Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
TRY OUR
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Volume: 105 No.207



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The Tribune

YOUR PASSPORT TO MISS UNIVERSE

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009



First woman president
ousted after landmark
Supreme Court decision

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

RECENTLY elected
Bahamas Hotel Catering
and Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWU) President
Nicole Martin has been
ousted from her post fol-
lowing a landmark Supreme
Court decision yesterday.

In a 35-page judgment
handed down by Justice Jon
Isaacs, Martin, the first
woman president in the
union’s almost 51-year his-
tory, was ordered to be
removed from her post as
the union elections held on
May 28 were declared null
and void. Approximately
6,000 members cast their
votes in those elections.

Justice Isaacs also granted
two other grounds of relief
sought by the First Vice
President Kirk Wilson and
twelve other members who
are listed as applicants in the
court action. Justice Isaacs
ordered that the certifica-
tion by Registrar of Trade
Unions Harcourt Brown on
June 2 of the elections held
on May 28 be vacated and
that the Registrar supervise
the union’s elections within

30 days of the order of the
court.

In the ruling Justice
Isaacs noted that by his lack
of response to the concerns
of the executive council,
“the registrar while profess-
ing an inability to interfere
with the internal workings
of the union has done exact-
ly that by abetting the
minority of the council to
hijack the union’s election
process through his agree-
ment to supervise the Dou-
glas election. This is truly an
example of the dog wagging
the tail.”

“In the circumstances as I
have found them to be, the
General Secretary’s request
for the Registrar was not the
request of the union, the
Registrar’s determination to
supervise the Douglas elec-
tion was outside his author-
ity and the applicants are
entitled to the declarations
they seek, the ruling stated.

“IT recognise that to
require the union to under-
go a second election is oner-
ous but that is an eventuali-
ty freely accepted by those
who went forward with the
Douglas election in the full

SEE page seven

Woman charged with
stealing almost $4,000
from place of employment

A 30-YEAR-
OLD woman charged with
stealing nearly $4,000 from
her place of employment

PLEASE NOTE

THAT, DUE TO THE
MONDAY HOLIDAY,
THE TRIBUNE WILL

NEXT BE ON
NEWSSTANDS
ON TUESDAY,
AUGUST 4TH



was arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday.

Marjorie Ann Cooper,
30, of Joan’s Heights, was
arraigned before Magistrate
Derrence Rolle in Court 5,
Bank Lane, yesterday,
charged with 17 counts of
stealing by reason of
employment.

It is alleged that Cooper,
between April 9, 2009, and
Saturday May 30, 2009, stole
a total of $3,830 from My
Oceans Company on Char-
lotte Street. Cooper pleaded
not guilty to all charges and
opted to have the case heard
in Magistrate’s Court.

Cooper was granted bail
in the sum of $10,000 with
one surety. The case was
adjourned to October 26.

Seer — a: FRAME

Tim Clarke/Tribune ! .
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PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

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‘



A TOURIST takes a photo of a collapsed seawall at the Western Esplanade yesterday. With the most active
months of the hurricane season yet to come, the sea wall is essential for the protection of the area.

Man dead after drive-by shooting

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A DRIVE-BY shooting in
the East Street area of Nassau
left a young man dead and
several others nursing gun-
shot wounds.

The murder, the country’s
47th, happened almost 15

hours after another man was
found dead in the middle of
Poinciana Avenue. He had a
wound to the back of his
head.

Supt Elsworth Moss, head
of the Central Detective Unit,
said police got reports of gun-
shots being fired in the area of
Evans and Comfort Streets,
in the East Street area,
around 9.20 pm on Thursday.

The latest victim has been
identified as Dario Smith, 26,
of Comfort Street.

"Police responded and
received information that
there was a male that was shot
and taken to hospital in a pri-
vate vehicle. We later learned
that the male died, and the
information we are working

SEE page seven

PCa Te EU CUI ae Te

Daughter of murdered American
woman is located in the US

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE daughter of murdered American
Anna Michelle Garrison wanted for ques-

A team of three chief superintendents
from the Royal Bahamas Police Force
investigating the killing returned from a
three-day visit with police in the north-

tioning in connection with her mother’s

death has been located in the United

States.

eastern state of Pennsylvania yesterday.
Elsworth Moss, Superintendent in

SEE page seven





NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISCANDS7 EEADING NEWSPAPER

Philip "Brave'
Davis set to run
for PLP deputy

leatler post

C A T

ISLAND,

Rum Cay

and San Sal-

vador MP

Philip Davis

is expected to
formally

announce his

decision to

is oh i Philip Davis
deputy leader of the
PLP on Tuesday, The
Tribune has learned.

Yesterday, the MP’s
communication’s
department issued a
statement to the media
stating that Mr Davis
will be making “a major
announcement” at the
Cat Island Association
Hall on Market and
Vesey Streets near
Transfiguration Baptist
Church.

Having campaigned
privately for some time
for the job, Mr Davis is
expected to join in the
list of other would-be
leaders who have also
expressed a desire to
take over the position
from current deputy
leader Cynthia Pratt.

Mrs Pratt formally
announced at the par-
ty’s previous convention
in 2007 that she will no
longer seek re-election.
With its next convention
slated for October 18,
Mr Davis is expected to
be running alongside
PLP MP Obie Wilch-
combe, Senator Jerome
Fitzgerald, and St Cecil-
ia nomination hopeful
Paul Moss.

In what is being ear-
marked as one of the
most important conven-
tions for the party with-

SEE page seven



Misconduct charges
fending against 16
Customs officers

MISCONDUCT charges
are pending against 16 Cus-
toms Department officers,
the Ministry of Finance
announced yesterday.

The officers were
informed in letters of inter-
diction issued yesterday, and
will be suspended with full
pay pending the determina-
tion of the charges,

They were also given 14
days to respond to the spe-
cific charges and explain
why they should not be dis-
missed from the Public Ser-
vice in letters issued by the
Public Service Department.

An ongoing restructuring
exercise being carried out
by the Ministry of Finance
has also led to 10 Customs
officers being transferred to
other departments.

The ministry said three
are being retired in the pub-
lic interest and one is being
given early retirement.



PAGE 2, SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



The difference in earnings
between men and women

THE most recent Occu-
pation and Wages report
released last weck showed
that the average Bahamian
woman earns less than her
male counterpart, even if
they both hold the same
position and are equally
qualified. The Tribune yes-
terday asked Bahamians
their opinion on this dis-
crepancy in wages.

JOY KNOWLES

“Tam surprised that it
(the wage difference) actu-
ally exists in our country
because we have so many
women who are in high-
ranking positions. I have an
aunt that is in a high-rank-
ing position and I always
assumed that she would be
on par with anyone of her
status, I didn’t think gen-
der had anything to do with

PETECHE Bethell, a 13-
year-old Queen’s College stu-
dent, has been declared the
winner of the first Miss Teen
USA Fantasy Camp.

The week-long camp at
Atlantis, Paradise Island,
coincided with the 2009 Miss

Fine Threads

Bernard Ba » Mocker Sto Thompeon Bed





STREET

it. I am surprised about it
and I don’t think that’s
right.

“For sure, if they are
doing the same job and
they are just as capable to
do the job I don’t think that
should be, I don’t know
why that should be, espe-
cially in a country with so
many single mothers. (Gen-
der) shouldn’t be consid-
ered in the salary as long
as the person has the qual-
ifications.”

Teen USA pageant where
more than 50 teen beauty
queens competed for the cov-
eted crown.

A group of 27 delegates
from across the US and also
five local participants - four
of whom won the contest
advertised in local newspa-
pers - spent an entire week
learning the ins and outs of
the pageant world from indus-
try professionals including
Miss Universe Organisation
president Paula Shugart, Miss
USA 2008 Crystle Stewart,
and a host of fashion design-
ers, hair and make-up stylists,
and more.

Kerzner International vice-
president of casino special
projects Anna Wilson led the
effort. She said the goal was
to piggyback on two exciting

MORTEZ HOPKINS

“T think it basically
unfair, women and men
should have equal rights,
and I think the government
should look into that, deal
with the situation at hand
to try to fix that.”

SHARON CHAPPELL
“Discrimination is dis-
crimination, and if we are
less tolerant of it in other
areas, then this should also
fall under the same umbrel-

events currently going on at
the resort - the Miss Teen
USA Pageant and the Miss
Universe Pageant.

Vice-president of guest
activities Amanda Felts is
described the first ever Teen
Fantasy Camp as a success.

“This is really amazing.
Coming from a non-pageant
background and hearing the
girls say that they were truly
blown away is a tremendous
accomplishment. In fact, I
think one of the participants
summed it up nicely. She told
us she thought she was com-
ing to another cheesy pageant
camp but was so impressed
by the presenters, the events,
and the venue itself,” Ms Felts
said.

During the week, the girls
were chaperoned by state title

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la. If we are going to be
intolerant of discrimination
racially then we should be
equally as intolerant of dis-
crimination among the sex-
es.”

DIANDRA CASH

“T feel that it’s wrong
because currently more
females attend tertiary
education, it means that we
are applying ourselves to
get a better job and not as
(many) males attend ter-
tiary education and are get-
ting paid (more) even
though they don’t have the
degree.

“Also, I guess society
still has this mentality that
the men are the providers
of the home so they feel
the men should be paid
more. I think that’s
wrong.”

JOY KNOWLES

SHARON CHAPPELL

PETECHE BETHELL, 13, wins Miss Teen USA Fantasy Camp.

holders and were treated to
a number of beauty and self-
development sessions, culmi-
nating in an awards ceremony
on Thursday, July 30.
Peteche Bethell - one of the
five Bahamians attending the
camp - was selected as the
winner impressing presenters,
organisers and her fellow

campers from the very first
day.

“T was really impressed. At
first I was a little bit afraid
but in the end I truly had the
most amazing time, the stu-
dent said.

“T learned a lot and it was
also a great opportunity to be
an ambassador to the

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YOUNG PETECHE with state title holders.



CAMPERS HIT the beach as a part of their week-long adventure.

Luucma

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DIANDRA CASH





Bahamas. I encouraged the
girls to return because we
really can use the (tourism)
business right now.”

Peteche walked away with
the winner’s sash, a trophy,
and lots of other prizes. She
promises to make the Miss
Teen USA Fantasy Camp an
annual event.



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

Residents vent concerns over
container port relocation issue



FRUSTRATED residents
of the Vista Marina area
vented their concerns over
the proposed container port
relocation to Arawak Cay
and called on government to
be more transparent about
the controversial develop-
ment.

At the meeting at the
British Colonial Hilton on
Thursday night, the residents
also questioned the environ-
mental ramifications of the
extension of Arawak Cay for
the nearby Saunders Beach.
They feel that government
has not fully explained its
plans on the development

ey UEP PU Melccmel gol): 0]sem COM e)te mie) ml NEU

and the numerous affects it
would have on residents
before moving full steam
ahead with the project.

Opposition Senator Jerome
Fitzgerald, who has passion-
ately resisted the move to
Arawak Cay, challenged gov-
ernment to disclose the "true
cost" of the container port
relocation inclusive of the
proposed island extension,
surrounding road extensions
and new port buildings.

"The cost of the port at
Arawak Cay may be $80 mil-
lion dollars or $150 million
dollars depending who you
believe," he said.

He asked whether an Envi-
ronmental Impact Assess-
ment (EIA) or a traffic study
was done to identify the
impact of the container port
on traffic, noise and pollution
on West Bay Street and the
Vista Marina subdivision, and
if government had deter-
mined where the cause-way
from Arawak Cay would con-
nect to West Bay Street.

"Why has the government
chosen the location ranked
sixth out of seven as the least
favourable location to relo-
cate the port. The prime min-
ister stated during the 2007
election campaign that

Arawak Cay would be devel-
oped as a cultural centre.
Why has he changed his
mind? How will the cargo lin-
ers enter the port? Through
the barrier reef between Sil-
ver Cay and Long Cay or
through the main entry to
Nassau Harbour," Mr
Fitzgerald said.

Area resident Michelle
Campbell said her attempts to
get a copy of the EIA done on
the Arawak Cay extension and
accompanying harbour dredg-
ing have been unsuccessful.

An employee of the Min-
istry of Works told her the doc-
uments were not available for

public viewing, Ms Campbell
said at the meeting on Thurs-
day night.

Copies of both reports were
available on the Bahamas
Environment Science and
Technology Commission's
(BEST) website yesterday.

The town meeting was
organised by the Committee
to Protect and Preserve the
Bahamas for Future Genera-
tions, headed by Mr Fitzger-
ald.

Recently, Mr Fitzgerald
challenged Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux to a
public debate on the port
relocation issue.

Cooper for a chance forher to get into the finals.

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AS beauty queens from around the world
make their way to the Bahamas for the Miss
Universe Pageant, a local beauty is heading to
the other side of the world for an internation-
al pageant of her own.

Tiara Cooper — first runner-up in the 2008
Miss Bahamas World pageant — heads to
Shanghai, China where she will compete in
the Miss Tourism Queen International Pageant.

The statuesque beauty hopes to bring home
the title of one of the largest pageants in the
world.

Tiara won the right to compete in the Miss
Tourism Queen International pageant with
her top three placement in last year’s Miss
Bahamas World pageant.

The Miss Tourism Queen International
Pageant was founded by Charlie See in 1949.
In 1993, the Miss Tourism Queen Organisation
held the first world final competition in Sri

Lanka, and later in the United States, Rus-
sia, Brazil, Germany, Japan, Singapore, and
many other countries.

The contest then moved to China in 2004,
and has been held there ever since, growing to
the point where it is now considered to be a
‘grand slam’ pageant — one of the top four in
the world. With each country’s tourism ambas-
sadors coming together for the event, Miss
Tourism Queen International aims to enhance
tourism development, friendship among the
countries, and international culture exchange.

Bahamians are being encouraged to boost
Tiara’s chances in the pageant by voting for her
online. The contestant receiving the highest
number of votes automatically advances to
the finals. There are 60 contestants competing
for the title in this event, which is scheduled for
August 28. Tiara leaves for Shanghai on
August 5.



Letisha Henderson/BIS Photo

GOVERNMENT Ministers signed two contracts with Rowdy Boys Construction Company for the comple-
tion of Long Island roads on Thursday. Pictured from left are Public Works and Transport Minister Neko
Grant; Minister of Agriculture and Marine Resources Larry Cartwright and contractor Bernard Knowles.

Contracts signed for
completion of Long
Island road works

By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION
SERVICES

GOVERNMENT has
signed two contracts
totalling over $200,000 for
completion of road works
in Long Island.

Public Works and Trans-
port Minister Neko Grant
said on Thursday that it is
anticipated that the road
works will “contribute to
the further overall develop-
ment of Long Island.”

The first contract totalling
$149,040 provides for the
construction of one mile of
White House Road in

Millers, while the second
contract of $135,436 will
cover reconstruction of
1,500 yards of the McKanns
Settlement Road.

Both contracts have been
awarded to Rowdy Boys
Construction Company rep-
resented at the signing by
Bernard Knowles, of Man-
grove Bush, Long Island.

Agriculture and Marine
Resources Minister Larry
Cartwright, MP for Long
Island, said he is ““more than
pleased” that the govern-
ment has decided to com-
plete the roads.

“This would make five
side-roads that have been

done within the last two
years,” Mr Cartwright said.

“These roads have been
neglected for quite some
time and have been allowed
to deteriorate.

“The residents there have
been complaining a lot and
I am sure they would be
happy that the government
has decided to repair them.”

Rowdy Boys Construc-
tion has an “outstanding”
record in Long Island for
doing “very fine work in
road building,” Mr
Cartwright said.

Mr Knowles said 12 per-
sons will be employed on
the road works projects that
will begin on August 3 and
be completed within 90
days.

The projects will be exe-
cuted concurrently.

Among those attending
the signing were Permanent
Secretary Colin Higgs,
Deputy Director George
Hutcheson and Chief Engi-
neer Howard Barrett.

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

Obama's rare race foray a positive step

PHILADELPHIA — Perhaps the biggest
"teachable moment" from the Henry Louis
Gates Jr. saga was for President Barack Oba-
ma: If you want to improve race relations,
you have to enter the fray.

Even some of Obama's fiercest oppo-
nents say that by bringing together the black
professor and the white police officer who
arrested him, the president had orchestrated
an unlikely and unifying moment, a peace-
able kingdom in the Rose Garden.

Symbolic? Yes. Made for TV? Certainly.
But these things could not obscure the fact
that a president who has tried to transcend
racial matters was down in the arena, talking
about race.

"The cynic in me wants to shoot holes in
it, the critic in me wants to pick it apart,” said
conservative radio host Mike Gallagher.
"But I'm sorry, you have two sides, polar
opposites in a racially tinged confrontation
like this, sitting down with the president of
the United States over a beer at the White
House?

"This is a great step forward in showing
how you can take a confrontation, a con-
flict, and make a positive out of it.”

This also is the kind of direct action Oba-
ma had sidestepped as he sought the support
of white voters weary of racial dissonance.

In March, Obama was asked whether he
agreed with Attorney General Eric Hold-
er's comments that many Americans have
been “cowards” because "we, average
Americans, simply do not talk enough with
each other about race."

"I'm not somebody who believes that
constantly talking about race somehow
solves racial tensions," Obama told The New
York Times. "I think what solves racial ten-
sions is fixing the economy, putting people to
work, making sure that people have health
care."

The standoff between Gates and Oba-
ma has the potential to exacerbate tensions.
Many blacks supported Gates’ claim that
he was racially profiled by Crowley, while
many whites insisted Crowley displayed no
bias in investigating a possible break-in at
Gates’ home.

Gates demanded an apology from Crow-
ley and called him a “rogue policeman."
After Obama said police had "acted stupid-
ly" in arresting an angry Gates for disorder-
ly conduct, Crowley said Obama was "way
off base wading into a local issue without
knowing all the facts."

The atmosphere was much different after
Thursday's conversation.

"No tension,” Crowley said.

Mostly, racial conflicts fade out without
any consultation, let alone resolution. Imag-
ine the widow of Sean Bell meeting with
the New York police officers who shot her
husband, or the black teens in Jena, La.,
talking to the white schoolmate they
attacked.

That made the White House meeting even
more remarkable — “revolutionary and
potentially healing, a peace pipe for modern

NOTICE is hereby given that SEAN WRIGHT of WEST

"

times," wrote the right-leaning columnist
Kathleen Parker.

"When future archaeologists excavate our
history, they will doubtless marvel at the
symbolism of that simple gesture," she wrote.

It probably never would have happened
had Obama not criticised Crowley, a mistake
that demanded damage control.

Why not?

"His advisers would have said, 'No, it's
not about health care!'" said Rev. Jim Wal-
lis, president of the progressive Christian
group Sojourners and author of "God's Pol-
itics: Why the Right Gets It Wrong and the
Left Doesn't Get It."

It was political theatre — but it sent a
powerful message, Wallis said.

"It was a parable for what needs to hap-
pen off-camera all the time — that kind of
conversation,” he said. "Obama was saying,
"This now needs to happen."

Obama has rarely joined that conversa-
tion since his national debut at the 2004
Democratic National Convention speech,
when he declared, "There is not a black
America and a white America and Latino
America and Asian America — there's the
United States of America.”

But as the first black president, son of a
white mother and black father, many say he
in uniquely suited — even obligated — to
lead the discussion.

"As a white man, I would say the nation
needs a president to be proactive on race,"
Wallis said. "He has a power to be that, the
capacity to be that, the identity and the his-
tory."

Gallagher said no one besides Obama
could have orchestrated this type of resolu-
tion.

"You had to almost have a black presi-
dent who's capable of saying to Gates, the
man who feels aggrieved and insulted, 'I
need you at the White House.'"

"Obama said ... "Let's show the world
that we're trying to advance race relations
rather than digress,'" he continued. "And
you know what? As one of his fiercest critics,
he gets an A-plus on this. I'm just blown
away."

Much has been made of the symbolism of
a black president and how he provides an
opportunity for people to talk about race. In
some ways, race is always an element of any
conversation Obama is involved in.

But "watercooler conversations aren't
enough any more,” Wallis said. "They don't
go deep enough, they are too short and they
are very safe. You gotta sit at the table.”

That's exactly what Crowley, Gates and
Obama did on the White House lawn, along
with Vice President Joe Biden, whose pres-
ence conveniently balanced out the image.

Earlier, Crowley and Gates talked after
they crossed paths while separately touring
the White House with their relatives.

They continued their tour as one large
group.

(This article was written by Jesse Wash-
ington, Associated Press’ national writer).



A national
lottery and
cambling

EDITOR, The Tribune.

AS A Bahamian who
loves his country and who
wants to see it as a beacon
on top of a hill shining
bright above all other
nations, I have to say that
gambling and the national
lottery is not the way to
20.
We have to think about
the next generation and
the future Bahamians and
the country that they want
to grow up in.

We as a country do not
need to follow other coun-
tries and learn the hard
way that gambling under-
mines a strong work ethic
and fosters an attitude of
laziness and greed as peo-
ple waste money in order
to try and win a ticket toa
life of leisure.

We must be true to our
constitution and live by
Christian values which do
not include gambling or a
national lottery.

Iam a firm believer that
God does bless those
nations that honour him
and so when he says that
“Righteousness exalts a
nation, but sin is a dis-
grace to any people” that
is truth, and a reality that
we can hold up to our peo-
ple as the solution to the
problems besetting us.

Coming from a sporting
family and having been
involved in sports for
almost 50 years I know
what it takes to be good
and to be the best you can
be, and it is not by trying

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



to take the easy way out,
but rather by becoming
very disciplined and work-
ing hard with the gifts that
God has given you.

Gambling and a Nation-
al Lottery go against the
work ethic and would be
the wrong message to send
to the very athletes that we
are trying to teach sacri-
fice, dedication, and self-
discipline.

I have never seen an
athlete compete at their
full potential by being lazy
or leaving anything to
chance and that should not
be our philosophy as a
nation.

This summer I have
been reading in the book
of Proverbs and it has
much to say against bet-
ting on chance and being
lazy, here are a few of
those gems,

“lazy hands make aman
poor, but diligent hands
bring wealth.”

“Whoever loves disci-
pline loves knowledge, but
he who hates correction is
stupid.”

“He who works his land
will have abundant food,
but he who chases fantasies
lacks judgment.”

“Diligent hands will rule,
but laziness ends in slave
labour. All hard work
brings a profit, but mere
talk leads only to poverty.”

These are the truths we
need to keep before the
conscience of a nation not
striving to be rich by
chance.

I know that we do need
funding to help our ath-
letes, and representing our
country well takes money,
but let’s support them
while sending the right
message.

Righteousness exalts a
nation, so let’s give all our
energies to building a
strong nation because we
trust God. There are so
many ways to raise money
and help our athletes and
students if we have the will
to do so.

Whereas, I cannot
endorse a national lottery
for sports, I can and do
endorse the other recom-
mendation put forth, i.c.a
tax.

We have the most beau-
tiful country in the world
and millions of tourists
come every year to see and
enjoy our sunshine, waters,
beaches, and people.

An additional $1 per
tourist to come or leave
our country would be $4
million for sports each
year. A one cent gasoline
tax per gallon at the sales
pump could do the same.
There are many ways to do
things right that are good
for our nation.

ANDY KNOWLES
Bahamas National
Swim Coach
Nassau,

July 30, 2009.

Have we swallowed
the tourism slogan?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I FIND it very disturb-
ing when a political figure
passes comment giving
obviously based opinion
as to what “their” Gov-
ernment has been doing
when in reality the Gov-
ernment has only done
very little.

Grace and | eet Wesleyan Church

BAY STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the

Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should

send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 1**day of August, 2009 to the

Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O.

Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

BKG/410.03

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

(8 ALOE DA

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Prayer Time: 10:15am

Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O. Box §8.2631

CTON?

Sealed tenders for B$56,209,000.00 of 91-Day Treasury Bills
will be received by the Banking Manager, The Central Bank

of The Bahamas, Frederick Street, Nassau up to 3:00 p.m on
Tuesday, August 4, 2009. Successful tenderers, who will be
advised should take up their bills against payment on Thursday,
August 6, 2009. These bills will be in minimum multiples of

B$100.00.

Tenders are to be on special forms obtainable from the Central

Bank of The Bahamas or Commercial Banks.

Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples of one
cent) and should be marked “Tender”. The Central Bank of the
Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

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Telephone number: 324-2558
Telefax number: 324-2587

Perfiunres
Colngeres
Accessories
Jewelry

Men's Tapedi Jeans
AVON Products
Favs & Jats More

The Senate President,
Hon Lynn Holowesko,
knows better when she
negatively criticizes the
Bay Street property own-
ers as to the external state
of their buildings when
you look at the Senate
building and the paint is
pealing off the building,
at least it was yesterday,
Wednesday, July 29.

Across from the Parlia-
ment buildings, the
Adderley building, owner
the Treasurer of the
Bahamas/government is
filthy — Vendue House
and the old BEC account-
ing office is also owned by
The Treasurer of The
Bahamas Government —
the old Lloyd’s Bank
building on George
Street, currently the Min-
istry of Tourism still has
sheets of plywood sur-
rounding it from three to
four years ago, that is
another Government
building.

Might it be, Madam
Senate President, that
your social friends, the
Bay Street property own-
ers, don’t see any business
that will come to Bay
Street out of Miss Uni-
verse, as clearly all the

SALE

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hype and events are going
to be taking place on
Kerzner’s island?

If the contestants are
going to Grand Bahama
please ensure they ride in
very dark tinted limos.

One hopes that Nation-
al Security will ensure
that during this global
event only the correct
coloured Bahamas nation-
al flag will be flying as the
majority today we see are
black — yellow and
BLUE!

I must ask: Are we real-
ly serious or have we
swallowed the tourism
slogan hook line and
sinker and really
believe...It’s better...When
the world says it isn’t.

ABRAHAM MOSS,
Nassau,
July 30, 2009.

Interesting
reading

EDITOR, The Tribune.

ALMOST every month
we read that a certain
accounting-auditor con-
sulting firm has been
retained by government
and soon after when their
report arrives it seems to
be guaranteed to be critical
of another consulting firm
who also were retained.

Might it be a good pro-
posal that government will
retain one of these consul-
tants to opinion whether
the government is provid-
ing good governance?

Isuggest that would
make interesting reading.

T WILLIAMS
Nassau,
July 3, 2009.



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



WHY YOU Anti-doping laws ‘will benefit

ing crazy.

"We the poor people }
knows the illegals does get |
drop off an’ pick up from
we neighbourhood, so }
politicians must stop say- ;
ing it is 'we'. What 'we' da :
poor does know is dat 'we' :
have to share we t'ings like :
PMH, government clinics,
government schools with |
da illegals yinna hire, so }
yinna don’t play fool an say ;
it is 'we' when it is 'you }

299

very well know who’.

- 'Fix ya face an laugh’,
Nassau. }

"I vex because I been to }
the gas station on Thomp- :
son Boulevard and this }
pretty lady pulled up right :
and the pump attendant }
seem to have forgotten I :
was there first. He went to }
pump her gas, and if that :
wasn't bad enough, he }
cleaned every one of her }
windshields, dat time I }
blowing my horn. You }
think he check for me? }
And guess what else, she :
did not give the poor boy }
one dollar, then he want to :
come to my car with atti- }
tude. Man, I had to pull off. :

"Good service still hard }
to get, even though a lot of :
people out there would :
gladly like to have the jobs :
some of us acting up with."

- Debbs, Nassau.

"T vex at those dog own- }
ers on Eastern Road who :
keep hounds, lil’ tiny }
hounds, outside their }
homes 24 hours a day, sev-
en days a week and they ;
bark at everything that :

passes by.

"And sometimes the
dogs jump out at passersby, :
scaring the daylights out of :

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

ATHLETES who have been cheat-
ed out of Olympic medals by those
taking performance-enhancing drugs
will benefit from anti-doping legisla-
tion, Senator Dion Foulkes argued in
the Senate yesterday.

The Minister of Labour and Social
Development highlighted the hard-
working Bahamian athletes who have
had to wait years for their medals
because “winners” on the day were
found to have used drugs illegally.

A Bill for an Act to Provide for the
Measures to Discourage the Use of
Drugs and Doping Methods in Sports
and for Related Purposes was tabled
in the House of Assembly last week as
government moves to fulfil obliga-
tions it vowed to uphold under the
World Anti-Doping Code in 2003.

The Code calls for countries to
implement effective programmes to
prevent, deter, detect and legally pun-
ish individuals for using or providing
performance enhancing drugs banned
under the Code, and enforce regula-
tions on all athletes in the country.

Pledging his support for the Bill,
the minister said: “The Code has
become the global instrument to har-
monise policies and regulations and to
provide a framework for the estab-
lishment and execution of anti-doping
policies, rules and regulations for the



-

oes



DION FOULKES, Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie and Pauline Davis-Thompson

benefit of sporting organisations and
to ensure fair play in all competitions
for athletes worldwide.”

He listed a staggering number of
Bahamian athletes who were cheat-
ed out of their medals by performance
enhancing users, including the men’s
relay team that only received its right-
fully-earned Olympic bronze medal
from Sydney 2000, eight years later.

And Pauline Davis-Thompson, who
was second place in the 200 metres
at the same Games, now stands to
receive the gold as “winner” Marion
Jones was found to have taken per-
formance enhancing drugs.

Debbie Ferguson was recently

awarded a gold medal after finishing
behind Ms Jones at the World Cham-
pionships in Athletics in 2001, the
same event the Bahamian men’s relay
team finished second, and now stands
to be awarded first place as the Unit-
ed States team was disqualified for
drug use.

Mr Foulkes also noted how Chan-
dra Sturrup was just given the bronze
medal she should have been given in
the 100 metres at the 2001 World
Championships as a result of the dis-
qualification of Marion Jones and
Kelli White; and the members of
men’s relay team are now recognised
as the bronze medalists for the 2003



athletes cheated out of medals’

"T is vex cause dem }
senior politicians keeps :
telling us that 'we' hiring :
and sheltering dem illegals. :
They mussey ain't know }
that ‘we’ is the majority }
who is poor an scrapping ;
and ain't gats no money to }
hire or shelter nobody }
cause we ain't have no yard :
or lawn, an we ain't have }
no extra house to rent or :
business to hire anybody.
It's dem other people with }
money who does that, and }
dem rich politicians should :
know that instead of talk- ;

Championships following disqualifi-
cation of the American team.

“The Bahamas has been negatively
impacted by cheating through the
doping process, and (that) has led to
these outstanding Bahamian athletes
being recognised as World and
Olympic Champions years after they
should have been, and they still have
not received their recognition at an
international event,” Mr Foulkes said.

“They are receiving their medals at
home in front of hundreds instead of
in the international arena in front of
thousands who sit in the stadiums and
hundreds of thousands of television
viewers.

“As a result, our athletes have lost
out on lucrative opportunities, and
our country has lost valuable inter-
national television exposure.

“By passing this legislation we will
be ensuring that the Bahamas will be
fully compliant with world norms with
respect to the fight against doping in
sports, and we will have the legal
authority to test any athlete who is
in the Bahamas, whether the athlete is
a Bahamian or not; to enter into rec-
iprocal agreements with other coun-
tries, and also to test Bahamian ath-
letes while they are in other coun-
tries.

“We are seeking to ensure that the
cheaters will never again take glory
away from the honest competitors on
the world stage in the sporting are-
na,” he said.

Local businessman collaborates with

artists to help revitalise Bay Street

LOCAL artists have been
given the opportunity to dis-
play completed works in the
eastern section of Bay Street
between East Street and Vic-
toria Avenue in an effort to
revitalise the dilapidated
area, using art to draw atten-
tion to the often overlooked
part of downtown.

Vaughn Roberts, manag-
ing director of the Downtown
Nassau Partnership (DNP),
is partnering with project
curator Jonathan Murray to
mobilise the art community
and get Bahamian artists
involved in a public change.

“T believe this mobilisation
is only one of the ways artistic

involvement can contribute
to the overall goals of the
DNP,” said Mr Roberts.

“The ‘East of East Street’
project is important for pro-
moting a sense of community
among stakeholders and
developing possibilities for
the blighted area.”

Makeover

The collaboration also uses
short-term methods to give
the area an aesthetic
makeover, allowing derelict
buildings to be used as can-
vasses for murals and vacant
storefronts to gain new life
from displayed artwork.

Local artists and volunteers
demonstrate communal
involvement by engaging
themselves in physical instal-
lations of art work along Bay
Street. Mr Roberts hopes the
collaboration will encourage
other Bahamians, artists and
volunteers, to become active
in the development that many
hope will “bring back the
magic” to the once vibrant
city.

“The East of East Street
project doesn’t stop at
appealing to participating
artists, volunteers and down-
town property owners. Hop-
ing to catch the eye of
Bahamians and visitors alike,

it’s getting coverage online
through popular networking
sites like Facebook, where a
group has been providing the
public with updates and pic-
tures as well as a place to
voice opinions about the pro-
ject,” organisers said.

Murals

The concept for the murals
uses Bahamian literature as
a focal point. John Cox, one
of the featured artists, coined
the phrase ‘this is how much I
love you’ in his expressive
piece located on the wall
behind an east downtown bus
stop. Mr Roberts said that
while some pieces were cre-

walk cleaning, planning for
the properties of container
shipping companies and
movements for on-street
parking in the area between
East Street and Victoria
Avenue.

Guided by an 11-member
board with public and private
sector representation and co-
chaired by Tourism Director
General Vernice Walkine
and Nassau Tourism Devel-
opment Board chairman
Charles Klonaris, the DNP
employs a full-time, profes-
sional management team to
coordinate the revitalisation
efforts steering the drive
toward the creation of a
‘Business Improvement Dis-

them. It's my right to walk

down the street without ;
fear of someone's dog bit- :
ing my leg or chasing me :

down the street."

- Concerned Citizen, }
Nassau. }

"Man what kind of tar }
dey be usin’ to fill in dese }
pot holes? To me, these }
fellas seem to be working }
twice as hard to fill these }
holes. The pothole by Sug- }
ar Kid Bowe was filled, but :
was right back, just as big }
and deep two days later. }
Man please tell me what }

you all doing?"

- Vexed Driver, }
Nassau. :

Are you vex?

Send your complaints to }
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net

or fax them to 328-2398.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



THE Bahamas Industrial Manufacturers and
Allied Workers Union has elected a new team of
officers.

President Wilfred Seymour, assistant secre-
tary general Clayton Seymour and treasurer
Arthur Penn had all resigned from their posi-
tions.

An election for treasurer, assistant treasurer
and trustees was held on Monday, leading to the
election of Jeffrey Arnett as treasurer; Francionn

Lan \)|

FARRINGTON RD.,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
7300M NIGHTLY

LEXINGTON. KY)

The BIMAWJU elects a
new team of officers

Cox as assistant treasurer, and Neville Cox, David
Morley and Tony Handfield as trustees.

The positions for president, vice-president,
secretary general and assistant secretary general
were unopposed and went to Ronald Roker,
Wilfred Seymour, Jennifer Brown and Carla
Lightbourne respectively.

An election for four shop stewards brought
Edward Miller, Leroy Arnett, Daniel Simmons,
and Adrian Lightbourne into office.

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ated specifically for the pro- Mets
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artworks and represent the
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For those interested in
additional DNP preparations
for the ‘East of East Street’
area, Mr Roberts mentioned
other plans including side-

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co.,, Ltd,

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Phone:322-1722 + Fax: 326-7452

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PAGE 6, SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Police: eight primarily
Haitian gangs are
dismantled in Florida

NORTH MIAMI BEACH, Fla. !

EIGHT primarily Haitian
gangs have been dismantled
in South Florida after a 17-
month investigation, author-
ities said Friday, according to
Associated Press.

“Operation Dead End”
targeted violent drug traf- }
fickers in North Miami }

Beach.

Information from the }
probe into the January 2008
slaying of Miami police }
Detective James Walker in :
North Miami Beach aided }
the undercover local and fed- }
eral law enforcement officers }
in their investigation, Police :
Chief Rafael Hernandez Jr. }

said.

That investigation continues.

“We've received a lot of :
complaints about gang prob- :
lems in our city,” Hernandez }

said.

Thirteen gang members :
and their associates face fed- }
eral armed robbery, drugs }
and weapons charges. If con- }
victed, they potentially face }

decades in prison.

Another 23 will be prose- }
cuted by the Miami State }
Attorney’s Office. Seventeen }
others arrested in this week’s
sweep will be processed for }
immigration violations or }

charges in other crimes,
authorities said.

The defendants range from
street-level dealers to large }
drug suppliers, Hernandez }

said.



Walker was shot by gang :
members with a semiauto- }
matic rifle, authorities said. :

Preserving the purity of
Bahamian goat pepper

By GENA GIBBS
Bahamas Information
Services

SPECIAL measures are
being taken at the Gladstone
Road Agricultural Centre
(GRAC) to preserve the potent
purity of the native Bahamian
goat pepper, the fifth hottest in
the world.

“Goat peppers are specifi-
cally Bahamian,” said Basil
Miller, senior agriculture officer
at GRAC. “They are native to
Andros.”

Being prolific reproducers,
Bahamian goat peppers need
plenty of space and they must
be isolated to maintain their
genetic purity.

“We have to keep them
more than 600 feet away from
any other pepper to avoid
inbreeding,” he explained.

And the Bahamian goat
pepper is in such demand,
GRAC cannot produce suffi-
cient seeds which are distrib-
uted through the Ministry of
Agriculture’s Fish and Farm
store at Potter’s Cay Dock.

“The potential 1s great for
business,” said Mr Miller,
“however farmers will have to
unite.

“What we have found is that
you can grow peppers all year
round. There is no season for

oe THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS
m7 ISLASDS CONFERENCE =
j OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IX THE) 3
CARIBBEAN ANDTHE AMERICAS |
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Faw: 328-2784: methodistcanforemcea min.com

REPOSITIONING FOR WIRACLES WITH FRESH EXPRESSIONS

eri Ch | is eYAsahs)



PEPPER GROWN at the Gladstone Road Agricultural Centre, pictured above, is in demand on the

Bahamian market.

peppers.”
He noted that as an incen-

tive, the Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) is making land avail-
able to persons interested in
farming.

Other varieties grown at
GRAC include finger pepper,
native to Eleuthera, and Tabas-
co pepper, native to New Mex-
ico, which grows well in the
Bahamas.

Harvested peppers go
through a wet extraction
process. The flesh is separated

and the seeds are deposited in a
bin.

They are then dried in the
sun and baked for a day. About
100 sample seeds are isolated
and tested for 11 days to deter-
mine their rate of germination.

Native goat peppers germi-
nate 95 per cent of the time, 10
per cent better than the inter-
national standard, Mr Miller
explained.

He underscored the impor-
tance of a national seed bank.
During passage of Hurricane
Andrew over Eleuthera in

1992, the finger pepper was
almost lost as a genetic variety.

“We were saved because a
lady had some seeds in her
kitchen cupboard that weren’t
destroyed by the salt water,”
said Mr Miller

“Once we establish a germ
bank we will always have the
seeds. If we ever experience a
major hurricane, we will have
seeds so when the coast is clear
we can plant our seeds again.”

Farmers who grow more
that one crop at a time without
isolating them, harvest cross-



BASIL MILLER, senior agricul-
ture officer at the Gladstone Road
Agricultural Centre, shows off a
variety of pepper grown there.

bred crops, substandard to
genetically pure crops, Mr
Miller warned.

“They should concentrate
on growing one crop at a time.

“Some farmers try to grow
too many things in the same
field and open their crops to
diseases. Crops must be grown
with other crops from different
families.”

Bahamas to host Caribhean Arts and Entertainment Expo

THE Caribbean Arts and
Entertainment Expo will be
held for the first time in the
Bahamas this year.

Organisers said they chose
the Bahamas because of the
country’s rapidly growing inter-
est and involvement in arts and
entertainment.

Launched in 2006, the
Caribbean Arts and Entertain-
ment Expo is the first and only
conference in the region dedi-
cated to song-writing, compos-
ing, audio engineering/produc-
tion, dance and videography.

Selling out in its inaugural
year, the Expo provided a
unique opportunity for song-
writers, composers, publishers,
producers — and those in the
industry that support them — to

ENERGIZING THE CONFERENCE NOW W
(Surtire Outreach Witness Worship)
IMMENSE VARIETY « IMMENSE CREATIVITY «= IMMENSE HOPE
*Cekebrating 225 wears of coationows Methodist witness for
Ohrist in The Bahamas”

TWELFTH LORD'S DAY AFTER PENTECOST, ALGUST 2, 20048,
LORD'S DAY BEFORE FMANCIPATION TRANSFIGURATION

COLLECT: Lord Gin your Son left riches of heaven and become pour
for cur cake: when we: Pieper GAVE Ua Ehen pride when we are fecal y save
us from despair, thal we may bust you alone; through Jesus Const our
Lard

WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Ril East)

4:00 am. Rev. De. Kenseth A. tagging (Holy Commennion)

RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH

(108 Manirow Ave. near Wolll Bali
7:00 a.m. Rev, Dr. Raymond BR. Neilly [Holy Communion}
10:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Demeritte
11:00) a.m, Rev. Emily A, Demeritte (Holy Communic)
030 p.m Youth

COKE VMEMONIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street, Pow Hilly
11:00 4.m. Rev. Leonard 4. Roberts Jc. (Holy Conmmurion)

PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plara)
11 aim Rev. Or, Kenneth 4. Haggins {Holy Communion)

HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOWE METHODIST CHL ACH
(78 Crawlord St, Oakes Field
7:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roherts Jr. (Holy Commurian)
4:00 am, sis, Ruth Pratt

METHODIST CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD (Fire Trail Ra}

00 am. Rev. biily A. Demonte (Hhaly Communion)

CHOIA-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Usiackow Street)
$:30 pam. Fridays Children’s: Club (Recess)

METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Qmackoo St) Min Sinise

JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford St. Qubes
Field) Reception to Primary

PEACE AND JLSTICR CAMPAIGN: = All Meihedists of the
Conference are urged bo pray ond to fast for Justice to prevail in the
Methodist Cases ond for om ead to the epsurge in violence. The fost
begins woekly after the evening meal oo Thursday and ends at noon om
Friday. This we proclaim unswervingly: ‘My God amd My Right."

RADIO PROGHAMS

‘Vision’ - Cn che Lord's Thay, #85 1 at? pms
Insparnaizon’ = Cn the Lord"s Day, Radio 8 1bet $240 pom.; “Famualy Vibes”
4N5 1, Tuesday, 7:30 pom; “To God be the Gore’ ANS 1, Tuesday,
T44 p.m

“Hireat Heynires af

: ren ee

BREARFREE

FROM BONDAGES

Come! Join us this Sunday as we
come together and experience Deliverance, Healing
and Victory in the presence of God.

ee
Pei ad
SUNDAY SERVICES

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

FRIDAY at 7?
i il
RADIO MINISTRY
1 HS |

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Collins pom oa an
eR ae One 7
ae Mn mM eu ste

7:30 p.m.



come together in an unprece-
dented way to share their
knowledge and expertise.

In previous years, the Expo
has been held in Puerto Rico,
Jamaica, and Bermuda.

For this year’s event in the
Bahamas’ top industry profes-
sionals will come together to
share their knowledge and
expertise on a broad range of
topics, specific to this market
and of interest to those vying to
take their product abroad.

Since its inaugural year, the
Expo has attracted more than
6,000 music creators, industry
professionals, exhibitors and
sponsors, and is expected to
bring together another large



gathering in the Bahamas.

The most popular elements
of the Expo include shopping
customised tracks/beats by the
best local audio engineers; a fea-
tured artist representative from
Def Jam Recording; one-on-one
sessions with videographers,
photographers, graphic design-
ers and dance agencies, and an
array of networking opportuni-
ties.

The Expo will take place on
August 6 from 8pm to lam at
the Garden of Eden Guest
House and Villas.

Email
mixologybahamas@gmail.com
for more information.

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS « Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, AUGUST 2ND, 2009
11:30 A.M. Speaker
PASTOR
MARCEL LIGHTBOURNE

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
¢ Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

j ‘Sunday Schook 10am
Preaching
Radio Bible Hour:
| Sunday Gam - 2NS 2
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

FUNDAMENTAL |
liam 4 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC

Pastor:H. Mile

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”

| Pastor: H. Mills * Phome: 392-0563 * Box W222 |

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) PO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, AUGUST 2ND, 2009

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/ Bro, Andre Bethel
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer / Sis. Nathalie Thompson (HC)
7:00 p.m. Rey, Carla Culmer.Bd. of Children, Youth & Young Adults

Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”

9 LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past &

Geared To The Future

Worship time: [lam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:

The Madeira
Shopping Center

Rev. Dr. Frankhin Konwles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

PO Bax EE- 6807
Telephone number 325-57 12
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Honduran
interim leaders:
Jelaya can't

he restored

TEGUCIGALPA,
Honduras

HONDURAS’ coup-
installed leader has damp-
ened hopes for a negotiated
solution to the country’s cri-
sis, capping days of mixed sig-
nals by saying firmly that
there’s no way the ousted
president can return to pow-
er, according to Associated
Press.

Also marking a tougher
stance, riot police fired tear
gas and arrested supporters
of ousted President Manuel
Zelaya who blocked a main
artery leading into the Hon-
duran capital Friday. Inter-
im President Roberto
Micheletti said his govern-
ment would no longer toler-
ate street blockades that reg-
ularly snarl traffic in Teguci-
galpa and other cities.

Micheletti’s Foreign Min-
istry said in a statement it
“reserves the right” to can-
cel visas for U.S. diplomatic
personnel in Honduras, in
retaliation for Washington’s
decision this week to revoke
the diplomatic visas of four
Honduran officials. Hon-
duras did not take any imme-
diate steps against U.S. diplo-
mats.

Zelaya’s return has been
a key demand of crisis medi-
ator and Costa Rican Presi-
dent Oscar Arias, who also
has proposed amnesty for the
coup plotters and other mea-
sures as part of a compro-
mise deal.

But on Friday, a judge in
Honduras issued yet another
set of arrest warrants against
Zelaya and three other for-
mer officials for alleged falsi-
fication of public records,
fraud and abuse of authority.
The charges are related to
the alleged misappropriation
of $2 million in government
funds to pay for ads by
Zelaya’s administration in
January.

The interim government
previously announced Zelaya
faces charges of treason,
usurping the powers of other
branches of government,
abuse of authority and try-
ing to undermine Honduras’
system of government.

Zelaya told a television
station in Managua,
Nicaragua on Friday that
“either they reverse the coup,
or there will be generalized
violence,” although he later
told Mexico’s Radio Formu-
la that he wanted to avoid
any bloodshed.

Zelaya also announced
plans to travel next week to
Mexico, where the govern-

Daughter of murdered
woman is located in the US

FROM page one

charge of the Criminal
Detective Unit, said they
located Ms Garrison’s
daughter Anna Pugh, 16,
but they are not yet ready
to make an arrest.

Mr Moss said officers are
working in close communi-
cation with American police
and he is pleased with the
development of the investi-
gation.

Mrs Garrison’s body was

found dumped at the south-
ern end of Fox Hill Road on
Saturday, July 4, wrapped in
a Sheet and plastic bag.

Police estimated she had
been dead for around two
months before her decom-
posing body was discovered
by walkers in a bushy area
on the side of the road near
the Blue Water Cay devel-
opment.

Ms Garrison, 33, of West
Palm Beach, Florida, had
been reported missing on
February 25 by the United

States Embassy in Nassau.
Diplomats said she may
have been in the company
of a Bahamian man.

Police are still awaiting
the results of an autopsy to
find out how she died.

In the week after her body
was found, Zyndall McKin-
ney, 22, of Isabella Boule-
vard, Nassau, was arraigned
in Magistrate’s Court and
charged with intentionally
causing Ms Garrison’s death
between Sunday, February
25, and Saturday, July 4,

Philip ‘Brave’ Davis set to run
for PLP deputy leader post

FROM page one

in the past decade, the PLP is expect-
ed to see a change in its deputy
leader, and a challenge to its current
chairman and possibly even its leader.

Former Prime Minister Perry
Christie has struggled since his defeat
at the polls in 2007 to maintain con-
trol over his parliamentary caucus
who privately insist that the party
desperately needs to see a change of
its leadership before it can go to the

polls again.

Having led the party to a crushing
defeat in 2007, Mr Christie commissioned a
leading research and polling company to ascer-
tain reasons for the PLP’s loss to the now gov-
erning Free National Movement.

According to the report, there were a num-

aA eas



government.

ber of scandals, two including mem-
bers of his own Cabinet, that con-
tributed to Mr Christie’s perceived
“weakness” in handling his minis-
ters that contributed to the PLP’s
poor showing at the polls.

Along with other recommenda-
tions, the firm suggested either a
change in leadership or a remodeling
of the leader’s image to make the
party more attractive to the coveted

youth/swing vote.

g = Since the PLP’s loss there has been
little change to the party’s image.
However, with the convention and
the prospect that the current deputy leader
will vacate her seat, members hope to see their
party reinvent itself — hopefully in time to
provide a substantive alternative to the current

Man dead after
drive-by shooting

FROM page one

with is that around 9.15 pm
(on Thursday) several persons
were standing in that area
when a light coloured vehicle
pulled up and fired shots in
the crowd, hitting the
deceased," Mr Moss said.
Supt Moss added that
police received reports that
others in the group were shot
from the passing car, but so

far they had not turned up at
the hospital for treatment.
"We also got information
that several other persons
may have been grazed or
received injuries — none of
those persons turned up at the
hospital but we are trying to
identify them,” said Mr Moss.
Meanwhile police said they
are waiting on the autopsy
results for 50-year-old
Kendall Hamilton, a resident
of Key West Street, the

Grove.

Mr Hamilton was killed
after he was struck on the
back of his head during an
argument with another man
at West End Avenue around
6 am Thursday, police said.

His body was found lying
in the middle of Poinciana
Avenue, near 2nd Street the
Grove around 6.45 am.

A 29-year-old male resident
of the Grove was assisting
police in their investigations.

Hotel union elections

2009, while being concerned
with another.

Anna Pugh is said to have
been McKinney’s girlfriend
and to have lived with him
in the Bahamas.

The 16-year-old also
known as Madison Sweet-
ing and Madison McKinney
is thought to have left the
Bahamas for the United
States sometime after her
mother’s death.

Bahamas Police want to
question Miss Pugh about
her mother’s murder and
have enlisted the United
States Federal Bureau of
Investigation (FBI) to help
find her.

Reports from various
news agencies claimed Miss
Pugh had been found in
Kennett Square, Pennsylva-
nia, with her father Chris
Pugh last weekend.

But the FBI and
Bahamas Police denied
Miss Pugh had been arrest-
ed.

However, Mr Moss told
The Tribune yesterday
police are sure they have
located her.

He said: “Three of our
chief superintendents went
to Pennsylvania to see what
information they could
gather and are due to
return this afternoon.

“Tam sure they know
where she is at now.

“They are aware of where
she is, but she has not been
arrested yet, because we are
not ready for her as yet.

“We are pleased with the
progress of the investiga-
tion and the good commu-
nication and cooperation
we have with police in the
United States.”

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = CLE/Qui/2009

IN THE SUPREME COURT

EQUITY SIDE
BETWEEN

QUI/FPO/No. 00180

IN THE MATTEROF THE QUIETING TITLES

ACT 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of JACKSON
McINTOSH of Coopers Town of the Island of
Abaco one of the Island of the Commonwealth

of The Bahamas.

NOTICE

THE PETITION OF JACKSON McINTOSH IN RESPECT OF:-

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate at Fire
Road on the Island of Abaco one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and designated
as Lot No.9 and being bounded EASTWARDLY by
Lot No.10 now or formerly owned by one Samuel
and Clifford McIntosh SOUTHWARDLY by the sea
at high-water mark WESTAWRDLY by Lot No&
now or formerly owned by one Thomas and Ezekiel
McIntosh NORTHWARDLY by the sea at high-water
mark which said parcel or lot of land is shown on the
diagram or plan filed herewith and is thereon colored
RED. And ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate
at Fire Road on the Island of Abaco one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and designated
as Lot 14 and being bounded EASTWARDLY by Lot
No.15 now or formerly owned by one Willis McIntosh
and Mable Burrows, SOUTHWARDLY by the sea _ at
high-water mark WESTWARDLY by Lot No.13 now
or formerly owned by one Henry David and Thomas
McIntosh; NORTHWARDLY by the sea at high-water

ment confirmed he will meet
with President Felipe
Calderon on Tuesday.

Micheletti, installed by
Congress after Zelaya was
forcibly flown out of the
country on June 28, has sent
mixed signals throughout the
week on whether he might
permit Zelaya’s return as
part of a deal. On Thursday,
a former government official
who has been in close con-
tact with Micheletti told The
Associated Press that the
leader was open to compro-
mising on the issue.

declared null and void

recognised with the trade and labour union
FROM page one movements is that the Registrar of Trade
Unions and all public officers are account-
able to the extent that they must act prop-
erly. They must follow the procedure that
they are governed by and they ought to
ensure that the rule of natural justice is
realised,” he said.

Mr Ferguson said that yesterday’s ruling
was a confirmation that the constitution of
the union and the rule of law applies. “This
is a very significant ruling; it is a landmark
ruling and one which will advance the cause
of labour relations in the country,” he said.

mark which said lot of land is shown on the diagram
or plan filed herewith and is thereon colored YELLOW.
And ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate at
Fire Road on the Island of Abaco one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and designated as
Lot 21 and bounded EASTWARDLY by Lot No.22 now

knowledge that it was opposed by the body
responsible for determining the election
dates,” the ruling stated.

Wilson and the union members were rep-
resented by Obie Ferguson and Keod Smith.
Mr Ferguson told The Tribune yesterday
that Mr Wilson has control of the majority of
executive council members and will essen-
tially have control of the union for the next
30 days.

“The fundamental point that needs to be

or formerly owned by Andrew, Eulin and Bartholomew
McIntosh. SOUTHWARDLY by the sea al high-water
mark WESTWARDLY by Lot No. 20 now or formerly

owned by Samuel Sr. Samuel Jr. and Clifford
McIntosh; NORTHWARDLY by the sea at high-
water mark which said lot of land is shown on the
diagram or plan filed herewith and is thereon colored
GREEN.

2: JACKSON McINTOSH claims to be the owner
in fee simple in possession of the said land by virtue of
a conveyance form one Ezekiel McIntosh dated the 31*
day of March A.D. 2008 and has made application of the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
Under Section 3 of the Quieting Title Act, 1959 to have his
tile to the said land investigated and the nature and extent
thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to
be granted by the Court in accordance with the provision
of the said Act. A plan of the said land may be inspected
during normal working hours at the following places.

= FG CAPITAL

MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

cam A Le

ROYAL FIDELITY

heey at Work
3c? L.
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 31 JULY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,572.63] CHG 4.53 | %CHG 0.29 | YTD -139.73 | YTD %-8.16
FINDEX: CLOSE 785.49 | YTD -5.91% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.28 Abaco Markets 1.39 1.39 0.127
Bahamas Property Fund 0.00
6.94 Bank of Bahamas 6.94 6.94 0.00
0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00 -0.877
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.078
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055
10.18 Cable Bahamas 11.39 11.39 0.00 1.406
2.74 Colina Holdings 2.74 2.74 0.00 0.249
5.50 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 5.62 5.71 0.09 0.419
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.53 3.51 -0.02 0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180
ases)
Interest

0.992
0.244

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Freeport,
Grand Bahama Commonwealth of The Bahamas;

(b) The Chambers of V. Alfred Gray & Company,
Marsh Harbour, Abaco;

(c) The Administrator’s Office Coopers Town, Abaco,
The Bahamas.

1.32 Doctor's Hospital 1.82 1.82 0.00
6.60 Famguard 6.60 6.60 0.00
10.00 Finco 10.79 10.79 0.00
10.34 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.34 10.34 0.00
4.95 Focol (S) 5.13 5.13 0.00
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30 0.00
5.50 ICD Utilities 5.49 5.49 0.00
10.39 J. S. Johnson 10.39 10.39 0.00
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
52wk-Hi _52wk-Low Securi Symbol Last Sale
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + i 3 T%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 Prime + 1.75%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 g : T%
1000.00 _ Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 3 fs i N/M
RND Holdings s ‘ 8 256.6
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 9.03
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55 261.90
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $
CFAL Bond Fund 1.3860 2.40
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.8952 -1.52
CFAL Money Market Fund 1.4791 3.17 5.33
3.1031 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.1031 -8.35 -13.82
12.3289 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.9801 2.87 5.79
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 101.6693 1.10 1.67
93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96.7398 0.35 -4.18
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.2765 2.00 -2.98
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person or persons
having dower or right of dower or an Adverse Claim or Claim
or recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 6" day of
September A.D. 2009 file in the Supreme Court in the City of
Freeportaforesaid and serve onthe Petitioner orthe undersigned
a Statement or her claim aforesaid on or before the 6" day of
September, A.D. 2009 or it will operate as a bar to such claim.

52wk-Low Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

NAV Date
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
17-Jul-09

1.3231
2.8952
1.4042
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
ge ee Dated this 22â„¢ day of July A.D. 2009.
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-09
1.0622 2.56 6.22
1.0243 -0.84 2.43
1.0585 2.04 5.85
MARKET TERMS

YIELD -last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of C

30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

V. ALFRED GRAY & CO.
Chambers

#21 Kipling Blvd.

Freeport, Grand Bahama

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change day to day
Daily Vol. - Numb
DIV $ - Dividends
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnin: gs
KS) - 4for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
KS1) - S-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Baharnas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Attorney for the Petitioner







SATURDAY, AUGUST 1,

PAGE 18 « International sports news s

ROUGH Start for



Top golfers
to tee off at
Caribbean
amateur
champs

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

TOP golfers in the Bahamas —
junior and senior — are preparing to
represent the country at the most
prestigious amateur golf event in the
Caribbean.

The Bahamas is expected to field an
11- member team at the 53rd
Caribbean Amateur Golf Champi-
onships set for August 3-8 in Provi-
denciales, Turks and Caicos.

The team is diligently training for
the fast approaching contest after fin-
ishing fifth out of 10 countries in 2008.

The Hoerman Cup team will fea-
ture five players —- Devaughn Robin-
son, Richard Gibson Jr, Peter McIn-
tosh, George Swann and Rashad Fer-
guson.

Two players will contest the Ramon
Baez Trophy meant for mid-amateur
men 35 years and older — Shane Gib-
son and Christopher Harris.

Milford Lockhart and Kevein
Marche will contest the Francis Steele
Perkins trophy for seniors aged 50
and older.

The Haris and Higgs trophy, for
super seniors 60 years and older, will
be contested by Harcourt Poitier and
George Turnquest.

The coach will be Frederick Wright
while Vernon Wells will act as team
captain. James Gomez will serve as
team manager.

Puerto Rico are the defending
national champions and will seek to
retain the title they won in 2008 in
the Cayman Islands.

The Caribbean Amateur Open
began in 1957 and at that time only
included two countries but throughout
the years it has evolved into the
largest annual golf event in the region.

The tournament is contested by ten
nations in the Caribbean — Bahamas,
Barbados, Cayman Islands, Domini-
can Republic, Jamaica, Order of East
Caribbean States, Puerto Rico,
Trinidad and Tobago, Turks and
Caicos Islands and US Virgin Islands.

2009





Former
England
soccer coach

Robson dies...
See page 18

Team Bahamas

Athletes struggle on opening day of
Pan American Junior Championships

2009 Carifta silver medallist Rashan Brown (seen in this file photo) finished fourth in a 400m heat...



By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

t was a rough start for Team

Bahamas on the opening day of

the Pan American Junior Cham-

pionships. Quartermilers were first
to take the track at the top regional meet
in the Hasley Crawford stadium in Port of
Spain, Trinidad & Tobago.

Rashan Brown and Katrina Seymour
saw action early yesterday in the wom-
en’s 400m. Brown, the 2009 Carifta silver
medallist, finished fourth in heat three in
a time of 57.25s.

Diamond Richardson of the US took
the heat in 54.94s, Jamaica’s Jodi-Ann
Muir was second in 55.70s, while Ashley
Kelly of the British Virgin Islands was
third in 56.00s

In heat two, Katrina Seymour failed to
finish her heat.

Neither of the quartermilers advanced
to the next round. Alisha Usery was the
top qualifier in 54.87s.

In the men’s 100m, Warren Frazier and
Geno Jones delivered a pair of impres-
sive performances.

Jones finished fourth in heat one in a
time of 10.63s. D’Angelo Cherry of the
US took the heat in 10.18s.

Frazier fared better in heat two, finish-
ing third in 10.42s. Jamaica’s Dexter Lee
took the heat in 10.24s.

Frazier advanced to the final as the sev-
enth fastest qualifier.

Marcus Rowland entered the final with
10.16s, followed by Cherry, Lee, Diego
Cavalcanti of Brazil, Shermund Alsop of
Trinidad, Miguel Lopez of Puerto Rico
and Jason Rodgers of St Kitts and Nevis.

Results of the final were unavailable
up to press time last night.

Cavic breaks Phelps’ 100 fly world record

By PAUL NEWBERRY
AP National Writer

ROME (AP) — Milorad Cavic can talk a
good game. He’s even better in the pool.

Cavic seized Michael Phelps’ 100-meter but-
terfly world record Friday at the world swim-
ming championships, where he’s making plen-
ty of headlines — in and out of the water.

First, the Serbian said he’s tired of hearing
complaints from the Phelps camp about com-
peting in an inferior suit, even offering to buy
him one of the polyurethane models respon-
sible for most of the worlds records at the
Foro Italico.

Then, Cavic went out in the semifinals of the
100-meter butterfly and knocked off Phelps’
world record, nearly becoming the first swim-
mer to break 50 seconds. Phelps was the sec-
ond-fastest qualifier at 50.48.

The two will be side-by-side tonight in their
rematch.

Cavic hasn’t backed off on his belief that
he beat Phelps to the wall at the Beijing
Olympics, all photographic and timing evi-
dence to the contrary. Now, the Serbian has
another shot at the man who officially won
by a hundredth of a second on the way to cap-
turing eight gold medals in China.

“T didn’t want to go out so fast, but I had so
much energy in my body that I couldn’t help
it,” said Cavic, who touched in 50.01 seconds to
break Phelps’ record of 50.22. “I’m capable
of swimming under 50, which would be enough
to win the gold.”

Less than an hour after his 100 fly semi,
Phelps claimed his third gold medal of the
championships, swimming the leadoff leg of
the 800 freestyle relay won by the United
States with a world record of 6 minutes, 58.55
seconds — one-hundredth of a second faster
than its gold medal time at the Olympics.

As for Cavic’s offer to get him a faster suit,
Phelps said he’s content in his year-old Speedo
LZR Racer.

“Tm wearing this,” Phelps said. “If he wants
to wear a different suit, he can throw this one
on.”

In the relay, Phelps was again no match for
Germany’s Paul Biedermann, who routed him
in the 200 free and put his team more than 1
1/2 seconds ahead on the first leg of the relay.
But Phelps had the better supporting cast,
teaming with Ricky Berens, David Walter and



2a =e 5 gis

MILORAD CAVIC competes in a 100m Butterfly heat at the FINA World Championships in Rome...

Ryan Lochte to set the sixth world
record of the night and 35th of the
championships.

Lochte, turning in an especially
gutty swim after earlier taking
bronze in the 200 backstroke, held
off Russia’s Alexander Sukhorukov
with Phelps screaming at him from
beside the starting block. When
Lochte got there first, Phelps threw
up both arms.

“T was kind of carried by my
teammates tonight,” Phelps said. “I
was probably a half-second slower
than I wanted to be. But these guys
were able to take control. Lochte
swam well the last 50. Ricky and
David did a good job of putting us in a good
spot.”

Aaron Peirsol made up for a huge disap-
pointment in the best way possible, obliterat-
ing the world record in the 200 backstroke
and getting back at Lochte, who beat his fellow
American in that event at both the 2007 worlds
in Melbourne and last summer on the biggest
stage of all.

This wasn’t just any race for Peirsol, not
after what happened Monday.

Expecting to cruise through to the final of
the 100 back — after all, he was three-time
defending champion and had just set a world
record a few weeks ago — Peirsol made a
huge miscalculation in how fast he needed to
go. He finished ninth in the semis; only the



MILORAD CAVIC

(AP Photo: Michael Sohn)

top eight moved on the final.

Peirsol watched from stands the
following night and started looking
ahead to his other chance for an
individual medal in Rome.

“It was kind of a blessing in dis-
guise,” he said. “I just didn’t know it
at the time”

Peirsol got out all his frustrations
with a dominating performance,
breaking his own world record by
more than a full second, his time of
1:51.92 wiping out the mark of
1:53.08 he set at the U.S. nationals
three weeks ago.

Japan’s Ryosuke Irie claimed sil-
ver in 1:52.51, also under the old
mark. Lochte faded to third.

“T wanted to race and I saw that I pulled out
from the beginning and I was feeling all right,”
Peirsol said. “When I kept pulling away, there
was even more of a fire to go a little faster.”

Peirsol knew he’d done it before he even
touched the wall. He spun around with a big
smile and gave the water a roundhouse punch.

“Wooo!” the laid-back Californian said,
showing a rare bit of emotion.

On the medal stand, Peirsol appeared to be
struggling to hold back tears as the national
anthem played.

Two Americans endured bitter disappoint-
ments.

Eric Shanteau, who put off treatment for
testicular cancer after qualifying for Beijing,

Serbian, American
set to be side-by-side
in rematch tonight

was edged out for gold in the 200 breaststroke
by the narrowest of margins. He appeared to
be ahead the final time his head popped out
the water, but his glide to the wall was a little
too long. Hungary’s Daniel Gyurta touched
in 2:07.64.

Shanteau’s time was 2:06.65 — a hundredth
of a second from his first world championship,
and one that would have been especially
poignant after what he went through last sum-
mer.

Rebecca Soni was cruising along in the wom-
en’s 200 breaststroke, 1.5 seconds ahead of
world-record pace halfway through a race she
won in Beijing.

But Soni clearly went out too fast and left
nothing in the tank for the finish. She shock-
ingly fell from first to fourth on the last lap —
out of the medals. Serbia’s Nadja Higl raced by
to claim gold, Canada’s Annamay Pierse took
silver and Austria’s Mirna Jukic got bronze.

Four world records were set in the first three
events of the night, not long after governing
body FINA announced its ban on bodysuits
would take effect the first day of 2010. It might
take years, even decades to surpass the tech-
nology assisted times of these championships.

Germany’s Britta Steffen broke her own
record in the 100 freestyle at 52.07, having set
the previous mark of 52.22 on the leadoff leg of
the 400 free relay at these championships.

Britain’s Fran Halsall claimed the silver,
and Australia’s Libby Trickett held on for
bronze after going out strong. Americans
Amanda Weir and Dana Vollmer were out of
the medals in fourth and fifth.

After Peirsol’s world record, the mark in
the women’s 50 butterfly dropped in consecu-
tive semifinal heats.

Marleen Veldhuis of the Netherlands won
the first semi in 25.28, eclipsing her own mark
of 25.33 set in April. She got to keep the record
less than 5 minutes — Sweden’s Therese
Alshammar won the next semi in 25.07.



PAGE 18, SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Former England soccer
coach Robson dies at 76

Ban on
high-tech
bodysuits
moved up

to Jan 1

By ANDREW DAMPF
AP Sports Writer

ROME (AP) — No need
to worry about a boycott
from Michael Phelps any-
more.

Swimming’s governing
body Friday set a Jan. 1 date
for its ban on the record-
breaking bodysuits, a move
that comes partly in
response to a threat from
Phelps’ coach to pull his
swimmer from competition
until the suits are outlawed.

Earlier this week, FINA
announced a ban but said it
might not take effect until
April or May, three or four
months later than expected.

“Now, without a doubt,
the rules are applying Jan. 1,
2010,” FINA executive
director Cornel Marculescu
said. “The manufacturers
are ready and can begin
(suit) submissions Nov. 1 or
before.”

The comments from
Phelps’ coach, Bob Bow-
man, came immediately
after his swimmer was upset
by unheralded Paul Bieder-
mann of Germany in the
200-meter freestyle Tues-
day. Biedermann wore a
100 percent polyurethane
Arena suit, while Phelps
stuck with last year’s LZR
Racer from Speedo, which
is less than half
polyurethane.

“T think there was a lot of
frustration with Michael.
We saw that with his incred-
ible swim in the 200 fly,”
USA Swimming executive
director Chuck Wielgus
said, referring to Phelps’
world record Wednesday.
“Bob maybe verbalized
what some people had been
feeling on behalf of
Michael.”

Last year, Phelps and oth-
ers with the LZR profited
from the suit, while this year
suits from Italian manufac-
turers Arena and Jaked are
considered faster. Each of
those suits will be banned
at the start of next year,
when men will be restrict-
ed to suits that extend from
the waist to the top of the
knees, and women to suits
that cannot go past the
shoulders or beyond the
knees.

FINA plans to issue new
suit guidelines to manufac-
turers by Sept. 30, and
thought about a delay for a
few months to give compa-
nies enough time to produce
new suits.

“We'll then probably
expect Michael not to swim
until they are implement-
ed,” Bowman said Tuesday.
“Tm done with this. It has to
be implemented immedi-
ately. The sport is in sham-
bles right now and they bet-
ter do something or they’re
going to lose their guy who
fills these seats.”

More than 30 world
records have been set at
these world championships,
about twice as many as at
the last edition two years
ago in Melbourne, Aus-
tralia.

“Comments by Michael
Phelps or anyone else we
respect, and we do our job
and control whatever hap-
pens in our sport,” Mar-
culescu said.

FINA also announced a
rule requiring suits to be
approved one year before
Olympics or world champi-
onships, and available com-
mercially six months in
advance.

A scientific commission
with materials experts from
each continent will approve
swimsuits and monitor
developments in technolo-
gy, FINA said.

USA Swimming is con-
sidering installing the new
suit rules for domestic com-
petition before the end of
the year. Polyurethane
bodysuits will be banned for
a Duel in the Pool competi-
tion in Manchester, Eng-
land, in December, with the
United States facing an all-
star team from France, Rus-
sia and Britain.

“We met after prelims
this morning and agreed to
adopt the rules for that
meet,” Wielgus said.
“Whether or not USA
Swimming adopts those
rules any sooner is some-
thing we’ll talk about when
we get home.”

By STUART CONDIE
AP Sports Writer

LONDON (AP) —
Bobby Robson, the
knighted ambassador
of English soccer who
coached his country to
the 1990 World Cup
semifinals and won tro-
phies in four countries,
died Friday. He was
70.

Robson had cancer
and died at home in
County Durham in
northeast England
with family beside him,

a family statement

said. He was diagnosed with cancer
five times since in 1991 but continued
to work until November 2007.

His death came five days after he
appeared in a wheelchair at New-
castle’s St. James’ Park. Thousands
crowded the stadium to pay tribute
to him and raise funds for his cancer
charity.

Robson played for England at the
1958 World Cup and as coach led his
country to its best World Cup finish
since its 1966 title. The coach was
knighted in 2002 for his service to the
sport. He also coached PSV Eind-
hoven, Sporting Lisbon, FC Porto and
Barcelona. “He always showed great
passion for the game and will be
missed by all football fans across the
globe,” FIFA president Sepp Blatter
said. “On behalf of the worldwide
football family, I would like to thank
Sir Bobby Robson for his memorable
contribution to the beautiful game.”

Robson rose to fame in the 1970s
when he turned unfashionable Ipswich
into one of the country’s top teams,
winning the FA Cup and UEFA Cup.

His last club job was at Newcastle,
the club he supported as a boy. In
January 2006, he took a job mentoring
Ireland coach Steve Staunton. “I did
what I loved, and I did what I was
pretty good at and I suppose what I
was born for,” Robson said in 2005. “I
enjoyed my career. It was wonderful.
I played for some fabulous clubs and
I played for England. Then I got the
top job, the best job in the world real-
ly. I managed England.”

Manchester United manager Alex
Ferguson said he drew on Robson for
his generous advice. “I mourn the
passing of a great friend, a wonderful
individual, a tremendous football man
and somebody with passion and
knowledge of the game that was
unsurpassed,” he said. “His charac-
ter was hewn out of the coal face,
developed by the Durham County
mining background that he came
from.”

Added former French soccer great
Michel Platini, the president of Euro-
pean soccer’s ruling body: “He was a
great ambassador for football and a
true gentleman in everything he did.”

Robson began his coaching career
in 1968, when he took charge of strug-
gling first division Fulham. The club

AN August 1953 AP file photo of Bobby Robson - seen playing for Fulham FC at the

Craven Cottage in London...

was relegated and fired him after 10
months. Robson was hired by Ipswich
and stayed there the next 13 years.
He was then appointed England’s
manager following the team’s elimi-
nation from the 1982 World Cup, and
he won 27 of 28 qualifying matches
in his eight years in charge.

The loss cost England a place at the
1984 European Championship. After
the Football Association rejected his
offer to resign, Robson went on to
lead the team to the quarterfinals of
the 1986 World Cup in Mexico.

England was eliminated from that
tournament when Diego Maradona
scored two of soccer’s most famous
goals. The Argentine great punched
the ball into the net for the first goal.
On the second, Maradona surged
halfway down the field, shredding
much of the England team in the
process.

Maradona called the first goal “The
Hand of God.” Robson would have
none of it. “It wasn’t the Hand of
God,” Robson said. “It was the hand
of a rascal. God had nothing to do
with it.”

A poor performance at Euro ’88
was followed by a run to the semifi-

nals of the 1990 World Cup in Italy,
where England lost a penalty-kick
shootout to West Germany after a 1-
1 draw.

Robson joined PSV after the World
Cup and won the Dutch league in
1991 and ’92. He also coached at
Sporting and FC Porto before moving
to Barcelona in 1996. A year later, he
was voted European Manager of the
Year after winning the Spanish Cup,
the Spanish Super Cup and the Euro-
pean Cup Winners’ Cup with a team
that included Brazilian star Ronaldo.
He returned to PSV and then went
to Newcastle from 1999 to 2004.

No matter what, he remained pop-
ular with fans, often chatting soccer
with them even as his declining health
prevented a full-time return to coach-
ing. He had surgery to remove a brain
tumor in 2006 but was again diag-
nosed with cancer the following year.

Asked in 2005 why he continued to
work into his later years, Robson said:
“Football is my drug. I don’t like
going to supermarkets on a Saturday
afternoon.”

Robson is survived by his wife,
Elsie, and sons Andrew, Paul and
Mark.



Police provide details on boxer Gatti’s death

By BRADLEY BROOKS
Associated Press Writer

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP)
— Arturo Gatti hanged him-
self with a handbag strap from
a staircase column more than
seven feet off the ground,
Brazilian police said Friday
as they released new details
about the boxer’s death.

Milena Saraiva, a police
spokeswoman in the north-
eastern city of Recife, provid-
ed more information about
Gatti’s suicide a day after
authorities reversed their
stance on the case. Until
Thursday, they insisted it was
a homicide and the boxer’s
wife was tagged as the prima-
ry suspect.

“This case has been
resolved. While the evidence
at the scene first led us to
think Gatti was murdered, the
autopsy results and a detailed
crime scene analysis simply
pointed to a different out-
come,” Saraiva said.

On Thursday, a judge
ordered the release of Gatti’s
wife, 23-year-old Amanda
Rodrigues, who had been
held since July 12 in Recife.
She and Gatti arrived with
their 10-month-old son a few
days before in the resort town
of Porto de Galinhas, where
they rented a two-level apart-
ment.

Police ultimately conclud-
ed that Gatti hanged himself
in the apartment early on July
11 from a wooden staircase
column that was 7.3 feet off
the ground. He stood on a
stool and kicked it out from
underneath him, police said.
The autopsy report said Gat-



MICKEY ROURKE attends a
memorial Mass for Aturo Gatti
at St John the Baptist Roman
Catholic Church in Jersey City,
NJ.

(AP Photo: Rich Schultz)

ti was suspended for about
three hours before his body
fell to the floor.

Rodrigues said she was
sleeping with the pair’s son in
an upstairs bedroom. She told
police she went downstairs
about 6 a.m. to get milk for
the boy and saw Gatti’s body
on the floor, but assumed he

was drunkenly sleeping. It was
not until she went back down-
stairs at 9 a.m. that she dis-
covered Gatti was dead and
called police. Saraiva said no
suicide note was found.

“The first investigators to
arrive at the scene only saw
his body on the floor and the
bloodied strap near his body,”
Saraiva said. “They assumed
his wife strangled him.”

Saraiva said 17 witnesses
told police that the pair got
into a loud fight on a street
near the beach in Porto de
Galinhas the night before
Gatti died. Saraiva said Gatti
had seven cans of beer, along
with two bottles of wine, over
the course of dinner and par-
tying at a bar.

Witnesses told police Gatti
at one point picked up
Rodrigues, who weighs about
100 pounds, by her chin with
his right hand and tossed her
to the ground.

Saraiva said at that point a
security guard for a local hotel
intervened, only to be
punched in the face by Gatti.
Asmall crowd that had gath-
ered around the scene grew
angry, with some throwing
stones and even a bicycle at
the boxer, the police spokes-
woman said.

One stone hit Gatti in the
back of the head, causing a
wound that police originally
said was caused by a small
steak knife that was found
near his body — and which
police showed off to reporters
the day after Gatti’s death.

The fracas eventually broke
up, and Gatti and Rodrigues
returned to the apartment in
separate taxis.

In an telephone interview
with The Associated Press as
she walked out of jail Thurs-
day, Rodrigues said Gatti may
have killed himself because
he feared she would leave him
after their fight, one of many
during a rocky two-year mar-
riage.

“T believe that when we got
home and he saw that he hurt
me, he thought I would leave
him, that I would tell him to
just let me go, that I would
separate from him,” she said.
“He did that in a moment of
weakness. He was drunk,
maybe he didn’t know what
he was doing, maybe he
thought I would leave him the
next day.”

According to records at the
Court of Quebec’s criminal
and penal division, Gatti was
charged on April 16 for vio-
lating a restraining order that
had been filed against him.
Records didn’t indicate who
filed the restraining order, but
Gatti’s mother, Ida, confirmed
it was Rodrigues who had tak-
en one out against him.

Gatti, a Canadian who cap-
tured two world titles in his
16-year pro career, retired in
2007 with a record of 40-9.

Many of his friends and
family have expressed disbe-
lief at the suicide ruling, and
Canadian Foreign Minister
Lawrence Cannon said in a
statement Friday that gov-
ernment officials will seek
more information from
Brazilian authorities on the
Gatti investigation and its
findings.

e Associated Press Writer
Rob Gillies in Toronto con-
tributed to this report

Creditors to

vote on Vick

hankruptcy
plan

By LARRY O’DELL
Associated Press Writer

NEWPORT NEWS, Va.
(AP) — Though a judge
ruled that Michael Vick’s
bankruptcy plan can be sent
to creditors to vote on, it
remains unclear how the
out-of-work quarterback
will get the income to pay
them.

Vick declined to answer
reporters’ questions before
and after a hearing Friday
on his Chapter 11 bank-
ruptcy plan. U.S. Bank-
ruptcy Judge Frank Santoro
ruled that the plan can
move forward after nobody
objected.

The plan now goes to
Vick’s creditors. After they
vote, Santoro will conduct a
confirmation hearing on
Aug. 27.

Creditors approved Vick-
’s first plan, but Santoro
rejected it in April, saying it
was not feasible. This time,
Vick has proposed selling
off more assets and giving
creditors a bigger cut of his
future income.

But the plan is based
largely on Vick’s prospec-
tive earnings from his goal
of returning to the NFL,
which still is not a sure
thing.

NFL commissioner
Roger Goodell condition-
ally reinstated Vick on
Monday, a week after Vick
completed his 23-month
sentence for running a dog-
fighting ring. Goodell said
Vick can sign with a team
and begin playing by week
six. Vick said Thursday that
he is “getting close” to sign-
ing but did not offer any
details.

Several NFL teams have
said they’re not mterested
in signing the 29-year-old
Vick.

“Mr. Vick’s time horizon
in his professional career is
not unlimited,” Santoro
said.

The judge also postponed
action on requests for pay-
ment by Vick’s attorneys,
saying he wanted to wait
until all the legal bills are
in. A New York-based law
firm is asking for $1.5 mil-
lion after slashing its origi-
nal request of nearly $2.7
million. A Norfolk firm is
seeking $385,000.

Santoro demanded an
explanation from one of the
New York attorneys,
Michael Blumenthal, on
how his firm could bill Vick
for 8,000 hours of work in
less than a year.

“This case is probably the
most difficult case ’ve ever
been involved in,” Blumen-
thal said.

He noted that Vick was
in the federal penitentiary
in Leavenworth, Kan.,
when the bankruptcy peti-
tion was filed in July 2008,
making attorney-client com-
munication difficult. And
Vick’s finances were in
shambles, requiring a Her-
culean effort to track down
assets, bank accounts and
financial records.

“We started at below
ground zero,” Blumenthal
said, adding that five
lawyers at his firm spent
substantial time on the case.

Vick’s lawyers also
endured an acrimonious
battle, largely behind the
scenes, with one of his
major creditors — Joel
Enterprises Inc., the com-
pany owned by Vick’s for-
mer agent.

Joel objected at virtually
every step on the bank-
ruptcy process before the
two sides finally settled
their differences.

On another matter, San-
toro rejected a motion for
Blumenthal’s colleague,
Peter Ginsberg, to with-
draw from the case. The
lawyers in Vick’s criminal
case asked Ginsberg to
withdraw after a federal
appeals court upheld sanc-
tions against him in an
unrelated case in Florida.
Ginsberg said he had not
been actively involved in
Vick’s case recently any-
way.

Santoro said Ginsberg
did nothing wrong in Vir-
ginia, and his troubles in
Florida had no bearing on
Vick’s case.



PAGE 20, SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

UK court rejects
hacker's bid to
avoid extradition

LONDON

BRITAIN’S High Court on

Friday rejected an autistic }
British man’s bid to avoid }
extradition to the United
States to face trial for hacking }
into military computers, }
according to Associated Press. }

Gary McKinnon, who }
claimed he was searching for }
evidence of UFOs, has fought :
a long legal battle against }
extradition after he was }
charged with breaking into 97 }
computers belonging to }
NASA, the U.S. Department }
of Defense and several branch- }
es of the U.S. military soon }
after the Sept. 11, 2001, ter- }

rorist attacks.

His lawyers argued 43-year-
old McKinnon is an eccentric }
but harmless man who had no i

malicious intent.

The High Court rejected his }
appeals Friday and ruled that :
he should face extradition. }
Judge Stanley Burnton, one of }
two judges hearing the case, }
said in a 41-page ruling that :
extradition was “a lawful and }
proportionate response to his }

offending.”

McKinnon’s lawyer, Karen :
Todner, called the ruling }
“hugely disappointing,” and }
urged Home Secretary Alan }
Johnson to stop the extradi- }

tion.

“We have 28 days to review }
the judgment and will continue }
to explore every legal avenue }
until we achieve a just and }
proper result,” she said. Tod- }
ner said she planned to appeal }
the High Court decision, pos- ;
sibly taking the case to }
Britain’s new Supreme Court }

and the European courts.

Johnson said he was pow-

erless to intervene.

“Tt would be illegal for me }
to stop the extradition of Gary }
McKinnon, which the court }
ruling has made clear,” he said }
in a statement. “Mr. McKin- }
non is accused of serious }
crimes, and the U.S. has alaw- :
ful right to seek his extradi- }
tion, as we do when we wish to }
prosecute people who break }

our laws.”

He said U.S. authorities had }
assured Britain that McKin- }
non’s health and welfare needs }
would be met, if he were extra- }

dited.

David Cameron, leader of }
the opposition Conservatives, }
said he was disappointed by :
the ruling and that McKinnon }
should face trial in a British }
court. “Gary McKinnon is a }
vulnerable young man, andI
see no compassion in sending }
him thousands of miles away }
from his home and loved ones }

to face trial,” Cameron said.

McKinnon’s family and sup- }
porters have argued he should }
not be extradited because he }
has Asperger’s syndrome, a }
form of autism, and could be }
at risk of psychosis or suicide if }

he is sent to the U.S.

McKinnon’s lawyers and 40 i
British lawmakers have writ- }
ten to President Barack Oba- }
ma asking him to prevent the }

extradition.

Earlier this year McKinnon :
offered to plead guilty to a }
criminal charge in Britain to }

avoid facing a USS. trial.

The Crown Prosecution Ser- }
vice ruled, however, that the }
case was best prosecuted in }
the United States, leading }
McKinnon’s attorney Edward }
Fitzgerald to argue that the }
service had failed to take }
account of humanitarian fac- ;

tors.

McKinnon’s lawyers had }
asked the High Court to over- }
turn the prosecutors’ decision,
as well as the British govern- }
ment’s decision to extradite }
him — requests dismissed in }

Friday’s ruling.

Judge Burnton said the case }
should be dealt with “as expe- i
ditiously as possible,” and that }
McKinnon could face extradi- :

tion in September.

McKinnon is charged in }
New Jersey and Virginia with :
eight counts of computer }
fraud. Each count potentially }
carries a sentence of up to 10 }
years in prison and $250,000 }

in fines.

Todner said McKinnon
would be extradited to Vir- }

ginia, if he is sent to the US.

McKinnon would be extra- }
dited through a treaty signed
by the U.S. and Britain in the }
wake of Sept. 11 that was :
designed to make it easier to }
transfer individuals, including }
terrorism suspects, between }
the two countries. Its critics }
argue that it is skewed against :

British citizens.

Menzies Campbell, a law- }
maker from the opposition }
Liberal Democrat party, said
the extradition treaty was }

flawed.

“The people who should }
hang their heads in shame are }
the members of the govern- }
ment who negotiated an extra- }
dition treaty with the United }
States which places British cit-
izens in a much weaker posi- }
tion than their American coun- }

terparts,” he said.





ECO-tour operator Grand
Bahama Nature Tours has
pledged to make a monthly
contribution to the Humane
Society of Grand Bahama to
assist with operating expens-
es of the animal shelter.

Said the tour company:
“The downturn in the econ-
omy and low visitor arrivals
affect us all.

“The effect is also being
felt at the Freeport animal
shelter which is swamped
with animals, many of which
are there as a result of eco-
nomic woes.

“While we realise that
there are many organisations
seeking funds for worthy
causes, please consider that
these animals have no con-
trol over their circumstances
and need our help.”

Unlike the shelter in Nas-
sau that is funded by the
government, Grand Bahama
Nature Tours said, the
Freeport shelter is depen-
dent on private donations.

The Port Authority con-
tributes substantially, but

Health Minister lauds PHA
for ‘many achievements’
over the first 10 years

By MATT MAURA
Bahamas Information
Services

THE launch of the
National Cancer Registry
and the construction of
the National Oncology
Centre are just two of the
“significant advances”
that have been made in
the public healthcare sys-
tem in the Bahamas since
the establishment of the
Public Hospitals Authori-
ty (PHA) 10 years ago,
Minister of Health Dr
Hubert Minnis said on
Wednesday.

The Public Hospitals
Authority became opera-
tional July 1999 with the
mandate to manage the
public hospitals through-
out the Bahamas; the clin-
ics/health centres in
Grand Bahama; the
National Emergency
Medical Services; the
Bahamas National Drug
Agency and the Materials
Management Directorate.

Dr Minnis said the
advancements have led to
the provision of a higher
quality of healthcare to
Bahamians presenting at
the country’s public
healthcare institutions,
clinics and health centres,
particularly those outside
of New Providence and
Grand Bahama.

Strides

“Both of these are
tremendous strides for-
ward in the care and
treatment of persons with
cancer in the Bahamas,”
Dr Minnis said.

Addressing honourees,
friends and family attend-
ing the Public Hospital
Authority’s Performance
Excellence and Long Ser-
vice Awards at Govern-
ment House, Dr Minnis
said while healthcare pro-
fessionals and cancer
patients and their families
are able to “marvel” at
the success of the devel-
opment of the National
Cancer Registry and the
National Oncology Cen-
tre, and the role both
have played in the diag-
nosis, care and treatment
of cancer patients within
the Bahamas, there have
been many other success-
es.

These include the
launch of the tele-medi-
cine and tele-radiology
projects which Dr Minnis
said bring the best med-
ical expertise in the
nation “to the bedside of
patients” at public health

i

Eco-tour operator pledges monthly
contribution to GB Humane Society



DENISE NEELY, general manager of Grand Bahama Nature Tours, presents a cheque to Lisa Lockhart of the Humane Society of ene Bahama.

there is still a major short-
fall in revenue to cover oper-
ating expenses particularly

clinics and centres outside
of New Providence and
Grand Bahama, in addi-
tion to the installation of
the state-of-the-art auto-
mated pharmacy system.

The pharmacy system is
expected to help pharma-
cists across the country
achieve greater levels of
efficiency in the dispen-
sation of medicines which
Dr Minnis said should
reassure Bahamians of the
accuracy of their pre-
scribed medication.

Other successes, he
said, have been realised
in the “tremendous facili-
ty repairs and upgrades”
and the major institutions
such as the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital and Sandi-
lands Rehabilitation Cen-
tre in New Providence,
and the Rand Memorial
Hospital in Freeport,
Grand Bahama.

Many training opportu-
nities have also been
offered for staff at the
various public healthcare
facilities.

Buildings

“Some of the older
buildings and sections of
the main facility of the
Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal have been restored
and re-purposed and the
capacity of the parking
areas has been increased,”
Dr Minnis said.

“The Rand Memorial
now boasts one of the
most pleasant and mod-
ern public pharmacies in
the country, thanks to
recent upgrades in that
area and Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre
also had its share of
repairs and upgrades.

“Much has been accom-
plished over the past ten
years and every member
of the PHA should feel
justifiably proud of the
progress that has been
made,” Dr Minnis added.

The health minister said
the improvements to the
physical and operational
structures of the public
health system would be
for naught if not for the
“goodly number” of high-
ly trained, motivated and
committed staff.

“As I look back over
the last ten years, nothing
matches the pride I feel
when I consider the level
of skill, training, discipline
and professionalism that
exist throughout our pub-
lic healthcare system and
throughout all of the
PHA’s hospitals and
agencies,” Dr Minnis said.



for animal care, the company Tours is encouraging all
said. businesses to work with their
Grand Bahama Nature — staff members and establish

a plan to pledge monthly
donations no matter the
amount.




“Much has been accomplished
over the past ten years and every
member of the PHA should feel
justifiably proud of the progress
that has been made.”

DR HUBERT MINNIS

Committee for the Privatisation of The
Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.

PUBLIC NOTICE

Legislation for the
Electronic Communications

Sector published

The Committee for the Privatisation of The Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company Ltd. is pleased to advise that the following
acts have been published:

The Communications Act. 2009 ("Comms Act") -— No. 10 of 2008

The Utilities Appeal Tripunal Act, 2009 (“UAT Act") - No. 11 of 2009

Wiles Reguiatan and Competition Authonty Act, 2007 ["URCA
Act") = No. 12 of 2009

Its intended that the URCA Act will come into force on August 1,

2007 and the Ceormms Act and UAT Act will come into force on
September 1, 2009.

Copies can be obfained from the Government Publications
offce or downloaded from the Govemment's website at
www.bohamas.goy.bs of fhe pvivotisation
www.bicprivatisation.com

website oat



Full Text

PAGE 1

A30-YEAROLD woman charged with stealing nearly $4,000 from her place of employment was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Marjorie Ann Cooper, 30, of Joan’s Heights, was arraigned before Magistrate Derrence Rolle in Court 5, Bank Lane, yesterday, charged with 17 counts of stealing by reason of employment. It is alleged that Cooper, between April 9, 2009, and Saturday May 30, 2009, stolea total of $3,830 from My Oceans Company on Charlotte Street. Cooper pleaded not guilty to all charges and opted to have the case heard in Magistrate’s Court. Cooper was granted bail in the sum of $10,000 with one surety. The case was adjourned to October 26. Hotel union elections declared null and void N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.207SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY WITH T-STORM HIGH 90F LOW 81F S P O R T S SEEPAGE SEVENTEENINSIDE Rough start for Team Bahamas N E W S SEENEWSSECTIONPAGETWO Local student takes teen crown By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net R ECENTLY elected Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union (BHCAWU Nicole Martin has beeno usted from her post fol lowing a landmark Supreme Court decision yesterday. I n a 35-page judgment handed down by Justice Jon Isaacs, Martin, the firstw oman president in the union’s almost 51-year history, was ordered to be removed from her post as the union elections held on May 28 were declared null and void. Approximately 6,000 members cast their votes in those elections. Justice Isaacs also granted two other grounds of relief sought by the First Vice President Kirk Wilson and twelve other members who are listed as applicants in the court action. Justice Isaacs ordered that the certification by Registrar of Trade Unions Harcourt Brown on June 2 of the elections held on May 28 be vacated and that the Registrar supervise the union’s elections within 30 days of the order of the court. In the ruling Justice Isaacs noted that by his lacko f response to the concerns of the executive council, “the registrar while profess ing an inability to interfere with the internal workingso f the union has done exact ly that by abetting the minority of the council to hijack the union’s election process through his agreement to supervise the Douglas election. This is truly an example of the dog wagging the tail.” “In the circumstances as I have found them to be, the General Secretary’s request for the Registrar was not the request of the union, the Registrar’s determination to supervise the Douglas election was outside his authority and the applicants are entitled to the declarations they seek, the ruling stated. “I recognise that to require the union to undergo a second election is onerous but that is an eventuali ty freely accepted by those who went forward with the Douglas election in the full First woman president ousted after landmark Supreme Court decision The Tribune YOUR PASSPORT TO MISS UNIVERSE B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR BBQ CHIPOTLE SNACK WRAP www.tribune242.com CAT ISLAND, RumCay and San Salvador MP Philip Davis is expected to formally announce his decision to run for the postof deputy leader of the PLP on Tuesday, The T ribune h as learned. Y esterday, the MP’s communication’s department issued a statement to the media stating that Mr Davis will be making “a major announcement” at theC at Island Association Hall on Market and Vesey Streets near Transfiguration Baptist Church. Having campaigned privately for some time for the job, Mr Davis is expected to join in the list of other would-be leaders who have also expressed a desire to take over the position from current deputy leader Cynthia Pratt. Mrs Pratt formally announced at the party’s previous convention in 2007 that she will no longer seek re-election. With its next convention slated for October 18, Mr Davis is expected to be running alongside PLP MP Obie Wilch combe, Senator Jerome Fitzgerald, and St Cecil ia nomination hopeful Paul Moss. In what is being earmarked as one of the most important conventions for the party withMISCONDUCT charges are pending against 16 Cus toms Department officers, the Ministry of Finance announced yesterday. The officers were informed in letters of inter diction issued yesterday, and will be suspended with full pay pending the determina tion of the charges, They were also given 14 days to respond to the spe cific charges and explain why they should not be dismissed from the Public Ser vice in letters issued by the Public Service Department. An ongoing restructuring exercise being carried out by the Ministry of Finance has also led to 10 Customs officers being transferred to other departments. The ministry said three are being retired in the pub lic interest and one is being given early retirement. By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net THE daughter of murdered American Anna Michelle Garrison wanted for ques tioning in connection with her mother’s death has been located in the United States. A team of three chief superintendents from the Royal Bahamas Police Force investigating the killing returned from a three-day visit with police in the northeastern state of Pennsylvania yesterday. Elsworth Moss, Superintendent in n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A DRIVE-BY shooting in the East Street area of Nassau left a young man dead and several others nursing gun shot wounds. The murder, the country's 47th, happened almost 15 hours after another man was found dead in the middle of Poinciana Avenue. He had a wound to the back of his head. Supt Elsworth Moss, head of the Central Detective Unit, said police got reports of gun shots being fired in the area of Evans and Comfort Streets, in the East Street area, around 9.20 pm on Thursday. The latest victim has been identified as Dario Smith, 26, of Comfort Street. "Police responded and received information that there was a male that was shot and taken to hospital in a pri vate vehicle. We later learned that the male died, and the information we are working PLEASE N O TE THA T , DUE T OTHE MONDAYHOLIDAY, THE TRIBUNE WILL NEXTBEON NEWSSTANDS ON TUESDAY, AUGUST 4TH Philip ‘Brave’ Davis set to run for PLP deputy leader post Philip Davis SEE page seven SEE page seven Misconduct charges pending against 16 Customs of ficers Daughter of murdered American woman is located in the US MAKING ACONNECTIONAHEADOFHARBOURDREDGING THE LARGE metal pipes which will be used to remove sand from Nassau Harbour were connected yesterday and extended into the harbour as part of the extensive dredging project. A TOURIST takes a photo of a collapsed seawall at the Western Esplanade yesterday. With the most active months of the hurricane season yet to come, the sea wall is essential for the protection of the area. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f COLLAPSEDSEAWALLINTHEFRAME Man dead after drive-by shooting SEE page seven SEE page seven Woman charged with stealing almost $4,000 from place of employment

PAGE 2

PETECHE Bethell, a 13year-old Queen’s College stud ent, has been declared the w inner of the first Miss Teen U SA Fantasy Camp. The week-long camp at Atlantis, Paradise Island, coincided with the 2009 Miss Teen USA pageant where more than 50 teen beauty q ueens competed for the cove ted crown. A group of 27 delegates from across the US and also five local participants four of whom won the contest advertised in local newspa pers spent an entire week l earning the ins and outs of the pageant world from industry professionals including Miss Universe Organisation president Paula Shugart, Miss USA 2008 Crystle Stewart, and a host of fashion designers, hair and make-up stylists, and more. Kerzner International vicepresident of casino special projects Anna Wilson led the effort. She said the goal was to piggyback on two exciting events currently going on at the resort the Miss Teen U SA Pageant and the Miss U niverse Pageant. V ice-president of guest activities Amanda Felts is described the first ever Teen Fantasy Camp as a success. “This is really amazing. Coming from a non-pageantb ackground and hearing the girls say that they were truly blown away is a tremendous accomplishment. In fact, I think one of the participants summed it up nicely. She told us she thought she was coming to another cheesy pageant camp but was so impressed by the presenters, the events, and the venue itself,” Ms Felts said. During the week, the girls were chaperoned by state title holders and were treated to a number of beauty and selfdevelopment sessions, culminating in an awards ceremony on Thursday, July 30. Peteche Bethell one of the five Bahamians attending the camp was selected as the winner impressing presenters, organisers and her fellow campers from the very first day. “I was really impressed. At first I was a little bit afraid but in the end I truly had the most amazing time, the stu dent said. “I learned a lot and it was also a great opportunity to be an ambassador to the Bahamas. I encouraged the girls to return because we really can use the (tourism business right now.” Peteche walked away with the winner’s sash, a trophy, and lots of other prizes. She promises to make the Miss Teen USA Fantasy Camp an annual event. THE most recent Occupation and Wages reportr eleased last week showed that the average Bahamian woman earns less than her male counterpart, even if they both hold the samep osition and are equally qualified. TheTribune yesterday asked Bahamians their opinion on this discrepancy in wages. J OY KNOWLES “I am surprised that it (the wage differencea lly exists in our country because we have so many w omen who are in highranking positions. I have an aunt that is in a high-rank-i ng position and I always assumed that she would be on par with anyone of hers tatus, I didn’t think gen der had anything to do with it. I am surprised about it and I don’t think that’sr ight. “For sure, if they are doing the same job andt hey are just as capable to do the job I don’t think that should be, I don’t knoww hy that should be, especially in a country with so m any single mothers. (Gender) shouldn’t be considered in the salary as longa s the person has the qualifications.” MORTEZ HOPKINS “I think it basically u nfair, women and men should have equal rights, and I think the governments hould look into that, deal with the situation at hand to try to fix that.” SHARON CHAPPELL Discrimination is discrimination, and if we are less tolerant of it in othera reas, then this should also fall under the same umbrella. If we are going to be intolerant of discriminationr acially then we should be equally as intolerant of discrimination among the sexes.” D IANDRA CASH “I feel that it’s wrong because currently more females attend tertiary education, it means that we are applying ourselves tog et a better job and not as (many tiary education and are get-t ing paid (more though they don’t have the d egree. “Also, I guess society still has this mentality thatt he men are the providers of the home so they feel the men should be paidm ore. I think that’s wrong.” The difference in earnings between men and women C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE T ALK STREET JOYKNOWLES MORTEZ HOPKINS SHARON CHAPPELL DIANDRA CASH Local student is first Miss Teen USAFantasy Camp winner PETECHE BETHELL, 13, wins Miss Teen USA Fantasy Camp. CAMPERS POSE for iconic Royal Towers shot. YOUNG PETECHE with state title holders. CAMPERS HIT the beach as a part of their week-long adventure.

PAGE 3

A S beauty queens from around the world make their way to the Bahamas for the Miss Universe Pageant, a local beauty is heading to the other side of the world for an internation-al pageant of her own. Tiara Cooper – first runner-up in the 2008 Miss Bahamas World pageant – heads toS hanghai, China where she will compete in the Miss Tourism Queen International Pageant. The statuesque beauty hopes to bring home the title of one of the largest pageants in the world. Tiara won the right to compete in the Miss Tourism Queen International pageant with her top three placement in last year’s Miss Bahamas World pageant. The Miss Tourism Queen International Pageant was founded by Charlie See in 1949. In 1993, the Miss Tourism Queen Organisation held the first world final competition in Sri L anka, and later in the United States, Rus sia, Brazil, Germany, Japan, Singapore, and many other countries. The contest then moved to China in 2004, and has been held there ever since, growing to the point where it is now considered to be a ‘grand slam’ pageant – one of the top four int he world. With each country's tourism ambas sadors coming together for the event, Miss Tourism Queen International aims to enhance tourism development, friendship among the countries, and international culture exchange. Bahamians are being encouraged to boost Tiara’s chances in the pageant by voting for her online. The contestant receiving the highest number of votes automatically advances to the finals. There are 60 contestants competing for the title in this event, which is scheduled for August 28. Tiara leaves for Shanghai on August 5. FRUSTRATED residents of the Vista Marina area vented their concerns over the proposed container port relocation to Arawak Cay and called on government to b e more transparent about t he controversial development. At the meeting at the British Colonial Hilton on Thursday night, the residents also questioned the environmental ramifications of the extension of Arawak Cay for the nearby Saunders Beach. They feel that government has not fully explained its plans on the development and the numerous affects it would have on residents before moving full steam ahead with the project. Opposition Senator Jerome Fitzgerald, who has passiona tely resisted the move to A rawak Cay, challenged government to disclose the "true cost" of the container port relocation inclusive of the proposed island extension, surrounding road extensions and new port buildings. "The cost of the port at Arawak Cay may be $80 million dollars or $150 million dollars depending who you believe," he said. He asked whether an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA was done to identify the impact of the container port on traffic, noise and pollution o n West Bay Street and the V ista Marina subdivision, and if government had determined where the cause-way from Arawak Cay would connect to West Bay Street. "Why has the government chosen the location ranked sixth out of seven as the least favourable location to relocate the port. The prime minister stated during the 2007 election campaign that Arawak Cay would be developed as a cultural centre. Why has he changed his mind? How will the cargo liners enter the port? Through the barrier reef between Silv er Cay and Long Cay or t hrough the main entry to Nassau Harbour," Mr Fitzgerald said. Area resident Michelle Campbell said her attempts to get a copy of the EIA done on the Arawak Cay extension and accompanying harbour dredging have been unsuccessful. An employee of the Ministry of Works told her the documents were not available for public viewing, Ms Campbell said at the meeting on Thursday night. Copies of both reports were available on the Bahamas Environment Science and T echnology Commission's ( BEST) website yesterday. The town meeting was organised by the Committee to Protect and Preserve the Bahamas for Future Generations, headed by Mr Fitzgerald. Recently, Mr Fitzgerald challenged Environment Minister Earl Deveaux to a public debate on the port relocation issue. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009, PAGE 3 Residents vent concerns over container port relocation issue Bahamian beauty heads to China for Tourism Pageant SHOPS wishing to do so, may open for business on Emancipation Day, observed on Monday, August 3, during normal operating hours, the Cabinet Office said yesterday. Employees who are required to work during this holiday should be treated as non-shift workers. Further, employers are to ensure that the provisions of section 10(a Act, 2001 apply in respect to the payment of wages. Businesses get the ‘go ahead’ to open for the holiday By BAHAMAS INFORMATION SERVICES GOVERNMENThas signed two contracts totalling over $200,000 for completion of road works in Long Island. Public Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant said on Thursday that it is anticipated that the road works will “contribute to the further overall development of Long Island.” The first contract totalling $149,040 provides for the construction of one mile of White House Road in Millers, while the second contract of $135,436 will cover reconstruction of 1,500 yards of the McKanns Settlement Road. Both contracts have been awarded to Rowdy Boys Construction Company represented at the signing by Bernard Knowles, of Man grove Bush, Long Island. Agriculture and Marine Resources Minister Larry Cartwright, MP for Long Island, said he is “more than pleased” that the govern ment has decided to complete the roads. “This would make five side-roads that have been done within the last two years,” Mr Cartwright said. “These roads have been neglected for quite some time and have been allowed to deteriorate. “The residents there have been complaining a lot and I am sure they would be happy that the government has decided to repair them.” Rowdy Boys Construction has an “outstanding” record in Long Island for doing “very fine work in road building,” Mr Cartwright said. Mr Knowles said 12 persons will be employed on the road works projects that will begin on August 3 and be completed within 90 days. The projects will be executed concurrently. Among those attending the signing were Permanent Secretary Colin Higgs, Deputy Director George Hutcheson and Chief Engineer Howard Barrett. GOVERNMENT Ministers signed two contracts with Rowdy Boys Construction Company for the completion of Long Island roads on Thursday. Pictured from left are Public Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant; Minister of Agriculture and Marine Resources Larry Cartwright and contractor Bernard Knowles. Contracts signed for completion of Long Island road works B AHAMIANS a re encouraged to vote for Tiara Cooper for a chance for her to get into the finals. Letisha Henderson /BIS Photo

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune . A S ABahamian who loves his country and who wants to see it as a beacono n top of a hill shining bright above all other nations, I have to say thatg ambling and the national lottery is not the way to g o. W e have to think about the next generation and t he future Bahamians and the country that they want to grow up in. We as a country do not n eed to follow other countries and learn the hard w ay that gambling undermines a strong work ethic and fosters an attitude ofl aziness and greed as people waste money in order to try and win a ticket to a life of leisure. We must be true to our c onstitution and live by Christian values which do not include gambling or an ational lottery. I am a firm believer that G od does bless those nations that honour him a nd so when he says that “Righteousness exalts a nation, but sin is a dis-g race to any people” t hat is truth, and a reality that w e can hold up to our people as the solution to the problems besetting us. C oming from a sporting family and having been involved in sports for almost 50 years I know what it takes to be gooda nd to be the best you can be, and it is not by trying t o take the easy way out, b ut rather by becoming very disciplined and worki ng hard with the gifts that God has given you. Gambling and a Nationa l Lottery go against the work ethic and would be t he wrong message to send to the very athletes that we are trying to teach sacri-f ice, dedication, and selfdiscipline. I have never seen an athlete compete at their full potential by being lazyo r leaving anything to chance and that should not be our philosophy as a nation. This summer I have b een reading in the book of Proverbs and it has much to say against bet-t ing on chance and being lazy, here are a few of those gems, “lazy hands make a man p oor, but diligent hands bring wealth.” “Whoever loves discip line loves knowledge, but he who hates correction is s tupid.” “He who works his land will have abundant food,b ut he who chases fantasies lacks judgment.” “Diligent hands will rule, but laziness ends in slave labour. All hard workb rings a profit, but mere talk leads only to poverty.” These are the truths we n eed to keep before the c onscience of a nation not striving to be rich by chance. I know that we d o n eed funding to help our athletes, and representing ourc ountry well takes money, but let’s support them w hile sending the right m essage. Righteousness exalts a n ation, so let’s give all our energies to building a strong nation because we trust God. There are so m any ways to raise money and help our athletes and s tudents if we have the will to do so. Whereas, I cannot e ndorse a national lottery for sports, I can and do endorse the other recommendation put forth, i.e. a tax. W e have the most beautiful country in the world and millions of touristsc ome every year to see and enjoy our sunshine, waters,b eaches, and people. An additional $1 per t ourist to come or leave our country would be $4 million for sports eachy ear. A one cent gasoline tax per gallon at the sales p ump could do the same. There are many ways to do things right that are goodf or our nation. ANDY KNOWLES Bahamas National Swim CoachN assau, July 30, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. I FIND it very disturb ing when a political figure passes comment giving obviously based opinion as to what “their” Government has been doing when in reality the Government has only done very little. The Senate President, Hon Lynn Holowesko,k nows better when she negatively criticizes the Bay Street property owners as to the external state of their buildings when you look at the Senate building and the paint is pealing off the building, at least it was yesterday, Wednesday, July 29. Across from the Parliament buildings, the Adderley building, owner the Treasurer of the Bahamas/government is filthy Vendue House and the old BEC accounting office is also owned by The Treasurer of The Bahamas Government the old Lloyd’s Bank building on George Street, currently the Ministry of Tourism still has sheets of plywood surrounding it from three to four years ago, that is another Government building. Might it be, Madam Senate President, that your social friends, the Bay Street property owners, don’t see any business that will come to Bay Street out of Miss Universe, as clearly all the hype and events are going to be taking place onK erzner’s island? If the contestants are going to Grand Bahama please ensure they ride in very dark tinted limos. One hopes that National Security will ensure that during this global event only the correct coloured Bahamas national flag will be flying as the majority today we see are black yellow and BLUE! I must ask: Are we really serious or have we swallowed the tourism slogan hook line and sinker and really believe...It’s better...When the world says it isn’t. ABRAHAM MOSS, Nassau, July 30, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama PHILADELPHIA Perhaps the biggest " teachable moment" from the Henry Louis Gates Jr. saga was for President Barack Obama: If you want to improve race relations, you have to enter the fray. E ven some of Obama's fiercest opponents say that by bringing together the black professor and the white police officer who arrested him, the president had orchestrateda n unlikely and unifying moment, a peaceable kingdom in the Rose Garden. S ymbolic? Yes. Made for TV? Certainly. But these things could not obscure the fact t hat a president who has tried to transcend racial matters was down in the arena, talking about race. "The cynic in me wants to shoot holes in it, the critic in me wants to pick it apart," saidc onservative radio host Mike Gallagher. "But I'm sorry, you have two sides, polaro pposites in a racially tinged confrontation like this, sitting down with the president of t he United States over a beer at the White House? "This is a great step forward in showing how you can take a confrontation, a conflict, and make a positive out of it." This also is the kind of direct action Obama had sidestepped as he sought the support o f white voters weary of racial dissonance. In March, Obama was asked whether he a greed with Attorney General Eric Holder's comments that many Americans have b een "cowards" because "we, average Americans, simply do not talk enough with each other about race." "I'm not somebody who believes that constantly talking about race somehow s olves racial tensions," Obama told The New York Times. "I think what solves racial ten s ions is fixing the economy, putting people to work, making sure that people have health c are." The standoff between Gates and Obama has the potential to exacerbate tensions. Many blacks supported Gates' claim that he was racially profiled by Crowley, while m any whites insisted Crowley displayed no bias in investigating a possible break-in atG ates' home. Gates demanded an apology from Crow l ey and called him a "rogue policeman." After Obama said police had "acted stupidly" in arresting an angry Gates for disorderly conduct, Crowley said Obama was "way off base wading into a local issue without knowing all the facts." The atmosphere was much different after Thursday's conversation. "No tension," Crowley said. Mostly, racial conflicts fade out without any consultation, let alone resolution. Imagine the widow of Sean Bell meeting with the New York police officers who shot her husband, or the black teens in Jena, La., talking to the white schoolmate they attacked. That made the White House meeting even more remarkable "revolutionary and potentially healing, a peace pipe for modern times," wrote the right-leaning columnist K athleen Parker. "When future archaeologists excavate our history, they will doubtless marvel at the symbolism of that simple gesture," she wrote. I t probably never would have happened had Obama not criticised Crowley, a mistake that demanded damage control. Why not? " His advisers would have said, 'No, it's not about health care!'" said Rev. Jim Wal-l is, president of the progressive Christian group Sojourners and author of "God's Poli tics: Why the Right Gets It Wrong and the Left Doesn't Get It." It was political theatre but it sent a powerful message, Wallis said. "It was a parable for what needs to happ en off-camera all the time that kind of conversation," he said. "Obama was saying,' This now needs to happen.'" Obama has rarely joined that conversat ion since his national debut at the 2004 Democratic National Convention speech, when he declared, "There is not a black America and a white America and Latino America and Asian America there's the United States of America." But as the first black president, son of a w hite mother and black father, many say he in uniquely suited even obligated tol ead the discussion. "As a white man, I would say the nation n eeds a president to be proactive on race," Wallis said. "He has a power to be that, the capacity to be that, the identity and the history." Gallagher said no one besides Obama c ould have orchestrated this type of resolution. " You had to almost have a black president who's capable of saying to Gates, the m an who feels aggrieved and insulted, 'I need you at the White House.'" "Obama said ... 'Let's show the world that we're trying to advance race relations rather than digress,'" he continued. "And y ou know what? As one of his fiercest critics, he gets an A-plus on this. I'm just blowna way." Much has been made of the symbolism of a black president and how he provides an opportunity for people to talk about race. In some ways, race is always an element of any conversation Obama is involved in. But "watercooler conversations aren't enough any more," Wallis said. "They don't go deep enough, they are too short and they are very safe. You gotta sit at the table." That's exactly what Crowley, Gates and Obama did on the White House lawn, along with Vice President Joe Biden, whose presence conveniently balanced out the image. Earlier, Crowley and Gates talked after they crossed paths while separately touring the White House with their relatives. They continued their tour as one large group. (This article was written by Jesse Wash ington, Associated Press’ national writer). A national lottery and gambling LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Obama's rare race foray a positive step 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW 6($1:5,*+7RI:(67 %$<675((71$66$8%$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH 0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRU UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDV DQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\ UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOG VHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQ WZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH VW GD\RI$XJXVW WRWKH 0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3 127,&( Have we swallowed the tourism slogan? EDITOR, The Tribune. ALMOSTevery month we read that a certain accounting-auditor consulting firm has been retained by government and soon after when their report arrives it seems to be guaranteed to be critical of another consulting firm who also were retained. Might it be a good pro posal that government will retain one of these consultants to opinion whether the government is provid ing good governance? I suggest that would make interesting reading. T WILLIAMS Nassau, July 3, 2009. Interesting reading

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LOCAL artists have been given the opportunity to display completed works in the eastern section of Bay Street between East Street and Victoria Avenue in an effort to revitalise the dilapidated area, using art to draw attention to the often overlooked part of downtown. Vaughn Roberts, managing director of the Downtown Nassau Partnership (DNP is partnering with project curator Jonathan Murray to mobilise the art community and get Bahamian artists involved in a public change. “I believe this mobilisation is only one of the ways artistic involvement can contribute to the overall goals of the DNP,” said Mr Roberts. “The ‘East of East Street’ project is important for promoting a sense of community among stakeholders and developing possibilities for the blighted area.” Mak eo v er T he collaboration also uses short-term methods to give the area an aesthetic makeover, allowing derelict buildings to be used as can vasses for murals and vacant storefronts to gain new life from displayed artwork. Local artists and volunteers demonstrate communal involvement by engaging themselves in physical instal lations of art work along Bay Street. Mr Roberts hopes the collaboration will encourage other Bahamians, artists and volunteers, to become active in the development that many hope will “bring back the magic” to the once vibrant city. “The East of East Street project doesn’t stop at appealing to participating artists, volunteers and downtown property owners. Hop ing to catch the eye of Bahamians and visitors alike, it’s getting coverage online through popular networking sites like Facebook, where a group has been providing the public with updates and pictures as well as a place to voice opinions about the project,” organisers said. Murals T he concept for the murals u ses Bahamian literature as a focal point. John Cox, one of the featured artists, coined the phrase ‘this is how much I love you’ in his expressive piece located on the wall behind an east downtown bus stop. Mr Roberts said that while some pieces were cre ated specifically for the project, others rely on existing artworks and represent the local contemporary art move ment. For those interested in additional DNP preparations for the ‘East of East Street’ area, Mr Roberts mentioned other plans including sidewalk cleaning, planning for the properties of container shipping companies and movements for on-street parking in the area between East Street and Victoria Avenue. Guided by an 11-member board with public and private sector representation and cochaired by Tourism Director General Vernice Walkine and Nassau Tourism Devel opment Board chairman Charles Klonaris, the DNP employs a full-time, professional management team to coordinate the revitalisation efforts steering the drive toward the creation of a ‘Business Improvement Dis trict’. THE Bahamas Industrial Manufacturers and Allied Workers Union has elected a new team of officers. President Wilfred Seymour, assistant secretary general Clayton Seymour and treasurer Arthur Penn had all resigned from their posi tions. An election for treasurer, assistant treasurer and trustees was held on Monday, leading to the election of Jeffrey Arnett as treasurer; Francionn Cox as assistant treasurer, and Neville Cox, David Morley and Tony Handfield as trustees. The positions for president, vice-president, secretary general and assistant secretary general were unopposed and went to Ronald Roker, Wilfred Seymour, Jennifer Brown and Carla Lightbourne respectively. An election for four shop stewards brought Edward Miller, Leroy Arnett, Daniel Simmons, and Adrian Lightbourne into office. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009, PAGE 5 " I is vex cause dem senior politicians keeps telling us that 'we' hiringand sheltering dem illegals. They mussey ain't knowt hat 'we' is the majority who is poor an scrapping and ain't gats no money to hire or shelter nobody cause we ain't have no yardo r lawn, an we ain't have no extra house to rent or business to hire anybody. It's dem other people withm oney who does that, and dem rich politicians should k now that instead of talking crazy. "We the poor people k nows the illegals does get drop off an' pick up from w e neighbourhood, so politicians must stop saying it is 'we'. What 'we' dap oor does know is dat 'we' have to share we t'ings like P MH, government clinics, government schools with da illegals yinna hire, so y inna don’t play fool an say it is 'we' when it is 'you very well know who’.” 'Fix ya face an laugh', N assau. " I vex because I been to the gas station on Thomp s on Boulevard and this pretty lady pulled up right and the pump attendants eem to have forgotten I was there first. He went to p ump her gas, and if that wasn't bad enough, he cleaned every one of herw indshields, dat time I blowing my horn. You think he check for me? And guess what else, she did not give the poor boyo ne dollar, then he want to come to my car with atti tude. Man, I had to pull off. "Good service still hard to get, even though a lot of p eople out there would gladly like to have the jobs some of us acting up with." Debbs, Nassau. "I vex at those dog owners on Eastern Road who k eep hounds, lil' tiny hounds, outside their homes 24 hours a day, sev en days a week and they bark at everything thatp asses by. "And sometimes the dogs jump out at passersby, scaring the daylights out of them. It's my right to walk down the street without fear of someone's dog biting my leg or chasing me down the street." Concerned Citizen, Nassau. "Man what kind of tar dey be usin' to fill in dese pot holes? To me, these fellas seem to be working twice as hard to fill these holes. The pothole by Sugar Kid Bowe was filled, but was right back, just as big and deep two days later. Man please tell me what you all doing?" Vexed Driver, Nassau. Are you vex? Send your complaints to whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net or fax them to 328-2398. WHYYOU VEX? Share your news The T ribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net ATHLETES who have been cheated out of Olympic medals by those t aking performance-enhancing drugs will benefit from anti-doping legislation, Senator Dion Foulkes argued in the Senate yesterday. The Minister of Labour and Social D evelopment highlighted the hardworking Bahamian athletes who have had to wait years for their medals because “winners” on the day were f ound to have used drugs illegally. A Bill for an Act to Provide for the Measures to Discourage the Use of Drugs and Doping Methods in Sports and for Related Purposes was tabled in the House of Assembly last week as government moves to fulfil obligations it vowed to uphold under the World Anti-Doping Code in 2003. T he Code calls for countries to implement effective programmes to prevent, deter, detect and legally punish individuals for using or providing p erformance enhancing drugs banned under the Code, and enforce regulat ions on all athletes in the country. Pledging his support for the Bill, t he minister said: “The Code has become the global instrument to harm onise policies and regulations and to provide a framework for the establishment and execution of anti-doping policies, rules and regulations for the benefit of sporting organisations and to ensure fair play in all competitions for athletes worldwide.” He listed a staggering number of B ahamian athletes who were cheated out of their medals by performance enhancing users, including the men’s relay team that only received its right-f ully-earned Olympic bronze medal from Sydney 2000, eight years later. A nd Pauline Davis-Thompson, who was second place in the 200 metres a t the same Games, now stands to receive the gold as “winner” Marion Jones was found to have taken performance enhancing drugs. D ebbie Ferguson was recently awarded a gold medal after finishing behind Ms Jones at the World Championships in Athletics in 2001, the same event the Bahamian men’s relay t eam finished second, and now stands to be awarded first place as the United States team was disqualified for drug use. M r Foulkes also noted how Chandra Sturrup was just given the bronzem edal she should have been given in the 100 metres at the 2001 World C hampionships as a result of the disqualification of Marion Jones and Kelli White; and the members of men’s relay team are now recogniseda s the bronze medalists for the 2003 C hampionships following disqualification of the American team. “The Bahamas has been negatively impacted by cheating through thed oping process, and (that these outstanding Bahamian athletes being recognised as World and Olympic Champions years after they s hould have been, and they still have n ot received their recognition at an international event,” Mr Foulkes said. “They are receiving their medals at home in front of hundreds instead ofi n the international arena in front of thousands who sit in the stadiums and hundreds of thousands of television viewers. As a result, our athletes have lost o ut on lucrative opportunities, and our country has lost valuable international television exposure. “By passing this legislation we will b e ensuring that the Bahamas will be fully compliant with world norms with respect to the fight against doping in sports, and we will have the legal a uthority to test any athlete who is i n the Bahamas, whether the athlete is a Bahamian or not; to enter into reciprocal agreements with other coun-t ries, and also to test Bahamian ath letes while they are in other count ries. “We are seeking to ensure that the cheaters will never again take glory away from the honest competitors on the world stage in the sporting are-n a,” he said. Anti-doping laws ‘will benefit athletes cheated out of medals’ Local businessman collaborates with artists to help revitalise Bay Street The BIMA WU elects a new team of of ficers DIONFOULKES , Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie and Pauline Davis-Thompson

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T HE Caribbean Arts and Entertainment Expo will be h eld for the first time in the Bahamas this year. Organisers said they chose the Bahamas because of the country’s rapidly growing inter e st and involvement in arts and entertainment. L aunched in 2006, the Caribbean Arts and Entertainm ent Expo is the first and only conference in the region dedicated to song-writing, composing, audio engineering/production, dance and videography. S elling out in its inaugural year, the Expo provided a u nique opportunity for song writers, composers, publishers, p roducers – and those in the industry that support them – to c ome together in an unprece dented way to share their k nowledge and expertise. In previous years, the Expo has been held in Puerto Rico, Jamaica, and Bermuda. For this year’s event in the B ahamas’ top industry professionals will come together to s hare their knowledge and expertise on a broad range of t opics, specific to this market and of interest to those vying to take their product abroad. Since its inaugural year, the Expo has attracted more than 6 ,000 music creators, industry professionals, exhibitors and s ponsors, and is expected to bring together another large g athering in the Bahamas. The most popular elements o f the Expo include shopping customised tracks/beats by the best local audio engineers; a featured artist representative from Def Jam Recording; one-on-one s essions with videographers, photographers, graphic designe rs and dance agencies, and an array of networking opportunit ies. The Expo will take place on August 6 from 8pm to 1am at the Garden of Eden Guest House and Villas. Email m ixologybahamas@gmail.com for more information. By GENA GIBBS Bahamas Information S ervices SPECIAL measures are being taken at the Gladstone R oad Agricultural Centre (GRAC purity of the native Bahamian goat pepper, the fifth hottest in the world. Goat peppers are specifically Bahamian,” said Basil Miller, senior agriculture officer at GRAC. “They are native to A ndros.” Being prolific reproducers, Bahamian goat peppers need plenty of space and they must be isolated to maintain theirg enetic purity. “We have to keep them more than 600 feet away from any other pepper to avoid i nbreeding,” he explained. And the Bahamian goat p epper is in such demand, GRAC cannot produce suffi-c ient seeds which are distributed through the Ministry of A griculture’s Fish and Farm store at Potter’s Cay Dock. The potential is great for business,” said Mr Miller, “however farmers will have tou nite. “What we have found is that y ou can grow peppers all year round. There is no season for peppers.” He noted that as an incen t ive, the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation( BAIC) is making land avail able to persons interested in f arming. Other varieties grown at GRAC include finger pepper, native to Eleuthera, and Tabasco pepper, native to New Mex i co, which grows well in the Bahamas. H arvested peppers go through a wet extraction p rocess. The flesh is separated and the seeds are deposited in a bin. T hey are then dried in the sun and baked for a day. About1 00 sample seeds are isolated and tested for 11 days to determ ine their rate of germination. Native goat peppers germinate 95 per cent of the time, 10 per cent better than the international standard, Mr Millere xplained. He underscored the import ance of a national seed bank. During passage of Hurricane A ndrew over Eleuthera in 1992, the finger pepper was almost lost as a genetic variety. We were saved because a lady had some seeds in herk itchen cupboard that weren’t destroyed by the salt water,” s aid Mr Miller “Once we establish a germ bank we will always have the seeds. If we ever experience a major hurricane, we will haves eeds so when the coast is clear we can plant our seeds again.” F armers who grow more that one crop at a time without i solating them, harvest crossb red crops, substandard to genetically pure crops, MrM iller warned. “They should concentrate o n growing one crop at a time. “Some farmers try to grow too many things in the same field and open their crops to diseases. Crops must be grownw ith other crops from different families.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Preserving the purity of Bahamian goat pepper P EPPER GROWN a t the Gladstone Road Agricultural Centre, pictured above, is in demand on the Bahamian market. BASIL MILLER , senior agriculture officer at the Gladstone Road Agricultural Centre, shows off a variety of pepper grown there. Bahamas to host Caribbean Arts and Entertainment Expo G e n a G i b b s / B I S NORTH MIAMI BEACH, Fla. EIGHTprimarily Haitian gangs have been dismantled in South Florida after a 17m onth investigation, authorities said Friday, according to Associated Press. “Operation Dead End” targeted violent drug traf-f ickers in North Miami Beach. Information from the probe into the January 2008 s laying of Miami police Detective James Walker in North Miami Beach aided the undercover local and federal law enforcement officersi n their investigation, Police Chief Rafael Hernandez Jr. said. Walker was shot by gang m embers with a semiautomatic rifle, authorities said. That investigation continues. “We’ve received a lot of complaints about gang prob-l ems in our city,” Hernandez said. Thirteen gang members and their associates face fede ral armed robbery, drugs and weapons charges. If conv icted, they potentially face d ecades in prison. A nother 23 will be prosecuted by the Miami State A ttorney’s Office. Seventeen others arrested in this week’s s weep will be processed for immigration violations orc harges in other crimes, a uthorities said. T he defendants range from s treet-level dealers to large drug suppliers, Hernandez s aid. Police: eight primarily H aitian gangs are dismantled in Florida

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009, PAGE 7 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.811.28Abaco Markets1.391.390.000.1270.00010.90.00% 11.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.306.94Bank of Bahamas6.946.940.000.2440.26028.43.75% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.3911.390.001.4060.2508.12.19% 2.882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.625.710.0910,7500.4190.36013.66.30% 4.781.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.533.51-0.020.1110.05231.61.48% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital1.821.820.000.2400.0807.64.40% 8.206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.5010.00Finco10.7910.790.000.3220.52033.54.82% 11.7110.34FirstCaribbean Bank10.3410.340.000.7940.35013.03.38%5 .534.95Focol (S)5.135.130.000.3320.15015.52.92% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.50ICD Utilities5.495.490.000.4070.50013.59.11% 12.0010.39J. S. Johnson10.3910.390.000.9520.64010.96.16% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100000 100000 FidelitBkNote13(SeriC)+ FBB13 10000 000 FRIDAY, 31 JULY 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,572.63| CHG 4.53 | %CHG 0.29 | YTD -139.73 | YTD % -8.16BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: 30May2013 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 InterestF INDEX: CLOSE 785.49 | YTD -5.91% | 2008 -12.31% 1000 . 00 1000 . 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 . 00 0 . 00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref4.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.38601.3231CFAL Bond Fund1.38602.404.75 3.03512.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8952-1.52-3.18 1.47911.4042CFAL Money Market Fund1.47913.175.33 3.60903.1031Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1031-8.35-13.82 12.980112.3289Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.98012.875.79 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.47339.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.27652.00-2.98 1.06221.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.06222.566.22 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0243-0.842.43 1.05851.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.05852.045.85 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. 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Rough start for Team Bahamas B y RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net TOP golfers in the Bahamas – junior and senior – are preparing to represent the country at the most prestigious amateur golf event in the Caribbean. The Bahamas is expected to field an 11member team at the 53rd Caribbean Amateur Golf Championships set for August 3-8 in Providenciales, Turks and Caicos. The team is diligently training for the fast approaching contest after finishing fifth out of 10 countries in 2008. The Hoerman Cup team will feature five players – Devaughn Robinson, Richard Gibson Jr, Peter McIntosh, George Swann and Rashad Ferguson. Two players will contest the Ramon Baez Trophy meant for mid-amateur men 35 years and older – Shane Gib son and Christopher Harris. Milford Lockhart and Kevein Marche will contest the Francis Steele Perkins trophy for seniors aged 50 and older. The Haris and Higgs trophy, for super seniors 60 years and older, will be contested by Harcourt Poitier and George Turnquest. The coach will be Frederick Wright while Vernon Wells will act as team captain. James Gomez will serve as team manager. Puerto Rico are the defending national champions and will seek to retain the title they won in 2008 in the Cayman Islands. The Caribbean Amateur Open began in 1957 and at that time only included two countries but throughout the years it has evolved into the largest annual golf event in the region. The tournament is contested by ten nations in the Caribbean – Bahamas, Barbados, Cayman Islands, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Order of East Caribbean States, Puerto Rico, Trinidad and Tobago, Turks andC aicos Islands and US Virgin Islands. C M Y K C M Y K SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 17 P AGE 18 International sports news F ormer England soccer coach R obson dies... See page 18 By PAUL NEWBERRY AP National Writer ROME (AP good game. He’s even better in the pool. Cavic seized Michael Phelps’ 100-meter butterfly world record Friday at the world swimming championships, where he’s making plen ty of headlines in and out of the water. First, the Serbian said he’s tired of hearing complaints from the Phelps camp about com peting in an inferior suit, even offering to buy him one of the polyurethane models responsible for most of the worlds records at the Foro Italico. Then, Cavic went out in the semifinals of the 100-meter butterfly and knocked off Phelps’ world record, nearly becoming the first swimmer to break 50 seconds. Phelps was the sec ond-fastest qualifier at 50.48. The two will be side-by-side tonight in their rematch. Cavic hasn’t backed off on his belief that he beat Phelps to the wall at the Beijing Olympics, all photographic and timing evidence to the contrary. Now, the Serbian has another shot at the man who officially won by a hundredth of a second on the way to cap turing eight gold medals in China. “I didn’t want to go out so fast, but I had so much energy in my body that I couldn’t help it,” said Cavic, who touched in 50.01 seconds to break Phelps’ record of 50.22. “I’m capable of swimming under 50, which would be enough to win the gold.” Less than an hour after his 100 fly semi, Phelps claimed his third gold medal of the championships, swimming the leadoff leg of the 800 freestyle relay won by the United States with a world record of 6 minutes, 58.55 seconds one-hundredth of a second faster than its gold medal time at the Olympics. As for Cavic’s offer to get him a faster suit, Phelps said he’s content in his year-old Speedo LZR Racer. “I’m wearing this,” Phelps said. “If he wants to wear a different suit, he can throw this one on.” In the relay, Phelps was again no match for Germany’s Paul Biedermann, who routed him in the 200 free and put his team more than 1 1/2 seconds ahead on the first leg of the relay. But Phelps had the better supporting cast, teaming with Ricky Berens, David Walter and Ryan Lochte to set the sixth world record of the night and 35th of the championships. Lochte, turning in an especially gutty swim after earlier taking bronze in the 200 backstroke, held off Russia’s Alexander Sukhorukov with Phelps screaming at him from beside the starting block. When Lochte got there first, Phelps threw up both arms. “I was kind of carried by my teammates tonight,” Phelps said. “I was probably a half-second slower than I wanted to be. But these guys were able to take control. Lochte swam well the last 50. Ricky and David did a good job of putting us in a good spot.” Aaron Peirsol made up for a huge disap pointment in the best way possible, obliterating the world record in the 200 backstroke and getting back at Lochte, who beat his fellow American in that event at both the 2007 worlds in Melbourne and last summer on the biggest stage of all. This wasn’t just any race for Peirsol, not after what happened Monday. Expecting to cruise through to the final of the 100 back after all, he was three-time defending champion and had just set a world record a few weeks ago Peirsol made a huge miscalculation in how fast he needed to go. He finished ninth in the semis; only the top eight moved on the final. Peirsol watched from stands the following night and started looking ahead to his other chance for an individual medal in Rome. “It was kind of a blessing in disguise,” he said. “I just didn’t know it at the time” Peirsol got out all his frustrations with a dominating performance, breaking his own world record by more than a full second, his time of 1:51.92 wiping out the mark of 1:53.08 he set at the U.S. nationals three weeks ago. Japan’s Ryosuke Irie claimed silver in 1:52.51, also under the old mark. Lochte faded to third. “I wanted to race and I saw that I pulled out from the beginning and I was feeling all right,” Peirsol said. “When I kept pulling away, there was even more of a fire to go a little faster.” Peirsol knew he’d done it before he even touched the wall. He spun around with a big smile and gave the water a roundhouse punch. “Wooo!” the laid-back Californian said, showing a rare bit of emotion. On the medal stand, Peirsol appeared to be struggling to hold back tears as the national anthem played. Two Americans endured bitter disappoint ments. Eric Shanteau, who put off treatment for testicular cancer after qualifying for Beijing, was edged out for gold in the 200 breaststroke by the narrowest of margins. He appeared to be ahead the final time his head popped out the water, but his glide to the wall was a little too long. Hungary’s Daniel Gyurta touched in 2:07.64. Shanteau’s time was 2:06.65 a hundredth of a second from his first world championship, and one that would have been especially poignant after what he went through last sum mer. Rebecca Soni was cruising along in the wom en’s 200 breaststroke, 1.5 seconds ahead of world-record pace halfway through a race she won in Beijing. But Soni clearly went out too fast and left nothing in the tank for the finish. She shockingly fell from first to fourth on the last lap out of the medals. Serbia’s Nadja Higl raced by to claim gold, Canada’s Annamay Pierse took silver and Austria’s Mirna Jukic got bronze. Four world records were set in the first three events of the night, not long after governing body FINA announced its ban on bodysuits would take effect the first day of 2010. It might take years, even decades to surpass the technology assisted times of these championships. Germany’s Britta Steffen broke her own record in the 100 freestyle at 52.07, having set the previous mark of 52.22 on the leadoff leg of the 400 free relay at these championships. Britain’s Fran Halsall claimed the silver, and Australia’s Libby Trickett held on for bronze after going out strong. Americans Amanda Weir and Dana Vollmer were out of the medals in fourth and fifth. After Peirsol’s world record, the mark in the women’s 50 butterfly dropped in consecutive semifinal heats. Marleen Veldhuis of the Netherlands won the first semi in 25.28, eclipsing her own mark of 25.33 set in April. She got to keep the record less than 5 minutes Sweden’s Therese Alshammar won the next semi in 25.07. Cavic breaks Phelps’ 100 fly world record Serbian, American set to be side-by-side in rematch tonight MILORAD CAVIC competes in a 100m Butterfly heat at the FINA World Championships in Rome... (AP Photo: Michael Sohn MILORAD CAVIC By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net I t was a rough start for Team Bahamas on the opening day of the Pan American Junior Championships. Quartermilers were first to take the track at the top regional meet in the Hasley Crawford stadium in Port of Spain, Trinidad & Tobago. Rashan Brown and Katrina Seymour saw action early yesterday in the women’s 400m. Brown, the 2009 Carifta silver medallist, finished fourth in heat three in a time of 57.25s. Diamond Richardson of the US took the heat in 54.94s, Jamaica’s Jodi-Ann Muir was second in 55.70s, while Ashley Kelly of the British Virgin Islands was third in 56.00s In heat two, Katrina Seymour failed to finish her heat. Neither of the quartermilers advanced to the next round. Alisha Usery was the top qualifier in 54.87s. In the men’s 100m, Warren Frazier and Geno Jones delivered a pair of impressive performances. Jones finished fourth in heat one in a time of 10.63s. D’Angelo Cherry of the US took the heat in 10.18s. Frazier fared better in heat two, finishing third in 10.42s. Jamaica’s Dexter Lee took the heat in 10.24s. Frazier advanced to the final as the seventh fastest qualifier. Marcus Rowland entered the final with 10.16s, followed by Cherry, Lee, Diego Cavalcanti of Brazil, Shermund Alsop of Trinidad, Miguel Lopez of Puerto Rico and Jason Rodgers of St Kitts and Nevis. Results of the final were unavailable up to press time last night. Top golfers to tee off at Caribbean amateur champs Athletes struggle on opening day of Pan American Junior Championships 2009 Carifta silver medallist Rashan Brown (seen in this file photo

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Former England soccer coach Robson dies at 76 C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 18, SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS By STUART CONDIE AP Sports Writer LONDON (AP Bobby Robson, the knighted ambassador of English soccer who c oached his country to t he 1990 World Cup semifinals and won trophies in four countries, died Friday. He was 76. Robson had cancer and died at home in County Durham in northeast England with family beside him, a family statement said. He was diagnosed with cancer five times since in 1991 but continued to work until November 2007. His death came five days after he appeared in a wheelchair at Newcastle’s St. James’ Park. Thousands crowded the stadium to pay tribute to him and raise funds for his cancer charity. Robson played for England at the 1958 World Cup and as coach led his country to its best World Cup finish since its 1966 title. The coach was knighted in 2002 for his service to the sport. He also coached PSV Eindhoven, Sporting Lisbon, FC Porto and Barcelona. “He always showed great passion for the game and will be missed by all football fans across the globe,” FIFA president Sepp Blatter said. “On behalf of the worldwide football family, I would like to thank Sir Bobby Robson for his memorable contribution to the beautiful game.” Robson rose to fame in the 1970s when he turned unfashionable Ipswich into one of the country’s top teams, winning the FA Cup and UEFA Cup. His last club job was at Newcastle, t he club he supported as a boy. In January 2006, he took a job mentoring Ireland coach Steve Staunton. “I did what I loved, and I did what I was pretty good at and I suppose what I was born for,” Robson said in 2005. “I enjoyed my career. It was wonderful.I played for some fabulous clubs and I played for England. Then I got the top job, the best job in the world really. I managed England.” Manchester United manager Alex Ferguson said he drew on Robson for his generous advice. “I mourn the passing of a great friend, a wonderful individual, a tremendous football man and somebody with passion and knowledge of the game that was unsurpassed,” he said. “His character was hewn out of the coal face, developed by the Durham County mining background that he came from.” Added former French soccer great Michel Platini, the president of European soccer’s ruling body: “He was a great ambassador for football and a true gentleman in everything he did.” Robson began his coaching career in 1968, when he took charge of strug gling first division Fulham. The club was relegated and fired him after 10 months. Robson was hired by Ipswich and stayed there the next 13 years. He was then appointed England’s manager following the team’s elimination from the 1982 World Cup, and he won 27 of 28 qualifying matches in his eight years in charge. T he loss cost England a place at the 1984 European Championship. After the Football Association rejected his offer to resign, Robson went on to lead the team to the quarterfinals of the 1986 World Cup in Mexico. England was eliminated from that t ournament when Diego Maradona scored two of soccer’s most famous goals. The Argentine great punched the ball into the net for the first goal. On the second, Maradona surged halfway down the field, shredding much of the England team in thep rocess. Maradona called the first goal “The Hand of God.” Robson would have none of it. “It wasn’t the Hand of God,” Robson said. “It was the hand of a rascal. God had nothing to do with it.” A poor performance at Euro was followed by a run to the semifinals of the 1990 World Cup in Italy, where England lost a penalty-kick shootout to West Germany after a 11 draw. Robson joined PSV after the World Cup and won the Dutch league in 1991 and . He also coached at Sporting and FC Porto before movingt o Barcelona in 1996. A year later, he was voted European Manager of the Year after winning the Spanish Cup, the Spanish Super Cup and the Euro pean Cup Winners’ Cup with a team that included Brazilian star Ronaldo. He returned to PSV and then wentt o Newcastle from 1999 to 2004. No matter what, he remained popular with fans, often chatting soccer with them even as his declining health prevented a full-time return to coaching. He had surgery to remove a brain tumor in 2006 but was again diag-n osed with cancer the following year. Asked in 2005 why he continued to work into his later years, Robson said: “Football is my drug. I don’t like going to supermarkets on a Saturday afternoon.” Robson is survived by his wife, Elsie, and sons Andrew, Paul and Mark. By ANDREW DAMPF AP Sports Writer ROME (AP to worry about a boycott from Michael Phelps anymore. Swimming’s governing body Friday set a Jan. 1 date for its ban on the recordbreaking bodysuits, a move that comes partly in response to a threat from Phelps’ coach to pull his swimmer from competition until the suits are outlawed. Earlier this week, FINA announced a ban but said itm ight not take effect until April or May, three or four months later than expected. “Now, without a doubt, the rules are applying Jan. 1, 2010,” FINA executive director Cornel Marculescu said. “The manufacturers are ready and can begin (suit before.” The comments from Phelps’ coach, Bob Bowman, came immediately after his swimmer was upset by unheralded Paul Biedermann of Germany in the 200-meter freestyle Tuesday. Biedermann wore a 100 percent polyurethane Arena suit, while Phelps stuck with last year’s LZR Racer from Speedo, which is less than halfp olyurethane. “I think there was a lot of frustration with Michael. We saw that with his incred ible swim in the 200 fly,” USA Swimming executive director Chuck Wielgus s aid, referring to Phelps’ w orld record Wednesday. “Bob maybe verbalized what some people had been feeling on behalf of Michael.” Last year, Phelps and others with the LZR profited from the suit, while this year suits from Italian manufac turers Arena and Jaked are considered faster. Each of those suits will be banned at the start of next year, when men will be restrict ed to suits that extend from the waist to the top of the knees, and women to suits that cannot go past the shoulders or beyond the knees. FINA plans to issue new suit guidelines to manufacturers by Sept. 30, and thought about a delay for a f ew months to give companies enough time to produce new suits. “We’ll then probably expect Michael not to swim until they are implemented,” Bowman said Tuesday. “I’m done with this. It has to be implemented immediately. The sport is in sham bles right now and they bet ter do something or they’re going to lose their guy who fills these seats.” More than 30 world records have been set at these world championships, about twice as many as at the last edition two years ago in Melbourne, Aus tralia. “Comments by Michael Phelps or anyone else we respect, and we do our job and control whatever happens in our sport,” Mar culescu said. FINA also announced a rule requiring suits to be approved one year before Olympics or world champi onships, and available com mercially six months in advance. A scientific commission with materials experts from each continent will approve swimsuits and monitor developments in technology, FINA said. USA Swimming is con sidering installing the new suit rules for domestic com petition before the end of the year. Polyurethane bodysuits will be banned for a Duel in the Pool competi tion in Manchester, Eng land, in December, with the United States facing an allstar team from France, Russia and Britain. “We met after prelims this morning and agreed to adopt the rules for that meet,” Wielgus said. “Whether or not USA Swimming adopts those rules any sooner is some thing we’ll talk about when we get home.” Ban on high-tech bodysuits moved up to Jan 1 By LARRY O’DELL Associated Press Writer NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (AP ruled that Michael Vick’s bankruptcy plan can be sent to creditors to vote on, it remains unclear how the out-of-work quarterback will get the income to pay them. Vick declined to answer reporters’ questions before and after a hearing Friday on his Chapter 11 bankruptcy plan. U.S. Bankr uptcy Judge Frank Santoro ruled that the plan can move forward after nobody objected. The plan now goes to Vick’s creditors. After they vote, Santoro will conduct a confirmation hearing on Aug. 27. Creditors approved Vick- ’s first plan, but Santoro rejected it in April, saying it was not feasible. This time, Vick has proposed selling off more assets and giving creditors a bigger cut of his future income. B ut the plan is based largely on Vick’s prospec-t ive earnings from his goal of returning to the NFL, which still is not a sure thing. NFL commissioner Roger Goodell conditionally reinstated Vick on Monday, a week after Vick completed his 23-month sentence for running a dogfighting ring. Goodell said Vick can sign with a team a nd begin playing by week six. Vick said Thursday that he is “getting close” to signing but did not offer any details. Several NFL teams have said they’re not interested in signing the 29-year-old Vick. “Mr. Vick’s time horizon in his professional career is not unlimited,” Santoro said. The judge also postponed action on requests for payment by Vick’s attorneys, saying he wanted to wait until all the legal bills are i n. A New York-based law firm is asking for $1.5 million after slashing its origi nal request of nearly $2.7 million. A Norfolk firm is seeking $385,000. Santoro demanded an explanation from one of the New York attorneys, Michael Blumenthal, on how his firm could bill Vick for 8,000 hours of work in less than a year. “This case is probably the most difficult case I’ve ever been involved in,” Blumenthal said. He noted that Vick was in the federal penitentiary in Leavenworth, Kan., when the bankruptcy peti tion was filed in July 2008, making attorney-client communication difficult. And Vick’s finances were in shambles, requiring a Herculean effort to track down assets, bank accounts and financial records. “We started at below ground zero,” Blumenthal said, adding that five lawyers at his firm spent substantial time on the case. Vick’s lawyers also endured an acrimonious battle, largely behind the scenes, with one of his major creditors Joel Enterprises Inc., the com pany owned by Vick’s former agent. Joel objected at virtually every step on the bankruptcy process before the two sides finally settled their differences. On another matter, San toro rejected a motion for Blumenthal’s colleague, Peter Ginsberg, to withdraw from the case. The lawyers in Vick’s criminal case asked Ginsberg to withdraw after a federal appeals court upheld sanc tions against him in an unrelated case in Florida. Ginsberg said he had not been actively involved in Vick’s case recently anyway. Santoro said Ginsberg did nothing wrong in Virginia, and his troubles in Florida had no bearing on Vick’s case. Creditors to vote on Vick bankruptcy plan By BRADLEY BROOKS Associated Press Writer RIO DE JANEIRO (AP Arturo Gatti hanged himself with a handbag strap from a staircase column more than seven feet off the ground, Brazilian police said Friday as they released new details about the boxer’s death. Milena Saraiva, a police spokeswoman in the northeastern city of Recife, provided more information about Gatti’s suicide a day after authorities reversed their stance on the case. Until Thursday, they insisted it was a homicide and the boxer’s wife was tagged as the primary suspect. “This case has been resolved. While the evidence at the scene first led us to think Gatti was murdered, the autopsy results and a detailed crime scene analysis simply pointed to a different outcome,” Saraiva said. On Thursday, a judge ordered the release of Gatti’s wife, 23-year-old Amanda Rodrigues, who had been held since July 12 in Recife. She and Gatti arrived with their 10-month-old son a few days before in the resort town of Porto de Galinhas, where they rented a two-level apartment. Police ultimately conclud ed that Gatti hanged himself in the apartment early on July 11 from a wooden staircase column that was 7.3 feet off the ground. He stood on a stool and kicked it out from underneath him, police said. The autopsy report said Gatti was suspended for about three hours before his body fell to the floor. Rodrigues said she was sleeping with the pair’s son in an upstairs bedroom. She told police she went downstairs about 6 a.m. to get milk for the boy and saw Gatti’s body on the floor, but assumed he was drunkenly sleeping. It was not until she went back downstairs at 9 a.m. that she dis covered Gatti was dead and called police. Saraiva said no suicide note was found. “The first investigators to arrive at the scene only saw his body on the floor and the bloodied strap near his body,” Saraiva said. “They assumed his wife strangled him.” Saraiva said 17 witnesses told police that the pair got into a loud fight on a street near the beach in Porto de Galinhas the night before Gatti died. Saraiva said Gatti had seven cans of beer, along with two bottles of wine, over the course of dinner and partying at a bar. Witnesses told police Gatti at one point picked up Rodrigues, who weighs about 100 pounds, by her chin with his right hand and tossed her to the ground. Saraiva said at that point a security guard for a local hotel intervened, only to be punched in the face by Gatti. A small crowd that had gathered around the scene grew angry, with some throwing stones and even a bicycle at the boxer, the police spokes woman said. One stone hit Gatti in the back of the head, causing a wound that police originally said was caused by a small steak knife that was found near his body and which police showed off to reporters the day after Gatti’s death. The fracas eventually broke up, and Gatti and Rodrigues returned to the apartment in separate taxis. In an telephone interview with The Associated Press as she walked out of jail Thurs day, Rodrigues said Gatti may have killed himself because he feared she would leave him after their fight, one of many during a rocky two-year mar riage. “I believe that when we got home and he saw that he hurt me, he thought I would leave him, that I would tell him to just let me go, that I would separate from him,” she said. “He did that in a moment of weakness. He was drunk, maybe he didn’t know what he was doing, maybe he thought I would leave him the next day.” According to records at the Court of Quebec’s criminal and penal division, Gatti was charged on April 16 for violating a restraining order that had been filed against him. Records didn’t indicate who filed the restraining order, but Gatti’s mother, Ida, confirmed it was Rodrigues who had taken one out against him. Gatti, a Canadian who captured two world titles in his 16-year pro career, retired in 2007 with a record of 40-9. Many of his friends and family have expressed disbe lief at the suicide ruling, and Canadian Foreign Minister Lawrence Cannon said in a statement Friday that government officials will seek more information from Brazilian authorities on the Gatti investigation and its findings. Associated Press Writer Rob Gillies in Toronto contributed to this report Police provide details on boxer Gatti’ s death MICKEY ROURKE attends a memorial Mass for Aturo Gatti at St John the Baptist Roman Catholic Church in Jersey City, N.J. (AP Photo: Rich Schultz AN August 1953 AP file photo of Bobby Robson seen playing for Fulham FC at the Craven Cottage in London... BOBBY ROBSON

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By MATT MAURA Bahamas Information Services THE launch of the National Cancer Registrya nd the construction of the National Oncology C entre are just two of the “significant advances” that have been made int he public healthcare sys tem in the Bahamas since the establishment of the Public Hospitals Authori ty (PHA M inister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis said on Wednesday. The Public Hospitals Authority became opera t ional July 1999 with the mandate to manage the public hospitals throughout the Bahamas; the clinics/health centres in Grand Bahama; the National Emergency Medical Services; the Bahamas National Drug Agency and the Materials Management Directorate. Dr Minnis said the advancements have led to the provision of a higher quality of healthcare to Bahamians presenting at the country’s public healthcare institutions, clinics and health centres, particularly those outside of New Providence and Grand Bahama. Strides “Both of these are tremendous strides forward in the care and treatment of persons with cancer in the Bahamas,” Dr Minnis said. Addressing honourees, friends and family attending the Public Hospital Authority’s Performance Excellence and Long Ser vice Awards at Government House, Dr Minnis said while healthcare pro fessionals and cancer patients and their families are able to “marvel” at the success of the development of the National Cancer Registry and the National Oncology Centre, and the role both have played in the diag nosis, care and treatment of cancer patients within the Bahamas, there have been many other successes. These include the launch of the tele-medicine and tele-radiology projects which Dr Minnis said bring the best medical expertise in the nation “to the bedside of patients” at public health clinics and centres outside o f New Providence and Grand Bahama, in addi tion to the installation of t he state-of-the-art automated pharmacy system. The pharmacy system is expected to help pharmacists across the countrya chieve greater levels of efficiency in the dispensation of medicines which Dr Minnis said should reassure Bahamians of thea ccuracy of their prescribed medication. Other successes, he s aid, have been realised in the “tremendous facili t y repairs and upgrades” and the major institutions such as the Princess Mar garet Hospital and Sandi lands Rehabilitation Centre in New Providence, and the Rand Memorial Hospital in Freeport, Grand Bahama. Many training opportu nities have also been offered for staff at the various public healthcare facilities. Buildings “Some of the older buildings and sections of the main facility of the Princess Margaret Hospital have been restored and re-purposed and the capacity of the parking areas has been increased,” Dr Minnis said. “The Rand Memorial now boasts one of the most pleasant and modern public pharmacies in the country, thanks to recent upgrades in that area and Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre also had its share of repairs and upgrades. “Much has been accomplished over the past ten years and every member of the PHA should feel justifiably proud of the progress that has been made,” Dr Minnis added. The health minister said the improvements to the physical and operational structures of the public health system would be for naught if not for the “goodly number” of highly trained, motivated and committed staff. “As I look back over the last ten years, nothing matches the pride I feel when I consider the level of skill, training, discipline and professionalism that exist throughout our pub lic healthcare system and throughout all of the PHA’s hospitals and agencies,” Dr Minnis said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 20, SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE ECO-touroperator Grand B ahama Nature Tours has pledged to make a monthly contribution to the Humane Society of Grand Bahama to assist with operating expens-e s of the animal shelter. Said the tour company: “The downturn in the economy and low visitor arrivals affect us all. The effect is also being felt at the Freeport animal shelter which is swamped with animals, many of whicha re there as a result of economic woes. “While we realise that t here are many organisations seeking funds for worthy c auses, please consider that these animals have no control over their circumstancesa nd need our help.” Unlike the shelter in Nass au that is funded by the government, Grand Bahama Nature Tours said, theF reeport shelter is dependent on private donations. T he Port Authority contributes substantially, but t here is still a major shortfall in revenue to cover operating expenses particularly f or animal care, the company said. Grand Bahama Nature T ours is encouraging all businesses to work with their staff members and establish a plan to pledge monthly donations no matter the amount. Eco-tour operator pledges monthly contribution to GB Humane Society D ENISE NEELY , general manager of Grand Bahama Nature Tours, presents a cheque to Lisa Lockhart of the Humane Society of Grand Bahama. LONDON BRITAIN’SHigh Court on F riday rejected an autistic B ritish man’s bid to avoid extradition to the United States to face trial for hacking into military computers, a ccording to Associated Press. Gary McKinnon, who claimed he was searching for evidence of UFOs, has fought a long legal battle against e xtradition after he was charged with breaking into 97 computers belonging to NASA, the U.S. Departmento f Defense and several branches of the U.S. military soon after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. H is lawyers argued 43-yearo ld McKinnon is an eccentric but harmless man who had no malicious intent. The High Court rejected his a ppeals Friday and ruled that he should face extradition. Judge Stanley Burnton, one of two judges hearing the case, s aid in a 41-page ruling that e xtradition was “a lawful and proportionate response to his offending.” M cKinnon’s lawyer, Karen Todner, called the ruling hugely disappointing,” and urged Home Secretary Alan Johnson to stop the extradition. “We have 28 days to review t he judgment and will continue to explore every legal avenueu ntil we achieve a just and proper result,” she said. Todn er said she planned to appeal the High Court decision, possibly taking the case to Britain’s new Supreme Court and the European courts. J ohnson said he was powerless to intervene. It would be illegal for me to stop the extradition of GaryM cKinnon, which the court ruling has made clear,” he said i n a statement. “Mr. McKin non is accused of serious crimes, and the U.S. has a law ful right to seek his extradi tion, as we do when we wish to p rosecute people who break our laws.” H e said U.S. authorities had assured Britain that McKinn on’s health and welfare needs would be met, if he were extradited. David Cameron, leader of the opposition Conservatives, s aid he was disappointed by the ruling and that McKinnon s hould face trial in a British court. “Gary McKinnon is a v ulnerable young man, and I see no compassion in sending him thousands of miles away from his home and loved ones to face trial,” Cameron said. M cKinnon’s family and supporters have argued he should n ot be extradited because he has Asperger’s syndrome, a form of autism, and could be at risk of psychosis or suicide if he is sent to the U.S. McKinnon’s lawyers and 40 British lawmakers have written to President Barack Oba ma asking him to prevent the e xtradition. Earlier this year McKinnon o ffered to plead guilty to a criminal charge in Britain to avoid facing a U.S. trial. The Crown Prosecution Ser vice ruled, however, that the case was best prosecuted in the United States, leading McKinnon’s attorney Edward Fitzgerald to argue that the service had failed to take account of humanitarian factors. McKinnon’s lawyers had asked the High Court to overturn the prosecutors’ decision, as well as the British government’s decision to extradite him requests dismissed in Friday’s ruling. Judge Burnton said the case should be dealt with “as expeditiously as possible,” and that McKinnon could face extradition in September. McKinnon is charged in New Jersey and Virginia with eight counts of computer fraud. Each count potentially carries a sentence of up to 10 years in prison and $250,000 in fines. Todner said McKinnon would be extradited to Virginia, if he is sent to the U.S. McKinnon would be extradited through a treaty signed by the U.S. and Britain in the wake of Sept. 11 that was designed to make it easier to transfer individuals, including terrorism suspects, between the two countries. Its critics argue that it is skewed against British citizens. Menzies Campbell, a law maker from the opposition Liberal Democrat party, said the extradition treaty was flawed. “The people who should hang their heads in shame are the members of the government who negotiated an extra dition treaty with the United States which places British citizens in a much weaker position than their American coun terparts,” he said. U K court rejects hacker’s bid to avoid extradition Health Minister lauds PHA f or ‘man y ac hie v ements’ over the first 10 years DR HUBERT MINNIS M M u u c c h h h h a a s s b b e e e e n n a a c c c c o o m m p p l l i i s s h h e e d d o o v v e e r r t t h h e e p p a a s s t t t t e e n n y y e e a a r r s s a a n n d d e e v v e e r r y y m m e e m m b b e e r r o o f f t t h h e e P P H H A A s s h h o o u u l l d d f f e e e e l l j j u u s s t t i i f f i i a a b b l l y y p p r r o o u u d d o o f f t t h h e e p p r r o o g g r r e e s s s s t t h h a a t t h h a a s s b b e e e e n n m m a a d d e e . .




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=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009



First woman president
ousted after landmark
Supreme Court decision

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

RECENTLY elected
Bahamas Hotel Catering
and Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWU) President
Nicole Martin has been
ousted from her post fol-
lowing a landmark Supreme
Court decision yesterday.

In a 35-page judgment
handed down by Justice Jon
Isaacs, Martin, the first
woman president in the
union’s almost 51-year his-
tory, was ordered to be
removed from her post as
the union elections held on
May 28 were declared null
and void. Approximately
6,000 members cast their
votes in those elections.

Justice Isaacs also granted
two other grounds of relief
sought by the First Vice
President Kirk Wilson and
twelve other members who
are listed as applicants in the
court action. Justice Isaacs
ordered that the certifica-
tion by Registrar of Trade
Unions Harcourt Brown on
June 2 of the elections held
on May 28 be vacated and
that the Registrar supervise
the union’s elections within

30 days of the order of the
court.

In the ruling Justice
Isaacs noted that by his lack
of response to the concerns
of the executive council,
“the registrar while profess-
ing an inability to interfere
with the internal workings
of the union has done exact-
ly that by abetting the
minority of the council to
hijack the union’s election
process through his agree-
ment to supervise the Dou-
glas election. This is truly an
example of the dog wagging
the tail.”

“In the circumstances as I
have found them to be, the
General Secretary’s request
for the Registrar was not the
request of the union, the
Registrar’s determination to
supervise the Douglas elec-
tion was outside his author-
ity and the applicants are
entitled to the declarations
they seek, the ruling stated.

“IT recognise that to
require the union to under-
go a second election is oner-
ous but that is an eventuali-
ty freely accepted by those
who went forward with the
Douglas election in the full

SEE page seven

Woman charged with
stealing almost $4,000
from place of employment

A 30-YEAR-
OLD woman charged with
stealing nearly $4,000 from
her place of employment

PLEASE NOTE

THAT, DUE TO THE
MONDAY HOLIDAY,
THE TRIBUNE WILL

NEXT BE ON
NEWSSTANDS
ON TUESDAY,
AUGUST 4TH



was arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday.

Marjorie Ann Cooper,
30, of Joan’s Heights, was
arraigned before Magistrate
Derrence Rolle in Court 5,
Bank Lane, yesterday,
charged with 17 counts of
stealing by reason of
employment.

It is alleged that Cooper,
between April 9, 2009, and
Saturday May 30, 2009, stole
a total of $3,830 from My
Oceans Company on Char-
lotte Street. Cooper pleaded
not guilty to all charges and
opted to have the case heard
in Magistrate’s Court.

Cooper was granted bail
in the sum of $10,000 with
one surety. The case was
adjourned to October 26.

Seer — a: FRAME

Tim Clarke/Tribune ! .
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PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

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A TOURIST takes a photo of a collapsed seawall at the Western Esplanade yesterday. With the most active
months of the hurricane season yet to come, the sea wall is essential for the protection of the area.

Man dead after drive-by shooting

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A DRIVE-BY shooting in
the East Street area of Nassau
left a young man dead and
several others nursing gun-
shot wounds.

The murder, the country’s
47th, happened almost 15

hours after another man was
found dead in the middle of
Poinciana Avenue. He had a
wound to the back of his
head.

Supt Elsworth Moss, head
of the Central Detective Unit,
said police got reports of gun-
shots being fired in the area of
Evans and Comfort Streets,
in the East Street area,
around 9.20 pm on Thursday.

The latest victim has been
identified as Dario Smith, 26,
of Comfort Street.

"Police responded and
received information that
there was a male that was shot
and taken to hospital in a pri-
vate vehicle. We later learned
that the male died, and the
information we are working

SEE page seven

PCa Te EU CUI ae Te

Daughter of murdered American
woman is located in the US

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE daughter of murdered American
Anna Michelle Garrison wanted for ques-

A team of three chief superintendents
from the Royal Bahamas Police Force
investigating the killing returned from a
three-day visit with police in the north-

tioning in connection with her mother’s

death has been located in the United

States.

eastern state of Pennsylvania yesterday.
Elsworth Moss, Superintendent in

SEE page seven





NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISCANDS7 EEADING NEWSPAPER

Philip "Brave'
Davis set to run
for PLP deputy

leatler post

C A T

ISLAND,

Rum Cay

and San Sal-

vador MP

Philip Davis

is expected to
formally

announce his

decision to

is oh i Philip Davis
deputy leader of the
PLP on Tuesday, The
Tribune has learned.

Yesterday, the MP’s
communication’s
department issued a
statement to the media
stating that Mr Davis
will be making “a major
announcement” at the
Cat Island Association
Hall on Market and
Vesey Streets near
Transfiguration Baptist
Church.

Having campaigned
privately for some time
for the job, Mr Davis is
expected to join in the
list of other would-be
leaders who have also
expressed a desire to
take over the position
from current deputy
leader Cynthia Pratt.

Mrs Pratt formally
announced at the par-
ty’s previous convention
in 2007 that she will no
longer seek re-election.
With its next convention
slated for October 18,
Mr Davis is expected to
be running alongside
PLP MP Obie Wilch-
combe, Senator Jerome
Fitzgerald, and St Cecil-
ia nomination hopeful
Paul Moss.

In what is being ear-
marked as one of the
most important conven-
tions for the party with-

SEE page seven



Misconduct charges
fending against 16
Customs officers

MISCONDUCT charges
are pending against 16 Cus-
toms Department officers,
the Ministry of Finance
announced yesterday.

The officers were
informed in letters of inter-
diction issued yesterday, and
will be suspended with full
pay pending the determina-
tion of the charges,

They were also given 14
days to respond to the spe-
cific charges and explain
why they should not be dis-
missed from the Public Ser-
vice in letters issued by the
Public Service Department.

An ongoing restructuring
exercise being carried out
by the Ministry of Finance
has also led to 10 Customs
officers being transferred to
other departments.

The ministry said three
are being retired in the pub-
lic interest and one is being
given early retirement.
PAGE 2, SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



The difference in earnings
between men and women

THE most recent Occu-
pation and Wages report
released last weck showed
that the average Bahamian
woman earns less than her
male counterpart, even if
they both hold the same
position and are equally
qualified. The Tribune yes-
terday asked Bahamians
their opinion on this dis-
crepancy in wages.

JOY KNOWLES

“Tam surprised that it
(the wage difference) actu-
ally exists in our country
because we have so many
women who are in high-
ranking positions. I have an
aunt that is in a high-rank-
ing position and I always
assumed that she would be
on par with anyone of her
status, I didn’t think gen-
der had anything to do with

PETECHE Bethell, a 13-
year-old Queen’s College stu-
dent, has been declared the
winner of the first Miss Teen
USA Fantasy Camp.

The week-long camp at
Atlantis, Paradise Island,
coincided with the 2009 Miss

Fine Threads

Bernard Ba » Mocker Sto Thompeon Bed





STREET

it. I am surprised about it
and I don’t think that’s
right.

“For sure, if they are
doing the same job and
they are just as capable to
do the job I don’t think that
should be, I don’t know
why that should be, espe-
cially in a country with so
many single mothers. (Gen-
der) shouldn’t be consid-
ered in the salary as long
as the person has the qual-
ifications.”

Teen USA pageant where
more than 50 teen beauty
queens competed for the cov-
eted crown.

A group of 27 delegates
from across the US and also
five local participants - four
of whom won the contest
advertised in local newspa-
pers - spent an entire week
learning the ins and outs of
the pageant world from indus-
try professionals including
Miss Universe Organisation
president Paula Shugart, Miss
USA 2008 Crystle Stewart,
and a host of fashion design-
ers, hair and make-up stylists,
and more.

Kerzner International vice-
president of casino special
projects Anna Wilson led the
effort. She said the goal was
to piggyback on two exciting

MORTEZ HOPKINS

“T think it basically
unfair, women and men
should have equal rights,
and I think the government
should look into that, deal
with the situation at hand
to try to fix that.”

SHARON CHAPPELL
“Discrimination is dis-
crimination, and if we are
less tolerant of it in other
areas, then this should also
fall under the same umbrel-

events currently going on at
the resort - the Miss Teen
USA Pageant and the Miss
Universe Pageant.

Vice-president of guest
activities Amanda Felts is
described the first ever Teen
Fantasy Camp as a success.

“This is really amazing.
Coming from a non-pageant
background and hearing the
girls say that they were truly
blown away is a tremendous
accomplishment. In fact, I
think one of the participants
summed it up nicely. She told
us she thought she was com-
ing to another cheesy pageant
camp but was so impressed
by the presenters, the events,
and the venue itself,” Ms Felts
said.

During the week, the girls
were chaperoned by state title

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la. If we are going to be
intolerant of discrimination
racially then we should be
equally as intolerant of dis-
crimination among the sex-
es.”

DIANDRA CASH

“T feel that it’s wrong
because currently more
females attend tertiary
education, it means that we
are applying ourselves to
get a better job and not as
(many) males attend ter-
tiary education and are get-
ting paid (more) even
though they don’t have the
degree.

“Also, I guess society
still has this mentality that
the men are the providers
of the home so they feel
the men should be paid
more. I think that’s
wrong.”

JOY KNOWLES

SHARON CHAPPELL

PETECHE BETHELL, 13, wins Miss Teen USA Fantasy Camp.

holders and were treated to
a number of beauty and self-
development sessions, culmi-
nating in an awards ceremony
on Thursday, July 30.
Peteche Bethell - one of the
five Bahamians attending the
camp - was selected as the
winner impressing presenters,
organisers and her fellow

campers from the very first
day.

“T was really impressed. At
first I was a little bit afraid
but in the end I truly had the
most amazing time, the stu-
dent said.

“T learned a lot and it was
also a great opportunity to be
an ambassador to the

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YOUNG PETECHE with state title holders.



CAMPERS HIT the beach as a part of their week-long adventure.

Luucma

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DIANDRA CASH





Bahamas. I encouraged the
girls to return because we
really can use the (tourism)
business right now.”

Peteche walked away with
the winner’s sash, a trophy,
and lots of other prizes. She
promises to make the Miss
Teen USA Fantasy Camp an
annual event.
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

Residents vent concerns over
container port relocation issue



FRUSTRATED residents
of the Vista Marina area
vented their concerns over
the proposed container port
relocation to Arawak Cay
and called on government to
be more transparent about
the controversial develop-
ment.

At the meeting at the
British Colonial Hilton on
Thursday night, the residents
also questioned the environ-
mental ramifications of the
extension of Arawak Cay for
the nearby Saunders Beach.
They feel that government
has not fully explained its
plans on the development

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and the numerous affects it
would have on residents
before moving full steam
ahead with the project.

Opposition Senator Jerome
Fitzgerald, who has passion-
ately resisted the move to
Arawak Cay, challenged gov-
ernment to disclose the "true
cost" of the container port
relocation inclusive of the
proposed island extension,
surrounding road extensions
and new port buildings.

"The cost of the port at
Arawak Cay may be $80 mil-
lion dollars or $150 million
dollars depending who you
believe," he said.

He asked whether an Envi-
ronmental Impact Assess-
ment (EIA) or a traffic study
was done to identify the
impact of the container port
on traffic, noise and pollution
on West Bay Street and the
Vista Marina subdivision, and
if government had deter-
mined where the cause-way
from Arawak Cay would con-
nect to West Bay Street.

"Why has the government
chosen the location ranked
sixth out of seven as the least
favourable location to relo-
cate the port. The prime min-
ister stated during the 2007
election campaign that

Arawak Cay would be devel-
oped as a cultural centre.
Why has he changed his
mind? How will the cargo lin-
ers enter the port? Through
the barrier reef between Sil-
ver Cay and Long Cay or
through the main entry to
Nassau Harbour," Mr
Fitzgerald said.

Area resident Michelle
Campbell said her attempts to
get a copy of the EIA done on
the Arawak Cay extension and
accompanying harbour dredg-
ing have been unsuccessful.

An employee of the Min-
istry of Works told her the doc-
uments were not available for

public viewing, Ms Campbell
said at the meeting on Thurs-
day night.

Copies of both reports were
available on the Bahamas
Environment Science and
Technology Commission's
(BEST) website yesterday.

The town meeting was
organised by the Committee
to Protect and Preserve the
Bahamas for Future Genera-
tions, headed by Mr Fitzger-
ald.

Recently, Mr Fitzgerald
challenged Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux to a
public debate on the port
relocation issue.

Cooper for a chance forher to get into the finals.

fhe Mall-at-Maratho:
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AS beauty queens from around the world
make their way to the Bahamas for the Miss
Universe Pageant, a local beauty is heading to
the other side of the world for an internation-
al pageant of her own.

Tiara Cooper — first runner-up in the 2008
Miss Bahamas World pageant — heads to
Shanghai, China where she will compete in
the Miss Tourism Queen International Pageant.

The statuesque beauty hopes to bring home
the title of one of the largest pageants in the
world.

Tiara won the right to compete in the Miss
Tourism Queen International pageant with
her top three placement in last year’s Miss
Bahamas World pageant.

The Miss Tourism Queen International
Pageant was founded by Charlie See in 1949.
In 1993, the Miss Tourism Queen Organisation
held the first world final competition in Sri

Lanka, and later in the United States, Rus-
sia, Brazil, Germany, Japan, Singapore, and
many other countries.

The contest then moved to China in 2004,
and has been held there ever since, growing to
the point where it is now considered to be a
‘grand slam’ pageant — one of the top four in
the world. With each country’s tourism ambas-
sadors coming together for the event, Miss
Tourism Queen International aims to enhance
tourism development, friendship among the
countries, and international culture exchange.

Bahamians are being encouraged to boost
Tiara’s chances in the pageant by voting for her
online. The contestant receiving the highest
number of votes automatically advances to
the finals. There are 60 contestants competing
for the title in this event, which is scheduled for
August 28. Tiara leaves for Shanghai on
August 5.



Letisha Henderson/BIS Photo

GOVERNMENT Ministers signed two contracts with Rowdy Boys Construction Company for the comple-
tion of Long Island roads on Thursday. Pictured from left are Public Works and Transport Minister Neko
Grant; Minister of Agriculture and Marine Resources Larry Cartwright and contractor Bernard Knowles.

Contracts signed for
completion of Long
Island road works

By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION
SERVICES

GOVERNMENT has
signed two contracts
totalling over $200,000 for
completion of road works
in Long Island.

Public Works and Trans-
port Minister Neko Grant
said on Thursday that it is
anticipated that the road
works will “contribute to
the further overall develop-
ment of Long Island.”

The first contract totalling
$149,040 provides for the
construction of one mile of
White House Road in

Millers, while the second
contract of $135,436 will
cover reconstruction of
1,500 yards of the McKanns
Settlement Road.

Both contracts have been
awarded to Rowdy Boys
Construction Company rep-
resented at the signing by
Bernard Knowles, of Man-
grove Bush, Long Island.

Agriculture and Marine
Resources Minister Larry
Cartwright, MP for Long
Island, said he is ““more than
pleased” that the govern-
ment has decided to com-
plete the roads.

“This would make five
side-roads that have been

done within the last two
years,” Mr Cartwright said.

“These roads have been
neglected for quite some
time and have been allowed
to deteriorate.

“The residents there have
been complaining a lot and
I am sure they would be
happy that the government
has decided to repair them.”

Rowdy Boys Construc-
tion has an “outstanding”
record in Long Island for
doing “very fine work in
road building,” Mr
Cartwright said.

Mr Knowles said 12 per-
sons will be employed on
the road works projects that
will begin on August 3 and
be completed within 90
days.

The projects will be exe-
cuted concurrently.

Among those attending
the signing were Permanent
Secretary Colin Higgs,
Deputy Director George
Hutcheson and Chief Engi-
neer Howard Barrett.

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

Obama's rare race foray a positive step

PHILADELPHIA — Perhaps the biggest
"teachable moment" from the Henry Louis
Gates Jr. saga was for President Barack Oba-
ma: If you want to improve race relations,
you have to enter the fray.

Even some of Obama's fiercest oppo-
nents say that by bringing together the black
professor and the white police officer who
arrested him, the president had orchestrated
an unlikely and unifying moment, a peace-
able kingdom in the Rose Garden.

Symbolic? Yes. Made for TV? Certainly.
But these things could not obscure the fact
that a president who has tried to transcend
racial matters was down in the arena, talking
about race.

"The cynic in me wants to shoot holes in
it, the critic in me wants to pick it apart,” said
conservative radio host Mike Gallagher.
"But I'm sorry, you have two sides, polar
opposites in a racially tinged confrontation
like this, sitting down with the president of
the United States over a beer at the White
House?

"This is a great step forward in showing
how you can take a confrontation, a con-
flict, and make a positive out of it.”

This also is the kind of direct action Oba-
ma had sidestepped as he sought the support
of white voters weary of racial dissonance.

In March, Obama was asked whether he
agreed with Attorney General Eric Hold-
er's comments that many Americans have
been “cowards” because "we, average
Americans, simply do not talk enough with
each other about race."

"I'm not somebody who believes that
constantly talking about race somehow
solves racial tensions," Obama told The New
York Times. "I think what solves racial ten-
sions is fixing the economy, putting people to
work, making sure that people have health
care."

The standoff between Gates and Oba-
ma has the potential to exacerbate tensions.
Many blacks supported Gates’ claim that
he was racially profiled by Crowley, while
many whites insisted Crowley displayed no
bias in investigating a possible break-in at
Gates’ home.

Gates demanded an apology from Crow-
ley and called him a “rogue policeman."
After Obama said police had "acted stupid-
ly" in arresting an angry Gates for disorder-
ly conduct, Crowley said Obama was "way
off base wading into a local issue without
knowing all the facts."

The atmosphere was much different after
Thursday's conversation.

"No tension,” Crowley said.

Mostly, racial conflicts fade out without
any consultation, let alone resolution. Imag-
ine the widow of Sean Bell meeting with
the New York police officers who shot her
husband, or the black teens in Jena, La.,
talking to the white schoolmate they
attacked.

That made the White House meeting even
more remarkable — “revolutionary and
potentially healing, a peace pipe for modern

NOTICE is hereby given that SEAN WRIGHT of WEST

"

times," wrote the right-leaning columnist
Kathleen Parker.

"When future archaeologists excavate our
history, they will doubtless marvel at the
symbolism of that simple gesture," she wrote.

It probably never would have happened
had Obama not criticised Crowley, a mistake
that demanded damage control.

Why not?

"His advisers would have said, 'No, it's
not about health care!'" said Rev. Jim Wal-
lis, president of the progressive Christian
group Sojourners and author of "God's Pol-
itics: Why the Right Gets It Wrong and the
Left Doesn't Get It."

It was political theatre — but it sent a
powerful message, Wallis said.

"It was a parable for what needs to hap-
pen off-camera all the time — that kind of
conversation,” he said. "Obama was saying,
"This now needs to happen."

Obama has rarely joined that conversa-
tion since his national debut at the 2004
Democratic National Convention speech,
when he declared, "There is not a black
America and a white America and Latino
America and Asian America — there's the
United States of America.”

But as the first black president, son of a
white mother and black father, many say he
in uniquely suited — even obligated — to
lead the discussion.

"As a white man, I would say the nation
needs a president to be proactive on race,"
Wallis said. "He has a power to be that, the
capacity to be that, the identity and the his-
tory."

Gallagher said no one besides Obama
could have orchestrated this type of resolu-
tion.

"You had to almost have a black presi-
dent who's capable of saying to Gates, the
man who feels aggrieved and insulted, 'I
need you at the White House.'"

"Obama said ... "Let's show the world
that we're trying to advance race relations
rather than digress,'" he continued. "And
you know what? As one of his fiercest critics,
he gets an A-plus on this. I'm just blown
away."

Much has been made of the symbolism of
a black president and how he provides an
opportunity for people to talk about race. In
some ways, race is always an element of any
conversation Obama is involved in.

But "watercooler conversations aren't
enough any more,” Wallis said. "They don't
go deep enough, they are too short and they
are very safe. You gotta sit at the table.”

That's exactly what Crowley, Gates and
Obama did on the White House lawn, along
with Vice President Joe Biden, whose pres-
ence conveniently balanced out the image.

Earlier, Crowley and Gates talked after
they crossed paths while separately touring
the White House with their relatives.

They continued their tour as one large
group.

(This article was written by Jesse Wash-
ington, Associated Press’ national writer).



A national
lottery and
cambling

EDITOR, The Tribune.

AS A Bahamian who
loves his country and who
wants to see it as a beacon
on top of a hill shining
bright above all other
nations, I have to say that
gambling and the national
lottery is not the way to
20.
We have to think about
the next generation and
the future Bahamians and
the country that they want
to grow up in.

We as a country do not
need to follow other coun-
tries and learn the hard
way that gambling under-
mines a strong work ethic
and fosters an attitude of
laziness and greed as peo-
ple waste money in order
to try and win a ticket toa
life of leisure.

We must be true to our
constitution and live by
Christian values which do
not include gambling or a
national lottery.

Iam a firm believer that
God does bless those
nations that honour him
and so when he says that
“Righteousness exalts a
nation, but sin is a dis-
grace to any people” that
is truth, and a reality that
we can hold up to our peo-
ple as the solution to the
problems besetting us.

Coming from a sporting
family and having been
involved in sports for
almost 50 years I know
what it takes to be good
and to be the best you can
be, and it is not by trying

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



to take the easy way out,
but rather by becoming
very disciplined and work-
ing hard with the gifts that
God has given you.

Gambling and a Nation-
al Lottery go against the
work ethic and would be
the wrong message to send
to the very athletes that we
are trying to teach sacri-
fice, dedication, and self-
discipline.

I have never seen an
athlete compete at their
full potential by being lazy
or leaving anything to
chance and that should not
be our philosophy as a
nation.

This summer I have
been reading in the book
of Proverbs and it has
much to say against bet-
ting on chance and being
lazy, here are a few of
those gems,

“lazy hands make aman
poor, but diligent hands
bring wealth.”

“Whoever loves disci-
pline loves knowledge, but
he who hates correction is
stupid.”

“He who works his land
will have abundant food,
but he who chases fantasies
lacks judgment.”

“Diligent hands will rule,
but laziness ends in slave
labour. All hard work
brings a profit, but mere
talk leads only to poverty.”

These are the truths we
need to keep before the
conscience of a nation not
striving to be rich by
chance.

I know that we do need
funding to help our ath-
letes, and representing our
country well takes money,
but let’s support them
while sending the right
message.

Righteousness exalts a
nation, so let’s give all our
energies to building a
strong nation because we
trust God. There are so
many ways to raise money
and help our athletes and
students if we have the will
to do so.

Whereas, I cannot
endorse a national lottery
for sports, I can and do
endorse the other recom-
mendation put forth, i.c.a
tax.

We have the most beau-
tiful country in the world
and millions of tourists
come every year to see and
enjoy our sunshine, waters,
beaches, and people.

An additional $1 per
tourist to come or leave
our country would be $4
million for sports each
year. A one cent gasoline
tax per gallon at the sales
pump could do the same.
There are many ways to do
things right that are good
for our nation.

ANDY KNOWLES
Bahamas National
Swim Coach
Nassau,

July 30, 2009.

Have we swallowed
the tourism slogan?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I FIND it very disturb-
ing when a political figure
passes comment giving
obviously based opinion
as to what “their” Gov-
ernment has been doing
when in reality the Gov-
ernment has only done
very little.

Grace and | eet Wesleyan Church

BAY STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the

Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should

send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 1**day of August, 2009 to the

Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O.

Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

BKG/410.03

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

(8 ALOE DA

ee ee ee
Horth America

aie Le

Worship Time: if] am.

Prayer Time: 10:15am

Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O. Box §8.2631

CTON?

Sealed tenders for B$56,209,000.00 of 91-Day Treasury Bills
will be received by the Banking Manager, The Central Bank

of The Bahamas, Frederick Street, Nassau up to 3:00 p.m on
Tuesday, August 4, 2009. Successful tenderers, who will be
advised should take up their bills against payment on Thursday,
August 6, 2009. These bills will be in minimum multiples of

B$100.00.

Tenders are to be on special forms obtainable from the Central

Bank of The Bahamas or Commercial Banks.

Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples of one
cent) and should be marked “Tender”. The Central Bank of the
Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

ARIK I IKK IK HK IK IK KK OK OK OK OK OK OK ROR ORK KR RR KR RRR AAR RRA RAK K

Telephone number: 324-2558
Telefax number: 324-2587

Perfiunres
Colngeres
Accessories
Jewelry

Men's Tapedi Jeans
AVON Products
Favs & Jats More

The Senate President,
Hon Lynn Holowesko,
knows better when she
negatively criticizes the
Bay Street property own-
ers as to the external state
of their buildings when
you look at the Senate
building and the paint is
pealing off the building,
at least it was yesterday,
Wednesday, July 29.

Across from the Parlia-
ment buildings, the
Adderley building, owner
the Treasurer of the
Bahamas/government is
filthy — Vendue House
and the old BEC account-
ing office is also owned by
The Treasurer of The
Bahamas Government —
the old Lloyd’s Bank
building on George
Street, currently the Min-
istry of Tourism still has
sheets of plywood sur-
rounding it from three to
four years ago, that is
another Government
building.

Might it be, Madam
Senate President, that
your social friends, the
Bay Street property own-
ers, don’t see any business
that will come to Bay
Street out of Miss Uni-
verse, as clearly all the

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hype and events are going
to be taking place on
Kerzner’s island?

If the contestants are
going to Grand Bahama
please ensure they ride in
very dark tinted limos.

One hopes that Nation-
al Security will ensure
that during this global
event only the correct
coloured Bahamas nation-
al flag will be flying as the
majority today we see are
black — yellow and
BLUE!

I must ask: Are we real-
ly serious or have we
swallowed the tourism
slogan hook line and
sinker and really
believe...It’s better...When
the world says it isn’t.

ABRAHAM MOSS,
Nassau,
July 30, 2009.

Interesting
reading

EDITOR, The Tribune.

ALMOST every month
we read that a certain
accounting-auditor con-
sulting firm has been
retained by government
and soon after when their
report arrives it seems to
be guaranteed to be critical
of another consulting firm
who also were retained.

Might it be a good pro-
posal that government will
retain one of these consul-
tants to opinion whether
the government is provid-
ing good governance?

Isuggest that would
make interesting reading.

T WILLIAMS
Nassau,
July 3, 2009.
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



WHY YOU Anti-doping laws ‘will benefit

ing crazy.

"We the poor people }
knows the illegals does get |
drop off an’ pick up from
we neighbourhood, so }
politicians must stop say- ;
ing it is 'we'. What 'we' da :
poor does know is dat 'we' :
have to share we t'ings like :
PMH, government clinics,
government schools with |
da illegals yinna hire, so }
yinna don’t play fool an say ;
it is 'we' when it is 'you }

299

very well know who’.

- 'Fix ya face an laugh’,
Nassau. }

"I vex because I been to }
the gas station on Thomp- :
son Boulevard and this }
pretty lady pulled up right :
and the pump attendant }
seem to have forgotten I :
was there first. He went to }
pump her gas, and if that :
wasn't bad enough, he }
cleaned every one of her }
windshields, dat time I }
blowing my horn. You }
think he check for me? }
And guess what else, she :
did not give the poor boy }
one dollar, then he want to :
come to my car with atti- }
tude. Man, I had to pull off. :

"Good service still hard }
to get, even though a lot of :
people out there would :
gladly like to have the jobs :
some of us acting up with."

- Debbs, Nassau.

"T vex at those dog own- }
ers on Eastern Road who :
keep hounds, lil’ tiny }
hounds, outside their }
homes 24 hours a day, sev-
en days a week and they ;
bark at everything that :

passes by.

"And sometimes the
dogs jump out at passersby, :
scaring the daylights out of :

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

ATHLETES who have been cheat-
ed out of Olympic medals by those
taking performance-enhancing drugs
will benefit from anti-doping legisla-
tion, Senator Dion Foulkes argued in
the Senate yesterday.

The Minister of Labour and Social
Development highlighted the hard-
working Bahamian athletes who have
had to wait years for their medals
because “winners” on the day were
found to have used drugs illegally.

A Bill for an Act to Provide for the
Measures to Discourage the Use of
Drugs and Doping Methods in Sports
and for Related Purposes was tabled
in the House of Assembly last week as
government moves to fulfil obliga-
tions it vowed to uphold under the
World Anti-Doping Code in 2003.

The Code calls for countries to
implement effective programmes to
prevent, deter, detect and legally pun-
ish individuals for using or providing
performance enhancing drugs banned
under the Code, and enforce regula-
tions on all athletes in the country.

Pledging his support for the Bill,
the minister said: “The Code has
become the global instrument to har-
monise policies and regulations and to
provide a framework for the estab-
lishment and execution of anti-doping
policies, rules and regulations for the



-

oes



DION FOULKES, Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie and Pauline Davis-Thompson

benefit of sporting organisations and
to ensure fair play in all competitions
for athletes worldwide.”

He listed a staggering number of
Bahamian athletes who were cheat-
ed out of their medals by performance
enhancing users, including the men’s
relay team that only received its right-
fully-earned Olympic bronze medal
from Sydney 2000, eight years later.

And Pauline Davis-Thompson, who
was second place in the 200 metres
at the same Games, now stands to
receive the gold as “winner” Marion
Jones was found to have taken per-
formance enhancing drugs.

Debbie Ferguson was recently

awarded a gold medal after finishing
behind Ms Jones at the World Cham-
pionships in Athletics in 2001, the
same event the Bahamian men’s relay
team finished second, and now stands
to be awarded first place as the Unit-
ed States team was disqualified for
drug use.

Mr Foulkes also noted how Chan-
dra Sturrup was just given the bronze
medal she should have been given in
the 100 metres at the 2001 World
Championships as a result of the dis-
qualification of Marion Jones and
Kelli White; and the members of
men’s relay team are now recognised
as the bronze medalists for the 2003



athletes cheated out of medals’

"T is vex cause dem }
senior politicians keeps :
telling us that 'we' hiring :
and sheltering dem illegals. :
They mussey ain't know }
that ‘we’ is the majority }
who is poor an scrapping ;
and ain't gats no money to }
hire or shelter nobody }
cause we ain't have no yard :
or lawn, an we ain't have }
no extra house to rent or :
business to hire anybody.
It's dem other people with }
money who does that, and }
dem rich politicians should :
know that instead of talk- ;

Championships following disqualifi-
cation of the American team.

“The Bahamas has been negatively
impacted by cheating through the
doping process, and (that) has led to
these outstanding Bahamian athletes
being recognised as World and
Olympic Champions years after they
should have been, and they still have
not received their recognition at an
international event,” Mr Foulkes said.

“They are receiving their medals at
home in front of hundreds instead of
in the international arena in front of
thousands who sit in the stadiums and
hundreds of thousands of television
viewers.

“As a result, our athletes have lost
out on lucrative opportunities, and
our country has lost valuable inter-
national television exposure.

“By passing this legislation we will
be ensuring that the Bahamas will be
fully compliant with world norms with
respect to the fight against doping in
sports, and we will have the legal
authority to test any athlete who is
in the Bahamas, whether the athlete is
a Bahamian or not; to enter into rec-
iprocal agreements with other coun-
tries, and also to test Bahamian ath-
letes while they are in other coun-
tries.

“We are seeking to ensure that the
cheaters will never again take glory
away from the honest competitors on
the world stage in the sporting are-
na,” he said.

Local businessman collaborates with

artists to help revitalise Bay Street

LOCAL artists have been
given the opportunity to dis-
play completed works in the
eastern section of Bay Street
between East Street and Vic-
toria Avenue in an effort to
revitalise the dilapidated
area, using art to draw atten-
tion to the often overlooked
part of downtown.

Vaughn Roberts, manag-
ing director of the Downtown
Nassau Partnership (DNP),
is partnering with project
curator Jonathan Murray to
mobilise the art community
and get Bahamian artists
involved in a public change.

“T believe this mobilisation
is only one of the ways artistic

involvement can contribute
to the overall goals of the
DNP,” said Mr Roberts.

“The ‘East of East Street’
project is important for pro-
moting a sense of community
among stakeholders and
developing possibilities for
the blighted area.”

Makeover

The collaboration also uses
short-term methods to give
the area an aesthetic
makeover, allowing derelict
buildings to be used as can-
vasses for murals and vacant
storefronts to gain new life
from displayed artwork.

Local artists and volunteers
demonstrate communal
involvement by engaging
themselves in physical instal-
lations of art work along Bay
Street. Mr Roberts hopes the
collaboration will encourage
other Bahamians, artists and
volunteers, to become active
in the development that many
hope will “bring back the
magic” to the once vibrant
city.

“The East of East Street
project doesn’t stop at
appealing to participating
artists, volunteers and down-
town property owners. Hop-
ing to catch the eye of
Bahamians and visitors alike,

it’s getting coverage online
through popular networking
sites like Facebook, where a
group has been providing the
public with updates and pic-
tures as well as a place to
voice opinions about the pro-
ject,” organisers said.

Murals

The concept for the murals
uses Bahamian literature as
a focal point. John Cox, one
of the featured artists, coined
the phrase ‘this is how much I
love you’ in his expressive
piece located on the wall
behind an east downtown bus
stop. Mr Roberts said that
while some pieces were cre-

walk cleaning, planning for
the properties of container
shipping companies and
movements for on-street
parking in the area between
East Street and Victoria
Avenue.

Guided by an 11-member
board with public and private
sector representation and co-
chaired by Tourism Director
General Vernice Walkine
and Nassau Tourism Devel-
opment Board chairman
Charles Klonaris, the DNP
employs a full-time, profes-
sional management team to
coordinate the revitalisation
efforts steering the drive
toward the creation of a
‘Business Improvement Dis-

them. It's my right to walk

down the street without ;
fear of someone's dog bit- :
ing my leg or chasing me :

down the street."

- Concerned Citizen, }
Nassau. }

"Man what kind of tar }
dey be usin’ to fill in dese }
pot holes? To me, these }
fellas seem to be working }
twice as hard to fill these }
holes. The pothole by Sug- }
ar Kid Bowe was filled, but :
was right back, just as big }
and deep two days later. }
Man please tell me what }

you all doing?"

- Vexed Driver, }
Nassau. :

Are you vex?

Send your complaints to }
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net

or fax them to 328-2398.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



THE Bahamas Industrial Manufacturers and
Allied Workers Union has elected a new team of
officers.

President Wilfred Seymour, assistant secre-
tary general Clayton Seymour and treasurer
Arthur Penn had all resigned from their posi-
tions.

An election for treasurer, assistant treasurer
and trustees was held on Monday, leading to the
election of Jeffrey Arnett as treasurer; Francionn

Lan \)|

FARRINGTON RD.,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
7300M NIGHTLY

LEXINGTON. KY)

The BIMAWJU elects a
new team of officers

Cox as assistant treasurer, and Neville Cox, David
Morley and Tony Handfield as trustees.

The positions for president, vice-president,
secretary general and assistant secretary general
were unopposed and went to Ronald Roker,
Wilfred Seymour, Jennifer Brown and Carla
Lightbourne respectively.

An election for four shop stewards brought
Edward Miller, Leroy Arnett, Daniel Simmons,
and Adrian Lightbourne into office.

== TRANSFORMATION MINISTRIES
/ \ INTERNATIONAL

= presents. a

~~ CONFERENCE OF THE

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(EMPOWERMENT WORSHIP WE Rune hy

ated specifically for the pro- Mets
ject, others rely on existing
artworks and represent the
local contemporary art move-
ment.

For those interested in
additional DNP preparations
for the ‘East of East Street’
area, Mr Roberts mentioned
other plans including side-

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co.,, Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 + Fax: 326-7452

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PAGE 6, SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Police: eight primarily
Haitian gangs are
dismantled in Florida

NORTH MIAMI BEACH, Fla. !

EIGHT primarily Haitian
gangs have been dismantled
in South Florida after a 17-
month investigation, author-
ities said Friday, according to
Associated Press.

“Operation Dead End”
targeted violent drug traf- }
fickers in North Miami }

Beach.

Information from the }
probe into the January 2008
slaying of Miami police }
Detective James Walker in :
North Miami Beach aided }
the undercover local and fed- }
eral law enforcement officers }
in their investigation, Police :
Chief Rafael Hernandez Jr. }

said.

That investigation continues.

“We've received a lot of :
complaints about gang prob- :
lems in our city,” Hernandez }

said.

Thirteen gang members :
and their associates face fed- }
eral armed robbery, drugs }
and weapons charges. If con- }
victed, they potentially face }

decades in prison.

Another 23 will be prose- }
cuted by the Miami State }
Attorney’s Office. Seventeen }
others arrested in this week’s
sweep will be processed for }
immigration violations or }

charges in other crimes,
authorities said.

The defendants range from
street-level dealers to large }
drug suppliers, Hernandez }

said.



Walker was shot by gang :
members with a semiauto- }
matic rifle, authorities said. :

Preserving the purity of
Bahamian goat pepper

By GENA GIBBS
Bahamas Information
Services

SPECIAL measures are
being taken at the Gladstone
Road Agricultural Centre
(GRAC) to preserve the potent
purity of the native Bahamian
goat pepper, the fifth hottest in
the world.

“Goat peppers are specifi-
cally Bahamian,” said Basil
Miller, senior agriculture officer
at GRAC. “They are native to
Andros.”

Being prolific reproducers,
Bahamian goat peppers need
plenty of space and they must
be isolated to maintain their
genetic purity.

“We have to keep them
more than 600 feet away from
any other pepper to avoid
inbreeding,” he explained.

And the Bahamian goat
pepper is in such demand,
GRAC cannot produce suffi-
cient seeds which are distrib-
uted through the Ministry of
Agriculture’s Fish and Farm
store at Potter’s Cay Dock.

“The potential 1s great for
business,” said Mr Miller,
“however farmers will have to
unite.

“What we have found is that
you can grow peppers all year
round. There is no season for

oe THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS
m7 ISLASDS CONFERENCE =
j OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IX THE) 3
CARIBBEAN ANDTHE AMERICAS |
= bt C EGLISE MET HODISTE DANS LA
==" CARAIBE ET LES AMERIQU ES NASSALEE Sr
CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES
1K Montrose Avenue
Pu. Bo E1679, Nastam, Bahamas: Telephone: 125-32;
Faw: 328-2784: methodistcanforemcea min.com

REPOSITIONING FOR WIRACLES WITH FRESH EXPRESSIONS

eri Ch | is eYAsahs)



PEPPER GROWN at the Gladstone Road Agricultural Centre, pictured above, is in demand on the

Bahamian market.

peppers.”
He noted that as an incen-

tive, the Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) is making land avail-
able to persons interested in
farming.

Other varieties grown at
GRAC include finger pepper,
native to Eleuthera, and Tabas-
co pepper, native to New Mex-
ico, which grows well in the
Bahamas.

Harvested peppers go
through a wet extraction
process. The flesh is separated

and the seeds are deposited in a
bin.

They are then dried in the
sun and baked for a day. About
100 sample seeds are isolated
and tested for 11 days to deter-
mine their rate of germination.

Native goat peppers germi-
nate 95 per cent of the time, 10
per cent better than the inter-
national standard, Mr Miller
explained.

He underscored the impor-
tance of a national seed bank.
During passage of Hurricane
Andrew over Eleuthera in

1992, the finger pepper was
almost lost as a genetic variety.

“We were saved because a
lady had some seeds in her
kitchen cupboard that weren’t
destroyed by the salt water,”
said Mr Miller

“Once we establish a germ
bank we will always have the
seeds. If we ever experience a
major hurricane, we will have
seeds so when the coast is clear
we can plant our seeds again.”

Farmers who grow more
that one crop at a time without
isolating them, harvest cross-



BASIL MILLER, senior agricul-
ture officer at the Gladstone Road
Agricultural Centre, shows off a
variety of pepper grown there.

bred crops, substandard to
genetically pure crops, Mr
Miller warned.

“They should concentrate
on growing one crop at a time.

“Some farmers try to grow
too many things in the same
field and open their crops to
diseases. Crops must be grown
with other crops from different
families.”

Bahamas to host Caribhean Arts and Entertainment Expo

THE Caribbean Arts and
Entertainment Expo will be
held for the first time in the
Bahamas this year.

Organisers said they chose
the Bahamas because of the
country’s rapidly growing inter-
est and involvement in arts and
entertainment.

Launched in 2006, the
Caribbean Arts and Entertain-
ment Expo is the first and only
conference in the region dedi-
cated to song-writing, compos-
ing, audio engineering/produc-
tion, dance and videography.

Selling out in its inaugural
year, the Expo provided a
unique opportunity for song-
writers, composers, publishers,
producers — and those in the
industry that support them — to

ENERGIZING THE CONFERENCE NOW W
(Surtire Outreach Witness Worship)
IMMENSE VARIETY « IMMENSE CREATIVITY «= IMMENSE HOPE
*Cekebrating 225 wears of coationows Methodist witness for
Ohrist in The Bahamas”

TWELFTH LORD'S DAY AFTER PENTECOST, ALGUST 2, 20048,
LORD'S DAY BEFORE FMANCIPATION TRANSFIGURATION

COLLECT: Lord Gin your Son left riches of heaven and become pour
for cur cake: when we: Pieper GAVE Ua Ehen pride when we are fecal y save
us from despair, thal we may bust you alone; through Jesus Const our
Lard

WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Ril East)

4:00 am. Rev. De. Kenseth A. tagging (Holy Commennion)

RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH

(108 Manirow Ave. near Wolll Bali
7:00 a.m. Rev, Dr. Raymond BR. Neilly [Holy Communion}
10:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Demeritte
11:00) a.m, Rev. Emily A, Demeritte (Holy Communic)
030 p.m Youth

COKE VMEMONIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street, Pow Hilly
11:00 4.m. Rev. Leonard 4. Roberts Jc. (Holy Conmmurion)

PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plara)
11 aim Rev. Or, Kenneth 4. Haggins {Holy Communion)

HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOWE METHODIST CHL ACH
(78 Crawlord St, Oakes Field
7:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roherts Jr. (Holy Commurian)
4:00 am, sis, Ruth Pratt

METHODIST CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD (Fire Trail Ra}

00 am. Rev. biily A. Demonte (Hhaly Communion)

CHOIA-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Usiackow Street)
$:30 pam. Fridays Children’s: Club (Recess)

METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Qmackoo St) Min Sinise

JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford St. Qubes
Field) Reception to Primary

PEACE AND JLSTICR CAMPAIGN: = All Meihedists of the
Conference are urged bo pray ond to fast for Justice to prevail in the
Methodist Cases ond for om ead to the epsurge in violence. The fost
begins woekly after the evening meal oo Thursday and ends at noon om
Friday. This we proclaim unswervingly: ‘My God amd My Right."

RADIO PROGHAMS

‘Vision’ - Cn che Lord's Thay, #85 1 at? pms
Insparnaizon’ = Cn the Lord"s Day, Radio 8 1bet $240 pom.; “Famualy Vibes”
4N5 1, Tuesday, 7:30 pom; “To God be the Gore’ ANS 1, Tuesday,
T44 p.m

“Hireat Heynires af

: ren ee

BREARFREE

FROM BONDAGES

Come! Join us this Sunday as we
come together and experience Deliverance, Healing
and Victory in the presence of God.

ee
Pei ad
SUNDAY SERVICES

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

FRIDAY at 7?
i il
RADIO MINISTRY
1 HS |

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Collins pom oa an
eR ae One 7
ae Mn mM eu ste

7:30 p.m.



come together in an unprece-
dented way to share their
knowledge and expertise.

In previous years, the Expo
has been held in Puerto Rico,
Jamaica, and Bermuda.

For this year’s event in the
Bahamas’ top industry profes-
sionals will come together to
share their knowledge and
expertise on a broad range of
topics, specific to this market
and of interest to those vying to
take their product abroad.

Since its inaugural year, the
Expo has attracted more than
6,000 music creators, industry
professionals, exhibitors and
sponsors, and is expected to
bring together another large



gathering in the Bahamas.

The most popular elements
of the Expo include shopping
customised tracks/beats by the
best local audio engineers; a fea-
tured artist representative from
Def Jam Recording; one-on-one
sessions with videographers,
photographers, graphic design-
ers and dance agencies, and an
array of networking opportuni-
ties.

The Expo will take place on
August 6 from 8pm to lam at
the Garden of Eden Guest
House and Villas.

Email
mixologybahamas@gmail.com
for more information.

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS « Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, AUGUST 2ND, 2009
11:30 A.M. Speaker
PASTOR
MARCEL LIGHTBOURNE

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
¢ Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

j ‘Sunday Schook 10am
Preaching
Radio Bible Hour:
| Sunday Gam - 2NS 2
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

FUNDAMENTAL |
liam 4 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC

Pastor:H. Mile

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”

| Pastor: H. Mills * Phome: 392-0563 * Box W222 |

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) PO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, AUGUST 2ND, 2009

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/ Bro, Andre Bethel
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer / Sis. Nathalie Thompson (HC)
7:00 p.m. Rey, Carla Culmer.Bd. of Children, Youth & Young Adults

Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”

9 LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past &

Geared To The Future

Worship time: [lam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:

The Madeira
Shopping Center

Rev. Dr. Frankhin Konwles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

PO Bax EE- 6807
Telephone number 325-57 12
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Honduran
interim leaders:
Jelaya can't

he restored

TEGUCIGALPA,
Honduras

HONDURAS’ coup-
installed leader has damp-
ened hopes for a negotiated
solution to the country’s cri-
sis, capping days of mixed sig-
nals by saying firmly that
there’s no way the ousted
president can return to pow-
er, according to Associated
Press.

Also marking a tougher
stance, riot police fired tear
gas and arrested supporters
of ousted President Manuel
Zelaya who blocked a main
artery leading into the Hon-
duran capital Friday. Inter-
im President Roberto
Micheletti said his govern-
ment would no longer toler-
ate street blockades that reg-
ularly snarl traffic in Teguci-
galpa and other cities.

Micheletti’s Foreign Min-
istry said in a statement it
“reserves the right” to can-
cel visas for U.S. diplomatic
personnel in Honduras, in
retaliation for Washington’s
decision this week to revoke
the diplomatic visas of four
Honduran officials. Hon-
duras did not take any imme-
diate steps against U.S. diplo-
mats.

Zelaya’s return has been
a key demand of crisis medi-
ator and Costa Rican Presi-
dent Oscar Arias, who also
has proposed amnesty for the
coup plotters and other mea-
sures as part of a compro-
mise deal.

But on Friday, a judge in
Honduras issued yet another
set of arrest warrants against
Zelaya and three other for-
mer officials for alleged falsi-
fication of public records,
fraud and abuse of authority.
The charges are related to
the alleged misappropriation
of $2 million in government
funds to pay for ads by
Zelaya’s administration in
January.

The interim government
previously announced Zelaya
faces charges of treason,
usurping the powers of other
branches of government,
abuse of authority and try-
ing to undermine Honduras’
system of government.

Zelaya told a television
station in Managua,
Nicaragua on Friday that
“either they reverse the coup,
or there will be generalized
violence,” although he later
told Mexico’s Radio Formu-
la that he wanted to avoid
any bloodshed.

Zelaya also announced
plans to travel next week to
Mexico, where the govern-

Daughter of murdered
woman is located in the US

FROM page one

charge of the Criminal
Detective Unit, said they
located Ms Garrison’s
daughter Anna Pugh, 16,
but they are not yet ready
to make an arrest.

Mr Moss said officers are
working in close communi-
cation with American police
and he is pleased with the
development of the investi-
gation.

Mrs Garrison’s body was

found dumped at the south-
ern end of Fox Hill Road on
Saturday, July 4, wrapped in
a Sheet and plastic bag.

Police estimated she had
been dead for around two
months before her decom-
posing body was discovered
by walkers in a bushy area
on the side of the road near
the Blue Water Cay devel-
opment.

Ms Garrison, 33, of West
Palm Beach, Florida, had
been reported missing on
February 25 by the United

States Embassy in Nassau.
Diplomats said she may
have been in the company
of a Bahamian man.

Police are still awaiting
the results of an autopsy to
find out how she died.

In the week after her body
was found, Zyndall McKin-
ney, 22, of Isabella Boule-
vard, Nassau, was arraigned
in Magistrate’s Court and
charged with intentionally
causing Ms Garrison’s death
between Sunday, February
25, and Saturday, July 4,

Philip ‘Brave’ Davis set to run
for PLP deputy leader post

FROM page one

in the past decade, the PLP is expect-
ed to see a change in its deputy
leader, and a challenge to its current
chairman and possibly even its leader.

Former Prime Minister Perry
Christie has struggled since his defeat
at the polls in 2007 to maintain con-
trol over his parliamentary caucus
who privately insist that the party
desperately needs to see a change of
its leadership before it can go to the

polls again.

Having led the party to a crushing
defeat in 2007, Mr Christie commissioned a
leading research and polling company to ascer-
tain reasons for the PLP’s loss to the now gov-
erning Free National Movement.

According to the report, there were a num-

aA eas



government.

ber of scandals, two including mem-
bers of his own Cabinet, that con-
tributed to Mr Christie’s perceived
“weakness” in handling his minis-
ters that contributed to the PLP’s
poor showing at the polls.

Along with other recommenda-
tions, the firm suggested either a
change in leadership or a remodeling
of the leader’s image to make the
party more attractive to the coveted

youth/swing vote.

g = Since the PLP’s loss there has been
little change to the party’s image.
However, with the convention and
the prospect that the current deputy leader
will vacate her seat, members hope to see their
party reinvent itself — hopefully in time to
provide a substantive alternative to the current

Man dead after
drive-by shooting

FROM page one

with is that around 9.15 pm
(on Thursday) several persons
were standing in that area
when a light coloured vehicle
pulled up and fired shots in
the crowd, hitting the
deceased," Mr Moss said.
Supt Moss added that
police received reports that
others in the group were shot
from the passing car, but so

far they had not turned up at
the hospital for treatment.
"We also got information
that several other persons
may have been grazed or
received injuries — none of
those persons turned up at the
hospital but we are trying to
identify them,” said Mr Moss.
Meanwhile police said they
are waiting on the autopsy
results for 50-year-old
Kendall Hamilton, a resident
of Key West Street, the

Grove.

Mr Hamilton was killed
after he was struck on the
back of his head during an
argument with another man
at West End Avenue around
6 am Thursday, police said.

His body was found lying
in the middle of Poinciana
Avenue, near 2nd Street the
Grove around 6.45 am.

A 29-year-old male resident
of the Grove was assisting
police in their investigations.

Hotel union elections

2009, while being concerned
with another.

Anna Pugh is said to have
been McKinney’s girlfriend
and to have lived with him
in the Bahamas.

The 16-year-old also
known as Madison Sweet-
ing and Madison McKinney
is thought to have left the
Bahamas for the United
States sometime after her
mother’s death.

Bahamas Police want to
question Miss Pugh about
her mother’s murder and
have enlisted the United
States Federal Bureau of
Investigation (FBI) to help
find her.

Reports from various
news agencies claimed Miss
Pugh had been found in
Kennett Square, Pennsylva-
nia, with her father Chris
Pugh last weekend.

But the FBI and
Bahamas Police denied
Miss Pugh had been arrest-
ed.

However, Mr Moss told
The Tribune yesterday
police are sure they have
located her.

He said: “Three of our
chief superintendents went
to Pennsylvania to see what
information they could
gather and are due to
return this afternoon.

“Tam sure they know
where she is at now.

“They are aware of where
she is, but she has not been
arrested yet, because we are
not ready for her as yet.

“We are pleased with the
progress of the investiga-
tion and the good commu-
nication and cooperation
we have with police in the
United States.”

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = CLE/Qui/2009

IN THE SUPREME COURT

EQUITY SIDE
BETWEEN

QUI/FPO/No. 00180

IN THE MATTEROF THE QUIETING TITLES

ACT 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of JACKSON
McINTOSH of Coopers Town of the Island of
Abaco one of the Island of the Commonwealth

of The Bahamas.

NOTICE

THE PETITION OF JACKSON McINTOSH IN RESPECT OF:-

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate at Fire
Road on the Island of Abaco one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and designated
as Lot No.9 and being bounded EASTWARDLY by
Lot No.10 now or formerly owned by one Samuel
and Clifford McIntosh SOUTHWARDLY by the sea
at high-water mark WESTAWRDLY by Lot No&
now or formerly owned by one Thomas and Ezekiel
McIntosh NORTHWARDLY by the sea at high-water
mark which said parcel or lot of land is shown on the
diagram or plan filed herewith and is thereon colored
RED. And ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate
at Fire Road on the Island of Abaco one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and designated
as Lot 14 and being bounded EASTWARDLY by Lot
No.15 now or formerly owned by one Willis McIntosh
and Mable Burrows, SOUTHWARDLY by the sea _ at
high-water mark WESTWARDLY by Lot No.13 now
or formerly owned by one Henry David and Thomas
McIntosh; NORTHWARDLY by the sea at high-water

ment confirmed he will meet
with President Felipe
Calderon on Tuesday.

Micheletti, installed by
Congress after Zelaya was
forcibly flown out of the
country on June 28, has sent
mixed signals throughout the
week on whether he might
permit Zelaya’s return as
part of a deal. On Thursday,
a former government official
who has been in close con-
tact with Micheletti told The
Associated Press that the
leader was open to compro-
mising on the issue.

declared null and void

recognised with the trade and labour union
FROM page one movements is that the Registrar of Trade
Unions and all public officers are account-
able to the extent that they must act prop-
erly. They must follow the procedure that
they are governed by and they ought to
ensure that the rule of natural justice is
realised,” he said.

Mr Ferguson said that yesterday’s ruling
was a confirmation that the constitution of
the union and the rule of law applies. “This
is a very significant ruling; it is a landmark
ruling and one which will advance the cause
of labour relations in the country,” he said.

mark which said lot of land is shown on the diagram
or plan filed herewith and is thereon colored YELLOW.
And ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate at
Fire Road on the Island of Abaco one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and designated as
Lot 21 and bounded EASTWARDLY by Lot No.22 now

knowledge that it was opposed by the body
responsible for determining the election
dates,” the ruling stated.

Wilson and the union members were rep-
resented by Obie Ferguson and Keod Smith.
Mr Ferguson told The Tribune yesterday
that Mr Wilson has control of the majority of
executive council members and will essen-
tially have control of the union for the next
30 days.

“The fundamental point that needs to be

or formerly owned by Andrew, Eulin and Bartholomew
McIntosh. SOUTHWARDLY by the sea al high-water
mark WESTWARDLY by Lot No. 20 now or formerly

owned by Samuel Sr. Samuel Jr. and Clifford
McIntosh; NORTHWARDLY by the sea at high-
water mark which said lot of land is shown on the
diagram or plan filed herewith and is thereon colored
GREEN.

2: JACKSON McINTOSH claims to be the owner
in fee simple in possession of the said land by virtue of
a conveyance form one Ezekiel McIntosh dated the 31*
day of March A.D. 2008 and has made application of the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
Under Section 3 of the Quieting Title Act, 1959 to have his
tile to the said land investigated and the nature and extent
thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to
be granted by the Court in accordance with the provision
of the said Act. A plan of the said land may be inspected
during normal working hours at the following places.

= FG CAPITAL

MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

cam A Le

ROYAL FIDELITY

heey at Work
3c? L.
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 31 JULY 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,572.63] CHG 4.53 | %CHG 0.29 | YTD -139.73 | YTD %-8.16
FINDEX: CLOSE 785.49 | YTD -5.91% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.28 Abaco Markets 1.39 1.39 0.127
Bahamas Property Fund 0.00
6.94 Bank of Bahamas 6.94 6.94 0.00
0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00 -0.877
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.078
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055
10.18 Cable Bahamas 11.39 11.39 0.00 1.406
2.74 Colina Holdings 2.74 2.74 0.00 0.249
5.50 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 5.62 5.71 0.09 0.419
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.53 3.51 -0.02 0.111
0.240
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180
ases)
Interest

0.992
0.244

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Freeport,
Grand Bahama Commonwealth of The Bahamas;

(b) The Chambers of V. Alfred Gray & Company,
Marsh Harbour, Abaco;

(c) The Administrator’s Office Coopers Town, Abaco,
The Bahamas.

1.32 Doctor's Hospital 1.82 1.82 0.00
6.60 Famguard 6.60 6.60 0.00
10.00 Finco 10.79 10.79 0.00
10.34 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.34 10.34 0.00
4.95 Focol (S) 5.13 5.13 0.00
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00
0.30 Freeport Concrete 0.30 0.30 0.00
5.50 ICD Utilities 5.49 5.49 0.00
10.39 J. S. Johnson 10.39 10.39 0.00
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
52wk-Hi _52wk-Low Securi Symbol Last Sale
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + i 3 T%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 Prime + 1.75%
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 g : T%
1000.00 _ Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 3 fs i N/M
RND Holdings s ‘ 8 256.6
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 9.03
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55 261.90
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $
CFAL Bond Fund 1.3860 2.40
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.8952 -1.52
CFAL Money Market Fund 1.4791 3.17 5.33
3.1031 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.1031 -8.35 -13.82
12.3289 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.9801 2.87 5.79
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 101.6693 1.10 1.67
93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96.7398 0.35 -4.18
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.2765 2.00 -2.98
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person or persons
having dower or right of dower or an Adverse Claim or Claim
or recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 6" day of
September A.D. 2009 file in the Supreme Court in the City of
Freeportaforesaid and serve onthe Petitioner orthe undersigned
a Statement or her claim aforesaid on or before the 6" day of
September, A.D. 2009 or it will operate as a bar to such claim.

52wk-Low Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

NAV Date
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
17-Jul-09

1.3231
2.8952
1.4042
30-Jun-09
31-May-09
ge ee Dated this 22â„¢ day of July A.D. 2009.
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1.0622 2.56 6.22
1.0243 -0.84 2.43
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MARKET TERMS

YIELD -last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of C

30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09

V. ALFRED GRAY & CO.
Chambers

#21 Kipling Blvd.

Freeport, Grand Bahama

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change day to day
Daily Vol. - Numb
DIV $ - Dividends
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KS) - 4for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
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TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
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N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Baharnas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Attorney for the Petitioner




SATURDAY, AUGUST 1,

PAGE 18 « International sports news s

ROUGH Start for



Top golfers
to tee off at
Caribbean
amateur
champs

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

TOP golfers in the Bahamas —
junior and senior — are preparing to
represent the country at the most
prestigious amateur golf event in the
Caribbean.

The Bahamas is expected to field an
11- member team at the 53rd
Caribbean Amateur Golf Champi-
onships set for August 3-8 in Provi-
denciales, Turks and Caicos.

The team is diligently training for
the fast approaching contest after fin-
ishing fifth out of 10 countries in 2008.

The Hoerman Cup team will fea-
ture five players —- Devaughn Robin-
son, Richard Gibson Jr, Peter McIn-
tosh, George Swann and Rashad Fer-
guson.

Two players will contest the Ramon
Baez Trophy meant for mid-amateur
men 35 years and older — Shane Gib-
son and Christopher Harris.

Milford Lockhart and Kevein
Marche will contest the Francis Steele
Perkins trophy for seniors aged 50
and older.

The Haris and Higgs trophy, for
super seniors 60 years and older, will
be contested by Harcourt Poitier and
George Turnquest.

The coach will be Frederick Wright
while Vernon Wells will act as team
captain. James Gomez will serve as
team manager.

Puerto Rico are the defending
national champions and will seek to
retain the title they won in 2008 in
the Cayman Islands.

The Caribbean Amateur Open
began in 1957 and at that time only
included two countries but throughout
the years it has evolved into the
largest annual golf event in the region.

The tournament is contested by ten
nations in the Caribbean — Bahamas,
Barbados, Cayman Islands, Domini-
can Republic, Jamaica, Order of East
Caribbean States, Puerto Rico,
Trinidad and Tobago, Turks and
Caicos Islands and US Virgin Islands.

2009





Former
England
soccer coach

Robson dies...
See page 18

Team Bahamas

Athletes struggle on opening day of
Pan American Junior Championships

2009 Carifta silver medallist Rashan Brown (seen in this file photo) finished fourth in a 400m heat...



By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

t was a rough start for Team

Bahamas on the opening day of

the Pan American Junior Cham-

pionships. Quartermilers were first
to take the track at the top regional meet
in the Hasley Crawford stadium in Port of
Spain, Trinidad & Tobago.

Rashan Brown and Katrina Seymour
saw action early yesterday in the wom-
en’s 400m. Brown, the 2009 Carifta silver
medallist, finished fourth in heat three in
a time of 57.25s.

Diamond Richardson of the US took
the heat in 54.94s, Jamaica’s Jodi-Ann
Muir was second in 55.70s, while Ashley
Kelly of the British Virgin Islands was
third in 56.00s

In heat two, Katrina Seymour failed to
finish her heat.

Neither of the quartermilers advanced
to the next round. Alisha Usery was the
top qualifier in 54.87s.

In the men’s 100m, Warren Frazier and
Geno Jones delivered a pair of impres-
sive performances.

Jones finished fourth in heat one in a
time of 10.63s. D’Angelo Cherry of the
US took the heat in 10.18s.

Frazier fared better in heat two, finish-
ing third in 10.42s. Jamaica’s Dexter Lee
took the heat in 10.24s.

Frazier advanced to the final as the sev-
enth fastest qualifier.

Marcus Rowland entered the final with
10.16s, followed by Cherry, Lee, Diego
Cavalcanti of Brazil, Shermund Alsop of
Trinidad, Miguel Lopez of Puerto Rico
and Jason Rodgers of St Kitts and Nevis.

Results of the final were unavailable
up to press time last night.

Cavic breaks Phelps’ 100 fly world record

By PAUL NEWBERRY
AP National Writer

ROME (AP) — Milorad Cavic can talk a
good game. He’s even better in the pool.

Cavic seized Michael Phelps’ 100-meter but-
terfly world record Friday at the world swim-
ming championships, where he’s making plen-
ty of headlines — in and out of the water.

First, the Serbian said he’s tired of hearing
complaints from the Phelps camp about com-
peting in an inferior suit, even offering to buy
him one of the polyurethane models respon-
sible for most of the worlds records at the
Foro Italico.

Then, Cavic went out in the semifinals of the
100-meter butterfly and knocked off Phelps’
world record, nearly becoming the first swim-
mer to break 50 seconds. Phelps was the sec-
ond-fastest qualifier at 50.48.

The two will be side-by-side tonight in their
rematch.

Cavic hasn’t backed off on his belief that
he beat Phelps to the wall at the Beijing
Olympics, all photographic and timing evi-
dence to the contrary. Now, the Serbian has
another shot at the man who officially won
by a hundredth of a second on the way to cap-
turing eight gold medals in China.

“T didn’t want to go out so fast, but I had so
much energy in my body that I couldn’t help
it,” said Cavic, who touched in 50.01 seconds to
break Phelps’ record of 50.22. “I’m capable
of swimming under 50, which would be enough
to win the gold.”

Less than an hour after his 100 fly semi,
Phelps claimed his third gold medal of the
championships, swimming the leadoff leg of
the 800 freestyle relay won by the United
States with a world record of 6 minutes, 58.55
seconds — one-hundredth of a second faster
than its gold medal time at the Olympics.

As for Cavic’s offer to get him a faster suit,
Phelps said he’s content in his year-old Speedo
LZR Racer.

“Tm wearing this,” Phelps said. “If he wants
to wear a different suit, he can throw this one
on.”

In the relay, Phelps was again no match for
Germany’s Paul Biedermann, who routed him
in the 200 free and put his team more than 1
1/2 seconds ahead on the first leg of the relay.
But Phelps had the better supporting cast,
teaming with Ricky Berens, David Walter and



2a =e 5 gis

MILORAD CAVIC competes in a 100m Butterfly heat at the FINA World Championships in Rome...

Ryan Lochte to set the sixth world
record of the night and 35th of the
championships.

Lochte, turning in an especially
gutty swim after earlier taking
bronze in the 200 backstroke, held
off Russia’s Alexander Sukhorukov
with Phelps screaming at him from
beside the starting block. When
Lochte got there first, Phelps threw
up both arms.

“T was kind of carried by my
teammates tonight,” Phelps said. “I
was probably a half-second slower
than I wanted to be. But these guys
were able to take control. Lochte
swam well the last 50. Ricky and
David did a good job of putting us in a good
spot.”

Aaron Peirsol made up for a huge disap-
pointment in the best way possible, obliterat-
ing the world record in the 200 backstroke
and getting back at Lochte, who beat his fellow
American in that event at both the 2007 worlds
in Melbourne and last summer on the biggest
stage of all.

This wasn’t just any race for Peirsol, not
after what happened Monday.

Expecting to cruise through to the final of
the 100 back — after all, he was three-time
defending champion and had just set a world
record a few weeks ago — Peirsol made a
huge miscalculation in how fast he needed to
go. He finished ninth in the semis; only the



MILORAD CAVIC

(AP Photo: Michael Sohn)

top eight moved on the final.

Peirsol watched from stands the
following night and started looking
ahead to his other chance for an
individual medal in Rome.

“It was kind of a blessing in dis-
guise,” he said. “I just didn’t know it
at the time”

Peirsol got out all his frustrations
with a dominating performance,
breaking his own world record by
more than a full second, his time of
1:51.92 wiping out the mark of
1:53.08 he set at the U.S. nationals
three weeks ago.

Japan’s Ryosuke Irie claimed sil-
ver in 1:52.51, also under the old
mark. Lochte faded to third.

“T wanted to race and I saw that I pulled out
from the beginning and I was feeling all right,”
Peirsol said. “When I kept pulling away, there
was even more of a fire to go a little faster.”

Peirsol knew he’d done it before he even
touched the wall. He spun around with a big
smile and gave the water a roundhouse punch.

“Wooo!” the laid-back Californian said,
showing a rare bit of emotion.

On the medal stand, Peirsol appeared to be
struggling to hold back tears as the national
anthem played.

Two Americans endured bitter disappoint-
ments.

Eric Shanteau, who put off treatment for
testicular cancer after qualifying for Beijing,

Serbian, American
set to be side-by-side
in rematch tonight

was edged out for gold in the 200 breaststroke
by the narrowest of margins. He appeared to
be ahead the final time his head popped out
the water, but his glide to the wall was a little
too long. Hungary’s Daniel Gyurta touched
in 2:07.64.

Shanteau’s time was 2:06.65 — a hundredth
of a second from his first world championship,
and one that would have been especially
poignant after what he went through last sum-
mer.

Rebecca Soni was cruising along in the wom-
en’s 200 breaststroke, 1.5 seconds ahead of
world-record pace halfway through a race she
won in Beijing.

But Soni clearly went out too fast and left
nothing in the tank for the finish. She shock-
ingly fell from first to fourth on the last lap —
out of the medals. Serbia’s Nadja Higl raced by
to claim gold, Canada’s Annamay Pierse took
silver and Austria’s Mirna Jukic got bronze.

Four world records were set in the first three
events of the night, not long after governing
body FINA announced its ban on bodysuits
would take effect the first day of 2010. It might
take years, even decades to surpass the tech-
nology assisted times of these championships.

Germany’s Britta Steffen broke her own
record in the 100 freestyle at 52.07, having set
the previous mark of 52.22 on the leadoff leg of
the 400 free relay at these championships.

Britain’s Fran Halsall claimed the silver,
and Australia’s Libby Trickett held on for
bronze after going out strong. Americans
Amanda Weir and Dana Vollmer were out of
the medals in fourth and fifth.

After Peirsol’s world record, the mark in
the women’s 50 butterfly dropped in consecu-
tive semifinal heats.

Marleen Veldhuis of the Netherlands won
the first semi in 25.28, eclipsing her own mark
of 25.33 set in April. She got to keep the record
less than 5 minutes — Sweden’s Therese
Alshammar won the next semi in 25.07.
PAGE 18, SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Former England soccer
coach Robson dies at 76

Ban on
high-tech
bodysuits
moved up

to Jan 1

By ANDREW DAMPF
AP Sports Writer

ROME (AP) — No need
to worry about a boycott
from Michael Phelps any-
more.

Swimming’s governing
body Friday set a Jan. 1 date
for its ban on the record-
breaking bodysuits, a move
that comes partly in
response to a threat from
Phelps’ coach to pull his
swimmer from competition
until the suits are outlawed.

Earlier this week, FINA
announced a ban but said it
might not take effect until
April or May, three or four
months later than expected.

“Now, without a doubt,
the rules are applying Jan. 1,
2010,” FINA executive
director Cornel Marculescu
said. “The manufacturers
are ready and can begin
(suit) submissions Nov. 1 or
before.”

The comments from
Phelps’ coach, Bob Bow-
man, came immediately
after his swimmer was upset
by unheralded Paul Bieder-
mann of Germany in the
200-meter freestyle Tues-
day. Biedermann wore a
100 percent polyurethane
Arena suit, while Phelps
stuck with last year’s LZR
Racer from Speedo, which
is less than half
polyurethane.

“T think there was a lot of
frustration with Michael.
We saw that with his incred-
ible swim in the 200 fly,”
USA Swimming executive
director Chuck Wielgus
said, referring to Phelps’
world record Wednesday.
“Bob maybe verbalized
what some people had been
feeling on behalf of
Michael.”

Last year, Phelps and oth-
ers with the LZR profited
from the suit, while this year
suits from Italian manufac-
turers Arena and Jaked are
considered faster. Each of
those suits will be banned
at the start of next year,
when men will be restrict-
ed to suits that extend from
the waist to the top of the
knees, and women to suits
that cannot go past the
shoulders or beyond the
knees.

FINA plans to issue new
suit guidelines to manufac-
turers by Sept. 30, and
thought about a delay for a
few months to give compa-
nies enough time to produce
new suits.

“We'll then probably
expect Michael not to swim
until they are implement-
ed,” Bowman said Tuesday.
“Tm done with this. It has to
be implemented immedi-
ately. The sport is in sham-
bles right now and they bet-
ter do something or they’re
going to lose their guy who
fills these seats.”

More than 30 world
records have been set at
these world championships,
about twice as many as at
the last edition two years
ago in Melbourne, Aus-
tralia.

“Comments by Michael
Phelps or anyone else we
respect, and we do our job
and control whatever hap-
pens in our sport,” Mar-
culescu said.

FINA also announced a
rule requiring suits to be
approved one year before
Olympics or world champi-
onships, and available com-
mercially six months in
advance.

A scientific commission
with materials experts from
each continent will approve
swimsuits and monitor
developments in technolo-
gy, FINA said.

USA Swimming is con-
sidering installing the new
suit rules for domestic com-
petition before the end of
the year. Polyurethane
bodysuits will be banned for
a Duel in the Pool competi-
tion in Manchester, Eng-
land, in December, with the
United States facing an all-
star team from France, Rus-
sia and Britain.

“We met after prelims
this morning and agreed to
adopt the rules for that
meet,” Wielgus said.
“Whether or not USA
Swimming adopts those
rules any sooner is some-
thing we’ll talk about when
we get home.”

By STUART CONDIE
AP Sports Writer

LONDON (AP) —
Bobby Robson, the
knighted ambassador
of English soccer who
coached his country to
the 1990 World Cup
semifinals and won tro-
phies in four countries,
died Friday. He was
70.

Robson had cancer
and died at home in
County Durham in
northeast England
with family beside him,

a family statement

said. He was diagnosed with cancer
five times since in 1991 but continued
to work until November 2007.

His death came five days after he
appeared in a wheelchair at New-
castle’s St. James’ Park. Thousands
crowded the stadium to pay tribute
to him and raise funds for his cancer
charity.

Robson played for England at the
1958 World Cup and as coach led his
country to its best World Cup finish
since its 1966 title. The coach was
knighted in 2002 for his service to the
sport. He also coached PSV Eind-
hoven, Sporting Lisbon, FC Porto and
Barcelona. “He always showed great
passion for the game and will be
missed by all football fans across the
globe,” FIFA president Sepp Blatter
said. “On behalf of the worldwide
football family, I would like to thank
Sir Bobby Robson for his memorable
contribution to the beautiful game.”

Robson rose to fame in the 1970s
when he turned unfashionable Ipswich
into one of the country’s top teams,
winning the FA Cup and UEFA Cup.

His last club job was at Newcastle,
the club he supported as a boy. In
January 2006, he took a job mentoring
Ireland coach Steve Staunton. “I did
what I loved, and I did what I was
pretty good at and I suppose what I
was born for,” Robson said in 2005. “I
enjoyed my career. It was wonderful.
I played for some fabulous clubs and
I played for England. Then I got the
top job, the best job in the world real-
ly. I managed England.”

Manchester United manager Alex
Ferguson said he drew on Robson for
his generous advice. “I mourn the
passing of a great friend, a wonderful
individual, a tremendous football man
and somebody with passion and
knowledge of the game that was
unsurpassed,” he said. “His charac-
ter was hewn out of the coal face,
developed by the Durham County
mining background that he came
from.”

Added former French soccer great
Michel Platini, the president of Euro-
pean soccer’s ruling body: “He was a
great ambassador for football and a
true gentleman in everything he did.”

Robson began his coaching career
in 1968, when he took charge of strug-
gling first division Fulham. The club

AN August 1953 AP file photo of Bobby Robson - seen playing for Fulham FC at the

Craven Cottage in London...

was relegated and fired him after 10
months. Robson was hired by Ipswich
and stayed there the next 13 years.
He was then appointed England’s
manager following the team’s elimi-
nation from the 1982 World Cup, and
he won 27 of 28 qualifying matches
in his eight years in charge.

The loss cost England a place at the
1984 European Championship. After
the Football Association rejected his
offer to resign, Robson went on to
lead the team to the quarterfinals of
the 1986 World Cup in Mexico.

England was eliminated from that
tournament when Diego Maradona
scored two of soccer’s most famous
goals. The Argentine great punched
the ball into the net for the first goal.
On the second, Maradona surged
halfway down the field, shredding
much of the England team in the
process.

Maradona called the first goal “The
Hand of God.” Robson would have
none of it. “It wasn’t the Hand of
God,” Robson said. “It was the hand
of a rascal. God had nothing to do
with it.”

A poor performance at Euro ’88
was followed by a run to the semifi-

nals of the 1990 World Cup in Italy,
where England lost a penalty-kick
shootout to West Germany after a 1-
1 draw.

Robson joined PSV after the World
Cup and won the Dutch league in
1991 and ’92. He also coached at
Sporting and FC Porto before moving
to Barcelona in 1996. A year later, he
was voted European Manager of the
Year after winning the Spanish Cup,
the Spanish Super Cup and the Euro-
pean Cup Winners’ Cup with a team
that included Brazilian star Ronaldo.
He returned to PSV and then went
to Newcastle from 1999 to 2004.

No matter what, he remained pop-
ular with fans, often chatting soccer
with them even as his declining health
prevented a full-time return to coach-
ing. He had surgery to remove a brain
tumor in 2006 but was again diag-
nosed with cancer the following year.

Asked in 2005 why he continued to
work into his later years, Robson said:
“Football is my drug. I don’t like
going to supermarkets on a Saturday
afternoon.”

Robson is survived by his wife,
Elsie, and sons Andrew, Paul and
Mark.



Police provide details on boxer Gatti’s death

By BRADLEY BROOKS
Associated Press Writer

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP)
— Arturo Gatti hanged him-
self with a handbag strap from
a staircase column more than
seven feet off the ground,
Brazilian police said Friday
as they released new details
about the boxer’s death.

Milena Saraiva, a police
spokeswoman in the north-
eastern city of Recife, provid-
ed more information about
Gatti’s suicide a day after
authorities reversed their
stance on the case. Until
Thursday, they insisted it was
a homicide and the boxer’s
wife was tagged as the prima-
ry suspect.

“This case has been
resolved. While the evidence
at the scene first led us to
think Gatti was murdered, the
autopsy results and a detailed
crime scene analysis simply
pointed to a different out-
come,” Saraiva said.

On Thursday, a judge
ordered the release of Gatti’s
wife, 23-year-old Amanda
Rodrigues, who had been
held since July 12 in Recife.
She and Gatti arrived with
their 10-month-old son a few
days before in the resort town
of Porto de Galinhas, where
they rented a two-level apart-
ment.

Police ultimately conclud-
ed that Gatti hanged himself
in the apartment early on July
11 from a wooden staircase
column that was 7.3 feet off
the ground. He stood on a
stool and kicked it out from
underneath him, police said.
The autopsy report said Gat-



MICKEY ROURKE attends a
memorial Mass for Aturo Gatti
at St John the Baptist Roman
Catholic Church in Jersey City,
NJ.

(AP Photo: Rich Schultz)

ti was suspended for about
three hours before his body
fell to the floor.

Rodrigues said she was
sleeping with the pair’s son in
an upstairs bedroom. She told
police she went downstairs
about 6 a.m. to get milk for
the boy and saw Gatti’s body
on the floor, but assumed he

was drunkenly sleeping. It was
not until she went back down-
stairs at 9 a.m. that she dis-
covered Gatti was dead and
called police. Saraiva said no
suicide note was found.

“The first investigators to
arrive at the scene only saw
his body on the floor and the
bloodied strap near his body,”
Saraiva said. “They assumed
his wife strangled him.”

Saraiva said 17 witnesses
told police that the pair got
into a loud fight on a street
near the beach in Porto de
Galinhas the night before
Gatti died. Saraiva said Gatti
had seven cans of beer, along
with two bottles of wine, over
the course of dinner and par-
tying at a bar.

Witnesses told police Gatti
at one point picked up
Rodrigues, who weighs about
100 pounds, by her chin with
his right hand and tossed her
to the ground.

Saraiva said at that point a
security guard for a local hotel
intervened, only to be
punched in the face by Gatti.
Asmall crowd that had gath-
ered around the scene grew
angry, with some throwing
stones and even a bicycle at
the boxer, the police spokes-
woman said.

One stone hit Gatti in the
back of the head, causing a
wound that police originally
said was caused by a small
steak knife that was found
near his body — and which
police showed off to reporters
the day after Gatti’s death.

The fracas eventually broke
up, and Gatti and Rodrigues
returned to the apartment in
separate taxis.

In an telephone interview
with The Associated Press as
she walked out of jail Thurs-
day, Rodrigues said Gatti may
have killed himself because
he feared she would leave him
after their fight, one of many
during a rocky two-year mar-
riage.

“T believe that when we got
home and he saw that he hurt
me, he thought I would leave
him, that I would tell him to
just let me go, that I would
separate from him,” she said.
“He did that in a moment of
weakness. He was drunk,
maybe he didn’t know what
he was doing, maybe he
thought I would leave him the
next day.”

According to records at the
Court of Quebec’s criminal
and penal division, Gatti was
charged on April 16 for vio-
lating a restraining order that
had been filed against him.
Records didn’t indicate who
filed the restraining order, but
Gatti’s mother, Ida, confirmed
it was Rodrigues who had tak-
en one out against him.

Gatti, a Canadian who cap-
tured two world titles in his
16-year pro career, retired in
2007 with a record of 40-9.

Many of his friends and
family have expressed disbe-
lief at the suicide ruling, and
Canadian Foreign Minister
Lawrence Cannon said in a
statement Friday that gov-
ernment officials will seek
more information from
Brazilian authorities on the
Gatti investigation and its
findings.

e Associated Press Writer
Rob Gillies in Toronto con-
tributed to this report

Creditors to

vote on Vick

hankruptcy
plan

By LARRY O’DELL
Associated Press Writer

NEWPORT NEWS, Va.
(AP) — Though a judge
ruled that Michael Vick’s
bankruptcy plan can be sent
to creditors to vote on, it
remains unclear how the
out-of-work quarterback
will get the income to pay
them.

Vick declined to answer
reporters’ questions before
and after a hearing Friday
on his Chapter 11 bank-
ruptcy plan. U.S. Bank-
ruptcy Judge Frank Santoro
ruled that the plan can
move forward after nobody
objected.

The plan now goes to
Vick’s creditors. After they
vote, Santoro will conduct a
confirmation hearing on
Aug. 27.

Creditors approved Vick-
’s first plan, but Santoro
rejected it in April, saying it
was not feasible. This time,
Vick has proposed selling
off more assets and giving
creditors a bigger cut of his
future income.

But the plan is based
largely on Vick’s prospec-
tive earnings from his goal
of returning to the NFL,
which still is not a sure
thing.

NFL commissioner
Roger Goodell condition-
ally reinstated Vick on
Monday, a week after Vick
completed his 23-month
sentence for running a dog-
fighting ring. Goodell said
Vick can sign with a team
and begin playing by week
six. Vick said Thursday that
he is “getting close” to sign-
ing but did not offer any
details.

Several NFL teams have
said they’re not mterested
in signing the 29-year-old
Vick.

“Mr. Vick’s time horizon
in his professional career is
not unlimited,” Santoro
said.

The judge also postponed
action on requests for pay-
ment by Vick’s attorneys,
saying he wanted to wait
until all the legal bills are
in. A New York-based law
firm is asking for $1.5 mil-
lion after slashing its origi-
nal request of nearly $2.7
million. A Norfolk firm is
seeking $385,000.

Santoro demanded an
explanation from one of the
New York attorneys,
Michael Blumenthal, on
how his firm could bill Vick
for 8,000 hours of work in
less than a year.

“This case is probably the
most difficult case ’ve ever
been involved in,” Blumen-
thal said.

He noted that Vick was
in the federal penitentiary
in Leavenworth, Kan.,
when the bankruptcy peti-
tion was filed in July 2008,
making attorney-client com-
munication difficult. And
Vick’s finances were in
shambles, requiring a Her-
culean effort to track down
assets, bank accounts and
financial records.

“We started at below
ground zero,” Blumenthal
said, adding that five
lawyers at his firm spent
substantial time on the case.

Vick’s lawyers also
endured an acrimonious
battle, largely behind the
scenes, with one of his
major creditors — Joel
Enterprises Inc., the com-
pany owned by Vick’s for-
mer agent.

Joel objected at virtually
every step on the bank-
ruptcy process before the
two sides finally settled
their differences.

On another matter, San-
toro rejected a motion for
Blumenthal’s colleague,
Peter Ginsberg, to with-
draw from the case. The
lawyers in Vick’s criminal
case asked Ginsberg to
withdraw after a federal
appeals court upheld sanc-
tions against him in an
unrelated case in Florida.
Ginsberg said he had not
been actively involved in
Vick’s case recently any-
way.

Santoro said Ginsberg
did nothing wrong in Vir-
ginia, and his troubles in
Florida had no bearing on
Vick’s case.
PAGE 20, SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

UK court rejects
hacker's bid to
avoid extradition

LONDON

BRITAIN’S High Court on

Friday rejected an autistic }
British man’s bid to avoid }
extradition to the United
States to face trial for hacking }
into military computers, }
according to Associated Press. }

Gary McKinnon, who }
claimed he was searching for }
evidence of UFOs, has fought :
a long legal battle against }
extradition after he was }
charged with breaking into 97 }
computers belonging to }
NASA, the U.S. Department }
of Defense and several branch- }
es of the U.S. military soon }
after the Sept. 11, 2001, ter- }

rorist attacks.

His lawyers argued 43-year-
old McKinnon is an eccentric }
but harmless man who had no i

malicious intent.

The High Court rejected his }
appeals Friday and ruled that :
he should face extradition. }
Judge Stanley Burnton, one of }
two judges hearing the case, }
said in a 41-page ruling that :
extradition was “a lawful and }
proportionate response to his }

offending.”

McKinnon’s lawyer, Karen :
Todner, called the ruling }
“hugely disappointing,” and }
urged Home Secretary Alan }
Johnson to stop the extradi- }

tion.

“We have 28 days to review }
the judgment and will continue }
to explore every legal avenue }
until we achieve a just and }
proper result,” she said. Tod- }
ner said she planned to appeal }
the High Court decision, pos- ;
sibly taking the case to }
Britain’s new Supreme Court }

and the European courts.

Johnson said he was pow-

erless to intervene.

“Tt would be illegal for me }
to stop the extradition of Gary }
McKinnon, which the court }
ruling has made clear,” he said }
in a statement. “Mr. McKin- }
non is accused of serious }
crimes, and the U.S. has alaw- :
ful right to seek his extradi- }
tion, as we do when we wish to }
prosecute people who break }

our laws.”

He said U.S. authorities had }
assured Britain that McKin- }
non’s health and welfare needs }
would be met, if he were extra- }

dited.

David Cameron, leader of }
the opposition Conservatives, }
said he was disappointed by :
the ruling and that McKinnon }
should face trial in a British }
court. “Gary McKinnon is a }
vulnerable young man, andI
see no compassion in sending }
him thousands of miles away }
from his home and loved ones }

to face trial,” Cameron said.

McKinnon’s family and sup- }
porters have argued he should }
not be extradited because he }
has Asperger’s syndrome, a }
form of autism, and could be }
at risk of psychosis or suicide if }

he is sent to the U.S.

McKinnon’s lawyers and 40 i
British lawmakers have writ- }
ten to President Barack Oba- }
ma asking him to prevent the }

extradition.

Earlier this year McKinnon :
offered to plead guilty to a }
criminal charge in Britain to }

avoid facing a USS. trial.

The Crown Prosecution Ser- }
vice ruled, however, that the }
case was best prosecuted in }
the United States, leading }
McKinnon’s attorney Edward }
Fitzgerald to argue that the }
service had failed to take }
account of humanitarian fac- ;

tors.

McKinnon’s lawyers had }
asked the High Court to over- }
turn the prosecutors’ decision,
as well as the British govern- }
ment’s decision to extradite }
him — requests dismissed in }

Friday’s ruling.

Judge Burnton said the case }
should be dealt with “as expe- i
ditiously as possible,” and that }
McKinnon could face extradi- :

tion in September.

McKinnon is charged in }
New Jersey and Virginia with :
eight counts of computer }
fraud. Each count potentially }
carries a sentence of up to 10 }
years in prison and $250,000 }

in fines.

Todner said McKinnon
would be extradited to Vir- }

ginia, if he is sent to the US.

McKinnon would be extra- }
dited through a treaty signed
by the U.S. and Britain in the }
wake of Sept. 11 that was :
designed to make it easier to }
transfer individuals, including }
terrorism suspects, between }
the two countries. Its critics }
argue that it is skewed against :

British citizens.

Menzies Campbell, a law- }
maker from the opposition }
Liberal Democrat party, said
the extradition treaty was }

flawed.

“The people who should }
hang their heads in shame are }
the members of the govern- }
ment who negotiated an extra- }
dition treaty with the United }
States which places British cit-
izens in a much weaker posi- }
tion than their American coun- }

terparts,” he said.





ECO-tour operator Grand
Bahama Nature Tours has
pledged to make a monthly
contribution to the Humane
Society of Grand Bahama to
assist with operating expens-
es of the animal shelter.

Said the tour company:
“The downturn in the econ-
omy and low visitor arrivals
affect us all.

“The effect is also being
felt at the Freeport animal
shelter which is swamped
with animals, many of which
are there as a result of eco-
nomic woes.

“While we realise that
there are many organisations
seeking funds for worthy
causes, please consider that
these animals have no con-
trol over their circumstances
and need our help.”

Unlike the shelter in Nas-
sau that is funded by the
government, Grand Bahama
Nature Tours said, the
Freeport shelter is depen-
dent on private donations.

The Port Authority con-
tributes substantially, but

Health Minister lauds PHA
for ‘many achievements’
over the first 10 years

By MATT MAURA
Bahamas Information
Services

THE launch of the
National Cancer Registry
and the construction of
the National Oncology
Centre are just two of the
“significant advances”
that have been made in
the public healthcare sys-
tem in the Bahamas since
the establishment of the
Public Hospitals Authori-
ty (PHA) 10 years ago,
Minister of Health Dr
Hubert Minnis said on
Wednesday.

The Public Hospitals
Authority became opera-
tional July 1999 with the
mandate to manage the
public hospitals through-
out the Bahamas; the clin-
ics/health centres in
Grand Bahama; the
National Emergency
Medical Services; the
Bahamas National Drug
Agency and the Materials
Management Directorate.

Dr Minnis said the
advancements have led to
the provision of a higher
quality of healthcare to
Bahamians presenting at
the country’s public
healthcare institutions,
clinics and health centres,
particularly those outside
of New Providence and
Grand Bahama.

Strides

“Both of these are
tremendous strides for-
ward in the care and
treatment of persons with
cancer in the Bahamas,”
Dr Minnis said.

Addressing honourees,
friends and family attend-
ing the Public Hospital
Authority’s Performance
Excellence and Long Ser-
vice Awards at Govern-
ment House, Dr Minnis
said while healthcare pro-
fessionals and cancer
patients and their families
are able to “marvel” at
the success of the devel-
opment of the National
Cancer Registry and the
National Oncology Cen-
tre, and the role both
have played in the diag-
nosis, care and treatment
of cancer patients within
the Bahamas, there have
been many other success-
es.

These include the
launch of the tele-medi-
cine and tele-radiology
projects which Dr Minnis
said bring the best med-
ical expertise in the
nation “to the bedside of
patients” at public health

i

Eco-tour operator pledges monthly
contribution to GB Humane Society



DENISE NEELY, general manager of Grand Bahama Nature Tours, presents a cheque to Lisa Lockhart of the Humane Society of ene Bahama.

there is still a major short-
fall in revenue to cover oper-
ating expenses particularly

clinics and centres outside
of New Providence and
Grand Bahama, in addi-
tion to the installation of
the state-of-the-art auto-
mated pharmacy system.

The pharmacy system is
expected to help pharma-
cists across the country
achieve greater levels of
efficiency in the dispen-
sation of medicines which
Dr Minnis said should
reassure Bahamians of the
accuracy of their pre-
scribed medication.

Other successes, he
said, have been realised
in the “tremendous facili-
ty repairs and upgrades”
and the major institutions
such as the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital and Sandi-
lands Rehabilitation Cen-
tre in New Providence,
and the Rand Memorial
Hospital in Freeport,
Grand Bahama.

Many training opportu-
nities have also been
offered for staff at the
various public healthcare
facilities.

Buildings

“Some of the older
buildings and sections of
the main facility of the
Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal have been restored
and re-purposed and the
capacity of the parking
areas has been increased,”
Dr Minnis said.

“The Rand Memorial
now boasts one of the
most pleasant and mod-
ern public pharmacies in
the country, thanks to
recent upgrades in that
area and Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre
also had its share of
repairs and upgrades.

“Much has been accom-
plished over the past ten
years and every member
of the PHA should feel
justifiably proud of the
progress that has been
made,” Dr Minnis added.

The health minister said
the improvements to the
physical and operational
structures of the public
health system would be
for naught if not for the
“goodly number” of high-
ly trained, motivated and
committed staff.

“As I look back over
the last ten years, nothing
matches the pride I feel
when I consider the level
of skill, training, discipline
and professionalism that
exist throughout our pub-
lic healthcare system and
throughout all of the
PHA’s hospitals and
agencies,” Dr Minnis said.



for animal care, the company Tours is encouraging all
said. businesses to work with their
Grand Bahama Nature — staff members and establish

a plan to pledge monthly
donations no matter the
amount.




“Much has been accomplished
over the past ten years and every
member of the PHA should feel
justifiably proud of the progress
that has been made.”

DR HUBERT MINNIS

Committee for the Privatisation of The
Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.

PUBLIC NOTICE

Legislation for the
Electronic Communications

Sector published

The Committee for the Privatisation of The Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company Ltd. is pleased to advise that the following
acts have been published:

The Communications Act. 2009 ("Comms Act") -— No. 10 of 2008

The Utilities Appeal Tripunal Act, 2009 (“UAT Act") - No. 11 of 2009

Wiles Reguiatan and Competition Authonty Act, 2007 ["URCA
Act") = No. 12 of 2009

Its intended that the URCA Act will come into force on August 1,

2007 and the Ceormms Act and UAT Act will come into force on
September 1, 2009.

Copies can be obfained from the Government Publications
offce or downloaded from the Govemment's website at
www.bohamas.goy.bs of fhe pvivotisation
www.bicprivatisation.com

website oat



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