Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
m Lhe Tribune

=USA TODAY.

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BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com

SUNNY WITH
TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009

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HELP WANTED
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BAHAMAS BIGGEST

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wounded woman
drove off to escape her
attacker and ended up
hitting a number of
nearby cars.

The cries of her
three-month-old son,
who neighbours said
was cushioned between his
bleeding mother and the car's
airbag, were the next sounds

SEE page seven

tribunemedia. net

AS POLICE remain
baffled over the
motiveless killing of a
mother of two, a neigh-
bour has revealed her
harrowing last words.

The gunman who shot Tagia
Soles-Armony at close range
walked up to her, and as he
cocked his weapon the terrified
29-year-old screamed: "No! No!

Tagia Soles-Armony



Former minister calls for the
death penalty to be carried out

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

1 MISS BAHAMAS Kiara

Sherman puts on a dazzling

} display in the Rainforest

Theatre at the Wyndham
Nassau Resort last night.

The Miss Universe contes-

tants took part in the National

Costume Competition.
¢ SEE PAGE TWO

A FORMER cabinet minister last night
slammed Government and his own party for
“failing to protect” the Bahamian people.

Speaking out following the murder of 29-
year-old Tagia Soles-Armony, Leslie Miller,
the former PLP MP for Blue Hills, also called
for the death penalty to be carried out in The
Bahamas.



STS LETS
WSS Ta ETE

AG expected to be

Mr Miller said none of the country’s parlia- ‘J t h 4 f . t _
SEE page seven ere ion siiacn Next Chier justice
THE Ministry of Tourism By MEGAN However, Mr
issued a statement yester- REYNOLDS Moree, the senior part-
T a i) T day explaining the post- Tribune Staff ner at McKinney, Ban-
e '@ | 4 = ponement of the Miss Uni- Reporter croft and Hughes,
verse Float Parade through mreynolds@ refused to comment on

on
Tuesdays!!

New Providence, leaving
Arawak Cay.

The statement explained
that as a result of the inter-
mittent heavy rain showers
over the last few days, a
number of floats sustained
some damage, causing unex-
pected delays. With the
floats subject to very strict
stipulations it would not
have been possible to use
the few that were ready.

The Float Parade will
now take place on Thurs-
day, August 20th, 2009 at
4pm along the same route.

tribunemedia.net reports when contact-
ed by The Tribune yes-
terday. He did not con-
firm whether he was
offered the position
nor would he stay
whether if offered, he
would accept.

And Mr Barnett failed to
return calls from The Tribune
to comment on the reported
appointment.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham is expected to rec-

ATTORNEY
General Michael
Barnett is expected
to step up as the next
chief justice when
Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham returns
from vacation in two weeks,
The Tribune has learned.

There is an unconfirmed
report that senior lawyer Bri-
an Moree has been offered
the position of attorney gen-
eral.

Michael Barnett



TiAl cP =
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Floppingipizzarabsolutely\

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SEE page seven



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SEE PAGE ELEVEN

The police are
tight-lipped on
‘serial rapist’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are remain-
ing tight-lipped about
their investigation into a
series of rapes and
attempted rapes in east-
ern New Providence.

Yesterday Assistant
Commissioner of Police
Raymond Gibson
declined to state where
exactly the attacks
occurred in the eastern
area of the island or com-
ment on any other details
relative to the cases.

However, he revealed
that two men were tak-
en into police custody
within the last two weeks
in connection with the
crimes but were released
pending further investi-
gation.

The senior officer con-
firmed that there have
been four such attacks
since March of this year
— two rapes and two
attempted rapes — and
police are “exploring the
possibility that they may
be connected.”

His comments come
after a police source
revealed the spate of inci-
dents to this newspaper.

The concerned officer,
who had claimed there
had been as many as five
incidents in the last
month, said they were
worried about the fact
that senior officers were
not going public with the
information.

The officer told The
Tribune that victims had
consistently described
their attacker.

It was alleged that the
man talks to his victims
and takes evidence such
as clothes and bed sheets
with him after commit-
ting his crime.

Meanwhile, the source
claimed that Elizabeth
Estates police station
instituted extra patrols in
the area in response to
the incidents as well as
instructing that bushy
areas in the vicinity to be
cleared.

Yesterday morning
Superintendent David
Deveaux, officer in
charge of the Elizabeth
Estates police station

SEE page seven

































PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)





PAGE 2, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





More tourism lay-offs expected

ROBERT SANDS







More lay-offs are expected in the
tourism sector during the summer
months, according to the Central Bank
of the Bahamas.

Noting that this expectation is based
on its observations of trends in the econ-
omy, not any specific knowledge of plans
by hotel owners, the Central Bank said
“further downsizing” is likely given the
“sustained slump in air arrivals” to New
Providence, Grand Bahama and the
Family Islands.

In its Monthly Economic and Finan-
cial Developments Report for June 2009,
issued Friday, the Central Bank said

Central Bank bases expectation on economic trends

that despite slight signs of “stabilising”
global economic conditions in June,
painful ripples continue to be felt in the
Bahamian economy.

Tourism remains weak with the sus-
tained slump in air arrivals negatively
impacting overall visitor trends during
the first half of the year, following a 2.2
per cent decrease a year earlier.

“Some offset was provided by the
firming in cruise arrivals, which bene-
fitted in recent months from significant

price discounting and the rerouting of
several cruise ships,” said the report.

Yesterday Minister of Labour Dion
Foulkes and Bahamas Hotel Associa-
tion President Robert Sands both said
they are not aware of any plans by hotels
to reduce their staffing levels in the sum-
mer months.

Meanwhile, the report noted that out-
side of the tourism sector, despite a
majority of businesses expecting their
profits to decline for the rest of the year,

UNIVERSE
Contestants show

national costumes

there were signals from the private sec-
tor that employment adjustments will
“moderate” in coming months.

Overall, however, the unemployment
rate is expected to grow, said the report,
“despite a modest offset anticipated
from the hosting of a number of inter-
national events in the latter half of the
year”.

Ultimately, the economy is not pro-
jected to return to its long-term growth
trend until late 2010, it added.

A\ tale Sts

Access to Affordable, Guaranteed
Healthcare for you and the ones
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MISS UNIVERSE contestants
strutted their stuff for the
National Costume Competition
at the Rainforest Theatre in the
Wyndham Nassau Resort on






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PHOTOS:
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Tribune staff

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THE Miss Universe 2009 con- Contestants to see

testants will today be shown

what Harbour Island and Abaco

have to offer.

The beauty queens will be
given a tour of Harbour Island

Harbour Island
and Abaco

by golf cart. Andin Abaco they
will engage in leisurely activities at the Coral Sands Beach
House on Green Turtle Cay.

Back in Nassau tomorrow, the contestants will take part in
the Bahamian Designer Fashion Show at the Sheraton Nassau

Beach Hotel.

The Miss Universe Float Parade through New Providence
which was cancelled on Monday will now to take place on
Thursday, August 20 (see Page One).





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL Malus



The best for news .

www. tribune?



O Court news

Mother set to
he sentenced
today over
Stabbing death

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

MOTHER-of-three
Shimeakima Delores Pratt,
30, was back in Supreme
Court yesterday as her attor-
ney sought to convince a
judge to be as lenient as possi-
ble in passing sentence on her.

Senior Justice Allen is
expected to sentence Pratt
this morning 1n connection
with the stabbing death of
Gary Leon Carey Sr.

Pratt was convicted on July
1 of manslaughter for the
death of her boyfriend of
eight years Gary Leon Carey
Sr, 54. A 12-member jury
unanimously found Pratt
guilty.

Carey, a Royal Bahamas
Defence Force officer, was
found stabbed to death in
Pratt's Minnis Subdivision
apartment off Carmichael
Road on Sunday, August 17,
2008.

According to evidence
heard at the trial, Pratt had
stabbed Carey in the chest
with a rat tail comb, but ini-
tially told police that Carey
had collapsed after taking the
male enhancement pill Via-
gra. Pratt denied that she had
intended to kill Carey.

Probation officer Matrena
Carey told the court yesterday
that her investigations had
determined that Pratt had
lacked a positive role model
growing up. She said that
Pratt had been a teen mother
and had lived in a children’s
home.

Carey said that the chal-
lenges Pratt faced led her to
abuse marijuana and alcohol.

She said that Pratt had
relied on men to support her
and had been involved in sev-
eral meaningless and abusive
relationships in her life.

Carey said that Pratt’s fami-
ly described her as having a
temper. Pratt’s attorney
Romona Farquharson told the
court that her client has
expressed remorse for Carey’s
death and asked the court to
be as lenient as possible in
passing a sentence on her.

She told the court that Pratt
and her eldest son are termi-
nally ill, and noted that Pratt
has already spent a year in
jail. Senior Justice Allen said
yesterday that she wanted to
take the night to consider the
matter before handing down
her decision.

Pratt is expected back in
court at 10 o’clock this morn-
ing.

No Sandals
union choice
on Thursday

A UNION to represent
Sandals employees will not be
chosen on Thursday as
planned after a Supreme
Court order was issued yester-
day.

Shavon Bethel, president of
the Bahamas Hotel and Main-
tenance Allied Workers
Union (BHMAWU), applied
for an Order of Stay of Exe-
cution to postpone a poll
which would decide on the
bargaining agent for Sandals
workers.

The poll would allow
employees of Sandals Royal
Bahamian to choose either
the BHMAWU or the
Bahamas Hotel Catering and
Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWU) to represent
them. It will now be held after
Mr Bethel’s action in the
Court of Appeal, concerning
leadership of the union, has
been completed.

In the ruling, Justice Jon
Isaacs ordered that leave be
granted for Mr Bethel to be
joined as third respondent in
the action, put forward by the
BHMAWJU, the applicant.
West Bay Management Ltd
(trading as Sandals Royal
Bahamian) is the first respon-
dent and the Attorney Gener-
al the second.

The judge further ruled that
the application for the stay,
ordered in the decision of Jus-

“.. We are definitely moniones this one closely.”

Basil Dean

eather experts track
ropical depression

BASIL DEAN
CENTRAL BANK REPORT

Bahamian dollar debt owed
to banks declines by $53m

People saving more in depressed economy



By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

With Bahamians request-
ing fewer loans from banks
and banks themselves approv-
ing less applications, the
amount of Bahamian dollar
debt owed to banks in the
country declined by $53 mil-
lion in the first five months
of the year, according to the
Central Bank.

Meanwhile, depressed eco-
nomic conditions and finan-
cial uncertainty saw Bahami-
ans taking a “wait and see
approach”, saving more.

“Everybody is really pro-
ceeding with caution until
things turn around and you
have a higher level of confi-
dence to venture forth,” said
Commonwealth Bank senior
vice president Denise Turn-
quest.

According to The Central
Bank’s Monthly Economic
and Financial Development
report for June 2009, a review
of local banks found that
Bahamian dollar deposits
grew by $18.5 million in the
first five months of this year,
compared with a $20 million
contraction in 2008.

This was due to a $38.3 mil-
lion build-up in fixed deposit
balances, following a $3.1 mil-
lion draw-down a year ago,
said the report.

Meanwhile, the Central
Bank stated that the fall-off
in outstanding funds owed to
banks primarily reflected a
$35.1 million downturn in
consumer credit, from growth
of $57.9 million a year ago,
and a $34 million contraction
in lending for commercial and
other purposes. Mortgage
growth was nearly halved to
$54.6 million.

Its June 2009 report,
released Friday, recorded
“notable declines” in loans
outstanding for credit cards,
private cars, travel, home
improvements and education.

This indicated that there
was more money being paid

WEATHER experts are
keeping a close eye on a trop-
ical depression which has a 50
per cent chance of develop-
ing into the season’s first
named storm over the next 36
hours.

While the tropical depres-
sion moving off the coast of
Africa weakened a bit yester-
day, Chief Meteorology Offi-
cer Basil Dean told The Tri-
bune that weather conditions
are favourable towards this
system becoming more organ-
ised in the next few days.

However, although it is
moving in a general westerly
direction in the Atlantic, it is
still too early to tell if the



“We’re looking for
better quality bor-
rowers who are
more established in
their employment.
Someone who hasn’t
been employed for a
minimum period of
time we’ve not even
considered.”

Denise Turnquest

back to banks than there are
new loans being made.

Mrs Turnquest told The
Tribune that in the case of
Commonwealth Bank, the
reduction in outstanding cred-
it is equally contributable to
the bank — like other institu-
tions globally — instituting
more stringent lending poli-
cies as to a fall off in applica-
tions for loans from Bahami-
ans seeking to buy new things.

As for whether the bank’s
lending policies may yet
become more restrictive, the
VP said this has yet to be
determined, noting that the
bank will continue to look at
how many of its loans are
being paid back and “make
adjustments as necessary.”

“Because of the economic
environment and the number
of lay offs we’re seeing, the
bank has — like I’m sure all
other banks have — reviewed
our credit policies and we’re
being more restrictive.

“We’re looking for better
quality borrowers who are
more established in their
employment. Someone who
hasn’t been employed for a
minimum period of time
we’ve not even considered.

“We'd prefer if we have an
established history with you
rather than borrowers with
whom you’d don’t have a
relationship and I think this
is something you’d see with
other banks too,” said Mrs

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islands of the Bahamas will
ultimately be in this system’s
path, he said.

“But we are definitely mon-
itoring this one closely,” Mr
Dean added.

Models

The National Hurricane
Centre (NHC) in Miami
reported yesterday that trop-
ical depression Nine-E, as it is
called now, was southwest of
the Cape Verde Islands.

At this time, all forecast
models are predicting that the
depression will curve towards
the north in the coming days.

Turnquest of the bank’s cur-
rent policy.

Meanwhile, the bank exec-
utive said she feels it is too
early to tell whether the drop
off in applications from con-
sumers for loans for things
like new cars, travel and oth-
er perhaps less essential items
will become a trend.

“T think this experience,
this current environment is
causing people to re-evaluate
their approach to borrowing,
which is a good thing.

“Whether it will cause a
long term trend of borrowing
less is very difficult to say. It
depends on how long the cur-
rent economic environment
exists and the extent of the
rebound from this.”

While consumers are get-
ting fewer new loans, the Cen-
tral Bank noted that contin-
ued strain on household
finances saw consumers
increase their use of debt con-
solidation loans, which grew
at an accelerated pace of
$34.1 million during the first
five months of the year.

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At 2pm yesterday the
depression was moving at a
speed of 12mph with maxi-
mum sustained winds of near
35mph with higher gusts.

Should the depression
become more organised and
develop into a tropical storm
it would be named Ana — the
first named storm of the 2009
Atlantic hurricane season.

By this time last year, four
named storms had already
formed in the Atlantic. Before
the start of this year’s hurri-
cane season, forecasters were
predicting 12 named storms,
with six of those expected to
develop into hurricanes.

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© fi Brief
Man accused
of robbing phone
card vendor

A 20-year-old man
accused of robbing a phone
card vendor was remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison yes-
terday after being arraigned
on two counts of armed rob-
bery.

Court dockets allege that
on Wednesday, August 5,
Kirklyn Bain, while armed
with a handgun, robbed
Lakeisha Park of five $5
phone cards, five $20 phone
cards, five $10 phone cards
and $82 in cash belonging to
the S & W phone card
booth. He is also accused of
robbing the same woman of
a maroon coloured pebble
cellular phone valued at
$300.

Bain, who was arraigned
before Magistrate Derrence
Rolle in Court 5, Bank
Lane, was not required to
enter a plea to the charge.
He was remanded to prison.
The case has been
adjourned to October 28.

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Tel: 362-5235

e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com

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THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009, PAGE 5



Have your say on any story . . . ;

rae. ‘tribune? 42. COR



Hanna-Martin hits out at
jovi over crime levels

PLP chairperson Glenys Han- :
na-Martin is hitting out at the }
government, claiming it has failed }
to make tangible efforts to }
aggressively meet and counter }
rising crime and violence levels }
in the country. :

Friday night’s murder of a }
woman who was shot in front of
her young children “culminates ;
a steady stream of violent homi- }
cide in the past several weeks in
this country,” Mrs Hanna-Mar- }
tin said. i

“The murder count now stands
at 50 and there is an increasing
sense that the level of crime is
rising in an unrelenting, unad- ;
dressed frenzy,” she said in a }
press statement. “Surely we can-
not be saying that as a nation we
accept this bloody phenomena as_ }
a natural part of our national life.
By now we would have expected

WIDE-SPREAD corruption in the
Bahamas will significantly hinder the search
for those responsible in the murder of
Welsh banker Hywell Jones, a former
Freeport port director told British media.

Speaking with the news site WalesOn-
line.co.uk, John Hincliffe, who spent almost
a decade in Freeport in the 1980s, claimed
that during his time in the Bahamas he
fought a never-ending battle against cor-
ruption and drug trafficking.

He claimed that when he recently
returned to the country he found that little
had changed in this respect.

Hywel Jones, 55, a resident in the
Bahamas was shot in the head execution
style outside the head office of his compa-

to see tangible interventions by ;

IanO ss

ny, Britannia Investment Group in

Nassau, on April 22.

He remained in a coma in hospital until
May 8 when he died of his injuries.

Police have yet to arrest anyone in con-
nection with the killing, but said they have
received some new leads that may help
advance the case.

Case

Yesterday, Assistant Commissioner Ray-
mond Gibson told The Tribune that the
case was still “under active investigation”
but added that police do not have any sus-
pects in custody.

Last week, Mr Gibson - who heads the
crime division - told another local daily

Claim that wide- spread corruption
will hinder murder investigation

that the police was following several new
leads into Mr Jones’ murder.

"Our investigations are progressing quite
well,” Mr Gibson is quoted as saying, but
he declined to provide further details. "I
can't report in depth into the investiga-
tion."

Former port director Mr Hincliffe told
the Welsh website that he believes that the
businessman’s murderer may have been a
contract killer.

He said that there is easy access to guns
in the Bahamas and people willing to use
them for payment of either money or drugs.

Mr Hincliffe said he believes the amount
of guns on the streets is now worse than it
was in the 1980s when he lived in the
Bahamas.

the government through its vari-
ous agencies and in policy for- j

mation to aggressively meet and
counter the violence and causes
of violence in this country and in
particular gun violence.”

This is what is expected of pro- }
gressive government, Mrs Hanna- }
Martin said. However, the PLP
chairperson said that no such }
energy appears to be applied or }
even foreshadowed by the gov- }
ernment in the midst of graphic ;
social deterioration. “Instead the
minister is on vacation and his }
voice cannot be heard. It appears
that the government along with :
the rest of us are simply stand- i
ing by and watching in awe asthe }
body count grows and the pain
increases when loved ones get }
the difficult call that a child has

been murdered,” she said.

Mrs Hanna-Martin is calling }
on Bahamians to voice their out- ;
rage and demand accountability }
on the part of those who have
been elected to manage the }
affairs of state and in whose :
charge the public safety has been i

placed.

The country recorded its 50th
murder for the year when Tagia :
Soles-Armony, a 29-year-old }

Bahamian who lives in St Kitts,

was shot and killed outside of her
family’s house in front of her chil-

dren and other relatives.



OPPOSITION MP Fred
Mitchell yesterday expressed
concern over allegations that
public service employees are
being “abused” by govern-
ment.

Speaking at a press confer-
ence at his office in Fox Hill,
the former minister of public
affairs warned that the cases
of many government workers
who have been dismissed
recently may end up before
the courts as the government
has reportedly failed to give
proper or sufficient notice to
these individuals.

“On a number of occasions
in the past, I have made the
complaint that the words
‘restructuring’ and ‘reform’
have come to mean firing peo-
ple,” Mr Mitchell began.

“We have seen this with the
police, immigration and more
recently with customs officers
bearing the brunt of this abuse.

“In recent days, a number
of customs officers have been
threatened with dismissal.



FRED MITCHELL speaks to
members of the media yesterday.

Some of them have come to
me as an attorney and others
have a more general com-
plaint. The complaints seem
to rest principally with the
question of due process and
delay on the part of the gov-
ernment.

“It also appears that the

government has simply made
up their minds and are not
paying attention to the
responses.

“Tt appears that a number
of these matters will end up in
the courts,” he said.

Claiming that even the dri-
vers of government ministers
are suffering — overtime pay
owed to them having report-
edly been withheld — Mr
Mitchell said that the PLP
made a special effort during
its last term in office to ensure
that all government drivers
received overtime pay in
accordance with the Employ-
ment Act.

“The government has
instead suspended overtime
for their drivers and are paying
them the lump sum of $300
per month in lieu of overtime.
This is not in accordance with
the law and there is some
unhappiness amongst some
drivers over this. But unhappy
or not, the law should be fol-
lowed.



5

“My general concerns are
that public servants ought to
be able to do their jobs with-
out fear or favour and to be
able to act with the political
neutrality of the service, and
the fact that there appears to
be a concerted effort on the



part of this administration to
stack the offices of the public
service at its management lev-
els with political operatives.

“This is not what the public
service should be and the pub-
lic should stand warned of this
practice,” he said.

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Taking issue with BTC’
‘poor service quality’

YOUNG MAN’S VIEW
N G

Evergreen Mortuary

ESCELLEMCE [N THE SEIVICE WE PRLOWIE

Far all of your Purse Service Sanda,
We evil be pled oo ere pou pith bance.

GEMALEE E PERN LP
MARAGIROPURERAL [SCTE

“aches Sanout Sout
(Uppal Aide Ate hee) Bawa, Plaka

Funeral Service For

Master Edon Foster John
Emmanuel Greene III, 2 days

will be held on Wednesday,
August 12th, 2009 at
Pilgrim Baptist Temple, St.
James Road at 11:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Bishop
Randy Fraser assisted by
Pastor Benjamin Bailey.
Interment will follow in the
Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen and Spikenard
Roads.

Edon leaves precious memories that will forever
linger in the hearts of his mother, Monique
Gordon; father, Edon Foster Greene Jr.; brothers,
Jason, Jalano uncles, De Angelo Greene,
Coyotito Greene and Zhivargo Evans;
grandmothers, Princess Greene and Joan
Gordon; grandfathers, Edon Foster Greene Sr.
and Michael Gordon; great grandparents, Mr.
John Emmanuel Greene II and Ms. Betsy Annie
Ferguson Bowe; and a host of other relatives
and friends.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at
Evergreen Mortuary on Tuesday from 1:00 p.m.
until 5:00 p.m. and again at the church on
Wednesday from 10:00a.m. until service time.



ADRIA

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

HANDS down, the
Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company (BTC) fin-
ishes in the top three as one
of the worst service
providers in the Bahamas—
public or private. No, it does
not appear that BTC is hear-
ing the cries of its many cus-
tomers—neither loudly nor
clearly—and its services are
far from ever qualifying as
second-rate.

Why is it that customers,
particularly those seeking
new services or transferring
services from one location to
another (eg, myself), are
held to ransom for weeks
before receiving services?

Frankly, I’m sick and tired
of being fleeced as BTC con-
tinues to charge ridiculous
fees for lousy services. Just
last week, while speaking to
a Cabinet minister via cell
phone, our conversation was
abruptly interrupted at least
three times by dropped calls.
Over the years, if I added up
the charges for text messages
that were sent but never
arrived to the intended recip-
ient, BTC would have reim-
bursement cheque for me
and thousands of other cell
phone customers.

Last Thursday, I contact-
ed BTC and was made to
hold on for more than an
hour while being forced to
listen to automated machines
and annoying records of peo-
ple singing BTC’s promo-
tional ads. Who exactly are
they competing against to
justify the glut of annoying
advertisements and where

















THE BAHAMAS






ELECTRICITY CORPORATION






wishes to advise



in both New Previcd
payment|s] on o

servicels|.

“2 and the Farnily islands. to rake orornpt

eccount to aveld interuption of your electicity

The public & also advised that all overdue paymenis should be mode

directy to the Corperation, Those payments can be made at the Head

Office on Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, fhe Mall at Marathon or the Main Past

Office on East Hill Street. Payment can alse be rade on SATURDAYS al

the Mall at Marathen from 8:30 am to 1 pom. Please make sure fo see a

Credit and Collections supervisor once overdue bill is poid to ensure

reconnection.

Conmumern whose account|s) ore not overdue con also make

| BS ON



are the living customer ser-
vice operators? Which mar-
ket is BTC competing for,
since we all must use their
services since they hold a
telephony monopoly? It was
so dreadful that after calling
many of the available num-
bers, I finally spoke to some-
one who admitted that she
couldn’t reach BTC’s cus-
tomer care representatives
herself—and she is a compa-
ny insider! Luckily for me,
she did provide the direct
contacts of a few represen-
tatives, one of whom—Ms
Zina Dillet FK)—was most
accommodating.

BTC is an overstaffed
company with a labour force
some of whom appear to be
too lazy to even answer the
telephone. Any serious suit-
ors seeking to purchase an
interest in the corporation
should seek to provide better
quality services by offload-
ing the company’s freeload-
ers in restructuring exercises.

BTC must know that
throngs of customers are dis-
pleased with its exorbitant
charges and poor service
quality.

Recently, the company
unceremoniously cancelled
the “free” voice mailing fea-
ture—which allowed cus-
tomers to place “voicemail
calls” if they had “no min-
utes”—under the premise
that it was clearing up the
voice channels to prevent
call failures/drops. Since the
company took that stance,
there is no evidence of
improvement.

Of late, BTC’s Vice Pres-
ident of Marketing Sales and
Business Development Mar-
lon Johnson wrote on the
company’s EZ Top-up web-
site:

“Dear Customer, Please
note that the EZ Top-Up
platform has been taken
down temporarily in order
for BTC to enhance the
security features and make
the feature more customer
friendly. We anticipate that
the new and improved EZ
Top-Up feature will be back
on-line on August 3, 2009.”

The EZ Top-up feature
did not return on August 3rd
and today it remains unavail-
able to those prepaid cus-
tomers seeking to recharge
phone cards or load minutes
on to their cell phones.

So, contrary to BTC’s
self-serving ads, EZ Top-up
is the company’s latest inno-
vation that does not work

CKD

KIA MOTORS

The Power to Surpriceâ„¢

and, contradictory to the
company’s claims, is far from
putting “connection at the
fingertips” of Bahamians.

If BTC’s services do not
improve, the moment they
are privatized and other
companies offering better
services set-up, for me and
thousands of other Bahami-
ans, it will be “bush crack,
man gone!”

NO HOME COURT
ADVANTAGE

I would be the first one in
my car, honking my horn
about Nassau’s streets of
Miss Bahamas Universe,
Kiara Sherman, is crowned
Miss Universe on August
23rd.

However, after seeing
many of the world’s mind-
blowing beauties that have
graced New Providence’s
landscape recently, not only
has my interest for the
pageant peaked at the sight
of the gorgeous ladies the
Miss Universe tidal wave has
brought in, but I’m also
acutely aware that Ms Sher-
man’s road to the top is filled
with well-prepared, interna-
tional beauties who will
make the local pageant seem
like a cake walk.

While many Bahamian
males (and some females)
are gawking at the queens
representing 80-plus coun-
tries, I encourage Ms Sher-
man to strive for excellence
and not to become intimi-
dated or complacent, as the
journey will be rough and,
quite honestly, there is no
home court advantage.

TAKING EMPLOYEES
FINGERPRINTS
With all the in-fighting
and squabbling seen in
unions of late, it is patently
obvious that unions have lost
their purpose and are no



longer relevant or as resolute
as they once were.

In recent years, it appears
that some unions are electing
grubby little ingrates, posi-
tion seekers, and tunnel-
vision headline hunters to
front office positions.

There appears to be little
interest in the members, as
these so-called leaders are
not seeking solutions to
labour issues but instead are
contributing to the ongoing
mélée consuming so many
unions.

Frankly, the unions ought
to support employers who
should seek to have the
Employment Act amended
to allow for biometric fin-
gerprint recognition of
employees, which would no
doubt save businesses thou-
sands of dollars, mitigate
against productivity losses,
deter workers from fraudu-
lently using time cards,
reduce thefts and prevent
clocking in scams.

Presently, the Employ-
ment Act of 2001 outlaws the
use of fingerprints by
Bahamian employers, except
for those in the casino indus-
try.

T understand that biomet-
ric machines do not store fin-
gerprints but instead match
the shape of hands, fingers,
eye vessels and retinas to a
mathematical algorithm. In
these gloomy economic
times, the unions should
have no problems with bio-
metric fingerprinting, as it
would undoubtedly save jobs
via a reduction in losses asso-
ciated with thefts and also
improve employee produc-
tivity.

Besides, Bahamians hap-
pily allow US Custom agents
to take their fingerprints and
scan their retinas as they
gleefully skip to Miami/Fort
Lauderdale every few weeks!

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009, PAGE 7





AG expected

to be next
chief justice

FROM page one

ommend Mr Barnett’s
appointment to Governor
General Arthur Hanna
upon his return to Nassau at
the end of his Alaskan
cruise on August 24.

If Mr Barnett takes the
position as head of the
judiciary, his resignation
from the Cabinet also will
be announced, as well as
the appointment of the
next attorney general by
the end of the month.

The chief justice is
appointed by the Prime
Minister after consulta-
tion with the leader of the
opposition. It has also
been reported that PLP
leader Perry Christie
does not agree with Mr
Ingraham’s choice and
has written a strong letter
of protest.

But Mr Christie was
not available yesterday to
confirm or deny this
report.

The appointment is
said to be controversial as
Mr Barnett would be the
second attorney general
in two years to be elevat-
ed to the high court.

Mrs Ruth Bowe-
Darville, president of the
Bahamas Bar Associa-
tion, denied the report
that she, with other mem-
bers of the Bar Council,
planned to register their
objection to Mr Barnett’s
appointment and accuse
Mr Ingraham of politicis-
ing the court.

Mrs Bowe-Darville
told The Tribune yester-
day that the report is
false as she has not been
informed or consulted
about the appointment.

The Bar Association
president said: “I haven’t
said anything to the
Prime Minister or to the
press, and the Bar Coun-
cil hasn’t instructed me to
say anything, so I don’t
even know where they
are getting it from.

“T would think the
powers that be would
make their intention clear
to me before they make
their appointment, but I
have not heard anything
so I will not comment as
yet, not until they say
something definite to
me.”

However, it is believed
that Mr Barnett has
already decided to accept
the position left vacant by
Chief Justice Sir Burton
Hall.

Justice Hall was recent-
ly nominated to become a
permanent judge of the
International Criminal
Tribunal for the former
Yugoslavia (ICTY).

Mr Barnett is a former
partner of Graham
Thompson and Co.

He was appointed to
the post of Attorney
General just over a year
ago.

He ran in the 2007 gen-
eral election as an FNM
candidate for the Fort
Charlotte constituency,
but was defeated by for-
mer Attorney General
Alfred Sears.

Armony, who is now one year old.

FROM page one

mentarians has the “guts or tes-
ticular fortitude” to carry out
capital punishment “despite the
fact it is being called for by the
Bahamian people.”

“This lady, I understand,
came here with her young baby
to surprise her mother who’s
birthday was Sunday,” said Mr
Miller, who lost his own son
Mario to a brutal murder in
2002.

“Whoever shot her pulled up
to her garage. If they wanted
to take the lady’s car, why was
it necessary to kill her? Just
because they could. Just
because they know that their
life would not be taken, just
because they know that they
will go and sit in Fox Hill
prison and live off the people of
this land because those who
were elected to run this country
don’t have the guts — none of
them — the Government or

L G
TAGIA SOLES-ARMONY, 29, with her ol

dest son Chelan

FROM page one

residents heard.

"A guy who live 'round here
told me he was outside when he
heard a girl scream. And then he
heard a gun cock, and that’s when
he knew someone was going to
get shot,” said a neighbour who
asked not to be identified.

Neighbours said the brazen gun-
man — described as a 5' 9" slim,
dark male — approached the vic-
tim after the crash to presumably
see if she was still alive, but was
scared off by people who had
come to inspect the commotion.

Neighbour Jillian Rodgers said
her 30-year-old son, who was get-
ting out of a car rear-ended in the
crash, rescued the infant whose
face was covered in his mother's
blood.

"My sister and I were sitting
inside the house when I heard the
gunshot. Then we heard two loud
crashes and a loud bang. I hung up
the phone, ran towards the front
door and saw my son hobbling
towards me with the baby,” said
Ms Rodgers, who first thought her

son was hurt in a drive-by shoot-
ing.
"The baby was screaming.
Blood was on the side of the
baby's head. We didn't know if
the baby was bleeding or what,”
she told The Tribune yesterday.

The child was not injured.

Ms Soles-Armony was attacked
at around 8 pm Friday as she was
reportedly breast-feeding her
three-month-old son in her sister's
car outside her mother's house on
Sea Grape Avenue, Sea Breeze.

When police arrived on the
scene, she was already dead.

Shards of glass, presumably
from the victim's car window, still
littered the street outside her
mother's home yesterday.

Overcome with her grief,
Tagia's mother could only say:
"She was well-loved."

Police do not have a motive for
the killing, and have appealed for
the public for information which
would help their investigation.

"We haven't established a
motive yet but we are following
significant leads," said ACP Ray-
mond Gibson.

Former minister calls for the
death penalty to be carried out

the PLP, none of them have
the guts to execute the laws of
this land.”

Mr Miller said he finds it
“extraordinary” that in 2009,
the Bahamas was still concern-
ing itself with what the Privy
Council in London has to say
about capital punishment being
carried out in the Bahamas.

“IT don’t understand for the
life of me, that the Members
of Parliament that we elect to
do the work of the people of
the Bahamas are so gutless and
spineless that none of them to
date has stepped to the plate
saying enough is enough.

“But none of them will say it
until it happens to one of their
immediate family.

“The laws are on the books.
The government of the
Bahamas has the right to hang

ee

We, the Management
and Staff of

Tile King
are deeply saddened by the tragic
accident of August 7, 2009 which

resulted in the death of one of our
beloved employees,

Mr. Jessiken
Ferguson

Employed by Tile King, Jessi was busy
unloading a shipping container using the
forklift as he was accustomed to doing

when the fatally

disastrous accident

occurred just before 10 a.m.

Jessi was a loyal and hard-working
member of the Tile King staff. He worked
in the warehouse being involved in

unloading containers and loading goods
for deliveries.

His cheerful disposition and sense of

each and every prisoner who is
sentenced to death. It is clear
what the mandate is, and yet
they play these sick political
games on the people of our
country,” he said.

With the last hanging in 2000
at Her Majesty’s Prison, those
opposed to capital punishment
maintain that the death penal-
ty has not been proven to be
an effective deterrent to vio-
lent crime.

Others submit that the
process of rehabilitation has
proved to be a disaster causing
the country’s murder count to
continually climb higher year
after year.

However, in view of all of
this, Mr Miller said the aver-

age citizen is not without blame
as well.

“As a people we have
allowed ourselves to be manip-
ulated and dictated to by those
who refuse to execute the laws
of our land.

“Tt is an utter disgrace what
we put up with in this country,”
he said.

Expressing his sympathy for
the family of Mrs Soles-Armo-
ny, Mr Miller said he and his
family know from personal
experience with the loss of his
son Mario, what the victim’s
family must be going through.

“When you butcher some-
one in that manner, you don’t
only kill her. Her husband is
now finished. Her sisters and
brothers, her poor mother and
father are finished as human
beings. All they can do now is
wait for death to take them out

Sy

—

LOCAL NEWS
——— o ] J

Early reports indicate Ms
Armony, who had just returned
home with her infant son and one-
year-old son to visit her mother,
may have been the victim of mis-
taken identity.

While he declined to release
any details about the case, ACP
Gibson said police think Ms
Armony'’s attack was an isolated
incident.

"The most I can say is we don't
think it (her shooting) was a
trend," he said.

Tagia, who lived in St Kitts with
her husband Kachi Armony, was
reportedly in town for a few days
to celebrate her mother's birth-
day.

She reportedly spent the after-
noon at the mall with her two
younger sisters and two sons. The
young girls and Ms Armony's
elder son had just got out of the
car to knock on the front door of
the family home, when the victim
was shot.

Her husband, a St Kitts busi-
nessman and radio show co-host,
reportedly flew to her family’s side
after her murder.

of this world so they can rejoin
her again.

“People don’t understand
the destruction that takes place
in the entire family life when
one is butchered the way this
woman was butchered. I can
tell you from my personal expe-
rience with my son Mario. They
destroy your life, and all you
want to do is destroy them and
they have a right to destroy
them for what they have done
to that young lady.

“And you know why they
did it? Because they know they
can get away with it because
they know that the gutless
spineless ones that you sent to
Parliament; none of them has
the guts or the testicles to do
the right thing. Not a god-
damned one. None! And I
blame them all. FNM and PLP
alike.”

a

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CR SNMC

The police are
tight-lipped on
‘serial rapist
FROM page one

which was said to have
received the majority of the
calls reporting the attacks
said the extra patrols were
primarily part of an effort
to reduce the number of
housebreakings occurring
in the eastern area.

Meanwhile, rather than
police having pushed for the
clearance of bushy areas
around the area as they
seek to find evidence that
may have been hidden by
the attacker, Supt Deveaux
suggested that the clearing
of bush was a “community
initiative” that was unrelat-
ed to the rapes.

We wish to offer to his loving brother,
Mr. Kevin Ferguson, his two children
and the entire family our deepest and
sincere sympathies on their, and our, great
loss.

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THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS

Meacher ‘Pain’ Major’s
Back-to-School Bash

BAHAMAS lightweight
champion Meacher “Pain”
Major took a break from his
training schedule to host a
Back-to-School Bash on Sat-
urday. The event was held in
Strachan’s Alley off Kemp
Road where Major grew up.
He decided to give back to
the community that has stood
by his side during his climb
from the amateur to the pro-
fessional ranks.

Major, who recently
received a No. 15 ranking in
the World Boxing Organisa-
tion, said it’s important at this
time of the year to remember
the many young people in his
community who look up to
him. He congratulated all of
the persons who joined in as
sponsors and all who helped
out with the activities, includ-
ing a hoola hoop contest and
potato sack race, that were
staged during the day.

The Back-to-School bash is
one of the annual events that
Major puts on in the commu-
nity. Another is the basket-
ball tournament that was held
earlier this year.





































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FROM page 11

“And he was an unsung
hero because although much
credit was given to me, a lot
of the success I achieved with
the Bain Town Flyers, I col-
laborated it with him. He also
helped to send off hundreds
of athletes to school.”

Wisdom said it’s a difficult
time for their family because
they have been in mourning
over the last few years with
deaths in the Wisdom,
Roberts, Johnson and
Williams families, all of whom

“But we still trust God and
we know that anything he
does is well done,” he said.
“That’s the faith that we oper-
ate with and so we are putting
all of our trust in him.”

The late Wisdom’s son,
Jason, said his dad played a
major role in his life and he
will definitely be missed
because he made sure that he
participated in all of the major
functions in his life.

“JT didn’t participate in
track, but bowling was my
sport,” said Jason Wisdom,
whose performance in the

enabled him to make the
Tournament of Americas in
Florida in the 1992.

“Dad was a big support for
me in that. So I was glad that
he was around to be a sup-
port for me in that regard.”

Although he was a sports
fanatic, Jason said during the
latter stages of his life, his
father spent a great deal of
time talking about politics.

The late Wisdom was a life-
long supporter of the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party. He was
elevated to the position of
stalwart councilor.

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS

Five Jamaican
alhiletes cleared
of doping

By ANTHONY FOSTER
Associated Press Writer

KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP) —
Five Jamaican athletes were cleared
Monday of doping at their national
championships two months ago
after the country's anti-doping pan-
el failed to determine whether the
banned substance was on the pro-
hibited list.

The athletes reportedly tested
positive for the stimulant methyl-
hexanamine. But Kent Gammon,
chairman of the Jamaica Anti-Dop-
ing Commission's disciplinary com-
mittee, said it was unable to prove
they had breached any doping pol-

"Therefore, we have not found
any of the athletes in violation of
the (anti-doping) code," Gammon
said.

The athletes had previously been
identified as Yohan Blake, Sheri-
Ann Brooks, Allodin Fothergill,
Lansford Spence and Marvin
Anderson.

The athletes are now cleared to
compete in the world champi-
onships in Berlin, but the Interna-
tional Association of Athletics Fed-
erations — track and field's gov-
erning body and organiser of the
worlds — could review the ruling.

The IAAF can challenge any
judgments in the Court of Arbitra-
tion for Sport, world sport's highest
court of appeal, based in Lausanne,
Switzerland. The IAAF can also
provisionally suspend athletes until
the CAS delivers a verdict.

The anti-doping panel started its
hearing last week. None of the five
athletes are considered among
Jamaica's top talent, but the positive
tests were a blow to a nation that
takes great pride in the accom-
plishments of its sprinters.

Monday's announcement came
after Jamaica's Amateur Athletic
Association warned another five
athletes that they would be barred
from the worlds if they did not
attend a training camp this week.

Those athletes included 100-
meter Olympic champion Shelly-
Ann Fraser and Asafa Powell, a for-
mer 100 world-record holder. The
others are 400 hurdles Olympic gold
medalist Melaine Walker, hurdler
Brigitte Foster-Hylton and sprinter
Shericka Williams.

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THE Bahamas placed
seventh out of 25 countries
at the US Junior Open —
the most prestigious junior
tournament in the Pan
American region.

Bahamian athletes won
five medals (four bronze
and one silver). The silver
was won by nine-year-old
Lyle Sherman and the four
bronze medals by 14-year-
old Myriael Newry, Peter
Deveaux Isaacs, 13, Dorne
Albury, 10, and 12-year-
old Matthew Rahming.
The Bahamas sent a 15-
member team and many
of the athletes won match-
es.
Judo is an Olympic
sport where matches are
won by throwing the
opponent to his back or
pinning his back to the
ground for 25 seconds.

It is one of the most
widely practiced sports in
the world and has been an
Olympic sport since 1964.
It has grown in popularity
in the Bahamas because it
teaches self discipline, con-
fidence and self defense.

“T was so happy because
this is my first internation-
al tournament,” said 12-
year-old Matthew Rah-
ming.

Neville Munnings, ref-
eree/director, who went
with the team to the tour-
nament, said: “We are
very proud of all of the
children. This was a tough
tournament with some
great competition. Our
kids raised to the chal-
lenge and did the country
proud.”

Said 2004 US Olympian
Rhadi Bullard Ferguson,
who was head coach for
the delegation: “I am
pleased with the results
and eager to assist the
Bahamas in turning its
judo programme into a
world class programme.
We have made great
progress in a short time,
but more work lies
ahead."

Later this month, Fer-
guson is scheduled to
accompany judo athletes
Cynthia Rahming and
Alex Martinborough to
the World Cadet Champi-
onships in Budapest, Hun-

gary.



THE TRIBUNE

Sp

PAGE



I

UESDAY, AUGUST 11,

ts

2009

For the best sporting action . . .

www. tribune242. o——

Coach
Gerald
Wisdom
dies at 62

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net net

THE life of
the late Gerald
“Jerry” Lloyd
Wisdom will
be remem-
bered as an
extraordinary
athlete, coach,
mentor and
historian, but
one who never
received any
national
acclaim for his
achievement.

Wisdom, 62, passed away on
Saturday at the Princess Margaret
Hospital. He will be buried 10am
Saturday after a funeral service at
Faith United Baptist Church
where he will be eulogized by
Rev Dr William Thompson.

The accolades were pouring in
yesterday from the track and field
fraternity about the sprinter/long
jumper who represented the
Bahamas at the Olympic Games
in Mexico City in 1968.

Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations (BAAA) pub-
lic relations officer Kermit Taylor
sent out condolences from the
executive board, many of whom
are in Berlin for the 12th IAAF
World Championships.

“Jerry and I used to be room-
mates,” said businessman/politi-
cian Leslie Miller, who got Jerry,
along with Willie Moss and the
late Tommy Thompson, full four-
year scholarships from 1967-71
to go to Texas El Paso, known
back then as Texas Western.

“He was one of our top 100
and 200 sprinters. He was a very
fine individual and I mourn his
passing and offer my condolences
to his family and his extended
family, the athletes who would
have known Gerry. He had a
good career in track and field.
He certainly made a contribu-
tion.”

As a sprinter, Miller said Wis-
dom was called upon by the
coaching staff and did a very
good job as a member of the
relay team, which also included
former world record holder Bob
Beamon, who expressed his con-
dolences on behalf of his family.

Wayne Weindenburg, who
served as the head track and field
coach at Texas Western, also
offered his condolences to the
Wisdom family that includes his
wife Linda, son Jason, daughter-
in-law Janua, two grand-children
Raquel and Joshua, three broth-
ers Neville, Keith and Evon,
three sisters-in-law Manita, Sonya
and Yudenia and three step-chil-
dren Owen, Danielle and Robin.

Neville Wisdom, the former
Minister of Youth, Sports and
Culture, said all that he achieved
during his tenure as a track and
field coach with the Baintown
Flyers, he owes it all to his older
brother Gerry.

“Jerry was my best friend. We
grew up together. We were very
close,” the former minister said.
“He was actually the first athlete
I coached, even though he was a
little older than I was.

“JT just used to love to see him
perform. He was a high school
champion and he went on to
become an Olympian. He and
Leslie Miller represented the
Bahamas with their team-mate
Bob Beamon at the 1968 Mexi-
can Olympics. Bob had the best
jump, but Jerry was right there.”

Aside from his prowess on the
track, Wisdom said his brother
was a walking encyclopedia off
the track.

“He was one of the most
knowledgeable and experienced
sports personalities,” he said. “I
often contacted him for advice
and information. He was always
right.

SEE page 9

Gerald Wisdom






Meacher
Majot’s
Back-to-

School Bash...
See page 9

Pro golfers earn trip
to World Cup qualifier

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

duo of Bahamian
golf pros earned the
right to represent
the country at a
series of qualifying
events and continue their trek
toward the sport’s World Cup.

Keno Turnquest and Lemon
Gorospe emerged from a field of
nine golfers last weekend at a quali-
fying event hosted by Lyford Cay
Golf Club.

Turnquest shot a combined score
of 151 to lead the group, while
Gorospe shot a 154.

The team will now have more than
two months of preparation before
they head to the Nations Cup -
Omega Mission Hills Qualifier.

The event is set to be hosted Sep-
tember 21-25 at the Caracas Country
Club, with spots for the Omega Mis-




































sion Hills World Cup on the line.

Turnquest is a former Bahamas
Professional Golfers Association
national champion, and has a résumé
which includes being a multi-junior
national champion, representing the
Bahamas at a previous World Cup
event, being a former member of the
Hoerman Cup team and playing on
the collegiate scene for five years.

Gorospe is also a former junior
national champion, Hoerman Cup
team member, former junior college
champion in North Carolina and he
has played for years on the pro cir-
cuit.

Both golfers will be making their
third trip to the World Cup Qualify-
ing event, and have previously
teamed up in 2007.

Gorospe qualified for the tourna-
ment last year with BPGA president
Chris Lewis.

Turnquest said his third tourna-
ment qualification looks to be the
most effective thus far because of

the extended preparation time the
team has headed into the event.

“Tt was a very good feeling to qual-
ify again,” he said. “I think we have
a strong team this year and for one of
the first times we have time and an
opportunity to practice and fully pre-
pare ourselves for competition and
that preparation will be vital for us.”

With more than two months until
he and Gorospe compete in Cara-
cas, Turnquest expects the team to
deliver an impressive showing.

“In the past we have never really
had time to work together which is
crucial because it is a team event.
We get to work on our games togeth-
er, develop a team chemistry, work
on how we complement each oth-
er,” he said.

“One person can not win and it
obviously has to be a team effort so
with this time we have to work
together and work on our weak-
nesses...I think it will make all the
differences in years past.”



KENO TURNQUEST, BPGA president
Chris Lewis (centre) and Lemon Gorospe

(right)

Stubbs,
Mackey
don’t
make
top 10

BAHAMIAN professional
bodybuilders and training
partners Joel Stubbs and Jena
Mackey (not shown) com-
peted in the International
Bodybuilding Federation’s
2009 Tampa Pro Tournament
in Florida over the weekend.

However, neither of them
finished in the top 10.

Stubbs, competing in the
men’s heavyweight division,
was 12th overall with 180
points. The winner was Den-
nis James of Germany with
20, followed by Fouad Abiad
of Canada with 40. Antoher
Canadian Ben Pakulski was
third with 61.

The top three competitors
qualified to compete in the
2009 Mr Olympia, scheduled
for September 24-27 in Las
Vegas.

Mackey, competing in the
women’s heavyweight divi-
sion, was 11th overall.

The title was won by Betty
Pariso, who led an American
sweep with Gale Frankie as
the runner-up and Tina
Chandler who placed third.



PAGE 12, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

Protection of the environment 'of
primary concern’ in harbour project

BY KATHRYN CAMPBELL





HEALTH, safety and protection of the environment "are of pri-
mary concern” during the Nassau Harbour and Arawak Cay port
works, project manager with Boskalis International BV Frans
Thomassen assured government officials.

"It is the responsibility of everyone on the site," he said during
a tour of the project last Friday.

The general scope of work includes dredging Nassau Harbour,
sheet pile extension and reclamation works on Arawak Cay, and
installation of mooring dolphins at Prince George Wharf.

“To protect the environment, we are using the highest standards
ever seen in any project around the country,” said Public Works
Minister Neko Grant.

“The alarms that were raised regarding the environment were
without merit. In time we will see that we chose the right contractor
who is making every effort to ensure the environment is not dam-
aged.”

Project Manager Mr Thomassen assured government officials
that the project would be executed as if it were in an “environ-
mentally sensitive area.”

He outlined several environmental considerations that are
required of the project team during the project. Dredging is expect-
ed to be completed by November.

All equipment is checked for leaks before use, Mr Thomassen
said. Any leak is cleaned up immediately utilising the emergency
response spill kits available on the vessels and placed at strategic
locations around the site during the dredging activities. Leaks are
reported to the project manager.

Waste is never to be thrown overboard and use of the designated
waste skips located around the various working areas is mandatory,
he said. Equipment is switched off when not is use; the use of silt - - -
screens in certain locations along the beach is mandatory; water | PROJECT Manager with Boskalis International BV Frans Thomassen makes a point as he leads government officials on a tour of the
clarity level are monitored twice a day; marine animals are notto Arawak Cay construction site. Pictured from left are Public Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant; acting director of Works Gordon

be disturbed; and bunker fuel is permitted only in designated — Major: project engineer Robert Garraway; permanent secretary Colin Higgs, and Environment Minister the Earl Deveaux.
areas and according to agreed procedures with Port Authority, Mr

Thomassen explained.

He emphasised that regulations stipulate that accidents, inci-
dents, near misses, damage to property and quality deviations are
to be reported to management by all personnel on site, including
visitors.

Among the officials touring the site last Friday were Minister
Grant; Environment Minister Earl Deveaux; permanent secre-
tary at the Ministry of Works Colin Higgs; permanent secretary at
the Ministry of the Environment Ronald Thompson; acting direc-
tor of Works Gordon Major; director of the Bahamas Environment
Science and Technology (BEST) Commission Philip Weech and
project engineer Robert Garraway.

Prior to the tour the team underwent a 20-minute safety and
induction exercise, a mandatory requirement by contractor Boskalis
International BV and sub-contractor American Bridge Bahamas
for entry to the sites and vessels.



GOVERNMENT project engineer on

the Nassau Harbour Port Improve-

ment Project Robert Garraway gives

government ministers an update on

the plans for the extension of Arawak
Cay during a tour of the site on August 7. Pictured
from left are Mr Garraway, Environment Minister
Earl Deveaux; Project Manager with Boskalis Inter-
national BV Frans Thomassen and Public Works
and Transport Minister Neko Grant.

(BIS photos/Patrick Hanna)

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init



SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

tel employment numbers
ould increase next year



By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

ahamian hotels could

see employment num-

bers increase in the

first three months of

2010 after a 20 per
cent contraction in tourism sector
this year, according to the Bahamas
Hotel Association President.

It is also thought that the need
for previously seen numbers in the
industry has been drastically
changed by the recession.

Robert Sands, who is also a senior
executive with Baha Mar, said in the
midst of the global economic
decline, hotels have adapted to run-
ning operations with reduced staff.

However, according to him, fluc-
tuations in employment numbers
have always been, and will continue
to be, driven by visitor numbers.
And the industry has just entered

the traditionally slow season for the
year, curtailed minimally by the Miss
Universe pageant.

"There is no question in my mind
that hotels are learning to work bet-
ter with less, but an increase in busi-
ness demand, by necessity, will
demand labour," said Mr Sands.

"T can't say that all the labour that
has been release will be replaced.

"The reality is that there has been
some downsizing in out sector in the
last 12 months, so there is already
downward pressure on head counts
in our business."

Mr Sands said employment num-
bers could increase between January
and March of next year, but added
that until the economy and tourism
regains the strength it once had, the
industry will not see employment
levels where they once were.

"Business is like an accordion and
that accordion is almost com-
pressed," he said.

"We need to give it some new life



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“There is no question in my
mind that hotels are learning

to work better with less, but an
increase in business demand, by

necessity, will demand labour.”
— BHA president Robert Sands

and hopefully new life will come -
certainly during this period I don't
see it happening.

"T think we won't see any real
demand for stimulating additional
employment until winter of next
year."

He said the decline in the industry
is evident by the number of layoffs
and resort closures seen snowballing
since year end 2008.

"Employment levels match busi-
ness demand," said Mr sands.

Baha Mar will be closing its Wyn-
dham resort on Monday, August 17,
with the reopening scheduled for
October 5.

According to Mr Sands, plans to
close the hotel had been talked
about 12 months prior, and employ-
ees were notified to take their vaca-
tions during that time.

Cable Bahamas
extends deadline
for preference
share offering

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

CABLE Bahamas has
extended the deadline for its
non-voting cumulative
redeemable convertible pref-
erence share offering because
some interested purchasers
have not been able to acquire
them, according to sources
close to the Cable Bahamas
buyout.

According to a release
issued by the Bisx-listed cable
company: "The Board of
Directors of Cable Bahamas
Ltd wishes to announce that
the closing date for the Series
Four 8%, non-voting cumula-
tive redeemable convertible
preference share offering has
been extended to August 31,
2009."

Sources told Tribune Busi-
ness the company wished to
give those interested buyers a
chance to purchase shares, as
many individuals the company
knew had shown interest were
on holidays.

"There has been substan-
tial interest and it (the pref-
erence share offering) was
well received,” the source
said.

The $80million buyout of

its controlling shares will put
in place the structure that
deals with our financing for
the next three to four years",
Cable Bahamas’ president,
Anthony Butler, told Tribune
Business recently.

He said the company’s buy-
back of its majority share-
holder’s stake would “position
us well to take advantage of
the opportunities” stemming
from the government’s dereg-
ulation/liberlisation of the
Bahamian communications
market, through removing any
issues surrounding ‘foreign
ownership’ of Cable Bahamas.

The purchase is being
financed through the combi-
nation of a $40million prefer-
ence share issue, a $105mil-
lion senior bank credit facility
and Cable Bahamas’ own
working capital. The BISX-
listed firm is raising for more
than the $80million it needs
to finance the Columbus pur-
chase because it wants to refi-
nance its existing credit facili-
tates at the same time.

“We’re basically refinanc-
ing our existing credit facili-
ties,” Mr Butler told Tribune
Business, adding that the com-
pany’s existing credit line was
around $28 million according
to his last recollection.

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EPA seminar attracts more than
150 professional service providers

THE SMESU Trade Unit
of The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce in partnership
with the Caribbean Regional
Negotiation Machinery
(CRNM), and the Grand
Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce recently hosted a two-
day seminar to highlight the
benefits and opportunities
that are available to profes-
sional service providers
through the European Part-
nership Agreement (E.P.A.).
Seminars were held both in
New Providence and Grand
Bahama.

Over the two days, the sem-
inar attracted more than 150
professional service providers
aiming to expose and inform
them of the opportunities for
market access to the Euro-

pean Union (EU).

These benefits and rights
of access for Bahamian ser-
vices providers are a result of
the now concluded negotia-
tions for the Economic Part-
nership Agreement (EPA).
The seminar attracted a
diverse group of participants,
which is indicative of the wide
reach of those persons that
stand to benefit and be
impacted by this Agreement.

Minister of State for
Finance and the Public Ser-
vice, Zhivargo Laing opened
the seminar at the British
Colonial Hilton and wel-
comed the representatives
from the CRNM. He com-
mended the Chamber for
hosting such a seminar, noting
that the Bahamian business

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community needs to be edu-
cated on the impact that the
EPA will have on the way
they do business and the
opportunities that are being
created.

The session in Nassau was
also attended by leading
lawyers, including the chair
of the Bahamas Trade Com-
mission, John Delaney and
Frank Comito, Executive
Director of the Bahamas
Hotel Association.

The seminar was facilitat-
ed by Ramesh Chaitoo, Head
of the Services Trade Unit of
the CRNM and Noel Watson,
Trade Consultant to the
CRNM.

Seminar participants were
provided with a general
overview of the professional

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



services element of the agree-
ment and the opportunities
for further development of

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS ee
McDonald’s July same-store sales rise 4.3%

By BETSY VERECKEY
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) —McDon-
ald's Corp. said Monday its same-
store sales climbed 4.3 per cent in
July, as the nation's biggest ham-
burger chain benefited from bud-
get-conscious consumers and wide
promotion of new coffee drinks.

The Oak Brook, Ill., company
said US same-store sales climbed
2.6 per cent because of new prod-
ucts, including McCafe espresso-
based coffee.

European same-store sales
surged 7.2 per cent, helped by
growth in France and the UK.

Same-store sales for Asia Pacific,
the Middle East and Africa rose
2.1 per cent, as strength in Aus-
tralia helped offset weakness in
China. Longer operating hours also
boosted sales.

Deutsche Bank analyst Jason
West, who rates the stock "Buy,"
said the third quarter "is off to a
good start” but maintained his
earnings-per-share estimate of
$1.10.

McDonald's same-store sales, or

sales at restaurants open at least 13
months, are a key indicator of per-
formance because they measure
growth at existing restaurants rather
than newly opened ones.

Total sales declined 0.3 per cent
because of currency translation.

McDonald's shares rose $1.07, or
1.9 per cent, to close at $56.27 Mon-
day.

Many companies that sell their
products abroad convert sales from
foreign currencies back to dollars
when reporting financial results.
When the dollar is stronger than
those currencies, it results in fewer
dollars in revenue.

McDonald's results have bene-
fited from consumers trading down
to cheaper meal options amid the
recession, but its second-quarter
profit declined eight per cent
because of the stronger dollar and a
year-ago gain. Year-ago results also
benefited from a better economy
and stimulus checks, the company
said.

McDonald's, which has at least
32,000 restaurants worldwide, plans
to release August same-store sales
on September 9.

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SHOWN (I-r) are Gershan Major, first vice president, Chamber of Commerce, Khaalis Rolle, Chamber president, Philip Simon, executive
director, Chamber of Commerce, Ramesh Chaitoo, head of the Services Trade Unit, CRNM, Hank Ferguson, director, Chamber of Com-

merce SMESU Trade Unit, Noel Watson, trade consultant, CRNM, and John Delaney, chairman of the Bahamas Trade Commission

IS

52wk-Low
1.28
10.00
6.25
0.63
3.15
2.14
10.18
2.74
5.50
1.27
1.32
6.60
10.00
10.30
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.39
10.00

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

Focol Class B Preference

ROYAL @ FIDELITY

Maney at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 10 AUGUST 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,564.59] CHG 8.48 | %CHG 0.54 | YTD -147.77 | YTD % -8.63
FINDEX: CLOSE 779.58 | YTD -6.62% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Previous Close Today's Close
1.34 1.34
11.00 11.00
6.25 6.25
0.63 0.63
3.15 3.15
2.37 2.37
11.35 11.35
2.74 2.74
5.60 5.76
3.48 3.85
1.82 1.82
6.60 6.60
10.63 10.63
10.30 10.30
5.13 5.13
1.00 1.00
0.30 0.30
5.49 5.49
10.39 10.39
10.00 10.00

Change

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.16
0.37
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b

52wk-Low Security

Symbol Last Sale

Change

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

52wk-Low
14.25
6.00
0.20

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $

8.42
6.25
0.40

Last Price

14.60
6.00
0.35

Daily Vol.

Weekly Vol.

EPS $

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

CI:e7 Lc IN TA

Div $
0.127
0.992
0.244

-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

ases)

Interest
7%
Prime + 1.75%
7%
Prime + 1.75%

EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

10.6
11.1
25.6
N/M
40.4
43.1
8.1
11.0
13.7
34.7
7.6
15.7
33.0
13.0
15.5
N/M
8.6
13.5
10.9
55.6

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

P/E
N/M
N/M

256.6

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3860 2.40 4.75
2.9047 -1.20 -3.66
1.4817 3.35 5.38
3.1031 -8.35 -13.82
12.9801 2.87 5.79
101.6693 1.10 1.67
96.7398 0.35 -4.18
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.2765 2.00 -2.98
1.0622 2.56 6.22
1.0243 -0.84 2.43
1.0585 2.04 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

52wk-Low
1.3231
2.8952
1.4059
3.1031
12.3289
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
30-Jun-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
KS1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Mime iimie



EPA, from page 1B

trade in services between The
Bahamas, the members of
Cariforum and the EU. The
presenters are rated among
the best in region. Mr Chaitoo
was the lead negotiator for
services during the three years
of EPA negotiations.

Hank Ferguson, Director
of the Chamber of Com-
merce’s SMESU Trade Unit,
noted: “We are grateful for
the support of the Grand
Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce and were fully sup-
ported by the Minister of
State for Finance and The
Bahamas Trade Commis-
sion.”

“We were also particularly
happy to be able to take this
seminar, which is partially
funded by a grant from the
Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB) to the island of
Grand Bahama. This engage-
ment enabled the private sec-
tor there to be engaged in this
important national discus-
sion.”

The facilitators spoke to
architects, engineers, lawyers,
tour operators and other
Bahamian service providers
on the benefits and opportu-
nities for Bahamians to do
business in Europe.

As the Head of the Services
Trade Unit at the CRNM, Mr
Chaitoo researches and analy-
ses bilateral, regional and
multilateral trade policy issues
and advises Caribbean gov-
ernments on negotiating
strategies and options regard-
ing services. He was respon-
sible for services and invest-
ment negotiations in the Eco-
nomic Partnership Agree-
ment (EPA) between CARI-

FORUM states and the Euro-
pean Union. Chaitoo is a
graduate of Carleton Univer-
sity, Cambridge University
and the University of the
West Indies.

Mr Chaitoo urged the
Bahamas follow the lead of
its Caribbean counterparts
and form a Coalition of Ser-
vice Industries saying: “The
Bahamian private sector
needs to be better organized
to take advantage of the
opportunities being presented
through the EPA. Profes-
sional service providers not
represented by an Associa-
tion will have a difficult time
being recognized by govern-
ments and export develop-
ment companies.”

He encouraged business
persons to continue to edu-
cate themselves on the details
of the EPA, citing resources
like the CRNM’s website as
informative tools.

Noel Watson is Chairman
of A-Z Information Jamaica
Limited, which is a consult-
ing and information firm
operating in the Caribbean.

His consultancy work on
the removal of restrictions to
the free movement of services
and capital was important to
the establishment of the
CARICOM Single Market
that officially came into being
in early 2006. He received a
PhD in economics from
Simon Fraser University in
Canada.

When asked what he’d like
seminar participants to take
away from the event, a pas-
sionate Watson exclaimed,
“Bahamians ought to take
action now. Take advantage
of the window of opportunity
in the European market
now.”





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009, PAGE 3B





Cigar shops fret
over higher taxes
and smoking laws

By ALAN SAYRE
AP Business Writer

NEW ORLEANS (AP) —
With the world becoming
ever less welcoming for tobac-
co smoke of all kinds, the
owners of specialty shops that
sell premium cigars have con-
verged on New Orleans with
the same concerns as mass-
market cigarette manufactur-
ers — higher taxes and anti-
smoking laws.

The cigars at the annual
trade show of the Interna-
tional Premium Cigar & Pipe
Retailers Association are not
the packaged stogies found in
an isolated corner of a con-
venience store. These are
hand-rolled smokes — some-
times with Cuban seed tobac-
co grown in a non-embargoed
country — that can go from a
couple of bucks to $30 each.

“It’s tough,” said Chris
McCalla, legislative director
for Columbus, Ga.-based
IPCRA, which represents
about 1,500 tobacco stores.
“People view us in the same
category of cigarettes. With a
cigar, it’s different. It’s a plea-
surable experience. It’s social-
ization of sorts.”

Mark Twain once said he
always tried not to smoke two
cigars at once. Winston
Churchill smoked cigars in
peacetime and wartime. A
cigar was more than just a
prop for Groucho Marx. John
F Kennedy enjoyed puffing
— although he barred the
import of Cuban cigars during
his showdowns with another
cigar aficionado, Fidel Cas-
tro, who later claimed to have
quit smoking. And, in mod-
ern times, Rush Limbaugh
often associates himself with a
premium cigar.

“The cigar continues to
have a unique place in the
hearts of a lot of men,” said
Norm Sharp, president of the
Cigar Association of America,
a Washington, D.C.-based
trade group of distributors
and manufacturers. “There
are a lot of aficionados out
there.”

And many detractors,
including the American Can-
cer Society, which has said
that cigars — as well as pipes
— are not a safe substitute
for cigarettes and carry much
of the same cancer risk.

IPCRA estimates there are
12 to 13 million cigar smokers
in the United States, who puff
an average of two a week,
ranging from several a day to
the special-event-only smok-
er, McCalla said.

When Congress hiked ciga-
rette taxes earlier this year,

ELECTRIC

state

WATER HEATERS

UNDER
COUNTER

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

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VARIOUS CIGARS are displayed at the 77th annual trade show of the International Premium Cigar & Pipe



Retailers Association in New Orleans on Saturday...

cigars did not escape the
attention of lawmakers, who
imposed a tax increase
between about five cents and
40 cents per cigar. The indus-
try now fears that state legis-
latures, many of which are
trying to close big budget
gaps, will follow suit.

“Tobacco is considered
low-hanging fruit for taxa-
tion,” Sharp said.

And cigars are among the
active targets for anti-smoking
groups.

Although only Delaware,
Washington state and Utah
ban puffing in tobacco estab-
lishments, the city of Galve-
ston, Texas, recently passed
a clean air ordinance that for-
bids smoking in a planned cig-
ar lounge — a store that pro-
vides a room for cigar-lovers
to visit and enjoy their tobac-
co.
Owner Charlie Head, who
plans to open September 1
after his previous store was
wiped out by Hurricane Ike,
said it’s ridiculous to think
people who don’t smoke
would even come inside his
business, which includes lock-
ers for smokers to store their
cigars and liquor they bring
in. “We’re going ahead with
it,” Head said. “But a big part
of our business is locker
rental.”

Head said he hoped to win
an exemption for his shop
before the ban takes effect on
January 1.

Even before the spread of
cigarette smoking bans, cig-
ars and pipes received a chilly

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reception in many places. Air-
liners that used to permit cig-
arettes wouldn’t allow cigars
and pipes. And many smok-
ing bars today are actually cig-
arette-only bars — don’t light
up that cigar or pipe, a sign
often says.

As a result, cigar smoking
has become largely a private
activity, McCalla said, with
the cigar lounge or cigar bar a
popular gathering place.

“Most cigar smokers would
like to sit down comfortably
and smoke with others,” he
said.

The recession has cut into
business, said Doug Winston,
manager of the New Orleans
Cigar Co., a 700-square-foot
store in the downtown district.
To start with, go-outside-to-
smoke rules are making short-
er cigars more popular.

“With the tax and the econ-
omy, people also seem to be
going to the lesser-expensive
cigars,” Winston said.

As for the convention itself,
which is hosting about 4,000
people through Wednesday,
smoking will be allowed in the
exhibit hall between 10am
and Spm. But members of the
public aren’t invited to the
meeting — and no one under
18 will be let in, McCalla said.

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PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, VIRGINIA CAROLYN
KESTER of Lyford Cay in the Western District
of New Providence, intend to change the name to GIA
VIRGINIA CAROLYN KESTER. |i there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication
of this notice.

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The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd, (BTC) is
pleased fo invite Tenders fo provide the Company with
Motor Insurance coverage.

Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender Specifi-

cation from the Security's Desk located in the Administra-

tive building on John F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours
of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

The deadline for submission of fenders is on or before
Friday, August 2st, 2009. Tenders should be sealed and
marked “TENDER FOR MOTOR INSURANCE" and should be
delivered to the attention of the “Mr. |. Kirk Griffin, Acting

President and CEO,”

BIC reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.

wwwbtcbahamas.com



PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Atlantic City casino revenues down 12.7%

By WAYNE PARRY

Associated Press Writer

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J.
(AP) —Atlantic City's casi-
no revenues were all wet dur-
ing a rainy July that kept gam-
blers away.

The city’s 11 casinos won
$383 million in July, a 12.7 per
cent decline from a year ago.

Slot revenue was $266.8 mil-
lion, down 12.4 per cent, while
table games revenue was
$116.2 million, down 13.4 per
cent.

The city is in the midst of a
third straight year of declining
revenues that started when
slots parlors began opening
in neighbouring Pennsylvania
in November 2006. The reces-

W EWC

HOME & BUSINESS 4 ZONES ALARM
SPECIAL $299.00 INSTALLED

sion also has made gamblers
keep a tighter hold on their
wallets.

For the first seven months
of this year, Atlantic City casi-
nos won $2.3 billion, down
14.9 per cent from the same
period in 2008.

Only one casino, the Trump
Taj Mahal Casino Resort,
posted an increase in revenue
last month, up 8.7 per cent.

Mark Juliano, CEO of
Trump Entertainment
Resorts, said the heavy invest-
ment the company made in
its flagship property is paying
off; it opened a second hotel
tower last year, adding nearly
800 new rooms.

"Where we spend the most
time and effort, we're getting
the biggest and best results,”
he said.

For all of 2009 so far, the

Taj Mahal has posted the best
performance in Atlantic City,
down just 2.5 per cent. That's
twice as good as the perenni-
al market leader, the Borgata
Hotel Casino & Spa, which is
down 5.2 per cent year-to-
date.

Trump

Trump Entertainment
recently chose Donald Trump
and Dallas-based Beal Bank
to buy it out of bankruptcy
court for $100 million. Bond-
holders say they'll try to block
the deal, which would leave
them with nothing. A deci-
sion is due in late October.

Trump Plaza Hotel and
Casino posted the biggest
decline, down 27.6 per cent.

The third Trump casino,
Trump Marina Hotel Casino,

was down 14.2 per cent. A
deal fell apart in June in
which a former protege of
Donald Trump, Richard
Fields, was to buy the casino
and rebrand it as Margari-
taville in conjunction with
singer Jimmy Buffett.

Two casinos beset by
labour strike also fared par-
ticularly poorly in July. Cae-
sars Atlantic City and Bally's
Atlantic City have been pick-
eted by the United Auto
Workers, which has taken out
billboard, print and broadcast
advertisements urging gam-
blers to play elsewhere. The
union is protesting the casi-
nos’ failure to sign contracts
with workers more than two
years after dealers voted to
unionize.

Caesars was down 19.7 per
cent, and Bally's was down

17.3 per cent.

"Tt has cast somewhat of a
pall on the city and our prop-
erties," said Dan Nita, Mid-
Atlantic president of Harrah's
Entertainment Inc. "We're
getting calls from customers
upset that they're being
reached out to by the UAW."

Other declines were at Har-
rah's Resort Atlantic City
(down 15.6 per cent); the
Atlantic City Hilton Casino
Resort (down 15 per cent);
the Showboat Casino Hotel
(down 13.8 per cent); and the
Borgata, which was down 9.7
per cent last month.

The Tropicana Casino and
Resort, which was recently
sold to a group led by billion-
aire investor Carl Icahn, was
down 9.1 per cent, and
Resorts Atlantic City was
down 7.5 per cent.

| 1 Panel & LED Keypud
2 Motion Detectors a
2 Door Contacts f —
1 Siren A Go On Vacation,
| Translormer a fn’

| 4 Amp Stand-By Battery
2 HOURS MONITORING,

1 Wemco Decal

ACCESS CONTROL

Less than a dalla a day for COV INTERCOM SYSTEM
monitoring GUARD SERVICE, Ko

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel of land being Parcel A
bounded on the NORTH by the other part of Gladstone Road Crown
Allotment #22 now or formerly the Property of F. A. Garraway and
running thereon Fifty-two Feet and thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’),
bounded on the EAST by Parcel B and running thereon One
Hundred Twenty-five Feet (125’), bounded on the SOUTH by the
portion of Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or formerly
the ee of Richard Sands and running thereon Fifty-Two Feet
and Thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’) and bounded on the WEST by
the other portion of the Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or
formerly the property of Richard Sands and running thereon One
Hundred Twenty-five Feet (125’) containing Six Thousand
Eighty-three square feet (6,083 sq. ft.) and situated in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas shown on the plan filed herein and
thereon coloured pink AND IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece
parcel of land being Parcel B bounded on the NORTH by the other
art of Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or formerly the
roperty of F A. Garraway and running thereon Fifty-two Feet and
thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’), bounded on the EAST by the other
ortion of the Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or
ormerly the property of Richard Sands and running thereon One
Hundred Twenty-five Feet (125’), bounded on the SOUTH by
the portion of Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or
formerly the property of Richard Sands and running thereon
Fifty-Two Feet and Thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’) and
bounded on the WEST by Parcel A and running thereon One Hundred
Twenty-five Feet (125’) containing Six Thousand Eighty-three square
feet (6,083 sq. ft.) and situated in the Western District of the said Island
of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas shown on the plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow.

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Buster, Caswell and
Pauline Ferguson.

2009/CLE/qui/0666

NOTICE
The Quieting Titles Act 1959

The Petition of Buster Ferguson of the Eastern District in the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Pauline and Caswell Ferguson both of the Southern
District of the said Island of New Providence in respect of: - ALL
THAT piece parcel of land being Parcel A bounded on the NORTH
by the other part of Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or
formerly the Property of RF A. Garraway and running thereon
Fifty-two Feet and thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’), bounded on the
EAST by Parcel B and sae thereon One Hundred Twenty-five Feet
(125’), bounded on the SOUTH by the portion of Gladstone Road Crown
Allotment #22 now or formerly the property of Richard Sands and
running thereon Fifty-Two Feet and Thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’) and
bounded onthe WEST by the other portion of the Gladstone Road Crown
Allotment #22 now or formerly the property of Richard Sands and
running thereon One Hundred Twenty-five Feet (125’) containing Six
Thousand Eighty-three square feet (6,083 sq. ft.) and situated in the
Western District of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas shown on the plan filed herein and
thereon coloured pink AND IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece
parcel of land being Parcel B bounded on the NORTH by the other part
of Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or formerly the Property
of F. A. Garraway and running thereon Fifty-two Feet and thirty-two
Hundredths (52.32’), bounded on the EAST by the other portion of the
Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or formerly the property
of Richard Sands and a Aa One Hundred Twenty-five Feet
(125’), bounded on the SOUTH by the portion of Gladstone Road Crown
Allotment #22 now or formerly the property of Richard Sands and
running thereon Fifty-Two Feet and Thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’) and
bounded on the WEST by Parcel A and running thereon One Hundred
Twenty-five Feet (125’) containing Six Thousand Eighty-three square
feet (6,083 sq. ft.) and situated in the Western District of the said Island
of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas shown on the plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow.
Buster, Caswell and Pauline Ferguson claim to be the owners
of the fee simple estate in possession of the tracts of land hereinbefore
described free from encumbrances.
D the Petitioners have made application to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have their title to
the said tracts of land investigated and the nature and extent
thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any _ persons
having Dower or a Right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a
claim not recognized in the petition shall on or before the 30th of
September A.D., 2009 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the
Petitioners or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the pre-
scribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of
any such person to file and serve a statement of his claim on or before
the 30th of September A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to such claim.

Copies of the Filed Plan may be inspected at:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court;

2. The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co. attorneys for
the Petitioner, Sassoon House, Shirley Street & Victoria
Avenue, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas;

Dated the 6th day of August A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioners







PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, DEVAUGHN QUINCY
KEMP of the City of Nassau, of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, intends to change the name to DEVAUGHN QUINCY
KEMP-SAWYER. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

Employment Opportunity

FINANCIAL MANAGER
Vie seek oo employ a talenced, innovative, leader with a passion
to suceeed and the capacity oo initiane progress.

Job Requirements & Experience

Bachelor's Degree in Accounting or an equivalent from a
recognized tertiary level Institution.

Minimum of 3 years practical experience ina similar robe,

Experience in Management Reporting In a commercial
enterprise, with Orach database manageneent system,

Demonstrated ability to manage, motivate and develop a
team and effectively work with staf,

Extensive experience using automated accounting systems
such as Quickbooks and Peachtree.

Demonstrated ability in managing projects.

Well adjusted to working for organizations with 24/7
operations.

Proctical/Specialist Skills include
Technical and practical skills in financial accounting.
Skills in forecasting, budgeting and analyses of variances.
Strong customer focus (internal and external).

Strang cammunication and interpersonal akills co effectively
translate ideas.

Strong reasening and interprecation skills,
Dervanstrated abilicy to research innovative solutions.
Strang computer and Microsoft Office skills,

The oversight of (A) payrall processing and reporting, (Bi
customer balling and: (C) accoune reconciliations,

Managing year end audits

APPLY VIA EMAIL BEFORE August |4, 2009 TO;
executivelindciemall.com

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Email: energysavingsconsulttants @ hotmail.com

Contact 326-6171 Montrose Avenue

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM ROOSEVELT
WALLACE late of Market Street in the Northern
District of the Island of New Providence one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the above Estate
are required to send the same duly certified
in writing to the Undersigned on or before the
31st day of August, A.D. 2009, after which date the
Co-Executors will proceed to distribute the assets
having regard only to the claims to which they
shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
indebted to the said Estate are requested to make
full settlement on or before the date hereinbefore
mentioned.

MERIDIAN LAW CHAMBERS
Attorneys for the Co-Executors
Chambers,

P.O. Box N-168,

East Bay Shopping Center,
East Bay Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.



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PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009

meaty

THE TRIBUNE






©

LOVING RELATIONSHIPS

SEX AND THE NET: WORK PLACE REALITY :

IN the last few weeks, we have dis-
cussed the ever increasing growth of
Internet use world wide, computer
suave children, adolescents and the
explosion of sexual interest online.
Logically, it would then make sense
that people who find sexual gratifi-
cation online would allow their minds
to wander throughout the day to
places of comfort and contentment. If
your workplace does not have any
policies concerning Internet usage
during work hours, then the door is
left wide open.

Is it wrong, therefore, to cut your
lunch break short to check the chat
room you were in before you left
home, and continue the conversation
with that beautiful person in Dallas?
Down load those sexy full frontal
shots of teenagers because no one
checks your computer at work? Per-
haps you have had a scare about a
sexually transmitted disease you do
not want to ask anyone, but just need
to do a little research. Is it all classed
as online sexual activity and is it all
bad? Should the repercussions vary
depending on the act and should the
position you hold in the company be
relevant?

Rules and regulations concerning
sexual issues need to be laid out, very
clearly, in black and white for all to
see. Staff hand books have details
about conduct and sexual harassment,

(oy

GREEN SCENE





but rarely do they define the behav-
iour. Statistically, larger companies
seem to do a little better because they
have the staff, access to professional
advice and funding to implement
training programs. They are acutely
aware of the cost of firing, rehiring
and training of staff.

The more forward thinking com-
panies are seeing the benefits of car-
ing and understanding for the com-
plete individual and the value of
investing in a person's future. We
know now that a healthy individual,
both in body and mind, produces a
better employee. But let us not get so
idealistic in our thinking that we lose
sight of the potential legal ramifica-
tions and the pay outs for sexual
harassment lawsuits. Companies
know that they need to keep away
from the far reaching effects of being
labeled a ‘hostile work environment’
and so they are attempting to antici-
pate sexual problems before they are
faced with them.

The reality is that many jobs

Guavas

MANY of our tropical fruits orig-
inate in Asia so it makes a change to
find one that is a favorite in Asia
but comes from Central America.
Guavas can now be found all
through the tropical and subtropi-
cal world but their ripening habits
and soft fruits make them very diffi-
cult to export.

Guava (Psidium guajava) has long
been naturalised in The Bahamas
and grows in the wild, particularly
near to abandoned settlements. The
trees are easily distinguished by their
perpetually peeling coppery bark
and the strongly veined leaves. Wild
guava trees rarely bear heavily and
tend to produce on and off through-
out the year. Summer, and August in
particular, is the time of heaviest
bearing.

One of the problems associated
with wild guava trees is their sus-
ceptibility to attack by fruit flies and
the subsequent larvae, or ‘worms’,

that infest the fruits at ripening time.
The fruits also tend to be quite small,
usually about golf ball size.

Cultivated guavas are a complete-
ly different experience. Their fruits
usually have a skin thick enough to
deter predation by fruit flies. They
are also much larger, as large as a
baseball or bigger.

According to the cultivator the
flesh of guavas can be white, pink
or red while the skin can be all of
these colours plus yellow.

Small cultivated guava trees
should be set out in well drained soil
in a location where they receive full
sunlight and no salt spray. As long
as the soil is well drained the guava
is not fussy about soil type. Culti-
vated guava trees bear early and
benefit from pruning when the main
growing season is over.

The guava flowers look like straw-
berry blossoms that quickly give way
to young fruits after being pollinat-

require some online time and so the
rules become vague and can be
manipulated. Some companies have
guidelines determining if the con-
duct is viewed as one of concern,
undesirable online sexual activity, or
a real problem that warrants inter-
vention. Others do not discriminate
or differentiate. They use time, mon-
ey and energy to monitor and police
their employee's online behaviour.

Are we always able to recognise a
person who has a void in their life
and who needs to find an outlet to fill
that space? Not all of us are good at
solving our problems, reaching out
for help, or even having someone to
trust to share our most innermost
thoughts. It is those isolated people
who have trouble dealing with their
internal self and who have not learnt
good coping skills, are those who are
so susceptible. Because of its easy
accessibility, anonymity and afford-
ability the Internet is the obvious
choice for many. The sexual activity
online becomes the quick fix instead
of a drink, smoke, pill or any other
‘upper’.

However, if we do notice changes
in our colleague's behaviour, then
hopefully it would not be left unat-
tended. The most visible clue may
be a drop in productivity but there
are less obvious changes that are so
easy to attribute to outside stressors.



ed by bees. The tree rarely grows
taller than a large shrub, though the
native guavas tend to be leggier and
taller, more like small trees. The
bane of native guava is the presence
of many small but very hard seeds.
Many of the cultivated varieties are
virtually seedless or have much
smaller seeds.

Guava fruits should be picked
when mature yet still firm or the
risk is run of having them fall from
the tree and become inedible. Even
one guava inside a house makes its
presence known through a pervad-
ing aroma that is impossible to hide.
It is one of the most pleasant of nat-
ural scents. Fruits that are picked, or
have dropped, while still hard can be
ripened by placing them in a paper
bag and adding a little banana peel
or a slice of apple.

The majority of Bahamian guavas
will be picked and turned into gua-
vajam, one of the most delicious of
all jams. Much of the remainder will
contribute towards guava duff, a
steamed pudding that uses both the
guava flesh and the seed pulp. The
pulp sauce that accompanies guava

Signs for concern include: unhappi-
ness, secretiveness, shame, guilt,
wanting to be alone, and unwilling-
ness to interact with coworkers. If
the online use is being tracked for 2
hours a day, purely for sexual use, it
is a clear indicator that the behav-
iour has now become compulsive.

Workplace reality is that there is
always the possibility that you can
lose so much more than just your
job. For those who have spent years
building a career, establishing a posi-
tion in society, it can all come crash-
ing down and have devastating
effects. Perhaps, the most difficult
aspect of the problem after reaching
rock bottom is the helplessness to
rid the label of ‘Sex Addict’. All of
this should make us think carefully
before using our work computer for
personal use. Employers also need
to step up and play their part in pro-
viding an environment that is healthy
and conducive for work.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual and
Couples Relationship Therapist. She is
a Registered Nurse and a Certified Clin-
ical Sex Therapist. Call for an appoint-
ment- Relate Bahamas at 364- 7230,
or email relatebahamas@yahoo.com
orwww.relatebahamas.blogspot.com.
She is also available for speaking
engagements.



By Gardener Jack

CULTIVATED guavas are larger
than native varieties and tend
to have thicker skins, all the
better to ward off fruit flies.

duff is usually lightly fortified with
brandy or rum. The same sauce
works well when poured hot over
vanilla ice cream.

The Cattley or strawberry guava is
a small shrub with shiny leaves that
can be grown in a 20-gallon con-
tainer. Perhaps I should not advise
you to do that because Cattley gua-
va is on the Florida list of undesir-
able plants and I would not like to
be accused of encouraging the crim-
inal element of plant life. If your
Cattley guava is grown in a contain-
er and the seeds disposed of prop-
erly then I see little harm in raising
one or two.

Children will thank you for it.
Cattley guava fruits are about an
inch long and shaped like pears. The
fruit does not taste like strawber-
ries but is quite pleasant. The seeds
are very different from regular gua-
va, being quite large in relation to
the fruit and fluted. Cattley guava
trees tend to bear in the spring and
early summer.

e j.hardy@coralwave.com

Tips for fitting
and selecting
Children's footwear

As we wind down to the open-
ing of the school year, many par-
ents are busy selecting footwear
for their children. I find it neces-
sary to address this topic as many
children experience foot problems
due to improper footwear. Par-
ents can worry about their child's
teeth, eyes, but may not give as
much concern to the developing
foot. Many adult foot problems
can have their origins in childhood,
so attention to footwear in chil-
dren can minimise these problems
in adults.

Buy Children's Shoes that Fit - it
is not unusual for a parent or
grandparent to purchase shoes for
a child without the child present. A
child's shoe should be directly fit-
ted to the foot in the store. Tradi-
tionally, it was standard to buy
shoes for children that were two
sizes too big to cut down on cost.
It is good to buy kids footwear a
little larger to leave room to grow,
but anything more than one size
bigger is too big.

Proper fit - when considering
size the length and width of the
shoe must be considered. The
width of the shoe is extremely
important, especially if the child
has wide feet. Do not purchase
shoes more than one size larger
even if you are experiencing diffi-
culties finding the right width, seek
the help of a specialty store where
adjustments can be done to sup-
port the width of the child's feet.
Shoes that are too big can cause
heel slipping and a child can trip
when walking. Further, toes can
slide forward and be very uncom-
fortable resulting with sore toes.
Likewise, shoes that are too tight
or small will cause sore feet,
ingrown toenails and other foot
problems.

Comfort - Children's shoes
should be comfortable immedi-
ately, while in the store and not
be expected to be “broken in” or
“stretched” later. If the shoe does
not appear to have enough sup-
port, there are specialty stores that
can add proper inserts not only to
support the foot, but also help to
wick away moisture. Moisture
management prevents fungus,
odors and athlete's foot from
developing.

Inspect Children's Shoes regu-
larly - even after kids' footwear is
purchased they need to be
checked regularly for wear and
tear around the soles and for prop-
er cushioning and arch support.
Children tend to adapt to what
they regard as normal and accept
it. Peer group pressure and the
dictates of fashion may also stop a
child complaining. This is why
skilled shoe fitters/specialist and
regular checks are important, par-
ticularly with young children.

Socks - the sock should fit and
be the same size as the shoe. One
hundred per cent cotton is best,
especially if the child has skin prob-
lems. Most cotton socks contain a
small percentage of nylon. A fifty
per cent wool with fifty per cent
mix is also very good. Avoid one
hundred per cent nylon socks as
they will make the foot sweat and
do not absorb moisture. Today,
modern walking socks have a wick-
ing effect (e.g. Thorlos).

In conclusion, poorly fitted chil-
dren's shoes can cause a number
of problems in adults. Therefore, it
is logical to attempt to prevent
these problems by ensuring that
the child's shoe is fitted appropri-
ately.

e Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board
Certified & licensed Pedorthist, is
the proprietor of Foot Solutions, a
health and wellness franchise that
focuses on foot care and proper
shoe fit, located in the Sandyport
Plaza, Nassau. Please direct any
questions or comments to nas-
sau@footsolutions.com or 327-FEET
(3338). ‘The views expressed are
those of the author and does not
necessarily represent those of Foot
Solutions Incorporated or any of its
subsidiary and/or affiliated compa-
nies”.



THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009, PAGE 7B



ad
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The Poop Deck hosts lunch
for Miss Universe contestants

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MISS Bahamas, one of the 84 contestants of the Miss Universe
2009 pageant, is shown leaving the Poop Deck restaurant on West
Bay Street where the girls were treated to lunch on Saturday.







PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE







Pr
i



Meet four



of the contestants



from Africa and Europe

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Feature Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

MISS SOUTH AFRICA
999999999999999999999999999>
NAME: Tatum Keshwar

AGE: 25
PROFESSION: Model and Industrial Psychologist

Tatum first competed in Miss South Africa
in 2005 and although she was unsuccessful,
she continued to prepare herself mentally
and physically. In December 2008, she won
the crown and is now competing against 84
other girls for the title of Miss Universe, and
this time, she has just one shot.

She is confident that she can be a wonder-
ful role model and ambassador for her coun-
try if she were to win Miss Universe.

“Preparations for me took quite a while, I
did a lot of growing those three years
between both pageants.

“T did a lot of traveling, I completed my
degree in Industrial Psychology, I also got a
good job practicing my industrial psychology
degree which was great because corporate
experience really grows your mind, it opens
your mind up, and actually P’ve become quite
business minded now. I did a lot of physical
preparations, and also a lot of reading.”

She grew up in KwaZulu-Natal in Durban,
which is on the east coast of South Africa,
and said it’s as beautiful and very similar to
the Bahamas.

Tatum said she grew up listening to golden
oldies. One of her favourite groups is Earth,
Wind, and Fire.

She grew up with her Mom, Dad, and
younger sister Chanel.

“My mom is one of nine, my dad is one of
ten, so I have a huge family and extended
family,” she said.

Tatum said during her reign as Miss South
Africa, she hopes to bring change to the
polarisation of rural and urban areas of

South Africa as the rural regions are so much |

more underdeveloped.

































































| MISS FRANCE
| 9999999999999999999999999999

NAME: Chloe Mortaud
AGE: 19

Chloe said her role model is actress Halle
Berry, and hopes to one day become as suc-
cessful as her.

One thing most people don’t know about
her is that she is the first Miss France to have
duel citizenship.

She said although there is a common
assumption that French people are bour-
geoisies: “we really like the simple life.”

She said one of the most emotional
moments in her life was when she recently
watched the inauguration of US President
Barack Obama while in Washington DC. “I
cried because here it was a black person
being made the president of one of the
biggest countries of the world. I was enjoying
it, all those years people fought for liberty
and freedom, and today it seems like all of
that has come to being, it was good to see
that through my own eyes. If I have children
I will tell them ‘mommy was there to see
that.’”

Chloe said her mother is a black American
originally from Mississippi and her father is
French, a combination that helped to create
her exotic look.

She said the Bahamas is far different from
France, the sun shines brighter, the water is
warmer, and the food is more ‘alive.’ She said
so far in the Bahamas her favourite food is
conch salad.

Chloe is 5 foot 10 and also speaks three
languages; English, French, and Chinese.







| MISS IRELAND

999999999999999999999999999>
NAME: Diana Donnelly

AGE: 20
PROFESSION: Model

“T don’t know how I will compare to the
other girls in this pageant, but I will definite-
ly give it my best shot and just hope for the
best. [ have a good personality, and a great
sense of humor.”

Diana said her family will arrive the week
of the pageant to support her but other than
that she did not bring any Irish lucky charms
with her. “ [left the lepruchans at home,”
she laughed.

Comparing the similarities with the
Bahamas and Ireland, Diana said the people
are similar because they are both warm and
welcoming.

However the beaches are a lot different,
she said in the Bahamas the beaches are
clear, but at home they are all rocky and very
dark.

Her favourite place in the world is her
home in Dublin, Ireland.

She is 5 feet 9 inches, and is excited to rep- |

resent her country in the 2009 Miss Universe
Pageant.



I



A Bahamian welcome for international beauties



































/MISS NAMIBIA
| 9929999999992999929999999999

NAME: Happie Nielamo

| AGE: 21

Happie said although she has the potential
to be a model she has not tried her hand at it,
and added that even though she would like to
win the Miss Universe competition, she
would be just as happy to know that she was
able to put a smile on someone’s face
through her role as Miss Namibia.

Happie is 6 foot tall, and is pursuing a law
degree at the University of Namibia.

She described her country as very dry:
“There’s the Sahara, the Namib, and the
Kalahari Desert, which are all very dry.
August is actually the windiest month for us,
it’s also very cold now in the city because we
are now experiencing winter there.”

In her spare time to unwind, Happie said
she enjoys afternoon picnics by the lakeside
with her friends and loves the night life.



FROM page 10

Em band, Nita and KB to name a
few of the entertainers who were
present.

In brief remarks, Owen Bethel,
the chairman of the local Miss Uni-
verse planning committee, thanked
the ground team for their hard

work, dedication and determination
in lying the ground work for the
pageant over the last six months.
Noting her surroundings and the
effort the staff had made in trans-
forming the grounds of the Bal-
moral, Paula Shugart told the con-
testants that they would soon see
why it was indeed “ better in the

Bahamas,” while the reigning Miss
Universe Dayana Mendoza said
that she has truly identified with
the Bahamas and in her numerous
visits here feels like she is Bahami-
an.

Tourism Minister Vincent Van-
derpool Wallace joked that it was
easy to receive RSVPs for the event

as people were extremely eager to
get the chance to interact with the
international beauties.

He added that he was extremely
pleased that throughout their time
in the country, the contestants
would be able to visit several of the
other family islands so that they can
get a true Bahamian experience.

Following dinner, guests were
treated to a dazzling fireworks dis-
play. Fortunately Mother Nature
was also in a welcoming mood as
the night was clear until after the
guests had started to leave when a
light sprinkle came down placing a
final stamp on a truly magical
evening.



THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST

TAMPA

High: 91° F/33° C
Low: 77° F/25°C

@ ¢
KEY WEST

High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 80° F/27°C
@

ORLANDO |
High:94°F34°C
Low: 74°F/23°C
@

cw,



Â¥

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Today

High Low W High

F/C F/C F/C
Albuquerque 93/33 67/19 t 94/34
Anchorage 66/18 51/10 s 66/18
Atlanta 92/33 73/22 t 87/30
Atlantic City 93/33 68/20 t 84/28
Baltimore 92/33 70/21 t 83/31
Boston 80/26 68/20 t 78/25
Buffalo 78/25 61416 pe 79/26
Charleston, SC 94/34 77/25 s 94/34
Chicago 82/27 60/15 pc 81/27
Cleveland 82/27 64/417 pe 78/25
Dallas 100/37 78/25 t 97/36
Denver 89/31 58/14 s 92/33
Detroit 84/28 62/16 pc 82/27
Honolulu 89/31 77/25 sh 88/31
Houston 96/35 76/24 t 96/35

Low

F/C
66/18
53/11
70/21
66/18
66/18
63/17
59/15
75/23
57/13
60/15
76/24
59/15
64/17
75/23
76/24

Ww

pe
s
t
pe
pe
pe
s
t
s
pe
pe
pe
pe
pe
t

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando

Partly sunny with a

thunderstorm.

H ig h: 88°
ICE UC acl aec dt



Patchy clouds with a

Partly sunny with a

Partly sunny, a

shower. thunderstorm. t-storm possible.
High: 89° High: 89°
Low: 80° Low: 81° Low: 80°
L__97°-87° FF 98°-90° F

Partly sunny, a
t-storm possible.






Le

—— i

Some sun with a
shower or t-storm.

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and

elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

@ WEST PALM BEACH
High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 77° F/25°C

FT. LAUDERDALE
High: 90° F/32° C @
Low: 78° F/26°C

= AMI

High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 78° F/26° C



High
F/C
86/30
93/33
88/31
105/40
94/34
86/30
88/31
92/33
90/32
88/31
92/33
92/33
85/29
96/35
94/34

Today

Low

F/C
65/18
74/23
64/17
77/25
73/22
64/17
68/20
72/22
78/25
66/18
69/20
78/25
73/22
69/20
74/23

ABACO
High: 89° F/32° C

—— Low: 77° F/25°C
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FREEPORT
High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 76° F/24° C

High: 93° F/34° C
Low: 77° F/25° C

Wednesday

W High

F/C
t 81/27
t 92/33
pe 89/31
s 105/40
t 92/33
pe —- 86/80
t 86/30
t 90/32
t 90/32
s 89/31
t 83/31
t 91/32
t 86/30
t 93/33
t 93/33

Low

F/C
62/16
73/22
65/18
82/27
69/20
64/17
66/18
71/21
78/25
69/20
67/19
78/25
70/21
69/20
75/23

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Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, OR
Raleigh-Durham
St. Louis

Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego

San Francisco
Seattle
Tallahassee
Tampa

Tucson
Washington, DC

NASSAU

High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 80° F/27°C
@

ANDROS

F/C
91/32

107/41

83/28
77/25
98/36
86/30
92/33
99/37
78/25
74/23
71/21
96/35
91/32
99/37
92/33

Today

Low

F/C
72/22
85/29
64/17
59/15
71/21
67/19
63/17
77/25
67/19
58/14
55/12
73/22
77/25
78/25
74/23

WwW

ELEUTHERA
High: 91° F/33° C
Low: 77° F/25°C

g

GREAT EXUMA

High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 78° F/26° C

Fz
US. Cres

Wednesday Wednesday

High

F/C
86/30
106/41
82/27
78/25
91/32
88/31
94/34
100/37
77/25
72/22
73/22
92/33
90/32
98/36
85/29

Low

F/C
68/20
83/28
60/15
57/13
70/21
66/18
68/20
76/24
67/19
57/13
53/11
73/22
77/25
76/24
69/20

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High: 90° F/32° C

Low: 73° F/23°C

CROOKEDISLAND / ACKLINS

RAGGED ISLAND

High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 70° F/21°C

High: 93° F/34° C
Low: 74° F/23°C

*2

GREAT INAGUA
High: 92° F/33°C
Low: 75° F/24°C

F

« *





High: 90° High: 90°
Low: 80° Low: 81° a ES)
ETCH
102°-83° F 94°-87° F High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht.(ft.
Tod 14:51am. 29 5:31am. 0.2
a ek 6t1pm. 05
Wednesday'2:09 a.m. 24 6:13am. 0.2
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thursday T250am. 24 702am. 03
Temperature 1:35pm. 29 807pm. 06
WOM, acesecadveceeeeeeae cet eceeeee 90° F/32° C * 1:57 2 3 8:00 0 3
scatiiesannenses 79° F/26° C Friday 9-39 a 29 9:14 oa 05
Normal high... 89° F/32° C ee
Normal low 76° F/24° C
Last year's Nigh... cece 93° F/34° C SUN AND ity
Last year's LOW o.ccceeseseteeseeeeteees 77° F/25° C
Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:42 a.m. Moonrise ... 10:56 p.m.
As Of 2 p.m. yesterday oo... trace Sunset....... 7-48 p.m. Moonset... . 11:30 a.m.
Year to date : i
Normal year to date oo... cc cceceeeceneeee 26.96" a Est
AccuWeather.com = a
Forecasts and graphics provided by eI -
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Aug.13 Aug. 20 Aug. 27
CATISLAND
High: 87° F/31°C
Low: 73° F/23°C
or
SAN SALVADOR
High: 89° F/32°C
Low: 75° F/24° C
LONGISLAND
High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 74° F/23°C
MAYAGUANA



Wor_p Cities

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg





High
F/C
93/33
72/22
81/27
86/30
59/15
90/32
90/32
82/27
95/35
80/26
82/27
72/22
84/28
66/18
72/22
77/25
62/16
97/36
92/33
68/20
91/32
78/25
87/30
76/24
70/21
77/25
17/25
64/17
93/33
70/21
91/32
102/38
80/26
84/28
70/21
89/31
72/22
77/25
90/32
88/31
75/23
104/40
75/23
73/22
17/25
79/26
99/37
68/20
17/25
77/25
70/21
112/44
86/30
90/32
17/25
88/31
70/21
91/32
62/16
82/27
70/21
66/18
95/35
85/29
78/25
82/27
68/20
78/25
13/22
84/28

il

Today

Low
F/C
77/25
59/15
43/8
72/22
46/7
78/25
79/26
69/20
73/22
76/24
63/17
55/12
M128
44/6
55/12
59/15
50/10
72/22
83/28
44/6
77/25
68/20
71/21
57/13
55/12
55/12
56/13
59/15
73/22
52/11
84/28
86/30
63/17
65/18
45/7
79/26
58/14
59/15
63/17
79/26
54/12
75/23
59/15
52/11
54/12
54/12
84/28
52/11
58/14
55/12
65/18
90/32
66/18
79/26
41/5
70/21
45/7
74/23
56/13
70/21
57/13
50/10
81/27
77/25
59/15
59/15
56/13
60/15
56/13
63/17

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Wednesday

High
F/C
92/33
70/21
81/27
84/28
59/15
90/32
86/30
81/27
96/35
81/27
82/27
70/21
86/30
67/19
75/23
82/27
66/18
96/35
91/32
66/18
90/32
83/28
89/31
71/21
64/17
79/26
78/25
73/22
89/31
70/21
91/32
109/42
83/28
86/30
69/20
89/31
72/22
77/25
91/32
86/30
77/25
104/40
82/27
77/25
75/23
79/26
97/36
67/19
79/26
76/24
75/23
109/42
88/31
90/32
83/28
87/30
61/16
87/30
69/20
86/30
73/22
66/18
92/33
85/29
17/25
90/32
70/21
80/26
70/21
87/30

Low
F/C
79/26
55/12
50/10
70/21
48/8
79/26
77/25
69/20
73/22
76/24
61/16
54/12
76/24
43/6
59/15
59/15
54/12
74/23
82/27
46/7
78/25
72/22
69/20
55/12
52/11
57/13
57/13
57/13
72/22
50/10
82/27
85/29
67/19
63/17
46/7
79/26
59/15
55/12
63/17
78/25
55/12
76/24
64/17
57/13
58/14
54/12
84/28
50/10
55/12
58/14
68/20
90/32
68/20
80/26
44/6
74/23
41/5
73/22
59/15
68/20
55/12
48/8
80/26
77/25
61/16
64/17
56/13
65/18
54/12
66/18

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MariNE FORECAST

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YoTN MDH eA HH AT
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pc
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Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace







TUESDAY, AUGUST 11TH, 2009, PAGE 9B

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 85° F
Wednesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 85° F
FREEPORT Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 86° F
Wednesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 86° F
ABACO Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 84° F
Wednesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 84° F



& VERY
Billings) \ WARM) Minneapolis)
94/59) =

=

Denver)
89/58





Miami
90/78

Showers
T-storms







[677d Rain Fronts

[x4 | Flumes Shown are noon positions of weather systems and —

BEL] Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm ficnfiientia

[v=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Menge
10s| 0s (0s | 10s 20s [Osi] 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s /G0s//A00eN iii)



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 11,



A BAHAMIAN WELCOME
FOR INTERNATIONAL BEAUTIES



By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

he eighty four contestants and members

of the Miss Universe organisation were
officially welcomed to the Bahamas at a gala
reception held on the lawn of the Balmoral
Club on Sandford Drive Friday evening.

The event was attended by hundreds of Bahamians and fea-
tured an official introduction of each contestant as they made
their way down the lawn escorted by members of the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force.

The Balmoral Club’s lawn was transformed into a gorgeous
black and white garden oasis with masses of food stations,
champagne, and Grey Goose specialty drinks.

Many of the contestants enjoyed conch fritters and grouper
fingers for the first time and declared the food delicious.
Throughout the evening, the ladies got a chance to relax and let
their hair down as they mingled and posed for photos with
guests and danced under the stars to music provided by the Ting

SEE page eight

Pet

sca EENsTos Epes



Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway * 394-1759



Full Text

PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.214TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY WITH T-STORM HIGH 88F LOW 80F F E A T U R E S SEEWOMANSECTION S P O R T S A Bahamian welcome for contestants SEEPAGEELEVEN Golfers on course for World Cup B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net A S POLICE remain baffled over the m otiveless killing of a mother of two, a neigh b our h as revealed her harrowing last words. The gunman who shot Tagia Soles-Armony at close range walked up to her, and as hec ocked his weapon the terrified 29-year-old screamed: "No! No! N o! Don't do that!" Seconds later a gunshot rang through the air followed by a series of crashes as the wounded woman drove off to escape her a ttacker and ended up hitting a number ofn earby cars. The cries of her t hree-month-old son, who neighbours said was cushioned between his bleeding mother and the car's airbag, were the next sounds Tragic mother’s plea to her killer The Tribune YOUR PASSPORT TO MISS UNIVERSE B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Former minister calls for the death penalty to be carried out ‘No! No! No!’ as shots fir ed SEE page seven The police are tight-lipped on ‘serial rapist’ By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net POLICE are remaining tight-lipped about their investigation into a series of rapes and attempted rapes in eastern New Providence. Yesterday Assistant Commissioner of Police Raymond Gibson declined to state where exactly the attacks occurred in the eastern area of the island or comment on any other details relative to the cases. However, he revealed that two men were taken into police custody within the last two weeks in connection with the crimes but were released pending further investi gation. The senior officer con firmed that there have been four such attacks since March of this year two rapes and two attempted rapes and police are “exploring the possibility that they may be connected.” His comments come after a police source revealed the spate of incidents to this newspaper. The concerned officer, who had claimed there had been as many as five incidents in the last month, said they were worried about the fact that senior officers were not going public with the information. The officer told The Tribune that victims had consistently described their attacker. It was alleged that the man talks to his victims and takes evidence such as clothes and bed sheets with him after commit ting his crime. Meanwhile, the source claimed that Elizabeth Estates police station instituted extra patrols in the area in response to the incidents as well as instructing that bushy areas in the vicinity to be cleared. Yesterday morning Superintendent David Deveaux, officer in charge of the Elizabeth Estates police station Series of attacks in eastern New Providence By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@ tribunemedia.net ATTORNEY General Michael Barnett is expected to step up as the next chief justice when Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham returns from vacation in two weeks, The Tribune has learned. There is an unconfirmed report that senior lawyer Brian Moree has been offered the position of attorney gen eral. However, Mr Moree, the senior part ner at McKinney, Ban croft and Hughes, refused to comment on reports when contacted by The Tribune yesterday. He did not confirm whether he was offered the position nor would he stay whether if offered, he would accept. And Mr Barnett failed to return calls from The Tribune to comment on the reported appointment. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham is expected to recAGexpected to be next chief justice SEE page seven THEMinistryof Tourism issued a statement yester day explaining the post ponement of the Miss Universe Float Parade through New Providence, leaving Arawak Cay. The statement explained that as a result of the intermittent heavy rain showers over the last few days, a number of floats sustained some damage, causing unexpected delays. With the floats subject to very strict stipulations it would not have been possible to use the few that were ready. The Float Parade will now take place on Thurs day, August 20th, 2009 at 4pm along the same route. SEE page seven Ministry explains Miss Universe Float Parade postponement MISSBAHAMAS Kiara Sherman puts on a dazzling display in the Rainforest Theatre at the Wyndham Nassau Resort last night. The Miss Universe contes tants took part in the National Costume Competition. SEEPAGETWO DRESSEDFORSUCCESS T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net A FORMER cabinet minister last night slammed Government and his own party for “failing to protect” the Bahamian people. Speaking out following the murder of 29year-old Tagia Soles-Armony, Leslie Miller, the former PLP MP for Blue Hills, also called for the death penalty to be carried out in The Bahamas. Mr Miller said none of the country’s parliaSEE page seven Michael Barnett Leslie Miller Tagia Soles-Armony

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE More lay-offs are expected in the tourism sector during the summer months, according to the Central Bank o f the Bahamas. Noting that this expectation is based on its observations of trends in the econ-o my, not any specific knowledge of plans by hotel owners, the Central Bank said “further downsizing” is likely given the “sustained slump in air arrivals” to New Providence, Grand Bahama and the Family Islands. I n its Monthly Economic and Financial Developments Report for June 2009, issued Friday, the Central Bank said that despite slight signs of “stabilising” global economic conditions in June, painful ripples continue to be felt in the Bahamian economy. Tourism remains weak with the sustained slump in air arrivals negatively impacting overall visitor trends during the first half of the year, following a 2.2 per cent decrease a year earlier. “Some offset was provided by the firming in cruise arrivals, which benefitted in recent months from significant price discounting and the rerouting of several cruise ships,” said the report. Yesterday Minister of Labour Dion Foulkes and Bahamas Hotel Association President Robert Sands both said they are not aware of any plans by hotels to reduce their staffing levels in the summer months. Meanwhile, the report noted that outside of the tourism sector, despite a majority of businesses expecting their profits to decline for the rest of the year, there were signals from the private sector that employment adjustments will “moderate” in coming months. Overall, however, the unemployment rate is expected to grow, said the report, “despite a modest offset anticipated from the hosting of a number of international events in the latter half of the year”. Ultimately, the economy is not projected to return to its long-term growth trend until late 2010, it added. More tourism lay-offs expected THE Miss Universe 2009 contestants will today be shown what Harbour Island and Abaco have to offer. The beauty queens will be given a tour of Harbour Island by golf cart. And in Abaco they will engage in leisurely activities at the Coral Sands Beach House on Green Turtle Cay. Back in Nassau tomorrow, the contestants will take part in the Bahamian Designer Fashion Show at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Hotel. The Miss Universe Float Parade through New Providence which was cancelled on Monday will now to take place on Thursday, August 20 (see Page One MISS UNIVERSE SCHEDULE ROBERT SANDS Central Bank bases expectation on economic trends Contestants to see Harbour Island and Abaco MISS UNIVERSE PAGEANT PHOTOS: Tim Clarke/ Tribune staff MISS UNIVERSE contestants strutted their stuff for the National Costume Competition at the Rainforest Theatre in the Wyndham Nassau Resort on Cable Beach last night. Contestants show national costumes

PAGE 3

By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net With Bahamians requesting fewer loans from banks and banks themselves approving less applications, the amount of Bahamian dollard ebt owed to banks in the c ountry declined by $53 mil lion in the first five months of the year, according to the Central Bank. Meanwhile, depressed economic conditions and financial uncertainty saw Bahami a ns taking a “wait and see approach”, saving more. “Everybody is really pro ceeding with caution until things turn around and you have a higher level of confidence to venture forth,” said Commonwealth Bank senior vice president Denise Turn quest. According to The Central Bank’s Monthly Economic and Financial Development report for June 2009, a review of local banks found that Bahamian dollar deposits grew by $18.5 million in the first five months of this year, compared with a $20 million contraction in 2008. This was due to a $38.3 million build-up in fixed deposit balances, following a $3.1 million draw-down a year ago, said the report. Meanwhile, the Central Bank stated that the fall-off in outstanding funds owed to banks primarily reflected a $35.1 million downturn in consumer credit, from growth of $57.9 million a year ago, and a $34 million contraction in lending for commercial and other purposes. Mortgage growth was nearly halved to $54.6 million. Its June 2009 report, released Friday, recorded “notable declines” in loans outstanding for credit cards, private cars, travel, home improvements and education. This indicated that there was more money being paid back to banks than there are new loans being made. Mrs Turnquest told The Tribune that in the case of Commonwealth Bank, the reduction in outstanding credit is equally contributable to the bank – like other institutions globally – instituting more stringent lending poli cies as to a fall off in applications for loans from Bahamians seeking to buy new things. As for whether the bank’s lending policies may yet become more restrictive, the VP said this has yet to be determined, noting that the bank will continue to look at how many of its loans are being paid back and “make adjustments as necessary.” “Because of the economic environment and the number of lay offs we’re seeing, the bank has – like I’m sure all other banks have – reviewed our credit policies and we’re being more restrictive. “We’re looking for better quality borrowers who are more established in their employment. Someone who hasn’t been employed for a minimum period of time we’ve not even considered. “We’d prefer if we have an established history with you rather than borrowers with whom you’d don’t have a relationship and I think this is something you’d see with other banks too,” said Mrs Turnquest of the bank’s current policy. Meanwhile, the bank exec utive said she feels it is too early to tell whether the drop off in applications from consumers for loans for things like new cars, travel and oth er perhaps less essential items will become a trend. “I think this experience, this current environment is causing people to re-evaluate their approach to borrowing, which is a good thing. “Whether it will cause a long term trend of borrowing less is very difficult to say. It depends on how long the cur rent economic environment exists and the extent of the rebound from this.” While consumers are getting fewer new loans, the Central Bank noted that continued strain on household finances saw consumers increase their use of debt consolidation loans, which grew at an accelerated pace of $34.1 million during the first five months of the year. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009, PAGE 3 B y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net M OTHER-of-three Shimeakima Delores Pratt, 30, was back in Supreme Court yesterday as her attorn ey sought to convince a j udge to be as lenient as possible in passing sentence on her. Senior Justice Allen is expected to sentence Prattt his morning in connection with the stabbing death of Gary Leon Carey Sr. Pratt was convicted on July 1 of manslaughter for the d eath of her boyfriend of e ight years Gary Leon Carey Sr, 54. A 12-member jury unanimously found Pratt guilty. C arey, a Royal Bahamas Defence Force officer, was found stabbed to death in Pratt's Minnis Subdivisiona partment off Carmichael R oad on Sunday, August 17, 2008. According to evidence heard at the trial, Pratt had s tabbed Carey in the chest with a rat tail comb, but ini t ially told police that Carey had collapsed after taking the m ale enhancement pill Via gra. Pratt denied that she had intended to kill Carey. Probation officer Matrena Carey told the court yesterday t hat her investigations had determined that Pratt had l acked a positive role model growing up. She said that P ratt had been a teen mother and had lived in a children’s home. Carey said that the challenges Pratt faced led her to a buse marijuana and alcohol. She said that Pratt had r elied on men to support her and had been involved in sev e ral meaningless and abusive relationships in her life. Carey said that Pratt’s family described her as having a temper. Pratt’s attorney R omona Farquharson told the court that her client has e xpressed remorse for Carey’s death and asked the court to b e as lenient as possible in passing a sentence on her. She told the court that Pratt and her eldest son are termi nally ill, and noted that Pratt h as already spent a year in jail. Senior Justice Allen said y esterday that she wanted to take the night to consider the m atter before handing down her decision. P ratt is expected back in court at 10 o’clock this morning. Mother set to be sentenced today over stabbing death WEATHER experts are keeping a close eye on a tropi cal depression which has a 50 p er cent chance of developi ng into the season’s first named storm over the next 36 hours. While the tropical depression moving off the coast of Africa weakened a bit yesterday, Chief Meteorology Offi cer Basil Dean told The Tribune that weather conditions are favourable towards this system becoming more organised in the next few days. However, although it is moving in a general westerly direction in the Atlantic, it is still too early to tell if the islands of the Bahamas will ultimately be in this system’s path, he said. “But we are definitely monitoring this one closely,” Mr Dean added. Models The National Hurricane Centre (NHC reported yesterday that tropical depression Nine-E, as it is called now, was southwest of the Cape Verde Islands. At this time, all forecast models are predicting that the depression will curve towards the north in the coming days. At 2pm yesterday the depression was moving at a speed of 12mph with maximum sustained winds of near 35mph with higher gusts. Should the depression become more organised and develop into a tropical storm it would be named Ana the first named storm of the 2009 Atlantic hurricane season. By this time last year, four named storms had already formed in the Atlantic. Before the start of this year’s hurri-c ane season, forecasters were predicting 12 named storms, w ith six of those expected to develop into hurricanes. Weather experts track tropical depression A 20-year-old man accused of robbing a phone card vendor was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison yesterday after being arraigned on two counts of armed robbery. Court dockets allege that on Wednesday, August 5, Kirklyn Bain, while armed with a handgun, robbed L akeisha Park of five $5 phone cards, five $20 phone cards, five $10 phone cards and $82 in cash belonging to the S & W phone card booth. He is also accused of robbing the same woman of a maroon coloured pebble cellular phone valued at $300. Bain, who was arraigned before Magistrate Derrence Rolle in Court 5, Bank Lane, was not required to enter a plea to the charge. He was remanded to prison. The case has been adjourned to October 28. Man accused of robbing phone card vendor A UNION to represent Sandals employees will not be chosen on Thursday as planned after a Supreme Court order was issued yester day. Shavon Bethel, president of the Bahamas Hotel and Maintenance Allied Workers Union (BHMAWU for an Order of Stay of Execution to postpone a poll which would decide on the bargaining agent for Sandals workers. The poll would allow employees of Sandals Royal Bahamian to choose either the BHMAWU or the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union (BHCAWU them. It will now be held after Mr Bethel’s action in the Court of Appeal, concerning leadership of the union, has been completed. In the ruling, Justice Jon Isaacs ordered that leave be granted for Mr Bethel to be joined as third respondent in the action, put forward by the BHMAWU, the applicant. West Bay Management Ltd (trading as Sandals Royal Bahamian) is the first respon dent and the Attorney General the second. The judge further ruled that the application for the stay, ordered in the decision of Jus tice Neville Adderley on July 16, be granted pending an appeal at the Court of Appeal, on the condition that the notice of appeal is filed on or before Friday, August 14. No Sandals union choice on Thursday Court news Bahamian dollar debt owed to banks declines by $53m “... we are definitely monitoring this one closely. B B a a s s i i l l D D e e a a n n I n Brief BASIL DEAN CENTRAL BANK REPORT People saving more in depressed economy e’r e looking for better quality borr o wers who ar e more established in their employment. Someone who hasn’t been employed for a minimum period of time we’ve not even consider ed.” Denise T urnquest

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O PPOSITION MP Fred Mitchell yesterday expressed c oncern over allegations that p ublic service employees are b eing “abused” by governm ent. Speaking at a press conference at his office in Fox Hill, the former minister of public a ffairs warned that the cases o f many government workers who have been dismissed r ecently may end up before the courts as the government has reportedly failed to give proper or sufficient notice to these individuals. “On a number of occasions in the past, I have made the complaint that the words restructuring’ and ‘reform’ have come to mean firing people,” Mr Mitchell began. We have seen this with the police, immigration and more recently with customs officersb earing the brunt of this abuse. In recent days, a number of customs officers have been threatened with dismissal. S ome of them have come to me as an attorney and others have a more general com-p laint. The complaints seem t o rest principally with the question of due process and delay on the part of the government. “It also appears that the g overnment has simply made up their minds and are not p aying attention to the r esponses. It appears that a number o f these matters will end up in the courts,” he said. Claiming that even the drivers of government ministers a re suffering – overtime pay o wed to them having reportedly been withheld – Mr M itchell said that the PLP made a special effort during its last term in office to ensure that all government drivers received overtime pay in accordance with the Employment Act. “The government has i nstead suspended overtime for their drivers and are paying them the lump sum of $300 p er month in lieu of overtime. This is not in accordance with the law and there is someu nhappiness amongst some d rivers over this. But unhappy or not, the law should be fol lowed. My general concerns are that public servants ought to b e able to do their jobs with o ut fear or favour and to be a ble to act with the political n eutrality of the service, and the fact that there appears to be a concerted effort on the p art of this administration to stack the offices of the public s ervice at its management lev e ls with political operatives. This is not what the public s ervice should be and the public should stand warned of this practice,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009, PAGE 5 Miss Universe Pageant Event Schedule:MISS UNIVERSE PRESENTATIONSunday, August 16th, 8:00pm Imperial Ballroom, Atlantis, Paradise IslandWatch all of the contestants compete in the Swimsuit and Evening Gown competitions to secure their spot in the Final Show.Tickets: General $50, Deluxe $100, Preferred $125, Gold $175 VIP $250 (includes dinner at select restaurant)MISS UNIVERSE FINAL SHOWSunday, August 23rd, 9:00pmImperial Ballroom, Atlantis, Paradise IslandBe there live to witness the crowning of the new 2009 Miss Universe!Tickets: General $175, Deluxe $250, Preferred $400, Gold $750 VIP $1000 (includes admission to Coronation Ball with open bar and gourmet buffet)CORONATION BALLSunday, August 23rd, 11:30pmThe Royal Deck, Atlantis, Paradise IslandCelebrate with the new Miss Universe and her fellow contestants and enjoy great music, a gourmet buffet and an open bar!Tickets: $145 For tickets and information call the Atlantis Box Ofce at 363-6601 Witness the crowning of the 2009 Miss Universe on giant multiple screens. Enjoy an open bar and a sumptuous a lfresco buffet. This royal fete will culminate with the prestigious Coronation Ball at 11:30pm where you can mingle with the newly crowned Miss Universe and her fellow contestants! Celebrate an experience that will never happen again!Tickets: $185THE VIEWING PARTYTHE 2009 MISS UNIVERSE PAGEANTSunday, August 23rd, 8:00pm The Royal Deck, Atlantis, Paradise Island W IDE-SPREAD corruption in the Bahamas will significantly hinder the search for those responsible in the murder of Welsh banker Hywell Jones, a former Freeport port director told British media. Speaking with the news site WalesOnline.co.uk, John Hincliffe, who spent almosta decade in Freeport in the 1980s, claimed t hat during his time in the Bahamas he fought a never-ending battle against corr uption and drug trafficking. He claimed that when he recently r eturned to the country he found that little h ad changed in this respect. H ywel Jones, 55, a resident in the Bahamas was shot in the head execution style outside the head office of his compan y, Britannia Investment Group in N assau, on April 22. He remained in a coma in hospital until M ay 8 when he died of his injuries. Police have yet to arrest anyone in connection with the killing, but said they have received some new leads that may help advance the case. Case Y esterday, Assistant Commissioner Ray mond Gibson told The Tribune that the case was still "under active investigation”b ut added that police do not have any suspects in custody. Last week, Mr Gibson who heads the c rime division told another local daily t hat the police was following several new leads into Mr Jones' murder. "Our investigations are progressing quite well," Mr Gibson is quoted as saying, but he declined to provide further details. "I can't report in depth into the investigation." F ormer port director Mr Hincliffe told t he Welsh website that he believes that the businessman’s murderer may have been a c ontract killer. He said that there is easy access to guns i n the Bahamas and people willing to use t hem for payment of either money or drugs. M r Hincliffe said he believes the amount of guns on the streets is now worse than it was in the 1980s when he lived in the B ahamas. Claim that wide-spread corruption will hinder murder investigation PLP chairperson Glenys Hanna-Martin is hitting out at theg overnment, claiming it has failed to make tangible efforts to aggressively meet and counter rising crime and violence levels in the country. Friday night’s murder of a woman who was shot in front of her young children “culminates a steady stream of violent homic ide in the past several weeks in this country,” Mrs Hanna-Martin said. “The murder count now stands at 50 and there is an increasing sense that the level of crime is rising in an unrelenting, unaddressed frenzy,” she said in a press statement. “Surely we can-n ot be saying that as a nation we accept this bloody phenomena as a natural part of our national life. By now we would have expected to see tangible interventions by the government through its various agencies and in policy formation to aggressively meet and counter the violence and causes of violence in this country and in p articular gun violence.” This is what is expected of prog ressive government, Mrs HannaMartin said. However, the PLP chairperson said that no such energy appears to be applied or even foreshadowed by the government in the midst of graphic social deterioration. “Instead the m inister is on vacation and his voice cannot be heard. It appears t hat the government along with the rest of us are simply stand ing by and watching in awe as the body count grows and the pain increases when loved ones get the difficult call that a child has been murdered,” she said. M rs Hanna-Martin is calling on Bahamians to voice their out rage and demand accountability on the part of those who havebeen elected to manage the affairs of state and in whose charge the public safety has been placed. The country recorded its 50th m urder for the year when Tagia Soles-Armony, a 29-year-old Bahamian who lives in St Kitts, was shot and killed outside of her family’s house in front of her chil dren and other relatives. Hanna-Martin hits out at govt over crime levels MP concerned over allegations of ‘abused’ public service staff FRED MITCHELL speaks to m embers of the media yesterday. HYWELL JONES

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By ADRIAN GIBSON ajbahama@hotmail.com H ANDSdown,the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC ishes in the top three as one of the worst service providers in the Bahamas public or private. No, it does not appear that BTC is hear-i ng the cries of its many customersneither loudly norc learlyand its services are f ar from ever qualifying as s econd-rate. Why is it that customers, particularly those seeking n ew services or transferring services from one location to another (eg, myselfh eld to ransom for weeks b efore receiving services? Frankly, I’m sick and tired of being fleeced as BTC continues to charge ridiculous f ees for lousy services. Just last week, while speaking to a Cabinet minister via cell phone, our conversation was abruptly interrupted at least three times by dropped calls. Over the years, if I added up t he charges for text messages t hat were sent but never a rrived to the intended recipi ent, BTC would have reim bursement cheque for me a nd thousands of other cell p hone customers. Last Thursday, I contacted BTC and was made toh old on for more than an hour while being forced to listen to automated machines a nd annoying records of peo ple singing BTC’s promotional ads. Who exactly are they competing against to j ustify the glut of annoying advertisements and where are the living customer service operators? Which market is BTC competing for, s ince we all must use their services since they hold a telephony monopoly? It was so dreadful that after calling many of the available numbers, I finally spoke to someone who admitted that she c ouldn’t reach BTC’s customer care representatives h erselfand she is a compa ny insider! Luckily for me, she did provide the directc ontacts of a few representatives, one of whomMs Z ina Dillet (JFK accommodating. BTC is an overstaffed company with a labour force some of whom appear to bet oo lazy to even answer the telephone. Any serious suitors seeking to purchase an interest in the corporation should seek to provide better quality services by offloadi ng the company’s freeloade rs in restructuring exercises. BTC must know that throngs of customers are dis-p leased with its exorbitant charges and poor service quality. R ecently, the company u nceremoniously cancelled the “free” voice mailing featurewhich allowed cust omers to place “voicemail calls” if they had “no minutes”under the premiset hat it was clearing up the voice channels to prevent call failures/drops. Since thec ompany took that stance, there is no evidence of improvement. Of late, BTC’s Vice Presi dent of Marketing Sales and Business Development Mar lon Johnson wrote on the company’s EZ Top-up web site: “Dear Customer, Please n ote that the EZ Top-Up p latform has been taken down temporarily in order for BTC to enhance thes ecurity features and make the feature more customer friendly. We anticipate thatt he new and improved EZ T op-Up feature will be back on-line on August 3, 2009.” The EZ Top-up feature d id not return on August 3rd and today it remains unavailable to those prepaid cus-t omers seeking to recharge phone cards or load minutes on to their cell phones. So, contrary to BTC’s self-serving ads, EZ Top-up is the company’s latest inno vation that does not work and, contradictory to the c ompany’s claims, is far from p utting “connection at the fingertips” of Bahamians. I f BTC’s services do not improve, the moment they are privatized and other companies offering better services set-up, for me and t housands of other Bahamians, it will be “bush crack, m an gone!” NO HOME COURT A DVANTAGE I would be the first one in m y car, honking my horn a bout Nassau’s streets of Miss Bahamas Universe, K iara Sherman, is crowned Miss Universe on August 2 3rd. However, after seeing many of the world’s mindblowing beauties that haveg raced New Providence’s landscape recently, not only has my interest for the pageant peaked at the sight o f the gorgeous ladies the Miss Universe tidal wave has b rought in, but I’m also a cutely aware that Ms Sher man’s road to the top is filled with well-prepared, interna-t ional beauties who will make the local pageant seem like a cake walk. While many Bahamian males (and some females are gawking at the queens representing 80-plus countries, I encourage Ms Sherm an to strive for excellence and not to become intimi dated or complacent, as the j ourney will be rough and, quite honestly, there is no home court advantage. T AKING EMPLOYEES FINGERPRINTS With all the in-fighting and squabbling seen in unions of late, it is patently obvious that unions have lost their purpose and are no longer relevant or as resolute a s they once were. I n recent years, it appears that some unions are electing g rubby little ingrates, position seekers, and tunnelvision headline hunters to front office positions. There appears to be little i nterest in the members, as these so-called leaders are n ot seeking solutions to labour issues but instead are contributing to the ongoingm le consuming so many unions. F rankly, the unions ought t o support employers who should seek to have the E mployment Act amended to allow for biometric fin g erprint recognition of employees, which would no doubt save businesses thou sands of dollars, mitigate a gainst productivity losses, deter workers from fraudulently using time cards, reduce thefts and prevent c locking in scams. Presently, the Employm ent Act of 2001 outlaws the u se of fingerprints by Bahamian employers, except for those in the casino indus-t ry. I understand that biometric machines do not store fingerprints but instead match the shape of hands, fingers, eye vessels and retinas to a mathematical algorithm. In these gloomy economic t imes, the unions should have no problems with bio metric fingerprinting, as it w ould undoubtedly save jobs via a reduction in losses asso ciated with thefts and also improve employee produc t ivity. Besides, Bahamians happily allow US Custom agents to take their fingerprints and scan their retinas as they gleefully skip to Miami/Fort Lauderdale every few weeks! C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 6, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Taking issue with BTC’s ‘poor service quality’ Y OUNG M AN S V IEW A DRIANGIBSON

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m entarians has the “guts or testicular fortitude” to carry outc apital punishment “despite the fact it is being called for by the Bahamian people.” “This lady, I understand, came here with her young baby t o surprise her mother who’s birthday was Sunday,” said MrM iller, who lost his own son Mario to a brutal murder in 2 002. “Whoever shot her pulled up to her garage. If they wanted to take the lady’s car, why was it necessary to kill her? Just b ecause they could. Just because they know that theirl ife would not be taken, just because they know that they w ill go and sit in Fox Hill prison and live off the people of this land because those who were elected to run this country don’t have the guts none of t hem the Government or the PLP, none of them have t he guts to execute the laws of this land.” M r Miller said he finds it “extraordinary” that in 2009, t he Bahamas was still concern ing itself with what the Privy Council in London has to say about capital punishment being carried out in the Bahamas. I don’t understand for the life of me, that the Members o f Parliament that we elect to do the work of the people of t he Bahamas are so gutless and spineless that none of them to date has stepped to the plate saying enough is enough. “But none of them will say it u ntil it happens to one of their immediate family. The laws are on the books. The government of the B ahamas has the right to hang each and every prisoner who is s entenced to death. It is clear what the mandate is, and yett hey play these sick political games on the people of our c ountry,” he said. With the last hanging in 2000 at Her Majesty’s Prison, those opposed to capital punishment maintain that the death penal t y has not been proven to be an effective deterrent to viol ent crime. Others submit that the p rocess of rehabilitation has proved to be a disaster causing the country’s murder count to continually climb higher year after year. H owever, in view of all of this, Mr Miller said the average citizen is not without blame a s well. “As a people we have a llowed ourselves to be manipulated and dictated to by those who refuse to execute the laws of our land. “It is an utter disgrace what we put up with in this country,” he said. E xpressing his sympathy for the family of Mrs Soles-Armo-n y, Mr Miller said he and his family know from personal e xperience with the loss of his son Mario, what the victim’s family must be going through. “When you butcher some one in that manner, you don’t o nly kill her. Her husband is now finished. Her sisters andb rothers, her poor mother and father are finished as human b eings. All they can do now is wait for death to take them out of this world so they can rejoin h er again. “People don’t understand t he destruction that takes place in the entire family life when one is butchered the way this woman was butchered. I can tell you from my personal experience with my son Mario. They destroy your life, and all you w ant to do is destroy them and they have a right to destroyt hem for what they have done to that young lady. And you know why they did it? Because they know they can get away with it because they know that the gutless spineless ones that you sent to P arliament; none of them has the guts or the testicles to dot he right thing. Not a goddamned one. None! And I b lame them all. FNM and PLP alike.” residents heard. "A guy who live 'round here told me he was outside when he heard a girl scream. And then he heard a gun cock, and that's when he knew someone was going to get shot," said a neighbour who asked not to be identified. Neighbours said the brazen gunman described as a 5' 9" slim, dark male approached the victim after the crash to presumably see if she was still alive, but was scared off by people who had come to inspect the commotion. N eighbour Jillian Rodgers said h er 30-year-old son, who was gett ing out of a car rear-ended in the c rash, rescued the infant whose face was covered in his mother's blood. "My sister and I were sitting inside the house when I heard the gunshot. Then we heard two loud crashes and a loud bang. I hung up the phone, ran towards the front door and saw my son hobbling towards me with the baby," said Ms Rodgers, who first thought her son was hurt in a drive-by shooting. "The baby was screaming. Blood was on the side of the baby's head. We didn't know if the baby was bleeding or what," she told The Tribune yesterday. The child was not injured. Ms Soles-Armony was attacked at around 8 pm Friday as she was reportedly breast-feeding her t hree-month-old son in her sister's car outside her mother's house on Sea Grape Avenue, Sea Breeze. When police arrived on the scene, she was already dead. Shards of glass, presumably from the victim's car window, still littered the street outside her mother's home yesterday. Overcome with her grief, Tagia's mother could only say: "She was well-loved." Police do not have a motive for the killing, and have appealed for the public for information which would help their investigation. "We haven't established a motive yet but we are following s ignificant leads," said ACP Raym ond Gibson. Early reports indicate Ms Armony, who had just returned home with her infant son and oneyear-old son to visit her mother, may have been the victim of mistaken identity. While he declined to release any details about the case, ACP Gibson said police think Ms Armony's attack was an isolated incident. " The most I can say is we don't think it (her shooting trend," he said. Tagia, who lived in St Kitts with her husband Kachi Armony, was reportedly in town for a few days to celebrate her mother's birthday. She reportedly spent the afternoon at the mall with her two younger sisters and two sons. The young girls and Ms Armony's elder son had just got out of the car to knock on the front door of the family home, when the victim was shot. Her husband, a St Kitts businessman and radio show co-host, r eportedly flew to her family's side a fter her murder. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009, PAGE 7 ommend Mr Barnett’s appointment to Governor General Arthur Hanna upon his return to Nassau at the end of his Alaskan cruise on August 24. If Mr Barnett takes the position as head of the judiciary, his resignation f rom the Cabinet also will be announced, as well as the appointment of the next attorney general by the end of the month. The chief justice is appointed by the Prime Minister after consulta-tion with the leader of the opposition. It has also been reported that PLP leader Perry Christie does not agree with Mr Ingraham’s choice andhas written a strong letter of protest. But Mr Christie was not available yesterday to confirm or deny this r eport. T he appointment is said to be controversial as Mr Barnett would be the second attorney generalin two years to be elevated to the high court. Mrs Ruth BoweD arville, president of the Bahamas Bar Association, denied the report that she, with other members of the Bar Council, planned to register their objection to Mr Barnett’sa ppointment and accuse Mr Ingraham of politicis ing the court. Mrs Bowe-Darville told The Tribune yester day that the report is false as she has not been informed or consulted about the appointment. The Bar Association president said: “I haven’t said anything to the Prime Minister or to the press, and the Bar Coun cil hasn’t instructed me to say anything, so I don’t even know where they are getting it from. would think the powers that be would make their intention clear to me before they make their appointment, but Ihave not heard anything so I will not comment as yet, not until they say something definite tome.” However, it is believed that Mr Barnett has already decided to accept the position left vacant by Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall. Justice Hall was recently nominated to become apermanent judge of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY Mr Barnett is a former partner of Graham Thompson and Co. He was appointed to the post of Attorney General just over a yearago. He ran in the 2007 gen eral election as an FNM candidate for the Fort Charlotte constituency, but was defeated by former Attorney General Alfred Sears. which was said to have received the majority of the calls reporting the attacks said the extra patrols were primarily part of an effort to reduce the number of housebreakings occurring in the eastern area. Meanwhile, rather than police having pushed for the clearance of bushy areas around the area as they seek to find evidence that may have been hidden by the attacker, Supt Deveaux suggested that the clearing of bush was a “community initiative” that was unrelat ed to the rapes. The police are tight-lipped on ‘serial rapist’ FROM page one AGexpected to be next chief justice F ROM page one ‘No! No! No!’ as shots fired F ROM page one TAGIA SOLES-ARMONY , 29, with her oldest son Chelan Armony, who is now one year old. Former minister calls for the death penalty to be carried out F ROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009, PAGE 9 “And he was an unsung hero because although much credit was given to me, a lot of the success I achieved with the Bain Town Flyers, I col laborated it with him. He also helped to send off hundreds of athletes to school.” Wisdom said it’s a difficult time for their family because they have been in mourning over the last few years with deaths in the Wisdom, Roberts, Johnson and Williams families, all of whom are bond together by blood. “But we still trust God and we know that anything he does is well done,” he said. “That’s the faith that we operate with and so we are putting all of our trust in him.” The late Wisdom’s son, Jason, said his dad played a major role in his life and he will definitely be missed because he made sure that he participated in all of the major functions in his life. “I didn’t participate in track, but bowling was my sport,” said Jason Wisdom, whose performance in the Rothmans Bowling Nationals enabled him to make the Tournament of Americas in Florida in the 1992. “Dad was a big support for me in that. So I was glad that he was around to be a support for me in that regard.” Although he was a sports fanatic, Jason said during the latter stages of his life, his father spent a great deal of time talking about politics. The late Wisdom was a life long supporter of the Progressive Liberal Party. He was elevated to the position of stalwart councilor. Coach Gerald Wisdom dies at 62 F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 BAHAMAS lightweight champion Meacher “Pain” Major took a break from his training schedule to host a Back-to-School Bash on Saturday. The event was held in Strachan’s Alley off Kemp Road where Major grew up. He decided to give back to the community that has stood by his side during his climb from the amateur to the professional ranks. Major, who recently received a No. 15 ranking in the World Boxing Organisation, said it’s important at this t ime of the year to remember t he many young people in his c ommunity who look up to him. He congratulated all of the persons who joined in as sponsors and all who helped out with the activities, including a hoola hoop contest and potato sack race, that were staged during the day. The Back-to-School bash is one of the annual events that Major puts on in the community. Another is the basketball tournament that was held e arlier this year. Meacher ‘Pain’ Major’s Back-to-School Bash MEACHER MAJOR (far left and centre YOUNGSTERS take part in the hoola hoop contest... MEACHER MAJOR (wearing hat CHILDREN enjoy the potato sack race (TOP

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE THE Bahamas placed seventh out of 25 countries at the US Junior Open – the most prestigious juniort ournament in the Pan A merican region. Bahamian athletes won five medals (four bronze and one silver). The silver was won by nine-year-old Lyle Sherman and the four bronze medals by 14-yearold Myriael Newry, Peter Deveaux Isaacs, 13, Dorne Albury, 10, and 12-yearold Matthew Rahming. The Bahamas sent a 15member team and many of the athletes won matches. Judo is an Olympic sport where matches are won by throwing the opponent to his back or pinning his back to the ground for 25 seconds. It is one of the most widely practiced sports in the world and has been an Olympic sport since 1964. It has grown in popularity in the Bahamas because it teaches self discipline, confidence and self defense. “I was so happy because this is my first international tournament,” said 12year-old Matthew Rahming. Neville Munnings, referee/director, who went with the team to the tournament, said: “We are very proud of all of the children. This was a tough tournament with some great competition. Our kids raised to the challenge and did the country proud.” Said 2004 US Olympian Rhadi Bullard Ferguson, who was head coach for the delegation: “I am pleased with the results and eager to assist the Bahamas in turning its judo programme into a world class programme. We have made great progress in a short time, but more work lies ahead." Later this month, Ferguson is scheduled to accompany judo athletes Cynthia Rahming and Alex Martinborough to the World Cadet Champi onships in Budapest, Hungary. Bahamas seventh out of 25 countries at US Junior Open By ANTHONY FOSTER Associated Press Writer KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP Five Jamaican athletes were cleared Monday of doping at their national championships two months ago after the country's anti-doping panel failed to determine whether the banned substance was on the prohibited list. The athletes reportedly tested positive for the stimulant methylh exanamine. But Kent Gammon, c hairman of the Jamaica Anti-Dopi ng Commission's disciplinary committee, said it was unable to prove they had breached any doping policy. "Therefore, we have not found any of the athletes in violation of the (anti-doping said. The athletes had previously been identified as Yohan Blake, SheriAnn Brooks, Allodin Fothergill, Lansford Spence and Marvin Anderson. The athletes are now cleared to compete in the world championships in Berlin, but the International Association of Athletics Federations track and field's governing body and organiser of the worlds could review the ruling. The IAAF can challenge any judgments in the Court of Arbitration for Sport, world sport's highest court of appeal, based in Lausanne, Switzerland. The IAAF can also provisionally suspend athletes until the CAS delivers a verdict. The anti-doping panel started its hearing last week. None of the five athletes are considered among Jamaica's top talent, but the positivet ests were a blow to a nation that t akes great pride in the accomplishments of its sprinters. Monday's announcement came after Jamaica's Amateur Athletic Association warned another five athletes that they would be barred from the worlds if they did nota ttend a training camp this week. T hose athletes included 100meter Olympic champion ShellyAnn Fraser and Asafa Powell, a former 100 world-record holder. The others are 400 hurdles Olympic gold medalist Melaine Walker, hurdler Brigitte Foster-Hylton and sprinter Shericka Williams. Five Jamaican athletes cleared of doping Judo athletes win silver and four bronze JUDO ATHLETES compete at the US Junior Open... TEAM BAHAMAS members share a special moment... TEAM BAHAMAS placed seventh out of 25 countries at the US Junior Open... BAHAMIAN ATHLETES (one shown second from rightfour bronze and one silver

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By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net A duo of Bahamian golf pros earned the right to represent the country at a series of qualifying events and continue their trek toward the sport’s World Cup. Keno Turnquest and Lemon Gorospe emerged from a field of nine golfers last weekend at a qualifying event hosted by Lyford Cay Golf Club. Turnquest shot a combined score of 151 to lead the group, while Gorospe shot a 154. The team will now have more than two months of preparation before they head to the Nations Cup Omega Mission Hills Qualifier. The event is set to be hosted September 21-25 at the Caracas Country Club, with spots for the Omega Mission Hills World Cup on the line. Turnquest is a former Bahamas Professional Golfers Association national champion, and has a rsum w hich includes being a multi-junior n ational champion, representing the Bahamas at a previous World Cup event, being a former member of the Hoerman Cup team and playing on the collegiate scene for five years. Gorospe is also a former junior national champion, Hoerman Cupt eam member, former junior college champion in North Carolina and he has played for years on the pro cir cuit. Both golfers will be making their third trip to the World Cup Qualify ing event, and have previously t eamed up in 2007. Gorospe qualified for the tournament last year with BPGA president Chris Lewis. Turnquest said his third tourna ment qualification looks to be the most effective thus far because of the extended preparation time the team has headed into the event. “It was a very good feeling to qualify again,” he said. “I think we have a strong team this year and for one of t he first times we have time and an opportunity to practice and fully prepare ourselves for competition and that preparation will be vital for us.” With more than two months until he and Gorospe compete in Caracas, Turnquest expects the team tod eliver an impressive showing. “In the past we have never really had time to work together which is crucial because it is a team event. We get to work on our games together, develop a team chemistry, work on how we complement each oth e r,” he said. “One person can not win and it obviously has to be a team effort so with this time we have to work together and work on our weak nesses...I think it will make all the differences in years past.” C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 10 Judo athletes win silver, four bronze By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THE life of the late Gerald “Jerry” Lloyd Wisdom will be remembered as an extraordinary athlete, coach, mentor and historian, but one who never received any national acclaim for his achievement. Wisdom, 62, passed away on Saturday at the Princess Margaret Hospital. He will be buried 10am Saturday after a funeral service at Faith United Baptist Church where he will be eulogized by Rev Dr William Thompson. The accolades were pouring in yesterday from the track and field fraternity about the sprinter/long jumper who represented the Bahamas at the Olympic Gamesi n Mexico City in 1968. B ahamas Association of Athletic Associations (BAAA lic relations officer Kermit Taylor sent out condolences from the executive board, many of whom are in Berlin for the 12th IAAF World Championships. Jerry and I used to be roommates,” said businessman/politician Leslie Miller, who got Jerry, along with Willie Moss and the late Tommy Thompson, full fouryear scholarships from 1967-71 to go to Texas El Paso, known back then as Texas Western. “He was one of our top 100 and 200 sprinters. He was a very fine individual and I mourn his passing and offer my condolences to his family and his extended family, the athletes who would have known Gerry. He had a good career in track and field. He certainly made a contribution.” As a sprinter, Miller said Wisdom was called upon by the coaching staff and did a very good job as a member of the relay team, which also included former world record holder Bob Beamon, who expressed his con dolences on behalf of his family. Wayne Weindenburg, who served as the head track and field coach at Texas Western, also offered his condolences to the Wisdom family that includes his wife Linda, son Jason, daughterin-law Janua, two grand-children Raquel and Joshua, three broth ers Neville, Keith and Evon, three sisters-in-law Manita, Sonya and Yudenia and three step-children Owen, Danielle and Robin. Neville Wisdom, the former Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture, said all that he achieved during his tenure as a track and field coach with the Baintown Flyers, he owes it all to his older brother Gerry. “Jerry was my best friend. We grew up together. We were very close,” the former minister said. “He was actually the first athlete I coached, even though he was a little older than I was. “I just used to love to see him perform. He was a high school champion and he went on to become an Olympian. He and Leslie Miller represented the Bahamas with their team-mate Bob Beamon at the 1968 Mexi can Olympics. Bob had the best jump, but Jerry was right there.” Aside from his prowess on the track, Wisdom said his brother was a walking encyclopedia off the track. “He was one of the most knowledgeable and experienced sports personalities,” he said. “I often contacted him for advice and information. He was always right. Coach Gerald Wisdom dies at 62 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 Gerald Wisdom Pro golfers earn trip to World Cup qualifier KENO TURNQUEST , BPGA president Chris Lewis (centre (right BAHAMIAN professional bodybuilders and training partners Joel Stubbs and Jena Mackey (not shown competed in the International Bodybuilding Federation’s 2009 Tampa Pro Tournament in Florida over the weekend. However, neither of them finished in the top 10. Stubbs, competing in the men’s heavyweight division, was 12th overall with 180 points. The winner was Den nis James of Germany with 20, followed by Fouad Abiad of Canada with 40. Antoher Canadian Ben Pakulski was third with 61. The top three competitors qualified to compete in the 2009 Mr Olympia, scheduled for September 24-27 in Las Vegas. Mackey, competing in the women’s heavyweight division, was 11th overall. The title was won by Betty Pariso, who led an American sweep with Gale Frankie as the runner-up and Tina Chandler who placed third. Stubbs, Mackey don’t make top 10 Meacher Major’sB ack-toS chool Bash... See page 9

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Sweet Treat.59GETADONUTFORJUSTWhen you buy a Medium or Large Coee or Tea (at regular price)L IMITEDTIMEOFFERAVAILABLEATDOWNTOWNNASSAULOCATIONONLY NOW OPEN DOWNTOWNOPPOSITETHEBRITISHCOLONIALHILTONA ONVENIENTLOCATIONSA THEAIRPORTTOSERVEYOU BY KATHRYN CAMPBELL HEALTH, safety and protection of the environment "are of primary concern" during the Nassau Harbour and Arawak Cay port works, project manager with Boskalis International BV Frans T homassen assured government officials. "It is the responsibility of everyone on the site," he said during a tour of the project last Friday. The general scope of work includes dredging Nassau Harbour, sheet pile extension and reclamation works on Arawak Cay, andi nstallation of mooring dolphins at Prince George Wharf. “To protect the environment, we are using the highest standards ever seen in any project around the country,” said Public Works Minister Neko Grant. The alarms that were raised regarding the environment were without merit. In time we will see that we chose the right contractor who is making every effort to ensure the environment is not damaged.” Project Manager Mr Thomassen assured government officials t hat the project would be executed as if it were in an “environmentally sensitive area.” He outlined several environmental considerations that are required of the project team during the project. Dredging is expecte d to be completed by November. All equipment is checked for leaks before use, Mr Thomassen said. Any leak is cleaned up immediately utilising the emergency response spill kits available on the vessels and placed at strategic locations around the site during the dredging activities. Leaks are reported to the project manager. W aste is never to be thrown overboard and use of the designated waste skips located around the various working areas is mandatory, h e said. Equipment is switched off when not is use; the use of silt s creens in certain locations along the beach is mandatory; water clarity level are monitored twice a day; marine animals are not to be disturbed; and bunker fuel is permitted only in designated areas and according to agreed procedures with Port Authority, Mr T homassen explained. He emphasised that regulations stipulate that accidents, incid ents, near misses, damage to property and quality deviations are to be reported to management by all personnel on site, including v isitors. A mong the officials touring the site last Friday were Minister Grant; Environment Minister Earl Deveaux; permanent secretary at the Ministry of Works Colin Higgs; permanent secretary at the Ministry of the Environment Ronald Thompson; acting direc t or of Works Gordon Major; director of the Bahamas Environment Science and Technology (BEST p roject engineer Robert Garraway. Prior to the tour the team underwent a 20-minute safety and i nduction exercise, a mandatory requirement by contractor Boskalis International BV and sub-contractor American Bridge Bahamas for entry to the sites and vessels. Protection of the environment 'of primary concern' in harbour project GOVERNMENT project engineer on the Nassau Harbour Port Improvement Project Robert Garraway gives government ministers an update on the plans for the extension of Arawak Cay during a tour of the site on August 7. Pictured from left are Mr Garraway, Environment Minister Earl Deveaux; Project Manager with Boskalis International BV Frans Thomassen and Public Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant. PROJECT Manager with Boskalis International BV Frans Thomassen makes a point as he leads government officials on a tour of the Arawak Cay construction site. Pictured from left are Public Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant; acting director of Works Gordon Major; project engineer Robert Garraway; permanent secretary Colin Higgs, and Environment Minister the Earl Deveaux. (BIS photos/Patrick Hanna

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T HE SMESU Trade Unit of The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce in partnership with the Caribbean Regional Negotiation Machinery (CRNM Bahama Chamber of Com merce recently hosted a twoday seminar to highlight the benefits and opportunities that are available to professional service providers through the European Partnership Agreement (E.P.A. Seminars were held both in New Providence and Grand Bahama. Over the two days, the seminar attracted more than 150 professional service providers aiming to expose and inform them of the opportunities for market access to the Euro p ean Union (EU These benefits and rights of access for Bahamian ser vices providers are a result of the now concluded negotiations for the Economic Part nership Agreement (EPA The seminar attracted a diverse group of participants, which is indicative of the wide reach of those persons that stand to benefit and be impacted by this Agreement. Minister of State for Finance and the Public Ser vice, Zhivargo Laing opened the seminar at the British Colonial Hilton and welcomed the representatives from the CRNM. He commended the Chamber for hosting such a seminar, noting that the Bahamian business c ommunity needs to be educated on the impact that the EPA will have on the way they do business and the opportunities that are being created. The session in Nassau was also attended by leading lawyers, including the chair of the Bahamas Trade Commission, John Delaney and Frank Comito, Executive Director of the Bahamas Hotel Association. The seminar was facilitat ed by Ramesh Chaitoo, Head of the Services Trade Unit of the CRNM and Noel Watson, Trade Consultant to the CRNM. Seminar participants were provided with a general overview of the professional services element of the agree ment and the opportunities for further development of C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4.68$4.51$4.69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.96 $3.90 $4.10 #!( fr#"( #!!(,+( ,# #)&#!' )'(&#$' (,''(#&,'(#+"#)'#,' $& #"*+$&#+")&''+!!"$## ' fn"" By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net B ahamian hotels could see employment numbers increase in thef irst three months of 2010 after a 20 per cent contraction in tourism sector this year, according to the BahamasH otel Association President. I t is also thought that the need f or previously seen numbers in the industry has been drastically changed by the recession. Robert Sands, who is also a senior e xecutive with Baha Mar, said in the m idst of the global economic decline, hotels have adapted to running operations with reduced staff. However, according to him, fluctuations in employment numbersh ave always been, and will continue to be, driven by visitor numbers. And the industry has just entered the traditionally slow season for the y ear, curtailed minimally by the Miss Universe pageant. " There is no question in my mind that hotels are learning to work better with less, but an increase in business demand, by necessity, will demand labour," said Mr Sands. " I can't say that all the labour that h as been release will be replaced. "The reality is that there has been some downsizing in out sector in the last 12 months, so there is already downward pressure on head countsi n our business." Mr Sands said employment numbers could increase between January and March of next year, but added that until the economy and tourism regains the strength it once had, thei ndustry will not see employment levels where they once were. " Business is like an accordion and that accordion is almost comp ressed," he said. "We need to give it some new life a nd hopefully new life will come certainly during this period I don't see it happening. "I think we won't see any real demand for stimulating additional employment until winter of next y ear." He said the decline in the industry is evident by the number of layoffs and resort closures seen snowballing since year end 2008. " Employment levels match business demand," said Mr sands. Baha Mar will be closing its Wyndham resort on Monday, August 17, with the reopening scheduled for October 5. A ccording to Mr Sands, plans to close the hotel had been talked about 12 months prior, and employees were notified to take their vacations during that time. Hotel employment numbers could increase next year “There is no question in my mind that hotels are learning to work better with less, but an increase in business demand, by necessity, will demand labour. BHA president Robert Sands Ca b le Bahamas e xtends deadline f or pr ef er ence shar e of f ering EP A seminar attracts more than 150 professional service providers ROBERT SANDS By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter c robards@tribunemedia.net CABLE Bahamas has extended the deadline for its non-voting cumulative redeemable convertible pref e rence share offering because some interested purchasers h ave not been able to acquire t hem, according to sources close to the Cable Bahamas buyout. According to a release issued by the Bisx-listed cable c ompany: "The Board of Directors of Cable Bahamas Ltd wishes to announce that the closing date for the Series Four 8%, non-voting cumulative redeemable convertible preference share offering has been extended to August 31, 2009." Sources told Tribune Business the company wished to give those interested buyers a chance to purchase shares, as many individuals the company knew had shown interest were on holidays. "There has been substantial interest and it (the preference share offering) was well received," the source said. The $80million buyout of its controlling shares will put i n place the structure that deals with our financing for t he next three to four years", C able Bahamas' president, Anthony Butler, told Tribune Business recently. H e said the company’s buy back of its majority shareh older’s stake would “position us well to take advantage of the opportunities” stemming from the government’s deregulation/liberlisation of the Bahamian communications market, through removing any issues surrounding ‘foreign ownership’ of Cable Bahamas. The purchase is being financed through the combination of a $40million preference share issue, a $105mil lion senior bank credit facility and Cable Bahamas’ own working capital. The BISXlisted firm is raising for more than the $80million it needs to finance the Columbus purchase because it wants to refinance its existing credit facilitates at the same time. “We’re basically refinanc ing our existing credit facilities,” Mr Butler told Tribune Business, adding that the company’s existing credit line was around $28 million according to his last recollection. S S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y P revious CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.811.28Abaco Markets1.341.340.000.1270.00010.60.00% 1 1.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9 .306.25Bank of Bahamas6.256.250.000.2440.26025.64.16% 0 .890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 1 4.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3511.350.001.4060.2508.12.20% 2 .882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7 .505.50Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.605.760.167,9090.4190.36013.76.25% 3 .851.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.483.850.370.1110.05234.71.35% 2 .851.32Doctor's Hospital1.821.820.000.2400.0807.64.40% 8 .206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 1 2.5010.00Finco10.6310.630.000.3220.52033.04.89% 11.7110.30FirstCaribbean Bank10.3010.300.000.7940.35013.03.40% 5.534.95Focol (S)5.135.130.000.3320.15015.52.92% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9 .025.50ICD Utilities5.495.490.000.4070.50013.59.11% 12.0010.39J. S. Johnson10.3910.390.000.9520.64010.96.16% 1 0.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1 000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1 000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100000 100000 FidelitBkNote13(SeriC)+ FBB13 10000 000 MONDAY, 10 AUGUST 2009B ISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,564.59| CHG 8.48 | %CHG 0.54 | YTD -147.77 | YTD % -8.63BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7 % P rime + 1.75% 7% BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: 30May2013 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 InterestF INDEX: CLOSE 779.58 | YTD -6.62% | 2008 -12.31% 1 000 . 0 0 1 000 . 0 0 F idelity B ank N ote 1 3 ( Series C ) + F BB13 1 00 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0 .540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 4 1.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.38601.3231CFAL Bond Fund1.38602.404.75 3 .03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.9047-1.20-3.66 1 .48171.4059CFAL Money Market Fund1.48173.355.38 3.60903.1031Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1031-8.35-13.82 12.980112.3289Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.98012.875.79 1 01.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 1 00.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.47339.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9 .27652.00-2.98 1.06221.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.06222.566.22 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0243-0.842.43 1.05851.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05852.045.85 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-May-09 Prime + 1.75% 7 % 30-Jun-09 3 0-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 NAV Date 3 0-Jun-09Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities C olina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds 3 0 M ay 2 013 29 May 2015TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-75253 0-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 31-Dec-07 3 0-Jun-09 31-Jul-09 31-Jul-09 30-Jun-09MARKET TERMS By BETSY VERECKEY AP Business Writer NEW YORK (AP ald's Corp. said Monday its samestore sales climbed 4.3 per cent in July, as the nation's biggest hamburger chain benefited from budget-conscious consumers and wide promotion of new coffee drinks. The Oak Brook, Ill., company said US same-store sales climbed 2.6 per cent because of new products, including McCafe espressobased coffee. European same-store sales surged 7.2 per cent, helped by growth in France and the UK. Same-store sales for Asia Pacific, the Middle East and Africa rose 2.1 per cent, as strength in Australia helped offset weakness in China. Longer operating hours also boosted sales. Deutsche Bank analyst Jason West, who rates the stock "Buy," said the third quarter "is off to a good start" but maintained his earnings-per-share estimate of $1.10. McDonald's same-store sales, or sales at restaurants open at least 13 months, are a key indicator of performance because they measure growth at existing restaurants rather than newly opened ones. Total sales declined 0.3 per cent because of currency translation. McDonald's shares rose $1.07, or 1.9 per cent, to close at $56.27 Monday. Many companies that sell their products abroad convert sales from foreign currencies back to dollars when reporting financial results. When the dollar is stronger than those currencies, it results in fewer dollars in revenue. McDonald's results have benefited from consumers trading down to cheaper meal options amid the recession, but its second-quarter profit declined eight per cent because of the stronger dollar and a year-ago gain. Year-ago results also benefited from a better economy and stimulus checks, the company s aid. M cDonald's, which has at least 3 2,000 restaurants worldwide, plans to release August same-store sales on September 9. McDonald’s July same-store sales rise 4.3% IN THIS April 20, 2009 file photo, the lights from cars streak past the Rock N Roll McDonald's restaurant in Chicago... C h a r l e s R e x A r b o g a s t / A P trade in services between The Bahamas, the members of Cariforum and the EU. The presenters are rated among the best in region. Mr Chaitoo was the lead negotiator for services during the three years of EPA negotiations. Hank Ferguson, Director of the Chamber of Commerce’s SMESU Trade Unit, noted: “We are grateful for the support of the Grand Bahama Chamber of Com merce and were fully supported by the Minister of State for Finance and The Bahamas Trade Commission.” “We were also particularly happy to be able to take this seminar, which is partially funded by a grant from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB Grand Bahama. This engage ment enabled the private sector there to be engaged in this important national discussion.” The facilitators spoke to architects, engineers, lawyers, tour operators and other Bahamian service providers on the benefits and opportu nities for Bahamians to do business in Europe. As the Head of the Services Trade Unit at the CRNM, Mr Chaitoo researches and analyses bilateral, regional and multilateral trade policy issues and advises Caribbean gov ernments on negotiating strategies and options regarding services. He was responsible for services and investment negotiations in the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA FORUM states and the Euro pean Union. Chaitoo is a graduate of Carleton Univer sity, Cambridge University and the University of the West Indies. Mr Chaitoo urged the Bahamas follow the lead of its Caribbean counterparts and form a Coalition of Ser vice Industries saying: “The Bahamian private sector needs to be better organized to take advantage of the opportunities being presented through the EPA. Professional service providers not represented by an Association will have a difficult time being recognized by governments and export development companies.” He encouraged business persons to continue to edu cate themselves on the details of the EPA, citing resources like the CRNM’s website as informative tools. Noel Watson is Chairman of A-Z Information Jamaica Limited, which is a consult ing and information firm operating in the Caribbean. His consultancy work on the removal of restrictions to the free movement of services and capital was important to the establishment of the CARICOM Single Market that officially came into being in early 2006. He received a PhD in economics from Simon Fraser University in Canada. When asked what he’d like seminar participants to take away from the event, a passionate Watson exclaimed, “Bahamians ought to take action now. Take advantage of the window of opportunity in the European market now.” E E P P A A , , f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B SHOWN (l-r director, Chamber of Commerce, Ramesh Chaitoo, head of the Services Trade Unit, CRNM, Hank Ferguson, director, Chamber of Com merce SMESU Trade Unit, Noel Watson, trade consultant, CRNM, and John Delaney, chairman of the Bahamas Trade Commission

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By ALAN SAYRE AP Business Writer NEW ORLEANS (AP With the world becoming ever less welcoming for tobacco smoke of all kinds, the owners of specialty shops that sell premium cigars have converged on New Orleans with the same concerns as massmarket cigarette manufacturers higher taxes and antismoking laws. The cigars at the annual trade show of the International Premium Cigar & Pipe Retailers Association are not the packaged stogies found in an isolated corner of a convenience store. These are h and-rolled smokes somet imes with Cuban seed tobac c o grown in a non-embargoed country that can go from a couple of bucks to $30 each. “It’s tough,” said Chris McCalla, legislative director for Columbus, Ga.-based IPCRA, which represents about 1,500 tobacco stores. “People view us in the same category of cigarettes. With a cigar, it’s different. It’s a pleasurable experience. It’s socialization of sorts.” Mark Twain once said he always tried not to smoke two cigars at once. Winston Churchill smoked cigars in peacetime and wartime. A cigar was more than just a prop for Groucho Marx. JohnF Kennedy enjoyed puffing although he barred the import of Cuban cigars during his showdowns with another cigar aficionado, Fidel Castro, who later claimed to havequit smoking. And, in mod ern times, Rush Limbaugh often associates himself with a premium cigar. “The cigar continues to have a unique place in the hearts of a lot of men,” said Norm Sharp, president of the Cigar Association of America,a Washington, D.C.-based trade group of distributors and manufacturers. “There are a lot of aficionados out there.” And many detractors, including the American Can cer Society, which has said that cigars as well as pipes are not a safe substitute for cigarettes and carry much of the same cancer risk. IPCRA estimates there are 12 to 13 million cigar smokers in the United States, who puff an average of two a week, ranging from several a day to the special-event-only smok er, McCalla said. When Congress hiked cigarette taxes earlier this year, cigars did not escape the attention of lawmakers, who imposed a tax increase between about five cents and 40 cents per cigar. The industry now fears that state legis latures, many of which are trying to close big budget gaps, will follow suit. “Tobacco is considered low-hanging fruit for taxation,” Sharp said. A nd cigars are among the active targets for anti-smoking groups. Although only Delaware, Washington state and Utah ban puffing in tobacco establishments, the city of Galve-s ton, Texas, recently passed a clean air ordinance that for bids smoking in a planned cigar lounge a store that provides a room for cigar-lovers to visit and enjoy their tobac co. Owner Charlie Head, who p lans to open September 1 after his previous store was wiped out by Hurricane Ike, said it’s ridiculous to think people who don’t smoke would even come inside his business, which includes lock ers for smokers to store their cigars and liquor they bring in. “We’re going ahead with it,” Head said. “But a big part of our business is locker rental.” Head said he hoped to win an exemption for his shop before the ban takes effect on January 1. Even before the spread of cigarette smoking bans, cig ars and pipes received a chilly reception in many places. Airliners that used to permit cigarettes wouldn’t allow cigars and pipes. And many smoking bars today are actually cigarette-only bars don’t light up that cigar or pipe, a sign often says. As a result, cigar smoking has become largely a private activity, McCalla said, with the cigar lounge or cigar bar ap opular gathering place. “Most cigar smokers would like to sit down comfortably and smoke with others,” he said. The recession has cut into business, said Doug Winston,m anager of the New Orleans C igar Co., a 700-square-foot store in the downtown district. To start with, go-outside-tosmoke rules are making short er cigars more popular. “With the tax and the economy, people also seem to beg oing to the lesser-expensive cigars,” Winston said. As for the convention itself, which is hosting about 4,000 people through Wednesday, smoking will be allowed in the exhibit hall between 10am and 5pm. But members of the public aren’t invited to the meeting and no one under 18 will be let in, McCalla said. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009, PAGE 3B btrt tfr f r!%* &'!$()))!*&*# tffn""bnff !$ %#&!*&*# !%** Cigar shops fret over higher taxes and smoking laws F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s VARIOUS CIGARS are displayed at the 77th annual trade show of the International Premium Cigar & Pipe Retailers Association in New Orleans on Saturday... J u d i B o t t o n i / A P

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By WAYNE PARRY Associated Press Writer ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (APno revenues were all wet during a rainy July that kept gamblers away. The city's 11 casinos won $383 million in July, a 12.7 per cent decline from a year ago. Slot revenue was $266.8 million, down 12.4 per cent, while table games revenue was $116.2 million, down 13.4 per cent. The city is in the midst of a t hird straight year of declining r evenues that started when s lots parlors began opening in neighbouring Pennsylvania in November 2006. The recession also has made gamblers keep a tighter hold on their wallets. For the first seven months of this year, Atlantic City casinos won $2.3 billion, down 1 4.9 per cent from the same p eriod in 2008. O nly one casino, the Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort, posted an increase in revenue last month, up 8.7 per cent. Mark Juliano, CEO of Trump Entertainment Resorts, said the heavy investment the company made in its flagship property is paying off; it opened a second hotel tower last year, adding nearly 800 new rooms. "Where we spend the most t ime and effort, we're getting the biggest and best results," he said. For all of 2009 so far, the Taj Mahal has posted the best performance in Atlantic City, down just 2.5 per cent. That's twice as good as the perennial market leader, the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa, which is d own 5.2 per cent year-tod ate. T rump Trump Entertainment recently chose Donald Trump and Dallas-based Beal Bank to buy it out of bankruptcy court for $100 million. Bondholders say they'll try to block the deal, which would leave them with nothing. A decision is due in late October. Trump Plaza Hotel and C asino posted the biggest decline, down 27.6 per cent. The third Trump casino, Trump Marina Hotel Casino, was down 14.2 per cent. A deal fell apart in June in which a former protege of Donald Trump, Richard Fields, was to buy the casino and rebrand it as Margarit aville in conjunction with s inger Jimmy Buffett. T wo casinos beset by labour strike also fared particularly poorly in July. Caesars Atlantic City and Bally's Atlantic City have been picketed by the United Auto Workers, which has taken out billboard, print and broadcast advertisements urging gamblers to play elsewhere. The union is protesting the casinos' failure to sign contracts with workers more than two y ears after dealers voted to unionize. Caesars was down 19.7 per cent, and Bally's was down 17.3 per cent. "It has cast somewhat of a pall on the city and our properties," said Dan Nita, MidAtlantic president of Harrah's Entertainment Inc. "We're g etting calls from customers u pset that they're being r eached out to by the UAW." Other declines were at Harrah's Resort Atlantic City (down 15.6 per cent Atlantic City Hilton Casino Resort (down 15 per cent the Showboat Casino Hotel (down 13.8 per cent Borgata, which was down 9.7 per cent last month. The Tropicana Casino and Resort, which was recently sold to a group led by billiona ire investor Carl Icahn, was down 9.1 per cent, and Resorts Atlantic City was down 7.5 per cent. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009/CLE/qui/0666 IN THE SUPREME COURT IN THE MATTER OF ALLTHATpiece parcel of land being Parcel A bounded on the NORTH by the other part of Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or formerly the Property of F. A. Garraway and running thereon Fifty-two Feet and thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’ bounded on the EASTby Parcel B and running thereon One Hundred Twenty-ve Feet (125’ portion of Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or formerly the property of Richard Sands and running thereon Fifty-Two Feet and Thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’the WESTby the other portion of the Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or formerly the property of Richard Sands and running thereon One Hundred Twenty-ve Feet (125’Six Thousand Eighty-three square feet (6,083 sq. ft.Western District of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas shown on the plan led herein and thereon coloured pink AND IN THE MATTER OF ALLTHATpiece parcel of land being Parcel B bounded on the NORTH by the other p art of Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or formerly the Property of F. A. Garraway and running thereon Fifty-two Feet and thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’by the other portion of the Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or formerly the property of Richard Sands and running thereon One Hundred Twenty-ve Feet (125’ the portion of Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or formerly the property of Richard Sands and running thereon Fifty-Two Feet and Thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’ bounded on the WESTby Parcel Aand running thereon One Hundred Twenty-ve Feet (125’Thousand Eighty-three square feet (6,083 sq. ft.Western District of the said Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas shown on the plan led herein and thereon coloured yellow. AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Buster, Caswell and Pauline Ferguson. NOTICE The Quieting Titles Act 1959 The Petition of Buster Ferguson of the Eastern District in the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Pauline and Caswell Ferguson both of the Southern District of the said Island of New Providence in respect of: ALL THATpiece parcel of land being Parcel Abounded on the NORTH by the other part of Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or formerly the Property of F. A. Garraway and running thereon Fifty-two Feet and thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’ EASTby Parcel B and running thereon One Hundred Twenty-ve Feet (125’ Allotment #22 now or formerly the property of Richard Sands and running thereon Fifty-Two Feet and Thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’ bounded on the WESTby the other portion of the Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or formerly the property of Richard Sands and running thereon One Hundred Twenty-ve Feet (125’ Thousand Eighty-three square feet (6,083 sq. ft. Western District of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas shown on the plan led herein and thereon coloured pink AND IN THE MATTER OF ALLTHATpiece parcel of land being Parcel B bounded on the NORTH by the other part of Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or formerly the Property of F. A. Garraway and running thereon Fifty-two Feet and thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’by the other portion of the Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or formerly the property of Richard Sands and running thereon One Hundred Twenty-ve Feet (125’ Allotment #22 now or formerly the property of Richard Sands and running thereon Fifty-Two Feet and Thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’ bounded on the WESTby Parcel Aand running thereon One Hundred Twenty-ve Feet (125’Thousand Eighty-three square feet (6,083 sq. ft.Western District of the said Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas shown on the plan led herein and thereon coloured yellow. Buster, Caswell and Pauline Ferguson claim to be the owners of the fee simple estate in possession of the tracts of land hereinbefore described free from encumbrances. AND the Petitioners have made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have their title to the said tracts of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certicate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act. NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that any persons having Dower or a Right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the petition shall on or before the 30th of September A.D., 2009 le in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioners or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed form veried by an Afdavit to be led therewith. Failure of any such person to le and serve a statement of his claim on or before the 30th of September A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to such claim. Copies of the Filed Plan may be inspected at: 1.The Registry of the Supreme Court; 2.The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co. attorneys for the Petitioner, Sassoon House, Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas; Dated the 6th day of August A.D., 2009 GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO., Chambers, Sassoon House, Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas. Attorneys for the Petitioners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he Public is hereby advised that I, DEVAUGHN QUINCY KEMPof the City of Nassau, of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, intends to change the name to DEVAUGHN QUINCY KEMP-SAWYER .If there are any objections to this change o f name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Ofcer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30 PUBLIC NOTICE INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL Atlantic City casino revenues down 12.7%

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B y BERNADETTE G IBSON GREEN SCENE By Gardener Jack L OVING RELATIONSHIPS C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE health B ODYANDMIND T h e T r i b u n e INthe last few weeks, we have disc ussed the ever increasing growth of I nternet use world wide, computer suave children, adolescents and the explosion of sexual interest online. Logically, it would then make sense t hat people who find sexual gratific ation online would allow their minds t o wander throughout the day to places of comfort and contentment. If your workplace does not have anyp olicies concerning Internet usage during work hours, then the door is left wide open. I s it wrong, therefore, to cut your l unch break short to check the chat room you were in before you left home, and continue the conversation w ith that beautiful person in Dallas? Down load those sexy full frontal shots of teenagers because no onec hecks your computer at work? Perhaps you have had a scare about a sexually transmitted disease you do not want to ask anyone, but just need to do a little research. Is it all classed as online sexual activity and is it all bad? Should the repercussions varyd epending on the act and should the position you hold in the company be relevant? Rules and regulations concerning s exual issues need to be laid out, very clearly, in black and white for all to see. Staff hand books have detailsa bout conduct and sexual harassment, b ut rarely do they define the behaviour. Statistically, larger companies s eem to do a little better because they h ave the staff, access to professional advice and funding to implement training programs. They are acutely a ware of the cost of firing, rehiring a nd training of staff. The more forward thinking com panies are seeing the benefits of cari ng and understanding for the com plete individual and the value of investing in a person's future. We k now now that a healthy individual, b oth in body and mind, produces a b etter employee. But let us not get so idealistic in our thinking that we lose s ight of the potential legal ramifica tions and the pay outs for sexual harassment lawsuits. Companiesk now that they need to keep away from the far reaching effects of being labeled a 'hostile work environment'a nd so they are attempting to antici pate sexual problems before they are faced with them. The reality is that many jobs require some online time and so the r ules become vague and can be m anipulated. Some companies have guidelines determining if the conduct is viewed as one of concern, undesirable online sexual activity, or a real problem that warrants interv ention. Others do not discriminate o r differentiate. They use time, money and energy to monitor and police their employee's online behaviour. A re we always able to recognise a person who has a void in their life and who needs to find an outlet to fillt hat space? Not all of us are good at s olving our problems, reaching out for help, or even having someone to trust to share our most innermost t houghts. It is those isolated people who have trouble dealing with their internal self and who have not learntg ood coping skills, are those who are so susceptible. Because of its easy accessibility, anonymity and affordability the Internet is the obvious choice for many. The sexual activity online becomes the quick fix instead of a drink, smoke, pill or any other' upper'. However, if we do notice changes in our colleague's behaviour, then hopefully it would not be left unat t ended. The most visible clue may be a drop in productivity but there are less obvious changes that are soe asy to attribute to outside stressors. Signs for concern include: unhappin ess, secretiveness, shame, guilt, w anting to be alone, and unwillingness to interact with coworkers. If the online use is being tracked for 2 hours a day, purely for sexual use, it i s a clear indicator that the behavi our has now become compulsive. W orkplace reality is that there is always the possibility that you can lose so much more than just yourj ob. For those who have spent years building a career, establishing a position in society, it can all come crash-i ng down and have devastating e ffects. Perhaps, the most difficult aspect of the problem after reaching rock bottom is the helplessness to r id the label of 'Sex Addict'. All of this should make us think carefully before using our work computer forp ersonal use. Employers also need to step up and play their part in providing an environment that is healthy and conducive for work. Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse and a Certified Clin ical Sex Therapist. Call for an appoint mentRelate Bahamas at 3647230, o remail relatebahamas@yahoo.com orwww.relatebahamas.blogspot.com. She is also available for speakinge ngagements. SEX AND THE NET: WORK PLACE REALITY B y MAGGIE B AIN MANY of our tropical fruits orig inate in Asia so it makes a change to find one that is a favorite in Asia but comes from Central America. Guavas can now be found all through the tropical and subtropi cal world but their ripening habits and soft fruits make them very diffi cult to export. Guava (Psidium guajava been naturalised in The Bahamas and grows in the wild, particularly near to abandoned settlements. The trees are easily distinguished by their perpetually peeling coppery bark and the strongly veined leaves. Wild guava trees rarely bear heavily and tend to produce on and off throughout the year. Summer, and August in particular, is the time of heaviest bearing. One of the problems associated with wild guava trees is their sus ceptibility to attack by fruit flies and the subsequent larvae, or ‘worms’, that infest the fruits at ripening time. The fruits also tend to be quite small, usually about golf ball size. Cultivated guavas are a completely different experience. Their fruits usually have a skin thick enough to deter predation by fruit flies. They are also much larger, as large as a baseball or bigger. According to the cultivator the flesh of guavas can be white, pink or red while the skin can be all of these colours plus yellow. Small cultivated guava trees should be set out in well drained soil in a location where they receive full sunlight and no salt spray. As long as the soil is well drained the guava is not fussy about soil type. Culti vated guava trees bear early and benefit from pruning when the main growing season is over. The guava flowers look like straw berry blossoms that quickly give way to young fruits after being pollinated by bees. The tree rarely grows taller than a large shrub, though the native guavas tend to be leggier and taller, more like small trees. The bane of native guava is the presence of many small but very hard seeds. Many of the cultivated varieties are virtually seedless or have much smaller seeds. Guava fruits should be picked when mature yet still firm or the risk is run of having them fall from the tree and become inedible. Even one guava inside a house makes its presence known through a pervad ing aroma that is impossible to hide. It is one of the most pleasant of nat ural scents. Fruits that are picked, or have dropped, while still hard can be ripened by placing them in a paper bag and adding a little banana peel or a slice of apple. The majority of Bahamian guavas will be picked and turned into gua va jam, one of the most delicious of all jams. Much of the remainder will contribute towards guava duff, a steamed pudding that uses both the guava flesh and the seed pulp. The pulp sauce that accompanies guava duff is usually lightly fortified with brandy or rum. The same sauce works well when poured hot over vanilla ice cream. The Cattley or strawberry guava is a small shrub with shiny leaves that can be grown in a 20-gallon con tainer. Perhaps I should not advise you to do that because Cattley guava is on the Florida list of undesir able plants and I would not like to be accused of encouraging the criminal element of plant life. If your Cattley guava is grown in a container and the seeds disposed of prop erly then I see little harm in raising one or two. Children will thank you for it. Cattley guava fruits are about an inch long and shaped like pears. The fruit does not taste like strawber ries but is quite pleasant. The seeds are very different from regular guava, being quite large in relation to the fruit and fluted. Cattley guava trees tend to bear in the spring and early summer. j.hardy@coralwave.com Guavas CULTIVATED g uavas are larger t han native varieties and tend t o have thicker skins, all the better to ward off fruit flies. A s we wind down to the opening of the school year, many parents are busy selecting footwear for their children. I find it neces sary to address this topic as many children experience foot problems due to improper footwear. Parents can worry about their child's teeth, eyes, but may not give as much concern to the developing foot. Many adult foot problems c an have their origins in childhood, s o attention to footwear in chil dren can minimise these problems in adults. Buy Children's Shoes that Fit it is not unusual for a parent or grandparent to purchase shoes for a child without the child present. A child's shoe should be directly fitted to the foot in the store. Tradi tionally, it was standard to buy shoes for children that were two sizes too big to cut down on cost. It is good to buy kids footwear a little larger to leave room to grow, but anything more than one size b igger is too big. Proper fit when considering size the length and width of the shoe must be considered. The width of the shoe is extremely important, especially if the child has wide feet. Do not purchase shoes more than one size larger even if you are experiencing difficulties finding the right width, seek the help of a specialty store where adjustments can be done to support the width of the child's feet. Shoes that are too big can cause heel slipping and a child can trip when walking. Further, toes can slide forward and be very uncomf ortable resulting with sore toes. L ikewise, shoes that are too tight or small will cause sore feet, ingrown toenails and other foot problems. Comfort Children's shoes should be comfortable immedi ately, while in the store and not be expected to be “broken in” or stretched” later. If the shoe does not appear to have enough sup port, there are specialty stores that can add proper inserts not only to support the foot, but also help to wick away moisture. Moisture management prevents fungus, odors and athlete's foot from developing. Inspect Children's Shoes regularly even after kids' footwear is purchased they need to be checked regularly for wear and tear around the soles and for proper cushioning and arch support. Children tend to adapt to what they regard as normal and accept it. Peer group pressure and the dictates of fashion may also stop a child complaining. This is why skilled shoe fitters/specialist and regular checks are important, par ticularly with young children. Socks the sock should fit and be the same size as the shoe. One hundred per cent cotton is best, especially if the child has skin problems. Most cotton socks contain a small percentage of nylon. A fifty per cent wool with fifty per cent mix is also very good. Avoid one hundred per cent nylon socks as they will make the foot sweat and do not absorb moisture. Today, modern walking socks have a wick ing effect (e.g. Thorlos In conclusion, poorly fitted children's shoes can cause a number of problems in adults. Therefore, it is logical to attempt to prevent these problems by ensuring that the child's shoe is fitted appropri ately. Bernadette D. Gibson , a Board Certified & licensed Pedorthist, is the proprietor of Foot Solutions, a health and wellness franchise that focuses on foot care and proper shoe fit, located in the Sandyport Plaza, Nassau. Please direct any questions or comments to nas sau@footsolutions.com or 327-FEET (3338 "The views expressed are those of the author and does not necessarily represent those of Foot Solutions Incorporated or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated companies”. Tips for fitting and selecting children’s footwear

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C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009, PAGE 7B MISS Bahamas, one of the 84 contestants of the Miss Universe 2009 pageant, is shown leaving the Poop Deck restaurant on West Bay Street where the girls were treated to lunch on Saturday. ALL HANDS ON DECK The Poop Deck hosts lunch for Miss Universe contestants Felip Major /Tribune staff

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C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Em band, Nita and KB to name a few of the entertainers who were present. In brief remarks, Owen Bethel, the chairman of the local Miss Uni verse planning committee, thanked the ground team for their hard work, dedication and determination in lying the ground work for the pageant over the last six months. Noting her surroundings and the effort the staff had made in trans forming the grounds of the Bal moral, Paula Shugart told the con testants that they would soon see why it was indeed “ better in the Bahamas,” while the reigning Miss Universe Dayana Mendoza said that she has truly identified with the Bahamas and in her numerous visits here feels like she is Bahami an. Tourism Minister Vincent Van derpool Wallace joked that it was easy to receive RSVPs for the event as people were extremely eager to get the chance to interact with the international beauties. He added that he was extremely pleased that throughout their time in the country, the contestants would be able to visit several of the other family islands so that they can get a true Bahamian experience. Following dinner, guests were treated to a dazzling fireworks dis play. Fortunately Mother Nature was also in a welcoming mood as the night was clear until after the guests had started to leave when a light sprinkle came down placing a final stamp on a truly magical evening. A Bahamian welcome for inter national beauties FROM page 10 By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Feature Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net Meet four of the contestants from Africa and Europe MISS FRANCE NAME: Chloe Mortaud AGE: 19 Chloe said her role model is actress Halle Berry, and hopes to one day become as successful as her. One thing most people don’t know about her is that she is the first Miss France to have duel citizenship. She said although there is a common assumption that French people are bourgeoisies: “we really like the simple life.” She said one of the most emotional moments in her life was when she recently watched the inauguration of US President Barack Obama while in Washington DC. “I cried because here it was a black person being made the president of one of the biggest countries of the world. I was enjoying it, all those years people fought for liberty and freedom, and today it seems like all of that has come to being, it was good to see that through my own eyes. If I have children I will tell them ‘mommy was there to see that.’” Chloe said her mother is a black American originally from Mississippi and her father is French, a combination that helped to create her exotic look. She said the Bahamas is far different from France, the sun shines brighter, the water is warmer, and the food is more ‘alive.’ She said so far in the Bahamas her favourite food is conch salad. Chloe is 5 foot 10 and also speaks three languages; English, French, and Chinese. MISS IRELAND NAME: Diana Donnelly AGE: 20 PROFESSION: Model “I don’t know how I will compare to the other girls in this pageant, but I will definitely give it my best shot and just hope for the best. I have a good personality, and a great sense of humor.” Diana said her family will arrive the week of the pageant to support her but other than that she did not bring any Irish lucky charms with her. “ I left the lepruchans at home,” she laughed. Comparing the similarities with the Bahamas and Ireland, Diana said the people are similar because they are both warm and welcoming. However the beaches are a lot different, she said in the Bahamas the beaches are clear, but at home they are all rocky and very dark. Her favourite place in the world is her home in Dublin, Ireland. She is 5 feet 9 inches, and is excited to rep resent her country in the 2009 Miss Universe Pageant. MISS NAMIBIA NAME: Happie Ntelamo AGE: 21 Happie said although she has the potential to be a model she has not tried her hand at it, and added that even though she would like to win the Miss Universe competition, she would be just as happy to know that she was able to put a smile on someone’s face through her role as Miss Namibia. Happie is 6 foot tall, and is pursuing a law degree at the University of Namibia. She described her country as very dry: “There’s the Sahara, the Namib, and the Kalahari Desert, which are all very dry. August is actually the windiest month for us, it’s also very cold now in the city because we are now experiencing winter there.” In her spare time to unwind, Happie said she enjoys afternoon picnics by the lakeside with her friends and loves the night life. MISS SOUTH AFRICA NAME: Tatum Keshwar AGE: 25 PROFESSION: Model and Industrial Psychologist Tatum first competed in Miss South Africa in 2005 and although she was unsuccessful, she continued to prepare herself mentally and physically. In December 2008, she won the crown and is now competing against 84 other girls for the title of Miss Universe, and this time, she has just one shot. She is confident that she can be a wonder ful role model and ambassador for her country if she were to win Miss Universe. “Preparations for me took quite a while, I did a lot of growing those three years between both pageants. “I did a lot of traveling, I completed my degree in Industrial Psychology, I also got a good job practicing my industrial psychology degree which was great because corporate experience really grows your mind, it opens your mind up, and actually I’ve become quite business minded now. I did a lot of physical preparations, and also a lot of reading.” She grew up in KwaZulu-Natal in Durban, which is on the east coast of South Africa, and said it’s as beautiful and very similar to the Bahamas. Tatum said she grew up listening to golden oldies. One of her favourite groups is Earth, Wind, and Fire. She grew up with her Mom, Dad, and younger sister Chanel. “My mom is one of nine, my dad is one of ten, so I have a huge family and extended family,” she said. Tatum said during her reign as Miss South Africa, she hopes to bring change to the polarisation of rural and urban areas of South Africa as the rural regions are so much more underdeveloped.

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 74F/23C Low: 77F/25C Low: 77F/25C Low: 78F/26C Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 80F/27C Low: 80 F/27 C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 94F/34C High: 91F/33C High: 90 F/32 C High: 90 F/32 C High: 90F/32C High: 88 F/31C High: 88F/31C Low: 77F/25C High: 89F/32C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 91F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 70F/21C High: 90 F/32 C Low: 78F/26C High: 89 F/32 Low: 73F/23C High: 87F/31C Low: 75 F/24C High: 89F/32C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 93F/34C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 90F/32C Low: 73 F/23 C High: 90F/32C Low: 75F/24C High: 92 F/33 C Low: 77F/25C High: 93F/34C High: 89 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 11 TH , 2009, PAGE 9B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. Patchy clouds with a shower. Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 88 Low: 80 High: 89 High: 89 High: 90 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Some sun with a shower or t-storm. High: 90 Low: 81 Low: 80 Low: 80 AccuWeather RealFeel 97F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 85F 97-87F 98-90F 102-83F 94-87F Low: 81 TODAYTONIGHTWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................90F/32C Low ....................................................79F/26C Normal high ......................................89F/32C Normal low ........................................76F/24C Last year's high .................................. 93 F/34C Last year's low .................................. 77 F/25C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................trace Year to date ................................................20.82" Normal year to date ....................................26.96" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Last New First Full Aug. 13 Aug. 20Aug. 27Sep. 4 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:42 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:48 p.m. Moonrise . . . 10:56 p.m. Moonset . . . . 11:30 a.m. Today Wednesday Thursday Friday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 11:51 a.m.2.95:31 a.m.0.2 -----6:11 p.m.0.5 12:09 a.m.2.46:13 a.m.0.2 12:39 p.m.2.97:05 p.m.0.5 12:59 a.m.2.47:02 a.m.0.3 1:35 p.m.2.98:07 p.m.0.6 1:57 a.m.2.38:00 a.m.0.3 2:39 p.m.2.99:14 p.m.0.5 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco93/3377/25pc92/3379/26pc Amsterdam72/2259/15c70/2155/12r Ankara, Turkey81/2748/8s81/2750/10s Athens86/3072/22s84/2870/21s Auckland59/1546/7c59/1548/8r Bangkok90/3278/25t90/3279/26t Barbados90/3279/26pc86/3077/25s Barcelona82/2769/20pc81/2769/20pc Beijing95/3573/22s96/3573/22s Beirut80/2676/24s81/2776/24s Belgrade82/2763/17t82/2761/16pc Berlin72/2255/12pc70/2154/12sh Bermuda84/2875/23s86/3076/24s Bogota66/1844/6sh67/1943/6c Brussels72/2255/12sh75/2359/15sh Budapest77/2559/15t82/2759/15pc Buenos Aires62/1650/10pc66/1854/12pc Cairo97/3672/22s96/3574/23s Calcutta92/3383/28t91/3282/27t Calgary68/2044/6pc66/1846/7s Cancun91/3277/25pc90/3278/25pc Caracas78/2568/20t83/2872/22t Casablanca87/3071/21s89/3169/20s Copenhagen76/2457/13pc71/2155/12sh Dublin70/2155/12sh64/1752/11pc Frankfurt77/2555/12pc79/2657/13pc Geneva 77/25 56/13 s 78/2557/13s Halifax 64/17 59/15 t 73/22 57/13 pc Havana 93/33 73/22 t 89/31 72/22 r Helsinki 70/21 52/11sh70/2150/10r Hong Kong 91/32 84/28 t 91/32 82/27t Islamabad 102/38 86/30 s 109/42 85/29 s Istanbul80/2663/17s83/2867/19s Jerusalem 84/28 65/18s86/3063/17s Johannesburg 70/2145/7s69/2046/7s Kingston 89/3179/26t89/3179/26sh Lima72/2258/14s72/2259/15s London77/2559/15pc77/2555/12sh Madrid90/3263/17pc91/3263/17pc Manila88/3179/26pc86/3078/25c Mexico City75/2354/12t77/2555/12t Monterrey104/4075/23s104/4076/24s Montreal75/2359/15pc82/2764/17s Moscow73/2252/11pc77/2557/13pc Munich77/2554/12sh75/2358/14pc Nairobi79/2654/12pc79/2654/12c New Delhi 99/3784/28pc97/3684/28pc Oslo68/2052/11pc67/1950/10sh Paris77/2558/14pc79/2655/12pc Prague 77/25 55/12 c 76/24 58/14 sh Rio de Janeiro70/2165/18sh75/2368/20c Riyadh112/4490/32s109/4290/32s Rome 86/30 66/18 s 88/31 68/20 s St. Thomas90/3279/26t90/3280/26r San Juan77/2541/5pc83/2844/6pc San Salvador 88/31 70/21 t 87/30 74/23 t Santiago 70/2145/7pc61/1641/5c Santo Domingo91/3274/23pc87/3073/22r Sao Paulo 62/16 56/13 sh 69/20 59/15sh Seoul82/2770/21r86/3068/20r Stockholm 70/21 57/13 sh 73/22 55/12 c Sydney 66/18 50/10 sh66/1848/8pc Taipei95/3581/27pc92/3380/26pc T okyo 85/29 77/25 t 85/29 77/25 pc T oronto 78/2559/15pc77/2561/16s Trinidad82/2759/15pc90/3264/17s V ancouver 68/20 56/13 c 70/2156/13pc Vienna 78/2560/15t80/2665/18s W arsaw 73/22 56/13 sh 70/21 54/12 pc Winnipeg 84/28 63/17 s 87/3066/18s H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles85F Wednesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles85F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles86F Wednesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles86F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles84F Wednesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles84F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque93/3367/19t94/3466/18pc Anchorage66/1851/10s66/1853/11s Atlanta92/3373/22t87/3070/21t Atlantic City93/3368/20t84/2866/18pc Baltimore92/3370/21t88/3166/18pc Boston80/2668/20t78/2563/17pc Buffalo78/2561/16pc79/2659/15s Charleston, SC94/3477/25s94/3475/23t Chicago82/2760/15pc81/2757/13s Cleveland82/2764/17pc78/2560/15pc Dallas100/3778/25t97/3676/24pc Denver89/3158/14s92/3359/15pc Detroit84/2862/16pc82/2764/17pc Honolulu89/3177/25sh88/3175/23pc Houston96/3576/24t96/3576/24t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday TodayWednesdayTodayWednesday Indianapolis86/3065/18t81/2762/16pc Jacksonville93/3374/23t92/3373/22t Kansas City88/3164/17pc89/3165/18s Las Vegas105/4077/25s105/4082/27s Little Rock94/3473/22t92/3369/20t Los Angeles86/3064/17pc86/3064/17pc Louisville88/3168/20t86/3066/18pc Memphis92/3372/22t90/3271/21t Miami90/3278/25t90/3278/25t Minneapolis88/3166/18s89/3169/20s Nashville92/3369/20t88/3167/19t New Orleans92/3378/25t91/3278/25t New York85/2973/22t86/3070/21pc Oklahoma City96/3569/20t93/3369/20pc Orlando94/3474/23t93/3375/23t Philadelphia91/3272/22t86/3068/20pc Phoenix 107/41 85/29 s 106/4183/28pc Pittsburgh83/2864/17t82/2760/15pc Portland, OR 77/2559/15pc78/2557/13pc Raleigh-Durham 98/36 71/21 t 91/32 70/21 t St. Louis86/3067/19t88/3166/18pc Salt Lake City 92/33 63/17 s 94/3468/20s San Antonio 99/37 77/25 pc 100/37 76/24 t San Diego78/2567/19pc77/2567/19pc San Francisco 74/23 58/14 pc 72/2257/13pc Seattle71/2155/12pc73/2253/11c T allahassee 96/3573/22t92/3373/22t T ampa 91/32 77/25 t 90/32 77/25t Tucson99/3778/25pc98/3676/24pc W ashington, DC 92/33 74/23t85/2969/20pc UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

PAGE 19

C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONC HEALTH: Body and mind TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009 By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL Tribune Features Editor T he eighty four contestants and members of the Miss Universe organisation were officially welcomed to the Bahamas at a gala reception held on the lawn of the Balmoral Club on Sandford Drive Friday evening. A BAHAMIAN WELCOME FOR INTERNA TIONAL BEAUTIES The event was attended by hundreds of Bahamians and featured an official introduction of each contestant as they made their way down the lawn escorted by members of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force. The Balmoral Club’s lawn was transformed into a gorgeous black and white garden oasis with masses of food stations, champagne, and Grey Goose specialty drinks. Many of the contestants enjoyed conch fritters and grouper fingers for the first time and declared the food delicious. Throughout the evening, the ladies got a chance to relax and let their hair down as they mingled and posed for photos with guests and danced under the stars to music provided by the Ting SEE page eight


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drove off to escape her
attacker and ended up
hitting a number of
nearby cars.

The cries of her
three-month-old son,
who neighbours said
was cushioned between his
bleeding mother and the car's
airbag, were the next sounds

SEE page seven

tribunemedia. net

AS POLICE remain
baffled over the
motiveless killing of a
mother of two, a neigh-
bour has revealed her
harrowing last words.

The gunman who shot Tagia
Soles-Armony at close range
walked up to her, and as he
cocked his weapon the terrified
29-year-old screamed: "No! No!

Tagia Soles-Armony



Former minister calls for the
death penalty to be carried out

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

1 MISS BAHAMAS Kiara

Sherman puts on a dazzling

} display in the Rainforest

Theatre at the Wyndham
Nassau Resort last night.

The Miss Universe contes-

tants took part in the National

Costume Competition.
¢ SEE PAGE TWO

A FORMER cabinet minister last night
slammed Government and his own party for
“failing to protect” the Bahamian people.

Speaking out following the murder of 29-
year-old Tagia Soles-Armony, Leslie Miller,
the former PLP MP for Blue Hills, also called
for the death penalty to be carried out in The
Bahamas.



STS LETS
WSS Ta ETE

AG expected to be

Mr Miller said none of the country’s parlia- ‘J t h 4 f . t _
SEE page seven ere ion siiacn Next Chier justice
THE Ministry of Tourism By MEGAN However, Mr
issued a statement yester- REYNOLDS Moree, the senior part-
T a i) T day explaining the post- Tribune Staff ner at McKinney, Ban-
e '@ | 4 = ponement of the Miss Uni- Reporter croft and Hughes,
verse Float Parade through mreynolds@ refused to comment on

on
Tuesdays!!

New Providence, leaving
Arawak Cay.

The statement explained
that as a result of the inter-
mittent heavy rain showers
over the last few days, a
number of floats sustained
some damage, causing unex-
pected delays. With the
floats subject to very strict
stipulations it would not
have been possible to use
the few that were ready.

The Float Parade will
now take place on Thurs-
day, August 20th, 2009 at
4pm along the same route.

tribunemedia.net reports when contact-
ed by The Tribune yes-
terday. He did not con-
firm whether he was
offered the position
nor would he stay
whether if offered, he
would accept.

And Mr Barnett failed to
return calls from The Tribune
to comment on the reported
appointment.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham is expected to rec-

ATTORNEY
General Michael
Barnett is expected
to step up as the next
chief justice when
Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham returns
from vacation in two weeks,
The Tribune has learned.

There is an unconfirmed
report that senior lawyer Bri-
an Moree has been offered
the position of attorney gen-
eral.

Michael Barnett



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* Debt consolidation with built-in savings
* Lower monthly payments
* Debt reduction

FIDELITY

12 ahh AREAS

Mageew: 356.77T6S Freeper: 352.6676'7 Marsh Harbowr: 367.3135

STM MI ele tt





NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISCANDS7 EEADING NEWSPAPER

WAKE UP!

Sausage & Egg
Burrito

SEE PAGE ELEVEN

The police are
tight-lipped on
‘serial rapist’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are remain-
ing tight-lipped about
their investigation into a
series of rapes and
attempted rapes in east-
ern New Providence.

Yesterday Assistant
Commissioner of Police
Raymond Gibson
declined to state where
exactly the attacks
occurred in the eastern
area of the island or com-
ment on any other details
relative to the cases.

However, he revealed
that two men were tak-
en into police custody
within the last two weeks
in connection with the
crimes but were released
pending further investi-
gation.

The senior officer con-
firmed that there have
been four such attacks
since March of this year
— two rapes and two
attempted rapes — and
police are “exploring the
possibility that they may
be connected.”

His comments come
after a police source
revealed the spate of inci-
dents to this newspaper.

The concerned officer,
who had claimed there
had been as many as five
incidents in the last
month, said they were
worried about the fact
that senior officers were
not going public with the
information.

The officer told The
Tribune that victims had
consistently described
their attacker.

It was alleged that the
man talks to his victims
and takes evidence such
as clothes and bed sheets
with him after commit-
ting his crime.

Meanwhile, the source
claimed that Elizabeth
Estates police station
instituted extra patrols in
the area in response to
the incidents as well as
instructing that bushy
areas in the vicinity to be
cleared.

Yesterday morning
Superintendent David
Deveaux, officer in
charge of the Elizabeth
Estates police station

SEE page seven

































PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





More tourism lay-offs expected

ROBERT SANDS







More lay-offs are expected in the
tourism sector during the summer
months, according to the Central Bank
of the Bahamas.

Noting that this expectation is based
on its observations of trends in the econ-
omy, not any specific knowledge of plans
by hotel owners, the Central Bank said
“further downsizing” is likely given the
“sustained slump in air arrivals” to New
Providence, Grand Bahama and the
Family Islands.

In its Monthly Economic and Finan-
cial Developments Report for June 2009,
issued Friday, the Central Bank said

Central Bank bases expectation on economic trends

that despite slight signs of “stabilising”
global economic conditions in June,
painful ripples continue to be felt in the
Bahamian economy.

Tourism remains weak with the sus-
tained slump in air arrivals negatively
impacting overall visitor trends during
the first half of the year, following a 2.2
per cent decrease a year earlier.

“Some offset was provided by the
firming in cruise arrivals, which bene-
fitted in recent months from significant

price discounting and the rerouting of
several cruise ships,” said the report.

Yesterday Minister of Labour Dion
Foulkes and Bahamas Hotel Associa-
tion President Robert Sands both said
they are not aware of any plans by hotels
to reduce their staffing levels in the sum-
mer months.

Meanwhile, the report noted that out-
side of the tourism sector, despite a
majority of businesses expecting their
profits to decline for the rest of the year,

UNIVERSE
Contestants show

national costumes

there were signals from the private sec-
tor that employment adjustments will
“moderate” in coming months.

Overall, however, the unemployment
rate is expected to grow, said the report,
“despite a modest offset anticipated
from the hosting of a number of inter-
national events in the latter half of the
year”.

Ultimately, the economy is not pro-
jected to return to its long-term growth
trend until late 2010, it added.

A\ tale Sts

Access to Affordable, Guaranteed
Healthcare for you and the ones
you care about most







MISS UNIVERSE contestants
strutted their stuff for the
National Costume Competition
at the Rainforest Theatre in the
Wyndham Nassau Resort on






FOR ALL YOUR DECORATIN

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Cable Beach last night.

PHOTOS:
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THE Miss Universe 2009 con- Contestants to see

testants will today be shown

what Harbour Island and Abaco

have to offer.

The beauty queens will be
given a tour of Harbour Island

Harbour Island
and Abaco

by golf cart. Andin Abaco they
will engage in leisurely activities at the Coral Sands Beach
House on Green Turtle Cay.

Back in Nassau tomorrow, the contestants will take part in
the Bahamian Designer Fashion Show at the Sheraton Nassau

Beach Hotel.

The Miss Universe Float Parade through New Providence
which was cancelled on Monday will now to take place on
Thursday, August 20 (see Page One).


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL Malus



The best for news .

www. tribune?



O Court news

Mother set to
he sentenced
today over
Stabbing death

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

MOTHER-of-three
Shimeakima Delores Pratt,
30, was back in Supreme
Court yesterday as her attor-
ney sought to convince a
judge to be as lenient as possi-
ble in passing sentence on her.

Senior Justice Allen is
expected to sentence Pratt
this morning 1n connection
with the stabbing death of
Gary Leon Carey Sr.

Pratt was convicted on July
1 of manslaughter for the
death of her boyfriend of
eight years Gary Leon Carey
Sr, 54. A 12-member jury
unanimously found Pratt
guilty.

Carey, a Royal Bahamas
Defence Force officer, was
found stabbed to death in
Pratt's Minnis Subdivision
apartment off Carmichael
Road on Sunday, August 17,
2008.

According to evidence
heard at the trial, Pratt had
stabbed Carey in the chest
with a rat tail comb, but ini-
tially told police that Carey
had collapsed after taking the
male enhancement pill Via-
gra. Pratt denied that she had
intended to kill Carey.

Probation officer Matrena
Carey told the court yesterday
that her investigations had
determined that Pratt had
lacked a positive role model
growing up. She said that
Pratt had been a teen mother
and had lived in a children’s
home.

Carey said that the chal-
lenges Pratt faced led her to
abuse marijuana and alcohol.

She said that Pratt had
relied on men to support her
and had been involved in sev-
eral meaningless and abusive
relationships in her life.

Carey said that Pratt’s fami-
ly described her as having a
temper. Pratt’s attorney
Romona Farquharson told the
court that her client has
expressed remorse for Carey’s
death and asked the court to
be as lenient as possible in
passing a sentence on her.

She told the court that Pratt
and her eldest son are termi-
nally ill, and noted that Pratt
has already spent a year in
jail. Senior Justice Allen said
yesterday that she wanted to
take the night to consider the
matter before handing down
her decision.

Pratt is expected back in
court at 10 o’clock this morn-
ing.

No Sandals
union choice
on Thursday

A UNION to represent
Sandals employees will not be
chosen on Thursday as
planned after a Supreme
Court order was issued yester-
day.

Shavon Bethel, president of
the Bahamas Hotel and Main-
tenance Allied Workers
Union (BHMAWU), applied
for an Order of Stay of Exe-
cution to postpone a poll
which would decide on the
bargaining agent for Sandals
workers.

The poll would allow
employees of Sandals Royal
Bahamian to choose either
the BHMAWU or the
Bahamas Hotel Catering and
Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWU) to represent
them. It will now be held after
Mr Bethel’s action in the
Court of Appeal, concerning
leadership of the union, has
been completed.

In the ruling, Justice Jon
Isaacs ordered that leave be
granted for Mr Bethel to be
joined as third respondent in
the action, put forward by the
BHMAWJU, the applicant.
West Bay Management Ltd
(trading as Sandals Royal
Bahamian) is the first respon-
dent and the Attorney Gener-
al the second.

The judge further ruled that
the application for the stay,
ordered in the decision of Jus-

“.. We are definitely moniones this one closely.”

Basil Dean

eather experts track
ropical depression

BASIL DEAN
CENTRAL BANK REPORT

Bahamian dollar debt owed
to banks declines by $53m

People saving more in depressed economy



By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

With Bahamians request-
ing fewer loans from banks
and banks themselves approv-
ing less applications, the
amount of Bahamian dollar
debt owed to banks in the
country declined by $53 mil-
lion in the first five months
of the year, according to the
Central Bank.

Meanwhile, depressed eco-
nomic conditions and finan-
cial uncertainty saw Bahami-
ans taking a “wait and see
approach”, saving more.

“Everybody is really pro-
ceeding with caution until
things turn around and you
have a higher level of confi-
dence to venture forth,” said
Commonwealth Bank senior
vice president Denise Turn-
quest.

According to The Central
Bank’s Monthly Economic
and Financial Development
report for June 2009, a review
of local banks found that
Bahamian dollar deposits
grew by $18.5 million in the
first five months of this year,
compared with a $20 million
contraction in 2008.

This was due to a $38.3 mil-
lion build-up in fixed deposit
balances, following a $3.1 mil-
lion draw-down a year ago,
said the report.

Meanwhile, the Central
Bank stated that the fall-off
in outstanding funds owed to
banks primarily reflected a
$35.1 million downturn in
consumer credit, from growth
of $57.9 million a year ago,
and a $34 million contraction
in lending for commercial and
other purposes. Mortgage
growth was nearly halved to
$54.6 million.

Its June 2009 report,
released Friday, recorded
“notable declines” in loans
outstanding for credit cards,
private cars, travel, home
improvements and education.

This indicated that there
was more money being paid

WEATHER experts are
keeping a close eye on a trop-
ical depression which has a 50
per cent chance of develop-
ing into the season’s first
named storm over the next 36
hours.

While the tropical depres-
sion moving off the coast of
Africa weakened a bit yester-
day, Chief Meteorology Offi-
cer Basil Dean told The Tri-
bune that weather conditions
are favourable towards this
system becoming more organ-
ised in the next few days.

However, although it is
moving in a general westerly
direction in the Atlantic, it is
still too early to tell if the



“We’re looking for
better quality bor-
rowers who are
more established in
their employment.
Someone who hasn’t
been employed for a
minimum period of
time we’ve not even
considered.”

Denise Turnquest

back to banks than there are
new loans being made.

Mrs Turnquest told The
Tribune that in the case of
Commonwealth Bank, the
reduction in outstanding cred-
it is equally contributable to
the bank — like other institu-
tions globally — instituting
more stringent lending poli-
cies as to a fall off in applica-
tions for loans from Bahami-
ans seeking to buy new things.

As for whether the bank’s
lending policies may yet
become more restrictive, the
VP said this has yet to be
determined, noting that the
bank will continue to look at
how many of its loans are
being paid back and “make
adjustments as necessary.”

“Because of the economic
environment and the number
of lay offs we’re seeing, the
bank has — like I’m sure all
other banks have — reviewed
our credit policies and we’re
being more restrictive.

“We’re looking for better
quality borrowers who are
more established in their
employment. Someone who
hasn’t been employed for a
minimum period of time
we’ve not even considered.

“We'd prefer if we have an
established history with you
rather than borrowers with
whom you’d don’t have a
relationship and I think this
is something you’d see with
other banks too,” said Mrs

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islands of the Bahamas will
ultimately be in this system’s
path, he said.

“But we are definitely mon-
itoring this one closely,” Mr
Dean added.

Models

The National Hurricane
Centre (NHC) in Miami
reported yesterday that trop-
ical depression Nine-E, as it is
called now, was southwest of
the Cape Verde Islands.

At this time, all forecast
models are predicting that the
depression will curve towards
the north in the coming days.

Turnquest of the bank’s cur-
rent policy.

Meanwhile, the bank exec-
utive said she feels it is too
early to tell whether the drop
off in applications from con-
sumers for loans for things
like new cars, travel and oth-
er perhaps less essential items
will become a trend.

“T think this experience,
this current environment is
causing people to re-evaluate
their approach to borrowing,
which is a good thing.

“Whether it will cause a
long term trend of borrowing
less is very difficult to say. It
depends on how long the cur-
rent economic environment
exists and the extent of the
rebound from this.”

While consumers are get-
ting fewer new loans, the Cen-
tral Bank noted that contin-
ued strain on household
finances saw consumers
increase their use of debt con-
solidation loans, which grew
at an accelerated pace of
$34.1 million during the first
five months of the year.

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At 2pm yesterday the
depression was moving at a
speed of 12mph with maxi-
mum sustained winds of near
35mph with higher gusts.

Should the depression
become more organised and
develop into a tropical storm
it would be named Ana — the
first named storm of the 2009
Atlantic hurricane season.

By this time last year, four
named storms had already
formed in the Atlantic. Before
the start of this year’s hurri-
cane season, forecasters were
predicting 12 named storms,
with six of those expected to
develop into hurricanes.

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Man accused
of robbing phone
card vendor

A 20-year-old man
accused of robbing a phone
card vendor was remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison yes-
terday after being arraigned
on two counts of armed rob-
bery.

Court dockets allege that
on Wednesday, August 5,
Kirklyn Bain, while armed
with a handgun, robbed
Lakeisha Park of five $5
phone cards, five $20 phone
cards, five $10 phone cards
and $82 in cash belonging to
the S & W phone card
booth. He is also accused of
robbing the same woman of
a maroon coloured pebble
cellular phone valued at
$300.

Bain, who was arraigned
before Magistrate Derrence
Rolle in Court 5, Bank
Lane, was not required to
enter a plea to the charge.
He was remanded to prison.
The case has been
adjourned to October 28.

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THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009, PAGE 5



Have your say on any story . . . ;

rae. ‘tribune? 42. COR



Hanna-Martin hits out at
jovi over crime levels

PLP chairperson Glenys Han- :
na-Martin is hitting out at the }
government, claiming it has failed }
to make tangible efforts to }
aggressively meet and counter }
rising crime and violence levels }
in the country. :

Friday night’s murder of a }
woman who was shot in front of
her young children “culminates ;
a steady stream of violent homi- }
cide in the past several weeks in
this country,” Mrs Hanna-Mar- }
tin said. i

“The murder count now stands
at 50 and there is an increasing
sense that the level of crime is
rising in an unrelenting, unad- ;
dressed frenzy,” she said in a }
press statement. “Surely we can-
not be saying that as a nation we
accept this bloody phenomena as_ }
a natural part of our national life.
By now we would have expected

WIDE-SPREAD corruption in the
Bahamas will significantly hinder the search
for those responsible in the murder of
Welsh banker Hywell Jones, a former
Freeport port director told British media.

Speaking with the news site WalesOn-
line.co.uk, John Hincliffe, who spent almost
a decade in Freeport in the 1980s, claimed
that during his time in the Bahamas he
fought a never-ending battle against cor-
ruption and drug trafficking.

He claimed that when he recently
returned to the country he found that little
had changed in this respect.

Hywel Jones, 55, a resident in the
Bahamas was shot in the head execution
style outside the head office of his compa-

to see tangible interventions by ;

IanO ss

ny, Britannia Investment Group in

Nassau, on April 22.

He remained in a coma in hospital until
May 8 when he died of his injuries.

Police have yet to arrest anyone in con-
nection with the killing, but said they have
received some new leads that may help
advance the case.

Case

Yesterday, Assistant Commissioner Ray-
mond Gibson told The Tribune that the
case was still “under active investigation”
but added that police do not have any sus-
pects in custody.

Last week, Mr Gibson - who heads the
crime division - told another local daily

Claim that wide- spread corruption
will hinder murder investigation

that the police was following several new
leads into Mr Jones’ murder.

"Our investigations are progressing quite
well,” Mr Gibson is quoted as saying, but
he declined to provide further details. "I
can't report in depth into the investiga-
tion."

Former port director Mr Hincliffe told
the Welsh website that he believes that the
businessman’s murderer may have been a
contract killer.

He said that there is easy access to guns
in the Bahamas and people willing to use
them for payment of either money or drugs.

Mr Hincliffe said he believes the amount
of guns on the streets is now worse than it
was in the 1980s when he lived in the
Bahamas.

the government through its vari-
ous agencies and in policy for- j

mation to aggressively meet and
counter the violence and causes
of violence in this country and in
particular gun violence.”

This is what is expected of pro- }
gressive government, Mrs Hanna- }
Martin said. However, the PLP
chairperson said that no such }
energy appears to be applied or }
even foreshadowed by the gov- }
ernment in the midst of graphic ;
social deterioration. “Instead the
minister is on vacation and his }
voice cannot be heard. It appears
that the government along with :
the rest of us are simply stand- i
ing by and watching in awe asthe }
body count grows and the pain
increases when loved ones get }
the difficult call that a child has

been murdered,” she said.

Mrs Hanna-Martin is calling }
on Bahamians to voice their out- ;
rage and demand accountability }
on the part of those who have
been elected to manage the }
affairs of state and in whose :
charge the public safety has been i

placed.

The country recorded its 50th
murder for the year when Tagia :
Soles-Armony, a 29-year-old }

Bahamian who lives in St Kitts,

was shot and killed outside of her
family’s house in front of her chil-

dren and other relatives.



OPPOSITION MP Fred
Mitchell yesterday expressed
concern over allegations that
public service employees are
being “abused” by govern-
ment.

Speaking at a press confer-
ence at his office in Fox Hill,
the former minister of public
affairs warned that the cases
of many government workers
who have been dismissed
recently may end up before
the courts as the government
has reportedly failed to give
proper or sufficient notice to
these individuals.

“On a number of occasions
in the past, I have made the
complaint that the words
‘restructuring’ and ‘reform’
have come to mean firing peo-
ple,” Mr Mitchell began.

“We have seen this with the
police, immigration and more
recently with customs officers
bearing the brunt of this abuse.

“In recent days, a number
of customs officers have been
threatened with dismissal.



FRED MITCHELL speaks to
members of the media yesterday.

Some of them have come to
me as an attorney and others
have a more general com-
plaint. The complaints seem
to rest principally with the
question of due process and
delay on the part of the gov-
ernment.

“It also appears that the

government has simply made
up their minds and are not
paying attention to the
responses.

“Tt appears that a number
of these matters will end up in
the courts,” he said.

Claiming that even the dri-
vers of government ministers
are suffering — overtime pay
owed to them having report-
edly been withheld — Mr
Mitchell said that the PLP
made a special effort during
its last term in office to ensure
that all government drivers
received overtime pay in
accordance with the Employ-
ment Act.

“The government has
instead suspended overtime
for their drivers and are paying
them the lump sum of $300
per month in lieu of overtime.
This is not in accordance with
the law and there is some
unhappiness amongst some
drivers over this. But unhappy
or not, the law should be fol-
lowed.



5

“My general concerns are
that public servants ought to
be able to do their jobs with-
out fear or favour and to be
able to act with the political
neutrality of the service, and
the fact that there appears to
be a concerted effort on the



part of this administration to
stack the offices of the public
service at its management lev-
els with political operatives.

“This is not what the public
service should be and the pub-
lic should stand warned of this
practice,” he said.

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Taking issue with BTC’
‘poor service quality’

YOUNG MAN’S VIEW
N G

Evergreen Mortuary

ESCELLEMCE [N THE SEIVICE WE PRLOWIE

Far all of your Purse Service Sanda,
We evil be pled oo ere pou pith bance.

GEMALEE E PERN LP
MARAGIROPURERAL [SCTE

“aches Sanout Sout
(Uppal Aide Ate hee) Bawa, Plaka

Funeral Service For

Master Edon Foster John
Emmanuel Greene III, 2 days

will be held on Wednesday,
August 12th, 2009 at
Pilgrim Baptist Temple, St.
James Road at 11:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Bishop
Randy Fraser assisted by
Pastor Benjamin Bailey.
Interment will follow in the
Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen and Spikenard
Roads.

Edon leaves precious memories that will forever
linger in the hearts of his mother, Monique
Gordon; father, Edon Foster Greene Jr.; brothers,
Jason, Jalano uncles, De Angelo Greene,
Coyotito Greene and Zhivargo Evans;
grandmothers, Princess Greene and Joan
Gordon; grandfathers, Edon Foster Greene Sr.
and Michael Gordon; great grandparents, Mr.
John Emmanuel Greene II and Ms. Betsy Annie
Ferguson Bowe; and a host of other relatives
and friends.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at
Evergreen Mortuary on Tuesday from 1:00 p.m.
until 5:00 p.m. and again at the church on
Wednesday from 10:00a.m. until service time.



ADRIA

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

HANDS down, the
Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company (BTC) fin-
ishes in the top three as one
of the worst service
providers in the Bahamas—
public or private. No, it does
not appear that BTC is hear-
ing the cries of its many cus-
tomers—neither loudly nor
clearly—and its services are
far from ever qualifying as
second-rate.

Why is it that customers,
particularly those seeking
new services or transferring
services from one location to
another (eg, myself), are
held to ransom for weeks
before receiving services?

Frankly, I’m sick and tired
of being fleeced as BTC con-
tinues to charge ridiculous
fees for lousy services. Just
last week, while speaking to
a Cabinet minister via cell
phone, our conversation was
abruptly interrupted at least
three times by dropped calls.
Over the years, if I added up
the charges for text messages
that were sent but never
arrived to the intended recip-
ient, BTC would have reim-
bursement cheque for me
and thousands of other cell
phone customers.

Last Thursday, I contact-
ed BTC and was made to
hold on for more than an
hour while being forced to
listen to automated machines
and annoying records of peo-
ple singing BTC’s promo-
tional ads. Who exactly are
they competing against to
justify the glut of annoying
advertisements and where

















THE BAHAMAS






ELECTRICITY CORPORATION






wishes to advise



in both New Previcd
payment|s] on o

servicels|.

“2 and the Farnily islands. to rake orornpt

eccount to aveld interuption of your electicity

The public & also advised that all overdue paymenis should be mode

directy to the Corperation, Those payments can be made at the Head

Office on Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, fhe Mall at Marathon or the Main Past

Office on East Hill Street. Payment can alse be rade on SATURDAYS al

the Mall at Marathen from 8:30 am to 1 pom. Please make sure fo see a

Credit and Collections supervisor once overdue bill is poid to ensure

reconnection.

Conmumern whose account|s) ore not overdue con also make

| BS ON



are the living customer ser-
vice operators? Which mar-
ket is BTC competing for,
since we all must use their
services since they hold a
telephony monopoly? It was
so dreadful that after calling
many of the available num-
bers, I finally spoke to some-
one who admitted that she
couldn’t reach BTC’s cus-
tomer care representatives
herself—and she is a compa-
ny insider! Luckily for me,
she did provide the direct
contacts of a few represen-
tatives, one of whom—Ms
Zina Dillet FK)—was most
accommodating.

BTC is an overstaffed
company with a labour force
some of whom appear to be
too lazy to even answer the
telephone. Any serious suit-
ors seeking to purchase an
interest in the corporation
should seek to provide better
quality services by offload-
ing the company’s freeload-
ers in restructuring exercises.

BTC must know that
throngs of customers are dis-
pleased with its exorbitant
charges and poor service
quality.

Recently, the company
unceremoniously cancelled
the “free” voice mailing fea-
ture—which allowed cus-
tomers to place “voicemail
calls” if they had “no min-
utes”—under the premise
that it was clearing up the
voice channels to prevent
call failures/drops. Since the
company took that stance,
there is no evidence of
improvement.

Of late, BTC’s Vice Pres-
ident of Marketing Sales and
Business Development Mar-
lon Johnson wrote on the
company’s EZ Top-up web-
site:

“Dear Customer, Please
note that the EZ Top-Up
platform has been taken
down temporarily in order
for BTC to enhance the
security features and make
the feature more customer
friendly. We anticipate that
the new and improved EZ
Top-Up feature will be back
on-line on August 3, 2009.”

The EZ Top-up feature
did not return on August 3rd
and today it remains unavail-
able to those prepaid cus-
tomers seeking to recharge
phone cards or load minutes
on to their cell phones.

So, contrary to BTC’s
self-serving ads, EZ Top-up
is the company’s latest inno-
vation that does not work

CKD

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and, contradictory to the
company’s claims, is far from
putting “connection at the
fingertips” of Bahamians.

If BTC’s services do not
improve, the moment they
are privatized and other
companies offering better
services set-up, for me and
thousands of other Bahami-
ans, it will be “bush crack,
man gone!”

NO HOME COURT
ADVANTAGE

I would be the first one in
my car, honking my horn
about Nassau’s streets of
Miss Bahamas Universe,
Kiara Sherman, is crowned
Miss Universe on August
23rd.

However, after seeing
many of the world’s mind-
blowing beauties that have
graced New Providence’s
landscape recently, not only
has my interest for the
pageant peaked at the sight
of the gorgeous ladies the
Miss Universe tidal wave has
brought in, but I’m also
acutely aware that Ms Sher-
man’s road to the top is filled
with well-prepared, interna-
tional beauties who will
make the local pageant seem
like a cake walk.

While many Bahamian
males (and some females)
are gawking at the queens
representing 80-plus coun-
tries, I encourage Ms Sher-
man to strive for excellence
and not to become intimi-
dated or complacent, as the
journey will be rough and,
quite honestly, there is no
home court advantage.

TAKING EMPLOYEES
FINGERPRINTS
With all the in-fighting
and squabbling seen in
unions of late, it is patently
obvious that unions have lost
their purpose and are no



longer relevant or as resolute
as they once were.

In recent years, it appears
that some unions are electing
grubby little ingrates, posi-
tion seekers, and tunnel-
vision headline hunters to
front office positions.

There appears to be little
interest in the members, as
these so-called leaders are
not seeking solutions to
labour issues but instead are
contributing to the ongoing
mélée consuming so many
unions.

Frankly, the unions ought
to support employers who
should seek to have the
Employment Act amended
to allow for biometric fin-
gerprint recognition of
employees, which would no
doubt save businesses thou-
sands of dollars, mitigate
against productivity losses,
deter workers from fraudu-
lently using time cards,
reduce thefts and prevent
clocking in scams.

Presently, the Employ-
ment Act of 2001 outlaws the
use of fingerprints by
Bahamian employers, except
for those in the casino indus-
try.

T understand that biomet-
ric machines do not store fin-
gerprints but instead match
the shape of hands, fingers,
eye vessels and retinas to a
mathematical algorithm. In
these gloomy economic
times, the unions should
have no problems with bio-
metric fingerprinting, as it
would undoubtedly save jobs
via a reduction in losses asso-
ciated with thefts and also
improve employee produc-
tivity.

Besides, Bahamians hap-
pily allow US Custom agents
to take their fingerprints and
scan their retinas as they
gleefully skip to Miami/Fort
Lauderdale every few weeks!

SORENTO

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0 (2 esas? 1247) 3-208
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009, PAGE 7





AG expected

to be next
chief justice

FROM page one

ommend Mr Barnett’s
appointment to Governor
General Arthur Hanna
upon his return to Nassau at
the end of his Alaskan
cruise on August 24.

If Mr Barnett takes the
position as head of the
judiciary, his resignation
from the Cabinet also will
be announced, as well as
the appointment of the
next attorney general by
the end of the month.

The chief justice is
appointed by the Prime
Minister after consulta-
tion with the leader of the
opposition. It has also
been reported that PLP
leader Perry Christie
does not agree with Mr
Ingraham’s choice and
has written a strong letter
of protest.

But Mr Christie was
not available yesterday to
confirm or deny this
report.

The appointment is
said to be controversial as
Mr Barnett would be the
second attorney general
in two years to be elevat-
ed to the high court.

Mrs Ruth Bowe-
Darville, president of the
Bahamas Bar Associa-
tion, denied the report
that she, with other mem-
bers of the Bar Council,
planned to register their
objection to Mr Barnett’s
appointment and accuse
Mr Ingraham of politicis-
ing the court.

Mrs Bowe-Darville
told The Tribune yester-
day that the report is
false as she has not been
informed or consulted
about the appointment.

The Bar Association
president said: “I haven’t
said anything to the
Prime Minister or to the
press, and the Bar Coun-
cil hasn’t instructed me to
say anything, so I don’t
even know where they
are getting it from.

“T would think the
powers that be would
make their intention clear
to me before they make
their appointment, but I
have not heard anything
so I will not comment as
yet, not until they say
something definite to
me.”

However, it is believed
that Mr Barnett has
already decided to accept
the position left vacant by
Chief Justice Sir Burton
Hall.

Justice Hall was recent-
ly nominated to become a
permanent judge of the
International Criminal
Tribunal for the former
Yugoslavia (ICTY).

Mr Barnett is a former
partner of Graham
Thompson and Co.

He was appointed to
the post of Attorney
General just over a year
ago.

He ran in the 2007 gen-
eral election as an FNM
candidate for the Fort
Charlotte constituency,
but was defeated by for-
mer Attorney General
Alfred Sears.

Armony, who is now one year old.

FROM page one

mentarians has the “guts or tes-
ticular fortitude” to carry out
capital punishment “despite the
fact it is being called for by the
Bahamian people.”

“This lady, I understand,
came here with her young baby
to surprise her mother who’s
birthday was Sunday,” said Mr
Miller, who lost his own son
Mario to a brutal murder in
2002.

“Whoever shot her pulled up
to her garage. If they wanted
to take the lady’s car, why was
it necessary to kill her? Just
because they could. Just
because they know that their
life would not be taken, just
because they know that they
will go and sit in Fox Hill
prison and live off the people of
this land because those who
were elected to run this country
don’t have the guts — none of
them — the Government or

L G
TAGIA SOLES-ARMONY, 29, with her ol

dest son Chelan

FROM page one

residents heard.

"A guy who live 'round here
told me he was outside when he
heard a girl scream. And then he
heard a gun cock, and that’s when
he knew someone was going to
get shot,” said a neighbour who
asked not to be identified.

Neighbours said the brazen gun-
man — described as a 5' 9" slim,
dark male — approached the vic-
tim after the crash to presumably
see if she was still alive, but was
scared off by people who had
come to inspect the commotion.

Neighbour Jillian Rodgers said
her 30-year-old son, who was get-
ting out of a car rear-ended in the
crash, rescued the infant whose
face was covered in his mother's
blood.

"My sister and I were sitting
inside the house when I heard the
gunshot. Then we heard two loud
crashes and a loud bang. I hung up
the phone, ran towards the front
door and saw my son hobbling
towards me with the baby,” said
Ms Rodgers, who first thought her

son was hurt in a drive-by shoot-
ing.
"The baby was screaming.
Blood was on the side of the
baby's head. We didn't know if
the baby was bleeding or what,”
she told The Tribune yesterday.

The child was not injured.

Ms Soles-Armony was attacked
at around 8 pm Friday as she was
reportedly breast-feeding her
three-month-old son in her sister's
car outside her mother's house on
Sea Grape Avenue, Sea Breeze.

When police arrived on the
scene, she was already dead.

Shards of glass, presumably
from the victim's car window, still
littered the street outside her
mother's home yesterday.

Overcome with her grief,
Tagia's mother could only say:
"She was well-loved."

Police do not have a motive for
the killing, and have appealed for
the public for information which
would help their investigation.

"We haven't established a
motive yet but we are following
significant leads," said ACP Ray-
mond Gibson.

Former minister calls for the
death penalty to be carried out

the PLP, none of them have
the guts to execute the laws of
this land.”

Mr Miller said he finds it
“extraordinary” that in 2009,
the Bahamas was still concern-
ing itself with what the Privy
Council in London has to say
about capital punishment being
carried out in the Bahamas.

“IT don’t understand for the
life of me, that the Members
of Parliament that we elect to
do the work of the people of
the Bahamas are so gutless and
spineless that none of them to
date has stepped to the plate
saying enough is enough.

“But none of them will say it
until it happens to one of their
immediate family.

“The laws are on the books.
The government of the
Bahamas has the right to hang

ee

We, the Management
and Staff of

Tile King
are deeply saddened by the tragic
accident of August 7, 2009 which

resulted in the death of one of our
beloved employees,

Mr. Jessiken
Ferguson

Employed by Tile King, Jessi was busy
unloading a shipping container using the
forklift as he was accustomed to doing

when the fatally

disastrous accident

occurred just before 10 a.m.

Jessi was a loyal and hard-working
member of the Tile King staff. He worked
in the warehouse being involved in

unloading containers and loading goods
for deliveries.

His cheerful disposition and sense of

each and every prisoner who is
sentenced to death. It is clear
what the mandate is, and yet
they play these sick political
games on the people of our
country,” he said.

With the last hanging in 2000
at Her Majesty’s Prison, those
opposed to capital punishment
maintain that the death penal-
ty has not been proven to be
an effective deterrent to vio-
lent crime.

Others submit that the
process of rehabilitation has
proved to be a disaster causing
the country’s murder count to
continually climb higher year
after year.

However, in view of all of
this, Mr Miller said the aver-

age citizen is not without blame
as well.

“As a people we have
allowed ourselves to be manip-
ulated and dictated to by those
who refuse to execute the laws
of our land.

“Tt is an utter disgrace what
we put up with in this country,”
he said.

Expressing his sympathy for
the family of Mrs Soles-Armo-
ny, Mr Miller said he and his
family know from personal
experience with the loss of his
son Mario, what the victim’s
family must be going through.

“When you butcher some-
one in that manner, you don’t
only kill her. Her husband is
now finished. Her sisters and
brothers, her poor mother and
father are finished as human
beings. All they can do now is
wait for death to take them out

Sy

—

LOCAL NEWS
——— o ] J

Early reports indicate Ms
Armony, who had just returned
home with her infant son and one-
year-old son to visit her mother,
may have been the victim of mis-
taken identity.

While he declined to release
any details about the case, ACP
Gibson said police think Ms
Armony'’s attack was an isolated
incident.

"The most I can say is we don't
think it (her shooting) was a
trend," he said.

Tagia, who lived in St Kitts with
her husband Kachi Armony, was
reportedly in town for a few days
to celebrate her mother's birth-
day.

She reportedly spent the after-
noon at the mall with her two
younger sisters and two sons. The
young girls and Ms Armony's
elder son had just got out of the
car to knock on the front door of
the family home, when the victim
was shot.

Her husband, a St Kitts busi-
nessman and radio show co-host,
reportedly flew to her family’s side
after her murder.

of this world so they can rejoin
her again.

“People don’t understand
the destruction that takes place
in the entire family life when
one is butchered the way this
woman was butchered. I can
tell you from my personal expe-
rience with my son Mario. They
destroy your life, and all you
want to do is destroy them and
they have a right to destroy
them for what they have done
to that young lady.

“And you know why they
did it? Because they know they
can get away with it because
they know that the gutless
spineless ones that you sent to
Parliament; none of them has
the guts or the testicles to do
the right thing. Not a god-
damned one. None! And I
blame them all. FNM and PLP
alike.”

a

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The police are
tight-lipped on
‘serial rapist
FROM page one

which was said to have
received the majority of the
calls reporting the attacks
said the extra patrols were
primarily part of an effort
to reduce the number of
housebreakings occurring
in the eastern area.

Meanwhile, rather than
police having pushed for the
clearance of bushy areas
around the area as they
seek to find evidence that
may have been hidden by
the attacker, Supt Deveaux
suggested that the clearing
of bush was a “community
initiative” that was unrelat-
ed to the rapes.

We wish to offer to his loving brother,
Mr. Kevin Ferguson, his two children
and the entire family our deepest and
sincere sympathies on their, and our, great
loss.

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THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS

Meacher ‘Pain’ Major’s
Back-to-School Bash

BAHAMAS lightweight
champion Meacher “Pain”
Major took a break from his
training schedule to host a
Back-to-School Bash on Sat-
urday. The event was held in
Strachan’s Alley off Kemp
Road where Major grew up.
He decided to give back to
the community that has stood
by his side during his climb
from the amateur to the pro-
fessional ranks.

Major, who recently
received a No. 15 ranking in
the World Boxing Organisa-
tion, said it’s important at this
time of the year to remember
the many young people in his
community who look up to
him. He congratulated all of
the persons who joined in as
sponsors and all who helped
out with the activities, includ-
ing a hoola hoop contest and
potato sack race, that were
staged during the day.

The Back-to-School bash is
one of the annual events that
Major puts on in the commu-
nity. Another is the basket-
ball tournament that was held
earlier this year.





































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FROM page 11

“And he was an unsung
hero because although much
credit was given to me, a lot
of the success I achieved with
the Bain Town Flyers, I col-
laborated it with him. He also
helped to send off hundreds
of athletes to school.”

Wisdom said it’s a difficult
time for their family because
they have been in mourning
over the last few years with
deaths in the Wisdom,
Roberts, Johnson and
Williams families, all of whom

“But we still trust God and
we know that anything he
does is well done,” he said.
“That’s the faith that we oper-
ate with and so we are putting
all of our trust in him.”

The late Wisdom’s son,
Jason, said his dad played a
major role in his life and he
will definitely be missed
because he made sure that he
participated in all of the major
functions in his life.

“JT didn’t participate in
track, but bowling was my
sport,” said Jason Wisdom,
whose performance in the

enabled him to make the
Tournament of Americas in
Florida in the 1992.

“Dad was a big support for
me in that. So I was glad that
he was around to be a sup-
port for me in that regard.”

Although he was a sports
fanatic, Jason said during the
latter stages of his life, his
father spent a great deal of
time talking about politics.

The late Wisdom was a life-
long supporter of the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party. He was
elevated to the position of
stalwart councilor.

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SPORTS

Five Jamaican
alhiletes cleared
of doping

By ANTHONY FOSTER
Associated Press Writer

KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP) —
Five Jamaican athletes were cleared
Monday of doping at their national
championships two months ago
after the country's anti-doping pan-
el failed to determine whether the
banned substance was on the pro-
hibited list.

The athletes reportedly tested
positive for the stimulant methyl-
hexanamine. But Kent Gammon,
chairman of the Jamaica Anti-Dop-
ing Commission's disciplinary com-
mittee, said it was unable to prove
they had breached any doping pol-

"Therefore, we have not found
any of the athletes in violation of
the (anti-doping) code," Gammon
said.

The athletes had previously been
identified as Yohan Blake, Sheri-
Ann Brooks, Allodin Fothergill,
Lansford Spence and Marvin
Anderson.

The athletes are now cleared to
compete in the world champi-
onships in Berlin, but the Interna-
tional Association of Athletics Fed-
erations — track and field's gov-
erning body and organiser of the
worlds — could review the ruling.

The IAAF can challenge any
judgments in the Court of Arbitra-
tion for Sport, world sport's highest
court of appeal, based in Lausanne,
Switzerland. The IAAF can also
provisionally suspend athletes until
the CAS delivers a verdict.

The anti-doping panel started its
hearing last week. None of the five
athletes are considered among
Jamaica's top talent, but the positive
tests were a blow to a nation that
takes great pride in the accom-
plishments of its sprinters.

Monday's announcement came
after Jamaica's Amateur Athletic
Association warned another five
athletes that they would be barred
from the worlds if they did not
attend a training camp this week.

Those athletes included 100-
meter Olympic champion Shelly-
Ann Fraser and Asafa Powell, a for-
mer 100 world-record holder. The
others are 400 hurdles Olympic gold
medalist Melaine Walker, hurdler
Brigitte Foster-Hylton and sprinter
Shericka Williams.

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THE Bahamas placed
seventh out of 25 countries
at the US Junior Open —
the most prestigious junior
tournament in the Pan
American region.

Bahamian athletes won
five medals (four bronze
and one silver). The silver
was won by nine-year-old
Lyle Sherman and the four
bronze medals by 14-year-
old Myriael Newry, Peter
Deveaux Isaacs, 13, Dorne
Albury, 10, and 12-year-
old Matthew Rahming.
The Bahamas sent a 15-
member team and many
of the athletes won match-
es.
Judo is an Olympic
sport where matches are
won by throwing the
opponent to his back or
pinning his back to the
ground for 25 seconds.

It is one of the most
widely practiced sports in
the world and has been an
Olympic sport since 1964.
It has grown in popularity
in the Bahamas because it
teaches self discipline, con-
fidence and self defense.

“T was so happy because
this is my first internation-
al tournament,” said 12-
year-old Matthew Rah-
ming.

Neville Munnings, ref-
eree/director, who went
with the team to the tour-
nament, said: “We are
very proud of all of the
children. This was a tough
tournament with some
great competition. Our
kids raised to the chal-
lenge and did the country
proud.”

Said 2004 US Olympian
Rhadi Bullard Ferguson,
who was head coach for
the delegation: “I am
pleased with the results
and eager to assist the
Bahamas in turning its
judo programme into a
world class programme.
We have made great
progress in a short time,
but more work lies
ahead."

Later this month, Fer-
guson is scheduled to
accompany judo athletes
Cynthia Rahming and
Alex Martinborough to
the World Cadet Champi-
onships in Budapest, Hun-

gary.
THE TRIBUNE

Sp

PAGE



I

UESDAY, AUGUST 11,

ts

2009

For the best sporting action . . .

www. tribune242. o——

Coach
Gerald
Wisdom
dies at 62

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net net

THE life of
the late Gerald
“Jerry” Lloyd
Wisdom will
be remem-
bered as an
extraordinary
athlete, coach,
mentor and
historian, but
one who never
received any
national
acclaim for his
achievement.

Wisdom, 62, passed away on
Saturday at the Princess Margaret
Hospital. He will be buried 10am
Saturday after a funeral service at
Faith United Baptist Church
where he will be eulogized by
Rev Dr William Thompson.

The accolades were pouring in
yesterday from the track and field
fraternity about the sprinter/long
jumper who represented the
Bahamas at the Olympic Games
in Mexico City in 1968.

Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations (BAAA) pub-
lic relations officer Kermit Taylor
sent out condolences from the
executive board, many of whom
are in Berlin for the 12th IAAF
World Championships.

“Jerry and I used to be room-
mates,” said businessman/politi-
cian Leslie Miller, who got Jerry,
along with Willie Moss and the
late Tommy Thompson, full four-
year scholarships from 1967-71
to go to Texas El Paso, known
back then as Texas Western.

“He was one of our top 100
and 200 sprinters. He was a very
fine individual and I mourn his
passing and offer my condolences
to his family and his extended
family, the athletes who would
have known Gerry. He had a
good career in track and field.
He certainly made a contribu-
tion.”

As a sprinter, Miller said Wis-
dom was called upon by the
coaching staff and did a very
good job as a member of the
relay team, which also included
former world record holder Bob
Beamon, who expressed his con-
dolences on behalf of his family.

Wayne Weindenburg, who
served as the head track and field
coach at Texas Western, also
offered his condolences to the
Wisdom family that includes his
wife Linda, son Jason, daughter-
in-law Janua, two grand-children
Raquel and Joshua, three broth-
ers Neville, Keith and Evon,
three sisters-in-law Manita, Sonya
and Yudenia and three step-chil-
dren Owen, Danielle and Robin.

Neville Wisdom, the former
Minister of Youth, Sports and
Culture, said all that he achieved
during his tenure as a track and
field coach with the Baintown
Flyers, he owes it all to his older
brother Gerry.

“Jerry was my best friend. We
grew up together. We were very
close,” the former minister said.
“He was actually the first athlete
I coached, even though he was a
little older than I was.

“JT just used to love to see him
perform. He was a high school
champion and he went on to
become an Olympian. He and
Leslie Miller represented the
Bahamas with their team-mate
Bob Beamon at the 1968 Mexi-
can Olympics. Bob had the best
jump, but Jerry was right there.”

Aside from his prowess on the
track, Wisdom said his brother
was a walking encyclopedia off
the track.

“He was one of the most
knowledgeable and experienced
sports personalities,” he said. “I
often contacted him for advice
and information. He was always
right.

SEE page 9

Gerald Wisdom






Meacher
Majot’s
Back-to-

School Bash...
See page 9

Pro golfers earn trip
to World Cup qualifier

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

duo of Bahamian
golf pros earned the
right to represent
the country at a
series of qualifying
events and continue their trek
toward the sport’s World Cup.

Keno Turnquest and Lemon
Gorospe emerged from a field of
nine golfers last weekend at a quali-
fying event hosted by Lyford Cay
Golf Club.

Turnquest shot a combined score
of 151 to lead the group, while
Gorospe shot a 154.

The team will now have more than
two months of preparation before
they head to the Nations Cup -
Omega Mission Hills Qualifier.

The event is set to be hosted Sep-
tember 21-25 at the Caracas Country
Club, with spots for the Omega Mis-




































sion Hills World Cup on the line.

Turnquest is a former Bahamas
Professional Golfers Association
national champion, and has a résumé
which includes being a multi-junior
national champion, representing the
Bahamas at a previous World Cup
event, being a former member of the
Hoerman Cup team and playing on
the collegiate scene for five years.

Gorospe is also a former junior
national champion, Hoerman Cup
team member, former junior college
champion in North Carolina and he
has played for years on the pro cir-
cuit.

Both golfers will be making their
third trip to the World Cup Qualify-
ing event, and have previously
teamed up in 2007.

Gorospe qualified for the tourna-
ment last year with BPGA president
Chris Lewis.

Turnquest said his third tourna-
ment qualification looks to be the
most effective thus far because of

the extended preparation time the
team has headed into the event.

“Tt was a very good feeling to qual-
ify again,” he said. “I think we have
a strong team this year and for one of
the first times we have time and an
opportunity to practice and fully pre-
pare ourselves for competition and
that preparation will be vital for us.”

With more than two months until
he and Gorospe compete in Cara-
cas, Turnquest expects the team to
deliver an impressive showing.

“In the past we have never really
had time to work together which is
crucial because it is a team event.
We get to work on our games togeth-
er, develop a team chemistry, work
on how we complement each oth-
er,” he said.

“One person can not win and it
obviously has to be a team effort so
with this time we have to work
together and work on our weak-
nesses...I think it will make all the
differences in years past.”



KENO TURNQUEST, BPGA president
Chris Lewis (centre) and Lemon Gorospe

(right)

Stubbs,
Mackey
don’t
make
top 10

BAHAMIAN professional
bodybuilders and training
partners Joel Stubbs and Jena
Mackey (not shown) com-
peted in the International
Bodybuilding Federation’s
2009 Tampa Pro Tournament
in Florida over the weekend.

However, neither of them
finished in the top 10.

Stubbs, competing in the
men’s heavyweight division,
was 12th overall with 180
points. The winner was Den-
nis James of Germany with
20, followed by Fouad Abiad
of Canada with 40. Antoher
Canadian Ben Pakulski was
third with 61.

The top three competitors
qualified to compete in the
2009 Mr Olympia, scheduled
for September 24-27 in Las
Vegas.

Mackey, competing in the
women’s heavyweight divi-
sion, was 11th overall.

The title was won by Betty
Pariso, who led an American
sweep with Gale Frankie as
the runner-up and Tina
Chandler who placed third.
PAGE 12, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

Protection of the environment 'of
primary concern’ in harbour project

BY KATHRYN CAMPBELL





HEALTH, safety and protection of the environment "are of pri-
mary concern” during the Nassau Harbour and Arawak Cay port
works, project manager with Boskalis International BV Frans
Thomassen assured government officials.

"It is the responsibility of everyone on the site," he said during
a tour of the project last Friday.

The general scope of work includes dredging Nassau Harbour,
sheet pile extension and reclamation works on Arawak Cay, and
installation of mooring dolphins at Prince George Wharf.

“To protect the environment, we are using the highest standards
ever seen in any project around the country,” said Public Works
Minister Neko Grant.

“The alarms that were raised regarding the environment were
without merit. In time we will see that we chose the right contractor
who is making every effort to ensure the environment is not dam-
aged.”

Project Manager Mr Thomassen assured government officials
that the project would be executed as if it were in an “environ-
mentally sensitive area.”

He outlined several environmental considerations that are
required of the project team during the project. Dredging is expect-
ed to be completed by November.

All equipment is checked for leaks before use, Mr Thomassen
said. Any leak is cleaned up immediately utilising the emergency
response spill kits available on the vessels and placed at strategic
locations around the site during the dredging activities. Leaks are
reported to the project manager.

Waste is never to be thrown overboard and use of the designated
waste skips located around the various working areas is mandatory,
he said. Equipment is switched off when not is use; the use of silt - - -
screens in certain locations along the beach is mandatory; water | PROJECT Manager with Boskalis International BV Frans Thomassen makes a point as he leads government officials on a tour of the
clarity level are monitored twice a day; marine animals are notto Arawak Cay construction site. Pictured from left are Public Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant; acting director of Works Gordon

be disturbed; and bunker fuel is permitted only in designated — Major: project engineer Robert Garraway; permanent secretary Colin Higgs, and Environment Minister the Earl Deveaux.
areas and according to agreed procedures with Port Authority, Mr

Thomassen explained.

He emphasised that regulations stipulate that accidents, inci-
dents, near misses, damage to property and quality deviations are
to be reported to management by all personnel on site, including
visitors.

Among the officials touring the site last Friday were Minister
Grant; Environment Minister Earl Deveaux; permanent secre-
tary at the Ministry of Works Colin Higgs; permanent secretary at
the Ministry of the Environment Ronald Thompson; acting direc-
tor of Works Gordon Major; director of the Bahamas Environment
Science and Technology (BEST) Commission Philip Weech and
project engineer Robert Garraway.

Prior to the tour the team underwent a 20-minute safety and
induction exercise, a mandatory requirement by contractor Boskalis
International BV and sub-contractor American Bridge Bahamas
for entry to the sites and vessels.



GOVERNMENT project engineer on

the Nassau Harbour Port Improve-

ment Project Robert Garraway gives

government ministers an update on

the plans for the extension of Arawak
Cay during a tour of the site on August 7. Pictured
from left are Mr Garraway, Environment Minister
Earl Deveaux; Project Manager with Boskalis Inter-
national BV Frans Thomassen and Public Works
and Transport Minister Neko Grant.

(BIS photos/Patrick Hanna)

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THE TRIBUNE

USITIC

TUESDAY,

AUGUST



init



SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

tel employment numbers
ould increase next year



By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

ahamian hotels could

see employment num-

bers increase in the

first three months of

2010 after a 20 per
cent contraction in tourism sector
this year, according to the Bahamas
Hotel Association President.

It is also thought that the need
for previously seen numbers in the
industry has been drastically
changed by the recession.

Robert Sands, who is also a senior
executive with Baha Mar, said in the
midst of the global economic
decline, hotels have adapted to run-
ning operations with reduced staff.

However, according to him, fluc-
tuations in employment numbers
have always been, and will continue
to be, driven by visitor numbers.
And the industry has just entered

the traditionally slow season for the
year, curtailed minimally by the Miss
Universe pageant.

"There is no question in my mind
that hotels are learning to work bet-
ter with less, but an increase in busi-
ness demand, by necessity, will
demand labour," said Mr Sands.

"T can't say that all the labour that
has been release will be replaced.

"The reality is that there has been
some downsizing in out sector in the
last 12 months, so there is already
downward pressure on head counts
in our business."

Mr Sands said employment num-
bers could increase between January
and March of next year, but added
that until the economy and tourism
regains the strength it once had, the
industry will not see employment
levels where they once were.

"Business is like an accordion and
that accordion is almost com-
pressed," he said.

"We need to give it some new life



ROBERT SANDS

ROYAL FIDELITY

Le aR

RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company

NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com



“There is no question in my
mind that hotels are learning

to work better with less, but an
increase in business demand, by

necessity, will demand labour.”
— BHA president Robert Sands

and hopefully new life will come -
certainly during this period I don't
see it happening.

"T think we won't see any real
demand for stimulating additional
employment until winter of next
year."

He said the decline in the industry
is evident by the number of layoffs
and resort closures seen snowballing
since year end 2008.

"Employment levels match busi-
ness demand," said Mr sands.

Baha Mar will be closing its Wyn-
dham resort on Monday, August 17,
with the reopening scheduled for
October 5.

According to Mr Sands, plans to
close the hotel had been talked
about 12 months prior, and employ-
ees were notified to take their vaca-
tions during that time.

Cable Bahamas
extends deadline
for preference
share offering

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

CABLE Bahamas has
extended the deadline for its
non-voting cumulative
redeemable convertible pref-
erence share offering because
some interested purchasers
have not been able to acquire
them, according to sources
close to the Cable Bahamas
buyout.

According to a release
issued by the Bisx-listed cable
company: "The Board of
Directors of Cable Bahamas
Ltd wishes to announce that
the closing date for the Series
Four 8%, non-voting cumula-
tive redeemable convertible
preference share offering has
been extended to August 31,
2009."

Sources told Tribune Busi-
ness the company wished to
give those interested buyers a
chance to purchase shares, as
many individuals the company
knew had shown interest were
on holidays.

"There has been substan-
tial interest and it (the pref-
erence share offering) was
well received,” the source
said.

The $80million buyout of

its controlling shares will put
in place the structure that
deals with our financing for
the next three to four years",
Cable Bahamas’ president,
Anthony Butler, told Tribune
Business recently.

He said the company’s buy-
back of its majority share-
holder’s stake would “position
us well to take advantage of
the opportunities” stemming
from the government’s dereg-
ulation/liberlisation of the
Bahamian communications
market, through removing any
issues surrounding ‘foreign
ownership’ of Cable Bahamas.

The purchase is being
financed through the combi-
nation of a $40million prefer-
ence share issue, a $105mil-
lion senior bank credit facility
and Cable Bahamas’ own
working capital. The BISX-
listed firm is raising for more
than the $80million it needs
to finance the Columbus pur-
chase because it wants to refi-
nance its existing credit facili-
tates at the same time.

“We’re basically refinanc-
ing our existing credit facili-
ties,” Mr Butler told Tribune
Business, adding that the com-
pany’s existing credit line was
around $28 million according
to his last recollection.

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EPA seminar attracts more than
150 professional service providers

THE SMESU Trade Unit
of The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce in partnership
with the Caribbean Regional
Negotiation Machinery
(CRNM), and the Grand
Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce recently hosted a two-
day seminar to highlight the
benefits and opportunities
that are available to profes-
sional service providers
through the European Part-
nership Agreement (E.P.A.).
Seminars were held both in
New Providence and Grand
Bahama.

Over the two days, the sem-
inar attracted more than 150
professional service providers
aiming to expose and inform
them of the opportunities for
market access to the Euro-

pean Union (EU).

These benefits and rights
of access for Bahamian ser-
vices providers are a result of
the now concluded negotia-
tions for the Economic Part-
nership Agreement (EPA).
The seminar attracted a
diverse group of participants,
which is indicative of the wide
reach of those persons that
stand to benefit and be
impacted by this Agreement.

Minister of State for
Finance and the Public Ser-
vice, Zhivargo Laing opened
the seminar at the British
Colonial Hilton and wel-
comed the representatives
from the CRNM. He com-
mended the Chamber for
hosting such a seminar, noting
that the Bahamian business

ROYAL FIDELITY

Li tela ae ed 4

RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company

community needs to be edu-
cated on the impact that the
EPA will have on the way
they do business and the
opportunities that are being
created.

The session in Nassau was
also attended by leading
lawyers, including the chair
of the Bahamas Trade Com-
mission, John Delaney and
Frank Comito, Executive
Director of the Bahamas
Hotel Association.

The seminar was facilitat-
ed by Ramesh Chaitoo, Head
of the Services Trade Unit of
the CRNM and Noel Watson,
Trade Consultant to the
CRNM.

Seminar participants were
provided with a general
overview of the professional

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



services element of the agree-
ment and the opportunities
for further development of

SEE next page

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BAHAMAS
Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

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ROYAL @ FIDELITY

Money at Work


PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS ee
McDonald’s July same-store sales rise 4.3%

By BETSY VERECKEY
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) —McDon-
ald's Corp. said Monday its same-
store sales climbed 4.3 per cent in
July, as the nation's biggest ham-
burger chain benefited from bud-
get-conscious consumers and wide
promotion of new coffee drinks.

The Oak Brook, Ill., company
said US same-store sales climbed
2.6 per cent because of new prod-
ucts, including McCafe espresso-
based coffee.

European same-store sales
surged 7.2 per cent, helped by
growth in France and the UK.

Same-store sales for Asia Pacific,
the Middle East and Africa rose
2.1 per cent, as strength in Aus-
tralia helped offset weakness in
China. Longer operating hours also
boosted sales.

Deutsche Bank analyst Jason
West, who rates the stock "Buy,"
said the third quarter "is off to a
good start” but maintained his
earnings-per-share estimate of
$1.10.

McDonald's same-store sales, or

sales at restaurants open at least 13
months, are a key indicator of per-
formance because they measure
growth at existing restaurants rather
than newly opened ones.

Total sales declined 0.3 per cent
because of currency translation.

McDonald's shares rose $1.07, or
1.9 per cent, to close at $56.27 Mon-
day.

Many companies that sell their
products abroad convert sales from
foreign currencies back to dollars
when reporting financial results.
When the dollar is stronger than
those currencies, it results in fewer
dollars in revenue.

McDonald's results have bene-
fited from consumers trading down
to cheaper meal options amid the
recession, but its second-quarter
profit declined eight per cent
because of the stronger dollar and a
year-ago gain. Year-ago results also
benefited from a better economy
and stimulus checks, the company
said.

McDonald's, which has at least
32,000 restaurants worldwide, plans
to release August same-store sales
on September 9.

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AS CHAMBE!
_OMMER





SHOWN (I-r) are Gershan Major, first vice president, Chamber of Commerce, Khaalis Rolle, Chamber president, Philip Simon, executive
director, Chamber of Commerce, Ramesh Chaitoo, head of the Services Trade Unit, CRNM, Hank Ferguson, director, Chamber of Com-

merce SMESU Trade Unit, Noel Watson, trade consultant, CRNM, and John Delaney, chairman of the Bahamas Trade Commission

IS

52wk-Low
1.28
10.00
6.25
0.63
3.15
2.14
10.18
2.74
5.50
1.27
1.32
6.60
10.00
10.30
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.39
10.00

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

Focol Class B Preference

ROYAL @ FIDELITY

Maney at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 10 AUGUST 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,564.59] CHG 8.48 | %CHG 0.54 | YTD -147.77 | YTD % -8.63
FINDEX: CLOSE 779.58 | YTD -6.62% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

Previous Close Today's Close
1.34 1.34
11.00 11.00
6.25 6.25
0.63 0.63
3.15 3.15
2.37 2.37
11.35 11.35
2.74 2.74
5.60 5.76
3.48 3.85
1.82 1.82
6.60 6.60
10.63 10.63
10.30 10.30
5.13 5.13
1.00 1.00
0.30 0.30
5.49 5.49
10.39 10.39
10.00 10.00

Change

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.16
0.37
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b

52wk-Low Security

Symbol Last Sale

Change

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

52wk-Low
14.25
6.00
0.20

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $
7.92
4.00
0.35

Ask $

8.42
6.25
0.40

Last Price

14.60
6.00
0.35

Daily Vol.

Weekly Vol.

EPS $

FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

CI:e7 Lc IN TA

Div $
0.127
0.992
0.244

-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

ases)

Interest
7%
Prime + 1.75%
7%
Prime + 1.75%

EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

10.6
11.1
25.6
N/M
40.4
43.1
8.1
11.0
13.7
34.7
7.6
15.7
33.0
13.0
15.5
N/M
8.6
13.5
10.9
55.6

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

P/E
N/M
N/M

256.6

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3860 2.40 4.75
2.9047 -1.20 -3.66
1.4817 3.35 5.38
3.1031 -8.35 -13.82
12.9801 2.87 5.79
101.6693 1.10 1.67
96.7398 0.35 -4.18
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.2765 2.00 -2.98
1.0622 2.56 6.22
1.0243 -0.84 2.43
1.0585 2.04 5.85
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

52wk-Low
1.3231
2.8952
1.4059
3.1031
12.3289
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
30-Jun-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
KS1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

Mime iimie



EPA, from page 1B

trade in services between The
Bahamas, the members of
Cariforum and the EU. The
presenters are rated among
the best in region. Mr Chaitoo
was the lead negotiator for
services during the three years
of EPA negotiations.

Hank Ferguson, Director
of the Chamber of Com-
merce’s SMESU Trade Unit,
noted: “We are grateful for
the support of the Grand
Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce and were fully sup-
ported by the Minister of
State for Finance and The
Bahamas Trade Commis-
sion.”

“We were also particularly
happy to be able to take this
seminar, which is partially
funded by a grant from the
Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB) to the island of
Grand Bahama. This engage-
ment enabled the private sec-
tor there to be engaged in this
important national discus-
sion.”

The facilitators spoke to
architects, engineers, lawyers,
tour operators and other
Bahamian service providers
on the benefits and opportu-
nities for Bahamians to do
business in Europe.

As the Head of the Services
Trade Unit at the CRNM, Mr
Chaitoo researches and analy-
ses bilateral, regional and
multilateral trade policy issues
and advises Caribbean gov-
ernments on negotiating
strategies and options regard-
ing services. He was respon-
sible for services and invest-
ment negotiations in the Eco-
nomic Partnership Agree-
ment (EPA) between CARI-

FORUM states and the Euro-
pean Union. Chaitoo is a
graduate of Carleton Univer-
sity, Cambridge University
and the University of the
West Indies.

Mr Chaitoo urged the
Bahamas follow the lead of
its Caribbean counterparts
and form a Coalition of Ser-
vice Industries saying: “The
Bahamian private sector
needs to be better organized
to take advantage of the
opportunities being presented
through the EPA. Profes-
sional service providers not
represented by an Associa-
tion will have a difficult time
being recognized by govern-
ments and export develop-
ment companies.”

He encouraged business
persons to continue to edu-
cate themselves on the details
of the EPA, citing resources
like the CRNM’s website as
informative tools.

Noel Watson is Chairman
of A-Z Information Jamaica
Limited, which is a consult-
ing and information firm
operating in the Caribbean.

His consultancy work on
the removal of restrictions to
the free movement of services
and capital was important to
the establishment of the
CARICOM Single Market
that officially came into being
in early 2006. He received a
PhD in economics from
Simon Fraser University in
Canada.

When asked what he’d like
seminar participants to take
away from the event, a pas-
sionate Watson exclaimed,
“Bahamians ought to take
action now. Take advantage
of the window of opportunity
in the European market
now.”


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009, PAGE 3B





Cigar shops fret
over higher taxes
and smoking laws

By ALAN SAYRE
AP Business Writer

NEW ORLEANS (AP) —
With the world becoming
ever less welcoming for tobac-
co smoke of all kinds, the
owners of specialty shops that
sell premium cigars have con-
verged on New Orleans with
the same concerns as mass-
market cigarette manufactur-
ers — higher taxes and anti-
smoking laws.

The cigars at the annual
trade show of the Interna-
tional Premium Cigar & Pipe
Retailers Association are not
the packaged stogies found in
an isolated corner of a con-
venience store. These are
hand-rolled smokes — some-
times with Cuban seed tobac-
co grown in a non-embargoed
country — that can go from a
couple of bucks to $30 each.

“It’s tough,” said Chris
McCalla, legislative director
for Columbus, Ga.-based
IPCRA, which represents
about 1,500 tobacco stores.
“People view us in the same
category of cigarettes. With a
cigar, it’s different. It’s a plea-
surable experience. It’s social-
ization of sorts.”

Mark Twain once said he
always tried not to smoke two
cigars at once. Winston
Churchill smoked cigars in
peacetime and wartime. A
cigar was more than just a
prop for Groucho Marx. John
F Kennedy enjoyed puffing
— although he barred the
import of Cuban cigars during
his showdowns with another
cigar aficionado, Fidel Cas-
tro, who later claimed to have
quit smoking. And, in mod-
ern times, Rush Limbaugh
often associates himself with a
premium cigar.

“The cigar continues to
have a unique place in the
hearts of a lot of men,” said
Norm Sharp, president of the
Cigar Association of America,
a Washington, D.C.-based
trade group of distributors
and manufacturers. “There
are a lot of aficionados out
there.”

And many detractors,
including the American Can-
cer Society, which has said
that cigars — as well as pipes
— are not a safe substitute
for cigarettes and carry much
of the same cancer risk.

IPCRA estimates there are
12 to 13 million cigar smokers
in the United States, who puff
an average of two a week,
ranging from several a day to
the special-event-only smok-
er, McCalla said.

When Congress hiked ciga-
rette taxes earlier this year,

ELECTRIC

state

WATER HEATERS

UNDER
COUNTER

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

a.
S
e
o
=
[=]
ao
s
=
z

VARIOUS CIGARS are displayed at the 77th annual trade show of the International Premium Cigar & Pipe



Retailers Association in New Orleans on Saturday...

cigars did not escape the
attention of lawmakers, who
imposed a tax increase
between about five cents and
40 cents per cigar. The indus-
try now fears that state legis-
latures, many of which are
trying to close big budget
gaps, will follow suit.

“Tobacco is considered
low-hanging fruit for taxa-
tion,” Sharp said.

And cigars are among the
active targets for anti-smoking
groups.

Although only Delaware,
Washington state and Utah
ban puffing in tobacco estab-
lishments, the city of Galve-
ston, Texas, recently passed
a clean air ordinance that for-
bids smoking in a planned cig-
ar lounge — a store that pro-
vides a room for cigar-lovers
to visit and enjoy their tobac-
co.
Owner Charlie Head, who
plans to open September 1
after his previous store was
wiped out by Hurricane Ike,
said it’s ridiculous to think
people who don’t smoke
would even come inside his
business, which includes lock-
ers for smokers to store their
cigars and liquor they bring
in. “We’re going ahead with
it,” Head said. “But a big part
of our business is locker
rental.”

Head said he hoped to win
an exemption for his shop
before the ban takes effect on
January 1.

Even before the spread of
cigarette smoking bans, cig-
ars and pipes received a chilly

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reception in many places. Air-
liners that used to permit cig-
arettes wouldn’t allow cigars
and pipes. And many smok-
ing bars today are actually cig-
arette-only bars — don’t light
up that cigar or pipe, a sign
often says.

As a result, cigar smoking
has become largely a private
activity, McCalla said, with
the cigar lounge or cigar bar a
popular gathering place.

“Most cigar smokers would
like to sit down comfortably
and smoke with others,” he
said.

The recession has cut into
business, said Doug Winston,
manager of the New Orleans
Cigar Co., a 700-square-foot
store in the downtown district.
To start with, go-outside-to-
smoke rules are making short-
er cigars more popular.

“With the tax and the econ-
omy, people also seem to be
going to the lesser-expensive
cigars,” Winston said.

As for the convention itself,
which is hosting about 4,000
people through Wednesday,
smoking will be allowed in the
exhibit hall between 10am
and Spm. But members of the
public aren’t invited to the
meeting — and no one under
18 will be let in, McCalla said.

For the stories
behind the news,
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PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, VIRGINIA CAROLYN
KESTER of Lyford Cay in the Western District
of New Providence, intend to change the name to GIA
VIRGINIA CAROLYN KESTER. |i there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication
of this notice.

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The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd, (BTC) is
pleased fo invite Tenders fo provide the Company with
Motor Insurance coverage.

Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender Specifi-

cation from the Security's Desk located in the Administra-

tive building on John F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours
of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

The deadline for submission of fenders is on or before
Friday, August 2st, 2009. Tenders should be sealed and
marked “TENDER FOR MOTOR INSURANCE" and should be
delivered to the attention of the “Mr. |. Kirk Griffin, Acting

President and CEO,”

BIC reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.

wwwbtcbahamas.com
PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Atlantic City casino revenues down 12.7%

By WAYNE PARRY

Associated Press Writer

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J.
(AP) —Atlantic City's casi-
no revenues were all wet dur-
ing a rainy July that kept gam-
blers away.

The city’s 11 casinos won
$383 million in July, a 12.7 per
cent decline from a year ago.

Slot revenue was $266.8 mil-
lion, down 12.4 per cent, while
table games revenue was
$116.2 million, down 13.4 per
cent.

The city is in the midst of a
third straight year of declining
revenues that started when
slots parlors began opening
in neighbouring Pennsylvania
in November 2006. The reces-

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sion also has made gamblers
keep a tighter hold on their
wallets.

For the first seven months
of this year, Atlantic City casi-
nos won $2.3 billion, down
14.9 per cent from the same
period in 2008.

Only one casino, the Trump
Taj Mahal Casino Resort,
posted an increase in revenue
last month, up 8.7 per cent.

Mark Juliano, CEO of
Trump Entertainment
Resorts, said the heavy invest-
ment the company made in
its flagship property is paying
off; it opened a second hotel
tower last year, adding nearly
800 new rooms.

"Where we spend the most
time and effort, we're getting
the biggest and best results,”
he said.

For all of 2009 so far, the

Taj Mahal has posted the best
performance in Atlantic City,
down just 2.5 per cent. That's
twice as good as the perenni-
al market leader, the Borgata
Hotel Casino & Spa, which is
down 5.2 per cent year-to-
date.

Trump

Trump Entertainment
recently chose Donald Trump
and Dallas-based Beal Bank
to buy it out of bankruptcy
court for $100 million. Bond-
holders say they'll try to block
the deal, which would leave
them with nothing. A deci-
sion is due in late October.

Trump Plaza Hotel and
Casino posted the biggest
decline, down 27.6 per cent.

The third Trump casino,
Trump Marina Hotel Casino,

was down 14.2 per cent. A
deal fell apart in June in
which a former protege of
Donald Trump, Richard
Fields, was to buy the casino
and rebrand it as Margari-
taville in conjunction with
singer Jimmy Buffett.

Two casinos beset by
labour strike also fared par-
ticularly poorly in July. Cae-
sars Atlantic City and Bally's
Atlantic City have been pick-
eted by the United Auto
Workers, which has taken out
billboard, print and broadcast
advertisements urging gam-
blers to play elsewhere. The
union is protesting the casi-
nos’ failure to sign contracts
with workers more than two
years after dealers voted to
unionize.

Caesars was down 19.7 per
cent, and Bally's was down

17.3 per cent.

"Tt has cast somewhat of a
pall on the city and our prop-
erties," said Dan Nita, Mid-
Atlantic president of Harrah's
Entertainment Inc. "We're
getting calls from customers
upset that they're being
reached out to by the UAW."

Other declines were at Har-
rah's Resort Atlantic City
(down 15.6 per cent); the
Atlantic City Hilton Casino
Resort (down 15 per cent);
the Showboat Casino Hotel
(down 13.8 per cent); and the
Borgata, which was down 9.7
per cent last month.

The Tropicana Casino and
Resort, which was recently
sold to a group led by billion-
aire investor Carl Icahn, was
down 9.1 per cent, and
Resorts Atlantic City was
down 7.5 per cent.

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COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel of land being Parcel A
bounded on the NORTH by the other part of Gladstone Road Crown
Allotment #22 now or formerly the Property of F. A. Garraway and
running thereon Fifty-two Feet and thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’),
bounded on the EAST by Parcel B and running thereon One
Hundred Twenty-five Feet (125’), bounded on the SOUTH by the
portion of Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or formerly
the ee of Richard Sands and running thereon Fifty-Two Feet
and Thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’) and bounded on the WEST by
the other portion of the Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or
formerly the property of Richard Sands and running thereon One
Hundred Twenty-five Feet (125’) containing Six Thousand
Eighty-three square feet (6,083 sq. ft.) and situated in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas shown on the plan filed herein and
thereon coloured pink AND IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece
parcel of land being Parcel B bounded on the NORTH by the other
art of Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or formerly the
roperty of F A. Garraway and running thereon Fifty-two Feet and
thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’), bounded on the EAST by the other
ortion of the Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or
ormerly the property of Richard Sands and running thereon One
Hundred Twenty-five Feet (125’), bounded on the SOUTH by
the portion of Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or
formerly the property of Richard Sands and running thereon
Fifty-Two Feet and Thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’) and
bounded on the WEST by Parcel A and running thereon One Hundred
Twenty-five Feet (125’) containing Six Thousand Eighty-three square
feet (6,083 sq. ft.) and situated in the Western District of the said Island
of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas shown on the plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow.

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Buster, Caswell and
Pauline Ferguson.

2009/CLE/qui/0666

NOTICE
The Quieting Titles Act 1959

The Petition of Buster Ferguson of the Eastern District in the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Pauline and Caswell Ferguson both of the Southern
District of the said Island of New Providence in respect of: - ALL
THAT piece parcel of land being Parcel A bounded on the NORTH
by the other part of Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or
formerly the Property of RF A. Garraway and running thereon
Fifty-two Feet and thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’), bounded on the
EAST by Parcel B and sae thereon One Hundred Twenty-five Feet
(125’), bounded on the SOUTH by the portion of Gladstone Road Crown
Allotment #22 now or formerly the property of Richard Sands and
running thereon Fifty-Two Feet and Thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’) and
bounded onthe WEST by the other portion of the Gladstone Road Crown
Allotment #22 now or formerly the property of Richard Sands and
running thereon One Hundred Twenty-five Feet (125’) containing Six
Thousand Eighty-three square feet (6,083 sq. ft.) and situated in the
Western District of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas shown on the plan filed herein and
thereon coloured pink AND IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece
parcel of land being Parcel B bounded on the NORTH by the other part
of Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or formerly the Property
of F. A. Garraway and running thereon Fifty-two Feet and thirty-two
Hundredths (52.32’), bounded on the EAST by the other portion of the
Gladstone Road Crown Allotment #22 now or formerly the property
of Richard Sands and a Aa One Hundred Twenty-five Feet
(125’), bounded on the SOUTH by the portion of Gladstone Road Crown
Allotment #22 now or formerly the property of Richard Sands and
running thereon Fifty-Two Feet and Thirty-two Hundredths (52.32’) and
bounded on the WEST by Parcel A and running thereon One Hundred
Twenty-five Feet (125’) containing Six Thousand Eighty-three square
feet (6,083 sq. ft.) and situated in the Western District of the said Island
of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas shown on the plan filed herein and thereon coloured yellow.
Buster, Caswell and Pauline Ferguson claim to be the owners
of the fee simple estate in possession of the tracts of land hereinbefore
described free from encumbrances.
D the Petitioners have made application to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have their title to
the said tracts of land investigated and the nature and extent
thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any _ persons
having Dower or a Right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a
claim not recognized in the petition shall on or before the 30th of
September A.D., 2009 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the
Petitioners or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the pre-
scribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of
any such person to file and serve a statement of his claim on or before
the 30th of September A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to such claim.

Copies of the Filed Plan may be inspected at:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court;

2. The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co. attorneys for
the Petitioner, Sassoon House, Shirley Street & Victoria
Avenue, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas;

Dated the 6th day of August A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioners







PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, DEVAUGHN QUINCY
KEMP of the City of Nassau, of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, intends to change the name to DEVAUGHN QUINCY
KEMP-SAWYER. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

Employment Opportunity

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Experience in Management Reporting In a commercial
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Demonstrated ability to manage, motivate and develop a
team and effectively work with staf,

Extensive experience using automated accounting systems
such as Quickbooks and Peachtree.

Demonstrated ability in managing projects.

Well adjusted to working for organizations with 24/7
operations.

Proctical/Specialist Skills include
Technical and practical skills in financial accounting.
Skills in forecasting, budgeting and analyses of variances.
Strong customer focus (internal and external).

Strang cammunication and interpersonal akills co effectively
translate ideas.

Strong reasening and interprecation skills,
Dervanstrated abilicy to research innovative solutions.
Strang computer and Microsoft Office skills,

The oversight of (A) payrall processing and reporting, (Bi
customer balling and: (C) accoune reconciliations,

Managing year end audits

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NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM ROOSEVELT
WALLACE late of Market Street in the Northern
District of the Island of New Providence one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the above Estate
are required to send the same duly certified
in writing to the Undersigned on or before the
31st day of August, A.D. 2009, after which date the
Co-Executors will proceed to distribute the assets
having regard only to the claims to which they
shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
indebted to the said Estate are requested to make
full settlement on or before the date hereinbefore
mentioned.

MERIDIAN LAW CHAMBERS
Attorneys for the Co-Executors
Chambers,

P.O. Box N-168,

East Bay Shopping Center,
East Bay Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.



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PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009

meaty

THE TRIBUNE






©

LOVING RELATIONSHIPS

SEX AND THE NET: WORK PLACE REALITY :

IN the last few weeks, we have dis-
cussed the ever increasing growth of
Internet use world wide, computer
suave children, adolescents and the
explosion of sexual interest online.
Logically, it would then make sense
that people who find sexual gratifi-
cation online would allow their minds
to wander throughout the day to
places of comfort and contentment. If
your workplace does not have any
policies concerning Internet usage
during work hours, then the door is
left wide open.

Is it wrong, therefore, to cut your
lunch break short to check the chat
room you were in before you left
home, and continue the conversation
with that beautiful person in Dallas?
Down load those sexy full frontal
shots of teenagers because no one
checks your computer at work? Per-
haps you have had a scare about a
sexually transmitted disease you do
not want to ask anyone, but just need
to do a little research. Is it all classed
as online sexual activity and is it all
bad? Should the repercussions vary
depending on the act and should the
position you hold in the company be
relevant?

Rules and regulations concerning
sexual issues need to be laid out, very
clearly, in black and white for all to
see. Staff hand books have details
about conduct and sexual harassment,

(oy

GREEN SCENE





but rarely do they define the behav-
iour. Statistically, larger companies
seem to do a little better because they
have the staff, access to professional
advice and funding to implement
training programs. They are acutely
aware of the cost of firing, rehiring
and training of staff.

The more forward thinking com-
panies are seeing the benefits of car-
ing and understanding for the com-
plete individual and the value of
investing in a person's future. We
know now that a healthy individual,
both in body and mind, produces a
better employee. But let us not get so
idealistic in our thinking that we lose
sight of the potential legal ramifica-
tions and the pay outs for sexual
harassment lawsuits. Companies
know that they need to keep away
from the far reaching effects of being
labeled a ‘hostile work environment’
and so they are attempting to antici-
pate sexual problems before they are
faced with them.

The reality is that many jobs

Guavas

MANY of our tropical fruits orig-
inate in Asia so it makes a change to
find one that is a favorite in Asia
but comes from Central America.
Guavas can now be found all
through the tropical and subtropi-
cal world but their ripening habits
and soft fruits make them very diffi-
cult to export.

Guava (Psidium guajava) has long
been naturalised in The Bahamas
and grows in the wild, particularly
near to abandoned settlements. The
trees are easily distinguished by their
perpetually peeling coppery bark
and the strongly veined leaves. Wild
guava trees rarely bear heavily and
tend to produce on and off through-
out the year. Summer, and August in
particular, is the time of heaviest
bearing.

One of the problems associated
with wild guava trees is their sus-
ceptibility to attack by fruit flies and
the subsequent larvae, or ‘worms’,

that infest the fruits at ripening time.
The fruits also tend to be quite small,
usually about golf ball size.

Cultivated guavas are a complete-
ly different experience. Their fruits
usually have a skin thick enough to
deter predation by fruit flies. They
are also much larger, as large as a
baseball or bigger.

According to the cultivator the
flesh of guavas can be white, pink
or red while the skin can be all of
these colours plus yellow.

Small cultivated guava trees
should be set out in well drained soil
in a location where they receive full
sunlight and no salt spray. As long
as the soil is well drained the guava
is not fussy about soil type. Culti-
vated guava trees bear early and
benefit from pruning when the main
growing season is over.

The guava flowers look like straw-
berry blossoms that quickly give way
to young fruits after being pollinat-

require some online time and so the
rules become vague and can be
manipulated. Some companies have
guidelines determining if the con-
duct is viewed as one of concern,
undesirable online sexual activity, or
a real problem that warrants inter-
vention. Others do not discriminate
or differentiate. They use time, mon-
ey and energy to monitor and police
their employee's online behaviour.

Are we always able to recognise a
person who has a void in their life
and who needs to find an outlet to fill
that space? Not all of us are good at
solving our problems, reaching out
for help, or even having someone to
trust to share our most innermost
thoughts. It is those isolated people
who have trouble dealing with their
internal self and who have not learnt
good coping skills, are those who are
so susceptible. Because of its easy
accessibility, anonymity and afford-
ability the Internet is the obvious
choice for many. The sexual activity
online becomes the quick fix instead
of a drink, smoke, pill or any other
‘upper’.

However, if we do notice changes
in our colleague's behaviour, then
hopefully it would not be left unat-
tended. The most visible clue may
be a drop in productivity but there
are less obvious changes that are so
easy to attribute to outside stressors.



ed by bees. The tree rarely grows
taller than a large shrub, though the
native guavas tend to be leggier and
taller, more like small trees. The
bane of native guava is the presence
of many small but very hard seeds.
Many of the cultivated varieties are
virtually seedless or have much
smaller seeds.

Guava fruits should be picked
when mature yet still firm or the
risk is run of having them fall from
the tree and become inedible. Even
one guava inside a house makes its
presence known through a pervad-
ing aroma that is impossible to hide.
It is one of the most pleasant of nat-
ural scents. Fruits that are picked, or
have dropped, while still hard can be
ripened by placing them in a paper
bag and adding a little banana peel
or a slice of apple.

The majority of Bahamian guavas
will be picked and turned into gua-
vajam, one of the most delicious of
all jams. Much of the remainder will
contribute towards guava duff, a
steamed pudding that uses both the
guava flesh and the seed pulp. The
pulp sauce that accompanies guava

Signs for concern include: unhappi-
ness, secretiveness, shame, guilt,
wanting to be alone, and unwilling-
ness to interact with coworkers. If
the online use is being tracked for 2
hours a day, purely for sexual use, it
is a clear indicator that the behav-
iour has now become compulsive.

Workplace reality is that there is
always the possibility that you can
lose so much more than just your
job. For those who have spent years
building a career, establishing a posi-
tion in society, it can all come crash-
ing down and have devastating
effects. Perhaps, the most difficult
aspect of the problem after reaching
rock bottom is the helplessness to
rid the label of ‘Sex Addict’. All of
this should make us think carefully
before using our work computer for
personal use. Employers also need
to step up and play their part in pro-
viding an environment that is healthy
and conducive for work.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual and
Couples Relationship Therapist. She is
a Registered Nurse and a Certified Clin-
ical Sex Therapist. Call for an appoint-
ment- Relate Bahamas at 364- 7230,
or email relatebahamas@yahoo.com
orwww.relatebahamas.blogspot.com.
She is also available for speaking
engagements.



By Gardener Jack

CULTIVATED guavas are larger
than native varieties and tend
to have thicker skins, all the
better to ward off fruit flies.

duff is usually lightly fortified with
brandy or rum. The same sauce
works well when poured hot over
vanilla ice cream.

The Cattley or strawberry guava is
a small shrub with shiny leaves that
can be grown in a 20-gallon con-
tainer. Perhaps I should not advise
you to do that because Cattley gua-
va is on the Florida list of undesir-
able plants and I would not like to
be accused of encouraging the crim-
inal element of plant life. If your
Cattley guava is grown in a contain-
er and the seeds disposed of prop-
erly then I see little harm in raising
one or two.

Children will thank you for it.
Cattley guava fruits are about an
inch long and shaped like pears. The
fruit does not taste like strawber-
ries but is quite pleasant. The seeds
are very different from regular gua-
va, being quite large in relation to
the fruit and fluted. Cattley guava
trees tend to bear in the spring and
early summer.

e j.hardy@coralwave.com

Tips for fitting
and selecting
Children's footwear

As we wind down to the open-
ing of the school year, many par-
ents are busy selecting footwear
for their children. I find it neces-
sary to address this topic as many
children experience foot problems
due to improper footwear. Par-
ents can worry about their child's
teeth, eyes, but may not give as
much concern to the developing
foot. Many adult foot problems
can have their origins in childhood,
so attention to footwear in chil-
dren can minimise these problems
in adults.

Buy Children's Shoes that Fit - it
is not unusual for a parent or
grandparent to purchase shoes for
a child without the child present. A
child's shoe should be directly fit-
ted to the foot in the store. Tradi-
tionally, it was standard to buy
shoes for children that were two
sizes too big to cut down on cost.
It is good to buy kids footwear a
little larger to leave room to grow,
but anything more than one size
bigger is too big.

Proper fit - when considering
size the length and width of the
shoe must be considered. The
width of the shoe is extremely
important, especially if the child
has wide feet. Do not purchase
shoes more than one size larger
even if you are experiencing diffi-
culties finding the right width, seek
the help of a specialty store where
adjustments can be done to sup-
port the width of the child's feet.
Shoes that are too big can cause
heel slipping and a child can trip
when walking. Further, toes can
slide forward and be very uncom-
fortable resulting with sore toes.
Likewise, shoes that are too tight
or small will cause sore feet,
ingrown toenails and other foot
problems.

Comfort - Children's shoes
should be comfortable immedi-
ately, while in the store and not
be expected to be “broken in” or
“stretched” later. If the shoe does
not appear to have enough sup-
port, there are specialty stores that
can add proper inserts not only to
support the foot, but also help to
wick away moisture. Moisture
management prevents fungus,
odors and athlete's foot from
developing.

Inspect Children's Shoes regu-
larly - even after kids' footwear is
purchased they need to be
checked regularly for wear and
tear around the soles and for prop-
er cushioning and arch support.
Children tend to adapt to what
they regard as normal and accept
it. Peer group pressure and the
dictates of fashion may also stop a
child complaining. This is why
skilled shoe fitters/specialist and
regular checks are important, par-
ticularly with young children.

Socks - the sock should fit and
be the same size as the shoe. One
hundred per cent cotton is best,
especially if the child has skin prob-
lems. Most cotton socks contain a
small percentage of nylon. A fifty
per cent wool with fifty per cent
mix is also very good. Avoid one
hundred per cent nylon socks as
they will make the foot sweat and
do not absorb moisture. Today,
modern walking socks have a wick-
ing effect (e.g. Thorlos).

In conclusion, poorly fitted chil-
dren's shoes can cause a number
of problems in adults. Therefore, it
is logical to attempt to prevent
these problems by ensuring that
the child's shoe is fitted appropri-
ately.

e Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board
Certified & licensed Pedorthist, is
the proprietor of Foot Solutions, a
health and wellness franchise that
focuses on foot care and proper
shoe fit, located in the Sandyport
Plaza, Nassau. Please direct any
questions or comments to nas-
sau@footsolutions.com or 327-FEET
(3338). ‘The views expressed are
those of the author and does not
necessarily represent those of Foot
Solutions Incorporated or any of its
subsidiary and/or affiliated compa-
nies”.
THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009, PAGE 7B



ad
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The Poop Deck hosts lunch
for Miss Universe contestants

ea
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MISS Bahamas, one of the 84 contestants of the Miss Universe
2009 pageant, is shown leaving the Poop Deck restaurant on West
Bay Street where the girls were treated to lunch on Saturday.




PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE







Pr
i



Meet four



of the contestants



from Africa and Europe

By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Feature Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

MISS SOUTH AFRICA
999999999999999999999999999>
NAME: Tatum Keshwar

AGE: 25
PROFESSION: Model and Industrial Psychologist

Tatum first competed in Miss South Africa
in 2005 and although she was unsuccessful,
she continued to prepare herself mentally
and physically. In December 2008, she won
the crown and is now competing against 84
other girls for the title of Miss Universe, and
this time, she has just one shot.

She is confident that she can be a wonder-
ful role model and ambassador for her coun-
try if she were to win Miss Universe.

“Preparations for me took quite a while, I
did a lot of growing those three years
between both pageants.

“T did a lot of traveling, I completed my
degree in Industrial Psychology, I also got a
good job practicing my industrial psychology
degree which was great because corporate
experience really grows your mind, it opens
your mind up, and actually P’ve become quite
business minded now. I did a lot of physical
preparations, and also a lot of reading.”

She grew up in KwaZulu-Natal in Durban,
which is on the east coast of South Africa,
and said it’s as beautiful and very similar to
the Bahamas.

Tatum said she grew up listening to golden
oldies. One of her favourite groups is Earth,
Wind, and Fire.

She grew up with her Mom, Dad, and
younger sister Chanel.

“My mom is one of nine, my dad is one of
ten, so I have a huge family and extended
family,” she said.

Tatum said during her reign as Miss South
Africa, she hopes to bring change to the
polarisation of rural and urban areas of

South Africa as the rural regions are so much |

more underdeveloped.

































































| MISS FRANCE
| 9999999999999999999999999999

NAME: Chloe Mortaud
AGE: 19

Chloe said her role model is actress Halle
Berry, and hopes to one day become as suc-
cessful as her.

One thing most people don’t know about
her is that she is the first Miss France to have
duel citizenship.

She said although there is a common
assumption that French people are bour-
geoisies: “we really like the simple life.”

She said one of the most emotional
moments in her life was when she recently
watched the inauguration of US President
Barack Obama while in Washington DC. “I
cried because here it was a black person
being made the president of one of the
biggest countries of the world. I was enjoying
it, all those years people fought for liberty
and freedom, and today it seems like all of
that has come to being, it was good to see
that through my own eyes. If I have children
I will tell them ‘mommy was there to see
that.’”

Chloe said her mother is a black American
originally from Mississippi and her father is
French, a combination that helped to create
her exotic look.

She said the Bahamas is far different from
France, the sun shines brighter, the water is
warmer, and the food is more ‘alive.’ She said
so far in the Bahamas her favourite food is
conch salad.

Chloe is 5 foot 10 and also speaks three
languages; English, French, and Chinese.







| MISS IRELAND

999999999999999999999999999>
NAME: Diana Donnelly

AGE: 20
PROFESSION: Model

“T don’t know how I will compare to the
other girls in this pageant, but I will definite-
ly give it my best shot and just hope for the
best. [ have a good personality, and a great
sense of humor.”

Diana said her family will arrive the week
of the pageant to support her but other than
that she did not bring any Irish lucky charms
with her. “ [left the lepruchans at home,”
she laughed.

Comparing the similarities with the
Bahamas and Ireland, Diana said the people
are similar because they are both warm and
welcoming.

However the beaches are a lot different,
she said in the Bahamas the beaches are
clear, but at home they are all rocky and very
dark.

Her favourite place in the world is her
home in Dublin, Ireland.

She is 5 feet 9 inches, and is excited to rep- |

resent her country in the 2009 Miss Universe
Pageant.



I



A Bahamian welcome for international beauties



































/MISS NAMIBIA
| 9929999999992999929999999999

NAME: Happie Nielamo

| AGE: 21

Happie said although she has the potential
to be a model she has not tried her hand at it,
and added that even though she would like to
win the Miss Universe competition, she
would be just as happy to know that she was
able to put a smile on someone’s face
through her role as Miss Namibia.

Happie is 6 foot tall, and is pursuing a law
degree at the University of Namibia.

She described her country as very dry:
“There’s the Sahara, the Namib, and the
Kalahari Desert, which are all very dry.
August is actually the windiest month for us,
it’s also very cold now in the city because we
are now experiencing winter there.”

In her spare time to unwind, Happie said
she enjoys afternoon picnics by the lakeside
with her friends and loves the night life.



FROM page 10

Em band, Nita and KB to name a
few of the entertainers who were
present.

In brief remarks, Owen Bethel,
the chairman of the local Miss Uni-
verse planning committee, thanked
the ground team for their hard

work, dedication and determination
in lying the ground work for the
pageant over the last six months.
Noting her surroundings and the
effort the staff had made in trans-
forming the grounds of the Bal-
moral, Paula Shugart told the con-
testants that they would soon see
why it was indeed “ better in the

Bahamas,” while the reigning Miss
Universe Dayana Mendoza said
that she has truly identified with
the Bahamas and in her numerous
visits here feels like she is Bahami-
an.

Tourism Minister Vincent Van-
derpool Wallace joked that it was
easy to receive RSVPs for the event

as people were extremely eager to
get the chance to interact with the
international beauties.

He added that he was extremely
pleased that throughout their time
in the country, the contestants
would be able to visit several of the
other family islands so that they can
get a true Bahamian experience.

Following dinner, guests were
treated to a dazzling fireworks dis-
play. Fortunately Mother Nature
was also in a welcoming mood as
the night was clear until after the
guests had started to leave when a
light sprinkle came down placing a
final stamp on a truly magical
evening.
THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST

TAMPA

High: 91° F/33° C
Low: 77° F/25°C

@ ¢
KEY WEST

High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 80° F/27°C
@

ORLANDO |
High:94°F34°C
Low: 74°F/23°C
@

cw,



Â¥

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Today

High Low W High

F/C F/C F/C
Albuquerque 93/33 67/19 t 94/34
Anchorage 66/18 51/10 s 66/18
Atlanta 92/33 73/22 t 87/30
Atlantic City 93/33 68/20 t 84/28
Baltimore 92/33 70/21 t 83/31
Boston 80/26 68/20 t 78/25
Buffalo 78/25 61416 pe 79/26
Charleston, SC 94/34 77/25 s 94/34
Chicago 82/27 60/15 pc 81/27
Cleveland 82/27 64/417 pe 78/25
Dallas 100/37 78/25 t 97/36
Denver 89/31 58/14 s 92/33
Detroit 84/28 62/16 pc 82/27
Honolulu 89/31 77/25 sh 88/31
Houston 96/35 76/24 t 96/35

Low

F/C
66/18
53/11
70/21
66/18
66/18
63/17
59/15
75/23
57/13
60/15
76/24
59/15
64/17
75/23
76/24

Ww

pe
s
t
pe
pe
pe
s
t
s
pe
pe
pe
pe
pe
t

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando

Partly sunny with a

thunderstorm.

H ig h: 88°
ICE UC acl aec dt



Patchy clouds with a

Partly sunny with a

Partly sunny, a

shower. thunderstorm. t-storm possible.
High: 89° High: 89°
Low: 80° Low: 81° Low: 80°
L__97°-87° FF 98°-90° F

Partly sunny, a
t-storm possible.






Le

—— i

Some sun with a
shower or t-storm.

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and

elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

@ WEST PALM BEACH
High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 77° F/25°C

FT. LAUDERDALE
High: 90° F/32° C @
Low: 78° F/26°C

= AMI

High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 78° F/26° C



High
F/C
86/30
93/33
88/31
105/40
94/34
86/30
88/31
92/33
90/32
88/31
92/33
92/33
85/29
96/35
94/34

Today

Low

F/C
65/18
74/23
64/17
77/25
73/22
64/17
68/20
72/22
78/25
66/18
69/20
78/25
73/22
69/20
74/23

ABACO
High: 89° F/32° C

—— Low: 77° F/25°C
eo”,
im

FREEPORT
High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 76° F/24° C

High: 93° F/34° C
Low: 77° F/25° C

Wednesday

W High

F/C
t 81/27
t 92/33
pe 89/31
s 105/40
t 92/33
pe —- 86/80
t 86/30
t 90/32
t 90/32
s 89/31
t 83/31
t 91/32
t 86/30
t 93/33
t 93/33

Low

F/C
62/16
73/22
65/18
82/27
69/20
64/17
66/18
71/21
78/25
69/20
67/19
78/25
70/21
69/20
75/23

WwW

7
oO

i

oO

ace ma? n ae ee’ 2

Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, OR
Raleigh-Durham
St. Louis

Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego

San Francisco
Seattle
Tallahassee
Tampa

Tucson
Washington, DC

NASSAU

High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 80° F/27°C
@

ANDROS

F/C
91/32

107/41

83/28
77/25
98/36
86/30
92/33
99/37
78/25
74/23
71/21
96/35
91/32
99/37
92/33

Today

Low

F/C
72/22
85/29
64/17
59/15
71/21
67/19
63/17
77/25
67/19
58/14
55/12
73/22
77/25
78/25
74/23

WwW

ELEUTHERA
High: 91° F/33° C
Low: 77° F/25°C

g

GREAT EXUMA

High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 78° F/26° C

Fz
US. Cres

Wednesday Wednesday

High

F/C
86/30
106/41
82/27
78/25
91/32
88/31
94/34
100/37
77/25
72/22
73/22
92/33
90/32
98/36
85/29

Low

F/C
68/20
83/28
60/15
57/13
70/21
66/18
68/20
76/24
67/19
57/13
53/11
73/22
77/25
76/24
69/20

WwW

pe
pce
pe
pe
t
pe
s
t
pe
pe
E
t
t
pe
pe





AY a NY

o|1|2

LOW

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the

3|4[5

MODERATE





HIGH |



|a|gl1o

\. HIGH

0

caine, LTH ULI:

greater the need for eye and skin protection.



High: 90° F/32° C

Low: 73° F/23°C

CROOKEDISLAND / ACKLINS

RAGGED ISLAND

High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 70° F/21°C

High: 93° F/34° C
Low: 74° F/23°C

*2

GREAT INAGUA
High: 92° F/33°C
Low: 75° F/24°C

F

« *





High: 90° High: 90°
Low: 80° Low: 81° a ES)
ETCH
102°-83° F 94°-87° F High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht.(ft.
Tod 14:51am. 29 5:31am. 0.2
a ek 6t1pm. 05
Wednesday'2:09 a.m. 24 6:13am. 0.2
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thursday T250am. 24 702am. 03
Temperature 1:35pm. 29 807pm. 06
WOM, acesecadveceeeeeeae cet eceeeee 90° F/32° C * 1:57 2 3 8:00 0 3
scatiiesannenses 79° F/26° C Friday 9-39 a 29 9:14 oa 05
Normal high... 89° F/32° C ee
Normal low 76° F/24° C
Last year's Nigh... cece 93° F/34° C SUN AND ity
Last year's LOW o.ccceeseseteeseeeeteees 77° F/25° C
Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:42 a.m. Moonrise ... 10:56 p.m.
As Of 2 p.m. yesterday oo... trace Sunset....... 7-48 p.m. Moonset... . 11:30 a.m.
Year to date : i
Normal year to date oo... cc cceceeeceneeee 26.96" a Est
AccuWeather.com = a
Forecasts and graphics provided by eI -
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Aug.13 Aug. 20 Aug. 27
CATISLAND
High: 87° F/31°C
Low: 73° F/23°C
or
SAN SALVADOR
High: 89° F/32°C
Low: 75° F/24° C
LONGISLAND
High: 90° F/32° C
Low: 74° F/23°C
MAYAGUANA



Wor_p Cities

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg





High
F/C
93/33
72/22
81/27
86/30
59/15
90/32
90/32
82/27
95/35
80/26
82/27
72/22
84/28
66/18
72/22
77/25
62/16
97/36
92/33
68/20
91/32
78/25
87/30
76/24
70/21
77/25
17/25
64/17
93/33
70/21
91/32
102/38
80/26
84/28
70/21
89/31
72/22
77/25
90/32
88/31
75/23
104/40
75/23
73/22
17/25
79/26
99/37
68/20
17/25
77/25
70/21
112/44
86/30
90/32
17/25
88/31
70/21
91/32
62/16
82/27
70/21
66/18
95/35
85/29
78/25
82/27
68/20
78/25
13/22
84/28

il

Today

Low
F/C
77/25
59/15
43/8
72/22
46/7
78/25
79/26
69/20
73/22
76/24
63/17
55/12
M128
44/6
55/12
59/15
50/10
72/22
83/28
44/6
77/25
68/20
71/21
57/13
55/12
55/12
56/13
59/15
73/22
52/11
84/28
86/30
63/17
65/18
45/7
79/26
58/14
59/15
63/17
79/26
54/12
75/23
59/15
52/11
54/12
54/12
84/28
52/11
58/14
55/12
65/18
90/32
66/18
79/26
41/5
70/21
45/7
74/23
56/13
70/21
57/13
50/10
81/27
77/25
59/15
59/15
56/13
60/15
56/13
63/17

=

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oO oO

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> Bay >

—~ fe ee ec ee ee oe eee ee OO Be BOC eee ee CS ew
oO a = aS oO = Oooaond Fano

sh
s

Wednesday

High
F/C
92/33
70/21
81/27
84/28
59/15
90/32
86/30
81/27
96/35
81/27
82/27
70/21
86/30
67/19
75/23
82/27
66/18
96/35
91/32
66/18
90/32
83/28
89/31
71/21
64/17
79/26
78/25
73/22
89/31
70/21
91/32
109/42
83/28
86/30
69/20
89/31
72/22
77/25
91/32
86/30
77/25
104/40
82/27
77/25
75/23
79/26
97/36
67/19
79/26
76/24
75/23
109/42
88/31
90/32
83/28
87/30
61/16
87/30
69/20
86/30
73/22
66/18
92/33
85/29
17/25
90/32
70/21
80/26
70/21
87/30

Low
F/C
79/26
55/12
50/10
70/21
48/8
79/26
77/25
69/20
73/22
76/24
61/16
54/12
76/24
43/6
59/15
59/15
54/12
74/23
82/27
46/7
78/25
72/22
69/20
55/12
52/11
57/13
57/13
57/13
72/22
50/10
82/27
85/29
67/19
63/17
46/7
79/26
59/15
55/12
63/17
78/25
55/12
76/24
64/17
57/13
58/14
54/12
84/28
50/10
55/12
58/14
68/20
90/32
68/20
80/26
44/6
74/23
41/5
73/22
59/15
68/20
55/12
48/8
80/26
77/25
61/16
64/17
56/13
65/18
54/12
66/18

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MariNE FORECAST

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YoTN MDH eA HH AT
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Thao
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pc
pc
Cc
pc
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S$

$
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pc
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sh
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pc
pc
pc
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$
pc
$

pe
s

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace







TUESDAY, AUGUST 11TH, 2009, PAGE 9B

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 85° F
Wednesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 85° F
FREEPORT Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 86° F
Wednesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 86° F
ABACO Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 84° F
Wednesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 84° F



& VERY
Billings) \ WARM) Minneapolis)
94/59) =

=

Denver)
89/58





Miami
90/78

Showers
T-storms







[677d Rain Fronts

[x4 | Flumes Shown are noon positions of weather systems and —

BEL] Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm ficnfiientia

[v=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Menge
10s| 0s (0s | 10s 20s [Osi] 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s /G0s//A00eN iii)



=. bay?

‘You Can Be Blown
Away By A Hurricane
_ Or rest easy k ing
that Youhave excellent insurance
coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Tei: (242) 257-4204 ff Tak (242) 352-2082 ff Tel: (22) 336-2504

Tei: (242) 34-5555 Te (248 50




THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 11,



A BAHAMIAN WELCOME
FOR INTERNATIONAL BEAUTIES



By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

he eighty four contestants and members

of the Miss Universe organisation were
officially welcomed to the Bahamas at a gala
reception held on the lawn of the Balmoral
Club on Sandford Drive Friday evening.

The event was attended by hundreds of Bahamians and fea-
tured an official introduction of each contestant as they made
their way down the lawn escorted by members of the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force.

The Balmoral Club’s lawn was transformed into a gorgeous
black and white garden oasis with masses of food stations,
champagne, and Grey Goose specialty drinks.

Many of the contestants enjoyed conch fritters and grouper
fingers for the first time and declared the food delicious.
Throughout the evening, the ladies got a chance to relax and let
their hair down as they mingled and posed for photos with
guests and danced under the stars to music provided by the Ting

SEE page eight

Pet

sca EENsTos Epes



Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway * 394-1759