Kitts with her husband, had just
arrived in Nassau to visit her
family after years of living
abroad to visit her family.

court is,” lawyer Keod Smith told reporters yes-

terday. According to Mr Smith, who is repre-
senting BHCAWU First Vice president Kirk
Wilson and his team, new elections must now
be held within 60 days of Justice Isaacs’ ruling,
which was handed down on July 31.

In the 35-page judgment, Justice Isaacs had
declared that the union’s elections held on May
28 were “null and void.” Mr Wilson and his team
had filed an application to have the process
reviewed; contending that the setting of both the
nomination and election dates circumvented the
union's constitution. Ms Martin, the first woman
president in the unions almost 51-year history,
won the presidency in a landslide victory.

“The court has denied the application made by
Ms Martin to stay the proceedings or the execu-
tion of its order pending an appeal and it has
denied a similar application by the Attorney
General for the Registrar of Trade Unions to
do the same. “It has made it very clear that Ms
Martin and those persons who would have been
elected on her team and any other who would be
preventing the existing executive council from
doing its task, to refrain from doing so,” Mr
Smith said. Mr Smith said that members of the
union’s previous executive council will resume

FROM page one

after taking the male enhance-
ment pill Viagra. Pratt denied
that she had intended to kill
Carey.

their posts.

Martin said.

Mother sentenced

Pratt, who was dressed in a
pink outfit, remained silent
while Senior Justice Allen

IN THE ESTATE OF ELIZABETH BROOKS
late of #83 Alexander Boulevard in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence,

Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons having any claim or demand against
the said estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the undersigned
on or before the 26th day of August, A.D.
2009, after which date the Administrator will

proceed to distribute the estate having regard

only to the claims of which he shall have

had notice.
AND notice is hereby given that all

persons indebted to the estate are required

to make full settlement on or before the date

hereinabove mentioned.

Dated the 12th day of August, A.D. 2009

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Attorneys for the Administrator
9 Rusty Bethel Drive
Nassau, Bahamas



Mr Wilson told reporters, “The law is the law
and that’s all we were doing, following the law
and the outcome as we expected, it is what it is.”

Ms Martin’s attorney Damian Gomez told
the court that decision has no impact on the
notice of appeal filed on behalf of his client.

“We have also been informed that the Attor-
ney General’s Office is in the process of filing an
appeal on behalf of the Registrar, and the appeal
court will eventually have a hearing and we will
abide by whatever decision the Court of Appeal
makes,” he said.

Amidst supporters who periodically chanted,
“No retreat, no surrender,” Ms Martin told
reporters that she was disappointed by the out-
come yesterday, but remains encouraged.

“[’m disappointed, but I am also relieved
that we will have the opportunity to do it the
way Wilson and those want us to do it. We were
not given an election we won an election. The
people are poised and ready to do it again. As we
campaigned before we will campaign even more
so now because this shows how important it is to
have the right people in your organisation,” Ms

handed down her sentence.
Outside the courtroom, Ter-
rence Carey, a brother of the
deceased, told reporters that he
thought Pratt should have had a
lengthier prison sentence.

“T think she should get more
years. The judge said she had to
sleep on it, so I know her mind
was going to change.” Carey
said that his brother was the
closest to their mother who is
also deceased. He said that his
death would have been diffi-
cult for her to handle. “My sis-
ter is taking it very hard
because she really didn’t like it
at all. She doesn’t know why
she only got 10 years,” he said.

Before handing down the
sentence yesterday, Senior Jus-
tice Allen noted that
manslaughter is a serious
offence that carries a maximum
penalty of life imprisonment
although a judge can exercise
her discretion. Senior Justice
Allen said that the sentence
should reflect the position of
the court and noted that homi-
cide is far too prevalent in the
Bahamas. The judge said she
had taken into account all of
the aggravating and mitigating
factors in the case having noted
that the offence took place in a
domestic situation. She also
said that the ill health of the
accused may be a matter for
the prerogative of mercy com-
mittee. The year that Pratt has
spent on remand has been tak-
en into account.

“T was hoping for something
much less bearing in mind all
of the circumstances, it was
about a domestic situation gone
wrong,” Pratt’s attorney
Romona Farquharson told
reporters yesterday. Ms Far-
quharson said she offered her
client words of encouragement
after the sentence was handed
down noting that the proceed-
ings have taken a toll on Pratt
who has been on suicide watch.
Ms Farquharson said she will
have to get instructions from
her client as to whether the sen-
tence will be appealed.


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY,

AUGUST

usiness

2 2 0-0°9

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Central Bank report:
could see turnaroun

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunebusiness.net

ocal financial experts

and a Central Bank

report believe the

Bahamian economy

could see a turnaround
in the beginning months of 2010, as
the US markets bottom-up, save the
housing market which is facing mar-
ginal recovery.

Kenn Kerr of Providence Advi-
sors told Tribune Business the rea-
sonable degree of recovery occur-
ring world wide bodes well for the
Bahamas economy which relies on
tourism as its top dollar earner.

And the monthly 3.6 per cent

increase in hous-
ing starts and com-
pletions in the US
housing market in
2009, according to
the Central Bank's
monthly econom-
ic and financial
developments
report for June, is
a good sign of sta-
ble recovery of
assets. KERR

According to
him, the 'muted recovery’ in the US
is a positive sign for the region,
despite the slow turnaround in the
tourism sector.

He said in the US market, the
recovery has been too slow to quell



the high unemployment figures,
which could be a product of the
leisurely recovering housing mar-
ket.

The collapse of the housing mar-
ket in the US is thought to have been
the catalyst for the global economic
downturn.

Mr Kerr said if the measured
recovery in the US continues then
"you probably wont have deep
recovery.”

Of course, he added, that if travel
outside of US borders increases, the
Bahamas could see a substantial
increase in visitor numbers and con-
sequently an increase in economic
stability vis-a-vis the hospitality sec-
tor in the Bahamas.

"T suspect that by the first or sec-

ond quarter of 2010 there will be
vast improvements in the economy if
the muted recovery keeps advancing
in the US," said Mr Kerr.

According to the Central Bank
report: "Indicators suggest that the
global economy remained moribund
over the first half of the year; how-
ever, in recent months, modest signs
of a flattening in the economic
downturn emerged, buoyed by the
aggressive “stimulus” from mone-
tary and fiscal packages, improved
consumer confidence indicators and
corporate sector cost cutting mea-
sures, which supported stock mar-
ket gains."

The report added that the major-
ity of Bahamian firms indicated they
had to reduced staffing levels within

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Econom
d in 2010

the past six months, with "more
than four-fifths signaling either no
anticipated change or likely further
reductionsin the months ahead."

Furthermore, the Central Bank
asserted that foreclosure filings
surged by nine per cent.

"Buttressed by a surge in credit
to Government, domestic foreign
currency credit expanded by
$113.4million, a reversal from the
$54.6million net repayment recorded
during 2008," the report continued.

"Net claims on the Government
rebounded by $159.5million, from a
$20.3million decrease a year earli-
er, on account of an increase in
short-term advances. In contrast,
claims on the rest of the public sector
fell by $45.4million."

Surveys will be performed by company
contracted to dredge Nassau harbour

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunebusiness.net

TOPOGRAPHICAL and
photographic surveys will be
performed by the company
contracted to carry out the
dredging of Nassau harbour
for the post dredging restora-
tion of the the areas sur-
rounding the excavation sites,
according to the Boskalis'’
Environment Management
Plan (EMP), as vehement dis-
sent to the project persists.

The EMP, drawn up by
dredging company Boskalis
and which will be a constant-
ly amended document, will
follow the environmental
impact mitigation plan.

According to the docu-
ment: "The EMP is also an
umbrella document in which
all other environmental pro-
tection documents are evalu-
ated and communicated."

These documents include
the Environmental spill
response plan, the Environ-
mental Impact Assessment
(EIA) for the Storage and use
of dredged material for Nas-
sau Harbour Port Improve-
ment Project and the EJA for
the Nassau Harbour Port
Improvement Project.

Government ministers have
recently not been clear on cer-
tain guidelines that will have
to be adhered to during the
dredging process and western

























The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report

Sale Ends
September Sth

extension of Arawak Cay.

Members of the governing
party have even been accused
by the opposition of contra-
dicting each other on the
Arawak Cay extension deal,
being obscure on the details
of the movement of the con-
tainer port and not being
forthcoming on information
concerning several other pro-
jects associated with the con-
tainer port movement.

The EMP seeks to shed
light on the environmental
side of the dredging project
and highlight efforts
employed by the dredging
company to secure the safety
of the environment around it.

It is thought that the
Arawak Cay extension, which
was purported by the Minister
of the Environment Earl
Deveaux to be directly related
to the dredging project,
should not be used for relo-
cation of the container port
from downtown Nassau.

Former Minister of Trade
for the PLP, Leslie Miller,
told Tribune Business recent-
ly that every international
body that has come to the
Bahamas to study proposed
sites for the relocation of the
container port have shunned
Arawak Cay as a viable site.

Clifton in the South West
of New Providence was con-
sidered to be a more suitable
site to Arawak Cay. However,
the present government
decided the move to Clifton
would be too costly.

"Where is your study that
states that Arawak Cay is a
superior site to Clifton,” said
Mr Miller.

Former FNM minister Ten-
nyson Wells echoed similar
sentiments saying he was not
convinced that the estimate
to move the container port to
Clifton would have cost what
the government said it would
have.

"As a nationalist and some-
body who would look toward
the country moving forward, I
would not have put the port
on Arawak Cay. I would take
the risk and spend $100 to 150
million," Mr Wells said
recently.

According to him, special
interest groups are pushing
for the port’s relocation to
Arawak Cay which he sug-
gested may be able to be com-

er la
r

er

ee

pleted for half of the cost
quoted, though many figures

Aide

“Where is your study that states that
Arawak Cay is a superior site to Clifton.”

— Leslie Miller

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A representative for the
Committee to Protect and
Preserve the Bahamas for
Future generations said dur-
ing a recent town hall meet-
ing: "They have sought to

and the extension of Arawak
Cay.

“They continue to negoti-
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the night ... deals involving
the people’s land at Arawak

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report that suggested con-
sumer spending, a major eco-
nomic driver, may be
depressed for some time as
companies cut back.
Benchmark crude for Sep-
tember delivery fell $1.15 to
settle at $69.45 a barrel on the
New York Mercantile
Exchange. It was the fourth
straight day of declines and
the first time this month that

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the price for crude dipped
below $69.

Oil prices have ended the
week higher for five straight
weeks, a period that coincides
with earnings reports from US
companies. The results
appeared surprisingly healthy,
which gave energy prices a
boost on the belief that the
recession has loosened its
grip.

While that may be true,
data from the Labour Depart-
ment Tuesday again showed
that company profits were in
many cases buoyed by less
spending on employee pay.

The Labour Department
reported that productivity, the
amount of output per hour of
work, rose at an annual rate
of 6.4 per cent in the April-
June quarter. (see story on
page 3B)

In normal economic times
companies might pay more
for workers and increase pro-
duction. Yet companies dur-
ing the recession have instead
frozen hiring and cut hours to
prop up profits.

If workers are not getting

the hours they need, the pull-
back on spending for every-
thing from gasoline to prod-
ucts made from petroleum,
will likely remain depressed.

That has already happened
this year.

The Energy Information
Administration in its short-
term energy outlook Tuesday
said US consumption of liquid
fuels will fall by 4.1 per cent
this year. The falloff in gaso-
line sales has been tempered
somewhat because it's
become so cheap compared
with past years.

Crude prices rose early in
the day on reports from China
that the nation's exports,
retail sales and factory out-
put improved in July, and the
country imported a record 4.6
million barrels of fuel a day
last month.

The market reversed course
when the Labour Department
released its report and oil
prices fell two per cent.

The monthly forecast by
the Organisation of Petrole-
um Exporting Countries also
may have helped pushed

THE TRIBUNE





Energy prices
slump after Labour
Department report

energy prices down. OPEC
— responsible for about a
third of the world's crude pro-
duction — said it expected
demand to fall by 1.65 million
barrels a day this year, com-
pared with last year, before
rising in 2010.

The Federal Reserve on
Tuesday begins a two-day
meeting that could shed more
light on the US economy. An
interest-rate hike is highly
unlikely, but people want to
hear what the Fed will say
about the state of the econo-
my, said Jim Ritterbusch,
president of energy consul-
tancy Ritterbusch and Asso-
ciates.

"By and large, we're just
taking a little of this econom-
ic optimism out of the mar-
ket right now and responding
to the possibility that we're
going to see a more stable
currency environment going
forward," he said.

The falling dollar has
helped push crude prices up
because oil is priced in the US
currency.

The EIA predicted Tues-
day that gas prices will aver-
age around $2.34 per gallon
in 2009.

In other Nymex trading,
gasoline for September deliv-
ery gained 1.38 cents to settle
at $2.9422 a gallon and heat-
ing oil fell 1.59 cents to settle
at $1.9117. Natural gas for
September delivery fell 10
cents to settle at $3.541 per
1,000 cubic feet.

In London, Brent prices fell
$1.04 to settle at $72.46 a bar-
rel on the ICE Futures
exchange.

¢ Associated Press Writers
Alex Kennedy in Singapore,
George Jahn in Vienna, Joe
McDonald in Beijing and
Martin Crutsinger in Wash-
ington contributed to this
report

MOVIES
























GET 1 FREE

of equal or lesser value

WeNBLD W FED

HOME & BUSINESS 4 ZONES ALARM
SPECIAL $299.00 INSTALLED

HOMIYBUSINESSES

| Panel & LED Keypad
2 Motion Detectors

2 Door Conlacls

1 Siren

1 Transformer

4 Amp Stand-By Battery
1 Wena Deval

Mall at Marathon
Town Centre Mall
Golden Gates Shopping Cenire
Harbour Bay Shopping Plaza



2 HOURS MONITORING,
SERVICE & RESPONSE,
ACCESS CONTROL
CCTM INTERCOM SYSTE
GUARD SERVICE, KO UNI

le Bank of The Bahamas

@inTERN ATION AL INSIGHT
For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

{evs thaw a dollar a day for
i:

424,
AMENDED Sh ra

GOVERNMENT GUARANTEED ADVANCED FO, Bor CHIH, 62 Alsen Hots,

EDUCATION LOAN SCHEME

In collaboration with The Education Guaranteed Fund Loan Program of
the Ministry of Education, Bank of The Bahamas International is pleased
to advise that the cheque disbursement for RETURNING students
in the Loan Program will continue at Holy Trinity Activity
Centre, Stapledon Gardens, Monday, August 10", to Friday,
August 14°, 2009 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. as follows:

__ ———

a
CABLE BAHAMAS

Surnames beginning with

Monday, August 10, 2009
Tuesday, August 11, 2009
Wednesday, August 12, 2009
Thursday, August 13, 2009

Friday, August 14, 2009

PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT

Series Four 8%, Non-Voting Cumulative
Redeemable Convertible Preference
Share Offering

TIME: 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
PLACE: Holy Trinity Activity Centre
Stapledon Gardens

Thursday, August 06, 2009 - NASSAU, BAHAMAS -The Board of
Directors of Cable Bahamas Ltd wishes to announce that the Closing
Date for the Series Four 8%, Non-Voting Cumulative Redeemable
Convertible Preference Share Offering has been extended to

- Returning Students AND Guarantors should be present and must euigust et 52002

bring relevant identification, (valid Passport and National Insurance
Card).

Cable Bahamas Ltd. is majority owned by 2,500 Bahamians and the
Government of the Bahamas. The company’s 280 employees provide:
(1) world-class cable television service on 16 Bahamian islands;
(2) high-speed Internet access services in Grand Bahama, Abaco,
Eleuthera and New Providence; telecommunications services between
the Bahamas and the rest of the world with a 600-kilometer submarine
fiber-optic system owned and operated by Caribbean Crossings Ltd,
a wholly-owned subsidiary; and (4) web-hosting, data center and
disaster recovery services through its wholly-owned subsidiary, Maxil
Communications Ltd. Cable Bahamas’ ordinary shares trade on the
Bahamas International Stock Exchange (Symbol: CAB).

- Cheques will not be released until completion of all required
documentation.

PLEASE NOTE: DISBURSEMENTS MADE AT THE
BANK WILL INCUR A PENALTY FEE!
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009, PAGE 3B





Productivity rises in Q2
while labour costs plunge

By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Productivity surged in the
spring by the largest amount
in almost six years while
labour costs plunged at the
fastest pace in nine years. The
results point to a recession
losing steam, but they do not
bode well for the unemployed
or those forced to work short-
er weeks who were hoping for
more hours.

The Labour Department
said Tuesday that productivi-
ty, the amount of output per
hour of work, rose at an annu-
al rate of 6.4 per cent in the
April-June quarter, while unit
labour costs dropped 5.8 per
cent. Both results were
greater than economists
expected.

Productivity can help boost
living standards because it
means companies can pay
their workers more, with
those wage increases financed
by rising output. However, in
this recession, companies
have been using their pro-
ductivity gains from layoffs
and other cost cuts not to hire
again but to bolster their prof-
its.

The result: Many compa-
nies have been reporting bet-
ter-than-expected second-
quarter earnings despite
falling sales.

Businesses producing more
with fewer employees means
millions of unemployed
Americans likely will continue
to face a dismal job market.
Some analysts also worry that
companies’ aggressive cost-
cutting could make it hard to
mount a sustainable recovery.
That's because a lack of wage
growth and a shortage of jobs
will likely depress consumer

Please
Mr. Raphael Noel “Ray” Adams
is no longer associated with
Raygian Reprographics and has
no
with the company.
therefore
to transact
whatsoever on behalf of the
company.

NOTICE

ESTATE OF JOHN HERBERT BETHELL,
(deceased)

Notice is hereby given pursuant to Section
29 of the Law of Property Act that any person
having a claim against or an interest in the
Estate of John Herbert Bethell, deceased, late
of No. 8 Woodland Road off Skyline Drive in the
Western District of the Island of New Providence
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas and who
died on the 5th July, 2008 is hereby required
to send particulars in writing of his or her claim
or interest to Higgs & Kelly, Attorneys for the
Executors, of P.O. Box N-4818, 384 Bay Street,
Nassau, and to send such particulars not later
than the 25th August, 2009, after which date the
Executors will distribute the Estate among the
persons entitled thereto having regard only to
the claims and interests of which they have had

notice, and will not, as

distributed, be liable to any person of whose
claim they shall not then have had notice.

HIGGS

Attorneys for the Executors



IN THIS June 4, 2009 file photo, people look for jobs at the Los Angeles Mission Career Fair. Productivity surged in the spring by the largest
amount in almost six years while labour costs plunged at the fastest pace in nine years.

spending, which accounts for
about 70 per cent of econom-
ic Output.

Ideally, businesses would
use the current productivity
gains to stabilize their own
financial situations and as the
economy rebounds, resume
hiring to meet the rising
demand, analysts said.

"Hopefully, businesses will
stop the layoffs and start hir-
ing again so that consumers
will have the ability to spend,
but that is a tricky transition,”
said Mark Zandi, chief econ-
omist at Moody's Econo-
my.com.

In a second report, the
Commerce Department said
wholesale inventories

consecutive month, falling 1.7
per cent in June. That was
nearly double the 0.9 per cent
decrease economists had
expected.

But in an encouraging sign,
sales rose 0.4 per cent for a
second straight month. The
first back-to-back increases in
a year boosted hopes that
businesses will begin to ramp
up production to meet rising
demand.

On Wall Street, stocks fell
after the mixed economic
reports and on comments
from analyst Richard Bove of
Rochdale Securities who
wrote in a research note that
bank earnings won't improve
in the second half of this year

gross domestic product.
Economists had expected
productivity to surge in the
second quarter as businesses
continued to lay off workers
and trim the number of hours
being worked by their remain-
ing employees amid the
nation's worst recession since
the end of World War IT.
The second-quarter pro-
ductivity increase reflected
that the number of hours
worked fell much faster than

(AP Photo: Damian Dovarganes)

output dropped.

Total hours worked
dropped at an annual rate of
7.6 per cent, while the output
of non-farm businesses fell at
a 1.7 per cent rate.

The nation's total output of
goods and services, as mea-
sured by the gross domestic
product, fell at an annual rate
of one per cent in the second
quarter. That was a much
slower rate of decline than the
previous two quarters when

the economy shrank at the
fastest pace in more than a
half-century.

Many economists believe
the recession is on the verge
of ending. Should the econo-
my start to grow in the sec-
ond half of this year, some
companies might boost
employment — if demand for
their products showed a sus-
tained increase.

Still, the leaner work force
should help keep productivity
rising in coming quarters
although the gains are not
expected to be as large as the
jump in the spring.

"Before the recession of
2001, productivity typically
fell in recessions because
companies waited too long to
respond to the downturn,”
Ian Shepherdson, chief US
economist at High Frequency
Economics, wrote in a
research note.

Among those reporting sec-
ond-quarter profits due part-
ly to layoffs and other cost
cuts were Internet company
Yahoo Inc., which saw earn-
ings grow eight per cent, and
automaker Ford Motor Co.

The 6.4 per cent jump in
productivity at an annual rate
was the biggest quarterly gain
since a 9.7 per cent surge in
the third quarter of 2003.

The 5.8 per cent decline in
unit labour costs followed a
revised 2.7 per cent dip in the
first quarter and was the
biggest quarterly drop since
a 7.7 per cent decline in the
second quarter of 2000.

LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.
“Eattage Lat With Private Beach



declined for a record 10th — and that many companies will
post losses. The Dow Jones
industrial average lost about
65 points in afternoon trad-
ing and broader indices also
fell.

The 6.4 per cent jump in
productivity followed a 0.3
per cent increase in the first
three months of the year that
was revised downward from
an earlier estimate of a 1.6
per cent gain. The revision
partially reflected the annual
benchmark revisions of eco-
nomic data connected to the

FOR SALE

RAYGIAN REPROGRAPHICS
Tel: 327-8640, 437-8687
West Bay Street, Cable Beach

PUBLIC NOTICE Web Listing # 8377

Mario A. Carey, CRS, CIPS, CLHMS

be advised that
info@mariocareyrealty.com

www.marioca reyreaily.com

Eo

CcFAL"
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 10 AUGUST 2009

whatsoever
He is
NOT Authorized
any — business

involvement

ROYAL BFIDELITY

The Management Maney at Work

FINDEX: CLOSE 779.58 | YTD -6.62% | 2008 -12.31%

52wk-Low Securit y EPS
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (81)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)}
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.39 10.39 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3860 2.40 4.75
2.9047 -1.20 -3.66
1.4817 3.35 5.38
3.1031 -8.35 -13.82
12.9801 2.87 5.79
101.6693 1.10 1.67
96.7398 0.35 -4.18
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.2765 2.00 -2.98
1.0622 2.56 6.22
1.0243 -0.84 2.43
1.0585 2.04 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol.
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.16
0.37
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

6.25
0.63
3.15
2.14

6.25
0.63
3.15
2.37

6.25
0.63
3.15
2.37

2.74
5.50
1.27
1.32
6.60
10.00
10.30
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.39
10.00

2.74
5.60
3.48
1.82
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.13
1.00
0.30
5.49

2.74
5.76
3.85
1.82
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.13
1.00
0.30
5.49

52wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

7%

7%

52wk-Low

Symbol

14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

52wk-Low
1.3231
2.8952
1.4059
3.1031
12.3289
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Fund Name Div$

CFAL Bond Fund

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund

CFAL Money Market Fund

Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund

Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

Fidelity International Investment Fund

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund

respects the property so FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV §$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings

& KELLY

) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Tel: 242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013

Prime + 1.75%
Prime + 1.75%

EPS $
-0.041

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!
Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million

ATs

Mario Carey Realty
Dt's abaut yaw... Let's talk.



FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

CoO LGONTAL

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,564.59] CHG 8.48 | %CHG 0.54 | YTD -147.77 | YTD % -8.63

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

$ Div$
0.127
0.992
0.244

P/E

-0.877

0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

ases)

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29 May 2015

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E
N/M
N/M

256.6

Yield

0.000
0.001

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90
Yield % NAV Date
30-Jun-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

mths

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TORRINGTON
MANAGEMENT LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ROMANZA LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BIALEX VISTA LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WOHLEN LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
APRIL HARVEST LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BUNT IMP. CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
UPWARD LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
OSB INCORPORATION LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ABBI VOLCANY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BIALEX VISTA LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Hybrid efficiency
General Motors Corp. said
Tuesday that its new plug-in
hybrid car, the Volt, should get
triple-digit miles per gallon.

City miles per gallon,
HYBRID VEHICLES
2011 Chevrolet Volt
8
2010 Toyota Prius
me 51

2000 Honda Insight
49

2009 Toyota Prius
De 48

2001 Toyota Prius
De 42

2010 Ford Fusion
a 41

2010 Honda Insight
MS 40

2010 Ford Escape
ae 34

2009 Chevrolet Malibu

WS 26

NOTE: The Vo 1 differant
aditional hybrids. Its

calculated by GM using
AP

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SIX FORTUNES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EMEK INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
STAEL INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009, PAGE 5B



Asian markets inch higher
as China data sifted

By JEREMIAH MARQUEZ
AP Business Writer

HONG KONG (AP) —
Major Asian markets inched
higher Tuesday amid signs
China’s stimulus measures
were helping shield its econ-
omy from the global slump
and as governments issued
cautious outlooks about the
recovery.

Regional markets made
tentative gains as investors
sifted through a rash of data
about China’s economy that
together provided positive
signs for Beijing’s multibil-
lion-dollar effort to restore
stable growth, though still
hinted at weak fundamentals.

While industrial output and
retail sales rose last month in
the world’s third-largest econ-
omy, imports and exports
were still down sharply from

a year earlier amid continuing
weak global demand.

Investors have been count-
ing on China’s homegrown
growth to help other
economies turn around
quicker, but Tuesday’s data
raised concerns such expec-
tations may fall short, said
Peter Lai, investment man-
ager at DBS Vickers in Hong
Kong. That in turn could
weigh on the markets, he
said.

“The upside room is quite
limited right now,” he said.
“The global economy may
have reached a bottom, but
the revival will take some
time, there are just too many
uncertainties.”

Markets across the region
traded in a narrow range.

In a back-and-forth session,
Hong Kong’s Hang Seng was
up 86.34 points, or 0.4 per

cent, at 21,015.86 and Shang-
hai’s benchmark gained 0.3
per cent to 3,258.40.

Japan’s Nikkei 225 stock
average rose 18.54, or 0.2 per
cent, to 10,542.80 as the Bank
of Japan said there were signs
the downturn was bottoming
out but warned about grow-
ing joblessness.

South Korea’s central bank
was similarly cautious, saying
the road to stronger growth
was uncertain because recov-
eries in other major
economies could be delayed.
The benchmark Kospi added
less than 0.1 per cent to
1,576.81.

Australia’s benchmark rose

0.3 per cent and Singapore’s
main index climbed nearly
two per cent after being
closed for a national holiday
Monday. Indexes in Thailand,
Taiwan and New Zealand
were moderately lower.

Wall Street posted moder-
ate losses overnight as
investors took some profits
without any major corporate
or economic news.

The Dow Jones industrial
average fell 32.12, or 0.3 per
cent, to 9,337.95. The Stan-
dard & Poor’s 500 index fell
3.38, or 0.3 per cent, to
1,007.10, while the Nasdaq
composite index fell 8.01, or
0.4 per cent, to 1,992.24.

NOTICE

Wall Street futures

declined modestly with Dow
futures off five points at
9,315.

Oil prices lingered below
$71 a barrel, with benchmark
crude for September delivery





up four cents at $70.64. On
Monday, the contract fell 33
cents,

The dollar fell to 96.63 yen
from 97.09 yen, and the curo
traded lower at $1.4137 com-
pared to $1.4144.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SAMANTHA LOUISE
COX KEMP, P.O. BOX N-10767,# 3 HALLS ROAD and
POMPANO COURT, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12" day of
August, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

















NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOHNNY JOSEPH
P.O. BOX GT-2752 , YELLOW ELDER is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 12" day of August, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE ANGE NOEL of
#137 FAWCETT LANE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
12th day of AUGUST, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

TOMCAT PROPERTIES
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICEis Oy that DEJA SIFFRARD of MARSH
HARBOUR, P.O. BOX AB-20554, ABACO, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration’ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 5th day of
AUGUST 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

TOMCAT PROPERTIES (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
N OTIC E IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) TOMCAT PROPERTIES (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
is in dissolution under the provisions of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
7th day of August, 2009 when its Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said Company is Mr. Dayan Bourne
of Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Dated the 10th day of August, 2009.
H & J CORPORATE SERVICES LTD.

Registered Agent
for the above-named Company

Legal Notice

RAMBLING HOLDINGS LTD.
IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 RAMBLING
HOLDINGS LTD. is in dissolution.

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 10th
August 2009. David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.,
Building 2 Caves Village, P O. Box N 3917 is the Liquidator of
RAMBLING HOLDINGS LTD. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
address and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the
10th September 2009.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LUCKSON VERSANNES
of BAHAMAS AVENUE, THE GROVE, P.O. Box 8843,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 12‘ day of August, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-
7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS IN THE
SUPREME COURT 2004
Common Law and Equity Division CLE/qui/00946

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot
of land containing 11,897 square feet situated on the
Eastern Side of Lincoln Boulevard approximately 500
feet south of Homestead Avenue and on the Western
Side of Washington Street in the Subdivision called
and known as Englerston in the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF THOMAS A. MINNS

NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of Thomas A. Minns of the Englerston
Constituency in the Eastern District of the said Island of
New Providence in respect to:

ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land situated about
500 feet south of Homestead Avenue, on the Eastern
side of Lincoln Boulevard and on the Western Side of
Washington Street in the subdivision called and known
as Englerston in the Islands of New Providence one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
which said piece parcel or tract of land is bounded on the
West by a road named Lincoln Boulevard and running
thereon one hundred and two and twelve Hundredths feet
(112.12) and bounded on the North by property believed
to be owned by the Church of God In Christ and running
thereon One hundredth and Four and Sixteen hundredths
feet (104.16) and bounded on the -East by a road named
Washington Street and running thereon One Hundred
and Three and Ninety-six hundredths feet (103.96) and
bounded on the South by property believed to be owned
partially by Adderley’s Upholstery and partially by one
Joan Hanna and running together thereon One Hundred
and Thirty and Fifty nine hundredths feet (130.59) which

said piece parcel or tract of land has such position shape
boundaries marks and dimensions as shown delinated
on the Plan filed herein and which is thereon coloured
Pink. Thomas A. Minns claims to be the equitable and
beneficial owner in possession of the parcel of land
hereinbefore described and such ownership as aforesaid
arises by virtue of a possessory title to the said land. The
Petitioner has made application to the Supreme Court of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of
the Quieting Titles Act, 1959, to have his title to the said
land investigated.

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned
at Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay Street, Nassau,
Bahamas as sole Liquidator on or before the 21st day of August,
2009. In default thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of
any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 10th day of August, 2009.

DAYAN BOURNE
LIQUIDATOR

of
TOMCAT PROPERTIES (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Copies of the filed Plan may be inspected during normal
working hours at:
1. The Registry of the Supreme Court,
Ansbacher House, East Street, Nassau,

Legal Noti
i ae Bahamas; and

NOTICE

2. The Law Chambers of Floyd C. Watkins &
NOTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

Co. situated at St Alban’s Drive (East) Nassau,

Bahamas.
(a) GYROSCOPE LIMITED (SAC) is in dissolution under the provisions of

the International Business Companies Act 2000. ‘ : F :
Notice is hereby given that any person having dower

or right of dower or any adverse claim or a claim not
recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 3rd day
of October, 2009, file in the Supreme Court and serve
on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of such
claim in the prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit to
be filed therewith. Failure by any such person to file and
serve a statement of such claim on or before the 3rd day
of October, 2009, will operate as a bar to such claim.

41R Cameras
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Power Supply & Accessories

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on August 11, 2009 when
its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

\
\
§

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are required
on or before the 11th day of September, 2009 to send their names and addresses
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or,
in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made before such debts are proved.

August 12, 2009

> a / Aho ae
( a } et 4 ee j

oe a"

Floyd C. Watkins & CO.,
Attorneys for the Petitioner.

LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY




THE BAHAMAS MARITIME

AUTHORITY
(LONDON OFFICE)

Technical and Compliance Officer
(Inspections & Surveys)

An appointment is available for a marine professional in the
Inspections and Surveys Department, carrying out a wide range of
duties associated with statutory compliance of The Bahamas flagged
fleet of about 1,700 vessels comprising over 51,000,000 GT.

Duties will include
* close oversight of response and management of PSC inspection,
* operation of the BMA inspection programme
* technical advice to owners, managers and Recognised
Organisations,

A logical thinking, safety orientated person is required who must
have a wide knowledge of the International Maritime Conventions
and Codes.

Candidates should have seagoing experience at a senior level or
surveying experience, or as a Naval Architect within an IACS
Classification Society. Suitably experienced candidates from an
alternative professional stream may also be considered. Audit
experience 1s advantageous.

This particular vacancy will be better suited to a holder of an STCW
II/2 certificate. However outstanding candidates who are otherwise
qualified will be considered.

The successful candidate will be required to work in the London
Office of the BMA and should be prepared to undertake occasional
travel on the business of the Authority.

Technical and Compliance Officer
(STCW and Manning)

Applications are invited for the position of Technical & Compliance
Officer in the STCW and Manning Department of the BMA. The
STCW and Manning Section 1s responsible for all aspects related
to the training, certification and approval of seafarers and STCW
courses, and the assessment of the manning provisions, for The
Bahamas flagged fleet.

The successful candidate will be employed at a supervisory level
with duties including:
¢ Representing the Authority at meetings/forum on matters
relating to seafarers training and manning
* Oversight of the BMA processes and development of national
policies relating to seafarers, STCW course approval and safe
manning
* Provision of training and manning guidance/assistance to
Owners, Managers and the Authority’s other stakeholders

Candidates for the post should have a university degree with practical
and theoretical knowledge of STCW Convention/Code and the
international principles on manning of ships. Applicants with other
qualifications gained in the field of maritime training/education or
other relevant experience/expertise will also be considered. Previous
experience in auditing will be advantageous.

Applicants are invited to write, enclosing a copy of their C/V, and
details of their current salary to: Deputy Director, Inspections &
Surveys, The Bahamas Maritime Authority, 120 Old Broad Street,
London EC2N IAR, U K, or by email to tech@bahamasmaritime.c

om.

Closing date for applications 1s 28 August 2009. All applications
will be acknowledged.

PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Nevada casino

winnings down
14% in June

NOTICE

FROND ASSETS LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) FROND ASSETS LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
07" August 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Ms. Celene Koh of
1 Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

Dated this 11" day of August A. D. 2009



Ms. Celene Koh
Liquidator



NOTICE

MAXIMUS PRIME LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MAXIMUS PRIME LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
07" August 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.
The Liquidator of the said company is Ms. Celene Koh of
1 Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

Dated this 11" day of August A. D. 2009



Ms. Celene Koh
Liquidator

NOTICE

MENTOR ANGEL VENTURES LTD.

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) MENTOR ANGEL VENTURES LTD. is in voluntary

dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4)

of the International Business Companies Act 2000.
The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
07" August 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.
The Liquidator of the said company is Ms. Celene Koh of
1 Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393

Dated this 11" day of August A. D. 2009



Ms. Celene Koh



By SANDRA CHEREB
Associated Press Writer

CARSON CITY, Nev.
(AP) — Nevada casinos won
almost $820 million from
gamblers in June, down near-
ly 14 per cent compared with
the same month a year ago
and marking the smallest
gaming win reported in the
last five years, state gaming
regulators said Tuesday.

For the fiscal year ended
June 30, the state Gaming
Control Board report said the
total gambling win was $10.8
billion, down almost 14 per
cent from the previous 12-
month period.

June was the 18th straight
month of decline.

Nevada collected $45.8 mil-
lion in taxes based on the
June win, a 13.5 per cent drop
from a year earlier.

"It's a continuation of what
we've seen," said Frank
Streshley, an analyst with the
Gaming Control Board.
"We're seeing less visitors and
they're spending a lot less
than what they had been.”

The number of visitors to
Las Vegas fell 6.3 per cent in
June, marking the sixth
straight month of decline,
according to the Las Vegas
Convention and Visitors
Authority. About 2.98 million
visitors traveled to Las Vegas
in June, compared with near-
ly 3.18 million a year earlier.

The monthly win was down
in every major market in the
state. The Las Vegas Strip
was down almost 15 per cent.
The Reno-Sparks-North
Tahoe area was down more
than seven per cent. It was
the 24th straight month of
declines in Washoe County,
Streshley said.

Elsewhere, declines were
15 per cent at South Lake
Tahoe, 5.6 per cent in down-
town Las Vegas, 11.6 per cent
in Laughlin, and 15.6 per cent
in the Carson Valley area of
Douglas County.

The June win was the
amount left in casino coffers
after gamblers wagered $11
billion in table games and
slots. There were declines in
both types of gambling.

"It's across the board,"
Streshley said.

Slot wagering totaled $9.2
billion, down 10.7 per cent,
while the $1.8 billion wagered
on table games was down 12.7
per cent.

Gaming revenues account
for 30 per cent of state's gen-
eral fund.

Last month, the Nevada
Department of Taxation
reported taxable sales for 11
months of the 2009 fiscal year
fell 11.9 per cent compared
with the prior year, and they
fell 21 per cent in May.

Gov. Jim Gibbons called
the latest casino numbers
"troubling" but said no deci-
sion has been made on
whether he will call state law-
makers into special session to
address the revenue shortfall.

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PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
ENTERTAINMENT

World’s most beautiful women

By Bahamas
Information
Services

ALL 84 of the world’s
most beautiful women
graced the stage of Wyn-
dham Nassau Resort
Rain Forest Theater on
Monday to unveil their
national costumes for the
first time.

As each contestant
took centre stage, a kalei-
doscope of colour illumi-
nated the theatre to the
delight of the crowd who
shouted for their
favourites. Many foreign
residents living in Nassau
came prepared with flags
and dressed in their own
national costumes to
specifically cheer on their
home country. There was
a huge amount of sup-
port for the Latin Amer-
ican and Caribbean coun-
tries in particular. Miss
India and Miss USA also
came out to much local
support.

“This is one of the best
shows I have ever seen
in terms of colour dis-
play, presentation and
quality of the fabrics and
the way the costumes
were made,” said Lisa
Harold, an aspiring fash-
ion designer from New
York.

Contestants wore cos-
tumes depicting the
national symbol from
their respective country.

Leading the way was
Miss Bahamas, Kiara
Sherman, whose golden
costume depicted the
‘Bahamian sunshine.’

“Tt was a very impres-
sive display of costumes,”
said Dwayne Delancy,
photographer with
NuWoman magazine. “I
especially liked the
detailed workings of the
costumes worn by Miss
Czechoslovakia and Miss
Ecuador, Nicaragua and
Panama. Miss Bahamas
was also a very good
depiction.”

Each presentation was
divided into groups of six
with contestants coming
out in alphabetical order.

Actress Claudette
‘Cookie’ Allens and his-
torian and junkanoo
artist Arlene Nash-Fer-
guson were the hostesses.

Judges included Lynn
Holowesko, President of
the Senate; Leslie Van-
derpool, Bahamas Inter-
national Film Festival;
artist John Cox, owner of
Popop Studios; Rochelle
Walker, Solomon’s
Mines; Gershin Major,
CEO, Mail Boxes Etc;
Elaine Pinder, the owner
of La Rose; and Kishlane

SEE next page


THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009, PAGE 11B

SSeS

unveil their national costumes

Photos by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

FROM page 10B

O’Brien, vice president Cititrust.

The winner of the “Best Costume’ award
will be announced tonight during the
Bahamian Designer Fabric Fashion show

scheduled for the Sheraton Nassau Beach
Hotel.

The event went off very smoothly. The
attendance was not as good as it could
have been which may have due to the high
cost of tickets which were eventually
reduced in price in the lead up days.




PAGE 12B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST, 12, 2009



ARTS

THE TRIBUNE



Red Bull
has many
forms

By ALEX MISSICK
Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net

REDBULL, the popular
energy drink, has for a num-
ber of years, pulled together
great events allowing people
from around the world to
express their creativity and
has now launched its “Red
Bull Art of Can” in the
Bahamas with the final local
competition and exhibition to
be hosted at THE HUB,
located on Bay Street on Sep-
tember 4.

Red Bull Art of Can has
pulled creativity from people
of all ages and stages the
world over producing some
of the most fashionable, imag-
inative and inspired pieces
using from as little as one can
to hundreds. With no restric-
tions, artists can design, cre-
ate, mold, sculpt, photograph,
do anything you like with as
many or as few cans as
desired. There are very few
countries in the world that can
boast the creativity of
Bahamians so Red Bull is
inviting the nation to get busy
and start building.

Arame Strachan, Market-
ing Manager at Bristol Wines
and Spirits, said because the
Art of Can is a global initia-
tive of Red Bull, as a distrib-
utor, Bristol Wines wants to
integrate alot of the pro-
grammes if they are applicible
to the Bahamian market.

“T appealed to them
because I think we have a
great creative market here
because of Junkanoo. I am
partial to Junkanoo and I
know Junkanooers can create
anything out of nothing. We
have alot of local talent here
that don’t really have a forum
to express their creative
works outside of Junkanoo so
I think this is a great initia-
tive for them,” Ms Strachan
said.

Registration is free and
open to Bahamian artists
through August 31. The top
three pieces from this exhibi-
tion will be sent to Jamaica
to compete in the regional
competition. Sculptures,
paintings, digital/graphic
designs and various forms of
mixed media will all be con-
sidered. Judges will review
each piece based on creativity
(overall idea behind the

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piece), conceptual execution
(how well the piece translates
the idea) and construction
(the quality of
production/final presenta-
tion).

“Anyone can enter and
there is no age requirement.
Any piece of art work can be
created out of the cans once it
is inspired by Red Bull and
made with the Red Bull cans
it can be entered. Right now I
think there are about 12
entrants. We have cans avail-
able at the warehouse so peo-
ple can come and get them
from Bristol Wines,” Ms Stra-
chan said.

The lucky first place
Bahamian winner will be
flown all expenses paid with
his/her piece to this final exhi-
bition that will be hosted at
Devon House, Kingston,
Jamaica in October. This
competition promises to fea-
ture the finest pieces from the
Caribbean and will be judged
by the public through the peo-
ple’s choice award, a media
choice award and the coveted
prize being given to the best
piece chosen by a panel of
Caribbean art gurus.

Other Red Bull Art of Can
exhibitions have taken place
in the US in Boston, Atlanta,
Dallas, Minneapolis, Philadel-
phia, Houston and Chicago.
Red Bull Art of Can has a
long international history
which began in Europe in
2000. Since then, exhibits
have been hosted all over the
world including Prague,
Switzerland, London, Dublin,
Dubai, Budapest, Vienna,
Warsaw and Amsterdam.

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Photos by Naphtali Junior

TOP — Miss Jamaica Carolyn Yapp showing off her Red Bull earrings

ABOVE —- Miss Jamaica Universe ‘09 Carolyn Yapp has a great time trying on and admiring
great fashion pieces submitted for Red Bull Art of Can. The pieces, using Red Bull cans in
its creation, including funky earrings and a very edgy and futuristic dress were submitted by
Jamaican jewelry designers Reve Jewelry and on display at the Hilton on Saturday August
1, 2009 at the Miss Universe’ send off to the Bahamas.

Three artists unite to
put on exhibition of
their works at Hilton

that I'm studying the past legends in this project, I feel
that we all need to embrace the past. People like Joseph
Spence, Blind Blake and many others were great locally
and internationally. These men and women paved the
way for us in music, now we need to get back on that
path and value 'us' first instead of rap or reggae or any
other foreign art style. Not to say that these styles of
music aren't good but they are not who we are. So I
guess my inspiration comes from knowing that there
needs to be a consciousness of where we came from,
who we are as Bahamians so that we will know where
we're going,” Mr Wildgoose said.

Mr Wildgoose said during the show, he is expecting a
cultural awakening and an appreciation for who we are
as Bahamians.

“T'm expecting viewers to be inspired not just by art
pieces, but fine art itself and to know that it 1s ‘the quali-
ty of our art that reflects the quality of our society,’” Mr
Wildgoose said.

As for Mr Strachan, his body of work is all paintings
just as his co-exhibitors and is probably the most repre-
sentational of them all. They can be described as figura-
tive in subject matter but his interpretation of the con-
tent he addresses is intermediary of subtle and bold.
According to Mr Petit, Mr Strachan’s work can be seen
as multiplexed as this recent compilation of his is made
up of landscapes, seascapes and portraits.

“His brush strokes are a bit more defined or intense
than that of Bernard’s, but not giving as much of a hard-
ened appearance as that of Matthew’s canvases. Further-
more, the manner in which he addresses his subject mat-
ter demonstrates an artist’s sensitivity towards not totally
adapting the content beyond reasonable recognition,”
Mr Petit said.

Mr Strachan said although this is his fourth show, it is

Ni o } his first with Mr Petit and Mr Wildgoose.
Gas Stove | “T expect that the showing gets the attention it rightful-
white ] ly needs as it draws not only the Bahamian public but
also off island viewers and potential buyers. I also expect
that a major difference can be made with this showing as
it’s to acknowledge the younger talent in this country on
how to explore their gifts,” Mr Strachan said.

Mr Petit hopes that he and his co-exhibitors will begin
to gain more exposure as young up and coming artists.

“T hope that we develop a following from this new
approach we have taken to our work. Ideally we would
want people to walk away feeling that we have brought
something different to the art scene in comparison to
what some of our contemporaries are presenting of late,”
Mr Petit said.

ate tLOre)[
Counter Top

aR eu



By LLOYD ALLEN
Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

WITH all the excitement
surrounding the Miss Uni-
verse pageant added with
everything else that’s hap-
pening in Nassau, it’s impor-
tant to know exactly what’s
happening. This week Things
2 Do is mixing all the right
elements of fun, flare, and
beauty, offering you every-
thing and then some for the
best in entertainment.

1. It’s all glitz and glamour
for the 84 contestants of the
Miss Universe Pageant with
the organisers sparing no
effort in giving the girls the
all Bahamian experience.
Tonight at 7pm, locals
designers will have a rare
opportunity to have the
international beauties model
their designs made from the
local Bahamian fabrics
Androsia and Bahama Hand
Prints. The public is invited
to join the contestants at the
Sheraton’s Nassau Beach
Hotel, Cable Beach. Tickets
are priced at $75 to $125 and
can be purchased from the
Miss Universe events box-
office in the Sheraton’s con-
vention centre lobby.

Following the event is a
Junkanoo rush-out between
the Sheraton and Breezes
hotel starting at 9pm.

2. Continuing with its sixth
annual film festival series,
The Bahamas International
Film Festival is presenting
the flick Pretty Ugly People.
First released in 2008, the
film tells the story of a dying
woman’s last wish of bringing
together her estranged circle
of friends from college to
spend a final weekend
together. As the film unfolds,
the reality that none of the
characters are the way the
were in college comes to light
for Lucy (Missi Pyle), and
they all spend the time
together without any of the
modern conveniences while
tolerating each other. The
film is being shown tonight
at Galleria Cinema JFK at
8pm and tickets are priced at

$5.

3. On Thursday the organ-
isers from the Miss Universe
committee have scheduled a
State Gift Auction and Din-
ner where souvenirs and cul-
tural pieces from the 84
countries represented in the
pageant will be auctioned off
and proceeds given to the
Bahamas’ HIV/AIDS Foun-
dation. The event will take
place at the Sheraton Nas-
sau Beach Hotel at 6.30pm
on Thursday. Tickets are
priced between $150 and
$200 general admission, and
$500 for banner seats. To buy
yours now, visit the Miss
Universe box office in the
Sheraton’s convention cen-
ter lobby or contact the
Bahamas Aids Foundation
at 325.9326/7.

4. It’s all about TGI Fri-
day’s, and throughout the
island there are activities
galore all offering the best in
entertainment to launch the
weekend. On the list are
Market Paradiso on Paradise
Island with an up tempo hap-
py hour from 5pm to 8.
There’s also Van Breugel’s
on Charlotte Street and if
that’s not enough, Green
Parrots on East Bay Street
may be just the place for you.
It’s right on the water’s edge
giving the best in urban and
pop music, a spectacular
décor, and drinks are priced
just right. Either way, enter-
tainment on Friday is all
about unwinding, so go out
and indulge.

5. What is TRI-ART-IC?
It’s a new approach to art,
particularly local art helping
to translate the essence of
Bahamian experiences,
lifestyles, and culture into the
local and international con-
sciousness. This Friday at the
British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, local artists Bernard
Petit, Charlton Strachan, and
Matthew Wildgoose, will pre-
sent several pieces of their
art along with intimate dis-
cussions and light refresh-
ments all to generate more
talk of the TRI-ART-IC ini-
tiative. The event runs from
6pm to 9, and will extend to
an after party at Harry’s
Haven of Rest on George
Street. Access to the event is
free, and all are invited.






THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 121h, 2009, PAGE 13B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MarINE FORECAST











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Red Bull World's most beautiful

has many women unveil their

forms... .
See page 12B national costumes...

See pages 10 & 11B

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12, 2009

For the very best features . . .



www. tribune 24? .cor-

‘Tri-art-1C’

ratieereore ‘Three artists put on exhibition

amissick@tribunemedia.net

alented artistic
trio, Bernard
Petit, Charlton
Strachan and
Matthew Wild-
goose, have come together
to put on an art exhibition
entitled “Tri-art-ic” featur-
ing their recent works from
August 14-August 15 at the
British Colonial Hilton.

Triartic is adapted from
the word “Triadic” which ts
one of several colour
schemes where three
colours are used that appear
equally spaced from each
other on the colour wheel.

“Given that we are three
young artists that possess
three styles that are equally
distinct from each other we
found the name to be fitting
in describing us and the
body of work,” Mr Petit
said.

Mr Petit said although
this is his sixth group show,
his work in Tri-art-ic can be
described as being the most
subtle and simplistic of the
three. Mr Petit attempts to
create a smoother surface
onto the canvas. Though his
colour palette is arbitrary
from plausible reality, each
painting still reflects some
degree of visual credibility.

“From my body of work I
favor the piece ‘Perspective
View of the Restful Wall.’
Lately, I have found myself
interested in anthropomor-
phising inanimate objects,
making them seem as if they
can experience human situa-
tions of being lonely or even
observers of other objects, - -
for example. This piece MAN WITH CIGAR by Matthew Wildgoose...
shows a pole looking on at
the perspective of the wall
stretching further into the
distance from hun. I felt
that this particular piece
accomplished my attempt to
create these scenarios with
non living objects,” Mr Petit
said.

Mr Wildgoose’s series
which is the boldest of the
three, takes the most cele-
brated Bahamian figures
and exaggerates their fea-
tures into caricature por-
traits. Through his pieces,
there is an artist’s interest to
stretch his subject beyond
what is normally perceived
in reality as natural.

Mr Wildgoose said at this
point, he has completed
eight pieces with hopes to
have twelve at the time of
the show.

“T always had a deep
appreciation for today's
Bahamian music (Goom-
bay) and musicians. Now



RAKE AND SCRAPE by Matthew Wildgoose...

SEE page 12B PERSPECTIVE VIEW of the restful wall... MUSICIAN by Matthew Wildgoose...



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