Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 105 No.213



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009

m Lhe Tribune

=USA TODAY.



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)











‘
FOR FULL DETAILS









The 80th murder victim...
mother brutally slain in

Iront of her young children

Woman
killed in
‘case of
mistaken
identity’

By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

A MOTHER of two was
brutally slain in front of her
children and other relatives
in what family and friends
believe was a case of mis-
taken identity with devas-
tating consequences.

Tagia Soles-Armony, 29,
was shot in front of her
grandmother’s house on Sea
Grape Avenue, in Sea
Breeze, on Friday night at
around 8pm as she was tak-
ing her three-month-old son
from his car seat.

She is the country’s 50th
homicide victim for the year.

Her heartbroken family
now has to come to terms
with what seems to have

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ABOVE: Tagia Soles-Armony was
shot in front of her grandmoth-
er’s house in Sea Breeze.

been a senseless killing of a
young woman who was
described by all who knew
her as “fun-loving, outgoing
and lovable”.

Friends of the dead
woman, who was a former
student of Xavier’s Lower
School and St Andrew’s
School, told The Tribune
that a gunman approached
Mrs Soles-Armony as she
was just getting out of the
car, a white 2008 Honda
Accord, to go into her
grandmother’s house.

“Her oldest son had just
run up to ring her grammy’s
door bell. She was getting
the baby when a man hold-

SEE page 10

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THE Prime Minister and his
deputy have been challenged to a
debate on the port relocation
issue.

Senator Jerome Fitzgerald
claimed last week’s town hall
meeting as an “outright failure”
and a “public relations exercise”
which proved that ministers can-
not answer public questions of

5

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the matter.

He added: “After attending the
town hall meeting we are con-
vinced that a continued debate
on the movement of the contain-
er port with any of the three pre-
senting ministers would be a
waste of time.

“The failure of the three min-

SEE page nine

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Aico tema ivdetele-l(e

Serial rapist’
strikes more
than five times

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A SUSPECTED serial
rapist who has struck more
than five times within a
month in Eastern New Provi-
dence has police puzzled, The
Tribune has learned.

The man, who has been
consistently described by his
female victims, has caused
police at the Elizabeth Estates
station to implement two new
patrols in the early morning
hours and see that bushes in
the area are cleared to
remove opportunities for him
to hide himself or evidence
from the scene of his crimes.

He targets homes where
women are living alone or
where the man of the house-
hold is not present at the time,
The Tribune was told.

According to a concerned
police source, senior officers
are reluctant to inform the
public of the attacks - which
have been taking place pri-
marily between 3am and 6am
- sO as not to cause a panic.

But women living in the
area have told The Tribune
they think it is “ridiculous”
that they have not been
informed of the new threat in
their community.

A police source said the
perpetrator talks to his vic-

SEE page 10

Two men
drown over
the weekend

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

TWO men, aged 33 and 40,
drowned this weekend in
waters off New Providence.

The 33-year-old, who police
have not identified, was found
submerged in the water in an
area of Jaws Beach off Lyford
Cay on Saturday.

He had been with a family
member and others on a div-
ing trip when he went miss-
ing.

A search was launched and
after being found he was tak-
en to hospital where he died a
short time later.

Aman identified by police
as Granville Francis was also
discovered drowned in the
water near Potter’s Cay Dock
at around 10am Saturday.

The body was removed by
police and examined. An
autopsy is to take place to
determine the cause of death.

Foul play is not suspected
in either case, police said.

SANDWICH

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

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contestants
in swimsuit
presentation

Our Lucaya
Radisson
Beach and

Golf Resort
hosts event

THE MISS UNIVERSE
contestants competed for the
“Best Figure” category fol-
lowing the swimsuit presenta-
tion at Our Lucaya Radisson
Beach and Golf Resort in
Grand Bahama last night.

The 84 Miss Universe 2009
contestants sashayed down
the catwalk showing off the
swim wear of BSC, the official
sponsor of the pageant’s
swimsuit event.

Miss Bahamas Kiara Sher-
man received a non-stop
standing ovation from the
crowd and people waved
Bahamian flags in support of
their queen.

Miss Great Britain Clair
Cooper and Miss Jamaica
Carolyn Yapp were also the
recipients of enthusiastic
applause.

President of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority Ian
Rolle thanked all those who
came out in support of the
Miss Universe pageant.

Shelley Carey and Donald
Glass hosted the swimsuit
event.

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Photos: Tim Aylen

WW PEE ABAS

ee) ee at





MISS BAHAMAS on the
catwalk last night.

FOLLOWING last
night’s Swimsuit Event at
the Our Lucaya Resort,
in Grand Bahama, the
international beauty
queens today take part in
the Miss Universe Float
Parade through New
Providence which starts
at lpm leaving Arawak
Cay.

This evening the con-
testants will be strutting
their stuff for the Nation-
al Costume Competition
held at the Rainforest
Theatre in the Wyndham
Nassau Resort on Cable
Beach starting at 7pm.

All Bahamians and for-
eign nationals residing in
the Bahamas are invited
to come and wave their
national colours in sup-
port of their country’s
queen.

General admission is
$125, balcony tickets are
$100 and VIP tickets are
$175.



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



www.tribune242.com * www.tribune242.com * www.tribune242.com * www.

The Tribune

is now online =

News, sports,
business,
features and
advertising at
tribune242.com

IT’S here! TRIBUNE242, the
only website to satisfy all your
news, sport, business, features
and advertising requirements.

From today at 2pm, and every
following day at the same time,
your Tribune — the biggest,
brightest and best-selling news-
paper in the Bahamas — is now
available online.

Like its big print sister The
Tribune, TRIBUNE242 will
lead the way by bringing you
the hottest news stories, the
brightest pictures, in-depth
analysis, incisive comment and
the issues which affect you.

Along with all your favourite
features and the very best in
sporting action, advertisers will
have a new way to sell their
goods and services to the
Bahamian and even interna-
tional market.

Careful thought has been put
into what size ads are available,
and where they appear on the
site. This ensures that advertis-
ers get their desired exposure
without diminishing the online
experience of a reader.

Premium ad spots appear on
the home page, which is where
all visitors first navigate to, and
also where the top news stories
appear. Advertisers can also
select to place their ads on the
Business page, on the Editorial
and Insight pages, or target their
ads to the various Features sec-
tions or local Sports.

TRIBUNE242 also has ban-
ner advertising opportunities on
the Bahamas’ most extensive
online classified section page
and on the Obituary section,
which will soon be searchable
by name.

“We've had advertisers call-
ing for weeks, expressing inter-
est in advertising on TRI-
BUNE242, and this before
they’ve even seen the site. We
wanted to make sure that we
priced the online ads in a way
that even the smallest client will
find this an affordable and effec-
tive advertising option,” said
Tribune Advertising Manager
Godfrey Arthur.

In February, The Tribune
launched a PDF flipbook site so
that loyal readers in the Family
Islands could have their daily
news even though high freight
prices forced the company to
stop sending the physical paper
to the islands.

The user demograhics gath-
ered and analysed on a regular
basis show that even the simple
flipbook site has had far more
wide reaching appeal.

Since that launch, TRI-
BUNE242 has seen a daily
increase in people registering
with the site and now thousands
of people throughout the
Bahamas and across the world
make a point of logging on each
afternoon to keep up with
what’s happening in the country.

“What’s particularly unique
about the TRIBUNE242 adver-
tising platform is the ability to
begin targeting ads to specific
users,” explained TRIBUNE242
Online Editor Jessica Robert-
son.

“We require all site visitors
to register and share some basic
demographic information with
us. Once activated, this feature
will enable our advertisers to
have ads run only when read-
ers in their target demographic
group are online.

“This kind of strategy makes
for a more valuable advertising

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In addition to the banner
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PAGE 4, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

A suggestion to combat criminals

ALTHOUGH police have not confirmed
that the plane that crashed on a drug run to
Jamaica was the US registered twin-engine
Piper Seneca stolen from North Eleuthera
airport on the August Monday holiday
weekend, Tribune sources have confirmed
that it is in fact the plane.

And although it is street talk in Spanish
Wells and Harbour Island that at least four
persons have been picked up in Harbour
Island for questioning in connection with
the theft, police have said nothing. Nor have
the names of the two persons killed in the
crash been released, although — again street
talk — it is claimed that they are both from
Andros.

The plane, owned by Spanish Wells con-
tractor Terry Higgs, was taken from the
North Eleuthera airport at about 7am on
August 3. A police officer should have been
on duty at the airport at the time, but it is not
known if he saw anything that would have
aroused his suspicion when the plane taxied
down the runway for take off. The aircraft
was next seen a few hours later, a heap of
burned wreckage — with no one to explain
how it got there — on a private road owned
by the Windalco Bauxite company about 15
miles south of Ocho Rios near the St Ann/St
Catherine border. Jamaican police told a
Tribune reporter that although they know
the identity of the two men burned beyond
recognition and trapped in the cockpit, they
were not releasing their names until the next
of kin had been notified. Unconfirmed
reports claim that at least one of the men had
been arrested earlier for stealing an aircraft
and for drug smuggling.

Jamaican police, convinced that the plane
was on a drug mission, confiscated 2,000 Ibs
of marijuana in St Catherine shortly after
the crash. They believe that the stolen air-
craft was there to pick up the marijuana for
delivery to another destination.

According to Jamaican police, although
drug smuggling from the Bahamas has
always been a problem, they have recently
seen an increase in this activity.

And, like the height of the drug smuggling
era in the Bahamas, there has been an
increase in murders and drive-by shootings.
While we are not suggesting that all of these
incidents are drug related, we believe — as
happened in the eighties — that the drive-by
shootings are in some way connected with
retaliation, and, as in the past, retaliation
usually led investigators to a drug deal gone
wrong. However, too many innocent peo-
ple are now being caught in the cross-fire,
and, although police are constantly confis-
cating firearms, too many of these lethal
weapons are still being smuggled into this

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country undetected.

On Friday night a young mother was shot
in front of her grandmother’s house as she
was taking her three-month-old son out of
his car seat. The drive-by shooting was exe-
cuted in front of her one-year-old son who
had run ahead to ring his grandmother’s
doorbell. It is claimed that it was a case of
mistaken identity. If this is so, no one knows
the motive for wanting to kill the woman
for whom the bullet was intended. We are
not suggesting that this incident was drug
related, but obviously it was committed by
someone who is filled with hate and has too
much idle time to plot a crime.

And so what can our overworked police
do? Currently they not only have to keep an
eye on persons released on bail by the courts
while they await trial, but also other up-and-
coming criminals who are entering the fra-
ternity of the lawless. Presumably, these per-
sons are all jobless.

Other than encouraging the public to step
up their cooperation with the police to try to
get the guns off the streets, and to volunteer
information to help run these criminals to
ground, a way must be found to keep jobless
persons, including those on bail and those
with criminal intent, busy.

With Crown land so much in the news
these days, we suggest that government
select a large tract of arable land, employ an
agriculture instructor — one who is himself
well versed in the way of the land and enthu-
siastic about making it turn a profit — and
employ these people to feed the country.

Today, Jamaica is doing an impressive
job of feeding itself and providing local pro-
duce for its hotels. Last year Jamaica
reduced its food imports by 28 per cent. In
the next two years Jamaica expects its agri-
culture contribution to the country’s gross
domestic product to at least double from its
present 5.7 per cent.

From July 31 to August 2 Jamaica held its
annual agricultural exhibition at the Den-
bigh show grounds in May Pen Clarendon. It
was most impressive. (See The Tribune’s
report in Insight, which is included in this
edition).

If our courts are in such a shambles that
they cannot take care of the case load, and
the accused cannot be held in prison for an
unreasonable time without trial, then it is
irresponsible to turn them loose on the pub-
lic. It is naive to think that any business per-
son is going to knowingly employ anyone
with a rap sheet. Therefore, there has to be
some initiative to get these people busy and
off the road. What better way than to send
them to the farm, and let them pay their
dues by helping to feed the nation.



Why is my son

being rerouted

to Government
High School?

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

My son, Deon Ferguson,
is a graduate from S.C.
McPherson which is the
feeder school for Analol
Rodgers.

He lives in the area of
Anatol Rodgers. On June 1,
2009 he received a letter
from S.C. McPherson indi-
cating that he was on Anatol
Rodgers School list. I don’t
understand why all of a sud-
den he is being re-routed to
Government High School.

In my opinion this is a
huge inconvenience for me
and it makes no sense for
the Ministry to offer the bus-
ing service to him because
this takes him two miles out
of his area to attend school.
Could you imagine the cost
of busing a child for years
on the Ministry of Educa-

letters@triobunemedia.net



tion for a child who lives a
stone’s throw away from the
feeder school, Anatol
Rodgers?

What is so vexing about
this situation is that he has
another sibling slated to
attend Anatol Rodgers and
he is now going to be sepa-
rated from his brother to
attend Government High
School; this comes after
receiving a letter from his
feeder school informing us
that he would be attending
Anatol Rodgers.

supplies that would equip
him for September. What do
they expect us to do now?

It is my belief that we are
being held accountable for
the mistakes of the school,
and the District Superinten-
dent seeing that as a parent
I followed all of the neces-
sary steps and procedures,
to equip my child for the
upcoming academic year.

I spoke to the relevant
authorities to understand
exactly what was happening;
but what I was being told
did not make sense to me
and as a concerned and
upset parent I feel that
something ought to be done
about my situation.

It is so aggravating now CONCERNED
for us seeing that uniforms PARENT,
were bought along with all Nassau,

the other necessary school August 5, 209.

Having a Bay Street store is no longer valuable

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Looking at the “official” event advertise-
ment, I can’t find where the contestants for
Miss Universe will be doing a “walk-a-bout”
on Bay Street, so rationally the business
owners have absolutely no interest, as if
there was any business to be picked up, their
branches at Atlantis will do that, hopefully.

Not being critical, but was it necessary to

ment dignitaries who rightly receive such a
status — they are just Beauty Queens!

The Editor’s comments in her last para-
graph of today’s edition draws the obvious
— Dah we miss again!

Can’t anyone understand that having a
Bay Street store is no longer valuable —
gotta get into Atlantis and survive or possi-
bly survive!

accredit the contestants with police out-rid-

ers with sirens blaring for the drive from

LPIA to Atlantis?

Come off it, they are not visiting govern-

Time to wake up — and see
the writing on the wall

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I listened last evening to a certain Ms Cowen
from Kerzner International comment on the
impact of the current event of Miss Teen USA
going on at Paradise Island, and just want to ask
the dear lady a question: Why would anyone
from any other country visit The Bahamas for a
Miss Teen USA competition other than Amer-

icans?

It seems even the foreigners in our midst have
gotten convinced it is better in The Bahamas.

Few international reports say so — so we had
better see the writing on the wall and awaken

ABRAHAM MOSS,
Nassau,
August 4, 2009.

National pride?
EDITOR, The Tribune.

Independence Day, July 10th, theme this
year is National Pride, but it is obvious the
Ministry of Health and Environment have
not received the memo from Cabinet.

Check Goodman’s Bay and Saunders
Beach and the few garbage cans and bins,
the new red ones?

Already early this morning Saturday full
and over-flowing.

Well communications seem yet again to
have fallen down as usual.

So much talk how well we are doing and
they ain’t got a clue.

Happy National Pride Independence Day
— let’s hope the Environmental people
have enough time to empty the bins on the
beach or, oh Lord, what a mess that will

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H. RAHMING,
Nassau,
July 30, 2009

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Nassau,
July 4, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Four taken into
custody after

guns, ammunition

are discovered

FOUR people were taken :
into police custody on Friday }
when a high-powered subma- }
chine gun and two other }
firearms, along with several }
quantities of ammunition, were :

discovered.

The first arrests were made }
at around 3pm when Drug }
Enforcement Unit officers in }
Gladstone Road stopped a green }
Honda Accord after observing }
three men inside “with an }

object.”

Once the vehicle was :
searched, officers found and }
seized a submachine gun with }

21 live rounds of ammunition.

Three men, ages 20, 22 and :

36 years, are being questioned.

At around 6pm, Wulff Road :
officers acting on a tip went toa }
bushy area in the vicinity of }
Cooper’s Terrace, off Kemp }
Road, where they seized a }
38mm handgun with two bul- }

lets.

the gun and six live bullets.

A 30-year-old man was tak- }

en into custody.

in connection with
Stabbing of girl

POLICE in Grand Bahama
are questioning a woman in }
connection with the stabbing |

of a 19-year-old girl.

The Grand Bahama :
a resident of }
Bartlette Hill, is in hospital }
in stable condition after being }
attacked with a knife in the }
Eigh Mile Rock area on Fri- :

teenager,

day at around 9.30pm.

Investigations are ongoing. }
Police are also continuing }
their investigations into }
Grand Bahama’s two latest }
homicides in an attempt to }
bring them to a speedy clo- }

sure.

911

Meanwhile, a .357mm was :
also taken off the streets hours !
later at 83pm when DEU officers,
executing a search warrant at a }
home in Bamboo Town, found }

The support of the Grand }
Bahama community is being }
solicited in this regard and }
persons with any additional }
information are asked to con- }
tact police at 350-3107/8 or }

PLPs slam decision to
suspend student loans

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SEVERAL members of the
PLP blasted the Government
yesterday for its “insensitive”
and “lacklustre” decision to
suspend the Guaranteed Loan
scheme for would-be students,
saying it must re-think its pri-
orities.

MP for Fort Charlotte,
Alfred Sears, claimed the
move - which left the expecta-
tions of hundreds of college
hopefuls shattered - was par-
ticularly troublesome given
that it was use of the loan pro-
gramme by the FNM for “par-
tisan political purposes” that
compromised its “sustainabili-
ty and viability” in the first
place.

Meanwhile, PLP chairman
and Englerston MP Glenys
Hanna Martin, along with Cat
Island MP Phillip Davis, both
hit out at the government in
separate statements for failing
to make any public announce-
ment in relation to the likely
suspension of the programme
ahead of time.

“Tt is reported that some 300
young Bahamians applied
months ago for the award of
scholarships only to be told at
the ninth hour that not one of
them would receive any assis-
tance despite what would have
been a reasonable expectation
that there would at least be
some assistance.

“We are told that the rea-
son for this is “due to defaulting
loan holders who are either
unwilling or unable to repay
their obligation and the fact
that the guarantee programme
has reached its statutory limit’.

“It is reported that the
defaulting amount is almost
$70 million. These are factors
and facts which would have
been available to the Govern-
ment long before the month
of August and ought to have

PMs las



been shared with the Bahami-
an public rather than cause
hopeful young aspirants and
their families to go through the
farce of applying for assistance
when no such assistance could
or would be given,” said Mrs
Hanna Martin.

“Today children from some
300 families have had their
hopes crushed in a most cruel
fashion,” she added.

Mrs Hanna Martin and Mr
Davis suggested that given evi-
dence of declining exam aver-
ages revealed last week now is
not the time to take steps that
restrict the potential of those
who are focused on achieving
their educational goals.

Mr Sears said: “It is incon-
ceivable that the Government
would invest $120 million in
the New Providence Road
Improvement Project, over $50
million in the dredging of the
Nassau Harbour and spend
millions of dollars on a facelift
of the roads from the airport to
Atlantis for the Miss Universe
Pageant and not be willing
properly to fund opportunities
for talented Bahamians to pur-
sue tertiary education to
advance the national develop-
ment of The Bahamas.”

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009





with Senator Higgs

By A. FELICITY INGRAHAM

THE Miss Universe contes-
tants have been told to use a
visit to Clifton Heritage
National Park as a platform
during their reigns as beauty
queens.

Senator Jacinta Higgs said
the very core of Clifton is the
habitation of three different
civilizations there.

She said: “We want them to
take away celebration of a past

that may not have been har-
monious, but we want them to
take away healing.

“We want them to take
away the harmony of what they
represent as contestants in this
one pageant vying to represent
the universe.

“We want them to take away
heritage — and that’s key
because each one of those
young women would be able
to see here represented in the
tour, a part of themselves.”

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

The Miss Universe
contestants meet

MISS MEXICO Karla Carrillo with Senator Jacinta Higgs.




BWA makes $5,000 donation
to the Bahamas National Trust

BAHAMAS Wholesale
Agency (Freeport) Ltd. has
made a $5,000 donation to the
bridge project at Lucayan
National Park.

Wayne Russell, General
Manager of BWA, made the
cheque presentation to Karin
Sanchez, Chairman of the GB
regional branch of the
Bahamas National Trust at
BWA’s Grand Bahama head-
quarters on Milton Street on
July 31, 2009. Gary Wilfred
Burrows, sales manager at
BWA was also on hand for
the presentation.

In making the donation, Mr
Russell said: “We at BWA
and the brands we represent
such as Kerrygold, Jumex

juices, Festival cleaners, Ari-
zona Iced Tea, McVities bis-
cuits, Jergens lotions, OK flour
and Ruth detergent, feel it is
important to give back to the
community. The president of
our company, Jeffrey Robert-
son felt it was important to
make a financial contribution
towards the Bahamas Nation-
al Trust and the bridge at the
Lucayan National Park was a
natural choice.The park is one
of Grand Bahama Island’s
unique experiences.”

Ms Sanchez said: “It is a
great testament to see that we
have such community-mind-
ed corporate sponsors who
recognize the importance of
the work we do.”



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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 7



Nea aa eae
Minister responds to container port questions

POSTED on his website — “In
My Words” www.earlede-
veaux.com — Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux responds
to questions posed by PLP Sen-
ator Jerome Fitzgerald, who
objects to the container port
being moved from its present
Bay Street site to Arawak Cay.

Says Mr Deveaux:

By EARL DEVEAUX

I HAVE parsed recent news-
paper articles and have also
obtained a flyer entitled “The
Future is Now .... The Commit-
tee to Protect and Preserve the
Bahamas for Future Genera-
tions." Jerome Fitzgerald and
the proposed relocation of the
container port to Arawak Cay
and the harmful impact it will
have on the surrounding Envi-
ronment our communities and
us, the Bahamian people.

The advert is headlined with
the words: "There have been so
many questions and we have
received so few answers.”

The Government, and by
extension me have been
described as “...secretive and
criminal...” according to Jerome
Fitzgerald “...lacks transparen-
cy...,” according to Glenys Han-
na Martin

Here are the questions in the
flyer and my answers:

oeoee

Q. Did you know that in
November 2005 an Environ-
mental Impact Assessment
showed that the favoured loca-
tion for the new port was the
“southwest port’?

A. The Ecorys Report
analysed seven sites for the pro-
posed Port. Based on the analy-
sis they concluded that a Port
could be located at Clifton.
Please see my analysis of their
ranking system.

Q. Did you know that in the
same report Arawak Cay ranked
sixth out of seven as the least
favourable spot, with the present
site downtown ranking fifth?

A. Please see my analysis of
the ranking system. You will see
that according to a more scien-
tific ranking with properly
weighted numbering system all
of the numbers would change
and Arawak Cay would far out-
weigh the other sites.

Q. Did you know that the
Deputy Prime Minister Brent
Symonette, whose family has
interest in a shipping company,
chaired a meeting in July 2007,
the purpose of which was to pre-
sent a plan to move the Contain-
er port to Arawak Cay?

A. This incredible fabrication
has been refuted time and again
by the Deputy Prime Minister.
The Deputy Prime Minster
denied, in Parliament, in
response to the Rt Hon. Perry
Christie that he ever chaired
such a meeting.

Q. Did you know that in Octo-
ber 2007 the Deputy Prime Min-
ister and Dr. Earl Deveaux
chaired a meeting where they
received the Ecory’s Report
which stated that the Southwest
Port was financially feasible and
the report has never been made
public?

A. This is another fabrication.
I, along with the Deputy Prime
Minister, accepted an invitation
from Michael Maura or Tropical
Shipping to hear the report from
the Dutch group which com-
pleted the Study on the Clifton
Port. We were guests of the
group which financed the report.
It was their report. It has been
made public by them.

Q. Did you know that the gov-
ernment is acquiring land in the
Vista Marina area and the own-
ers have not been given notice
that their land is being taken?

A. Again this is an inflamma-
tory fabrication. The notices of
acquisitions are a matter of pub-
lic record.

From 1998 the Government
announced its intention to build
19 road corridors in New Provi-
dence as part of an overall traf-
fic remediation programme. The
contract was signed with Asso-
ciated Asphalt which went bank-
rupt prior to completing the pro-
ject. They did complete Charles
Saunders Highway. The PLP
Government completed Milo
Butler Extension and Blue Hill
Roundabout and Tonique Dar-
ling Highway. The FNM rene-
gotiated with IDB to complete
the project and the work is now
ongoing. The Corridor at Saun-
ders beach was always a part of
the project. All of the lands
around the corridors were post-
ed back in 1999 and 2000 and
acquisitions proceedings initiat-
ed and some completed. When
we took office in 2007, we found
over 400 outstanding acquisi-
tions unsettled.

Government extension to
Arawak Cay without submitting
EIA.

Q. Did you know that the gov-
ernment commenced extension
of Arawak Cay without submit-
ting an Environmental Impact
Assessment (ETA), a traffic study
and a financial feasibility study?

A. This is an outright lie. The
EIAs was completed by Blue
Engineering and of the several
options proposed to dispose of
the fill. The extension of
Arawak Cay was the least intru-
sive to the environment.

YOUR SAY



Q. Did you know that you are
paying for the 40 million dollar
extension to Arawak Cay for the
benefit of a special interest
group?

A. This is another lie. The
extension of the Cay is part of
the Dredging contract to dispose
of the two million cubic yards
of fill that will be generated as a
result of the activity.

Q. Did you know that the total
cost of the extension to the tax-
payer has yet to be determined?

A. The Contract amount for
the Harbour Dredging is $76
million. It was publicly signed.

Q. Did you know that this
extension to Arawak will dimin-
ish Saunders Beach also known
as “the Bahamian Cabbage
Beach”?

A. This is particularly alarmist
and incendiary because it has
been so often refuted. The EIA
conclusively determined that
Saunders Beach will not be
affected by the dredging of the
Harbour. However, what was
also shown is that if work is not
done to maintain beaches,
remove casuarinas, Saunders
beach, like other beaches in
New Providence, will eventually
disappear. It is for this reason
that the Government decided to
acquire the land. This was given
to the Government for $1 by the
same Symonettes (Deputy
Prime Minister Brent Symon-
ette) to make a permanent pub-
lic beach with enhanced dunes,
access, parking toilets and chil-
dren play area.

Comment on the Coastal
Systems International Report.

Iam frankly amazed that a
professional body could have
compiled such a specious rating
system. I have detailed its limi-
tation below.

The Rating Table —
Methodology

This is very strange and non-
statistical. The way to do a rating
is to identify the salient issues
and then assign them a discrete
weighting. For instance cost can-
not be considered in the same
category as, say, air pollution.
This would mean that good on
air pollution (rated 3) outweighs
poor on costs (rating 1). So if we
took air pollution and cost alone
and Arawak Cay scored 3 for
cost and 1 for air pollution, while
the Power Plant (i.e. Clifton in
their terminology) scored 3 for
air pollution and 2 for cost, then
Arawak Cay (4 points versus 5)
is the poorer choice. This is
clearly not a tenable result, but it
is exactly what they have done in
the table.

Environmental Criteria

The scoring is very arbitrary,
how can the Power Plant, adja-
cent to the dive industry’s sites,
and quoted as of special signifi-
cance in the executive summary,
be given the same score as
Arawak Cay which has virtually
no impact on the marine envi-
ronment as it uses the existing
dredged harbour entrance? In
their terms they scored them 2 —
2, but really it should be 1-3. I
think there is a lot of bias here, if
a student gave me this work I’d
say they were working back-
wards to justify a predisposition.

The Cumulative Impact cat-

CLAM DIV selUy 4

egory is quite ingenious. It basi-
cally sums up the criteria already
evaluated and scores them
again. What is the point of this?
The description in the text is
basically incomprehensible.
Compatibility with Long
Term Island Master Planning
The table is also extremely
devious here. It starts by scoring
the existing downtown location
5 out of 15 when the score by
definition in their mandate had
to be zero. It then gives the
same score to Arawak Cay, a
totally different location which
meets all the criteria with a 2 or
3 (their scoring) but they have
given it ones. How can they say
that traffic transferred to
Arawak Cay would have no
impact on downtown congestion
as it is now? Also, as it is already
reclaimed land used for port
activities, why isn’t this a suit-
able use? There is plenty of
room for modern infrastructure,
but they deny this.
Construction and
Engineering Criteria
This has been largely dealt
with in the media, it is clearly
cheaper to locate at Arawak
Cay and the overall disruption

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to day-to-day activities will be
almost nil with the exception of
the road-building. The south
west excavation would be a
nightmare for everyone out west
for years.

Socio-Economic Factors

There is always some impact,
and even they score the Power
Plant worse than Arawak Cay,
but it would be much worse over
the years.

Missed Out

How about time-to-comple-
tion; stakeholder participation;
alternative use of land (lots for
out west, little for Arawak Cay);
existing infrastructure?

Arawak Cay Container Port

With respect to the reloca-

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extensively on it.

The Port at southwest New
Providence was estimated to
cost $200 million. When the fig-
ures for on shore investment are
added, the total costs run to
approximately $400 million. The
expense was not one which the
Government thought it could
undertake, in light of the other
projects it had to do. As well,
the Government had received
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PAGE 8, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





New book validates cricket
role in West Indian identity

insight

By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
diplomat)

CLEM SEECHARAN’S
new book, From Ranji to
Rohan, sports a cover photo-
graph of what one cricket
commentator describes as
Rohan Kanhai’s “triumphant
fall” —a sweep shot to the leg
side that culminated in Kan-
hai on his back but the ball
either racing to the boundary

Bway om oe ad
CaN cg cay erenven tar

for four or soaring past it for
Six.
It was not a shot emulated
by many. It originated in
Kanhai’s approach to the
game of cricket which was to
overcome the bowlers and
win. Kanhai came from very
humble beginnings — Port
Mourant Sugar Estate in
Berbice, Guyana. That origin
had a lot to do with his game
as Seecharan explores in this
book. “I play my cricket in
two ways — first as a means
of enjoyment (both for me
and the spectator, I hope)

Thursday, August 13th, 2009
REO @Mneresh..

reali 9:00pm

WORLD VIEW.

and second to win,” Kanhai
declares. He shared this atti-
tude with another West Indi-
an batsman, who was to come
after him, Antiguan Sir
Vivian Richards.

What would lovers of

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West Indian cricket not do to
see their ike in the West
Indian team of today — play-
ers who value the game for
the game itself, and who excel
at it not only for their own
glory, but also because they
understand that they carry
the pride of the West Indian
people in every stroke they
play.

From Ranji to Rohan is a
superbly written book.
Seecharan’s use of the Eng-
lish Language is as graceful
as it is descriptive and his
research is meticulous in the
proven manner of his previ-
ous publications. He calls on
the work of a host of experts
in almost every cricketing
nation, among them John
Arlott, CLR James, and Sir
Hilary Beckles

It is a book about cricket,
and yet it is more than that. It
is also a book about how
Indians in Guyana estab-
lished their West Indian citi-
zenship by staking a claim for
places first in their national
teams and then in the West
Indian team.

Staking the claim was not
easy. In the case of Guyana,
the struggle was tied up in
class differences, racial big-
otry and even politics. Like
Kanhai, Cheddi Jagan,
Guyana’s firebrand politician

ya
SIR RONALD SANDERS

from the 40s to the 60s, also
came from Port Mourant, and
the sugar estates of Guyana
were his hotbed of resistance
to colonial exploitation epit-
omised by the British, firm,
Booker, that owned the
majority of the estates and a
good chunk of the Guyana
economy.

Among the Indian players
from Port Mourant who came
to represent the West Indies
in Cricket Test matches were
Kanhai, Joe Solomon and
Ivan Madray. Basil Butcher
also came from Port Mourant
and played for Guyana and
the West Indies at the same
time as the others. He was
not an Indian but he too
faced the obstacle of breaking
into a Guyana national team
when the Cricket authorities
resided in Demerara and
belonged to its well-estab-
lished clubs.

And then along came a
man who would transform all



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that: the Barbadian and West
Indian batsman, Clyde Wal-
cott.

It is paradoxical, given the
difficulties that currently sur-
round Guyanese Indian
immigrant labour in Barba-
dos that it was a Barbadian
that helped to unearth the
cricket talent of Indians on
the Booker sugar estates and
secure their places in the
national and West Indian
teams.

Walcott arrived in British
Guiana (Guyana became
independent from Britain in
1966) in 1954 recruited, as
Seecharan explains, “by the
Sugar Producers Association
following the recommenda-
tion of Jock Campbell (the
progressive Chairman of
Booker).” The political con-
text of his arrival was contin-
ual strikes on the sugar
estates and a report by a
Colonial Office-appointed
Commission which recom-
mended that cricket clubs be
set-up on each estate. Cricket
— “a status symbol distin-
guishing the white manageri-
al elite from the Indian work-
ers created a new area in
which social prestige could be
won.”

As Seecharan describes it:
Walcott’s “was a towering
presence that infused cricket
in British Guiana with a sense
of purpose and resolve that
had eluded it for most of its
existence. Imbued with the
moral compass of the black
Barbadian middle class, a
product of the elite school,
Harrison College, he was the
ideal man for the volatile
Guyanese political environ-
ment of the 1950s, rendered
even more hazardous by the
intractable race issue.” In
three years, he had four
Guyanese in the West Indi-
an test match team — three of
them from Port Mourant.

It is an everlasting tribute
to Clyde Walcott as a great
human being as much as to
his capacity for recognising
cricket talent that Seecharan
records Ivan Madray, one of
the Indians that Walcott guid-
ed from Port Mourant, as say-
ing: “I could have walked to
the end of the earth for Clyde
Walcott.”

Clem Seecharan is Profes-
sor of Caribbean History at
London Metropolitan Uni-
versity. As a true academic
he supports his assertions
with empirical evidence. His
Bibliography is extensive and
his research material includes
interviews with cricketers
Basil Butcher, Joe Solomon
and Ivan Madray. But
Guyanese political leaders
are there too: Cheddi Jagan
and Eusi Kwayana.

For all that, as a product of
a Berbice village himself and
a young boy as Rohan Kan-
hai’s batting exploits were
being hailed all over the
cricketing world, Seecharan
admits that “for Indo-
Guyanese, including myself
and boys growing up at the
time of Kanhai’s ascent”, his
taste for the game and the
way he played it, “came out
of our unconscious craving
for a great West Indian bats-
man to transport us to the
heart of creole sensibility —
West Indian authenticity.”

This book starts with Ran-
jitsinghji, the Indian Prince
who played for England and
dazzled cricket spectators
between 1896 and 1912. He
was an inspiration to the Indi-
an Diaspora in the West
Indies and this is well chron-
icled by Seecharan. But, the
book’s main theme explores
the role of cricket in authen-
ticating Indo-Guyanese as
West Indians. He does a con-
vincing job, and has written a
book that will enthral all
Cricket lovers of all races and
nations.

Seecharan ends by point-
ing to the necessity for inte-
grating Caribbean countries
in the same way that West
Indian cricket is integrated —
as a representation of our
oneness and a source of our
pride.

“Chanderpaul and Sar-
wan,” he says, “could now be
an example pointing the way
for the politicians toward gen-
uine regional integration,
based on our diversity, not
some imagined creole pro-
crustean mould.”

“From Ranji to Rohan”

by Clem Seecharan is
published by Hansib, London.
Website:
www.hansib-books.com



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



PM, deputy challenged
to port relocation debate

FROM page one

isters (Earl Deveaux, Vin-
cent Vanderpool Wallace
and Neko Grant) rein-
forced the committee’s
assertion that the move of
the container port to
Arawak Cay without cred-
ible scientific and financial
analysis makes no sense.

“We did not invite the
Prime Minister and the
Deputy Prime Minister to
come clean with the
Bahamian people and we
now invite them to a
debate on this matter.”

He charged that the gov-
ernment is still in no posi-
tion to make assertions
about the preferability of
Arawak Cay as a location
for the port versus South
West New Providence as
it has presented no data or
analyses to support its
claim and contradict a
study commissioned by the
PLP which found it ranked
sixth out of seven poten-
tial sites.

The $80 million dollar
privately funded reloca-
tion of the container ship-
ping facilities from down-
town Nassau is set to go
ahead later this year. Min-
ister of the Environment
Earl Deveaux has charged
that a reduced cost and
environmental impact
involved in taking the
facilities to Arawak Cay
over South West New
Providence - the location



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham and Deputy Prime Minister Brent

Symonette

preferred by the PLP gov-
ernment, subsequent to
various studies - justifies
the decision.

However, Mr Fitzgerald
is undeterred in his stance,
charging that without pre-
senting information to
prove their thinking and
contradict the findings of
an earlier report which
picked South West New
Providence as a better site,
Bahamians have been “left
to suspect there may be
some level of corruption
at the highest level in gov-
ernment.”

“How else can one
explain this mad dash to
extend Arawak Cay?” said
Mr Fitzgerald yesterday.
He said that his request
for a debate on the issue in

‘YOUR VIEW’

To have your say on this or any other
issue, email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your
letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207



Leave the outside world
far behind

Pim ond RSs afi (eom || toms Ome) as ate

parliament has gone unan-
swered since he tabled it
on April 30.

Deputy Prime Minister
Brent Symonette “appears
to be the mastermind”
behind the scheme to
move the port to Arawak
Cay, having chaired meet-
ings on the proposal since
as early as 2007, said the
senator, and “Bahamians
are now left to wonder
whether the Prime Minis-
ter...is complicit in this
conspiracy to secretively
enrich a special interest
group at great expense to
the Government’s purse,
the environment and the
property value of hard
working Bahamians.”

Mr Deveaux has also
charged that private rather
than the public interest
lies behind the opposition
to the Arawak Cay move
on behalf of Mr Fitzgerald
and others, claiming a
“peculiar set of interests
that will be derailed” if it
is taken there rather than
to the South West of the
island.

An Environmental
Impact Assessment and
the Environmental Man-
agement Plan relating to

Para h RC h Com oom Lie



the dredging of Nassau
Harbour and the extension
of Arawak Cay using fill
from the harbour, which
will form the basis of the
port move, are now avail-
able for public scrutiny at
www.best.bs/harbour-
docs.html.

However, the documents
do not address the specific
question of the impact of
moving the port facilities
to the area after these pro-
jects take place.

Mr Fitzgerald said the
committee intends to gal-
vanise public opposition
against the Arawak Cay
move, stating yesterday:
“You can rest assured that
the voice of the Bahami-
an people in this matter
will be heard loud and
clear and government will
have to decide how it
responds to that and if it
fails to do so it does so at
its detriment.”

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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MONDAY, AUGUST 10,





2009

TRIBUTES TO
TOMMY ROBINSON

‘T’m humbled by
the experience’





















TOMMY ROBINSON surrounded by friends a

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

TWO weeks after being the showpiece
of the biggest single honorary for any
Bahamian athlete in the country, legendary
sporting icon Thomas A. Robinson said
he’s humbled even more by the experience.

Friday night at Da Balcony, Robinson
was presented with a cheque from Basil
Sands, the accountant for the Friends of
Thomas A. Robinson who hosted the lun-
cheon on Sunday, July 26.

The event was originally scheduled for
the Sandals Royal Bahamian Hotel, but
was moved to the Wyndham Nassau Resort
& Crystal Palace Casino at the eleventh
hour because of the high demand for tickets.

“It was an overwhelming experience, it
was an awesome experience, it was an exhil-
arating experience at the luncheon two Sun-
days ago,” Robinson said.

“T never in my wildest dream thought
that we were going to get that kind of crowd
to attend a luncheon tribute to me.”

While at the luncheon, Robinson said so
many people came up to him congratulating
him, wished him well and thanked him for
what he did.

“Then I was trying to figure what did I
do,” said Robinson, who drew large laughs
from the audience that included his close
friends and some family members.

Anniversary

Robinson, 71, was honoured on the 51st
anniversary of his historic British Empire
Games in the 220 yards in Cardiff, Wales in
15958b where he also secured a silver medal
in the 100 yards as the lone Bahamian flag
carrier.

More than 600 persons, including Gov-
ernor General Arthur Dion Hanna, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham and the Leader
of the Opposition, Perry Christie, a team-
mate of Robinson, attended the luncheon.

Also in attendance was Cuba’s Enrique
Figuerola, the silver medalist in the 100m at
the Tokyo Olympics and Hilton Nicholson,
his roommate at the University of Michigan.

The Reverend Canon Dr. Gervais Clarke,
Secretary General of the North American,
Central American, and Caribbean Area
Athletic Association also attended.

In 1981, Sports Ambassador Robinson
had his name placed on the national track
and field stadium at the Queen Elizabeth

\a =

ite unl at Da Balcony.

Robinson
presented with
cheque from
Basil Sands

TOMMY ROBINSON at the microphone. Pic-
tured next to him are Laura Charlton, Linda
Thomspon, Doris Wood and Carrie Young.

Sports Center. And Ingraham, at the lun-
cheon, assured all that once the Chinese
government complete the new national sta-
dium adjacent to the current student,
Robinson’s name will also be placed on it.

The only thing that many felt that Robin-
son should have been honoured with was a
knighthood from the Queen.

Many are of the opinion that he should be
called Sir Robinson.

Reception

At a smaller reception held on Friday,
Robinson thanked everybody, including the
organizing committee headed by Alpheus
‘Hawk’ Finlayson, for having the initiative
to put on such an event.

Basil Sands, the accountant for the orga-
nizing committee, said that while he has no
such acclaim to being a track and field star,
he was delighted when asked by Finlayson
to serve on the committee.

“T hope you use it to the best of your
ability,” said Sands in presenting Robinson
with a cheque from part of the proceeds

SEE page 12

TOMMY ROBINSON, presented with a cheque by Basil Sands, the accountant for the Friends of
Thomas A. Robinson who hosted the luncheon on Sunday, July 26.

PHOTOS: Stanley Mitchell



BERLIN: 127H IAAF WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS IN ATHLETICS

heady to taxe
on the worid!

Bahamian team, apart from three
athletes, get acclimatised in Germany

DERRICK ATKINS

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

HE Bahamian 24-member team,

minus three athletes, have all set-

tled in and are going through

their workout sessions with the
coaches as they prepare for the 12th IAAF
World Championships in Athletics.

With the exception of sprinters Derrick
Atkins and Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie and
quartermiler Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown, all of
the athletes have arrived safely at the training
camp in Berlin, Germany.

With “nice warm” weather to train in, team
manager Ralph McKinney said all of the ath-
letes are comfortable and making the best of
the excellent facility that they share with the

DEBBIE FERGUSON-MCKENZIE

a " ve 2 4
CHRIS ‘FIREMAN’ BROWN



United States team.

“Everybody is settled in. The weather is
nice and warm, so we can’t complain about
that,” said McKinney from the hotel where
they are staying.

Veteran sprinter Chandra Sturrup was the
last of the contingent to arrive. She reported to
camp early yesterday morning and they are
just waiting the arrival of Atkins, Ferguson-
McKenzie and Brown, who are all due in
today.

The team, coached by Tyrone Burrows,
Frank ‘Pancho’ Rahming and George Cleare,
will remain at the camp until Tuesday when
they will report to the Games Village for the
championships in Berlin.

The championships will begin on Saturday,

SEE page 12

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



TOMMY ROBINSON TRIBUTE

‘’m humbled by

the experience’





j
TOMMY ROBINSON is flanked by, from the left, Angela Watson,
Sandra Smith, Carrie Young, Doris Wood, Linda Thompson and
Laura Charlton.

FROM page 11

from the event, which served as a medical fund-raiser for the ail-
ing national hero.

The event, moderated by Sherwin Stuart, featured a number
of speakers who served in their recollection of the days of
Robinson’s athletic prowess, but more importantly his acade-
mic oursuits being the youngest Bahamian at age 9 to attend
high school in the Bahamas, while being the first Bahamian ath-
lete to attend college on an athletic scholarship.

The night was certainly a nostalgic one for the speakers who
included Finlayson, Harrison Petty, Stanley Mitchell, the Rev.
Walter Hanchell (who raised an additional offering from the
audience), Winston ‘Gus’ Cooper, Ed Bethel, Keith Parker
and Arlington Butler, the immediate past president of the
Bahamas Olympic Association.

Mike Sands, the immediate past president of the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associations, gave the vote of thanks on
behalf of the committee.

7th ANNUAL JUNIOR CARIBBEAN VOLLEYBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS

Girls volleyball team returns
home with bronze medal

THE Bahamas Volleyball Federation’s junior girls team
returned home with the bronze medal from the 7th annual
Junior Caribbean Volleyball Championships that wrapped
up on Saturday.

In a hard fought five set marathon, the Bahamas knocked
off Martinique to finish as the third best team in the tour-
nament. Meanwhile, the boys team failed to win a game.

The week-long tournament was played in Guadeloupe.

BASKETBALL

BOUND FOR CANADA

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs @tribunemedia.net

COACH Patricia ‘Patti’ Johnson will
take her stellar high school junior girls
basketball team to Canada to test the
waters on another level of competi-
tion.

Johnson and a nine-member team is
scheduled to leave town on Tuesday
for Ontario, Canada where they will
compete and participate in a tour of
some of the high schools through
August 17.

The tour was arranged by David
Whitty, the head of the Physical Edu-
cation from Ridley College, who was
introduced to Johnson through bas-
ketball guru Gladstone ‘Moon’
McPhee from Grand Bahama while
here for a college fair.

Ridley College, located in St.
Catharines, Ontario, is a school for stu-
dents in grades 5-13, the latter which
serves as college preparatory.

“T was encouraged by a lot of people
in the community to go ahead and try
it,” said Johnson, who opted not to go
to the United States this year on her
annual Summer Tour.

“T received a lot of assistance from
people like Philip ‘Brave’ Davis and
Renard Rigby. Of course with the tight
economic times, we gave our word to
the school that we are going to come
and we are trying to carry it through.”

When they return home, Johnson
said they hope to have at least two ath-
letic scholarships secured for their play-
ers, especially since the oldest person in
her contingent is in grade 10.

“The deal is you have to have your
academics,” Johnson stressed. “We’ve
been tutoring our kids from September
and they did sort of well on the BJC
exams.

“As a matter of fact, one of the kids
who would not have passed any, she
passed five of them and another got
five Bs and a C. That was a shocker. So
the classes were helping. But we have
to be persistent because it is time con-
suming.”

Johnson, owner of the most impres-
sive high school record in high school
basketball having won the junior girls
basketball title with the HO Nash

Coach Patricia ‘Patti’ Johnson to take
girls team on tour of high schools



Lions just about every year since 1992,
said she’s very proud of the squad she
has to work with in Ontario.

Making up the squad are Randya
Kemp, who is 5-feet; Cherish Wilson, 5-
4; Lakishna Munroe, 5-11; Michelle
Burrows, 5-6; Leashya Grant, 6-2;
Khadijah Moncur, 5-8; Sashana Smith,
6-0; Kerri Bascom, 5-2 and Shaquel
Bain, 5-2.

While there, they will play in a series
of games to display their skills and they
will visit a number of schools as well as
take the DAT entrance exam to deter-
mine who is eligible and they will also
take a tour of the country.

“We have a very good high school
team, but we are going to play players
in grade 10-12,” Johnson said. “But
that shouldn’t worry us because we

TURKS & CAICOS ISLANDS: 53rd CARIBBEAN AMATEUR GOLF CHAMPIONSHIPS

National golf team returns from Caribbean championships with ninth place finish



“We have a very
good high school
team, but we are
going to play
players in grade
10-12. But that
shouldn’t worry
us because we
have players who
are really hang
game-wise.”



Patricia ‘Patti’ Johnson

have players who are really hang game-
wise.

“But my biggest fear when we go
and come back is that we will have to
zoom a lot more on academics. We
have to bear in mind now is one of our
key problem is time management.
Instead of going home and study, we
pick up the computer and cellphones.
But the game piece, we have that
downpack. I think we have an excellent
team.”

Johnson feels that the team is so tal-
ented that if she had the opportunity to
keep them together as a squad in the
Government Secondary Schools Sports
Association, she feel they will “hurt
somebody.”

In the meantime, she thanked
“everybody who helped us to get off
the ground,” especially mentioning her
HO Nash principal Rev. Franklyn
Lightbourne, the staff and the parents
of the players.

THE Bahamas Golf Federation’s
national team returned yesterday
from the 53rd Caribbean Amateur
Golf Championships with a ninth
place finish at the Provo Golf Club
in the Turks & Caicos Islands.

The Bahamas, without a team
fielded in the ladies’ George Teale
Trophy, collected a total of 21 points,
just one ahead of the host Turks &
Caicos, who ended up in last place
with 22.

Repeating as champion was Puer-

to Rico with 40, Jamaica got second
with 35 and Trinidad & Tobago was
third with 34. Tied for fourth place
was the Dominican Republic and
the OECS with 31 apiece.

e Resulted posted by the Bahami-
an players in the tournament are as
follows:

Hoerman Cup for regular players

Bahamas finished eighth with a
combined score of 1298.

Rashad Fergudon (92-86-76-80),
Richard Gibson Jr (93-83-91-78),

Peter McIntosh (80-82-79-81),
Devaughn Robinson (81-73-80-80)
and George Swann (84-79-90-84).

Puerto Rico won eith 1,178, fol-
lowed by the OECS with 1,217 and
Barbaods with 1,227,

Ramon Baez Trophy for players
35-years and older

Bahamas finished seventh with a
score of 299.

D. Shane Gibson (77-77-75-70)
and Christopher Harris (77-77-75-
70).

Francis/Steele-Perkins Cup for
senior players.

Bahamas finished in seventh place
with a score of 303.

Milford ‘Shaggy’ Lockhart (74-78-
76-75) and Kevin Marche (74-78-76-
75).

Barbados won with 288, followed
by the Dominican Republic with 294
and Puerto Rico with 295.

George Teale Trophy for ladies.

Bahamas did not enter.

Puerto Rico won with 603, fol-

lowed by Trinidad & Tobago ith 610
and the OECS with 655.

Higgs & Higgs Trophy for super
seniors.

Bahamas had its best showing with
a third place finish with 294.

George Turnquest (75-75-74-70)
and Harcourt Poitier (75-75-74-70).

Puerto Rico won with 279 and
Trinidad & Tobago was second with
291.

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COTECC SUMMER TOUR
Rising star Justin

Roberts captures

under-14 singles championship

But Kloratina Klonaris falls just short

BAHAMIAN rising star Justin Roberts
captured his first boys under-14 singles
championship of the COTECC Summer
Tour over the weekend, while Kloratina
Klonaris just fell short in her bid.

Playing at the Almond Beach Resort in
Castries, St. Lucia, Roberts won the finqal in
straight set scores of 6-0, 6-2 over Shakir
Elvin of Antigua in the Coca-Cola ITF
Junior Tournament.

Roberts, 12-years-old, joined the
COTECC Summer Tour on June 6 in
Guatemala City, Guatemala.

He has played in eight single tournaments
reaching the quarterfinals four times and
both the semifinal and final twice before he
finally won his first championship title.

In the boys U-14 doubles, Roberts played
in his seventh consecutive final of the
COTECC Summer Tour and he won for
the fourth straight time.

He teamed up with Jaulon Greig of
Trindad & Tobago to defeat Shakir Elvin of
Antigua and Matthew Hutchinson of Bar-
bados 7-5 and 6-0. Roberts and Greig trailed

3-4 in the first set before winning four of
the next five games to capture the first set 7-

Having seized the momentum at the end
of the first set, they easily won the second set
6-0.

In the meantime, Klonaris of Grand
Bahama got to the final of the girls under-18
singles where she was scheduled to play
Nelo Phiri of the United States.

However, she lost the match by a
walkover. No reason was given.

Roberts is now in St. Vincent and the
Grenadines where he’s playing in the boys
U-14 round robin.

He won his first match 4-0, 4-0 over Cort-
land Bunyan.

He was scheduled to play his next match
again Richard Akcayli of Barbados.

Also at the tournament is his brother,
Alexis Roberts. He won his under-18 singles
7-5, 7-6 (3) over Eric Mikhlin from the Unit-
ed States.

His next month was against Jabrille Kabli
from Trinidad & Tobago.

National cricket team still undefeated

THE Bahamas Cricket Association’s
national team are still undefeated heading
into its fourth and final match in the Inter-
national Cricket Association’s Under-15
tournament.

Taking advantage of their home turf at
Haynes Oval, the Bahamas improved to 3-0
as they knocked off the Cayman Islands on
Saturday.

The Cayman Islands batted first and
scored 115 runs.

The Bahamas responded with 120 runs in

only 20 overs to secure another victory. It
was the second victory for the Bahamas
over the Cayman Islands, having defeated
them in the opening match of the tourna-
ment.

Today, the Bahamas will play the final
match of the tournament, starting at 11 am
when they take on Belize in their second
match-up.

The Bahamas also won their first meeting
with Belize in their second match of the
tournament.

Ready to
take on
the world!

FROM page 11

August 15 and will wrap up
on Sunday, August 23.

“The facility where we are
have everything,” McKinney
said. “Our training period is
between 12 o’clock and 5 pm
everyday until we leave here
on Tuesday. The US use the
track in the morning and they
come back at 5 pm.

“It’s a good facility. They
have everything.

“You know what it’s like.
It’s like Haynes Oval where
they have a restaurant and
everything.

“Tt’s a secured facility. We
have been able to do every-
thing that we need to do to
get the team ready.”

Spirit

With the championships
less than a week from open-
ing, McKinney said all of the
athletes are in great spirit and
are eager for the competition
to get underway.

“The main thing is to get
up and training,” he said.
“After a long flight, every-
body is getting acclimatized
and ready to go. Everybody
practiced today, except for
Chandra because she just
arrived from North Carolina.

“They are all doing their
normal workouts as pre-
scribed by their coaches. We
have our medical personnel
here working with them as
well. We also rented a van, so
we are escorting our people
to and from the training site.”



MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 13

TRIBUNE SPORTS
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TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Aussies complete innings victory

AUSTRALIA'S cap-
tain Ricky Ponting
leaves the pitch
after Australia won
the fourth test on
the third day of the
fourth cricket test
match between
England and Aus-
tralia at Headingley
cricket ground in
Leeds, England,
Sunday, Aug. 9,
2009.

Australia
draw level in
series after
Headingley
triumph

England's lower-order resis-
tance was ended swiftly after
lunch as Australia completed a
comprehensive innings victory
in the fourth Test to draw level
in the Ashes series at Heading-
ley.

Resuming the third morning
in a seemingly impossible posi-
tion, trailing by 261 runs on 82
for five, England's daunting
task became all the more diffi-
cult when they lost two wick-
ets inside the first hour.

Despite a boundary-filled
108-run eighth-wicket partner-
ship between Stuart Broad and
Graeme Swann, England
slumped to 263 all out six overs
after lunch, handing Australia
victory by an innings and 80
runs. Australia's victory sets up
a series decider at The Oval,
starting on August 20.

Nightwatchman James
Anderson got off the mark with
a slash through point for four
off the second ball of the day
from Ben Hilfenhaus to extend
his run to 54 consecutive
innings without suffering a Test
duck. It was his last act of defi-
ance, however, with Anderson
edging the next ball to the safe
hands of Ricky Ponting at sec-
ond slip to accelerate England's
demise. Wicketkeeper Matt Pri-
or, unbeaten on four overnight,
was England's last hope of
mounting a serious fightback
as their last recognised bats-
men.

Having progressed to 22,
however, Prior pushed at a Hil-
fenhaus outswinger and edged
behind for wicketkeeper Brad
Haddin to take a brillant one-
handed catch low to his right.



AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth

AUSTRALIA'S Simon Katich, right, and Mitchell Johnson, left, cel-
ebrate winning the fourth test as England's Graham Onions
walks by on the third day of the fourth cricket test match between
England and Australia at Headingley cricket ground Leeds, Eng-
land, Sunday, Aug. 9, 2009.

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(AP Photo/John Giles/PA Wire)
AUSTRALIA'S Ben Hilfenhaus celebrates the wicket of England's
Matt Prior during the fourth test match between England and Australia
at Headingley cricket ground in Leeds, England Sunday Aug. 9, 2009.

RUGBY: TRI NATIONS

Ea oO tel (AP Photo/
oe Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Australia fan
admits to
eae evaCe

aCe Moyer

SYDNEY

A Sydney newspaper
says an Australian cricket
supporter was responsible
for setting off a fire alarm
at the England team's hotel
in Leeds, England on the
first day of the fourth Ash-
es test, according to Associ-
ated Press.

Warren Livingston, head
of the Australian fan group
the "Fanatics," told The
Sunday Telegraph that one
of its 100-member group
had managed to set the
alarm off at 4:30 a.m. with
the intention of disrupting
the English team's sleep,
describing it as "good old-
fashioned Aussie hijinks."

"Yes it was one of our
guys who did it as a bit of a
prank, I got a text message
after it happened,” Liv-
ingston told the newspaper
from England.

"At first I thought ...
we're just doing our bit for
Australia. But I can't con-
done this sort of thing. I
don't want any trouble.
We've all had a big laugh
and it might have made a
difference, the way they
batted."

England's test team was
evacuated with other
guests and staff while two
fire engines searched the
premises for the source of
the alarm. Players were left
standing in the street in
their pajamas for more
than 20 minutes until the
all-clear was given for them
to return to their beds.

Just hours later the Eng-
land team traveled to
Headingley where it was
dismissed for 102 in its first
innings after winning the
toss in the series it leads 1-
0. Australia has dominated
the fourth test and
wrapped up victory, to
draw level in the series.

It means the five-match
series hinges on the final
test at The Oval from Aug.
20-24.



South Africa heat Australia 29-17

ee



AP Photo/Schalk van Zuydam

SOUTH AFRICA'S Brian Habana, left, runs in front of Australia's Berrick Barnes, centre rear, as he pass-
es the ball during the Tri Nations in Cape Town, South Africa, Saturday, Aug. 8, 2009. The Springboks
looked comfortable for almost the entire 80 minutes, sweeping past Australia 29-17 in Cape Town to
follow on from back-to-back wins over New Zealand in the previous two weeks.

COMMUNITY SHIELD

ROB HARRIS,
AP Sports Writer
WEMBLEY, ENGLAND

Salomon Kalou scored the winning penalty
Sunday as Chelsea beat Manchester United 4-1 in
a shootout to clinch the Community Shield in
Carlo Ancelotti's first competitive match in
charge.

The traditional curtain raiser to the English
season is rarely a spectacle, but on this occasion
was hotly contested with a heated conclusion.

With the match level at 1-1 in the 71st minute,
United's Patrice Evra was lying on the ground
after being fouled by Michael Ballack when
Chelsea midfielder Frank Lampard made it 2-1.

The goal sparked a furious reaction from Unit-
ed players who felt the game should have been
stopped.

"With a replay you can see Ballack has
elbowed the boy, and if the referee had seen it
properly, it is a red card," United manager Alex
Ferguson said. "The referee is in line with it, and
should have at least stopped the game.”

The Premier League champions, however,
equalized in stoppage time when Wayne Rooney
broke free.

But it was FA Cup winner Chelsea who dom-
inated the shootout.

"This is sweet," Lampard said. "It feels nice to
make a winning start to the season. After that last
goal we could have been on a downer but we
didn't let out heads drop.”

This was United's first competitive match since
losing the Champions League final to Barcelona
in May and after an offseason of upheaval as

Alex Ferguson prepared for his 23rd campaign in
charge. Ferguson started with Ben Foster in goal,
giving him a chance to impress England coach
Fabio Capello. Foster was tested inside two min-
utes when Didier Drogba struck from 20 meters
(yards).

The Red Devils are still reeling from Cristiano
Ronaldo and Carlos Tevez being lured away
from Old Trafford in big-money moves. Ulti-
mately, United's season is likely to hinge on how
effectively Wigan's Antonio Valencia can replace
Ronaldo, who was sold to Real Madrid for a
record 80 million pounds ($133 million).

The Ecuador winger only played the final half
hour, replacing the injured Nani, who started on
the left flank and was causing problems for
Chelsea right back Branislav Ivanovic.

The Portugal winger took just 10 minutes to
find the target, cutting inside from the left past
Ivanovic and unleashing a fierce shot past Petr
Cech. The Red Devils could have doubled their
lead in the 16th when Wayne Rooney headed
the ball back to Park Ji-Sung on the six-meter
(yard) box, but the South Korean's effort was
blocked by Cech, who also denied Dimitar
Berbatov minutes later.

Chelsea then began to assert themselves with
Florent Malouda shooting wide and Michael
Essien heading over.

The equalizer came in the 52nd when Lampard
won possession in the United penalty area and
picked out Malouda and a chipped effort was
only half cleared by Foster who was lightly
injured in a clash with Didier Drogba. Ricardo
Carvalho then headed the loose ball into the
unguarded net.



PAGE 16, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS



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Container port response
FROM page seven

Port Group a collection of all the container operators in New Prov-
idence. The Government is fundamentally committed to having the
ownership base broadened to include Bahamians and consequently
offered and agreed a structure which requires that no entity could
own more than 15 per cent and that 20 per cent would be sold as
public offering. The Government would hold 40 per cent and retain
ownership of the land.

The Port Group is required to produce an Environmental
Impact Assessment EIA), an Environmental Management Plan
(EMP), a Traffic Study and an Economic Impact Assessment pri-
or to final approval. The Group estimates that it can build the
facility for between $70 and $80 million. Forty acres have been allo-
cated at Arawak Cay for the Port Group. An additional 15 acres
have been promised for an inland port.

Significantly in the government’s consideration were the fol-
lowing:

¢ It would not have to permit another cut into New Providence;

¢ Arawak Cay is already the major port in Nassau;

¢ Arawak Cay has been an industrial site for over 40 years;

¢ Arawak Cay can be organized and managed to the greater ben-
efit of all;

¢ There would be ample opportunity for increased economic
activity at the down home fish fry.

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Government
to establish

for ‘cutting
of hills’

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT will con-
sider putting a moratorium on
excavating hills for fill when
the dredging of the harbour
will produce two million cubic
yards of it, according to the
Minister of Environment.

Earl Deveaux revealed that
the government could con-
sider stopping companies
tearing down hills and digging
enormous holes in the earth
for fill when the Harbour
dredging produces the two
million cubic yards of spoils
from the sea bed.

“Once the harbour dredg-
ing is complete and we have
the fill stockpiled, we will
establish a moratorium for the
cutting of hills,” said Mr
Deveaux.

As a part of the govern-
ment’s plan for the harbour
dredging, it had mulled over
selling some of the excess fill
that will be left after Arawak
Cay’s western end and the
Prince George Wharf, from
the cruise ship dock to Arm-
strong Street, had been
extended.

It is expected that 900,000
cubic yards of the two million
will be used for the Arawak
Cay extension, while it is not
yet know how much fill the
wharf will need to be extend-
ed or what design the pro-
posed promenade with take.

“The information
party and. The Tibu can

responsible for errors and/or “omnissio n
from the daily report, ue



(ae) . 5 K fad Se Dy) A
eae G i, Sara art eae i, ST oO

lie



EARL DEVEAUX

However, former minister
of trade for the PLP, Leslie
Miller, told Tribune Business
that fill dredged from the
seabed is not construction
grade.

“The fill that government
will get out of the harbour is
not usable fill because it is not
going to dry,” he said.

“Maybe on the golf course
at Albany, maybe they could
use it there but it can't be
used for the foundation of a
home.”

According to Mr Miller, the
government will also be tam-
pering with the Bahamas’s
free market system by stop-
ping the legal sale of fill. He is
involved in selling fill form
his Harold Road property.

He said the government
should focus its attention on
the illegal cutting of hill just
south of Bozine town instead
of selling useless fill.

“He ( Minister of the Envi-
ronment) will see the wanton
destruction of land where
people have no contract and
no rights to the land,” said Mr
Miller.

“There are a whole lot of
other things to keep the hon-
orable minister busy.”

He said the initial Arawak
Cay project itself should be a
model for the use fill from the
sea bed. According to him,
Arawak Cay took years to
properly dry and compact.

“That fill stayed out there
for a year until it was able to
cure and it doesn't compact
properly,” he said.

“No one would dare try to
buy that fill.”

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MODAY,

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net




ee A .

AUGUST 10, 2009

Reports on Wharf
moratorium extension could be



Colinalmperial.

elie tele A

ready by next week

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

concept and the cost

analysis for the exten-

sion of the Prince

George Wharf from

the cruise port to
Armstrong Street could be ready by
next week, the Minister of the Envi-
ronment revealed during a town hall
meeting last week Thursday.

Earl Deveaux said he and Minister
of Tourism and Aviation, Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace, were instructed
to have reports on the Prince George
Wharf extension completed by August
19.

He also revealed that the current
landowners whose properties will be
extended with fill from the harbour
dredging will enter into equitable shar-

ing of that additional real estate with
the government.

“The government has indicated to
the current owners that the state has an
unfettered right to extend the board-
walk along the sea bed,” said Mr
Deveaux.

“People already own 35 per cent of
the land between the port and Arm-
strong street.

“When the boardwalk is extended,
our hope is to have waterfront access
and to share in the experience on the
waterfront and to share in the experi-
ence on the back street.”

The Downtown Nassau Partnership,
a public/private venture, was put in
place to facilitate the development of a
plan for the city of Nassau and to draft
legislation for the creation of a Busi-
ness Improvement District (BID).

Mr Deveaux alluded during a line
of questing at the meeting that the

complete redevelopment of the down-
town area could take as much as 20 to
AO years.

According to him, those properties
that will be vacant when the container
port is relocated to Arawak Cay will
have to be developed when the BID is
created and ratified by Parliament.

According to a chief engineer at the
Ministry of Works, the construction
of the Promenade could be one year
away dependent upon the final design
approved by government.

“There are some options on the
board with respect to how the Wood-
es Rodgers Wharf will occur,” said Mr
Deveaux.

“Not sure if it will be linear or will
follow the contour of the existing
boardwalk.

“It will be based on the establish-
ment of the utility corridor and analy-
sis of the cost.”



Proposed Arawak Cay development seeks
to give Bahamians 51 per cent ownership

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

A PROGRESSIVE devel-
opment proposal called Cul-
ture Village, which seeks to
give Bahamians 51 per cent
ownership, proposed for
Arawak Cay could include a
4-D theatre, a clock tower
topped by an enormous
conch shell and pirate ship,
according to the President
and CEO of the Culture Vil-
lage Bahamas Ltd.

Gerald Strachan told Tri-
bune Business the develop-
ment will augment the attrac-
tions of the surrounding area
including the Botanical Gar-
dens, Fish Fry, Fort Charlotte
and Ardastra Gardens.

According to him, plans for
the development were started
as early as 2006 and were ini-
tially envisaged to be located
in an area of Perpall Track.

However, after consulta-
tion with key people in the
tourism industry in the
Bahamas, he was directed to

consider incorporating the
oceanic vista of Arawak Cay.
According to responses
sent to Mr Strachan from the
Director General of Tourism,
and a development company
based in Orlando, there is
widespread support for his
idea of a Cultural Village.
Conceptual drawing of the
village show craft markets,
eateries, a hammock bar and
the crowning conchshell clock
tower, which Mr Strachan
said could be the welcome
beacon for incoming cruise

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ships.

Also on the drawing board
is acable car that would take
guests from Arawak Cay to
other attraction such as the
Fort Charlotte and the Botan-
ical Gardens.

When asked about the
introduction of the Cultural
Village at a recent town hall
meeting put on the govern-
ment, Minister of Tourism
and Aviation, Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace, said he

SEE page 4B

Pd

Colinalmperial.





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 3B

Fed likely to keep key
interest rate at record low

By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON — With
the economy strengthening
but still fragile, Federal
Reserve policymakers are
expected to hold a key lend-
ing rate at a record low this
week and will weigh whether
to extend some programs that
were created to ease the
financial crisis.

Fed Chairman Ben
Bernanke and his colleagues
also are likely to signal that
while the recession is wind-
ing down, the pain isn’t over.

Though the unemployment
rate dipped to 9.4 per cent in
July — its first drop in 15
months — economists predict
it will start climbing again.
Many, including people in the
Obama administration and at
the Fed, say it could still top
10 per cent this year.

For months, consumers
have pulled back on spend-
ing and borrowing. To try to
stimulate economic activity,
Fed policymakers are all but
certain to keep the target
range for its bank lending rate
between zero and 0.25 per
cent at the end of their two-
day meeting Wednesday.

That means commercial
banks’ prime lending rate,
used to peg rates on home
equity loans, certain credit
cards and other consumer
loans, will stay around 3.25
per cent, the lowest rate in
decades.

Fed policymakers also will
probably pledge anew to keep
rates there for “an extended
period,” which economists
interpret to mean through the
rest of the year and into part
of 2010.

“We’re doing everything
we can to support the econo-
my,” Bernanke said recently.
“We will try to get through
this process. It’s going to take
some patience.”

By holding rates so low, the
Fed hopes to induce con-

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the
news, read
Insight on
Mondays



IN THIS July 21, 2009 file photo, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke delivers a report on the
country's economic and financial health before the House Financial Services Committee, on Capitol Hill

in Washington...

sumers and businesses to
boost spending, even though
banks are still being stingy
about extending credit.

“The Fed will be guardedly
optimistic,” said Brian
Bethune, economist at IHS
Global Insight. “We’re see-




ing initial signs of the econo-
my moving toward recovery
.. (but) the underlying fun-
damentals are still weak.”
With numerous signs that
the recession is finally ending
and financial stresses easing,
the Fed will consider whether

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Eleuthera and New Providence; telecommunications services between
the Bahamas and the rest of the world with a 600-kilometer submarine
fiber-optic system owned and operated by Caribbean Crossings Ltd,
a wholly-owned subsidiary; and (4) web-hosting, data center and
disaster recovery services through its wholly-owned subsidiary, Maxil
Communications Ltd. Cable Bahamas’ ordinary shares trade on the
Bahamas International Stock Exchange (Symbol: CAB).

(AP Photo: J Scott Applewhite)

some rescue programmes
should continue. Any such
decisions, though, might not
come at this week’s meeting.

One such programme,
aimed at driving down inter-
est rates on mortgages and
other consumer debt, involves
buying US Treasurys. The
central bank is on track to
buy $300 billion worth of
Treasury bonds by the fall; it
has bought $236 billion so far.

Another programme, the
Term Asset-Backed Securi-
ties Loan Facility, or TALF,
is intended to spark lending to
consumers and small busi-
nesses. It got off to a slow
start in March and is slated
to shut down at the end of
December. Despite this pro-
gramme, many people are still
having trouble getting loans,
analysts say.

The Fed isn’t expected to
launch any new revival efforts
or change another existing
programme that aims to push
down mortgage rates. In that
venture, the Fed is on track to
buy $1.25 trillion worth of
securities issued by mortgage
finance companies Fannie
Mae and Freddie Mac by the
end of the year. The central
bank’s recent purchases have
averaged $542.8 billion.

In the meantime, the econ-
omy has shown clear signs of
improvement. Employers cut

only 247,000 jobs in July, the
fewest in a year, the govern-
ment said Friday. Wages and
workers’ hours also nudged
up — encouraging signs that
companies no longer see the
need for drastic cost-cutting.
Those developments could
deliver a psychological boost
to both companies and con-
sumers.

The economy in the second
quarter contracted at a pace
of just one per cent, suggest-
ing that the recession, which
started in December 2007, is
ending.

That dip came after a dizzy-
ing free-fall in the first three
months of this year. The
economy had plunged at an
annual rate of 6.4 per cent in
the first quarter, the worst
showing in nearly three
decades.

With the economy improv-
ing but still weak, inflation
should stay low, the Fed says.
Given consumers’ caution,
companies won’t have much
power to raise prices.

And the weak job market
will limit wage growth. Com-
panies aren’t going to feel
generous about wages and
benefits until they are confi-
dent a recovery will last.

LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.

FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!

Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million

Web Listing # 8377

Mario A. Carey, CRS, CIPS, CLHMS

www.marioca reyrea

Tel: 242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013

info@mariocareyrealty.com

com

As

Mario Carey Realty
Dt's abaut yaw... Let's talk.



THE COMPLIANCE COMMISSION

NOTICE

PUBLICATION OF REVISED ANTI-MONEY LAUNDERING
AND THE COMBATTING THE FINANCING OF TERRORISM
(AML/CFT) CODES OF PRACTICE AND EXAMINATION

FORMS

The Compliance Commission (the Commission), a statutory
body established by section 39 of the Financial Transactions
Reporting Act, announces the publication of revised AML/
CFT Codes of Practice and Examination Forms for the
legal profession, the accounting profession, the real estate
industry and financial and corporate service providers.

Additionally, revised Examination Forms have been published
for the life insurance industry, credit unions and other
designated financial institutions supervised by the Commission,

The revised Codes and Examination Forms are the result of
extensive consultations with the constituent financial institutions
supervised by the Commission. They provide greater clarity to
these institutions on their AML/CFT obligations, and to persons
conducting related on-site and off-site examinations. They
also take account of recent AML/CFT legislative amendments
passed in order to maintain international best practices.

Copies of the revised Codes and Examination Forms are
available for download from the Commission’s website or by

hardcopy from the Commission’s office at the address below.

The Compliance Commission
2Nd Floor, Clarlotte House

Charlotte Street South

P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel.: (242) 397-4198
Fax: (242) 322-6968

Email: compliance@bahamas.gov.bs
Website:www.bahamas.gov.bs/compliance

Executive Commissioner

30! July 2009





PAGE 4B, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a
Proposed Arawak —_Job security but no advancement from the
Cay development seeks

to give Bahamians
51% ownership

FROM page 1B

could not make a formal
statement.

“It is a private sector
undertaking and until there
is a formal proposal I can't

comment on Cultural Vil-
lage,” he said.

Mr Strachan said he thinks
the development could be
feasible to the tourism prod-
uct of the Bahamas and also
grow Bahamian owned busi-
nesses and well as the local
job market.

Employment Opportunity

FINANCIAL MANAGER

We seek to employ a talented, innovative, leader with a passion
to succeed and the capacity to initiate progress.

Job Requirements & Experience

Bachelor's Degree in Accounting or an equivalent from a
recognized tertiary level institution.

By DEEPTI HAJELA
and MICHAEL HILL
Associated Press Writers

NEW YORK (AP) —
Sleep is a rare commodity for
Juan Cortez. Between nights
spent clearing tables at a
Manhattan nightclub and days
running food to customers in
a Bronx restaurant, the 42-
year-old Peruvian immigrant
worries more about finding
time for shuteye than job
security.

More than 100 miles to the
north in the Hudson Valley,
Omar Guzman also isn’t con-
cerned about staying

employed. The 20-year-old
migrant farm worker spends
his summer days picking peas
and cherries, and by fall will
be harvesting acres of apples.

Even with the unemploy-
ment rate above 9 percent,
the nation’s native-born job-
less are looking at higher
rungs of the labor market for
their next career move. For
immigrants like Cortez and
Guzman, it means a degree
of job security — but also
more competition if they want
to advance into jobs above
bussers and barbacks, run-
ners, dishwashers and crop
hands.



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Knowledge of backup software and tape rotation schemes,
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The phenomenon of Amer-
icans shunning farm jobs is
nothing new — the influx of
Mexicans and other foreign-
born workers to fill vacancies
has fueled a long, sometimes
contentious immigration
debate. Those labor dynamics
seem largely unchanged this
year.

In one sign, farmers are still
steadily applying for visas
under the federal program
designed to provide tempo-
rary farm workers where
there are expected domestic
labor shortages. Federal
immigration officials received
5,574 so-called H-2A petitions
from Oct. 1 through mid-
June. The numbers could
exceed the previous fiscal
year if applications continue
at the same pace.

“Even as rural unemploy-
ment increases, U.S. workers
regard farm work as beneath
them,” said Jordan Wells,
coordinator of the Justice for
Farmworkers Campaign in
Poughkeepsie, N.Y. “Why do
people work at McDonald’s
and not the farm? There’s
something about farm work
that has been stigmatized.”

Farmers like the Ron Sam-
ascott in Kinderhook, N.Y.
typically advertise available
jobs before bringing in work-
ers from other countries.

“T don’t think we had any
responses,” Samascott said.

Crop workers at Samascot-
t’s farm can earn more than
$2 an hour above the New
York state minimum wage of
$7.25 an hour.

The American Farm
Bureau estimates there are 11
million Americans in jobs that
pay less than farm work. In a
country where roughly eight
out of 10 people live in urban
areas, farm work is not an
option for many of those low-
wage workers. But the ardu-
ous work performed by more
than a million people nation-
wide is unattractive to many
job seekers.

Steve Rivera of Washing-
tonville, N.Y., a student at the
State University of New York
at Albany, has held jobs at
the Gap and McDonald’s,
worked construction and on
a golf course, but he never
really considered working at a

SEE next page



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Scrong computer and Microsoft Office skills.

The oversight of (A) payroll processing and reporting, (B)
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Managing year end audits

APPLY VIA EMAIL BEFORE August 14, 2009 TO;
executivefind@gmail.com

Caribbean Bottling Co. (Bahamas) Ltd
600)

is seeking candidates for the position of

iH

ACCOUNTS CLERK

Responsibilities of the function
include but are not limited to:
¢ Bank Reconciliations
* Inventory Valuation and Controls
¢ Route Settlement

Requirements:

* An Associate’s Degree in Accounting,
Business or related field.

* Minimum of two years work
experience in the field of accounting
would be an asset.

* Ability to multi-task, communicate
effectively and be a team player.

* Computer literate and at a minimum

efficient with MS Excel and MS Word

Salary commensurate with experience
and qualifications.

If you are interested in a challenging
career, designed to bring out the best
in you in a progressive environment,
please email or hand deliver a
copy of your Resume on or before
August 21st, 2009 to:

Bradley Watson

Caribbean Bottling Co. (Bah.) Ltd
P.O. Box N-1123

Nassau, Bahamas

or Email to:
cbcaccounts@cbcbahamas.com



Must be ready to improve skills set in multiple areas

Comfortable working remotely during projects/support

If interested please e-mail: XJTResume@ gmail.com

Mr. Elliot B. Lockhart
and

Mr. Norwood A. Rolle

are pleased to announce the
opening of their Chambers

LOCKHART & CO.
No. 35 at Buen Retiro Road
Off Shirley Street
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas

Effective Monday the 10th day
of August, A.D., 2009.

Telephone: (242) 322-1282/4
Fax: (242) 356-3371
P.O. Box N-8615
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
IMPORTANT DATES

Fall Semester 2009
New Student Orientation

Parents’ Evenin
Tuesday, 18th August, 2009
6:30 p.m. — 8:00 p.m.

Orientation
Wednesday, 19th August, 2009

8:0) a.m.

1:00 p.m.

Advisement & Registration
Wednesday, 19th August, 2049
1:00 pum. — 7:00 pom.

Advisement, Registration & Bill Payment
Thursday, 20th August, 2009 and
Friday, 21st August, 2009
9:00 am. — 7:00 p.m.

Venue:
Front of Portia Smith Student Services
Centre,
Poinciana Drive

i
Z 7) I

| MEDICAL
TECHNOLOGIST

QUALIFICATIONS:

¢ Baccalaureate degree in Medical Technology
® 2 years experience

¢ ASCP NCA or AMT Certification

® Excellent written and oral communication

skills

POSITION SUMMARY:

The successful candidate will be required to:

* Cross-train through all areas of the lab -
Chemistry, Hematology, Blood Bank and

Microbiology;

¢ Perform phlebotomy and specimen
processing and any other duties assigned.

Please submit resume via email: nwatkins@doctorshosp.com
or hand-deliver to Doctors Hospital, Human Resources Department
ON Ore Amiga SDE Aaa m Ora AD | | Meni) NP ea

Doctors Hospital | P.O. Box N-3018 | Nassau, Bahamas

WAN LED

MEDICAL SALES
REPRESENTATIVE

The medical rep will be responsible for
promoting international pharmaceutical brands
to the healthcare community in The Bahamas.

Skills & Educational Requirements

J Bachelor’s degree in medical sciences, allied
health, or business administration

/ Effective communication and presentation

abilities

J Effective time management, planning, and

organizing skills

J Proficiency in a variety of computer applications
J Self-motivated team player
Previous experience in pharmaceutical detailing

would be an asset

Candidates should possess a reliable motor
vehicle, be willing to travel to the family islands,
the U.S., and other foreign countries.

Please send application letter and résumé by
August 21, 2009 to:

MEDICAL REP
P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas
or Fax: 395-0440

We thank ail applicants for their interest; however,
only short-listed candidates will be contacted.





THE TRIBUNE

Soe
bottom

farm.

“T work at the garden cen-
ter at Wal-Mart,” said Rivera.
“Td probably get dirtier farm-
ing, so I just would not con-
sider it.”

It’s a theme that runs
throughout New York City’s
massive restaurant trade as
well.

At Cafe du Soleil in upper
Manhattan, managing partner
Cyril Tregoat hasn’t seen
native-born Americans apply-
ing to work as busboys.

“They don’t want those.
Nobody asked me to work as
a busboy,” he said. “They
want the waiter job or the
bartender job.”

That doesn’t surprise Rob
Paral, a research fellow at the
American Immigration Law
Foundation who is research-
ing unemployment trends.
Excluding teenagers, immi-
grants make up more of the
work force in the food ser-
vices sector than native-born
Americans, he said.

For most native-born work-
ers, these jobs are “a stepping
stone, maybe it’s your first
employment, something you
do while you’re going to
school,” he said. “Society
doesn’t expect us to be work-
ing in these jobs in our 30s
and 40s.”

Some of it is due to the per-
ception of status, he said.
“You don’t want to be pushed
to the point where you’re per-
ceived as being desperate and
doing these lower-status, low-
er-prestige jobs.”

Ousman Trawally, a 36-
year-old Gambian native,
smiles at the idea of native-
born Americans working his
job of running food to restau-
rant diners.

“Tve been doing this almost
eight years,” he said. “I work
with Americans. They never
complete six months.”

While the field is seemingly
wide open for immigrants
willing to work those low-
wage jobs, the competition
heats up when it comes to
moving up — or trying to do
so.

“It has slowed down the
upward mobility of immi-
grants and their families and
children,” Miguel Carranza,
professor of Sociology and
Ethnic Studies at the Univer-
sity of Nebraska-Lincoln. “If
it continues for a while then it
will have long-term effects”
on immigrants’ ability to pro-
vide better lives to future gen-
erations by paying for things
like higher education or being
able to afford to live in nicer
neighborhoods.

Mohammad Abdul Muk-
tadir, who works as a runner,
says he has more experience
than the native-born waiters
he now assists. They make
more money than he does and
have the job he wants.

“They’ve never been wait-
ers before,” the 48-year-old
Bangladesh immigrant said.

Like restaurant workers in
New York City, farm
migrants around the country
are having a harder time
“stepping up” to better jobs as
truck drivers, certified nurs-
ing assistants, child care work-
ers and data entry workers.
Now more native-born work-
ers are scrambling for those
jobs in the tough economy,
said David Strauss, executive
director of the Association of
Farmworker Opportunity
Programs.

Jim Bittner, manager of
Singer Farms near the Lake
Ontario shore north of Buf-
falo, has witnessed the effects
— the return of migrant
workers who had left to pur-
sue better-paying jobs.

“We’re seeing people come
back that we haven’t seen in a
few years because they had
drifted off to the Carolinas
and Florida, where they
worked construction,” he said.
“Those jobs no longer are
there.”



¢ Deepti Hajela reported
from New York. Michael Hill
reported from Albany, N.Y.
AP Writers Jessica M. Pasko
in Albany and Ben Dobbin in
Rochester contributed to this
report.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the

news, read
Insight on
Mondays



RBC
Royal Bank
533%, of Canada

MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 5B

PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.
HOUSES/APARTMENTS/COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

(401) Lots #17 & #18 Crown Allot-
ments, Love Hill Settlement, An-
dros. Containing a two-storey res.
Appraised value: $100,000

(806) Lots #1 & #2, Block 3 with
a parcel situated between Lot #1,
Block 3, containing a 4 bedroom
condominium — Sunset View Villas,
West Bay Street. Appraised value:
$750,000

(433) Lot #27 of Village Allotment
#14 in the Eastern District, contain-
ing residence situated on Denver
Street off Parkgate Road in the Ann's
Town Constituency, New Providence.
Property size 2,500 sqft Building size
990 sqft. Appraised value: $50,000

(400) Property situated in Calabash
Bay on the Island of Andros. 75’ x
150’ and containing thereon a small
grocery store 480 sqft. and an in-
complete 3 bed 2 bath house 900
sqft. Appraised value: $65,000

(301) Lot #2 in block #8, Steward
Road, Coral Heights East Subdivi-
sion situated in Western District of
New Providence, approx. size 8,800
sq. ft. with a split level containing
two bed, two bath, living, dining
& family rooms, kitchen and util-
ity room - approx. size of building
2,658 sqft Appraised value: $322,752

(702) Lot #20 with residential prop-
erty located Skyline Heights.
Appraised value $280,000

(902) Lot of land 94 x94 x 150 x 150
on Queens Highway just south of
Palmetto Point with a two storey
stone building containing two apart-
ments. Each unit has 3 bed/2 1/2
bath, kitchen, living room and 3 linen
closets. Appraised value: $287,209

(400) Lot#14 situated in the settle-
ment of Love Hill on the Island of
Andros totalling 20,000 sqft Property
contains a two storey 5 bedroom,
3 bathroom residence. Appraised
value: $185,000

(105) Lot containing 2 storey bldg.
with three bed, two and ahalf bath
residence, and 30’ x 86’ situated Bai-
ley Town, North Bimini.
Appraised value: $235,000

(702) Undeveloped lots # 4A, 16,
17, 18 and 19 located Chapman
Estates, West Bay. Appraised value:
$348,000

(701) Undeveloped lot #149. Sea-
fan Lane, Lucayan Beach Subdi-
vision. Grand Bahama, 18750 sq
ft. Appraised value: TBA

(565) Vacant lot #5 located Eleu-
thera Island Shores, Seaside Drive
Section B, Block #15, Eleuthera,
Bahamas. 9,691 sqft, Appraised
value: $27,620

(402) Lot 89, Block 7 Aberdeen
Drive, Bahamia West Replat Sub-
division, Freeport, Grand Bahama,
consisting of 12,100 sqft.
Appraised value: $51,000

(800) Vacant property located
Bahamia South. Block 16 lot 9A,
Freeport, Grand Bahama consist-
ing of 24,829.20 sqft. Appraised
value: $52,000

(565) Vacant Lot #9 (11,406.65 sqft)
situated in Mango Lane Section
“B” Block #15, Eleuthera Island
Shores, Eleuthera.

Appraised value: $50,189

(909) Vacant residential Lot# 63
(7800 sqft) Crown Allotments
located Murphy Town, Abaco.
Appraised value: $18,000

(108) Vacant Single Family Lot #5

COMMERCIAL BANKING CENTRE

Tel: 242-356-8568
800) Mrs. Monique Crawford
801) Mr. Jerome Pinder
802) Mr. Brian Knowles
803) Mr. Vandyke Pratt
804) Mrs. Hope Sealey
805) Mrs. Tiffany Simms O’brien
806) Mrs. Lois Hollis
807) Mr. Lester Cox
808) Mrs. DaShann Clare-Paul
810) Miss LaPaige Gardiner
(811) Ms. Lydia Gardiner
PALMDALE SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-322-4426/9 or
242-302-3800
(201) Ms. Nicola Walker
(202) Mr. Robert Pantry
(205) Mrs. Anya Major

(801) Lot #18 in Sandilands Allot-
ment on the western side of Cross-
wind Road between Seabreeze Lane
and Pineyard Road in the Eastern
Distract of The Island of New Provi-
dence-The Bahamas, containing sin-
gle storey private residence com-
prising the following: covered entry
porch, living room, dining room,
kitchen, laundry room, family room,
sitting area, 4 bedrooms, 2 bathroom
and patio. The total area of land is
approximately 7,641 square feet.
Appraised value: $289,426

(801) Two parcels of land containing
21,120 sq.ft. situated on the south-
ern side of East Shirley Street and
100 feet west of its junction with
“Shirlea” in the Eastern District, New
Providence. Situated thereon is a
Gas Station and Auto Repair Shop.
Appraised value: $799,497

(601) Lot #17 located Village Allot-
ment with fourplex,
Appraised value: $500,000

(701) Lotofland having the number
16 in Block number 16 in Section
Three of the Subdivision called
and known as Sea Breeze Estates
situated in the Eastern District of
New Providence. Property contains
a three bed, two bath residence.
Appraised value: $277,000

(701) Lot of land being lot number
11 in Block number 10 on a plan of
allotments laid out byVillage Estates
Limited and filed in the dept of Land
& Surveys as number 142 N.P. and
situated in the Eastern District of
New Providence. Property contains
three bed, two bath residence.
Appraised value: $165,000

(565) Lot # 1018 in Golden Gates
Estates #2 Subdivision situate in
the South Western District of the
island of New Providence Containing
a single storey private residence 3
bedroom 2 bath. Property approx.
size 6,000 sqft Building approx size
2,400 sqft Appraised value: $173,176

(205) Lot B - 50 ft x 115.73 ft situ-
ated on the north side of Shell Fish
Road, being the third lot west of Fire
Trail Road and east of Hamster Road

Block #5 Unit#1 Devonshire
Appraised value $30,000

(802) Vacant Commercial Lot No:
3A, Block 60 Bahamia Subdivision
VI containing 3 acres located Free-
port, Grand Bahama.

Appraised value: $750,000

(108) Vacant Single Family Lot #5
Block F Bahamia South Subdivi-
sion. Appraised value $35,700

(569) Vacant property located in
Subdivision called “Culmerville”
being a portion of Lot #47 and a
portion of Lot #57. Appraised value:
$24,000

(569) All that piece parcel or lot
of land situate in the settlement
of James Cistern on the Island of
Eleuthera one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas
measuring approx 10,000 sq.ft.
Appraised value TBA

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot No. 102 in the Sub-
division known as “EXUMA HAR-
BOUR’ in the Island of Great Exuma
measuring 10,000 sq.ft. Appraised
value $20,000.00.

(202) Vacant lot of land contain-
ing 41,164 sqft, Lot #8, Love Estate,
Phase 1, 2,300 ft. south of West Bay
Street, Western District, New Provi-
dence. Appraised value $165,000
(202) Vacantlot ofland containing

Tel: 242-322-8700
701
702
301
304

Tel: 242-393-3097
601

Tel: 242-325-4711
401
402

Tel: 242-393-7505/8

501) Mr. Jason Sawyer
503) Mr. Dwight King
505

Tel: 242-327-6077
466





RBC > HELPING YOU SUCCEED

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean/bahamas

™ Trademark of Royal Bank of Canada. ® The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are registered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada.

NASSAU MAIN BRANCH

Mr. James Strachan
Mr. Antonio Eyma
Ms. Thyra Johnson
Mrs. Alicia Thompson
MACKEY STREET BRANCH

Ms. Cherelle Martinborough
JOHN EF. KENNEDY DRIVE BRANCH

Mrs. Renea Walkine
Mrs. Chandra Gilbert
PRINCE CHARLES SHOPPING CENTRE

Ms. Patricia Russell
CABLE BEACH BRANCH

Mrs. Winnifred Roberts
LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE
Tel: 242-502-5170/502-5180

with a one half duplex residential
premises. Appraised value: TBA

(901) Lot#32 containing 4 bedroom
2bath concrete structure located
Triana Shores Harbour Island, Eleu-
thera. Property size 80’ x 120’ x 80’
120 feet Appraised value: $332,735

(910) Lot#12 Madeira Park, a small
subdivision on the outskirts of Treas-
ure Cay, Abaco having an area of
9,444 square feet residence contain-
ing aconcrete block structure with
asphalt shingle roof comprises of
three bedrooms, two bathrooms,
family room, living room, dining
room, and kitchen. Appraised value:
$147,000

(569) Property situated on Wil-
liams Lane off Kemp Road, New
Providence, Bahamas containing
a two-storey house and an apart-
ment building consisting of 1800
sqft. Appraised value $100,000

(569) All that piece of land being Par-
cel #3 and Parcel #4 situated on the
South side of Prince Charles Drive,
New Providence, Bahamas contain-
ing a commercial building housing
two shop space on the ground floor
and three shop space on the second
floor with a large storage area in the
rear. Total area 8400 sq ft.
Appraised value: $366,650

(569) All that piece, parcel or land
having an approximate area of 2100
sqft situated on the Western side of
Blue Hill Road about 70 ft North of
Peter Street and about 115 ft south
of Laird Street in the Southern Dis-
trict of New Providence, Bahamas
containing a commercial building
housing a two bed/one bath unit
on the top floor and a store on the
first floor. Appraised value: $154,000

(569) All that piece, parcel or lot
of land situated on Cowpen Road
(1000 ft east of the Faith Avenue Junc-
tion) in the Southern District of New
Providence, Bahamas containing
a duplex apartment comprising of
two - 2-bedroom/1-bathroom apart-
ments. Appraised value: $150,000
(800) All that parcel or lot of land
being Lots #10 and 11 in Block 29
of Coconut Grove Subdivision, con-

VACANT PROPERTIES

1.786 acre, situated east of Know-
les Drive, approximately 1,420
ft. southward of Harrold Road in
the western district of New Provi-
dence, Bahamas. Appraised value:
$ 170,000

(503) Vacant property consisting
of Lot #894 situated in the Free-
port Ridge Subdivision, Section #1,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Baha-
mas. Appraised value: TBA

(505) Ten (10) acres of land situ-
ated on Woods Cay, known as Little
Abaco, between Cooper's Town and
Cedar Harbour in Abaco, Bahamas.
The property is undeveloped with
a view of the sea from both the
North and South side. Appraised
value: $1,078,750

(569) All that piece parcel or lot
of land Lot # 977, Pinewood Gar-
dens Subdivision, Southern Dis-
trict, New Providence. Appraised
value: $65,000

(008) All that piece parcel of lot
and land on the Island of Great
Exuma situated about 101/2 miles
Northwestwardly of George Town
which said piece parcel or lot of
land is #10750 Bahama Sound
O.A.E. 10,900 sqft.

Appraised value: $65,000

(008) All that piece parcel or lot of
land designated as Lot Number 563
on aplan of a Subdivision called

OFFICERS

723

)
)
)
724)
)
)



716) Ms. Quincy Fisher

717) Mrs. Nancy Swaby

Ms. Deidre King

Mrs. Faye Higgs

725) Ms. Marguerite Johnson
565) Mrs. Catherine Davis
569) Mrs. Vanessa Scott
NASSAU INT’L AIRPORT

Tel: 242-377-7179

433) Mrs. Suzette Hall-Moss
LYFORD CAY BRANCH

Tel: 242-362-4540 or 242-362-4037
101-N) Mrs. Lindsey Peterson
GOVERNOR’S HARBOUR, ELEUTHERA
Tel: 242-332-2856/8

902) Ms. Nicole Evans
HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH
Tel:242-333-2230

901) Ms. Velderine Laroda
ANDROS TOWN BRANCH

Tel: 242-368-2071

400) Mrs. Rose Bethel
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO

taining a shopping plaza. The lot
is trapezium in shape, 8,383 sq ft.
Appraised value $500,000

(560) Lot of land #2 Sea View Sub-
division, Russell Island, Spanish
Wells. Property size 11,323 sqft,
building size 2236 sq ft containing
3 bedrooms, 2 bath, living room, an
eat-in kitchen, dining room, laun-
dry room, covered porch, a one car
garage, and a covered water tank.
Appraised value: $299,000

(901) Lot # 57 block # Trianna Shores
containing 3 bed 2 bath front room,
dining room, & kitchen. Concrete
structure, 1926.40 sq ft wooden
deck 321.60 sq ft. property 9600 sqft.
Appraised value: $448,645

(901) Lot “K” Barrack Street, Harbour
Island containing a 2 storey concrete
building with 4 bed 4 bath, dining
room & kitchen -Building 2934.56
sqft property 6563 sqft.
Appraised value: $479,228

(811) Property containing Condo
“Millennium II’, Unit A-101, building
57, Phase 1C, 2 bedrooms, 3 bath-
rooms, living room, dining room,
utility closet & patio. Situated in
the area known as Bimini Bay Re-
sort, Bimini, Bahamas.

Appraised value - $485,000

(008) Single Story tri-plex building,
one 2 bedrooms and two 1 bed-
room located on a multi-family Lot
No.4, block 3, Shirley Lane, section
1, Bahama Reef Yacht & Country
Club Subdivision, Freeport Grand
Bahama. Property size is approx.
16,621 sq ft Appraised value $348,000

(908 Lot# 52 Crown Allotments
located Murphy Town, Abaco with
size being 10,200 sq ft. Containing
a one storey house with 4 bed/2
bath — Concrete Block Structure -—
Appraised value. $200,000

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot #39 in the residen-
tially zoned area of Highbury Park
Subdivision in the Eastern District
of New Providence, Bahamas. Ap-
prox. land size 6,000 sq ft. Property
contains a 3-bedroom/2-bathroom
house, size being 1,563 sq. ft.

or known as Bahama Highlands
#4, 11,223.41 sqft. Appraised value:
$87,000

(201) Single family residential Lot
No. 11703 Bahama Sound Subd.
Number 11 West, Great Exuma.
Size: approx. 10,000 sq ft
Appraised value $15,000

(201) Multifamily Lot No. 10 -
Southeast Corner of Mandarin
Drive, Sugar Apple Road, Sans
Souci Sudv. Size: 14,368 sq ft
Appraised value $165,000

(201) Single family residential Lot
No. 11698 Bahama Sound Subd.
Number 11 West, Great Exuma.
Size: approx. 10,426 sq ftAppraised
value: $15,000

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot #1 located in Block
3in the Subdivision known as East-
ern Estates situate in the Eastern
District of the island of New Provi-
dence. Property approx. 6950 sq.
ft. Appraised value $80,000

(569) All that piece parcel or lot
ofland located on Marigold Road
in the Subdivision known as Kool
Acres. Lot is approx.9455 sq. ft.
Appraised value $93,000.

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot #152 locatedin the
Subdivision known as West Ridge-
land Park situated in the South-

908
909
910

105
GRA

100



008

103)
108)



dete

®

Appraised Value $131,000

(908) Lot# 23 located in the Sub-
division of Spring City, Abaco with
size being 8,925 sq ft. Containing a
one storey wooden structure house
with 3 bed/1 bath of 7985 sq ft
Appraised value. $60,000

(304) Single storey triplex, situated
on Lot 615, Mermaid Boulevard,
Golden Gates #2 in the Western
District, New Providence. Two two-
bedroom, one-bathroom units and
one one-bedroom, one-bathroom
unit. The property is zoned as Multi
Family Residential, measuring 9,092
sqft with the living area measuring
2,792 sq ft. Appraised value $374,192

(201) Duplex Lot #25 situated on
Faith Ave. North (Claridge Estates)
- size being 7,354 sqft with duplex
thereon. Appraised value - TBA

(201) Lot of land situated on Fire
Trail Road being a partition of Glad-
ston Allot #41 New Providence, Ba-
hamas containing townhouse apart-
ment unit and two proposed units
(completed as is). Appraised value
$237,714

(201) Lotcontaining residence situ-
ated in Carey’s Subdivision - Lot B,
Block B Appraised Value $108,000.

(103) All that piece parcel of lot of
land and improvements thereon
known as No.3 block 31 Bahamia
Marina & Section IX located in south-
western city of Freeport Grand Ba-
hama Island. Approx. 13,070 sq.ft.
or 0.30 acres property contains
duplex dwelling. Appraised value
$300,000

(804) Six condominium units and
five parcels of vacant land situated
at Regattas of Abaco, Marsh Har-
bour, Bahamas. The single/multi
family residential condominium/
timeshare development is situated
on 9.426 acres of land. The condo-
miniums consist of 2 bedrooms, 2
bathrooms and the amenities on the
property includes amanned secu-
rity gate, swimming pool, 2 tennis
courts, landscaped gardens and an
administration building.
Appraised value $2,450,000

ern District of the island of New
Providence. Property approx. 4000
sqft Appraised value $55,000.

(008) An undeveloped waterfront
lot land being Lot #12032 with a
size of 10,600 sq.ft. in the Bahama
Sound of Exuma Subdivision # 11
West, Great Exuma, Bahamas.
Appraised value $224,000

(008) Partially developed parcel
ofland being 10,000 sq.ft. situate
about the eastern portion of The
Forest Estate in the vicinity ofthe
settlements of Southside andThe
Forest being Lot Number 4803 in
Bahama Sound of Exuma6, Exuma,
Bahamas.

Appraised value $25,000

(724) Vacantland at Love Beach,
Western District of New Providence
comprising a portion of “LoveEs-
tate” containing 1 acre.
Appraised value $225,000.00.

(800) Lot#2vacantland 30,000 sq
ft located Chapman Estates Sub-
division on West Bay Street with
open zoning. Appraised value
$600,000.

(800) Single/multi family residen-
tial vacant lot being a portion of
lot #77 situated on the Southern
side of Fire Trail Road in the West-
ern District of New Providence.
Property size 110,000 sqft

Appraised value $550,000

Tel: 242-367-2420

Mr. Toure Holder

Mrs. Sylvia Poitier

Miss Cyprianna Williams
BIMINI BRANCH
Tel:242-347-3031

Miss. Ganiatu Tinubu

*S, LONG ISLAND

Tel: 242-337-0101

Mrs. Lucy Wells
EXUMA BRANCH

Tel: 242-336-3251

Ms. Jocyelyn Mackey
FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-352-6631/2

101-F) Ms. Garnell Frith
102) Ms. Elaine Collie

Mrs. Damita Newbold-Cartwright
Ms. Sylvie Carey

SPANISH WELLS

Tel: 242-333-4131 or
242-333-4145

(560) Mr. Walter Carey

RBC Royal
Bank of Canada





PAGE 6B, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Small is beautiful, and successful,

By MICHAEL LIEDTKE
AP Business Writer

NEWSPAPERS are hurt-
ing all over the United States,
but the pain is less severe at
small publications like The
Blackshear Times in Georgia.

The weekly newspaper fills
an information vacuum in a
county of 17,000 people who
live about 75 miles from the
closest metropolitan market,
in Jacksonville, Fla. That has
made it easier for The Times
to hold on to its 3,500 sub-
scribers and keep its revenue
stable in a recession that’s rav-
aging much of the newspaper
industry.

“CNN is not coming to my
town to cover the news and
there aren’t a whole lot of
bloggers here either,” said
Robert M. Williams Jr., The
Times’ editor and publisher.
“Community newspapers are
still a great investment



because we provide some-
thing you can’t get anywhere
else.”

The scarcity of other media
in small- and medium-sized
cities has helped shield hun-
dreds of newspapers from the
upheaval that’s causing dailies
in big cities to shrink in size
and scope as their print cir-
culations and advertising sales
decline.

Less competition means the
print editions and Web sites
of smaller newspapers remain
the focal points for finding
out what’s happening in their
coverage areas.

In contrast, large newspa-
pers carry more national
news, as well as local, and
have many competitors,
including Web sites and tele-
vision and radio stations.
They report much of the news
the day before printed news-
papers reach homes and
newsstands. Large newspa-

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TSAR VENTURES LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)












Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
















Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





SUSIE WILLIAMS-ALLEN (left), the managing editor of The Purcell

a, EE

Register, interviews McClain County Under-Sheriff, Bill Shobe in

Purcell, Oklahoma...

pers’ Web sites also provide
the news for free a day ahead
of print editions.

Perhaps even more impor-
tant, newspapers in smaller
markets still haven’t lost a big
chunk of their revenue to
Craigslist and other online
classified advertising alterna-
tives that have become the
bane of large newspapers.

(AP Photo)

Print ads for everything
from jobs to jalopies were a
gold mine for newspapers
until Craigslist began expand-
ing an online service for free
classified ads in 1999. Today,
Craigslist blankets most major
metropolitan markets while
publishing about 40 million
classified ads each month.

In 2000, classified advertis-

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HERRIDGE ISLAND LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE,
INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES — FALL SEMESTER 2009 - 042004

COURSE

CODE

|BEGINS | ENDS

coor

Gshamian Culsine

St

| Ox. 22

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| Sept, 10

CcOOe

Gourmet Cooking |

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| Sept. 7 | Oct. 19

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Cake & Pastry
Making |

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Bae

Sept. | Oct. 24

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| Bept.8 | Mow. 3

Bapt.70 | New, 5

Sept. 10 | Mew. 5

[DURATION | DAYS

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| 6 weeks

6 waeks

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| TIME
600 -

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| FEES | Fi

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520,00 | LE



COOK

Cake Decorating

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PK

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All fees are incloded in the price quoted almve; new siucents pay a ooe-lime application foe of 0, (SON REPL NDABLE)

Application Deadline: August 28, 2109 at 4:10 p.m.
For furtler information o¢ io peck ip an application case comet the Iriarte | Pith tie hearioent of the Cy linary & Hoapita ity
Managcment Institute, 323-3804, 323-314 or fax 325-1267.

The Cowl ‘pe

52wk-Low

1.28

10.00
6.25
0.63
3.15
2.14

10.18
2.74
5.50
1.27

Abaco Markets

Benchmark

Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

1.32
6.60
10.00
10.30
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.39
10.00

Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Securit y

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Bahamas Waste

Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol Class B Preference

Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money a4 Work

Me)

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 7 AUGUST 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,556.11] CHG -5.83 | %CHG -0.37 | YTD -156.25 | YTD % -9.12

FINDEX: CLOSE 787.45 | YTD -5.68% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW _.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

1.39
11.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.35
2.74
5.60
3.47
1.82
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.13
1.00
0.30
5.49
10.39
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.
1.34
11.00
6.25
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.35
2.74
5.60
3.48
1.82
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.13
1.00
0.30
5.49
10.39
10.00

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

EPS $

-0.877

af the Furhowes reverwss atee dinky A Haren: Thitinn, Fis, Cow Comin, Cove Sohewine aed Conese ldterlals

FG CAPITAL

MARKET.
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Lad

c1as bcs NT A OL

Div $ P/E
10.6
11.1
25.6
N/M
0.078 40.4
0.055 43.1
1.406 8.1
0.249 11.0
0.419 13.4
0.111 31.4
0.240 7.6
0.420 15.7
0.322 33.0
0.794 13.0
0.332 15.5
0.000 N/M
0.035 8.6
13.5
10.9
55.6

0.127
0.992
0.244

0.407
0.952
0.180

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + Prime + 1.75%

ases)

52wk-Hi__ 52wk-Low Interest
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
FBB15 100.00 0.00 29 May 2015
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3860 2.40 4.75
2.9047 -1.20 -3.66
1.4817 3.35 5.38
3.1031 -8.35 -13.82
12.9801
101.6693
96.7398
1.0000
9.2765
1.0622
1.0243 -0.84
1.0585 2.04
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $ P/E
0.300
0.480
0.000

N/M
256.6

ABDAB
RND Holdings.

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
30-Jun-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

1.3231
2.8952
1.4059
3.1031
12.3289
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

2.87
1.10
0.35
0.00
2.00
2.56

5.79
1.67
-4.18
0.00
-2.98
6.22
2.43
5.85

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 18 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price fram day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
KS1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

ing accounted for nearly $20
billion, or about 40 per cent,
of the US newspaper indus-
try’s revenue. In 2008, classi-
fied ads in U.S. newspapers
had dwindled to less than $10
billion, or about one-quarter
of the industry’s revenue.
(Subscription and single-copy
sales traditionally contribute
just 20 to 30 per cent of news-
papers’ revenue.)

Now it appears the highly
profitable classified ads in the
print editions of large news-
papers could dwindle to vir-
tually nothing within the next
few years, said media analyst
Mike Simonton of Fitch Rat-
ings. “There is still more
pain,” he predicted.

Smaller newspapers have
been defying the ominous
trend, based on a recent study
of the finances at 125 US
newspapers of different sizes
by the Inland Press Associa-
tion, a trade group.

The classified ad revenue
among daily newspapers with
circulations of less than 15,000
actually rose by an average of
23 per cent in the five years
ending in 2008, the study
found.

Overall ad revenue for dai-
ly newspapers with less than
15,000 in circulation rose by
an average of 2.5 per cent in
the same time frame. Mean-
while, ad revenue dropped 25
per cent at daily newspapers
with circulations greater than
80,000, according to Inland
Press.

“The bigger they are, the
harder they are falling,” said
Ray Carlsen, Inland Press’
executive director.

Smaller newspapers also
have largely avoided the deep
staff cuts made by the rest of
the newspaper industry, which
has eliminated more than
100,000 jobs since 2005. The

Inland Press study found dai-
ly newspapers with circula-
tions of less than 50,000 were
spending more on their news-
rooms in 2008 than they were
in 2004.

But if they’ve largely avoid-
ed the Internet’s impact on
advertising and circulation,
smaller newspapers have not
been immune to the misery
of the longest recession since
World War II.

Nearly one-fifth of their
collective revenue evaporated
in the first quarter compared
with the same time last year,
according to one industry
study.

“It would be wrong to
assume there is some sort of
bubble over our market,” said
Chris Doyle, president and
publisher of the Naples Daily
News, a daily newspaper in
southwestern Florida with a
circulation averaging about
64,000 during the six months
ending in March. “We are
becoming leaner, more scrap-
py and more aggressive than
ever before.”

To cope with the recession,
which has hit Florida espe-
cially hard, the Daily News
and four neighboring com-
munity newspapers — all
owned by E.W. Scripps Co.
— have reduced their staffing
nearly 30 per cent.

For the most part, though,
big newspapers are under
more pressure. Denver and
Seattle each lost a printed dai-
ly newspaper this year, while
Detroit’s two newspapers cut
home delivery to three days a
week.

The shakeout could leave
more big newspapers adopt-
ing the so-called “hyperlocal”
approach that publishers of

SEE next page

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GUNSIGHT INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ISPHOLINE CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JJR INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 7B



a
for newspapers

smaller newspapers have
always focused on.

Rather than filling their
pages with material that is
readily available on the Inter-
net, smaller newspapers focus
on the politics, business,
sports, crime and community
affairs occurring in narrowly
defined geographic areas —
a county, a town or, in some
cases, even a few neighbor-
hood blocks.

“Tf it walks, talks or spits
on the concrete in our area,
we cover it,” said John D.
Montgomery Jr., editor and
publisher of The Purcell Reg-
ister in Oklahoma. The week-
ly newspaper, based about 40
minutes south of Oklahoma
City, had built up a circula-
tion of about 5,000 by focus-
ing on Purcell and four near-
by towns with a combined
population of about 17,000.

With a weekday circulation
of about 73,000, The Chat-
tanooga Times Free Press in
Tennessee has been setting
aside more space for local
news and puts all national
news through a community
lens, said Tom Griscom, the
daily newspaper’s publisher
and executive editor.

“Tf you really want to read
about the Iraq war every day,
you are not going to buy our
paper. You will buy The New
York Times,” Griscom said.

More large newspapers also
may take a page from smaller
newspapers by reducing the
number of days that they
print their editions. Many
small newspapers already are
weeklies or don’t come out
every day — another factor
that has helped them stay out
of major trouble.

Production and delivery
costs are among newspapers’
biggest expenses, so more
publishers are assessing
whether it makes sense to

drop their print editions on
days that traditionally don’t
attract a lot of advertising —
typically Mondays through
Wednesdays.

Being small also makes it
easier to stay tuned to read-
ers’ interests, said Jeff Ack-
erman, publisher of The
Union, a daily newspaper
with a circulation of about
16,000 in Grass Valley, Calif.,
not far from the Tahoe
National Forest.

“Too many newspapers
have been operating in an
ivory tower for too long,” said
Ackerman, whose newspaper
is based in a county with a
population of about 100,000.
“T answer my own phone.
Some newspapers are just
now trying to develop rela-
tionships with the local com-
munities they cover. Ours has
been going on for 144 years.”

Most community newspa-
pers are privately held —
often owned by the same fam-
ily for several generations.
That means they aren’t under
constant pressure to boost
their earnings in a time of
declining ad prices. It also
means they don’t have to
make the same financial dis-
closures as the publicly traded
companies that own most
major newspapers.

Smaller newspapers gener-
ally have little debt. Huge
debts drove the owners of
newspapers like the Los
Angeles Times, Chicago Tri-
bune, Philadelphia Inquirer
and Star Tribune of Min-
neapolis into bankruptcy
court to reorganize their
finances.

Still, small-town newspa-
pers face more of the prob-
lems dogging big-city dailies.

Last year, ad revenue
drooped four per cent at more
than 1,000 community news-
papers responding to a sur-

7 te
atl ie

vey by the National Newspa-
per Association and the Sub-
urban Newspapers of Ameri-
ca. Industrywide, newspaper
ad revenue plunged 17 per
cent, according to the News-
paper Association of Ameri-
ca.

But that difference nar-
rowed this year. First-quarter
ad revenue at community
newspapers was nearly 19 per
cent below the first quarter
of 2008 while the industry-
wide total plummeted 28 per
cent, according to the same
groups.

As the Web becomes even
more ubiquitous and indis-
pensable, more people may
start sites focused on the same
issues covered by small news-
papers. Advertising alterna-
tives like Craigslist also could
catch on in more remote areas
of the United States.
Craigslist serves more than
325 US cities — offering free
classified ads in most of them
— and welcomes suggestions
on areas where it should
expand.

Richard Connor, publisher
of The Times Leader in
Wilkes-Barre, Pa., (weekday
circulation of about 36,000),
already has to contend with
Craigslist in his market, but
he has another worry: disap-
pearing car dealers, tradition-
ally big ad buyers. His news-
paper’s ad revenue declined
by about five per cent in the
first quarter but improved
modestly in the second. He
suspects sales will still be
scarce in the months ahead.

Even so, Connor is betting
small newspapers still have a
bright future. He just bought
three dailies in Maine in June.

“We still think community
newspapers have an audience
and it’s not going away,” he
said. “There will always be an
audience for local news.”

PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

ADVERTISEMENT

VACANCY

TWO (2) VACANCIES FOR

EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN (EMT) BASIC

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post
Emergency Medical Technician - Basic, Corporate Office, Public Hospitals

Authority.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-

Aminimum of two (2) subjects at the B.G.C.S.E level at grade “C” or above,
or equivalent (including Math, English, Science); Good oral, writing and
reading skills; Certification as an Emergency Medical Technician, Basic with
three years relevant experience; Must be able to communicate and interact
with members of the public and other public safety and health professionals
during times of extreme stress, while maintaining composure.

LICENSES CERTIFICATIONS

Obtains certification equivalent to US National Registry EMT-Basic.

2.Maintains certification in Basic Life Support (BLS); Pre-hospital Trauma
Life Support (PHTLS); American Heart Association (AHA) and Cardio
Pulmonary Recitation (CPR) for the Professional Rescuer.

Registered and licensed with the Health Professions Council (Bahamas).

JOB SUMMARY

Responsible for providing timely pre hospital care to patients who require

emergency medical assistance;

DUTIES:

* Responds immediately to emergency calls.

ecure scene and maintains safety.

Secures the scene of an emergency situation and maintains safety.

Performs basic life support and other medical assistance until the
patient arrives at the hospital.

Completes required reports related to patient care and provides
electronic, verbal and written report to medical staff.

Communicates with hospitals and dispatch center using various radio /
telephone equipments.

Ensures that all emergency equipment are in the ambulance at all

times.

Prepares and submits an inventory of supplies at the end of each shift.

Letters of Application, resume, documentary evidence of qualifications
and three (3) references should be submitted, no later than Friday, 21°
August 2009, to the Human Resources Director, Public Hospitals Authority,

P.O. Box N-8200 or Corporate Office Building ‘B’, 3% & West Terraces,

Centreville.



THE BAHAMAS MARITIME

AUTHORITY
(LONDON OFFICE)

Technical and Compliance Officer
(Inspections & Surveys)

An appointment 1s available for a marine professional in the
Inspections and Surveys Department, carrying out a wide range of
duties associated with statutory compliance of The Bahamas flagged
fleet of about 1,700 vessels comprising over 51,000,000 GT.

Duties will include
* close oversight of response and management of PSC inspection,
* operation of the BMA inspection programme
* technical advice to owners, managers and Recognised
Organisations,

A logical thinking, safety orientated person 1s required who must
have a wide knowledge of the International Maritime Conventions
and Codes.

Candidates should have seagoing experience at a senior level or
surveying experience, or as a Naval Architect within an IACS
Classification Society. Suitably experienced candidates from an
alternative professional stream may also be considered. Audit
experience 1s advantageous.

This particular vacancy will be better suited to a holder of an STCW
II/2 certificate. However outstanding candidates who are otherwise
qualified will be considered.

The successful candidate will be required to work in the London
Office of the BMA and should be prepared to undertake occasional
travel on the business of the Authority.

Technical and Compliance Officer
(STCW and Manning)

Applications are invited for the position of Technical & Compliance
Officer in the STCW and Manning Department of the BMA. The
STCW and Manning Section 1s responsible for all aspects related
to the training, certification and approval of seafarers and STCW
courses, and the assessment of the manning provisions, for The
Bahamas flagged fleet.

The successful candidate will be employed at a supervisory level
with duties including:
* Representing the Authority at meetings/forum on matters
relating to seafarers training and manning
* Oversight of the BMA processes and development of national
policies relating to seafarers, STCW course approval and safe
manning
* Provision of training and manning guidance/assistance to
Owners, Managers and the Authority’s other stakeholders

Candidates for the post should have a university degree with practical
and theoretical knowledge of STCW Convention/Code and the
international principles on manning of ships. Applicants with other
qualifications gained in the field of maritime training/education or
other relevant experience/expertise will also be considered. Previous
experience in auditing will be advantageous.

Applicants are invited to write, enclosing a copy of their C/V, and
details of their current salary to: Deputy Director, Inspections &
Surveys, The Bahamas Maritime Authority, 120 Old Broad Street,
London EC2N I1AR, U K, or by email to tech@bahamasmaritime.c

om.

Closing date for applications 1s 28 August 2009. All applications
will be acknowledged.





PAGE 8B, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a aaa 2 ee ee
A missed opportunity on climate change

By N GREGORY MANKIW
c.2009 New York Times
News Service

During the presidential
campaign of 2008, Barack
Obama distinguished himself
on the economics of climate
change, speaking far more
sensibly about the issue than
most of his rivals. Unfortu-
nately, now that he is presi-
dent, Obama may sign a cli-
mate bill that falls far short
of his aspirations. Indeed, the
legislation making its way to
his desk could well be worse
than nothing at all.

Let’s start with the basics.
The essential problem of cli-
mate change, scientists tell us,
is that humans are emitting
too much carbon into the
atmosphere, which tends to



raise world temperatures.
Emitting carbon is what econ-
omists call a “negative exter-
nality”— an adverse side
effect of certain market activ-
ities on bystanders.

The textbook solution for
dealing with negative exter-
nalities is to use the tax sys-
tem to align private incentives
with social costs and benefits.
Suppose the government
imposed a tax on carbon-
based products and used the
proceeds to cut other taxes.
People would have an incen-
tive to shift their consump-
tion toward less carbon-inten-
sive products. A carbon tax
is the remedy for climate
change that wins overwhelm-
ing support among econo-
mists and policy wonks.

When he was still a candi-

Legal Notice

NOTICE
XANADUE BEACH LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)











Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

















Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)







ECONOMIC VIEW

date, Obama did not exactly
endorse a carbon tax. He
wanted to be elected, and
embracing any tax that hits
millions of middle-class vot-
ers is not a recipe for elec-
toral success. But he did come
tantalizingly close.

What Obama proposed was
a cap-and-trade system for
carbon, with all the
allowances sold at auction. In
short, the system would put a
ceiling on the amount of car-
bon released, and companies
would bid on the right to emit
carbon into the atmosphere.

Such a system is tanta-
mount to a carbon tax. The
auction price of an emission

right is effectively a tax on
carbon. The revenue raised
by the auction gives the gov-
ernment the resources to cut
other taxes that distort behav-
ior, like income or payroll tax-
es.
So far, so good. The prob-
lem occurred as this sensible
idea made the trip from the
campaign trail through the
legislative process. Rather
than auctioning the carbon
allowances, the bill that
recently passed the House
would give most of them
away to powerful special
interests.

The numbers involved are
not trivial. From Congres-
sional Budget Office esti-
mates, one can calculate that
if all the allowances were auc-
tioned, the government could

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KUCHENHAUS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

raise $989 billion in proceeds
over 10 years. But in the bill
as written, the auction pro-
ceeds are only $276 billion.

Obama understood these
risks. When asked about a
carbon tax in an interview in
July 2007, he said: “I believe
that, depending on how it is
designed, a carbon tax accom-
plishes much of the same
thing that a cap-and-trade
program accomplishes. The
danger in a cap-and-trade sys-
tem is that the permits to emit
greenhouse gases are given
away for free as opposed to
priced at auction. One of the
mistakes the Europeans made
in setting up a cap-and-trade
system was to give too many
of those permits away.”

Congress is now in the
process of sending Obama a
bill that makes exactly this
mistake.

How much does it matter?
For the purpose of efficiently
allocating the carbon rights,
it doesn’t. Even if these rights
are handed out on political
rather than economic
grounds, the “trade” part of
“cap and trade” will take care
of the rest. Those companies
with the most need to emit
carbon will buy carbon
allowances on newly formed
exchanges. Those without
such pressing needs will sell
whatever allowances they are
given and enjoy the profits
that resulted from Congress’s
largess.

The problem arises in how
the climate policy interacts
with the overall tax system.
As the president pointed out,
a cap-and-trade system is like
a carbon tax. The price of car-
bon allowances will eventu-
ally be passed on to con-
sumers in the form of higher
prices for carbon-intensive

products. But if most of those
allowances are handed out
rather than auctioned, the
government won’t have the
resources to cut other taxes
and offset that price increase.
The result is an increase in
the effective tax rates facing
most Americans, leading to
lower real take-home wages,
reduced work incentives and
depressed economic activity.

The hard question is
whether, on net, such a policy
is good or bad. Here you can
find policy wonks on both
sides. To those who view cli-
mate change as an impending
catastrophe and the distort-
ing effects of the tax system as
a mere annoyance, an imper-
fect bill is better than none at
all. To those not fully con-
vinced of the enormity of
global warming but deeply
worried about the adverse
effects of high current and
prospective tax rates, the bill
is a step in the wrong direc-
tion.

What everyone should
agree on is that the legisla-
tion making its way through
Congress is a missed oppor-
tunity. Obama knows what a
good climate bill would look
like. But despite his immense
popularity and personal
charisma, he appears unable
to persuade Congress to go
along.

As for me, I hope the pres-
ident refuses to sign a bill that
fails to auction most of the
allowances. Some might say
a veto would make the best
the enemy of the good. But
sometimes good is not good
enough.

¢ N Gregory Mankiw is a
professor of economics at
Harvard. He was an adviser
to President George W Bush

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ROCKYROAD STREAM INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JAMESVILLE ALPS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KOTULEIKO LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VENEZUELA BAY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FENSTER SLOPES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EVERQUEST CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEW BASEL INT’L LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BAMBOO HILLS VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TEKLANIKA INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 11B



INSIGHT



FROM page 14B

peppers by 23 per cent — not
to mention pork, by 60 per
cent.

The impression I was left
with was that the country is
benefiting from a business-
minded, youthful and driven
Ministry of Agriculture, which
is systematically identifying
what is holding back agricul-
ture from achieving its full
potential and going after it.

The Ministry’s vision
extends down to the commu-
nity level by way of the Rural
Agricultural Development
Authority (RADA), a statu-
tory body whose staff — who
are required to undergo 60
hours of continued education
a year — provides technical
advice on farming, marketing
and implementing new pro-
jects to local farmers.

Youth In Agriculture

Meanwhile, major emphasis
is being placed on youth
involvement in agriculture in
order to ensure that there are
ongoing generations of
skilled, technically-orientat-
ed agriculturalists.

While at present the aver-
age Jamaican farmer is not
formally educated and is in
his/her mid-50s, planners are
calling for 570 new farmers to
replace those who leave the
sector each year, and stake-
holders want them to be
young and technologically-
savvy.

The country has four agri-
cultural institutions which
each turn out hundreds of
well-equipped agriculturalists
into the workforce every year,
but the most recent govern-
ment found that this was not
enough.

Jamaican children are now
benefitting from Govern-
ment’s School farm pro-
gramme, which has seen
farms added to 401 of the
public schools since last year.
By 2011, the Ministry expects
that every school will have its
own farm.

The idea is to ensure that
children, who are already
being taught agriculture as
part of their curriculum, get
the hands-on experience that
will really make them profi-
cient modern farmers.

In the knowledge that
access to land and funding is a
primary obstacle to ambitious
would-be farmers — particu-
larly young ones — the gov-
ernment is developing several
new programmes through the
Ministry of Agriculture,
specifically designed to bene-
fit young people looking to
get into a career in the sec-
tor.

“In one of them, we will put
(the young farmer) on a fair-
ly large plot — 10 acres —
and we say we’re going to give
you these high value crops,
we'll assist you with the mar-
keting, we give you support
and you go ahead and pro-
duce,” said Mr Panton.

“On a smaller plot we are
looking at introducing anoth-
er concept — the EMMIS
programme — an easily man-
aged multiple income stream
project.”

“Essentially what we want
to do is take a small farmer,
put them on that plot, where
you will have a greenhouse,
bees, maybe an intensive goat
rearing, pig rearing or chicken
rearing facility, where that
young person can literally eas-
ily manage those three and at
the same time they are get-

FAMILY I

ecuring our food



JERVIS ROWE, greenhouse pioneer, inspects his crop of Romaine lettuce, which will be sold directly to a selection of hotels on the island...

ting income from all of those
three.

“The idea is that with
young people, when they are
going into agriculture, they
want to know that they are
going to make money, we all
want to know that. And we
can demonstrate using these
select crops that, yes, you can
do well. It requires a little dis-
cipline, it requires you to be
dedicated, but what we are
doing with this is changing the
focus of young people from
an urban drift to staying in
the rural area and live a
lifestyle that is quite frankly
just wonderful,” said Mr Pan-
ton.

At the Denbigh show, day
one of which was dedicated
to “Youth In Agriculture”,
young agricultural students
showcased their “value
added” creations made from
produce grown on the 500-
acre property’s lands.

Students engaged in the
Youth in Agriculture pro-
gramme, some of whom this
newspaper met, were ambi-
tious, proud of their work and
had high hopes of a successful
career in agro-industry once
they graduated from their
respective schools.

Standing in front of an
impressive array of products
— sweets, snacks, jams and
sauces — 27-year-old Dean
Anglin told The Tribune at
the Denbigh show that the
process is as easy as “one, two
three.”

“It’s very easy as long as
you can understand it and
apply the methodology,” he
said.

Anglin said that once he
graduates from the Ebony
Park Heart Academy he
hopes to get a loan to start
his own business.

Fellow student, Nicole
Gray, 19, said that her three
years experience at the acad-

J s —
Sp ae ene
Fee

emy has taught her that
Jamaica “can produce any-
thing it wants.”

“We don’t have to import
anything. What we want is
right here in Jamaica and we
just have to stand up on our
feet and get to the point.

“Food is here for all of us
and we just need to accept the
fact and get out of using all
of those foreign materials,”
said the young farmer and
agro-processor who said she
hopes to work at the academy
once she graduates before set-
ting up her own factory to cre-
ate popular seasonings and
spices.

She added that she notices
more young women than
before entering the field as
they see the opportunities it
offers them.

“They see it as a means of
getting what they want. They
can plan their own backyard
farm and it makes us as
women feel very independent.
We don’t have to depend on
men,” said the 19 year old.

The Tribune took a tour of
the 500-acre Ebony Park
Heart Academy in Claren-
don, Jamaica, where Anglin,
Gray and Dr Leroy Santiago
have all studied.

The school is free to attend
and generates significant
income from the crops and
livestock grown there, which
include chickens, pigs, sheep,
goats, dairy cows, fruit and
vegetables.

Dr Santiago, a graduate of
the school claims Ebony stu-
dents are the most practical
of all of those who come out
of agricultural education.

They are also well equipped
in the much-needed technical
know-how that is key to 21st
century farming and agri-busi-
ness.

“They are doing agro-pro-
cessing, value added, they are
going out to start their own

LAND DISTRICTS

SPEECH COMPETITION
TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK
3RD - 10TH OCTOBER, 2009

The Department of Public Service will host a Speech Competition as one of the
activities for the Tenth Annual Public Service Week. The competition is open to
Senior High School Students in the Northern, Southern and Central Bahamas.

Students interested in participating should prepare a five minute speech to be
delivered on the topic: “The Public Service - Striving for Excellence in Customer

Service.”

The deadline for the names of students participating should be referred to
the attention of Ms Rose Gibson, Chairperson, Public Service Committee,
Department of Public Service by 4th September, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 computer system will be awarded to the winners. The first
runners-up will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winner will be announced during the Tenth Annual Public Service Week
Awards Ceremony scheduled for Saturday, 10th October, 2009.

Students wishing to participate can obtain further details regarding the requirements
for entry from their Language Arts Teacher of Family Island Administrator, in

their respective district.



businesses. They are going to
be making juices, processing,
bottling stuff, they are excited
about doing that. And so even
though (Jamaica’s) money is
sliding at $88 (Jamaican dol-
lars) to $1 (US dollar), and
IMF has us by the throat,
we’ve got about 3 million peo-
ple, we still are a country
whereby we are producing
second generation farmers,
agriculturalists, the next gen-
eration, and that’s what real-
ly makes or builds a nation
and its agricultural economy
— agricultural education.”

While all of them are
respectable professions, it was
extremely refreshing to meet
young people who were
inspired by the idea of putting
their brain cells to something
other than the traditional
Bahamian pursuits of law,
medicine or politics.

Advancing our food securi-
ty is about raising awareness
of the opportunity the sector
represents for young people
to develop careers that are
both intellectually and finan-
cially rewarding.

Based on the young stu-
dents I met, and observations
from others in the industry,
an agricultural education also
has social benefits — teach-
ing young people discipline,
initiative, responsibility and
punctuality.

Greenhouse

With technology considered
one of the key pillars of agri-
cultural advancement in
Jamaica by the present

administration under Prime
Minister Bruce Golding’s
Jamaica Labour Party the
government is emphasising
greenhouse technology as the
way for the country to revi-
talise its farming sector and
increase its food security.

Jervis Rowe, described by
some as the “father of the
greenhouse” in Jamaica,
began his life as a traditional
outdoor farmer but felt that
there must be a better way to
achieve his agricultural goals,
without being thwarted by the
threats posed to crops grown
in an outdoor environment.

Having developed a green-
house design that he says
“works very well” he is now
finding that Jamaicans from
“all stratas of society” are
interested in getting into
greenhouse farming — which,
if done properly, can greatly
increase a farmer’s output and
income on a given plot of
land, improve the quality of
crops, land and water use effi-
ciency and resistance to
adverse weather.

Now, at the same time as
running his Abbey Gardens
farm, where he grows
Romaine lettuce in abun-
dance for large hotels, he pro-
duces greenhouses for farm-
ers across the country.

“T thought that there must
be some easier way to get
done what you need to get
done. Well it wasn’t easier but
it was far, far better,”
explained Mr Rowe.

“Over a period of time I
tried different designs and it
worked out well.

“So here we are now fabri-

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()) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.ednu.by

TENDER

Provision of Vending Machines

The College of the Bahamas

invites Tenders for the services described below.

Bidders are required to collect the tender documents from the

Portia Smith Building

located at the Oakes Field Campus
Contact Mrs, Elvina Bastian at 302-4516

Tenders are to be addressed to:

Ms. Cheryl Simms
OF Finance

The College of the Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to the College on or before August 14th, 2009,

No later that 3pm

Submission should be marked as follows:

Tender 01,09

PROPOSAL TO PROVIDE VENDING MACHINE SERVICES
AT THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

The College of the Bahamas

Reserves the right to accept or reject all proposals

For all enquiries regarding the tender site visit
Contact Mr. Julian Miller at
(242)-302-4507, (242)-302-4325 or (242)-376-3051

The site visit will take place on Thursday August 6th 2009 at 10:00am
at The College of the Bahamas’ Oaks Field Campus at the

Physical Plant building.





PAGE 12B, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



FROM page 11B

cating them from metal and
putting them up all over the
country.”

“We have the technology
at all scales. It all depends on
what level you are going to
go in at, and that will deter-
mine the people who will
become interested.”

“The richest man in
Jamaica wouldn’t mind if he
had some greenhouses, and
the ordinary farmer is always
telling me that ‘Oh boy’, he
has to get a greenhouse.”

“The present government
is actually paying a lot of
attention to it and I think the
news is getting out there and
it’s really developing a whole
lot of interest.”

Greenhouse technology will
increase the typical yield of a
particular plot of land “ten-
fold”, said Rowe. He said the
Bahamas would do well to get
into it if it wants to improve
its food security and create
new economic opportunities.

“Jamaica is trying to revi-
talise their industry and they
have seen where greenhouse
technology will be the way
that they have to go. You
don’t have to do the same
thing, but you can look down
low, and you can look up high
— Canada, say, or Holland
— and that’s where green-
houses are too. The people
below you are trying to devel-
op that technology, the people
above you have that technol-
ogy, so pretty much that’s
what you should be looking
to do,” he added.

“My entire farm would be
captured on two and a half
acres and that keeps me very,
very busy. The idea is if you
have a space there must be a
plant in that space at all
times.”

Linkages with Hotels and
Resorts

Jamaica’s economy also
benefits from significant link-
ages between agriculturalists
and another pillar of the
country’s economy, tourism,
and is looking to further
extend this relationship.

An example of the coun-
try’s success in this regard and
the potential for each partner
in the equation to benefit can
be seen in the connection
between the Sandal’s resort
and Jamaica’s farmers.

In the mid-1990s Sandals

Securing our foo



TWENTY SEVEN-YEAR-OLD Dean Anglin (wearing hat) and a group of his fellow Ebony Park Heart Academy students wait to see how their

products faired in the Youth In Agriculture competition at the Denbigh Agiricultural and Industrial Show...

was the first hotel chain to
forge a relationship with
Jamaica’s farmers when it
approached several senior
agriculturalists and asked
them if they could find a way
by which Jamaica could pro-
duce much more of the crops
they imported to feed their
guests.

Pilot projects were run on a
number of farms throughout
Jamaica with crops such as
cantaloupe, broccoli and zuc-
chini, and ultimately within a
year the chain was able to
stop importing some of the
products altogether, simulta-
neously creating a consistent
market for hundreds of farm-
ers.

Glendon Harris, President
of the JAS, noted that today

similar linkages exist with the
Holiday Inn and Superclubs
chains, among others.

An Information Centred
Strategy

Another factor in the Min-
istry of Agriculture’s strate-
gy to advance agriculture is
that, according to Chief Tech-
nical Officer Mark Panton,
everything it does is “market
driven.”

Masses of data is collected
from producers and proces-
sors, and a picture is devel-
oped of where opportunities
lie in the local and export
market for farmers to exploit.

Farmers are assisted and
directed towards developing
their farms in a way that
responds to specific demands
and supply chain irregulari-

ties which have seen farmers
unable to find buyers for their
produce and local agro-
processors unable to find raw
materials are being ironed
out.

The Ministry produces an
impressive and up to date
array of easily readable and
obtainable informational
leaflets describing the state of
each type of farming in
Jamaica — whether it be
sweet potatoes, cocoa, honey
production or peppers — and
the advantages, costs and
returns which can be expected
from entering that area.

A National Farming Body

On the civil society side, the
Jamaica Agricultural Society
has made leaps and bounds
in promoting the sector in the

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last few years.

Chairman of the Caribbean
Farming Association, former
JAS President Senator Nor-
man Grant, notes that while
there have been Bahamian
representatives at executive
meetings of the Caribbean
Farmers Association there is a
noticeable absence of a
national farming body in the
Bahamas.

“T think that is something
that needs to be looked at to
generate interest from stake-
holders, and to give the sector
a united voice,” he told The
Tribune.

Importers are a strong lob-
bying bloc when it comes to
government policy and farm-
ers in the Bahamas could ben-
efit from having a louder say.

The JAS has played a piv-
otal role in the drive towards
food security.

After taking over as Presi-
dent of the JAS in 2004 Mr
Grant pushed the rural agen-
da forward, launching a major
campaign to increase produc-
tion and consumption of agri-
cultural produce. He also
made strides towards ensur-
ing that there is now more
access to affordable loans for
farmers, improved rural infra-
structure, research and devel-



opment and land availability.

“There were so many chal-
lenges but I would say with
concentrated work, engage-
ment with the government,
engagement with private sec-
tor and all stakeholders I real-
ly feel that we have moved to
a level where agriculture is
now the sector that gives
countries like Jamaica the
greatest opportunity to pull
itself out of debt in the long
run,” he said.

The Ministry of Agriculture
(Bahamas).

If you ask Dr Leroy Santi-
ago, animal and agricultural
scientist, and consultant to the
Jamaican government on agri-
culture (he co-authored the
country’s agricultural mani-
festo), The Bahamas Ministry
of Agriculture is in the dol-
drums. Dr Santiago said that
in his experience of working
with the Ministry, a large part
of what is holding back our
agricultural development is
that it is stocked with aging
technocrats who lack the sci-
entific know-how and the dri-
ve to take the steps necessary
to push Bahamian agriculture
to the next level.

“The Ministry of Agricul-
ture has a lot of old heads. It
has had the same people for
decades — the whole time —
so there’s a limit to science
and technology and embrac-
ing new methods.

“You need people to accept
change. If not now, when?
This is the main hindrance,
along with poor work ethics.
You hear a lot of talk, but see
little action.”

Dr Santiago said that dur-
ing his time in Nassau, where
he successfully undertook an
embryo transfer project,
which improved the quality
and quantity of Bahamian
goat and sheep stocks setting
the country on the path
towards greater self-suffi-
ciency in meat production, he
believed Ministry employees
felt “challenged and threat-
ened” when confronted with
suggestions as to how to
improve agriculture.

Meanwhile, officials are too
often keeping training oppor-
tunities from farmers who
could benefit from them.

“You need to empower
farmers. You need to get
farmers to go on orientations
overseas and then let him
come back and help build his
country,” said Dr Santiago.

Jamaica, a country which
lacks the financial resources
of the Bahamas, has proven
that food security and the
employment and wealth
opportunities it creates is an
achievable goal worth striv-
ing for. Is the Bahamas ready
to step up to the mark?

e If you would like to com-
ment on this article, email
alowe@tribunemedia.net

rr |








aL

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST

MONDAY, AUGUST 10TH, 2009, PAGE 13B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MarINE FORECAST













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oars ORLANDO A Ankara, Turkey 81/27 Sa/12 s 79/26 48/8 s | ABACO Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 82°F
Hi h:93°F/34°C _ =—=s Some sunshine with Mainly clear. Partly sunny with a Mostly sunny with a Partly sunny, a Partly sunny, a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 86/30 71/21 s 86/30 72/22 s Tuesday: _ E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 82° F
“7a F/2C i ” a thunderstorm. thunderstorm. thunderstorm. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 5713 45/7 pc 5O15 46/7 c
i Ow: /4— @ ins High: 90° High: gg° High: gg° High: 90° Bangkok 90/32 82/27 t 90/32 81/27 t
bL hs é ene > a 3 > Barbados 86/30 77/25 pc 86/30 77/25 sh
TAMPA Ke | High: 89 Low: 80 Low: 80 Low: 81 Low: 80 Low: 80 Se ESS Barcelona 81/27 69/20 t 8227 71/21 pc my tia
pa Ls ; I ET Bain 95/35 68/20 pc 100/37 70/24 s
High: 92° F/33° C (i 106°-84° F 97°-88° F 102°-83° F 105°-85° F High _HiL(ft.) Low _Ht(f.) = Bn cone 77s ee dee
Low: 77° F/25°C ae - The Sen a an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 1110am. 28 4:55am. 0.2 Belgrade 89/31 65/18 pc 91/32 63/17 r
a @ _ s elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 11:26pm. 25 5:25pm. 04 Berlin 72/29 59/15 t 73/22 59/15 pc
a ——— CT ne Tuesday 1e5Tam. 29 Batam 02 Bermuda 81/27 75/23 s 81/27 75/23 s
BoP ll 61pm. 0.5 Bogota 66/18 45/7 c 66/18 44/6 pc
, ei r Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Wednesday! 2.09 am. 04 6413am. 02 Brussels 76/24 54/12 pc 75/23 55/12 pe
: - ABACO Temperature 12:39 p.m. 29 7:05pm. 05 Budapest 85/29 61/16 pc 76/24 61/6 sh
F “ -*. 5h. 00° £/99° HiQh oaeccececsssssscesssssseessssssesssssetesssseees 93° F/34° C Buenos Aires 64/17 50/10 pe 64/17 52/11 s
/ , @ ae a Low aie Fa7° ¢ Thursday ee bore 08 Cairo 97/96 77/25 s 97/36 72/22 s
: ore ow: 78° F/ Normal high... gorraz2c CE 95/35 81/27 t 93/33 81/27 t
? : Py Normal low 76° F/24° C Calgary 75/23 48/8 c 72/22 47/8 pc
; ia @ WEST PALMBEACH a co 94° F/35° C STE Cancun 93/33 71/21 pc 93/33 70/21 s
’ eel High: 90° F/32° C =<— Last year's low aieaeaulaeat iets, 77° F/25° C ; " Caracas 82/27 72/22 t 81/27 72/22 t
ae Low: 77° F/25°C Ve, ~ Precipitation _ bees tn a.m. LL gag ea p.m. Casablanca 81/27 63/17 s 85/29 66/18 s
~ ‘alll ; As of 2 p.m. yesterday oo... 0.00" unsel....... ‘40 p.m. Moonset. ... 1Uroo a.m. Copenhagen 72/22 60/15 sh 71/21 57/13 pc
© . FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Fe Year to date 20. last New First Full Dublin 66/18 54/12 pc 68/20 54/12 pc
High: 90° F/32° C @ High:87° F/31°C Normal year to date oo... 26.76" a : a Frankfurt 73/25 60/15 t 80/26 58/14 c j
Low: 79° F/26°C Fs > Low: 75° F/24° C Geneva 78/25 56/13 t 77/25 59/15 s
a ae = Mae tats one ets acy
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-— MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Aug.13 Aug. 20 Aug. 27 Helsinki 77/25 55/12 s 73/22 55/12 1 ie 91/79
a High: $1° F/33°C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 93/33 84/28 pc 91/32 84/28 t aE
i 35°F /26°C NASSAU High: 91° F/33° C Islamabad 110/43 86/30 s 109/42 86/30 s Soe Saige
F High: 89° F/32°C Low: 77° F/25°C Istanbul 82/27 64/17 s 80/26 66/18 s Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
19 sea 9 Jerusalem 84/28 64/17 s 84/28 65/18 5 Bk.) Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm fifi.
od i. — a F27°C = Johannesburg 63/20 45/7 s 68/20 45/7 s [v=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mengumii-
KEY WEST = i. Kingston 89/31 79/26 sh 89/31 79/26 sh am ‘50s 60s 70s 80s /603//HOUSN/aTRa!
High: 90° F/32°C 9 CAT ISLAND Lima 71/21 59/15 s 72/22 59/15 s 10s -Os i081) 10s 20s 308) 40s
Low: 80°F/27°C High: 88° F/31°C London 73/22 59/15 pc 77/25 61/16 pc
: Low: 73° F/23°C Madrid 90/32 63/17 pc 88/31 63/17 pc
@ Manila 88/31 81/27 t 88/31 81/27 t
: Pas Mexico City 75/23 49/9 t 76/24 49/9 pc oye A mr,
——~ all , Monterrey 105/40 75/23 s 104/40 75/23 pc
a GREAT EXUMA ; SAN SALVADOR Montreal 81/27 63/17 t 75/23 59/15 pc
i High: 90° F/32° C High: 91° F/33°C Moscow 70/21 52/11 pe 75/23 56/13 s
Low: 78° F/26° C L OSE Mae Munich 76/24 58/14 t 77/25 54/12 t
. ow: 75° F/24°C wa
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ier : : Hees ee oa pe ane eam Oe ry
highs and tonights's lows. : > , cama pC
: , Low: 77° F/25° C a & Oslo 68/20 51/10 sh 72/22 53/11 pc : Yo LI an Be Blown
he - HY Paris 77/25 60/15 s 75/23 58/14 c
Prague 78/25 59/15 t 77/25 55/12 s A A H
LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 78/25 63/17 s 70/21 65/18 + W aly V ur r cane
High: 91° F/33°C Riyadh 113/45 86/30 s 111/43 84/28 s
Today "Tuesday Today Tuesday Today Tuesday MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 89/31 79/26 sh 90/32 79/26 sh Txt 5 have excellent i insurance
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W ai High: 91° F/33°C San Juan 73/22 39/3 s 79/26 41/5 pe overac c no matter which
Fe FIC Fie FIC Fe FIC Fie FIC Fe FIC Fe FIC Low: 72° F/22°C ee aie bs mi ie ren d bl
Albuquerque 92/33 66/18 s 93/33 65/18 t Indianapolis 90/32 69/20 t 84/28 66/18 t Philadelphia 96/35 76/24 pce 93/33 74/23 t antago. be be way the win OWS.
Anchorage 69/20 50/10 s 66/18 5140 s Jacksonville 94/34 71/21 s 93/83 74/23 t Phoenix 107/41 82/27 s 109/42 85/29 s cRONED LAN HL Santo eu ee 732 7 B6i80 rs 7 y
Atlanta 94/34 73/22 po 92/33 73/22 t Kansas City 91/32 68/20 t 82/27 64/17 pc Pittsburgh 90/32 68/20 t 82/27 BING t RAGGEDISLAND — Uist:93°F/34" a0 Paulo s s e
Atlantic City 100/37 75/23 pc 96/35 68/20 t Las Vegas 103/39 74/23 s 105/40 81/27 s Portland,OR 78/25 61/16 pc 80/26 59/15 pc ewe Low: 74° F/23°C las se eee pe a a s Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 97/36 76/24 pc 95/35 72/22 t Little Rock 96/35 75/23 po 94/34 73/22 t Raleigh-Durham 99/37 73/22 s 96/35 71/21 s Low:70°F/21°C =< * sen oT B63 52/11 =. 68/20 50/10 =
Boston 90/32 73/22 pc 85/29 68/20 t Los Angeles 84/28 64/17 pc 86/30 64/17 pc St. Louis 92/33 74/23 t 83/28 67/19 ¢t . oneare ORE Pe ERT a
Buffalo 85/29 67/19 t 77/25 6146 pc Louisville 91/32 74/23 t 90/32 70/21 t Salt Lake City 86/30 60/15 s 92/83 63/17 s GREAT INAGUA wr Tula 99197 75/93 1 91/99 79/26
Charleston, SC 96/35 73/22 s 95/35 75/23 s Memphis 94/34 76/24 t 92/33 74/23 t San Antonio 99/37 78/25 pc 99/87 77/25 pc Se . |
: ee : High: 92° F/33° C Toronto 82/27 61/16 t 79/26 59/15 pc E
Chicago 88/31 65/18 t 81/27 63/17 pc Miami 91/32 79/26 t 89/31 78/25 t San Diego 77/25 679 pe 78/25 67/19 pc Low: 75° F/24°C Trinidad 75/23 51/10 pc 30/26 56/13 s (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Cleveland 91/32 69/20 t 80/26 6246 pc Minneapolis 83/28 65/18 t 88/31 66/18 s San Francisco 80/26 58/14 pc 79/26 56/13 pc ; aneman 64/17 7/3. sh 70/21 56/13
Dallas 99/37 80/26 s 100/37 78/25 s Nashville 92/33 73/22 t 90/32 73/22 t Seattle 70/21 58/14 sh 74/23 58/14 pc Gianna 84/28 70/21 pc 78/25 60/15 + ~ New Providence f Grand Abaco Eleuthera Exuma
Denver 82/27 55/12 t 89/31 58/14 s New Orleans 91/32 78/25 t 91/32 76/24 t Tallahassee 97/36 73/22 po 95/35 73/22 t = “y Warsaw 78/25 57/13 s 66/18 56/13 1 Tee (242) 294-9555 ff Teds (242) Tek: (242) 367-4204 fF Tek (242) Tee-2662 ff Tek (242) 19-2904
Detroit 89/31 66/18 t 83/28 62/16 pc New York 97/36 77/25 pe 90/32 76/24 t Tampa 92/33 77/25 t 91/32 77/25 t Winnipeg 32/97 BOIS s 85/29 63/17 s .
Honolulu 89/31 77/25 c 89/31 77/25 c OklahomaCity 98/36 71/21 s 96/35 69/20 pc Tucson 99/37 75/23 s 101/38 76/24 pc VW :
Houston 93/33 78/25 t 96/35 76/24 pc Orlando 93/33 74/23 pc 93/33 76/24 t Washington,DC 98/36 77/25 pc 94/34 74/23 t Re eee TS foe Pee on ie



MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009

bk



“be





i Cur 1

The stories behind the news





By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

here are many good
reasons why the
Bahamas Govern-
ment should be
talking about food
security. In the Caribbean the
concept is framed around the
idea that countries have for
too long been in the vulnera-
ble position of being almost
totally dependent on imports
from such countries as the
US for their food. They now
have to become more self-
sufficient in feeding
themselves by growing
more of what they eat.

The food price crisis of 2007 and
2008, and the global financial crisis
that is still upon us both provide
incentives for it.

Future global population growth
and changing consumption habits as
well as declining arable land and
water supplies, as well as glaring evi-
dence of the grand returns that can
be had from agricultural enterprises,
could all have urged us to concrete
action by now.

And yet the contribution that agri-
culture makes to our GDP, and our
output of Bahamian grown and pro-
duced goods, is falling.

According to data compiled by
the Department of Statistics, the
Agriculture and Fisheries contribu-
tion to Bahamian Gross Domestic
Product fell from $122,874,000 in
2004 to $88,486,000 in 2008. Fish-
eries represented the mass of this
reduction, with its little sister, agri-
culture, contributing $31,439,000 in
2004 and $27,875 in 2008.

While in 2005 we produced 61,692
short tons of agricultural goods,
according to the Ministry of Agri-
culture, that dropped to 57,410 in
2007.

When measured by typical eco-
nomic indicators, our prosperity as a
nation is high — and for this we must
be thankful — but just as we are one
of the most dependent countries in
the Caribbean when it comes to our
dependence on foreign oil imports
for our power, we are behind the
eightball on agriculture and without
good reason.

On suitable occasions, Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham has espoused
the virtues of growing our agricul-
tural sector to its full potential — at
present, it is only at 10 per cent of
that, he said in February.

Clearly we could be doing a lot
better than we are — but this takes
vision and commitment and new
ideas in a old ministry and an under-
standing among the Bahamian peo-
ple — most especially its youth — of
what agriculture can be.

During a recent trip to Jamaica to
attend the 57-year-old Denbigh
Agricultural and Industrial Show,
which highlights the best of the coun-
try’s agriculture as well as its poten-





Photos by Alison Lowe

FUTURE GLOBAL POPULATION
GROWTH, changing consumption
habits, declining water supplies and
glaring evidence of the grand returns
that can be had from agricultural
enterprises, could all have urged us
to concrete action by now...

tial as a viable vehicle to enhance
national development, The Tribune
was impressed by the country’s com-
mitment to agriculture and the
rewards that that commitment is
reaping. The three-day show — July
31 to August 2 — was held at Den-
bigh’s show grounds in May Pen
Clarendon. “Grow what we eat and
eat what we grow” was its theme.

Addressing the show, Prime Min-
ister Bruce Golding of Jamaica told
a crowd of thousands that agricul-
ture should no longer be dismissed
by Caribbean nations in favour of
more “glamorous sectors” — such
as tourism.

He was echoed by President of
Guyana and Caricom Chairman
Bharrat Jagdeo, an agricultural

advocate in the region, who said that
if we can give “incentives” to the
tourism and financial sectors, we
should give it to agriculture.

This mindset is what is guiding
Jamaica towards greater food secu-
rity, as it should guide the Bahamas.

During my trip, I was over-
whelmed by the extent to which our
near neighbour is feeding itself —
almost every type of vegetable, fruit
and meat consumed in Jamaica’s
homes, restaurants and fast food
chains is grown there to some extent,
and in some cases, imports of foods
that are also grown locally have now
dropped by 25, 35 or even 60 per
cent in the case of pork.

There is a wide chasm between
the level of emphasis being placed
on the sector by their government
and ours — and it shows.

While agricultural output in The
Bahamas has fallen, in Jamaica it
has grown — contributing to a 28
per cent reduction in imports in
2008.

Mr Golding congratulated farmers
at Denbigh for responding to gov-
ernment’s agricultural call to arms
and used strong words, saying that
the country must not return to the
“psychological prison” which saw it
happily sending away its money to
buy imports to feed itself.

In the past Jamaica fell into the
“luxury” of allowing its tourism,
bauxite and remittance dollars to
tide it through as it purchased food
from overseas, but that the global
financial crisis and the food price



crisis of 2007-2008 represented a
“rude awakening” for the country,
and his government.

President Jagdeo praised Mr
Golding’s government as being
“ahead of the curve” in putting in
place necessary “ingredients for agri-
culture to prosper.”

Mr Golding, Mr Jagdeo, and Min-
ister of Agriculture Dr Chris Tufton
were united in the message they sent
to the Caribbean — that agriculture
has been treated as the “bastard
child” of the region’s economies, and
additional steps taken to stimulate it
must not fall by the wayside when a
recovery from the latest crisis
enthralling the world takes over.

The Bahamas, which spent $500
million last year on food imports,
would do very well to heed their
message, delivered with conviction.

For too long we have made excus-
es about our agricultural poverty —
not enough land, bad soil, difficulty
in transporting produce — but with
vision, technology, and most impor-
tantly, the involvement of the
younger generation, much can be
overcome.

In its place, greater economic
diversity, prosperity and indepen-
dence can be found for a nation and
its people on a societal and individ-
ual level, not to mention food which
reaches our shelves in many cases
in a fresher and more nutritious state
than those we currently import.

In Jamaica, the three quarters
beginning December 2008 and end-
ing June 2009, recorded increases in



Securing our food



DENTON HoPwooD, a 46-
| year-old bell pepper (shown
below), lettuce and sweet
| potato farmer who has only
| been in the industry for three
years said he enjoys the

lifestyle his work offers...















the amount of agricultural produce
totalling 57 per cent — the most
recent quarter having seen the
largest hike, at 22.3 per cent.

It’s figures like this and the con-
tinuing efforts of the government,
led by prime Minister Bruce Gold-
ing, that are behind its commitment
— backed by the 60,000 member
strong Jamaican Agricultural Society
— that within the next two years,
the contribution agriculture makes to
the country’s Gross Domestic Prod-
uct will at least double from the pre-
sent 5.7 per cent.

In 2008 the country was able to
reduce its imports of carrots by 29
per cent, tomatoes by 35 per cent,
cabbage by 25 per cent, and sweet

SEE page 11B

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Volume: 105 No.213



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009

m Lhe Tribune

=USA TODAY.



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)











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The 80th murder victim...
mother brutally slain in

Iront of her young children

Woman
killed in
‘case of
mistaken
identity’

By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

A MOTHER of two was
brutally slain in front of her
children and other relatives
in what family and friends
believe was a case of mis-
taken identity with devas-
tating consequences.

Tagia Soles-Armony, 29,
was shot in front of her
grandmother’s house on Sea
Grape Avenue, in Sea
Breeze, on Friday night at
around 8pm as she was tak-
ing her three-month-old son
from his car seat.

She is the country’s 50th
homicide victim for the year.

Her heartbroken family
now has to come to terms
with what seems to have

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shot in front of her grandmoth-
er’s house in Sea Breeze.

been a senseless killing of a
young woman who was
described by all who knew
her as “fun-loving, outgoing
and lovable”.

Friends of the dead
woman, who was a former
student of Xavier’s Lower
School and St Andrew’s
School, told The Tribune
that a gunman approached
Mrs Soles-Armony as she
was just getting out of the
car, a white 2008 Honda
Accord, to go into her
grandmother’s house.

“Her oldest son had just
run up to ring her grammy’s
door bell. She was getting
the baby when a man hold-

SEE page 10

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and you could
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THE Prime Minister and his
deputy have been challenged to a
debate on the port relocation
issue.

Senator Jerome Fitzgerald
claimed last week’s town hall
meeting as an “outright failure”
and a “public relations exercise”
which proved that ministers can-
not answer public questions of

5

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the matter.

He added: “After attending the
town hall meeting we are con-
vinced that a continued debate
on the movement of the contain-
er port with any of the three pre-
senting ministers would be a
waste of time.

“The failure of the three min-

SEE page nine

zi Pe \ {3 AS
SiGe DHEARTAY



Aico tema ivdetele-l(e

Serial rapist’
strikes more
than five times

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A SUSPECTED serial
rapist who has struck more
than five times within a
month in Eastern New Provi-
dence has police puzzled, The
Tribune has learned.

The man, who has been
consistently described by his
female victims, has caused
police at the Elizabeth Estates
station to implement two new
patrols in the early morning
hours and see that bushes in
the area are cleared to
remove opportunities for him
to hide himself or evidence
from the scene of his crimes.

He targets homes where
women are living alone or
where the man of the house-
hold is not present at the time,
The Tribune was told.

According to a concerned
police source, senior officers
are reluctant to inform the
public of the attacks - which
have been taking place pri-
marily between 3am and 6am
- sO as not to cause a panic.

But women living in the
area have told The Tribune
they think it is “ridiculous”
that they have not been
informed of the new threat in
their community.

A police source said the
perpetrator talks to his vic-

SEE page 10

Two men
drown over
the weekend

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

TWO men, aged 33 and 40,
drowned this weekend in
waters off New Providence.

The 33-year-old, who police
have not identified, was found
submerged in the water in an
area of Jaws Beach off Lyford
Cay on Saturday.

He had been with a family
member and others on a div-
ing trip when he went miss-
ing.

A search was launched and
after being found he was tak-
en to hospital where he died a
short time later.

Aman identified by police
as Granville Francis was also
discovered drowned in the
water near Potter’s Cay Dock
at around 10am Saturday.

The body was removed by
police and examined. An
autopsy is to take place to
determine the cause of death.

Foul play is not suspected
in either case, police said.

SANDWICH

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

sen,
ce

pe hi ae

contestants
in swimsuit
presentation

Our Lucaya
Radisson
Beach and

Golf Resort
hosts event

THE MISS UNIVERSE
contestants competed for the
“Best Figure” category fol-
lowing the swimsuit presenta-
tion at Our Lucaya Radisson
Beach and Golf Resort in
Grand Bahama last night.

The 84 Miss Universe 2009
contestants sashayed down
the catwalk showing off the
swim wear of BSC, the official
sponsor of the pageant’s
swimsuit event.

Miss Bahamas Kiara Sher-
man received a non-stop
standing ovation from the
crowd and people waved
Bahamian flags in support of
their queen.

Miss Great Britain Clair
Cooper and Miss Jamaica
Carolyn Yapp were also the
recipients of enthusiastic
applause.

President of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority Ian
Rolle thanked all those who
came out in support of the
Miss Universe pageant.

Shelley Carey and Donald
Glass hosted the swimsuit
event.

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Photos: Tim Aylen

WW PEE ABAS

ee) ee at





MISS BAHAMAS on the
catwalk last night.

FOLLOWING last
night’s Swimsuit Event at
the Our Lucaya Resort,
in Grand Bahama, the
international beauty
queens today take part in
the Miss Universe Float
Parade through New
Providence which starts
at lpm leaving Arawak
Cay.

This evening the con-
testants will be strutting
their stuff for the Nation-
al Costume Competition
held at the Rainforest
Theatre in the Wyndham
Nassau Resort on Cable
Beach starting at 7pm.

All Bahamians and for-
eign nationals residing in
the Bahamas are invited
to come and wave their
national colours in sup-
port of their country’s
queen.

General admission is
$125, balcony tickets are
$100 and VIP tickets are
$175.
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



www.tribune242.com * www.tribune242.com * www.tribune242.com * www.

The Tribune

is now online =

News, sports,
business,
features and
advertising at
tribune242.com

IT’S here! TRIBUNE242, the
only website to satisfy all your
news, sport, business, features
and advertising requirements.

From today at 2pm, and every
following day at the same time,
your Tribune — the biggest,
brightest and best-selling news-
paper in the Bahamas — is now
available online.

Like its big print sister The
Tribune, TRIBUNE242 will
lead the way by bringing you
the hottest news stories, the
brightest pictures, in-depth
analysis, incisive comment and
the issues which affect you.

Along with all your favourite
features and the very best in
sporting action, advertisers will
have a new way to sell their
goods and services to the
Bahamian and even interna-
tional market.

Careful thought has been put
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and where they appear on the
site. This ensures that advertis-
ers get their desired exposure
without diminishing the online
experience of a reader.

Premium ad spots appear on
the home page, which is where
all visitors first navigate to, and
also where the top news stories
appear. Advertisers can also
select to place their ads on the
Business page, on the Editorial
and Insight pages, or target their
ads to the various Features sec-
tions or local Sports.

TRIBUNE242 also has ban-
ner advertising opportunities on
the Bahamas’ most extensive
online classified section page
and on the Obituary section,
which will soon be searchable
by name.

“We've had advertisers call-
ing for weeks, expressing inter-
est in advertising on TRI-
BUNE242, and this before
they’ve even seen the site. We
wanted to make sure that we
priced the online ads in a way
that even the smallest client will
find this an affordable and effec-
tive advertising option,” said
Tribune Advertising Manager
Godfrey Arthur.

In February, The Tribune
launched a PDF flipbook site so
that loyal readers in the Family
Islands could have their daily
news even though high freight
prices forced the company to
stop sending the physical paper
to the islands.

The user demograhics gath-
ered and analysed on a regular
basis show that even the simple
flipbook site has had far more
wide reaching appeal.

Since that launch, TRI-
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increase in people registering
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of people throughout the
Bahamas and across the world
make a point of logging on each
afternoon to keep up with
what’s happening in the country.

“What’s particularly unique
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tising platform is the ability to
begin targeting ads to specific
users,” explained TRIBUNE242
Online Editor Jessica Robert-
son.

“We require all site visitors
to register and share some basic
demographic information with
us. Once activated, this feature
will enable our advertisers to
have ads run only when read-
ers in their target demographic
group are online.

“This kind of strategy makes
for a more valuable advertising

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In addition to the banner
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ty to have mini commercials
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PAGE 4, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

A suggestion to combat criminals

ALTHOUGH police have not confirmed
that the plane that crashed on a drug run to
Jamaica was the US registered twin-engine
Piper Seneca stolen from North Eleuthera
airport on the August Monday holiday
weekend, Tribune sources have confirmed
that it is in fact the plane.

And although it is street talk in Spanish
Wells and Harbour Island that at least four
persons have been picked up in Harbour
Island for questioning in connection with
the theft, police have said nothing. Nor have
the names of the two persons killed in the
crash been released, although — again street
talk — it is claimed that they are both from
Andros.

The plane, owned by Spanish Wells con-
tractor Terry Higgs, was taken from the
North Eleuthera airport at about 7am on
August 3. A police officer should have been
on duty at the airport at the time, but it is not
known if he saw anything that would have
aroused his suspicion when the plane taxied
down the runway for take off. The aircraft
was next seen a few hours later, a heap of
burned wreckage — with no one to explain
how it got there — on a private road owned
by the Windalco Bauxite company about 15
miles south of Ocho Rios near the St Ann/St
Catherine border. Jamaican police told a
Tribune reporter that although they know
the identity of the two men burned beyond
recognition and trapped in the cockpit, they
were not releasing their names until the next
of kin had been notified. Unconfirmed
reports claim that at least one of the men had
been arrested earlier for stealing an aircraft
and for drug smuggling.

Jamaican police, convinced that the plane
was on a drug mission, confiscated 2,000 Ibs
of marijuana in St Catherine shortly after
the crash. They believe that the stolen air-
craft was there to pick up the marijuana for
delivery to another destination.

According to Jamaican police, although
drug smuggling from the Bahamas has
always been a problem, they have recently
seen an increase in this activity.

And, like the height of the drug smuggling
era in the Bahamas, there has been an
increase in murders and drive-by shootings.
While we are not suggesting that all of these
incidents are drug related, we believe — as
happened in the eighties — that the drive-by
shootings are in some way connected with
retaliation, and, as in the past, retaliation
usually led investigators to a drug deal gone
wrong. However, too many innocent peo-
ple are now being caught in the cross-fire,
and, although police are constantly confis-
cating firearms, too many of these lethal
weapons are still being smuggled into this

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country undetected.

On Friday night a young mother was shot
in front of her grandmother’s house as she
was taking her three-month-old son out of
his car seat. The drive-by shooting was exe-
cuted in front of her one-year-old son who
had run ahead to ring his grandmother’s
doorbell. It is claimed that it was a case of
mistaken identity. If this is so, no one knows
the motive for wanting to kill the woman
for whom the bullet was intended. We are
not suggesting that this incident was drug
related, but obviously it was committed by
someone who is filled with hate and has too
much idle time to plot a crime.

And so what can our overworked police
do? Currently they not only have to keep an
eye on persons released on bail by the courts
while they await trial, but also other up-and-
coming criminals who are entering the fra-
ternity of the lawless. Presumably, these per-
sons are all jobless.

Other than encouraging the public to step
up their cooperation with the police to try to
get the guns off the streets, and to volunteer
information to help run these criminals to
ground, a way must be found to keep jobless
persons, including those on bail and those
with criminal intent, busy.

With Crown land so much in the news
these days, we suggest that government
select a large tract of arable land, employ an
agriculture instructor — one who is himself
well versed in the way of the land and enthu-
siastic about making it turn a profit — and
employ these people to feed the country.

Today, Jamaica is doing an impressive
job of feeding itself and providing local pro-
duce for its hotels. Last year Jamaica
reduced its food imports by 28 per cent. In
the next two years Jamaica expects its agri-
culture contribution to the country’s gross
domestic product to at least double from its
present 5.7 per cent.

From July 31 to August 2 Jamaica held its
annual agricultural exhibition at the Den-
bigh show grounds in May Pen Clarendon. It
was most impressive. (See The Tribune’s
report in Insight, which is included in this
edition).

If our courts are in such a shambles that
they cannot take care of the case load, and
the accused cannot be held in prison for an
unreasonable time without trial, then it is
irresponsible to turn them loose on the pub-
lic. It is naive to think that any business per-
son is going to knowingly employ anyone
with a rap sheet. Therefore, there has to be
some initiative to get these people busy and
off the road. What better way than to send
them to the farm, and let them pay their
dues by helping to feed the nation.



Why is my son

being rerouted

to Government
High School?

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

My son, Deon Ferguson,
is a graduate from S.C.
McPherson which is the
feeder school for Analol
Rodgers.

He lives in the area of
Anatol Rodgers. On June 1,
2009 he received a letter
from S.C. McPherson indi-
cating that he was on Anatol
Rodgers School list. I don’t
understand why all of a sud-
den he is being re-routed to
Government High School.

In my opinion this is a
huge inconvenience for me
and it makes no sense for
the Ministry to offer the bus-
ing service to him because
this takes him two miles out
of his area to attend school.
Could you imagine the cost
of busing a child for years
on the Ministry of Educa-

letters@triobunemedia.net



tion for a child who lives a
stone’s throw away from the
feeder school, Anatol
Rodgers?

What is so vexing about
this situation is that he has
another sibling slated to
attend Anatol Rodgers and
he is now going to be sepa-
rated from his brother to
attend Government High
School; this comes after
receiving a letter from his
feeder school informing us
that he would be attending
Anatol Rodgers.

supplies that would equip
him for September. What do
they expect us to do now?

It is my belief that we are
being held accountable for
the mistakes of the school,
and the District Superinten-
dent seeing that as a parent
I followed all of the neces-
sary steps and procedures,
to equip my child for the
upcoming academic year.

I spoke to the relevant
authorities to understand
exactly what was happening;
but what I was being told
did not make sense to me
and as a concerned and
upset parent I feel that
something ought to be done
about my situation.

It is so aggravating now CONCERNED
for us seeing that uniforms PARENT,
were bought along with all Nassau,

the other necessary school August 5, 209.

Having a Bay Street store is no longer valuable

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Looking at the “official” event advertise-
ment, I can’t find where the contestants for
Miss Universe will be doing a “walk-a-bout”
on Bay Street, so rationally the business
owners have absolutely no interest, as if
there was any business to be picked up, their
branches at Atlantis will do that, hopefully.

Not being critical, but was it necessary to

ment dignitaries who rightly receive such a
status — they are just Beauty Queens!

The Editor’s comments in her last para-
graph of today’s edition draws the obvious
— Dah we miss again!

Can’t anyone understand that having a
Bay Street store is no longer valuable —
gotta get into Atlantis and survive or possi-
bly survive!

accredit the contestants with police out-rid-

ers with sirens blaring for the drive from

LPIA to Atlantis?

Come off it, they are not visiting govern-

Time to wake up — and see
the writing on the wall

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I listened last evening to a certain Ms Cowen
from Kerzner International comment on the
impact of the current event of Miss Teen USA
going on at Paradise Island, and just want to ask
the dear lady a question: Why would anyone
from any other country visit The Bahamas for a
Miss Teen USA competition other than Amer-

icans?

It seems even the foreigners in our midst have
gotten convinced it is better in The Bahamas.

Few international reports say so — so we had
better see the writing on the wall and awaken

ABRAHAM MOSS,
Nassau,
August 4, 2009.

National pride?
EDITOR, The Tribune.

Independence Day, July 10th, theme this
year is National Pride, but it is obvious the
Ministry of Health and Environment have
not received the memo from Cabinet.

Check Goodman’s Bay and Saunders
Beach and the few garbage cans and bins,
the new red ones?

Already early this morning Saturday full
and over-flowing.

Well communications seem yet again to
have fallen down as usual.

So much talk how well we are doing and
they ain’t got a clue.

Happy National Pride Independence Day
— let’s hope the Environmental people
have enough time to empty the bins on the
beach or, oh Lord, what a mess that will

from the dream we have been living in for thir- | be!

ty plus years.

H. RAHMING,
Nassau,
July 30, 2009

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July 4, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Four taken into
custody after

guns, ammunition

are discovered

FOUR people were taken :
into police custody on Friday }
when a high-powered subma- }
chine gun and two other }
firearms, along with several }
quantities of ammunition, were :

discovered.

The first arrests were made }
at around 3pm when Drug }
Enforcement Unit officers in }
Gladstone Road stopped a green }
Honda Accord after observing }
three men inside “with an }

object.”

Once the vehicle was :
searched, officers found and }
seized a submachine gun with }

21 live rounds of ammunition.

Three men, ages 20, 22 and :

36 years, are being questioned.

At around 6pm, Wulff Road :
officers acting on a tip went toa }
bushy area in the vicinity of }
Cooper’s Terrace, off Kemp }
Road, where they seized a }
38mm handgun with two bul- }

lets.

the gun and six live bullets.

A 30-year-old man was tak- }

en into custody.

in connection with
Stabbing of girl

POLICE in Grand Bahama
are questioning a woman in }
connection with the stabbing |

of a 19-year-old girl.

The Grand Bahama :
a resident of }
Bartlette Hill, is in hospital }
in stable condition after being }
attacked with a knife in the }
Eigh Mile Rock area on Fri- :

teenager,

day at around 9.30pm.

Investigations are ongoing. }
Police are also continuing }
their investigations into }
Grand Bahama’s two latest }
homicides in an attempt to }
bring them to a speedy clo- }

sure.

911

Meanwhile, a .357mm was :
also taken off the streets hours !
later at 83pm when DEU officers,
executing a search warrant at a }
home in Bamboo Town, found }

The support of the Grand }
Bahama community is being }
solicited in this regard and }
persons with any additional }
information are asked to con- }
tact police at 350-3107/8 or }

PLPs slam decision to
suspend student loans

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

SEVERAL members of the
PLP blasted the Government
yesterday for its “insensitive”
and “lacklustre” decision to
suspend the Guaranteed Loan
scheme for would-be students,
saying it must re-think its pri-
orities.

MP for Fort Charlotte,
Alfred Sears, claimed the
move - which left the expecta-
tions of hundreds of college
hopefuls shattered - was par-
ticularly troublesome given
that it was use of the loan pro-
gramme by the FNM for “par-
tisan political purposes” that
compromised its “sustainabili-
ty and viability” in the first
place.

Meanwhile, PLP chairman
and Englerston MP Glenys
Hanna Martin, along with Cat
Island MP Phillip Davis, both
hit out at the government in
separate statements for failing
to make any public announce-
ment in relation to the likely
suspension of the programme
ahead of time.

“Tt is reported that some 300
young Bahamians applied
months ago for the award of
scholarships only to be told at
the ninth hour that not one of
them would receive any assis-
tance despite what would have
been a reasonable expectation
that there would at least be
some assistance.

“We are told that the rea-
son for this is “due to defaulting
loan holders who are either
unwilling or unable to repay
their obligation and the fact
that the guarantee programme
has reached its statutory limit’.

“It is reported that the
defaulting amount is almost
$70 million. These are factors
and facts which would have
been available to the Govern-
ment long before the month
of August and ought to have

PMs las



been shared with the Bahami-
an public rather than cause
hopeful young aspirants and
their families to go through the
farce of applying for assistance
when no such assistance could
or would be given,” said Mrs
Hanna Martin.

“Today children from some
300 families have had their
hopes crushed in a most cruel
fashion,” she added.

Mrs Hanna Martin and Mr
Davis suggested that given evi-
dence of declining exam aver-
ages revealed last week now is
not the time to take steps that
restrict the potential of those
who are focused on achieving
their educational goals.

Mr Sears said: “It is incon-
ceivable that the Government
would invest $120 million in
the New Providence Road
Improvement Project, over $50
million in the dredging of the
Nassau Harbour and spend
millions of dollars on a facelift
of the roads from the airport to
Atlantis for the Miss Universe
Pageant and not be willing
properly to fund opportunities
for talented Bahamians to pur-
sue tertiary education to
advance the national develop-
ment of The Bahamas.”

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009





with Senator Higgs

By A. FELICITY INGRAHAM

THE Miss Universe contes-
tants have been told to use a
visit to Clifton Heritage
National Park as a platform
during their reigns as beauty
queens.

Senator Jacinta Higgs said
the very core of Clifton is the
habitation of three different
civilizations there.

She said: “We want them to
take away celebration of a past

that may not have been har-
monious, but we want them to
take away healing.

“We want them to take
away the harmony of what they
represent as contestants in this
one pageant vying to represent
the universe.

“We want them to take away
heritage — and that’s key
because each one of those
young women would be able
to see here represented in the
tour, a part of themselves.”

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

The Miss Universe
contestants meet

MISS MEXICO Karla Carrillo with Senator Jacinta Higgs.




BWA makes $5,000 donation
to the Bahamas National Trust

BAHAMAS Wholesale
Agency (Freeport) Ltd. has
made a $5,000 donation to the
bridge project at Lucayan
National Park.

Wayne Russell, General
Manager of BWA, made the
cheque presentation to Karin
Sanchez, Chairman of the GB
regional branch of the
Bahamas National Trust at
BWA’s Grand Bahama head-
quarters on Milton Street on
July 31, 2009. Gary Wilfred
Burrows, sales manager at
BWA was also on hand for
the presentation.

In making the donation, Mr
Russell said: “We at BWA
and the brands we represent
such as Kerrygold, Jumex

juices, Festival cleaners, Ari-
zona Iced Tea, McVities bis-
cuits, Jergens lotions, OK flour
and Ruth detergent, feel it is
important to give back to the
community. The president of
our company, Jeffrey Robert-
son felt it was important to
make a financial contribution
towards the Bahamas Nation-
al Trust and the bridge at the
Lucayan National Park was a
natural choice.The park is one
of Grand Bahama Island’s
unique experiences.”

Ms Sanchez said: “It is a
great testament to see that we
have such community-mind-
ed corporate sponsors who
recognize the importance of
the work we do.”



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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 7



Nea aa eae
Minister responds to container port questions

POSTED on his website — “In
My Words” www.earlede-
veaux.com — Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux responds
to questions posed by PLP Sen-
ator Jerome Fitzgerald, who
objects to the container port
being moved from its present
Bay Street site to Arawak Cay.

Says Mr Deveaux:

By EARL DEVEAUX

I HAVE parsed recent news-
paper articles and have also
obtained a flyer entitled “The
Future is Now .... The Commit-
tee to Protect and Preserve the
Bahamas for Future Genera-
tions." Jerome Fitzgerald and
the proposed relocation of the
container port to Arawak Cay
and the harmful impact it will
have on the surrounding Envi-
ronment our communities and
us, the Bahamian people.

The advert is headlined with
the words: "There have been so
many questions and we have
received so few answers.”

The Government, and by
extension me have been
described as “...secretive and
criminal...” according to Jerome
Fitzgerald “...lacks transparen-
cy...,” according to Glenys Han-
na Martin

Here are the questions in the
flyer and my answers:

oeoee

Q. Did you know that in
November 2005 an Environ-
mental Impact Assessment
showed that the favoured loca-
tion for the new port was the
“southwest port’?

A. The Ecorys Report
analysed seven sites for the pro-
posed Port. Based on the analy-
sis they concluded that a Port
could be located at Clifton.
Please see my analysis of their
ranking system.

Q. Did you know that in the
same report Arawak Cay ranked
sixth out of seven as the least
favourable spot, with the present
site downtown ranking fifth?

A. Please see my analysis of
the ranking system. You will see
that according to a more scien-
tific ranking with properly
weighted numbering system all
of the numbers would change
and Arawak Cay would far out-
weigh the other sites.

Q. Did you know that the
Deputy Prime Minister Brent
Symonette, whose family has
interest in a shipping company,
chaired a meeting in July 2007,
the purpose of which was to pre-
sent a plan to move the Contain-
er port to Arawak Cay?

A. This incredible fabrication
has been refuted time and again
by the Deputy Prime Minister.
The Deputy Prime Minster
denied, in Parliament, in
response to the Rt Hon. Perry
Christie that he ever chaired
such a meeting.

Q. Did you know that in Octo-
ber 2007 the Deputy Prime Min-
ister and Dr. Earl Deveaux
chaired a meeting where they
received the Ecory’s Report
which stated that the Southwest
Port was financially feasible and
the report has never been made
public?

A. This is another fabrication.
I, along with the Deputy Prime
Minister, accepted an invitation
from Michael Maura or Tropical
Shipping to hear the report from
the Dutch group which com-
pleted the Study on the Clifton
Port. We were guests of the
group which financed the report.
It was their report. It has been
made public by them.

Q. Did you know that the gov-
ernment is acquiring land in the
Vista Marina area and the own-
ers have not been given notice
that their land is being taken?

A. Again this is an inflamma-
tory fabrication. The notices of
acquisitions are a matter of pub-
lic record.

From 1998 the Government
announced its intention to build
19 road corridors in New Provi-
dence as part of an overall traf-
fic remediation programme. The
contract was signed with Asso-
ciated Asphalt which went bank-
rupt prior to completing the pro-
ject. They did complete Charles
Saunders Highway. The PLP
Government completed Milo
Butler Extension and Blue Hill
Roundabout and Tonique Dar-
ling Highway. The FNM rene-
gotiated with IDB to complete
the project and the work is now
ongoing. The Corridor at Saun-
ders beach was always a part of
the project. All of the lands
around the corridors were post-
ed back in 1999 and 2000 and
acquisitions proceedings initiat-
ed and some completed. When
we took office in 2007, we found
over 400 outstanding acquisi-
tions unsettled.

Government extension to
Arawak Cay without submitting
EIA.

Q. Did you know that the gov-
ernment commenced extension
of Arawak Cay without submit-
ting an Environmental Impact
Assessment (ETA), a traffic study
and a financial feasibility study?

A. This is an outright lie. The
EIAs was completed by Blue
Engineering and of the several
options proposed to dispose of
the fill. The extension of
Arawak Cay was the least intru-
sive to the environment.

YOUR SAY



Q. Did you know that you are
paying for the 40 million dollar
extension to Arawak Cay for the
benefit of a special interest
group?

A. This is another lie. The
extension of the Cay is part of
the Dredging contract to dispose
of the two million cubic yards
of fill that will be generated as a
result of the activity.

Q. Did you know that the total
cost of the extension to the tax-
payer has yet to be determined?

A. The Contract amount for
the Harbour Dredging is $76
million. It was publicly signed.

Q. Did you know that this
extension to Arawak will dimin-
ish Saunders Beach also known
as “the Bahamian Cabbage
Beach”?

A. This is particularly alarmist
and incendiary because it has
been so often refuted. The EIA
conclusively determined that
Saunders Beach will not be
affected by the dredging of the
Harbour. However, what was
also shown is that if work is not
done to maintain beaches,
remove casuarinas, Saunders
beach, like other beaches in
New Providence, will eventually
disappear. It is for this reason
that the Government decided to
acquire the land. This was given
to the Government for $1 by the
same Symonettes (Deputy
Prime Minister Brent Symon-
ette) to make a permanent pub-
lic beach with enhanced dunes,
access, parking toilets and chil-
dren play area.

Comment on the Coastal
Systems International Report.

Iam frankly amazed that a
professional body could have
compiled such a specious rating
system. I have detailed its limi-
tation below.

The Rating Table —
Methodology

This is very strange and non-
statistical. The way to do a rating
is to identify the salient issues
and then assign them a discrete
weighting. For instance cost can-
not be considered in the same
category as, say, air pollution.
This would mean that good on
air pollution (rated 3) outweighs
poor on costs (rating 1). So if we
took air pollution and cost alone
and Arawak Cay scored 3 for
cost and 1 for air pollution, while
the Power Plant (i.e. Clifton in
their terminology) scored 3 for
air pollution and 2 for cost, then
Arawak Cay (4 points versus 5)
is the poorer choice. This is
clearly not a tenable result, but it
is exactly what they have done in
the table.

Environmental Criteria

The scoring is very arbitrary,
how can the Power Plant, adja-
cent to the dive industry’s sites,
and quoted as of special signifi-
cance in the executive summary,
be given the same score as
Arawak Cay which has virtually
no impact on the marine envi-
ronment as it uses the existing
dredged harbour entrance? In
their terms they scored them 2 —
2, but really it should be 1-3. I
think there is a lot of bias here, if
a student gave me this work I’d
say they were working back-
wards to justify a predisposition.

The Cumulative Impact cat-

CLAM DIV selUy 4

egory is quite ingenious. It basi-
cally sums up the criteria already
evaluated and scores them
again. What is the point of this?
The description in the text is
basically incomprehensible.
Compatibility with Long
Term Island Master Planning
The table is also extremely
devious here. It starts by scoring
the existing downtown location
5 out of 15 when the score by
definition in their mandate had
to be zero. It then gives the
same score to Arawak Cay, a
totally different location which
meets all the criteria with a 2 or
3 (their scoring) but they have
given it ones. How can they say
that traffic transferred to
Arawak Cay would have no
impact on downtown congestion
as it is now? Also, as it is already
reclaimed land used for port
activities, why isn’t this a suit-
able use? There is plenty of
room for modern infrastructure,
but they deny this.
Construction and
Engineering Criteria
This has been largely dealt
with in the media, it is clearly
cheaper to locate at Arawak
Cay and the overall disruption

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to day-to-day activities will be
almost nil with the exception of
the road-building. The south
west excavation would be a
nightmare for everyone out west
for years.

Socio-Economic Factors

There is always some impact,
and even they score the Power
Plant worse than Arawak Cay,
but it would be much worse over
the years.

Missed Out

How about time-to-comple-
tion; stakeholder participation;
alternative use of land (lots for
out west, little for Arawak Cay);
existing infrastructure?

Arawak Cay Container Port

With respect to the reloca-

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extensively on this. I also spoke
extensively on it.

The Port at southwest New
Providence was estimated to
cost $200 million. When the fig-
ures for on shore investment are
added, the total costs run to
approximately $400 million. The
expense was not one which the
Government thought it could
undertake, in light of the other
projects it had to do. As well,
the Government had received
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PAGE 8, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





New book validates cricket
role in West Indian identity

insight

By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
diplomat)

CLEM SEECHARAN’S
new book, From Ranji to
Rohan, sports a cover photo-
graph of what one cricket
commentator describes as
Rohan Kanhai’s “triumphant
fall” —a sweep shot to the leg
side that culminated in Kan-
hai on his back but the ball
either racing to the boundary

Bway om oe ad
CaN cg cay erenven tar

for four or soaring past it for
Six.
It was not a shot emulated
by many. It originated in
Kanhai’s approach to the
game of cricket which was to
overcome the bowlers and
win. Kanhai came from very
humble beginnings — Port
Mourant Sugar Estate in
Berbice, Guyana. That origin
had a lot to do with his game
as Seecharan explores in this
book. “I play my cricket in
two ways — first as a means
of enjoyment (both for me
and the spectator, I hope)

Thursday, August 13th, 2009
REO @Mneresh..

reali 9:00pm

WORLD VIEW.

and second to win,” Kanhai
declares. He shared this atti-
tude with another West Indi-
an batsman, who was to come
after him, Antiguan Sir
Vivian Richards.

What would lovers of

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West Indian cricket not do to
see their ike in the West
Indian team of today — play-
ers who value the game for
the game itself, and who excel
at it not only for their own
glory, but also because they
understand that they carry
the pride of the West Indian
people in every stroke they
play.

From Ranji to Rohan is a
superbly written book.
Seecharan’s use of the Eng-
lish Language is as graceful
as it is descriptive and his
research is meticulous in the
proven manner of his previ-
ous publications. He calls on
the work of a host of experts
in almost every cricketing
nation, among them John
Arlott, CLR James, and Sir
Hilary Beckles

It is a book about cricket,
and yet it is more than that. It
is also a book about how
Indians in Guyana estab-
lished their West Indian citi-
zenship by staking a claim for
places first in their national
teams and then in the West
Indian team.

Staking the claim was not
easy. In the case of Guyana,
the struggle was tied up in
class differences, racial big-
otry and even politics. Like
Kanhai, Cheddi Jagan,
Guyana’s firebrand politician

ya
SIR RONALD SANDERS

from the 40s to the 60s, also
came from Port Mourant, and
the sugar estates of Guyana
were his hotbed of resistance
to colonial exploitation epit-
omised by the British, firm,
Booker, that owned the
majority of the estates and a
good chunk of the Guyana
economy.

Among the Indian players
from Port Mourant who came
to represent the West Indies
in Cricket Test matches were
Kanhai, Joe Solomon and
Ivan Madray. Basil Butcher
also came from Port Mourant
and played for Guyana and
the West Indies at the same
time as the others. He was
not an Indian but he too
faced the obstacle of breaking
into a Guyana national team
when the Cricket authorities
resided in Demerara and
belonged to its well-estab-
lished clubs.

And then along came a
man who would transform all



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that: the Barbadian and West
Indian batsman, Clyde Wal-
cott.

It is paradoxical, given the
difficulties that currently sur-
round Guyanese Indian
immigrant labour in Barba-
dos that it was a Barbadian
that helped to unearth the
cricket talent of Indians on
the Booker sugar estates and
secure their places in the
national and West Indian
teams.

Walcott arrived in British
Guiana (Guyana became
independent from Britain in
1966) in 1954 recruited, as
Seecharan explains, “by the
Sugar Producers Association
following the recommenda-
tion of Jock Campbell (the
progressive Chairman of
Booker).” The political con-
text of his arrival was contin-
ual strikes on the sugar
estates and a report by a
Colonial Office-appointed
Commission which recom-
mended that cricket clubs be
set-up on each estate. Cricket
— “a status symbol distin-
guishing the white manageri-
al elite from the Indian work-
ers created a new area in
which social prestige could be
won.”

As Seecharan describes it:
Walcott’s “was a towering
presence that infused cricket
in British Guiana with a sense
of purpose and resolve that
had eluded it for most of its
existence. Imbued with the
moral compass of the black
Barbadian middle class, a
product of the elite school,
Harrison College, he was the
ideal man for the volatile
Guyanese political environ-
ment of the 1950s, rendered
even more hazardous by the
intractable race issue.” In
three years, he had four
Guyanese in the West Indi-
an test match team — three of
them from Port Mourant.

It is an everlasting tribute
to Clyde Walcott as a great
human being as much as to
his capacity for recognising
cricket talent that Seecharan
records Ivan Madray, one of
the Indians that Walcott guid-
ed from Port Mourant, as say-
ing: “I could have walked to
the end of the earth for Clyde
Walcott.”

Clem Seecharan is Profes-
sor of Caribbean History at
London Metropolitan Uni-
versity. As a true academic
he supports his assertions
with empirical evidence. His
Bibliography is extensive and
his research material includes
interviews with cricketers
Basil Butcher, Joe Solomon
and Ivan Madray. But
Guyanese political leaders
are there too: Cheddi Jagan
and Eusi Kwayana.

For all that, as a product of
a Berbice village himself and
a young boy as Rohan Kan-
hai’s batting exploits were
being hailed all over the
cricketing world, Seecharan
admits that “for Indo-
Guyanese, including myself
and boys growing up at the
time of Kanhai’s ascent”, his
taste for the game and the
way he played it, “came out
of our unconscious craving
for a great West Indian bats-
man to transport us to the
heart of creole sensibility —
West Indian authenticity.”

This book starts with Ran-
jitsinghji, the Indian Prince
who played for England and
dazzled cricket spectators
between 1896 and 1912. He
was an inspiration to the Indi-
an Diaspora in the West
Indies and this is well chron-
icled by Seecharan. But, the
book’s main theme explores
the role of cricket in authen-
ticating Indo-Guyanese as
West Indians. He does a con-
vincing job, and has written a
book that will enthral all
Cricket lovers of all races and
nations.

Seecharan ends by point-
ing to the necessity for inte-
grating Caribbean countries
in the same way that West
Indian cricket is integrated —
as a representation of our
oneness and a source of our
pride.

“Chanderpaul and Sar-
wan,” he says, “could now be
an example pointing the way
for the politicians toward gen-
uine regional integration,
based on our diversity, not
some imagined creole pro-
crustean mould.”

“From Ranji to Rohan”

by Clem Seecharan is
published by Hansib, London.
Website:
www.hansib-books.com
THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



PM, deputy challenged
to port relocation debate

FROM page one

isters (Earl Deveaux, Vin-
cent Vanderpool Wallace
and Neko Grant) rein-
forced the committee’s
assertion that the move of
the container port to
Arawak Cay without cred-
ible scientific and financial
analysis makes no sense.

“We did not invite the
Prime Minister and the
Deputy Prime Minister to
come clean with the
Bahamian people and we
now invite them to a
debate on this matter.”

He charged that the gov-
ernment is still in no posi-
tion to make assertions
about the preferability of
Arawak Cay as a location
for the port versus South
West New Providence as
it has presented no data or
analyses to support its
claim and contradict a
study commissioned by the
PLP which found it ranked
sixth out of seven poten-
tial sites.

The $80 million dollar
privately funded reloca-
tion of the container ship-
ping facilities from down-
town Nassau is set to go
ahead later this year. Min-
ister of the Environment
Earl Deveaux has charged
that a reduced cost and
environmental impact
involved in taking the
facilities to Arawak Cay
over South West New
Providence - the location



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham and Deputy Prime Minister Brent

Symonette

preferred by the PLP gov-
ernment, subsequent to
various studies - justifies
the decision.

However, Mr Fitzgerald
is undeterred in his stance,
charging that without pre-
senting information to
prove their thinking and
contradict the findings of
an earlier report which
picked South West New
Providence as a better site,
Bahamians have been “left
to suspect there may be
some level of corruption
at the highest level in gov-
ernment.”

“How else can one
explain this mad dash to
extend Arawak Cay?” said
Mr Fitzgerald yesterday.
He said that his request
for a debate on the issue in

‘YOUR VIEW’

To have your say on this or any other
issue, email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your
letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207



Leave the outside world
far behind

Pim ond RSs afi (eom || toms Ome) as ate

parliament has gone unan-
swered since he tabled it
on April 30.

Deputy Prime Minister
Brent Symonette “appears
to be the mastermind”
behind the scheme to
move the port to Arawak
Cay, having chaired meet-
ings on the proposal since
as early as 2007, said the
senator, and “Bahamians
are now left to wonder
whether the Prime Minis-
ter...is complicit in this
conspiracy to secretively
enrich a special interest
group at great expense to
the Government’s purse,
the environment and the
property value of hard
working Bahamians.”

Mr Deveaux has also
charged that private rather
than the public interest
lies behind the opposition
to the Arawak Cay move
on behalf of Mr Fitzgerald
and others, claiming a
“peculiar set of interests
that will be derailed” if it
is taken there rather than
to the South West of the
island.

An Environmental
Impact Assessment and
the Environmental Man-
agement Plan relating to

Para h RC h Com oom Lie



the dredging of Nassau
Harbour and the extension
of Arawak Cay using fill
from the harbour, which
will form the basis of the
port move, are now avail-
able for public scrutiny at
www.best.bs/harbour-
docs.html.

However, the documents
do not address the specific
question of the impact of
moving the port facilities
to the area after these pro-
jects take place.

Mr Fitzgerald said the
committee intends to gal-
vanise public opposition
against the Arawak Cay
move, stating yesterday:
“You can rest assured that
the voice of the Bahami-
an people in this matter
will be heard loud and
clear and government will
have to decide how it
responds to that and if it
fails to do so it does so at
its detriment.”

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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MONDAY, AUGUST 10,





2009

TRIBUTES TO
TOMMY ROBINSON

‘T’m humbled by
the experience’





















TOMMY ROBINSON surrounded by friends a

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

TWO weeks after being the showpiece
of the biggest single honorary for any
Bahamian athlete in the country, legendary
sporting icon Thomas A. Robinson said
he’s humbled even more by the experience.

Friday night at Da Balcony, Robinson
was presented with a cheque from Basil
Sands, the accountant for the Friends of
Thomas A. Robinson who hosted the lun-
cheon on Sunday, July 26.

The event was originally scheduled for
the Sandals Royal Bahamian Hotel, but
was moved to the Wyndham Nassau Resort
& Crystal Palace Casino at the eleventh
hour because of the high demand for tickets.

“It was an overwhelming experience, it
was an awesome experience, it was an exhil-
arating experience at the luncheon two Sun-
days ago,” Robinson said.

“T never in my wildest dream thought
that we were going to get that kind of crowd
to attend a luncheon tribute to me.”

While at the luncheon, Robinson said so
many people came up to him congratulating
him, wished him well and thanked him for
what he did.

“Then I was trying to figure what did I
do,” said Robinson, who drew large laughs
from the audience that included his close
friends and some family members.

Anniversary

Robinson, 71, was honoured on the 51st
anniversary of his historic British Empire
Games in the 220 yards in Cardiff, Wales in
15958b where he also secured a silver medal
in the 100 yards as the lone Bahamian flag
carrier.

More than 600 persons, including Gov-
ernor General Arthur Dion Hanna, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham and the Leader
of the Opposition, Perry Christie, a team-
mate of Robinson, attended the luncheon.

Also in attendance was Cuba’s Enrique
Figuerola, the silver medalist in the 100m at
the Tokyo Olympics and Hilton Nicholson,
his roommate at the University of Michigan.

The Reverend Canon Dr. Gervais Clarke,
Secretary General of the North American,
Central American, and Caribbean Area
Athletic Association also attended.

In 1981, Sports Ambassador Robinson
had his name placed on the national track
and field stadium at the Queen Elizabeth

\a =

ite unl at Da Balcony.

Robinson
presented with
cheque from
Basil Sands

TOMMY ROBINSON at the microphone. Pic-
tured next to him are Laura Charlton, Linda
Thomspon, Doris Wood and Carrie Young.

Sports Center. And Ingraham, at the lun-
cheon, assured all that once the Chinese
government complete the new national sta-
dium adjacent to the current student,
Robinson’s name will also be placed on it.

The only thing that many felt that Robin-
son should have been honoured with was a
knighthood from the Queen.

Many are of the opinion that he should be
called Sir Robinson.

Reception

At a smaller reception held on Friday,
Robinson thanked everybody, including the
organizing committee headed by Alpheus
‘Hawk’ Finlayson, for having the initiative
to put on such an event.

Basil Sands, the accountant for the orga-
nizing committee, said that while he has no
such acclaim to being a track and field star,
he was delighted when asked by Finlayson
to serve on the committee.

“T hope you use it to the best of your
ability,” said Sands in presenting Robinson
with a cheque from part of the proceeds

SEE page 12

TOMMY ROBINSON, presented with a cheque by Basil Sands, the accountant for the Friends of
Thomas A. Robinson who hosted the luncheon on Sunday, July 26.

PHOTOS: Stanley Mitchell



BERLIN: 127H IAAF WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS IN ATHLETICS

heady to taxe
on the worid!

Bahamian team, apart from three
athletes, get acclimatised in Germany

DERRICK ATKINS

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

HE Bahamian 24-member team,

minus three athletes, have all set-

tled in and are going through

their workout sessions with the
coaches as they prepare for the 12th IAAF
World Championships in Athletics.

With the exception of sprinters Derrick
Atkins and Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie and
quartermiler Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown, all of
the athletes have arrived safely at the training
camp in Berlin, Germany.

With “nice warm” weather to train in, team
manager Ralph McKinney said all of the ath-
letes are comfortable and making the best of
the excellent facility that they share with the

DEBBIE FERGUSON-MCKENZIE

a " ve 2 4
CHRIS ‘FIREMAN’ BROWN



United States team.

“Everybody is settled in. The weather is
nice and warm, so we can’t complain about
that,” said McKinney from the hotel where
they are staying.

Veteran sprinter Chandra Sturrup was the
last of the contingent to arrive. She reported to
camp early yesterday morning and they are
just waiting the arrival of Atkins, Ferguson-
McKenzie and Brown, who are all due in
today.

The team, coached by Tyrone Burrows,
Frank ‘Pancho’ Rahming and George Cleare,
will remain at the camp until Tuesday when
they will report to the Games Village for the
championships in Berlin.

The championships will begin on Saturday,

SEE page 12

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



TOMMY ROBINSON TRIBUTE

‘’m humbled by

the experience’





j
TOMMY ROBINSON is flanked by, from the left, Angela Watson,
Sandra Smith, Carrie Young, Doris Wood, Linda Thompson and
Laura Charlton.

FROM page 11

from the event, which served as a medical fund-raiser for the ail-
ing national hero.

The event, moderated by Sherwin Stuart, featured a number
of speakers who served in their recollection of the days of
Robinson’s athletic prowess, but more importantly his acade-
mic oursuits being the youngest Bahamian at age 9 to attend
high school in the Bahamas, while being the first Bahamian ath-
lete to attend college on an athletic scholarship.

The night was certainly a nostalgic one for the speakers who
included Finlayson, Harrison Petty, Stanley Mitchell, the Rev.
Walter Hanchell (who raised an additional offering from the
audience), Winston ‘Gus’ Cooper, Ed Bethel, Keith Parker
and Arlington Butler, the immediate past president of the
Bahamas Olympic Association.

Mike Sands, the immediate past president of the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associations, gave the vote of thanks on
behalf of the committee.

7th ANNUAL JUNIOR CARIBBEAN VOLLEYBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS

Girls volleyball team returns
home with bronze medal

THE Bahamas Volleyball Federation’s junior girls team
returned home with the bronze medal from the 7th annual
Junior Caribbean Volleyball Championships that wrapped
up on Saturday.

In a hard fought five set marathon, the Bahamas knocked
off Martinique to finish as the third best team in the tour-
nament. Meanwhile, the boys team failed to win a game.

The week-long tournament was played in Guadeloupe.

BASKETBALL

BOUND FOR CANADA

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs @tribunemedia.net

COACH Patricia ‘Patti’ Johnson will
take her stellar high school junior girls
basketball team to Canada to test the
waters on another level of competi-
tion.

Johnson and a nine-member team is
scheduled to leave town on Tuesday
for Ontario, Canada where they will
compete and participate in a tour of
some of the high schools through
August 17.

The tour was arranged by David
Whitty, the head of the Physical Edu-
cation from Ridley College, who was
introduced to Johnson through bas-
ketball guru Gladstone ‘Moon’
McPhee from Grand Bahama while
here for a college fair.

Ridley College, located in St.
Catharines, Ontario, is a school for stu-
dents in grades 5-13, the latter which
serves as college preparatory.

“T was encouraged by a lot of people
in the community to go ahead and try
it,” said Johnson, who opted not to go
to the United States this year on her
annual Summer Tour.

“T received a lot of assistance from
people like Philip ‘Brave’ Davis and
Renard Rigby. Of course with the tight
economic times, we gave our word to
the school that we are going to come
and we are trying to carry it through.”

When they return home, Johnson
said they hope to have at least two ath-
letic scholarships secured for their play-
ers, especially since the oldest person in
her contingent is in grade 10.

“The deal is you have to have your
academics,” Johnson stressed. “We’ve
been tutoring our kids from September
and they did sort of well on the BJC
exams.

“As a matter of fact, one of the kids
who would not have passed any, she
passed five of them and another got
five Bs and a C. That was a shocker. So
the classes were helping. But we have
to be persistent because it is time con-
suming.”

Johnson, owner of the most impres-
sive high school record in high school
basketball having won the junior girls
basketball title with the HO Nash

Coach Patricia ‘Patti’ Johnson to take
girls team on tour of high schools



Lions just about every year since 1992,
said she’s very proud of the squad she
has to work with in Ontario.

Making up the squad are Randya
Kemp, who is 5-feet; Cherish Wilson, 5-
4; Lakishna Munroe, 5-11; Michelle
Burrows, 5-6; Leashya Grant, 6-2;
Khadijah Moncur, 5-8; Sashana Smith,
6-0; Kerri Bascom, 5-2 and Shaquel
Bain, 5-2.

While there, they will play in a series
of games to display their skills and they
will visit a number of schools as well as
take the DAT entrance exam to deter-
mine who is eligible and they will also
take a tour of the country.

“We have a very good high school
team, but we are going to play players
in grade 10-12,” Johnson said. “But
that shouldn’t worry us because we

TURKS & CAICOS ISLANDS: 53rd CARIBBEAN AMATEUR GOLF CHAMPIONSHIPS

National golf team returns from Caribbean championships with ninth place finish



“We have a very
good high school
team, but we are
going to play
players in grade
10-12. But that
shouldn’t worry
us because we
have players who
are really hang
game-wise.”



Patricia ‘Patti’ Johnson

have players who are really hang game-
wise.

“But my biggest fear when we go
and come back is that we will have to
zoom a lot more on academics. We
have to bear in mind now is one of our
key problem is time management.
Instead of going home and study, we
pick up the computer and cellphones.
But the game piece, we have that
downpack. I think we have an excellent
team.”

Johnson feels that the team is so tal-
ented that if she had the opportunity to
keep them together as a squad in the
Government Secondary Schools Sports
Association, she feel they will “hurt
somebody.”

In the meantime, she thanked
“everybody who helped us to get off
the ground,” especially mentioning her
HO Nash principal Rev. Franklyn
Lightbourne, the staff and the parents
of the players.

THE Bahamas Golf Federation’s
national team returned yesterday
from the 53rd Caribbean Amateur
Golf Championships with a ninth
place finish at the Provo Golf Club
in the Turks & Caicos Islands.

The Bahamas, without a team
fielded in the ladies’ George Teale
Trophy, collected a total of 21 points,
just one ahead of the host Turks &
Caicos, who ended up in last place
with 22.

Repeating as champion was Puer-

to Rico with 40, Jamaica got second
with 35 and Trinidad & Tobago was
third with 34. Tied for fourth place
was the Dominican Republic and
the OECS with 31 apiece.

e Resulted posted by the Bahami-
an players in the tournament are as
follows:

Hoerman Cup for regular players

Bahamas finished eighth with a
combined score of 1298.

Rashad Fergudon (92-86-76-80),
Richard Gibson Jr (93-83-91-78),

Peter McIntosh (80-82-79-81),
Devaughn Robinson (81-73-80-80)
and George Swann (84-79-90-84).

Puerto Rico won eith 1,178, fol-
lowed by the OECS with 1,217 and
Barbaods with 1,227,

Ramon Baez Trophy for players
35-years and older

Bahamas finished seventh with a
score of 299.

D. Shane Gibson (77-77-75-70)
and Christopher Harris (77-77-75-
70).

Francis/Steele-Perkins Cup for
senior players.

Bahamas finished in seventh place
with a score of 303.

Milford ‘Shaggy’ Lockhart (74-78-
76-75) and Kevin Marche (74-78-76-
75).

Barbados won with 288, followed
by the Dominican Republic with 294
and Puerto Rico with 295.

George Teale Trophy for ladies.

Bahamas did not enter.

Puerto Rico won with 603, fol-

lowed by Trinidad & Tobago ith 610
and the OECS with 655.

Higgs & Higgs Trophy for super
seniors.

Bahamas had its best showing with
a third place finish with 294.

George Turnquest (75-75-74-70)
and Harcourt Poitier (75-75-74-70).

Puerto Rico won with 279 and
Trinidad & Tobago was second with
291.

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COTECC SUMMER TOUR
Rising star Justin

Roberts captures

under-14 singles championship

But Kloratina Klonaris falls just short

BAHAMIAN rising star Justin Roberts
captured his first boys under-14 singles
championship of the COTECC Summer
Tour over the weekend, while Kloratina
Klonaris just fell short in her bid.

Playing at the Almond Beach Resort in
Castries, St. Lucia, Roberts won the finqal in
straight set scores of 6-0, 6-2 over Shakir
Elvin of Antigua in the Coca-Cola ITF
Junior Tournament.

Roberts, 12-years-old, joined the
COTECC Summer Tour on June 6 in
Guatemala City, Guatemala.

He has played in eight single tournaments
reaching the quarterfinals four times and
both the semifinal and final twice before he
finally won his first championship title.

In the boys U-14 doubles, Roberts played
in his seventh consecutive final of the
COTECC Summer Tour and he won for
the fourth straight time.

He teamed up with Jaulon Greig of
Trindad & Tobago to defeat Shakir Elvin of
Antigua and Matthew Hutchinson of Bar-
bados 7-5 and 6-0. Roberts and Greig trailed

3-4 in the first set before winning four of
the next five games to capture the first set 7-

Having seized the momentum at the end
of the first set, they easily won the second set
6-0.

In the meantime, Klonaris of Grand
Bahama got to the final of the girls under-18
singles where she was scheduled to play
Nelo Phiri of the United States.

However, she lost the match by a
walkover. No reason was given.

Roberts is now in St. Vincent and the
Grenadines where he’s playing in the boys
U-14 round robin.

He won his first match 4-0, 4-0 over Cort-
land Bunyan.

He was scheduled to play his next match
again Richard Akcayli of Barbados.

Also at the tournament is his brother,
Alexis Roberts. He won his under-18 singles
7-5, 7-6 (3) over Eric Mikhlin from the Unit-
ed States.

His next month was against Jabrille Kabli
from Trinidad & Tobago.

National cricket team still undefeated

THE Bahamas Cricket Association’s
national team are still undefeated heading
into its fourth and final match in the Inter-
national Cricket Association’s Under-15
tournament.

Taking advantage of their home turf at
Haynes Oval, the Bahamas improved to 3-0
as they knocked off the Cayman Islands on
Saturday.

The Cayman Islands batted first and
scored 115 runs.

The Bahamas responded with 120 runs in

only 20 overs to secure another victory. It
was the second victory for the Bahamas
over the Cayman Islands, having defeated
them in the opening match of the tourna-
ment.

Today, the Bahamas will play the final
match of the tournament, starting at 11 am
when they take on Belize in their second
match-up.

The Bahamas also won their first meeting
with Belize in their second match of the
tournament.

Ready to
take on
the world!

FROM page 11

August 15 and will wrap up
on Sunday, August 23.

“The facility where we are
have everything,” McKinney
said. “Our training period is
between 12 o’clock and 5 pm
everyday until we leave here
on Tuesday. The US use the
track in the morning and they
come back at 5 pm.

“It’s a good facility. They
have everything.

“You know what it’s like.
It’s like Haynes Oval where
they have a restaurant and
everything.

“Tt’s a secured facility. We
have been able to do every-
thing that we need to do to
get the team ready.”

Spirit

With the championships
less than a week from open-
ing, McKinney said all of the
athletes are in great spirit and
are eager for the competition
to get underway.

“The main thing is to get
up and training,” he said.
“After a long flight, every-
body is getting acclimatized
and ready to go. Everybody
practiced today, except for
Chandra because she just
arrived from North Carolina.

“They are all doing their
normal workouts as pre-
scribed by their coaches. We
have our medical personnel
here working with them as
well. We also rented a van, so
we are escorting our people
to and from the training site.”
MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 13

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TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



Aussies complete innings victory

AUSTRALIA'S cap-
tain Ricky Ponting
leaves the pitch
after Australia won
the fourth test on
the third day of the
fourth cricket test
match between
England and Aus-
tralia at Headingley
cricket ground in
Leeds, England,
Sunday, Aug. 9,
2009.

Australia
draw level in
series after
Headingley
triumph

England's lower-order resis-
tance was ended swiftly after
lunch as Australia completed a
comprehensive innings victory
in the fourth Test to draw level
in the Ashes series at Heading-
ley.

Resuming the third morning
in a seemingly impossible posi-
tion, trailing by 261 runs on 82
for five, England's daunting
task became all the more diffi-
cult when they lost two wick-
ets inside the first hour.

Despite a boundary-filled
108-run eighth-wicket partner-
ship between Stuart Broad and
Graeme Swann, England
slumped to 263 all out six overs
after lunch, handing Australia
victory by an innings and 80
runs. Australia's victory sets up
a series decider at The Oval,
starting on August 20.

Nightwatchman James
Anderson got off the mark with
a slash through point for four
off the second ball of the day
from Ben Hilfenhaus to extend
his run to 54 consecutive
innings without suffering a Test
duck. It was his last act of defi-
ance, however, with Anderson
edging the next ball to the safe
hands of Ricky Ponting at sec-
ond slip to accelerate England's
demise. Wicketkeeper Matt Pri-
or, unbeaten on four overnight,
was England's last hope of
mounting a serious fightback
as their last recognised bats-
men.

Having progressed to 22,
however, Prior pushed at a Hil-
fenhaus outswinger and edged
behind for wicketkeeper Brad
Haddin to take a brillant one-
handed catch low to his right.



AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth

AUSTRALIA'S Simon Katich, right, and Mitchell Johnson, left, cel-
ebrate winning the fourth test as England's Graham Onions
walks by on the third day of the fourth cricket test match between
England and Australia at Headingley cricket ground Leeds, Eng-
land, Sunday, Aug. 9, 2009.

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(AP Photo/John Giles/PA Wire)
AUSTRALIA'S Ben Hilfenhaus celebrates the wicket of England's
Matt Prior during the fourth test match between England and Australia
at Headingley cricket ground in Leeds, England Sunday Aug. 9, 2009.

RUGBY: TRI NATIONS

Ea oO tel (AP Photo/
oe Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Australia fan
admits to
eae evaCe

aCe Moyer

SYDNEY

A Sydney newspaper
says an Australian cricket
supporter was responsible
for setting off a fire alarm
at the England team's hotel
in Leeds, England on the
first day of the fourth Ash-
es test, according to Associ-
ated Press.

Warren Livingston, head
of the Australian fan group
the "Fanatics," told The
Sunday Telegraph that one
of its 100-member group
had managed to set the
alarm off at 4:30 a.m. with
the intention of disrupting
the English team's sleep,
describing it as "good old-
fashioned Aussie hijinks."

"Yes it was one of our
guys who did it as a bit of a
prank, I got a text message
after it happened,” Liv-
ingston told the newspaper
from England.

"At first I thought ...
we're just doing our bit for
Australia. But I can't con-
done this sort of thing. I
don't want any trouble.
We've all had a big laugh
and it might have made a
difference, the way they
batted."

England's test team was
evacuated with other
guests and staff while two
fire engines searched the
premises for the source of
the alarm. Players were left
standing in the street in
their pajamas for more
than 20 minutes until the
all-clear was given for them
to return to their beds.

Just hours later the Eng-
land team traveled to
Headingley where it was
dismissed for 102 in its first
innings after winning the
toss in the series it leads 1-
0. Australia has dominated
the fourth test and
wrapped up victory, to
draw level in the series.

It means the five-match
series hinges on the final
test at The Oval from Aug.
20-24.



South Africa heat Australia 29-17

ee



AP Photo/Schalk van Zuydam

SOUTH AFRICA'S Brian Habana, left, runs in front of Australia's Berrick Barnes, centre rear, as he pass-
es the ball during the Tri Nations in Cape Town, South Africa, Saturday, Aug. 8, 2009. The Springboks
looked comfortable for almost the entire 80 minutes, sweeping past Australia 29-17 in Cape Town to
follow on from back-to-back wins over New Zealand in the previous two weeks.

COMMUNITY SHIELD

ROB HARRIS,
AP Sports Writer
WEMBLEY, ENGLAND

Salomon Kalou scored the winning penalty
Sunday as Chelsea beat Manchester United 4-1 in
a shootout to clinch the Community Shield in
Carlo Ancelotti's first competitive match in
charge.

The traditional curtain raiser to the English
season is rarely a spectacle, but on this occasion
was hotly contested with a heated conclusion.

With the match level at 1-1 in the 71st minute,
United's Patrice Evra was lying on the ground
after being fouled by Michael Ballack when
Chelsea midfielder Frank Lampard made it 2-1.

The goal sparked a furious reaction from Unit-
ed players who felt the game should have been
stopped.

"With a replay you can see Ballack has
elbowed the boy, and if the referee had seen it
properly, it is a red card," United manager Alex
Ferguson said. "The referee is in line with it, and
should have at least stopped the game.”

The Premier League champions, however,
equalized in stoppage time when Wayne Rooney
broke free.

But it was FA Cup winner Chelsea who dom-
inated the shootout.

"This is sweet," Lampard said. "It feels nice to
make a winning start to the season. After that last
goal we could have been on a downer but we
didn't let out heads drop.”

This was United's first competitive match since
losing the Champions League final to Barcelona
in May and after an offseason of upheaval as

Alex Ferguson prepared for his 23rd campaign in
charge. Ferguson started with Ben Foster in goal,
giving him a chance to impress England coach
Fabio Capello. Foster was tested inside two min-
utes when Didier Drogba struck from 20 meters
(yards).

The Red Devils are still reeling from Cristiano
Ronaldo and Carlos Tevez being lured away
from Old Trafford in big-money moves. Ulti-
mately, United's season is likely to hinge on how
effectively Wigan's Antonio Valencia can replace
Ronaldo, who was sold to Real Madrid for a
record 80 million pounds ($133 million).

The Ecuador winger only played the final half
hour, replacing the injured Nani, who started on
the left flank and was causing problems for
Chelsea right back Branislav Ivanovic.

The Portugal winger took just 10 minutes to
find the target, cutting inside from the left past
Ivanovic and unleashing a fierce shot past Petr
Cech. The Red Devils could have doubled their
lead in the 16th when Wayne Rooney headed
the ball back to Park Ji-Sung on the six-meter
(yard) box, but the South Korean's effort was
blocked by Cech, who also denied Dimitar
Berbatov minutes later.

Chelsea then began to assert themselves with
Florent Malouda shooting wide and Michael
Essien heading over.

The equalizer came in the 52nd when Lampard
won possession in the United penalty area and
picked out Malouda and a chipped effort was
only half cleared by Foster who was lightly
injured in a clash with Didier Drogba. Ricardo
Carvalho then headed the loose ball into the
unguarded net.
PAGE 16, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS



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Container port response
FROM page seven

Port Group a collection of all the container operators in New Prov-
idence. The Government is fundamentally committed to having the
ownership base broadened to include Bahamians and consequently
offered and agreed a structure which requires that no entity could
own more than 15 per cent and that 20 per cent would be sold as
public offering. The Government would hold 40 per cent and retain
ownership of the land.

The Port Group is required to produce an Environmental
Impact Assessment EIA), an Environmental Management Plan
(EMP), a Traffic Study and an Economic Impact Assessment pri-
or to final approval. The Group estimates that it can build the
facility for between $70 and $80 million. Forty acres have been allo-
cated at Arawak Cay for the Port Group. An additional 15 acres
have been promised for an inland port.

Significantly in the government’s consideration were the fol-
lowing:

¢ It would not have to permit another cut into New Providence;

¢ Arawak Cay is already the major port in Nassau;

¢ Arawak Cay has been an industrial site for over 40 years;

¢ Arawak Cay can be organized and managed to the greater ben-
efit of all;

¢ There would be ample opportunity for increased economic
activity at the down home fish fry.

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Government
to establish

for ‘cutting
of hills’

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT will con-
sider putting a moratorium on
excavating hills for fill when
the dredging of the harbour
will produce two million cubic
yards of it, according to the
Minister of Environment.

Earl Deveaux revealed that
the government could con-
sider stopping companies
tearing down hills and digging
enormous holes in the earth
for fill when the Harbour
dredging produces the two
million cubic yards of spoils
from the sea bed.

“Once the harbour dredg-
ing is complete and we have
the fill stockpiled, we will
establish a moratorium for the
cutting of hills,” said Mr
Deveaux.

As a part of the govern-
ment’s plan for the harbour
dredging, it had mulled over
selling some of the excess fill
that will be left after Arawak
Cay’s western end and the
Prince George Wharf, from
the cruise ship dock to Arm-
strong Street, had been
extended.

It is expected that 900,000
cubic yards of the two million
will be used for the Arawak
Cay extension, while it is not
yet know how much fill the
wharf will need to be extend-
ed or what design the pro-
posed promenade with take.

“The information
party and. The Tibu can

responsible for errors and/or “omnissio n
from the daily report, ue



(ae) . 5 K fad Se Dy) A
eae G i, Sara art eae i, ST oO

lie



EARL DEVEAUX

However, former minister
of trade for the PLP, Leslie
Miller, told Tribune Business
that fill dredged from the
seabed is not construction
grade.

“The fill that government
will get out of the harbour is
not usable fill because it is not
going to dry,” he said.

“Maybe on the golf course
at Albany, maybe they could
use it there but it can't be
used for the foundation of a
home.”

According to Mr Miller, the
government will also be tam-
pering with the Bahamas’s
free market system by stop-
ping the legal sale of fill. He is
involved in selling fill form
his Harold Road property.

He said the government
should focus its attention on
the illegal cutting of hill just
south of Bozine town instead
of selling useless fill.

“He ( Minister of the Envi-
ronment) will see the wanton
destruction of land where
people have no contract and
no rights to the land,” said Mr
Miller.

“There are a whole lot of
other things to keep the hon-
orable minister busy.”

He said the initial Arawak
Cay project itself should be a
model for the use fill from the
sea bed. According to him,
Arawak Cay took years to
properly dry and compact.

“That fill stayed out there
for a year until it was able to
cure and it doesn't compact
properly,” he said.

“No one would dare try to
buy that fill.”

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ine

MODAY,

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net




ee A .

AUGUST 10, 2009

Reports on Wharf
moratorium extension could be



Colinalmperial.

elie tele A

ready by next week

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

concept and the cost

analysis for the exten-

sion of the Prince

George Wharf from

the cruise port to
Armstrong Street could be ready by
next week, the Minister of the Envi-
ronment revealed during a town hall
meeting last week Thursday.

Earl Deveaux said he and Minister
of Tourism and Aviation, Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace, were instructed
to have reports on the Prince George
Wharf extension completed by August
19.

He also revealed that the current
landowners whose properties will be
extended with fill from the harbour
dredging will enter into equitable shar-

ing of that additional real estate with
the government.

“The government has indicated to
the current owners that the state has an
unfettered right to extend the board-
walk along the sea bed,” said Mr
Deveaux.

“People already own 35 per cent of
the land between the port and Arm-
strong street.

“When the boardwalk is extended,
our hope is to have waterfront access
and to share in the experience on the
waterfront and to share in the experi-
ence on the back street.”

The Downtown Nassau Partnership,
a public/private venture, was put in
place to facilitate the development of a
plan for the city of Nassau and to draft
legislation for the creation of a Busi-
ness Improvement District (BID).

Mr Deveaux alluded during a line
of questing at the meeting that the

complete redevelopment of the down-
town area could take as much as 20 to
AO years.

According to him, those properties
that will be vacant when the container
port is relocated to Arawak Cay will
have to be developed when the BID is
created and ratified by Parliament.

According to a chief engineer at the
Ministry of Works, the construction
of the Promenade could be one year
away dependent upon the final design
approved by government.

“There are some options on the
board with respect to how the Wood-
es Rodgers Wharf will occur,” said Mr
Deveaux.

“Not sure if it will be linear or will
follow the contour of the existing
boardwalk.

“It will be based on the establish-
ment of the utility corridor and analy-
sis of the cost.”



Proposed Arawak Cay development seeks
to give Bahamians 51 per cent ownership

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

A PROGRESSIVE devel-
opment proposal called Cul-
ture Village, which seeks to
give Bahamians 51 per cent
ownership, proposed for
Arawak Cay could include a
4-D theatre, a clock tower
topped by an enormous
conch shell and pirate ship,
according to the President
and CEO of the Culture Vil-
lage Bahamas Ltd.

Gerald Strachan told Tri-
bune Business the develop-
ment will augment the attrac-
tions of the surrounding area
including the Botanical Gar-
dens, Fish Fry, Fort Charlotte
and Ardastra Gardens.

According to him, plans for
the development were started
as early as 2006 and were ini-
tially envisaged to be located
in an area of Perpall Track.

However, after consulta-
tion with key people in the
tourism industry in the
Bahamas, he was directed to

consider incorporating the
oceanic vista of Arawak Cay.
According to responses
sent to Mr Strachan from the
Director General of Tourism,
and a development company
based in Orlando, there is
widespread support for his
idea of a Cultural Village.
Conceptual drawing of the
village show craft markets,
eateries, a hammock bar and
the crowning conchshell clock
tower, which Mr Strachan
said could be the welcome
beacon for incoming cruise

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ships.

Also on the drawing board
is acable car that would take
guests from Arawak Cay to
other attraction such as the
Fort Charlotte and the Botan-
ical Gardens.

When asked about the
introduction of the Cultural
Village at a recent town hall
meeting put on the govern-
ment, Minister of Tourism
and Aviation, Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace, said he

SEE page 4B

Pd

Colinalmperial.


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 3B

Fed likely to keep key
interest rate at record low

By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON — With
the economy strengthening
but still fragile, Federal
Reserve policymakers are
expected to hold a key lend-
ing rate at a record low this
week and will weigh whether
to extend some programs that
were created to ease the
financial crisis.

Fed Chairman Ben
Bernanke and his colleagues
also are likely to signal that
while the recession is wind-
ing down, the pain isn’t over.

Though the unemployment
rate dipped to 9.4 per cent in
July — its first drop in 15
months — economists predict
it will start climbing again.
Many, including people in the
Obama administration and at
the Fed, say it could still top
10 per cent this year.

For months, consumers
have pulled back on spend-
ing and borrowing. To try to
stimulate economic activity,
Fed policymakers are all but
certain to keep the target
range for its bank lending rate
between zero and 0.25 per
cent at the end of their two-
day meeting Wednesday.

That means commercial
banks’ prime lending rate,
used to peg rates on home
equity loans, certain credit
cards and other consumer
loans, will stay around 3.25
per cent, the lowest rate in
decades.

Fed policymakers also will
probably pledge anew to keep
rates there for “an extended
period,” which economists
interpret to mean through the
rest of the year and into part
of 2010.

“We’re doing everything
we can to support the econo-
my,” Bernanke said recently.
“We will try to get through
this process. It’s going to take
some patience.”

By holding rates so low, the
Fed hopes to induce con-

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the
news, read
Insight on
Mondays



IN THIS July 21, 2009 file photo, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke delivers a report on the
country's economic and financial health before the House Financial Services Committee, on Capitol Hill

in Washington...

sumers and businesses to
boost spending, even though
banks are still being stingy
about extending credit.

“The Fed will be guardedly
optimistic,” said Brian
Bethune, economist at IHS
Global Insight. “We’re see-




ing initial signs of the econo-
my moving toward recovery
.. (but) the underlying fun-
damentals are still weak.”
With numerous signs that
the recession is finally ending
and financial stresses easing,
the Fed will consider whether

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CABLE BAHAMAS

PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT

Series Four 8%, Non-Voting Cumulative

Redeemable

Convertible

Share Offering

Thursday, August 06, 2009 - NASSAU, BAHAMAS -The Board of
Directors of Cable Bahamas Ltd wishes to announce that the Closing
Date for the Series Four 8%, Non-Voting Cumulative Redeemable
Convertible Preference Share Offering has been extended to

August 31, 2009.

Preference

Cable Bahamas Ltd. is majority owned by 2,500 Bahamians and the
Government of the Bahamas. The company’s 280 employees provide:
(1) world-class cable television service on 16 Bahamian islands;
(2) high-speed Internet access services in Grand Bahama, Abaco,
Eleuthera and New Providence; telecommunications services between
the Bahamas and the rest of the world with a 600-kilometer submarine
fiber-optic system owned and operated by Caribbean Crossings Ltd,
a wholly-owned subsidiary; and (4) web-hosting, data center and
disaster recovery services through its wholly-owned subsidiary, Maxil
Communications Ltd. Cable Bahamas’ ordinary shares trade on the
Bahamas International Stock Exchange (Symbol: CAB).

(AP Photo: J Scott Applewhite)

some rescue programmes
should continue. Any such
decisions, though, might not
come at this week’s meeting.

One such programme,
aimed at driving down inter-
est rates on mortgages and
other consumer debt, involves
buying US Treasurys. The
central bank is on track to
buy $300 billion worth of
Treasury bonds by the fall; it
has bought $236 billion so far.

Another programme, the
Term Asset-Backed Securi-
ties Loan Facility, or TALF,
is intended to spark lending to
consumers and small busi-
nesses. It got off to a slow
start in March and is slated
to shut down at the end of
December. Despite this pro-
gramme, many people are still
having trouble getting loans,
analysts say.

The Fed isn’t expected to
launch any new revival efforts
or change another existing
programme that aims to push
down mortgage rates. In that
venture, the Fed is on track to
buy $1.25 trillion worth of
securities issued by mortgage
finance companies Fannie
Mae and Freddie Mac by the
end of the year. The central
bank’s recent purchases have
averaged $542.8 billion.

In the meantime, the econ-
omy has shown clear signs of
improvement. Employers cut

only 247,000 jobs in July, the
fewest in a year, the govern-
ment said Friday. Wages and
workers’ hours also nudged
up — encouraging signs that
companies no longer see the
need for drastic cost-cutting.
Those developments could
deliver a psychological boost
to both companies and con-
sumers.

The economy in the second
quarter contracted at a pace
of just one per cent, suggest-
ing that the recession, which
started in December 2007, is
ending.

That dip came after a dizzy-
ing free-fall in the first three
months of this year. The
economy had plunged at an
annual rate of 6.4 per cent in
the first quarter, the worst
showing in nearly three
decades.

With the economy improv-
ing but still weak, inflation
should stay low, the Fed says.
Given consumers’ caution,
companies won’t have much
power to raise prices.

And the weak job market
will limit wage growth. Com-
panies aren’t going to feel
generous about wages and
benefits until they are confi-
dent a recovery will last.

LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.

FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!

Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million

Web Listing # 8377

Mario A. Carey, CRS, CIPS, CLHMS

www.marioca reyrea

Tel: 242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013

info@mariocareyrealty.com

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THE COMPLIANCE COMMISSION

NOTICE

PUBLICATION OF REVISED ANTI-MONEY LAUNDERING
AND THE COMBATTING THE FINANCING OF TERRORISM
(AML/CFT) CODES OF PRACTICE AND EXAMINATION

FORMS

The Compliance Commission (the Commission), a statutory
body established by section 39 of the Financial Transactions
Reporting Act, announces the publication of revised AML/
CFT Codes of Practice and Examination Forms for the
legal profession, the accounting profession, the real estate
industry and financial and corporate service providers.

Additionally, revised Examination Forms have been published
for the life insurance industry, credit unions and other
designated financial institutions supervised by the Commission,

The revised Codes and Examination Forms are the result of
extensive consultations with the constituent financial institutions
supervised by the Commission. They provide greater clarity to
these institutions on their AML/CFT obligations, and to persons
conducting related on-site and off-site examinations. They
also take account of recent AML/CFT legislative amendments
passed in order to maintain international best practices.

Copies of the revised Codes and Examination Forms are
available for download from the Commission’s website or by

hardcopy from the Commission’s office at the address below.

The Compliance Commission
2Nd Floor, Clarlotte House

Charlotte Street South

P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel.: (242) 397-4198
Fax: (242) 322-6968

Email: compliance@bahamas.gov.bs
Website:www.bahamas.gov.bs/compliance

Executive Commissioner

30! July 2009


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a
Proposed Arawak —_Job security but no advancement from the
Cay development seeks

to give Bahamians
51% ownership

FROM page 1B

could not make a formal
statement.

“It is a private sector
undertaking and until there
is a formal proposal I can't

comment on Cultural Vil-
lage,” he said.

Mr Strachan said he thinks
the development could be
feasible to the tourism prod-
uct of the Bahamas and also
grow Bahamian owned busi-
nesses and well as the local
job market.

Employment Opportunity

FINANCIAL MANAGER

We seek to employ a talented, innovative, leader with a passion
to succeed and the capacity to initiate progress.

Job Requirements & Experience

Bachelor's Degree in Accounting or an equivalent from a
recognized tertiary level institution.

By DEEPTI HAJELA
and MICHAEL HILL
Associated Press Writers

NEW YORK (AP) —
Sleep is a rare commodity for
Juan Cortez. Between nights
spent clearing tables at a
Manhattan nightclub and days
running food to customers in
a Bronx restaurant, the 42-
year-old Peruvian immigrant
worries more about finding
time for shuteye than job
security.

More than 100 miles to the
north in the Hudson Valley,
Omar Guzman also isn’t con-
cerned about staying

employed. The 20-year-old
migrant farm worker spends
his summer days picking peas
and cherries, and by fall will
be harvesting acres of apples.

Even with the unemploy-
ment rate above 9 percent,
the nation’s native-born job-
less are looking at higher
rungs of the labor market for
their next career move. For
immigrants like Cortez and
Guzman, it means a degree
of job security — but also
more competition if they want
to advance into jobs above
bussers and barbacks, run-
ners, dishwashers and crop
hands.



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Knowledge of backup software and tape rotation schemes,
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The phenomenon of Amer-
icans shunning farm jobs is
nothing new — the influx of
Mexicans and other foreign-
born workers to fill vacancies
has fueled a long, sometimes
contentious immigration
debate. Those labor dynamics
seem largely unchanged this
year.

In one sign, farmers are still
steadily applying for visas
under the federal program
designed to provide tempo-
rary farm workers where
there are expected domestic
labor shortages. Federal
immigration officials received
5,574 so-called H-2A petitions
from Oct. 1 through mid-
June. The numbers could
exceed the previous fiscal
year if applications continue
at the same pace.

“Even as rural unemploy-
ment increases, U.S. workers
regard farm work as beneath
them,” said Jordan Wells,
coordinator of the Justice for
Farmworkers Campaign in
Poughkeepsie, N.Y. “Why do
people work at McDonald’s
and not the farm? There’s
something about farm work
that has been stigmatized.”

Farmers like the Ron Sam-
ascott in Kinderhook, N.Y.
typically advertise available
jobs before bringing in work-
ers from other countries.

“T don’t think we had any
responses,” Samascott said.

Crop workers at Samascot-
t’s farm can earn more than
$2 an hour above the New
York state minimum wage of
$7.25 an hour.

The American Farm
Bureau estimates there are 11
million Americans in jobs that
pay less than farm work. In a
country where roughly eight
out of 10 people live in urban
areas, farm work is not an
option for many of those low-
wage workers. But the ardu-
ous work performed by more
than a million people nation-
wide is unattractive to many
job seekers.

Steve Rivera of Washing-
tonville, N.Y., a student at the
State University of New York
at Albany, has held jobs at
the Gap and McDonald’s,
worked construction and on
a golf course, but he never
really considered working at a

SEE next page



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Monitoring tools, ete.

Experience in Management Reporting in a commercial

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Scrong computer and Microsoft Office skills.

The oversight of (A) payroll processing and reporting, (B)
customer billing and; () account reconciliations.

Managing year end audits

APPLY VIA EMAIL BEFORE August 14, 2009 TO;
executivefind@gmail.com

Caribbean Bottling Co. (Bahamas) Ltd
600)

is seeking candidates for the position of

iH

ACCOUNTS CLERK

Responsibilities of the function
include but are not limited to:
¢ Bank Reconciliations
* Inventory Valuation and Controls
¢ Route Settlement

Requirements:

* An Associate’s Degree in Accounting,
Business or related field.

* Minimum of two years work
experience in the field of accounting
would be an asset.

* Ability to multi-task, communicate
effectively and be a team player.

* Computer literate and at a minimum

efficient with MS Excel and MS Word

Salary commensurate with experience
and qualifications.

If you are interested in a challenging
career, designed to bring out the best
in you in a progressive environment,
please email or hand deliver a
copy of your Resume on or before
August 21st, 2009 to:

Bradley Watson

Caribbean Bottling Co. (Bah.) Ltd
P.O. Box N-1123

Nassau, Bahamas

or Email to:
cbcaccounts@cbcbahamas.com



Must be ready to improve skills set in multiple areas

Comfortable working remotely during projects/support

If interested please e-mail: XJTResume@ gmail.com

Mr. Elliot B. Lockhart
and

Mr. Norwood A. Rolle

are pleased to announce the
opening of their Chambers

LOCKHART & CO.
No. 35 at Buen Retiro Road
Off Shirley Street
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas

Effective Monday the 10th day
of August, A.D., 2009.

Telephone: (242) 322-1282/4
Fax: (242) 356-3371
P.O. Box N-8615
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
IMPORTANT DATES

Fall Semester 2009
New Student Orientation

Parents’ Evenin
Tuesday, 18th August, 2009
6:30 p.m. — 8:00 p.m.

Orientation
Wednesday, 19th August, 2009

8:0) a.m.

1:00 p.m.

Advisement & Registration
Wednesday, 19th August, 2049
1:00 pum. — 7:00 pom.

Advisement, Registration & Bill Payment
Thursday, 20th August, 2009 and
Friday, 21st August, 2009
9:00 am. — 7:00 p.m.

Venue:
Front of Portia Smith Student Services
Centre,
Poinciana Drive

i
Z 7) I

| MEDICAL
TECHNOLOGIST

QUALIFICATIONS:

¢ Baccalaureate degree in Medical Technology
® 2 years experience

¢ ASCP NCA or AMT Certification

® Excellent written and oral communication

skills

POSITION SUMMARY:

The successful candidate will be required to:

* Cross-train through all areas of the lab -
Chemistry, Hematology, Blood Bank and

Microbiology;

¢ Perform phlebotomy and specimen
processing and any other duties assigned.

Please submit resume via email: nwatkins@doctorshosp.com
or hand-deliver to Doctors Hospital, Human Resources Department
ON Ore Amiga SDE Aaa m Ora AD | | Meni) NP ea

Doctors Hospital | P.O. Box N-3018 | Nassau, Bahamas

WAN LED

MEDICAL SALES
REPRESENTATIVE

The medical rep will be responsible for
promoting international pharmaceutical brands
to the healthcare community in The Bahamas.

Skills & Educational Requirements

J Bachelor’s degree in medical sciences, allied
health, or business administration

/ Effective communication and presentation

abilities

J Effective time management, planning, and

organizing skills

J Proficiency in a variety of computer applications
J Self-motivated team player
Previous experience in pharmaceutical detailing

would be an asset

Candidates should possess a reliable motor
vehicle, be willing to travel to the family islands,
the U.S., and other foreign countries.

Please send application letter and résumé by
August 21, 2009 to:

MEDICAL REP
P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas
or Fax: 395-0440

We thank ail applicants for their interest; however,
only short-listed candidates will be contacted.


THE TRIBUNE

Soe
bottom

farm.

“T work at the garden cen-
ter at Wal-Mart,” said Rivera.
“Td probably get dirtier farm-
ing, so I just would not con-
sider it.”

It’s a theme that runs
throughout New York City’s
massive restaurant trade as
well.

At Cafe du Soleil in upper
Manhattan, managing partner
Cyril Tregoat hasn’t seen
native-born Americans apply-
ing to work as busboys.

“They don’t want those.
Nobody asked me to work as
a busboy,” he said. “They
want the waiter job or the
bartender job.”

That doesn’t surprise Rob
Paral, a research fellow at the
American Immigration Law
Foundation who is research-
ing unemployment trends.
Excluding teenagers, immi-
grants make up more of the
work force in the food ser-
vices sector than native-born
Americans, he said.

For most native-born work-
ers, these jobs are “a stepping
stone, maybe it’s your first
employment, something you
do while you’re going to
school,” he said. “Society
doesn’t expect us to be work-
ing in these jobs in our 30s
and 40s.”

Some of it is due to the per-
ception of status, he said.
“You don’t want to be pushed
to the point where you’re per-
ceived as being desperate and
doing these lower-status, low-
er-prestige jobs.”

Ousman Trawally, a 36-
year-old Gambian native,
smiles at the idea of native-
born Americans working his
job of running food to restau-
rant diners.

“Tve been doing this almost
eight years,” he said. “I work
with Americans. They never
complete six months.”

While the field is seemingly
wide open for immigrants
willing to work those low-
wage jobs, the competition
heats up when it comes to
moving up — or trying to do
so.

“It has slowed down the
upward mobility of immi-
grants and their families and
children,” Miguel Carranza,
professor of Sociology and
Ethnic Studies at the Univer-
sity of Nebraska-Lincoln. “If
it continues for a while then it
will have long-term effects”
on immigrants’ ability to pro-
vide better lives to future gen-
erations by paying for things
like higher education or being
able to afford to live in nicer
neighborhoods.

Mohammad Abdul Muk-
tadir, who works as a runner,
says he has more experience
than the native-born waiters
he now assists. They make
more money than he does and
have the job he wants.

“They’ve never been wait-
ers before,” the 48-year-old
Bangladesh immigrant said.

Like restaurant workers in
New York City, farm
migrants around the country
are having a harder time
“stepping up” to better jobs as
truck drivers, certified nurs-
ing assistants, child care work-
ers and data entry workers.
Now more native-born work-
ers are scrambling for those
jobs in the tough economy,
said David Strauss, executive
director of the Association of
Farmworker Opportunity
Programs.

Jim Bittner, manager of
Singer Farms near the Lake
Ontario shore north of Buf-
falo, has witnessed the effects
— the return of migrant
workers who had left to pur-
sue better-paying jobs.

“We’re seeing people come
back that we haven’t seen in a
few years because they had
drifted off to the Carolinas
and Florida, where they
worked construction,” he said.
“Those jobs no longer are
there.”



¢ Deepti Hajela reported
from New York. Michael Hill
reported from Albany, N.Y.
AP Writers Jessica M. Pasko
in Albany and Ben Dobbin in
Rochester contributed to this
report.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the

news, read
Insight on
Mondays



RBC
Royal Bank
533%, of Canada

MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 5B

PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.
HOUSES/APARTMENTS/COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

(401) Lots #17 & #18 Crown Allot-
ments, Love Hill Settlement, An-
dros. Containing a two-storey res.
Appraised value: $100,000

(806) Lots #1 & #2, Block 3 with
a parcel situated between Lot #1,
Block 3, containing a 4 bedroom
condominium — Sunset View Villas,
West Bay Street. Appraised value:
$750,000

(433) Lot #27 of Village Allotment
#14 in the Eastern District, contain-
ing residence situated on Denver
Street off Parkgate Road in the Ann's
Town Constituency, New Providence.
Property size 2,500 sqft Building size
990 sqft. Appraised value: $50,000

(400) Property situated in Calabash
Bay on the Island of Andros. 75’ x
150’ and containing thereon a small
grocery store 480 sqft. and an in-
complete 3 bed 2 bath house 900
sqft. Appraised value: $65,000

(301) Lot #2 in block #8, Steward
Road, Coral Heights East Subdivi-
sion situated in Western District of
New Providence, approx. size 8,800
sq. ft. with a split level containing
two bed, two bath, living, dining
& family rooms, kitchen and util-
ity room - approx. size of building
2,658 sqft Appraised value: $322,752

(702) Lot #20 with residential prop-
erty located Skyline Heights.
Appraised value $280,000

(902) Lot of land 94 x94 x 150 x 150
on Queens Highway just south of
Palmetto Point with a two storey
stone building containing two apart-
ments. Each unit has 3 bed/2 1/2
bath, kitchen, living room and 3 linen
closets. Appraised value: $287,209

(400) Lot#14 situated in the settle-
ment of Love Hill on the Island of
Andros totalling 20,000 sqft Property
contains a two storey 5 bedroom,
3 bathroom residence. Appraised
value: $185,000

(105) Lot containing 2 storey bldg.
with three bed, two and ahalf bath
residence, and 30’ x 86’ situated Bai-
ley Town, North Bimini.
Appraised value: $235,000

(702) Undeveloped lots # 4A, 16,
17, 18 and 19 located Chapman
Estates, West Bay. Appraised value:
$348,000

(701) Undeveloped lot #149. Sea-
fan Lane, Lucayan Beach Subdi-
vision. Grand Bahama, 18750 sq
ft. Appraised value: TBA

(565) Vacant lot #5 located Eleu-
thera Island Shores, Seaside Drive
Section B, Block #15, Eleuthera,
Bahamas. 9,691 sqft, Appraised
value: $27,620

(402) Lot 89, Block 7 Aberdeen
Drive, Bahamia West Replat Sub-
division, Freeport, Grand Bahama,
consisting of 12,100 sqft.
Appraised value: $51,000

(800) Vacant property located
Bahamia South. Block 16 lot 9A,
Freeport, Grand Bahama consist-
ing of 24,829.20 sqft. Appraised
value: $52,000

(565) Vacant Lot #9 (11,406.65 sqft)
situated in Mango Lane Section
“B” Block #15, Eleuthera Island
Shores, Eleuthera.

Appraised value: $50,189

(909) Vacant residential Lot# 63
(7800 sqft) Crown Allotments
located Murphy Town, Abaco.
Appraised value: $18,000

(108) Vacant Single Family Lot #5

COMMERCIAL BANKING CENTRE

Tel: 242-356-8568
800) Mrs. Monique Crawford
801) Mr. Jerome Pinder
802) Mr. Brian Knowles
803) Mr. Vandyke Pratt
804) Mrs. Hope Sealey
805) Mrs. Tiffany Simms O’brien
806) Mrs. Lois Hollis
807) Mr. Lester Cox
808) Mrs. DaShann Clare-Paul
810) Miss LaPaige Gardiner
(811) Ms. Lydia Gardiner
PALMDALE SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-322-4426/9 or
242-302-3800
(201) Ms. Nicola Walker
(202) Mr. Robert Pantry
(205) Mrs. Anya Major

(801) Lot #18 in Sandilands Allot-
ment on the western side of Cross-
wind Road between Seabreeze Lane
and Pineyard Road in the Eastern
Distract of The Island of New Provi-
dence-The Bahamas, containing sin-
gle storey private residence com-
prising the following: covered entry
porch, living room, dining room,
kitchen, laundry room, family room,
sitting area, 4 bedrooms, 2 bathroom
and patio. The total area of land is
approximately 7,641 square feet.
Appraised value: $289,426

(801) Two parcels of land containing
21,120 sq.ft. situated on the south-
ern side of East Shirley Street and
100 feet west of its junction with
“Shirlea” in the Eastern District, New
Providence. Situated thereon is a
Gas Station and Auto Repair Shop.
Appraised value: $799,497

(601) Lot #17 located Village Allot-
ment with fourplex,
Appraised value: $500,000

(701) Lotofland having the number
16 in Block number 16 in Section
Three of the Subdivision called
and known as Sea Breeze Estates
situated in the Eastern District of
New Providence. Property contains
a three bed, two bath residence.
Appraised value: $277,000

(701) Lot of land being lot number
11 in Block number 10 on a plan of
allotments laid out byVillage Estates
Limited and filed in the dept of Land
& Surveys as number 142 N.P. and
situated in the Eastern District of
New Providence. Property contains
three bed, two bath residence.
Appraised value: $165,000

(565) Lot # 1018 in Golden Gates
Estates #2 Subdivision situate in
the South Western District of the
island of New Providence Containing
a single storey private residence 3
bedroom 2 bath. Property approx.
size 6,000 sqft Building approx size
2,400 sqft Appraised value: $173,176

(205) Lot B - 50 ft x 115.73 ft situ-
ated on the north side of Shell Fish
Road, being the third lot west of Fire
Trail Road and east of Hamster Road

Block #5 Unit#1 Devonshire
Appraised value $30,000

(802) Vacant Commercial Lot No:
3A, Block 60 Bahamia Subdivision
VI containing 3 acres located Free-
port, Grand Bahama.

Appraised value: $750,000

(108) Vacant Single Family Lot #5
Block F Bahamia South Subdivi-
sion. Appraised value $35,700

(569) Vacant property located in
Subdivision called “Culmerville”
being a portion of Lot #47 and a
portion of Lot #57. Appraised value:
$24,000

(569) All that piece parcel or lot
of land situate in the settlement
of James Cistern on the Island of
Eleuthera one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas
measuring approx 10,000 sq.ft.
Appraised value TBA

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot No. 102 in the Sub-
division known as “EXUMA HAR-
BOUR’ in the Island of Great Exuma
measuring 10,000 sq.ft. Appraised
value $20,000.00.

(202) Vacant lot of land contain-
ing 41,164 sqft, Lot #8, Love Estate,
Phase 1, 2,300 ft. south of West Bay
Street, Western District, New Provi-
dence. Appraised value $165,000
(202) Vacantlot ofland containing

Tel: 242-322-8700
701
702
301
304

Tel: 242-393-3097
601

Tel: 242-325-4711
401
402

Tel: 242-393-7505/8

501) Mr. Jason Sawyer
503) Mr. Dwight King
505

Tel: 242-327-6077
466





RBC > HELPING YOU SUCCEED

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean/bahamas

™ Trademark of Royal Bank of Canada. ® The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are registered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada.

NASSAU MAIN BRANCH

Mr. James Strachan
Mr. Antonio Eyma
Ms. Thyra Johnson
Mrs. Alicia Thompson
MACKEY STREET BRANCH

Ms. Cherelle Martinborough
JOHN EF. KENNEDY DRIVE BRANCH

Mrs. Renea Walkine
Mrs. Chandra Gilbert
PRINCE CHARLES SHOPPING CENTRE

Ms. Patricia Russell
CABLE BEACH BRANCH

Mrs. Winnifred Roberts
LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE
Tel: 242-502-5170/502-5180

with a one half duplex residential
premises. Appraised value: TBA

(901) Lot#32 containing 4 bedroom
2bath concrete structure located
Triana Shores Harbour Island, Eleu-
thera. Property size 80’ x 120’ x 80’
120 feet Appraised value: $332,735

(910) Lot#12 Madeira Park, a small
subdivision on the outskirts of Treas-
ure Cay, Abaco having an area of
9,444 square feet residence contain-
ing aconcrete block structure with
asphalt shingle roof comprises of
three bedrooms, two bathrooms,
family room, living room, dining
room, and kitchen. Appraised value:
$147,000

(569) Property situated on Wil-
liams Lane off Kemp Road, New
Providence, Bahamas containing
a two-storey house and an apart-
ment building consisting of 1800
sqft. Appraised value $100,000

(569) All that piece of land being Par-
cel #3 and Parcel #4 situated on the
South side of Prince Charles Drive,
New Providence, Bahamas contain-
ing a commercial building housing
two shop space on the ground floor
and three shop space on the second
floor with a large storage area in the
rear. Total area 8400 sq ft.
Appraised value: $366,650

(569) All that piece, parcel or land
having an approximate area of 2100
sqft situated on the Western side of
Blue Hill Road about 70 ft North of
Peter Street and about 115 ft south
of Laird Street in the Southern Dis-
trict of New Providence, Bahamas
containing a commercial building
housing a two bed/one bath unit
on the top floor and a store on the
first floor. Appraised value: $154,000

(569) All that piece, parcel or lot
of land situated on Cowpen Road
(1000 ft east of the Faith Avenue Junc-
tion) in the Southern District of New
Providence, Bahamas containing
a duplex apartment comprising of
two - 2-bedroom/1-bathroom apart-
ments. Appraised value: $150,000
(800) All that parcel or lot of land
being Lots #10 and 11 in Block 29
of Coconut Grove Subdivision, con-

VACANT PROPERTIES

1.786 acre, situated east of Know-
les Drive, approximately 1,420
ft. southward of Harrold Road in
the western district of New Provi-
dence, Bahamas. Appraised value:
$ 170,000

(503) Vacant property consisting
of Lot #894 situated in the Free-
port Ridge Subdivision, Section #1,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Baha-
mas. Appraised value: TBA

(505) Ten (10) acres of land situ-
ated on Woods Cay, known as Little
Abaco, between Cooper's Town and
Cedar Harbour in Abaco, Bahamas.
The property is undeveloped with
a view of the sea from both the
North and South side. Appraised
value: $1,078,750

(569) All that piece parcel or lot
of land Lot # 977, Pinewood Gar-
dens Subdivision, Southern Dis-
trict, New Providence. Appraised
value: $65,000

(008) All that piece parcel of lot
and land on the Island of Great
Exuma situated about 101/2 miles
Northwestwardly of George Town
which said piece parcel or lot of
land is #10750 Bahama Sound
O.A.E. 10,900 sqft.

Appraised value: $65,000

(008) All that piece parcel or lot of
land designated as Lot Number 563
on aplan of a Subdivision called

OFFICERS

723

)
)
)
724)
)
)



716) Ms. Quincy Fisher

717) Mrs. Nancy Swaby

Ms. Deidre King

Mrs. Faye Higgs

725) Ms. Marguerite Johnson
565) Mrs. Catherine Davis
569) Mrs. Vanessa Scott
NASSAU INT’L AIRPORT

Tel: 242-377-7179

433) Mrs. Suzette Hall-Moss
LYFORD CAY BRANCH

Tel: 242-362-4540 or 242-362-4037
101-N) Mrs. Lindsey Peterson
GOVERNOR’S HARBOUR, ELEUTHERA
Tel: 242-332-2856/8

902) Ms. Nicole Evans
HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH
Tel:242-333-2230

901) Ms. Velderine Laroda
ANDROS TOWN BRANCH

Tel: 242-368-2071

400) Mrs. Rose Bethel
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO

taining a shopping plaza. The lot
is trapezium in shape, 8,383 sq ft.
Appraised value $500,000

(560) Lot of land #2 Sea View Sub-
division, Russell Island, Spanish
Wells. Property size 11,323 sqft,
building size 2236 sq ft containing
3 bedrooms, 2 bath, living room, an
eat-in kitchen, dining room, laun-
dry room, covered porch, a one car
garage, and a covered water tank.
Appraised value: $299,000

(901) Lot # 57 block # Trianna Shores
containing 3 bed 2 bath front room,
dining room, & kitchen. Concrete
structure, 1926.40 sq ft wooden
deck 321.60 sq ft. property 9600 sqft.
Appraised value: $448,645

(901) Lot “K” Barrack Street, Harbour
Island containing a 2 storey concrete
building with 4 bed 4 bath, dining
room & kitchen -Building 2934.56
sqft property 6563 sqft.
Appraised value: $479,228

(811) Property containing Condo
“Millennium II’, Unit A-101, building
57, Phase 1C, 2 bedrooms, 3 bath-
rooms, living room, dining room,
utility closet & patio. Situated in
the area known as Bimini Bay Re-
sort, Bimini, Bahamas.

Appraised value - $485,000

(008) Single Story tri-plex building,
one 2 bedrooms and two 1 bed-
room located on a multi-family Lot
No.4, block 3, Shirley Lane, section
1, Bahama Reef Yacht & Country
Club Subdivision, Freeport Grand
Bahama. Property size is approx.
16,621 sq ft Appraised value $348,000

(908 Lot# 52 Crown Allotments
located Murphy Town, Abaco with
size being 10,200 sq ft. Containing
a one storey house with 4 bed/2
bath — Concrete Block Structure -—
Appraised value. $200,000

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot #39 in the residen-
tially zoned area of Highbury Park
Subdivision in the Eastern District
of New Providence, Bahamas. Ap-
prox. land size 6,000 sq ft. Property
contains a 3-bedroom/2-bathroom
house, size being 1,563 sq. ft.

or known as Bahama Highlands
#4, 11,223.41 sqft. Appraised value:
$87,000

(201) Single family residential Lot
No. 11703 Bahama Sound Subd.
Number 11 West, Great Exuma.
Size: approx. 10,000 sq ft
Appraised value $15,000

(201) Multifamily Lot No. 10 -
Southeast Corner of Mandarin
Drive, Sugar Apple Road, Sans
Souci Sudv. Size: 14,368 sq ft
Appraised value $165,000

(201) Single family residential Lot
No. 11698 Bahama Sound Subd.
Number 11 West, Great Exuma.
Size: approx. 10,426 sq ftAppraised
value: $15,000

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot #1 located in Block
3in the Subdivision known as East-
ern Estates situate in the Eastern
District of the island of New Provi-
dence. Property approx. 6950 sq.
ft. Appraised value $80,000

(569) All that piece parcel or lot
ofland located on Marigold Road
in the Subdivision known as Kool
Acres. Lot is approx.9455 sq. ft.
Appraised value $93,000.

(569) All that piece parcel or lot of
land being Lot #152 locatedin the
Subdivision known as West Ridge-
land Park situated in the South-

908
909
910

105
GRA

100



008

103)
108)



dete

®

Appraised Value $131,000

(908) Lot# 23 located in the Sub-
division of Spring City, Abaco with
size being 8,925 sq ft. Containing a
one storey wooden structure house
with 3 bed/1 bath of 7985 sq ft
Appraised value. $60,000

(304) Single storey triplex, situated
on Lot 615, Mermaid Boulevard,
Golden Gates #2 in the Western
District, New Providence. Two two-
bedroom, one-bathroom units and
one one-bedroom, one-bathroom
unit. The property is zoned as Multi
Family Residential, measuring 9,092
sqft with the living area measuring
2,792 sq ft. Appraised value $374,192

(201) Duplex Lot #25 situated on
Faith Ave. North (Claridge Estates)
- size being 7,354 sqft with duplex
thereon. Appraised value - TBA

(201) Lot of land situated on Fire
Trail Road being a partition of Glad-
ston Allot #41 New Providence, Ba-
hamas containing townhouse apart-
ment unit and two proposed units
(completed as is). Appraised value
$237,714

(201) Lotcontaining residence situ-
ated in Carey’s Subdivision - Lot B,
Block B Appraised Value $108,000.

(103) All that piece parcel of lot of
land and improvements thereon
known as No.3 block 31 Bahamia
Marina & Section IX located in south-
western city of Freeport Grand Ba-
hama Island. Approx. 13,070 sq.ft.
or 0.30 acres property contains
duplex dwelling. Appraised value
$300,000

(804) Six condominium units and
five parcels of vacant land situated
at Regattas of Abaco, Marsh Har-
bour, Bahamas. The single/multi
family residential condominium/
timeshare development is situated
on 9.426 acres of land. The condo-
miniums consist of 2 bedrooms, 2
bathrooms and the amenities on the
property includes amanned secu-
rity gate, swimming pool, 2 tennis
courts, landscaped gardens and an
administration building.
Appraised value $2,450,000

ern District of the island of New
Providence. Property approx. 4000
sqft Appraised value $55,000.

(008) An undeveloped waterfront
lot land being Lot #12032 with a
size of 10,600 sq.ft. in the Bahama
Sound of Exuma Subdivision # 11
West, Great Exuma, Bahamas.
Appraised value $224,000

(008) Partially developed parcel
ofland being 10,000 sq.ft. situate
about the eastern portion of The
Forest Estate in the vicinity ofthe
settlements of Southside andThe
Forest being Lot Number 4803 in
Bahama Sound of Exuma6, Exuma,
Bahamas.

Appraised value $25,000

(724) Vacantland at Love Beach,
Western District of New Providence
comprising a portion of “LoveEs-
tate” containing 1 acre.
Appraised value $225,000.00.

(800) Lot#2vacantland 30,000 sq
ft located Chapman Estates Sub-
division on West Bay Street with
open zoning. Appraised value
$600,000.

(800) Single/multi family residen-
tial vacant lot being a portion of
lot #77 situated on the Southern
side of Fire Trail Road in the West-
ern District of New Providence.
Property size 110,000 sqft

Appraised value $550,000

Tel: 242-367-2420

Mr. Toure Holder

Mrs. Sylvia Poitier

Miss Cyprianna Williams
BIMINI BRANCH
Tel:242-347-3031

Miss. Ganiatu Tinubu

*S, LONG ISLAND

Tel: 242-337-0101

Mrs. Lucy Wells
EXUMA BRANCH

Tel: 242-336-3251

Ms. Jocyelyn Mackey
FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-352-6631/2

101-F) Ms. Garnell Frith
102) Ms. Elaine Collie

Mrs. Damita Newbold-Cartwright
Ms. Sylvie Carey

SPANISH WELLS

Tel: 242-333-4131 or
242-333-4145

(560) Mr. Walter Carey

RBC Royal
Bank of Canada


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Small is beautiful, and successful,

By MICHAEL LIEDTKE
AP Business Writer

NEWSPAPERS are hurt-
ing all over the United States,
but the pain is less severe at
small publications like The
Blackshear Times in Georgia.

The weekly newspaper fills
an information vacuum in a
county of 17,000 people who
live about 75 miles from the
closest metropolitan market,
in Jacksonville, Fla. That has
made it easier for The Times
to hold on to its 3,500 sub-
scribers and keep its revenue
stable in a recession that’s rav-
aging much of the newspaper
industry.

“CNN is not coming to my
town to cover the news and
there aren’t a whole lot of
bloggers here either,” said
Robert M. Williams Jr., The
Times’ editor and publisher.
“Community newspapers are
still a great investment



because we provide some-
thing you can’t get anywhere
else.”

The scarcity of other media
in small- and medium-sized
cities has helped shield hun-
dreds of newspapers from the
upheaval that’s causing dailies
in big cities to shrink in size
and scope as their print cir-
culations and advertising sales
decline.

Less competition means the
print editions and Web sites
of smaller newspapers remain
the focal points for finding
out what’s happening in their
coverage areas.

In contrast, large newspa-
pers carry more national
news, as well as local, and
have many competitors,
including Web sites and tele-
vision and radio stations.
They report much of the news
the day before printed news-
papers reach homes and
newsstands. Large newspa-

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TSAR VENTURES LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)












Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
















Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





SUSIE WILLIAMS-ALLEN (left), the managing editor of The Purcell

a, EE

Register, interviews McClain County Under-Sheriff, Bill Shobe in

Purcell, Oklahoma...

pers’ Web sites also provide
the news for free a day ahead
of print editions.

Perhaps even more impor-
tant, newspapers in smaller
markets still haven’t lost a big
chunk of their revenue to
Craigslist and other online
classified advertising alterna-
tives that have become the
bane of large newspapers.

(AP Photo)

Print ads for everything
from jobs to jalopies were a
gold mine for newspapers
until Craigslist began expand-
ing an online service for free
classified ads in 1999. Today,
Craigslist blankets most major
metropolitan markets while
publishing about 40 million
classified ads each month.

In 2000, classified advertis-

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HERRIDGE ISLAND LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE,
INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES — FALL SEMESTER 2009 - 042004

COURSE

CODE

|BEGINS | ENDS

coor

Gshamian Culsine

St

| Ox. 22

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| Sept, 10

CcOOe

Gourmet Cooking |

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| Sept. 7 | Oct. 19

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Cake & Pastry
Making |

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reed Making

Bae

Sept. | Oct. 24

4

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| Bept.8 | Mow. 3

Bapt.70 | New, 5

Sept. 10 | Mew. 5

[DURATION | DAYS

5 weeks

| 6 weeks

6 waeks

S weeks

a weeks

weeks

| TIME
600 -

Th meday SLipm

| 6.00
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| 3:00pm

| Menday

| Wadnasday
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| Tiesto
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Thursday 00pm

TUITION &
| FEES | Fi

No. of
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5360.00 | Mik

$455.00 | ME

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S375 ,00 | PK

520,00 | LE



COOK

Cake Decorating

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| Lo

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Sept, 7 Neve, 2

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| Wednesday

PK

PK

All fees are incloded in the price quoted almve; new siucents pay a ooe-lime application foe of 0, (SON REPL NDABLE)

Application Deadline: August 28, 2109 at 4:10 p.m.
For furtler information o¢ io peck ip an application case comet the Iriarte | Pith tie hearioent of the Cy linary & Hoapita ity
Managcment Institute, 323-3804, 323-314 or fax 325-1267.

The Cowl ‘pe

52wk-Low

1.28

10.00
6.25
0.63
3.15
2.14

10.18
2.74
5.50
1.27

Abaco Markets

Benchmark

Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

1.32
6.60
10.00
10.30
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.39
10.00

Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Securit y

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Bahamas Waste

Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol Class B Preference

Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money a4 Work

Me)

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 7 AUGUST 2009

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,556.11] CHG -5.83 | %CHG -0.37 | YTD -156.25 | YTD % -9.12

FINDEX: CLOSE 787.45 | YTD -5.68% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW _.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

1.39
11.00
6.94
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.35
2.74
5.60
3.47
1.82
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.13
1.00
0.30
5.49
10.39
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change Daily Vol.
1.34
11.00
6.25
0.63
3.15
2.37
11.35
2.74
5.60
3.48
1.82
6.60
10.63
10.30
5.13
1.00
0.30
5.49
10.39
10.00

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

EPS $

-0.877

af the Furhowes reverwss atee dinky A Haren: Thitinn, Fis, Cow Comin, Cove Sohewine aed Conese ldterlals

FG CAPITAL

MARKET.
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Lad

c1as bcs NT A OL

Div $ P/E
10.6
11.1
25.6
N/M
0.078 40.4
0.055 43.1
1.406 8.1
0.249 11.0
0.419 13.4
0.111 31.4
0.240 7.6
0.420 15.7
0.322 33.0
0.794 13.0
0.332 15.5
0.000 N/M
0.035 8.6
13.5
10.9
55.6

0.127
0.992
0.244

0.407
0.952
0.180

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + Prime + 1.75%

ases)

52wk-Hi__ 52wk-Low Interest
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
FBB15 100.00 0.00 29 May 2015
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
4.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.3860 2.40 4.75
2.9047 -1.20 -3.66
1.4817 3.35 5.38
3.1031 -8.35 -13.82
12.9801
101.6693
96.7398
1.0000
9.2765
1.0622
1.0243 -0.84
1.0585 2.04
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-0.041
0.000

0.001

Div $ P/E
0.300
0.480
0.000

N/M
256.6

ABDAB
RND Holdings.

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
30-Jun-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

1.3231
2.8952
1.4059
3.1031
12.3289
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

2.87
1.10
0.35
0.00
2.00
2.56

5.79
1.67
-4.18
0.00
-2.98
6.22
2.43
5.85

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 18 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price fram day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
KS1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

ing accounted for nearly $20
billion, or about 40 per cent,
of the US newspaper indus-
try’s revenue. In 2008, classi-
fied ads in U.S. newspapers
had dwindled to less than $10
billion, or about one-quarter
of the industry’s revenue.
(Subscription and single-copy
sales traditionally contribute
just 20 to 30 per cent of news-
papers’ revenue.)

Now it appears the highly
profitable classified ads in the
print editions of large news-
papers could dwindle to vir-
tually nothing within the next
few years, said media analyst
Mike Simonton of Fitch Rat-
ings. “There is still more
pain,” he predicted.

Smaller newspapers have
been defying the ominous
trend, based on a recent study
of the finances at 125 US
newspapers of different sizes
by the Inland Press Associa-
tion, a trade group.

The classified ad revenue
among daily newspapers with
circulations of less than 15,000
actually rose by an average of
23 per cent in the five years
ending in 2008, the study
found.

Overall ad revenue for dai-
ly newspapers with less than
15,000 in circulation rose by
an average of 2.5 per cent in
the same time frame. Mean-
while, ad revenue dropped 25
per cent at daily newspapers
with circulations greater than
80,000, according to Inland
Press.

“The bigger they are, the
harder they are falling,” said
Ray Carlsen, Inland Press’
executive director.

Smaller newspapers also
have largely avoided the deep
staff cuts made by the rest of
the newspaper industry, which
has eliminated more than
100,000 jobs since 2005. The

Inland Press study found dai-
ly newspapers with circula-
tions of less than 50,000 were
spending more on their news-
rooms in 2008 than they were
in 2004.

But if they’ve largely avoid-
ed the Internet’s impact on
advertising and circulation,
smaller newspapers have not
been immune to the misery
of the longest recession since
World War II.

Nearly one-fifth of their
collective revenue evaporated
in the first quarter compared
with the same time last year,
according to one industry
study.

“It would be wrong to
assume there is some sort of
bubble over our market,” said
Chris Doyle, president and
publisher of the Naples Daily
News, a daily newspaper in
southwestern Florida with a
circulation averaging about
64,000 during the six months
ending in March. “We are
becoming leaner, more scrap-
py and more aggressive than
ever before.”

To cope with the recession,
which has hit Florida espe-
cially hard, the Daily News
and four neighboring com-
munity newspapers — all
owned by E.W. Scripps Co.
— have reduced their staffing
nearly 30 per cent.

For the most part, though,
big newspapers are under
more pressure. Denver and
Seattle each lost a printed dai-
ly newspaper this year, while
Detroit’s two newspapers cut
home delivery to three days a
week.

The shakeout could leave
more big newspapers adopt-
ing the so-called “hyperlocal”
approach that publishers of

SEE next page

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GUNSIGHT INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ISPHOLINE CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JJR INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 7B



a
for newspapers

smaller newspapers have
always focused on.

Rather than filling their
pages with material that is
readily available on the Inter-
net, smaller newspapers focus
on the politics, business,
sports, crime and community
affairs occurring in narrowly
defined geographic areas —
a county, a town or, in some
cases, even a few neighbor-
hood blocks.

“Tf it walks, talks or spits
on the concrete in our area,
we cover it,” said John D.
Montgomery Jr., editor and
publisher of The Purcell Reg-
ister in Oklahoma. The week-
ly newspaper, based about 40
minutes south of Oklahoma
City, had built up a circula-
tion of about 5,000 by focus-
ing on Purcell and four near-
by towns with a combined
population of about 17,000.

With a weekday circulation
of about 73,000, The Chat-
tanooga Times Free Press in
Tennessee has been setting
aside more space for local
news and puts all national
news through a community
lens, said Tom Griscom, the
daily newspaper’s publisher
and executive editor.

“Tf you really want to read
about the Iraq war every day,
you are not going to buy our
paper. You will buy The New
York Times,” Griscom said.

More large newspapers also
may take a page from smaller
newspapers by reducing the
number of days that they
print their editions. Many
small newspapers already are
weeklies or don’t come out
every day — another factor
that has helped them stay out
of major trouble.

Production and delivery
costs are among newspapers’
biggest expenses, so more
publishers are assessing
whether it makes sense to

drop their print editions on
days that traditionally don’t
attract a lot of advertising —
typically Mondays through
Wednesdays.

Being small also makes it
easier to stay tuned to read-
ers’ interests, said Jeff Ack-
erman, publisher of The
Union, a daily newspaper
with a circulation of about
16,000 in Grass Valley, Calif.,
not far from the Tahoe
National Forest.

“Too many newspapers
have been operating in an
ivory tower for too long,” said
Ackerman, whose newspaper
is based in a county with a
population of about 100,000.
“T answer my own phone.
Some newspapers are just
now trying to develop rela-
tionships with the local com-
munities they cover. Ours has
been going on for 144 years.”

Most community newspa-
pers are privately held —
often owned by the same fam-
ily for several generations.
That means they aren’t under
constant pressure to boost
their earnings in a time of
declining ad prices. It also
means they don’t have to
make the same financial dis-
closures as the publicly traded
companies that own most
major newspapers.

Smaller newspapers gener-
ally have little debt. Huge
debts drove the owners of
newspapers like the Los
Angeles Times, Chicago Tri-
bune, Philadelphia Inquirer
and Star Tribune of Min-
neapolis into bankruptcy
court to reorganize their
finances.

Still, small-town newspa-
pers face more of the prob-
lems dogging big-city dailies.

Last year, ad revenue
drooped four per cent at more
than 1,000 community news-
papers responding to a sur-

7 te
atl ie

vey by the National Newspa-
per Association and the Sub-
urban Newspapers of Ameri-
ca. Industrywide, newspaper
ad revenue plunged 17 per
cent, according to the News-
paper Association of Ameri-
ca.

But that difference nar-
rowed this year. First-quarter
ad revenue at community
newspapers was nearly 19 per
cent below the first quarter
of 2008 while the industry-
wide total plummeted 28 per
cent, according to the same
groups.

As the Web becomes even
more ubiquitous and indis-
pensable, more people may
start sites focused on the same
issues covered by small news-
papers. Advertising alterna-
tives like Craigslist also could
catch on in more remote areas
of the United States.
Craigslist serves more than
325 US cities — offering free
classified ads in most of them
— and welcomes suggestions
on areas where it should
expand.

Richard Connor, publisher
of The Times Leader in
Wilkes-Barre, Pa., (weekday
circulation of about 36,000),
already has to contend with
Craigslist in his market, but
he has another worry: disap-
pearing car dealers, tradition-
ally big ad buyers. His news-
paper’s ad revenue declined
by about five per cent in the
first quarter but improved
modestly in the second. He
suspects sales will still be
scarce in the months ahead.

Even so, Connor is betting
small newspapers still have a
bright future. He just bought
three dailies in Maine in June.

“We still think community
newspapers have an audience
and it’s not going away,” he
said. “There will always be an
audience for local news.”

PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

ADVERTISEMENT

VACANCY

TWO (2) VACANCIES FOR

EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN (EMT) BASIC

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post
Emergency Medical Technician - Basic, Corporate Office, Public Hospitals

Authority.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-

Aminimum of two (2) subjects at the B.G.C.S.E level at grade “C” or above,
or equivalent (including Math, English, Science); Good oral, writing and
reading skills; Certification as an Emergency Medical Technician, Basic with
three years relevant experience; Must be able to communicate and interact
with members of the public and other public safety and health professionals
during times of extreme stress, while maintaining composure.

LICENSES CERTIFICATIONS

Obtains certification equivalent to US National Registry EMT-Basic.

2.Maintains certification in Basic Life Support (BLS); Pre-hospital Trauma
Life Support (PHTLS); American Heart Association (AHA) and Cardio
Pulmonary Recitation (CPR) for the Professional Rescuer.

Registered and licensed with the Health Professions Council (Bahamas).

JOB SUMMARY

Responsible for providing timely pre hospital care to patients who require

emergency medical assistance;

DUTIES:

* Responds immediately to emergency calls.

ecure scene and maintains safety.

Secures the scene of an emergency situation and maintains safety.

Performs basic life support and other medical assistance until the
patient arrives at the hospital.

Completes required reports related to patient care and provides
electronic, verbal and written report to medical staff.

Communicates with hospitals and dispatch center using various radio /
telephone equipments.

Ensures that all emergency equipment are in the ambulance at all

times.

Prepares and submits an inventory of supplies at the end of each shift.

Letters of Application, resume, documentary evidence of qualifications
and three (3) references should be submitted, no later than Friday, 21°
August 2009, to the Human Resources Director, Public Hospitals Authority,

P.O. Box N-8200 or Corporate Office Building ‘B’, 3% & West Terraces,

Centreville.



THE BAHAMAS MARITIME

AUTHORITY
(LONDON OFFICE)

Technical and Compliance Officer
(Inspections & Surveys)

An appointment 1s available for a marine professional in the
Inspections and Surveys Department, carrying out a wide range of
duties associated with statutory compliance of The Bahamas flagged
fleet of about 1,700 vessels comprising over 51,000,000 GT.

Duties will include
* close oversight of response and management of PSC inspection,
* operation of the BMA inspection programme
* technical advice to owners, managers and Recognised
Organisations,

A logical thinking, safety orientated person 1s required who must
have a wide knowledge of the International Maritime Conventions
and Codes.

Candidates should have seagoing experience at a senior level or
surveying experience, or as a Naval Architect within an IACS
Classification Society. Suitably experienced candidates from an
alternative professional stream may also be considered. Audit
experience 1s advantageous.

This particular vacancy will be better suited to a holder of an STCW
II/2 certificate. However outstanding candidates who are otherwise
qualified will be considered.

The successful candidate will be required to work in the London
Office of the BMA and should be prepared to undertake occasional
travel on the business of the Authority.

Technical and Compliance Officer
(STCW and Manning)

Applications are invited for the position of Technical & Compliance
Officer in the STCW and Manning Department of the BMA. The
STCW and Manning Section 1s responsible for all aspects related
to the training, certification and approval of seafarers and STCW
courses, and the assessment of the manning provisions, for The
Bahamas flagged fleet.

The successful candidate will be employed at a supervisory level
with duties including:
* Representing the Authority at meetings/forum on matters
relating to seafarers training and manning
* Oversight of the BMA processes and development of national
policies relating to seafarers, STCW course approval and safe
manning
* Provision of training and manning guidance/assistance to
Owners, Managers and the Authority’s other stakeholders

Candidates for the post should have a university degree with practical
and theoretical knowledge of STCW Convention/Code and the
international principles on manning of ships. Applicants with other
qualifications gained in the field of maritime training/education or
other relevant experience/expertise will also be considered. Previous
experience in auditing will be advantageous.

Applicants are invited to write, enclosing a copy of their C/V, and
details of their current salary to: Deputy Director, Inspections &
Surveys, The Bahamas Maritime Authority, 120 Old Broad Street,
London EC2N I1AR, U K, or by email to tech@bahamasmaritime.c

om.

Closing date for applications 1s 28 August 2009. All applications
will be acknowledged.


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a aaa 2 ee ee
A missed opportunity on climate change

By N GREGORY MANKIW
c.2009 New York Times
News Service

During the presidential
campaign of 2008, Barack
Obama distinguished himself
on the economics of climate
change, speaking far more
sensibly about the issue than
most of his rivals. Unfortu-
nately, now that he is presi-
dent, Obama may sign a cli-
mate bill that falls far short
of his aspirations. Indeed, the
legislation making its way to
his desk could well be worse
than nothing at all.

Let’s start with the basics.
The essential problem of cli-
mate change, scientists tell us,
is that humans are emitting
too much carbon into the
atmosphere, which tends to



raise world temperatures.
Emitting carbon is what econ-
omists call a “negative exter-
nality”— an adverse side
effect of certain market activ-
ities on bystanders.

The textbook solution for
dealing with negative exter-
nalities is to use the tax sys-
tem to align private incentives
with social costs and benefits.
Suppose the government
imposed a tax on carbon-
based products and used the
proceeds to cut other taxes.
People would have an incen-
tive to shift their consump-
tion toward less carbon-inten-
sive products. A carbon tax
is the remedy for climate
change that wins overwhelm-
ing support among econo-
mists and policy wonks.

When he was still a candi-

Legal Notice

NOTICE
XANADUE BEACH LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)











Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

















Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)







ECONOMIC VIEW

date, Obama did not exactly
endorse a carbon tax. He
wanted to be elected, and
embracing any tax that hits
millions of middle-class vot-
ers is not a recipe for elec-
toral success. But he did come
tantalizingly close.

What Obama proposed was
a cap-and-trade system for
carbon, with all the
allowances sold at auction. In
short, the system would put a
ceiling on the amount of car-
bon released, and companies
would bid on the right to emit
carbon into the atmosphere.

Such a system is tanta-
mount to a carbon tax. The
auction price of an emission

right is effectively a tax on
carbon. The revenue raised
by the auction gives the gov-
ernment the resources to cut
other taxes that distort behav-
ior, like income or payroll tax-
es.
So far, so good. The prob-
lem occurred as this sensible
idea made the trip from the
campaign trail through the
legislative process. Rather
than auctioning the carbon
allowances, the bill that
recently passed the House
would give most of them
away to powerful special
interests.

The numbers involved are
not trivial. From Congres-
sional Budget Office esti-
mates, one can calculate that
if all the allowances were auc-
tioned, the government could

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KUCHENHAUS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

raise $989 billion in proceeds
over 10 years. But in the bill
as written, the auction pro-
ceeds are only $276 billion.

Obama understood these
risks. When asked about a
carbon tax in an interview in
July 2007, he said: “I believe
that, depending on how it is
designed, a carbon tax accom-
plishes much of the same
thing that a cap-and-trade
program accomplishes. The
danger in a cap-and-trade sys-
tem is that the permits to emit
greenhouse gases are given
away for free as opposed to
priced at auction. One of the
mistakes the Europeans made
in setting up a cap-and-trade
system was to give too many
of those permits away.”

Congress is now in the
process of sending Obama a
bill that makes exactly this
mistake.

How much does it matter?
For the purpose of efficiently
allocating the carbon rights,
it doesn’t. Even if these rights
are handed out on political
rather than economic
grounds, the “trade” part of
“cap and trade” will take care
of the rest. Those companies
with the most need to emit
carbon will buy carbon
allowances on newly formed
exchanges. Those without
such pressing needs will sell
whatever allowances they are
given and enjoy the profits
that resulted from Congress’s
largess.

The problem arises in how
the climate policy interacts
with the overall tax system.
As the president pointed out,
a cap-and-trade system is like
a carbon tax. The price of car-
bon allowances will eventu-
ally be passed on to con-
sumers in the form of higher
prices for carbon-intensive

products. But if most of those
allowances are handed out
rather than auctioned, the
government won’t have the
resources to cut other taxes
and offset that price increase.
The result is an increase in
the effective tax rates facing
most Americans, leading to
lower real take-home wages,
reduced work incentives and
depressed economic activity.

The hard question is
whether, on net, such a policy
is good or bad. Here you can
find policy wonks on both
sides. To those who view cli-
mate change as an impending
catastrophe and the distort-
ing effects of the tax system as
a mere annoyance, an imper-
fect bill is better than none at
all. To those not fully con-
vinced of the enormity of
global warming but deeply
worried about the adverse
effects of high current and
prospective tax rates, the bill
is a step in the wrong direc-
tion.

What everyone should
agree on is that the legisla-
tion making its way through
Congress is a missed oppor-
tunity. Obama knows what a
good climate bill would look
like. But despite his immense
popularity and personal
charisma, he appears unable
to persuade Congress to go
along.

As for me, I hope the pres-
ident refuses to sign a bill that
fails to auction most of the
allowances. Some might say
a veto would make the best
the enemy of the good. But
sometimes good is not good
enough.

¢ N Gregory Mankiw is a
professor of economics at
Harvard. He was an adviser
to President George W Bush

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ROCKYROAD STREAM INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JAMESVILLE ALPS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KOTULEIKO LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VENEZUELA BAY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
FENSTER SLOPES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EVERQUEST CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEW BASEL INT’L LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BAMBOO HILLS VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TEKLANIKA INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of August 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 11B



INSIGHT



FROM page 14B

peppers by 23 per cent — not
to mention pork, by 60 per
cent.

The impression I was left
with was that the country is
benefiting from a business-
minded, youthful and driven
Ministry of Agriculture, which
is systematically identifying
what is holding back agricul-
ture from achieving its full
potential and going after it.

The Ministry’s vision
extends down to the commu-
nity level by way of the Rural
Agricultural Development
Authority (RADA), a statu-
tory body whose staff — who
are required to undergo 60
hours of continued education
a year — provides technical
advice on farming, marketing
and implementing new pro-
jects to local farmers.

Youth In Agriculture

Meanwhile, major emphasis
is being placed on youth
involvement in agriculture in
order to ensure that there are
ongoing generations of
skilled, technically-orientat-
ed agriculturalists.

While at present the aver-
age Jamaican farmer is not
formally educated and is in
his/her mid-50s, planners are
calling for 570 new farmers to
replace those who leave the
sector each year, and stake-
holders want them to be
young and technologically-
savvy.

The country has four agri-
cultural institutions which
each turn out hundreds of
well-equipped agriculturalists
into the workforce every year,
but the most recent govern-
ment found that this was not
enough.

Jamaican children are now
benefitting from Govern-
ment’s School farm pro-
gramme, which has seen
farms added to 401 of the
public schools since last year.
By 2011, the Ministry expects
that every school will have its
own farm.

The idea is to ensure that
children, who are already
being taught agriculture as
part of their curriculum, get
the hands-on experience that
will really make them profi-
cient modern farmers.

In the knowledge that
access to land and funding is a
primary obstacle to ambitious
would-be farmers — particu-
larly young ones — the gov-
ernment is developing several
new programmes through the
Ministry of Agriculture,
specifically designed to bene-
fit young people looking to
get into a career in the sec-
tor.

“In one of them, we will put
(the young farmer) on a fair-
ly large plot — 10 acres —
and we say we’re going to give
you these high value crops,
we'll assist you with the mar-
keting, we give you support
and you go ahead and pro-
duce,” said Mr Panton.

“On a smaller plot we are
looking at introducing anoth-
er concept — the EMMIS
programme — an easily man-
aged multiple income stream
project.”

“Essentially what we want
to do is take a small farmer,
put them on that plot, where
you will have a greenhouse,
bees, maybe an intensive goat
rearing, pig rearing or chicken
rearing facility, where that
young person can literally eas-
ily manage those three and at
the same time they are get-

FAMILY I

ecuring our food



JERVIS ROWE, greenhouse pioneer, inspects his crop of Romaine lettuce, which will be sold directly to a selection of hotels on the island...

ting income from all of those
three.

“The idea is that with
young people, when they are
going into agriculture, they
want to know that they are
going to make money, we all
want to know that. And we
can demonstrate using these
select crops that, yes, you can
do well. It requires a little dis-
cipline, it requires you to be
dedicated, but what we are
doing with this is changing the
focus of young people from
an urban drift to staying in
the rural area and live a
lifestyle that is quite frankly
just wonderful,” said Mr Pan-
ton.

At the Denbigh show, day
one of which was dedicated
to “Youth In Agriculture”,
young agricultural students
showcased their “value
added” creations made from
produce grown on the 500-
acre property’s lands.

Students engaged in the
Youth in Agriculture pro-
gramme, some of whom this
newspaper met, were ambi-
tious, proud of their work and
had high hopes of a successful
career in agro-industry once
they graduated from their
respective schools.

Standing in front of an
impressive array of products
— sweets, snacks, jams and
sauces — 27-year-old Dean
Anglin told The Tribune at
the Denbigh show that the
process is as easy as “one, two
three.”

“It’s very easy as long as
you can understand it and
apply the methodology,” he
said.

Anglin said that once he
graduates from the Ebony
Park Heart Academy he
hopes to get a loan to start
his own business.

Fellow student, Nicole
Gray, 19, said that her three
years experience at the acad-

J s —
Sp ae ene
Fee

emy has taught her that
Jamaica “can produce any-
thing it wants.”

“We don’t have to import
anything. What we want is
right here in Jamaica and we
just have to stand up on our
feet and get to the point.

“Food is here for all of us
and we just need to accept the
fact and get out of using all
of those foreign materials,”
said the young farmer and
agro-processor who said she
hopes to work at the academy
once she graduates before set-
ting up her own factory to cre-
ate popular seasonings and
spices.

She added that she notices
more young women than
before entering the field as
they see the opportunities it
offers them.

“They see it as a means of
getting what they want. They
can plan their own backyard
farm and it makes us as
women feel very independent.
We don’t have to depend on
men,” said the 19 year old.

The Tribune took a tour of
the 500-acre Ebony Park
Heart Academy in Claren-
don, Jamaica, where Anglin,
Gray and Dr Leroy Santiago
have all studied.

The school is free to attend
and generates significant
income from the crops and
livestock grown there, which
include chickens, pigs, sheep,
goats, dairy cows, fruit and
vegetables.

Dr Santiago, a graduate of
the school claims Ebony stu-
dents are the most practical
of all of those who come out
of agricultural education.

They are also well equipped
in the much-needed technical
know-how that is key to 21st
century farming and agri-busi-
ness.

“They are doing agro-pro-
cessing, value added, they are
going out to start their own

LAND DISTRICTS

SPEECH COMPETITION
TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK
3RD - 10TH OCTOBER, 2009

The Department of Public Service will host a Speech Competition as one of the
activities for the Tenth Annual Public Service Week. The competition is open to
Senior High School Students in the Northern, Southern and Central Bahamas.

Students interested in participating should prepare a five minute speech to be
delivered on the topic: “The Public Service - Striving for Excellence in Customer

Service.”

The deadline for the names of students participating should be referred to
the attention of Ms Rose Gibson, Chairperson, Public Service Committee,
Department of Public Service by 4th September, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 computer system will be awarded to the winners. The first
runners-up will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winner will be announced during the Tenth Annual Public Service Week
Awards Ceremony scheduled for Saturday, 10th October, 2009.

Students wishing to participate can obtain further details regarding the requirements
for entry from their Language Arts Teacher of Family Island Administrator, in

their respective district.



businesses. They are going to
be making juices, processing,
bottling stuff, they are excited
about doing that. And so even
though (Jamaica’s) money is
sliding at $88 (Jamaican dol-
lars) to $1 (US dollar), and
IMF has us by the throat,
we’ve got about 3 million peo-
ple, we still are a country
whereby we are producing
second generation farmers,
agriculturalists, the next gen-
eration, and that’s what real-
ly makes or builds a nation
and its agricultural economy
— agricultural education.”

While all of them are
respectable professions, it was
extremely refreshing to meet
young people who were
inspired by the idea of putting
their brain cells to something
other than the traditional
Bahamian pursuits of law,
medicine or politics.

Advancing our food securi-
ty is about raising awareness
of the opportunity the sector
represents for young people
to develop careers that are
both intellectually and finan-
cially rewarding.

Based on the young stu-
dents I met, and observations
from others in the industry,
an agricultural education also
has social benefits — teach-
ing young people discipline,
initiative, responsibility and
punctuality.

Greenhouse

With technology considered
one of the key pillars of agri-
cultural advancement in
Jamaica by the present

administration under Prime
Minister Bruce Golding’s
Jamaica Labour Party the
government is emphasising
greenhouse technology as the
way for the country to revi-
talise its farming sector and
increase its food security.

Jervis Rowe, described by
some as the “father of the
greenhouse” in Jamaica,
began his life as a traditional
outdoor farmer but felt that
there must be a better way to
achieve his agricultural goals,
without being thwarted by the
threats posed to crops grown
in an outdoor environment.

Having developed a green-
house design that he says
“works very well” he is now
finding that Jamaicans from
“all stratas of society” are
interested in getting into
greenhouse farming — which,
if done properly, can greatly
increase a farmer’s output and
income on a given plot of
land, improve the quality of
crops, land and water use effi-
ciency and resistance to
adverse weather.

Now, at the same time as
running his Abbey Gardens
farm, where he grows
Romaine lettuce in abun-
dance for large hotels, he pro-
duces greenhouses for farm-
ers across the country.

“T thought that there must
be some easier way to get
done what you need to get
done. Well it wasn’t easier but
it was far, far better,”
explained Mr Rowe.

“Over a period of time I
tried different designs and it
worked out well.

“So here we are now fabri-

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()) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

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TENDER

Provision of Vending Machines

The College of the Bahamas

invites Tenders for the services described below.

Bidders are required to collect the tender documents from the

Portia Smith Building

located at the Oakes Field Campus
Contact Mrs, Elvina Bastian at 302-4516

Tenders are to be addressed to:

Ms. Cheryl Simms
OF Finance

The College of the Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to the College on or before August 14th, 2009,

No later that 3pm

Submission should be marked as follows:

Tender 01,09

PROPOSAL TO PROVIDE VENDING MACHINE SERVICES
AT THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

The College of the Bahamas

Reserves the right to accept or reject all proposals

For all enquiries regarding the tender site visit
Contact Mr. Julian Miller at
(242)-302-4507, (242)-302-4325 or (242)-376-3051

The site visit will take place on Thursday August 6th 2009 at 10:00am
at The College of the Bahamas’ Oaks Field Campus at the

Physical Plant building.


PAGE 12B, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



FROM page 11B

cating them from metal and
putting them up all over the
country.”

“We have the technology
at all scales. It all depends on
what level you are going to
go in at, and that will deter-
mine the people who will
become interested.”

“The richest man in
Jamaica wouldn’t mind if he
had some greenhouses, and
the ordinary farmer is always
telling me that ‘Oh boy’, he
has to get a greenhouse.”

“The present government
is actually paying a lot of
attention to it and I think the
news is getting out there and
it’s really developing a whole
lot of interest.”

Greenhouse technology will
increase the typical yield of a
particular plot of land “ten-
fold”, said Rowe. He said the
Bahamas would do well to get
into it if it wants to improve
its food security and create
new economic opportunities.

“Jamaica is trying to revi-
talise their industry and they
have seen where greenhouse
technology will be the way
that they have to go. You
don’t have to do the same
thing, but you can look down
low, and you can look up high
— Canada, say, or Holland
— and that’s where green-
houses are too. The people
below you are trying to devel-
op that technology, the people
above you have that technol-
ogy, so pretty much that’s
what you should be looking
to do,” he added.

“My entire farm would be
captured on two and a half
acres and that keeps me very,
very busy. The idea is if you
have a space there must be a
plant in that space at all
times.”

Linkages with Hotels and
Resorts

Jamaica’s economy also
benefits from significant link-
ages between agriculturalists
and another pillar of the
country’s economy, tourism,
and is looking to further
extend this relationship.

An example of the coun-
try’s success in this regard and
the potential for each partner
in the equation to benefit can
be seen in the connection
between the Sandal’s resort
and Jamaica’s farmers.

In the mid-1990s Sandals

Securing our foo



TWENTY SEVEN-YEAR-OLD Dean Anglin (wearing hat) and a group of his fellow Ebony Park Heart Academy students wait to see how their

products faired in the Youth In Agriculture competition at the Denbigh Agiricultural and Industrial Show...

was the first hotel chain to
forge a relationship with
Jamaica’s farmers when it
approached several senior
agriculturalists and asked
them if they could find a way
by which Jamaica could pro-
duce much more of the crops
they imported to feed their
guests.

Pilot projects were run on a
number of farms throughout
Jamaica with crops such as
cantaloupe, broccoli and zuc-
chini, and ultimately within a
year the chain was able to
stop importing some of the
products altogether, simulta-
neously creating a consistent
market for hundreds of farm-
ers.

Glendon Harris, President
of the JAS, noted that today

similar linkages exist with the
Holiday Inn and Superclubs
chains, among others.

An Information Centred
Strategy

Another factor in the Min-
istry of Agriculture’s strate-
gy to advance agriculture is
that, according to Chief Tech-
nical Officer Mark Panton,
everything it does is “market
driven.”

Masses of data is collected
from producers and proces-
sors, and a picture is devel-
oped of where opportunities
lie in the local and export
market for farmers to exploit.

Farmers are assisted and
directed towards developing
their farms in a way that
responds to specific demands
and supply chain irregulari-

ties which have seen farmers
unable to find buyers for their
produce and local agro-
processors unable to find raw
materials are being ironed
out.

The Ministry produces an
impressive and up to date
array of easily readable and
obtainable informational
leaflets describing the state of
each type of farming in
Jamaica — whether it be
sweet potatoes, cocoa, honey
production or peppers — and
the advantages, costs and
returns which can be expected
from entering that area.

A National Farming Body

On the civil society side, the
Jamaica Agricultural Society
has made leaps and bounds
in promoting the sector in the

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last few years.

Chairman of the Caribbean
Farming Association, former
JAS President Senator Nor-
man Grant, notes that while
there have been Bahamian
representatives at executive
meetings of the Caribbean
Farmers Association there is a
noticeable absence of a
national farming body in the
Bahamas.

“T think that is something
that needs to be looked at to
generate interest from stake-
holders, and to give the sector
a united voice,” he told The
Tribune.

Importers are a strong lob-
bying bloc when it comes to
government policy and farm-
ers in the Bahamas could ben-
efit from having a louder say.

The JAS has played a piv-
otal role in the drive towards
food security.

After taking over as Presi-
dent of the JAS in 2004 Mr
Grant pushed the rural agen-
da forward, launching a major
campaign to increase produc-
tion and consumption of agri-
cultural produce. He also
made strides towards ensur-
ing that there is now more
access to affordable loans for
farmers, improved rural infra-
structure, research and devel-



opment and land availability.

“There were so many chal-
lenges but I would say with
concentrated work, engage-
ment with the government,
engagement with private sec-
tor and all stakeholders I real-
ly feel that we have moved to
a level where agriculture is
now the sector that gives
countries like Jamaica the
greatest opportunity to pull
itself out of debt in the long
run,” he said.

The Ministry of Agriculture
(Bahamas).

If you ask Dr Leroy Santi-
ago, animal and agricultural
scientist, and consultant to the
Jamaican government on agri-
culture (he co-authored the
country’s agricultural mani-
festo), The Bahamas Ministry
of Agriculture is in the dol-
drums. Dr Santiago said that
in his experience of working
with the Ministry, a large part
of what is holding back our
agricultural development is
that it is stocked with aging
technocrats who lack the sci-
entific know-how and the dri-
ve to take the steps necessary
to push Bahamian agriculture
to the next level.

“The Ministry of Agricul-
ture has a lot of old heads. It
has had the same people for
decades — the whole time —
so there’s a limit to science
and technology and embrac-
ing new methods.

“You need people to accept
change. If not now, when?
This is the main hindrance,
along with poor work ethics.
You hear a lot of talk, but see
little action.”

Dr Santiago said that dur-
ing his time in Nassau, where
he successfully undertook an
embryo transfer project,
which improved the quality
and quantity of Bahamian
goat and sheep stocks setting
the country on the path
towards greater self-suffi-
ciency in meat production, he
believed Ministry employees
felt “challenged and threat-
ened” when confronted with
suggestions as to how to
improve agriculture.

Meanwhile, officials are too
often keeping training oppor-
tunities from farmers who
could benefit from them.

“You need to empower
farmers. You need to get
farmers to go on orientations
overseas and then let him
come back and help build his
country,” said Dr Santiago.

Jamaica, a country which
lacks the financial resources
of the Bahamas, has proven
that food security and the
employment and wealth
opportunities it creates is an
achievable goal worth striv-
ing for. Is the Bahamas ready
to step up to the mark?

e If you would like to com-
ment on this article, email
alowe@tribunemedia.net

rr |





aL

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST

MONDAY, AUGUST 10TH, 2009, PAGE 13B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MarINE FORECAST













Te, mitts LeBIIL



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; Le Today Tuesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
ai ! ry = . : we High = Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 85° F
# = =" ~~. -. om 0| 1|2 3|4|5|6| 8|9|t Fc FIC FC FIC Tuesday: Eat 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet __5-15 Miles 85° F
pee “aX RK a | ee eee ee ee ee
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oars ORLANDO A Ankara, Turkey 81/27 Sa/12 s 79/26 48/8 s | ABACO Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 82°F
Hi h:93°F/34°C _ =—=s Some sunshine with Mainly clear. Partly sunny with a Mostly sunny with a Partly sunny, a Partly sunny, a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 86/30 71/21 s 86/30 72/22 s Tuesday: _ E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 5-15 Miles 82° F
“7a F/2C i ” a thunderstorm. thunderstorm. thunderstorm. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 5713 45/7 pc 5O15 46/7 c
i Ow: /4— @ ins High: 90° High: gg° High: gg° High: 90° Bangkok 90/32 82/27 t 90/32 81/27 t
bL hs é ene > a 3 > Barbados 86/30 77/25 pc 86/30 77/25 sh
TAMPA Ke | High: 89 Low: 80 Low: 80 Low: 81 Low: 80 Low: 80 Se ESS Barcelona 81/27 69/20 t 8227 71/21 pc my tia
pa Ls ; I ET Bain 95/35 68/20 pc 100/37 70/24 s
High: 92° F/33° C (i 106°-84° F 97°-88° F 102°-83° F 105°-85° F High _HiL(ft.) Low _Ht(f.) = Bn cone 77s ee dee
Low: 77° F/25°C ae - The Sen a an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 1110am. 28 4:55am. 0.2 Belgrade 89/31 65/18 pc 91/32 63/17 r
a @ _ s elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 11:26pm. 25 5:25pm. 04 Berlin 72/29 59/15 t 73/22 59/15 pc
a ——— CT ne Tuesday 1e5Tam. 29 Batam 02 Bermuda 81/27 75/23 s 81/27 75/23 s
BoP ll 61pm. 0.5 Bogota 66/18 45/7 c 66/18 44/6 pc
, ei r Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Wednesday! 2.09 am. 04 6413am. 02 Brussels 76/24 54/12 pc 75/23 55/12 pe
: - ABACO Temperature 12:39 p.m. 29 7:05pm. 05 Budapest 85/29 61/16 pc 76/24 61/6 sh
F “ -*. 5h. 00° £/99° HiQh oaeccececsssssscesssssseessssssesssssetesssseees 93° F/34° C Buenos Aires 64/17 50/10 pe 64/17 52/11 s
/ , @ ae a Low aie Fa7° ¢ Thursday ee bore 08 Cairo 97/96 77/25 s 97/36 72/22 s
: ore ow: 78° F/ Normal high... gorraz2c CE 95/35 81/27 t 93/33 81/27 t
? : Py Normal low 76° F/24° C Calgary 75/23 48/8 c 72/22 47/8 pc
; ia @ WEST PALMBEACH a co 94° F/35° C STE Cancun 93/33 71/21 pc 93/33 70/21 s
’ eel High: 90° F/32° C =<— Last year's low aieaeaulaeat iets, 77° F/25° C ; " Caracas 82/27 72/22 t 81/27 72/22 t
ae Low: 77° F/25°C Ve, ~ Precipitation _ bees tn a.m. LL gag ea p.m. Casablanca 81/27 63/17 s 85/29 66/18 s
~ ‘alll ; As of 2 p.m. yesterday oo... 0.00" unsel....... ‘40 p.m. Moonset. ... 1Uroo a.m. Copenhagen 72/22 60/15 sh 71/21 57/13 pc
© . FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Fe Year to date 20. last New First Full Dublin 66/18 54/12 pc 68/20 54/12 pc
High: 90° F/32° C @ High:87° F/31°C Normal year to date oo... 26.76" a : a Frankfurt 73/25 60/15 t 80/26 58/14 c j
Low: 79° F/26°C Fs > Low: 75° F/24° C Geneva 78/25 56/13 t 77/25 59/15 s
a ae = Mae tats one ets acy
- q ‘ Forecasts and graphics provided by ay L avana 7 s 7 s NY Sh Miami
-— MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Aug.13 Aug. 20 Aug. 27 Helsinki 77/25 55/12 s 73/22 55/12 1 ie 91/79
a High: $1° F/33°C ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 93/33 84/28 pc 91/32 84/28 t aE
i 35°F /26°C NASSAU High: 91° F/33° C Islamabad 110/43 86/30 s 109/42 86/30 s Soe Saige
F High: 89° F/32°C Low: 77° F/25°C Istanbul 82/27 64/17 s 80/26 66/18 s Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
19 sea 9 Jerusalem 84/28 64/17 s 84/28 65/18 5 Bk.) Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm fifi.
od i. — a F27°C = Johannesburg 63/20 45/7 s 68/20 45/7 s [v=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mengumii-
KEY WEST = i. Kingston 89/31 79/26 sh 89/31 79/26 sh am ‘50s 60s 70s 80s /603//HOUSN/aTRa!
High: 90° F/32°C 9 CAT ISLAND Lima 71/21 59/15 s 72/22 59/15 s 10s -Os i081) 10s 20s 308) 40s
Low: 80°F/27°C High: 88° F/31°C London 73/22 59/15 pc 77/25 61/16 pc
: Low: 73° F/23°C Madrid 90/32 63/17 pc 88/31 63/17 pc
@ Manila 88/31 81/27 t 88/31 81/27 t
: Pas Mexico City 75/23 49/9 t 76/24 49/9 pc oye A mr,
——~ all , Monterrey 105/40 75/23 s 104/40 75/23 pc
a GREAT EXUMA ; SAN SALVADOR Montreal 81/27 63/17 t 75/23 59/15 pc
i High: 90° F/32° C High: 91° F/33°C Moscow 70/21 52/11 pe 75/23 56/13 s
Low: 78° F/26° C L OSE Mae Munich 76/24 58/14 t 77/25 54/12 t
. ow: 75° F/24°C wa
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ier : : Hees ee oa pe ane eam Oe ry
highs and tonights's lows. : > , cama pC
: , Low: 77° F/25° C a & Oslo 68/20 51/10 sh 72/22 53/11 pc : Yo LI an Be Blown
he - HY Paris 77/25 60/15 s 75/23 58/14 c
Prague 78/25 59/15 t 77/25 55/12 s A A H
LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 78/25 63/17 s 70/21 65/18 + W aly V ur r cane
High: 91° F/33°C Riyadh 113/45 86/30 s 111/43 84/28 s
Today "Tuesday Today Tuesday Today Tuesday MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 89/31 79/26 sh 90/32 79/26 sh Txt 5 have excellent i insurance
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W ai High: 91° F/33°C San Juan 73/22 39/3 s 79/26 41/5 pe overac c no matter which
Fe FIC Fie FIC Fe FIC Fie FIC Fe FIC Fe FIC Low: 72° F/22°C ee aie bs mi ie ren d bl
Albuquerque 92/33 66/18 s 93/33 65/18 t Indianapolis 90/32 69/20 t 84/28 66/18 t Philadelphia 96/35 76/24 pce 93/33 74/23 t antago. be be way the win OWS.
Anchorage 69/20 50/10 s 66/18 5140 s Jacksonville 94/34 71/21 s 93/83 74/23 t Phoenix 107/41 82/27 s 109/42 85/29 s cRONED LAN HL Santo eu ee 732 7 B6i80 rs 7 y
Atlanta 94/34 73/22 po 92/33 73/22 t Kansas City 91/32 68/20 t 82/27 64/17 pc Pittsburgh 90/32 68/20 t 82/27 BING t RAGGEDISLAND — Uist:93°F/34" a0 Paulo s s e
Atlantic City 100/37 75/23 pc 96/35 68/20 t Las Vegas 103/39 74/23 s 105/40 81/27 s Portland,OR 78/25 61/16 pc 80/26 59/15 pc ewe Low: 74° F/23°C las se eee pe a a s Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 97/36 76/24 pc 95/35 72/22 t Little Rock 96/35 75/23 po 94/34 73/22 t Raleigh-Durham 99/37 73/22 s 96/35 71/21 s Low:70°F/21°C =< * sen oT B63 52/11 =. 68/20 50/10 =
Boston 90/32 73/22 pc 85/29 68/20 t Los Angeles 84/28 64/17 pc 86/30 64/17 pc St. Louis 92/33 74/23 t 83/28 67/19 ¢t . oneare ORE Pe ERT a
Buffalo 85/29 67/19 t 77/25 6146 pc Louisville 91/32 74/23 t 90/32 70/21 t Salt Lake City 86/30 60/15 s 92/83 63/17 s GREAT INAGUA wr Tula 99197 75/93 1 91/99 79/26
Charleston, SC 96/35 73/22 s 95/35 75/23 s Memphis 94/34 76/24 t 92/33 74/23 t San Antonio 99/37 78/25 pc 99/87 77/25 pc Se . |
: ee : High: 92° F/33° C Toronto 82/27 61/16 t 79/26 59/15 pc E
Chicago 88/31 65/18 t 81/27 63/17 pc Miami 91/32 79/26 t 89/31 78/25 t San Diego 77/25 679 pe 78/25 67/19 pc Low: 75° F/24°C Trinidad 75/23 51/10 pc 30/26 56/13 s (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Cleveland 91/32 69/20 t 80/26 6246 pc Minneapolis 83/28 65/18 t 88/31 66/18 s San Francisco 80/26 58/14 pc 79/26 56/13 pc ; aneman 64/17 7/3. sh 70/21 56/13
Dallas 99/37 80/26 s 100/37 78/25 s Nashville 92/33 73/22 t 90/32 73/22 t Seattle 70/21 58/14 sh 74/23 58/14 pc Gianna 84/28 70/21 pc 78/25 60/15 + ~ New Providence f Grand Abaco Eleuthera Exuma
Denver 82/27 55/12 t 89/31 58/14 s New Orleans 91/32 78/25 t 91/32 76/24 t Tallahassee 97/36 73/22 po 95/35 73/22 t = “y Warsaw 78/25 57/13 s 66/18 56/13 1 Tee (242) 294-9555 ff Teds (242) Tek: (242) 367-4204 fF Tek (242) Tee-2662 ff Tek (242) 19-2904
Detroit 89/31 66/18 t 83/28 62/16 pc New York 97/36 77/25 pe 90/32 76/24 t Tampa 92/33 77/25 t 91/32 77/25 t Winnipeg 32/97 BOIS s 85/29 63/17 s .
Honolulu 89/31 77/25 c 89/31 77/25 c OklahomaCity 98/36 71/21 s 96/35 69/20 pc Tucson 99/37 75/23 s 101/38 76/24 pc VW :
Houston 93/33 78/25 t 96/35 76/24 pc Orlando 93/33 74/23 pc 93/33 76/24 t Washington,DC 98/36 77/25 pc 94/34 74/23 t Re eee TS foe Pee on ie
MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009

bk



“be





i Cur 1

The stories behind the news





By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

here are many good
reasons why the
Bahamas Govern-
ment should be
talking about food
security. In the Caribbean the
concept is framed around the
idea that countries have for
too long been in the vulnera-
ble position of being almost
totally dependent on imports
from such countries as the
US for their food. They now
have to become more self-
sufficient in feeding
themselves by growing
more of what they eat.

The food price crisis of 2007 and
2008, and the global financial crisis
that is still upon us both provide
incentives for it.

Future global population growth
and changing consumption habits as
well as declining arable land and
water supplies, as well as glaring evi-
dence of the grand returns that can
be had from agricultural enterprises,
could all have urged us to concrete
action by now.

And yet the contribution that agri-
culture makes to our GDP, and our
output of Bahamian grown and pro-
duced goods, is falling.

According to data compiled by
the Department of Statistics, the
Agriculture and Fisheries contribu-
tion to Bahamian Gross Domestic
Product fell from $122,874,000 in
2004 to $88,486,000 in 2008. Fish-
eries represented the mass of this
reduction, with its little sister, agri-
culture, contributing $31,439,000 in
2004 and $27,875 in 2008.

While in 2005 we produced 61,692
short tons of agricultural goods,
according to the Ministry of Agri-
culture, that dropped to 57,410 in
2007.

When measured by typical eco-
nomic indicators, our prosperity as a
nation is high — and for this we must
be thankful — but just as we are one
of the most dependent countries in
the Caribbean when it comes to our
dependence on foreign oil imports
for our power, we are behind the
eightball on agriculture and without
good reason.

On suitable occasions, Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham has espoused
the virtues of growing our agricul-
tural sector to its full potential — at
present, it is only at 10 per cent of
that, he said in February.

Clearly we could be doing a lot
better than we are — but this takes
vision and commitment and new
ideas in a old ministry and an under-
standing among the Bahamian peo-
ple — most especially its youth — of
what agriculture can be.

During a recent trip to Jamaica to
attend the 57-year-old Denbigh
Agricultural and Industrial Show,
which highlights the best of the coun-
try’s agriculture as well as its poten-





Photos by Alison Lowe

FUTURE GLOBAL POPULATION
GROWTH, changing consumption
habits, declining water supplies and
glaring evidence of the grand returns
that can be had from agricultural
enterprises, could all have urged us
to concrete action by now...

tial as a viable vehicle to enhance
national development, The Tribune
was impressed by the country’s com-
mitment to agriculture and the
rewards that that commitment is
reaping. The three-day show — July
31 to August 2 — was held at Den-
bigh’s show grounds in May Pen
Clarendon. “Grow what we eat and
eat what we grow” was its theme.

Addressing the show, Prime Min-
ister Bruce Golding of Jamaica told
a crowd of thousands that agricul-
ture should no longer be dismissed
by Caribbean nations in favour of
more “glamorous sectors” — such
as tourism.

He was echoed by President of
Guyana and Caricom Chairman
Bharrat Jagdeo, an agricultural

advocate in the region, who said that
if we can give “incentives” to the
tourism and financial sectors, we
should give it to agriculture.

This mindset is what is guiding
Jamaica towards greater food secu-
rity, as it should guide the Bahamas.

During my trip, I was over-
whelmed by the extent to which our
near neighbour is feeding itself —
almost every type of vegetable, fruit
and meat consumed in Jamaica’s
homes, restaurants and fast food
chains is grown there to some extent,
and in some cases, imports of foods
that are also grown locally have now
dropped by 25, 35 or even 60 per
cent in the case of pork.

There is a wide chasm between
the level of emphasis being placed
on the sector by their government
and ours — and it shows.

While agricultural output in The
Bahamas has fallen, in Jamaica it
has grown — contributing to a 28
per cent reduction in imports in
2008.

Mr Golding congratulated farmers
at Denbigh for responding to gov-
ernment’s agricultural call to arms
and used strong words, saying that
the country must not return to the
“psychological prison” which saw it
happily sending away its money to
buy imports to feed itself.

In the past Jamaica fell into the
“luxury” of allowing its tourism,
bauxite and remittance dollars to
tide it through as it purchased food
from overseas, but that the global
financial crisis and the food price



crisis of 2007-2008 represented a
“rude awakening” for the country,
and his government.

President Jagdeo praised Mr
Golding’s government as being
“ahead of the curve” in putting in
place necessary “ingredients for agri-
culture to prosper.”

Mr Golding, Mr Jagdeo, and Min-
ister of Agriculture Dr Chris Tufton
were united in the message they sent
to the Caribbean — that agriculture
has been treated as the “bastard
child” of the region’s economies, and
additional steps taken to stimulate it
must not fall by the wayside when a
recovery from the latest crisis
enthralling the world takes over.

The Bahamas, which spent $500
million last year on food imports,
would do very well to heed their
message, delivered with conviction.

For too long we have made excus-
es about our agricultural poverty —
not enough land, bad soil, difficulty
in transporting produce — but with
vision, technology, and most impor-
tantly, the involvement of the
younger generation, much can be
overcome.

In its place, greater economic
diversity, prosperity and indepen-
dence can be found for a nation and
its people on a societal and individ-
ual level, not to mention food which
reaches our shelves in many cases
in a fresher and more nutritious state
than those we currently import.

In Jamaica, the three quarters
beginning December 2008 and end-
ing June 2009, recorded increases in



Securing our food



DENTON HoPwooD, a 46-
| year-old bell pepper (shown
below), lettuce and sweet
| potato farmer who has only
| been in the industry for three
years said he enjoys the

lifestyle his work offers...















the amount of agricultural produce
totalling 57 per cent — the most
recent quarter having seen the
largest hike, at 22.3 per cent.

It’s figures like this and the con-
tinuing efforts of the government,
led by prime Minister Bruce Gold-
ing, that are behind its commitment
— backed by the 60,000 member
strong Jamaican Agricultural Society
— that within the next two years,
the contribution agriculture makes to
the country’s Gross Domestic Prod-
uct will at least double from the pre-
sent 5.7 per cent.

In 2008 the country was able to
reduce its imports of carrots by 29
per cent, tomatoes by 35 per cent,
cabbage by 25 per cent, and sweet

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PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.213MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNSHINE WITH T-STORM HIGH 89F LOW 80F B y KARIN HERIG Tribune Staff Reporter k herig@tribunemedia.net A MOTHER of two was brutally slain in front of her children and other relatives in what family and friends believe was a case of mistaken identity with devas tating consequences. Tagia Soles-Armony, 29, was shot in front of her grandmother’s house on Sea Grape Avenue, in Sea Breeze, on Friday night at around 8pm as she was taking her three-month-old son from his car seat. She is the country’s 50th homicide victim for the year. Her heartbroken family now has to come to terms with what seems to have been a senseless killing of a young woman who was described by all who knew her as “fun-loving, outgoing and lovable”. Friends of the dead woman, who was a former student of Xavier’s Lower School and St Andrew’s School, told The Tribune that a gunman approached Mrs Soles-Armony as she was just getting out of the car, a white 2008 Honda Accord, to go into her grandmother’s house. “Her oldest son had just run up to ring her grammy’s door bell. She was getting the baby when a man holdWoman killed in ‘case of mistaken identity’ The Tribune YOUR PASSPORT TO MISS UNIVERSE B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com /77 57:616/ )VaWVM' The 50th murder victim... mother brutally slain in front of her young children THE Prime Minister and his deputy have been challenged to a debate on the port relocation issue. Senator Jerome Fitzgerald claimed last week’s town hall meeting as an “outright failure” and a “public relations exercise” which proved that ministers cannot answer public questions of the matter. He added: “After attending the town hall meeting we are convinced that a continued debate on the movement of the contain er port with any of the three presenting ministers would be a waste of time. “The failure of the three minBy ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A SUSPECTED serial rapist who has struck more than five times within a month in Eastern New Providence has police puzzled, The Tribune has learned. The man, who has been consistently described by his female victims, has caused police at the Elizabeth Estates station to implement two new patrols in the early morning hours and see that bushes in the area are cleared to remove opportunities for him to hide himself or evidence from the scene of his crimes. He targets homes where women are living alone or where the man of the household is not present at the time, The Tribune was told. According to a concerned police source, senior officers are reluctant to inform the public of the attacks which have been taking place pri marily between 3am and 6am so as not to cause a panic. But women living in the area have told The Tribune they think it is “ridiculous” that they have not been informed of the new threat in their community. A police source said the perpetrator talks to his vicI N S I D E SEEPAGETHREEFORFULL DETAILS SEE page 10 ABOVE: Tagia Soles-Armony was shot in front of her grandmoth er’s house in Sea Breeze. ‘Serial rapist’ strikes more than five times Two men drown over the weekend By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net TWO men, aged 33 and 40, drowned this weekend in waters off New Providence. The 33-year-old, who police have not identified, was found submerged in the water in an area of Jaws Beach off Lyford Cay on Saturday. He had been with a family member and others on a diving trip when he went missing. A search was launched and after being found he was taken to hospital where he died a short time later. A man identified by police as Granville Francis was also discovered drowned in the water near Potter’s Cay Dock at around 10am Saturday. The body was removed by police and examined. An autopsy is to take place to determine the cause of death. Foul play is not suspected in either case, police said. SEE page 10 PM, deputy challenged to port relocation debate SEE page nine Jerome Fitzgerald TAGIA SOLES-ARMONY , 29, with her oldest son Chelan Armony, who is now one year old.

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THE MISS U NIVERSE contestants competed for the “Best Figure” category fol-l owing the swimsuit presentation at Our Lucaya Radisson Beach and Golf Resort in Grand Bahama last night. The 84 Miss Universe 2009 contestants sashayed down the catwalk showing off the swim wear of BSC, the official sponsor of the pageant’s swimsuit event. Miss Bahamas Kiara Sher man received a non-stop standing ovation from the crowd and people waved Bahamian flags in support of their queen. Miss Great Britain Clair Cooper and Miss Jamaica Carolyn Yapp were also the recipients of enthusiastic applause. President of the Grand Bahama Port Authority Ian Rolle thanked all those who came out in support of the Miss Universe pageant. Shelley Carey and Donald Glass hosted the swimsuit event. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Miss Universe contestants in swimsuit presenta tion CONTESTANTS ON the catwalk at the Our Lucaya Radisson Beach and Golf Resort. THEMISSUNIVERSE contestants pose for a photo in the sunshine. FOLLOWING last night’s Swimsuit Event at the Our Lucaya Resort, in Grand Bahama, the international beauty queens today take part in the Miss Universe Float Parade through New Providence which starts at 1pm leaving Arawak Cay. This evening the contestants will be strutting their stuff for the National Costume Competition held at the Rainforest Theatre in the Wyndham Nassau Resort on Cable Beach starting at 7pm. All Bahamians and foreign nationals residing in the Bahamas are invited to come and wave their national colours in sup port of their country’s queen. General admission is $125, balcony tickets are $100 and VIP tickets are $175. MISSUNIVERSE SCHEDULE Our Lucaya Radisson Beach and Golf Resort hosts event MISSBAHAMAS on the catwalk last night. Photos: Tim Aylen

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IT’S here! TRIBUNE242 , the o nly website to satisfy all your n ews, sport, business, features and advertising requirements. From today at 2pm, and every following day at the same time, y our T ribune the biggest, brightest and best-selling newspaper in the Bahamas – is now available online. L ike its big print sister T he Tribune , TRIBUNE242 will lead the way by bringing you the hottest news stories, theb rightest pictures, in-depth analysis, incisive comment andt he issues which affect you. Along with all your favourite f eatures and the very best in sporting action, advertisers will have a new way to sell their goods and services to the Bahamian and even interna-t ional market. Careful thought has been put i nto what size ads are available, and where they appear on the s ite. This ensures that advertisers get their desired exposure without diminishing the online experience of a reader. Premium ad spots appear on the home page, which is where all visitors first navigate to, and a lso where the top news stories appear. Advertisers can alsos elect to place their ads on the Business page, on the Editorial a nd Insight pages, or target their ads to the various Features sections or local Sports. TRIBUNE242 also has banner advertising opportunities on t he Bahamas’ most extensive online classified section pagea nd on the Obituary section, which will soon be searchable b y name. “We’ve had advertisers calling for weeks, expressing interest in advertising on TRI BUNE242 , and this before t hey’ve even seen the site. We wanted to make sure that wep riced the online ads in a way that even the smallest client will f ind this an affordable and effective advertising option,” said Tribune Advertising Manager Godfrey Arthur. In February, The Tribune launched a PDF flipbook site so that loyal readers in the Family Islands could have their daily news even though high freight prices forced the company to stop sending the physical paper to the islands. The user demograhics gathered and analysed on a regular basis show that even the simple flipbook site has had far more wide reaching appeal. Since that launch, TRIBUNE242 has seen a daily increase in people registering with the site and now thousands of people throughout the Bahamas and across the world make a point of logging on each afternoon to keep up with what’s happening in the country. “What’s particularly unique about the TRIBUNE242 adver tising platform is the ability to begin targeting ads to specific users,” explained TRIBUNE242 Online Editor Jessica Robertson. “We require all site visitors to register and share some basic demographic information with us. Once activated, this feature will enable our advertisers to have ads run only when readers in their target demographic group are online. “This kind of strategy makes for a more valuable advertising option for our clients as well as a m ore beneficial site experience for our readers,” In addition to the banner advertising, TRIBUNE242 will soon offer clients an opportuni-t y to have mini commercials embedded in video articles as well as sponsor daily newslett ers reaching thousands of subscribers. To log on, go to www.tribune242.com Access will be free for a m onth, after which there will be a subscription charge for users. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $3,730 $3,730 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $3,940 $3,940Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza W ong’s Plaza Madeira Street M adeira Street (242 ( 242)326 2335 2 335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank L L a a F F r r o o n n t t e e r r a a L L a a F F r r o o n n t t e e r r a a The Tribune is now online News, sports, business, features and advertising at tribune242.com w ww.tribune242.com www.tribune242.com www.tribune242.com www.tribune242.com THENEW Tribune website carries all of the day’s news (above comprehensive classifieds section (above left all at www.tribune242.com

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EDITOR, The Tribune. My son, Deon Ferguson, i s a graduate from S.C. McPherson which is the f eeder school for Analol Rodgers. He lives in the area of A natol Rodgers. On June 1, 2009 he received a letter f rom S.C. McPherson indicating that he was on Anatol Rodgers School list. I don’tu nderstand why all of a sudden he is being re-routed to Government High School. I n my opinion this is a huge inconvenience for me a nd it makes no sense for the Ministry to offer the busing service to him becauset his takes him two miles out of his area to attend school. C ould you imagine the cost of busing a child for years on the Ministry of Education for a child who lives a stone’s throw away from thef eeder school, Anatol Rodgers? W hat is so vexing about this situation is that he has another sibling slated toa ttend Anatol Rodgers and he is now going to be separ ated from his brother to attend Government High School; this comes afterr eceiving a letter from his feeder school informing us that he would be attendingA natol Rodgers. It is so aggravating now f or us seeing that uniforms were bought along with all the other necessary school supplies that would equip him for September. What do they expect us to do now? I t is my belief that we are being held accountable for t he mistakes of the school, and the District Superintendent seeing that as a parentI followed all of the necessary steps and procedures, t o equip my child for the upcoming academic year. I spoke to the relevant a uthorities to understand exactly what was happening; but what I was being toldd id not make sense to me and as a concerned and u pset parent I feel that something ought to be done about my situation. CONCERNED P ARENT, Nassau, August 5, 209. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm A LTHOUGH police have not confirmed t hat the plane that crashed on a drug run to J amaica was the US registered twin-engine Piper Seneca stolen from North Eleuthera a irport on the August Monday holiday weekend, Tribune sources have confirmed t hat it is in fact the plane. And although it is street talk in Spanish W ells and Harbour Island that at least four p ersons have been picked up in Harbour I sland for questioning in connection with t he theft, police have said nothing. Nor have the names of the two persons killed in the c rash been released, although again street talk it is claimed that they are both from A ndros. The plane, owned by Spanish Wells cont ractor Terry Higgs, was taken from the North Eleuthera airport at about 7am on A ugust 3. A police officer should have been on duty at the airport at the time, but it is not known if he saw anything that would have aroused his suspicion when the plane taxied down the runway for take off. The aircraft w as next seen a few hours later, a heap of burned wreckage with no one to explain h ow it got there on a private road owned by the Windalco Bauxite company about 15 m iles south of Ocho Rios near the St Ann/St Catherine border. Jamaican police told a Tribune reporter that although they know the identity of the two men burned beyond recognition and trapped in the cockpit, they w ere not releasing their names until the next of kin had been notified. Unconfirmed r eports claim that at least one of the men had been arrested earlier for stealing an aircraft a nd for drug smuggling. Jamaican police, convinced that the plane was on a drug mission, confiscated 2,000 lbs of marijuana in St Catherine shortly after the crash. They believe that the stolen air c raft was there to pick up the marijuana for delivery to another destination. A ccording to Jamaican police, although drug smuggling from the Bahamas has a lways been a problem, they have recently seen an increase in this activity. And, like the height of the drug smuggling era in the Bahamas, there has been an increase in murders and drive-by shootings. While we are not suggesting that all of these incidents are drug related, we believe ash appened in the eighties that the drive-by shootings are in some way connected with r etaliation, and, as in the past, retaliation usually led investigators to a drug deal gone wrong. However, too many innocent people are now being caught in the cross-fire, and, although police are constantly confiscating firearms, too many of these lethal weapons are still being smuggled into this c ountry undetected. O n Friday night a young mother was shot i n front of her grandmother’s house as she was taking her three-month-old son out of h is car seat. The drive-by shooting was executed in front of her one-year-old son who h ad run ahead to ring his grandmother’s doorbell. It is claimed that it was a case ofm istaken identity. If this is so, no one knows t he motive for wanting to kill the woman f or whom the bullet was intended. We are n ot suggesting that this incident was drug related, but obviously it was committed by s omeone who is filled with hate and has too much idle time to plot a crime. A nd so what can our overworked police do? Currently they not only have to keep ane ye on persons released on bail by the courts while they await trial, but also other up-andc oming criminals who are entering the fra ternity of the lawless. Presumably, these per sons are all jobless. Other than encouraging the public to step up their cooperation with the police to try to g et the guns off the streets, and to volunteer information to help run these criminals to g round, a way must be found to keep jobless persons, including those on bail and those w ith criminal intent, busy. With Crown land so much in the news these days, we suggest that government select a large tract of arable land, employ an agriculture instructor – one who is himself w ell versed in the way of the land and enthusiastic about making it turn a profit and e mploy these people to feed the country. Today, Jamaica is doing an impressive j ob of feeding itself and providing local pro duce for its hotels. Last year Jamaica reduced its food imports by 28 per cent. In the next two years Jamaica expects its agriculture contribution to the country’s gross d omestic product to at least double from its present 5.7 per cent. F rom July 31 to August 2 Jamaica held its annual agricultural exhibition at the Denb igh show grounds in May Pen Clarendon. It was most impressive. (See The Tribune’s report in Insight, which is included in this edition) . If our courts are in such a shambles that they cannot take care of the case load, and the accused cannot be held in prison for anu nreasonable time without trial, then it is irresponsible to turn them loose on the publ ic. It is naive to think that any business person is going to knowingly employ anyone with a rap sheet. Therefore, there has to be some initiative to get these people busy and off the road. What better way than to send them to the farm, and let them pay their dues by helping to feed the nation. LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net A suggestion to combat criminals ::IMPERIALOPTICAL ::ROSETTASTREETAND ::THEMALL-AT-MARATHON FORMOREINFO CALL 322 OR 393GET A FREE FRAMEwith the purchase of LensesBACK TO SCHOOLAND T’INGSTOUGH ? SALEAPPLIESTOSELECTEDFRAMES.SALEENDSAUGUST31,2009. Why is my son being rerouted to Government High School? EDITOR, The Tribune. Looking at the “official” event advertisem ent, I can’t find where the contestants for Miss Universe will be doing a “walk-a-bout”o n Bay Street, so rationally the business o wners have absolutely no interest, as if t here was any business to be picked up, their b ranches at Atlantis will do that, hopefully. Not being critical, but was it necessary to accredit the contestants with police out-riders with sirens blaring for the drive from L PIA to Atlantis? Come off it, they are not visiting govern ment dignitaries who rightly receive such a status they are just Beauty Queens! The Editor’s comments in her last para graph of today’s edition draws the obvious Dah we miss again! Can’t anyone understand that having a Bay Street store is no longer valuable gotta get into Atlantis and survive or possi bly survive! ABRAHAM MOSS, Nassau, August 4, 2009. Having a Bay Street store is no longer valuable EDITOR, The Tribune. I listened last evening to a certain Ms Cowen from Kerzner International comment on thei mpact of the current event of Miss Teen USA going on at Paradise Island, and just want to ask the dear lady a question: Why would anyonef rom any other country visit The Bahamas for a Miss Teen USA competition other than Ameri cans? It seems even the foreigners in our midst have gotten convinced it is better in The Bahamas. Few international reports say so so we had better see the writing on the wall and awaken from the dream we have been living in for thir ty plus years. H. RAHMING, Nassau, July 30, 2009 EDITOR, The Tribune. Independence Day, July 10th, theme this year is National Pride, but it is obvious the Ministry of Health and Environment have not received the memo from Cabinet. Check Goodman’s Bay and Saunders Beach and the few garbage cans and bins, the new red ones? Already early this morning Saturday full and over-flowing. Well communications seem yet again to have fallen down as usual. So much talk how well we are doing and they ain’t got a clue. Happy National Pride Independence Day let’s hope the Environmental people have enough time to empty the bins on the beach or, oh Lord, what a mess that will be! If only we could harness the talk and recy cle it to BEC! MARCIA HANNA Nassau, July 4, 2009. T ime to wake up – and see the writing on the wall N N a a t t i i o o n n a a l l p p r r i i d d e e ? ?

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By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net SEVERAL members of the PLP blasted the Government yesterday for its “insensitive” and “lacklustre” decision to suspend the Guaranteed Loan scheme for would-be students, saying it must re-think its priorities. MP for Fort Charlotte, Alfred Sears, claimed the move which left the expectations of hundreds of college hopefuls shattered was particularly troublesome given that it was use of the loan programme by the FNM for “partisan political purposes” that compromised its “sustainability and viability” in the first place. Meanwhile, PLP chairman and Englerston MP Glenys Hanna Martin, along with Cat Island MP Phillip Davis, both hit out at the government in separate statements for failing to make any public announcement in relation to the likely suspension of the programme ahead of time. “It is reported that some 300 young Bahamians applied months ago for the award of scholarships only to be told at the ninth hour that not one of them would receive any assistance despite what would have been a reasonable expectation that there would at least be some assistance. “We are told that the rea son for this is ‘due to defaulting loan holders who are either unwilling or unable to repay their obligation and the fact that the guarantee programme has reached its statutory limit’. “It is reported that the defaulting amount is almost $70 million. These are factors and facts which would have been available to the Government long before the month of August and ought to have been shared with the Bahamian public rather than cause hopeful young aspirants and their families to go through the farce of applying for assistance when no such assistance could or would be given,” said Mrs Hanna Martin. “Today children from some 300 families have had their hopes crushed in a most cruel fashion,” she added. Mrs Hanna Martin and Mr Davis suggested that given evidence of declining exam averages revealed last week now is not the time to take steps that restrict the potential of those who are focused on achieving their educational goals. Mr Sears said: “It is inconceivable that the Government would invest $120 million in the New Providence Road Improvement Project, over $50 million in the dredging of the Nassau Harbour and spend millions of dollars on a facelift of the roads from the airport to Atlantis for the Miss Universe Pageant and not be willing properly to fund opportunities for talented Bahamians to pursue tertiary education to advance the national development of The Bahamas.” C M Y K C M Y K THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 5 PLPs slam decision to suspend student loans RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS P HONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 LOCAL NEWS FOUR people were taken into police custody on Friday when a high-powered submachine gun and two other firearms, along with several quantities of ammunition, were d iscovered. The first arrests were made at around 3pm when Drug Enforcement Unit officers in G ladstone Road stopped a green Honda Accord after observing three men inside “with an object.” Once the vehicle was s earched, officers found and seized a submachine gun with 21 live rounds of ammunition. Three men, ages 20, 22 and 3 6 years, are being questioned. At around 6pm, Wulff Road officers acting on a tip went to a bushy area in the vicinity of Cooper’s Terrace, off KempR oad, where they seized a .38mm handgun with two bullets. Meanwhile, a .357mm was a lso taken off the streets hours later at 8pm when DEU officers, executing a search warrant at a h ome in Bamboo Town, found t he gun and six live bullets. A 30-year-old man was take n into custody. Four taken into custody after guns, ammunition are discovered POLICE in Grand Bahama are questioning a woman inc onnection with the stabbing of a 19-year-old girl. T he Grand Bahama teenager, a resident of Bartlette Hill, is in hospital in stable condition after being attacked with a knife in the E igh Mile Rock area on Fri day at around 9.30pm. I nvestigations are ongoing. Police are also continuing t heir investigations into Grand Bahama’s two latest homicides in an attempt to bring them to a speedy clo sure. T he support of the Grand Bahama community is beings olicited in this regard and persons with any additional i nformation are asked to con tact police at 350-3107/8 or 911. Woman questioned in connection with stabbing of girl Alfred Sears

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t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f $FRPSHWLWLYHVDODU\DQGEHQHWVDUHEHLQJRIIHUHG7DSSO\SOHDVHSURYLGH UHVXPHWRWKHDWWHQWLRQRI $SSOLFDWLRQVVKRXOGEHVXEPLWWHGQRODWHUWKDQ The Miss Universe contestants meet with Senator Higgs By A. FELICITY INGRAHAM THE Miss Universe contestants have been told to use a visit to Clifton Heritage National Park as a platform during their reigns as beauty queens. Senator Jacinta Higgs said the very core of Clifton is the habitation of three different civilizations there. She said: “We want them to take away celebration of a past that may not have been harmonious, but we want them to take away healing. “We want them to take away the harmony of what they represent as contestants in this one pageant vying to represent the universe. “We want them to take away heritage – and that’s key because each one of those young women would be able to see here represented in the tour, a part of themselves.” BAHAMASWholesale Agency (Freeport made a $5,000 donation to theb ridge project at Lucayan National Park. W ayne Russell, General Manager of BWA, made the cheque presentation to Karin S anchez, Chairman of the GB regional branch of the Bahamas National Trust at BWA’s Grand Bahama head-q uarters on Milton Street on J uly 31, 2009. Gary Wilfred Burrows, sales manager atB WA was also on hand for t he presentation. In making the donation, Mr Russell said: “We at BWA and the brands we represents uch as Kerrygold, Jumex juices, Festival cleaners, Arizona Iced Tea, McVities biscuits, Jergens lotions, OK floura nd Ruth detergent, feel it is important to give back to the c ommunity. The president of our company, Jeffrey Robertson felt it was important to m ake a financial contribution towards the Bahamas National Trust and the bridge at the Lucayan National Park was an atural choice.The park is one o f Grand Bahama Island’s unique experiences.” M s Sanchez said: “It is a g reat testament to see that we have such community-minded corporate sponsors who recognize the importance oft he work we do.” BW A makes $5,000 donation to the Bahamas National Trust CONTESTANTS enjoy their visit to Clifton Heritage National Park. MISSSINGAPORE Rachel Kum enjoys her day at the heritage site. MISSMEXICO Karla Carrillo with Senator Jacinta Higgs. F ROM LEFT TO RIGHT: W ayne Russell, General Manager B .W.A., Karin Sanchez, Bahamas National Trust and Gary Wilfred Burrows, Sales Manager B.W.A. Photos: Marisa Wells

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POSTED on his website – “In My Words” www.earledeveaux.com Environment Minister Earl Deveaux responds to questions posed by PLP Senator Jerome Fitzgerald, who objects to the container port being moved from its present Bay Street site to Arawak Cay. Says Mr Deveaux: By EARL DEVEAUX I HAVEparsed recent newspaper articles and have also obtained a flyer entitled “The Future is Now ....The Committee to Protect and Preserve the Bahamas for Future Generations." Jerome Fitzgerald and the proposed relocation of the container port to Arawak Cay and the harmful impact it will have on the surrounding Environment our communities and us, the Bahamian people. The advert is headlined with the words: "There have been so many questions and we have received so few answers." The Government, and by extension me have been described as “secretive and criminal” according to Jerome Fitzgerald “lacks transparency,” according to Glenys Hanna Martin Here are the questions in the flyer and my answers: Q . Did you know that in November 2005 an Environmental Impact Assessment showed that the favoured location for the new port was the “southwest port”? A. The Ecorys Report analysed seven sites for the proposed Port. Based on the analysis they concluded that a Port could be located at Clifton. Please see my analysis of their ranking system. Q. Did you know that in the same report Arawak Cay ranked sixth out of seven as the least favourable spot, with the present site downtown ranking fifth? A. Please see my analysis of the ranking system. You will see that according to a more scientific ranking with properly weighted numbering system all of the numbers would change and Arawak Cay would far outweigh the other sites. Q. Did you know that the Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette, whose family has interest in a shipping company, chaired a meeting in July 2007, the purpose of which was to pre sent a plan to move the Container port to Arawak Cay? A . This incredible fabrication has been refuted time and againby the Deputy Prime Minister. The Deputy Prime Minster denied, in Parliament, in response to the Rt Hon. Perry Christie that he ever chaired such a meeting. Q . Did you know that in Octo ber 2007 the Deputy Prime Min ister and Dr. Earl Deveaux c haired a meeting where they received the Ecory’s Report which stated that the Southwest Port was financially feasible and the report has never been made public? A . This is another fabrication. I, along with the Deputy Prime Minister, accepted an invitation f rom Michael Maura or Tropical Shipping to hear the report from the Dutch group which com pleted the Study on the Clifton Port. We were guests of the group which financed the report. It was their report. It has been made public by them. Q. Did you know that the government is acquiring land in the Vista Marina area and the owners have not been given notice that their land is being taken? A. Again this is an inflamma tory fabrication. The notices of acquisitions are a matter of public record. From 1998 the Government announced its intention to build 19 road corridors in New Providence as part of an overall traf fic remediation programme. The contract was signed with Asso ciated Asphalt which went bankrupt prior to completing the project. They did complete Charles Saunders Highway. The PLP Government completed Milo Butler Extension and Blue Hill Roundabout and Tonique Darling Highway. The FNM renegotiated with IDB to complete the project and the work is now ongoing. The Corridor at Saun ders beach was always a part of the project. All of the lands around the corridors were post ed back in 1999 and 2000 and acquisitions proceedings initiated and some completed. When we took office in 2007, we found over 400 outstanding acquisi tions unsettled. Government extension to Arawak Cay without submitting EIA. Q. Did you know that the government commenced extension of Arawak Cay without submitting an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA and a financial feasibility study? A. This is an outright lie. The EIAs was completed by Blue Engineering and of the several options proposed to dispose of the fill. The extension of Arawak Cay was the least intrusive to the environment. Q. Did you know that you are paying for the 40 million dollar extension to Arawak Cay for the benefit of a special interest group? A. This is another lie. The extension of the Cay is part of the Dredging contract to dispose of the two million cubic yards of fill that will be generated as a result of the activity. Q. Did you know that the total cost of the extension to the taxpayer has yet to be determined? A . The Contract amount for the Harbour Dredging is $76 million. It was publicly signed. Q. Did you know that this extension to Arawak will diminish Saunders Beach also known as “the Bahamian Cabbage Beach”? A. This is particularly alarmist and incendiary because it has been so often refuted. The EIA conclusively determined that Saunders Beach will not be affected by the dredging of the Harbour. However, what was also shown is that if work is not done to maintain beaches, remove casuarinas, Saunders beach, like other beaches in New Providence, will eventually disappear. It is for this reason that the Government decided to acquire the land. This was given to the Government for $1 by the same Symonettes (Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette) to make a permanent pub lic beach with enhanced dunes, access, parking toilets and children play area. Comment on the Coastal Systems International Report. I am frankly amazed that a professional body could have compiled such a specious rating system. I have detailed its limitation below. The Rating Table – Methodology This is very strange and nonstatistical. The way to do a rating is to identify the salient issues and then assign them a discrete weighting. For instance cost cannot be considered in the same category as, say, air pollution. This would mean that good on air pollution (rated 3 poor on costs (rating 1 took air pollution and cost alone and Arawak Cay scored 3 for cost and 1 for air pollution, while the Power Plant (i.e. Clifton in their terminology) scored 3 for air pollution and 2 for cost, then Arawak Cay (4 points versus 5 is the poorer choice. This is clearly not a tenable result, but it is exactly what they have done in the table. Environmental Criteria The scoring is very arbitrary, how can the Power Plant, adjacent to the dive industry’s sites, and quoted as of special significance in the executive summary, be given the same score as Arawak Cay which has virtually no impact on the marine environment as it uses the existing dredged harbour entrance? In their terms they scored them 2 – 2, but really it should be 1 – 3. I think there is a lot of bias here, if a student gave me this work I’d say they were working backwards to justify a predisposition. The Cumulative Impact category is quite ingenious. It basically sums up the criteria already evaluated and scores them again. What is the point of this? The description in the text is basically incomprehensible. Compatibility with Long Term Island Master Planning T he table is also extremely devious here. It starts by scoring the existing downtown location 5 out of 15 when the score by definition in their mandate had to be zero. It then gives the same score to Arawak Cay, a totally different location which meets all the criteria with a 2 or3 (their scoring g iven it ones. How can they say that traffic transferred to Arawak Cay would have no impact on downtown congestion as it is now? Also, as it is already reclaimed land used for port activities, why isn’t this a suit-a ble use? There is plenty of room for modern infrastructure, b ut they deny this. Construction and Engineering Criteria This has been largely dealt with in the media, it is clearly cheaper to locate at Arawak Cay and the overall disruption to day-to-day activities will be almost nil with the exception of the road-building. The south west excavation would be a nightmare for everyone out west for years. Socio-Economic Factors There is always some impact, and even they score the Power Plant worse than Arawak Cay, but it would be much worse over the years. Missed Out How about time-to-completion; stakeholder participation; alternative use of land (lots for out west, little for Arawak Cay); existing infrastructure? Arawak Cay Container Port With respect to the relocation of Container shipping from downtown to Arawak Cay, the Prime Minister has spoken extensively on this. I also spoke extensively on it. The Port at southwest New Providence was estimated to cost $200 million. When the figures for on shore investment are added, the total costs run to approximately $400 million. The expense was not one which the Government thought it could undertake, in light of the other projects it had to do. As well, the Government had received three different offers from MSC, Tropical and the Arawak Cay C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 7 Minister responds to container port questions Y OUR S AY SEE page 16 Earl Deveaux

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By SIR RONALD SANDERS (The writer is a Consultant and former Caribbean diplomat) CLEM SEECHARAN’S new book, From Ranji to Rohan , sports a cover photograph of what one cricketc ommentator describes as Rohan Kanhai’s “triumphantf all” – a sweep shot to the leg side that culminated in Kanhai on his back but the ball either racing to the boundary f or four or soaring past it for six. It was not a shot emulated by many. It originated in Kanhai’s approach to theg ame of cricket which was to o vercome the bowlers and win. Kanhai came from very humble beginnings Port Mourant Sugar Estate in Berbice, Guyana. That origin had a lot to do with his gamea s Seecharan explores in this b ook. “I play my cricket in two ways – first as a means of enjoyment (both for me and the spectator, I hope) and second to win,” Kanhai declares. He shared this attitude with another West India n batsman, who was to come after him, Antiguan Sir Vivian Richards. What would lovers of West Indian cricket not do to see their like in the West Indian team of today – playe rs who value the game for the game itself, and who excel at it not only for their own glory, but also because they understand that they carryt he pride of the West Indian people in every stroke theyp lay. From Ranji to Rohan is a superbly written book. Seecharan’s use of the Eng-l ish Language is as graceful as it is descriptive and his research is meticulous in the proven manner of his previous publications. He calls on the work of a host of experts in almost every cricketingn ation, among them John Arlott, CLR James, and Sir Hilary Beckles It is a book about cricket, and yet it is more than that. It is also a book about how I ndians in Guyana establ ished their West Indian citizenship by staking a claim for places first in their nationalt eams and then in the West Indian team. Staking the claim was not e asy. In the case of Guyana, t he struggle was tied up in class differences, racial bigotry and even politics. Like K anhai, Cheddi Jagan, Guyana’s firebrand politician from the 40s to the 60s, also c ame from Port Mourant, and the sugar estates of Guyana were his hotbed of resistancet o colonial exploitation epito mised by the British, firm, Booker, that owned the majority of the estates and a good chunk of the Guyana economy. Among the Indian players f rom Port Mourant who came to represent the West Indies in Cricket Test matches were Kanhai, Joe Solomon and Ivan Madray. Basil Butcher also came from Port Mourant a nd played for Guyana and t he West Indies at the same time as the others. He was not an Indian but he toof aced the obstacle of breaking into a Guyana national team when the Cricket authorities r esided in Demerara and b elonged to its well-established clubs. And then along came a m an who would transform all t hat: the Barbadian and West Indian batsman, Clyde Walcott. It is paradoxical, given the difficulties that currently sur-r ound Guyanese Indian i mmigrant labour in Barbados that it was a Barbadian that helped to unearth the cricket talent of Indians on the Booker sugar estates and secure their places in then ational and West Indian t eams. Walcott arrived in British Guiana (Guyana became independent from Britain in 1966) in 1954 recruited, as Seecharan explains, “by the Sugar Producers Association following the recommenda-t ion of Jock Campbell (the progressive Chairman of Booker).” The political con-t ext of his arrival was continu al strikes on the sugar estates and a report by a Colonial Office-appointed C ommission which recom mended that cricket clubs be set-up on each estate. Cricket “a status symbol disting uishing the white managerial elite from the Indian workers created a new area in which social prestige could be won.” As Seecharan describes it: W alcott’s “was a towering presence that infused cricket in British Guiana with a sense of purpose and resolve that had eluded it for most of its e xistence. Imbued with the moral compass of the black B arbadian middle class, a product of the elite school, Harrison College, he was thei deal man for the volatile G uyanese political environ ment of the 1950s, rendered even more hazardous by thei ntractable race issue.” In three years, he had four Guyanese in the West Indi a n test match team – three of them from Port Mourant. It is an everlasting tribute to Clyde Walcott as a great h uman being as much as to his capacity for recognising cricket talent that Seecharan records Ivan Madray, one of the Indians that Walcott guid ed from Port Mourant, as sayi ng: “I could have walked to the end of the earth for Clyde Walcott.” Clem Seecharan is Profes sor of Caribbean History atL ondon Metropolitan University. As a true academic he supports his assertions with empirical evidence. His Bibliography is extensive and his research material includes interviews with cricketers Basil Butcher, Joe Solomon and Ivan Madray. But Guyanese political leaders are there too: Cheddi Jagan and Eusi Kwayana. For all that, as a product of a Berbice village himself and a young boy as Rohan Kanhai’s batting exploits were being hailed all over the cricketing world, Seecharan admits that “for IndoGuyanese, including myself and boys growing up at the time of Kanhai’s ascent”, his taste for the game and the way he played it, “came out of our unconscious craving for a great West Indian bats man to transport us to the heart of creole sensibility – West Indian authenticity.” This book starts with Ran jitsinghji, the Indian Prince who played for England and dazzled cricket spectators between 1896 and 1912. He was an inspiration to the Indi an Diaspora in the West Indies and this is well chronicled by Seecharan. But, the book’s main theme explores the role of cricket in authenticating Indo-Guyanese as West Indians. He does a convincing job, and has written a book that will enthral all Cricket lovers of all races and nations. Seecharan ends by pointing to the necessity for integrating Caribbean countries in the same way that West Indian cricket is integrated – as a representation of our oneness and a source of our pride. “Chanderpaul and Sarwan,” he says, “could now be an example pointing the way for the politicians toward genuine regional integration, based on our diversity, not some imagined creole procrustean mould.” “From Ranji to Rohan” by Clem Seecharan is published by Hansib, London. Website: www.hansib-books.com C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE J.S. Johnson keeps my family safe during hurricane season and beyond .Nassau Collins Ave 242 322 2341 Thompson Blvd 242 325 8776 Soldier Rd North 242 393 6286 Family Islands Freeport 242 352 7119 Abaco 242 367 2688 Exuma 242 336 2420www.jsjohnson.com ADWORKS 2009 New book validates cricket role in West Indian identity WORLDVIEW SIRRONALD SANDERS

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i sters (Earl Deveaux, Vincent Vanderpool Wallace and Neko Grant) reinforced the committee’s assertion that the move oft he container port to Arawak Cay without credible scientific and financial analysis makes no sense. “We did not invite the Prime Minister and the Deputy Prime Minister toc ome clean with the Bahamian people and we n ow invite them to a debate on this matter.” He charged that the gove rnment is still in no position to make assertions a bout the preferability of Arawak Cay as a location for the port versus SouthW est New Providence as it has presented no data or a nalyses to support its claim and contradict a study commissioned by theP LP which found it ranked sixth out of seven potential sites. T he $80 million dollar privately funded relocat ion of the container shipping facilities from downtown Nassau is set to goa head later this year. Minister of the Environment E arl Deveaux has charged that a reduced cost and environmental impacti nvolved in taking the facilities to Arawak Cay o ver South West New Providence the location preferred by the PLP gove rnment, subsequent to various studies justifies the decision. H owever, Mr Fitzgerald is undeterred in his stance, c harging that without presenting information to prove their thinking andc ontradict the findings of an earlier report which picked South West New Providence as a better site, Bahamians have been “leftt o suspect there may be some level of corruption at the highest level in gov-e rnment.” “How else can one e xplain this mad dash to extend Arawak Cay?” said M r Fitzgerald yesterday. He said that his request for a debate on the issue in parliament has gone unans wered since he tabled it on April 30. Deputy Prime Minister B rent Symonette “appears to be the mastermind” b ehind the scheme to move the port to Arawak Cay, having chaired meet-i ngs on the proposal since as early as 2007, said the senator, and “Bahamians are now left to wonder whether the Prime Minis-t er...is complicit in this conspiracy to secretively enrich a special interestg roup at great expense to the Government’s purse, t he environment and the property value of hard w orking Bahamians.” Mr Deveaux has also charged that private rathert han the public interest lies behind the opposition t o the Arawak Cay move on behalf of Mr Fitzgerald and others, claiming a peculiar set of interests that will be derailed” if it is taken there rather than to the South West of the island. A n Environmental Impact Assessment and the Environmental Management Plan relating to the dredging of Nassau H arbour and the extension o f Arawak Cay using fill from the harbour, which will form the basis of the port move, are now avail-a ble for public scrutiny at w ww.best.bs/harbourdocs.html. However, the documents do not address the specific question of the impact of moving the port facilitiest o the area after these projects take place. Mr Fitzgerald said the c ommittee intends to galvanise public opposition a gainst the Arawak Cay move, stating yesterday: “You can rest assured thatt he voice of the Bahamian people in this matter w ill be heard loud and clear and government will have to decide how itr esponds to that and if it fails to do so it does so at i ts detriment.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 9 Sporty meets sophistication.It all starts the moment you set eyes on the new Mercedes-Benz CLC Sports Coup. Expressive styling and visible dynamism appeal to the heart, the mind and the eye in equal measure. Its distinctive wedge shaped design exudes energy and the desire to be on the move at all times. Its agile sportiness coupled with a high standard of comfort makes this Sports Coup heads and shoulders above the rest. Anyone opting for a CLC buys far more than just a car. You own engineering excellence. Come into Tyreflex Star Motors and test drive a MercedesBenz CLC-Class today.OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT IS FULLY STOCKED WITH EVERY COMPONENT NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT YOUR MERCEDES RUNS TROUBLE FREE. TRAINED TECHNICIANS ON DUTY.TYREFLEX STAR MOTORSCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz CLC-Class at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667 PM, deputy challenged to port relocation debate PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham and Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette F ROM page one To have your say on this or any other issue, email T he T r ibune at: letter s@tr ibunemedia.net or deliv er y our letter to The T r ibune on Shirle y Str eet, P.O. Box N-3207 Share your news The Tribune wants to hear f rom people who are m aking news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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C M Y K C M Y K MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE Aussies level Ashes series By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net TWO weeks after being the showpiece of the biggest single honorary for any Bahamian athlete in the country, legendary sporting icon Thomas A. Robinson said he’s humbled even more by the experience. Friday night at Da Balcony, Robinson w as presented with a cheque from Basil S ands, the accountant for the Friends of Thomas A. Robinson who hosted the luncheon on Sunday, July 26. The event was originally scheduled for the Sandals Royal Bahamian Hotel, but was moved to the Wyndham Nassau Resort& Crystal Palace Casino at the eleventh hour because of the high demand for tickets. “It was an overwhelming experience, it was an awesome experience, it was an exhil arating experience at the luncheon two Sun days ago,” Robinson said. “I never in my wildest dream thought that we were going to get that kind of crowdto attend a luncheon tribute to me.” While at the luncheon, Robinson said so many people came up to him congratulating him, wished him well and thanked him for what he did. “Then I was trying to figure what did I do,” said Robinson, who drew large laughs from the audience that included his close friends and some family members. Anniv er sar y Robinson, 71, was honoured on the 51st anniversary of his historic British Empire Games in the 220 yards in Cardiff, Wales in 15958b where he also secured a silver medal in the 100 yards as the lone Bahamian flag carrier. More than 600 persons, including Governor General Arthur Dion Hanna, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and the Leader of the Opposition, Perry Christie, a team mate of Robinson, attended the luncheon. Also in attendance was Cuba’s Enrique Figuerola, the silver medalist in the 100m at the Tokyo Olympics and Hilton Nicholson, his roommate at the University of Michigan. The Reverend Canon Dr. Gervais Clarke, Secretary General of the North American, Central American, and Caribbean Area Athletic Association also attended. In 1981, Sports Ambassador Robinson had his name placed on the national track and field stadium at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Center. And Ingraham, at the luncheon, assured all that once the Chinese government complete the new national stadium adjacent to the current student, Robinson’s name will also be placed on it. The only thing that many felt that Robinson should have been honoured with was a knighthood from the Queen. Many are of the opinion that he should be called Sir Robinson. Reception At a smaller reception held on Friday, Robinson thanked everybody, including the organizing committee headed by Alpheus ‘Hawk’ Finlayson, for having the initiative to put on such an event. Basil Sands, the accountant for the orga nizing committee, said that while he has no such acclaim to being a track and field star, he was delighted when asked by Finlayson to serve on the committee. “I hope you use it to the best of your ability,” said Sands in presenting Robinson with a cheque from part of the proceeds ‘I’m humbled by the experience’ By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net T HE Bahamian 24-member team, minus three athletes, have all set tled in and are going through their workout sessions with the coaches as they prepare for the 12th IAAF W orld Championships in Athletics. With the exception of sprinters Derrick Atkins and Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie and quartermiler Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown, all of the athletes have arrived safely at the training camp in Berlin, Germany. With “nice warm” weather to train in, team manager Ralph McKinney said all of the ath letes are comfortable and making the best of the excellent facility that they share with the United States team. “Everybody is settled in. The weather is nice and warm, so we can’t complain about that,” said McKinney from the hotel where they are staying. Veteran sprinter Chandra Sturrup was the last of the contingent to arrive. She reported to camp early yesterday morning and they are just waiting the arrival of Atkins, FergusonMcKenzie and Brown, who are all due in today. The team, coached by Tyrone Burrows, Frank ‘Pancho’ Rahming and George Cleare, will remain at the camp until Tuesday when they will report to the Games Village for the championships in Berlin. The championships will begin on Saturday, Ready to take on the world! B ERLIN: 1 2TH IAAF WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS IN ATHLETICS Bahamian team, apart from three athletes, get acclimatised in Germany DERRICK ATKINS DEBBIE FERGUSON-MCKENZIE CHRIS ‘FIREMAN’ BROWN SEE page 12 TRIBUTESTO TOMMYROBINSON Robinson presented with cheque from Basil Sands T OMMY ROBINSON s urrounded by friends and family at Da Balcony. TOMMY ROBINSON at the microphone. Pictured next to him are Laura Charlton, Linda Thomspon, Doris Wood and Carrie Young. TOMMY ROBINSON , presented with a cheque by Basil Sands, the accountant for the Friends of Thomas A. Robinson who hosted the luncheon on Sunday, July 26. PHOTOS: Stanley Mitchell SEE page 12

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net COACH Patricia ‘Patti’ Johnson will take her stellar high school junior girls basketball team to Canada to test the waters on another level of competition. J ohnson and a nine-member team is scheduled to leave town on Tuesday for Ontario, Canada where they will compete and participate in a tour of some of the high schools throughA ugust 17. The tour was arranged by David W hitty, the head of the Physical Education from Ridley College, who was i ntroduced to Johnson through basketball guru Gladstone ‘Moon’ McPhee from Grand Bahama whileh ere for a college fair. Ridley College, located in St. C atharines, Ontario, is a school for students in grades 5-13, the latter which serves as college preparatory. I was encouraged by a lot of people in the community to go ahead and try it,” said Johnson, who opted not to got o the United States this year on her annual Summer Tour. I received a lot of assistance from people like Philip ‘Brave’ Davis and Renard Rigby. Of course with the tighte conomic times, we gave our word to the school that we are going to come a nd we are trying to carry it through.” When they return home, Johnson said they hope to have at least two ath-l etic scholarships secured for their players, especially since the oldest person in her contingent is in grade 10. “The deal is you have to have your academics,” Johnson stressed. “We’veb een tutoring our kids from September and they did sort of well on the BJC exams. “As a matter of fact, one of the kids who would not have passed any, shep assed five of them and another got five Bs and a C. That was a shocker. So the classes were helping. But we havet o be persistent because it is time con suming.” J ohnson, owner of the most impressive high school record in high school basketball having won the junior girlsb asketball title with the HO Nash Lions just about every year since 1992, s aid she’s very proud of the squad she has to work with in Ontario. Making up the squad are Randya K emp, who is 5-feet; Cherish Wilson, 54; Lakishna Munroe, 5-11; Michelle B urrows, 5-6; Leashya Grant, 6-2; Khadijah Moncur, 5-8; Sashana Smith, 6-0; Kerri Bascom, 5-2 and ShaquelB ain, 5-2. While there, they will play in a series of games to display their skills and they will visit a number of schools as well as take the DAT entrance exam to determine who is eligible and they will also take a tour of the country. “We have a very good high school t eam, but we are going to play players in grade 10-12,” Johnson said. “But that shouldn’t worry us because we have players who are really hang gamew ise. “But my biggest fear when we go and come back is that we will have toz oom a lot more on academics. We have to bear in mind now is one of our k ey problem is time management. Instead of going home and study, we pick up the computer and cellphones.B ut the game piece, we have that downpack. I think we have an excellent team.” Johnson feels that the team is so talented that if she had the opportunity tok eep them together as a squad in the Government Secondary Schools Sports Association, she feel they will “hurts omebody.” In the meantime, she thanked everybody who helped us to get off the ground,” especially mentioning her HO Nash principal Rev. FranklynL ightbourne, the staff and the parents of the players. BOUNDFORCANADA BAHAMIAN rising star Justin Roberts captured his first boys under-14 singles championship of the COTECC Summer Tour over the weekend, while Kloratina Klonaris just fell short in her bid. Playing at the Almond Beach Resort in Castries, St. Lucia, Roberts won the finqal in straight set scores of 6-0, 6-2 over Shakir Elvin of Antigua in the Coca-Cola ITF Junior Tournament. Roberts, 12-years-old, joined the COTECC Summer Tour on June 6 in Guatemala City, Guatemala. He has played in eight single tournaments reaching the quarterfinals four times and both the semifinal and final twice before he finally won his first championship title. In the boys U-14 doubles, Roberts played in his seventh consecutive final of the COTECC Summer Tour and he won for the fourth straight time. He teamed up with Jaulon Greig of Trindad & Tobago to defeat Shakir Elvin of Antigua and Matthew Hutchinson of Bar bados 7-5 and 6-0. Roberts and Greig trailed 3-4 in the first set before winning four of the next five games to capture the first set 75. Having seized the momentum at the end of the first set, they easily won the second set 6-0. In the meantime, Klonaris of Grand Bahama got to the final of the girls under-18 singles where she was scheduled to play Nelo Phiri of the United States. However, she lost the match by a walkover. No reason was given. Roberts is now in St. Vincent and the Grenadines where he’s playing in the boys U-14 round robin. He won his first match 4-0, 4-0 over Cortland Bunyan. He was scheduled to play his next match again Richard Akcayli of Barbados. Also at the tournament is his brother, Alexis Roberts. He won his under-18 singles 7-5, 7-6 (3 ed States. His next month was against Jabrille Kabli from Trinidad & Tobago. Rising star Justin Roberts captures under-14 singles championship T OMMY ROBINSON i s flanked by, from the left, Angela Watson, Sandra Smith, Carrie Young, Doris Wood, Linda Thompson and Laura Charlton. THE Bahamas Golf Federation’s national team returned yesterday from the 53rd Caribbean Amateur Golf Championships with a ninth place finish at the Provo Golf Club i n the Turks & Caicos Islands. The Bahamas, without a team fielded in the ladies’ George Teale Trophy, collected a total of 21 points, just one ahead of the host Turks & Caicos, who ended up in last place with 22. Repeating as champion was Puerto Rico with 40, Jamaica got second with 35 and Trinidad & Tobago was third with 34. Tied for fourth place was the Dominican Republic and the OECS with 31 apiece. Resulted posted by the Bahami an players in the tournament are as follows: Hoerman Cup for regular players Bahamas finished eighth with a combined score of 1298. Rashad Fergudon (92-86-76-80 Richard Gibson Jr (93-83-91-78 Peter McIntosh (80-82-79-81 Devaughn Robinson (81-73-80-80 and George Swann (84-79-90-84 Puerto Rico won eith 1,178, followed by the OECS with 1,217 and B arbaods with 1,227, Ramon Baez Trophy for players 35-years and older Bahamas finished seventh with a score of 299. D. Shane Gibson (77-77-75-70 and Christopher Harris (77-77-7570). Francis/Steele-Perkins Cup for senior players. Bahamas finished in seventh place with a score of 303. Milford ‘Shaggy’ Lockhart (74-787 6-75) and Kevin Marche (74-78-7675). Barbados won with 288, followed by the Dominican Republic with 294 and Puerto Rico with 295. George Teale Trophy for ladies. Bahamas did not enter. Puerto Rico won with 603, followed by Trinidad & Tobago ith 610 and the OECS with 655. Higgs & Higgs Trophy for super seniors. Bahamas had its best showing with a third place finish with 294. George Turnquest (75-75-74-70 and Harcourt Poitier (75-75-74-70 Puerto Rico won with 279 and Trinidad & Tobago was second with 291. National golf team returns from Caribbean championships with ninth place finish THE Bahamas Volleyball Federation’s junior girls team returned home with the bronze medal from the 7th annual Junior Caribbean Volleyball Championships that wrapped up on Saturday. I n a hard fought five set marathon, the Bahamas knocked off Martinique to finish as the third best team in the tournament. Meanwhile, the boys team failed to win a game. The week-long tournament was played in Guadeloupe. Girls volleyball team returns home with br onze medal THE Bahamas Cricket Association’s national team are still undefeated heading into its fourth and final match in the International Cricket Association’s Under-15 tournament. Taking advantage of their home turf at Haynes Oval, the Bahamas improved to 3-0 as they knocked off the Cayman Islands on Saturday. The Cayman Islands batted first and scored 115 runs. The Bahamas responded with 120 runs in only 20 overs to secure another victory. It was the second victory for the Bahamas over the Cayman Islands, having defeated them in the opening match of the tourna ment. Today, the Bahamas will play the final match of the tournament, starting at 11 am when they take on Belize in their second match-up. The Bahamas also won their first meeting with Belize in their second match of the tournament. National cricket team still undefeated from the event, which served as a medical fund-raiser for the ailing national hero. The event, moderated by Sherwin Stuart, featured a number of speakers who served in their recollection of the days of Robinson’s athletic prowess, but more importantly his acade mic oursuits being the youngest Bahamian at age 9 to attend high school in the Bahamas, while being the first Bahamian athlete to attend college on an athletic scholarship. The night was certainly a nostalgic one for the speakers who included Finlayson, Harrison Petty, Stanley Mitchell, the Rev. Walter Hanchell (who raised an additional offering from the audience), Winston ‘Gus’ Cooper, Ed Bethel, Keith Parker and Arlington Butler, the immediate past president of the Bahamas Olympic Association. Mike Sands, the immediate past president of the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations, gave the vote of thanks on behalf of the committee. F ROM page 11 B ASKETBALL TURK S & C AICOS ISLANDS: 53r d C ARIBBEAN AMA TEURGOLFCHAMPIONSHIPS Coach Patricia ‘Patti’ Johnson to take girls team on tour of high schools ‘I’m humbled by the experience’ TOMMYROBINSONTRIBUTE 7th ANNUALJUNIORCARIBBEANVOLLEYBALLCHAMPIONSHIPS e have a very g ood high school t eam, but we are going to play players in grade 10-12. But that shouldn’t worry us because we have players who are really hang game-wise.” Patricia ‘Patti’ Johnson August 15 and will wrap up on Sunday, August 23. “The facility where we are have everything,” McKinney said. “Our training period is between 12 o’clock and 5 pm everyday until we leave here on Tuesday. The US use the track in the morning and they come back at 5 pm. “It’s a good facility. They have everything. “You know what it’s like. It’s like Haynes Oval where they have a restaurant and everything. “It’s a secured facility. We have been able to do everything that we need to do to get the team ready.” Spirit With the championships less than a week from opening, McKinney said all of the athletes are in great spirit and are eager for the competition to get underway. “The main thing is to get up and training,” he said. “After a long flight, every body is getting acclimatized and ready to go. Everybody practiced today, except for Chandra because she just arrived from North Carolina. “They are all doing their normal workouts as pre scribed by their coaches. We have our medical personnel here working with them as well. We also rented a van, so we are escorting our people to and from the training site.” Ready to take on the world! FROM page 11 COTECC SUMMER TOUR But Klor atina Klonar is f alls just shor t

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 13 THE Morgan’s Buccanneersd efeated the Mighty Mits 15-8 i n the men’s game played on Saturday night at the Baillou Hills SportingC omplex. It was the lone game played in the New P rovidence Softball Association as the ladies’ matchup was called off. Morgan’s Buccaneers defeat the Mighty Mits SOFTBALL:PICTURESPECIAL PHOTOS: Felip Major / Tribune staff ONTHECHARGE

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 14, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS S YDNEY A Sydney newspaper says an Australian cricket supporter was responsible for setting off a fire alarm at the England team's hotel in Leeds, England on the first day of the fourth Ashes test, according to Associa ted Press . W arren Livingston, head of the Australian fan group the "Fanatics," told The Sunday Telegraph that one of its 100-member group had managed to set the alarm off at 4:30 a.m. with t he intention of disrupting the English team's sleep, describing it as "good oldfashioned Aussie hijinks." "Yes it was one of our guys who did it as a bit of a prank, I got a text message after it happened," Livingston told the newspaper from England. " At first I thought ... we're just doing our bit for Australia. But I can't condone this sort of thing. I d on't want any trouble. We've all had a big laugh and it might have made a difference, the way they b atted." England's test team was evacuated with other guests and staff while two f ire engines searched the premises for the source of t he alarm. Players were left standing in the street in their pajamas for more t han 20 minutes until the all-clear was given for them to return to their beds. Just hours later the England team traveled to Headingley where it was dismissed for 102 in its first innings after winning the toss in the series it leads 10 . Australia has dominated the fourth test and wrapped up victory, to d raw level in the series. I t means the five-match series hinges on the final test at The Oval from Aug. 20-24. AUSTRALIA'S Simon Katich, right, and Mitchell Johnson, left, celebrate winning the fourth test as England's Graham Onions walks by on the third day of the fourth cricket test match between England and Australia at Headingley cricket ground Leeds, England, Sunday, Aug. 9, 2009. AUSTRALIA'S captain Ricky Ponting leaves the pitch after Australia won the fourth test on the third day of the fourth cricket test match between England and Australia at Headingley cricket ground in Leeds, England, Sunday, Aug. 9, 2009. (AP Photo/ Kirsty Wigglesworth) (AP Photo/John Giles/PA Wire AUSTRALIA'S Ben Hilfenhaus celebrates the wicket of England's Matt Prior during the fourth test match between England and Australia at Headingley cricket ground in Leeds, England Sunday Aug. 9, 2009. CRICKET:ASHESSERIES, FOURTH TEST E ngland's lower-order resistance was ended swiftly after lunch as Australia completed a comprehensive innings victory i n the fourth Test to draw level in the Ashes series at Headingley. Resuming the third morning i n a seemingly impossible position, trailing by 261 runs on 82 for five, England's daunting t ask became all the more diffic ult when they lost two wickets inside the first hour. Despite a boundary-filled 108-run eighth-wicket partners hip between Stuart Broad and Graeme Swann, England slumped to 263 all out six overs after lunch, handing Australiav ictory by an innings and 80 r uns. Australia's victory sets up a series decider at The Oval, starting on August 20. Nightwatchman James A nderson got off the mark with a slash through point for four off the second ball of the day from Ben Hilfenhaus to extendh is run to 54 consecutive innings without suffering a Test duck. It was his last act of defiance, however, with Anderson edging the next ball to the safe h ands of Ricky Ponting at sec ond slip to accelerate England'sd emise. Wicketkeeper Matt Pri or, unbeaten on four overnight,w as England's last hope of mounting a serious fightback as their last recognised batsmen. Having progressed to 22, h owever, Prior pushed at a Hil fenhaus outswinger and edgedb ehind for wicketkeeper Brad Haddin to take a brilliant oneh anded catch low to his right. Aussies complete innings victory Australia draw level in series after Headingley triumph Australia fan a dmits to England hotel prank A P P h o t o / K i r s t y W i g g l e s w o r t h SOUTH AFRICA'S Brian Habana, left, runs in front of Australia's Berrick Barnes, centre rear, as he pass es the ball during the Tri Nations in Cape Town, South Africa, Saturday, Aug. 8, 2009. The Springboks looked comfortable for almost the entire 80 minutes, sweeping past Australia 29-17 in Cape Town to follow on from back-to-back wins over New Zealand in the previous two weeks. A P P h o t o / S c h a l k v a n Z u y d a m ROB HARRIS, AP Sports Writer WEMBLEY, ENGLAND Salomon Kalou scored the winning penalty Sunday as Chelsea beat Manchester United 4-1 in a shootout to clinch the Community Shield in Carlo Ancelotti's first competitive match in charge. The traditional curtain raiser to the English season is rarely a spectacle, but on this occasion was hotly contested with a heated conclusion. With the match level at 1-1 in the 71st minute, United's Patrice Evra was lying on the ground after being fouled by Michael Ballack when Chelsea midfielder Frank Lampard made it 2-1. The goal sparked a furious reaction from Unit ed players who felt the game should have been stopped. "With a replay you can see Ballack has elbowed the boy, and if the referee had seen it properly, it is a red card," United manager Alex Ferguson said. "The referee is in line with it, and should have at least stopped the game." The Premier League champions, however, equalized in stoppage time when Wayne Rooney broke free. But it was FA Cup winner Chelsea who dominated the shootout. "This is sweet," Lampard said. "It feels nice to make a winning start to the season. After that last goal we could have been on a downer but we didn't let out heads drop." This was United's first competitive match since losing the Champions League final to Barcelona in May and after an offseason of upheaval as Alex Ferguson prepared for his 23rd campaign in charge. Ferguson started with Ben Foster in goal, giving him a chance to impress England coach Fabio Capello. Foster was tested inside two minutes when Didier Drogba struck from 20 meters (yards The Red Devils are still reeling from Cristiano Ronaldo and Carlos Tevez being lured away from Old Trafford in big-money moves. Ultimately, United's season is likely to hinge on how effectively Wigan's Antonio Valencia can replace Ronaldo, who was sold to Real Madrid for a record 80 million pounds ($133 million The Ecuador winger only played the final half hour, replacing the injured Nani, who started on the left flank and was causing problems for Chelsea right back Branislav Ivanovic. The Portugal winger took just 10 minutes to find the target, cutting inside from the left past Ivanovic and unleashing a fierce shot past Petr Cech. The Red Devils could have doubled their lead in the 16th when Wayne Rooney headed the ball back to Park Ji-Sung on the six-meter (yard blocked by Cech, who also denied Dimitar Berbatov minutes later. Chelsea then began to assert themselves with Florent Malouda shooting wide and Michael Essien heading over. The equalizer came in the 52nd when Lampard won possession in the United penalty area and picked out Malouda and a chipped effort was only half cleared by Foster who was lightly injured in a clash with Didier Drogba. Ricardo Carvalho then headed the loose ball into the unguarded net. Chelsea beat United on penalties C OMMUNIT Y SHIELD R UGB Y : TRI N ATIONS South Africa beat Australia 29-17

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Port Group a collection of all the container operators in New Prov i dence. The Government is fundamentally committed to having the ownership base broadened to include Bahamians and consequently o ffered and agreed a structure which requires that no entity could own more than 15 per cent and that 20 per cent would be sold as p ublic offering. The Government would hold 40 per cent and retain ownership of the land. The Port Group is required to produce an Environmental Impact Assessment EIA), an Environmental Management Plan (EMP or to final approval. The Group estimates that it can build the facility for between $70 and $80 million. Forty acres have been allo-c ated at Arawak Cay for the Port Group. An additional 15 acres have been promised for an inland port. Significantly in the government’s consideration were the following: It would not have to permit another cut into New Providence; Arawak Cay is already the major port in Nassau; Arawak Cay has been an industrial site for over 40 years; Arawak Cay can be organized and managed to the greater benefit of all; There would be ample opportunity for increased economic activity at the down home fish fry. FROM page seven Container port response AUGUST IS celebrated as Police Reserves Month and reserve officers yesterday marched from police headquarters to the East Street Gospel Chapel for their annual church service. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Police Reserves go on the march

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By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter c robards@tribunemedia.net A PROGRESSIVE development proposal called Culture Village, which seeks to give Bahamians 51 per cent ownership, proposed for Arawak Cay could include a 4-D theatre, a clock tower topped by an enormous c onch shell and pirate ship, according to the President and CEO of the Culture Village Bahamas Ltd. Gerald Strachan told Tri bune Business the development will augment the attractions of the surrounding area including the Botanical Gar-d ens, Fish Fry, Fort Charlotte and Ardastra Gardens. According to him, plans for the development were started as early as 2006 and were ini tially envisaged to be located i n an area of Perpall Track. However, after consulta tion with key people in the tourism industry in the Bahamas, he was directed to consider incorporating the oceanic vista of Arawak Cay. According to responses sent to Mr Strachan from the Director General of Tourism,a nd a development company based in Orlando, there is widespread support for his idea of a Cultural Village. Conceptual drawing of the village show craft markets,e ateries, a hammock bar and the crowning conchshell clock tower, which Mr Strachan said could be the welcome beacon for incoming cruise ships. Also on the drawing board is a cable car that would take guests from Arawak Cay to other attraction such as theF ort Charlotte and the Botan ical Gardens. When asked about the introduction of the Cultural Village at a recent town hall meeting put on the govern m ent, Minister of Tourism and Aviation, Vincent Van derpool-Wallace, said he Reports on Wharf extension could be ready by next week By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net GOVERNMENT will consider putting a moratorium on excavating hills for fill when the dredging of the harbour will produce two million cubic yards of it, according to the Minister of Environment. Earl Deveaux revealed that the government could consider stopping companies tearing down hills and digging enormous holes in the earth for fill when the Harbour dredging produces the twom illion cubic yards of spoils from the sea bed. “Once the harbour dredg ing is complete and we have the fill stockpiled, we will establish a moratorium for the cutting of hills,” said MrD eveaux. A s a part of the govern ment’s plan for the harbour dredging, it had mulled over selling some of the excess fill that will be left after Arawak Cay’s western end and the Prince George Wharf, from the cruise ship dock to Armstrong Street, had been extended. It is expected that 900,000 cubic yards of the two million will be used for the Arawak Cay extension, while it is not yet know how much fill the wharf will need to be extend ed or what design the pro posed promenade with take. However, former minister of trade for the PLP, Leslie Miller, told Tribune Business that fill dredged from the seabed is not construction grade. “The fill that government will get out of the harbour is not usable fill because it is not going to dry,” he said. “Maybe on the golf course at Albany, maybe they could use it there but it can't be used for the foundation of a home.” According to Mr Miller, the government will also be tampering with the Bahamas’s free market system by stop ping the legal sale of fill. He is involved in selling fill form his Harold Road property. He said the government should focus its attention on the illegal cutting of hill just south of Bozine town instead of selling useless fill. “He ( Minister of the Environment) will see the wanton destruction of land where people have no contract and no rights to the land,” said Mr Miller. “There are a whole lot of other things to keep the hon orable minister busy.” He said the initial Arawak Cay project itself should be a model for the use fill from the sea bed. According to him, Arawak Cay took years to properly dry and compact. “That fill stayed out there for a year until it was able to cure and it doesn't compact properly,” he said. “No one would dare try to buy that fill.” C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MODAY, AUGUST 10, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a third party and The T ribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report. $3.96 $3.90 $4.10 f f &&& bntn n (#$(' $ ! # %"$#%# !$ b Government to establish moratorium for ‘cutting of hills’ EARL DEVEAUX By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net A concept and the cost analysis for the extension of the Prince George Wharf from the cruise port to Armstrong Street could be ready by next week, the Minister of the Environment revealed during a town hall meeting last week Thursday. Earl Deveaux said he and Minister of Tourism and Aviation, Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, were instructed to have reports on the Prince George Wharf extension completed by August 19. He also revealed that the current landowners whose properties will be extended with fill from the harbour dredging will enter into equitable sharing of that additional real estate with the government. “The government has indicated to the current owners that the state has an unfettered right to extend the boardwalk along the sea bed,” said Mr Deveaux. “People already own 35 per cent of the land between the port and Armstrong street. “When the boardwalk is extended, o ur hope is to have waterfront access a nd to share in the experience on the waterfront and to share in the experience on the back street.” The Downtown Nassau Partnership, a public/private venture, was put in place to facilitate the development of a plan for the city of Nassau and to draft legislation for the creation of a Business Improvement District (BID Mr Deveaux alluded during a line of questing at the meeting that the complete redevelopment of the downtown area could take as much as 20 to 40 years. According to him, those properties that will be vacant when the container port is relocated to Arawak Cay will have to be developed when the BID is created and ratified by Parliament. According to a chief engineer at the Ministry of Works, the construction of the Promenade could be one year a way dependent upon the final design a pproved by government. “There are some options on the board with respect to how the Woodes Rodgers Wharf will occur,” said Mr Deveaux. “Not sure if it will be linear or will follow the contour of the existing boardwalk. “It will be based on the establishment of the utility corridor and analysis of the cost.” Proposed Arawak Cay development seeks to give Bahamians 51 per cent ownership S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B

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By JEANNINE AVERSA A P Economics Writer WASHINGTON With the economy strengthening b ut still fragile, Federal Reserve policymakers are expected to hold a key lending rate at a record low this w eek and will weigh whether to extend some programs that were created to ease the financial crisis. Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke and his colleagues also are likely to signal that while the recession is windi ng down, the pain isn’t over. Though the unemployment r ate dipped to 9.4 per cent in J uly its first drop in 15 months economists predict it will start climbing again. Many, including people in the Obama administration and att he Fed, say it could still top 10 per cent this year. For months, consumers have pulled back on spending and borrowing. To try to stimulate economic activity, F ed policymakers are all but certain to keep the target range for its bank lending rate between zero and 0.25 per cent at the end of their twoday meeting Wednesday. T hat means commercial banks’ prime lending rate, used to peg rates on home equity loans, certain credit cards and other consumer loans, will stay around 3.25 p er cent, the lowest rate in decades. Fed policymakers also will probably pledge anew to keepr ates there for “an extended period,” which economists interpret to mean through the rest of the year and into part of 2010. “We’re doing everything we can to support the economy,” Bernanke said recently.“We will try to get through this process. It’s going to take some patience.” By holding rates so low, the Fed hopes to induce consumers and businesses to boost spending, even though b anks are still being stingy about extending credit. “The Fed will be guardedly optimistic,” said Brian Bethune, economist at IHSG lobal Insight. “We’re seeing initial signs of the econo my moving toward recovery. .. (but damentals are still weak.” With numerous signs that the recession is finally ending and financial stresses easing,t he Fed will consider whether some rescue programmes should continue. Any such d ecisions, though, might not come at this week’s meeting. One such programme, aimed at driving down interest rates on mortgages and other consumer debt, involvesb uying US Treasurys. The central bank is on track to buy $300 billion worth of Treasury bonds by the fall; it has bought $236 billion so far. Another programme, the Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility, or TALF, is intended to spark lending to consumers and small businesses. It got off to a slow start in March and is slated t o shut down at the end of December. Despite this programme, many people are still h aving trouble getting loans, analysts say. T he Fed isn’t expected to launch any new revival efforts or change another existing programme that aims to push d own mortgage rates. In that venture, the Fed is on track tob uy $1.25 trillion worth of securities issued by mortgage finance companies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac by the e nd of the year. The central bank’s recent purchases havea veraged $542.8 billion. In the meantime, the economy has shown clear signs of improvement. Employers cut only 247,000 jobs in July, the fewest in a year, the government said Friday. Wages and workers’ hours also nudgedu p encouraging signs that companies no longer see the need for drastic cost-cutting. Those developments could deliver a psychological boost to both companies and consumers. The economy in the second quarter contracted at a pace of just one per cent, suggesting that the recession, which started in December 2007, is e nding. That dip came after a dizzying free-fall in the first three m onths of this year. The economy had plunged at ana nnual rate of 6.4 per cent in the first quarter, the worst showing in nearly three decades. W ith the economy improv ing but still weak, inflations hould stay low, the Fed says. Given consumers’ caution, companies won’t have much power to raise prices. A nd the weak job market will limit wage growth. Com-p anies aren’t going to feel generous about wages and benefits until they are confident a recovery will last. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 3B btrt tfr f r !%* '!$()))!*&*#tffn""bnff ! $ %#&!*&*# !%** 7+(&203/,$1&(&200,66,21127,&(38%/,&$7,215(9,6('$17,(
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By DEEPTI HAJELA and MICHAEL HILL Associated Press Writers NEW YORK (AP Sleep is a rare commodity for Juan Cortez. Between nights spent clearing tables at a Manhattan nightclub and days running food to customers ina Bronx restaurant, the 42year-old Peruvian immigrant worries more about finding time for shuteye than job security. More than 100 miles to the north in the Hudson Valley, Omar Guzman also isn’t concerned about staying employed. The 20-year-old migrant farm worker spends his summer days picking peas and cherries, and by fall will be harvesting acres of apples. E ven with the unemploym ent rate above 9 percent, t he nation’s native-born jobless are looking at higher rungs of the labor market for their next career move. For immigrants like Cortez and Guzman, it means a degree of job security but also more competition if they want to advance into jobs above bussers and barbacks, runners, dishwashers and crop hands. The phenomenon of Americans shunning farm jobs is nothing new the influx of Mexicans and other foreignborn workers to fill vacancies h as fueled a long, sometimes c ontentious immigration d ebate. Those labor dynamics seem largely unchanged this year. In one sign, farmers are still steadily applying for visas under the federal program designed to provide temporary farm workers where there are expected domestic labor shortages. Federal immigration officials received 5,574 so-called H-2A petitions from Oct. 1 through midJune. The numbers could exceed the previous fiscal year if applications continue at the same pace. “Even as rural unemployment increases, U.S. workers regard farm work as beneath them,” said Jordan Wells, coordinator of the Justice for Farmworkers Campaign in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. “Why do people work at McDonald’s and not the farm? There’s something about farm work that has been stigmatized.” Farmers like the Ron Samascott in Kinderhook, N.Y. typically advertise available jobs before bringing in workers from other countries. I don’t think we had any r esponses,” Samascott said. C rop workers at Samascott’s farm can earn more than $2 an hour above the New York state minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. The American Farm Bureau estimates there are 11 million Americans in jobs that pay less than farm work. In a country where roughly eight out of 10 people live in urban areas, farm work is not an option for many of those lowwage workers. But the arduous work performed by more than a million people nationwide is unattractive to many job seekers. Steve Rivera of Washingtonville, N.Y., a student at the State University of New York at Albany, has held jobs at the Gap and McDonald’s, worked construction and ona golf course, but he never really considered working at a C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Please submit resume via email: nwatkins@doctorshosp.como r hand-deliver to Doctors Hospital, Human Resources DepartmentONLY QUALIFIED APPLICANTS WILL BE CONTACTED. &DULEEHDQ%RWWOLQJ&R%DKDPDVf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f/WG 3 1DVVDX%DKDPDV RU(PDLOWR FEFDFFRXQWV#FEFEDKDPDVFRP Proposed Arawak Cay development seeks to give Bahamians 51% ownership could not make a formal statement. “It is a private sector u ndertaking and until there is a formal proposal I can't comment on Cultural Vill age,” he said. Mr Strachan said he thinks the development could be feasible to the tourism product of the Bahamas and also grow Bahamian owned businesses and well as the local job market. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Job security but no advancement from the S S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 5B HOUSES/APARTMENTS/COMMERCIAL BUILDINGSVACANT PROPERTIES(401rown Allotments, Love Hill Settlement, Andros. Containing a two-storey res. Appraised value: $100,000 (806Lots #1 & #2, Block 3 with a parcel situated between Lot #1, Block 3, containing a 4 bedroom condominium – Sunset View Villas, West Bay Street. Appraised value: $750,000 (433Lot #27 of Village Allotment #14 in the Eastern District, contain-ing residence situated on Denver Street off Parkgate Road in the AnnsTown Constituency, New Providence. Property size 2,500 sqft Building size 990 sqft. Appraised value: $50,000(400) Property situated in Calabash B ay on the Island of Andros. 75’ x 150’ and containing thereon a small grocery store 480 sqft. and an incomplete 3 bed 2 bath house 900 sqft. Appraised value: $65,000 (301Lot #2 in block #8, Steward Road, Coral Heights East Subdivi-s ion situated in Western District of New Providence, approx. size 8,800 sq. ft. with a split level containing two bed, two bath, living, dining & family rooms, kitchen and util-ity room – approx. size of building 2,658 sqft Appraised value: $322,752(702)Lot #20 with residential prop-erty located Skyline Heights. Appraised value $280,000 ( 902)Lot of land 94 x 94 x 150 x 150 on Queens Highway just south of Palmetto Point with a two storey stone building containing two apart-m ents. Each unit has 3 bed/2 1/2 bath, kitchen, living room and 3 linen closets. Appraised value: $287,209( 400)Lot #14 situated in the settle-ment of Love Hill on the Island of Andros totalling 20,000 sqft Property c ontains a two storey 5 bedroom, 3 bathroom residence. Appraised value: $185,000( 105) Lot containing 2 storey bldg. with three bed, two and a half bath residence, and 30’ x 86’ situated Bai-ley Town, North Bimini. Appraised value: $235,000(801 Lot #18 in Sandilands Allot-ment on the western side of Cross-wind Road between Seabreeze Lane and Pineyard Road in the Eastern Distract of The Island of New Provi-dence-The Bahamas,containing sin-g le storey private residence com-prising the following: covered entry porch, living room, dining room, kitchen, laundry room, family room, sitting area, 4 bedrooms, 2 bathroom and patio. The total area of land is approximately 7,641 square feet. Appraised value: $289,426(801) Twoparcels of land containing 21,120 sq.ft. situated on the south-ern side of East Shirley Street and 100 feet west of its junction with Shirlea” in the Eastern District, New P rovidence. Situated thereon is a Gas Station and Auto Repair Shop. Appraised value: $799,497(601Village Allot-ment with fourplex, Appraised value: $500,000( 701)Lot of land having the number 16 in Block number 16 in Section Three of the Subdivision called and known as Sea Breeze Estates situated in the Eastern District of New Providence. Property contains a three bed, two bath residence. Appraised value: $277,000(701)Lot of land being lot number 11 in Block number 10 on a plan of allotments laid out byVillage Estates L imited and led in the dept of Land & Surveys as number 142 N.P. and situated in the Eastern District of New Providence. Property contains t hree bed, two bath residence. Appraised value: $165,000 (565Lot # 1018 in Golden Gates E states #2 Subdivision situate in t he South Western District of the island of New Providence Containing a single storey private residence 3 bedroom 2 bath. Property approx. size 6,000 sqft Building approx size 2,400 sqft Appraised value: $173,176(205Lot B 50 ft x 115.73 ft situ-ated on the north side of Shell Fish Road, being the third lot west of FireTrail Road and east of Hamster Road with a one half duplex residential premises. Appraised value: TBA(901)Lot #32 containing 4 bedroom 2bath concrete structure located Triana Shores Harbour Island, Eleu-thera. Property size 80’ x 120’ x 80’ 1 20 feet Appraised value: $332,735 (910)Lot #12 Madeira Park, a small subdivision on the outskirts of Treas-ure Cay, Abaco having an area of 9,444 square feet residence contain-ing a concrete block structure with asphalt shingle roof comprises of three bedrooms, two bathrooms, family room, living room, dining room, and kitchen. Appraised value: $147,000 (569Property situated on Will iams Lane off Kemp Road, New Providence, Bahamas containing a two-storey house and an apartment building consisting of 1800 sqft. Appraised value $100,000(569)All that piece of land being Par-cel #3 and Parcel #4 situated on the S outh side of Prince Charles Drive,New Providence, Bahamas contain-ing a commercial building housing two shop space on the ground oor and three shop space on the second oor with a large storage area in the rear. Total area 8400 sq ft. Appraised value: $366,650(569All that piece, parcel or land having an approximate area of 2100 sqft situated on the Western side of B lue Hill Road about 70 ft North of Peter Street and about 115 ft south of Laird Street in the Southern Dis-trict of New Providence, Bahamas c ontaining a commercial building housing a two bed/one bath unit on the top oor and a store on the rst oor. Appraised value: $154,000(569All that piece, parcel or lot of land situated on Cowpen Road ( 1000 ft east of the Faith Avenue Junc-tion) in the Southern District of New Providence, Bahamas containing a duplex apartment comprising of t wo 2-bedroom/1-bathroom apart-ments. Appraised value: $150,000 (800All that parcel or lot of land being Lots #10 and 11 in Block 29 of Coconut Grove Subdivision, con-taining a shopping plaza. The lot is trapezium in shape, 8,383 sq ft. Appraised value $500,000(560Lot of land #2 Sea View Sub-division, Russell Island, Spanish Wells. Property size 11,323 sqft, b uilding size 2236 sq ft containing 3 bedrooms, 2 bath, living room, an eat-in kitchen, dining room, laun-dry room, covered porch, a one car garage, and a covered water tank. Appraised value: $299,000(901Trianna Shores containing 3 bed 2 bath front room, dining room, & kitchen. Concrete structure, 1926.40 sq ft wooden deck 321.60 sq ft. property 9600 sqft. Appraised value: $448,645( 901) Lot K” Barrack Street, Harbour Island containing a 2 storey concrete building with 4 bed 4 bath, dining room & kitchen -Building 2934.56 sqft property 6563 sqft. Appraised value: $479,228 (811Property containing Condo Millennium II”, Unit A-101, building 57, Phase 1C, 2 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, living room, dining room, utility closet & patio. Situated in the area known asBimini Bay Resort, Bimini, Bahamas. Appraised value $485,000 (008) Single Story tri-plex building, one 2 bedrooms and two 1 bed-room located on a multi-family Lot No.4, block 3, Shirley Lane, section 1 , Bahama Reef Yacht & Country Club Subdivision, Freeport Grand Bahama. Property size is approx.16,621 sq ft Appraised value $348,000(908 Lot# 52 Crown Allotments located Murphy Town, Abaco with size being 10,200 sq ft. Containing a one storey house with 4 bed/2 bath – Concrete Block Structure – Appraised value. $200,000(569All that piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #39 in the residen-tially zoned area of Highbury ParkS ubdivision in the Eastern District of New Providence, Bahamas. Ap-prox. land size 6,000 sq ft. Property contains a 3-bedroom/2-bathroom house, size being 1,563 sq. ft.. Appraised Value $131,000 (908Lot# 23 located in the Sub-division of Spring City, Abaco with size being 8,925 sq ft. Containing a one storey wooden structure house with 3 bed/1 bath of 7985 sq ft Appraised value. $60,000 (304) Single storey triplex, situated o n Lot 615, Mermaid Boulevard, Golden Gates #2 in the Western District, New Providence. Two twobedroom, one-bathroom units and one one-bedroom, one-bathroom unit. The property is zoned as Multi Family Residential, measuring 9,092 s q ft with the living area measuring 2,792 sq ft. Appraised value $374,192(201Duplex Lot #25 situated on Faith Ave. North (Claridge Estates) size being 7,354 sqft with duplex t hereon. Appraised value TBA (201Lot of land situated on FireTrail Road being a partition of Glad-ston Allot #41 New Providence, Ba-hamas containing townhouse apart-ment unit and two proposed units ( completed as is). Appraised value $237,714(201)Lot containing residence situ-ated in Carey’s Subdivision Lot B,B lock B Appraised Value $108,000.(103All that piece parcel of lot of land and improvements thereon k nown as No.3 block 31 Bahamia Marina & Section IX located in south-western city of Freeport Grand Ba-hama Island. Approx. 13,070 sq.ft. o r 0.30 acres property contains duplex dwelling. Appraised value $300,000 ( 804) Six condominium units and ve parcels of vacant land situated at Regattas of Abaco, Marsh Harbour, Bahamas. The single/multi f amily residential condominium/timeshare development is situated on 9.426 acres of land. The condo-miniums consist of 2 bedrooms, 2 b athrooms and the amenities on the property includes a manned secu-rity gate, swimming pool, 2 tennis courts, landscaped gardens and an a dministration building. Appraised value $2,450,000OFFICERSPROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALEContact Account Ofcer listed below by using number code for each property.(702Undeveloped lots # 4A, 16, 17, 18 and 19 located Chapman Estates, West Bay. Appraised value: $348,000(701) Undeveloped lot #149. Sea-f an Lane, Lucayan Beach Subdivision. Grand Bahama, 18750 sq ft. Appraised value: TBA (565Vacant lot #5 located Eleu-thera Island Shores, Seaside Drive Section B, Block #15, Eleuthera, Bahamas. 9,691 sqft, Appraised value: $27,620 (402Lot 89, Block 7 Aberdeen Drive, Bahamia West Replat Sub-division, Freeport, Grand Bahama, consisting of 12,100 sqft. Appraised value: $51,000 (800 V acant property located Bahamia South. Block 16 lot 9A, Freeport, Grand Bahama consist-ing of 24,829.20 sqft. Appraised value: $52,000(565) Vacant Lot #9 (11,406.65 sqftsituated in Mango Lane Section B” Block #15, Eleuthera Island Shores, Eleuthera. Appraised value: $50,189 (909Vacant residential Lot# 63 (7800 sqftrown Allotments located Murphy Town, Abaco. Appraised value: $18,000(108) Vacant Single Family Lot #5 Block #5 Unit #1 Devonshire Appraised value $30,000(802Vacant Commercial Lot No: 3 A, Block 60 Bahamia Subdivision VI containing 3 acres located Free-p ort, Grand Bahama. Appraised value: $750,000(108) Vacant Single Family Lot #5 Block F Bahamia South Subdivision. Appraised value $35,700 (569Vacant property located in Subdivision called Culmerville being aportion of Lot #47 and aportion of Lot #57. Appraised value:$ 24,000 (569cel or lot of land situate in the settlement of James Cistern on the Island of Eleuthera one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas measuring approx 10,000 sq.ft. Appraised value TBA (569)All that piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 102 in the Sub-division known as EXUMA HAR-BOUR” in the Island of Great Exuma measuring 10,000 sq.ft. Appraised value $20,000.00. (202Vacant lot of land contain-ing 41,164 sqft, Lot #8, Love Estate, Phase 1, 2,300 ft. south of West Bay Street, Western District, New Provi-dence. Appraised value $165,000(202)Vacant lot of land containing 1.786 acre, situated east of Know-les Drive, approximately 1,420 ft. southward of Harrold Road in the western district of New Provi-d ence, Bahamas. Appraised value: $ 170,000(503acant property consisting of Lot #894 situated in the Free-port Ridge Subdivision, Section #1, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas. Appraised value: TBA (505Ten (10es of land situ-ated on Woods Cay, known as Little A baco, between CoopersTown and Cedar Harbour in Abaco, Bahamas. T he property is undeveloped with a view of the sea from both the North and South side. Appraised value: $1,078,750 (569All that piece parcel or lot of land Lot # 977, Pinewood Gardens Subdivision, Southern Dis-trict, New Providence. Appraised value: $65,000 (008cel of lot and land on the Island of Great Exuma situated about 10 1/2 miles Northwestwardly of George Town which said piece parcel or lot of land is #10750 Bahama Sound O.A.E. 10,900 sqft. Appraised value: $65,000(008)All that piece parcel or lot of land designated as Lot Number 563 on a plan of a Subdivision called or known as Bahama Highlands #4. 11,223.41 sqft. Appraised value: $87,000( 201) Single family residential Lot No. 11703 Bahama Sound Subd. N umber 11 West, Great Exuma. Size: approx. 10,000 sq ft Appraised value $15,000 (201Multifamily Lot No. 10 Southeast Corner of Mandarin Drive, Sugar Apple Road, Sans Souci Sudv. Size: 14,368 sq ft Appraised value $165,000 (201) Single family residential Lot N o. 11698 Bahama Sound Subd. Number 11 West, Great Exuma. Size: approx. 10,426 sq ft Appraised value: $15,000 (569)All that piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #1 located in Block 3 in the Subdivision known as East-ern Estates situate in the Eastern District of the island of New Provi-dence. Property approx. 6950 sq. ft. Appraised value $80,000 (569All that piece parcel or lot of land located on Marigold Road in the Subdivision known as Kool Acres. Lot is approx.9455 sq. ft. Appraised value $93,000. (569)All that piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #152 located in the Subdivision known as West Ridge-land Park situated in the Southern District of the island of New Providence. Property approx. 4000 sqft Appraised value $55,000.( 008) Anundeveloped waterfront lot land being Lot #12032 with a s ize of 10,600 sq.ft. in the Bahama Sound of Exuma Subdivision # 11 West, Great Exuma, Bahamas. Appraised value $224,000 (008Partially developed parcel of land being 10,000 sq.ft. situate about the eastern portion of The Forest Estate in the vicinity of the s ettlements of Southside and The Forest being Lot Number 4803 in B ahama Sound of Exuma 6, Exuma, Bahamas. Appraised value $25,000 (724Vacant land at Love Beach, Western District of New Providence comprising a portion of LoveEs-tate” containing 1 acre. Appraised value $225,000.00. (800)Lot # 2 vacant land 30,000 sq ft located Chapman Estates Sub-division on West Bay Street with open zoning. Appraised value $600,000.(800ingle/multi family residen-tial vacant lot being a portion of lot #77 situated on the Southern side of FireTrail Road in the West-ern District of New Providence. Property size 110,000 sqft Appraised value $550,000 COMMERCIAL BANKING CENTRE Tel: 242-356-8568 (800. Monique Crawford (801. Jerome Pinder (802. Brian Knowles (803. Vandyke Pratt (804. Hope Sealey (805. Tiffany Simms O’brien (806. Lois Hollis (807. Lester Cox (808. DaShann Clare-Paul (810iss LaPaige Gardiner (811. Lydia Gardiner PALMDALE SHOPPING CENTRE Tel: 242-322-4426/9 or 242-302-3800 (201. Nicola Walker (202. Robert Pantry (205. Anya Major NASSAU MAIN BRANCH Tel: 242-322-8700 (701. James Strachan (702. Antonio Eyma (301. Thyra Johnson (304. Alicia Thompson MACKEY STREETBRANCH Tel: 242-393-3097 (601. Cherelle Martinborough JOHN F. KENNEDY DRIVE BRANCH Tel: 242-325-4711 (401. Renea Walkine (402. Chandra Gilbert PRINCE CHARLES SHOPPING CENTRE Tel: 242-393-7505/8 (501. Jason Sawyer (503. Dwight King (505. Patricia Russell CABLE BEACH BRANCH Tel: 242-327-6077 (466. Winnifred Roberts LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE Tel: 242-502-5170/502-5180 (716. Quincy Fisher (717. Nancy Swaby (723. Deidre King (724. Faye Higgs (725. Marguerite Johnson (565. Catherine Davis (569. Vanessa Scott NASSAU INT’L AIRPORT Tel: 242-377-7179 (433. Suzette Hall-Moss LYFORD CAYBRANCH Tel: 242-362-4540 or 242-362-4037 (101-N. Lindsey Peterson GOVERNOR’S HARBOUR, ELEUTHERA Tel: 242-332-2856/8 (902. Nicole Evans HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH Tel:242-333-2230 (901. Velderine Laroda ANDROS TOWN BRANCH Tel: 242-368-2071 (400. Rose Bethel MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO Tel: 242-367-2420 (908. Toure Holder (909. Sylvia Poitier (910iss Cyprianna Williams BIMINI BRANCH Tel:242-347-3031 (105iss. Ganiatu Tinubu GRAY’S, LONG ISLAND Tel: 242-337-0101 (100. Lucy Wells EXUMA BRANCH Tel: 242-336-3251 (008. Jocyelyn Mackey FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH Tel: 242-352-6631/2 (101-F. Garnell Frith (102. Elaine Collie (103. Damita Newbold-Cartwright (108. Sylvie Carey SPANISH WELLS Tel: 242-333-4131 or 242-333-4145 (560. Walter Carey farm. “I work at the garden center at Wal-Mart,” said Rivera. “I’d probably get dirtier farming, so I just would not consider it.” It’s a theme that runs throughout New York City’s massive restaurant trade as well. At Cafe du Soleil in upper Manhattan, managing partner Cyril Tregoat hasn’t seen native-born Americans applying to work as busboys. “They don’t want those. Nobody asked me to work as a busboy,” he said. “They want the waiter job or the bartender job.” That doesn’t surprise Rob Paral, a research fellow at the American Immigration Law Foundation who is researching unemployment trends. Excluding teenagers, immigrants make up more of the work force in the food services sector than native-born Americans, he said. For most native-born workers, these jobs are “a stepping stone, maybe it’s your first employment, something you do while you’re going to school,” he said. “Society doesn’t expect us to be working in these jobs in our 30s and 40s.” Some of it is due to the perception of status, he said. “You don’t want to be pushed to the point where you’re perceived as being desperate and doing these lower-status, lower-prestige jobs.” Ousman Trawally, a 36year-old Gambian native, smiles at the idea of nativeborn Americans working his job of running food to restaurant diners. “I’ve been doing this almost eight years,” he said. “I work with Americans. They neverc omplete six months.” W hile the field is seemingly wide open for immigrants willing to work those lowwage jobs, the competition heats up when it comes to moving up or trying to do so. It has slowed down the upward mobility of immigrants and their families and children,” Miguel Carranza, professor of Sociology and Ethnic Studies at the Univer sity of Nebraska-Lincoln. “If it continues for a while then it will have long-term effects” on immigrants’ ability to provide better lives to future generations by paying for things like higher education or being able to afford to live in nicer neighborhoods. Mohammad Abdul Muk tadir, who works as a runner, says he has more experience than the native-born waiters he now assists. They make more money than he does and have the job he wants. “They’ve never been wait ers before,” the 48-year-old Bangladesh immigrant said. Like restaurant workers in New York City, farm migrants around the country are having a harder time “stepping up” to better jobs as truck drivers, certified nurs ing assistants, child care workers and data entry workers. Now more native-born workers are scrambling for those jobs in the tough economy, said David Strauss, executive director of the Association of Farmworker Opportunity Programs. Jim Bittner, manager of Singer Farms near the Lake Ontario shore north of Buffalo, has witnessed the effects the return of migrant workers who had left to pur sue better-paying jobs. “We’re seeing people come back that we haven’t seen in a few years because they had drifted off to the Carolinas and Florida, where they worked construction,” he said. “Those jobs no longer are there.” Deepti Hajela reported from New York. Michael Hill reported from Albany, N.Y. AP Writers Jessica M. Pasko in Albany and Ben Dobbin in Rochester contributed to this report. bottom I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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By MICHAEL LIEDTKE AP Business Writer NEWSPAPERS are hurting all over the United States, but the pain is less severe at small publications like The Blackshear Times in Georgia. T he weekly newspaper fills a n information vacuum in a c ounty of 17,000 people who live about 75 miles from the closest metropolitan market, in Jacksonville, Fla. That has made it easier for The Times to hold on to its 3,500 subscribers and keep its revenue stable in a recession that’s ravaging much of the newspaper industry. “CNN is not coming to my town to cover the news and there aren’t a whole lot of b loggers here either,” said Robert M. Williams Jr., The Times’ editor and publisher. “Community newspapers are still a great investment because we provide something you can’t get anywhere else.” The scarcity of other media in smalland medium-sized cities has helped shield hundreds of newspapers from the upheaval that’s causing dailies in big cities to shrink in size and scope as their print circulations and advertising sales decline. Less competition means the print editions and Web sites of smaller newspapers remain the focal points for finding out what’s happening in their coverage areas. In contrast, large newspapers carry more national news, as well as local, and have many competitors, including Web sites and television and radio stations. They report much of the news the day before printed newspapers reach homes and newsstands. Large newspapers’ Web sites also provide the news for free a day ahead o f print editions. P erhaps even more import ant, newspapers in smaller markets still haven’t lost a big chunk of their revenue to Craigslist and other online classified advertising alternatives that have become the bane of large newspapers. Print ads for everything from jobs to jalopies were a g old mine for newspapers u ntil Craigslist began expandi ng an online service for free classified ads in 1999. Today, Craigslist blankets most major metropolitan markets while publishing about 40 million classified ads each month. In 2000, classified advertising accounted for nearly $20 billion, or about 40 per cent, of the US newspaper industry’s revenue. In 2008, classified ads in U.S. newspapers had dwindled to less than $10 billion, or about one-quarter of the industry’s revenue. (Subscription and single-copy sales traditionally contribute just 20 to 30 per cent of newspapers’ revenue.) Now it appears the highly profitable classified ads in the print editions of large newspapers could dwindle to virtually nothing within the next few years, said media analyst Mike Simonton of Fitch Ratings. “There is still more pain,” he predicted. Smaller newspapers have been defying the ominous trend, based on a recent study of the finances at 125 US newspapers of different sizes by the Inland Press Association, a trade group. The classified ad revenue among daily newspapers with circulations of less than 15,000 actually rose by an average of 23 per cent in the five years ending in 2008, the study found. Overall ad revenue for daily newspapers with less than 15,000 in circulation rose by an average of 2.5 per cent in the same time frame. Meanwhile, ad revenue dropped 25 per cent at daily newspapers with circulations greater than 80,000, according to Inland Press. “The bigger they are, the harder they are falling,” said Ray Carlsen, Inland Press’ executive director. Smaller newspapers also have largely avoided the deep staff cuts made by the rest of the newspaper industry, which has eliminated more than 100,000 jobs since 2005. The Inland Press study found daily newspapers with circulations of less than 50,000 were spending more on their newsrooms in 2008 than they were in 2004. But if they’ve largely avoided the Internet’s impact on advertising and circulation, smaller newspapers have not been immune to the misery of the longest recession since World War II. Nearly one-fifth of their collective revenue evaporated in the first quarter compared with the same time last year, according to one industry study. “It would be wrong to assume there is some sort of bubble over our market,” said Chris Doyle, president and publisher of the Naples Daily News, a daily newspaper in southwestern Florida with a circulation averaging about 64,000 during the six months ending in March. “We are becoming leaner, more scrappy and more aggressive than ever before.” To cope with the recession, which has hit Florida especially hard, the Daily News and four neighboring community newspapers all owned by E.W. Scripps Co. have reduced their staffing nearly 30 per cent. For the most part, though, big newspapers are under more pressure. Denver and Seattle each lost a printed daily newspaper this year, while Detroit’s two newspapers cut home delivery to three days a week. The shakeout could leave more big newspapers adopting the so-called “hyperlocal” approach that publishers of C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1 .811.28Abaco Markets1.391.34-0.051,0000.1270.00010.60.00% 11.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.306.25Bank of Bahamas6.946.25-0.692,5000.2440.26025.64.16% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00%3 .493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3511.350.001.4060.2508.12.20% 2.882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.605.600.002010.4190.36013.46.43% 4.781.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.473.480.010.1110.05231.41.49% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital1.821.820.000.2400.0807.64.40%8 .206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.5010.00Finco10.6310.630.004000.3220.52033.04.89% 11.7110.30FirstCaribbean Bank10.3010.300.000.7940.35013.03.40% 5.534.95Focol (S)5.135.130.000.3320.15015.52.92%1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.50ICD Utilities5.495.490.000.4070.50013.59.11% 12.0010.39J. S. Johnson10.3910.390.000.9520.64010.96.16% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100000 100000 FidelitBkNote13(SeriC)+ FBB13 10000 000 FINDEX: CLOSE 787.45 | YTD -5.68% | 2008 -12.31%B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: 30May2013 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 Interest Prime + 1.75% 7% FRIDAY, 7 AUGUST 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,556.11| CHG -5.83 | %CHG -0.37 | YTD -156.25 | YTD % -9.12BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7% 1000 . 00 1000 . 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 . 00 0 . 00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.38601.3231CFAL Bond Fund1.38602.404.75 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.9047-1.20-3.66 1.48171.4059CFAL Money Market Fund1.48173.355.38 3.60903.1031Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1031-8.35-13.82 12.980112.3289Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.98012.875.79 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.47339.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.27652.00-2.98 1.06221.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.06222.566.22 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0243-0.842.43 1.05851.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05852.045.85 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 31-Dec-07 30-Jun-09 31-Jul-09 31-Jul-09 30-Jun-09MARKET TERMS30-Jun-09Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 31-May-09 Prime + 1.75% 7% 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 30-Jun-09 NAV Date THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG R Q WKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU L V $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU L V $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG R Q WKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV / HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV Small is beautiful, and successful, S S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e SUSIE WILLIAMS-ALLEN (left Register, interviews McClain County Under-Sheriff, Bill Shobe in Purcell, Oklahoma... 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Rather than filling their pages with material that is readily available on the Internet, smaller newspapers focus on the politics, business, sports, crime and community affairs occurring in narrowly defined geographic areas a county, a town or, in some cases, even a few neighborhood blocks. “If it walks, talks or spits on the concrete in our area, we cover it,” said John D. Montgomery Jr., editor and publisher of The Purcell Register in Oklahoma. The weekly newspaper, based about 40 minutes south of Oklahoma City, had built up a circulation of about 5,000 by focusing on Purcell and four nearby towns with a combined population of about 17,000. With a weekday circulation of about 73,000, The Chattanooga Times Free Press in Tennessee has been setting aside more space for local news and puts all national news through a community lens, said Tom Griscom, thed aily newspaper’s publisher and executive editor. “If you really want to read about the Iraq war every day, you are not going to buy our paper. You will buy The New York Times,” Griscom said. More large newspapers also may take a page from smaller newspapers by reducing the number of days that they print their editions. Many small newspapers already are w eeklies or don’t come out e very day another factor t hat has helped them stay out of major trouble. Production and delivery costs are among newspapers’ biggest expenses, so more publishers are assessing whether it makes sense to drop their print editions on days that traditionally don’t attract a lot of advertising typically Mondays through Wednesdays. Being small also makes it easier to stay tuned to readers’ interests, said Jeff Ackerman, publisher of The Union, a daily newspaper with a circulation of about 16,000 in Grass Valley, Calif., not far from the Tahoe National Forest. “Too many newspapers have been operating in an ivory tower for too long,” said Ackerman, whose newspaper is based in a county with a population of about 100,000. “I answer my own phone. Some newspapers are just now trying to develop relationships with the local communities they cover. Ours has been going on for 144 years.” Most community newspapers are privately held often owned by the same family for several generations. That means they aren’t under constant pressure to boost their earnings in a time of declining ad prices. It alsom eans they don’t have to make the same financial disclosures as the publicly traded companies that own most major newspapers. Smaller newspapers generally have little debt. Huge debts drove the owners of newspapers like the Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, Philadelphia Inquirer and Star Tribune of Minneapolis into bankruptcy c ourt to reorganize their f inances. S till, small-town newspapers face more of the problems dogging big-city dailies. Last year, ad revenue drooped four per cent at more than 1,000 community newspapers responding to a sur vey by the National Newspaper Association and the Suburban Newspapers of America. Industrywide, newspaper ad revenue plunged 17 per cent, according to the Newspaper Association of America. But that difference narrowed this year. First-quarter ad revenue at community newspapers was nearly 19 per cent below the first quarter of 2008 while the industrywide total plummeted 28 per cent, according to the same groups. As the Web becomes even more ubiquitous and indispensable, more people may start sites focused on the same issues covered by small newspapers. Advertising alternatives like Craigslist also could catch on in more remote areas of the United States. Craigslist serves more than 325 US cities offering free classified ads in most of them and welcomes suggestions on areas where it should expand. Richard Connor, publisher of The Times Leader inW ilkes-Barre, Pa., (weekday circulation of about 36,000), already has to contend with Craigslist in his market, but he has another worry: disappearing car dealers, traditionally big ad buyers. His newspaper’s ad revenue declined by about five per cent in the first quarter but improved modestly in the second. He suspects sales will still be scarce in the months ahead. E ven so, Connor is betting s mall newspapers still have a b right future. He just bought three dailies in Maine in June. “We still think community newspapers have an audience and it’s not going away,” he said. “There will always be an audience for local news.”

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By N GREGORY MANKIW c.2009 New York Times News Service During the presidential campaign of 2008, Barack Obama distinguished himself on the economics of climate change, speaking far more sensibly about the issue than most of his rivals. Unfortunately, now that he is president, Obama may sign a climate bill that falls far short of his aspirations. Indeed, the legislation making its way to his desk could well be worse than nothing at all. Let’s start with the basics. The essential problem of climate change, scientists tell us, is that humans are emitting too much carbon into the atmosphere, which tends to raise world temperatures. Emitting carbon is what economists call a “negative externality” an adverse side effect of certain market activities on bystanders. The textbook solution for dealing with negative externalities is to use the tax system to align private incentives with social costs and benefits. Suppose the government imposed a tax on carbonbased products and used the proceeds to cut other taxes. People would have an incentive to shift their consumption toward less carbon-intensive products. A carbon tax is the remedy for climate change that wins overwhelming support among economists and policy wonks. When he was still a candidate, Obama did not exactly endorse a carbon tax. He wanted to be elected, and embracing any tax that hits millions of middle-class voters is not a recipe for electoral success. But he did come tantalizingly close. What Obama proposed was a cap-and-trade system for carbon, with all the allowances sold at auction. In short, the system would put a ceiling on the amount of carbon released, and companies would bid on the right to emit carbon into the atmosphere. Such a system is tantamount to a carbon tax. The auction price of an emission right is effectively a tax on carbon. The revenue raised by the auction gives the government the resources to cut other taxes that distort behavior, like income or payroll taxes. So far, so good. The problem occurred as this sensible idea made the trip from the campaign trail through the legislative process. Rather than auctioning the carbon allowances, the bill that recently passed the House would give most of them away to powerful special interests. The numbers involved are not trivial. From Congressional Budget Office estimates, one can calculate that if all the allowances were auctioned, the government could raise $989 billion in proceeds over 10 years. But in the bill as written, the auction proceeds are only $276 billion. Obama understood these risks. When asked about a carbon tax in an interview in July 2007, he said: “I believe that, depending on how it is designed, a carbon tax accomplishes much of the same thing that a cap-and-trade program accomplishes. The danger in a cap-and-trade system is that the permits to emit greenhouse gases are given away for free as opposed to priced at auction. One of the mistakes the Europeans made in setting up a cap-and-trade system was to give too many of those permits away.” Congress is now in the process of sending Obama a bill that makes exactly this mistake. How much does it matter? For the purpose of efficiently allocating the carbon rights, it doesn’t. Even if these rights are handed out on political rather than economic grounds, the “trade” part of “cap and trade” will take care of the rest. Those companies with the most need to emit carbon will buy carbon allowances on newly formed exchanges. Those without such pressing needs will sell whatever allowances they are given and enjoy the profits that resulted from Congress’s largess. The problem arises in how the climate policy interacts with the overall tax system. As the president pointed out, a cap-and-trade system is like a carbon tax. The price of carbon allowances will eventu ally be passed on to con sumers in the form of higher prices for carbon-intensive products. But if most of those allowances are handed out rather than auctioned, the government won’t have the resources to cut other taxes and offset that price increase. The result is an increase in the effective tax rates facing most Americans, leading to lower real take-home wages, reduced work incentives and depressed economic activity. The hard question is whether, on net, such a policy is good or bad. Here you can find policy wonks on both sides. To those who view climate change as an impending catastrophe and the distorting effects of the tax system asa mere annoyance, an imperfect bill is better than none at all. To those not fully convinced of the enormity of global warming but deeply worried about the adverse effects of high current and prospective tax rates, the bill is a step in the wrong direction. What everyone should agree on is that the legislation making its way through Congress is a missed opportunity. Obama knows what a good climate bill would look like. But despite his immense popularity and personal charisma, he appears unable to persuade Congress to go along. As for me, I hope the president refuses to sign a bill that fails to auction most of the allowances. Some might say a veto would make the best the enemy of the good. But sometimes good is not good enough. N Gregory Mankiw is a professor of economics at Harvard. He was an adviser to President George W Bush C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG R Q WKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQWKHGD\RI$XJXVW 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV A missed opportunity on climate change E E C C O O N N O O M M I I C C V V I I E E W W

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peppersby 23 per cent not to mention pork, by 60 per cent. The impression I was left with was that the country is benefiting from a business-m inded, youthful and driven M inistry of Agriculture, which is systematically identifying what is holding back agriculture from achieving its full potential and going after it. The Ministry’s vision e xtends down to the commun ity level by way of the Rural Agricultural Development Authority (RADA tory body whose staff who are required to undergo 60h ours of continued education a year provides technical a dvice on farming, marketing and implementing new projects to local farmers. Youth In Agriculture Meanwhile, major emphasis i s being placed on youth involvement in agriculture in order to ensure that there are ongoing generations of skilled, technically-orientated agriculturalists. W hile at present the average Jamaican farmer is not formally educated and is inh is/her mid-50s, planners are c alling for 570 new farmers to replace those who leave the sector each year, and stakeholders want them to be young and technologicallysavvy. T he country has four agricultural institutions which each turn out hundreds of well-equipped agriculturalists into the workforce every year, but the most recent governm ent found that this was not e nough. Jamaican children are now benefitting from Govern-m ent’s School farm programme, which has seen farms added to 401 of the p ublic schools since last year. B y 2011, the Ministry expects that every school will have its own farm. T he idea is to ensure that children, who are already being taught agriculture as part of their curriculum, get t he hands-on experience that will really make them profi cient modern farmers. I n the knowledge that access to land and funding is a primary obstacle to ambitiousw ould-be farmers particu larly young ones the gov ernment is developing several new programmes through theM inistry of Agriculture, specifically designed to bene fit young people looking to g et into a career in the sector. “In one of them, we will put ( the young farmer) on a fairly large plot 10 acres and we say we’re going to give you these high value crops, w e’ll assist you with the mar keting, we give you support and you go ahead and pro-d uce,” said Mr Panton. “On a smaller plot we are looking at introducing anoth e r concept the EMMIS programme an easily managed multiple income stream project.” “Essentially what we want to do is take a small farmer, put them on that plot, where you will have a greenhouse, bees, maybe an intensive goat rearing, pig rearing or chicken rearing facility, where that young person can literally easily manage those three and at the same time they are gett ing income from all of those three. “The idea is that with y oung people, when they are g oing into agriculture, they want to know that they are going to make money, we all w ant to know that. And we can demonstrate using these select crops that, yes, you cand o well. It requires a little discipline, it requires you to be dedicated, but what we are doing with this is changing thef ocus of young people from an urban drift to staying in the rural area and live a l ifestyle that is quite frankly just wonderful,” said Mr Pan ton. At the Denbigh show, day o ne of which was dedicated to “Youth In Agriculture”, young agricultural studentss howcased their “value added” creations made from produce grown on the 500-a cre property’s lands. Students engaged in the Youth in Agriculture pro gramme, some of whom this n ewspaper met, were ambi t ious, proud of their work and had high hopes of a successful career in agro-industry once they graduated from their respective schools. Standing in front of an impressive array of products sweets, snacks, jams and sauces 27-year-old Dean Anglin told The Tribune at the Denbigh show that the process is as easy as “one, two three.” “It’s very easy as long as you can understand it and apply the methodology,” he said. Anglin said that once he graduates from the Ebony Park Heart Academy he hopes to get a loan to start his own business. Fellow student, Nicole Gray, 19, said that her three years experience at the acade my has taught her that Jamaica “can produce anything it wants.” We don’t have to import a nything. What we want is right here in Jamaica and we just have to stand up on our f eet and get to the point. “Food is here for all of us and we just need to accept thef act and get out of using all of those foreign materials,” said the young farmer and agro-processor who said sheh opes to work at the academy once she graduates before setting up her own factory to cre a te popular seasonings and spices. She added that she notices more young women than b efore entering the field as they see the opportunities it offers them. They see it as a means of getting what they want. They can plan their own backyardf arm and it makes us as women feel very independent. We don’t have to depend on men,” said the 19 year old. T he Tribune took a tour of t he 500-acre Ebony Park Heart Academy in Claren don, Jamaica, where Anglin, Gray and Dr Leroy Santiago have all studied. The school is free to attend and generates significant income from the crops and livestock grown there, which include chickens, pigs, sheep, goats, dairy cows, fruit and vegetables. Dr Santiago, a graduate of the school claims Ebony students are the most practical of all of those who come out of agricultural education. They are also well equipped in the much-needed technical know-how that is key to 21st century farming and agri-business. “They are doing agro-pro cessing, value added, they are going out to start their own b usinesses. They are going to be making juices, processing, bottling stuff, they are exciteda bout doing that. And so even t hough (Jamaica’s sliding at $88 (Jamaican dollars) to $1 (US dollar), and I MF has us by the throat, we’ve got about 3 million people, we still are a countryw hereby we are producing second generation farmers, agriculturalists, the next gen eration, and that’s what reall y makes or builds a nation and its agricultural economy agricultural education.” W hile all of them are respectable professions, it was extremely refreshing to meet young people who were i nspired by the idea of putting their brain cells to something other than the traditionalB ahamian pursuits of law, medicine or politics. Advancing our food securit y is about raising awareness of the opportunity the sector represents for young people to develop careers that areb oth intellectually and finan c ially rewarding. Based on the young stu dents I met, and observations from others in the industry, an agricultural education also has social benefits teaching young people discipline, initiative, responsibility and punctuality. Greenhouse W ith technology considered one of the key pillars of agricultural advancement inJ amaica by the present a dministration under Prime Minister Bruce Golding’s Jamaica Labour Party the government is emphasising greenhouse technology as the way for the country to revit alise its farming sector and i ncrease its food security. Jervis Rowe, described by some as the “father of the greenhouse” in Jamaica, began his life as a traditionalo utdoor farmer but felt that t here must be a better way to a chieve his agricultural goals, without being thwarted by the threats posed to crops grown in an outdoor environment. Having developed a greenh ouse design that he says works very well” he is now f inding that Jamaicans from “all stratas of society” are interested in getting into greenhouse farming which, if done properly, can greatlyi ncrease a farmer’s output and i ncome on a given plot of land, improve the quality of crops, land and water use efficiency and resistance to a dverse weather. N ow, at the same time as running his Abbey Gardens farm, where he growsR omaine lettuce in abundance for large hotels, he pro-d uces greenhouses for farme rs across the country. “I thought that there must be some easier way to get done what you need to get done. Well it wasn’t easier but it was far, far better,” explained Mr Rowe. Over a period of time I tried different designs and it worked out well. “So here we are now fabriC M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, PAGE 11B Bright +Effective 322-2188/9 You’ll wonder how you ever got along without it. Long life Spirallamps 2 0 0 8 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t Securing our food S S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e J ERVIS ROWE , greenhouse pioneer, inspects his crop of Romaine lettuce, which will be sold directly to a selection of hotels on the island... F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 4 4 B B

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cating them from metal and putting them up all over the country.” “We have the technology at all scales. It all depends on what level you are going tog o in at, and that will determ ine the people who will become interested.” “The richest man in Jamaica wouldn’t mind if he had some greenhouses, and the ordinary farmer is alwayst elling me that ‘Oh boy’, he h as to get a greenhouse.” “The present government is actually paying a lot of attention to it and I think the news is getting out there andi t’s really developing a whole l ot of interest.” G reenhouse technology will increase the typical yield of a particular plot of land “tenfold”, said Rowe. He said the Bahamas would do well to geti nto it if it wants to improve its food security and create new economic opportunities. “Jamaica is trying to revitalise their industry and they have seen where greenhouset echnology will be the way that they have to go. You don’t have to do the samet hing, but you can look down l ow, and you can look up high Canada, say, or Holland and that’s where greenhouses are too. The people below you are trying to develop that technology, the people a bove you have that technology, so pretty much that’s what you should be looking to do,” he added. “My entire farm would be captured on two and a half a cres and that keeps me very, v ery busy. The idea is if you have a space there must be a plant in that space at all t imes.” Linkages with Hotels and Resorts J amaica’s economy also b enefits from significant linkages between agriculturalists and another pillar of thec ountry’s economy, tourism, and is looking to further extend this relationship. An example of the coun t ry’s success in this regard and the potential for each partner in the equation to benefit can b e seen in the connection between the Sandal’s resort and Jamaica’s farmers. I n the mid-1990s Sandals was the first hotel chain to forge a relationship with Jamaica’s farmers when it a pproached several senior a griculturalists and asked t hem if they could find a way by which Jamaica could pro duce much more of the crops t hey imported to feed their guests. P ilot projects were run on a number of farms throughout J amaica with crops such as cantaloupe, broccoli and zucchini, and ultimately within a y ear the chain was able to stop importing some of the products altogether, simulta-n eously creating a consistent m arket for hundreds of farm ers. Glendon Harris, President o f the JAS, noted that today similar linkages exist with the Holiday Inn and Superclubs chains, among others. A n Information Centred S trategy A nother factor in the Ministry of Agriculture’s strate gy to advance agriculture is t hat, according to Chief Technical Officer Mark Panton,e verything it does is “market driven.” M asses of data is collected from producers and processors, and a picture is develo ped of where opportunities lie in the local and export market for farmers to exploit. F armers are assisted and d irected towards developing their farms in a way that responds to specific demandsa nd supply chain irregulari ties which have seen farmers unable to find buyers for their produce and local agrop rocessors unable to find raw m aterials are being ironed o ut. The Ministry produces an impressive and up to datea rray of easily readable and obtainable informationall eaflets describing the state of each type of farming in J amaica whether it be sweet potatoes, cocoa, honey production or peppers and t he advantages, costs and returns which can be expected from entering that area. A National Farming Body O n the civil society side, the Jamaica Agricultural Society has made leaps and boundsi n promoting the sector in the last few years. Chairman of the Caribbean Farming Association, former J AS President Senator Norm an Grant, notes that while t here have been Bahamian representatives at executive meetings of the CaribbeanF armers Association there is a noticeable absence of an ational farming body in the Bahamas. I think that is something that needs to be looked at to generate interest from stakeh olders, and to give the sector a united voice,” he told The Tribune. I mporters are a strong lobb ying bloc when it comes to government policy and farm ers in the Bahamas could bene fit from having a louder say. The JAS has played a piv otal role in the drive towards f ood security. After taking over as Presi dent of the JAS in 2004 Mr Grant pushed the rural agen d a forward, launching a major campaign to increase produc tion and consumption of agricultural produce. He also made strides towards ensuring that there is now more access to affordable loans for farmers, improved rural infrastructure, research and devel o pment and land availability. “There were so many challenges but I would say with concentrated work, engagement with the government,e ngagement with private sect or and all stakeholders I really feel that we have moved to a level where agriculture is now the sector that gives countries like Jamaica the greatest opportunity to pulli tself out of debt in the long r un,” he said. The Ministry of Agriculture (Bahamas If you ask Dr Leroy Santiago, animal and agricultural scientist, and consultant to the J amaican government on agric ulture (he co-authored the country’s agricultural manifesto), The Bahamas Ministry of Agriculture is in the doldrums. Dr Santiago said that in his experience of working w ith the Ministry, a large part o f what is holding back our agricultural development is that it is stocked with aging technocrats who lack the sci-e ntific know-how and the drive to take the steps necessary to push Bahamian agriculture to the next level. “The Ministry of Agriculture has a lot of old heads. It has had the same people ford ecades the whole time so there’s a limit to science and technology and embrac-i ng new methods. “You need people to accept change. If not now, when?T his is the main hindrance, a long with poor work ethics. You hear a lot of talk, but see little action.” D r Santiago said that dur ing his time in Nassau, where he successfully undertook ane mbryo transfer project, w hich improved the quality and quantity of Bahamian goat and sheep stocks setting the country on the path towards greater self-sufficiency in meat production, heb elieved Ministry employees felt “challenged and threat ened” when confronted with suggestions as to how to i mprove agriculture. Meanwhile, officials are too often keeping training oppor-t unities from farmers who could benefit from them. “You need to empower f armers. You need to get farmers to go on orientations overseas and then let him come back and help build hisc ountry,” said Dr Santiago. Jamaica, a country which lacks the financial resources o f the Bahamas, has proven that food security and the employment and wealtho pportunities it creates is an a chievable goal worth striv ing for. Is the Bahamas ready to step up to the mark? If you would like to comment on this article, email a lowe@tribunemedia.net C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 12B, MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Securing our food F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 B B TWENTY SEVEN-YEAR-OLD Dean Anglin (wearing hat products faired in the Youth In Agriculture competition at the Denbigh Agiricultural and Industrial Show...

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 74F/23C Low: 77F/25C Low: 77F/25C Low: 79F/26C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 80F/27C Low: 80 F/27 C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 93F/34C High: 92F/33C High: 90 F/32 C High: 90 F/32 C High: 91F/33C High: 90 F/32C High: 89F/32C Low: 78F/26C High: 89F/32C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 91F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 70F/21C High: 89 F/32 C Low: 78F/26C High: 90 F/32 Low: 73F/23C High: 88F/31C Low: 75 F/24C High: 91F/33C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 93F/34C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 91F/33C Low: 72 F/22 C High: 91F/33C Low: 75F/24C High: 92 F/33 C Low: 77F/25C High: 94F/34C High: 87 F/31 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THETRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 10 TH , 2009, PAGE 13B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Some sunshine with a thunderstorm. Mainly clear.Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. Mostly sunny with a thunderstorm. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 89 Low: 80 High: 90 High: 89 High: 89 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 90 Low: 80 Low: 81 Low: 80 AccuWeather RealFeel 106F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 87F 106-84F 97-88F 102-83F 105-85F Low: 80 TODAYTONIGHTTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................93F/34C Low ....................................................81F/27C Normal high ......................................89F/32C Normal low ........................................76F/24C Last year's high .................................. 94 F/35C Last year's low .................................. 77 F/25C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ................................................20.82" Normal year to date ....................................26.76" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Last New First Full Aug. 13 Aug. 20Aug. 27Sep. 4 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:42 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:48 p.m. Moonrise . . . 10:21 p.m. Moonset . . . . 10:35 a.m. Today Tuesday Wednesday Thursday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 11:10 a.m.2.84:55 a.m.0.2 11:26 p.m.2.55:25 p.m.0.4 11:51 a.m.2.95:31 a.m.0.2 -----6:11 p.m.0.5 12:09 a.m.2.46:13 a.m.0.2 12:39 p.m.2.97:05 p.m.0.5 12:59 a.m.2.47:02 a.m.0.3 1:35 p.m.2.98:07 p.m.0.6 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco87/3077/25pc88/3176/24s Amsterdam70/2157/13pc72/2261/16sh Ankara, Turkey81/2754/12s79/2648/8s Athens86/3071/21s86/3072/22s Auckland57/1345/7pc59/1546/7c Bangkok90/3282/27t90/3281/27t Barbados86/3077/25pc86/3077/25sh Barcelona81/2769/20t82/2771/21pc Beijing95/3568/20pc100/3770/21s Beirut90/3277/25s80/2676/24s Belgrade89/3165/18pc91/3263/17r Berlin72/2259/15t73/2259/15pc Bermuda81/2775/23s81/2775/23s Bogota66/1845/7c66/1844/6pc Brussels76/2454/12pc75/2355/12pc Budapest85/2961/16pc76/2461/16sh Buenos Aires64/1750/10pc64/1752/11s Cairo97/3677/25s97/3672/22s Calcutta95/3581/27t93/3381/27t Calgary75/2348/8c72/2247/8pc Cancun93/3371/21pc93/3370/21s Caracas82/2772/22t81/2772/22t Casablanca81/2763/17s85/2966/18s Copenhagen72/2260/15sh71/2157/13pc Dublin66/1854/12pc68/2054/12pc Frankfurt78/2560/15t80/2658/14c Geneva 78/25 56/13 t 77/2559/15s Halifax 71/21 59/15 r 75/23 59/15 t Havana 91/32 71/21 s 90/32 71/21 s Helsinki 77/25 55/12s73/2255/12r Hong Kong 93/33 84/28 pc 91/32 84/28t Islamabad 110/43 86/30 s 109/42 86/30 s Istanbul82/2764/17s80/2666/18s Jerusalem 84/28 64/17s84/2865/18s Johannesburg 68/2045/7s68/2045/7s Kingston 89/3179/26sh89/3179/26sh Lima71/2159/15s72/2259/15s London73/2259/15pc77/2561/16pc Madrid90/3263/17pc88/3163/17pc Manila88/3181/27t88/3181/27t Mexico City75/2349/9t76/2449/9pc Monterrey105/4075/23s104/4075/23pc Montreal81/2763/17t75/2359/15pc Moscow70/2152/11pc75/2356/13s Munich76/2458/14t77/2554/12t Nairobi80/2654/12pc79/2654/12pc New Delhi 99/3784/28pc99/3784/28t Oslo68/2051/10sh72/2253/11pc Paris77/2560/15s75/2358/14c Prague 78/25 59/15 t 77/25 55/12 s Rio de Janeiro78/2563/17s70/2165/18r Riyadh113/4586/30s111/4384/28s Rome 86/30 66/18 pc 86/30 68/20 s St. Thomas89/3179/26sh90/3279/26sh San Juan73/2239/3s79/2641/5pc San Salvador 86/30 74/23 pc 88/31 74/23 t Santiago 61/1645/7pc64/1746/7pc Santo Domingo87/3073/22sh86/3074/23s Sao Paulo 64/17 49/9 sh 64/17 56/13sh Seoul88/3172/22pc81/2770/21r Stockholm 75/23 59/15 pc 72/22 57/13 sh Sydney 66/18 52/11 pc68/2050/10sh Taipei91/3280/26c95/3581/27pc T okyo 82/27 75/23 r 91/32 79/26 t T oronto 82/2761/16t79/2659/15pc Trinidad75/2351/10pc80/2656/13s V ancouver 64/17 57/13 sh 70/2156/13c Vienna 84/2870/21pc78/2560/15r W arsaw 78/25 57/13 s 66/18 56/13 r Winnipeg 82/27 59/15 s 85/2963/17s H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles85F Tuesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles85F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles86F Tuesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles86F Today:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles82F Tuesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet5-15 Miles82F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque92/3366/18s93/3365/18t Anchorage69/2050/10s66/1851/10s Atlanta94/3473/22pc92/3373/22t Atlantic City100/3775/23pc96/3568/20t Baltimore97/3676/24pc95/3572/22t Boston90/3273/22pc85/2968/20t Buffalo85/2967/19t77/2561/16pc Charleston, SC96/3573/22s95/3575/23s Chicago88/3165/18t81/2763/17pc Cleveland91/3269/20t80/2662/16pc Dallas99/3780/26s100/3778/25s Denver82/2755/12t89/3158/14s Detroit89/3166/18t83/2862/16pc Honolulu89/3177/25c89/3177/25c Houston93/3378/25t96/3576/24pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday TodayTuesdayTodayTuesday Indianapolis90/3269/20t84/2866/18t Jacksonville94/3471/21s93/3374/23t Kansas City91/3268/20t82/2764/17pc Las Vegas103/3974/23s105/4081/27s Little Rock96/3575/23pc94/3473/22t Los Angeles84/2864/17pc86/3064/17pc Louisville91/3274/23t90/3270/21t Memphis94/3476/24t92/3374/23t Miami91/3279/26t89/3178/25t Minneapolis83/2865/18t88/3166/18s Nashville92/3373/22t90/3273/22t New Orleans91/3278/25t91/3276/24t New York97/3677/25pc90/3276/24t Oklahoma City98/3671/21s96/3569/20pc Orlando93/3374/23pc93/3376/24t Philadelphia96/3576/24pc93/3374/23t Phoenix 107/41 82/27 s 109/4285/29s Pittsburgh90/3268/20t82/2761/16t Portland, OR 78/2561/16pc80/2659/15pc Raleigh-Durham 99/37 73/22 s 96/35 71/21 s St. Louis92/3374/23t83/2867/19t Salt Lake City 86/30 60/15 s 92/3363/17s San Antonio 99/37 78/25 pc 99/37 77/25 pc San Diego77/2567/19pc78/2567/19pc San Francisco 80/26 58/14 pc 79/2656/13pc Seattle70/2158/14sh74/2358/14pc T allahassee 97/3673/22pc95/3573/22t T ampa 92/33 77/25 t 91/32 77/25t Tucson99/3775/23s101/3876/24pc W ashington, DC 98/36 77/25pc94/3474/23t UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT M ONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009 The stories behind the news B y ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net T here are many good reasons why the Bahamas Govern-m ent should be talking about food security. In the Caribbean the concept is framed around the idea that countries have for t oo long been in the vulnerable position of being almost totally dependent on imports from such countries as the US for their food. They now have to become more selfsufficient in feeding themselves by growing more of what they eat. The food price crisis of 2007 and 2008, and the global financial crisis t hat is still upon us both provide incentives for it. Future global population growth a nd changing consumption habits as w ell as declining arable land and water supplies, as well as glaring evidence of the grand returns that canb e had from agricultural enterprises, could all have urged us to concrete action by now. A nd yet the contribution that agri c ulture makes to our GDP, and our output of Bahamian grown and pro duced goods, is falling. A ccording to data compiled by the Department of Statistics, the Agriculture and Fisheries contribu-t ion to Bahamian Gross Domestic Product fell from $122,874,000 in 2004 to $88,486,000 in 2008. Fish eries represented the mass of this r eduction, with its little sister, agriculture, contributing $31,439,000 in 2004 and $27,875 in 2008. While in 2005 we produced 61,692 short tons of agricultural goods, according to the Ministry of Agriculture, that dropped to 57,410 in 2007. When measured by typical eco nomic indicators, our prosperity as a nation is high and for this we must be thankful but just as we are one of the most dependent countries in the Caribbean when it comes to our dependence on foreign oil imports for our power, we are behind the eightball on agriculture and without good reason. On suitable occasions, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham has espoused the virtues of growing our agricul tural sector to its full potential at present, it is only at 10 per cent of that, he said in February. Clearly we could be doing a lot better than we are but this takes vision and commitment and new ideas in a old ministry and an under standing among the Bahamian peo ple most especially its youth of what agriculture can be. During a recent trip to Jamaica to attend the 57-year-old Denbigh Agricultural and Industrial Show, which highlights the best of the coun try’s agriculture as well as its poten tial as a viable vehicle to enhance national development, The Tribune was impressed by the country’s commitment to agriculture and the rewards that that commitment is reaping. The three-day show July 31 to August 2 was held at Denbigh’s show grounds in May Pen Clarendon. “Grow what we eat and eat what we grow” was its theme. Addressing the show, Prime Minister Bruce Golding of Jamaica told a crowd of thousands that agricul ture should no longer be dismissed by Caribbean nations in favour of more “glamorous sectors” such as tourism. He was echoed by President of Guyana and Caricom Chairman Bharrat Jagdeo, an agricultural advocate in the region, who said that if we can give “incentives” to thet ourism and financial sectors, we should give it to agriculture. This mindset is what is guiding Jamaica towards greater food secur ity, as it should guide the Bahamas. During my trip, I was overwhelmed by the extent to which our near neighbour is feeding itself almost every type of vegetable, fruit and meat consumed in Jamaica’s homes, restaurants and fast food chains is grown there to some extent, and in some cases, imports of foods that are also grown locally have now dropped by 25, 35 or even 60 per cent in the case of pork. There is a wide chasm between the level of emphasis being placed on the sector by their government and ours and it shows. While agricultural output in The Bahamas has fallen, in Jamaica it has grown contributing to a 28 per cent reduction in imports in 2008. Mr Golding congratulated farmers at Denbigh for responding to gov ernment’s agricultural call to arms and used strong words, saying that the country must not return to the “psychological prison” which saw it happily sending away its money to buy imports to feed itself. In the past Jamaica fell into the “luxury” of allowing its tourism, bauxite and remittance dollars to tide it through as it purchased food from overseas, but that the global financial crisis and the food price crisis of 2007-2008 represented a “rude awakening” for the country,a nd his government. President Jagdeo praised Mr Golding’s government as being “ahead of the curve” in putting in p lace necessary “ingredients for agriculture to prosper.” Mr Golding, Mr Jagdeo, and Minister of Agriculture Dr Chris Tufton were united in the message they sent to the Caribbean that agriculture has been treated as the “bastard child” of the region’s economies, and additional steps taken to stimulate it must not fall by the wayside when a recovery from the latest crisis enthralling the world takes over. The Bahamas, which spent $500 million last year on food imports, would do very well to heed their message, delivered with conviction. For too long we have made excuses about our agricultural poverty not enough land, bad soil, difficulty in transporting produce but with vision, technology, and most importantly, the involvement of the younger generation, much can be overcome. In its place, greater economic diversity, prosperity and indepen dence can be found for a nation and its people on a societal and individual level, not to mention food which reaches our shelves in many cases in a fresher and more nutritious state than those we currently import. In Jamaica, the three quarters beginning December 2008 and end ing June 2009, recorded increases in the amount of agricultural produce totalling 57 per cent the most recent quarter having seen the largest hike, at 22.3 per cent. It’s figures like this and the con tinuing efforts of the government, led by prime Minister Bruce Gold ing, that are behind its commitment backed by the 60,000 member strong Jamaican Agricultural Society that within the next two years, the contribution agriculture makes to the country’s Gross Domestic Product will at least double from the pre sent 5.7 per cent. In 2008 the country was able to reduce its imports of carrots by 29 per cent, tomatoes by 35 per cent, cabbage by 25 per cent, and sweet Securing our food S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 B B FUTURE GLOBAL POPULATION GROWTH , changing consumption habits, declining water supplies and glaring evidence of the grand returns that can be had from agricultural enterprises, could all have urged us to concrete action by now... P h o t o s b y A l i s o n L o w e DENTON HOPWOOD , a 46year-old bell pepper (shown below), lettuce and sweet potato farmer who has only b een in the industry for three years said he enjoys the lifestyle his work offers...